Citation
Titcomb's letters to young people, single and married

Material Information

Title:
Titcomb's letters to young people, single and married
Series Title:
Titcomb's letters to young people, single and married
Creator:
Holland, J. G.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Charles Scribner
Language:
English
Edition:
Twenty-sixth

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA4410 ( LTQF )
ALH9108 ( LTUF )
15225935 ( OCLC )
026989021 ( ALEPHBIBNUM )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










The Baldwin Library

RmB











&

LOL hale

Bip ie &





















‘





SINGLE AND MARRIED. |
TIMOTHY TITCOMB, Esquire |

ew. YORK: |
CHAELES SCRIBNER. |
, 124 GRAND STREET.

ie a ARO.











aks












Eatered according te Act of Congress, in en yeal 1806, a
CHARLES SCRIBNER,

b the Clerk's Office of the Distriet Court of the United States for the
~ Southern District of New York. ees ee




























— Pee = pe ee
7a eS Ma NE RR “Sy eiee a, y 2 .
x ;
Set eT US are .
,
ee {
‘ « . Se 4
. a
.
ok: F
. } Z
ben ‘ a
uy
.
4 ‘
Â¥
¢
a S Fe,





.
mh
hah

















TO THE

| REY. waxy WARD BEECHER



oy “You digrs very kindly suitcase me to dedi-
a cate this book to you. I do it with hearty plea-
: sure, and with cordial thanks for your courtesy,



because it will do me good in several ways. First,



apect and admiration which I entertain towards
one who, in the best way, is doing more than any
other American for the elevation of the standard
of Christian manhood and womanhood. Second,




it will save to me the awkward labor of writing a



he

+ will give me an opportunity to manifest the re-







ete eam a at oe og j :
: or eae ahi eae ah 9? | TR ce TO RLS
‘ e ee ee 2 Ny ds be atts ° eens wt ih ee
* en ee ety ee ee Te ee es, r a nt Antec teen te bain me Hs















vi PREFACE,

general preface. One can say to a friend, you
know, in a familiar way, what he would hesitate
to say directly to the public of his own perform-
ances. Third, it will show the public that yo
know the author of these letters, and that you
have confidence in his good intentions.

The Great Master taught you how to teach,
and, if we heed the lesson of His life, He will

teach us all. He assumed a sympathetic level

with humanity, that He might secure the eye and
ear of the world. Through these He obtained
the heart—a conquest preliminary to that of the
world’s understanding and life. It was the divine
policy—rather, perhaps, I should say, the eternal
necessity—that He should be made in all points
like as we are, in order to a fitness for and the
fulfilment of his mission. It was the brother
that was in Him which touched humanity, and
became the medium of heavenly impulses and
inspirations; and it is the brother in us, rather
than the preceptor, which will enable us to reach
the hearts and minds that call for our ministra-
tions.

With this idea in mind, I cannot but think that
a general mistake has been made in the instrue-









Vill PREFACE.

breadth, and its contents may occupy an inferior
level, yet it may brim a goblet with pure water,
without other elevation than that which is neces
sary for the service.

You will notice that I address my letters to the
young men, young women, and young married
people, as classes, with distinctness of aim and ap-
plication, while I inclose all in a single volume.
I have intended the whole book for each class. I
believe that each should know what Ihave to say
to the other. I have written nothing to one class
which it would not be well for the other to know.
The effort to maintain a divided interest and a
divided sympathy between the sexes, to deny to
them partnership in a common knowledge of their
relationship, to hide them from each other as if
they were necessarily enemies or dangerous asso-
ciates, and to obliterate the idea that they are
sharers in the same nature, and companions in a
common destiny, may spring fromsthe purest mo-
tives, but it produces inhuman results. :

I look around me, and I see the young of both
sexes with hearts bounding high with hope, forms
elastic with health, and eyes bright with the
enjoyment of life; and the thought of the stern









PREFACE, 1X

discipline which awaits them, touches me to tears.
Their dawning sun gilds only the mountain-tops
of life, and leaves the blind defiles and dismal
gorges for their weary feet to find, through years
of patient or fretful travel. To tell them how te
perform this journey worthily, and to do it hand
in hand, in harmonious companionship, I have

written these letters. It has been with me an

honest and earnest work, in the object of which I
am sure that you will sympathize. I only hope
that you will find little to criticise and nothing to
condemn, in the nature and style of the means by
which I have sought to accomplish it.
Yours, |
With respectful affection,

Tor AUTHOR.
- REPUBLICAN OFFICE, |

a aeeees July 1, 1358,
1*



ELLE LE - - Ss TY EET EIEIO TR settee Rane lee Dt NEE IEE COL OL CELLO A ALLEL AAD AAAEAAL ELIE
:

opment Ai By

oy teers















6
























PAGE.

g the Right Start, . ee . 1s

; Female Society—The Woman for a Wire, ¢5 e
— Bg Oe ee
CM et B
; Bay aie tk . . . 45

Popeater, .... °°. «- .. 64

Duties ivi tn le
cae















tT a ED SAL LEN OE EN NEI

xi CONTENTS.

LETTER. PACE
V. The Claims of Lol and Lucre, fc tg a ly ag ee

VI. The Prudent and Proper Use of Language, . . 134

VI. Housewifery and Industry, . ‘ - 144

Vill. The Beauty and Blessedness of female Piety, : 155

LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

I. The First Essential Duties of the Connubial Relaticn, 167

IT. Special Duties of the Husband, ‘ : ‘ s 1%
III. Special Duties of the Wife,
IV. The Rearing of Children, . ‘ ’ ; 198
V. Separation—Family Relatives—Servants, oe ae
VI. The Institution of Home, . ° . 219
VII. Social Homes, and Blessings for Daily Use, ‘ . 229
VIII. A Vision of Life and its Meaning. . .~ 0 aoe

. . k8S ’







LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

pen mes

LETTER I.
GETTING THE RIGHT START.

In idle wishes fools supinely stay,
Be there a will, then wisdom finds a way. —
BuRNS.

SUPPOSE that the first great lesson a young

man should learn is that he knows nothing; and
that the earlier and more thoroughly this lesson is
learned, the better it will be for his peace of mind and
his success in life. A young man, bred at home, and
growing up in the light of parental admiration and
fraternal pride, cannot readily understand how it is
that every one else can be his equal in talent and
acquisition. If, bred in the country, he seeks the life of

the town, he will very early obtain an idea of his

insignificance. After putting on airs and getting severely
laughed at, going into a bright and facile society and

finding himself awkward and tongue-tied, undertaking





14 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

to speak in some public place and breaking down, and

ear

paying his addresses to some gentle charmer and
receiving for his amiable condescension a mitten of
inconvenient dimensions, he will be apt to sit down in
a state “ bordering on distraction,” to reason about it.
This is a critical period in his history. The result of
his reasoning will decide his fate. If, at this time, he

thoroughly comprehend, and in his soul admit and accept

SPAN EA ST RR TEI I DEL AT BLO LEN LN ELA AG AS

the fact, that he knows nothing and is nothing; if he
bow to the conviction that his mind and his person are
but ciphers among the significant and cleanly cut
figures about him, and that whatever he is to be, and is
to win, must be achieved by hard work, there is abun-
dant hope of him. If, on the contrary, a huge self-
conceit still hold possession of him, and he straighten
stiffly up to the assertion of his old and valueless self; or
if he sink discouraged upon the threshold of a life of
fierce competitions and more manly emulations, he
might as well be a dead man. The world has no use
for such a man, and he has only to retire or be trod-
den upon. |

When a young man has thoroughly comprehended
the fact that he knows nothing, and that, intrinsically,
he is of but little value, the next thing for him to learn

is that the world cares nothing for him ;—that he is the -

subject of no man’s overwhelming admiration and es:









GETTING THE RIGHT START. 15

- teem; that he must take care of himself. A letter of
introduction may possibly procure him an invitation to
tea. If he wear a good hat, and tie his cravat with
propriety, the sexton will show him to a pleasant seat in
church, and expect him to contribute liberally . wher
the plate goes round. If he be a stranger, he will find
every man busy with his own affairs, and none to look
after him. He will not be noticed until he becomes
noticeable, and he will not become noticeable until he
does something to prove that he has an absolute value
in society. No letter of recommendation will give him
this, or ought to give him this. No family connexion
will give him this, except among those few who think
more of blood than brains.

Society demands that a young man shall be some-
body, not only, but that he shall prove his right to the
title; and it has a right to demand this. Society will
not take this matter upon trust—at least, not for a long
time, for it has been cheated too frequently. Society is
not very particular what a man does, so that it prove
_ him to be a man: then it will bow to him, and make
room for him. I know a young man who made a place
for himself by writing an article for the North Ameri-
can Review: nobody read the article, so far as [ know
but the fact that he wrote such an article, that it was
very long, and that it was published, did the business

ee





16 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

for him. Everybody, however, cannot write articles for

the North American Review—at least, I hope every-

body will not, for it is a, publication which makes me .

a quarterly visit; but everybody, who is somebody, can
do something. There is a wide range of effort between
holding a skein of silk for a lady and saving her from
drowning—between collecting voters on election day
and teaching a Sunday School class. A man must enter
society ef his own free will, as an active element or
a valuable component, before he can receive the recog-
nition that every true man longs for. I take it that
this is right. A man whois willing to enter society as
a beneficiary is mean, and does not deserve recognition.

There is no surer sign of an unmanly and cowardly
spirit than a vague desire for help; a wish to depend,
to lean upon somebody, and enjoy the fruits of the in-
dustry of others. ‘There are multitudes of young men,
I suppose, who indulge in dreams of help from some

uarter, coming in at a convenient moment, to enable
? 3

them to secure the success in life which they covet.

The vision haunts them of some benevolent old gentle
nan with a pocket full of money, a trunk full of mort-
gages and stocks, and a mind remarkably appreciative
M{ merit and genius, who will, perhaps, give or lend
them anywhere from ten to twenty thousand dollars,

with which they will commence and goon swimmingly.



ee ee ee





GETCING THE RIGHT START. 1?

Perhaps he will take a different turn, and educate them,
Or, perhaps, with an eye to the sacred profession, they
desire to become the beneficiaries of some benevolent
gociety, or some gentle circle of female devotees,

To me, one of the most disgusting sights in the world
is that of a young man with healthy blood, broad shoul-
ders, presentable calves, anda hundred and fifty pounds,
more or less, of good bone and muscle, standing with
his hands in his pockets, longing for help. I admit that
there are positions in which the most independent spirit
may accept of assistance—may, in fact, as a choice

of evils, desire it ; but for a man who is able to help

himself, to desire the help of others in the accomplish--
ment of his plans of life, is positive proof that he has

received a most unfortunate training, or that there is a
leaven of meanness in his composition that should make
him shudder. Do not misunderstand me: I would not.

inculcate that pride of personal independence which

repels in its sensitiveness the well-meant good offices

nd benefactions of friends, or that resorts to desperate
hifts rather than incur an obligation. What I con
demn in a young man is the love of dependence; the
willingness to be under obligation for that which his

own efforts may win.
I have often thought that the Education Society, and

_ kindred organizations, do much more harm than good

asec ate PP Reenter tnd

a ‘ we sim penen aa ee ee tm Be rman a
Zi comers msectadncnastmsictnts paths ates eet earner ye nei NLP It naa! LOGE ELITE NALA LLL LD ALOE veer ~

saat ACTRESS I IES







ee rere enspemmnmemrevenee sateen en
.

ee Ee

18 VITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YUUNG MEN,

by inviting into the Christian ministry a class of young
men who are willing to be helped. A man who wil-
lingly receives assistance, especially if he has applied

for it, invariably sells himself to his benefactor, unless

_ that benefactor happen to be a man of sense who is giv:

ing absolutely necessary assistance to one whom he
knows to be sensitive and honorable. Any young man
who will part with freedom and the self-respect: that
gTOWS out of self-reliance and self- “support, is unmanly,
neither deserving of assistance, nor capable of making
good use of it. Assistance will invariably be received

by a young man of spirit as a dire necessity—as the

“ chief evil of his poverty.

When, therefore, a young man has ascertamed and
fully received the fact that he does not know anything,
that the world does: nob care anything about him, that
_what he wins must be won by his own brain and brawn,
and that while he holds i in his own hands the means of

gaining his own. livelihood and the objects of his life,
:

he cannot receive assistance without compromising his
self-respect and selling his freedom, he is in a fair posi-
tion for beginning life. When a young man becomes
aware that only by his own efforts can he rise into com
panionship and competition with the sharp, strong, and

well-drilled minds around him, he is ready for work,

and not before.

renee eel













GETTING THE RIGHT START. 19

The next lesson is that of patience, thoroughness of
preparation, and contentment with the regular channels
of business effort and enterprise. This i is, perhaps, one
of the most difficult to learn, of all the lessons of life.
It is natural for the mind to reach out eagerly for im-
mediate results. As manhood dawns, and the young
man catches in its first light the pinnacles of realized
dreams, the golden domes of high possibilities, and the
purpling hills of great delights, and then looks down
upon the narrow, sinuous, long, and dusty path by
‘which others have reached them, he is apt to be dis-
gusted with the passage, and to seek for success through
broader channels, by quicker means. Beginning at the
very foot of the hill, and working slowly to the top,
seems a very discouraging process ; and precisely at this

point have thousands of young men made shipwreck of

3 their lives. os
i | Let this be understood, then, at starting; that the
a | . patient conquest of difficulties which rise in the regular
e | _ and legitimate channels of business and enterprise, is.

not cnly essential in securing the successes which you
seck, but it is essential to that preparation of your mind
requisite for the enjoyment of your successes, and for
retaining them when gained. It is the general rule of
| Providence, the world over, and in all time, that un-
earned success is a curse. It is the rule of Providence,
shat the process of earning success shall be the prepara-

ee 2 eee

{
i
!

ee sg nner RSET eee RIFE
€





20 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

tion for its conservation and enjoyment. So, day by
day, and week by week; so, month after month, and
year after year, work on, and in that process gain
strength and symmetry, and nerve and knowledge, that
when success, patiently and bravely worked for, shall
come, it may find you prepared to receive it and keep
it. The development which you will get in this brave
and patient labor, will prove itself, in the end, the most
valuable of your successes. It will help to make aman
of you. It will give you power and self-reliance. It
will give you not only self-respect, but the respect of
your fellows and the public.

Never allow yourself to be seduced from this course.
You will hear of young men who have made fortunes
in some wild speculations. Pity them; for they will
almost certainly lose their easily won success. Do not
be in a hurry for anything. Are you in love with some
dear girl, whom you would make your wife? Give
Angelina Matilda to understand that she must wait ;
and if Angelina Matilda is really the good girl you take

er tobe, she will be sensible enough to tell you to choose
your time. You cannot build well without first laying
a good foundation; and for you to enter upon a busi-
ness which you have not patiently and thoroughly
learned, and to marry before you have won a character,
or even the reasonable prospect of a competence, is

ntimately to bring your house down about the ears of








or




. GETTING THE RIGHT START. 21

give you. If, at the age of thirty years, you find your-
self established in a business which pays you with cer-
tainty a living income, you are to remember that God
has blessed you beyond the majority of men.

In saying what I have said to you in this letter, I

nave had no wish to make of you pattern young men; _

but of this I will speak more fully hereafter. The fash-
ion plates of the magazines bear no striking resem-
blance to the humanity which we meet in the streets.
I only seek to give you the principles and the spirit
which should animate you, without any attempt or de-
sire to set before you the outlines of the life I would
have you lead. In fact, if there are detestable things
which I despise above all other things detestable, they
are the patterns made for young men, and the young
men made after them. I would have you carry all your

individuality with you, all your blood well purified, all

your passions well controlled and made tributary to —

the motive forces of your nature; all your manhood.
enlarged, ennobled, and uncorrupted ; all your piety, ren
dering your whole being sensitively alive to your rela-
tions to God and man; all your honor, your affections,
and your faculties—all these, and still hold yourselves
strictly amenable to those laws which confine a true
success to the strong and constant hand of patient

achievement.

Angelina Matilda, and such pretty children as she may —





ne ON A aetena

kai ceeessnemeeitieney an cg nee nner arin ann

LETTER II.

_ FEMALE SOCIETY—THE WOMAN FOR A WIFE.

O woman! lovely woman! Nature made thee
To temper man; we had been brutes without you.

Angels are painted fair to look like you.
; Otway,

When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think that I should live
till I were married, SHAKSPERE.

‘

lr many of the books addressed to young men, a
great deal is said about the purifying and elevating
influences of female society. Sentimental young men

affect this kind of reading, and if anywhore in it they :

ean find countenance for the policy of early marriage,
they are delighted. Now, while I will be the last to
deny the purifying and elevating influence of pure and
elevated women, I do deny that there is anything in

indiscriminate devotion to female society, which makes



;
j
/
{










238



FEMALE SOCIETY—-THE WOMAN FOR A WIFE.



aman better or purer. Suppose aman cast away on the
Cannibal Islands, and not in sufficiently good flesh to
excite the appetites of the gentle epicureans among
whom he has fallen. Suppose him, in fact, to be “ re-

ceived into society,” and made the private secretary of a
i




king without a liberal education, Suppose, after awhile,
he feels himself subsiding into a state of barbarism, and
casts around for some redeeming or conservative influ-
ence. At this moment it occurs to him that in the
trunk on which he sailed ashore were a number of books.
He flies to the trunk, and, in an ecstasy of delight, dis-
covers that among them is a volume addressed to young |
nen. He opens it eagerly, and finds the writer to de-
dlare that next to the Christian religion, there is nothing |
that will tend so strongly to the elevation and purifica- _ |
tion of young men, as female society. He accordingly |
seeks the society of women, and drinks in the marvellous
influences of their presence. He finds them unacquaint-
ed with some of the most grateful uses of water, and in
evident ignorance of the existence of ivory combs,
About what year of the popular era is it to be supposed
ehat he will arrive at a desirable state of purification
and perfection?

Now, perhaps you do not perceive the force of this
illustration. Let us get at it, then. When you find
yourself shut out from all female society except that

9 a ne nt ern i ee a i



24 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

which is beneath you, that society will do you just as
much and no more good than that of the fair cannibals,
especially if it be young. If, in all this society, you can
find one old woman of sixty, who has common sense
genial good-nature, experience, some reading, and

sympathetic heart, cherish her as you would her weighs
in gold, but let the young trash go. You will hear no-

thing from them but gossip and nonsense, and you will

only get disgusted with the world and yourself. Inspi-

ration to higher and purer life always comes from above
aman; and female society can only elevate and purify a
man when it is higher and purer than he is. In the
element of purity, I doubt not that women generally
are superior to men, but it is very largely a negative or
unconscious element, and has not the power and influ-
ence of a positive virtue.

Therefore, whenever you seek for female society, as
an agency in the elevation of your tastes, the preserva-
tion of your morals, and the improvement of your mind,
seek for that which is above you. Ido not counsel you

o treat with rudeness or studied neglect such inferio
female society as you are obliged to come in contact
with. On the contrary, you owe such society a duty.
You should stimulate it, infuse new life into it, if possi-
ble, and do for it what you would have female ‘society
do for yourself.











:

wh.
ee
ee:
a
cr att
iS
mr
; ,
a
ee
es
i
te

Se Ste ee
PP ee Se

ERROR Eg eee CN Oe ee ay ea Nd ON I EN Re Se ee RO MEM Tonle

o

FEMALE SOCIETY—-INE WOMAN FOR A WIFE, 2

This mattor of seeking female socicty above yourself

-gou should carry still further. Never content yourself

with the idea of having a common-place wife. You

want one who will stimulate you, stir you up, keep you
moving, show you your weak points, and make some

thing of you. Don’t fear that you cannot get such a

‘wife. I very well remember the reply which a gentle-

man who happened to combine the qualities of wit and
common sense, made to a yourg man who expressed a
fear that a-certain young lady of great beanty and
attainments would dismiss him, if he should become
serious. “My friend,” said the wit, “infinitely more
beautiful and accomplished women. than she is, have
married infinitely uglier and meaner men than you are.”
And such is the fact. If you are honest and honorable,
if your character is spotless, if you are enterprising and

industrious, if you have some grace and a fair degree of

sense, and if you love appreciatingly and truly, you can

marry almost anybody worth your having. So, to en-
courage yourself, carry in your memory the above
aphorism reduced to a form something like this: “In-
finitely finer women than I ever expect to marry, have
loved and married men infinitely meaner than I am.”
The apprehensions of women are finer and quicker
‘han those of men. Av ith equal early advantages, the

woman is more of a woman at eighteen than a man is
3 ,





ee a ae





pe nae a ana te in ow ty

Y 2
SSR ETS ES ROE ARES LETS Sas RSS SEB SER SLB AI EE IIT TIT eS OS SL CO LC CL es LIL LLCS LOS COLL LS CLLR OLLE ELIOT LT A IL | I AL LL OO A LO CL | I EE ON ITE

28 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.



a man at twenty-one) After marriage, as a genera
thing, the woman ceases to acquire. Now, Ido not say
that this is necessary, or that it should be the case,
but I simply state a general fact. The woman is ab-
sorbed in family cares, or perhaps devotes from ten te
twenty years to the bearing and rearing of children—
the most dignified, delightful, and honorable office of
her life. This consumes her time, and, in a great multi-
tude of instances, deprives her of intellectual culture.
In the meantime, the man is out, engaged in busi-
ness. He comes in daily contact with minds stronger

and sharper than hisown, He grows and matures, and

in ten years from the date of his marriage, becomes, in

reality, a new man. Now, if he was so foolish as to

marry a woman because she had a pretty form and face, .

or sweet eyes, or an amiable disposition, or a pleasant
temper, or wealth, he will find that he has passed en-
tirely by his wife, and that she is really no more of a
companion for him than a child would be. I know of
but few sadder sights in this world than that of mates
whom the passage of years has mis-mated. A woman
ought to have a long start of a man, and then, ten to

one, the man will come out ahead in the race of a long

~ dife.

T suppose that in every young man’s mind there exist

the hope and the expectation of marriage. Whena












FEMALE SOCIETY—IHE WOMAN FOR A WIFE. 27

young man pretends to me that he has no wish to marry,
and that he never expects to marry, I always infor one
of two things: that he lies, and is really very anxious

for marriage, or that his heart has been polluted by asso-



ciation with unworthy women. In athousand cases we
Ss shall not find three exceptions to this rule. A young
| man who, with any degree of earnestness, declares that

he intends never to marry, confesses to a brutal nature

Ps
songs tannin onioatennlbas
: ;

or perverted morals.



But how shall a good wife be won? I know that
. : men naturally shrink from the attempt to obtain com-
panions who are their superiors; but they will find that
really intelligent women, who possess the most desirable
qualities, are uniformly modest, and hold their charms
In modest estimation. What such women most admire
gin men is gallantry; not the gallantry of courts and
fops, but boldness, courage, devotion, decision, and re-
fined civility. A man’s bearing wins ten superior wo-
men where his boots and brains win one. If a man
stand before a woman with respect for himself and fear-
-essness of her, his suit is half won. The rest may safely
be left to the parties most interested. Therefore, never

be afraid of a woman. Women are the most harmless

shows that he has got a man’s soul in him. If you

have not got the spirit in you to come up to a test like

'
and agreeahle creatures in the world, to a man who





7x
*



ee ek Cee ee ee fe ee es,
a S 54 (, 5 . * -




° 7 28 TITCOME’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

this, you have not got that in you which most pleases
a high-souled woman, and you will be obliged to con-
tent yourself with the simple girl who, in a quict way,
is endeavoring to attract and fasten you.

But don’t be in a hurry about the matter. Don’t ge
into a feverish longing for marriage. It isn’t creditable
to you. Especially don’t imagine that any disappomt-
ment in love which takes place before you are twenty-
one years old will be of any material damage to you.
The truth is, that before a man is twenty-five years old
he does not know what he wants himself. So don't

be ina hurry. The more of a man you become, and

the more of manliness you. become capable of exhibit-

4
mcntnctinbataeginatnarasmarendinptinity wrcinapins eee aeC Ot EIT EE NCOs Oe
nin i Sa et é * jae a * >» x
i i ea ira ects ta! he a alae Naki tat it a a aia ia on Sled
eal Nati 4 ae rs ae pis Dag PERE Pe OR ee i

ing in your association with women, the better wife you
will be able to obtain; and one year’s possession of the
| heart and hand of a really noble specimen of her sex, @ 4
is worth nine hundred and ninety-nine years’ possession
of a sweet creature with two ideas in her head, and no-
thing new to say about either of them. “ Better fifty
years of Europe than a cycle of Cathay.” So don’t be | 4
in a hurry, I say again. You don’t want a wife now |
and you have not the slightest idea of the kind of wife
you will want by-and-by. Go into female society if you |
can find that which will improve you, but not other- j
wise. You can spend your time better. Seek the

society of good men. That is often more accessible to

~

88



























FEMAL.{ SOCIETY —Titm WOMAN FOR A WIFE. 29
-

you than the other, and it is through that mostly that
You will find your way to good female society. |

Ifany are disposed to complain of the injustice to
Sas of advice like this, and believe that it involves a
. _ wrong to her, I reply.that not the slightest wrong is in-
tended. Thorough appreciation of a good woman, on ‘he
_ part of a young man, is one of his strongest recommen-

dations to her favor. The desire of such a man to pos-

dence of qualities, aptitudes, and capacities which enti-
~ tle him to any woman’s consideration and_ respect.
‘There is something good in him; and however uncul-
Be - tivated he 1 may be—however rude in manner, and rough
in person—he only needs development to become wor-
thy of her, i in some respects, at least. I shall not quar-

herself, for I know it will L ¢ well for her to obtain such
an one, if she will be stimulated by contact with a higher
“mind toa brighter and broader development. At the
‘same time, I must believe that for a man to marry his
+ nfo, is to call upon himself a great misfortune; to
de] are himself of one rot =e most ee and refin-

sess and associate his life with such a woman, gives evi-_

rel with a woman who desires a husband superior to_



30

ert ENS rt ert

LS TLD g SRE Rete ee Senger Ut eran tes muse aet ne nme

TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

this conspire to establish the soundness of my coun-
sel, 7

One thing more: not the least important, but the
last in this letter. No woman without picty in he

heart is fit to be the companion of any man. You may

“get, in your wife, beauty, amiability, sprightliness, wit,

accomplishments, wealth, and learning, but if that wife
have no higher love than herself and yourself, she is a
poor creature. She cannot elevate you above mean
aims and objects, she cannot educate her children pro-
perly, she cannot in hours of adversity sustain and com-
fort you, she cannot bear with patience your petulance
induced by the toils and vexations of business, and she
will never be safe against the seductive temptations of
gaiety and dress.

Then, again, a man who has the prayers of a pious
wife, and knows that he has them—upheld by heaven,
or by arefined sense of obligation and gratitude—can
rarely become a very bad man. A daily prayer from
the heart of a pure and pious wife, for a husband en-
grossed in the pursuits of wealth or fame, is a chain cf
golden words that links his name every day with the
name of God. He may snap it three hundred and sixty-
five times in a year, for many years, but the chances are

that in time he will gather the sundered filaments, and

seck to re-unite them in an everlasting bond.

0 te 8 Be AOR

_ tL Ane ORS este Oe 8e ne ome mee we oR ey A 8

ea agent

eA OL LO GALE ON ACEO GE LCE Le RRL OO ME IE a MC ot A oe pn











LETTER Il.

MANNERS AND DRESS.

So over violent, or over civil,

That every man with him was God or devil.
ries Drrpun

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy;

For the apparel oft proclaims the man.
SUAKSPERE.

T is well for young men to obtain, at the very start
| of their career, some idea of the value of politeness,
Some cannot be otherwise than urbane. They are born
so. One can kick them roundly and soundly, and they
will not refuse to smile, if it be done good-naturedly.
They dodge all corners by a necessity of their nature.
If their souls had only corporeal volume, we could see

them making their way through a crowd, like nice

little spaniels, scaring nobody, running between nobody’s





32 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

legs, but winding along shrinkingly and gracefully, see:
ing a master in every man, and thus flattering every
man’s vanity mto good-nature, but really spoiling their
reputation as reliable dogs, by their undiscriminating and
aniversal complaisance. There is a self-forgetfulness
which is so deep as to be below self-respect, and such
instances as we occasionally meet with should be treated
compassionately, like cases of idiocy or insanity, except
when found in connexion with the post-office depart-
ment or among hote: waiters.

But puppyism is not really politeness. The genuine
article is as necessary to success, and particularly to an

enjoyable success, as integrity, or industry, or any other

. indispensable thing. All machinery ruins itself by fric-

‘tion, without the presence of a lubricating fluid. Polite-

woss, OF civility, or urbanity, or whatever we may choose
to call it, is the oil which preserves the machinery of
society from destruction. We are obliged to bend to
ane another—to step aside and let another pass, to iznore
this and that personal peculiarity, to speak pleasantly
when irritated, and to do a great many things to avoid

abrasion and collision. In other words, in a world of

selfish interests and pursuits, where every man is pursuing

his own special good, we must mask our real designs in
studied politeness, or mingle them with real kindness, i in

order to clevate the ne of men above the society of





la
mee seo as ear
: i onli 5 eee ee pian Na
~ on ah Spat e aie Miami ae Behe Dek?





MANNERS AND DRESS, 8a

wolves. Young men generally would doubtless be

thoroughly astonished if they could comprehend at a

single glance how greatly their personal happiness,
popularity, prosperity, and usefulness depend on their
manners.

I know young men who, in the discharge of their
duties, imagine that if they go through them with a
literal performance, they are doing ali that they under-
take to do. You willneversee a smile upon their faces,

nor hear a genial word of good fellowship from then

lips; and from the manner in which their labor is per: °

formed you would never learn that they were engaged

in intercourse with human beings. They carry the

same manner and the same spirit into the counting-room |

that they do into the dog-kennel or the stable. Every-
body hates such young men as these, and recoils from

all contact with them. If they have business with

them, they close it as soon as possible, and get out of

. their presence. A man who, having got his vessel under

headway on the voyage of life, takes a straight course,
minding nothing for the man-of-war that lies in his path,
or the sloop that crosses his bow, or the fishing smacks
that find game where he seeks nothing but a passage,
or interposing rocks or islands, will be very sure to get

terribly rubbed before he gets through—and he ought
to be. - *
7 Q*

oe See Se ot tee rteaeeme

nate agar:









&
34 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

'

I despise servility, but true and uniform politeness is

the glory of any young man. It should be a politeness
full of frankness and good-nature, unobtrusive and con-
stant, and uniform in its exhibition to every class o
men, ‘The young man who is overwhelmingly polite t

a celebrity or a nabob, and rude to a poor Irishman be-
cause he 1s a poor Irishman, deserves to be despised.

That style of manners which combines self-respect with

bie E PRO: ET ES SS AR OATES SEN TE PRT NSS RN SUT ES EE se de te

a ee ee ee
.
. fe
; f " Fm

respect for the rights and feelings of others, especiaily
if it be warmed up by the fires of a genial heart, is a
thing to be coveted and cultivated, and it is a thing
that pays, alike in cash and comfort.

The talk of manners introduces us naturally to dress
and personal appearance. I believe in dress. I believe
that it is the duty of all men—young and old—to make
their persons, so far as practicable or possible, agreeable

toethose with whom they are thrown into association.
I mean by this that they shall not offend by singularity,
nor by slovenliness ; that they shall “make a conscience” “
of clean boots and finger-nails, change their linen twice .
a week, and not show themselves in shirt-sleeves if they
can help it. Let no man know by your dress what
your business is. You dress your person, not your
trade. You are, if you know enough, to mould the

fashion of the time to your own personal peculiarities

—to make it your servant, and not allow it to be your



uate









MANNERS AND DRESS. 35

master. Never dress in extremes. Let there always be.
a hint in your dress that you know the style, but, for
the best of reasons, disregard its more extreme demands.
‘The best possible impression that you can make by your
dress is to make no separate impression at all; but st

to harmonize its material and shape with your persona-
lity, that it becomes tributary in the general effect, and
so exclusively tributary that people cannot tell after
seeing you what kind of clothes you wear, They will
only remember that you look well, and somehow dress
becomingly.

I suppose that I shall be met here with a protest
from employers, and a kind of protest from the employ-
ed. Counsel to dress well is dangerous, is it? But every-
body now dresses extravagantly ; and, as extravagant
dressing is usually very far from good dressing, I think
that the danger of exciting greater extravagance is very
small. It may be descending into pretty small particu-
lars, but it is proper to say that some men can dress
better on fifty dollars a year than others can on one hun-
dred, and for reasons which it is my duty to disclose
There was something in the doctrine of the loafer who
maintained that “extremes justify the means,” illus-
trating his proposition by wearing faultless hat and
boots and leaving the rest of his person in rags; but
he had not touched the real philosophy of the matter.



36 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

« There is on every man what may be called a dress-
centre—a nucleus from which the rest of the dress
should be developed, and unfolde!. This dress-centre,

co St TE

or primary dress idea, is different in different persons,

ee eee

but it is always above the waist. The cravat, the vest,
the hat, the bosom, the coat-collar, may either of them \
be this idea. It is always safe to locate it about the

neck and chest. less dicky, is about all a man can stand without damage,
in the way of elegant dress. This should form the cen-
tre. The vest should harmonize, but be modest, and
all the other robing should be shaded off, until there is
not an obtrusive feature. Extremities will then only
be noticed. These should be faultlessly dressed, but in
a manner rather to satisfy than attract attention. Every-
thing should be subordinated to this idea; the whole
dress should bow to the cravat. Any man who has - i

made dress a study knows very well that ten dollars a

year, spent about the neck, will go further than fifty
dollars spread upon the person. Coarsest clothes, deve- 4
loped from an elegant neck-tie, or an elegant centra!
idea of any kind, become elegant themselves, and re-
ceive and evolve a glory which costs absolutely nothing
at all, except a few brains, some consideration, and the
reading of this letter.



eos te SS Ss SA SS Se

One sees the demonstration of this in travelling. We





MANNERS AND DRESS. 37
,

meet muititudes from ali quarters and of different na- ,

tionalities. One, and he is usually a Yankee, wears the
best of broadcloth, and the costliest of coats, and looks
vulgar; while gnother with a single stamp of good taste
upon him, at some central point, is a gentleman at half
price. Rich clothes are really a sign of mental poverty.
Let the secret of good dressing be thoroughly learned,
and we shall hear comparatively little of the cost of
dress. Let each young man choose his central idea,
plant it and develop it; and if he has good common
sense he will find that he can dress better than he
ever could before, with the expenditure of half the
money it has usually cost him.

ee on An AOS Oe tee ee 6 Sal

ee NN nt rt D ae a

OAR oe.





LETTER IV

BAD HABITS.

‘There's rvthmg ill can dwell in such a tempig
If the ill spirit nave so fair a house
Good things will strive to dwell with’t.
: SHAKSPEERR,

He that has light within his own clear breast
May sit i’ the centre and enjoy bright day;
But he that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts,
Benighted walks under the mid-day sun,
MILrTon.

T is entirely natural for people to form habits, so tha
l if bad habits be avoided, the good ones -will gene
rally take care of themselves. I had no intention when
I commenced these letters of saying anything upon
dogmatic theology, but I take the liberty of suggesting
to those who are interested in this kind of thing that if
there be anything that demonstrates total depravity, it



—









stg San an EBD OO CEE 8

BAD HABITS. 39

is the readiness with which young men imbibe bad

habits. I have seen original sin in the shape of “a short

six” sticking out of the mouth of a lad of ten years. lt

is strange what particular pains boys and young men

' will take to learn to do that which will make th

miserable, ruin their health, render them disgusting to
their friends, and damage their reputation.

Some of the fashionable bad habits of the day are
connected with the use of tobacco. Here is a drug
that a young man is obliged to become accustoined to
before he can tolerate either the taste or the effect of
it. It isarank vegetable poison; and in the unaccus-
tomed animal produces vertigo, faintness, and horrible
sickness. Yet young men persevere in the use of it
until they can endure it, and then until they love it.
They go about the streets with cigars in their mouths,
or into society with breath sufficiently offensive to drive
all unperverted nostrils before them. They chew to-
bacco—roll up huge wads of the vile drug and stuff
their cheeks with them. They ejaculate their saliva
apon the sidewalk, in the store, in spittoons which
become incorporate stenches, in dark corners of rail-
road cars to stain the white skirts of unsuspecting
women, in lecture-rooms and churches, upon fences,

and into stoves that hiss with anger at the insult. And

the quids after they are ejected! They are to be found —

Fo ee Ss A SS te SS RE SEE SS LS Rg ER ET SEE RT





40 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YCUNG MEN.

in odd corners, in out-of-the-way places—great boul

ders, boluses, buibs! Horses stumble over them, dogs -

bark at them; they poison young shade-trees, and break

down the constitutions of sweepers. This may be an

exaggeration of the facts, but not of the disgust with

which one writes of them.

Now, young men, just think of this thing! You are |

born into the world with a sweet breath. At a proper
age, you acquire a good set of teeth. Why will you
make of one a putrescent exhalation, and of the other a
set of yellow pegs? A proper description of the habit
of chewing tobacco would exhaust the filthy adjectives
of the language, and spoil the adjectives themselves for

further use; and yet, you will acquire the habit, and

persist in it after ib is acquired! It is very singular

that young men will adopt a habit of which every man
who is its victim is ashamed. There is, probably, no
tobacco-chewer in the world who would advise a young
man to commence this habit. I have never seer
a slave of tobacco who did not regret his bondage ,
yet, against all advice, against nausea and disgust
against cleanliness, against every consideration of

health and comfort, thousands every year bow the

neck to this drug, and consent to wear its repulsive
yoke. They will chew it; they will smoke it in cigars

and pipes until their bed-rooms and shops cannot be

}

Le En ee ES ET ae re ccna ren RRS 32 TS

’
we etemeech ne SOO A

OAS LT” CTI IP DAE A ABA EAT Di HB ae) in ae estes Cee os se











BAD HABITS. 4]

breathed in, and until their breath is as rank as the
breath of a foul beast, and their clothes have the odor

of the sewer. Some of them take snuff; cram the

fiery weed up their nostrils to irritate that suktle sense

which rarest flowers were made to feed—in all this
working against God, abusing nature, perverting sense,
injuring health, planting the seeds of disease, and insult-
ing the decencies of life and the noses of the world.

So much for the nature of the habit; and I would
stop here, but for the fact that Iam in earnest, and
wish to present every motive in my power to prevent
young men from forming the habit, or persuade them to
abandon it. The habit of using tobacco is expensive.
A clerk on a modest salary has no right to be seen
with a cigar in his mouth. Three cigars a day, at five
cents apiece, amount to more than fifty dollars a year.
Can you afford it? You know you cannot. You know
that to do this you have either got to run in debt or
steal, Therefore I say that you have no business to be

seen with a cigar in your mouth. It is presumptive

évidence against your meral character.

Did it ever occur to you what you are, what you are
made for, whither you are going? That beautiful bedy
of yours, in whose construction infinite wisdom ex

hausted the resources of its ingenuity, is the temple of

a soul that shall live for ever, a companion of angels, a





Apr uann tenet DRE SUmEtES TE DRE ite: oem mentee ace



42 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

‘searcher into the deep things of God, a being allied in

essence to the divine. I say the body is the temple, or

the tabernacle, of such a being as this; and what do you

hink of stuffing the front door of such a building full

of the most disgusting weeds that you can find, or set-

ting a slow match to it, or filling the chimneys with

snuff? It looks to me much like an endeavor to smoke

out the tenant, or to insult him in such a manner as to
-nduce him to quit the premises. You really ought to
be ashamed of such behavior. A clean mouth, a sweet
breath, unstained teeth, and inoffensive clothing—are

rot these treasures worth preserving? Then throw

away tobacco, and all thoughts of it, at once and for ever.

Beaman. Be decent, and be thankful to me for talk-
ng so plainly to you.

But there are other bad habits besides the use of
tobacco. There is the habit of using strong drink,—
aot the habit of getting drunk, with most young men,
but the habit of taking drink occasionally in its milder
forms—of playing with a small appetite that only needs
sufficient playing with to make you a demon or a dolt

You think you are safe. I know you are not safe, if
you drink at all; and when you get offended with the
good friends who warn you of your danger, I know you
are a fool. I know that the grave swallows daily, by

scores, drunkards, every one of, whom thought he was



20s SE STS aes

= " = SA Ds RSET EE TREN SOE STO SS BRST LS
I a RE IT ES EE RR SSS “eae:



BAD HABITS. ~~ ae



Rte. ager wee 2"

safe while he was forming his appetite. But this is old
talk. A young man in this age who forms the habit of
drinking, or puts himself in danger of forming the habit,
is usually so weak that it doesn’t pay to save him.

I pass by profanity. (That is too offensive and vulgar
a habit for any man who reads a respectable book to
indulge in. \ I pass by this, I say; to come to a habit
more destructive than any I have contemplated.

Young man! you who are so modest in the presence
of women,—so polite and amiable ; you who are invited
into families where there are pure and virtuous girls;
you who go to church, and seem to be such a pattern
young man; you who very possibly neither smoke, nor
chew, nor snuff, nor swear, nor drink—you have one
habit ten times worse than all these put together,—a
habit that makes you a whited sepulchre, fair without,
but within full of dead men’s bones and all uncleanness.
You have a habit of impure thought, that poisons the
very springs of your life. It may lead you into lawless
indulgences, or it may not. So far as your character is
concerned, it makes little diiference.- A young man wh
cherishes impure images, and indulges in impure con-
versations with his associates, is poisoned. There is
rottenness in him. He is not to be trusted. Hundreds

of thousands of men are living in unhappiness and

degradation to-day who owe their unhappy lives to an





44 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

early habit of impure thought. Toa young man who
has become poisoned in this way, women all appear to
be vicious or weak} and when a young man loses his
respect for the sex made sacred by the relations of
mother and sister, he stands upon the crumbling edge
of ruin. His sensibilities are killed, and his moral na-

ture almost beyond the reach of regeneration. I believe

it to be true that a man who has lost his belief in WO- |

man has, as a general thing, lost his faith in God.
_ The only proper way to treat such a habit as this is
to fly from it—discard it—expel it—fight it to the death,

Impure thought is a moral drug quite as seductive and.

poisonous to the soul as tobacco is to the body. It
perverts the ton¢ of every fibre of the soul. One should
have more respect for his body than to make it the
abode of toads and lizards and unclean reptiles of all
sorts. The whole matter resolves itself into this: A
young man is not fit for life until he is clean—clean and

healthy, body and soul, with no tobacco in his mouth, no

_ liquor in his stomach, no oath on his tongue, no snuff in

is nose, and no thought in his heart which if exposed

would send him sneaking into darkness from the presence

of good women. I knowa man who believes that the
regeneration of the world is to be brought about by a
thange of diet. If he will add the policy of utter clean-

ness to his scheme, I will agree not to quarrel with him.













é ; ; Sena mf ORs .
oe she ai Rhee e ‘
My Spat’ ieee Bs ae ‘ ‘
erp PNR EMR ie

one NRA CRIN in NL airman nme eomcatr: Aii mastic tw martin raft

cease inshore cca CREA ENG Ia NN tt AIO SOE COE TE «le a A eNOS an at AN GG oe nt OC EN ee Nt me ee tRNA NAAN A cI P= A OE
-

ln nr tte ne atest Rafe nent
‘

LETTER V.

THE BLEW.nGS OF POVERTY—OFFICE AND EFFEOT OF A
| PROFESSION.

Tho labor we Celight in physics pain.
er. - - SHAKSPEES,
Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow;
The rest is all but leather and prunello,
3 Porz.
[ there is anything in the world that a young man
_ should be more grateful for than another, it is the
poverty which necessitates starting life under very great
disadvantages. Poverty is one of the best tests of hr
man quality in existence. A triumph over it is like
graduating with honor from West Point. It demon-
strates stuff and stamina. It is a certificate of worthy
labor, faithfully performed. A young man who cannot

stand this test is not good for anything. He can never

“ een YR Mg te ae
pee an weet en raat etl EE EC







46 . TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

rise above a drudge or a pauper. A young man whe
cannot feel his will harden as the yoke of poverty
presses upon him, and his pluck rise with every difficulty
that poverty throws in his way, may as well retire into
ome corner, and hide himself. Poverty saves a thou-
sand times more men than it ruins, for it only ruins
those who are not particularly worth saving, while it
saves multitudes of those whom wealth would have
ruined. If any young man who reads this letter is so
unfortunate as to be rich, I give him my pity. I pity
you, my rich young friend, because you are in danger.
You lack one great stimulus to effort and excellence
which your poor companion possesses. You will be
very apt, if you have a soft spot in your head, to think
yourself above him, and that sort of thing makes you
mean, and injures you. With full pockets and full
stomach, and good linen and broadcloth on your back,
vour heart and soul will get plethoric, and in the race
of life you will find yourself surpassed by all the poor
boys around you, before you know it.

No, my boy, if you are poor, thank God and take
courage; for he intends to give you a chance to make
something of yourself. If you had plenty of money,
ten chances to one it would spoil you for all useful pur-

poses. Do you lack education? Have you been cut

short in the text books? Remember that education,



ay btw aay narod

RS ETRE ORE ATED IERIE TIN IRE EE RR RO UR ae

TOE VOR oes gute BONE

$2 BAN
.













eT Re i ae ee



* .
ee ee ee

aS te

Ae SP ORB FR THis T



THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 47

like some other things, does not consist in the multitude

of things a man possesses. Whatcanyou do? That is

the question that settles the business for you. Do you
know your business? Do you know men, and how to

deal with them? Has your mind, by any means what-

soexer, received that discipline which gives to its action ©

power and facility? Ifso, then you are more of a man,
and a thousand times better educated, than the fellow
who graduates from a college with his brains full of
stuff that he cannot apply to the practical business of
life—stuif the acquisition of which has been in no sense
a disciplinary process, so far as he is concerned. There
are very few men in this world less than thirty years of
age, and unmarried, who can afford to be rich. One of
the greatest benefits to be reaped from great financiai
disasters, is the saving of a large crop of young men.
In regard to the choice of a profession, that is your
business, and not mine, nor that of any of your friends.
If you take to a trade or profession, don’t be persuaded
out of it, until you are perfectly satisfied that you are
not adapted to it. You will receive all sorts of the
most excellent advice, but you must remember that if
you follow it, and it leads you into a profession that
starves you, those who gave the advice never feel bound

to give you any money. You have got to take care of

yourself in this world, and you may as well choose





48 -TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

your own way of doing it, always remembering that it
is not your trade nor your protession which makes you
respectable. ‘This leads me to a matter that I may as
well dispose of here as anywhere.

I propose to explain what I meant in a previous letter
by the counsel to “let no man know by your dress
what your business is. You dress your person, not
your trade.” As the proper explanation of this involves
a very important principle, I will devote the rest of this
letter to its development and illustration. The fault
fotind with this counsel is that it has always been con-
sidered best to dress according to one’s business and
position.

Manhood, and profession or handicraft, are entirely
different things; and I wish particularly that every
young man engaged im reading these letters should
understand the reason why. God makes men, and men
make blacksmiths, tailors, farmers, horse jockeys, trades-
men of all sorts, governors, judges, dc. The offices of

men may be more or less important, and ‘ef higher or

lower quality, but manhood is a higher possession than

office. An occupation is never an end of life. Itisan

instrument put into our hands, or taken into our hands, -

by which to gain for the body the means of living until

sickness or old age robs it of life, and we pass on ta

the werld for which this is a preparation, However







THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 49

thoroughly acquired and assiduously followed, a trade

is something to be held at arm’slength. Icanillustrate by

fot se eee creer, 5

what I mean by placing, side by side, two horses,—one,. |
fresh from the stall, with every hair in its right place |
| his head up and mane flying, and another that has been
worked in the same harness every day for three years,
antil the skin is bare on each hip and thigh, an inflamed
abrasion glows on each side of the back-bone where the
hard saddle-pad rests, a severe gall-mark spreads its
brown patch under the breast collar, and all the other
marks of an abused horse abound. Now a trade, or a
profession, will wear into a man as a harness wears into
a horse. One can see the “trade mark” on almost
every soul and body met in the street.. A trade has
taken some men by the shoulders and shaken their

humanity out of them. It has so warped the natures

sun to dry a thousand times without being warped back.

Thus, I say, a man’s trade or profession should be
kept at arm’s length. It should not be allowed to
tyrannize over him, to mould him, to crush him. I
should not occupy the whole of his attention. So far
from this, it should be regarded, in its material aspect,
at least, only as a means for the development of man-

hood. The great object of living is the attainment of



|
|
of others that they might be wet down and set in the
|
:
|

trae manhood—the cultivation of every power of the



wae Feet nar 8 na SE TE RISO ROE TES ENS AARON CITORE OCLC E ASCITES

water sateen =

Saas ania Se cope pom ena ome

50 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

‘soul and of every high spiritual quality, naturally in-
herent or graciously superadded. ‘The trade is beneath
the man, and should be kept there. With this idea in
your minds—and you may be very sure that it is the
correct idea—just look around you, and see. how almost
everybody has missed it. You and I both know physi-
cians whose mental possessions, beyond their knowledge
of drugs and diseases, are not worth anything. We are
acquainted with lawyers who are never seen out of their
offices, who live among pigeon-holes and red tape, and
busy their minds with quirks and quarrels so unremit-
tingly, that they have not a thought for other subjects.
They are not men at all; they are nothing but lawyers
Often we find not more than five whole men in a town
of five thousand inhabitants. Those who pass for men,
and who really do get married and have families, are a
hundred to one fractional men, or exclusively machines,

Elihu Burritt cultivated the man that was in him
until his trade and his blacksmith’s shop would not stay
with him. They ceased to be useful to him. He could
got a living in a way that was better for him. Benja

min Franklin was an excellent printer, but he used his

trade only asa means. The development of his mind»

and his manhood went on above it. Printing with
him was not an end of life. If it had been, we should

have missed his words of wisdom ;.some one else would



RRA NT A A AS OIE SEI a GATE BE

ope

A ER SAR ON AT SE ONE [NE TR NN RRO
ee





LL LLL A LO AOI at A ttn rt met ee enna aat e—en, enne AO O SR e e mcyAi,
; a
-

*
=
ERE ES ER ES a EE EE Sy RS oy a a RR i Ra ER Ee Oy TRE TT SIE A SIE RR RRS SOE 4 ST SNE RRS SEE TES

PE SACO Ags LO i gE Ba tat a

\

THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. | 5]

have built the kite that exchanged the first kiss with
electricity, and less able men would have been set to do

the work which he did so creditably in the manage-

ment of his country’s affairs. It is not necessary that’

you be learned blacksmiths or philosophical and diplc-
matic printers, but it is necessary that you be a man
before your calling, behind your calling, above your call-
ing, outside of your calling, and inside of it; and that
that calling modify your character no more than it
would were it your neighbor’s. |

If I have made my point plain to you, you can
readily see that I attach very little value to the distinc-
tions in society based on callings, and still less to those
based on office. If a man be a man, let him thank his
stars that he is not a justice of the peace. Of all the
appetites that curse young men, the appetite for office
seems to me to be the silliest and the meanest. There
is nothing which fills me with greater disgust than to
see a young man eager for the poor distinction which
office confers. An office seeker, for the sake of honor,
s constitutionally, necessarily, mean. I have seen men
begin at twenty-one as prudential committees in small
school districts, and stick to office until everybody was
sick of them. Whether it rained porridge or potatoes,
oaving stones or pearls, their dish was always out. They

and their families always had to be cared for,



i
t
{

a ds PN erie pr Reames



tenes =e secteur tn tn ee ttt tt AN AOE NT NORM: Nt A OT CO A RI AEN
cet ae tee

|

t
'
{

|
|
{

52 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

Office always brings obligation and a certain kind of
slavery. It brings something more than this—it brings

insanity. A young man who allows himself to get a

“taste of it very rarely recovers. It is like tobacco, o

opium, or brandy, producing a morbid appetite; anc
we need all through the nation, a new society of re.
form. ‘There should be a pledge circulated, and every-
where signed, promising total abstinence from office-

secking. To this every young man should put his

name. There are chronic cases that may be considered

hopeless, but the young can be saved.
Do not let me be misunderstood; I have spoken of

the thirst for office for the sake of office. My belief is

that office should neither be sought for nor lightly re-_

fused. The curse of our country is that office-seekers
have made place so contemptible that good men will
not accept it, but so far keep themselves removed from
politics that all the affairs of government fall into un-
worthy hands. When a young man is sought for tc
fill a responsible place in public affairs—sought for and
elected on the ground of fitness—he should decid
whether he owes that duty to the public, and perform
it well if he does. Office was properly regarded in the
“good old colony times.” Then it was considered a
hindrance to business, and almost or quite a hardship :

so much so that laws were passed, in some instances,

Fa te re 6 Seraph at ott







THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 53 |
compelling- men to accept office, or pay a fine. So I |
! would have you to do your duty to the public at all
| times, and especially in seeing that oflice-seekers, by |
| profession or constant practice, are crowded from the |
| track, and worthy men put on, |
|
|

pa a a ec ee

PROS ARP EE GEES EP SRR RN RENE DAES AT Se PTT EE SE I IIIT TE ES EE
4
.
nopecsncenee merece

CU EN 8 RENE tert ee a RNS Eee eR



fet RR ROO Ot

LETTER VI.

FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.

Man is the noblest growth our realms supply,
And souls are ripened in our northern sky.
Mrs. BARBAULD,

paged S22 AREA A NRE ARERR PES

ILAVE noticed that most writers of books for young

men have a good deal to say about diet and regimen,

knowing the least of these important subjects invariably

being the most elaborate and specific in their treatment

ee

PRON SS ae

in this business. All the spare curses I accumulate I
dedicate to those white-livered, hatchet-faced, thin-
blooded, scrawny reformers, who prescribe sawdust
puddings and plank beds, and brief sleep, and early

walks, and short commons for the rising generation. I

aera ca ice eee eens secrete easier elemental ree

and physical culture, and all that sort of thing, those —

of them. ‘There have been some awful sins committed.

;
ore wotineenrenemenrepatgyarimnmnnrarsmepiaminnnmmannniaaitincipa asinine

Posen RanmEe eta N on Fare

mcs ee tt I LN te A A ACTS

pasate a tainapeefiatmaeniat

he Lk Ree 9 Re a RA NA RETA SST RTT











FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE,



despise them; and if there is a being who always
touches the profoundest depths of ‘my sympathy, it is a
young man who has become a victim to their notions.
It is a hard sight to see a young man with the pluck all
taken out of him by a meagre diet—his whole natur

starved, degenerated, emasculated.

I propose to apply a little common sense to this busi-
ness. If I have a likely Durham steer, which I wish to
have grow into the full development of his breed, I
keep him on something more than a limited quantity
of bog hay. I do not stir him up with a pitchfork
before he has his nap out, and insist on his being driven
ten miles before he has anything to eat. I do not take
pains to give him the meanest bed I can find for him.
I know perfectly well that that animal will not grow up
strong and sound, fat and full, the pride of the farm and
the gem of the stall, unless I give him an abundance of
the best food, a clean and comfortable place to sleep in,
and just as long naps as he sees fit to take. The horse,
which in its organization more nearly approaches man
than the steer, is still more sensitive to the influence of
generous living. How much pluck and spirit will a
horse get out of aton of rye straw? The truth is, that
a good and abundant diet is not only essential to the
highest physical health and development of man, but it

modifies very importantly the development and manifes-



REN ene ee ES -



sowaeeeeme ee pemreeset

ee ee

a ae aaa

Seer

PES gt eee tscsesses

SESSA ELSES GE NI EG DE LOO LA Ot OO

56 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

tation of the soul. A man cannot acquire courage by
feeding on theories and milk. An Englishman cannot
fight without beef in his belly; and no more can any
of us.

It may be objected to this that we do not wish for a
preat animal development in man. I say we do. I
declare that the more perfect a man can make his ani-
mal nature the better. ‘That animal nature is the asso-
ciate—home—servant—of the soul. If it be not well de-
veloped, in all its organs and in all its functions, it will
neither give a generous entertainment to the spiritual
thing that dwells in it, nor serve it with vigor and efli-
ciency. If strong meat nurses your passions, let it; it
does not nurse your passions any more than it nurses

all the rest of you, and if you grow symmetrically where

is the harm? Besides, what would you be without’

passions? They are the impelling forces of life. A
man with no passion is as useless in the world as if he
were without brains. He cannot even acquire the pos-
session of virtue, but is obliged to content himself with
imnocence. If God gave passions to a man, he gave

them to him for a natural, full development; and the

grandest type of man we see is that in whick we find

fully developed and thoroughly trained passions; and a

soul which has not these among its motive forces is like

“a sailor out at sea, in a skiff without oars. This idea



i fomintessigManeiseosaibi

ee eee eee

PES RNS SS IS ATE NORA TIN ony Se Ae SS TEESE 5 Rie Rt

peTS se

ENE SHEER TREE PT teens et a Le



FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 57

that the body is something to be contemned, that its

growth and development must necessarily antagonize |

with the best growth and development of the soul, is
essentially impious, No matter where it started—it is
all wrong. A perverted and perverting passion is a

fearful thing, but a passion in its place is like everything

_ that God makes, “very good.”

1 would have you properly understand this kind of
talk. I counsel the use of no food that tends to the
stimulation of one portion of your system more than
another, but I ask you to remember that the best food
is not too good for you, and that, unless you have a
perverted appetite, there is very little danger of your
eating too much of it. If I were to be charged with

the special mission of degrading a nation, in mind and —

body—stunting the form, and weakening in the same
proportion the mental and moral nature—there is no
way in which I could so readily accomplish my object
as through food. No nation can preserve its vitality,

and its tendency to progress, with a diet of pork and

potatoes. Nothing but the cerealia and the rumznaniva

will do for this—nothing but bread and muscle.
I wish I could take you to one of those institutions

which will be found in nearly every State, where the

outcast and pauper children are gathered for shelter,

eare, and culture. They come from the gutters, where
sf.



oe





ge NTE AS Ts SI GT

esters BITS
LLCO TU ee ee PERSE ESET
SILER TE et ee ce a PRONE REE SW TE TRIE I PA ere pe TR

Deere



58 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

they have lived on garbage and cold potatoes. Theis
eyes are red around the edges and very weak, their

muscles are flabby, their skin is lifeless in color and in

fact. Their minds are as dull as the minds of brutes, ©

and their faces give the impression almost of idiotic
stupidity. In six months, wheat and corn bread give
them a new body, and a new soul; and it would be
difficult to find a brighter set of faces than fill those

crowded halls and illuminate the noisy playgrounds.

Therefore, I say to you, young men, however falsely

you may deal with your back, be honest with your
stomach. Feed well—as well as you can afford to feed.
Sleep well. If Benjamin Franklin ever originated the
maxim, “six hours of sleep for a man, seven for a wo-
man, and eight for a fool,” he ought uniformly to have
practised by the rule of the last number. Young man,
if you are a student, or engaged in any severe mental
occupation, sleep just as long as you can sleep soundly,
Lying in bed from laziness is another thing entirely.
Sleep is a thing that bells have no more business to

interfere with, than with prayers and sermons. God is

re-creating us. We are as unconscious as we were be-
fore we were born; and while he holds us there, feeding
anew the springs of lite, ana mfusing fresh fire into our
brains, and preparing us for the work of another day,

the pillow is as sacred as a sanctuary. If any fanatic







SUDA EEG TSS A IEE

OT SE TTT

FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 59

has made you believe that it is good for you to be vio-
lently wakened from your sleep at an early hour, and to
go out into the damp, raw air, morning after morning,
with your fast unbroken, and your body unfortified by

the stimulus of food, forget him and his counsels, and

‘ take the full measure of your rest. When you get your

breakfast down, take your exercise if you have time, or

wait until a later hour in the day. Just as much labor

_ can be accomplished in ten hours as in fourteen, with

more efficiency and less fatigue, when rest and bodily
exercise are properly taken.

But physical culture—what is that? A very impor-
tant thing, I assure you. Some of you get this in your
employments, and are growing up with manly frames
and strong arms. But there are others who are coming
up delicately, with spindling shanks, and narrow shoul-
ders, and flat chests, and weak arms—great babies, with
soft hands and soft muscles, and not enough of physical

prowess to undertake to carry a disputed point with the

cook in the kitchen. Howawoman ever makes up her

mind to love such a man as this is a mystery to me, A
feminine man is a masculine monster, and no woman
with unperverted instincts can love and marry him. A
true woman loves a pair of good strong arms, fastened

to a pair of broad shoulders, for they can defend her,

provide for her, and—but I wander from my subject.

INABA ga eae ees AR

Ral a eS ST SS at

> ase. Saari SCI
unepnitet ntee

Soa eS ee aS Se a eee









j
——



60 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN.

Physical culture perfects a very important portion of
the work which good feeding begins. The best mate-
rial supplied to the mouth, assimilated by the process
of digestion, and carried by the blood to the muscles
and all the other structures of the body, is essential ;
but these organs, when constructed and supplied, need
not only thorough training for the development ot
power and the acquisition of facility, but for the preser-
vation of their harmony and health. God sets all the
little children playing for this. He lays the necessity
of play upon them, and those restless little fellows that

are always sliding, or skating, or wrestling, or running,

are all inspired by a divine impulse. Those little bro-—
thers of yours who drive you half insane by their noise, ,

who will not sit upon your knee aminute without some

fresh twist of their bodies, are discharging their primary
Christian duties.
A new world, tossed into space by the Creative Hand,

informed with its laws of motion, and set spinning on

_ its axis and careering around its orbit, never stops. It

is only the boy who gets lazy as he grows older. God
puts him in motion at first, and teaches him to use every
physical power he possesses, and he does it faithfully at
first. Children who sit still do not live. The mission
of play does not cease with childhood. When labcr is
not capable of doing for you what play has done and





FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 61

when you have no regular task for your bodily powers,
you are to play still, Walking and riding, boxing and
fencing, playing ball, pitching quoits, rowing and bowl-
ing—all these are as legitimate to the man as the sim
pier sports are to the boy, and-are in a degree essential
to his happiness and usefulness,

I should be unjust to the age were I to omit the
mention of a special point of “physical culture” which
has been long neglected. You find as you come into
man’s estate, that hair has a tendency to grow upon
your face. It is the mark by which God meant that men
and women should be distinguished from each other
in the crowd. That hair was placed there in infinite
wisdom, but your fathers have been cutting it off from
their chins in small crops for thirty to fifty years, thus
impugning Nature’s policy, wasting precious time, draw-
ing a great deal of good blood, creating a great deal of
bad, and trying to erase from their faces the difference
which was intended to be maintained between them and
those of women. If you are a man, and have a beard,
rear it. You know it was made to wear. Itis- enough
o make a man with a decent complement of informa

tion and a common degree of sensibility (and a hand

some beard) deny his kind, to see these smooth-faceé

tcen around the streets, and actually showing them-

selves in female society! Let us have one generation

of beards.

em

es o . cet ea NN SOREN







|
|
|

LETTER VII.

SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES.

Say, shall my little bark attendant sail,
Pursue the triumph and partake the gale ?
Pops,

The primal duties shine aloft like stars;

The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, ~

Are scatter’d at the feet of man like flowers.
WorpDswortH

| PROPOSE in this letter to talk to you concerning

your relations to society. Many, and I may say
most -young men fail for many years to get hold of the
idea that they are members of society. They seem to
suppose that the social machinery of the world is self-ope-
rating. They cast their first ballot with an emotion of
pride, perhaps, but are sure to pay their first tax with a

groan. They see political organizations in active exist-

ptrae crenata:





a

SSNS SS STE





SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES, 63

ence ; the parish, and the church, and other important
bodies that embrace in some form of society aii men,
are successfully operated; and yet these young men
have no part nor lot in the matter. They do not think
of giving a day’s time to society. ‘They do not think
of giving anything to society. They have an idea that
the business of society is to look after them; that they
are to be provided for, that seats are to be furnished to
them in the churches gratis, that the Lyceum is to be
kept up for their amusement—that all social movements
whatsoever are to be organized and. operated without
their aid, and that they exist as legitimate objects of

their criticism. This is the very stupidity of selfishness.

_ Some of you haven’t known the fact until now, and are

not very much to blame. It is one of the incidents of
what Fanny Kemble once called your “ age of detesta-
bility.”

One of the first things a young man should do is to
see that he is acting his part in society. he earlier
this is begun the better. I think that the opponents of
secret societies in colleges have failed to estimate the
benefit which it must be to every member to be obliged
to contribute to the support of his particular organiza-
tion, and to assume personal care and responsibility as a
member. If these societies have a tendency to teach

the lesson of which I speak, they are a blessed thing.



j
sags a Pati eI A SSRN GES SE TSE RS RTE ESE LCE ODO LED EEL AL CELE RAL LE ELE VLE LE EEL GEL L GE AAD



ee Y

a nat at SiS a os

ae en eee ee eee SE

aes eters nee RS oe ene ae

Sten nae me ee.

ee eS ee eas

64 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN,

Half the ills of society originate in the fact that its bur
dens are unequally borne, and that the duties of indivi
duals to it are not discharged. Therefore I say to every
young man, begin early to do for the social institution:
im which you have your life. Ifyou have intellect and
accomplishments, give them to the elevation and delight
of the circle in which you move. If you have none of
these, show an accommodating disposition by attending
the sewing circle and holding yarn for the girls. De
your part, and be aman among men. Assume your
portion of social responsibility, and see that you dis
charge it well. If you do not do this, then you are
mean, and society has the right to despise you just ae
much as it chooses. You are, to use a word more em-
phatic than agreeable, a sneak, and have not a claim
upon your neighbors for a single polite word.

Young men have all noticed how easily some of thei
number get into society, and how others remain out of

a good social circle always. They are very apt to think

4 :
that society has not discharged its duties to them. Now

all social duties are reciprocal. Society, as it is called,
is far more apt to pay its dues to the individual than
the individual to society. Have you, young man, who
are at home whining over the fact that you cannot get

into society, done anything to give you aclaim to socia

recognition? Are you able to make any return for



snareeaeanpieaiacias

Bae ee a ae ee Crt RET ROO RO ABILENE DT

APOE OETA. a Ra A n° tgs
¢





"
“€
x
&

i
at

ee
ee ore

*
Sao
ge ais,





- SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES, 65

social recognition and social privileges? Do you know
anything 4 “What kind of coin do you propose to pay,
in the discharge of the obligation which comes upon
you with social recognition? In other words, as a re-
turn for what you wish to have society do for you, what
can you do for society? This is a very important ques-
tion—more important to you than to society. The
question is, whether you will be a member of society

by right, or by courtesy. If you have so mean a spirit

as to be content to be a beneficiary of society—to re- .

ceive favors and confer none—you have no business in
the society to which you aspire. You are an exacting,
conceited fellow. )
You ask me what society would have of you. Any-
thing that you possess which has value in society. So-
ciety is not particular on this point. Can you act ina
charade? Can you dance? Can you tell a story well?
Have you travelled, and have you a pleasant faculty of
telling your adventures? Are you educated, and able
to impart valuable ideas and general information ? Have
ou vivacity in conversation? Can you sing? Can
you play whist, and are you willing to assist those to a
pleasant evening who are not able to stand through a
party? Do you wear a good coat, and can you bring
good dress into the ornamental department of society ?

Are you up to anything in the way of private theatri-

sneer es OST ES See SS AE ee ee eee he ete ne ee ee re oa

i a nt oR at ti





——

2S SSS

PASE AeeeS RS Rae eS eS

nna etn eC CROC EI OT ES

aA:

66 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

cals? If you do not possess a decent degree of sense,

can you talk decent nonsense? Are you a good bean,

and are you willing to make yourself useful in wait.

ing on the ladies on all occasions? Have you a good
set of teeth, which you are willing to show whenevce
the wit of the company gets off a good thing? Are

you a true, straight-forward, manly fellow, with whose

healthful and uncorrupted nature it is good for society
to come in contact? In short, do you possess anything
of any social value? If you do, and are willing to im-
part it, society will yield itself to your touch. If you
have nothing, then society, as such, owes you nothing.
Christian philanthropy may put its arm round you, as
a lonely young man, about to spoil for want of some-
thing, but it is very sad and humiliating for a young
man to be brought to that. There are people who
devote themselves to nursing young men, and doing
them good. If they invite you to tea, go by all means,
and try your hand. If, in the course of the evening,
you can prove to them that your society is desirable,
you have won a point. Don’t be patronized.

Young men are very apt to get into a morbid state
of mind, which disinclines them to social intercourse,

They become devoted to business with such exclusive-

hess, that all social intercourse is irksome. They go

out to tea as if they were going to jail, and drag them-

\

a eeaheieniae



;

Bette a Sg RRO See TOE ee eee.

:
aemeer aoutgrencseimnmen cagpmrnecnas 5
eee

recat soo Soe Meee Te

aS et RATS

on rer TE SET TIE ETE SS SA





|
SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES. 67
selves to a ts as to on. execution, This disposition
is thoroughly morbid, and to be overcome by going

where you are invited, always, and at any sacrifice

a eS

of feeling. Don’t shrink from contact with anythine
but bad morals. Men who affect your unhealthy mind

anon

ee

with antipathy, will prove themselves very frequently
to be your best friends and most delightful companions,
Because a man seems uncongenial to you, who are
squeamish and foolish, you have no right to shun him.
We become charitable by knowing men. We learn to

love those whom we have despised by rubbing against

ee

them. Do you not remember some instance of mecting
a& man or woman at a watering-place whom you have
never previously known nor cared to know—an indivi-
vidual, perhaps, against whom you have entertained
the strongest. prejudices—but to whom you became
bound by a life-long friendship through the influence

of a three days’ intercourse? Yet if you had not thus

‘ cenadtiaendieanmiiaamniaanmenenamaaioamamhatitanes-sampeasaeueaderenic ee

met, you would have carried through life the idea that

it would be impossible for you to give your fellowship

Ane ere eer eeenne te

to such an individual.

PD. omen = POG tr OL LA OLLI OARS LOA I SED AOL I GENT EI TO BOOT 5

God has introduced into human character infinite
variety, and for you to say that you do not love and
will not associate with a man because he is unlike you,
Is not only foolish but wrong. You are to remember

that in the precise manner and degree in which a man

;
:
‘
'
i
‘
|
i
i
t
i
i
i





i
{
i
:
{
i

renee seth cna nga ae Sane Nh PS A Sn ES a en URN a ne Be meena

68 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

differs from you, do you differ from him; and that from
his standpoint you are naturally as repulsive to him as
he, from your standpoint, is to you. So, leave all this
talk of congeniality to silly girls and transcendental
dreamers. Do your business in your own way, and
concede to every man the privilege which you claim
for yourself. The more you mix with men, the less
you will be disposed to quarrel, and the more chari-
table and liberal will you become. The fact that you
do not understand a man, is quite as likely to be your
fault as his. ‘There are a good many chances in favor
of the conclusion that, if you fail to love an individual
whose acquaintance you make, it is through your own
ignorance and illiberality. So I say, meet every man
honestly ; seek to know him; and you will find that
in those points in which he differs from you rests his
power to instruct you, enlarge you, and do you good.
Keep your heart open for everybody, and be sure that
you shall have your reward. You shall find a jewel
under the most uncouth exterior; and associated with

-omeliest manners and the oddest ways and the ugliest

- aces, you will find rare virtues, fragrant little humani-

ties, and inspiring heroisms.
Again: you can have no influence unless you are
pocial. A strictly exclusive man is as devoid of influ-

ence as an ice-peak is of verdure, If you will takea







eo Sy

z
e.

re. & pe ae ees - Pate 2
: E . are





SOCIAL AND MORAL PRIVILEGES, 69

peep at the Hudson river some bright morning, you will |

see, ploughing grandly along towards the great metro-
polis, a magnificent steamer, the silver wave peeling off
from her cutwater, and a million jewels sparkling in
her wake, passing all inferior barks in sublime indiffer
ence, and sending yacht and skiff dancing from her
heel. Right behind her, you shall see a smaller steamer,

the central motive power of a plateau of barges, loaded
to their edges with the produce of thousands of well

tilled acres. She has fastened herself to these barges
by lines invisible to you. They may be homely things,
but they contain the food of the nation. Her own
speed may be retarded by this association, but the work
she does for commerce is ten fold greater than that
accomplished by the grand craft that shuns abrasion as
misfortune, and seeks to secure nothing but individual
dignity and fast time. It is through social contact and

absolute social value alone that you can accomplish any

- great social good. It is through the invisible lines

which you are able to attach to the minds with which
you are brought into association alone that you can tow
society, with its deeply freighted interests, to the great
haven of your hope.

The revenge which society takes upon the man who

isolates himself, is as terrible as it is inevitable. The

pride which sits alone, and will do nothing for society,



|
70 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

because society disgusts it, or because its possessor does
not at once have accorded to him his position, will have
the privilege of sitting alone in its sublime disgust till it
drops into the grave. The world sweeps by the isolat-

-ed man, carelessly, remorsely, contemptuously. He

ease

has no hold upon society, because he is not a part of it. :
The boat that refuses to pause in its passage, and throw
| a line to smaller craft, will bring no tow into port. So
let me tell you, that if you have an honorable desire in
your heart for influence, you must be a thoroughly
social man. You cannot move men until you are one
of them. They will not follow you until they have
heard your voice, shaken your hand, and fully learned
your principles and your sympathies. It makes no dif-
ference how much you know, or how much you are
capable of doing. You may pile accomplishment upon
acquisition mountain high ; but if you fail to be a social

man, demonstrating to society that your lot is with the

_
f }
|

|
|

?

rest, a little child with a song in its mouth, and a kiss
for all, and a pair of innocent hands to lay upon the
knees, shall lead mora hearts and change the direction

| of more lives than you.







a a RS iS ART ERR i AE RE RRS STR Sinha Soc







=

LETTER VIII.

THE REASONABLENESS AND DESIRABLENESS OF RELIGION,

Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends!

ah Hath he not always treasures, always friends,
The great good man? Three treasures, love and light,
And calm thoughts, regular as infants’ breath; “
And three firm friends, more sure than day and night—
Himself, his maker, and the angel death ?

COLERIDGE,

\7OUNG men, I hate cant,and I do not know exactly

how to say what I wish to say in this letter; but

I desire to talk to you ratioually upon the subject of
religion. Now don’t stop reading at the mention of
this word, but read this letter through. The fact is, it

is the Icst important letter I have undertaken to write

to you. I kuow you, I think, very thoroughly. Life

looks so good to you, and you are anticipating so muck

eainctnn ee anh sapeitr tt

a a ae

terpenes eipetsnanessaing set cintingactieeepeanasin

nae teen are

z PARTE AAA Te ME NN ct
FO BE eee ESS ERT. SETS weet =



eres

tie Sie

ET PR re ee A eee ee



cata eens 2 et

pce aan nceieia OEE
eng Og OPE TCO OIE ITE rere

;
ee RN Se EN Rn er RNR AG TEER SE ee ae te

tote meas ser ae er ere rnin SSIES

Meo 1 Rca RTE SES SE ELE ERI STE TE NOTES

42 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

from it, that religion comes to you, and comes over you

like a shadow. You associate it with long faces, and
prayer meetings, and psalm-singing, and dull sermons
and grave reproofs and stupidity. Your companions are
gay, and so are you. Perhaps you make a jest of reli.
gion; but deep down in your heart of hearts you know
that you are not treating religion fairly. You hnow
perfectly well that there is something in it for you, and
that you must have it. You know that the hour will
come when you will specially need it. But you wish to
put it off, and “enjoy life” first. This results very
much from the kind of preaching you have always lis-
tened to. You have been taught that human life is a
humbug, that these things which so greatly delight you
are vain and sinful, that your great business in this
world is to be saved, and that you are only to be saved
by learning to despise things that you love, and to love
things which you despise. You feel that this is unnatu-
ral and irrational. I think it is, myself. Now let me
talk to you.

Go with me, if you please, to the next station-house,
and look off upon that line of railroad. Itis as straight
as an arrow. Out run the iron lines, glittering in the
sun,—out, as far as we can see, until, converging almost
to a single thread, they pierce the sky. What were
those rails laid in that way for? It is a road, is it?

‘
; 9 re OG CTE LOE LOCO ret
ot sap RAGES St RET RENN I GOELLER EL eT COA CEO CLOT CLEA OLLIE CLE OLE CEO

ees a ee ee

ee ee

as







THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 73

Try your cart or your coach there. The axletrees are
too narrow, and you go bumping along upon the sleep-
ers. ‘Try a wheelbarrow. You cannot keep it on the
rail. But that road was made for something. Now go
with me to the locomotive shop. Whatisthis? We are
told it is a locomotive. What is a locomotive? Why,
it is a carriage moved by steam. But it is very heavy.
The wheels would sink into a common road to the axle.
That locomotive can never run on a common road, and
the man is a fool who built it. Strange that men will

waste time and money in that way! But stop a mo-

_ ment. Why wouldn’t those wheels just fit those rails ?

We measure them, and then we go to the track and
measure its gauge. That solves the difficulty. Those
rails were intended for the locomotive, and the locomo-
tive for the rails. They are good for nothing apart.
The locomotive is not even safe anywhere else. If it
should get off, after it is once on, it would run into rocks
and stumps, and bury itself in sands or swamps beyond
recovery.
Young man, you are a locomotive. You are a thing
that goes by a power planted inside of you. You are

made te go. In fact, considered as a machine, you are

very far superior to a locomotive. The maker of the

locomotive is man; your maker is man’s maker. You

are as different from a horse, or an ox, or a camel, as a
4

Be EE a a a a ee Sere a em a nr ore ree



74 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN.



=a

Eee

—-

locomotive is different from a wheelbarrow, a cart, or a
coach. Now do you suppose that the being who made
you——manufactured your machine, and put into it the

motive power—did not make a special road for you to

run upon? My idea of religion is that it is a railroad

for a human locomotive, and that just so sure as it
undertakes to run upon a road adapted only to animal
power, will it bury its wheels in the sand, dash itself —
among rocks, and come to inevitable wreck. If you
don’t believe this, try the other thing. Here are forty
roads: suppose you choose one of them, and see where
you come out. Here is the dram-shop road. Try it.
Follow it, and see how long it will be before you come
to a stump and a smash-up. Here is the road of sen-
sual pleasure. You are just as sure to bury your
wheels in the dirt as you try it. Your machine is too
heavy for that track altogether. Here is the winding,
uncertain path of frivolity. There are morasses on each
side of it, and, with the headway that you are under,
you will be sure, sooner or later, to pitch into one of
them. Here is the road of philosophy, but it runs
through a country from which the light of Heaven is |
shut out; and while you may be able to keep your ma- |
chine right side up, it will only be by feeling your way
along in a clumsy, comfortless kind of style, and with

no certainty of ever arriving at the heavenly station-





ere



. e
*
eae came iar tae lee ds te fA iti ls nr tn ert sinatra



ITHE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 75

house. Here is the road of scepticism. That is cover-
ed with fog, and a fence runs across it within ten rods
Don’t you sce that your machine was never intended te
run on those roads? Don’t you know that it never was,
and don’t you know that the only track under heaven
upon which it can run safely is the religious track ?
Don’t you know that just as long as you keep your
wheels on that track, wreck is impossible? Don’t you

know that it is the only track on which wreck is not

_ certain? I know it, if you don’t; and I tell you that

on that track which God has laid down expressly for
your soul to run upon, your soul will find free play for
all its wheels, and an unobstructed and happy progress.
It is straight and narrow, but it is safe and solid, and
furnishes the only direct route to the heavenly city.
Now, if God made your soul, and made religion for it,
you are a fool if you refuse to place yourself on the
track. You cannot prosper anywhere else, and your
inachine will not run anywhere else.

I suppose that a nice casuist would say that I had

hus fartalked only of morality—only of obedience to law

- But Iwas only dealing with the subject in the rough,

and trying to show you how rational a thing religion is,
and to bring to your comprehension your natural rela-
tion to it. I know that the rule of your life is selfish-

ness. I know that you are sinful, polluted, wilful, and

Aa A A AN EC ON te te tae

4
| ne



et tet AE OL Ct A eT CINE GE
On cea aN ee re eee

mc

76 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

that you act from low motives. I know that the race

to which you belong have all fallen from innocence, and

that they have so thoroughly put out the light that God

meant should light every man who comes into the
world, that, supplementary to the natural moral system,
ffe has, in great benevolence, devised a scheme of reli-
gion, embracing salvation. This is Christianity, and its
purpose is to get you back upon the track where the
race first started. It is a divine contrivance, or plan, for
accomplishing this purpose.

Jesus Christ saw the whole mass of human machinery
off the track, and going to irremediable ruin just so
truly as he did not interfere to prevent it. He came
and told us all how to get back, through repentance,
faith, reformation, the surrender of will, the abnegation
of self, and the devotion of the heart in love to God
and good will to men. He placed himself upon the
track and ran over it, not only showing us how to get
there ourselves, but showing us how to run when there.
In other words, he exhibited to us a true human life.
Then, when he had cleared away all the rubbish from

the track, shown us how to get upon it again, how to run

when we get there, howto avoid and repair accidents by
the way,—when he had done all this, and set his agents
at work in carrying out his plans, he went back to Hea-

ven, and now looks down to see how the work goes on.



cree ss

et Se ee ee

s cenetiepnanenematiien een eunenn nena

A A RN ttt tea
‘







NON a ee

THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 77

Young men, J believe this. I know it is true, and I
know, and God knows that this plan which he has

devised to save you and make it possible for you to

lead a true human life, which shall ultimate in life’s
highest issues, is the only one which can save you, I
know that you can never be happy until you have
heartily and practically accepted this religion ; and for
you to go on, year after year, carelessly, thoughtlessly,
spoiling yourself, growing harder, meaner, more polluted,
with no love to God and outgushing benevolence to men,
is an insult to Jesus Christ and a brutal wrong to that
which he came to save. The fact is that sin is the most
unmanly thing in God’s world. You never were made
for sin and selfishness. You were made for love and
obedience. If you think it is manly to reject religion,
and the noble obligations it imposes upon you, it only
shows how strong a hold the devil has upon you. It
shows how degraded you are; how the beast that is in
vou domineers over the soul that is in you.

Young man, your personal value depends entirely
upon your possession of religion. You are worth to
yourself what you are capable of enjoying; you are
worth to society the happiness you are capable of
imparting. To yourself, without religion, you are worth
very little. A man whose aims are low, whose motives
are selfish, who has in his heart no adoration for the



TS CO IC CEN AE CE A PETAL i te

A a a CE ea ee Nar ena eee le ent sete erent



78 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

great God, and no love of his Christ, whose will is not

subordinate to the Supreme will—gladly and gratefully

_ —who has no faith, no tenable hope of a happy immor-

tality, no strong-armed trust that with his soul it shall

_be well in all the future, cannot be worth very much ts

himself. Neither can such a man be worth very much
to society, because he has not that to bestow which
society most needs for its prosperity and its happiness.
A locomotive off the track is worth nothing to its
owner or the public so long as it is off the track. The
conditions of its legitimate and highest value are not
complied with. It cannot be operated satisfactorily to
the owner, or usefully to the public, because it is not
where it was intended to run by the man who made it.
, Just look at the real object of religion, and see how
rational it is. It is the placing of your souls in har-
mony with God and his laws. God is the perfect,
supreme soul, and your souls are the natural offspring

of that soul. Your souls are made in the image of his,

and, like all created things, are subject to certain

immutable laws.’ The transgression of these laws
damages your souls, warps them, stunts their growth,
outrages them. Do you not see that you can only be
manly and attain a manly growth by preserving your
true relations and likeness to the father soul, and a

strict obedience to the laws of your being? God has









THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION, 79

given you appetites, and he meant you should indulge
them, and that they should be sources of happiness to
you; but always in a way which shall not interfere
with your spiritual growth and development. He gave
you passions, and they are just as sacred as any part of
you, but they are to be under the strict control of your
reason and your conscience. He gave you desires for
earthly happiness. He planted in you the love of
human praise, delight in society, the faculty to enjoy all
his works. He gave you his works to enjoy, but you
can only enjoy them truly when you regard them as
clessings from the great Giver, to feed and not starve
your higher natures. There is not a true joy in life
which you are required to deprive yourself of, in being
faithful to him and his laws. Without obedience .to
law, your souls cannot be healthful, and it is only to a
healthful soul that pleasure comes with its natural—its
divine aroma. Is a nose stuffed with drugs capable of
perceiving the delicate fragrance of the rose? Is the
soul that intensifies its pleasures as an object of life
capable of a healthful appreciation of even purely sen-
sual pleasures? The idea of a man’s enjoying life
without religion is absurd.

I have been thus particular upon this point, because
I love you, and because I know that without it, or

independent of it, all my previous talk has very httl

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

c
i
ences





SOR

* WA SRS



80 _ TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN. |

significance. I have reasoned the thing to you on its

merits, and I urge it upon your immediate attention, as

a matter of duty and policy. The matter of duty you
understand. I do not need to talk to you about that

Now about the policy. It will not be five years, proba- |

bly, before every one of you will be involved, head and
ears, in business. Some of you are thus involved
already. You grow hard as you grow older. You get
.abits of thought and life which incrust you. You
-ecome surrounded with associations which hold you,
o that the longer you live without religion the worse

will be for you, and the less probable will be your
.doption of a religious life. If you expect to be a man,
you must begin now. It is so easy, comparatively, to
Jo it now !

“With this paragraph I cease to direct my words par-
Sicularly to you. What I have said to you, I have said
heartily and conscientiously. I shall see you some
time. We are none of us to live very long, but if we
all act the manly part we were sent here to act, and are
true to God and ourselves, we shall be gathered into a
great kingdom, whose throne will be occupied by the
founder of our religion. During some golden hour of
that cloudless day, sitting or straying upon some
heayenly hill, watching upon the far-stretching plains
the tented hosts of God’s redeemed, or marking the

te me aerate Sor oem

a Biake
Sala ti i Ti aT i Ni gs Shwe





la i ae





a

P senegets pees

west

ota ea oe BO aot

a a ER MI Sy AYE aM DSIRE St 8
/

j
|



THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION, — 81

'

shadow of an argel’s flight across the bright mirror of
the river of life, I shall say something about these let-
‘ers to you. [I shall look you in the face as I say it, to
we if you are moved to an emotion of gratitude or
of gratification; and if you should happen to tell me
that they made you better, that they led you to a
higher development, that they directed you to a manly
and a godly life, I should press your hand, and if I
should keep from weeping it would be more than I cap
do now. 7
4* .

- A Re tt







*

ETTERS TO YOUNG

ia are : _











eel se ital saat li ssn

mntcpec nano memo

LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN

(open nns pceraman nn
LETTER I.

DRESS— ITS PROPRIETIES aND ABUSES

A creature not too bright or good

For human nature’s daily food ;

For transient sorrows, simple wiles,

Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles.
a en ee ee ee ce ee

A perfect woman, nobly planned
To warn, to comfort, and command.

‘W ORDSW ORTH.

I have observed, among all nations, that the women ornament them
selves more than the men.
Joun LEDYARD.

ACCOUNT a pure, beautiful, intelligent, and well-
bred woman, the most attractive object of vision

and contemplation inthe world. As mother, sister, and

wife, such a woman is an angel of grace and goodness,
and makes a heaven of the home which is sanctified

and glorified by her presence. Asan element of society

she invites into finest demonstrations all that is good in



ees

a ey





eid
.

86 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

the heart, and shames into secresy and silence all that
?s unbecoming and despicable. There may be more of
greatness and of glory in the higher developments of
manhood, bnt, surely, in womanhood God most delights
to show the beauty of the holiness and the sweetness
of the love of which he is the infinite source. It is for
this reason that a girl or a young woman is a very
sacred thing to me. It is for this reason that a silly
young woman or a vicious one makes me sigh or shud-
der. It is for this reason that I pray that I may write
worthily to young women.
In getting at a piece of work, it is often necessary, as
a preliminary, to clear away rubbish; and I say at first

that I do not write to masculine young women. I

deem masculine women abnormal women, and I there-

fore refer all those women who wish to vote, who
delight in the public exhibition of themselves, who
bemoan the fate which drapes them in petticoats, who
quarrel with St. Paul and their lot, who own more
rights than they possess; and fail to fulfil the duties
ei their sphere while seeking for its enlargement—I
refer all these to the eight letters recently addressed to
young men. They will find some practical remarks in

those letters upon masculine development and a manly

discharge of life’s duties. My theory may be very un-

sound, but it is my belief, that the first natural division





- anil hile = ee
ats assuinenincnenartaicin ntstaenantiitecmteapiaeeonmateetat pe 2 EE TE A i Se fe SPECS PR LTR ARES SES OER ES

[SES SEG IGE ERSTE RR RTE FUE RE

ores ene SE Caen re areas

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 8?

of the human race is marked by the line that distin-

guishes the sexes. I believe that a true woman is just
as different from a true man as a true man is different

from a true woman. The nature and the constitution

of the masculine are one, and the nature and constitu-

tion of the feminine are another. So of the glory
attached to each ; so of the functions; so of the sphere
Therefore, if there be “strong-minded women” who
read these letters, I bid them, with all kindness, to turn

to the other series for that which will most benefit ;

them.
I shall talk first of that thing which, worthily or

most unworthily, engages the minds of all young wo-

men, viz—pDrREsS. I speak of this first, because it is
part of the rubbish which I wish to get out of the way
before commencing more serious work ; and yet this is
not altogether trivial. I believe in dress. I believe
that God delights in beautiful things, and as he has
never made anything more beautiful than woman, I
believe that that mode of dressing the form and face
which best harmonizes with their beauty, is that which

pleases him best. I believe the mode of female

_ dress prevalent among the Shaker women is absolute

desecration. To take anything which infinite ingenu-
‘ty and power have made beautiful, and capable by the
gracefulness of its form and the harmony of its parts



Ths ee

°
seeninn pe HGS NNEC OED ICE UNE EATS elt AEN ie nae tel eNO OLE IRS Ia aE SNE eT aaa iss Aa lls tats lata Pe

ETERS SSeBS SS

- PEERS: SST





sce ners ene a Oe

TE, Ia

88 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN,

of producing the purest pleasure to the observer, and
clothe it with a meal bag and crown it with a sugar-
scoop, is an irreverent trifling with sacred things which
should be punished by mulct and imprisonment.

It is ashame to any woman who has the means to
dress well, to dress meanly, and it is a particular shame
for any womanto do this in the name of religion. I have

seen women who, believing the fashionable devotion to

dress to be sinful, as it doubtless is, go to that extreme in |
plainness of attire which, if it prove anything touching

the power that governs them, proves that it is a power
which is at war with man’s purest instincts,and most
elevated tastes. I say it is a shame for a woman to
dress unattractively who has it in her power to dress
well. It is every woman’s duty to make herself
pleasant and attractive by such raiment and ornament
as shall best accord with the style of beauty witb
which she is endowed. The beauty of woman’s per-
son was intended to be a source of pleasure—the
fitting accompaniment of that which in humanity is the
most nearly allied to the angelic. Surely, if God plants
flowers upon a clod they may rest upon a woman’s

bosom, or glorify a woman’s hair!
?

But dress is a subordinate thing, because beauty is
not the essential thing. Beauty is very desirable; it is

a very great blessing; it is a misfortune to possess an

ct ate ait nina nace RIO N Ee



eo
Ye





.
pO RINE re OR tte BOILED EE EE ae aatt BG



INTIS CT ET EA Sn ee

==

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 89

unattractive person ; bnt there are multitudes of women
with priceless excellences of aeart and mind who are
not beautiful. Beauty, so far as it is dependent upon
form and color, is a material thing, and belongs to the
grosser nature. Therefore, dress is a subject which
should occupy comparatively few of the thoughts of a
true woman, whether beautiful or not. To dress well,
becomingly, even richly, if it can be afforded, is a wo-

man’s duty. ‘To make the dress of the person the ex-

ponent of personal taste, is a woman’s privilege. But .

to make dress the grand object of life; to think of
nothing and talk of nothing but that which pertains to
the drapery and artificial ornament of the person, is
but to transform the trick of a courtesan into amuse-
ment for a fool. There are multitudes of women with
whom dress is the all-prevalent thought. They think
of it, dream of it, live for it. It is enough to disgust
one to hear them talk about it, It goes with them
from the gaiety of the ball-room into the weeds of the
house of death. They use it as a means for splitting
grief into vulgar fractions, and are led out from great
bereavements into the consolations of vanity, by the
hands of numerators and denominators. They flat-
ter one another, envy one another, hate one another—
all on the score of dress. They go upon the street to
show their dresses. They enter the house of God to

ceca een ns eo eEEEERETEnRIAInnnanenemmemnmminneme nei aepeneeneinneases needa ee eee a ers

NF RR A A ANA OE eT NE RN ES I A pt RE En, RE



eee eee AACA PLE ETT OE 5
ree en nt AP NASER '
* |

aN NE a NSF EMSAs eerste en

90 ‘TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

display their bonnets. They actually prize themselves
more highly for what they wear than for any charm of
person or mind which they may possess!

One of the most vulgar and unbecoming things ir
the world is this devotion to dress, which, in many
minds, grows into a form of insanity, and leads to the
worship of dry goods and dress-makers. Now it will be
impossible for me to give you special directions upon

this subject of dress. Your dress-maker and your

books, and, better than all, your own taste and expe-,

rience, will tell you what colors become your complex-
ion, what style of make best accords with your form
and style of movement. I shall only speak generally ;
and I say, first, dress modestly. It is all well enough
for little girls to show their necks, but for a woman to
make her appearance in the society of young men with
such displays of person as are made in what is so mis-
takenly called “ full dress,” is a shame to her. I know
what fashion allows in this matter, and fashion has

many sins to answer for. ‘Thousands of girls dress in a

manner that they would discard with horror and dis

gust, if the knew the trains of thought which are sug-
gested by ther presence. I know young men, and I
know there is not one in one hundred who attends a
“fall dress party,” and comes out as pure and worthy a

man as he went in. There is not one in one hundred



a



— a
ie
7 san



DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 91

who does not hold the secret of a base thought
suggested by the style of dress which he sees around
him. _ This may tell very badly for young men. Doubt-
less it does; but we are obliged to take things as we
find them. The millennium has not dawned yet, and we
have receded to a considerable distance from the era of
human innocence. I tell you a fact; and, if you are
modest young women, you will heed its suggestions.
If you choose to become the objects of foul fancies
among young men, whose respect you are desirous of
securing, you know the way.

Again, shun peculiarities of dress which attract the
attention of the vulgar. Just now the red petticoat is
the talk of the newspaper world. It is the inspiring
theme of many a sportive pen, and when one of these is
scen upon the street, it attracts the attention of the pru-
rient crowd. A modest woman will shun a notoriety
like this, aide it ceases to be such. - I should deprecate
the appearance upon the street of a sister of mine with
such a garment, ostentatiously displayed, as a calamity
to her; and yet I do not believe I am a squeamish man
I know that a young woman can dress in such a way as
to excite a chaste and worthy admiration among her
own sex as well as mine, and my judgment tells me
that that is the proper dress for her to wear. .I feel that

it is right and well for her to dress like this, and

ce ee ee co ee a ae ee eee

ne erent ena tn er

aN En stent etree Netti a i

see tO EASE PCE LO EIN ES





92 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

that it is not right and well for her to dress other
wise.

Again, dress in such a manner that your attire will
not occupy your thoughts after it is upon you. Let
every garment be well fitted and well put on—ugly in
no point, fussy in no point, nor made of such noticeable

material that you necessarily carry with you the con-
sciousness that people around you are examining it.
Make it always subordinate to yourself—tributary to
your charms, rather than constituent of them. Then
the society in which you move will see you, and not
your housings and trappings. “Jane was dressed very
becomingly,” or “how well Jane looked,” are very
much more complimentary comments than “that was a

’ and a tolerably acute

splendid dress that Jane wore ;’
mind may gather from these expressions the philosophy
of the whole thing.

There is, as a general thing, no excuse for attire
which is not neat and orderly, at any time ‘n the day.
A thoroughly neat and orderly young woman is pre-
wentable at any hour, whether she be in the kitchen or
parlor ; and I have seen specimens of womanhood that
were as attractive at the wash-tub, with their tidy hair
and their nine-penny calico, as in their parlors at a later
hour, robed in silk and busy at their embroidery. Ma-

terials may be humble, but they may always be taste-

Cera cera ante ener ERNE Bet ROR NN EN LR NN et ne RNR Se nr nN Rae eee

Mee RN ee OS - —



.
ene oa ES Rte we Pree Seine Se SS Se

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 93

fully made and neatly kept. There are few habits that
a young woman may acquire which, in the long run,
will tend more to the preservation of her own self
respect than that of thorough tastefulness, appropriate-
ness, and tidiness of dress, and certainly very few which
will make her more agreeable to others.

So, I say, dress well if you can afford it, always
neatly, never obtrusively, and always with a modest
regard to rational ideas of propriety. Scorn the idea of
making dress in any way the great object of life. It is
beneath you. A woman was made for something
higner than a convenient figure for displaymg uary-
goods and the possibilities of millinery and mantua-

making.



LETTER II.
"HEH TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOP Tc WOMANHOOP

UO mirtn and innocence! Omilk and water!
Ye happy mixtures of more happy days!
Brron

We figure to ourselves the thing we like, and then we build itup tm
chance will have it, on the rock or sand.
: Henry TAyLor.

} ares young woman who has arrived at twenty
years of age has passed through three dispensa-
tions—the chaotic, the transitional, and the crystalline,

The chaotic usually terminates with the adoption of the

long skirt. Then commences the transitional dispen-.

sation, involving the process of crystallization. This
process may go on feebly for years, or it may proceed

so rapidly that two years. will complete it. In some

pa 9 RTE A PS eT PSA OSS POE I SP ES PE CSAS tet

a RS NTO RE IR ET UR RINE LT HN

)

\

\ 4
i

OH







TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOD TO WOMANHOOD, 95

women, it is never completed, in consequence of a lack
of inherent vital force, or a criminal disregard of the
requisite conditions. ‘This transitional dispensation,
which is better characterized by calling it the silly
dispensation, is so full of dangers that it calls fora
separate letter; and this I propose to write now.

The silly dispensation or stage of a young woman’
life is marked by many curious symptoms, some of
them indicative of disease. As the cutting of the
natural teeth is usually accompanied by various dis-
orders, so the cutting of the spiritual teeth in women is
very apt to exhibit its results in abnormal manifesta.
tions. They sometimes eat slate pencils and chalk, and
some have been known to take kindly to broken bits
of plastering. Others take a literary turn, and, not
content with any number of epistles to female acquain-
tances, send in contributions to the press, which the
friendly and appreciative editor kindly and carefully
returns, or as kindly and carefully loses, or fails to
receive. Others still take to shopping and dawdling
with clerks who have dawning beards, red cheeks, and

frock coats with outside pockets, from which protrude

white handkerchief-tips. Still others yoke themselves —

m pairs, drawn together by sympathetic attraction, and

by community of mental exercise on the subject of

beaux. Yon shall see them walking through the

Cs oe

crs tmasttinaat ts team CN CT COOOL TENT



net ae Ten 2 rte oo perce SE Tae Tem ee ee ot

a eae eee cen nee a

9 errata taht ar sarc Rt eS aS TR ERE SENSES SEE TEEN Sent a eet SS

96 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

streets, locked arm in arm, plunging into the most
charming confidences, or, if you happen to sleep in the
house with them, you shall hear them talking in
their chamber until, at midnight, the monotonous hum
of their voices has soothed you into sleep; and the
same voices, with the same unbroken hum, shall greet
your ears in the morning. Others take to solitude and
long curls. They walk with their eyes down, murmur-
ing to themselves, with the impression that everybody
is looking at them.

If a young woman can be safely carried through this
dispensation, the great step of life will nave been gained.
This is the era of hasty marriages, deathless attach-
ments which last until they are superseded, and deli-
berately formed determinations to live a maiden life,
which endure until the reception of an offer of marriage.
If, during this period, a young woman be at home, en-

gaged more or less in the duties of the household, or,

if she be engaged in study, with the healthful restraints

and stimulus of general society about her, it is very well
for her. But if she be among her mates constantly, with

nothing to do, or if she be shut up in a boarding-school —

conducted on the high pressure principle, where imagina-

tion is stimulated by restraint, and disobedience to law

is provoked by its unreasonableness, it is indeed very
bad for her.





Full Text



















































































































































































































































































































The Baldwin Library

RmB








&

LOL hale

Bip ie &















‘





SINGLE AND MARRIED. |
TIMOTHY TITCOMB, Esquire |

ew. YORK: |
CHAELES SCRIBNER. |
, 124 GRAND STREET.

ie a ARO.











aks






Eatered according te Act of Congress, in en yeal 1806, a
CHARLES SCRIBNER,

b the Clerk's Office of the Distriet Court of the United States for the
~ Southern District of New York. ees ee

























— Pee = pe ee
7a eS Ma NE RR “Sy eiee a, y 2 .
x ;
Set eT US are .
,
ee {
‘ « . Se 4
. a
.
ok: F
. } Z
ben ‘ a
uy
.
4 ‘
Â¥
¢
a S Fe,





.
mh
hah














TO THE

| REY. waxy WARD BEECHER



oy “You digrs very kindly suitcase me to dedi-
a cate this book to you. I do it with hearty plea-
: sure, and with cordial thanks for your courtesy,



because it will do me good in several ways. First,



apect and admiration which I entertain towards
one who, in the best way, is doing more than any
other American for the elevation of the standard
of Christian manhood and womanhood. Second,




it will save to me the awkward labor of writing a



he

+ will give me an opportunity to manifest the re-







ete eam a at oe og j :
: or eae ahi eae ah 9? | TR ce TO RLS
‘ e ee ee 2 Ny ds be atts ° eens wt ih ee
* en ee ety ee ee Te ee es, r a nt Antec teen te bain me Hs












vi PREFACE,

general preface. One can say to a friend, you
know, in a familiar way, what he would hesitate
to say directly to the public of his own perform-
ances. Third, it will show the public that yo
know the author of these letters, and that you
have confidence in his good intentions.

The Great Master taught you how to teach,
and, if we heed the lesson of His life, He will

teach us all. He assumed a sympathetic level

with humanity, that He might secure the eye and
ear of the world. Through these He obtained
the heart—a conquest preliminary to that of the
world’s understanding and life. It was the divine
policy—rather, perhaps, I should say, the eternal
necessity—that He should be made in all points
like as we are, in order to a fitness for and the
fulfilment of his mission. It was the brother
that was in Him which touched humanity, and
became the medium of heavenly impulses and
inspirations; and it is the brother in us, rather
than the preceptor, which will enable us to reach
the hearts and minds that call for our ministra-
tions.

With this idea in mind, I cannot but think that
a general mistake has been made in the instrue-




Vill PREFACE.

breadth, and its contents may occupy an inferior
level, yet it may brim a goblet with pure water,
without other elevation than that which is neces
sary for the service.

You will notice that I address my letters to the
young men, young women, and young married
people, as classes, with distinctness of aim and ap-
plication, while I inclose all in a single volume.
I have intended the whole book for each class. I
believe that each should know what Ihave to say
to the other. I have written nothing to one class
which it would not be well for the other to know.
The effort to maintain a divided interest and a
divided sympathy between the sexes, to deny to
them partnership in a common knowledge of their
relationship, to hide them from each other as if
they were necessarily enemies or dangerous asso-
ciates, and to obliterate the idea that they are
sharers in the same nature, and companions in a
common destiny, may spring fromsthe purest mo-
tives, but it produces inhuman results. :

I look around me, and I see the young of both
sexes with hearts bounding high with hope, forms
elastic with health, and eyes bright with the
enjoyment of life; and the thought of the stern






PREFACE, 1X

discipline which awaits them, touches me to tears.
Their dawning sun gilds only the mountain-tops
of life, and leaves the blind defiles and dismal
gorges for their weary feet to find, through years
of patient or fretful travel. To tell them how te
perform this journey worthily, and to do it hand
in hand, in harmonious companionship, I have

written these letters. It has been with me an

honest and earnest work, in the object of which I
am sure that you will sympathize. I only hope
that you will find little to criticise and nothing to
condemn, in the nature and style of the means by
which I have sought to accomplish it.
Yours, |
With respectful affection,

Tor AUTHOR.
- REPUBLICAN OFFICE, |

a aeeees July 1, 1358,
1*



ELLE LE - - Ss TY EET EIEIO TR settee Rane lee Dt NEE IEE COL OL CELLO A ALLEL AAD AAAEAAL ELIE
:

opment Ai By

oy teers












6





















PAGE.

g the Right Start, . ee . 1s

; Female Society—The Woman for a Wire, ¢5 e
— Bg Oe ee
CM et B
; Bay aie tk . . . 45

Popeater, .... °°. «- .. 64

Duties ivi tn le
cae












tT a ED SAL LEN OE EN NEI

xi CONTENTS.

LETTER. PACE
V. The Claims of Lol and Lucre, fc tg a ly ag ee

VI. The Prudent and Proper Use of Language, . . 134

VI. Housewifery and Industry, . ‘ - 144

Vill. The Beauty and Blessedness of female Piety, : 155

LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

I. The First Essential Duties of the Connubial Relaticn, 167

IT. Special Duties of the Husband, ‘ : ‘ s 1%
III. Special Duties of the Wife,
IV. The Rearing of Children, . ‘ ’ ; 198
V. Separation—Family Relatives—Servants, oe ae
VI. The Institution of Home, . ° . 219
VII. Social Homes, and Blessings for Daily Use, ‘ . 229
VIII. A Vision of Life and its Meaning. . .~ 0 aoe

. . k8S ’




LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

pen mes

LETTER I.
GETTING THE RIGHT START.

In idle wishes fools supinely stay,
Be there a will, then wisdom finds a way. —
BuRNS.

SUPPOSE that the first great lesson a young

man should learn is that he knows nothing; and
that the earlier and more thoroughly this lesson is
learned, the better it will be for his peace of mind and
his success in life. A young man, bred at home, and
growing up in the light of parental admiration and
fraternal pride, cannot readily understand how it is
that every one else can be his equal in talent and
acquisition. If, bred in the country, he seeks the life of

the town, he will very early obtain an idea of his

insignificance. After putting on airs and getting severely
laughed at, going into a bright and facile society and

finding himself awkward and tongue-tied, undertaking


14 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

to speak in some public place and breaking down, and

ear

paying his addresses to some gentle charmer and
receiving for his amiable condescension a mitten of
inconvenient dimensions, he will be apt to sit down in
a state “ bordering on distraction,” to reason about it.
This is a critical period in his history. The result of
his reasoning will decide his fate. If, at this time, he

thoroughly comprehend, and in his soul admit and accept

SPAN EA ST RR TEI I DEL AT BLO LEN LN ELA AG AS

the fact, that he knows nothing and is nothing; if he
bow to the conviction that his mind and his person are
but ciphers among the significant and cleanly cut
figures about him, and that whatever he is to be, and is
to win, must be achieved by hard work, there is abun-
dant hope of him. If, on the contrary, a huge self-
conceit still hold possession of him, and he straighten
stiffly up to the assertion of his old and valueless self; or
if he sink discouraged upon the threshold of a life of
fierce competitions and more manly emulations, he
might as well be a dead man. The world has no use
for such a man, and he has only to retire or be trod-
den upon. |

When a young man has thoroughly comprehended
the fact that he knows nothing, and that, intrinsically,
he is of but little value, the next thing for him to learn

is that the world cares nothing for him ;—that he is the -

subject of no man’s overwhelming admiration and es:






GETTING THE RIGHT START. 15

- teem; that he must take care of himself. A letter of
introduction may possibly procure him an invitation to
tea. If he wear a good hat, and tie his cravat with
propriety, the sexton will show him to a pleasant seat in
church, and expect him to contribute liberally . wher
the plate goes round. If he be a stranger, he will find
every man busy with his own affairs, and none to look
after him. He will not be noticed until he becomes
noticeable, and he will not become noticeable until he
does something to prove that he has an absolute value
in society. No letter of recommendation will give him
this, or ought to give him this. No family connexion
will give him this, except among those few who think
more of blood than brains.

Society demands that a young man shall be some-
body, not only, but that he shall prove his right to the
title; and it has a right to demand this. Society will
not take this matter upon trust—at least, not for a long
time, for it has been cheated too frequently. Society is
not very particular what a man does, so that it prove
_ him to be a man: then it will bow to him, and make
room for him. I know a young man who made a place
for himself by writing an article for the North Ameri-
can Review: nobody read the article, so far as [ know
but the fact that he wrote such an article, that it was
very long, and that it was published, did the business

ee


16 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

for him. Everybody, however, cannot write articles for

the North American Review—at least, I hope every-

body will not, for it is a, publication which makes me .

a quarterly visit; but everybody, who is somebody, can
do something. There is a wide range of effort between
holding a skein of silk for a lady and saving her from
drowning—between collecting voters on election day
and teaching a Sunday School class. A man must enter
society ef his own free will, as an active element or
a valuable component, before he can receive the recog-
nition that every true man longs for. I take it that
this is right. A man whois willing to enter society as
a beneficiary is mean, and does not deserve recognition.

There is no surer sign of an unmanly and cowardly
spirit than a vague desire for help; a wish to depend,
to lean upon somebody, and enjoy the fruits of the in-
dustry of others. ‘There are multitudes of young men,
I suppose, who indulge in dreams of help from some

uarter, coming in at a convenient moment, to enable
? 3

them to secure the success in life which they covet.

The vision haunts them of some benevolent old gentle
nan with a pocket full of money, a trunk full of mort-
gages and stocks, and a mind remarkably appreciative
M{ merit and genius, who will, perhaps, give or lend
them anywhere from ten to twenty thousand dollars,

with which they will commence and goon swimmingly.



ee ee ee


GETCING THE RIGHT START. 1?

Perhaps he will take a different turn, and educate them,
Or, perhaps, with an eye to the sacred profession, they
desire to become the beneficiaries of some benevolent
gociety, or some gentle circle of female devotees,

To me, one of the most disgusting sights in the world
is that of a young man with healthy blood, broad shoul-
ders, presentable calves, anda hundred and fifty pounds,
more or less, of good bone and muscle, standing with
his hands in his pockets, longing for help. I admit that
there are positions in which the most independent spirit
may accept of assistance—may, in fact, as a choice

of evils, desire it ; but for a man who is able to help

himself, to desire the help of others in the accomplish--
ment of his plans of life, is positive proof that he has

received a most unfortunate training, or that there is a
leaven of meanness in his composition that should make
him shudder. Do not misunderstand me: I would not.

inculcate that pride of personal independence which

repels in its sensitiveness the well-meant good offices

nd benefactions of friends, or that resorts to desperate
hifts rather than incur an obligation. What I con
demn in a young man is the love of dependence; the
willingness to be under obligation for that which his

own efforts may win.
I have often thought that the Education Society, and

_ kindred organizations, do much more harm than good

asec ate PP Reenter tnd

a ‘ we sim penen aa ee ee tm Be rman a
Zi comers msectadncnastmsictnts paths ates eet earner ye nei NLP It naa! LOGE ELITE NALA LLL LD ALOE veer ~

saat ACTRESS I IES




ee rere enspemmnmemrevenee sateen en
.

ee Ee

18 VITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YUUNG MEN,

by inviting into the Christian ministry a class of young
men who are willing to be helped. A man who wil-
lingly receives assistance, especially if he has applied

for it, invariably sells himself to his benefactor, unless

_ that benefactor happen to be a man of sense who is giv:

ing absolutely necessary assistance to one whom he
knows to be sensitive and honorable. Any young man
who will part with freedom and the self-respect: that
gTOWS out of self-reliance and self- “support, is unmanly,
neither deserving of assistance, nor capable of making
good use of it. Assistance will invariably be received

by a young man of spirit as a dire necessity—as the

“ chief evil of his poverty.

When, therefore, a young man has ascertamed and
fully received the fact that he does not know anything,
that the world does: nob care anything about him, that
_what he wins must be won by his own brain and brawn,
and that while he holds i in his own hands the means of

gaining his own. livelihood and the objects of his life,
:

he cannot receive assistance without compromising his
self-respect and selling his freedom, he is in a fair posi-
tion for beginning life. When a young man becomes
aware that only by his own efforts can he rise into com
panionship and competition with the sharp, strong, and

well-drilled minds around him, he is ready for work,

and not before.

renee eel










GETTING THE RIGHT START. 19

The next lesson is that of patience, thoroughness of
preparation, and contentment with the regular channels
of business effort and enterprise. This i is, perhaps, one
of the most difficult to learn, of all the lessons of life.
It is natural for the mind to reach out eagerly for im-
mediate results. As manhood dawns, and the young
man catches in its first light the pinnacles of realized
dreams, the golden domes of high possibilities, and the
purpling hills of great delights, and then looks down
upon the narrow, sinuous, long, and dusty path by
‘which others have reached them, he is apt to be dis-
gusted with the passage, and to seek for success through
broader channels, by quicker means. Beginning at the
very foot of the hill, and working slowly to the top,
seems a very discouraging process ; and precisely at this

point have thousands of young men made shipwreck of

3 their lives. os
i | Let this be understood, then, at starting; that the
a | . patient conquest of difficulties which rise in the regular
e | _ and legitimate channels of business and enterprise, is.

not cnly essential in securing the successes which you
seck, but it is essential to that preparation of your mind
requisite for the enjoyment of your successes, and for
retaining them when gained. It is the general rule of
| Providence, the world over, and in all time, that un-
earned success is a curse. It is the rule of Providence,
shat the process of earning success shall be the prepara-

ee 2 eee

{
i
!

ee sg nner RSET eee RIFE
€


20 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

tion for its conservation and enjoyment. So, day by
day, and week by week; so, month after month, and
year after year, work on, and in that process gain
strength and symmetry, and nerve and knowledge, that
when success, patiently and bravely worked for, shall
come, it may find you prepared to receive it and keep
it. The development which you will get in this brave
and patient labor, will prove itself, in the end, the most
valuable of your successes. It will help to make aman
of you. It will give you power and self-reliance. It
will give you not only self-respect, but the respect of
your fellows and the public.

Never allow yourself to be seduced from this course.
You will hear of young men who have made fortunes
in some wild speculations. Pity them; for they will
almost certainly lose their easily won success. Do not
be in a hurry for anything. Are you in love with some
dear girl, whom you would make your wife? Give
Angelina Matilda to understand that she must wait ;
and if Angelina Matilda is really the good girl you take

er tobe, she will be sensible enough to tell you to choose
your time. You cannot build well without first laying
a good foundation; and for you to enter upon a busi-
ness which you have not patiently and thoroughly
learned, and to marry before you have won a character,
or even the reasonable prospect of a competence, is

ntimately to bring your house down about the ears of





or




. GETTING THE RIGHT START. 21

give you. If, at the age of thirty years, you find your-
self established in a business which pays you with cer-
tainty a living income, you are to remember that God
has blessed you beyond the majority of men.

In saying what I have said to you in this letter, I

nave had no wish to make of you pattern young men; _

but of this I will speak more fully hereafter. The fash-
ion plates of the magazines bear no striking resem-
blance to the humanity which we meet in the streets.
I only seek to give you the principles and the spirit
which should animate you, without any attempt or de-
sire to set before you the outlines of the life I would
have you lead. In fact, if there are detestable things
which I despise above all other things detestable, they
are the patterns made for young men, and the young
men made after them. I would have you carry all your

individuality with you, all your blood well purified, all

your passions well controlled and made tributary to —

the motive forces of your nature; all your manhood.
enlarged, ennobled, and uncorrupted ; all your piety, ren
dering your whole being sensitively alive to your rela-
tions to God and man; all your honor, your affections,
and your faculties—all these, and still hold yourselves
strictly amenable to those laws which confine a true
success to the strong and constant hand of patient

achievement.

Angelina Matilda, and such pretty children as she may —


ne ON A aetena

kai ceeessnemeeitieney an cg nee nner arin ann

LETTER II.

_ FEMALE SOCIETY—THE WOMAN FOR A WIFE.

O woman! lovely woman! Nature made thee
To temper man; we had been brutes without you.

Angels are painted fair to look like you.
; Otway,

When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think that I should live
till I were married, SHAKSPERE.

‘

lr many of the books addressed to young men, a
great deal is said about the purifying and elevating
influences of female society. Sentimental young men

affect this kind of reading, and if anywhore in it they :

ean find countenance for the policy of early marriage,
they are delighted. Now, while I will be the last to
deny the purifying and elevating influence of pure and
elevated women, I do deny that there is anything in

indiscriminate devotion to female society, which makes



;
j
/
{







238



FEMALE SOCIETY—-THE WOMAN FOR A WIFE.



aman better or purer. Suppose aman cast away on the
Cannibal Islands, and not in sufficiently good flesh to
excite the appetites of the gentle epicureans among
whom he has fallen. Suppose him, in fact, to be “ re-

ceived into society,” and made the private secretary of a
i




king without a liberal education, Suppose, after awhile,
he feels himself subsiding into a state of barbarism, and
casts around for some redeeming or conservative influ-
ence. At this moment it occurs to him that in the
trunk on which he sailed ashore were a number of books.
He flies to the trunk, and, in an ecstasy of delight, dis-
covers that among them is a volume addressed to young |
nen. He opens it eagerly, and finds the writer to de-
dlare that next to the Christian religion, there is nothing |
that will tend so strongly to the elevation and purifica- _ |
tion of young men, as female society. He accordingly |
seeks the society of women, and drinks in the marvellous
influences of their presence. He finds them unacquaint-
ed with some of the most grateful uses of water, and in
evident ignorance of the existence of ivory combs,
About what year of the popular era is it to be supposed
ehat he will arrive at a desirable state of purification
and perfection?

Now, perhaps you do not perceive the force of this
illustration. Let us get at it, then. When you find
yourself shut out from all female society except that

9 a ne nt ern i ee a i
24 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

which is beneath you, that society will do you just as
much and no more good than that of the fair cannibals,
especially if it be young. If, in all this society, you can
find one old woman of sixty, who has common sense
genial good-nature, experience, some reading, and

sympathetic heart, cherish her as you would her weighs
in gold, but let the young trash go. You will hear no-

thing from them but gossip and nonsense, and you will

only get disgusted with the world and yourself. Inspi-

ration to higher and purer life always comes from above
aman; and female society can only elevate and purify a
man when it is higher and purer than he is. In the
element of purity, I doubt not that women generally
are superior to men, but it is very largely a negative or
unconscious element, and has not the power and influ-
ence of a positive virtue.

Therefore, whenever you seek for female society, as
an agency in the elevation of your tastes, the preserva-
tion of your morals, and the improvement of your mind,
seek for that which is above you. Ido not counsel you

o treat with rudeness or studied neglect such inferio
female society as you are obliged to come in contact
with. On the contrary, you owe such society a duty.
You should stimulate it, infuse new life into it, if possi-
ble, and do for it what you would have female ‘society
do for yourself.








:

wh.
ee
ee:
a
cr att
iS
mr
; ,
a
ee
es
i
te

Se Ste ee
PP ee Se

ERROR Eg eee CN Oe ee ay ea Nd ON I EN Re Se ee RO MEM Tonle

o

FEMALE SOCIETY—-INE WOMAN FOR A WIFE, 2

This mattor of seeking female socicty above yourself

-gou should carry still further. Never content yourself

with the idea of having a common-place wife. You

want one who will stimulate you, stir you up, keep you
moving, show you your weak points, and make some

thing of you. Don’t fear that you cannot get such a

‘wife. I very well remember the reply which a gentle-

man who happened to combine the qualities of wit and
common sense, made to a yourg man who expressed a
fear that a-certain young lady of great beanty and
attainments would dismiss him, if he should become
serious. “My friend,” said the wit, “infinitely more
beautiful and accomplished women. than she is, have
married infinitely uglier and meaner men than you are.”
And such is the fact. If you are honest and honorable,
if your character is spotless, if you are enterprising and

industrious, if you have some grace and a fair degree of

sense, and if you love appreciatingly and truly, you can

marry almost anybody worth your having. So, to en-
courage yourself, carry in your memory the above
aphorism reduced to a form something like this: “In-
finitely finer women than I ever expect to marry, have
loved and married men infinitely meaner than I am.”
The apprehensions of women are finer and quicker
‘han those of men. Av ith equal early advantages, the

woman is more of a woman at eighteen than a man is
3 ,





ee a ae


pe nae a ana te in ow ty

Y 2
SSR ETS ES ROE ARES LETS Sas RSS SEB SER SLB AI EE IIT TIT eS OS SL CO LC CL es LIL LLCS LOS COLL LS CLLR OLLE ELIOT LT A IL | I AL LL OO A LO CL | I EE ON ITE

28 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.



a man at twenty-one) After marriage, as a genera
thing, the woman ceases to acquire. Now, Ido not say
that this is necessary, or that it should be the case,
but I simply state a general fact. The woman is ab-
sorbed in family cares, or perhaps devotes from ten te
twenty years to the bearing and rearing of children—
the most dignified, delightful, and honorable office of
her life. This consumes her time, and, in a great multi-
tude of instances, deprives her of intellectual culture.
In the meantime, the man is out, engaged in busi-
ness. He comes in daily contact with minds stronger

and sharper than hisown, He grows and matures, and

in ten years from the date of his marriage, becomes, in

reality, a new man. Now, if he was so foolish as to

marry a woman because she had a pretty form and face, .

or sweet eyes, or an amiable disposition, or a pleasant
temper, or wealth, he will find that he has passed en-
tirely by his wife, and that she is really no more of a
companion for him than a child would be. I know of
but few sadder sights in this world than that of mates
whom the passage of years has mis-mated. A woman
ought to have a long start of a man, and then, ten to

one, the man will come out ahead in the race of a long

~ dife.

T suppose that in every young man’s mind there exist

the hope and the expectation of marriage. Whena









FEMALE SOCIETY—IHE WOMAN FOR A WIFE. 27

young man pretends to me that he has no wish to marry,
and that he never expects to marry, I always infor one
of two things: that he lies, and is really very anxious

for marriage, or that his heart has been polluted by asso-



ciation with unworthy women. In athousand cases we
Ss shall not find three exceptions to this rule. A young
| man who, with any degree of earnestness, declares that

he intends never to marry, confesses to a brutal nature

Ps
songs tannin onioatennlbas
: ;

or perverted morals.



But how shall a good wife be won? I know that
. : men naturally shrink from the attempt to obtain com-
panions who are their superiors; but they will find that
really intelligent women, who possess the most desirable
qualities, are uniformly modest, and hold their charms
In modest estimation. What such women most admire
gin men is gallantry; not the gallantry of courts and
fops, but boldness, courage, devotion, decision, and re-
fined civility. A man’s bearing wins ten superior wo-
men where his boots and brains win one. If a man
stand before a woman with respect for himself and fear-
-essness of her, his suit is half won. The rest may safely
be left to the parties most interested. Therefore, never

be afraid of a woman. Women are the most harmless

shows that he has got a man’s soul in him. If you

have not got the spirit in you to come up to a test like

'
and agreeahle creatures in the world, to a man who





7x
*
ee ek Cee ee ee fe ee es,
a S 54 (, 5 . * -




° 7 28 TITCOME’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

this, you have not got that in you which most pleases
a high-souled woman, and you will be obliged to con-
tent yourself with the simple girl who, in a quict way,
is endeavoring to attract and fasten you.

But don’t be in a hurry about the matter. Don’t ge
into a feverish longing for marriage. It isn’t creditable
to you. Especially don’t imagine that any disappomt-
ment in love which takes place before you are twenty-
one years old will be of any material damage to you.
The truth is, that before a man is twenty-five years old
he does not know what he wants himself. So don't

be ina hurry. The more of a man you become, and

the more of manliness you. become capable of exhibit-

4
mcntnctinbataeginatnarasmarendinptinity wrcinapins eee aeC Ot EIT EE NCOs Oe
nin i Sa et é * jae a * >» x
i i ea ira ects ta! he a alae Naki tat it a a aia ia on Sled
eal Nati 4 ae rs ae pis Dag PERE Pe OR ee i

ing in your association with women, the better wife you
will be able to obtain; and one year’s possession of the
| heart and hand of a really noble specimen of her sex, @ 4
is worth nine hundred and ninety-nine years’ possession
of a sweet creature with two ideas in her head, and no-
thing new to say about either of them. “ Better fifty
years of Europe than a cycle of Cathay.” So don’t be | 4
in a hurry, I say again. You don’t want a wife now |
and you have not the slightest idea of the kind of wife
you will want by-and-by. Go into female society if you |
can find that which will improve you, but not other- j
wise. You can spend your time better. Seek the

society of good men. That is often more accessible to

~

88
























FEMAL.{ SOCIETY —Titm WOMAN FOR A WIFE. 29
-

you than the other, and it is through that mostly that
You will find your way to good female society. |

Ifany are disposed to complain of the injustice to
Sas of advice like this, and believe that it involves a
. _ wrong to her, I reply.that not the slightest wrong is in-
tended. Thorough appreciation of a good woman, on ‘he
_ part of a young man, is one of his strongest recommen-

dations to her favor. The desire of such a man to pos-

dence of qualities, aptitudes, and capacities which enti-
~ tle him to any woman’s consideration and_ respect.
‘There is something good in him; and however uncul-
Be - tivated he 1 may be—however rude in manner, and rough
in person—he only needs development to become wor-
thy of her, i in some respects, at least. I shall not quar-

herself, for I know it will L ¢ well for her to obtain such
an one, if she will be stimulated by contact with a higher
“mind toa brighter and broader development. At the
‘same time, I must believe that for a man to marry his
+ nfo, is to call upon himself a great misfortune; to
de] are himself of one rot =e most ee and refin-

sess and associate his life with such a woman, gives evi-_

rel with a woman who desires a husband superior to_
30

ert ENS rt ert

LS TLD g SRE Rete ee Senger Ut eran tes muse aet ne nme

TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

this conspire to establish the soundness of my coun-
sel, 7

One thing more: not the least important, but the
last in this letter. No woman without picty in he

heart is fit to be the companion of any man. You may

“get, in your wife, beauty, amiability, sprightliness, wit,

accomplishments, wealth, and learning, but if that wife
have no higher love than herself and yourself, she is a
poor creature. She cannot elevate you above mean
aims and objects, she cannot educate her children pro-
perly, she cannot in hours of adversity sustain and com-
fort you, she cannot bear with patience your petulance
induced by the toils and vexations of business, and she
will never be safe against the seductive temptations of
gaiety and dress.

Then, again, a man who has the prayers of a pious
wife, and knows that he has them—upheld by heaven,
or by arefined sense of obligation and gratitude—can
rarely become a very bad man. A daily prayer from
the heart of a pure and pious wife, for a husband en-
grossed in the pursuits of wealth or fame, is a chain cf
golden words that links his name every day with the
name of God. He may snap it three hundred and sixty-
five times in a year, for many years, but the chances are

that in time he will gather the sundered filaments, and

seck to re-unite them in an everlasting bond.

0 te 8 Be AOR

_ tL Ane ORS este Oe 8e ne ome mee we oR ey A 8

ea agent

eA OL LO GALE ON ACEO GE LCE Le RRL OO ME IE a MC ot A oe pn








LETTER Il.

MANNERS AND DRESS.

So over violent, or over civil,

That every man with him was God or devil.
ries Drrpun

Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not expressed in fancy; rich, not gaudy;

For the apparel oft proclaims the man.
SUAKSPERE.

T is well for young men to obtain, at the very start
| of their career, some idea of the value of politeness,
Some cannot be otherwise than urbane. They are born
so. One can kick them roundly and soundly, and they
will not refuse to smile, if it be done good-naturedly.
They dodge all corners by a necessity of their nature.
If their souls had only corporeal volume, we could see

them making their way through a crowd, like nice

little spaniels, scaring nobody, running between nobody’s


32 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

legs, but winding along shrinkingly and gracefully, see:
ing a master in every man, and thus flattering every
man’s vanity mto good-nature, but really spoiling their
reputation as reliable dogs, by their undiscriminating and
aniversal complaisance. There is a self-forgetfulness
which is so deep as to be below self-respect, and such
instances as we occasionally meet with should be treated
compassionately, like cases of idiocy or insanity, except
when found in connexion with the post-office depart-
ment or among hote: waiters.

But puppyism is not really politeness. The genuine
article is as necessary to success, and particularly to an

enjoyable success, as integrity, or industry, or any other

. indispensable thing. All machinery ruins itself by fric-

‘tion, without the presence of a lubricating fluid. Polite-

woss, OF civility, or urbanity, or whatever we may choose
to call it, is the oil which preserves the machinery of
society from destruction. We are obliged to bend to
ane another—to step aside and let another pass, to iznore
this and that personal peculiarity, to speak pleasantly
when irritated, and to do a great many things to avoid

abrasion and collision. In other words, in a world of

selfish interests and pursuits, where every man is pursuing

his own special good, we must mask our real designs in
studied politeness, or mingle them with real kindness, i in

order to clevate the ne of men above the society of





la
mee seo as ear
: i onli 5 eee ee pian Na
~ on ah Spat e aie Miami ae Behe Dek?


MANNERS AND DRESS, 8a

wolves. Young men generally would doubtless be

thoroughly astonished if they could comprehend at a

single glance how greatly their personal happiness,
popularity, prosperity, and usefulness depend on their
manners.

I know young men who, in the discharge of their
duties, imagine that if they go through them with a
literal performance, they are doing ali that they under-
take to do. You willneversee a smile upon their faces,

nor hear a genial word of good fellowship from then

lips; and from the manner in which their labor is per: °

formed you would never learn that they were engaged

in intercourse with human beings. They carry the

same manner and the same spirit into the counting-room |

that they do into the dog-kennel or the stable. Every-
body hates such young men as these, and recoils from

all contact with them. If they have business with

them, they close it as soon as possible, and get out of

. their presence. A man who, having got his vessel under

headway on the voyage of life, takes a straight course,
minding nothing for the man-of-war that lies in his path,
or the sloop that crosses his bow, or the fishing smacks
that find game where he seeks nothing but a passage,
or interposing rocks or islands, will be very sure to get

terribly rubbed before he gets through—and he ought
to be. - *
7 Q*

oe See Se ot tee rteaeeme

nate agar:






&
34 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

'

I despise servility, but true and uniform politeness is

the glory of any young man. It should be a politeness
full of frankness and good-nature, unobtrusive and con-
stant, and uniform in its exhibition to every class o
men, ‘The young man who is overwhelmingly polite t

a celebrity or a nabob, and rude to a poor Irishman be-
cause he 1s a poor Irishman, deserves to be despised.

That style of manners which combines self-respect with

bie E PRO: ET ES SS AR OATES SEN TE PRT NSS RN SUT ES EE se de te

a ee ee ee
.
. fe
; f " Fm

respect for the rights and feelings of others, especiaily
if it be warmed up by the fires of a genial heart, is a
thing to be coveted and cultivated, and it is a thing
that pays, alike in cash and comfort.

The talk of manners introduces us naturally to dress
and personal appearance. I believe in dress. I believe
that it is the duty of all men—young and old—to make
their persons, so far as practicable or possible, agreeable

toethose with whom they are thrown into association.
I mean by this that they shall not offend by singularity,
nor by slovenliness ; that they shall “make a conscience” “
of clean boots and finger-nails, change their linen twice .
a week, and not show themselves in shirt-sleeves if they
can help it. Let no man know by your dress what
your business is. You dress your person, not your
trade. You are, if you know enough, to mould the

fashion of the time to your own personal peculiarities

—to make it your servant, and not allow it to be your



uate






MANNERS AND DRESS. 35

master. Never dress in extremes. Let there always be.
a hint in your dress that you know the style, but, for
the best of reasons, disregard its more extreme demands.
‘The best possible impression that you can make by your
dress is to make no separate impression at all; but st

to harmonize its material and shape with your persona-
lity, that it becomes tributary in the general effect, and
so exclusively tributary that people cannot tell after
seeing you what kind of clothes you wear, They will
only remember that you look well, and somehow dress
becomingly.

I suppose that I shall be met here with a protest
from employers, and a kind of protest from the employ-
ed. Counsel to dress well is dangerous, is it? But every-
body now dresses extravagantly ; and, as extravagant
dressing is usually very far from good dressing, I think
that the danger of exciting greater extravagance is very
small. It may be descending into pretty small particu-
lars, but it is proper to say that some men can dress
better on fifty dollars a year than others can on one hun-
dred, and for reasons which it is my duty to disclose
There was something in the doctrine of the loafer who
maintained that “extremes justify the means,” illus-
trating his proposition by wearing faultless hat and
boots and leaving the rest of his person in rags; but
he had not touched the real philosophy of the matter.
36 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

« There is on every man what may be called a dress-
centre—a nucleus from which the rest of the dress
should be developed, and unfolde!. This dress-centre,

co St TE

or primary dress idea, is different in different persons,

ee eee

but it is always above the waist. The cravat, the vest,
the hat, the bosom, the coat-collar, may either of them \
be this idea. It is always safe to locate it about the

neck and chest. less dicky, is about all a man can stand without damage,
in the way of elegant dress. This should form the cen-
tre. The vest should harmonize, but be modest, and
all the other robing should be shaded off, until there is
not an obtrusive feature. Extremities will then only
be noticed. These should be faultlessly dressed, but in
a manner rather to satisfy than attract attention. Every-
thing should be subordinated to this idea; the whole
dress should bow to the cravat. Any man who has - i

made dress a study knows very well that ten dollars a

year, spent about the neck, will go further than fifty
dollars spread upon the person. Coarsest clothes, deve- 4
loped from an elegant neck-tie, or an elegant centra!
idea of any kind, become elegant themselves, and re-
ceive and evolve a glory which costs absolutely nothing
at all, except a few brains, some consideration, and the
reading of this letter.



eos te SS Ss SA SS Se

One sees the demonstration of this in travelling. We


MANNERS AND DRESS. 37
,

meet muititudes from ali quarters and of different na- ,

tionalities. One, and he is usually a Yankee, wears the
best of broadcloth, and the costliest of coats, and looks
vulgar; while gnother with a single stamp of good taste
upon him, at some central point, is a gentleman at half
price. Rich clothes are really a sign of mental poverty.
Let the secret of good dressing be thoroughly learned,
and we shall hear comparatively little of the cost of
dress. Let each young man choose his central idea,
plant it and develop it; and if he has good common
sense he will find that he can dress better than he
ever could before, with the expenditure of half the
money it has usually cost him.

ee on An AOS Oe tee ee 6 Sal

ee NN nt rt D ae a

OAR oe.


LETTER IV

BAD HABITS.

‘There's rvthmg ill can dwell in such a tempig
If the ill spirit nave so fair a house
Good things will strive to dwell with’t.
: SHAKSPEERR,

He that has light within his own clear breast
May sit i’ the centre and enjoy bright day;
But he that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts,
Benighted walks under the mid-day sun,
MILrTon.

T is entirely natural for people to form habits, so tha
l if bad habits be avoided, the good ones -will gene
rally take care of themselves. I had no intention when
I commenced these letters of saying anything upon
dogmatic theology, but I take the liberty of suggesting
to those who are interested in this kind of thing that if
there be anything that demonstrates total depravity, it



—






stg San an EBD OO CEE 8

BAD HABITS. 39

is the readiness with which young men imbibe bad

habits. I have seen original sin in the shape of “a short

six” sticking out of the mouth of a lad of ten years. lt

is strange what particular pains boys and young men

' will take to learn to do that which will make th

miserable, ruin their health, render them disgusting to
their friends, and damage their reputation.

Some of the fashionable bad habits of the day are
connected with the use of tobacco. Here is a drug
that a young man is obliged to become accustoined to
before he can tolerate either the taste or the effect of
it. It isarank vegetable poison; and in the unaccus-
tomed animal produces vertigo, faintness, and horrible
sickness. Yet young men persevere in the use of it
until they can endure it, and then until they love it.
They go about the streets with cigars in their mouths,
or into society with breath sufficiently offensive to drive
all unperverted nostrils before them. They chew to-
bacco—roll up huge wads of the vile drug and stuff
their cheeks with them. They ejaculate their saliva
apon the sidewalk, in the store, in spittoons which
become incorporate stenches, in dark corners of rail-
road cars to stain the white skirts of unsuspecting
women, in lecture-rooms and churches, upon fences,

and into stoves that hiss with anger at the insult. And

the quids after they are ejected! They are to be found —

Fo ee Ss A SS te SS RE SEE SS LS Rg ER ET SEE RT


40 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YCUNG MEN.

in odd corners, in out-of-the-way places—great boul

ders, boluses, buibs! Horses stumble over them, dogs -

bark at them; they poison young shade-trees, and break

down the constitutions of sweepers. This may be an

exaggeration of the facts, but not of the disgust with

which one writes of them.

Now, young men, just think of this thing! You are |

born into the world with a sweet breath. At a proper
age, you acquire a good set of teeth. Why will you
make of one a putrescent exhalation, and of the other a
set of yellow pegs? A proper description of the habit
of chewing tobacco would exhaust the filthy adjectives
of the language, and spoil the adjectives themselves for

further use; and yet, you will acquire the habit, and

persist in it after ib is acquired! It is very singular

that young men will adopt a habit of which every man
who is its victim is ashamed. There is, probably, no
tobacco-chewer in the world who would advise a young
man to commence this habit. I have never seer
a slave of tobacco who did not regret his bondage ,
yet, against all advice, against nausea and disgust
against cleanliness, against every consideration of

health and comfort, thousands every year bow the

neck to this drug, and consent to wear its repulsive
yoke. They will chew it; they will smoke it in cigars

and pipes until their bed-rooms and shops cannot be

}

Le En ee ES ET ae re ccna ren RRS 32 TS

’
we etemeech ne SOO A

OAS LT” CTI IP DAE A ABA EAT Di HB ae) in ae estes Cee os se








BAD HABITS. 4]

breathed in, and until their breath is as rank as the
breath of a foul beast, and their clothes have the odor

of the sewer. Some of them take snuff; cram the

fiery weed up their nostrils to irritate that suktle sense

which rarest flowers were made to feed—in all this
working against God, abusing nature, perverting sense,
injuring health, planting the seeds of disease, and insult-
ing the decencies of life and the noses of the world.

So much for the nature of the habit; and I would
stop here, but for the fact that Iam in earnest, and
wish to present every motive in my power to prevent
young men from forming the habit, or persuade them to
abandon it. The habit of using tobacco is expensive.
A clerk on a modest salary has no right to be seen
with a cigar in his mouth. Three cigars a day, at five
cents apiece, amount to more than fifty dollars a year.
Can you afford it? You know you cannot. You know
that to do this you have either got to run in debt or
steal, Therefore I say that you have no business to be

seen with a cigar in your mouth. It is presumptive

évidence against your meral character.

Did it ever occur to you what you are, what you are
made for, whither you are going? That beautiful bedy
of yours, in whose construction infinite wisdom ex

hausted the resources of its ingenuity, is the temple of

a soul that shall live for ever, a companion of angels, a


Apr uann tenet DRE SUmEtES TE DRE ite: oem mentee ace



42 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

‘searcher into the deep things of God, a being allied in

essence to the divine. I say the body is the temple, or

the tabernacle, of such a being as this; and what do you

hink of stuffing the front door of such a building full

of the most disgusting weeds that you can find, or set-

ting a slow match to it, or filling the chimneys with

snuff? It looks to me much like an endeavor to smoke

out the tenant, or to insult him in such a manner as to
-nduce him to quit the premises. You really ought to
be ashamed of such behavior. A clean mouth, a sweet
breath, unstained teeth, and inoffensive clothing—are

rot these treasures worth preserving? Then throw

away tobacco, and all thoughts of it, at once and for ever.

Beaman. Be decent, and be thankful to me for talk-
ng so plainly to you.

But there are other bad habits besides the use of
tobacco. There is the habit of using strong drink,—
aot the habit of getting drunk, with most young men,
but the habit of taking drink occasionally in its milder
forms—of playing with a small appetite that only needs
sufficient playing with to make you a demon or a dolt

You think you are safe. I know you are not safe, if
you drink at all; and when you get offended with the
good friends who warn you of your danger, I know you
are a fool. I know that the grave swallows daily, by

scores, drunkards, every one of, whom thought he was



20s SE STS aes

= " = SA Ds RSET EE TREN SOE STO SS BRST LS
I a RE IT ES EE RR SSS “eae:
BAD HABITS. ~~ ae



Rte. ager wee 2"

safe while he was forming his appetite. But this is old
talk. A young man in this age who forms the habit of
drinking, or puts himself in danger of forming the habit,
is usually so weak that it doesn’t pay to save him.

I pass by profanity. (That is too offensive and vulgar
a habit for any man who reads a respectable book to
indulge in. \ I pass by this, I say; to come to a habit
more destructive than any I have contemplated.

Young man! you who are so modest in the presence
of women,—so polite and amiable ; you who are invited
into families where there are pure and virtuous girls;
you who go to church, and seem to be such a pattern
young man; you who very possibly neither smoke, nor
chew, nor snuff, nor swear, nor drink—you have one
habit ten times worse than all these put together,—a
habit that makes you a whited sepulchre, fair without,
but within full of dead men’s bones and all uncleanness.
You have a habit of impure thought, that poisons the
very springs of your life. It may lead you into lawless
indulgences, or it may not. So far as your character is
concerned, it makes little diiference.- A young man wh
cherishes impure images, and indulges in impure con-
versations with his associates, is poisoned. There is
rottenness in him. He is not to be trusted. Hundreds

of thousands of men are living in unhappiness and

degradation to-day who owe their unhappy lives to an


44 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

early habit of impure thought. Toa young man who
has become poisoned in this way, women all appear to
be vicious or weak} and when a young man loses his
respect for the sex made sacred by the relations of
mother and sister, he stands upon the crumbling edge
of ruin. His sensibilities are killed, and his moral na-

ture almost beyond the reach of regeneration. I believe

it to be true that a man who has lost his belief in WO- |

man has, as a general thing, lost his faith in God.
_ The only proper way to treat such a habit as this is
to fly from it—discard it—expel it—fight it to the death,

Impure thought is a moral drug quite as seductive and.

poisonous to the soul as tobacco is to the body. It
perverts the ton¢ of every fibre of the soul. One should
have more respect for his body than to make it the
abode of toads and lizards and unclean reptiles of all
sorts. The whole matter resolves itself into this: A
young man is not fit for life until he is clean—clean and

healthy, body and soul, with no tobacco in his mouth, no

_ liquor in his stomach, no oath on his tongue, no snuff in

is nose, and no thought in his heart which if exposed

would send him sneaking into darkness from the presence

of good women. I knowa man who believes that the
regeneration of the world is to be brought about by a
thange of diet. If he will add the policy of utter clean-

ness to his scheme, I will agree not to quarrel with him.










é ; ; Sena mf ORs .
oe she ai Rhee e ‘
My Spat’ ieee Bs ae ‘ ‘
erp PNR EMR ie

one NRA CRIN in NL airman nme eomcatr: Aii mastic tw martin raft

cease inshore cca CREA ENG Ia NN tt AIO SOE COE TE «le a A eNOS an at AN GG oe nt OC EN ee Nt me ee tRNA NAAN A cI P= A OE
-

ln nr tte ne atest Rafe nent
‘

LETTER V.

THE BLEW.nGS OF POVERTY—OFFICE AND EFFEOT OF A
| PROFESSION.

Tho labor we Celight in physics pain.
er. - - SHAKSPEES,
Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow;
The rest is all but leather and prunello,
3 Porz.
[ there is anything in the world that a young man
_ should be more grateful for than another, it is the
poverty which necessitates starting life under very great
disadvantages. Poverty is one of the best tests of hr
man quality in existence. A triumph over it is like
graduating with honor from West Point. It demon-
strates stuff and stamina. It is a certificate of worthy
labor, faithfully performed. A young man who cannot

stand this test is not good for anything. He can never

“ een YR Mg te ae
pee an weet en raat etl EE EC




46 . TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

rise above a drudge or a pauper. A young man whe
cannot feel his will harden as the yoke of poverty
presses upon him, and his pluck rise with every difficulty
that poverty throws in his way, may as well retire into
ome corner, and hide himself. Poverty saves a thou-
sand times more men than it ruins, for it only ruins
those who are not particularly worth saving, while it
saves multitudes of those whom wealth would have
ruined. If any young man who reads this letter is so
unfortunate as to be rich, I give him my pity. I pity
you, my rich young friend, because you are in danger.
You lack one great stimulus to effort and excellence
which your poor companion possesses. You will be
very apt, if you have a soft spot in your head, to think
yourself above him, and that sort of thing makes you
mean, and injures you. With full pockets and full
stomach, and good linen and broadcloth on your back,
vour heart and soul will get plethoric, and in the race
of life you will find yourself surpassed by all the poor
boys around you, before you know it.

No, my boy, if you are poor, thank God and take
courage; for he intends to give you a chance to make
something of yourself. If you had plenty of money,
ten chances to one it would spoil you for all useful pur-

poses. Do you lack education? Have you been cut

short in the text books? Remember that education,



ay btw aay narod

RS ETRE ORE ATED IERIE TIN IRE EE RR RO UR ae

TOE VOR oes gute BONE

$2 BAN
.










eT Re i ae ee



* .
ee ee ee

aS te

Ae SP ORB FR THis T



THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 47

like some other things, does not consist in the multitude

of things a man possesses. Whatcanyou do? That is

the question that settles the business for you. Do you
know your business? Do you know men, and how to

deal with them? Has your mind, by any means what-

soexer, received that discipline which gives to its action ©

power and facility? Ifso, then you are more of a man,
and a thousand times better educated, than the fellow
who graduates from a college with his brains full of
stuff that he cannot apply to the practical business of
life—stuif the acquisition of which has been in no sense
a disciplinary process, so far as he is concerned. There
are very few men in this world less than thirty years of
age, and unmarried, who can afford to be rich. One of
the greatest benefits to be reaped from great financiai
disasters, is the saving of a large crop of young men.
In regard to the choice of a profession, that is your
business, and not mine, nor that of any of your friends.
If you take to a trade or profession, don’t be persuaded
out of it, until you are perfectly satisfied that you are
not adapted to it. You will receive all sorts of the
most excellent advice, but you must remember that if
you follow it, and it leads you into a profession that
starves you, those who gave the advice never feel bound

to give you any money. You have got to take care of

yourself in this world, and you may as well choose


48 -TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

your own way of doing it, always remembering that it
is not your trade nor your protession which makes you
respectable. ‘This leads me to a matter that I may as
well dispose of here as anywhere.

I propose to explain what I meant in a previous letter
by the counsel to “let no man know by your dress
what your business is. You dress your person, not
your trade.” As the proper explanation of this involves
a very important principle, I will devote the rest of this
letter to its development and illustration. The fault
fotind with this counsel is that it has always been con-
sidered best to dress according to one’s business and
position.

Manhood, and profession or handicraft, are entirely
different things; and I wish particularly that every
young man engaged im reading these letters should
understand the reason why. God makes men, and men
make blacksmiths, tailors, farmers, horse jockeys, trades-
men of all sorts, governors, judges, dc. The offices of

men may be more or less important, and ‘ef higher or

lower quality, but manhood is a higher possession than

office. An occupation is never an end of life. Itisan

instrument put into our hands, or taken into our hands, -

by which to gain for the body the means of living until

sickness or old age robs it of life, and we pass on ta

the werld for which this is a preparation, However




THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 49

thoroughly acquired and assiduously followed, a trade

is something to be held at arm’slength. Icanillustrate by

fot se eee creer, 5

what I mean by placing, side by side, two horses,—one,. |
fresh from the stall, with every hair in its right place |
| his head up and mane flying, and another that has been
worked in the same harness every day for three years,
antil the skin is bare on each hip and thigh, an inflamed
abrasion glows on each side of the back-bone where the
hard saddle-pad rests, a severe gall-mark spreads its
brown patch under the breast collar, and all the other
marks of an abused horse abound. Now a trade, or a
profession, will wear into a man as a harness wears into
a horse. One can see the “trade mark” on almost
every soul and body met in the street.. A trade has
taken some men by the shoulders and shaken their

humanity out of them. It has so warped the natures

sun to dry a thousand times without being warped back.

Thus, I say, a man’s trade or profession should be
kept at arm’s length. It should not be allowed to
tyrannize over him, to mould him, to crush him. I
should not occupy the whole of his attention. So far
from this, it should be regarded, in its material aspect,
at least, only as a means for the development of man-

hood. The great object of living is the attainment of



|
|
of others that they might be wet down and set in the
|
:
|

trae manhood—the cultivation of every power of the
wae Feet nar 8 na SE TE RISO ROE TES ENS AARON CITORE OCLC E ASCITES

water sateen =

Saas ania Se cope pom ena ome

50 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

‘soul and of every high spiritual quality, naturally in-
herent or graciously superadded. ‘The trade is beneath
the man, and should be kept there. With this idea in
your minds—and you may be very sure that it is the
correct idea—just look around you, and see. how almost
everybody has missed it. You and I both know physi-
cians whose mental possessions, beyond their knowledge
of drugs and diseases, are not worth anything. We are
acquainted with lawyers who are never seen out of their
offices, who live among pigeon-holes and red tape, and
busy their minds with quirks and quarrels so unremit-
tingly, that they have not a thought for other subjects.
They are not men at all; they are nothing but lawyers
Often we find not more than five whole men in a town
of five thousand inhabitants. Those who pass for men,
and who really do get married and have families, are a
hundred to one fractional men, or exclusively machines,

Elihu Burritt cultivated the man that was in him
until his trade and his blacksmith’s shop would not stay
with him. They ceased to be useful to him. He could
got a living in a way that was better for him. Benja

min Franklin was an excellent printer, but he used his

trade only asa means. The development of his mind»

and his manhood went on above it. Printing with
him was not an end of life. If it had been, we should

have missed his words of wisdom ;.some one else would



RRA NT A A AS OIE SEI a GATE BE

ope

A ER SAR ON AT SE ONE [NE TR NN RRO
ee


LL LLL A LO AOI at A ttn rt met ee enna aat e—en, enne AO O SR e e mcyAi,
; a
-

*
=
ERE ES ER ES a EE EE Sy RS oy a a RR i Ra ER Ee Oy TRE TT SIE A SIE RR RRS SOE 4 ST SNE RRS SEE TES

PE SACO Ags LO i gE Ba tat a

\

THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. | 5]

have built the kite that exchanged the first kiss with
electricity, and less able men would have been set to do

the work which he did so creditably in the manage-

ment of his country’s affairs. It is not necessary that’

you be learned blacksmiths or philosophical and diplc-
matic printers, but it is necessary that you be a man
before your calling, behind your calling, above your call-
ing, outside of your calling, and inside of it; and that
that calling modify your character no more than it
would were it your neighbor’s. |

If I have made my point plain to you, you can
readily see that I attach very little value to the distinc-
tions in society based on callings, and still less to those
based on office. If a man be a man, let him thank his
stars that he is not a justice of the peace. Of all the
appetites that curse young men, the appetite for office
seems to me to be the silliest and the meanest. There
is nothing which fills me with greater disgust than to
see a young man eager for the poor distinction which
office confers. An office seeker, for the sake of honor,
s constitutionally, necessarily, mean. I have seen men
begin at twenty-one as prudential committees in small
school districts, and stick to office until everybody was
sick of them. Whether it rained porridge or potatoes,
oaving stones or pearls, their dish was always out. They

and their families always had to be cared for,



i
t
{

a ds PN erie pr Reames
tenes =e secteur tn tn ee ttt tt AN AOE NT NORM: Nt A OT CO A RI AEN
cet ae tee

|

t
'
{

|
|
{

52 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

Office always brings obligation and a certain kind of
slavery. It brings something more than this—it brings

insanity. A young man who allows himself to get a

“taste of it very rarely recovers. It is like tobacco, o

opium, or brandy, producing a morbid appetite; anc
we need all through the nation, a new society of re.
form. ‘There should be a pledge circulated, and every-
where signed, promising total abstinence from office-

secking. To this every young man should put his

name. There are chronic cases that may be considered

hopeless, but the young can be saved.
Do not let me be misunderstood; I have spoken of

the thirst for office for the sake of office. My belief is

that office should neither be sought for nor lightly re-_

fused. The curse of our country is that office-seekers
have made place so contemptible that good men will
not accept it, but so far keep themselves removed from
politics that all the affairs of government fall into un-
worthy hands. When a young man is sought for tc
fill a responsible place in public affairs—sought for and
elected on the ground of fitness—he should decid
whether he owes that duty to the public, and perform
it well if he does. Office was properly regarded in the
“good old colony times.” Then it was considered a
hindrance to business, and almost or quite a hardship :

so much so that laws were passed, in some instances,

Fa te re 6 Seraph at ott




THE BLESSINGS OF POVERTY, ETC. 53 |
compelling- men to accept office, or pay a fine. So I |
! would have you to do your duty to the public at all
| times, and especially in seeing that oflice-seekers, by |
| profession or constant practice, are crowded from the |
| track, and worthy men put on, |
|
|

pa a a ec ee

PROS ARP EE GEES EP SRR RN RENE DAES AT Se PTT EE SE I IIIT TE ES EE
4
.
nopecsncenee merece

CU EN 8 RENE tert ee a RNS Eee eR
fet RR ROO Ot

LETTER VI.

FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE.

Man is the noblest growth our realms supply,
And souls are ripened in our northern sky.
Mrs. BARBAULD,

paged S22 AREA A NRE ARERR PES

ILAVE noticed that most writers of books for young

men have a good deal to say about diet and regimen,

knowing the least of these important subjects invariably

being the most elaborate and specific in their treatment

ee

PRON SS ae

in this business. All the spare curses I accumulate I
dedicate to those white-livered, hatchet-faced, thin-
blooded, scrawny reformers, who prescribe sawdust
puddings and plank beds, and brief sleep, and early

walks, and short commons for the rising generation. I

aera ca ice eee eens secrete easier elemental ree

and physical culture, and all that sort of thing, those —

of them. ‘There have been some awful sins committed.

;
ore wotineenrenemenrepatgyarimnmnnrarsmepiaminnnmmannniaaitincipa asinine

Posen RanmEe eta N on Fare

mcs ee tt I LN te A A ACTS

pasate a tainapeefiatmaeniat

he Lk Ree 9 Re a RA NA RETA SST RTT








FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE,



despise them; and if there is a being who always
touches the profoundest depths of ‘my sympathy, it is a
young man who has become a victim to their notions.
It is a hard sight to see a young man with the pluck all
taken out of him by a meagre diet—his whole natur

starved, degenerated, emasculated.

I propose to apply a little common sense to this busi-
ness. If I have a likely Durham steer, which I wish to
have grow into the full development of his breed, I
keep him on something more than a limited quantity
of bog hay. I do not stir him up with a pitchfork
before he has his nap out, and insist on his being driven
ten miles before he has anything to eat. I do not take
pains to give him the meanest bed I can find for him.
I know perfectly well that that animal will not grow up
strong and sound, fat and full, the pride of the farm and
the gem of the stall, unless I give him an abundance of
the best food, a clean and comfortable place to sleep in,
and just as long naps as he sees fit to take. The horse,
which in its organization more nearly approaches man
than the steer, is still more sensitive to the influence of
generous living. How much pluck and spirit will a
horse get out of aton of rye straw? The truth is, that
a good and abundant diet is not only essential to the
highest physical health and development of man, but it

modifies very importantly the development and manifes-



REN ene ee ES -
sowaeeeeme ee pemreeset

ee ee

a ae aaa

Seer

PES gt eee tscsesses

SESSA ELSES GE NI EG DE LOO LA Ot OO

56 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

tation of the soul. A man cannot acquire courage by
feeding on theories and milk. An Englishman cannot
fight without beef in his belly; and no more can any
of us.

It may be objected to this that we do not wish for a
preat animal development in man. I say we do. I
declare that the more perfect a man can make his ani-
mal nature the better. ‘That animal nature is the asso-
ciate—home—servant—of the soul. If it be not well de-
veloped, in all its organs and in all its functions, it will
neither give a generous entertainment to the spiritual
thing that dwells in it, nor serve it with vigor and efli-
ciency. If strong meat nurses your passions, let it; it
does not nurse your passions any more than it nurses

all the rest of you, and if you grow symmetrically where

is the harm? Besides, what would you be without’

passions? They are the impelling forces of life. A
man with no passion is as useless in the world as if he
were without brains. He cannot even acquire the pos-
session of virtue, but is obliged to content himself with
imnocence. If God gave passions to a man, he gave

them to him for a natural, full development; and the

grandest type of man we see is that in whick we find

fully developed and thoroughly trained passions; and a

soul which has not these among its motive forces is like

“a sailor out at sea, in a skiff without oars. This idea



i fomintessigManeiseosaibi

ee eee eee

PES RNS SS IS ATE NORA TIN ony Se Ae SS TEESE 5 Rie Rt

peTS se

ENE SHEER TREE PT teens et a Le
FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 57

that the body is something to be contemned, that its

growth and development must necessarily antagonize |

with the best growth and development of the soul, is
essentially impious, No matter where it started—it is
all wrong. A perverted and perverting passion is a

fearful thing, but a passion in its place is like everything

_ that God makes, “very good.”

1 would have you properly understand this kind of
talk. I counsel the use of no food that tends to the
stimulation of one portion of your system more than
another, but I ask you to remember that the best food
is not too good for you, and that, unless you have a
perverted appetite, there is very little danger of your
eating too much of it. If I were to be charged with

the special mission of degrading a nation, in mind and —

body—stunting the form, and weakening in the same
proportion the mental and moral nature—there is no
way in which I could so readily accomplish my object
as through food. No nation can preserve its vitality,

and its tendency to progress, with a diet of pork and

potatoes. Nothing but the cerealia and the rumznaniva

will do for this—nothing but bread and muscle.
I wish I could take you to one of those institutions

which will be found in nearly every State, where the

outcast and pauper children are gathered for shelter,

eare, and culture. They come from the gutters, where
sf.



oe


ge NTE AS Ts SI GT

esters BITS
LLCO TU ee ee PERSE ESET
SILER TE et ee ce a PRONE REE SW TE TRIE I PA ere pe TR

Deere



58 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

they have lived on garbage and cold potatoes. Theis
eyes are red around the edges and very weak, their

muscles are flabby, their skin is lifeless in color and in

fact. Their minds are as dull as the minds of brutes, ©

and their faces give the impression almost of idiotic
stupidity. In six months, wheat and corn bread give
them a new body, and a new soul; and it would be
difficult to find a brighter set of faces than fill those

crowded halls and illuminate the noisy playgrounds.

Therefore, I say to you, young men, however falsely

you may deal with your back, be honest with your
stomach. Feed well—as well as you can afford to feed.
Sleep well. If Benjamin Franklin ever originated the
maxim, “six hours of sleep for a man, seven for a wo-
man, and eight for a fool,” he ought uniformly to have
practised by the rule of the last number. Young man,
if you are a student, or engaged in any severe mental
occupation, sleep just as long as you can sleep soundly,
Lying in bed from laziness is another thing entirely.
Sleep is a thing that bells have no more business to

interfere with, than with prayers and sermons. God is

re-creating us. We are as unconscious as we were be-
fore we were born; and while he holds us there, feeding
anew the springs of lite, ana mfusing fresh fire into our
brains, and preparing us for the work of another day,

the pillow is as sacred as a sanctuary. If any fanatic




SUDA EEG TSS A IEE

OT SE TTT

FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 59

has made you believe that it is good for you to be vio-
lently wakened from your sleep at an early hour, and to
go out into the damp, raw air, morning after morning,
with your fast unbroken, and your body unfortified by

the stimulus of food, forget him and his counsels, and

‘ take the full measure of your rest. When you get your

breakfast down, take your exercise if you have time, or

wait until a later hour in the day. Just as much labor

_ can be accomplished in ten hours as in fourteen, with

more efficiency and less fatigue, when rest and bodily
exercise are properly taken.

But physical culture—what is that? A very impor-
tant thing, I assure you. Some of you get this in your
employments, and are growing up with manly frames
and strong arms. But there are others who are coming
up delicately, with spindling shanks, and narrow shoul-
ders, and flat chests, and weak arms—great babies, with
soft hands and soft muscles, and not enough of physical

prowess to undertake to carry a disputed point with the

cook in the kitchen. Howawoman ever makes up her

mind to love such a man as this is a mystery to me, A
feminine man is a masculine monster, and no woman
with unperverted instincts can love and marry him. A
true woman loves a pair of good strong arms, fastened

to a pair of broad shoulders, for they can defend her,

provide for her, and—but I wander from my subject.

INABA ga eae ees AR

Ral a eS ST SS at

> ase. Saari SCI
unepnitet ntee

Soa eS ee aS Se a eee






j
——



60 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN.

Physical culture perfects a very important portion of
the work which good feeding begins. The best mate-
rial supplied to the mouth, assimilated by the process
of digestion, and carried by the blood to the muscles
and all the other structures of the body, is essential ;
but these organs, when constructed and supplied, need
not only thorough training for the development ot
power and the acquisition of facility, but for the preser-
vation of their harmony and health. God sets all the
little children playing for this. He lays the necessity
of play upon them, and those restless little fellows that

are always sliding, or skating, or wrestling, or running,

are all inspired by a divine impulse. Those little bro-—
thers of yours who drive you half insane by their noise, ,

who will not sit upon your knee aminute without some

fresh twist of their bodies, are discharging their primary
Christian duties.
A new world, tossed into space by the Creative Hand,

informed with its laws of motion, and set spinning on

_ its axis and careering around its orbit, never stops. It

is only the boy who gets lazy as he grows older. God
puts him in motion at first, and teaches him to use every
physical power he possesses, and he does it faithfully at
first. Children who sit still do not live. The mission
of play does not cease with childhood. When labcr is
not capable of doing for you what play has done and


FOOD AND PHYSICAL CULTURE. 61

when you have no regular task for your bodily powers,
you are to play still, Walking and riding, boxing and
fencing, playing ball, pitching quoits, rowing and bowl-
ing—all these are as legitimate to the man as the sim
pier sports are to the boy, and-are in a degree essential
to his happiness and usefulness,

I should be unjust to the age were I to omit the
mention of a special point of “physical culture” which
has been long neglected. You find as you come into
man’s estate, that hair has a tendency to grow upon
your face. It is the mark by which God meant that men
and women should be distinguished from each other
in the crowd. That hair was placed there in infinite
wisdom, but your fathers have been cutting it off from
their chins in small crops for thirty to fifty years, thus
impugning Nature’s policy, wasting precious time, draw-
ing a great deal of good blood, creating a great deal of
bad, and trying to erase from their faces the difference
which was intended to be maintained between them and
those of women. If you are a man, and have a beard,
rear it. You know it was made to wear. Itis- enough
o make a man with a decent complement of informa

tion and a common degree of sensibility (and a hand

some beard) deny his kind, to see these smooth-faceé

tcen around the streets, and actually showing them-

selves in female society! Let us have one generation

of beards.

em

es o . cet ea NN SOREN




|
|
|

LETTER VII.

SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES.

Say, shall my little bark attendant sail,
Pursue the triumph and partake the gale ?
Pops,

The primal duties shine aloft like stars;

The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, ~

Are scatter’d at the feet of man like flowers.
WorpDswortH

| PROPOSE in this letter to talk to you concerning

your relations to society. Many, and I may say
most -young men fail for many years to get hold of the
idea that they are members of society. They seem to
suppose that the social machinery of the world is self-ope-
rating. They cast their first ballot with an emotion of
pride, perhaps, but are sure to pay their first tax with a

groan. They see political organizations in active exist-

ptrae crenata:





a

SSNS SS STE


SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES, 63

ence ; the parish, and the church, and other important
bodies that embrace in some form of society aii men,
are successfully operated; and yet these young men
have no part nor lot in the matter. They do not think
of giving a day’s time to society. ‘They do not think
of giving anything to society. They have an idea that
the business of society is to look after them; that they
are to be provided for, that seats are to be furnished to
them in the churches gratis, that the Lyceum is to be
kept up for their amusement—that all social movements
whatsoever are to be organized and. operated without
their aid, and that they exist as legitimate objects of

their criticism. This is the very stupidity of selfishness.

_ Some of you haven’t known the fact until now, and are

not very much to blame. It is one of the incidents of
what Fanny Kemble once called your “ age of detesta-
bility.”

One of the first things a young man should do is to
see that he is acting his part in society. he earlier
this is begun the better. I think that the opponents of
secret societies in colleges have failed to estimate the
benefit which it must be to every member to be obliged
to contribute to the support of his particular organiza-
tion, and to assume personal care and responsibility as a
member. If these societies have a tendency to teach

the lesson of which I speak, they are a blessed thing.



j
sags a Pati eI A SSRN GES SE TSE RS RTE ESE LCE ODO LED EEL AL CELE RAL LE ELE VLE LE EEL GEL L GE AAD
ee Y

a nat at SiS a os

ae en eee ee eee SE

aes eters nee RS oe ene ae

Sten nae me ee.

ee eS ee eas

64 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN,

Half the ills of society originate in the fact that its bur
dens are unequally borne, and that the duties of indivi
duals to it are not discharged. Therefore I say to every
young man, begin early to do for the social institution:
im which you have your life. Ifyou have intellect and
accomplishments, give them to the elevation and delight
of the circle in which you move. If you have none of
these, show an accommodating disposition by attending
the sewing circle and holding yarn for the girls. De
your part, and be aman among men. Assume your
portion of social responsibility, and see that you dis
charge it well. If you do not do this, then you are
mean, and society has the right to despise you just ae
much as it chooses. You are, to use a word more em-
phatic than agreeable, a sneak, and have not a claim
upon your neighbors for a single polite word.

Young men have all noticed how easily some of thei
number get into society, and how others remain out of

a good social circle always. They are very apt to think

4 :
that society has not discharged its duties to them. Now

all social duties are reciprocal. Society, as it is called,
is far more apt to pay its dues to the individual than
the individual to society. Have you, young man, who
are at home whining over the fact that you cannot get

into society, done anything to give you aclaim to socia

recognition? Are you able to make any return for



snareeaeanpieaiacias

Bae ee a ae ee Crt RET ROO RO ABILENE DT

APOE OETA. a Ra A n° tgs
¢





"
“€
x
&

i
at

ee
ee ore

*
Sao
ge ais,


- SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES, 65

social recognition and social privileges? Do you know
anything 4 “What kind of coin do you propose to pay,
in the discharge of the obligation which comes upon
you with social recognition? In other words, as a re-
turn for what you wish to have society do for you, what
can you do for society? This is a very important ques-
tion—more important to you than to society. The
question is, whether you will be a member of society

by right, or by courtesy. If you have so mean a spirit

as to be content to be a beneficiary of society—to re- .

ceive favors and confer none—you have no business in
the society to which you aspire. You are an exacting,
conceited fellow. )
You ask me what society would have of you. Any-
thing that you possess which has value in society. So-
ciety is not particular on this point. Can you act ina
charade? Can you dance? Can you tell a story well?
Have you travelled, and have you a pleasant faculty of
telling your adventures? Are you educated, and able
to impart valuable ideas and general information ? Have
ou vivacity in conversation? Can you sing? Can
you play whist, and are you willing to assist those to a
pleasant evening who are not able to stand through a
party? Do you wear a good coat, and can you bring
good dress into the ornamental department of society ?

Are you up to anything in the way of private theatri-

sneer es OST ES See SS AE ee ee eee he ete ne ee ee re oa

i a nt oR at ti


——

2S SSS

PASE AeeeS RS Rae eS eS

nna etn eC CROC EI OT ES

aA:

66 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

cals? If you do not possess a decent degree of sense,

can you talk decent nonsense? Are you a good bean,

and are you willing to make yourself useful in wait.

ing on the ladies on all occasions? Have you a good
set of teeth, which you are willing to show whenevce
the wit of the company gets off a good thing? Are

you a true, straight-forward, manly fellow, with whose

healthful and uncorrupted nature it is good for society
to come in contact? In short, do you possess anything
of any social value? If you do, and are willing to im-
part it, society will yield itself to your touch. If you
have nothing, then society, as such, owes you nothing.
Christian philanthropy may put its arm round you, as
a lonely young man, about to spoil for want of some-
thing, but it is very sad and humiliating for a young
man to be brought to that. There are people who
devote themselves to nursing young men, and doing
them good. If they invite you to tea, go by all means,
and try your hand. If, in the course of the evening,
you can prove to them that your society is desirable,
you have won a point. Don’t be patronized.

Young men are very apt to get into a morbid state
of mind, which disinclines them to social intercourse,

They become devoted to business with such exclusive-

hess, that all social intercourse is irksome. They go

out to tea as if they were going to jail, and drag them-

\

a eeaheieniae



;

Bette a Sg RRO See TOE ee eee.

:
aemeer aoutgrencseimnmen cagpmrnecnas 5
eee

recat soo Soe Meee Te

aS et RATS

on rer TE SET TIE ETE SS SA


|
SOCIAL DUTIES AND PRIVILEGES. 67
selves to a ts as to on. execution, This disposition
is thoroughly morbid, and to be overcome by going

where you are invited, always, and at any sacrifice

a eS

of feeling. Don’t shrink from contact with anythine
but bad morals. Men who affect your unhealthy mind

anon

ee

with antipathy, will prove themselves very frequently
to be your best friends and most delightful companions,
Because a man seems uncongenial to you, who are
squeamish and foolish, you have no right to shun him.
We become charitable by knowing men. We learn to

love those whom we have despised by rubbing against

ee

them. Do you not remember some instance of mecting
a& man or woman at a watering-place whom you have
never previously known nor cared to know—an indivi-
vidual, perhaps, against whom you have entertained
the strongest. prejudices—but to whom you became
bound by a life-long friendship through the influence

of a three days’ intercourse? Yet if you had not thus

‘ cenadtiaendieanmiiaamniaanmenenamaaioamamhatitanes-sampeasaeueaderenic ee

met, you would have carried through life the idea that

it would be impossible for you to give your fellowship

Ane ere eer eeenne te

to such an individual.

PD. omen = POG tr OL LA OLLI OARS LOA I SED AOL I GENT EI TO BOOT 5

God has introduced into human character infinite
variety, and for you to say that you do not love and
will not associate with a man because he is unlike you,
Is not only foolish but wrong. You are to remember

that in the precise manner and degree in which a man

;
:
‘
'
i
‘
|
i
i
t
i
i
i


i
{
i
:
{
i

renee seth cna nga ae Sane Nh PS A Sn ES a en URN a ne Be meena

68 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

differs from you, do you differ from him; and that from
his standpoint you are naturally as repulsive to him as
he, from your standpoint, is to you. So, leave all this
talk of congeniality to silly girls and transcendental
dreamers. Do your business in your own way, and
concede to every man the privilege which you claim
for yourself. The more you mix with men, the less
you will be disposed to quarrel, and the more chari-
table and liberal will you become. The fact that you
do not understand a man, is quite as likely to be your
fault as his. ‘There are a good many chances in favor
of the conclusion that, if you fail to love an individual
whose acquaintance you make, it is through your own
ignorance and illiberality. So I say, meet every man
honestly ; seek to know him; and you will find that
in those points in which he differs from you rests his
power to instruct you, enlarge you, and do you good.
Keep your heart open for everybody, and be sure that
you shall have your reward. You shall find a jewel
under the most uncouth exterior; and associated with

-omeliest manners and the oddest ways and the ugliest

- aces, you will find rare virtues, fragrant little humani-

ties, and inspiring heroisms.
Again: you can have no influence unless you are
pocial. A strictly exclusive man is as devoid of influ-

ence as an ice-peak is of verdure, If you will takea




eo Sy

z
e.

re. & pe ae ees - Pate 2
: E . are





SOCIAL AND MORAL PRIVILEGES, 69

peep at the Hudson river some bright morning, you will |

see, ploughing grandly along towards the great metro-
polis, a magnificent steamer, the silver wave peeling off
from her cutwater, and a million jewels sparkling in
her wake, passing all inferior barks in sublime indiffer
ence, and sending yacht and skiff dancing from her
heel. Right behind her, you shall see a smaller steamer,

the central motive power of a plateau of barges, loaded
to their edges with the produce of thousands of well

tilled acres. She has fastened herself to these barges
by lines invisible to you. They may be homely things,
but they contain the food of the nation. Her own
speed may be retarded by this association, but the work
she does for commerce is ten fold greater than that
accomplished by the grand craft that shuns abrasion as
misfortune, and seeks to secure nothing but individual
dignity and fast time. It is through social contact and

absolute social value alone that you can accomplish any

- great social good. It is through the invisible lines

which you are able to attach to the minds with which
you are brought into association alone that you can tow
society, with its deeply freighted interests, to the great
haven of your hope.

The revenge which society takes upon the man who

isolates himself, is as terrible as it is inevitable. The

pride which sits alone, and will do nothing for society,
|
70 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

because society disgusts it, or because its possessor does
not at once have accorded to him his position, will have
the privilege of sitting alone in its sublime disgust till it
drops into the grave. The world sweeps by the isolat-

-ed man, carelessly, remorsely, contemptuously. He

ease

has no hold upon society, because he is not a part of it. :
The boat that refuses to pause in its passage, and throw
| a line to smaller craft, will bring no tow into port. So
let me tell you, that if you have an honorable desire in
your heart for influence, you must be a thoroughly
social man. You cannot move men until you are one
of them. They will not follow you until they have
heard your voice, shaken your hand, and fully learned
your principles and your sympathies. It makes no dif-
ference how much you know, or how much you are
capable of doing. You may pile accomplishment upon
acquisition mountain high ; but if you fail to be a social

man, demonstrating to society that your lot is with the

_
f }
|

|
|

?

rest, a little child with a song in its mouth, and a kiss
for all, and a pair of innocent hands to lay upon the
knees, shall lead mora hearts and change the direction

| of more lives than you.




a a RS iS ART ERR i AE RE RRS STR Sinha Soc







=

LETTER VIII.

THE REASONABLENESS AND DESIRABLENESS OF RELIGION,

Greatness and goodness are not means, but ends!

ah Hath he not always treasures, always friends,
The great good man? Three treasures, love and light,
And calm thoughts, regular as infants’ breath; “
And three firm friends, more sure than day and night—
Himself, his maker, and the angel death ?

COLERIDGE,

\7OUNG men, I hate cant,and I do not know exactly

how to say what I wish to say in this letter; but

I desire to talk to you ratioually upon the subject of
religion. Now don’t stop reading at the mention of
this word, but read this letter through. The fact is, it

is the Icst important letter I have undertaken to write

to you. I kuow you, I think, very thoroughly. Life

looks so good to you, and you are anticipating so muck

eainctnn ee anh sapeitr tt

a a ae

terpenes eipetsnanessaing set cintingactieeepeanasin

nae teen are

z PARTE AAA Te ME NN ct
FO BE eee ESS ERT. SETS weet =



eres

tie Sie

ET PR re ee A eee ee
cata eens 2 et

pce aan nceieia OEE
eng Og OPE TCO OIE ITE rere

;
ee RN Se EN Rn er RNR AG TEER SE ee ae te

tote meas ser ae er ere rnin SSIES

Meo 1 Rca RTE SES SE ELE ERI STE TE NOTES

42 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN,

from it, that religion comes to you, and comes over you

like a shadow. You associate it with long faces, and
prayer meetings, and psalm-singing, and dull sermons
and grave reproofs and stupidity. Your companions are
gay, and so are you. Perhaps you make a jest of reli.
gion; but deep down in your heart of hearts you know
that you are not treating religion fairly. You hnow
perfectly well that there is something in it for you, and
that you must have it. You know that the hour will
come when you will specially need it. But you wish to
put it off, and “enjoy life” first. This results very
much from the kind of preaching you have always lis-
tened to. You have been taught that human life is a
humbug, that these things which so greatly delight you
are vain and sinful, that your great business in this
world is to be saved, and that you are only to be saved
by learning to despise things that you love, and to love
things which you despise. You feel that this is unnatu-
ral and irrational. I think it is, myself. Now let me
talk to you.

Go with me, if you please, to the next station-house,
and look off upon that line of railroad. Itis as straight
as an arrow. Out run the iron lines, glittering in the
sun,—out, as far as we can see, until, converging almost
to a single thread, they pierce the sky. What were
those rails laid in that way for? It is a road, is it?

‘
; 9 re OG CTE LOE LOCO ret
ot sap RAGES St RET RENN I GOELLER EL eT COA CEO CLOT CLEA OLLIE CLE OLE CEO

ees a ee ee

ee ee

as




THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 73

Try your cart or your coach there. The axletrees are
too narrow, and you go bumping along upon the sleep-
ers. ‘Try a wheelbarrow. You cannot keep it on the
rail. But that road was made for something. Now go
with me to the locomotive shop. Whatisthis? We are
told it is a locomotive. What is a locomotive? Why,
it is a carriage moved by steam. But it is very heavy.
The wheels would sink into a common road to the axle.
That locomotive can never run on a common road, and
the man is a fool who built it. Strange that men will

waste time and money in that way! But stop a mo-

_ ment. Why wouldn’t those wheels just fit those rails ?

We measure them, and then we go to the track and
measure its gauge. That solves the difficulty. Those
rails were intended for the locomotive, and the locomo-
tive for the rails. They are good for nothing apart.
The locomotive is not even safe anywhere else. If it
should get off, after it is once on, it would run into rocks
and stumps, and bury itself in sands or swamps beyond
recovery.
Young man, you are a locomotive. You are a thing
that goes by a power planted inside of you. You are

made te go. In fact, considered as a machine, you are

very far superior to a locomotive. The maker of the

locomotive is man; your maker is man’s maker. You

are as different from a horse, or an ox, or a camel, as a
4

Be EE a a a a ee Sere a em a nr ore ree
74 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MEN.



=a

Eee

—-

locomotive is different from a wheelbarrow, a cart, or a
coach. Now do you suppose that the being who made
you——manufactured your machine, and put into it the

motive power—did not make a special road for you to

run upon? My idea of religion is that it is a railroad

for a human locomotive, and that just so sure as it
undertakes to run upon a road adapted only to animal
power, will it bury its wheels in the sand, dash itself —
among rocks, and come to inevitable wreck. If you
don’t believe this, try the other thing. Here are forty
roads: suppose you choose one of them, and see where
you come out. Here is the dram-shop road. Try it.
Follow it, and see how long it will be before you come
to a stump and a smash-up. Here is the road of sen-
sual pleasure. You are just as sure to bury your
wheels in the dirt as you try it. Your machine is too
heavy for that track altogether. Here is the winding,
uncertain path of frivolity. There are morasses on each
side of it, and, with the headway that you are under,
you will be sure, sooner or later, to pitch into one of
them. Here is the road of philosophy, but it runs
through a country from which the light of Heaven is |
shut out; and while you may be able to keep your ma- |
chine right side up, it will only be by feeling your way
along in a clumsy, comfortless kind of style, and with

no certainty of ever arriving at the heavenly station-


ere



. e
*
eae came iar tae lee ds te fA iti ls nr tn ert sinatra



ITHE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 75

house. Here is the road of scepticism. That is cover-
ed with fog, and a fence runs across it within ten rods
Don’t you sce that your machine was never intended te
run on those roads? Don’t you know that it never was,
and don’t you know that the only track under heaven
upon which it can run safely is the religious track ?
Don’t you know that just as long as you keep your
wheels on that track, wreck is impossible? Don’t you

know that it is the only track on which wreck is not

_ certain? I know it, if you don’t; and I tell you that

on that track which God has laid down expressly for
your soul to run upon, your soul will find free play for
all its wheels, and an unobstructed and happy progress.
It is straight and narrow, but it is safe and solid, and
furnishes the only direct route to the heavenly city.
Now, if God made your soul, and made religion for it,
you are a fool if you refuse to place yourself on the
track. You cannot prosper anywhere else, and your
inachine will not run anywhere else.

I suppose that a nice casuist would say that I had

hus fartalked only of morality—only of obedience to law

- But Iwas only dealing with the subject in the rough,

and trying to show you how rational a thing religion is,
and to bring to your comprehension your natural rela-
tion to it. I know that the rule of your life is selfish-

ness. I know that you are sinful, polluted, wilful, and

Aa A A AN EC ON te te tae

4
| ne
et tet AE OL Ct A eT CINE GE
On cea aN ee re eee

mc

76 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

that you act from low motives. I know that the race

to which you belong have all fallen from innocence, and

that they have so thoroughly put out the light that God

meant should light every man who comes into the
world, that, supplementary to the natural moral system,
ffe has, in great benevolence, devised a scheme of reli-
gion, embracing salvation. This is Christianity, and its
purpose is to get you back upon the track where the
race first started. It is a divine contrivance, or plan, for
accomplishing this purpose.

Jesus Christ saw the whole mass of human machinery
off the track, and going to irremediable ruin just so
truly as he did not interfere to prevent it. He came
and told us all how to get back, through repentance,
faith, reformation, the surrender of will, the abnegation
of self, and the devotion of the heart in love to God
and good will to men. He placed himself upon the
track and ran over it, not only showing us how to get
there ourselves, but showing us how to run when there.
In other words, he exhibited to us a true human life.
Then, when he had cleared away all the rubbish from

the track, shown us how to get upon it again, how to run

when we get there, howto avoid and repair accidents by
the way,—when he had done all this, and set his agents
at work in carrying out his plans, he went back to Hea-

ven, and now looks down to see how the work goes on.



cree ss

et Se ee ee

s cenetiepnanenematiien een eunenn nena

A A RN ttt tea
‘




NON a ee

THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION. 77

Young men, J believe this. I know it is true, and I
know, and God knows that this plan which he has

devised to save you and make it possible for you to

lead a true human life, which shall ultimate in life’s
highest issues, is the only one which can save you, I
know that you can never be happy until you have
heartily and practically accepted this religion ; and for
you to go on, year after year, carelessly, thoughtlessly,
spoiling yourself, growing harder, meaner, more polluted,
with no love to God and outgushing benevolence to men,
is an insult to Jesus Christ and a brutal wrong to that
which he came to save. The fact is that sin is the most
unmanly thing in God’s world. You never were made
for sin and selfishness. You were made for love and
obedience. If you think it is manly to reject religion,
and the noble obligations it imposes upon you, it only
shows how strong a hold the devil has upon you. It
shows how degraded you are; how the beast that is in
vou domineers over the soul that is in you.

Young man, your personal value depends entirely
upon your possession of religion. You are worth to
yourself what you are capable of enjoying; you are
worth to society the happiness you are capable of
imparting. To yourself, without religion, you are worth
very little. A man whose aims are low, whose motives
are selfish, who has in his heart no adoration for the



TS CO IC CEN AE CE A PETAL i te

A a a CE ea ee Nar ena eee le ent sete erent
78 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN.

great God, and no love of his Christ, whose will is not

subordinate to the Supreme will—gladly and gratefully

_ —who has no faith, no tenable hope of a happy immor-

tality, no strong-armed trust that with his soul it shall

_be well in all the future, cannot be worth very much ts

himself. Neither can such a man be worth very much
to society, because he has not that to bestow which
society most needs for its prosperity and its happiness.
A locomotive off the track is worth nothing to its
owner or the public so long as it is off the track. The
conditions of its legitimate and highest value are not
complied with. It cannot be operated satisfactorily to
the owner, or usefully to the public, because it is not
where it was intended to run by the man who made it.
, Just look at the real object of religion, and see how
rational it is. It is the placing of your souls in har-
mony with God and his laws. God is the perfect,
supreme soul, and your souls are the natural offspring

of that soul. Your souls are made in the image of his,

and, like all created things, are subject to certain

immutable laws.’ The transgression of these laws
damages your souls, warps them, stunts their growth,
outrages them. Do you not see that you can only be
manly and attain a manly growth by preserving your
true relations and likeness to the father soul, and a

strict obedience to the laws of your being? God has






THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION, 79

given you appetites, and he meant you should indulge
them, and that they should be sources of happiness to
you; but always in a way which shall not interfere
with your spiritual growth and development. He gave
you passions, and they are just as sacred as any part of
you, but they are to be under the strict control of your
reason and your conscience. He gave you desires for
earthly happiness. He planted in you the love of
human praise, delight in society, the faculty to enjoy all
his works. He gave you his works to enjoy, but you
can only enjoy them truly when you regard them as
clessings from the great Giver, to feed and not starve
your higher natures. There is not a true joy in life
which you are required to deprive yourself of, in being
faithful to him and his laws. Without obedience .to
law, your souls cannot be healthful, and it is only to a
healthful soul that pleasure comes with its natural—its
divine aroma. Is a nose stuffed with drugs capable of
perceiving the delicate fragrance of the rose? Is the
soul that intensifies its pleasures as an object of life
capable of a healthful appreciation of even purely sen-
sual pleasures? The idea of a man’s enjoying life
without religion is absurd.

I have been thus particular upon this point, because
I love you, and because I know that without it, or

independent of it, all my previous talk has very httl

|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|

c
i
ences


SOR

* WA SRS



80 _ TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MEN. |

significance. I have reasoned the thing to you on its

merits, and I urge it upon your immediate attention, as

a matter of duty and policy. The matter of duty you
understand. I do not need to talk to you about that

Now about the policy. It will not be five years, proba- |

bly, before every one of you will be involved, head and
ears, in business. Some of you are thus involved
already. You grow hard as you grow older. You get
.abits of thought and life which incrust you. You
-ecome surrounded with associations which hold you,
o that the longer you live without religion the worse

will be for you, and the less probable will be your
.doption of a religious life. If you expect to be a man,
you must begin now. It is so easy, comparatively, to
Jo it now !

“With this paragraph I cease to direct my words par-
Sicularly to you. What I have said to you, I have said
heartily and conscientiously. I shall see you some
time. We are none of us to live very long, but if we
all act the manly part we were sent here to act, and are
true to God and ourselves, we shall be gathered into a
great kingdom, whose throne will be occupied by the
founder of our religion. During some golden hour of
that cloudless day, sitting or straying upon some
heayenly hill, watching upon the far-stretching plains
the tented hosts of God’s redeemed, or marking the

te me aerate Sor oem

a Biake
Sala ti i Ti aT i Ni gs Shwe





la i ae


a

P senegets pees

west

ota ea oe BO aot

a a ER MI Sy AYE aM DSIRE St 8
/

j
|



THE REASONABLENESS OF RELIGION, — 81

'

shadow of an argel’s flight across the bright mirror of
the river of life, I shall say something about these let-
‘ers to you. [I shall look you in the face as I say it, to
we if you are moved to an emotion of gratitude or
of gratification; and if you should happen to tell me
that they made you better, that they led you to a
higher development, that they directed you to a manly
and a godly life, I should press your hand, and if I
should keep from weeping it would be more than I cap
do now. 7
4* .

- A Re tt

*

ETTERS TO YOUNG

ia are : _





eel se ital saat li ssn

mntcpec nano memo

LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN

(open nns pceraman nn
LETTER I.

DRESS— ITS PROPRIETIES aND ABUSES

A creature not too bright or good

For human nature’s daily food ;

For transient sorrows, simple wiles,

Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles.
a en ee ee ee ce ee

A perfect woman, nobly planned
To warn, to comfort, and command.

‘W ORDSW ORTH.

I have observed, among all nations, that the women ornament them
selves more than the men.
Joun LEDYARD.

ACCOUNT a pure, beautiful, intelligent, and well-
bred woman, the most attractive object of vision

and contemplation inthe world. As mother, sister, and

wife, such a woman is an angel of grace and goodness,
and makes a heaven of the home which is sanctified

and glorified by her presence. Asan element of society

she invites into finest demonstrations all that is good in



ees

a ey


eid
.

86 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

the heart, and shames into secresy and silence all that
?s unbecoming and despicable. There may be more of
greatness and of glory in the higher developments of
manhood, bnt, surely, in womanhood God most delights
to show the beauty of the holiness and the sweetness
of the love of which he is the infinite source. It is for
this reason that a girl or a young woman is a very
sacred thing to me. It is for this reason that a silly
young woman or a vicious one makes me sigh or shud-
der. It is for this reason that I pray that I may write
worthily to young women.
In getting at a piece of work, it is often necessary, as
a preliminary, to clear away rubbish; and I say at first

that I do not write to masculine young women. I

deem masculine women abnormal women, and I there-

fore refer all those women who wish to vote, who
delight in the public exhibition of themselves, who
bemoan the fate which drapes them in petticoats, who
quarrel with St. Paul and their lot, who own more
rights than they possess; and fail to fulfil the duties
ei their sphere while seeking for its enlargement—I
refer all these to the eight letters recently addressed to
young men. They will find some practical remarks in

those letters upon masculine development and a manly

discharge of life’s duties. My theory may be very un-

sound, but it is my belief, that the first natural division


- anil hile = ee
ats assuinenincnenartaicin ntstaenantiitecmteapiaeeonmateetat pe 2 EE TE A i Se fe SPECS PR LTR ARES SES OER ES

[SES SEG IGE ERSTE RR RTE FUE RE

ores ene SE Caen re areas

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 8?

of the human race is marked by the line that distin-

guishes the sexes. I believe that a true woman is just
as different from a true man as a true man is different

from a true woman. The nature and the constitution

of the masculine are one, and the nature and constitu-

tion of the feminine are another. So of the glory
attached to each ; so of the functions; so of the sphere
Therefore, if there be “strong-minded women” who
read these letters, I bid them, with all kindness, to turn

to the other series for that which will most benefit ;

them.
I shall talk first of that thing which, worthily or

most unworthily, engages the minds of all young wo-

men, viz—pDrREsS. I speak of this first, because it is
part of the rubbish which I wish to get out of the way
before commencing more serious work ; and yet this is
not altogether trivial. I believe in dress. I believe
that God delights in beautiful things, and as he has
never made anything more beautiful than woman, I
believe that that mode of dressing the form and face
which best harmonizes with their beauty, is that which

pleases him best. I believe the mode of female

_ dress prevalent among the Shaker women is absolute

desecration. To take anything which infinite ingenu-
‘ty and power have made beautiful, and capable by the
gracefulness of its form and the harmony of its parts



Ths ee

°
seeninn pe HGS NNEC OED ICE UNE EATS elt AEN ie nae tel eNO OLE IRS Ia aE SNE eT aaa iss Aa lls tats lata Pe

ETERS SSeBS SS

- PEERS: SST


sce ners ene a Oe

TE, Ia

88 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN,

of producing the purest pleasure to the observer, and
clothe it with a meal bag and crown it with a sugar-
scoop, is an irreverent trifling with sacred things which
should be punished by mulct and imprisonment.

It is ashame to any woman who has the means to
dress well, to dress meanly, and it is a particular shame
for any womanto do this in the name of religion. I have

seen women who, believing the fashionable devotion to

dress to be sinful, as it doubtless is, go to that extreme in |
plainness of attire which, if it prove anything touching

the power that governs them, proves that it is a power
which is at war with man’s purest instincts,and most
elevated tastes. I say it is a shame for a woman to
dress unattractively who has it in her power to dress
well. It is every woman’s duty to make herself
pleasant and attractive by such raiment and ornament
as shall best accord with the style of beauty witb
which she is endowed. The beauty of woman’s per-
son was intended to be a source of pleasure—the
fitting accompaniment of that which in humanity is the
most nearly allied to the angelic. Surely, if God plants
flowers upon a clod they may rest upon a woman’s

bosom, or glorify a woman’s hair!
?

But dress is a subordinate thing, because beauty is
not the essential thing. Beauty is very desirable; it is

a very great blessing; it is a misfortune to possess an

ct ate ait nina nace RIO N Ee



eo
Ye


.
pO RINE re OR tte BOILED EE EE ae aatt BG



INTIS CT ET EA Sn ee

==

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 89

unattractive person ; bnt there are multitudes of women
with priceless excellences of aeart and mind who are
not beautiful. Beauty, so far as it is dependent upon
form and color, is a material thing, and belongs to the
grosser nature. Therefore, dress is a subject which
should occupy comparatively few of the thoughts of a
true woman, whether beautiful or not. To dress well,
becomingly, even richly, if it can be afforded, is a wo-

man’s duty. ‘To make the dress of the person the ex-

ponent of personal taste, is a woman’s privilege. But .

to make dress the grand object of life; to think of
nothing and talk of nothing but that which pertains to
the drapery and artificial ornament of the person, is
but to transform the trick of a courtesan into amuse-
ment for a fool. There are multitudes of women with
whom dress is the all-prevalent thought. They think
of it, dream of it, live for it. It is enough to disgust
one to hear them talk about it, It goes with them
from the gaiety of the ball-room into the weeds of the
house of death. They use it as a means for splitting
grief into vulgar fractions, and are led out from great
bereavements into the consolations of vanity, by the
hands of numerators and denominators. They flat-
ter one another, envy one another, hate one another—
all on the score of dress. They go upon the street to
show their dresses. They enter the house of God to

ceca een ns eo eEEEERETEnRIAInnnanenemmemnmminneme nei aepeneeneinneases needa ee eee a ers

NF RR A A ANA OE eT NE RN ES I A pt RE En, RE
eee eee AACA PLE ETT OE 5
ree en nt AP NASER '
* |

aN NE a NSF EMSAs eerste en

90 ‘TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

display their bonnets. They actually prize themselves
more highly for what they wear than for any charm of
person or mind which they may possess!

One of the most vulgar and unbecoming things ir
the world is this devotion to dress, which, in many
minds, grows into a form of insanity, and leads to the
worship of dry goods and dress-makers. Now it will be
impossible for me to give you special directions upon

this subject of dress. Your dress-maker and your

books, and, better than all, your own taste and expe-,

rience, will tell you what colors become your complex-
ion, what style of make best accords with your form
and style of movement. I shall only speak generally ;
and I say, first, dress modestly. It is all well enough
for little girls to show their necks, but for a woman to
make her appearance in the society of young men with
such displays of person as are made in what is so mis-
takenly called “ full dress,” is a shame to her. I know
what fashion allows in this matter, and fashion has

many sins to answer for. ‘Thousands of girls dress in a

manner that they would discard with horror and dis

gust, if the knew the trains of thought which are sug-
gested by ther presence. I know young men, and I
know there is not one in one hundred who attends a
“fall dress party,” and comes out as pure and worthy a

man as he went in. There is not one in one hundred



a
— a
ie
7 san



DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 91

who does not hold the secret of a base thought
suggested by the style of dress which he sees around
him. _ This may tell very badly for young men. Doubt-
less it does; but we are obliged to take things as we
find them. The millennium has not dawned yet, and we
have receded to a considerable distance from the era of
human innocence. I tell you a fact; and, if you are
modest young women, you will heed its suggestions.
If you choose to become the objects of foul fancies
among young men, whose respect you are desirous of
securing, you know the way.

Again, shun peculiarities of dress which attract the
attention of the vulgar. Just now the red petticoat is
the talk of the newspaper world. It is the inspiring
theme of many a sportive pen, and when one of these is
scen upon the street, it attracts the attention of the pru-
rient crowd. A modest woman will shun a notoriety
like this, aide it ceases to be such. - I should deprecate
the appearance upon the street of a sister of mine with
such a garment, ostentatiously displayed, as a calamity
to her; and yet I do not believe I am a squeamish man
I know that a young woman can dress in such a way as
to excite a chaste and worthy admiration among her
own sex as well as mine, and my judgment tells me
that that is the proper dress for her to wear. .I feel that

it is right and well for her to dress like this, and

ce ee ee co ee a ae ee eee

ne erent ena tn er

aN En stent etree Netti a i

see tO EASE PCE LO EIN ES


92 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

that it is not right and well for her to dress other
wise.

Again, dress in such a manner that your attire will
not occupy your thoughts after it is upon you. Let
every garment be well fitted and well put on—ugly in
no point, fussy in no point, nor made of such noticeable

material that you necessarily carry with you the con-
sciousness that people around you are examining it.
Make it always subordinate to yourself—tributary to
your charms, rather than constituent of them. Then
the society in which you move will see you, and not
your housings and trappings. “Jane was dressed very
becomingly,” or “how well Jane looked,” are very
much more complimentary comments than “that was a

’ and a tolerably acute

splendid dress that Jane wore ;’
mind may gather from these expressions the philosophy
of the whole thing.

There is, as a general thing, no excuse for attire
which is not neat and orderly, at any time ‘n the day.
A thoroughly neat and orderly young woman is pre-
wentable at any hour, whether she be in the kitchen or
parlor ; and I have seen specimens of womanhood that
were as attractive at the wash-tub, with their tidy hair
and their nine-penny calico, as in their parlors at a later
hour, robed in silk and busy at their embroidery. Ma-

terials may be humble, but they may always be taste-

Cera cera ante ener ERNE Bet ROR NN EN LR NN et ne RNR Se nr nN Rae eee

Mee RN ee OS - —
.
ene oa ES Rte we Pree Seine Se SS Se

DRESS—ITS PROPRIETIES AND ABUSES. 93

fully made and neatly kept. There are few habits that
a young woman may acquire which, in the long run,
will tend more to the preservation of her own self
respect than that of thorough tastefulness, appropriate-
ness, and tidiness of dress, and certainly very few which
will make her more agreeable to others.

So, I say, dress well if you can afford it, always
neatly, never obtrusively, and always with a modest
regard to rational ideas of propriety. Scorn the idea of
making dress in any way the great object of life. It is
beneath you. A woman was made for something
higner than a convenient figure for displaymg uary-
goods and the possibilities of millinery and mantua-

making.
LETTER II.
"HEH TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOP Tc WOMANHOOP

UO mirtn and innocence! Omilk and water!
Ye happy mixtures of more happy days!
Brron

We figure to ourselves the thing we like, and then we build itup tm
chance will have it, on the rock or sand.
: Henry TAyLor.

} ares young woman who has arrived at twenty
years of age has passed through three dispensa-
tions—the chaotic, the transitional, and the crystalline,

The chaotic usually terminates with the adoption of the

long skirt. Then commences the transitional dispen-.

sation, involving the process of crystallization. This
process may go on feebly for years, or it may proceed

so rapidly that two years. will complete it. In some

pa 9 RTE A PS eT PSA OSS POE I SP ES PE CSAS tet

a RS NTO RE IR ET UR RINE LT HN

)

\

\ 4
i

OH




TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOD TO WOMANHOOD, 95

women, it is never completed, in consequence of a lack
of inherent vital force, or a criminal disregard of the
requisite conditions. ‘This transitional dispensation,
which is better characterized by calling it the silly
dispensation, is so full of dangers that it calls fora
separate letter; and this I propose to write now.

The silly dispensation or stage of a young woman’
life is marked by many curious symptoms, some of
them indicative of disease. As the cutting of the
natural teeth is usually accompanied by various dis-
orders, so the cutting of the spiritual teeth in women is
very apt to exhibit its results in abnormal manifesta.
tions. They sometimes eat slate pencils and chalk, and
some have been known to take kindly to broken bits
of plastering. Others take a literary turn, and, not
content with any number of epistles to female acquain-
tances, send in contributions to the press, which the
friendly and appreciative editor kindly and carefully
returns, or as kindly and carefully loses, or fails to
receive. Others still take to shopping and dawdling
with clerks who have dawning beards, red cheeks, and

frock coats with outside pockets, from which protrude

white handkerchief-tips. Still others yoke themselves —

m pairs, drawn together by sympathetic attraction, and

by community of mental exercise on the subject of

beaux. Yon shall see them walking through the

Cs oe

crs tmasttinaat ts team CN CT COOOL TENT
net ae Ten 2 rte oo perce SE Tae Tem ee ee ot

a eae eee cen nee a

9 errata taht ar sarc Rt eS aS TR ERE SENSES SEE TEEN Sent a eet SS

96 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

streets, locked arm in arm, plunging into the most
charming confidences, or, if you happen to sleep in the
house with them, you shall hear them talking in
their chamber until, at midnight, the monotonous hum
of their voices has soothed you into sleep; and the
same voices, with the same unbroken hum, shall greet
your ears in the morning. Others take to solitude and
long curls. They walk with their eyes down, murmur-
ing to themselves, with the impression that everybody
is looking at them.

If a young woman can be safely carried through this
dispensation, the great step of life will nave been gained.
This is the era of hasty marriages, deathless attach-
ments which last until they are superseded, and deli-
berately formed determinations to live a maiden life,
which endure until the reception of an offer of marriage.
If, during this period, a young woman be at home, en-

gaged more or less in the duties of the household, or,

if she be engaged in study, with the healthful restraints

and stimulus of general society about her, it is very well
for her. But if she be among her mates constantly, with

nothing to do, or if she be shut up in a boarding-school —

conducted on the high pressure principle, where imagina-

tion is stimulated by restraint, and disobedience to law

is provoked by its unreasonableness, it is indeed very
bad for her.


eeeeee eres see

arco ater rear ere erties.

eA SRLS ENP MOEN RAIN i Pa Ps rane

ener:

TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOD TO WOMANHOOD, 97

It is probable that the theatre is a school of vice
rather than of virtue, that the ball-room is a promoter

of dissipation, and that indiscriminate society has its

temptations and its dangers; but a female boarding-

school, shut. off from general society by law, its mem-
bers lacking free exercise in the open air, denied the
privilege of daily amusements, and presided over by
teachers who fail to understand the nature of the pre-
cious material they have in charge, is as much worse
for mind and morals than all these combined, as can
well be imagined. I know female boarding-schools that

are properly conducted, whose teachers know what a

_ girl is, and what she needs, and who contrive to lead

her through this transitional passage of her life into a
healthful and rational womanhood; and I know others
whose very atmosphere is that of fever. I know board-
ing-schools where beaux are the everlasting topic of
conversation, and where an unhealthy imagination is so
stimulated by irrational restraints and mutual fellow-
foeding, that the foundation of nearly every character is
necessarily laid in rottenness.

‘If any young woman, in a boarding-school or out of
it, should find herself a subject of any of the discases
waich I have pointed out, she should seek a remedy at
once. If she finds herself moved to go shopping for
the simple purpose of talking with the clerks, let her

SoG EE ne a en me re ro ec er ee NE Te ee SE ATE SN ae SS SS ee SE oes emer

2S SS ETRE STE




pros steer cacet

Lis mete a TEES

wpa ATED ae

i Be ET, RI ee eta Aer

on eae eee emp 28 gt ERE Ot came

98 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

remember that she is not only doing an immodest and
unbecoming thing, but that she is manifesting the
symptom of that which is a dangerous mental disease.
To begin with, she is doing a very silly thing. Again,
she is doing that which compromises her in the eyes of
all sensible young men. If she finds herself possessed
with unaccountable proclivities to a mineral dict, or a
foggy out-reaching for something or other that mani-
fests itself in profound confidences with one similarly

afflicted, or any one of a hundred absorbing sentimen-

7 talisms, let her remember that she is mentally and

morally sick, and that, for her own ¢ mfort and peace,
she should seck at once for a remedy. Her only safety
is in seeking direct contact with a healthier and more

advanced life, and by securing healthful occupation for

all her powers, intellectual and physical. Dreams,

imaginations, silly talk and twaddle about young men,
yearnings after sympathetic hearts, the dandling cf
precious little thoughts about beaux on the knees of
fancy, and all that sort of nonsense should be discarded
—thrust out of the sacred precincts of the mind—as
if they “were so many foul reptiles. Get out of this
feverish and unhealthy frame just as soon.as possible,
and walk forth into a more natural, dignified, and
womanly life.

A young woman at this age should remember that


a ce TS Sa EE En TRG EN TET SP RES De A et ep re nee RR iy TR OER A RES Se RR LATE IED AEA DR A ATT A NS RT TE i RA PTE NTS LS TTT NT TT NT cS



TRANSITION FROM GIRI-HOOD TO WOMANHOOD. 99

her special business is to fit herself for the duties of life.
I would not deny to her the society of young men,
when she has time for it, and a proper opportunity, but
she should remember that she has nothing to do with
peaux, nothing to do with thoughts of and calculations
for marriage, nothing to do but to become, in the
noblest way,a woman. She should remember that she
is too young to know her own mind, and that, as a
general thing, it is not worth knowing. Girlish attach-
ments and girlish ideas of men are the silliest things in
all the world. If you do not believe it, ask your
mothers. Ninety-nine times in a hundred they will
tell you that they did not marry the boy they fancied,
before they had a right to fancy anybody. If you
dream of matrimony for amusement, and for the sake
of killing time, I have this to say, that, considering the
kind of young men you fancy, you can do quite as well
by hanging a hat upon a hitching-post, and worshipping
it through your chamber window. Besides, it is during
this period of unsettled notions and readily shifting
ttachments that a habit of flirting and a love of it are
generated. ;
I suppose that coquetry, in its legitimate form, is
among a woman’s charms, and that there is a legitimate
sphere for its employment, for, except in rare natures,

t is a natural thing with your sex. Nature has

EE RE AO RRS SRE TSR RE ERR EN SIRE TE TRS REAP rt ENTE APT RS EAE OAT A EES ERS TESTS t

an NN 1 ROAR OE ATT CANETTI

NRA A TC

—
creel ALOT ALLELE COLO Ny

snes aenasencncet engi a LaLa CCG LOL OE nt TE SLCC OCCA COOOL A COLIC LL CALL LOAD LOLA LA
_ ~

100 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

ordained that men shail prize most that which shall
cost an effort, and while it has designed that you shall
at some time give your heart and hand to a worthy
man, it has also provided a way for making the priz
he seeks an apparently difficult one to win. It is a
simple and beautiful provision for enhancing your value
in his eyes, so as to make a difficult thing of that which
you know to be unspeakably easy. If you hold your-
selves cheaply, and meet all advances with open willing-
ness and gladness, the natural result will be that your
lover will tire of you. I introduce this subject here,
not because I wish to, but because I am compelled to,
in order to explain what I have to say upon the habit
and love of flirting.

To become a flirt is to metamorphose into a disgust-
ing passion that which by natural constitution is a
harmless and useful instinct. This instinct of coquetry,
which makes a woman a thing to be won, and which I
suppose all women are conscious of possessing in some

degree, is not a thing to be cultivated or developed, at

all. It should be left to itself, unstimulated and unper.—

verted, and if, in the formative stage of your woman-
hood, by initiating shallow attachments and heartlessly
breaking them, or seeking to make impressions for the
sake of securing attentions which are repaid by insult

and negligence, you do violence to your nature, you

erereninenpicinaeaencnhncrenseeiattacsittaigna pct n ings sili

eee NE CLO IOTC tb r t

a
a

sinensis aerate etenre

a AE EE At A EROTIC. OC RET TCE A tt aint nA

TRANSITION FROM GIRLHOOD TO WOMANHOOD. 101

make of yourself a woman whom your own sex despise,
and whom all sensible men who do not mean to cheas
you with insincerities as mean as yours, are afraid of
They will not love, and they will not trust you. Thi
instinct, then, is not a thing to be harmlessly playec
with ; and I know of few more unhappy and disgusting
sights than a girl bringing into her womanhood this
passion—harmful alike to herself and others.

The natural and inevitable influence of the devotion
of your thoughts—spoken, written, or unexpressed—to
beaux and the subject of marriage, while your mind is
undergoing a process of crystallization, is to deter that
process, to vitiate it, aud to make you unworthy in
many ways. It is all-important to you at this time to
have the counsel of a good, sensible woman, who shal]
be your senior by at least ten years. She should be a
married woman, and, by all means, your mother, unless
there be some natural bar to entire communion between
you. Do nothing, and give a cherished entertainment
to no thoughts which you are unwilling to reveal to
this woman. If your companions persist in keeping
subjects of this character before your mind, leave
them—cut them. |

It is necessary that, while your education is active.y
in progress, your perceptions be kept healthful, and
your sentiments unperverted by thoughtless tampering

ccnewteremanenmaatanesatatt. titi tanta anata

- me er eer ene ment ne ate St mente
'
cP SS SRE a ee rrr re a SE RR CD at a it

ee re

ee ete or eee eee ee en ee nee ems Se ES

Peele th At IA ETS CB

102 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

with a subject which you will some time come to know
is one of the most serious moment. It spoils a girl to
get the idea inte her head, that marriage is the chief

end of woman, that education is but a preparation for

matrimony, and that accomplishments are nothing but

contrivances for catching a husband. And now, young

woman, whose eye traces these lines, I ask you to decide

how much of this letter belongs to you. How are you

living? What is the principal subject of your thoughts?
I know that I reveal some young women to themselves ;
and I only fear that they will find themselves so bound
to their scductive thoughts and fancies—so dissipated
and enervated by them—that they have not mora
strength enough left to break away from them.

on

ponent arenes art

ne gn Re RE ARO OOO EIR EA COL EE CLINT CRANE RI OLEAN Oe A COC te AE ETE

ee ee

s
epinmenpmerrney sina. ae anne teen eoe


LETTER Iii.

ACQUISITIONS AND. ACCOMPLISHMEXSYS.

A woman may be made.
‘WonrpswortTH.

T is a matter of special importance to you that you
comprehend and thoroughly appreciate the differ-

- ence between accomplishments and scientific and literary
acquisitions. A woman may have many acquisitions,
and no accomplishments, in the usual meaning of that
word, and vice versd. As the life of woman goes in this

_ country, these acquisitions perform their most important
office in the process by which they are achieved ;—that
is, the great work which they do for a woman is that of
training and disciplining her mind. Many a woman

thoroughly learned Algebra at school, with decided

|
Show â„¢s how divine a thing

REI TEDL LE SEE ee art re ere ee tne are tS eee + ar i CESS
SEER ESS SSS EN aD

t

PES STE SSS SS ESS SE ee see
-

h
v
f

104 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

advantage to herself, who see makes a practical use
of Algebra. She may have been a good Latin or Greek
scholar, but, having no important use for her acquisi-
tion in practical life, she suffers her knowledge of thoso
szanguages to fade out. In short, there are very few of
her text-books which, in five years after leaving school,
‘she would not be obliged to review with the severest
study before she could re-acquire the credit she won in
her last examination, A woman may have a pet
acquisition which she transforms, by her manner of
treatment, into an accomplishment. Botany is thus
transformed, not unfrequently, into a very graceful thing.

An accomplishment differs from a science, or a sys-
tem of truth of any kind, acquired during the process of
education, in that it needs to be permanent, and so far
as possible perfect, to be of any use to the individual or
to society. Music, drawing, conversation, composition,
the French language, dancing—all these in America are
regarded as accomplishments; yet of fifty women who
acquire either of them, or all of them, not more than
two retain them.

Miss Georgiana Aurelia Atkins Green was an intimate

friend of mine, or, rather, perhaps I should say, her |

mother’s brother boarded my horse, and I bought my
meat of her father. It was the determination of Mrs.
Green that her daughter should be a finished lady



sonmeeeerecse

PRPS ASB R AAT PARIS TS BTCA PRG ARTO IO RES OAT Lt eee

SP RRS OET Toe

i a ee OED
Lae RO AR ft

on Tn i a ee

ACQUISITIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS, 105

During the finishing process I saw but little of her. It

occupied three years, and was performed at a fashiona-
ble boarding-school, between the ages of fifteen and
eighteen, regardless of expense. When she was finished
off, she was brought home in triumph, and exhibited on

various occasions to crowds of admiring friends. I went

one evening to see her. She was really very pretty, —

and took up her réle with spirit, and acted it admira-
bly. I saw a portfolio lying upon her piano, and know-
ing that I was expected to seize upon it at once, I did
so, against Miss Green’s protestation, which she was
expected to make, of course. I found in it various pen-
cil drawings, a crayon head of the infant Samuel, and a
terrible shipwreck in India ink. The sketches were not
without merit. These were all looked over, and praised,

of course. Then came the music. This was some

years ago, and the most that I remember is that she

played O Dolce Concento with the variations, and the
Battle of Prague, the latter of which the mother
explained to me during its progress. The pieces were

cleverly executed, and then I undertook to talk to the

young woman. I gathered from her conversation that

- Mrs. Martinet, the principal ef the school where she had

been finished, was a lady of “so much style!” that Miss

Kittleton of New York was the dearest girl in the

school, and that she (Georgiana) and the said Kittleton
; §*

.
soe deienmnemtnemnetaeemmenammemenentieshienalniammeetatietieeceeaieceneene emenmamtetianene rememeenmnnamiaeemmanemetnneetnn ie dneteaiseretteatededtneeeerenesenete inet ee

eentanpinnninnaeas

eer wee cane




- eT ate =
a

ABS BeBe Sor SS Stee regan e

106 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

were such friends that they always dressed alike; and
that Miss Kittleton’s brother Fred was a magnificent fel-
low. The last was said with a blush, from the embar-
rassments of which she escaped gracefully by stating that
the old Kittleton was a banker, and rolled in money.
It was easy to see that the parents -of this dear girl
admired her profoundly. I pitied her and them, and
determined, as a matter of duty, that I would show her
just how much her accomplishments were worth. I
accordingly asked of my wife the favor to invite the
whole family to tea, in a quiet way. They all came, on
the appointed evening, and after the tea was over, I
expressed my delight that there was one young lady in
our neighborhood who could do something to elevate
the tone of our society. I then drew out, in a careless
way, a letter I had just received from a Frenchman, and
asked of Miss Georgiana the favor to read it to me.
She took the letter, blushed, went half through the first
line correctly, then broke down on a simple word, and
confessed that she could not read it. It was a little
cruel ; but I wished to do her good, and proceeded with
my experiment. I took up a piece of music, and asked
her if she had seen it. She had not, . I told her there

was a pleasure in store for both of us. I had heard the

song once, and I would try to sing it if she would play

the accompaniment. She declared she could not do it

oan

ee ee

ao ea REE ER ET RE RT SR ONE UE ATES ANE AERIS RE OER a

ee






ACQUISITIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 107

without practice, but I told her she was too modest by
nalf. So I dragged her, protesting, to the piano. She
knew she should break down. I knew she would, and
sae did. Well, I would not let her rise, for as Mr. and
Mrs. Green were fond of the old-fashioned ‘church music
and had been singers in their day, and in their way, |
selected an old tune, and called them to the piano to
assist. Miss Green gave us the key, and we started off
in fine style. It was a race to see which would come
eut ahead. Georgiana won, by skipping most of the
notes. She rose from the piano with her cheeks as red
as a beet.

“ By the way,” said I, “Georgiana, your teacher of
drawing must have been an excellent one.” I did not
tell her that I had seen evidence of this in her own
efforts in art, but I touched the right spring, and the
lady gave me the teacher’s credentials, and told me
what such and such people had said of her. “ Well,”
said I, “I am glad if there is one young woman who

has learned drawing properly. Now you have nothing

— to do but to practise your delightful art, and you must

do something for the benefit of your friends. I promised
a sketch of my house to a particular friend, at a dis-
tance, and you shall come up to-morrow and make one.
I remember that beautiful cottage among your sketches ;

and I should prize a sketch of my own, even half as

—_——— oi aceainanenpniaenieteerenianibesnanenensctshiatiit ED DLE A ss as Na OS Sa OE il a CE OAC O LE TSE


ae
t
i

rg a ne Se



108 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

well done, very highly.” The poor girl was blushing
again, and from the troubled countenances of hei
parents, I saw that they had begun indistinctly tc com-
prehend the shallowness—the absolute werthlessness —
of the accomplishments that had cost them so much,
Georgiana acknowledged that she had never sketche¢
from nature—that her teacher had never required it of
her, and that she had no confidence that she could
sketch so simple an object as my house. The Greeng
took an early leave, and I regret to say a cool one.
They were mortified, and there was not good sense
enough in the girl to make an improvement of the
hints I had given her.

The Green family resided upon a street that I alwayz
took on my way to the post-office, and there was rarely
a pleasant evening that did not show their parlor alight,
and company within it. I heard the same old varia
tions of O Dolce Concenio evening after evening. The
Batile of Prague was fought over and over again. The
portfolio of drawings (such of them as had not been
expensively framed) was exhibited, I doubt not, te
admiring friends until they were soiled with thumbing,
At last, Georgiana was engaged, and then she was
married—married to a very good fellow, too. He loved
music, loved painting, and loved his wife. Two years
passed away; and I determined to ascertain how the

eR EE eS a EER EE




SEAS SRS TENE REET ESET SEE AS

rc. tse cc mr Ra a CRAY AREER ET CR EGET

ACQUISITIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 106

pair got along. She was the mother of a fine boy
whom I knew she would be glad to have mesee. |

called, was treated cordially, and saw the identical old

portfolio, on the identical old piano. I asked the favor

ef a tune. The husband with a sigh informed me that
Georgiana had dropped her music. I looked about the
walls, and saw the crayon Samuel, and the awful ship-
wreck in India ink, Alas! the echoes of the Battle of
Prague that came back over the field of memory, and
these fading mementoes around me, were all that
remained of the accomplishments of the late Miss
Georgiana Aurelia Atkins Green.

Now, young woman, I think you will not need any

assurance from me that I have drawn a genuine por-

trait, for which any number of your acquaintances may

have played the original. What do you think of
accomplishments like these? How much do they
amount to? My opinion of them is that they are the
shabbiest of all things that can be associated with a
woman’s life and history. I have told you this story in
order to show you the importance of incorporating
your accomplishments with your very life. It is com-
paratively an easy task to learn a few tunes by rote; to
get up, with the assistance of a teacher, a few drawings:
to go through with a few French exercises ; but it is not

so easy to learn the science o music, and go through





110 ‘'TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

the manual practice necessary to make the science
available under all circumstances. It is not easy to
sketch with facility from nature. It is not easy to
comprehend the genius of the French language, and so
to familiarize yourself with it that it shall ever remain
an open language to you, and give you a key to a new
literature. A true accomplishment is won only by hard
work; but when it is won, itis a part of you, which
nothing but your own neglect can take away from you.

And now let me tell you a secret. Multitudes of
married men are led to seek the society of other wo
men, or go out among their own fellows, and often intc
bad habits, because they have drunk every sweet of
life which their wives can give them. They have heard
all their tunes, seen all their efforts at art, sounded their
minds, and measured every charm, and they see that
henceforth there is nothing in the society of their wives
but insipidity. They married women of accomplish-
ments, but they see never a new development—no
improvement. Thcir wives can do absolutely nothing
The shell is broken; the egg is eaten.

The first accomplishment that I would urge upon
you, is that of using the English language with cor-
rectness, elegance, and facility. There are, compara- |
tively, few young women who can write a good note.

[ know of hardly one who can punctuate her sentences





sperms =

ACQUISITIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. lil

properly. I beg of you never to write affection with a

single f, or friendship without an ¢ in the first syllable.
Such slips destroy the words, and the sentiments they
represent. If you accomplish yourselves in nothing
else, learn thoroughly how to use your mother tongue
I remember one young woman with whom, when in
youth, I had the misfortune to correspond. In the
barrenness of subjects upon which to engage her pen,
she once inquired by note whether I ever saw such “a
spell of wether,” as we had been having. I frankly
informed her that I never did, and that I hoped she
would never indulge in such another, for it made me cool.
She took the hint, and broke off the correspondence.
There are many who can write tolerably well, but
who cannot talk. Conversation I am inclined to rank
among the greatest accomplishments and the greatest
arts. Natural aptness has much to do with this, but no
woman can talk well who has not a good stock of defi-
nite information. I may add to this, that no woman
talks well and satisfactorily who reads for the simple
purpose of talking. There must exist a genuine in
terest in the affairs which most concern all men and
women. The book, magazine, and newspaper literature
of the time, questions of public moment, all matters
and movements relating to art, affairs of local interest

—all these a woman may know something of, and

a> ir a


arene

et ESE eH amen

aren nee ig Sra neers a
ee oo

re eh ee RESID AES SEE VED. SP EE

112 ‘cTTCOMB’s LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

know something definitely. Of all these she can talk
if she will try, because there is something in all which

excites feeling of some kind, and shapes itself into opi-

- nion.

But whatever accomplishment a young woman at-
tempts to acquire, let her by all means acquire it
thoroughly and keep it bright. Accomplishments all
oceupy the field of the arts, They are things which
have no significance or value save in the ability of
doing. They become, or should become, the exponents
of a woman’s highest personality. They are her most
graceful forms of self-expression, and into them she can
pour the stream of her thoughts and faicies, and
through them utter the highest language of her na-
ture and her culture. Accomplishments make a wo-
man valuable to herself. They greatly increase her
pleasure, both directly in the practice, and indirectly
through the pleasures which she gives to society. A
truly accomplished woman—one whose thoughts have
come naturally to flow out in artistic forms, whether
through the instrumentality of her tongue, her pen,

her pencil, or her piano, is a treasure to herself and

to society. Such a woman as this would I have you |

to be. There may be something to interfere with ©

your being all this; but this you can do: you can

acquire thoroughly every accomplishment for which






ACQUISITIONS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 113

you have a natural aptitude, or you can let it alone.
Do not be content with a smattering of anything.
Do not be content to play parrot to your teachers,

until your lesson is learned, and then think you are

| in any accomplishment you undertake. Do not ke

|

_ accomplished. Do not be content with mediocrity
j
content to be a Miss Georgiana Aurelia Atkins Greee |
|

:

ee nt ARE SCOOT RDI NOE RNAS AEG ET NED SE EEN II I Ac

Sr nm ert cht ie Et the Eh yesh tr star te pth een rte
LETTER IV.

UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS.

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments.

SHAKSPERE.

SUPPOSE that most men have observed the follow-
| ing facts, from which I propose to draw a lesson :—
First, that young married women have a_ peculiar
charm for unmarried young men, and that a young
man’s first love is almost uniformly devoted to a woman
older than himself. |

A marriageable young woman occupies, or is made to

occupy, a position of peculiar hardship. Our theory is

that a woman should never make an advance towards ~

the man she loves and would marry. Such a step is

deemed inconsistent with maiden modesty. I do not






quarrel with this, but the effect has been to make young

women, who possess sensitive natures, hypocrites. It

UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS. 115

ought not to do it, but it does. Every modest young
woman, possessing a good degree of sagacity, plays a
part, almost always, when in the society of young men.
The fear is that by some word, or look, or act, she shall
express such a degree of interest in a young man as
shall lead him to believe that she is after him. Young
women study the effect of their language, they often
shun civilities, they put on an artificial and constrained
style of behavior, for fear that some complacent fool will
misconstrue them, or some gentleman whom they wish to
please will deem them too forward, and so become dis-
gusted. The result is, that a man rarely finds out either
the best or the worst points of his wife’s character
before he marries her. Social intercourse is carried on
under a kind of protest, which places every young
woman in a position absolutely false before the eyes
of young men. Many a woman owes 4 life of celibacy
and disappointment to the fact that she never felt at
liberty to act out herself.

With these statements, it is very easy to understand

RN 8 rr nr ern ae -2 erin eee. inochi idee alas ett abc aectniseeintiaiicttantia gbasice'isinsanieie

the attractions which a young married woman has for

man falling in love with a woman older than himself.

|
|
;
a bachelor, and to explain the phenomenon of a young
In the first instance, a married woman becomes

cen ernest Sent gnc tt ata eee nga tenses ies ennitnamenn.
116 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

agreeable because she becomes perfectly natural anc
unconstrained, her circumstances allowing all the more
grateful forms of politeness—the cordial greeting, the
complimentary attentions, and the free conversation
—without the danger of being misconstrued. In the
latter instance, the woman throws off her constraint in
the same manner, because she is in the society of one
whom she regards as, in reality, a boy. She finds, very
much to her surprise, that she has won the boy’s heart ;
but it was the most natural thing in the world. He had
never had a sight of a woman’s nature before. The
girls with whom he had associated had always worn a
mask, The real hearts behind it he had thus far failed to
apprehend, There is a very general impression among
the young men whose affections are not engaged that
the best women are married, and that those who are
left do notamount to much. They will think differently
some time or other.

Now my idea is that this universal mask-wearing sys-
tem should be broken up. It does injustice to all par-
ties. If there is, in society, any poor creature in the
form of a man whose vanity is so open to flattery that a
young woman cannot treat him with natural, cordial
politeness, without his thinking that she would like to
marry him, and is trying to ensnare him, let him think

so, and trust to time and circumstances for justice.

ep eer enteleme eentt ACC COOL ALLLLL LLCALL LA AE
Menara a enn tn a ett te net ete

UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS. 11?

Such men are of too little account in the world to pay
for carrying a deceitful face, and despoiling the inter-
course of the young of its sweetest charms. If you like
the society of young men, take no pains to conceal it,
but treat them with frank cordiality. No true gentle-
man among them will misconstrue you. It is not neces-
sary for you to tell them that you calculate to live a
maiden life. They know you lie. It will not do to
indicate to any man of sense that you do not like the
attentions and society of gentlemen, for he knows better.
He knows, at least, that you ought to like them, and that
it you do not, there is something wrong about you. Don’t
practise deception of any kind. A man who is frank
and open-hearted with you, deserves to be met with a
frank and open heart by you; and in ninety-nine cases
jn every hundred, men will be honorable and manly
with you, if you will lay aside suspicion, and trust them.
If a man prove himself unworthy of your confidence,
you have your remedy. Cut him, or tell him what you
think of him, and bring him upon his knees.
I have given my advice without many qualifications,
but do not misconstrue me. I wiite upon the supposi-
tion that you have common sense, and know what I
mean. Some people, I suppose, would present you
with a formula by which to conduct all your intercourse

with young men. J know a large number of fathers



seem teeth scene tenet am ea OC L LOLL AD ALAC LE LOO

Seraccernrnenchaan wemmnenant- ant yit Genin msepiiie nasi goon
&

enero arnereeepanartnanete pees et inner th A SION te Net GO TE EOLA ALON AAP EN
*
-
y
a OF ete F5TB US. ys at en .

118 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

and mothers who will think that, upon this subject, ]
ought to guard my language, and be more particular ;
but I know very well that if you have not sense ana
prudence enough to take this general counsel, and use
it judiciously, no qualifications that I could make would
be of any service to you. ems

Itrust you. I believe you are virtuous young women,
with pure hearts and true intentions; and I know there
is no danger to you until you cease to be such. You
nave an instinct—God’s word in your own souls—that
tells you when a man takes the first wrong step towards
you; and if you do not repel that step in such a manner
that it will never be repeated, do yousuppose that anything
I could say to you would do you any good? I say this:
that perfect frankness and cordiality in the treatment of
young men are entirely consistent with the safety of any
true woman from insult or offensive familiarity. Is
your father afraid to trust you out of his sight? I am
not. If I were, I would be ashamed to confess it, par-
ticularly if you were a daughter of mine. I believe in
you, and I believe, moreover, that if this contemptible
idea that men are your natural enemies, and that you
must cheat them and look out for them, could be got
out of the way, and a free and unconstrained social inter-
course established between you and them, they would

be much better, and you altogether safer for it.




UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS. 119

There is another subject, more or less intimately asso-
ciated with this, which may as well be treated here. Ti
is very natural for young women to get in the habit of
treating only those young men politely whom they hap-
pen, for various reasons, to fancy. They “don’t care”
what the majority of young men think of them, provided
they retain the good will of their particular pets. They
are whimsical, and take on special and strong likes or

dislikes for the young men whom they meet. One is

= perfectly hateful,” and another is “perfectly splen-
did,” and so they proceed to make fools of themselves

over both parties. Now there is nothing upon which a
young man is so sensitive as this matter of being treated
with polite consideration by the young women of his
acquaintance; and I know of nothing which will tend
more certainly to make a young man hateful than to
treat him as if he were so. There is a multitude of
young men whose self-respect is nurtured, whose ambi-
tion is quickened, and whose hearts are warmed with a
genial fire, by those considerate recognitions on the part
of their female acquaintances which assure them that
they have a position in the-esteem of those with whom
they associate the sweetest hopes and happiness of life.
To be cut for no good cause is to receive a wound which
is not easily healed.

The duty, therefore, which I would inculcate is that
120 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

-

of systematic politeness. If you know a young man,
bow to him when you meet him. He will not bow to
you first, for he waits for your recognition. He does

not know whether you esteem him of sufficient value to

be recognised. If you pass him without a recognition,

you say to him, in a language which he feels with a

keenness which you cannot measure, that you consider

him beneath your notice. You plant in his heart imme-
diately a prejudice against yourself, You disturb him.
You hurt him, and this, too, let me admit, very fre-
quently without design. You are sensitive yourself, and

are afraid he has forgotten you. You think, perhaps,

that he would not like to notice you, and would not

like to have you notice him., There is a good deal of
this kind of thing, doubtless, but it is all wrong. | There
is no man who will not return your bow, and feel the
better for your smile; and if the young man receiving
the attention is poor, and has his position in the world
to win, and*feels that he has not as many attractions,
personal or circumstantial, as others, you have made his
heart light, and awakened towards yourself a fecling of
eordial good will, akin in many instances to gratitude.
A young woman who is afraid of compromising her
position by recognising men out of her set, or out of a
certain line of genteel occupations, shows by how frail a

tenure she holds her own respectability. I could name

4
pnt NPE ET SAT SA RR

severe wae ewerene ner =

een re ne


oe

seemsantcmonraattnn me sete eects it NE AE OEE CNEL LILLE BEE LD LOLA

ere en EECA G RS A tT I ENGST

UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS, 121 _

~

to you women who have not only a recognised but a
commanding position in the best society, who are as
uniformly and systematically polite to the clerk who

sells them silks, as to the pets of their circle; who have

- bow and a smile for all with whom they have ever

been thrown into personal relations, and who, by this
very politeness, more than by any other self-expression,
vindicate their place among those whom society calls
ladies. There is a kind word for them in every young
man’s mouth: and no young man would ever think of
resuming upon such politenesses for the indulgence of
an offensive familiarity. Such women have a sacredness
in his eyes that no other women possess, and he would
offend them in no way, for the world.

The advice I have given you in these matters is
partly for _the benefit of your sex, and partly for mine.
I believe that there should be a far more rational mode
of intercourse between young men and young women
than at present exists. I believe that every legitimate
attraction that your society has for young men should
be free and unconstrained. I believe that there is nc
good reason why a young married woman should be
more attractive to a bachelor than yourselves, and that
ta the degree in which they are more attractive, do you
wrong yourselves and the young men of your acquaint-

mee, I believe that it is well for you, and well for
§


ane

ATIC TE rn ee tg opt pennies Lanse se shpat at

separ

a ee eee

sce em eceaenrcommemee cere nr

122 §=TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

young men, that they should be attracted to you by a

frank behavior on your part, which will place them at

their ease, and exercise upon them all that good influ-

ence which a pure, strong, outspoken female nature is
so well calculated to exert.

Young men and young women, to use a cant phrase
of the day, are “in the same boat.” But a few years
will pass away before they will be the bosom compa-
nions of each other, and the fathers and mothers of the
land. It matters everything to them that they. under-
stand eachother; and to this end, in my judgment, an
intercourse between them should be established upon a
very different basis from that which is now maintained
by society. It should be more simple, more ample,
more natural, more trustful, and more heartily consider-
ate. There is nothing in the history of the race to
prove that anything has ever been preserved or won to
virtue by a system of essential falsehood, or a policy of
arbitrary constraint. Many a girl feels this, and will
feel it to her dying day. To tie a. young woman up to
the meanly cautious conventionalisms of the day, is to
prepare her as a helpless sacrifice to the first designing
villain who insinuates himself into her confidence,

Many a woman groans to-day in bondage to a drunkard, a

libertine, or a dolt, who only needed to have been allowed

to know men better to have secured a proper companion.

a A SE RE LR SR A AR INA SOR SE EN SE RE RS AR SE RRR EE RT ERE ER SSSR A SSR a scp cons ONE name

epee ogee tc nereensnemen te asSSeretpmsens sif se
_ UNREASONABLE AND INJURIOUS RESTRAINTS. 125

[ say, then, to you, young women, reform this thing
altogether. It is in your hands, I give you the idea:
I leave you to carry it into practice. You do not need
that IJ should tell you how to do it. If you are not
vicious, there is nothing for you, in your mind and
heart, to conceal. Be simply yourselves, taking all
possible care to make yourselves what you should be.
Learn to think kindly of all young men, save those
who you have reason to believe possess black hearts
and foul intentions—those who are enemies of your sex
and social purity. Treat every young man well, both
for his sake and your own. You shall thus be the
light of many eyes, and your kind heart, thorough good
manners, and transparent nature, cannot fail to attract
to you those whose true nobility is the most strongly
touched by that which is best in womanhood. One of
those will become your companion, I am inclined to
think, if human nature, meanwhile, do not suffer some

remarkable change.

cncusveem im git tet tC EI TCO LEE DEDEDE AB CCE DOLE

ees
a a ene enn ROE:
do-siduntiqupecbdiabsalanaammdapnaaet

FER SL rE ar EA AES ORC CLO i OAR A RENE a hh RO ANE RS EONAR SEO ROT ARR ctr omman 2 mS Am

LETTER Y.

THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND LUCRE.

Maidens, like moths, are ever caught by glare,
And Mammon wins his way where Seraphs might despair.

Byron.

OU calculate when you are married to be married

to the man you love, and no other; yet there are

a good many chances that you will be influenced in
your choice by other considerations. But you should
never think of marrying a man simply because you love
him. You may love a man who has personal habite
that will make you miserable. You may love a man so
lazy or so inefficient that your whole life will be neces-
sarily a continued struggle with poverty. You may
love a man who has no adaptation to you—who is surly

and stupid and unresponsive; who can give no satisfac

inane nte-nnemetntn ent RTGS th tA Na Nn PG AE A SIRNAS ES SERED Mu EP Sea ERENCE eM Ee!

fe RR a an a RE SENSO RE Se IN RO CLOSES TEP EIO CN Nw ee ee

amie a8 met Hee te

peer rene mae? rem


.
mace nc0 NENG re ASGREIIA ONT SEOE PCIE MEN I TRIOS EO AB aA 2 NERA OO ERED RAT OEE ELT IA OEE ACCC CLL LCN ICAO TES SIO IE ION SOA CP LES

THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND LUCRE, 125

tory return of your affection, and who will repulse every
demonstration of your fondness. You may love a man
who is supremely selfish. When you become bound
for life ‘to a man, he should be one who can make you
happier than you would be alone. There are doubtless
some instances of a love so noble and so self-sacrificing
that it will welcome poverty and want, with the object
of its desire, as being far better than riches without it.
I will not quarrel with this. I only say that, generally,

competence (I do not mean wealth) is necessary to that

degree of comfort without which love fails of its sweetest |

exercises and most grateful rewards. Love for a man
is only one reason why you should marry him. There
may be a round dozen of reasons why you should not.
A woman's Heart isa very queer thing, on the whole.
It falls in love in the most unaccountable way, with the
most unaccountable men. It is a hard thing to reason
with, and a much harder thing to reason about, yet
there are some things which may be said to those whose
judgment is not yet blinded by a passion that contemns
reason. You should marry a man to whom you will
be willing to bend, or one whom you know you can
manage without his knowledge, or with his consent.
The instances are very rare in which two strong wills
can harmonize in close companionship. They must

both be governed by principle, and be mutually forbear-

seater cmap re nn AON et GI re
encanta MERE

cee SERENE

126 ‘TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

ing from principle. I have seen noble instances of this,
but not often. The law of nature is that the wife shall
bend to the husband—that her will shall, at last, be
subject ; yet there are instances of true affection between
man and woman when subjection on the part of the
man becomes the law of nature, the woman’s judgment
being the best, and her will the strongest. In these
cases, the female mind possesses masculine characteris-
tics and the male mind feminine characteristics ; and it
is just as proper that her mind should gcvern in these
instances as that the male mind should govern in others.
But there is something unnatural in this, after all—or
something, I should say, out of the common order of
things.

If a woman sincerely believe that there is no man to

whose ,will she can gladly subordinate her own, let her

_ eck out a feminine man, and make suit for his hand.

A noted female vocalist, whom all of us love, had the
credit of doing this. He gave up even his religion for
her, though that may not have cost him much. I pre-
sume that she governs him, and I have'yet to learn that
the union is not thoroughly a happy one. After all, if
the lady were a graceful subject of a kingly intellect, I
cannot help thinking that she would be in a more
natural position, and one in which she would be hap-

pier than she is now.


nonce ahamster nina eons ascent nt eA Oe



THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND I.UCRE. 727

You are placed in a position of peculiar temptation.

You have ambitions to be something more than pretty,

accomplished, and loved—at least, some of you have.

You want a career. As a woman, you see that yo

cannot have one, save through a matrimonial connexion

You wish to do something—to be something—to be
mistress of an establishment, or to be associated with one
who has the public eye, or the public consideration. It
is thus that wealth and position come to you with very
great temptations. A man of wealth or a man of power
offers you his hand, and, unless he is absolutely repul-
sive, he will generally get it. You will try to love him,
or learn to love him, or think you love him; or perhaps
you will take a mercenary or a worldly view of the
whole thing, and marry him for what of wealth and

position he can bring you. Now all this marrying for

money, or for position, or for any other consideration,

when genuine love is absent, is essential prostitution. I
know of no difference between selling one’s self for a
lifetime, and that sale of the soul and body which is
made in the house of her whose steps take hold on hel’
If you find yourself willing to give up yourself to a mz

in a life-long connéxion forthe house he gives you, for
the silks and furs with which he clothes you, for the
society into which he introduces you, for the position

with which he endows you, then, whether you know it

4


s
é
caret RE SSP STN EG GOP ODE IED ID IR PELE ALI TEL OAP ELPA AE ROLE LED LD LL IAAI DE LLL LDAP ICL A DIOLS,

a too teen rai tt toe
RL IN IEEE ES SII LOS PIES CEI A OIE 8 IS ID CS EPO RO A I SO 8 EN I AT IR LLL OIC LO I A A STR SF
i

128 w4TiTCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

or not, you become the sister of the drab whom you
so inconsistently spurn from your side. In fact, the
motives that have made her what she is may be white
by the side of yours. Marrying for love may seem to be
a very silly thing to a woman of the world; but marry-
ing without love, for a consideration, is wicked. “Love
in a cottage” is laughed at by very “judicious people,”
but it is a very sweet thing by the side of indifference
in a palace. I know of nothing more disgusting in all
the world than that mercenary tie which, under the
name of marriage, binds a woman to the bosom of one
who bought her with his money.

I know what the world says about this matter, and I
very heartily despise the world for it. When I ask the
world if Jane has “made out well” by her union, and
am told that she has done finely, and married a man
worth a hundred thousand dollars, I am tempted to be
profane. When I ask the world how Kate has settied,
and am informed, as the essential portion of the rep!y,
that her husband is “an excellent provider,” I ar
tempted to spit in its face. The conventional idea of 4
happy and proper matrimonial connexion is so mean
and so arbitrary, that it is no wonder that unsophisti-
cated girls sacrifice themselves. I pity them from the
bottom of my heart. They cannot have even the repu

tation of marrying well unless they allow base motives



step ate -ta cmeamemecames!

RTE ERIE TEENS SORES TE BESTT TS.


POS SLE NE PR RE AMORA nT ERT A NES

SDE SA cat mt

THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND LUCRE. Ts

to enter into their calculations. They learn early to aim

at wealth or position as primary and supremely desira-

ble things.

atones for low morals, uncongenial tastes, and luke-
warm hearts.

Now, if you must make calculations, let me help you.
Make genuine affection the first thing. This is abso-
lutely indispensable. It takes precedence of everything
else. You are not at liberty to consider anything before
this. A union based upon anything else, is, as I have
already told you, essential prostitution. It is against
nature—against God’s most wise and benevolent inten-
tions. You can make no union with a man, not based
on this, that will give you happiness. Friendship alone
will not do. Esteem alone will not do. The idea of
giving yourself to a man simply because you esteem
him, and respect him, is disgusting. The union of the
current of your life with that of a man is the grea:
event of your history, and if this be not through those
natural affinities, sympathies, and partialities—that pas-
sion of your soul which heaven intended shoula be
called into exercise by manhood—then is it only a con
ventional union, and no union in fact. Love, then, I

say, is the essential thing, and yet love, as I have said

before, is only one thing. There may be in the man

who excites the holiest and strongest passion of your
6*

a


emt

ten 0A a A EOE ATONE SSO tN hee RO RN Salhi
,’

SOc Re mae mien eae

sanestintemasenteentniane:taedneiamaneenneeeaientnenestiiednaa ah ae



1380 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

nature many things which, if you value peace—if yuu
value your own purity, even—should lead you to pluck
that passion from your breast, and turn your back upon
ats object, that God’s light may rest upon your brow
even if sorrow make darkness in your heart.

It is hard to examine character, and profit by th.
study, after the heart has become the seat of an absorb-
ing passion; but it is indispensably necessary to do it
sometimes. It is far better that the passion be excited
by the influence of character, disposition, and bearing,
but when study becomes necessary, it should be entered
upon conscientiously; for the second requisite for a

happy union is sound character. A woman possessing

the best elements of womanhood cannot be happy with

a man who has not a sound character. He may have
a good disposition, he may be intelligent, he may have
wealth and honor, but if his character be weak or faulty,
she has no reliance; and she must ultimately lose her
respect for him. When respect is gone, she may love,
she may pity, she may forgive, but she cannot be happy
Disposition comes in for consideration in the third place,
and worldly circumstances in the fourth, or perhaps still
lower in the scale. I might speak of another thing,
requisite to happiness in the highest degree, but I will
not, now and here. |

In the consideration of worldly circumstances, be

aavacecilpicesaclinnl

eet


THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND LUCRE. ‘184 &

wise. Remember that if your lover be intelligent, |

healthy, the master of a business or a profession, he



stands many more chances to die in the possession of
wealth or competence than he would if rich now, and
without a settled business and settled purposes. I hav

watched the results of many matches, and I have seen

pepenctate
et

ten which started with a fortune to be acquired, turn out

well in a worldly point of view, where I have seen one

result happily, starting with the fortune made. If a

oe re es ah. cae ie

young man is honorable, intelligent, industrious, and

ise siesta ee ee

manly in every respect, and you love him, marry him.
There is no power under heaven that has a moral right
to stand between you and your happiness. Many a
poor girl who married for money now pines in poverty,
and covets the position of girls whose wiser choice she
once contemned,

I speak in this way for two reasons. The first is, that
it is not only your right but your duty to consider
whether a life of certain poverty will be compensated by
a life of association with the man you love. The
second is, that when you take this matter into conside-
ration you should make your judgment upon a sound
basis. Wealth in hand, without business habits, busi-

ness tastes, and business interests, is the most unreliable

|
|
|
|
|
|
|

thing in the world. It may even spoil a good lover,

and in time transform him into a loafer or a sot. On



a ai a tp
132 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

the contrary, good business habits, goal character,
enterprise, ambition—all these combined—are almost
sure to secure competence and success. If you would
rely on anything, rely on these, for they are the only
reliable things. Misfortune may deal harshly with these,
but that is the business of Providence.

I fancy one reply that may be made to all this wise
talk. Women practically have comparatively little
choice in the matter. ‘They grow up from the cradle
with the idea that it is a horrible thing to live and die
an old maid. That, in the minds of half the girls, is the
most terrible thing in all the world. They can abide
anything better than that. So they feel a kind of obli-

gation to jump at the first offer, they are so much

_ afraid they shall never have another. Let them remem-

ber that a mismated match is much worse than an

unmated life. I believe that marriage is the true condi-_

tion, and that no man or woman can fully enjoy life

unmarried; but I know they will be more unhappy if

they are badly matched than if not matched at all, But

women have more choice than they think, and would
have still more than they do, if their intercourse with
young men were placed upon the basis indicated in my
last letter.

Most young women study the character of men but lit:

tle, because they have but little opportunity. They see






en ee ee ee



THE CLAIMS OF LOVE AND LUCRE. 133

sumparatively few, and, through the character of their
intercourse, know them very incompletely. It is a sin
and a shame that young women enjoy such inferior
opportunities of learning the character of young men,—
of weighing, comparing, and judging them. It is a

shame that they have no more opportunities for a choice.

My own wife very fortunately got an excellent hus-

band, but it is something for which she is to be grateful
to an overruling Providence, for her own knowledge had
very little to do with it. I could have cheated her
beyond all account. I tell you, men want studvirg for
some years, before you find them out, and it becomes
you to run fewer risks than the most of your sex run in
this business. It is a good deal of a step—this getting
married, and I am very anxious that you shall know a
great many men, that you shall get the one you love,
that he shall be worthy of you, and that you shal be
happy all the days of your life.

|
i
3
'
}
i
i
}
4
'
j
i
;
i
}
i
;

ONG EIN NE wg At a nae Ne

necrespees exnen cmeqean wearin iti arene atest ett te sean tales taaetitee

eee new




LETTER VI.

fHE PRUDEN1 .ND PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE.

Of all the griefs that harass the distressed,
Sure the most bitter is a scornful jest.
SAMUEL JOHNSON,

»

And lovelier things have mercy shown
To every failing but their own,
And every woe a tear can claim
Except an erring sister’s shame.
brnens.

HAVE met with a good many young women, first
I and last, whose intellects were of that keen, quick
variety which delights in uttering sharp things—often
very hard things. They do it, at first, playfully; they
produce a laugh which flatters them; and they soon
get to doing it wantonly. They acquire an appetite

for praise, and they become willing to procure it at -




THE PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE. 135

a

whatever expense te others. Genuine wit in a man is
almost always genial; wit in a woman, however genial
it may be at first, almost always gets into personalities,
sooner or later, which makes it very dangerous and very
hateful. Man is held in restraint, whatever his tenden
cies may be, by the consideration that, as a man, he will
be held responsible for iis words; women presume

upon the fact that they are women, in taking license to

_ say what they choose of each other, and of men in par-

ticular. There is not always—perhaps there is not
generally—malice in these sharp and hard speeches, but
they poison, nevertheless. They poison her who utters

them, and they poison those who suffer from them.

The utterer becomes the student, for a purpose, of the ©

weak points of her friends, and they learn to hate her.
I have known not a few women whose personal witti-
cisms were enjoyed by the gossip-loving crowd around
her, every man of whom would as soon think of marry-

ing a tigress as the one he was flattering by. the applause

of his laugh.

Therefore I say that to be a witty woman is a very |

dangerous thing. To be a witty woman is to be the

subject of very great temptations, for personality forms

the very zest of gossip—an employment of which most

women, I think, know something by experiment. Men

are afraid of witty women, especially those who delight


cosmetr ars se

weetis many cet

ee

<

®

1386 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

in making cutting speeches. They say, very rationally,
that if a woman will secure praise at the expense of one
friend, she will also at the expense of others, and that
no one can be safe. There is nothing in my eyes more
admirable in a woman than an honest wish to hear no
one spoken against—than that consideration for the
feelings of others which leads her to treat all faults with
tenderness, and all weaknesses and natural unpleasant
peculiarities with indulgence. One of the most attrac-
tive sights in the world, to any young man of common
sensibility, is that of a young woman who not only will
neither say nor hear ill of any one, but who takes spe-
cial pains to notice those whom the crowd neglect.
Such a woman is the admired of all whose admiration is
worth securing. And now, young woman, if you are
one of the sharp ones, and are tenipted to. say sharp
things, remember that you are in very great danger of
injuring yourself, not only in your own soul, but in the
eyes of all those whom you imagine you are pleasing.

I think, as a general thing, that women are harder iv
their judgments of their own sex than men are of theirs
or even of them. This arises partly from jealousy—a
wish to stand among the uppermost in the popular
esteem. ‘The praise of women, poured into the ears of

other women, is not usually gratefully received. The

disposition of women to judge harshly of each other ia

Ao ENR EE ERD rt

FRSA i RARER SE Ry IRE NT TESS ENS CET TS AE AED TENE EI ct


ered mec a

THE PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE. 137

seen particularly in those instances in which a woman
has taken a falsé step. Here the fact is patent;—a
woman forgets, or forgives, much less promptly than a
man. However deep the repentance, however decided
the reformation, a woman never forgets that her sister
has sinned, notwithstanding the fact that weakness and
misfortune and a hundred mitigating if not exculpating
circumstances plead in her behalf. It is the same with
less important lapses of behavior, in a corresponding
degree. I do not know but this is one of the safe-
guards which God intended should be around a woman’s
path, but it seems to me a very unwomanly and a very
unchristian thing. It seems to me, too, to be a very
unnatural thing. I judge that, much more than a man,
a woman should be interested in securing justice for her
own sex; and that if a sinning or a silly woman should
find a charitable defender anywhere, it should be among
those who, like her, are exposed to the temptations, and
particularly to the uncharitable misconstructions, of a
captious world.

What I would insist upon, is, that you not only do not
wound the feelings of your own sex by sharp criticisms,
but that you be heartily enlisted in maintaining thei
honor. Do not think that you do this while putting
down this one and that, in order to make your own im-

maculateness the more conspicuous, Believe what is

~

et a eee ea rt oS re ur er er SR Ee rt nu ner



tage ae Se TSE SISSIES A AOA SLC sr Ci A re nt in
pepe e Sa a SS SE SN SEE

188 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

generally true, that those who sin are those who sin
rather through weakness than vicious tendency; that
villains who wear cravats and waistcoats—the very men
whom you are by no means particular enough to exclude
from your company—are those who most deserve you
reproaches.

And now that I am upon this subject of talk, it will
be well to say all I have to say upon it. It isa very com-
mon thing for young women to indulge in hyperbole.
A pretty dress is very apt to be “ perfectly splendid ;” a
disagreeable person is too often “perfectly hateful ;” a party
in which the company enjoyed themselves, somehow be-
comes tranzmuted into the “most delightful thing ever
seen.” A young man of respectable parts and manly

bearing is very often “such a magnificent fellow!” The

_ adjective “perfect,” that stands so much alone as never

to have the privilege of help from comparatives and

superlatives, is sadly over-worked, in company with seve-

ral others of the intense and extravagant order. The

result is that, by the use of such language as this, your —

opinion soon becomes valueless. .

A woman who deals only in superlatives demonstrate.
at once the fact that her judgment is subordinate to her
fselings, and that her opinions are entirely unreliable.
Ali language thus loses its power and significance. The

same words are brought into use to describe a ribbon in

t
saan neeeeneeresieeneestinetene diene aemeenee tne ee acne earn iene eee ee ~
@



ar eR SR TIO ETP DCE NE ICIS NEE a RAE NN a SE A i AS Ee Tg .
®
are inant stm at ncn Ngene A ie

te A tn ete

< “
$$$ nr arp nen cin tenner acanindht anima
.



THE PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE. 139

a milliner’s window, as are employed in the endeavor to
do justice to Thalberg’s execution of Beethoven’s most
heavenly symphony. The use of hyperbole is so com-
mon among women that a woman’s criticism is gencrally
without value’ Let me insist upon this thing. Be more
economical in the use of your mother tongue. Apply
your terms of praise with precision; use epithets with
some degree of judgment and fitness. Do not waste
your best and highest words upon inferior objects, and
find that when you have met with something which

really is superlatively great and good, the terms by which

you would distinguish it have all been thrown away upon *

inferior things—that you are bankrupt in expression. If
a thing is simply good, say so; if pretty, say so; if very
pretty, say so; if fine, say so; if very fine, say so; if
grand, say so; if sublime, say so; if magnificent, say
so; if splendid, say so. These words all have different

meanings, and you may say them all of as many different

objects, and not use the word “perfect” once. That is

a very large word. You will probably be obliged to save
it for application to the Deity, or to his works, or to that
serene rest which remains for those who love him.
Young women are very apt to imbibe another bad habit,
namely, the use of slang. I was walking along the street

the other day when I met an elegantly dressed lady and

gentleman upon the sidewalk. My attention was the


dataset tater ena na ena OO OSS SOG OO OE SRE ASA

nS RE A RN i a

Se ee

140 #£TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

more attracted to them because they were evidentl:
strangers. At any rate they impressed me as being very
thoroughly refined and genteel people. As I came with.
in hearing of their voices—they were quietly chatting
along the way—I heard these words from the woman’s
lips: “ You may bet your life on that.” Iwas disgusted
I could almost have boxed her ears. I remember once
being in the company of a belle—one who had hada
winter’s reign in Washington. Some kind of game was
in progress, when, in a moment of surprise, she exclaimed,
“My Gracious!” Now you may regard this asa finical
notion, but I tell you that woman fell as flatly in my
esteem as if she had uttered an oath. A lady, fresh
from Paris, once informed me that it would do the resi-
dents of a certain quiet village a great deal of good to
be “stirred up with a long pole.” Let us see how you
like this kind of talk.

If you wish to be an “A No. 1” woman, you have
got to “toe the mark,” and be less “hifalutin.” “ You
may bet your head on that.” You may sing “slightu-
ally” “like a martingale,” you may “spin street yarn”

at the rate of ten knots an hour, you may “talk like a

900k,” you may dance as if you were on “a regular

break-down,” you may “turn up your nose at common
folks,” and play the piano “mighty fine,” but “ Z-tedl-

you,” you “can’t come to tea.” “You may be hand

rete ee ae Re ee ee Pn I ARE Ie RR RO AL NN A NE I OES

a As IE NORTE UE EE a en eae

eee PRP aN erga aratran

eerie neers seneniinennns st tratamiento ners rns senagnene te Acree
(ra tn ne nem ent i NA RR RN RS A a nN rem a a

pi iene site iiirtgtes recente ctl ties itpastliomeng tr a namhrajaenseorenemaataltipnrentit

rt neninmenanniiiennnerietiaheaPtienehar antenna teat Sand ie ter tenet

THE PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE. 141

some, but you can’t come in.” You might just as welt
“ cave in,” first as last, and “ absquatulate,” for you can’t
“put it through,” “any way you can fix it.” If you
imagine that you may “go it while you are young, for
when you are old you can’t,” you won’t “come it,” “by
a long chalk.” “Own up,” now, and “do the straight
thing,” and [’ll “set you down” as “one of the women
we read of.” If you can’t “come up to the scratch,”
why I must “let you slide” But if you have a
“sneakin’ notion” for being a “regular brick,” there is
no other way—not as you knows on ”—“ no sir-ree-
hoss?” If a young man should “kind o’ shine up to
you,” and you should “cotton to him,” and he should
hear you say “by the jumping Moses,” or “ by the liv-
ing jingo,” or “my goodness,” or “I vow,” or “go it,
Betsey, Pll hold your bonnet,” or “ mind your eye,” or
“hit ’im agin,” or “take me away,” or “dry up, now,”
or “draw your sled,” or “cut stick,” or “ give him par-
ticular fits,” he would pretty certainly “ evaporate.”

I would by no means insinuate that all young women
use slang as coarse as this, but I acknowledge to have
heard some of these phrases from friends whom I really
esteem. Is not the use of these phrases, and of phrases
like them whose number is legion, a very vulgar habit ?
It seems so to me, and I can hear them from the lips

of no pretty woman except w'th pain, and a certain



a aint Antena

pn Tne amgnnn nomena eran ba me,
nbc AEE SCR RETEST
‘

ear

142 ‘TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

degree of diminution of my respect for her. The habit
certainly detracts from womanly dignity. It can be
dropped without the slightest danger of going into that
extreme of precision in the use of language, which takes
out all the life and freedom from social intercourse.
Slang is bad enough in young men, and they indulge in
far too much of it; but in a young womazn, it is disgust-
ing, It is not the outgrowth of fine natures; it is not
accordant with refined taste. Any young woman who
indulges in it does it at a very sad expense to her mind,
and manners, and reputation. Therefore, beware of it;
discard it; guard the door of your lips, and leave it to
those coarse specimens cf your sex of whose natures and
habits of thought it is the natural and fitting expression,

One more bad habit of your tongues, and I conclude,

It is very common for young women to imagine that al.

tradesmen have a desire to cheat them. They will talk
to the provision dealers and peddlers who call at their
doors, and to tradesmen in their shops, with a harshness
that would not be forgiven in a man. Men become
hardened to this kind of thing, and expect it; and very
naturally choose those who suspect them, and accuse
them of cheati.g—who chaffer, and cheapen, and find
fault—for the victims of their sharpest operations. A
young woman who treats every man with whom she

trades as a gentleman, giving him her confidence, and

ne

a ee or

ne ne

Baa ek Lactiar a
ome ee at

a Re RS RN A SE ARSENE SN a CT:

eter er cert at

THE PROPER USE OF LANGUAGE. 143

throwing herself upon his honor and generosity, will
stand the best possible chance to be fairly dealt by. I
except Jews with China ware, and men of Celtic origin
with short pipes in their mouths. It is always safe to
close a bargain with such persons before entering into
any operations; but even this may be done without
loss of self-respeet. If you see that a man designs to
cheat you, it is not lady-like to put yourself upon a
footing with him, and undertake to extort a bargain
from him. Dismiss him without a word. You cannot
afford to waste any breath or self-respect upon him.
Because a man has a thing to sell—vecause he stands
behind a counter, or drives a cart, he is not necessarily
no gentleman. As a general thing, those men deserve
past as considerate politeness at your hands as if they
were in your parlor. You have no right to banter

them. You have no right to suspect them— to say

‘harsh things to them—to depreciate their wares, and to

place them practically in the position of sharpers and

knaves. It is not lady-like for you to put their polite-

ness to the test. They will not insult you, and in that
very fact vindicate their claim to your good opinion
and polite treatment. You may get the credit with

them of being sharp, hard customers, but they will dis-

like you, and if they speak of you, will not say anything »

to flatter you.



pee PALA IOLE NIEAAER AEE e Nn

ae!
A PES NIE AI A EI SA ORISSA SA es SOc AT POT AEE TNE PO ITE OCC ONE OTE CELLONE GOOEY EON NCCE TET ESE PES AOA eaceenUeTee athe atnenl it cht aaa tnst tsrgctatre gaan rege tee a IR ERC CENCE CO oc



\
HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY.

»

Bhe .syeth her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff. * *
She is not afraid of the snow for her household ; for all her household are
clothed with scarlet. * * * Strength and honor are her clothing, and she
shall rejoice in time to come. :

SOLOMON.

MONG the more homely but most essential accom-
A plishments of a young woman is that of house-
wifery. ‘There are many things at the present day to
interfere with its acquisition, but the fact that it is essen-
tial should Jead you to subordinate to it those which are
not. We hear a great deal about the laziness of the pre-
sent generation of girls. I think the accusation is unjust.
Girls who acquire a really good education now, accom-

plish much more genuine hard work than those in “the

RO eNO EN LSI CT TE ICT ES BEREAN ut serene

At Oa A Sl oe RAE NR EN a NE cL
"

ae eae arate

oer aot

me ternome weaned

a ne ae na NN ty see er Gin at nN NN RE I te

HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY. 145

good old times” who only learned to read and write,

and occupied the most of their time in the kitchen |

and dairy. Nothing that can be called education and

accomplishment can be achieved without great labor
and, in my opinion, the principal reason why good
housewifery is so much neglected, as an accomplishment,

is, that the time is so much occupied in study. Lazi-

ness is very apt to come with wealth, and there are

undoubtedly a great many more lazy girls now than fifty
years ago. ‘They are certainly a very undesirable arti-
cle to have about, and I pity the poor fellow who gets
one of them for a companion; but I say candidly that
[ do not think: there are any more naturally lazy girls
in the world than usual.

You expect, one of these days, to be the mistress of
a house. Your comfort and happiness, and the comfort

and happiness of your husband, will depend very much

- upon your ability to order that house well. If your

companion be in humble circumstances, you will very
likely be obliged to do the most of your work yourself.
In this case, a thorough knowledge of, and taste for
housewifery will be very necessary to you. If you
marry a man of competence or wealth, a knowledge of
good housewifery is quite as essential to you as if you
were required to do your own work. The expenses of

your house will be large or small, as you are a bad or a

| |
/
ane nta naran itncliae edintrete b denatitesiiere

14$ TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

good housekeeper. If you do not: know how to do the
work of the house; if you have no practical knowledge
of all the offices and economies of an establishment, you
will be dependent. So far from being the mistress of
your house, you will be only its guest. Your servants

will circumvent you, they will cheat you, they will

make you miserable. If they do not perform their

work properly, through wilfulness or ignorance, you

cannot tell them better. You will scold them for

things which you cannot tell them how to mend, you~

will be unjust, and you will not keep them. Many a
really good servant is constantly suffering from griev-
ances growing directly from the ignorance of her mis-
tress. Unless you are willing to take up for life with a
boarding-house—a place for people to vegetate in—you
must be a good housewife. It matters not whether you
are rich or poor. You need a practical knowledge ot
cookery, of the laundry, of the prices and qualities of
provisions, of chamber work—of everything that enters
into the details of home life.

Of course, if you have no mother who is capable of

teaching you these things, you are in a measure excusa-

ble for not learning them. I pity a family of girls whose
mother is a know-nothing and a do-nothing. I do not
blame girls for not wishing to put themselves under the

tuition of the cook and the maid-of-all-work. But even

r



b on mm a nape ee ect tne eee tn ee te ER TN RR SRE OE SES A FANON ET TR RR i ee oe




HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY. 147

when you find yourselves under disadvantages like these,
you cannot afford to become a woman without knowing

something of the homely utilities of life. Your own

_aptness of nund—your own good sense and ready inge

nuity—will give you a clue to the mysteries which prac-
tice will ultimately make plain. Your comfort, your
independence, your reputation, your husband's respect
fer you, depend so much upon your ability to keep
house well, that I cannot leave the subject without
insisting upon the importance of your learning to do it
while you have the chance. There are few higher

_ compliments that can be paid to a young woman than

that which accords to her the character of an excellent
housekeeper. There is no reputation which will more
thoroughly tend to confirm a young woman in the

esteem of young men, or more forcibly commend her to

_ their esteem than that of being acquainted, practically,

with the details of the kitchen and the economies of
housekeeping.

This naturally introduces me to a discussion of the
benefits of physical industry, and the assumption of
regular household duties. There is no better relief to
study than the regular performance of special duties in

the house. To feel that one is really doing something |

every day, that the house is the tidier for one’s efforts,
and the comfort of the family enhanced, is the surest

Pe Rete eee rerae ren ce reece

wide teeta

shaded detinicteteah deride eatin teed

on asnaeteatrsuenstincnatipestieaemaniainaten . ee

ee
eieteieeiiennieenteaaa er EES Ean Ee . Be

petivonetaaeaiaacinia vial

a en ee

148 ‘TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

warrant of content and cheerfulness. There is some-
thing about this habit of daily work—this regular per-
formance of duty—which tends to regulate the passions,
to give calmness and vigor to the mind, to impart
healthy tone to the body, and to diminish the desire fo.
iife in the street and for resort to gossiping companions.
Were Las rich as Croesus, my girls should have some-
thing to do regularly, just as soon as they should be-
come old enough to do anything. They should, in the
first place, make their own bed, and take care of their
own room. ‘They should dress each other. They
should sweep a portion of the house. They should learn,
above all things, to help themselves, and thus to be inde-
pendent in all circumstances. A woman, helpless from
any other cause than sickness, is essentially a nuisance.
_There is nothing womanly and ladylike in helplessness.
My policy would be, as girls grow up, to assign to them —
special duties, first in one part of the house, then in an-
other, until they should become acquainted with all
housewifely offices; and I should have an object in this
beyond the simple acquisition of a knowledge of house
wifery. It should be for the acquisition of habits of
physical industry—of habits that conduce to the health
of body and mind—of habits that give them an insight
into the nature of labor, and inspire within them a

genuine sympathy with those whose lot it is to labor. |




HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY. 149

All young mind is uneasy if it be good for anything
There is not the genuine human stuff in a girl who is
habitually and by nature passive, placid, and inactive.

The body and the mind must both be in motion. It

his tendency to activity be left to run loose—undirected

into channels of usefulness—a spoiled child is the result.

- A girl growing up to womanhood, is, when unemployed,

habitually uneasy. The mind aches and chafes because

it wants action, for a motive. Now a mind in this con-

dition is not benefited by the command to stay at home,
or the withdrawal from companions. It must be set to
work, ‘This vital energy that is struggling to find reliet
in demonstration should be so directed that habits may
be formed,—habits of industry that obviate the wish for
change and unnecessary play, and form a regular drain

upon it. Otherwise, the mind becomes dissipated, the

will irresolute, and confinement irksome. Girls will

never be happy, except in the company of their play-

mates, unless home becomes to them a scene of regular .

duty and personal usefulness.

There is another obvious advantage to be derived
from the habit of engaging daily upon special household
duties. The imagination of girls is apt to become ac-
vive to an unhealthy degree, when no corrective is em-
ployed. False views of life are engendered, and labor

is regarded as menial. Ease comes to be looked upon

AcOH RT DESI
eee eee hatin

eR Sea RS EES



pe Soars Sea tt tee tne

150 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

as a supremely desirable thing, so that when the real,

inevitable cares of life come, there is no preparation for.

them, and weak complainings or ill-natured discontent
are the result,
And here I am naturally introduced to another sub
sect. Young women, the glory of your life is to do
something and to be something. You very possibly

may have formed the idea that ease and personal enjoy-

ment are the ends of your life. This is a terrible mis-_

take. Development in the broadest sense and in the
highest direction is the end of. your life. You may
possibly find ease with it, and a great deal of precious
personal enjoyment, or your life may be one long ex-
perience of self-denial. If you wish to be something
more than the pet and plaything of a man; if you
would rise above the position of a pretty toy, or the
ornamental fixture of an establishment, you have got a
work to do. You have gota position to maintain ‘in
society ; you have got the poor and the sick to visit;
you may possibly have a family to rear and train ; you
have got to take a load of care upon your shoulders and
bear it through life. You have got a character to sus-
tain; and I hope that you will have the heart of a hus-
band to cheer and strengthen. Ease is not for you,

Selfish enjoyment is not for you. The world is to be

made better by you. You have got to suffer and to

seesmeree en
Ra emote ce mmrseie Rett et sam aR SRR MR EN ETE! ey

:

4 *

a
1 a Sagem RR RETR PS SENT ASSERTED NERS Inne men gan nn mm ma pat man


tse tac cone tore AIR N CT OS Stren ten wanmawartet

aa ans ATC RR HE Oe Uae aI gS dye ne TE

ryoermests

sar apasare Smee

OG EEO LYEL SEINE TED RIT

HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY. 15]

work; and if there be a spark of the true fire in you,
your hearts will respond to these words.

The time will come when you shall see that all your
toil, and care, and pain, and sorrow, and practical sympa-

thy for others has built you up into a strength of woman

hood which will despise ease as an end of life, and pity

jhose who are content with it. Get this idea that your

_ zreat business is simply to live at ease out of your head

at once. There is nothing noble and ennobling in it.

Your mental and physical powers can only give you
worthy happiness in the using. They were made for
use; and a lazy woman is inevitably miserable. I do
not put this matter of enjoyment before you as the
motive for action. I simply state the fact that it is a
result of action——an incident of a life worthily spent.
When you have properly comprehended and received
this idea, the recreations of life and the pleasures of
social intercourse will take their appropriate positions
with relation to the business of lite—its staple dutics.

Recreation will become re-creation—simply the renewat

of your powers, that they may all the better perform:

the work which you have undertaken, or which circum-

stances have devolved upon you. Social pleasure wili

rise into a sympathetic communion with natures and

lives earnest like your own, upon the subjects nearest

your hearts, and it will give you strength and guidance.

Serco erence ne RR nn ER REI LES SREY ERE



1
1
i
;
\
J
ene ei ee le) vient SOY Se ER EER EE RAN ce NR HE RRA cn lt nH Hen Raith ei at nea et neta Ie

152 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

The pleasures of life will become the wells,scattered along
the way, where you will lay down your burdens for the

moment, wipe your brows, and drink, that you may go

into the work before you refreshed in body and mind. |

In these quiet hours you will feel a healthy thrill of

happiness which those who seek pleasure for its own

sake never know.

There are few objects in this world more repulsive te”

me than a selfish woman—a woman who selfishly con
sults her own enjoyments, her own ease, her own plea-
sure. If you have the slightest desire to be loved;
if you would have your presence a welcome one in
palace and cottage alike; if you would be admired, re-
spected, revered ; if you would have all sweet human
sympathies clustering around you while you live, and
the tears of a multitude of friends shed upon you
grave when you die, you must be a working woman—
living and working for others, denying yourself for
others, and building up for yourself a character, strong
symmetrical, beautiful. If I were you, I would rather
be that insensate and quietly gliding shadow which the
wounded soldier kissed as the noble Florence’ Nightin
gale passed his weary pillow, than the pampered crea-
ture of luxury, who has no thought above her personal
ease and personal adornment.

Do not seek out for yourselves any prominent field

a a a ee

HOUSEWIFERY AND INDUSTRY. 153

of service where you will attract the attention of the
world. Remain where God places you. Some of the
noblest heroisms of the world have been achieved in
humble life. The poor ye have always with ycu. The
miserable are always around you. You can lighten
your father’s burdens. You can restrain your brothers
from vicious society. You can relieve your failing and

fading mother of much care. You can gather the rag-

ged and ignorant children at your knee, and teach them

something of a better life than they have seen. You
ean become angels of light and goodness to many
stricken hearts. You can read to the aged. You can
do many things which will be changed to blessings upon
your own soul. Florence Nightingale did her work in
her place ; do your work in yours, and your Father who
seeth in secret shall reward you openly.

I would be the last one to cast a shadow on your
brows, but I would undeceive you at the first, so that
you may begin life with right ideas. Life is real—it is
a real and earnest thing.) It has homely details, painful
passages, and a crown of care for every brow. Iseck to
inspire you with a wish and a will to meet it with a
womanly spirit. I seek to point you to its nobler mean-
ings and its higher results. The tinsel with which your
imagination has invested it will all fall off of itsclf, so

coon as you shall fairly enter upon its experiences.
ek
i



sic eietenicltiodeiteai ciiretatab like Me clarence aah peak i ag ke

em ernest Asm th EOIN Nig 2 SE

i
g
'
j
“4
i
}
i
154 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

Then if these ideas have no place in you, you will be
obliged to acquire them slowly and painfully, or you
will sink into a poor, selfish, discontented creature—and
be, so far as others are concerned, either a nonentity

or a disagreeable hanger-on and looker-on. So I say

ee

begin to take up life’s duties now.) Learn something

Segre ROAR CERN BEE ae

of what life is, before you take upon yourself its graver

sume,

responsibilities.

2) TA eee care etre ee en aT

Hin LS ROARS | Roo eet Usa:

LE a ER a EE RARE LVS FR SN

St SE RE TEE ST ER i RTA 8 ER a te POROUS 2 Aa eat neem
}

|
i
4
i
j
i




7 ores sot eT: ee
SSS (St en rate ee 3 ete TT Ste De eS Rs SS SETS SS

om Steet neces i as are
arn: Soe Mee 3a SS PES PORES PE RES IS TRE Ser BSS.

LETTER VIII.

THE BEAUTY AND BLESSXNDNESS OF FEMALE PIETY.

The cross, if rightly borne, shall be
No burden, but support to thee.
3 , WHITTIER.

— women, this is my last letter addressed spe-
| cially to you; and as I take your hand, and give
you my adieu, I wish to say a few words which shall be
worth a great deal to you. It is my opinion that to a
certain extent, in certain directions, God meant that you
should be dependent upon men, and that in this depend-
ence should exist some of your profoundest and sweetest
attractions and your noblest characteristics. Your
bodies are smaller than those of men. You were not
made to wrestle with the rough forces of nature. You

were not made for war, nor commerce, net agriculture.

Ne a a eR a Se TSS SST nenmgners—s a
*

SAIS eS

oo a ree 2S

ee nendiodimnimesiens




Derher ttt teen

156 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

In all these departments, the iron wills and the ‘rot
muscles of man are alone at home. The bread yor eat,
and the fabrics you wear, are to be gathered from the
earth by men. You are to be protected by men.
They build your houses ; they guard your persons. It
is entirely natural for you to rely upon them for much
that you have. You give, or may give, great rewards
for all this. It is not a menial relation, nor one which
detracts from your dignity in the least. The circle of
human duties is only complete by the union of those of
man and woman. Man has his sphere—woman, hers,
We cannot talk of superiority among spheres and duties
that are alike essential. Suffice it that, in the degree
in which you are dependent upon man for support and
protection, does he owe support and protection to you.
He is bound to do for you what you, through the pecu-
liarities of your constitution, are unable to do for your:
self, You are never to quarrel with this arrangement,
You will only make yourself unhappy by it, because, by
quarrelling with God’s plans, you essentially unsex you-
self, and become a discord. Therefore, recognise yow
dependence gladly and gracefully. Be at home in it
for in it lies your power for influence and for good.
This advances us a step towards the point to which
I wish to lead you. Now, if you will go with me into
a circle of praying Christians, or if you will take up

cae Ae SERIE ESET

ee “

er SSE SENOS Ps ee
et EO a a Di, a a

a.



THE BLESSEDNESS OF FEMALE PIETY. 157 |

with me a list of the members of any church, I wili
show you a fact which I wish to connect with the facts
state. in the preceding paragraph. You will find, I
attppose, that at least two-thirds of the members of the
prayer-meeting are women, and that the church regis-
ter will show a corresponding proportion of female
names. Whyisthis? Is it because women are weaker
than men, simply? Is it because women are subject to
smaller temptations than men? Is it because their
passions are less powerful than those of men? Not at
all—or not in any important degree. It is because a
feeling of dependence is native in the female heart. It
is because the pride of independence has little or no
place there. It is because the female mind has to
undergo comparatively a small revolution to become
religious. Rather, perhaps, I should say, that one pow-
erful barrier that stands before the path of every man
in his approach to the valley of humiliation does not
oppose the passage of the true woman. I suppose it is
very rare that those who are denominated “strong-
minded women” become religious. The pride of per-
sonai independence is built before them by their own
hands.

So sweet and so natural a thing is piety among
‘women that men have come to regard a woman with-

out it as strange, if not unhealthy. The coarsest and


{48 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

most godless men often select pious wives, because they
sce that piety softens, and deepens, and elevates every
natural grace of person, and every accomplishment of
mind. Now my opinion is that Heaven, seeing how
important it is for you to be its own children, in profes
sion and in spirit, has given special favors to your sex,
through this simple fact or principle of dependence. It
is your work to soften and refine men. Men living
without you, by themselves, become savage and sinful.
The purer you are, the more are they restrained,
and the more are they elevated. It is your work to
form the young mind,—to give it direction and
instruction—to develop its love for the good and the
true. It is your work to make home happy—to nou-
rish all the virtues, and instil all the sentiments which
build men up into good citizens. The foundation of our
national character is laid by the mothers of the nation.
I say that Heaven, seeing the importance to the world
of piety in you, has so modified your relations to man
that it shall be comparatively easy for you to descend
into that valley, over which all must walk, before their
feet can stand upon the heights of Christian experience,
between which and Heaven’s door the ascent is easy.
For my own part, I shrink with horror from a godless

woman. There seems to be no light in her—no glory

proceeding from her. There is something monstrons



SSE SRE SESE SSDS SARTRE TI OES








THE BLESSEDNESS OF FEMALE PIETY. 159

abeut her. I can see why men do not become religious.
It isa hard thing—it is, at least, if experience and
observation are to be relied on—for a man whose will
has been made stern by encounters in the great battle
of life, who is conscious of power and accustomed t¢
have the minds around him bend to his, who possesses
the pride of manhood and the self-esteem that springs
naturally in the mind of one in his position, to become
“as a little child.” Woman has only to recognise her
dependences upon One higher than man, and, in doing
this, is obliged to do but little violence to her habits of
thought, and no violence at all to such sentiments of
independence as stand most in the way of man. SoI
say that a godless woman is a monstrous woman. She
is an unreasonable woman. She is an offensive woman.
Even an utterly godless man, unless he be debauched

and debased to the position of an animal, deems such a

woman without excuse. He looks on her with suspicion.

He would not have such an one to take the care of his
children. He would not trust her.

I do not propose to offer you any incentives to piety
drawn from a future condition of rewards and punish-
ments. I leave it to the pulpits whose ministrations you
attend to talk of this matter in their own way. My

whole argument shall relate to the propricties and

necessities of the present life. It is proper that you

/


160 ‘TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

serve the Being who made you, and that you love the
One who redeemed you. It is proper that to all yout
graces you add that of unselfishness. It is proper that

all the elements of your character be harmonized and

sublimated by the tenderest devotion to the “One —

altogether lovely.” It is proper that your heart be
purified, so that all the influence which goes out of it,
through the varied relationships of life, be good, and
only good. I mean by the word “proper” all that
the word proper can mean. It is eternally and immuta-
bly fit. I mean that it is émproper and unfit that you
should fail of piety. I mean that by carrying with you

a rebellious and cold and careless heart, you introduce

among the sweet harmonies of the world, a harsh dis-

cord, which it is not fit and proper that you should
introduce. You are a wandering star. You are a
voiceless bird. You are a motionless brook. The
strings of your soul are not in tune with those chords
which the Infinite hand sweeps as he evolves the music
of the universe. Your being does not respond to the
touch of Providence; and if Beauty, and Truth»and
Goodness, and Love, come down to you, like angels out
of heaven, and sing you their sweetest songs, you do not
see their wings, nor recognise their home and parentage.
I say that it is not proper—it is inexpressibly unfit that

you—a woman—witk delicate sensibilities, and pure

REAR a I et Nt ct tre tc ns einai




Lestat anaemia etna tie ete Hone ST SiO ELI AT tls ME LOL LEIOE ADE ITP LLCAAE D ait PEI PT ABLE
’

Nee ener tetris name cece meen nate ne ttn es in eat er nr nt emt

THE BLESSEDNESS OF FEMALE PIETY. 161

instincts and a dependent nature, should ignore the
relations which exist between your soul and God, and
put aveil of blackness between the light which he
has lighted within you, and that Infinite fountain of
ight still open and ready to fill all your being with its
divine radiance.

Then, as to your necessities : First, remember what
you are. You are really the consolers of the world.
You attend the world in sickness; you give all its
medicines ; your society soothes the world after its toil,
and rewards it for its perplexities ; you receive the in-
fant when it enters upon. existence; you drape the cold
form of the aged when life is past ; you settle the little
difficulties, and assuage the sorrows of childhood; you
minister to the poor and the distressed. Do you sup-
pose that out of the resources of your poor heart, you
can supply all the draughts that will be made upon your
sympathies and their varied ministry? Do you believe
that you carry within your own bosom light for the
dying, hope for the despairing, consolation for the bereft,
patience for the sick? Nay, do you believe that you
have light and hope and consolation and patience sufli-
cient, for your own soul’s wants, while performing the
ministries to which, in Heaven’s economy, you are
appointed ? Piety is, then, an absolute necessity to you.

You can no more perform these offices to which you are

sa een mene tan ae enter carefree mtr teaser


162 MTITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

called, properly and efficiently, without piety, than a bird
can fly without wings. You would be trying to make
bricks without straw. Think of a woman by the side
of a dying sister, or a sick child, or a sorrowing friend,
or a broken-hearted and broken-spirited man, without a
word of heaven in her mouth—without so much as the
ability to whisper “Our Father,” or even to point her
finger hopefully towards the stars!

Again, your life and duties are peculiar, as your sphere
is distinct. If you lead a worthy, womanly life, it will
be a home life- -fece from great excitements. The cur-
rent of your t.ougkts will flow in retired channels, You
will hear, outside, the braying of trumpets, and the roll
of drums, and the din of wheels, and the rush and roar
of the world’s great business. Oftentimes, when you
are busy with your modest affairs, and going through
the wearying routine of your life, you will be tempted
to repine at their quietness and insipidness. Many a
woman does the work of her life without being seen or

noticed by the world. The world sees a family reared

_to virtue—one child after another growing into Chris-

tian manhood and womanhood, and at last it sees them

all gathered around a grave where the mother that bore

them rests from her labors. But the world has never »

seen that quict woman laboring for her children, making

their clothes, providing their food, teaching them their

*
5 ms _



| aera cneN CNRS SSS SSE SARE ee Teme tS te


8

THE BLESSEDNESS OF FEMALE PIETY. 163

prayers, and making their homes comfortable and
happy.

The world knows nothing, or does not think, of the
fears, the pains, and the anxieties inseparable from the
mother’s office. She bears them alone, and discharges
her peculiar responsibilities without assistance. No in-
dividual in the world can do a mother’s work for her
A family of young immortals is committed to her hands.
The rearing and training of these form a business to
which she has served no apprenticeship. If divine
guidance and support be necessary to any one in the
word, they are necessary to the wife and mother. It
is a sad, sad thought to any son or daughter that his or
her mother was not a woman of piety. The boy thai
feels that his name is mentioned in a good mother’s
prayers, is comparatively safe from vice, and the ruin to
which it leads, The sweetest thought that N. P. Willis
ever penned grew out of a reference to his pious mother’s
prayers for him. Tossed by the waves, in a vessel which
was bearing him homeward, he wrote:

" “Sleep safe, O wave-worn mariner,

Nor fear to-night nor storm nor sea!

The ear of Heaven bends low to her;
Le comes to shore who sails with me !”

Will not piety be necessary to you? Will not your

piety be necessary to your children ?




4

164 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG WOMEN.

And now, young women, a few closing words. I have
no doubt many of you have read these letters with care,
and with an earnest wish to profit by them. They have |
been written in all honesty and sincerity, and I leave
them with you. The opinions I have given you have
not been hastily formed, nor has the counsel I have
urged upon you arisen from anything but a conscien-
tious conviction of your wants, and a desire to help you
to a womanhood, the noblest to be achieved in this
world. Your happiness is very much in your own hands;
so are your usefulness and your good name. I do not
ask you to be anything but a glad, sunny woman. I
would have no counsels of mine recommended by long
faces and formal behavior. I would have you so at
peace with Heaven, with the world and with yourself,
that tears shall flow only at the call of sympathy. I

would have you immaculate as light, devoted to all



good deeds, industrious, intelligent patient, heroic. And
crowning every grace of person and mind, every ac-
complishment, every noble sentiment, every womanly
‘aculty, every delicate instinct, every true impulse, I
would see religion upon your brow—the coronet by
token of which God makes you a princess in his family,
and an heir to the brightest glories, the sweetest plea-
sures, the noblest privileges, and the highest honors of

his kingdom,
aE A ih ENE Riss toh i ah ad fe ie lic fpcingienebcldaaeninecar ee eas ania labs biped og) sheeted


Lex
sR a

a

Â¥

vi






LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED
PEOPLE.

LETTER I.
;
THE FIRST ESSENTIAL DUTIES OF THE CONNUBIAL RELATION

0 let us walk the world, so that our love
Burn like a blessed beacon, beautiful,
Upon the walls of life’s surrounding dark! —
GERALD Massry.

OU are married, and it is for better or for worse. You
Â¥ are bound to one another as companions for life,
Did it ever occur to you that this is a stupendous, a
momentous fact? Did you ever think that since you

ame into the world, a precious lump of helpless life,
there is no fact of your history which will so much
affect your destiny as this? Ido not propose to inquire
into the ‘motives which led you to this union, You
may have come together like two streams, flowing

naturally towards one point, and then mingling their
anor neeeteee enn meee me

eopesetneeennniracarcancinninmentcerepninapesimesratar iat pe tienen anaes tLett neem aati nce tp cniritidetareeignetdimacuinivarttguasmistiiaie nnciie

poe ge tg OE NE a ORT Ee OL OI ne Oia I ERE NRE a Oe ERS nt LET NLT EAST ANNE CREP ot

- 168 TITCOMR’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

waters with scarcely a ripple, to pass on together to the

great ocean. You may have come together under the

wild stress of passion, or the feeble attractions of fancy,

or the sordid compulsions of interest, or by force of a

love so pure that an angel would think himself in

heaven while in its presence. But the time for con-
sidering the motives which have united you is past.
You are married, for better or for worse. The word is
spoken. The bond is sealed; and the only question now
is—“ how shall this union be made to contribute the
most to your happiness and your best development ?”
it is to answer this question as well as I can, that I write
this series of letters.

You have but one life to live, and no amount of money,
or influence, or fame, can pay you for a life of unhap-
piness. You cannot afford to be unhappy. You cannot
afford to quarrel with one another. You cannot afford

to cherish a single thought, to harbor a single desire, to

gratify a single passion, nor indulge a single selfish feel- °

ing that will tend to make this union anything but a
source of happiness to you. So it becomes you, at
starting, to have a perfect understanding with one an-
other. It becomes you to resolve that you will be happy
together, at any rate; or that if you suffer, it shall be
from the same cause, and in perfect sympathy. You

are not to let any human being step between you, under

Ee er A eevee er aN BRS SH etN ET
‘

oo


we ee oe

es



~

er: NN NIE oe SRN IO ATS OAR eA RA AN NO NRE

;
¢

THE DUTIES OF THE CONNUBIAL RELATION. 169

any circumstances. Neither father nor mother, neither
brother nor sister, neither friend nor neighbor, has any
right to interfere with your relations,.so long, at least,
as you are agreed. You twain are to be one flesh—
identified in objects, desires, sympathies, fortunes, posi-
tions—everything. You are to know no closer friend.
Now I care not how pure and genuine may be the love
which has brought you together, if you have any charac-
ter at all, you will find that this perfect union cannot
be effected without compromises. Human character,
by a wise provision of Providence, is infinitely varied,
and there are not two individuals in existence so entirely
alike in their tastes, habits of thought, and natural apti-
tudes, that they can keep step with one another over all
the rough places in the path of life. So there must be
a bending to one another. I suppose the brides are few
who have not wept once over the hasty words of a hus-
band not six months married; and I suppose there are

few husbands who, in the early part of their married

life, have not felt that perhaps their choice was not a

wise one.

- Breaches of harmony will occur between imperfect
men and women; but all bad results may be avoided
by a resolution, well kept on both sides, to ask the

other’s pardon for every offence—for the hasty word.

the peevish complaint, the unshared pleasure—every- |
| a g | |

PRES SOE ea SSR ee ES a SS ee eS i SS
|

* ~
mieminneeshianialini teins FP REPEALED ENGI | Lt POEL ELL LY GEO TOC COOGEE LIE A OL EC OO AE CE LO ION LL LE NOI INE LEE nt tT RRR PRE Ey EE 8 a ra





rata

170 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

thing that awakens an unpleasant thought, or wounds a
sensibility. This reparation must be made at once

and if you have a frank and worthy nature, a quarrel is
impossible. My opinion is that ninety-nine one-hun
dredths of the unhappiness in the connubial relation, is
the absolute fault, and not primarily the misfortune, of
the parties. You can be happy together if you will;
but the agreement to be happy must be mutual. The
compromise cannot be all on one side. It is a mulish
pride in men, and a sensitive will in women, that make
the principal difficulty in all unhappy cases. I say to
every man and woman, if you have done anything
which has displeased your companion, beg her or his
pardon, whether you were intentionally guilty or not
It is the cheapest and quickest way to settle the busi

ness. One confession makes way for another, and the
matter is closed—closed, most probably, with the very
sweetest kiss of the season.

Be frank with one another. Many a husband and

wife go on from year to year with thoughts in their

hearts, that they hesitate to reveal to one another. If
you have anything in your mind concerning your com-
panion that troubles you, out with it. Do not brood
over it. Perhaps it can be explained on the spot, and

the matter for ever put to rest. Draw your souls cloger

and closer together, from year to year. Get all obstacles

a a te OST

.
Ser ct AE EL PA OR RS A

ow omer cage sey sore

nen ee See satin mpage th np beet AO




4
erect eum pep Ne EN ER SNS EI AA SAT ENED tS SS TIES
:

jon eatareee tities

ieee

eee ee tae NEGLECTING CRG NESE tg ADO I a A I a RG EERE



ah le ei tlhe A PN OR tt me te a A tet At At ec eC eA NS,

THE DUTIES OF THE CONNUBIAL RELATION. 171

out of the way. Just as soon as one arises, attend to it,
and get rid of it. At last, they will all disappear. You
will become wonted to one another’s habits and frames
of mind and peculiarities of disposition ; and love, res-
vect, and charity will take care of the rest.

I insist on this, because it is the very first essential
thing. I insist on it, because I believe that if there be
sufficient aflinity between two persons to bring them
together, and to lead them to unite their lives, it is their
fault if they fail to live happily, and still more and more
happily as the years advance. I will go so far as to say
that I believe there are few women with whom a kind,
sensible man may not live happily, if he be so dis-
posed; and I know that woman is more plastic in her
nature, and more susceptible to love than man. So,
when I hear of unhappy matches, I know that some-
body is to blame.

This intimate association of husband and wife—nay,
this identity—can never be preserved while either is
blabbing of the other. A man who tells his neighbors
that his wife is extravagrant, that she is wasteful, that
he never finds her home, that she will never go out
with him, or that she is or does anything which he desires

her not to be or do, does a shameful thing, and a cruel

thing, besides making a fool of himself. A woman whe

bruits her husband’s faults, who tells the neighbors how

Se SEE EER REE RTE STEIN

ee

ery ne ce er meer:
eee

SS ERR AE ein adda p-eptimtntnonue

172 TITCOML’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

much he seeks the society of other women, how much
he spends for cigars, how late he is out at night, how
lazy he is, how little he cares for what interests her,
how stingy he is with -his money, and all that sort of
thing, sins against herself, and consents, or voluntarily
enlists, to publish that which is essentially her own
shame. A husband and wife have no business to tell
one another’s faults to anybody but to one another.
They cannot do it without shame. Their grievances
are to be settled in private, between themselves; and
in all public places, and among friends, they are to
preserve towards one another that nice consideration
and entire respectfulness which their relation enjoins.
For they are one in the law; and for a man or woman
to publish the truth, that they are not one in fact, is to
acknowledge that they are living in the relation of an
unwilling lover and a compulsbry mistress.

A great deal of evil might be prevented between you
if you would allow your affection to give itself natural ex:
pression. I know of husbands so proud and stiff and surly
that they never have a kiss or a caress, or a fond word
for their wives whom they really love. I know such
husbands who have most lovable wives—wives to whom
a single tender demonstration, that shall tell to their
hearts how inexpressibly pleasant their faces and their

weiety are, and how fondly they are loved, would be

-

(

te OO Rt tt RN ELEN AS SO RIDE tN nC ACS nee

ror nn mpnticasbnaecacrtttasareecstnines atattinaplntaainsetoeenais
| f

ee eee

EE ARI EERE IRE A « non setmnapesseean settnglnncaainds

onsets.

THE DUTIES OF THE CONNUBIAL RELATION. 1738

better than untold gold—wives, to whom caresses are
sweeter than manna, and fond words more musical than
robin-songs in the rain. They go through life starving
for them—bearing buds of happiness upon their bosoms
that must be kissed into bloom, or wither and fall. Yet
the cast-iron husband goes about his business without
even a courteous “good morning,” eats his meals with
immense regularity, provides for his family exemplarily,
imagines that he is an excellent husband, and entertains
a profound contempt for silly people who are fond of
one another. :

Heaven be thanked that there are some in the world
to whose hearts the barnacles will not cling! Heaven
be thanked for the young old boys and the young old
girls—boys and girls for ever—who, until the evening

of life falls upon them, interchange the sweet caresses

“that call back the days of courtship and early marriage!

‘Thank Heaven that my wife can never grow old; that
so long as a lock adorns her temples, brown or grey, my
finger shall toy with it; that so long as I can sit there
shall be a place for her on my knee; and that so long
as | can whisper and she can hear, she shall know by
fond confession that her soul is next to mine—linked to
mine—mine! ~

I wish in this letter to impress upon you the idea

which ‘ew married people apparently thoroughly com-

ccmteneneaneta tt Nt eC tt eit te

th ORES en oO one sania

eens a tenor EEE TORENT NERS MORN IOP Mw wr

eierwercter east rst eee

cerca cen inte tc ren PA AIDA ATE

on ae eee


ar At Sa emer SIRE TY BN Rn A A
\

174 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE

prehend, that you—husband and wife—are one,—that
you have no separate interests, that you can have no
separate positions in society, that you should desire

none, and that it is within your ability, and is most im-

peratively your duty to be happy together. In ordei

to be what you should be to each other, and in order to
be happy yourselves—in your own hearts—you should
begin right. You should be willing at all times to bear
one another’s burdens; and in fact, I know of no better
rule for accomplishing the end I seek for you than by
your constantly studying and ministering to the happi-
ness of each other. Selfishness is the bane of all life,
and especially of married life; and if a husband and
wife devote themselves to one another’s happiness, re-
linquishing their‘own selfish gratification for that end.
the task is accomplished—the secret solved. The path
of such a pair is paved with gold. Their life is a song
of praise. All good angels are about them, bearing
consolations for every sorrow, antidotes for every bane,
rewards for every labor, and strength for every trial.
That is essential marriage; and, as Paul Dombey said
when Mrs. Pipchin told him there was nobody else like
her, “that is a very good thing.”

_ I suppose there is a modicum of romance in most
natures, and that if it gather about any event, it is that

of marriage. Most people marry ideals. There is

pater te tre tt

Re A RL RT RL ERNREN AE OnIN png a hte
THE DUTIES OF THE CONNUBIAL RELATION. 175

more or less of fictitious and fallacious glory resting
upon the head of every bride, which the inchoate hus-
band sees and believes in. _Both men and women ma-
nufacture perfections in their mates by a happy process
of their imaginations, and then marry them. ‘This, of
course, wears away. Dy the time the husband has seen
his wife eat heartily of pork ‘and beans, and, with her
hair frizzled, and her oldest dress on, full of the enter-
prise of overhauling things, he sees that she belongs to
the same race with himself. And she, when her hus-
band gets up cross in the morning, and undertakes
to shave himself with cold water and a dull razor,
while his suspenders dangle at his heels, begins to see
that man is a very prosaic animal. In other words,
there is such a thing as a honeymoon, of longer or
shorter duration; and while the moonshine lasts, the
radiance of the seventh heaven cannot compare with it.
It is avery delicious little delirium—a febrile mental
disease—which, like measles, never comes again.
When the honeymoon passes away, setting behind
dull mountains, or dipping silently into the stormy sea
of life, the trying hour of married life has come. Be
tween the parties, there are no more illusions. The
feverish desire of possession has gone—vanished into
gratification—and all excitement has receded. Then

begins, or should begin, seriously, the business of adap-

saan ea re A SE AG RE a LRT OE A RN a



. ii pa San A a ga Ste TS a AES ET



'

i

5 eee to eS ea ES Sk i i ee a ee
-




4
|
f
Ul
q
j
4
a
a
j

|
}
i
'
i

es Se
.

ot

eS eee

176 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

tation. If they find that they do not love one another
as they thought they did, they should conscientiously
and earnestly foster and strengthen every bond of attach-
ment which exists. They should double their assiduous
attentions to one another, and be jealous of everything
which tends in the slightest degree to separate them.
Life is too precious to be thrown away in secret regrets
or open differences.

I say to any married pair, from whom the romance
of life has fled, and who are discontented in the slight-
est degree with their condition and relations, begin this
work of reconciliation before you are a day older.
Renew the attentions of earlier days. Draw your
hearts closer together. Talk the thing all over. Acknow-
ledge your faults to one another, and determine that
henceforth you will be all in all to each other; and, my
word for it, you shall find in your relation the sweetest
joy earth has for you. There is no other way for you
to do. If you are unhappy at home, you must be
unhappy abroad. The man or woman who has settled
down upon the conviction that he or she is attached for
life to an uncongenial yoke-fellow, and that there is no
way of escape, has lost life. There is no effort too
costly to be made which can restore to its setting upon

their bosoms the missing pearl.

wo tr eee eee

graces seston 9 misao re

Sane ESS eral eate eS ae
SSS Se te er re at em ese ee — seas

a

dasptiammsaresn pine stance seinen icin apace



LETTER Ii.

SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE HUSBAND.

He that loveth his wife loveth himself. For no man ever yet hated his
own flesh; but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the church,
St. Pav.

les husband, this letter is for you. Have you

an idea that you have anything like a just com-
prehension of the nature of the being whom God has
given you for a companion? If you have, you labor
under a very serious mistake. You may live with her
until, amid grey hairs and grandchildren, you celebrate
your golden wedding, and then know but a tithe of her
strength and tenderness. I believe in such a thing as
sex of soul, A woman’s happiness flows to her from
sources and through channels, different from those which

give origin and conduct to the happiness of man, and,



poclennien aatiee ini ees enine ene,




ah teetrenerers eh

ee

A nS SOOO ERE DS ES

1.8 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

in a measure, will continue to do so for ever. Her
faculties bend their exercise towards different issues;
her social and spiritual natures demand a different ali-
ment. What will satisfy you will not satisfy her. That
which most interests you is not that in which her soul
finds its most grateful exercise. Jer ‘ove for you may
bring her intimately into sympathy with your pursuits,
through all their wide range, from a hotly driven politi-
cal contest to breaking up a piece of wild land, or even
to the cultivation of an unthrifty whisker; but it will
only be because they interest the man she loves above
all others. She is actuated by motives that do not
affect you at all, or not to the extent that they do her
If she be led into sin, you renounce and denounce her
as a thing unclean; yet, through all your debauchery,
your untruth to her, your beastly drunkenness, your
dishonor, your misfortune, she will cling to you. There
is in her heart a depth of tenderness of which ncither
you nor she herself has any conception. Only the cir-
sumstances and exigencies of life will reveal it; and
this is why a healthy female soul is always fresh and
new. Longfellow, in his “Spanish Student,” gives a
hint of this—and a pretty deep one—in the language

he puts into the mouth of Preciosa’s lover :—

“ What most I prize in woman
Is her affections, not her intellect.

wes

ae pec RE eA RED TENS mA TE






Beate e tex:

a SS SSS STE BS Ss Lee Se SS ee ee

wowecseecs sete cet

2 PIRES bate MOE = feos ~



SPECIAL DUTIES OF 'THE HUSBAND. 17

The intellect is finite; but the affections

_Are infinite, and cannot be exhausted.”
* O* * & * . # * -*

‘The world of the affections is thy world ;—
Not that of man’s ambition. In that stillness,
* Which most becomes a woman, calm and holy,
Thou sittest by the fireside of the heart,

Feeding ‘its flame.”

“The affections are infinite, and cannot be exhaust-
e1;” and it is through her affections, and through the
deepest of all affections, that happiness comes to the
bosom of your wife. The world may pile its honors
upon you until your brain goes wild with delirious
excitement; wealth may pour into your coffers through
long years of prosperity; you may enjoy the fairest

rewards of enterprise and excellence; but if all these

. things are won by depriving your wife of your society

—by driving her out of your thoughts, and by inter-
fering with the constant sympathetic communion
of your heart with hers, she cannot but feel that what
enriches you impoverishes her, and that your gain,
whatever it may be, is at her expense. She may enjoy
your reputation and your wealth, your successes and
good fortunes, but you and your society are things that
are infinitely more precious to her. She depends upon

you, naturally and by force of circumstances. Friends

may crowd around her; but if you come not, she is not

j
3 ;

tS ech ei nt tb nn OER IEE CERCLA LILLE ELD DLE A ANI LER ES SEES
hep ~

PSPS

EBS

Cline ee SS hah aE I SBS OE

SOA BS SE ete






180 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE

satisfied. She may have spread before her a thousand
delicacies ; but if they are unshared with you, she would
exchange them all for an orange which you bring home
to her as an evidence that you have thought of her
The dress you selected when in the city is the dearest,
though she may acknowledge to hersclf that she would
have chosen different colors and material. In short, it
is from your heart, and the world coming through your
heart, that she draws that sustenance and support which
her deepest nature craves.

Now, how are you dealing by this wife of yours?
Do you say that you have all you can attend to in
your business, and that she must look out for herself?
Do you forget that she lives in the house, away from
the excitements of the world which so much interest
you, and that the very sweetest excitement of the day
is that which throws the warm blood in her heart into
eddies as she hears your step at the door? Do you for-
get that she has no pleasure in public places unless you
are at her side? Are you unmindful that she has no
such pleasant walks as those which she takes with her
hand upon your arm? Do you ignore the fact that she

has a claim upon your time? Do you fail to remember

that you took her out of a pleasant family circle, away

from the associations of her childhood, and that she has

no society in all the wide world which she prizes se

Ste eeecesaceeos | ly

i ee ea eS UES

ee ee EE
x




SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE HUSBAND. 181

highly as yours?) Do you forget that you owe your
first duty to her, and that you have no right to give to
society, or to your own pleasure, the time which neces-
sarily involves neglect of her? To come to a practical
point—is it one of the aims of your life to give to your
wife a portion of your time and society, so that she shall
not always be obliged to sit alone, and go out alone ?
There are some poor specimens of your sex in the
world who not only do not feel that their wives have

any special claim on their consideration and their time,

but who take the occasion, when in the presence of their

wives, to make themselves generally despicable. I
know a man whose appearance when in society, or
mingling in the common affairs of business, has all the
blandness and fragrance of. newly mown hay. He
touches his hat to the ladies whom he meets in the
street with a grace which a D’Orsay would honor with
admiration, and gives them a smile as genial and
radiant as a harvest moon. He bears with him all the
polish and grace of a gentleman. The concentrated
virtues of all the lubricating oils could not add to the
ease of his manners. People cannot imagine how such
a man could be anything but the best of husbands; but
he is not any such thing. If I were a Jew, and not
particularly fond of bacon, I should say that he was‘a

hog inhis own house. He is, there, domineering, peevish,
amen |

\eicetiinnciatibintiiiiiniipgensaagiepeing

a A ANE RN










182 TrITCOMrD’s LETITEKS CO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

exacting, and hateful. I have never known him te
speak an affectionate or pleasant word to the best of
wives. Nothing is out of place in the house for which

she is not reproached 1m fretful and insulting language -

‘Nothing goes wrong out of doors for which he does no

take revenge, or show his spite, by finding fault with the-
companion of his life. He criticises her cooking and
her personal appearance, and, in short, lets off upon her
wounded but patient ear all the foul accumulations of
his miserable nature and most contemptible disposition.
Although some powerful impressions received in early
life have induced me to oppose corporeal punishment
on principle, I have sometimes wondered whether I
should be entirely inconsolable if he should, some time,
be cowhided, kicked, cuffed, maimed, and otherwise
shamefully entreated.

But this is an extreme case, you say. Well, it ought
to be; but will you just stop for a moment, and ask
yourself where it is that you show the worst side of
your nature? Where is it that you feel at the greatest
liberty to exhibit your spleen, to give way to your

fretfulness, to speak harsh words, to make hateful little

speeches that are contemptible from their unprovoked |



Seeeptres

asian aniniapealeaiaviitieel



j
|
f

ose

bitterness? Is it among your fellows, and in the society |

of other ladies, that you take occasion to say your

meanest things? No, sir! You go home to your wife;
SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE HUSBAND, 183

you go home from those who care no more for you than
they do for a thousand others, to the woman whom in
the presence of God and men you have promised to
love and cherish above all others; to the woman who
loves ‘you, and who regards you as better than all else
earthly ; to a woman who is unprotected save by you,
and wholly unprotected from you, and spit your spleen
into her ear, and say things to her which, if any one
else were to say, would secure him a well deserved
caning. Are you not ashamed of this? You say
things to her which you would not dare to say to any
other lady, however much you might be provoked,
You say them—O courageous friend ! because nobody
has the right to cowhide you for it. Isn’t that brave
and manly? As the good mothers of us all have told
us a thousand times, “don’t you never let me hear of
your doing that again.” It isn’t pretty. It 1s ineffably
wicked and dastardly. .

That husbands and wives may entertain perfect

sympathy, there should be the closest confidence be-

tween them. I need not tell the wife to give her hus-
band the most perfect confidence in all affairs. She
does this naturally, if her husband do not repulse her.

But you, young husband, do not give your wife your

confidence—vou do not make her your confidante—you

have an idea that your business is not your wife’s busi-

sabe dereety ee veneer bene

PRS RNS SE SRESS, FT Re NS ene SE a ore gee SHEET

mwet 2


La EE te nc Ratt IR
’

nance eat at ip SAE PEELE ES EEE Gast et stein tt Ag eaten tant asst

184 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

ness. So you keep your troubles, your successes—
everything—to yourself. Numberless disturbances of
married life begin exactly at this point. Your wife
receives the money for her personal expenses, and for the
expenses of the house, at your hands. You do not tell
her how hardly it has been won; with how much
difficulty you have contrived to get it into your purse,
and how necessary it is for her to be economical. You
often deceive her, out of genuine love for her, into the
belief that you are really doing very well; and yet
you wonder the woman can give ten dollars for a hat
and thirty dollars for a cloak. Perhaps you chide her
for her extravagance, and so, in course of time, she
comes to think you have got a niggardly streak in you,
and very naturally rebels against it. She will not be cur-
tailed in her expenditures. She dresses no better than
her neighbors. So you run your fingers through your
hair, and sigh over the fact. that you have got an
extravagant wife, while she, in turn, wonders how it is
possible for a loving husband to be so selfish and stingy

Thus for life, perhaps, a hostility of feeling and
nterest is established, which might all have been pre-
vented by a free and full statement of your circum-
stances. This would interest her in, and identify her

with, all your trials. It is entirely rational and right

that your wife should understand the basis of all your |


RARER Poy meter tel

es



SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE HUSBAND. ~ 185

requirements of her; and, when she does this, the
chances are that she will not only be economical her-
self, but will point out leakages in your prosperity for
which you are responsible rather than herself. It is
possible that you have a companion as much troubled
by figures as the child-wife, Dora, was. If so, I am
sorry for you; but, if so, very luckily she will do what
you require of her without a reason.

I understand perfectly the desire of a young and
sensitive husband to give his wife all the money she
wants. You would fulfil her wishes in all things;
especially would you allow her those means that will
enable her to gratify her tastes in dress and household
equipage. You dislike to appear unthrifty, inefficient,
or mean, and you are willing to sacrifice much, that no
care, no small economies, no apprehension of coming
evil, should cloud the brow of the one you love. Well,
I honor this feeling, for it has its birth in a sensitive,
manly pride; but it may go too far—very much too
far. It has carried many a man straight into the open
hroat of bankruptcy, and ruined both husband and
wife for life. No, you must tell her all about it. She
must know what your objects and projects are. She
must know what your income is, and the amount of
your annual expenses. Then, if she be a good wife,

and worthy of a good husband, she will become more

tt a ania ann cenaenn eqaaeempaemetss?

hontai AT eA BR ea EEE A

~ eatin ncageiia ionamin sshatesietineiiuguiesirilttiensiititiaptiatetaeinictlnas ease perintinntentne anim teniainnimges

pene nema valance nna nanan ver iencbneenareaneenvenioancaneenartinsianenin deine eatin teen nl laren sates PD
cS EA RS IIT ALOE IIORET

186 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

thoroughly your partner, and “cut her garment accord-
ing to the cloth.” The interest which you thus secure
from her in your business affairs, will be the greatest
possible comfort to you. She will enjoy all your suc
cesses, for they become her own. She will sympathize
in all your trials, and you will find great consolation in
feeling that there is one heart in the world that under-
stands you.

And this matter of confidence between you and your
wife must be carried into everything, for she is your life
partner—your next soul. There is no way by which
she can understand fully her relations to the commu-
nity and its various interests, save by understanding your
own. So I say in closing, that to your wife you owe a
reasonable portion of your time and society, the very
choicest side of your nature and character when in her
society, and your fullest confidence in all the affairs con-
nected with your business, your ambitions, your hopes,
and your fears. In the fierce conflicts of life you will
find abundant recompense for all this. Your wife will
soften your resentments, assuage your disappointments,
pour balm upon your wounded spirit, and harmonize
and soften you. At the same time, the exercise of heart
and soul which this will give her, will make her a nobler,
freer, better woman. _It will give her greater breadth

and strength of mind, and deepen her sensibilities. To



Bo) PaaS ES EE A EEE ES TRENT




: C1 re wae occurs in that charming picture gee
ae Pinckney, of the Indian husband and his pale-faced
wile: _—_ |

“She humanizes him, and he
Educates her to liberty.” :




LETTER Iti.

SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE.

And when the King’s decree which he shall make shall be published
througt.out all his empire (for it is great), all the wives shall give to their

husbatds honor, both to great and small.
Boox or EsTHER,

Teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love
their children, to be discreet, keepers at home, good, obedient to their

own husbands.
St, Pav.

OUNG wife, I talked to your husband in my last let-
y ter, and now I address you. I told him that you
have a claim on his time and society. There are quali-
fications of this claim which concern you particularly,
and so I speak to you about them. Your husband labors
all day—every day—and during the waking hours, be-
tween the ¢onclusion of his labor at night and its com-

mencement n the morning, he must have recreation of

wenn eee sirememnemnen inten en inten ae te temaine cima tee ee ett NT OCC CONC A PORDAS



ee EAL

Us wens emer ene:


SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE. 189

some kind; and here comes in your duty. If you do
not make his home pleasant, so that-the fulfilment of
his duty to you shall be a sweet pleasure to him, you
cannot hope for much of his company. What his
nature craves it will have—must have. He cannot be
a slave all the time—a slave to his work by day and a
slave to you by night. He must have hours of free-
dom; and happy are you if, of his own choice, he take
the enjoyment you offer in the place of anything which
the outside world has to give. I supvose there are few
men who, when their work is over, and their supper
eaten, do not have a desire to go down town “to meet
a, man,” or visit “ the post-office.” There is a natural
desire in every heart to have, every day, an hour of
social freedom—a few minutes, at least, of walk in the
open air and contact with the minds of other men.
This is entirely a natural and necessary thing ; and you
should encourage rather than seek to prevent it, unless
your husband is inclined to visit bad places, and asso-
ciate with bad companions.

Precisely here is a dangerous point for both husband
and wife. The wife has been alone during the day, and
thinks that her husband ought to spend the whole
evening with her. The husband has been confined to
his labor, and longs for an hour of freedom, in whatever
direction his fect may choose to wander. Perhaps the

tne nee nine RR ae tht at meen

Se A St onl


ass sce dilantin AED

ng a eae nee eS et en ett en et AS nt tay ines naeaalsucbecenersasee Biondi Sem

190 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

wife thinks he has no business to wander at all, and that
his custom is to wander too widely and too long. She
complains, and becomes exacting. She cannot bear to
have her husband out of her sight for a moment, after
he quits his work. Now, if there be anything in all this
world that will make a husband hate his wife, it is a
constant attempt on her part to monopolize all his lei-
sure time and all his society, to curtail his freedom, and
a tendency to be for ever fretting his ears with the
statement that “she is nothing, of course,” that he
“does not care anything about her,” and that he dis-
likeshishome. Treatment like this will just as certainly
rouse all the perverseness in a man’s nature as a spark
will ignite gunpowder. Injustice and inconsiderateness
will not go down, especially when administered by a
man’s companion. He knows that he loves his home,
and that he needs and has a right to a certain amount
of his time, away from home; and if he be treated as
if he possessed no such necessity and right, he will soon
learn to be all that his wife represents him to be. I tell
you that a man wants very careful handling. ‘You must
remember that he can owe no duty to you which does
not involve a duty from you. You have the charge of
the home, and if you expect him to spend a portion, or
all of his evening in it, you must make it attractive. If

you expect a man, as a matter of duty, to give any con-




fh



)
~ 5
{
}
$
f
|

ABR ana

vane

sr ie eterna teen seme eer ra ip er ae Ee

~~
'
eerie sayeseeeonmEm:

ss SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE, |

: ae | ilersble amount of time to your society, daily, through
| a long series of years, you are to see that that society

is worth something to him. Where are your accom-
plishments? Where are your books? Whi ere are your
subjects of conversation ?

But let us take up this question separately : how shall
a wife make her home pleasant and her society attrac-
tive? This is a short question, but a full answer would
make a book. I can only touch a few points. In the

first place, she should never indulge in fault-finding. DD

a man has learned to expect that he will invariably b«
found fault with by his wife, on his return home, and
that the burden of her words will be complaint, he has
absolutely no pleasure to anticipate and none to enjoy.
There is but one alternative for a husband in such a
case: either to steel himself against complaints, or be
harrowed up by them and made snappish and waspish.
They never produce a good effect, under any circum-
stances whatever. There should always be a pleasant

word and look ready for him who returns from the toils

of the day, wearied with eaining the necessaries of the

family. If a pretty pair of slippers lie before the fire,
ready for his feet, so much the better.

Then, again, the desire to be pleasing in person should
never leave a wife for a day. The husband who comes

home at night, and finds his wife dressed to receive him,

8 SSR VIR Re SOE RRS AC TOBE TN inertial

mete nS nn eel NAPA SS Renee wae

Deraisenerecernaty ee vemennee

a amnemaeeeememeat ae thaerina aeamne hdiee aerate ines intntassie rete
eC AAI NOLO tN Tt tt NT rE a Cmey tt aetha resets teSitinarhsitn mening

a enn

jee on nr tee trees ove.



192 TITCOMB’s LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

—dressed neatly and tastefully, because she wishes te
be pleasant to his eye, cannot, unless he be a brute,
neglect her, or slight her graceful pains-taking. It is a
compliment to him. It displays a desire to maintain
the charms which first attracted him, and to keep intac
the silken bonds which her tasteful girlhood had fastened

_ to his fancy.

I have seen things maaaged very differently from
this. I have known an undressed head of “horrid hair”
worn all day long, because nobody but the husband
would see it. I have seen breakfast dresses with sugar
plantations on them of very respectable size, and most
disagreeable stickiness. In short, I have seen slatterns,

whose kiss would not tempt the hungriest hermit that

ever forswore women, and was sorry for it. I have

seen them with neither collar nor zone,—with a person
which did not possess a single charm to a husband with
his eyes open, and in his right mind. ‘This isall wrong,
young wife, for there is no being in this world for whom
it is so much for your interest to dress, as for your hus-
band. Your happiness depends much on your retaining,
not only the esteem of your husband, but his admiration.
He should see no greater neatness and no more taste in

material and fitness, in any woman’s dress, than in

yours; and there is no individual in the world before ©

whom you should always appear with more thorough



soe eit teetemeeemdens atime rinetbetetenee idee rceritee ge ate ian onden theta raenee eee a ae

cana






Peenreneee cases nee:

4

SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE. 193

tidiness of person than your husband. If you are care
less in this particular, you absolutely throw away some
of the strongest and most charming influences which
you possess. What is true of your person is also true
of your house. If your house be disorderly; if dust
cover the table, and invite the critical finger to write
your proper title;.if the furniture look as if it were
tossed into a room from a cart; if your table-cloth have
a more intimate acquaintance with gravy than with soap,
and from cellar to garret there be no order, do you
blame a husband for not wanting to sit down and spend
his evening with you? I should blame him, of course
on general principles, but, as all men are not so sensible
as I am, I should charitably entertain all proper
EXCUSES. — |

Still again, have you anything to talk about—any-
thing better than scandal—with which to interest and
refresh his weary mind? I believe in the interchange
of caresses, as I have told you before, but kisses are only
the spice of life. You cannot always sit on your hus-
pand’s knee, for, in the first place, it would tire him,
and in the second place, he would get sick of it. You
should be one with your husband, but never in the
shape of a parasite. He should be able to see growth
in your soul, independent of him; and whenever he

truly feels that he has received from you a stimulus to
9

FL LST ST SRS EES a Aen eee



b lla ie este — 253 r etait bitch citi natin le eeatial a sia
SSE SITE AS INS OT IE LE as TON CE OS LIE A EEN TI SS YRS i TG NRA RROD




IO



|
{
|
'
‘
'

194 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

progress and to goodness, you have refreshed him, and
made a great advance into his heart.

He should sce that you really have a strong desire to
make him happy, and to retain for ever the warmest
place in his respect, his admiration, and his affection.

Enter into all his plans with interest. Sweeten all his

_ troubles with your sympathy. Make him feel that there

is one ear always open to the revelation of his experiences,
that there is one heart that never misconstrues him,
that there is one refuge for him in all circumstances ;
and that in all wearinesses of body and soul, there is
one warm pillow for his head, beneath which a heart is
beating with the same unvarying truth and affection,
through all gladness and sadness, as the faithful chrono-
meter suffers no perturbation of its rhythm by shine or
shower. A husband who has such a wife as this, has
little temptation to spend much time away from home.
He cannot stay away long at atime. He may “meet
aman,” but the man will not long detain him from his’
wife. He may go to “the post-office,” but he will not
call upon the friend’s wife on the way. He can do
better. The great danger is that he will love his home
too well—that he will neither be willing to have you
visit your aunts and cousins, nor, without a groan, accept
an invitation to tea at your neighbor's.

But I leave this special point, to which I have devo-


SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE. 195

ted my space somewhat improvidently. There is one
relation which you bear to your husband, or one aspect
of your relation to him, to which I have not alluded

sufficiently. You are not only the wife of his bosom—

_ the object of his affections, but you have a business

relation with him—you are his helpmate. To a very
great extent you are dependent upon him, but you are

also his assistant,—bound to use his money economically,

and to aid, so far as you can, in saving and accumulat-

ing it. The woman who feels that she has a right to
spend every cent that “the old man” allows her, and
that all she gets out of him is hers to lavish upon her
vanities, takes a very low view of her relations to him.
It is simply the view of a mistress, and is utterly dis-
honorable—utterly mercenary. The money which he
puts into your hand endows you simply with a steward-
ship. You have no right to waste it, or to part with it,
for anything but such values as are consistent with his
means.’ You have consented to be the partner of his
life, and you have no more right to squander his money
than his business partner has. It is your duty to hus-
band it; and happy are you if your companion has
such confidence in your faithfulness to him and his
interest, that he puts money into your hand always
willingly, believing that it will be parted with judicious-

ly, and with discreet and conscientious regard to his


mc nnenentens emeet e AAO ecE CO OTL CLL ELDCOTCT:

I LLL LET ONT LC ELT CET CCE OO ONL ALE LALLA LLL LO

196 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

*

means and abilities. If your husband has no confidence
in your economy and discretion, and consequently stints
you, and absolutely feels obliged to place you in the
position of a favorite dependent and pensioner—a play
thing or a housekeeper for whom he has got to pay—
you are not happy by any means.

You can do very much in your character of helpmate
to lighten your husband’s cares, and relieve him from

anxieties. If he finds you looking closely after his in-

terests, buying economically the food for his table, and

never wastefully sacrificing your old dresses in conse-
quence of your thirst for new, always counting the cost
of every object which you may desire, you relieve his

mind from a load of care which no man can carry with-

out embarrassment. A man who feels that there is in

his own house a leak which will absorb all he may earn,
be that little or much, and that he has got to suffer it,
and suffer from it, or institute restrictions that will pro

bably make him appear mean in the eyes of his wife

_ (wasteful wives are very apt to have mean husbands)

the great stimulus and encouragement of his industry
are taken away from him.

The full appreciation of your character, as your hus-
band’s helpmate, depends upon the thorough identifica-
tion of yourself with him. Of this I have talked before,
and call it up again for the purpose of showing you that

a
4
i




SPECIAL DUTIES OF THE WIFE. 197

there is absolutely no aspect of your relation to him
which can be considered legitimate and complete that
does not involve his identification. It is an equal thing.
You are interested in your husband’s expenditures ; and
he is interested in yours. You have cast in your lot
together—your whole lot; and he has no more right
to expend his money in such a way as to embarrass you
and deprive you of what you need, than you have to
squander the means which he places at your disposal.
It is a partnership concern, and if you succeed in man-
aging your department of it in such a way as to secure
your husband’s confidence, fairly considering the cost of
every cent to him, he will feel that he is appreciated,
honored, and loved. Very likely he will understand
this better than tasteful comforts and tender demonstra-
tions of a lighter nature—demonstrations that involve
no self-denial.



SOE ES TE FR EEE TEP IES EST STRESS ET TS
af cece AES AEP ETE LOGE A EEC NE ie =



LETTER IV. |

THE REARING OF CHILDREN

7 manaiyhtigicnreauetiate

Once thou wert hidden in her painful side,
A boon unknown, a mystery and a fear;
Strange pangs she bore for thee; but Hz whose name
Is everlasting Love hath healed her pain;
And paid her suffering hours with living joy.
HENRY ALFORD

ne eneenmnnenind

Hail, wedded Love! mysterious law; true source
Of human offspring !

semen ngrect om

MILTON.

Y theory of life is that it is a school of mental

and moral development—that God intended that

each soul should pass under a series of influences, whose

office it should be to evolve all its faculties, and soften

and harmonize them. To this end, he has laid upon
each a sweet necessity to adopt the ordinances he has

contrived. When I speak of necessity, I do not mean


THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 199

compulsion, save in a limited sense—compulsion entire-
ly consistent with individual election. Thus I believe
that there is a very material portion of mental and
moral development which cannot be achieved out of
the marriage relation; and, to bring men and women
into this relation, he has given them the sentiment of
Jove, and the desire of mutual personal possession. This
sentiment and desire are made so strong that they may
hardly be resisted, so that all shall choose to be joined

in conjugal relations. Thus the strong are softened by

_ the weak, and the weak are invigorated by the strong ;

and the influences of men and women upon each other
become the most powerful agencies for their mutual
harmonious growth. But this is not all. When a pair
have become united in wedlock, there rises in each
healthy heart a desire for offspring. Nothing is more
natural than this desire, and nothing more imperative.
[ts germ is seen far back in childhood. The boy’s love
of pets is but a manifestation of the primary outreach-
ings of this desire, which fasten at first upon the only
possible objects; and there probably never lived a little
girl that did not love her doll beyond all other play-
things. She takes it first, and retains it the longest of any.

This brings me to the subject of children, as legiti-
mately something to be talked about in these letters.

The having and the rearing of children form one of














200 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

God’s ordinances for making you what you should be—

what he wishes you to be. They are as necessary to
you as you are tothem, You can no more reach the
highest and most harmonious development of which
you are capable without children, than you can develop.
a muscle without exercise. Without them, one of the!
most beautiful regions of your nature must for ever
remain without appropriate and direct culture. The
offices of children in the culture of their parents are
manifold. In the first place, they are a conservative

and regulating force. A pair living together without

children naturally become selfish, A pair unwatched —

by innocent eyes are often thrown off their guard in
their language towards, and treatment of, each other.
They lose one great stimulus to industry, and do not
possess that which is, perhaps, the strongest bond, under
all the circumstances of life, which can bind husband
and wife together. There can be no true development
of heart and mind where pure selfishness is the predo-
minant principle ; so God ordains that in each house
there shall be little ones, more precious than all else,
who shall engage the sympathy, tax the efforts, and
absorb the love of those who sustain to them the rela-
tion of parents, The law is irreversible that our best
individual progress in mental and moral good shail be
attained by efforts devoted to others; and in children,

2 nae Re Ser ate EPO OR Stee Neen *

RE EE IS A LES I TE II ATID SCO RE AI I Ie iSO A ee app erent nce

SRE A tn SRR ASR re Sie
stm sete tee

tevenntet


Seen ESR GRE ROE

cattsipinpsiiesinpieiipeaensiahage dtiseiaaitdignasteleihe

sp arerer eae

THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 201

each parent finds the nearest objects of such devotion.
And there is, perhaps, nothing which so tends to soften
the heart, to develop the kindlier affections, and to un-

_ lock and chasten the sympathies of men and women, as

the children which sit around their table, and frolic
upon their knees.

When I see a man stop in the streets to comfort
some weeping child, or to get a kiss from a pair of
juvenile lips, I know that he has passed through a
blessed experience with children. A helpless little head
has been laid upon his shoulder, in some hushed and
hallowed room where the great mystery of birth has
been enacted. Some feeble, wailing boy, pressed to his
breast, has been borne, night after night, with weary
arms, back and forth in the dimly lighted chamber,
while the mother caught her short half hours of rest.
More likely still, some precious warbler, her eyes closed,
her lips for ever stilled, her golden curls parted away
from a marble forehead, a white rose in her hand, has
been laid in the grave, and the sod that covers her has
been fertilized by his tears. Oh! there is something in
loving dependent children, in tender care for them, and
in losing them, even, which bestows upon the soul the

most enriching of its experiences. They make us ten-
der and sympathetic, and a thousand times reward us

for all we do for them. We cannot get along without
: o*






ARR ANEE inte a ses

SES LS COR REL RRL GL RRR ee AER Sega SIA As IRS

A RE Eo aps rs 8

902 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

them; you cannot get along without them. You can:
not afford to do it. They are cheap at the price of
pain and sickness, and care and toil.

What do I mean by talk like this? What do Imean
by the utterance of common-place like this? I mean
simply to reveal some of the considerations upon which
T condemn a great and growing vice among the young
married people of this country—a vice which involves
essential murder in many instances, and swells the
profits of a thousand nostrum venders. And what dol
mean by this? I mean that in thousands of American
homes children have come to be regarded either as
nuisances or luxuries. I mean that, in these homes, to
have children is deemed a great misfortune. They are
the bugbear that threatens people away from the mar-
riage relation, and frightens them when in it. I mean
that men and women, more and more in this country,
hug to themselves their selfish delights, cherish their
selfish ease, and consult their selfish convenience, with:
out a consideration of their duties as men and women
and without a comprehension of the fact that they cana
only find their highest enjoyment by obedience to the
laws of God, natural and revealed. I mean that there
are multitudes who envy those unblest with children,
and congratulate them upon their poverty. I mean tha

there are husbands who grudge every charm lost b-

iociocitapiasrinsieaasneipiaiadiidntiancenate:

oe eee EEE EES


> PETE ASS te EI





THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 205

their wives in the duties and sacrifices of maternity,
and that there are wives who are made spiteful and
angry by the interference of children with their indo-
lent habits, their love of freedom and self-indulgence, —
and their vain pursuits. I mean ‘that the number i
increasing of those who receive the choicest earthly
blessings God can confer with ingratitude and wilful
complainings. That is precisely what I mean; and I
do not hesitate to say that it is all a very shabby and
sinful thing, and that it is high time that those who are
guilty were ashamed of it. |

A woman who, by cool and calculating choice, is no
mother, and who congratulates herself that she has no
“young ones” tied to her apron strings, is either very
unfortunately organized, or she is essentially immoral.
A man who can tip up his feet, over against his lonely
wife, and thank his stars that he has no “squalling
brats” around to bother him, is a brute. It is time
that some one protest, and I hereby do protest, against
one of the great sins and shames of the age,—a sin
which deadens the conscience, bestializes the affections
and ruins the health of the mistaken creatures who
practise it,—which cuts the channel from one end of
the land to the other of a broader Ganges than that
which bubbles along its heathenish bank with the ex-
piring breath of infancy. |
204 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

There is growing up a cowardly disposition to shirk
trouble and responsibility in this matter. “I don’t feel
competent to bring up a family of children.” Who
does? It is a part of your education to acquire compe-
tence for this work. “But I don’t feel like assuming
such a responsibility.” That responsibility is precisely
what you need to keep you in the path you ought to
walk in. “But I can’t afford it.” Are there two pairs
of hands between you, and not sufficient patience, cou-
rage, and enterprise to do the duties of life? “But 1
am afraid that I should lose my children. They are
liable to so many accidents that it would be very
strange if I should be able to raise a family without
losing one or two.” The sweetest and truest couplet
that the Queen’s laureate ever wrote tells the story upon
this point :— |

“Tis better to have loved and lost
Than never to have loved at all.”

Ask the father and the mother, weeping over the
coffin of their first-born and only child, whether they
regret that the child was born. Ask them the same
question in after years, when that little life has come to

be a thread of gold running through all their expe-

riences. If they give an affirmative answer, I will be
‘lent. No, my married friends—you who shrink from






i



THE REARING OF CHILDREN. ~ 208
.
accepting the choicest privilege bestowed upon you—

you are all wrong; and if you live, you will arrive at a
petiod where you will see that there are rewards and
punishments attached to this thing. What is to sus
tain you when, in old age—the charms of youth all

past, desire extinguished, and the grasshopper a burden

—you sit at your lonely board, and think of the stran- |

gers who are to enjoy the fruit of your most fruitless
life? Who are to feed the deadening affections of your
heart and keep life bright and desirable to its close, but
the little ones whom you rear to manhood and woman-
hood? What is to reward you for the toils of life if
you do not feel that you—your thoughts, your blood,
your influence—are to be continued into the future ?
Do you like the idea of having hirelings, or those who
are anxious to get rid of you, about your dying bed ?
Is it not worth something to have a family of children
whom you have reared, lingering about your grave, with
tears on their cheeks and blessings on their lips—
tears for a great loss, and blessings on the hallowed
influence which has trained them in the path of duty,
and directed them to life’s noblest ends? _

This is a subject which has not been talked about
much publicly, but it is a very serious thing with me,
and it ought to be with you. I love the family life. I
esteem a Christian family—the more numerous the bet


mice nner te RE EET ATT LEER OOL I OLLI CLEC OD ED COT

VARIN RE EATER I PEER AE OS IT Ne A Re Ge REE NER RN SE ET TS RET NPE

Oca S TE ret Tb er

OE: st AM TET EN ETI SME

~ Ree oan ete eee sare:

206 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.
~-
ter—one of the most beautiful subjects of contemplation

the earth affords. A father, thoroughly chastened and
warmed in all his affections, and a mother overflowing
with love for the dear children God has given her
devoted to their welfare, and guiding them by her ten-
der counsels, sitting at their board with the sprightly
forms and bright eyes of childhood around the table, or
all kneeling at the family altar, form a sight more
nearly allied to heaven than any other which the world
presents. Do you suppose such a father would be what
he is but for his children? Do you believe such a
mother would be the blessed being she is but for the
development which she receives in her maternal office ?
No, you know that both have been chastened, elevated,
purified, made strong, and essentially glorified, by a
relation as sanctifying as it is sacred. _

So I say, in closing, that you can never realize the
very choicest and richest blessings that Heaven intends
for you, in your relations as husband and wife, without
children. Whom God deprives of these, he has other
thought for, and I have nothing to say to them; but to
the multitude, I say, give welcome to each new comer
whom God has lighted with a spark of his own divinity,
to grow in glory till it shall outshine the star beneath

which it entered existence, such greeting as you would

zive an angel. Clothe him in white, bear him to the

a eee ee ee ee

mi SSE SSS Se


anton enanene aeRO a oR OO ETE EE

fret erase

ota LR et PS PNT OEE! Se ET PRE oo SESE Te wn

7 PR OE aad

THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 207

baptismal font, rejoice over him as a testimonial that
God remembers you, and celebrate the day when he was
given to your arms in such a manner that he shall know
that it is a blessed thing to be born. Sing to him plea
sant songs, and scatter roses upon his cradle. “Of such
is the kingdom of heaven,” and in such the Saviour has
given to you those to whose pure, simple, and innocent
likeness he would have you conform your heart. You
are to rear your boy to manhood, and educate him to
be a man; and he, in turn, is to educate you to be a
child, and protect your helpless years. It is an even
thing, and a beautiful exhibition of that wonaerful
machinery by which all are made to pear equal ourden
in evolving the noblest life of tne race.

aorceeerte ee

sao wenn ese tee gO wR PP A SS EY sg tn et tr ete rn ne nea apastpnddnt ere

tA a2! NERO GIT ERO ALE EE SC ATES TEES PIE:
ene SRG SE ASOT Do OR TAS RAT

wate Smaart eee

ee ee

eas

\

LETTER V.
SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS&.

Whate’er the uplooking soul admires,
Whate’er the senses’ banquet be,
Fatigues, at last, with vain desires,
Or sickens by satiety.

But, truly, my delight was more
In her to whom I’m bound for aye
Yesterday than the day before,
And more to-day than yesterday !
Tut ANGEL IN THE Hovsx.

HERE are so many subjects which call for notice

. in my letters to you that one letter, at least, must

be a piece of patchwork. I propose that this one shall
bear such a character.

It is doubtless a general experience that a husband

and wife, efter living together for a time, become in a

SISO SE RL Oe EE RRR ROR OES A EE

DoW RARREE Cis RETEST S

we SSRN Cte RRNA AON SA OLE E TIE TE




SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS. 209



measure tired of one another’s company Before
marriage, they were essential to each other; after long
months of intimacy, a sense of monotony creeps upon
them, and a separation for a few weeks is regarded as
desirable, or not to be regretted. The husband would
like a little more freedom ; the wife, perhaps, pines for
the associations of her free and careless girlhood.
When this feeling comes upon a married pair, the time
for a temporary separation has arrived, and the quicker
it is instituted the better. The object and end of it is
to prove to both that they cannot be happy when
separated. The first week will pass off very pleasantly ;

the second will find them rather longing for one

another’s society again; the third will burden the mails
with tender epistles in which the romance and ardor of
courtship will be revived; the fourth will convince the
wife that she has the very dearest husband in the world,
and the husband will carry his package of letters in his
breast pocket and sigh ; the fifth will find a day set for
the greatly longed-for ‘re-union, about which both will

.¢ thinking all the time; and the sixth will bring the
wife home, with all her precious beauty and band-boxes ;
and such a meeting will take place as well might make
an observing old bachelor commit suicide. Well, they
have learned a lesson which they will remember as long

as they shall live. It is proved to them that they can-

Fascias stillet lanlgiclassshicattctaamninisaenetinistileiniial
anne mae

een nee a eT TS
nnn

eet en IE RO TEE ALLIEN OAS CC OAL CAL TOO

Meme nae

ee

210 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

not be happy apart, and that separation will always be
a ca.amity. |

Yarious circumstances spring up in the course of life
which seem to dictate a temporary separation, on the
score of economy or profit. A man will desire to go
into a distant city, for a sojourn of months and perhaps
years, that he may buy and sell and get gain. The wife
may not go, as it would interfere with the profits. This
is one case; and there may be a thousand others in
which policy dictates a like temporary separation. My
counsel is to regard all such inducements for separation
as temptations of the devil. It is morally degrading
for a husband and wife to live apart from each other.
It is the rupture of a sacred tie—the denial of a sacred
pledge—the breaking up of a relation into which reli-
gion, affection, and habits of thought and life have all
become intimately interwoven, leaving both man and
woman loosely floating among new influences, and freed
from the restraints to which their lives had become
conformed. 3 |

Separation for the time being destroys the comfort
and withholds the rewards of married life. It isa long

_ dreary, monotonous, or anxious episode, for which neither

fame nor money can compensate. It is this, or worse;
for, certainly, nothing can compensate for the acquisition
of that indifference on either side which proves that






Se ac
=~



SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS, 211

separation is not a calamity. A broken bone, too long
left without setting, can never again make a firm junction.

Separation which shows that a pair cannot live apart is

so ante tap menor sre
‘

well; separation which proves that they can, is one o}
| the worst things that can happen. Therefore I say to
| every man, that the circumstances should be most ex-
> traordinary which will leave him at liberty to break up
his home, or justify him in separating from his wife.
If you cannot take the wife of your bosom with you,
| you are to believe, generally, that your plans have not
the favor of Providence.

It is the habit of some husbands and wives to have |
intimate friends whom they cherish and correspond with,
independently. I have known very good husbands to
carry on limited flirtations with girls, to be the reposi-
tories of secrets belonging to such, and to act as their
very agreeable next friends. Very pleasant connexions

are these, to a young husband, who has time to attend

tC AU SLLE 2. EO AES LETTE OT

to them, brit very dangerous in the long run. Similar

connexions on the other side of the house have made a

snaps aT LC SCC RENAE LOE NBA TTE LES OID CBG BATE TO NRL MI

great deal of difficulty since the world began. They
are very harmless things at first; but there is nothing
but danger in the intimacy of a married heart with an

unmarried one, unless there be other relationships which

aN OE SN ERIE CT I ABI OEE" REE BAY

PRESTR AB

justify it. .A man or a woman who, from the most in-

nocent motives originally, plays with such an intimacy


2 oe pce nS
ae a ARR TEE

A AAR ASO EIST ADA ENE a

212 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE

as this, is toying with a very dangerous instrument. It
“eads to the establishment of secrets between husband
and wife—itself a bad thing—and too frequently leads
to their estrangement, more or less pronounced. You
siould never write a letter, or give occasion for the re-
ceipt of one, which you are unwilling to show to your
companion. Under none but extraordinary circum-
stances should you consent to receive a secret from a
friend which he or she may be unwilling your companion
should know. |

If you have friends, they should be the friends of
your companion; and this should be carried outside of
the circle of your intimacies. You have no business
with a friend who refuses to be your companion’s friend;
and again you have no business with a friend whom, for
a valid reason, your companion refuses to know. You

may have come together from different classes of society

The wife or the husband may be proscribed by a class

while her or his companion may be a favorite of the
sameclass. A husband ora wife, who is willing to ignore
his proscription and distinction, demonstrates a lack of

spirit and self-respect that is utterly contemptible. A

husband or a wife acting thus dishonors his or her owt |

flesh and blood. You go together; you are to be re-
ceived together or not at all; and an insult to one is an

insult to both, always, and under all circumstances.


SE rarer tn ra ON PERE Se Te a =
= oe area Selene a tcaeade to nee ahi cement ime nena eaten teenies neeagaroeaie cements aac nmartemmmeeenmimanamiaimeetmmaaammediataieamaditeiamemenaiaainaaeL

oS

a corre tens ome

rm neciignenare walnut caress rpesnaenssac artnet eospu ane mimes warn fe ee eect tate

soyeerren nuns oe

sae

saeepoe nae ibiae metanvenemauena tae tetpene ay mane te dew ieee span

SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS. 213

And now that I have spoken of your mutual relations
to intimates and friends, it is proper that J speak of yom
relations to your respective blood connexions. Very
fruitful causes of disturbance between husbands and
wives are the relatives of the married pair. Not unfre-
juently the parents of the husband are brought into his
family, and not unfrequently those of the wife. Doubt-
less there are instances in which it is impossible to get
along without difficulty with these, but if you have fully
apprehended my course of reasoning with you, and ad-
mitted its validity, there is but one course for you to
pursue, Youare one. The husband’s parents are the
wife’s parents, and the wife’s parents are the parents of

the husband. You are to receive and treat them as your

commas terme

own—not with constraint and as a matter of duty, but

willingly and affectionately. You are to learn to love
and respect them,—to bear with their frailties, to com
fort them in their passage to the tomb, to treat them in
no sense as dependents, and to make them feel that they
are not only welcome to your kindly offices, but that
they have a right to the home which they have with
you. You are young, and they are old. It is for the
honor of your companion that his or her parents have
support at his or her hands, and what is your com-
panion’s honor is yours. Besides, this world is a world

of compensations, more nicely adapted and more cer:

is oa ra i ae EY AS a RS NR nna BesimeNge

Mee ak RE ERENT SRR SSE CEE
sateen cit a af Ain SARA A ARERR SO RSC SOG NERS ARE ESE : saighchanae

he na A AEE ee *

214 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

tain than you know. ‘The time will pass away, and the

children now on your knee will have grown to manhood

and womanhood, and will have chosen their companions.

as their fathers and mothers chose theirs before them
The home which you now enjoy may be broken up
Your companion will be taken from you, and your only
resort may be the home of your child. The treatment
which you would wish to receive from your son’s wife,
or your daughter’s husband, is precisely the treatment
which you now owe to those who hold to you the rela-
tion which you will then sustain to them.

The same rules which govern you in regard to the
parents should extend to the circle of your other rela-
tives. Of course, your ability to maintain dependents
is a consideration; but I regard personal and family
honor as most inseparably involved in this thing. A
son or a daughter who, with the power of maintaining
without impossible self-sacrifice a father and mother,
allows them to finish their life in an alms-house, or to
live on the charity of those upon whom they have no
pecial claims, is a brute. There are a few such misera-
ple creatures in the world, who ought to be hooted at
and cut by all decent people. In a measure the same
thing is true of all family relatives. It is a matter of

personal and family pride, as I have said. It is some-

thing more than this. The poor we have always with ©

‘
‘ ?
:
gem
Â¥

a
5

q


ace aR ASA Cig PE ST RCS SEP RT EEE SEES SS RTS PTR NS TT I EIT EES DOE SPE

ease’

SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS, 215

us, and we owe a duty to them, unless we ourselves are
equally poor; but when a man has poor relatives who
must be dependent, more or less, upon some one, it is
as if God’s finger had kindly pointed out to him the
very objects upon which his benefactions should be
bestowed.

I am aware that this is rather serious doctrine for
some minds. I am aware that relatives are often proud
as wellas poor; that they will be dependent rather than
labor; that they become insufferable drones and_ bores,
and haunt your homes with a most offensive and vexa-
tious presence. There ought to be some short method
of treating such, but I do not possess it. If you cannot
make them uséful, there are several ways of making
them uncomfortable which may be safely left to the
invention and discretion of the suffering parties. My
plea is for a thorough identification of family feeling
and family pride between husband and wife. If it
entail disagreeable and unjust burdens, through the

laziness or extravagance of dependent relatives, it is a

. misfortune; but misfortunes are incident to all relations.

Better bear them than leave your motives open to
suspicion, or bring disgrace upon your family name.

I cannot close this letter better than by saying a word
or two upon the subject of servants. The general pro-
position that the quality of the servant is dependent



ae 2 ; i :
6 oD aed nk 8 ie ae dls ke a
a A

a

peter tee ONTO
cere pene A AC TC LTT LEENA LOE LCT ACE ECOL CDE T ELL LED CLL LAL LLL NL TIO ASN eR EEE OEIC wots

216°.
pon the quality of the mistress isa sound one. If a
voman who frets at and scolds her servants ever has a
good servant, it is in spite of the treatment she receives.
In order to be a good mistress, it is necessary to believe
in a few fundamental truths, which may be briefly stated
as follows: First, servants are human beings, and con

sequently have souls; second, servants, having souls, are

consequently controlled by the motives which address

themselves to acommon humanity; third, being human,

servants have rights which no amount of service money

can buy; and fourth, transcendent intellectual endow
ments, a physical development of fifty-horse power, the
broad circle of the Christian graces and virtues, a fault-
less disposition, a knowledge of French cookery, and
elegant habits, cannot be obtained for nine Yankee
shillings a week. A mistress admitting generally the
truth of these propositions possesses a basis for securing
service that shall be reasonably satisfactory to her.
There is quite too much of the feeling among mis-
tresses that they have a right to use a servant as a fast
boy uses a hired horse. They are to get the most out
of them that they can for the money they pay. They
take no personal interest in them,—extend to them no
matronly care and kindness. They forget that a servant

is a social being. They forget that she has humble

loves and hopes, has desires for freedom and secreation,

sagen

esinsenecionstinntihantjnithen taeeeserae






son RR tN eS REE RETO RRR OS EN a

2 ON A RE ER ENTS

nce i se Ee

SEPARATION—FAMILY RELATIVES—SERVANTS. 217

as important to her as the higher love and hopes and

desires of the more favored girls who occupy the parlor,

They forget that the labors of the kitchen are tedious;

that the confinement of the kitchen is irksome. They

become exacting,—strict in rules, rigid in discipline, and
peremptory in their commands. It is not in human
nature to stand this kind of thing, so the servant gets
hardened at last, or wilfully careless. She receives no
praise, any way, and therefore tries to get none. A
servant, generally speaking, whose feelings as a humble
woman are appreciated by her mistress, who is praised
for what she does that is well, and kindly and patiently
instructed to correct that which is not well; who is

treated to sympathetic and considerate words, and

indulged in that liberty which is absolutely essential to —
her bodily and mental health, will love her mistress,
and have a desire to please. This, in all good and tole-.

_rakly sensible natures, will settle the matter. A girl
_ exercised by this love and this desire will be a good

servant ninety-nine times in a hundred. It is under
relations like these that attachmeuts are formed which
are as tender as humanity and as lasting as life. _
There is a broad view in which this and all kindred
matters are to be regarded. The mistress is quite as
dependent upon the servant as the servant upon the

mistress. She renders an equivalent for what you give
10

eager werent eet OEE PAN PPE ESTE AEE AEE BECP OIE PCTS ELEC PES AA PORN IO CRT EE


ee RENEE er

sisi amie naear aides tasers satin ttatasnsjcascieeannittns niide ota atisiitesipitasinns.sistiaaahiinntnn cima rs

218 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

her, and her service is as essential to you as your money

is to her. You cannot get along without her, nor can

she get along without you. Your position, to be sure,

is superior to hers, but she owes you nothing, save faith

ful service and respect. The obligations are not al

upon one side. It is just as much your duty to be a
kind mistress and friend to her, as it is her duty to give
faithful service and respectful treatment to you. If,
therefore, you failin your duty, you must not blame
her for failing in hers. I have never yet seen a good
servant who had not either a good mistress, or one who
was actually inferior to herself. Human nature is very
prevalent among women, and especially among maids
of all-work.

seteineneiy ceases retin tihtasishil ipatannivestinaenenisbintianliiiiaineatitaidinitiiiiddaleid

a ee en
‘

at tt Rtg aI EEOC
.

; et
‘i Ath gga *
ie a i el


a ewee owsna eee EE,

eae ean er EE EE TT I

ose ———— a ee enmenenmeaiell
ccna i ca ONE EE LEE LOC COON NOLL LOE L ICED I DEL LOLOL ELT
a tednessnbenmesenannemademeaarramaneneenmaemiee

“a

LETTER VI.

THE INSTITUTION OF HOME.

flome of our childhood! How affection clings,
And hovers round thee with her seraph wings!

O. W. Horus

For there are two heavens, sweet,
Both made of love—one inconceivabla
Even by the other, so divine it is;
The other far on this side of the stars
By men called Home, when some blest pair have met,

_ AS we are now.
. LriaH Hunt.

HE French have no word into which the English
word home may be legitimately translated; yet

it is sufficiently evident that many of the French people
have the thing without the name, while a large portion
of the American people have the name without the

thing. Thereare comparatively few who have an ade-

~





Nera a SE a RE EE Te Al i eR ln En lS wo ~ =

aera a


9220 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

quate idea of what home is, as an institution. It is
recognised as a house, containing a convenient number
of chairs and tables, with a sufficiency of chamber fur-
niture and eatables, a place to eat and sleep in, simply.
It is not unjust to say that half of the young married
people of America have no higher conception of home
than this. What they call their homes are simply
boarding-houses, where, for purposes of economy and
convenience, they board themselves.

In my idea, home rises to the dignity of an institu-
tion of life, and, like everything legitimately to be called
an institution of life, is both an outgrowth of life, and a
contributor to its development. Like all institutions, it

has its external form and internal power and signifi-

cance. Like the church, it has its edifice and appoint- y

° ein sia ae
ments not only, but its membership, its bonds of spirit-

ual fellowship, and its germinal ideas, developing them-

selves into influences that bear flowers and fruits to

charm and feed the soul. It is into the meaning of the |

word Home that I would introduce you first, my friends,
and then into the home itself. Marriage is the legiti-
mate basis of a genuine home. A husband is its priest
and a wife its priestess ; and it is for you, young hus-
band and young wife, to establish this institution, main-
tain it, beautify it in its outward form, fill it with all

ood influences, develope its capacities, make it the ex-

te tC me a ne PN RT

sc STR ag SEE LLEE EI ATOLL IISA ANE EOE RON AL MIE Se LEN AET I PLC EIA i ETT

es

BARS PAS RARRTETES TOES ERTS SP TRI ER eS

eR IES EO TEA st te eB wo LS
Ce a I RR ARE SR aS Se or een Somme

“
‘
ne ractenereeete - A A PA SPO EPIC PO Et AS ee ste ht EN CARED Ua Ot
wre SES ea eS RE rR oa mae ea ence we
‘

THE INSTITUTION OF HOME. 29}

pression of your best ideas of intimate social life, and to
use it as an instrument of genial power in moulding
such outside life as may come into contact with it. Its
outward form and its internal arrangements should, se
far as your means will permit, be the outgrowth of your
finest ideas and the expression of your best tastes, com-

bined with the practical ingenuities which may be ren-

dered necessary by a wholesome economy.

It is not the elm before the door of home that the

sailor pines for when tossing on the distant sea. It is
not the house that sheltered his childhood, the well

that gave him drink, nor the humble bed where he used
to lie and dream, ‘These may be the objects that come
to his vision as he paces the lonely deck, but the heart
within him longs for the sweet influences that came
through all these things, or were associated with them;
for the heart clings to the institution which developed
it—to that beautiful tree of which it is the fruit.
Wherever, therefore, the heart wanders, it carries the
thought of home with it. Wherever, by the rivers of
Babylon, the heart feels its loss and loneliness, it hangs
its harp upon the willows and weeps. It prefers home
to its chief joy. It will never forget it. For there
swelled its first throb. There were developed its first
affections. There a mother’s eyes looked into it; there
a mother’s voice spoke to it; there a mother’s prayers



on ne ce
monroe mttaer aenetan nas ene weet te ge



SR ttt tence snes ne

222 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

blessed it. There the love of parents and brothers and
sisters gave it precious entertainment. There bubbled
up from unseen fountains life’s first effervescing hopes,
There life took form, and color, and consistence. From

that centre went out all its young ambitions. Toward

that focus return its concentring memories. There it

took form, and fitted itself to loving natures and plea-
sant natural scenes; and it will carry that impress
wherever it may go, unless it become perverted by sin
or make to itself another home, sanctified by a new and
more precious affection.

It is in the little communities which we call Ameri-

can homes that the hope of America rests. It is here

that subordination to wholesome restraint and respect

for law are inculcated. It is here, if anywhere, that

- the affections receive their culture, that amiable dispo-

sitions are developed, that the amenities of life are —

learned, that the mind and the body are established in
healthful habits, that mutual respect for mutual rights is
engendered, and here that all those faculties and quali-
ties are nurtured which enter into the structure of wor
thy character. In the homes of America are born the
children of America, and from them go out into Ame-
rican life American men and women. They go out
with the stamp of these homes an , and only as

these homes are what they should be, will they be what

SSS ne ASE ELE PARE REET AE Ea ORR ERT ENTE ON


a as

2

[nee cain enirnnerieenenmmncenioneiteons setormeinaeh rete tbtinn MeRPORSPE A BETA Me NOTRE STN I SP NER OIE REELS LOLOL EDIE DLS ALLO LIE COLELLO

THE INSTITUTION OF HOME. 22a

they should be. It is with this in view that I offer a
few suggestions touching the establishment of this insti-
tution by you. |

Just as soon as it is possible for you to do so, buy a
house, the ground it stands on, and as much land

around it as your business, convenience, or taste may

require. A home can never be all that it should be to.

you and yours, unless you own it. This is doubtless
impossible to a great multitude who will read this let-
ter, but let not such be discouraged. A beautiful home
life may be developed, even by a tenant at will; though
the security and fixedness of proprietorship are greatly
tributary to home’s permanent influences. If the home

is owned, see that its exterior represent you faithfully.

What you cannot afford in architecture, you can sup-

ply in vines and flowers. The interior should receive

the impress of all the order, neatness, taste, and inge-

. nuity that are in you. Your home is the temple of your

sweetest human love. It is in this temple that young
‘mmortals are born. Itis here that characters are shaped

into manhood and womanhood—the highest earthly

estate. It is here that you are to work out the problem ©

of your lives. It isa place of dignity. Therefore give
it honor; make it beautiful ; make it worthy!

All this, however, only relates to the location—the

shell of your home. The ordering of its internal life is



ee ats TE Te a I

oe

aaa


224 TITCOMB’S LEITERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

of still greater importance. The greatest danger of
home life springs from its familiarity. Kindred hearts,
gathered at a common fireside, are far too apt to relax
from the proprieties of social life. Careless language
and careless attire are too apt to be indulged in when
che eye of the world is shut off, and the ear of the
world cannot hear. I counsel no stiffness of family eti-
quette—no sternness of family discipline—like that
which prevailed in the olden time. The day is past for
that, but the day for thorough respectfulness among the
members of a home—the day for careful propriety of
dress and address—will never pass. For it is here that”
the truest and most faultless social life is to be lived; it
is here that such a life is to be learned. A home in
which politeness reigns is a home from which polite
men and women go out; and they go out directly from
no other. | 7 |

The ordering of a home life is so intimately connected
with the treatment of children, that this subject should
be treated definitely. First, every child born to you

should learn among the first things it is capable of learn-

ing, that an your home your will is supreme. The ~

earlier a child learns this, the better; and be should
learn, at the same time, from all your words and all

your conduct, that such authority is the companion of

the tenderest love and the most genial kindness., Play

‘naeterennaiterenmeeare tsa SIE nat ocean ag ry Ta i ESN I SCT SNS Nth nih Ni Ns EON enc eC eteBSRAE

sete ate rae ee sar aR ee nT a IE TO EE

.
n> hyena en sane pn PENTA gt rn Tp nisneoen em


Scares



THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 226

with your children as much as you please; make your-
selves their companions and sympathizers and confidants ;
but keep all the time the reins of your authority steadily
drawn, and never allow yourselves to be trifled with. It

is only in this way that you can keep the management

of your home in your own hands, and retain the affec-

tionate respect of those whom you love as you do
yourselves,

Again, make your home a happy place—a pleasant
place. Much can be done towards this end by beautify-
ing it in the manner I have already pointed out. Much
more can be done by providing food and amusement for
the minds of your children. These minds you will find
to be active, restless, and greedy for new impressions.

This restlessness is a heaven-implanted impulse. You

_ have neither the power nor the right to repress it; but it

is your duty to give it direction, so far as possible, and to

guide it to legitimate ends. You will find one of three

- things to be true of your children. They will be happy

at home, or discontented at home, or they will seek for
happiness away from home. In the ignorance of the
nature of childhood .on the part of parents has origin-
ated the ruin of millions of menand women. Bursting
from an unnatural and irrational restraint, they have
rushed from the release of parental authority to perdi-

tion ; or, allowed to-seek for happiness away from home
oe



Samsacicieahdictaeaeanioadibinntn = iin ie

PETES AI

Se Ee

ENED SUSS HOE ASTER ERTS WSEAS

RCTS OI

seeaaaes ESS TTT.

eS SSR
saehincieia aitabipiatgiaeemate

ere tg ee:



226 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

and away from restraint, they have contracted habits
which curse them and their parents while they live. So
I tell you that the only way for you to save your chu-
dren is to make a home so pleasant to them—to pro
vide such grateful changes for their uneasy natures—as
shall make their home the most delightful spot on earth,
a spot to be loved while they live in it, and a spot to
be recalled with grateful memories when they leave it.
Profoundly to be commiserated is that child who looks

back upon his home as upon a prison-house; upon his

_ youth as a season of hardship; upon his parents as

tyrants. Ifsucha child ever become a good and genial
man or woman, it will be in spite of a bad home.

I am well aware that the homes of America will not
become what they should be until a true idea of life
shall become more widely implanted. The worship of
the dollar does more to degrade American homes and
the life of those homes than anything—than all things
—clse, Utility is the God of almost universal worship.
The chief end of life is to gather gold, and that gold is
counted lost which hangs a picture upon the wall, which
ourchases flowers for the yard, which buys a toy or a book
for the eager hand of childhood. Is ae whole of
human life? Then it is a mean, meagre, and a most un-
desirable thing! LoTR child will go forth from such a home
as a horse will go from a stall—glad to find free air and a

aqtescere scrensee |

ea an RES SESE

RS SS RSA eNO RS ETT PE

SSS SH I RIT SRST SRT TERETE IERIE HESS SITE
THE REARING OF CHILDREN. 924

wider pasture. The influence of sucha home upon him in
after life willbe just none at all, or nothing good. Thou-
sands are rushing from homes likethese every year. They
crowd into cities. They crowdinto villages. They swarm
into all places where life is clothed with a higher signifi
cance; and the old shell of home is deserted by every
bird as soon as it can fly. Ancestral homesteads and
patrimonial acres have no sacredness; and when the
father and the mother die, the stranger’s money and
the stranger’s presence obliterate associations that should
be among the most sacred of all things.

I would have you build up for yourselves and for
your children a home which will never be lightly parted
with—a home which shall be to all whose lives have
been associated with it the most interesting and precious
spot upon earth. I would have that home the abode of
dignity, propriety, beauty, grace, love, genial fellowships
and happy associations. Out from such a home I would
have good influences flow into neighborhoods and
communities. In such a home I would see noble
ambitions taking root, and receiving all generous cul
ture. And there I would see you, young husband and
young wife, happy. Do not deprive yourselves of such

influences as will come to you through an institution

like this. No money can pay you for such a depriva-

tion. No circumstances but those of utter poverty can

AS Ca PR TPT Ts nn Mt TO ance ase


FSS ER ARE TR SP IETS AEP BN TRE

a



ot as tL tO LAPT CRELEEES SE SETTLE DEE EE POTN



228 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

justify you in denying these influences to your chil
dren. |

It is to the institution of home, as developed in its
best form and power, under the letter and spirit of
Christianity, that I point when the socialist approachcs
me with his sophisms, the New Lights with their loose
theories of marriage, and the infidel with his howl over
the basis of American civilization. It is the history of
this home, since Christ lived, that is one of the strongest
testimonials to his divine authority. In whatever land,
under whatever system, by whatever men and women,
the Christian home has beer set aside for fanciful inven-
tions, mr degenerated towards or into beastliness,
As I have sai ‘before, the hope of America is the homes
ot America. Ifyou to whom I write will each for

_limself and herself make these homes the noble institu-

tions Heaven designs they shall be, this generation
shall not pass away before the world shall look upon a
people the like and the equal of which it has never

seen. A generation shall take possession of the land

full of dignity, love, erace, , and goodness, glowing with

a patriotism as true as their regard for home is sacred,

and showing that the strength of the nation is forged

under tlle smoke that rises from its nePPY household
fires,

OR SCR TS AE EEE a Sy ED

a SPURIOUS ERS ES 2

Syme

seo




sot ocean tating sy esrsemeay



LETTER VII. :
| ®OCIAL HOMES, AND BLESSINGS FOR DAILY USB.
How sweet, how passing sweet, is Solitude i |
| But grant me still a friend in my retreat
Whom I may whisper, Solitude is sweet !
| . Cowrzr. |
| The good he scorned,
Stalked off reluctant, like an ill used ghost, |
\ |
Not to return.
Rosert BiarE.
HAVE talked to you of your duties to each other, te
i e e |
your relatives, and to your servants. It remains to |
: me to speak of your duties to society, as heads of fami |
lies and rulers of homes.
i

L have insisted on the thorough identification of hus
band and wife in feeling, pride of character and family,

pursuit, and interest; yet Iam aware that thisidentifica-

tion may be perverted into a most senseless and selfish

a8 RRS TR EDULE IT MRE SOBEL ETE RE


230 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

devotion to one another, and an exclusiveness of com:
munication, which are destructive of social life. J am
acquainted with too many husbands and wives who,
though all the world to each other, are nothing to: th
world. Their whole life is within their home. They
gather comforts about them, they bear dainties to each
other’s lips; they live and move and have their whole
being in each other’s love; and, shutting out all the
world, live only for themselves. Isay I know too many
such pairs as these. They are far too plenty. They
cannot bear to be torn from their homes for an after-
noon. They take no interest in others. They never
call friends and neighbors around their board, and they
consider it a hardship to fulfil the common offices of
social politeness—to say nothing of hospitality. It is
not unjust to say that this is one of the most dangerous

and most repulsive forms of married life. It is selfish-

ness doubled, associated, instituted; and it deserves

serious treatment.

Homes, like individuals, have their relations to each

other; and, as no man liveth to himself alone, no home
should live to itself alone. It is through the medium
of homes that the social life-blood of America is kept
in circulation—through this medium almost exclusively.
Every home should be as a city set upon a hill, that
eannot be hid. Into it should flock friends and friend-
a in RS ASAD EISELE TESA
t

|
|

SOCIAL HOMES, AND BLESSINGS FOR DAILY USE. 231

ships, bringing the life of the world, the stimulus and
the modifying power of contact with various natures,
the fresh flowers of feeling gathered from wide fields.
Out of it should flow benign charities, pleasant ameni

ties, and all those influences which are the natura

offspring of a high and harmonious home life. Inter-

communication of minds and homes is the condition of
individual and social development, and failing of this
no married pair can be what they should be to each
other. Exclusive devotion to business by day, and
exclusive devotion to selfish home enjoyments at night,

will dry up, harden, and depreciate the richest natures

in the course of a few years; and,so soon as the man

withdraws from the business of the world, the world
has seen the last of him and his family for life. They
have no outside associations. It is as if they did not
live at all, When they die, nobody misses them, for

they have been nothing to society. As many doors

are open as before, and social life feels no ripple upon

its surface when the sand is thrown upon their coffins.

There should glow in every house, throughout the
land, the light of a pleasant welcome for friends. On
every hearth should leap the flame that irradiates the
forms and faces of associates. Neighborhood should
mean something more than a collection of dark and

selfishly-closed hearts and houses. A community should

See Se en nen

as

aes


232 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

be something better than an aggregation of individuals
and homes governed by the same laws, and sustaining
_ equal civil burdens. Neighborhood should be the name
of a vital relationship. A community should be a com-
munity in fact—informed with a genial, social life, in
| which the influence of each nature, the power of each
| intellect, the wealth of every individual acquisition, the
| force of every well-directed will, and the inspiration of
every high and pure character, should be felt by all. A
neighborhood of homes like this, would be a neighbor-

| hood indeed ; and none other deserves the name.
The fact is, that selfishness is the bane of all life. It

cannot .enter into life—individual, family, or social—



without cursing it. Therefore, if any married pair find

Sprincn Sess ase =

| themselves inclined to confine themselves to one ano-
| ther’s society, indisposed to go abroad and mingle with
| the life around them, disturbed and irritated by the col- |
| lection of friends in their own dwelling, or in any way
moved to regard their social duties as disagreeable, let
| them be alarmed at once. It is a bad symptom—an

essentially morbid symptom. They should institute

SSS Se
\

means at once for removing this fecling; and they can

| only remove it by persistently going into society, persis-
| tently gathering it into their own dwelling, and persis:
tently endeavoring to learn to love, and feel an interest

'n, all with whom they mect. The process of regenera-


rina
‘

Se



SOCIAL HOMES, AND BLESSINGS FOR DAILY USE, 233

tion will not be a tedious one, for the rewards of social
life are immediate. The heart enlarges quickly with
the practice of hospitality. The sympathies run and
take root, from point to point, each root throwing up
leaves and bearing flowers and fruit hke strawberry
vines, if they are only allowed to do so. It is only
sympathies and strawberries that are cultivated in hills,
which do otherwise. The human face is a thing which
should be able‘to bring the heart into blossom with a
moment’s shining, and it will be such with you, if you
will meet it properly. ;

The penalties of family isolation will not, unhappily,
fall entirely upon yourselves. They will be visited with
double force upon your children. Children, reared in a
home with few or no associations, will grow up either
boorish or sensitively timid. It is a cruel wrong to chil-
dren to rear them without bringing them into continued
contact with polite social life. The ordeal through
which children thus reared are obliged to pass, in
gaining the ease and assurance which will make them
at home elsewhere than under the paternal roof, is one
of the severest ; while those who are constantly accus-
tomed to a social life from their youth, are educated in
all its forms and graces without knowing it.

Great multitudes of men and women, all over the

country, are now living secluded from social contact,
ean EE TS SIAN ae

sate canoes.

sy sine ea ra RE oN sae a ELE TS

234 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

simply from their sensitive consciousness of ignorance
of the forms of graceful intercourse. They feel that
they cannot break through their reserve. There is,
doubtless, much that is morbid in this feeling, and yet
tis mainly natural. From all this mortification and
this deprivation, every soul might have been saved by
education in a home where social life was properly
lived. It is cruel to deny to children the opportunity,
not only to become accustomed froni their first con-
sciousness to the forms of society, but to enjoy its in-
fluence upon their developing life. Society is food to

children. Contact with other minds is the means by

which they are educated; and the difference in families

of children will show at once to the accustomed eye, the
different social character of their parents. But I have
no space to follow this subject further; and I leave it
with you, with the earnest wish that you will con-
sider it, and profit by the suggestions I have given
you. 3

I must talk to you in this letter (for I have but one

_ more to write) in regard to your way of living, and

your main objects of life. Are you stretching every
nerve and straining every muscle to get gold? Have
you associated respectability with wealth? Are you
denying to yourself a free and generous life now in

your youth, in order to enjoy such a life when youth



a AE CE RE sn sree :

(ear mcpnesrc eae RR RAR RS UR REESE ORT Cn
SOCIAL HOMES, AND BLESSINGS FOR DAILY USE. 235

shall have passed away? Are you scrimping yourselves

and your families by mean economies which grudge
every sixpence that escapes you, and make of your life
a hard and homely thing? I know of many young
married people who are living a life like this, and I pity
them more than I blame them, because they are vic-
tims of false ideas, very probably inculcated by thrifty
parents or by most thriftless philosophers. If you are
an unsocial pair, the probabilitics are that you are
engaged in precisely this business.

Now I wish to tell you of something very much bet-

ter than this. I am not going to advise you to adopt.

a luxurious style of living. Iam not going to tell you
to spend all you get, and to run in debt for that which
you are unable to pay for. But I say that for every
capable and healthy man, ‘and every clever and sensible
woman, both of whom are industrious, there is enough
to be won in the work of life to afford a generous living,

and leave a sufficient margin for independent compe-

tence. The years of your life will be few, at the most;

nd for you to throw away the enjoyment of their pass-
mg days for a good which may never come, to be en-
joyed in a life that is uncertain, is to throw away for

ever the blessings which God intends for your present

food. God’s blessings are not cumulative. The manna

that fell in the wilderness came every day, and spoiled

ESE

arian ste ohne Aa RNS ORT ER A ORE NTE ES


tere

re

236 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE,

with the keeping. You may lay up wealth for age, but
age, with its teeth gone, its sensibilities killed, and with-
out employment, cannot enjoy it. So, I tell you to
enjoy your wealth while you are earning it. I do not
mean by this that you are to lay up nothing. Ido no

mean that you shall be imprudent or improvident. ]

only counsel that use of your money, from day to day, —

which will give you generous food, tasteful dress, and
pleasant surroundings, and which will tend to make life
comfortable and beautiful.

But some will read this who are in poverty, who do

not hope to obtain even independence. I am not writ-

ing to you, my friends, but to your nejghbors, less happy
than you, who have taken it into their heads to get
rich. Perhaps they may be your employers. At any

rate, they are very unenviable people. I write to those

‘who have the power to make money, and who ignore

the present blessings of their lot—who enjoy no present
blessings. I write to those who wait for wealth to
make their first contribution¢ to public charities, to aid
in the support of social and religious institutions, te
mingle in that neighborhood. life which involves a
genial hospitality, to fill their library with books and
their halls with pictures, to resort to the concert and
exhibition rooms for refining amusement, to give em-

ployment to the poor, to make their homes the embodi-

pce ch

o = yee serene ns Sta gre nr ath se ee
ome = fire ahi fo A RIE SO ET MEAS MONIES ELOY SCENE ASE TREE AES BENE SN pee RE A escarpment
Mt eM Ct io ert ARS an ce BEM Ee esr ae: eee ea

SOT ES RRR SE RS See teenie mn

Se see ct elite ==
eT nT USP REL NN eH NET HS EIRENE ESSA SSNS ae

eR Diesen tith encernermncncte esa
- SOCIAL HOMES, AND BLESSINGS FOR DAILY USE. 237

ment of good taste and substantial comfort, and to pro-

vide for health and pleasant recreation.
I believe that twice as much may be enjoyed in this

life, as is now enjoyed, if people would only take and

use the blessings which Heaven confers on them for pre

sent use. We strive to accumulate beyond our wants,

and beyond the wants of our families. In doing this,

_ we deny to ourselves leisure, recreation, culture, and so-

cial relaxation. When wealth has been won, our power
to enjoy it is past, and it goes into the hands of children
whose industry and enterprise it kills and whose best
life it spoils. It is not often that great accumulations
of wealth do anybody good. They usually spoil the
happiness of two generations—one in the getting, anc
one in the spending.

I love the man who earns his money with the special
design of spending it—the man who regards money
only as a means of procuring that which shall supply
the passing wants of his nature—of his whole nature—
and for securing education to his children, and comfort

to his old age. It is to such that men go for subscerip-

tions to worthy objects. It is by the fireside and at the

board of such that Iam happy. It is with the free and

' generous souls of such that I delight to come in contact.

It is for such souls that life is made. Such men as these

go on from year to year, building up their homes, mak


238 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

refreshment for five hundred cordial hearts. Wher-

Se ARS Ser aA a a SEE SE RSET TESS SU

ever they go, hands of warm good fellows are held out
to them. They have the blessing of the helpless, and

the envy of no man. Sometimes, perhaps, their wives

Spee ig RH TSR

are envied by the wives of other men, but it is proba-
tly out of the power of either party to help that.

a RAE HORST SETAE RONAN PSLRA SE AE ONE SEN a PA EE

phot eth P AREAL A ADOT TN OIE

pera cee arene soe SmaI le at nS mses

ing them abodes of beauty and plenty, and places. of

|
|



RS RSE TET ES IESE ARIES ETNIES

Sn SRO

CABS

{TRADE APOPTOSIS PETERSEN SEITE

Iimmiewnenrt tere
LETLER VIIL

& VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING,

Nere manhood struggles for the sake
Of mother, siz‘2r, daughter, wife,
The graces and the loves which make
The music of the march of life;
And woman, in her daily round
| Of duty, walks on holy ground! .
| WHutttrEr,
And 80, *twixt joy,
And love, and tears, and whatsoever pain
Man fitly shares with man, these two grow old:
And, ifindeed blest thoroughly, they die
In the same spot, and nigh the same good hour 3
And setting suns look heavenly on their grave !
Lriéx Hunt,

rT. is my twenty-fourth and last letter to the young.
As a preliminary to its composition, I have re-read
every previous letter, and the subject of this has been

suggested by the perusal. I have asked myself “ what


Ln ET ACO AL COLO CEEOL Ree Oa PPI cara errmsg esate tna

SRS SRO ET ST rE REP PPR MERON SP ne eessay rears ill

RA RRR ESE TE Te

ot tes:

ORE AE NE RETO I IRS SN

hea ws ee Soiree emma Sn eRe enema Me verrateeee

tare Te
go i TIES RSE SETS SN Re SR cae ER =
}
:



240 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

kind of men and women will these letters make, if there
happen to be any who adopt their counsels?” The
reply comes to me in the form of a vision which I will
unfold to you. ; |

(see a young man standing at the opening gates o
life, and with earnest eyes scanning the landscape that
stretches before him.) Flowers are springing at his feet
among the velvet grass; brooks are dragging their
chains of flashing silver over the rocks, and passing in
careless frolic towards the sea; birds are fluttering like
wind-tossed blossoms amid the overhanging foliage, and
breathing their fragrant melody upon the air; breezes
full of love are fanning his cheek, and filling him with
a sense of intoxicating pleasure, and the sky is bending
over him with no break of blue save where, in the ex-
alted perspective, golden clouds sit like crowns upon
golden mountains. His heart is bold, his limbs are

strong, his blood is healthful, and his whole susceptible

and sensuous nature throbs with responses to the appeals

of the beauty and music and sweetness around and before

: ‘
him.

He takes a stap, and Pleasure comes from her secres
power, and invites him to her banquet of delights. He
pauses for a moment, shivers with the stress of the
temptation, puts her resolutely aside, and passes on.
Idleness, lolling beneath a shade, points to a vacant seat,

/

i
Neem SS EAN ORE PO eT a sn Sea

erect specie chee aelalawaioen recs nai ie eae ean arena

ct A CS I A
\ o
Ee

AA Sterne ho ena ToS

a Sa cD RN ePrice tee

ti centr NICE EI te NES EEE GEIS EH Ra ed
i

= 2
die Lotretenatcotte memantine,
RN CEO OT RN NINA ANETTA ES et SR PQ ah eee yy NTR) mn RUA ne een Ngee sh arrest anne tin eiRAmen mene

A VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING, 241

and closes her languid eyes; but with disgust he leaves
her and presses forward, Ambition beckons from some
sudden summit, but he heeds her not. Then Duty
comes, and standing before him—a firm and earnest
figure—points to a burden and bids him take it up, and
bear it as he journeys onward. He pauses, looks
around, ahead, above, then lifts it to his shoulder, and
with muscles firmly strained presses forward with new
vigor. Soon he becomes accustomed to the load, and
then Duty comes again, and bids him add to it. He
willingly takes on the new burden, and as he does s0,
finds his heart warming with cheerfulness, and his voice
bursting into song. Revellers, steeped with wine and
wild with hilarity, look up from their vine-covered table
at the sound of the healthy lay, and laugh and scoff,
but they do not approach him. Temptations that
throng the path of the weak and faithless slink away
from him without attack; or, if one scatter its charms

upon him, they slide off like dew from bronze.

So Duty becomes to him a guiding angel.) Wherever

she leads he follows. In her steps he drops into
deep ravines, hidden from the light of the sun; he
plunges into streams whose billows affright and chili

him, and crosses them by a might which grows with every ;

struggle; he scales mountains that lie in his path, piled

with huge discouragements, and sees from the summit
11 . :

SE SS a SSE A SE ST RE SRE CA eens
e

ERASE HO

ea ee ee ee eee

stemmnaieniuahmenee dre

RRR RE AE a Se



we
.
SS ah EER RR RO EA AE AER





94.2 TITCOMB’S LETIERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

of achievement, shimmering in the distance, the streains
of great reward, winding among meadows of heavenly
recompense. At last he comes to a point in his way
where he pauses, and looks around him. In the pause,
he listens to the beating of his own heart. It is the
thrill and rhythm of manhood which that heart is strongly
telling. He secs that he has made progress towards the
golden mountains, with their crowns of golden clouds,
The noise of the revellers has died upon hisear. Pleasure
and Indolence are far back, and the temptations of youth
are past, and he is, so far, safe. He sees how the bur-
dens he has borne and the struggles he has put forth
have knit his muscles, and strengthened his will, and
developed his power. He sees how each constituent of
the manhood that has now become his choicest posses-
sion was won by toil and fatigue, and self-denial and
patience and resistance of temptation. He sees that it
could have been won in no other way, and gives honest
thanks to the Providence which has thus transmuted
the evil of life into good. ; .

There we leave fier standing, and change tho scene,
At another gate a maiden enters. The rose sits upon
her cheek, and the lily upon her-bosom. Good angels

are hovering all about her; and seeking some secret

recess, she kneels and dedicates herself to Heaven. As —

she comes into the path, the Tempter looks at her, and



rane eeansesrthensrnceaneras sents eens ant nSt SRAP
A VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING. 243

slinks away from her sweet and unsuspicious eyes, as if
they were windows through which he had caught a
glimpse of God. She is conscious from, the first that
life has meaning in it, and that the soul which informs
her has a duty and a destiny. She knows that that soul
is to be strengthened and enriched,—that it is to be kept
pure, and beautified with all precious graces. Fashion
and Frivolity flaunt their gewgaws before her eyes, but
she puts them aside. They seck to divert her into vain
pursuits, but she has a steady purpose and keeps a steady
path. Flocks of seductive thoughts hover about her
head, and tease her bewildered eyes; but she repels
them until they leave her. She gathers the flowers of
life that bloom by the way, and places them in her hair.
Kind words and smiles go out from her, and come back
winged blessings to nestle on her breast. Little deeds

of charity and mercy, dropped by the way, change into

pearls, and seek her hand again. The mother leans upon

her shoulder, and the sister clings to her arm. Up
weary slopes she toils to gather fruits from the tree of
knowledge. Down into valleys of suffering she walks,
bearing balsams for the sick. - She thinks of ease but to
scorn it, and finds in the exercise of her faculties and
the play of her sympathies and the development of her
powers such healthful joy as only the worthy know.

And thus she passes on—a creature cf beauty, a bearer

Beas eit rm es a ae

ae ere

_SegReR RR S te pS nT

ee


244 TILCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE;

semen ttt tt nist chm

of purity, a being of modest graces and noble aptitudes,

of fine instincts and self-denying heroism, until her

irae meant a PRC Se

nature brims—a golden goblet—with the wine of woman- |
hood, and she meets the companion for whom God
designed her—whom God designed for her. :

Thus our third scene is prepared for us. Manhood

and womanhood meet, and lives that were separate
melodies become a harmony. ow it may seem to
others I know not, but true love between man and

woman—the love that gives its all for life, for the sim-

pan esha em se een ee cme elle ceenns seamen

ple rewards of congenial companionship, seems to me

the most lovely outgrowth of human nature. God and

see

all good things breathe benisons upon it. It is the ad-

vent of a heart into another heart,—the entrance of one

spiritual nature into the spiritual nature of another,

which thrills the soul as it passes into the gate of Para- |

cect ee enema mec pm nm

dise. And there stand our young man and’ young

giving, I doubt not, a foretaste of the exquisite bliss

Snare ee

woman, her head upon his shoulde#, and her ear drink-
| ing in the tender confessions of an affection to which

her happy heart responds in gentlest numbers. “ What

God hath joined together let no man put asunder,”

falls from the sky where the evening star is glowing.

| They look up, and a pledge, heard in heaven and on

earth, falls from their lips. Friends flock around them,

and kisses fall upon the young wife’s cheek amid the


A VISION OF LIFE AND 1TS MEANING. 245

beptiom of tears. Golden fruits are borne to their lips,
and the twilight air is full of the pleasant jargon of
happy human voices, Oh! brightly gleam the golden
mountains in the last rays ofthe sunken sun; and the
golden clouds that crown them blaze with more than a
solar glory.

And now begins the united life. Hand in hand and
heart to heart they resume their passage up the long
incline. In the early morning, I see them kneeling
side by side, worshipping the God of their life, confess-
ing their weakness and their sin, and praying for that
spiritual nourishment which shall build them up into a
saintly estate. At evening, before they lie down by the

wayside for repose, I see them kneel again, and commune

with the Good Father whose spirit dwells within them.
If one takes up a cross, it is lightened by the other’s.

hand. Ifone gathers a joy from the boughs of Heaven’s
munificence, the other is called to share it. With no
heart-wanderings, no untruth, no repinings, no selfish
monopoly of delight, they pass on for months till now I
see that the wife has become a mother, and bears a
little babe upon her bosom. It is a gift of God, pre-
cious beyond all price; and when they kneel again they
thank God for it,—for all the joy it brings them, for

all the care it imposes upon them, for all the hallowed

sympathies it calls into play, for the new springs of

a ee

ASRS PIAA ig PETIA aT TRS TT

$2 ERR RAAT TFET ES IN




246 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG .£ARRIED PEOPLE.

pleasure and life which it uncoverstothem, Soonthelittle
one is on its feet, and dances along the way, while another
takes its place in the maternal arms, And as the years
pass away, another and another are added to the pilgrim
group, till they look like a band of attendant cherubim,

Meanwhile, I see that the limbs of the pair are.
growing weary. The way is hard and rough, and both
are laden with a burden of care, accumulating as they
go; and now they pass into a cloud. Dimly through
the vapor gathering before my own eyes, or enveloping
them, I see them bowing by the way. One of the little
ones—its fingers full of life’s roses—lies stretched upon
the sand. They kiss his marble cheek, and the little
group bend over him and weep trickling tears, like
“ Oh,
but for these, would I had died for thee, my son!”

statues at a fountain. I hear the mother say



From the far height I hear the tone of a bell :—is it on
earth or in heaven? Is it a sad bell or a glad bell 2
I know not; but I see that after they have hollowed a
little grave, and deposited their treastre, and knelt upon
it and said, “Thy will, not mine,” the cloud is drunk
up by the unseen spirits of the air, and away, on the
pinnacle of the golden mountains, stands a little form

with its fingers full of roses, beckoning! ‘There is a

stir in the golden clouds above him, and he is received
up.out of their sight. ;



1
one niin egetlceesatatatiinta aplasia naniete pak jellies

aw ia hop onnee tne SomUnaNrtSesa naam me

peta ca ere AR AM ARNE SN FROGS A MARNE

drei ana -been anes AEE Nena

yoo:

a
fe
bi Se a a

A VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING. 24°

Years come and go till the little ones have become
men and women, ‘The father’s beard and the father’s
hair, so black and heavy at first, have become thin and
white. He leans upon his staff, and_totters manfully
on. Son and daughter press around the mother and
sustain her feeble form. An atmosphere of love envelops
them all. And so they rise higher and still higher,
until, in other than earthly light, they stand glorified
upon one of the golden summits. They stand upon the
mount of vision, earth below and heaven above them.
They gaze down upon the long and weary path they
have trodden, and see that their life has been one long
process of education and purification. That which was
but a path of thorns in the passage is changed to a
pavement of gold in the retrospect. Flying over the
shining track, they sce the Angel of God’s Providence }

and now they know, what once they could not wholly

see, that the darkness which had so often passed over

them as they journeyed was but the shadow of his.

blessed wings, But there comes a sound of chariots
and horses; the children press up to bid them adien,
the mountains grow radiant with a descending light; a
little voice, never forgotten, breaks through the purpling
silence like an arrow of silver; and at the swect word

“come,” they are withdrawn into the opening glory. |

That, my friends, is my vision. Is it-all fancy?- Is



oe

Sere caer necenerngemeene emnenie

Sri rnin tattanalicarpaniiican indepen

'
Sh A OS SIO IEE SLI EOI GION ET AI BASIN A PL IP ETS CT OT a
PATS AR AIRES EPS AE ERASER EAS OE TSE IT SP Viva te oe ee RSET 2 = a


acre

scatman aoc arene ees tate

Na RHETT ERAS SMEAR

ee



248 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

it all imagination? Is it al] poetry: Have you an
idea that fancy, or imagination, or poetry can de justice
to the grandeur, beauty, and essential glory of a true
life? J have only felt, in painting it, how utterly poor
I am in the endeavor to express my conception of the
highest life of man and woman, by the use of language.
That little creed of Mrs. Browning, uttered impulsively
in a flash of inspired conviction, has a world of meaning
in it that the slow soul does not perceive. “I do believe
in God and love,” said the sweet songstress; and so do
I. ‘With God and love in human life, it becomes essen-
tially a noble and beautiful thing. To live a life thus
informed is a peerless privilege—no matter at what
cost of transient pain or unremitting toil. It isa thing
above professions and callings and creeds. It is a thing
which brings to its nourishment all good, and appropri-
ates to its development of power all evil. It is the

greatest and best thing under the whole heaven. Place

cannot enhance its honor; wealth cannot add to its

value. It is the highest thing. Its course lies through
true manhood and womanhood, through true father-
hood and motherhood, through true friendship and
relationships, of all legitimate and natural sorts whatso-
ever. It lies through sorrow and pain and poverty, and

all earthly discipline. It hes through unswerving truth

to God and man. It lies through patient, self-denying


et ca perp ec tn NER PCR A AEE AES AR OE



A VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING, 245

heroism. It lies through all heaven-prescribed and
conscientious duty, and it leads as straight to heaven’s
brightest gate, as the track of a sunbeam to the bosom
of a flower.

As I look around me, and see how poor, how frivolous,
how weak and drivelling a thing life is, as it is lived by
the mass of those who are married, I confess that I am

filled with wonder and with pity. Marriage is too much

‘a convention,—its habits and duties are too much con-

ventional. ‘That it is only to be made something better
by a change in the general estimate and idea of life, I
have said in previous letters. That a man and woman
who live to eat, and dress, and make money; whose
ends of life are answered in the satisfaction of appetite
and ambition, and a thirst for gold and equipage and
position, should marry for a higher motive than fancy
and convenience, is not to be expected. The structure,
therefore, of a true married life, must be Jaid upon the
basis of a true individual life. When men and wo-
men have conceived and accepted the idea that all

ood in earth and heaven is intended to. minister directly
and indirectly to individual growth, and that that which
we call evil—toil, poverty, sorrow, pain, and temptation
to sin—is intended for the development of power and

the discipline of passion; when they see that life tends

upwards, and is only a preparation for another sphere
i

do ences aha ahi ten nO NEON a OTN AEE A RTA C CEE RE AST A AED EA
1

i minsenoclaiinndenyimsabittne eat palidipinbeeiiutyte iecninb tae ssastandinseecnatia

(Ce
- DamP UML aa ete tk ies ob
ee ene

mere



-



250 TITCOMB’S LETTERS TO YOUNG MARRIED PEOPLE.

and a better, and that all that surrounds them is perisha-
ble—food and shelter and ministry by the way—then
they can have a conception of what true marriage is.
The relation is illuminated with its full significance only
by this true idea of individual life. The masculine and
feminine nature come together for mutual stimulus and
mutual feeding. All that is good in each becomes the
property of the other, and all that is bad in each is
neutralized by the other. Like the acid and the alkali,

when brought together, their united life becomes a

beaded draught, bland as the juice of nectarines, and fit —

to sparkle on the lips of an angel.

And now, my friends, farewell! Life is before you,—
not earthly life alone, but life—a thread running inter-
minably through the warp of eternity; and while I
wish you all manly and womanly joy, and all healthful
delight, I do not wish that no pain come on you, no
care oppress you, no toil weary you, no sorrow swim in
your eyes, no temptations beset you; but I wish that
you may bear what God puts upon your shoulders, and
bear it well. I wish that it may not be necessary tc
chasten you overmuch 3 but you can hardly grow stiong
without trouble, or sympathetic without sorrow. It
was necessary that the only true human life ever lived
should be made “perfect through suffering ;” and it is

strange presumption for you to think that you can be

‘



, é
+ i i
Se PRs 2h apn . s se
~ 2 one meee Sie N hh. 18 oes bal

Didier mandi bitin eteneill
pa i ANP SE IRIN AE STILT Rg Bt SR CR

en ere te ee ae aE NA a et atte

A VISION OF LIFE AND ITS MEANING. 254

made perfect without it. I wish you many years upon
the earth—as many as will minister to your growth and

happiness—for life is a sweet as well as a great and

wonderful thing. I wish you a family of precious

hildren to fill your homes with music, and enrich your
hearts with love. And when, in the evening of life,
the golden clouds rest sweetly and invitingly upon the
golden mountains, and the light of heaven streams
down through the gathering mists of death, I wish you
a peaceful and abundant entrance into that world of
blessedness, where the great riddle of life, whose mean-
ing I can only hint at, will be unfolded to you in the

quick consciousness of a soul redeemed and purified.

THR END.

niteiehaintp Bettie 5



We,
Te .
Sian

Biase ceeeiesy en tte4

sree

r4 Ssacae 238s

peer peerrrre:

ieierestod
pepe reese seg

meer are teres
Epeiteters

rere eer ee
LESSER eee

Pith puarre ee
See

cei sees
eer.

TE
53 Tees
Sprescarise reel pest ont
cepebietr toot Satan rraeees
PPh Pets crise Sorte
peer ek bt
Ate dese)
ite te

LE ean easy!
tasks

Sie

Sh
Se

See

acess eS

TEI tseR te es
rae ope ermee boe
Lin Biase Sie

re
Et

ieee
ohare ty

ae

e
fe
ow

3
Speer

Ne Rabi ees
ete

Sere ees

pre bis eee

Sn ae ane ang
SITIOS eek
noe eo asainse ee ero we

kexPH oti tee tee tere ere ered Ts
SE erees to

= te oe
Sate ee

Ypaoce Shs

peer res

NSN eee reer?

- eer es rersee yr Sehr reeenr ye!
Soest cotter eaten seats

et

pestice tre tea peeeeeeey te ge teers

Peete scones

Soe eee ote}

deseedeseiB ieee

pS

HS
Eee
ert ee roa eas

oe

fT
oe Se
Barrie Se
cde peiytatpte wate aye
fo reas ey
hoe eee aes Y
apy t rect

es

rete er peter srteateh Spettian
Seti aise

SAE S
3 Srilet Sess stess

Sora rmaaieeses
ees ee es eer E epee

Patna Certecede aoaps

rade tess it tess

See ee en ae

ane Oye woh ee Per wey
MTC PEXIS ET repress tee i eee

btw
pores yeas tes
pretreat yet

Pepereee atts

etches
eS renee aan sete ete ne see

Pree eg

coe ere rtry
See eeeser yet

Deel etentencaited er

REY NS ted peters

Eo

Respro

aaa
etic centtset

Hee ee ea
Ee ETS

eared
Scaaese

ES
EL Mae ae etre ERS
d cape Be PES BOC ERTE YUM PET IS eT

eee eon vee) weet ht

PENI Chae rer

ise Ere}

ees = 3

Righter es

Renee ate tae

Sore

ete

Sekpastreritite he esos
est rets ie taboctar nents
SESE

pein eve bee cbaygl “yee

ee

ray eee
Ba ee ee Peres
wy ee paebtlion, bande

Ba

Lteeider eaten ees aes ae erie pete aera eee

reatecotbsts Saree. | Sirus es telsey Strke te rit aro est
ei ey ep peaees Saree etgee Se SSS

aka
eeesirrrreetere rr tt
eee be na

:
had. piss et test Rite

eH ete Sey

Prcreertrertesretie ssnassne ee

seg carats
gt a
=

EOPre eek y sana one
pd sy Cortyrt hy

See
= Te

renner nerey
Stee ep nearer

TP iEare oes

crestor
rey
ores

ieee er eee
2
eset

pobre.
heed oe

rere

Perera et sety
PE maha.

re reer

2
: tet
Pisa steers
ies :
cs Cae ee

chee
cs

reaps
occa ote
ee

an
ee
=

es

aes

Se SIS Ferra is oe bees td

3
enor ee

pees
seers

pamenterer odes

a
phthac eres er ren rere ts

Fs
Se
Shit eetr a end oe

Petersen et

ees

eer

Staessen sess te

oe sero stete rs

eteoress .
Lr nee Ri breess toa poe
Sinterirettite ke
brett

ans
peter

3
SoMa hcpes au iole Ri

Sa
RST peter
cet erooeepebesss tae

= : pope wae ore een inl Pe pita
on sWaaeeenions

Spetapexegeiake ts

poeta erg
creetestoresoe tt
pSretsirt es
pe porteees tenet ase.
33

bestest ireeicrir st
RS

$4

eS Hest:

See ete

Sees =~

See scstesss
Bessctrs ots
is

etre ssi ce

enera tesa l sae eo per at paners pets
Seep e reyes ESE STS het sean con tegen tues ee Smet
Piteer teres

HO Seta PEA
peeabetetiateeetetceest

pier sets

Prasat h 33h
Paeeesrerresent ieee ort
BIO PIS te Phat ltie binelt betes

mort Peek peow mre ewe Welt wer 4

=
israr tice)
pasate
pkree ioe
ne

etre
Sipe
Pepeerar try

ape
Boreas

pte eer Unc ret bares
fy apc

ates ctesinee tine

bSimin eet etree ete

santa res

ee SS erae res
piano tate npg
Mpre EST RE

Sressbeereaasts
SSrseigs Sethe aise oS

Saoepee eeeea ye Aeeers bereeeas
: yy

eer ea
SEIS IT

=< 7 ones
Settee eerste ery

eters es pieberst ot

ete peert aes
per eter seen arEet
= ae-> deceuneden beieath-abatpeee bemaphich ede be ae ee
cart

seescanaoaeee esas
RL EI
Spunnierie
iG

Rirpsaetesenees
rppeienee sis 3]
Sy eee es “

aay
ae <
Se Recreosstsores
Pee e een Sy Saar es >
Stet Sigh ae eS
Paebeh, he pe ee
Sep heSe eS

eth ateetecs
Peete he see Sty sateers is
pret beret ary Taste)
pera ry’ Ese rit pee oes
betecaed

pire
Soin ate

rerees
ie

este
co elite
eye

ener tae
recent ieee ae

Cotes
ee Saar Stay

Soreetee
Peres
betakeee seit pies

eee Lr eres
ECR SIDE Ter ee TS
Semabiisecee ste

pet
Sera tes

ber bys
Breit. pba cad
Sela eee tet

a

ee Ad bam eetee ee

pees eer

peeneeetoes
ieee ritn cn

IS oe
sete atts =

See titer spose tree
rates cre tictrmnbeaty oe
epimers StER Tea
ephentepetiey est

=
Rat

oot tags Seite

is

at te het ey
aeotescree teres
Stee

)

Sorpeer presse
Heisei
+

vps ye
apr sy
SARS A as
epee yt Poe
Sore y ted eee ites

$




















xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000325900001datestamp 2009-03-26setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Titcomb's letters to young people, single and marrieddc:creator Holland, J. G.dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00003259&v=00001AAA4410 (LTQF)ALH9108 (LTUF)15225935 (OCLC)002238590 (ALEPHBIBNUM)dc:source University of Florida






xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090903_AAAADP' PACKAGE 'UF00003259_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-09-03T06:51:13-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T18:00:44-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 300049; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-11T23:28:43-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '1479515' DFID 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMA' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00014.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 2828def679ce98498b4e1abd36d608c1
'SHA-1' 3ec23e25e99b24d8862376d0ae52bc07e9e44899
EVENT '2012-03-30T14:44:31-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'105447' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMB' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
71971b36ba952de55c8371e9b05dcae6
a5d65578b2fc47c9b8891e2310baff98ac7ca59a
'2012-03-30T14:47:13-04:00'
describe
'37717' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
8d888fe2bb24c280267683524dad7986
5970d65ea0922115717f633c4243dc4644d3829e
'2012-03-30T14:55:17-04:00'
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMD' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5ae722f87e844ea7413640f685a78fc6
04c50c68aa77b13fb8291de307c154cd4e2bc9a7
'2012-03-30T14:46:31-04:00'
describe
'35510468' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLME' 'sip-files00014.tif'
7d8295ba1509eba6e62dc47fc3bdf718
068a03a4487d021f2fdde5372457f7465a1ad758
'2012-03-30T14:40:25-04:00'
describe
'1487' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMF' 'sip-files00014.txt'
d51ca8e8b1347672901573ef43af8ff1
ba0ad32b5d3d8fcb55f20078a723f455bd321e1b
'2012-03-30T14:47:01-04:00'
describe
'8118' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMG' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
bf03a1e36eba36a1857ece765e3aee8e
f4e4a884f0eb181b28e129fdef0c88078d107e6f
'2012-03-30T14:46:08-04:00'
describe
'1527166' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMH' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
00eaeb7e087542ec2bdd8ab928beaae2
f9d3fed7b660f28bb0bc9005c7c9749ae92cab42
'2012-03-30T14:43:53-04:00'
describe
'101799' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMI' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
017927e4444f8c4b4bd61325cfcb7bab
1a581b4d11812c4d1e542480abe0e3900f5c94d1
'2012-03-30T14:51:16-04:00'
describe
'37063' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
267ed3fbdcbf0fddabeaf3c6f6413c0f
eda8aad4c474ff8b3ee8bd7ef6754b67350750e3
'2012-03-30T14:42:18-04:00'
describe
'31591' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMK' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
afa5954d61a458587f341b203812d96e
4a050a881da980b72baa40b37515886fa2124206
'2012-03-30T14:51:52-04:00'
describe
'36654120' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLML' 'sip-files00015.tif'
98e9d4cd357e58be1bd17a97148ed15a
f85031669c02bf63fedf1d885443396457006d22
'2012-03-30T14:37:45-04:00'
describe
'1476' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMM' 'sip-files00015.txt'
f59b7a284c3005437f6a0a61294b6ef1
df619d9d77c8f9c83019c59227b279a1f97f55f3
describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
c6d4f2bbb04a79b89c2a4dfc6866447e
ee1c73650bad0f79c2a5a2d0e6e47b88583f8bec
'2012-03-30T14:45:18-04:00'
describe
'1494316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
78e3477e9eeca65e9b8d9ca964c8dc5b
6e65a31b08075a73694521ec0a8abbfc9644396e
'2012-03-30T14:46:06-04:00'
describe
'138243' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMP' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c92574951212eb03a7a5a175cdee8520
301a8088b8a09e3ef3b54fc7384742ac93c38aa7
'2012-03-30T14:51:36-04:00'
describe
'37716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
201a3ea4cb2dca7dc2a89df04eec5176
9ab1c51e8c1484b92948cfb432441ed9fc4bbcb5
'2012-03-30T14:40:55-04:00'
describe
'41246' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
6eea7cf75c65c7c4842a88c79adc286b
bb538cd66bdab42b009991ceb4c87670a1021436
'2012-03-30T14:42:26-04:00'
describe
'35865604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
3272e7ca349857e96b0e9d429ba1c625
b9fcd12ae0b20e8326a0204be691a17791c8008e
'2012-03-30T14:52:05-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMT' 'sip-files00016.txt'
df821e5b27611645940dd3c76067e007
44a6d1590429ae4d4d68d724e89e7aae7423d95f
'2012-03-30T14:37:31-04:00'
describe
'10760' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMU' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
477d3222a7702bc8006c5dbbe01361da
fe34e8dbc45e86c20eb8b7d7c7f44415ec728aa6
'2012-03-30T14:51:13-04:00'
describe
'1535430' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMV' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e446560354f85fadd22d5be338c2cb9d
fb8fe8c3590300da76cd9737fd84a0b278444cd3
'2012-03-30T14:36:35-04:00'
describe
'124056' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMW' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2d95348dcb9f5055ca8d13aa6e86737e
f4940f08d919b465a55d2c8e3c5fbb228fb5a95f
'2012-03-30T14:42:05-04:00'
describe
'37214' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMX' 'sip-files00017.pro'
409d91653dc43ef90ef0d0c265f0f9a8
d0ad0007a7a5adc5fc62804057034c4437515bf2
'2012-03-30T14:39:16-04:00'
describe
'35907' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMY' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d7ccf7f147e830750bde38d830116b42
adedb1d7c3e70e600d38de4ef4b2e4d4984b8d1c
'2012-03-30T14:48:58-04:00'
describe
'36852498' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6de3fc7ea95e02bda6d8c1b6a9369bba
52e902ff8191a7bceacba814c8ce7e8e01e6db9f
'2012-03-30T14:36:58-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNA' 'sip-files00017.txt'
be69729afd4e95b2a56ac05f0000f254
43f8dab36fcf4a85e25c9498765f540fa855a4e8
'2012-03-30T14:38:32-04:00'
describe
'8865' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNB' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
de5a3bbc0cffda074688b459d25e60ec
0bda8605cd87629afe3e1474568baf0851c7c0ef
'2012-03-30T14:46:44-04:00'
describe
'1548008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNC' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
9292d205c7f5595e25adbf50f87284ec
0a36a9384e8e335124aee49cf8c5f8a71a389f02
'2012-03-30T14:40:48-04:00'
describe
'100134' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLND' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b72efc60d5cfb6c9ec00bcec18936968
7bcf1e95df308dba84d27fee3aa0e84fe6ac006d
'2012-03-30T14:39:15-04:00'
describe
'37903' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNE' 'sip-files00018.pro'
a5d0bdba2493096cb59181dd6f2f16f0
acac668838ee72b0ba0253106ec609df315907d2
'2012-03-30T14:50:49-04:00'
describe
'29011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNF' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
8f47b417af5da01da0d4df221d1730a1
824e619027cc6d6a176a7496a4f4c4ff6cd36e25
'2012-03-30T14:52:55-04:00'
describe
'17483292' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNG' 'sip-files00018.tif'
084bc2fd852181eb7e6e736f3fec9e82
fd0bf94d6c0629fc64f5117fae1b728b4da68208
'2012-03-30T14:44:09-04:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNH' 'sip-files00018.txt'
ccd7e577c7639abb324381b58718ad5b
d5cb5e98b6f1c69378b34f0163081bf7ded5a614
'2012-03-30T14:54:45-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7073' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNI' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
25b0f54a9e569322f321e6492989fdf5
0dfebd2e6aec8bceb1222f673b2afeefda34d595
'2012-03-30T14:45:47-04:00'
describe
'1563498' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
53f8b9747cba65df0f7cd668cb8b2823
70a0106602cc458c56941c3d9210f6652e89a2f7
'2012-03-30T14:54:36-04:00'
describe
'100891' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNK' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
511db1d39f03cfd8ce15c59989055aa0
cd32a0b776b483ced33f57475576937448a1f958
'2012-03-30T14:43:15-04:00'
describe
'37580' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNL' 'sip-files00019.pro'
cc28cbe6c0860c6ee373aa95a375dc07
035c35aa175ddb25b250fb1843b9e12aa1492516
'2012-03-30T14:52:06-04:00'
describe
'29107' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNM' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
f2c5fe67be7331121b72665f7eabd5b1
7a4494fc3d15626a874c228d9a7b5993c99d67be
'2012-03-30T14:51:58-04:00'
describe
'37537320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNN' 'sip-files00019.tif'
9cf86cc8ac54cc4ca66be369c48ca6f8
a8b7beecfca5ea5c4368f8b35dd6e424c5ef6b0c
'2012-03-30T14:39:21-04:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNO' 'sip-files00019.txt'
844915f45c9e90fc71b4b565af3efdef
6995181811ec69691e94913365406c018a628387
'2012-03-30T14:48:43-04:00'
describe
'6993' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNP' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
bc3e4a71d4418d2cc011f10489e56192
47a8884c40cf1edbfe546033bd18a334930f55cf
describe
'1432044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
1155bef1ba22695a4a6be701318e1f6e
487f723d1e142829fd8df08d7121cab35e59a9bb
'2012-03-30T14:49:04-04:00'
describe
'100210' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNR' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
0325c8b49000c93bb3f0feb8d1043b4d
792bfd72625e645e02d0ad3f1e39a78cbf5b1778
'2012-03-30T14:44:03-04:00'
describe
'36990' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNS' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c82c149a3d7f05a243554347b458ab89
edb2293775a7d4b134e8223b0b805ccdfb265cbe
'2012-03-30T14:40:08-04:00'
describe
'30316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNT' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
ff7c9641cac970ab060535ad49999507
2eb84676474c69aaf90278277c9a569e9b954fbf
'2012-03-30T14:37:54-04:00'
describe
'16356176' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNU' 'sip-files00020.tif'
dfc27a67829e487725297f6fb0c94614
04172010be6f7b94875ebbee55f898545c545294
'2012-03-30T14:39:49-04:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4fe1630f87a23a3dcd370618c5a0047e
99e58d499b24fc6f5e7d61984e47f238100d1b08
'2012-03-30T14:45:09-04:00'
describe
'8721' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNW' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
be9662e3f7cdc24e1c53f2e206babddc
4b0155b65cce7d45aa148c0f82ff358bce20480f
'2012-03-30T14:44:06-04:00'
describe
'1505701' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNX' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
21528eee1d15dfd87d037f848b80a74c
43a0fc6180d3c463e7b79710f2bb56506fbd908e
describe
'102136' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNY' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3f2677fc6967b15b59fed7f41a716edf
96b92ca5859b2130ca3e8593d1aebebb99a6e208
'2012-03-30T14:38:02-04:00'
describe
'37933' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLNZ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
65d6aad6e94d22947d2c2863ee3fdcc9
a4d38bc2b6f6dc916ae3a448c2f7401a7ac534db
'2012-03-30T14:45:53-04:00'
describe
'30658' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOA' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
4b180be94e8b968c864279787da16134
e37de8d6b45ce73cb6538d94a4c3d203e2f1191a
'2012-03-30T14:43:42-04:00'
describe
'17392058' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOB' 'sip-files00021.tif'
590d14cfb205d57af817a5a85ab57e1b
7eabf75e6b0f1d81dfecb832444ee8bd146b4f9b
'2012-03-30T14:40:30-04:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
3ff3900d697268402e751030f8ee6841
948605402011c1c2ad270d2b98e9efc70cfe98af
'2012-03-30T14:44:18-04:00'
describe
'7553' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOD' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ca50dc15131038ee0c28a962b006b2ca
a09f3aebd244b42ca4a10fac9de7e50e6f637515
'2012-03-30T14:51:35-04:00'
describe
'1490399' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOE' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f48e214122eeb907900cbd7ddf7e8c77
1470adc574c670262a9e283d5cd0e40cf65486e8
'2012-03-30T14:37:39-04:00'
describe
'72439' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOF' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7d9ff3e19061adac7fafbf898dfc2c1f
94efe7b1f5a213e2e5e6fb4bbf55ba6fee6f4061
'2012-03-30T14:43:08-04:00'
describe
'20405' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOG' 'sip-files00022.pro'
16aa76b1c0a1a80550b5cf1af9c68add
f69fee3f9324766ffec7081dde7fefedb413c267
'2012-03-30T14:54:51-04:00'
describe
'19902' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOH' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
0d7c66cae49066ede9658b3b07638d02
b47ab1d3044ecca822863807dab95c7655c6c649
'2012-03-30T14:44:24-04:00'
describe
'15530150' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOI' 'sip-files00022.tif'
258f34544fb3cb4d31346704070f8a46
12c9c7811fd6a2d98b12c03499022c54678fc6ea
'2012-03-30T14:52:12-04:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOJ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
9d4e26ab74accf57bec447edea3d7e5c
a8e840ba08350284a8cf4c7c68f62ceea6e59a12
'2012-03-30T14:53:27-04:00'
describe
'5650' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOK' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
bc1f9d780effa10d0fede6accc0cb72d
2a0fdaad0bf9c4a08ac8255efe2f6253db7de315
'2012-03-30T14:47:58-04:00'
describe
'1496679' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOL' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
6f19b81a12332ccef2386a9062cc4178
d15585e1505a30ce10db541fac83c1c2b3baed17
'2012-03-30T14:38:19-04:00'
describe
'102010' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOM' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
08675b230547e1f306d6ce31d9af9252
6d16225965f853d8bb08fbb3992af7ab19b3967c
'2012-03-30T14:40:43-04:00'
describe
'36157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLON' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2fb624e8d0c43e23fd5168b48b508174
03ae4f8607de2bf3e7dcc3db740c31079d553b57
'2012-03-30T14:41:26-04:00'
describe
'29574' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOO' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
73053e0efddb25b64b707be1192cfba7
71e6ed1ee9142e959f8d2db04661170fc505e5be
'2012-03-30T14:49:40-04:00'
describe
'17122638' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOP' 'sip-files00023.tif'
87d67aa2924c25b0723b1aded43cc0f5
2d96f42638eccac600fddbd445227ccdf3abeafe
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOQ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8942a8bda8981b9f7b2a0a2dee41e231
32d91b1b5c6b9bbdec4ea5e73487732ee1f18fb2
'2012-03-30T14:53:19-04:00'
describe
'7445' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOR' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
fc17ee257bfcd93cf79b2210ceeae7af
8fd6541081f4b760f4481c618b44f202fdd5830c
'2012-03-30T14:44:37-04:00'
describe
'1538527' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOS' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
2ca0d84d70785dd15591fd4cb3ce8c5e
47d9ae239f21ca943cbc9709f0c96e13400dcf7c
'2012-03-30T14:49:36-04:00'
describe
'101686' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
b193866c73ce141e3fce6f8f31ddc173
e260a8ecc085ec8f31ea404f44d3cd0766ef9fba
'2012-03-30T14:36:37-04:00'
describe
'36722' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOU' 'sip-files00024.pro'
10dc633e02d869bf725be7b003b555cb
e1946f0e6c2b6d049524885e5353cc77d0d02520
'2012-03-30T14:42:58-04:00'
describe
'30132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOV' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
74096ffff9c71dd526afac9a2410447f
83f12a8a405bd8e0c40f6f286518ddadce948296
'2012-03-30T14:44:56-04:00'
describe
'17528636' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOW' 'sip-files00024.tif'
af45e4bcd61074332e5aa3c7c6c4fe08
c0bb0b5259f719268537fa67dcc484f4d1afbc32
'2012-03-30T14:37:19-04:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOX' 'sip-files00024.txt'
b44675fd98207cd74f8b2716a7ca0f20
d5a6a6feb35de28f8e533ffe87cf76b77480b68e
'2012-03-30T14:49:10-04:00'
describe
'7576' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOY' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
d26df986836e87848013c2e2142e9b9a
16c38d20a7cdda5d28554e71a4eaf5ddea88f2c3
'2012-03-30T14:52:47-04:00'
describe
'1508324' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLOZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a64a0ccada55439676a4de33b55c4e11
232ac66876b51a8ed08e715241918344daacbdc7
'2012-03-30T14:49:37-04:00'
describe
'92927' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8fc53bff4caa70daba6efd040faa2cc5
c6d4f677a0b486b9a675d7f3d45c80349345e762
'2012-03-30T14:46:22-04:00'
describe
'36873' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPB' 'sip-files00025.pro'
638b157a08f38e6ac97f9bd20af58fdc
781eb0a2e867ef0d0b0683b0b53ec981bc8cb28a
'2012-03-30T14:52:19-04:00'
describe
'26748' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPC' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
9f28a1cf4f9fc70bb6b9892a04076d7d
9a1d3032dc2d958f83e35206207dcc98349b1664
'2012-03-30T14:51:40-04:00'
describe
'16397092' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPD' 'sip-files00025.tif'
edba2bcebce0044205053e4fa5d7afe5
209eedc9368ce1f2a68252da24bec3e888dcf32b
'2012-03-30T14:53:57-04:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPE' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1a64106fc2daf47e49cef74f0c883866
fcf4ff67f33df3cdbd88a2fce9da628d9be542c4
'2012-03-30T14:37:01-04:00'
describe
'6685' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPF' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
4ede55ea2a79dc7c361c3c540a5eec6b
eb677849e5990c152422ee03e6e1e00525787e0b
'2012-03-30T14:49:09-04:00'
describe
'1590496' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
053858e178ab3de76e8e10f7972c7560
82461c18f13ee690b7da0acd1b8569928bf61eb1
'2012-03-30T14:48:59-04:00'
describe
'96795' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
3a1037a2a59237e90fa10a672268e9b6
9cdcde24ad1957d3254e6f2e558d9ce50c079b3f
'2012-03-30T14:51:26-04:00'
describe
'35812' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPI' 'sip-files00026.pro'
eb1ce70b81f8a54936b90ff2b6203235
4623c79667047ccc1f1415370064d09981988e73
'2012-03-30T14:47:51-04:00'
describe
'27944' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPJ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
2b07d70db95f7cd0011a764a9c597867
f5c95155658ca971fcd72d974dd9eb5b93e58378
'2012-03-30T14:38:36-04:00'
describe
'38184912' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPK' 'sip-files00026.tif'
3a10d4607c439854b33e6ffa6e971116
d48d1e20f8dd2773f708150cb60ad40691768e9c
'2012-03-30T14:38:26-04:00'
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPL' 'sip-files00026.txt'
02f23411c3475bd59ae75b17ad7e65eb
4b0b22fc3a4dd58ff2cfe0b31d51e409888547a4
'2012-03-30T14:41:27-04:00'
describe
'6932' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
f660029292d35eb6620063dbb0eea0f1
cdbd7b0398b95a77c6ff4156be7c48baf9f11cfd
'2012-03-30T14:39:50-04:00'
describe
'1561477' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPN' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
59a837c4e39127e25065d11703ef1bd0
d5d113b6bbde5d4c9ceb1090aff4c274c5e7deb7
'2012-03-30T14:49:52-04:00'
describe
'100112' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPO' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
278b21437a08df89cee02fd0c45129be
3b7d4e45553a16aca945f22f3053ee99ad0d05f1
'2012-03-30T14:41:13-04:00'
describe
'36391' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
c6bdbdb3bb248d99fb38ae09743470ee
4eb835002037f74053d252e555d07a64592830a0
'2012-03-30T14:40:27-04:00'
describe
'28738' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPQ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f38dee944590d65c373f6cac3dfe81bd
ab6795f20530216a245ded170ce681a69149e569
'2012-03-30T14:42:21-04:00'
describe
'37488416' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fc2f36b74e966237428ba98f5d04f03c
eee2356e87cf0e3d381e967fa765aaa51b0fd3d5
'2012-03-30T14:37:06-04:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPS' 'sip-files00027.txt'
f3f6b1be8e1f1cc4ed54515f2050e352
5be205c5a491fcd5661c2105a9b9b920a0f39b81
'2012-03-30T14:54:30-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7099' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPT' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
2fd59f2bb75ca5d0ef364a8c6cc2450a
b79015b353d3de1a729a4c2e7185787511d4a34f
describe
'1491952' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPU' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4c6c1907d07355e7395f1e57e954cc6a
77c93bbc6d18b5e86fa1f987063cefc5355a2166
'2012-03-30T14:42:45-04:00'
describe
'132573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPV' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1d4bf3c6352cfa61320d513dee765266
ab8ead7a813e3228e62e497103744ce534087413
'2012-03-30T14:47:26-04:00'
describe
'36939' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPW' 'sip-files00028.pro'
35466da378b2cbc3478f18578b6b2729
d3cbdb1d036d780ac438b1ef7ae4ba7ceb6474ba
'2012-03-30T14:41:33-04:00'
describe
'38016' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPX' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2089a9a516c90e6519c4327a262e61b1
a18110978f84ce11a7f4ec322df2b975bdc96ad6
'2012-03-30T14:49:18-04:00'
describe
'35808862' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPY' 'sip-files00028.tif'
583068abd3394c48010c2cf0676a63aa
8257cdc7e93eb72d91012c468193296e657b6ac4
'2012-03-30T14:47:37-04:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLPZ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
a3141ec48f20593ce8989624089473ae
e1549ddaf645935100e36f9f856aca202796dc4d
'2012-03-30T14:50:02-04:00'
describe
'9873' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQA' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
7a1c637842ca3c6ed364e892c6478cee
babb5dab407e0f58462bd9f2179abcd3b26d32f4
'2012-03-30T14:45:36-04:00'
describe
'1568425' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQB' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8e43443f8a61233dbf7b53aa8baffa28
4e4bc9c36b49bccc0e0f3202303ed83ce46d2c7f
'2012-03-30T14:48:15-04:00'
describe
'120698' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQC' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
a83f50fb2b7890d071d5db5f546d94ec
8e9927b1f133575ef71eca4504122cfaafa67d0a
'2012-03-30T14:47:56-04:00'
describe
'37469' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQD' 'sip-files00029.pro'
53e30bf73d8fe5473de2f09947c037c6
ffa7a77b9d1b39d722caebe8be025eabcb34bb1e
'2012-03-30T14:51:59-04:00'
describe
'33973' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQE' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
870aca0566b50f013355093f8233ec78
cef76320eabda05e33dbe1a9c31386905552352f
'2012-03-30T14:52:40-04:00'
describe
'37644396' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
edc0e39f349eff62b0f7fe2be467bd8f
e684b891ebfd5bc590cf9f38d1607c6c237b54c1
'2012-03-30T14:52:26-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQG' 'sip-files00029.txt'
642597990d7b87ca78df8d2519b8b6fd
f47f2734afdb0b5bc35ac697157b4a2ccca29694
'2012-03-30T14:39:39-04:00'
describe
'8048' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
4c2c013143a0cebbfac961521eea160b
b85ecc5a4f7a991fef331610c830f3ce94e63cfa
'2012-03-30T14:39:51-04:00'
describe
'1476296' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQI' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
abcc03435d09d4b4ad82a2f07320d2a8
5dd655d5f4eac0063286aca35b356c4f1e85c968
'2012-03-30T14:45:49-04:00'
describe
'129132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQJ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
81b3d490cf412d51ff920f9585b67232
053be051e1071fbbf234451c3ea38931c99e9bc2
describe
'35639' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQK' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b689fc957389501333a90f45ff01cb7a
f415df06098fd135be3c8e47bed4719f79b569ee
'2012-03-30T14:42:24-04:00'
describe
'38182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQL' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
14d95cc8a0324d863811e55d081377e5
b072ccd95b87491b482178d79c08e84f1c248d40
describe
'35433090' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQM' 'sip-files00030.tif'
5ed755e858e3fb64108ea577006c6840
238601cc1c2bc55d801c4ef6ed08d817bb0e38e7
'2012-03-30T14:43:36-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQN' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c5c4054311db681a881311c4985d889d
7814bb76f05673b7be43172ce527b2d4b5dfa602
'2012-03-30T14:50:45-04:00'
describe
'10035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQO' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
6beeb99c1b093a89be5c9f0144320aca
0d0a02081696b3f2430dd3b83dda97a703ff5306
'2012-03-30T14:43:52-04:00'
describe
'1555749' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
55f9d6c0a6dc18e2b02b42fd9554eda2
f371157158f8dd2aadc9a12b96b64c0a374e3721
'2012-03-30T14:40:04-04:00'
describe
'97459' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQQ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e4096e0494d25f72feefe9079484ee49
d24c0b85895a7259c5fc8fa25256c0ccf7655821
'2012-03-30T14:41:49-04:00'
describe
'20058' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQR' 'sip-files00031.pro'
84fd56a66fbd80ee0775c3365c06238e
d2b3550e5a800cfb9d968d75b4d607dcab6f0160
'2012-03-30T14:54:29-04:00'
describe
'26050' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
16fa6473b11296f116d46efc0cac8d04
f55bd720ab90772cb773f899e20155f4579c6a18
'2012-03-30T14:43:50-04:00'
describe
'37340972' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQT' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7ab4b47c54d72ab3c79d44ba8ea84559
60c518372dd682d41ba02a5bf267f375827f5a18
'2012-03-30T14:47:50-04:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQU' 'sip-files00031.txt'
0bca5f51b6880f69b770321719217b03
80013db875b828557a35974382297f10a85459d6
'2012-03-30T14:37:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6489' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQV' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
f3bf3e37057d2c008cbb1ec11fb42e22
d605b653065ed3816f5fce3816a4f96558b1fa28
'2012-03-30T14:50:53-04:00'
describe
'1551727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQW' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
db9bd2e2729e9b51ae269c86eb157988
23d94292954d6ea0a608186239eb32fda7679ebc
'2012-03-30T14:52:17-04:00'
describe
'94237' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQX' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
d6ace13fd8d2d125f14d2375ac5fed9e
be13fdfda1f071034a9ce9f1a2b32615488eed51
'2012-03-30T14:51:32-04:00'
describe
'39172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3cc31d96b53a138ddc08a81527c4a535
289c9477c1fbbcd1b5b523525695624f7aa934c0
'2012-03-30T14:45:45-04:00'
describe
'27394' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLQZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a874e6b17b39d8d534fb66ceacf571f6
0939aefbafaaacabd7c76fca804bd55536e33ef1
'2012-03-30T14:40:53-04:00'
describe
'37243428' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRA' 'sip-files00032.tif'
d746968fbe02f6c0fe7aa8367b9f4383
981121f4ab2cde3560ec958df96d77573f0d5132
'2012-03-30T14:47:22-04:00'
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d485af1f56f5b11ea48ea03072395a08
0fc7efd5167a21001b7efe4abfbf111be01f3605
'2012-03-30T14:43:31-04:00'
describe
'6575' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRC' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
b77c02cef6939dd85019a78830bf1396
5646b57d98f0467f9ebb2db0b3ec88b7c11d65a9
'2012-03-30T14:47:28-04:00'
describe
'1449101' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRD' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
c5bb9b93cd627d471c44cc5f84866698
f7198c0cdf4d567824a9e08380209f17ffe8039b
'2012-03-30T14:43:41-04:00'
describe
'93510' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRE' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
13c935adec6730a827aa667d5084f13b
2d0e8054fdd262582150acc1fe20fe81b3c35514
'2012-03-30T14:38:08-04:00'
describe
'35129' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRF' 'sip-files00033.pro'
b4a2ccd8f5381a82df4df04736c45346
8e46f6ee04e8fda78750f4c8a4a9d51dd8fc75f1
'2012-03-30T14:45:25-04:00'
describe
'27538' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRG' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7d06ea4f76499099b7c164fe19ef8478
28e7b57f81bec44c24b3a2ba18af733ab14285d4
'2012-03-30T14:46:45-04:00'
describe
'34780436' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRH' 'sip-files00033.tif'
a15f1faf15be28e38f4a9b70f107f990
7b1ebe1bff075cc82bc157753148bd568e237aea
'2012-03-30T14:53:46-04:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRI' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bdddd3abe6f6d629908723726f2e17c5
60f352cf5b4f192410de0f55100ca954ec0f1835
describe
'6940' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRJ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
f7ab0a772eb51cfb5d62752b1f597790
79ae391e42a617608fc50cd2881cfa74fd67e99b
'2012-03-30T14:54:57-04:00'
describe
'1614863' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRK' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
140ab02d42dacf604af3345b119de1fe
792abf1ba96adf648484bbd99e65fd5edf70f7fa
'2012-03-30T14:51:04-04:00'
describe
'119673' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRL' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
330bf432e37d6c0a3c7bffd5e451f668
6677bb9cfce7d3257092668daa1a1ba6e3dcf879
'2012-03-30T14:47:17-04:00'
describe
'36691' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRM' 'sip-files00034.pro'
22aa200080cfda31cad78a7a4f7b35db
23196921c5f795482247c60ea8b98d3cc8fdb1ce
'2012-03-30T14:38:43-04:00'
describe
'34016' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRN' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
bafdd403d596d5aff4b6f3d72f794068
2880476e1d8335910ef36e36d5bd3694eae228d1
'2012-03-30T14:42:16-04:00'
describe
'23608774' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRO' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2cacbf53afaab49dae366adb57d5c4bd
4eb35e4b463f426bf462c7a46d07d7eab05c4e1a
'2012-03-30T14:39:18-04:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7a442edea24e8265877cd34ff4a99adc
733ee65b4e29854c678ee0b1e40c89987297da08
'2012-03-30T14:41:32-04:00'
describe
'8548' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRQ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
8a1632b8993956fd737661430505587a
c2d6abaf0d06b6e9d956abdb10ea7f3d8f4f117f
'2012-03-30T14:47:29-04:00'
describe
'1579704' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
be05377f1767aa28e406eb6e67ff3deb
85a72af370331e5520c69827998108f35f9130f4
'2012-03-30T14:46:42-04:00'
describe
'100330' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRS' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
668ee0a896e484c6cf40e4d0e77c06f3
18f5c7307e1c78f7e1525f8d0e1b63b3cfc09d20
'2012-03-30T14:46:00-04:00'
describe
'35960' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRT' 'sip-files00035.pro'
afd3e78ac1756936ecc728fffc3e4084
cc12adb0287878f662dba1fd859f9ca07ece931e
describe
'28762' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRU' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
c58d2b9ae3bf37630206bfbd349f3860
bdfbd55b90977e9a09f5d04a5d770fe679dcc8be
'2012-03-30T14:45:32-04:00'
describe
'21011986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRV' 'sip-files00035.tif'
48430e3864ce5f0ab03f6cf39a43d784
f105d8630dabbaeeed0861b83c87908038b5332e
'2012-03-30T14:41:52-04:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRW' 'sip-files00035.txt'
897c87677f955523ab58b635fe83fb8b
2dd29712b054b2e5f883825a1d6df9e693322f7b
'2012-03-30T14:38:54-04:00'
describe
'7254' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRX' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
5246090fb84ef90da6892f20120676c7
785f28e86258b30094e684ad73bd42b54bc6fa1b
'2012-03-30T14:41:38-04:00'
describe
'1546376' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRY' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
0ccb3534f81dbf21b3bc4d26e320120a
5e9c7106cc4e40d527dcc86c188ed58a402e710c
'2012-03-30T14:48:33-04:00'
describe
'113490' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLRZ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
47f40129862a975840baa969163d025c
e31e14aa4bbb1d78503532ea13ef03b509523e18
'2012-03-30T14:37:17-04:00'
describe
'37936' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSA' 'sip-files00036.pro'
513e2162d0bdc5707614a89b79a494b5
78c158f863fb368b0e13ad5dfdce4fe89df31248
'2012-03-30T14:38:49-04:00'
describe
'33171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSB' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d42e6535c1be150c6e9e087d451091d1
16514fe306c277046d3c094b43790cb0d0858105
'2012-03-30T14:50:50-04:00'
describe
'37115132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSC' 'sip-files00036.tif'
05b811234a6ca55988d35383c3246e40
bce4601c7d3a0c04480eaea4706c1f4f9d8a8e22
'2012-03-30T14:52:11-04:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSD' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3f30b5ecf13d2d7e57ba4b4c23d3f6e9
62362c3fe596ebf0064046e22e43c655df1485cb
'2012-03-30T14:53:26-04:00'
describe
'8282' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a715c098ce398db5de49edd71d737ccd
44689b32755d4851943e73d7b52565d6585c9822
'2012-03-30T14:54:19-04:00'
describe
'1477536' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSF' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
08447d8fa204d95e4d01342fe5b3af92
3f3b416c71dc1cfac8814c26ea8dd251e1fb3624
'2012-03-30T14:44:49-04:00'
describe
'72591' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
9c13c53033e04743ac28d41a3795a806
c646cb0a95da9992e8c2cda9898aaf59aea54a1c
'2012-03-30T14:52:20-04:00'
describe
'18337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSH' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5fdee1b336803a61013d1f4505b30e69
b4f765bbae3ff03349df2f6dab24bc739c42f44f
'2012-03-30T14:49:17-04:00'
describe
'20820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSI' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
da0ef5eb333d13b594bd297209a3e440
7576f6285ee91f66715153035575d29c4a65f237
'2012-03-30T14:36:23-04:00'
describe
'35463116' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSJ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0863d34ca99fd94044babd61b02cbf61
e89633898b197c0e298e0cd53f0a98918113c81e
'2012-03-30T14:38:46-04:00'
describe
'768' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSK' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b78de13bc77dcec6507f9ff653d28384
664800f8a2f34404ea0b0ddc344b1c709a5de739
'2012-03-30T14:54:33-04:00'
describe
'5121' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
2de35f3122432d930fb11c8b1de1de40
234061f3cc081667550629e523b05ea189259ef1
'2012-03-30T14:38:18-04:00'
describe
'1539072' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSM' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
89491335e86844b8aa12eaef1d9ab113
c90e2a8a7e4c9e5fc7f3ad2cefa491ae548683f5
'2012-03-30T14:50:19-04:00'
describe
'72424' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f83ab98d1f3941d14745a77d046438f6
2192feb0a81b0d06abd0ca6380ec63ccbbe41bba
'2012-03-30T14:47:05-04:00'
describe
'19938' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSO' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e88346c3561ca069b10995008e83312f
ac2fa4416534353cea35cf8656982c5c34f80988
'2012-03-30T14:46:36-04:00'
describe
'18673' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
95f37096828131fd0c150f6e41c81b0a
0f14c5b1e79475cd4ba8610036d5ea2bcf8b4158
'2012-03-30T14:38:06-04:00'
describe
'36949528' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
b46b9fa2b17e3e0eee8dfa7faea7183e
75ca41d09b947ac208c9c92264df31c243bf5442
'2012-03-30T14:53:24-04:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
547ad30be19a1070a80716331925fe72
e6dcc77e54e8ef9e8e1347337e775b095327dc3f
'2012-03-30T14:50:11-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4967' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSS' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ad8047a15da798c8c23509601f537ba9
4f62fb162dd71906e65f0c0762601cad5e77c2dc
'2012-03-30T14:46:34-04:00'
describe
'1533643' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLST' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
58187ffb75d756d490a62a84aa4087e5
a6573859043227bb9e29f1425ec72ef6575975d6
'2012-03-30T14:45:39-04:00'
describe
'100797' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
c52f87e2afb9ddb9dbdedfcb81a16bc0
bc01b42df8bed87d99f69f09fd63a301cd4ee2b0
describe
'35694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSV' 'sip-files00039.pro'
3f403c74567c785efe55fe886535ca0c
599903883866461e3e3a7f58391072db814cf5a6
'2012-03-30T14:55:14-04:00'
describe
'29498' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSW' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ebb6f65a4d6f668478f521f20c0321e4
43683beeda334efdfc02516d4314bf0797ac4cc6
'2012-03-30T14:40:57-04:00'
describe
'36821156' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
abd713b3240cb018b4d3bc97ea227380
68455cde48c46951eaa90bdcbbddc61203093f4d
'2012-03-30T14:50:00-04:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSY' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8c3c6c4e181f0c60d8b8b7ef3609b3f7
3a32a41e4c390af26c6a08f8b37db7bdb412d8d3
describe
'7269' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLSZ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6866e664faed5056bbdfe0ac49a61b8d
9639687ccedef701ade7fd90fec57916269ad5e3
'2012-03-30T14:45:26-04:00'
describe
'1529620' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTA' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4d12a58445fbecde85bd8cbc5e2171ad
796e5c0c0753793d5c838aab243d4c7b5e062a93
'2012-03-30T14:49:03-04:00'
describe
'98579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTB' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1026eb511dab1ca193b34bf61b6340da
74e505d5239be37cfac3c503eefa328aba889839
'2012-03-30T14:44:32-04:00'
describe
'35732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTC' 'sip-files00040.pro'
110466d9684b0e4797cc8d0ffa6e433b
ca8539e133f6547d70f9b8b64d08add4393ca50c
'2012-03-30T14:39:25-04:00'
describe
'27901' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTD' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
677603a7a61dc494dafac99e4c30c0dd
f5964b784351d468e8489cf59abf4721ac672f5d
'2012-03-30T14:49:45-04:00'
describe
'36724920' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
99529729b474026fb52efba9d253b282
df10ef3098151ea5895be443c2b9406e7112d626
'2012-03-30T14:51:01-04:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTF' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1eb5d7e3feec9ce801edbf8a979f17c1
2a9fcdf8bf3a66b02609a82546171900ed3a6c0e
'2012-03-30T14:49:16-04:00'
describe
'6786' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTG' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c54bad6cf7e75218daa9c34053a038c1
16fa3c9bd70c21ca35ffffae356a1005471806c7
describe
'1551754' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTH' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4f7ae64885b63d9dbeaa7b77b23b1baf
222dbb82638be4197eb0ee37fa6d8edf45946bd2
describe
'94707' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTI' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
44f71d050e0d1795789a2db3d055bdf5
c50ee6bfb8f90e708839238e3e7fd76754cec8e4
'2012-03-30T14:43:27-04:00'
describe
'36534' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTJ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
fc60c1db938961644ea1dd2bbb34816d
16ff2ea054a4f188a2bb48bf71fbb533c0dde910
'2012-03-30T14:54:23-04:00'
describe
'26833' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTK' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4489c12b8dcbe7a23c55cf9c53e707a4
f7e7af7ef82ec9102b7fa84fe1eec5800858340e
describe
'37254296' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTL' 'sip-files00041.tif'
53a0e0db3cc39c1b46c5479d98e2006c
b05ef460f2aba117121b033266f51787d8954102
'2012-03-30T14:38:59-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTM' 'sip-files00041.txt'
7d61ecf81fcdc0bd2e40ff4921e4f303
0506117a09444429dacb9ab1adb3c8bbff2e8ba7
describe
'6675' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTN' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
89fe7fbcc2b66884c89bce0df286e536
c174bde08b9ead1f9f7fc65e6e97e5e308580f3f
'2012-03-30T14:51:37-04:00'
describe
'1523388' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTO' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
97b390bddee4f042645cf4bce566ce92
80f111f51b324a047fe39dcc9a05cb4ee82d3198
'2012-03-30T14:49:29-04:00'
describe
'99063' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTP' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
fdd3c3f7768f0a21b3e127601104ee63
dc22681f12b6d14f7e5fddbeff80219afbc196a3
'2012-03-30T14:38:40-04:00'
describe
'36967' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTQ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
f856599e8a10e6552b7e3e901922ea00
38b7c28f212e1ec44a35352bc663c872ee49dd87
'2012-03-30T14:40:29-04:00'
describe
'28412' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
bf4751767ac6b4b435cd71c7b8fddf5b
93120a2a387bdfdf63b1dd87b0f53755731734e1
'2012-03-30T14:54:04-04:00'
describe
'36575004' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
5196a8035971050a87244ab6b5b0def9
19905182129e6c883a96e4e0721ff466dd4ddd85
'2012-03-30T14:53:13-04:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTT' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e9523cfd03e0c0ee42c607b6eda7742c
27c4980da3269798cceabf1910a057eb5a171939
'2012-03-30T14:41:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6891' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTU' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e551549f06c6f75c799658ebf0aa8fa8
2609a31aac37409c30285311578bf7a053968959
'2012-03-30T14:42:20-04:00'
describe
'1533875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTV' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2e91a3714836da836d3d0ac63cdf5382
e71e4fbe559517d8eebaaf636c00e8de2150b410
'2012-03-30T14:41:14-04:00'
describe
'98848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTW' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
74eeecaf9a7b09b17f6d1ac4f073f119
172ffb91514163be17360e4f42ae83084a2d3ed1
'2012-03-30T14:37:38-04:00'
describe
'36101' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTX' 'sip-files00043.pro'
0539bc33af3ea4e1ae269417fe293167
49b787566f181c54f8df16a80c23d24b4f92d8da
'2012-03-30T14:37:53-04:00'
describe
'28701' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTY' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
9bbfe4f35f2905708fb8d1f0a0dda4f6
e92328d435aac928643496e366c55dd9cabfa60a
'2012-03-30T14:47:45-04:00'
describe
'36826320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLTZ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
30927583a8ac927d506ccc7d13c6ad65
3f7faddc93a52ed63526d6ad8dfaadb3f210afee
'2012-03-30T14:41:08-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUA' 'sip-files00043.txt'
5347b884c5b7a1bc0fa12032e0e99ff2
2784ab8385cbc6dc47f052409ada470e252e908e
'2012-03-30T14:37:49-04:00'
describe
'6999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUB' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
48fdf3279b3c896016a2d360306f343c
cec74ccab3ec1a39abc9e9eb87de9fe1a58b31b3
'2012-03-30T14:53:03-04:00'
describe
'1502900' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUC' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
38b6709d67eedfce46374bcdb96ca135
7586400ea3327e45b127374e68613ec66580da9c
'2012-03-30T14:53:43-04:00'
describe
'97289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUD' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
8c631db50654d7c904f217b4a0690134
444aca69253d28760fb497628f36f5b95ed908b9
'2012-03-30T14:41:46-04:00'
describe
'37225' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
53c96722c09b01cf4fdf3731bb770455
29c8fd8215fb78d0a5ee573b1dda217e7ff8363d
'2012-03-30T14:44:39-04:00'
describe
'27622' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUF' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
974703063896aa759ea9d1cf7ef127f1
694678ade13dcac06e894466ca51f32f37e84fab
'2012-03-30T14:46:56-04:00'
describe
'36082096' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUG' 'sip-files00044.tif'
79d8fee5e91df82fb4b96b72cf7d61a2
6573598ecc2971013b879c10ccc6278fac6b81f3
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUH' 'sip-files00044.txt'
3d00b6301e9bfd5e89e4ce2a9a06d763
9f67458784d08c00981cfe935c782b685e94fe4c
'2012-03-30T14:53:20-04:00'
describe
'6674' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUI' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
dc39b464f354060e441d6e2a0a0f5660
46a09838af6e43f0aca2400a175e40a7e4e90135
'2012-03-30T14:43:25-04:00'
describe
'1533664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUJ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
a29b4847be60c24888014a07aa799a84
00f1601a4dccbba9ddecaccc84957eb7689203f1
'2012-03-30T14:50:55-04:00'
describe
'69890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUK' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
411df399c1cab7817647d2643c8eded4
899a4e055837f8e0aba179ec3037e1d8b62e950e
describe
'18288' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c230ef88c6a42cacdecc37dff7831d7b
63126951878b7fb483b0bd49d5dfe6e7672a6cc5
describe
'18632' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUM' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
fa704ccedc7c6bf2e54c89beaece7010
dc55f5e605517a9c77c5896728a20e01ae26bf6f
'2012-03-30T14:42:25-04:00'
describe
'36818532' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
4a73f595da1e89d9d022bfbf2e3d8199
bd13bf4c2926659da53b957f234ee05d04381e7a
'2012-03-30T14:45:04-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
302819b47065fa2d51ff045febe0033e
04fc5975e60b77375f8d1528005286654fa7b066
'2012-03-30T14:50:25-04:00'
describe
'4649' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUP' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
952aacca20cb3d3022f9db78a86b70ef
ced5b0eac8c170fc70e35ecf9fddfd0db7ea50a9
'2012-03-30T14:46:26-04:00'
describe
'1561236' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5015c35a9f26c6e5f86a5cef921a173b
60482b0f62c86c205714b995d41e607b1f697277
'2012-03-30T14:41:57-04:00'
describe
'98395' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUR' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
cef96a2e46a4bede4350ae17370272c4
a759a037bda65845deac50c73d02f46e1047a4e3
'2012-03-30T14:54:32-04:00'
describe
'35577' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUS' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3cafda717544851e8ce31121daad4d6a
9dad331131684e0767abfc4cb3d1dcbb83c56a63
describe
'29167' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUT' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2c97c20aad70c9010d9ea7195fa19afb
aef44c2397a147e73ee45f22468253cf2071d111
describe
'37483080' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUU' 'sip-files00046.tif'
809678fb3615075d2b93447fd449adf1
804e9a85ca94f960eb92a79afac66485c919056c
'2012-03-30T14:42:41-04:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUV' 'sip-files00046.txt'
9a61951d862c58e5e0d2a56e5d2b9ee6
5efd2dd9eb49f224fffed27156317a903e8730b9
'2012-03-30T14:42:52-04:00'
describe
'7095' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUW' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
7f93e29bdd07ab4c87d78392ee26910f
8399a53d2afed988fb8edadb96999b49390cc18e
'2012-03-30T14:45:38-04:00'
describe
'1564323' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUX' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
735d05983a0b592cf741915df46e1c75
e483f71752b80b5ada595fe292522c00086b98b0
'2012-03-30T14:46:58-04:00'
describe
'97076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUY' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6c70068a3ade821514b2dadef14c568f
66197f50b91e2416217f3003a62bbe51e7c82e8e
'2012-03-30T14:48:23-04:00'
describe
'37202' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLUZ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
5ff476f6ec131d5820b0db783365d576
9e573c1f48060b255bf0a3e4043287649425711a
'2012-03-30T14:49:00-04:00'
describe
'28245' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVA' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4dfe8a2442cfab3923a06ca6e597f50a
5e465c13e8cd72f4b0a6ac2f99a37e88e5207f0a
'2012-03-30T14:45:29-04:00'
describe
'37557060' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVB' 'sip-files00047.tif'
57f9a5cc3655d36480081e743810526d
32954daa0844b1c284816fc6935ed6c631e29d06
'2012-03-30T14:50:14-04:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVC' 'sip-files00047.txt'
64f027c8a4de391b71f1ac1b672faac6
c4d3f135a2a2456cc57428261dc9a5e25e6cbc9b
'2012-03-30T14:52:38-04:00'
describe
'6762' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVD' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9292dc47bac7f8109bc9a10f689e2a15
48a36c2bb0df43d1e7f9f9f080bcc889442d9fe0
'2012-03-30T14:44:14-04:00'
describe
'1517123' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVE' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a3f99187d94d4fbc96c6f248ecb8a6cc
430a8b9cb39c853e9dc4c7d10ac37af5a8cf40b2
'2012-03-30T14:47:55-04:00'
describe
'93483' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVF' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
ca40b5288fa194bc34a3903d2ba9a92e
825af6332eab49df7d5f64f08d6c81f29bbe246c
'2012-03-30T14:41:55-04:00'
describe
'36258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVG' 'sip-files00048.pro'
378638eca764c7c35d632f2924129691
9fe6abcd4d9bfd8d41690004a398f1141bd4d0f7
'2012-03-30T14:37:52-04:00'
describe
'27359' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVH' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
59e1c95f62fb316ce89215860164e006
f44f81a333d2f12b80e1cf24decf5a4c7aa28429
'2012-03-30T14:46:10-04:00'
describe
'36423732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVI' 'sip-files00048.tif'
fc9cd506efea6562f61ac6eef19a0460
d92904e5a18dffe7e8c7ef453965809bff6efccc
'2012-03-30T14:37:22-04:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
15ae855659e0f50143ded466087c420c
cf8a2f3be0e88dcfb8f188dfed092d0999d05b65
'2012-03-30T14:48:40-04:00'
describe
'6699' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVK' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
d19420f7a53df2177a7498e57abb5672
b17a26c535846cf83a29050da8536f571581102a
'2012-03-30T14:47:54-04:00'
describe
'1551684' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVL' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
cbd19f1f90f4eaf6c35f1cdce8cfc43f
a856f68698edc582a5e75ba30c0a0a4d70d6e985
'2012-03-30T14:37:46-04:00'
describe
'100573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVM' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2aa760a47582d9b7b10a6c906b4093de
cc74b2639efb8d1b803eafcf345426a62cffb614
'2012-03-30T14:47:10-04:00'
describe
'36822' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVN' 'sip-files00049.pro'
0252861b5336aeeb1c4a80148a62ec92
e53c64cf7f9732b8ba63d0d963160603db23e279
describe
'28963' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVO' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
0b9d5b956ea746c23c65b5874616634e
d089e576811cf9d2a6f80cd5eee1a3e478853231
describe
'37254168' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVP' 'sip-files00049.tif'
26edfa587fb072d75d63c68c96fa34e1
3d106d44ff8aeb1b082738e11335c399bb6bf1c3
'2012-03-30T14:42:51-04:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVQ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
b5b61eccec3c66187ddf6a33b3f9fe36
76cde401df99c49bed3867bb8b30ef0c887429e0
'2012-03-30T14:47:57-04:00'
describe
'7144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVR' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e79aa6f9c80de160c081dc3a8f865962
7f5fcc939e6e4316b807871d1aac98bdd84f06b3
'2012-03-30T14:48:35-04:00'
describe
'1527999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVS' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
479e3eb90a6145ed06c3144e0b9c8f59
9cdd579c71d9f6dac0a5e8093af2578f74193540
'2012-03-30T14:45:13-04:00'
describe
'103665' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVT' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
2bf311483fca14636437a150ad5ae107
7f5b9ae9d8ba21c07e6e893dd57e48f42fbe1eb6
'2012-03-30T14:49:54-04:00'
describe
'36694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVU' 'sip-files00050.pro'
2f29506c55cb68ece5f378fad6d9c88b
89be25bb8f66e9140264936d131917e837c52bcb
'2012-03-30T14:43:23-04:00'
describe
'30009' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVV' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
8c1abec1c98dc671af2cd64d3355a515
7fe7e67a0e28e1c7a04d3d7360b976e9511d1aed
'2012-03-30T14:55:06-04:00'
describe
'36686124' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVW' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d527a9f80af8bb21a0e29bb1e0b28ac6
5722f2fcaf8a48c98332aaf2f339876a2b306a17
'2012-03-30T14:51:19-04:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVX' 'sip-files00050.txt'
f8674e1070c666ee8d95449c3056aab9
7d923e55d1d19b3c4b900d98293c3e9b360e8638
'2012-03-30T14:41:18-04:00'
describe
'7494' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVY' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e45348688f19afce238a078ca22aa070
7073913b1214657f490ce704fe6e4f4c244f21d1
'2012-03-30T14:40:20-04:00'
describe
'1584274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLVZ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6a827bf838f6a4bd2aa33be8b7684abe
440b9f672e7a9d5c64590a078bd9754c35cfda3e
'2012-03-30T14:53:50-04:00'
describe
'98527' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWA' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
810a27bc8c2de28d1222c586b560791a
e755f2edec7f1511d24a9a86829c910106da3e66
'2012-03-30T14:38:21-04:00'
describe
'36790' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWB' 'sip-files00051.pro'
28c91f951ec9777ec31f4f0249ceb455
ee2f32890b9f4679b7c0318ca67034e7227ac8dd
'2012-03-30T14:46:20-04:00'
describe
'28365' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWC' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d4e1f64037d1911b0005cecaca87449d
abe87d9c38dfd08d9feb257c7d31d07d1355494b
'2012-03-30T14:40:02-04:00'
describe
'38035728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWD' 'sip-files00051.tif'
0664590555db8f19d443cc2095f0a978
7bb02eb842e80eafddc406f10ca1386cf13c02dd
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWE' 'sip-files00051.txt'
e9bb440a49001f20dce68288179b5e3c
c157f0990d3bdcb9d6f7eb3edf5e939df5ca63d9
'2012-03-30T14:51:02-04:00'
describe
'7013' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWF' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
504c24c73880bea94d62638486c266d1
d68608f3e26732aed8200726cae4128aac293da4
describe
'1548271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c3764840d81947fbaf8cfc78ee88b2ca
92387ea4b255e6eab176211f3a2d37d7cc410442
'2012-03-30T14:50:28-04:00'
describe
'98853' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWH' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
43287e42ce3532097bea50022fb5be9f
ecc1265e9688c7284b34ecbeff698b7ee4bf7374
'2012-03-30T14:46:27-04:00'
describe
'36035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWI' 'sip-files00052.pro'
4d02cab85af63d1e8c0a33a0c584d96f
9eef8a6b7ded8cebb5d8eeadd51840aeabcc7d98
describe
'28959' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWJ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
954a7b49a86c354b6e74de295bb37e18
bf49a6a0aef290dc0a45a60169d5e7110b35bb74
'2012-03-30T14:43:01-04:00'
describe
'37173976' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWK' 'sip-files00052.tif'
6d4728b330c357fc7f7f160c9554768c
4ee65ec737875a421cc7034998451c2c5a0f9b7b
'2012-03-30T14:47:04-04:00'
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8538b2a949a186ade242d1070f1a4356
088f9f1477bf46dc2adf2620a6ff6009a9c3c11a
describe
'6976' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e6b0e82a4352b8553cb684b6fe15cd94
07ad9442f4c2115cdf09a10607b05b3fb7af5947
'2012-03-30T14:39:45-04:00'
describe
'1546209' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWN' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
19f01b828dc9b509e9ea080c002e3663
f9cfb72b8848da2b98c66c0d9d9dd283f019541e
'2012-03-30T14:41:34-04:00'
describe
'56221' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWO' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
a48eb3fd417d30d95be913f56e67bc5f
b57de9b514c382915f47c391fc1842366cf8e0aa
describe
'7895' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWP' 'sip-files00053.pro'
ec55ab1ac88f815b48dbdee221d895af
bf68367a6dff78f0828da3bc9a132be184f3e59b
describe
'14320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWQ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2369b471e458ec2b72e884a7066783a5
72348e70f0a09dc917edb6380bf55dd7911eef87
'2012-03-30T14:40:36-04:00'
describe
'37117700' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
33c5cb3033375bb6af185f4c398b393a
29b448e81b0fa43faf54f2fbdfe6c2bae1e656a8
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWS' 'sip-files00053.txt'
79e01b775c200cc06bede0f240b54b87
458ea950ebb4a05e76d75691e5d1ac4b10e9bbda
'2012-03-30T14:39:32-04:00'
describe
'4130' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWT' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b72d4aef19b9a9ccc6cdf05dadb34791
72cb0872ed975f2871692671f217e7d788fc9a9b
'2012-03-30T14:52:00-04:00'
describe
'1525806' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWU' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
7c46d16600cf0e0ece94abde886f83aa
7591d702e4ca7274a7321f38ef7f209607c44a8a
describe
'73224' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWV' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
b329ecfd5c7715afc7b98d3928e0ca35
5e03bc4a2870fce0a6d97fcf11dd6c5da2a2e3b2
'2012-03-30T14:38:01-04:00'
describe
'19135' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWW' 'sip-files00054.pro'
13e89a04d51ea669080989bb58372539
ed63b74f5c654e83bbce8da99e88b1460c6d1645
'2012-03-30T14:51:25-04:00'
describe
'19838' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWX' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
bdcf02e53dd37f31d9c4521a3bfb6c6f
b3f6671e63797d2f199436a3c577a5d0cf9d2e5c
describe
'36629908' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWY' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b46e554dd817e2e8417775999f0a4d95
57a0e83310c59be673d31b17cb44eb630d47bb54
'2012-03-30T14:41:45-04:00'
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLWZ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
2fff85d99495c88416cb72df271b7035
e5e7c4ddea3c1b70f17af9117c88afdf10108b49
'2012-03-30T14:38:39-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXA' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
28b1ab8f8bb865fc110e5ca8c6e04b25
ee44d7c535d6b274ae9cf96d60dfad59cdfd2295
'2012-03-30T14:37:20-04:00'
describe
'1562694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXB' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
c3c26dafb994c647622cabc9c847d93d
b9361114bdd15cb12001ac06d1e096f59e232637
'2012-03-30T14:47:42-04:00'
describe
'97554' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXC' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
7e0c6b9a681c48735e675764f77ee785
8fe88173fdbb1a6b8aef3fc559a92f7a4501691c
'2012-03-30T14:50:07-04:00'
describe
'36719' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXD' 'sip-files00055.pro'
247fbc78013b68018fe1da33c85a5f23
f32a993fb900ac57e077205433e3bf85373d80be
'2012-03-30T14:45:57-04:00'
describe
'28157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXE' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
eb7d751fcdef0003df9604e7ad9f55a1
372454c9410080093c3b7b9328d28beeaf5ef8f6
'2012-03-30T14:43:24-04:00'
describe
'37518684' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7be427f8be24959984554393efb4cda9
848c3a681b3352afd0e21debd224d74355cdc7d4
'2012-03-30T14:37:13-04:00'
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXG' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1111de8391756546280602784ac45e9f
7f664454543f6ddf402737dcfa88769d893be99c
describe
'6887' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXH' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
52f3b766cba5fc7afbb8a14572331c55
4b6215e053e0f571651133b65c5ccf48bea7896d
describe
'1537070' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXI' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
b1dd948f6ea0bd14432067a8a2828235
a8714af85749ce3aa0756d074fa89bccd6e8dbba
describe
'96663' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXJ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
1b40c1eefcf8ac00a5d878baf03d8b36
abf4031dca804e9fdcba78367d281a91e1d7890c
describe
'37584' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXK' 'sip-files00056.pro'
f7904717fba9786573a0011da537878e
5aac658873b318c24f971d040f62cd07c7835ab0
'2012-03-30T14:55:15-04:00'
describe
'28255' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXL' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
8edd40a29ca3d10b9d509d5bfa34a51e
bcbcdb3927581bc5e25ed7fe71cf0938c8499b25
'2012-03-30T14:37:08-04:00'
describe
'36902876' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXM' 'sip-files00056.tif'
8e8eb81cda2656009474a77f75ea1e52
11597f3d26b119409abe5ff8de255e1a2383ee14
'2012-03-30T14:53:09-04:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXN' 'sip-files00056.txt'
61109d22fc0c06e3fe93a60c9371bc2b
685d6bddf0d88e6b1cc918c5d32dfcd05df99ad8
'2012-03-30T14:42:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6792' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXO' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
219cfefa5a4dd4e70515bd3ccbc876af
df0008e2872aecd2a04fd20eaa406558ed6218a6
'2012-03-30T14:53:15-04:00'
describe
'1570118' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXP' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b45bcd2080966a6cc15b5e257776781b
e5d9acb6cb91fabec3184b6db998d2fd293ccf71
describe
'98898' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXQ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
358a5da89727c7819b1d7f2a21a0a995
46a07e07ba2f4116bec62028bb7b06be67fbc4a6
'2012-03-30T14:40:26-04:00'
describe
'35323' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXR' 'sip-files00057.pro'
033c1d0d888152c96613404f6d116f77
d973e7c9013c534d9a5db52ea315953cc266994f
'2012-03-30T14:48:50-04:00'
describe
'29426' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXS' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b619660d7d84d3abd47d88e575e454d0
25413ac0cb48a9e08db4f090e3b5d70226a34870
'2012-03-30T14:38:38-04:00'
describe
'37696948' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXT' 'sip-files00057.tif'
111c0149fbf9a7945bf0884e054a3e45
c7c13a92a60c5aff937b52240ed4ed9aaef58ee2
'2012-03-30T14:39:08-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXU' 'sip-files00057.txt'
c13a8e1f4f674c3a6df8bd8f5488f6c4
5372f39c6bf8af8271de3d332f3e52b31801af5d
'2012-03-30T14:45:52-04:00'
describe
'7271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXV' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
70f74d4936d64ceb8a9825f1263397fe
9a36e5bf9c5ba038ae4873e71020ee5ce33b4cd8
'2012-03-30T14:54:52-04:00'
describe
'1553870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXW' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
674d68c77f14eda5657de7075452b9cb
63b497cd8b0e67fc877752b37eebbb259eb6be73
'2012-03-30T14:50:26-04:00'
describe
'98034' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXX' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
c263377c74c6a0f1f6e39e02c3edb34a
c66682bfac2ce72ea7b22b5fbf024375e6244dfd
'2012-03-30T14:42:57-04:00'
describe
'37914' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
ff3358ed78a7825403e2a5ed1506a33d
5470ae4626fbf29b412eeb56cd3dc9a5bc677aa3
'2012-03-30T14:39:33-04:00'
describe
'28521' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLXZ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
151ab98c4637a07950129426fb24100e
ccd4c6a0535d3783f265bf7a3a484758a1561800
describe
'37312852' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYA' 'sip-files00058.tif'
317c53d45690628cea7f8d531a07bfd8
dae1b8920d0475f1aa003d9d7e66315e0125284e
'2012-03-30T14:40:07-04:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYB' 'sip-files00058.txt'
3c1b54ea2720b1958b98007a50cbbff0
2bc4c0f197ec606a50a6645e4763e457c2727330
describe
Invalid character
'7182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYC' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3a7a7c810f5ea60320344a352050c261
c2e17fc2c6f3feee29ea924dbd22d21dd1224636
'2012-03-30T14:45:02-04:00'
describe
'1535605' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYD' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
5fb74e6f22a5f04a7df94cda910a6ab5
6f9c39ae9b20ed49967c11b113c541a9b5192a54
'2012-03-30T14:43:49-04:00'
describe
'99612' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYE' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a1d8b9569a7979cdc88d114db20cf2e7
4d35073664c4d769e37bbb39a3fa199bb92d53db
'2012-03-30T14:52:14-04:00'
describe
'35901' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYF' 'sip-files00059.pro'
5a102069abfc1a618ad00f2e753d49c5
36ed1c6d9117b3b1907b3caca2d0277887816477
describe
'29227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYG' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c85d6846708031e6ce54bc08e1745015
9e09415b2cd87bdb65fc5ea364cc429cd7eab09a
'2012-03-30T14:40:52-04:00'
describe
'36869796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYH' 'sip-files00059.tif'
29958389a5d18a6282e450edea4e4a7e
65ca859ef132dbe7923d08e618e147a2ddb82540
'2012-03-30T14:52:44-04:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYI' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f2a2a2c6c3f0842048dcec2387364113
e21f1ef6856ad8f60f0b479c9732a824a3750873
describe
'7037' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYJ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e46db2c8ca9fb1abb5bde3f87c67870b
706fcafaebc2e6a02c824aa035ef26b86afbf493
describe
'1549398' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYK' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
02eed8d34b5e0487e8a94980bcb474c6
7c5a8405a306a183c91cfff3bb6854a045e21e7b
describe
'98821' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYL' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
da81aa50c41a5634a077220e1465b780
f14c731b6276b001c50ec8fe9264fee22b97dd08
'2012-03-30T14:50:29-04:00'
describe
'37831' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYM' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f42c35a4d23d35efd52a49651a32da3c
f8f5132ca20f52b30c21449ef23dacac1e374110
'2012-03-30T14:43:39-04:00'
describe
'28433' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYN' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
5f0d1c0b7270397e1d1cfd18dc5ca444
f12c105a2bbf5ebfbf77e031cb385e067bcc3be1
'2012-03-30T14:46:54-04:00'
describe
'37202332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYO' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f4a94b04ff2800d83b2e8e7a9c9ebf6f
751d0bca2810bc25c049cf39a134d70b8f77808a
'2012-03-30T14:51:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
004dd3dec994ca514700e2d2b130894e
f6a9795f46dbf63e64bf10da792c443aaf089a1f
describe
'7154' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYQ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
08a0eb9b64a14e04403f6ccc0d1b63ae
74d997c34e80c30fbd706bd37bda2f975f88550f
'2012-03-30T14:37:27-04:00'
describe
'1549704' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
153acb7172ac34a56a4487c60084cee1
05b81daaef8d0b5f3e51e389c28b472a7d54e01f
'2012-03-30T14:53:44-04:00'
describe
'96696' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYS' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
9af1d7be37d2d371a15d051d46f9c107
d5b857897562ba4508f315d8c708f614e05b32d9
'2012-03-30T14:52:15-04:00'
describe
'37170' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYT' 'sip-files00061.pro'
7aacb9f63a46c8a881e59abb55d3841b
ec07a72da7b77e7b3074d302c93a6ba5b7d5dfcc
'2012-03-30T14:39:24-04:00'
describe
'28035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYU' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
515850e044641b9d5a57b2253c644dbb
8d990357d46ce8346431f9abe225bdc695f5d36a
describe
'37206592' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYV' 'sip-files00061.tif'
df0d6b3fda454f9a9edfc1f102cf0ceb
48dc3bed00ae73df3dd62faefc0645bc3e10fa04
'2012-03-30T14:52:46-04:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYW' 'sip-files00061.txt'
7f87004dc02fefc315b29b07ea371f38
746918d58c303b393ef9e3ad3f360baadc06974a
'2012-03-30T14:41:30-04:00'
describe
'6953' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYX' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
cecd2a8ece0140d5b786500535a61758
2f1e47538ab7c9eb73cc461124c96c98101d99d8
'2012-03-30T14:45:20-04:00'
describe
'1550160' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYY' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
40cef312794402e2ad2871353981158c
164376b1fcb27233249f273960f72e52c28f1c73
'2012-03-30T14:38:55-04:00'
describe
'68120' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLYZ' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0a57bbd658b9f7241542fa577d873db4
8c62e80d64444abf035b1a8033ca91525680fd42
'2012-03-30T14:55:02-04:00'
describe
'19416' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZA' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3e4b1162d75e9fc14c2d147256161ffa
e27f3a513865843699b54ea0c2ce871f947e72dc
describe
'18616' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZB' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e4f2683ae992b015c18ddbe8306af899
481c82cc8165dc33ce440bf175d779a29cca10fe
'2012-03-30T14:49:28-04:00'
describe
'37214640' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZC' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1b401ac2fde1f0d03c30949557c30b90
04bb0c386f0c35fafed1e578ec10f6071f21c1c9
'2012-03-30T14:51:08-04:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZD' 'sip-files00062.txt'
927e1e4a8ba3503b63baaa6f7533c7f0
ef35e36e2ddafd02e5477f4080103d18fccfbfd7
'2012-03-30T14:46:04-04:00'
describe
'5085' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZE' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
f2e9deab0808ca6659b88050fc21d82b
d3be4450bbdb40c951b909ea7c659fb2ca182a0b
describe
'1522523' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZF' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
3a7e378b847f8f3bbb9125bf3fad8ed8
9701b65cea0db801946e9bd4092fd3cbd4d5dffb
'2012-03-30T14:38:28-04:00'
describe
'96157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZG' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
6c5f95c0e352cfe72b8131e4e1dfdda4
c7908fc8ee1faa8dd056e1324d9a5525a288ea83
'2012-03-30T14:41:05-04:00'
describe
'37136' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZH' 'sip-files00063.pro'
abe0b6672ac05f31ca34e08bec07fe4f
3d3582c56b689df7f5aa81ba6255687303c31481
'2012-03-30T14:54:46-04:00'
describe
'28179' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZI' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
bedaf777d25f74b820d09248d024fca5
786cc36506ecdbcef14d79098b0b30fbee8c637a
'2012-03-30T14:40:05-04:00'
describe
'36554448' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZJ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
bfc89b41ce811d51ea39a57cfb0ba18b
4100da5c1513654baa14b7a468933cf3a516b648
'2012-03-30T14:45:31-04:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZK' 'sip-files00063.txt'
9c4ca46545f5c4271709d52bd97c4ef8
8f6871f92691eab7f380621b5b7782aaed784bde
describe
Invalid character
'7307' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZL' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
bcada9a3ecd8874cf0377284b1e49fb9
f6ca154d0b75821d42fbbf22cc7068edfe101c01
describe
'1437692' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZM' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
739fe60c1720bec2d4ba171c77d5518e
0036e592431ec0ca01d7f48993deec4b8badf075
'2012-03-30T14:42:56-04:00'
describe
'99613' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
7103a0d97240ed87608bf44f51279dbc
2ed74bc26818beba88be286ee28494c1fceb423a
describe
'37884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZO' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6d60abbc63978d864e2da8d16973f298
350156b4fd7eadffd53894a325536cd73774a92c
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ab6d88adcc1083ace26367762a58a2b4
13c74fcde7f48f61ed3a3fc0b3b11fe6da768058
'2012-03-30T14:54:44-04:00'
describe
'34506556' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZQ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
653bca71e57d507ad7f11875c67446f9
75bc4f906f9e522ed1fb4f7db2e9dc8a116c73c9
'2012-03-30T14:50:18-04:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c02addf41d032348ac112553d7557d4d
c0d959e35e5eda9b2135ee257a3a9831e43de4e1
'2012-03-30T14:40:58-04:00'
describe
'7529' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZS' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
bdfd1cee4b7e67b9d51ce8bf14e4f6c0
2bf5aef46308e252c82d26a91b41e477a234ef22
describe
'1505196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZT' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
8db5c38ca1677939574670498881bc9a
4d73ac2eed283b888e30cb17cfe487f62f414ac5
'2012-03-30T14:48:47-04:00'
describe
'90433' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8b4d42b62246b8480247617325f8921e
afabecd4e74a4a36c9e487116c8ccac5151ef10a
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZV' 'sip-files00065.pro'
953cd28a1ab6e493b7f03cbe5ee4a2ef
1b5b0a5d96d1286c4747b799f0c077a269ee830f
'2012-03-30T14:49:51-04:00'
describe
'27024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZW' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
be8fd1e34284af3937297f8d1ac3c449
cbe186281c33a391725f4d95568e9490df775813
describe
'36126668' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZX' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c956d3d889f4c9feb43d66b2ac30f94e
d75717918491912ae31dfbf2341ba2a90315bdbd
describe
'1498' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZY' 'sip-files00065.txt'
81cd517763ff7863fdd622f66914f34b
5a40e6ae36c2a35b5ce93643d5aab6233c8a8c46
'2012-03-30T14:46:57-04:00'
describe
'6754' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABLZZ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e8d4f596a265e656ac2f95e7c03e35b8
b11bc5ecb199b77d94b0e70d57887ba26b30755f
'2012-03-30T14:36:53-04:00'
describe
'1461491' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAA' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
fbb8a3b377163a4691a682c658df7897
c9224c32c6340fb316289e100616eaa51769a9cf
'2012-03-30T14:52:21-04:00'
describe
'95316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAB' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
0f58699164742f78b4db08741acb60ad
14b7b69f05e8b2715d1c94c1b6992a0fb589e975
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAC' 'sip-files00066.pro'
0d6d075c1a63a5cc8c5a78faa911594b
8d108c22f8ab76624b48d3bf3ef40fdf0ffdf432
describe
'29446' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAD' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
4a240fdf00b361eb6b3135abb39bb08c
2bedbacd63aa6f793b9a3bf46063906f85411fb0
'2012-03-30T14:47:12-04:00'
describe
'17024664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAE' 'sip-files00066.tif'
fb218a060aede2ad28685f04741299f2
743f04e9078bf0b028efea76dd4f85a77c66aad4
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAF' 'sip-files00066.txt'
26cd945610a1cb04b14f600610a942b5
a4453ea889bd70c6c5c2b6969e06a8d4fb45bf14
'2012-03-30T14:49:39-04:00'
describe
'7208' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAG' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5209fcb1940884403039b1a442a74dcb
da6c9bdcb9d8a54398309858434681a2cd2f7e1f
describe
'1499409' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAH' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
fe279549a647d8ee1a5ec78f43f99052
86d7f06f496aa7e9dc47c145086cc52d51e220a7
'2012-03-30T14:45:21-04:00'
describe
'90763' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAI' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
720dfe7f56ecc8f1e6884e4ba3132fc2
ba6ff874b5b1d577055ea44d144fe960cf2b0251
describe
'34603' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAJ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
bf06a80f1038536c51005b44b53ee0c7
f5f66803b8d94d1b42c58b2e63e0d4e6f70ce43a
describe
'28142' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAK' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a4cc35c7eb424826fa7844145489db57
fed03fdcc7429fd9af6f28f921b4456f62d2a15f
describe
'14117634' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAL' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a8833fc329fc4c88d61c01ee64727e66
0e3042337c3f7b310db662a5675ed27d9d3c98f2
'2012-03-30T14:46:33-04:00'
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2b5f629cf66cfddd21232ba26557cc67
79a9f84d0e27d433ff4bfaa431bba3e0338553e4
'2012-03-30T14:46:11-04:00'
describe
'6794' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAN' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
ddc9c657dd91762716252c38c2cfe45e
f082d8ae6d319e8901e0a248218e5728b7ca3e7f
'2012-03-30T14:47:00-04:00'
describe
'1568218' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAO' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
8f9e9ccbf6ed2e09a3675cb453a4949b
a90e1c977d4e0e2514e064988ea2d6ba21820fec
'2012-03-30T14:47:24-04:00'
describe
'94145' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAP' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
070469a65d4d6329c6ed89082668ee6f
0161f302664884211afb5a5fcf54c9aac0b16ef5
describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAQ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e981e3b0575e21b9e225085dd07a22b7
9c747f48115690dd5d51a84b17973293a3596dd6
'2012-03-30T14:41:39-04:00'
describe
'27250' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAR' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
6a8e7596c2476f0d19498e1c0bf6a807
a5f52409430b67e318dc2ba6f264f11862b7fbf4
'2012-03-30T14:51:43-04:00'
describe
'20091820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
40d445d91775c4bc4177230e39c6c25c
d1c2b46688471a631444edc0785994e029b895b9
'2012-03-30T14:42:59-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAT' 'sip-files00068.txt'
405b45393b05a43ca7de0f009255737c
793a87e0efd0187661ec50424ebd3befeed29335
'2012-03-30T14:50:10-04:00'
describe
'6821' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAU' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
d860b72d6469f0da6caa5b52a0e1fc7a
6093a4931454ebd8e1da470c3764e17bb34b1206
'2012-03-30T14:36:42-04:00'
describe
'1552242' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAV' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
69216e0ec1a129a5c4d786b941890bb4
0533017c7a41c1f48f0db47803ec6c3ff1fcbb3c
describe
'94471' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAW' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
c7112a9e9c753123ea9b0cce5ff5f8e5
db7bd69d085dea3a0ed6dd0aa87e8df52c4c92c0
'2012-03-30T14:45:40-04:00'
describe
'36204' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAX' 'sip-files00069.pro'
5cb8ad892c2d32626d3e1548c0945d8d
3c016c47f29c48c7e0937886d8699cb99ca8178a
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAY' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
1ddeaa881ba65dab6ce2bf781833d6b5
ff58239de959ea59e0811c8ce10401c9fd1c0232
'2012-03-30T14:52:08-04:00'
describe
'20284302' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMAZ' 'sip-files00069.tif'
300c4fa250e99a19452f936e39031ca4
73554f2b107328ca9b278290c79e77a28c55283b
'2012-03-30T14:38:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBA' 'sip-files00069.txt'
ef0a3ca0b2a5e1773fcbc86d0d72d68f
f13de73386e33f6e9dec58f4723e22fff7552d0e
describe
'6504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBB' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ced5a21330e1879e9ea41369fa08e156
770d5d8b9ad43b0d40b2ec58ac9fa5a2dd603d7e
'2012-03-30T14:48:25-04:00'
describe
'1566840' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBC' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
eb11bb21aec9fdf22bdacb2890c353c7
fa98704b2ff588ee5fe32e041d3a6d79f9852e67
describe
'87370' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBD' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
19352af67019c6282d304a5b1111ccac
846c277d5b3ad4d878746839b0a07afd3faa664c
'2012-03-30T14:44:38-04:00'
describe
'31187' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBE' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2eded834d16a0e2085e804ae97c24cb6
d5984ab33ba1306afdc9679e171e6c1b916b34fd
'2012-03-30T14:52:48-04:00'
describe
'25404' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBF' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
d4ebf7ebea64c4239e1acc844caa014a
0b4ff37b122ea863d73edbe65594d2771b9bdeb9
'2012-03-30T14:52:23-04:00'
describe
'20249434' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBG' 'sip-files00070.tif'
cf7bfa9c47e6d0143f17bc389b6fe582
4813e0b1cf73715781b6a94c16c0b847a30beefe
'2012-03-30T14:49:48-04:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBH' 'sip-files00070.txt'
1f3e43d8bc7a26b87cccb162bf677cca
2d600d8c90d7c7bf5f1a426e1772501a6d977895
'2012-03-30T14:53:17-04:00'
describe
'6450' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBI' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
3e4c3b56e2394140e55ae7f5e85c6f7c
d9ad97776e60ab848caa9dcc53ac0cf587eccc19
'2012-03-30T14:49:07-04:00'
describe
'1545157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBJ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
296b29e56b49490b9abfe0a77e03220c
93827d5d675361f0e2278d5be21aeeb7a2a40fc0
'2012-03-30T14:42:19-04:00'
describe
'67986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBK' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
de9b4e797c72721dce7c045674b79392
e1fc8ba57f50e42b7232a6e359879cfcaefcf8d6
'2012-03-30T14:51:48-04:00'
describe
'20892' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBL' 'sip-files00071.pro'
db559e852629ad79beeef57875b5d974
4bcd8f99c8ef23af625f04d83ea065d97ec60004
'2012-03-30T14:44:30-04:00'
describe
'18613' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBM' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
b3090e325ec3162e1e91ce4da9133c9b
b9f57e54066352b66a43f0e3c5e028fb0d138f16
'2012-03-30T14:40:41-04:00'
describe
'19318368' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBN' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0b628219551125a4e2dfb140eb9c8280
c44328bd3831578e3ca650cd5dd6d99e577b29f8
'2012-03-30T14:38:04-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
694af605d17aa99b565a345c29df392f
4f957b9f1febad7556365916af25d4239cffcffc
'2012-03-30T14:51:17-04:00'
describe
'4938' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBP' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
77d730377344db17bdefc50dd53e77ec
c3813c61c1a30c49d039f305b9d160fd9e260281
'2012-03-30T14:39:19-04:00'
describe
'1502477' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBQ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8efd4ec6af4e9437bdef90df6d304d0b
e4d95baf3081c88981783d2352520e40b179c060
'2012-03-30T14:54:42-04:00'
describe
'398862' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBR' 'sip-filesfly1.jp2'
9c4f64dff5cd5415ba3d8db6560d3940
83ff49fcbca3601986c24439b6028b0e76f85422
'2012-03-30T14:44:00-04:00'
describe
'92724' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBS' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
f853baf9e43851f6013ee80acc635ff9
683e086c1c4bb176065983e28a532e9841419c85
describe
'36046' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
6bdaa114143287e82b8ff5d1fd03a0e6
116b9d12eacf1b518bd45fd8da532e523d5a1ffb
describe
'27403' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c7194911ce2c0764edf47ed5ccc0e698
a9a0bbcbb33dc52243bbe10f4d16ecc47e08d4ac
describe
'17054294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
b18cde87c6bfe8198624d3e2ee245b5b
bec7359aea95789d6bd3e45222cb5698974915f9
'2012-03-30T14:40:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ad8214871ca58e02da6196719e7391d0
635ad41b44a3283c88317ffe2ad021c77be05a32
'2012-03-30T14:46:35-04:00'
describe
'6843' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
117648a12c539f620ace92d4594318dd
5705f76edaa16dbfd31aebf7917bef4938ef23ff
describe
'1520779' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
da2a7f97b017ebcb3b78a0c1fe6fe839
ab247e27c4ddabc85abc5cda7b168a9c439f8226
'2012-03-30T14:51:38-04:00'
describe
'91921' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMBZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
74d5d08fe867a92073ef2f9e1636a96e
3cf5afbe4df5b2dc52689b7db4c332c7c69754a2
'2012-03-30T14:46:32-04:00'
describe
'34762' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a53076b962e99dc96364d61312d82908
ed01eb7c69b28e2342ca35b2d22542ed5bf18f78
'2012-03-30T14:36:27-04:00'
describe
'28087' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
3ee097de03c77152452d2f7a606adc28
09fdb7b2522abf44ed81551e777dff50a14544d5
'2012-03-30T14:53:38-04:00'
describe
'14015436' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
66304fb5628d6b0a2542c2d59e038262
42fb7be2ab204174e132da5d55ba5dbcada11218
'2012-03-30T14:48:16-04:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
e726e260500104d3901ff3ad8ab0be40
5475a75de0d03dd202d035f7e6f538b469241716
'2012-03-30T14:37:26-04:00'
describe
'6796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
34e5cd13811603440a365687235058b1
bb21d6fbf7ad8b6ba5f3cddc825c04d31a623574
'2012-03-30T14:36:22-04:00'
describe
'1523542' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b6b58153f8e8dd64ba25f5fd307f8e5c
87c1364a5a495adf4723a0a88e6637923594e944
describe
'88601' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
da5cdf330213365724c6cd0deaf66a56
e14808b170338b17b18bf644cb0baf3be04e64d3
describe
'36678' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
f52413c5bb0be8714d1533ce625b8775
7c3594dae85c7dee56b38f24bafd56a3b1027018
'2012-03-30T14:42:29-04:00'
describe
'27738' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
23b50a3f0a9bfe18f3f1540b7761a448
97fd4364e965c9e9a0a77ff5be936528f583e92b
'2012-03-30T14:36:48-04:00'
describe
'36567540' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c8d3aeebfb15154f07e455d742b4ba2b
1c8d3fee8fecbbe91649c58d9fab0f10bc178dd2
'2012-03-30T14:48:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
70ffb4a1151bd6fefcd6201fe14ebc98
f5cb967cb2f1cfcf486523d21d22539814c7c164
describe
'7032' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
14909efabf136c4d2537086a3f7459b4
3f245afae8d5cfde1bb30d9b4632c13e4287ce1f
'2012-03-30T14:40:31-04:00'
describe
'1530868' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
7d32a0c03cd98e69a3401a4e28d0a5ee
76437a452bdd87069e69cce0c2b3edc606276e45
'2012-03-30T14:40:37-04:00'
describe
'85863' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
456e6556885ffadaf1d703ee3612e402
d6fef5934d4cc0595d290017721af9de15ec947c
describe
'36395' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
798b5134961333b93b693a7646a3085a
aa1920915b04ad5dc36492515e35cabbca4041c7
'2012-03-30T14:45:17-04:00'
describe
'26862' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
dd9b1b9feb9b487ca8feaf90b45ec6c7
f78998fd1763148b9203d40ee5a761c5cf516843
'2012-03-30T14:50:22-04:00'
describe
'36742820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0008772af90feb26bdb1f2ec11ab8c6f
5757c8849a28325a1f8726ceb33d98ebc9c05dc9
'2012-03-30T14:53:59-04:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
41cbdf9609bd3afcd1d270950b7c3cde
e5c3e43e622c821adb271c6f8acf7148bf4085ef
'2012-03-30T14:37:02-04:00'
describe
'6708' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
19c308b022edd93714b5193b637e39c9
f6649f306d5aee6dc894af94dd320db612870c18
describe
'1512277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
181e013bb6ad99610d0bd12374ca7a4a
ab047f70b997dfedca3c00fb7423a631c80596f4
'2012-03-30T14:47:11-04:00'
describe
'95186' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCU' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
86b293b89f50c0dcc6aeb36403cb5e86
b598b16ad4102df31d7fea031db9727d9e23ea17
describe
'36248' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
926664b1105e75b20a772b25ef11c043
a93ebbf60e635eeb91610a152ed9c258dd7ccb8c
describe
'29539' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
bdb52b9adc39ca5c9f6360184dd6286d
2c99341ffd76f7360b61c1727305d09036ce90da
'2012-03-30T14:54:13-04:00'
describe
'12323976' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCX' 'sip-files00076.tif'
89a88c4cfebaa8793bacedecf3fac1fd
ffc5e303487e505d5682a460d7f71d8eeb28d694
'2012-03-30T14:37:34-04:00'
describe
'1474' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCY' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1e44652a403744f50fd7baa709f18d28
9240aef153e2b8c7d8ffb6e946e939ede7ebfb79
'2012-03-30T14:50:54-04:00'
describe
'7382' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMCZ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
51f5b3c1f173131fd153fb09f3f84d0a
21c1e4b18924562240d5402d0d5c73f000d9dea0
'2012-03-30T14:36:34-04:00'
describe
'1507969' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDA' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
8deef73f91b589b942d9044acbfa1e2e
3b79ac8897e760bfc5b7960a5240bdf88c720e01
'2012-03-30T14:47:47-04:00'
describe
'94732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDB' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
cd172e197530a752a186aed82efec0c7
02c771422f1cc1394832b3f0627bd9c1dd7b7ff5
describe
'37509' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDC' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2cb1415b51b293c1fdaebd321135a066
c13c5e790af5ea0f9a19a9579722a66b5f5fb945
'2012-03-30T14:43:54-04:00'
describe
'29612' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDD' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
65c77a3f42ef587667bffac3ba8d4164
6dd7bf1c7d6cce15b815f39d1fcf604ad22362d6
'2012-03-30T14:50:08-04:00'
describe
'15709278' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
4d4d505844f8cd4990536b0000aea531
f2342628f9e4b8635ed635fd84ea56bcf78d9a16
'2012-03-30T14:41:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDF' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ed73515dfec74732a51305e4de0f5b82
1ec3364d1d5b3db5ba16c33b1a11970b736c621f
'2012-03-30T14:41:29-04:00'
describe
'7618' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDG' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
a2705e80a1c698a3301b3ffe79d078e7
5d08a357df88bff14acf76db17e05a8bc6927eb7
'2012-03-30T14:53:31-04:00'
describe
'1515198' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDH' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
d6b6137dba7f082fe47128a96efe634f
2a999a659d438069dbcff7a7f47488bc1c36425a
'2012-03-30T14:50:33-04:00'
describe
'92160' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8ccbb29b8966f67dd761532f634fb00e
621f81c4ccf0a478cc9e3559f4e8f7244407640a
describe
'37073' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDJ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
b577c76510d2c0cfc51da3164d7bd76f
a7be095bfb9b400f78013224d4622ae622d09145
'2012-03-30T14:53:21-04:00'
describe
'28509' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDK' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
dfa377a90aa61a44194eacf672797e69
9f52603d81f4494aae7b8fd5d7b33a62c55821f3
'2012-03-30T14:50:46-04:00'
describe
'18654396' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
6b56fd1aff90e4b1b55fb7e6225fd77b
f5c8a9358cf59c42209e558710b16482e4131d85
'2012-03-30T14:51:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDM' 'sip-files00078.txt'
b90db649277bf8831aefd6af3d425c2f
d177e79619140e3a8099c1b3f5a67e059cd70a4b
'2012-03-30T14:38:15-04:00'
describe
'6946' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDN' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
90f5f8ff51be9b2bb8c2469e0187856a
c2eea72e33ad01e7e6442bed85bf89bea6ccf13c
describe
'1530718' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDO' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
97f1b151a65e9295a4a5aaffde6ae609
38397d45d619802a7b59eed3014a6defe102e1d5
'2012-03-30T14:50:12-04:00'
describe
'90726' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
b02f9cd7195b9bc4ecf4b63d2027a9ed
1987d13279faee9d30a8ce7da21cfefa219a2df9
'2012-03-30T14:51:41-04:00'
describe
'35933' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDQ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
f5d27fae5f9c82c662b16d38a02d194f
905462b09a2c0d729156a282295b65e9ec877b38
'2012-03-30T14:49:53-04:00'
describe
'27767' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
14999adb7a88c80727aa35e29bddf00f
bf5334ece601425dbe5671e3c0d061aac2f9d8e1
'2012-03-30T14:49:21-04:00'
describe
'19100184' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDS' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2256d72f092919cf4c554ad8f8a6ac20
0928b1c26cc9bddece535209e6698f06a20a67cb
'2012-03-30T14:42:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDT' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e20d13599721a98fff5b120af639c8b8
fc6849fd960e59fec2f28e280c7fa32576d8346e
describe
'7142' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDU' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
0a7e2db684beaa2e7a96b9738a84e4b9
a2bf280f1007d3380b1657193f54067d99ce4211
'2012-03-30T14:45:46-04:00'
describe
'1527868' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bdeb8314dbd3b754936560eb4ce57594
ea47e34ac240e04da0725abfe667636529384f64
'2012-03-30T14:53:53-04:00'
describe
'94767' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDW' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ac3b8d65c416d8cad9dd9c4d8ca89534
7f49084ca914c951e4c120f1507b1ebfc344bfec
'2012-03-30T14:46:18-04:00'
describe
'35143' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDX' 'sip-files00080.pro'
57ff697a9c5d0b596b3244765f816429
f5e48a4b891b983e752ffa07b197e12d2bfd169c
describe
'29342' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDY' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
dc33a751c5184987b5bab730850a8454
d6ff44782b8d753a548be4ef32fbfed8256ed01c
'2012-03-30T14:46:43-04:00'
describe
'15433084' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMDZ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
fb572f2b707ed446f306f8b833b249a9
a14bd9e7ba1ccdcf7c59e47f03c3dd8320c97804
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEA' 'sip-files00080.txt'
ab34d633fc476317c3f7d36ab3cdcf28
973a6805c62bdcab7196d30a04bfdef8d2b964ee
describe
'7454' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEB' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
db52e51c370fbafbafeb2ddc2e705431
98b5357383096c205de9eff691de16ee2572cd1a
describe
'1509464' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
29333d2779509d93c6faddd52be29997
d2eaf408e44554e709f769609744bb98e2d3bc72
'2012-03-30T14:54:48-04:00'
describe
'55727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMED' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
ab7a5c7c53d23341d7c940a28f32efba
0cf8588006293b8dce7181380f2e55f5348e91d4
describe
'13842' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEE' 'sip-files00081.pro'
3b18f56c8856f1050ba7d8f9bc218646
7f65e640f63f31841f6d5c9ea5b9fe408e57dfc6
describe
'16602' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEF' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
90ef500a39d38bee98875d37dae5701d
e7b76c4ada3d42e69c5f531cfb55268bded53597
'2012-03-30T14:51:54-04:00'
describe
'12225504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEG' 'sip-files00081.tif'
25d59c1995d8a968098e138e661c1cd0
4b6dd54fdd3971c52df00b8a36dd2477b84c92fc
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEH' 'sip-files00081.txt'
6f25ef31ab19c5d3bda86b3b21b1601d
c75bf9af4081896e14f99a57841a6ff23a608a92
'2012-03-30T14:53:41-04:00'
describe
'4670' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEI' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
182eb9a754d05a26829ed979aeeb20cb
3092901d2443ca81504cf891a4dff60f578945a5
describe
'1420903' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEJ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
22083fedc0339b4d5b2e37631e367c65
3b70e410e56edb04fd8186be3b30e4492dfb4eee
'2012-03-30T14:42:32-04:00'
describe
'30716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEK' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
db5e9a8ab4f5f0233263015de998814c
7c82b387bf400467f7fdedb3c33104766d47968b
describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEL' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
90a1e7edf4eda9947bb127f65122c5de
cb417c37f7d36ed2341b5c3cf865a1b983a11ee4
describe
'10905828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEM' 'sip-files00082.tif'
0aff9d010f8e460fa55c854aed1f546f
dc0d36b5f94f9eb2fc2ed0ff7cb1ee9455bc2ba2
'2012-03-30T14:36:43-04:00'
describe
'2645' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEN' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
508c99c170faa136de67c20f6b2e89dd
108302fbb95382cbf1b0ae6465c2d09d44b53f02
'2012-03-30T14:48:14-04:00'
describe
'1476355' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9266177c342dd2ec302000783a73ea32
6b24578ce5918eebf91eb6dad4b7a7e62b455ac0
'2012-03-30T14:44:19-04:00'
describe
'30234' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEP' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
3fb982fe6cd8f195761fb8b08dfbd43b
d54765270b36fde5194cd84dcc73d0fe27b53e63
'2012-03-30T14:55:18-04:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
3886b8569f60133f337353fe56633a40
c9d2187be880365f04449f992f4123f09e9c0dcf
'2012-03-30T14:52:13-04:00'
describe
'8562' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMER' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
45a57d70994c764161fbbdbf1379599a
f1d309d7c8d4d17661b9be9f868b6777fb86192b
'2012-03-30T14:38:42-04:00'
describe
'10043772' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMES' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6900de8cedf48e661965e86bd52ffacf
297e7554892b6cce16636f4e7fd574801b4d3a03
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMET' 'sip-files00083.txt'
ea4cf9b4337f61cb53ebced4380cb9ae
62815a15db0fd21038e480d007aa2d6a0e280c89
'2012-03-30T14:37:50-04:00'
describe
'2768' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
7862ad5fe5ee938c67e726677b12e41d
05dc4cff4db2ff5fe99bcb83a46e0072c24c3e68
'2012-03-30T14:40:59-04:00'
describe
'1446160' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEV' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
ee8f454ef078e5fb58079b0d8609a78d
6d79ce8804c54d95bef8a263a5946ad6eb73e048
describe
'34136' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEW' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
0ed150220df9f134a01bb7ed422dc61a
c498c817c835a001e819226effce08695f9a20f9
describe
'9062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
3209907f4d030453350bf7e61ccbc87d
db0ce08b4c82736b3ebbf978d85776bf73bc3b2f
'2012-03-30T14:52:30-04:00'
describe
'11750032' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEY' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d165a33bd6e3010d197013a65d176490
d7ffc39f305402623415b9c7602ac4472b2faf07
'2012-03-30T14:41:56-04:00'
describe
'2813' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMEZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
5964f98290bfd34b34c11d002f07c074
4ddc9b7dcec09b05286c0ef250de7e281180d6d6
'2012-03-30T14:47:25-04:00'
describe
'1546182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
d764f606c2d65b753451739e0f45f0ff
50b4258aca4330b12770abc76620155e75d4d907
'2012-03-30T14:52:22-04:00'
describe
'67604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
73d68858333c9dfb6b46cbdf83a36d17
b6c45e0dda773e2be76e05410fd80f47e5cc09e9
'2012-03-30T14:43:09-04:00'
describe
'20614' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
4e7dd1f4aa38699604f59692d5c61afd
755f5502cf2257621ae41cf083f0c8eb39a056e9
'2012-03-30T14:45:24-04:00'
describe
'20305' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d6c989dd8b2e5d2e99e520c1beb2df7d
849c233095919d115b2875663b814e3cbac990d4
describe
'18277136' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
06439640e7ba2f4a470cc238ca16cc7d
4f022fc08e3ed52df2444cd746f5b5991504e7bb
'2012-03-30T14:38:07-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
10656884671c35e982de8b2fc2fbc5c2
2ccf58ab2f6728e866ca9cd14a528102fc0ea3cc
'2012-03-30T14:43:51-04:00'
describe
'5474' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
515eb6ca0bb5fa1dd0a77a1da4000599
c6c5820cebe77964c1583b878d71920e30c62701
'2012-03-30T14:41:21-04:00'
describe
'1525195' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
03be362eb4587ff6f54bff357d65172e
0ecfa85a66d07033ebea326460e4bdabe2b427a1
'2012-03-30T14:47:09-04:00'
describe
'90837' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFI' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
eb6057482b3a43c5024e226717d5edd9
92dd108a4e87fc5e4eb0008e26069cb063610c35
describe
'35755' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFJ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
6758c8dbe0221c85e5beb8227932271d
988b51ec088b434b22360ef9e6158c092344e7b1
'2012-03-30T14:36:38-04:00'
describe
'27635' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
2b2617e7abd7778f6faff24e683c4e60
26163fe84fcc61d7c90081c98c21f9fd8243c587
'2012-03-30T14:52:01-04:00'
describe
'18477286' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
b71e05682fc2bf825237415635d1e745
534e879cf62f0c5353cdc3437f33e3d7d4d9fdd8
'2012-03-30T14:54:58-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
2681410e4176a7b0c0b30222d6d3ee74
35f12d49577f2f10774810e11b5a08c130a86523
describe
'7293' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
5199e52b05136192eb5877ed864a58fc
8d7c3890ed2b27471b5aa100218e552446cb51dd
'2012-03-30T14:49:08-04:00'
describe
'1383650' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f5c2272bead90f57cead1e2bef060a54
133c5671cf0a441b58308788e69868c76da01547
describe
'94891' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
aa9df32dc5f85d482a444c9ecc1d178d
2f44c43361085a79957636dafb188703372a921c
describe
'36013' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
657d9543f5a1f6d6bd77705e069ac330
b24d3961ce6b15e9996a78d46a2f8c0e56b71872
'2012-03-30T14:51:47-04:00'
describe
'30034' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFR' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
3e0adc00a1a871422bb677d2c438eb5e
f7328237511cadf70c1a576c9f1f7dddf8da504f
describe
'15178564' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFS' 'sip-files00087.tif'
6c0832580d7c3984220acb9ec80c6a98
67b959bc91d332f3de8e54921b249a2f3537ab04
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFT' 'sip-files00087.txt'
92e4e1576fa3a4e52f80aee7dd48b1ff
5fb828cb8b217c183d2f4fe887641e3560bd5cd4
describe
'7826' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFU' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
3eda5a3034e4a75275838440f79f0a31
4ec221d82d81de7a21626470e007520f1ad4007c
describe
'1493997' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
5ec407634f1eb1cb21511aae064b0dcc
f90872b62a1aa18df8af3c1e7204bc646a222bb6
'2012-03-30T14:36:51-04:00'
describe
'93027' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFW' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7ca3d4db833ee05ba885ccc0bf518f52
86ed57e6edc1f434049992682696d1df6184b72e
describe
'37224' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
55553b4c692b7a79c338afe8164b3ae4
8720bae8ecf22d0ab82bf14ab8439ed2b56f0c0f
describe
'29292' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
688223fefa661eb73361082ef9b911cd
190cce065f5211535f497a69b45fa6ef158417dd
describe
'12288294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMFZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
c804a165243f7f3202c07968ad958c30
be0444c9af4a4227043bcc60c1e42c20b4870aa5
'2012-03-30T14:43:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
76def58a7975718bff954dc636603b88
9b82341fa9302fa2a3e5c8d30d15aa7e3471ceee
'2012-03-30T14:36:54-04:00'
describe
'7496' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
2c7b2dccd51eb4ece426cbb6f8391d4c
c1759d5a402bd9845a0e2db78203061537f712b5
'2012-03-30T14:46:21-04:00'
describe
'1512084' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
d8ec303a775fc92374c7f824f773544c
3b3f9ec6b3e814c575aa48440f0ccd438536af06
describe
'93819' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
293274fc3e859576ac1fbcc80e7d3f34
981d6dcc9a65f5149c95e34c6765a32275822abf
'2012-03-30T14:45:05-04:00'
describe
'36663' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGE' 'sip-files00089.pro'
e516c998b6966cef24b8a996f6bf0c5a
00820a0821398a8f065fc0913909f8282c5d2e9e
'2012-03-30T14:51:24-04:00'
describe
'28975' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
d5746833c21e8fccdc35e8d31ea56450
543585e6fd4fd707f0e2f4001c201cee41441aca
describe
'14490826' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
9767e785fd423dc6e04802e457c996c8
78680bd09d8bd34c127c329ef7cabb4928d34280
'2012-03-30T14:54:22-04:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
96f67513535993dd06dfd5f776df1ee7
0f67ae999bcb64101c414c8bbb9da97f20be3c99
describe
'6950' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
498641dca8c3a6c1fcd047deb0ee7818
cce92ce933a3c7520cc4f64e0a6bdac83baec7f5
'2012-03-30T14:48:17-04:00'
describe
'1560078' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
b35886f904bc49150b079f37a828879c
f3d1ae1a64d243a956f5b58cb380524ef8ab81a0
'2012-03-30T14:40:09-04:00'
describe
'94485' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
1b4fc47b966da35d1d44a7b80abdc2aa
29a9ba5b22c6174c6fbadd582b5d2c121e274fcc
'2012-03-30T14:49:22-04:00'
describe
'35955' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2655a01606ec0458b4392e5ad5f78658
54e8aef5441c4f0db72ba072ed58e61354ca4b25
'2012-03-30T14:49:23-04:00'
describe
'28040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
5f358082c255a1102b0156f2c0ad64be
a64592a36ef17b5c4b5422e03260126d42e2c261
'2012-03-30T14:45:48-04:00'
describe
'37456088' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a37459b690f52217cb084d4db2f2565b
c853cb47f1723bbb1d6c65daa233a07431fb0ee1
'2012-03-30T14:53:55-04:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c04238ec09140f5dc66822df14edf5f6
e3a39ce700e1c45bbe064637245fcfb98dfc0601
describe
'7302' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
44da7a0474a855c4f9d663d47c2c1bfe
59e1c31cbc3a1aae948ad2480218c348252c3153
'2012-03-30T14:37:47-04:00'
describe
'1544008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
873e420c924b51bc5e4e9aefd36d8c9e
855972aaba8b0b588811075e84b9949bc4e878a8
'2012-03-30T14:51:21-04:00'
describe
'93676' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5a1bde182ed73c9dc2d9abfaad984a4e
5d78c25f8c85ec5111ce3eb5726e8aeb3754730a
'2012-03-30T14:54:35-04:00'
describe
'36463' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGS' 'sip-files00091.pro'
70e62906feb1dd859964d40b497678ad
08f6e296095356379e53207556fc55ba7db323ce
describe
'28060' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7f8304cd55400cd09e3213dc4e907497
fbd47e2c321d6a7407e1cebfbe8b8f09e92ca565
'2012-03-30T14:50:06-04:00'
describe
'37070196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
89bc09e92b2ffe647504f66c71e5ed65
a60d8ae3f2928fa1bae5068ebec150da7a49c7e5
'2012-03-30T14:51:57-04:00'
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
168db1f87b0a9c7b27977c3a4e6c1df2
ca4492f2c6ab94f036d9c84a269c4001d8ba3ff2
describe
'7031' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
bcd7ea03f3aa7da39417c76cf0650c0b
5338210a89f9f2834ed16e4e32f2c646b4cc07d4
'2012-03-30T14:48:24-04:00'
describe
'1561216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
ae30205f9dc1562092abe70d8d5a4b35
cbc7bde49f45b75b64adebad0068bfd42a7600b1
describe
'93437' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
9a841287e1d8bf10d622d8c32457d4b7
199f36680461c76eed0e54d786e1357fb85a0f95
'2012-03-30T14:50:21-04:00'
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMGZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
6704c494f492752a7e74cfe2ee97dced
c516e5fa7c00f9e3dce9aaf0fdfbd8c81f610436
describe
'27637' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5f32f8d7917234c3696277d372095aea
a0315baac8a9c70428efe3de5609a78821ca4438
describe
'37482768' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b08ff265d1884e292a3d2bd5f79d0c32
7799d88a731b9347bd886c17b43bd6ac6971b8e9
'2012-03-30T14:48:32-04:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
a89ce4fd627b1d7fb6e2a86197000d42
77b9efb4f4328a71ff1c23b97ba6c67dfd26d271
'2012-03-30T14:46:01-04:00'
describe
'7220' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7698a089532de86a0a7b09db3898bf73
2d250019c94292f960f6bb25230716b925ac957f
'2012-03-30T14:45:41-04:00'
describe
'1541014' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
d6eb995a9819663391cee54c4264a0fe
0a3e71adb02807d7279b2f9ab8a4e65d3c528bba
'2012-03-30T14:39:44-04:00'
describe
'73065' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c0d1aa06ccb801bf19bf9ace7876dd73
9d01027b037bc02b77174f1a444f563649423908
'2012-03-30T14:37:58-04:00'
describe
'18802' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
78fe3239fdf618b9e8bc3ccf1b441d3d
f0c257cf4247a1d7b3316aba8c8b822e7e7db491
describe
'20964' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
10d1cdd5bf651f5bab6353c4e5545760
4f355b98645dc0bccbc6b0d27624b8ead49087da
'2012-03-30T14:46:48-04:00'
describe
'36995216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
6eec606c80bc0514ec0a922963b9f601
17a423004fd8743b234959197916894837ad5142
'2012-03-30T14:43:45-04:00'
describe
'784' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHJ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f461829a33ec847be50cef4aa902ed40
e9dca0816d9a10c1e6a22c2601e941a1f6b825b7
describe
'5296' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
048b5c391f45663a4fe4496432f3923f
91f027c2272f6e7a87494badb6fe13453c33ad88
'2012-03-30T14:37:32-04:00'
describe
'1544865' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
9c01ad0ad937d3fd31b0cbf3d7376cb4
9e2b56506efbe3747ca14b0d479f2fa141f592e9
'2012-03-30T14:46:38-04:00'
describe
'64254' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8109a3792337e6f5728ea320a9d00193
d4cc954d1ea026d516c58ba146fc73efd0f3923f
'2012-03-30T14:47:38-04:00'
describe
'18329' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
780632ac23ee9f730e5e7b16624966d1
29a65edd49f368cacec2873497dea754ca5b9b4c
describe
'18381' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
be08ce518ddfc2b6ad9566c10ef1a9bf
d83a93b55d571b48673f8cb83f9bbe069209243f
'2012-03-30T14:39:57-04:00'
describe
'37088364' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ac4dd4096dee18a3ef169087e63c03a0
b7be46288eea1267dcb3ffe9dee7746192772faf
'2012-03-30T14:47:16-04:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
adc8d327b9ebeac29b53a42f6f454104
5d000c464aaca16a5d0335363e79bbebc4f76a00
describe
'5197' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
ca1934321fc2741f58186a1bca43a32d
0093287471854c717c3982806714c88211de6a79
'2012-03-30T14:46:09-04:00'
describe
'1540043' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
5f4ba2fd44c97344b1543de5de0e571e
f1b98bf62f9dc51e1f7db91a959df8a024763598
'2012-03-30T14:44:29-04:00'
describe
'93911' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
4fa2d6d04c7f317979f552c59a01f018
3ebecbbb973e71b5d9a5d16f8e90ba183b21a57d
'2012-03-30T14:43:00-04:00'
describe
'36283' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
c3aa8a0204cdf8eef5063152833272bd
54be3b435e97be3fca5c513b5fd1e8a3902e8f0f
'2012-03-30T14:44:42-04:00'
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d550ae7efca9e97d4314a6ff1fb480f4
5d10fde5753a926aeb7c5c146454f4c1c2266ad8
describe
'36974380' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
7a29227d4f9a564cc50635e2f27f1ba8
0dc0c440f4d073bbff1d42a94c977308ff4c5f20
'2012-03-30T14:42:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e1ff481e6b4485ace66c9ac66c53b866
03378cb31091a325006bb423f66c55167fd91ed0
'2012-03-30T14:50:03-04:00'
describe
'7058' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
eb9ee2eb531d1220a1daea31f62600dd
96fc141ce5f75f473a0177df43d647866f9c0dbe
'2012-03-30T14:40:15-04:00'
describe
'1546438' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMHZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
3aa0159b7e5c26f8ffdac42aeedee856
6459affe12cd07d934af231639be831c90071d99
describe
'100076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
713171dd026f7b953810234a6023c532
8138550a34df3b8790bf0a5cb6bf1186d4b94232
describe
'37790' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
847d46dc9a7fe2a95e12c9c47d1ff1e7
5d7806625e0d52b709dbd400380882e8875d868d
'2012-03-30T14:44:43-04:00'
describe
'29130' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
fdd694f26ba33eb5cf898cc63652f1e1
90a343b0028158686c12cf575e6b7ec60cef16bc
'2012-03-30T14:36:33-04:00'
describe
'37128252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMID' 'sip-files00096.tif'
8a19b5e522f6d1d51d87ad31f80cca0f
3469e3270771c3c87769feee804424b8ee7e6b7b
'2012-03-30T14:44:36-04:00'
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
413ccaacf421463d46af56d0dc90601b
9f110810e46fe40fc1e8ea7a1468d4f702018700
describe
'7449' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
7af7f435e9afb3d70439cc21500a5b8b
96088981918089b4dd648588d9ac3f955a024012
'2012-03-30T14:47:32-04:00'
describe
'1547245' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
95bde5bb02b9cccfe17681e007ba6b60
4ae0ebb0f830894fbb68bb148dfc41665a726a26
describe
'93684' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
ff6a2216b5194f62a02bfc2d11718045
8ecab81136acb63aec8e4dafd1a3df0fae9ff563
'2012-03-30T14:47:39-04:00'
describe
'36437' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMII' 'sip-files00097.pro'
6426981c77afb9ae1fff9ce0405d62f2
d3198be2de28f9742bf0bb268f6af48d31f2e311
describe
'27849' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8c739d0e21f4fd336c5c9e0579b1ccc2
cdf89595cf7e670e4f8bffc7b36deb9c196d04c0
describe
'37146940' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4ed8f526b82604b4fe26ba752a2578f0
0de5379645e473f8c159bafbcd1f13397036f537
'2012-03-30T14:48:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
226940802b5a11c0fc5862b3b1720324
4cb1cc766bc46f11b08a997128116291730456b4
'2012-03-30T14:46:53-04:00'
describe
'7045' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
02f1c3e932095df7e87340e20302d5fd
81972d6dee1354d05d8a4a2553cefaa15b8487a8
describe
'1608608' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
097b91045d9a5a8092123be0dfd66b5a
4de5c1fd44405fa1bf940c905bedce7ad273a757
'2012-03-30T14:40:35-04:00'
describe
'91811' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
25e11b69ccba568bcc830dd5455f1c01
feee61e6a36999fd47d39e5e221b44ada68205cd
describe
'35604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
c5c8671f05a5425985d28dd21b7c4cf3
d516e5460c4efb6b7abd5876db5f553a5b8a3ef4
describe
'27131' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
633d9727541d88e6137cf0fe0d68da2d
fa5a7b8e5fa88aad9533bfed3431d33ba89a2292
'2012-03-30T14:54:09-04:00'
describe
'38620680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
f5b993635cb0ea3e08251d974633ce07
ae0e3d4223b0271f75236335c6818c6d2f568120
'2012-03-30T14:36:32-04:00'
describe
'1452' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
44a5b5435181e3f91ba0b9fff131a3f2
253176fed833ecd79c9948d817edc3fa63727939
describe
'6612' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIT' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
209de2e92de3c9fc1c5b209a3d700152
eb26cb21e2e743dc5e4750863c0e4a71a2d39950
describe
'1568820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
e23539953348dbce547c66e8c6e57b58
2196129e2fe06f08313ee587765607ff0e9b31df
describe
'93476' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
ee78e7ea90675038137f4e34988fe487
57b2e2904662eb9c4a9332be9dc217f0c0c07a3e
describe
'35484' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
7aa8aeb440d7cfb386fd52e66c853d82
124e8e2d71d982a56d8d4907e7b85da297179968
describe
'27511' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
5043b30febc4e6d8d3eb28f008471d55
adb5fb4830d79c9cc6caed4bfe0c02a22a36bfdc
describe
'37665552' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
5dffbd0b5931353c7ab9dce1dd33db6b
a2f00bf00301f7dd1e776a39a684efd98856af65
describe
'1451' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMIZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
8de69e0642122522e2272476742db755
74735fd39866acb120b6d8a326037900f2ee2a85
'2012-03-30T14:54:40-04:00'
describe
'6784' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
df6ecd41613943ce7e0ef8086e762209
102b6610cf0f1dbb9ca89d3d176fb8b56ae47bec
'2012-03-30T14:54:08-04:00'
describe
'1516593' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
54d0c4b524446107eb54e891d92c20ff
e2712658b6c133878e9feceeaafecd0a2fc7cb6a
describe
'93547' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
98f375b0797363b8f5775e7671482509
d418553f42bef836f887cafcafb522bbdfb33eb5
'2012-03-30T14:53:34-04:00'
describe
'36228' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
d448eea89dcc095fc0717a38d5c8ff13
0f0542b37161ca1926a25fbc0aee95940d7edf37
'2012-03-30T14:39:42-04:00'
describe
'27707' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
dc5688fd744ce39b6f3f0c030ecd2f6b
15e2f57a40f18f598c0ccb42a45a3a0fa5f4fa1c
describe
'36400276' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
64f76756b268697edca18503ef2bdb79
8bf3306704b801ebb53906641d7bfebec687859e
'2012-03-30T14:37:41-04:00'
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
878da19484370d70e2a8b275f55dc6fd
fe364d6023a3e7e327e359deb0c881edf1c3658a
'2012-03-30T14:48:57-04:00'
describe
'7373' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
10deb1edd5bf53b486a85880fda74658
c7f1a9f4b36f83a78942c49bd45f729773fdd9f1
'2012-03-30T14:53:18-04:00'
describe
'1533709' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
62d0d7878bf049e20e55854f0b69b948
a2e1375fdb955adb6ffe3000fcd867d4cda68a68
'2012-03-30T14:51:33-04:00'
describe
'93432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
111d81c528e4ed6d0107f11fb0847f78
8351ab5b8de52ca817a13cf442c344cbd7ac9dfd
'2012-03-30T14:45:44-04:00'
describe
'35192' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
79d5faabc76e2de8d103bfa853f30528
5e42f2a364d3c863ba3b794e150dce776113ee6a
describe
'28482' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5da005ddc6eaf6f01648482ebbaead31
bbcebac6aba8dd2943838c599ff3cb882d284421
'2012-03-30T14:44:28-04:00'
describe
'36810988' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
431a7c2ca510a6e6521bd85077441719
1432b9f6eedf3be00c1e0ac7cf3b1c5b062ccdfd
'2012-03-30T14:47:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
550ac34ca27d490c133ff078b8e14ac0
273f4d1527331cf49cb43323cd9ba9ad57de095e
'2012-03-30T14:48:53-04:00'
describe
'50967' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJO' 'sip-filesfly1.jpg'
5bb73faf68ee1f78274eb7cc7e2ce2b7
de7d9e9ba7512a41ed4e566d00b23cf5495f4513
describe
'6945' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
0c6b45452b648c2e699809b748769462
eb946671f7d7ba52b077e56d96260b4a6335b3b3
'2012-03-30T14:50:20-04:00'
describe
'1536914' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0bfd2c9c5e98f8ad7c989439af53d1dc
f5712b2a9d4fb56fb1b178749d1679aa5a79c701
'2012-03-30T14:37:57-04:00'
describe
'74328' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
a98178bc7c429446df2043cb94ff2c60
52e25323edddcbb19f8cad6fdf871bf5267b1505
'2012-03-30T14:48:26-04:00'
describe
'20726' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJS' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7d40d05cb5f2a0d8c0926db9c38e4984
0dfe02f9b76c828c5dc792c0d2cb8547a8fd614f
describe
'21085' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJT' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
7a4e3d62ceeffe8b48457d77feef7b22
1f441d80ff2913b2d2e8f9aba00ec8312e4dcd16
describe
'36888072' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJU' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d89ebd6a772f03f99e63f85cbdad1787
e3a8779b079f0a147e0dcb1c26d17dbd22dc3f8c
'2012-03-30T14:48:42-04:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJV' 'sip-files00102.txt'
11f46cbb064e13abfb710e09a3610a52
29dd0447b2d0c8b78c376bb0577e13856cf4a6a4
'2012-03-30T14:42:33-04:00'
describe
'5609' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJW' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
007fcda89678ce92803cfa8e7afb0c10
f982e6c7d01dc9143cb75da12deb09ab80c2258d
describe
'1551986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJX' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
554ca08018eaef02318f4fef3b49765d
762d6d51dec0da2e1025ab13901eb736f0cc02e2
describe
'67213' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJY' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
e081eefc48e4ee4fe4e742e38311a9cc
178f2749b181196859cb021cbc79ff0d1d08445a
'2012-03-30T14:54:56-04:00'
describe
'18067' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMJZ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
1cd6f794e8523ea8e8431aca96122097
e00ad6ecd679389b7135ba7074dc489f1970c686
'2012-03-30T14:49:15-04:00'
describe
'19028' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKA' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ee69123f935e621b1788c2a5074fe69c
b04410f87a4c7772e2ca961163049ff0f8b50a29
'2012-03-30T14:42:09-04:00'
describe
'37249716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKB' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4f2f390d9f20e3ff5cce8ccab1520224
65d8f5a881abffb3bbb03c359f329b550adfee91
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
2ea11530e386a4a70e4ad1a0cdde1032
8ff43920fa82a93d3efd938b990b4cd479accfea
describe
Invalid character
'5205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKD' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d77056fef15231f92b0d958fc45909b3
3b4fe4dac2bb1c339bfb611d5c2565d4d98c7837
'2012-03-30T14:52:34-04:00'
describe
'1629784' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKE' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
7132f922f5f9344c3951e80dbdc55867
e0c0deb0f0b5f284d0e04d648b5047613ce59822
'2012-03-30T14:41:25-04:00'
describe
'93839' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKF' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
825e8798c2afa3fa61ac93fc3c3b03b3
5ec92dd503ab494c1fb39f22e409813378c8475e
describe
'36057' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKG' 'sip-files00104.pro'
2b69e7d2f4641d986b394e959854a9f5
1e7dd42040aca34084c0966c3716239c87a1a48e
'2012-03-30T14:36:52-04:00'
describe
'27319' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
5f9e003b7e11b456e0aa154c23f72f11
c5f001a6d6e54f3e42ef878c0445739a25de7d78
describe
'39117244' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKI' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3e1ecd51548251132f03b7dc56719a78
1318a0d071d4eb11dce736b2b407b1b3da4fd1ac
'2012-03-30T14:38:23-04:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKJ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
41317a72b251ac1ebae8e2f7871221fb
7e3e6e182897012f0ca8e60a5cce0e4a74e70a3e
'2012-03-30T14:48:34-04:00'
describe
'6958' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
3683b6377fe8ce2d07c0f7c6c469c8d1
f5fdb04034b82d8e4c85a381f7c15826e9af53c8
describe
'1583697' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKL' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
f5b6c4512db40644992d96c0f4a2df04
181e9d0cdf64a133d343bdf09bd12afcd88e6ea3
'2012-03-30T14:53:35-04:00'
describe
'94837' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKM' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
2834b644fe6a13f1d5c67a551914ea03
fdc03f596f0a8492f8831180bb3377b91656568f
describe
'37038' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
956a4367dd02a2e3bc7c0f72d5cfd422
fecbfecac9af67d089e0eae34723f4285a7ea0cf
'2012-03-30T14:48:36-04:00'
describe
'28513' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKO' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
63ebb1d00e2219d7eed7735cdf182273
4f46954ca426bb5f9d05f989acba060a707c609b
'2012-03-30T14:38:56-04:00'
describe
'38010720' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f08d09408cf1de27e0a9f8e46241172e
6e653cef2ad8a953126ebffa4418b5be4ba0f760
'2012-03-30T14:37:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKQ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
36273ec486d4c4584c8cb59ab0ca5c3f
35bdf071392c2343e67f603875de46f5a35410fd
'2012-03-30T14:41:22-04:00'
describe
'6827' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKR' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
45db675954c5f76cb5fa3e6ea91a8f1f
51edf021892e6021794c1a8a3f71c0a6eba089d7
'2012-03-30T14:47:48-04:00'
describe
'1623234' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKS' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8bfaedbd8bfe7bd27d25880f7cc6646d
b0644aabbaaf71382d85c54e9efb1da95e8ad9af
describe
'95876' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4b43e5e23abe96cf2caf5f8994b40a9c
17eb0dc78d23a8071e0b04ea0704eb23ac558972
'2012-03-30T14:45:19-04:00'
describe
'36920' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKU' 'sip-files00106.pro'
4490efc4b6ec53a75f9148609b08041b
6a4a3a43d06d1d6205634930a0bd52530f00b67b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKV' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d4ec801055132aa1d315b61fe9ccc277
f06df6a96341f6815d732a13ca23609860f184f7
describe
'38959612' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4b9d1bf1ae2d4efe9c1af2720afae2c1
2328187dc1bbd863dbfa396bc3a2ad58cfc5c7dc
'2012-03-30T14:49:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKX' 'sip-files00106.txt'
edab01cf19782d67eee516585d21e072
c59c6ad6a0829a04f0e6f72683bf7664d37de270
describe
'6874' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKY' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
ae809cd12f898b82f55c5b62d1a92f68
c9cc2cdce80dcea83c20a75c3be691489a215307
describe
'1582386' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMKZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
562754e8599beabb2387a365039cd91a
928bc49c448ae4e66d5902981a04853c03e32a43
describe
'94487' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLA' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
a8706c72aa2e171fc2b1e5a16115a395
75fb44f3dca6701ff8da11c736ce032cac4e5d0c
'2012-03-30T14:49:44-04:00'
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
76ae0247f984c76bf6a61f6cd5786d67
08d392f99e8dcdf0e2298b0a3053eedd1bc79f94
'2012-03-30T14:51:34-04:00'
describe
'28125' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLC' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
7fb2683930be521d514bfcad041a1521
281700e10cf8943a6324d530eb7c3c0a193254d7
describe
'37979996' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLD' 'sip-files00107.tif'
10eea1dcb38d5a19152e75b542468576
49e93a2b936e57d8230324be3abf4d79177ccb4f
'2012-03-30T14:53:06-04:00'
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLE' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a54d72262fe847a4dd3ae719a6962a30
97ced7017120a366d07cb966bb871a7e68319961
describe
'6889' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLF' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
083eebc1024087e7fbf5cc81ef3b045d
aa6b21a66681d7fe96b4da37010ce8dd46a3828f
'2012-03-30T14:44:20-04:00'
describe
'1476374' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLG' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4ae2a40bc64d449419b963866baafc74
d32c67fa2e670479d3d4f8e025a696b975dfe1d7
describe
'118199' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLH' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
edaeba3b193851ae9329564a6c9b853a
7703b7d92bdd8c62b83515f812112018fc2948c3
describe
'36006' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLI' 'sip-files00108.pro'
f38edde95e3fb58c3152275c5394cec6
bf739922fddf09fc31a8ca99286ebdeb5d8ae44f
'2012-03-30T14:42:04-04:00'
describe
'35821' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLJ' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9041845fc40f6c1cd8a3f0bb001b01f2
455c30b07931099d01370189bf78b77e2e2df1a6
describe
'35435068' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLK' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c8714d4b764840577a5eb06754a4b3f6
1e0216f7c0cb3505889515b8889e0789b70ede23
describe
'1418' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLL' 'sip-files00108.txt'
9fdba245bfb4f3a49da8eceb49ce7c62
6f6b5a8b4e95c031cc0041db2c0a7c2ced277409
describe
'8862' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLM' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
793ba429b0f30af6e6d714f37710ff1c
4f2042d656e845aad930ba3847b0cb6d60097129
'2012-03-30T14:42:31-04:00'
describe
'1481044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLN' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d06021671b8161f03917566051249416
bf3678270c1e26cc332e8bec0f4a2fd598acbf62
describe
'116731' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e017e39437ae7bb06e430a17ecfa09f8
afa8540c9890d6fab6948386229d0a86ab84bd67
'2012-03-30T14:39:37-04:00'
describe
'36704' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLP' 'sip-files00109.pro'
17c39c4d9994c6d84119dd81fe902afe
8d7949ee9c47fe8038608afb570c6b466de84d3b
describe
'34693' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLQ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
29a99e63697eb6b795697387e540189f
2bd35be7d7bb90d0a6602cea188842ec549b2894
'2012-03-30T14:38:20-04:00'
describe
'35547664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLR' 'sip-files00109.tif'
ff1ade11f4086125ed7110e60cb1397e
c9a4ee6886744d0e077d244ef502a9075f2b1ebc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLS' 'sip-files00109.txt'
a8793c53ea5eb8bd19dbda3a24fc5f7e
c0612079d3285b3e55c59f97d336925489a699df
describe
'8497' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLT' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
fa40b84ad5ad2186c6694b554208fb7f
bf1e76d34766e35c690acc9838d1b3b0b12c717e
describe
'1545205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLU' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
88ff5beb5dfdba4cc4c62ddcc6b55739
6444a9c78fc0e8f730a2c01449c3a9f74dca6279
describe
'112937' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLV' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
561ee7a5bffaa43ec8a3e78e5458c719
01c1a4b7a68cdac12d51f6da5ac7f353294b587a
describe
'36371' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLW' 'sip-files00110.pro'
add92c19f6bacea3e9c1735390baa395
3bd979ed3fc81eb9dfd7830c59e10205a21d61d0
'2012-03-30T14:37:33-04:00'
describe
'33752' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
368dfa215c8b6cc8ac6c26e98baa07d9
989bc308e0906250eabef384dda29030b3eb93c7
'2012-03-30T14:48:29-04:00'
describe
'37086868' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLY' 'sip-files00110.tif'
3d1100fc5db3a340318204416a9fc02c
ec6a1209ecf1c996dc8771904c28309810f8c82a
'2012-03-30T14:49:02-04:00'
describe
'1489' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMLZ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ab37d752c8eb9e4801bcdf71ce8165e7
f552cedf90853d712f8e5751095e01225015acc0
describe
'8370' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMA' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
b2ab314894c72a30fb41e888a39b20c5
e8e20e60340048fe67265c70e85514b8cf3a7c72
'2012-03-30T14:46:14-04:00'
describe
'1520895' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
766fdd0393249c9470e4b252f1938e22
4a17845101fb04d2f3b012516e613cbd578805be
'2012-03-30T14:50:15-04:00'
describe
'111690' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
e1cd608d7ff9a9af95c4616caff46378
ae24feef74ffa60936fc72d78da38f43e40868bf
describe
'37333' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMD' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5f6ef381255b276e102abc47a39da3b5
b0b24442328ebb3881dfae82812bab7045f9c678
describe
'33490' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMME' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
e4f45b8d135089d235ce3d77b6fdc77e
a493b4768a3a97e49ac99b15f3352b5f2d7be2d7
describe
'36503348' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMF' 'sip-files00111.tif'
5a6771c543bcff3b139c5cb178f0e53b
487acdbe3535f46b71cc18e9d81e8f78ecfdfdb5
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMG' 'sip-files00111.txt'
cd96fb31239f0f0a5be7c402351ecb56
348adaece64d8c50f4ede229726d3e8efd8955a1
describe
'8428' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
ad674719b56f424e33342c0151de5f05
0fe2a6654f26e4681854efcdd3743fbab773aa5a
'2012-03-30T14:50:09-04:00'
describe
'1583682' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMI' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
9326eba7fe69290654217edca71d66b9
37d6abd792c6f9a5d5c18efa542e743d2fb86f00
'2012-03-30T14:50:05-04:00'
describe
'90618' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMJ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
a4aba477034e6cdd017414d4aff1dc7c
859d12ddf87b475292c7fbb5bf4f3b8f2de21dde
'2012-03-30T14:47:31-04:00'
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMK' 'sip-files00112.pro'
dd06dad9110a2dcc0e48b84b46e430a0
0bb00400a3ba8f0ea2769c5b5242fbeb48af04ab
'2012-03-30T14:36:28-04:00'
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMML' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
12a3db8a76bcca79158ac10e43cbc265
765159f871858cc946223b00cd54a112dd632801
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMM' 'sip-files00112.tif'
84948a833412604bab15c132cd5e22d6
2ff1b10a3ca464a4785244e6ebce417d0db656da
'2012-03-30T14:50:32-04:00'
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
d9b982552889fdafc7c4269245bc657c
3e19aaa4ae68199c8d29dcfd33dfb0167bd307f5
describe
'6639' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMO' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ce6aa09d952e181c8e0c8cccfb5f53a9
ca5ab7ae7de328cfd3d1605b204dc6724bfe9743
describe
'1576968' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
5d887c65ad8164faa9fa657c90e90c9f
0f18d53aaa1c9b49bb7c8e32c912e669e41aa549
'2012-03-30T14:37:28-04:00'
describe
'54864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ac392e684ec82c01a1289b3b939eeaaa
c89b3b44eaa7cfb6774cbee22f53e6fdd2260e05
'2012-03-30T14:40:32-04:00'
describe
'10445' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMR' 'sip-files00113.pro'
2fdfc6c2920eddee262eaec75cc207bb
64d6a18fac57193bd493404c798e7761db1431ec
'2012-03-30T14:39:52-04:00'
describe
'14893' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMS' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
0001e75f0e4d0302d1f50281d1985ad2
43d11c96439114f4c89ca7dfc16e29cce55bbcae
describe
'37849516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMT' 'sip-files00113.tif'
01e7613683b6c8216b258becc51bcf1c
b35f4a351804ea4f94ce1392bbad1da0cdc27c6d
'2012-03-30T14:37:10-04:00'
describe
'424' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMU' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9c535acd2587a75cfe882b79eba0f0bc
e010bbc65bc362412c15dd7bc1a1f8f1e13e932a
describe
'3990' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMV' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
11644577dad27f82e11028893f53572d
6601bd1c123a4ee8aa485176aad2a39cacfe36a7
describe
'1538054' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMW' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4d65f2878c6b34272ce02a741236a7dd
5998f5c5d176459bd7b81f226bc58ad53051cd97
describe
'67306' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMX' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
fb0dade622d556d17fb85262b0773747
77e95baebfa70c32aba3d72cc2cf3baf7b097029
describe
'17434' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMY' 'sip-files00114.pro'
e0c56cce3c12d044b4a091f0925c4936
5b20ec80b1735e3426cc306fcce65645f5ce87c4
describe
'18877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMMZ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
6bbed10755421149bd86dbe65e258042
3f51b3d4f36abff6794251efe9b377ffe2dd04d2
'2012-03-30T14:49:27-04:00'
describe
'36916280' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
297f8089d3d5e437b120381aa06f28ec
d6d0448b8f518ade9582c581c552510a28175496
'2012-03-30T14:37:37-04:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNB' 'sip-files00114.txt'
74b70ab1d26f90d1a31709c1d38c1516
eb2c2573203b508a733f25f89761eeffe80b81e8
'2012-03-30T14:37:42-04:00'
describe
'5140' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNC' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
15cf311c4e59974726bea38dd44eb023
2e97fdb56c96b563be9dde8e4dba3736f1676c8f
'2012-03-30T14:44:33-04:00'
describe
'1563131' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMND' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ee6d20531372d86d944a0e858b48fa32
c47f507c80b9e8242d6cf0c88e72f6070e0800b5
describe
'93335' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNE' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
181fcd23451e5c8113313b05cffc5c85
7672e74ea1d9ae0cacc86ea5b4d82c383b2add96
'2012-03-30T14:54:03-04:00'
describe
'36091' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNF' 'sip-files00115.pro'
1d4e66b3421ff440f7278880849e011b
864d62f5a53ebd17485445082cca823ee77dade6
describe
'28333' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
249ef5059e5d6a0f72f24fba6fbe9fe4
d17e2d2325219dbd859816420f39956e209c98dc
'2012-03-30T14:52:02-04:00'
describe
'37517412' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
d43051120eaa344681dac3a5f83353e8
c31b57b7eb035732c86036223709783f2af7c6a0
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2acb204188d30989577abdbc52c6aded
686584074b84a52c8598233826eed5fad1547f2a
'2012-03-30T14:48:13-04:00'
describe
'6908' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNJ' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
5f6351a6a4fdc8a4a6afe8f4e91876fb
c4226bbc2ad57a93eb1f170754047be20e307b2c
'2012-03-30T14:44:07-04:00'
describe
'1578472' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNK' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4a149b86ad50f0c70ac362849d79bb1f
dd2809fad725c6cbbaae8e92e15dc6b60405dd9b
describe
'92153' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNL' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ed0bd4c517c684aa11981f8214245275
fbb33aa7fafd7650e2b9cd2397d6c601f1f2b596
describe
'35874' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNM' 'sip-files00116.pro'
56ff7242c5bc8f19a8186c07b01fceea
3cf819f64e5cc0da53cf23f0cbc15e424b83d6c5
describe
'27232' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNN' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
17e28b13f5be65d189867bd9ec312121
73b3638765008bf7f5e70e821b66152b4521c3e9
'2012-03-30T14:44:17-04:00'
describe
'37888268' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
d293e1e2eab456730b68350f0d8de5b4
6164795a3460fc620327a8fb62f1c7e230331f02
'2012-03-30T14:45:16-04:00'
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNP' 'sip-files00116.txt'
70d503015e92bd7b33288147af00065e
e2c33a23a40e2af3a2231aa17e558654cd03d086
'2012-03-30T14:54:50-04:00'
describe
'6773' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNQ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
859bf542d8d37aaaa01f1650c92fa2f3
dfe9d67d27a39ac0a2dd9acdf1c51e30d9b9bb95
describe
'1586179' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a0a9e77d67a91141f483b9faf1929724
15997ab2b036de0376b6d03043907bc70bc773d6
describe
'92065' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNS' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
1d934a86cd68b5e937e137ce0596a6f6
87e8cac189c221f7eddfc2e860750cadd66b7720
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
f583e1d193888293f1697f385e183eb9
622addf2d0f71ecc00a9654141951dabbdad40d8
'2012-03-30T14:52:16-04:00'
describe
'27038' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNU' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
608870517ce1682bef468ee749ea75b2
8ca5c5cd7defaf2c7b5924cdb678e4f7bb44c58d
describe
'38070426' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNV' 'sip-files00117.tif'
e04a0a7266acffabb5f35b167cec8410
8157d64c2bfbe8aee949a75d0b781d443b237ee1
'2012-03-30T14:38:11-04:00'
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNW' 'sip-files00117.txt'
48a7b7a8ab9f4654e1e62c4e69b18036
9d56926c8907373d1e1aef83dfe35bb32a6b6c3a
describe
'6589' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNX' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
11e4c95065989ed4c5ed7a4d39eacf9a
d2976664355da813b092c820c1a411c579b01be3
'2012-03-30T14:39:35-04:00'
describe
'1611751' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNY' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
b5aed24e9eb577a911869ac563dd29c1
20c6d845b38ec7be9cc770a429ca8d429f6318aa
describe
'92000' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b813d61fa3ee2773a85904f59f377d97
1430154a2a3c5a91b26ac0656f2f41bdf6bf0d21
describe
'36432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
89bf839023cb7da20dc7d1097fc5cb6a
62ebfa227f7faaa3b18dc851346e49bf3783ea88
describe
'27632' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
ee8072ecf3340cbdf2d96f83a6e96252
fcfe01e7cbc3d4ea5eb8ce0a4fd826e921e2a41b
describe
'38683988' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOC' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4b9dcc58f23b5e1c8bb42f69e04b1dfa
153bf53d804aeabc44c2ea5dc7a3eaa940209fd2
'2012-03-30T14:39:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOD' 'sip-files00118.txt'
6c53539f12970a2f339cd1c39488746a
cf8433284283aac11fe5b4d62b3bddade6202605
'2012-03-30T14:42:15-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6922' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOE' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
9b059fd493499d456efa5026ae4e5319
dc338c28a6c55e445955a47e30b116a1dbd76c55
'2012-03-30T14:45:00-04:00'
describe
'1565813' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOF' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
65027b164a4055c3411839452322d50c
9de2907b185eedb03836e866d2c5ed30fdb8e0d9
describe
'95236' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d720a65c01ae9e95b3e840c65bce4e31
86facba5338d3740d5df6b4aa4bd6d81702f944a
'2012-03-30T14:51:55-04:00'
describe
'36146' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
d1bafada320d1e6d3219d204fd44449b
906ba8bae886361b702463145aad6b89893044bb
'2012-03-30T14:53:37-04:00'
describe
'28327' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOI' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
5ae480e33384e312d66837958b7cdac3
fca3818353a7368b51409e5fa6b1fcae338e3dc6
'2012-03-30T14:48:49-04:00'
describe
'37581488' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
076804f96ad8303613898adc4047b8ff
7977def312af500547e3fa6c7fb1c400816e9afb
'2012-03-30T14:43:14-04:00'
describe
'1473' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOK' 'sip-files00119.txt'
7f48e23d4a12c7fe47a704d4655a0b83
88d3375fc137c25b10313a4d9c797bdfb1a73db7
describe
'6720' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOL' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
2309cfae5c5f8344ed550a1257ea2ee1
3415476fe12a43b482f7922b4685f6ddf33fb8d0
'2012-03-30T14:38:48-04:00'
describe
'1602827' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
737b376b1dfc076d1ea71bca80fc8a76
f3e79427104bfe031355438c5103a5fd910b788f
'2012-03-30T14:46:49-04:00'
describe
'92912' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMON' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c22451e15045967d2d4640696dcdb0e8
81b13e70e4491ca708884c2a0357520794a20b4a
describe
'36856' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOO' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8ec3b1ba53681c3d4346aa8a2292e436
f2dbdb2a1a5503f93e06699038a8c9dc4d37159d
describe
'27509' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a2136707c267c6d12ea1ff407d72fdff
f441614925485b85e14af3431fae09601344d1a0
'2012-03-30T14:41:17-04:00'
describe
'38469816' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
a349299b68ffd2399a8b00cccf01e2fa
1746627a8cad251b4df857b01e0cd8148e6988e3
'2012-03-30T14:45:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOR' 'sip-files00120.txt'
dc3d23e0e576abdd6bb1c9e084a56073
176fbde50540161262e6292c1872dbdea8bc7e0f
describe
'6761' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
1de2290aae02c90e4986a9270a52b20a
7386802f61ff80bcecf6c4baff819c4c7a766eb4
'2012-03-30T14:47:46-04:00'
describe
'1643776' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOT' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
b63f9f58203119690980e441c2e2a20c
a5bf6464a25dba8ece57bfdc961466dc5151f444
describe
'88563' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
74aa2b3116a4cb774916f72137b37973
e29c463038f2e4cdae60ec0d6145264238ec10a5
describe
'36366' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOV' 'sip-files00121.pro'
54b6f2abefcb9939ddd7b829017407db
a5a2fcd453fffd91f8f5a642c31b37e85162ce09
describe
'26086' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c34a94893d225c81ecc51fab9e240864
2655bd9199e2dd8f2a8713105405c75493f9c3c7
describe
'39452960' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
78f9b9a428eeea397dd9ecf0e5a634f3
bd40bb99bce3eda5b9f97881233d50d83954a85b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
e76d173df93f06f8694b34f61874c9d6
cfab83631b946823d632a20ff302e19ee63ad19f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
fea180c0adb639a4fc6a6cd50694ee37
7d94f842e5487ec0a30e16c7c336692bb1e413e9
describe
'1531116' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
07aeb6b8ac06724eebb849bfbc6d917c
56d5f93dd915b2256fe6705de55605c5068f5008
'2012-03-30T14:50:38-04:00'
describe
'96916' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
5d7b979905053f8584c05dab80a2c4fc
3029b9414dbff97ade200bfd199b22610be93714
'2012-03-30T14:48:44-04:00'
describe
'37663' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
54d2e6a459186d0eab70900873cd838d
6889833585d2cea3ccdd020446450de82bf6c3ba
describe
'28423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
aadfff44f20147db64921ccbcf9b58c1
5e75e3c6f190d491263cfc8ce923c6704a09d01b
'2012-03-30T14:39:38-04:00'
describe
'36760792' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
0a35999bac2af8327a8b9eaee55d6fe2
d20190e0820efcf3bbe6d1089509c09bf90e0529
'2012-03-30T14:53:40-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
07133b49e2bf82f2a36aab1f900b3bb9
f9d412d918246fe53985638960d02ffae79226c0
describe
Invalid character
'6746' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ec91400a6cbf591a645eee48d8c907c1
f25a0d8228a8922d4393df8b3a85031816310f33
describe
'1529705' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
015850c950c3ac3867c6de104321c945
f1c0c8820f50786326b47066bda087aaa9f5f60b
describe
'80543' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
177880d438be3ddf9cea0212d180d4ee
393dda398d722ed85fd55025931382c4bd6da809
'2012-03-30T14:46:17-04:00'
describe
'27575' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
ff077390e37d2467e814427d10f0a3b3
77f7aa21a9c15ba4a36f35e1fcfdd0fd7f6accdc
'2012-03-30T14:51:31-04:00'
describe
'23264' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
c47995d67527dbeceaf3be15c91e0812
d86e791af77f487493ebcfe89f2866f239186c98
describe
'36725556' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
17010a51b3d8707fe8c4702a8ff42cdb
f1a0c2d829210a782894c619baee66d5c645e3de
'2012-03-30T14:41:16-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
fd87e1a74df41c3a6c47db5ac4a9452e
276a9d5c7a585969adb5b8ba7f209720b89b7ec0
describe
Invalid character
'5985' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPN' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
312a417892c548015f98feea5e3903f5
ba048779bfc221cd7c6b0512343b80c854846a2c
describe
'1559580' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
c5d9fd6f45b8fe3f990382065539b396
cfe3d92b1a52924677c30e3fa5dc1f8efed104a9
describe
'67812' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2491fbd82ab9219dec39ff273ec6f025
67ac988ed32fcaea2eb41a2f7fc582f3cfd0296c
'2012-03-30T14:50:41-04:00'
describe
'19184' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
e842ddc3a10bc84d7cff44d26eb4311e
488eacf59c3eff8a7380816c787db5789085c3c6
describe
'18773' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
ae241c5a957c7e4b8044a91669c8f21d
ea14e25bda76e4bb4f21923e1d477e1dd97ae6dd
'2012-03-30T14:50:27-04:00'
describe
'37441332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPS' 'sip-files00124.tif'
d4c526cb047821fd3b9d76ba60194a07
f5625ed904dc3fa7ddb83736c474cf12124701d7
'2012-03-30T14:50:37-04:00'
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
9a0cab3ca5cc7fc6713e1dbf85cc4d7e
d340ecfb3e75f382cf0a49157ae278e09e95fbd1
'2012-03-30T14:38:34-04:00'
describe
'5014' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d752fcd6d401d149e40a27fb1539eea5
d2b608dc96e83641506665816f281f3bf5c8addd
describe
'1562822' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPV' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
70b196495e4f5482bfcae1633ffbbfa1
e63b6ad1b7d5d1719c1b3e33eda152abefe06870
'2012-03-30T14:42:39-04:00'
describe
'93703' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPW' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
9a55b0466f71515f293085bd2176c13b
48fd6e26c615d677afdf3ca5f6dc8808c86de109
describe
'36738' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPX' 'sip-files00125.pro'
25ba7d7ba0c938a2555cce714401f428
c5170455fe9f967f78bd1cf661739cf6768fe4f8
'2012-03-30T14:53:07-04:00'
describe
'27381' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPY' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
2246c331592f3982bf57b5b2dbf50ece
a2108e22b80ab9381bd6f58db9a1b0cf911b692b
'2012-03-30T14:44:04-04:00'
describe
'37521380' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
8e59084426c04b87ea6f5cea67c5482f
19511780747cedc6fa768691d7df07bf0bc3a382
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
774c563daf138f0af1eef3606bbaabb5
d728753428f9baf95593884071b085b4eb6afbec
'2012-03-30T14:36:49-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6578' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQB' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
739804496303cb70a39c2e3e3a0835ba
05b478dd658b3f0e490a3a8ffcf946b238efa2fd
describe
'1584768' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
1f101fede47de9e47d3420d5cdb0c2da
68eba41c4453ce9befa15d5a1c0ac6b9ab57f899
'2012-03-30T14:49:55-04:00'
describe
'91924' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d72b454b519f6aa93837810516b9c2b2
9b7d9f3bd3afbd16ea39e85c854e1fc7d861d0d1
'2012-03-30T14:43:48-04:00'
describe
'35006' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQE' 'sip-files00126.pro'
7212fb82e2b632b41bad9bd85609cc77
54dec4d3760239800fdd6627f645a3c013da24c1
'2012-03-30T14:51:53-04:00'
describe
'26827' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
be90d931f3fb1b9c48cbff090273bf9d
fc173001aa956b94bbbc534cccfcfffa21b33057
'2012-03-30T14:42:10-04:00'
describe
'38047936' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
9c4723456cf1f7e62ce2f0bdce85e68c
bb815f322de0e0516e854b1aa9fa5e64df35ba31
'2012-03-30T14:48:09-04:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
af9752a69cb9a2ffca1b06fbfc22e39a
34d3654096edc50ab2b62f95edcde003ba15f998
'2012-03-30T14:46:28-04:00'
describe
'6597' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQI' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
1c1d3f378365f0cdfd472b21f46ec9ab
d3fefac3d1b6fc3a9872cc18925d43f6a5c4b0ad
'2012-03-30T14:51:05-04:00'
describe
'1544156' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a99bcc73f6a76445d61406fc44e85356
9a7a146ee7469be399d6067354d3e4491eab9b2f
describe
'94674' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQK' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
8c3412fabaed1c8bd4d1bb1ebb75a101
beeb03a45ad286fe4b008fab061de8d63e496519
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQL' 'sip-files00127.pro'
3357285653c950ece47ee518db66dc5c
d557aea54374d4d92028874f7bb89d9d73fc6c5f
describe
'28294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQM' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
849ab94aa26400b30b854cec7b197304
a63a5fd7a3d0cf4cc9cbc4325e48a9e3538fc78a
describe
'37073348' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
874c6c707a5e39c951851db9ea4140d1
c6f6f235cac771ec39f09baf28ad7d28ea036489
'2012-03-30T14:40:12-04:00'
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQO' 'sip-files00127.txt'
2e93b5c99e19986fd9661a8289c6b5b0
037011dfbc625de2a414807da7ca52b69934fb81
describe
'6729' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQP' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
69558711e9a916f3afe7ab7c1f877f95
c95deee4996311a9c9366e56fb00da2c480526dd
describe
'1535911' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
dbcf2e7f7336b84b261cfd089ff58250
f0fb4cf84780cedbd8b32ddc2f81070044f0026c
describe
'92715' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQR' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4a2b3a1cef4d16173e63dfda132de157
5c45d78b31513b12b45561c60f17b7be4b57bac1
describe
'36329' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQS' 'sip-files00128.pro'
21155d3152e1d24df4620769f7456451
1128a441879ae969d49b84f10801e3bda3aa58a6
'2012-03-30T14:44:02-04:00'
describe
'27605' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQT' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
1431419c410b81700d2f116be72d4a48
06b3c5956f5aa92db66a2f1b84015d3b66231c95
describe
'36875068' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQU' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c94d3dd721f8ec265e0e7fe3d2e523f5
547a55a0bec0e138b741968db19705cdda0b51be
'2012-03-30T14:52:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
5428e710db6d3e615f62fcd2e17713dc
1f111d697ff0ac8bc175c5ffb2e6622d4d95bcd5
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
f11d955e8e19d2e63a6d0515e9fed50f
20ba0649271eb0f085782bf67c37d623456bacb9
describe
'1533946' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQX' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
0506ca8516403081769d045cf8428843
7a8196a044e534fd612c96f1b8e8e2922e91e173
describe
'96045' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQY' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
087f7802272ba743c436eb816d370359
4ee03f34bce77afcd79fc3cc9f6ea1ba615bd617
describe
'35867' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e01201c167ee67b2f96f0a21493bbc40
0ce194cc8f42a458c32a31fee1a2a4cedf62c874
'2012-03-30T14:52:03-04:00'
describe
'28385' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRA' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
bc222475601b1d7f5334c47672c0d936
a3beb0a6ea5e2f81a9079047d66e9378efe8af59
'2012-03-30T14:38:53-04:00'
describe
'36828068' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
8626c051581c636ebd6fd94be84c786a
e6daf667a0b86f6b850a367fcc51ac3d76e21207
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRC' 'sip-files00129.txt'
850febf2f1ec1b4c634f134268136617
36b886ee680c16eb750db0fd890a2b2b5ff352f6
'2012-03-30T14:40:10-04:00'
describe
'6779' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRD' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
926ec14793513a58576bdcaaa994e0b1
2774d6e1d72f15694ae972c973a989c1830e1f71
describe
'1570579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRE' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9a21f43922ff7b6a0ba1de4352c7f307
3a94b5d6d54f5813835f2aafc00614b028fea782
'2012-03-30T14:38:35-04:00'
describe
'94854' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRF' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4caa6ec5ca88bb34ff602370609c59c6
faf87bc3e9bc65fc14d1094058e27c3d4d171d5e
'2012-03-30T14:39:56-04:00'
describe
'35929' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ea67944a969858200b3c2d589b9b1ab1
56c1d79d0382200076cee14c38248ad5f1a69f76
'2012-03-30T14:45:23-04:00'
describe
'27453' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRH' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
14c580aa43d7722dba22e2e4df321a41
caf590ef3ceb84569787d495d53c9e14b9101b4a
describe
'37715888' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRI' 'sip-files00130.tif'
00ca716f06291362fddb552e285f673a
fa5c08dfe40ca3b8db6655c2cc395c9211de2d14
'2012-03-30T14:42:00-04:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
ea56b2d84cc4ff57c127e4fdc5278245
6d20e0eb01ce99af32a9879e18153ffe5f291894
'2012-03-30T14:42:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'6734' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
31e36be18bd5fba4afb8159a88b07cfe
4966a5b826db49f1779c3c6637d017cc978d2b08
'2012-03-30T14:39:55-04:00'
describe
'3198552' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRL' 'sip-filesfly1.tif'
d0f24ab4b192f9226cf4d7933611e8e9
426721b2b55c0c209f9879a1e41bcb5fa720a056
describe
'1569579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRM' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
794e28520202d4b139ab9cedc6995835
9be2f04e931c95b8e39316b2d28cd95ee79eea59
'2012-03-30T14:37:00-04:00'
describe
'95938' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
e448e4f018dc1f86cffb0d555aeae0f4
3c7d5ac138b44bd172a206863ff5a7993310b909
describe
'35483' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
330b55dc0417f6e197020e4c6f042272
05176c7bba751ab1e8f02f9b9953606333c4b91f
describe
'28656' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
5cf3de2d3babe777ec759598056da7e1
9d64e245789dd518aba7b39e014c1a41c16871b0
'2012-03-30T14:43:26-04:00'
describe
'37683532' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e96baa1ba3f0711f567e81596dac8e02
8e93286d4e55d418f5c6e99e99b91393bef12282
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
63be146ec7783c21513a3c7a68b5a6e8
f7b26abd781b29ce80b7839961402542c6337f8d
describe
'7008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRS' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
e2bd4fb286c9932097f16f630bd2e5af
9d22b1193a802b6f0173b80389cf56ad7781450c
describe
'1517367' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
736f78d57a808147092f114644e2c559
0bad578a35d39e2541dbbc7e35a10356220af923
describe
'96036' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3f9b350292eddd0401ffd9da328f0563
812da55f4e6de89d4fbaa3b2ff199047b6043cc2
describe
'36299' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
75cb77696e51109fcef94804acbe7f6d
9ea643546552863cf604c816de3720ea8197fd60
describe
'28277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRW' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
991d7a421d197ab7d543c9cd23c5474e
b3d5bb0cec6a7a741c447544d50e328fb9d9c09c
describe
'36430596' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRX' 'sip-files00132.tif'
d3a4101c482411b3584a439062c8c3cf
7183c86ee2320ceec214e85447d6d54cfac694fb
'2012-03-30T14:36:41-04:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRY' 'sip-files00132.txt'
47630096c4752d8399ce2fce71506878
58742a648bf02ccdb4ff12aa3c24cc38530c84a4
describe
'7110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
9ffd622afddca4eba9ac3009553fe46a
ff363241725f5d7e07a37e3b449d750606974054
describe
'1557617' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSA' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
cb92a920e518a86d2cd570982b547e6f
1c3613c32c323fcf94043427f012e70a5df5ec8c
describe
'82241' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
6a96b9ff5a5a6e56403c1cb5951cbce3
d000957a05c84b9fdd4f780e16570d33e75e8077
'2012-03-30T14:42:14-04:00'
describe
'26118' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSC' 'sip-files00133.pro'
71c8c327052bf6bc7a65cfc241000b07
e9fbe0901cb52b80267446ec9126d64d88781f9b
describe
'23984' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
3004c5b1ec99b71fdadce96c3dea0a88
833f873e777b58419c57660ff38ea9580a8b4c4a
describe
'37394712' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSE' 'sip-files00133.tif'
a0e11b43bd2054f550420aa4affa5c0d
50c2bb0dffa3c09a8ae9c27379ae71ca2ba41856
'2012-03-30T14:44:53-04:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSF' 'sip-files00133.txt'
5bccbd39ceadb748221bbe86744f9088
5ee37904c0e8a434cf2aa9c7780672a20f3299a4
describe
'5920' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSG' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
d60cd58a1ea6deabae26d6952efa8316
9393850c40a5a17225d306f5029f4d8aed854fee
describe
'1562233' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSH' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a707326042652b520ff3274cbde669a8
ddb78ecc5d39e8307fd5af1935f36be6e79c82c8
describe
'63115' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSI' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
68138821dc8466d8b479b09220ce44ff
b9cb2aad8f560a837dc4a4561887da505f1301ec
describe
'17482' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
80f7d7e263d22f5d76cf59da4754479b
22a4bc785e4f60e352b7235ac0185e2cc8fd52d4
describe
'18001' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSK' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
66aa6e544fc84c2f8c6060064d6d1ba2
ec07a6c8bbe7ea1d8afbbaf8c6be0a61fe145d8f
describe
'37504024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSL' 'sip-files00134.tif'
6292c05f75201a97fb853bb0b091a00a
ae3f9b19cbe7cdc4218b81a95f1e23dc91b5f119
'2012-03-30T14:38:13-04:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSM' 'sip-files00134.txt'
cdbb0800b16e3ae428364664ec033d76
8cdd32f56ac7f66e0fb323c81040132ae5eb3a35
describe
'4874' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSN' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
46ef4fcb3c0833a2698a5a4e9edca218
0fe9bda21b833412730ffbccf0702cb14ab6cde8
'2012-03-30T14:46:39-04:00'
describe
'1549235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSO' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
e7163254c9cfbf0b97eed23c44451833
f6c78e26c8267bbef2d3664479f0008a95fabad0
'2012-03-30T14:53:32-04:00'
describe
'96731' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSP' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
94167f44581b6e7ce55cf1801873872c
1b4fc720c20d2c23e45b5b4729133cc4ee87c67f
'2012-03-30T14:42:53-04:00'
describe
'35584' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00135.pro'
3c69b8a794a27e817fcb1f3190acc12f
c48be751725869f42162b4709b7cb06e2875e6da
'2012-03-30T14:47:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSR' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
9f6e3a3e29032573c15da253a3d09cf2
c58601da4efa250462ef95c038e8c5c0cea5b6d4
describe
'37196120' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSS' 'sip-files00135.tif'
20c6663d268f220672094adfd022c23c
52468015118104bde63b1ee6345471aab73e3765
'2012-03-30T14:50:58-04:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMST' 'sip-files00135.txt'
0e4587bc811dbcdb885a14e60d764d73
fb6bc9c2db57f8fe48096f90f0351b145b234933
'2012-03-30T14:47:35-04:00'
describe
'7085' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSU' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
9152e5cce3560c8657e7ed12d2f91ac3
4b3f2015c065509102966d1a1c60f4492a63b677
describe
'1536441' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSV' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
58709844811433d067a08e54635a94fd
e1ad61de503c3d9f03395df4fd61a66b21919a9e
describe
'96735' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSW' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
f0441aeb9e2a160ee5ccd4fea3927630
16b31d8f89b6135d0cf22fd706eee85cb5636249
'2012-03-30T14:41:50-04:00'
describe
'36620' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSX' 'sip-files00136.pro'
28ae589b0b564728f94f3da188e2c50f
77ede71a60c68d49912241b884c82f4bb7441dec
'2012-03-30T14:38:29-04:00'
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSY' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
4b1bb7524f55c64f24ea2a01b7e91094
df656b34775f3cb432367c588c213d2afc0cdd89
describe
'36888464' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
ef9be84a554adb1818b1a4e52de785a7
dfc6ef6250149a7d2ccc4f91bb5736d4c9bc4110
'2012-03-30T14:39:05-04:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTA' 'sip-files00136.txt'
c12bd30aa7e6eadcd801c2827043f797
cd4daa64ecc097f4eb323f98441919b1bdb0c5ac
describe
'7076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTB' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
e2da8e10a4d1f3bacbd8782ca2167a20
e767c302b70a66f2256208071dd4935c71355551
'2012-03-30T14:39:02-04:00'
describe
'1559251' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTC' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5e54ec399bd2a429c4e3fc91b621790e
c1dafaef3a07b0d51a59cb52f99c6c1b7b5a0740
describe
'90773' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTD' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
5fc1c64aa51694600fc1011ff868959f
8d9991b46ff0630866d8b1dcfbb0bc29fd61bb45
'2012-03-30T14:51:49-04:00'
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
0ebe769b62bb7b395bfff75c577a38e7
539df8f6b96ffe86e938f2592bb8460c56429fd2
describe
'26308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTF' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
d28554a99f2160ec3765007f0794207d
1405b1fc95374482c4c5a4d889ece4f34bd395cd
'2012-03-30T14:45:14-04:00'
describe
'37435716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTG' 'sip-files00137.tif'
5fc724c1ae7621968be3b7542a729cf3
9c8896882e7559a35863a7050e43f0d14b04f4ea
'2012-03-30T14:54:12-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTH' 'sip-files00137.txt'
0e111c6e767038091a7b58ca18fe1d28
22c2ef9ea3d6e0ac21928f79f321e2c832f2f7d3
'2012-03-30T14:46:02-04:00'
describe
'6495' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTI' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
f7b597c4336c31a33e0d36db728ea082
b9d773a366cb1176f7017d02a47fe0fa46b2936d
describe
'1578603' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
9656ce4ad9abb223db0bb159aab42c7a
095c71bf5816b4ed088fb460916f28163f9e1904
describe
'95862' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTK' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
6161f550605bac4d52eea07059cf36eb
ff4871c12b5dac5c679e7deb6e17b58a38f24c09
describe
'37197' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTL' 'sip-files00138.pro'
be969e0030103882f3d478937f5fa44e
6d60b401dbcc50bd4d91d985639c1f0259fe1a05
describe
'27950' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
dba9b5954f9e0b1a420352f272aa9466
f3c0912550c23c1cf582a5eceb33cef0d4ac26ef
describe
'37900376' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTN' 'sip-files00138.tif'
658f9af41bfb01f92d997e679d51a6d7
17e4077d17348ee822444c2b2de21b54bb4701b7
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTO' 'sip-files00138.txt'
0566e0871bae709201296c9f8f495151
6a48936b03b79edbd1faf48021e0d78206d701d7
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTP' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
6094964bddc7a06db7ea493afb65717e
7bcc8d7b43b4475797d7977f6d9fc66b0a9122b1
describe
'1539508' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
43772911d81606592c7766e85cb37703
a1063c03b9f9c7e94d2fd49d329d8c0483f345d2
describe
'94727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTR' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
877fb35b4e37df787512e84d3418f310
51ac3512ff8b9352d7b79f973bf98d9afaaf75ca
describe
'37707' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTS' 'sip-files00139.pro'
89955365d1a81a9a321092db8fbd7136
e037f06e5546471da72e124a3dd0311981881d0a
describe
'28062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTT' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ea461e59927227fbeda1b4967ff6b2a6
8dfa9e6d0f3bff7bced804d326e1ecec3408f714
describe
'36961876' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTU' 'sip-files00139.tif'
63873e112b6bd5c4c0fc2bb2f4600f7e
02c660c917c144a43f83cd06f16254065ecfb258
describe
'1533' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTV' 'sip-files00139.txt'
318a6af46d835c227682eca7cf5e820b
e105254892cdadf25a7b4be0a6b06959ed710c0b
describe
Invalid character
'7011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTW' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
5ce0c040ade4eade24c07702df10032f
cddd448cfb5f6a58d985a309d521c991d081d064
'2012-03-30T14:47:43-04:00'
describe
'1549163' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTX' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4dd0eb2770e202953702922448c06767
6cd66f704147c07ee999860ffe86ee0cde83168e
describe
'94460' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTY' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
78f88920b926770a5f83f41fb5d4e5b3
6f87806741762431eabdb27eafd46248942a93d6
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
c7984d5585251288358767e6a3ee2d93
9e403097aa00f9ff0bf50d02cf0a4747e61e4cda
describe
'27746' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUA' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
7ce816b50d99ee974e14eb4bfafa9daa
505884e149cd06907647643819a6db3f064a1e8d
describe
'37194144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUB' 'sip-files00140.tif'
84843d7af1a113b7c9375d5ca000ca3e
b96c74210b3c80604cabcb99981de816b38301cb
'2012-03-30T14:45:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUC' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b25463a7594a0225eb2bd105d4affd73
2cfd66e7a0d32807ccfce7eb5b4504cb36d309c6
'2012-03-30T14:52:52-04:00'
describe
'7004' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUD' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
d9c8daa7f33aa24bdbaa12970b524f4b
457df12b90e2d3ce775fb547b86070b54d5fe1e6
describe
'1558901' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUE' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
fb4af3c162c979869753cce2b580bc47
e8ad93c35aefa6c26b8ad0eb577466b4ac09c402
describe
'94301' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9a26e0bfa931e83fb810b19edcd026a9
12ca741c61383e3e58ad19dce270f782442a7b46
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
fc57bdc1f5de1017298af84231b3a791
8557a35be0eac0c8533469642203f6ab9b09ac40
'2012-03-30T14:51:14-04:00'
describe
'27949' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
e6f457aea43d1c89176054a71a2c57c0
8892242f0f4c89aa4dfe33a200159fa98cd404d3
describe
'37427240' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUI' 'sip-files00141.tif'
3d79d9798b42b6592f5735b4fdf54b20
83c72c7df8c06aff6a042c05a970d2c752362004
'2012-03-30T14:43:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
1bb520564bb40db5f7011e25dcd0435f
9bebf2bdeab3e7980eb225898c43a95568b83e70
describe
'6954' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUK' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
23159611c9af4b9d69752b820511001d
1900145b0ff3f5d8b1e05ea0277202150f7a28de
'2012-03-30T14:38:44-04:00'
describe
'1529132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
be54b98284cfccbaec73e06ae342598a
f6606be59a92378c430998da8942e38630670459
'2012-03-30T14:37:11-04:00'
describe
'99186' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUM' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
5fe923f2b7b8a599ffb91a1bf572459b
a90a4ea7b6105d83b2c6d09675189feaa93bf196
'2012-03-30T14:49:56-04:00'
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUN' 'sip-files00142.pro'
6a05e77f976de3ee2e267a4b58acc533
ed38aa709602bf1454713f4d311c71e582bb3ecd
'2012-03-30T14:54:55-04:00'
describe
'29311' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUO' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c371302e9ca1205f1720d063a40d2ab3
885f5dd7bbb441e64664669a8130d8580365ed44
describe
'36713308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUP' 'sip-files00142.tif'
7daa24918a8209e4b7bc21402b67fe1f
bc1503aa011c89eaa7e611566421675b6088209a
'2012-03-30T14:39:47-04:00'
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
3d5a7d9cbcc4f5a35e8ca05f30aa6dbb
9c2557b031cdc7b3cd279ffa24c002b054c65751
'2012-03-30T14:39:54-04:00'
describe
'7167' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUR' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a2c0d8543f4ea1b02a44a8367ebc453a
0f1738eeb64e54ef0656b01ec020b33a5e15b2b3
'2012-03-30T14:36:24-04:00'
describe
'1545666' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUS' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
5ebd43a97438f67f87013498bb646390
263433fc9a800397df1fce3f8e9413f2c5fec818
'2012-03-30T14:47:27-04:00'
describe
'94942' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUT' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e13eb4ad9900a328e749ebb338f231f4
815848b77be56dbf3a34c90591958445f8a93355
describe
'35415' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUU' 'sip-files00143.pro'
b919999be93cd234e069bd50692467bb
d77936f9ed093b315b75928427b8af89c4658217
'2012-03-30T14:47:30-04:00'
describe
'28148' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
34e1fdaa64af72e294c5fa2c46833b21
2adcdd7203c23e0519a85a03266da70cc15605c9
'2012-03-30T14:53:30-04:00'
describe
'37109300' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUW' 'sip-files00143.tif'
cbb8031ea5b141825ad5569581bd26d7
728616a3e11cfd54b98105f9b533718c5bb2f5e7
'2012-03-30T14:43:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUX' 'sip-files00143.txt'
62b39cb4b55b00b085f3d784820dabb4
a7ddf03a59efc33a8d12174ab315541fc0666c98
'2012-03-30T14:54:34-04:00'
describe
'6980' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUY' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b31846ecb4f75826c772640fff993112
8aab66499f728501d98839754f53c0a4bcd69832
'2012-03-30T14:49:41-04:00'
describe
'1552816' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
3170eed100181aa535aed41a465667bf
877e3b986a26d42abf98d24254279dafc30530c2
'2012-03-30T14:36:59-04:00'
describe
'70683' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVA' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
322e9073ebc0f33d1c03cc652b4d58a5
78a02feca5b89e658473e7c65a4047d178f531cd
describe
'21126' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
ba06dbe2f5d8e676d9eeb9591b8f0e01
4e2e41624b2222f29807faa2896d309d4268c9f9
describe
'19245' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVC' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
8af5bc52f51ad2bd8c889a9042ba57f2
07b98b37f5bbe4ee46369419978d742758cb7b7f
describe
'37278216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVD' 'sip-files00144.tif'
96e48993a0d6c1b6050b7d34e1ceec9c
e9b5bddc1e46f0c7ac4ffa427af2fde177efbd9b
'2012-03-30T14:36:45-04:00'
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
06cac18e1ea16218278107a2c8775697
6c1935807d12120dbd69685ee3b3d05f37bc1501
'2012-03-30T14:42:11-04:00'
describe
'5367' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVF' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
caf38db385358eba9eb725ef661c9ed9
f9f0f2a96e56ac204eb490fcb6a1fd162df59303
'2012-03-30T14:43:40-04:00'
describe
'1532986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
cb6fbde7700b7b7c5a93780dde3f53b7
bc5c64d836b2f2db70a74434af4a20f9c8708736
describe
'92253' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
dcf2a70b4439a9a748d4aa669278aeb4
d557d78e294f7cb3fb7fd678924f625e8572c1da
'2012-03-30T14:39:29-04:00'
describe
'35332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
237e409e6d173044f84d8c3a348b9881
2aeb43a5a50690a38351e4a3505115b7c644a74b
describe
'27960' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
2c11873c0cf993888aeb69ec29bea55c
ef11170bfd364f35a475d29b8358a7528dfee125
'2012-03-30T14:45:06-04:00'
describe
'36805368' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVK' 'sip-files00145.tif'
7ca185d1b72ab22db7b008b35a69c8e4
2449016cc46eb4516d573aece6bde9fbb1919e68
'2012-03-30T14:53:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVL' 'sip-files00145.txt'
087a62fb61268144b3cafedc555f34c5
a351a112555a16dff98bf46abd742ab529faadd2
describe
'6917' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVM' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
96297644a9669fa8e00af738bf3b51e4
be644df38947ec3afa96838ef6051e39c55ec9f8
describe
'1485698' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVN' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
c367eea7f2274f426a54b0c3f44991eb
a46f70753307553a483815fa0f6f0344ab751470
describe
'100311' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVO' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
223466286a233aa49edae6ffc2a193fb
0cfff8fb743646ad1b183f7352352e023c20b87e
describe
'36122' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVP' 'sip-files00146.pro'
36fefcd5bdce1f174857abd0cf81ea18
1ea77e7dd0b506f5d8ca3dce9c9885db3622be0a
describe
'30705' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
44ae2ab7302e6654396486f0be94a346
b4ab0df8fb65e659bd472c392c93e80d4d813e42
'2012-03-30T14:38:31-04:00'
describe
'35671044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVR' 'sip-files00146.tif'
d90006f13171717bccb1cc079219b884
2e824e0efe1021ebf948d6e93e6785b58a66bab5
'2012-03-30T14:41:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVS' 'sip-files00146.txt'
ba33e1f00029aadf3d212e7e0c512435
12b42846a407f93a0eb5493fdcc0fc37da434ad9
describe
'7684' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVT' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
19d62ab0bec7d0e42ef7e79bb8b1c5ea
fc55971913c8c45f536399bc61d2abe722fd2d11
describe
'1543238' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
89a25a610c3cb4a24f707f575c777e21
4dbaf72e34d35b84ce63ffc9369ef315c933c9ee
'2012-03-30T14:38:05-04:00'
describe
'95115' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVV' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
11527acb615f765c36d2717a2f435322
5637c80f33458acac9bd40d15de6e061bd59b27b
describe
'36618' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVW' 'sip-files00147.pro'
2ddd49b5e697638b92e319f7532ffda7
b42684ccc51f73295150f4eaa005952e06f0673f
describe
'28704' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVX' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
a3ee8c5812e38a601fe7cf897a9380e1
e105993a2cf07aa752e7baefe3a35009bdc4f63e
describe
'37052408' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
be4666eb07974565ade72c474b9fd782
6f490be46cc5ef87877ea3a80442041e600e9287
describe
'1494' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
28825c757c7464cc1af50c57ec51bac9
4e4285f15e7df582a471f7ef430a1a8117f34636
'2012-03-30T14:44:57-04:00'
describe
'7189' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWA' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
9877b44f0d231b18edb3862ff9188aba
46981a4a17210bcbd1ed26d2eebc616c1b96c04d
describe
'1535967' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWB' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
c8ed362ac2fa9c2cc987f7b8ebf0c14b
6c9f177defeebadfab839cbd942b13dc682d4264
'2012-03-30T14:41:35-04:00'
describe
'102911' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWC' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
505b9eed6ca4b40b160e74dc6f11a622
206fd9bedf8a8816d8746c0c4e00fcd469b7c009
describe
'37504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWD' 'sip-files00148.pro'
6391d74dc9ad314227368d805caa6676
79519f887ef8656be1810620d0fadfb3457dbbd2
describe
'31131' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
bcc2255f2d58500c8a41b3ccfd1ef897
2a12bc87de5c6412ccd74f9ec4b8ae4430b083e3
describe
'36877252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWF' 'sip-files00148.tif'
b8753e7dca8d1b2639cef15f889d4d3e
115a992d781854f3e0ad50756b0f0eefc060c04f
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWG' 'sip-files00148.txt'
b6f0d6fd893ed6364a388af577970f36
a71fbcde230e38457f63ede1c445ea3e7418ff06
describe
'7502' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWH' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
777101f0aeb274e7f3f2518f6a46fa4f
6fb7229b8f7748943910cff401992fc8d77f252f
describe
'1544360' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWI' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
4acebe06caeaa5ea47d14731f6c63d47
1c3fdfdcac56260d85470f7b2d1c3a268f0d439b
describe
'99570' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWJ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
9c0f4715aba297e403dd69d6984459dc
2287df27209d0ec9d3c8adef718a7ad226ada644
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWK' 'sip-files00149.pro'
49a5a68a39bba85a3bed9dcaa6d2aee2
ff9c43afaa48fe8b11a369302e5f0b5f02013f06
'2012-03-30T14:44:50-04:00'
describe
'29670' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWL' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
f898f8f326d1eb4cf07c78c8648b4fba
c3e194cf57f52aa08896e57ecbe3534bf2195b8a
'2012-03-30T14:39:31-04:00'
describe
'37078320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWM' 'sip-files00149.tif'
2276efcccb703c01b0b14bd334f0b559
d87f70702c117275eae93106149bff6175d6271c
'2012-03-30T14:39:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWN' 'sip-files00149.txt'
b65dc2c154aba244b8c37290ad8bb15d
7b1a4538bf2ffa2c2d0f2b5183835bf487a9ed43
describe
'7067' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWO' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
65d30d7f7e5b0bd7007b77ea49358fd6
1fe0c7329e922ea49d8d705277d50d707a12fdcb
'2012-03-30T14:46:37-04:00'
describe
'1530766' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWP' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
5e07e8ce37969e36363b9b06fe18fbd5
a4dc78a10386f40118ddc3e979e6c04e5f6f8935
'2012-03-30T14:45:34-04:00'
describe
'107220' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWQ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
690b47f642b03c1edbc99b22f09aafb2
b80fa87cac3826b9f8fa9ab2ddcf0adaa1166ca5
'2012-03-30T14:53:25-04:00'
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
ff4986dc5a4b311dd4a017d34c9296e1
f62ee8f497c7b49cbc27d76e0d40d013a58bb1a8
'2012-03-30T14:50:30-04:00'
describe
'31955' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWS' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
792ba24e5f2bad3163f71eca0379c975
0a0e95e331037cc6a3051d452b17cdcacb72c89c
describe
'36752668' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
a0e1b7788e030d1a5837b92be86a5efb
ca783c3171191653e8d823ff6daac5976bdc811f
'2012-03-30T14:50:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWU' 'sip-files00150.txt'
aada70d88a8ffa8bf5fea9795aafd06e
21920827df9f16cb0f8820524311b00d35fa40fb
'2012-03-30T14:45:54-04:00'
describe
'7688' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWV' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
6265c7db42694d802da7938567cb6fec
78a635fccbbd8ef022a0df83084cc889680f8dca
describe
'1544183' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWW' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
aedbbb345918129ecbc654dc327876b1
da2616d8e39ad7214a0566067a0ed62cfa41253c
describe
'107523' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWX' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
2514032530d958a185eb529858e6b8c3
ad159d3ebbcb3ef183bf193bc2943c859321c997
describe
'36431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWY' 'sip-files00151.pro'
8f9f3b4c8beecbaaa1d0ef1a3752bf9a
b6ccf416263509e5eecf627cfa9b3dc56d138805
describe
'31823' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMWZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
45f613fa79f8e068d958b48bd79b565c
ce4efff68286d8f624074ca6634a773bf9b2237a
describe
'37074900' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
b603bc3a36f1c66129f98a521e3f817e
bd4e4f9c9756f9e0507c0dc6588cd497b5e1cd64
'2012-03-30T14:40:01-04:00'
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXB' 'sip-files00151.txt'
356aa6aa4870bc5cfa76e25b4860e132
b0c8ddcfe40ae4c40f5fd1f3400797ae397f2704
describe
'7917' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
f3dff32df7324ad0bb6e28c73789b299
4ae543520cd3ad61dc962e0cb6ceca056ebb5893
describe
'1518828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXD' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
b9833ec3c557d1656a0f2347f2acc9d9
feb2962288aae3e5e98cd3dbc76893ccd6a17dce
'2012-03-30T14:37:14-04:00'
describe
'103767' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXE' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
cb796ade4ecd5e237a14d479aa212751
6efc7be35e8044adb6f0dd5ff71c002cb5b0d212
describe
'35244' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXF' 'sip-files00152.pro'
b2c1e7bb638ecb6adcc21e5adb9339d3
d7e7fed63c5a9fdc57a6ce0ed7f68b04d74484f7
'2012-03-30T14:44:15-04:00'
describe
'31171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXG' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
4d5d3d11134b271c87794d29ea193063
53272a5c594403ea70fefb16b9825fa547e8e70f
describe
'36466380' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXH' 'sip-files00152.tif'
bd1bd34183c13faf39641d6db31e3ccd
2b40826b56d5400b673076d78415285185cfe2a3
'2012-03-30T14:41:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXI' 'sip-files00152.txt'
7879b29a5c685961aca744de2850b9b5
5053c7fda5bd75e32df5310ccecd98c09e67bf6a
describe
'7538' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXJ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
a0a1d0776ca6d57925af8fb8c5a6a1b6
a8c22f1b21ead82a45d9051e7a1a2776f5c6c6c3
describe
'1481539' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXK' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
441995524192ddd922d8ac192bbcb826
4baaf55a273737f07ae8fe30fce4f8fe65d20a60
describe
'106472' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXL' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
c64b0aaed595d1989553adb786471b73
3e66b10c1fdacefc9a257b5503ac71f64e095ba3
'2012-03-30T14:40:03-04:00'
describe
'36523' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXM' 'sip-files00153.pro'
037afb16b44408bfc9d4ab64a1e71945
3de7ea165cfc5f3159c5b6dddbf9d2175a57adce
describe
'32694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXN' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
85861a7dc585f2d2ec7ad6335078f25f
154bf692ef0420bf2331429aae76bea910094faf
describe
'35571644' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
25bc049d1a27d1c726adebb511d8db64
88a6ec483f47df2e71d57e2f10d1a96cf03e4a14
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXP' 'sip-files00153.txt'
5fa3e3402fa12ca7342be6563d06c800
bdb6c23101ea38cd45595d1e19dfccb953c2db38
describe
'7947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXQ' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
3b6ad194dde37e12f1c63aa740350226
c510b6f2dfadd2d81458bc594b689e891a07221d
describe
'1466825' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXR' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
b29bd881fbffa9bbd42e36a630035d2e
dd08c0702a2d6fe94b3c84594c2285f39befdb73
'2012-03-30T14:51:39-04:00'
describe
'57806' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXS' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
16ffe708483b49fb8f1a7460017c79bf
da5bfc01bdf02070fdb31bf17f7299ecacaa3358
describe
'13892' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXT' 'sip-files00154.pro'
ee3b5ed5f2fc5a2b2f042fb724af0292
523d5b6c469d0f30013aa712da05c3d991efc2fb
describe
'17058' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXU' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
52cbc85451011335f6eadf3931a88693
aa6a6b436216873c6cd1ec99e323e1e0d2d6cf73
describe
'35213052' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXV' 'sip-files00154.tif'
3842f8a7b175aa7f25c4800bc37af9cd
6d7176cac704c2fb5f85a97f29eeefc2ec887952
'2012-03-30T14:45:12-04:00'
describe
'591' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXW' 'sip-files00154.txt'
0f528f96fdae66c748dced14aa9fb3d1
7f22aff684038dbaa76b8f0decc0aea0e0855795
describe
Invalid character
'4887' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXX' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
47c9a57153e7e63a08a3ba08ddaee115
6d46c31526a2e55e3cc63671e1c4731f932cc7f4
describe
'1511802' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
d6287b42884d5387bbbff5878bc91fa0
3cb69b8e5fdcd49791b4c24ee4a1a15c5b679cc9
describe
'66537' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMXZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
35137e494865fc5deeb283ed6494ac1d
9d0d43ad9a707a28dbf6e65c3761e3c36ade15aa
'2012-03-30T14:38:47-04:00'
describe
'18801' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYA' 'sip-files00155.pro'
125dcafaa7e7dd525d4196a8b72461da
be4f5a7337afdd7238bb298789cb0e432af042d7
describe
'20071' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYB' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
8d645442be71938c933cedac81af4356
32285f27c670b06507449b694e7d2719b4dcd04b
describe
'36295664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYC' 'sip-files00155.tif'
91d22e14b25433e0f7c72fbc5ac71898
b1960f7c94ac820117d75419058dcf1eef963ae9
'2012-03-30T14:38:51-04:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYD' 'sip-files00155.txt'
63018f8bf1ab86d31b481218dbe55248
4b1c0b23588aa01fe1eea0b1af7244c1d2b9a893
describe
'5358' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYE' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
73bb08e9aaf0922cf13fd6ec37922d79
b03ed749e1d625c88f615f1b89ab551027802bee
describe
'1467224' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYF' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
c83030b97c6c1bd12a6182bc62ca370b
e2082a6670b7f3b2062e59fab85414f371ab15c4
describe
'99337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYG' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
2898245e64da5dbb4aea08957853a544
61a9c71937a598eecaff80f6c06ad6cf3b6ee3a8
describe
'38008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
98cc5dcb54c217c99a3c764bb986757c
51cc5a2573dcc3c08b978831cd704ecd535656d6
describe
'31207' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
70bef461e62791164cb948bba5c1f438
a57e9f56600a1278a90ef705885f80219c5ea435
'2012-03-30T14:54:43-04:00'
describe
'35227292' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYJ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
83949970e94cb553963873907229d0b8
4368d9daec8123012937f78ab7dbba5aeeefd9cc
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYK' 'sip-files00156.txt'
ecb2d429f77213f3b83655a05b920a09
a05096ed1323f56d02ca59f939d1d2765dfd41ed
describe
'7713' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYL' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
3ea8e12060d1baebda8e45c8389eb04c
68e53c0b1e32b4f5c34b18201bb3d4eaa5b3078f
'2012-03-30T14:41:09-04:00'
describe
'1422125' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYM' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d28a4d9ff2db7509e6c56abb44a79437
2d101e95e0bf43ec4a829f3b33fc2e9be116670e
describe
'90289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYN' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
0dca527c41ce310d235a3873a4054f91
41e3e16b8aaaa9c88ad1e018f93fab2a9351a705
'2012-03-30T14:41:00-04:00'
describe
'35728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYO' 'sip-files00157.pro'
158254fa9f420bb171b60f081123c536
ee2c6e3034f7ba6a942539d808170495a00b4a94
'2012-03-30T14:48:22-04:00'
describe
'28221' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYP' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
3a1d5a22c3947d8137a0acfc15f7c89d
39af4870ee1af5046c1addd22bb4820d22827f58
describe
'34148184' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYQ' 'sip-files00157.tif'
23213b9c469fdfc9117f56ce36c15b22
b26d9c72dc734cef3597154eb9336735406e1c99
'2012-03-30T14:36:47-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
3c80f4b16b00206e7e32afe061f1322d
6b2e3ae092fa666b11992dadd1116caeebf7f3bc
describe
'6994' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYS' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
2768324e7ea09bb0c5ee5ebca8f11777
5b4ddaa498f9e6472c940f281c3a7f81bfa9a5f9
'2012-03-30T14:55:05-04:00'
describe
'1498432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYT' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
48d6d1d04fa520f664c3a3a0934829f1
5b4e9c5c61124ab75751ff28c4b38a5b345a8376
'2012-03-30T14:47:59-04:00'
describe
'95937' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYU' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
5f93f5951016cd90b9f859b7d63e72ef
972eb569cb6efd2627cf317acd43d7308843e33f
describe
'38922' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYV' 'sip-files00158.pro'
0b2aef611e51b82a8db897c68b3b41c8
0a4d799e39758f812e12c947765ac9b2f94f0484
'2012-03-30T14:42:30-04:00'
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYW' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
42dafa673315c1a282ffc2ea5438a490
a83fa4ef9d515dc7041cea6defc270c1c47c6f20
describe
'35976644' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYX' 'sip-files00158.tif'
4c10dfe15d8a5afad18510c205ab809b
1341bb8f7a3fac8a170354e4a74d3023ce73b93c
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYY' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f7bb61d197056c00a46bbccb8f88b04d
00fb2a1fb7ba43b26f672e2fc959711ddf97ab92
describe
'7615' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMYZ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
dcf70ff8a783fdf94aa1fc4b5a7f6f46
59962630188576efca623a35e62ba0f2b6a11d0b
describe
'1497200' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZA' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
1e437b20b5644361ad141653e7b04cf6
cbba4e24cd090d6fa0862b3cfe723b959efbbdab
'2012-03-30T14:54:14-04:00'
describe
'93776' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZB' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
01e3d25759cd39357cc261e1645077e2
02f92561529777ac356b661fb83b4b7616bfda74
describe
'35919' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZC' 'sip-files00159.pro'
3831eb58f4d5ac9a9cfee2679f46f8ac
1ce36bcb3f6e5d586d25864e12c716394738db3c
'2012-03-30T14:42:13-04:00'
describe
'29272' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZD' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
23aa8fb31434e23770fe6d4c986b1806
6935a07343ca7b1d3a7f41688b02acbb7871bc5c
'2012-03-30T14:44:59-04:00'
describe
'35947152' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZE' 'sip-files00159.tif'
a18e63845ac18a1f677ee481478c8198
0488dfe37f4b22d61dd229831ff1e666bcdc5f53
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZF' 'sip-files00159.txt'
dd8f00b396e9056d1defdb658d90cd8d
4ca35aa41eff0a3e989ff07e3c7170ce2ad41f04
describe
'7570' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZG' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
6a99c5806f115184a8035def4b0c566f
3bae558d4d653f228c354ecbee0fa9f475e7c2aa
'2012-03-30T14:42:17-04:00'
describe
'1505906' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZH' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
1129482bebfc35e3cddb1eb765cdd7d6
6a3c0786cc8c1cc4471a4744b291e05ada1197f3
describe
'412003' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZI' 'sip-filesfly2.jp2'
3ad8df769def1175882fb11beaaa6c12
96397bd8a7c8208a3c506f02fca42cae3a044496
describe
'95439' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZJ' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
2113293845678cd4a0fe78349419515a
4a980beb6ff9c768365cd0707acf5f034bc4b536
'2012-03-30T14:42:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZK' 'sip-files00160.pro'
07aa0f57997f437628ae266a8bb32c0c
490dd999c2d58ccd9ade00b412381afcd9001810
'2012-03-30T14:37:55-04:00'
describe
'29444' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZL' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
c46e65c237d1708d70f8a9bc114ad033
77679bd5e68fb06acaff18cdd37a321cf37297ea
describe
'36155380' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZM' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6f0b1b41a243cd6374368066d07e9255
85e885268c14238cd815bbf06b8011188fe20279
'2012-03-30T14:43:17-04:00'
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZN' 'sip-files00160.txt'
7f1a0b12b615853ebfe20c4685518019
76a85e1be27932018f7631df6c54fd3b5bccce81
'2012-03-30T14:37:43-04:00'
describe
'7389' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZO' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a10333ccbccc4700022015c6d3a489f0
c9431ae7f3a6a9043c510454c3b62dbfd32861a8
'2012-03-30T14:38:41-04:00'
describe
'1534146' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZP' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
4fc0fc9407c86634ecf9049b6df4efa4
5c575873efa80abb03f65dcbafb41d67cb1aad3c
'2012-03-30T14:36:21-04:00'
describe
'88658' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZQ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
20e4f27de488a855cf0c57975c5e2ac0
d6097da318b84dfc318f20b5039a888c68d05b65
describe
'36194' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZR' 'sip-files00161.pro'
06ef10fa15bf4615516015e9fc753b2f
3a086b3df1f3f45215fe5fdbf8b0bae7d970299c
describe
'26801' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZS' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
82e4b5c8760a02ccb7f3f998f0429eb4
de88862eb4429503e1f38658f8dd542800597afd
'2012-03-30T14:37:07-04:00'
describe
'36833244' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZT' 'sip-files00161.tif'
9422bde2a418a7e9c56d054b34014d2b
51c9f8fa5176cc250fe64c6769249414ce6f1ab9
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZU' 'sip-files00161.txt'
af16d10bfc3b7d1d54c9e24498ce4bdc
37864b168660b17c6104e1727b1fe9e18a210661
'2012-03-30T14:50:42-04:00'
describe
'6560' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZV' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
784fe122ee3f469e1e6ffa420521cd52
a53d09e155153689eab5d09d7c6ade2b07da1326
describe
'1530309' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
5b84faf20eccea5f138e8812d0270271
6ca02edb62ae7089836ceafa6c6f8ce26ea06fff
describe
'97900' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZX' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
3030872a7c305a92a2a3255cc5fa5ce1
68e5d8ccb8e76f6e9ba745e33b3c00216ff54710
'2012-03-30T14:36:36-04:00'
describe
'39047' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZY' 'sip-files00162.pro'
5f05225dd3ad1d1941ea257475f0a732
4036e04aa3cd8b29a6d14c8f65e1724be8898340
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABMZZ' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
cdef675bedcae1b0dfa61e0f166c85c1
0d80bdc3fd5467860a8e1a850d05629a55e6e224
'2012-03-30T14:54:31-04:00'
describe
'36741316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAA' 'sip-files00162.tif'
1eb6d2a65673263c2ffe6abc98280a81
85941bc854f8dd93271525d09cde1124713a5b2a
'2012-03-30T14:49:26-04:00'
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAB' 'sip-files00162.txt'
d9f22643685e789a21cc57b7f0f2a270
61e209820ac2e39e2ccb6b823eb03c5fccf96f53
'2012-03-30T14:40:38-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7399' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAC' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
30e3bd4716fb48eb46b9346fd0393d03
b876dd98a368e9c15a77f744a5d64c91394eb15e
describe
'1546270' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAD' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
de7d836ac4c1c21e3655fdbf3a1ab528
00e41762c3e01ecf30181f3d593e1c5310e18442
describe
'84761' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAE' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9400c73af436253ab1be6ae70bcbef09
41b16cfb36a5e473700785ad59538059216e3958
describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAF' 'sip-files00163.pro'
12107f6c3395dc75e39cc9257efd5e2d
ad6aa21dbd3ea12221654fea0db583d7bd243c63
describe
'26101' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAG' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
345f6f24fab8a43cfe764a9340c7effd
8956454d1a78fda3aa13c88d135c86a62ed5f9ad
'2012-03-30T14:44:01-04:00'
describe
'37125796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAH' 'sip-files00163.tif'
1ad7c83590d936e59c35d61ec93094d3
c4bbb57ceb341537d3182c8336086c3683c533db
'2012-03-30T14:43:03-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAI' 'sip-files00163.txt'
66ea2303b04d569418c09e52fe3ad485
9bf34b7b1154bde2d56aa9bde5206bb1ed8c7850
'2012-03-30T14:45:37-04:00'
describe
'6616' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAJ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
ff497153668a795027b93d6880e1729b
5a31f1f4603fd2e809fe16cc974bcbab4444a0aa
describe
'1593302' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAK' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
0fad4089cc14bf398b86e73eb0c21e18
cec202c48a4f6fecc486e753941ddfee8158c85d
'2012-03-30T14:40:56-04:00'
describe
'90558' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAL' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
9c99b4e7fc53062db7b7848316ba992d
88499c2fb64a4cf65be302095688b01395847ccd
describe
'35922' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAM' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e74bc994469a732817e95c573a36cc52
f81a5285a716a18ce63a695bb5121d6e637ddeb1
describe
'27712' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAN' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
01e2848889e69a1c593017b08e6aed41
797ecf0927d5a1cfc2b6bd6d9a8b76e5b77baf01
describe
'38252800' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAO' 'sip-files00164.tif'
7e486de666774dcf9af80653cc25cd0e
202a33f05d4972c73fb9ba12b42905e34894a0b7
'2012-03-30T14:42:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
19f992acd2958b76d50fef09a463732c
bb18d3547e2ae9b94620857a2626da3cef26c969
describe
'7166' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAQ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
056e764183f0e06db710f30e6faf4555
cfe13d720c3049a969b7408edb5f9ce59e254328
'2012-03-30T14:40:49-04:00'
describe
'1577617' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAR' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
97968be2e9194d96ce939f1e797dae12
76c864b98dabc99bf7ad63ea7987693dc8293c49
describe
'36125' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAS' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
2a9cf7a1f6ee33bd9e46ced8a061346f
6b06115de996feabe938b7ba83ada42d84eb9431
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAT' 'sip-files00165.pro'
d99d11a3d454feb8bb31ff94f2200826
eea9da4986ee0a8ee6576a271dd068ee221f379d
describe
'9788' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAU' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
97af06dd3fc532e576b6fc5a6bc23b42
990db866c6264e1f2be44375be7d0614137b81a4
'2012-03-30T14:39:43-04:00'
describe
'37880964' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAV' 'sip-files00165.tif'
d42c7af57bbda9b21eb35cc64bf03499
7ca6e967fdc66301b39db915372d63961203ddd5
'2012-03-30T14:41:37-04:00'
describe
'85' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAW' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6262769e86dba57ff0a640f6bd0d96d0
d0e1d58432eb8f1fd9c49712c909c5c1c8dc9b57
describe
'3169' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAX' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
8ebde5650c487e815974aa77f807572e
80142ce647c7392b53e3dd0070e71787928fcd7a
describe
'1598574' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAY' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
fe146546294f86fddc079622f555a244
61f278b814d9a1557bd2b72a0a8a32e7b8eb8cf3
describe
'41267' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNAZ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
a18c3117a90aa4d5f602e2ffe1cc22b6
6db041f815205c7fb13ac0f941d1d9641c8fb61e
describe
'10580' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBA' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
ebf4f241b6983e8d431931e5958adf1f
ac26384e455fc5a454802cf0df6c595f5c0698c3
describe
'38375888' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBB' 'sip-files00166.tif'
04ceda0b3e13a734f0382bd9e3ad8ec4
0183a31d9a0291b469783b159a7246b31d3bbe7e
'2012-03-30T14:48:02-04:00'
describe
'3306' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBC' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
e5a192be322ba4f3942b8f46b5084936
742b01cdc47fdc47fa7dcfa9c115e285329244ff
describe
'1577108' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
fbe4150dbc31734b51ed2a4d52bd3702
e9f0ebd771ea8c60e3bfcbea17e53b7bedbe7f52
describe
'71054' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBE' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
e90c44b3bf36a7fc80a01cedeef9df1d
6f9685778cdf23397775c8d639ba298f137b0fa6
describe
'20822' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBF' 'sip-files00167.pro'
cea35a7ef12e48e07d230ab7213c88f4
87e6ee1c186ffac86ba096a8bf5e1de97df16680
'2012-03-30T14:51:44-04:00'
describe
'20031' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBG' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
1db1034d84fa5e7e3d5522dd0e7df363
cc8a1bae31244989ceb0cdee3cc60f7e878b088a
describe
'37861676' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBH' 'sip-files00167.tif'
2a2eb495ee7035a0404a356fab13165b
3d6155f315590c4c308cac8da94061f142f676b2
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBI' 'sip-files00167.txt'
2add7d0a457410a724d1d7ebf1081c09
743b86ce344a02b0dded3d5e9de00a04147c9f67
describe
'5851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBJ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
67055722f187f19605f43a0600c2028e
838d4efdd5f7ea731fc316b8ddb2b5147e74db6e
describe
'1482489' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBK' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
1d4811a405215953cb524317df9dd27c
1d8f9182e048fbf90d5d516212552817043480b1
describe
'98553' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBL' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
694f733baaee06ba8e9c0e3b4ac08f1e
232b72fe450cf53708bc0d6bf6ca88a798678fe1
describe
'36593' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBM' 'sip-files00168.pro'
cf4db9481cc92fd4d1a9259a50a9dfcf
1b70f53e2b44e56ca5764cd823bfed411957a915
describe
'29313' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBN' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b898553492f984d827a1b4599d0916a0
37758933ff2798224e1904e567781230d03edc87
describe
'35593644' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBO' 'sip-files00168.tif'
fba06402996b0def1c39aae1e08e1694
14bb8ffe9190f67f2ca8e345cf81b5334c70ed57
'2012-03-30T14:46:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBP' 'sip-files00168.txt'
7a45eb33aff2841fc4fef5c3f4d1c184
37bc17f633dae1a53233fc106edfec83e7d7daa8
describe
'7997' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBQ' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
2cec0594b51f5bdaf3cb84b59756cf68
21d9e831957c06a737edf2fabdc557e21918f52e
'2012-03-30T14:38:52-04:00'
describe
'1583706' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBR' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
d45021f895d0db722ee95da1cdc2929c
978e715926d3335fde9eef459ef15d38ea0446e5
describe
'91303' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBS' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
b3f1db7f54fadbbc65fdbb55ba8075f3
32b0bbd70924cd5104702b615a39d0831cd5f281
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBT' 'sip-files00169.pro'
c688f3966023131a8f3174ec0d755928
f05103804549e5d59269b26f15500562af0ced69
describe
'26434' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
a86529b764b57a837381e6414e4169e6
fe79ff144365e9d5a1e34df2074d07874a2f8b04
describe
'38021528' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBV' 'sip-files00169.tif'
f26d4cbe25459bb4ef028a02b3ac7e48
0b9f9c93a1f305ede6e5ee79b627964e860fcd22
'2012-03-30T14:38:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBW' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1391c5007f78406c9720ed47e84e1158
1b812c84f5578aef678a61b12d6517cfe03ca770
describe
'6636' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBX' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
f7b1d7c4252b3661b3ca1a3499c1f268
93b27ddd3c47912effc4420f8b07a3fb6edf42ea
'2012-03-30T14:40:54-04:00'
describe
'1537695' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBY' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
40427720fd41f6fc7a58a0504913cd01
507bad422ddeded8c96fa98ddc1f9dd60c475a37
describe
'99478' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNBZ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
ce0e1cb384f3c4fb64fefcefa13737d6
c44c5e0a80f9af649f6af2a5252f3ac301d90b2b
'2012-03-30T14:47:02-04:00'
describe
'37043' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCA' 'sip-files00170.pro'
6d470477ec5738d56e1c80d2107680ce
c2de9b1a91d7d9f52d2386ba26e7623f624d87f6
describe
'28890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCB' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
5ec8621b0c5acc8bcb3fc4839174ee6e
81da3a641145553effdf2b628d89f9274677e6ab
describe
'36918728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCC' 'sip-files00170.tif'
d19e61c679249e547a690e5e70f68d7a
bc73796a7b9cf2923939df91c646724fe9260c61
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCD' 'sip-files00170.txt'
d6bb10c978e502656f99db729e210bc1
7fb679badaff1f1d238affba7c23db105dbe45f1
describe
'7164' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCE' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ff71222b5ec7a5fdd24c5c21ad95a1e1
98fc037a66daf8183612860fd767569e9144fccd
describe
'1530570' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ab864ed77fa77b6927f746478381e740
576d58ae54ef663165302cb86204e51736d7d344
describe
'95814' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCG' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
5e131d2312f70d34d4a11cab968a35c9
56836e2faa736e01f634b6b266e494d1bbe78c08
describe
'36994' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
cccd0b960cb60415546a309a1652dd6b
ee3f5ce3bb13d24e62df59550b9de2abbf75bf0b
describe
'27907' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCI' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7da95aab999c2708688b30caff0b4179
ccdc9b43efe4a3f870a537cb2ad4773e42d2ccfa
describe
'36746032' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCJ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
696ca1cd8d2e92af93153d558dcbd54d
aa9c27459d01298302d05eb08666ed54eb67d68c
'2012-03-30T14:41:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCK' 'sip-files00171.txt'
f41c4af4e0e20a74a0d991a289a31d4f
a9c310a3c9d89486c2bc76a816a6d4a22e70c57e
describe
Invalid character
'6839' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCL' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8676f631fad4ec57fc2acd7d922e7b88
30cd3654de9e6ef3bbe4ce3a9f3575d856e19308
describe
'1508803' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
56d68aa0c02129adbb8d500e74084f69
f378d503a6a6c19cbe6a553078a2bef8e5ef35b9
describe
'101273' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCN' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
823f837d0891b4205fb882d958cdc699
dcfc58a3700048999e5a7135bab3bfd56539dadd
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCO' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d626ffeef20d0cc376a81475f9bb57a1
28f6bdc6cfd272bd064afda6f52af335bfe36315
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
48fda274ebf26c9361d281b1b48c7a40
a5fe08b637519020b4b25fc01969665eaf0ce9eb
describe
'36224668' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCQ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c31878da24455979e27fa6d4cb9b7b94
81f050d8c55d32cbb6e0addddf000eda2e72b083
'2012-03-30T14:44:23-04:00'
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCR' 'sip-files00172.txt'
dbc8cf8c8200e76bae154a69ca2dbf39
bfc83500d5d611bafd012186dfbba23068459d58
describe
'7187' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
95d57aeeafed0a8365c03f672cfd874d
8e8dbb74a115f9b52e9ae7a7121f8831ef0b8d41
describe
'1555116' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCT' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
cb0d6130a0c6ac03464fc1b891936963
b2da6d3e04fd28b74cf27d96afa8d160b5c80080
describe
'94412' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCU' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
a8799cf773bc31876f4f410876a4eb49
11cd09d72cc3942146b17c6690a87a86a3ad6aec
describe
'35599' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCV' 'sip-files00173.pro'
cb730eae839a04515ad2047fb528750d
9325693b165ceb7e7820d9541501204a0cfcce61
'2012-03-30T14:55:16-04:00'
describe
'28002' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCW' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
c5fcff3a31b98d0c42c4d6e6b7522c0d
e58fec34f979f772b06c7cafa36d3cb2599196da
describe
'37336468' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCX' 'sip-files00173.tif'
cc631e349a167c9d9e1c6a9fb6c70126
8b699502322470399174e6074311eac318790060
'2012-03-30T14:48:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
7c017ed5a8b0425e09a05708f17b3782
88e5c34dab8521c550595b418404c68855c1e33e
'2012-03-30T14:36:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'7196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNCZ' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
ce8e48d390f28a4b4136c628f7791b26
732d38c5b158f13b5152c284bf392b2996496dc7
describe
'1434410' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDA' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
e08cbecfc225024f8f97074c4626fffb
1155b6001ccaf1f146d9c20db9494035174043e5
describe
'152044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDB' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
bb54e2b50a07b0c2c831ddfccfed32eb
66ef64066b2a0da8620a5188e4a3d1ebc71da901
describe
'38149' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDC' 'sip-files00174.pro'
598a4cb089e416cee9f3ff2829538b9d
d6382b1e21a3f6fa4217e0f3859cc2be120bf269
describe
'44209' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDD' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
44ea9c163a13ccc3d168c33419d528ac
f6efc0acf9aa33ecf380c88783f6d8df1b7de5a4
describe
'34444032' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDE' 'sip-files00174.tif'
7789143f854b582295b74ed6df8ed467
367dcafe160111d0da266996db85e63b967dfd7e
'2012-03-30T14:53:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDF' 'sip-files00174.txt'
a213f02c028bd2e2c789f3f84ff834de
1f55b80d14dea02e7aa56cf2c4421c9eabab579f
describe
'10905' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDG' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
c8e57ce36949a31dd6218c75004749da
d537eadea9a5d4bf40d65bffd76700e2bd2ddde8
'2012-03-30T14:52:27-04:00'
describe
'1355370' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDH' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
0d845ca4948d79122c59ab39f3f054d9
218e9d7217b61079f80cfdba3bdf9208cb8bfc92
'2012-03-30T14:51:42-04:00'
describe
'104347' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDI' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
00d05d7f52bc74cf49be9bbf3f1297d3
e5eeceb62ec7003d02c609fad1c5cd0a888396b9
describe
'36273' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDJ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
9d195febe7ec5011a7505331c31bf732
1a4ae3eceeaf6a977853f0f93f9b5fa53445d2fd
describe
'31495' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
29a9380b8d8c02562ca2c0a8f95ce03a
36bad876bd440b4af2bd00eb43d12dee6cafb61d
describe
'32535334' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDL' 'sip-files00175.tif'
70657d1f9c49b4edff6055ec1790689b
f79edd62c9ef048aca7d1b14c2cae6e4012ef954
'2012-03-30T14:54:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDM' 'sip-files00175.txt'
9c5a7be8125022d2b485c94902102909
74f3311e939411d9608a4118aedc59cb68f49495
describe
'7639' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDN' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
43c434a3e40f34a59af2cb2a44f69d1d
0dba41c1d63a60e016c7e4d8385943b6ecb91221
describe
'1386220' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDO' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
23925b7d488f475e40435adfcc9f9c55
3cd3b74ca47de64bd558c9712a56e37a93e1eb9b
'2012-03-30T14:50:01-04:00'
describe
'100168' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDP' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
711aac8163f23ee7720c9d5bdbc0d7dd
1336b1f02ea43e945c4172a3c8823db2c9f64b01
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDQ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
fa5d6c257608c6dc9e77b074123c7cd3
ca1eebfd4df23601712ab2ae5c7d593a30e34bde
'2012-03-30T14:49:30-04:00'
describe
'29472' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDR' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
73e923bab66098a0f8d213690b674ea4
e929673200cc26fd0152a5b2356e8338e2208807
describe
'33272110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDS' 'sip-files00176.tif'
d4a6da9230c66993eb417cdaf23aee63
76c703e3310dd6056231b22c71a15ccb63f00e05
'2012-03-30T14:51:11-04:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
c2990a16223489d18c5a0f133987fe08
0ce889e088ad3bbd26ba554e74864b8837341c6e
describe
Invalid character
'7686' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDU' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
621edafd6c49fc72c500ef3d31ae57d7
f3f978fd4a7b15b7416c054f7507d3344ddab60a
describe
'1497856' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDV' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
7dd2f84e2c982b3153789f7fdd33bc30
1003f7bad963a59ea4c763fb265dc380f670f593
describe
'75890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
69831d349663d18cc94ad3bb3e779eef
ecb18aede0d447f53cd9a033b917355b3d854d51
describe
'20199' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDX' 'sip-files00177.pro'
8054bbd69a4bb02fc2a3cdd036423ebd
fdd45e4741d19b8c577482030cbb7102d29b03e5
describe
'21089' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDY' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
f3bf2cf3061cdf01507610fe4c2ae92f
31379a94aa695f338670cc9c630b8b65915189e5
describe
'35950570' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNDZ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
780a8d9d4a9eaa6563658d0706b30faf
e07fd5cd9824520964a1b9797f30ad2346fbeed4
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEA' 'sip-files00177.txt'
092098f6c8aaaffc7ad41a0142786f42
2d9bbdf128a57c9450cebddd40b38a5c27fcdf8f
describe
'5711' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEB' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a7a6fa261a8b21a0c2f1978a4d7c5d66
239dc0d5a9db83913b0410a0a40605c3a7054836
describe
'1374042' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
1deb9e6c895078be2dbb3c0ff1fb8ab2
3af20d76f8fc9fa1ccdec0f376a997d6cbcb0afc
describe
'101227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNED' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
2cf18845b504c39554e5e4f9412d16be
8d16f3983c9be4576f45ce70398f69e781409077
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEE' 'sip-files00178.pro'
10a087b07f44a8c14b277513e952ea7b
e07fcea4e401c776c64496e6e1e27b254e49bc19
describe
'30840' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEF' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
8deeb6454bf924dc66ea715133209725
cd716487b092efb2d436c6d8dcb03cc582ac5441
describe
'32978944' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEG' 'sip-files00178.tif'
8b6a6bc5808022780de7bdd5bd94459a
c7ea97228c74875b7d412e03be60caa0603e35a3
'2012-03-30T14:44:11-04:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEH' 'sip-files00178.txt'
8d05cec1002414cd4d08176c8964792e
7f4a27b9b50aca4621542e399b6a06d0ea0bfb57
describe
'8176' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
f9b68e82fbd78208ef182fdef991893e
a5e24956cdb4ae38932a81ca63b4ac752e711df8
describe
'1404724' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEJ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
11c1b74eba7d7dc4e1fd07953734cf42
74dfb8e246ef527421dc41203f55c30031aaa6dc
'2012-03-30T14:52:56-04:00'
describe
'95328' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEK' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
c50e902556807c13c2a1ec5f270b051b
7de1eae728f17c670b3accf1971b962ebfc91d90
describe
'34610' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEL' 'sip-files00179.pro'
d7ffc84053c42c333922a7caa298de35
6e97d7384e4b503546e7dd4fb3a0db51c796005a
describe
'28664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEM' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
ff3fd9345fc6daf8a1b3d4dc122a8665
b40b75e7cea20bc0e99f5323ec9f4d95fcf03501
describe
'33715220' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
559f272b988ee72500eb3ad55cf57773
981891a80abd48f8d15fef54068813f7cd3ddb65
'2012-03-30T14:48:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEO' 'sip-files00179.txt'
05743b8c5ab77904e6cd01bd6f18a496
3b31734c8e459ed3c2b2953076e31e4701231b4a
describe
'7431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEP' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
30eb3f27a26127700ca915381b92eb96
9860f693b05d77d7d99df52ab1d141ba20fa22a6
'2012-03-30T14:52:24-04:00'
describe
'1502094' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
154bbd18391a46af184b998de7304ddf
2030a2a664eb68b83547bb773d5bb58d031a13ca
describe
'99258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNER' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c69e2161bde7d7b697134683a915db43
1fb4321070aa88f06c08a85bdc2ae05c6e6f9892
describe
'36017' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNES' 'sip-files00180.pro'
29d2d0715e0f0f4dfe971aaf036c3277
d06bfb43a3422fee28f9bf90abebbc8e61961bf6
describe
'29884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNET' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
03a2ce320790c41f5ec29357edfd8565
0835b852186be8314373fc4883d171ba37de6138
describe
'36064316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEU' 'sip-files00180.tif'
6c968445b7ba646e807b6c1bf49bfac7
4cd97146ee4b9dd02721372b981ec4a3686d5381
'2012-03-30T14:52:51-04:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
2e214fcdeb365f94eb0637d468b602a4
39387b2cd574515bd762c176f19f10c7b6af6dfc
describe
'7397' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEW' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
610331ec77d86b2ba3a677f7f14b91a1
52fb9b4910679809321245fec0615238ccca076d
'2012-03-30T14:55:07-04:00'
describe
'1328730' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEX' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
7106633a9cbacea765267834045256d4
782cf96f1b4580e461e9bcd9288ce41f5fb41457
describe
'101020' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEY' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
de07533fd0fa84198d88273902a4f2b9
74fc5322db76c0dca041e87483df9de141102c1a
describe
'36161' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNEZ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
77a4d4d5bb4aadf191df067fc5f627e8
656df09a70ba1a49bf8ccf1dd348787cdaa78957
describe
'31285' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFA' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
a9391e7f2c8db60674a911cebefd9e57
7511a7b896e28420d1941a5eaa4facdace8d6a1d
describe
'31891572' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFB' 'sip-files00181.tif'
0d89ab66b0cc53133f015fbbf2aa36a9
a0aab3ff035bcc2b26a17867199f758c4de66540
'2012-03-30T14:43:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFC' 'sip-files00181.txt'
566a1596c4cb9e5f3f4b0f2f6f3ea7c8
662d1aaf6073ef7e7d7bfaa1678abd613462ff1c
'2012-03-30T14:46:03-04:00'
describe
'7869' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
0a3fe42e78a3a0d2c40649b6a4a46a25
4080705eca67cfbd3bef772ad5d90f650e118b22
describe
'1411171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFE' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c0ef84e0a56d23780f3c9dffadaafb64
3afb8c5720d9140825572b52f459ae1f767154e1
describe
'94694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFF' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
82244d3b73b69640be4a62fe456a1791
a306cc6d1fbb2cfbcb896cd6ca0a66ad89f569ae
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFG' 'sip-files00182.pro'
cbcb583097c38317db41127efbfa5ae1
4ac065da9e4a5b6a1b31cedb24d4b731e7f5fe45
describe
'29475' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFH' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
c08bc672badb7a3acaafb4b53b5cc4f2
6eaff0c8de05a5f6d5176f879d8bb7ed3bf6f9e6
describe
'33871028' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFI' 'sip-files00182.tif'
eccbd2c8ec738674ccbe714337654bfe
e88733d82d21edf2bd27f614178bff0204753b3d
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFJ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
0f66d91ae985604a20f2f15a3744f41d
2501f8f62d3bb4c6dd484cc6a8a68a4149b10bcf
describe
'8110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
7309d7f14ae026b2556c273b46f565da
ed646a6d6c9e3b16eb7bbe099ca1513524601ac0
describe
'1566037' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
56609bf538c501b8b28d7e844744b4cd
3160924c7abc6af525fad7d2a3a6f804c32c5d72
describe
'99643' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFM' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
bc112676fe196f303c452ae722dfe427
711dd710b8198c3fbe1c01691f513545107206fa
describe
'34884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFN' 'sip-files00183.pro'
38a9a6c0ae954f27c231cb14766b5087
c8813d67467d556bc14595f8d31e640a6b0c4a4e
describe
'29718' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFO' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
9d295c1eb6ddeb912f63502ab240cabe
67b7b6cff870daaef3d828a0a782354c53f5ece3
describe
'37598932' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFP' 'sip-files00183.tif'
482767dea96752d2d98bb5d040e871b8
b3c7b5c8de559f1a6c0eb51ee2d66f904e118b77
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFQ' 'sip-files00183.txt'
ce7304f8b4a934510b8eb608bde72986
a5c21696518b5ec2ecf0de5f2f15aef65a7d1388
describe
'7294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFR' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
d0681d00d95a28f7960affeafef8e80f
02d4d32079a5959ed984ec05c8976db939bc59e6
describe
'1363010' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
605ac7a06fea9a0f51d17f012501d339
be8d06d65ed258cd484a66c8d3b986a37b9dff9e
'2012-03-30T14:48:18-04:00'
describe
'104837' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFT' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
9b90a30b2ab28ff26199bd1b25ebcb40
f875eb5060d5c8da4a432b1163b174011382433e
describe
'36642' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
2580a5c7504d33521e2d70be50221748
092ca4e4040c4855909158ef22785126a6114b91
describe
'32440' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFV' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
773edddc6f12a8618db8f71991135f1e
10db702ac230c4cd282b5fb460408018a7dedaa4
describe
'32726356' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFW' 'sip-files00184.tif'
ae40a0e46f8cbc72f98da8e21b2fb39c
32d4be146260c4713d680b9567e7b47910ad0eb1
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFX' 'sip-files00184.txt'
e2da7f3b769f63296122c6b37b3bf80c
bb8fcb6785f2d11d990e1cb9442a1cced0079452
describe
'8394' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFY' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
4612f819b4cd48455a5cb341e9e7d224
2da4b06d7f1b1a64dc2f0f03f88126ab86435f0d
'2012-03-30T14:40:42-04:00'
describe
'1386870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNFZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
844c480b4be4bc711220d0c2e2fee44a
7ae8a013336f49efc4269b8f0eb671b887b48701
describe
'95476' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGA' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
04c6b7bb6c5cd1e702741ed7cafd8168
e7073c8f131ee4c97544fb47e70a5d8e2ba0b000
'2012-03-30T14:54:21-04:00'
describe
'36005' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGB' 'sip-files00185.pro'
4ddff14b7b397a30c1b765ed5809629a
5d8ed8cb5b4c1a902581a2b6b5ca6401204a958f
describe
'28983' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
8280e5c296b57653dc5d184e60c215c4
9e6d102f42e61c0cecbc47da813f135271ef163c
describe
'33286942' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGD' 'sip-files00185.tif'
0e16f8cef76ba7c192bd77a7a1528d68
f00a693e4ac10c8c216a84f68d9bde2f6cccfa1e
'2012-03-30T14:55:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGE' 'sip-files00185.txt'
5bc8d76f9d7d3883e171bea823f75bd2
75283a24ab840a7a629bcbbf4ecd29f5c479f014
describe
'7751' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGF' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
6e8bb7d640d87919941a5a6221df8e83
dbfa9ceaf1d79cc324327a1d277fe4547ab259dc
describe
'1345247' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGG' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
534e1a3201adca4f245e270e96f7821f
864d92994caba87d943948ab06099cfef7046038
'2012-03-30T14:37:48-04:00'
describe
'101097' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGH' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
8cab873b76957cf357a772534ba3657f
d5d5b26b8eb160bee87b8aed64163bbd6eaa3fbb
describe
'36531' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGI' 'sip-files00186.pro'
e4f7d42581f74d625b73e47671b78116
2a4f1b8eae79dba98f0e2f84fcf3b3aade83a347
describe
'30516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGJ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
a29f8954041d38ec0ad987147c26ffdd
3e6d1d0118e18da381aca70b5712ce7be48a5639
'2012-03-30T14:40:44-04:00'
describe
'32287914' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
f3db1f8c3387e867f1154c728e0efeaa
a3d4ab1dc5fd1133a860e4ef0fff2ac4d97fac12
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
545081aa57865c6c561bddebb735da99
1388915070c9147851837ab44f94cf9346eddb5f
describe
'8258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGM' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
044a7820edc44cfed24efec480f13d3c
19cab91d2bfa472d5948608c66014d3c16a51318
'2012-03-30T14:54:20-04:00'
describe
'1537725' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGN' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
53cb11a25c468935b108c7d4889dbb14
14b99d3b126e1c8abfdb720f4b6614bc6cc99423
'2012-03-30T14:51:27-04:00'
describe
'51204' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGO' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
25e36ca4a1671f77089103a8a60d22f5
09f232d527cacb6cdb292f248827c4fbb3503c63
describe
'6810' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGP' 'sip-files00187.pro'
b224d230a7cf6f11125f8a72f8491e44
1501d730958575954e89d4b526659e1edccfa1e8
describe
'12900' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGQ' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
138ddb9bcbd04016930c3f0f90f21668
beb7dacfc419234c4ccb1cf82cf5533f0d9bdfa9
'2012-03-30T14:44:58-04:00'
describe
'36917828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGR' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ba9cbeebab4a374a958362c056e78c7f
48eef12911aeaea2552dbfa4a66f6d3f0b446d47
'2012-03-30T14:45:08-04:00'
describe
'324' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGS' 'sip-files00187.txt'
19d014457a3f3b4e49ccbd637db3f6e0
8513d27fa160a09bf4a23f52f66868f16a68240b
describe
'3782' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGT' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
41ac011dd5e87d8131492059d550a2ab
01ab223a3ab7682230bcb91f1e3beaace87c13fe
'2012-03-30T14:52:41-04:00'
describe
'1462019' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
70eb6d7d05a4227b0a7a947c75ed79e8
df227e98705029b44c334f54025ec698cabefe4a
describe
'73466' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGV' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
c8cdcd38c2aca72a873b4b35034e0395
a9613a754f39a8c1b6f6c280b7c4d7a73ac4764e
describe
'21448' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
46914c8d2310025f0cd48cbddd9f4d76
35cfa66b044c16856f7a033f29c74ba16e7635b6
describe
'20213' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
f7ab3415bbdbbfb3ddacd8f509f7f562
df7984615deacdf0af4f8e66c6b0a88f7eba6fe1
describe
'35090516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGY' 'sip-files00188.tif'
ac18e0cf2e2702b5f6e3a9825b5b455c
61d02222f34942b8929b256698d16a40fea86076
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNGZ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
2d3fa3e5311bd801e0768a0dc05cfe3c
8f44cdd2da9ef4eacc55309642088beb576628ad
describe
'5268' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHA' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
0f19a2a2c58dfc6d1edb743d52b3d574
177ce795767d48b3b9f9a003ff02db1b8587075e
describe
'1387706' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHB' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
259b42c5cfc3637edbc0f0b76e4fc7fc
8a218c6603aae8272c25bf860ffa034b3ab772d5
describe
'96692' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHC' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
8ae76a77ddabf9b487de3019ac4460bc
efdcfb96e9eae828df5718f5e0d0923a7888e516
'2012-03-30T14:48:48-04:00'
describe
'36793' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHD' 'sip-files00189.pro'
8836a90d0822f28c0ad6d0f5a136e167
89b361a095c240be7aba0b29d47c766090d63753
describe
'28932' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
3c4b36f1d7f644f0bc01f2a03a29476d
214fafce232a219b7717342dc52b20719e01403a
describe
'43695' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHF' 'sip-filesfly2.jpg'
8977e7aea81735ce3ab6bd03dacc87b6
35581f029d78abe3b2746be1739abcd4623fa031
describe
'33307156' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHG' 'sip-files00189.tif'
12db9d975c46242985c586ead68c484c
0f34c30bda33b05e60cdad145057712f77475eec
'2012-03-30T14:36:50-04:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHH' 'sip-files00189.txt'
686d2421dd6c13dd8a6070099605aebb
8753271906d17669a1cbdf0cdf37bc6f83115cc8
describe
Invalid character
'7509' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHI' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
ffd91163c113b5bd6cf4cb57b67f2638
1d116710e4118dfb7decc84c2c3df7cf77413013
describe
'1501319' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHJ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
2b7d5f1708d2d0e8ae03c85a893f9047
fd6fa417f46912f8091206796d337d4b279c8a8f
describe
'103181' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHK' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
58132dc27b8b8f62a530fcb8c77b7676
b90adc16b745b047075d22210598d45f88274398
describe
'37472' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHL' 'sip-files00190.pro'
c930d2eefae1e3a88cdce6b8427e1e4e
1a90e42e6e9b33785e0126f538192a548660c0c8
describe
'30207' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHM' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
32b795565e364f96759bddd450a49620
85a38629ed0c0da091619cf9ecea955f720309a9
'2012-03-30T14:39:28-04:00'
describe
'36045448' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHN' 'sip-files00190.tif'
4977b7165e88b87f1a6d0da8d8ec7d07
ac466dca71c58060ccaff3e534421387f8b9b1f3
'2012-03-30T14:43:59-04:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHO' 'sip-files00190.txt'
73c952211059cbe2dfd2304bc28e1850
9727beb2739d9358d8eccc237f211cf8d8cb6a62
describe
'7636' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHP' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
77c203483d4717da65242b7ab589c9cd
8218a7ed4d51a7811ac8e1ab03c9091db56836f1
'2012-03-30T14:54:41-04:00'
describe
'1484128' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHQ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
d18506bfcdf54854c51d459dcf9fbdf3
3918bdf47500b9c157a7fe2bd9e7c84644bababd
describe
'97140' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHR' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
03e113c9f686e404ad03f265330102c3
5852826d13b5439f675436548909751d0801b881
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHS' 'sip-files00191.pro'
5fde9f711a41d54b59039cc972c2f89f
caf11b37b0a27213562eedc2f446c621109dbddc
describe
'28696' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHT' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
f6aa7b457944c79034fcd469960dba32
df6ecf3ef60dcce0453297dec63fe2977ead4933
describe
'35631828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHU' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6336e069737e89b006101d525bd957ea
a281df7c200735bf0aac896ddd15a70d0eb7960b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHV' 'sip-files00191.txt'
7aca888bc44d534a8e12c357ce555018
a00f5c655803ac9a553b81d4450718962f594a21
describe
'7083' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHW' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
4258deabd381dd29d358244279411a82
66b2d413a80a4f700ba2ebca2099e3d0eb956770
describe
'1421666' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHX' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
d1f9cbb93439a0084b89c305aebb44e1
c24238565d1c946a8d82b54e9fb816ae79055697
'2012-03-30T14:53:36-04:00'
describe
'99858' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHY' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
5f65c3e4ac242c988ae5d69d292341f6
ca99c45651089e6675c00d67065994a2e87420e2
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNHZ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
d751c8f78c32ef6de492dc6a215bde56
2da4c273b24fb16d54ea59572dd7dd5728c8d191
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIA' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
e961e58c5316d9262d1bad2310cf0fca
5ffcec1a426ee03367b9bab7e70fc391968356d2
describe
'34133652' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIB' 'sip-files00192.tif'
67a6c8f5272bedb8cc3f61153d1de71d
ed1198fe3be2dd485af15417ed4d6040abf07a8c
'2012-03-30T14:51:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIC' 'sip-files00192.txt'
fd85f770be0e4f25f1fe010c535c25e9
f5f7e7b30cf9e27a9d2018a9b5957f6a227f1172
describe
'7934' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNID' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
a43443e61b29951fe497f610f5d393ef
7ffd3ed09986d366a0888eeb0efff52dc3d79635
describe
'1493248' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIE' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
58c63579dfca8f881e7628b1e0058896
4b7d71c270d5aeb84be1fb98daada12d66ffa563
describe
'97765' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIF' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
a911779525e5d60ac777e08a9ce04d88
f62bd7b89ce74069920b1f59fb38b76c9b680ec4
describe
'35445' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIG' 'sip-files00193.pro'
f694bed8f78c4db1df808b9caf3eaad9
4b93ca7d6bcdaefc8caf3831db63e48a14682314
'2012-03-30T14:54:24-04:00'
describe
'29172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
69a46fe2f08519cbe749b48786e68dd2
e1cbcb85bf1a3e67f597e4c150fd269685367c60
describe
'35851680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNII' 'sip-files00193.tif'
e230fec889a1dc351cdac309510cde18
33036660c7ce706a1bea32c9497838bc63579608
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIJ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
7e18e7ccc87ecf8a25a653b962b25f6f
c2459ba7078188feb6b1c9bd119109e98388e346
'2012-03-30T14:49:58-04:00'
describe
'7359' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIK' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
d9a03b05d646b7adfe14ee0b19d0fff1
cffccbf731d04247ba85fd21c0f28497070ca59a
'2012-03-30T14:38:14-04:00'
describe
'1498161' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIL' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
2a6a130e69cc62b1855420cb31311826
b4a55aa3e44784d404ef3b86b271a1c95206bf0b
'2012-03-30T14:48:30-04:00'
describe
'102105' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIM' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
df411c1d947cd89e8f9da5864904c111
dc468469b02486dca3723dab9d0004fd68401f87
'2012-03-30T14:46:50-04:00'
describe
'36580' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIN' 'sip-files00194.pro'
325655c67ee018df21711f4a44869cc2
bad14e7fa63efc83ff71de22837a84c714eee1c0
describe
'30474' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIO' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
a385f1c0f78b0fad44e3d7b5bbe0924d
d0b4d4ae848bc93f6d935d16c07961bf12204db2
describe
'35969548' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIP' 'sip-files00194.tif'
1dff238affea04a97fbd292c8c5b25c0
516ea132b16729ce39abda2f89f3fa8e6a69f391
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIQ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
ee92a63beabe15674547db698d833236
1218ffd38124acf3c26fb5b9b6fe8904dd5ff3a5
describe
'7796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIR' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
02f3c56aa0ca6e9a8a870d87777cd702
815c14ed1cc9abc6cd0d0b486e7eb97d1d1e1be2
describe
'1512979' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIS' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
1cdc4b7b8896a44436d1844bd00121ba
2adf5f1abd1947c15798701af495d294faf176f5
describe
'100601' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIT' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
dd4ef5e6544e50d29d346242990f0f17
8628e4876847778f756d0751a23562759ed85e7a
'2012-03-30T14:51:20-04:00'
describe
'36277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIU' 'sip-files00195.pro'
88f01b6654fe202e656358adf04e40c2
13007f79fdc09ff1812da7e4e4bb4f00e4e0302d
describe
'30131' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIV' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
8b54ebce78ecf54ca54c38d43da5d26e
f1cfb9249d696abb03cbe5ceeb47f97914616fd7
describe
'36325164' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIW' 'sip-files00195.tif'
1efbd430a9bd0f709613394fcdbef211
67fd5d9775c27bf60bed0fe3c10fd221c6379747
'2012-03-30T14:47:53-04:00'
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIX' 'sip-files00195.txt'
f61455fce59ad3d5413cc9d0a45aeca6
d42d60344d181b4807c3f4ded2b86071a1ce24ed
'2012-03-30T14:49:11-04:00'
describe
'7670' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIY' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
39958a1b5a1216b77ab7218b5336319f
8061e6fe1eb585baf9ef20a154d68a3672d63f7b
describe
'1551898' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNIZ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
1ba67c1c4395c6cbdd93fdc95df36d22
4f56fb683bf42836b615cdfca20bbc5d6c8a3180
'2012-03-30T14:45:01-04:00'
describe
'101388' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJA' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
5a78685f2977cdecfdeafc286ef47410
e4bbe01c12516942fa620d4558d62b2d6d8ea68f
describe
'36171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJB' 'sip-files00196.pro'
180cce37d6764238577ee82a47edd238
edf2ad8bc239fbbbcdb331d5f4b43d399a817715
describe
'29880' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJC' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
68eb0eedc4cbf650dbeeef397c0f886d
24144c67921a44836d552bc35ae21f188aae5a31
'2012-03-30T14:42:27-04:00'
describe
'37259448' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJD' 'sip-files00196.tif'
7a23274b78d0c250a1429bf395530285
69ef1f618c901234c0a098ab7917f77f801da75d
'2012-03-30T14:46:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJE' 'sip-files00196.txt'
04d5421d576dfd1a8b716e34c2c40933
c52aaf237ae0ea22e4a2cd8bdfa6847a9730069f
describe
'7473' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJF' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
293bb1d346f08a29335e8adf1c4237b2
0f2d61c33adbd7b1de2ec4a45351541231c89efe
describe
'1501144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJG' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
b329da79c6e0a45a74f9ed78e06bd82d
d18a7c8dbf3a2cc9aedb8b4c8ec2019bff8d2549
'2012-03-30T14:55:11-04:00'
describe
'82729' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJH' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
c6d11e6a7a4f96678bf9c860b578f85f
487f87d4e1b9b121e7e853294ea9d10b1e864b07
describe
'24191' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJI' 'sip-files00197.pro'
e527354b4b42698277b2afc8d034db7a
1df84ed782bf5a3041c7a8d846594baaebcdfbba
describe
'23992' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJJ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
8a8af3dbe9cb05ac6fb74d9603cae969
73e4f97f33083317a9d634a86b297f23d9c2c042
describe
'36039272' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJK' 'sip-files00197.tif'
9244decd2f189cf6500956408a83ad73
317ef20a5bfa1b42ffe7ac091c239960ee53d99e
'2012-03-30T14:44:27-04:00'
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
fe31651e4176e3a5799a1334cc15d8dd
4f706462bd52df88d6ca2a3609e33a2a647acf0c
describe
'6363' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJM' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
dd6c0d599357f9d9f05b2ee34b8f0153
a5167df623ac69d16c23687df7869d6802c28bd0
describe
'1483724' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJN' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
1c340ae2556fd435aec0c7ad59fd639e
7f921e9723d5542814a00b727eac1ef980632b28
describe
'69911' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJO' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
48063c847ab00f2b82954e5f485eb01b
8a38112f6d60923800bfa1ffc425dc8997c1f608
describe
'18988' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJP' 'sip-files00198.pro'
306fd71117d24353ea66f6df139e80a9
28c8d34a5af3f56a4503aba8e0e83258a5e39fd3
describe
'20062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJQ' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
fe70497cefa7fa66e8ff34429a9a9631
77d8fe343dae22f31eec1814702fc86ec9e6593c
describe
'35612108' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJR' 'sip-files00198.tif'
99c0e7b57685894f605cf7a9bbf65645
21fffb5c8bc98230aeaaad18d4f86a60cbb38a7e
'2012-03-30T14:40:23-04:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJS' 'sip-files00198.txt'
cf98f6ea41be386e07bc87ad9bd57ef6
87e084340609d3f4a7eb47defffb89d4111af3fb
describe
'5378' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJT' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
8a2d4cf19e838dfb3cabdc623cb9b786
0f34c98ee01b8cea1758d59c6808290a870a7b5c
describe
'1484754' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJU' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
dfa021bf06777e5e6496289a7494df6e
fc9569638a6d5ca05b7393b873f4cc9394d93ccf
describe
'102854' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJV' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
f54a4a65f7fcfb94782e99382de63df4
7d84f8916c2c6319bc86a8f4abc89ce8ce892728
describe
'38036' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJW' 'sip-files00199.pro'
a7457e0d516fd5a2414ae399e1c0bcb9
14f4ac1f77dd9fb3cea3636683704e5a6d5ed98d
'2012-03-30T14:53:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJX' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
1fbfac8e52827452442130b8d41c8782
f887dbb0170ef111ab79e963f6d701904a802a6d
describe
'35647468' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJY' 'sip-files00199.tif'
abfb59dda1571bf1de32f49bf83e5dca
2f339dfb3ef07078d163768b73895294aeba8a41
'2012-03-30T14:40:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNJZ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
94751c6160639e43485d0eb2b2197899
f63a990cb4098dd838acc72b7bdebf3cd440f1ca
describe
'7675' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKA' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
3f158c5e57c2c5e43c17fc6d2c3492f7
82d2c36204aa44267d9f89ee21d029a47a82a2c4
describe
'1360164' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKB' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
b04a4679959504850e1a9d98b84c9805
46cc6c2792ab7fc434768b2850ee0c218fe9d67f
describe
'108882' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKC' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
f61c9ec187d90509a36d60bb7361c31d
7c2292bfb34ab3c5c69c1d450be7a53b3f0dde44
describe
'37743' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKD' 'sip-files00200.pro'
c91f682c037daf40619947263bb1f9bc
6cadefebbadb5725f7d5e3c0fc36256b8c3517cd
'2012-03-30T14:49:47-04:00'
describe
'33792' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKE' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
ca2db3ee33f51d77e7e04c814566c5d5
e470aca83631c396d79e7098e2c68847f9bb400d
describe
'32658808' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKF' 'sip-files00200.tif'
6c005815d4fae49821872cf5bbdf1907
a7c9f29419326a28fd6bee26cbd1b68115d69998
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKG' 'sip-files00200.txt'
c40bd6f74e196da0db585d3f349bafd7
39d1bf9defff59b5b6a99c1d889c7d23941064ca
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKH' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
750b09cf697e066f72805d1f8723f5ad
a4a3cba9b1e790ff3fed29aab43cb9625950642b
describe
'1537966' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKI' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
52113a7af12db446649249b3c1a04da0
24d9e08a6250993575ed26e41f7f91e15d9dc1c7
describe
'101753' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKJ' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
d29b473906467c0bcfedef4a0eace9cf
0d5a902b952ba457b4232264cb359ccd7f33cb54
describe
'36924' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKK' 'sip-files00201.pro'
5cc5f4e933accd717acdccf480f4daa9
189d4a69a92f2246e4e749b184616bc09bda4ff4
describe
'30482' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKL' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
9cc4fca5d18b1633026344f1e52957e4
b55fc8f4e6e791079190993b48859d09756374a4
'2012-03-30T14:46:55-04:00'
describe
'36926064' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKM' 'sip-files00201.tif'
cf54a75dff9c0bb6a2a8b07218d0dcd7
04a92cf90613d54c7592c913271c4dc857d1e7d7
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKN' 'sip-files00201.txt'
8e1b6b9c278d732896d86816a3f3c507
0c97974334003ad70273c578bb96dcbb398da3df
describe
'7407' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKO' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
49b4778b4776de055b2956077b99765a
3e10413e78b7ffc096f62f998dd3f1cbd43145a0
'2012-03-30T14:49:24-04:00'
describe
'1556739' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKP' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
e377b87856ca86745860f664deb52afe
db0c14261d3eb6391a350c8d266f1d6e0423f54e
'2012-03-30T14:54:00-04:00'
describe
'102553' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
57efd4981ea6b3ff115a96c1b9581557
6554c9ea7bec57c087a8e08f1e143edc21062a11
describe
'36968' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKR' 'sip-files00202.pro'
bba24ad58cb42ce15fb9eff93e53462d
48747ad78a1d22c608b4f152874de23b34130b37
'2012-03-30T14:55:10-04:00'
describe
'30165' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKS' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
ce8b85e589f77debb574d69d9d9e8f64
f9a888592b7183390856bb8624c485b9a27ef4c0
describe
'37380796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKT' 'sip-files00202.tif'
ee8b6001b2b6126d386bc8f9e722b436
5c7f847aa8b63c63f347db081d716f01f928ac87
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKU' 'sip-files00202.txt'
bcf4394395b45035bb6115125cf69acc
d43a3c899d479bbe2901d840d9929e101f7c98e6
describe
'7640' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKV' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
5665f20c8c7f1945e7e32167fd70a7ea
c6cd1d26d23cf34f5c13582f547df0d897c7065d
describe
'1366550' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKW' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
0ecd3b51bc54b3945f57fa459d14b374
9d2fff1fc49ac3643a6035ba65ccb085c2ccd316
'2012-03-30T14:41:10-04:00'
describe
'107359' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKX' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
8eb046f57c2514940693ad65fe1759f3
81c53c32d341401850a73a78efc2a4759a082e33
describe
'35927' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKY' 'sip-files00203.pro'
c54f8ff293f18e797c64ff1346efe945
b0a68fc280df8cb9092daaa65249584725b77a19
describe
'32531' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
ca7b0bafc302fada9e7ec11e916c767d
950462238f9344326f90b9fa5b92f2aa50b9475b
describe
'32817240' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLA' 'sip-files00203.tif'
6ffb19780edfce288155ca1b39e5cb62
11bc0ba00d8296b8916e1de3a95199d0e9dc60ef
'2012-03-30T14:55:20-04:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLB' 'sip-files00203.txt'
8cb4d45cd69f6b1a7f6cdb22a3ff6e6e
19b162b48267e3998747cde10b9eb97773d08e23
describe
'8126' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLC' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
d8a99998b317a1705df4123660c21e27
7be5d2df4746e8393c3b0dc7a750df51f4773e02
describe
'1518360' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLD' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
41637d5a466f68ad2a0276945e64f468
53cf39c5e36536aafdbcbabca5e84bfde1e91ff7
describe
'101140' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLE' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
ae7434046fa6cce86193c352e7efbc37
1b975fe2940f871e7dacc29f53b67ef221825fb3
'2012-03-30T14:45:33-04:00'
describe
'34397' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLF' 'sip-files00204.pro'
a0ffdbcc9f329e07d8bcb6d9759a255f
94e71c7caf9015ef97fea822fabbb76d84973484
describe
'30307' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLG' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
6d41dde66d8d0f02c27f7b65593af6bf
31c943f142d98d6d2d8dd8717649cfbf04e5e678
'2012-03-30T14:51:15-04:00'
describe
'36458076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLH' 'sip-files00204.tif'
1045e6a95ab08e242df2e9bd75697cfa
36160a4049d344f5076486f118e21f73e6704b14
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLI' 'sip-files00204.txt'
a52f48591b1b8d8e41fa3885e42efc45
6258c670c25509265a43702609293c0c16145fd2
'2012-03-30T14:38:27-04:00'
describe
'7732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
8b7d798152e9e69bb5498433bb09f134
767108e357e26759de68031882e8dad0fe573f8c
describe
'1410989' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLK' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
ffe2e8833a1fedd9b5c174ada6f5ea23
56cce8a33892c68e87d6c74f87dc9877ad92b731
describe
'107284' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLL' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
f751e68e3a2aeaf6d024fc79f783337a
5ea30d7908eb2868654583eeb8a48a14179aa07c
describe
'37286' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLM' 'sip-files00205.pro'
5594b3547a5f044c42fdb715a264b95d
e1097c1061cfdda8f0e254db09f94d58475da014
describe
'32914' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLN' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
66304ffa41f5934d2129be4619e43f9b
e9de6e0f9ee7d7f039a34ae294862c5933edba8d
describe
'33878656' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLO' 'sip-files00205.tif'
89c5a2948f18e5b829c888bdccbd537e
70b41b4c6119e6344a98c15767d53762037ee648
'2012-03-30T14:42:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLP' 'sip-files00205.txt'
360abf612d18adb9bbedab9708607e71
d4d6221251f98960759c286da8173fcc7cf55526
describe
Invalid character
'8024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
35abe98e0cd4297a8a1c17c162eab5d9
48276f262c2eaf201a58cc54691cd50454df9d4d
describe
'1532436' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLR' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
bf3a23c763dd6d5bf52303725470b9f4
93e8879e46a42e71e95934609c72c3b103882b34
describe
'100455' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLS' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
45954be11f79e0898a8cdaf7ccdf7d57
47a441a29024aaecc1ce346f1c44d3756855a5eb
describe
'36662' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLT' 'sip-files00206.pro'
7d595928ec4f3def9fcc86d64980bae7
7d0f80d25b82c2dc58009e8ecdf5009d1d4c87ac
'2012-03-30T14:50:34-04:00'
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLU' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
779f58a285693ecbe5f911d7951e74a6
5764ef9af30123d8c7a2a5d803373c1c41b643d8
'2012-03-30T14:52:49-04:00'
describe
'36792788' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLV' 'sip-files00206.tif'
389ebc0c392b320d845c7140d9b1d137
ae748faf06ae9ad387de532581e958541177595e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLW' 'sip-files00206.txt'
05ec7b4b38f36b32577ea84aa73ef400
ad259e2371196f011f2ea0c86a811dcbf42eca40
describe
'7056' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLX' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
27bebd57222f99786aa2a8e124deacdb
9a4704bc0d915b38b676462d1ab113d2507f57fe
describe
'1453273' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLY' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
3802b883ae1f88cc47f2a55a8f4971a4
33aeec2d1072825aea4041aafe601d3aa9186e5e
describe
'76586' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
609417cbf918662df146ebebbf32221a
2ec609197d75b2f0092bddd1d92a2e78a19d3eb9
describe
'19752' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMA' 'sip-files00207.pro'
59c41599a1e24b02fcab0e0630ac3040
ae582ed7d3bbb99e6ec0b06e5b42a6600d1f92e7
describe
'21707' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMB' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
bf0c2268f40ea3cf9da7849354ea91cd
a6899ab89c5068bdafa20f36e7340a4bb8aff0c5
describe
'34890440' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMC' 'sip-files00207.tif'
d5374b5ba50e92c7972dc87b074f3c9e
a560aab36cfee7498aa4e03c2b172080bd5dc866
'2012-03-30T14:45:43-04:00'
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMD' 'sip-files00207.txt'
d1a8fad852861e79c958518c80b1de31
486c933bb23a0a794fdbf17af13417cdcdb66dfa
describe
'5557' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNME' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
ba9c25cfefc6a62438857a2295bdba6e
433afc795d9cbfef43ffdbc356ce774081d7b987
describe
'1534084' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMF' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
82db7a5ca5a555dcab7c7c715a3c3e3f
278d9f24f47d13f6a7ee344bf40e817a6512e67c
describe
'69458' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMG' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
08a5a7593c9f8c4b1d96f26437a9b976
deb82b46ae5802c2750d05ac8bd4545423714f42
'2012-03-30T14:49:57-04:00'
describe
'17218' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMH' 'sip-files00208.pro'
839c9b06b519f85dbe3c2f6dc0563aa6
3b94162d183951af110fdf87cccbd860ecd1c4e1
'2012-03-30T14:39:14-04:00'
describe
'19389' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMI' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
2bb9ebc89ecbf09a1bfdc8ab3b9b6c8e
141aa80f611aadccfbfc58cf00a3519f94b79a3c
'2012-03-30T14:41:31-04:00'
describe
'36828564' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00208.tif'
21d8123ddf5a42c1e28749f4d8cc2cfb
b86fdd612cd8493b31a1ef9d74211a531d385098
'2012-03-30T14:39:59-04:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMK' 'sip-files00208.txt'
c1256b978e40db902d7eccdddce6a66c
6e40f74be0b815d6e3e15da45acffd43291186b2
'2012-03-30T14:51:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'5196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNML' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
54bcde20334628b3dc50689ba823e229
e99dbf4ad87f67f72eaf55bfa771f8c030978a81
describe
'1521441' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMM' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
ee32766ce0cf605030d207fb10a68446
e7bd35ed5d2cbf5c50a2cba33007d2a932af67f6
describe
'102192' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMN' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
3a38f61077e52c9a9e4d4fcc8eec0873
4abbd7e19af555d2076e673b35bbbd2bbfa897ad
describe
'37277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMO' 'sip-files00209.pro'
dab59a037161e25b269e7d8527d68f78
19363ec28bc7f1f7eed162c6dacd563920308241
describe
'30360' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMP' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
ef2bf76a75aec4bb76932658f5f14e58
3e951c890dda8a2bf86fdf5407a5e24b17a002de
describe
'36534764' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
6e766c2fdf095d06433a30c1e9101132
ffc00c96b4c4c92611572daa5d1abcba650adda2
'2012-03-30T14:41:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMR' 'sip-files00209.txt'
6460559bcdf14aa8bd58461ad2705d56
cd58b671286a0030ea3f9f9ccb9de687ac0c3d64
describe
'7310' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMS' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
53499aa733bdb291b5620f697e646377
d6841fdbb4926cea5a5091cd881583820d4ecd11
describe
'1500626' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMT' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
21ffc0db2423d094b0ff9069b59448ad
c5cfac7cfdb2b4aacbd6923634668d5d543f93de
describe
'96317' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMU' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
015582be8cde4a15345896f24645d3b1
8119c33dee79ac48c192f5e90f157f5c6a7dcfc9
describe
'35085' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMV' 'sip-files00210.pro'
1773bf910ec95d6c5cae20ea7b23a64f
9878a06b6a674c1aca4d1bcbaa87aa74da4a06a0
describe
'28913' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMW' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
d5d8d9b8095966628a9cdb9f2ad99e2a
92d44a5cfa786d6d910750596083d2da77dc3439
describe
'36017148' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMX' 'sip-files00210.tif'
0f3f5c5496669abbc779725b8a6a5f2f
52abedcb6f254cc23a71b23a658e63941649e56c
'2012-03-30T14:49:06-04:00'
describe
'1429' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMY' 'sip-files00210.txt'
2adcebfc918e3b5e9727934e717a2d17
675902361dc49d8c9af3ed8742deca68ccf0314e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
a8f1f1ceb73b39dec04b4fe756389ca7
ab4648a50e2d1e0b143e03adc67e46294f315e82
describe
'1496171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNA' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
95e7e466f14bbbcd1143d7ff58d86c04
fe0833901291c15e8a57446061570aecdbf04ed6
describe
'100585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNB' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
9e255547265f53103e8fbaee3ccdeacc
c99df6473576ddb5165ab2ad6aba726000652209
'2012-03-30T14:49:35-04:00'
describe
'37633' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNC' 'sip-files00211.pro'
b513f95c2f2f410f357e243d0b108dad
4bd813bd6e9189962171c50b3d0851fdebe87239
describe
'30152' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNND' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
19518cd448e7e02c71459312ec1f4d88
e22bb300da831640cda03c47db57eb2bdabcdcb4
describe
'35921928' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNE' 'sip-files00211.tif'
d2d2df7d67e90bc74454ba6152899507
69cffc62cc014409611a2e8330ff266b5945bcfa
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNF' 'sip-files00211.txt'
e22ecd0169a2e2fe751ac4253390a47f
d409c58a23fec3271d73065e9d080644f36e764c
describe
'7421' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNG' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
9b6b667f70c17cb459e36e7744b62df1
b9dbdb06eef2b0dfbab3b6d2df5ffd50b15a7a95
describe
'1448229' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNH' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
facc7db9c379741691e76c347df1c2f9
c7fe45998b92b4bb540723227cc9b6d50b103faa
'2012-03-30T14:53:42-04:00'
describe
'105579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNI' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
6b706c67b280776cfa3f19196aeaf0e6
6564b6971791a0ca3ac2da95949a21bd73248bf3
'2012-03-30T14:46:05-04:00'
describe
'37359' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00212.pro'
051dc192c4d23d5c42a3c775d46bdf50
5bbc9ce180f6cf725acd0d485c05a0075ed2c6a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNK' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
252cd1b79a1d830eb7c469d76e6e1223
93fddced2f37cf923730b600a086d6732d000eb4
describe
'34772076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNL' 'sip-files00212.tif'
ebbb4a0db4b6f90001f61c291644d4f1
527d0f7200706daccd86bad048779bf8dbf899cd
'2012-03-30T14:39:41-04:00'
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNM' 'sip-files00212.txt'
e6c8b7d51b2f0b58a648e4885ceb9866
8c5847190558b6428d53ed32b1b2af92854e12e8
describe
Invalid character
'7727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNN' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
883a56221a480aa669acea1416c18c8b
185d7e2771ffdd3ee4ef7cf46ead39ae29449d1e
describe
'1570711' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNO' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
b3babd90de12914080d89fa6de0afe0c
2200abd1fd916a5245140f00b5563673004eff8b
describe
'118235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNP' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
e607dc2711d0c1a245c534d8cea469bf
d8a23f15d89ebbd795a4c95b4b6eacd667e351ab
describe
'37182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00213.pro'
3da0f2920696dbe9c3e63ffe0a7abe0e
5a08e9c2089110ac1f337a07c91774839f584586
describe
'31560' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNR' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
ed3e88af82efcebdf4c0a459753546a6
c2b793e5aec529446986481d704698269c5d9645
'2012-03-30T14:53:00-04:00'
describe
'37710144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNS' 'sip-files00213.tif'
1614164cddbba5809b80286bd687c5df
65f409785c4076a18c8a32d618520493ef4f0c59
'2012-03-30T14:47:08-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNT' 'sip-files00213.txt'
849c23613dab07bae44d3405b93feef7
5ab58cc1665f8ee8badc1b5c6afabd5d4f600f84
'2012-03-30T14:40:13-04:00'
describe
'7585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNU' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
1ed2d9144d2b77fb86f2c9ad0ee2efbf
8c738159285646daef5fc688760f1221921a93e0
describe
'1567531' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNV' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
1c7e508f3d9b779f2b293912fe478c58
70e7718020495a66dcb8c6a8b0fa49c62635a213
'2012-03-30T14:44:12-04:00'
describe
'98060' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNW' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
16a48ff319daa1a68fd0fea4d17982f9
be9f0744640909fb79f82c6ff41cf10eede20fe3
describe
'36256' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNX' 'sip-files00214.pro'
a621c54fc5439b03c46f389508af6845
7994c0ec2fde6cc4c1713cca8aba06a257e305bc
'2012-03-30T14:49:38-04:00'
describe
'28647' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNY' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
3058434d56987d0a50f1caa617969ddf
e540c052ed079843d0b7ea1f5ce63efa34afc76b
describe
'37639716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
820b9507e204eda9af97411239e10955
5c3de49a3453ef35067556af6dc61fcfab73a765
'2012-03-30T14:49:14-04:00'
describe
'1470' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOA' 'sip-files00214.txt'
1d89a5e38d62d792cb36e8fa0549da0e
203d9dc6e68970867334a96144f4c36bca302573
describe
'7265' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOB' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
ea80d2695890c1f8bf7d8871ea404e3f
f885bde62e64850c0906cbd0242b3ccf7a8dbff1
describe
'1499139' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOC' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
d9de9235ce9d24e4812bb31e43eb8c24
08a958ffeca9cd261a606c9175688a8a290fc176
describe
'95857' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOD' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
754765540fc90e127aaaa9be19bc7c95
4ef56a7bb84376a81c252bdaece1adcadd2ddccf
describe
'35735' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOE' 'sip-files00215.pro'
f6a4b979b9da168cda3e5368c05e3c33
ce209215c922a48738fcdebcfb61e1ade56ab49f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOF' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
3d7d02232d0ea299ecc441e73674670f
ad186b3f862c56e135612115c76ff94eaab33926
describe
'35995920' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOG' 'sip-files00215.tif'
7d77d991cbf9a299756dd23952bf0902
573ba56503cd7be559589ad7a2aed1a048964b62
'2012-03-30T14:43:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOH' 'sip-files00215.txt'
0f2867235a044b70ed6df2fdb1ee0134
d5a3a5b31aa489ded60da7798d3736f4e4ba0e88
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOI' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
7921c77cb9f53db2146cfa3c9c12079b
4ef2bcd32fe1f39d7b4b11f7c4f76632fbd7a786
describe
'1526342' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
b96d00b8f9c88fddd1c70ba0df523498
e51b7fefc2e095746ff97d660e58bc6af3168903
describe
'99388' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOK' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
f6cf03aa1bc2d508afbf38e6e4a29137
a231b5ebd91981b1d796e2ce358b9b4fcbe7ea4f
describe
'37366' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOL' 'sip-files00216.pro'
f798e697170e2acf3f846d9bb6c49ffe
aed2604f004c9f95419eabdfbb4cf54d2483ce76
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOM' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
94595ef981a2a85ecddfe1fd62e0b3e2
b7d22f31879d1f33afbfe984d173d48e13f9cef2
describe
'36653208' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNON' 'sip-files00216.tif'
631c864dbcd316b2fcf16986320c504b
ebed34023acd9248501f0649d9293c0fd4b2266c
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOO' 'sip-files00216.txt'
29f3083fa804ce2eacbee974ba435414
ea1d0463fc7cc257a021856c632fb24c81b33f6d
describe
'7035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOP' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
59c72b7daffd01c9989bc674fce7d05f
0eff1125cf880b9630dbfe51677fe9590c5bb0b4
describe
'1537235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
5ee50dad603b1a88c2b2ca419a270502
03a503ce3b98d509ae14849d77b01c9aabb246cf
'2012-03-30T14:49:46-04:00'
describe
'101083' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOR' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
1a1205c1bebc3e8cee6ed13d19e07eb2
1886bf46a7ce299c3084feceeb75f85853a6d219
describe
'38240' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOS' 'sip-files00217.pro'
3b3471d85c4f2c0cfe0c41a2cbcb8bb6
f1a9506f1059bd2a529080108a17091eb9cb85c5
describe
'30020' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOT' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
552f48de48062d46a1129fa691c990bb
c4854926881699e3bd139e918044ab77de7d0bc4
describe
'36907984' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOU' 'sip-files00217.tif'
f476bcd510c96a160e0a5944ac1fc842
663109d8773990dc2c04ea2e383c7571e8bf54af
'2012-03-30T14:46:25-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOV' 'sip-files00217.txt'
bd69791f52b6497bdfb0265751dfef66
49565eac8d70d13a7ce6c8b41c82826ad5b31336
describe
'7343' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOW' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
c0f5272c541b8a2f4142677524f2191b
1e9f4a4bbc087cbc8ff21674875fe973c5eeb264
'2012-03-30T14:53:10-04:00'
describe
'1575984' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOX' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
eafe30d6778b30e85a5cb33953ead7af
76a7e921fc3a431c295dac71f049ab686e1d0f1f
'2012-03-30T14:43:10-04:00'
describe
'74227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOY' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
d1f27a5b0af8b97de99de7ce570939dc
5bdc4a7bfa0c498a2a41193fdbc3a02952473a7a
'2012-03-30T14:48:05-04:00'
describe
'19716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
764bd062da0ccee4a94466e66eeaa428
aefe4fd79e4ba321e6d2aa696d98ae090a1839dc
describe
'20555' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPA' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
1128ca73a3dbec43544f07e262f7a793
f1ce4b0d6686f87bc267b424504e786a80c92484
describe
'37835080' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPB' 'sip-files00218.tif'
547dd37f37b974c698cc521a6f55bd44
ee1752440fd2bec92e9731f7d39d131dfc73faca
'2012-03-30T14:39:27-04:00'
describe
'3304904' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPC' 'sip-filesfly2.tif'
95763510968a723e93ab1328eb7efb4a
63006735b7320a06bbbb351d27208d401c7670e3
'2012-03-30T14:46:41-04:00'
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPD' 'sip-files00218.txt'
dd6a5e790a3efb03cbb063b51856f0c4
3aa081c7c065abce7522115b5ead4b736e1573c4
describe
'5221' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPE' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
87ebe4371e2f4105c635b8671a355ad4
c7db1aab17f1cdc0d526cf0d9a84e555453e34e1
'2012-03-30T14:43:30-04:00'
describe
'1416059' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPF' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
b56bd8b1ce622da08e358bbf12155a92
6118eacb81b573a23ed740393f63ce378e0c8a51
'2012-03-30T14:45:10-04:00'
describe
'68147' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPG' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
2474663e0bcc4e59f6738c9cd8ca0030
932d47b8cf43c03dae8787b19c4a79aafba4a3f5
describe
'17537' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPH' 'sip-files00219.pro'
383a04e7a57bb890f7ffae982f3c92f3
1ec6fa9fe67c283ce9273c02c64d6afc6954a4da
describe
'18747' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPI' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
545b2bcad400a0899700003d996e695b
c6e5120a28de68fb45c4fbfa03458c10ed53fb73
describe
'33996172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00219.tif'
d33dc25af2509a7963f97645853c5936
41c4b980e159bb1647bec94b5ae35a0892c76c05
'2012-03-30T14:52:36-04:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPK' 'sip-files00219.txt'
28889d8dcf5b19a733e7b914112fa3ed
14ce1a179f3da53d78770b1f55fdddcfa0842554
'2012-03-30T14:48:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPL' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
e8c20cbd3f35c06f3771f1b6ad1729ca
8bdfb6e021ec605910e1296c2961b8459c61fa01
describe
'1459024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPM' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
46ebf5dcac6054e9c5f9f4d92d40a6bb
90a0b6b8233679770fa5ab49cca363a5ac3eba75
describe
'99757' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPN' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
f2da475b88ae3056780abb4507476f94
33371eb308acfb30de1854643728896c954e9157
describe
'37468' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPO' 'sip-files00220.pro'
959cdfabe838b96580df64e22dca55bb
6f335835724eded391be5c0a91808e09bafadc7e
describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPP' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
7a90edb98afa7780a9947b3cece6c6c5
ea7f8ca276b1d61f0a758548e6028cbeb9421cdf
describe
'35031056' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
8edfea5b2cd88e97afa6e4edff065019
df101e9c0f57c32e5b26b72cf8597b842ab446d2
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPR' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c81feeb03ae554910e2864bd42b23703
1d5c36a3a9398aca31c0963ee5e6ebaf31b55d36
'2012-03-30T14:54:15-04:00'
describe
'6968' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPS' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
3d75eae34ba04331af3aedcd4d7b61e7
4276d774df611cedcbcee12cb8eda20346467dff
describe
'1527769' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPT' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
9d5aa84650a20b9d2cfc4806411299ec
e4d5eb73e0667645c82982d5d73bfffdbacf6e33
'2012-03-30T14:54:59-04:00'
describe
'95048' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPU' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
9580aa85793dd582a1e65a96b950339a
4d53453e224887f39f75ecc5d07c203ea493e5a9
describe
'36565' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPV' 'sip-files00221.pro'
7fd43d00cf2efbc74c9e7eb01e9c7e57
ffd0485edba6889cc9d2ab5eae060d4d1fffb188
describe
'27621' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPW' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
2b32e22d4d341b84bd76d68ce7217db7
bd786687e5c3d22afe8ffb6a32c54d3403c81326
'2012-03-30T14:48:07-04:00'
describe
'36680100' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPX' 'sip-files00221.tif'
b73fe7a970fa1c8e44882fc772591216
5aec2be897e6b51be53a403cf469511d223f7d26
'2012-03-30T14:49:43-04:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPY' 'sip-files00221.txt'
78f1d6bd5cad03afed02db9e01257650
17f78f30acd5893395bd0b8f664ebb397495843f
describe
'6673' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
93206527dc352edcea1476bb7af1cb3b
862b855b67156b512298959b3eabdf4940d80762
describe
'1496073' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQA' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
e5ac0b49e3fca90f2a213b720238b6c9
7cd86493870e8cae5d9166f1a06a5de4b8606d96
'2012-03-30T14:51:06-04:00'
describe
'122897' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQB' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
bbe899abd14624ccccaa1039e1ab0c82
2a02eb623b7dfd63cbdb5713c23cab486c572316
describe
'36695' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQC' 'sip-files00222.pro'
b48b9264e45b70f4489915d692a5ec45
9ddc6d7019a944ec040efb532eb3ad85524e8f98
describe
'35409' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQD' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
d4aa97bbc16143c535e2472dc799a68d
a275cb922bd00fe92ebaf95c0012dea90580b37b
describe
'35921664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQE' 'sip-files00222.tif'
46db9454b5f4fa5045c01d6420beeecd
3d8b6c587f008d5fda8efa8214303ea7512f3211
'2012-03-30T14:37:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQF' 'sip-files00222.txt'
90bd492bdc8c8bdb00f09248fbd6d6d3
c33ba98be670464df67b8b496d31d4f132ed0944
describe
Invalid character
'8727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQG' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
f201e7a75227f8cd11f1d916b88374d3
625a6c9e84ff3eee46b228d637e2a1354c200b94
describe
'1579699' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQH' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
f6972452adde9353ac5e3cbc30b78eb1
a3ccfee7cfe0a7c608453196133bb5aff5490203
describe
'116275' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQI' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
f746fd07a4b48689a75d54246b0b4587
1406c717d5e403ccd9a63608952e964fffc42011
describe
'36102' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00223.pro'
0cee1a44292b881a66b5e689b1c78428
96c5722b9ef1e52ad8cd9dc3bc3d1780ab617439
describe
'34161' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQK' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
6c30b5ac9ab26acae0d1895e3cbe88f5
724fe652c6a2dc189f4854a9f3a8f333da4b5a54
describe
'37928556' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQL' 'sip-files00223.tif'
99c1f2863f979dca8e3526731f1f84ec
b5323f29b19dd8c1e690b4f15b51764e8c08e647
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQM' 'sip-files00223.txt'
423f4c7e52ac76bf072529b5a1ccec4f
6d376b0883f32e801988405b5138f83e9e12e70e
describe
'8322' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQN' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
d70ba5c75c96b6246f4941a586451bee
3e1b2ac6adb4909195d4daf72678f8c6bc1d8f15
describe
'1404931' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQO' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
c333bec7d04731814b3b72152e6aab4e
ac123285f707e5780b2aa528b8dcdbfec4b81518
'2012-03-30T14:41:42-04:00'
describe
'126289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQP' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
8caebfb27ec60f05b4db8fd99d0b36b8
8f6a0090270d17dff1b8dae2e2d038ead1b564f1
describe
'36249' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00224.pro'
e1712fc1db87362329309fb6d316b98d
9371fae6014d2ac621efb309f6104401a9eb2d06
describe
'37347' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQR' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
94b25e0be7ca152430e2f3182eb79b52
0d990242f3a44f56afe13b1bdd9097e55798df43
describe
'33733828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQS' 'sip-files00224.tif'
025551d306807e8ed827372f5b4fc3c3
6d9edb158b438f7c42d3dabd48092b097bf3c00a
'2012-03-30T14:43:29-04:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQT' 'sip-files00224.txt'
de4e70191a05f724ed47c65f4f44a3fd
5d1a39b05641ab530830fe7bdb091fc491aef9fb
describe
'9566' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQU' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
a9e06b9a6e0c93d4cc6ae7fa96e068f8
4e4267ce305a24b26f9e6ec6f4457a0c4c916cc9
describe
'1579551' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQV' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
7646f0ef6701c9731a621de61f8a9762
156751ac4cbb11fabe07afd7d7d8a1187c5267a9
describe
'123825' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQW' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
1f8349a765238b186d48bebf933f6aaf
c50ce65adbedbf4f09787c0af43ea609605005c4
describe
'37815' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQX' 'sip-files00225.pro'
13431460e4bb96046c6dd047ce234ccd
cab631155359e390ab63134daecbd37e97223625
describe
'36094' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQY' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
789116ddbb9e71ed837fffce35a963b1
56af79bee3a9a9c119e602d72a1e75270ebef6ac
describe
'37924988' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
37257f87298038e7f84558716e5f9667
246f3c703171c732e3ee6234b9fb295f26560964
'2012-03-30T14:47:34-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRA' 'sip-files00225.txt'
7a770ead92710f57a881df406ffd1ea1
910f03603735f20014dd4348a41d0b8bdcf28b4d
describe
'9040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRB' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
7cee0505b1afb3b73400bb0a06ff2439
3a4efc246f08319e6554d4b187a6b7da0bedc7ce
describe
'1481877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRC' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
05e1b4aabc13e9c5e04b7d682ff5c672
9740119827b81c19610972a865393a2bca0db838
describe
'132075' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRD' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
d6cb41400f3dc94261b758a1310378d4
6b87247544d42009b9130ec4b2d4d626a4b2b52c
describe
'38493' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRE' 'sip-files00226.pro'
3ac3619726d78570c581fa07a682ab87
fc9c39395a2efb0e7e43a20191e557e37b59eba8
describe
'39158' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRF' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
a840b2e38826804f984108b0f5216db0
105752df179a87f0ba5ec2481b4ebe00889cf94c
describe
'35581288' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRG' 'sip-files00226.tif'
35053fe580d2c1bbd69d4d79cfca666c
444756e164bbe4e117e5b8f4faa37894611166e7
'2012-03-30T14:45:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRH' 'sip-files00226.txt'
b152c47966eef067335c050ee2a520ff
dd9096c0f0dbd6474eaf1627625924ff326097eb
describe
'9773' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRI' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
08d110241445f5409dbc7c43fd6db6a6
4474558e061a515e95b667401bf97cd4e3c8aad7
describe
'1513333' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
6093b669113160f7558cd6e7ae3622d3
b3fbe1cb4592baf14e4b89aa6726f5df2de8894c
'2012-03-30T14:52:37-04:00'
describe
'123189' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRK' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
a8f719a10e379bdd5b40367fda30d802
593951fdeb97db44c836346b81b170eb72a092ac
describe
'37585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRL' 'sip-files00227.pro'
732d7343ec44a05e3126e873ea3c603a
73ca940b310f108b5be6c35b13f32233bf54015d
describe
'36596' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRM' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
84f4f91b6494240ddc9a4b0a3bd69380
ec6dd642d18b4ae08e9cfec76d0e404ddfd3b2f0
describe
'36335536' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRN' 'sip-files00227.tif'
6c60f342f9f67a9b4b214884aa1d70a9
c978a572aabf297edd40da38468664f8e28246df
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRO' 'sip-files00227.txt'
64a1d6c93df5ca9d69157517f4c9bfbc
045002ab6a42538ad7b27af257b76553fe572ed2
describe
'9248' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRP' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
ac8d4b37ec671714f76ebddd793b6302
2d9e83f19a6a37ee294093d51b359125cebedcd6
'2012-03-30T14:54:05-04:00'
describe
'1438938' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
8360c19a3b15b257645c2f42613bcb7d
ffd02f5eed7c16d23b30a18eab872c27e496241d
describe
'124465' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRR' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
7850c99bc4e816dbdc35e9a2fd8a835e
0623944be87ace0e141f076187e538b2a465f9b9
describe
'36019' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRS' 'sip-files00228.pro'
4a9f52960200438e757b31f7825464ce
384de8fdd180903738f731df0f459d475cb5bd70
'2012-03-30T14:42:46-04:00'
describe
'37087' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRT' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
5a8242bb41e6a769d4e598883a4b2f43
13a08caea3db36b76003a765c39c3fd04c7c6e68
describe
'34551352' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRU' 'sip-files00228.tif'
3edb975bc60010eb4a58976cf361113b
62eaaffa1cba39ca87bf7d74854b2f1c81c08370
'2012-03-30T14:50:48-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRV' 'sip-files00228.txt'
87493042fd2d28f9b47a87c38dee31e7
5e7b667e5b67eaf0392719de55c9c0a48967eaf4
describe
Invalid character
'9622' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRW' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f76ddabc87363899d68ca4695af903ad
30ae10627a13af8a0e196f390ea550cdc46878c5
describe
'1457889' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRX' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
c7d49d6635e96e3c67ca6224774251eb
f05df3024739314607c80e91975741f35d34dd98
'2012-03-30T14:40:51-04:00'
describe
'85789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRY' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
779f37e34b3b21c2f4e73284d437a227
124408ab6e079eea5a7ccb9abffcd3b06911b7b3
describe
'18454' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
286afb5291c97657f4b03233f34fae1c
bef4b0d244af0f2ff5d331f12c98129cf066c19a
describe
'24604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSA' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
367639f409a40f1c1ba57feee6bd7443
c35b0b38f6a43e3388140d9f2c72a0c79c8c2968
describe
'35000980' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSB' 'sip-files00229.tif'
c8cee9bf0409bffafd1e1c8b5bd297bb
177f5c58f7d2c14afcc842d056021fd0acb0c1c4
'2012-03-30T14:53:02-04:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSC' 'sip-files00229.txt'
544cb84f90a028775940170767e30666
5bfe86a9661c96b691289f9aaf46c4b14740db6a
describe
'6587' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSD' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
614230ae820f2e4b13edf29c943651b5
f28a21a650ef9619c22c0040c60ca3160008397e
describe
'1522074' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSE' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
c3b98a0d3925759380e59778f80dedd6
b13d1a56d1e0a020fb7e6ad67d4f65d6b0b54b32
describe
'121872' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSF' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
da9de3e86213f842707bd36f714e22d8
607f80ea6a5c4889282f783ad02ff05b5af331d2
'2012-03-30T14:54:37-04:00'
describe
'38566' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSG' 'sip-files00230.pro'
d9eedfecdb8fd11ebe8c0623e3ba2116
29384793729a847918cd54481648383147a05d52
describe
'35672' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSH' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
155db6012db38486ca034bb1764ee50e
99c0627ce24d88535563b099881a6063e4cce893
describe
'36545956' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSI' 'sip-files00230.tif'
cdc7bace60512f88c19e47d45b120155
9ac14aff4dbe2dcf2a17d74b90d189296137f24e
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00230.txt'
5640636ba72c70d159cfa4a72a2e70b0
9096ccf2aa3205b00097152bbdae582e7880b0fd
describe
'8982' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSK' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
4f815b5a02e68dc5abf6063c4e7ef3c2
d499d4619e031d6dc57423987d5a2d46369368c8
'2012-03-30T14:46:07-04:00'
describe
'1590377' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSL' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
92e4cbef498e091a599649ebf866a77f
1fe19228725abffca1c51a8997d824fc2259bdd8
describe
'122805' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSM' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
33874466499ad94fa9f1ac839cc409ba
398f3673cb8990a9270955143536128769f73d5a
describe
'36825' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSN' 'sip-files00231.pro'
dd1515ac6ae74fa5d8d73c605e07be40
dae93f1d9986fb12d7f06a15142159565ecd30b3
describe
'35840' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSO' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
b9e0f4d9e705e30d5eb49af3e9a5b46c
abcba4324a2c51a7cdb135b7712261abc2d4455a
describe
'38184752' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSP' 'sip-files00231.tif'
35d5d15feb70cba2d17bd9448254465a
9f0e125801569a87334b9ca007e47596d1199c52
'2012-03-30T14:52:59-04:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00231.txt'
a88040246979bb6b6295be1bb8fe035c
a46bf5ab4823580dd509dc7b9996fbcb9357e83e
'2012-03-30T14:42:49-04:00'
describe
'9169' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSR' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
109e7cb922efa89c3352bea3f3ba1a28
b28c36ca6819f96bce916ab96111671b6b851d3d
describe
'1566641' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSS' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
dc6499eb2b466e6f0ecc7222d39eef8b
a1df0271cf40a8ffeedcfea797061f547eb4b621
describe
'127858' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNST' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
90aca968b543fb7e7c4e7535dd8ceee9
489da127eed47388ee0d704ab4f89fdc2096e417
'2012-03-30T14:54:18-04:00'
describe
'37657' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSU' 'sip-files00232.pro'
1df8ca272e9f3e0d923bf2f81a6b5370
fee68ba7366616ee7a741f9654b5bef5872e1e41
describe
'37828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSV' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
f27388e04e3a251b3cb1fee4590643f8
1d00914142486ce06db9824ec9c853476efa86fd
describe
'37615680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSW' 'sip-files00232.tif'
225a5d0ffafdafe67805feae4a29fffb
928fa2a1fdf98c3bb875c7e6f75c4e949d4d41a1
'2012-03-30T14:41:20-04:00'
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSX' 'sip-files00232.txt'
0e56c4dc18ad53c24aea086009560b19
0a425d46c0bc12f21ee6dd20e7d8ef7d8ed3d175
describe
'9216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSY' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
6ed5a92f844a80a8bb33489f89e4a6b7
be300867f30ee26595c5ae0921cc3260a9a25ec9
'2012-03-30T14:53:22-04:00'
describe
'1582550' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
4269c4e3afe0fb2257ebf4b5261cab55
3cb5256620b90a381a680bf248fdcdea209a02b4
describe
'120020' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTA' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
9394b01c93782367340a850586cf9b80
aaff19cdd0f5e98bc82e161151311a5839b45949
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTB' 'sip-files00233.pro'
35629c6963e10520d920a27192c00cc3
7707b18d8055b00ac6342cfd4199040005c62f2d
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTC' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
bd5fb23060547ea251407b4aedfa0b48
159ee8fb2ad5b58c6efe872c3c4afe92f4fb737d
describe
'37996800' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTD' 'sip-files00233.tif'
eb34b3199c8fc3d1e84f1d47355490d4
35db35a668b1103a75ee9793bb5fc9c67cb52046
'2012-03-30T14:43:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTE' 'sip-files00233.txt'
a78304104da04c271d1c7132f5916e18
2f69e670612cb6528b9e37422164a77b8d5ad50e
describe
'8584' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTF' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
eaa933e250016afbf9e1680b6e638b59
effc66a1c684e2ab0316f2549a81ae888e9fa492
describe
'1549506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTG' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
9d1f92c91fff01a001354c4a0df4d948
389ba887c160c9e8f8a8d1baa71e9620111cfd57
describe
'124779' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTH' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
85f90af4ba80a38acf63b52c151c322f
1840a6bad81302d7121c774f72e52d3d83214289
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTI' 'sip-files00234.pro'
eaf9b99be0963efd7316e4e8bc51e406
a00b91f6e2111d47f65e683acb65ac5e7d9c9d32
describe
'37278' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
d2be87e74aa6956232493e0dbff047c8
7b878fd1a39932da7c99d608a77f66945150772b
describe
'37204492' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTK' 'sip-files00234.tif'
a529b06a3d5f86c8d1fc6e09592f3207
84cee967e97ca488baf8a6982f00e14399c4e024
'2012-03-30T14:55:09-04:00'
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTL' 'sip-files00234.txt'
cd5e84baa495565bd203f7416b1707d5
e20bc6570015f8274e0d6479b9e43f4a4e67a2e6
describe
'9272' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTM' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
e4a2888af42ffeb95b0fb0b1b76a1345
2f8b8b387eb2f0e0d061d58ada336649dc5153a4
describe
'1592886' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTN' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
bbba41be52b3f22d78d26de5b5d042bb
83061cd473a88d07b11800173c440f140300a0fe
describe
'124215' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTO' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
1eeacb9931b1558137d7043f6939960b
01a653d563071167e6a58527bc6b55a814bd9071
'2012-03-30T14:40:21-04:00'
describe
'36959' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTP' 'sip-files00235.pro'
3424e36fd65970871b3180ef8f9e6e01
b32c494a3494b5e34c22db32d7427350921700e4
describe
'36689' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
25feafd755e8587c60b6e7329c0e94df
d1065f31130f20a89218339ce99734e27ff6d503
describe
'38245104' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTR' 'sip-files00235.tif'
90ca4b862b58f6226b27701550204dee
63dea216e1c2c79be5afe4034e09e5de65c38846
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTS' 'sip-files00235.txt'
27028f07507a170d509dfac0ec490556
bd703bb48cbdb00291bd3e2f231e097d40feeeb7
describe
'9197' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTT' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
ab70173915313cee7f097b8bb39cd771
0c2d1eeccc0692b324fedc0e7bde7a86129e3d7d
describe
'1530126' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTU' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
d79d981e8bc89f8fa8af154b6a148289
e07611df949edc7fa771fbb9826c4cac81e033ef
describe
'124859' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTV' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
95f448b3712ecafc5d98f98e72918770
241b37d1509a3639cf8c14b736adefb2dec33cbd
describe
'36266' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTW' 'sip-files00236.pro'
201db65b34a27e22e1d39683e041d688
9c397b13f872a4ee707f27ddbdc60d11d89c1cf3
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTX' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
54f19119997600de3d7dfc1849390ba9
1ac901b2dcbdd59e26a072c4f1511dc7e46a4da0
describe
'36739236' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTY' 'sip-files00236.tif'
591d4b53fb922342e7522e725fefcdef
952f2d4420b2710438d80e828b61e863a1d6a3cc
'2012-03-30T14:36:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
a4c1b6c98d65bdc8c95eefed09774dcb
d899fbda64dedcb258d81343b7126596e15d1edf
describe
'8949' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUA' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
5a7b825a2c1a35d401951eecc248a433
b70947e4afee12152bbbef02dd3cd05981fef7b4
describe
'1581919' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUB' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
528c1494f75abe7212526410ef48b999
91f25bcbe2c745f14512fdb721d9b44ed01e2e33
describe
'119183' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUC' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
a17763f7d2648f19620a10f050afc583
ed54e67b534f63c16af369b3893a27fdb084e897
describe
'36128' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUD' 'sip-files00237.pro'
163e807b6ab4e312772ce4aaf71746f7
0b27c2ac0fe02bd3ec1eae400634907588e7ea60
describe
'34678' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUE' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
ced70d45439f87ee1e86e53769811b72
4747d85249d6ddab53a74360f9cc97d79c312330
'2012-03-30T14:52:09-04:00'
describe
'37982620' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUF' 'sip-files00237.tif'
aa57bde5f1d6e455c086d8b90ec49a87
c1983a5e68f55216f3124b2e1a293d09a5422c61
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUG' 'sip-files00237.txt'
04854fb9f73197213d67d5514c3470f1
69774aec527554d2df417146be896365951f94b4
describe
'8561' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUH' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
993b656135d32ce99f2cb0b18088144d
a9cbc4b4e612fefe7bdeb40c43d1fcee13521ed1
describe
'1472395' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUI' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
8f80435b66440ac265ee193dfc5b26d7
ea5e311b6b8e74a1cdf560c48ce38c9a1464e829
describe
'82563' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
92754040cd0d4fc10773ba5c1fc0507b
30cd9992b2cd6f53b3f26b85c053a984080c200f
describe
'11279' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUK' 'sip-files00238.pro'
388123d35c9fdfeb8b00e5772cc108a3
75c7336cd77078e0834f3e1e985abbde2b523e64
describe
'21757' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUL' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
57433773b40efb5433a620258f6e2556
2885477c8e69df5e1bfa8a1b48091b64b92997e4
describe
'35349460' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUM' 'sip-files00238.tif'
b9e205fa173b4535661e520b9116d2c9
ca038480630dc543fea2ab3ad52f9d7e93a5b88f
'2012-03-30T14:49:32-04:00'
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUN' 'sip-files00238.txt'
9374ca9995afbfd57625bd8619d0893f
81cd44afd3d072aea269f84fd19ec658ee74e662
describe
'5795' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUO' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
445f3611c6b30000cbb277ae414c604a
b287e6c1f046160ce5453ee3bb50b778371beae1
describe
'1600808' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUP' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
1d85520613954c58c2aabba3a64d8629
c8a7c6091805c654bfb0d61eee6fe90040af992c
describe
'83389' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
ed54a191231b06940d094ec7b37b838c
e255b7b1db60e15ecd2f9e5138e9ab9a78fed0b9
'2012-03-30T14:46:40-04:00'
describe
'20912' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUR' 'sip-files00239.pro'
88c1fbd150c1fe1a1a60d7a459d114ca
333060be23eba8814ff9fb9d6eb54fb732f4cf18
describe
'22304' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUS' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
62dab1c33a7a92459a7e28e0fd9c7437
b693ec34c8cd9ee01effee07d2e41a61266a8dda
describe
'38430752' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUT' 'sip-files00239.tif'
6ef47b2cea78913aef171fca6a0cf2a4
5fe245ed7ef3f907a45a6ef9e36bd2732b041e98
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUU' 'sip-files00239.txt'
814097c250cc9e15b1b37cd6bd987cbb
8618e21cecdd4ba543ee83b0f10e26c86ae9a822
describe
'5994' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUV' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
35ee56ceb8350af4476f5703865cf261
3100c815bf3e5a61fb6ab464bcc118e852bce133
describe
'1513586' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUW' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
6f1bb8882a330c4e4991ff9d6c51d2b1
31b43889edd74e1a2be951611dc3736cc09db349
describe
'126975' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUX' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
ecd2687ac61efd8deee78bf646e454e5
8599d9307062499b2fad682ce68f218e2e8e5145
describe
'36860' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUY' 'sip-files00240.pro'
fd67e430f646d5a9991574d50b712bf8
da0fefd2f912a4685bb3ab837ac8df984a19f431
'2012-03-30T14:48:21-04:00'
describe
'36378' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
bad5778bab0ec1575aea8b7faf71ceb0
73f206433622a4a1b963f4fe25bd1bbd905d7eca
describe
'36341976' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVA' 'sip-files00240.tif'
5f65344c9d0b82b1ed93025b9c55ea9f
025fafe4563c1d119395c032cfd5971ce8169fe8
'2012-03-30T14:37:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVB' 'sip-files00240.txt'
c9b94187a585efb08e2854c5715bb9dd
7073c7ecfd582f9604c12f932c550edafd344e36
describe
'9190' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVC' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
89ba778983bfc62512c345e02fb44b7d
031fdf26b9d36c99dbbff4dc906b0c545462dabb
describe
'1528340' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVD' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
35932c070ec185d685eaec923845dcaa
b919f9f028d9ba3a0bac2ee9f9f86ae56a5c0d04
describe
'126247' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVE' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
0265000b58f7dc4bb8a678906c18c1ef
88b4d12baa8c367fe018d1b4127b96ec28a0cfc7
describe
'39000' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVF' 'sip-files00241.pro'
af2b6f427ce4207efd58696e47655a01
93200f5d241d505c410e51716075bcbad70e95bd
describe
'36764' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVG' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
1f90a9c489a8e1cca512dc59d956ab23
3a354648d929d12524cfefbd29fa874ffac8d99f
describe
'36697340' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVH' 'sip-files00241.tif'
32aaedc761eef42b8afa56c9128133a8
1ffc6712d648d43e63c7ee305aa65b7c7c2a829e
'2012-03-30T14:46:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVI' 'sip-files00241.txt'
2fc45cda6ed01e28ea9b490207143455
ec4d3177615bc2b9e31f9e3686d02e0c3504895a
describe
Invalid character
'9227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
19841c99b17179b67995fd7d18f7f0f9
3c8f0e7ff6fa10327ac1582eaa1fcb210857a5a2
describe
'1516364' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVK' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
21c9b68eacc322f5d2f87151b0eb0b8f
4838db8bf393d9c3694d2ad41c4dfc7c22386177
describe
'132287' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVL' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
0d2bde6326c4d85c1dc2ce63ed5ee0e6
c24d735e35ef24c420abe3f0fb4fb24e6bdc55bc
describe
'38638' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVM' 'sip-files00242.pro'
2d503d92aea35e2858d530544ca4c390
f0947fc57d5a3b17d241f4258f526e692343bc5a
describe
'38595' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVN' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
b9d4e510ad42dcef167d80ad2b48d82e
44764874648c2eaed9a707ff6a162a9e25e76653
describe
'36408672' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVO' 'sip-files00242.tif'
fe0545ef7b5c39873028a170905c7d8c
26660d25b2b062d3114588500e99414aabfa6280
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVP' 'sip-files00242.txt'
321e0c154b8fda87751ec3f430c8bbc3
3734d8883a9863822dcc6710af45553ceb9eb80a
describe
'9386' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
8ab0a99484bca422e402027cd5a03e31
b56a715eb36607318d1e27a12ba9a5b44aee35ea
describe
'1575437' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVR' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
2c28e431622c084d15a34867cd9ec66b
6b2e0b1fea32caeedf349ad6606c538eaf6c2375
describe
'125818' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVS' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
b21f3bf1019750670b1bc1baa99f81b0
3ba26e44a7949dd1bcf9d6c91ff4a29a7b468579
describe
'37181' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVT' 'sip-files00243.pro'
b9c2916cb9acf5950ab2f07b8e99a131
213d84e15ebcaa3ac709678bf08d582be80eec8b
describe
'35891' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVU' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
2456fe127b63ecd53b337c85251165ef
f8b051a5ae83700f176b1237579519a5eeefbcd3
describe
'37826144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVV' 'sip-files00243.tif'
19cf514adadd95dc9f89a771a7891608
cf2c5b9734dbb7a92ea1e313e46ebb3dd9344be5
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVW' 'sip-files00243.txt'
15f20b9e514f9d30b832874eb541c456
92381f7c7e5c59e537a948484a387e257b449ac6
'2012-03-30T14:36:30-04:00'
describe
'9017' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVX' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
8f0c955b7fc4c7232cbae476372f72dc
88d8e86fcf6d4d0c7bd199a2eeae4148f149734e
'2012-03-30T14:36:25-04:00'
describe
'1508790' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVY' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
8f668e733a99766f3e89c79fc7583c90
8226e17eec49a48ec91cc495507f1c554f1be1a0
describe
'128711' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
7f638bff3b6b21736fc663b12e0eb1ff
0d3985777db63d6a6ba011bd8f5bee9fd7e886ec
describe
'36254' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWA' 'sip-files00244.pro'
8a254f0a015ae9eed118c8fff84d9784
042178bcd9f54b2a48206539d05ced88bf85a109
describe
'37425' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWB' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
03df74cee11394096194ecc5544e53f4
471147dce53cfb8a8304a16927277aa4d0ba108a
'2012-03-30T14:50:04-04:00'
describe
'36226624' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWC' 'sip-files00244.tif'
c87582143547f615edf0fac3d4e0a12d
a03b56b1eca0baa94421e8572f0d970a105ab1cf
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWD' 'sip-files00244.txt'
13a1cbce4919602b16db138cb7c32a2c
90799d0d8702e346c6943e76ba0348a61fef18f5
describe
Invalid character
'9295' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWE' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
de65cb749e9f7fc0deede04319da031c
0a8df458d560cd7d4feef5347955a090e5a3c193
describe
'1528612' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWF' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
af0d7f7591d7d3ba3984ecbde08dc19d
c4c96513dff4b35f26a02e81978abfb4fab7b618
describe
'123737' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWG' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
b14e4720ba80be764683466221f6de07
613a847b4b8b66c28d76f2176d7196b7196f7fdb
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWH' 'sip-files00245.pro'
e38f83b03aa825ee8813cdbddcbf06f4
64d67be79a38ceb19ca8d235d31a9c94c270cc6f
describe
'35848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWI' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
34f860674b884dec8d5903ab47229998
d9d465c68775ccfc44a7d678d9ab5875fb95b4e4
describe
'36702804' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00245.tif'
623f257d8f765b312c310f32b1344640
85af74700ff1c87f0fa219af389582c4edd4211a
'2012-03-30T14:40:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWK' 'sip-files00245.txt'
ce419fb4b7d8f1695f031e96365dedbd
69439575353d20a26b242f4e3c1045608ea6afc4
describe
'8667' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWL' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
ca00cba890f2216ed23e7050ec9d0b94
62f188e20db270ab87cf57f6e3dadbbbbc84999f
describe
'1555299' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWM' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
1d3ccd80f4c4d6970c6efeafbb766ba5
3171bbf859d5924aa245f90ff1a8896c3f65eb12
'2012-03-30T14:46:59-04:00'
describe
'125924' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWN' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
c4ad616a0425ed89cb132c2b27c12e6e
f0574aa30f720c38fc4f138e8a2d8077f8dbd5f6
'2012-03-30T14:39:48-04:00'
describe
'36824' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWO' 'sip-files00246.pro'
da7d13b35cddfc0eadcae99351cd726d
f7dd71ff48d265e450658d5f96db4248d677ebf3
describe
'36129' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWP' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
8ae2ad591be27b7e3f6158382b4d92b0
a2f8f064091b2b0912a0d026141a25b9009c5e82
describe
'37342980' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00246.tif'
3d18360d365a77bd291bbec6429844a9
989badbc9029809d574c62e30f3305af2bed0e7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWR' 'sip-files00246.txt'
cd2deed6c56f8b800dc7afa264c4855c
0db16c870bd94bbefc94229fca7a5e99402f05c9
describe
'8870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWS' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
ab2646b0c1db351476f6636a511aca12
dca2a440af19807fa34b106a1851bcc71f7ff76c
describe
'1563062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWT' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
c2090e6b816c321fedf9214ac4612591
438783636d999c62dcfd455686c08b92e2a260ac
describe
'123011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWU' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
941c027e305674319b4e9fb22edc04a1
cf8b054a3cc9321aa86a309680923b916bb3c6c8
describe
'36030' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWV' 'sip-files00247.pro'
158540b950218eb5481193f7a0c24e5c
3a03719fe4c07bb0b7c7d206052a0f5fcac8f8f3
describe
'35568' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWW' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
0c8233e3ddf2442dcecc82e5b0b2f3a5
aad29c5c5c9447166aa7857b7be315599c643771
describe
'37529244' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWX' 'sip-files00247.tif'
b1b82e1e9ccdb501731010a21271b51e
6c552f0ca8bbb4e5a1dcf7aec112bf2aac8ce097
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWY' 'sip-files00247.txt'
405750d218354732fb4984e47a360558
5dc1e98128fa4fa1b2327f5a7bbcd68ee6623ab4
describe
'1629239' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNWZ' 'sip-filesi.jp2'
2392d10a087328863a73cc8a41e983b1
d7340b9a3d1389a8195f30c31faef21f7589a1d7
describe
'8555' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXA' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
b7c77ed5ec8dff781da306138f88c542
01aca384ec7df38ecc36b25ebabf817c1d8537a3
describe
'1655262' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXB' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
95c5c356963b86aca37ec74a97a6e26e
37253ab7f8090db0dd46d16005cb4c5753e9950a
'2012-03-30T14:54:47-04:00'
describe
'110669' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXC' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
3eca1e11c1bf37a1626112eb6a7d5b2c
380b3a5d2e8a6c78b23669311af9a82a297bf21d
describe
'37617' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXD' 'sip-files00248.pro'
52839a22780e1ae13ce6f4e939471286
fcb612ae9cb14c143cb4a25b1e5059c4c8011ca3
describe
'29278' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXE' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
8accbd9815760962da1456a57c534ab0
fdbace11b43b90ae0d523efbb871bf558429cffb
describe
'39739624' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXF' 'sip-files00248.tif'
5e18289d4efe7f8bc9f9f766940f7918
8580ee2ccf8eff9b1c1f77318ed42dff6462db69
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXG' 'sip-files00248.txt'
3ff384c9f0920a17519828dbcdf41bf5
dc15e608200e205289c4f9df1f48cea37a8020e7
'2012-03-30T14:42:22-04:00'
describe
'6694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXH' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
cc948f87fc6f44362895265e6079770c
b105a9493ef0e0b1f2b79bc299f0cc7fac7d95e0
describe
'1628865' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXI' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
3f0dba37f52b3d5f42f0f1bf7a013a69
3452867be62b1d9c604dd177faa8effcbcf667c6
describe
'109746' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
74c2c0ba3fafba1526ea14e8eb54e70d
81f2c52c328a5d2c9b1e6491c07afe75e20db416
describe
'37782' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXK' 'sip-files00249.pro'
2da20b86beba88b23e52d74673600206
699ee2f348da84ddf6a12cc9730630d9ad33281c
describe
'28524' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXL' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
68bddc2eafd6ce85c7b5a88cb8899980
ac889bfcfaa138e802719e1f962672369bafcffb
describe
'39105848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXM' 'sip-files00249.tif'
d1d04badcd468e092cc7dece259783ee
8ec35b644529d2f8dcf631f53eebca23756ca202
'2012-03-30T14:49:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXN' 'sip-files00249.txt'
87894424579fdf6032441d3c561278e7
6978120006f01038d2b76fdb242a9dc5ccb38ff9
describe
'6753' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXO' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
205609413adba4ffddc04eb1b6c542af
b2d7fb4a8e73f6c813d4825cc4c1f1cb4148ba06
describe
'1612230' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXP' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
d6661b42ec43af8e063c6f0ddc8cc546
cb9ae76ca642d6142e9bdb7fd3d8fc076c5cde42
describe
'101641' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
6c17f93cc4ff19deb00e8e887827ee04
2552de5b55dc71e9651f9c3920de053c8e208283
describe
'36585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXR' 'sip-files00250.pro'
a0eb2413c6fc0bdca4acf5e8b9fdb667
47e02834cec778b66f11b33d46e8bd9f403793d1
describe
'29236' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXS' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
ac5981dfc7e32bcdf7874fc3ccdea973
6d454abeb18adb55734f0aa3f85a4d0155cd2f7f
describe
'38707480' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXT' 'sip-files00250.tif'
9d7b407c0845f3921b33d20419733b57
61665307f682390dc18d40c1093af6e744e2c321
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXU' 'sip-files00250.txt'
6e240bfad4c53dcbd7dc71c2efe1322c
cc3becbef447bf151fb3df16fb60b0c6c44cd50d
'2012-03-30T14:53:56-04:00'
describe
'7336' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXV' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
42c73a44deb7ea90602198ee9b60a3d4
917212ed0b83a3158ec5408d350684e27c211772
'2012-03-30T14:37:18-04:00'
describe
'1386013' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXW' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
950e91f22ffac5f03993e9f1aab70869
ba2773719e473eb9b6030f539378f535136bf700
describe
'72607' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXX' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
adb4b3a9790f1853c92556ed0aaddc75
e9a187f45729f72310b59b9e91ba2131d2a5645e
describe
'19074' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXY' 'sip-files00251.pro'
894141d7863d6a2f417fcabd7845ff18
15a774bac552aac4afddabbecb5e5389c7aa4b68
describe
'20451' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
175198b473550140a2d70b5d8365e614
ee2f6a03aed945adc0b4e121c466ef9ff3422de4
describe
'33274500' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYA' 'sip-files00251.tif'
17bea34b0419086c7a05801a9c220727
b5c818c91befcd7f57990b85719f29d53d1147c0
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYB' 'sip-files00251.txt'
6393da3cc77c4b0c4c5c2bc9d55898bc
1424f6597acc2dfece9643033f92754742caf366
describe
'5319' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYC' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
b9899b61c55e15c1ca37af38b96bdfb7
3c772cbe9484dfc9d5603d1e40cb442a3c1295fe
describe
'1535542' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYD' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
749d2b83cc24fbe73957fe6a86df2823
e7c80ea034af753fc3d44e16ef339012a90848ef
describe
'34852' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYE' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
f7211572ddf0996cd898d139d573e70c
4d8d86ee1809d723cf11e1dc7de6963888e917bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYF' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
fbae8a3150a21600aa4e87875e4915e9
43cf4a6f64c839f07590a13a178303f3e8f56cf2
describe
'36868788' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYG' 'sip-files00252.tif'
d4733f5beb1f4282d9cd8f31e276d245
f031433246b9d1c7142dc25eb310fa14ed1673fd
describe
'2676' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYH' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
61324cb6f49db53551ece18c19a689fe
e5b638cd0db77df4f4444200728be9afff02bb00
describe
'406631' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYI' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
965a3951efa888d3688fb5e2561c4e5d
e19dbf704f79a843491b6bf0b4e7e55870b8d393
describe
'220001' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYJ' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
bdd6e65dbfa9b3a4e81cd2915f08526b
3a386e41f1426fe2387e6d9e56c1ae3930396b94
describe
'45414' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYK' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
1f6167659e1d3f3d4f0f6b0feda5ebdf
1e0f21b7aa5ff892d75cf8043babde46e36959be
describe
'9765872' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYL' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
d5dfa57ec3422c040d6085698831eae5
821c11a1d4e635867197e7a973aa49151277a24f
describe
'9361' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYM' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
312abf86ebf972764b4fdcc40c239b06
7f4a8adc040d21abe975aa850c1dda176b6bbf4b
describe
'1816368' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYN' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
d4e74d6aa8ec5d35d1fa0d3f9e676c71
3dce6979183162648fb2f9256a522c7e59dc0d3b
describe
'48471' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYO' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
b9d7b45958989bd4c9e8447723db0e43
2995556067563ce36329eccf2ff401ab391662e3
describe
'13125' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYP' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
5e852b9c28e3eb817f920880372a8521
61eb14e33d043a24f3120fe169344639bf535b9e
describe
'43601076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYQ' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
48ed9a4491333ebb92344a6c0cb9384b
8204b99110bc2b8826bdf284560641c3f915ad28
describe
'4001' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYR' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
634bd1cf4ddb79a91a6d45d42abb0d11
5892bab9e93ce919460a5bb1abfc5ec091ca2edc
describe
'1680674' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYS' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
7fc7a69adbc218251e6ea6ebfb9d14e0
7ca1a82e98641122dcb51dc42e6d78dcb12fc9ff
describe
'30453' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYT' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
96e12e4d28a6712907bdc59c86c46bee
c3de29f6bec92f2d3c6243784eeb631c9f27910a
describe
'8344' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYU' 'sip-filescover3.QC.jpg'
96ae8582ffeb5047a93b4e502d2ecf56
4839a1d72c4dff284e3e94088a90ccf4e35611a3
describe
'40343388' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYV' 'sip-filescover3.tif'
cf0ee03876d42b9e8df393c6043bae11
4cf9be8403a2405149d348b4aeea80cd0510c186
describe
'2803' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYW' 'sip-filescover3thm.jpg'
b7f0afcc09a308fa7864c02865f2dd09
813abb92e78339fb7d6ed919713d63fd4c119f22
describe
'1533592' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYX' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
d897b6bba990252b7d68a8163873d8c3
eb750b729927df1cc9ec88c74133536bd7214ee5
describe
'186534' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYY' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
4d8274dcf045a110a0889819e8865c99
2a892771cc83c0ce3a1249fb521922af50063c2d
describe
'37040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNYZ' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
e5fc64b3fe578a5d67afed64301f830c
10a743b8a21aae430825ea4f6a3bb0a0b94db054
describe
'36816960' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZA' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
04ccc413cf8e980dda8b24958d2078b4
70df2d6828c3b339d4af94d884829feed5611907
describe
'7682' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZB' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
7962c9283d9113be38480b760f60d03f
d43b83230e3087fbb88724bc8e184b6c1d9c137e
describe
'12489' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZC' 'sip-filesfly1.QC.jpg'
da9bd9ce397297c004e74a062e79ec80
e8b4b04d5651bc248159adde0b47c49d023a5fa0
describe
'3383' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZD' 'sip-filesfly1thm.jpg'
e54adbcbdf02e4f48467e2dd3791c623
c67c6aa3c57367a1b8dbc6bae422130d025a8d58
'2012-03-30T14:53:04-04:00'
describe
'9720' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZE' 'sip-filesfly2.QC.jpg'
849784c94ecdd4f3b4e1a17dc97691fb
2474a4de2bd15f4983861b5be377a7672575fe9b
'2012-03-30T14:48:10-04:00'
describe
'2699' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZF' 'sip-filesfly2thm.jpg'
3d7a1ef59c732fcd30e3f2c408231c2f
95edf810cb1923aa704ed2d74a6387c4683ad964
describe
'57213' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZG' 'sip-filesi.jpg'
d7bd3dae5384535c1c22a8575d836cfc
a44b8a43ad9d77c5a9e8811f610444426bf93d0a
describe
'5057' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZH' 'sip-filesi.pro'
5bd49ba45bad81d3b16dbbab7dd0d50b
df884068bf720406590277702ccbf90a5ba0c3d4
describe
'15772' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZI' 'sip-filesi.QC.jpg'
a39c5ea4f7b901b6e138529df137ecd0
3104553f9c64d06a0212434d30d21bc044e725d5
describe
'39111668' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZJ' 'sip-filesi.tif'
406655783671c638268790ab3fd44273
75b4eac6c3ec30e12b43ff66177f1365e25ece85
'2012-03-30T14:48:12-04:00'
describe
'313' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZK' 'sip-filesi.txt'
fffc4f2a77a40408ed9baae9ac26aa73
73abd411752506830d3ece1ad0b00496a5994977
describe
'1609755' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZL' 'sip-filesii.jp2'
557ed7bf5fe3339dc8d3f57d86e647e5
46c1ba1abd1e9d6213f48554d8b502dfec7bb09c
'2012-03-30T14:48:54-04:00'
describe
'43945' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZM' 'sip-filesii.jpg'
a712d66f46c479768fce18e2a7477315
c7d454e455636a59af92008a97cb4ec0d73044d1
describe
'2942' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZN' 'sip-filesii.pro'
c736c115a785a6565799d8eadc2ad9e2
d390e952a5cde43b201b6ea022757014374077bb
describe
'11402' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZO' 'sip-filesii.QC.jpg'
6bc2a7105d38188b601edfc3fb359c70
6a750379bc950c8b3e626588bdf3046322c93aae
describe
'38646268' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZP' 'sip-filesii.tif'
3516a6bcfa14456e66e8f59c4dad71e0
f64fc5a888751836063d5ab2dde2de323fbc1b0d
'2012-03-30T14:41:12-04:00'
describe
'252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZQ' 'sip-filesii.txt'
7071979244a35a16dd1c1f098265a39b
5d6577d15c6d3b6b808f18215f56313b80a3cd04
describe
Invalid character
'1569906' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZR' 'sip-filesiii.jp2'
0e92113c8c3473e7fbba4a68d6e37a95
f37535668b43c3dcc97a533469de100ebed86df7
describe
'51180' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZS' 'sip-filesiii.jpg'
5ad4750db6d7756df9c0ebd094a599e5
8d19c58b3e79a16318b8d7921c986e603d3a2ca1
describe
'5725' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZT' 'sip-filesiii.pro'
677d2081045a49cb94c0a956c50d8191
4858366c480d70c7ba43bad4f61c228243d2fff2
describe
'12148' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZU' 'sip-filesiii.QC.jpg'
70d5de0bbca137b0722d930490de4a3f
9044be1b60603aec72732143c2af8048ca5fe82a
describe
'37685536' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZV' 'sip-filesiii.tif'
b054848dc875877e26d44ce00814f573
519081c5117f98099347ae37b8569b4ba850685d
'2012-03-30T14:41:54-04:00'
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZW' 'sip-filesiii.txt'
ec41d36f22825dbd2eaef6bdf06abb06
88d97bb13ca798b4b16a64031655fe31117347db
describe
'3714' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZX' 'sip-filesiiithm.jpg'
4c9f3e485b0182aba8c3f1a833237495
c11c34f4bb58009e061919bb2a6c8b1a23b5dc6f
describe
'3451' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZY' 'sip-filesiithm.jpg'
306ca24cd947e851dcf6e4da9b9725ee
9dcad49c0474d6f5dbce842583095581e660c1ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABNZZ' 'sip-filesithm.jpg'
5cadd450f01174cc82c4edce5ce90afe
9f33d3c534f77288b0ab651899f5ff2a7cb1cd3a
describe
'1584442' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAA' 'sip-filesiv.jp2'
836c8abd41904d59d01a15e4e0177b9c
97e2b1888ab9f1ca72c3874a363e9e7030311dad
describe
'45873' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAB' 'sip-filesiv.jpg'
31e502d33787710cf9cf91d4ba9c52b9
29035b0edcc380de85bc7b77ef7483853937d4f9
describe
'11141' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAC' 'sip-filesiv.QC.jpg'
101b4deb2d1e52f369bba569c34fb37c
bf4a793a2c461a9e69abd08ae7bbcf36234c5a68
describe
'38033772' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAD' 'sip-filesiv.tif'
0dd7be3207df7491d2245f1ca77530f4
d3e2643b88afd7cc567e58cac7f38710be3131b4
describe
'3399' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAE' 'sip-filesivthm.jpg'
e82a2ce9ce9bfb8b3bb0b933b6d0a6af
0abdcfd46c4cb840e4a31e2c0cd4bb1bc023e13e
describe
'1376460' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAF' 'sip-filesix.jp2'
77f41f3fc77e05fc71aa4ebaf515fd84
a050f154c452647177bafa3674025d7f5d73a0b3
describe
'77390' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAG' 'sip-filesix.jpg'
db6b2fd7db267369d5628284fe589e58
85fc58e9d9a4729d12b5324889ba5f772f34d160
describe
'19718' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAH' 'sip-filesix.pro'
8a08193d8f4cc85594b9b938255481af
c2642fd2630e514aacb89e11adaeb32f84e1e99d
describe
'22690' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAI' 'sip-filesix.QC.jpg'
994eb9d53279257b86b3abe971314546
6ca6f0cbfec5b3e04ad8c948c8979ea3e70cd904
describe
'13005632' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAJ' 'sip-filesix.tif'
f24f7bd783517b5032bb906693386a25
4aff5f15eb350b26fbfb219ebf0757a209d098b4
'2012-03-30T14:38:30-04:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAK' 'sip-filesix.txt'
2bc05a795f2432cf5bc29bf5ceafd372
08be6d084baa4240323097294b2d03aa80c3087f
describe
'6330' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAL' 'sip-filesixthm.jpg'
760cfc38e738e2c6e201a3b7a4c344da
927283cb769d7709d2e58da090d6bcb07fe3ec9f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
f73a7d90db2b6b3735112932edddc488
44bd52b09e98f1e9b40f5bf32fd44e9bda2864c5
describe
'103972' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAN' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
aa3e24bc0bdfec050a1120e181c52cfb
dd410f0550dede0bbf8caef56947f39b3d8413ac
describe
'64740' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAO' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
0539bb21c645cc4df23d7fd1324cc044
3657748d6090175410b2469e5af1c0a1fed99b8b
describe
'14011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAP' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
7acf63edf06f1361714a032828a623f5
88559dcd5b1262cfbb3914638c4b7e08d237396d
describe
'2502156' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAQ' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
d6dd1e23841b4ba1ebf33361f56a0dac
5aaaebd685c0f3fe711dc23549b9250a9780d207
describe
'5073' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAR' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
cfdb80a79fed67ab4db5e895f174a168
dd929934eba77d297daed4fe789cd712bcab8599
describe
'371944' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAS' 'sip-filesUF00003259_00001.mets'
ba3f9e3cf019ba9cb01319759490583b
ca412f553b37993172c8c95d25b29b56dc234b6f
'2012-03-30T14:41:03-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T22:47:35-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'68877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAV' 'sip-filesv.jpg'
4e1c6827242ede9fc8e58ef31e593e4f
264050a17fc25160f0db25ce435ebe95498b5233
describe
'119899' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAW' 'sip-filesvi.jpg'
bb97e8e220804852eab6bbe3900faf67
95679f90722815c6d9fd44507d769aaca9876368
describe
'111056' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAX' 'sip-filesVII.jpg'
0aed3f192302bdb2e6290ebe13c5953a
cab81047d26191e4099e4920ca0a39537c503d07
describe
'101982' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAY' 'sip-filesviii.jpg'
6bca5ed9132381d50868b168f602af09
676299f19faa14bf8fe06edfa93cecfafc4e1f74
describe
'44389' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOAZ' 'sip-filesx.jpg'
4b2094ab66cd06d5a6dc8acdf24fa21c
252fb2b252cfc60cd8baa352ebaa49b9aba952a3
describe
'66109' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBA' 'sip-filesxi.jpg'
06036731ea2b56c1d765a0cfddf4e435
1ea485b022f338472b60561a0f917584cf20e272
describe
'71631' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBB' 'sip-filesxii.jpg'
a143d81fc558453d73f4815891821229
5498a81227daeddbfa54d7bf79bd675984d4b4df
describe
'86249' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBC' 'sip-filesxiii.jpg'
347c5af7f0f3dd175a83c01ed84f8883
12911ceb7f079694fe4396aeeb0ecd0b5a19f151
describe
'1590290' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBD' 'sip-filesv.jp2'
07dc9ab7918656c9c307101bcaf52a35
3f16050e441d3264746dd16bb3269eb5e1bdbc7c
describe
'358508' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBE' 'sip-filesvi.jp2'
8e5a9afcde847dcd3734d8fbb3c7a092
4a39462953f97b7bf4d10f70178ad6671b270dd8
describe
'1543494' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBF' 'sip-filesVII.jp2'
4135332a90254aa2ea8b012fc106b72a
c838ba641527a10857109ba1b2e295670059d36d
describe
'1516979' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBG' 'sip-filesviii.jp2'
e0447227e7d75223a214c44ee987e600
7ba598bdfe173dbd3f80456cf059872ff1f529e4
describe
'376709' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBH' 'sip-filesx.jp2'
03e2c1cf4426f6dcb3e3e596786c033e
b0fcea1c21496fe4423558677b31f272c51c4940
describe
'1544367' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBI' 'sip-filesxi.jp2'
0c9163a797b17c5dd1a8277c19267f08
c2a13e8155d2c05bf463271458dc2b832a0fb70b
describe
'1532880' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBJ' 'sip-filesxii.jp2'
668004da24acfc089071705d08ca53d1
9647d739a6707f2135fe47d3daf108d14af6495a
describe
'1528676' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBK' 'sip-filesxiii.jp2'
8abbc0e62478e24021e5a1ebc86d1d3e
70f4c88882e83b15a1a6dcebdc2defe4fa27d314
describe
'38177908' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBL' 'sip-filesv.tif'
b719cdff6053bd4f9c3c34b06e1d2b9d
0aaafe77fb06542d480d4ec6802f0f181b0ba8b3
'2012-03-30T14:50:44-04:00'
describe
'5743594' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBM' 'sip-filesvi.tif'
79c97dc402307dcde33eb3f95b499a6e
0b6a9b57b3f868c676c4082de6c798e1f0012834
describe
'74098968' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBN' 'sip-filesVII.tif'
6042feed947710e6b891e7ec0a8626cc
48e21908e732fdce59072a963308ebb7206f2e60
'2012-03-30T14:44:48-04:00'
describe
'17104068' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBO' 'sip-filesviii.tif'
efa57b11d03b2f6ed8e1d97b3204b1f8
34cf3c540def81b816f81f015433ab633ed61809
'2012-03-30T14:48:06-04:00'
describe
'9049644' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBP' 'sip-filesx.tif'
fefbcf81b3ec1cf7aafa6c8f39981e51
4460bfc007c132bdf6943aeebd8f26da83a916fc
describe
'16244554' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBQ' 'sip-filesxi.tif'
fb14a86610fe4f1b7571d47960257f40
9ff61f3cbd928ef487324dcf6e3cce0339bc55ca
describe
'16084378' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBR' 'sip-filesxii.tif'
f89082f3b6ab052a30235cf522e1f048
c61e868a155e3ffc8e914ce690a0a3076f4b3a3a
'2012-03-30T14:42:06-04:00'
describe
'18761764' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBS' 'sip-filesxiii.tif'
23d9fbbd366dafcb2b244a054767f0e8
1a053838bdfdc6e53c57d450216deb724a17d263
'2012-03-30T14:41:28-04:00'
describe
'14580' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBT' 'sip-filesv.pro'
f1572fc82a43514145eaa622cfc321e0
78f8661840f53e97451e7bffb067fe6c59fe94e0
describe
'30851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBU' 'sip-filesvi.pro'
ae3c4ed83c098e1156ab4ad6b5831f8a
aaafbc812620a17f4da0315ba6a7661ee4c76c22
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBV' 'sip-filesviii.pro'
8548dbfc7157b4d51f335f8539ecfb9c
f88e8fedd8225ac798e1747997e4c3f51e92e617
describe
'20677' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBW' 'sip-filesxi.pro'
0f935d4014177f9e520486c7bd2fff8b
adf75f813c7520ff672ac845ff1cd705a805a3e5
describe
'19696' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBX' 'sip-filesxii.pro'
e53ef62ea4caca5fb648beccbaaa9ada
34ead5c6542753e942d8e85c0ac2568b095484a7
describe
'21813' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBY' 'sip-filesxiii.pro'
582189a305002ca32b367d00a6d7007e
6eda52cfa367df802c268808e156e2e9336c37a4
describe
'678' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOBZ' 'sip-filesv.txt'
4e7139ac81529461c3278f6595563e61
37c4a8271cea1df25ff204804af29d2ecf841b60
describe
Invalid character
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCA' 'sip-filesvi.txt'
db0cb073a2da4d3d07710f1f06f5e235
6cf3a6cdd229b25e5d4e4bc44133ad29c530987c
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCB' 'sip-filesviii.txt'
91220d024c797d53a54c2d9c972d0143
790d72856a0339aa433e420b3b9e006554076034
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCC' 'sip-filesxi.txt'
992910614d13fad4807350e60a032257
d5e169cb266de70cf5d155a40d871195a42441bc
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCD' 'sip-filesxii.txt'
b0589088406906cde22fa7ffcc1ca797
206f83ad1a89ad225bd6105d8fd424db3ba28147
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCE' 'sip-filesxiii.txt'
6986fb1b57c4e330844c7bbe1bd5a4e2
47187487321b2fe430e902fdb79354b9ec07bce3
describe
'489986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCF' 'sip-filesUF00003259_00001.xml'
726d8b8c2bf8d713831e08ca9e52c292
3e676bcdb2abb51ac61380fc0cc84b2e22bbbed1
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T22:47:30-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'19282' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCG' 'sip-filesv.QC.jpg'
c6d062c964e035093e07cbff3f8c3c37
90812fdd3b60386dcb557fe1343a48d2358bf2d8
describe
'34846' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCH' 'sip-filesvi.QC.jpg'
b016a7ce9c30a78113008a51bf676c20
578192547bd7df4149b7eebedcffbf9f9b3c33d6
describe
'31542' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCI' 'sip-filesVII.QC.jpg'
bd262b126ac580874ec0e50ab64c4db9
51a1d7d77a9af43d3c3e6d1d26801fca0a451479
describe
'30706' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCJ' 'sip-filesviii.QC.jpg'
ee9719c6f6876f16e5f3f2f7e281b995
619c6adacfd1f5718d95372836c7f0466ff3bc9c
describe
'7977' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCK' 'sip-filesviiithm.jpg'
533015b48264cbcbdb3eb2437d691bc9
3a0ac685999dd654f1ac4bf2c315fa76b21df64d
describe
'8070' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCL' 'sip-filesVIIthm.jpg'
1182660c5d42cc8a7946fa0d929e6055
866aa6e400da7b2c774db7513c7f0478c99196c0
describe
'8537' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCM' 'sip-filesvithm.jpg'
bcb80021d63e92002e53e3b0aa730522
af3b1ad1d46d301621eebdc97577af7b5a5f00d6
describe
'5318' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCN' 'sip-filesvthm.jpg'
8957c4edb2cd3598b48808cbbd5c28d6
ac60518467bdfabaf0203b58a38dfaa1da2e7191
describe
'11648' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCO' 'sip-filesx.QC.jpg'
e178a4bb5d5855bcc9849dc42b27d233
7c9e1cee5bdc615aebfb1199201d1ef71e8a7fde
describe
'18680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCP' 'sip-filesxi.QC.jpg'
e951c67ead2b1ceaf7e0b4aff312c89f
d5ecb2c1680d64a7f2615ebaac16c9afcf6bd84e
describe
'19837' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCQ' 'sip-filesxii.QC.jpg'
a38aff43f163eda4954c74c4a720cf06
4b7f201c0d07f70b1afb2bc6bee732c218c42cac
describe
'25155' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCR' 'sip-filesxiii.QC.jpg'
96c14ec185afb633720c88e457d59212
c44aade6793cd677dd997cec450534e7901650f0
describe
'6527' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCS' 'sip-filesxiiithm.jpg'
432364bee77bd12e31fb6620a77eef0d
16417e35917799988d083f3afa1e9dc2eb70e66a
describe
'5408' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCT' 'sip-filesxiithm.jpg'
e1c3573c03e72a6629ef293a9c5bd2ea
0e2fc5d6e9ca319d15cdd6564803c7d66417a708
describe
'5172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCU' 'sip-filesxithm.jpg'
213a8937ceb71557e99519fc135451da
5d0ccddb241962ba9812049f069e06d924e72a31
describe
'3638' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAADPfileF20090903_AABOCV' 'sip-filesxthm.jpg'
af75cca1f24ced5c68285d0acd0c2141
9c6298a80418209f8394aa1b4686fad010749809
describe