Citation
Tales about America and Australia

Material Information

Title:
Tales about America and Australia
Running title:
Parley's tales about America and Australia
Creator:
Goodrich, Samuel G ( Samuel Griswold ), 1793-1860
Wilson, T., 1810-1875 ( Editor )
Williams, Samuel, 1788-1853 ( Illustrator )
Billing ( Printer, Stereotyper )
Darton & Hodge ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Darton and Hodge
Manufacturer:
Billing, Printer and Stereotyper
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed., brought down to the present time / -- revised by T. Wilson.
Physical Description:
iv, 207 p., [2] leaves of plates : ill., col. maps ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Indians -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- America ( lcsh )
Discovery and exploration -- Juvenile literature -- America ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- Australia ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1862 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Guildford
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Peter Parley was a pseudonym used by S.G. Goodrich.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Peter Parley ; with illustrations by S. Williams.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026909096 ( ALEPH )
39183873 ( OCLC )
ALH6120 ( NOTIS )

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TALES

ALOUT

AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA.

PETER PARLEY.

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A New Evitton,
BROUGHT DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME.

REVISED BY e 7
THE REY. T. WILSON.

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WiTR ILLUSTRATIONS BY S. WILLIAMS:

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‘LONDON:
DARTON AND HODGE, HOLBORN ELL,
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CONTENTS.

PAGE

PARLEY TELLS HOW AMERICA WAS FIBST DISCO-
VERED, AND ABOUT COLUMBUS . ; ; cick
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS . ; wv: 12
COLUMBUS SETS SAIL. TO RETURN TO SPAIN; EN-
COUNTERS A DREADFUL STORM . é «2k
COLUMBUS PREPARES FOR ANOTHER VOYAGE . . 85
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS DISCOVERED THE
CONTINENT OF AMERICA . ‘ : : . 45
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS W4S ROBBED OF THE
HONOUR OF GIVING HIS NAME TO AMERICA. . 59
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS SHIPWRECKED,
AND OF HIS DEATH . ae i . . 65
PARLEY TELLS OF OVANDO’S CRUEL TREATMENT OF

ANACAONA, THE PRINCESS OF HAYTI. ; te



1V CONTENTS.

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE TREES, THE PLANTS, AND
FLOWERS OF THE NEW WORLD . : : ie
PARLEY TELLS OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO ., . 96
PARLEY RELATES HOW PIZARRO DISCOVERED AND
CONQUERED PERU. ° ‘ . = - 121
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE BEAUTIES OF AMERICA. . 133
PARLEY TELLS OF THE FIRST “ENGLISH COLONY IN |
AMERICA . pe eg pot: a Sachs een 1g 141
PARLEY TELLS OF THE ORIGINAL NATIVE AMERICANS 150
PARLEY SHOWS HOW THE UNITED STATES AROSE, AND
WHAT FOLLOWED THEIR ESTABLISHMENT , . 165
PARLEY TELLS ABOUT NEW SOUTH WALES. : . 176
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS OF AUSTRALIA
—THE BRITISH SETTLEMENTS—THE GOID RE-
GIONS—RECENT EXPLORATIONS. . ; . 183

CONCLUSION . ; ; ‘ ‘ ‘ . 205



TALES

ABOUT

AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA.

CHAPTER I.

PARLEY TELLS HOW AMERICA WAS FIRST

DISCOVERED, AND ABOUT COLUMBUS THE
DISCOVERER.

Now that I have given you an account of
European cities in my “‘ Tales about Europe,”
I shall now furnish you with some descrip-
tion of America, with its flourishing cities,
and its multitude of ships, its fertile fields, its
mighty rivers, its vast forests, and its mil-
lions of happy and industrious inhabitants,
of which [am quite certain you must be
very curious to know something, when you
are told that though the world has been
A



2 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

created nearly six thousand years, and many
powerful nations have flourished and decayed,
and are now scarcely remembered, yet it is
only three hundred and seventy years ago
since it was known that such a country as
America existed.

It was in the year 1492, which you know
is only 870 years since, on the third of
August, a little before sunrise, that Chris-
topher Columbus, undertaking the boldest
enterprise that human genius ever conceived,
or human talent and fortitude ever accom-
pushed, set sail from Spain, for the discovery |
of the Western World.

I will now give you a short account of
Columbus, who was one of the greatest men
the world ever produced. He was born in
the city of Genoa, in Italy ; his family were
almost all sailors, and he was brought up for
a sailor also, and after being taught geography
and various other things necessary for a sea
captain to know, he was sent on board ship
at the age of fourteen. Columbus was tall,
muscular, and of a commanding aspect ; his
hair, light in youth, turned prematurely grey,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 3

and ere he reached the age of thirty was
white as snow. |

His first voyages were short ones, but
after several years, desiring to see and learn
more of distant countries, and thinking there
were still new ones to be discovered, he went
into the service of the King of Portugal and
made many voyages to the western coast of
Africa, and to the Canaries, and the Madeiras, _
and the Azores, islands lying off that coast,
which were then the most westerly lands
known to Europeans.

In his visits to these parts, one person
informed him that his ship, sailing out
farther to the west than usual, had picked
up out of the sea a piece of wood curiously
carved, and that very thick canes, hke those
which travellers had found in India, had
been seen floating on the waves; also that
great trees, torn up by the roots, had often
been cast on shore, and once two dead bodies
of men, with strange features, neither like
Europeans nor Africans, were driven on the
coast of the Azores.

All these stories set Columbus thinking



4 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and considering that these strange things had
come drifting over the sea from the west, he
looked upon them as tokens sent from some
unknown countries lying far distant in that
quarter: he was therefore eager to sail away
and explore, but as he had not money enough
himself to fit out ships and hire sailors, he
determined to go and try to persuade some
king or some state to be at the expense of
the trial. :

First he went to his own countrymen the
Genoese, but they would have nothing to
say to him: he then submitted his plan to ©
the Portuguese, but the King of Portugal,
pretending to listen to him, got from him his
plan, and perfidiously attempted to rob him
of the honour of accomplishing it, by send-
ing another person to pursue the same track
which he had proposed.

The person they so basely employed did
not succeed, but returned to Lisbon, execrat-
ing a plan he had not abilities to execute.

On discovering this treachery, Columbus
quitted the kingdom in disgust and set out
for Spain, to. King Ferdinand and Queen



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 5

Isabella. He was now so poor that he was
frequently obliged to beg as he went along.

About half a league from Palos, a sea-port
of Andalusia in Spain, on a solitary height,
overlooking the sea-coast, and surrounded
by a forest of pines, there stood, and now
stands at the present day, an ancient convent
of Franciscan friars.



A stranger, travelling on foot, accompanied
by a young boy, stopped one day at the



6 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

gate of the convent, and asked of the porter
a little bread and water for his child.—That
stranger was Columbus, accompanied by his
son Diego.

While receiving this humble refreshment,
the guardian of the convent, Friar Juan
Perez, happening to pass, was taken with
the appearance of the stranger, and being an
intelligent man and agguainted with geo-
graphical science, he W€came interested with
the conversation of Columbus, and was so
struck with the grandeur of his project that
he detained him as his guest and invited a
friend of his, Martin Alonzo Pinzon, a resi-
dent of the town of Palos, to come and hear
Columbus explain his plan. .

Pinzon was one of the most intelligent
sea captains of the day, and a distinguished
navigator. He not only approved of his
project, but offered to engage in it, and to
assist him.

Juan Perez now advised Columbus to re-
pair to court. Pinzon generously furnished
him with the money for the journey, and
the friar kindly took charge of his youthful



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 7

son Diego, to maintain and educate him in
the convent, which I am sure you will think
was the greatest kindness he could have done
him at that time.

Ferdinand and Isabella gave him hopes
and promises, then they made difficulties and
objections, and would do nothing. At last,
after waiting five years, he was just setting
_ off for England, where he had previously sent
his brother Bartholomew, when he was in-
duced to wait a little longer in Spain. ©

This little longer was two years, but then
at last he had his reward, for queen Isabella
stood his friend, and even offered to part
with her own jewels in order to raise money
to enable him to make preparations for the
voyage, so that he contrived to fit out three
very small vessels which altogether carried
but one hundred and twenty men.

Two of the vessels were light Jarques, or
barges built high at the prow and stern, with
forecastles and cabins for the crew, but were
without deck in the centre; only one of the
three, the Santa Maria, was completely
decked ; on board of this, Columbus hoisted



8 - PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

his flag. Martin Alonzo Pinzon commanded
the Pinta, and his brother, Vincente Yanez
Pinzon, the Nina. He set sail in the sight of
a vast crowd, all praying for the success, but
never expecting and scarcely hoping to see
either him or any of his crews again.

Columbus first made sail for the Canaries,
where he repaired his vessels: then taking
leave of these islands, he steered his course
due west, across the great Atlantic ocean, .
where never ship hadgploughed the waves
before.

No sooner had they lost sight of land
than the sailors’ hearts began to fail them,
and they bewailed themselves like men con-
demned to die: but Columbus cheered them
with the hopes of the rich countries they
were to discover.

After awhile they came within those re-
gions where the trade-wind, as it is called,
blows constantly from east to west without
changing, which carried them on at a vast
rate; but he judiciously concealed from his
ignorant and timid crews the progress he
made, lest they might be alarmed at the speed.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 9

with which they were receding from home.
After some time, they found the sea covered
with weeds, as thick as a meadow with grass,
and the sailors fancied that they should soon
be stuck fast,—that they had reached the end
of the navigable ocean, and that some strange
thing would befal them.

Still, however, Columbus cheered them
on, and the sight of a flock of birds encou-
raged them: but when they had been three
weeks at sea and no land appeared, they
grew desperate with fear, and plotted among
themselves to force their commander to turn
back again, lest all their provisions should be
spent, or, if he refused, to throw him over-
board.

Columbus, however, made them a speech
which had such an effect upon them that
they became tolerably quiet for a week
longer; they then grew so violent again that
at last he was obliged to promise them that
if they did not see land in three days, he
would consent to ane it up and sail home
again.

But he was now almost sure that land



10 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was not far off: the sea grew shallower, and
early every morning flocks of land birds
began to flutter around them, and these all
left the ship in the evening, as if to roost on
shore. One of the vessels had picked up a '
cane newly cut, and another a_ branch
covered with fresh red berries; and the air
blew softer and warmer, and the wind began
to vary.

That véry night, Columbus ordered the
sails to be taken in, and strict watch to be
kept, in all the ships, for fear of running
aground ; he and all his men remained stand-
ing on the deck, looking out eagerly: at.
length he spied a distant light ; he showed it:
to two of his officers, and they all plainly
perceived it moving, as if carried backwards
and forwards, from house to house.

Soon after the cry of “ Land! land !”’ was.
heard from the foremost ship, and, at dawn
of day, they plainly saw a beautiful island,.
green and woody, and watered with many
pleasant streams, lying stretched before them.

As soon as the sun rose, the boats of the
vessel were lowered and manned, and Colum-



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 1}

bus, in a rich and splendid dress of scarlet,
entered the principal one. They then rowed
towards the island, with their colours dis-
played, and warlike music, and other martial

pomp.











Columbus was the first to leap on shore,
to kiss the earth, and to thank God on his
knees: his men followed, and throwing
themselves at his feet they all thanked him
for leading them thither, and begged his
forgiveness for their disrespectful and unruly
behaviour.



12 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

CHAPTER II,
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS.

Tux poor inhabitants, a simple and inno-
cent people, with copper-coloured skins and
long black hair, not curled, like the negroes,
but floating on their shoulders, or bound in
tresses round their heads, came flocking
down to the beach and stood gazing in silent
admiration.

The dress of the Spaniards, the whiteness
of their skins, their beards, their arms, and
the vast machines that seemed to move upon
the waters with wings, which they supposed
had, during the night, risen out of the sea,
or come down from the clouds; the sound
and flash of the guns, which they mistook
for thunder and lightning: all these things
appeared to them strange and surprising ;



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 13

they considered the Spaniards as children of
the sun, and paid homage to them as gods.

‘ihe Icuropeans were hardiy less amazed
at the scene now before them. Every herb,
and shrub, and tree, differed from those
which flourished in Europe: the inhabitants
appeared in the simple innocence of nature,
entirely naked ; their features were singular,
but not disagreeable, and their manners
gentle and timid.



The first act of Columbus was to take
solemn and formal possession of the country

B



14 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

in the name of his sovereign ; this was done
by planting the Spanish flag on the coast,
and other ceremonies, which the poor natives
looked upon with wonder, but could not un-
derstand. |

Nor could there be an act of greater crue!-
ty and injustice; for the Spaniards could not
have any right to drive these gentle and
peaceful inhabitants (as they afterwards did)
from their peaceful abodes, which had been
theirs and their fathers before them, perhaps
for thousands of years, and in the end,
utterly to destroy them, and take their land
for themselves. |

After performing this ceremony, of which
Columbus himself could not foresee the con-
sequences to the Indians, for he was very
kind to them, he made them presents of
trinkets and other trifles, with which they
were greatly delighted, and brought him in
return the fruits of their fields and groves,
and a sort of bread called cassada, made
from the root of the yuca; with whatever

else their own simple mode of life might
afford,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 15

Columbus then returned to his ship, ac-
companied by many of the islanders in their
boats, which they called canoes ; these simple
and undiscerning children of nature having
no foresight of the calamities and desolation
which awaited their country.

‘This island was called by the natives
Guanahini, and by the Spaniards St. Salva-
dor: it is one of that cluster of West India
Islands called the Bahamas, and if you look
on the map you will see that it is the very
first island that would present itself to a
ship sailing direct from Spain.

Columbus did not continue his voyage for
some days, as he wished to give all his sailors
an opportunity of landing and seeing the
wonders of the new-discovered world, and to |
take in a fresh supply of water, in which
they were cheerfully assisted by the natives,
who took them to the clearest springs and
the sweetest and freshest streams, filling
their casks and rolling them to the boats, and
seeking in every way to gratify (as they be-
lieved) their celestial visitors. |

Columbus having thus refreshed his crews,



16 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and suppied his ships with water, proceeded
on his voyage. After visiting several smaller
islands he discovered a large island which
the natives called Cuba, and which still
retains that name. This was so large an
island that he at first thought it to be a new
continent.

In proceeding along the coast, aceite
observed that most of the people whom he
-had seen wore small plates of gold by way
of ornament in their noses, he eagerly in-
quired, by signs, where they got that doen
metal.

The Indians, as much astonished at his
eagerness in quest of gold as the Europeans
were at their ignorance and simplicity,
pointed towards the east, to an island which
they called Hayti, in which this metal was
more abundant.

Columbus ordered his squadron to bend
their course thither, but Martin Alonzo Pin-
zon, impatient to be the first who should
take possession of the treasure which this
country was supposed to contain, quitted his
companions with his ship, the Pinta, and



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 17

though Columbus made signals to slacken
sail, he paid no regard to them.

When they came in sight of Hayti, which
you will see was no great distance, if you
look on the map, Columbus having had no
sleep the night before, had gone to his cabin
to lie down and rest himself, having first
given the charge of the vessel to an experi-
enced sailor.

This careless man, {this lazy lubber, the
sailors would call him,) instead of performing
. his duty, and watching over the safety of
the ship and the lives of his companions,
which were entrusted to him, deserted his
post and went to sleep, leaving the vessel to
the management of a young and thoughtless
boy. |

The rapid currents which prevail on that
coast soon carried the vessel on a shoal, and
Columbus was roused from his sleep by the
‘striking of the ship and the cries of the ter-
rified boy.

They first endeavoured, by taking out an
sanchor, to warp the vessel off, but the
‘strength of the current was more than a



18 - ' PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

- match for them, and the vessel was driven
farther and farther on the shoal; they then
cut away the mast and took out some of the
stores to lighten her; but all their efforts
were vain. |

Before sunset the next evening the vessel
was a complete wreck. Fortunately the
Nina was close at hand, and the shipwzecked
mariners got on board of her; the inhabitants.
of the island came in their canoes and assisted
them in preserving part of their stores.

They found Hayti a very beautiful island,
and were treated with the greatest kindness
by the inhabitants; but, though delighted
with the beauty of the scenes which every-
where presented themselves, and amazed at
the luxuriance and fertility of the soil, Co-
lumbus did not find gold in such quantities
as was sufficient to satisfy the avarice of his
followers; he was nevertheless anxious to
prolong his voyage, and explore those magni-
ficent regions which seemed to invite them
on every hand.

But as the Pinta had never joined them
again after parting from them, he had no



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 19

vessel now left but the Nina; he did not
therefore think it prudent to pursue his dis-
coveries with one small vessel, and that a
very crazy one, lest, if any accident should
befal it, he might be left without the means
of returning to Europe, and both the glory
and benefit of his great discoveries might
be lost; so he determined to prepare for his
return. |

But as it was impossible for so small a
vessel as the Nina to contain the crew of
the ship that was wrecked in addition to its
own, Columbus was greatly perplexed what
to do. |

Many of his men were so delighted with
the island and its inhabitants, that they
begged of him to let them remain there, and
Columbus consented to leave forty of them
on the island, while he and the remainder
made the voyage back.

He promised to return to them speedily.
He now built them a fort with the timber
of the wreck, and fortified it with the guns
of the Santa Maria, and did every thing in
his power to provide for their comfort



20 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

during his absence, particularly enjoining
them to be kind and peaceful towards the
Indians.

This was the first colony of Europeans
that settled in the new world, and Columbus
gave it the name of Navidad.



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AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 21

CHAPTER Titi.

COLUMBUS SETS SAIL TO RETURN TO
SPAIN, AND ENCOUNTERS A DREADFUL
| STORM.

Havine obtained a certain quantity of the
precious metals, and other curious produc-
tions of the countries he had discovered, he
set sail to recross the wide Atlantic Ocean.

It was the second day after they had left
the island that they saw a sail at a distance,
which proved to be the Pinta.

On joining the admiral, Pinzon made
many excuses and endeavoured to account for
his desertion, saying he had been separated
by stress of weather. Columbus admitted
his excuse, but he ascertained afterwards that
Pinzon parted company intentionally, and
had steered directly east in quest of a region



29 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

where the Indians had assured him that he
would find gold in abundance. :

They had guided him to Hayti, where he
had been for some time, in a river about fif-
teen leagues from the part of the coast where
Columbus had been wrecked.

He had collected a large quantity of gold
by trading with the natives, and on leaving
the river he had carried off four Indian men
and two girls, to be sold in Spain.

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Columbus immediately sailed back for this
iver, and ordered the four men and two girls



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 93:

to be dismissed well clothed and with many
presents, to atone for the wrong they had ex-
perienced. This resolution was not carried
into effect without great unwillingness and:
many angry words on the part of Pinzon.

Columbus, being now joined by the Pinta,
thought he might pursue his discoveries a.
little further, and on leaving this part of the
coast he took with him four young Indians
to guide him to the Carribean Islands, of
which they gave him a very interesting
account, as well as of another island said to
be inhabited by Amazons. |

A favourable breeze, however, sprang up
for the voyage homewards, and seeing gloom
and impatience in the countenances of his:
men, he gave up his intention of visiting
these islands, and made all sail for Spain, the
young Indians having consented to accom-
pany him that they might learn the Spanish
language, and be his guides and interpreters:
when they should return.

His voyage homeward was much more
tedious; for those trade winds which had
wafted him so rapidly westward, across the



24 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Atlantic, still blew from east to west, and
Columbus did not then know that their in-
fluence only extends to a certain distance on
each side of the Equator, so that if he had
sailed a little farther north, on his return, he
would very likely have met with a south-
west wind, which was just what he wanted.

On the 12th of February they had made
such progress as led them to hope they
should soon see land. The wind now came
on to blow violently; on the following
evening there were three flashes of lightning
in the north-east, from which signs Colum-
bus predicted an approaching tempest.

It soon burst upon them with frightful
violence. Their small and crazy vessels were
little fitted for the wild storms of the Atlan-
tic; all night they were obliged to scud
under bare poles, at the mercy of the ele-
ments; as the morning dawned there was a
transient pause and they made a little sail,
but the wind rose with redoubled fury from
the south and increased in the night, threat-
ening each moment to overwhelm them or
dash them to pieces,



“AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 25

The admiral made signal-lights for the
Pinta to keep in company, but she was sepa-
rated by the violence of the storm, and her
lights gleamed more and more distant till ©
they ceased entirely.

When the day dawned the sea presented
a frightful waste of wild and broken waves.
Columbus looked round anxiously for the
Pinta, but she was nowhere to be seen, and
he became apprehensive that Pinzon had
borne away for Spain, that he might reach it
before him, and by giving the first account
of his discoveries, deprive him of his fame.

Through a dreary day the helpless bark
was driven along by the tempest. |

Seeing all human skill baffled and con-
founded, Columbus endeavoured to propi-
tiate heaven by solemn vows, and various
private vows were made by the seamen.
The heavens, however, seemed deaf to their
vows: the storm grew still more furious, and
every one gave himself up for lost.

During this long and awful conflict of the
elements, the mind of Columbus was a prey
to the most distressing anxiety.



26 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT.

He was harassed by the repinings of his
crew, who cursed the hour of their leaving
their country. |

He was afflicted also with the thought of
his two sons, who would be left destitute by
his death.

But he had another source of distress
more intolerable than death itself. In case
the Pinta should have foundered, as was
highly probable, the history of his discovery
would depend upon his own feeble bark.
One surge of the ocean might bury it for
ever in oblivion, and his name only be re-
corded as that of a desperate adventurer.

At this crisis, when all was given up for
lost, Columbus had presence of mind enough
to retire to his cabin and to write upon
- parchment a short account of his voyage.

This he wrapped in an oiled cloth, which
he enclosed in a cake of wax, put it into a
tight cask, and threw it into the sea, in
hopes that some fortunate accident might
preserve a deposit of so much importance to
the world. ;

_ But that being which had preserved him



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. ip

through so many dangers still protected him ;
andehappily these precautions were super-
fluous. |

_ At sunset there was a streak of clear sky
in the west; the wind shifted to that quarter,
and on the morning of the 15th of February
they came in sight of land.

The transports of the crew at once more
beholding the old world, were almost equal
to those they had experienced on discovering
the new. This proved to be the island of
St. Mary, the most southern of the Azores.

After remaining here a few days, the wind
proving favourable he again set sail, on the
24th of February.

After two or three days of pleasant sailing,
there was a renewal of tempestuous weather.
About midnight of the 2d of March the
caravel was struck by a squall, which rent all
her sails and threatened instant destruc-
tion. The crew were again reduced to
despair, and made vows of fasting and pil-
grimages.

The storm raged through the succeeding
day, during which, from various signs they



28 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

considered that land must be near. The
turbulence of the following night was dread-
ful; the sea was broken, wild, and moun-
tainous, the rain fell in torrents, and the
lightning flashed and the thunder pealed from
various parts of the heavens. __ |

In the first watch of this fearful night, the
seamen gave the usual welcome cry of land
—but it only increased their alarm, for they
dreaded being driven on shore or dashed
upon the rocks. Taking in sail, therefore, they
endeavoured to keep to sea as much as_pos-
sible. At day-break on the 4th of March
they found themselves off the rock of Cintra
at the mouth of the Tagus, which you know |
is the principal river of Portugal.

Though distrustful of the Portuguese, he
had no alternative but to run in for shelter.
The inhabitants came off from various parts
of the shore to congratulate him on what
they deemed a miraculous preservation, for
they had been watching the vessel the whole
morning with great anxiety, and putting up
prayers for her safety. The oldest mariners
of the place assured him that they had never



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 29

during the whole course of their lives known
so tempestuous a winter.

Such were the difficulties and perils with
which Columbus had to contend on his
return to Europe. Had one tenth part of
them beset his outward voyage, his factious—
crew would have risen in arms against the
enterprise, and he never would have disco-
vered the new world. 3

The king of Portugal must have been
greatly mortified when he heard of the arri-
val of Columbus and the wonderful disco-
veries he had made, for he could not but
reflect that all the advantages of these disco-
veries might have belonged to him if he had
not treated Columbus as he did.

But notwithstanding the envy which it
was natural for the Portuguese to feel, he was
allowed to come to Lisbon, and was treated
- with-all the marks of distinction due to a
man who had performed things so extraor-
dinary and.unexpected. The king admitted
him into his presence, and listened with ad-
-miration to the account which he gave of his
voyage, while Columbus enjoyed the satis-

C



80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

faction of being able to prove the solidity of
his schemes to those very persons who had
with disgraceful ignorance rejected them as
the projects of a visionary adventurer.

Columbus was so impatient to return to
Spain that he remained only five days in
Lisbon. On the 15th of March he arrived
at Palos, seven months and eleven days from
the time when he set out from thence upon
his voyage.

When the prosperous issue of it was
known, when they beheld the strange people,
the unknown animals, and singular produc-
tions brought from the countries he had
_ discovered, the joy was unbounded ; all the
bells were rung, the cannons were fired, and
he was welcomed with all the acclamations
which the people are ever ready to bestow
on great and glorious characters. They
flocked ‘in crowds to the harbour to see him
land, and nothing but Columbus and the
New World, as the Spaniards called it, was
talked of.

He was desired by Ferdinand and Isabella
in the most respectful terms to repair to



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 31

court, that they might receive from his own
mouth, an account of his wonderful disco-
veries.

On his arrival at Barcelona the king and
queen received him clad in their royal robes,
seated upon a throne, and surrounded by
their nebles.



When he approached, they commanded
him to take his seat upon a chair prepared
for him, and to give a circumstantial account
of his voyage, which he related with a gra-
vity suitable to the dignity of the audience



32 ' PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

he addressed, and with that modesty which
ever accompanies superior merit.

_ Every mark of honour that gratitude or
admiration could suggest, was conferred
upon him ; his family was ennobled, and, as
a mark of particular favour, Isabella ap-
pointed his son Diego, the boy, who, you
remember, had been left at the convent,
page to prince Juan, the heir apparent, an
honour only granted to sons of persons of
distinguished rank.

The king and queen, and, after their
example, the courtiers treated him with all
the respect paid to persons of the highest
rank, Yet some of these courtiers were his
bitterest enemies, and did every thing they
could, in his absence, to poison the minds of
the king and queen against him, and to
cause his downfall. _ |

The favour shown Columbus -by the so-
vereigns insured him for a time the caresses
of the nobility, for in court every one is
eager to lavish attentions upon the man
“ whom the king delighteth to honour.”

. At one of the. banquets which were given



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 33

him occured the well known circunistance
of the egg.



A shallow courtier present, impatient of
the honours paid to Columbus, and meanly
jealous of him as a foreigner, abruptly asked
him, whether he thought that, in case he
had not discovered the Indies, there would
have been wanting men in Spain capable of
the enterprise.

To. this Columbus made no direct reply
but, taking an egg, invited the company to
make it stand on one end. Every one



34 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

attempted it, but in vain; whereupon he
struck it upon the table, broke one end, and
left it standing on the broken part; illus-
trating, in this simple manner, that when he
had once shown the way to the new world,
nothing was easier than to follow it.





AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. ou

CHAPTER IV.

COLUMBUS PREPARES FOR ANOTHER
VOYAGE.

CoLUMBUS was now anxious to set out on
another voyage to proceed with his disco-
veries, and the king and queen gave orders
that every thing should be done to further
his wishes. |

By his exertions a fleet of seventeen sail,
large and small, was soon in a state of
forwardness; labourers and artificers of all
kinds were engaged for the projected colo-
nies, and an ample supply was provided of
whatever was necessary for the cultivation of
the soil, the working of the mines, and for
traffic with the natives.

He now found no difficulty in getting
sailors to accompany him, and the account



36 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

he gave of the countries he had discovered,
and particularly the intelligence that they
abounded with gold, excited the avarice and
rapacity of the Spaniards, and numbers of
needy adventurers of ruined fortunes and
desperate circumstances, were eager to share
in the spoil.

Many persons of distinction, thinking to
become rich by the same means, also volun-
teered to enlist, and many got on board of
the ships by stealth, so that about 1500 set.
sail in the fleet, though only a thousand
were originally permitted to embark.

The departure of Columbus on his second
voyage presented a brilliant contrast to his
gloomy embarkation at Palos. |

. There were three large ships of heavy
burden and fourteen smaller vessels, and the
persons on board, instead of being regarded
by the populace as devoted men, were looked
upon with envy as favoured mortals, des-
tined to golden regions and delightful climes,
where nothing but wealth, and wonder, and
enjoyment awaited them.

At sunrise the whole fleet was under sail,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 87

on the 13th of October he lost sight of the
island of Ferro, and, favoured by the trade
winds, was borne pleazantly along, till, on
the 2nd of November, a lofty island was des-
cried to the west, to which he gave the name
of Dominica, from having discovered it on
the Lord’s day.

As the ships moved gently onward, other:
islands arose to sight, one after another;.
covered with forests and enlivened by the
flight of parrots and other tropical birds,
while the whole air was sweetened by the
fragrance of the breezes which passed over
them.

In one of these islands, to eee: the
Spaniards gave the name of Guadaloupe,
they first met with the delicious fruit, the
Anana or pine-apple.

Columbus now sailed-in the direction of
’ Hayti, to which he had given the name of
Hispaniola, where he shortly arrived.

In passing along the coast he set on shore:
one of the young Indians who had been
taken from that neighbourhood and had
accompanied him to Spain. He dismissed



38 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

him finely apparelled, and loaded with trin-
kets, thinking he would impress his coun-
trymen with favourable feelings towards the
Spaniards, but he never heard anything of
him afterwards.

When he arrived on that part of the
island where he had built the fort and taken
leave of his companions, the evening grow-
ing dark, the land was hidden from their
sight. Columbus watched for the dawn of
day with the greatest anxiety; when at last
the approach of the morning sun rendering
the objects on shore visible, in the place
where the fort had stood, nothing was to be
seen. No human being was near, neither
Indian nor European; he ordered a boai
to be manned, and himself went, at the
head of a party, to explore how things really
were. |
The crew hastened to the place where the
fortress had been erected; they found it
burnt and demolished, the palisades beaten
down, and the ground strewed with broken
chests and fragments of European garments.

The natives, at their approach, did not



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 39

welcome them as they expected, like friends,
but fled and concealed themselves as if
afraid to be seen.
- Columbus, at length, with some difficulty,
by signs of peace and friendship, persuaded
afew of them to come forth tohim. From
them he learned, that scarcely had he set
sail for Spain, when all his counsels and
commands faded from the minds of those
who remained behind. Instead of culti-
vating the good-will of the natives, they —
endeavoured, by all kinds of wrongful
means, to get possession of their golden
ornaments and other articles of value, and
seduce from them their wives and daughters,
‘and had also quarrelled among themselves.

The consequences of this bad conduct
were what might have been expected: some
died by sickness caused by intemperance,
some fell in brawls between themselves about _
their ill-gotten spoil, and others were cut off
by the Indians, whom they had so shame-
fully treated, and who afterwards pulled
dawn and burnt their fort.

The misfortunes which had befallen the



40 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Spaniards in the vicinity of this harbour
threw a gloom over the place, and it was.
considered by the superstitious mariners as:
under some baneful influence. The situa-.
tion was low and unhealthy, and not capa~
ble of improvement ; Columbus therefore de--
termined to remove the settlement.

With this view he made choice of a
situation more healthy and commodious
than that of Navidad, and having ordered
the troops and the various persons to be
employed in the colony to be immediately
disembarked, together with the stores, am-
munition, and all the cattle and live-stock,
he traced out the plan of a town in a large
plain near a spacious bay; and obliging
every person to put his hand to the work,
the houses were soon so far advanced as ta
afford them shelter, and forts were con-
structed for their defence.

This rising city, the first that Rurldpeinss
founded in the new world, he named Isa-
bella, in honour of his patroness the Queen
of Castile.

As long as the Indians had any prospect



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, Al

that their sufferings might terminate by the
voluntary departure of the invaders, they
submitted in silence, and dissembled their
sorrow; but now that the Spaniards had
built a town—now that they had dug up
the ground and planted it with corn — it
became apparent that they came not to visit
the country, but to settle in it.

They were themselves naturally so ab-
stemious and their wants so few, that they
were easily satisfied with the fruits of the
island, which, with a handful of maize or a
little of the insipid bread made of the cas-
sava root, were sufficient for their support.

But it was with difficulty they could
afford subsistence for the new guests. The
Spaniards, though considered an abstemious
people, appeared to them excessively voraci-
ous. One Spaniard consumed as much as
‘several Indians; this keenness of appetite
‘appeared so insatiable, that they supposed
the Spaniards had left their own country be-
cause it did not produce enough to gratify
their immoderate appetites, and had come
among them in quest of nourishment.



42 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Columbus having taken all the steps
which he thought necessary to ensure the
prosperity of his new colony, entrusted the
command of the military force to Margaritta,
and set sail with three vessels to extend his
discoveries; but, after a long and tedious
voyage, in which he endured every hardship,.
the most important discovery he made was
the island of Jamaica.

Having been absent much longer than he |
had expected, he returned to his new settle-
ment, but the colonists had become refrac-
tory and unmanageable.

No sooner had he left the island on his
- voyage of discovery, than the soldiers under
Margaritta dispersed in straggling parties
over the island, lived at discretion upon the
natives, wasted their property, and treated
that inoffensive race with the insolence of
military oppression.

During the absence of Columbus, several
unfavourable accounts of his conduct had
been transmitted to Spain, and these accu-
-sations gained such credit in that jealous:
court, that Aguado, a person in every way



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 43

unsuited for the purpose, was appointed to
proceed to Hispaniola to observe the con-
duct of Columbus.

This man listened with eagerness to every
accusation of the discontented Spaniards,
and fomented still further the spirit of dis-
sension in the island.

Columbus felt how humiliating it must be
if he remained in the island with such a
partial inspector to observe his motions and >
control his authority ; he therefore took the
resolution of returning to Spain, in order to
lay a full account of his transactions before
Ferdinand and Isabella.

Having committed the government of the
colony during his absence to Don Bartho-
lomew, his brother, he appointed Roldan
Chief Justice, a choice which afterwards
caused great calamities to the colony.

On his arrival in Spain, Columbus ap-
peared at court with the confidence of a
man, not only conscious of having done no
wrong; but of having performed great ser-
vices.

Ferdinand and 1euelta, ashamed of hav-



44 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

ing listened to ill-founded accusations, re-
ceived him with such marks of respect as
silenced the calumnies of his enemies, and
covered them with shame and confusion.

The gold, the pearls, and other commo-
dities of value which he had brought home,
and the mines which he had found, fully
proved the value and importance of his dis-
coveries, though Columbus considered them
only as preludes to future and more import-
ant acquisitions.





AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 45

CHAPTER V.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS DISCO<-
VERS THE CONTINENT OF AMERICA,

Cotumbus, having been furnished with six
vessels of no great burden, departed on his
third voyage. He touched at the Canaries
and at the Cape de Verd islands; from
the former he despatched three ships with
a supply of provisions for the colony of
Hispaniola; with the other three he con-
tinued his voyage to the south.

Nothing remarkable occurred till they
were within five degrees of the line; then
they were becalmed, and the heat became so
’ excessive, that the wine casks burst and
their provisions were spoiled.

The Spaniards, who had never ventured

D



46 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

so far to the south, were afraid the ships
would take fire, but they were relieved in
some measure from their fear by a season-
able fall of rain.

This, however, though so heavy and in-
cessant that the men could hardly keep the
deck, did not greatly mitigate the heat,
and Columbus was at last constrained to
yield to the importunities of his crew, and
to alter his course to the north-west, in order
to reach some of the Caribbee islands, where
he might refit and he supplied with pro-
visions.

On the Ist of August, 1498, the man sta-
tioned at the round-top surprised them with
the joyful cry of “Land!” They stood
towards it, and discovered a considerable
island, which the admiral called Trinidad, a
name it still retains, and near it the mouth
of a river, rolling towards the ocean such a
vast body of water, and rushing into it with
such impetuous force, that when it meets the
tide, which on that coast rises to an uncom-
mon height, their meeting occasions an extra-
ordinary and dangerous swell of the waves,



at
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 47

In this conflict, the irresistable torrent of
the river so far prevails, that it freshens the
ocean many leagues with its flood.

Columbus, before he could perceive the
danger, was entangled among these adverse
currents and tempestuous waves; and it
was with the utmost difficulty that he es-
caped through a narrow strait, which ap-
peared so tremendous, that he called it
“The Dragon’s Mouth.”

As soon as his consternation permitted
him to reflect on an appearance so extraor-
dinary, he justly concluded that the land
must be a part of some mighty continent,
and not of an island, because all the springs
that cd¥ild rise, and all the rain that could
fall on an island, could never, as he caleu-
lated, supply water enough to feed so pro-
digiously broad and deep a river; and he
was right, the river was the Orenoko.

Filled with this idea, he stood to the
west, along the coast of those provinces
which are now known by the name of Paria
and Cumana. He landed in several places,
and found the people to resemble those of



48 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Hispaniola in their appearance and manner
of life.

They wore as ornaments small plates of
gold and pearls of considerable value, which
they willingly exchanged for European toys.
They seemed to possess greater courage and
better understandings than the inhabitants
of the islands.

The country produced four-footed animals
of several kinds, as well as a great variety of
fowls and fruits.

The admiral was so much delighted with
its beauty and fertility, that, with the warm
enthusiasm of a discoverer, he imagined it
to be the Paradise described in Scripture.

Thus Columbus had the glory @f disco-
vering the new world, and of conducting the
Spaniards to that vast continent which has
been the seat of their empire and the source
of their treasure, in that quarter of the
globe. The shattered condition of his ships
and the scarcity of provisions, made it now
necessary to bear away for Hispaniola,
where he arrived wasted to an extreme
degree with fatigue and sickness.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 49

Many revolutions had happened in that
country during his absence, which had lasted
more than two years.

His brother, whom he had left in com-
mand, had, in compliance with advice which
he had given him before his departure, re-
moved the colony from Isabella to a more
commodious station on the opposite side of
the island, and laid the foundation of St.
Domingo, which long continued to be
the most considerable town in the new
world.

Such was the cruelty and oppression with
which the Spaniards treated the Indians,
and so intolerable the burden imposed upon

-them, that they at last took arms against
their oppressors; but these insurrections
were not formidable. In a conflict with
timid and naked Indians, there was neither
danger nor doubt-of victory.

A mutiny which broke out among the
Spaniards, was of a more dangerous nature,
the ringleader in which was Francisco
Roldan, whom Columbus, when he sailed
for Spain, had appointed chief judge, and



50 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

whose duty it was to have maintained the
laws, instead of breaking them.

This rebellion of Roldan, which threatened
the whole country with ruin, was only sub-
dued by the most wise and prudent conduct
on the part of Columbus; but order and
tranquillity were at length apparently re-
stored.

As soon as his affairs would permit, lie
sent some of his ships to Spain, with a
journal of the voyage which he had made,
and a description of the new continent
which he had discovered, and also a chart
of the coast along which he had sailed, and
of which I shall have something more to
tell you presently.

He at the same time sent specimens of
the gold, the pearls, and other curious and
valuable productions which he had acquired
by trafficking with the natives. —

He also transmitted an account of the
insurrection in Hispaniola, and accused the
mutineers of having, by their unprovoked
rebellion, almost ruined the colory.

Roldan and his associates took care to



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. oa

send to Spain, by the same ships, apologies
for their mutinous conduct, and unfortu-
nately for the happiness of Columbus, their
story gained most credit in the court of Fer-
dinand and Isabella.

By these ships Columbus granted the
liberty of returning to Spain to all those,
who, from sickness or disappointment, were
disgusted with the country. “A good num-
ber of such as were most dissatisfied, em-
braced this opportunity of returning to Eu-
rope. The disappointment. of their unrea-
sonable hopes inflamed their rage against
Columbus to the utmost pitch, and their
distress made their accusations be believed.

A gang of these disorderly ruffians, who
had been shipped off to free the island from
their seditions, found their way to the court
at Grenada. Whenever the king or queen
appeared in public, they surrounded them,
insisting, with importunate clamours, on the
payment of arrears due to them, and de-
manding vengeance on the author of their
sufferings.

These endeavours to ruin Columbus were



oO

2 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

seconded by Fonseca, who was now made
bishop of Badajos, and who-was entrusted
with the chief direction of Indian affairs.
This man had always been an implacable
enemy of Columbus, and with others of his
enemies who were about the court, having
continual access to the sovereign, they were
enabled to aggravate all the complaints
that were urged against him, while they
carefully suppressed his vindications of him-
self.

By these means Ferdinand was at last in-
duced to send out Bobadilla, an officer of the
royal household, to inquire into the conduct
of Columbus, and if he should think the
charges against him proved, to supersede
him in his command, that is, to send him
home, and make himself governor in his
stead; so that it was the interest of the
judge to pronounce the person guilty whom
he was sent to try.

On his arrival he found Columbus absent
in the interior of the island; and as he had,
before he landed, made up his mind to treat
him as a criminal, he proceeded at once,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 58

without any inquiry, to supersede him in his
command.

He took up his residence in Columbus’
house, from which the owner was absent,
seized upon his arms, gold, plate, jewels,
books, and even his letters and most secret
manuscripts, giving no account of the pro-
perty thus seized, but disposing of it as if
already confiscated to the crown; at the
same time he used the most unqualified
language when speaking of Columbus, and
hinted that he was empowered to send him
home in chains; thus acting as if he had
been sent out to degrade the admiral, not
to inquire into his conduct.

As soon as Columbus arrived from the
interior, Bobadilla gave orders to put him in
irons and confine him in the fortress, and so
far from hearing him in his defence, he
would not even admit him to his presence ;
but having collected from his enemies what
he thought sufficient evidence, he determined
to send both him and his brother home in
chains.

The charge of conducting the prisoners to



54. PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Spain was committed to Alonzo Villejo,
a man of honourable conduct and generous
feelings. When Villejo entered with the
guard to conduct him on board the caravel,
. Columbus thought it was to conduct him to
the scaffold. “ Villejo” said he, “whither
are you taking me?” “To the ship, your
excellency, to embark,” replied the other.
“To embark!” repeated the admiral, ear-
nestly, “ Villejo, do you speak the truth ?”
“ By the life of your excellency,” replied the
honest officer, “it is true.”

With these words the admiral was com-
forted, and felt as restored from death to life,
for he now knew he should have an oppor- °
tunity of vindicating his conduct. The cara-
vel set sail in October, bearing off Columbus
shackled like the vilest criminal.

The worthy Villejo, as well as Andries
Martin, the master of the caravel, would
have taken off his irons, but to this he
would not consent. “No,” said he proudly,
“their majesties commanded me, by letter,
to submit to whatever Bobadilla should order
in their name; by their authority he has put



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 55

upon me these chains; I will wear them till
they shall order‘them to be taken off, and I
will afterwards, preserve them as relics and
memorials of the reward of my services.”



The arrival of Columbus, a prisoner and
in chains, produced almost as great a sensa-
tion as his triumphant return on his first
voyage.

A general burst of indignation arose in



56 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Cadiz and in Seville, which was echoed
through all Spain, that Columbus was,
brought home in chains from the world he
had discovered.

The tidings reached the court of Grenada,
and filled the halls of the Alhambra with
murmurs of astonishment.

On the arrival of the ships at Cadiz, Co-
lumbus, full of his wrongs, but not knowing
how far they had been authorized by his
sovereigns, forbare to write to them; but he
‘sent a long letter to a lady of the court,
high in favour with the queen, containing,
in eloquent and touching language, an ample
vindication of his conduct.

When it was read to the noble-minded
Isabella, and she found how grossly Colum-
bus had been wronged, and the royal autho-
rity abused, her heart was filled with sym-
pathy and indignation.

Withoat waiting for any documents that
might arrive from Bobadilla, Ferdinand and
Isabella sent orders to Cadiz, that he should
be instantly set at liberty, and treated with
-all distinction, and sent him two thousand



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 57

ducats to defray his expenses to court.
They wrote him a letter at the same time,
expressing their grief. at all that had hap-
pened, and inviting him to Grenada.

He was received by their majesties with
the greatest favour and distinction. When the
queen beheld this venerable man approach,
and thought on all he had deserved and all
he had suffered, she was moved to tears.

Columbus had borne up firmly against
the injuries and wrongs of the world, but
when he found himself thus kindly treated,
and beheld tears in the benign eyes of Isa-
bella, his long suppressed feelings burst
forth, he threw himself upon his knees, and
for some time could not utter a word for the
violence of his tears and sobbings.

Ferdinand and Isabella raised him from
the ground and endeavoured to encourage
him by the most gracious expressions.

As soon as he had recovered his self-pos-

session, he entered into an eloquent and
" high-minded vindication of his conduct, and
his zeal for the glory and advantage of the
Spanish crown,



58 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

The king and queen expressed their indig-
nation at the proceedings of Bobadilla, and
promised he should be immediately dismissed
from his command.

The person chosen to supersede Bobadilla
was Nicholas de Ovando. While his depar-
ture was delayed by various circumstances,
every arrival brought intelligence of the dis-
asterous state of the island under the admi-
nistration of Bobadilla.

He encouraged the Spaniards in the exer-
cise of the most wanton cruelties towards the
natives, to obtain from them large quantities
of gold. ‘Make the most of your time,”
he would say, “there is no knowing how
long it will last ;” and the colonists were not
backward in following his advice. In the
meantime the poor Indians sunk under the
toils imposed upon them, and the severities
with which they were enforced.

These accounts hastened the departure of
Ovando, and a person sailed with him, in

order to secure what he could of the wreck ~

of Columbus’ property.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 59

CHAPTER VI.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS
ROBBED OF THE HONOUR OF GIVING
HIS NAME TO AMERICA.

I nave told you that Columbus, as soon as
he arrived at Hispaniola, after discovering
the new continent, sent a ship to Spain with
a journal of the voyage he had made, and a
description of the new continent which he
had discovered, together with a chart of the
coast of Paria and Cumana, along which he
had sailed.

This journal, with the charts and descrip-
tion, and Columbus’ letters on the subject,
were placed in the custody of Fonseca, he
being minister for Indian affairs.



60 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

No sooner had the particulars of this dis-
covery been communicated by Columbus,
than a separate commission of discovery,
signed by Fonseca, but not by the sove-
reigns, was granted to Alonzo de Ojeda, who
had accompanied Columbus on his second
voyage, and whom Columbus had instructed
in all his plans. Ojeda was accompanied on
this voyage by a Florentine, whose name
was Amerigo Vespucci.

To these adventurers Fonseca communi-
cated Columbus’ journal, his description of
the country, his charts, and all his private
letters.

This expedition sailed from Spain while
Columbus was still at Hispaniola, and
wholly ignorant of what was taking place; -
and Ojeda, without touching at the colony,
steered his course direct for Paria, following
the very track which Columbus had marked
out.

Having extended their discoveries very
little farther than Columbus had gone be-
fore them, Vespucci, on returning to Spain,
published an account of his adventures and



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 61

discoveries, and had the address and confi-
dence so to frame his narrative, as to make
it appear that the glory of having discovered
the new continent belonged to him.

Thus the bold pretensions of an impostor
have robbed the discoverer of his just re-
ward, and the caprice of fame has unjustly
assigned to him an honour far above the
renown of the greatest conquerors — that of
indelibly impressing his name upon this
vast portion of the earth, which ought in
justice to have been called Columbia.

Two years had now been spent in soli-
citing the favour of an ungrateful court,
and notwithstanding all his merits and ser-
vices, he solicited in vain; but even this
ungracious return did not lessen his ardour
in his favourite pursuits, and his anxiety to
pursue those discoveries in which he felt he
had yet only made a beginning.

Ferdinand at last consented to grant him
four small vessels, the largest of which did
not exceed seventy tons in burden; but,
accustomed to brave danger and endure
hardships, he did not hesitate to accept the

E



62 PARLEY’S TALES AEOUT

command of this pitiful squadron, and he
sailed from Cadiz on his fourth voyage on
the 9th of May.



Having touched, as usual, at the Canaries,
he intended to have sailed direct for this
new discovered continent; but his largest
vessel was so clumsy and unfit for service,
that he determined to bear away for His-
paniola, in hopes of exchanging her for
some ship of the fleet that had carried out
Ovando,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 63

The fleet that had brought out Ovando
lay in the harbour ready to put to sea, and
was to take home Bobadilla, together with
Roldan and many of his adherents, to be
tried in Spain for rebellion. Bobadilla was
to embark in the principal ship, on board of
which he had put an immense amount of
gold, which he hoped would atone for all
his faults.

Among the presents intended for his
sovereign was one mass of virgin gold,
which was famous in the Spanish chroni-
cles; it was said to weigh 3600 castillanos.
Large quantities of gold had been shipped
in the fleet by Roldan and other adventurers
—the wealth gained by the sufferings of the
unhappy natives.

Columbus sent an officer on shore to re-
quest permission to shelter his squadron in
the river, as he apprehended an approaching
storm. He also cautioned them not to let
the fleet sail, but his request was refused by
Ovando, and his advice disregarded.

The fleet put to sea, and Columbus kept
his feeble squadron close to shore, and



64 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

sought for shelter in some wild bay or river
of the island.

Within two days, one of those tremendous
storms which sometimes sweep those lati-
tudes gathered up, and began to blow.
Columbus sheltered his little squadron as
well as he could, and sustained no damage.
A different fate befel the other armament.

The ship in which were Bobadilla, Rol-
dan, and a number of the most inveterate
enemies of Columbus, was swallowed up
with all its crew, together with the prin-
cipal part of the ill-gotten treasure, gained.
by the miseries of the Indians,

Some of the ships returned to St. Do-
mingo, and only one was able to continue
her voyage to Spain; that one had on board
four thousand pieces of gold, the property
of Columbus, which had been recovered by
the agent whom he sent out with Ovando.

Thus, while the enemies of the admiral
were swallowed up as it were before his eyes,
the only ship enabled to pursue her voyage
was the frail bark freighted with his pro-

perty.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 65

CHAPTER VII.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS SHIP-
WRECKED, AND ALSO OF THE MANNER
OF HIS DEATH.

CotumBus soon left Hispaniola where he
met with so inhospitable a reception, and
steering towards the west, he arrived on the
coast of Honduras. There he had an inter-
view with some of the inhabitants of the
continent, who came off in a large canoe;
they appeared to be more civilized than any
whom he had hitherto discovered.

In return to the inquiries which the Spa-
niards made with their usual eagerness, where
the Indians got the gold which they wore
by way of ornaments, they directed him to
countries situated to the west, in which gold



66 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was found in such profusion that it was
applied to the most common uses.

Well would it have been for Columbus:
had he followed their advice. Within a day
or two he would have arrived at Yucatan;
the discovery of Mexico and the other opu-
lent countries of New Spain would have
necessarily followed, the Southern Ocean
would have been disclosed to him, and a
succession of splendid discoveries would.
have shed fresh glory on his declining age.

But the admiral’s mind was bent upon
discovering the supposed strait that was to
lead to the Indian Ocean. In this naviga-
tion he explored a great extent of coast
from Cape Gracios 4 Dios till he came to a
harbour, which on account of its beauty and
security, he called Porto Bello.

On quitting this harbour he steered for
the south, and he had not followed this.
course many days when he was overtaken by
storms more terrible than any he had yet
encountered.

For nine days the vessels were tossed
about at the mercy of a raging tempest.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 67

The sea, according to the description of
Columbus, boiled at times like a cauldron,
at other times it ran in mountain waves
covered with foam: at night the raging
billows sparkled with luminous particles,
which made them resemble great surges of
flame.

For a day and a night the heavens glowed
like a furnace with incessant flashes of light-
ning, while the loud claps of thunder were
often mistaken for signal guns of their foun-
dering companions.

In the midst of this wild tumult of the
elements, they beheld a new object of alarm.
The ocean, in one place, became strangely
agitated; the water was whirled up into a
kind of pyramid or cone; while a livid cloud,
tapering to a point, bent down to meet it;
joining together, they formed a column,
which rapidly approached the ship, spinning
along the surface of the deep, and drawing
up the water with a rushing sound, it passed
the ship without injury.

His leaky vessels were not able t to with-
stand storms like these. One of them



68 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

foundered, and he was obliged to abandon
another.

With the remaining two he bore away for
Hispaniola, but in the tempest his ships -
falling foul of each other, it was with the
greatest difficulty he reached the island of
Jamaica,

His two vessels were in such a shattered
condition, that, to prevent them from sink-
ing, and to save the lives of his crews, he
was obliged to run them on shore.

Having no ship now left, he had no means
of reaching Hispaniola, or of making his
situation known. In this juncture he had
recourse to the hospitable kindness of the
natives, who, considering the Spaniards as
beings of a superior nature, were eager, on
every occasion to assist them.

From them he obtained two canoes, each
formed out of a single tree hollowed with
fire. In these, which were only fit for
creeping along the coast, two of his brave
and faithful companions, assisted by a few
Indians, gallantly offered to set out for
Hispaniola; this voyage they accomplished



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 69

in ten days, after encountering incredible
fatigues and dangers.

By them he wrote letters to Ovando,
describing his situation and requesting him
to send ships to bring off him and his crews;
but what will you think of the unfeeling
cruelty of this man, when I tell you that he
suffered these brave men to wait eight
months before he would give them any hopes
of relieving their companions: and what
must have been the feelings of Columbus
during this period.

At last the ships arrived which were to
take them from the island, where the un-
feeling Ovando had suffered them to languish
above a year, exposed to misery in all its
various forms. When he arrived at St.
Domingo, Ovando treated him with every
kind of insult and injustice. Columbus sub-
mitted in silence, but became extremely im-
patient to quit a country where he had been
treated with such barbarity.

The preparations were soon finished, and
he set sail for Spain with two ships, but
disaster still pursued him to the end of his



70 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

course. He suffered acutely from a painful
and dangerous disease, and his mind was
kept uneasy and anxious by a continued suc-
cession of storms. One of the vessels being
disabled, was forced back to St. Domingo,
and in the other he sailed 700 leagues with
_ jury-masts, and reached with difficulty the
pert of St. Lucar in Spain, 1504.

On his arrival he received the fatal news
‘of the death of his patroness queen Isabella,
’ from whom he had hoped for the redress of
his wrongs,

He dpptied to the king, who, instead of
. confirming the titles and honours which he
had fortierl conferred upon him, insulted
him with the proposal of renouncing them
all for a pension.

Disgusted with the ripalawde of a mo-
rarch Shot he had served with fidelity and
success, exhausted with the calamities which
he had endured, and broken with infirmities,
this great and good man breathed his last at
Valladolid, a. p. 1506, in the 69th year of
his age.

He was buried in the cathedral at Seville,



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. qt

and on his tomb was engraved an epitaph
commemorating his discovery of a New
World. i

Christobal Colon, obtit 1506,
ETAT 69.








& Castilla yp x Leon
Peubho Munda via Colaw.*



Thus much for Columbus; those who are
the greatest benefactors of mankind seldom
raeet with much gratitude from men in their
lives; they must. look to God for their re-
ward, and leave future generations to do
justice to their memory.

It was very unfortunate for the natives of
America, that the country fell into the hands
of such a cruel, covetous, and bigoted
nation as the Spaniards were. Their thirst
for gold was insatiable, and the cruelties
they exercised upon the natives are too hor-

* To Castile and to Leon
Columbus gave a New World.



72 PARLEY’S TALES. ABOUT

rible to recite. After the death of Colum-
bus, the Indians were no longer treated with
gentleness, for it was his defence of the pro-
perty and lives of these harmless natives that
brought down upon his head such bitter
hatred. You will now look into your map
and follow Columbus in some of his disco-
veries. You will see a great number of
islands extending in a curve from Florida,
which is the southernmost part of the United
States, to the mouth of the river Oronoko
in South America; and, as Columbus firmly
believed these islands, when he discovered
them, to be a part of India, the name of
Indies was given to them by Ferdinand and
Isabella; and, even after the error was de-
tected, and the true position of the new
world ascertained, the name has remained,
and the appellation of Indies is given to the
country, and that of Indians to the inha-
bitants.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 13

CHAPTER VIII.

PARLEY TELLS OF OVANDO’S CRUEL
TREATMENT OF ANACAONA, THE
PRINCESS OF HAYTI.

CotumBus discovered and gave names to
some of these islands, and on several of
them he settled colonies, and did all he
could to make them the abodes of peace and
happiness.

On his taking leave of them for the last
time, Ovando continued governor of Hayti.

The cruelties exercised by this unfeeling
man it would take a volume to describe, but
I will mention only one or two instances.

When the natives were unable to pay the
tribute which he exacted from them, he
always accused them of insurrection, and it



74 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was to punish a slight insurrection of this
kind in the eastern part of the island that
he sent his troops, who ravaged the country
with fire and sword. He showed no mercy
to age or sex, putting many to death with
horrible tortures, and brought off the brave
Catabanama, one of the five sovereign ca-
ziques of the island, in chains to St. Do-
mingo, where he was ignominiously hanged
by Ovando, for the crime of defending his
territory and his native soil against usurping
strangers.

But the most atrocious act of Ovando,
and one that must heap odium on his name,
wherever the woes of the gentle natives of
Hayti are heard of, was the cruelty he was
guilty of towards the province of Xaragua
- for one of those pretended conspiracies.

Ovando set out at the head of nearly four
hundred well armed soldiers, seventy of
whom were steel-clad horsemen; giving out
that he was coming on a visit of friendship,
to make arrangements for the payment of
tribute.

Behechio, the antient cazique of the pro-



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 75

vince, was dead, and his sister, Anacaona,
wife of the late formidable chief Caonabo,
had succeeded to the government,

She was one of the most beautiful females
in the island; of great natural grace and dig-
nity, and superior intelligence; her name
in the Indian language signified “ Golden
Flower.”



She came forth to meet Ovando, according
to the custom of her nation, attended by her
most distinguished subjects, and her train of
damsels waving palm branches, and dancing
to the cadence of their popular ayretos.



76 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

All her principal caziques had been assem-
bled to do honour to the guests, who, for
several days were entertained with banquets,
and national games and dances.

In return for these exhibitions, Ovando
invited Anacaona, with her beautiful daugh-
ter Higuenamata, and her principal subjects,
to witness a tilting match in the public
square.

When all were assembled, and the square
crowded with unarmed Indians, Ovando gave
a signal, and instantly the horsemen rushed
into the midst of the naked and defenceless
throng, trampling them under foot, cutting
them down with their swords, transfixing
them -with their lances, and sparing neither
age nor sex.

Above eighty caziques had been assembled
in one of the principal houses: it was sur-
rounded by troops, the caziques were bound
to the posts which supported the roof, and
put to cruel tortures, until in the extremity
of anguish they were made to admit as true
what their queen and themselves had been
charged with.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 77

When they had thus been made, by tor-
ture, to accuse themselves, a horrible punish-
ment was immediately inflicted. Fire was
set to the house, and they all perished miser-
ably in the flames.

As to Anacaona, she was carried to St.
Domingo, where, after the mockery of a
trial, she was pronounced guilty on the tes-
timony of the Spaniards, and was barba-
rously hanged by the people whom she had
so long and so greatly befriended.

After the massacre of Xaragua, the de-
struction of its inhabitants went on. They
were hunted for six months amid the fast-
nesses of the mountains, and their country
ravaged by horse and foot, until, all being
reduced to deplorable misery and abject sub-
mission, Ovando pronounced the province
restored to order; and in remembrance of
his triumph, founded a town near the lake,
which he called Santa Maria de la Verdadera
Pas (St. Mary of the true peace.)

Such was the tragical fate of the beautiful
Anacaona, once extolled as the Golden Flower
of Haytis and such the story of the delight-

F



78 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

ful region of Xaragua, which the Spaniards,
by their own account, found a perfect para-
dise, but which, by their vile passions, they
filled with horror and desolation.

After this work of destruction, they made
slaves of the remaining inhabitants, and di-
vided them amongst them, and many of the
sanguinary contests among themselves arose
out of quarrels about the distribution.

We cannot help pausing to cast back a
look of pity and admiration over these beau-
tiful but devoted regions.

The white man had penetrated the land!
In his train came avarice, pride, and am-
bition ; sordid care, and pining labour, were
soon to follow, and the paradise of the Indian
was about to disappear for ever.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 79

CHAPTER IX,

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE TREES, PLANTS,
AND FLOWERS OF THE NEW WORLD.

WHEN once the way had been pointed out,
it was easy for other navigators to follow,
and accordingly many Spaniards undertook
voyages of further discovery.

Among others, Yanez Pinzon, one of the
brave companions of Columbus, undertook a
voyage to the new world in 1499.

This navigator suffered much from storms,
and having sailed southward, he crossed the
equator and lost sight of the polar star.

The sailors were exceedingly alarmed at
this circumstance, as the polar star was
relied upon by them as one of their surest.
guides; not knowing the shape of the earth,



80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

they thought that some prominence hid this
star from their view.

The first land that Pinzon discovered,
after crossing the line, was Cape St. Augus-
tine, in eight degrees south latitude, the
most projecting part of the extensive coun-
try of Brazil.

As the fierceness of the natives made it
unsafe to land on this coast, he continued his
voyage to the north-west, and fell in with
the mighty river Amazon, which is. nearly
under the equinoctial line.

The mouth of this river is more than
thirty leagues in breadth, and its waters
enter more than forty leagues into the ocean
without losing its freshness.

He now recrossed the line, and coming
again in sight of the polar star, he pursued
his course along the coast, passed the mouth
of the Oronoko, and entered the Gulph of
Paria, after which he returned to Spain.

Ojeda also undertook a voyage expressly
to found a settlement; but as the character
of the Spaniards was now well known to the
inhabitants of these parts, they determined



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 81

to oppose their landing, and being a numer-
ous and warlike people, Ojeda nearly lost his
life in the attempt.

Many of his companions were slain; the
survivors, however, succeeding in making
good their retreat on board the ships.

Shortly afterwards he landed on the east-
ern side of the Gulph of Darien, and built a
fortress which they called San Sebastian.

Ojeda had with him in this expedition
Francisco Pizarro, about whom I shall have
to tell you something more presently.

About the same time another Spaniard,
of the name of Nicuessa, formed a settle-
ment on that part of the coast, and built a
fortress there, which he called Nombre de
Dios, not very distant from the harbour of
Portobello.

Thus, by degrees, the whole coast of Ame-
rica, on the side of the Atlantic, was disco-
vered and explored.

But the Spaniards did not know that in
the part where they were, it was only a
narrow neck of land (which you know is
called an Isthmus) that separated them from



82 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

another vast ocean; and this, when they
discovered the ocean on the other side, was
called the Isthmus of Darien.

T will now give you a short account of the
discovery of this ocean.

Nothing having been heard of Ojeda and
his new colony of San Sebastian, another
expedition, commanded by Enciso, set sail
in search of them.

Among the ship’s company was a man, by
name Vasco Ninez de Balboa, who, although
of a rich family, had, by his bad habits, not
only become very poor, but also very much
in debt.

To avoid being thrown into prison for the
debts that he owed, he contrived to get on
board Enciso’s ship, concealed in a cask,
which was taken on board the vessel as a
cask of provisions.

When the ship was far from St. Domingo,
Balboa came out from his cask to the asto-
nishment of all on board.

Enciso at first was angry at the way he
had escaped from the punishment which his
bad conduct had deserved; yet, as he thought



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 8&3

that he might be of service to him, he par-
doned him.

The settlement of St. Sebastian, however,
had been broken up, the Spaniards having
suffered much from the repeated attacks of
the natives, who would no longer patiently
submit to their unjust treatment.

Soon after Enciso arrived at Carthagena
he was joined by Pizarro, with the wretched
remains of the colony; he determined never-
theless, to continue his voyage to the settle-
‘ment.

Upon his arrival there he found Pizarro’s
account was too true, for where St. Sebastian
had stood, nothing was to be seen but a heap
of ruins.

Here misfortune followed misfortune, his
own ship was wrecked and then he was at-
tacked by the natives.

In despair at these disasters Enciso was
at a loss what to do, or where to go, when
Balboa advised him to continue his course
along the coast in Pizarro’s little vessel.

He stated that he had once before been
on an expedition in this same gulf, and on



84 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the westerri side he well remembered an In-
dian village, on the banks of a river, called
by the natives Darien.

Enciso pleased with Balboa’s advice, re-
solved to take possession of this village, and
to drive out all the Indians.

Arrived at the river, he landed his men,
and, without giving the unfortunate people
of the village any notice, he attacked them,
killed several, drove the rest out, and robbed
them of all their possessions.

He then made the village the chief place
of his new government, and called it Santa
Maria del Darien. Balboa assisted in this
work of cruelty and injustice.

The Spaniards had not been long here
when they became tired with Enciso, and
they refused to obey him, and sent him off
in a ship to Spain. Upon his departure,
Balboa took the command.

In one of his expeditions into the interior
parts of the country in search of gold, he
first heard of a sea to the west, as yet un-
known to Europeans.

He hed received a large quantity of gold



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 85

from an Indian cazique, or chief, and was
weighing it into shares for the purpose of
dividing it among his men when a quarrel
arose as to the exactness of the weight.

One of the sons of the Indian cazique
was present, and he felt so disgusted at the
sordid behaviour of the Spaniards that he
struck the scales with his fist and scattered
the glittering gold about the place.



Before the Spaniards could recover from
their astonishment at this sudden act, he said
to them, “ why should you quarrel for such a



86 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

trifle? If you really esteem gold to be so
precious as to abandon your homes, and
come and seize the lands and dwellings of
others for the sake of it, I can tell you of a
jand not far distant where you may find it in
plenty.”

“ Beyond those lofty mountains,” he con-
tinued, pointing to the south, “lies a mighty
sea, all the streams that flow into which
down the southern side of those mountains,
abound in gold, .and all the utensils the
people have, are made of gold.”

Balboa was struck with this account of the
young Indian, and eagerly imquired the best
way of penetrating to this sea, and this land
of gold.

The young Indian warned him of the
dangers he would meet with from the fierce
race of Indians inhabiting these mountains,
who were cannibals, or eaters of human flesh,
but Balboa was not to be deterred by ac-
counts of difficulties and dangers.

He was, besides, desirous of getting pos-
‘session of the gold, and of obtaining, by the
merits of the discovery, the pardon of the



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 87

King of Spain, for taking from Enciso the
command of the settlement.

He resolved, therefore, to penctrate to
this sca, and immediately began to make
preparations for the journey.

He first sent to Hispaniola for an ad-
ditional number of soldiers, to assist him in
the perilous adventure, but instead of receiv-
ing these, the only news that reached him
by the return of his messengers was, that he
would most probably have the command of
Darien taken from him, and be punished for
assisting to dispossess Enciso.

This news made him determine no longer
to delay his departure. All the men he
could muster for the expedition amounted
only to one hundred and ninety; but these
were hardy and resolute, and much attached
to him. He armed them with swords and
targets; cross-bows and arquebusses; be-
sides this little band, Balboa took with him
a few of the Indians of Darien whom he
had won by kindness, to serve him.

On the Ist of September, 1513, Balboa set
out from Darien, first to the residence of the



88 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Indian cazique, from whose son he first
heard of the sea.

From this chief he obtained the assistance
of guides and some warriors, and with this
force he prepared to penetrate the wilderness
before him.

It was on the 6th of September that he
began his march for the mountains-which
separated him from the great Pacific Ocean,
he set out with a resolution to endure pati-
ently all the miseries, and to combat boldly
all the difficulties that he might meet with,
and he contrived to rouse the same determi-
nation in his followers.

Their journey was through a broken rocky
country covered with forest trees and under-
wood, so thick and close as to be quite
matted together and every here and there
deep foaming streams, some of which they
were forced to cross on rafts.

So wearisome was the journey, that in four
days they had not advanced more than ten
leagues, and they began to suffer much from
hunger.

They had now arrived in the province of



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 89

a warlike tribe of Indians who, instead of
flying and hiding themselves, came forth to
the attack. They set upon the Spaniards
with furious yells, thinking to overpower them
at once. They were armed with bows and
arrows, and clubs made of palm-wood almost
as hard as iron. But the first shock of the
report from the fire-arms of the Spaniards
struck them with terror, They took to
flight, but were closely pursued by the
Spaniards with their blood-hounds. The
Cazique and six hundred of his people were
left dead upon the field of battle.

After the battle the Spaniards entered the
adjoining village, which was at the foot of
the last mountain that remained to be
climbed; this village they robbed of every
thing valuable. There was much gold and
many jewels.

Balboa shared the booty among his band
of followers. But this victory was not
gained without some loss on the side of the
Spaniards.

Balboa found that several of his men had.
been wounded by the arrows of the Indians,



80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and many also, overcome with fatigue, had
fallen sick, these he was obliged to leave
in the village, while he ascended the moun-
tain.

At the cool and fresh hour of day-break he
assembled his scanty band, and began to
climb the height, wishing to reach the top
before the heat of noon.

About ten o’clock they came out from the
thick forest through which they had been
struggling ever since day-break: the change
from the closeness of the woods to the
pleasant breeze from the mountain, was.
delightful. But they were still further en-
couraged. “From that spot” exclaimed one
of the Indian guides, pointing to the height.
above them “may be seen the great sea of
which you are in search.”

When Balboa heard this, he commanded
his men to halt, and forbade any one to stir
from his place. He was resolved to be the.
first European who should look upon that
sea, which he had been the first to discover.

Accordingly he ascended the mountain
height alone, and when he reached the



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 91

summit he beheld the wide sea glittering in
the morning sun.

Balboa called to his little troop to ascend
the height and look upon the glorious pros-
pect; and they joined him without delay.

“Behold, my friends,” said he, “ the re-
ward of all our toils, a sight upon which
the eye of Spaniard never rested before.”

He now took possession of the sea-coast
and the surrounding country in the name of
the king of Spain.

He then had a tree cut down, and made
into the form of a cross, and planted it on
the spot from which he had first beheld the
sea. He also made a mound by heaping up
large stones upon which he carved the
names of the king of Spain.

The Indians saw all this done, and while
they helped to pile the stones and set up
the cross, they little thought that they were
assisting to deprive themselves of their
homes and their country.

You remember the noble reproof of Canute
in the “ History of England,” to his flatter-
ers, when they assured him that even the



92 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

waves of the sea would obey him: but this
arrogant and weak minded Spaniard waded
into the waves of the great Pacific Ocean, up
to his knees, and absurdly took possession
of it in the name of the Spanish monarch.

ts



Balboa was some time employed in fight-
ing with the Indian tribes that inhabited the
sea-coast, and in hunting them with blood-
hounds.



AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 93

He soon made these helpless people sub-
mit. From them he got some further ac-
counts of the rich country which the Indian
prince had mentioned, and which proved
afterwards to be Peru.

He now quitted the shores of the Pacific
Ocean on his return across the mountains of
Darien. His route homewards was different
from that which he had before pursued, and
the sufferings of his troops much greater.

Often they could find no water, the heat
having dried up the pools and brooks.
Many died from thirst, and those who sur-
vived, although loaded with gold, were ex-
hausted for want of food; for the poor
Indians brought gold and jewels, instead of
food, as peace offerings to the Spaniards.

At length, after much slaughter of the
Indians that dwelt in the mountains, and
burning of the villages, Balboa and _ his
troops arrived at Darien ; having robbed the
Indians of all the gold and silver they could
find. The Spaniards at Darien received
with great delight and praise the news of his

success and discovery—a discovery gained
G



94 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

at the expense of much unnecessary cruelty
and injustice.

He now despatched a ship to Spain, with
the news of his discovery, and by it he sent
part of the gold he had carried 6ff from the
different Indian tribes.

A few days before this ship reached Spain
a new governor had been sent out, by name
Padrarias Davila, to take Balboa’s place, and
with orders to punish Balboa for his conduct
to Enciso.

But when he arrived at Darien, and saw
how much. the discoverer of the Pacific was
beloved by all the Spaniards of the settle-
ment he hesitated through fear, and finally
resolved to defer the execution of the orders
which he had brought with him.

Davila permitted Balboa to depart from
Darien for the purpose of building brigan-
tines with a view to navigate and explore the
Pacific Ocean. Three years had elapsed
since he discovered this ocean,“and. with
joy he now prepared to build the ships which
were to be the first belonging to Europeans
to sail upon it.



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TALES

ALOUT

AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA.

PETER PARLEY.

w

A New Evitton,
BROUGHT DOWN TO THE PRESENT TIME.

REVISED BY e 7
THE REY. T. WILSON.

oe

WiTR ILLUSTRATIONS BY S. WILLIAMS:

‘at
OSs
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‘LONDON:
DARTON AND HODGE, HOLBORN ELL,
| 1862, -

ti a te
CONTENTS.

PAGE

PARLEY TELLS HOW AMERICA WAS FIBST DISCO-
VERED, AND ABOUT COLUMBUS . ; ; cick
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS . ; wv: 12
COLUMBUS SETS SAIL. TO RETURN TO SPAIN; EN-
COUNTERS A DREADFUL STORM . é «2k
COLUMBUS PREPARES FOR ANOTHER VOYAGE . . 85
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS DISCOVERED THE
CONTINENT OF AMERICA . ‘ : : . 45
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS W4S ROBBED OF THE
HONOUR OF GIVING HIS NAME TO AMERICA. . 59
PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS SHIPWRECKED,
AND OF HIS DEATH . ae i . . 65
PARLEY TELLS OF OVANDO’S CRUEL TREATMENT OF

ANACAONA, THE PRINCESS OF HAYTI. ; te
1V CONTENTS.

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE TREES, THE PLANTS, AND
FLOWERS OF THE NEW WORLD . : : ie
PARLEY TELLS OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO ., . 96
PARLEY RELATES HOW PIZARRO DISCOVERED AND
CONQUERED PERU. ° ‘ . = - 121
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE BEAUTIES OF AMERICA. . 133
PARLEY TELLS OF THE FIRST “ENGLISH COLONY IN |
AMERICA . pe eg pot: a Sachs een 1g 141
PARLEY TELLS OF THE ORIGINAL NATIVE AMERICANS 150
PARLEY SHOWS HOW THE UNITED STATES AROSE, AND
WHAT FOLLOWED THEIR ESTABLISHMENT , . 165
PARLEY TELLS ABOUT NEW SOUTH WALES. : . 176
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS OF AUSTRALIA
—THE BRITISH SETTLEMENTS—THE GOID RE-
GIONS—RECENT EXPLORATIONS. . ; . 183

CONCLUSION . ; ; ‘ ‘ ‘ . 205
TALES

ABOUT

AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA.

CHAPTER I.

PARLEY TELLS HOW AMERICA WAS FIRST

DISCOVERED, AND ABOUT COLUMBUS THE
DISCOVERER.

Now that I have given you an account of
European cities in my “‘ Tales about Europe,”
I shall now furnish you with some descrip-
tion of America, with its flourishing cities,
and its multitude of ships, its fertile fields, its
mighty rivers, its vast forests, and its mil-
lions of happy and industrious inhabitants,
of which [am quite certain you must be
very curious to know something, when you
are told that though the world has been
A
2 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

created nearly six thousand years, and many
powerful nations have flourished and decayed,
and are now scarcely remembered, yet it is
only three hundred and seventy years ago
since it was known that such a country as
America existed.

It was in the year 1492, which you know
is only 870 years since, on the third of
August, a little before sunrise, that Chris-
topher Columbus, undertaking the boldest
enterprise that human genius ever conceived,
or human talent and fortitude ever accom-
pushed, set sail from Spain, for the discovery |
of the Western World.

I will now give you a short account of
Columbus, who was one of the greatest men
the world ever produced. He was born in
the city of Genoa, in Italy ; his family were
almost all sailors, and he was brought up for
a sailor also, and after being taught geography
and various other things necessary for a sea
captain to know, he was sent on board ship
at the age of fourteen. Columbus was tall,
muscular, and of a commanding aspect ; his
hair, light in youth, turned prematurely grey,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 3

and ere he reached the age of thirty was
white as snow. |

His first voyages were short ones, but
after several years, desiring to see and learn
more of distant countries, and thinking there
were still new ones to be discovered, he went
into the service of the King of Portugal and
made many voyages to the western coast of
Africa, and to the Canaries, and the Madeiras, _
and the Azores, islands lying off that coast,
which were then the most westerly lands
known to Europeans.

In his visits to these parts, one person
informed him that his ship, sailing out
farther to the west than usual, had picked
up out of the sea a piece of wood curiously
carved, and that very thick canes, hke those
which travellers had found in India, had
been seen floating on the waves; also that
great trees, torn up by the roots, had often
been cast on shore, and once two dead bodies
of men, with strange features, neither like
Europeans nor Africans, were driven on the
coast of the Azores.

All these stories set Columbus thinking
4 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and considering that these strange things had
come drifting over the sea from the west, he
looked upon them as tokens sent from some
unknown countries lying far distant in that
quarter: he was therefore eager to sail away
and explore, but as he had not money enough
himself to fit out ships and hire sailors, he
determined to go and try to persuade some
king or some state to be at the expense of
the trial. :

First he went to his own countrymen the
Genoese, but they would have nothing to
say to him: he then submitted his plan to ©
the Portuguese, but the King of Portugal,
pretending to listen to him, got from him his
plan, and perfidiously attempted to rob him
of the honour of accomplishing it, by send-
ing another person to pursue the same track
which he had proposed.

The person they so basely employed did
not succeed, but returned to Lisbon, execrat-
ing a plan he had not abilities to execute.

On discovering this treachery, Columbus
quitted the kingdom in disgust and set out
for Spain, to. King Ferdinand and Queen
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 5

Isabella. He was now so poor that he was
frequently obliged to beg as he went along.

About half a league from Palos, a sea-port
of Andalusia in Spain, on a solitary height,
overlooking the sea-coast, and surrounded
by a forest of pines, there stood, and now
stands at the present day, an ancient convent
of Franciscan friars.



A stranger, travelling on foot, accompanied
by a young boy, stopped one day at the
6 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

gate of the convent, and asked of the porter
a little bread and water for his child.—That
stranger was Columbus, accompanied by his
son Diego.

While receiving this humble refreshment,
the guardian of the convent, Friar Juan
Perez, happening to pass, was taken with
the appearance of the stranger, and being an
intelligent man and agguainted with geo-
graphical science, he W€came interested with
the conversation of Columbus, and was so
struck with the grandeur of his project that
he detained him as his guest and invited a
friend of his, Martin Alonzo Pinzon, a resi-
dent of the town of Palos, to come and hear
Columbus explain his plan. .

Pinzon was one of the most intelligent
sea captains of the day, and a distinguished
navigator. He not only approved of his
project, but offered to engage in it, and to
assist him.

Juan Perez now advised Columbus to re-
pair to court. Pinzon generously furnished
him with the money for the journey, and
the friar kindly took charge of his youthful
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 7

son Diego, to maintain and educate him in
the convent, which I am sure you will think
was the greatest kindness he could have done
him at that time.

Ferdinand and Isabella gave him hopes
and promises, then they made difficulties and
objections, and would do nothing. At last,
after waiting five years, he was just setting
_ off for England, where he had previously sent
his brother Bartholomew, when he was in-
duced to wait a little longer in Spain. ©

This little longer was two years, but then
at last he had his reward, for queen Isabella
stood his friend, and even offered to part
with her own jewels in order to raise money
to enable him to make preparations for the
voyage, so that he contrived to fit out three
very small vessels which altogether carried
but one hundred and twenty men.

Two of the vessels were light Jarques, or
barges built high at the prow and stern, with
forecastles and cabins for the crew, but were
without deck in the centre; only one of the
three, the Santa Maria, was completely
decked ; on board of this, Columbus hoisted
8 - PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

his flag. Martin Alonzo Pinzon commanded
the Pinta, and his brother, Vincente Yanez
Pinzon, the Nina. He set sail in the sight of
a vast crowd, all praying for the success, but
never expecting and scarcely hoping to see
either him or any of his crews again.

Columbus first made sail for the Canaries,
where he repaired his vessels: then taking
leave of these islands, he steered his course
due west, across the great Atlantic ocean, .
where never ship hadgploughed the waves
before.

No sooner had they lost sight of land
than the sailors’ hearts began to fail them,
and they bewailed themselves like men con-
demned to die: but Columbus cheered them
with the hopes of the rich countries they
were to discover.

After awhile they came within those re-
gions where the trade-wind, as it is called,
blows constantly from east to west without
changing, which carried them on at a vast
rate; but he judiciously concealed from his
ignorant and timid crews the progress he
made, lest they might be alarmed at the speed.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 9

with which they were receding from home.
After some time, they found the sea covered
with weeds, as thick as a meadow with grass,
and the sailors fancied that they should soon
be stuck fast,—that they had reached the end
of the navigable ocean, and that some strange
thing would befal them.

Still, however, Columbus cheered them
on, and the sight of a flock of birds encou-
raged them: but when they had been three
weeks at sea and no land appeared, they
grew desperate with fear, and plotted among
themselves to force their commander to turn
back again, lest all their provisions should be
spent, or, if he refused, to throw him over-
board.

Columbus, however, made them a speech
which had such an effect upon them that
they became tolerably quiet for a week
longer; they then grew so violent again that
at last he was obliged to promise them that
if they did not see land in three days, he
would consent to ane it up and sail home
again.

But he was now almost sure that land
10 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was not far off: the sea grew shallower, and
early every morning flocks of land birds
began to flutter around them, and these all
left the ship in the evening, as if to roost on
shore. One of the vessels had picked up a '
cane newly cut, and another a_ branch
covered with fresh red berries; and the air
blew softer and warmer, and the wind began
to vary.

That véry night, Columbus ordered the
sails to be taken in, and strict watch to be
kept, in all the ships, for fear of running
aground ; he and all his men remained stand-
ing on the deck, looking out eagerly: at.
length he spied a distant light ; he showed it:
to two of his officers, and they all plainly
perceived it moving, as if carried backwards
and forwards, from house to house.

Soon after the cry of “ Land! land !”’ was.
heard from the foremost ship, and, at dawn
of day, they plainly saw a beautiful island,.
green and woody, and watered with many
pleasant streams, lying stretched before them.

As soon as the sun rose, the boats of the
vessel were lowered and manned, and Colum-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 1}

bus, in a rich and splendid dress of scarlet,
entered the principal one. They then rowed
towards the island, with their colours dis-
played, and warlike music, and other martial

pomp.











Columbus was the first to leap on shore,
to kiss the earth, and to thank God on his
knees: his men followed, and throwing
themselves at his feet they all thanked him
for leading them thither, and begged his
forgiveness for their disrespectful and unruly
behaviour.
12 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

CHAPTER II,
PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS.

Tux poor inhabitants, a simple and inno-
cent people, with copper-coloured skins and
long black hair, not curled, like the negroes,
but floating on their shoulders, or bound in
tresses round their heads, came flocking
down to the beach and stood gazing in silent
admiration.

The dress of the Spaniards, the whiteness
of their skins, their beards, their arms, and
the vast machines that seemed to move upon
the waters with wings, which they supposed
had, during the night, risen out of the sea,
or come down from the clouds; the sound
and flash of the guns, which they mistook
for thunder and lightning: all these things
appeared to them strange and surprising ;
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 13

they considered the Spaniards as children of
the sun, and paid homage to them as gods.

‘ihe Icuropeans were hardiy less amazed
at the scene now before them. Every herb,
and shrub, and tree, differed from those
which flourished in Europe: the inhabitants
appeared in the simple innocence of nature,
entirely naked ; their features were singular,
but not disagreeable, and their manners
gentle and timid.



The first act of Columbus was to take
solemn and formal possession of the country

B
14 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

in the name of his sovereign ; this was done
by planting the Spanish flag on the coast,
and other ceremonies, which the poor natives
looked upon with wonder, but could not un-
derstand. |

Nor could there be an act of greater crue!-
ty and injustice; for the Spaniards could not
have any right to drive these gentle and
peaceful inhabitants (as they afterwards did)
from their peaceful abodes, which had been
theirs and their fathers before them, perhaps
for thousands of years, and in the end,
utterly to destroy them, and take their land
for themselves. |

After performing this ceremony, of which
Columbus himself could not foresee the con-
sequences to the Indians, for he was very
kind to them, he made them presents of
trinkets and other trifles, with which they
were greatly delighted, and brought him in
return the fruits of their fields and groves,
and a sort of bread called cassada, made
from the root of the yuca; with whatever

else their own simple mode of life might
afford,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 15

Columbus then returned to his ship, ac-
companied by many of the islanders in their
boats, which they called canoes ; these simple
and undiscerning children of nature having
no foresight of the calamities and desolation
which awaited their country.

‘This island was called by the natives
Guanahini, and by the Spaniards St. Salva-
dor: it is one of that cluster of West India
Islands called the Bahamas, and if you look
on the map you will see that it is the very
first island that would present itself to a
ship sailing direct from Spain.

Columbus did not continue his voyage for
some days, as he wished to give all his sailors
an opportunity of landing and seeing the
wonders of the new-discovered world, and to |
take in a fresh supply of water, in which
they were cheerfully assisted by the natives,
who took them to the clearest springs and
the sweetest and freshest streams, filling
their casks and rolling them to the boats, and
seeking in every way to gratify (as they be-
lieved) their celestial visitors. |

Columbus having thus refreshed his crews,
16 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and suppied his ships with water, proceeded
on his voyage. After visiting several smaller
islands he discovered a large island which
the natives called Cuba, and which still
retains that name. This was so large an
island that he at first thought it to be a new
continent.

In proceeding along the coast, aceite
observed that most of the people whom he
-had seen wore small plates of gold by way
of ornament in their noses, he eagerly in-
quired, by signs, where they got that doen
metal.

The Indians, as much astonished at his
eagerness in quest of gold as the Europeans
were at their ignorance and simplicity,
pointed towards the east, to an island which
they called Hayti, in which this metal was
more abundant.

Columbus ordered his squadron to bend
their course thither, but Martin Alonzo Pin-
zon, impatient to be the first who should
take possession of the treasure which this
country was supposed to contain, quitted his
companions with his ship, the Pinta, and
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 17

though Columbus made signals to slacken
sail, he paid no regard to them.

When they came in sight of Hayti, which
you will see was no great distance, if you
look on the map, Columbus having had no
sleep the night before, had gone to his cabin
to lie down and rest himself, having first
given the charge of the vessel to an experi-
enced sailor.

This careless man, {this lazy lubber, the
sailors would call him,) instead of performing
. his duty, and watching over the safety of
the ship and the lives of his companions,
which were entrusted to him, deserted his
post and went to sleep, leaving the vessel to
the management of a young and thoughtless
boy. |

The rapid currents which prevail on that
coast soon carried the vessel on a shoal, and
Columbus was roused from his sleep by the
‘striking of the ship and the cries of the ter-
rified boy.

They first endeavoured, by taking out an
sanchor, to warp the vessel off, but the
‘strength of the current was more than a
18 - ' PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

- match for them, and the vessel was driven
farther and farther on the shoal; they then
cut away the mast and took out some of the
stores to lighten her; but all their efforts
were vain. |

Before sunset the next evening the vessel
was a complete wreck. Fortunately the
Nina was close at hand, and the shipwzecked
mariners got on board of her; the inhabitants.
of the island came in their canoes and assisted
them in preserving part of their stores.

They found Hayti a very beautiful island,
and were treated with the greatest kindness
by the inhabitants; but, though delighted
with the beauty of the scenes which every-
where presented themselves, and amazed at
the luxuriance and fertility of the soil, Co-
lumbus did not find gold in such quantities
as was sufficient to satisfy the avarice of his
followers; he was nevertheless anxious to
prolong his voyage, and explore those magni-
ficent regions which seemed to invite them
on every hand.

But as the Pinta had never joined them
again after parting from them, he had no
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 19

vessel now left but the Nina; he did not
therefore think it prudent to pursue his dis-
coveries with one small vessel, and that a
very crazy one, lest, if any accident should
befal it, he might be left without the means
of returning to Europe, and both the glory
and benefit of his great discoveries might
be lost; so he determined to prepare for his
return. |

But as it was impossible for so small a
vessel as the Nina to contain the crew of
the ship that was wrecked in addition to its
own, Columbus was greatly perplexed what
to do. |

Many of his men were so delighted with
the island and its inhabitants, that they
begged of him to let them remain there, and
Columbus consented to leave forty of them
on the island, while he and the remainder
made the voyage back.

He promised to return to them speedily.
He now built them a fort with the timber
of the wreck, and fortified it with the guns
of the Santa Maria, and did every thing in
his power to provide for their comfort
20 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

during his absence, particularly enjoining
them to be kind and peaceful towards the
Indians.

This was the first colony of Europeans
that settled in the new world, and Columbus
gave it the name of Navidad.



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AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 21

CHAPTER Titi.

COLUMBUS SETS SAIL TO RETURN TO
SPAIN, AND ENCOUNTERS A DREADFUL
| STORM.

Havine obtained a certain quantity of the
precious metals, and other curious produc-
tions of the countries he had discovered, he
set sail to recross the wide Atlantic Ocean.

It was the second day after they had left
the island that they saw a sail at a distance,
which proved to be the Pinta.

On joining the admiral, Pinzon made
many excuses and endeavoured to account for
his desertion, saying he had been separated
by stress of weather. Columbus admitted
his excuse, but he ascertained afterwards that
Pinzon parted company intentionally, and
had steered directly east in quest of a region
29 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

where the Indians had assured him that he
would find gold in abundance. :

They had guided him to Hayti, where he
had been for some time, in a river about fif-
teen leagues from the part of the coast where
Columbus had been wrecked.

He had collected a large quantity of gold
by trading with the natives, and on leaving
the river he had carried off four Indian men
and two girls, to be sold in Spain.

Ts

SSS

x
Se
in i

n

SS
ee
oa x



Columbus immediately sailed back for this
iver, and ordered the four men and two girls
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 93:

to be dismissed well clothed and with many
presents, to atone for the wrong they had ex-
perienced. This resolution was not carried
into effect without great unwillingness and:
many angry words on the part of Pinzon.

Columbus, being now joined by the Pinta,
thought he might pursue his discoveries a.
little further, and on leaving this part of the
coast he took with him four young Indians
to guide him to the Carribean Islands, of
which they gave him a very interesting
account, as well as of another island said to
be inhabited by Amazons. |

A favourable breeze, however, sprang up
for the voyage homewards, and seeing gloom
and impatience in the countenances of his:
men, he gave up his intention of visiting
these islands, and made all sail for Spain, the
young Indians having consented to accom-
pany him that they might learn the Spanish
language, and be his guides and interpreters:
when they should return.

His voyage homeward was much more
tedious; for those trade winds which had
wafted him so rapidly westward, across the
24 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Atlantic, still blew from east to west, and
Columbus did not then know that their in-
fluence only extends to a certain distance on
each side of the Equator, so that if he had
sailed a little farther north, on his return, he
would very likely have met with a south-
west wind, which was just what he wanted.

On the 12th of February they had made
such progress as led them to hope they
should soon see land. The wind now came
on to blow violently; on the following
evening there were three flashes of lightning
in the north-east, from which signs Colum-
bus predicted an approaching tempest.

It soon burst upon them with frightful
violence. Their small and crazy vessels were
little fitted for the wild storms of the Atlan-
tic; all night they were obliged to scud
under bare poles, at the mercy of the ele-
ments; as the morning dawned there was a
transient pause and they made a little sail,
but the wind rose with redoubled fury from
the south and increased in the night, threat-
ening each moment to overwhelm them or
dash them to pieces,
“AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 25

The admiral made signal-lights for the
Pinta to keep in company, but she was sepa-
rated by the violence of the storm, and her
lights gleamed more and more distant till ©
they ceased entirely.

When the day dawned the sea presented
a frightful waste of wild and broken waves.
Columbus looked round anxiously for the
Pinta, but she was nowhere to be seen, and
he became apprehensive that Pinzon had
borne away for Spain, that he might reach it
before him, and by giving the first account
of his discoveries, deprive him of his fame.

Through a dreary day the helpless bark
was driven along by the tempest. |

Seeing all human skill baffled and con-
founded, Columbus endeavoured to propi-
tiate heaven by solemn vows, and various
private vows were made by the seamen.
The heavens, however, seemed deaf to their
vows: the storm grew still more furious, and
every one gave himself up for lost.

During this long and awful conflict of the
elements, the mind of Columbus was a prey
to the most distressing anxiety.
26 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT.

He was harassed by the repinings of his
crew, who cursed the hour of their leaving
their country. |

He was afflicted also with the thought of
his two sons, who would be left destitute by
his death.

But he had another source of distress
more intolerable than death itself. In case
the Pinta should have foundered, as was
highly probable, the history of his discovery
would depend upon his own feeble bark.
One surge of the ocean might bury it for
ever in oblivion, and his name only be re-
corded as that of a desperate adventurer.

At this crisis, when all was given up for
lost, Columbus had presence of mind enough
to retire to his cabin and to write upon
- parchment a short account of his voyage.

This he wrapped in an oiled cloth, which
he enclosed in a cake of wax, put it into a
tight cask, and threw it into the sea, in
hopes that some fortunate accident might
preserve a deposit of so much importance to
the world. ;

_ But that being which had preserved him
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. ip

through so many dangers still protected him ;
andehappily these precautions were super-
fluous. |

_ At sunset there was a streak of clear sky
in the west; the wind shifted to that quarter,
and on the morning of the 15th of February
they came in sight of land.

The transports of the crew at once more
beholding the old world, were almost equal
to those they had experienced on discovering
the new. This proved to be the island of
St. Mary, the most southern of the Azores.

After remaining here a few days, the wind
proving favourable he again set sail, on the
24th of February.

After two or three days of pleasant sailing,
there was a renewal of tempestuous weather.
About midnight of the 2d of March the
caravel was struck by a squall, which rent all
her sails and threatened instant destruc-
tion. The crew were again reduced to
despair, and made vows of fasting and pil-
grimages.

The storm raged through the succeeding
day, during which, from various signs they
28 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

considered that land must be near. The
turbulence of the following night was dread-
ful; the sea was broken, wild, and moun-
tainous, the rain fell in torrents, and the
lightning flashed and the thunder pealed from
various parts of the heavens. __ |

In the first watch of this fearful night, the
seamen gave the usual welcome cry of land
—but it only increased their alarm, for they
dreaded being driven on shore or dashed
upon the rocks. Taking in sail, therefore, they
endeavoured to keep to sea as much as_pos-
sible. At day-break on the 4th of March
they found themselves off the rock of Cintra
at the mouth of the Tagus, which you know |
is the principal river of Portugal.

Though distrustful of the Portuguese, he
had no alternative but to run in for shelter.
The inhabitants came off from various parts
of the shore to congratulate him on what
they deemed a miraculous preservation, for
they had been watching the vessel the whole
morning with great anxiety, and putting up
prayers for her safety. The oldest mariners
of the place assured him that they had never
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 29

during the whole course of their lives known
so tempestuous a winter.

Such were the difficulties and perils with
which Columbus had to contend on his
return to Europe. Had one tenth part of
them beset his outward voyage, his factious—
crew would have risen in arms against the
enterprise, and he never would have disco-
vered the new world. 3

The king of Portugal must have been
greatly mortified when he heard of the arri-
val of Columbus and the wonderful disco-
veries he had made, for he could not but
reflect that all the advantages of these disco-
veries might have belonged to him if he had
not treated Columbus as he did.

But notwithstanding the envy which it
was natural for the Portuguese to feel, he was
allowed to come to Lisbon, and was treated
- with-all the marks of distinction due to a
man who had performed things so extraor-
dinary and.unexpected. The king admitted
him into his presence, and listened with ad-
-miration to the account which he gave of his
voyage, while Columbus enjoyed the satis-

C
80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

faction of being able to prove the solidity of
his schemes to those very persons who had
with disgraceful ignorance rejected them as
the projects of a visionary adventurer.

Columbus was so impatient to return to
Spain that he remained only five days in
Lisbon. On the 15th of March he arrived
at Palos, seven months and eleven days from
the time when he set out from thence upon
his voyage.

When the prosperous issue of it was
known, when they beheld the strange people,
the unknown animals, and singular produc-
tions brought from the countries he had
_ discovered, the joy was unbounded ; all the
bells were rung, the cannons were fired, and
he was welcomed with all the acclamations
which the people are ever ready to bestow
on great and glorious characters. They
flocked ‘in crowds to the harbour to see him
land, and nothing but Columbus and the
New World, as the Spaniards called it, was
talked of.

He was desired by Ferdinand and Isabella
in the most respectful terms to repair to
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 31

court, that they might receive from his own
mouth, an account of his wonderful disco-
veries.

On his arrival at Barcelona the king and
queen received him clad in their royal robes,
seated upon a throne, and surrounded by
their nebles.



When he approached, they commanded
him to take his seat upon a chair prepared
for him, and to give a circumstantial account
of his voyage, which he related with a gra-
vity suitable to the dignity of the audience
32 ' PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

he addressed, and with that modesty which
ever accompanies superior merit.

_ Every mark of honour that gratitude or
admiration could suggest, was conferred
upon him ; his family was ennobled, and, as
a mark of particular favour, Isabella ap-
pointed his son Diego, the boy, who, you
remember, had been left at the convent,
page to prince Juan, the heir apparent, an
honour only granted to sons of persons of
distinguished rank.

The king and queen, and, after their
example, the courtiers treated him with all
the respect paid to persons of the highest
rank, Yet some of these courtiers were his
bitterest enemies, and did every thing they
could, in his absence, to poison the minds of
the king and queen against him, and to
cause his downfall. _ |

The favour shown Columbus -by the so-
vereigns insured him for a time the caresses
of the nobility, for in court every one is
eager to lavish attentions upon the man
“ whom the king delighteth to honour.”

. At one of the. banquets which were given
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 33

him occured the well known circunistance
of the egg.



A shallow courtier present, impatient of
the honours paid to Columbus, and meanly
jealous of him as a foreigner, abruptly asked
him, whether he thought that, in case he
had not discovered the Indies, there would
have been wanting men in Spain capable of
the enterprise.

To. this Columbus made no direct reply
but, taking an egg, invited the company to
make it stand on one end. Every one
34 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

attempted it, but in vain; whereupon he
struck it upon the table, broke one end, and
left it standing on the broken part; illus-
trating, in this simple manner, that when he
had once shown the way to the new world,
nothing was easier than to follow it.


AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. ou

CHAPTER IV.

COLUMBUS PREPARES FOR ANOTHER
VOYAGE.

CoLUMBUS was now anxious to set out on
another voyage to proceed with his disco-
veries, and the king and queen gave orders
that every thing should be done to further
his wishes. |

By his exertions a fleet of seventeen sail,
large and small, was soon in a state of
forwardness; labourers and artificers of all
kinds were engaged for the projected colo-
nies, and an ample supply was provided of
whatever was necessary for the cultivation of
the soil, the working of the mines, and for
traffic with the natives.

He now found no difficulty in getting
sailors to accompany him, and the account
36 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

he gave of the countries he had discovered,
and particularly the intelligence that they
abounded with gold, excited the avarice and
rapacity of the Spaniards, and numbers of
needy adventurers of ruined fortunes and
desperate circumstances, were eager to share
in the spoil.

Many persons of distinction, thinking to
become rich by the same means, also volun-
teered to enlist, and many got on board of
the ships by stealth, so that about 1500 set.
sail in the fleet, though only a thousand
were originally permitted to embark.

The departure of Columbus on his second
voyage presented a brilliant contrast to his
gloomy embarkation at Palos. |

. There were three large ships of heavy
burden and fourteen smaller vessels, and the
persons on board, instead of being regarded
by the populace as devoted men, were looked
upon with envy as favoured mortals, des-
tined to golden regions and delightful climes,
where nothing but wealth, and wonder, and
enjoyment awaited them.

At sunrise the whole fleet was under sail,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 87

on the 13th of October he lost sight of the
island of Ferro, and, favoured by the trade
winds, was borne pleazantly along, till, on
the 2nd of November, a lofty island was des-
cried to the west, to which he gave the name
of Dominica, from having discovered it on
the Lord’s day.

As the ships moved gently onward, other:
islands arose to sight, one after another;.
covered with forests and enlivened by the
flight of parrots and other tropical birds,
while the whole air was sweetened by the
fragrance of the breezes which passed over
them.

In one of these islands, to eee: the
Spaniards gave the name of Guadaloupe,
they first met with the delicious fruit, the
Anana or pine-apple.

Columbus now sailed-in the direction of
’ Hayti, to which he had given the name of
Hispaniola, where he shortly arrived.

In passing along the coast he set on shore:
one of the young Indians who had been
taken from that neighbourhood and had
accompanied him to Spain. He dismissed
38 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

him finely apparelled, and loaded with trin-
kets, thinking he would impress his coun-
trymen with favourable feelings towards the
Spaniards, but he never heard anything of
him afterwards.

When he arrived on that part of the
island where he had built the fort and taken
leave of his companions, the evening grow-
ing dark, the land was hidden from their
sight. Columbus watched for the dawn of
day with the greatest anxiety; when at last
the approach of the morning sun rendering
the objects on shore visible, in the place
where the fort had stood, nothing was to be
seen. No human being was near, neither
Indian nor European; he ordered a boai
to be manned, and himself went, at the
head of a party, to explore how things really
were. |
The crew hastened to the place where the
fortress had been erected; they found it
burnt and demolished, the palisades beaten
down, and the ground strewed with broken
chests and fragments of European garments.

The natives, at their approach, did not
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 39

welcome them as they expected, like friends,
but fled and concealed themselves as if
afraid to be seen.
- Columbus, at length, with some difficulty,
by signs of peace and friendship, persuaded
afew of them to come forth tohim. From
them he learned, that scarcely had he set
sail for Spain, when all his counsels and
commands faded from the minds of those
who remained behind. Instead of culti-
vating the good-will of the natives, they —
endeavoured, by all kinds of wrongful
means, to get possession of their golden
ornaments and other articles of value, and
seduce from them their wives and daughters,
‘and had also quarrelled among themselves.

The consequences of this bad conduct
were what might have been expected: some
died by sickness caused by intemperance,
some fell in brawls between themselves about _
their ill-gotten spoil, and others were cut off
by the Indians, whom they had so shame-
fully treated, and who afterwards pulled
dawn and burnt their fort.

The misfortunes which had befallen the
40 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Spaniards in the vicinity of this harbour
threw a gloom over the place, and it was.
considered by the superstitious mariners as:
under some baneful influence. The situa-.
tion was low and unhealthy, and not capa~
ble of improvement ; Columbus therefore de--
termined to remove the settlement.

With this view he made choice of a
situation more healthy and commodious
than that of Navidad, and having ordered
the troops and the various persons to be
employed in the colony to be immediately
disembarked, together with the stores, am-
munition, and all the cattle and live-stock,
he traced out the plan of a town in a large
plain near a spacious bay; and obliging
every person to put his hand to the work,
the houses were soon so far advanced as ta
afford them shelter, and forts were con-
structed for their defence.

This rising city, the first that Rurldpeinss
founded in the new world, he named Isa-
bella, in honour of his patroness the Queen
of Castile.

As long as the Indians had any prospect
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, Al

that their sufferings might terminate by the
voluntary departure of the invaders, they
submitted in silence, and dissembled their
sorrow; but now that the Spaniards had
built a town—now that they had dug up
the ground and planted it with corn — it
became apparent that they came not to visit
the country, but to settle in it.

They were themselves naturally so ab-
stemious and their wants so few, that they
were easily satisfied with the fruits of the
island, which, with a handful of maize or a
little of the insipid bread made of the cas-
sava root, were sufficient for their support.

But it was with difficulty they could
afford subsistence for the new guests. The
Spaniards, though considered an abstemious
people, appeared to them excessively voraci-
ous. One Spaniard consumed as much as
‘several Indians; this keenness of appetite
‘appeared so insatiable, that they supposed
the Spaniards had left their own country be-
cause it did not produce enough to gratify
their immoderate appetites, and had come
among them in quest of nourishment.
42 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Columbus having taken all the steps
which he thought necessary to ensure the
prosperity of his new colony, entrusted the
command of the military force to Margaritta,
and set sail with three vessels to extend his
discoveries; but, after a long and tedious
voyage, in which he endured every hardship,.
the most important discovery he made was
the island of Jamaica.

Having been absent much longer than he |
had expected, he returned to his new settle-
ment, but the colonists had become refrac-
tory and unmanageable.

No sooner had he left the island on his
- voyage of discovery, than the soldiers under
Margaritta dispersed in straggling parties
over the island, lived at discretion upon the
natives, wasted their property, and treated
that inoffensive race with the insolence of
military oppression.

During the absence of Columbus, several
unfavourable accounts of his conduct had
been transmitted to Spain, and these accu-
-sations gained such credit in that jealous:
court, that Aguado, a person in every way
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 43

unsuited for the purpose, was appointed to
proceed to Hispaniola to observe the con-
duct of Columbus.

This man listened with eagerness to every
accusation of the discontented Spaniards,
and fomented still further the spirit of dis-
sension in the island.

Columbus felt how humiliating it must be
if he remained in the island with such a
partial inspector to observe his motions and >
control his authority ; he therefore took the
resolution of returning to Spain, in order to
lay a full account of his transactions before
Ferdinand and Isabella.

Having committed the government of the
colony during his absence to Don Bartho-
lomew, his brother, he appointed Roldan
Chief Justice, a choice which afterwards
caused great calamities to the colony.

On his arrival in Spain, Columbus ap-
peared at court with the confidence of a
man, not only conscious of having done no
wrong; but of having performed great ser-
vices.

Ferdinand and 1euelta, ashamed of hav-
44 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

ing listened to ill-founded accusations, re-
ceived him with such marks of respect as
silenced the calumnies of his enemies, and
covered them with shame and confusion.

The gold, the pearls, and other commo-
dities of value which he had brought home,
and the mines which he had found, fully
proved the value and importance of his dis-
coveries, though Columbus considered them
only as preludes to future and more import-
ant acquisitions.


AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 45

CHAPTER V.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS DISCO<-
VERS THE CONTINENT OF AMERICA,

Cotumbus, having been furnished with six
vessels of no great burden, departed on his
third voyage. He touched at the Canaries
and at the Cape de Verd islands; from
the former he despatched three ships with
a supply of provisions for the colony of
Hispaniola; with the other three he con-
tinued his voyage to the south.

Nothing remarkable occurred till they
were within five degrees of the line; then
they were becalmed, and the heat became so
’ excessive, that the wine casks burst and
their provisions were spoiled.

The Spaniards, who had never ventured

D
46 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

so far to the south, were afraid the ships
would take fire, but they were relieved in
some measure from their fear by a season-
able fall of rain.

This, however, though so heavy and in-
cessant that the men could hardly keep the
deck, did not greatly mitigate the heat,
and Columbus was at last constrained to
yield to the importunities of his crew, and
to alter his course to the north-west, in order
to reach some of the Caribbee islands, where
he might refit and he supplied with pro-
visions.

On the Ist of August, 1498, the man sta-
tioned at the round-top surprised them with
the joyful cry of “Land!” They stood
towards it, and discovered a considerable
island, which the admiral called Trinidad, a
name it still retains, and near it the mouth
of a river, rolling towards the ocean such a
vast body of water, and rushing into it with
such impetuous force, that when it meets the
tide, which on that coast rises to an uncom-
mon height, their meeting occasions an extra-
ordinary and dangerous swell of the waves,
at
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 47

In this conflict, the irresistable torrent of
the river so far prevails, that it freshens the
ocean many leagues with its flood.

Columbus, before he could perceive the
danger, was entangled among these adverse
currents and tempestuous waves; and it
was with the utmost difficulty that he es-
caped through a narrow strait, which ap-
peared so tremendous, that he called it
“The Dragon’s Mouth.”

As soon as his consternation permitted
him to reflect on an appearance so extraor-
dinary, he justly concluded that the land
must be a part of some mighty continent,
and not of an island, because all the springs
that cd¥ild rise, and all the rain that could
fall on an island, could never, as he caleu-
lated, supply water enough to feed so pro-
digiously broad and deep a river; and he
was right, the river was the Orenoko.

Filled with this idea, he stood to the
west, along the coast of those provinces
which are now known by the name of Paria
and Cumana. He landed in several places,
and found the people to resemble those of
48 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Hispaniola in their appearance and manner
of life.

They wore as ornaments small plates of
gold and pearls of considerable value, which
they willingly exchanged for European toys.
They seemed to possess greater courage and
better understandings than the inhabitants
of the islands.

The country produced four-footed animals
of several kinds, as well as a great variety of
fowls and fruits.

The admiral was so much delighted with
its beauty and fertility, that, with the warm
enthusiasm of a discoverer, he imagined it
to be the Paradise described in Scripture.

Thus Columbus had the glory @f disco-
vering the new world, and of conducting the
Spaniards to that vast continent which has
been the seat of their empire and the source
of their treasure, in that quarter of the
globe. The shattered condition of his ships
and the scarcity of provisions, made it now
necessary to bear away for Hispaniola,
where he arrived wasted to an extreme
degree with fatigue and sickness.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 49

Many revolutions had happened in that
country during his absence, which had lasted
more than two years.

His brother, whom he had left in com-
mand, had, in compliance with advice which
he had given him before his departure, re-
moved the colony from Isabella to a more
commodious station on the opposite side of
the island, and laid the foundation of St.
Domingo, which long continued to be
the most considerable town in the new
world.

Such was the cruelty and oppression with
which the Spaniards treated the Indians,
and so intolerable the burden imposed upon

-them, that they at last took arms against
their oppressors; but these insurrections
were not formidable. In a conflict with
timid and naked Indians, there was neither
danger nor doubt-of victory.

A mutiny which broke out among the
Spaniards, was of a more dangerous nature,
the ringleader in which was Francisco
Roldan, whom Columbus, when he sailed
for Spain, had appointed chief judge, and
50 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

whose duty it was to have maintained the
laws, instead of breaking them.

This rebellion of Roldan, which threatened
the whole country with ruin, was only sub-
dued by the most wise and prudent conduct
on the part of Columbus; but order and
tranquillity were at length apparently re-
stored.

As soon as his affairs would permit, lie
sent some of his ships to Spain, with a
journal of the voyage which he had made,
and a description of the new continent
which he had discovered, and also a chart
of the coast along which he had sailed, and
of which I shall have something more to
tell you presently.

He at the same time sent specimens of
the gold, the pearls, and other curious and
valuable productions which he had acquired
by trafficking with the natives. —

He also transmitted an account of the
insurrection in Hispaniola, and accused the
mutineers of having, by their unprovoked
rebellion, almost ruined the colory.

Roldan and his associates took care to
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. oa

send to Spain, by the same ships, apologies
for their mutinous conduct, and unfortu-
nately for the happiness of Columbus, their
story gained most credit in the court of Fer-
dinand and Isabella.

By these ships Columbus granted the
liberty of returning to Spain to all those,
who, from sickness or disappointment, were
disgusted with the country. “A good num-
ber of such as were most dissatisfied, em-
braced this opportunity of returning to Eu-
rope. The disappointment. of their unrea-
sonable hopes inflamed their rage against
Columbus to the utmost pitch, and their
distress made their accusations be believed.

A gang of these disorderly ruffians, who
had been shipped off to free the island from
their seditions, found their way to the court
at Grenada. Whenever the king or queen
appeared in public, they surrounded them,
insisting, with importunate clamours, on the
payment of arrears due to them, and de-
manding vengeance on the author of their
sufferings.

These endeavours to ruin Columbus were
oO

2 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

seconded by Fonseca, who was now made
bishop of Badajos, and who-was entrusted
with the chief direction of Indian affairs.
This man had always been an implacable
enemy of Columbus, and with others of his
enemies who were about the court, having
continual access to the sovereign, they were
enabled to aggravate all the complaints
that were urged against him, while they
carefully suppressed his vindications of him-
self.

By these means Ferdinand was at last in-
duced to send out Bobadilla, an officer of the
royal household, to inquire into the conduct
of Columbus, and if he should think the
charges against him proved, to supersede
him in his command, that is, to send him
home, and make himself governor in his
stead; so that it was the interest of the
judge to pronounce the person guilty whom
he was sent to try.

On his arrival he found Columbus absent
in the interior of the island; and as he had,
before he landed, made up his mind to treat
him as a criminal, he proceeded at once,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 58

without any inquiry, to supersede him in his
command.

He took up his residence in Columbus’
house, from which the owner was absent,
seized upon his arms, gold, plate, jewels,
books, and even his letters and most secret
manuscripts, giving no account of the pro-
perty thus seized, but disposing of it as if
already confiscated to the crown; at the
same time he used the most unqualified
language when speaking of Columbus, and
hinted that he was empowered to send him
home in chains; thus acting as if he had
been sent out to degrade the admiral, not
to inquire into his conduct.

As soon as Columbus arrived from the
interior, Bobadilla gave orders to put him in
irons and confine him in the fortress, and so
far from hearing him in his defence, he
would not even admit him to his presence ;
but having collected from his enemies what
he thought sufficient evidence, he determined
to send both him and his brother home in
chains.

The charge of conducting the prisoners to
54. PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Spain was committed to Alonzo Villejo,
a man of honourable conduct and generous
feelings. When Villejo entered with the
guard to conduct him on board the caravel,
. Columbus thought it was to conduct him to
the scaffold. “ Villejo” said he, “whither
are you taking me?” “To the ship, your
excellency, to embark,” replied the other.
“To embark!” repeated the admiral, ear-
nestly, “ Villejo, do you speak the truth ?”
“ By the life of your excellency,” replied the
honest officer, “it is true.”

With these words the admiral was com-
forted, and felt as restored from death to life,
for he now knew he should have an oppor- °
tunity of vindicating his conduct. The cara-
vel set sail in October, bearing off Columbus
shackled like the vilest criminal.

The worthy Villejo, as well as Andries
Martin, the master of the caravel, would
have taken off his irons, but to this he
would not consent. “No,” said he proudly,
“their majesties commanded me, by letter,
to submit to whatever Bobadilla should order
in their name; by their authority he has put
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 55

upon me these chains; I will wear them till
they shall order‘them to be taken off, and I
will afterwards, preserve them as relics and
memorials of the reward of my services.”



The arrival of Columbus, a prisoner and
in chains, produced almost as great a sensa-
tion as his triumphant return on his first
voyage.

A general burst of indignation arose in
56 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Cadiz and in Seville, which was echoed
through all Spain, that Columbus was,
brought home in chains from the world he
had discovered.

The tidings reached the court of Grenada,
and filled the halls of the Alhambra with
murmurs of astonishment.

On the arrival of the ships at Cadiz, Co-
lumbus, full of his wrongs, but not knowing
how far they had been authorized by his
sovereigns, forbare to write to them; but he
‘sent a long letter to a lady of the court,
high in favour with the queen, containing,
in eloquent and touching language, an ample
vindication of his conduct.

When it was read to the noble-minded
Isabella, and she found how grossly Colum-
bus had been wronged, and the royal autho-
rity abused, her heart was filled with sym-
pathy and indignation.

Withoat waiting for any documents that
might arrive from Bobadilla, Ferdinand and
Isabella sent orders to Cadiz, that he should
be instantly set at liberty, and treated with
-all distinction, and sent him two thousand
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 57

ducats to defray his expenses to court.
They wrote him a letter at the same time,
expressing their grief. at all that had hap-
pened, and inviting him to Grenada.

He was received by their majesties with
the greatest favour and distinction. When the
queen beheld this venerable man approach,
and thought on all he had deserved and all
he had suffered, she was moved to tears.

Columbus had borne up firmly against
the injuries and wrongs of the world, but
when he found himself thus kindly treated,
and beheld tears in the benign eyes of Isa-
bella, his long suppressed feelings burst
forth, he threw himself upon his knees, and
for some time could not utter a word for the
violence of his tears and sobbings.

Ferdinand and Isabella raised him from
the ground and endeavoured to encourage
him by the most gracious expressions.

As soon as he had recovered his self-pos-

session, he entered into an eloquent and
" high-minded vindication of his conduct, and
his zeal for the glory and advantage of the
Spanish crown,
58 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

The king and queen expressed their indig-
nation at the proceedings of Bobadilla, and
promised he should be immediately dismissed
from his command.

The person chosen to supersede Bobadilla
was Nicholas de Ovando. While his depar-
ture was delayed by various circumstances,
every arrival brought intelligence of the dis-
asterous state of the island under the admi-
nistration of Bobadilla.

He encouraged the Spaniards in the exer-
cise of the most wanton cruelties towards the
natives, to obtain from them large quantities
of gold. ‘Make the most of your time,”
he would say, “there is no knowing how
long it will last ;” and the colonists were not
backward in following his advice. In the
meantime the poor Indians sunk under the
toils imposed upon them, and the severities
with which they were enforced.

These accounts hastened the departure of
Ovando, and a person sailed with him, in

order to secure what he could of the wreck ~

of Columbus’ property.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 59

CHAPTER VI.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS
ROBBED OF THE HONOUR OF GIVING
HIS NAME TO AMERICA.

I nave told you that Columbus, as soon as
he arrived at Hispaniola, after discovering
the new continent, sent a ship to Spain with
a journal of the voyage he had made, and a
description of the new continent which he
had discovered, together with a chart of the
coast of Paria and Cumana, along which he
had sailed.

This journal, with the charts and descrip-
tion, and Columbus’ letters on the subject,
were placed in the custody of Fonseca, he
being minister for Indian affairs.
60 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

No sooner had the particulars of this dis-
covery been communicated by Columbus,
than a separate commission of discovery,
signed by Fonseca, but not by the sove-
reigns, was granted to Alonzo de Ojeda, who
had accompanied Columbus on his second
voyage, and whom Columbus had instructed
in all his plans. Ojeda was accompanied on
this voyage by a Florentine, whose name
was Amerigo Vespucci.

To these adventurers Fonseca communi-
cated Columbus’ journal, his description of
the country, his charts, and all his private
letters.

This expedition sailed from Spain while
Columbus was still at Hispaniola, and
wholly ignorant of what was taking place; -
and Ojeda, without touching at the colony,
steered his course direct for Paria, following
the very track which Columbus had marked
out.

Having extended their discoveries very
little farther than Columbus had gone be-
fore them, Vespucci, on returning to Spain,
published an account of his adventures and
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 61

discoveries, and had the address and confi-
dence so to frame his narrative, as to make
it appear that the glory of having discovered
the new continent belonged to him.

Thus the bold pretensions of an impostor
have robbed the discoverer of his just re-
ward, and the caprice of fame has unjustly
assigned to him an honour far above the
renown of the greatest conquerors — that of
indelibly impressing his name upon this
vast portion of the earth, which ought in
justice to have been called Columbia.

Two years had now been spent in soli-
citing the favour of an ungrateful court,
and notwithstanding all his merits and ser-
vices, he solicited in vain; but even this
ungracious return did not lessen his ardour
in his favourite pursuits, and his anxiety to
pursue those discoveries in which he felt he
had yet only made a beginning.

Ferdinand at last consented to grant him
four small vessels, the largest of which did
not exceed seventy tons in burden; but,
accustomed to brave danger and endure
hardships, he did not hesitate to accept the

E
62 PARLEY’S TALES AEOUT

command of this pitiful squadron, and he
sailed from Cadiz on his fourth voyage on
the 9th of May.



Having touched, as usual, at the Canaries,
he intended to have sailed direct for this
new discovered continent; but his largest
vessel was so clumsy and unfit for service,
that he determined to bear away for His-
paniola, in hopes of exchanging her for
some ship of the fleet that had carried out
Ovando,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 63

The fleet that had brought out Ovando
lay in the harbour ready to put to sea, and
was to take home Bobadilla, together with
Roldan and many of his adherents, to be
tried in Spain for rebellion. Bobadilla was
to embark in the principal ship, on board of
which he had put an immense amount of
gold, which he hoped would atone for all
his faults.

Among the presents intended for his
sovereign was one mass of virgin gold,
which was famous in the Spanish chroni-
cles; it was said to weigh 3600 castillanos.
Large quantities of gold had been shipped
in the fleet by Roldan and other adventurers
—the wealth gained by the sufferings of the
unhappy natives.

Columbus sent an officer on shore to re-
quest permission to shelter his squadron in
the river, as he apprehended an approaching
storm. He also cautioned them not to let
the fleet sail, but his request was refused by
Ovando, and his advice disregarded.

The fleet put to sea, and Columbus kept
his feeble squadron close to shore, and
64 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

sought for shelter in some wild bay or river
of the island.

Within two days, one of those tremendous
storms which sometimes sweep those lati-
tudes gathered up, and began to blow.
Columbus sheltered his little squadron as
well as he could, and sustained no damage.
A different fate befel the other armament.

The ship in which were Bobadilla, Rol-
dan, and a number of the most inveterate
enemies of Columbus, was swallowed up
with all its crew, together with the prin-
cipal part of the ill-gotten treasure, gained.
by the miseries of the Indians,

Some of the ships returned to St. Do-
mingo, and only one was able to continue
her voyage to Spain; that one had on board
four thousand pieces of gold, the property
of Columbus, which had been recovered by
the agent whom he sent out with Ovando.

Thus, while the enemies of the admiral
were swallowed up as it were before his eyes,
the only ship enabled to pursue her voyage
was the frail bark freighted with his pro-

perty.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 65

CHAPTER VII.

PARLEY TELLS HOW COLUMBUS WAS SHIP-
WRECKED, AND ALSO OF THE MANNER
OF HIS DEATH.

CotumBus soon left Hispaniola where he
met with so inhospitable a reception, and
steering towards the west, he arrived on the
coast of Honduras. There he had an inter-
view with some of the inhabitants of the
continent, who came off in a large canoe;
they appeared to be more civilized than any
whom he had hitherto discovered.

In return to the inquiries which the Spa-
niards made with their usual eagerness, where
the Indians got the gold which they wore
by way of ornaments, they directed him to
countries situated to the west, in which gold
66 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was found in such profusion that it was
applied to the most common uses.

Well would it have been for Columbus:
had he followed their advice. Within a day
or two he would have arrived at Yucatan;
the discovery of Mexico and the other opu-
lent countries of New Spain would have
necessarily followed, the Southern Ocean
would have been disclosed to him, and a
succession of splendid discoveries would.
have shed fresh glory on his declining age.

But the admiral’s mind was bent upon
discovering the supposed strait that was to
lead to the Indian Ocean. In this naviga-
tion he explored a great extent of coast
from Cape Gracios 4 Dios till he came to a
harbour, which on account of its beauty and
security, he called Porto Bello.

On quitting this harbour he steered for
the south, and he had not followed this.
course many days when he was overtaken by
storms more terrible than any he had yet
encountered.

For nine days the vessels were tossed
about at the mercy of a raging tempest.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 67

The sea, according to the description of
Columbus, boiled at times like a cauldron,
at other times it ran in mountain waves
covered with foam: at night the raging
billows sparkled with luminous particles,
which made them resemble great surges of
flame.

For a day and a night the heavens glowed
like a furnace with incessant flashes of light-
ning, while the loud claps of thunder were
often mistaken for signal guns of their foun-
dering companions.

In the midst of this wild tumult of the
elements, they beheld a new object of alarm.
The ocean, in one place, became strangely
agitated; the water was whirled up into a
kind of pyramid or cone; while a livid cloud,
tapering to a point, bent down to meet it;
joining together, they formed a column,
which rapidly approached the ship, spinning
along the surface of the deep, and drawing
up the water with a rushing sound, it passed
the ship without injury.

His leaky vessels were not able t to with-
stand storms like these. One of them
68 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

foundered, and he was obliged to abandon
another.

With the remaining two he bore away for
Hispaniola, but in the tempest his ships -
falling foul of each other, it was with the
greatest difficulty he reached the island of
Jamaica,

His two vessels were in such a shattered
condition, that, to prevent them from sink-
ing, and to save the lives of his crews, he
was obliged to run them on shore.

Having no ship now left, he had no means
of reaching Hispaniola, or of making his
situation known. In this juncture he had
recourse to the hospitable kindness of the
natives, who, considering the Spaniards as
beings of a superior nature, were eager, on
every occasion to assist them.

From them he obtained two canoes, each
formed out of a single tree hollowed with
fire. In these, which were only fit for
creeping along the coast, two of his brave
and faithful companions, assisted by a few
Indians, gallantly offered to set out for
Hispaniola; this voyage they accomplished
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 69

in ten days, after encountering incredible
fatigues and dangers.

By them he wrote letters to Ovando,
describing his situation and requesting him
to send ships to bring off him and his crews;
but what will you think of the unfeeling
cruelty of this man, when I tell you that he
suffered these brave men to wait eight
months before he would give them any hopes
of relieving their companions: and what
must have been the feelings of Columbus
during this period.

At last the ships arrived which were to
take them from the island, where the un-
feeling Ovando had suffered them to languish
above a year, exposed to misery in all its
various forms. When he arrived at St.
Domingo, Ovando treated him with every
kind of insult and injustice. Columbus sub-
mitted in silence, but became extremely im-
patient to quit a country where he had been
treated with such barbarity.

The preparations were soon finished, and
he set sail for Spain with two ships, but
disaster still pursued him to the end of his
70 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

course. He suffered acutely from a painful
and dangerous disease, and his mind was
kept uneasy and anxious by a continued suc-
cession of storms. One of the vessels being
disabled, was forced back to St. Domingo,
and in the other he sailed 700 leagues with
_ jury-masts, and reached with difficulty the
pert of St. Lucar in Spain, 1504.

On his arrival he received the fatal news
‘of the death of his patroness queen Isabella,
’ from whom he had hoped for the redress of
his wrongs,

He dpptied to the king, who, instead of
. confirming the titles and honours which he
had fortierl conferred upon him, insulted
him with the proposal of renouncing them
all for a pension.

Disgusted with the ripalawde of a mo-
rarch Shot he had served with fidelity and
success, exhausted with the calamities which
he had endured, and broken with infirmities,
this great and good man breathed his last at
Valladolid, a. p. 1506, in the 69th year of
his age.

He was buried in the cathedral at Seville,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. qt

and on his tomb was engraved an epitaph
commemorating his discovery of a New
World. i

Christobal Colon, obtit 1506,
ETAT 69.








& Castilla yp x Leon
Peubho Munda via Colaw.*



Thus much for Columbus; those who are
the greatest benefactors of mankind seldom
raeet with much gratitude from men in their
lives; they must. look to God for their re-
ward, and leave future generations to do
justice to their memory.

It was very unfortunate for the natives of
America, that the country fell into the hands
of such a cruel, covetous, and bigoted
nation as the Spaniards were. Their thirst
for gold was insatiable, and the cruelties
they exercised upon the natives are too hor-

* To Castile and to Leon
Columbus gave a New World.
72 PARLEY’S TALES. ABOUT

rible to recite. After the death of Colum-
bus, the Indians were no longer treated with
gentleness, for it was his defence of the pro-
perty and lives of these harmless natives that
brought down upon his head such bitter
hatred. You will now look into your map
and follow Columbus in some of his disco-
veries. You will see a great number of
islands extending in a curve from Florida,
which is the southernmost part of the United
States, to the mouth of the river Oronoko
in South America; and, as Columbus firmly
believed these islands, when he discovered
them, to be a part of India, the name of
Indies was given to them by Ferdinand and
Isabella; and, even after the error was de-
tected, and the true position of the new
world ascertained, the name has remained,
and the appellation of Indies is given to the
country, and that of Indians to the inha-
bitants.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 13

CHAPTER VIII.

PARLEY TELLS OF OVANDO’S CRUEL
TREATMENT OF ANACAONA, THE
PRINCESS OF HAYTI.

CotumBus discovered and gave names to
some of these islands, and on several of
them he settled colonies, and did all he
could to make them the abodes of peace and
happiness.

On his taking leave of them for the last
time, Ovando continued governor of Hayti.

The cruelties exercised by this unfeeling
man it would take a volume to describe, but
I will mention only one or two instances.

When the natives were unable to pay the
tribute which he exacted from them, he
always accused them of insurrection, and it
74 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

was to punish a slight insurrection of this
kind in the eastern part of the island that
he sent his troops, who ravaged the country
with fire and sword. He showed no mercy
to age or sex, putting many to death with
horrible tortures, and brought off the brave
Catabanama, one of the five sovereign ca-
ziques of the island, in chains to St. Do-
mingo, where he was ignominiously hanged
by Ovando, for the crime of defending his
territory and his native soil against usurping
strangers.

But the most atrocious act of Ovando,
and one that must heap odium on his name,
wherever the woes of the gentle natives of
Hayti are heard of, was the cruelty he was
guilty of towards the province of Xaragua
- for one of those pretended conspiracies.

Ovando set out at the head of nearly four
hundred well armed soldiers, seventy of
whom were steel-clad horsemen; giving out
that he was coming on a visit of friendship,
to make arrangements for the payment of
tribute.

Behechio, the antient cazique of the pro-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 75

vince, was dead, and his sister, Anacaona,
wife of the late formidable chief Caonabo,
had succeeded to the government,

She was one of the most beautiful females
in the island; of great natural grace and dig-
nity, and superior intelligence; her name
in the Indian language signified “ Golden
Flower.”



She came forth to meet Ovando, according
to the custom of her nation, attended by her
most distinguished subjects, and her train of
damsels waving palm branches, and dancing
to the cadence of their popular ayretos.
76 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

All her principal caziques had been assem-
bled to do honour to the guests, who, for
several days were entertained with banquets,
and national games and dances.

In return for these exhibitions, Ovando
invited Anacaona, with her beautiful daugh-
ter Higuenamata, and her principal subjects,
to witness a tilting match in the public
square.

When all were assembled, and the square
crowded with unarmed Indians, Ovando gave
a signal, and instantly the horsemen rushed
into the midst of the naked and defenceless
throng, trampling them under foot, cutting
them down with their swords, transfixing
them -with their lances, and sparing neither
age nor sex.

Above eighty caziques had been assembled
in one of the principal houses: it was sur-
rounded by troops, the caziques were bound
to the posts which supported the roof, and
put to cruel tortures, until in the extremity
of anguish they were made to admit as true
what their queen and themselves had been
charged with.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 77

When they had thus been made, by tor-
ture, to accuse themselves, a horrible punish-
ment was immediately inflicted. Fire was
set to the house, and they all perished miser-
ably in the flames.

As to Anacaona, she was carried to St.
Domingo, where, after the mockery of a
trial, she was pronounced guilty on the tes-
timony of the Spaniards, and was barba-
rously hanged by the people whom she had
so long and so greatly befriended.

After the massacre of Xaragua, the de-
struction of its inhabitants went on. They
were hunted for six months amid the fast-
nesses of the mountains, and their country
ravaged by horse and foot, until, all being
reduced to deplorable misery and abject sub-
mission, Ovando pronounced the province
restored to order; and in remembrance of
his triumph, founded a town near the lake,
which he called Santa Maria de la Verdadera
Pas (St. Mary of the true peace.)

Such was the tragical fate of the beautiful
Anacaona, once extolled as the Golden Flower
of Haytis and such the story of the delight-

F
78 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

ful region of Xaragua, which the Spaniards,
by their own account, found a perfect para-
dise, but which, by their vile passions, they
filled with horror and desolation.

After this work of destruction, they made
slaves of the remaining inhabitants, and di-
vided them amongst them, and many of the
sanguinary contests among themselves arose
out of quarrels about the distribution.

We cannot help pausing to cast back a
look of pity and admiration over these beau-
tiful but devoted regions.

The white man had penetrated the land!
In his train came avarice, pride, and am-
bition ; sordid care, and pining labour, were
soon to follow, and the paradise of the Indian
was about to disappear for ever.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 79

CHAPTER IX,

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE TREES, PLANTS,
AND FLOWERS OF THE NEW WORLD.

WHEN once the way had been pointed out,
it was easy for other navigators to follow,
and accordingly many Spaniards undertook
voyages of further discovery.

Among others, Yanez Pinzon, one of the
brave companions of Columbus, undertook a
voyage to the new world in 1499.

This navigator suffered much from storms,
and having sailed southward, he crossed the
equator and lost sight of the polar star.

The sailors were exceedingly alarmed at
this circumstance, as the polar star was
relied upon by them as one of their surest.
guides; not knowing the shape of the earth,
80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

they thought that some prominence hid this
star from their view.

The first land that Pinzon discovered,
after crossing the line, was Cape St. Augus-
tine, in eight degrees south latitude, the
most projecting part of the extensive coun-
try of Brazil.

As the fierceness of the natives made it
unsafe to land on this coast, he continued his
voyage to the north-west, and fell in with
the mighty river Amazon, which is. nearly
under the equinoctial line.

The mouth of this river is more than
thirty leagues in breadth, and its waters
enter more than forty leagues into the ocean
without losing its freshness.

He now recrossed the line, and coming
again in sight of the polar star, he pursued
his course along the coast, passed the mouth
of the Oronoko, and entered the Gulph of
Paria, after which he returned to Spain.

Ojeda also undertook a voyage expressly
to found a settlement; but as the character
of the Spaniards was now well known to the
inhabitants of these parts, they determined
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 81

to oppose their landing, and being a numer-
ous and warlike people, Ojeda nearly lost his
life in the attempt.

Many of his companions were slain; the
survivors, however, succeeding in making
good their retreat on board the ships.

Shortly afterwards he landed on the east-
ern side of the Gulph of Darien, and built a
fortress which they called San Sebastian.

Ojeda had with him in this expedition
Francisco Pizarro, about whom I shall have
to tell you something more presently.

About the same time another Spaniard,
of the name of Nicuessa, formed a settle-
ment on that part of the coast, and built a
fortress there, which he called Nombre de
Dios, not very distant from the harbour of
Portobello.

Thus, by degrees, the whole coast of Ame-
rica, on the side of the Atlantic, was disco-
vered and explored.

But the Spaniards did not know that in
the part where they were, it was only a
narrow neck of land (which you know is
called an Isthmus) that separated them from
82 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

another vast ocean; and this, when they
discovered the ocean on the other side, was
called the Isthmus of Darien.

T will now give you a short account of the
discovery of this ocean.

Nothing having been heard of Ojeda and
his new colony of San Sebastian, another
expedition, commanded by Enciso, set sail
in search of them.

Among the ship’s company was a man, by
name Vasco Ninez de Balboa, who, although
of a rich family, had, by his bad habits, not
only become very poor, but also very much
in debt.

To avoid being thrown into prison for the
debts that he owed, he contrived to get on
board Enciso’s ship, concealed in a cask,
which was taken on board the vessel as a
cask of provisions.

When the ship was far from St. Domingo,
Balboa came out from his cask to the asto-
nishment of all on board.

Enciso at first was angry at the way he
had escaped from the punishment which his
bad conduct had deserved; yet, as he thought
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 8&3

that he might be of service to him, he par-
doned him.

The settlement of St. Sebastian, however,
had been broken up, the Spaniards having
suffered much from the repeated attacks of
the natives, who would no longer patiently
submit to their unjust treatment.

Soon after Enciso arrived at Carthagena
he was joined by Pizarro, with the wretched
remains of the colony; he determined never-
theless, to continue his voyage to the settle-
‘ment.

Upon his arrival there he found Pizarro’s
account was too true, for where St. Sebastian
had stood, nothing was to be seen but a heap
of ruins.

Here misfortune followed misfortune, his
own ship was wrecked and then he was at-
tacked by the natives.

In despair at these disasters Enciso was
at a loss what to do, or where to go, when
Balboa advised him to continue his course
along the coast in Pizarro’s little vessel.

He stated that he had once before been
on an expedition in this same gulf, and on
84 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the westerri side he well remembered an In-
dian village, on the banks of a river, called
by the natives Darien.

Enciso pleased with Balboa’s advice, re-
solved to take possession of this village, and
to drive out all the Indians.

Arrived at the river, he landed his men,
and, without giving the unfortunate people
of the village any notice, he attacked them,
killed several, drove the rest out, and robbed
them of all their possessions.

He then made the village the chief place
of his new government, and called it Santa
Maria del Darien. Balboa assisted in this
work of cruelty and injustice.

The Spaniards had not been long here
when they became tired with Enciso, and
they refused to obey him, and sent him off
in a ship to Spain. Upon his departure,
Balboa took the command.

In one of his expeditions into the interior
parts of the country in search of gold, he
first heard of a sea to the west, as yet un-
known to Europeans.

He hed received a large quantity of gold
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 85

from an Indian cazique, or chief, and was
weighing it into shares for the purpose of
dividing it among his men when a quarrel
arose as to the exactness of the weight.

One of the sons of the Indian cazique
was present, and he felt so disgusted at the
sordid behaviour of the Spaniards that he
struck the scales with his fist and scattered
the glittering gold about the place.



Before the Spaniards could recover from
their astonishment at this sudden act, he said
to them, “ why should you quarrel for such a
86 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

trifle? If you really esteem gold to be so
precious as to abandon your homes, and
come and seize the lands and dwellings of
others for the sake of it, I can tell you of a
jand not far distant where you may find it in
plenty.”

“ Beyond those lofty mountains,” he con-
tinued, pointing to the south, “lies a mighty
sea, all the streams that flow into which
down the southern side of those mountains,
abound in gold, .and all the utensils the
people have, are made of gold.”

Balboa was struck with this account of the
young Indian, and eagerly imquired the best
way of penetrating to this sea, and this land
of gold.

The young Indian warned him of the
dangers he would meet with from the fierce
race of Indians inhabiting these mountains,
who were cannibals, or eaters of human flesh,
but Balboa was not to be deterred by ac-
counts of difficulties and dangers.

He was, besides, desirous of getting pos-
‘session of the gold, and of obtaining, by the
merits of the discovery, the pardon of the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 87

King of Spain, for taking from Enciso the
command of the settlement.

He resolved, therefore, to penctrate to
this sca, and immediately began to make
preparations for the journey.

He first sent to Hispaniola for an ad-
ditional number of soldiers, to assist him in
the perilous adventure, but instead of receiv-
ing these, the only news that reached him
by the return of his messengers was, that he
would most probably have the command of
Darien taken from him, and be punished for
assisting to dispossess Enciso.

This news made him determine no longer
to delay his departure. All the men he
could muster for the expedition amounted
only to one hundred and ninety; but these
were hardy and resolute, and much attached
to him. He armed them with swords and
targets; cross-bows and arquebusses; be-
sides this little band, Balboa took with him
a few of the Indians of Darien whom he
had won by kindness, to serve him.

On the Ist of September, 1513, Balboa set
out from Darien, first to the residence of the
88 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Indian cazique, from whose son he first
heard of the sea.

From this chief he obtained the assistance
of guides and some warriors, and with this
force he prepared to penetrate the wilderness
before him.

It was on the 6th of September that he
began his march for the mountains-which
separated him from the great Pacific Ocean,
he set out with a resolution to endure pati-
ently all the miseries, and to combat boldly
all the difficulties that he might meet with,
and he contrived to rouse the same determi-
nation in his followers.

Their journey was through a broken rocky
country covered with forest trees and under-
wood, so thick and close as to be quite
matted together and every here and there
deep foaming streams, some of which they
were forced to cross on rafts.

So wearisome was the journey, that in four
days they had not advanced more than ten
leagues, and they began to suffer much from
hunger.

They had now arrived in the province of
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 89

a warlike tribe of Indians who, instead of
flying and hiding themselves, came forth to
the attack. They set upon the Spaniards
with furious yells, thinking to overpower them
at once. They were armed with bows and
arrows, and clubs made of palm-wood almost
as hard as iron. But the first shock of the
report from the fire-arms of the Spaniards
struck them with terror, They took to
flight, but were closely pursued by the
Spaniards with their blood-hounds. The
Cazique and six hundred of his people were
left dead upon the field of battle.

After the battle the Spaniards entered the
adjoining village, which was at the foot of
the last mountain that remained to be
climbed; this village they robbed of every
thing valuable. There was much gold and
many jewels.

Balboa shared the booty among his band
of followers. But this victory was not
gained without some loss on the side of the
Spaniards.

Balboa found that several of his men had.
been wounded by the arrows of the Indians,
80 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and many also, overcome with fatigue, had
fallen sick, these he was obliged to leave
in the village, while he ascended the moun-
tain.

At the cool and fresh hour of day-break he
assembled his scanty band, and began to
climb the height, wishing to reach the top
before the heat of noon.

About ten o’clock they came out from the
thick forest through which they had been
struggling ever since day-break: the change
from the closeness of the woods to the
pleasant breeze from the mountain, was.
delightful. But they were still further en-
couraged. “From that spot” exclaimed one
of the Indian guides, pointing to the height.
above them “may be seen the great sea of
which you are in search.”

When Balboa heard this, he commanded
his men to halt, and forbade any one to stir
from his place. He was resolved to be the.
first European who should look upon that
sea, which he had been the first to discover.

Accordingly he ascended the mountain
height alone, and when he reached the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 91

summit he beheld the wide sea glittering in
the morning sun.

Balboa called to his little troop to ascend
the height and look upon the glorious pros-
pect; and they joined him without delay.

“Behold, my friends,” said he, “ the re-
ward of all our toils, a sight upon which
the eye of Spaniard never rested before.”

He now took possession of the sea-coast
and the surrounding country in the name of
the king of Spain.

He then had a tree cut down, and made
into the form of a cross, and planted it on
the spot from which he had first beheld the
sea. He also made a mound by heaping up
large stones upon which he carved the
names of the king of Spain.

The Indians saw all this done, and while
they helped to pile the stones and set up
the cross, they little thought that they were
assisting to deprive themselves of their
homes and their country.

You remember the noble reproof of Canute
in the “ History of England,” to his flatter-
ers, when they assured him that even the
92 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

waves of the sea would obey him: but this
arrogant and weak minded Spaniard waded
into the waves of the great Pacific Ocean, up
to his knees, and absurdly took possession
of it in the name of the Spanish monarch.

ts



Balboa was some time employed in fight-
ing with the Indian tribes that inhabited the
sea-coast, and in hunting them with blood-
hounds.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 93

He soon made these helpless people sub-
mit. From them he got some further ac-
counts of the rich country which the Indian
prince had mentioned, and which proved
afterwards to be Peru.

He now quitted the shores of the Pacific
Ocean on his return across the mountains of
Darien. His route homewards was different
from that which he had before pursued, and
the sufferings of his troops much greater.

Often they could find no water, the heat
having dried up the pools and brooks.
Many died from thirst, and those who sur-
vived, although loaded with gold, were ex-
hausted for want of food; for the poor
Indians brought gold and jewels, instead of
food, as peace offerings to the Spaniards.

At length, after much slaughter of the
Indians that dwelt in the mountains, and
burning of the villages, Balboa and _ his
troops arrived at Darien ; having robbed the
Indians of all the gold and silver they could
find. The Spaniards at Darien received
with great delight and praise the news of his

success and discovery—a discovery gained
G
94 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

at the expense of much unnecessary cruelty
and injustice.

He now despatched a ship to Spain, with
the news of his discovery, and by it he sent
part of the gold he had carried 6ff from the
different Indian tribes.

A few days before this ship reached Spain
a new governor had been sent out, by name
Padrarias Davila, to take Balboa’s place, and
with orders to punish Balboa for his conduct
to Enciso.

But when he arrived at Darien, and saw
how much. the discoverer of the Pacific was
beloved by all the Spaniards of the settle-
ment he hesitated through fear, and finally
resolved to defer the execution of the orders
which he had brought with him.

Davila permitted Balboa to depart from
Darien for the purpose of building brigan-
tines with a view to navigate and explore the
Pacific Ocean. Three years had elapsed
since he discovered this ocean,“and. with
joy he now prepared to build the ships which
were to be the first belonging to Europeans
to sail upon it.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 95

Balboa having overcome all his difficul-
ties, had the satisfaction of seeing two brigan-
tines finished and floating on a river which
“they called the Balsas.

As soon as they had been made ready for
sea, he embarked with some of his followers,
and sailing down the river, was the first to
launch into the ocean that he had been the
first to discover. But his death was now
about to put a stop to his further discoveries.

The new governor, Davila, who was a bad
and cruel man, and envious of Balboa, on
account of the discoveries he had made, had
long resolved to put him to death.

The time having, as he thought, arrived,
which was favourable for his villanous de-
sign, he sent for Balboa to return, and on
his arrival he had him seized by one of
his early friends and followers, Franciso Pi-
zarro, and then, after throwing him into pri-
son, he ordered him to be put to death by
haying his head cut off.

‘This unjust sentence was executed, and
Balboa, after a mock trial, was publicly be-
headed, in the 48th year of his age.
GS PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

CHAPTER X. ©

PARLEY TELLS OF THE CONQUEST OF
MEXICO.

Nor long after this another expedition sailed
from Cuba, under the command of Cordova,
to make further discoveries on the new con-
tinent.

The first land they saw proved to be the
eastern cape of that large peninsula which
you see in the map projecting into the gulf
of Mexico, and which still retains its original
name of Yucatan.

As they approached the shore, five canoes
came off full of people decently clad in cot-
ton garments; this excited the wonder of
the Spaniards, who had found every other
part they had yet visited, possessed by
naked savages.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 97

Cordova endeavoured to gain their good-
will by presents, but perceived they were
preparing to attack him; and, as his water
began to fail, he sailed further along the
coast in hopes of procuring a supply, but
not a single river did he find all along that
coast till he came to Potonchon, in the
bay of Campeachy, which is on the western
side of the peninsula.

Here Cordova landed all his troops, in
order to protect the sailors while filling their
casks ; but, notwithstanding, the natives
rushed down upon them with such fury
and in such numbers, that forty-seven of the
Spaniards were killed upon the spot, and
one man only of the whole body escaped
unhurt,

Cordova, though wounded in twelve
places, led off his wounded men with great
presence of mind and fortitude, and with
much difficulty they reached their ships,
and hastened back to Cuba. Cordova died
of his wounds soon after his arrival.

Notwithstanding the ill success of this
expedition, another was shortly after fitted
98 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

out under the command of Grijalva, a young
man of known merit and courage. He di-
rected his course to the bay of Campeachy,
to the part from which Cordova had re-
turned, and as they advanced they saw many
villages scattered along the coast, in which
they could distinguish houses of stone that
appeared white and lofty at a distance.

In the warmth of their admiration, they
fancied these to be cities, adorned with
towers and pinnacles; and one of the sol-
diers happening to remark that this country
resembled Spain in appearance, Grijalva,
with universal applause, called it New Spain ;
the name which still distinguishes this ex-
tensive and opulent province of the Spanish
dominions.

They landed to the west of Tabasco, where
they were received with the respect due to
superior beings; the people perfumed them
as they landed with incense of gum copal,
and presented to them offerings of the
choicest delicacies of their country.

They were extremely fond of trading with
their new visitants, and in six days, the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, og

Spaniards obtained ornaments of gold, and
of curicus workmanship, to the amount of
fifteen thousand pesoes, an immense sum,
in exchange for European toys of small
price.

They learned from the natives that they
were the subjects of a great monarch, whose
dominions extended over that and many
other provinces.

Grijalva now returned with a full account
of the important discoveries he had made,
and with all the treasure he had acquired
by trafficking with the natives.

The favourable account of New Spain
brought by Grijalva, determined Velasquez,
the governor of Cuba, seriously to undertake
the conquest of that country, but as he did
not wish to take the command himself, he
endeavoured to find a person who would
act under his directions,

After much deliberation he fixed upon
Fernando Cortez, a man of restless and
ardent spirit, on whom he had conferred
many benefits; but these Cortez soon for-
got, and was no sooner invested with the
100 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

command than he threw off the authority
of Velasquez altogether.

The greatest force that could be collected
for the conquest of a great empire, amounted
to no more than five hundred and eight men,
only thirteen of whom were armed with mus-
kets; thirty-two were cross-bowmen, and the
rest had swords and spears; they had only
sixteen horses, and ten small field-pieces.

With such a slender and ill provided force
did Cortez set sail to make war upon a mo-
narch whose dominions were more extensive
than all the kingdoms subject to the Spanish
crown,

On his voyage Cortez first landed on the
island of Cozumel, where he redeemed from
slavery Jerome de Aguilar, a Spaniard, who
had been eight years a prisoner among the
Indians, and having learned the Yucatan
Janguage (which is spoken in all those parts),
proved afterwards extremely useful as an ii
terpreter.

He then proceeded to the river of Ta-
paseo, where the disposition of the natives
proved very hostile, and they showed the


AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 101
most determined resistance ; but the noise
of the artillery, the appearances of the float-
ing fortresses which brought the Spaniards
over the ocean, and the horses on which
they fought, all new objects to the natives,
inspired them with astonishment mingled
swith terror; they regarded the Spaniards as
gods, and sent them supplies of provisions,
‘with a present of some gold and twenty
female slaves.

Cortez here learned that the native sove-
reign, who was called Montezuma, reigned
over an extensive empire, and that thirty
vassals, called caziques, obeyed him; that
his riches were immense, and his power
absolute. No more was necessary to inflame
the ambition of Cortez, and the avarice of
his followers.

He then proceeded along the coast till he
came to St. Juan de Ulua, where, having
laid the foundation of Vera Cruz, he caused
himself to be elected Captain-general of the
new colony.

Here he was visited by two native ca-
ziques, whose names were Teutile and Pil-
102 PARLEY S TALES ABOUT

patoe, who entered his camp with a nume-
rous retinue, and informed him that they
were persons entrusted with the government
of that province by a great monarch, whom
they called Montezuma, and that they were
sent to inquire what his intentions were in
visiting their coast, and to offer him what
assistance he might need.

Cortez received them with much formal
ceremony, and informed them that he came
from Don Carlos of Austria, the greatest
monarch of all the east, with propositions of
such moment, that he could impart them to
none but the emperor himself; and _ re-
quested them to conduct him, without loss
of time, into the presence of their master.

Messengers were immediately despatched
to Montezuma, with a full account of every-
thing that had passed.

The Mexican monarch, in order to obtain
early information, had couriers posted along
the road, and the intelligence was conveyed
by a very curious contrivance called picture
writing, persons being employed to repre-
sent, in a series of pictures, everything that
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 103

passed, which was the Mexican mode of
writing: Teutile and Pilpatoe were em-
ployed to deliver the answer of their master,
but as they knew how repugnant it was to
the wishes and schemes of the Spanish com-
mander, they would not make it known till
they had first endeavoured to soothe and
pacify him. For this purpose they intro-
duced a train of a hundred Indians loaded
with presents sent to him by Montezuma,

The magnificence of these far exceeded
any idea which the Spaniards had formed of
his wealth.

They were placed on mats spread on the
ground, in such order as showed them to the
greatest advantage. Cortez and his officers
viewed with admiration the various manu-
factures of the country. Cotton stuffs so
fine as to resemble silk. Pictures of ani-
mals, trees, and other natural objects, formed
with feathers of different colours, disposed.
with such skill and elegance, as to resemble,
in truth and beauty of imitation, the finest
paintings. But what chiefly attracted their
eyes were two large plates of circular form ;
104 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

one of massive gold, representing the sun,
the other of silver, an emblem of the moon.
These were accompanied with bracelets,
collars, rings, and other trinkets of gold, and
with several boxes filled with pearls, precious
stones, and grains of gold unwrought, as
they had been found in the mines or rivers.

Cortez received all these with an appear-
ance of profound respect for the monarch
by whom they were bestowed ; but when the
Mexican informed him that their master
would not give his consent that foreign
troops should approach nearer to his capital,
-or even allow them to continue longer in his
‘dominions, the Spanish general declared that
he must insist on his first demand, as he
could not, without dishonour, return to his
own country until he was admitted into the
presence of the princes whom he was ap-
pointed by his sovereign to visit.

He first caused all his vessels to be burnt,
in order to cut off the possibility of retreat,
and to show his soldiers that they must
either conquer or perish. He then pene-
trated into the interior of the country, drew
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 105

to his camp several caziques, hostile to Mon-
tezuma, and induced these native princes to
assist him.

After surmounting every obstacle he ar-
rived with his army in sight of the immense:
lake on which was built the city of Mexico,.
the capital of the empire.

In descending from the mountains of
Chalco, the vast plain of Mexico opened
gradually to their view, displaying a pros-
pect the most striking and beautiful: fertile
and cultivated fields, stretched out further
than the eye could reach, a lake resembling
the sea in extent, encompassed with large
towns, and the capital city rising upon an
island, adorned with temples and turrets. -

Many messengers arrived one after another
from Montezuma, one day permitting them
to advance, on the next requiring them te
retire, as his hopes or fears alternately pre-
vailed, and so wonderful was his infatuation
that Cortez was almost at the gates of the
capital before the monarch had determined
whether to receive him as a friend or oppose
him as an enemy, but as no signs of hos-
106 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

tility appeared, the Spaniards continued
their march along the causeway which led
to Mexico through the lake with great cir-
eumspection, though without seeming to
suspect the prince whom they were about to
visit.

When they drew near the city, about a
thousand persons who appeared to be of
distinction, came out to meet them, adorned
with plumes and clad in mantles of fine
cotton.

Each of these as they passed Cortez, sa-
luted him according to the mode of their
country ; they announced the approach of
Montezuma himself, and soon his harbingers
came in sight.

There appeared first two hundred persons
in uniform dresses, with large plumes of
feathers, marching two and two in deep
silence, barefooted, with their eyes fixed on
the ground.

Then followed a company of higher rank,
in their most shewy apparel. In the midst
of these was Montezuma, in a chair or litter,
richly ornamented with gold and feathers of
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 107

various colours. Four of his principal
favourites carried him on their shoulders;
others supported a canopy of curious work-
manship over his head: before him marched
three officers with rods of gold in their
hands, which they lifted on high at certain
intervals.



At that signal all the people bowed their
heads and hid their faces, as unworthy to
look on so great a monarch.

When he drew near, Cortez dismounted
108 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

advancing towards him in respectful posture
at the same time Montezuma alighted from
his chair, and leaning on the arm of two of.
his nearest relations, approached him with a.
slow and stately pace, his attendants covering
the way with cotton cloths, that he might
not touch the ground.

Cortez accosted him with profound rever-
ence, after the European fashion. He re-
turned the salutation, according to the mode
of his country, by touching the earth with
his hand and then kissing it.

This condescension, in so proud a mo-
narch, made all his subjects believe that the
Spaniards were something more than human..

Montezuma conducted Cortez to the
quarters which he had ordered for his recep-
tion, and immediately took his leave, with a
politeness not unworthy of a court more re-
fined.

“ You are now,” said he, “ with your bro-
thers, in your own house: refresh yourselves.
after your fatigue, and be happy until I
return.”

The place allotted for the Spaniards was
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 109

a magnificent palace built by the father of
Montezuma. It was surrounded by a stone
wall with towers, and its apartments and
courts were so large as to accommodate both
the Spaniards and their Indian allies.

The first care of Cortez was to take pre-
cautions for his security, by planting artil-
lery so as to command the different avenues
which led to it, and posting sentinels at
proper stations, with orders to observe the
greatest vigilance.

In the evening Montezuma returned to
visit his guests, with the same pomp as in
their first interview, and brought presents of
great value not only to Cortez and his offi-
cers, but even to the private men. A long
conference ensued, in which Cortez, in his
usual style, magnified the power and dignity
of his sovereign.

Next morning Cortez and some of his
principal attendants were admitted to a pub-
lic audience of the emperor; the three fol-
lowing days were employed in viewing the
eity, the appearance of which was so far
superior to any place the Spaniards had

H
110 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

beheld in America, and yet so little resem-
bling the structure of an European city,
that it filled them with surprise and admi-
ration.

Mexico, or Tenuchtitlan, as it was an-
tiently called, is situated on some small
islands, near one side of a large lake, which
is ninety miles in circumferenee. The ac-
cess to the city was by artificial causeways
or streets, formed of stones and earth, about
thirty feet in breadth. These. causeways
were of considerable length: that on the
west extended a mile and a half; that on the
north-west three miles, and that towards the
south six miles. On the east, the city could
only be approached by canoes.

Not only the temples of their Gods, but
the palaces belonging to the monarch, and
to persons of distinction, were of such di-
mensions that they might be termed magni-
ficent.

But, however the Spaniards might be
amused or astonished at these objects, they
felt the utmost anxiety with respect to their

situation.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 11}

They had been allowed to penetrate into
the heart of a powerful kingdom, and were
now lodged in its capital without having
once met with open opposition from its mo-
narch; but they had pushed forward into a
situation where it was difficult to continue,
and from which it was impossible to retire
without disgrace and ruin.

They could not, however, doubt of the
hostility of the Mexicans, more especially as,
on his march, Cortez received advice from
Vera Cruz, where he had left a garrison, that
a Mexican general had marched to attack the
rebels whom the Spaniards had encouraged to
revolt against Montezuma, and that the com-
mander of the garrison had marched out
with some of his troops to support the
rebels, that an engagement had ensued, in
which, though the Spaniards were victorious,
the Spanish general with seven of his men,
had been mortally wounded, his horse killed,
and one Spaniard taken alive, and that the
head of his unfortunate captive had been
sent to Mexico, after being carried in tri-
umph to different cities in order to convince
112 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the people that their invaders were not im-
mortal.

In this trying situation, he fixed upon a
plan no less extraordinary than daring; he
determined to sieze Montezuma in his palace
and to carry him a prisoner to the Spanish
quarters. This he immediately proposed to
his officers, who, as it was the only resource
in which there appeared any safety, warmly
approved of it, and it was agreed instantly to
make the attempt.

At his usual hour of visiting Montezuma,
Cortez went to the palace, accompanied by
five of his principal officers, and as many
trusty soldiers; thirty chosen men followed,
not in regular order, but sauntering at some
distance, as if they had no object but curio-
sity: the remainder of his troops continued
under arms, ready to sally out on the first
alarm.

Cortez and his attendants were admitted
without suspicion, the Mexicans retiring, as
usual, out of respect.

He now addressed the monarch in a tone
very different from that which he had em-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 113

ployed on former occasions, and a conver-
sation ensued, very much resembling that
between the wolf and the lamb, in the fable,
which you no doubt remember.

Cortez bitterly reproached him as the
author of the violent assault made by the
Mexican general upon the Spaniards, and
with having caused the death of some of his
companions.

Montezuma, with great earnestness, as-
serted his innocence, but Cortez affected not
to believe him, and proposed that, as a proof
of his sincerity, he should remove from his
own palace, and take up his residence in the
Spanish quarters.

The first mention of so strange a proposal
almost bereaved Montezuma of speech; at
length he haughtily answered “ That persons
of his rank were not accustomed voluntarily
to give themselves up as prisoners, and were
he mean enough to do so, his subjects would
not permit such an affront to be offered to
their sovereign.”

Cortez now endeavoured to soothe, and
then to intimidate him, and in this way the
114 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

altercation continued three hours, when
Velasquez de Leon, an impetuous young
man exclaimed, “Why waste more time in
vain? Let us seize him instantly, or stab him
to the heart.” The threatening voice and
fierce gesture with which these words wer.
uttered, struck Montezuma with a sense of
his danger, and abandoning himself to his
fate; he complied with their request: his
officers were called, he communicated to
them his resolution. Though astonished
and affected, they presumed not to question
the will of their master, but carried him in
silent pomp, all bathed in tears, to the
Spanish quarters.

Cortez at first pretended to treat Monte-
zuma with great respect, but soon took care
to let him know that he was entirely in his
power. Being thus master of the person of
the monarch, he demanded that the Mexican
general who had attacked the Spaniards, his
son, and five of the principal officers who
served under him, should be brought prison-
ers to Mexico, and delivered into his hands.

As Cortez wished that the shedding the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 115

blood of a Spaniard should appear the most
heinous crime that could be committed, he
then ordered these brave men, who had only
acted as became loyal subjects in opposing
the invaders of their country, to be burnt
alive, before the gates of the imperial palace.

The unhappy victims were led forth, and
laid on a pile composed of the weapons col-
lected in the royal magazine for the public
defence.

During this cruel execution, Cortez en-
tered the apartments of Montezuma, and
caused him to be loaded with irons, in order
to force him to acknowledge himself a vassal
of the king of Spain. The unhappy prince
yielded, and was restored to a semblance of
liberty on presenting the fierce conqueror
with six hundred thousand marks of pure
gold, and a prodigious quantity of precious
stones. :

The Mexicans driven to desperation, all at
once flew to arms, and made so sudden and
violent an attack that all the valour and
skill of Cortez was scarcely sufficient to
repel them.
116 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

The Spaniards now found themselves en-
closed in a hostile city, the whole population
of which was exasperated to the highest
pitch against them, and without some extra-
ordinary exertion they were inevitably un-
done. Cortez therefore made a desperate
sally, but after exerting his utmost efforts
for a whole day, was obliged to retreat to his
quarters with the loss of twelve men killed,
and upwards of sixty wounded ; Cortez him-
self was wounded in the hand.

The Spanish general now betook himself
to the only resource which was left, namely,
to try what effect the interposition of Mon-
tezuma would have to soothe and overawe his
subjects.

When the Mexicans approached next
morning to renew the assault, that unfor-
tunate prince, who was now reduced to the
sad necessity of becoming the instrument of
his own disgrace, and of the slavery of his
people, advanced to the battlements in his
royal robes, and with all the pomp in which
he used to appear on solemn occasions. At
the sight of their sovereign, whom they had
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. V7

long been accustomed to reverence almost
as a god. the Mexicans instant'y forebore
their hostilities; and many prostrated them-
selves on the ground; but when he ad-
dressed them in favour of the Spaniards,
and made use of all the arguments he could
think of to mitigate their rage, they testified
their resentment with loud murmurings, and
at length broke forth with such fury, that
before the soldiers appointed to guard Mon-



tezuma had time to cover him with their
shields, he was wounded with two arrows
118 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

and a blow on the temple with a stone struck
him to the ground.

On seeing him fall, the Mexicans instantly
fled with the utmost precipitation, and
Montezuma was conveyed to his apart-
ments, whither Cortez followed in order to
console him; but as the unhappy monarch
now perceived that he was become an object
of contempt even to his own subjects, his
haughty spirit revived, and scorning to pro-
long his life after this last humiliation, he
tore the bandages from his wounds, in a
transport of rage, and refusing to take any
nourishment, he soon ended his wretched
days; refusing with disdain all the solicita-
tions of the Spaniards to embrace the Chris-
tian faith.

The Mexicans having chosen his son
Guatimozin emperor, attacked the head quar-
ters of Cortez with the utmost fury, and, in
spite of the advantages of fire-arms, forced
the Spaniards to retire, which alone saved
them from destruction. Their rear guard
was cut to pieces, and suffered severely
during the retreat, which lasted six days.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 119

The Spaniards, however, having received
fresh troops from Spain, defeated the Mexi-
cans, and took Guatimozin prisoner, and in
the end succeeded in totally subjugating this
vast empire.

Guatimozin, befge he was taken prisoner,
being aware of '4s impending fate, had or-
dered all his treasures to be thrown into the
lake, and he was now put to the torture, on
suspicion of having concealed his treasure.
This was done by laying him on burning
coals; but he bore whatever the cruelty of
his tormentors could inflict, with the invin-
cible fortitude of an American warrior. One
of his chief favourites, his fellow sufferer,
being overcome by the violence of the an-
guish, turned a dejected eye towards his
master, which seemed to implore his per-
mission to reveal allhe knew. But the high
spirited prince darted on him a look of au-
thority mingled with scorn, and checked his
weakness by asking, “Am I reposing on a
bed of flowers ?”

Overawed by the reproach, he persevered
in dutiful silence and expired.
120 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Cortes, utterly regardless of what crimes
and cruelties he committed, added largely to
the Spanish territory and revenue. But
Spain was always ungrateful. Pizarro was.
murdered; Columbus died of a broken
heart, and Balboa the death of a felon; so
what could Cortez expect? He fell into
neglect and poverty when his work was
done. One day he forced his way through
the crowd that had collected about the car-
riage of the sovereign, mounted the door-step,
and looked in. Astonished at so gross a
breach of etiquette, the monarch demanded
to know who he was? “I am a man,” re-
pled Cortez, “who has given you more
provinces than your ancestors left you
cities }??

ie
al!
no

AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 121

CHAPTER XI.

PARLEY RELATES HOW PIZARRO DISCO-
VERED AND CONQUERED PERU.

Peru, when first discovered by the Span-
iards, was a large and flourishing empire,
including two kingdoms, Peru, and Quito,
and extended over nearly half of the widest
part of the South American Continent, as
you will see if you look into the map, Brazil
occupying the other half of the wide part.

It had been governed by a long succession
of Emperors, who were called the Incas of
Peru.

On the 14th of Nov. 1524, three Spanish
adventurers whose names were Francisco
Pizarro, in early life a feeder of swine, Diego
‘de Almagro, and Hernando Luque, set sail
from Panama for the discovery of Peru.
129 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Panama was a new settlement which the
Spaniards had formed on the western side of
the Isthmus of Darien, on the shores of the
Pacific Ocean.

Pizarro had only a single ship and one
hundred and twenty men, to undertake this
discovery, and so little was he acquainted
with the climate of America, that the most
improper season of the whole year was chosen
for his departure ; the periodical winds which
were then set in, being directly opposite to.
the course he proposed to steer.

He spent two years in sailing from Pana-
ma to the northern extremity of Peru, a voy-
age which is now frequently performed in a
fortnight.

At Tumbez, a place about three degrees
south of the line, Pizarro and his compani-
ons feasted their eyes with the first view of
the opulence and civilization of the Peru-
vian empire.

This place was distinguished for its stately
temple, and for one of the palaces of the
Incas, or sovereigns of the country.

But what chiefly attracted their notice,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 123

was such a show of gold and silver, not only
in the ornaments of their persons and tem-
ples, but in the several vessels and utensils
of common use, as left them no room to
doubt that these metals abounded in the
greatest profusion.

Having explored the country sufficiently
to satisfy his own mind, Pizarro hastened
back to Panama, and from thence to Spain,
where he obtained from Charles the Fifth
the most liberal concessions, himself being
made chief governor of all the countries he
should subdue; Almagro, king’s lieutenant,
and Luque being appointed first bishop of
Peru.

Thus encouraged, Pizarro returned to Pa-
nama, whence he soon after sailed with three
small vessels, containing only one hundred
and eighty-six soldiers, and arrived at the
Bay of St. Matthew; he then advanced by
land as quickly as possible towards Peru.

When Pizarro landed in the bay of St.
Matthew, a civil war was raging with the
greatest fury between Atahualpa, who was
then seated on the throne of Peru, and his
brother.
124 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

This contest so much engaged the atten-
tion of the Peruvians, that they never once
attempted to check the progress of the
Spaniards, and Pizarro determined to take
advantage of these dissensions.

He directed his course towards Caxama-
lia, a small town at the distance of twelve
days’ march from St. Michael, where Ata-
hualpa was encamped with a considerable
body of troops.

Before he had proceeded far, an officer,
despatched by the Inca, met him with valu-
able presents from that prince, accompanied
with a proffer of his alliance, and his assur-
ance of a friendly reception at Caxamalia.

Pizarro, according to the usual artifice of
his countrymen, pretended to come as the
ambassador of a powerful monarch, to offer
his aid against those enemies who disputed
his title to the throne.

The Peruvians were altogether unable to
comprehend the object of the Spaniards in
entering their country, whether they should
consider them as beings of a superior nature,
who had visited them from some beneficent
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 125

motive, as the Spaniards wished them to be-
iieve, or whether they were sent as evil de-
mons to punish them for their crimes, as the
rapaciousness and cruelty of the Spaniards
led them to apprehend.

Pizarro’s declaration of his pacific inten-
tions, however, so far removed all the Inca’s
fears, that he determined to give him a
friendly reception.

In consequence of this the Spaniards
were allowed to march across a sandy desert,
which lay in their way to Metupe, where the
smallest efforts of an opposing enemy might
have proved fatal to them, and then through
a defile so narrow, that a few men might
have defended it against a numerous army ;
but here, likewise, they met with no opposi-
tion.

Pizarro, having reached Caxamalia with
his followers, sent messengers, inviting Ata-
hualpa to visit him in his quarters; which he
readily promised. On the return of these
messengers, they gave such a description of
the wealth which they had seen, as deter-
mined Pizarro to seize upon the Peruvian

I
128 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

monarch, in order that he might more easily
come at the riches of his kingdom.

The next day the Inca approached Caxama-
lia, without suspicion of Pizarro’s treachery;
but, as he drew near the Spanish quarters,
Vincent Valverde, chaplain to the expedition,
advanced with a crucifix in one hand and a
breviary.in the other, and, in a long dis-
course, attempted to convert him to the Ro-
man Catholic faith.

This the monarch declined, avowing his
resolution to adhere to the worship of the
sun; at the same time wished to know where
the priest had learned these extraordinary
things he had related. “ In this book !” ans-
wered Valverde, reaching out his breviary.

The Inca opened it eagerly, and turning
- over the leaves, raised it to his ear, “This,”
said he, “is silent, it tells me nothing;” and
threw it with disdain to the ground.

The enraged monk, running towards his
countrymen, cried out, “To arms, Christians!
to arms ! the word of God is insulted—avenge
the profanation of these impious dogs !”

Pizarro immediately gave the signal of
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 127

assault, which ended in the destruction of
four thousand Peruvians, without the loss of



a single Spaniard. The plunder was rich
beyond any idea which even the conquerors
had yet formed concerning the wealth of
Peru. The Inca, who was taken prisoner,
quickly discovered that the ruling passion
of the Spaniards was the desire of gold; he
offered therefore to recover his liberty by a
splendid ransom.

The apartment in which he was confined
was twenty-two feet long, by sixteen in
128 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

breadth; this he undertook to fill with ves-
sels of gold as high as he could reach. .

Pizarro closed with the proposal, and a
line was drawn upon the walls of the cham-
ber, to mark the stipulated height to which
the treasure was to rise.

During this ‘confinement, Atahualpa had
attached himself with peculiar affection to
Ferdinand Pizarro, and Hernando Soto;
who, as they were persons of birth and edu-
cation, superior to the rough adventurers
with whom they served, were accustomed to
behave with more decency and kindness to
the captive monarch.

Soothed with this respect, he delighted in
their society; but in the presence of the
governor he was always uneasy and over-
awed, and this dread soon became mingled
-with contempt.

Among all the European arts, what he
admired most was that of reading and writ-
ing, and he long deliberated with himself
whether it was a natural or an acquired
talent. In order to determine this, he desired
one of the’ soldiers, who guarded him, to
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 129

write the name of God on the nail of his
thumb. This he showed successively to
several Spaniards, asking its meaning, and
to his amazement, they all, without hesitation
returned the same answer. At length Fran-
cisco Pizarro entered, and on presenting it to
him, he blushed, and with some confusion
was obliged to acknowledge that he could
not read.

From that moment Atahualpa considered
him as a mean person, less instructed than
his own soldiers, nor could he conceal the
sentiments of contempt with which this dis-
covery inspired him. He, however, per-
formed his part of the contract, and the
gold which his subjects brought in, was
worth three or four hundred thousand
pounds sterling.

When they assembled to divide the spoils
of this innocent people, procured by deceit,
extortion, and cruelty, the transaction began
with a solemn invocation to Heaven, as if
they expected the guidance of God in dis-
tributing the wages of iniquity. In this
division, eight thousand pesoes, at that time
130 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

equal in value to £10,000 sterling, of the
present day, fell to the share of each soldier:
Pizarro and his officers received shares in
proportion to the dignity of their rank.

The Spaniards having divided the treasure
among them, the Inca insisted that they
should fulfil their promise of setting him at
liberty. But the Spaniards, with unparalel-
led treachery and cruelty had now deter-
mined to put him to death; an action the
most criminal and atrocivus that stains the
Spanish name, amidst all the deeds of vio-
lence committed in carrying on the conquest
of the New World. In order to give some
colour of justice to this outrage, Pizarro
resolved to try the Inca, according to the
forms of the criminal courts of Spain, and
having. constituted himself chief judge,
charges the most absurd, and even ridiculous,
were brought against him; but, as his infa-
mous judges had predetermined, he was
found guilty, and condemned to be burnt
alive.

Atahualpa, astonished at his fate, endea-
voured to avert it by tears, by promises, and
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 131

by entreaties; but pity never touched the
unfeeling heart of Pizarro. He ordered him
to be led instantly to execution, and the cruel
priest, after having prostituted his sacred
office to confirm the wicked sentence, offered
to console, and attempted to convert him.

The dread of a cruel death, extorted from
the trembling victim his consent to be bap-
tized. The ceremony was performed; and
Atahualpa, instead of being burnt alive,
was strangled at the stake.

Pizarro then proceeded in his career of
cruelty and rapacity, till, in ten years, he
subdued the whole of this great empire, and
divided it among his followers.

In making the division, he allotted the
richest and finest provinces to himself and
his favourites, giving the less valuable to
Almagro and his friends.

This partiality highly offended Almagro,
who thought his claims equal to Pizarro’s,
and this led to cpen hostilities; when Al-
magro being taken prisoner, he was beheaded
in prison by order of Pizarro.

_Soon after this, Pizarro himselt was as-
132 _ PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

sassinated in his palace by a party of Alma-
gro’s friends, headed by the son of Almagro,
in revenge for the death of his father.

Some time before this, the cruel and bi-
goted priest, Val de Viridi, had been beaten
to death with the butt end of muskets,
in the island of Puma, at the instigation of
Almagro.

Thus retributive justice, in the end, over-
took these unjust and cruel men.


AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 133

CHAPTER XIL.

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE NATURAL BEAUTIES
OF AMERICA,

Let us now leave for a while the cruel
Spaniards, and talk about the beauties of
nature, in these new discovered countries.

In these extensive regions, every thing
appeared new and wonderful; not only the
inhabitants, but the whole face of nature
was totally different from anything that had
been seen in Europe.

Grand ridges of mountains, numerous
volcanoes, some cf them, though under the
Equator, covered with perpetual snows.
Noble rivers, whose course, in several in-
stances, exceeds three thousand miles.

Here are found the palm-tree, the cedar,
134 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the tamarind, the guaiacum, the sassafras, the
hickory, the chestnut, the walnut of many
different kinds, the wild cherry (sometimes
a hundred feet high), and more than fifty
different sorts of oak.

The plane, of which there are two kinds,
’ one found in Asia, which is called the orien-
tal plane: that found in America is called
the occidental plane; but the Americans call
it button-wood, or sycamore. — Its foliage is
richer, and its leaves of a more beautiful
green than the oriental. It grows to a great
size.

The cypress is perhaps the largest of the
American trees; it is a more than a hundred
and twenty feet high; and the diameter of
the trunk at forty or fifty feet from the
ground is sometimes eight or ten feet.

Another tree of gigantic magnitude is
the wild cotton or Cuba tree. A canoe
made from the single trunk of this tree has
been know to contain a hundred persons.

Above all these in beauty is the majestic
magnolia which shoots up to the height of
more than a hundred feet; its trunk per-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 135

fectly straight, surmounted by a thick ex-
panded head of pale green foliage, in the
form of a cone.

From the centre of the flowery crown
which terminates each of its branches, a
flower of the purest white arises, having the
form of a rose, from six to nine inches in
diameter.

To the flower succeeds a crimson cone;
this, in opening, exhibits round seeds of the
finest coral red, surrounded by delicate
threads, six inches long.

Here, every plant and tree displays its
most majestic form.

Upon the shady banks of the Madelina
there grows a climbing plant which the bota-
nists call Aristolochia, the flowers of which
are four feet in circumference, and children
amuse themselves with covering their heads
with them as hats.

The Banana which grows in all the hot
parts of America, and furnishes the Indians
with the chief part of their daily food, pro-
ducing more nutritious substance, in less
136 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

space, and with less trouble than any other
known plant.



It is here that the ground produces the
sugar-cane, the coffee, and the cocoa-nut from
which is produced the chocolate. The van-
illa, the anana or pine apple, and many other
delicious fruits.

The cacao, though generally pronounced
cocoa, must not be confounded with the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 137

Cocoa Palm which produces that largest of all
nuts, the Cocoa-nut.

These trees and plants which I have men-
tioned, and many more equally beautifui, are
all natives of the American woods.

But the European settlers, when they
came, brought over to Europe many valuable
kinds of fruit and plants, which they did not
find here; and I never was more delighted
than once on passing through Virginia, to
observe the dwellings of the settlers shaded
by orange, lemon, and pomegranate trees,
that fill the air with the perfume of their
flowers, while their branches are loaded with
fruit.

Strawberries of native growth, of the
richest flavour, spring up beneath your feet;
and when these are passed away, every prove
and field looks like a cherry orchard. Then
follow the peaches, every hedge-row is
planted with them. But it is the flowers
and the flowering shrubs, that, beyond all
else, render these regions so beautiful. No
description can give an idea of the variety,
the profusion, and the luxuriance of them.
138 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

The Dog-wood, whose lateral fan-like
branches are dotted all over with star-like
blossoms of splendid white, as large as those
of the gumcistus.

The straight silvery column of the Papan
fig, crowned with a canopy of large indented
leaves; and the wild orange tree, mixed
with the odoriferous and common laurel,
form striking ornaments of this enchanting
scene, with many other lovely flowers too
numerous to describe.

There is another charm that enchants the
wanderer in the American woods. In a
bright day in the summer months you walk
through an atmosphere of butterflies, so
gaudy in hue, and so varied in form, that I
often thought they looked like flowers on the
wing.

Some of them are large, measuring three
or four inches across the wing, but many,
and those of the most beautiful, are small.
Some have wings the most dainty lavender,
and bodies of black; others are fawn and
rose colour, and others are orange and bright
blue: but pretty as they are, it is their num-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 139

bers more than their beauty; and their gay,
and noiseless movement through the air,
crossing each other in chequered maze, that
so delights the eye.



That. beautiful production, the humming
bird, is also the sportive inhabitant of these
warm climates, and I think they surpass all
the works of nature in singularity of form,
splendour of colour, and variety of species.

They - 2 found in all the West India
m0 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

islands and in most parts of the American
continent: the smallest species does not ex-
ceed the size of some of the bees.

fi
AA



‘There are so many different kinds, and
each so beautiful, that it is impossible to des-
cribe them. They are constantly on the
wing, collecting insects from the blossoms of
the tamarind, the orange, or any other tree
that happens to be in flower: and the hum-
ming noise proceeds from the surprising ve-
locity with which they move their wings.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 141

CHAPTER XIII,

PARLEY TELLS OF THE FIRST ENGLISH

COLONY IN AMERICA.

In the beginning of the reign of James the
First, who you know succeeded Elizabeth,
the first successful attempt was made by the
English to found a colony in America.
Three small vessels, of which the largest
did not exceed one hundred tons burden,
under the command of Captain Newport,
formed the first squadron that was to exe-
cute what had been so long, and so vainly
attempted; and sailed with a hundred and
five men destined to remain in America.
Several of these emigrants were mem-
bers of distinguished families—particularly
George Percy, a brother of the Earl of
K
142 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

a

Northumberland ; and several were officers
of reputation, of whom we may notice
Bartholomew Gosnald, the navigator, and
Captain John Smith, one of the most
distinguished ornaments of an age that
abounded with memorable men.

Thus, after the lapse of a hundred and
ten years from the discovery of the con-
tinent by Cabot, and twenty-two years after
its first occupation by Raleigh, was the
number of the English colonists limited to
a hundred and five; and this handful of
men undertook the arduous task of peopling
a remote and uncultivated land, covered
with woods and marshes, and inhabited only
by savages and beasts of prey.

Newport and his squadron did not accom-
plish their voyage in less than four months ;
but its termination was rendered _parti-
cularly fortunate by the effect of a storm,
which defeated their purpose of landing and
settling at Roanoak, and carried them into
the bay of Chesapeak; and coasting along
its southern shore, they entered a river which
the natives called Powhatan, and explored
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 148

its banks for more than forty miles from its
mouth.

The adventurers, impressed with the supe-

rior advantages of the coast and region to
which they had been thus happily conducted,
determined to make this the place of their
abode. ‘
‘hey gave to their infant settlement, as
well as to the neighbouring river, the name
of their king; and James Town retains the
distinction of being the oldest of existing
habitations of the English in America.

Newport having landed the colonists, with
what supplies of provisions were destined
for their support, set sail with his ships
to return to England, in the month of June,
1607.

The colonists soon found themselves
limited to a scanty supply of unwholesome
provisions ; and the heat and moisture of the
climate combining with the effect of their
diet, brought on diseases that raged with
fatal violence.

Before the month of September, one half
of their number had miserably perished, and
144 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

among these victims was Bartholomew Gos-
nald, who had planned the expedtion, and
greatly contributed to its success,

This scene of suffering was embittered by
dissensions among themselves. At length,
in the extremity of their distress, when ruin
seemed to threaten them, as well from
famine as the fury of the savages, the
colonists obtained a complete and unex-
pected deliverance, which the piety of Smith
ascribed to the influence of God in their
behalf,

The savages, actuated by a sudden change
of feeling, not only refrained from molesting
them, but brought them, without being
asked, a supply of provisions so liberal, as
at once to remove their apprehensions of
famine and hostility.

The colonists were now instructed by
their misfortunes, and the sense of urgent
danger, led them to submit to the advice of
the man, whose talents were most likely to
extricate them from the difficulties with
which they were surrounded.

Every eye was now turned on Captain
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 145

Smith, whose superior talents and experience,
had so far excited the envy and jealousy of
his colleagues, that he had been excluded
from a seat in the council.

Under Captain Smith’s directions, James
Town was fortified, so as to repel the attacks
of the savages, and its inhabitants were pro-
vided with dwellings that afforded shelter
from the weather, and contributed to restore
and preserve their health.

Finding the supplies of the savages dis-
continued, he took with him some of his
people and penetrated into the interior of
the country, where by courtesy and kindness
to the tribes whom he found well disposed,
he succeeded in procuring a plentiful supply
of provisions. In the midst of his successes
he was surprised during an expedition by a
hostile body of savages, who having made
him prisoner, after a gallant and nearly suc-
cessful defence, prepared to inflict on him
the usual fate of their captives.

His genius and presence of mind did not
desert him on this trying occasion. He
desired to speak with the sachem or chief of
146 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the tribe to which he was a prisoner, and,
presenting him with a mariner’s compass,
expatiated on the wonderful discoveries
to which this little instrument had led, des-
cribed the shape of the earth, the vast-
ness of its land and oceans, the course of
the sun and the varieties of nations, wisely
forbearing to express any solicitude for his
life.

The savages listened to him with amaze-
ment and admiration. They handled the
compass, viewing with surprise the play
of the needle, which they plainly saw, but
were unable to touch; and he appeared to
have gained some ascendancy over ther
minds.

For an hour afterwards they seemed un-
decided; but their habitual disposition
returning, they bound him to a tree, and
were preparing to despatch him with their
arrows.

But a deeper impression had been made
by his harangue on the mind of their chief,
who, holding up the compass in his hand,
gave the signal of reprieve, and Smith,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 147

though still guarded as a prisoner, was con-
ducted to a dwelling, where he was kindly
treated and pleutifully entertained.



But after vainly attempting to prevail on
their captive to betray the English colony
into their hands, the Indian referred his
fate to Powhatan, the king or principal
sachem of the ccuntry, to whose presence
148 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

they conducted him in pompous and tri-
umphant procession.

This prince received him with much cere~
mony, ordered a rich repast to be set before
him, and then adjudged him to suffer death
by having his head laid on a stone and
beaten to pieces with clubs.



At the place appointed for his execution,
Smith was again rescued from impending
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 149

destruction by Pocahontas, the favourite
daughter of the chief, who, finding her first
entreaties disregarded, threw her arms round
the prisoner, and declared her determination
to save him or die with him.

Her generous compassion prevailed over
the cruelty of her tribe, and the king not
only gave Smith his life, but soon after sent
him back to James Town, where the benifi-
cence of Pocahontas continued to follow him
with supplies of provisions that delivered the
colony from famine.

This eminent commander continued for
some time to govern the colony with the
greatest wisdom and prudence, when he
received a dangerous wound from the acci-
dental explosion of some gunpowder. Com-
pletely disabled by this misfortune, and
destitute of surgical aid in the colony, he
was compelled to resign his command, and
take his departure for England. He never
returned to Virginia again.
150 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

CHAPTER XIV.

PARLEY TELLS OF THE ORIGINAL NATIVE
AMERICANS.

I recontect when I was staying in America,
an old Delaware Indian came to Boston to
sell some skins and furs, and he called at the
house where I was stopping. He had once
been a chief among the Indians, but was
now poor.

I went to this Indian’s home, which was a
little hut near Mount Holyoke. We found
his wife and his three children; two boys
and a girl. They came out to meet us, and
were very glad to see their father and me.

I was very hungry and tired when I ar-
rived. The Indian’s wife roasted some bear’s
flesh, and gave us some bread made of
pounded corn, for our supper.

I then went to bed on some bear skins,
and slept very well. Early in the morning
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 151

I was called to go hunting with the Indain
and his two sons. It was a fine bright
morning in October. The sun was shining
on the tops of the mountains; we climed
Mount Holyoke, through the woods, and as-
cended a high rock, from which we could
see a beautiful valley far below us, in the
centre of which was the little town of North-
ampton, much smaller than it is now.



“Do you see those houses?” said the
Indian to me, “ When my grandfather was
a boy, there was not a house where you see
152 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

so many: that valley which now belongs to
white men, belonged to red men.”

“ Then the red men were rich and happy;
now they are poor and wretched. Then
that beautiful river which you see running
through the valley, and which is called the
Connecticut, was theirs. They owned these
fine mountains too, they hunted in these
woods, and fished in that river, and were
numerous and powerful,—now they are few
and weak.”

“But how has this change happened?”
said I, “who has taken your lands from you,
and made you so miserable ?”

“I will tell you all about that to-night,”
said he, “ when we return home.”

We proceeded cautiously through the
woods, and had not gone far when the
Indian beckoned us all to stop. ‘ Look
yonder,” said he to me, “on that high rock
above us!” I did so, but could see nothing.
Look again,” said he; I did, and saw a
young hind standing upon the point of a
rock which hung over the valley; she was a
beautiful little animal, full of spirit, with
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 153

large black eyes, slender legs and of a
reddish brown colour.

He now selected a choice arrow, placed it
on the bow, and sent it whizzing through
the air. It struck directly through the heart.
The little animal sprang violently forward,
over the rock, and fell dead many feet below,



where Whampum’s sons soon found it; we
now returned to the wigwam, carrying the
fawn with us.
154 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

In the evening I reminded him of his
promise to tell me how the Indians had been
robbed of their lands and reduced to po-
verty. He accordingly began as follows :—

“ A great many years ago,” said he, “ when
men with white skins had never been seen
in this land, some Indians who were out
fishing at a place where the sea widens,
espied at a great distance something very
large, floating on the water, and such as
they had never seen before.

“ These Indians immediately returning to
the shore, apprized their countrymen of
what they had observed, and pressed them
to go out with them and discover what it
might be. They hurried out together, and
saw with astonishment what the others had
described, but could not agree upon what it
was; some believed it to be an uncommonly
large fish or animal, whilst others were of
opinion that it must be a very large house
floating on the sea.

“They sent off messengers to carry the
news to their scattered chiefs and warriors
that they should come together immediately.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 155

“ The chiefs were soon assembled and de-
liberating as to the manner in which they
should receive the Manitou or Supreme
Being on his arrival. Every measure was
taken to be well provided with plenty of
meat for a sacrifice, the women were desired
to prepare the best victuals, all the idols
were examined and put in order, and a
grand dance was supposed not only to be
agreeable to the Great Being, but it was be-
lieved that it might tend to appease him if
he was angry with them.

“ Distracted betwecn hope and fear, they
were at a loss what to do; a dance, how-
ever, commenced in great confusion; fresh
runners arrive, declaring it to be a large
house, of various colours, and crowded with
living creatures.

Many are for running off into the woods,
but are pressed by others to stay, in order
not to give offence to their visitors, who
might find them out and destroy them. The
house at last stops, and a canoe of small
size comes on shore, with a man clothed
in red, and some others in it; some stay
156 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

with his canoe to guard it. The chiefs and
wise men assembled in council, form them-
selves into a large circle, towards which the
man in red approaches, with two others ; he
salutes them with a friendly countenance,
and they return the salute in the same
manner; they are lost in admiration, the
dress, the manner, the whole appearance of
the unknown strangers is to them a subject
of wonder; but they are particularly struck
with him who wore the red coat, all glitter-
_ ing with gold, which they could in no man-
ner account for.

* He surely must be the great Manitou;
but why should he have a white skin?
Meanwhile a large Hack-hack is brought by
one of his servants, from which an unknown
liquid is poured out into a small cup,
and handed to the supposed Manitou; he
drinks,—has the cup filled again, and hands
it to the chief standing next to him; the
chief receives it, but only smells the contents
and passes it on to the next chief, who does
the same.

“The glass or cup thus passes through the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 157

circle without the liquor being tasted by any
one, and is upon the point of being returned
to the red-clothed Manitou, when one of the
Indians, a brave man and a great warrior,
suddenly jumps up and harangues the as-
sembly, on the impropriety of returning the
cup with its content: Itwas handed to
them, said he, by the Manitou, that they
should drink out of it as he had done: to
follow his example would be pleasing to him,
but to return what he had given to them,
might provoke his wrath, and bring destruc-
tion on them ; and since the orator believed
it for the good of the nation, that the con-
tents should be drunk, and as no one else
would do it, he would drink it himself, let
the consequences be what they might: it
was better for one man to die, than that a
whole nation should be destroyed.

“ He then took the cup, and bidding the
assembly a solemn farewell, at once drank
up its whole contents. Every eye was fixed
on the resolute chief, to see what effect the
unknown liquor would produce.

“ He soon began to stagger, and at last fell

L
158 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

prostrate on the ground; his companions
now bemoan his fate, he falls into a sound



sleep, and they think he is dead: he wakes
again:—he asks for more, his wish is granted ;
the whole assembly then imitate him, and all
become intoxicated.

« After this general intoxication had
ceased, the man with the red clothes, who
had remained in his great canoe while it
lasted, returned again and distributed pre-
sents among them, consisting of beads, axes,
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 159

shoes and stockings, such as white people
‘wear.

“They soon became familiar with each
other, and began to converse by signs; the
strangers made them understand that they
would not stay here, that they would return
home again, but would pay them another
visit next year, when they would bring them
more presents and stay with them awhile.

“ They went away, as they had said, and
returned in the following season, when both
parties were much rejoiced to see each other ;
but the white men laughed at the Indians,
for they had the axes and hoes, which they
had given them the year before, hanging to
their breasts, as ornaments, and the stock-
ings were made use of as tobacco pouches.
‘The whites now put handles to the axes for
them, and cut down trees before their eyes,
hoed up the ground, and put .the stockings
on their legs: here, they say, a general
laughter ensued among the Indians, that
they had remained ignorant of the use of
such valuable tools, and had borne the
weight of them hanging to their necks for
160 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

such a length of time. They took every
white man they saw for an inferior attend-



ant on the supreme Manitou in the red
laced clothes.

* As they became daily more familiar with
the Indians, the white men proposed to stay
with us, and we readily consented.

“ It was we who so kindly received them
in our country, we took them by the hand
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 161

and bade them welcome to sit down by our
side and live with us as brothers; but how
did they requite our kindness? They first
asked only for a little land, cn which to raise
bread for themselves and their families, and
pasture for their cattle, which we freely gave
them; they soon wanted more, which we also
gave them ; they saw the game in the woods,
which the Great Spirit had given us for our
subsistence, and they wanted that too; they
penetrated into the woods in quest of game ;
they discovered spots of land which pleased
them, that land they also wanted; and be-
cause we were loath to part with it, as we saw
they had already more than they had need
of, they took it from us by force, and drove
us to a great distance from our antient
homes; they looked everywhere for good
spots of land, and when they found one,
they immediately, and without ceremony,
possessed themselves of it ; but when at last
they came to our favourite spots, those
which lay most convenient to our fisheries,
then bloody wars ensued. We would have
been contented that the white people and we
162 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

should have lived quietly beside each other,
but these white men encroached so fast upon
us, that we saw at once we should lose all if
we did not resist them. The wars that we
carried on against each other were long and.
cruel,—we were enraged when we saw the
white people put our friends and relatives,
whom they had taken prisoners, on board
their ships, whether to drown or sell them
as slaves in the country from which they
came, we know not; but certain it is, that
none of them have ever returned, or even
been heard of.

* At last they got possession of the whole
country, which the Great Spirit had given
us; one of our tribes was forced to wander
far to the north, others dispersed in small
bodies, and sought refuge where they could.

“ How long we shall be permitted to remain
in this asylum, the Great Spirit only knows.
The whites will not rest contented till they
shall have destroyed the last of us, and
made us disappear entirely from the face of
the earth.”

The old Indian said no more: he looked
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 163

sad, and his two sons looked sad also ; and
I shall never forget the impression his story
made upon my mind.

Thus, these good Indians, with a kind of
melancholy pleasure, recite the long history
of their sufferings ; and often have I listened
to their painful details, until I have felt
ashamed of being a white man.

A few days after this we set out upon an-
other hunting excursion, and again climbed
the mountains. We had proceeded some dis-
tance when we heard the report of a gun,
and coming round the point of a rock which
lay just before us, we saw a Delaware Indian
hunter, who had just discharged his cara-
bine at a huge bear, and broken its back-
bone; the animal fell, and set up a most
plaintive cry; something like that of the
panther when he is hungry.

The Indian includes all savage beasts in
the number of his enemies, and wien he has
conquered one, he taunts him before he kills
him, in the same strain as he would a con-
quered enemy of a hostile tribe.

Instead of giving the bear another shot,
164 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

the hunter stood close to him, and addres-
sed him in these words :—-



“ Hark ye! bear; you are a coward, and
no warrior, as you pretend to“be. Were
you a warrior, you would show it by your
firmness, and would not cry and whimper,
like an old woman. You know, bear, that
our tribes are at war with each other, and
that yours were the aggressors.” As you.
may suppose, I was not a little surprised at
the delivery of this curious invective.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 165

CHAPTER XV.
PARLEY TELLS ABOUT THE UNITED STATES.

Tue English settlements in America grew
very rapidly into power and importance.
The French settlements also increased in
extent and influence, and a rivalry between
the French and English, fostered and
nourished by the “natural enmity” which
was said to subsist between the Gauls and
the Britons, broke out at last in terrible
warfare. War is very frightful under any
circumstances. It looks very much like
murder; and, even at the best of times, a
battle-field reminds us of Cain and Abel.
Brother slaughters brother, and the con-
queror rejoices and describes his sanguinary
work as “a glorious victory.” In the war
between the English and French settlers in
America, a new and atrocious feature was
introduced. The Indians were engaged,
166 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

for pay and powder, on either side, to com-
mit the most hideous cruelties; and things
were done which must not be told here, but
the very thought of which should make us
shudder and turn pale.

The English got the better of the French,
and they took Quebec, a strong city in
Canada. General Wolfe, a young man
and an excellent soldier, captured the city ;
but it cost him his life. During the heat
of the engagement, Wolfe was shot. “Sup-
port me,” said he to an officer near him;
“do not let my brave fellows see my face!’
He was removed to the rear, and water was
brought to quench his thirst. Just then a
cry was heard, “They run! they run!”
“Who runs?” exclaimed Wolfe, faintly
raising himself. “The @emy!” was the
reply. ‘ Then,” said he, “I die content,”
and expired.

The result of the war in which General
Wolfe perished, left a vast amount of debt
as a heavy weight upon the country. The
English settlers had fought very bravely all
through the war, and they thought that the
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 167

English at home ought to pay the debt, and
not tax them for its payment. But the
king and the parliament thought differently.
They taxed the American settlers very
heavily ; they would listen to no remon-
strance; and, when some signs were given
of resistance, they were threatened with
punishment, like so many unruly school-
boys. Certain privileges which had been
granted them were taken away, and troops
sent out to enforce obedience. One very
objectionable tax to the Americans was a
stamp duty on newspapers. Another was a
tax on tea. They urged that it was unfair
for the British government to tax them
without they were allowed to send members
to Pariiament to look after their interests ;
but remonstrance only tended to make the
British government more determined; and
so at last they came to what somebody
has called gunpowder law, that is to say,
fighting.

IT need not enter on the events of the
war. It ended in the triumph of the
American settlers, and in the declaration of
168 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

American independence and the formation of
the United States. The foremost man, both as
a statesman and a soldier, in the conduct of the
war, on the part of the Americans, was George
Washington. He was elected three times
to the presidency, and no name is more
revered than his by the Americans.

Since the separation of America from
England, more than one quarrel has oc-
curred between them. That which most
vitally touches the future prosperity of the
states is the warfare which now rages be-
tween the northern and southern sections of
the republic. Most of you are aware that
slavery prevails to a great extent in America.
The negroes or blacks (the word negro
means black) are more particularly found in
the southern states. ‘The northern states
do not hold slaves, but they have so far held
with slavery as to give up runaways, and
tolerate the laws which make a man—be-
cause he was black—a mere beast of burden.
A quarrel, however, on this question, and
others of minor importance, has at last
broken out between the north and south.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA, 169

The southerners have separated from the
northerners, and established a new republic
of their own. Their right to do this has
been denied by the north, and a civil war
has commenced in consequence. What may
be the final result it is impossible for any
one to predict. The quarrel threatened at
one time to involve a war with England;
but this is no longer apprehended. It
seems a very sad thing that a people so
clever, so enterprising, so prosperous as the
Americans, should, by a quarrel and separa-
tion among themselves, endanger—if they
do not entirely overthrow—one of the most
important states in the world. We cannot
forget what it is that lies at the bottom of
the mischief—SraveEry.

“O execrable crime! so to aspire
Above our brethren, to ourselves assuming
Authority usurped from God, not given.
He gave us only over beast, fish, fow],
Dominion absolute ; that right we hold
By his donation : but man over man
He made not lord—such title to himself
Reserving, human left from human free.”
170 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

I may now tell you something about
some of the chief cities in the United States.

New York is the principal seaport and
commercial metropolis of the States. It is
situated at the southern extremity of an
island called Manhattan Island, near the
mouth of the Hudson river. Its progress
has been very rapid, and its population
is more than double that of any other city in
the new world. The approach to the city
is very fine—the shores of the bay being
wooded down to the water’s edge, and
thickly studded with farms, villages, and
country seats. New York measures about
ten miles round. It is triangular in form.
The principal street is Broadway, a spacious
thoroughfare extending in a straight line
through the centre of the city. The houses
have a clean, fresh, cheerful appearance ;
many of the stores or shops are highly
decorated; the public buildings, including
the churches, while they can make no pre-
tension to grandeur, are good of their kind ;
the university is probably the finest building
in the city. The hotels in New York are
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 171

far more extensive than anything of the
kind in Europe, and they are fitted up and
conducted on a scale of princely grandeur.
The city of New York was founded by
the Dutch in 1621, and called New Am-
sterdam; but it was given to the Duke of
York (afterwards James II.) in i604, and
was henceforth called by his name. The
first congress of the United States was held
there in 1789.

Washington is the government capital of
the States, and is so called in honour of the
distinguished man—the father of the Re-
public—to whom I have already alluded.
The entrance to the city by the Pennsylva-
nian avenue is 100 feet wide, and planted
with some of the trees. The president’s re-
sidence is called the “ White House.” The
chief public offices and halls for the assembly
of congress are contained in one building
known as the Capitol. It stands on a hill,
and is said to be the finest building in the
Union. It is surrounded by ornamental
grounds, and overlooks the river Potomac.

Boston is a maritime city,and a great place
172 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

of trade; it is situated on an extensive bay,
and is connected with the interior of the
country by canals, railways, and river navi-
gation. Itis the great seat of the Ameri-
can ice trade. In the history of the war of
independence it occupies a conspicuous
place, as the Bostonians displayed great
energy in asserting popular rights. At Bos-
ton, when the “ taxed tea’? was sent over
by the British government, a number of
the citizens disguised themselves as Mo-
hawk Indians, boarded the ships in which
it had been brought over, seized upon and
staved the chests, and threw their contents
into the sea. ‘This affair was known as the
Boston’tea party. Boston is the birth-place
of Dr. Benjamin Franklin — the “ Poor
Richard’? of whom I have no doubt you
have often heard, and whose excellent ad-
vice cannot be too well remembered nor too
carefully applied.

CHARLESTON is another of the principal
sea-ports of the States. It is the largest
town in South Carolina, and is situated at a
low point of laud at the confluence of two
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 173

rivers. It is the stronghold of slavery.
One of the most recent events connected
with it is that of the Northerners blocking
up the harbour by sinking several ships,
laden with stones, at the entrance. This is
avery barbarous act, as it closes—perhaps for’
ever—one of the first ports in America.
PHILADELPHIA is the last city I shall men-
tion. It is the great Quaker city ; its streets
are remarkable for their regularity, and the
houses and stores for the peculiar air of
cleanness which they exhibit. The public
buildings are nearly all of white marble.
It is distinguished for its vast number of
charitable institutions and religious edifices,
and it is a thriving place of business. The
city was founded by William Penn in 1682.
There is a monument marking the site of
the signing of Penn’s famous treaty with the
Indians. With some little account of this
treaty I shall conclude my notice of America.
King Charles II. made a grant of land to
Penn, but this good man would not enter
upon its possession until after he had ar-
ranged a treaty with those to whom he justly
M
174 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

thought it more fairly belonged than to the
King of England—namely, with the Indians.
He consequently convened a meeting—under
the wide spreading branches of an elm
tree, the Indian chiefs assembled. They
were unarmed; the old men sat ina half-moon
upon the ground, the middle aged in the
same figure, at a little distance from them;
the younger men formed a third semicircle
in the rear. Before them stood William
Penn,—a light blue sash, the only mark
which distinguished him from his friends,
bound round his waist.

“«* Thou'lt find,’ said the quaker, ‘ in me and mine,
But friends and brothers to thee and thine,
Who above no power, admit no line,

Twixt the red man and the white.’

And bright was the spot where the quaker came,

To leave his hat, his drab, and his name,

That will sweetly sound from the trumpet of fame,
Til) its final blast shall die.”

It is to be regretted that the speeches of
the Indians on this memorable day have not
come down to us. It is only known that
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 175

they solemnly pledged themselves to live
with William Penn and his people in peace
and amity so long asthe sun and moon
should endure. ‘This was the only treaty, it
has been said, between these people and
the Christians that was not ratified by an
oath, and that was never broken.
176 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

AUSTRALIA,

CHAPTER XVI.
PARLEY TELLS ABOUT NEW SOUTH WALES.

Ar the termination of the American war, of
which I have just given you a short account,
the United States of America, which had
been called by England her American Colo-
nies, ceased to be any longer subject to
Great Britain.

The province of Virginia, in America,
had for a long time been the only authorized
outlet for those criminals in Great Britain
and Ireland, who had been sentenced to
transportation.

It now became necessary for the English
government to fix upon some other country,
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transported, who were condemned to banish-
ment for their crimes.

After much deliberation in the British
Parliament, it was determined to form a
penal settlement in New South Wales.

If you will look at a globe, or, if you
have not a globe, at a map of the world,
turning the South Pole from you, or upper-
most, and, supposing yourself to be in a
ship, sail across the Atlantic Ocean till you
come to the Equator, which is an imaginary
line that divides the northern half of the
globe from the southern; then “cross the
line,”’ as it is called, and sail along the South
Atlantic, in the direction of the coast of
South America, till you arrive at its southern
extremity, which you will see is called Cape
Horn ; then sailing round Cape Horn, (which
is called doubling Cape Horn), and directing
your course westward, right across the Great
Pacific Ocean. After having sailed across
these three great oceans, you will find your-
self, if you have a prosperous voyage,
exactly on the opposite side of the globe,
and before you, an extensive chain of large
178 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

islands, lying off the South-eastern extre-
mity of the continent of Asia.

This group of islands has been named
Australasia, which means Southern Asia, and
the largest of these, which is the largest
island in the whole world, has been called
Australia, or New Holland.

This is so large an island, that if you
were to divide the whole of Europe into ten
parts, New Holland is as large as nine of
them: and hence, from its great extent,
some geographers have dignified it with the
title of a continent.

The northern and western coasts of this
vast island were discovered by a succession of
Dutch navigators, who gave them the name
of New Holland.

The eastern coast, which has been ex-
plored, and taken possession of by the
English, was discovered by Capt. Cook, who
gave it the name of New South Wales.

At the southern extremity of Australia or
New Holland, you will see Van Dizmen’s
Lanp, which was discovered by Tasman,
one of the Dutch navigators, who was sent
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. . 179

from Batavia by Anthony Van Diemen, the.
Dutch governor-general of the Indies, to
survey the coast of New Holland.

In this voyage Tasman discovered an ex-
tensive country lying to the south of New
Holland ; in giving a name to which, he im-
mortalized his patron, by calling it “ Van
Diemen’s Land,” having no suspicion at
the time that it was an island.

It was not till the year 1798 that it was
discovered to be such; as in all the old maps
and charts it is represented as part of the
main land of New Holland.

This important discovery was effected in
an open boat, by Mr. Bass, a surgeon in the
royal navy, who found it to be separated
from Australia by a broad strait, which has
‘ever since borne the name of its discoverer,
“ Bass’ Straits.”

A. fleet of eleven sail was assembled at
Portsmouth in March, 1783, for the forma-
tion of the proposed settlement on the coast
of New Holland.

On board of these vessels were embarked
600 male, and 250 female convicts, with a
180 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

guard consisting of about 200 soldiers, with
their proper officers. Forty women, wives
of the marines, were also permitted to ac-
company their husbands, together with their
children.

Captain Arthur Phillip, an officer highly
qualified in every respect for the arduous
undertaking, was appointed governor of the
proposed colony.

The little fleet which was thus placed
under the command of Captain Phillip, and
which has ever since been designated by the
colonists “ the first fleet,” set sail from Ports-
mouth on the 13th of May 1787, and ar-
rived at Botany Bay, in New South Wales,
in January 1788, after a long, but compara-
tively prosperous voyage of eight months
and upwards.

Captain Phillip soon found, to his disap-
pointment, that Botany Bay was by no means
an eligible harbour ; nor was it, in other res-
pects, suitable for the establishment of a co-
lony, and he determined, even before any
number of the convicts had been permitted
to land, to search for a more eligible site.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 181

In Captain Cook’s chart of the coast,
another opening had been laid down, a few
miles to the northward of Botany Bay, on
the authority of a seaman of the name of
Jackson, who had seen it from the foretop-
mast-head; and Captain Cook, conceiving
it to be nothing more than a harbour for
boats, which it was not worth his while to
examine, called it Port Jackson.

It is no wonder that Captain Cook came
to this conclusion ; for no opening of any
kind can be perceived till you come close in
with the land.

This opening Captain Phillip examined,
and the result of that examination was the
splendid discovery of Port Jackson,—one of
the finest harbours, whether for extent or
security, in the world.

To this harbour the fleet was immediately
removed, and the settlement was ultimately
formed at the head of Sydney Cove, one of
the numerous and romantic inlets of Port
’ Jackson.

The labour and patience required, and
the difficulties which the first settlers must
182 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

have had to encounter, are incalculable; but
their success has been compiete.

The forest has been cleared away, - the
corn-field and the orchard have supplanted
the wild grass and the bush, and towns and
villages have arisen as if by magic. You
may hear the lowing of herds where, a few
years before, you would have trembled at
the wild whoop of the savage, and the still-
ness of that once solitary shore is broken by
the sound of wheels and the busy hum of
commerce.


AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 183

CHAPTER XVII.

PARLEY DESCRIBES THE INHABITANTS, VE~-
GETABLES, AND ANIMALS OF AUSTRALIA.

Tue natives of this part of Australia are,
beyond comparison, the most barbarous on
the surface of the globe.

They are hideously ugly, with flat noses,
wide nostrils, eyes sunk in the head, and
overshadowed with thick eyebrows. The
mouth very wide, lips thick and prominent,
hair black, but not woolly; the colour of the
skin varies from dark bronze to jet black.
Their stature is below the middle size, and
they are remarkably thin and ill-made.

To add to their natural deformity, they
thrust a bone through the cartilage of the
nose, and stick with gum to their hair
matted mrss, the teeth of men, sharks, and
184 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

kangaroos, the tails of dogs, and jaw-bones:
of fish.

On particular occasions they ornament
themselves with red and white clay, using
the former when preparing to fight, and the
latter for the more peaceful amusement of
dancing. The fashion of these ornaments was
left to each person’s taste, and some, when
decorated in their best manner, looked per-



fectly horrible: nothing could appear more
terrible than a black and dismal face, with a
large white circle drawn round each eye.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 185

They scarify the skin in every part with
sharp shells.

The women and female children are gene-
rally found to want the first two joints of
the little finger of the left hand, which are
taken off while they are infants, and the
reason they assign is, that they would be in
the way in winding the fish-lines over the
hand.

The men all want one of their front teeth,
which is knocked out when they arrive at
the age of fifteen or sixteen, with many ridi-
culous ceremonies; but the boys are not
allowed to consider themselves as men be-
fore they have undergone that operation.

They live chiefly on fish, which they some-
times spear and sometimes net; the women,
on the parts of the coast, aiding to catch
them with the hook and line.

“ The facility,” (observes Captain Sturt),
“ with which they procured fish was really
‘surprising.

“ They would slip, feet foremost, into the
water, as they walked along the bank of the
river, as if they had accidentally done so;
186 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUL
3

but, in reality, to avoid the splash they
would have made if they had plunged in
head foremost.

* As surely as a native disappeared under
the surface of the water, so surely would he
re-appear, with a fish writhing upon the
point of his short spear.

“ The very otter scarcely exceeds them in
power over the finny race, and so true is the
aim of these savages, even under the water,
that all the fish we procured from them



were pierced either close behind the lateral
fin or in the very centre of the head.”
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 187

If a dead whale happens to be cast on the
shore, numbers flock to it, from every part
of the coast, and they feast sumptuously
while any part remains.

Those in the interior are stated to live on
grubs, insects, ants and their eggs, kan-
garoos, when they can catch them, fern
roots, various kinds of berries, and honey ;
caterpillars and worms also form part of
their food.

Captain Phillip took every possible pains
to reclaim these ignorant savages, and he
once nearly lost his life in endeavouring to
conciliate a party of them, having ventured
amongst them unarmed for that purpose ;
one of the savages threw a spear which
pierced the upper part of his shoulder and
came out at his back.

But all the efforts of the governor to effect
the permanent civilization of these miserable
people proved utterly abortive.

They possess the faculty of mimickry or
imitation to a very considerable degree. I
was walking with a friend, one beautiful
evening, on the banks of the Paramatta-
188 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

when Bungarry, chief of the Sydney tribe
‘ of black natives, was pulling down the river
with his two jins, or wives, in a boat which
he had received as a present from the go-
vernor. .My friend accosted him on his
coming up with us, and the good-natured
chief immediately desired his jins to rest
upon their oars, for he was rowed by his
wives, During the short conversation that



ensued, my friend requested Bungarry to
show how governor Macquarrie made a bow.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 189

Bungarry happened to be dressed in the
old uniform of a military officer, and stand-
ing up in the stern of his boat, and taking
off his cocked hat, with the requisite punc-
tilio, he made a low formal bow, with all the
dignity and grace of a general officer of the
old school.

The rich variety of vegetation on the
Illawarra mountain, which is a lofty range
running parallel. with the coast, contrasts
beautifully with the richness of the scenery.
The fern tree, shooting up its rough stem,
about the thickness of a small boat’s mast,
to the height of fifteen or twenty feet, and
then, all at once shooting out a number of
leaves in every direction, each at four cr five
feet in length, and exactly similar in appear-
ance to the leaf.of the common fern; while
palms of various botanical species, are ever
and anon shooting up their tall slender
branchless stems to the height of seventy or
a hundred feet, and then forming a large
canopy of leaves, each of which bends
gracefully outwards and then downwards,
like a Prince of Wales’ feathers,

N
190 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Another beautiful species met with in the
low grounds of Illawarra, is the fan palm, or
cabbage tree, and another equally graceful
in its outline, is called by the natives Ban-
galo.



The nettle tree, which is also met with in
the bushes, is not only seen by the tra-~
veller, but occasionally felt, and remembered,
for its name is highly descriptive.

Both the animal and vegetable creation
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 191

in Australia, are wholly different from those
in every other part of the world.

To show that the existence of a thing was
not believed in, it was compared to a black
swan, but in New Holland we find black
swans, and blue frogs; red lobsters, and
blue crabs; flying opossums, and beasts
with bills like ducks; fish that hop abouc
on dry land, and quadrupeds that lay eggs.

The quadrupeds hitherto discovered, with
very few exceptions, are all of the kangaroo
or opossum tribe; having their hinder legs
long, out of all proportion when compered
with the length of the fore legs, and a sack
under the belly of the female for the recep-
tion of the young.

They have krangaréo rats, and degs of the



jackal kind, all exactly alike; and a little
animal of the bear tribe, named the wombat,
192 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

but the largest quadruped at present dis-
covered is the kangaroo.

These pretty nearly complete the catalo-
gue of four-footed animals yet known on this
vast island.

There is, however, an animal which resem-
bles nothing in the creation but itself, and
which neither belongs to beast, bird or fish.

This animal is called the Duck-billed Pla-
tyhus.



Of all the quadrupeds yet known, this
seems the most extraordinary in its con-
formation; exhibiting the perfect semblance
of the beak of a duck on the head of a
quadruped.

The head is flattish, and rather small than
large; the mouth or snout so exactly resem-
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 193

bles that of some broad-billed species of duck,
that it might be mistaken for one.

The birds and fish are no less singular
than the beasts. There is a singular fish,
which when left uncovered by the ebbing of
the tide, leaps about like the grasshopper, by
means of strong fins.

The Mecenura Superba, with its scalloped



tail feathers, is perhaps the most singular
and beautiful of that elegant race of bird:
known by the name of Birds of Paradise.
194 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Cockatoos, Parrots, and Parroquets, are
innumerable, and of great variety.

The Nonpareil Parrot is perhaps the most
beautiful bird of the parrot tribe in the
whole world.

The Mountain Eagle is a magnificent
creature; but the Emu, or New Holland



Cassowary, is perhaps the tallest and loftiest
bird that exists.
The capital of the colony, and the seat of
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 195

the colonial Government is Sydney. The
Town of Sydney is beautifully situated in
Sydney Cove, which I told you is one of the
romantic inlets of Port Jackson, about seven
miles from the entrance of the harbour.
The headlands at the mouth of the harbour
form one of the grandest features in the
natural scenery of the country.

It is not, however, a distant or cursory
glance that will give you a just idea of the
importance of this busy capital.

In order to form a just estimation of it,
you should take a boat and proceed from
Sydney Cove to Darling Harbour, you will
then sce the whole extent of the eastern
shore of the latter capacious basin equally
crowded with watehouses, stores, dock-yards,
mills, and wharfs; the store-houses built on
the most magnificent scale, and with the best
and mest substantial materials. The popu-
lation of Sydney is supposed now to exceed
10,000 persons.

The second town in the colony is Paramatta.
It is distant about fourteen miles from
196 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Sydney, being pleasantly situated at the
head of one of the navigable arms of Port
Jackson. It contains nearly 5,000 inhabit-
ants. The other towns in the colony, are
Windsor, Liverpool, Campbell Town, New-
castle and Maitland. The last will doubtless
ere long be the second in the colony, as it is
situated at the head of the navigation ‘of
Hunter’s river.

Very fine roads have been formed in Aus-
tralia, particularly one leading across the
Blue mountains to Bathurst, on the western
side of that range, which is 180 miles from
Sydney.

The openness of the country around Bath-
urst is more favourable for hunting and
shooting than most other parts of the colony.

The Kangaroo and the Emu are both
hunted with dogs; they are both feeble ani-
mals, but they are not altogether destitute of
the means of defence.

In addition to swiftness of foot, the Emu
has a great muscular power in his long iron
limbs, and can give an awkward blow to his
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 197

«pursuer, by striking out at him behind, like
a young horse, while the Kangaroo, when
brought to bay by the dogs, rests himself on
his strong muscular tail, seizes the dog with
his little hands or fore-feet, and thrusts at
him with one of his hind feet, which is
armed for that purpose with a single sharp-
pointed hoof, and perhaps lay his side com-
pletely open.

When hotly pursued, the kangaroo some-
timcs takes to the water, where, if he hap-



‘pen to be followed by a dog, he has a sin-
-gular advantage over all other quadrupeds
198 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

of his own size, from his being able to stand
erect in pretty deep water.

In this position he waits for the dog, and
when the latter comes close up to him, he
seizes him with his fore-feet and presses him
under water till he is drowned.

The Bustard, or native turkey, is occasion-
ally shot in the Bathurst country. It some-
times weighs eighteen pounds, and is different
from the common turkey, in the flesh of the
legs being white, while that of the breast is
dark-coloured.

Among the natives the old men have alone
the privilege of eating the Emu, and married
people only are permitted to eat ducks.

The natives suffer no animal, however
small, to escape them.

One of the blacks being anxious to get an
Opossum out of a dead tree, every branch of
which was hollow, asked for a tomahawk,
with which he cut a hole in:the trunk above
where he thought the animal lay concealed.
He found, however, that he had cut too low,
and that it had run higher up. This made
it necessary to smoke it out; he accordingly
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 199

got some dry grass, and having set fire to it,
stuffed it into the hole he had cut.



A raging fire soon kindled in the tree, where
the current of air wasgreat,and dense columns
of smoke issued from the end of each branch
as thick as that from the chimney of a steam-
engine.

The shell of the tree was so thin, that I
200 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

thought it would soon be burnt through,
and that the tree would fall; but the black
had no such fears, and, ascending to the
highest branch, he waited anxiously for the
poor little wretch he had thus surrounded
with dangers, and devoted to destruction ;
and no sooner did it appear half singed and
half roasted, than he seized upon it and
threw it down to us with an air of triumph.
The effect of the scene, in so lonely a forest,
was very fine. The roaring of the fire in
the tree, the fearless attitude of the savage,
and the associations which his colour and
appearance called up, enveloped as he was
in smoke, were singular, and_still dwell in
my recollection. He had not long left the
tree, when it fell with a tremendous crash, -
and was, when we next passed that way, a
mere heap of ashes,

The territory of the colony has been di-
vided into ten counties, named as follows :—
Cumberland, Camden, Argyll, Westmore-
land, Londonderry, Boxburgh, Northumber-
land Durham, Ayr, and Cambridge.
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 201

I will now give you a short account of
Van Diemen’s Land.

This fair and fertile island lies, as I have
told you, at the southern extremity of New
Holland, from which it is separated by Bass’
Straits.

Its medial length from north to south is
about 185 miles, and its breadth from east
to west is 166 miles.

Its surface possesses every variety of
mountain, hill, and dale; of forests and
open meadows ; of inland lakes, rivers and in-
lets of the sea, forming safe and commodious
harbours; and every natural requisite that
can render a country valuable or agreeable.

It enjoys a temperate climate, which is
perhaps not very different from that of
England, though less subject to violent
changes.

The island is intersected by two fine rivers,
rising near the centre; the one named the
Tamar, falling into Bass’ Straits, on the
north, and forming Port Dalrymple; the
other the Derwent, which discharges itself
into the sea, on the south-eastern extremity.
202 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

Hobart Town, the capital, is situated on the
right bank of the Derwent, about five miles
from the sea.

The natives of Van Diemen’s Land are
described by all the navigators, as a mild,
affable, good-humoured and inoffensive race.

Though they are obviously the same race
of people as those of New Holland, and go
entirely naked, both men and women, yet
their language is altogether different.

The British settlements in Australia are
both numerous and important. The oldest,
most extensive, and valuable, was founded,
as we have shewn already, at Sydney. The
island of Tasmania was next occupied ;
within the last few years we have established
the colonies of Port Phillip, Melbourne,
Victoria, Cooksland, and others. The pro-
gress of these settlements has been rapid.

An extraordinary increase to emigration
to Australia was given by the discovery of
the Gold Regions.

For many years reports had been current
that the Australian Alps and the Snowy
Mountains were full of gold, but it was not
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 203

till after the Californian discoveries that any
was found in Australia.

Two shepherds were the first persons who
found any gold, and for a long time they
successfully concealed the source from which
they obtained it; but being watched, their
secret was discovered, and the news spread
like wild-fire over the colony. Everybody
was mad to go gold hunting; shepherds
forsook their flocks; traders closed their
stores ; sailors ran away from their ships;
servants threw up their situations; everybody
was mad to visit this newly-discovered Tom
Tiddler’s ground, to pick up gold and silver.
A groom informed his master, in one in-
stance, that he would stop with him, as he
had been in the family for five years, for a
guinea a day, if it would be any convenience
tohim. Another family was left with only a
boy of sixteen to attend them, and his stipu-
lations werc—two pounds a week, and wine
to his dinner! In one year the population
of Melbourne rose from 23,000 to 85,000
inhabitants; the town of Geelong trcebled
its numbers; perhaps never in the whole
204 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

history of the world had there been so ex-
traordinary an emigration.

As amonument of the golden wealth of
Australia, there is in the International Ex-
hibition a wooden obelisk dead gilt on the
outside. This column is nearly seventy feet
high, and some ten fect square at the base.
It represents exactly the bulk of gold which
Australia has sent to this country since 1851,
and which in all amounts to nearly 800 tons.
Valuing the precious metal at its ascertain-
able worth, it appears that gold to the value
of upwards of £15,000 sterling was dug
from the bowels of the earth, washed from
the sand of the rivers, or discovered by
fortunate diggers in various parts of Aus-
tralia in a single year.

The interior of Australia is still compara-
tively unknown. Last year an expedition
was undertaken to discover a way across the
Continent, and entrusted to a vigilant and
enterprising commander named Burke. Al-
though a certain amount of success attended
the object. of the expedition, the fate of
Burke and his immediate companions was
ANERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 205

most deplorable. They perished by starva-
vation !

CONCLUSION.

I have now told you all that my present
limits will admit, of those interesting por-
tions of the globe, called America and Aus-
tralia, and I wish you to read again all that
I have said, and I wish you also to view the
inhuman conduct of the first discoverers of
the former with proper feelings of aversion.
If you have read an account of William
Penn’s first colony of Pennsylvania, you
will see that his was the only just way of
establishing himself among the Indians.
You must rejoice within yourselves on this
occasion, that they were not Englishmen
who practised these acts of cruelty and
treachery towards the unoffending Mexicans
and Peruvians. The workings of Provi-
dence are full of mystery, and I cannot help
thinking that the state of anarchy and civil
war in which Spain and Portugal are now
and ever have been engaged, is an act of re-

N
206 PARLEY’S TALES ABOUT

tribution awarded to their barbarity in the
great scheme of God’s providence.

It makes one blush for the sake of Chris-
tianity, to think that the perpetrators of the
outrages upon the original possessors of the
Americas were persons professing that sub-
lime religion,—and that in the midst of their
slaughter and plunder, they impiously held
forth the cross of Christ. The confiding
but dignified nature of the idolatrous Mexi-
cans, did much more honour to the purity
of the Christian religion than did the base
treachery of their invaders, who professed
Christ but knew him not.

Had they by mildness, perseverance, and
reason convinced the inhabitants of the truth
of the Christian religion, they might have
become faithful converts, but it was unrea-
sonable to expect that they should cast off
the religion which their forefathers had pro-
fessed, for a religion which they knew not
at all, and the professors of which came
with the sword to deprive them of their lives
and their property.

I wish you, my young friends, to weigh
AMERICA AND AUSTRALIA. 207

all these circumstances whenever you read.
It will impress the different subjects more
thoroughly upon your memory ; and if your
minds be properly constituted, it will culti-
vate the good and eradicate the bad. I will
again ask you to read this book a second
time, and refer occasionally to the maps.
And now good-bye!

THE END.

BILLING, PRINTER AND STEREOTYPER,
GUILDFORD, SURREY,








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No printable characters
No printable characters
'150' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZN' 'sip-files00002.txt'
15fecae30c1e8af6aea59710912fcbb3
099a2e38d8951c95aadf5518b1be971cc92f95c5
'2011-12-16T19:22:42-05:00'
describe
'419' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZO' 'sip-files00004.txt'
270084a913e22668eac67e6f09e474ba
4cc6d0fd89dbd558334491b41996eb115dae33de
'2011-12-16T19:27:38-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'390' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZP' 'sip-files00007.txt'
57ababbaf70c9418e0eebe5427482de7
ab5572bbdf7d73d3a7f24a11bef01170cd03737b
'2011-12-16T19:30:51-05:00'
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZQ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e1eed50e03ec4792ba21d47173bd15c5
5be9ac79fae8a29fa21bd38d379a0477ee4f6c3d
'2011-12-16T19:25:04-05:00'
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZR' 'sip-files00010.txt'
71dc4c1f6c0acc20b8fc6eb940a1463d
042b215c882c9946cad0ba7bacfcab90e576a34d
'2011-12-16T19:26:28-05:00'
describe
'653' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
be3e6fafbc35aa79d78ba18a5c67a11a
8775775af9d6c7cb2dd850e4538eecfc76223ceb
'2011-12-16T19:32:05-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
1f0a59b4833333c7c6da4d63a926385d
a217c0e49cebf1581f6129690f9a4872e14bf2e5
'2011-12-16T19:26:19-05:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZU' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c9dd0a60551122f03508fb76ddbed919
b37a3f5e829ac6def1b2321df1ee43b7d07a4205
'2011-12-16T19:31:03-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZV' 'sip-files00014.txt'
55cdd6cc5c29669702c5726e4ad97312
bc137ecb140f14bd1e3d1b52579a1e1038b33618
'2011-12-16T19:33:28-05:00'
describe
'534' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
7c3a6618cb4cd398fe9bae6959c12707
074e1dcf9f3c86a92b7b14d6a6d1f00cc4af59ff
'2011-12-16T19:34:30-05:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZX' 'sip-files00016.txt'
99364dba7ae98ba33616aa876ddafa9f
9cd341e6d9d7f2034fe6ee72978635867dc0c0e2
'2011-12-16T19:34:22-05:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZY' 'sip-files00017.txt'
fe3e447fae829cd4a2962c5ef69e8c5f
4ef3c15944566914205d3409564eec1f396cc972
'2011-12-16T19:22:28-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAANZZ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
1a9a8da6d682625056cf4add2a1906d9
8c77d03a9724c1c0c10354f00f7c38b320028517
'2011-12-16T19:28:38-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
ec6a487ca09db6743ca38294dc58f768
21cfbab93c44cc28bbce41ae62c4edcf74d535a2
'2011-12-16T19:26:13-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAB' 'sip-files00020.txt'
2b1bcc9266cd1ad34b0b802c8bb368ed
b512cbbcb8ea514de431446ac5eb1295f2c34f96
'2011-12-16T19:34:27-05:00'
describe
'511' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAC' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ce5c8040221e1044e90fcca0d97b07ef
913233159224925657cf38f851914be35a11c598
'2011-12-16T19:29:41-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
949c5d1983a61aed2c814ea66c4bd72c
e5205980731aed2bd5b81ec3486827547a7b4b6f
'2011-12-16T19:33:45-05:00'
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAE' 'sip-files00023.txt'
98de75e6dfeeb87d3e2df1f8a1706656
93de68b64bd291348f0d33dd6e3e7f5e1c4d8951
'2011-12-16T19:33:52-05:00'
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f1c0be1b470a0a79e506d585903960f8
40667002e808d127f39f87fd3a68e93bb85b6a2c
'2011-12-16T19:33:35-05:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f6934b1b9b30c982a2c67b706ffe2411
627945371f5fc9a4a6ddb9ce1ee80b5a52cd6a2c
'2011-12-16T19:30:04-05:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAH' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a4addfc40d4e490bea7699f80ae57b2e
f74a412858a3c9ab972818df3d5681770a7d6244
'2011-12-16T19:23:41-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
8848a41e5a79f1741f8e66b422be2f81
d1f566b2481bca5b5d85e30df28c1fafee56222b
'2011-12-16T19:27:40-05:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
4dee793afacb9e42d218fcc316f6e9f8
97aeb5c6f0f434ce56b11d0f3fff61fad650b8f6
'2011-12-16T19:26:38-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAK' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1cd65707b7fc7ad13ea313374e5f5dc4
b0fa2c3b63d743bb1f34e54fcd491c5e280f1992
'2011-12-16T19:31:54-05:00'
describe
'255' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
faf118d6eff0994c56e4bc76adad9850
160799bf830c904906176b16816ec5ccae7885f9
'2011-12-16T19:31:04-05:00'
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
0139e23fa40701d54dbe3169a7806a2c
f488390d4f643c0e37d926db6dd059e60b3880c9
'2011-12-16T19:31:10-05:00'
describe
'554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2259ad58edf8e027f286148933ac3ecc
20248bf1a684870553852723d58560669876ea22
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAO' 'sip-files00033.txt'
eb0b0c9dd7621051aefa7b4ea94b0362
f8da95fc2765d259638a6859b7e472a32c380206
'2011-12-16T19:28:57-05:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAP' 'sip-files00034.txt'
f8f35476954eb6812d47e86d0b7e14ca
505553dba5a5e67d70519dfbf8e2c448e2364db6
'2011-12-16T19:32:13-05:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAQ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
1dd354115374c8e5aa6537cd36fc67e5
bc80ff8b083a2d9574b76c646f82ea625699d20c
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAR' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5e42c5c5d21d3df2df877c27803efcff
5068e67b851aa40b07e9dee7bf797ad941a364fa
'2011-12-16T19:33:22-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a8ec335d73612cd3d943a1debd3e79a1
f93707ee85f18ada9d7aadbc632e5e4ac4a80857
'2011-12-16T19:24:39-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
57bfb71748f60ec5549af74590b3e06a
553771c37c57285b48418dbb538ccb644a422670
'2011-12-16T19:30:48-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAU' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a288183ba92404ef13f398cd100bd0c0
e0143e4d4216958f48defb558502a27c7f5ed998
'2011-12-16T19:24:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1dfd56c9d701e46f34df8658fcc73b08
f567f63974bf8ae1763773f2c3f320c9ad862b56
'2011-12-16T19:30:29-05:00'
describe
'514' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
5ec1ea1317711054bd407c7c3c188105
f03ae98d4a6d270bedfa59db8ca1746aa8fed307
'2011-12-16T19:32:10-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAX' 'sip-files00042.txt'
f16d1a7b05f9fb04ea53ca4dcde0a95f
e07623b1c490f8ca8ca27791751bd7aa12f0d1ff
'2011-12-16T19:32:34-05:00'
describe
'508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAY' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a64242130f9094788754897fdf0ff1b1
41758841b5f0ead6c7e7a0e13feee4d53a1854f8
'2011-12-16T19:28:44-05:00'
describe
'300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOAZ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
b8d061dc8f8e4881edb4075e21c987f8
4a4c07b7d7d5d92e7804c64aea237a0b9d6ab54a
'2011-12-16T19:31:57-05:00'
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
16198f9c3b767df64c028e92b43037b2
d0d9b499157f8c9b17d6ccf8a5d6383f8560915b
'2011-12-16T19:33:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBB' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2945920b49b6c159be02d55198c85f17
98e1a505b2e82da79387eb3d8b72119fd33752d8
'2011-12-16T19:28:34-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBC' 'sip-files00047.txt'
e0def3d81ea77ea38b0fadb194aa687e
74ed618dc7d14f087c4bac65c42f2fe85dd6cbc1
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBD' 'sip-files00048.txt'
a5da8aefeae330a20b3dac631a1bfb13
79e823a1d9d532c50e63308b6d3ae7870f66bfd0
'2011-12-16T19:23:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBE' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f9d7769c466cb865549e7cbda9fa9151
68e7f893f39535f0b751262feb8fa55305650af0
'2011-12-16T19:24:20-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
ee5555083e29593c6c776df405de3446
4553e80dd597e00c44021cce088709c754dde2d5
'2011-12-16T19:33:36-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
5cbb1da78be78569fb29c353d407e2ce
f10c2aaf8bb6b1f5c1f9093e8e32f5cf889ad0cd
'2011-12-16T19:34:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBH' 'sip-files00052.txt'
08531934e1b02c22abbd1eef433af825
a650a95a1a6eee47c5c47d969c3a187a54856378
'2011-12-16T19:28:25-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBI' 'sip-files00053.txt'
bb1260244bb4cbe684fc88b9c4ee4484
d923bb355c7d63469cdbd8dc437f0d9210144dac
'2011-12-16T19:27:54-05:00'
describe
'494' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
bb0c465f242aadc9aecc9c7b89038c43
846372162a86ba5f7042185bcffd558a021f56c1
'2011-12-16T19:25:57-05:00'
describe
'711' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBK' 'sip-files00055.txt'
edb639b31b13b77b38d539a90afde967
6549a24c7cbb4699b8fc9dec948cf63173de7309
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBL' 'sip-files00056.txt'
e152b2f640a983c2c3e8eaf892c37936
3f0f5064006e84a83b47d0a966f988371754da7a
'2011-12-16T19:25:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
b76ceab68340f4c4b07fec003ce339b7
4c93812fc958234111cc0c417953832af2c147bf
'2011-12-16T19:22:25-05:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
c793bccf38b32d63cc3e1b972a277541
e2798267491abd6bb6716cf9f08bdd2eeaefc922
'2011-12-16T19:27:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
14d6e8b4eec67589ebcf04d3053aab42
9251d54fdb565fa1c919fc942a09eeffddac3dd4
'2011-12-16T19:26:29-05:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBP' 'sip-files00060.txt'
5df0cb2a9234ca1157213f429d6e53c2
803ce809116c010d85ed2af26e13cef08460fa0f
'2011-12-16T19:28:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBQ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
3b259c2f464bc284372121a1f6975f33
8010180d6d4d101cf4e28e0b7682f7d65c8b4a82
'2011-12-16T19:23:48-05:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBR' 'sip-files00062.txt'
390924c17aac20f0ced1b00bda955635
97dcb5ed45804e03aad8f1129e1b799b11a888e5
'2011-12-16T19:30:30-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBS' 'sip-files00063.txt'
1ec7e06d691bc63a5aa3c096af37e101
63fb7b9f431c454c1690214668bed55d03ac652d
'2011-12-16T19:28:22-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBT' 'sip-files00064.txt'
e8e639cedc04e41bae6d78ec432a9e51
2ce4eedc692211509e1e6849dd1874d817c11ce6
'2011-12-16T19:30:44-05:00'
describe
'426' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBU' 'sip-files00065.txt'
eed81c1b9f888bc83e7fe9b4210693c3
974de7ba7b06b98592d1635070b1169dc6c3e154
'2011-12-16T19:29:08-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBV' 'sip-files00066.txt'
5eb73915c010b983319567589152d52a
e6212f7478f11bccae7368e0aee2252d450e228d
'2011-12-16T19:28:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBW' 'sip-files00067.txt'
4ad43893f3c7ad0d6f555a02c503c02c
dd2ef81153eb788bcda1488a3d0e93529d7dc1e6
'2011-12-16T19:32:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
47048ab80df44fd59019c58b7f09cea5
55106b79164db688158a21cdc3e96f8428a7f7a7
'2011-12-16T19:32:21-05:00'
describe
'675' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBY' 'sip-files00069.txt'
e8b3c81ce178c68ce47d8083b91888aa
20171ae9c86960271f9b637ab0a8da65e2206bb7
'2011-12-16T19:21:56-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOBZ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
ffd87d67aa1bf7caeeea1949a8dc0439
bb62894051ee648ca1b293c142ab820d2bae7405
'2011-12-16T19:29:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d87d2930fb5ddc949aaa6c638155cf72
ce929f78cf210646920f7a6f55f2d163941187c8
'2011-12-16T19:28:00-05:00'
describe
'465' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCB' 'sip-files00072.txt'
a4b55c496fa2e4b2bb0e799b71b57908
b98483cbf8965066c507a32e2854f9f5dc78779a
'2011-12-16T19:29:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCC' 'sip-files00073.txt'
3de0520716e34db334971a1f9c87b0e7
87ee6517dd4314703494697b3c10edf7f94707c2
'2011-12-16T19:27:06-05:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
b0092a9aac939f15916914e14a47e10b
cea66af7e422d082e5a073b8ba797e2548e74985
'2011-12-16T19:30:38-05:00'
describe
'722' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
300b65f44f24837d08336f2782feaf9b
841522a9a65f661bd0a95cb112f477423d4e6efb
'2011-12-16T19:23:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
2d6ed070552f240fc67b97badaa07600
904230ff304075b7466c55fc7f15367d6dd2937d
'2011-12-16T19:30:12-05:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
165e54b9d04a953d8bc3625de67d7e85
f6d4e4fb9047303bc37236097b192d74f1e1c707
'2011-12-16T19:27:21-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCH' 'sip-files00078.txt'
eb2b18ff176a036b2a7c4807e9e516d7
f58584dac8cf49dcdf1db957c83572767f88f3e8
'2011-12-16T19:22:45-05:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCI' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7439892b9684cef47bdca65de1e3a9fe
9c894518f130d06cae6864c4345d2cbb8d7607ff
'2011-12-16T19:23:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3004db494ca953422242778d6235ca56
92c7d05ca3f3e81562ad6902774779476c344b01
'2011-12-16T19:34:32-05:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2b2a20bad67d79828c0c5dcbc7ead1d4
b6d3e1d4f0e946d01a9ea78a1edb3f424811fa07
'2011-12-16T19:29:58-05:00'
describe
'929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCL' 'sip-files00082.txt'
904211350daae9db09a28d609f72dcaa
89f188bf18c319696db00a0e342187854b0e8e99
'2011-12-16T19:30:40-05:00'
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCM' 'sip-files00083.txt'
9a70539678e11c2fcc9dcc4ebb920e87
ee81bf3bf4f9d2c399f2a07c10bcfbc48a22429a
'2011-12-16T19:26:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
45ac147b38b0c427413872e7361a72c9
2b995937945320a7915843ac3c635c6391dac8dc
'2011-12-16T19:32:43-05:00'
describe
'595' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCO' 'sip-files00085.txt'
6f1e3dafc5272704dd50448ef3010e6c
9ac3f145c8ec693901238bca90405f8d8478dcbf
'2011-12-16T19:33:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCP' 'sip-files00086.txt'
07de71f14cb457816d6510fc7c4fa560
43c8406273bcbb16746817f0ba994b476ad99876
'2011-12-16T19:31:28-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCQ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
63740ff1de1acd8c73ed5da36250fe07
f469a8772fd9b5625a510a6604aeb6cd050fd4bf
'2011-12-16T19:29:17-05:00'
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCR' 'sip-files00088.txt'
1707c3c069e12fabc81313800fba6e7e
07ef1993cbf994aee00f3eb1cc44a16ba29a4fce
'2011-12-16T19:27:03-05:00'
describe
'730' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCS' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9b2991e5d2b2e55672ee4d05530eca80
41536da1c8cbd435e32b02bded71b60722686098
'2011-12-16T19:34:01-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
db873a9fe20dc3427fc4772dcc3b3016
cef57e39d024196272803a708f14b19d7baa63df
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCU' 'sip-files00091.txt'
b99f2f1a4f2df2b8b7dcf421b2108858
d6b49d8fbd4900df74c62f364aaf43a996775e5d
'2011-12-16T19:33:56-05:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCV' 'sip-files00092.txt'
69cc527a607f18befb2c1485dc64280d
298c194dbcf949cea146065987994832e978f7b4
'2011-12-16T19:26:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCW' 'sip-files00093.txt'
ce3ef432590da478fc36e74b5402ae0f
f40b29a64ee35b25b709005e4d4e9e32b7d9c6d7
'2011-12-16T19:25:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b17a2ea7a1bd1b5ebb1a9a32ce25c89a
8b6dcb0ec5ce95c38e3873fdb31db33b7a713cd8
'2011-12-16T19:21:57-05:00'
describe
'565' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCY' 'sip-files00095.txt'
727b403e72e3da8f98885b4272f81e0b
7a2bc463ce86fb4dc1260643524c4741c9c19148
'2011-12-16T19:32:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOCZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
3a636952ce189dc05b3d2df911cd0779
1a3f97352c8c8e61cce1947d7050882d78b231bd
'2011-12-16T19:25:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
04ee434c41a360eca1345282e692c00b
b1dd2dd17e5a9bd3fd30b91871db03d951b4a916
'2011-12-16T19:25:46-05:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODB' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c759f50438802218497606e360d4d837
7eb7289e1263e3f363b9108b25d94b6cad77406b
'2011-12-16T19:30:50-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODC' 'sip-files00099.txt'
bc3ccfb8dc5e3bc2436ddebedf13e4f6
c9f7fa1d75b67632be72bf02ae68aa7a16667f86
'2011-12-16T19:25:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODD' 'sip-files00100.txt'
71fb319c911ed22a9aadd8af5c1a9370
d2eaa5a9bd156bd853a038bef53f1d0a90694122
'2011-12-16T19:24:37-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODE' 'sip-files00101.txt'
683e2c7e23ca53876560ceeb08e81a1c
5004bfc05c5f5c331a3bbc9b4630d614cd6c2d90
describe
'411' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODF' 'sip-files00102.txt'
d164a0a81e702f80733ef5b26b1c8ff1
1ee2bf21d0d854d90e6e93d8045ce1fae28631cf
'2011-12-16T19:24:59-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
2fa5d41644b23fa11fe6c64f653e9922
d91a63d9802f570f711db73eebe0f63ff9335939
'2011-12-16T19:27:30-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODH' 'sip-files00104.txt'
62515f8682c39b1a3a776cbaf7a6bc33
f778bc3c1d61f71ffe034437b164b7b25b33c8b6
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODI' 'sip-files00105.txt'
c4430b20d6ca2f08c31e8544c19d5154
68a36350c369ceac92634ad1f1fc83ac0c1abbed
'2011-12-16T19:24:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODJ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
ac8a81b3bacfc1c5b50935b918a7230b
1ff67619493678f2b5c0627f6d6750415740aa09
'2011-12-16T19:28:56-05:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODK' 'sip-files00107.txt'
fc210a37fdc58f79bb6a30583505424b
39ee3872d41aa052e5f69141e183f033c0a80a8b
'2011-12-16T19:25:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODL' 'sip-files00108.txt'
3675d400999e281225c34d519bc5e2e6
996bd32b676c94b00850fb791d9cbf12bda6ec2e
'2011-12-16T19:23:29-05:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODM' 'sip-files00109.txt'
872bf537fd35835098d064e1393344a6
910aae97fe345e6e8ef50969e15f8c316a637a87
'2011-12-16T19:24:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b939d61fddadae7813f8c75a9ace6501
41773902f3402d981b048e20d3047c2d31e79029
'2011-12-16T19:33:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODO' 'sip-files00111.txt'
54cc95e761d1450df1e2b21860217137
027fb6057cc7633fd8e9ccb0d868aad991820582
'2011-12-16T19:30:33-05:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODP' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c503303ba6b59f563393d4b377df88d0
578249cb35cbd766f3e0e3a600d483b8477bddf6
'2011-12-16T19:33:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODQ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b5182fd180c86211bc6ab1f144734cfe
b12ed098fa2329039ad1bc1c94b16416078b9d2a
'2011-12-16T19:31:26-05:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODR' 'sip-files00114.txt'
17849f4fb9bba3df5ba0d4c4130db88d
bec4e190e3c6022d2b8d27ed96ca03f07804aa05
'2011-12-16T19:30:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODS' 'sip-files00115.txt'
799831eee4df5737abe21a43a2b1cf86
e583a97d3f4e1ce0dfbf1bec7fdc5f76d30805bd
'2011-12-16T19:28:19-05:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b92ecac7badae0fa95c0e4ded50e8e14
343d78d8225650841d88c95c7f59a5c2c871e669
'2011-12-16T19:33:33-05:00'
describe
'474' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODU' 'sip-files00117.txt'
93f2a79624d75ad570b73af341ce602c
b37025306a7c03d3632634ba8a2930a054d00095
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODV' 'sip-files00118.txt'
f09e767ef1f5aea4ac842c137e20a558
0cc8c4b15c0acbb908965e7a952aaf9ef13e72ec
'2011-12-16T19:34:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODW' 'sip-files00119.txt'
756ab23d9a10d0212d8c03a75e197279
975f81458a341e980e1990e98dcf6e2f0f45bfc9
'2011-12-16T19:25:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODX' 'sip-files00120.txt'
69046b57b5a4834145d2d1bff9c1dc86
7c1cd601e3e0856ce7851e923f4ba5e719370693
'2011-12-16T19:22:53-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
2ec35bab4ccea2bab5a9ea09b96d2af5
a504a37bdefd519b3904b8ad8fb333a01d93c233
'2011-12-16T19:24:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAODZ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
5628a8502b7a732a846e9837acef3135
492dd797a0899c8e5cb0d6a5538b421810514dfd
'2011-12-16T19:27:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
1d9bb2b0120dfb111f34fe969ae05e60
0336a96e9eca992aff97a436f7f5d54f94209b82
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEB' 'sip-files00124.txt'
341f0dea6e7e373fccdc28a29a97d1d1
886f3b20f8ad45c0ee7e4b5fd6aed7b7a37baa66
'2011-12-16T19:28:26-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEC' 'sip-files00125.txt'
82299fb6542584f7a8ff8553dab96d67
96fda193ce3492800558a9738df51e481fbf4461
'2011-12-16T19:28:12-05:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOED' 'sip-files00126.txt'
783d3c845043f63f52ee24d998b6e736
2bf76ec1a84bf0d93fe3bb972bc8c60cf2c20b6d
'2011-12-16T19:23:13-05:00'
describe
'588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEE' 'sip-files00127.txt'
dffa5780d71c39ecdd5b2df9d43fda95
44caeb3014bf5973e5546df869e320e3ba648911
'2011-12-16T19:32:53-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEF' 'sip-files00128.txt'
f0809286b6b2986b4cb35ecacbb60cc1
61b6ba80d5f2caf4358c6206715e5d719cd4374c
'2011-12-16T19:34:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEG' 'sip-files00129.txt'
39f73d5c2dab7c0ab6210a393b2bc592
ef7207868c8e9d88b75ccd4665ce5bec15fd19cc
'2011-12-16T19:34:29-05:00'
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEH' 'sip-files00130.txt'
0504542cf382a66f845d668279da484f
defa073eb88d0fe6c31ca33a01c39fc60d948902
describe
'759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEI' 'sip-files00131.txt'
87e5a2b426bec5e32b9f0f9206c36747
a6f41e3d7531504dab6cba160292eb7895db3e63
'2011-12-16T19:32:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEJ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
664f1e32b31f93df6019a941610d7dff
54154a35978a7d102fa1481c81538fa346c3ba91
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEK' 'sip-files00133.txt'
2c772baf5125898514865be1b43ad6fa
5a9d214274a4ea1f7686bcfec5056d94fe952787
'2011-12-16T19:31:23-05:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEL' 'sip-files00134.txt'
633d40204070c45eea445b66438e9297
4688363cca979ecd19a9619db267014d41620776
'2011-12-16T19:30:56-05:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
42d4be9ea5141bc2e86ae12034024b24
a02c3a049b4e6252a4017b2c4da1fedb281230a4
'2011-12-16T19:28:51-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEN' 'sip-files00136.txt'
46eccc4a68e8079840e26205998e53e4
faee5451d3bfc8c09811537e4cce3f5a5ef1ca2f
'2011-12-16T19:34:11-05:00'
describe
'625' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEO' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9bde89cc240f4cb95ed568b50fafecc1
87606e502159127b9a97e840871d26801ccf0a13
'2011-12-16T19:30:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEP' 'sip-files00138.txt'
80607cba4a98114fa4c24c52850e3b5e
414de56724aeea9b4bf5df004abcd7c387198f8c
'2011-12-16T19:27:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEQ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
9baf60bb8df56e9c29a725c2d055bad6
8233c3118fe5b2b69205c02b57b149b896010377
'2011-12-16T19:30:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOER' 'sip-files00140.txt'
8d07c36637bbe27571042161c3526052
37df0a2182ec9659ba04c2d06db2ec2940c8f79e
'2011-12-16T19:24:43-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOES' 'sip-files00141.txt'
41b5fc074d61cd25c572da739a38577e
3e6769733a44e3028198d17618bf0c9d4fe038d0
'2011-12-16T19:34:10-05:00'
describe
'441' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOET' 'sip-files00142.txt'
342ecc5c870b7a12dde07aa3e6343348
7b9ed7a349f2036dece697969150dcf778cd8f47
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEU' 'sip-files00143.txt'
a1fce2a4f9375b2cded2ab8a0705d547
c7425c4f2f0bbdf633f201330eae07e5e6754527
'2011-12-16T19:34:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEV' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bf4e873a4cf7f71894b402d8d482d9a5
9ae34d652d1d43cca48379d8dd95c4cfa772f82b
'2011-12-16T19:25:38-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
10783d92a09210cdb64deaefe45c6bb4
5b24d32cb415220f852f787161e900309b6e740c
'2011-12-16T19:33:42-05:00'
describe
'391' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEX' 'sip-files00146.txt'
642e269c78e6feba0d1285d258d854df
379499734c5207c4f9b739bddee7a6df679c4e33
'2011-12-16T19:24:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
8d0c0d775a11f710c5c24c32f85fbe61
079462b88d664b4ec6deb12df9408fb312ef7299
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOEZ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
cc829cf746408ebefc61e0431f3bc6f4
853f7f52464f41ab75b14c01cbdd127076dcc961
'2011-12-16T19:25:44-05:00'
describe
'507' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
dfb680faf2d0cff827f0c70e54b46477
2a61263fe1e613cced1dfcffbfa7bc11c2741139
'2011-12-16T19:24:25-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'553' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFB' 'sip-files00150.txt'
aac00a66c9cfad33ae2a0f969aecc489
cd824a9d39fe7ff556df274ab90eacd9acac5da3
'2011-12-16T19:26:08-05:00'
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
2f4244298cd2bbcd05aecdb15071893d
dbef2516adb693ae985f8d9cd07bb76a4bd2011d
'2011-12-16T19:30:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
25ad63594fc577aea904401e28e7136f
51d35caff84635fe5b7c3371f43cee176a981f36
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFE' 'sip-files00153.txt'
7b891fed115053048a83d2c8cb5cb7ac
4a874dab494fb149214d05b0b512c90e968c2483
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFF' 'sip-files00154.txt'
bb263da13b8ff6586ccb8785e87d4547
404f103e3cf5e9cfde09dca09c8e8e7cc6a5ba48
'2011-12-16T19:22:37-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFG' 'sip-files00155.txt'
6e1e0d12aafc3e3b3c46901ce73a0bfd
13987f68c08be83dd8ce836df53e2726dfc684ba
'2011-12-16T19:27:41-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
bb88ca419e54b684014256421e427026
d5b158d25d9dbc6edad80b11360c49d593bebe58
'2011-12-16T19:28:14-05:00'
describe
'429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFI' 'sip-files00157.txt'
e15169193b1bc80fa00d849f0f3a81f1
2501afce3b8dd5b752bfc2003aef12e2169785db
'2011-12-16T19:31:48-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'401' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
7493a20038ce7acf1a87ac2f235a35f4
97c8cd6cd0f99f705fba9e64d9e717203712a90a
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFK' 'sip-files00159.txt'
a04d3bcb22cd1f8d3583fda4aedf3a61
84a71824244904e2cfba39911e7ac3ef7964be45
'2011-12-16T19:29:21-05:00'
describe
'821' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFL' 'sip-files00160.txt'
d6d835e26a9b9224486c28e0a3c3fdba
9dad7d3a9262fa053e9a018d4d2db0a25be259f9
'2011-12-16T19:34:28-05:00'
describe
'551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFM' 'sip-files00161.txt'
676ef6dd54ec2fe59c854dc9e2fc6c52
e578fe191c753f06caf3e306474cad82b4815ee1
'2011-12-16T19:32:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFN' 'sip-files00162.txt'
58deb7b97948f446db3f7b3f5c155734
56b58074ba50f0e722212e1d3fe02927df56951f
'2011-12-16T19:33:06-05:00'
describe
'430' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFO' 'sip-files00163.txt'
ac182da03db8286aa1afb5b00c2b69a5
a8d4b6ff2fb79e62314af158b1d3ff20c8f1d9da
'2011-12-16T19:22:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
7abe2cb2b9db1c8da4baa929b063ceaa
a43fe25a56e0684c8de77e3f5250130cf9e5c887
'2011-12-16T19:30:17-05:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
74ae21960aad72315a3624784bea5aad
ed57cffaf1a80d4901d8f00d5bbc2c79557e39d5
'2011-12-16T19:32:50-05:00'
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFR' 'sip-files00166.txt'
017f148ccbcf659c635e8d56466ec4a3
52cc2f0c82a52be077e6555b230de4595daa9fe3
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00167.txt'
fbc84442708a9e3eae8ffee78b81ee1a
a5a5d2bc6c48a356a0b69d2a0c3d62cc0b527a15
'2011-12-16T19:22:50-05:00'
describe
'506' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00168.txt'
1ff0ed6a622ef96c92a781084f87b33d
342099651dd8fa3dac9c996d8c7f1a019ab36ce0
'2011-12-16T19:33:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
e7b95aa9497577eefaff5c5ee8807f3e
b01b548a11007892ede6eb0ce9ed019dce82bf02
'2011-12-16T19:29:09-05:00'
describe
'406' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00170.txt'
9ea016314c43e1d7b7a512a4f7fac219
f4cb22f8228446cf5a3a7f0a5ec2cb851d388cfd
'2011-12-16T19:27:59-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
37eb4febeb90940816f5cd1149b17e98
442a01054883e8254a5e1288c720bfa90ac8d136
'2011-12-16T19:24:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00172.txt'
06d721ccee830fb698602748976220d2
a731ec2933a90d54806a2300f7acf2eada069316
'2011-12-16T19:29:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
965b59a2c18a895059d6a08e412e63ea
11b034bb609023e908ce1dff4144d19014a2839c
'2011-12-16T19:24:10-05:00'
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
f29da471ea7bc840765cac487cf65003
879635ca23aea409748a5685ca1c90d345450b8d
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
c670090a5d677397d396007db4ea56e4
d9369f07533552c157e716524160373aee45415c
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00176.txt'
3abad7e206f7f69edcbb70aea7bac1f2
018028dc1cce900480f25449bd6e589aae3bf4d2
'2011-12-16T19:31:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00177.txt'
26b8f604b5886e3f5589dbe8dfd666ce
d0a0ceda821fd4c10d1ea0ddd2b69db0244e7c36
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00178.txt'
4ae161cd859ddafb7d9fb1baf6006c99
33b1be171d4204949105ec44881906f2ed855c0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00179.txt'
bde17d9621e48909492a56c0ab3b500f
41ecfe40ff37e09c2b59436b1cbed432a2c62a2f
'2011-12-16T19:25:28-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
11d73c8be48065715ffb334366e54699
fb81fdbc2cf04f3973088bfd3d269d35875c2df3
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00181.txt'
385d9e250fa6d46a8a61fc576c93712b
0ef414b2fefe75acfa22701d35610513aa47effb
'2011-12-16T19:27:26-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
5251350b7d62be43bfd76863635e5b91
f5d18e73bb803b71b23710f1109bed3b20b0f8fd
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00183.txt'
40a731cc39bcd8b41c0d19b2887e5f7b
985de53c947828edfb7b8aa604b148a52b891848
'2011-12-16T19:27:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
342557725411109d11f34cfbd89f4332
58aea7f1c489ac06e03749975c4049af0b747119
'2011-12-16T19:26:42-05:00'
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00185.txt'
2350d5f8c250c2f1a60b5500e9311cc8
914eb0b0d8e5f5adbbd7c452b7114e6dbc568670
'2011-12-16T19:23:11-05:00'
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
27b9740e08f9d258802866624e7c04c2
65fb84a77061e71cb7bd0bf5824ed4dfa298ab4e
'2011-12-16T19:26:00-05:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00188.txt'
1afcef66f68a52866f319d650f7a281b
4f7a6e413e2cc7fc2bc4a3182b5ec0d3d83d5b2e
'2011-12-16T19:26:18-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e45a28e7df71f62a1362fa8461705197
fdeb31ea01bea578013baddccba650df1ea7bd28
'2011-12-16T19:24:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1541c2920fc877b266361ac5f880cb54
0590e082d0953ca6d7f828c95494c7ed45a315ee
'2011-12-16T19:28:04-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00191.txt'
c92039ea34eb0fe8ffdb10ed8c2b3cd6
da7a8353ae7e58bd54f0a8d5aab26ddb86120737
'2011-12-16T19:27:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
bde6b6382ad173f91ea7d1e31069aae9
87c5a83d21f818e4892162deef05b22e10ec1d9d
'2011-12-16T19:27:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00193.txt'
1692b08c26a72e10a5a99812c1c8f0e6
ef619c0e35e185f45be1fbb88a4211ae927aeecf
'2011-12-16T19:33:00-05:00'
describe
'524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00194.txt'
06fb0241aa99552cb551a9058abccb0f
08a418a2097e47a9fa2c92ae15df58b39f428026
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00195.txt'
fea8aec572c68a8ff6fd08d5b1810b09
d506b2909e3dd1da3bf32c0d6cc989fa8264423e
'2011-12-16T19:25:07-05:00'
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00196.txt'
5746599d7312e1f27adb8c5840c6be1a
afb2f8f9626b9d197c40d794bc12bd0cf3886faf
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
3994ab71319557897f3885b2c2e7ff38
e2879db124f0e3bc04a3eff98bffabf7cc0ccb43
'2011-12-16T19:26:21-05:00'
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00198.txt'
b55eebcbb2e0d20fee4830e9e407a232
ca77919c8103eccfba08dcd2bd7d798cf372af70
'2011-12-16T19:34:24-05:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00199.txt'
49154f3a44f94f3306f89ff4e52757d0
611dcb59e358020bf9c521b4ad976d31f066e243
describe
'538' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a3b4be17383c0f77b5f03a35e40d4ea3
7e3738b1b446e68dffadbeb8c933732f3b681739
'2011-12-16T19:32:26-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
a85a535891c76c35ec2c5d0f68a00bc2
faecfe4b578878f3b568d35fbd3b132e8ed50fd2
'2011-12-16T19:24:28-05:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
9e9e66b00c157e8dd8391d10510d9e1d
099ebd8cf62ae300f04fc6de562090700eb48df2
'2011-12-16T19:23:44-05:00'
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00203.txt'
3bd87eb3663f5aceac914df387c94ca1
1f2c08ae81563cf7ad6aae06480ae336af677a56
'2011-12-16T19:27:34-05:00'
describe
'698' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00204.txt'
b0b8eec900247a33388e384d5e698238
b59764d8a8ec76ffb897b6bfaa5623d6d1b09ae5
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00205.txt'
39a9b429cdbd28559e2169595d83fa4a
5c2dbeff6d518b9dc7cf03c2b4ebbb11f3aa3242
'2011-12-16T19:26:58-05:00'
describe
'440' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00206.txt'
946b72764499fd9eec158e2dbea6dd3d
c9731d83015e9beda5cb4d41d4eec83d8acb00bf
'2011-12-16T19:30:26-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00207.txt'
4d2096ed83e7555e38353110d8a17e2f
d23000d369af7a7329036890fc9158c03e242fe2
'2011-12-16T19:33:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00208.txt'
16c5283e268a5e79f15ccc5256c84ab1
2eef0acfc67f0f2aa893c41d2fcf78043504a001
'2011-12-16T19:27:19-05:00'
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00209.txt'
d274b09257d6b80790dde9c697bc26d3
d7a18af03ff3744f66514e44b8ed2092e0d5de8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00210.txt'
5fbe9edb7a9c4f42e9fb9fde577c5699
f7746968c10b1594303a2cf2aae434ce02b2ada9
'2011-12-16T19:26:33-05:00'
describe
'422' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00211.txt'
bf914a58424e3f2f3a05ae08ff26b540
37b7b0955dd732830b1520dcab715042f7179dee
'2011-12-16T19:26:17-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00212.txt'
711ab84683db79fc706343e9f7f081c5
b67b60fc10c10201b1dc52ca473a4bb787c0bc69
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00213.txt'
dde72559c5c644459bf9c9f2bec67dba
dd18b755dc88499e172966487583edf224a3994f
'2011-12-16T19:27:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
708e14a65276588f540d1fc618fe8177
d8d782cb65d22128602c620f9ae73e09a94e9093
'2011-12-16T19:34:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00215.txt'
4c5956aa618a1bffbc2a66ac20ad2095
0a2db1eee128c6d11901cb2ea406fadb2466af7f
'2011-12-16T19:33:21-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00216.txt'
7c02b18fbcbcf1c4085a306638070e31
78908d867258cdaee463d4a3e7264f478efffb39
'2011-12-16T19:33:51-05:00'
describe
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Invalid character
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
Not valid first byte of UTF-8 encoding
'1011' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00217.txt'
2ae5f798078b224a2d8ec8a60254aad7
ed9c8b1db7a296d35242c820c84c86cb2757fffb
'2011-12-16T19:27:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
836992085511237e55d32641756a4643
5cad66769fd59a5b3bc3a5430646973ac00b078a
'2011-12-16T19:24:29-05:00'
describe
'502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00219.txt'
be6c388179ca7b2799e71b94013c8dc8
3f50b398bac1009cc22ff8b131867fc799024abd
describe
'209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00001.pro'
5b052d32f4c41b1aa08babc36292b7df
f28227198c4ff8193e1e422770e4eee168ea65c0
'2011-12-16T19:21:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00002.pro'
54805caa5483e5f39588e53c798d46ab
c8177b92b253d3dbacb1a5675437108c8ba67b98
describe
'5614' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00004.pro'
448f5522d863417c20142034ade93911
0e439276385359dce20ad9f6381cdfe0caaf7f9d
'2011-12-16T19:24:24-05:00'
describe
'6216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00007.pro'
6284325bdc4d6b116404de041bdab8c3
df0869832423e366604f604161dfca6da68e8e39
'2011-12-16T19:23:04-05:00'
describe
'15692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
7d9978bd1bbb51ab4abc470ee99e5a59
58412c9a61ed9370f0087d3f482c711a3e25df2e
'2011-12-16T19:24:19-05:00'
describe
'18670' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00010.pro'
62a1cbaf821fce28e263b8e3fc5e90a0
9a609a33a3b88a419b650dd35ed4e5fbce9eba6e
'2011-12-16T19:28:32-05:00'
describe
'15021' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00011.pro'
bb7139a00116e1825fe6b80488afb7af
b6ec63781981f72c5752883fd21ac2120bc4c211
'2011-12-16T19:26:46-05:00'
describe
'28025' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
634d024dee4f08d2c3a10ba1c5d66b61
2f97e5f56a61344e65449476ff238c84902fed0e
'2011-12-16T19:29:05-05:00'
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5376f3c527208906cc260e7b29eaa327
cc9b12cfb12af1f6b1998b7b7c6a8389586a7165
'2011-12-16T19:33:44-05:00'
describe
'27648' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
13e999cdcc9cbbe6fc98d8c27a814d4c
897b432228eaf84dfcd05e9eec30e915354c11c1
describe
'11801' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
330d71d7a8463c688db52a3e28de0f86
9fab344c57a882ea48ff639b3686aad1579807ab
'2011-12-16T19:27:27-05:00'
describe
'26743' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOID' 'sip-files00016.pro'
1fdb19401513c8715ec5c797ac1ded31
72b3719eff0f345eff8a785218b34fb99438e921
'2011-12-16T19:33:34-05:00'
describe
'28271' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
07bc1e611faea4f05d8e482b33dc5f6e
8b0e4dc254d2fe8adf15f3f7e676e9087a6417c2
describe
'27356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c7764b28788e306953806134d6b2e204
12e8c0fc7f3dd51cccf0bc974cd3d19e289bdbee
describe
'26325' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1568256c6ad718f52913f4b965b77563
85c2a658d1c2938470f51594f887560a96683bb4
'2011-12-16T19:29:04-05:00'
describe
'28116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
626e4293e859eb07d375ee02dc4bc1b4
2675bba37ee4a6c1e227627b424333eabc6ccbb4
describe
'12634' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOII' 'sip-files00021.pro'
158f8a4da73a66b7fde05c94f035f186
77fb932abad0f000a66fea55fc0e6ac83b130d6e
describe
'19452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
2223331444056200b6da6ed3ca9564a4
5af19fcddee73a0df5a248390b7d6d273ca61639
'2011-12-16T19:23:59-05:00'
describe
'13679' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
b0637af0d632ff3784ba9c2da864d6cf
c98a1c1e990fa86b609152a02ee957a6fba9ddce
'2011-12-16T19:28:35-05:00'
describe
'26643' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ab533fb391513fd260bcb90320675a49
bc6ddf77aa01ede8c781c3668b157b33a9462858
'2011-12-16T19:32:31-05:00'
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fcbb26742339b3450273a6b3223ce315
2eb5821ee7e371b8345c9b22932fe57c37b30c8b
describe
'26385' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0cd142fa84cdbe039f34f210f6e1b134
116f7e8cc81d92f2d9329d2a18b23e84ced7d9b9
'2011-12-16T19:23:52-05:00'
describe
'25919' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00027.pro'
9be7b41ab7db6f5dcd1367c79a20ecda
5c9e04acd9db46ffc50b63cf04d12abc3dc51929
'2011-12-16T19:24:21-05:00'
describe
'27508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
645f592198724a75ecd1361b425314df
d11adbe4e52c5e11f3ddc3f7ee2c6312338c7911
'2011-12-16T19:29:40-05:00'
describe
'26353' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00029.pro'
240d3694b736896669223da0226b73bb
741629308d749280ed6fe518d03c33d298cfc318
'2011-12-16T19:22:48-05:00'
describe
'6184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
9508b242948e08bb6b1db9c19d67c82c
10c4a7952f90bd6d0978c18031e0796f141dc200
'2011-12-16T19:30:41-05:00'
describe
'18702' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00031.pro'
9019b8cb1993509cd0b46fb8d156d240
4bfe62393a79c94e7f16c4556711fbb6d7ac71f6
'2011-12-16T19:26:06-05:00'
describe
'13680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00032.pro'
55e3bb8b36ba8c24f9eaeb5c446e7297
23a4e412cf39e96d148ebe31f748d0a6db972605
'2011-12-16T19:30:58-05:00'
describe
'27915' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
74d93f8bfc4ff7f2ae1f768bcd496ea2
24c236996f154909bd7072329d67efac258eec3e
describe
'28181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00034.pro'
8c466114a9d4254d0d05a1b086f4e6fc
9d0ed7c4cb0ed47bc8b83eb5303f0316560d453c
describe
'26929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
60098aed8a03396eeb03624d55ae81c7
6a95b3dcda8f6a14b28a5aa7b3f880a39f757283
describe
'25887' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
9758875b2516b80f392674e73dd12f0f
1ff901e0a60faacf6cf6640b949a341e02c43bc5
describe
'26188' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
00d312da8ea06483386eea86d63ba7af
625fb0bcdf770bdfcd338cb5316512792681aa01
'2011-12-16T19:31:56-05:00'
describe
'28670' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
095574000c0271775bdfbd54919990df
2cf6ce3d9d593aa9ca8a3af0a0ed123372a725bc
'2011-12-16T19:26:31-05:00'
describe
'27149' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f10cb0eda45649b2005cec1d374e5397
7ede54c85a13d8148e916fcce42c1448ac5976d9
'2011-12-16T19:25:51-05:00'
describe
'26794' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00040.pro'
2b661aaa1c3fb3e4e45d0f510e7819a8
010230f22fac13fd6d63e9328895e6deb6ed7ff2
describe
'12651' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9f308f52af8d0078b0d0276226c7521e
91847ab167d32c1f3ed081bfb6763c78f2188fb7
'2011-12-16T19:24:46-05:00'
describe
'26939' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
51c1736d846fde73dcc06217eac96724
b92c1be474911dbd3c3911e55d3255af50a5d0f0
'2011-12-16T19:27:25-05:00'
describe
'12483' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e048231993c2542e331a4cacc4fe6299
b0ebde0b40a9ad4742dcf940c69b12d11493d827
'2011-12-16T19:23:45-05:00'
describe
'7383' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00044.pro'
420da9dd0e4d4d5414a38a8dbe062794
29d28705752110b84d6cefbccda6e7cc1ea8777c
'2011-12-16T19:28:08-05:00'
describe
'17575' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00045.pro'
7e689d81f24ae3471c30f10c8a726a34
325c939ff7f44d7cbe60e10ce70f10a0a973a24f
'2011-12-16T19:23:49-05:00'
describe
'27043' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
5a22e658dd2d073f5405494e6f1e00b8
e636287736ce4f2dd6de5b24587adf7492ce151f
'2011-12-16T19:33:58-05:00'
describe
'25920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d6dcc149af87c426ff876784b4621184
1106a2afe02ee74bd97ba595eb726c4c3114e98d
'2011-12-16T19:26:20-05:00'
describe
'26779' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
71b966faea6d372e88d1110a290019b1
e4b58b90dcc75c1325b3c7ad4715ef7aaa6e633e
'2011-12-16T19:28:24-05:00'
describe
'27163' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00049.pro'
768783bad1e080d46a192e1e33959fea
553edf8545c0a2660e87433245bfb4bed08496a6
'2011-12-16T19:34:34-05:00'
describe
'26937' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00050.pro'
6c9ba7ad2beeeb42a58c01ab0913d714
9a75eea338a63cf17790cd9e4cdba310b0094447
'2011-12-16T19:27:56-05:00'
describe
'28155' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00051.pro'
09c22f6a1d695f8dafc70a8b07a79856
fc3c160d37fddbcb78a0aed087c972da03f32d5b
'2011-12-16T19:24:07-05:00'
describe
'27210' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ab29ed4209a251c98d75dc795b5ebf00
d4b493c50b1a5a648e79daa59b44d84688664ed2
'2011-12-16T19:32:33-05:00'
describe
'25805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00053.pro'
564b03d787dc33dd16dfad8c56223680
2a9136a1c70c6128a6b0206e36d759cd3d1c131b
describe
'12015' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5d43f0ff172a7b37ca61f844b4e9dcf8
9a0fc3ced58bcbe43b490b191ac7ec73d2d1f471
describe
'17178' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d54edc3a394a80cb478f1ae4dd7cdab0
ac945d3773a8549167b00344c95514c32c74d917
'2011-12-16T19:29:51-05:00'
describe
'27630' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
18cc51459a402c4a17f493e3223c846e
adc4d27087e02e6a8b66ca8243f48393c338ec89
'2011-12-16T19:34:12-05:00'
describe
'27467' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00057.pro'
95b88f318a0e911e591b845f63418935
e897aa4309e3aa1ada5cde773b892ea4858c58b6
'2011-12-16T19:33:59-05:00'
describe
'26264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b12027b5dd0723938f4f2fdd2a1aac34
78dee05b3587a82172b7cbe95bb4a1b39c3a90d1
describe
'25854' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
7282eb7e57dcb68d46564a805849e35a
21fff1af94121a7978a89fe8f7ad6c65a92f3956
'2011-12-16T19:32:20-05:00'
describe
'25994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7ce180e3de3bfb28030e97a5474ea646
1a844c9e8830557fe7f31d63e8c88e463a78e955
'2011-12-16T19:30:43-05:00'
describe
'27179' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
4fdeb25dfd19a7d073f5e79c2f8691c2
9aa53493610b557b53bbf9886c435d80632ba053
describe
'26789' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
ff126b284a3025a630e2e5fd8f02476a
cc6852819b7ba20a5637a52024db961107c0b0ec
describe
'26112' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ae9dbc9c26af7f636cfd386b7673af33
b433fdc2fcd7eefeb83d16bedba00ced898f2ae1
'2011-12-16T19:23:15-05:00'
describe
'28088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
215ee786ff98c93bf3de33012cbc8a51
79d4ba5c4965b5ddf7710ce9412088a8774b4520
'2011-12-16T19:32:16-05:00'
describe
'10210' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ed63157fde1fffa039e0732730675bf4
772ac408f704d0f50c5c5119c8bb3f3ffa09d859
'2011-12-16T19:31:24-05:00'
describe
'26575' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00066.pro'
d3b1534810cca0512a09a176acd37215
df2511663e5a836da8adf7a9eaefcf6839814ce9
describe
'27133' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00067.pro'
7ed507c5dc01496b3ed14cb14873953a
6a7cff88a8d21e4b07e0923bb87bc33cc4eb7390
'2011-12-16T19:28:47-05:00'
describe
'25839' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00068.pro'
b2f899afa7dcea903bdabce4f186ece2
f3359f0dff674389486433de686da3cd2ec2f2bb
'2011-12-16T19:27:46-05:00'
describe
'15793' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6a63ae92ccc8c5d9bf2570549c8fb335
1b1207c6390f21c3fe91a57beb3355063b32666e
'2011-12-16T19:26:07-05:00'
describe
'25747' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00070.pro'
35a760d67a7ad18bdfe0749c1c7d091f
ac35f15313861aed6d2a098b98b7fd4e86d5c5e6
'2011-12-16T19:23:22-05:00'
describe
'27982' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a97fbeb4a2fedf8250175ff70ee34582
115193722bc99e3480d6c4b11f8facd461cba461
'2011-12-16T19:22:57-05:00'
describe
'11512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
be4f6a3f8ce678bf1c1785e70eec349e
0f29424357088e311fc4bcd480db9a23e3e0f122
'2011-12-16T19:28:46-05:00'
describe
'26190' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00073.pro'
02d586e886f642cc3b8c96e83ebe2799
cbe5db4d80d187946382764f5e20177443c782b4
'2011-12-16T19:22:07-05:00'
describe
'26375' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
66c3df78c7507397f5a9be0af17653e7
3859aafd875d89cd83ca1d08a548b3ec240e95f9
'2011-12-16T19:31:55-05:00'
describe
'17441' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
f525b29c3a3cb4a463256867864dd5cf
a1600719d5277d44e2cb5e9917984c7f3ab4a5a1
'2011-12-16T19:29:15-05:00'
describe
'26645' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ab631997157efdac902b738ca22e0caa
b9ad130441e4431e1407d14bb5475ccd2d04e12b
describe
'26518' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
f9fc3ed6de26f746f29e00acbb986be6
46849c73fab72c205c75e14a7a4a127460fd12f3
'2011-12-16T19:22:35-05:00'
describe
'26232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00078.pro'
d62bf61da44a244c97f83f05b37a5bbc
3719d3d67e54a54908c64caf76af4d7a83e8d8c1
'2011-12-16T19:31:49-05:00'
describe
'26700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
cdc083f430be90f511d5a3bbeef95022
d65bd913826afd3723dacfa6fc574c3772f8e11f
'2011-12-16T19:34:19-05:00'
describe
'26374' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00080.pro'
444e7ba5e466001993d2d82dca5db4b3
8df895297f44d08ea4bad785b744a190f7102aa5
'2011-12-16T19:25:01-05:00'
describe
'19624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00081.pro'
90db6523b972d7d57a64519cca1e13a3
d738b7e8a609b22a81385a3dbe96eef074c5c8da
'2011-12-16T19:28:59-05:00'
describe
'23401' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00082.pro'
36cddb9b5e0613a5affa108e21679c32
90ff2efc24097b38aa927f1dbbfabb3c3e375c30
'2011-12-16T19:27:18-05:00'
describe
'16463' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00083.pro'
5c31afca0f595396dfad10b3cef59d97
972d1bb66d345f046a491deee50800cef49d2394
'2011-12-16T19:29:18-05:00'
describe
'26923' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6d9d6c4ea95b646cc996276ee3154233
fc4f8c2bb77550addb37baf915aba2700ed1af5a
'2011-12-16T19:29:03-05:00'
describe
'14182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a8e1ad2904a7e1358805584c400b98c4
6a621df98cc482c8d8af47a0ccb1771b470cd2ce
'2011-12-16T19:31:17-05:00'
describe
'26191' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00086.pro'
1bb5010c050f0e9cb478af8f7d99006e
fb3b89e53e6d7c3c59a0da81428b87b122b35701
describe
'27584' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
855c9853b83443eed8f0bdb57676bfa6
02ac61ee0a61036c69a3dadc1334834990425d48
'2011-12-16T19:29:11-05:00'
describe
'19118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
731757618b15015b9658f764e065cf14
02da1b8cf85427081c30bfa59e6da621bd7a7693
describe
'17527' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00089.pro'
e0986e9fe31f8e6295df929ca6e1a92f
5fd7020038a02d4575f55643e44dd3b113022338
'2011-12-16T19:32:36-05:00'
describe
'26769' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
e5c8fc255548673cba593f1451a23467
357f4190b0b573637326b909cd84d1de47318ff4
'2011-12-16T19:33:54-05:00'
describe
'26059' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00091.pro'
2cbbe0bede26fcbf432dc52fac4b535c
5215260b2396674a78f271952c5aacf354e4a0f0
'2011-12-16T19:25:11-05:00'
describe
'25093' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00092.pro'
77ffdab4667b86a4112f8d7aa63a2c74
055d5b34beaf5870044e8986c44be7f2490a0d0c
'2011-12-16T19:26:57-05:00'
describe
'25451' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4a0d8cd1b31d96376d0e0f1e37bc3f7a
b1b06af5e2658e1dc531fd84f1e6d138bd8cf2ae
'2011-12-16T19:25:10-05:00'
describe
'26321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f2c9517171db0cd5913b336f9b51efab
0719166393d96a3382721d955e9f4f826f40d5c7
describe
'14089' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00095.pro'
bcec88817a839f5122c9ebdc39905e85
6df53b10c9cc23a33441286f8219030de1e0cd8d
'2011-12-16T19:33:20-05:00'
describe
'26432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00096.pro'
659e4900d4ed2fe2df19b39b677c83bc
1ced0fd844307118bebf80dd28918372bd7c6279
'2011-12-16T19:22:59-05:00'
describe
'26856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00097.pro'
fa6503f36ca28cb763efa1239f9d2978
8faf080ec0e291fedd9f36431eae53b448ca49e6
'2011-12-16T19:25:32-05:00'
describe
'24729' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
d1733ea6c478ad0afd8e1800f0e0b310
0976e5ac0d8ca6386b736570dea93da469901ecc
'2011-12-16T19:26:09-05:00'
describe
'24857' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00099.pro'
9258d5a0009794a5cb65994948708668
bbedaf589c925bbcac2e6d120e85b2700194c425
'2011-12-16T19:22:41-05:00'
describe
'26262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
58cc6ca98060900d2fb0250faed9dda6
a5cad1a5a9ab2e6e8d387291c6f2c38f0de0b25f
describe
'26130' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
8186bcc42b37f8c97551a6fc924de6dc
ab1338bbaae8253f2e9012e74e5e9b9ce45ebf81
describe
'9961' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00102.pro'
8c8da99889e143a48782166b4ae6d04a
e12ad8dd7782c4879279d03904d96fd5c1567c05
'2011-12-16T19:24:08-05:00'
describe
'27605' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
d727e688c87ad8844b0e1ea94e5b5b75
cd5611939fe2822406080f7bbeaf0bf695ba6f2a
'2011-12-16T19:25:05-05:00'
describe
'25955' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
d1906e4b658125139ee9887a5190b513
691c83a04642dd7e7627629df227514457117390
describe
'27646' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00105.pro'
fbb90da74799861e38fb4ec8305bff0d
63da18ae59852b4a429f686fca01dc194ca70b86
describe
'16874' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00106.pro'
a2ec46ef160bc3a98d6753ecc9cb6c28
90344dff5a2a22094c304061ae50d9c230a7e7fa
'2011-12-16T19:30:46-05:00'
describe
'26656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
b83b240a0614a4450cfc951f58172229
2dff5f818d20bf7ffdf780d1de2872bb11a0a6cd
'2011-12-16T19:26:15-05:00'
describe
'27402' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
571d5b994a77e1a7a35c504cf9fff601
e0d883be145f6dc322f4ed4a46f13f0efeb706ef
'2011-12-16T19:30:00-05:00'
describe
'25409' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00109.pro'
0ad8318ee88e252e3bb9919d15dbe7ee
9f354e0776185b01a254bb6d1fca920140a4bf36
'2011-12-16T19:27:50-05:00'
describe
'26614' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00110.pro'
3cca4ea954093ebf38aa82927616edb8
d7fd60bfb5af1cc1a8e299be058477b0d307aa36
'2011-12-16T19:22:03-05:00'
describe
'26415' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00111.pro'
09a3a9982ddfd1ca0ca23a64c2b6a4c5
cb0e4aef85e9d9409f3e06c3c3d1266f715d1409
'2011-12-16T19:23:27-05:00'
describe
'26644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00112.pro'
9cf228cc1174fb6d9995ac3263c7d1f8
49e31158845d53f30d9a965c97a653e896021416
'2011-12-16T19:26:12-05:00'
describe
'27760' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00113.pro'
075a7e4f2126745755e16aecb19eae49
ef921bae32f0fe5b2b1f3b843a83dda04de1745e
describe
'28868' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
00fb101d572427d0f9bcce6142870334
a052dac396ff05dfad3c1d37aa5e629de3e5a653
'2011-12-16T19:24:14-05:00'
describe
'27689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00115.pro'
b27a4b99937f3b235287748bc9dd5393
9822d7900bffb0df2e175f5c89a56f06ab57dbf1
describe
'24896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
05d35271be2f6c36886f4b7fa75385c4
6c7f66116642c72a5db307ed987c0a03d3f0e0a1
'2011-12-16T19:32:56-05:00'
describe
'11799' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
eb400885878f82b92f6a85941863a993
edf96ed49ec11b55dbf7845e251ec9e0db369d31
'2011-12-16T19:25:21-05:00'
describe
'26107' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00118.pro'
118fa6f87858e067e79cb9917ce8150d
6cf177d53b1d53e98ea6a8b10f7da8d67151b964
'2011-12-16T19:26:51-05:00'
describe
'27267' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
06cc3e127cfde200e526a7d704e131b0
05d2337a25da82398ff6346801dccfc5c53b8380
'2011-12-16T19:28:07-05:00'
describe
'25951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00120.pro'
437e57d71ff19f0098cc05e25a1b7e6e
56707ac6808785513447c360fd8b52b830fe7dc8
'2011-12-16T19:31:07-05:00'
describe
'28366' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOME' 'sip-files00121.pro'
5e6cb5a21c69f84c971d92bf0bf71565
fdcf727bd98e293a43b41758894f4df03dfce357
'2011-12-16T19:34:13-05:00'
describe
'26203' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00122.pro'
c99d9724ba5e25da2e05409ac9092e9c
f431a5b2570b14312f11d5a650836d8a479e8353
'2011-12-16T19:29:38-05:00'
describe
'26429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
6628151b1a6500ff5250cb79e95a4988
7f5249517b76d297076f8692b7ae9d490b935c6d
'2011-12-16T19:27:20-05:00'
describe
'27861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
c2335750824a77d38276576fc1a6a776
531fe00a37da152b0a0a6fe42f6e009f872ee666
'2011-12-16T19:27:39-05:00'
describe
'26072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00125.pro'
643251588c617721061c1346fc9e706a
11985bfa103777ec83d900061449e35c99b1a2f4
'2011-12-16T19:32:37-05:00'
describe
'27682' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1dd62594a11c9cc2690cbb4f35e877fa
665c1f4a0ebf7a4bc30376ea1f3e97ee15f99efa
'2011-12-16T19:27:29-05:00'
describe
'14045' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
e1235afe2a7fffdd61e13190000ec83e
d163107a6af4d9d8cf84ebb147b6935169131bd5
describe
'26286' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOML' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c20902ddee9a9579f7296aed30c017f0
2dbc431b3bc534d3e5485daa476f2321af7617ce
'2011-12-16T19:25:00-05:00'
describe
'27173' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00129.pro'
654a34845e7eefd3add019877a0fc196
c29b80777496afc21ab6b211b661f85c2f37bc60
describe
'17614' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00130.pro'
e33e9ffe947af8ca4b95de09e7f99c64
ab8a1decdd7f2e88f03fdc89b53962fbf0371c89
'2011-12-16T19:25:33-05:00'
describe
'18301' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00131.pro'
80a9acf0f9eccef244840211b9311776
cc09a9e12a3039e68f9ca5affea265f4528b480d
describe
'26090' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00132.pro'
87a32558e189afbdb542b59af1b71a6d
8aed9da0028220dcf8aaf89836b9a522da366112
'2011-12-16T19:30:27-05:00'
describe
'27022' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
f92fdc99e259071f41f4cca3e4729882
2fff8eb0f4b79d07b02bcb58cb70b42acd65a295
'2011-12-16T19:28:03-05:00'
describe
'27189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
3724c32312d75908a7d061918131f381
1d83bcef3b5356c9f9279da9a674b340cfc2bbb4
describe
'26758' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
fe88928ef0d368bcde9e086cdf326ec6
021ff261041c460c69e662283a7df8ec0e3b16ed
'2011-12-16T19:23:39-05:00'
describe
'27466' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5cec1c2b93ba425834dfc970991fed25
2fd9e6761be7aa7133517ebf046b9bb31ebfcf80
'2011-12-16T19:29:43-05:00'
describe
'14495' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9fa0dda1b9ca7fb83e39e3959b2cfe70
d002f89ba2026ece42391cc12ac589f2cd231195
'2011-12-16T19:27:52-05:00'
describe
'25616' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00138.pro'
419614cbd9e98ffb53efb678539b22a1
b2b18a591b076501585fdf8db547b27d9a3dc47e
'2011-12-16T19:24:11-05:00'
describe
'25983' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00139.pro'
d284427261bc56e2f256f7129100874b
ffbaca2f00b4912154739031cd15f894063ff670
describe
'27938' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00140.pro'
0a9b96d33da8e440541e4edf794e9756
09dab64d39094f378245be710eb5e9b665db3e96
describe
'27374' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00141.pro'
7e7488a1b901dc28fc199f2801d7b680
dbf4e52c1cdefe3d364f9c7c3b5693e7c24c42e5
describe
'10773' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
a5e1d6812b0977bca80e842323e3355c
590e2ef84418351148d23f2760b50ebfad82df91
describe
'16911' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONA' 'sip-files00143.pro'
0aec980bd49f8f289d3f9d6a9ce5e4f3
03536120e7c5deaf2bebd0def7d84852bb5f5fd1
describe
'27273' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONB' 'sip-files00144.pro'
34d4a7b51b0061f19587be82a4b927db
3ec9c1a4f2390c654abff07030b0aab547d48111
'2011-12-16T19:25:39-05:00'
describe
'24336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONC' 'sip-files00145.pro'
accd89442904e99608eacf28d3113dd1
8a0669dc1302b5c0635ae1b347b2949d605243d8
describe
'9255' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOND' 'sip-files00146.pro'
3be3018ddebc97e56372d11091381a2d
dbbc907161b835fe9a081c7bd9ccc67e618b303d
describe
'26525' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONE' 'sip-files00147.pro'
9b0f7864008b9164e7b7ae3cf524371d
de4edc80d4492a245e28f3c2e6c21a35ff62815e
'2011-12-16T19:23:06-05:00'
describe
'26481' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONF' 'sip-files00148.pro'
b95a8e0c3d58f0c8be96bbb44327875e
08adbc554155abfba435d1f3e144dc444c501b84
'2011-12-16T19:21:54-05:00'
describe
'11554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONG' 'sip-files00149.pro'
7f43ff1c89b12e21a1329bbcd40552d9
df5ca6f5fd6a38a86f0e2ced72b861024c064036
describe
'13067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONH' 'sip-files00150.pro'
4d457d08e82583ff1ca1b6cce1de7a0b
cfba45b3a28c3b5ed9fc0d675921a778d4a06069
'2011-12-16T19:28:05-05:00'
describe
'17520' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONI' 'sip-files00151.pro'
43ee62e200cccdf3ff6e457661c34b46
15524ddf571d7834ac56bb50877651efda7db484
describe
'26371' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
52fa23a8882fb43aff7943636655af84
3689e4e01e49fc1b5541e27d35e0e6660dfe2b0e
describe
'25029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONK' 'sip-files00153.pro'
b72b46a21de9c63447b05164fc3fb666
c8f772fa0f82ead36d2438231bfb3ced176c828d
'2011-12-16T19:28:31-05:00'
describe
'26211' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONL' 'sip-files00154.pro'
43def7f1a3a4f4d4e5b58d7e08ab6a67
2395f0d42eb54b5aa3d21f7a061bbc7c82f16a2e
'2011-12-16T19:24:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
c7160118c959f7cd3a38d8811bfee46c
b02cd4164152f8712ad9668caa600adcd2663327
'2011-12-16T19:25:15-05:00'
describe
'25250' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONN' 'sip-files00156.pro'
987154fe5a935e1386ab9d23aa6d60d1
401f7a8104e6911b996c90f9f7809dd9f771451e
'2011-12-16T19:24:12-05:00'
describe
'10251' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONO' 'sip-files00157.pro'
84b288b0133eca816c421ae85cd7f591
93973a7a89b457cf6ba1c0494cbc5f16b0b61ff3
'2011-12-16T19:27:58-05:00'
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONP' 'sip-files00158.pro'
2a55ba3b126c0db4966cb341f6e05091
a0ed83fc8af220beec75d464350619c2492bd01f
'2011-12-16T19:34:02-05:00'
describe
'22900' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f82ed58f920049b761f8f235fd15e89d
b4cab0c9e72184779d44e163b6a777b2d0638320
describe
'19796' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONR' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ee78f49f5b5cec732d7e323f5dbe6a6f
7ede4242b1a0b0d87f3fb35c18edc9f9d794a040
'2011-12-16T19:33:03-05:00'
describe
'13591' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONS' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4b9b9d3b5d073cd1ddbcf24a428b1095
491a631cd4c988391006f5e5f81617c3a51daf78
'2011-12-16T19:28:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONT' 'sip-files00162.pro'
3068bd487758f3622b360d07c3d4adf9
5d6ad8d6be3475274612e06ef6d3469b954ec34b
'2011-12-16T19:31:50-05:00'
describe
'10680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
dbefb0c3f6db440897a52c90e044d3fe
4ef35da0383d794091c04f0f053bf9c3a61b2ed6
describe
'27225' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONV' 'sip-files00164.pro'
ce50834597cdf839402d5c2a830b22a4
d5fb70c0f604f1cfd56a37aaa8e3e9ef9a36f4b9
'2011-12-16T19:34:03-05:00'
describe
'27201' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONW' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b9f6a656c64e8bb27e56913cb9ac5663
4c22c97963cb8d080bf2dd3bfc51582b5726d6f7
describe
'27054' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONX' 'sip-files00166.pro'
0e7ba36e2067d6e8dca855cc0022326b
8ace5461597a2d81f24b073048361f2ed5bf454c
'2011-12-16T19:22:04-05:00'
describe
'28323' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONY' 'sip-files00167.pro'
0452fd0a7500709d59313e51ffe1b5cd
aa87e5c6bc3766f76833dfd0e234c350b269e714
'2011-12-16T19:34:04-05:00'
describe
'12621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
d16a2a8d09a8cb26e44c232984d885f0
d12cac5bf8a78849e3d8e35ed2e184a59b2b70a2
'2011-12-16T19:34:25-05:00'
describe
'27308' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00169.pro'
ec53a33c2e4c9189ae5d12cd9d2ccad9
99f69e1173c52a9265c32f0dc3dda26fdedcdf34
'2011-12-16T19:34:18-05:00'
describe
'9630' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00170.pro'
a64d93761933edbbd659d59d3edee94d
91f26724be81484f99de213bd17d5894b4e93aee
describe
'28076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00171.pro'
78169e1bdb4882e7a6362f2636a7b350
0566ab5772d41c94b0b2c9d6edd64f20ebffe8e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00172.pro'
79cb7f624f7c41e2739e2efc9e200941
112615c32e213feb7764ba780f4aefd3c628ad58
'2011-12-16T19:31:32-05:00'
describe
'27253' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00173.pro'
688ddcd139ebe4ece06cb2f2e44f0d1e
4a773b4ebea720c3c36bce780815b055fdd7eea8
describe
'12174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00174.pro'
16d399a3305aa6c1c5c65cc328f38060
2b745a9669d390960553baada28977abeef45aad
describe
'21491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e287aaa2ffe6782cf3bce6a04ccc7b53
316161e327dcfb9745f0f833786c01ee9b93b413
describe
'26772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00176.pro'
071692207ff701d81db3ed3ff3263d77
15387bd8a22098e7eda6bf90741b7c725bbba4cb
'2011-12-16T19:28:27-05:00'
describe
'26571' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00177.pro'
7156934e3fc64b858b041415bf21e22e
0c554e4b209360985f72edca2393a89e5b7ac37c
'2011-12-16T19:30:55-05:00'
describe
'27899' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00178.pro'
feb116f0eb1395a1de87712705fc6ee0
578c3e98b08123046c9228598a2c2226694366c3
describe
'26808' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
d608027a5cfe733b76c55dd76bd8d274
5ae37345dcf28a20011452a18701e070559ed315
'2011-12-16T19:31:53-05:00'
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00180.pro'
8919dd5157c854cff3eea3a987170218
36dd3f014eb05d6f0b8b3fac23e5afbb4abe67ff
describe
'26485' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00181.pro'
0698ac234ad4cc3b8533a913b4de21bd
3ae3f03e0dd5707857487e49315f5c68321e4295
'2011-12-16T19:33:26-05:00'
describe
'27621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOON' 'sip-files00182.pro'
822ccb1a86e485001dd0b2e3f4fa159b
61eb8b9a0e32e3f5a944f68da50e2f90555b281e
describe
'28909' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00183.pro'
1ac7e4e00b4c73587a8ab02d44b4bf0b
dba759fe2b0be0dfe17da5853250d59f6d5edf1c
'2011-12-16T19:30:42-05:00'
describe
'26673' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00184.pro'
0581341aceea5aea1b6260a635741f62
e5ae6d6907077972aa60b300d06f84b2450afe7c
'2011-12-16T19:21:50-05:00'
describe
'8190' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0463fa00bcf168e68caf8db763ff554a
a694eda13d21a5903e0401d24e0cdc69324f2769
describe
'16364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00186.pro'
42f819b9134c6c1fb2296b05b30ac0ef
8a230e654bc72b6910680fcbbad0ab2ff1c0a3c3
'2011-12-16T19:29:48-05:00'
describe
'2747' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00188.pro'
d217f82ca8cc7c5b735fb415c1888ef1
68c7cb611a85effddb6907f37e8ac80f3e3cefdf
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00189.pro'
6bdb9a2ba8477e9c72623fbde72050b6
d075b01361cfee363616cc670d1d397a6f8f5b6e
'2011-12-16T19:29:07-05:00'
describe
'26200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00190.pro'
ecfb69389e1007ab9538ea401e118d13
113a99e314b55aa1f6aa14c0c6ca759136ae9ada
describe
'26037' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00191.pro'
a2f4d862cf160f3fee95adc776c14cd9
38bb1a598ece16ea0bc2e0f5724143d78199c52f
describe
'26728' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00192.pro'
f3fa7d164164d50b3f35139e625f1cb0
8d4669d5bc618bb04a2f52421c7945dd54e05193
'2011-12-16T19:31:25-05:00'
describe
'25862' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00193.pro'
50b7a5078e8fabbab5696a6c89d63895
840696023a793dc74713594ba6f822df9ddb9efd
'2011-12-16T19:29:25-05:00'
describe
'13058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00194.pro'
4c75ee33cc520ebf011100f7667a0044
8d616ded9ef059cd4b03eb602e863624c7caad5c
describe
'18999' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00195.pro'
93f332e3d63f8831588ce0afabafe448
d97bc442496198abe3a0562c1d518c8271d51835
describe
'13051' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00196.pro'
deee876c4fbb138976e237a3d34a66ff
04e3179421339306b7c094b5d9316e52803ae77d
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00197.pro'
3e648b8c5f31b2d7137346fd29050e52
42bf78ed889d8e172c066d63da875d1fabc91b7a
'2011-12-16T19:31:41-05:00'
describe
'13820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00198.pro'
82aafbff9a1786e069cb63f41d5e5775
0e6dfeeded8315f5d9c8697776f1f71c9def7ff2
'2011-12-16T19:24:52-05:00'
describe
'26364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3cb3d83061344df6c3c2eed27e83ede2
d887bcb5f1c3bec9968a832547cbb4f9829c40fc
'2011-12-16T19:31:06-05:00'
describe
'13170' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00200.pro'
3dbe20ee75fd79bae123b990ab8275d7
c2697805b2c24e2ae1231ef1a99648871c7acfcd
describe
'28278' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
c83e07b12705513addc20d04c21ba169
ca7a2f250d17a4d6bb88b8a865bf496b7b010ba8
'2011-12-16T19:25:36-05:00'
describe
'11133' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00202.pro'
f7f4bed364c7620a221b855d44eda74e
e0a71c5ab123fb4d11f8f940ada32e427455fe60
'2011-12-16T19:29:42-05:00'
describe
'21262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00203.pro'
4e6b2affae61f30860eb54b25853448f
7522b6499eed824504a6ca821bf8db331d981948
'2011-12-16T19:26:59-05:00'
describe
'16863' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00204.pro'
7e00e654e6719fcd0039b5a71372e4a4
e2c473a1af4858c2f433e0d34a71a856f37b17b9
describe
'12615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
174fd8be70493ea998dfeac7cd8988dc
fee2289494b2748e5b7745369a95684d0d2f78d9
'2011-12-16T19:30:07-05:00'
describe
'10660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00206.pro'
e3253b3ba13dcc830cfdc94a7a1cefdc
20292de7715bd00239d906201254dbd21c64fab8
describe
'26179' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00207.pro'
0b886baca97619ba2b1796e8b722209b
c2f39262f3fcf12b4b6b26872a841a49587839b0
'2011-12-16T19:21:55-05:00'
describe
'25469' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00208.pro'
f7b22b12cec8f404fb073a429620545f
4a89ac0905c5ec87f55b4df2f22393cb735b4440
describe
'14761' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00209.pro'
0a05f11b5ba905647aed49a4dc71b52e
303d5cdf74c6f2b79cca92fc4735505a5443e267
'2011-12-16T19:33:05-05:00'
describe
'27259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00210.pro'
e5971595df14b23ef8a680fc9b74598d
693dc74d42884ba12c08c17c7d08f3d3017b25cd
describe
'9646' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00211.pro'
2e96c6296d8b1eb8d62f4653a04ba6bb
1edad44f60b837dd9dc9f809083e19c6e6b49357
describe
'26750' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00212.pro'
e8f086840f627a19f5b3872cabe16a99
4f47cc74103e8611710ed6237eac2495dcfe199a
'2011-12-16T19:28:18-05:00'
describe
'25708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00213.pro'
601f0d7c5bf4f24f3cddbf2bf4e27db6
4638b50fea941a3757c7f59f54c92190bd10a2f9
'2011-12-16T19:29:57-05:00'
describe
'25859' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00214.pro'
bdcf29c42a619a709d5f939358f6fe29
6f814ac33391542d3db39a34919b8916aab62475
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00215.pro'
36876a2bdccae0aa213c1379659e8c09
4cbbc036d1b98115184a7cb40687abffd134c47c
describe
'27789' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00216.pro'
4382b67bb94651b3d20a7a71d8166414
773991a030261d1704d348c9767ba4ba0df3ac3e
describe
'23975' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00217.pro'
366f7528798165d4f714659f4cd35be4
4ee94c97b049f979e51b3d4a4a69c8bf5eb9d0e1
describe
'27807' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00218.pro'
6ec9860deab6192e0a977f2cd6cd8327
1edaed6251c76da44f66a522c89862abfad45dcc
describe
'11016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00219.pro'
d1b627e45c8cf4e9837424ec61c6e399
ebd883f71a1982f86df702f684f2391f9e8e2e7f
'2011-12-16T19:28:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00221.pro'
555376ac17d5995902849f745e0f0b54
6bdf08ac9346a6a4226572b509e4a44ce0bed5fd
'2011-12-16T19:34:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00222.pro'
afa9509c4b6d15a1efc20cce6b520223
44b9527c3eec7f6e0046669397b41555a14a8ab9
'2011-12-16T19:32:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00223.pro'
27c03fe8a58f806276851069ea1dbb02
7d1ff00102054e19524660ecbe98123f7d882da5
describe
'1242225' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b4c81518e8a06e53a0d73e6afd9c1864
9731cade51c2b4daa74b1e5155a7650cbb1ecb11
'2011-12-16T19:33:31-05:00'
describe
'1274096' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
81e05c332a4f97b7b5170b13848882f8
9e8201db0c8afd8b7e697255e5ebace056821bc0
describe
'1056096' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
3219090a0d5371aa0881cf7fc47a79da
e3a6dd37ad6d6252ec91b1145398e6e7a2c49b4f
describe
'1193749' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
078c70e7ab367edf841bd89e13559e8c
43e77c294207c5f7280b727293f51675626facbb
describe
'1082852' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
a7fc5baf07c5657434f7db6e6583c5ce
339d9c8ebe52f58fb344e727db16d618fb41be72
'2011-12-16T19:26:37-05:00'
describe
'1131612' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
ad21cf0027815d477b7da45351a30cfd
ceca5d0d8c6cde7ac8377c5312e1901cbeb8fb6c
describe
'974791' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
4a5fa6352afc805b163c45e283436f3c
c0984a8c1c9e4973378c96d5fe235d710b82b807
'2011-12-16T19:26:34-05:00'
describe
'1035556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
57ff51ddadd43a297d3a569d33f63152
95d6e5a06da0da00af03200bf4886cecd883be19
'2011-12-16T19:31:20-05:00'
describe
'1034770' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
0dc34ee761e396ed1a8d7e56fb2174ea
de89901c2bff5da702378a20c7fa925e14c83574
'2011-12-16T19:28:06-05:00'
describe
'1064583' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c2be7c86a458542141e76468f9c8e5e1
57e869d0f0ee4f22a40cd96286626d05817d1214
'2011-12-16T19:22:01-05:00'
describe
'1027331' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d93c558dd7daef00a91239ec79c43901
b89bfcbd7f00a89ef3ee4c21525fcb1884d3c617
describe
'984272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
3863fa78f48371300b870c4cc5c53498
6e649ec70ea373b1d3c53aaed641bdd353eb0dea
'2011-12-16T19:34:21-05:00'
describe
'961975' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
d8c7bd6c71230fc7ce60cf3ea37e6b98
8019a9f1d7670ba41e14cfceb31519cd30292347
describe
'1058095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
056c1f6303fd35afc2486ac7e30ef553
3982f85fcf1680a59419cfe99f2b12f6f2e3ca9a
'2011-12-16T19:24:06-05:00'
describe
'964580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
f3189f7671947fa7990bcb2795d98c3f
fe6ee7e16c1b9fe7a654484f2301776bb723f98c
describe
'1022142' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
bc57834c49bc335223818f3dc5bff3f2
df2e2bb4cc938b26dc91b274963bda27ae9d0060
describe
'981899' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
819b6bafcd7859c733ad05acccd9c5aa
37229d355decc5a13ef0ab0ac1a939c96ee30123
'2011-12-16T19:29:22-05:00'
describe
'1053511' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
91fb4c7d3cdf23abee2c9e1600310eb5
d865edbca432d0d2c78138008977728394481375
describe
'939512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
9b5a596b928f99f987032e35629ceaf4
737a9fd91e49a272479711d572323c87a9b3537e
'2011-12-16T19:24:53-05:00'
describe
'982354' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
543ae7edb7d08d5979216a91098ac83a
e620af03bd17af47e9704341d6c93ee11264daf7
'2011-12-16T19:31:05-05:00'
describe
'995027' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
9b71862f77cfe3d0ecb95d78e08a235c
72fe1f07e69127a968b174c0fd6b59db87caa99d
describe
'987945' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
a010bdb615251408edbe2abe45cf828e
bdeeba33b3c9f8aa8e2c11606b94ebd7c9603ef1
describe
'897067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
1bf400e1f02fb1161c0d7d1c16d43a58
c3e3e4b5be9971b515894a16395dfe1e0fdddaac
describe
'968357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
753639b4b87be35f489eb95b75080cf7
e87edd8cd4d5cdbb78d1de552546302ef3d76094
describe
'1020635' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
154807cbdedd6d8a072386f01a18ac9b
cabe144aed5c1d818512909014fb2f0c081b0cc9
'2011-12-16T19:28:43-05:00'
describe
'1006833' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORA' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a1da21f56ec1bc1b9ccc059b668def8f
a3a60f1c4419bb87c5f291de0b4e45d14da6c80e
'2011-12-16T19:25:19-05:00'
describe
'1015071' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1f125098e9924a28c2c3c62580faef82
179086d9cebc69d40e9603afb044521b0250a2a3
describe
'1028692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORC' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
549c5973f53664edda9db4acfdafd081
e97ebcc83d61d446fddb9c1b75004194097f6d9a
'2011-12-16T19:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1026413' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORD' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
aeeb52de44cc34932e59d6f3e0927520
707295ccda46d54d362376f9dda035a9ccc33071
'2011-12-16T19:33:14-05:00'
describe
'1004673' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORE' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0945a9abe425f74413f436d7ff0d6bdc
61d3a1ad778f6ee68c5bb2f51829567cfeb68586
'2011-12-16T19:25:22-05:00'
describe
'945628' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORF' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
191efcc898f965b2d80a6f031c3bc6df
e47b44d9d13545d60d907ab04149e6bbe613f629
'2011-12-16T19:30:32-05:00'
describe
'938643' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
572904cbf1094c2999c5fd6ace5f166f
50979f9f26d7af712c8b8bdabb05cc349de4f5af
'2011-12-16T19:32:00-05:00'
describe
'975337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
d8a5cc96c18f06757794b5982fd2d335
3fc5442554da634a80dcde01e07aa83d689f618b
'2011-12-16T19:30:06-05:00'
describe
'996615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORI' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d68c6a42ef3c12601640efe2941b8fdf
8e957d185264aa8b27fb632c24d04096775d8d54
'2011-12-16T19:24:05-05:00'
describe
'887883' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
e88fb65c9c68676e03294f090ada7250
f425cfee6c880c81bd242960ac01ad25fd0425e1
'2011-12-16T19:33:15-05:00'
describe
'1004113' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
ef38c90d3bfa9a27a9973dad95415ffa
a3ef5817adaad9e073e653e98ab7524b73bdc189
describe
'987212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORL' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
aec82281c32c82c6ed0f4fc3e94e9da8
b2387618736b6c82b6b5e7707639d0b04c023afd
describe
'999933' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORM' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f7f9dfc6984a9a3027e2bd5b298a2dc4
fc8e3825878258d7b9c23702ae57253bf478a4c5
'2011-12-16T19:25:29-05:00'
describe
'902434' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
1af5d4262898cc356b9f6be60dfb5806
5110f31bb6b49c8832367c51cf3b84e86d646af6
'2011-12-16T19:25:03-05:00'
describe
'947126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d351211facfcc71376ed66133516b16f
6a3cc7e868102144edd1593c9c032e22668a5693
describe
'970384' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORP' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
3b4c89dc2097c1e664d0384dfe5cb75f
a4b86fde5426de4fa03d74e2a0b429996e96d68f
'2011-12-16T19:23:43-05:00'
describe
'838296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0c1eeb90802c4339b106dec85b9b8f39
43c40d01e4cf441769a0b694be272f86e34063c3
'2011-12-16T19:28:50-05:00'
describe
'997715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORR' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
2ccb6c7423494d4141cdafde640479ea
0e58bd61d399beaf24e6fadb0bf6fa5e67ca5b9f
'2011-12-16T19:34:05-05:00'
describe
'1019846' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORS' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
7afa1688fa568cff079547567b9f1a5a
64042a3ad3bf4a021bbe482b4189ae176838d70d
'2011-12-16T19:30:25-05:00'
describe
'999524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
0ff8962f70ff50e0493f46b2dc6c3bb9
7f2f3a30c58a0e89edbf4534404061a07dac87b7
'2011-12-16T19:29:53-05:00'
describe
'982484' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
3330a635189e5f90e2ba85f2cd38ac5d
2f6cce0f820627407ed26d63f083cb00a33fcc69
describe
'957946' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORV' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
c9b33008a32964c62fc41ca48bb60512
0c2c91b56081838e1f45cfaf127ed0623b0aa1e6
'2011-12-16T19:30:14-05:00'
describe
'1006708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORW' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c59829bee7570343d44badb5f46a2229
62467a9ad78e2aab6e3d583024a01d88227ef885
describe
'935297' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4aeeaafce498806b3bbaff26ee34de78
5752f955b70b66b47ef7d92acf54e9567bd554d5
describe
'260426' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORY' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
69459489b0d6c97c33d597eae5edb9cb
f45fe205276994b8886dab21db50c8fe0984aad7
'2011-12-16T19:26:40-05:00'
describe
'257736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
136185045a72f4fdb9b2c8294345b79e
8d748833af768a371ca05c98839cb5214a73b59e
'2011-12-16T19:33:47-05:00'
describe
'262689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3c6b13022523b1b17af59e257a314986
7d57d8ef17939a2833b9bc064c2a96b723778367
'2011-12-16T19:24:16-05:00'
describe
'239879' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ed04f34e7b568654db03c69508b17f48
ee6ff1c33ec1844914d3cc972e91a92803aadc67
describe
'245846' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8816d75feddca2630b17ccbfb78aaf42
0d608a8a8fb6a31696cfe32bdbf22b590a53c812
describe
'253787' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fc0e6f09569c8fae30981187593125e3
24170437217dc2980a69039e862bb2fa4b4ec6a2
describe
'255891' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a0e1c582c157bc85e2fb7ae6b3d97867
3c68b166f4ac3071093ec78cc5559e64736ce6c0
'2011-12-16T19:28:21-05:00'
describe
'269739' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
de7974591c8e2fdaec49eabf1de5ca93
d22fe831197413d7a504700770938d24a1eeddbb
describe
'251921' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1886de66a0442c6c25ade3cd4eebb3a4
8b39edbc8313b380cc9698db629e17f8d0a5e179
describe
'253441' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
df44a5bfc4c49e86efd17f277fcc5796
b3e9a1e1017933bdb8eaef6059e0db0b49dd665a
describe
'262203' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
f6588ce2856e4f42bbbe353e91d0adba
c311c56751db373e0e846759fab98aad99cbbaeb
describe
'246575' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
db0a0fac2896edb01b72dd115f1a52fb
17f919f82d2a3d3b28ea800224dadf458cfa79a1
'2011-12-16T19:27:05-05:00'
describe
'258682' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
3d1068b6d594cb99378e543322267147
d0fae10c497bd1ebfced517d6f516fa1adca3fc0
describe
'240367' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
099ff4992a85eb7a8b7bdfb262154cd6
b37062d1ee54816a0d37a0e5e422bf12e561da6a
describe
'263744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e3582980c8de030dabbfdbd0b9bbcad8
bdf39b314a3b69d9c1f95c83ec4bb1d7b22225e6
'2011-12-16T19:23:18-05:00'
describe
'247656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
638870841447cc9e8630ae137fe525b2
a0d0b3b026f1095976dc315d37d49f5af435a32e
'2011-12-16T19:22:31-05:00'
describe
'264433' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c8a07b4687a50afa473fc3e2279b9c26
fe3d04801944398a1a4285e617f2c9bc571a6f22
describe
'254676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a2c4d5d1cfa10f1f0bfec540e4476063
71febc570ef4f70fdeb85b83c99d9b0cecd8aa99
'2011-12-16T19:31:15-05:00'
describe
'265854' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
fa5a13208806ffcff5939a3ec8b80b16
d76aace456b3672405b01e4753ec33fb348bea32
describe
'255945' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
30399788c7ce11ceddc87cd16f414bc0
c14e264296a38c15298dcc29b185f3dfd3c957cc
describe
'252488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
a8a53076ecded460e17f9159afd794db
458aaf08aa5ee4ef716302ac7f9cc06f1047507c
'2011-12-16T19:22:32-05:00'
describe
'249665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOST' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
7ea2b77f808bf3263816ce15dfdc843a
062b41e51ed97a37cc9e1caafda9e2f8f80199bc
describe
'262093' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c3d834f6848f83de240450e67c5624ce
bcab53fca8f006626f58b104930ea1d22bfa43c0
'2011-12-16T19:29:01-05:00'
describe
'261941' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
159951027332f96efd91f254c6c03c52
41fc5c2cf8d235b851b899ae23b231c57798f282
describe
'256722' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9e1874f22d25f16c75b67c70820fe84b
52e448087073e32451219e66a82c21b77503c283
describe
'229160' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
9e2a0f08573617e32740fe9bf123f336
3296cc76be301a7018f3be1682b2151d76758394
describe
'252644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
41a8a577d1883180e0cfd249c07d42dd
e37baea208f2a775f1f38f6933406df220f80063
describe
'264336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
32f5965c7ee3dfb8544e2a2ccd66e470
ced7db01218a4af9cc3809f2824466566cd2b59b
describe
'247185' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
20111639ea24c6cbcfff0e352d36bcdc
155d7af989b1b4635d4d9b4697b8a1e74a6c64da
'2011-12-16T19:25:13-05:00'
describe
'262706' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
8b525729d8f67c9348dcac19014ca816
6be8657854686cb51e0cf612ae8703cced6dd24c
'2011-12-16T19:32:29-05:00'
describe
'251855' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bd946d7664c2369c0749b8922a5e6f42
f44107aeb69c4652e4a1926ff3bb04d9065c4c05
describe
'232139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
ac7de79d3366469cb2ef8d35e30b75c6
58ebcd935a32f18267e59e19038e22f755358ec2
describe
'254751' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f938ab4900ba2f4b4f157242916cd8c6
40b4b62e96b55779aa6863dc61dbd96f7edf4304
'2011-12-16T19:34:14-05:00'
describe
'254152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
51936fb1a332454eb14b1dc555552b78
737d862cf6e927636904e313270a9ad63e204033
'2011-12-16T19:29:00-05:00'
describe
'257552' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e35d97a2faa86bdf0a8eedb64af56e93
de47747a8519a0e62e882ca8bf69c789c3bd7999
'2011-12-16T19:27:47-05:00'
describe
'232173' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9c48399ca2fb1ec380437f4a73fa0ff1
03b426cbef18b8c0bed06edc7c110ad8a04c1657
'2011-12-16T19:26:25-05:00'
describe
'253082' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
9b6d97421f0d26a11a80c9e76f6cca67
8e30c3e269aa7a593163e19618fda4880931fcf0
'2011-12-16T19:23:58-05:00'
describe
'244500' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTJ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
224b56a2d4d16a73856c8286eeea9870
f490e3067842ed631a8aaae357fe1838d8bb81ba
describe
'243095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
f29bfe30cc56997aefe27655b6400f6a
ae6901523763d5b023f75baf9b39a2515c15b2d6
'2011-12-16T19:23:20-05:00'
describe
'234847' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
670daebc7b30192ccdf8c1c2fbf12203
b752dc71efd7abf196ad93a0b04d0d98d268259f
'2011-12-16T19:34:17-05:00'
describe
'219378' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTM' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
f0015c43a62d07c8ce576bcee3af2d9c
6c544e5ea051e1c9903c891d9eb15cc42e5c8926
'2011-12-16T19:24:48-05:00'
describe
'234861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
f5d0e2360804295cfbba045a96bf7eff
388d6ab418e10b7340454f355b99dd32e676c8b4
describe
'220975' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
be28e42d5fe9337c4118e5918d9c75d9
f0ec23db15b1bfb73171fc496500ead0f185dd22
describe
'226520' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTP' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
d0520256b05ad0d8db68f6fd16972543
98f1d8eee722a3f4f2e34d82571cafa56b9287f8
'2011-12-16T19:28:53-05:00'
describe
'258368' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTQ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
28e9fcd2ff27eb6080b9d0418391b86a
60c936df44d0dd9e3a5ca5a8f02579d5c4413039
'2011-12-16T19:25:25-05:00'
describe
'63018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c784156de61821985cf2917ffa826e60
f19720621428c2d900e15c232d4f2aeaee6ad184
'2011-12-16T19:26:55-05:00'
describe
'246102' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTS' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b13da2358e93bfcc908ad6ba12502721
25377e3c69e15f2570d5c45a139c1eae755427bc
describe
'248340' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
764977d047f1b50b9c36c9224f14f03e
67efed4b302ccc9ed28b0e7427a461762cd30717
'2011-12-16T19:30:19-05:00'
describe
'262955' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
196f0c52523ea29bd8e8bc9b6f5eb21d
8ee9c9d893f0c2361822824e11bc1f2797a94811
'2011-12-16T19:25:24-05:00'
describe
'252668' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTV' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
cfa2eb93ed0b9b63163a73e4d63468bc
c15b32f3e836f946a531f8470145b5923c030768
describe
'247436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTW' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
3e27c4c7e5a809bad2247b90065cb513
7e338314d2d4ddc371958c2114e4bade1322f9c5
'2011-12-16T19:27:35-05:00'
describe
'254517' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTX' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2171f856c44d79e3ba6e1c4a4344c651
f4b7aeacd2bac0d247c5f9956e5c681f6a3afad1
'2011-12-16T19:33:57-05:00'
describe
'238841' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTY' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
8137741bf3f2769183063e2dffda8d12
cb4e2838c1ca6f5b9ce8fb205483ae3fb2116a1a
describe
'253354' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOTZ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
40377a4419e068e8a24866f7e18f0f15
5f60f7eaa83aba07e8bf13fdf05ac2c2096c836e
'2011-12-16T19:32:03-05:00'
describe
'247880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUA' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
a6df0e0a534b54f1b4f20fa3f920d6be
e6fabd627a237738be826d60a1a4bc9855e62be3
'2011-12-16T19:22:40-05:00'
describe
'256917' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
a4b9c1c589560c2aef5796f22c324af2
62c191781bc5a428b22bb3a81dc3351c056406ba
describe
'68158' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUC' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d9baaf4b003bb474473c3f639c273f1c
9ab32d70a2da355cd6dc90622c15d5c31a0b5b7d
describe
'266830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUD' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
dba962371922e884f3aaa6b5721ebaf2
b98f969f1306ce0bf2bc58c81d3bf134973f7971
describe
'267018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUE' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
05e17fdfb922cc960cb94e07c4a40c6f
9890943db2ca6ae8c5028019f093542aeb321299
'2011-12-16T19:26:52-05:00'
describe
'270821' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUF' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f6a5a2fdca45d17471496e9051cb7dbc
8421f1cb1f8c1ba4050810788e02fc73cdf82e32
'2011-12-16T19:25:18-05:00'
describe
'257668' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUG' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
4c7833c8794757c8b34020fc84ad178d
38c4745670548816412f2f614e0d3b37bccb4ef0
'2011-12-16T19:28:10-05:00'
describe
'256864' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
55a742b1cb2ae0c96e78331811127dd7
d45ebe5b6132f71c4c4fa095d28c93fffde8c323
'2011-12-16T19:25:53-05:00'
describe
'266030' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUI' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
0c585c0c2d3b2c48f4cacff86203b8b3
19360e2fe51dab4bc4b3a9ed12b777ad0e506d90
'2011-12-16T19:30:24-05:00'
describe
'264041' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUJ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f796c028290362bce9d37581dc356ef0
5390df84b91eed7d691cdc822406e5f738d3e871
describe
'253576' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUK' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
7f69f388cf374401812b89f5ff8fd06d
2fc112c6d90a447396d1645b836174c1c920cc57
'2011-12-16T19:22:19-05:00'
describe
'272756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUL' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e625b729c1e1c095dbe142cf63fb3549
6c9dd06f879c711a6f84de643c985bf06721eeff
describe
'266467' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUM' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8a429d27b1e975dead5a2feb6007ce07
1cd0c9dc7a5d0f73eb922d4df9aaf93334328a79
describe
'264184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUN' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6e1651879b2eb4947ebc750207393219
80b591de576b83bf32f07f029d9f3029b93a4771
'2011-12-16T19:30:20-05:00'
describe
'241243' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7bce2b33a3b355ea814c05eab2c0cd06
0f1907e0bd9d17de98edb4feff1ae9c2c96ebb97
'2011-12-16T19:24:04-05:00'
describe
'261223' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUP' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
958d776bbff8836f3515e6d54aedb219
e27ae75a7e54a36201a66e42838869d69728ec1c
'2011-12-16T19:25:34-05:00'
describe
'233619' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
3a2be9eb72e15841d9e9361e65bac23e
a7ada458204abb88168a5dbd742a3f346d4e6f29
describe
'250090' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUR' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
373ac9c59931859e6c2ab6541c415d42
52e2ac0b1b8d3e158ff93f8789ac0b85fdd77ab6
describe
'252428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
1b60628aca2bbeecf4f1358b444abf50
940aa588f0c12271471796adad45de13eed0e40d
describe
'251948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
86b30042aeaee4bc5ab1bf558916bffa
77f8f27b95e7d700a838bacf4dfc6daf6d765d8d
'2011-12-16T19:28:41-05:00'
describe
'260298' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
dc9fb3688361f91dd221de372e78bede
d8d24cef02f9ca6f7442339e093ecc2fb45c0053
describe
'243188' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
f6f90f5bf827fa188519633099b5cf41
bc73ba88ebecd86e2b1260988acc7faec26be8f6
describe
'245861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
9f0bdf6ee2ff077969149538ebb21157
384ee1e2ea1c312a26173996e47b847dc363c998
describe
'260600' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
cc9be5e7c2b4cd7c8963aac9a4e2a88c
65b748aa574d260e8b58e999bc90626b032caf1c
describe
'251341' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
a4416fa456fbd4ce8e3dbccbcda70974
cdec30e4d594d4c87c85b420d06f515a4440cbe7
describe
'225209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
bced909df60dfec86c004d8bd2832418
31a3ee4f4c20d5d9d9c243e52df9d50135a382a6
'2011-12-16T19:23:50-05:00'
describe
'253038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
1875b5abc3a75fb4ff78c79a793b2265
a0b873511f2351b7d3a4370213c88dfe964714fd
'2011-12-16T19:22:43-05:00'
describe
'252422' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5730f4cd11894457a3dab272f75abbd8
5e877f872af577174e6082d36127b9396b3e8d84
'2011-12-16T19:22:18-05:00'
describe
'231220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
c02f39af8d915c5be3d8142e1ff6e193
b9b404708e01e6786b80dee8cbca86574aed237b
'2011-12-16T19:23:12-05:00'
describe
'254445' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
826179be4b1b0301532b00e579ae5304
bd868ea06744f7e32a60f7d5aaaae3f3a93f51a9
describe
'258566' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
d76d43aff499308c94ea0ffba8b6cee5
8b2b17e11a6923cd2a10b7a7d667d3970c06a4ac
'2011-12-16T19:25:09-05:00'
describe
'246644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
331f88dbe751aa5ac799c9e13d67ae40
8c3dd028f56d59e34c5b11d088e8a9ba43fced80
'2011-12-16T19:29:33-05:00'
describe
'229497' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
b918842c4db926eb980053f64d288efe
9d35dce842baae4a9d4404decb0c4f494a05cd3d
describe
'219283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
29bfa8e2d5240ac1b6664760067e8581
0612a471458f427a9167e0d1ebcf2ba45bbdc966
describe
'236271' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
18ef551b85351e543421834a4ba13964
64db9c7987efdd632d4bc746fd9d003f305cdc64
'2011-12-16T19:29:30-05:00'
describe
'262702' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
70fcb86d882708ea5081b3054f6b8314
98c5ee5b24f94110b40f77d783dd7c545dfdd9af
'2011-12-16T19:23:09-05:00'
describe
'262912' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
1f866bbb0849873511cdef03cd140639
f744e5b1568ab933e7411b53f5537e69cd198e68
'2011-12-16T19:27:32-05:00'
describe
'244417' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
72a06eaab7d867162709d33c2806b378
2b1eb3b34090e48d12e67cbe910f0136e2a0f8b5
describe
'253067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
95283ca6cc4babe40faf753c8b387821
8ad9c392303b14e56cb95b9a46e4d5b56830ea22
'2011-12-16T19:31:58-05:00'
describe
'244139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
4a5794eb9a5143b0f2303f0e8144df1f
02d12151cc3e859ae720abf2f436a32da6136445
'2011-12-16T19:31:16-05:00'
describe
'268569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
ef2d8c5a0e108590ed9d293b84e66c01
dbd67377b2c934ee4cc68c5b0658ce98450518b0
'2011-12-16T19:26:49-05:00'
describe
'259762' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
4afaa3567c39696029da218f7bacf597
6d0fe039d0c97e4628682f100d035dd27e1511f2
describe
'237973' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
3886a6f465bb7778ff051707b2f3a29b
ad0949f07440a883082e6a3d62fdeec9ca63a306
'2011-12-16T19:30:52-05:00'
describe
'254932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
5431bb63d9fa2950a674f9f51615125d
a878fe64d81e3546fa11817d5b6f60ffb0cbfe0b
describe
'234983' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
483a2ef3def7e6c7956ee276ea3b335c
36ce946da686ce981c7b1fdfd6120db16a22ffba
describe
'244764' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
80e3ce489dfc17be33db6e89fcda1f76
68a142c987180d18eae155d573915d86219d13f6
'2011-12-16T19:29:14-05:00'
describe
'231802' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
cded4473564623ee499834c6b96231b8
b64be77af754d8ae98efe31b1f0236a8839e3496
'2011-12-16T19:22:06-05:00'
describe
'247868' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9aa0e88255b5ff045354ac40301cff45
604730412b8fd5f6e2b5e7cfde8f52e17b72e31a
describe
'246736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
942c1049938133ca566bdbb1418dc740
89f4af72994c6eea41f0a4a6c7d67ebbdf368c14
'2011-12-16T19:23:40-05:00'
describe
'252701' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
f7ec1ca41a0b2d1e2395dca4eaa8c100
964d8bdfb820a8a45ae66cfb02cb75fd4e3e2029
describe
'259512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
6f11ec4e1b2412dfa4383711ffdd2375
0b78af995e6a19c8fb4c80926eb52c6731f6eb3e
describe
'214650' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
734bb1214f632ef589058161f5e5af00
6b55f1b5943894396a19fd2364b6a26def7d4353
'2011-12-16T19:24:34-05:00'
describe
'247345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
4ece0d058375f7d063fd3b9defdec86c
af25a02fab4da67a257d8885ce2af38792465862
describe
'226264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a4e39e6489c625b2e3168e27b4046124
992714ffd30dc6dc6d6d02a266cb592fa8692548
describe
'233230' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
449b09097f749fdcf94146654f89a257
8bb30fa5bb0273680c66f566c04cecf8d33024bd
describe
'246804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5e9d1712753b661d2088be4afef54695
0df10c3842485219489ca486b4b4dc82c578d7de
describe
'249174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
0f75b0254d9dc35c0b136169440b2d82
6c40ca3cacf20803797c0fb721f96f21164db78b
'2011-12-16T19:22:54-05:00'
describe
'239869' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4a0ad118bcf3063700da215ab9b5c4fe
c72d628831c8001887d4dc363f81662c7ddfa60e
describe
'244834' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
3557b30c3afeef79c9fa053d4b4c69a8
7131a5f0db01f0b3151aa172623e7ceab21ca2d6
'2011-12-16T19:22:51-05:00'
describe
'237342' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
7a556c65662ea61fcdc177905a4c3953
cdc7fafa5531518c0d7890bcd65b7c302221eab1
describe
'251532' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
667fe07770d94a66e44f772486aac1eb
48f77e86a4aff145569b04deb1b00afa83090c48
'2011-12-16T19:24:13-05:00'
describe
'229600' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
85220ac8e6fd70a08d662eef95f492b2
a5c307d9f82def3a2260b90a365b9d6ebf1ff851
describe
'254000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
a470e1079b5be5217b1c6c1fc3ea8276
bd4ff8489ac41b329534c9d00803d18e35a60134
describe
'247157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
de6f54975548752c176478558736b50a
28e80f74b215cbe65bf8d0d7462e6dbbca952f25
'2011-12-16T19:22:14-05:00'
describe
'250526' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
7747e05c9b4de186e7628cc04cf4e59b
d337cec223936c839cad5e6bbf0872a2e51cae80
describe
'225684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
928ae01186351e2b051b62c4472c13b4
3ecdd0af1b8dee42206c542bc20f332bac294dac
describe
'234493' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
7212c42394f4aa0dbc170c557f91436b
3ea48fdca97cd636042cc000b989584868c2055a
'2011-12-16T19:34:09-05:00'
describe
'255234' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
a74eca2599084d998f73ce1ad24d10be
780d7b3828716ae2d97986cab38b24bb3b25b203
describe
'251450' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
8931594c3f72392bbad71c2d98fb4153
0aeda0e8a0f5a0a9c0511911b483ff58b1fe5f70
describe
'233585' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
9c67e5978025278b754c81a5edfde05c
246bd76956cd1a5bb329d4370c37463dfd0ee48a
describe
'234213' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
00681eb4bbce9147d89ad52da78e8391
4b1533b2fd561067bac316b023573414e048bfca
'2011-12-16T19:28:54-05:00'
describe
'231894' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
2ad39f24544527707f2bac9fdf02c37b
a2453e96489f1384729d3a27eba49a793e32719d
'2011-12-16T19:25:08-05:00'
describe
'246521' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
b08c2ac5df1bbb5faff34a9419c88b32
f94dc6ad7615566d28fca04debc16d4fbb37b000
describe
'230083' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
0c1b3615ca356a9c40ed4c8c73ad845b
80eb1c11b079e35d0f88f7e6e7fc5bca0f0369dd
describe
'233650' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
b964bf093655de2974f0807b282314ec
3fa28a279996862a12e749d03fb091243a11fa37
'2011-12-16T19:24:41-05:00'
describe
'245280' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
b1ee5447c083f485347c0cf8640308b8
6b34fd316046a016bc80050006a1b5753bc9afe0
describe
'231488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
466d21bb3d68d35b8b66b46c5a82b5c0
218f7988b6e45a7d447c979e57503e09ac16d2a0
'2011-12-16T19:23:26-05:00'
describe
'141599' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
9c6982942fbd5723af1b74042d36b5b6
8bf98649da2802eeedfb85fd050410d2cf780c0c
describe
'255496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
ec6d974f827cf23416733f91c3f6336b
92fe89469e2862649c8211b7c3dada7445ff6932
'2011-12-16T19:22:58-05:00'
describe
'260405' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
493c2aa7a6e64a36bd6efe8bb4a06029
6806558fdd9d88700a67d7b1ee7bad7068cfe84b
describe
'260158' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
713ffa0aff6faf32159090ab4d396aed
2498f658e65f0c77cee0811ad082aab4983f3f0a
'2011-12-16T19:30:37-05:00'
describe
'253046' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
bedd7fe9efa3fe7896b9ae3a4cb9ed2f
50f2a4b19fce14a9da32c669ad12f1b122f2ab57
describe
'223435' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
08329d30ee43ccaa73337ce60e4d7f09
0ec651466db0720a8ea29e5337c0f286ade0bae0
describe
'247735' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
256f3833602d20da3312dfb4daf4a9af
07bf336da20f09bbd0b8780c58f8d149cb092a54
describe
'228248' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
187050a0724df41e045d5bfd8b2cca35
64fff03387fd6205b24f067ff04065b0194b539b
describe
'234826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
feb00cd6805c2fe510d6b8352a3d9188
a28a0669f298f9212ba4eca16f8811cc86d61b6a
'2011-12-16T19:26:24-05:00'
describe
'251995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
c963e3e3cd04e26dfb9e4a6f493552fe
21b9b4e1cf27f0db758a06d2854920915bb63391
describe
'265493' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
2dae2547cb2f266008d522eaf5f4c230
28bfdc0cfb9a44b02d899f5e3fcdba4116db0f83
'2011-12-16T19:26:32-05:00'
describe
'206137' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c423fd17c00dd86dca43f59b99b53e5c
f06d4f9575a67150e29598ed1a9ba3a0f4f15d44
describe
'256140' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
30b562d29333d67cf523028755b4e2f2
1f64b1ce1ba56647eb742fbf862f8cc7d7f05b2a
describe
'239184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
ca952b6b1a3708109ccd86d7193638dd
7dbb6a5e35c578e9934082a96b9f4e90c13c0cec
'2011-12-16T19:22:09-05:00'
describe
'228670' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
7763f908d05de9611b9ecafb4bdf10fb
1799803fc8fa102e3aafe770511cbbe790b095cd
describe
'238755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
560f8e69125c27593c2b812f88747527
361eebfd3745e5c4d0be54777ca94f4b83995738
describe
'243392' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
dd14e3f8b5115c5a51c00a90eda694dd
262ea42da6c8d9f435fddd52bd5f1e2661accd6b
describe
'223891' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
ab0b8a34a9a591f795a9d84f269e23ce
bddee1604ee4f134acd9bd70849a80b03b001cf1
describe
'235548' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
98769857172d4bbb69e34c296cafe963
d2e6ee99964a8901ba2cfc26508dc3310b5a7fae
'2011-12-16T19:32:40-05:00'
describe
'262743' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d424c36c171cec809e6a10ff8b6f3aca
e9347853c6b767e94106b772a4c7e0937495ead5
describe
'237458' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
baa97b149e10386bacc99be439f08485
b908a8dbdc9dc7161db7b19a1da2d71950cc1947
'2011-12-16T19:29:55-05:00'
describe
'231804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
e3c62e9e133f595428a1e762f91f03aa
0d44192aa9b85a64e355affbe0535ecda10e65cc
'2011-12-16T19:31:35-05:00'
describe
'252643' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
3839252627ac86605033209a8a9a6984
a688afecd8d48261d7795015d99f9d4a3acc68a0
'2011-12-16T19:33:24-05:00'
describe
'246339' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXW' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
9c175a5f611974191c6c0bf261d0472d
2eca720fb5d0e910929e587e1c33d10c45f5a066
describe
'243408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXX' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
c6bd05de968ac24bc1ab3918fc9aff16
7f6e527e3d63d1f226f09e9c3ecec2c2cbf9db85
'2011-12-16T19:33:39-05:00'
describe
'223349' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXY' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
206ce2652b9eb6d95d0c93337b69134d
e1600f8d4c932af3aa1fc91a71cfffbe43829f3a
describe
'233074' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
935c5186fe3b162f2cf83ce3a78032c9
a8b60595fb4c6faf79a46d273b83dd24e2c576eb
'2011-12-16T19:29:19-05:00'
describe
'230051' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
0b0a62bb1cca3ffe4ebba45d0a474180
2aa575750e1a0314d46191d46cf468a07867b46a
describe
'252009' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
e9698a47c749a239811e36de27d06e5f
1e8274b882bd816f586fc72bc79bc141fffa35a4
'2011-12-16T19:32:24-05:00'
describe
'237013' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
8ee23705996ad680a1ddf98cb0454956
f753eb8588028a8eec11d63a423d0a86d420553b
'2011-12-16T19:33:49-05:00'
describe
'237330' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
e34bb8e2b59bccd446b756898fdccb7f
fc124e609755b739070c5ac8b992eaa6ca58e454
'2011-12-16T19:27:55-05:00'
describe
'225644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
3f61950e321df6fefcd2842036661765
58bdbbd53cc8e48c39225e3203b0f7cb47fc84fb
'2011-12-16T19:26:36-05:00'
describe
'238489' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
22c517fbab9411c6121fff6e0ef1379a
a210acefbe88fdd61c41e365d20bcd5ce752d82f
describe
'137082' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
f289606225a995fed5a59c06ae4f6804
358c79bd449f46c96212f68e47506fb04d599b48
'2011-12-16T19:32:35-05:00'
describe
'307674' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
dbdc46f530d9feabd3046affdca57015
7d3363bf2bd5d29857f0845db14c6cce9bd909b6
'2011-12-16T19:33:30-05:00'
describe
'330872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
6811fe240129be014366727c09c39b82
23bf177b5043f5371640209f33209a02af807f53
describe
'70007' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
832aeea5e5af7ed9f0937fb24bc7bcdb
fc56cd9473aad38b91b8348b48f2185afc9aa876
describe
'29822932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00001.tif'
3955b63b20ef04801ce466e4242701a3
3fabda96f3f92e31254e3aaafe7308f92738f455
'2011-12-16T19:34:07-05:00'
describe
'30587508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00002.tif'
310e464cde0287c8643053cb536d63cc
052d676cd5dab62399e73124997e3faf2c7c108e
'2011-12-16T19:27:01-05:00'
describe
'25355588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00004.tif'
94d5064298d1c82e2ace01f577f2d62c
b672b79317e48feb59689780bf8e1f7f37eb8d96
'2011-12-16T19:23:57-05:00'
describe
'9560632' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00007.tif'
99edd9a7878cf16d0d4f2c030a8c5295
d09bc04035a244c3890d453d1b0e185bd5da1b5c
describe
'8674660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
5c4edd731ba60c9807500af6eba0bf02
6a59ea7a97b901de82ad741d0451a5b8cd5361b4
'2011-12-16T19:25:54-05:00'
describe
'9064104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b348fb27e4213c0eb5da6e1b544613a4
59ebbe1fadcf0cd5c07bde836b8b11f3e2ccbe5f
'2011-12-16T19:31:44-05:00'
describe
'7809584' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8f75c655722a394965f262ec2bb4df6b
186cdc23d81753390800766a0ea066d1795baa52
describe
'8297220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3958b68d90dc86ecd843ba0dc83aaff3
63c1d92c39e105c4658e3ed979b333c7314243cb
'2011-12-16T19:25:52-05:00'
describe
'8290888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00013.tif'
0d0d354ed699d39b1507717a64b755ee
3422ab07fdee1bc032ba039ec2676701352e55d5
'2011-12-16T19:25:20-05:00'
describe
'8529164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
2629bb79292f5a43f035f3022863237f
c4553cbe3bbd33336e8caf7fdf82c51c75a0dc39
'2011-12-16T19:28:16-05:00'
describe
'8230332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00015.tif'
861a45a378b08221ff34749affaf734a
5999f80483ba144f6b4e0e82f5239503b747bdb4
describe
'7887472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2726c062f0551a6ea7d57b253821c43e
a7f1e306cfdc7a23d349d516f5a4b0464cf671bd
'2011-12-16T19:27:07-05:00'
describe
'7708768' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
a87ef75251b8be1289df7b33bfcd7687
1a6a85fee0302739fd2cc88dcedce8305374c2f8
'2011-12-16T19:22:49-05:00'
describe
'8477072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3bec7d18f4f15f2f91c11ef2eb9e09bd
1d9a0e7c003927f46752f138656e85aeea68bc51
describe
'7728964' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
af6cc39211c9f1090888ba60a323632d
c67b7e9a96a5b84e8dc816c4e896a197dded810e
'2011-12-16T19:31:21-05:00'
describe
'8189644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
71edf711abdce5ffa173f234d50fcb55
14cf4c2af157f7a4a7b880d9a29efdc493e19ba2
'2011-12-16T19:26:02-05:00'
describe
'7868084' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e1244a17a11b80fbf448325dea5e2404
f4b40841a7f4d6c50bb95427df7146320d3e7856
'2011-12-16T19:22:56-05:00'
describe
'8440076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
c01fa1c5f0c2d07fdd7c8a0f878724cf
6c7d681cce1bc112234e850e8475bead085684e0
'2011-12-16T19:28:42-05:00'
describe
'7530312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
53d46ad67fbe47913d31413828e3e078
3cb40855661cb3caebf24c500c5f9ed78042f448
describe
'7871872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
33ab61d16f764202748b40e104c560fc
a584e80f726c1075c08709513c021aa7d9968f2d
'2011-12-16T19:23:38-05:00'
describe
'7972660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b38a3175cea4639c1985ae63a46e7a64
7bfb8d6215813c24ff39829559ecfe6c73bc7f3c
describe
'7915816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00026.tif'
5eefe6c7c7eefa72e7245fa8e7e47552
2ae539eb33844f43c60e51c79006b8be889fb0da
'2011-12-16T19:27:37-05:00'
describe
'7190156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
af9a03602f0ef2cdedb9bb5c46f3ff51
ff1c8a97ea22fdc7c6d118d5e46c17c53781d4cd
'2011-12-16T19:32:58-05:00'
describe
'7759424' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00028.tif'
0f22e5abf62f020a3d8887d34b295d33
66167d2badf77e259756ee11e6f3626801ee49a2
'2011-12-16T19:30:16-05:00'
describe
'8177060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00029.tif'
1aae3f285a367f0549ce046cf4de6dc8
854eb23e4eb114c58fac15bf111a7ee680c62f67
describe
'8065416' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
f1e4db6e991e64aa6efe35aa21602d1c
127367496d87a8600ff687b36fb16aaef4bb4dfa
'2011-12-16T19:26:05-05:00'
describe
'8132352' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
108921a03c02dc7eded35f080fc57f73
75c5ec49ac9822cfdb9027d341e2eee8d4ed29a1
describe
'8241512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6feea3e701c9b89cafe8ede8c7f58421
4cc2d58cfa1d079c63571a4039e428b5b4d353d3
'2011-12-16T19:31:14-05:00'
describe
'8223656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1d8dfa2cbf60122b3d03747e81ca01d7
8f701a466c65e0f95a7e6f1836bf9fb8d1d2ca82
'2011-12-16T19:31:40-05:00'
describe
'8049896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ffdb1723d645c4fed8d27717515e268f
70696c27ad95dccc8e54d65ee2765035fd54000b
'2011-12-16T19:32:45-05:00'
describe
'7577804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4de3ebcfc5411a8ee6e46a9e04bc8e18
876ca133c380fd5cc69d01b1e3d24cdbc74001d8
describe
'7522160' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00036.tif'
87446fafd8b4fdcf68e171b3173a25f2
0d21845718f76ba41c31ac67cec98f120dbe7791
describe
'7814976' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5839bd014e0a5e26ab1cd89083eaf177
282ad7b6b383a5dee95aca5ff9c0a83f8b2b7485
'2011-12-16T19:31:43-05:00'
describe
'7985888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00038.tif'
531bbaf7a6122110adb5a840575ae634
ab0a93aec8946770bba0f33235a9d6bbb1bbb5f4
describe
'7116092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00039.tif'
42008a0bf7e25eca809183e915bd77ff
d1d995b43e78267c8afa0252ba1049577ce84537
'2011-12-16T19:33:09-05:00'
describe
'8045448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
9446b25fd03f56229595e75099ce4d7a
e0ff37f94eb8048b79ced94a167b383e4c211e1c
'2011-12-16T19:30:13-05:00'
describe
'7909696' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00041.tif'
b92171bbc61aad6e2dc391c64da4274e
a5e98bdd2edb6c9372505262a2a89b5fe3ae14dc
describe
'8012708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00042.tif'
ab0b7b8fa8be80b7800504135f9058fc
ed92fa35d5bb1552c24be42168c3b243b168827a
'2011-12-16T19:24:40-05:00'
describe
'7232184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
5c9950763b7b733e2460bedaf9162f6d
b71fcd09e07d6fa44a325debbdb2364d32c9cdbc
'2011-12-16T19:24:26-05:00'
describe
'7588056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e5921f41a6669fb31f47a611539dc3cf
375f12fe124cabc593d55cf11aee5ed016902a4d
describe
'7774364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
3f5e57325d450a0dd53234f83379ad68
4e78f2e606214a1e982f9052d4a710c379dfc8f1
'2011-12-16T19:28:09-05:00'
describe
'6721148' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
98bdaaed2a63e4fe0eca7c56532ade99
2395475f8f8fa10507f392132a4665a90265fa6d
'2011-12-16T19:32:07-05:00'
describe
'7994076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
080754e918f8346ffb1f4295f2d13e80
6c891c55763e92b0a59c8c003a69040f7f667564
'2011-12-16T19:22:55-05:00'
describe
'8171272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
97183a01b54af370611d3590d221f453
6725fdc175b597e60cc24b74bcadc856d58ba403
'2011-12-16T19:26:54-05:00'
describe
'8008488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4adf321f3fa5e458ace2b4543aa0c947
8ae266ff8397537c1a49e46ec7e87abccc4bf4d5
'2011-12-16T19:30:36-05:00'
describe
'7872464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
34adb6e40adfbfd7b9e89c1e415692ac
f06ff929bcc47617912eabd79856ce4cef4adaa2
'2011-12-16T19:33:48-05:00'
describe
'7676616' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
802d26a2421f42a44dbbdc2491a6ae04
fde9719f1d28d7efbd47ac3d7a815cca266c2fe7
describe
'8066108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
94daa68d1128d7f49054426f9016f6a5
5cb917fad8db510a6fa805fd9b2cd7e220bb4214
describe
'7495596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
18e2ed63a92e1c2d30176cbbfcce7780
1e73c2d665576dde3dc1f6b33853fedd86bbdfd9
'2011-12-16T19:24:33-05:00'
describe
'2094496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00054.tif'
872a09fb48eb3948a7e6f2b3c5a18163
ff0ef4af4f68e59b99e78a09111c2dabdb5ed0ff
describe
'2073376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ace061723743e778c751adecf09c594c
cfda920ef624c0afc4abd8aa9bed3c5203eec1a7
describe
'2113160' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
1abd029dc5aa37be4537db4b9c40aacf
5c5f918c959588145a179268a6cb70cb0c3383b0
'2011-12-16T19:32:41-05:00'
describe
'1931040' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00057.tif'
86e5c9de9f4eb82436701cdb8074de08
7561ee5bdb364e0e5cb30a12cbef223e73de9a56
describe
'1979196' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00058.tif'
294d50f4fb4b6d43e8a4bdaa81f65d15
14728b24d48ef01fe37001eca411db69621480c6
'2011-12-16T19:31:37-05:00'
describe
'2043116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
997d0f78df1d00d7d54a54c4cf144ede
3187ea2fd3be95f733a61ec141f9144822e2f7b1
describe
'2058540' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00060.tif'
83409581315c8e13ea3544856a2bf1eb
e09eaa6b1762c6cc61476098f4ef9758be9d2952
'2011-12-16T19:22:20-05:00'
describe
'2169932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
0165bb17146d22e1337cda19effbc430
4b95f7678aa7d5228b37851f4b6c2bf4d0e101a5
'2011-12-16T19:23:53-05:00'
describe
'2027552' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00062.tif'
abbac78763fa54732e95a771ba26daa5
a8648963a5754fdca9d57fd5ee7a40594b58106d
'2011-12-16T19:22:33-05:00'
describe
'2039872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
2d81f3a2bfe3388485153df0a1c28263
8f6aa339eee75fffb26006fd312a7c438882f9e8
'2011-12-16T19:25:48-05:00'
describe
'2110928' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00064.tif'
acc424752ca347d0534d3c0cd0432288
180ef9a3f14b646c5121e96a2fb73e21a4a68b84
'2011-12-16T19:24:36-05:00'
describe
'1986064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00065.tif'
c5b75fa27bbaea73035529dce9b120ca
dc7506f57ca0bf28f1e98b1d9485d0fd3cc1fdb1
'2011-12-16T19:23:31-05:00'
describe
'2082036' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
ce0798816851cd3f354aa1863bcff62a
eb6f57f61cf74cfcb79ff91719fb0c2d43d2b6fd
'2011-12-16T19:29:10-05:00'
describe
'1935576' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00067.tif'
a9400534a7ccea21465272967c5db94b
a53d25ceb32f441b9b93ff7e431e058e80787175
'2011-12-16T19:29:32-05:00'
describe
'2125412' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
501b7e45b86ad88eb18d50ab5a29d5aa
b94de5f8f3e7ce568e0c32eff8c7422bbb362e2a
describe
'1993168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
213ed5099d95658ee9830b0fa23c0de9
401c95b0411b03517406aa6d2a67002047b1f973
describe
'2127172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b16bf000a01183c2b09bea33fee8470e
8daa93ccd181951dd8b5c1e321b5bb82dc1d63c8
'2011-12-16T19:23:16-05:00'
describe
'2049888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
fa798a72cdf03873d4a4adb7adc1bba9
ee523fe28eb9097ee0b89adcebbf05f48c968591
describe
'2138720' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
744b090f7945f09955be97c38442af8c
ffce249deb5d441101966fbee8d659f77307d3bd
describe
'2060564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00073.tif'
ab30a7bc938d308f70e003a46dc2c74c
48147424670c4dc6fb69718e03cbb5fc836a4af6
describe
'2032068' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f913de4c66f73152d376167efa56e7fd
16a8063d7974e487d786b37c8cc6bb99293f3ca9
describe
'2008940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00075.tif'
4b1cae50b9ce33127eb1ec22b769bcfd
2020f1c79216c2182e8a9e59f5055e699bdecc38
'2011-12-16T19:23:17-05:00'
describe
'2108880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3006257a322f68169e7ed0fcff4b991a
cac88d755a361089c382ee06a6650aa51708f54f
describe
'2107344' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00077.tif'
43284ade764dd68fc7ccda01920614f2
6b653572eb21db9a21befffcacfbb00c08b80ab2
'2011-12-16T19:33:55-05:00'
describe
'2065672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
0aa01583f47ebd2dfc3ac7eb8182e35e
bbc5ae1f151cb4380ceb947ea038832d6a77acf7
'2011-12-16T19:33:27-05:00'
describe
'1846776' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
232b52eddfde4874791228a4d451db31
7e7b265b5a5ad04034957e750e00854a39c7413d
describe
'2033864' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00080.tif'
0238061f16a8b268430c490f094154c3
87ace72ac0488385376bfb6b6e056de71258d74f
'2011-12-16T19:28:48-05:00'
describe
'2126944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00081.tif'
6bc825d7c1ece8edb7a0f95cefbebb00
d83151e8e0995dc28ec10058168ee9ec2dca84ca
'2011-12-16T19:22:26-05:00'
describe
'1989144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
aab524f691cc1f964980b3a0cc8e5211
47aa80156dd6f75672691987f1420a4e8a4a7e17
'2011-12-16T19:32:57-05:00'
describe
'2112912' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00083.tif'
9ac53aae448b28c29bd00d18681f634d
26cc1cf772e79d0f57ad704de8278335bdca7411
describe
'2027200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
c308e2b82629956eb7bfd518c6d4d162
450439f1357c6c425e242d37735c59ea8ad32cd8
describe
'1871100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
79e2c0bdc96aa972078dc097f8318349
061d9d47c4bb2207bf5ffc89465d378e53f35d61
describe
'2050796' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2244cbb12c0078b9e42a718bde727ba7
0f8573f59e8cbfbc9c026db3bcb4d020357b59ea
'2011-12-16T19:32:19-05:00'
describe
'2045924' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a612dc8b60ad835ed46cbf811fe15e12
01c612786970600a2c2ebc7dfb6755a994dffb78
describe
'2072448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
0d45289994e2b47131f275e66bb3edd6
d8ee828013149821bf7a9cd10aab0e26c725ab7a
'2011-12-16T19:30:08-05:00'
describe
'1869100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
5d5336349481c6ec2910aeaeb07af252
ca626f0f6d814c8ef89a2b85b81611138e5f02c1
describe
'2036828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00090.tif'
46b7b58cdd248be31c1d48232251fccc
69b9310c30b07328de6d954112da3c75f848719d
describe
'1967948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e58324865d56e2dcc6b45c4551e6a8fa
6419da689a236d39234d78f6d56055a1b612e40d
'2011-12-16T19:23:10-05:00'
describe
'1956812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
f77385f34594b4aac680452284938285
483050086010922d709a1dfe42f587637e074089
describe
'1891184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
365631c41d86bcd12ed1d148ddbf0493
0e9c684620cc8c35430718c085fe49f9336e2629
describe
'1768552' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00094.tif'
84b77d88a2d9d02665e31db39c2fa73d
0d227cd99330afe6dc5992f7149ecd628ac0e2ba
'2011-12-16T19:22:11-05:00'
describe
'1891784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
9e232f15f547e1536def756b13c8a8db
ebd7dc0ee5a88ee7389b9ad5bb98a35d0d11a409
describe
'1780220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7fba205cb434768c71ecec39d44b76e6
2d418c2f43b5333cc009269faa383ca71c5ea390
describe
'1824160' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8b816fa990ad9918f7e3f1c3718147f3
f0180524a8c86b1abd3edd9890a7c39342a8399f
'2011-12-16T19:32:15-05:00'
describe
'2079216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
29fac0b150a8b0e618791f7397a13df9
152340970517d25b1e9463b6dc3623d599e111b5
describe
'516000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00099.tif'
09a99abd85faa14dced82b69d6e0affb
229ca4ab9a6c290f644a7dd73d937a45b2381e83
describe
'1982132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d4d19f127be8befddf18816de9820b98
7d6b3623b84d13af1fb3dc274a68af63e4f949e3
'2011-12-16T19:22:02-05:00'
describe
'1998560' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00101.tif'
d3dfd1bae6f190dc1d07afab2f5e1954
dc8b8c420c0a028075f8a3c75eeee2d8a76d81c9
describe
'2115300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
d88e0d36700c59b09a35ed4f63e7d80e
e91f40a7384087536ac3fd3fc70632e61fbf1c43
describe
'2033772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00103.tif'
40d694211fc1b58d110b12dab4e4fe33
4f491d935e2a046d200cbb31c377d535a6ee60d5
'2011-12-16T19:24:09-05:00'
describe
'1992656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00104.tif'
edff24d3364bac430ae94b1deb5c944f
bd11891037e11ffaf6e41b377c11aa20ba45f9ea
'2011-12-16T19:26:53-05:00'
describe
'2048132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
bc13cb93e57ae518f62a2f5c8d9b5377
d533e2280cbe2e94508e47c3b93de71fbb4c9ee5
'2011-12-16T19:28:29-05:00'
describe
'1921784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00106.tif'
e38f1f6331781a3ce362f889190e5bbf
95779367f29f1aa1faebb47c00bd4415e22da989
describe
'2039072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
aa16dcd3635dc5d0b2c1d4b5122fb926
5446e814bbd04eacbe27685db57265342b89305e
'2011-12-16T19:32:44-05:00'
describe
'1995332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
1f9eec70a852c46db2889e296d203e25
1b6194dae0eeeff16fcacb600eb8fe59d880b327
'2011-12-16T19:27:42-05:00'
describe
'2067092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6d94f0e4671a24f59135c728e94b465e
00c28bc233a40c0e71cd46704920dac6ed03a194
describe
'557208' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
33aa2ffb28805922e835d7e7f75d8927
da9b0afa3b79d3d95a9cb1df5bb53c20fb1f3bfb
describe
'2147624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00111.tif'
63925a7c228394136888503af37fa5ea
9c9ad5142c7d3c3366e9c16b6a6bf2d0d0eec9e3
describe
'2148060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00112.tif'
94d671a620ce5a9eaf53c414e5390ea6
fd234b5b34fb917381221cfad1f4d8c181f2b9e6
'2011-12-16T19:29:31-05:00'
describe
'2178384' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
334d2d917c51c058d173c9072f020a93
278982a30cdd181791511493e8399523f4b86b42
describe
'2072952' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00114.tif'
3b215bf113ca5eaec6a9db10c8c5560b
dafab739db301f2a213ae0849c2952f5f71c6b15
'2011-12-16T19:34:16-05:00'
describe
'2067364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
af699092f4cccf9c13749a3af91e1b0c
71163bcd9d90b2cf051e6899a7b636877a53673e
describe
'2139972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00116.tif'
9d589a34d71b91bb259f87f6cd0b8597
8680641e0a75390005548d252a22e0ecc0c177f6
'2011-12-16T19:32:48-05:00'
describe
'2124020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00117.tif'
84c1bd7287f89ac4212ac288f1bc4449
b927ae375fa3b0523a862b961f5ac53f60bdb905
describe
'2040940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00118.tif'
5c19eb55db5d84e83f76be5060cb1ea0
dcae62bd4a19a65d710380a871f3ea654f784fc2
describe
'2193688' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
815a620af876f824c99d39963447b3c8
074ee28802c1d6351fc06585811bed4e46ad9506
'2011-12-16T19:31:59-05:00'
describe
'2143672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00120.tif'
7a0cce32b752bf55c6ab3a846d31a20f
92b572afb55af164ac6bfac6bd1fe63ff32ca9e9
'2011-12-16T19:32:39-05:00'
describe
'2126044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
deececa0d3706816500d10682bdbe861
82b54c7b947725642a09f78ff4e343fdfcb26f78
describe
'1943128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d35bb95c6364f651240afde1c503ac7f
8c6a3a6af7cfba8e67a67f4e4c6657896fba7a8b
'2011-12-16T19:34:23-05:00'
describe
'2101864' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
959f50f9abb07e571a133e924a92bea5
d06e0a829e319a9ddb14b0a222275482664ef655
'2011-12-16T19:30:53-05:00'
describe
'1882036' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
59f39ac27f395789fc20e35bbc5552e1
a1274eba7b83ece91c96eaf3869ddf10b9a89e22
describe
'2013188' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6d9c123c5f7eb078965ae31f0db6e0b4
1e46afab30e370961bb286fb8489c90da1541b52
describe
'2031192' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
a08be9e8cebaeabdd6d343aa581167c8
9def86256c2a793bc928a32e4a4bfb9a413e73ec
'2011-12-16T19:31:45-05:00'
describe
'2027596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
cde861aadfda77e94f7ca67238e57591
52292512e87edfd408da8f145b633f5f8ba60273
describe
'2093684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a08569fae500da10e369fa2ab60c980a
70ef803f0966c51983a5bb7d15d30c218432fb25
'2011-12-16T19:22:22-05:00'
describe
'1956880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00129.tif'
dcaa822e0601b4dc292217b3e6219111
c46c3136c2535cd6f996fb25f277cc49d57cd3cd
describe
'1977472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00130.tif'
c1b22e5e942ed23569648a174726041c
14779bcbf9bd06a5b2f9f53cfbf16e4691b342a9
'2011-12-16T19:30:59-05:00'
describe
'2095740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00131.tif'
f2feb6aa3ecd0a599cac27a049f4a689
7677e78d1e31d94937f605b4fd54ec54aa1b7823
'2011-12-16T19:21:53-05:00'
describe
'2022424' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b458d2a94ae1ccc0157c08793024475c
8f0dc0c959cdf6adea7a14ac96d2c04c9fe7693c
describe
'1813340' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00133.tif'
cd6ff8d3f3877f46d861369af0c108a4
0bb1215a66bcdd2ab6624532885c6555a6ace1f5
describe
'2035992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
bf3b476682436c412f85eee54b5c9cdb
96537d091aa74574191a0188a2ea8a9ab7b471ea
describe
'2032216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a9f3da2b79077f3018b24ccc16d0fcdc
59f415f89c332943ae05d055267f24a01be15a34
describe
'1862760' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0e7c9238d47eb85960772307c4f93a0f
949a09785fd3e2aa2ed28186a660f712171b4905
describe
'2047900' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00137.tif'
7ae7e174f99d430cf4cbf11f44726949
7dd078839bc5666e6577f7f5f37086c6f833bef9
describe
'2080264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00138.tif'
84be994c80f1b7956a3221d48025fed8
e732c38616cb9b2bef90e881b35d2881cd8bcdc2
'2011-12-16T19:33:18-05:00'
describe
'1985356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
4d9345ad27dbd659722e9dcb4d8056d7
24163879a88e2c26a6ba4213d20338cf52b330d9
'2011-12-16T19:23:54-05:00'
describe
'1848772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
7f8d332d13d2cc3f243a40915dc81b2a
53872d34981f6c88bd54763d5e1c6d1409b713a9
'2011-12-16T19:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1767464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
af04d7c76f45f0243914dafa8d2fe651
5619fc4aa8934a4b6399c83de91bcec25e5f3272
describe
'1902356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00142.tif'
101ee48b2a5e72606cf30229e90141f2
3f36a4d6a3299ba9a7938fe27031021d059223fa
describe
'2111820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00143.tif'
a297ea56394fdd8b870560032aa7b293
ce83a07ec0bd007ca78105a5c2432cb6daadda4c
describe
'2114988' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00144.tif'
70eaa77b2ff9b3860e308cf4d776ee3d
20d90b7494ce459ee302dc532b51c0112acb48dc
describe
'1968004' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00145.tif'
279f3c5049cf1912b0c1581869df9c93
1c7c5407026a01e26d9b79d40870c50a2ba33f6f
'2011-12-16T19:31:33-05:00'
describe
'2035304' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00146.tif'
0e17bf38a996ab948d717cbc967e85bd
8a8f5a3b7bcba877f6795ca25fc91376c9c5a4a1
'2011-12-16T19:29:56-05:00'
describe
'1965888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00147.tif'
74d4e589a8d86e10296d98897e1c0cdc
bb79d865c566fe05f63b8b54b7ad748ca0debe2d
describe
'2160640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00148.tif'
664f52da804c3a51bc3025ce14914158
a661a9e4de0e943ea791882ab6a4b84b39ca6eb7
describe
'2089008' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
41e84e4d424c600bdcb4d7e36b6e19b6
29becd0e991064d0fab4e4124f05753889401842
describe
'1915216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
e188e23740687b88b77d702df5d84119
42b1a8e2c49eb69c0f3c7510a16ca8fa48a274b8
'2011-12-16T19:27:17-05:00'
describe
'2050072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00151.tif'
307d1b9e9179b412e558ace4f035be1b
8f34b1bda321ac82701505a027b27ef46a3a7fb3
'2011-12-16T19:22:36-05:00'
describe
'1892876' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00152.tif'
01b2a95949dcb4d51e3f220d987be2cc
b620fb15925eae7fa5a6ccbc2fe921287ee46908
'2011-12-16T19:22:30-05:00'
describe
'1970524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00153.tif'
278c6ee753cf723d3d949a0f8e53bbd4
ac40afa4f9661f5d9ebaa28c96b242072e0c37ae
describe
'1867116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPED' 'sip-files00154.tif'
e1cbad767336694856a735fa47d1e4f3
b2e2f8a1fe9a4a606b9ba3a29a9277b8f9e39a87
describe
'1995020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00155.tif'
955a9961ca354cb818d6ffd317c994a1
906755367c47464326d317d150eadd32dcd0e4ac
'2011-12-16T19:27:14-05:00'
describe
'1986968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00156.tif'
455475d20db70b7c82bc03b581ee858c
421c2a9d8bd9087df974ce13ddaf9b44fdafd6cc
describe
'2032584' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
fd5cc2a49320450c4635865a44c4b33c
84439d0839e1ebff14074c416a73e8053df6a3a2
describe
'2087660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00158.tif'
9a7ee50c998aa3ae00ecd4ae9590f08c
a8224b269434447a3234af451a567ae499a3345c
describe
'1729632' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00159.tif'
5a0b92a4e5b358c6b661e6f49c4cd96e
0f6c01186f95817a72e64a05412cd23880b75bf2
'2011-12-16T19:33:10-05:00'
describe
'1990488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
7068dbb66ba29e98304df27847c12ce2
00670f5824adb51bedfa38c17d697729f9e3d4b3
'2011-12-16T19:28:33-05:00'
describe
'1823068' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00161.tif'
872472560bc7c24bcab791ecdfbb00da
ce5d71a32dc77aa3774ee8ed3ebdf1b75ca1dfae
'2011-12-16T19:28:49-05:00'
describe
'1878556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
3cf76812100bf03667d30c79aa203302
503ec8d78fc4fb9723508f3e570394680acebb0a
describe
'1985344' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00163.tif'
3479ba51027377bcf2ec6079901efe0d
662c1729e0ffcccec053ead5651f405816727c3e
describe
'2005784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00164.tif'
944b806c9f874fc97e6e30bb4b1a310d
f889407af55f6489d3edaf3339a27cd234ee08e8
describe
'1931076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00165.tif'
bcf2482dfd84217e6cdedfa6d669ef94
71a72a56e6867075d26c523717864efcd5ae1a91
'2011-12-16T19:29:23-05:00'
describe
'1971044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00166.tif'
6bb32cb1a9e96a56da1b6f4427d303cd
73895e3d63ca7dc27d61677e237bcb982542e029
'2011-12-16T19:25:26-05:00'
describe
'1910920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00167.tif'
3887dd47529530c66a9f3c2f8be9aa3c
6b9e7257e4e6018ac298f69e6e263ef116412e2d
'2011-12-16T19:30:10-05:00'
describe
'2024408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPER' 'sip-files00168.tif'
72ea4d06d4e9f682ffc7187bcb5065ab
8a3323cd580be67cfc67d4bcc6cda2c10ad37862
describe
'1849840' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPES' 'sip-files00169.tif'
b8433b081246d3c2e261fca29cf91592
47cb69a63aa938c7ee2f1a208631b159baf0e25f
describe
'2043128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPET' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b1e49f1652e83545c6a66b100547a61e
2bfd76dd159a24b9f435ed6bec3a5ace0a1795f8
'2011-12-16T19:34:26-05:00'
describe
'1989720' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00171.tif'
629de8cd97c77749a3127efe9855b41a
4ef4f2cd96b7cdcdae28f0b1e1427988b89df213
describe
'2016204' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00172.tif'
b64e6a5bd79fb44825842b5a752f4242
9b42fadf763ed78ccb9832926ba38c89dc7f7517
'2011-12-16T19:31:29-05:00'
describe
'1817744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00173.tif'
abf11304c44c827c633d1ccf1d150b47
b9dc3b2a3dc47eba44cd104112b0b1a3d87492bb
describe
'1887440' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00174.tif'
9dd7e9c68bd75a394ad702cbc0fa90b6
869b6a6afb768e173fc0b690fcfbb71514235d57
describe
'2053108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
7870c0f7c4d248589b02d37cd3192040
399bf11f34c50e35476581b8f02ae6b2d28d6f05
'2011-12-16T19:29:06-05:00'
describe
'2023316' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
f56242081e4cd50595a05f8f04440091
a21a42b7142b659c630c7931473bae3bde1f1a77
describe
'1881420' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00177.tif'
7534ab893a72ec1022af9ce1c00857aa
aea376aa3c00f2bc50b435458816df52ea815b84
describe
'1886592' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00178.tif'
a1f7633243d7bd7d60e1540e8084c1fb
e05e22927c4499d301b059d2a0d2845c0e089395
'2011-12-16T19:28:15-05:00'
describe
'1866844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00179.tif'
30ec8e89273e2492503e6d63a94a0c6b
55aec095ff40682d54c26e960ac53a238b0e6811
describe
'1984184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00180.tif'
12461eefe75ce7f92ab53b7d51319e43
cdb3710fb598a4b3a4a9ea914d6f3a56dccd0fec
describe
'1854212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00181.tif'
dab1ba1b2aabdd2a513e6d5258e994b6
20685fd09544559cd76959a7fce98725cdc278bf
describe
'1881624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00182.tif'
5fb8c350127ef815bfb50ba260c7df6a
e9b3c7bb5479f43655450485301cdd0b340557b0
describe
'1973920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00183.tif'
c32b07c1c2d9c1c56b9b3fd5ac505ff8
b3421adc82850cb70b2db8b4ad02ee0427379ef4
describe
'1864628' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00184.tif'
ddc9eab49cdc4a90e898f0ba1cd633d6
902b6a446eca6b9f598cb0332376daa9aa4867e0
describe
'2096848' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00185.tif'
3e301c08dc16dae9b03d224b9a358edb
348da89570b5c5294f7cfa60b25d7992456686f6
describe
'2054968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
bdc7da70e79773c7d8b2c0a7c8b40f6a
cab1105d0b07060a712abf698ca886dd6d7e4e12
describe
'6260948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00188.tif'
c6b4098613f118ce636485b761cc65e3
f2c996d69b706f9d54c3ca1828acd9ddf8b8edcb
'2011-12-16T19:25:40-05:00'
describe
'2094436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00189.tif'
9c3f7fe45fcfbcd5c241f32e62cb1a24
1481353091d1146101e62e85d4cb97f64c1d267f
describe
'2037556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00190.tif'
c1c203a4eb0cab1919dd1e7b1227b38c
bfd035dd8c46287032f95f3c3ff8f365d0a9474e
'2011-12-16T19:28:55-05:00'
describe
'1800568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00191.tif'
db6a80473d2d3cdffc075623c9a0118c
96aa691071c36011e41de46f58b664397be87590
describe
'1994324' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00192.tif'
261b0a8a1a9609273e14b7ee68c58c2f
2f3967c7a6ff699bac9edf088f1c363139a51a85
describe
'1839336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00193.tif'
efc1c545c3ffcd1df05fb6b62a2b23fa
be4958d9a883d7391198b066b375eb4faa24e58c
describe
'1889468' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00194.tif'
3a179bf562161a5e95b6bc1a01cd88ed
090ead5e27eff7ca3de6c1d9cc6d9cc9aaa8a538
describe
'2027104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00195.tif'
010c878e403dc022ac6a16c8d264d192
ee7b3068899f4329532bccc12bf114880c33faad
describe
'2135524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00196.tif'
2bd212ef04b92407790c525b7e35f022
acc7f4316668b02d9493d2d35f0e56821f4d062f
'2011-12-16T19:29:12-05:00'
describe
'1662972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b11ad039e1088aa3584ad13a0d6ea33d
c663b42a8e6b5cd277c17fda40594cc0bb63ef1d
describe
'2061704' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00198.tif'
31615a682a6c9e9d74050f978083f8ec
d0e472e910d2cf927d1fef90008fccb4e6e4c595
describe
'1926248' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00199.tif'
0baa5fed29d5067e3158aa6db3f80a85
e3f6584782dc19dcae92b9f9ed436ec93ecc322c
describe
'1840992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00200.tif'
4a74caee29bf3e299ccbdd6502caf9f7
def7ac9c5b33f161ccc5b28e6d9dd70bf2f71a37
'2011-12-16T19:33:17-05:00'
describe
'1921948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00201.tif'
f02b3c1bdecb51f76e9fcc29936c3b2c
3d9da51a392c65246fb2914734ff602d64bd2887
describe
'1958408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00202.tif'
afa5b8ac2478b7c6d9282bc8dd8b25ae
ca7b2bade671896be215eb3742d0f635b42db7ac
'2011-12-16T19:31:34-05:00'
describe
'1805432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
d5dc8e393a6354750a97acb20460b837
4cd1592f882402bb2bdfbcfaf25c036aaa927f21
describe
'1896376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00204.tif'
99b557332d3a684c6647dae62741f948
5934b094257dbbbd644abbdc6e73633b18f05930
describe
'2113240' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
4dc9082564e3585234fac7f17db0a11d
13d7f1c1ee5f75143102f8921d7eb656a394683e
describe
'1910820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00206.tif'
c644ca0e7d50c1a4e0e4559ce3cc17c8
ae3232452f4f6200acfd44c6835d6beb0996edf5
describe
'1867168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00207.tif'
cc70a1d196ed91d7b60acc46203ee7b7
6e3b4705561bd9cea034bcdac1feb115a54633f1
'2011-12-16T19:26:43-05:00'
describe
'2033756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00208.tif'
5d40d9f648546625592970334c23ec6a
150499584f1c73ac068c2d1ee3177e4c906346df
describe
'1983616' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00209.tif'
3907ada274ca352f218073b77b623811
12d5940b1f72e2c1c6f98214fd074ff987d6c729
'2011-12-16T19:25:41-05:00'
describe
'1959680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00210.tif'
c1ef9aad63cdec71cab018ee882e3939
bfb0321f1094293629c76fd37f93e64de236ac5f
'2011-12-16T19:27:31-05:00'
describe
'1798580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00211.tif'
beef52ea3e65c6e12bd118c57b4e11c4
8c8de70b7d6ec0c27d9b7e5016e3e76ea37c5826
describe
'1877288' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
0aa43a170a9f4ccbd0b4152ee80eef2e
d31349cb5e66cabb8a93ed4a92df958816a6eea1
'2011-12-16T19:26:04-05:00'
describe
'1853048' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
07d6655d9000e6319c4739710b06ff98
a498c75f0e859c6998d58b0f85a5270923e43fca
describe
'2027784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00214.tif'
c9c5743e6db325c801a43c3cc7f97759
45103a1353d8c4a679bf49e061a46f7656310b6c
describe
'1908524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00215.tif'
b76626b1a871adf72a0ba148fe76a7e0
61e97c18c2aefd7c8eb9ba01759a030c1594b069
describe
'1909888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00216.tif'
eef50ad903058bcb44d6afff6e19c77d
ab4b0746379d8c146279f3222d603d911ad441df
describe
'1816992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00217.tif'
ec021504853d7c1d5478110b66abbffc
02fcc5e3d963642b6be554f9ef628310b00dfbe0
describe
'1919596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00218.tif'
9dcceec552b9ad7acff52fb62937b2b3
b87af0362ac847335f326a443ab4bcf46155dc95
'2011-12-16T19:24:56-05:00'
describe
'1591428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00219.tif'
b6fb53dbf69020c870aa2a735e94731e
365cac42fc0d5d6d2fb337ca52d45da111bb2b00
'2011-12-16T19:33:13-05:00'
describe
'7391540' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
f9a031c4dfdf42e1403bf2e4270a0a92
9e7955d90a19eda7029f722f3da43d86858469ed
describe
'7949708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00222.tif'
fa1a2bac961bf38929656ba08028abdf
d8e59e48879e6ffb0c7f5fd038a4d5faa083855f
describe
'1691068' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00223.tif'
57acbd410b59fbcaac297e94afd2e483
21940b080fcbf65a9f8c9951f9a9b044900c3008
describe
'355284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
0b7b44e4b8ff6df14cd94d8687b56d4a
114e2ff8586c10dded1f88ca88061eeddf4966b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'156572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
f9d0633d547391f072f79142d9f91e3a
77c9707ba65d74d8a6596f75930dca155c778b76
'2011-12-16T19:32:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
0a25e42fc4c233d13628bfc91e316287
dc1f5f9ba03190a4005d7d35fb6ceec9a09b7ae9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'220107' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
dc14be3f52a2f7d6ccaede7f26363240
a29eaf1efe0d0b5fb2136f70adee4eee76b2809b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206306' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
8c7d0ea12dccdeac0d2206266602a33e
9fbd98b1d5cc95910fbb5ab653d06f12e3e153ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209406' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a10c06cc17d178235c7f50758703b3fa
895e60808c04c16716da6dc8dc34551c9a08638c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'220597' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2e3f0e83da22e99c30450aa63934b634
7fde039dba222a6cdd1b679764bdf0511d8dada7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282343' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
62065780737f01cc85d71828655311f1
6a0e2eab7c946dbfccfbb3f8d2e6ffb5fd0c5aa9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278727' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
1ef83953fefdf8bb44d6a44d861e86ed
c51cc5282934a89a1ef4b13d35ac08c78e439829
'2011-12-16T19:25:43-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278277' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
08e2dd7a5c81d3999c87703751b2d348
10689829fd070d2b3d98405aad5f492fa773a3a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
51b6274866aa1dd7b484c6915f910d37
95b509c6a3906bcd344f7d7903a9b866d1d550a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278613' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
32ab575eb1a53294f5e4bc2640081f40
79be8ce2357dd6a1f192eff753a98257a5e55207
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267223' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
e22ac2eba09fb89b7893fb0629b178ab
b3c74ade0636c06df242a11543294d3a1466ecf7
'2011-12-16T19:32:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270699' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
56f38914b43adbff77cebe476fb15fa9
0c42e387260ca45bccb8cce848cc33c2d2d4f60c
'2011-12-16T19:23:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'252655' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
446694dfcc74cd3ddbb69fb93bfe07e3
22c26db89fd0f302a69b3d3017012a670f1c90c5
'2011-12-16T19:29:20-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f8228905fa65716f9a7a91565fd57e96
de687f7cc032ef680ef2c0c0a83b6dabb8f0cc2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f872cf1d35218c07b254743cd99367a3
342c5b76fb902454beb878b3a83329699af3cb72
'2011-12-16T19:31:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'237933' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e7bed2002c7fb9fa8d44929f87ee01d3
1fb0cc8a96dec64ed5fe3bfeb75691a09aafcf84
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270499' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
6f81a28e83c7bf7244c4513f26524d0b
52f773ac55d80bf12a33d9f726969858a29011ae
'2011-12-16T19:24:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279955' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
6aff77b775c01155677414550715af3c
23872989089ad45d9d207a684889472e01206bd0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'243286' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
f5bcaf07e27d714cb1e9e222c8964fba
d4d475d107b8bc6ef5b30d8dfb90b0f572171c25
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264138' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
36972d7e237b7b9d481114a6a2badda3
dc31e69940cad5d2e3c714bc7b7e37e3b6ed8446
'2011-12-16T19:33:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f9fcdaed5f8ba45c9f9af65538f1fedf
8b0fb1e84cdd85a4373292ccfb3bcb3facbc74c3
'2011-12-16T19:33:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265679' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
4322a8cedb3455d3bb0086a053841863
8650a21750fc4a30e990dd8f9a3f8ed583e2cd0f
'2011-12-16T19:31:19-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
31eb3ac1524a76497a1b6fe4d242f407
8350575363c3cf87b192eda780f7c2c8adee8d10
'2011-12-16T19:22:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204963' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
28ac9f32da3af40447c5cafc59fefea3
23311063ed115f026334cf73b369fff06e633bb1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
5d3d6c7b39c377c3237b13f511d5c6db
2b3c41625dd755ca080e611d2d73627876865352
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260347' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
f66269ec948b8db29c65f171326558b3
b11972269dd9bc772988bb907c71349a1f3107f1
'2011-12-16T19:23:14-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'242622' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
515eb8e4da52262ccbec3b65f08d103d
140e812f00fda4d2feee9515be764f186832ed68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
682133e054e49732e7da0fc2245be42e
95015b681e30db65c2974ba0e1b0522e2015ce05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262577' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
76e755a1a96a839a91f0150077931217
2e0b4d2281af46aa487965fcbfcd82338b8567ec
'2011-12-16T19:27:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292013' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
98364de48b7579f565252f48fb353367
9f9fc46419472495f38384e29b16d8e6a521b06a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
7959d411191e3e66390401eb8bfa5e57
8f02b4bec8f92ad7904b5d41972f318c02746642
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269789' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0a04c3605f5d92182f26fec4900aedcc
a47aed6dcb0d09b1bc691222862da0be1b7bbdf7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
7d32e40340391c4f5389a247832837c8
038ac89859c62f501c33b186240996435f4c4cdc
'2011-12-16T19:29:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'266859' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b40c8408a2f2dd2a0c04f0c3bef5765e
d220b24d5dac141a6faee37b1f44624cf4678055
'2011-12-16T19:32:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPID' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a39d883e28d3a5345a5a4d4bddba53d2
42ac90efa1e21e19b5eb82cacf411c424d20a57b
'2011-12-16T19:23:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275561' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
5c9704cdceb0c609392b35a8ac5cc159
93253043a1aaa54c8b291c5b3df37705c4da04cc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'249408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
22a0252c01aed8699385e0fef35b5907
e487a9c7fa1833be67a0f4c2a9fedeca6ed25efa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
26074fc2e6959b722ccbf67f7d7bb2fc
955bf3f9934c807052c70d828a6fba385d17e06e
'2011-12-16T19:22:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186641' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
91b8a0cefc5453bc1a57311c1e3245a6
3eb9e4928befa8e69672f099e0b396347943fcf7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPII' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c236f86c9f5f03dc4c0d1f74d4682969
5159ad33f9a98c8fdecf2ac9b1074f4bdc77b211
'2011-12-16T19:25:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229154' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
d7b889c7660a99042a149fa2164758d8
53852d616768f308feae34d6adec21154c304318
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262328' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
95d425e590b987cfdbede65ef7464c07
d8159492e939e9b58c67e7cfb80aefad4e820910
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b7698cc46e1c96f65b44faad082b5667
25589f9de1063c47b6ded84fe4665817887d4ec2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267305' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
7f98320be9afb5a4b70040be12cf7b05
31d20825c7a671c9b31e08f7c9bc21ce56007bd8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259129' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e8564f9b50bd3ae6bccc8a5ebdb97ee0
c26a80ecfab4f07db4dd0adbbd8d3a54df0b541d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'261830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0391da8897ddd2b2177b08a18531795b
9033145985711a698d001dc32dd8fdacee64c1cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'242405' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4cfbd201c1a9a492f70e8462304c7872
20292b65912e128fbaf877ea3382fbbd9cbbeb2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172730' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
82da589dde546bc650070e9752ad4a15
eb752bb91bbe950dfb2d9e7a91c3497f163a4c74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
80ab25a31c0ed9560f793ee71940fa16
0fce4c07a3688eae6f4230bad359334e544c5cd8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'227603' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
b360ffd7fcc4c921b4b0107a0382f052
d14bbb8aae9c848b3882d04333eb2289ab3c474d
'2011-12-16T19:24:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'236515' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
194c7f93ebc4878607b7c4817f42886f
e0306ed5894a0ac80c66bf7c6df575201d1534fc
'2011-12-16T19:30:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'258120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
3dda3b0cd2282f3027b58f99fa68b042
2171fcfc6a11856a9b374974865dcc93f297e0dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
87eaf144b99f0400a6fabdf298a05880
b7e702b6ba04e2118b19825fe7020bb2cbb22389
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268882' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ff50bd37b35fedbd4e59df7b6408d47a
821d240827dce952599ec31b6f65f7d7cc87a578
'2011-12-16T19:28:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233409' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c53d2d7f3d9d6d8d3eb0c3b7f14cca36
194454817a5a8f9c5f2dae5f66223524a9d06c8f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271585' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
28eb259f68ac1532c095be2e9addd1b7
e667a61b45abac396903c7e3363d4d71a5b6c3cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
368824b7511731d2a36af63149c0b254
cc23c04ae06ce174c7752adc73ac44f4fe0122f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265661' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
a631f6755cae4c5e97531be6bc2239d4
bf3cedc60ce4c3906f7291c16a0ad5c809c08482
'2011-12-16T19:25:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'252778' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
4d608ff25a1d1e22d843632264cd780b
a3c39bd0f121b86fabdf79b2467aa0a90eaee517
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'225739' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
cfc128dfe585c5209ae672b010555fa4
2dfd7ec5dab3091cfa669b7e0132209071e92419
'2011-12-16T19:23:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283291' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d39128af4ab89e9674d54813c05008dc
acd79452bca155248214aa4fd5f8d72c6d5b750f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'241515' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
52f95c16147bdff8c5afaf2cda355607
56177c7aa379230b724c8bf639974aeb63202b2e
'2011-12-16T19:31:51-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194041' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
06a74e2fbc8853af025d810af2916cbd
ec723bc042e3a704c45589e08a0ead65cf07a52e
'2011-12-16T19:27:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226997' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
82b704b76aafe18a960989d53699767b
043d0babc55205fad1d65507bcc2d253e22c8080
'2011-12-16T19:26:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262294' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
be2e9146d4cd1a8664b66ea527c2a1cc
1339df9daa0f88dcce317a76856511db4a4ed488
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'220001' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c3fb56cccd3ab92d7f2c96e787ea93c2
1c9454aa755e89c20a1ed62c8b97a41f92e4923b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
c9fe2efc0eaf905d4af3dc724e09d66b
cb92a23676ac01f0144cb5a38e52404bab5b46ed
'2011-12-16T19:25:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260305' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
39d890464c790266639c09451e244d68
63c2aec8dbfccb86298c8452490c934d8489c0fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208487' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
3c600b388b1b131ca9a557a2cbd155cc
e04cc1e86f7b0e0eb84a013700af29204135321a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'257410' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
cbfeae0807d7b2d006d46f54a032cdc1
d433b35d5079879851c884d0580e3d11609b0912
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234205' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
becee4250d2468bf11099423a85799e2
170996252c386ca044cc5f63ef96060e9bbee910
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
a37c567c7522a1279ed3c08047239c76
0185f667a767912555f558fb49372a344ddd0e93
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238565' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
8c11c3f95fd3e4788b70b05db3ec623e
5f675ccb59481a33e493a725de8ce2da4fe5258b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264183' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
00c8c9ee43adc6f8772b11990572f1f4
abe78c3634e6cfe3ba59e552fbf68b934a8011b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234304' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
efe97e4ef618737dffb513235a9470c7
215f5c06b5c6b897f3ce3ddf2a2775a2e1f9bbe3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219229' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
8a2a563abfe5d9b6e13c7e933aab55eb
bf8e0377b39e29f87eb217069d764048e8b2f9fc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
cad68af927059d4a5d7d13a45f922a4e
03c749f13181bc72942748405ca31d8b4901583e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265937' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
ee4f5d84b6957f4a275537d079cf9a64
a7a5ad259b32d4850a7bfd8ac7a3a7471a229619
'2011-12-16T19:30:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247933' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0c8ea09d3756d860573d6d0f1ce652ff
25a8a0bfa6b1a7966b63051009241f34e43963c7
'2011-12-16T19:23:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'240510' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
9a210ba0010ed6e402a430b0d6b0d0e1
faca291f3b354a86a782383c09da1feb2a039436
'2011-12-16T19:28:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259533' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9cf1fcdcdc9c119678401276750c8532
fb0dfc0c4e769001362887ac09189b0555b81eaa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'243482' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
3fd45041fae1dda152b5db1efa41dc77
4726a29b3273b7ffb860831e9cdea2a75928733e
'2011-12-16T19:33:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235061' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
6ff7156b7431a51024e1337e63e78f73
eaf449a64d50d315bd35f845ae9f8b53d6399293
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'273584' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
0d749446c3e72ad036682b3497b25495
bfe07f0a940d74218ad823610e7ce45dbecd2850
'2011-12-16T19:27:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183925' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
49c6e20056d67da8f00a6e7c447a6311
d1cf642ce1b6c4552dca299c38dc4912f25a4ee1
'2011-12-16T19:29:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
eb1e54e55207ffced3936baaffef8368
265bd07890ec4db905840aedae59a66cc8a4ddff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178922' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1d56851b2aed3713000859ffe2c3d10b
83d9ead44113f1531fbadefa05cbf21022b51621
'2011-12-16T19:21:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
9be94f10415c0356b49d993ab3959c6d
b411ed7cde1d9c5caa4cf65250974e1b7b195709
'2011-12-16T19:33:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'224991' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
bc04a09b5f61ee34fb798bb4cb2f6010
0b4995cd9877ce32d98cd7bb84e6b820f86cb355
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198122' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
015e78ee35b8ae8a65a3c816962f574a
ae9b734a8f4ccc25b8f4e69240f765bdba27b260
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196107' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
305d530f4579c50fdb657bce7a63c9cf
83a784b8999ba22b79a3dee3dfd86d5c5e937783
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
97d567cc25a5b632324ab61431c7f069
9a8227b3aebc4a115b327ec4feeaf7e5b7fe8eae
'2011-12-16T19:23:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
71530318dd2d47a5f935ad9118c5a6d1
8d243f38638da0abee5aff32779f6ff3186adceb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
237b94ca64d00bb8a955f8b981cad253
6513498dfc8af46476ec7178c14637ee3b2838ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179910' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
32d963a9f63c1f62994a2efb2c4e4234
9d9bec50a7909b41b1d635c214a3887308e7d7c2
'2011-12-16T19:33:19-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179224' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8433e62a0f4c51530738c0bcf0c9b346
1d8205fdc7897951f7bca40e7d0a50dc7867d294
'2011-12-16T19:32:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200979' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
510f392da6b89ac20ef137e8859b4abc
adaf4ad50f638059b873bcf3289cba4a41b478b6
'2011-12-16T19:27:28-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208973' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
bc54b0c83d6f3c1f69f268196568e1c2
cb7d5feff970a13bd1da9ea97da98835e436c9fc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
97a66c1d355212840c24fe9b322ddc25
80625661e76abab84e44a67a49688abde4b89dbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'145035' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
2eb92d56df6fa292f1b4f207d86f3577
7634d4b27a4eea3f60e3feaa15669d7ff0492a0a
'2011-12-16T19:22:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9f0559903b8b62a133e67b708c617e00
b01d00bd05cde40021fef7e8ff83dcd0b8becd02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
eb7b7e4020576bce308a4970dff07cbf
e42abb1c712ff004866d55a41d6d54d2cec99301
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177798' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
a867c4f8e2e33370abbdb693e9fff03e
1f165a9d882e5f265d8303c29a4e388435178001
'2011-12-16T19:31:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
979ea6081212b3adbac1fc6b2de95097
c38272ad2609a1f304256ab5368d66135c72a484
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186764' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
7304ee9ab8461f220525534dddf96306
e06363092ad658dab5bfd733d76997a23bb459dc
'2011-12-16T19:26:44-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191635' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
74557ccd0f9cb4a052987accb692ac82
e4a03499e60a8f85ebede9f9c013b956978de3e9
'2011-12-16T19:29:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178697' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
62aab06e709fc3799b765dc40cb8019e
3ef6973299a1faac53a0c010d3b7f8d3686a62a0
'2011-12-16T19:24:18-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194702' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
6070164d22a6d15cc29bad8a6f541d45
d8a740e678e4d9de8f1087cf806e534dbb71b08f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
09f35b2eb5204de4688666f37f19e74c
2e5b5e6a5352479a64bbeee1b1d714d57d37edd0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
a2cd66d0ef8c2dcc6baacfc4170748e2
b1cbbe4ed4e5abd7e84fde255d70aecb9cf5da8d
'2011-12-16T19:30:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189899' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
e928b8a3410721634c2e9172458f190c
3ce3955a01ec5485659daae996554f06e188b447
'2011-12-16T19:23:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
26fcdd580e463ad923b0121ee6990499
5af8c0dca029ef6c4097ba61f0606d410b48ce8c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189544' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
e22789a7265e794cdc3052e55bf2d4f0
d17c65418df1dae2465a896e41eecb31098e6d9e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193930' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
3173174a5fc2b25aafead50599e6a442
59e42c267845386258b587ed8d821c52a470cf62
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'217135' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d2a367eb58d20a1abb58fbb91282b297
de07b0959136ef4b11fc85b151f314b00f96ad76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206817' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
43b9649b0617fb289c13e115548f503d
114247e885b7f05ce8a8c1f1305264b3012d25b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195318' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
813579ade1c8ebcf5d886cab74e82524
8ccb7e019170935d56bf3ee20befe9069c323028
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b82677dd4c3f9e7e66599800abe13abb
9433d8ebb3985c70f521c26348a0b1b9a75ea183
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
cbfcb4b4aad98c2e9b8ce88bc7f48044
611b0f5d6e41e1ffd861945625074f23c057c085
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204649' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
31c73a724c913a619e94225ec8254198
68ec7782ad08b199de0e4840d9a2ebabd814b51b
'2011-12-16T19:26:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189781' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b18567cff7cfe51877a01e29dbe0f272
f70a55adbfcbb11fb001c63309e79cffaa65aa7a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'168291' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
d913d8b6994b5f09a7fab51b924053f0
b1412d04cd5c03d79ca541c96ba00b9192c9efea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
b4106d17e44efed52d44dfe43ee81c25
9b3680c6b4b841aef52ca77fe69f0887aa656bfe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'126842' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4fb614f2bc0e612e591d4eec667d6986
569771ed2d2905436ae54562a0a9fd4924cb3009
'2011-12-16T19:33:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'123820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
bf4204cbf9cc30dd8c0753e4e12b4f3b
62ffdd0c6f05ac9b310b2381746de8ad860619b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'171999' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
77f21688d877eae03f7f218026b6dcb8
5d38218001bed7c66b51bcba32cc5ddf5b3c3a2f
'2011-12-16T19:24:00-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
87eaff32d9f7678665d8b7c8c4bac446
8a8bacfc0545b1f5fb516776dae46f33db58c0b4
'2011-12-16T19:31:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
180e18b29cf8e4cf8496cf111be53ff1
d829271c4cc961aa6d035e4cd54fb4df78d68355
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192865' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
1d07cdd7111bbccb82ffb7ed02ce01fa
54e74adbf45ed19fad79d93e2c301fdda423393a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213365' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
4b22077211e52d4bbf5ed8344208e65f
714ca96a1d64599280743ba194904bee75fbb2c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'218222' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
2c639030868c5744ea985a6f2bfa3ab3
8231b15943bbc748cd4ab770f5678e909441e843
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
b5ff0cd896f1c30b00406e78cc0c627e
31a6eb44ae0c593e70aef579c73c2e8a210bf054
'2011-12-16T19:27:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203485' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
28f6c2365a7d157f2cd831b5381e1e50
b017964ba1bc987af2c812c9ae3406352b084788
'2011-12-16T19:33:04-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'254092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
6c16f78cd6a3d1eb48a150c74451c4ae
8517747ea4b6e0acb719e3c29138c8cc5c12636a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211390' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
aded6269c6e595d6b62129324545c093
32450f61dd36bc47f926e0f87dfdd4112fbc75f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195550' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
0aeab070e16ffb7f030e8012fa8db75f
97375228094e4298726d14465b9832d6cc84e8ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'127044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
3e01749c35c48215456ae8729d49c4a9
bbf1e59dcd119342081918b784bf9328624669b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
40a402380367b9ca755df3719afefe02
b353c29819303cc94149409251cd9a5489138e3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
4a8979e87b4bebce9b3f521c91b1f0b5
26cab2f59f8f71d5e9c2b1fc5879b6776c630d93
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'149506' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPME' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
b3667905bd47f0ad0dca63d6ca07e6b3
42d7953261f8b8606812359df7f3a4807b316d6e
'2011-12-16T19:32:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203396' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
6ffdc7a07601e0cebba035e8511b53a3
aaf183e499646c4342b35e5ad3552fb232c8244f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182960' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
63d48ec152d7eb058f0eb9d54a3acb19
b6a8184677e387720c79f828f314c305dd73fa84
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'159697' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
11e53677090188539dcc1c16fd2def1f
9993e0a2e104eb88d2d0d1dd9c8636bb494e1600
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'152177' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
8e9b9cefe9c34f8c533917ba6a8131c6
b358c5c76522904002800e048df81ab62dda581a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'132288' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
b70109c76896eeea6b25cf5ea581cc7c
406be8be9f543cffc894dccff88c63eb76630afb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
52412ecb4fc18f7deffc1b9d3220046d
1215a85ddce57c8f0c54b68025d6c13b7faded95
'2011-12-16T19:22:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPML' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
4bda3d281ddf38e5eef95849243c6cf3
16b40cf58f8fee057b90e5e519401f1bea40c4b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206215' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7c0d981563f457289062ec67488ec3ab
c4a21da65893ab9c480c2fdf8487e228dd1ea627
'2011-12-16T19:22:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197475' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
bababb3d3132e36e69d58a77f68bb139
757395131c4a5d28263926ef1ba700faceaf81a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189669' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
960afb64bb833f21863bf7fb5765e72e
ccd794b789894a52274d905e72df8297839be876
'2011-12-16T19:30:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'161184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
9d63543786b3be14bccd5a83e9fcd804
2ec06ef4f019eb6f1909522a581a9f004c5afeb3
'2011-12-16T19:31:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'156655' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
a752e9bfd556991ec05415ee11546a32
674eb827d8c75d489845675fd26d885ac58f697e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200813' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
ce3790a8cc543885e04a8ea39a5a5b2f
37ad9b9f1f04e1aacc45e17a6815b9e8dd66f162
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'153754' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f10e00706c9c9fa0241bc4f9cb5c6d40
02d40a34d457dea5053b66950c6227f909330340
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206347' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4d52b91aa60c8512a37e7a37f79c15b3
923468aedc7548c43799971b882e1a647ca82ade
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200081' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
74e531505940ea13e43e2e7039311f1e
325c46217dc4496fe8b54ee90d2df3bd1d7a040e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'144364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
a2f2405a7db2f69b85910829227f4327
f0a7bde8f724e762c17acd7e712ce95f9e7f41aa
'2011-12-16T19:31:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196574' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
d6b3943f1820f16cbaa949ec4d8ff71e
cce3b8f5ebec8afaf60cd881d7acc68638d93a89
'2011-12-16T19:31:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200754' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
03faf52033cefa203499d1439c2bf533
3280ab2e932b9b021e32d9b9811dd07c5e44e263
'2011-12-16T19:32:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196737' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
0118243be0061f14e213db908a351304
949e91e71efb0801b6e0e3bf75b2a47c0826a57b
'2011-12-16T19:29:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
077d5fb06331623b0eadb9ed6590f8c0
9587a390f9b2c39900bfd797916507bfc050c96b
'2011-12-16T19:22:23-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190162' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
79d1a9b36401ce852b2f4f91b7fdb88c
8b9d93a301e76f48debc7570b73bac5584952abb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199758' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
e76676056dd11cf7937909c2a65f8142
03f43bfed6be5255642aa935063a6e8613a47151
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'161735' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
1bd0b595bdc472120210a846bb2b0f45
804089189354c27fb78e6047850d961d4e83ecdb
'2011-12-16T19:31:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200859' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPND' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
2b4d47f88b64dc1c4d4b93bac9773c6a
0d5bd465026d20d32f43b79f0b40e3517864dd58
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192653' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
fe7f3f854245c501baa0b20ff213d258
5e117bd9f9262f8842b1f6638f607629b139dd70
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205065' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
1d49c5ee084bbbec4fb31f91f01ec1f8
f565bb8a5adaaafb968ac4cfe6c33e2cafb46458
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
e967c03c5a75be27277fb6a618c3f12b
fe6c7d325bf81d457588d41253f0d6fff54dde4c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'153963' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
e385e574372b751c340c80b54e5e295f
a0ede1575465f697d3ff6759bff5152d15abdd10
'2011-12-16T19:34:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196427' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
c20b778f252f636c116b0b20c3a30159
56ab08d220d7196af0e1fff1241cded900b5244a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200598' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
484534ae38270a67efc62f7c420173dd
a2cceb291308e4b2d660cd9716f75b4d5ad73d10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190942' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
b1816132bc9f5dccb6280f333167d9e1
0c0607e1a0acd49f805345b30ddfeff9baccc80b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'168020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
3eb18129f7367927b709a3ae4e23327d
f0dfef2bb991a817dcd610cd6abd1d786a385d56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200159' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
dd707c0f4c8115c6571c4700177bc79d
31edf31ec4eddc422f7926882deb6f097342a7ba
'2011-12-16T19:29:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
73d79b1ba33c8c2e0a31cc5ab3f4a9f5
cc2d3d0d771765408c60df04313947dfdea19e2e
'2011-12-16T19:26:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193268' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
3d810d946b98fa51d3e8c82800961abd
f264318f11727ff80d230a988005e422df6a0223
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195745' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
7ca1958bd545aa769f6840f54926f443
e8ad5aad21ce89a965ec2e98d992ecc8fe054c77
'2011-12-16T19:23:19-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195683' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
2916a8e9537a58271cb56b711652a26a
35343d71f1e9abb57d1a1906db62c5d4df226d20
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71002' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
8124a583f07f9524d8488aef80a165f4
f5eb51dbb16c6fcc140ee8093285fc535dcd5c84
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'129474' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
a28c7da932cfaf776a437d2cc9eda095
7f2d2dd4959f8a2a3f692b01491da440dab39bd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'138207' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
33c54bee8396d0f42dc4d11fc75d0f03
53aa5cf59c388b2f6c764a98619b3c2d9466602a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
0b1ec59f500fd54a1bc76349629cec94
a192596d123cbef8d48c98037935508ae12b4b36
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
81dac61d845da22b5c77a2eb121cfca4
f66f0f74404b4b390df391bdf302100832e51606
'2011-12-16T19:30:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197991' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
328116eb8be8f6cf8d10bff0b5dc16f6
b3cea7567703110d69465ecdcc9d81aa958bf1e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196236' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
8899beec06beeb630e08c29823595aab
ced058cd5a4ea0081848c1885091586408251d72
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203765' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
ae2321c9269186e47f455a16e62d7911
0c03ae44813a83d8321dac615640e536fb77e2d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'145379' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
f6754c1f24b97f83f4b53a8b0580758b
ce92edc8bf1c8c39f2c74676c9e1c45018871091
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'145891' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
61feb552fe5f94b64b17f1af1c9afe95
7f56cfb8048addd7f38776bba8dcd7cafb7ba367
'2011-12-16T19:24:15-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181390' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
c0fe051ab1094d4a820b02498e768a15
a51a39987d5813714cc8f7c10c608cf258a5bd0a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'217635' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
95efc80ebeaddc972e78b3adefec052d
ec79894a6f58f120c9e67289feea650bcc005552
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'182608' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
abe7dc9d28d019533b8321a5e85b7a1a
256f372e07b7982d89d3e3b00dab2b2bbcd8715e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183775' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
0f66ce902e0f4c3f271bee42c7436e7d
ec11b7e2f94015b1f1d8590a53af77a03ad33e05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191810' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
1c80a5f443908213e166cee437c5ae97
555b820d354bca6509be084940b9b82223807163
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193476' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
8a5d42588ab6a28152f9dfd7c4b4a7e3
3bd60f7776672b27c2d74eaf81d214af469e1b69
'2011-12-16T19:22:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'135367' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
a4cd75948f3abd5c9f4738ec006f045a
d0a410d8dbd99ed2268ea715b7f9469c48933c05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201606' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
a8efebe287d040fc57fcfb495a521f62
af1c8905a62155a5104f3bdc5488c8bdce9ecb13
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'165235' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
44576d678866d57b3608e00034ed5d9a
bddf54d2c356e40c0537133f7f0369e3f08f2c5d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'146487' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
605cf3d35e446668cc7a20788782e1de
551ddb4056e486a633b9cd51c0107a8f97208c2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'141758' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
ddb1d24e10cbcc723f93d16c8a753e53
35d5be9ab0fc7283c1e221ec830212420cd6515c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193935' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
238f423bd2453ed83dc742cd6d5c9f6d
5f4c25b642d920e677124683e3688ef1aa5d62ed
'2011-12-16T19:25:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185401' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPON' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
97aa093ba60ead5f75a70c3f26b0ab6a
0846166f85d73b1f3701ec5306089000bbff446e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181239' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
2c3663cf2093dc4b1e8e579c5c42da9c
f69a5ba0761d4e26bc72591f26c45daef83ae171
'2011-12-16T19:26:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205431' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
bbedc305d957f44c953ec566b77cf3f0
fb540f7872998c52ff9c841aa5cd48f6d52ff8d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'178416' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
93729efa6fc1c04df13bc291377bb508
68cef34f2f1f07a6c7130a863d2b2ea53c1ff65d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197094' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
b8e46f151ee5eab7ea68564b1198f5fa
aac9750c5384c529d17539392d3689c416e72857
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
46b3fb493d4098b62b64506b98a968dc
c9ff7ed69d274358e378279a56c762ffbbcd089b
'2011-12-16T19:22:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180202' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
4b36e59bddf7583b54ceca8792fd13d6
a9a5e73fffcd938f0972299ba05fabedd4afa34d
'2011-12-16T19:32:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197613' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
ebefd15a813aee7ba3f1e57a2bd7cf6a
47752a284dce930dc3330e5a1de4a9289a272a77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'177122' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
c65c2f4c7c08c77c11477e241316e97f
0045ca366f8434f00e60fa90992f65c79128977b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'144772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
1439c1b0c51b2929f21d3282f3b29b23
858f707551108c09c12484e466e907c7d2680bb3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186998' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
6c5d7f49ff90c9a7bc99ed24189922fe
953a0edf01933c9c1a81ae1b7c7e728cc1e0594a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75451' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
b6905658fb5e655f70cbc0bdc6ce1d82
c495c97e6ccfe3c8d388c7eae9e0c3310be72ef2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'130000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
6993c7c1e64dc654b3d231d0f2cdce2e
4ff792c80c7454dd0036b8b2485ec5bf727ce6ef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'411359' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
58fdf80a3277f0ea2ff90b387a7b066a
134205a17da777029a75e348e9f4eea2172cdb5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'110573' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
2a6960715002778ad45f8b2db78afc79
2a2a49a9a712d4d43c9f71c9a45face4df9bac57
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91011' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
b611b71e91200b5f0a30980560e6df5d
5fb659030fe9d6f9f06022838c1064c3043b092a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
0e7c75e20eefa0a07c47e5c085f6e821
8eca5d7861a92f6b654dff8ca58b32ac2e07c05f
'2011-12-16T19:22:39-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53446' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7c28691576cbec346fddeb14ba0ec6d6
76349f45068e21f9c2a039796610180acca59c2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83138' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
26e48b13987e2166bcf53c7cf371c865
7e78e0d71abd8cf68e3a21982aea3be232812b3e
'2011-12-16T19:32:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67066' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
273ae277f0226b09f5f2493c22986d76
5ec576f9fcca613aaa041baf5ae837aae4a5526c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69650' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
c1b4ba99b7e02ffd768e762bfd610496
36e6185bf8b7b3aa14c1618817b83b87cb182cb3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67215' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
34632c6d37031005f5b598ce12fc8a4d
69038710c6d746a97a5d44f4bacfc549c06c5e74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74243' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
f67bc0d992c30a528383be2eb6c3d84c
110067a1aaf49485194c8f374178c30fe9eeac58
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2a0e13beb26d2681a1807e9ddaed4338
48deaba8870ba1dd2ef3f1d02639832ad6bc3e5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96147' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5cc97cd20da84074f2ad95b786cc9623
6db3e073cf46df2dcd7bbb8880d4dc4784128c46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
9b8aefef8d983085fcf734b8605b031b
135cb732313ab9ce853b59fe957ca02d05b4915a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
7f428906e80566e2a3b03b928c7a83a3
5ecd62f3204328d3c77d70025f6d7dd19f2261c7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95279' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ed283b07f7a4da109edffb8cae465e27
f004fce177fe89f132f085ab61e9ec8cd921caa5
'2011-12-16T19:24:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92158' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
4c7c7a1b8e2ca93538a3374d85e07285
e32ba77cdd82f92ee777d8902baff7de99accc99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91347' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
26f5f9841c60adbe4d855005787afcc0
d09e4a4626a61caae47a855f914c9d734b1ff95f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86425' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
1d4581e906f3e86102db2b29e7f8fa52
e072921f7986ece7e6b7f2146681d336dfa11fc2
'2011-12-16T19:23:07-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
902eb4581d2c3036fba10f8277dd2637
a19d2f25aab487e3f7f01ddf2bc302381c7d3822
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88527' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3f5ac8ca7dd5dbe3cbb4373134036d74
7b0cf7bb750e7f59971878d43a6fe6b25b9ffcc6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
bfd0b526d94cc9a73e8a62295b114469
5613a546300d8b8204a20dc94da8929233e65bfc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
f7619022262248265e387bfac3057db8
bb75b431071671c1e2f8cd2ed6e20616d4ef9d4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94945' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f3b413b7604e9e5401975d26b4155523
f8b9cf9a4db022f70ee714b86e7b0ba5fa3f14dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87052' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e35e28d59d178c16ed5233946609ad8c
5e5f6974b62cb67a251dd963c47a0ba0c80091ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89218' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
63e63d613c4b90426fe6f36120943de2
806578bc4eb973edc0c4380b8f078be55a6f51ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87121' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
48067980d5a6803cdce327036e182e03
eb221f312e6b4f2aa89e373b6ce70857fa1bee1c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9705918cf7b27be6af07d0f3a522c483
2a405f90132026e0f859a4160b80ff49dea1b207
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
446d78d8c1efe3b8ea11241b8e9314a6
9536b54a70148fabb7f7ea351ebe2f3f1e71ef10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
313787fcfc9d35bc8098c1201a0485c5
2234a52e4a33fc0c1fc42e976202e29e3388013f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71595' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
71e27b34eb30b9cefe39aac944652070
4d2f12baf6a268a142d7c587184310f27b378718
'2011-12-16T19:26:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
86f72906cb323ec932985f5037b50d9e
2122a28f1a32b10f891624b871813c49de0a5467
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85629' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
901c6f8e935e25254619f4640100884c
be0527a8d282f6d0938a0963836d1b2bcff43955
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
05957e9ba795102242099314d48332e4
3d0154a9296ff786e47272f0d2542e0da6e2b625
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
19cdedd65e15709313e01538d5a1054b
bd82b49bc267ffc7a170f2dc8658e6ec15c5d231
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98801' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7bf98e6350a401db19555d44e7038710
0613b08656c5ebe3339ab9d8b2679526c5a53a86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88859' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a2f7d5f1688d56f652963d06643400bb
4fe75d0c77ff9fd2d5c4b5ab86fd2a0b7432e375
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91716' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2e1bda830996ebcd09f95d557d4f0b7a
c75a0d12a48f4d7d237a404774eb590f30782fbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96463' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3f70dd3a1c88f7d4e4418affd47af905
58fdd0079ebcbbafb0fe74c804ff203fab27837d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92690' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4574ac783491915d9b76e261388a863f
928ce77950ba7dbe2fb877a2ee1e08b9901efbcf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
8b9009e390abc9b5266ec37669955925
b63ff597ec4e37a48b5897d49b5ad8c66b142f58
'2011-12-16T19:32:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94540' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
32099f1718176ed729e49258ee067203
91e30eba04fb98389e54611736f904a27f3b1abb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
13a2adea5e0af2769788647909e4eca6
53f2aba22482f4860ef21c3947e7608155977afd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71853' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2eb4fdcabca7f9d8267dec620c36b1be
456125349b959d61a65d8a7dc6cb25076dc2cbf9
'2011-12-16T19:25:17-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
6d065a125464ea5aa357f308b481fe7b
c269bff078d8a0c5a065b2a4060763907d789067
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'109119' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
d3a9226e4dc4acd470479e6573c6ef60
e87ebbc2dde9297b1f6be40825a457add6cc3c81
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83762' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
d253ce9f528264999d13470b0e9279f7
a9ac0e58c33f89d5743f8ee1e182159d35a9fe1c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90833' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
03569fb38cbbc1d2c29cb28dd2104531
d151510acbab58aa175a9cfac430d3cc28a0c48a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8c43216b84156b339bddc8020e41974a
2bbcba41726eecd8941bbdada05ee2c3792331d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91608' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
ca857750601bf9872fe066b5c3f46b9e
2bcf65ac9d1d1924f10381834f2a82fe0515c97f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92607' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
9dea6e782164c5b0b8412fd25f27825f
a3ed3ef18bba07e7d8bcf99dc9e3f5668ca60d14
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89770' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
4b4b769413a5fcd6fe9f3b40b300fd83
2eadc8a5ac9f6d0c6f4889d341c04367aec49356
'2011-12-16T19:26:14-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88604' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
a47b32ae57e0edb5f46a548f36e4bc32
ec9a8b1b67769187f017b3c7ad0b1c531b1e74ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
d945c40586abdd117ffbc6c24e523bec
ba731b6aae6a759f188bac4fe8d2289a5abd418b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72667' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c62c9e7fd1229089714faf0baa4c87b9
266585c801e31ed3ed8dfd6cd83bd6d05c3edf6a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79402' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
1633b890cb4956ae7f3772a842220ab5
1e3326d3cf5eccba6f0dd6b9bdefb5d4fe4469bd
'2011-12-16T19:31:42-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a5850b0d0679453180b85be57d5ec168
1a757bf04f6ca47c2aafdbcc50fad96d37ba2447
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91710' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d26fd93284f2a03e4484dbf9246c6173
c25afad8b62b541f9c695a64bc51f73d596ab08e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86733' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1a1bb9e97cc72fdfaebf93e6449714b5
9e07c800a8d2e9138b767330798067bfd0e832f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d6f5118fdee3c8e0b7c37c24f18f8e4f
70c98cd108dfbabec8660b2e76d0e25d6db4621a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
b530a72194597cf4858ea5f1a24666a1
161b9fabc08217dcd9d742e97b658431ad084fb9
'2011-12-16T19:23:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92343' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
083df69b94ceb2f584a2dc36f258a852
dc4e12e0331e6a1dcbaa796ad7e37558f94cf9e7
'2011-12-16T19:32:46-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
43fc65bbd25c993a96425bd25a23ec76
549a3142baed488e72145b1da94df5abafb6ec00
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87371' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ec67d1450f19db6a98d6e040134e5314
031e9263b48ced4c1373140b17779a08d64fb8ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82188' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
0c39627d753a00d692a1f177e2349645
dc27848fe8ca8df63f07190e37f8f746916aa551
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86274' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
edb52dee22d41d825770ac53afa1baf3
67d1d3a57bbafc9c97507b3eaafc9c90784ebf68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
11ee13d13ea8120787f0a477ff034d2d
2e48ea3885158dbc8a0f6d507b6b668d317125a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83957' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
f4089c7aa1ab9bee4fb960e8562f06c2
f273807ce249abeddb0cbc527a78ad4b635f020e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71800' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
841e54e3d5c480309a6e3924936da87b
8203acd3c1521349dc6dc0ebc973a6e1b3542a7e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84383' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
b765b8eb2583845b794e0c9f02bea2d4
2ec71661a4140ce296c7149cfef05bb9252a4b5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91633' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
93bc740772d81433f645003b12b7be77
b850d5fdcadb903ffbace8f72eb7ebae69af3134
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78372' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
53db5fe9631b8df31ae47628abb2e4a4
386fbe5da4f13a21869f48d46e8e90950a3bc1d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89722' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
59a2a150a87184abbb14fe432b1e93dc
1b96c337be3402b943c1f7f5a4f5b98101eeb9c3
'2011-12-16T19:31:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6b4c21060482d16f689593f6f7658375
26821ca9f4ace446911d28aa3ae66f80df991ade
'2011-12-16T19:32:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8fd0daff6b8c345e5b39663711d7eec2
563eb185be7817ab55f75bf49598c9fcfd7ad620
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89365' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
453a47aff897984136dcfc0775b8b4e6
af1f5bd8762e5845e4eac5edd76ef47d3a8e37a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85479' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
50ebc7acef10a2f23eb2aa8280d81b10
75e1ddc1466a3c9a8e3463d5f6f51ec21bc10af0
'2011-12-16T19:33:16-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86933' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
8ccdac8a71eeaf7d38b9ef9b42c935cf
d2cd61e3b49fb734a53d62a066eee956b2b4e14b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89626' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
b3f8aa3b7975081e4c1171e48a8285c8
86ae9cde28d80d7aacb292bbeceef991cb8e078b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89366' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
61d6862bf9de4cc78eb4ea61eece4082
7d053e023a508ac1b211098125bb1d86c1d1cd17
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7996b69292758e88f7e760f955d84aa4
20d219371909a8f2f0dd27aa1c7f298578ea5cff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81271' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
b5c2f0b61cab37e32a8ec2f54add8d40
560d750d87ca51a8df8d3007076d6e865f69d50d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73829' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
4ca4a4e3d4f28a4168314897f6c8f4a2
3e4b8fa805975de2a7fae86b6855c913a3e5d570
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94121' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
95d84d469c462cc4f694271f5a0d30b3
9edb1be29bf0310f863b7c1d3254628eeaaaaf3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88483' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
7a8256dbe0428454ddf61f72429f6eec
5b34ff744800c6ff22e0bd1493a2538d6b396219
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
ef383ae57fa678c4ac8af92d697d33e3
0847064445dab2ce9740b9fe4429aa6f6363bd4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
bc2c52547f4d86a1ba27856953f5fa22
ca4775e588b0f68c3fbc35e47e203feb0e35dca6
'2011-12-16T19:26:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80842' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0dd515e0da005f79e8bbfd187f69f16f
b2009a68ccbd46714dd4fe25b70d084c916bcfd3
'2011-12-16T19:33:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82051' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
5838f3c66fd4af8ea88903e53b3fc2b2
2927154eb090b39fde005f29ce9cb5868bce62b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
ae719900f095985dd58a5c3723b644d4
a1028da26dd2ae2b9b1ddcd13791ff122f19b29f
'2011-12-16T19:33:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79119' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4ba54ffb601c2d2a3ca96e5006b6d3f9
3a64c6b5cddcc7970b6b86bc144f890fc58ac56f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7726da168974b435b0fd287fca0d4c72
ca17ddf46b688802ec0b99b2d6e469a4816fe273
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
ee83352c610aa711a17a59da37490a9d
d401356089a9c06cd9dfa1c4641d4f731c9782d1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c776ae1ebfad3e9a1a47b7e04dc2646b
541055e85f09d6d0a53eff75f3177c522af3c797
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d53abd11b34e1521bee82b9b5c50d19b
cc693834543b98f747f862409a981b65d1577c2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
95a204be467ade28157d97866adeaae4
957285f98d119cd5a6ea2a64505bd9c70b918266
'2011-12-16T19:26:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c43a3842de753e2095c2f6ebff35e726
8ecfbf2d98eefc7fabb9c7981839d86eaa20912b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78105' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7c9c9f6136d79a352cb4e9a7085913ac
fe04009d6ec27bba4c2f65bdef22d154db43cb46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72069' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPST' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
bb7c6afc1143a6f75e0b09d80306b17a
7c958f207b8c675a3684952e69d786b2cef35de8
'2011-12-16T19:32:55-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
a23274adae67b1b1001242cb7f1d4226
7e53425357f616d1cab018524303711c776b4a4b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
c99fc6d6d0bded2651fbb71dfb57d4c7
ddc640fbb8938698bc27a97203befc0645d7fc19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64548' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f16d4979d7a8ba899d7b90179247d8f6
8b31bffc582fcdb1c15894d5c8e3c2bf0473443f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83771' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
64f432a18036437eefee2d67424fe628
0df96de0a9fa1465094a3828c7ff0ea94ba4af83
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83285' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
5b1a385b66636ddc87e3a764a3ccb311
c75a852dd1285956d7c34ee24071b5fc40068873
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
c6c1a78642b6ef39e939da0b9534f6b3
8ef637979a6d9e72c1b06b865be2ab40f0423e85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'60983' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
9c3810eb29f5bafe9c6501fd67a1abf9
e2b001464fb1c51f428306f0d632682f135855c5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
0b5b725427e690a9993e044c8423f357
761e64060f1a5fc636553f7ac2fe13a2367ea00b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87433' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
37be9152f7da91ed789d9a0164069f01
553bb8f14445a3b22bdf831852c09b421092c136
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
1f31e094e025f1b5fd1f7e515885944d
0f1eefb0b3c01ec2ccfad3556d273e22070bc06f
'2011-12-16T19:28:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80373' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
d9a3209c5b02b9fd63640d57680a018f
989550c411e23eb8f648d8f9a3dd040dbf599b06
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
baa1e139d0dfd1d4ccf4cfe6779d8f91
b883243197595ad4e8312f908839617254ba96b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77338' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
d0b74ff55afb422f0008af72a2b46863
a7a816d97cc97450faa6a23f2246c245300e6bbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75059' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
b33b555123abfb54352c5a5e69ee2cfb
5dc5d3f5324fbeb511730819433508c5672bdb97
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80855' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
e8a8cafbaa7c1bcfd2f2f2cbd57b29fd
18d9338ee5bde5be4bfef562e4e36ee7c75f0239
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ed91ace354c8a661990119a35b816e51
e02abc4a9240d9ecb34251a20dc85b125656f7c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
b9f31770d7302a6ccbc04d40b23aa564
132a649a7fbb816c54b9d59ceb37b0d69575aca3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69463' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c32764cd5ca329bbc3231a149c7bd0d0
504346012d98eb2a7029dd8bdd6c40ece9852362
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77674' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
1552e82881248b5ae4e818bbd811783a
ecbe8137a7f2d5c710e2f2adc45fe9445fed1ee5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
e724924a9c4b353b9631620509c453c6
4efc8cfcef48e64606f8f64dfc6209f138587fd8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78282' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
89cdc768949c0456e2a205846094fa0a
b4043fbfecc41685cbb6bfe60718d029cabf57e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86196' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
73e9a44c3ccc40dbbc4041efa5b12f19
c4ca7d03aed5040cfb0b62c39c61227b32048b43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85070' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
cf1cad07bbda39c42c07b24f33f3663f
24bebbcf57ef749380818ff84a3fca03651ac62a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79881' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
a47e9cf93c28e8d9df5d6d848f7bef39
76588ab43dc2136841a5c04ee7a843eb0e589940
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
4417f592caacedfac2a973f8eab4f8fa
7a384689edbc8cf09249c2fdee7bbc399a357d9c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83525' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
87fa38705d790528ddb3ffbc6763a6a0
a41213055a14f3a6adc2d18fd5bb0db55e377a0e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82505' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
1932694b505e4bcf22ec8dc1c2c8aa15
fbcd373e4184c86ad3ae32def0425615577d9fa0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
817ae84735b211f95ef36d1ce7b1b964
174c0ab7f1517ef8043d0426f1b8120a7b4838aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72241' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
fcd99907eb5680d5646c8d3b64543983
67b6aa192ff2bb8549326b5f9383864139ff7620
'2011-12-16T19:26:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73105' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
510f179b0b20650d115a622b1d80d4d1
7c4e5154f34952478f21073dd834f0730a06dcf7
'2011-12-16T19:30:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
4a4c166a36a9d40eb1d27eee9da36ed5
dec6b03c59d196981ad06af6f3065cd2423bcd9c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'53386' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
4f9488b8ff3ea46f06de75463624c8b0
2a1f15975a0f67bb293ed479895d70d1b6009498
'2011-12-16T19:33:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71146' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
846ff268c315777aacd11c2b853e59bd
eb4c44cc7aca9805cc3823848ef6d529148e33ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f73ff73b4eca777c76ef11cb110d25c8
92519fd6c98e873953b334ace4a4f8c0cbd03e31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
85f9969e6bcc57071da340c8922ce4ab
c02d42af708345872bc7523db8e5c584f28f6a19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78394' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
19b89e88816d49a77141bdc20d261e14
304c5fde5f1a7d7bdbfe6effccd8a7155e2bba9d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88813' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d5135af86d7c1ddadabe8cf386ba5aad
0d35d8062f290eb70841cdbf713358f126454630
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77499' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
4db76f82b707fc2727bef3c93930203a
b45c7f00b5d16b979d1cb61ae9e2d908db7eed65
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
8f6cd3dd6ba0aee96717ded2cad37035
ec21f12ce6bbc3deb5b680bf0f7a8945195d73e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
c32a77cc79d35910a0293d482fe0a5b4
c58aa859519193fc6f62ac0b51fbef65b523cf17
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92254' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
861e96ceb0cdbd9f138192bc29c538ba
57b402ebac114f6cd43560770782b71f33423edc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88417' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
a01d2c303b217035d597b5b83ee4bab4
e4d4aee49736a75218b2e99b2e5503b4cf0731fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67848' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
82119df2845157e91f8d581f93bca687
0e1dd6b2e48f4cd7c68c1eb69baa1bbac5a3299e
'2011-12-16T19:25:14-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'55569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5aa9d1aecbe0a3a8a385ee758c496739
e6cfcb46f15745e3cf23a8bc5efad5502c73d6b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
069b0280c1806610a4e52fd4ea868d5f
4e2cf2bde0f597932bc4b6c31e6e9e363cc166aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76550' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
07bace0f6e19dc7c2687ab1297e19d4a
1c8dfcbccec4b422c974b5ce18f059c435185254
'2011-12-16T19:30:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
485c8d347787682b432ee6c56be5d59e
51322fd87644fe3470b0c624874bf5cfa60240fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84402' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
5abedac45c2f53e29144034574f4f5ad
41084997179e854ac64dfa5b61b7d7206efd2d8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75939' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
f6ba96c84b6dd15d25386693a6330332
7e8125f5b1221af80e366611b148214cd064cf16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'60056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
709a421b674d43d6a5269064383875ed
d44a481c09d5376d2a495401fe6916147ff69611
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'63513' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
318a0c2985032fa6bd236e1160e1360c
530689532b3536abdf2689625ed667ac652c735b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'56150' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
b9b698f00972a8747460fe217bfd12bf
27198506a90d4b7cbcfa1de3df6110908d0a1194
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87253' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
cbb2c311c8077a2c2effb0df3bd47228
b971442f600ac364b72abb0f0a77cf9bcf978f4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80438' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
b426bf4fe4a79b98ef264a0557295c21
f4ba56c9abdbeefbf9a2b31a9252c6595457591b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
713beacbb536420f7c2b18f8c47e6cf4
2fe8cb868000bb9d9f115434778cd064636d1363
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80739' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
a889b23b131c0bddcddd152d61876e74
685b481ab1f1b33076e764b6f501402279328ba3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79035' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
fa02982ae4cf7fa8c49e4d86c008ecdb
aa63c747f096a5bfa63dd8b98e7e834d71a69dad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'61006' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
95bb9f1e480d9b19636b38e13fdf3dea
a9994f2f7d416f870fbfe832bcd3f9f37840a1c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59988' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
a557bf8907796dc47437a9232fe2cd26
3e3c27a8df3b5dd18e2c6c0c1e06bba6067fd0af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
03306947b79c053200755f82136c0a6a
0baba9d3f133b25c3754766f8c0afc57879ad5d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67961' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
3a78716df53dbd8be1dfc8aa3dde079f
27fd31cdfd10ec6e2db38e88c449d92a02396630
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76303' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
9e38e37dd8af12582122fd4dd2097877
bbef68d460bf28b4be4c35882b8be2352d9f3706
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84087' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
6f075a9decae805bd89a837ee18e6e6e
d09280e57c5fca73dc472e2f33df2ab292cb4948
'2011-12-16T19:30:03-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
620043abcad15a7a863a904d134719db
c736f1eef685e34e72cf5a2611ad5ff904386df3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81798' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
5d2bc5cd30b4d21f49432e35601f4837
55ebdd362ca0a2d8f96f322c11fad9c206f1a04f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83065' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
fa3e132429c71d46a535980f95f945b2
32ea70b0c6f82361db633ea49f0cd304d376edd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e914dedf36e34eefe4e1e66ecb37ab76
fc55031da664654d88cf60706f3675d37f64b7d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84374' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
48585229330549608bf909045447e307
42204f932ff5b8e74c373ed465f6de0ecb109821
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71302' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
9b6f3f60d0d512d3459ee2a9b27dcf7f
5dd7ba69a70f8405f4b5b4f5b168a4518d3968d5
'2011-12-16T19:24:27-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
3e6410c36d3a3f2e8f5197c9626c02f6
839a0e7c59f9d6b066c896b5642441663459ae43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59475' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
d58369616543e34d7a66a05fdec68881
603add7e5abd0d68be360b3e322f437b52713ef8
'2011-12-16T19:31:08-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83017' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
dd2bb03d6a75e46dba513f72ef160fe9
0f4e6e97226aab8e6cc148269286dc5110f1fe8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
dd465010986406cb2a967a18dfbbfbb3
2ba5a4dc8841474aeaede0f821b573995c9068be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86131' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
df5e1f101667dac3b9da74ffff77d41f
ec17ea021dd7c6af50cccd0545bc0d105878511f
'2011-12-16T19:32:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70918' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
2d560fa408a129f3af23080dd4cf1819
e62f0fe222a3b6e2847fcdd220693516c18b049e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'65097' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
0c2b7bc86cf1cddfae3ffa21b73878dc
3ffddada477eda4785ecbf07f2f14e5276ed1608
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
dbfa9e5bccca871843136b0d230ac38e
4011b76f3312e284ead6950f71993eedca3e596a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85750' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
8e06b1624edeea28bc69eb464910ba71
bdd783fea36b0ae071c4f86f8d294a4b72e23141
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82622' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
90f0c92ab1724b9d2b3f4e367e21eee2
546b8dc935d557bf4e50f35e569f2819a724bee9
'2011-12-16T19:30:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
d4a26d6f89624cb1b31450a186bb04e0
c733e8fcba50e5c51c8daf3415fe11627311473c
'2011-12-16T19:24:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82305' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
bf16f404f9b9aadf1077a0148ea63f1e
c47f74d7765d2ebbcc5eb3e3984036c4f17f0a92
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
87713e27f202fade0efa81a4e329325d
2c84f9db0c59502bcead59c9648160a6b4539519
'2011-12-16T19:25:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80776' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
f3e65062877d31242d2be97051e71ed2
27cc4290c8f7c0ecda0aacf7bbaf367c7f36b7bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78309' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
ad7c15e652688b548e078a786a1b3e5a
c354443aca9ebeb5241ffe6b8205e584772d12f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79517' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
ac2044746a05bfc60b9a6c98b5e43a71
69e32308abe06e65003900319847c69ee209e358
'2011-12-16T19:26:26-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
f3ae4a292af413324d5b768c0ef7a635
efd9c7c111fab1a6491c0b1f4b72e2d0ad8a6c54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'55622' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
782a5b965fd272caf4729242fd258090
851577f61781a6454cb57a9cd5f8867425ca8a68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'51234' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
5cae8b210372ae517b1c2b5eb4b4ab64
523056e74ae33228ced4f75f25ca83786d18e1a4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82787' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d50c09f3c5a1e61165933d757a86733c
ceabe384a196f1c1f4b05c910bb5e39aac4ccd11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87135' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
ecd03b3f9983a89f0d20b5a06b639947
746ea3dedff184ccd9d01b87437a5eeee1586892
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
f7b2bd799979c5bf26dcbedf63a42495
88350025f38fd44079ae214aed0f4fc1353b4114
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79707' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
9abc0d2d90756a44413db7e3d6392cb4
8b092470b2fd2be96c080e872fe098351e6b81d9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e2f5bdaa191565d49326a3492d70534a
349430c673827bebf8e1f8c0e2a0d7f4ea451d4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58813' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
73b6d4d7b867443675f53ccf97c730b3
cfc72df876a8a54c3a00737d68daa8fd06a6d063
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64270' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
330b40aa442253878e103be2fd8055e2
45cf0d80a90f1c80dbe894570c1c9ba418873039
'2011-12-16T19:27:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68733' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
aebc7a3f27d6b8e332f9e517016a1cc8
e17f795d246f4bc9ca892eb716751818fb6c5849
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
dc4d7b301d86d1b95760dc025fbc5573
2333f356519c539a3e1fd81be462ae1b83fd0d03
'2011-12-16T19:33:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67781' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
789b93da493c967548c9da1a14f21ca4
adfdc999ddc344aca1855daa590a3d1032567b03
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77484' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
87ce750c9087af7705c66ff9f4f2eea0
b5a82ff3600d2d07fbd8ccbf5aeb5f1a05f9b0da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73724' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
5696fd37caa215ad82a669ff31d8ccc7
5b2acb513ece1583f6e152694d60765a2565d0d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80735' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
5e8eeafcb930dbe1582c87480ea75694
96d604d37f08dd8b588ea94cf417692c2256495b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54617' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
0d4d822e911511bf166e5d96cc80c284
232c5a6922ac8dc132e754c9152f8a8470128d16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80275' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
15ea1fcb9b6f268dfbb6e669b951a98c
2d6e45ec87aa4ba0a95cb438438f2a475ab3e40f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71149' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
19ba00ca7ce7bd5d95e5882f99eb0b16
85e9b884c8fc5f90e5f1afff231c11715615be8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59791' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
3eb4dc7c8b38e43738843c2cb264113a
6ca7aa26d8ce68279e1a39d457a906d85b7a780a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57614' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
26f5dc667e54a9d1b5876f9fb07222c7
31c0b5fe3a4a8903f03dd927d0e0a70438ae6689
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86693' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
032546330e8f17808dc89a76b529a73a
8ab259e06eab75e95cade73fbdeaf0111af5d7e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
b95cefb65bded4ed0310d642119060fa
4f874883b7104b9c959c43730df37a06589db28c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
8919c74ab7e971fc083835c215f9e5d2
9ee8a160649b11a7f32c2c3681cefbf900d2baef
'2011-12-16T19:23:28-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
c9fa68d523e29f0809a88d21ca054eeb
637ff22c92bebec35fcdce9a82ab3aef598e4a11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68559' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
8e16858095852d4b8d387d9483192d5b
de4d659cd6792792cba67d7fef3be9c33687452d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86779' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
944e4aac862cc1f06c97a3fc30ffc614
d915e70c79e4ed42597a9e421a88fe6d5ba526df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
40feead6fb557f833879be2e01c12e3b
57eaed98edb9f98756250fbd5a8de09d9616183c
'2011-12-16T19:24:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
f8d6f7ff381e025b25b497b2f9d19a22
e83019d5eaa4961d37129381b637662f400db671
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
8ed209f576db6c0729ddc89b5b8a299c
59b9607077bb6119f63985f62e6412b140aa6c39
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
0c65c512dfd8c057ca79364ae7dd7740
368aa0a20129566bb6610de5be1c8dac7e198577
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69701' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
9b19d2fd5180c3432d47d49bd8e15e53
398089c65a84edc22c57f8af255bb02b6dcf92fd
'2011-12-16T19:27:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77922' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
33f7ede9a5b58b5840f28c7f960197bc
ef8b403ca020b4ba8193fcd5713244cf8f00eabf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
fc42ecf673f4a70c04d3a7a100188578
b99629076cb5e7278b3b01979ed3fb636055ed14
'2011-12-16T19:22:10-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'43830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
e59440f9487c0f0213834bff81a9a362
8127944ace9288d4091289086bc31f5a66b3670d
'2011-12-16T19:26:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
65917de79e0bb363d9e0d2b1c4fda718
c14e6649c33879cc1af3a132d2991eb66d9722f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36479' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
eadb7b46fae19ff9cf93564e36f9cb8f
f3c31d49f6899d3c25be05e3bde532f8edaa5f1c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'40' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
4b0185350895400146290ad20936e098
70485b630422a8dafc5f6944c2a4b95ad45ae95a
describe
'366419' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXN' 'sip-filesUF00003253_00001.mets.xml.ufdc'
a064c2c1acbd9096c6f919b0674b3ba2
db571b9f7f619b55bf8290864ef937561e87a398
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T01:06:41-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'336752' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAABFfileF20080531_AAAPXP' 'sip-filesUF00003253_00001.mets.xml'
c7f727cdada9880958be32bbee9facce
e483604506b204b3a06226c1398b42a0b9fd386e
describe
'2013-12-18T01:06:33-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc/http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc/
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema