Citation
Little threads

Material Information

Title:
Little threads : tangle thread, golden thread, silver thread
Added title page title:
Tangle thread, Silver thread, and Golden thread
Creator:
Prentiss, E ( Elizabeth ), 1818-1878 ( Author, Primary )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Nimmo, William Philip, 1831-1883 ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Edinburgh
Publisher:
William P. Nimmo
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
124, 4 p., 1 leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Infants -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Nannies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1864 ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1864 ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1864 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1864
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved and signed by E. Evans.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA4679 ( LTQF )
ALH6734 ( NOTIS )
46235455 ( OCLC )
026924995 ( AlephBibNum )

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Page 71.









LITTLE THREADS:

TANGLE THREAD, GOLDEN THREAD, AND
SILVER THREAD.

EDINBURGH :

WILLIAM P. NIMMO.
1864.



ae. eee





CONTENTS.

——.

PAGE
TaneLte Tureap, . . . : 9
Gotpen Tureap, 7 7 . . 88

Strver Tureap, 7 . 7 : 87






TANGLE THREAD.









LITTLE THREADS.

—~>—_

Cangle Thread.

CHAPTER I.

Tee was once a very beautiful piece of white satin,
which had been woven with care and skill. Yet those
who saw it went away shaking their heads, saying, ‘* What
a pity! what a pity!” For there ran across this lovely
fabric a tangled thread, and that one thread spoiled all.

And there was a lady who was very beautiful, too. She
had always lived in a pleasant home, with kind and loving
friends about her. She had never in her life known what it
was to want anything she could not have. Indeed she
seemed born to be treated gently and tenderly. People
who were ignorant were not afraid to go to see and talk



«@
10 TANGLE THREAD.

with her, for they knew she never laughed at their mis-
takes; and poor people liked to go and tell her about their
poverty, just as if she were poor too. And those who were
sick or in trouble wanted her to know all about their trials.
For those who went to see her with empty hands, came away
not half so poor as they went in; and the sick and the sor-
rowful were comforted by her words of pity. You will
think that this lady who was so good, who could dress just
as she pleased, and ride when and where she pleased, who
had friends to love her, and friends to admire her, must
have been very happy indeed. And so she was, for a
time. Her life looked as smooth and fair as the white
satin you have just heard of. Bat by and by there began
to run across it a thread not at all like the soft and
even threads of which it was made; here came a soiled
spot; there were knots and tangles; as far as you could
see, its beauty was gone. How did this happen? Why,
there came into the house one day, a little baby. A little,
soft, tender baby, that did not look as if it would harm any
body. Its mother was very glad to see it. She thought
herself almost too happy with such a treasure. The most
sunshiny, pleasant room in the house was given this little
thing for its own. All sorts of pure white garments were
bought for it, and every thing possible was done to keep it
well and make it happy. Before it came its mother used to
lie down to sleep at night as sweetly as you do, little rosy
-child, who read this book. But now she slept, as people
say, with one eye and one ear open! That is, she kept
starting up to see if it were nicely covered with its soft blan-



TANGLE THREAD. " 8

kets, or to listen to its gentle breathing, to know if it were
quite well, If it happened to be restless or unwell, she
would sit up all night to take care of it, or walk with it hour
after hour when any body but its own dear mother would
have been out of patience, or too tired to keep awake,

And before the baby came there, this lady used to spend
a good deal of time at her piano, singing and playing. She
used to draw and paint, and read and write. But now she
had almost forgot she had any piano. The baby's cooing
was all the music she cared for. And she left off drawing and
painting, and thought the sweetest picture in the world was
that tiny, sleeping creature in its cradle. To be sure,
mother and baby together did make a lovely picture indeed.
As for books, she had not now much time to read anything
but Combe on Infancy, which she studied every day, because
it is a book, about babies, and tells how to wash and dress
them, and what to give them to eat.

Perhaps you will begin to think that this lady loved her
baby too much. But no, a mother cannot do that, unless
she loves it better than God, and this little child’s mother
loved God best. She loved Him so dearly that if He had
asked her to give it back to Him, she would have given it
without a word, He would not ask her to do it without
tears.



12 TANGLE THREAD,

CHAPTER II.

The baby had a name of its own, but it was called “ Tur
Basy,” and nothing else, just as if there never had been one
in the world before, and never would be again. As it had
nothing to do but to grow, it did grow, but not very fast.
Its mother said she liked a tiny baby better than she did a
big one. When she shewed it to her friends she always
said, ‘It isn’t a very large child, I know; but you see its
bones are very small, and of course that makes a difference.”
And they would reply, “ Certainly, that makes a great dif-
ference. And it has the prettiest little round face, and wee
bits of hands and feet, there ever were!”

The day on which the nurse who took care of the baby
and its mother at first, was obliged to go away, another young
woman came to fill her place. Her name was Ruth. She
was very glad to come, indeed. For she thought it would
be very nice to sit in that bright, pleasant room, holding
that pretty little baby on her lap. She thought she should
never know a care or a trouble. But she was quite fright-
ened when she undertook to wash and dress the pretty little
creature, to find how it screamed. The truth is, if there was
any one thing this baby could not bear, it was to be touched
with water. What was to be done? Let it go unwashed ?

-Oh! no, that would never do! Its mother really trembled
when she saw such a young, feeble creature ery so. She
knelt down by the side of the nurse, and with her soft hands



,

TANGLE THREAD. 18

tried to hurry through the washing and dressing. They
never knew how they got on the little shirt, or how they
fastened on the little petticoats, or which of them tied the
clean, white frock. The nurse was red and warm, and the
mother pale and tired, when this great task was over. But
they both thought things would go better next time, and
Ruth said so to herself as she walked up and down trying to
quiet the child, and the mother said so to herself as she lay
all worn out on the sofa, watching them.

Day after day passed, however, and every morning the
baby screamed. As it grew older and stronger, its mother
was less frightened when it cried, but it was painful to hear
such an uproar, and she began to dread the hour for washing
and dressing it.

‘* What can be the reason the baby cries so?” she asked
the nurse every morning, till at last, tired of saying,

‘Perhaps she won't cry so, next time ;” poor Ruth cried
out,

‘Why, it’s the temper, ma’am !””

“Tts temper !”” said its mother, much astonished. “ Why,
I should as soon think of talking about the temper of one of
the cows in your father’s farm-yard !”

‘And you might well do that, ma’am, for cows have tem-
pers of their own as well as babies and other folks. There
was old White Spot, now. She couldn't cry and scream
like this baby, but she could kick over a pail of milk equal
to any body. And did it many a time when she was put
out.”

The baby’s mother hardly knew what to think, Combe on



14 TANGLE THREAD.

Infancy did not say a word on this subject. She thought
she would write to her own mother, who lived not far off,
and beg her to tell her whether little babies really did cry
because they were angry, and ask her advice about » great
many other things just as important. There was a small
spot on the child’s forehead, and she wanted to know if that
would be likely to go away, of itself. And how soon would
the baby begin to “‘take notice?” And what playthings
had she better be buying, to be ready for it when it was
ready for them? And, oh! how would it do to tie up a
raisin in a rag and stop the baby’s mouth with that while
they were washing it? For Ruth said she was sure that
would do so nicely!

CHAPTER III.

Tue baby grew older and grew stronger, but it did not
grow better. The truth is, it had a very strong will of its
own. As long as it could have its own way, it was pleasant
and sweet, but the moment other people undertook to have
their way, it began to scream.

As soon as it became old enough to understand what was
said to it—and that was very soon—its mother resolved
never to give it things for which it cried. She told Ruth so.
But one day she went into the nursery, and there lay Miss



TANGLE THREAD. 15

Baby fast asleep on the bed, with a china vase on each
arm.

“Why, Ruth, what does this mean?” she asked.

“The baby cried so for the vases that I could dé nothing
with her,” replied Ruth. ‘It was time for her nap, and I
did all I could to get her to sleep, but she cried herself
nearly into fits for the vases. So at last I had to give them
to her. She dropped right off to sleep then, like a lamb.”

“Never do so again, Ruth. You may spare yourself a
little trouble for the time, by giving a child what it cries
for. But in the end you increase your trouble tenfold, and
strengthen the child in its resolution to have its own way.”

When the baby awoke, it did not miss the vases, which
its mother had replaced on the shelf, but when it was ready
to go to bed that night it looked at them, and stretched out
its arms towards them, saying plainly by its gestures, “I
am going to sleep with those pretty things in my arms.”

“No, baby can’t have them,” said Ruth. ‘ Baby must
go to sleep.”

Baby’s answer was a fearful scream, which was heard in
the dining-room where her papa and mamma were taking
tea.

“Hark!” said her papa. ‘I hear the baby. She has
either had a fall, or there are a dozen pins sticking in her.”

“No, that is not a cry of pain,” replied her mother.
“Tt is a cry of anger. And I think I know what it means.
However, I'll go up and see.”

She ran up stairs and found poor Ruth walking up and
down with the child, looking hot and tired.



16 TANGLE THREAD.

“I knew you would think I was murdering her, ma’am,”
she said. ‘‘ But it’s those vases she wants. Wouldn't it be
best to pacify her with them? She's hoarse with crying.”

“No, Ruth, no,” said her mamma. ‘I do not wonder
you are tired and almost discouraged. But we must think
of the child’s good rather than our own present comfort.”

She took the angry baby in her arms, and sat down sadly
in a low chair with it. :

“You aro sure there are no pins about its clothes ?”

Oh! yes, ma’am! I sewed on its clothes just as you
bid me.”

“Very well. Go down now to your tea.”

‘T don’t like to leave you with the child crying so.”

‘T prefer you should go. She will certainly stop crying
before long.”

Ruth went slowly downstairs.

‘Two sticks an’t crosser than that baby,” she said to
herself. ‘I never saw such a child. Why, every bone in
me aches like the toothache.”

“ What's going on upstairs?” asked the cook, as Ruth
entered the kitchen.

“You might knock me down with a straw,” replied Ruth.
“TI have been trying for an hour to get the baby to sleep,
and it has screamed the whole time till I was afraid it would
kill itself.”

Meanwhile the poor mother still sat sadly and quietly in
the low chair, holding the struggling child, and praying to
God to teach her how to subdue it. She begged Him to
give her patience, and to give her gentleness, and to give her



TANGLE THREAD. 17

firmness. The baby’s cries began to grow less and less
noisy, and at last, all tired out, it fell asleep. Its mother
looked down upon it tenderly, and kissed it over and over.
But her heart was full of care and pain.

“Ah!” thought she, “the old saying is true,—Every
rose has its thorn !”

CHAPTER IV,

Day after day passed on, and the baby grew from a baby
into a little child, with busy hands, and active feet, and a
will of its own that seemed jo grow with its growth, and
strengthen with its strength. Her father, seeing how much
anxiety and trouble she caused her mother, began to call
her “Tangle Thread,” instead of “Baby.” By degrees
every body in the house fell into the same habit, and in-
stead of bearing her own sweet name of “Lily,” this new
name was fastened to her.

When she was two years old she could talk quite plainly,
and when nothing was vexing her she was bright and play-
ful. Her mother tried to avoid conflicts with her, as much
as possible. But if she once began she did not yield. She
knew that no child can be happy that always has its own
way. She knew that God would be displeased with her if
she let her little daughter grow up self-willed and disobedient.
* Early one morning Tangle Thread awoke, smiling and

B .



18 TANGLE THREAD.

cheerful. Her little crib was close by her mamma's bed, and
she saw that neither her father nor mother was yet awake.
She sat up in bed and played awhile with her pillow. But
she was soon tired of that, so she climbed from her crib to
the bed, and from the bed slipped down to the floor.
Pretty soon her mother, hearing a slight noise, awoke, and
starting up, she saw Tangle Thread standing in a chair before
her father’s dressing-table, with a razor open in her hand.

‘© Oh! she has a razor!” she said, jumping from the bed,
and hastening towards the child.

Tangle Thread instantly got down from the chair and ran
across the room with the razor in her hand.

“Tangle Thread! stop this instant!’ cried her father,
awakened by the noise. But Tangle Thread only ran faster,
and when she saw her father and mother both rusning after
her, she became angry.

‘¢ Will have it! will shave!” she cried.

‘* Stop this instant!” cried her father once more.

By this time her mother had seized her hand, and after a
struggle the razor was secured. Tangle Thread burst into
frantic screams, but suddenly stopped short when she saw
that her mother’s hand was covered with blood.

“ Yes, you made your poor mamma cut her hand,” said
her father.

Tangle Thread was frightened.

“T sorry,” she said.

_ But in an instant she was angry with herself for being
sorry. She began to dance up and down, and to scream
out, ‘* No, no, not sorry.”



TANGLE THREAD. 19

Her mother was used to such scenes. Her father had
never seen her so angry.

“Why, this is dreadful!’ he cried. ‘I never saw such
a child. If she does not learn to obey, she will sometime
cut herself to pieces or get burned up.”

“Yes, I know it,” replied her mother. ‘‘I have tried,
in every possible way, to teach her obedience. But nothing
seems to have any effect. Not half an hour after being
punished for this offence, she will do something else just as
bad.”

‘“‘But has the child no feeling? It seems so unnatural
for a little thing of her age not to be alarmed and pained at
the sight of blood. And your fingers are all cut, I do be-
lieve. Let me see. Yes, every one of your poor mamma’s
fingers is cut and is bleeding,” he said, turning to Tangle
Thread, who during this time had not ceased to scream and
stamp with all her might. Her father’s address only made
her cry more angrily and loudly.

Her mamma said to him, in a low voice, ‘‘ Do not notice
her. It only irritates her yet more. She has a great deal
of feeling, and I am sure she is distressed at the sight of my
cut fingers.”

And this was true. Tangle Thread was distressed. But
she did not know herself what was the matter with her, and
she was still angry and excited, and kept on crying. And
when she once begun to ery, she was like a horse that has
begun to run, and the more he runs the more he must run,
till he gets almost wild and quite worn out, and has to stop
to take breath.



20 TANGLE THREAD.

CHAPTER V.

Wuen Tangle Thread had cried till she could cry no
longer, her mamma sent for Ruth to come and dress her.

Daring breakfast, the father and mother were both silent
and thoughtful. At last her father said,

“Do not you intend to bring that child to her senses, my
dear ?”

“Yes, I shall punish her by and by. Now, while she is
so excited, she would let me kill her before she would give

up.

“But you intend to make her say she is sorry ?”

“T don’t know.”

‘You don't know, my dear? Do you mean that you do
not intend to break that child's will ?”

“«T used to think I must do that, once for all,’’ she re-
plied. ‘‘I have heard great stories of conflicts between
parents and children, that finished up the business for ever.
There’s Mr Hamilton, he told me that his little Ellen, when
she was about a year and a half old, was standing near him,
holding a little doll in her hand.

“ «Let papa see your dolly,’ said he.

* “The child put both hands behind her, and made no
answer.

“« «Come to me, and let me see your dolly,’ he repeated.

“The child refused. At last, after urging her some time,
he said,



TANGLE THREAD. 21

“«* Then papa will have to make you doit.’ He began
by slapping her hands. She changé@the-doll fromhand to
hand, but held it firmly. He then used a littletod. The
child grew more and more violent; a raged
between them. He kept repeating, ‘I shall punish you,
Nelly, till you shew me your dolly;’ but she would not yield.
At last she threw it at him, angrily. Hour after hour
passed before the child would submit; but at last she gave
up, and that was their final conflict. But I have had twenty
such scenes with Tangle Thread. She yields at last, and
is as sweet and gentle and loving, for a time, as need be.
But perhaps the very next day the whole ground will have
to be fought over again.”

“Perhaps Tangle Thread would yield to me more readily,”
said her father. ‘As it was “my razor about which she was
80 obstinate, perhaps I ought to take her in hand myself.”

So, after breakfast, he took Tangle Thread into his
dressing-room, and said to her,

“You have been a very naughty child; you would not
mind either papa or mamma; and you made poor mamma
cut her fingers very badly. Are not you sorry you were
so naughty ?”’

Tangle Thread held down her head and was silent.

‘* Answer papa. Are you sorry ?”

No answer.

He took her little hand in his. ‘I shall slap this little
hand very hard, if you do not answer me.”

Then Tangle Thread burst out into “her usual
scream.



22 TANGLE THREAD,

Her father struck her hands again and again, but she only
kept on’ crying.

He began to wish he had not undertaken the task of
conquering such a child.

“ After all, it is a mother’s work,”’ he said to himself,
He looked at his watch. It is ten o'clock. I ought to be
in my office,” he said, uneasily.

“Tangle Thread, are you going to obey me, or shall I
have to punish you more severely ?”

Ten minutes passed—fifteen—Tangle Thread had no
thought of yielding. .

At eleven o'clock her father sat in despair, looking more
worn out than the angry child did; but the battle was not
yet ended.

At last her poor mother, who had sat looking on in agony,
burst into tears,

“O my child!” she cried, ‘will you make your father
strike you yet more ?”

Then Tangle Thread's stubborn heart seemed to melt.
She cried out,

‘* Am sorry, papa!”

“Then run to your dear mamma, and tell her so,”

Tangle Thread ran into her mamma’s arms, who kissed
her and wept over her, but was too tired and heart-sick to
say much,

“Do you know, my little child, that your mamma feels
just so when you are naughty, and have to be punished ?
She certainly does. Then won’t you try to be good for her
sake ?”



TANGLE THREAD. . 28

CHAPTER VI. °

Tancte Tareap fell asleep in her mamma's arms. Her
papa looked at her sorrowfully.

“T am sorry I undertook to govern her,” said he. “I
never was so tired in my life. Who would think that that
tiny frame could hold such a will?”

“T never have these conflicts with her now,” replied her
mamma. ‘It has been suggested to me, that when a child
refuses to obey, it is best to punish it for disobedience at
once, rather than enter on a contest with it. And, on the
whole, I believe it to be the proper way.”

“Well, good-by, my dear’; it is past twelve, and I ought
not to stay another moment. Do go and lie down. You
look quite worn out. Or shall I order the carriage for you?
Ah! your life is very different now from what it used to be,
before this strange child dropped down upon us?”

“Tt may look hard to those who only see the wilful,
wayward ways of the child,” said her mother. “But I love
this poor little creature dearly.”

The father now kissed the pale mother and the sleeping
child, and went out. He soon forgot, in trying to make up
for his lost time, what he had been through. God means
that the work of training little children should belong chiefly
to the mother. She has no business to call her out; she
can have no business so important outside her own doors.
It is for her to watch every look and word and tone; to give



24 TANGLE THREAD.

up all her time, if necessary, and find her happiness in seeing
her child grow up good and gentle, or her sorrow in seeing
it continue perverse and disobedient. So Tangle Thread’s
mamma could not go out, like her papa, and forget her
troubles. There was only one place in all the world where
she could find comfort. That was on her knees, before God.
She placed the weary little sleeper on her own bed, and then,
with many tears, gave her away more truly than ever before
to Him. She told Him all her troubles and cares, and be-
sought Him to look down in love on her poor little lamb,
and to take her in His arms and carry her in His bosom, till
she should become like Himself.

Perhaps you think that God heard this prayer and
answered it at once, so that Tangle Thread awoke from her
nap quite another child, and never was naughty again. And
no doubt He did hear and answer it. But fruit does not
ripen in one day, nor in two. Under the care of the skil-
fal gardener it will surely ripen, but it must have sun and
rain not once or twice, but day after day, week after week;
sometimes, even, month after month.

Poor little Tangle Thread was only conquered for a time.
The very day after the sad affair with the razor she was as
naughty as ever. And the next day it was just the same.
No matter what she was refused, she always cried for it with
her whole heart. No matter how she was punished, she
would do, right over again, the very things she had been

+ forbidden.

Ruth found it hard work to get along with her ; for when

her mamma was out, she could cry as much as she pleased,



. TANGLE THREAD, 25

and tease Ruth till her patience was worn, as she said her-
self, ‘‘ to tatters.”

“If you won't seream once to-morrow,” Ruth said to her
one day, ‘I'll ask your mamma to let you go home with me
some time. Then you can seo all our cows, and our hens
and chickens, and you can take a basket and hunt for eggs.”

Well!” said Tangle Thread.

But the next day she cried half a dozen times. Once it
was because her hair was cut; once because she did not
wish to go to walk. Again, because there was rice-pudding
for her dinner, and she said she hated rice; and so on,
through the day.

“Try again to-morrow,” urged Ruth.

“Well!” said Tangle Thread, “ if you'll promise not to
wash my face, nor change my dress, nor make me wear
over-shoes when I go out; if you'll go on the shady side of
the street, and walk down to Union Square, then I won't
cry. I shan’t have any thing to cry about.”

“But I can't promise,” said Ruth. «I must wash your
face and change your dress; I must put on your over-shoes ;
and while this cold weather lasts, I must walk on the sunny
side of the street. Your mamma has bidden me do all these
things ; aud as for Union Square, you know your mamma
won't let you go there, because she is afraid you'll get run
over.”

“Then I shall cry,” returned Tangle Thread. « Of
course if you and mamma do all you can to plague ‘me,
and won’t let me do a thing I want to do, I must ery. Or
at any rate I must fret.”



26 TANGLE THREAD. ‘

“You think if we let you alone, and you could do just as
you pleased, you would have nothing to cry or fret about.
But you'd go to destruction in the space of half an hour.
You would kill yourself eating cake and candy, or you would
get run over by some cart or carriage, or you would catch
your death of cold. It frightens me to think what you
would do if it wasn’t for your poor mamma slaving herself
into a consumption to make you a better child. And your
niamma is such a sweet lady, too. Oh! I wish you would
be a good child!”

But Tangle Thread was much amused at the various ways
in which Ruth said she might go to destruction, and she
liked better to hear that sort of talk, than talk about being
good, which was an old story.

“Tell some more dreadful things I might do,” said she.

“T've told enough,” said Ruth.

‘You must tell me some more. Mamma says you must
do all you can to amuse me. Come! make haste! Sug-
gest something else !”

“Well, you might get choked to death trying to say a
big word.”

“ Now you are laughing at me! And I've a right to say
‘suggest’ if I’ve a mind. I'll tell mamma how you laugh
at me !”

+ Ruth answered, good naturedly, ‘‘ I didn’t mean to tease
you, at any rate. Come, let me tell you all about my father’s
farm.”

‘You're always telling that. You've told me nine hun-
dred times. I'd rather hear about something else.”



TANGLE THREAD. 27

“ Then I'll tell you about the Babes in the Wood.”

“No, I don’t want to hear that, either. Tell me about
a nurse that put a baby in a carriage and made a poor little
lamb draw it all over town. And at last the poor little lamb
fell down dead.”

“ But I don’t know that story.”

“Yes, you do, for I've just told it to you.”

“ But if I only tell just what you've told me, you will get
angry and go to crying.”

“T told you all I know,” said Tangle Thread. ‘I made
it up, myself. And you must tell me a lot more about it.”

“ But I can't,” said Ruth. ‘I can’t make up stories. I
never could.”

“You're a naughty girl. I don’t like you one bit. I'll
tell mamma of you.” .

‘And you are a tiresome, naughty child!” Ruth was
tempted to say. But she bit her lips, and was silent. Then
Tangle Thread ran away behind the bed, and was silent, too.
Ruth knew she would sit there and pout for a long tinfe, and
then, if not noticed, scream till attention was paid her. She
got up and opened her bureau-drawer, and took from it three
little bits of candy.

“Here is some candy your mamma said I might give
you,” said she. ‘‘ Come, get up from the floor and eat it.”

Tangle Thread remained lying flat on the floor with her
face hidden in her two hands, Ruth placed the candy near
her, and went back to her work. The child pulled the candy
towards her, ate it, still lying on the floor, and at last fell
asleep.



28 TANGLE THREAD.

‘ Was there ever such a child!” said Ruth. “If I take
her up, she'll cry and kick and scream till the walls come
down. If I leave her there, she’ll get cold. Well, I can
but cover her up with a shawl and let her alone.”

CHAPTER VII.

I suaut skip over several years of Tangle Thread’s life
now, for I don’t like to write about naughty children. When
she was old enough to learn to read, her mother was glad,
for she thought the child would be better and happier if she
could amuse herself with books. She determined to give
her four very short lessons every day, so as never to let her
get tired. So one morning she called Tangle Thread, and
taking her into her lap, she said,

“ Here is a nice little book for you, and I am going to
teach you to read. Don’t you want to learn to read?”

“No,” said Tangle Thread ; ‘I want to play.”

“Yes, you shall play very soon. But you must learn a
little bit of"a lesson, first, And I do not like you to say
‘No’ when you speak to me. I wish you to be a polite
little girl, and it isn’t polite to speak so to your mamma.”

“I don’t want to be polite,” said Tangle Thread.

Her mamma sighed a little, though she tried not, and
smiled as sweetly and pleasantly as ever.



TANGLE THREAD. e 29

“ This letter is great A,” said she. ‘See! one of his
legs goes up,jso; and the other down, so. What did I say
his name was?”

“«T don’t know,” said Tangle Thread, in a sulky voice.

‘© A,” said her mother. ‘‘ Now, say it after me—A.”

‘TI don’t want to learn to read,” repeated Tangle Thread.

‘But I am resolved you shall learn, my child,” replied
her mother. ‘‘ Now, say A, after me.”

Tangle Thread was silent. Her mother looked at her
watch. The time she had set apart for the lesson was over.

“« My child,” said she, ‘ you have disobeyed me, and I
must punish you. And at twelve o’clock I shall give you
another lesson.” Then, with a heavy heart she punished
the little girl, and sent her back to the nursery.

At twelve o’elock the nurse “brought her home from her
usual morning-walk, took off her things, brushed her hair,
and led her to her mother for the second lesson, as she had
been told to do.

Her mother received her with a loving word and a kiss.

“ Now, can you tell me the name of the letter ?” she asked.

“ T don’t know, and I said I did'nt know. And I don’t
want to learn to read.”

“I think you do know, Tangle Thread,” said her mother.
“But I will tell you once more. It is A.”

“Tcan’t say A,” said Tangle Thread. ‘And I can’t
say B, either. Nor C.”

“Why, where did you learn your letters?” asked her
mother, in great surprise. ‘“ How glad I am that you know
them!”



80 ° TANGLE THREAD,

“They're on my blocks,” said Tangle Thread, in a
gracious voice, ‘And if you'll buy me a wax doll as big as
Edith May's, I'll say some more.” :

“T can’t promise to pay you for doing what I bid you,”
replied her mother. ‘ You have a dozen dolls now, and if
you had one like Edith’s, you would soon break it. But
do not let us talk of that, now. Let me hear you say D.”

Half-crying, and with pouts and frowns this second lesson
was finished. Tangle Thread’s mother went on faithfully to
teach her naughty child in spite of her behaviour. But when
she called her to her lessons, she felt very much as people
do when they go up the steps of the dentist's house and
ring his bell. Tangle Thread never came pleasantly; she
almost always cried before they got through the few minutes’
task; she would not half-listen to what was said, and every
thing had to be repeated over and over again. Her book was
blotted with tears, and its leaves were crumpled in her im-
patient hands, so that many a new one had to be bought be-
fore the end of the year. And oh! how many weary, weary
hours this work she had looked forward to with pleasure,
cost the poor mother!

CHAPTER VIII.

Wun Tangle Thread could read quite well, her mamma

. bought for her a good many pretty little books, and a book-
case in which to keep them. And one day she went out on
purpose to get a silver thimble for her, that she might learn



4

TANGLE THREAD. . 81

tosew. Then she fitted some work very nicely} and sat
down by Tangle Thread’s side, so as to shew her how to
hold the needle and how to take the stitches. But Tangle
Thread was just as naughty about this task as she had been
in learning to read. Now, if any one had said to her,

“Tangle Thread, take your needle and prick your
mamma's cheeks and neck and arms all over with it’—do
you think the child was cruelenough to do so? No, indeed.
But when she cried, and made her needle rusty with her
tears; when she jerked her thread till it broke or became
full of hard knots ; when she pouted, and was sullen or im-
patient, her mother was really wounded over and over again,
and that in a tenderer spot than cheek or arm or neck.
Remember that, my child, the next time you are tempted to
behave as Tangle Thread did, ard beg God to help you to
be gentle and patient to those who take the trouble to teach
you.

Tangle Thread had also to learn to write. Then she
would not sit properly at the table, or hold her pen as she
ought; she blotted her book and stained her fingers with
ink, and kept saying,

‘0 dear! I wish I didn’t have to learn to write!” or,
“«T wish I could hold my pen as I've a mind.”

While her mother stood over Tangle Thread trying to
teach her, she had to keep silently praying to God to give
her patience with this wilful little child. For sometimes
she was tempted to say, :

“Very well ; since you will not learn pleasantly, you shall
not learn at all. I will let you grow up a dunce.



'
82 p TANGLE THREAD.

But she loved her child too well to do this, and she
loved God too well not to try to do the work He had given
her to do, in the best possible manner, leaving it to Him to
make that work hard or easy as He thought best.

But she was so troubled with her child’s conduct that
when she tried to read she often did not know what book
she held in her hand, and when she tried to draw or paint,
her hand would tremble so that she had no pleasure in what
she was doing. By degrees the piano was opened less and
less frequently, the portfolio of drawings began to be ne-
glected, and new books and magazines to lie with uncut
leaves upon the table. What she studied now was the
character of her child, and how best to mould and to fashion
it into the likeness of Christ; and wherever she went or
whateyer she did, there was always a secret care gnawing at
her heart. Is it so with your mother? Do you never
speak that rude or impatient word to her which cuts her to
the quick ? When you see her sitting silent and anxious,
can you say to yourself,

‘‘Whatever it may be that is now grieving my dear
mother, I know it is nothing I have said or done.”

Do not hurry over these pages without stopping to think.
This book is not written merely to amuse you. It is writ-
ten with the hope of touching the heart of some wilful child,
of persuading it to pray day and night that God would make
it docile and submissive, like Him of whom it is said,

‘As a lamb before its shearers is dumb, so He opened
not His mouth.”



GOLDEN THREAD.






Golden Ghread.

CHAPTER I.

Pe was once a piece of coarse, black stuff, and a
bright golden thread waved and rippled through it like
a sunbeam.

And there was a poor, solitary woman, who had known
little but trouble since the day she was born. When she
was only eight years old, the parent-birds pushed her out
of the nest, to find home and shelter where she could. No-
body taught her to read or to write; nobody cared where she
went or what she did. She wore rags for clothing, ate the
coarsest food, and not enough of that; was knocked about,
scolded, and abused. At last she was married. Her hus-
band lived with her till what little money she had laid up
was gone, and then ran away. After a time she heard that
he was dead.

But just before he went away, God had pity on the joyless
life of this poor woman, and He wove into it a golden thread.
In other words, He sent a little smiling, loving child into the



86 GOLDEN THREAD.

dark room that used to be so lonely. There wasn’t much
in it besides the child. While the mother lay in bed with
the baby by her side, the drunken husband had broken most
of the furniture to pieces with an axe. The bureau that
she had been so proud of was only fit to light the firé now;
and the table and the chairs were not worth much more.
But what if the floor was covered with these fragments—
wasn’t there a live baby lying on her arm ?

Little Golden Thread grew fat every minute, as good
babies are apt to do. God had provided plenty of sweet
milk for her, and nobody had to go out of the house to buy
it when the baby was hungry. It kept coming as fast as it
was wanted, just as oil kept coming into the poor woman's
cruse in the Bible. But food for the mother did not come
of its own accord, and it was necessary for her to do some-
thing to earn money to pay her rent with, to buy bread and
potatoes, and coal and clothes. She did not know, at first,
how to manage it; for she must stay at home and take care
of her baby, and could not go out to work as she used to do.
There was a poor little seamstress who was willing to pay
half a dollar a week if she would let her come and sleep in
her bed. And she came every night, when her day’s labour
was ended, and crept in far over toward the wall, so as to
leave room for Golden Thread and her mother. Then in
the morning, while the child was taking its nap, the
mother would go out, with an old poker in one hand and a
- tin pail in the other, to rake out bits of coal from rich
people’s ash-barrels. Her clothes were scauty, and of all
sorts of odd shapes, so that if you happened to see her from



GOLDEN THREAD. 87

your bed-room window, half buried in your barrel of ashes,
you would hardly have been able to tell whether that queer
figure was a man’s or a woman's. These bits of coal helped
to keep them warm, and to cook a dinner now and then.

Golden Thread had to lie on an old rug on the floor, and
take care of herself most of the time. Her mother was
afraid to leave her on the bed, lest she should fall off. But
the child was happy on her rug, and she threw up her arms
and hands and legs, and played with them, or watched her
mother moving about the room, or just lay kicking and
laughing, and crowing and cooing. Some of her little clothes
were always in the wash-tub, or else hanging on a line be-
hind the stove, drying. This was because she had so few
things, that they had to be washed every day. But she did
not know or care anything about that. She went on
enjoying herself just as much as if she had had a housefal
of clothes, and her mother would stop now and then, look
fondly down at the old rug and the little creature on it, and
say, half-aloud, half to herself, « Little comfort ! little bless-
ing!” and then go cheerily on with her work.

CHAPTER II.

Wuen Golden Thread had learned to creep and to walk,
it was not so safe to go out and leave her alone, as it had



88 GOLDEN THREAD.

been. She would get burned or scalded, or pull the chairs
over and hurt herself, because she did not know any better
than to get into mischief. So her mother had to wrap her
up in an old shawl and take her with her when she went out.
Golden Thread used to pat and kiss her as they went along,
with the clothes that were to be washed, or the coarse needle-
work that was to be done. And this made the way seem
short when it was long. This poor woman had often to
carry a very heavy basket on one arm, with her child on the
other, and this was hard, and she often had to stop to take
breath. If Golden Thread had fallen asleep, these sudden
halts would wake her up; then she would smile, put up her
lips to be kissed, and settle down to sleep again. And as
soon as she was strong enough to trot along by her mother’s
side, she wanted to help to carry the basket, or the pail, or the
bundle that was almost as big as herself, indeed sometimes
much bigger than she was. Now, of course, she could not
help at all, and yet it was very sweet to see her try, and to
watch her bright face when she fancied herself of some use
to her mother. Don’t you remember how pleased you were
when you ran to get your papa’s boots for him? And how
pleased he was, too? You see you were like little Golden
Thread when you did that.

When Golden Thread was three years old, her mother
thought she must begin to leave her at home and go out to
work by the day. Ladies who wanted washing done would

_ let her come and wash for them all day, give her plenty of
good food to eat, and when she went home at night pay her
six shillings or a dollar for her work. So she asked one of



GOLDEN THREAD, 89

her neighbours to look in now and then to see how the child
was getting along, made up a fire that would last till her
return, put bread where Golden Thread could reach it,
charged her to be a good girl, and went away. She knew
that Golden Thread would stay where she was bidden, but
she did not love to go and leave her all alone, and she went
back twice to kiss her, and to promise to get home as early
as possible. Golden Thread did not cry or fret when her
mother had gone, and she heard her lock the door behind
her. She ran and climbed up into a chair to look out from
the window, and watch for her to come home, just as she
always did when her mother went out on errands. She sat
patiently and quietly a long, long time, thinking every minute
she should see her mother turn the corner, and then hear
her step coming up the stairs. “She did not know how long
a day is. By and by, the neighbour who had promised to
look after her came up and unlocked the door, and put in
her head. Golden Thread’s mother had given her the key
to keep while she was gone.

“O mother! is that you?” cried the lonely little child,
running to the door.

“No, it’s not time for your mother to be back yet. Sup-
pose you go down and stay with me a bit ?”

Golden Thread was very glad to go, and for a time she
was quite happy, playing with the neighbour's children,
But by and by they began to quarrel, and to pull each other’s
hair, and their mother boxed all the ears in the room, even
poor Golden Thread’s, without stopping to ask who was to
blame, and the poor little thing was very glad to be taken



40 GOLDEN THREAD.

home again to her own room. The fire had begun to get
low, and the neighbour put on more coal before she went
away. Golden Thread made-believe iron when she was left
alone, but this made her arms ache, and then she made
houses with the clothes-pins. Then dinner-time came, and she.
ate her bread and drank some water, and climbed up to watch
once more for her mother. Dear me! what a joyful sound
it was to hear her come toiling up the stairs! They hugged
ani kissed each other so many times, and it was 80 nice!

“ Poor little soul !’’ said her mother ; “ it was lonesome
while its mother was gone !"’

“But you've come now!” cried Golden Thread, and she
forgot all the long hours, and was just as happy as a little
bird.

And the tired mother forgot how tired she was, and she
put on the tea-kettle and a sauce-pan, and began to get the
little one’s supper. She had had hers, and now all she
thought of was giving something warm to her child who had
been so sweet and contented with her bread and water all day.

“See,” said she, “this pretty white egg. I am going to
boil it for you. And you shall have a drop of milk, and a
bit of sugar, and a cup of tea to-night. And mother will
make you a slice of toast.” What a feast after a long,
lonely day !

« “Mother, do rich people have such nice suppers?’’ asked
Golden Thread, hopping round her and looking gaily on.

“Dear me! bless the child!’ said her mother; and she
laughed all to herself, and felt a good deal happier than
many rich folks put together.



GOLDEN THREAD. 41

So Golden Thread sat up to the table and had her warm
supper. Her tea was make-believe tea, made of water with
a little milk in it, but she had it in a real tea-cup, and the
egg wasn't a make-believe egg byany means, /

“T'm going again to-morrow to the same place,” said her
mother. ‘‘ And you must be a good child, and not fret for
mother.”

“No, I won't fret one bit,” said Golden Thread. ‘ And
when you're a big girl I'll buy you a great big egg, and cook
it for your supper.”

“Why, I'm a big girl now,” said her mother. Then they
both laughed a good deal, and by and by it was time to go
to bed. When Golden Thread had fallen asleep, her mother
put on her hood and shawl, and went out to spend the money
she had earned that day. She bought a little coal, and a
loaf of bread, and three pennies’ worth of tea, and some
meal. Some of the meal was to be boiled next morning for
the child’s breakfast. And the coal was to keep her from
freezing through the wintry day.

‘Wait upon me as soon as you can,” she said to the’
grocer of whom she bought her tea. ‘ For I’ve locked my
little girl up alone in the room, and I’m so afraid of fires
when it comes night.”

“Tt’s a pretty risky thing to lock a child up, day or
night,” replied the grocer. ‘ There's no telling how many
come to their death that way, every year. You see they get
lonesome, and they fall to playing with the fire, or with
matches.”

“* My little girl never does such things,” said the woman.



42 GOLDEN THREAD.

“That doesn’t prove she never will do them, some time,”
persisted the grocer. ‘Children’s all just alike. And it’s
my opinion they all make a point of getting into all the mis-
chief ~ can. Don’t lock ’em up in rooms by themselves,
T say.”

“That's my doctrine, too,” said another man, who stood
by. “Besides, it’s a piece of cruelty. Children wasn’t
made to live alone by the day.”

-“T don’t know what else we poor folks are to do,” said
Golden Thread’s mother. She caught up her basket and
hastened away, ‘to see that the child was safe.

CHAPTER Il.

Gotpen Tareap spent a great many such days as the one
I have told you about. How would you like to be locked
into the room and left alone all day? Do you think you
should ery ?

At last Golden Thread was old enough to go to school,
and then her long, lonely days were over. It is hard work
to learn to read, but it isn’t half so hard as to stay by your-
self all day. So Golden Thread was very happy to stand
by her teacher's side and be taught her letters. There were

“a great many children in the school, and many of them were
naughty, tiresome children. They teased their teacher and



GOLDEN THREAD. 48

made her a deal of trouble, so that she often got quite out of
patience, and would speak sharply to them or even shake
them. She even got out of patience with our good little
Golden Thread, because she did not learn faster, and one day
she spoke quite roughly to her, and said,

“Your are as stupid as an owl!”

The tears came into Golden Thread’s eyes, but she looked
up sweetly into her teacher’s face, and said,

“‘ Why, Miss Bacon ? you called me an owl!”

“TI did not mean to call you so,” replied the teacher.
“You must forgive me for speaking so rudely. You are
my best child, and if all the rest were like you I should not
lose my temper so.”

When Golden Thread’s mother came home that night,
with her limbs aching and her hands all wrinkled and puck-
ered with hot water, how pleased she was to hear her dear
child say,

“« My teacher says I am her best child !”

Indeed the poor woman did not creep home to a dark and
gloomy room in these days as she used to do befgre she had
any child. As she passed swiftly through the streets she
knew that Golden Thread would have the fire burning cheer-
fully, the room nicely swept, the candle lighted, and the little
low chair waiting for her. And, what was more, she knew
that the moment she opened the door she should hear the
joyful ery, “Oh! here you come, mother!” and that two
arms would be round her neck and twenty kisses on her
cheek before she had time to take off her things. Oh! it is
80 pleasant to have somebody glad to see you when you get



44 GOLDEN THREAD.

home! Sailors on the sea think so, and soldiers in their
tents think so, and so all mothers think who have little
Golden Threads watching and waiting for them !

“T wish I might bring home to you somo of the good
things I see wasted every day,” said the mother. ‘Or,
that I could go without half my dinner, so that you could
have it.”

Golden Thread looked quite surprised.

- “Why, mother? I have plenty to eat!” said she.
“Some children have to go a-begging. They are worse off
than I am.”

“ Well, you haven't plenty of clothes, at any rate. I wish
you had. Then you wouldn’t have to lie in bed while I wash
and dry what few old things you have.”

Then Golden Thread laughed, and said, ‘ But it is so
nice that I’ve got some clothes, and don’t have to lie in bed
all the time. And pretty soon I shall be a big girl, and can
help you work, and we shall have lots of clothes.”

Yet down in the depths of little Golden Thread’s heart
there lay a good many wants and wishes, that she never told
of. There are always such wishes in the hearts of those
who are poor, or only pretty well off. Some great agitation
throws them to the surface, and friends see them with as-
tonishment, not dreaming of their existence until now. Just
so, all sorts of plants are growing down in the depths of the
sea. But it needs a great wind or storm to tear them loose
from the rocks and toss them to the surface.



GOLDEN THREAD. 45

CHAPTER IV.

Gotpen Turean’s mother kept on working very hard, and
by degrees she was able to get good warm clothing for her-
self and her child. She bought a new bureau, and some
chairs and a table, and their room looked more like a nice
pleasant home than ever. But hard work in all sorts of
weather, now in freezing cold, now in long summer days,
requires a good deal of health and strength, and this poor
woman began to lose hers. Now and then, instead of going
out to earn money, she had to stay at home to rest, and then
what she had been saving had to be used up. At last, one
day, she fell from a ladder on which she was standing, and
the pail of whitewash she had been using overturned and
poured its contents all over her. Her eyes were filled, and
so was her mouth, and she could hardly breathe or see.
Some of the servants in the house where she was at work
helped her to get up and wipe the whitewash from her face,
but they could not cure her eyes, which burned like fire.
One of them led her home, where she spent the night in
great pain and anxiety. In the morning Golden Thread
could not run gaily to school, as usual. She must lead her
half-blind mother to a dispensary. Do you know what a
dispensary is? If not, ask your mother, and she will tell
you. The poor woman was given something with which to
cool her eyes, but it did little good, and she sat with folded



46 GOLDEN THREAD.

hands, she who had always been so busy! Golden Thread
made the fire, and got the breakfast, and swept the room ;
and she said every thing she could think of .to comfort her
mother.

But the poor woman needed a great deal of comfort. She
knew that if she lost her eyes she could not work any more,
to earn money for herself and her child. They would be
turned out of their pleasant little home, and have to go to
the alms-house. When she said so, Golden Thread an-
swered,

“ But, won't they be good to us in the alms-house ?”

“You don’t know what you are talking about, poor thing,”
said her mother. ‘‘ And I’m glad you don’t. And to think
of my being blind, and not able to walk another step !”

“But you've got me to lead you, mother,” said Golden
Thread. ‘ It isn’t so bad as if you hadn’t any little girl like
me!”

“No, I know it isn’t. But if I am blind I never shall
see your face again.” ,

«‘ But you can feel it with your hands, and that’s most as
good,” said Golden Thread. ‘‘ And I shall never leave you,
no, not one minute. And pretty soon I shall be able to read
to you. I'll read such beautiful stories. All about kings
and soldiers, and battles and giants. There's lots of stories
in the Bible.”

“««Dear me! the child would bring a dead man to life!”
said the mother; ‘‘and I am an ungrateful creature not to
‘be thinking of my mercies instead of sitting here groaning.
Why, if I had to choose which I'd lose, this child or my



GOLDEN THREAD. 47

two eyes, it would come dreadfal hard ; but I'd choose to
keep the child.”

So many days passed, but the injured eyes were no better,
and all the neighbours came in to see the poor woman and
to give their advice. One wanted her to try this thing and
another that; and at last they told of a woman who knew a
great deal about the eye, and would be sure to cure the
worst case. Golden Thread danced for joy when she heard
this, for she believed all she heard, like other little children.
She could hardly wait till her mother was got ready to set
off to visit this wonderful person who was to cure her eyes.
She led her carefully and tenderly along the street, just as
you would lead your little baby-sister if you were allowed to
take her out. The woman-doctor looked at the eyes and
made great promises, and in returf for her advice she took
fourteen shillings from the widow's hard-working hands.
And she took fourteen shillings a good many times after
this, till all the money the poor woman had was gone. And
ut the end of the visits her eyes were almost gone, too.

CHAPTER V.

Tuese were hard times. The bureau that held all their
treasures was sold ; by and by the little clock that used to tick
so cheerfully, went where the bureau did ; then the mother's
warm shawl was pawned ; then Golden Thread’s best frock



48 GOLDEN THREAD.

that she wore to Sunday school; then other things, one
after another, till they and their room looked as forlorn as
a room could that had Golden Thread in it, and as Golden
Thread could, while always wearing her sweet, cheery
smiles,

But winter was coming on; and winter wants many things
that summer can do without. It wants those blankets that
are at the pawnbroker's; those thick shawls and petticoats,
plenty of coal, plenty of warm food.

“Mother,” said Golden Thread, “if rich people knew
how poor we ave, wouldn't they give us something ?”

“Yes, I dare say ; but I never begged.”

“‘ But there was a lady said she would give us cold meat
if we would come for it. Is it begging to go ?””

“ Why, if I ever get well, I could do something to pay
for them,” replied her mother. ‘ You're hungry, poor
thing ; I know you are. Come, I'll go with you. But it
comes hard,” she added, for her courage failed her, and she
sat down again, and pressed both hands on her eyes to keep
back the tears that would have scalded them.

“‘ Never mind, mother,” said Golden Thread, ‘I am not
very hungry. And there’s my best shoes left; may be we
could get something for them.”’

“ Well, we'll try,” said her mother. They put on their
scanty shawls and went out.

“Golden Thread held her mother’s hand fast in hers, and

led her carefully along, looking on all sides to see that she

“was not run over—picking out the dry places, and every
now and then speaking a word of love and good cheer.



GOLDEN THREAD. ‘49

Walking slowly along in this way, Golden Thread
observed a lady very richly dressed, leading by the hand a
little girl younger than herself. The child was made on a
very tiny scale. Her hands and feet were so small that
you could not help wondering at them; and her very red
cheeks were on such a cunning little face that you would
have said they were doll’s cheeks, if the eyes and the mouth
hadn’t such a wise and knowing way with them. She was
pulling very hard on the hand that held hers, trying to get
away. Hear what she says, and perhaps you will know who
she is:

«I fI can’t have plumcake and coffee, I don’t want any
party. Edith has plumcake, and she drinks two cups of
coffee. When I am a big woman I mean to have just what
I've a mind.” ‘

“Do you see that little girl across the street ?” asked her
mother. ‘See how miserably she is dressed. Look at her
poor feet. Her shoes are so old that she can hardly keep
them on. And the poor woman she is leading has a band-
age over her eyes. Do you think that little girl teases for
rich cake and coffee? Do you think, if I should invite her
to come to our house to lunch, she would cry for things I
did not give her ?”

‘‘She would be afraid to cry,” replied Tangle Thread ;
‘and I dare say she is a bad girl, and her mother is only
making-believe blind. Gertrude says the streets are full of
impostors.

Tangle Thread was so pleased that she had said a big
word that her ill-humour began to give way.

b



50 GOLDEN THREAD.

“T’ll run and ask them if they're impostors,” said she ;
“and if they say they're not, I'll give them a shilling,” she
added, tossing up her little bit of a head. »

And before her mother had time to answer, she ran to-
wards Golden Thread, who had stopped to pull up her shoes
that kept slipping from her feet. Many carriages and
heavy carts and stages were passing, and the child was in
the midst of them before her mother had recovered from
het surprise at her flight. A moment more and she would
have been thrown down, and perhaps killed. But Golden
Thread pulled off her old shoes, ran quickly to the middle of
the crossing, and snatched up the little figure in her own
big arms.

“Put me down, you old girl, you!” cried Tangle Thread,
frightened and angry. ‘“ Put me down, I say! I’ve got as
many feet as you have!”

By this time her mother had reached them.

“Thank you, little girl,” said she, looking at Golden
Thread ; “thank you, with all my heart. You are a brave
child to run in among the horses and carriages, to save this
foolish little thing. But is that thin shawl warm enough
this cold day ? and are not your feet half-frozen ?

“Oh! I don’t mind it,” said Golden Thread, smiling,
and slipping her feet into her old shoes.

- And is this your mother ?” asked the lady, looking,
with pity, at the bandaged eyes,

“Yes, ma’am, but I lead her,” replied Golden Thread.
“She's hurt her eyes, and can't see so well as she used,”

“Do you see that house on the corner?” asked the



GOLDEN THREAD. 51

lady. ‘‘ Well, I live there, and I wish you would come and
see me to-morrow morning. Will you let her come ?” she
asked, in a gentle voice, turning to Golden Thread’s mother.

“The child’s hardly decent, ma'am,” said the poor
woman.

“She looks very clean, I’m sure,” said the lady.

“Very well, if you’re kind enough to think so, ma'am,”
replied the woman.

So they bid each other good-bye, and each passed on their
way, only Golden Thread and Tangle Thread looked back
at each other several times.

‘‘ What a nice, pleasant-looking little girl,” said Tangle
Thread’s mother. ‘‘ And ob, my child, how thankful we
ought to be to God for saving you when you were in such
danger. How could you run ‘across the street in that reck-
less way? You know how often I have told you never to
do it. But I won’t say any more = it. I am mo
thankful that no harm has come to you.”

“Should you cry if I should be killed ?” asked Tangle
Thread. ‘If I had been killed you wouldn’t have had any
little girl to tease you.”

“O my darling child! how little you know how your
mother loves you. If you only could begin to know, what a
different child you would be !”

Tangle Thread’s proud little heart melted a little, and she
said, in a low voice,

“I won’t tease for plumcake and coffee again. I'll have
just what you want me to have. And I am going to invite
that little girl to my party. Idon’t think she’s an impostor.”



52 GOLDEN THREAD.

Her mother smiled, and would gladly have caught her
child in her arms, and covered her with kisses, as they
entered the house together. But Tangle Thread would not
have allowed herself to be caressed for making one civil
speech. She was too proud for that. So they went in
together, and were both full of business all day.

Golden Thread and her mother went on, meanwhile, to
the pawnbroker’s, where they pawned the shoes. With the
money thus gained they bought a bit of bread, and, hungry
as they were, ate it on the way home.

“What do you suppose that rich lady wants me to come
there for, mother ?” asked Golden Thread.

“I suppose she wants to give you something because you
picked up her little girl for her.”

‘She must be a very nice lady, then. It only took me a
minute to snatch up the little girl.”

“Yes, but you might have got run over and killed in that
one minute. And then what would have become of your
poor old mother ?””

Golden Thread was silent. But, after a while, she said,
“‘T don’t believe God would take away your eyes and your
little girl both at once. And if that kind lady gives me as
much as a shilling, I'll buy a little piece of beef with it.
The doctor you went to first, said you wasn’t at all strong,
and ought to eat beef.”

‘Much he knows where it's to come from!” said the
mother. ‘But that lady won't give you money, child.
How should she, not knowing but I would take it from you
and spend it in drink ?”



GOLDEN THREAD. 53

CHAPTER VI.

Tue next morning, very early, Golden Thread washed
her face and hands, and combed her hair, and was going to
set off at once to make the promised visit. But her mother
said,

“You must nof go these three hours. The lady won't
be up this long while, and then there’s her breakfast. It
will take a good deal longer to eat it than it takes us to eat
our bit of dry bread.”

Golden Thread tried to wait in patience, but it was ten
o'clock when her mother at last let her set off. She was
taken upstairs, where her néw friend sat by a cheerful fire,
with Tangle Thread by her side.

“Come in,” said the lady ; “come to the fire and warm
yourself, Have you had your breakfast?”

“Oh, yes, ma’am, a good while ago,” said Golden Thread,
trying not to look round her at the beautiful things in the
room, but looking in spite of herself.

“If you had your breakfast long ago, I dare say you
could eat some more by this time. Or, would you rather
have something to take home, so as to share it with the
rest ?””

“There isn’t anybody but mother,” said Golden Thread.

‘And she is almost blind, isn’t she ?”

‘‘ Her eyes were almost burnt up with whitewash,” replied

Golden Thread ; “and since then she can’t work as she



54 GOLDEN THREAD.

used. If she could, she wouldn’t let me go into a lady's
house with such shoes on,” she added, looking down at her
miserable feet. ‘‘ She says she hopes you will excuse it.”

“To be sure, to be sure,” said the lady, drawing a little
chair to the fire. ‘ Sit down, my child, and tell me what
is your name.”

“Mother calls me her little Golden Thread. But that
isn’t my real name. My real name is”.

“ Néver mind ; Lam sure it isn’t so pretty as the one by
which your mother calls you. And now, Golden Thread, do
you know why I asked you to come here to-day ?”

‘No, ma’am.”

“* Well, I wanted to ask you, for one thing, if you were
going to have a good many little girls come to see you, what
would you give them to eat ?”

Golden Thread smiled and looked down. At last she
said,

“Why, if I had plenty of roasted potatoes, with butter
on them, I'd give them as many as they liked. Roasted
potatoes are very nice if you have butter with them.”

‘And nothing else ?”

“* And may be I'd give every one apiece of cake. I mean
if I had any cake. But I shouldn't, yon know, ma’am.”

The lady looked at Tangle Thread and smiled, and Tangle
Thread smiled too, for she was thinking, as her mother was,
of the sponge cake, and maccaroons, and kisses, and candies,

+ and ice cream, that had been ordered for her party ; and
which she had pouted about, and said she wouldn't have, un-
less there was wedding-cake and coffee !





GOLDEN THREAD. 55

“And now, Golden Thread,” said the lady, “I should
like you to tell me what of all things you want most. For
I feel very grateful to you, and it will be a great pleasure to
me to give you something.”

Golden Thread smiled, and looked thoughtfally into the
fire. Dear me! she wanted so many things most!

Then the lady said,

“In this deep bureau drawer I keep things to give away.
You would laugh if you could see what queer things.I keep
in it. Toys, and books, and clothing, and shoes, and stock-
ings.”

“Oh! is there a pair of shoes there?” cried Golden
Thread, jumping up.

“Why didn’t you say a big wax doll?” cried Tangle
Thread. ‘ Mamma would just as soon give you a doll as
not.”

“There are no shoes large enough for you in the drawer,”
said the lady. ‘ Come, what would you like next best to
shoes ?””

“Perhaps there's stockings,” suggested the child.
‘Mother says warm stockings are good for chilblains.”

“Oh! there are larger things in the drawer than stock-
ings. Choose once more.”

“There never could be a shawl big enough for mother ?”

The lady rose, opened the drawer, and took thence a thick
woollen shawl.

“ Like this ?” she asked.

‘Oh! how nice!” cried Golden Thread. ‘‘ Mother is so
cold since she got sick. But, have I been begging ? oh!



56 GOLDEN THREAD,

have I been begging ?”” she cried, looking alarmed. “ Did
T ask for a shawl for mother? And I was never thinking
of a big warm shawl like that.”

“Perhaps you were thinking of a little warm one like
this,” said the lady, almost erying with pleasure that she had
found out so many of the child’s secret wishes. «But this
is just large enough for you, and you can give the other to
your mother.”

* Oh! thank you, ma’am, thank you,” cried Golden Thread.

“And here are more things in the drawer,” said Tangle
Thread, climbing into a chair, and looking down into it.
“See, books, dolls, reticules, pictures, workboxes.”

“Why, how came these things here?” asked her
mother, surprised,

“T put them there my own self,” replied Tangle Thread.
“ They are for the little girl. And I should like to have her
take off her things, and stay here and play with me.”

“I left mother all alone, and I must go now,” said
Golden Thread.

“Stop a minute,” said the lady. These thick night-
gowns are for you.”

“Why, I never had any night-gowns,” said Golden
Thread, with great surprise and pleasure. “ What will
mother say ?”’

-“‘And in this bundle you will find a good many other
such things.”

“ Why, I had to lie in bed while my things were washed !
T'll go right home and shew all these to mother. What will
she say ?”



GOLDEN THREAD. 57

The lady smiled, and Tangle Thread looked almost as
much astonished as Golden Thread. She drew near and
whispered,

‘But why don’t you ask my mother for a big doll? And
some cake and candy, and nuts and raisins ?”

Golden Thread was speechless. Was she the sort of
child to ask for dolls, and cake and candy, while her
mother sat half-blind, half-frozen, half-starved, at home ?

“Oh!” she cried, bursting into tears, “it isn’t nico
things we want! It's bread and meat, and fire !””

Tangle Thread rushed out of the room, and upstairs to
Rath.

“Give me all my money, quick!” said she ; ‘there's a
little girl downstairs that wants some bread and meat, and
fire!” °

“Oh! your mamma won't let you give to beggars,” said
Ruth.

“She isn’t a beggar any more than you are!” cried Tangle
Thread, angrily. ‘‘ And I will have my money. Get it this
instant !”’

“I'm not to give you things unless you ask me in a pro-
per way.”

“T will have my money!” said Tangle Thread ; and she
climbed up and opened the upper bureau drawer, and began
to turn over the things there, in search of her purse.

“Don't toss over your nice clean collars in that way,”
said Ruth. “ Your purse is not in that drawer, and you'll
not find it if you look all day.”

Tangle Thread burst into loud and angry cries. She took

ee



58 GOLDEN THREAD,

out her nice collars and aprons, and threw them one by one
to the floor, and was trampling them under her feet when her

“mamma suddenly entered the room.

The happy moments she had spent with Golden Thread
were over, and she stood in the door with that sorrowful,
grieved look, that was now almost always on her face. She
did not say a word, but taking the angry child by the hand,
she led her downstairs to her own room, and seated herself

“opposite to her in silence.

CHAPTER VII.

Were you ever disappointed in your life? When you
were going into the country to spend the day, and it began
to rain just as you were all ready to set off, how did you
feel ? And when you were invited to a Christmas tree, and
had talked about nothing else for a week, how did you be-
have when your mamma said you had too bad a cold to go,
and all the other children went without you? You were
disappointed, and very likely cried more or less about it.
Well, Tangle Thread's mother was disappointed, that just as
her child seemed gentler and sweeter than usual, her good-
ness lasted so little while. You know just how she felt as
she sat there, looking at Tangle Thread sobbing with anger.
But no, you do not know, and you never will, till you grow
up and have some little children of your own.



|

GOLDEN THREAD. 59

Meanwhile Golden Thread had gone home, and one of
the maids went with her, as she was directed to do,
with a basket on her arm and some money in her pocket.
With the money she was to buy shoes and stockings, that
Golden Thread was to put right on and wear home.

“But I've a pair of shoes at the pawnbroker’s,” said
Golden Thread.

“Never mind, I’m to do as I’m told,” said the maid.
“Tf you ever get your other shoes back, they'll may be do
for Sundays.”

“Look at me, mother!” cried Golden Thread, ranning
in with her stout shoes on, and making all the noise she
could. ‘‘ Lift up your bandage just a minute, and see what
I've got. Shoes and stockings, and shawls and night.gowns,
and petticoats, and the lady-says she’s coming to see you.
And here are roasted potatoes right out of the oven, and
butter to eat them with! Oh, mother, I didn’t mean to beg
for them !”

The poor mother looked so bewildered and so ready to ery, |
that the maid thought it best to set the basket on the table
and to slip out as quietly as she could. As soon as she had
gone, Golden Thread flew into her mother’s arms,

“Oh, it was such a nice lady!” said she. ‘ She is com-
ing to see you, mother, and says you must go to her doctor
and let him see your eyes. And she told me to tell you not
to be troubled, for you would not be left to suffer when you
were not fit to work.”

The poor woman shook her head. ‘TI cannot take all
these things,” said she. “I never can pay for them,



é

60 GOLDEN THREAD.

and I haven't been used to having things I didn’t work
for.”

Golden Thread stood silent, for she did not know what to
say.

“ At any rate, you'll eat some of the potatoes, won't you,
mother ?”” she asked. And she began taking them from the
basket. ‘‘ Why, there’s a piece of roast meat here!” she
cried. ‘Oh, mother, it will do you so much good! And
-there’s enough to last a week!”

They sat down, hungry and thankful, to this little dinner,
and then they looked at the shawls, the shoes, and all the
other treasures.

“T can’t think of keeping them,” said the poor woman
again. ‘ Unless, indeed, the lady will let me come and
work for her whenever I get well.”

“The lady is very rich,” said Golden Thread, looking
down at her shoes. ‘And she said herself that my old
shoes were not fit to wear.”

Her mother made no answer, but looked again and again
at the thick shawls, and at last laid every thing carefully
away on the bed.

“‘T haven't got down quite so low as all this comes to,”
said she. ‘‘ Begging is a trade 1 wasn’t brought up to. We
must not keep these things. Just as soon as my eyes get

. Well, I shall be able to earn what we need.”

“« May be if you'd seen the lady as long as I did, mother,
you wouldn’t mind taking presents from her. But I'll do
just as you say. You are not angry with me, are you ?”

“Angry with you? Bless your heart! No, indeed. If



GOLDEN THREAD. 61

I'm angry with any body it’s with myself, for getting that fall
and spoiling my eyes.”

CHAPTER VIII.

Watzx this was going on in the one small room in which
Golden Thread lived, poor little Tangle Thread sat crying
before her mamma. She was crying with anger, and when
spoken to she made no answer, unless it was by crying more
loudly and by kicking against the chair on which she sat.
So at last her mamma rose quietly and went away into an-
other room. There she threw herself down upon her knees,
hid her face in her hands, and burst into tears. Then she
prayed long and earnestly to God to touch the heart of her
child. When she returned to her room Tangle Thread had
stopped crying, and looked tired. Indeed, she was both tired
and ashamed. She wished she hadn't been so angry, and
that she could tell her mamma so. But it would have been
easier to have a tooth out than to tell her secret thoughts to
anybody.

‘Come here, my child,” said her mother, tenderly, and
holding out her hand.

Tangle Thread rose slowly, and walked to her mother’s
side.

“T am not going to say anything to you about your be-
haviour,” said her mother. ‘I have said everything I had
to say, a great many times already. And I am not going



62 GOLDEN THREAD.

to punish you, either. I am quite tired of that. I can
hardly remember a day in your life that I have not had to
punish you in some way. But I will tell you to-morrow
what I intend to do.”

She spoke in a gentle, loving, but very sad tone, and
Tangle Thread saw that her eyes were red with crying. She
never had felt so miserable in her life. What a pity that she
did not throw herself into her mamma’s arms, tell her how
sorry she felt, and promise to try, with God’s help, to be a
better child! But she did not say a word, and pretty soon
the carriage was ordered, and she saw her mamma drive
off. She went back to the nursery and tried to play with her
dolls, but they did not comfort her. Then she took down
The Fairchild Family and read a little here and there in
that favourite book.

Meanwhile her mother drove from place to place, making
inquiries about Golden Thread’s mother. She heard nothing
ill of her anywhere. Everybody said she was a hard-working,
industrious woman. So then she drove to the house where
the poor woman lived. All the neighbours ran to the win-
dows to look at the carriage, and some of them directed her
to the room she was seeking.

‘Oh, mother! it’s the nice lady !” cried Golden Thread, as
she opened the door on hearing her gentle knock.

“‘T have come to see you on account of your eyes,” said
‘the lady, kindly. ‘I want you to tell me all about your
accident, and what has been done for your eyes since they
were injured.”

Golden Thread's mother was glad to tell her story to so



GOLDEN THREAD. 68

kind a listener, and by degrees a good many things came
out that she did not mean to tell.

“T will take you to see an oculist, if you are willing to
go,” said the lady. “I have the carriage at the door, on
purpose, and there is plenty of time before dark.”

The poor woman coloured, and was silent. At last she
said,

“T thank you, ma’am, with all my heart. But I am not
decent to go with a lady, like you. If you would please to
give me a bit of a note to the doctor, my little girl could
lead me to his house.”

“Tt is too far. Besides, I want to see him myself.
Your shaw] will nearly cover you, and I’m sure your dress
is clean and tidy.”

“Do go,” whispered Golden Thread. “ Do go, mother,”

“I was going to say, ma'am, speaking of the shawl and
things, that I am grateful for them ; but I can’t think of
taking them unless you will let me do something for you.
T can wash and iron, and scrub and scour, and I understand
whitewashing ; and I can get in coal, and sweep off the
walks.”

“Not now, that you are nearly blind !”” said the lady,

“Why, no, ma’am, I can’t say that I can see to do much
of anything now ; but I hope to get well.”

“The first thing then is to see what the doctor says,”
replied the lady ; “and I promise to give you work as soon
as you are able to do it. So get ready, and we'll go at once.
Pat on your shawl, too, Golden Thread,” she added, “ for
of course you are to go with us.”



64 GOLDEN THREAD.

You should have seen Golden Thread's face as she led her
mother down the stairs and helped her into’ the carriage !
Driving off in a carriage as if they were queens! Well, if
it was a dream, what a delightful dream it was!

The doctor said the poor eyes were in a sad state, what
with the whitewash and the quack medicine. But he
thought they would be well in time. He spoke kindly and
cheerfully to the poor woman, who felt as if a great, heavy
stone had been lifted off her heart.

“‘ And now,” said the lady, as she set her down at her
own door, “I have one thing more to say to you. Suppose
I should be very ill several months, not able to turn myself
in bed, and needing constant care day and night. I should
have to have a nurse, and I should take all her time and
strength and patience. Now, I should pay her all she askéd,
and perhaps more. But could I really pay her with money
so as not to have any reason to feel grateful to her for all
she had done and all she had suffered for me ?”

‘* Why, no, ma’am, may be not,” said the poor woman,
wondering what was coming next.

“Well, if I could never repay her, then I must always
feel under obligation to her. I could, in fact, only repay
her by nursing her through just such illness. But I should
not be unhappy on that account. I love to feel obliged to
people. I love to feel grateful to God for His goodness to
nie, and I love to feel grateful to kind friends for their good-
ness. And I want you to love to have me do all I can for

* you in this time of your trouble. Anybody can refuse a
favour, but it isn't everybody who knows how to accept one,



; GOLDEN THREAD. 65

nobly and freely. But you must try, for my sake, and for
His sake who bids His children to minister to each other as
they would to Him.”

So saying, the lady allowed Golden Thread and her
mother to alight from the carriage, and the coachman
handed them from under his seat such a big bundle that they
could hardly get it upstairs. And when they got there,
they did not know their own room. There was such a fire
burning ; and the bureau had come back, and so had the -
table and the chairs, and the clock. And when they opened

' the big bundle, there were blankets and a warm quilt, and
shoes and stockings for the mother, and flannel petticoats,
and a woollen dress. And when she tried to put ona pair of
the stockings, there was something hard in each toe, and
the hard thing proved to be gold dollars, with which to buy
coal, and food, and medicine, all through this strait!

“ Are you going to send all these things back, mother ?””
asked Golden Thread, anxiously, for she had not understood
the lady’s talk with her mother.

“Send them back! No, indeed! Iam going to keep
them, and be grateful for them!” was the answer.

Then Golden Thread was so glad she did not know what
to do, and she threw herself down on the floor and rolled
like a ball across the room. And they put away their
treasures nicely in the drawers, and Golden Thread went
out and bought a candle to eat their supper by.



66 GOLDEN THREAD.

CHAPTER IX.

Tue next morning Tangle Thread's mother said to her,
‘‘T had a plan in my mind yesterday which I do not approve
of, now that I have bad more time to think it over. Do you
want to know what it was ?”

“Tf it was about me, I do,” said Tangle Thread.

“Well, I had half a mind to send you to spend a week
with that little girl who was here yesterday.”

“« What !—that little golden girl ?”

“ Little Golden Thread, yes. I thought it might do you”
good to see how poor people live, and to watch that nice,
pleasant child at her work. But, on the whole, I cannot
get courage to let you go.”

“Why not, mamma? I want to go. I am tired of
always being in this house.”

‘No, I dare not trust you. You might take cold, or get
into trouble of some sort.”

It was just like Tangle Thread to begin to cry, and to
want to go because her mamma did not wish it. So she
fancied herself much abused because she could not have her
qwn way.

‘I have to play all alone,” said she. ‘I never have any
, one to play with me.”

“ Not little Gertrude ?”” said her mother.
“Gertrude gets all my toys, and she won't play anything



GOLDEN THREAD. 67

I like. She just sits and sings to my wax doll as if it was
alive. Do let me go, mamma.”

Her mother could hardly help smiling.

At this moment her father entered the room. He looked
at Tangle Thread with displeasure and said,

“‘T shall really have to send you away if you behave in
this manner. You weary your mamma's life out with such
constant teasing.”

«TI was just telling her that I had been thinking of send-
ing her to spend a week with a poor woman I know of.
But instead of being alarmed at the prospect, she is quite
vexed because I will not let her go.”

“Is the woman trustworthy ? Does she live in a decent
place ?” asked the father ; ‘‘ for I am not sure it would not
be a good thing for Tangle Thread to be sent away among
strangers.”

‘«T really began to think so,” said her mamma.

Then Tangle Thread suddenly changed her mind, and
began to think she did not want to go.

‘“‘ They are not nice people,” said she, ‘‘ and they have
no meat or bread or fire. I would rather stay at home.”

“‘I was quite in earnest in what I said,” urged her
father. ‘A little girl who will not try to be gentle and good,
and who, after so many years, continues so wilful, ought
not to be treated like other little girls. If she makes her
home unhappy, she ought not to stay there.”

So saying he took his hat and went out.

“IT never saw your father so displeased,” said Tangle
Thread’s mother. “I am afraid that he will really send



68 GOLDEN THREAD.

you away. We know of a lady in the country who
takes little girls, and she would be quite willing to take
you.”

«I wasn't any naughtier than usual,” said Tangle Thread.
“T don’t see why I should be sent away, just for fretting a
little bit.” ‘

* « Your father was thinking of all your naughty ways ever
since you were born ; and perhaps he thinks that some one
else will manage you better than your mother can. But, oh,
my poor child! nobody will love you as I do, and you will
miss the love. Your heart will ache for it day and night.”

Tangle Thread sighed. It is easy to be naughty, but it’s
hard, too.

“I won't tease you any more,” said she. “ It isn’t very
nice to tease people. I can do anything I've a mind. I
can be good, and I can be naughty.”

“ Don't say so, my dear. Say you can be good if Jesus
will help you ; for there’s no use in trying unless He helps
you.”

“Tf I can’t be good all by myself, I don’t want to be good
at all,” said Tangle Thread. ‘‘ You destroy all my am-
bition.”

She was so pleased with herself for having made this
great speech, that her little tightly-packed body almost
seemed to swell with the pride it was hardly big enough to
hold. She went to the nursery, lost in thought.

“T can be good if I’ve a mind,” she said to herself.
“T’ve a great mind to begin. Then everybody will be so
astonished. They'll say they never saw such a sweet little



GOLDEN THREAD. 69

girl. That’s what people say about good children—they
say they're sweet, and I can be sweet if I've a mind.”

These thoughts were so pleasing that she laughed aloud.

“ What are you laughing at ?” asked Ruth.

Tangle Thread blushed, and started. “I wasn’t laughing,”
said she.

‘Indeed, you were,” said the nurse.

“‘T was not. Or if I was, you needn’t be asking about
it. I can laugh if I choose.”

‘ She’s out of humour, and I won’t say anything to vex
her,” thought Ruth. ‘I did provoke her yesterday, and I
wish I hadn't.”

“T've been looking everywhere for your purse,” said she.
“Twas sorry that I did not help you to look for it. But
I had such a toothache, I could not bear to move. And
you'll never guess where I found it. Why, in one of your
boots, under the bed.”

“Oh! Iremember now. I played that my boot was a
ship, and I put my purse on board for cargo. I am so glad
T’ve found it. Let’s go right out now and give some money
to that little girl.”

“We must see what your mamma says, first. And I
doubt if she lets you give so much money to one person.”

“Yes, she will. She likes generous people.”

“ But what will you do when all your money is gone ?”

‘Oh! papa will give me plenty more.”

“Then I don’t call it generous to give it away. You
wouldn't do it if you were not sure he would give you
more.”



70 GOLDEN THREAD.

Tangle Thread was silent. But after a minute she ran
down to her mamma. She found her writing.

“Mamma !”’ said she, ‘‘ mamma!”

“Do not interrupt me now; I am busy,” said her
mother.

«But, mamma, I want’”——

Her mother put her gently away.

“I should think you might listen,” said Tangle Thread,
‘reproachfully.

Her mother looked up. ‘I was making up the week's
accounts,” said she, ‘‘ and you have disturbed me so, that I
shall have to go over them all again. Go away, now, and
come again in half-an-hour.”

«« But you've stopped now, and’’——

‘Go, my child,” said her mother. ‘ You must learn to
obey.”

Tangle Thread went. But it was not a ‘sweet little
girl” who ran from the room with a flushed face.

“«T'll go up into the attic and stay there till I freeze to
death,” she said to herself. ‘Then mamma will wish she
hadn’t teased me so. Oh! she'll be sorry enough when
she sees me lying there, cold and dead !”

The attic was not a very agreeable place on this wintry
day. Tangle Thread soon became tired of pouting there
alone. So she concluded not to freeze, but to starve to
death ; a resolution that she kept till supper-time, when she

+ put it off till next day.



GOLDEN THREAD. jl

CHAPTER X.

In half an hour her mother sent for her.

“T am at leisure now,” said she ; “ what were you going
to say?”

“I want to know if I can go to see that little gil, and
give her all my money?”

“I have given her all she needs for the present,” replied
her mother. “ But I am going to see them now, and if you
wish to go with me, you can run and get ready.”

Tangle Thread hesitated. At last she went up to be
dressed, and she slipped the purse into her pocket.

They found Golden Thread ‘and her mother quite cheerful
and happy. Their room looked clean and pleasant; and
the two children sat apart, while their mothers conversed
together and had a little chat of their own.

“ Where are your toys?” asked Tangle Thread.

‘‘ T have none,” said Golden Thread.

“What have you done with them, then ?”

“Oh! I never had any to speak of. When I was a little
girl, mother made me a rag-baby; but I gave it away, long
ago.”

“But what do you do all day, if you have no toys?”

“IT help mother. I wash the dishes and I sweep the
floor; and I can knit, I knit almost a whole stocking,
once.”

“Can you read? Have you any books ?”



72 GOLDEN THREAD.

“I can’t read very well. I have to stay at home from
school, to take care of mother now.”

“Why doesn’t she teach you, then ?”

“Oh! she’s almost blind. Besides, she doesn’t know
how to read herself.”

Tangle Thread was speechless with surprise. A grown-
up woman not know how to read!

‘‘ Mamma knows every thing,” said she, “and she teaches
me. And one of these days I shall know as much as she
does. But I am afraid she won't go to heaven unléss she
gives you more money. She ought to give you money to
buy ever so many toys with. But I've got some money of
my own, and you shall have it all. You must buy a large
doll and a cradle.” ,

“But does your mamma know about it 2” asked Golden
Thread, half-pleased and half-frightened.

“No, she doesn’t. It says in the Bible, that you should
not let your left hand know what your right hand does.
So of course I don’t want her to know about it.” And
Tangle Thread felt very virtuous indeed, as she put the
purse into Golden Thread’s hand.

By this time her mamma was ready to go; and when
they were in the carriage again, she said,

‘How do you feel about spending a week with that poor
blind woman and her child? You know you could help
them to pare potatoes and wash dishes, and make their bed
and sweep.”

“You are laughing at me, mamma,” said Tangle
Thread,



GOLDEN THREAD. 73

“ And you may laugh at me, too, if you like,” answered
her mamma; “but I have another plan now. Golden
Thread cannot go to school while her mother is so helpless,
and I have been thinking how it would answer to let her
comeevery day to our house to be taught.”

“ Who would teach her ?”

“T thought you would.”

Tangle Thread could not conceal her smile of pride and
pleasure. She sat up as straight as possible, and said,

“T should like that dearly.”

“But you must make up your mind to find it quite a
task. At first it will be pleasant, but after the novelty wears
off you will often find it irksome. But I want you to feel
that you were not placed in this world just to amuse your-
self and have a good time. 1 want you to do some things
that are tiresome, and that require labour and patience.”

“ When may I begin ?”

“ To-morrow or next day. I have already spoken to the
child's mother about it.”

CHAPTER XI.

Tancte Tureap went to bed full of ambitious schemes.
She forgot that it was not Golden's Thread’s fault that,
though two years older than herself, she could not read well.



74 GOLDEN THREAD.

She forgot who had given her her own great readiness to
learn, and yet what impatience she had always shewn at her
tasks.

Next morning at the — hour Golden Thread made
her appearance.

‘My mother says I ought not to have taken this money,”
said she, placing the purse in Tangle Thread’shand, ‘ She
says I am to say I am very sorry I was such a foolish
child.”

Tangle Thread's mother looked at her little daughter with
surprise.

“Did you give her your purse, after all ?” she asked.

«Yes, mamma,” replied Tangle Thread, in a firm voice.
“The Bible says, ‘Blessed is he that considereth the
poor.’”

«But what does it say about obedience to parents ? Oh,
Tangle Thread ! what shall I do with you?”

She sank back into a chair, almost ill. Golden Thread
stood looking on, surprised and troubled, and was very glad
to be told that she might run home, as there would be no
lessons that day.

On hearing her story, her mother was greatly shocked.

‘No wonder that lady looks so sorrowful,” she said. ‘I
thought she had some trouble on her mind.”

«Oh! but her little girl will never do so again,” said
Golden Thread. ‘‘ She wouldn't like to make her mother
, turn so pale again.”

“Ah!” thought the poor woman, “I've had a sorrowful,

hard life; and if I get well, I've got to go on working just

”



GOLDEN THREAD. 75

so, a8 long asI live. But what of it? I've got the best
child that eyer was. A child that never crossed me in any-
thing, nor ever spoke a rough word to me. There isn’t
anything God could have given a poor lonely creature like
me, that I should have been half so pleased with as my little
Golden Thread. Why, since she came into the world, it
isn’t the same world it was before, and I ain’t the same
woman. But I have not been so thankful as I ought. I've
grumbled and fretted a good deal because I was so poor.
And yet I'd rather have my little Golden Thread than all
the money, and all the houses, and all the good things there
are in the world!”

While these thoughts lighted up the little obscure room
in which the poor woman lived, Tangle Thread’s mother sat
in her beautiful house, sad and sorrowful. What to do next
for her child she kuew not. But God saw her grief and
pain, and heard her prayers. He put new courage and
patience into her heart. She said to herself, ‘I have a
very hard task to perform. I must teach this child obedi-
ence. But I see that this cannot be done at once. I must
go on day after day, trusting in God to lead me every step of
the way. I must pray more, I must love her more, I must
be more gentle and tender. But I must have her obedi-
ence.” .

Tangle Thread stood, meanwhile, with a dark and gloomy
face, near the window. A little bird hung near her in his
cage, and she looked at him as he hopped about picking up
his seeds, and said half aloud,

“T wish J was a bird! Then I'd fly away—away off



76 GOLDEN THREAD.

where there are no houses and no people, and where I
should have nobody to plague me,”

“Poor little unhappy child!” said her scams * don’t
you know who it is that ‘ plagues’ you ?” :

‘‘ Everybody does!” cried Tangle Thread. ‘‘ Papa does,
and you do, and Ruth does. You all seem to think I am
always naughty.”

‘Poor child!” repeated her mother, ‘it is you who tor-
ment yourself. But I will not argue with you. I will tell
you onee more what I have often told you. I cannot treat
you exactly as God treats me, for I am a sinful, ignorant
creature. I make mistakes, and He never does. I get out
of patience, and He does not. I know almost nothing,
and He knows everything. But I mean to try to treat
you, as nearly as I can, as He does me. He has had
patience with me a great many times, when I wonder He
was willing to wait for me to be penitent. He has been
good to me, and given me many, many things. And He has
never ceased to put me under the rod since the day I gave
myself awayto Him. I don’t know which to thank Him for
most,.His goodness or His severity.”

Tangle Thread did not perfectly understand all this. But
she saw that her mother spoke out of the very depths of her
heart. She saw that she was more than ever resolved to
make her obedient. And what she did not understand, she felt.

“She went away sorrowfully to her play-room and locked

herself in. She could not think what made her feel so sad

‘and unhappy. Her books and her toys did not seem to be
what she wanted.



GOLDEN THREAD. 77

“TI don’t know what I do want!" she said, to herself,
and tears began to roll down her cheeks.

Ah! little Tangle Thread! This is what you want—To
have Jesus touch your heart and make it sorry. To kneel
right down and tell Him how sad and desolate you feel, and
to beg Him to make you His own dear child, and to help you
to love and obey Him. And then to run and throw your-
self right into your dear mother’s arms, hide your head in
her bosom, tell her how grieved you are for all your wilful,
naughty ways, and how you want to begin now to be like
Jesus, and to love and obey Him!

But the child had not yet learned this sweet lesson. She

could not bear to be sorry, much less to own she was sorry. .

CHAPTER XII.

As nothing more was said to Tangle Thread about her
teaching Golden Thread to read, she saw that her mother
did not mean to give her that pleasure, on account of her
behaviour about the purse. Nor was she now invited to go
with her mamma to visit poor people, as she had often done.
To march into sick-rooms laden with baskets of fruit and
flowers, her little figure fairly swelling with pride, had been
one of her greatest pleasures. There were some good and
kind feelings mingled with her pride ; she liked to see a pale

°



78 GOLDEN THREAD.

face light up with joy on her entrance, and to see how
grateful fruit often was to parched lips.

“There's the makings of a good woman in her, bless her
heart!” said one of the poor invalids whom she was often
* taken to see. This woman had lived in her mother's house
as cook; she had heard of Tangle Thread’s behaviour
through the other servants, and knew pretty well what she
was.

About this time, Gertrude, Tangle Thread's little friend,
came to spend the day with her.

Soon after dinner Gertrude complained of feeling chilly.
Ruth, on hearing this, put more coal on the fire, and made
Gertrude wear one of Tangle Thread’s flannel sacs. But
in a few hours she was taken quite sick. Tangle Thread
ran quickly for her mother, who came at once.

“She surely can have eaten nothing at dinner to make
her ill ?” said she, turning to Ruth.

“No, ma’am. They had nothing but their mutton-chops,
potatoes, and a rice pudding. No—it was tapioca pudding
to-day.”

‘“‘Her head and her hands are quite hot,” said Tangle
Thread.

“‘ What a child you are!” said her mother, smiling.
But she looked anxiously at little Gertrude.

“It is snowing, and is very cold,” said she. ‘TI hardly
like to send Gertrude home in such a storm. Gertrude,
darling, would you feel very badly to stay here to-night ta

“I want to go home,” said Gertrude. ‘I want my own,
mamma to make me get well.”



,.

GOLDEN THREAD. 79

“Twill go for your mamma, and if she thinks it best she
will take you home. But if she thinks it would not be safe,
then you will stay here, just to-night, won't you ?”

“Oh, yes! just as mamma says,” replied Gertrude.
And she closed her eyes and fell back fast asleep in Ruth’s
arms. Tangle Thread ran for a shawl, and covered the
sleeping child carefully.

“ That’s right, dear,” said her mother.

“ Thank you—that’s a good child,” said Ruth.

It was just at dusk that Gertrude’s mother came hurrying
up to the nursery. Gertrude awoke and stretched her arms
towards her dear mamma with a sigh of relief. Once in
her arms, she expected to be well.

“I dare not touch you yet, dear,” said her mother. ‘I
am all covered with snow. Wait till I can shake it off and
get dry. Where do you feel sick, darling?”

“‘T feel better now. My head” aches a little, and I am
thirsty. And I am tired a little.”

«Tt never would answer to take her home in this storm,”
said Tangle Thread’s mother. ‘‘ She may be quite relieved
by to-morrow, and we might then take her home safely, I
will sleep with her myself, and do everything I can for
her.”

“TI don’t know—I feel nervous about illness,” replied
Gertrude’s mother, looking anxiously at the child’s glowing
cheeks. ‘Since I lost my little Mary, I am frightened at
everything. And Gertrude is just one of those little lovely
creatures one is always expecting,to lose.”

“Can't you stay here with Gertrude?” asked Tangle



80 GOLDEN THREAD.

Thread, who had heard every word of this whispered con-
versation. ;

‘Ah! no ;—there’s the baby to nurse, and where he is
I must be. But'I dare not move Gertrude to-night. Per-
haps, after all, it’s only a fit of indigestion My darling,”
said she, now taking the child from Ruth, ‘you'll do just
what dear mamma wishes. I know you will. You'll stay
here to-night, and early in the morning I'll come with the
carriage and take you home. Only just to-night, dear.”

“Yes, mamma,” said Gertrude. “If you want me to
stay, I will.”

CHAPTER XIII.

Tuey soon had the child undressed and in a warm bed.
She fell asleep again, and though her sleep was restless, she
complained of nothing when she woke ; only once, when she
tried to take some water, she said, ‘It hurts me when I
drink ; I don’t want any more water.” Her mother, having
sat by her side all the evening, was now preparing to go
home, and did not hear these words. Tangle Thread’s
mother did.

“Can her throat be sore 2” she said, to herself, “Is it
possible that scarlet fever has crossed our threshold ?”
Her heart yearned over her own child. “Oh! if she should
have it, and die!”



GOLDEN THREAD. 81

“Tf there are any alarming symptoms during the night, I
had better send for the’ doctor, had I not?” she said, as
Gertrude’s mother took leave,

“Certainly, certainly. But I hope she will have a good
night, and be quite bright to-morrow.”

But the child did not have a good night. She tossed to
and fro, and moaned in her sleep, and often said,

“It hurts me where my throat is.”

As soon as daylight began to steal into the room, it
became plain that Gertrude was covered with an eruption of
some sort, and was very ill. The doctor was sent for her.
He said at once, ‘Yes, it is scarlet fever |” 3

“Can I go home to my own mamma ?” asked Gertrude.

“We'll send for your mamma to come here,” said the
doctor. And turning to Tangle Thread’s mother, he
said,

“As to your own child, you will of course see that she
does not enter this room.” +

“« But may she not have already taken the disease ? She
and Gertrude were together all day yesterday.”

“T cannot say. We must use the precaution of keeping
them apart a couple of weeks at any rate. As to little
Gertrude, if she lives through it, you will have her in this
room six weeks,”

“ Tf she lives through it! _ Is she, then, so ill ?”

“TI think her a very sick child. And you know what
scarlet fever is. But we will do all we can. It is not
necessary to alarm her mother. She will take the alarm
when she hears what the disease is.”

F



82 GOLDEN THREAD.

Gertrude's mother soon came in, and a glance at her
child told her the whole story.

“Nobody need tell me what it is!” she cried, bursting
into tears. “It is scarlet fever! Oh, my little Gertrude !
My sweetest, my best child! I never thought she would
live to grow up! I knew she was too good! But I never
dreamed it would come so soon !”

“Hush !” said Tangle Thread's mother, “ she is waking ;
she will hear you. You must put on a cheerful face when
she sees you.”

“Oh! how can I look cheerful when my heart is break-
ing ?”

“Come into the next room till you are more composed.
Stay yourself dn God, my dear friend. He will not touch
a hair of Gertrude’s head unless it is best. And if it is
best—if He does take her from you—you will still have
Him left. But do not be discouraged. You are not ina
state to judge fairly how she is. You look as if you had not
slept an hour since you left us last night.”

“T did not close my eyes. Something kept saying,
‘ Gertrude is going just where little Mary did.’”

“Little Mary went to a very happy place !"”

“Yes, yes, [know. But, oh! she left such a great chasm
when she went away. You never lost a child. You don’t
know anything about it. This world never has seemed the
same to me since I lost my little Mary.”

“Nor has the next world either. You have often told
me how much nearer, how much dearer heaven had been
made to you by that aflliction. And it will become yet



GOLDEN THREAD. 83

nearer and dearer if your precious little Gertrude goes there
too. But God will not take her away unless it is best. Let
us believe that. Let us trust herto Him. He never makes
mistakes, nor snatches away our treasures a moment too
soon.”

Gertrude’s mother dried her tears. ‘I will trast Him,”
said she. ‘I thank Him for giving me such a friend as
you to lean on in this time of trouble. But what am I think-
ing of ?” she cried, suddenly. ‘‘ Here is your child, your
only child, exposed to this fearful disease! And I thought
only of myself!”

‘“*T must do what I have been urging you to do. I must
trust in God,” replied Tangle Thread's mother.

CHAPTER XIV.

Litrte Gertrude remained very ill many weeks. Her
precious life hung, as it were, ona thread. A little self-will
on her part, a want of docility in submitting to painful
remedies, would have broken that thread at any moment.
But she lay, with little meekly folded hands, on her weary
bed, behaving and quieting herself like a weaned child.
There was never a frown nor an impatient word. She let
the doctor, and her mother, and all her friends do what was
thought best to do, without in any way resisting their wishes.

Her mother never left her, save now and then to weep in
secret.

*



84 GOLDEN THREAD.

“She will not get well,” said she. ‘‘ She is too patient,
too gentle, too lovely, for this world.”

Everybody thought as she did. Tangle Thread’s mother
looked at this lamb as upon one already chosen of Christ,
and precious. She had never seen such sweet submission
and docility.

“TI ‘never look at her,” she whispered to Gertrude’s
mother, ‘‘ without thinking of the lines,

“*Sweet to lie passive in Thy hands,
And know no will but Thine.’”

“T have learned, at last, to say those blessed words out
of the depths of my own heart,” was the answer. “TI have
no longer any choice about my child. If she is bound
heavenward I will not detain her.”

Meanwhile, Tangle Thread’s restless, wilful soul was quite
subdued by the silence and sadness that reigned in the
house. Nothing now would tempt her to indulge in those
angry screams that used to resound through every room.
She spoke in a low voice, walked softly up and down the
stairs, and seemed quite another child. Indeed, her habit
of crying aloud with rage was now broken up once for all.

“Do you think Gertrude will get well ?” she asked Ruth,
anxiously, every hour; and Ruth always replied, ‘ Yes, I


But at last she could not help saying,

‘No, Ido not. Children like her always die. It is the
cross, hateful ones that get well.”

“Then if I am taken sick I suppose I shall get well,”



GOLDEN THREAD. 85

said Tangle Thread. But after a time she started up and
cried out,

‘But every body dies some time or other. Does every-
body get good, first ?”

“TI don’t know. And I don't know as I did right to say
Gertrude wouldn’t get well. The doctor says her goodness
is in her favour. She takes every thing so beautifully, you
can’t think. And now they're trying to feed her up, and
she has to take brandy, and beef tea, and all sorts of things
so often. And if she was naughty, and would not take them,
or if she cried and fretted about them, then she certainly
would die.

“ But beef tea is very nice,” said Tangle Thread.

“Nice to people that feel pretty well. But Gertrude is
so weak that she can hardly swallow. It tires her dread-
fully to take anything. Why, I heard of a little boy who
starved to death because he would not take the nice,
nourishing things he needed. His father got down on his
knees and begged him, with tears in his eyes, to take just
a little bit of wine jelly, and he wouldn’t. So he died. It's
a very bad thing for a child to be self-willed when it is well.
But when it is sick it is perfectly dreadful.”

“‘T mean to be very good when I am sick,” replied Tangle
Thread. ‘‘I feel a little sick now. I wish you would look
down my throat and see if there’s anything the matter with
it.”

“Oh! there’s nothing the matter with your throat,” said
Ruth, trying to believe what she said. ‘Who told you
Gertrude’s throat was sore ?”



86 GOLDEN THREAD.

“Why, nobody. I didn’t know it was sore. But I know
mine is, And I know my head aches.”

“Dear me! I hope you're not going to be sick!” cried
Ruth. “I'm sure your mamma has her hands full now.
Well, well, what is to be will have to be. Come here ; sit
in my lap, and lay your head on my shoulder. Poor little
thing! her head is hot, I declare.”

. “ Why, Ruth, you seem to love me!” said poor Tangle
Thread, bursting into tears.



SILVER THREAD.






Silber Thread.

CHAPTER I.

Ro could not help crying a little when Tangle Thread
* said that.

“T'm sure I’ve always loved you when you were good,”
she replied. ‘And you have been a very nice little girl
lately. But I suppose I ought to go and tell your mamma
that you don’t feel well. Only I hate to worry her.”

“TfIam sick and die, then she won't have anybody to
tease her,”’ said Tangle Thread. «And she'll have plenty
of time to read, and to paint, and everything.”

“She'd rather have you than the time,” said Ruth. « It
would just break her heart if you should die. But don't talk
that way. You are not going to die. You are going to get
well and be the best little girl that ever lived. And while
you're sick we'll take such good care of you! And when
you get well, I'll ask your mamma to let me take you home *
with me, and you shall drink new milk right from the cow,
and you'll grow strong and fat again.”



90 SILVER THREAD.

But Tangle Thread had fallen into a heavy sleep, and did
not hear Ruth’s cheerful words,

Ruth placed her on the bed, covered her with a blanket,
and went to tell her mother how ill she seemed. The
doctor happened to come in at that moment to see little
Gertrude, and he went at once to look at Tangle Thread.
There was not much to say or to do. He promised to come
in again in a few hours, and then returned to Gertrude.

‘Tangle Thread's mamma was very quiet, but her heart
felt heavy indeed.

“If Tangle Thread should be as ill as Gertrude,” she said
to Ruth, ‘‘ she cannot live, she is so very unlike Crertrude.”

Ruth made some cheering, pleasant answer, and began to
arrange things in the nursery, as if she expected Tangle
Thread to remain there during her illness.

‘Oh! I shall have Tangle Thread in my room,” said her
mother.

“I was hoping to keep her here, ma'am,” said Ruth.
“T'll take the very best care of her. And you are worn out
now with little Gertrude’s sickness, and so many coming and
going.”

“Thank you, Ruth. You are very kind, but I feel that
I must have Tangle Thread in my own room. You must
remember she is all Ihave.” And then the thought that she
anight now be about to lose that all, made her eyes fill with
tears, and she sat down by the bed, and hid her face in her
child’s pillow, and silently wept and prayed.

Tangle Thread awoke and started up, looking flushed and
distressed.



SILVER THREAD... 91

“Oh! mamma, is Gertrude dead ?” she cried.

“No, my darling, Gertrude seems a little better to-day.”

“Then what makes you cry so?”

“ Oh! I am not crying much,” replied her mother. ‘I
suppose I am pretty tired with watching Gertrude; and so
when I heard you were sick, too, I could not help shedding
a few tears. You see mamma loves you very much, and it
grieves her to see you suffer. But now you are going into
my room to sleep with me in my bed, and I shall take care
of you day and night. And if you will try to be patient and
docile, like Gertrude, you will get well before long.”

«
She was very glad to be undressed and to lay her head on
the cool pillow in her mamma’s own bed. She passed a
weary night, and only slept in snatches.

When the doctor came the next day, he knew, and they
all knew, that she had the fever with which Gertrude had
been so ill.

And now the fruits of her mamma’s long patience shewed
themselves. Tangle Thread did not submit to painful
remedies as sweetly as Gertrude had done; and sometimes
she cried, and was peevish and unreasonable. But she had
been learning lessons of obedience all her life, and now she
was humbled and subdued by greater suffering than she had
ever known. So she never absolutely resisted the doctor’s
wishes nor her mamma's. She was not so ill as Gertrude
had been, but she had a long and tedious sickness, and
passed many weary hours. Her mamma seldom left her,
and did all she could to make her forget her sufferings.



92 » @@ SILVER THREAD.

After a time, little Gertrude, whose room was on the
same floor, was brought in’ the nurse’s arms, to make
Tangle Thread a visit. The poor little creature was very
feeble. She could not hold up her head, nor could she
amuse herself in any way.

“‘ Why don’t you tell Gertrude stories, mamma, and sing
to her?” asked Tangle Thread.

“The poor little thing cannot hear,” replied her mamma.
“Tt makes my heart ache when I see how little we can any
of us do for her.”

“Why can’t she hear?” asked Tangle Thread, in sur-
prise. ‘‘ She used to hear as well as I did.”

“Yes, but she has been very, very ill. And it will be a
long time before she can hear stories, if ever.”

“J will give her all my toys, then,” said Tangle Thread.
“ My Paris doll and all its clothes; its dotted muslin frock
and its pink silk, and its gaiter-boots, and its bracelets, and
its watch, and its pocket handkerchief, and under-sleeves,
and collars.”

“But Gertrude has a little Eugénie already.”

“So she has—I forgot it ;” and so saying, Tangle Thread
buried her face in the pillow and began to ery pitifully.

Her mamma was afraid she would make herself very ill
by crying so. She told Gertrude’s nurse to take her away ;

.and then leaning over the bed, she said, gently, but very
firmly,

“You must stop crying, my child.”

“TI can’t,” sobbed Tangle Thread, “I'm so tired! And
I don’t want Gertrude not to hear.”



SILVER THREAD, 93

“T am sorry I let you know that,” said her mamma,
kissing her and stroking back the hair that had fallen
over her face. ‘But now stop crying, for I have two
things to say to you, and you can’t hear unless you are
quite.”

Tangle Thread stopped crying and wiped her eyes.

“ You must not break your heart about little Gertrude,”
said her mother. ‘‘ The doctor hopes, and we all hope,
that by and by her hearing will return to her. But if it
never does, her dear Saviour, who loves her so, and who has
been with her all through her sickness, will comfort her and
make her happy. Even at the longest, we do not stay in
this world very long. Little Gertrude will only have to be
patient a few years, and then God will take her to heaven,
where she will hear just as well as youand I, You know
we mustn't be always thinking how we are getting along with
the troubles we have in this world. We must be thinking
how sweet heaven will be when we get there.”

Tangle Thread’s, face began to look a little brighter.
But after a moment she said,

“But Gertrude’s mamma will feel so sorry !”

‘Yes, she feels very sorry already. But then Gertrude's
mamma loves Jesus dearly. And she likes to have Him do
just what He thinks best.”

“But what makes Him think it best to make people
deaf?”

“Ido not know. I do not expect to understand every-
thing He does. When the doctor used such painful
remedies for your throat you did not expect to understand



94 SILVER THREAD.

why he used them. You let him do what he pleased,
because you knew he was wise and kind.”

Tangle Thread smiled. After a time she said,

“What was the other thing you were going to say,
mamma ?”

“IT was going to say, that, on the whole, you have been
very good while you were ill. I expected to have a hard
time with you. I thought you would be unwilling to take
your medicines, and to do other things the doctor desired.
But we have had some quite happy hours together since you
were moved into this room. So you are not to be called
Tangle Thread any longer. You are to be called my little
Silver Thread.”

“ That's nice ! that’s real nice! But, oh! mamma, what
has become of Golden Thread ?”

“She has not been here during your illness, I believe.
I must send some one to see how they are. And, my
darling, don’t you think that before long you will become a
little Golden Thread ?”

“T don't know. I'm afraid I never shall be so good as
that,” replied Silver Thread, whose ideas on the subject bad
undergone a great change since the time when she said, “I
can be whatever I please!”



CHAPTER II.

.Durine Gertrude’s illness and Tangle Thread's, nobody had
had much time to think of Golden Thread. For four weeks



SILVER THREAD. 95

Gertrude’s mother had never undressed, and the whole house
had been full of care and anxiety. But now both children
were out of danger, and Ruth was very glad to run around,
as before, among the poor and the sick. She was particu-
larly glad to be sent to inquire after Golden Thread and her
mother, for she liked them both. And they liked her, and
were thankful to see her pleasant face once more. At least
Golden Thread was. As to her poor mother, her eyes were
worse than ever, so that she could not use thenrat all, and
she looked pale and thin. She said the doctor had told her
she never would get well while she lived in that house; there
was water in the cellar, and the whole street was damp and
unwholesome. She felt discouraged and anxious, and
thought she never should be able to see again. But she
still had great comfort in her good, loving child, and said
the world could not seem quite dark to her while Golden
Thread was in it, happen what might.

‘Tt comes very hard on poor folks to be sick,” said she.
“Tt is many a long day since I earned a penny, and my
strength seems all gone.”

Then Ruth told her all about the two sick children at their
house ; how lovely little Gertrude had been, and how she
had lain nine days so ill that they thought she might die at
any moment. And how Tangle Thread's name had been
changed to Silver Thread, because she had behaved so much
better during her sickness than ever before in her life.

“You see rich folks have their troubles as well as poor
folks,” added Ruth. ‘And our folks make a good use of
theirs. It seemed as if they were as kind to the poor and



96 SILVER THREAD.

the sick as they well could be, but they're even kinder now.
Why, when I go home and tell how you're getting on, and
what the doctor says, I'm sure they'll be for moving you int»
a healthier place.”

“But rents are higher in better houses,” returned the
poor woman.

“Of course, And our notions about goodness havo risen
a peg or two higher,” said Ruth, laughing, I've been
thinking it-over since I came in, and I’ve made up my mind
to let you have so much a month out of my wages. I get
good wages, and many a present besides. If you ever get
well you can pay me again, you know.”

Ruth did not really expect this poor blind woman to be
able to repay her. She only said this to comfort her. She
went home quite pleased and happy; but there she found
dismal news awaiting her. Her mother had written to say
that all sorts of trouble had come upon them. The big barn
had burned down, and one of the horses was lame, and
“father” had the rheumatism, and some of their best milk
and butter customers had fallen off. Poor Ruth had a good
cry, and sat‘up late that night writing a long letter in reply.
She said there should be another big barn built out of her
savings ; she was going to be very careful and not waste a
penny; then the horse would certainly get well, in time for
the spring work, and she knew father's rheumatism would
go off when warm weather came, especially if he would use
the liniment she was going to send him. And as to the
milk and butter, why, if folks wouldn't buy it, suppose they
got somebody to come and eat and drink it? That is, sup-



SILVER THREAD. 97

pose they took in one or two boarders this coming summer.
And just as she said that, a thought came into her head
that made her get up and look at herself in the glass, to see
what sort of a body it was that could make such splendid
plans.

“ Mother would like the company, and she wouldn't have
to put herself out at all for them. There's plenty of house
room, and plenty to eat and drink. If they once went there
they'd be likely to stay, year in and year out. And Golden
Thread is a good, handy child; she'd soon save mother
some steps. Mother would get fond of her, I know. Let
me see—what was it I promised to give them? I do
believe I said I would pay the difference in their rent, if
they'd move. But, of course, I can’t do that and let my
own father suffer. Well, I won't worry about it. It will
all come out right in the end, I'm sure it will!”

CHAPTER III.

On hearing Ruth’s account of the state in which she had
found the poor blind woman—for she was now really quite
blind—Silver Thread was full of pity.

“ Do go to see her, mamma,” said she. And do carry

lots of things to her.”
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LITTLE THREADS:

TANGLE THREAD, GOLDEN THREAD, AND
SILVER THREAD.

EDINBURGH :

WILLIAM P. NIMMO.
1864.
ae. eee


CONTENTS.

——.

PAGE
TaneLte Tureap, . . . : 9
Gotpen Tureap, 7 7 . . 88

Strver Tureap, 7 . 7 : 87
TANGLE THREAD.



LITTLE THREADS.

—~>—_

Cangle Thread.

CHAPTER I.

Tee was once a very beautiful piece of white satin,
which had been woven with care and skill. Yet those
who saw it went away shaking their heads, saying, ‘* What
a pity! what a pity!” For there ran across this lovely
fabric a tangled thread, and that one thread spoiled all.

And there was a lady who was very beautiful, too. She
had always lived in a pleasant home, with kind and loving
friends about her. She had never in her life known what it
was to want anything she could not have. Indeed she
seemed born to be treated gently and tenderly. People
who were ignorant were not afraid to go to see and talk
«@
10 TANGLE THREAD.

with her, for they knew she never laughed at their mis-
takes; and poor people liked to go and tell her about their
poverty, just as if she were poor too. And those who were
sick or in trouble wanted her to know all about their trials.
For those who went to see her with empty hands, came away
not half so poor as they went in; and the sick and the sor-
rowful were comforted by her words of pity. You will
think that this lady who was so good, who could dress just
as she pleased, and ride when and where she pleased, who
had friends to love her, and friends to admire her, must
have been very happy indeed. And so she was, for a
time. Her life looked as smooth and fair as the white
satin you have just heard of. Bat by and by there began
to run across it a thread not at all like the soft and
even threads of which it was made; here came a soiled
spot; there were knots and tangles; as far as you could
see, its beauty was gone. How did this happen? Why,
there came into the house one day, a little baby. A little,
soft, tender baby, that did not look as if it would harm any
body. Its mother was very glad to see it. She thought
herself almost too happy with such a treasure. The most
sunshiny, pleasant room in the house was given this little
thing for its own. All sorts of pure white garments were
bought for it, and every thing possible was done to keep it
well and make it happy. Before it came its mother used to
lie down to sleep at night as sweetly as you do, little rosy
-child, who read this book. But now she slept, as people
say, with one eye and one ear open! That is, she kept
starting up to see if it were nicely covered with its soft blan-
TANGLE THREAD. " 8

kets, or to listen to its gentle breathing, to know if it were
quite well, If it happened to be restless or unwell, she
would sit up all night to take care of it, or walk with it hour
after hour when any body but its own dear mother would
have been out of patience, or too tired to keep awake,

And before the baby came there, this lady used to spend
a good deal of time at her piano, singing and playing. She
used to draw and paint, and read and write. But now she
had almost forgot she had any piano. The baby's cooing
was all the music she cared for. And she left off drawing and
painting, and thought the sweetest picture in the world was
that tiny, sleeping creature in its cradle. To be sure,
mother and baby together did make a lovely picture indeed.
As for books, she had not now much time to read anything
but Combe on Infancy, which she studied every day, because
it is a book, about babies, and tells how to wash and dress
them, and what to give them to eat.

Perhaps you will begin to think that this lady loved her
baby too much. But no, a mother cannot do that, unless
she loves it better than God, and this little child’s mother
loved God best. She loved Him so dearly that if He had
asked her to give it back to Him, she would have given it
without a word, He would not ask her to do it without
tears.
12 TANGLE THREAD,

CHAPTER II.

The baby had a name of its own, but it was called “ Tur
Basy,” and nothing else, just as if there never had been one
in the world before, and never would be again. As it had
nothing to do but to grow, it did grow, but not very fast.
Its mother said she liked a tiny baby better than she did a
big one. When she shewed it to her friends she always
said, ‘It isn’t a very large child, I know; but you see its
bones are very small, and of course that makes a difference.”
And they would reply, “ Certainly, that makes a great dif-
ference. And it has the prettiest little round face, and wee
bits of hands and feet, there ever were!”

The day on which the nurse who took care of the baby
and its mother at first, was obliged to go away, another young
woman came to fill her place. Her name was Ruth. She
was very glad to come, indeed. For she thought it would
be very nice to sit in that bright, pleasant room, holding
that pretty little baby on her lap. She thought she should
never know a care or a trouble. But she was quite fright-
ened when she undertook to wash and dress the pretty little
creature, to find how it screamed. The truth is, if there was
any one thing this baby could not bear, it was to be touched
with water. What was to be done? Let it go unwashed ?

-Oh! no, that would never do! Its mother really trembled
when she saw such a young, feeble creature ery so. She
knelt down by the side of the nurse, and with her soft hands
,

TANGLE THREAD. 18

tried to hurry through the washing and dressing. They
never knew how they got on the little shirt, or how they
fastened on the little petticoats, or which of them tied the
clean, white frock. The nurse was red and warm, and the
mother pale and tired, when this great task was over. But
they both thought things would go better next time, and
Ruth said so to herself as she walked up and down trying to
quiet the child, and the mother said so to herself as she lay
all worn out on the sofa, watching them.

Day after day passed, however, and every morning the
baby screamed. As it grew older and stronger, its mother
was less frightened when it cried, but it was painful to hear
such an uproar, and she began to dread the hour for washing
and dressing it.

‘* What can be the reason the baby cries so?” she asked
the nurse every morning, till at last, tired of saying,

‘Perhaps she won't cry so, next time ;” poor Ruth cried
out,

‘Why, it’s the temper, ma’am !””

“Tts temper !”” said its mother, much astonished. “ Why,
I should as soon think of talking about the temper of one of
the cows in your father’s farm-yard !”

‘And you might well do that, ma’am, for cows have tem-
pers of their own as well as babies and other folks. There
was old White Spot, now. She couldn't cry and scream
like this baby, but she could kick over a pail of milk equal
to any body. And did it many a time when she was put
out.”

The baby’s mother hardly knew what to think, Combe on
14 TANGLE THREAD.

Infancy did not say a word on this subject. She thought
she would write to her own mother, who lived not far off,
and beg her to tell her whether little babies really did cry
because they were angry, and ask her advice about » great
many other things just as important. There was a small
spot on the child’s forehead, and she wanted to know if that
would be likely to go away, of itself. And how soon would
the baby begin to “‘take notice?” And what playthings
had she better be buying, to be ready for it when it was
ready for them? And, oh! how would it do to tie up a
raisin in a rag and stop the baby’s mouth with that while
they were washing it? For Ruth said she was sure that
would do so nicely!

CHAPTER III.

Tue baby grew older and grew stronger, but it did not
grow better. The truth is, it had a very strong will of its
own. As long as it could have its own way, it was pleasant
and sweet, but the moment other people undertook to have
their way, it began to scream.

As soon as it became old enough to understand what was
said to it—and that was very soon—its mother resolved
never to give it things for which it cried. She told Ruth so.
But one day she went into the nursery, and there lay Miss
TANGLE THREAD. 15

Baby fast asleep on the bed, with a china vase on each
arm.

“Why, Ruth, what does this mean?” she asked.

“The baby cried so for the vases that I could dé nothing
with her,” replied Ruth. ‘It was time for her nap, and I
did all I could to get her to sleep, but she cried herself
nearly into fits for the vases. So at last I had to give them
to her. She dropped right off to sleep then, like a lamb.”

“Never do so again, Ruth. You may spare yourself a
little trouble for the time, by giving a child what it cries
for. But in the end you increase your trouble tenfold, and
strengthen the child in its resolution to have its own way.”

When the baby awoke, it did not miss the vases, which
its mother had replaced on the shelf, but when it was ready
to go to bed that night it looked at them, and stretched out
its arms towards them, saying plainly by its gestures, “I
am going to sleep with those pretty things in my arms.”

“No, baby can’t have them,” said Ruth. ‘ Baby must
go to sleep.”

Baby’s answer was a fearful scream, which was heard in
the dining-room where her papa and mamma were taking
tea.

“Hark!” said her papa. ‘I hear the baby. She has
either had a fall, or there are a dozen pins sticking in her.”

“No, that is not a cry of pain,” replied her mother.
“Tt is a cry of anger. And I think I know what it means.
However, I'll go up and see.”

She ran up stairs and found poor Ruth walking up and
down with the child, looking hot and tired.
16 TANGLE THREAD.

“I knew you would think I was murdering her, ma’am,”
she said. ‘‘ But it’s those vases she wants. Wouldn't it be
best to pacify her with them? She's hoarse with crying.”

“No, Ruth, no,” said her mamma. ‘I do not wonder
you are tired and almost discouraged. But we must think
of the child’s good rather than our own present comfort.”

She took the angry baby in her arms, and sat down sadly
in a low chair with it. :

“You aro sure there are no pins about its clothes ?”

Oh! yes, ma’am! I sewed on its clothes just as you
bid me.”

“Very well. Go down now to your tea.”

‘T don’t like to leave you with the child crying so.”

‘T prefer you should go. She will certainly stop crying
before long.”

Ruth went slowly downstairs.

‘Two sticks an’t crosser than that baby,” she said to
herself. ‘I never saw such a child. Why, every bone in
me aches like the toothache.”

“ What's going on upstairs?” asked the cook, as Ruth
entered the kitchen.

“You might knock me down with a straw,” replied Ruth.
“TI have been trying for an hour to get the baby to sleep,
and it has screamed the whole time till I was afraid it would
kill itself.”

Meanwhile the poor mother still sat sadly and quietly in
the low chair, holding the struggling child, and praying to
God to teach her how to subdue it. She begged Him to
give her patience, and to give her gentleness, and to give her
TANGLE THREAD. 17

firmness. The baby’s cries began to grow less and less
noisy, and at last, all tired out, it fell asleep. Its mother
looked down upon it tenderly, and kissed it over and over.
But her heart was full of care and pain.

“Ah!” thought she, “the old saying is true,—Every
rose has its thorn !”

CHAPTER IV,

Day after day passed on, and the baby grew from a baby
into a little child, with busy hands, and active feet, and a
will of its own that seemed jo grow with its growth, and
strengthen with its strength. Her father, seeing how much
anxiety and trouble she caused her mother, began to call
her “Tangle Thread,” instead of “Baby.” By degrees
every body in the house fell into the same habit, and in-
stead of bearing her own sweet name of “Lily,” this new
name was fastened to her.

When she was two years old she could talk quite plainly,
and when nothing was vexing her she was bright and play-
ful. Her mother tried to avoid conflicts with her, as much
as possible. But if she once began she did not yield. She
knew that no child can be happy that always has its own
way. She knew that God would be displeased with her if
she let her little daughter grow up self-willed and disobedient.
* Early one morning Tangle Thread awoke, smiling and

B .
18 TANGLE THREAD.

cheerful. Her little crib was close by her mamma's bed, and
she saw that neither her father nor mother was yet awake.
She sat up in bed and played awhile with her pillow. But
she was soon tired of that, so she climbed from her crib to
the bed, and from the bed slipped down to the floor.
Pretty soon her mother, hearing a slight noise, awoke, and
starting up, she saw Tangle Thread standing in a chair before
her father’s dressing-table, with a razor open in her hand.

‘© Oh! she has a razor!” she said, jumping from the bed,
and hastening towards the child.

Tangle Thread instantly got down from the chair and ran
across the room with the razor in her hand.

“Tangle Thread! stop this instant!’ cried her father,
awakened by the noise. But Tangle Thread only ran faster,
and when she saw her father and mother both rusning after
her, she became angry.

‘¢ Will have it! will shave!” she cried.

‘* Stop this instant!” cried her father once more.

By this time her mother had seized her hand, and after a
struggle the razor was secured. Tangle Thread burst into
frantic screams, but suddenly stopped short when she saw
that her mother’s hand was covered with blood.

“ Yes, you made your poor mamma cut her hand,” said
her father.

Tangle Thread was frightened.

“T sorry,” she said.

_ But in an instant she was angry with herself for being
sorry. She began to dance up and down, and to scream
out, ‘* No, no, not sorry.”
TANGLE THREAD. 19

Her mother was used to such scenes. Her father had
never seen her so angry.

“Why, this is dreadful!’ he cried. ‘I never saw such
a child. If she does not learn to obey, she will sometime
cut herself to pieces or get burned up.”

“Yes, I know it,” replied her mother. ‘‘I have tried,
in every possible way, to teach her obedience. But nothing
seems to have any effect. Not half an hour after being
punished for this offence, she will do something else just as
bad.”

‘“‘But has the child no feeling? It seems so unnatural
for a little thing of her age not to be alarmed and pained at
the sight of blood. And your fingers are all cut, I do be-
lieve. Let me see. Yes, every one of your poor mamma’s
fingers is cut and is bleeding,” he said, turning to Tangle
Thread, who during this time had not ceased to scream and
stamp with all her might. Her father’s address only made
her cry more angrily and loudly.

Her mamma said to him, in a low voice, ‘‘ Do not notice
her. It only irritates her yet more. She has a great deal
of feeling, and I am sure she is distressed at the sight of my
cut fingers.”

And this was true. Tangle Thread was distressed. But
she did not know herself what was the matter with her, and
she was still angry and excited, and kept on crying. And
when she once begun to ery, she was like a horse that has
begun to run, and the more he runs the more he must run,
till he gets almost wild and quite worn out, and has to stop
to take breath.
20 TANGLE THREAD.

CHAPTER V.

Wuen Tangle Thread had cried till she could cry no
longer, her mamma sent for Ruth to come and dress her.

Daring breakfast, the father and mother were both silent
and thoughtful. At last her father said,

“Do not you intend to bring that child to her senses, my
dear ?”

“Yes, I shall punish her by and by. Now, while she is
so excited, she would let me kill her before she would give

up.

“But you intend to make her say she is sorry ?”

“T don’t know.”

‘You don't know, my dear? Do you mean that you do
not intend to break that child's will ?”

“«T used to think I must do that, once for all,’’ she re-
plied. ‘‘I have heard great stories of conflicts between
parents and children, that finished up the business for ever.
There’s Mr Hamilton, he told me that his little Ellen, when
she was about a year and a half old, was standing near him,
holding a little doll in her hand.

“ «Let papa see your dolly,’ said he.

* “The child put both hands behind her, and made no
answer.

“« «Come to me, and let me see your dolly,’ he repeated.

“The child refused. At last, after urging her some time,
he said,
TANGLE THREAD. 21

“«* Then papa will have to make you doit.’ He began
by slapping her hands. She changé@the-doll fromhand to
hand, but held it firmly. He then used a littletod. The
child grew more and more violent; a raged
between them. He kept repeating, ‘I shall punish you,
Nelly, till you shew me your dolly;’ but she would not yield.
At last she threw it at him, angrily. Hour after hour
passed before the child would submit; but at last she gave
up, and that was their final conflict. But I have had twenty
such scenes with Tangle Thread. She yields at last, and
is as sweet and gentle and loving, for a time, as need be.
But perhaps the very next day the whole ground will have
to be fought over again.”

“Perhaps Tangle Thread would yield to me more readily,”
said her father. ‘As it was “my razor about which she was
80 obstinate, perhaps I ought to take her in hand myself.”

So, after breakfast, he took Tangle Thread into his
dressing-room, and said to her,

“You have been a very naughty child; you would not
mind either papa or mamma; and you made poor mamma
cut her fingers very badly. Are not you sorry you were
so naughty ?”’

Tangle Thread held down her head and was silent.

‘* Answer papa. Are you sorry ?”

No answer.

He took her little hand in his. ‘I shall slap this little
hand very hard, if you do not answer me.”

Then Tangle Thread burst out into “her usual
scream.
22 TANGLE THREAD,

Her father struck her hands again and again, but she only
kept on’ crying.

He began to wish he had not undertaken the task of
conquering such a child.

“ After all, it is a mother’s work,”’ he said to himself,
He looked at his watch. It is ten o'clock. I ought to be
in my office,” he said, uneasily.

“Tangle Thread, are you going to obey me, or shall I
have to punish you more severely ?”

Ten minutes passed—fifteen—Tangle Thread had no
thought of yielding. .

At eleven o'clock her father sat in despair, looking more
worn out than the angry child did; but the battle was not
yet ended.

At last her poor mother, who had sat looking on in agony,
burst into tears,

“O my child!” she cried, ‘will you make your father
strike you yet more ?”

Then Tangle Thread's stubborn heart seemed to melt.
She cried out,

‘* Am sorry, papa!”

“Then run to your dear mamma, and tell her so,”

Tangle Thread ran into her mamma’s arms, who kissed
her and wept over her, but was too tired and heart-sick to
say much,

“Do you know, my little child, that your mamma feels
just so when you are naughty, and have to be punished ?
She certainly does. Then won’t you try to be good for her
sake ?”
TANGLE THREAD. . 28

CHAPTER VI. °

Tancte Tareap fell asleep in her mamma's arms. Her
papa looked at her sorrowfully.

“T am sorry I undertook to govern her,” said he. “I
never was so tired in my life. Who would think that that
tiny frame could hold such a will?”

“T never have these conflicts with her now,” replied her
mamma. ‘It has been suggested to me, that when a child
refuses to obey, it is best to punish it for disobedience at
once, rather than enter on a contest with it. And, on the
whole, I believe it to be the proper way.”

“Well, good-by, my dear’; it is past twelve, and I ought
not to stay another moment. Do go and lie down. You
look quite worn out. Or shall I order the carriage for you?
Ah! your life is very different now from what it used to be,
before this strange child dropped down upon us?”

“Tt may look hard to those who only see the wilful,
wayward ways of the child,” said her mother. “But I love
this poor little creature dearly.”

The father now kissed the pale mother and the sleeping
child, and went out. He soon forgot, in trying to make up
for his lost time, what he had been through. God means
that the work of training little children should belong chiefly
to the mother. She has no business to call her out; she
can have no business so important outside her own doors.
It is for her to watch every look and word and tone; to give
24 TANGLE THREAD.

up all her time, if necessary, and find her happiness in seeing
her child grow up good and gentle, or her sorrow in seeing
it continue perverse and disobedient. So Tangle Thread’s
mamma could not go out, like her papa, and forget her
troubles. There was only one place in all the world where
she could find comfort. That was on her knees, before God.
She placed the weary little sleeper on her own bed, and then,
with many tears, gave her away more truly than ever before
to Him. She told Him all her troubles and cares, and be-
sought Him to look down in love on her poor little lamb,
and to take her in His arms and carry her in His bosom, till
she should become like Himself.

Perhaps you think that God heard this prayer and
answered it at once, so that Tangle Thread awoke from her
nap quite another child, and never was naughty again. And
no doubt He did hear and answer it. But fruit does not
ripen in one day, nor in two. Under the care of the skil-
fal gardener it will surely ripen, but it must have sun and
rain not once or twice, but day after day, week after week;
sometimes, even, month after month.

Poor little Tangle Thread was only conquered for a time.
The very day after the sad affair with the razor she was as
naughty as ever. And the next day it was just the same.
No matter what she was refused, she always cried for it with
her whole heart. No matter how she was punished, she
would do, right over again, the very things she had been

+ forbidden.

Ruth found it hard work to get along with her ; for when

her mamma was out, she could cry as much as she pleased,
. TANGLE THREAD, 25

and tease Ruth till her patience was worn, as she said her-
self, ‘‘ to tatters.”

“If you won't seream once to-morrow,” Ruth said to her
one day, ‘I'll ask your mamma to let you go home with me
some time. Then you can seo all our cows, and our hens
and chickens, and you can take a basket and hunt for eggs.”

Well!” said Tangle Thread.

But the next day she cried half a dozen times. Once it
was because her hair was cut; once because she did not
wish to go to walk. Again, because there was rice-pudding
for her dinner, and she said she hated rice; and so on,
through the day.

“Try again to-morrow,” urged Ruth.

“Well!” said Tangle Thread, “ if you'll promise not to
wash my face, nor change my dress, nor make me wear
over-shoes when I go out; if you'll go on the shady side of
the street, and walk down to Union Square, then I won't
cry. I shan’t have any thing to cry about.”

“But I can't promise,” said Ruth. «I must wash your
face and change your dress; I must put on your over-shoes ;
and while this cold weather lasts, I must walk on the sunny
side of the street. Your mamma has bidden me do all these
things ; aud as for Union Square, you know your mamma
won't let you go there, because she is afraid you'll get run
over.”

“Then I shall cry,” returned Tangle Thread. « Of
course if you and mamma do all you can to plague ‘me,
and won’t let me do a thing I want to do, I must ery. Or
at any rate I must fret.”
26 TANGLE THREAD. ‘

“You think if we let you alone, and you could do just as
you pleased, you would have nothing to cry or fret about.
But you'd go to destruction in the space of half an hour.
You would kill yourself eating cake and candy, or you would
get run over by some cart or carriage, or you would catch
your death of cold. It frightens me to think what you
would do if it wasn’t for your poor mamma slaving herself
into a consumption to make you a better child. And your
niamma is such a sweet lady, too. Oh! I wish you would
be a good child!”

But Tangle Thread was much amused at the various ways
in which Ruth said she might go to destruction, and she
liked better to hear that sort of talk, than talk about being
good, which was an old story.

“Tell some more dreadful things I might do,” said she.

“T've told enough,” said Ruth.

‘You must tell me some more. Mamma says you must
do all you can to amuse me. Come! make haste! Sug-
gest something else !”

“Well, you might get choked to death trying to say a
big word.”

“ Now you are laughing at me! And I've a right to say
‘suggest’ if I’ve a mind. I'll tell mamma how you laugh
at me !”

+ Ruth answered, good naturedly, ‘‘ I didn’t mean to tease
you, at any rate. Come, let me tell you all about my father’s
farm.”

‘You're always telling that. You've told me nine hun-
dred times. I'd rather hear about something else.”
TANGLE THREAD. 27

“ Then I'll tell you about the Babes in the Wood.”

“No, I don’t want to hear that, either. Tell me about
a nurse that put a baby in a carriage and made a poor little
lamb draw it all over town. And at last the poor little lamb
fell down dead.”

“ But I don’t know that story.”

“Yes, you do, for I've just told it to you.”

“ But if I only tell just what you've told me, you will get
angry and go to crying.”

“T told you all I know,” said Tangle Thread. ‘I made
it up, myself. And you must tell me a lot more about it.”

“ But I can't,” said Ruth. ‘I can’t make up stories. I
never could.”

“You're a naughty girl. I don’t like you one bit. I'll
tell mamma of you.” .

‘And you are a tiresome, naughty child!” Ruth was
tempted to say. But she bit her lips, and was silent. Then
Tangle Thread ran away behind the bed, and was silent, too.
Ruth knew she would sit there and pout for a long tinfe, and
then, if not noticed, scream till attention was paid her. She
got up and opened her bureau-drawer, and took from it three
little bits of candy.

“Here is some candy your mamma said I might give
you,” said she. ‘‘ Come, get up from the floor and eat it.”

Tangle Thread remained lying flat on the floor with her
face hidden in her two hands, Ruth placed the candy near
her, and went back to her work. The child pulled the candy
towards her, ate it, still lying on the floor, and at last fell
asleep.
28 TANGLE THREAD.

‘ Was there ever such a child!” said Ruth. “If I take
her up, she'll cry and kick and scream till the walls come
down. If I leave her there, she’ll get cold. Well, I can
but cover her up with a shawl and let her alone.”

CHAPTER VII.

I suaut skip over several years of Tangle Thread’s life
now, for I don’t like to write about naughty children. When
she was old enough to learn to read, her mother was glad,
for she thought the child would be better and happier if she
could amuse herself with books. She determined to give
her four very short lessons every day, so as never to let her
get tired. So one morning she called Tangle Thread, and
taking her into her lap, she said,

“ Here is a nice little book for you, and I am going to
teach you to read. Don’t you want to learn to read?”

“No,” said Tangle Thread ; ‘I want to play.”

“Yes, you shall play very soon. But you must learn a
little bit of"a lesson, first, And I do not like you to say
‘No’ when you speak to me. I wish you to be a polite
little girl, and it isn’t polite to speak so to your mamma.”

“I don’t want to be polite,” said Tangle Thread.

Her mamma sighed a little, though she tried not, and
smiled as sweetly and pleasantly as ever.
TANGLE THREAD. e 29

“ This letter is great A,” said she. ‘See! one of his
legs goes up,jso; and the other down, so. What did I say
his name was?”

“«T don’t know,” said Tangle Thread, in a sulky voice.

‘© A,” said her mother. ‘‘ Now, say it after me—A.”

‘TI don’t want to learn to read,” repeated Tangle Thread.

‘But I am resolved you shall learn, my child,” replied
her mother. ‘‘ Now, say A, after me.”

Tangle Thread was silent. Her mother looked at her
watch. The time she had set apart for the lesson was over.

“« My child,” said she, ‘ you have disobeyed me, and I
must punish you. And at twelve o’clock I shall give you
another lesson.” Then, with a heavy heart she punished
the little girl, and sent her back to the nursery.

At twelve o’elock the nurse “brought her home from her
usual morning-walk, took off her things, brushed her hair,
and led her to her mother for the second lesson, as she had
been told to do.

Her mother received her with a loving word and a kiss.

“ Now, can you tell me the name of the letter ?” she asked.

“ T don’t know, and I said I did'nt know. And I don’t
want to learn to read.”

“I think you do know, Tangle Thread,” said her mother.
“But I will tell you once more. It is A.”

“Tcan’t say A,” said Tangle Thread. ‘And I can’t
say B, either. Nor C.”

“Why, where did you learn your letters?” asked her
mother, in great surprise. ‘“ How glad I am that you know
them!”
80 ° TANGLE THREAD,

“They're on my blocks,” said Tangle Thread, in a
gracious voice, ‘And if you'll buy me a wax doll as big as
Edith May's, I'll say some more.” :

“T can’t promise to pay you for doing what I bid you,”
replied her mother. ‘ You have a dozen dolls now, and if
you had one like Edith’s, you would soon break it. But
do not let us talk of that, now. Let me hear you say D.”

Half-crying, and with pouts and frowns this second lesson
was finished. Tangle Thread’s mother went on faithfully to
teach her naughty child in spite of her behaviour. But when
she called her to her lessons, she felt very much as people
do when they go up the steps of the dentist's house and
ring his bell. Tangle Thread never came pleasantly; she
almost always cried before they got through the few minutes’
task; she would not half-listen to what was said, and every
thing had to be repeated over and over again. Her book was
blotted with tears, and its leaves were crumpled in her im-
patient hands, so that many a new one had to be bought be-
fore the end of the year. And oh! how many weary, weary
hours this work she had looked forward to with pleasure,
cost the poor mother!

CHAPTER VIII.

Wun Tangle Thread could read quite well, her mamma

. bought for her a good many pretty little books, and a book-
case in which to keep them. And one day she went out on
purpose to get a silver thimble for her, that she might learn
4

TANGLE THREAD. . 81

tosew. Then she fitted some work very nicely} and sat
down by Tangle Thread’s side, so as to shew her how to
hold the needle and how to take the stitches. But Tangle
Thread was just as naughty about this task as she had been
in learning to read. Now, if any one had said to her,

“Tangle Thread, take your needle and prick your
mamma's cheeks and neck and arms all over with it’—do
you think the child was cruelenough to do so? No, indeed.
But when she cried, and made her needle rusty with her
tears; when she jerked her thread till it broke or became
full of hard knots ; when she pouted, and was sullen or im-
patient, her mother was really wounded over and over again,
and that in a tenderer spot than cheek or arm or neck.
Remember that, my child, the next time you are tempted to
behave as Tangle Thread did, ard beg God to help you to
be gentle and patient to those who take the trouble to teach
you.

Tangle Thread had also to learn to write. Then she
would not sit properly at the table, or hold her pen as she
ought; she blotted her book and stained her fingers with
ink, and kept saying,

‘0 dear! I wish I didn’t have to learn to write!” or,
“«T wish I could hold my pen as I've a mind.”

While her mother stood over Tangle Thread trying to
teach her, she had to keep silently praying to God to give
her patience with this wilful little child. For sometimes
she was tempted to say, :

“Very well ; since you will not learn pleasantly, you shall
not learn at all. I will let you grow up a dunce.
'
82 p TANGLE THREAD.

But she loved her child too well to do this, and she
loved God too well not to try to do the work He had given
her to do, in the best possible manner, leaving it to Him to
make that work hard or easy as He thought best.

But she was so troubled with her child’s conduct that
when she tried to read she often did not know what book
she held in her hand, and when she tried to draw or paint,
her hand would tremble so that she had no pleasure in what
she was doing. By degrees the piano was opened less and
less frequently, the portfolio of drawings began to be ne-
glected, and new books and magazines to lie with uncut
leaves upon the table. What she studied now was the
character of her child, and how best to mould and to fashion
it into the likeness of Christ; and wherever she went or
whateyer she did, there was always a secret care gnawing at
her heart. Is it so with your mother? Do you never
speak that rude or impatient word to her which cuts her to
the quick ? When you see her sitting silent and anxious,
can you say to yourself,

‘‘Whatever it may be that is now grieving my dear
mother, I know it is nothing I have said or done.”

Do not hurry over these pages without stopping to think.
This book is not written merely to amuse you. It is writ-
ten with the hope of touching the heart of some wilful child,
of persuading it to pray day and night that God would make
it docile and submissive, like Him of whom it is said,

‘As a lamb before its shearers is dumb, so He opened
not His mouth.”
GOLDEN THREAD.
Golden Ghread.

CHAPTER I.

Pe was once a piece of coarse, black stuff, and a
bright golden thread waved and rippled through it like
a sunbeam.

And there was a poor, solitary woman, who had known
little but trouble since the day she was born. When she
was only eight years old, the parent-birds pushed her out
of the nest, to find home and shelter where she could. No-
body taught her to read or to write; nobody cared where she
went or what she did. She wore rags for clothing, ate the
coarsest food, and not enough of that; was knocked about,
scolded, and abused. At last she was married. Her hus-
band lived with her till what little money she had laid up
was gone, and then ran away. After a time she heard that
he was dead.

But just before he went away, God had pity on the joyless
life of this poor woman, and He wove into it a golden thread.
In other words, He sent a little smiling, loving child into the
86 GOLDEN THREAD.

dark room that used to be so lonely. There wasn’t much
in it besides the child. While the mother lay in bed with
the baby by her side, the drunken husband had broken most
of the furniture to pieces with an axe. The bureau that
she had been so proud of was only fit to light the firé now;
and the table and the chairs were not worth much more.
But what if the floor was covered with these fragments—
wasn’t there a live baby lying on her arm ?

Little Golden Thread grew fat every minute, as good
babies are apt to do. God had provided plenty of sweet
milk for her, and nobody had to go out of the house to buy
it when the baby was hungry. It kept coming as fast as it
was wanted, just as oil kept coming into the poor woman's
cruse in the Bible. But food for the mother did not come
of its own accord, and it was necessary for her to do some-
thing to earn money to pay her rent with, to buy bread and
potatoes, and coal and clothes. She did not know, at first,
how to manage it; for she must stay at home and take care
of her baby, and could not go out to work as she used to do.
There was a poor little seamstress who was willing to pay
half a dollar a week if she would let her come and sleep in
her bed. And she came every night, when her day’s labour
was ended, and crept in far over toward the wall, so as to
leave room for Golden Thread and her mother. Then in
the morning, while the child was taking its nap, the
mother would go out, with an old poker in one hand and a
- tin pail in the other, to rake out bits of coal from rich
people’s ash-barrels. Her clothes were scauty, and of all
sorts of odd shapes, so that if you happened to see her from
GOLDEN THREAD. 87

your bed-room window, half buried in your barrel of ashes,
you would hardly have been able to tell whether that queer
figure was a man’s or a woman's. These bits of coal helped
to keep them warm, and to cook a dinner now and then.

Golden Thread had to lie on an old rug on the floor, and
take care of herself most of the time. Her mother was
afraid to leave her on the bed, lest she should fall off. But
the child was happy on her rug, and she threw up her arms
and hands and legs, and played with them, or watched her
mother moving about the room, or just lay kicking and
laughing, and crowing and cooing. Some of her little clothes
were always in the wash-tub, or else hanging on a line be-
hind the stove, drying. This was because she had so few
things, that they had to be washed every day. But she did
not know or care anything about that. She went on
enjoying herself just as much as if she had had a housefal
of clothes, and her mother would stop now and then, look
fondly down at the old rug and the little creature on it, and
say, half-aloud, half to herself, « Little comfort ! little bless-
ing!” and then go cheerily on with her work.

CHAPTER II.

Wuen Golden Thread had learned to creep and to walk,
it was not so safe to go out and leave her alone, as it had
88 GOLDEN THREAD.

been. She would get burned or scalded, or pull the chairs
over and hurt herself, because she did not know any better
than to get into mischief. So her mother had to wrap her
up in an old shawl and take her with her when she went out.
Golden Thread used to pat and kiss her as they went along,
with the clothes that were to be washed, or the coarse needle-
work that was to be done. And this made the way seem
short when it was long. This poor woman had often to
carry a very heavy basket on one arm, with her child on the
other, and this was hard, and she often had to stop to take
breath. If Golden Thread had fallen asleep, these sudden
halts would wake her up; then she would smile, put up her
lips to be kissed, and settle down to sleep again. And as
soon as she was strong enough to trot along by her mother’s
side, she wanted to help to carry the basket, or the pail, or the
bundle that was almost as big as herself, indeed sometimes
much bigger than she was. Now, of course, she could not
help at all, and yet it was very sweet to see her try, and to
watch her bright face when she fancied herself of some use
to her mother. Don’t you remember how pleased you were
when you ran to get your papa’s boots for him? And how
pleased he was, too? You see you were like little Golden
Thread when you did that.

When Golden Thread was three years old, her mother
thought she must begin to leave her at home and go out to
work by the day. Ladies who wanted washing done would

_ let her come and wash for them all day, give her plenty of
good food to eat, and when she went home at night pay her
six shillings or a dollar for her work. So she asked one of
GOLDEN THREAD, 89

her neighbours to look in now and then to see how the child
was getting along, made up a fire that would last till her
return, put bread where Golden Thread could reach it,
charged her to be a good girl, and went away. She knew
that Golden Thread would stay where she was bidden, but
she did not love to go and leave her all alone, and she went
back twice to kiss her, and to promise to get home as early
as possible. Golden Thread did not cry or fret when her
mother had gone, and she heard her lock the door behind
her. She ran and climbed up into a chair to look out from
the window, and watch for her to come home, just as she
always did when her mother went out on errands. She sat
patiently and quietly a long, long time, thinking every minute
she should see her mother turn the corner, and then hear
her step coming up the stairs. “She did not know how long
a day is. By and by, the neighbour who had promised to
look after her came up and unlocked the door, and put in
her head. Golden Thread’s mother had given her the key
to keep while she was gone.

“O mother! is that you?” cried the lonely little child,
running to the door.

“No, it’s not time for your mother to be back yet. Sup-
pose you go down and stay with me a bit ?”

Golden Thread was very glad to go, and for a time she
was quite happy, playing with the neighbour's children,
But by and by they began to quarrel, and to pull each other’s
hair, and their mother boxed all the ears in the room, even
poor Golden Thread’s, without stopping to ask who was to
blame, and the poor little thing was very glad to be taken
40 GOLDEN THREAD.

home again to her own room. The fire had begun to get
low, and the neighbour put on more coal before she went
away. Golden Thread made-believe iron when she was left
alone, but this made her arms ache, and then she made
houses with the clothes-pins. Then dinner-time came, and she.
ate her bread and drank some water, and climbed up to watch
once more for her mother. Dear me! what a joyful sound
it was to hear her come toiling up the stairs! They hugged
ani kissed each other so many times, and it was 80 nice!

“ Poor little soul !’’ said her mother ; “ it was lonesome
while its mother was gone !"’

“But you've come now!” cried Golden Thread, and she
forgot all the long hours, and was just as happy as a little
bird.

And the tired mother forgot how tired she was, and she
put on the tea-kettle and a sauce-pan, and began to get the
little one’s supper. She had had hers, and now all she
thought of was giving something warm to her child who had
been so sweet and contented with her bread and water all day.

“See,” said she, “this pretty white egg. I am going to
boil it for you. And you shall have a drop of milk, and a
bit of sugar, and a cup of tea to-night. And mother will
make you a slice of toast.” What a feast after a long,
lonely day !

« “Mother, do rich people have such nice suppers?’’ asked
Golden Thread, hopping round her and looking gaily on.

“Dear me! bless the child!’ said her mother; and she
laughed all to herself, and felt a good deal happier than
many rich folks put together.
GOLDEN THREAD. 41

So Golden Thread sat up to the table and had her warm
supper. Her tea was make-believe tea, made of water with
a little milk in it, but she had it in a real tea-cup, and the
egg wasn't a make-believe egg byany means, /

“T'm going again to-morrow to the same place,” said her
mother. ‘‘ And you must be a good child, and not fret for
mother.”

“No, I won't fret one bit,” said Golden Thread. ‘ And
when you're a big girl I'll buy you a great big egg, and cook
it for your supper.”

“Why, I'm a big girl now,” said her mother. Then they
both laughed a good deal, and by and by it was time to go
to bed. When Golden Thread had fallen asleep, her mother
put on her hood and shawl, and went out to spend the money
she had earned that day. She bought a little coal, and a
loaf of bread, and three pennies’ worth of tea, and some
meal. Some of the meal was to be boiled next morning for
the child’s breakfast. And the coal was to keep her from
freezing through the wintry day.

‘Wait upon me as soon as you can,” she said to the’
grocer of whom she bought her tea. ‘ For I’ve locked my
little girl up alone in the room, and I’m so afraid of fires
when it comes night.”

“Tt’s a pretty risky thing to lock a child up, day or
night,” replied the grocer. ‘ There's no telling how many
come to their death that way, every year. You see they get
lonesome, and they fall to playing with the fire, or with
matches.”

“* My little girl never does such things,” said the woman.
42 GOLDEN THREAD.

“That doesn’t prove she never will do them, some time,”
persisted the grocer. ‘Children’s all just alike. And it’s
my opinion they all make a point of getting into all the mis-
chief ~ can. Don’t lock ’em up in rooms by themselves,
T say.”

“That's my doctrine, too,” said another man, who stood
by. “Besides, it’s a piece of cruelty. Children wasn’t
made to live alone by the day.”

-“T don’t know what else we poor folks are to do,” said
Golden Thread’s mother. She caught up her basket and
hastened away, ‘to see that the child was safe.

CHAPTER Il.

Gotpen Tareap spent a great many such days as the one
I have told you about. How would you like to be locked
into the room and left alone all day? Do you think you
should ery ?

At last Golden Thread was old enough to go to school,
and then her long, lonely days were over. It is hard work
to learn to read, but it isn’t half so hard as to stay by your-
self all day. So Golden Thread was very happy to stand
by her teacher's side and be taught her letters. There were

“a great many children in the school, and many of them were
naughty, tiresome children. They teased their teacher and
GOLDEN THREAD. 48

made her a deal of trouble, so that she often got quite out of
patience, and would speak sharply to them or even shake
them. She even got out of patience with our good little
Golden Thread, because she did not learn faster, and one day
she spoke quite roughly to her, and said,

“Your are as stupid as an owl!”

The tears came into Golden Thread’s eyes, but she looked
up sweetly into her teacher’s face, and said,

“‘ Why, Miss Bacon ? you called me an owl!”

“TI did not mean to call you so,” replied the teacher.
“You must forgive me for speaking so rudely. You are
my best child, and if all the rest were like you I should not
lose my temper so.”

When Golden Thread’s mother came home that night,
with her limbs aching and her hands all wrinkled and puck-
ered with hot water, how pleased she was to hear her dear
child say,

“« My teacher says I am her best child !”

Indeed the poor woman did not creep home to a dark and
gloomy room in these days as she used to do befgre she had
any child. As she passed swiftly through the streets she
knew that Golden Thread would have the fire burning cheer-
fully, the room nicely swept, the candle lighted, and the little
low chair waiting for her. And, what was more, she knew
that the moment she opened the door she should hear the
joyful ery, “Oh! here you come, mother!” and that two
arms would be round her neck and twenty kisses on her
cheek before she had time to take off her things. Oh! it is
80 pleasant to have somebody glad to see you when you get
44 GOLDEN THREAD.

home! Sailors on the sea think so, and soldiers in their
tents think so, and so all mothers think who have little
Golden Threads watching and waiting for them !

“T wish I might bring home to you somo of the good
things I see wasted every day,” said the mother. ‘Or,
that I could go without half my dinner, so that you could
have it.”

Golden Thread looked quite surprised.

- “Why, mother? I have plenty to eat!” said she.
“Some children have to go a-begging. They are worse off
than I am.”

“ Well, you haven't plenty of clothes, at any rate. I wish
you had. Then you wouldn’t have to lie in bed while I wash
and dry what few old things you have.”

Then Golden Thread laughed, and said, ‘ But it is so
nice that I’ve got some clothes, and don’t have to lie in bed
all the time. And pretty soon I shall be a big girl, and can
help you work, and we shall have lots of clothes.”

Yet down in the depths of little Golden Thread’s heart
there lay a good many wants and wishes, that she never told
of. There are always such wishes in the hearts of those
who are poor, or only pretty well off. Some great agitation
throws them to the surface, and friends see them with as-
tonishment, not dreaming of their existence until now. Just
so, all sorts of plants are growing down in the depths of the
sea. But it needs a great wind or storm to tear them loose
from the rocks and toss them to the surface.
GOLDEN THREAD. 45

CHAPTER IV.

Gotpen Turean’s mother kept on working very hard, and
by degrees she was able to get good warm clothing for her-
self and her child. She bought a new bureau, and some
chairs and a table, and their room looked more like a nice
pleasant home than ever. But hard work in all sorts of
weather, now in freezing cold, now in long summer days,
requires a good deal of health and strength, and this poor
woman began to lose hers. Now and then, instead of going
out to earn money, she had to stay at home to rest, and then
what she had been saving had to be used up. At last, one
day, she fell from a ladder on which she was standing, and
the pail of whitewash she had been using overturned and
poured its contents all over her. Her eyes were filled, and
so was her mouth, and she could hardly breathe or see.
Some of the servants in the house where she was at work
helped her to get up and wipe the whitewash from her face,
but they could not cure her eyes, which burned like fire.
One of them led her home, where she spent the night in
great pain and anxiety. In the morning Golden Thread
could not run gaily to school, as usual. She must lead her
half-blind mother to a dispensary. Do you know what a
dispensary is? If not, ask your mother, and she will tell
you. The poor woman was given something with which to
cool her eyes, but it did little good, and she sat with folded
46 GOLDEN THREAD.

hands, she who had always been so busy! Golden Thread
made the fire, and got the breakfast, and swept the room ;
and she said every thing she could think of .to comfort her
mother.

But the poor woman needed a great deal of comfort. She
knew that if she lost her eyes she could not work any more,
to earn money for herself and her child. They would be
turned out of their pleasant little home, and have to go to
the alms-house. When she said so, Golden Thread an-
swered,

“ But, won't they be good to us in the alms-house ?”

“You don’t know what you are talking about, poor thing,”
said her mother. ‘‘ And I’m glad you don’t. And to think
of my being blind, and not able to walk another step !”

“But you've got me to lead you, mother,” said Golden
Thread. ‘ It isn’t so bad as if you hadn’t any little girl like
me!”

“No, I know it isn’t. But if I am blind I never shall
see your face again.” ,

«‘ But you can feel it with your hands, and that’s most as
good,” said Golden Thread. ‘‘ And I shall never leave you,
no, not one minute. And pretty soon I shall be able to read
to you. I'll read such beautiful stories. All about kings
and soldiers, and battles and giants. There's lots of stories
in the Bible.”

“««Dear me! the child would bring a dead man to life!”
said the mother; ‘‘and I am an ungrateful creature not to
‘be thinking of my mercies instead of sitting here groaning.
Why, if I had to choose which I'd lose, this child or my
GOLDEN THREAD. 47

two eyes, it would come dreadfal hard ; but I'd choose to
keep the child.”

So many days passed, but the injured eyes were no better,
and all the neighbours came in to see the poor woman and
to give their advice. One wanted her to try this thing and
another that; and at last they told of a woman who knew a
great deal about the eye, and would be sure to cure the
worst case. Golden Thread danced for joy when she heard
this, for she believed all she heard, like other little children.
She could hardly wait till her mother was got ready to set
off to visit this wonderful person who was to cure her eyes.
She led her carefully and tenderly along the street, just as
you would lead your little baby-sister if you were allowed to
take her out. The woman-doctor looked at the eyes and
made great promises, and in returf for her advice she took
fourteen shillings from the widow's hard-working hands.
And she took fourteen shillings a good many times after
this, till all the money the poor woman had was gone. And
ut the end of the visits her eyes were almost gone, too.

CHAPTER V.

Tuese were hard times. The bureau that held all their
treasures was sold ; by and by the little clock that used to tick
so cheerfully, went where the bureau did ; then the mother's
warm shawl was pawned ; then Golden Thread’s best frock
48 GOLDEN THREAD.

that she wore to Sunday school; then other things, one
after another, till they and their room looked as forlorn as
a room could that had Golden Thread in it, and as Golden
Thread could, while always wearing her sweet, cheery
smiles,

But winter was coming on; and winter wants many things
that summer can do without. It wants those blankets that
are at the pawnbroker's; those thick shawls and petticoats,
plenty of coal, plenty of warm food.

“Mother,” said Golden Thread, “if rich people knew
how poor we ave, wouldn't they give us something ?”

“Yes, I dare say ; but I never begged.”

“‘ But there was a lady said she would give us cold meat
if we would come for it. Is it begging to go ?””

“ Why, if I ever get well, I could do something to pay
for them,” replied her mother. ‘ You're hungry, poor
thing ; I know you are. Come, I'll go with you. But it
comes hard,” she added, for her courage failed her, and she
sat down again, and pressed both hands on her eyes to keep
back the tears that would have scalded them.

“‘ Never mind, mother,” said Golden Thread, ‘I am not
very hungry. And there’s my best shoes left; may be we
could get something for them.”’

“ Well, we'll try,” said her mother. They put on their
scanty shawls and went out.

“Golden Thread held her mother’s hand fast in hers, and

led her carefully along, looking on all sides to see that she

“was not run over—picking out the dry places, and every
now and then speaking a word of love and good cheer.
GOLDEN THREAD. ‘49

Walking slowly along in this way, Golden Thread
observed a lady very richly dressed, leading by the hand a
little girl younger than herself. The child was made on a
very tiny scale. Her hands and feet were so small that
you could not help wondering at them; and her very red
cheeks were on such a cunning little face that you would
have said they were doll’s cheeks, if the eyes and the mouth
hadn’t such a wise and knowing way with them. She was
pulling very hard on the hand that held hers, trying to get
away. Hear what she says, and perhaps you will know who
she is:

«I fI can’t have plumcake and coffee, I don’t want any
party. Edith has plumcake, and she drinks two cups of
coffee. When I am a big woman I mean to have just what
I've a mind.” ‘

“Do you see that little girl across the street ?” asked her
mother. ‘See how miserably she is dressed. Look at her
poor feet. Her shoes are so old that she can hardly keep
them on. And the poor woman she is leading has a band-
age over her eyes. Do you think that little girl teases for
rich cake and coffee? Do you think, if I should invite her
to come to our house to lunch, she would cry for things I
did not give her ?”

‘‘She would be afraid to cry,” replied Tangle Thread ;
‘and I dare say she is a bad girl, and her mother is only
making-believe blind. Gertrude says the streets are full of
impostors.

Tangle Thread was so pleased that she had said a big
word that her ill-humour began to give way.

b
50 GOLDEN THREAD.

“T’ll run and ask them if they're impostors,” said she ;
“and if they say they're not, I'll give them a shilling,” she
added, tossing up her little bit of a head. »

And before her mother had time to answer, she ran to-
wards Golden Thread, who had stopped to pull up her shoes
that kept slipping from her feet. Many carriages and
heavy carts and stages were passing, and the child was in
the midst of them before her mother had recovered from
het surprise at her flight. A moment more and she would
have been thrown down, and perhaps killed. But Golden
Thread pulled off her old shoes, ran quickly to the middle of
the crossing, and snatched up the little figure in her own
big arms.

“Put me down, you old girl, you!” cried Tangle Thread,
frightened and angry. ‘“ Put me down, I say! I’ve got as
many feet as you have!”

By this time her mother had reached them.

“Thank you, little girl,” said she, looking at Golden
Thread ; “thank you, with all my heart. You are a brave
child to run in among the horses and carriages, to save this
foolish little thing. But is that thin shawl warm enough
this cold day ? and are not your feet half-frozen ?

“Oh! I don’t mind it,” said Golden Thread, smiling,
and slipping her feet into her old shoes.

- And is this your mother ?” asked the lady, looking,
with pity, at the bandaged eyes,

“Yes, ma’am, but I lead her,” replied Golden Thread.
“She's hurt her eyes, and can't see so well as she used,”

“Do you see that house on the corner?” asked the
GOLDEN THREAD. 51

lady. ‘‘ Well, I live there, and I wish you would come and
see me to-morrow morning. Will you let her come ?” she
asked, in a gentle voice, turning to Golden Thread’s mother.

“The child’s hardly decent, ma'am,” said the poor
woman.

“She looks very clean, I’m sure,” said the lady.

“Very well, if you’re kind enough to think so, ma'am,”
replied the woman.

So they bid each other good-bye, and each passed on their
way, only Golden Thread and Tangle Thread looked back
at each other several times.

‘‘ What a nice, pleasant-looking little girl,” said Tangle
Thread’s mother. ‘‘ And ob, my child, how thankful we
ought to be to God for saving you when you were in such
danger. How could you run ‘across the street in that reck-
less way? You know how often I have told you never to
do it. But I won’t say any more = it. I am mo
thankful that no harm has come to you.”

“Should you cry if I should be killed ?” asked Tangle
Thread. ‘If I had been killed you wouldn’t have had any
little girl to tease you.”

“O my darling child! how little you know how your
mother loves you. If you only could begin to know, what a
different child you would be !”

Tangle Thread’s proud little heart melted a little, and she
said, in a low voice,

“I won’t tease for plumcake and coffee again. I'll have
just what you want me to have. And I am going to invite
that little girl to my party. Idon’t think she’s an impostor.”
52 GOLDEN THREAD.

Her mother smiled, and would gladly have caught her
child in her arms, and covered her with kisses, as they
entered the house together. But Tangle Thread would not
have allowed herself to be caressed for making one civil
speech. She was too proud for that. So they went in
together, and were both full of business all day.

Golden Thread and her mother went on, meanwhile, to
the pawnbroker’s, where they pawned the shoes. With the
money thus gained they bought a bit of bread, and, hungry
as they were, ate it on the way home.

“What do you suppose that rich lady wants me to come
there for, mother ?” asked Golden Thread.

“I suppose she wants to give you something because you
picked up her little girl for her.”

‘She must be a very nice lady, then. It only took me a
minute to snatch up the little girl.”

“Yes, but you might have got run over and killed in that
one minute. And then what would have become of your
poor old mother ?””

Golden Thread was silent. But, after a while, she said,
“‘T don’t believe God would take away your eyes and your
little girl both at once. And if that kind lady gives me as
much as a shilling, I'll buy a little piece of beef with it.
The doctor you went to first, said you wasn’t at all strong,
and ought to eat beef.”

‘Much he knows where it's to come from!” said the
mother. ‘But that lady won't give you money, child.
How should she, not knowing but I would take it from you
and spend it in drink ?”
GOLDEN THREAD. 53

CHAPTER VI.

Tue next morning, very early, Golden Thread washed
her face and hands, and combed her hair, and was going to
set off at once to make the promised visit. But her mother
said,

“You must nof go these three hours. The lady won't
be up this long while, and then there’s her breakfast. It
will take a good deal longer to eat it than it takes us to eat
our bit of dry bread.”

Golden Thread tried to wait in patience, but it was ten
o'clock when her mother at last let her set off. She was
taken upstairs, where her néw friend sat by a cheerful fire,
with Tangle Thread by her side.

“Come in,” said the lady ; “come to the fire and warm
yourself, Have you had your breakfast?”

“Oh, yes, ma’am, a good while ago,” said Golden Thread,
trying not to look round her at the beautiful things in the
room, but looking in spite of herself.

“If you had your breakfast long ago, I dare say you
could eat some more by this time. Or, would you rather
have something to take home, so as to share it with the
rest ?””

“There isn’t anybody but mother,” said Golden Thread.

‘And she is almost blind, isn’t she ?”

‘‘ Her eyes were almost burnt up with whitewash,” replied

Golden Thread ; “and since then she can’t work as she
54 GOLDEN THREAD.

used. If she could, she wouldn’t let me go into a lady's
house with such shoes on,” she added, looking down at her
miserable feet. ‘‘ She says she hopes you will excuse it.”

“To be sure, to be sure,” said the lady, drawing a little
chair to the fire. ‘ Sit down, my child, and tell me what
is your name.”

“Mother calls me her little Golden Thread. But that
isn’t my real name. My real name is”.

“ Néver mind ; Lam sure it isn’t so pretty as the one by
which your mother calls you. And now, Golden Thread, do
you know why I asked you to come here to-day ?”

‘No, ma’am.”

“* Well, I wanted to ask you, for one thing, if you were
going to have a good many little girls come to see you, what
would you give them to eat ?”

Golden Thread smiled and looked down. At last she
said,

“Why, if I had plenty of roasted potatoes, with butter
on them, I'd give them as many as they liked. Roasted
potatoes are very nice if you have butter with them.”

‘And nothing else ?”

“* And may be I'd give every one apiece of cake. I mean
if I had any cake. But I shouldn't, yon know, ma’am.”

The lady looked at Tangle Thread and smiled, and Tangle
Thread smiled too, for she was thinking, as her mother was,
of the sponge cake, and maccaroons, and kisses, and candies,

+ and ice cream, that had been ordered for her party ; and
which she had pouted about, and said she wouldn't have, un-
less there was wedding-cake and coffee !


GOLDEN THREAD. 55

“And now, Golden Thread,” said the lady, “I should
like you to tell me what of all things you want most. For
I feel very grateful to you, and it will be a great pleasure to
me to give you something.”

Golden Thread smiled, and looked thoughtfally into the
fire. Dear me! she wanted so many things most!

Then the lady said,

“In this deep bureau drawer I keep things to give away.
You would laugh if you could see what queer things.I keep
in it. Toys, and books, and clothing, and shoes, and stock-
ings.”

“Oh! is there a pair of shoes there?” cried Golden
Thread, jumping up.

“Why didn’t you say a big wax doll?” cried Tangle
Thread. ‘ Mamma would just as soon give you a doll as
not.”

“There are no shoes large enough for you in the drawer,”
said the lady. ‘ Come, what would you like next best to
shoes ?””

“Perhaps there's stockings,” suggested the child.
‘Mother says warm stockings are good for chilblains.”

“Oh! there are larger things in the drawer than stock-
ings. Choose once more.”

“There never could be a shawl big enough for mother ?”

The lady rose, opened the drawer, and took thence a thick
woollen shawl.

“ Like this ?” she asked.

‘Oh! how nice!” cried Golden Thread. ‘‘ Mother is so
cold since she got sick. But, have I been begging ? oh!
56 GOLDEN THREAD,

have I been begging ?”” she cried, looking alarmed. “ Did
T ask for a shawl for mother? And I was never thinking
of a big warm shawl like that.”

“Perhaps you were thinking of a little warm one like
this,” said the lady, almost erying with pleasure that she had
found out so many of the child’s secret wishes. «But this
is just large enough for you, and you can give the other to
your mother.”

* Oh! thank you, ma’am, thank you,” cried Golden Thread.

“And here are more things in the drawer,” said Tangle
Thread, climbing into a chair, and looking down into it.
“See, books, dolls, reticules, pictures, workboxes.”

“Why, how came these things here?” asked her
mother, surprised,

“T put them there my own self,” replied Tangle Thread.
“ They are for the little girl. And I should like to have her
take off her things, and stay here and play with me.”

“I left mother all alone, and I must go now,” said
Golden Thread.

“Stop a minute,” said the lady. These thick night-
gowns are for you.”

“Why, I never had any night-gowns,” said Golden
Thread, with great surprise and pleasure. “ What will
mother say ?”’

-“‘And in this bundle you will find a good many other
such things.”

“ Why, I had to lie in bed while my things were washed !
T'll go right home and shew all these to mother. What will
she say ?”
GOLDEN THREAD. 57

The lady smiled, and Tangle Thread looked almost as
much astonished as Golden Thread. She drew near and
whispered,

‘But why don’t you ask my mother for a big doll? And
some cake and candy, and nuts and raisins ?”

Golden Thread was speechless. Was she the sort of
child to ask for dolls, and cake and candy, while her
mother sat half-blind, half-frozen, half-starved, at home ?

“Oh!” she cried, bursting into tears, “it isn’t nico
things we want! It's bread and meat, and fire !””

Tangle Thread rushed out of the room, and upstairs to
Rath.

“Give me all my money, quick!” said she ; ‘there's a
little girl downstairs that wants some bread and meat, and
fire!” °

“Oh! your mamma won't let you give to beggars,” said
Ruth.

“She isn’t a beggar any more than you are!” cried Tangle
Thread, angrily. ‘‘ And I will have my money. Get it this
instant !”’

“I'm not to give you things unless you ask me in a pro-
per way.”

“T will have my money!” said Tangle Thread ; and she
climbed up and opened the upper bureau drawer, and began
to turn over the things there, in search of her purse.

“Don't toss over your nice clean collars in that way,”
said Ruth. “ Your purse is not in that drawer, and you'll
not find it if you look all day.”

Tangle Thread burst into loud and angry cries. She took

ee
58 GOLDEN THREAD,

out her nice collars and aprons, and threw them one by one
to the floor, and was trampling them under her feet when her

“mamma suddenly entered the room.

The happy moments she had spent with Golden Thread
were over, and she stood in the door with that sorrowful,
grieved look, that was now almost always on her face. She
did not say a word, but taking the angry child by the hand,
she led her downstairs to her own room, and seated herself

“opposite to her in silence.

CHAPTER VII.

Were you ever disappointed in your life? When you
were going into the country to spend the day, and it began
to rain just as you were all ready to set off, how did you
feel ? And when you were invited to a Christmas tree, and
had talked about nothing else for a week, how did you be-
have when your mamma said you had too bad a cold to go,
and all the other children went without you? You were
disappointed, and very likely cried more or less about it.
Well, Tangle Thread's mother was disappointed, that just as
her child seemed gentler and sweeter than usual, her good-
ness lasted so little while. You know just how she felt as
she sat there, looking at Tangle Thread sobbing with anger.
But no, you do not know, and you never will, till you grow
up and have some little children of your own.
|

GOLDEN THREAD. 59

Meanwhile Golden Thread had gone home, and one of
the maids went with her, as she was directed to do,
with a basket on her arm and some money in her pocket.
With the money she was to buy shoes and stockings, that
Golden Thread was to put right on and wear home.

“But I've a pair of shoes at the pawnbroker’s,” said
Golden Thread.

“Never mind, I’m to do as I’m told,” said the maid.
“Tf you ever get your other shoes back, they'll may be do
for Sundays.”

“Look at me, mother!” cried Golden Thread, ranning
in with her stout shoes on, and making all the noise she
could. ‘‘ Lift up your bandage just a minute, and see what
I've got. Shoes and stockings, and shawls and night.gowns,
and petticoats, and the lady-says she’s coming to see you.
And here are roasted potatoes right out of the oven, and
butter to eat them with! Oh, mother, I didn’t mean to beg
for them !”

The poor mother looked so bewildered and so ready to ery, |
that the maid thought it best to set the basket on the table
and to slip out as quietly as she could. As soon as she had
gone, Golden Thread flew into her mother’s arms,

“Oh, it was such a nice lady!” said she. ‘ She is com-
ing to see you, mother, and says you must go to her doctor
and let him see your eyes. And she told me to tell you not
to be troubled, for you would not be left to suffer when you
were not fit to work.”

The poor woman shook her head. ‘TI cannot take all
these things,” said she. “I never can pay for them,
é

60 GOLDEN THREAD.

and I haven't been used to having things I didn’t work
for.”

Golden Thread stood silent, for she did not know what to
say.

“ At any rate, you'll eat some of the potatoes, won't you,
mother ?”” she asked. And she began taking them from the
basket. ‘‘ Why, there’s a piece of roast meat here!” she
cried. ‘Oh, mother, it will do you so much good! And
-there’s enough to last a week!”

They sat down, hungry and thankful, to this little dinner,
and then they looked at the shawls, the shoes, and all the
other treasures.

“T can’t think of keeping them,” said the poor woman
again. ‘ Unless, indeed, the lady will let me come and
work for her whenever I get well.”

“The lady is very rich,” said Golden Thread, looking
down at her shoes. ‘And she said herself that my old
shoes were not fit to wear.”

Her mother made no answer, but looked again and again
at the thick shawls, and at last laid every thing carefully
away on the bed.

“‘T haven't got down quite so low as all this comes to,”
said she. ‘‘ Begging is a trade 1 wasn’t brought up to. We
must not keep these things. Just as soon as my eyes get

. Well, I shall be able to earn what we need.”

“« May be if you'd seen the lady as long as I did, mother,
you wouldn’t mind taking presents from her. But I'll do
just as you say. You are not angry with me, are you ?”

“Angry with you? Bless your heart! No, indeed. If
GOLDEN THREAD. 61

I'm angry with any body it’s with myself, for getting that fall
and spoiling my eyes.”

CHAPTER VIII.

Watzx this was going on in the one small room in which
Golden Thread lived, poor little Tangle Thread sat crying
before her mamma. She was crying with anger, and when
spoken to she made no answer, unless it was by crying more
loudly and by kicking against the chair on which she sat.
So at last her mamma rose quietly and went away into an-
other room. There she threw herself down upon her knees,
hid her face in her hands, and burst into tears. Then she
prayed long and earnestly to God to touch the heart of her
child. When she returned to her room Tangle Thread had
stopped crying, and looked tired. Indeed, she was both tired
and ashamed. She wished she hadn't been so angry, and
that she could tell her mamma so. But it would have been
easier to have a tooth out than to tell her secret thoughts to
anybody.

‘Come here, my child,” said her mother, tenderly, and
holding out her hand.

Tangle Thread rose slowly, and walked to her mother’s
side.

“T am not going to say anything to you about your be-
haviour,” said her mother. ‘I have said everything I had
to say, a great many times already. And I am not going
62 GOLDEN THREAD.

to punish you, either. I am quite tired of that. I can
hardly remember a day in your life that I have not had to
punish you in some way. But I will tell you to-morrow
what I intend to do.”

She spoke in a gentle, loving, but very sad tone, and
Tangle Thread saw that her eyes were red with crying. She
never had felt so miserable in her life. What a pity that she
did not throw herself into her mamma’s arms, tell her how
sorry she felt, and promise to try, with God’s help, to be a
better child! But she did not say a word, and pretty soon
the carriage was ordered, and she saw her mamma drive
off. She went back to the nursery and tried to play with her
dolls, but they did not comfort her. Then she took down
The Fairchild Family and read a little here and there in
that favourite book.

Meanwhile her mother drove from place to place, making
inquiries about Golden Thread’s mother. She heard nothing
ill of her anywhere. Everybody said she was a hard-working,
industrious woman. So then she drove to the house where
the poor woman lived. All the neighbours ran to the win-
dows to look at the carriage, and some of them directed her
to the room she was seeking.

‘Oh, mother! it’s the nice lady !” cried Golden Thread, as
she opened the door on hearing her gentle knock.

“‘T have come to see you on account of your eyes,” said
‘the lady, kindly. ‘I want you to tell me all about your
accident, and what has been done for your eyes since they
were injured.”

Golden Thread's mother was glad to tell her story to so
GOLDEN THREAD. 68

kind a listener, and by degrees a good many things came
out that she did not mean to tell.

“T will take you to see an oculist, if you are willing to
go,” said the lady. “I have the carriage at the door, on
purpose, and there is plenty of time before dark.”

The poor woman coloured, and was silent. At last she
said,

“T thank you, ma’am, with all my heart. But I am not
decent to go with a lady, like you. If you would please to
give me a bit of a note to the doctor, my little girl could
lead me to his house.”

“Tt is too far. Besides, I want to see him myself.
Your shaw] will nearly cover you, and I’m sure your dress
is clean and tidy.”

“Do go,” whispered Golden Thread. “ Do go, mother,”

“I was going to say, ma'am, speaking of the shawl and
things, that I am grateful for them ; but I can’t think of
taking them unless you will let me do something for you.
T can wash and iron, and scrub and scour, and I understand
whitewashing ; and I can get in coal, and sweep off the
walks.”

“Not now, that you are nearly blind !”” said the lady,

“Why, no, ma’am, I can’t say that I can see to do much
of anything now ; but I hope to get well.”

“The first thing then is to see what the doctor says,”
replied the lady ; “and I promise to give you work as soon
as you are able to do it. So get ready, and we'll go at once.
Pat on your shawl, too, Golden Thread,” she added, “ for
of course you are to go with us.”
64 GOLDEN THREAD.

You should have seen Golden Thread's face as she led her
mother down the stairs and helped her into’ the carriage !
Driving off in a carriage as if they were queens! Well, if
it was a dream, what a delightful dream it was!

The doctor said the poor eyes were in a sad state, what
with the whitewash and the quack medicine. But he
thought they would be well in time. He spoke kindly and
cheerfully to the poor woman, who felt as if a great, heavy
stone had been lifted off her heart.

“‘ And now,” said the lady, as she set her down at her
own door, “I have one thing more to say to you. Suppose
I should be very ill several months, not able to turn myself
in bed, and needing constant care day and night. I should
have to have a nurse, and I should take all her time and
strength and patience. Now, I should pay her all she askéd,
and perhaps more. But could I really pay her with money
so as not to have any reason to feel grateful to her for all
she had done and all she had suffered for me ?”

‘* Why, no, ma’am, may be not,” said the poor woman,
wondering what was coming next.

“Well, if I could never repay her, then I must always
feel under obligation to her. I could, in fact, only repay
her by nursing her through just such illness. But I should
not be unhappy on that account. I love to feel obliged to
people. I love to feel grateful to God for His goodness to
nie, and I love to feel grateful to kind friends for their good-
ness. And I want you to love to have me do all I can for

* you in this time of your trouble. Anybody can refuse a
favour, but it isn't everybody who knows how to accept one,
; GOLDEN THREAD. 65

nobly and freely. But you must try, for my sake, and for
His sake who bids His children to minister to each other as
they would to Him.”

So saying, the lady allowed Golden Thread and her
mother to alight from the carriage, and the coachman
handed them from under his seat such a big bundle that they
could hardly get it upstairs. And when they got there,
they did not know their own room. There was such a fire
burning ; and the bureau had come back, and so had the -
table and the chairs, and the clock. And when they opened

' the big bundle, there were blankets and a warm quilt, and
shoes and stockings for the mother, and flannel petticoats,
and a woollen dress. And when she tried to put ona pair of
the stockings, there was something hard in each toe, and
the hard thing proved to be gold dollars, with which to buy
coal, and food, and medicine, all through this strait!

“ Are you going to send all these things back, mother ?””
asked Golden Thread, anxiously, for she had not understood
the lady’s talk with her mother.

“Send them back! No, indeed! Iam going to keep
them, and be grateful for them!” was the answer.

Then Golden Thread was so glad she did not know what
to do, and she threw herself down on the floor and rolled
like a ball across the room. And they put away their
treasures nicely in the drawers, and Golden Thread went
out and bought a candle to eat their supper by.
66 GOLDEN THREAD.

CHAPTER IX.

Tue next morning Tangle Thread's mother said to her,
‘‘T had a plan in my mind yesterday which I do not approve
of, now that I have bad more time to think it over. Do you
want to know what it was ?”

“Tf it was about me, I do,” said Tangle Thread.

“Well, I had half a mind to send you to spend a week
with that little girl who was here yesterday.”

“« What !—that little golden girl ?”

“ Little Golden Thread, yes. I thought it might do you”
good to see how poor people live, and to watch that nice,
pleasant child at her work. But, on the whole, I cannot
get courage to let you go.”

“Why not, mamma? I want to go. I am tired of
always being in this house.”

‘No, I dare not trust you. You might take cold, or get
into trouble of some sort.”

It was just like Tangle Thread to begin to cry, and to
want to go because her mamma did not wish it. So she
fancied herself much abused because she could not have her
qwn way.

‘I have to play all alone,” said she. ‘I never have any
, one to play with me.”

“ Not little Gertrude ?”” said her mother.
“Gertrude gets all my toys, and she won't play anything
GOLDEN THREAD. 67

I like. She just sits and sings to my wax doll as if it was
alive. Do let me go, mamma.”

Her mother could hardly help smiling.

At this moment her father entered the room. He looked
at Tangle Thread with displeasure and said,

“‘T shall really have to send you away if you behave in
this manner. You weary your mamma's life out with such
constant teasing.”

«TI was just telling her that I had been thinking of send-
ing her to spend a week with a poor woman I know of.
But instead of being alarmed at the prospect, she is quite
vexed because I will not let her go.”

“Is the woman trustworthy ? Does she live in a decent
place ?” asked the father ; ‘‘ for I am not sure it would not
be a good thing for Tangle Thread to be sent away among
strangers.”

‘«T really began to think so,” said her mamma.

Then Tangle Thread suddenly changed her mind, and
began to think she did not want to go.

‘“‘ They are not nice people,” said she, ‘‘ and they have
no meat or bread or fire. I would rather stay at home.”

“‘I was quite in earnest in what I said,” urged her
father. ‘A little girl who will not try to be gentle and good,
and who, after so many years, continues so wilful, ought
not to be treated like other little girls. If she makes her
home unhappy, she ought not to stay there.”

So saying he took his hat and went out.

“IT never saw your father so displeased,” said Tangle
Thread’s mother. “I am afraid that he will really send
68 GOLDEN THREAD.

you away. We know of a lady in the country who
takes little girls, and she would be quite willing to take
you.”

«I wasn't any naughtier than usual,” said Tangle Thread.
“T don’t see why I should be sent away, just for fretting a
little bit.” ‘

* « Your father was thinking of all your naughty ways ever
since you were born ; and perhaps he thinks that some one
else will manage you better than your mother can. But, oh,
my poor child! nobody will love you as I do, and you will
miss the love. Your heart will ache for it day and night.”

Tangle Thread sighed. It is easy to be naughty, but it’s
hard, too.

“I won't tease you any more,” said she. “ It isn’t very
nice to tease people. I can do anything I've a mind. I
can be good, and I can be naughty.”

“ Don't say so, my dear. Say you can be good if Jesus
will help you ; for there’s no use in trying unless He helps
you.”

“Tf I can’t be good all by myself, I don’t want to be good
at all,” said Tangle Thread. ‘‘ You destroy all my am-
bition.”

She was so pleased with herself for having made this
great speech, that her little tightly-packed body almost
seemed to swell with the pride it was hardly big enough to
hold. She went to the nursery, lost in thought.

“T can be good if I’ve a mind,” she said to herself.
“T’ve a great mind to begin. Then everybody will be so
astonished. They'll say they never saw such a sweet little
GOLDEN THREAD. 69

girl. That’s what people say about good children—they
say they're sweet, and I can be sweet if I've a mind.”

These thoughts were so pleasing that she laughed aloud.

“ What are you laughing at ?” asked Ruth.

Tangle Thread blushed, and started. “I wasn’t laughing,”
said she.

‘Indeed, you were,” said the nurse.

“‘T was not. Or if I was, you needn’t be asking about
it. I can laugh if I choose.”

‘ She’s out of humour, and I won’t say anything to vex
her,” thought Ruth. ‘I did provoke her yesterday, and I
wish I hadn't.”

“T've been looking everywhere for your purse,” said she.
“Twas sorry that I did not help you to look for it. But
I had such a toothache, I could not bear to move. And
you'll never guess where I found it. Why, in one of your
boots, under the bed.”

“Oh! Iremember now. I played that my boot was a
ship, and I put my purse on board for cargo. I am so glad
T’ve found it. Let’s go right out now and give some money
to that little girl.”

“We must see what your mamma says, first. And I
doubt if she lets you give so much money to one person.”

“Yes, she will. She likes generous people.”

“ But what will you do when all your money is gone ?”

‘Oh! papa will give me plenty more.”

“Then I don’t call it generous to give it away. You
wouldn't do it if you were not sure he would give you
more.”
70 GOLDEN THREAD.

Tangle Thread was silent. But after a minute she ran
down to her mamma. She found her writing.

“Mamma !”’ said she, ‘‘ mamma!”

“Do not interrupt me now; I am busy,” said her
mother.

«But, mamma, I want’”——

Her mother put her gently away.

“I should think you might listen,” said Tangle Thread,
‘reproachfully.

Her mother looked up. ‘I was making up the week's
accounts,” said she, ‘‘ and you have disturbed me so, that I
shall have to go over them all again. Go away, now, and
come again in half-an-hour.”

«« But you've stopped now, and’’——

‘Go, my child,” said her mother. ‘ You must learn to
obey.”

Tangle Thread went. But it was not a ‘sweet little
girl” who ran from the room with a flushed face.

“«T'll go up into the attic and stay there till I freeze to
death,” she said to herself. ‘Then mamma will wish she
hadn’t teased me so. Oh! she'll be sorry enough when
she sees me lying there, cold and dead !”

The attic was not a very agreeable place on this wintry
day. Tangle Thread soon became tired of pouting there
alone. So she concluded not to freeze, but to starve to
death ; a resolution that she kept till supper-time, when she

+ put it off till next day.
GOLDEN THREAD. jl

CHAPTER X.

In half an hour her mother sent for her.

“T am at leisure now,” said she ; “ what were you going
to say?”

“I want to know if I can go to see that little gil, and
give her all my money?”

“I have given her all she needs for the present,” replied
her mother. “ But I am going to see them now, and if you
wish to go with me, you can run and get ready.”

Tangle Thread hesitated. At last she went up to be
dressed, and she slipped the purse into her pocket.

They found Golden Thread ‘and her mother quite cheerful
and happy. Their room looked clean and pleasant; and
the two children sat apart, while their mothers conversed
together and had a little chat of their own.

“ Where are your toys?” asked Tangle Thread.

‘‘ T have none,” said Golden Thread.

“What have you done with them, then ?”

“Oh! I never had any to speak of. When I was a little
girl, mother made me a rag-baby; but I gave it away, long
ago.”

“But what do you do all day, if you have no toys?”

“IT help mother. I wash the dishes and I sweep the
floor; and I can knit, I knit almost a whole stocking,
once.”

“Can you read? Have you any books ?”
72 GOLDEN THREAD.

“I can’t read very well. I have to stay at home from
school, to take care of mother now.”

“Why doesn’t she teach you, then ?”

“Oh! she’s almost blind. Besides, she doesn’t know
how to read herself.”

Tangle Thread was speechless with surprise. A grown-
up woman not know how to read!

‘‘ Mamma knows every thing,” said she, “and she teaches
me. And one of these days I shall know as much as she
does. But I am afraid she won't go to heaven unléss she
gives you more money. She ought to give you money to
buy ever so many toys with. But I've got some money of
my own, and you shall have it all. You must buy a large
doll and a cradle.” ,

“But does your mamma know about it 2” asked Golden
Thread, half-pleased and half-frightened.

“No, she doesn’t. It says in the Bible, that you should
not let your left hand know what your right hand does.
So of course I don’t want her to know about it.” And
Tangle Thread felt very virtuous indeed, as she put the
purse into Golden Thread’s hand.

By this time her mamma was ready to go; and when
they were in the carriage again, she said,

‘How do you feel about spending a week with that poor
blind woman and her child? You know you could help
them to pare potatoes and wash dishes, and make their bed
and sweep.”

“You are laughing at me, mamma,” said Tangle
Thread,
GOLDEN THREAD. 73

“ And you may laugh at me, too, if you like,” answered
her mamma; “but I have another plan now. Golden
Thread cannot go to school while her mother is so helpless,
and I have been thinking how it would answer to let her
comeevery day to our house to be taught.”

“ Who would teach her ?”

“T thought you would.”

Tangle Thread could not conceal her smile of pride and
pleasure. She sat up as straight as possible, and said,

“T should like that dearly.”

“But you must make up your mind to find it quite a
task. At first it will be pleasant, but after the novelty wears
off you will often find it irksome. But I want you to feel
that you were not placed in this world just to amuse your-
self and have a good time. 1 want you to do some things
that are tiresome, and that require labour and patience.”

“ When may I begin ?”

“ To-morrow or next day. I have already spoken to the
child's mother about it.”

CHAPTER XI.

Tancte Tureap went to bed full of ambitious schemes.
She forgot that it was not Golden's Thread’s fault that,
though two years older than herself, she could not read well.
74 GOLDEN THREAD.

She forgot who had given her her own great readiness to
learn, and yet what impatience she had always shewn at her
tasks.

Next morning at the — hour Golden Thread made
her appearance.

‘My mother says I ought not to have taken this money,”
said she, placing the purse in Tangle Thread’shand, ‘ She
says I am to say I am very sorry I was such a foolish
child.”

Tangle Thread's mother looked at her little daughter with
surprise.

“Did you give her your purse, after all ?” she asked.

«Yes, mamma,” replied Tangle Thread, in a firm voice.
“The Bible says, ‘Blessed is he that considereth the
poor.’”

«But what does it say about obedience to parents ? Oh,
Tangle Thread ! what shall I do with you?”

She sank back into a chair, almost ill. Golden Thread
stood looking on, surprised and troubled, and was very glad
to be told that she might run home, as there would be no
lessons that day.

On hearing her story, her mother was greatly shocked.

‘No wonder that lady looks so sorrowful,” she said. ‘I
thought she had some trouble on her mind.”

«Oh! but her little girl will never do so again,” said
Golden Thread. ‘‘ She wouldn't like to make her mother
, turn so pale again.”

“Ah!” thought the poor woman, “I've had a sorrowful,

hard life; and if I get well, I've got to go on working just

”
GOLDEN THREAD. 75

so, a8 long asI live. But what of it? I've got the best
child that eyer was. A child that never crossed me in any-
thing, nor ever spoke a rough word to me. There isn’t
anything God could have given a poor lonely creature like
me, that I should have been half so pleased with as my little
Golden Thread. Why, since she came into the world, it
isn’t the same world it was before, and I ain’t the same
woman. But I have not been so thankful as I ought. I've
grumbled and fretted a good deal because I was so poor.
And yet I'd rather have my little Golden Thread than all
the money, and all the houses, and all the good things there
are in the world!”

While these thoughts lighted up the little obscure room
in which the poor woman lived, Tangle Thread’s mother sat
in her beautiful house, sad and sorrowful. What to do next
for her child she kuew not. But God saw her grief and
pain, and heard her prayers. He put new courage and
patience into her heart. She said to herself, ‘I have a
very hard task to perform. I must teach this child obedi-
ence. But I see that this cannot be done at once. I must
go on day after day, trusting in God to lead me every step of
the way. I must pray more, I must love her more, I must
be more gentle and tender. But I must have her obedi-
ence.” .

Tangle Thread stood, meanwhile, with a dark and gloomy
face, near the window. A little bird hung near her in his
cage, and she looked at him as he hopped about picking up
his seeds, and said half aloud,

“T wish J was a bird! Then I'd fly away—away off
76 GOLDEN THREAD.

where there are no houses and no people, and where I
should have nobody to plague me,”

“Poor little unhappy child!” said her scams * don’t
you know who it is that ‘ plagues’ you ?” :

‘‘ Everybody does!” cried Tangle Thread. ‘‘ Papa does,
and you do, and Ruth does. You all seem to think I am
always naughty.”

‘Poor child!” repeated her mother, ‘it is you who tor-
ment yourself. But I will not argue with you. I will tell
you onee more what I have often told you. I cannot treat
you exactly as God treats me, for I am a sinful, ignorant
creature. I make mistakes, and He never does. I get out
of patience, and He does not. I know almost nothing,
and He knows everything. But I mean to try to treat
you, as nearly as I can, as He does me. He has had
patience with me a great many times, when I wonder He
was willing to wait for me to be penitent. He has been
good to me, and given me many, many things. And He has
never ceased to put me under the rod since the day I gave
myself awayto Him. I don’t know which to thank Him for
most,.His goodness or His severity.”

Tangle Thread did not perfectly understand all this. But
she saw that her mother spoke out of the very depths of her
heart. She saw that she was more than ever resolved to
make her obedient. And what she did not understand, she felt.

“She went away sorrowfully to her play-room and locked

herself in. She could not think what made her feel so sad

‘and unhappy. Her books and her toys did not seem to be
what she wanted.
GOLDEN THREAD. 77

“TI don’t know what I do want!" she said, to herself,
and tears began to roll down her cheeks.

Ah! little Tangle Thread! This is what you want—To
have Jesus touch your heart and make it sorry. To kneel
right down and tell Him how sad and desolate you feel, and
to beg Him to make you His own dear child, and to help you
to love and obey Him. And then to run and throw your-
self right into your dear mother’s arms, hide your head in
her bosom, tell her how grieved you are for all your wilful,
naughty ways, and how you want to begin now to be like
Jesus, and to love and obey Him!

But the child had not yet learned this sweet lesson. She

could not bear to be sorry, much less to own she was sorry. .

CHAPTER XII.

As nothing more was said to Tangle Thread about her
teaching Golden Thread to read, she saw that her mother
did not mean to give her that pleasure, on account of her
behaviour about the purse. Nor was she now invited to go
with her mamma to visit poor people, as she had often done.
To march into sick-rooms laden with baskets of fruit and
flowers, her little figure fairly swelling with pride, had been
one of her greatest pleasures. There were some good and
kind feelings mingled with her pride ; she liked to see a pale

°
78 GOLDEN THREAD.

face light up with joy on her entrance, and to see how
grateful fruit often was to parched lips.

“There's the makings of a good woman in her, bless her
heart!” said one of the poor invalids whom she was often
* taken to see. This woman had lived in her mother's house
as cook; she had heard of Tangle Thread’s behaviour
through the other servants, and knew pretty well what she
was.

About this time, Gertrude, Tangle Thread's little friend,
came to spend the day with her.

Soon after dinner Gertrude complained of feeling chilly.
Ruth, on hearing this, put more coal on the fire, and made
Gertrude wear one of Tangle Thread’s flannel sacs. But
in a few hours she was taken quite sick. Tangle Thread
ran quickly for her mother, who came at once.

“She surely can have eaten nothing at dinner to make
her ill ?” said she, turning to Ruth.

“No, ma’am. They had nothing but their mutton-chops,
potatoes, and a rice pudding. No—it was tapioca pudding
to-day.”

‘“‘Her head and her hands are quite hot,” said Tangle
Thread.

“‘ What a child you are!” said her mother, smiling.
But she looked anxiously at little Gertrude.

“It is snowing, and is very cold,” said she. ‘TI hardly
like to send Gertrude home in such a storm. Gertrude,
darling, would you feel very badly to stay here to-night ta

“I want to go home,” said Gertrude. ‘I want my own,
mamma to make me get well.”
,.

GOLDEN THREAD. 79

“Twill go for your mamma, and if she thinks it best she
will take you home. But if she thinks it would not be safe,
then you will stay here, just to-night, won't you ?”

“Oh, yes! just as mamma says,” replied Gertrude.
And she closed her eyes and fell back fast asleep in Ruth’s
arms. Tangle Thread ran for a shawl, and covered the
sleeping child carefully.

“ That’s right, dear,” said her mother.

“ Thank you—that’s a good child,” said Ruth.

It was just at dusk that Gertrude’s mother came hurrying
up to the nursery. Gertrude awoke and stretched her arms
towards her dear mamma with a sigh of relief. Once in
her arms, she expected to be well.

“I dare not touch you yet, dear,” said her mother. ‘I
am all covered with snow. Wait till I can shake it off and
get dry. Where do you feel sick, darling?”

“‘T feel better now. My head” aches a little, and I am
thirsty. And I am tired a little.”

«Tt never would answer to take her home in this storm,”
said Tangle Thread’s mother. ‘‘ She may be quite relieved
by to-morrow, and we might then take her home safely, I
will sleep with her myself, and do everything I can for
her.”

“TI don’t know—I feel nervous about illness,” replied
Gertrude’s mother, looking anxiously at the child’s glowing
cheeks. ‘Since I lost my little Mary, I am frightened at
everything. And Gertrude is just one of those little lovely
creatures one is always expecting,to lose.”

“Can't you stay here with Gertrude?” asked Tangle
80 GOLDEN THREAD.

Thread, who had heard every word of this whispered con-
versation. ;

‘Ah! no ;—there’s the baby to nurse, and where he is
I must be. But'I dare not move Gertrude to-night. Per-
haps, after all, it’s only a fit of indigestion My darling,”
said she, now taking the child from Ruth, ‘you'll do just
what dear mamma wishes. I know you will. You'll stay
here to-night, and early in the morning I'll come with the
carriage and take you home. Only just to-night, dear.”

“Yes, mamma,” said Gertrude. “If you want me to
stay, I will.”

CHAPTER XIII.

Tuey soon had the child undressed and in a warm bed.
She fell asleep again, and though her sleep was restless, she
complained of nothing when she woke ; only once, when she
tried to take some water, she said, ‘It hurts me when I
drink ; I don’t want any more water.” Her mother, having
sat by her side all the evening, was now preparing to go
home, and did not hear these words. Tangle Thread’s
mother did.

“Can her throat be sore 2” she said, to herself, “Is it
possible that scarlet fever has crossed our threshold ?”
Her heart yearned over her own child. “Oh! if she should
have it, and die!”
GOLDEN THREAD. 81

“Tf there are any alarming symptoms during the night, I
had better send for the’ doctor, had I not?” she said, as
Gertrude’s mother took leave,

“Certainly, certainly. But I hope she will have a good
night, and be quite bright to-morrow.”

But the child did not have a good night. She tossed to
and fro, and moaned in her sleep, and often said,

“It hurts me where my throat is.”

As soon as daylight began to steal into the room, it
became plain that Gertrude was covered with an eruption of
some sort, and was very ill. The doctor was sent for her.
He said at once, ‘Yes, it is scarlet fever |” 3

“Can I go home to my own mamma ?” asked Gertrude.

“We'll send for your mamma to come here,” said the
doctor. And turning to Tangle Thread’s mother, he
said,

“As to your own child, you will of course see that she
does not enter this room.” +

“« But may she not have already taken the disease ? She
and Gertrude were together all day yesterday.”

“T cannot say. We must use the precaution of keeping
them apart a couple of weeks at any rate. As to little
Gertrude, if she lives through it, you will have her in this
room six weeks,”

“ Tf she lives through it! _ Is she, then, so ill ?”

“TI think her a very sick child. And you know what
scarlet fever is. But we will do all we can. It is not
necessary to alarm her mother. She will take the alarm
when she hears what the disease is.”

F
82 GOLDEN THREAD.

Gertrude's mother soon came in, and a glance at her
child told her the whole story.

“Nobody need tell me what it is!” she cried, bursting
into tears. “It is scarlet fever! Oh, my little Gertrude !
My sweetest, my best child! I never thought she would
live to grow up! I knew she was too good! But I never
dreamed it would come so soon !”

“Hush !” said Tangle Thread's mother, “ she is waking ;
she will hear you. You must put on a cheerful face when
she sees you.”

“Oh! how can I look cheerful when my heart is break-
ing ?”

“Come into the next room till you are more composed.
Stay yourself dn God, my dear friend. He will not touch
a hair of Gertrude’s head unless it is best. And if it is
best—if He does take her from you—you will still have
Him left. But do not be discouraged. You are not ina
state to judge fairly how she is. You look as if you had not
slept an hour since you left us last night.”

“T did not close my eyes. Something kept saying,
‘ Gertrude is going just where little Mary did.’”

“Little Mary went to a very happy place !"”

“Yes, yes, [know. But, oh! she left such a great chasm
when she went away. You never lost a child. You don’t
know anything about it. This world never has seemed the
same to me since I lost my little Mary.”

“Nor has the next world either. You have often told
me how much nearer, how much dearer heaven had been
made to you by that aflliction. And it will become yet
GOLDEN THREAD. 83

nearer and dearer if your precious little Gertrude goes there
too. But God will not take her away unless it is best. Let
us believe that. Let us trust herto Him. He never makes
mistakes, nor snatches away our treasures a moment too
soon.”

Gertrude’s mother dried her tears. ‘I will trast Him,”
said she. ‘I thank Him for giving me such a friend as
you to lean on in this time of trouble. But what am I think-
ing of ?” she cried, suddenly. ‘‘ Here is your child, your
only child, exposed to this fearful disease! And I thought
only of myself!”

‘“*T must do what I have been urging you to do. I must
trust in God,” replied Tangle Thread's mother.

CHAPTER XIV.

Litrte Gertrude remained very ill many weeks. Her
precious life hung, as it were, ona thread. A little self-will
on her part, a want of docility in submitting to painful
remedies, would have broken that thread at any moment.
But she lay, with little meekly folded hands, on her weary
bed, behaving and quieting herself like a weaned child.
There was never a frown nor an impatient word. She let
the doctor, and her mother, and all her friends do what was
thought best to do, without in any way resisting their wishes.

Her mother never left her, save now and then to weep in
secret.

*
84 GOLDEN THREAD.

“She will not get well,” said she. ‘‘ She is too patient,
too gentle, too lovely, for this world.”

Everybody thought as she did. Tangle Thread’s mother
looked at this lamb as upon one already chosen of Christ,
and precious. She had never seen such sweet submission
and docility.

“TI ‘never look at her,” she whispered to Gertrude’s
mother, ‘‘ without thinking of the lines,

“*Sweet to lie passive in Thy hands,
And know no will but Thine.’”

“T have learned, at last, to say those blessed words out
of the depths of my own heart,” was the answer. “TI have
no longer any choice about my child. If she is bound
heavenward I will not detain her.”

Meanwhile, Tangle Thread’s restless, wilful soul was quite
subdued by the silence and sadness that reigned in the
house. Nothing now would tempt her to indulge in those
angry screams that used to resound through every room.
She spoke in a low voice, walked softly up and down the
stairs, and seemed quite another child. Indeed, her habit
of crying aloud with rage was now broken up once for all.

“Do you think Gertrude will get well ?” she asked Ruth,
anxiously, every hour; and Ruth always replied, ‘ Yes, I


But at last she could not help saying,

‘No, Ido not. Children like her always die. It is the
cross, hateful ones that get well.”

“Then if I am taken sick I suppose I shall get well,”
GOLDEN THREAD. 85

said Tangle Thread. But after a time she started up and
cried out,

‘But every body dies some time or other. Does every-
body get good, first ?”

“TI don’t know. And I don't know as I did right to say
Gertrude wouldn’t get well. The doctor says her goodness
is in her favour. She takes every thing so beautifully, you
can’t think. And now they're trying to feed her up, and
she has to take brandy, and beef tea, and all sorts of things
so often. And if she was naughty, and would not take them,
or if she cried and fretted about them, then she certainly
would die.

“ But beef tea is very nice,” said Tangle Thread.

“Nice to people that feel pretty well. But Gertrude is
so weak that she can hardly swallow. It tires her dread-
fully to take anything. Why, I heard of a little boy who
starved to death because he would not take the nice,
nourishing things he needed. His father got down on his
knees and begged him, with tears in his eyes, to take just
a little bit of wine jelly, and he wouldn’t. So he died. It's
a very bad thing for a child to be self-willed when it is well.
But when it is sick it is perfectly dreadful.”

“‘T mean to be very good when I am sick,” replied Tangle
Thread. ‘‘I feel a little sick now. I wish you would look
down my throat and see if there’s anything the matter with
it.”

“Oh! there’s nothing the matter with your throat,” said
Ruth, trying to believe what she said. ‘Who told you
Gertrude’s throat was sore ?”
86 GOLDEN THREAD.

“Why, nobody. I didn’t know it was sore. But I know
mine is, And I know my head aches.”

“Dear me! I hope you're not going to be sick!” cried
Ruth. “I'm sure your mamma has her hands full now.
Well, well, what is to be will have to be. Come here ; sit
in my lap, and lay your head on my shoulder. Poor little
thing! her head is hot, I declare.”

. “ Why, Ruth, you seem to love me!” said poor Tangle
Thread, bursting into tears.
SILVER THREAD.
Silber Thread.

CHAPTER I.

Ro could not help crying a little when Tangle Thread
* said that.

“T'm sure I’ve always loved you when you were good,”
she replied. ‘And you have been a very nice little girl
lately. But I suppose I ought to go and tell your mamma
that you don’t feel well. Only I hate to worry her.”

“TfIam sick and die, then she won't have anybody to
tease her,”’ said Tangle Thread. «And she'll have plenty
of time to read, and to paint, and everything.”

“She'd rather have you than the time,” said Ruth. « It
would just break her heart if you should die. But don't talk
that way. You are not going to die. You are going to get
well and be the best little girl that ever lived. And while
you're sick we'll take such good care of you! And when
you get well, I'll ask your mamma to let me take you home *
with me, and you shall drink new milk right from the cow,
and you'll grow strong and fat again.”
90 SILVER THREAD.

But Tangle Thread had fallen into a heavy sleep, and did
not hear Ruth’s cheerful words,

Ruth placed her on the bed, covered her with a blanket,
and went to tell her mother how ill she seemed. The
doctor happened to come in at that moment to see little
Gertrude, and he went at once to look at Tangle Thread.
There was not much to say or to do. He promised to come
in again in a few hours, and then returned to Gertrude.

‘Tangle Thread's mamma was very quiet, but her heart
felt heavy indeed.

“If Tangle Thread should be as ill as Gertrude,” she said
to Ruth, ‘‘ she cannot live, she is so very unlike Crertrude.”

Ruth made some cheering, pleasant answer, and began to
arrange things in the nursery, as if she expected Tangle
Thread to remain there during her illness.

‘Oh! I shall have Tangle Thread in my room,” said her
mother.

“I was hoping to keep her here, ma'am,” said Ruth.
“T'll take the very best care of her. And you are worn out
now with little Gertrude’s sickness, and so many coming and
going.”

“Thank you, Ruth. You are very kind, but I feel that
I must have Tangle Thread in my own room. You must
remember she is all Ihave.” And then the thought that she
anight now be about to lose that all, made her eyes fill with
tears, and she sat down by the bed, and hid her face in her
child’s pillow, and silently wept and prayed.

Tangle Thread awoke and started up, looking flushed and
distressed.
SILVER THREAD... 91

“Oh! mamma, is Gertrude dead ?” she cried.

“No, my darling, Gertrude seems a little better to-day.”

“Then what makes you cry so?”

“ Oh! I am not crying much,” replied her mother. ‘I
suppose I am pretty tired with watching Gertrude; and so
when I heard you were sick, too, I could not help shedding
a few tears. You see mamma loves you very much, and it
grieves her to see you suffer. But now you are going into
my room to sleep with me in my bed, and I shall take care
of you day and night. And if you will try to be patient and
docile, like Gertrude, you will get well before long.”

«
She was very glad to be undressed and to lay her head on
the cool pillow in her mamma’s own bed. She passed a
weary night, and only slept in snatches.

When the doctor came the next day, he knew, and they
all knew, that she had the fever with which Gertrude had
been so ill.

And now the fruits of her mamma’s long patience shewed
themselves. Tangle Thread did not submit to painful
remedies as sweetly as Gertrude had done; and sometimes
she cried, and was peevish and unreasonable. But she had
been learning lessons of obedience all her life, and now she
was humbled and subdued by greater suffering than she had
ever known. So she never absolutely resisted the doctor’s
wishes nor her mamma's. She was not so ill as Gertrude
had been, but she had a long and tedious sickness, and
passed many weary hours. Her mamma seldom left her,
and did all she could to make her forget her sufferings.
92 » @@ SILVER THREAD.

After a time, little Gertrude, whose room was on the
same floor, was brought in’ the nurse’s arms, to make
Tangle Thread a visit. The poor little creature was very
feeble. She could not hold up her head, nor could she
amuse herself in any way.

“‘ Why don’t you tell Gertrude stories, mamma, and sing
to her?” asked Tangle Thread.

“The poor little thing cannot hear,” replied her mamma.
“Tt makes my heart ache when I see how little we can any
of us do for her.”

“Why can’t she hear?” asked Tangle Thread, in sur-
prise. ‘‘ She used to hear as well as I did.”

“Yes, but she has been very, very ill. And it will be a
long time before she can hear stories, if ever.”

“J will give her all my toys, then,” said Tangle Thread.
“ My Paris doll and all its clothes; its dotted muslin frock
and its pink silk, and its gaiter-boots, and its bracelets, and
its watch, and its pocket handkerchief, and under-sleeves,
and collars.”

“But Gertrude has a little Eugénie already.”

“So she has—I forgot it ;” and so saying, Tangle Thread
buried her face in the pillow and began to ery pitifully.

Her mamma was afraid she would make herself very ill
by crying so. She told Gertrude’s nurse to take her away ;

.and then leaning over the bed, she said, gently, but very
firmly,

“You must stop crying, my child.”

“TI can’t,” sobbed Tangle Thread, “I'm so tired! And
I don’t want Gertrude not to hear.”
SILVER THREAD, 93

“T am sorry I let you know that,” said her mamma,
kissing her and stroking back the hair that had fallen
over her face. ‘But now stop crying, for I have two
things to say to you, and you can’t hear unless you are
quite.”

Tangle Thread stopped crying and wiped her eyes.

“ You must not break your heart about little Gertrude,”
said her mother. ‘‘ The doctor hopes, and we all hope,
that by and by her hearing will return to her. But if it
never does, her dear Saviour, who loves her so, and who has
been with her all through her sickness, will comfort her and
make her happy. Even at the longest, we do not stay in
this world very long. Little Gertrude will only have to be
patient a few years, and then God will take her to heaven,
where she will hear just as well as youand I, You know
we mustn't be always thinking how we are getting along with
the troubles we have in this world. We must be thinking
how sweet heaven will be when we get there.”

Tangle Thread’s, face began to look a little brighter.
But after a moment she said,

“But Gertrude’s mamma will feel so sorry !”

‘Yes, she feels very sorry already. But then Gertrude's
mamma loves Jesus dearly. And she likes to have Him do
just what He thinks best.”

“But what makes Him think it best to make people
deaf?”

“Ido not know. I do not expect to understand every-
thing He does. When the doctor used such painful
remedies for your throat you did not expect to understand
94 SILVER THREAD.

why he used them. You let him do what he pleased,
because you knew he was wise and kind.”

Tangle Thread smiled. After a time she said,

“What was the other thing you were going to say,
mamma ?”

“IT was going to say, that, on the whole, you have been
very good while you were ill. I expected to have a hard
time with you. I thought you would be unwilling to take
your medicines, and to do other things the doctor desired.
But we have had some quite happy hours together since you
were moved into this room. So you are not to be called
Tangle Thread any longer. You are to be called my little
Silver Thread.”

“ That's nice ! that’s real nice! But, oh! mamma, what
has become of Golden Thread ?”

“She has not been here during your illness, I believe.
I must send some one to see how they are. And, my
darling, don’t you think that before long you will become a
little Golden Thread ?”

“T don't know. I'm afraid I never shall be so good as
that,” replied Silver Thread, whose ideas on the subject bad
undergone a great change since the time when she said, “I
can be whatever I please!”



CHAPTER II.

.Durine Gertrude’s illness and Tangle Thread's, nobody had
had much time to think of Golden Thread. For four weeks
SILVER THREAD. 95

Gertrude’s mother had never undressed, and the whole house
had been full of care and anxiety. But now both children
were out of danger, and Ruth was very glad to run around,
as before, among the poor and the sick. She was particu-
larly glad to be sent to inquire after Golden Thread and her
mother, for she liked them both. And they liked her, and
were thankful to see her pleasant face once more. At least
Golden Thread was. As to her poor mother, her eyes were
worse than ever, so that she could not use thenrat all, and
she looked pale and thin. She said the doctor had told her
she never would get well while she lived in that house; there
was water in the cellar, and the whole street was damp and
unwholesome. She felt discouraged and anxious, and
thought she never should be able to see again. But she
still had great comfort in her good, loving child, and said
the world could not seem quite dark to her while Golden
Thread was in it, happen what might.

‘Tt comes very hard on poor folks to be sick,” said she.
“Tt is many a long day since I earned a penny, and my
strength seems all gone.”

Then Ruth told her all about the two sick children at their
house ; how lovely little Gertrude had been, and how she
had lain nine days so ill that they thought she might die at
any moment. And how Tangle Thread's name had been
changed to Silver Thread, because she had behaved so much
better during her sickness than ever before in her life.

“You see rich folks have their troubles as well as poor
folks,” added Ruth. ‘And our folks make a good use of
theirs. It seemed as if they were as kind to the poor and
96 SILVER THREAD.

the sick as they well could be, but they're even kinder now.
Why, when I go home and tell how you're getting on, and
what the doctor says, I'm sure they'll be for moving you int»
a healthier place.”

“But rents are higher in better houses,” returned the
poor woman.

“Of course, And our notions about goodness havo risen
a peg or two higher,” said Ruth, laughing, I've been
thinking it-over since I came in, and I’ve made up my mind
to let you have so much a month out of my wages. I get
good wages, and many a present besides. If you ever get
well you can pay me again, you know.”

Ruth did not really expect this poor blind woman to be
able to repay her. She only said this to comfort her. She
went home quite pleased and happy; but there she found
dismal news awaiting her. Her mother had written to say
that all sorts of trouble had come upon them. The big barn
had burned down, and one of the horses was lame, and
“father” had the rheumatism, and some of their best milk
and butter customers had fallen off. Poor Ruth had a good
cry, and sat‘up late that night writing a long letter in reply.
She said there should be another big barn built out of her
savings ; she was going to be very careful and not waste a
penny; then the horse would certainly get well, in time for
the spring work, and she knew father's rheumatism would
go off when warm weather came, especially if he would use
the liniment she was going to send him. And as to the
milk and butter, why, if folks wouldn't buy it, suppose they
got somebody to come and eat and drink it? That is, sup-
SILVER THREAD. 97

pose they took in one or two boarders this coming summer.
And just as she said that, a thought came into her head
that made her get up and look at herself in the glass, to see
what sort of a body it was that could make such splendid
plans.

“ Mother would like the company, and she wouldn't have
to put herself out at all for them. There's plenty of house
room, and plenty to eat and drink. If they once went there
they'd be likely to stay, year in and year out. And Golden
Thread is a good, handy child; she'd soon save mother
some steps. Mother would get fond of her, I know. Let
me see—what was it I promised to give them? I do
believe I said I would pay the difference in their rent, if
they'd move. But, of course, I can’t do that and let my
own father suffer. Well, I won't worry about it. It will
all come out right in the end, I'm sure it will!”

CHAPTER III.

On hearing Ruth’s account of the state in which she had
found the poor blind woman—for she was now really quite
blind—Silver Thread was full of pity.

“ Do go to see her, mamma,” said she. And do carry

lots of things to her.”
G
98 SILVER THREAD.

Her mamma sat silent and thoughtful, and did not seem
to hear,

“Mamma! mamma!” repeated Silver Thread, impa-
tiently.

The mother was still silent.

“You won't do a thing I want you to do,” said Silver
Thread, rudely,

Her mamma started. ‘I was trying to think what I
could do for that poor woman,” she answered. “And I
did not think my little Silver Thread would ever speak to
me in that way again.”

“TI don't know how I came to do it,” said Silver Thread,
sorrowfully.

Oh! how quickly these few words, this gentle tone, set
everything right between them !

- But Silver Thread was very feeble, and she now began to
ery bitterly.

“Don't cry, my darling,” said her mamma. “I ought
not to expect you to cure yourself of your bad habits at once.
But now let me tell you what I have been planning. I will
go to see Dr A——, and find out just what he thinks of this
poor woman. He certainly seemed to think he could cure
her eyes when I took her to him. But if he says he cannot,
then I think a nice quiet home in the country, somewhere,
would be better for her general health than the best home
in the city.”

“Yes, my general health is better in the country,” said
“Silver Thread, wiping her eyes. ‘And Golden Thread
would like to go, I know. Do please, mamma, order the
SILVER THREAD. 99

carriage and see about it, right away. Ruth can come and
tell me stories while you are gone.”

“T thought Ruth was not gifted in story-telling.”

“Well, it isn’t stories exactly. It’s talk. She talks
about her father’s farm, and the horses, chickens, and such
things.”

“Her father’s farm! Why, that would be such a very
nice place for our poor blind woman! Ruth's mother is one
of the kindest creatures in the world. I wonder if she
would mind the care! I could make it quite an object to
her.”

Ruth came in now to say that the carriage was ready, and
Silver Thread was glad when she heard her mamma drive
off in it.

“Only to think, Ruth,” said she, ‘mamma has gone to
see the doctor about Golden Thread’s mother. She is going
to ask him if he thinks it would be good for her general
health to go into the country to live. And she says she
wonders if your mother would let her come there, because
she could make it quite an object to her.”

“Well! if I ever!” cried Ruth. “If the very same
idea didn’t come into my head! OnlyI didn’t mean to have
your mother pay a penny. I expected to manage it somehow
myself,

“It will be splendid!” said Silver Thread. .

They chatted on awhile, until the clock struck.

“It's time for you to take Your beef tea,” said Ruth.
“Do you mind staying alone while I run down for it ?”

“Oh! I don’t believe it is time yet,” replied Silver
100 SILVER THREAD,

Thread. You can’t think how I hate it. I don’t see what
the doctor makes me take it for.”

“You said once that beef tea was very nice. And you
must take it, whether or no.”

Silver Thread begen to fret and to mutter.

“ Won't let me have any peace. Keep pouring down the
beef tea, and pouring it down. Won’t let me go to sleep or
anything. Say it’s four o'clock when it isn’t four o'clock.
Do all they can to plague me.”

She spent the time of Ruth's absence in this state of ill-
humour, and swallowed her beef tea, with grimaces. How
many half-starved children would have been thankful for
every drop !

Ruth quieted and soothed Silver Thread, and made all
sorts of excuses for her.

“You are weak and tired,” said she. “ Perhaps I let
you talk too much. Now lie down and I'll sing to you.
Poor little Gertrude can’t hear singing or talking, and you
can. Now shut your eyes and lie still, and perhaps you'll
get a little nap, and then you'll wake up just in time to hear
what your mamma has to say.”

Silver Thread was very tired—too tired to fret any more.
She lay still and soon fell asleep, and when she awoke her
mamma had come home.

‘How have you been, my darling?” she asked, sitting
down by the bed. ~

“Rather cross,” said Silver Thread.

Her mamma smiled, not expecting just such an answer.

“Well, let me tell you what Dr A— says. I found
SILVER THREAD. 101

him at home and he was very glad to see me. He says the
poor creature’s eyes are past cure. She was a good deal
worn out with hard work when the accident happened, and
then she has been living in such an unwholesome place.
Otherwise he might, perhaps, have saved her eyes.”

“And she went to a quack doctor first,” said» Silver
Thread.

“Yes, that was another thing. So now, if she likes the
plan, we'll get her into the country very soon.”

‘Ruth says her mother will let her come there, she is
almost sure.”

“That will be very pleasant. Ruth could go with them
and arrange everything. Ruth needs a little change. I
thought this morning she did not look well.”

“Oh! that is because her father’s barn got burned down,
and ever so many other things happened.”

It was too late to do anything more that night. But
Silver Thread went to sleep, in good spirits, with a great
deal that was pleasant to think of. She dreamed that she
saw Golden Thread running about in the fields gathering
buttercups, and as bright and happy as a bird. She saw
her drinking fresh milk, and growing fat on it. She thought
she heard her say, ‘‘Oh! how glad I am I came here! I
never want to go and live in a big city again, as long as I
live.”
’ CHAPTER IV.

From being a very unhappy child, Silver Thread was
becoming a happy one. Do you know the reason? It was
because God has so made us, that while we spend our time
in thinking of nobody's comfort but our own, the best things
in the world fail to please us. A child may have all the
beautiful toys it wants, and a pleasant home, and the kindest
friends, and yet be restless, peevish, and uncomfortable.
But when it begins to try to be gentle and patient with every
body—when it speaks pleasant words and gives up its own
way—then a black cloud seems to clear away from before
its eyes, and it walks on in sunshine. Poor Silver Thread
had spent her whole life in troubling and grieving her dear
mother, and her nurse, and all about her, but she did not
know it was that which made her often go away by herself
to be sullen and sad in secret, nor did she now quite under-
stand what it was that made her, lying there so feeble on her
sickbed, have so many hours of sweet peace.

Now, if you want to understand better what I have been
saying, let us suppose you get up to-morrow morning and
begin the day by fretting all the time your nurse, or your
mamma, or your sister, is washing and dressing you. You
can cry when your hair is combed, and say she hurts you.
You can pull away from her while she is putting on your
élothes. Then, when you go down to breakfast, you ean
find fault with it, or get vexed because you can’t eat more
SILVER THREAD. 108

than is good for you. After breakfast, if you have lessons
to learn, you can cry again over them, and soil your book, —
and annoy every one in the room. Then if your mamma
wishes you to go out to walk, you can dispute with her about
what you shall wear. You can be very disagreeable if she
says you are to wear your overshoes, and declare that it is
quite dry out of doors. After you get home you can take
your little brother's chair, and when he cries for it—for why
shouldn’t he ery if you do?—you can call him a cry-baby,
and tell him to take his old chair, in a very unpleasant way.
If any of the other children ask you to lend them your
knife or your pencil, you can say, ‘‘ What plagues you are!
Why didn’t you tell me you wanted it before I sat down?
And if I lend you my pencil you'll break off the point, and
then I shall have to keep stopping to cut it.”

When it comes night and you are told it is time to go to
bed, you can say, ‘“‘O dear! must I go to bed? Can't I sit
up a little longer? I don’t believe it is eight o'clock.”
When, at last, those you have teased and annoyed all day
get you off to bed, they feel relieved and as if they should
now have a little peace. And you lie down on your pillow,
dissatisfied, out of sorts, and ready to get up next morning
peevish and tiresome. :

But let us suppose just the contrary. You get up
pleasant, and if your little sister is going to be dressed first,
you wait patiently for your turn. If your nurse pulls your
hair when she combs it, you can tell her so, gently, and ask
her to please to be more careful. You can go down stairs
smiling and pleasant, and ready to say good morning,
104 SILVER THREAD.

cheerfully, to everybody. If your mamma says you are to
have less breakfast than usual because you had headache
yesterday, you will not say a word, but eat what she gives
you, and be thankful it isso much. If she wants yon to
amuse the baby while she washes the silver, or breakfast
cups, you won’t answer, ‘“‘Oh! I was just going out to
play,” but will give her a sweet smile and a sweet word. If
one of the other children gets your toy, you will not ran to
snatch it away; you will say, “ Please, Mary, give me my
doll,”:and having always seen your good example, she will
be likely to give it up without a word. If you are busy
reading, you will lay aside your book pleasantly when your
papa asks you to run to get the paper for him, and he will
kiss you and be thankful he has such a little girl, when you
come tripping back with it. You will lie down to sleep at
night, peaceful and happy, knowing that you have tried all
day long to do right, and to do it in a pleasant way.

Now Silver Thread could not turn all at once into such
ways as these. Every now and then her old naughty
habits would come, like armed men, and seemed to make her
do and say things she did not want to say. Then she
would be quite provoked with herself, and think there was
no use in trying. And sometimes, after praying to God to
make her good, she felt impatient with Him for not making
her perfect without giving her the trouble of trying to be so.
But there’s no use in being discouraged! It is better for a
poor naughty child that wants to do right, but finds it very
hard, to keep right on trying and trying, and praying and
praying, hoping on, and hoping ever.
SILVER THREAD. 105

But perhaps you think this sort of talk is too much like a
sermon, and at any rate we had better see what Golden
Thread and her mother have to say about going into the
country. You must remember, that except her own sweet
temper, Golden Thread had not much in this world. She
was not yet old enough to do any sort of work that would
help much toward the support of her mother, and yet her
head was quite full of plans as to what she would do as soon as
she grew taller and stronger. She thought she could go and
live somewhere as little maid, and so earn a trifle ; enough
to get a room in a house where the cellar was not damp,
and though it made the tears come into her eyes to think of
it, she was resolved to do so very soon. Her mother knew
it would have to come to that sooner or later, but it almost
broke her heart to think of being left alone and blind, with-
out her bright Golden Thread’s cheery words and ways.
Ruth’s visits comforted them both for a time, but then the
poor mother grew sad again.

“Tf we are going to live on charity,” said she, “‘ we may
as well go to the alms-house first as last. And I don't see
much chance of our living on anything else.”

“ But if we could get along a little while longer, mother,
" just till I grow a bit taller, I could get a place, and then
you wouldn’t have to live on charity.”

‘Tt will be many a long year before you could earn money.
Nobody would give you more than your board and clothes.”

« But that would be a good deal. And I would try to do
everything I could to please them. Don’t cry, dear mother.”

“‘T can't help crying. When I think that ever since I
106 SILVER THREAD.

was eight years old I've earned my own bread and no thank
‘to anybody, and I’m helpless and have to demean myself to
be a beggar!”

“Why, mother,—are you a beggar?” cried Golden
Thread.

“It's just the same. I eat other people’s bread, and
wear other people’s clothes, and use other people's money.
And I can’t do a thing for them that feed and clothe me.”

“Can't you pray for them, mother? Praying’s some
thing.”

The poor woman was silent, What little praying she had
ever done in her life had been for herself, in her misery, and
for her child.

“Such prayers as mine wouldn’t do them any good,” she
said at last.

“Well, may be they'll do a little bit of good,” urged
Golden Thread. ‘TI pray for that kind lady every night.
And for that little girl, too. My teacher said we ought to
pray for everybody that is kind to us.”

“What do you say?”

“«T say, ‘Our Father, who art in heaven !’”

“What !—the Lord’s Prayer? I don’t call that praying
for the lady, or the little girl either.”

“Isn't it?” said Golden Thread, greatly digappointed and
puzzled. ‘ Why, I meant it, all the same. I don’t know
anything else to say, and so, whenever I think of them,
and how good the lady was, I say, ‘Our Father.’ May be
He knows what I mean.”

The woman sighed. ‘ Ah! my child knows more than I

+
SILVER THREAD. 107

do, and is better, too,” thought she. ‘I've never taught
her anything good, and now she’s teaching me. I'm afraid
I ain't just what I ought to be; but I don’t know. I never
wronged anybody in my life, nor told a lie, nor took a pin
that wasn’t mine. But I can’t say what's wanting in me.”

CHAPTER V.

“Do you think, Ruth, that this poor blind woman and her
child would give your mother too much trouble?” asked
Silver Thread’s mamma. ‘‘ You know I owe them a heavy
debt of gratitude, and I am resolved to place them in some
pleasant country place, where the child can be learned to do
such kinds of work as she is capable of, and where the
mother can recruit.”

“T think my mother would be very glad to take them,
ma’am,” replied Ruth. ‘Golden Thread is such a nice
pleasant child, and her mother is so grateful and humble.”

“T don't know about the humility,” said Silver Thread’s
mother, smiling a little. ‘ But I think well of her, and the
child has fairly won my heart.”

“The only trouble is, to get the poor creature to consent
to go at your expense, ma'am. It almost kills her to live
on charity.”

*
108 SILVER THREAD.

“ Did Elijah live on charity when the ravens fed him ?”
asked Silver Thread, in her wise little way.

‘*T shouldn't think it was charity, I should think it was
God,” she added. ‘Besides, Golden Thread saved my
life, and mamma would want to give her lots of things for
that. Oh! you needn't laugh, Ruth. She really did save
my life! There were all the stages, and carts, and carriages
going up and down, and I might have been run over. And
she risked her life for me.”

“Yes, yes,”’ said her mother. ‘I do really owe them
far more than I can ever repay. But this is nothing to the
debt I owe my heavenly Father, and He intends that those
of His children to whom He has given money shall use it for
Him. I am only thankful that He hes thrown this poor
woman in my way. And now, how very nice it will be if we
can put her under your mother's care. Do write to her by
this evening's mail, and see what she will say. Or stay—
suppose you run down and see her, and talk with her about
it. You can take the seven o’clock train to-morrow morn-
ing, and come back by the early train the day after. Then
if we decide to send Golden Thread and her mother, you
can go with them, and stay a few days until they feel at
home.”

Ruth felt very grateful for this proposal, and at twelve
o'clock next day she ate dinner with her father and mother,
to*their no small delight. Everything was easily arranged.
There was a room that could be spared as well as not; it

*was warmed in winter by a remarkable stove funnel, that ran
through it without heating it at all in summer; there was a
SILVER THREAD. 109

pleasant prospect from the window, of a strip of white sanded
beach and blue waters beyond, and of green trees and
meadows between.

“To be sure, if the poor creature is blind, the prospect
does not so much matter,” said Ruth’s mother ; ‘ but then
the little girl can tell her about it, and not let her think I
put her to sleep with her face to the barn, And you say
it is a nice child? I always did say a little girl round the
house was a nuisance I couldn’t and wouldn't bear; but
then some little girls ain’t like all little girls.”

«This one is the nicest child I ever saw,” returned Ruth.
“And you'll teach her your own ways, mother, won't you?
She is not to be brought up a fine lady—that I was to make
sure of—but to be an industrious girl, able to do all sorts of
work. Why, she'll save you some steps, now, mother.”

‘She won’t save as many as she'll make,” replied the
mother, whose opinion of “little girls” was not flattering.
“But you may depend I'll do my best for her, and her poor
mother, too.”

Ruth went back to town quite relieved of all anxiety.
‘Oh! mamma,” cried Silver Thread, eagerly, ‘let me tell
Golden Thread ‘ile to the country. She will be so ©

glad! Mayn’t I tell her?”

“T don’t know, darling. Iam not quite sure that Golden
Thread ought to be exposed to take the fever by coming
here. On the whole, I do not think it would be safe.”

“It’s too bad!” cried Silver Thread.

“Is anything God does ‘too bad’?” asked her mother,
gently. ‘You know it was He who sent you sickness, and
110 SILVER THREAD, .

it is He who makes it unsafe for children to come to see
you.”

“T didn’t think,” said Silver Thread. ‘But I should
like so much to tell Golden Thread.”

“Very likely you would be disappointed if you could see
and tell her. She knows nothing about the country, and can-
not go into ecstasies at the thought of living in it. I will
tell you all she does say when I come home, for I am going
now to see them. Perhaps they will prefer to stay in town.
In that case, of course, I cannot force them to leave it.”

At first it did seem as if leaving the noisy, dirty, unwhole-
some city was going to be a trial instead of a blessing. The
poor woman was so feeble that the thought of exerting her-
self to making any change, made her begin to cry. ‘Then
Golden Thread cried too, and things looked forlorn.

“It's so hard to go among strangers,” said the woman.
‘And to live on charity! If I could do anything to pay my
way, it would be so different! But I never lived on charity
till now.”

One needs patience with poor people as well as with little
children. Silver Thread’s mother had to try hard not to
lose hers, now. }

“While you were well and strong,” said she, “it was
quite right for you to work and not to accept charity. But
now God has laid His hand on you, and set you aside from
labour of any kind. And seeing you so helpless, He has
sent me to do for you what you can’t do for yourself.”

“T never thought as God had anything to do with it.
It was the whitewash, and the bad doctoring, and the damp
My)

SILVER THREAD. 111

room and all, that broke me down. I don’t mean any harm.
I am a poor, ignorant creature, and can’t reason things out
very well. But the alms-house is good enough for such as
we are, and we'd better go there if we must go anywhere.”

“Golden Thread, did you ever see any pretty white
hens?” asked the lady. ‘ Ruth says her mother’s hens
are all pure white, every one of them. And they have cows,
too—I don’t know how many; and when she was a little girl
she used to drive them home from pasture every evening.
You would like to feed the hens and chickens, I’m sure.
And you can't think how sweet and still it is in the country.
Very soon the spring will open, then the fields will be green
and covered with flowers; the birds will begin to sing and
to build their nests, and everything will be bright and
beautiful. Then, as the summer comes on, you will go out
to pick berries in the fields and woods, And you will be
learning all sorts of things. You will learn to milk, and to
hunt for eggs, and by and by to make butter and chéese.”

Golden Thread smiled. She began to think the country
must be nice, after all. To make butter and cheese—
why, that must be better than living in the city! But then
she did not want to do anything mother didn’t, and mother
kept crying !

“ My little daughter wanted, very much, to break this
good news to you,” added the lady, smiling. ‘But I
thought it very likely it wouldn't seem good news at first.
It is not necessary to decide at once what you will do.
You can think it over, and pray it over, and by and by you
will see just what is best to do.”
112 SILVER THREAD.

“Shall we say anything besides * Our Father’ ?” asked
Golden Thread. ‘‘I don’t know any prayer but that, and I
don’t think mother does.””

“I would say that, and I would, besides, tell God just
how troubled and perplexed you feel. Tell Him you do not
- know whether to stay here or go into the country. Ask
Him to make you do whatever is best and will please Him
most.” She spoke to the child, but she hoped the mother
would lay her words to heart.

* “Now, good-bye,” she added, rising to go. ‘‘ Don’t feel
troubled and unhappy. You will see your way out of this
strait, I have no doubt.” She shook hands with them both,
and took leave.

CHAPTER VI.

On hearing the result of her mamma’s visit, Silver Thread
was quite vexed with Golden Thread and her mother.

‘They are not nice people at all,” said she. ‘‘ They are
ungrateful. I hope you never will give them anything again,
mamma.”
. ‘(It is fortunate that the affairs of this world are not in
the hands of ignorant little children,” replied her mamma,
_ smiling. ‘So you would have me turn my back upon them
because they do not jump at my offer?”
SILVER THREAD. 113-

‘ That's what they deserve.”

«But what do you and I deserve? Suppose God should
give us exactly what we deserve, what would He give us,
do you think? Oh! my darling, what a mercy it is that He
does not! And we must try to be long-suffering and patient,
as He is, and not be harsh with our fellow-creatures.”

Silver Thread was silent. She was glad when Ruth came
in to see the colour rush into her cheeks, when told that
the poor woman did not entirely fancy the idea of going to
live in the country.

“It's only too good for such as her to be offered the
privilege of going to live with such as my mother!” she
said, quickly, ‘I begin to see now that you were right,
ma’am, in saying she was as proud as she could be.”

“T am not aware that I said that, Ruth. You forget
yourself. I barely suggested that she had less humility than
you fancied ; and that rather to prepare you for the dis-
appointment I thought might await you. As to pride, we
all have it, in one shape or other.”

“Tt’s a very ugly shape when it makes a body so stuck
up,” said Ruth, who rarely lost her temper, but when she
did, hardly knew where to look for it.

“T never saw it in any shape but an ugly one,” was the
answer. ‘It is certainly very unpleasant to see people too
proud to receive favours. But it is also unpleasant to see
people too proud of their own virtues to make allowances for
the faults of others.”

Rath coloured.

“Ido not mean to be severe with you, Ruth. We are

H
114 SILVER THREAD,

none of us guiltless in this respect. And do not feel irri-
tated about this matter. The next time you see that poor
woman, she will, as likely as not, have changed her mind.”

It turned out to be exactly so. The poor woman was
beginning to feel the effects of God's Spirit on her heart.
She tried to pray as she had been urged to do, and Golden
Thread prayed too, that they might be led to do what would
please Him. They were. groping their way toward Him in
the dark, as it were, and He was coming to meet them more
thar half-way, as our gracious Lord always does to those
who seek Him.

“Mother,” said Golden Thread, “is it nice in the
country ?”

“Folks say itis. I’ve always thought it must be lone-
some. Now, here you see the carriages going up and down,
and crowds of people stirring about, and everybody so wide
awake.”

“But you can't see them, now, mother.”

“No, that's true enough. And the noise in my ears does
tire me some days, May be, too, you'd take a notion to the
country yourself.”

“T should if you did,” replied Golden Thread.

The next day, Ruth, a little ashamed of her anger, asked
lea¥e to go and carry Golden Thread a few fresh eggs, which
she had brought for her from the farm.

The child and her mother were delighted. A breeze from
the furm-house seemed to come invitingly to meet them.
That unknown land, ‘the country,” did not seem so strange
since it sent those white eggs.
SILVER THREAD. 115

‘Don’t you think your mother will wish we hadn't come,
after she’s had ug a little while ?” asked the woman. ‘ For
we shall be a sight of trouble.”

“No, you won't,” answered Ruth. “ Golden Thread can
take all the care of you, lead you about, and all that, and
by degrees you will grow stronger, and can help more than
you'll hinder. And Golden Thread will wash dishes and set
the table, and feed the hens and chickens. There's my
little block that I used to stand on when I wasn't high
enough to reach up to the sink; there's my piece of tin on
it now, that I nailed on one end of it.”

“ What was the tin for ?” asked Golden Thread.

“Why, my block was going to split, and I nailed on a
bit of tin to keep it together.”

“Isn't it lonesome in the country?” asked the poor
woman, @ little timidly.

‘*T don’t think it’s lonesome anywhere, where my mother
is,” said Ruth. “But then she ain’t your mother, and I
ought not to expect you to feel as if she was.”

“How nice it must be to hunt for eggs!" cried Golden
Thread. ‘And you said we should have as much milk as
we wanted! It doesn't seem as if there was as much milk
in the world as that!”

They all laughed, and Golden Thread’s mother began to
think how pleasant it would be for the child to leave that
dirty street, and breathe the pure country air, She began
to wonder how she had happened to think so much of her-
self, and so little of that good patient child whom she
had never yet heard speak one unkind word.
116 SILVER THREAD.

“Oh! Ruth, if your mother will let us, we'll go!” said
she ; “ and we'll try to be as little trouble as we can.”

Ruth went away, well satisfied with this sudden change.
It was then agreed, that on the first of May she should take
them to their new home. Meanwhile, dear little Gertrude
was slowly regaining her strength, and she and Silver
Thread spent many happy hours together with their dolls
and other toys.

Silver Thread began to feel as if she had a sweet little
sister of her own, and when she at last heard that Gertrude
was going home, she nearly made herself ill again with ery-
ing. Poor little Gertrude could not guess what this terrible
distress was about, for they could not make her understand
that she was going away. But she tried to comfort Silver
Thread with kisses and caresses, and after she had gone,
everybody tried to divert the poor broken-hearted child.
Her mamma was very gentle and tender with her, and talked
to her about Jesus, who never has to go away and leave us,
happen what will. And she let her spend the money in her
little purse in buying some things for Golden Thread's
journey. Silver Thread felt very grateful for this favour,
because this was the very money about which she had been
so naughty. She made up her mind how she would have it
spent, and Ruth went out to get the things, which were odd
enough, you may depend. First, there was a basket to put
eggs in, if she should be so happy as to find any eggs.
Next, there was a small tin-cup which she was to fill with
milk and drink, as soon as she had learned how to milk all
herself. Thirdly, there was a sun-bonnet which Golden
SILVER THREAD. 117

Thread was to wear always except on Sundays. Fourthly, a
penny churn, with which to make butter. Fifthly, some
beans and peas, which were to be planted in whatever little
corner might be allowed her for a garden. Last of all, two
buns, lest she should be hungry on the journey. These
things being all spread out on her bed, she looked at them
with great satisfaction, and couldn’t help wishing she was
going on a journey too.

Golden Thread and her mother needed a good many other
things, which were supplied them, and at last they set off with
Ruth, in pretty good spirits. Indeed, Golden Thread would
have been as gay as a lark if her mother had not looked so
pale and tired ; and very soon her amusement and astonish-
ment at every thing she saw on the road, quite amused and
astonished the poor woman herself, and made her glad that
her child could be so free from care.

Ruth felt quite proud when she at last ushered its new
guests into the neat and cheerful farm-house, and saw how
they enjoyed her mother’s bread and butter, and how her
mother enjoyed being kind and friendly to them. After
dinner she made the poor tired woman lie down on her bed,
when, soothed by the sweet stillness, she soon fell asleep.
And then she and Golden Thread went all about the farm,
laughing, and talking, and making merry together with the
eggs they found and the eggs they couldn’t find, and feeding
the hens and paying visits to the cows. Golden Thread
lived as much in that one day as she had lived before in a
month. Oh! how pleasant everything looked to her! Only
she was almost afraid this was only a beautiful dream, and
118 SILVER THREAD.

that by and by she should wake up and hear the carts go
rumbling by, the milk-man shrieking, and the neighbours’
children quarrelling on the stairs.

CHAPTER VII.

Ruts stayed at home four days. She shewed Golden
Thread how to do what work she was able to do, and set up
a blue yarn stocking for her mother to knit, so that she
might not be unhappy from idleness. When she went back
to town, she left them in good spirits, and quite weaned
from the city, which they thought they never should want
to see again. The day after she left was Sunday, and the
farmer brought a waggon to the door, with two seats, and
took them all to church. It was many a year since the
blind woman had been to the house of God. She used to
think Sunday was only fit to rest in, especially for poor folks
who worked hard all the week. But now she could not
make that excuse, for she was resting all the week, not
working. Nor could she say her clothes were not decent,

“for they were as neat and tidy as clothes could be. So she
and Golden Thread sat together in the farmer's big, square

* pew, and had a truly blessed Sunday there. After church,
Ruth's father made Golden Thread stand by his side and
SILVER THREAD, 119

learn the first commandment, and spell out a few verses in
his big Bible, just as he used to do years before with Ruth
herself. Indeed, he soon began to treat the child as if she
were his own little Golden Thread, and to love her dearly;
and he and his wife kept saying how nice it was to have such
a cheerful, pleasant little thing about the house. This did
her mother as much good as the country air and country
food did. She began to feel that they were not a burden,
and to recover her health and spirits. Every pleasant day
she sat, with her knitting, before the door of the house,
looking as peaceful and happy as if she had never known a
care. Yes, happier and more peaceful, for God had blessed
to her the troubles she had passed through, and had taught
her to love Himself. By degrees she left off complaining
that she never expected to live on charity, and grew humble
and thankful, and willing to live just as God would have her.
And after a time she stopped talking about the loss of her
eyes, and only kept saying how happy she was in having
such a home, and such friends, and such a child.

This made everybody kind to her, and Ruth’s mother, as
she bustled about her work, often looked with envy at the
pale placid place, and said to herself,

“I'm afraid she’s on the way to a great deal better place
than this! But it is a pleasure to do what little one can for
her, and to try to make her last days her best days. And if
she's going to heaven, I’m glad she took us in her way !”

About two months after Golden Thread’s entrance into
her new home, she and Silver Thread had the pleasure of
meeting again, The doctor wished Silver Thread to travel
120 SILVER THREAD.

about a little this summer, and try change of air, because
she did not grow very strong, or recover her rosy cheeks.
So, for one thing, they all came to this pretty little village,
and when Silver Thread came out to the farm, Golden
Thread led her about, and shewed her all its wonders, and
they played together in the hay, and fed the chickens, to their
heart’s content.

Silver Thread liked being at the farm better than staying
at the village, where she had no playmate. Her mamma
‘allowed Ruth to take her home to spend a week there,
thinking that she would spend more time out of doors, and
gain strength faster. This was a very pleasant week to both
the children, and they were sorry when Saturday came, and
it was time for Silver Thread to go back.”

«J’ye a good mind not to go,” she said to Ruth, “I
like to stay here, and I think this place agrees with me very
well, indeed. Why can’t you go to the village and tell
mamma I want to stay another week ?”

“TJ should not dare to go without you,” replied Ruth.
“If your mamma should not choose to have you stay, it
would then be too late to take you home to-night. I would
go if I were you, and perhaps she will let you come back
next Monday.”

“But I want to be here on Sunday. Golden Thread says
it is such fun to ride to church in a waggon, and I never

+ rode on a waggon.”

“But I am to drive you home in the waggon as soon as
we have done supper.”

Silver Thread became sullen and silent.
SILVER THREAD. 121

“T don’t want to stay where I am not wanted,” she said
at last.

“We do want you,” cried Ruth. ‘ We all want you.
But how dare I disobey your mamma? Come! do be good.
And I daresay she will let you spend another week.”

Silver Thread’s old bad habits were too strong for her.
She began to cry in a very disagreeable way, kicking her
chair with her feet, and rocking back and forth as if in great
distress. Nobody could do anything with her. Golden .
Thread was frightened, and went and hid in the hay-mow.
Supper was ready, but neither of the children ate any.
Golden Thread was too unhappy, and Silver Thread was too
angry. Ruth’s father brought the waggon to the door,
lifted the crying child into it, and they drove away. Ruth
was thankful to get off; she was ashamed to have her father
and mother see such behaviour. By degrees Silver Thread
stopped crying. Then she began to feel woefully ashamed.
What had she been doing?- What must they all think ?
And what would God do with such a child? Ruth drove
on in silence. She had felt much vexed with Silver Thread,
but she now began to pity her.

“Poor thing!” thought she, ‘she’s got a hard time
before her with that temper of hers. She's the very oddest
child I ever saw. You never can tell one minute what
humour she’ll be in the next.”

After a time, touched by Silver Thread’s swollen, tearful
face, and something unusual in its expression, she said,

“Never mind. It’s all over now. You needn't be afraid
I shall tell your mamma of you.”
122 SILVER THREAD.

“T shall tell her, myself,” was the answer, and then they
drove on without another word, till they reached the house
where Silver Thread's mamma was boarding. Ruth was to
go home with the waggon, and after lifting the child out,
she hastened away, not caring to see the meeting be-
tween them,

“Here is your old Tangle Thread come back,” said the ‘
poor little girl, as her mother ran joyfully to meet her. ‘I’m
not Silver Thread any more. I am worse than cannibals and
- worse than heathens. I'm perfectly dreadful.”

“Why, my dear child, what can you mean?” cried her
mother. ‘What dreadful thing have you been doing ?
Don’t go off and sit by yourself in that way. Come, sit in
your own mamma's lap, and tell me all about it. Don’t you
know how dearly I love you, and how lonely I have been
without you?” She took the child in her lap and soothed
her tenderly. After a time Silver Thread told the whole
story.

“But, my dear little girl, do you expect to become quite
good all at once, like a flash of lightning for instance?” ;

“I don’t know. I know I’m old Tangle Thread, only
worse.”

Her mamma could not help smiling. ‘Old Tangle Thread,
as you call her,” she answered, ‘‘has gone away for ever.
She has left some of her bad habits behind her, it is true,
and they will be often trying to you and to me.” Why, ‘old
Tangle Thread’ was not only naughty, but she never tried to
be good. This little Silver Thread does try, and that very
hard. Tangle Thread never would own she did wrong. She
SILVER THREAD. 128

always disputed about it, and was angry when told of her
faults. Silver Thread has faults, and often is impatient and
angry, and likes to have her own way. But she is sorry
when she does wrong, and often tells me so, with tears.
Above all, my little Silver Thread really loves Jesus, and
prays to Him to make her like Himself, and He will.”

Silver Thread’s little thin hand crept softly into her
mother’s, and her face grew less sorrowful. ‘‘ It makes me
love Jesus to hear mamma talk as if I loved Him,” she said,
to herself. ‘I believe I do love Him. I am sorry I have
been in such a passion. Oh! I wish I hadn’t! I wish I
hadn't !”

I shall not tell you anything more now about Tangle
Thread and Golden Thread.

But I want, before I bid ydu good-bye, to ask you a ques-
tion. Are you the little thread in your mother’s life that
spoils it, or are you the little thread that makes it bright
and beautiful? Perhaps you say, ‘‘I am not so good as
Golden Thread, but I am not half so bad as Tangle Thread.”
And I daresay you are right. Little children are not often
exactly like these. But, on the whole, which are you most
like? You don't know. ThenI beg you to watch yourself
one day, and see. And if you find that you are really trying
to be good, that you are sorry, and say that you are sorry,
when you do wrong; if you sometimes climb into your
mamma’s lap, and kiss her, and promise to do all you can to
please her, then you may safely say to yourself, ‘I am
my dear mother’s little Silver or her little Golden Thread.
124 SILVER THREAD.

I love her and she loves me, and she wouldn't give me away
or sell me for all the treasures in the world.”

Bat if you find that you like to have your own way a great
deal better than you like your mamma to have hers—if you
pout and cry when you cannot do as you please—if you never
own that you are in the wrong, and are sorry for it—never,
in short, try with all your might to be docile and gentle, then
your name is Tangle Thread, Tangle Thread, and you may
depend you cost. your mamma many sorrowful hours and
many tears, And the best thing you can do is, to go away
by yourself and pray to Jesus to make you see how naughty
you are, and to make you humble and sorry. Then the
old and soiled thread that can be seen in your mother’s life
will disappear, and in its place there will come first a silver,
and by and by, with time and patience, and God’s loving
help, a sparkling and beautiful golden one. And do you
know of anything in this world you should rather be than
somebody’s Golden Thread? Especially the Golden Thread
of your dear mamma, who has loved you so many years, who
has prayed for you so many times, and who longs so to see
you gentle and docile, like Him of whom it was said, ‘“ Be-
hold the Lamb of God!”

‘THOMAS PATON, PRINTER, EDINBUROR.
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trait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and Vignette Title
Page.

Sir Walter Scott’s Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.
BY WILLIAM P. NIMMO. 8



NIMMO’S CHEAP EDITIONS OF THE POETS,—continued.



- Lord Byron's Poetical Works.

With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

Thomas Moore’s Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

William Wordsworth's Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

William Cowper's Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

John Milton’s Poetical Works.

With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

William Shakespeare's Complete Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Vignette Title Page. 2 vols.

James Thomson’s Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

Beattie’s,and Goldsmith's Poetical Works.

With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

Alexander Pope's Poetical Works.
With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations, and
Vignette Title Page.

Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Holy War.

With fine Portrait on Steel, and Six full-page Illustrations and
Vignette Title Page.
4 POPULAR WORKS PUBLISHED BY WILLIAM P, NIMMO.

NEW SERIES OF POETICAL GIFT BOOKS,

Tn small crown 8vo volumes, printed on toned paper, bound in extra
bevelled cloth, gilt edges, price 88. 6d. each ; or morocco antique,
price 6s. 6d, each,

LIFE-LIGHTS OF SONG.
A SELECTION OF POETRY.

VOL. 1, SONGS OF GOD AND NATURE.
» % SONGS OF LOVE AND BROTHERHOOD.
» 8 SONGS OF LIFE AND LABOUR,
Epirep sy DAVID PAGE, F.G.S.,
AUTHOR OF ‘* INTRODUCTORY TEXT-BOOK OF GEOLOGY.”

This Series of beautiful Books is specially adapted for School Prizes
and Gift Books. Each Volume is sold separately, and is in
arrangement and appearance quite complete in itself.



NEW PRESENTATION SERIES OF STANDARD WORKS.

In small crown 8vo, printed on toned paper, bound in cloth extra,
gilt edges, bevelled boards, with Portrait engraved on Steel, price

3s. 6d. each, iz
WISDOM, WIT, AND ALLEGORY.

Papers from ‘‘ The Spectator,” with Portrait of App1soy.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN: A BIOGRAPHY,

With Portrait.
ui.

MUNGO PARK’S TRAVELS IN AFRICA.

With Portrait of Park, and an Additional Chapter detailing the Pro-
gress of African Discovery down to the present time.

Other volumes in preparation.

This elegant and useful new Series of Books, while specially adapted
for School Prizes, also form admirable volumes for general presentation.




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'2012-04-05T12:33:13-04:00'
describe
'161924' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
801268cb330200b5a9772438f0e428e2
5107e6be246125003abfc0fd2d472a4fd0c0a741
'2012-04-05T12:20:09-04:00'
describe
'131265' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
65bc166e99ee377aad09f71a9d02c0f1
87fe305b4aa7e843168b5370e1d0fe162fe83605
'2012-04-05T12:19:05-04:00'
describe
'36736' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00011.pro'
5f9e1014866fcabc20fbe5bd6ff54b2f
3b9063ff2b823a061a5d087f12ceeafe30e3a9ac
'2012-04-05T12:34:53-04:00'
describe
'69601' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a46568a255fcbb382867970ebf6373ea
0c18f3b6ecacd79ba53990407fa7d58f96e7428f
'2012-04-05T12:33:09-04:00'
describe
'1319192' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
43081a29611517d7dfc758b5239bf20e
fefb921634f3c5a97391b2c0e1b447df7e459397
'2012-04-05T12:34:17-04:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
5ee66f88c9a34ed2b960ede7e76e3ee1
988d9082cef4cab131a94fcb2731e29e7c18f587
'2012-04-05T12:24:42-04:00'
describe
'36214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
5286cb5e252ddec1697636c61f332098
28089276ed45f7f42a09c6a6d9c06ce8d918195e
'2012-04-05T12:28:56-04:00'
describe
'164109' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
b308cc216041138c8b660ff7ae20d015
d4e7aae65fb1acbb8b9df1bca1044eacedddbcf6
'2012-04-05T12:24:11-04:00'
describe
'131894' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
4095c242a18526fb2b8f71ce497e7b52
7779ef13f1450d56f8b3e5910da24df9b6d7b3cc
'2012-04-05T12:35:10-04:00'
describe
'36667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e9bd72fe2947b1a5f4928fc9a5176424
3052a2861a33579d5d0abb6d1979a43448f02eb0
'2012-04-05T12:34:26-04:00'
describe
'69565' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
83a564bc2a364b130c96aeb30a94a131
eab5eabadd6f927e1639854c83a0f41de087dbb6
'2012-04-05T12:22:22-04:00'
describe
'1336728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
33824fe89c8b846a42c9fd39e90c1bea
9a876f0facf733d9f97e09543bd636cb26a3851f
'2012-04-05T12:29:04-04:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
b67ab122c67b19ccb6c53482cc1490c6
76795de7b8037a944db79325016f83261fc53049
'2012-04-05T12:24:40-04:00'
describe
'37126' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
239db90752b0c6ec44467a156ea07f88
68bebb06c9d13d00d688441a73763c5771bea092
'2012-04-05T12:16:41-04:00'
describe
'165850' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f2021cd7467ff05ffe5dd54aac2b18f3
19c1c0d3f2afa98b0ee8ec15915e06eaf336187f
'2012-04-05T12:26:08-04:00'
describe
'112754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
a53c10a957e0b81dbd29456f4946188f
27a343676cf8b6496393b4cb59011f34289d9267
'2012-04-05T12:25:05-04:00'
describe
'30481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
535a78bfa7c1ff41b807262f2ca73fe8
006fd40393698f474bd7aef3281e312297787c5a
describe
'61387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
84bf1f536a685defcb4afeac1fb7637e
a79463c54a1ea53e919cd8eb9e675e9e978724d3
'2012-04-05T12:19:35-04:00'
describe
'1349380' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
bc13c197187c745b8f9f0c1b8749e44f
4343b7edb5ac649e13209c6e546fef49fb8c702f
'2012-04-05T12:29:02-04:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
8b96ea2461706abcc6c032711c0c394b
a24b8e2fab6a4454d9eed4b47f3f4c6432b44735
'2012-04-05T12:19:16-04:00'
describe
'33669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
be5abf86345f5639e90fa9bf25d28c95
06b81077ea7b133909363bda55ccdd89a68b4694
'2012-04-05T12:22:00-04:00'
describe
'158512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
570cd8747be0e34944597c3ea2d82508
15f343bfb24533e34cae3e10de76ab7ee985f816
'2012-04-05T12:32:30-04:00'
describe
'131546' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
7ac4ce69ed2520b7bce1384589195e13
d7d62ef7da3501b67d1bfe7930b675a4973c1763
'2012-04-05T12:34:37-04:00'
describe
'36550' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
742b1c07ebf7a44fd761df49d1d5d13a
1c61c1a6c331094933634e4355ef930108ee176a
'2012-04-05T12:25:36-04:00'
describe
'71158' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
3c7efe45b60438a1eedea08dab10542c
4efe2a9c5c740249dfd3c392498e915a88f204ed
'2012-04-05T12:32:34-04:00'
describe
'1291464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1976a9dbfc9ad76d379bb9200393630d
aa029f6a1c30c6799ef8d39b99d152c1f22faef4
'2012-04-05T12:20:05-04:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ced98f59494484a6789403ad09fbef0d
4b04e7bb25ad0ce4ffc1ae5ee1b62f10484bfc80
'2012-04-05T12:23:18-04:00'
describe
'36972' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
d7bcaf085cb2c002751c9063d17ed13a
186e00bfe931a479a35e3adca0b1f690d6d523b8
'2012-04-05T12:28:54-04:00'
describe
'154285' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1e1e4593bd1e79e0262e0022a1ab006f
84e2e946c18a923cffcec2fc944e95480ec458cf
'2012-04-05T12:19:23-04:00'
describe
'124901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
0616e202b2832c3971835d955ba6f47d
c9b99b1ae80bdd77bbb84d9eba078f03f2b0c895
'2012-04-05T12:28:33-04:00'
describe
'34014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
e58c4e3fb0dffde1a190ca1919b09aea
a9223270914f62ac2990a66bbace74eb45de4b86
'2012-04-05T12:18:43-04:00'
describe
'68135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7b4c0bcfbdb0f9d845ad2f05cb4edb35
05703209d17a487530f6860b17fbf0d9c71e2836
'2012-04-05T12:30:24-04:00'
describe
'1257916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d73db6d31b622572a0fe697f087addef
4602dca0dd9a7ce9e8984a06070f11d66d0767aa
'2012-04-05T12:21:08-04:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
4a11a8584bcfc0e4c580e5090b4449b0
3869eadaef42c5fc776129eff3776589ae24f51a
'2012-04-05T12:21:48-04:00'
describe
'38203' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
686895a463c103c9e90547081198f7e2
a36f00eb454e1ba74c061ab02a4d88b69df7646f
describe
'160758' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
ceaa9f77b7f8c23ef7f974fbfe1cb76d
4f8929c1482510a0cf15a5a14806cf3c78c03d58
'2012-04-05T12:16:52-04:00'
describe
'114904' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f72e1a89b84ddcc2e7b21b8b88b3fc9b
95727b7b80b41db7339aae3944f29c32a04273c8
'2012-04-05T12:21:42-04:00'
describe
'31118' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
5fcb8ed78e400df978625d840e18c646
eabf628aad2feca9409cb1b1231fe11db42227c7
describe
'61082' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6e5f06816cdd67b3384c428a233b7e8f
af6c2073f423bc0d5dccf6d98bff476904b14631
'2012-04-05T12:20:04-04:00'
describe
'1308832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f21fb863a8e70f0799f99eabe5444e81
ad4b521909c842ad5b1cde7f4393a184771a7132
'2012-04-05T12:19:53-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
4213c2932891f641abdd530375fed998
ed0d1eac8db448083a2e033d92348e5fe0efcf57
'2012-04-05T12:20:01-04:00'
describe
'34726' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4564f926d782576386a92108e6827866
1a805704d44b4927cb41f8676ab72f146456d96b
'2012-04-05T12:21:03-04:00'
describe
'161339' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
eb4794be0ed8dc1b4f67af1a29832c53
012df82225c7e4b8f2804c3d3e11f14580cdaac8
'2012-04-05T12:34:45-04:00'
describe
'128739' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7c5fc0ecbbf8f7296e9ff5fa1a5e5bb0
ac73261f4a9e0da29ceaf8578358ad37f0fcce68
'2012-04-05T12:24:45-04:00'
describe
'35393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d08a0d5c4ab28e7d18e0fa1cb3268ea2
e31dc7bfb5fefeb3d235a9d7794eec45d25abb9a
'2012-04-05T12:18:34-04:00'
describe
'67782' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
49cd9a0bc330ebf562f212048559f473
7f838709034d8160bd5acb50ef21f6d908b6e493
'2012-04-05T12:17:14-04:00'
describe
'1313832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c2f743cd17936e06b7338e32d332ab83
6ec37c74566760a5edae6d93114d8818b258f7d2
'2012-04-05T12:19:29-04:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a2c7bd0d9c0e361ba89aeeb8e32f02f7
02ff6e33f45d1a3e6c4d075cc56fd8730d9b4426
'2012-04-05T12:17:07-04:00'
describe
'36430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
eb3f31d3dbd72a1414a120696c7a931a
a735baad1f49e024975d280ddc75cebd4ce1e187
'2012-04-05T12:21:24-04:00'
describe
'161204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2723f3d485eabaf130f75af6bc9d8be2
b1016aa6d6a5adcfba834b279c878b5e1d173ea0
'2012-04-05T12:21:22-04:00'
describe
'132269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
55d6de2f1d3439a5e37278ca391b72f6
2f9e2bda4d6acfe7fcd0b494f0c48c2352fbbd4d
'2012-04-05T12:23:22-04:00'
describe
'36502' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
9fec32e53cf4f983d1691c2991718f81
ac724ef4c8e482c8a9a58fb41348aabfc222dddf
'2012-04-05T12:19:45-04:00'
describe
'70272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
142bce1eca83e2790d2d261450d3bbd7
ff7523931e92a33cda4410acaf2dfd388b4c3aed
'2012-04-05T12:25:20-04:00'
describe
'1313828' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
af3300cdc191f9d57970f7a920e0c19d
986557fd312bbf61df6cc529e0b5ee1a3f89041f
'2012-04-05T12:32:42-04:00'
describe
'1563' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ef96ca8a87fdaf94d241142d0340c844
18e69c8a79ab71d255c38bb3ab6922e2421ab278
describe
'37368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
6c21ae38135f98754486e6598418cf34
5eb00b91173a2974dc15102c987d9480a84b5e97
'2012-04-05T12:24:01-04:00'
describe
'163095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
d611f7003ded64cb253fe2fe9c44900b
b7d3b6e31315845c5b41b73d4042f1b4dbb23978
'2012-04-05T12:23:10-04:00'
describe
'110365' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f6629e686316fa7fe7bb93486bf627f7
122db9de5d2aabf7ecd8d0903cb58f74dd0a54ea
'2012-04-05T12:34:46-04:00'
describe
'28150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
05403170ec9e598084a034ea1240a1b8
dc8f12fd54c0b1c67306385f78b72e03fac17f35
'2012-04-05T12:23:46-04:00'
describe
'59885' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c72e8d6dd6bf73e6a730d9ebae937380
faf84bb7ac26f6a390ce1af5b31f29c223f60ef8
'2012-04-05T12:26:49-04:00'
describe
'1327560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
574dc8970f91e7204383d118dc3e7704
a659f8b701cb725e1b6f5d47f5fffa7c855bac4e
'2012-04-05T12:29:34-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
0ca76172455ddb3eca88e8cf6df0961a
4f4c868d3b445addec476bd3c2ea0902dc109eff
'2012-04-05T12:23:52-04:00'
describe
'33532' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
445111547e08db06c8dd4faf51297f39
42f95fb2664a2548052b4e038ad351aafb7d9f8b
'2012-04-05T12:33:32-04:00'
describe
'170239' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
04605f98f365c25d617bbbfcb5db59b7
080e906f5d922911ab0b6e5e33d32a1504f4ce9b
'2012-04-05T12:34:44-04:00'
describe
'133725' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
72f4fe70c791f4cd282f5c3d9d6ef744
40dd05f59f876f2e1f1bc6bfbbb3f051aedf5d08
'2012-04-05T12:33:18-04:00'
describe
'34518' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
59eddef4497fd1fc720bff00f5a5b412
d480a4d8b211e05cfabc4a1c13d8930e631c389a
'2012-04-05T12:18:39-04:00'
describe
'70902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
c2386e4b721fe2d6916b1d8d8d5f9424
56b42a8fc467b9d58b2facc975aa7f40ecc2ee9d
'2012-04-05T12:16:56-04:00'
describe
'1385560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
38a3ea8bac3fcb334a63c16646720daa
5dc25f8fb2b119ff9562b9c747a4fd8aa1f4afc2
'2012-04-05T12:21:55-04:00'
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
13cc035d76d129169628a90cd5ac2f40
91a2c00344ff2ab89d4db4a031ff28ce8fb91781
'2012-04-05T12:20:44-04:00'
describe
'36949' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
25d79ced223a3136fd57da6a52ea99d6
e22001f47d4c6558919f7064db31fa716cd1eb28
'2012-04-05T12:21:58-04:00'
describe
'165040' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
04120b4930795d814dce130a2960a066
5f752408a10d8bce17132087ace4f27700300399
'2012-04-05T12:32:07-04:00'
describe
'115139' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
a7d1d427073084a1fa52a136c10e0c38
d88ae6bd3a7c4dde86d67806926b7972b4faf2c9
'2012-04-05T12:22:29-04:00'
describe
'29315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
647b1b47b4a790e4d77d579a96666eb7
c768611a8b86ba02ce470442ccab5ad049c26367
'2012-04-05T12:18:50-04:00'
describe
'61959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b57decd3e84eed2dfa1ca84af40e1a69
5da138860d7a47ad7483934b8db1f535e6238078
'2012-04-05T12:25:29-04:00'
describe
'1343240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
50ec555def0ad57320d1b733f0300977
57caa3d41c7710482edbf74eabc70900464b3c71
'2012-04-05T12:27:42-04:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
dfec63ff98dee4c7ee648b62315b01c2
2109460f6560da4ad81638e115a074aa06b920a9
'2012-04-05T12:33:11-04:00'
describe
'35063' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7be7203ec9240edcb8f678059e3e5671
4c02aecea3ad702b42d500d4b52dcbf72ebcb5d5
'2012-04-05T12:32:26-04:00'
describe
'164229' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQST' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
9447e3f86292df5adc06211b3c1f0997
48645eed3f5a5589360ed0f1e3614d03606a3010
'2012-04-05T12:35:13-04:00'
describe
'126600' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
802f27b42ec15d6daab270dd6f257ed7
a492d56bc60705c48f2e6b4116b69e1a46c1826d
'2012-04-05T12:32:17-04:00'
describe
'34406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
81b0c64a88e9a43892b491528c5fa068
cf5381f967245d932af481df2df47c3d075495b0
'2012-04-05T12:28:06-04:00'
describe
'67155' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
af59f081fd887609da4a74d8acc8c9b2
81d7b58f3edbeec3cabe5c339386b2a6cedffda9
'2012-04-05T12:34:38-04:00'
describe
'1336828' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
e5fe515640db461d2be84efb17d62eb0
09871bbedb0bada27dbda8466497cafbc9610c30
'2012-04-05T12:25:11-04:00'
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
3c7e9472e83cf350be95364612fc84d7
c8790b7058dca9f305eb6c8ad2bc7783b6bcec06
describe
'35665' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b35eb04d613bb2f9698f7566778611b5
61e20674370b1ad7d958e6ff769a0a4631ce1c71
'2012-04-05T12:19:17-04:00'
describe
'166145' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
82af9182dc4455a9797a1304544181a5
f832e73270334aa4b911be7cad2be457cca07e40
'2012-04-05T12:32:01-04:00'
describe
'137831' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
df9fa1e18e35af2e4ba1a147b4c64208
bf02d7c00f5830d07758a7ffd35afe27394526dd
'2012-04-05T12:16:37-04:00'
describe
'39411' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
fe44a6a7064a842dc17c003815288284
abeb2c8d8d6626caaee877571451e49c7c5a32d0
describe
'71160' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
a0e83d679e146ebb7458fd300854fd61
6647b19c52423a217909fff205f1f853ba9c152a
'2012-04-05T12:28:40-04:00'
describe
'1352924' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
ed534951810039b30d544b728d9a0a9f
0359d7b90c629947b7ec6894c6989468b968a650
'2012-04-05T12:22:11-04:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
93c5b808755ca24332e15b48d9e1cb45
3e137f456ad2beeead8f44a2d67c4c0b91baf693
'2012-04-05T12:20:16-04:00'
describe
'36851' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
93f0dd7b3d557154224eb6dc80828336
3610f1381c6b73830545f11e24ce76d32af6016d
'2012-04-05T12:31:09-04:00'
describe
'168151' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
64dc9dea967a8956c46e064fe8e4a9e3
9b60291ab0fd47102c03bb84f92c97a836133781
'2012-04-05T12:19:28-04:00'
describe
'130598' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a8792b6c55ab8cf1f2f1744c8f41da37
71f505148e53bef5c3274e4f069b288a602fbc6c
'2012-04-05T12:22:47-04:00'
describe
'35656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
0baad7da318880462a24e4601fcb8311
b35cca0bc110301fb6521a802f59a7968401f1dd
'2012-04-05T12:22:57-04:00'
describe
'68999' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
116357854d7378453c8bbc21a72c4ffb
c2fa7b149f201ef61066a2d0cb982efb53157648
'2012-04-05T12:27:23-04:00'
describe
'1369476' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
9a6ea8c2492bcbc14160758d9079b2b0
3de352e5a4a9f05052eefe4a333d36412ba9c5fb
'2012-04-05T12:24:34-04:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
55426a42e14602b9fa9bce95a99edf2f
38baf9bfc66c9953b28ec239ddfba963bc9c4ef0
'2012-04-05T12:28:57-04:00'
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0c8ff6026a4b8dfa633290ba71cf5434
9256ab9b56b19c8bafa92514ab0efeaf6b9ac685
'2012-04-05T12:25:23-04:00'
describe
'158423' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
b99f60dc17e26605839c38113b36b944
ce651fdc2384195dd08c5d6e5894e1f8b3bb9965
'2012-04-05T12:31:30-04:00'
describe
'128826' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
88d2e9803c73dce6a58452b28965dc35
40d36de52f9f3a0d71601315761c0b1ed45e217c
'2012-04-05T12:33:48-04:00'
describe
'34277' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
b48c4cc9367f37dda27dada2725402c6
046046c6e4b2ec008cc284ef80600f2940300257
describe
'69749' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
5906d16d34e173b8c9189f1eb1fab6df
e3b9ed7306dc93cf67913b7367e758fd7218dbe4
'2012-04-05T12:21:59-04:00'
describe
'1291592' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1d7a188b0acb4fbd55db85dbebea88e6
95dc9f923e378e517069a28c70ab8d7686c356f2
'2012-04-05T12:31:35-04:00'
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00025.txt'
058457947eba10b56f2e00fe0457723f
20b5462611df13502c2fe2db1d6d291b5d3bebc1
'2012-04-05T12:34:28-04:00'
describe
'37021' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b199eb09f797f5edeab7a2e3771b13f0
329616cac09f64aecf5ebf26965af5791a08c675
'2012-04-05T12:16:57-04:00'
describe
'162307' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
14f7f720bdeb2088c6cf210aaacab828
e1b9010554306b278a0bea0a53a09fac82bad70a
'2012-04-05T12:28:04-04:00'
describe
'128771' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
03454efdfc894ba4bf634d3fc0a5ae34
b04387d1614353c70d8c6c64788836813600f0d9
'2012-04-05T12:31:44-04:00'
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
344f2779e5068ea134b40a443a9d76aa
f358850ba4de4cd1f9a4655fde109fa70281260b
'2012-04-05T12:29:46-04:00'
describe
'67100' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
4ce7c27184e7653fa323a67b91b5a44b
58f97c5e02f9cdfc238cf97a241380e8fec15bfd
describe
'1321656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f453ef1c52d862a21c27088fa8cf91ac
e1247a1d24a24205b67e0efe7c25127868dc725f
'2012-04-05T12:31:48-04:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
89abebb9a737b6c9581bbe9763d40164
e92d0a1ba4bce35b289c36e900bdae3700a53eb2
'2012-04-05T12:22:38-04:00'
describe
'36920' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0e8414c990a8f24288c7ddb56350aa95
442120ebb12cba266428220c1d775ed7ce8a9082
'2012-04-05T12:33:22-04:00'
describe
'160902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3fcaaca0f54f2cd1243a6612d6e0a5c8
1dc21a922cf10e184951bf6d008c78f6dc83b3f7
'2012-04-05T12:23:04-04:00'
describe
'116219' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
898ac3ce0470efcf3e8a8f8c88bb9043
8516fbc6dc14095d11c524742efbf20f80208598
describe
'30361' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
166b72b6a43a63c2a46bcff4e23f6cd9
2918a1bb4ec2d418f6711a6eb6cf42c7a7f62318
'2012-04-05T12:23:44-04:00'
describe
'62105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
2cbf6dad9a930cfc72f5c36e22419519
355e5f736605a37370570e9aef2885f163b7594e
'2012-04-05T12:21:35-04:00'
describe
'1310244' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
3ce624a9835e39ff979294f39088e605
f9fbfe62bf36f9144c962a2a6b2de1e81dde4801
'2012-04-05T12:18:27-04:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ef061bbee4b752dfb59c26970aa322ae
d2342b056ba3266d2b8286318789c4916940c3e0
'2012-04-05T12:23:39-04:00'
describe
'34490' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c2dd4ffd1d73f277b4036de5e600a604
856bd721a46396502d0df9567e91b45e39516dba
'2012-04-05T12:17:59-04:00'
describe
'161852' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
8ecbcc38a02a96a665b8f32433f92f01
95d16d7a799820bd125ea8e0325d448ffad6d583
'2012-04-05T12:21:31-04:00'
describe
'129315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b3f9d1ebfbbdfe6905dbca54ff103428
c48ba5c79e48c17db5596acce66aa95192967ea8
'2012-04-05T12:23:21-04:00'
describe
'34529' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
14c70eeb2fd1793d608760783ca16ab1
e1f749caed4a5bde185937cc046a362c2124525c
'2012-04-05T12:22:25-04:00'
describe
'67925' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
790c95bea44838d06c780376db868178
dccb9dd7be32f82f50cb82676add9eda68d9d9e4
'2012-04-05T12:27:07-04:00'
describe
'1318468' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1e0865acd3d1cd9de416efb60b247b3f
d98ea49745164727f345d4c1b0fa3da226cc39e1
'2012-04-05T12:17:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
ae62f4a9aa89003d31a6fa37334f0071
f5bc2bf43687a6006f1eebfca117fea32a0a460c
'2012-04-05T12:19:31-04:00'
describe
'37725' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
1e6f76ac47154c65583307ef3c87e3f4
912a60c5b2a952a35bf9fdb23632cd593b9772a6
'2012-04-05T12:32:56-04:00'
describe
'160683' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
010cd8dde8d56181cd2ad88f9624c1f7
0801d48bbe539108745e78435429cbd2fe356202
'2012-04-05T12:21:38-04:00'
describe
'132305' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
807c62e9c02f17df63dddfc4e8856f99
0f7010c534d04d310b6caf8ca4021ad369adc91d
'2012-04-05T12:20:08-04:00'
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8bf3b823eddb2f249003d3ca8170ad40
56c441e8bca3b91aa94c226d6c4a83eba7d20666
'2012-04-05T12:28:17-04:00'
describe
'70115' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
252d4879a14e6f71ec6400196d404e6b
faa8eec71c0ba573cbda2dc281bd6c7695611fe9
'2012-04-05T12:33:43-04:00'
describe
'1309516' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a49fae44cdf6bd5a1a5647bbee5382a7
cfcd1e24d3d9bab7d4dae08d9684f1b306f54111
'2012-04-05T12:30:52-04:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
6e51bde1b09098d694c8720c3290238c
28af31acd7a580d3d0660ed4b32d851c88f3a710
describe
'36804' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
729cbe9a94156ddb6cb0a1a13339fae8
cf387faa64bfe611939bb2b3d1feef0825985029
'2012-04-05T12:18:42-04:00'
describe
'159264' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
5fdcffff2290c3925daf75a88e429744
aea36221891de629487d4bf725de97ba4c7c4eb6
'2012-04-05T12:28:43-04:00'
describe
'137119' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
27f83ef27f8bf70f10fa0cc101b20e9e
bb9535bd6167d7aae6844c23ec5ed5f4c2cedcdd
'2012-04-05T12:19:59-04:00'
describe
'37451' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
68b83b5a281aacaf5d9fa0227e798e65
5067b45dd3375690e5f41f604ee372de26934732
'2012-04-05T12:19:26-04:00'
describe
'71210' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2211680cb7f0f732ba456fee6802d62d
2ee382551975b42cdcc18890fcdeaafc69d65300
'2012-04-05T12:17:58-04:00'
describe
'1297692' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0290ee5ff08f1a6408a3e550d8d3ec06
72f3169fd1501c3f1b3bd6944e7aab3ca1a1f30f
'2012-04-05T12:31:29-04:00'
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c76918d1d15f6c2157b4f7671273359b
8a1a65e983afb962b654ed984a005bfe6392d3ad
'2012-04-05T12:21:20-04:00'
describe
'38376' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1e75b96631dd567b0f2558aaa3c4808a
dcd99ebfd4cecd5376ff216c2701482cabe5b863
'2012-04-05T12:24:53-04:00'
describe
'158514' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
ece0f895a254713f53f6769a2bb74ba0
a7cf317797a9b3d3d78e16c4b3bc81e519826651
'2012-04-05T12:27:46-04:00'
describe
'137964' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
7a12d8c9120726b54ca3b3c55043dc12
2b52b7c6e07c2bded283db39a1897c26d62ccf74
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
77703114cdc185ac0b660b93e1a403e2
a3d3e98a789bd8d2f84d35a4d2e6164bbfdf95a3
'2012-04-05T12:24:00-04:00'
describe
'72616' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
eb13f73893b027678077785a99310f1e
b1725340873c669e3cdeed027b08c9041b725594
'2012-04-05T12:30:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
93fe224feead5cd28962cfcd0c94300b
14c80c1ef91cdc7748b0056541ec680a272897a8
'2012-04-05T12:30:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
0b44c4ddc32cdd43b29f16b5d4806674
b428049cfd9cc2f4134544e187adde1ea3d3a1d1
'2012-04-05T12:33:55-04:00'
describe
'37344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
6bb167b48d29eb8303665f03a700128f
592473ee1fe6c1d5d95d028b1ab937d5d5674b2b
'2012-04-05T12:25:09-04:00'
describe
'23811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
c2474df24f9831c8e106fb8fa80fb4f2
0c8d087b57ef56fba06699f91dcba9e7be4bada2
'2012-04-05T12:30:13-04:00'
describe
'27606' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
589151d18d38c41aa33820825d63efde
6c1a3a80031a9bd9f52665a7d582b20011a8de8b
'2012-04-05T12:30:28-04:00'
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
1eda26f57f177abffbcc274b7748cc94
f4b4e13784a5c8a58b287c4dbf225274873557c5
'2012-04-05T12:20:02-04:00'
describe
'22630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
f0aa44b24392b5ad01adc330e04be7ea
0e6f71c7e2531b2f5abe83445bf64b3b57010de9
'2012-04-05T12:17:39-04:00'
describe
'1162976' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d3a5b79a8e6023162f1a615c8d67ed91
b85b8842d9288bb777aade3e406e9de6ac1a5722
'2012-04-05T12:27:22-04:00'
describe
'83' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
22cc950a182afa12e9d0c2fc7f9d9fe9
2a8b1f4c80840959e1cf4a3fec4dde5d205f1ae7
'2012-04-05T12:17:28-04:00'
describe
'20448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
13b2a845aa17f1585fa7f4ff4774884c
3b1a8f5d7fd8ed388cf17b218b793d6a1065ac93
'2012-04-05T12:20:48-04:00'
describe
'19886' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d7651efd8dd314aacbebbeea3976a29e
ae83879290a6a511956f5c9389236c48464a19e7
'2012-04-05T12:23:48-04:00'
describe
'24729' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
25107fc975265c47e89340a3a3200401
22be267f4b33c31962a4d1b972b8b962257cb6a5
'2012-04-05T12:32:31-04:00'
describe
'20679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
79b0703efbff7fe200a922d0896b0be1
d170396438e69c925d899eab97d0c5c3e827b62b
'2012-04-05T12:31:03-04:00'
describe
'1274272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1c9c1f7e4d2a47f3a171c4c52c4d4124
52c4a35fed62c63e40d83f3e246250af06ae0488
'2012-04-05T12:24:04-04:00'
describe
'19301' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
62ab5b886ea711761f8c0dbc35393c7c
bfc564203b22a3edea185887b1f45f656486949c
'2012-04-05T12:23:50-04:00'
describe
'161418' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
628a97f91c8c154206afac938aa7b9f4
ec7ffc529701383c6505741bc98dcf6e50abc957
'2012-04-05T12:22:51-04:00'
describe
'92552' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
991c41a7987ad45811e2631d72a40c89
c1efee8db4efe6a1472d5a4601ab051d922e9633
'2012-04-05T12:27:31-04:00'
describe
'22408' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f54a1507418ec248b538c71490f0b060
d5cbe319ccb037a35046d24bef61c0a85baa11b8
'2012-04-05T12:31:47-04:00'
describe
'51990' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
56679fa1e6f8d677f121b89f3c816c95
85cec0e1051bd1d9b83276f2070ad942e2477236
'2012-04-05T12:19:36-04:00'
describe
'1313092' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00034.tif'
979a4c58b9a8ce88875bffc1e264c693
4e7f3a16fbdc3dbfd1b3b2c1142c02b34d82963f
'2012-04-05T12:17:34-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00034.txt'
48a267cec184f69a21101cbaaa19d038
bd0314ca967edf8f733f037bfbb9304f0b9c533d
'2012-04-05T12:33:12-04:00'
describe
'30733' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
2a5222c5a5ff06a223dab78c15c8c57f
ebd3d7b48c7d67c69e1fc16358836ed037eb39c8
'2012-04-05T12:29:18-04:00'
describe
'157400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ce953dbf5ee2d5f261065d1e2fe614c0
7946d4b153c6ba0ffc400f2a79a7a42b8311349d
'2012-04-05T12:21:51-04:00'
describe
'143035' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
73791c4686a00c78dd9e2ab3cc17836a
8f502d950e09957a19198dbd057fff2f8c09a4d0
'2012-04-05T12:35:05-04:00'
describe
'41452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
d0482849f4b3c1e37b390dcac486d445
338ac852db5f5b4901554748b540d058efb6969a
'2012-04-05T12:28:08-04:00'
describe
'74772' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8cc5e599ee94ffeafb084d894f1704af
065b88f321f7b73f9214d7516423a8468f3ad7f8
'2012-04-05T12:30:01-04:00'
describe
'1282740' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00035.tif'
a5698c5adc90804dcf664cda4c48551d
0b44203980ea5e728649b3bff3b41fb4ef766170
'2012-04-05T12:22:54-04:00'
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
821990e2af8b72ce27233c984e0d7823
d721474d9b4b8b87d0784ef8a532e4510355846f
'2012-04-05T12:30:41-04:00'
describe
'38171' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
cc3ac2a90ffa21f655e3a086cf381cbf
1a030950bc79e76835707225940d049b10677d7c
'2012-04-05T12:25:18-04:00'
describe
'161003' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
1ad636d0d18064d477339aef8ca20ded
0405ec9067647a8ca2f3f1a88bc83b68ed139cc5
'2012-04-05T12:34:16-04:00'
describe
'117460' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
12866495584aebc813df301abe0f5de4
48a308a87e7af4aee4aebfce113c548db5b9451d
'2012-04-05T12:17:24-04:00'
describe
'32026' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00036.pro'
ffe2e6761e83327ca90df0b551f97d5c
1cf6563e1d3288a843d83ebdf9acb5af9fafe8a7
'2012-04-05T12:25:41-04:00'
describe
'62437' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
a3b355e0a81780afda8b06272039e695
0f7ebb641152e0ce95f08201b4ba019d8c321ee3
'2012-04-05T12:17:57-04:00'
describe
'1311144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0d1408bf7bfcc37fe17d9428cf96b6c1
dc4e99de80cff4e19090d2f9db38233e1853bb0a
'2012-04-05T12:30:11-04:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00036.txt'
10e9c47b40eb9abf7b43640230a5ebce
c9ef0630e5a57d8e16687dd760697505780c78cb
'2012-04-05T12:29:09-04:00'
describe
'34602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
4debb234e59f82f1ff9566ea6af4b6ff
aaf798d4dfabedf1997dcca65c98f23c978f6f98
'2012-04-05T12:34:58-04:00'
describe
'161210' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ca3f7039ce414c63b1a1e9af7abbf02d
05c37563dad91fbca8639d4b18fc6aeafb8f0ad7
'2012-04-05T12:23:09-04:00'
describe
'146351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
56d4547f6e3d868d3ed8071d4f77125b
ddb0a6cf545479c4b8eaaa39db2ac6c7abd2e269
describe
'41278' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d74a04e5b08f03405d886b45dad67582
d39cd7146db261bf303595ce68998384c15404f0
describe
'75952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
c82cfa34aea3892c8918cea7561778ee
f4b78101830ed535e7d3b55b7205050d9b1e59da
'2012-04-05T12:20:35-04:00'
describe
'1313600' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5e96b0671dffda85e6eb61c0b3197fd4
4ea55faac603024bc901fa0cbb23c72905cf1ef3
'2012-04-05T12:31:41-04:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00037.txt'
8c86af8934bc85626014071c350e42b6
354ec288ef9be4ceb1b97ba2dbb1ff2ddc452d6d
'2012-04-05T12:24:06-04:00'
describe
'38623' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
39ba26218668da19dfe8958591d97212
14b5eb94bc7e54a130beaa51a5d7c8820092ea31
'2012-04-05T12:22:01-04:00'
describe
'158834' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
71710f2dc9c2123ff7071a91a64f91f5
2660cb82a4f9f1f3e56accfd5bc5af6601b7e231
'2012-04-05T12:30:18-04:00'
describe
'144164' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
854b149dd028558490c7f545de5a1f24
4adb8691cde032a18b289fad336119a002094145
'2012-04-05T12:28:13-04:00'
describe
'39709' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4b3609bc6d04e1fd081a2952d0856399
cb139a6925a66d7386e0f66bc7507c8820ccdd84
'2012-04-05T12:22:39-04:00'
describe
'75004' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
01cf245c64da77cc3d3441fc0ab59de6
3ecc5257ee1181f6f65d1537ff45f0b10e96e389
'2012-04-05T12:29:17-04:00'
describe
'1295432' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00038.tif'
d66a96e7891a27928a993e625433765f
7bc659c869fe243389ce84e94fe340b8551db6a9
'2012-04-05T12:18:30-04:00'
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00038.txt'
75db7bec58f7395ae7cfa811a2a12819
cc6497ed739a87728ad1eca40a9ee49f28cdb56b
'2012-04-05T12:28:32-04:00'
describe
'38369' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
a2b43a8ed45a3565f983c5da4b573d2c
91bb4fdba24e9743778991d07dc3ce06dea9fd4f
'2012-04-05T12:33:23-04:00'
describe
'158347' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
5bf29caea33c8903f37d9bb76c610f32
588560f80b842f3bc936602b1b8f8086a2999e85
'2012-04-05T12:28:41-04:00'
describe
'134969' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
281d8412b59519563d6bdcd9ca54d0f1
6eb6da55aa20caf05434fdfbacc9ebf549e2ed2a
'2012-04-05T12:19:18-04:00'
describe
'37630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
9895c56596dad4f751d4747db212f813
75e4baf3eaab7b07bc44d87d793afb85222421af
'2012-04-05T12:22:05-04:00'
describe
'71446' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
cf2837676e34324badfb00e46f6dfa03
ca2ff140f1b05d12338376929d6622ef82f8adbf
describe
'1291084' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ef9d10a790c91e686e1f5a7c7ca1b8cb
a359922eb470ef485f8860b219be5373dee88d53
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3febf6863ea95157852502e4bd41be87
417bcfc728388dbd27541bee64045a750878d813
'2012-04-05T12:32:21-04:00'
describe
'38088' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
3a5c5e40302b8dee72b96ade72237f2e
c4825ac7794bf3e87bf50651db0c4fae6d0da309
'2012-04-05T12:33:39-04:00'
describe
'161217' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d1dea92d0fd4837bf0d2c9bd183ce068
ac999843dd76f3927451ed9f28357c2d37d5780b
'2012-04-05T12:19:20-04:00'
describe
'128887' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b24a80ba9458a54b9e50ca344db2c177
96985ca6b355ba6f1071e7c99241c115d0b5a00f
'2012-04-05T12:18:19-04:00'
describe
'36480' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00040.pro'
627d9c091b97f389a6a742a74bf5bda7
2c963d0308542589064a07559d804e3d74a265fb
'2012-04-05T12:31:02-04:00'
describe
'68324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
e3168d13cd7952813bab7f3e9e658afb
d1c62d2fe3cecdb0bea145b32ff4a75bcd586ec6
'2012-04-05T12:34:30-04:00'
describe
'1313492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
dca68811ba5cd4db5eeeb41722d63c3c
3f01e5c23f68e114d203f20a1ab95a45d91157b6
'2012-04-05T12:30:00-04:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
4c2ac7c4f5bc3aba4f6168ed1265957a
3404605eee7c2d19d2fb9d338f9255cc9ea20cb4
'2012-04-05T12:35:12-04:00'
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
5ec24f450d618b5e2c9e3343430fa9b8
8b9f01bf46c59df323bbacc336fe2534d77709c9
'2012-04-05T12:18:59-04:00'
describe
'157564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
e5d59a2dafb39b2faba59bd94be2267d
b609b38d1607494af0c16c9c56aa74f77f153149
'2012-04-05T12:27:26-04:00'
describe
'111540' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ffbc839218e6ace40b518687371ce8a6
260c1bacd540e97bb31fbe3da94d71b10ecfdb41
describe
'28522' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
e4fbf3735e686d03f0cc6ead796e0b4e
cb58044c1deb73c04f49665d233529e675d87da5
describe
'61067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
b1838d7071274452259ad55a9c2fd182
4a1084d6d2e4a55a9beabb97d1365b920135d289
describe
'1283112' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
c4274711ca17e9c6fd774f128b6691c1
f2d3d881185c3a2013850ac683abe377c4943fda
'2012-04-05T12:29:49-04:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
a056e493ca60a943a4c3e9486fa92f88
2b731e38131078fe952e99e1f61a7f8758a56d63
'2012-04-05T12:33:04-04:00'
describe
'34435' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
7fab49dc3e7ec6ebac092bad096ab2b0
3a5e0ed17507c795a94080895a135d8706f3d0fc
'2012-04-05T12:24:50-04:00'
describe
'157106' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a8f1be01bbc5d94b5f240f78fc4fdf54
6564bdefe78dd2f9ef5837a8edab8729ea07df11
'2012-04-05T12:29:29-04:00'
describe
'135440' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
31c6bc5387d04d2983ae83415b77aa0b
614b199301dd301bfb177e6ca8784766b8cdc9fb
'2012-04-05T12:20:42-04:00'
describe
'37536' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
be253d882933177f407c79287cdae968
1bb30c7ac19431038ec07f25fc963c11b40f305e
'2012-04-05T12:19:06-04:00'
describe
'72060' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a851dee8b1459fff884a6c7ea38ec7a8
c59e7d2799bbe58f76492adc83ac03ffa8ac8af5
'2012-04-05T12:29:13-04:00'
describe
'1280748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
0c74e984fad021d3f26be2eb9cda725c
86472662c30cd8c14ad8aae792142db5246a706c
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
826a00e4212e1e0f6a687d44c289e862
a8d1f6e67cf01906acf63ecf38cc103df09640e6
'2012-04-05T12:33:38-04:00'
describe
'37990' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
71b5a422eb4a534898516aec4e945153
8750dd313109ca8fe4c17917d42c293e5ab6c180
'2012-04-05T12:22:02-04:00'
describe
'158870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
fa87381a96b8d0599d49718a65a23b3a
25f140fd41aa4176dcaf8f711296db23d49a495f
'2012-04-05T12:19:07-04:00'
describe
'125229' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
f926be3d9b821d5b78b63a11b32b7d99
e02faec75b0f788d693fd606a51477b2fc58fdec
'2012-04-05T12:26:19-04:00'
describe
'35039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
02a68cd9155bef3ada3f68dfb535244b
b9c92a23ee1dc2bcdd2d22916b3ccfa1ebd30f7c
'2012-04-05T12:28:35-04:00'
describe
'66751' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
cd568e44fcae5eee2fbafe272e9a2756
11b62489f48a5ce8d221f4347d4bd6098064805b
'2012-04-05T12:34:32-04:00'
describe
'1294096' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00043.tif'
de2c02af2477139f0e0e09b31119ab51
395ecd2003f425845ca4e97a563cfd3e6c9d5e71
'2012-04-05T12:32:40-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00043.txt'
8c6b6f7d7d0255e861779a8d91348173
6e1919744636abf7df31d0aeb47c1df6c69d1788
'2012-04-05T12:28:59-04:00'
describe
'36481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
92b8e44ff64c7d8ca2d8bbb0f2c4b4e3
017c676617e544c6beb6c0c5d4f00899d56a9ae5
'2012-04-05T12:35:04-04:00'
describe
'166287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
542036fb5792579289c81515f65da2f5
4f0c13040a90938dd72a44d331587898f14b8337
'2012-04-05T12:24:43-04:00'
describe
'126339' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
6ebc8921dec60006ce155639fc407239
e8385c5530ac86f97e89eebe09bd894ef1b2d539
'2012-04-05T12:33:29-04:00'
describe
'34713' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
d7d51df8c02660ed9965e4d45a3a0f77
0083b1268ade138699b52ed176b69cc3069d0dab
describe
'65837' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
cd4df21b39c392ca2b288ad5e0c44ae6
3286957aa7d610199be093ac2a9e88f7b908a62a
'2012-04-05T12:23:01-04:00'
describe
'1353160' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
537702cca9378484597440d793e05a72
651a60a130c58c18eb038801e6803f169ddd5ff5
'2012-04-05T12:19:51-04:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
934e1b65738ac9b61310c7c093dcf2ca
835a424f6dbb95b78bc35040ab4870cc3b011ba1
'2012-04-05T12:22:48-04:00'
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
346608627ad26b64aeb09b9210ea1f16
932ca08163c66020de229e036b9a95fa887a5331
'2012-04-05T12:34:02-04:00'
describe
'158884' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
29d51e5f33a77226aaf34ac69f5c51fd
53aabca60b81dd0e55fb8f4d5b3b711c1b44df56
'2012-04-05T12:29:55-04:00'
describe
'132654' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
1730bc9e33139f524e89cd2a3e9ceced
1e8b68bf43f82f643eecac62276ef59def1d1c1f
describe
'35780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a2267813af0eeb86407f0126c070c1b7
0f8392868381f2ca2cba6f6bf086edb6f9d6ad50
'2012-04-05T12:27:41-04:00'
describe
'70958' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
48b13a06edec9be6ae7c445f55a1595b
df8cd3fcea4788cc19adff6f84c88ca61201b796
'2012-04-05T12:19:39-04:00'
describe
'1294744' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b483f640937b3b11254aa26249ce0f72
fd42fd6b02c94d6180fb30c904ad93d7c1361a38
'2012-04-05T12:35:03-04:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00045.txt'
745b00e02432e0926dfd79bda0ec7139
99fb9c73307ed03a7801b7b6e248ec4254764faa
'2012-04-05T12:24:02-04:00'
describe
'37730' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
6ac29b3c2c84a71e1c2dda05209a9e70
d8711058d31c2622ad8789ddf167f6a189ce7373
'2012-04-05T12:32:45-04:00'
describe
'161270' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
4bbc63ae4e69b428d909c1c8fdc2e332
6b7aed8c81425f5d0c81efd49c5eb009e4f4801e
'2012-04-05T12:27:49-04:00'
describe
'123857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
ace051d371a419d3419b16367cdf4c0f
045525f3f75b6106de926502bcb479bbaef04fd4
'2012-04-05T12:18:38-04:00'
describe
'32923' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00046.pro'
e1eead342d9cbbc95f70411364dd5388
654195625414a0b94e7c19cf7b3678a1a9bcf4e7
'2012-04-05T12:29:40-04:00'
describe
'65811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e22ae282e70e2f7a643082ae3a80ee9d
d0e753577978b0b9f56a1a4f762e1b7a41ae3b0e
'2012-04-05T12:30:03-04:00'
describe
'1313240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8d766b70dbe5f5571c2035dfb3465edb
275e7916bc239fcf1b6462376e3b83be4193840c
'2012-04-05T12:34:13-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3690e06d451b0e059b6b4ccad7662ab6
10581c73c1896186fe725216ecd362bb17f783c9
'2012-04-05T12:18:25-04:00'
describe
'35417' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
ab2af009ff9078624c75750d328d368c
ca5d1fa75e96ffcd7b40579a96c4f84618915b5b
'2012-04-05T12:33:46-04:00'
describe
'161636' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
16403a254873033e7566cdd15b35b92d
9be154d4fc9d36154cdc7b57f3ccf9c6f591ef46
describe
'132898' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e05c9e84f0240f9019d29d773d6297db
23c23ba6a65ce5e33d9b94a345d395a2ab4c89ff
'2012-04-05T12:21:44-04:00'
describe
'36966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6071dda09c17c6a2c4e497516737d43e
df711cef10476fcdc141e052e332677ff5e03d7a
'2012-04-05T12:22:33-04:00'
describe
'70561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
0fc9517782586ba5ebfd3eff1f36d75d
1cb3c1f348fbfb4f43b03e2af79244344c2ec999
'2012-04-05T12:26:03-04:00'
describe
'1316968' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c922c1f18bf8ddbbe7be1410b2f377c2
0a074d3c968b62b0040378d7416884b90f51fa56
'2012-04-05T12:22:15-04:00'
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00047.txt'
468b709f1d417c22717deee471366078
7f4cb2376cad70708cee016930eba08a614f28c9
describe
'36690' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
33282084f58f4c71474bff279e2fd1a0
d1a88350bbfe612221086af7456b1b4f250b84b7
describe
'163450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
adbef631afcb5e0e06f70f47434014de
91203e8b8e99884f64c328a456f274781a192ad6
'2012-04-05T12:25:31-04:00'
describe
'133722' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1d7a5f2b046968b051c43c4aa227266b
240bd40cafff83ebbd3afc5fb0511b3415553d7e
'2012-04-05T12:33:40-04:00'
describe
'36567' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
894bf55b2a547d62629d581f6253d19f
0ae4bfa8b23e797d2f7d658814662b2d3d6cd2cc
'2012-04-05T12:35:14-04:00'
describe
'70539' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4a54ab74179f8c87a5c5629623544eb6
517d1015ffe86f9f368c8472996e8f1d09f09a1f
'2012-04-05T12:27:28-04:00'
describe
'1331420' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00048.tif'
758de53d6f6b60fff2df9a629567bb9e
061bcec618b8ef1adf44c6ca282534c82c293990
'2012-04-05T12:26:30-04:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
374c15493e0db8b2d6bfb721e25f7478
4df481e5b3218dc24d23a585d85a457864b66106
'2012-04-05T12:17:36-04:00'
describe
'37436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
db4c16269d8eec21fc0ca838d5423f6e
592aa98513b0ada7722dca2e6542ef483e152fac
'2012-04-05T12:34:23-04:00'
describe
'160657' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2c4082deea8cd7d1c34f3466b83c94c8
c262f3a502436dcad60a207d7cf4b4ac84e0a268
'2012-04-05T12:17:43-04:00'
describe
'135673' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
63a74f4b998ee20db6f1dcc98817b711
ba9598d8c24d078f992d766f3b93c660f0a7ac34
'2012-04-05T12:21:06-04:00'
describe
'37351' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAA' 'sip-files00049.pro'
6ae7877a5170a5ded1a7a4b8159b65f5
a0c717ef7eb236696fbea1ebbd52dfa22f298eef
'2012-04-05T12:18:15-04:00'
describe
'71759' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAB' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
23db94db22d61e8926b20276318c7fce
5a67522a4577d5c16b6667efd80df66495c9ffca
'2012-04-05T12:34:39-04:00'
describe
'1309188' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
7f955ca5747d371402eeae348530684d
076cd7802725e18c020ca71d700fc81ff9df0942
'2012-04-05T12:27:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAD' 'sip-files00049.txt'
d0ba675c0ceccc9e5d5224c3bf3d76ad
6c41d331ef7d7e2adc2792db0a293f8d35b48845
'2012-04-05T12:27:35-04:00'
describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
33feb16636bc7ebdc0dc2b9207c645c4
343df585459f4877d546f1c9a152695a9533fc0e
describe
'159688' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAF' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
ac6f83d57b584441ddb0e342595474f9
0bbb6b1dd5f6a4de3bb6d79d9df4e8dc6826591f
'2012-04-05T12:27:10-04:00'
describe
'130991' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAG' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
976f1d88b55cc52850fb025c39ef6476
13dca778b2012ac219b5047fa0176bef89e50c89
'2012-04-05T12:24:10-04:00'
describe
'35269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAH' 'sip-files00050.pro'
94761005e68e53f3b0755e8c1c5714e4
0e5b62ec1266a2173c830f14169f1f1abecc483b
describe
'69847' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAI' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
fb7ef352fe42276dac3ff6a736f42e05
c3473a4ec1feaf81d292f118e1cd838bbc4028d5
'2012-04-05T12:29:12-04:00'
describe
'1300940' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
4d7778d4d67f5ff55ccda17edb08a6ca
c1d44274c97b0bfbf8219705a462d2c4d1b1e0b2
'2012-04-05T12:18:26-04:00'
describe
'1531' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAK' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ded8e8a0a0d39a2f5edd0459ba487ba5
d84fea6bdd8ecd834bedc5766d6a20fc6ff8e970
'2012-04-05T12:34:57-04:00'
describe
'37019' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAL' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
88256ef69e1a270b8dd4c7b5057487b4
d7ada9b21c08c0e67870461b76148c7f24696204
'2012-04-05T12:19:57-04:00'
describe
'162658' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
33885b6630c1e84c9d9b9a9d4af932aa
f20e5ee235339fc562b9cfd7c00b37ded36df962
'2012-04-05T12:28:53-04:00'
describe
'131535' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
1ba460c3c34a9681cb43573b792449c9
4303788f0d0d7083126ac098991a64e4646adb4c
'2012-04-05T12:26:39-04:00'
describe
'36349' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fefe04bb6fa45f671669aa5ebd9fe420
d999e47713f29e9da2462ba85b8352c5ba918fe5
'2012-04-05T12:34:49-04:00'
describe
'69042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
20d8f609eec15a2f138b6fc8e07ede72
79668c1b41105a1f3fbaa03b3ac125039cd7f772
'2012-04-05T12:31:21-04:00'
describe
'1324656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ff936e0a18a8b9d140671dab87f8146a
b36455303489803549595baf4f85870d5d5f6f52
'2012-04-05T12:26:15-04:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f17644d6ca283e6356d2a9465853aebd
d46767a474890dd38076aeb910b7f974dbf15df4
'2012-04-05T12:25:39-04:00'
describe
'36813' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAS' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b04e534d56146236b3c7cfe5a8cb726d
62c6a3ef4fe543ba2a57f0e8286b7108467ebde5
'2012-04-05T12:25:07-04:00'
describe
'166389' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAT' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ea2f96a4f1d1418c10b0efb4363ad75d
01ccc54275efc33fefc4486a35a635b567c013a4
describe
'119343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
42dd5acdf08b39d498caabe8bf107c7f
8cf9415607131c74d1289b83550483f6cdec3d68
'2012-04-05T12:21:46-04:00'
describe
'30829' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAV' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9595b5082a6426437fe522d37abab10b
09669f44114f383ad25f2ffd74f55e01aaab3375
'2012-04-05T12:34:35-04:00'
describe
'63834' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
521d8f98e61433ea5c80db5c75c14117
5abc6bb1b393d53f3b63babcdcfd0563ccacda8b
'2012-04-05T12:23:00-04:00'
describe
'1354044' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAX' 'sip-files00052.tif'
574ae26acce754f7a85dba2e59d4ad19
e6e171e2e26f0e7c139d28e237e447f78dbaefd0
'2012-04-05T12:20:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAY' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8cac312851a7936c510e8c0f6573bc60
ea97847b46ced7853f5776e7333bf579287edf37
'2012-04-05T12:34:52-04:00'
describe
'34519' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
976384f378948aa67444615f8e8a1317
5f06de0612ba470d0b0bf6a1603f71a07690389a
'2012-04-05T12:19:02-04:00'
describe
'164068' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
fea60d407a4528ebf095c13bb82de0ac
a009c1a0cd230bea0b0ac96ef4ad3647bde68ec8
'2012-04-05T12:22:42-04:00'
describe
'126194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a8c7f41498f86ad92f2af3ab95c5689c
7d70b853af5c3f5e171800f3a7441cd2e7654542
'2012-04-05T12:21:10-04:00'
describe
'35335' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBC' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3a95908b6c6d22584eb2922189ff6e3c
966fb81e3264c22b9b1bfd5cbf4905ef4dfcf8cf
'2012-04-05T12:23:26-04:00'
describe
'67412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBD' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
3fcb7664eb4078753a84c015ed54dfe8
6a04cc642a5c779a44149a98fb6570a43a5e5710
'2012-04-05T12:17:26-04:00'
describe
'1335560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b0a35f3971391355f7b4204f9bfb0b84
634de79713d00e9fbad641ea080073340840342e
'2012-04-05T12:26:02-04:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBF' 'sip-files00053.txt'
27cc8212d79d641b5d26d51998fe718c
69f041d9eeaa8f34efcac2376308fc974415e9f4
'2012-04-05T12:22:31-04:00'
describe
'35595' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBG' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e91cdddbb3c5384c926eaecf88d89104
d1da74bb23cf0a79fdfd050a73d19b5bdca39fb9
'2012-04-05T12:17:17-04:00'
describe
'169294' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBH' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
dcb0d0a2b6142928616f95225b052a92
4f2264f7904588e2e1d986599c9183470a13fcfc
'2012-04-05T12:17:30-04:00'
describe
'119011' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBI' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
75d0219547583cf73b30400c421083e9
6314771372f5a946f34e97bbb5d58c4506b5d471
'2012-04-05T12:21:05-04:00'
describe
'31809' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
99abcce08e2af5e28dd09dd9199c3e9e
5f36d9a54940f0c39f3a9d735b7af2c78f44e433
'2012-04-05T12:21:27-04:00'
describe
'63420' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBK' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
5d5e8c69e0dcf7b5fe0d6e575128222f
61306bd087ff3cbf1eb037cffaabb65314876216
describe
'1377144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBL' 'sip-files00054.tif'
70e4093598c4e39e559856efc14b5fd2
b8287ccdfe501a70239c74d75bead0ab4f492fbd
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBM' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7f4f2dfffb79db747d287fe86e5b6933
915d005bc7ea385fb28c6ba5101fdc99f3c91e0f
'2012-04-05T12:29:44-04:00'
describe
'34950' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBN' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
8d2911af4ab0c00f1b666bf6ba6473bc
81d04c4c603210acb3b0e9237bc2bc99a2dc22d7
'2012-04-05T12:29:11-04:00'
describe
'169910' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBO' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3308358f80972a79f2dcbd2c7bbbfd07
ae10e85a6b1e1d67eae06cdf636ef34ffca9d12a
'2012-04-05T12:30:15-04:00'
describe
'123407' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBP' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
53a7a6145754669adf98590e12e135d1
64f5b17c99f4c56163c9abdceb0b6ae6332391a0
describe
'32754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
04732af511ee77f095492840303258bc
8a05572dcc105521df73661d4094492024844bbf
'2012-04-05T12:24:22-04:00'
describe
'66161' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bb55c834bcff0e2265f5fe005479817f
380642dbb8538de27404c2540766acdfa0b79c65
'2012-04-05T12:21:53-04:00'
describe
'1382888' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBS' 'sip-files00055.tif'
118e9743b29ce8c359439ff554e6022a
87b989c3b142b91aeaebb7ba130a29ab83d1fb9b
'2012-04-05T12:26:44-04:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
5a96d9c4a17d52d2fe9c17e073e8302f
f37e8d7f4ab8bbbc3746578c6d4802ea1cc7b63a
'2012-04-05T12:24:52-04:00'
describe
'35186' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
78545a8c8852175b314f529123c919de
4dcc3b77491f2a5744c6b665a6dc5a965719eabb
'2012-04-05T12:25:44-04:00'
describe
'163926' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
5278cbdf8df2519b6b153403c64e70ff
9c0528806cc2ee0e474ce15a71e0a4c90d3741f3
'2012-04-05T12:24:27-04:00'
describe
'122700' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7318fdfb25651fc3e4607cf755e6156b
b59f30efad217432daefa9a15a064ff71850a7a5
'2012-04-05T12:31:34-04:00'
describe
'32614' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8f6b1c0f0eca6a1d3a5b4228fdc7fc04
84037a269863870d78bd0ca85b184df54df3766a
'2012-04-05T12:18:35-04:00'
describe
'65709' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6b5c453816554f017d9e447c7fb34c58
7582bafe4e72527aaef87ab6932706a5f1e480ac
'2012-04-05T12:27:39-04:00'
describe
'1334856' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
dde8505ff902356018302bc083ce0f81
f1d28a68d21d7a62dbbfb13a5f1df83a82d7f93d
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
39223117b2df72a4bc183edc367101fc
909120b2e812add1e877c9fe9d16f02d20e7dca1
'2012-04-05T12:25:24-04:00'
describe
'35242' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
ed68be8ced883524fdcc8562566f997e
b0dab148132cfb9fc222b28bb725c38bf8ba7906
'2012-04-05T12:30:26-04:00'
describe
'168207' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b50c124846440681a3e2088de39ae74a
dd42a31774fe11ad9bbd900303bfe483b60ffe52
'2012-04-05T12:32:00-04:00'
describe
'121262' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
159e30a2c3e6f546c4bbd9af74c3fbf4
26a333de77086d9481af3530f1d5db89e33b67ca
'2012-04-05T12:17:04-04:00'
describe
'32444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
4f2cbb15364a753df4bb96c713efaf08
4feac06fe39c905219e21086e880b75631a0b585
'2012-04-05T12:32:09-04:00'
describe
'64296' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
0de21dd643bddf712890471c9a1bc53f
f55762d750e701ccf66f8614e3eb052b8c365f43
'2012-04-05T12:32:24-04:00'
describe
'1369108' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
59a980b4f39f1da9657e84727e50fdb6
1ecdd2d8260bc9141c6f602d233297a5ff8336ad
'2012-04-05T12:33:56-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
7e4fabd28d2bacd06dde9296e6f80c00
c3ae6697e9dd2b976587062eba639212bb84cbc6
'2012-04-05T12:27:01-04:00'
describe
'33795' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCI' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
3fe33e69f4c5c3ca5767d3c126ad9c63
36872ab4b0008c0644446896c0d0027f4abf4167
'2012-04-05T12:28:07-04:00'
describe
'163977' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
c73cefdb03c966a9ed6bb172aa0e9f98
176ebf08bde49e2ec60a1dc842a41ed1f9f31cb6
'2012-04-05T12:33:07-04:00'
describe
'132097' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCK' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
5b0e421a3ced0ca3ae1f93d21131c492
92ed23e73f015ac411bed47ad04a104ec75d04b3
'2012-04-05T12:24:24-04:00'
describe
'36706' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCL' 'sip-files00058.pro'
df44bb3c01ed1aacb537b60ffc85563e
c4358e45910627244187e7d360c4a2865df63c22
'2012-04-05T12:28:03-04:00'
describe
'69994' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCM' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
b914a32e98824048626047902d473ad2
45b1ddcae7e811eff970514124a89e74c7897796
describe
'1337240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCN' 'sip-files00058.tif'
85615a098a980e561a8e528831ba7b28
2ef7cba1c6a9dffc31d9d6ff1eacd3f87fc9cc06
'2012-04-05T12:20:23-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCO' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7de56d8e424b7409e1afab35a211caa1
c589edc9eeeb88cb6efefa08a5b4ad7025932d7c
'2012-04-05T12:28:47-04:00'
describe
'36509' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCP' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
ed69ea5716c4754de0486b5ec45bb79e
4ceb1dc0bfb1feedc066619445a3d19a1e673303
'2012-04-05T12:34:47-04:00'
describe
'160745' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
3b22faae0fb1cc3703b37eb53671962d
64b4fb7d0a25eb2aec37d7bcfe5448094d24f79e
'2012-04-05T12:28:37-04:00'
describe
'126150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCR' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
52a57f8d47bc25e9f7f06c13093ca45a
208acf97ec9c9feb3069a3bac307de0ee8256ddd
'2012-04-05T12:21:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
cd519449307cb5b3a43d6caecfa37571
d61bf645afb18ba999e1eba99f121efa09682e3c
'2012-04-05T12:25:51-04:00'
describe
'67005' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCT' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
86e0309e7d2f0a2a9a987fda8636e023
80f76bc4c12d76b19e75cf1f43cb9c28c2ab5577
describe
'1310232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2ba4ac542f5e633df8a93514e25a2c19
d68d7ee895a032e6ea9f157049061253c94d0c3d
'2012-04-05T12:24:44-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCV' 'sip-files00059.txt'
70df8a4073a8b8d692cf31168d5a3417
49a6c08ad3db158200df29bc3834b942068d4c29
describe
'37578' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCW' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3de6a3ff371f07cd97e18bc2f9ecf7e0
60597bc55d8299f0ff4077621c7dce203ad1e8e2
describe
'164007' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCX' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
61fdf34493d4c7340a71c83dc88c9398
001aac02554ddd4b60ed3ab47729b751b23824bb
'2012-04-05T12:17:09-04:00'
describe
'118123' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCY' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
625adca2a839575222fac42303e19909
eec2e2a263ac1233412e895b144011a36fbc217c
'2012-04-05T12:29:31-04:00'
describe
'30748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c13de6364354e7339ad4f590ae36a956
e188b4c791da203b575ac106aa82eef7871533c0
'2012-04-05T12:32:12-04:00'
describe
'62723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
8b8d61ed10291e5db8d28b75f299c7b7
a5d01f03177c721c796dacb820ecb977aa36c580
'2012-04-05T12:27:38-04:00'
describe
'1335268' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a25c0d9b2d46eb2f049e87f0d936c184
f4988492e34eb064ba4608c17f266e8d39e9aa74
'2012-04-05T12:17:18-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDC' 'sip-files00060.txt'
239c07bbde49d0416e1d188126c60b29
9e106fa437067948d02229b6f9067bfe47b53756
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDD' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c95bf2e06906c59bb1c880069558cb48
741bae8a305722502ce1809fba11ca5e9acc5806
'2012-04-05T12:33:06-04:00'
describe
'154355' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
630e7ae3c0b23ba6e26930954b4c79aa
06deb62b254189e2c4aee8a9496cb839a22b0bfb
'2012-04-05T12:29:25-04:00'
describe
'137798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDF' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
31410ee9efdf6c510ef1549cc3f085f6
bb361ef73f3b2e08267ef7a1d2450bb77563aa78
'2012-04-05T12:22:20-04:00'
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
25891a053ce4ba54281d73e7397994f2
7efcfc8aeab26ca2afcee31ca6060c193615a816
'2012-04-05T12:27:53-04:00'
describe
'73149' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
d04e4de554b4f1048362ba1db7c68d90
2dfd27266d1ed6114ac947742c85e90dfac4ded5
'2012-04-05T12:31:53-04:00'
describe
'1259180' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDI' 'sip-files00061.tif'
683e8e4b14b8dbf8dd9c0d8bbc0915a9
ea508845cdcfdecd86db0402d43e5bf0cd5d1f57
'2012-04-05T12:25:06-04:00'
describe
'1603' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a0ba166d9a49f83291df6c0895d0a86c
e9c136043addd6ece6cdd7255ee8951ab13bedb8
'2012-04-05T12:29:36-04:00'
describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDK' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
35e7b0fd62c470881bfae8e4c41f607b
24e3f12da631bf0d680bc37001cc4877123551a1
'2012-04-05T12:31:16-04:00'
describe
'159448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDL' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4b8f4552f8f4eac41199767d8005eda9
4193dcb0ce36fe79ed500425dc24224b7770b50f
'2012-04-05T12:24:03-04:00'
describe
'126558' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
89e9ba10d73ac6a747156546aec08f29
98347ae8bbcd3e55b686afdb67bede4ab56291fa
'2012-04-05T12:34:55-04:00'
describe
'35316' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDN' 'sip-files00062.pro'
269ad43d3e74b7349503fe5dbef07e89
767aba0d30dc881762fc9a3ddeafc0ccf152dc84
describe
'66961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDO' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
90e13bcba8e8b1dcfd7df39920fb9c20
944c04ab5742dbbaf3a4b65a2820767c0b50ca0a
'2012-04-05T12:26:40-04:00'
describe
'1299644' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
d529616dddef6578b476ba30f0541474
f25d204bc5dfb57a0dd314ead5ee36af52600dff
'2012-04-05T12:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
7b54440ee90281a364a5f4c7c949717b
27f2d80b49748f8da772667a0bd92e4639432dfc
'2012-04-05T12:33:50-04:00'
describe
'37190' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDR' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3943a8fdb52f7b50abc24d569c8e8c1c
4d4c5c67679b711f449535d8795bf7441b1e0497
describe
'160296' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
55a9e21d53db34851f4c82e042517a53
48094d261040311da469cc187dd4dee72e289d8f
'2012-04-05T12:20:19-04:00'
describe
'142780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDT' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5764f7da37148cdaf243f4be054a5307
63ae028dc9e6d48b3c928a923318161f5564ab8c
'2012-04-05T12:30:27-04:00'
describe
'40324' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDU' 'sip-files00063.pro'
be9e11b2689537108e6810f8c24c2c0a
bcd729e515955bf6d1e88b5d6e15ca4e7a5fbc46
'2012-04-05T12:16:54-04:00'
describe
'75890' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDV' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
6730229f4de79b0488d5a1d54079adc1
6a2e357a6d00234ff4d50d5c98e82a95ae16f60f
describe
'1306352' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDW' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7452b9580dd0d785e4e604520cd8140c
06d87e15823ead39b62255c62f6727a7df4d5b1b
'2012-04-05T12:32:15-04:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDX' 'sip-files00063.txt'
aa60863277c04045041fbacf94968b07
3a3a7eda4c5bb356c6e8c8031de3dba989905ba1
'2012-04-05T12:24:39-04:00'
describe
'37883' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
c38d66c7c1ccf54ed24590f55f96b418
19045c0f5acdc28ac4d6ea0a9ed3592233d635bb
'2012-04-05T12:31:24-04:00'
describe
'156225' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
e666345aa436cf94f1b0a724dbddee92
287d59c8353673734dc9628b898b0092b96fdd92
'2012-04-05T12:32:23-04:00'
describe
'133249' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
4a04106df99b9d2c290ecbe885182df8
91fecb43a5c305fbf7996a28b754d8ea2823adf0
'2012-04-05T12:21:29-04:00'
describe
'34840' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREB' 'sip-files00064.pro'
82051ad5912a8e7603cdcfc5a5e4de24
e62228bd6882a9dde60b52ae4ad0e553e2dcd3b2
'2012-04-05T12:20:43-04:00'
describe
'71503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREC' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
4d6eb22681449dec06f907e61e58511b
b58765ea3b176b0c0b044223d53cd9eccbcf5e84
describe
'1273344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARED' 'sip-files00064.tif'
ae484ea8c3e5d1fb011cdc0fd85f0a5a
fd0e0bc0fdee2233c7bf04c255c9b45dbd99d638
'2012-04-05T12:27:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREE' 'sip-files00064.txt'
d9318854f2c2e4bc97845c620d699e5d
dfb740bc2455d474ac5677cfb38a9774f3c61f3a
'2012-04-05T12:17:49-04:00'
describe
'36965' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ab8bb26b636e8c14c0c22cf0924415a9
a41007c01c5e6c05ffee2479bd10baafc8eb7ae8
'2012-04-05T12:28:45-04:00'
describe
'159939' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
1bb2a7d80478f39fe880c7a02d4fca2b
4227f82b9b6fc87c3e8463e16538649cc050798f
'2012-04-05T12:28:42-04:00'
describe
'109918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREH' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
58c110b290ce2fba00baec64cce273a4
2ae931b771eae6c172403345e066265c99664074
'2012-04-05T12:30:07-04:00'
describe
'28155' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREI' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b76049418d3b5b3d3fc2a8ff266ed250
2a66360570697685cbeba7859f67764af71369fd
'2012-04-05T12:20:20-04:00'
describe
'59987' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0e04ef7e36c3ec3a4ecedf1e202a381b
11840ae2db158c7fffdd152320ec699a0a582640
'2012-04-05T12:20:50-04:00'
describe
'1302332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREK' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b19ae585cca144428310a9195272c9a4
d0391e00260750d81b8cea5f3734cb8ed4b8b603
'2012-04-05T12:32:04-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREL' 'sip-files00065.txt'
67114dbe35df70763c72bb8e6305f8c1
ae5e4bfa87df1333707433c828ad2d6064a2ea0f
'2012-04-05T12:18:18-04:00'
describe
'34199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8693924f3095a78932c533eb7a1917fd
9bd1421aa57e62906ae61f5c51ddba21c9af8d11
'2012-04-05T12:35:01-04:00'
describe
'158430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
7d33f7d5054f60a7ac4396c571044844
260acb08cf97683ecf98dce52c0c0b7cbb7f74c0
describe
'132849' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4aab7bbf6af3bf34f0a69980b94571d4
686d0c877a99f43c9293b046c7d369c0c62b8ddd
'2012-04-05T12:34:48-04:00'
describe
'35702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREP' 'sip-files00066.pro'
ae04f67f0be7fae30a684327ca8e4e9e
9d49bed61e8eb5749377a01efa80f9e31c23020d
'2012-04-05T12:18:40-04:00'
describe
'71315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
2d83b895a6d98f4baa7134ca7a366d66
87e7569206422fa94c4bda90e251f7d33a742a50
'2012-04-05T12:26:01-04:00'
describe
'1291156' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARER' 'sip-files00066.tif'
da890a17c6d8674339d9b8173135628e
43fc17f15ba9f4d583b4311f1e62e41798349bbb
'2012-04-05T12:35:11-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARES' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2706adc52be412c7eed23f456f37aacf
d1dadd5ef19e4dc178c46497669fd46fbbe1a225
describe
'37476' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARET' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
a62b242ecf400e3e5e42ef0ff0a03d4f
5c4de00d9c83b54652ba4c1bd305dd43c3a2c187
'2012-04-05T12:21:45-04:00'
describe
'159424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREU' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
ce6c2eb206976822fd271d3301cb4d3e
93de4c506dc0fa7c8290efaf0f36aed5054df6d9
'2012-04-05T12:26:20-04:00'
describe
'127258' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREV' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
704ba5a1309d6a6bf79b33cd41dd94c8
832dcaa244a422130c800d65dfdbc4d5ced8af79
'2012-04-05T12:19:25-04:00'
describe
'34723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREW' 'sip-files00067.pro'
67ddb4884635613430032aa9dc39e2e6
565b4015333d8eaae1ce508cb84c1bc000374578
'2012-04-05T12:18:52-04:00'
describe
'68811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREX' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
21d564c896888fd2787599c6659f4093
a2fa737a0b57545cc644f23479d551b7ffdfa206
'2012-04-05T12:19:44-04:00'
describe
'1300388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
50e8ee9fd824c5b7679ffdc2528b5214
4bd141c2cb695dc3a5b39486efa56d34846097fa
'2012-04-05T12:22:35-04:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAREZ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
fe5a5236c1dd069305ae420c90f2ef5b
2859fa8caef3fe96b84fb7426bcfe0b593a6ae71
'2012-04-05T12:29:51-04:00'
describe
'37149' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFA' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
eb5eff2d19633ad21da75086b6167203
12aca8318b74b715d7098463f3ae6b098ccf762e
'2012-04-05T12:21:11-04:00'
describe
'163526' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFB' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0842b7dfb4d92b06599a0a8615f49383
545dc77f40b5521ca4a01d3768161461a51e66d8
'2012-04-05T12:30:42-04:00'
describe
'123569' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFC' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
fb0eaf2280a620b029f52b7552007a7c
86e6925491af39784127d7741add53ea5f785be2
'2012-04-05T12:23:47-04:00'
describe
'32830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
02f7f279a9bf460027d6028fb104111d
dd62bb09cba87118662e2ba4e71383324d4e4f4c
'2012-04-05T12:30:04-04:00'
describe
'65104' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFE' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
85e840fc38fa11a3b793d4d6250a7bbb
71c6d7fe674c52b83dc69408ebcc0fb5094409c1
describe
'1331724' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFF' 'sip-files00068.tif'
9310c16713d4a17562dc6bdf4e870726
31f83cdaf28c6ca92f6b8af64347446ca6d6e7fd
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
42ea6943584512822cdc0f16ff221aad
c3f715a62aeb30304929e27657c49005ec4d2807
'2012-04-05T12:32:25-04:00'
describe
'36400' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFH' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
3ccb6ed07fccac4f3c95b7b8520e6d17
76ff9ee02cb43fa53d1ce1b19bc3d805549c86ae
describe
'160182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFI' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
47467cd8256484832449a2f994606897
6d948ce4ab58b87aa13a14c44cf61b2ece85754d
describe
'113255' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFJ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
206ef13b895bb43705963c75d701206c
e868e21b11831a13eff8a051b3784f9108cff50f
'2012-04-05T12:19:08-04:00'
describe
'29582' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFK' 'sip-files00069.pro'
58464fe9c37a277fb9bb61fd9dd2ea0b
0d46d4784ef78921804ca0b72445c113b94a6a1f
'2012-04-05T12:17:03-04:00'
describe
'62561' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
3c5a8793fa5efcfa3464eef6fdd9aea2
b4f347eed50373dd5356dbd32eb304966fe5c945
'2012-04-05T12:27:59-04:00'
describe
'1304484' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFM' 'sip-files00069.tif'
4233619113b2c9565e6cd3ff620cf62d
8ed55360e571e1a05cac3078e0d7501acd0e3b34
'2012-04-05T12:24:14-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFN' 'sip-files00069.txt'
3013ed4ae87fbcf205d54498fbfac265
502994f1370c51fb8932df6ab69c4fef5e5519a5
'2012-04-05T12:20:26-04:00'
describe
'34955' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFO' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
18eed74da2da1177781ddf23af29d99b
2e9c60ce8436dfe35f12f9a75194b7c3b2cbfea5
'2012-04-05T12:31:12-04:00'
describe
'162398' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFP' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
385d60350338488832b51f1fc0c4bded
fd4dfde012f1f74b61a72371b4ae1cff35b47f82
'2012-04-05T12:21:47-04:00'
describe
'108748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFQ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
1b08d432c121bc0fbf0f1ac52ea360a5
5f7411707ca1eb49e21b1575d38ecd98b2dd7861
'2012-04-05T12:29:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
736959892f07d6df353861e3d1e1f1cc
cdaf75c23159a8904d45218d3b0c25c03294c76e
'2012-04-05T12:16:53-04:00'
describe
'59596' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFS' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
39fd448efbc4b365bb2fe231ad62f09e
060df2eb80d3ea2893434fc7995ae7bf1e0f6645
'2012-04-05T12:18:07-04:00'
describe
'1322120' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
6be9726923b40a1239af7ec6e587a90e
7845423be0cf1f632ba1ade33620ac5833b42b65
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFU' 'sip-files00070.txt'
507157060c33857533b5364036cd2319
76c35e7f3c854096cd24d054d4d1da89c54f69a7
'2012-04-05T12:28:26-04:00'
describe
'33972' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFV' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
510fa08f6638c0ee444fffe761f7eeab
b52dae2f28e53e2143320bb1c4997513b96559b1
'2012-04-05T12:27:58-04:00'
describe
'168361' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFW' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
abd3c89f086a6e6bdc7f1a0a8ffe8909
1a7fe4dba52b1fad6ddda554e87fa982dbf3d2f4
'2012-04-05T12:22:45-04:00'
describe
'123199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFX' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
230420bfca7aac5469bab1a972ec880e
d3143ab42e0a28e053f6689f4bd0ae6f9425d35e
'2012-04-05T12:31:27-04:00'
describe
'32863' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFY' 'sip-files00071.pro'
f8b8c477b207399eebe0e8438e96926c
3276652bfd2894e7abdde1a97289dbd9d1feee95
'2012-04-05T12:31:23-04:00'
describe
'66325' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARFZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
bd0c911787403f47cea18596e04db78e
8ad77641429464a93d02a81a9b380ed08722321d
'2012-04-05T12:33:59-04:00'
describe
'1371416' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGA' 'sip-files00071.tif'
49f6608f51344cadf48e02481079dd8c
aff88b681d55be1b84ebeecd7ba6b50133c1f473
'2012-04-05T12:27:27-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGB' 'sip-files00071.txt'
cf443871f64802880c0b3cd0f545f630
e4e4028bfa99e257bdc616a544f7dd3e2a03db76
'2012-04-05T12:34:36-04:00'
describe
'35854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGC' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
ec25298d2926c285cdb0a6c0360a7044
b9dea6327dc6270238bcf158b64316e494ae8b44
describe
'164788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
afe9795f242fada8b2e242551d304cb1
9942ff3b97dcafb224a4b2f50012f01acfdd7e4e
describe
'105963' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGE' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a21e599ee870fa4f0e2db8be0ebc996a
b425370133f8bf0d48bfea3a393dace6d0004951
'2012-04-05T12:23:29-04:00'
describe
'27282' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ffeb151112876264377653192ca2bc08
d98b9f572fc6750afd3d41dafb8eb9006e838c0a
describe
'58414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGG' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
23ca304b5623a56ee0433cabe08b2076
cae8e1fb334a48183f18832b556cc41e93b0d8b6
'2012-04-05T12:30:59-04:00'
describe
'1340820' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGH' 'sip-files00072.tif'
eb8a7827709812d167780050ea7c6d66
7b545a02e730541840b04ac170e5a62263c8f6eb
'2012-04-05T12:35:00-04:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGI' 'sip-files00072.txt'
973f84f180f57daf117993d5a59b6ae7
0570b69c58901ecdd682a0a7b74e0ca07082e9a7
'2012-04-05T12:29:57-04:00'
describe
'33163' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGJ' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
04dffaad4bd919bf83158ef4f7276020
026de3ca8111602f92d63b6c7ffe8c1870bb04ef
'2012-04-05T12:31:45-04:00'
describe
'161983' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
21aa3401ea022078ee78ea4fcb1170d8
59f274ab309bd6e69a067786761eaeed0187cb2b
'2012-04-05T12:33:20-04:00'
describe
'123300' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGL' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f85498a2abc864b00be70d73f4fe0a06
7a43011ec05ddeaa4b192309963151ac6c8af88a
'2012-04-05T12:33:35-04:00'
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGM' 'sip-files00073.pro'
0561af6b10ac247e44428832fa111a83
30b79b6c37ca6bb02419d9cb7ce7494c469e9042
'2012-04-05T12:21:28-04:00'
describe
'66315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGN' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
b7205f3ecfcee0fe7a99448486ba2d07
cc9891a39dcef31b23f70c2ae9010922426aa21a
'2012-04-05T12:31:10-04:00'
describe
'1319932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
1e2ba282bdeef2494c2174236a39d81a
cd3d97b3d69c183ab3284f0e533ee274c6ddfb97
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGP' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e23f5965986cd916c2f7871a6ed79b35
1dc2eb0a9fae776140f493023ddafe8fd6ee5577
'2012-04-05T12:19:33-04:00'
describe
'36270' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGQ' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
a19564700733b6cb6ea7eb829d367382
91ad4b389da3a6830ea6f6130aa4557c256c1cab
'2012-04-05T12:23:15-04:00'
describe
'158923' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGR' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
ecffb02940d565f27d2b25b026268620
83362cf59335da3934923a1dcad9bdf686cf4539
'2012-04-05T12:25:04-04:00'
describe
'139977' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGS' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
738f9e793a56f3f09c8b8328ff774a0b
7b18f62954878e5226aa4b83d258f2466ad9adbf
'2012-04-05T12:22:59-04:00'
describe
'38204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
1476436b8a6d958db28a33e00268db9a
239ae115d3303b8cfd6b6b9db69388fd3a3f4be1
'2012-04-05T12:23:37-04:00'
describe
'74805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6c11fbbd85cc16e79d159e231d9244dd
51761210c3b8927236c8f62f74df8e11c3282c21
'2012-04-05T12:26:55-04:00'
describe
'1295776' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGV' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0cdd593997f3835172286617e56560c6
7b640f899fdb55ff200f1efddff6f14b66ce237b
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGW' 'sip-files00074.txt'
77eecf4090f237d315625b693909bb89
ccdda66549dd24e061a7efc596137c013a255fd1
'2012-04-05T12:22:16-04:00'
describe
'37457' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGX' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
4a3475f4f202cc551e92aa6c0d110c95
0a90fc2c3e2166be1734142f18cc976fa0861c6e
'2012-04-05T12:27:05-04:00'
describe
'164503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGY' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e5b3110ec769c0b76a17feffc665e99c
c10398369434ff27a98305cd11c5326ace61aebc
'2012-04-05T12:20:57-04:00'
describe
'135563' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARGZ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
1825426970b7f1443270258cb8bde337
ccfa91664f176cfb729fc57b2e51a2f1495ac695
'2012-04-05T12:26:04-04:00'
describe
'37512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHA' 'sip-files00075.pro'
b2bf854f51f6307702d99c32a5011d4b
26906688fd0ca4c6e7abb92313ed1e81031cb522
'2012-04-05T12:21:13-04:00'
describe
'73241' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHB' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
5e558f0220e912eca37f9a25f371765d
428e60ad4968dc3a72a6a4cb4522f7fb4ecde0e0
describe
'1339964' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
3da9ee3006ca5f9f425fde83793632d9
3e85ce655f61e92393a1b4a48eb77fae21c61d73
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHD' 'sip-files00075.txt'
fe2a72484449836ec0384cf565c399fc
cf82f17ded3545654dbb43d0b7e71593a813cbcd
'2012-04-05T12:22:08-04:00'
describe
'37510' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a9775219f4e585221572ace16e80ed50
df5bcd25189aa5d55277d5c4f42f4449e1306b29
'2012-04-05T12:29:24-04:00'
describe
'159594' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHF' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
4fd254620e478864d9ca1481f298e737
f12356cb29a515cb38087fb98721173956110430
'2012-04-05T12:27:32-04:00'
describe
'117245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHG' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
9b78fa3a2e68d16e110c5ab7d25c99f0
35481e183ead1b7748c865a4bdfaaecbbd57e036
'2012-04-05T12:18:12-04:00'
describe
'31145' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHH' 'sip-files00076.pro'
afcfd8b257b89db57acaa64feb73a8d2
15891f3681e3aa38e36bee5876b8dd22b211c023
'2012-04-05T12:18:04-04:00'
describe
'62568' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHI' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
7ce425dd230cfbb8686e8e5a5acbbcdd
ba654d03dd98e34aec73b3dcfb38f77fd549103d
'2012-04-05T12:29:15-04:00'
describe
'1299504' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
76e80081e60728be8dd84a2eeaf51a70
42bb634a6a4317907c8e154637ffc6541e866ef2
'2012-04-05T12:31:32-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHK' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2c5db0121638c71b74aaf3dacc5d78ea
be575470f37ea22b2249241f42d89c2d23a3dd57
'2012-04-05T12:19:54-04:00'
describe
'35133' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHL' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
c76424a10dc130499a778714271b6863
4f39fec5570b685d0f705e7fea90bf98c6a67041
'2012-04-05T12:30:25-04:00'
describe
'156674' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
43e9bca1fd6e744a60ffe842ecb0a486
14d64cda851b389d2fbe4740896f9032af2e2abf
describe
'130555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e7d3f645b6433162e0e4490e37e841ec
deabd8ec08ead6fcbe493ebc887edf17ce5a71a9
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
a07e981f6dc9750a3bc119d29102e85f
fb69511eca7b71a77302ae2e09fccfe792535841
'2012-04-05T12:19:49-04:00'
describe
'70317' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
072bf0a7fbebe04fd15d26dd3960d037
e1787d890b473700efdd0c77b16c10775ab87302
'2012-04-05T12:29:39-04:00'
describe
'1277196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
99e77564743d609e39ca221a5c000316
07c29ea0f98d0b9375ea9cdff5326409a5269cf1
'2012-04-05T12:20:15-04:00'
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5b455bc0b60d6c9510aaad1d148cb630
8be401ff051c37167b8b547133c129db484ea497
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHS' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a950bcc7939e8f9327aff724e99a4be8
004d3da340c670bca1ecae86d9d19fbf6efeed84
'2012-04-05T12:21:09-04:00'
describe
'157530' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
262a69ff373a554e79e4add265036401
619ba5570e99cc255201eb98f95f0ddc3f252ce5
'2012-04-05T12:30:20-04:00'
describe
'134520' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHU' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
293be0860a613785cdbc874115aed06d
41c58338671fd43fa9f91e66e210ce8cbe979f5b
'2012-04-05T12:20:30-04:00'
describe
'36453' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
79734b641dd7875c2c250c44a11a440c
ae526d0ad2f50325537e27008870d83bc1c7ac4b
'2012-04-05T12:24:17-04:00'
describe
'71842' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHW' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9707f3fa5aab970e324c24bc17b59881
632004df8e0eb772f4a01f0cb14e700be06eb8e7
'2012-04-05T12:22:24-04:00'
describe
'1284688' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHX' 'sip-files00078.tif'
1f0ecf0e1b888aeb1112cf445f38f999
5e2eb1252afac33fc7f1487dcb91f6be69eebe33
'2012-04-05T12:31:08-04:00'
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHY' 'sip-files00078.txt'
ec099271c3f166f2f642d2f10852f2dd
0c0c8fd356ca5ba277623f04b13a4a788063529c
'2012-04-05T12:19:37-04:00'
describe
'38056' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARHZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
c9816d5ca052fd03160c94dc57e53320
08807db09e55debde4807771b68a694c9024b41c
'2012-04-05T12:17:38-04:00'
describe
'162679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
97357272474dbb69e5d7fdbaa5b78d73
99691816c0646e7a53b17b8a383a977580d9095b
'2012-04-05T12:24:47-04:00'
describe
'111660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
355452cdf2bbb225ec681e5d75687d89
3abaeb16a203d0c2bee4c874dd0a788e42317510
describe
'28967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIC' 'sip-files00079.pro'
96975c280c93afcc90ff3738cdab6918
1bee9e2470943f1f39f4740def12eb1306e9e4dc
'2012-04-05T12:19:40-04:00'
describe
'61194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARID' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b6e73d984eac2411a90743f46432281c
0d641613601005a0538cc4bdb770cc90104da138
describe
'1324212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
56b341af4c17633e6d8a7c291a9802c0
d2bce3fdfc402bd79944e965efa0c843ca580687
'2012-04-05T12:28:50-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIF' 'sip-files00079.txt'
97406b0b569d75e8b469e9b7be1e52a3
126733e55ec92394dff60603b699c93c3b303fc0
describe
'34294' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIG' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
6d3357dd05e9649504472ff6eaa1f57b
b3369e0cdf995a5aed8b54d8ec5b4fccebe1c85c
'2012-04-05T12:23:42-04:00'
describe
'165918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIH' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
0699bc9b4e639c4d6f9fae9f767539fa
b1e6aaa337a451fca3baa8efa5340f0f016a9757
'2012-04-05T12:33:30-04:00'
describe
'125480' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARII' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
86c9ba675ad2cc7dc65de0e91176f65f
f29ac9ccaac2e605e140cda5ef340c834a0780ef
'2012-04-05T12:33:21-04:00'
describe
'34632' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
1db33f5c3e83dfd33e5f3923277a8b77
86b4964abe05406e7f280fe097212fbc0e19cc95
describe
'67231' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIK' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
dcd0060911ab43146cbe2aaeb8ced527
8a534d924d360676ff0c618a9a498d27e979cc10
'2012-04-05T12:19:58-04:00'
describe
'1350432' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIL' 'sip-files00080.tif'
125800c8ecd52ea6ce3c11ac09bf3b7b
2d72b47ed6717c0bf943d786f6a1cf595921a508
'2012-04-05T12:25:38-04:00'
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIM' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ad50401a58cc0a4fe24ce8eaed793a8b
a019a2cb2c64dccaecf2a60a32e7b9e8a6f9960e
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIN' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
fd1f6fda1498eebd12dce0786897d56a
5312aa1cd08c389da0021e4f53ae5536de6e7c56
'2012-04-05T12:29:50-04:00'
describe
'164677' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIO' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ece42c74f68d76f4b9c04297400b961d
2e076af698959a69a98ccca9fcea916a8532b130
describe
'129072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIP' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
06a053c16251a99e19a2749de24aa2b7
f19395b7b7750ed0c31cdc2620c1df2023225a6f
describe
'35911' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
611cd4931eca034d6c7a152f1e64ce09
c8385280f9e3c42947c20911df13782fef03c9b8
'2012-04-05T12:22:04-04:00'
describe
'68840' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
cb2e901f2726b9d9c1d90c83a836ccb5
5a2c8eb5092b70e23a43f8c8efc885cd0df08914
'2012-04-05T12:17:52-04:00'
describe
'1340728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIS' 'sip-files00081.tif'
e8d88c8d8be39004ec5bea7905595239
13a277161076251971b6895ceea2267484dfe810
'2012-04-05T12:25:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
65e61c7f8427bf4ea718370742e0d876
58bf6675446d995a63dbef9215313dedb6ce8f37
'2012-04-05T12:22:10-04:00'
describe
'36388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
1b0e62b82eebae5cc95a564bd18ff3fc
21a5e3b2840e1ab147b79bb009560d2cfd3ab9e0
'2012-04-05T12:31:58-04:00'
describe
'167935' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIV' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c205380683c994145225207d9118da96
ca25b96837c6d2dcf1f8a8afedee23ef5441d847
'2012-04-05T12:29:27-04:00'
describe
'121123' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
efd7914d5bd87dc8d5404768f57d7294
096340066a416a17252df2fb2ba8b5f2d4194b6f
'2012-04-05T12:27:13-04:00'
describe
'31213' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIX' 'sip-files00082.pro'
67e93dacfec6e4eb2ae099a77bae87ec
e8e7bf8f3b4efa6600caf3e89852f1408dfbd32d
'2012-04-05T12:35:07-04:00'
describe
'63847' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
927c0a8db42c3ed3ca8cfdabf3d60532
9d6cf8241191851c0821e3330fb8b23fa8942937
'2012-04-05T12:17:23-04:00'
describe
'1366656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
41db55b37d846464b99052caec963212
21e36c09954b7724b07b690fd15ce776fb51766b
'2012-04-05T12:20:58-04:00'
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJA' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4e610e1b0362b1ee442afc626c3d5afa
5b4fd6e66d9b5b986219d375565c50e24870511a
'2012-04-05T12:17:05-04:00'
describe
'34150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJB' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
04b9c29efe8d659e10a700e54e4c231e
2fe91619506f65ef387362561b55043c94ce7696
describe
'166090' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJC' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
4d4df11461a79c13c7c29c2b91773482
ffcfe66ce88253484fbcb77c6e9aa2d82f258758
describe
'121127' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
46ddfde8487e72a10e39d45c17afcbb1
56cfc910b780eb644851f5f6410682f526fde8f7
'2012-04-05T12:33:52-04:00'
describe
'33723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1d0f25dd5c3dd8344e4b467f1a868fce
84a994f950bf6851df5c9739c3e5938149e496bf
'2012-04-05T12:18:58-04:00'
describe
'64814' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJF' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
210b7ddf5b7785e1da6b27d5185a3ba8
3e138ef611b4c2eece4ca274b71e99c28cf679a0
'2012-04-05T12:22:50-04:00'
describe
'1351560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
d82a44f93504bb5a2ff3aa9476a4364f
68f36be92ebf73adea79b9a95a1864e3dc3b5503
'2012-04-05T12:28:44-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJH' 'sip-files00083.txt'
07d0c0150400e92c6cb095a1df4489ed
f05e245d50421453aaef137be0001a31889dc6f8
'2012-04-05T12:32:33-04:00'
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJI' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
56aeb1798d9ed0c378d75bb48725844c
0cf3141c884e1ec82d16a990638466977951927b
'2012-04-05T12:17:27-04:00'
describe
'161386' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
39976a74d3c94134befb3ef07b0023b1
24679e0da2c6692a5c1f41a2682d3dd2ccd2eaa5
'2012-04-05T12:34:20-04:00'
describe
'132564' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJK' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
7b77ac0ea0ea18556048241086275467
6987c3fb9912a12bcc522022ab8a71705a3d1b4a
describe
'36087' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJL' 'sip-files00084.pro'
1fb957df512a9e126cc02aebdc298b00
727bb6e82e7f1875caedd4aec118253f3c6cd978
describe
'70719' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJM' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
64aedc6c0a88a2457f3293278e787210
f11e8e728500cc9c997d037d57a11a0d858123b4
'2012-04-05T12:28:38-04:00'
describe
'1315472' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJN' 'sip-files00084.tif'
a04c0cb3e3e50d24f15e01a240ae5324
37e36be8cdca7880294d21ee4b7105c8184d35d3
'2012-04-05T12:24:35-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJO' 'sip-files00084.txt'
31d44c599bb812b903468845c205bb97
86cd8543642254e2845e873ee2a60ad109de6b13
'2012-04-05T12:25:52-04:00'
describe
'36888' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJP' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
0cf31d68b473059849f8df8a532b7230
1ebd4d3b56eec55ca10818fbdfc5876541dca757
describe
'115874' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
7e9ba73fb209f0d2cfac9eaf6290d9cb
e4b9cab26296f76dd78098bd740cc19dffba7c7c
'2012-04-05T12:21:37-04:00'
describe
'59054' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJR' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
2d9d94f0fff70cc6d7f3a8cf499919f7
9fc646ef982eab98552186ec76398a38041bfc7a
'2012-04-05T12:26:28-04:00'
describe
'11247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
40c9f789829501bda94ab3d25cc907c4
c1a1992bbbbdae9a5375b94db4f3e2cc7c48f670
describe
'36861' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJT' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1e404298600e009457218ac40bcf5151
b3919502232bfe3fa387880f5d3d26475d20437b
describe
'1369216' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJU' 'sip-files00085.tif'
0c9833e474f2778a223ffba9a5cc286a
58adad2066e17dd74e0d09290591ffb49cb8bf8c
'2012-04-05T12:27:08-04:00'
describe
'482' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJV' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5674d7455fb1261d386a428acba4b8b6
42cbe58c35d2f72a162c83714aa50c0a8d12e6e7
'2012-04-05T12:29:14-04:00'
describe
'25141' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJW' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
f3cb6bb288055f2a1c28e5352726cc46
92fb722b9d28976c6dad5b9a8ae362d352745a6b
describe
'24743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJX' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
74311f9c77d1799ea185872d0ef729fb
495844b4297b7d0f48bcda74589f9976edad48f2
describe
'27504' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJY' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
4ff5f1e4ccab809443c9c0ee77f0dda2
75ea9bcd9c332253d85453d44396879cde6f481d
'2012-04-05T12:27:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
c1af57026591d93b76ff3de4c9d7e06b
a9bae36c6ff15ff2273cb0aed5d80fffb1fa0345
'2012-04-05T12:24:05-04:00'
describe
'22572' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKA' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b037500585d1bfc8188e7f1d35aa39ec
3b1e52e558bc6e9d823459c2dc941b7fca0ef27b
'2012-04-05T12:34:22-04:00'
describe
'1290452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKB' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2414dd3911f3588e8456ba139ea208c0
ed6a6c174893d6eff4b0e07dde9c588198efa95c
'2012-04-05T12:26:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
043e54cc73e01224111ac6c1e2c50329
7fe95575a4057d8f6a71215f32413dd219c78957
describe
'20000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKD' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
5bc5728a6f812ae9f6bfd350d096ee76
a7be7c873d064b33670b5a520281379b535ecddc
describe
'11272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKE' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
13a22eaca3048d86fa90d2ed99ee93b3
03cb5ed699577d5d920c23a18522344366c951f1
describe
'22144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKF' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
09d5779e0fea6eefbaf1024f5606f36b
a06acd2581cfa1a35eeb0dd7dfe7a148ddf88128
describe
'19674' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8349267b98b78667af25307a0e432069
84452a936bed2eae29dd462fc2a57bbcd9e897d7
'2012-04-05T12:22:21-04:00'
describe
'1232948' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
3606b9a81e097957468d3709d29d296f
a79f97f9539d0a601c0b40656e536d3eed86565a
'2012-04-05T12:16:40-04:00'
describe
'18907' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
4c1c051012bd711dd2ce7c992062d5c7
09eef70fbfab6960fba1ad3ca2964a8ef528acc5
describe
'163197' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
33f25e674ce8c4df0b322d7ec7e0b267
6f2ba6bf671e19b5959b03284dd9eff3252ebd2d
'2012-04-05T12:25:50-04:00'
describe
'94921' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
1ef5635e0861aef6f82cff182a453fc3
7f1badb9c93f66acac405e08596b33102a248599
describe
'22469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKL' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c07522a568d76c774581b120bad842b0
0f557419a7b63fe625edd7969081dcccad172e6f
describe
'52094' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKM' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
8f6b142823ffe5eb899f5ec10e4233a4
a6d523ea0c3bec090208921f45d9b8f9a54b771b
describe
'1327072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
c1932e4f0a544e042eed87fc05b78f4b
dc79dde8e725677cd3b694f2b2558de6bc30434d
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKO' 'sip-files00088.txt'
7539d034c7ae2f589313268c1cc94644
cb0c23463cdfe68238cc904671d0ea360f270c36
'2012-04-05T12:19:38-04:00'
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
fdfbf9425080e67b19a18582f7c8a320
ee4448ee80d9a9ebf8549c579062625c4cccfd5e
describe
'163142' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
4a8b429604b5f8cfd094c16a66afdede
25d6614687b6c0ca260f00c224ca8356f925c602
describe
'127945' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKR' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
ddbc67963484c6c8154ac171de5894f9
cbf30fbdb9ef6dd0b21febc38c23b6de2ab4db9f
'2012-04-05T12:18:14-04:00'
describe
'35539' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKS' 'sip-files00089.pro'
3e4c26b6ff9dd537bec274ed299c10b4
114194d8a54fde57e101f91142a8e79748cf4871
describe
'67261' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6b1b8a9effc29002d52c3a1b5a6bbcfa
5288fa4efd61e913a1df96dac2e1646138757686
'2012-04-05T12:23:08-04:00'
describe
'1328456' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKU' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4d22392470fcfff2b67f193ab88a780a
9aaaf9cdf6ef2259abeabcce7800408d3b20ea92
'2012-04-05T12:23:03-04:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKV' 'sip-files00089.txt'
3eda933b7afe1c76248600ed2fd60f93
ad64ad489829ab2510d7bd416b51ae07f6af1557
'2012-04-05T12:28:23-04:00'
describe
'36640' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKW' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
f14e152a8d326692ee6c4a322e7d4717
9b244f9210106fd64a66c52ceedfbf8d352f5ff7
'2012-04-05T12:19:32-04:00'
describe
'166894' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
776c29dc086b4ace9f79935e332522dd
905b61ead808c60fa887374f3ba186dddfcd3426
'2012-04-05T12:17:29-04:00'
describe
'137055' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKY' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
d4efeb83d2e4db7fd011e72a276122d4
51c77c7ab99f05b9197e6b3fd7862caf6a013e46
'2012-04-05T12:28:29-04:00'
describe
'38094' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
3318956598315b57f8fbd806c45b6153
088460f3a6616ce44bcab66f42157b0db192bbf4
'2012-04-05T12:25:46-04:00'
describe
'72064' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLA' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
d3962ef1cb4b146076995fd15b64b983
166dbdc1d7572694d6f24b3578ecb9e48ff223b8
'2012-04-05T12:16:55-04:00'
describe
'1358676' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ffd2d076eaf56ad069ee65461f0696fd
d4a7341218cd44d8ff6ba83b5fde7cae37399fd4
'2012-04-05T12:16:44-04:00'
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
a48f4a3f55794d81f1ce4c30966b153e
7f6af0384d0fd324916735a73fab244aa54451f0
'2012-04-05T12:26:05-04:00'
describe
'37042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLD' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
0caf2bd45be384c40c040c036ff8933d
84bb9b82b629e351e612dad5bd38091e4536a3fc
'2012-04-05T12:34:40-04:00'
describe
'161685' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
97a7708cb1c4ee8b882c14e8ade1e729
3277d9244c6c908adba4329b31b80f2dc307ce19
'2012-04-05T12:33:08-04:00'
describe
'127641' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
7dda0e4483f5edf4161dc1130a0e8432
4a5aaec6dcb4fd8ea7385be34b242b4cd83c6329
'2012-04-05T12:26:58-04:00'
describe
'34670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLG' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c03c26d59f92261310e962000f1c7010
6941ee4ac9595616d54606881d5ec2ac120690a5
'2012-04-05T12:30:29-04:00'
describe
'67399' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLH' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
86e08a3d610056fb2034497226a80bbc
273e1c37c4481cb5ca34cb454d2d0d2760a0f7a1
'2012-04-05T12:28:22-04:00'
describe
'1317748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLI' 'sip-files00091.tif'
ad7e157828ee3d9d94f95b3f96b60b56
39248eab59daa6ec2f362bd265811a01a0ad8fed
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c5f9fe8d7471046d0d3ee56393157b74
6569207fa44d5a785ef170b41b22bffd692be428
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLK' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
6d0e9e2cde486778635eaaf0123935b9
4c006cf514d1b37b9430f0c2caef43d3bfe9e0f3
'2012-04-05T12:26:09-04:00'
describe
'159598' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1b8bece234d7d94ce65bd08dde6d3679
dc9e27ab02d8f8755d649e8fe85df8573e226543
'2012-04-05T12:21:54-04:00'
describe
'131881' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
1a62f9354394cef1828ff722ff11e75f
e9e59913ec8e6fad02c36b69a8200f3f731fa08f
'2012-04-05T12:32:05-04:00'
describe
'36001' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
7d68b64ebbbda8b72365ce03905cefb9
b395fff8bc928c865122e6c3f738d36a61a68283
'2012-04-05T12:21:52-04:00'
describe
'69191' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLO' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d575b57149c5e5280c6fedf348f2a673
c43bdbd67a6271c82f2576a9c006315b4e11e107
'2012-04-05T12:31:22-04:00'
describe
'1300224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
105f4191c0deb16139578a3d7b28efc4
00f155c6c8542f514c599c603315b201aaa1528c
'2012-04-05T12:27:04-04:00'
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
e70a73c0a615dd2e4e515c4bfa3678a5
a278bb970131ddc6dc24bb6c9690006a80647bc3
'2012-04-05T12:26:41-04:00'
describe
'36714' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d930ff789518e01b13c61474fd1620ef
5d7d28843d39e5e49cbb27f4ca640f6c24de2426
'2012-04-05T12:24:26-04:00'
describe
'158308' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLS' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
aeed1b3ede34ee5159944ceed816cf51
d6f79b67b55ecdc551832f073b26df877099ebb9
describe
'118475' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
92722448f0c937bd3ec5ded4078a90cd
6dee1e2ae6da248ff13e8a06dff1f5f27b71faba
'2012-04-05T12:24:13-04:00'
describe
'30509' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
08be843bd6e06b8fdee5f674dbd3f1fa
3611e4dd5a5bce325a42b9897fc1e696e36cace2
'2012-04-05T12:20:45-04:00'
describe
'64503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
c3eec86304d9a3b809b92feab982d68c
04b0942a0ec67cd27f3ef53193bd90ac9d20734f
describe
'1290076' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
32813ebb217eb3e14b182f1d5d14b614
99405b2b26a9b33caa88b0a1804aebee039a31c9
'2012-04-05T12:34:41-04:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLX' 'sip-files00093.txt'
02a04a168ab2cc9d6e5a67a433a57fb7
5eeecbfc9eba64ac28dc46b32f41ec705cef9145
'2012-04-05T12:33:51-04:00'
describe
'35180' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
afa0ef7c4bdf3642d429f2a1f8b0dcce
5c1e848c820b1a8ae8ac3d98d64ae4607febbf1d
'2012-04-05T12:18:48-04:00'
describe
'160635' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
7680e805a648de2daac974cccdf80d8f
b4d41570660bf30507f3e857ced58e533ab1b8bd
'2012-04-05T12:20:40-04:00'
describe
'142969' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
e3089e30e656dc08b864d2e427f74fb8
51da2931c12eb45255bc990d7027cf9bf4e85f35
'2012-04-05T12:32:06-04:00'
describe
'40374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a68e64e5983e35a35c7ddc5468560a3c
2509bc2558b59a9281daf724956d2754d0302158
'2012-04-05T12:25:26-04:00'
describe
'74786' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
658f4c546b5324173c8a361d76752706
bc64e685cdd8f4cf7b390581056f9b2c55ed3735
describe
'1309284' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMD' 'sip-files00094.tif'
e0fbbccf061cf6e079e10278b062b932
76be86e95903805b535a201fc42f06bf57fa2a61
'2012-04-05T12:31:55-04:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARME' 'sip-files00094.txt'
e06e3feb01294dd17ae2ab47545780e8
7b80831f4be1fe8408f826a38934f402e70611b5
describe
'38421' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMF' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d9ce3079768d066b3b6a23acda90e2f6
5e6f9e73e6da75f271570bcd65217182b933ef1f
'2012-04-05T12:20:41-04:00'
describe
'168780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
4438b36b1e37db28f77ab79c1b225fa0
25943e96affa6ed04dd61892e8250358e66e4862
'2012-04-05T12:18:51-04:00'
describe
'139583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMH' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
042abec5303b7fafea8acd746bb7c9b7
7439f54fb383f8a5ae2f63d85c646aca5ef1bb09
'2012-04-05T12:30:35-04:00'
describe
'39489' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMI' 'sip-files00095.pro'
1770c61f6df72c9192ddb0829db31ba3
52ce414a34e6681ccda4be2dfd3ab8231f874b4c
'2012-04-05T12:22:27-04:00'
describe
'72214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
7543c591911be182c8f3ca4dc3530b77
0e617bd584afb070b565fe2976528d2f663d0b70
'2012-04-05T12:34:51-04:00'
describe
'1374204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2ce2719658dc432a3662f59838987449
c718ae4476c806dd43043bce20029986607fc05f
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARML' 'sip-files00095.txt'
736bea4ff1ac3bde649f6a011f03892c
03df1fbf2687f2321a69fef8079bb4cec3497517
describe
'36893' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMM' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
ffb415cbcf57f4fe66e683fad20e0b21
62811199f69b1c27c683166964197ffb88197671
'2012-04-05T12:29:54-04:00'
describe
'157857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
2e810b28c8ae601aebb6935aaa517afa
c866965d43df24a5c4e4ed67566d0c85f8fe84b8
describe
'108492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
489e94faa790b7b7305862c02708787e
f94a94ecb760961973648e24f4df840beccc074d
'2012-04-05T12:21:21-04:00'
describe
'27259' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
e5dabc3b483dcdc1f61fddd3153f4dce
37359af4aba6cbdcb5d1227abf5d456e5423dc71
describe
'60544' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
67ab5eec5f7fa34b1a23a0a50c798a71
223a2d2825c381240df1a89401f925559b63cee2
'2012-04-05T12:32:22-04:00'
describe
'1286064' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
b3027d0e95c60dd3af625c5cca53e65a
0fccad24a6052fdd563912ba89ed9c6e9cab002c
'2012-04-05T12:31:38-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
e92d8f9a381256e5490dd37cba48d206
646154a8a3bdb77e3a38a8aaefde767161ba13ff
describe
'34392' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
1a00e4472371728e18fd985415207bad
edeed3d44b02f21b4e280dbab9025bcb7e560c76
'2012-04-05T12:27:18-04:00'
describe
'162402' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
e1ab53858f494013187bccca892d168a
ad8d6e608070de1a6adf78a24a5cd576cc9643b8
describe
'120640' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
403f78dafd1e88d5819a697d3c6d4971
c948f1674d97e3175a416d70df1eff6c828bd5a2
'2012-04-05T12:34:19-04:00'
describe
'31769' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMW' 'sip-files00097.pro'
a932346555ee0f1131262ec7dc40773f
ae64ec538187307c6c6b86337221892fbb3ed34b
describe
'65226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a23660011fabe4e854795c1a5beeaf69
f614bb6576319e1273df903d554d5d36f1d23381
'2012-04-05T12:27:52-04:00'
describe
'1322284' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
18ae02451d233ea4bb311e705c0a8431
7a874b445bd4965500db5f6f9f579c29e04f61be
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
3ae6dad403758ed30b0725b7c728306b
a33d494658f84cbf2fa0e7507f18ee10b4a9003b
describe
'35134' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ea9b1eb5e03f2fa9bb55d247fa3af329
8c6424cdea53c24e3d63b9001974656b2ece61d4
'2012-04-05T12:28:51-04:00'
describe
'166486' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
8364ee942aa78a73b2d7824597ff44c8
7061642f395cbbc4ea787e05d8643ffb3045eb2d
'2012-04-05T12:26:12-04:00'
describe
'127215' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6bba8dbe49d0027147709b1d3a77ccb7
508ee090fb6fb156206febdfba74ce89152e3573
'2012-04-05T12:32:19-04:00'
describe
'34628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARND' 'sip-files00098.pro'
7dc81ba003d18ce8e46cc50d5642ea6a
389cd4d250286a6482df898f4423acba7e1faf7c
'2012-04-05T12:20:25-04:00'
describe
'67232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9efd92549e9c0dfcb0fcfb44f45485ca
c9bd88295e2a5308f3401d71ff564d32af4278ec
describe
'1355416' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
1222791cf3e091db873fe9843a561d9a
a238f9c71ebcfea77076c54583b05517ca77bbf6
'2012-04-05T12:21:18-04:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
887cd67ad981130158b4a46795345d8b
e05a6a2b3c0f800e015b0daaa5467462f366978f
'2012-04-05T12:31:06-04:00'
describe
'36202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
fc3e6088148673c3039a5606bb7e7bf8
35dc1bcac0d9ec5cfd615b8f2b2fdd1523dd0b63
'2012-04-05T12:26:22-04:00'
describe
'161802' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
bbafd317ad50c75dab41d39d7384b9f3
03d197c0c5ddf70996ccc7b58bb04def7c6db2d6
describe
'126255' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ab9954278f1425fac0cb0fdccba407cd
3850c5af5b3cdc8ac393c70762fb5899cdc7edee
'2012-04-05T12:31:54-04:00'
describe
'33750' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
3221ca9468790ee57ef8fd8533acbec2
657b467e2c22a82973b0c0033373463550f044c1
'2012-04-05T12:18:44-04:00'
describe
'68785' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
d0a966ad969dcad30e95dd3b6dd39099
a4204773112b3786cfa25f97ee441b8ae8786c7d
'2012-04-05T12:22:07-04:00'
describe
'1318076' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
efa5ccc508b4702e1ed42e8470ad4dc2
d11d8418c72d1398722d80be0b839c90210dc093
'2012-04-05T12:33:45-04:00'
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a3fde2ef3e9ef758e165cb1a4129ef3c
f4ba22433802c00e50f403b91250a4b1357d6265
describe
'35741' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
57cd38ca68c7979fd532d9d79c3d93d2
02449e84bea5bff4ecf5490e14eabeddcb9150ab
'2012-04-05T12:34:33-04:00'
describe
'160857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
e6e18becffd79148cf7f9ca6837b3292
c1a40642e25f51d4fae005f033a3c57eed06b56b
describe
'119278' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b96ce53dfa0394072d801f445c6cfe54
66789f188efc59b4ea45e378c6de404b1b5e9c58
'2012-04-05T12:33:24-04:00'
describe
'30468' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNR' 'sip-files00100.pro'
00f8151926cb175f7a7e301a3cea7224
e0ccaf8048789285fc614d0beee946d1b4eace3a
'2012-04-05T12:23:57-04:00'
describe
'64681' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNS' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8a223a9b441c4e1906498af23f99a0c4
680060b7efde59fc6b8cbce89b498855cad85977
'2012-04-05T12:33:05-04:00'
describe
'1310024' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNT' 'sip-files00100.tif'
728908c85ef64d253a22ae1a4a5cec1b
aa28ec42ef156f1980c56777c704149a08ff493f
'2012-04-05T12:30:45-04:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
1c6735363a9b07a6e3ddd3044aedf06c
2fe7b004761251177b860b4176a1b4d60b005378
'2012-04-05T12:18:45-04:00'
describe
'35146' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
cb478b27804a62be0c75d46961f60750
badd0a91f87bca8fcdc49e99b43ca0248179b6bf
describe
'164360' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e7dba02ae7b4f7389a89c1bfc3898f45
22b13f92b4fe0a95ddf1b6614580a0f920ca591a
describe
'131291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
acb0d148da2be8a4bb6936c6a3419f38
debfcb1c1a5673f72b592db231d70efdaa0f59dd
'2012-04-05T12:22:56-04:00'
describe
'35913' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9d82eae28a499cb6ee6c5c34b5a5d37a
cea84c2624d2b4f280444edd51b3804cd7059e20
'2012-04-05T12:18:33-04:00'
describe
'68578' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
40949526a59e15ad3ad6e7a201384da1
a289ef81e97c02e567dc905d12c407e86c876eda
'2012-04-05T12:30:33-04:00'
describe
'1337892' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
c9d43a9badd580d941e5a43ab619b7b4
336cd7c4b25c7ba2dab09ac7bb8c5e9dc61198a5
'2012-04-05T12:33:54-04:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
f2713391f579fe8f249f5e107b1e0567
d86925f77645cf4a1db52a958d865ea91061b1ed
'2012-04-05T12:29:26-04:00'
describe
'35226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
74e07b4435b0014c001dcf8a80ce3aec
275aface09949fd878337ba1183cb68217206827
'2012-04-05T12:21:07-04:00'
describe
'153520' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
361665607eae88596077d9567d227445
5738af7b204624d9df47d496bca89b6a66bb6c30
describe
'144926' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
09ceef779123fc3132979ae039366f88
595eba50699ac11a18a8d8b754ac014446868209
'2012-04-05T12:17:15-04:00'
describe
'41097' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
71300be67d661a10b8632d696e3ed156
2c8a962344cb6674f9ab274decadb47c3e7b8899
describe
'76498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
3763c941687ba6b2b17a7e151591a16c
5a1a3fa8f9bc83fcffcdffff1775e33e91aa722b
'2012-04-05T12:24:46-04:00'
describe
'1252772' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
2e03dfe56f8ca149e18d94303734b521
d680b33bacecba95401535d9ba4555290324a2b3
'2012-04-05T12:25:42-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
73bca293395074d04dc12958ca9c22de
0d5940b59102b4f1e105bbbdf06130e1d7242ad9
'2012-04-05T12:31:42-04:00'
describe
'38981' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1fcbffdcd0930ca03618bee837b1c669
ebf68bea2f29c86e598d4516bb74473e87247da1
'2012-04-05T12:33:37-04:00'
describe
'161041' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
fd81874dfe564a45c3bac3bcbd218506
481cbbf0e223bd2fed112668dd250cc188450b8d
'2012-04-05T12:17:16-04:00'
describe
'146079' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
0f080b8c288847bf151965603fe94c8e
2ddcc703bfa641e24271d57bbf81b3b1c5367be1
describe
'41212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ec0ee41f4341160581a3624652f1974c
4cd29c21073de37ad4d8eb2ad90649fdd48d42e7
'2012-04-05T12:30:16-04:00'
describe
'76748' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARON' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
8839881357a11228aa2f55cce9807f61
192d0a700b503e145ba04e179e6c15a3acf2807e
describe
'1312472' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
98f03d04d7ce7d2d72703c5829ea5ff4
b77de67c23eba75554d78a3adf58d67b2135b026
'2012-04-05T12:28:25-04:00'
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a1fdf6c0196e02cc7223d9e2d5f087e8
71ffe53e6ee7dd4819fcf9fbc1f9e7c99cc58f02
'2012-04-05T12:28:46-04:00'
describe
'38757' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
a50052c0ed27753bf7c8b7429898484b
f7d7f90c2ddcfcb6503e75fc14f5fd1c7be93b8f
'2012-04-05T12:17:32-04:00'
describe
'156353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d288ea5496b585cbda08bf7279cf91ca
c87ba07a4b9f2d0366d44ed8adba82c377980ebb
'2012-04-05T12:34:27-04:00'
describe
'144163' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
1d5d7f62f60a4f2fd7e191c732b902dd
c27d234b04dc0087cd7782e0d99b7f44308b3e16
'2012-04-05T12:25:58-04:00'
describe
'40486' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
4049eb8c26dd06bb8191d38b6c5a84bd
2aa088aac9d49a7b065a46c094f35ce2b5b10ade
'2012-04-05T12:20:47-04:00'
describe
'75637' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
10e83225c3276bb601039bc2fe504455
70185ff13dae0c98a2e60a88b52c065009fbfa7e
'2012-04-05T12:26:35-04:00'
describe
'1274932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
06bc8b0f6408deff56947ee57cd05470
86a0d9be3c1ea6b6fa08cfa3e069ff9bf73f73a1
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
77bd744a90a458e7b5a53fd4f6b907c4
8bf1d60d5a7a164dd4ac26d53ea9b69b5658d62c
'2012-04-05T12:24:18-04:00'
describe
'39420' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
76409d10760035db7d13a8ede870e289
da386a240405c482b6283911c47c27f5d652db7e
'2012-04-05T12:20:11-04:00'
describe
'157708' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
76e65e2d72437ebd1ad1f10dcd4dd2b6
e81dec87c21562cbcc50a8ff8eb990073168dfcd
describe
'121514' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
9563b6dd3660b96d1c650de0e3c66cf7
0e938c08bf4c8445dbf2f3b29574ab8d1d7c7387
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPA' 'sip-files00105.pro'
bf06fa8bfbc606c8947ed937002f89a1
f2ea98aa0c9613f7e9eebe215671d3f3becf9fa0
describe
'66476' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
40c19a057c06f701a93eec82e8ef7386
dee2c9cc2e6e61c84d6b0f160c1340bd75f0c34c
'2012-04-05T12:17:00-04:00'
describe
'1285668' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
17b22dc9a7507ac708cfcb12db5f2de4
19fcacd384d81a0f33fcc634df10ea80c2b1e9df
'2012-04-05T12:17:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPD' 'sip-files00105.txt'
41fe9b49c82a3ee52afb062e84462af7
932ce48f867aedcce9bcb6c63828e3a207f0f0fc
describe
'36700' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPE' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
1c966411efb0461c35d674586e2e2279
bf152e8b91bb72c051fa974549c27b350cfb8fdd
describe
'156273' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPF' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
fdf1e59f3205d01f6bbdde9167f720d0
2139d955d2e42aa305c7d39f8c6d76eda1420f08
'2012-04-05T12:17:40-04:00'
describe
'107289' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0b37042e1d35899c5d5a764cab06afdb
8d8aec3cff1de19b9a54a0c7c0552ce3f70c9ecf
'2012-04-05T12:25:08-04:00'
describe
'27735' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPH' 'sip-files00106.pro'
6a41ef43dbeb710a7fc94ffe07667a93
902a3ce5520bb7ebf4b760190475e6e1b10510d0
describe
'58359' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPI' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
4bf12ea0f0c9d40150646a1db344ad49
716691b2c4b34e473ec255ff588cf7c7104ab54f
describe
'1272788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
7a1dcd12205480baab80060716fcdae7
7fa49f203d0d44a1e9013cf7dd795d175b8a7f93
'2012-04-05T12:26:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
3f4345038857ef25e353dc37ef705c1a
a30f270c42c8bc0b26cfc883949ab296b8afeda3
describe
'33766' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPL' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2fdefaeb639711f12dffd26c1ffeb1fa
62080666be50bdd123d27120557b4243248d93f0
'2012-04-05T12:25:33-04:00'
describe
'168480' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b44b4abf7524e093232b34b7236510b9
c713fc0daeaab427b3ddb81973a9a3e437613e37
'2012-04-05T12:22:06-04:00'
describe
'140906' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
e2fdef8e740854234f801fe9807f6b1f
d78005f10210a34443b832c7b8553b101f3bb909
'2012-04-05T12:24:41-04:00'
describe
'39571' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
49786fd6a59e9c22a6942e65abf0e671
e01a3315d9f0a95e4e4b6a42ca36bd8f11a90379
describe
'74199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ca89b97e0e3bcb0bf90473a5639c8690
78264207d654d6fb1234772f95d69f8c5731d198
'2012-04-05T12:26:24-04:00'
describe
'1371800' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e5fd50d4f31b24c39d286321d2355efb
4ff03da7cb14f8cd984f6ed288b80e9499a79680
'2012-04-05T12:23:55-04:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
d32b198b63b81f89546c4b7cfb966be7
ee12531977c1405f5f0c1776d03af15d30a795c0
describe
'37514' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
18df22347183c6fe6eefa69b166faa23
6afdf84faf2492b1bbb643017cd5264397a7474c
'2012-04-05T12:30:57-04:00'
describe
'165660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
82e311e6bf5d81c97ff1b7dd9ba51384
b769ac8e562ac973b9d0187085f1e2897ccfc4cc
describe
'135611' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2d3e76ff443f270da42bbf1558303dbc
1c3eb1d123b89bd9328ece2b640accc972c6b72a
describe
'38120' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
866c60f60b2dc2c2339cc7c442e5cddf
a57798197a5da0c4b119eb51bf1eb05fe5d31463
'2012-04-05T12:22:41-04:00'
describe
'70931' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
62d57310ce85fb743b4d512c7b3886a7
515c3b6e60e10c29ba125b8e2e4d3355c834a4a1
describe
'1349168' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
8e56a5bee7f0d90867f2aa7d1e24de04
b592a20db18dd2d7e1daf3b34c68883ec090e6b9
'2012-04-05T12:32:58-04:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3976f86156ec4ab8517fe220d892d2eb
04f5855f6be7d9626ea3eff8794f930d81856426
'2012-04-05T12:31:14-04:00'
describe
'36770' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
7ac6290175358a9d83bb4aca6b92a977
2cf67e5defda7c97ee954271c480edac01e52676
'2012-04-05T12:19:09-04:00'
describe
'169543' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a9cbff4c72c1b709edf1ff895254c744
2ba01a9b21bf28303722888e5377558cf9b993a0
describe
'135720' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
3b69e4a343fee1158ae5978671641dec
ca630c07af695181a5b33a83ebb1218085d5a17f
describe
'38066' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d3a167a0a4f892076d84154fafc853ff
ee1f9922640d5e5beab3a6f2486ff64608d82feb
describe
'70448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
247d078136bb65cc51018105ef2407f6
69285487b3af172c6b477a4b168c54fbecc36a21
'2012-04-05T12:27:14-04:00'
describe
'1380032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
260181bf84f30b54e41b96637e8e84c2
f19c593f3152dd14017bb17846fd5629bfcc1f61
'2012-04-05T12:31:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
3abae8e6e6b92a0dec2ef9abdb259a41
0cfa745bf65643fa96b9f2e70cbd3c17b352a826
'2012-04-05T12:19:41-04:00'
describe
'36473' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
c5c3ea5adcac5c1543181c5b3d4637ee
facd05dc32bd057b82b63c120e11a9d2a3bc04b9
describe
'169337' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQH' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
11e4bb1385e0be9659a3352aead7fb44
3580e72c11acef31be246a1c870978e17b498598
'2012-04-05T12:30:08-04:00'
describe
'140362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
fd4823f55fb7b4ccc2885cdf1c416803
1d6ef9ea0cc10ebe649f8cd3a63b9fbacc25b7ad
describe
'40101' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
2163ff57f62c2e116135f32a0339d1a5
c77f166d4880ef46789690203351db398dea1911
'2012-04-05T12:17:56-04:00'
describe
'72642' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQK' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
cc6a245dfb64a00a5f5bb88c9a9096e6
a00a3cc1717fa63d4619868b5f642061f36e0d9d
describe
'1378464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
7055d1727b239e8eb08206923f0728cf
b00acfd27ec9eb284e1d8b926a26840345cecd1b
'2012-04-05T12:27:36-04:00'
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
bff248667d79bbb3ccb86c22ceaa1f59
6fd911e6d0184c3643778c9af060467f86555d57
'2012-04-05T12:32:57-04:00'
describe
'36452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQN' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
92f45ebc26902b37f78aad845ea364ed
ce20133443bbfb4c1373bf4b02a3a4b870a4089e
'2012-04-05T12:34:25-04:00'
describe
'168098' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2cc811780aa23fb17d51a919a6cbea78
037ad340c630db7e01191e644af9c84ab286aa3e
'2012-04-05T12:19:52-04:00'
describe
'108838' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
1637fb3c8d41de4d72ae050522840d3b
3ffdab89d41220021805375825ad8cb9a24c4ae7
'2012-04-05T12:32:29-04:00'
describe
'27608' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
2bac2a7b35f39428ad3b22e847ac23f8
ee4f9d9a8b1336fa67375a7189dcf12ffb961bf3
describe
'59848' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
b78f1f67e288891275bd5839ba0278fa
0e0d764ba87dd33fb64a3a0470ccad6c526f74fa
describe
'1367232' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
91d3a854e73d3812dac453c15f9c39c4
c02ff21da230618cab8abe87c11a095a7b03c61a
'2012-04-05T12:32:18-04:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
8c7d4049a674325dc5735ea94176fb44
092e579e69d285950996a4b8d4b2b2a1f2b74562
'2012-04-05T12:28:30-04:00'
describe
'33582' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
0043daea7bad16eeae57f759d6f3e45e
5fd90ae4d6ee88a73b8490592bee664b0989f03e
'2012-04-05T12:25:47-04:00'
describe
'162237' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
6db09db576bea0ae441898fa0f2f1ce4
e06d58451513c351d8ca8e599cfb49b147ff3389
describe
'130960' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b72926bcff8ccdefef88238412f913f7
8437fba1bca8c8993e6757fcfb1d9015fbe94c43
'2012-04-05T12:20:29-04:00'
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
bf1dc08752fe0043da41e83a9b357992
c0516077eecb82f2118009f5875a4628a679789f
'2012-04-05T12:25:53-04:00'
describe
'69067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
dfed4c8cbffd7b4369e1c34b8a483795
bfab67a51e1eaf008c3f61c248447aaa38943aec
describe
'1321948' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
68941d895e6f5e9fe22a18d0f56f83a4
63a779e3f74d4f15a2d6875e3696f26239564fdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
eb15123b51d5970a1d7199153150c526
3911d3b38c90f3fb77b2c4f18e40b7cd8c03593d
'2012-04-05T12:17:25-04:00'
describe
'37178' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
71eab43ac0c8f563803d37137225ab56
f2f091b5b89e14f56ba18838e7d88deaa03f2f69
'2012-04-05T12:23:02-04:00'
describe
'162987' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRC' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
bb7d162214a2ef762c14aa10678bbd2f
458aac3b5ce2a84ae48188c5ba805e2ca38d9876
'2012-04-05T12:16:58-04:00'
describe
'129073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRD' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
286616f2a50bd208ece0d98b6b5fecf4
5656479bbde8fbc318b45f5d826c0b35744ee659
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRE' 'sip-files00113.pro'
dedf3f89ef417e86ab0e2084bae696fc
13e1cc7d090c92ab52e9221884c89b4615c6f365
describe
'68064' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRF' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b68e1abc59fa332aa000abdc55834517
656d7ce798f813ad60a1ef677ad6e69f4c9ff804
describe
'1328104' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRG' 'sip-files00113.tif'
14b0ab5f14387cba04cfdab787c865bd
9fed11799f63e16aff40a1d78cfcfe119c581ba2
'2012-04-05T12:31:17-04:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRH' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b0f492ebacd7412b3b900023e7ff8002
c67f055df795014f17ca457852cfce8ae3fc1b76
'2012-04-05T12:28:00-04:00'
describe
'36211' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRI' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
789789d99b96714b4d35c61722e51008
2d6dc5aa737213b0627aa6501253d43c59a154d6
'2012-04-05T12:23:23-04:00'
describe
'164174' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5a1e6437f93b59f29d19759bcde0e5c3
dd14be542165ec3af3b2876f15db0cc30cedb34e
'2012-04-05T12:27:02-04:00'
describe
'134663' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRK' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7099850f1ba508ff5e357fc302c3be6e
9572f940f28cb293e098bcd3870b67b9a2c5eac1
describe
'36914' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRL' 'sip-files00114.pro'
8fe310d57ff2e72817784219cedd9615
17b02e4a3a518ffda3536682207fc0bcd43901f2
'2012-04-05T12:27:55-04:00'
describe
'72202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRM' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
18bce63be1ddb6ed6e074ae265b754f8
1c6c0c625a41848a3e48ae6a18f816b55e9157ff
'2012-04-05T12:26:11-04:00'
describe
'1337396' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRN' 'sip-files00114.tif'
378b392f9570c81d56ffe1299ba4d354
3705e7e68d0f3568cc4b42381a2057b4572df3c2
'2012-04-05T12:31:46-04:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRO' 'sip-files00114.txt'
a452a3afd1e908e1b82d88b879e273a4
19db2449faa0fcca1ff85885fe04ae8f31e2eb2b
'2012-04-05T12:32:54-04:00'
describe
'37343' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRP' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
a4c482abdeb56f5e7e36b71b577ab475
d2c4732e11434a442cfe416876bfe8ef7c41b4cb
describe
'160434' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4874674d8626e0fdd64892d9ce8b6da2
389bc5353232cca01f3e19ac6513641e3943a8fd
'2012-04-05T12:18:13-04:00'
describe
'140924' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRR' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
7c5c5f8bc5cea02c069abe7a83e83e95
af5d2f896cd743158abc0b6b5b08e4f3d2e0b42a
describe
'40496' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRS' 'sip-files00115.pro'
c9adb1d4c283a776d6b7f84388a86fd8
08c634af9cbad16c814b749487d9f3f4a1b92fee
describe
'72880' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRT' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
1dacdb3553e0a2789795a8ed9ca48b1d
2907a1df6269e18a1d05a43722599156e2152c81
'2012-04-05T12:19:55-04:00'
describe
'1307320' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRU' 'sip-files00115.tif'
590977dfbd3cfbfca82daf618e0b9fef
e33dabc62fba45d83a9897fa6e1c82fb15a5758c
'2012-04-05T12:28:31-04:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRV' 'sip-files00115.txt'
5325a2dd29f91ceea6d6403abe711f8b
1248f54524318e48706e9fcbd367903a4da0e479
describe
'37570' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRW' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
d9491b65b94f5246f6256f2fcd9f2566
c87ae4f7d6777274202c4f80912ae8eda9475297
'2012-04-05T12:18:02-04:00'
describe
'159286' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
b82e40abb5d7c8d0a1d8be6f51a41de4
29fd9fd80d979621402f144412ddc8adff9b0d50
describe
'142014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRY' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
6f6f40ea3071578e5bab9dbd1fd85293
3c8027970a9126f28df0b994350ffabd6380b1c1
describe
'40676' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
9ac4f21f6ed9f4cfa0beef6620e3e4d0
281ca67abbf80308ced971162cb62601086ab898
'2012-04-05T12:20:59-04:00'
describe
'74769' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSA' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
2ebfa263847eb5f03c6a8f588d57073a
0d99c48d7b6656aca914f8ba819e1784a6d2df93
'2012-04-05T12:27:06-04:00'
describe
'1298680' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2fdf63ae7088e52cc2ad3191a27d6adb
55d2135d9f7d5956050ad045ccd568029744ca11
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
83a07a925e85c11bdc6459335b334567
ac3403ba46324d5d51b306604e980dce134e610f
'2012-04-05T12:22:32-04:00'
describe
'37959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSD' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
691435cc454c33ad997bd0a6caf21ec0
0a43ced2dab6911e8de9293db41766db3ebf052b
describe
'162247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
c38842f8d6235ae75adf9c49485986e3
a5947185a5076fada015406f27ef35d4b6b896fd
describe
'110727' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSF' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
33149cb4cf8cee2987d725f4e26efa09
f62edcfeafc8e2cd7d061398a60502c9f7193a05
'2012-04-05T12:19:30-04:00'
describe
'29698' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSG' 'sip-files00117.pro'
895975b9a46fc036c1f8da9a313e4acb
488f6a365779b1f8411ca2fe09694305a541fc63
'2012-04-05T12:17:42-04:00'
describe
'59399' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSH' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
f1671e2ae519342bbe1648bf683ce1f0
9062bccc3596549b44d3fa7ae258046e918a232a
'2012-04-05T12:17:06-04:00'
describe
'1320408' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSI' 'sip-files00117.tif'
7f4cb62e57b18879109f1ebbf53f9c61
5428ceb618ae172d2f44511775d8faf1b6a2aa90
'2012-04-05T12:25:35-04:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a30e77fdf1b55f7a907a6aa0fd139b55
fcc5b419f846dbe17ed994063efcd0b1c167ba36
'2012-04-05T12:27:03-04:00'
describe
'33784' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSK' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
6951ce8f738e989f4d68a0387dc2342f
0d8c0876fec5ea21abaaedd249ec3d198f3a550e
'2012-04-05T12:19:27-04:00'
describe
'167929' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
d989e75bf569083e335395d7f8ffbfd7
6eeb0617a93c2350b83c611f058c1768415c1056
describe
'142033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
239c4a09711a0404784a2122d6fc92ea
ea919d48a1a2214e34f0e506056046f7d75591a6
'2012-04-05T12:20:00-04:00'
describe
'41570' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSN' 'sip-files00118.pro'
6136deb1dc64d3385a59cb4327146845
c2816a4b96443e59d6c29773f7c4abb286388f78
'2012-04-05T12:32:51-04:00'
describe
'73085' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSO' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
6f964b74806304485ed8d10c06b424f7
b9004272f0b221b0d9b374c4950a15b98cc47768
describe
'1366912' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4ae93a9f2b62179bc9b2a78ebc7831d9
843362c5e19391200a72f39b84994ee34f05e5a9
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
0964c01dc0263617a94d76338a0c6072
2ac32734205250da0c5f57bfa5e6fb6386fa55a5
describe
'36630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSR' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
ac77ffe7f0d6a14f50256a94d985f80d
c8b36b5a692205efc09264361c67433ba8a7dc01
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSS' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
93a55c3e77c8d565509c979ea18b4369
924b6ad9f13ff61d4dc7154779b8f26727190880
describe
'129704' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARST' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
8e516b07e4becfc5ef5b58076a907b8a
2fd2db53aa766bf4903b4bcddb3f01d278c6bd99
'2012-04-05T12:31:56-04:00'
describe
'36196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSU' 'sip-files00119.pro'
f07ae75b60d0388a0ae709fd8442c0bb
ce765d08bea36cfd18e76c876751119f3b2ba6cd
'2012-04-05T12:16:47-04:00'
describe
'69248' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
809b232be4dfcc10664e3a5d83d2cb8b
77cf6abae788b049573de610208dddac14a38c0b
'2012-04-05T12:31:07-04:00'
describe
'1313940' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSW' 'sip-files00119.tif'
e38c3e7de4776150abf806574ebe8676
e4fdc92bcddb7272f152635ff920278041a351c6
'2012-04-05T12:23:56-04:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSX' 'sip-files00119.txt'
0999919332cfea1ba21f6b9b44550601
236c75ec1a16a6b56ced56446bf7033465ede19c
'2012-04-05T12:30:38-04:00'
describe
'36137' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSY' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
9c6e4077a80c1397b674b5364d659c3f
9f7623e37db026f093a152309f4a79eb1fcf68d1
describe
'157156' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
bec84f0da1a2b65a8d91748e6cdaad73
a480c43fa34871f1161cf275020cc489d4d0246b
'2012-04-05T12:27:00-04:00'
describe
'134966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTA' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a508f2ad53e25391ec2461bcf5c07f1d
ebd46f6c38367700af966ba5437040b3335d9986
'2012-04-05T12:34:29-04:00'
describe
'37506' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTB' 'sip-files00120.pro'
9d9a61424af3dd05a2310ec176e5bf9f
ab7c926f89173fb4c3aa2fde179a18655c4955bb
describe
'71667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTC' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8abef346bd52d5bb0099e4f34afdef9a
fbacc26283510dc0cb153b09deaadbe5fed00c13
'2012-04-05T12:24:23-04:00'
describe
'1281200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTD' 'sip-files00120.tif'
eb60b44bb0ebe3db44e9a11d68648286
01b5a6ddd14950b609c28cabc4bbca9c77a03241
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTE' 'sip-files00120.txt'
c175d8f7cc097517d3e6fccc1a00d8fe
fa2dce4b84635088ac8d8040c2e6c12bd80f14a6
describe
'38270' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTF' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
51a99146852978a80893dbc27014fb13
50584d781ed44be2f30efc2771e06f09338bf1c4
describe
'158005' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
5ee64fc83702aea6e399f029b4bd6556
d51b630e10d23e47a02cc65c5a9a0a37ea7d2391
'2012-04-05T12:21:36-04:00'
describe
'132781' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6bc64a0f2ca0c9e29a5f6d4f46038008
e60507a361588a14c1765f33c5c3a166d66db746
'2012-04-05T12:33:00-04:00'
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTI' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fb729c2da0756ec9866237dbd0ed7e06
f5485675f7b90d16217e091161b31f4bab1e69f1
'2012-04-05T12:29:22-04:00'
describe
'70500' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ffcf729c97aebd841f7d54ae02edf22b
48578c5950282bb82e3f2fee0a2034f73639eb03
describe
'1287388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
b8b61775ffc9314d549aea83f79851df
542cd1e06ef05a6826845d711115087117312c69
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
803d9ad64fcec9bbe1893a8a29a4353c
c5d2afe548e5872d10a0000290e2bdcdee831271
'2012-04-05T12:20:51-04:00'
describe
'37426' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTM' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a77ed59bc69ec8c78eeaf0c63c0db2bc
e723bd82e4a5f26268373bcd245f05ef5b7c5a26
'2012-04-05T12:27:20-04:00'
describe
'159531' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a3e5d4ed727778a2b516dd676590536a
2e988d737b66bda60e42ad04923732e4ef79ce6d
describe
'135455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
943f1a13eefa5fc19a2cbb91d44341fd
54afd00fe236841386afaaef64c40b17bf347328
'2012-04-05T12:25:15-04:00'
describe
'38207' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
3776e4ebca016792e80eb79981652048
bbf84d2040d26ba7734b24b58669b45b08bcf055
'2012-04-05T12:22:03-04:00'
describe
'72310' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
69419e7bc4c9f5c4c1274b9f71872ae0
2de47966de22742d5269cd8b3f06bd794d131527
describe
'1299512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ac6df424ae6db73cc768cc299b4ab4d6
c2bf5b7ffd5ce8babba1a19d64b9c9ab16b870bf
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
511217ac0522e8c3c3fa238897741307
c148ceb2d34dd4b278c5745c4f6f251d64364cc9
describe
'37307' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTT' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
cdc19b6e20b20587625569c7221bfc0b
b3cc4cd6dbef871e34af819042f2a63e3cc4da77
describe
'155154' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTU' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a6e82dcd6577a1a0692d4ca08d295f12
03dc11308829086e2aca219e2f127735bbc930c8
describe
'116733' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
b7919b6464b3bdb9dfb7edf76f0a913b
9d12819bb8d2fe276a0b07c10265dc8b484afcf4
'2012-04-05T12:33:28-04:00'
describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTW' 'sip-files00123.pro'
dc228da35d38cd769e482bf81e4bb148
d7f3e8a847e331c43fb25bea630d0af37aa570a6
describe
'63238' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
d513418e641c35f0be83c6e04c8b946e
3ac6bd98c88ca8065042742d5ba08fa0dbbb360b
'2012-04-05T12:21:33-04:00'
describe
'1264032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
5abbbab19dfadd2113b84833754f185a
056ce9be8a15bbf4b8718f4595e3f355df280e81
'2012-04-05T12:18:56-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
f4ced8949595c09fc91d7e1539c0c71b
6c3c9b97d7fb2e6a515193b33736774531fe8414
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'34988' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
cf061eccbc36779633ea8b66358b8e79
80a98afe0c4cdf40f5a1bad96f18d4624f16f9d5
'2012-04-05T12:19:00-04:00'
describe
'161682' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
39c264e10724322c9c8fded1e8d52c00
198b548cc077ce5a9005ef799f6c94da809bd6ee
describe
'90991' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
32523877d5fec93ac2f65845bcd3bb67
49eb059d89d7eb5d32c635f7432ea5e8cd2ae126
describe
'23165' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
209805a3ddf2b2ca8c49b92a49dada9c
771ea8d348e3f39dc60f29ad5d0d8d9eaf743d6b
'2012-04-05T12:26:52-04:00'
describe
'50129' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
77ce04e70934aa92ccb1b6e2b445e2b0
93c521ca18d69ac4d2f04b85dd1d71e986097123
'2012-04-05T12:34:12-04:00'
describe
'1315520' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
761c6ce3cd532d59ddddc04516a3c25b
28579d805dac37994c67565c37169fd60832c386
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
11c33c01c97e3bebc071a0d84dd6d272
1a87dc62b7fd2ac973fc930aaa78d826153c2945
'2012-04-05T12:21:19-04:00'
describe
'31670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
f9665276f53937e7e7c76f278de8139c
05b7d1926a6ff4279c36013e62da7a5cd97868fa
describe
'160095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
48473ca0608267c382b1261d24e88a83
93ec9c50bc3d599551bf7f04e861734f1d85e936
describe
'101927' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
67ad1cc7b62d3deb3a07475875eaf951
6f98a454045776c42949daffd810d0bb53356bbe
describe
'26085' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
803f88aae8b992981b2868e0e9250fa5
7d0e5d349adb03a3d724e8a1c82f30da7b0ae5ea
describe
'55619' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
199b9395389736097f7ad4b95a21c8fa
58a428d87f4cb618733ec6f9fae80f1a2a90a300
describe
'1303104' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c18d2517d5b7cc7e86bb925364a65759
05715916150593e63a282a85288872b4d2333b7d
'2012-04-05T12:23:49-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
5507d65c5c0ace6afa390c1580a16f51
7504434317a12eeaf39375f40330816df0a64cea
describe
'32957' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
06a1c1901acaff69bbe5b8a49ac57851
0c0a4d0c10864385262da4ff53db267f0ff4c417
'2012-04-05T12:32:08-04:00'
describe
'157362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUP' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b79a0a5a3960c8faf1feb05e5c86df1a
eae006e395ea52a84a69cb1481a1b64d49cec575
describe
'114631' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
956c7f9e5014a1314b39e17572850e53
d8db49ff83e520306f40fd18641fad18665c1554
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUR' 'sip-files00126.pro'
62c4cf561ae53185f4e021716dd4a1c3
efea6568db27b1a631c707676e55aa673eac56b3
'2012-04-05T12:28:39-04:00'
describe
'61262' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUS' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
7e70ec73b206677adddb4e9163d46722
25a682799d975433e3014bbd639d6f1974eb32a9
describe
'1281808' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
158f5d18bf257ab1d0030d1ae9c28e00
a77fa5dd943922942687e83e2fde4fda59e0bf60
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
e72a1d8273b13467a998f6afc6113db6
bbd19ee9945895dffadd208d9d582b550013c73d
'2012-04-05T12:27:37-04:00'
describe
'35330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUV' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
e8a8f6a0fa14bfac9fafc2eacf7a621a
dae6b11bc3473c6d73c091d4fdd59d0f491d69b6
describe
'159679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
33db219d4036f43b09c66c0e259db216
fe3e6e8c0eb9ad4d946e2c2af586bb1daf59caf2
'2012-04-05T12:23:43-04:00'
describe
'118463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e143b8e6d6589cd40eef66b3008d51b4
bf08c41e25a7a2e153aeec38c839c79cee6c0005
'2012-04-05T12:18:41-04:00'
describe
'32725' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUY' 'sip-files00127.pro'
d07d907f1bc2efe8ae7cf0d53f1fde7a
c3adefe7bcd3141deb421d1ff9d98613204702eb
describe
'60945' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
e53ec5f73670108356bdf97f41aaa7bf
b17e55b61aa1fdf16c2d158e5f3486ced256e1ac
describe
'1300740' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
1bfdfcc14b8b894efe30b6ac1be6f7d5
6b3e944ea25c074c28faafc64ccd37e30b4230c3
'2012-04-05T12:32:50-04:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVB' 'sip-files00127.txt'
dd727eb56fc93f3dd1583c203073ffb3
839135432536a1ecac32d5a389f99245bb562adf
'2012-04-05T12:18:05-04:00'
describe
'35086' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
c72087516ce0b9c119f28d9b0b2b520d
b7bce2f630d0be6b9ca8e4343d35c33f2a182575
describe
'313747' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVD' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
ec15243a26222b3475bb27e95673c392
b115ef8ce6cdc1ab0d09e489950a964af1b91a6f
describe
'142941' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVE' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
952a64db7c01d917648127612fe4b2bd
0725275a94c9ba5d913279aa9db5f5d061a0c60a
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVF' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
f59a39aee463d7190f16f804c32da054
7c85841477b40d66ae8ff3c7d169770720310265
'2012-04-05T12:31:20-04:00'
describe
'47586' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVG' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
98204f8a10ac4899179f826295b60d9d
c7238265bed3b9d01b7a6a3996e4905fc10d2344
'2012-04-05T12:22:34-04:00'
describe
'7548572' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVH' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
f924959d568b19e0619008a898468bbf
0557e5980ce2fc0db322f0c93fb18c13902a59a8
'2012-04-05T12:17:10-04:00'
describe
'91' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVI' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
3da73d8204ae04d15272964738fe2415
beb8c33802df4e8ea36d85f025a31ecd9a0f656e
describe
'25310' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVJ' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
034ba1f9bfbcb718f058f04803a027e4
1630de07a7e82d82c4d1d88fb4f63d3a08f59c35
'2012-04-05T12:23:34-04:00'
describe
'304372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVK' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
081671c682148d7fa0d4fac976589512
8fb30a9a7a0167ecbe7926403ce6efda4350d513
'2012-04-05T12:28:55-04:00'
describe
'93179' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVL' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
a1e9c9c68ae95d009494a13bd3b3e463
9b974ca2e86f6028917dcd7f5c3d5d8c50de49bb
'2012-04-05T12:23:28-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVM' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
0620c7313fe4104beea1a8e60b708acf
dcec9b60ae50ecc403ee656d453780ce23e91a04
'2012-04-05T12:33:26-04:00'
describe
'39959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVN' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
24e37a4fe7531b2787dfe476fb03e643
5d6ec6b93e37a565fb1e8eaccc8d28d1704ff9df
'2012-04-05T12:25:19-04:00'
describe
'7324960' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVO' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
3d9a08a76571932221173bc2906f474e
8f1c4c9a3e59312a8520c70f10b9897e5f23a8db
'2012-04-05T12:31:57-04:00'
describe
'245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVP' 'sip-filescover2.txt'
7ba0358d881e1afcf432cebe9565c4d2
7d342e0ccadcdfdc1c43552a9ab7f0cf520fd8c1
'2012-04-05T12:26:27-04:00'
describe
'24944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVQ' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
043eaf53579c397cc1231b1369ae3512
e552e81c391044dfa65034dee6a9d11e1f40797c
describe
'304544' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVR' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
647227538fd61841ba97220718ed55f2
d49bd68d7b6144c8f2f584fe77d5d28937afc692
describe
'81870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVS' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
3c36090b1d6f4640cac08a58c1139ebb
3bbecdb32088d3d92fe772ad8aed1528ffb8f300
'2012-04-05T12:25:45-04:00'
describe
'36637' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVT' 'sip-filescover3.QC.jpg'
a59b6b0797533ab7ab613fe5c64293aa
6677ad007b1e41456c2cbd01571c10256673e6d7
describe
'7330096' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVU' 'sip-filescover3.tif'
8e62955af762b913397d0dd74174d561
e46ee887e92f95d8f9f1ed64acb98f67658deaeb
'2012-04-05T12:25:57-04:00'
describe
'23996' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVV' 'sip-filescover3thm.jpg'
5f7ec72054dfa154994a1b20f9111b58
b7b9ca737a3569cc70684c39bd335a2049880652
'2012-04-05T12:21:00-04:00'
describe
'305455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVW' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
746eefc8cb6a525d476ba22d423b7c1c
35f71c7a44aeac4b8fa6743bb5e54f1fc1e7d2c4
describe
'137663' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVX' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
095ba0f32ee20e7fdbb3292f139d7d10
03a5eef6fc0e3e04bfd081504f45397d201f3338
'2012-04-05T12:18:10-04:00'
describe
'45663' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVY' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
9174a064947fab3143fa302d265ae314
7df96dfe8e3061049295eea52e7de79ca02cd734
'2012-04-05T12:20:39-04:00'
describe
'7347780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARVZ' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
f044965d86cb12b2c1c9db3dc0a286b4
8586981518ddaeffd802222124ac0fc772e7d6c9
'2012-04-05T12:20:54-04:00'
describe
'24061' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWA' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
9cc7e3803b59c82059b841de4b566adf
d37e5fb126845968f805ccd554a2bd1d3a17b9ce
'2012-04-05T12:30:58-04:00'
describe
'58' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWB' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b79fecf70b6f8d4eba79f21eee76e9fe
2169b790dd5fb7bbba52d041c48d7c2fc8456ce2
describe
'61054' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWC' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
8a8cb58e28b4d9935f0b854f8b5b52ea
d6f2d2023e527c9fff2e7986dd31f26307bcb7c7
describe
'48775' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWD' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
0c4e3474317ae24083aaee54584ea21e
fd85b0d79e9319b3f3ad936059a1060d105b1171
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWE' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
563362daa33fdfab53ef8704c76e704f
0c850caf932d22109f1fa7c12ede46362c14d027
'2012-04-05T12:26:23-04:00'
describe
'25319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWF' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
6b6a7f3be7f095fe90a46debb8d6e12a
aeef495baa743d148f64e0d62ebb12f3af6cb4c2
'2012-04-05T12:30:14-04:00'
describe
'1482664' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWG' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
4235567dcc0faab1725c7b185cd00dd0
7d20f13425cfe595fc3dd2eba62b085e6ddf15f6
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWH' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'20865' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWI' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
82d58e10d8c4048fbc17dd5cffe5da82
eeb6aefe83294c65d54fccd17df34ab681f59628
describe
'195858' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWJ' 'sip-filesUF00003426_00001.mets'
f9efe1d50f0ff606063dc226dd4bba0c
c9428007099ef537ce1cbc35ef093648a611431d
'2012-04-05T12:19:48-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T13:21:40-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'240029' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAABGfileF20090918_AAARWM' 'sip-filesUF00003426_00001.xml'
53cdd157a4754db0ff23bbc8fea96568
a32ce303b1f3ba12b39aecb9a4f1534d522c2546
'2012-04-05T12:19:12-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T13:21:38-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.