Citation
Harry at school

Material Information

Title:
Harry at school a story for boys
Creator:
Marryat, Emilia, 1837-1875
Absolon, John, 1815-1895 ( Illustrator )
James Burn & Company ( Binder )
Griffith and Farran ( Publisher )
Wertheimer and Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Griffith and Farran
Manufacturer:
Wertheimer and Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
95, 32 p., <4> leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
School children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1862 ( local )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1862 ( rbgenr )
Burn -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1862 ( rbbin )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1862 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre:
Hand-colored illustrations ( local )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Binders' tickets (Binding) ( rbbin )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Emilia Marryat ; with illustrations by John Absolon.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026892644 ( ALEPH )
48134421 ( OCLC )
ALH5443 ( NOTIS )

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HARRY LEAVING HOME.

Puge 8.



HARRY AT SCHOOL;

A STORY FOR BOYS.

BY

EMILIA MARRYAT,

(Daughter of the late Captain Marryat)

AUTHOR OF “ LONG EVENINGS, OR STORIES FOR MY LITTLE FRIENDS.”

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN ABSOLON.

LONDON :
GRIFFITH AND FARRAN

(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS),
CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.
M DCCC LXII.



LONDON :
PRINTED BY WERTHEIMER AND CO
CIRCUS PLACE, FINSBURY.



Cuap.

no

CONTENTS.

Leavine Home . .
Harry’s ScHooLreLLows
Lessons. . .

THe STRAWBERRIES.

IJarry BEGINS TO GO Wrone

THe HArppake . .
Doixa Wrone . :
Our at Nigut . .
Founp Our : .
THE Fire . .
Next Mornine . .
CONSCIENCE : .

Harry ConFresses .
LAWION IN THE Stupy
ForGivENESs . .

Francis ELTON . .

PAGE.






HARRY AT SCHOOL.

CHAPTER L
LEAVING HOME.

Ir was Monday morning; and there was such a
bustle and stir all over the house where Mr. and
Mrs. Blake lived. The breakfast had been laid for
a long time, but nobody came to eat it. The tea was
so strong, from standing, that I do not think it could
have been fit to drink.

Then in the hall, there was a large box ready
corded as if for travelling. The cat could not under-
stand it. She went into the breakfast-room, and
looked at the table, and cried “‘ Mew!” for she wanted
some milk; but no one was there to take any notice
of her. She sme%t the trunk in the hall, and then
jumped on the top of it; but could not read the
address on the card, so that she was not any the
wiser; then she ran into the kitchen, and looked into
the cook’s face to ask her what was the matter; but
Cook said “Get away, Puss, don’t stand in my way;

B



6 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Tam busy.” Everybody seemed busy; and what do
you think it was all about?

Harry was going to school. The great trunk in
the hall belonged to him: it was full of his clothes,
and books, and playthings; and all the hurry and
bustle was because Papa and Harry had to go by an
early train, as the school was some distance off.

A few minutes later, everybody in the house was
in the breakfast-room ; everybody but Harry’s Mamma;
she was not there: and Mr. Blake read prayers, and
after prayers, Harry’s little sister Amy poured out
the tea. Harry sat looking at his empty plate, and
thinking of having to say Good-bye, and go to school.

“You must eat something my dear,” said Papa.

“T am not hungry Papa,” said Harry, “indeed I
could not eat anything.”

“You must try,” Papa answered. ‘You must
not start without any breakfast.”

Harry took some bread and butter, and tried to eat
it; but as soon as he put it in his mouth, it seemed
as if it would choke him, and he laid it down again;
and the tears dripped from his eyes on to the bread
and butter. Papa took no notice at first; but pre-
sently Harry hid his face in his hands, and began to
sob. Then Papa went to him, and drew him on to
his knee, and kissed him. Harry was quite a little
boy, he was only eight years old; and although it is
silly, and like a baby, to cry when we are hurt, or
when we are teased, and naughty to cry when we
are out of temper; it is not babyish or wrong to



LEAVING HOME. 7

cry when we say Good-bye to those whom we love.
When Mr. Blake kissed Harry, the little boy’s tears
and sobs came faster; and he clung to his Papa and
cried bitterly. Papa did not check him for some
time; but when he was more quiet he said—

“It is very hard, I am sure, my poor child; but
you know well I would not send you from me if it
could be avoided; you must look forward to the
holiday-time, when, I trust in God, we shall all meet
again, and dear Mamma will be strong and well.
You must try not to distress poor Mamma, Harry,
by letting her see you cry.”

When Harry looked up, he saw that his Papa’s
eyes were full of tears; and he jumped up quickly
and said—

“No, Papa, I will not cry before Mamma if I can
help it; I will try not.”

You see he was a brave little boy.

Then he went back to the breakfast-table when his
Papa told him, and found that he could eat his bread
and butter.

After breakfast, Harry kept his word, when he
went to say Good-bye to poor Mamma. She was so
ill that she could not get out of bed, and it was
because of her illness, that Harry had to go to
school. Until then, Mr. Blake had always given
Harry lessons; but now Papa and Mamma were
both going abroad, to a warmer country, and they
could not take Harry with them. It was rather hard
not to cry when he kissed his Mamma, and saw her



8 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

looking so thin and pale, and thought what a long
time it would be before he saw her again. But he
had promised, and Harry knew it is a very wicked
thing to break a promise, and he felt very glad
that he had not cried, when his Papa called him a
good kind little boy, and secemd so pleased with
him.

Jt was some time before they could get off, even
after the carriage was at the door to take them to
the train. Harry had to say Good-bye to the ser-
vants. Jam sure Cook cried as she kissed him, and
then she gave him a large plum-cake, which she had
packed up in a parcel for him. So that was what
had made Cook so busy, when she said to Pussy,
“Get away, don’t stand in my way.”

Poor Pussy had to be said Good-bye to; but she
did not understand that Ilarry was going to school;
so she did not seem to care much about it, and she
purred when Harry spoke to her, whereas she ought
to have said “‘ Mew.”

At the last moment, just as they were setting off,
little Amy ran out and gave Harry a: little basket of
sandwiches and cakes. Harry felt as if he could
never touch cakes or sandwiches again; so he placed
them by his side, in the carriage, and looked out of
the window; for he could not help the tears running
down his cheeks, and he did not wish his Papa to
see them.

Tt was a beautiful day, and the sun made the trees
and the hedges look bright and pleasant, but poor



LEAVING HOME. 9

Harry scarcely noticed them, for he was thinking of
his Mamma.

_ At length they arrived at the railway station, and
there was such a bustle, and so many people running
to and fro, and such piles and trucks of luggage,
and the porters were so quick, and the engines made
such a noise, that Harry could not help being amused;
and by the time Papa and he took their seats in one
of the carriages, he was laughing and talking as fast
as usual, and thought that, after all, going to school
was not so bad. The train had not gone many miles
before he began to feel hungry, and it was not very
long before little Amy’s basket of sandwiches and
cakes was quite empty.

But Harry’s distress came back again as the train
stopped and they got out, and, taking a fly, drove to
the school house. He did not cry again, for he felt
afraid of going to school with red eyes. When Mr.
Blake walked into the house, Harry hung back such
a way behind, that Papa had to call to him, and by
the time he entered the drawing-room, and said to a
gentleman who came to meet him, “I have brought
my little son,” the “little son” was somewhere hidden
behind the door. The gentleman to whom Mr. Blake
spoke was Dr. Owen, the master of the school; he
was tall and thin, and had a rather bald head and
wore spectacles ; he was a good deal older than
Harry’s Papa. Harry felt so shy, that he could not
say a word when the gentleman asked him some
questions, and so he was sent out into the garden,



10 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

which was just in front of the window, while Dr.
Owen and Mr. Blake talked together.

After a time he was called in, for Mr. Blake was
going away. Then Harry forgot even that Dr. Owen
was in the room when he said Good-bye to his Papa ;
he could not speak for crying and sobbing, and he
could not hear half that his Papa said to comfort him;
one thing he heard, for it came back to his mind
that same evening as he was going to bed. It was
this —

‘Remember my child, that you are not left alone,
your Heavenly Father is with you ; remember that
His eye is always upon you, in your lessons, and in
your play: think always that He sees you, and above
all things, Harry, never forget to ask for His help
every day you live.”

*T will, Papa, I will,” sobbed Harry, “but oh, I
cannot bear it, I cannot say Good-bye, dear Papa.”
But the next moment Harry found himself alone in
the drawing-room with Dr. Owen, and he heard the
wheels of the carriage driving away.

Dr. Owen did not speak to him for some time, he
let the little boy cry, but when he was more quiet, he
said. “Come here to me, Harry, I want to say some-
thing to you.”

Harry went shyly to him, but Dr. Owen’s voice was
so kind, that he did. not feel so much afraid of him as
at first.

Dr. Owen said, ‘Do you love your Papa very much?”

“Of course I do,” said Harry.



LEAVING HOME. ll

“Then would you not think it best to do what
would please him most?’ asked Dr. Owen.

Harry said “ Yes.”

‘Now I think, were he here, he would prefer your
behaving like a little man, drying your eyes, and
coming with me into the school-room to make
acquaintance with the other little boys. Donot you?”

Harry thought that his Papa would have said much
the same thing, so he answered, ‘“‘ Yes, Sir, I think
he would, I will try if you please.”

So Dr. Owen took him by the hand and led him to
the school-room.



12

CHAPTER II.
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS.

As Dr. Owen and Harry came near the school-room,
they heard a humming noise, which became louder as
they stopped at the door; but when the Doctor opened
it and went in, the noise ceased all at once. The
boys were all learning their lessons for the next day,
that is what had made the humming; but they
looked up from their books as the door opened; and
when they saw who it was, they stood up.

Harry felt very shy at the sight of so many strange
faces; and he held Dr. Owen’s hand tighter, for he
was getting used to him.

“Elton,” said the Doctor, and when he spoke, one
of the tallest of the boys came forward to him;
“Elton, I introduce Harry Blake to you: see to
him.”

Several of the other boys whispered together as
the Doctor spoke. Elton held out his hand to Harry,
who shook it shyly; and then Dr. Owen left the
room.

No sooner was he gone, and out of hearing, than
one of the boys called out, in a rude voice,—



HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 13

“That’s what I call a sell! Here Elton will be
coming over this new chap with his humbug; and
there will be very little fun for us. Hollo! I say!
What’s your name?”

“ Blake,” said Harry.

‘* And who’s your father?” asked the boy.

Harry put his hands on his hips, and gave him no
answer.

“Well! you needn’t look so cocky, youngster,” said
the boy, as several of the others laughed; “ now, I’ll
give you a piece of advice, Blake, or whatever your
name is: don’t you attend to anything that fellow
Elton says to you; you won't, unless you’re a muff
like himself.”

Elton smiled; and Harry, sitting down by him,
said in a low voice,—

“ Are you a muff, Elton?”

“* T suppose so,” answered Elton laughing; “ they
all call me so.”

‘* Do you mind?” asked Harry.

“ Not much,” said Elton, and he coloured as he
spoke; ‘it cannot matter much.”

“I should not like them all to think me a muff,”
said Harry gravely, looking round the school-room at
the boys. “I wonder if they will think me one?”

His wondering was put an end to by the same boy
who had spoken before, and whose name Harry found
to be Tom Lawton. This boy suddenly flung all his
lesson-books one after the other at the ceiling. Some
of them fell again without their covers; but that did



14 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

not matter to Tom. He gathered them up again any-
how, and tossed them into his locker; and then danced
about the room, and over the forms, making faces,
and with his hair all hanging over his eyes, and look-
ing just like a wild boy.

‘“* You haven’t learnt your lessons already, Lawton,
surely?” asked another boy, whose name was Dick-
son.

“ Quite well enough for me,” said Tom; “ and quite
well enough for old Owen. I’m for cricket.”

“ All right!’’ said Dickson; “that’s enough for
to-day.” And because Lawton had thrown his books
at the ceiling, of course, Dickson must do the’ same;
and half-a-dozen other silly little boys all followed his
example; and then they all danced about the room
as Lawton had done.

“What funny boys!” said Harry, laughing; “ how
they do amuse me, to be sure!”’

“J say! Can you play cricket, Blake?” asked
Lawton.

Harry answered, ‘“ Yes.”

“All right! come on, then,” Lawton said.

“‘ T would sooner wait till Elton comes,” said Harry.

‘“¢ Oh you muff! Sooner wait till his Lordship comes!
Well, wait then. I don’t want you; but you’ll have
to wait a precious long time; for Elton is of so noble
and exalted a mind that he actually learns his lessons,
and that can’t be done in a few minutes.”

“Why, I thought you had learnt aia said
Harry.



HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 15

Lawton made a face, and most of the others cut
capers; and so they left the room, all but Elton and
Harry, and two others, who still sat at their books,
whose names were Grey and Ward.

‘What does he mean?” said Harry, feeling and
looking very puzzled; “I am sure, he said he knew his
lessons. I wish he wouldn’t call me a muff. I don’t
like it.”

“You musn’t mind being laughed at youngster,”
said Ward; ‘“ there are worse things than that.”

“ But I do mind it very much,” answered Harry. “I
don’t like it at all.”

Ward returned to his books, and Grey said,—

“¢ You won’t have been here many hours before you
will find out how much Lawton is werth. He is a
stupid bully.”

‘““ He seemed to me so very funny and clever,” said
Harry. ‘I could not help laughing even to look at
him. Is he really stupid, Elton?”

“ The more you talk, the longer I shall be learning
my lessons,’ answered Elton; “so if you want
to ‘play cricket this afternoon, you had better be
silent.”

Harry kept thinking of Lawton’s words, and feeling
very vexed about them. He did not know that he
had spoken out leud, but he said, “I wish he had not
called me a muff.”

Elton looked up, and asked, “‘ What is a muff,
Blake?”

“¢T don’t know,” said Harry.



16 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“Then I don’t think you need worry yourself about
being called one,” said Elton laughing.

‘“‘ But it is very disagreeable to be called names,
and all that,” said Harry.

‘* T think it depends a good deal upon who calls the
names,” said Elton.

At length, Elton closed his books, and they were
put away; and then, getting out his cricket-bat, he
ran downstairs, followed by Harry, and, presently
afterwards, by Ward and Grey.

“* Hollo, Elton! Here you are at last!” shouted out
Lawton, as they reached the play-ground. “ We
haven’t had a good game yet. Sayers can’t bowl any
better than a baby; and I’m the only one here fit to
be seen for play. I don’t know what has come to
Dickson. Here, my Lord! you bat; and show them
how to do it.”

‘Why do you call Elton My Lord?” asked Harry.

‘¢ Because of the great respect we all feel for him,”
answered Lawton, winking first one eye, and then the
other; ‘and because he carries himself with such an
air like this.” And Lawton drew himself up very stiflly,
and stuck out his chest, and strutted up and down.

Harry laughed, but he said. “If you think you
look a bit like Elton you are quite wrong, for you are
only about half his height, and your mouth is just
twice as big.”

Lawton turned red, and was going to answer angrily,
when he tripped over a stone on the ground and
sprawled upon his face. All the boys screamed with



HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 17

laughter, which was very unkind and very rude,
excepting Harry, who more like a gentleman, felt sorry
that Lawton had fallen, and said he hoped he had not
hurt himself, at which Lawton answered, “ Get out
with you.”

Elton had long ago run to his place by the wicket,
and now began calling to Lawton to begin to play.
Elton was the best batter in the school, and Lawton
bowled, so that the game went on gloriously. ‘The
boys shouted, and called out, and laughed, and they
all had great fun. Harry thought he had never seen
so good a game, and he felt quite delighted that Elton
could not be bowled out; he thought he looked go
nice as he stood at the wicket, with his face all flushed
with exercise and pleasure, and his light curling hair
blowing about when he ran. Elton made along score
before he was bowled out ; and everybody was making
as much noise as they possibly could, and all talking
at once, and shouting as loudly as they could shout ;
when Elton threw down his bat and gave place to
Sayers, and then they saw that Dr. Owen was stand-
ing amongst them, watching the game, and they had
not known he was there.

Harry ran towards him when he saw him, and said,
“Ts’nt it fun, Sir?”

“Great fun;’” answered the Doctor, “there is
nothing like cricket for boys; mark this, Blake !” and
the Doctor placed his hand kindly upon Harry’s head
as he spoke. “Elton plays better than any boy in
the school, and yet he learns better than any boy
in the school also.”



18 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

The afternoon, although it was a half-holiday, did
not seem to the boys long enough for cricket, and
they all looked quite vexed when the tea bell rang;
however, when they came to think of it, they all agreed
that they were very hungry, and Harry thought that
school was certainly the very pleasantest place in all
the world, for every body seemed so merry.

T have said that Harry thought again of his Papa’s
words before he went to bed; when they came to his
mind he was about to kneel down and say his prayers.

All the other boys, who were in the same room
with him were making such a noise, and throwing
pillows at each other, that Harry waited for them to
be more quiet. He was undressed, and standing in
his night-shirt.

‘““Why don’t you get into bed!” asked Sayers.

‘‘T was waiting till you had all done talking!” said
Harry ; ‘I have not said my prayers.”

“That’s good!” shouted Sayers ; “do you think we
are going to leave off talking for you, you young stupid.
I say Lawton!” and Sayers opened the door, which
led into the next room; ‘here’s a fellow wants to say
his prayers, and begs that we will be as quiet as mice
while he does so.” ;

Harry colored as red as crimson, and said.

‘I think you are a very wicked boy.”

‘Do you, indeed!” said Sayers.

Lawton stood in the door-way laughing. “ And
what do you think of me?” he asked; “come, speak
out;” for Harry looked half frightened.



HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 19

* You have no right to laugh, Lawton.”

** And why not,” asked Lawton.

‘« Because it is wrong to laugh at what is wicked,”
answered Harry.

Lawton walked up to him, and took him by the
shoulder; he held him so hard that Harry could hardly
help calling out.

‘You little rascal,’ said Lawton; ‘ how dare you
tell me Iam wrong. Beg my pardon this minute.”

“No!” said Harry, “for Ihave said nothing wrong;
you told me to say what I think, and I do think so.”

“Beg my pardon!” said Lawton, holding him
harder still; the tears came into Harry’s eyes, for
Lawton pinched him; but he shook his head.

“‘ Obstinate little wretch,” said Lawton, “ I’ll thrash
you if you don’t.”

** You'll do nothing of the kind!” said Elton, who
just then came into theroom. ‘ Whatis the matter ?”

Several of the boys began telling what had happened.

Elton said—

“Blake was quite right; Sayers is a wicked boy;
and you, Lawton, are a cowardly bully, who cannot
bear to hear the truth.”

“Take care, Elton,” said Lawton, getting crimson,
“take care what you say.”

“Take care what you do;” answered Elton, “ do
not try to bully little Blake; I won’t allow it.”

Elton left the room. When he was gone, Lawton
said he would not put up with it, and a great deal more;
but Dickson whispered to Sayers, that Lawton was



20 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

always very grand with his words, but he was too
much afraid of Elton to say such things when he was
there.

Lawton was a cowardly boy ; if he had been a brave
boy he would not have hurt a little fellow like Harry
Blake, for brave boys are always kind and gentle to
those younger than themselves. Harry tried to say
his prayers through all the din and noise, but he could
not do so. Iam sorry to say that all the three other
little boys jumped into bed without any prayers at all.
But when they were asleep, Harry got out of bed,
and knelt down in the dark and prayed.

You see Harry began well; when he went to school
he was in the midst of a great deal more wrong and
naughtiness than he had ever seen before; and it was
God only, who could keep him from evil.

He began very well.



21

CHAPTER III.
LESSONS.

Tue next day, of course, Harry had to begin lessons.
He did not dislike learning, because, although it is
much pleasanter to play than to work, Harry was
quite old enough to know, that if he played all day
while he was a boy, and took no pains to learn, that
when he grew into a man, no one would care to speak

to him, and all would laugh at him, because he knew
nothing like other people. There are a great many
things in this world which are not quite agreeable, but
which must be done. Lessons are some of those
things.

Tom Lawton did not seem to think so. He had,
the day before, you remember, thrown away his books,
and said he knew his lessons quite well enough; but,
when it came to saying them, he found he did not
know them at all. Harry saw him writing words
upon his finger nails, and he asked him what that
was for.

“* Oh! that’s part of my lessons,” said Tom. “ That’s

Cc



22 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

the only way to do things; when I forget what comes
next, I look at my nails.”

‘* That’s all the same as if you were looking at the
book,” said Harry.

* Just as good,” Tom answered.

“ T don’t think the Doctor would be pleased, if he
saw it,” Harry said.

‘¢ Oh,” said Lawton, “the Doctor never finds out.
I'll take care of that.”

Harry was silent for a moment; but he felt as if he
must speak. When he did, he said, getting very
red,—

“Lawton, I think it is very dishonorable, and
very mean; it’s just the same as if you told a
story.”

* You insolent little ” began Lawton, but, at
that moment, the Doctor came in, and Lawton was
obliged to be silent; but he gave Harry a great
kick on his leg, so that he could scarcely help
crying out.

Harry knew his lessons quite well when he was
called up; and Doctor Owen smiled at him as he
gave back the book, so that Harry grew quite red
with pleasure. He walked back to his seat, and found
Lawton correcting an exercise.

whe boy held, hidden under his slate, a Key to the
exercise.

‘Where did you get it?” asked Harry.

“You just mind your own business,” answered
Lawton. “I am not going to be questioned, or





LESSONS. 23

brought to task by you. It is my own book, and not
yours—and, now, you may go and tell the Doctor
I’ve got it, if you like, you little sneak.”

“Tam not a sneak,” said Harry; ‘‘and you are a
very bad boy. I shall not tell the Doctor, for it’s a
shabby thing to tell tales.”

It seemed to Harry that all Tom Lawton’s lessons
were got through in the same way. He was too idle
to learn anything.

When playtime came, Lawton walked up to Harry,
to pay him off for his insolence, as he called it; and,
as Elton was not present, and Lawton was much the
stronger of the two, he shook Harry well. Poor Harry
was both hurt and frightened. He held out as long
as he could; as long as Lawton was with him; but,
when he got into the garden, he burst into tears;
and cried and sobbed as he ran down the walk,
until he was stopped, by running into the arms of
Elton.

“Why, what is the matter, youngster?” Elton
asked.

Harry told him, as well as he could for his crying.

‘* Lawton won't take that sort of thing from a little
fellow, you see,” said Elton.

‘“ But was I not right? Is it not dishonorable—
is it not a story?” asked Harry.

wes."

‘* And if I werea sneak, and told the Doctor, would
not Lawton be punished?”

“ Yes, certainly.”



24 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

«© Then, why should I not say it?” asked Harry.

“ Only, if you say it, you must take the shaking
also,” said Elton, smiling.

“ Hilton, is not Lawton a very wicked boy?”

_ “Harry,” said Elton, gravely, “you would be
quite as wicked a a boy, if God did not keep you from
it: remember that.”

‘No, I would not,” said Harry; “I declare I
would not; I would never do such mean, naughty
things as Lawton does. I should be ashamed.”

« You might do other things as bad, Harry.”

“No, indeed,” said Harry. “ I would never be
wicked, like Lawton. He is a most naughty boy,
for he laughed at my saying my prayers; and,
do you know, he used wicked words this morning,
Elton.”

“Still, you or I would be quite as wicked, if God
did not keep us,” said Elton: “ remember that.”

Harry looked up into his face. Elton was quite a
boy, though he was, perhaps, five or six years older
than Harry: but he now spoke as gravely as a man.

_“* Who told you so?” he asked.

‘© The Bible says so,” answered Elton.

“ Are not you good, then? I aim sure you are.
The Doctor says you are the best boy in the school.”

« There never was but One who was good, Harry,”
said Elton, smiling again.

« Who was that?” asked Harry, in a low voice, for
he could guess who Elton meant—but he felt shy
about saying it.



LESSONS. 25

‘** The Lord Jesus,’’ Elton answered.

Harry walked silently by his side for some minutes,
looking into his face, and wondering that Elton, who
was not yet a man, should say such things. When
they reached the end of the garden walk, he placed
his hand in that of the elder boy, and said, gently,

“T love you, Elton.”



26

CHAPTER IV.
THE STRAWBERRIES.

Doctor Owen had a nice large garden, which joined
on to the playground. ‘The boys were allowed to go
in the greater part of it; but there was one part which
was railed off, with a low iron fence; into that part
the boys were not allowed to go. It was very full of
flowers, and there was a number of fruit trees; and
all along one side of it, next to a wall, was a broad
border of strawberry plants. The strawberries were
now ripe.

I think, if the little boys had been allowed to run
about in this garden, close to the strawberry bed, it
would have been very difficult for them to resist
eating the fruit. That must have been the reason
that the Doctor had the garden railed off.

One day Lawton stood spinning a top, close to the
iron fence, while Harry Blake watched him at a little
distance.

Each time Lawton’s top left off spinning, and he
took it up again, he looked at the Doctor’s garden, as
he wound it up.



THE STRAWBERRIES. 27

“TI say, Blake,” said he, after a time, “ come
here.”’

Harry went to him.

““T say,” said Lawton, “ don’t those strawberries
look jolly? They’re as ripe as can be.”

“ Yes,” said Harry; “ 1 was looking at them yes-
terday. I should like to eat them.”

“* All right,” said Lawton; “ come on.”

Harry laughed, thinking that Lawton was joking;
and said * I wish I had a whole lot of them—that I
do. Look at that very big fellow, there; isn’t he ripe?”

** Blake,” said a voice near; “ that’s a rather dan-
gerous place for you to be standing in. Much better
come away.”

* You don’t think I would take any, Elton, do
you?” said Harry, getting very red.

“No; I don’t believe you would, now; but wishing
is not safe.”

_ * I'll come directly, Elton,’ said Harry, as Elton
moved away.

As soon as his back was turned, Lawton jumped
the fence, and stood on the other side. ‘ Who cares
for him, I’d like to know?” said he. ‘ Come on,
Blake.”

“* Not really, Lawton; not really. Remember, the
Doctor has forbidden us. He told me so, himself,
when first I came. Pray come back?”

“Well, I think it is uncommonly greedy of the
Doctor, to keep them all to himself,” said Lawton;
“we ought to have our share.”



28 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

** Lawton, do come back,” said Harry.

** Shall I run round the garden?” asked Lawton.

** No, you must not,” said Harry.

** Dare me! and Ill run round three times.”

** Oh, Lawton,” said Harry, laughing.

** Dare me! and I'll jump over all the beds.”

** Don’t be ridiculous, Lawton.”

** Dare me! and I’ll bite off this big strawberry,
and say the slugs did it.”

** Oh, nonsense, Lawton; you must be joking, for

ou could not think of doing such things as that.”

* Such things as that! why not? I’d pick a
bushel for twopence,” said Lawton.

** Then you ’d be stealing them; and you’d be no
better than a thief, for they don’t belong to you,” said
Harry, angrily.

*« And, pray, what business would it be of yours?
and I’ll thank you not to be insolent,” said Lawton,
beginning to bully.

“You would!”

** And, pray, what more?’’ asked Lawton.

* T shall not tell you,” said Harry, walking away,
very stiffly, down the gravel walk. Lawton laughed
out loud, which made Harry feel very angry, but he
did not turn round.

When the bell rang, for the boys to go in to school,
Lawton came running, in a great hurry; and was
only just in time to take his seat before the Doctor
entered.

By the time evening came, Harry had forgotten all



THE STRAWBERRIES. 29

about the morning and the strawberries; when, stand-
ing on the steps which led down to the garden, he saw
the gardener coming towards the house.

“T want to speak to the Doctor, Master Blake,”
said the gardener; “I suspect some of you young
gentlemen have been at my strawberries this morn-
ing; and if you have, I hope you'll catch it, that’s
all.”

‘“T haven’t!” said Harry.

‘«T did’nt say it was you, Sir; I hope it wasn’t,” said
the gardener. And he went into the house to find the
Doctor.

“ Lawton must have eaten them,” thought Harry.

The next day, before beginning school, the Doctor
said—*~

“I have something to say to you, boys. I thought
T had made it understood, that I do not allow any of
you to go into that part of the garden which is railed
off; now I find that yesterday some one must have
been there, for the gardener tells me that a great
many strawberries have been eaten. I have no way of
finding out who has eaten them, as you know, except-
ing upon your own words. I can only hope that
whichever of you broke my order yesterday, did it
through forgetfulness; and did not consider that eating
my strawberries was committing a theft, for I shall
be very sorry, indeed, to think that any one of you boys
intended to be a thief. I trust to your honor to tell
me which of you did it.”

Then the Doctor called over each name, one after



30 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

the other, and every boy answered, “No, Sir.” Lawton
called out, “‘ No Sir,” as loudly as the rest.

From the first moment that the Doctor had begun
speaking, Harry’s face had grown more and more red,
as he thought of how he and Lawton had stood look-
ing at the strawberries, and wishing for them; and by
the time it came to his name, his cheeks were as scarlet
as the strawberries themselves; and he could scarcely
answer, “ No, Sir,” when the Doctor asked him.

Dr. Owensaid. ‘ Be careful, Blake; are you quite
sure ?” and Harry thinking that the Doctor fancied
he had taken the strawberries, grew redder than ever;
but he answered.

‘“* No, indeed, Sir, I didn’t.”

Lawton saw ‘Harry blushing as the Doctor spoke to
him, and he was afraid he might tell whet he knew
about him; so he called out.

“Do you think it was the slugs, Sir? Slugs often eat
strawberries.”

* Slugs could scarcely eat a quart of strawberries in
so short a time, Lawton,” said the Doctor. ‘“ No!
I don’t think it was slugs.”

Harry looked up, and saw Elton’s eyes fixed upon
him. Elton seemed so vexed, that Harry felt sure he
believed he had taken the strawberries ; and his eyes
filled with tears. He could scarcely see to read over
his lessons, and his voice trembled as he repeated them.

-He could not help thinking that the Doctor was cross
in his answers to him; and every thing went wrong;
so that when morning lessons were over, poor Harry



THE STRAWBERRIES. 31

instead of running into the play-ground as usual, sat
down upon one of the school-room lockers, and looked
sadly out of the window; breathing on the panes, and
drawing faces with his finger. He wanted to see Elton,
but he did not like to go and find him, for he did
not know what to say to him. He wondered if
Lawton had after all gone and eaten the strawberries;
but then he had answered the Doctor quite quickly,
and never colored at all. Harry had biushed so
much although he had not taken them: he would
have blushed much more if he had, and told a story
afterwards.

While he was thinking of this, Lawton came into
the schoolroom. Harry looked up, and said.

‘‘ Lawton, was it you took the strawberries ?”?

“Tl” said Lawton, angrily.‘ Did not you hear me
tell the Doctor that I didn’t; how dare you accuse me
of telling falsehoods; I believe you took them yourself.”

“J didn’t,” said Harry, “you know I didn’t; you
know I walked away, but I left you standing there;
and I am sure Elton and the Doctor both think I did.”

** And so do I,” said Lawton.

Harry made a rush at Lawton as he was speaking,
and began to beat him. Now Lawton was twelve years
old and Harry was only eight, and Lawton was also,
although short, a strong boy for his age, so that Harry
soon got the worst of it, and in afew minutes Lawton
was holding him down on the ground breathless, but
still kicking and struggling, when Elton came in.

‘*What’s this?” asked Elton. “ Play, or a fight?



32 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Surely Lawton, you have not been fighting a boy half
your size.”

‘The young savage,” said Lawton, scarcely able to
speak for passion, ‘he has made my nose bleed; Tl
thrash him for it some day, see if I don’t.”

‘Leave go of him now, at any rate;” said Elton,
‘ vet up, Blake.”

“T don’t care for his pummelling, me;” said Harry,
spluttering and talking very fast, ‘but I can’t bear
him, he is a horrid boy. I believe he stole the straw-
berries, and he says I did.”

‘“‘T am sure you did,” said Lawton, leaving the room.

Harry’s excitement was over, and he sat down and
cried.

‘“‘T wonder if the Doctor really thinks I did!” he
said, when he had a little recovered.

Elton walked up to him and placed his hand under
Harry’s chin, so as to turn his face upwards, with his
eyes looking full at Elton’s.

“No, indeed, Elton; I did not touch any of them,”
he said.

“ No: I don’t believe you did, Harry;” said Elton,
kindly, “but you must not be pitching into people,
as you did into Lawton, and you must not put your-
self into such passions, you know it isn’t right.”

“T believe all the boys will think I took the straw-
berries,” said Harry.

‘“No; I daresay they will not; very likely they
have forgotten all about it by this time; and, after all,
it does not signify, as you did not take them.”







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Page 32

HARRY IN TROUBLE.



THE STRAWBERRIES. 33

The next day the Doctor said nothing more about
the strawberries, and was as kind as before to Harry.

But it did not end here. Lawton had picked and
eaten the strawberries in such a hurry, that he had
smeared his hands all over with them, and dropped
one on his jacket, where it had smashed. When
he had heard the school-bell ring, he had quickly
scrubbed his fingers as clean as he could; and had
wiped off the crushed strawberry with his pocket-
handkerchief.

It so happened that the evening after their fight,
Harry was standing close to Lawton, who took his —
handkerchief from his pocket, and there came a strong
smell of strawberries on the air. Harry quickly
snatched the handkerchief from him, and held it up,
covered with stains of red.

“ You did take the strawberries, Lawton,” he called
out, “and you told stories about it; I wonder you
are not ashamed of yourself.”

The next moment, the fight had begun again.

I do not know which of them began it; but I know
who had soonest had enough of it; and that was Harry.
One of the other boys called out,-—“The Doctor
doesn’t allow fighting. You'll both of you catch it.”

Harry walked away sullenly: and when Lawton
followed him, after a few minutes, he would not turn
round or wait for him.

“Blake,” called out Lawton. “I wantto speaktoyou.”

“ Well,” said Harry.

“T say, Blake,” said Lawton. ‘ You are a much



34 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

pluckier fellow than Dickson or Sayers, and you play
cricket twice as well. You may just as well shake
hands and be friends; for if I tell the Doctor
that you have fought me twice to day; you’ll get
punished, as well as me. If we are friends, we shall
get on very well together; but if we are not, I shall
lick you every day until you behave yourself.”

Harry thought for a moment; and then he and
Lawton shook hands. And they ran back to the
play-ground together, and forgot all about the straw-
berries.



CHAPTER V.
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG.

Tuoucu Elton played cricket and other games so
well, very often he did not care to go into the play-
ground. He would sit for hours reading by himself,
unless Grey stayed in, as he did sometimes, for he
was very fond of drawing. But if the Doctor came
into the school-room, during play hours, and found
Grey and Elton there, he would always send them
off to play; for he said that those who worked
thoroughly during school, should play heartily when
school was over.

As Harry Blake played cricket better than Dickson
or Sayers, Tom Lawton very often let him play
with him, and Lawton was so funny in what he said,
that Harry was always laughing. At first when
Lawton said wrong things, even if they were amusing,
Harry did not laugh, but he forgot that after a little
time.

I am afraid he forgot other things besides. He
forgot the words which his Papa had said to him



36 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

before he went, and more than all, he forgot his duty
to God. I daresay, by this time, you have seen that
what Harry was more afraid of than anything else
was being laughed at. Now if Harry had thought
at all he would have remembered, that it is only
naughty boys who laugh at what is right; and after
all, it matters very little what naughty boys
think.

The three little boys who slept in the same room
with Harry, used to laugh each time he knelt down
to say his prayers. By laughing, they shewed that
they were not only wicked, but that they were little
fools. And the opinion of a fool is just worth
nothing. But Harry was so silly as to care; and
after a few days he became ashamed of saying his
prayers. Now that was being ashamed of God;
ashamed of Jesus Christ; and he got into bed with-
out saying them; and then he fell asleep without
saying them; and after a time he quite left off saying
them.

Harry was unhappy, for he had been taught better.
He knew all day through that he was doing wrong.
When he was playing with the other boys, he laughed
loudly and was very noisy, for he forgot about it for
the time; but when he was quiet and was alone, or
was in the dark, he felt unhappy and was afraid.
He feared also, that Elton might ask him about it,
so he tried now never to be alone with him. This
made him very much more unhappy, for Elton had
been more kind to him than anybody, and Harry



HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 37

liked him better than any in the house. Sometimes
whole days would pass now, without Harry speaking
to Elton; things got worse and worse. He longed
sometimes to go and tell him he was unhappy; but
he was ashamed lest Lawton and the others should
laugh.

One day, Harry was sitting away from the other
boys, for he did not feel inclined to play. He heard
a step coming towards him. He thought it was
Elton’s, and hoped he would not see him; presently
he heard coughing, then he knew it was Elton, for
he so often coughed.

Elton was learning his lessons for the next day. He
looked up from his book as he passed Harry, and then
went on; but as if he changed his mind, he stopped
and came back.

“Harry,” said he, “do you know your lessons for
to-morrow ?”

Harry’s lessons had been turned back that day, and
several times before. He had begun to copy Lawton
in his idleness.

If any one else had asked Harry the question, he
would most likely have answered as Lawton; “ Quite
well enough;” and thought it rather fine not to learn
his lessons, for Lawton said that none but muffs cared
about such things; but he did not dare say so to
Elton.

He turned very red, and answered, “ No.”

Elton came up quite close to him, and said, “ Would
it not be better to learn them, Harry. Are you happy

D



38 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

whilst you are doing wrong.” Harry burst into tears,
and could not speak; he would have said something
to Elton, but he heard Tom Lawton’s rude laugh near ;
and he stopped.

“Will you go in-doors and learn them?” said Elton;
“* promise me.”

Harry ran to the school-room, for he was afraid of
meeting Lawton; and got out his books. He learnt
his lessons and went out to play. Lawton was waiting
for him.

“That's good!” he called out, as Harry came down;
“if that fellow Elton hasn’t got hold of you again.”
“T thought you were grown too much of a man.—I
would not be a muff and a coward—I’d have a will of
my own.’

How little Tom Lawton knew the meaning of the
word coward.

A bad boy, calls another a coward if he will not
join with him in doing wrong; but it is the bad boy
who is the coward himself, and the boy who dares to
do right is the brave one.

If “Harry Blake had borne being laughed at, and
still kept to what he knew was right, he would have
been brave, but he was afraid of Lawton, and so did
wrong like a coward.

Do you understand ?

After that, if ever Harry did not like anything that
Lawton wanted to do, Lawton would say, “ Elton bid
you say so, I suppose,”’ and Harry would give in from
his false and naughty shame.



HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 39

But learning his lessons one day would not please
the Doctor, when Harry brought them so often badly
learnt. It only showed that he could learn them when
he chose. As day after day, Harry’s books were re-
turned, the Doctor became less kind in his manner,
and one day he told him that he should punish him by
keeping him in from play. After school, Lawton came
to him and said—

“ Ah! you’ve caught it at last, you see.”

“Oh! what shall I do?” said Harry, wringing his
hands, “ what shall I do?”

“Why, do you think you are the first fellow who
has ever been kept in for punishment?” said Lawton.
“J was dozens of times, until I took to writing my
lessons on my nails; I’m not going to be bothered
with lessons for anybody.”

“T won’t write on my nails,” said Harry, “it is so
mean, I won’t do it.

“Then don’t make a row about being punished,
I would’nt be such a baby,” and Lawton left
him.

Still Harry cried and felt very miserable. He could
think only of the Doctor’s stern face; and the whole
afternoon passed away without his finding any com-
fort in Lawton’s words. He heard the boys playing in
the ground below; they were all just as merry as ever,
and did not seem to care if he was in punishment
or no. Lawton had always pretended he was fond of
him, but he heard Lawton’s voice more merry than
the rest.



40 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Elton was spending the afternoon away with some
friends. He had known nothing of Harry’s punish-
ment before he left.

As tea-time drew on, Harry heard the Doctor’s voice
outside the door, and he felt very frightened he
would come in; the steps came up right to the
door, but when the door was opened, it was Elton
who entered; the Doctor must have told him all
about it.

Harry hid his face upon the form, so that Elton
should not see it.

«What is this,’ asked Elton, “have you really
been so naughty as to be kept in?”

Harry gave no answer; but still hid his face.

“Harry,” said Elton, “the Doctor is very angry
with you. He meant to have kept you in all the
evening; but I am to say, that if you will confess
yourself wrong, he will let you come down to
tea.”

Elton had begged the Doctor to forgive Harry,
although Harry had behaved so ungratefully to him;
but he did not say so.

“Will you do so?” asked Elton.

Harry only sobbed.

“Do you not know that you have been naughty.”

“Yes,” said Harry, “I am so miserable, I don’t
know what to do.”

“Come with me then,” said Elton, standing up.

“Ha, ha!’ laughed Tom Lawton, who had been
listening at the door.



HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. Al

Harry drew back.

“T cannot,” he said; ‘‘ Lawton will laugh at me
so.”

“Does Lawton’s laughter signify so much as God’s
anger, Harry?” said Elton, gravely.

“Oh, I cannot; I cannot, indeed,” said Harry,
breaking away from Elton’s hand, as Lawton looked
in at the door, and made a face.

He threw himself down upon a form and cried again.

“Oh my! what a muff!” said Lawton: ‘first he’ll
ery; and then he’ll beg pardon; and then he’ll cry.
I wouldn’t beg pardon to save my life. Id scorn
it.”

And Lawton really looked as if he had said some-
thing very grand.

“Are you coming with me?” asked. Elton.

Harry shook his head, and rolled upon the form;
and Elton left the room, desiring Lawton to do the
same.

So all the evening until bed-time, Harry was in
the school-room. Elton did not come again. I
fancy the Doctor would not allow him. From that
day, Harry was afraid to meet with Elton; he was
afraid to look him in the face. If he saw him coming,
he ran another way.

Elton coughed more and more every day; and it
made Harry feel very sad sometimes to see how thin
he had grown. One day, as Harry sat in the garden,
he heard the Doctor talking with Elton. He was
saying :



42 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘*T shall have you moved to another room; it will
be better for you to sleep by yourself; do you feel
any stronger to-day ?”

“Oh yes, Sir;” Elton answered. “I don’t think
there is anything the matter with me. I shall soon
be well, I dare say.”

“You must not work too hard, Frank,” said
Dr. Owen. “Go, now, and have a game with the
others.”

Elton ran off; and Harry peeped through the
bushes, wondering why the Doctor stood so long
looking after Elton.

That day, Elton moved into a room by himself;
it was a little distance off from the other boys’ rooms;
so that he could not be waked up by noise.

Perhaps, had he been able, Dr. Owen would, at
this time, have sent Frank Elton home; for every-
body could see that he was getting ill, and the Doctor
was very anxious about him; but Elton had not any
home in England. His Mamma had died some years
ago; and his Papa was living out in India; so that Elton
was obliged to remain at school. I think that must
have been one reason why the Doctor was so very
fond of him. He had been with him ever since he
first came over from India in a ship, when he was
quite a little child; younger than Harry Blake, a
good deal.

You have heard all about India, I dare say, many
times. It is so hot out there, that little children get
ill if they stop long; that is, little English children;



HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 43

for there are numbers of native children, of course;
and they like the hot sun, because it is natural to
them. I dare say they would shiver and shake with
cold if they were brought to England.

Perhaps you have been told, that India is the place
where all the carved ivory ornaments come from, and
the feather fans, and the curry-powder, and hot
pickles. And the: Elephants, and the Tigers, which
you have seen at the Zoological Gardens came from
India.

The people are very dark there, with very black
hair and black eyes; and they do not wear many
clothes because of the heat. That is all very well,
I dare say, for those who are used to it; but we
should not like it; and I think you will agree with
me, that we are much better off in England, where
God has placed us; for if we feel too cold, as we
often do, we can run about and make ourselves
warm; but it is not so easy to get cool where the
sun is so strong that it nearly fries people up into
cinders.

At first, when he came to school, Harry used to
like to have Elton tell him about the black people,
and the palanquin coaches, and the elephants, and
tigers, and monkeys, and the parrots, and the English
ladies and gentlemen out there; and the funny things
the natives sometimes do; and the odd manner in
which they speak English; for although Elton had
been quite a child when he came over in the
ship, he could remember a great deal about it all



44 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

still; and when he received letters from his Papa
every now and then, they brought back all these
things to his mind. But, now, Harry never heard
any thing about them; for he and Elton never talked
together.



45

CHAPTER VI.
THE HARDBAKE,

Lawron had not dared, when Elton slept in the same
room as he, to do many things which now he did.
Harry knew well that the boys were forbidden to
keep candles alight after they were in bed; but many
nights now there was a candle burning by Lawton’s
bedside, as he lay reading books, which were not lent
him by the Doctor.

One day, Harry took up one of them and asked
where Lawton got it. ‘Tom only made an ugly face
for answer.

One night, after all the boys had been in bed some
time, Harry was awakened by a noise in the next room.
It seemed as if some one was walking about. Then
he heard Lawton’s voice whispering. Harry jumped
out of bed and opened the door. The window was
wide open, and Lawton was leaning out talking to
some one below in the garden. Harry ran towards
him, and asked what he was doing,



46° HARRY AT SCHOOL.

As Lawton heard his voice, he turned round quickly
and said in a very angry tone.

‘How dare you come in here unasked? You
meddlesome young rascal. Get out! or I’ll thrash

ou
7 Harry stood still, looking very much surprised.
The next minute, Lawton said, in a much quieter
voice :

‘“T am not doing anything, Blake; you had better
go to bed again.”

Harry went back to bed; but he could not help
wondering what Lawton had been doing.

The next day, during play-hours, Lawton walked
away from the others with Harry; and when they
were some little distance, so that nobody could hear
them speak, Lawton said:

“Do you like hardbake ?”

Of course, Harry said Yes: all boys like hard-
bake; so Lawton gave him some.

While Harry was eating it, Lawton said:

‘‘ Don’t ever mention before any of the others that
you saw me at the window last night; above all,
don’t tell Elton; for he is such a fellow for making
harm out of everything, and is so very chummy with
the Doctor.

‘But what were you doing?” asked Harry.

~“ Just you mind your own business, youngster,”
said Lawton crossly, and he moved away.

Harry had often been told that when children do
things which are not to be told of, those things are



THE HARDBAKE. 47

generally wrong. He felt sure that Lawton had been
doing something he ought not to do, or he would not
have minded the Doctor knowing of it.

Tom’s lessons were worse learnt every day. He
was always now being turned back; for all the time
that ought to have been spent in learning, Lawton
was reading the books which he ought not to read.
One day, Lawton offered one to Harry to read, but it
did not seem at all amusing; for it was all about
grown up men and women, and places which Harry
could not understand. While Harry was looking
over it, Elton passed; and Lawton snatched the book
from him, and hid it.

After he was gone, Harry said.

“IT wish you would not read them, Lawton, if you
think you must hide them from other people. I am
sure it is very wrong.”

“ That’s good,” answered Lawton, “don’t you
begin to talk; why you have yourself eaten some of
my contraband goods; after that, you had better
hold your tongue.”

Contraband means against orders.

“¢ What do you mean?” asked Harry; “ [haven’t.”

‘Did you not eat my hardbake?” said Lawton.
“JT got that at the same time as the books; so now
you can’t ever tell against me, for you have shared
the spoil.”

“| didn’t know how you got it; how should 1?”
said Harry.

“Never you mind: what’s done can’t be helped.



48 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

You may as well help me now, as you are in the
scrape ; for if I say you have shared in the hardbake,
no one will believe you did’nt know all about it. I
want you to help me this evening.”

‘TI don’t half like it,” said Harry.

‘“* Nonsense, we will have oceans of hardbake this
time; enough to last us a week. Will you promise?”

‘But how do you get it?” asked Harry.

“Only think ; such lots of hardbake,” answered
Lawton. “ Will you promise?”

“Yes,” said Harry Blake.

How naughty of Harry! He knew well now that
Lawton was doing wrong; but he was too weak to
say so, partly because he wanted the hardbake, and
partly because he was afraid of Lawton.

“You promise to help me in everything to-night,”
said Lawton again, “ And never to let it out to any-
body. Honor bright!”

* Honor bright!” answered Harry.

He should have said, ‘Dirty Honor,” I think,
or “no honor at all,’ when it concerned Tom
Lawton.

Harry felt anxious for the night to come. He
could not learn, or play, or attend to anything, for
thinking what Lawton was going todo. The boys
went to bed at nine. As they all parted to their
different rooms, Lawton squeezed Harry’s hand and
whispered,

‘““As soon as the others are asleep, come to me,
don’t make a noise.”



_ THE HARDBAKE. 49

Harry undressed and went to bed. Never any
prayers now. He had got used to being wicked; but
he had not got used to feeling unhappy and afraid.
He felt unhappy as he lay down; for he had that day
received a letter from his Papa, saying he hoped he
was trying to be a good boy; that he hoped he never
forgot to ask the help of God. Harry would have
liked to try and say his prayers that night, but he
did not dare. It was not so much the other boys he
cared about; but he knew that he was going to do
wrong, and he did not dare. He lay trembling as
he thought of what he was going to do, and wished
that he could draw back; but he thought he could
not now. He remembered his words, ‘ Honor
bright!” and said to himself,

“Tt is too late now. I must keep my promise; it
would be dishonorable to go back now.”

Would it have been more dishonorable, do you
think, to break a wicked promise which he never
should have made, and try to do right and keep his
first promises to God, or to go on doing wrong, and
every minute making things worse.

The meaning of honor is honest and truthful
and straightforward; and to be honorable is to do
what is right. What a pity it is, that little boys so
often mistake the word.

Harry became more and more miserable, thinking
of these things in the dark, until he hid his head
under the clothes, because he was afraid.

What was he afraid of ?



50 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

He need not have been afraid of anything, if he had
not been a naughty boy; for God could take care of
him as well in the dark as the light.

At length he put his head out from under the
clothes and listened. He could hear by their breath-
ing that all the other boys were asleep.



bl

CHAPTER VII.
DOING WRONG.

Tr was time for Harry to keep his word with Lawton.
He got up, and although it was a warm night, he
trembled and his teeth chattered. He did not put on
his shoes, lest they should make a noise and wake
any of the boys; but he carried them in his hand,
until he opened Lawton’s door and stood within the
room.

“Hallo!” said Lawton jumping up. “ What’s the
matter; you look as pale as a ghost.”

“Lawton, I wish you could go to sleep quietly, and
let me do the same,” said Harry.

“You young muff.” Lawton knew well there was
no word Harry disliked more than that. “You
young muff! what! have you got frightened in the
dark ? I thought you had more spirit.”

“I wish I knew what you are going to do?” said
Harry sadly.

«¢ Well, 1 don’t mind telling you. You have
promised not to tell. Iam going to the town, and
you are going with me.”



52 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“Oh, indeed, I had rather not. J had no idea
of that. The Doctor would be so dreadfully
angry.”

“The Doctor will never know anything of it,
unless you are so lost to all sense of honor, as to
break your word.”

“J Shall not tell of you, Lawton; but, indeed, I
cannot go.”

“You are a nice fellow, I must say,’’ sneered
Lawton, “ Why you have promised to help me, and
what’s more, if you sneak out of it, sir, 1’ll thrash
you till you can’t stand.”

“‘T don’t intend to sneak out of it,” said Harry,
growing very red. “I am nota sneak at any rate.
I'll keep to what I promised;” and he sat down on
the side of the bed, and began putting on his shoes.

« That’s right!” said Lawton, slapping him on the
back. ‘“IthoughtI could depend upon you. There’s
not another boy in the school like you. Sayers is
such a blab, and Dickson such a coward; although
they have both of them taken my lollipops times out
of number. It was all through Dickson, that I was
found out last half.”

“Were you?” said Harry looking up.

«Yes, But it is too long a story to tellnow; we’ll
have that another time. I wonder Sir Francis has
never told you. It must be a good tale as a warning
against me.”

“Elton has never said a word against you,” said
Harry, and he sighed as he thought of Elton.



Z ———— ES

Se SSS
ee ES Se
SSS SSS ee

MUP



Page 53.

NIGHT.

HARRY GOES OUT BY



DOING WRONG. 53

‘But, I say, we must not be talking here; we shall
wake up somebody,” said Lawton. “Now for the
rope.”

“What rope?” asked Harry.

“You hold your tongue, and do as I bid you.”

Lawton then brought a rope and tied it to the
window sill.

“ Now, Blake, you holdit steady while I go down.”

Harry did as he was told; and saw Lawton swing
himself down into the garden by the rope, until he
stood upon the flower bed below.

‘* Now then, come on,” he called out in a loud
whisper.

Harry got out in his turn, while Lawton held the
rope steady from beneath. As he was going down,
the light of a candle flashed in one of the window
panes.

‘Make haste,” whispered Lawton; “But be as
quiet as a mouse, come with me.”

He caught Harry’s hand as he reached the ground,
and drew him away. At the same moment, a window
opened, and Doctor Owen looked out. Lawton and
Harry crouched amongst the bushes. The Doctor
looked down steadily into the garden; but he could
see nothing.

The rope could not be seen, because it hung close
to the wall: and presently Doctor Owen shut the
window again, and the light of the candle went
away.

Lawton rose up.



54 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“‘ Wasn’t that a near thing?” he said; “ Now for
it. Come, Blake, over the wall.”

Harry was over as soon as Lawton, and they both
stood in the high-road.

“Hurrah!” called Lawton, racing towards the
town; ‘* Hurrah! come on.”

“Hurrah!” answered Harry, racing after him; and
from that moment he forgot everything but the fun
of being out at night.

It is often very pleasant to do wrong while it lasts;
but it is afterwards that we suffer for it.

Do you know that Lawton was twice as wicked a
boy as if he had gone out alone that night; for he
made Harry as naughty as himself. Harry, being
much smaller than Lawton, was easily led by him.
If Lawton had set a good example, I think Harry
would have followed it. However small or young we
are, we can always meet with those who are smaller
and younger—whom we can teach to do either right
or wrong. If we teach evenababy to do wrong with
us, we shall be blamed for that baby’s naughtiness,
because all little children so quickly follow what they
see other children do.



59

CHAPTER VIII.
OUT AT NIGHT.

Lawton and Harry first went to the lollipop shop
and got a quantity of hardbake and other things. The
woman of the shop asked Lawton when he was going
to pay her for all the things he had; and Lawton
laughed, and said, “ Some day.”

The fact w as, he had no money to pay with, so
that he should not have bought things, for it was not
honest. Harry. had often been told by his Papa that
it is wrong to take what you cannot pay for, and felt
rather sorry that Lawton should do so. He paid for
his share of the lollipops, but he could not pay all.

Lawton laughed at him for paying, but the woman
in the shop said,

“J think he is much more like a gentleman than
you are, sir.’

So Lawton made a face at her.

The bad boys then went to a cake and tart-shop,
and bought things there, and to several other places.
Then they ran all down the High-street, cutting capers
and shouting loudly. Lawton threw stones at the



56 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

lamps, and broke the glasses. At first Harry asked
him not to do so;*but, after a little while, he laughed
with him, and at last joined, because Lawton called
him names for not doing so. They were several times
nearly caught by a policeman; and they would, I
think, have been locked up in the station-house if they
had, and have had to pass the night there: and once
a policeman chased them through several streets, so
that they were very much frightened indeed; but as
he did not catch them, Lawton, the next moment, said
he didn’t care for policemen, and cut fresh capers, and
made more noise, and gave double knocks at the doors
of private houses, so that the servants had to come
down, after they had gone to bed, and all for nothing;
while Lawton and Harry watched round the corner
of the street. I cannot help thinking that the two
boys only half thought how very badly they were be-
having. I am sure Harry Blake did: there was
more excuse for him than for Lawton, for Lawton
had done the same things before, and had been
punished for them, and told how wrong they were.
I am sure everybody in the street thought they were
anuisance. At length, aman, against whom Lawton -
pushed rudely, caught hold of him, and held him by
the arm, while he boxed his ears several times.

“What are you doing, you young scamp, running
up against people in this way? Whose boy are you?
Tell me your name.”

Lawton was silent; and the man dragged him
under a lamp, that he might see his face.



OUT AT NIGHT. 57

‘*'Tell me your name,” said he again, giving him a
good shake.

‘‘ Thomas Lawton,” squeaked out Lawton, in a very
frightened voice.

“You belong to Dr. Owen’s, | suppose.”

“No,” said Lawton.

Harry turned pale at hearing Lawton tell a lie.
The man said again—

“Tell me the truth this moment. Here, you little
fellow,” and he turned to Blake, “ what school do you
belong tor”

“* Dr. Owen’s,” said Harry, trembling.

“Uoh!” said the man, shaking Lawton again.
“Ugh! you mean little sneak to tell me alie. And
now what are yeu both doing out here at this time of

night ?”

“i Oh, please sir, don’t tell the Doctor,” whimpered
Lawton ; “please sir, don’t. We only came out for
a lark. ‘Oh, please sir, let me go.”

“Tve a great mind to take you home to ile
Doctor’s myself,” said the stranger. “I don’t like
boys who tell lies ; 5 and a good flogging would be the
best thing for you.”

Lawton slid down on his knees upon the pave-
ment, and cried and sobbed.

“Oh, no, sir, please sir, don’t, sir. I'll never do it
again. I beg your pardon.”

The stranger laughed and said—

“Ah! I see you’re a coward. Storytellers always
are.”



58 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

As he spoke, Lawton rose again to his feet. The
stranger had let go his arm as he knelt on the pave-
ment; and no sooner did Lawton find that he had
done so, than he started away, and ran down the
street at the top of his speed, calling out, “‘ Come on,
Harry.”

“‘T advise you to go back to school at once,” said
the stranger, speaking to Harry, who still stood near
him, with the tears running down his face.

‘Yes, I will,” Harry answered; “I wish I had
never come out.’

The man placed his hand upon his shoulder
kindly as he said,

‘You will always find, my boy, that doing wrong
brings sorrow with it.”

“Yes, sir,” said Harry; and the stranger wished
him good night.

Harry began walking towards school. He felt
afraid of being out alone at that hour ; but there was
no help for it. He walked with his eyes upon the
ground, and feeling very sad.

‘* Hallo !” said Lawton’s voice close to him.

‘Oh, Lawton,” said Harry, “you are a very
wicked boy indeed. I wish I had never had anything
to do with you. Do come home at once.”

“Not J,” said Lawton. “I am going to buy
candles and lucifers first.”

“ Then I shall not go with you,” said Harry.

“You may go where you like ; I don’t want you.
You are a young sneak.”



OUT AT NIGHT. 59.

** I think you are the sneak,” said Harry. “* That
kind man called you one ; and you cried and begged
his pardon fast enough when you were frightened,
although you said one day you’d scorn to beg any-
one’s pardon.”

“ Well,” said Lawton, in a threatening voice; “ you
just mind your own business, or perhaps I may teach

ou.”

“T don’t believe you dare,” said Harry. “I don’t
like you at all now; and I won’t be any longer
friends.”

And Harry left him, and walked home; leaving
Lawton to go for the candles and the lucifer matches
alone.



BO.

CHAPTER IX.
FOUND OUT. ©

Waite Lawton and Harry were running about the
town and getting into scrapes, there was somebody
walking about the garden at the school.

It was a tall thin figure, with a dressing gown on,
and a pair of spectacles.

He came down into the garden with a lantern in
his hand, and he looked carefully about all over the
walk, and then over the flower-bed, and of course, by
the light of the lantern, he saw the footmarks of the
two naughty little boys; and then he raised his eyes,
and through his spectacles he saw that the bedroom
window was open, and he knew that, since Elton had

‘been moved, no one slept in that bedroom but
Lawton. And next he wondered how he had
managed to get down; so he placed the lantern close
to the wall, and there was the rope still dangling.

That somebody who was standing in the garden
was the Doctor.

There’s a scrape for Master Lawton !

Perhaps you think now that the Doctor took down



FOUND OUT. ~ 61

the rope, shut the window, and then waited until the
boys came back. No; he did not do that.

He left the rope where it was, and the window
open, and went back into the house, and got into bed.

I do not say he went to sleep—I don’t think he
did. I fancy he lay awake until he heard the window
of Lawton’s room softly closed, and then he knew
that he was safe back again.

When Harry arrived at the school, he had no
trouble in climbing the wall and getting up by the
rope into Lawton’s room. He still felt very un-
happy; and as he lay down in bed, he made up his
mind that as soon as ever morning came, he would
tell the Doctor what a naughty boy he had been.

He did not feel at all inclined to go to sleep, and
lay there tossing about and crying, until he heard
Lawton come in, and remove the rope, and close the
window softly.

Lawton thought when he had done this that all
was safe. How little he knew!

Harry could plainly hear Lawton groping about
his room. Perhaps he was taking off his clothes, or
perhaps he was feeling for the bed in the dark. But
presently the gleam of a light came through the.
crack of the door, and Harry knew that Lawton had
lighted a candle that he might see where to put away
his things.

The next moment, the opposite door in Lawton’s
room opened, and some one came in.

Harry heard Lawton call out. “Oh!” and



62 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

then a voice said, but the voice was not the Doctor’s,
“Lawton, what can you be doing at this time of
night? You know that the Doctor has forbidden
candles being lighted after bedtime.”

Lawton answered,

‘““T was taken ill; I was obliged to get up.”

‘What are all these things lying about?” asked
Elton, for it was Elton’s voice that spoke, “ What is
this long rope? Surely, Lawton, you have not—?

Elton stopped, and Lawton gave no answer.

By this time Harry was out of bed, and at the
door which opened from his room.

“Surely Lawton,” said Elton, coughing while he
spoke, as he always did when he spoke fast, “ You
have not been out again at night. Tell me the truth.”

“No; of course I have not,” said Lawton quickly.
“You know the Doctor forbade it.”

“Oh, Lawton,” said Harry Blake, “how can you tell
more stories? Yes, we have both been out, Elton,
and we have bought hardbake and lollipops; and I
wish I’d never gone, I’m sure.”

Lawton had not known that Harry Blake was any
where near; and when he heard him answer Elton,
he turned round upon him and would have beaten
him, if Elton had not caught him by the arm.
But he called him a great many names, until he was
tired.

“Yes, Lawton,” said Elton, very gravely. ‘You
know the Doctor forbade it.”

“Oh, Elton!” said Lawton, quite quickly changing



FOUND OUT. 63

his tone, and speaking in a frightened way, ‘Oh,
Elton, pray don’t tell the Doctor: pray don’t. I’ll
give you anything if you won’t tell of me.”

“1 don’t want anything you can give me, Lawton,”
answered Elton; “but I am not sure whether I
ought not to tell the Doctor.”

“Oh,” said Lawton, ‘only let me off this time and
I’ll promise faithfully. Oh, Elton, remember, that
the Doctor said he would send me home and tell my
Uncle if I ever did it again. Pray let me off: pray
don’t tell of me.”

And Lawton was so frightened, that he dragged
himself along the ground after Elton, and cried like
a baby.

‘‘ Give me a little time to think,” said Elton.

Lawton still cried, and every now and then said,—
“Oh, pray let me off; oh, pray don’t tell the Doctor.”

a“ Well Lawton,” said Elton, after a time. “I
will make no promise until the morning. I do not
feel sure yet, what I ought todo. Get up from the
ground. I wonder you are not ashamed.”

“Promise me not. to tell, dear Elton! Elton, I
always liked you; indeed I did.”

Elton’s face flushed quite crimson, as he said,—

“Do not tell any more falsehoods. Begin to put
away all these things which are lying about the floor.
What are they?

“Oh, they are books, and candles, and cakes, and
lollipops,” whined Lawton. ‘I will give you half
of them, Elton, if you will promise not to tell.”



64 HARRY AT SCHOOL,

Elton turned quickly from him, and left the room
without another word.

Harry Blake looked after him. He longed to
speak to Elton, but he felt afraid. Elton had been
so very kind to him, and Harry had behaved so
badly in return.

But while he waited, thinking what to do, he
heard Elton cough, and the next moment he was in
the other room.

“Elton, I have been very wicked; quite as wicked
as Lawton. Oh, Elton, I’m so sorry.”

Elton turned towards him and held out his hands.

“Do you think the Doctor will forgive me? Do
you think he will believe that I am sorry? Do you
think he will ever trust me again?”

““Do you think you need most the Doctor’s for-
giveness, Harry, or the forgiveness of God?” asked
Elton.

““T do not dare to say my prayers, Elton;” said
Harry. “ Not now.”

“Why not?” asked Elton.

“ Because,” sobbed Harry, “TI have been a naughty
little boy, and I am afraid.”

“But, Harry,” said Elton, gently and with the
tears in his eyes, “have you forgotten that dear
Saviour, for whose sake God has promised to forgive
all who are sorry, however naughty they have been?’

By this time, Harry was clinging round Elton’s
waist.

“Yes; I have forgotten for a long time past.”



FOUND OUT. 65

“But you will remember now?”

Harry said “ Yes,” and Elton left him alone. But
God was with him—Harry knew that well. Before
he went to sleep, he asked God to forgive him for
being such a naughty boy, and to teach him to be
good; for Harry had been as naughty as a little boy
like him could be; and I think the only reason he
was not altogether so bad as Lawton, was because he
had been taught better.



66

CHAPTER X.
THE FIRE.

Ir seemed as if that night would never end. Harry
thought he could not have been asleep more than a
few minutes, when he woke up again with a start,
and sat up in bed. There was a strange kind of
smell all over the room, which he could not under-
stand. While he sat looking into the darkness and
listening for any sound, he heard a loud scream,
and the next moment Lawton flung the door open
and stood there in his night shirt, with his eyes wide
open, and screaming. Harry could see him plainly;
see his eyes wide open, and his face quite white
with fear, and his bare feet upon the floor; for, as
Lawton threw open his room door, a bright broad
light shone through and lighted up everything and
every place in the room. but it was not the light of
a candle.

As Lawton kept on screaming, all the boys in the
room woke up, and then boys from other rooms came
running in their shirts to know what was the matter;
then the servants, looking very frightened, came there
too; and last, in the doorway, stood the Doctor.



THE FIRE. 67

Several people said, “‘ What’s the matter?” But no
one answered, and still Lawton screamed. I think
there was no need to ask what the matter was; for
now, through the doorway, from Lawton’s room,
there burst out clouds of smoke and flames. All the
boys ran to the other door dnd into the passage.
The Doctor called out in a loud voice. ‘Go down
into the garden, all of you.” He had not to order
them away a second time.

There they stood upon the lawn, in the flower
garden, a crowd of little boys, watching the flames
which now rushed and tore from Lawton’s window.
Some of the bigger ones got over their fright in a
short time, and ran backwards and forwards, helping
the servants to carry things out into the garden,
where they might be safe from the fire. At length
—it seemed a long time first—the fire-engine arrived
from the town, and began to play upon Lawton’s
room.

I don’t know who it was first asked the question ;
but one said, “ Are we all here?’’ And almost at the
same moment the Doctor came up and said, “ Elton,
I want to speak to you.”

But no one answered; and Elton did not come
forward.

“ Elton !” said the Doctor; and his voice sounded
almost like a scream.

“ How many of you are there here?’ he asked
next. “Count!”

Grey counted. There were only eleven boys, and



68 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

there ought to have been twelve. Dr. Owen only
waited to hear that all were there but Elton, and he
ran into the house, and up the staircase.

Grey and Ward ran after him ; and as they saw
him go through the fire and smoke, they called out
with fear, for they thought he would be burnt.
Next they tried to follow him, but the thick smoke
choked them, and they turned back.

Oh, how long it seemed while the Doctor was
away.

The boys no longer cared to watch the engine
play; they no longer fixed their eyes on Lawton’s
room, where the flames kept trying to burst out
again, in spite of the water—all looked only at the
staircase, where the Doctor had gone up, crowding
round the doorway; and as near as they could, for
the smoke, waiting for his return.

At last !

They heard a footstep, and they crowded nearer,
for they knew he was coming.

“‘ Stand back! stand out of the way!” called the
Doctor, as soon as he came to the top of the stairs,
and saw them crowding there.

The boys all ran again into the garden, and stood
upon the lawn.

Then came the Doctor, and with him Elton. But,
not by his side ; not running down the staircase with
him ; not as the boys had seen him last.

Carried in the Doctor’s arms ; his face quite pale ;
his eyes fast closed; his hands hanging loosely by his
sides.





,*





Y GEO y Zy GT ET Va lig ty TVD r{ 1,7
by fi G “Jy ed BG, WY iggy MY,
GO) ZG Wi oy ai
; ye i yh og W/1 SS rr 7 \
MAM YM LOB MO
Lar haw . SSE A Gg Cong Aaa wee ; HHL / MMGAST | 7

ge G9.

Pu

ELTON SAVED FROM THE FIRE,



THE FIRE. 69

So the Doctor had found him, still, as if sleeping in
his bed, stifled with the smoke.

And all the children crowded again together ; for
they felt frightened when they saw him lying so;
and they felt frightened at the grave sad face of the
Doctor, and were afraid to speak out loud; so they
whispered to each other, ‘ He is dead!”

Harry Blake, who stood amongst them, heard them
say so; and saw the pale face of Elton, which but
such a little time before had looked so kindly at him ;
and a great sob broke from the little boy’s heart ;
and he clasped his hands together, half in sorrow and
half in fear, as he repeated to himself again, “ He is
dead !”’



70

CHAPTER XI.
NEXT MORNING.

Wuo cared then whether the engine put out the
flames or no? Who cared whether the books, and the
pictures, and the furniture were saved or burnt to
ashes? Not the Doctor, to whom they all belonged.
He never looked at the house after he had missed
Elton from amongst the boys.

The engine left off playing, for the fire was out,
and there was no great damage done, beyond Law-
ton’s room.

The men belonging to the engine went away, and
the servants went back into the house to try and set
things a little to rights; and the boys found that,
without their knowing it, it had become broad day-
light, and a great deal of the fear, which had kept
them silent all this time, went away with the dark-
ness. One by one they left the garden, for they felt
cold and tired; and there was now a fire in the
kitchen, and they wanted to talk of all that had taken
place, and to wonder to each other how it happened.

They did not dare do so in the Doctor’s presence,



NEXT MORNING. 71

for he looked so grave and sad, as he walked up and
down the garden-walk, waiting for the surgeon, for
whom he had sent.

Doctor Owen, you know, was called a “ Doctor”
because he was a very clever man; but he was not a
Doctor of Medicine; that is a different thing. It
was a medical doctor whom he had now sent for.
And every now and then he stopped to look at Elton,
who had been laid upon one of the sofas from the
drawing-room, wrapped up in a blanket.

But the Doctor was not the only one who watched
Elton as he lay there.

There was a little boy kneeling by the sofa, holding
Elton’s cold hand, and thinking of his kind words to
him only a few hours before.

That little boy was Harry Blake.

As the Doctor passed in his walking up and down
the garden-path, he heard a sob come from this little
boy, and he stopped and placed his hand upon his
head.

Then a sharp pain went through Harry’s heart,
when he thought that, if the Doctor knew all his
naughtiness of that night, he might not have been so
kind.

But where was Lawton all this time? With those

boys who were tired out, and had got into their beds,
and gone to sleep ?

No!

With those boys who were sitting chatting round
the kitchen fire, and warming their cold feet?



72 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

No!

With Grey and Ward, who had dressed themselves,
and were watching from their bed-room window for
the arrival of the surgeon’s gig, and speaking in
whispers together about Elton ?

No!

Where was he, then ?

There is a boy out there, far away in the shrub-
beries, lying upon the grass, although it is quite wet
with dew. He rolls upon the ground, and groans
and cries out aloud.

That is Lawton.

While the house was burning, there was one boy
who was crouched upon the lawn, with his hands over
his face, to shut out the sight.

That boy was Lawton.

When the Doctor came, carrying Elton in his arms,
and laid him down, and the children crouched toge-
ther, and whispered “He is dead!” one boy from
among them started away, and flung himself upon his
face in the damp grass, amongst the shrubberies, and
there he lay till now.

That was Lawton.

And there he lay, even when the surgeon’s gig
drove in, and Elton was carried upstairs, and the bed-
room door was shut upon him, and the surgeon and
Doctor Owen.

Until the boys’ breakfast was ready, long after the
usual time, and Lawton was missed and looked for,

and found by one of the servants, and brought into
the house.



NEXT MORNING. 73

And when the servant went back into the kitchen,
he told how he had found Lawton, and said,

‘“‘ He must have set alight to his own room; and he
knows it, too, young scamp.”

The cook said kindly,

“‘ Well, poor child, he seems terribly sorry for it.
I’ll be bound he'll be a better boy for the future: this
will be a lesson he will never forget.”

It was kind of Cook to think so. Does not Lawton
seem very sorry for what he has done? I believe he
felt very frightened, when he saw what fearful things
he had done. I hope he may have been sorry also:
we shall sce.

I do not think many of the boys cared about their
breakfast that morning. They had too many things
to think of, and too much to talk of, to have much
time even to eat.

I know that some of them were very brave, indeed,
in their words, now that the fire was put out.

Grey and Ward were the only two who had been
of any use in helping at the time, and now these two
said nothing.



CHAPTER XII.
CONSCIENCE.

Harry Brake sat upon the staircase, which led from
Elton’s room. All the balustrades were burnt, and
many of the steps were charred: the wall ,was all
black with smoke; and the paper quite spoiled.
Harry looked from one thing to the other, and
thought how different it had been the day before,
and watched the housemaid taking down the carpet,
which was so spoilt that it had hardly any colour
left in it. But all the while, Harry was thinking
what the Surgeon would say of Elton, and whether
he could really be dead.

It seemed so strange, that a boy, not many years
older than himself, should die. Harry knew that
grown-up men and women died; but he had never
felt quite sure about boys; though he had been
told so.

When the Surgeon’s step came on the landing,
Harry jumped up and going to him, caught him by
the hands and said,

“Ts Elton dead, Sir?”

“No, my boy,” said the Surgeon, kindly.



CONSCIENCE. 75

Harry sat down upon the stairs again.

“Ts this boy his brother?” asked the Surgeon of
Doctor Owen.

The Doctor said, “ No ;” and putting his hand on
Harry’s head, as he had done before in the garden,
he spoke so kindly to him, that Harry’s eyes filled
with tears, and he could not help saying:

‘Oh, please Sir, don’t.”

He went to find Lawton.

By this time, Lawton’s spirits were better than
they had been. He was sitting in the play-ground,
with Dickson and Sayers, and some others.

As soon as Harry joined them, Dickson called
out,

“ Well; how’s Elton?”

“ He is not dead,” said Harry. ‘“ The Doctor
says he is not dead.”

“ Ah, well,” said Sayers; “ Perhaps you will leave
off piping your eye about him, then.”

Harry gave him no answer; but, turning to
Lawton, said,

‘“¢ T want to speak to you.”

Lawton jumped up quickly, grew very red, and
taking Harry by the arm, said,

* « The Doctor hasn’t sent you; has he ?”

‘“‘ No,” said Harry; and Lawton looked less red.

“‘ Lawton,” Harry began, “‘ We ought to tell the
Doctor at once of our going out last night. He is so
kind. I cannot bear the thought of having deceived
him. The Surgeon is gone; will you come now ?” .



76 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘Tell him ? Come now? What do you mean ?”
asked Lawton opening his eyes.

Harry said again what he had said_ before.
Lawton was silent for a little while, and looked another
way from Harry, until Harry said, ‘‘Come on,
Lawton.”

“Blake,” said Lawton; “I always called you a
muff; but I had no idea you could go so far as this,
Even if the Doctor suspects me; he does not you.
Why should you get yourself into a scrape for
nothing ?”

“Tt is my duty; Iam sure it is right,” said Harry.

Lawton still walked on until Harry said again,
‘Will you come?”

“ Not I,” answered Lawton.

“Oh Lawton; do not be so wicked,” said Harry,
“Do come and tell the Doctor; we have done wrong
enough already.”

“T shall do no such thing,” said Lawton. “ The
Doctor will, I dare say, forget to speak about it;
what with the fire, and Elton and all. I shall say
nothing. Why should I?”

“ Because it is our duty,” said Harry.

“© Why ?” asked Lawton.

“* Because it is right,” said Harry again.

Now Harry was only repeating the same thing;
for Duty and Right are all one. That was because,
being a little boy, he did not know how to put his
feelings into words. Had he been a man, perhaps,
he would have said.



CONSCIENCE. 17

“T must tell the Doctor what I have done; be-
cause my conscience tells me I have been wrong;
and if I conceal it, I shall be going on doing wrong;
And, besides, it would make me feel happier to tell
him, as a proof that I am sorry; and I should not
believe that I am really sorry, if I did not go and
confess it.”

But these were too many and too fine words for a
little boy to say.

Yet Harry felt all this.

‘Then I shall go alone,” said he, sadly, as Lawton
still looked away.

* And tell about me, too, I suppose, you little
blab,” said Lawton, angrily.

“No, Lawton, I shall tell only of myself,” said
Harry.

And then he ran away from the play-ground
quickly, lest his heart should fail him.



78

CHAPTER XIII.

HARRY CONFESSES.

Ir was a rather hard thing to go to the Doctor, and
tell about his having been naughty. It was much
more natural, that Harry should have preferred doing
like Lawton; and waiting in the hope that nothing
would be said about it.

It was God who taught Harry to be brave in doing
right.

It was the Devil that made Lawton hold his
tongue.

Harry stopped a minute before the study door,
where he knew the Doctor was; and his heart beat
very fast before he knocked, and he felt half inclined
to turn back; but he did not turn back.

He knocked; and the Doctor’s voice said, “ Come
”

“What is it, my boy?’ said the Doctor, as
Harry stood quite silent with his eyes upon the
carpet.

in



HARRY CONFESSES. 79

“Tf you please, Sir, I want to tell you,” began
Harry, and there stopped.

The Doctor looked at him as if he were asking a
question.

“T want to tell you, if you please, Sir,” said Harry
again, and could get no further.

“‘ What is it you have to tell me?” said the Doctor,
taking him by the hand and drawing him to him.

“T went out last. night into the town, Sir, and
bought hardbake and lollipops and cakes, and ran
about and broke the lamps, and knocked at the doors.
And I knew all the while I was doing wrong, and
that you would be very angry if you knew it. But I
have been a very naughty boy ever since I came to
school.”

It was all out in about a minute. Harry spoke so
fast, that I wonder the Doctor could hear what he
said; and then he stood with his hands over his eyes,
hoping he had not said anything which showed that
Lawion had had a share in it.

“ Answer me this question, Harry,” said he at
last. ‘‘I will not say, be careful and tell me the
truth; for I don’t think you would tell me a lie.
Had you any share in setting the house on fire last
night?”

*“« No, sir,” said Harry.

“Do you know anything about it?”

“T am not obliged to tell of another boy, am I,
sir?” asked Harry looking in the Doctor’s face.
“ Besides I could not be quite sure.”



80 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘No, Harry; you need not tell,” said the Doctor.
“T knew all about your going out last night, and also
who Ied you away before you told me; but I should
have been very angry, my boy, if you had not told
me.”

“Will you please forgive me, Sir,” said Harry.
The Doctor shook hands with him, and Harry began
to cry.

“ Oh I wish I had never done it,” he said. “I’d
give anything not to have done it, Sir, because you
are so kind.”

“ And yet God is much kinder than I could ever be
to you; think how ungrateful and bad it must be
to forget Him, Harry.”

Do not you think, that the best proof Harry
could give of being sorry for having been naughty
was, after having asked the forgiveness of God, to
ask the Doctor’s forgiveness, and then try to do
better?

I think so.

If Lawton had been really sorry, he would have
done the same.

Perhaps when Lawton lay ‘on the ground in
the shrubbery crying, he thought he was sorry;
but he could only have been frightened, because
he thought the house was burning down and Elton
was dead.

When the fire was put out, and Elton was
better, Lawton was as naughty as before. Now we
all know that the first thing Harry did was to ask



HARRY CONFESSES. 81

for God’s forgiveness. Lawton did nothing of the
kind.

So God taught Harry to do right.

And the Devil made Lawton do wrong.



§2

CHAPTER XIV.
LAWTON IN THE STUDY.

Har an hour later, the Doctor sent for Lawton into
his study. You may be sure Master Tom felt very
unwilling to go; but he could not help himself: still
he went very slowly.

As he knocked, the Doctor’s voice said, ‘‘ Come in,”
in a much more stern tone than he had to Harry; and
when Lawton opened the door, the Doctor’s face
looked so grave, that he felt inclined to turn round
and run out again.

“ Lawton,” began the Doctor, ‘‘ What were
you doing when you set the house on fire last
night ?”

‘Please, Sir, I did’nt set the house on fire,” said
Lawton. |

‘What were you doing then with candles and
matches ?”

“Please, Sir, I had not any candles.”

The Doctor looked still more angry.

‘Perhaps you were not out in the town last night.



LAWTON IN THE STUDY. 83

Perhaps you did not climb out of your bed-room
window by a rope; nor buy all kinds of rubbish and
bring it home with you?”

Lawton began to say, “‘No;” but the Doctor’s eyes
were fixed upon him, and he stopped. He did not
feel sure whether the Doctor quite knew that he had
done all this; or whether he was only guessing it.
He knew that Elton could not have had any time to
tell the Doctor, and he thought that Harry could only
have told about himself, so he said,

“Perhaps, Sir, it might have been Blake. You
know he sleeps in the room which opens into
mine.”

The Doctor turned towards his desk, and took up
acane. ‘Then he said,

“ Lawton, you know that I very seldom flog. I
would not flog a manly, honorable boy, however
much he had done wrong. The best boys do wrong at
times; but I look upon a liar as more contemptible
than anything. Ihave more respect for a dog than
for a lying boy.”

“‘ Oh please, Sir, let me off,” said Lawton, falling on
his knees and clasping his hands.

** Years and years ago, when a wicked man called
Ananias told a lie, God struck him dead upon the
spot, and sent him to hell. God might strike you
dead, Lawton, in the same way.”

““Oh, please, Sir, let me off,” whimpered Lawton
again.

“¢ And like all liars,” said the Doctor again, “you



84 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

are a coward and a sneak. When Blake, like a good
brave little fellow as he is, came to me and told me
he had done wrong, I questioned him; but he would
not tell of you: you would have laid all the blame
upon him.”

‘Oh, please, Sir,” said Lawton.

‘““Do you remember, when last year you did much
the same thing as now, I threatened you, if ever you
got out again at night, that I would send you away
altogether?”

Lawton made no answer, and the Doctor took the
cane.

Then Lawton began to beg and pray again to be
let off; but the Doctor took no heed. He made many
promises of being good; but the Doctor did not
believe him.

Of course not: for he was a liar.

The Doctor thrashed him. well.

I think it was the only thing for him. Do not

ou?

I only hope that it may do Lawton good.

So you see, that even now, Lawton’s lies did him
no good.

Lies never do succeed, even if we are not found
out for a little while.

But think, what would have become of Lawton if
God had struck him dead, like Ananias and Sapphira
in the Bible?

Supposing it had been Lawton who had been burnt
in his bed instead of Elton. Would not that have



LAWTON IN THE STUDY. 85

been a dreadful thing? A wicked boy who never
thought of God; who never said his prayers; who

was always telling lies and breaking God’s command-
ments.



86

CHAPTER XV.

FORGIVENESS.

TuoucH Elton had not died at the time from the
smoke and the fire; yet he was very ill. He lay quite
still and pale upon the bed.

He was dying.

It must have been this which made the Doctor look
so grave and sad.

But Elton did not look sad. As the Doctor came
into the room, he turned his eyes towards him and
smiled.

Perhaps he did not know that he was so very ill.

Yet when the Doctor came and sat down by the
bedside and took Elton’s hand in his, and said, ‘‘ How
do you feel now, Frank?” Elton answered,

“TI am very weak, sir; but I shall never be stronger
in this world, I think.”

So he must have known that he was dying.

And the next moment he looked in the Doctor’s
face and smiled.

Elton said presently.

“What about Lawton, sir?”



FORGIVENESS. 87

“You have guessed then that he had something to
do with the fire ?”

Elton did not answer; and the Doctor said, “I
knew last night, that he and another boy had left the
house. Blake told me of himself this morning.
Lawton, as usual, told lies. I shall send him home to
his uncle as soon as possible.”

Still Elton said nothing.

“J cannot get any truth out of him. I cannot
know whether he was the cause of the fire last night,
although I think he was.”

He turned to Elton and said,

“ Do you know, Frank ?”

Elton changed colour.

‘“*T see you do : tell me.”

“T would rather not, Sir.”

“But you must,my dear boy. I insist upon it,”
said the Doctor.

“T can only guess, Sir,” said Elton, “ For I found
Lawton up last night with a candle.”

The Doctor rose and walked up and down the
room. Elton heard him say to himself—‘ Wretched
boy! my poor Frank!”

He meant to say that Lawton’s wickedness had
been the cause of Elton’s illness; and would be the
cause of his death.

That was true; for although Hlton had been ill
before, he had not been dying.

Elton knew very well what the Doctor meant, and
he said,



88 “HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“J wish you would not distress yourself about me,
dear Sir: I am very happy.”

The Doctor sat down by him again; and Elton said,

“Will you do me a very great “favour ? oe

“ What is it, Frank?”

“Do not send Lawton home: if you do, his uncle
will be so angry with him. Do forgive him; he
must be sorry for what he has done?”

‘“‘ He is not sorry,” said the Doctor. ‘ Do not ask
me, Frank;. you know I don’t like to refuse you_any-
thing.”

. “But, dear Sir, he will be sorry; perhaps he does
not yet know all he has done,” and Elton fixed his
eyes upon the Doctor's face.

The Doctor stooped over him and kissed his fore-
head, and said—
~ «Dear Frank, it is your Saviour himself has taught
you that spirit.”

“ Then you will forgive him, Sir?” said Frank again.

“Yes; because you ask it; for no other reason.’

And the Doctor left the room.

Soon, all the boys in the house knew that Elton
was dying; but the Doctor did not tell them that
Lawton had been the eause; he told Lawton so, and
he told him how Elton had asked that he might not be
sent home.

Lawton seemed very much shocked when the Doctor
told him. He sat for a long time thinking of it, and
wondering why Elton was not angry with him; and,
saying to himself, how dreadful it must be to die,



FORGIVENESS. 89

No wonder he was shocked and frightened. When
Harry Blake heard the Doctor say to the boys, that
Elton was dying, he ran to him and clung to him,
and called out,

“Oh! do let me go to him, Sir, do let me be with
him; I love him.”

Some of the boys thought that Harry must have
forgotten that it was the Doctor.

I think he knew the Doctor better than they did.

“ You will not cling to him, nor be rough or noisy,
nor talk much, Harry,” said the Doctor.

“ How could I, Sir, when he is so ill?’ said Harry.

And the Doctor said, “ Yes, you may go.”



90

CHAPTER XVI.

FRANCIS ELTON,

Ir was not for many days that Harry Blake could sit
by Elton.

Each day he became weaker. There were no lessons
now: most of the boys were gone home, although it
was not yet time for the holidays. Lawton was not
gone home.

All day long he did nothing.

He was so afraid every hour of hearing that Elton
was dead; but he was afraid of going into Elton’s
room, because he was looking so ill.

He sat with his chin upon his hands, doing nothing,
looking at nothing.

When the servants passed him on the stairs, they
would say,

** Come, Sir; get out of the way, please.”

Lawton would move for the time, but go back
again to his place, doing nothing, looking at nothing.

He seemed to be very unhappy.

Harry was, as he had promised, very quiet in
Elton’s room, There was no one there besides



FRANCIS ELTON. 91

him but the Doctor, when one evening, Elton asked
to sit up.

“ T want to see Lawton,” he said.

Harry ran to call him; but Lawton said,

“ T cannot go; I do not dare: say I cannot.”

“ But you must, Lawton,” said Harry.

And Harry dragged Lawton towards the door.

He would not look at Elton when he came into the
room, but kept his eyes upon the ground.

“Lawton,” said Elton, holding out his hand to
him.

«‘ No, don’t,” said Lawton, drawing back.

‘Lawton, do come near to me: I want to speak to

ou,” said Elton.

The Doctor moved Lawton nearer, until he stood
by the bedside, but with his eyes still upon the
ground.

‘«‘ Lawton,” said Elton, “I wish you would try to
be a better boy: I wish you would think how
wicked it is to live, day after day, without thinking
of God or saying your prayers.”

Lawton had thought that Elton would be angry
with him for making him ill; and that he was going
to speak to him about that. When he found that it
was not so, he felt better and looked up from the
ground.

“Lawton, will you try? Remember, you must
die some day, as I am dying.”

‘I should not like to die,” said Lawton. “ Are
not you afraid, Elton ?”



92 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“No: I do not think I am,” Elton said.

“‘ Have you nothing to say?” said the Doctor very
sternly to Lawton ; “If you have not, you had better

0.”
= And Lawton went.

He felt almost glad that Elton had said nothing
about the fire; nothing about his late conduct.
~ Do you think that Lawton was really sorry for
what he had done ?

No, indeed! He. was not going to be vlintehed
any more ; so he tried to forget all the rest.

What a lesson all this might have been to Lawton,
if he would have taken it. But I am afraid that
from a bad boy ke grew into a bad man, until his
heart became quite hard, and God left him to
himself.

When Lawton left the bedroom, Elton said,

“J think Lam going to faint ;” and they opened
_ the window, and fanned him; but he was not
fainting.

He turned his face towards Harry, who was

standing close, looking at him, and said,
- No, Harry, I am not afraid to die; because,
although _I am a sinner, Christ has forgiven
me, and I know that He now is taking me to
heaven.”

His eyes went from Harry’s face, upwards; and
his lips still moved, though he did not speak;
and Harry thought that he must be talking to
God.



FRANCIS ELTON. 93

Without moving his eyes, Elton died.

The Doctor said to Harry, ;

“Come away, my little boy; he is gone to that
Lord Jesus whom he loved.”

“Oh, he is not really dead,” said Harry, “I did
not think; 1 never thought he could really die. Oh,
Elton! dear Elton! Do come back! Do speak again!
[ have so many things more to say to you.”

“You must say them to him, my child, when you
meet him again in heaven,” saidthe Doctor. ‘Come
Harry.”

For Harry was still vainly calling to Elton, and
kissing his cold forehead.

Poor little boy! When the Doctor drew him from
the bedside, and then took him from the room, he
still said he was sure that Elton could not be dead;
that he would awake again, and speak again; and
then he threw his arms round the Doctor’s neck and
cried.

It was only the next day, that Harry’s Papa came
to take him home. It was a very different going
home from what he had thought of.

But he was very glad to see his dear Papa again;
and to find that the long visit away from England
had made Mamma well again. He was very glad to
see little Amy again, and the cook, and the cat;
and he had a great many things to talk of and to
see. A great many things to tell about school, and
play, and the fun he had had with the boys.

But the one he had to speak about most was



94 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Elton; and the one his Mamma liked to hear about
best was Elton.

You may be sure that Harry told his Papa and
Mamma all about his own naughtiness; and promised
to try and be a better boy; but I think he had learnt
the way to be a better boy.

When he returned to school, after the holidays
were over, he tried to obey all that the Doctor told
him, and to learn his lessons well; and when his old
cowardice and fear of being laughed at came over
him, something in the room, or in the play-ground,
a make him think of Elton, and then of Elton’s

od.

Tom Lawton was not sent away from school in
consequence of Hlton’s death ; but when he was home
for the holidays, he begged so hard to go to sea—for
he was afraid of going back to the Doctor’s, and
seeing again the house where all these things had
happened—that his uncle let him go; and | think
that Dr. Owen was very glad that he did not
return.

Later, when Harry was a man, and the good
Doctor was no longer with him to teach him, still he
knew that God was with him; and that it is God
only who can help us to do right, whether we are
children, or whether we have grown up to be men
and women; and I think he never again forgot to ask
for that help every morning and every night.

Little boys and little girls; do you remember who



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The Baldwin Library

University
RmB 2
Florida





HARRY LEAVING HOME.

Puge 8.
HARRY AT SCHOOL;

A STORY FOR BOYS.

BY

EMILIA MARRYAT,

(Daughter of the late Captain Marryat)

AUTHOR OF “ LONG EVENINGS, OR STORIES FOR MY LITTLE FRIENDS.”

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN ABSOLON.

LONDON :
GRIFFITH AND FARRAN

(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS),
CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.
M DCCC LXII.
LONDON :
PRINTED BY WERTHEIMER AND CO
CIRCUS PLACE, FINSBURY.
Cuap.

no

CONTENTS.

Leavine Home . .
Harry’s ScHooLreLLows
Lessons. . .

THe STRAWBERRIES.

IJarry BEGINS TO GO Wrone

THe HArppake . .
Doixa Wrone . :
Our at Nigut . .
Founp Our : .
THE Fire . .
Next Mornine . .
CONSCIENCE : .

Harry ConFresses .
LAWION IN THE Stupy
ForGivENESs . .

Francis ELTON . .

PAGE.
HARRY AT SCHOOL.

CHAPTER L
LEAVING HOME.

Ir was Monday morning; and there was such a
bustle and stir all over the house where Mr. and
Mrs. Blake lived. The breakfast had been laid for
a long time, but nobody came to eat it. The tea was
so strong, from standing, that I do not think it could
have been fit to drink.

Then in the hall, there was a large box ready
corded as if for travelling. The cat could not under-
stand it. She went into the breakfast-room, and
looked at the table, and cried “‘ Mew!” for she wanted
some milk; but no one was there to take any notice
of her. She sme%t the trunk in the hall, and then
jumped on the top of it; but could not read the
address on the card, so that she was not any the
wiser; then she ran into the kitchen, and looked into
the cook’s face to ask her what was the matter; but
Cook said “Get away, Puss, don’t stand in my way;

B
6 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Tam busy.” Everybody seemed busy; and what do
you think it was all about?

Harry was going to school. The great trunk in
the hall belonged to him: it was full of his clothes,
and books, and playthings; and all the hurry and
bustle was because Papa and Harry had to go by an
early train, as the school was some distance off.

A few minutes later, everybody in the house was
in the breakfast-room ; everybody but Harry’s Mamma;
she was not there: and Mr. Blake read prayers, and
after prayers, Harry’s little sister Amy poured out
the tea. Harry sat looking at his empty plate, and
thinking of having to say Good-bye, and go to school.

“You must eat something my dear,” said Papa.

“T am not hungry Papa,” said Harry, “indeed I
could not eat anything.”

“You must try,” Papa answered. ‘You must
not start without any breakfast.”

Harry took some bread and butter, and tried to eat
it; but as soon as he put it in his mouth, it seemed
as if it would choke him, and he laid it down again;
and the tears dripped from his eyes on to the bread
and butter. Papa took no notice at first; but pre-
sently Harry hid his face in his hands, and began to
sob. Then Papa went to him, and drew him on to
his knee, and kissed him. Harry was quite a little
boy, he was only eight years old; and although it is
silly, and like a baby, to cry when we are hurt, or
when we are teased, and naughty to cry when we
are out of temper; it is not babyish or wrong to
LEAVING HOME. 7

cry when we say Good-bye to those whom we love.
When Mr. Blake kissed Harry, the little boy’s tears
and sobs came faster; and he clung to his Papa and
cried bitterly. Papa did not check him for some
time; but when he was more quiet he said—

“It is very hard, I am sure, my poor child; but
you know well I would not send you from me if it
could be avoided; you must look forward to the
holiday-time, when, I trust in God, we shall all meet
again, and dear Mamma will be strong and well.
You must try not to distress poor Mamma, Harry,
by letting her see you cry.”

When Harry looked up, he saw that his Papa’s
eyes were full of tears; and he jumped up quickly
and said—

“No, Papa, I will not cry before Mamma if I can
help it; I will try not.”

You see he was a brave little boy.

Then he went back to the breakfast-table when his
Papa told him, and found that he could eat his bread
and butter.

After breakfast, Harry kept his word, when he
went to say Good-bye to poor Mamma. She was so
ill that she could not get out of bed, and it was
because of her illness, that Harry had to go to
school. Until then, Mr. Blake had always given
Harry lessons; but now Papa and Mamma were
both going abroad, to a warmer country, and they
could not take Harry with them. It was rather hard
not to cry when he kissed his Mamma, and saw her
8 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

looking so thin and pale, and thought what a long
time it would be before he saw her again. But he
had promised, and Harry knew it is a very wicked
thing to break a promise, and he felt very glad
that he had not cried, when his Papa called him a
good kind little boy, and secemd so pleased with
him.

Jt was some time before they could get off, even
after the carriage was at the door to take them to
the train. Harry had to say Good-bye to the ser-
vants. Jam sure Cook cried as she kissed him, and
then she gave him a large plum-cake, which she had
packed up in a parcel for him. So that was what
had made Cook so busy, when she said to Pussy,
“Get away, don’t stand in my way.”

Poor Pussy had to be said Good-bye to; but she
did not understand that Ilarry was going to school;
so she did not seem to care much about it, and she
purred when Harry spoke to her, whereas she ought
to have said “‘ Mew.”

At the last moment, just as they were setting off,
little Amy ran out and gave Harry a: little basket of
sandwiches and cakes. Harry felt as if he could
never touch cakes or sandwiches again; so he placed
them by his side, in the carriage, and looked out of
the window; for he could not help the tears running
down his cheeks, and he did not wish his Papa to
see them.

Tt was a beautiful day, and the sun made the trees
and the hedges look bright and pleasant, but poor
LEAVING HOME. 9

Harry scarcely noticed them, for he was thinking of
his Mamma.

_ At length they arrived at the railway station, and
there was such a bustle, and so many people running
to and fro, and such piles and trucks of luggage,
and the porters were so quick, and the engines made
such a noise, that Harry could not help being amused;
and by the time Papa and he took their seats in one
of the carriages, he was laughing and talking as fast
as usual, and thought that, after all, going to school
was not so bad. The train had not gone many miles
before he began to feel hungry, and it was not very
long before little Amy’s basket of sandwiches and
cakes was quite empty.

But Harry’s distress came back again as the train
stopped and they got out, and, taking a fly, drove to
the school house. He did not cry again, for he felt
afraid of going to school with red eyes. When Mr.
Blake walked into the house, Harry hung back such
a way behind, that Papa had to call to him, and by
the time he entered the drawing-room, and said to a
gentleman who came to meet him, “I have brought
my little son,” the “little son” was somewhere hidden
behind the door. The gentleman to whom Mr. Blake
spoke was Dr. Owen, the master of the school; he
was tall and thin, and had a rather bald head and
wore spectacles ; he was a good deal older than
Harry’s Papa. Harry felt so shy, that he could not
say a word when the gentleman asked him some
questions, and so he was sent out into the garden,
10 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

which was just in front of the window, while Dr.
Owen and Mr. Blake talked together.

After a time he was called in, for Mr. Blake was
going away. Then Harry forgot even that Dr. Owen
was in the room when he said Good-bye to his Papa ;
he could not speak for crying and sobbing, and he
could not hear half that his Papa said to comfort him;
one thing he heard, for it came back to his mind
that same evening as he was going to bed. It was
this —

‘Remember my child, that you are not left alone,
your Heavenly Father is with you ; remember that
His eye is always upon you, in your lessons, and in
your play: think always that He sees you, and above
all things, Harry, never forget to ask for His help
every day you live.”

*T will, Papa, I will,” sobbed Harry, “but oh, I
cannot bear it, I cannot say Good-bye, dear Papa.”
But the next moment Harry found himself alone in
the drawing-room with Dr. Owen, and he heard the
wheels of the carriage driving away.

Dr. Owen did not speak to him for some time, he
let the little boy cry, but when he was more quiet, he
said. “Come here to me, Harry, I want to say some-
thing to you.”

Harry went shyly to him, but Dr. Owen’s voice was
so kind, that he did. not feel so much afraid of him as
at first.

Dr. Owen said, ‘Do you love your Papa very much?”

“Of course I do,” said Harry.
LEAVING HOME. ll

“Then would you not think it best to do what
would please him most?’ asked Dr. Owen.

Harry said “ Yes.”

‘Now I think, were he here, he would prefer your
behaving like a little man, drying your eyes, and
coming with me into the school-room to make
acquaintance with the other little boys. Donot you?”

Harry thought that his Papa would have said much
the same thing, so he answered, ‘“‘ Yes, Sir, I think
he would, I will try if you please.”

So Dr. Owen took him by the hand and led him to
the school-room.
12

CHAPTER II.
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS.

As Dr. Owen and Harry came near the school-room,
they heard a humming noise, which became louder as
they stopped at the door; but when the Doctor opened
it and went in, the noise ceased all at once. The
boys were all learning their lessons for the next day,
that is what had made the humming; but they
looked up from their books as the door opened; and
when they saw who it was, they stood up.

Harry felt very shy at the sight of so many strange
faces; and he held Dr. Owen’s hand tighter, for he
was getting used to him.

“Elton,” said the Doctor, and when he spoke, one
of the tallest of the boys came forward to him;
“Elton, I introduce Harry Blake to you: see to
him.”

Several of the other boys whispered together as
the Doctor spoke. Elton held out his hand to Harry,
who shook it shyly; and then Dr. Owen left the
room.

No sooner was he gone, and out of hearing, than
one of the boys called out, in a rude voice,—
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 13

“That’s what I call a sell! Here Elton will be
coming over this new chap with his humbug; and
there will be very little fun for us. Hollo! I say!
What’s your name?”

“ Blake,” said Harry.

‘* And who’s your father?” asked the boy.

Harry put his hands on his hips, and gave him no
answer.

“Well! you needn’t look so cocky, youngster,” said
the boy, as several of the others laughed; “ now, I’ll
give you a piece of advice, Blake, or whatever your
name is: don’t you attend to anything that fellow
Elton says to you; you won't, unless you’re a muff
like himself.”

Elton smiled; and Harry, sitting down by him,
said in a low voice,—

“ Are you a muff, Elton?”

“* T suppose so,” answered Elton laughing; “ they
all call me so.”

‘* Do you mind?” asked Harry.

“ Not much,” said Elton, and he coloured as he
spoke; ‘it cannot matter much.”

“I should not like them all to think me a muff,”
said Harry gravely, looking round the school-room at
the boys. “I wonder if they will think me one?”

His wondering was put an end to by the same boy
who had spoken before, and whose name Harry found
to be Tom Lawton. This boy suddenly flung all his
lesson-books one after the other at the ceiling. Some
of them fell again without their covers; but that did
14 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

not matter to Tom. He gathered them up again any-
how, and tossed them into his locker; and then danced
about the room, and over the forms, making faces,
and with his hair all hanging over his eyes, and look-
ing just like a wild boy.

‘“* You haven’t learnt your lessons already, Lawton,
surely?” asked another boy, whose name was Dick-
son.

“ Quite well enough for me,” said Tom; “ and quite
well enough for old Owen. I’m for cricket.”

“ All right!’’ said Dickson; “that’s enough for
to-day.” And because Lawton had thrown his books
at the ceiling, of course, Dickson must do the’ same;
and half-a-dozen other silly little boys all followed his
example; and then they all danced about the room
as Lawton had done.

“What funny boys!” said Harry, laughing; “ how
they do amuse me, to be sure!”’

“J say! Can you play cricket, Blake?” asked
Lawton.

Harry answered, ‘“ Yes.”

“All right! come on, then,” Lawton said.

“‘ T would sooner wait till Elton comes,” said Harry.

‘“¢ Oh you muff! Sooner wait till his Lordship comes!
Well, wait then. I don’t want you; but you’ll have
to wait a precious long time; for Elton is of so noble
and exalted a mind that he actually learns his lessons,
and that can’t be done in a few minutes.”

“Why, I thought you had learnt aia said
Harry.
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 15

Lawton made a face, and most of the others cut
capers; and so they left the room, all but Elton and
Harry, and two others, who still sat at their books,
whose names were Grey and Ward.

‘What does he mean?” said Harry, feeling and
looking very puzzled; “I am sure, he said he knew his
lessons. I wish he wouldn’t call me a muff. I don’t
like it.”

“You musn’t mind being laughed at youngster,”
said Ward; ‘“ there are worse things than that.”

“ But I do mind it very much,” answered Harry. “I
don’t like it at all.”

Ward returned to his books, and Grey said,—

“¢ You won’t have been here many hours before you
will find out how much Lawton is werth. He is a
stupid bully.”

‘““ He seemed to me so very funny and clever,” said
Harry. ‘I could not help laughing even to look at
him. Is he really stupid, Elton?”

“ The more you talk, the longer I shall be learning
my lessons,’ answered Elton; “so if you want
to ‘play cricket this afternoon, you had better be
silent.”

Harry kept thinking of Lawton’s words, and feeling
very vexed about them. He did not know that he
had spoken out leud, but he said, “I wish he had not
called me a muff.”

Elton looked up, and asked, “‘ What is a muff,
Blake?”

“¢T don’t know,” said Harry.
16 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“Then I don’t think you need worry yourself about
being called one,” said Elton laughing.

‘“‘ But it is very disagreeable to be called names,
and all that,” said Harry.

‘* T think it depends a good deal upon who calls the
names,” said Elton.

At length, Elton closed his books, and they were
put away; and then, getting out his cricket-bat, he
ran downstairs, followed by Harry, and, presently
afterwards, by Ward and Grey.

“* Hollo, Elton! Here you are at last!” shouted out
Lawton, as they reached the play-ground. “ We
haven’t had a good game yet. Sayers can’t bowl any
better than a baby; and I’m the only one here fit to
be seen for play. I don’t know what has come to
Dickson. Here, my Lord! you bat; and show them
how to do it.”

‘Why do you call Elton My Lord?” asked Harry.

‘¢ Because of the great respect we all feel for him,”
answered Lawton, winking first one eye, and then the
other; ‘and because he carries himself with such an
air like this.” And Lawton drew himself up very stiflly,
and stuck out his chest, and strutted up and down.

Harry laughed, but he said. “If you think you
look a bit like Elton you are quite wrong, for you are
only about half his height, and your mouth is just
twice as big.”

Lawton turned red, and was going to answer angrily,
when he tripped over a stone on the ground and
sprawled upon his face. All the boys screamed with
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 17

laughter, which was very unkind and very rude,
excepting Harry, who more like a gentleman, felt sorry
that Lawton had fallen, and said he hoped he had not
hurt himself, at which Lawton answered, “ Get out
with you.”

Elton had long ago run to his place by the wicket,
and now began calling to Lawton to begin to play.
Elton was the best batter in the school, and Lawton
bowled, so that the game went on gloriously. ‘The
boys shouted, and called out, and laughed, and they
all had great fun. Harry thought he had never seen
so good a game, and he felt quite delighted that Elton
could not be bowled out; he thought he looked go
nice as he stood at the wicket, with his face all flushed
with exercise and pleasure, and his light curling hair
blowing about when he ran. Elton made along score
before he was bowled out ; and everybody was making
as much noise as they possibly could, and all talking
at once, and shouting as loudly as they could shout ;
when Elton threw down his bat and gave place to
Sayers, and then they saw that Dr. Owen was stand-
ing amongst them, watching the game, and they had
not known he was there.

Harry ran towards him when he saw him, and said,
“Ts’nt it fun, Sir?”

“Great fun;’” answered the Doctor, “there is
nothing like cricket for boys; mark this, Blake !” and
the Doctor placed his hand kindly upon Harry’s head
as he spoke. “Elton plays better than any boy in
the school, and yet he learns better than any boy
in the school also.”
18 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

The afternoon, although it was a half-holiday, did
not seem to the boys long enough for cricket, and
they all looked quite vexed when the tea bell rang;
however, when they came to think of it, they all agreed
that they were very hungry, and Harry thought that
school was certainly the very pleasantest place in all
the world, for every body seemed so merry.

T have said that Harry thought again of his Papa’s
words before he went to bed; when they came to his
mind he was about to kneel down and say his prayers.

All the other boys, who were in the same room
with him were making such a noise, and throwing
pillows at each other, that Harry waited for them to
be more quiet. He was undressed, and standing in
his night-shirt.

‘““Why don’t you get into bed!” asked Sayers.

‘‘T was waiting till you had all done talking!” said
Harry ; ‘I have not said my prayers.”

“That’s good!” shouted Sayers ; “do you think we
are going to leave off talking for you, you young stupid.
I say Lawton!” and Sayers opened the door, which
led into the next room; ‘here’s a fellow wants to say
his prayers, and begs that we will be as quiet as mice
while he does so.” ;

Harry colored as red as crimson, and said.

‘I think you are a very wicked boy.”

‘Do you, indeed!” said Sayers.

Lawton stood in the door-way laughing. “ And
what do you think of me?” he asked; “come, speak
out;” for Harry looked half frightened.
HARRY’S SCHOOLFELLOWS. 19

* You have no right to laugh, Lawton.”

** And why not,” asked Lawton.

‘« Because it is wrong to laugh at what is wicked,”
answered Harry.

Lawton walked up to him, and took him by the
shoulder; he held him so hard that Harry could hardly
help calling out.

‘You little rascal,’ said Lawton; ‘ how dare you
tell me Iam wrong. Beg my pardon this minute.”

“No!” said Harry, “for Ihave said nothing wrong;
you told me to say what I think, and I do think so.”

“Beg my pardon!” said Lawton, holding him
harder still; the tears came into Harry’s eyes, for
Lawton pinched him; but he shook his head.

“‘ Obstinate little wretch,” said Lawton, “ I’ll thrash
you if you don’t.”

** You'll do nothing of the kind!” said Elton, who
just then came into theroom. ‘ Whatis the matter ?”

Several of the boys began telling what had happened.

Elton said—

“Blake was quite right; Sayers is a wicked boy;
and you, Lawton, are a cowardly bully, who cannot
bear to hear the truth.”

“Take care, Elton,” said Lawton, getting crimson,
“take care what you say.”

“Take care what you do;” answered Elton, “ do
not try to bully little Blake; I won’t allow it.”

Elton left the room. When he was gone, Lawton
said he would not put up with it, and a great deal more;
but Dickson whispered to Sayers, that Lawton was
20 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

always very grand with his words, but he was too
much afraid of Elton to say such things when he was
there.

Lawton was a cowardly boy ; if he had been a brave
boy he would not have hurt a little fellow like Harry
Blake, for brave boys are always kind and gentle to
those younger than themselves. Harry tried to say
his prayers through all the din and noise, but he could
not do so. Iam sorry to say that all the three other
little boys jumped into bed without any prayers at all.
But when they were asleep, Harry got out of bed,
and knelt down in the dark and prayed.

You see Harry began well; when he went to school
he was in the midst of a great deal more wrong and
naughtiness than he had ever seen before; and it was
God only, who could keep him from evil.

He began very well.
21

CHAPTER III.
LESSONS.

Tue next day, of course, Harry had to begin lessons.
He did not dislike learning, because, although it is
much pleasanter to play than to work, Harry was
quite old enough to know, that if he played all day
while he was a boy, and took no pains to learn, that
when he grew into a man, no one would care to speak

to him, and all would laugh at him, because he knew
nothing like other people. There are a great many
things in this world which are not quite agreeable, but
which must be done. Lessons are some of those
things.

Tom Lawton did not seem to think so. He had,
the day before, you remember, thrown away his books,
and said he knew his lessons quite well enough; but,
when it came to saying them, he found he did not
know them at all. Harry saw him writing words
upon his finger nails, and he asked him what that
was for.

“* Oh! that’s part of my lessons,” said Tom. “ That’s

Cc
22 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

the only way to do things; when I forget what comes
next, I look at my nails.”

‘* That’s all the same as if you were looking at the
book,” said Harry.

* Just as good,” Tom answered.

“ T don’t think the Doctor would be pleased, if he
saw it,” Harry said.

‘¢ Oh,” said Lawton, “the Doctor never finds out.
I'll take care of that.”

Harry was silent for a moment; but he felt as if he
must speak. When he did, he said, getting very
red,—

“Lawton, I think it is very dishonorable, and
very mean; it’s just the same as if you told a
story.”

* You insolent little ” began Lawton, but, at
that moment, the Doctor came in, and Lawton was
obliged to be silent; but he gave Harry a great
kick on his leg, so that he could scarcely help
crying out.

Harry knew his lessons quite well when he was
called up; and Doctor Owen smiled at him as he
gave back the book, so that Harry grew quite red
with pleasure. He walked back to his seat, and found
Lawton correcting an exercise.

whe boy held, hidden under his slate, a Key to the
exercise.

‘Where did you get it?” asked Harry.

“You just mind your own business,” answered
Lawton. “I am not going to be questioned, or


LESSONS. 23

brought to task by you. It is my own book, and not
yours—and, now, you may go and tell the Doctor
I’ve got it, if you like, you little sneak.”

“Tam not a sneak,” said Harry; ‘‘and you are a
very bad boy. I shall not tell the Doctor, for it’s a
shabby thing to tell tales.”

It seemed to Harry that all Tom Lawton’s lessons
were got through in the same way. He was too idle
to learn anything.

When playtime came, Lawton walked up to Harry,
to pay him off for his insolence, as he called it; and,
as Elton was not present, and Lawton was much the
stronger of the two, he shook Harry well. Poor Harry
was both hurt and frightened. He held out as long
as he could; as long as Lawton was with him; but,
when he got into the garden, he burst into tears;
and cried and sobbed as he ran down the walk,
until he was stopped, by running into the arms of
Elton.

“Why, what is the matter, youngster?” Elton
asked.

Harry told him, as well as he could for his crying.

‘* Lawton won't take that sort of thing from a little
fellow, you see,” said Elton.

‘“ But was I not right? Is it not dishonorable—
is it not a story?” asked Harry.

wes."

‘* And if I werea sneak, and told the Doctor, would
not Lawton be punished?”

“ Yes, certainly.”
24 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

«© Then, why should I not say it?” asked Harry.

“ Only, if you say it, you must take the shaking
also,” said Elton, smiling.

“ Hilton, is not Lawton a very wicked boy?”

_ “Harry,” said Elton, gravely, “you would be
quite as wicked a a boy, if God did not keep you from
it: remember that.”

‘No, I would not,” said Harry; “I declare I
would not; I would never do such mean, naughty
things as Lawton does. I should be ashamed.”

« You might do other things as bad, Harry.”

“No, indeed,” said Harry. “ I would never be
wicked, like Lawton. He is a most naughty boy,
for he laughed at my saying my prayers; and,
do you know, he used wicked words this morning,
Elton.”

“Still, you or I would be quite as wicked, if God
did not keep us,” said Elton: “ remember that.”

Harry looked up into his face. Elton was quite a
boy, though he was, perhaps, five or six years older
than Harry: but he now spoke as gravely as a man.

_“* Who told you so?” he asked.

‘© The Bible says so,” answered Elton.

“ Are not you good, then? I aim sure you are.
The Doctor says you are the best boy in the school.”

« There never was but One who was good, Harry,”
said Elton, smiling again.

« Who was that?” asked Harry, in a low voice, for
he could guess who Elton meant—but he felt shy
about saying it.
LESSONS. 25

‘** The Lord Jesus,’’ Elton answered.

Harry walked silently by his side for some minutes,
looking into his face, and wondering that Elton, who
was not yet a man, should say such things. When
they reached the end of the garden walk, he placed
his hand in that of the elder boy, and said, gently,

“T love you, Elton.”
26

CHAPTER IV.
THE STRAWBERRIES.

Doctor Owen had a nice large garden, which joined
on to the playground. ‘The boys were allowed to go
in the greater part of it; but there was one part which
was railed off, with a low iron fence; into that part
the boys were not allowed to go. It was very full of
flowers, and there was a number of fruit trees; and
all along one side of it, next to a wall, was a broad
border of strawberry plants. The strawberries were
now ripe.

I think, if the little boys had been allowed to run
about in this garden, close to the strawberry bed, it
would have been very difficult for them to resist
eating the fruit. That must have been the reason
that the Doctor had the garden railed off.

One day Lawton stood spinning a top, close to the
iron fence, while Harry Blake watched him at a little
distance.

Each time Lawton’s top left off spinning, and he
took it up again, he looked at the Doctor’s garden, as
he wound it up.
THE STRAWBERRIES. 27

“TI say, Blake,” said he, after a time, “ come
here.”’

Harry went to him.

““T say,” said Lawton, “ don’t those strawberries
look jolly? They’re as ripe as can be.”

“ Yes,” said Harry; “ 1 was looking at them yes-
terday. I should like to eat them.”

“* All right,” said Lawton; “ come on.”

Harry laughed, thinking that Lawton was joking;
and said * I wish I had a whole lot of them—that I
do. Look at that very big fellow, there; isn’t he ripe?”

** Blake,” said a voice near; “ that’s a rather dan-
gerous place for you to be standing in. Much better
come away.”

* You don’t think I would take any, Elton, do
you?” said Harry, getting very red.

“No; I don’t believe you would, now; but wishing
is not safe.”

_ * I'll come directly, Elton,’ said Harry, as Elton
moved away.

As soon as his back was turned, Lawton jumped
the fence, and stood on the other side. ‘ Who cares
for him, I’d like to know?” said he. ‘ Come on,
Blake.”

“* Not really, Lawton; not really. Remember, the
Doctor has forbidden us. He told me so, himself,
when first I came. Pray come back?”

“Well, I think it is uncommonly greedy of the
Doctor, to keep them all to himself,” said Lawton;
“we ought to have our share.”
28 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

** Lawton, do come back,” said Harry.

** Shall I run round the garden?” asked Lawton.

** No, you must not,” said Harry.

** Dare me! and Ill run round three times.”

** Oh, Lawton,” said Harry, laughing.

** Dare me! and I'll jump over all the beds.”

** Don’t be ridiculous, Lawton.”

** Dare me! and I’ll bite off this big strawberry,
and say the slugs did it.”

** Oh, nonsense, Lawton; you must be joking, for

ou could not think of doing such things as that.”

* Such things as that! why not? I’d pick a
bushel for twopence,” said Lawton.

** Then you ’d be stealing them; and you’d be no
better than a thief, for they don’t belong to you,” said
Harry, angrily.

*« And, pray, what business would it be of yours?
and I’ll thank you not to be insolent,” said Lawton,
beginning to bully.

“You would!”

** And, pray, what more?’’ asked Lawton.

* T shall not tell you,” said Harry, walking away,
very stiffly, down the gravel walk. Lawton laughed
out loud, which made Harry feel very angry, but he
did not turn round.

When the bell rang, for the boys to go in to school,
Lawton came running, in a great hurry; and was
only just in time to take his seat before the Doctor
entered.

By the time evening came, Harry had forgotten all
THE STRAWBERRIES. 29

about the morning and the strawberries; when, stand-
ing on the steps which led down to the garden, he saw
the gardener coming towards the house.

“T want to speak to the Doctor, Master Blake,”
said the gardener; “I suspect some of you young
gentlemen have been at my strawberries this morn-
ing; and if you have, I hope you'll catch it, that’s
all.”

‘“T haven’t!” said Harry.

‘«T did’nt say it was you, Sir; I hope it wasn’t,” said
the gardener. And he went into the house to find the
Doctor.

“ Lawton must have eaten them,” thought Harry.

The next day, before beginning school, the Doctor
said—*~

“I have something to say to you, boys. I thought
T had made it understood, that I do not allow any of
you to go into that part of the garden which is railed
off; now I find that yesterday some one must have
been there, for the gardener tells me that a great
many strawberries have been eaten. I have no way of
finding out who has eaten them, as you know, except-
ing upon your own words. I can only hope that
whichever of you broke my order yesterday, did it
through forgetfulness; and did not consider that eating
my strawberries was committing a theft, for I shall
be very sorry, indeed, to think that any one of you boys
intended to be a thief. I trust to your honor to tell
me which of you did it.”

Then the Doctor called over each name, one after
30 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

the other, and every boy answered, “No, Sir.” Lawton
called out, “‘ No Sir,” as loudly as the rest.

From the first moment that the Doctor had begun
speaking, Harry’s face had grown more and more red,
as he thought of how he and Lawton had stood look-
ing at the strawberries, and wishing for them; and by
the time it came to his name, his cheeks were as scarlet
as the strawberries themselves; and he could scarcely
answer, “ No, Sir,” when the Doctor asked him.

Dr. Owensaid. ‘ Be careful, Blake; are you quite
sure ?” and Harry thinking that the Doctor fancied
he had taken the strawberries, grew redder than ever;
but he answered.

‘“* No, indeed, Sir, I didn’t.”

Lawton saw ‘Harry blushing as the Doctor spoke to
him, and he was afraid he might tell whet he knew
about him; so he called out.

“Do you think it was the slugs, Sir? Slugs often eat
strawberries.”

* Slugs could scarcely eat a quart of strawberries in
so short a time, Lawton,” said the Doctor. ‘“ No!
I don’t think it was slugs.”

Harry looked up, and saw Elton’s eyes fixed upon
him. Elton seemed so vexed, that Harry felt sure he
believed he had taken the strawberries ; and his eyes
filled with tears. He could scarcely see to read over
his lessons, and his voice trembled as he repeated them.

-He could not help thinking that the Doctor was cross
in his answers to him; and every thing went wrong;
so that when morning lessons were over, poor Harry
THE STRAWBERRIES. 31

instead of running into the play-ground as usual, sat
down upon one of the school-room lockers, and looked
sadly out of the window; breathing on the panes, and
drawing faces with his finger. He wanted to see Elton,
but he did not like to go and find him, for he did
not know what to say to him. He wondered if
Lawton had after all gone and eaten the strawberries;
but then he had answered the Doctor quite quickly,
and never colored at all. Harry had biushed so
much although he had not taken them: he would
have blushed much more if he had, and told a story
afterwards.

While he was thinking of this, Lawton came into
the schoolroom. Harry looked up, and said.

‘‘ Lawton, was it you took the strawberries ?”?

“Tl” said Lawton, angrily.‘ Did not you hear me
tell the Doctor that I didn’t; how dare you accuse me
of telling falsehoods; I believe you took them yourself.”

“J didn’t,” said Harry, “you know I didn’t; you
know I walked away, but I left you standing there;
and I am sure Elton and the Doctor both think I did.”

** And so do I,” said Lawton.

Harry made a rush at Lawton as he was speaking,
and began to beat him. Now Lawton was twelve years
old and Harry was only eight, and Lawton was also,
although short, a strong boy for his age, so that Harry
soon got the worst of it, and in afew minutes Lawton
was holding him down on the ground breathless, but
still kicking and struggling, when Elton came in.

‘*What’s this?” asked Elton. “ Play, or a fight?
32 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Surely Lawton, you have not been fighting a boy half
your size.”

‘The young savage,” said Lawton, scarcely able to
speak for passion, ‘he has made my nose bleed; Tl
thrash him for it some day, see if I don’t.”

‘Leave go of him now, at any rate;” said Elton,
‘ vet up, Blake.”

“T don’t care for his pummelling, me;” said Harry,
spluttering and talking very fast, ‘but I can’t bear
him, he is a horrid boy. I believe he stole the straw-
berries, and he says I did.”

‘“‘T am sure you did,” said Lawton, leaving the room.

Harry’s excitement was over, and he sat down and
cried.

‘“‘T wonder if the Doctor really thinks I did!” he
said, when he had a little recovered.

Elton walked up to him and placed his hand under
Harry’s chin, so as to turn his face upwards, with his
eyes looking full at Elton’s.

“No, indeed, Elton; I did not touch any of them,”
he said.

“ No: I don’t believe you did, Harry;” said Elton,
kindly, “but you must not be pitching into people,
as you did into Lawton, and you must not put your-
self into such passions, you know it isn’t right.”

“T believe all the boys will think I took the straw-
berries,” said Harry.

‘“No; I daresay they will not; very likely they
have forgotten all about it by this time; and, after all,
it does not signify, as you did not take them.”




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Page 32

HARRY IN TROUBLE.
THE STRAWBERRIES. 33

The next day the Doctor said nothing more about
the strawberries, and was as kind as before to Harry.

But it did not end here. Lawton had picked and
eaten the strawberries in such a hurry, that he had
smeared his hands all over with them, and dropped
one on his jacket, where it had smashed. When
he had heard the school-bell ring, he had quickly
scrubbed his fingers as clean as he could; and had
wiped off the crushed strawberry with his pocket-
handkerchief.

It so happened that the evening after their fight,
Harry was standing close to Lawton, who took his —
handkerchief from his pocket, and there came a strong
smell of strawberries on the air. Harry quickly
snatched the handkerchief from him, and held it up,
covered with stains of red.

“ You did take the strawberries, Lawton,” he called
out, “and you told stories about it; I wonder you
are not ashamed of yourself.”

The next moment, the fight had begun again.

I do not know which of them began it; but I know
who had soonest had enough of it; and that was Harry.
One of the other boys called out,-—“The Doctor
doesn’t allow fighting. You'll both of you catch it.”

Harry walked away sullenly: and when Lawton
followed him, after a few minutes, he would not turn
round or wait for him.

“Blake,” called out Lawton. “I wantto speaktoyou.”

“ Well,” said Harry.

“T say, Blake,” said Lawton. ‘ You are a much
34 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

pluckier fellow than Dickson or Sayers, and you play
cricket twice as well. You may just as well shake
hands and be friends; for if I tell the Doctor
that you have fought me twice to day; you’ll get
punished, as well as me. If we are friends, we shall
get on very well together; but if we are not, I shall
lick you every day until you behave yourself.”

Harry thought for a moment; and then he and
Lawton shook hands. And they ran back to the
play-ground together, and forgot all about the straw-
berries.
CHAPTER V.
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG.

Tuoucu Elton played cricket and other games so
well, very often he did not care to go into the play-
ground. He would sit for hours reading by himself,
unless Grey stayed in, as he did sometimes, for he
was very fond of drawing. But if the Doctor came
into the school-room, during play hours, and found
Grey and Elton there, he would always send them
off to play; for he said that those who worked
thoroughly during school, should play heartily when
school was over.

As Harry Blake played cricket better than Dickson
or Sayers, Tom Lawton very often let him play
with him, and Lawton was so funny in what he said,
that Harry was always laughing. At first when
Lawton said wrong things, even if they were amusing,
Harry did not laugh, but he forgot that after a little
time.

I am afraid he forgot other things besides. He
forgot the words which his Papa had said to him
36 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

before he went, and more than all, he forgot his duty
to God. I daresay, by this time, you have seen that
what Harry was more afraid of than anything else
was being laughed at. Now if Harry had thought
at all he would have remembered, that it is only
naughty boys who laugh at what is right; and after
all, it matters very little what naughty boys
think.

The three little boys who slept in the same room
with Harry, used to laugh each time he knelt down
to say his prayers. By laughing, they shewed that
they were not only wicked, but that they were little
fools. And the opinion of a fool is just worth
nothing. But Harry was so silly as to care; and
after a few days he became ashamed of saying his
prayers. Now that was being ashamed of God;
ashamed of Jesus Christ; and he got into bed with-
out saying them; and then he fell asleep without
saying them; and after a time he quite left off saying
them.

Harry was unhappy, for he had been taught better.
He knew all day through that he was doing wrong.
When he was playing with the other boys, he laughed
loudly and was very noisy, for he forgot about it for
the time; but when he was quiet and was alone, or
was in the dark, he felt unhappy and was afraid.
He feared also, that Elton might ask him about it,
so he tried now never to be alone with him. This
made him very much more unhappy, for Elton had
been more kind to him than anybody, and Harry
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 37

liked him better than any in the house. Sometimes
whole days would pass now, without Harry speaking
to Elton; things got worse and worse. He longed
sometimes to go and tell him he was unhappy; but
he was ashamed lest Lawton and the others should
laugh.

One day, Harry was sitting away from the other
boys, for he did not feel inclined to play. He heard
a step coming towards him. He thought it was
Elton’s, and hoped he would not see him; presently
he heard coughing, then he knew it was Elton, for
he so often coughed.

Elton was learning his lessons for the next day. He
looked up from his book as he passed Harry, and then
went on; but as if he changed his mind, he stopped
and came back.

“Harry,” said he, “do you know your lessons for
to-morrow ?”

Harry’s lessons had been turned back that day, and
several times before. He had begun to copy Lawton
in his idleness.

If any one else had asked Harry the question, he
would most likely have answered as Lawton; “ Quite
well enough;” and thought it rather fine not to learn
his lessons, for Lawton said that none but muffs cared
about such things; but he did not dare say so to
Elton.

He turned very red, and answered, “ No.”

Elton came up quite close to him, and said, “ Would
it not be better to learn them, Harry. Are you happy

D
38 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

whilst you are doing wrong.” Harry burst into tears,
and could not speak; he would have said something
to Elton, but he heard Tom Lawton’s rude laugh near ;
and he stopped.

“Will you go in-doors and learn them?” said Elton;
“* promise me.”

Harry ran to the school-room, for he was afraid of
meeting Lawton; and got out his books. He learnt
his lessons and went out to play. Lawton was waiting
for him.

“That's good!” he called out, as Harry came down;
“if that fellow Elton hasn’t got hold of you again.”
“T thought you were grown too much of a man.—I
would not be a muff and a coward—I’d have a will of
my own.’

How little Tom Lawton knew the meaning of the
word coward.

A bad boy, calls another a coward if he will not
join with him in doing wrong; but it is the bad boy
who is the coward himself, and the boy who dares to
do right is the brave one.

If “Harry Blake had borne being laughed at, and
still kept to what he knew was right, he would have
been brave, but he was afraid of Lawton, and so did
wrong like a coward.

Do you understand ?

After that, if ever Harry did not like anything that
Lawton wanted to do, Lawton would say, “ Elton bid
you say so, I suppose,”’ and Harry would give in from
his false and naughty shame.
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 39

But learning his lessons one day would not please
the Doctor, when Harry brought them so often badly
learnt. It only showed that he could learn them when
he chose. As day after day, Harry’s books were re-
turned, the Doctor became less kind in his manner,
and one day he told him that he should punish him by
keeping him in from play. After school, Lawton came
to him and said—

“ Ah! you’ve caught it at last, you see.”

“Oh! what shall I do?” said Harry, wringing his
hands, “ what shall I do?”

“Why, do you think you are the first fellow who
has ever been kept in for punishment?” said Lawton.
“J was dozens of times, until I took to writing my
lessons on my nails; I’m not going to be bothered
with lessons for anybody.”

“T won’t write on my nails,” said Harry, “it is so
mean, I won’t do it.

“Then don’t make a row about being punished,
I would’nt be such a baby,” and Lawton left
him.

Still Harry cried and felt very miserable. He could
think only of the Doctor’s stern face; and the whole
afternoon passed away without his finding any com-
fort in Lawton’s words. He heard the boys playing in
the ground below; they were all just as merry as ever,
and did not seem to care if he was in punishment
or no. Lawton had always pretended he was fond of
him, but he heard Lawton’s voice more merry than
the rest.
40 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Elton was spending the afternoon away with some
friends. He had known nothing of Harry’s punish-
ment before he left.

As tea-time drew on, Harry heard the Doctor’s voice
outside the door, and he felt very frightened he
would come in; the steps came up right to the
door, but when the door was opened, it was Elton
who entered; the Doctor must have told him all
about it.

Harry hid his face upon the form, so that Elton
should not see it.

«What is this,’ asked Elton, “have you really
been so naughty as to be kept in?”

Harry gave no answer; but still hid his face.

“Harry,” said Elton, “the Doctor is very angry
with you. He meant to have kept you in all the
evening; but I am to say, that if you will confess
yourself wrong, he will let you come down to
tea.”

Elton had begged the Doctor to forgive Harry,
although Harry had behaved so ungratefully to him;
but he did not say so.

“Will you do so?” asked Elton.

Harry only sobbed.

“Do you not know that you have been naughty.”

“Yes,” said Harry, “I am so miserable, I don’t
know what to do.”

“Come with me then,” said Elton, standing up.

“Ha, ha!’ laughed Tom Lawton, who had been
listening at the door.
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. Al

Harry drew back.

“T cannot,” he said; ‘‘ Lawton will laugh at me
so.”

“Does Lawton’s laughter signify so much as God’s
anger, Harry?” said Elton, gravely.

“Oh, I cannot; I cannot, indeed,” said Harry,
breaking away from Elton’s hand, as Lawton looked
in at the door, and made a face.

He threw himself down upon a form and cried again.

“Oh my! what a muff!” said Lawton: ‘first he’ll
ery; and then he’ll beg pardon; and then he’ll cry.
I wouldn’t beg pardon to save my life. Id scorn
it.”

And Lawton really looked as if he had said some-
thing very grand.

“Are you coming with me?” asked. Elton.

Harry shook his head, and rolled upon the form;
and Elton left the room, desiring Lawton to do the
same.

So all the evening until bed-time, Harry was in
the school-room. Elton did not come again. I
fancy the Doctor would not allow him. From that
day, Harry was afraid to meet with Elton; he was
afraid to look him in the face. If he saw him coming,
he ran another way.

Elton coughed more and more every day; and it
made Harry feel very sad sometimes to see how thin
he had grown. One day, as Harry sat in the garden,
he heard the Doctor talking with Elton. He was
saying :
42 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘*T shall have you moved to another room; it will
be better for you to sleep by yourself; do you feel
any stronger to-day ?”

“Oh yes, Sir;” Elton answered. “I don’t think
there is anything the matter with me. I shall soon
be well, I dare say.”

“You must not work too hard, Frank,” said
Dr. Owen. “Go, now, and have a game with the
others.”

Elton ran off; and Harry peeped through the
bushes, wondering why the Doctor stood so long
looking after Elton.

That day, Elton moved into a room by himself;
it was a little distance off from the other boys’ rooms;
so that he could not be waked up by noise.

Perhaps, had he been able, Dr. Owen would, at
this time, have sent Frank Elton home; for every-
body could see that he was getting ill, and the Doctor
was very anxious about him; but Elton had not any
home in England. His Mamma had died some years
ago; and his Papa was living out in India; so that Elton
was obliged to remain at school. I think that must
have been one reason why the Doctor was so very
fond of him. He had been with him ever since he
first came over from India in a ship, when he was
quite a little child; younger than Harry Blake, a
good deal.

You have heard all about India, I dare say, many
times. It is so hot out there, that little children get
ill if they stop long; that is, little English children;
HARRY BEGINS TO GO WRONG. 43

for there are numbers of native children, of course;
and they like the hot sun, because it is natural to
them. I dare say they would shiver and shake with
cold if they were brought to England.

Perhaps you have been told, that India is the place
where all the carved ivory ornaments come from, and
the feather fans, and the curry-powder, and hot
pickles. And the: Elephants, and the Tigers, which
you have seen at the Zoological Gardens came from
India.

The people are very dark there, with very black
hair and black eyes; and they do not wear many
clothes because of the heat. That is all very well,
I dare say, for those who are used to it; but we
should not like it; and I think you will agree with
me, that we are much better off in England, where
God has placed us; for if we feel too cold, as we
often do, we can run about and make ourselves
warm; but it is not so easy to get cool where the
sun is so strong that it nearly fries people up into
cinders.

At first, when he came to school, Harry used to
like to have Elton tell him about the black people,
and the palanquin coaches, and the elephants, and
tigers, and monkeys, and the parrots, and the English
ladies and gentlemen out there; and the funny things
the natives sometimes do; and the odd manner in
which they speak English; for although Elton had
been quite a child when he came over in the
ship, he could remember a great deal about it all
44 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

still; and when he received letters from his Papa
every now and then, they brought back all these
things to his mind. But, now, Harry never heard
any thing about them; for he and Elton never talked
together.
45

CHAPTER VI.
THE HARDBAKE,

Lawron had not dared, when Elton slept in the same
room as he, to do many things which now he did.
Harry knew well that the boys were forbidden to
keep candles alight after they were in bed; but many
nights now there was a candle burning by Lawton’s
bedside, as he lay reading books, which were not lent
him by the Doctor.

One day, Harry took up one of them and asked
where Lawton got it. ‘Tom only made an ugly face
for answer.

One night, after all the boys had been in bed some
time, Harry was awakened by a noise in the next room.
It seemed as if some one was walking about. Then
he heard Lawton’s voice whispering. Harry jumped
out of bed and opened the door. The window was
wide open, and Lawton was leaning out talking to
some one below in the garden. Harry ran towards
him, and asked what he was doing,
46° HARRY AT SCHOOL.

As Lawton heard his voice, he turned round quickly
and said in a very angry tone.

‘How dare you come in here unasked? You
meddlesome young rascal. Get out! or I’ll thrash

ou
7 Harry stood still, looking very much surprised.
The next minute, Lawton said, in a much quieter
voice :

‘“T am not doing anything, Blake; you had better
go to bed again.”

Harry went back to bed; but he could not help
wondering what Lawton had been doing.

The next day, during play-hours, Lawton walked
away from the others with Harry; and when they
were some little distance, so that nobody could hear
them speak, Lawton said:

“Do you like hardbake ?”

Of course, Harry said Yes: all boys like hard-
bake; so Lawton gave him some.

While Harry was eating it, Lawton said:

‘‘ Don’t ever mention before any of the others that
you saw me at the window last night; above all,
don’t tell Elton; for he is such a fellow for making
harm out of everything, and is so very chummy with
the Doctor.

‘But what were you doing?” asked Harry.

~“ Just you mind your own business, youngster,”
said Lawton crossly, and he moved away.

Harry had often been told that when children do
things which are not to be told of, those things are
THE HARDBAKE. 47

generally wrong. He felt sure that Lawton had been
doing something he ought not to do, or he would not
have minded the Doctor knowing of it.

Tom’s lessons were worse learnt every day. He
was always now being turned back; for all the time
that ought to have been spent in learning, Lawton
was reading the books which he ought not to read.
One day, Lawton offered one to Harry to read, but it
did not seem at all amusing; for it was all about
grown up men and women, and places which Harry
could not understand. While Harry was looking
over it, Elton passed; and Lawton snatched the book
from him, and hid it.

After he was gone, Harry said.

“IT wish you would not read them, Lawton, if you
think you must hide them from other people. I am
sure it is very wrong.”

“ That’s good,” answered Lawton, “don’t you
begin to talk; why you have yourself eaten some of
my contraband goods; after that, you had better
hold your tongue.”

Contraband means against orders.

“¢ What do you mean?” asked Harry; “ [haven’t.”

‘Did you not eat my hardbake?” said Lawton.
“JT got that at the same time as the books; so now
you can’t ever tell against me, for you have shared
the spoil.”

“| didn’t know how you got it; how should 1?”
said Harry.

“Never you mind: what’s done can’t be helped.
48 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

You may as well help me now, as you are in the
scrape ; for if I say you have shared in the hardbake,
no one will believe you did’nt know all about it. I
want you to help me this evening.”

‘TI don’t half like it,” said Harry.

‘“* Nonsense, we will have oceans of hardbake this
time; enough to last us a week. Will you promise?”

‘But how do you get it?” asked Harry.

“Only think ; such lots of hardbake,” answered
Lawton. “ Will you promise?”

“Yes,” said Harry Blake.

How naughty of Harry! He knew well now that
Lawton was doing wrong; but he was too weak to
say so, partly because he wanted the hardbake, and
partly because he was afraid of Lawton.

“You promise to help me in everything to-night,”
said Lawton again, “ And never to let it out to any-
body. Honor bright!”

* Honor bright!” answered Harry.

He should have said, ‘Dirty Honor,” I think,
or “no honor at all,’ when it concerned Tom
Lawton.

Harry felt anxious for the night to come. He
could not learn, or play, or attend to anything, for
thinking what Lawton was going todo. The boys
went to bed at nine. As they all parted to their
different rooms, Lawton squeezed Harry’s hand and
whispered,

‘““As soon as the others are asleep, come to me,
don’t make a noise.”
_ THE HARDBAKE. 49

Harry undressed and went to bed. Never any
prayers now. He had got used to being wicked; but
he had not got used to feeling unhappy and afraid.
He felt unhappy as he lay down; for he had that day
received a letter from his Papa, saying he hoped he
was trying to be a good boy; that he hoped he never
forgot to ask the help of God. Harry would have
liked to try and say his prayers that night, but he
did not dare. It was not so much the other boys he
cared about; but he knew that he was going to do
wrong, and he did not dare. He lay trembling as
he thought of what he was going to do, and wished
that he could draw back; but he thought he could
not now. He remembered his words, ‘ Honor
bright!” and said to himself,

“Tt is too late now. I must keep my promise; it
would be dishonorable to go back now.”

Would it have been more dishonorable, do you
think, to break a wicked promise which he never
should have made, and try to do right and keep his
first promises to God, or to go on doing wrong, and
every minute making things worse.

The meaning of honor is honest and truthful
and straightforward; and to be honorable is to do
what is right. What a pity it is, that little boys so
often mistake the word.

Harry became more and more miserable, thinking
of these things in the dark, until he hid his head
under the clothes, because he was afraid.

What was he afraid of ?
50 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

He need not have been afraid of anything, if he had
not been a naughty boy; for God could take care of
him as well in the dark as the light.

At length he put his head out from under the
clothes and listened. He could hear by their breath-
ing that all the other boys were asleep.
bl

CHAPTER VII.
DOING WRONG.

Tr was time for Harry to keep his word with Lawton.
He got up, and although it was a warm night, he
trembled and his teeth chattered. He did not put on
his shoes, lest they should make a noise and wake
any of the boys; but he carried them in his hand,
until he opened Lawton’s door and stood within the
room.

“Hallo!” said Lawton jumping up. “ What’s the
matter; you look as pale as a ghost.”

“Lawton, I wish you could go to sleep quietly, and
let me do the same,” said Harry.

“You young muff.” Lawton knew well there was
no word Harry disliked more than that. “You
young muff! what! have you got frightened in the
dark ? I thought you had more spirit.”

“I wish I knew what you are going to do?” said
Harry sadly.

«¢ Well, 1 don’t mind telling you. You have
promised not to tell. Iam going to the town, and
you are going with me.”
52 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“Oh, indeed, I had rather not. J had no idea
of that. The Doctor would be so dreadfully
angry.”

“The Doctor will never know anything of it,
unless you are so lost to all sense of honor, as to
break your word.”

“J Shall not tell of you, Lawton; but, indeed, I
cannot go.”

“You are a nice fellow, I must say,’’ sneered
Lawton, “ Why you have promised to help me, and
what’s more, if you sneak out of it, sir, 1’ll thrash
you till you can’t stand.”

“‘T don’t intend to sneak out of it,” said Harry,
growing very red. “I am nota sneak at any rate.
I'll keep to what I promised;” and he sat down on
the side of the bed, and began putting on his shoes.

« That’s right!” said Lawton, slapping him on the
back. ‘“IthoughtI could depend upon you. There’s
not another boy in the school like you. Sayers is
such a blab, and Dickson such a coward; although
they have both of them taken my lollipops times out
of number. It was all through Dickson, that I was
found out last half.”

“Were you?” said Harry looking up.

«Yes, But it is too long a story to tellnow; we’ll
have that another time. I wonder Sir Francis has
never told you. It must be a good tale as a warning
against me.”

“Elton has never said a word against you,” said
Harry, and he sighed as he thought of Elton.
Z ———— ES

Se SSS
ee ES Se
SSS SSS ee

MUP



Page 53.

NIGHT.

HARRY GOES OUT BY
DOING WRONG. 53

‘But, I say, we must not be talking here; we shall
wake up somebody,” said Lawton. “Now for the
rope.”

“What rope?” asked Harry.

“You hold your tongue, and do as I bid you.”

Lawton then brought a rope and tied it to the
window sill.

“ Now, Blake, you holdit steady while I go down.”

Harry did as he was told; and saw Lawton swing
himself down into the garden by the rope, until he
stood upon the flower bed below.

‘* Now then, come on,” he called out in a loud
whisper.

Harry got out in his turn, while Lawton held the
rope steady from beneath. As he was going down,
the light of a candle flashed in one of the window
panes.

‘Make haste,” whispered Lawton; “But be as
quiet as a mouse, come with me.”

He caught Harry’s hand as he reached the ground,
and drew him away. At the same moment, a window
opened, and Doctor Owen looked out. Lawton and
Harry crouched amongst the bushes. The Doctor
looked down steadily into the garden; but he could
see nothing.

The rope could not be seen, because it hung close
to the wall: and presently Doctor Owen shut the
window again, and the light of the candle went
away.

Lawton rose up.
54 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“‘ Wasn’t that a near thing?” he said; “ Now for
it. Come, Blake, over the wall.”

Harry was over as soon as Lawton, and they both
stood in the high-road.

“Hurrah!” called Lawton, racing towards the
town; ‘* Hurrah! come on.”

“Hurrah!” answered Harry, racing after him; and
from that moment he forgot everything but the fun
of being out at night.

It is often very pleasant to do wrong while it lasts;
but it is afterwards that we suffer for it.

Do you know that Lawton was twice as wicked a
boy as if he had gone out alone that night; for he
made Harry as naughty as himself. Harry, being
much smaller than Lawton, was easily led by him.
If Lawton had set a good example, I think Harry
would have followed it. However small or young we
are, we can always meet with those who are smaller
and younger—whom we can teach to do either right
or wrong. If we teach evenababy to do wrong with
us, we shall be blamed for that baby’s naughtiness,
because all little children so quickly follow what they
see other children do.
59

CHAPTER VIII.
OUT AT NIGHT.

Lawton and Harry first went to the lollipop shop
and got a quantity of hardbake and other things. The
woman of the shop asked Lawton when he was going
to pay her for all the things he had; and Lawton
laughed, and said, “ Some day.”

The fact w as, he had no money to pay with, so
that he should not have bought things, for it was not
honest. Harry. had often been told by his Papa that
it is wrong to take what you cannot pay for, and felt
rather sorry that Lawton should do so. He paid for
his share of the lollipops, but he could not pay all.

Lawton laughed at him for paying, but the woman
in the shop said,

“J think he is much more like a gentleman than
you are, sir.’

So Lawton made a face at her.

The bad boys then went to a cake and tart-shop,
and bought things there, and to several other places.
Then they ran all down the High-street, cutting capers
and shouting loudly. Lawton threw stones at the
56 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

lamps, and broke the glasses. At first Harry asked
him not to do so;*but, after a little while, he laughed
with him, and at last joined, because Lawton called
him names for not doing so. They were several times
nearly caught by a policeman; and they would, I
think, have been locked up in the station-house if they
had, and have had to pass the night there: and once
a policeman chased them through several streets, so
that they were very much frightened indeed; but as
he did not catch them, Lawton, the next moment, said
he didn’t care for policemen, and cut fresh capers, and
made more noise, and gave double knocks at the doors
of private houses, so that the servants had to come
down, after they had gone to bed, and all for nothing;
while Lawton and Harry watched round the corner
of the street. I cannot help thinking that the two
boys only half thought how very badly they were be-
having. I am sure Harry Blake did: there was
more excuse for him than for Lawton, for Lawton
had done the same things before, and had been
punished for them, and told how wrong they were.
I am sure everybody in the street thought they were
anuisance. At length, aman, against whom Lawton -
pushed rudely, caught hold of him, and held him by
the arm, while he boxed his ears several times.

“What are you doing, you young scamp, running
up against people in this way? Whose boy are you?
Tell me your name.”

Lawton was silent; and the man dragged him
under a lamp, that he might see his face.
OUT AT NIGHT. 57

‘*'Tell me your name,” said he again, giving him a
good shake.

‘‘ Thomas Lawton,” squeaked out Lawton, in a very
frightened voice.

“You belong to Dr. Owen’s, | suppose.”

“No,” said Lawton.

Harry turned pale at hearing Lawton tell a lie.
The man said again—

“Tell me the truth this moment. Here, you little
fellow,” and he turned to Blake, “ what school do you
belong tor”

“* Dr. Owen’s,” said Harry, trembling.

“Uoh!” said the man, shaking Lawton again.
“Ugh! you mean little sneak to tell me alie. And
now what are yeu both doing out here at this time of

night ?”

“i Oh, please sir, don’t tell the Doctor,” whimpered
Lawton ; “please sir, don’t. We only came out for
a lark. ‘Oh, please sir, let me go.”

“Tve a great mind to take you home to ile
Doctor’s myself,” said the stranger. “I don’t like
boys who tell lies ; 5 and a good flogging would be the
best thing for you.”

Lawton slid down on his knees upon the pave-
ment, and cried and sobbed.

“Oh, no, sir, please sir, don’t, sir. I'll never do it
again. I beg your pardon.”

The stranger laughed and said—

“Ah! I see you’re a coward. Storytellers always
are.”
58 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

As he spoke, Lawton rose again to his feet. The
stranger had let go his arm as he knelt on the pave-
ment; and no sooner did Lawton find that he had
done so, than he started away, and ran down the
street at the top of his speed, calling out, “‘ Come on,
Harry.”

“‘T advise you to go back to school at once,” said
the stranger, speaking to Harry, who still stood near
him, with the tears running down his face.

‘Yes, I will,” Harry answered; “I wish I had
never come out.’

The man placed his hand upon his shoulder
kindly as he said,

‘You will always find, my boy, that doing wrong
brings sorrow with it.”

“Yes, sir,” said Harry; and the stranger wished
him good night.

Harry began walking towards school. He felt
afraid of being out alone at that hour ; but there was
no help for it. He walked with his eyes upon the
ground, and feeling very sad.

‘* Hallo !” said Lawton’s voice close to him.

‘Oh, Lawton,” said Harry, “you are a very
wicked boy indeed. I wish I had never had anything
to do with you. Do come home at once.”

“Not J,” said Lawton. “I am going to buy
candles and lucifers first.”

“ Then I shall not go with you,” said Harry.

“You may go where you like ; I don’t want you.
You are a young sneak.”
OUT AT NIGHT. 59.

** I think you are the sneak,” said Harry. “* That
kind man called you one ; and you cried and begged
his pardon fast enough when you were frightened,
although you said one day you’d scorn to beg any-
one’s pardon.”

“ Well,” said Lawton, in a threatening voice; “ you
just mind your own business, or perhaps I may teach

ou.”

“T don’t believe you dare,” said Harry. “I don’t
like you at all now; and I won’t be any longer
friends.”

And Harry left him, and walked home; leaving
Lawton to go for the candles and the lucifer matches
alone.
BO.

CHAPTER IX.
FOUND OUT. ©

Waite Lawton and Harry were running about the
town and getting into scrapes, there was somebody
walking about the garden at the school.

It was a tall thin figure, with a dressing gown on,
and a pair of spectacles.

He came down into the garden with a lantern in
his hand, and he looked carefully about all over the
walk, and then over the flower-bed, and of course, by
the light of the lantern, he saw the footmarks of the
two naughty little boys; and then he raised his eyes,
and through his spectacles he saw that the bedroom
window was open, and he knew that, since Elton had

‘been moved, no one slept in that bedroom but
Lawton. And next he wondered how he had
managed to get down; so he placed the lantern close
to the wall, and there was the rope still dangling.

That somebody who was standing in the garden
was the Doctor.

There’s a scrape for Master Lawton !

Perhaps you think now that the Doctor took down
FOUND OUT. ~ 61

the rope, shut the window, and then waited until the
boys came back. No; he did not do that.

He left the rope where it was, and the window
open, and went back into the house, and got into bed.

I do not say he went to sleep—I don’t think he
did. I fancy he lay awake until he heard the window
of Lawton’s room softly closed, and then he knew
that he was safe back again.

When Harry arrived at the school, he had no
trouble in climbing the wall and getting up by the
rope into Lawton’s room. He still felt very un-
happy; and as he lay down in bed, he made up his
mind that as soon as ever morning came, he would
tell the Doctor what a naughty boy he had been.

He did not feel at all inclined to go to sleep, and
lay there tossing about and crying, until he heard
Lawton come in, and remove the rope, and close the
window softly.

Lawton thought when he had done this that all
was safe. How little he knew!

Harry could plainly hear Lawton groping about
his room. Perhaps he was taking off his clothes, or
perhaps he was feeling for the bed in the dark. But
presently the gleam of a light came through the.
crack of the door, and Harry knew that Lawton had
lighted a candle that he might see where to put away
his things.

The next moment, the opposite door in Lawton’s
room opened, and some one came in.

Harry heard Lawton call out. “Oh!” and
62 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

then a voice said, but the voice was not the Doctor’s,
“Lawton, what can you be doing at this time of
night? You know that the Doctor has forbidden
candles being lighted after bedtime.”

Lawton answered,

‘““T was taken ill; I was obliged to get up.”

‘What are all these things lying about?” asked
Elton, for it was Elton’s voice that spoke, “ What is
this long rope? Surely, Lawton, you have not—?

Elton stopped, and Lawton gave no answer.

By this time Harry was out of bed, and at the
door which opened from his room.

“Surely Lawton,” said Elton, coughing while he
spoke, as he always did when he spoke fast, “ You
have not been out again at night. Tell me the truth.”

“No; of course I have not,” said Lawton quickly.
“You know the Doctor forbade it.”

“Oh, Lawton,” said Harry Blake, “how can you tell
more stories? Yes, we have both been out, Elton,
and we have bought hardbake and lollipops; and I
wish I’d never gone, I’m sure.”

Lawton had not known that Harry Blake was any
where near; and when he heard him answer Elton,
he turned round upon him and would have beaten
him, if Elton had not caught him by the arm.
But he called him a great many names, until he was
tired.

“Yes, Lawton,” said Elton, very gravely. ‘You
know the Doctor forbade it.”

“Oh, Elton!” said Lawton, quite quickly changing
FOUND OUT. 63

his tone, and speaking in a frightened way, ‘Oh,
Elton, pray don’t tell the Doctor: pray don’t. I’ll
give you anything if you won’t tell of me.”

“1 don’t want anything you can give me, Lawton,”
answered Elton; “but I am not sure whether I
ought not to tell the Doctor.”

“Oh,” said Lawton, ‘only let me off this time and
I’ll promise faithfully. Oh, Elton, remember, that
the Doctor said he would send me home and tell my
Uncle if I ever did it again. Pray let me off: pray
don’t tell of me.”

And Lawton was so frightened, that he dragged
himself along the ground after Elton, and cried like
a baby.

‘‘ Give me a little time to think,” said Elton.

Lawton still cried, and every now and then said,—
“Oh, pray let me off; oh, pray don’t tell the Doctor.”

a“ Well Lawton,” said Elton, after a time. “I
will make no promise until the morning. I do not
feel sure yet, what I ought todo. Get up from the
ground. I wonder you are not ashamed.”

“Promise me not. to tell, dear Elton! Elton, I
always liked you; indeed I did.”

Elton’s face flushed quite crimson, as he said,—

“Do not tell any more falsehoods. Begin to put
away all these things which are lying about the floor.
What are they?

“Oh, they are books, and candles, and cakes, and
lollipops,” whined Lawton. ‘I will give you half
of them, Elton, if you will promise not to tell.”
64 HARRY AT SCHOOL,

Elton turned quickly from him, and left the room
without another word.

Harry Blake looked after him. He longed to
speak to Elton, but he felt afraid. Elton had been
so very kind to him, and Harry had behaved so
badly in return.

But while he waited, thinking what to do, he
heard Elton cough, and the next moment he was in
the other room.

“Elton, I have been very wicked; quite as wicked
as Lawton. Oh, Elton, I’m so sorry.”

Elton turned towards him and held out his hands.

“Do you think the Doctor will forgive me? Do
you think he will believe that I am sorry? Do you
think he will ever trust me again?”

““Do you think you need most the Doctor’s for-
giveness, Harry, or the forgiveness of God?” asked
Elton.

““T do not dare to say my prayers, Elton;” said
Harry. “ Not now.”

“Why not?” asked Elton.

“ Because,” sobbed Harry, “TI have been a naughty
little boy, and I am afraid.”

“But, Harry,” said Elton, gently and with the
tears in his eyes, “have you forgotten that dear
Saviour, for whose sake God has promised to forgive
all who are sorry, however naughty they have been?’

By this time, Harry was clinging round Elton’s
waist.

“Yes; I have forgotten for a long time past.”
FOUND OUT. 65

“But you will remember now?”

Harry said “ Yes,” and Elton left him alone. But
God was with him—Harry knew that well. Before
he went to sleep, he asked God to forgive him for
being such a naughty boy, and to teach him to be
good; for Harry had been as naughty as a little boy
like him could be; and I think the only reason he
was not altogether so bad as Lawton, was because he
had been taught better.
66

CHAPTER X.
THE FIRE.

Ir seemed as if that night would never end. Harry
thought he could not have been asleep more than a
few minutes, when he woke up again with a start,
and sat up in bed. There was a strange kind of
smell all over the room, which he could not under-
stand. While he sat looking into the darkness and
listening for any sound, he heard a loud scream,
and the next moment Lawton flung the door open
and stood there in his night shirt, with his eyes wide
open, and screaming. Harry could see him plainly;
see his eyes wide open, and his face quite white
with fear, and his bare feet upon the floor; for, as
Lawton threw open his room door, a bright broad
light shone through and lighted up everything and
every place in the room. but it was not the light of
a candle.

As Lawton kept on screaming, all the boys in the
room woke up, and then boys from other rooms came
running in their shirts to know what was the matter;
then the servants, looking very frightened, came there
too; and last, in the doorway, stood the Doctor.
THE FIRE. 67

Several people said, “‘ What’s the matter?” But no
one answered, and still Lawton screamed. I think
there was no need to ask what the matter was; for
now, through the doorway, from Lawton’s room,
there burst out clouds of smoke and flames. All the
boys ran to the other door dnd into the passage.
The Doctor called out in a loud voice. ‘Go down
into the garden, all of you.” He had not to order
them away a second time.

There they stood upon the lawn, in the flower
garden, a crowd of little boys, watching the flames
which now rushed and tore from Lawton’s window.
Some of the bigger ones got over their fright in a
short time, and ran backwards and forwards, helping
the servants to carry things out into the garden,
where they might be safe from the fire. At length
—it seemed a long time first—the fire-engine arrived
from the town, and began to play upon Lawton’s
room.

I don’t know who it was first asked the question ;
but one said, “ Are we all here?’’ And almost at the
same moment the Doctor came up and said, “ Elton,
I want to speak to you.”

But no one answered; and Elton did not come
forward.

“ Elton !” said the Doctor; and his voice sounded
almost like a scream.

“ How many of you are there here?’ he asked
next. “Count!”

Grey counted. There were only eleven boys, and
68 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

there ought to have been twelve. Dr. Owen only
waited to hear that all were there but Elton, and he
ran into the house, and up the staircase.

Grey and Ward ran after him ; and as they saw
him go through the fire and smoke, they called out
with fear, for they thought he would be burnt.
Next they tried to follow him, but the thick smoke
choked them, and they turned back.

Oh, how long it seemed while the Doctor was
away.

The boys no longer cared to watch the engine
play; they no longer fixed their eyes on Lawton’s
room, where the flames kept trying to burst out
again, in spite of the water—all looked only at the
staircase, where the Doctor had gone up, crowding
round the doorway; and as near as they could, for
the smoke, waiting for his return.

At last !

They heard a footstep, and they crowded nearer,
for they knew he was coming.

“‘ Stand back! stand out of the way!” called the
Doctor, as soon as he came to the top of the stairs,
and saw them crowding there.

The boys all ran again into the garden, and stood
upon the lawn.

Then came the Doctor, and with him Elton. But,
not by his side ; not running down the staircase with
him ; not as the boys had seen him last.

Carried in the Doctor’s arms ; his face quite pale ;
his eyes fast closed; his hands hanging loosely by his
sides.


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ELTON SAVED FROM THE FIRE,
THE FIRE. 69

So the Doctor had found him, still, as if sleeping in
his bed, stifled with the smoke.

And all the children crowded again together ; for
they felt frightened when they saw him lying so;
and they felt frightened at the grave sad face of the
Doctor, and were afraid to speak out loud; so they
whispered to each other, ‘ He is dead!”

Harry Blake, who stood amongst them, heard them
say so; and saw the pale face of Elton, which but
such a little time before had looked so kindly at him ;
and a great sob broke from the little boy’s heart ;
and he clasped his hands together, half in sorrow and
half in fear, as he repeated to himself again, “ He is
dead !”’
70

CHAPTER XI.
NEXT MORNING.

Wuo cared then whether the engine put out the
flames or no? Who cared whether the books, and the
pictures, and the furniture were saved or burnt to
ashes? Not the Doctor, to whom they all belonged.
He never looked at the house after he had missed
Elton from amongst the boys.

The engine left off playing, for the fire was out,
and there was no great damage done, beyond Law-
ton’s room.

The men belonging to the engine went away, and
the servants went back into the house to try and set
things a little to rights; and the boys found that,
without their knowing it, it had become broad day-
light, and a great deal of the fear, which had kept
them silent all this time, went away with the dark-
ness. One by one they left the garden, for they felt
cold and tired; and there was now a fire in the
kitchen, and they wanted to talk of all that had taken
place, and to wonder to each other how it happened.

They did not dare do so in the Doctor’s presence,
NEXT MORNING. 71

for he looked so grave and sad, as he walked up and
down the garden-walk, waiting for the surgeon, for
whom he had sent.

Doctor Owen, you know, was called a “ Doctor”
because he was a very clever man; but he was not a
Doctor of Medicine; that is a different thing. It
was a medical doctor whom he had now sent for.
And every now and then he stopped to look at Elton,
who had been laid upon one of the sofas from the
drawing-room, wrapped up in a blanket.

But the Doctor was not the only one who watched
Elton as he lay there.

There was a little boy kneeling by the sofa, holding
Elton’s cold hand, and thinking of his kind words to
him only a few hours before.

That little boy was Harry Blake.

As the Doctor passed in his walking up and down
the garden-path, he heard a sob come from this little
boy, and he stopped and placed his hand upon his
head.

Then a sharp pain went through Harry’s heart,
when he thought that, if the Doctor knew all his
naughtiness of that night, he might not have been so
kind.

But where was Lawton all this time? With those

boys who were tired out, and had got into their beds,
and gone to sleep ?

No!

With those boys who were sitting chatting round
the kitchen fire, and warming their cold feet?
72 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

No!

With Grey and Ward, who had dressed themselves,
and were watching from their bed-room window for
the arrival of the surgeon’s gig, and speaking in
whispers together about Elton ?

No!

Where was he, then ?

There is a boy out there, far away in the shrub-
beries, lying upon the grass, although it is quite wet
with dew. He rolls upon the ground, and groans
and cries out aloud.

That is Lawton.

While the house was burning, there was one boy
who was crouched upon the lawn, with his hands over
his face, to shut out the sight.

That boy was Lawton.

When the Doctor came, carrying Elton in his arms,
and laid him down, and the children crouched toge-
ther, and whispered “He is dead!” one boy from
among them started away, and flung himself upon his
face in the damp grass, amongst the shrubberies, and
there he lay till now.

That was Lawton.

And there he lay, even when the surgeon’s gig
drove in, and Elton was carried upstairs, and the bed-
room door was shut upon him, and the surgeon and
Doctor Owen.

Until the boys’ breakfast was ready, long after the
usual time, and Lawton was missed and looked for,

and found by one of the servants, and brought into
the house.
NEXT MORNING. 73

And when the servant went back into the kitchen,
he told how he had found Lawton, and said,

‘“‘ He must have set alight to his own room; and he
knows it, too, young scamp.”

The cook said kindly,

“‘ Well, poor child, he seems terribly sorry for it.
I’ll be bound he'll be a better boy for the future: this
will be a lesson he will never forget.”

It was kind of Cook to think so. Does not Lawton
seem very sorry for what he has done? I believe he
felt very frightened, when he saw what fearful things
he had done. I hope he may have been sorry also:
we shall sce.

I do not think many of the boys cared about their
breakfast that morning. They had too many things
to think of, and too much to talk of, to have much
time even to eat.

I know that some of them were very brave, indeed,
in their words, now that the fire was put out.

Grey and Ward were the only two who had been
of any use in helping at the time, and now these two
said nothing.
CHAPTER XII.
CONSCIENCE.

Harry Brake sat upon the staircase, which led from
Elton’s room. All the balustrades were burnt, and
many of the steps were charred: the wall ,was all
black with smoke; and the paper quite spoiled.
Harry looked from one thing to the other, and
thought how different it had been the day before,
and watched the housemaid taking down the carpet,
which was so spoilt that it had hardly any colour
left in it. But all the while, Harry was thinking
what the Surgeon would say of Elton, and whether
he could really be dead.

It seemed so strange, that a boy, not many years
older than himself, should die. Harry knew that
grown-up men and women died; but he had never
felt quite sure about boys; though he had been
told so.

When the Surgeon’s step came on the landing,
Harry jumped up and going to him, caught him by
the hands and said,

“Ts Elton dead, Sir?”

“No, my boy,” said the Surgeon, kindly.
CONSCIENCE. 75

Harry sat down upon the stairs again.

“Ts this boy his brother?” asked the Surgeon of
Doctor Owen.

The Doctor said, “ No ;” and putting his hand on
Harry’s head, as he had done before in the garden,
he spoke so kindly to him, that Harry’s eyes filled
with tears, and he could not help saying:

‘Oh, please Sir, don’t.”

He went to find Lawton.

By this time, Lawton’s spirits were better than
they had been. He was sitting in the play-ground,
with Dickson and Sayers, and some others.

As soon as Harry joined them, Dickson called
out,

“ Well; how’s Elton?”

“ He is not dead,” said Harry. ‘“ The Doctor
says he is not dead.”

“ Ah, well,” said Sayers; “ Perhaps you will leave
off piping your eye about him, then.”

Harry gave him no answer; but, turning to
Lawton, said,

‘“¢ T want to speak to you.”

Lawton jumped up quickly, grew very red, and
taking Harry by the arm, said,

* « The Doctor hasn’t sent you; has he ?”

‘“‘ No,” said Harry; and Lawton looked less red.

“‘ Lawton,” Harry began, “‘ We ought to tell the
Doctor at once of our going out last night. He is so
kind. I cannot bear the thought of having deceived
him. The Surgeon is gone; will you come now ?” .
76 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘Tell him ? Come now? What do you mean ?”
asked Lawton opening his eyes.

Harry said again what he had said_ before.
Lawton was silent for a little while, and looked another
way from Harry, until Harry said, ‘‘Come on,
Lawton.”

“Blake,” said Lawton; “I always called you a
muff; but I had no idea you could go so far as this,
Even if the Doctor suspects me; he does not you.
Why should you get yourself into a scrape for
nothing ?”

“Tt is my duty; Iam sure it is right,” said Harry.

Lawton still walked on until Harry said again,
‘Will you come?”

“ Not I,” answered Lawton.

“Oh Lawton; do not be so wicked,” said Harry,
“Do come and tell the Doctor; we have done wrong
enough already.”

“T shall do no such thing,” said Lawton. “ The
Doctor will, I dare say, forget to speak about it;
what with the fire, and Elton and all. I shall say
nothing. Why should I?”

“ Because it is our duty,” said Harry.

“© Why ?” asked Lawton.

“* Because it is right,” said Harry again.

Now Harry was only repeating the same thing;
for Duty and Right are all one. That was because,
being a little boy, he did not know how to put his
feelings into words. Had he been a man, perhaps,
he would have said.
CONSCIENCE. 17

“T must tell the Doctor what I have done; be-
cause my conscience tells me I have been wrong;
and if I conceal it, I shall be going on doing wrong;
And, besides, it would make me feel happier to tell
him, as a proof that I am sorry; and I should not
believe that I am really sorry, if I did not go and
confess it.”

But these were too many and too fine words for a
little boy to say.

Yet Harry felt all this.

‘Then I shall go alone,” said he, sadly, as Lawton
still looked away.

* And tell about me, too, I suppose, you little
blab,” said Lawton, angrily.

“No, Lawton, I shall tell only of myself,” said
Harry.

And then he ran away from the play-ground
quickly, lest his heart should fail him.
78

CHAPTER XIII.

HARRY CONFESSES.

Ir was a rather hard thing to go to the Doctor, and
tell about his having been naughty. It was much
more natural, that Harry should have preferred doing
like Lawton; and waiting in the hope that nothing
would be said about it.

It was God who taught Harry to be brave in doing
right.

It was the Devil that made Lawton hold his
tongue.

Harry stopped a minute before the study door,
where he knew the Doctor was; and his heart beat
very fast before he knocked, and he felt half inclined
to turn back; but he did not turn back.

He knocked; and the Doctor’s voice said, “ Come
”

“What is it, my boy?’ said the Doctor, as
Harry stood quite silent with his eyes upon the
carpet.

in
HARRY CONFESSES. 79

“Tf you please, Sir, I want to tell you,” began
Harry, and there stopped.

The Doctor looked at him as if he were asking a
question.

“T want to tell you, if you please, Sir,” said Harry
again, and could get no further.

“‘ What is it you have to tell me?” said the Doctor,
taking him by the hand and drawing him to him.

“T went out last. night into the town, Sir, and
bought hardbake and lollipops and cakes, and ran
about and broke the lamps, and knocked at the doors.
And I knew all the while I was doing wrong, and
that you would be very angry if you knew it. But I
have been a very naughty boy ever since I came to
school.”

It was all out in about a minute. Harry spoke so
fast, that I wonder the Doctor could hear what he
said; and then he stood with his hands over his eyes,
hoping he had not said anything which showed that
Lawion had had a share in it.

“ Answer me this question, Harry,” said he at
last. ‘‘I will not say, be careful and tell me the
truth; for I don’t think you would tell me a lie.
Had you any share in setting the house on fire last
night?”

*“« No, sir,” said Harry.

“Do you know anything about it?”

“T am not obliged to tell of another boy, am I,
sir?” asked Harry looking in the Doctor’s face.
“ Besides I could not be quite sure.”
80 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

‘No, Harry; you need not tell,” said the Doctor.
“T knew all about your going out last night, and also
who Ied you away before you told me; but I should
have been very angry, my boy, if you had not told
me.”

“Will you please forgive me, Sir,” said Harry.
The Doctor shook hands with him, and Harry began
to cry.

“ Oh I wish I had never done it,” he said. “I’d
give anything not to have done it, Sir, because you
are so kind.”

“ And yet God is much kinder than I could ever be
to you; think how ungrateful and bad it must be
to forget Him, Harry.”

Do not you think, that the best proof Harry
could give of being sorry for having been naughty
was, after having asked the forgiveness of God, to
ask the Doctor’s forgiveness, and then try to do
better?

I think so.

If Lawton had been really sorry, he would have
done the same.

Perhaps when Lawton lay ‘on the ground in
the shrubbery crying, he thought he was sorry;
but he could only have been frightened, because
he thought the house was burning down and Elton
was dead.

When the fire was put out, and Elton was
better, Lawton was as naughty as before. Now we
all know that the first thing Harry did was to ask
HARRY CONFESSES. 81

for God’s forgiveness. Lawton did nothing of the
kind.

So God taught Harry to do right.

And the Devil made Lawton do wrong.
§2

CHAPTER XIV.
LAWTON IN THE STUDY.

Har an hour later, the Doctor sent for Lawton into
his study. You may be sure Master Tom felt very
unwilling to go; but he could not help himself: still
he went very slowly.

As he knocked, the Doctor’s voice said, ‘‘ Come in,”
in a much more stern tone than he had to Harry; and
when Lawton opened the door, the Doctor’s face
looked so grave, that he felt inclined to turn round
and run out again.

“ Lawton,” began the Doctor, ‘‘ What were
you doing when you set the house on fire last
night ?”

‘Please, Sir, I did’nt set the house on fire,” said
Lawton. |

‘What were you doing then with candles and
matches ?”

“Please, Sir, I had not any candles.”

The Doctor looked still more angry.

‘Perhaps you were not out in the town last night.
LAWTON IN THE STUDY. 83

Perhaps you did not climb out of your bed-room
window by a rope; nor buy all kinds of rubbish and
bring it home with you?”

Lawton began to say, “‘No;” but the Doctor’s eyes
were fixed upon him, and he stopped. He did not
feel sure whether the Doctor quite knew that he had
done all this; or whether he was only guessing it.
He knew that Elton could not have had any time to
tell the Doctor, and he thought that Harry could only
have told about himself, so he said,

“Perhaps, Sir, it might have been Blake. You
know he sleeps in the room which opens into
mine.”

The Doctor turned towards his desk, and took up
acane. ‘Then he said,

“ Lawton, you know that I very seldom flog. I
would not flog a manly, honorable boy, however
much he had done wrong. The best boys do wrong at
times; but I look upon a liar as more contemptible
than anything. Ihave more respect for a dog than
for a lying boy.”

“‘ Oh please, Sir, let me off,” said Lawton, falling on
his knees and clasping his hands.

** Years and years ago, when a wicked man called
Ananias told a lie, God struck him dead upon the
spot, and sent him to hell. God might strike you
dead, Lawton, in the same way.”

““Oh, please, Sir, let me off,” whimpered Lawton
again.

“¢ And like all liars,” said the Doctor again, “you
84 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

are a coward and a sneak. When Blake, like a good
brave little fellow as he is, came to me and told me
he had done wrong, I questioned him; but he would
not tell of you: you would have laid all the blame
upon him.”

‘Oh, please, Sir,” said Lawton.

‘““Do you remember, when last year you did much
the same thing as now, I threatened you, if ever you
got out again at night, that I would send you away
altogether?”

Lawton made no answer, and the Doctor took the
cane.

Then Lawton began to beg and pray again to be
let off; but the Doctor took no heed. He made many
promises of being good; but the Doctor did not
believe him.

Of course not: for he was a liar.

The Doctor thrashed him. well.

I think it was the only thing for him. Do not

ou?

I only hope that it may do Lawton good.

So you see, that even now, Lawton’s lies did him
no good.

Lies never do succeed, even if we are not found
out for a little while.

But think, what would have become of Lawton if
God had struck him dead, like Ananias and Sapphira
in the Bible?

Supposing it had been Lawton who had been burnt
in his bed instead of Elton. Would not that have
LAWTON IN THE STUDY. 85

been a dreadful thing? A wicked boy who never
thought of God; who never said his prayers; who

was always telling lies and breaking God’s command-
ments.
86

CHAPTER XV.

FORGIVENESS.

TuoucH Elton had not died at the time from the
smoke and the fire; yet he was very ill. He lay quite
still and pale upon the bed.

He was dying.

It must have been this which made the Doctor look
so grave and sad.

But Elton did not look sad. As the Doctor came
into the room, he turned his eyes towards him and
smiled.

Perhaps he did not know that he was so very ill.

Yet when the Doctor came and sat down by the
bedside and took Elton’s hand in his, and said, ‘‘ How
do you feel now, Frank?” Elton answered,

“TI am very weak, sir; but I shall never be stronger
in this world, I think.”

So he must have known that he was dying.

And the next moment he looked in the Doctor’s
face and smiled.

Elton said presently.

“What about Lawton, sir?”
FORGIVENESS. 87

“You have guessed then that he had something to
do with the fire ?”

Elton did not answer; and the Doctor said, “I
knew last night, that he and another boy had left the
house. Blake told me of himself this morning.
Lawton, as usual, told lies. I shall send him home to
his uncle as soon as possible.”

Still Elton said nothing.

“J cannot get any truth out of him. I cannot
know whether he was the cause of the fire last night,
although I think he was.”

He turned to Elton and said,

“ Do you know, Frank ?”

Elton changed colour.

‘“*T see you do : tell me.”

“T would rather not, Sir.”

“But you must,my dear boy. I insist upon it,”
said the Doctor.

“T can only guess, Sir,” said Elton, “ For I found
Lawton up last night with a candle.”

The Doctor rose and walked up and down the
room. Elton heard him say to himself—‘ Wretched
boy! my poor Frank!”

He meant to say that Lawton’s wickedness had
been the cause of Elton’s illness; and would be the
cause of his death.

That was true; for although Hlton had been ill
before, he had not been dying.

Elton knew very well what the Doctor meant, and
he said,
88 “HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“J wish you would not distress yourself about me,
dear Sir: I am very happy.”

The Doctor sat down by him again; and Elton said,

“Will you do me a very great “favour ? oe

“ What is it, Frank?”

“Do not send Lawton home: if you do, his uncle
will be so angry with him. Do forgive him; he
must be sorry for what he has done?”

‘“‘ He is not sorry,” said the Doctor. ‘ Do not ask
me, Frank;. you know I don’t like to refuse you_any-
thing.”

. “But, dear Sir, he will be sorry; perhaps he does
not yet know all he has done,” and Elton fixed his
eyes upon the Doctor's face.

The Doctor stooped over him and kissed his fore-
head, and said—
~ «Dear Frank, it is your Saviour himself has taught
you that spirit.”

“ Then you will forgive him, Sir?” said Frank again.

“Yes; because you ask it; for no other reason.’

And the Doctor left the room.

Soon, all the boys in the house knew that Elton
was dying; but the Doctor did not tell them that
Lawton had been the eause; he told Lawton so, and
he told him how Elton had asked that he might not be
sent home.

Lawton seemed very much shocked when the Doctor
told him. He sat for a long time thinking of it, and
wondering why Elton was not angry with him; and,
saying to himself, how dreadful it must be to die,
FORGIVENESS. 89

No wonder he was shocked and frightened. When
Harry Blake heard the Doctor say to the boys, that
Elton was dying, he ran to him and clung to him,
and called out,

“Oh! do let me go to him, Sir, do let me be with
him; I love him.”

Some of the boys thought that Harry must have
forgotten that it was the Doctor.

I think he knew the Doctor better than they did.

“ You will not cling to him, nor be rough or noisy,
nor talk much, Harry,” said the Doctor.

“ How could I, Sir, when he is so ill?’ said Harry.

And the Doctor said, “ Yes, you may go.”
90

CHAPTER XVI.

FRANCIS ELTON,

Ir was not for many days that Harry Blake could sit
by Elton.

Each day he became weaker. There were no lessons
now: most of the boys were gone home, although it
was not yet time for the holidays. Lawton was not
gone home.

All day long he did nothing.

He was so afraid every hour of hearing that Elton
was dead; but he was afraid of going into Elton’s
room, because he was looking so ill.

He sat with his chin upon his hands, doing nothing,
looking at nothing.

When the servants passed him on the stairs, they
would say,

** Come, Sir; get out of the way, please.”

Lawton would move for the time, but go back
again to his place, doing nothing, looking at nothing.

He seemed to be very unhappy.

Harry was, as he had promised, very quiet in
Elton’s room, There was no one there besides
FRANCIS ELTON. 91

him but the Doctor, when one evening, Elton asked
to sit up.

“ T want to see Lawton,” he said.

Harry ran to call him; but Lawton said,

“ T cannot go; I do not dare: say I cannot.”

“ But you must, Lawton,” said Harry.

And Harry dragged Lawton towards the door.

He would not look at Elton when he came into the
room, but kept his eyes upon the ground.

“Lawton,” said Elton, holding out his hand to
him.

«‘ No, don’t,” said Lawton, drawing back.

‘Lawton, do come near to me: I want to speak to

ou,” said Elton.

The Doctor moved Lawton nearer, until he stood
by the bedside, but with his eyes still upon the
ground.

‘«‘ Lawton,” said Elton, “I wish you would try to
be a better boy: I wish you would think how
wicked it is to live, day after day, without thinking
of God or saying your prayers.”

Lawton had thought that Elton would be angry
with him for making him ill; and that he was going
to speak to him about that. When he found that it
was not so, he felt better and looked up from the
ground.

“Lawton, will you try? Remember, you must
die some day, as I am dying.”

‘I should not like to die,” said Lawton. “ Are
not you afraid, Elton ?”
92 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

“No: I do not think I am,” Elton said.

“‘ Have you nothing to say?” said the Doctor very
sternly to Lawton ; “If you have not, you had better

0.”
= And Lawton went.

He felt almost glad that Elton had said nothing
about the fire; nothing about his late conduct.
~ Do you think that Lawton was really sorry for
what he had done ?

No, indeed! He. was not going to be vlintehed
any more ; so he tried to forget all the rest.

What a lesson all this might have been to Lawton,
if he would have taken it. But I am afraid that
from a bad boy ke grew into a bad man, until his
heart became quite hard, and God left him to
himself.

When Lawton left the bedroom, Elton said,

“J think Lam going to faint ;” and they opened
_ the window, and fanned him; but he was not
fainting.

He turned his face towards Harry, who was

standing close, looking at him, and said,
- No, Harry, I am not afraid to die; because,
although _I am a sinner, Christ has forgiven
me, and I know that He now is taking me to
heaven.”

His eyes went from Harry’s face, upwards; and
his lips still moved, though he did not speak;
and Harry thought that he must be talking to
God.
FRANCIS ELTON. 93

Without moving his eyes, Elton died.

The Doctor said to Harry, ;

“Come away, my little boy; he is gone to that
Lord Jesus whom he loved.”

“Oh, he is not really dead,” said Harry, “I did
not think; 1 never thought he could really die. Oh,
Elton! dear Elton! Do come back! Do speak again!
[ have so many things more to say to you.”

“You must say them to him, my child, when you
meet him again in heaven,” saidthe Doctor. ‘Come
Harry.”

For Harry was still vainly calling to Elton, and
kissing his cold forehead.

Poor little boy! When the Doctor drew him from
the bedside, and then took him from the room, he
still said he was sure that Elton could not be dead;
that he would awake again, and speak again; and
then he threw his arms round the Doctor’s neck and
cried.

It was only the next day, that Harry’s Papa came
to take him home. It was a very different going
home from what he had thought of.

But he was very glad to see his dear Papa again;
and to find that the long visit away from England
had made Mamma well again. He was very glad to
see little Amy again, and the cook, and the cat;
and he had a great many things to talk of and to
see. A great many things to tell about school, and
play, and the fun he had had with the boys.

But the one he had to speak about most was
94 HARRY AT SCHOOL.

Elton; and the one his Mamma liked to hear about
best was Elton.

You may be sure that Harry told his Papa and
Mamma all about his own naughtiness; and promised
to try and be a better boy; but I think he had learnt
the way to be a better boy.

When he returned to school, after the holidays
were over, he tried to obey all that the Doctor told
him, and to learn his lessons well; and when his old
cowardice and fear of being laughed at came over
him, something in the room, or in the play-ground,
a make him think of Elton, and then of Elton’s

od.

Tom Lawton was not sent away from school in
consequence of Hlton’s death ; but when he was home
for the holidays, he begged so hard to go to sea—for
he was afraid of going back to the Doctor’s, and
seeing again the house where all these things had
happened—that his uncle let him go; and | think
that Dr. Owen was very glad that he did not
return.

Later, when Harry was a man, and the good
Doctor was no longer with him to teach him, still he
knew that God was with him; and that it is God
only who can help us to do right, whether we are
children, or whether we have grown up to be men
and women; and I think he never again forgot to ask
for that help every morning and every night.

Little boys and little girls; do you remember who
FRANCIS ELTON, 95

came to teach you how to be good, and to show you
the way to heaven? It was the Lord Jesus Christ,
the same Lord whom Elton loved, and who made
Elton a good boy; for of himself, Elton was not
better than Lawton.

And He will make you good little children, if you
ask Him.

THE END.

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of “Paul Blake,” etc. Illustrated by Roperr Dupiey. Fcap, 8vo.

Price 5s. cloth; 5s. 6d. gilt edges.
“ The descriptions of Sardinian life and scenery are admirable.”—Athenzuin.

The Nine Lives of a Cat;

A Tale of Wonder. Written and Illustrated by C. H. Bennett.
Twenty-four Engravings. Imperial 16mo. price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d.
coloured.

“ Rich in the quaint humour and fancy that a man of genius knows how to spare for the
enlivenment of children.’’—E.waminer.

Blind Man’s Holiday ;

Or Short Tales for the Nursery. By the Author of “ Mia and Charlie,”
“Sidney Grey,” etc, Illustrated by John Absolon. Super Royal
16mo. price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

. “ Very true to nature and admirable in feeling.”—Guardian.




| 6 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

Tuppy ;
| Or the Autobiography of a Donkey. By the Author of “ The Triumphs
of Steam,” etc., etc. Tilustrated by Harrison Werr. Super Royal
16mo. price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

| “ A very intelligent donkey, worthyof the distinction conferred upon him by the artist.”
—Art Journal,

Funny Fables for Little Folks.

By Frances Freetrne Broperre (Daughter of the late THomas
Hoop). Illustrated by her Brother. Super Royal 16mo. price 2s. 6d.
| cloth; 38s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges,

“ The Fables contain the happiest mingling of fun, fancy, humour, and instruction.”—
Art Journal.

The History of a Quartern Loaf.
Rhymes and Pictures. By Wirtttam Newman. 12 Iilustrations.
Price 6d. plain, 1s. coloured.

Uniform in size and price,
The History of a Cup of Tea.
_ The History of a Scuttle of Coals.
| The History of a Lump of Sugar (preparing).

A Woman’s Secret;
Or How to Make Home Happy. 18mo., with Frontispiece, price 6d.
i Uniform with the above in size and price, and by the same Author,

Woman’s Work;

Or, How she can Help the Sick.

A Chapter of Accidents ;
Or, the Mother’s Assistant in cases of Burns, Scalds, Cuts, &c.
Pay To-day, Trust To-morrow;
A Story founded on Facts, illustrative of the Evils of the Tally
System.
Nursery Work; |
Or Hannah Baker’s First Place. |
Family Prayers for Cottage Homes;

With a Few Words on Prayer, and Select Scripture Passages. Feap. |

| 8vo. price 4d. limp cloth.

*,* These little works are admirably adapted for circulation among the working |
classes.






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 7

The Triumphs of Steam;

Or, Stories from the Lives of Watt, Arkwright, and Stephenson. By
the Author of “Mizht not Right,” “Our Eastern Empire,” &e. With
filustrations by J. Girpert. Dedicated by permission to Robert
Stephenson, Esq., M.P. Second edition. Royal 16mo, price 3s: 6d.
cloth; 4s. 6d., coloured, gilt edges.

“A most delicious volume of examples.”—Art Journal.

The War Tiger;

Or, The Adventures and Wonderful Fortunes of the Young Sea-Chief
and his Lad Chow. By Wizztam Darron, Author of “The White
Elephant,” &c. Hlustrated by H. 8. Mervitxre. cap. 8vo, price 5s.
cloth; 5s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges.
“A tale of lively adventure, vigorously told, and embodying much curious information.”
Illustrated News.

The Boy’s own Toy Maker.
A Practical Illustrated Guide to the useful employment of Leisure
Hours. By E. Lanpevis. With Two Hundred Cuts. Fourth Edi-
tion. Royal 16mo, price 2s. 6d., cloth.

«A new and valuable form of endless amusement.”’—Nonconformist.
“We recommend it to all who have children to be instructed and amused.” —Lconomist.

Hand Shadows,

To be thrown upon the Wall, A Geiias of Highteen Original |

Designs. By Henry Bursinu. 4to price 2s. plain; 2s. ‘6d. coloured.

A Second Series of Hand Shadows;

With Eighteen New Subjects. Ly H, Borsmx. Price 2s. plain;
2s. 6d. coloured.
«“Uncommonly clever—some wonderful effects are produced.” —The Press.

BY THE LATE THOMAS HOOD.

The Headlong Career and Woful Ending of Preco-

CIOUS PIGGY. Written for his Children, by the late Tuomas Hoop.
With a Preface by his Daughter; and Ilustrated by his Son, Third
Edition. Post 4to, fancy boards, price 2s. 6d., coloured.

“ The Illustrations are intensely humourous.”—The Critic.

The Harpsden Riddle Book,



A Collection of 350 Original Charades, Conundrums, Rebuses, etc |

Feap. 8vo. price 2s. 6d., cloth.






} youthful min



8 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS



The Fairy Tales of Science.

A Book for Youth. By J.C. Broven. With 16 Beautiful Tlustra-
tions by C. H. Benynerr. Feap. 8vo, price 5s., cloth; 5s. 6d. gilt edges,

Contents: 1. The Age of Monsters.—2. The Amber Spirit.—
3. The Four Elements.—4. The Life of an Atom.—5. A Little Bit.—
6. Modern Alchemy.—7. The Magic of the Sunbeam.—8s. Two Eyes
Better than One.—9. The Mermaid’s Home.—10. Animated Flowers.—
11. Metamorphoses.—12. The Invisible World.—13. Wonderful Plants.
14, Water Bewitched.—15. Pluto’s Kingdom.—16. Moving Lands.—

17, The Gnomes.—18. A Flight through Space.—19. The Tale of a |

Comet.—20, The Wonderful Lamp.
“Science, Perhaps, was never made more attractive and easy of entrance into the
-’—The Builder.

“« Altogether the volume is one of the most original, as well as one of the most useful,
books of the season.” —Gentleman’s Magazine.

Paul Blake;

Or, the Story of a Boy’s Perils in the Islands of Corsica and Monte

Cristo. By ALrrep Exwsxs, Author of “Ocean and her Rulers.” |

Illustrated by H. AneLay. Feap. 8vo, price 5s. cloth; 5s. 6d. cloth,
gilt edges.

“This spirited and engaging story will lead our young friends to a very intimate
acquaintance with the island of Corsica.”’—Art Journal.

Sunday Evenings with Sophia;

Or, Little Talks on Great Subjects. .A Book for Girls. By Leonora
G. Bett. Frontispiece by J. ABsoton. Feap. 8vo, price 2s. 6d. cloth.
“A very suitable gift for a thoughtful girl.”—Bell’s Messenger.

Scenes of Animal Life and Character.

From Nature and Recollection. In Twenty Plates. By J.B. 4to,
price 2s. 6d., plain; 3s. 6d., coloured, fancy boards,

“Truer, heartier, more playful, or more enjoyable sketches of animal life could
scarcely be found anywhere.”—Spectator.

Caw, Caw;

Or, the Chronicles of the Crows. Illustrated by J. B. 4to, price
2s. plain; 2s. 6d. coloured.

Three Christmas Plays for Children

1, The Sleeper Awakened. 2. The Wonderful Bird. 3. Crinolina. By
Tueresa Putszky. With Original Music, composed by Jansa; and
Three Illustrations by Anmrracy, coloured. 3s. 6d., cloth, gilt edges.




PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 9
W.H. CG. KINGSTON’S BOOKS FOR BOYS.
With Illustrations. Feap. 8vo. price 5s. each, cloth; 5s. 6d. gilt edges.

Will Weatherhelm ;

Or, the Yarn of an Old Sailor about his Early Life and Adventures.

“* We tried the story on an audience of boys, who one and all declared it to be capital.”
—Atheneum.

Fred Markham in Russia;

Or, the Boy Travellers in the Land of the Czar.

“Most admirably does this book unite a capital narrative, with the communication of
valuable information respecting Russia.”—Nonconformist.

Salt Water;

Or Neil D’Arcy’s Sea Life and Adventures. With Light Illustrations.

“*With the exception of Capt. Marryat, we know of no English author who will compare
with Mr. Kingston as a writer of books of nautical adventure.”—Iliustrated News.

Manco, the Peruvian Chief;

With Illustrations by Cari Scumonze.

“‘A capital book ; the story being one of much interest, and presenting a good account
of the history and institutions, the customs and manners, of the country.”—Literary Gazette.

Mark Seaworth;

A Tale of the Indian Ocean, By the Author of “ Peter the Whaler,”
etc, With Illustrations by J. ABsoton. Second Edition.

“No more interesting, nor more safe book, can be put into the hands of youth; and
to boys especially, ‘ Mark Seaworth’ will be a treasure of delight.”—Art Journal.

Peter the Whaler;

His early Life and Adventures in the Arctic Regions. Second Edition.
Illustrations by E. Duncan.
‘*A better present for a boy of an active turn of mind conld not be found. The tone of
the book is manly, healthful, and vigorous.”— Weekly News.

*‘A book which the old may, but which the young must, read when they have once
begun it.’—Atheneum,

Blue Jackets;

Or, Chips of the Old Block. A Narrative of the Gallant Exploits of
British Seamen, and of the principal Events in the Naval Service
during the Reign of Queen Victoria, by W. H. G. Kinesron. Post
8vo.; price 7s. 6d. cloth,

‘« 4 more acceptable testimonial than this to the valour and enterprise of the British
Navy, has not issued from the press for many years.”—Zhe Critic.








10 NEW AND. INTERESTING WORKS

HISTORY OF INDIA FOR THE YOUNG.

Our Eastern Empire;

Or, Stories from the History of British India. By the author of
“The Martyr Land,” “Might not Right,” etc. Second Edition, with
Continuation to the Proclamation of Queen Victoria. With Four
Illustrations, Royal 16mo. cloth 3s. 6d.; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

«These stories are charming, and convey a general view of the progress of our Empire in
the East. The tales are told with admirable clearness.”—-Atheneum.

The Martyr Land ;
Oy, Tales of the Vaudois. By the Author of “ Our Eastern Empire,”
etc. Frontispiece by J. Girperr. Royal 16mo; price 3s. 6d. cloth.

““While practical lessons run throughout, they are never obtruded; the whole tone is
refined without affectation, religious and cheerful.”—English Churchman.

Might not Right;

Or, Stories of the Discovery and Conquest of America. By the
author of “Our Eastern Empire,” etc. Illustrated by J. Gilbert.
Royal 16mo. price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“With the fortunes of Columbus, Cortes, and Pizarro, for the staple of these stories, the
writer has succeeded in producing a very interesting volume.’’—ZJllustrated News.

Jack Frost and Betty Snow; -

With other Tales for Wintry Nights and Rainy Days. Illustrated by
i. Weir. 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“The dedication of these pretty tales, prove by whom they are written; they are inde-
libly stamped with that natural and graceful method of amusing while instructing, which
only persons of genius possess.”—4v't Journal.

Old Nurse’s Book of Rhymes, Jingles, and Ditties.
Edited and Illustrated by C. H. Bennert, Author of “Shadows.”

With Ninety Engravings. Heap. 4to, price 3s. 6d. cloth, plain, or 6s.
coloured.

“The illustrations ara all so replete with fun and imagination, that we scarcely know
who will be most pleased with the book, the good-natured grandfather who gives it, or the
chubby grandchild who gets it, for a Christmas-Box.”’—Noies and Queries.

Maud Summers the Sightless:

A Narrative for the Young. Illustrated by Absolon. 3s. 6d. cloth;
4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“ A touching and beautiful story.”—Christian Treasury.
PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 11

Clara Hope;
Or, the Blade and the Kar. By Miss Mizner. With Frontispiece
by Birket Foster. Fcap. 8vo. price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. cloth elegant,
gilt edges.

“A beautifnl narrative, showing how bad habits may be eradicated, and evil tempers
subdued.”--British Mother's Jowrnal,

The Adventures and Experiences of Biddy Dork-

ING and of the FAT FROG. Edited by Mrs.S.C. Harz. Illustrated
by H. Weir. 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“Most amusingly and wittily told.”—Morning Herald.

ATTRACTIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE AMUSEMENT FOR THE YOUNG,

Home Pastime;

Or, The Child’s Own Toy Maker. With practical instructions. By
E. Lanperrs. New and Cheaper Edition, price 3s. 6d. complete, with
the Cards, and Descriptive Letterpress.

*,.* By this novel and ingenious “Pastime,” beautiful Models can be made
by Children from the Cards, by attending to the Plain and Simple Instruc-
tions in the Book.

Contents: 1. Wheelbarrow.—2. Cab.— 3. Omnibus.—4. Nursery
Yacht.—5. French Bedstead.—6. Perambulator.—7. Railway Engine.—
8. Railway Tender.—9. Railway Carriage.—10. Prince Albert’s Model
Cottage.—11. Windmill.—12. Sledge, ;
“As a delightful exercise of ingenuity, and a most sensible mode of passing a winter’s
evening, we commend the Child’s own Toy Maker.”—IdWustraied News.
“Should be in every house blessed with the presence of children.”—The Field.



BY THE AUTHOR OF “CAT AND DOG,” ETC.

7: ° . 7
Historical Acting Charades;
Or, Amusements for Winter Evenings. New Edition. Fcap. 8yo.
price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. gilt edges.
“A rare book for Christmas parties, and.of practical value.”—Illustrated News.



The Story of Jack and the Giants:

With thirty-five Hlustrations by Ricuarp Doyrz. Beautifully printed.
New and Cheaper Edition, cap. 4to. price 2s. 6d. in fancy boards;
4s. 6d. coloured, extra cloth, gilt edges.

“In Doyle’s drawings we have wonderful conceptions, which will secure the book a
place amongst the treasures of collectors, as well as excite the imaginations of children.”
—Iliustraied Times.










12 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS



Granny’s Wonderful Chair ;

And its Tales of Fairy Times. By Frances Browne. With Illus-
trations by Kenny Meapows. Small 4to, 3s. 6d. cloth, 4s. 6d. coloured,
gilt edges.

“One of the happies blendings of marvel and moral we have ever seen.”—Literary
Gazette. .

Pictures from the Pyrenees;

Or, Agnes’ and Kate’s Travels. By CaroLing Bett. With numerous
Illustrations. Small 4to.; price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“‘ With admirable simplicity'of manner it notices the towns, the scenery, the people, and
natural phenomena of this grand mountain region.”—The Press.

The Early Dawn;

Or, Stories to Think about. By a Counrry CLERGYMAN. Illus-
trated by H. Wer, etc. Small 4to.; price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d.
coloured, gilt edges.

“The matter is both wholesome and instructive, and must fascinate as well as benefit
the young.”—Literurium

Angelo;
Or, the Pine Forest among the Alps. By Grratpine E. Jewssury,
author of “The Adopted Child,” etc. With Illustrations by Joun
Axsoton. Small 4to; price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“As pretty a child’s story as one might look for on a winter’s day.” Examiner.

Tales of Magic and Meaning.

Written and Illustrated by ALFRED Crowaquitt, Author of “Funny

Leaves for the Younger Branches,” “The Careless Chicken,” “ Picture

Fables,” ete. Small 4to.; price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured.
“Cleverly written, abounding in frolic and pathos, and inculcates so pure a moral, that

we must pronounce him a very fortunate little fellow, who catches these ‘Tales of Magic,’
as a windfall from * The Christmas Tree’.”—Atheneum.

Faggots for the Fire Side;

Or, Tales of Fact and Fancy. By Perrr Partey. With Twelve
Tinted Illustrations. Foolscap 8vo.; 38s. 6d., cloth; 4s, gilt edges.

Conrents.—The Boy Captive; or Jumping Rabbit’s Story—The White
Owl—Tom Titmouse—The Wolf and Fox—Bob Link— Autobio-
graphy of a Sparrow—The Children of the Sun: a Tale of the Incas—
The Soldier and Musician—The Rich Man and His Son—The Ava-
lanche—Flint and Steel—Songs of the Seasons, etc.

** A new book by Peter Parley is a pleasant greeting for all boys and girls, wherever the

English language is spoken and read. He has a happy method of conveying information,
while seeming to address himself to the imagination.” —The Critic.





.




PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 13



The Discontented Children ;
And How they were Cured. By Mary and Exizazetn Kirsy, authors
of “The Talking Bird,” ete. Illustrated by H. K. Browne (Phiz.).
Second edition, price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“We know no better method of banishing ‘discontent’ from school-room and nursery
than by introducing this wise and clever story to their inmates.”—Art Journal,

The Talking Bird;
Or, the Little Girl who knew what was going to happen. By M. and
E. Kirgy, Authors of ‘The Discontented Children,” etc. With Illus-
trations by H. K. Brownu (Puiz). Small 4to. Price 2s. 6d. cloth;
3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“The story is ingeniously told, and the moral clearly shown.”—Athenaum,

Julia Maitland;
Or, Pride goes before a Fall. By M. and E. Kirpy, Authors of
“The Talking Bird,” etc, Illustrated by Joun Axsoton. Lrice
2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“It is nearly such a story as Miss Edgeworth might have written on the same theme.”—
The Press

Letters from Sarawak,
Addressed to a Child; embracing an Account of the Manners, Cus-
toms, and Religion of the Inhabitants of Borneo, with Incidents of
Missionary Life among the Natives. By Mrs. M‘Doucary. Fourth
Thousand, enlarged in size, with Illustrations. 3s. 6d. cloth.
All is new, interesting, and admirably told.” —Church and State Gazette.



COMICAL PICTURE BOOKS.
Uniform in size with The Struwwelpeter.”
Each with Sixteen large Coloured Plates, price 2s. 6d., in fancy boards,
or mounted on cloth, 1s. extra.

Picture Fables.

Written and Illustrated by ALrreD CrowQuiLy.

The Careless Chicken ;
By the Baron Kraxemsipes. By ALrrep CrowQuiLL.

Funny Leaves for the Younger Branches.
By the Baron Kraxemsiprs, of Burstenoudelafen Castle. Illustrated
by ALFRED CrowQulLu.

Laugh and Grow Wise;
By the Senior Owl of Ivy Hall.








14 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

The Remarkable History of the House that Jack

Built. Splendidly Wlustrated and magnificently Mluminated by Tur
Son or A Genrus. Price 2s. wn fancy cover.
*‘ Magnificent in suggestion, and most comical in expression !””—Atheneum.

A Peep at the Pixies;

Or, Legends of the West. By Mrs. Bray. Author of “The Borders
of the Tamar and the T'avy,” “Life of Stothard,” “Trelawny,” etc.,
ete. With Illustrations by Hastor K. Browns (Phiz) Super-royal
16mo, price 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“A peep at the actual Pixies of Devonshire, faithfully described by Mrs. Bray, is a
treat. Her knowledge of the locality, her affection for her subject, her exquisite feeling
for nature, and her real delight in fairy lore, have given a freshness to the little volume
we did not expect. The notes at the end contain matter_of interest for all who feel a
desire to know the origin of such tales and legends.” —Art Journal. :

A BOOK FOR EVERY CHILD.

The Favourite Picture Book;

A Gallery of Delights, designed for the Amusement and Instruction of
the Young. With several Hundred Illustrations from Drawings by
J. Assoton, H. K. Browne (Phiz), J. Givpert, T. Lanpserr,
J. Lercu, J. S. Prout, HW. Werr, ete. New Edition. Royal 4to.,
price 8s. 6d., bound in anew and Elegant Cover; 7s. 6d. coloured;
10s. 6d. mounted on cloth and coloured.

Ocean and her Rulers;
A Narrative of the Nations who have from the earliest ages held do-
minion over the Sea; and comprising a brief History of Navigation.
By Atrrep Etwes. With Frontispiece. Fecap. 8vo, 5s. cloth;
5s. 6d. gilt edges.
“The volume is replete with valuable and interesting information; and we cordially

recommend it as a useful auxiliary in the school-room, and entertaining companion in the
library.” —Morning Post.

Berries and Blossoms.
A Verse Book for Children. By T, Wesrwoov, With Title and
Frontispiece printed in Colours. Super-royal iGmo, price 3s. 6d.
cloth, gilt edges.


PUSLISHED BY CRIFFITH AND FARRAN.

|

The Wonders of Home, in Eleven Stories.

By Granpraruer Grey. With Illustrations. Third and Cheaper
Edition.. Royal 16mo., 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Conrents.—1. The Story of a Cup of Tea—2. A Lump of Coal.—3.
Some Hot Water.—4, A Piece of Sugar.—d. The Milk Jug.—6. A
Pin.—7. Jenny’s Sash.—8, Harry’s Jacket.—9. A Tumbler.—10. A
Knife.—11. This Book.

“ The idea is excellent, and its execution equally commendable. The subjects are well
solected, and are very happily told in alight yet sensible manner.” — Weekly News,

Cat and Dog;

Or, Memoirs of Puss and the Captain. Tustrated by Weir. Sixth
Edition, Super-royal 16mo, 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“The author of this amusing little tale is, evidently, a keen observer of nature, The

iNustrations are well executed; and the moral, which points the tale, is conveyed in the
most attractive form.”’—Britannia,

The Doll and Her Friends;

r, Memoirs of the Lady Seraphina. By the Author of “Cat and
Dog.” ‘Third Edition, With Four Illustrations by H. K. Brownz
(Phiz), 2s.6d., cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“Evidently written by one who has brought great powers to bear upon a small matter.”—
Morning Herald. .

ned

Tales from Catland;

Dedicated to the Young Kittens of England. By an Oxrp Tappy.
Illustrated by H. Wein. Third Edition. Small 4to, 2s. 6d. plain;
3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“The combination of quict humour and sound sense has made this one of the pleasantest
little books of the season.”—Lady’s Newspaper.

The Grateful Sparrow.

A True Story, with Frontispiece. Second Edition, Price 6d. sewed.

How I Became a Governess.

By the Author of “The Grateful Sparrow.” With Frontispiece.
Price 1s. sewed.






16

NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

WORKS BY MRS. R. LEE.

Anecdotes of the Habits and Instincts of Animals.
Third and Cheaper Edition. With Illustrations by Harrison Weir.

Feap. 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. gilt edges.

Anecdotes of the Habits and Instincts of Birds,

REPTILES, and FISHES. With Illustrations by Harrison Weir.
Second and Cheaper Edition. Feap. 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. gilt edges.

** Amusing, instructive, and ably written.”—Literary Gazette.
“Mrs, Lee's authorities—to name only one, Professor Owen—are, for the most part
first-rate.’—Atheneum.

Twelve Stories of the Sayings and Doings of |

ANIMALS. With Illustrations by J. W. Arncurr. Third Edition.

Super-royal 16mo, 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloure

d, gilt edges.

“It is just such books as this that educate the imagination of children, and enlist their
sympathies for the brute creation.”’—Nonconformist.

Familiar Natural History.

With Forty-two Illustrations from Original Drawings by Harrison
Weir. Super-royal 16mo, 3s. 6d. cloth; 5s. coloured gilt edges.

Playing at Settlers;

Or, the Faggot House. Illustrated by Ginpert. Second Edition.

Price 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Adventures in Australia;

Or, the Wanderings of Captain Spencer in the Bush and the Wilds.
Second Edition. Illustrated by Prour. F cap. 8vo., 5s. cloth; 5s. 6d.

gilt edges.

“This volume should find a place in every school library ; and it will, we are sure, be a
very welcome and useful prize.”—£ducational Times.

The African Wanderers;

“Tn strongly recommending this admirable work to the attention of young readers, we |

Or, the Adventures of Carlos and Antonio;

embracing interesting |
Descriptions of the Manners and Customs of the Western Tribes, and |

the Natural Productions of the Country. Third Edition. With Eight
Engravings. Fcap. 8vo, 5s. cloth; 5s. 6d. gilt edges,

“For fascinating adventure, and rapid succession of incident, the volume 1s equal to any
relation of travel we ever read.” —Britannia.

feel that we are rendering a real service to the cause of African civilization.” —Patriot.

Sir Thomas; or, the Adventures of a Cornish

BARONET IN WESTERN AFRICA.
J. Gitserr. Fecap. 8vo.; 3s. 6d. cloth.

With Illustrations by

|

|
|
{






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 17

Harry Hawkins’s H-Book;
Shewing how he learned to aspirate his H’s. Frontispiece by H. Wxrr
Super-royal 16mo, price 6d.

“No family or school-room within, or indeed beyond, the sound of Bow bells, should be
without this merry manual.”—Art Journal.



The Family Bible Newly Opened;
With Uncle Goodwin’s account of it. By Jerrerys Tayzor, author
of “A Glance at the Globe,” ete. Frontispiece by J.GmBerr. Feap.
8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth.

_ ‘A very good account of the Sacred Writings, adapted to the tastes, feelings, and intel-
ligence of young people.’’—Eaducational Times.

“ Parents will also find it a great aid in the religious teaching of their families.”—Zdin-
burgh Witness.

Kate and Rosalind;

Or, Early Experiences. By the author of “ Quicksands on Foreign
Shores,” ete. Feap. 8vo, 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. gilt edges.

“ A book of unusual merit. The story is exceedingly well told, and the characters are
drawn with a freedom and boldness seldom met with.” —Church of England Quarterly.

“We have not room to exemplify the skill with which Puseyism is tracked and detected.
The Irish scenes are of an excellence that has not been surpassed since the best days of
Miss Edgeworth.”—Fraser’s Magazine.

Good in Everything;
Or, The Early History of Gilbert Harland. By Mrs. Barwe11,
Author of “Little Lessons for Little Learners,” etc. Second idition.
With Illustrations by Joun Gitzerr. Royal 16mo., 2s. 6d. cloth;
3s.6d., coloured, gilt edges.

“The moral of this exquisite little tale will do more good than a thousand set tasks
abounding with dry and uninteresting truisms.”’—Bell’s Messenger.

A Word to the Wise;

Or, Hints on the Current Improprieties of Expression in Writing and
Speaking. By Parry Gwynxz. Fifth Edition. 18mo. price 6d.
sewed, or Is. cloth, gilt edges.

“ All who wish to mind their p’s and g’s should consult this little volume.”—Gentleman’s
Magazine.
“May be advantageously consulted by even the well-educated.”—Athenaum.




18 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

ELECANT CIFT FORA LADY.
Trees, Plants, and Flowers;

Their Beauties, Uses and Influences. By Mrs. R. Ler, Author of

“The African Wanderers,” etc. With beautiful coloured Llustrations
by J. ANDREWS. Svo, price 10s. 6d., cloth elegant, gilt edges.

“ The voluine is at once useful as a botanical work, and exquisite as the ornament of a
boudoir table.” —Briiannia. * As full of interest as of beauty.”—
N=iW AND BEAUTIFUL LIBRARY EDITION,
The Vicar of Wakefield;

A Tale. By Oxiver Goupsmirn. Printed by: Whittingham. With

Eight Hlustrations by J. Agsoton. Square feap. 8yvo, price 5s., cloth;

7s. half-bound morocco, Roxburghe style; 10s. 6d. antique morocco.
Mr. Absolon’s graphic sketches add greatly to the interest of the volume: altogether,

it is as pretty an edition of the‘ Vicar’ as we have seen. Mrs. Primrose herseli w ould
consider it ‘ well dressed.’ ’—Art Journal.

“A delightful edition of one of the most delightful of works: the fine old type and thick
paper make this volume attractive to any lover of books. ”_ Edinburgh Guardian.
3 WORKS BY MRS. LOUDON.
Domestic Pets;
Their Habits and Management; with Mlustrative Anecdotes. By

Mrs. Loupon. With Engravings from Drawings by Harrison Weir.
Second ‘Thousand. Feap. 8vo, 2s. 6d. cloth.

Conrrents:—The Dog, Cat, Squirrel, Rabbit, Guinea-Pig, White
Mice, the Parrot and other Talking Birds, Singing Birds, Doves and
Pigeons, Gold and Silver Fish.

“A most attractive and instructive little work. All who study Mrs. Loudon’s pages will
be able to treat their. pets with certainty and wisdom.”—Standard of Freedoit.

Glimpses of Nature;
And Objects of Interest described during a Visit to the Isle of Wight.

Designed to assist and encourage Young Persons in forming habits of

observation. By Mrs. Loupon. Second Edition, enlarged. With
Forty-one Ulustrations. 3s. 6d. cloth.

“ We could not recommend a more valuable little volume. It is full of information, con-
veyed in the most agreeable manner.”—Literary Gazelle.

Tales of School Life.

By Acnes Loupon, Author of “Tales for Young People.” With Hlus-
trations by Joun Ansonton. Second Edition. Royal 16mo, 2s. 6d.
plain; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“ These reminiscences of school days will be recognised as truthful pictures of every-day
occurrence. The style is colloquial and pleasant, and therefore well suited to those for
whose perusal it is intended.” —Atheneum,




PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 19

MISS JEWSBURY.

Clarissa Donnelly ;
Or, The History of an Adopted Child. By Miss Grratpine FI,
Jnwspory. With an Illustration by Joun Ansoton. F cap. 8vo,
3s. 6d. cloth; 4s, gilt edges.
* With wonderful power, only to be matched by as admirable a simplicity, Miss Jewsbury

has narrated the history of a child. For nobility of purpose, for simple, nervous writing,
and for artistic construction, it is one of the most valuable works of the day.’’—Lady's

Companion.

The Day of a Baby Boy;

A Story for a Young Child. By E. Bercer. With Illustrations by
Joun Axssotox. Sccond Edition, Super-royal 16mo, price 2s. 6d.
cloth; 8s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“ A sweet little book for the nursery.”—Christian Times.

Every-Day Things;
Or, Useful Knowledge respecting the principal Animal, Vegetable, and
Mineral Substances in common use. Written for Young Persons.
Second Edition, revised. 18mo., 1s. 6d. cloth.

“ A little encyc’opzedia of useful knowledge, deserving a place in every juvenile library.”” |

—E£vangelical Magazine.

PRICE SIXPENCE EACH, PLAIN; ONE SHILLING, COLOURED.

In Super-Royal 16mo., beautifully printed, each with Seven Illustrations by
Harrison Weir, and Descriptions by Mrs. Ler.
. BRITISH ANIMALS. First Series.
. BRITISH ANIMALS. Second Series,
. BRITISH BIRDS.
. FOREIGN ANIMALS. First Series.
. FOREIGN ANIMALS. Second Series.
. FOREIGN BIRDS.
** Or bound in One Volume under the title of “Familiar Natural
History,” see page 16.

& Ot da Co BD

Oniform in size and price with the above.

THE FARM AND ITS SCENES. With Six Pictures from Drawings
by Harrison Weir.

THE DIVERTING HISTORY OF JOHN GILPIN. With Six Tlus-
trations by Warrs Puinuirs.

THE PEACOCK AT HOME, AND BUTTERFLY’S BALL. With
Four Illustrations by Harrison WEIR.






20 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS



WORKS BY THE AUTHOR OF MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES.

Fanny and her Mamma ;
Or, Easy Lessons for Children. In which it is attempted to bring Scrip~
tural Principles into daily practice. Illustrated by J. Girzertr. Third
Edition. 16mo, 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“A little book in beautiful large clear type, to suit the capacity of infant readers, which
we can with pleasure recommend.”—Christian Ladies’ Magazine.

Short and Simple Prayers,

For the Use of Young Children. With Hymns. Fifth Edition. |

Square 16mo, 1s. 6d. cloth.

“ Well adapted to the capacities of children—beginning with the simplest forms which
the youngest child may lisp at its mother’s knee, and proceeding with those suited to its
gradually advancing age. Special prayers, designed for particular circumstances and
occasions, are added. We cordially recommend the book.”’—Christian Guardian,

Mamma’s Bible Stories,

For her Little Boys and Girls, adapted to the capacities of very young
Children. Eleventh Edition, with Twelve Engravings. 2s. 6d. cloth;
8s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

A Sequel to Mamma’s Bible Stories.

Fifth Edition. Twelve Illustrations. 2s. 6d. cloth, 8s. 6d. coloured.

Scripture Histories for Little Children.

With Sixteen Illustrations, by Jonn Gitsert. Super-royal 16mo,
price 3s. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Contents.—The History of Joseph—-History of Moses—History of our
Saviour— The Miracles of Christ.

Sold separately: 6d. each, plain; 1s. coloured.

Bible Scenes ;

Or, Sunday Employment for very young Children. Consisting of
Twelve Coloured Illustrations on Cards, and the History written in
Simple Language. In a neat box, 3s. 6d.; or the Illustrations dis-
sected as a Puzzle, 6s. 6d.

First Sertes: JOSEPH. Srconp Serres: OUR SAVIOUR.
Tuirp Serres: MOSES. Fourtu Serres: MIRACLES OF CHRIST.

“Tt is hoped that these ‘Scenes’ may form a useful and interesting addition to the Sab-
bath occupations of the Nursery. From their very earliest infancy little children will
listen with interest and delight to stories brought thus palpably before their eyes by means
of illustration.”—Preface.






| PUBLISHED BY CRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 21



ILLUSTRATED BY GEORCE CRUIKSHANK,

| Kit Bam, the British Sinbad;

Or, the Yarns of an Old Mariner. By Mary Cownen CrarkgE, author
of “The Concordance to Shakspeare,”
cloth; 4s. gilt edges.

“A more captivating volume for juvenile recreative reading we never remember to have

matter which characterises the Eastern fiction.”—Standard of Freedom.
“ Cruikshank’s plates are worthy of his genius.” —Ewaminer.



The Favourite Library.

A Series of Works for the Young; each Volume with an Illustration
by a well-known Artist. Price 1s. cloth,

1, THE ESKDALE HERD BOY. By Lapy Sropparr.

2. MRS. LEICESTER’S SCHOOL. By Cuartes and Mary Lams.
3. THE HISTORY OF THE ROBINS, By Mrs. Trimmer.

4. MEMOIR OF BOB, THE SPOTTED TERRIER,
5.
6.
7.



KEEPER’S TRAVELS IN SEARCH OF HIS MASTER.
THE SCOTTISH ORPHANS. By Lapy Sropparr.

NEVER WRONG; or, THE YOUNG DISPUTANT; and “IT |

WAS ONLY IN FUN.”
8. THE LIFE AND PERAMBULATIONS OF A MOUSE.

9. EASY INTRODUCTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF
NATURE. By Mrs. Tromer.

10. RIGHT AND WRONG. By the Author of “ ALways Happy.”
11, HARRY’S HOLIDAY. By Jerrerys Tayror.
12. SHORT POEMS AND HYMNS FOR CHILDREN.

The above may be had Two Volumes bound in One, at Two Shillings cloth,
or 2s. 6d. gilt edges, as follows :—

LADY STODDART’S SCOTTISH TALES,

ANIMAL HISTORIES. Tue Doe.

ANIMAL HISTORIES. Tue Rosrys and Mouse.

TALES FOR BOYS. Harry’s Hormay and Never Wrona.

oS

ao

AND WronG.

6. POETRY AND NATURE. Snort Poems and Trimmer’s
INTRODUCTION.

etc, Feap. 8vo, price 3s. 6d, |

seen. It is as wonderful as the ‘Arabian Nights,’ while it is free from the objectionable |



. TALES FOR GIRLS. Mars. Luicester’s Scnoon and Rieur |
|


29 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

Stories of Julian and his Playfellows.

Written by His Mamma. With Four Illustrations by Jounw Apsoron,
Second Edition, Small 4to., 2s. 6d., plain; 3s. 6d., coloured, gilt edges.

“The lessons taught by Julian’s mamma are each fraught with an excellent moral.”—
Morning Advertiser.

Blades and Flowers.

Poems for Children. Frontispiece by H. Anrtay. Fecap. Svo; price
2s. cloth.
“Breathing the same spirit as the Nursery Poems of Jane Taylor.”—Literary Gazette.

Aunt Jane’s Verses for Children.

By Mrs. T.D.Crewpson. Illustrated with twelve beautiful Engravings. |

Fcap. 8vo; 3s. 6d. cloth.

“A charming little volume, of excellent moral and religious tendency.”—L£vangelical
Magazine.

The History of a Family;

Or, Religion our best Support. With an Illustration on Steel by Jounn
Axsonon. Feap. 8vo, 2s. 6d. cloth.

“ A natural and gracefully written story, pervaded by a tone of Scriptural piety, and
well calculated to foster just views of life and duty. We hope it will find its way into many
English homes.—Englishwoman’s Magazine.

Rhymes of Royalty.

The History of England in Verse, from the Norman Conquest to the
reign of QurEN VictorIA; with an Appendix, comprising a summary
of the leading events in each reign. By 8. Buewerr. Fecap. 8vo,
with Frontispiece. 2s, 6d. cloth.

NEW AND CHEAPER EDITION.

The Ladies’ Album of Fancy Work.

Consisting of Novel, Elegant, and Usetul Patterns in Knitting, Netting,
Crochet, and Embroidery, printed in Colours. Bound in a beautiful
cover. New Edition. Post 4to, 3s. 6d., gilt edges.




PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 23

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN,

The Dream of Little Tuk;

And other Tales, by H.C. Anpersen. ‘Translated and dedicated to
the Author by Cuartes Boxer. Illustrated by Counr Poccx. Feap.
8vo, 2s. plain; 3s. coloured.

“Full of charming passages of prose, poetry, and such tiny dramatic scenes as will make
the pulses of young readers threb with delight.” —Atlas.

Visits to Beechwood Farm;

Or, Country Pleasures, and Hints for Happiness addressed to the
Young. By Caruertne M. A. Courrr. Illustrations by ABsonon.
Small 4to, 3s. 6d., plain; 4s. 6d. coloured; gilt edges.

_ “The work is well calculated to impress upon the minds of the young the superiority of
simple and natural pleasures over those which are artificial.”—Lnglishwoman’s Magazine.

Insect Changes.

With richly Hluminated Borders, composed of Flowers and Insects, in
the highly-wrought style-of the celebrated“ Hours of Anne of Brittany,”
and forming a first Lesson in Entomology. Price 5s., in elegant binding.
‘One of the richest gifts ever offered, even in this improving age, to childhood. Nothing

can be more perfect in illumination than the embellishments of this charming little
volume.”—Art Union.

The Modern British Plutarch;
Or, Lives of Men distinguished in the recent History of our Country
for their Talents, Virtues and Achievements. By W. C. Taxnor, LL.D.
Author of “A Manual of Ancient and Modern History,” ete.. 12mo,
Second Thousand, with anew Frontispiece. 4s. 6d. cloth; 5s. gilt edges.

Contents: Arkwright — Burke — Burns — Byron —Canning—Earl
of Chatham — Adam Clarke— Clive — Captain. Cook — Cowper —
Crabbe — Davy — Eldon— Erskine — Fox -- Franklin — Goldsmith —
Earl Grey — Warren Hastings — Heber — Howard — Jenner — Sir
W.. Jones— Mackintosh—H. Martyn—Sir J. Moore — Nelson — Pitt
—Romilly —-Sir. W. Scott — Sheridan — Smeaton— Watt — Marquis
of Wellesley — Wilberforce —Wilkie — Wellington...

‘““A work which will be welcomed in any circle of intelligent young persons.”—British
Quarterly Review.




24 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

Home Amusements.

A Choice Collection of Riddles, Charades, Conundrums, Parlour
Games, and Forfeits. By Peter Puzztewsrtt, Esq., of Rebus Hall.
New Edition, revised and enlarged, with Frontispiece by H. K.
Browns (Phiz). 16mo, 2s. 6d. cloth.

Early Days of English Princes.

By Mrs. Russert Gray. Dedicated by permission to the Duchess of
Roxburgh. With Illustrations by Joun Franxxin. Small 4to.,
3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

“Just the book for giving children some first notions of English history, as the person-
ages it speaks about are themselves young.”— Manchester Examines.

First Steps in Scottish History,

By Miss Ropwe tt, Author of “ First Steps to English History.” With
Ten Illustrations by Wr1gaLL. 16mo, 3s. 6d. cloth; 4s. 6d. coloured.

“It is the first popular book in which we have seen the outlines of the early history of
the Scottish tribes exhibited with anything like accuracy.”—Glasgow Constitutional.

“The work is throughout agreeably and lucidly written.”—Adidland Counties Herald.

London Cries and Public Edifices.

Illustrated in Twenty-four Engravings by Luxe Limnepr; with descrip-
tive Letter-press. Square 12mo, 2s. 6d. plain; 5s. coloured. Bound in
emblematic cover.



r .
The Silver Swan;
A Fairy Tale. By Mapame pe Cuarerary. Illustrated by Joun
Lerrcu. Small 4to, 2s. 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.
“ The moral isin the good, broad,unmistakeable style of the best fairy period.” —Atheneum.
“The story is written with excellent taste and sly humour.’’—Allas.

Mrs. Trimmer’s Concise History of England,

Revised and brought down to the present time by Mrs. Mirner. With
Portraits of the Sovereigns in their proper costume, and Frontispiece
by Harvey. New Edition in One Volume. 5s. cloth.

“The editing has been very judiciously done. The work has an established reputation for

the clearness of its genealogical and chronological tables, and for its pervading tone of
Christian piety.”—Church and State Gazetle.






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 25



_ The Celestial Empire;

or, Points and Pickings of Information about China and the Chinese. |

By the late “Ory Humpurey.” With Twenty Engravings from
Drawings by W. H. Prior. Fcap. 8vo, 3s. 6d., cloth; 4s. gilt edges.

“This very handsome volume contains an almost incredible amount of information.”—
Church and State Gazette.

“The book is exactly what the author proposed it should be, full of good information,
good feeling, and good temper.”—AUen’s Indi i

ian Mail.
“Even well-known topics are treated with a graceful air of novelty,”’—Atheneum.

Tales from the Court of Oberon.

Containing the favourite Histories of Tom Thumb, Graciosa and Per-
cinet, Valentine and Orson, and Children in the Wood. With Sixteen
Illustrations by ALFRED Crow@uiLL. Small 4to, 2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d.
coloured.

True Stories from Ancient History, «

Chronologically arranged from the Creation of the World to the Death
of Charlemagne. Twelfth Edition. With 24 Steel Engravings. 12mo,
5s. cloth.

True Stories from Modern History,

Chronologically arranged from the Death of Charlemagne to the
present Time. Eighth Edition. With 24 Steel Engravings. 12mo, 5s.
cloth.

True Stories from English History,

Chronologically arranged from the Invasion of the Romans to the
Present Time. Sixth Edition. With 36 Steel Engravings. 12mo, 5s.
cloth.

Stories from the Old and New Testaments,

On an improved plan. By the Rey. B. H. Draper. With 48 En-
gravings, Fifth Edition, 12mo, 5s. cloth.

Wars of the Jews,

As related by Josrrnus; adapted to the Capacities of Young Persons,
With 24 Engrayings. Sixth Edition. 4s. 6d. cloth.

The Prince of Wales’ Primer.

With 300 Tlustrations by J. Giger. Dedicated to her Majesty. New
Edition, price 6d.; with title and cover printed in gold and colours, 1s.










26 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

Pictorial Geography.
For the use of Children. Presenting at one view Illustrations of the
various Geographical Terms, and thus imparting clear and definite

ideas of their meaning. On a Large Sheet. Price 2s. 6d. in tints; |

5s. on Rollers, varnished.

One Thousand Arithmetical Tests;

Or, The Examiner’s Assistant. Specially adapted, by a novel arrange-
ment of the subject, for Examination Purposes, but also suited for
general use in Schools. By T.S.Cayzer, Head Master of Queen
Elizabeth’s Hospital, Bristol. Price 1s. 6d. cloth.

*,* Answers to the above, 1s, 6d. cloth.

THE ABBE GAULTIER’S GEOGRAPHICAL WORKS.

1, Familiar Geography.

With a concise Treatise on the Artificial Sphere, and two coloured
Maps, illustrative of the principal Geographical Terms. Fifteenth
Edition. 16mo, 3s. cloth.

ur. An Atlas.

Adapted to the Abbé Gaultier’s Geographical Games, consisting of 8
Maps coloured, and 7 in Outline, etc. Folio, 15s. half-bound.

Butler’s Outline Maps, and Key;

Or, Geographical and Biographical Exercises; with a Set of Coloured
Outline Maps; designed for the Use of Young Persons. By the late
Wiiu1am Borer. Enlarged by the author’s son, J. O. Burinr.
Thirty-second Edition, revised. 4s,

Rowbotham’s New and Easy Method of Learning
the FRENCH GENDERS. New Edition. 6d.

Bellenger’s French Word and Phrase-book.

Containing a select Vocabulary and Dialogues, for the Use of Begin-
ners. New Edition, ls. sewed.






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 27

MARIN DE LA VOYE’S ELEMENTARY FRENCH WORKS.

Les Jeunes Narrateurs;

Ou Petits Contes Moraux, With a Key to the difficult words and
phrases. Frontispiece, Second Edition, 18mo, 2s. cloth,
“Written in pure and easy French.” —Morning Post.

The Pictorial French Grammar;

For the Use of Children. With Eighty Illustrations. Royal 16mo.,
price 1s. sewed; 1s. 6d. cloth.

Le Babillard.

An Amusing Introduction to the French Language. By a French
Lady. Sixth Edition. 2s. cloth.

Der Schwiitzer;

Or, the Prattler. An amusing Introduction to the German Langnage,
on the Plan of ‘‘Le Babillard.” 16 Illustrations. 16mo, price 2s. cloth.

Battle Fields.

A graphic Guide to the Places described in the History of England as
the scenes of such Events; with the situation of the principal Naval
Engagements fought on the Coast of the British Empire. By Mr.
Wauruigr, Geographer. On a large sheet 3s.6d.; in case 6s., or
ona roller, and varnished, 9s.



Tabular Views of the Geography and Sacred His-

TORY of PALESTINE, and of the TRAVELS of ST. PAUL.
Intended for Pupil Teachers, and others engaged in Class Teaching.
By A. T. Wuirr. Oblong 8vo, price 1s., sewed.

The First Book of Geography ;

Specially adapted as a Text Book for Beginners, and as a Guide to the
Young Teacher. By Huco Rem, author of “ Elements of Astronomy,”
etc. ‘Third Edition, carefully revised. 18mo, 1s, sewed.

“ One of the most sensible little books on the subject of Geography we have met with.”
—Educational Times.

The Child’s Grammar,
| By the late Lapy Fenn, under the assumed name of Mrs. Lovechild.
Forty-ninth Edition. 18mo, 9d. cloth.






28 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS



Always Happy;

Or, Anecdotes of Felix and his Sister Screna. By the author of
“Claudine,” ete. Eighteenth Edition, with new Illustrations. Royal
18mo, price 2s. 6d. cloth.

Andersen’s (H. C.) Nightingale and other Tales.

2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured.

Anecdotes of Kings,

Selected from History; or, Gertrude’s Stories for Children. With En-
gravings. 2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured.

Bible Illustrations ;

Or, a Description of Manners and Customs peculiar to the East, and
especially Explanatory of the Holy Scriptures. By the Rev. B. H.
Draper. With Engravings. Fourth Edition. Revised by J. Kirro,
Editor of “ The Pictorial Bible,” ete. 3s. 6d. cloth.

“This volume will be found unusually rich in the species of information so much needed
by young readers of the Scriptures.”—Christian Mother's Magazine.

The British History briefly told,

and a Description of the Ancient Customs, Sports, and Pastimes of the
English. Embellished with full-length Portraits of the Sovereigns of
England in their proper Costumes, and 18 other Engravings. 3s. 6d.
cloth.

Chit-chat ;
Or, Short Tales in Short Words. By a Morner, author of “Always
Happy.” New Edition. With Eight Engravings. Price 2s. 6d. cloth,
3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

Conversations on the Life of Jesus Christ.
For the use of Children. By a Morner. A new Edition. With 12
Engravings. 2s.6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured.

Cosmorama.

The Manners, Customs, and Costumes of all Nations of the World
described. By J. Aspix. New Edition with numerous Illustrations.
3s. 6d. plain; and 4s. 6d. coloured.

Easy Lessons;

Or, Leading-Strings to Knowledge. New dition, with 8 Engravings.
2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges,






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN. 29



Key to Knowledge;
Or, Things in Common Use simply and shortly explained. By a
Morner, Author of “ Always Happy,” ete. Thirteenth Edition. With
Sixty Illustrations. 3s. 6d. cloth.
Facts to correct Fancies;
Or, Short Narratives compiled from the Biography of Remarkable
Women. By a Moruer. With Engravings, 3s. 6d. plain; 4s. 6d. coloured.
Fruits of Enterprise ;
Exhibited in the Travels of Belzoni in Egypt and Nubia. Thirteenth
Edition, with six Engravings. 18mo, price 3s. cloth.

The Garden;

. Or, Frederick’s Monthly Instructions for the Management and Forma-
tion of a Flower Garden. Fourth Edition. With Engravings of the
Flowers in Bloom for each Month in the Year, ete. 3s. 6d, plain; or
6s. with the Flowers coloured.

How to be Happy;

Or, Fairy Gifts: to which is added a Selection of Moral Allegories,
from the best English Writers. With Steel Engravings. Price 3s. 6d.
cloth,

Infantine Knowledge.

A Spelling and Reading Book, on a Popular Plan, combining much
Useful Information with the Rudiments of Learning, By the Author
of “The Child’s Grammar.” With numerous Engravings. Ninth
Edition. 2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

The Ladder to Learning.

A Collection of Fables, Original and Select, arranged progressively in
words of One, Two, and Three Syllables. Edited and improved by the
late Mrs. Trimmer. With 79 Cuts. Nineteenth Edition. 3s. 6d. cloth.

Little Lessons for Little Learners.
In Words of One Syllable. By Mrs. Barwezn., Ninth Edition,
with numerous Illustrations. 2s. 6d. plain; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges.

The Little Reader.

A Progressive Step to Knowledge. Fourth Edition with sixteen Plates.
Price 2s. 6d. cloth.




30 NEW AND INTERESTING WORKS

Mamma’s Lessons.

For her Little Boys and Girls. Thirteenth Edition, with eight En-
gravings. Price 2s, 6d. cloth; 3s. 6d. coloured, gilt edges,

The Mine;

Or, Subterranean Wonders. An Account of the Operations of the
Miner and the Products of his Labours; with a Description of the most
important in all parts of the World. By the late Rev. Isaac Taytor.
Sixth Edition, with numerous corrections and additions by Mrs. Loupon,
With 45 new Woodcuts and 16 Steel Engravings. 3s. 6d. cloth.

Young Jewess, The, and her Christian School-

fellows. By the Author of “Rhoda,” ete. With a Frontispiece by
J. GILBERT. 16mo, Ls. cloth,

Rhoda;

Or, The Excellence of Charity. Fourth Edition. With Ilustrations.
16mo, 2s. cloth. A

The Rival Crusoes,

And other Tales. By Acnes SrrickLanp, author of “The Queens
of England.” Sixth Edition. 18mo, price 2s. 6d. cloth.

| Short Tales.

Written for Children. By Dame Trvuexove and her Friends. A new
Edition, with 20 Engravings. 3s. 6d. cloth.

The Students;
Or, Biographies of the Grecian Philosophers. 12mo, price 2s. 6d. cloth.

Stories of Edward and his little Friends.
With 12 Illustrations. Second Edition, 3s. 6d. plain; 4s. 6d. coloured.

Sunday Lessons for little Children.

By Mrs. Barwett. Third Edition. 2s, 6d. plain; 3s. coloured.

A Visit to Grove Cottage,

And the India Cabinet Opened. By the author of “ Fruits of Enter-
prise.” New Edition. 18mo, price $s. cloth.






PUBLISHED BY GRIFFITH AND FARRAN.

oo
at



Dissections for Young Children;
In a neat box. Price 5s. each.
1. SceNEs rrom THE Lives or Joseru AND Mosss.
2. SceNES FROM THE History or Our Saviour.

3. OLp Moruer Husparp and ner Dog,
4, Lire anp Dearnu or Cock Rosin.

TWO SHILLINGS EACH, CLOTH.
ANECDOTES OF PETER THE | COUNSELS AT HOME; with
GREAT, Emperor of Russia. | Anecdotes, Tales, &c.
L8mo, | MORAL TALES. By a Farner.
| With 2 Engravings.

ONE SHILLING AND SIXPENCE EACH, CLOTH.
THE DAUGHTER OF A GE- | SHORT AND SIMPLE PRAY-
NIUS. A Tale. By Mrs.Hor- | ERS FOR CHILDREN, WITH
| LAND, Sixth Edition. | HYMNS. By the Author of
| . | © Me 2s Bible Stories,” &c.
ELLEN THE TEACHER. By | .., Mamma’s Bible Stories,” &c.
\ Mrs. Hortanp. New Edition. — TRIMMER’S (MRS.) OLD TES-

| TAMENT LESSONS. With 40
THE SON OF A GENIUS. By | Engravings.

_ Mrs. Hornaxn. New Edition. | TRIMMER’S (MRS.) NEW TES-
THEODORE; or, the Crusaders, TAMENT LESSONS. With 40
By Mrs. Hortanp. New Edition. | Engravings. New Editions.

ONE SHILLING, PLAIN. CINE SHILLING AND SIXPENCE, COLOURED,
THE DAISY, with Thirty Wood | THE COWSLIP, with Thirty En-
Engravings. 26th Edition. gravings, 24th Edition.
|
ONE SHILLING EACH. CLOTH. |
WELCOME VISITOR; a Collec- | THE CHILD'S DUTY. Dedicated |



tion of Original Stories, &c. | by a Mother to her Children. |
NINA, an Icelandic Tale. By the | Second Edition.

Author of “ Always Happy.” | DECEPTION and FREDERICK
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