Citation
The children's picture book

Material Information

Title:
The children's picture book
Creator:
Cloues, Samuel ( Engraver )
Hyde, J ( Illustrator )
American Tract Society (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
Kilburn & Mallory ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
American Tract Society
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
96 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1862 ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1862 ( local )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors and engraved by Kilburn & Mallory.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved and signed by Cloues after Hyde.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy inscribed date: 1862.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026636634 ( ALEPH )
27126209 ( OCLC )
ALG4302 ( NOTIS )

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CHILDREN’S

PICTURE BOOK.

PUBLISHED BY THE
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,

28 CORNHILL, BOSTON.








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GOING TO CHURCH,

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SCENES OF TRAVEL, ...---+---->

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MISSIONARY SCENES, .- .

MISCELLANEOUS SCENES,



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THE NURSERY. 5

OUR BABY. we

A HAT do you think we have got at our
house? You can’t guess—so I will tell
you. It is a little baby, and his name is Johnnie!
He looks so sweet, that I love him very much.
He has blue eyes, but only-a very little hair. And
his hands — oh, how beautiful they are, with such
tiny nails! His fingers are just as fat as they can
When I take hold of his hand, and say, “ Lit-
tle brother!” how he does jump and crow, and want
to come to me! But Susan will not allow it, for
she says I shall let him fall.
I am glad that we do not live in India, where
they throw little babies to the crocodiles.



et



6 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



' THE CRADLE.

\ NE day my father brought home a cradle for

ip

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our baby. It is made of willow, like a bas-
ket, and I can rock it very easily.

I have read that in some countries they have
no cradles. So the mother takes a long piece of
cloth, and ties the two ends to a tree. Then she
puts her baby in it, and the wind rocks it while
she is at work. Once, when a baby was asleep,
a large bird came and pecked its face. Its mother
heard it ery, and drove away the bird. I sup-
pose that God watched over the baby, and saved
| it from being killed.

I shall ask him every day to take care of our
baby — dear little Johnnie!





THE NURSERY.

“I















JOHNNIE’S BATH.

UR Johnnie gets a real good washing in a



tub every morning. Sometimes, when the
water is cold, he don’t much like it; but mother
tells Susan not to omit it, because it will make him
grow strong. After he is washed, she rubs him
with a towel, which makes him nice and warm.

I went with my mother one morning to the
“ Home for the Friendless,” and we saw more than
a dozen babies washed. They were orphan chil-
dren. When they were dressed, the nurse put
some of them on rocking horses — two on a horse.
They were very much pleased.

i





BEGINNING TO WALK.

Mw ERE is our Johnnie, just beginning to walk.
Don’t he look funny? He wants to go to
mother, but he is afraid. Mother calls him to
come, and holds out both hands. He knows that
she will not let him fall, so he starts right off; but
I think he would fall if she did not catch him.
Mother says that is just the way with every
body in the world. God made us, and we are his
children. If he did not watch over us every day,
and take care of us, we should die. She says we
ought to trust God, just as the baby trusts her.



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i

THE NURSERY.





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RIDING GRANDPA’S CANE.

“ (3 ET up, Bonnie, get up, Bonnie!” What a

er noise little brother does make! He has a
whip in his hand, and is riding grandpa’s cane all
over the house.

Do hear him! “Whoa, sir! Get up, horsy!”
Mother says, that little boys must play somewhere,
and he can not play in the yard because the snow
is so deep.

: Johnnie used to play on the Sabbath; but he
does not do so since he learned my verse, —

“TIT must not work, I must not play,
Upon God’s holy Sabbath day.”



10 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



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Madan
FISHING IN THE WASH-TUB.

7) AST summer I went with father and mother
LS to the sea shore. We used to go out in the
boat every day, and catch fish. Johnnie wanted
to fish too; but father said the fish would pull
him out of the boat. ;

When Susan was washing clothes, Johnnie got
grandpa’s cane, and fastened to it a string and a
crooked pin. Then he dropped it in the tub, and
made believe he was catching fish. |



THE NURSERY. 11



THE CUT FINGER.



! ( NE day Johnnie found a knife open on the

| table, and he thought he would try to make
a little boat. He had seen the larger boys using
their jackknives, and he wanted to do what they
| did. ;

He went out to the wood-shed, and got a piece
of pine wood, and began to whittle; but very soon
he cut his finger, and then he ran to mother, crying
| with pain.





12 CUILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



MY VISIT.












AM going to see Bessie White. I love her
& better than any of the other girls. My aunt |
likes Bessie, too, for she says that she is a good
girl, and always tries to do right.

What a nice time we shall have! I have gota
new book. It is, The First Lessons of Gentleness
and Truth. I have read it all through; and I shall
like to read it again with Bessie. The sun is very
hot, but my hat_is better than a parasol, because I
do not have to carry it in my hand.

Bessie lives near the church where I go every
Sabbath. She and I are in the same class in the
Sabbath School. We have a dear teacher, who is
always pleasant and good to us. How delightful
it is to learn about Jesus and heaven! ,



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DRINKING TEA.

. OUR mother is very kind, Bessie, to let us

54 drink tea by ourselves.”

“Yes, mother is always kind. She says she
likes to see us happy. When we have washed the
dishes, and put up the table, we will read your
new book. Do you like reading better than play-
ing with dolls ?” 7

“J.like both. I did not bring my dolls, because
I thought that you would like the book best.”

“So I should; and mother says we may read it
aloud to her. After that she will tell us a story.
She tells beautiful stories; but I think the best ones
are from the Bible. She told me about Joseph,
and Samuel, and Daniel, and, best of all, about

Jesus, who was once a little babe in the manger.”















14



CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



PLAYING IN THE WOODS.

W ¥ OW nice it is to live so near the woods!
rf Bessie, and I, and her two cousins have
come to play under this old tree. There are
plenty of berries all about us, but they are not
ripe yet. I suppose there are children who have
never been in the woods at all.

A poor woman came to my aunt’s door to beg.
She had a baby, and she set it down on the grass.
The grass was green, and the baby put its hand
out, and felt of it. Then it rolled over, and laid
‘its face on it. It seemed pleased with the grass.

I suppose it never saw any before:







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THE VISIT. 15



THE FLOWERS.

VIGRS. WHITE, do look at our beautiful flow-
(VE ers! Bessie -and I gathered them in the
woods. All little girls love flowers— don’t they?
My sister Jennie did. She is dead, now, you
know; but mother says she lives in heaven, where
the flowers are the sweetest, and never fade.

She used to gather flowers every day, and carry
them to her teacher. Mother had a beautiful rose
tree, and often gave my little sister one of the roses.
She died before she was six years old; and when
she was laid in the coffin, mother put a bud from
off the rose tree in her hand.













16 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



MRS. WHITE READS TO US.

ee are Bessie and I standing by her moth- |
SOR, or while she reads this story : — |

“ A company of young persons were traveling in |
Ireland, and wanted a guide. A little girl, named |
Grace O’Gara, offered to show them up the moun-
tains, saying that she knew the paths, for she went
up with the goats every day.

“The travelers liked Grace, and were pleased to
hear her talk. She loved the Lord Jesus; and
when they asked questions, she answered them
from the Bible, which she learned while watching
the goats. By her constant reference to the Bible,
they were led to read it, and became Christians.

“*Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings Thou
hast perfected praise.’ ”















THE COUNTRY. 17



MY UNCLE’S FAMILY.

T is vacation in school, and my father has sent
me to visit at my uncle’s in the country. They
have a baby, too, not so old as our Johnnie. She
is a little bit of a thing, but she. knows me already.
Auntie sits by her cradle, and sings,

‘*¢ Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber,’?

and she goes right to sleep.

Auntie is very kind, and plays with us every day.
But how I do love to sit with uncle, and hear him
tell about Moses that was put into the ark of bul-
rushes, and Daniel who was cast into the lion’s den!









18 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE MORNING WALK.

ron don’t know Betty, that lives at my un-

cle’s —do you? She goes out to walk with
me and Allie almost every day. Allie is my little
cousin Alice; she is two years old.

Auntie says ‘it will make us strong to walk, and
I really think it does, for I and Allie grow bigger
every day. Betty says.we must be good, or God
will not love us; and I mean to be. I have learned
a long verse in my new Bible: “Suffer little chil-
dren to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of
such is the kingdom of heaven.”









THE COUNTRY. 19



FEEDING THE CHICKENS.

ifs NE, two, three, four, five; how many chick-
ens we have got, Tommy! Auntie says
we may have them for our own. I wish that great
rooster and the black hen would not eat up all the
corn. Poor little chickies! If you don’t eat faster
you will not get much breakfast.

Uncle says we must not be greedy when we eat.
Johnnie May ate so much cake one day when his
mother was away, that he was sick for a long time;
the doctor was afraid he would die.





20 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

MAKING GARDEN.

AND Susie have a garden of our own, all to
ourselves. We planted a good many seeds,

but they do not all come up.
Uncle and aunt have come to see us. They
call us their little gardeners! You ought to see

our rose-bush. It has a great many roses on it.
And then we have seven pots with nice plants in
them. How nicely they grow! We must put
them in the shade, or the hot sun will kill them.
My aunt says our hearts are like a garden, and we

must not let the weeds grow in it.









:
|
| THE COUNTRY. os



SCHOOL.

CN )ETERE do you think I have been to-day?
I have been at school. Some of the schol-



ars are almost as large as the teacher. Some are
very small, and only just beginning to read.

Miss Lane looked very pleasant. In the morn-
ing, she told us to take our Bibles, and turn to the
first chapter of Genesis. Then she read and talked
about how God made the world. Then she prayed
that we might be good children, just as mother
does at home.









22, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

Treen
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THE FAULT.

(% H dear! I meant to be so good, and now I
N have done something that Miss Lane has for-
bidden. I don’t like to tell what it is. She keeps
a book with all our names in it, and she has given
me a bad mark. I must cry, but I should not have
thought she would. I don’t like her as well as I did.

And the girls all looked at me. Perhaps they
will not play with me any more. But they seemed
sorry, and so did Miss Lane. Well, I suppose she
thought she must mark me. She asked me if I
thought God would be pleased with me.







THE CONFESSION.

DID not mean to tell auntie about the bad
mark. She is so kind, and I did not want to
make her feel badly. When she asked me, “ How
has my little girl got along to-day?” I could not
keep from crying. And then I told her all about it.
“Miss Lane gave us a short lesson, and said we

must repeat every word perfectly. I did not know

mine, and so I looked in the book.
“Oh, auntie, I never will try to deceive again.
Will you forgive me, and ask God to forgiveme, too?”





24 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE BEGGAR CHILDREN.

‘¥- WENT to the door one morning to see the
Se snow that fell in the night; and there were
widew Jones’ little boy and girl just coming up
the steps. Their clothes were ragged, and they had
no stockings, and but very poor shoes. Their mother
was very sick, and had sent them here to ask for food.
My aunt is kind to every body; so she filled their
basket. Afterward she went to see Mrs. Jones, and
carried some nice broth. The doctor says, if aunt
takes care of her, she will soon be well again.














THE COUNTRY. 25



THE SMOKER.

; OW that boy looks who is standing by the |
Er post! He has no coat; and I do not think
he combs his hair very often. He has a cigar in his
mouth, and is smoking. I should not think that
boys would like tobacco. I do not like to smell it.
The gentleman who is passing with his sons sees
this poor lad, and bids them take warning by him.
He tells them that tobacco is a slow poison, that it
makes a man sickly and poor, and leads to intem-
perance











26 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

THE AGED.

CHS UNTIE, see that aged man and woman! How
XG very old they are! I met him in the market |
the other day. He gave me a large, red apple, and
said he hoped God would bless me. I love old
people, when they are good — don’t you, auntie? It
makes me think of a verse in my Sabbath school
lesson: “The hoary head is a crown of glory, when
found in the way of righteousness.” My teacher
told us the meaning. She said it was living as God
wishes to have us, and obeying his commands.





THE COUNTRY. 27




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THE TEA TABLE.

OW nice it is to have the tea all ready when

we come home! We are very hungry, and
the bread and butter are good. Susie forgot to brush
her hair, and auntie tells her she had better do it
before she comes to the table. Poor Trip is hungry,



though he waits quietly by my aunt’s chair, until
she is ready to feed him.

But the best of all is the singing. We always
sing at my uncle’s after tea, at evening prayers.
To-night Susie and I are going to sing,

‘“‘T want to be an angel.”





28 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE SHEEP.

VIG Y aunt told me and Tommy that, after break-
“WA fast, she would show us something that
would please us. So we got ready in a minute, and
she took us out through the yard, up the street,
and over the hill, and there we saw uncle’s sheep.
There are ever so many of them!

How the lambs did play! They would throw
each other down, then spring up again and scamper
away across the field. |

Some of the sheep are very large, and their wool

will soon be cut off and made into clothing.












THE COUNTRY. 29

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SELLING THE LAMB.

SN’T it too bad? Our lammie Carlo has been
¢b sold to the butcher, and carried off to be killed!
Tommy and I cried, and Susie and Betty cried, too.
It was so cunning, and played with us every day.
It followed us all about the house. Uncle said it
had become troublesome, and he would give us
another.

My aunt says that the lamb is a type of Christ.
“ Tle was led as a lamb to the slaughter.” It was
for us, because we are sinners.







CHULLDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



BUILDING THE NEST.

OW busy these two birds are! It is a beau-
tiful morning in spring, and they have found
a nice place for their little home on that branch of
the tree.

I hope no bad boy will find it, and rob them of
their treasure. I am sure our Johnnie would not
be so cruel.

God takes care of the birds. He notices even
the fall of a little sparrow, as the Bible tells us.
‘The kindly-feeling and generous boy will never
disturb a bird’s-nest.





PTET rere

PT Ree



a nk VB ht rl a Oe



GOING TO CHURCH. 31



THE SHADY PATH.

ACH HEN the Sabbath morning came, the sun
shone brightly, and the air was fresh and
“Come, Annie,” said her aunt, “we will
walk to church this morning ;” and soon they were
on their way.
_ “What a nice, shady path this is, aunty!” said
Annie; “how cool and pleasant!” Just then a
robin opened his little mouth, and sung sweetly.
If birds sing praises to their Creator, much more



should we, to whom he has given souls that will
never die.







32 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.





THE WALK.

i S Annie and her aunt walked to church by the |
AX pleasant path, they talked about the Sabbath.

“Do you know, my dear, that the Saviour rose |
from the grave on the morning of Sunday, or the ||
Christian Sabbath ?”

“Yes, auntie, I have read about it in my Testa-
ment, and I like Sabbath days, for then I always
go to church and Sabbath school.”

All good people love the Sabbath and the house |
of God. The Psalmist says, ‘A day in thy courts
is better than a thousand” God is displeased with
those who dishonor his holy day.









GOING TO CHURCH. 33




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THE GRAVEYARD.

. C{ HALL we go through the graveyard, auntie ?”

gS) “Yes, dear, if you would like to do so. Our
graveyard is a pleasant spot. Do you know that
two of your cousins are buried there ?”

“No, auntie. Will you show me the place?”

“This is where your dear grandfather was laid,
and there beside him are the graves of your little
cousins. But it is only their bodies that were put
in the ground. Their souls never die. When
Lillie died, she said, “I want to go to heaven now,
but I want you to come too, mother.” We believe
that both she and Jennie are with the Saviour.



34 CUILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.







THE CHURCH.

CMC S Annie and her aunt drew near the church,
& they found many others who were going
there too; so they went. in quietly with the rest,
and took a seat. The minister was already in the
pulpit, and a lady was playing on the organ while
the people were coming in. A nice carpet covered
the floor, and every thing looked very neatly.

In some parts of this country where but few
people live, there are no churches, but sometimes
there is a Sabbath school: I have heard of children
who went more than five miles in the winter to
attend one. Would you do it?







GOING TO CHURCH. 35



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A PILGRIM.

“RP

if ia O you remember, Annie, what the minister
D> said about our being pilgrims ?”

“Yes, aunty. He said we are all going on a

journey through this world to another country.
The journey is our life, and the country where
we are going is heaven. I have a beautiful story
about it, called the Pilgrim’s Progress.









36 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



- THE BARREN FIG TREE.

> HAT did the minister say about the fig
© tree, Annie ?”

“He said that we should not be like the barren
fig tree, that had leaves, but no fruit. We must
always do good things, and think good thoughts,
and that would be bringing forth good fruit.”





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GOING TO CHURCH.

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TVG Y New Year’s present from father was a

‘VU beautiful Bible, and I have begun to read it
through. How many nice stories there are in it!
I can not tell the number. Father says that if I
ask God to make me wise, as Solomon did, he will
do it. But I think I had rather be like little Samuel.
When God called him, he said, “ Speak, Lord, for thy
servant heareth:? I wish God would speak to me ;
but he don’t speak to people now, only in the Bible.

I like to read all the stories, but those about

J esus I like best. 3





38 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



OUR VESSEL.

HIS is a fine vessel. How trim it looks, with
Or its tall masts, and white sails, and many ropes!
It is all new, and is just setting out on a long
voyage. Iam going in it. Would you like to go
with me? She has many people on board. There
are the captain and his two mates, the carpenter,
and ten sailors. These take care of the vessel and
passengers.

Do you know that our life is like a voyage? God
is our Captain. If we go on in the way he leads
us, he will bring us all safely to our heavenly
home. z







THE SAILOR BOY.

or .. is Tom MHalyard climbing up the

W/L, shrouds of the vessel. He is one of the
sailor boys on board our ship. He has been sent
aloft to fasten some ropes that have got loose
among the rigging. You see he is looking back,
to hear what the mate says. “Ay, ay, sir,” he
shouts in reply, and away he goes. He does not
wait, and say, “I don’t want to,” as some boys do.
He obeys at once. Just so should we boys do to
our parents, for the Bible says, “Children, obey
your parents in the Lord, for this is right.”







40 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK,



THE NAUTILUS.



Ww O you see that curious thing sailing upon the
; IE ' water yonder? What can it be? It looks
something like a snail, but it has long legs hanging
down upon each side, and a pair of sails standing
upright.

This wonderful little sailor is called a Nautilus.
His shell is the house in which he lives. It is very
light, and is easily carried along by the wind, or
paddled by his long legs. Throw something to-
wards him. There, he has turned his mouth down
into the water, and sunk out of sight. God has
thus given him the means of escaping from danger.
How good he is to every living thing!





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|

“SCENES OF TRAVEL. 41



THE SWORD-FISH.

Ee. is another of the inhabitants of the
sea, not so pretty as the nautilus. It is the

|| Sword-fish. He gets his name from his long bony

snout, as hard asivory. This is a terrible weapon.
Even the whale is afraid of it, and is often killed
by it.

See him dart through the water. There, he has
| struck the vessel, though not very hard! Some-
times the animal pierces the bottom with his
sword, and sinks the vessel. An old ship was
once being repaired, and one of these swords
was found sticking right through her solid tim-

ber.





42 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE CAPTAIN’S INSTRUMENTS.

Neen Ee ae

HEN we are out on the ocean, far away |

from the land, how do you suppose the
captain knows which way to steer the vessel? I

will tell you. This long instrument that you see |

on a stand is a telescope. It magnifies objects
which are far away, and thus enables us to see
them. Then there is the globe, on which is traced
the land and water. Besides these he has a com-
pass, which shows which way we are going.

The Bible is our telescope. Through it we can see ||
heaven. It is our globe. It shows us what to ||

seek, and what to shun. It is our compass, too.
It never varies, but guides us always, if we obey it,
to the port of peace.







SCENES OF TRAVEL. 43



THE STORM.

H, how the wind blows! The sails are all
taken down and lashed to the spars. The
lightning flashes across the heavens. The vessel
rolls; the passengers are seasick, and wish they
were on the land. Let us ask God to help us.
The Psalmist describes such a gale; he says, “ He
| commandeth and raiseth the stormy wind, which
lifteth up the waves thereof. They mount up to
the heavens ; they go down again unto the depths.”





44. CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



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THE ISLAND.

YNRULY God heard our prayer in the midst |
Or of the storm, and no serious accident has
befallen us. The night has gone, and is followed
by a pleasant day. But what do we see before us?
We are coming near to a beautiful country. There
are mountains whose peaks shoot far up into the
sky, with green valleys lying at their feet.

I wonder if any people live there, and what kind |
of people they are. |







SCENES OF TRAVEL. 45



‘THE CAPTAIN AFRAID.

UR captain says that this island is inhabited
by savages. What if they should attack us!
With a glass we can see boats afar off, and they are

coming this way. The captain has got out his

pistol, and if they attempt to come on board, he
will say, “ Keep off, or I will shoot you!”

Perhaps missionaries have come to this island.
If they have, they will teach the people to love God,
to give up their wickedness, and love the Lord
Jesus Christ. Then we shall have nothing to fear.







46 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



INHABITANTS.

OP von strange-looking men these are! Did
you ever see any like them? ‘They wear

no clothing, and their bodies are curiously marked
all over. We do not see any spears or weapons of
war. They seem so friendly that the captain has
allowed them to come on board. One of them sits
on the side of the vessel, and is taking hold of a
rope. The other tells us that “Mikenari” live in
the huts on the little plain. How glad I am to
hear that missionaries have come to this island!

MNT ES YE IP PAE EEE






SCENES OF TRAVEL.







THE PRESENT.

HE captain is giving a hat to the chief. What
Op do you think he will do with it? He can not
wear it, unless he takes off his feathers. All savages
like to wear feathers and other ornaments.

Many years ago, a traveler from America stopped
at the Sandwich Islands. On the Sabbath he at-
tended church, and was much amused as he saw
one man walk in with the skirts of a coat tied
around him, and another with only one boot on.







48 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE PICTURE.

Mh) PICTURE of the captain’s wife hangs in
AC our cabin. The chief never saw one before,
and is delighted with it. On being told how it
was drawn, he was very desirous to be made on
paper too. |

So here you see them. The chief stands by a
table, and the captain, with pencil and paper, sits
on a stool. The chief is laughing, and we fear the
captain will not get a good likeness.

Have you a picture of your little sister or brother,
whom God has taken to a heavenly home?









ee
SCENES OF TRAVEL. 49

S\

WSS

eee



SHIPWRECKED.

N what a dreadful condition our poor vessel
lies!’ A sudden gale blew us out of our course,
and in the darkness of night we struck upon a
rock. The waves dashed over the deck, and have
carried away every thing that was not made fast.
There are people on the land, but they can afford
us little help. We fear that the vessel will break
up. Is there any one on board who is +willing to
risk his life to save the rest ?
Jesus Christ has done far more than this. We
are all sinners; but he died for us.











50 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK. -































OUR ISLAND HOME.

3 ) SORE than a year has passed since our vessel
AY was wrecked. We have been hard at work,
and now you see our pleasant island home. We
have formed ourselves into families, each living in
a house by itself.

The large house with a veranda in front is our
chapel. Here the friendly people come every Sab-
bath, and we teach them from the Bible. We think
that some of them love the Saviour, and try to
please him. We are happy here, but we should
like to see our native land again.





SCENES OF TRAVEL. 51



















GOING HOME.

Ope are now starting for home in a vessel

MM‘ that stopped at the island to get cocoa-
nuts and oranges. The seamen were surprised
when they found white men here. In going out
of the bay, the vessel ran aground. So we threw
out ropes, which the natives seized and pulled
with all their might. But the people are sorry to
have us go, and some accompany us in their boats
a long distance.





52, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE CRUEL BOY.

CYAMES is a cruel boy. He is trying to catch
it the poor fly that never injured him. Once he
stuck a pin through a fly, and fastened it to the
window seat. There it buzzed and whirled round
and round in great pain, while James stood looking
on. The fly suffered much, and tried to get away.

_A pirate who was about to be hanged said that
when he was a boy he always liked to torment flies,
toads, cats, and other animals. ‘Thus his heart grew
hard, until he became a murderer.





WK
SSX C |
A
SEC NN tl
EA \ \ A
CANS
=
SSG

\
\N
NS
Ni
“S

Xs
—
NY N . AN

‘\ IA X’E[









THE DISHONEST BOY.

O you see this boy? His name is Howard,



and he has got into a baggage car to steal.
He feels that it is wrong, and is looking behind
him to see if the gentleman and lady have noticed
him. But God has seen him.

Howard began to be a thief at school, when a
very little boy. He stole pens, pencils, knives, and
other small things. When he grew older, he took
money from the store where he was a clerk. Now
he is called a thief, and no one will employ him.





54 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE RAGGED BOY.

, Oe ye a ragged fellow this is!”
\ Yes, he is, indeed, and he goes by the

name of “ Ragged Jim.” He always looks just about
the same. Just such a looking boy we used to see
selling papers in the streets. But he did not like
to be ragged: there was no one to care for him.
After he had sold papers a while, he bought a suit
of clothes for himself, and was as neat and tidy a
boy as any you would wish to.see.
God will help those that help themselves.





~~”

= Ul ee SO

i +

— = =) Ue

-— —"

——

3
|
;
.







THE IDLE BOY.

OES this boy look as though he would ever

AP get his lesson? There he sits at his desk,
half an hour at a time, with his book in his lap,
and crying because his lesson is hard. He is not a
vicious boy; he is only idle. Charley will never be
much of aman. It is too much trouble for him to
study, and too much trouble to work.

There is much in the Bible about work. “Work
while the day lasts.” “The idle soul will suffer
hunger.” “Six days shalt thou labor, and do all
thy work.”

W ork is honorable, but idleness is sinful.







56 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



> me

= sr



THE DILIGENT BOY.

NHIS is Robert, the diligent boy. When told
Oe to do any thing, he sets about it at once, and
will not allow other things to take up his time and
make him forget it. His teacher loves him, for he
is one of the best scholars in school.

Robert’s father is dead; so he tries to do all he
can for his mother. She is very happy in her son,
and can trust any thing to him. Here he is work-
ing in the garden among some choice plants. He
can play when his work is done.

al a a i i sl



BOYS. 57





THE THOUGHTFUL BOY.

Oy AMIE HARRIS had been sitting some time
i by the window, his eyes fixed upon the clouds,
which he watched very closely. At last he spoke:
“Mother, how curiously the clouds look! See, the
sun shines on some places, and don’t on others.
Why don’t it shine every where alike?”

Jamie is always thinking, and asking the reasons
of things, but he is not troublesome about it. So
his mother takes pleasure in teaching him. He
asks a great many questions about heaven, and
God, and Jesus Christ.









58 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE BOOK OF ANIMALS.

“8 VER since I went to the Aquarial Gardens,

te I have wanted to read about animals.
Don’t you, brother? How sorry I was for that
poor bear, that had only just room enough in his
cage to turn round in! Father said that his home
was in a cold country, where there was ice all the
year. I want to read about bears.”

“But wasn’t you glad that the lion was in a
cage? How ugly he looked when he was fed, and
the tiger too! Father says that tigers and cats
are the same kind of animals.”

“T have a book, sister, which is a history of ani-
mals. Let us sit on the grass and read it.”







THE MENAGERIE. 59



——YADE. SON mili =’ —..

THE BEAR.

N the frozen regions of the North the White
Bear is found. It makes a house for itself by
digging a hole in the ice or snow. But why don’t
it freeze to death? Because it is fitted by its
Creator for the climate where it lives. God has
covered it with a warm coat of long, coarse fur.
He has given it large, soft paws, so that it can walk
easily on the ice.
| Bears dive into the water, and catch fish and
| seals. They have a strong affection for their
| young, and, when attacked, will fight for them
| till they are themselves killed.



















60 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE ELK.

YB ime years ago, the Elk, or, as it is some-
: times called, the Moose-deer, lived in all the

New England States. Now it is found chiefly in
Maine. It is a great, awkward-looking animal,
with a hump on its back, and branching horns on
its head. These horns are often a yard long.

The Indians used to value the Elk very highly.
Its flesh was their food. Clothes were made out
of its skin, and also a covering for their tents.
The horns were made into dippers and other need-
ful articles. Every part of the animal was useful
to those poor people, who had so few of the com- |}
forts and productions of civilized life.

nee oto

es

a aera





THE MENAGERIE. 61



ee a a ee ene ee ee





THE KANGAROO.

Hi Kangaroo was found in New Holland by
CY? the people who first sailed around the world.
It is of a singular form, having a small head, a
large body, with short fore legs, while the hinder
ones are more than a yard long. Grass is its
principal food, and it laps water like a dog. It
leaps like a frog, sometimes twenty feet at once.
Kangaroos are hunted by dogs, and when one is
about to be caught, he will sometimes seize the
dog, and hug it to death. If the dog overtakes it
in the water, the animal will draw the dog under

ee Se

// and drown it.









62



THE LION.

(SHE Lion is called the king of beasts. It is

A, large and strong, being, when full grown,
eight feet long and four feet high. It can run with
a buffalo in its mouth.

Lions keep pretty quiet in the daytime, but at
night they steal softly about to catch their prey.
They roar terribly when they make an attack.

The Lion very much resembles a cat, and has
just such claws, only larger.

Did you ever read the story of Daniel in the
den of lions? Can you tell why it was that he
was not killed by them?





“s+. <.

se.





THE MENAGERIE. 63



FIELD MICE.

SHE little animals that are eating the grain
Oy are mice; not of the kind that runs about our
houses, in the closets and pantries, tasting of many
things they ought not. These live in the fields,
and make their nests in the tall grass and grain.
They pick out the seeds, and lay them away care-
fully for winter.

The farmers do not like to have mice make nests
in their fields, for though they are so little, they do
much mischief. Their nests are round, with a small
opening on the top. Who told them how to build
thus, so that if the nest is thrown down, the little
ones will not fall out ?





THE OPOSSUM.

Once this is a new style of traveling in-

deed! An Opossum giving a ride to her
little family. This animal is a little larger than a
cat. The Creator has formed the mother with a
pouch in which she carries her little ones; but
oftener she takes them on her back, hanging by
their tails. The Opossum climbs from tree to tree
by means of its tail, which is twisted around the
branches.

Did you ever hear of a boy’s “ playing ’possum”?
That is when he tries to deceive by pretending to
be what he is not. ‘The Opossum, when the hunter
is after him, will lie down and pretend to be dead.









THE MENAGERIE. 65



| a \
Deri I

THE PEACOCK.

YSHE Peacock is called a “silly bird;” I sup-
Or pose it is because it struts about, and spreads
its tail, and seems to say, “Look at me: see how
fine I am.” |

A gentleman sent home to his children a pair of
peacocks. The male walked about with his tail
spread grandly, while the female was a plain-look-
ing brown bird. One day the male flew into the
yard, all bloody; his long tail was gone. Some cruel
boys had caught him, and pulled out all his bright
feathers. He was so much hurt that he soon died.





66 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK



THE QUAGGA.

2 SUPPOSE that my little friends will think
that this animal is a zebra; butitis not. zebra is not so large, and the stripes are more regu-
lar, and of a deeper color.
This is the Quagga of South Africa. It is a
fierce animal, and goes about the country in large

droves. The natives eat the flesh. The Quagga

had not been tamed until a hunter thought he
would try it, and contrived to catch some of them.
After a few days of kicking and running away,
they were obliged to yield, and soon were broken
to the saddle and harness.







THE MENAGERIE. 67



THE RHINOCEROS.

HE Rhinoceros is a large, clumsy animal,

having a shape somewhat like that of a hog.
Its skin is very thick and tough, so that it will
resist a spear, and it is said even a musket ball
can not pierce it. Upon its snout is a very stout
and sharp horn of ivory, sometimes two.

The rhinoceros often engages in battle with the
elephant. Its thick hide defends it from the power-
ful blows of its adversary’s trunk, and the thrust
of his great tusks. Sometimes he will dash at the
elephant and rip open his side with his sharp horn.
Many think that the unicorn mentioned in the
Scriptures was the rhinoceros.





68 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

S \S
as T NX
CBE.

GERSES

THE SQUIRREL.

Wc E- my little readers visit Boston Common in the
pb summer, they will surely see some gray squir-
rels hopping about on the ground, and running up
the trees. They are pretty little creatures, with a
Sharp nose, whiskers like a cat, bright eyes that
keep a sharp lookout, and a large, bushy tail.

One day a little boy sat there with some chestnuts
in his pocket. He threw one of them upon the
ground, and one of the squirrels came and ate it.

The boy then laid a nut upon his knee; and Bunny |

crept cautiously up and seized that too. At last
the boy opened his pocket, and in went the squirrel
out of sight.







THE MENAGERIE. 69

SES]

|

\ \ Seer =
\ .

NS SOY
YS ee



THE TIGER. —

HIS fierce-looking animal, with black and yel-
CP” low stripes, is a Tiger. It is nearly as. large
as the lion, but it has no mane. Its skin, which is
valuable, is spyead on the floors, in China, and used
to sit on. The Tiger roams about among the
bushes and tall grass, and is ready to attack any
traveler it may chance to find.

Mr. Lindley, the missionary from Africa, saw
many tigers, but none attacked .him. One day, a
large one came and seated itself on the hill oppo-
site his house. There he watched, thinking, per-
haps, to catch one of the children for supper, until
he was killed.







70 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE ZEBU.

MPYHIS sleepy-looking animal, with long ears and
Or short horns, 1s called the Zebu, or Sacred
Bull of India. It is generally white, or of a cream
color. Sometimes it is no larger than a dog, but
commonly is as big as an ox.- The people think it
is very wicked to kill one, or eat any of the flesh.
Some of the white bulls are made to carry heavy
burdens, but others walk about from place to place
and help themselves to any thing they like. If one
of them lies down in the road t6 rest, the traveler
is obliged to go around it, or wait until the lazy
animal chooses to get up. How foolish it is to pay
so much veneration to a brute beast !























THE HINDU BOY.

C 5 HEATHEN boy, whose name was Shun-
kuru, one day found a little book by the
road-side. It was a part.of the New Testament,
and told of Jesus Christ, who died on the cross for
sinners. He wanted to know more about Jesus.
So he traveled a very long journey, and at last
found a missionary who instructed him. Then he
began to love Christ, and went from town to town
to read the Bible to others.
Afterward he became a Christian minister, and
went home to teach his friends the way of life.
His aged mother also became a Christian.







72, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE AFRICAN BOY.

OF an natives of Africa had no knowledge of the
6

true God until missionaries went there and 7

hgtes\r>
diel olay view

taught them. They are. negroes, and have woolly
hair and thick lips, and for this reason some people
despise them, as though they were to blame for
being what God made them. But they are human
beings, and have immortal souls. Jesus died for
them as well as for white men, and in heaven they
will be “made white in the blood of the Lamb.”

Men, women, and children are stolen, every year,
and brought to this country to be sold as slaves;
many die on the way.

“= ges homes Bid Geesedenr*
hee settee ht





ee ee

PT eR



MISSIONARY SCENES. 13



A PRAYING MILL.

. Cn can this picture mean ?, 1 don't

think you can guess. This man sits on
fhe: A watching a praying machine, which is
being turned round by the water which runs out
of that pipe. |
A praying machine! What is that? Prayers
are written upon this box, and every time it turns
round, the owner imagines that he prays once.
So, the faster it turns, the more prayers he offers.
Thus the man is saved the trouble of praying himself.
Surely God ‘will not hear such prayer as this.
He looks upon the heart.









TA. - CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



GOING TO SCHOOL.

On these boys running to school. They live ||
¢-) in Southern India, where it is very hot. There ||
the people are all dark colored. They do not wear |}
clothing, as we do, but have only a piece of cloth |
around their bodies. —

Let us go into the school house. Here are no |
desks, or seats, or books, or slates. The children |
learn the A B C by making letters in the sand
with their fingers, and they recite their lessons in
the same way.

But what have they upon their backs? They |
are books made of dried leaves. 3



MISSIONARY SCENES. 75

Yy,

ga

ae

Pe czas tcond ne ets u



MEKHIEL.

(Vern was a little Nestorian boy who
| A, lived far away in Persia. His home was
up in the mountains, with his father and sister.
The father was a good man, and used to take his
| boy to the plains in the winter, so that he might go
to school. |

| He had learned much about. the Testament be-
|fore he was eight years old. Once, when some
robbers were taking away his father’s coat, he said,
“Give them your cloak also, father, as the Lord
Jesus has said.” He wanted to be a missionary,
but God took him to himself.





|
|





76 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

ae ete el Se Se 8 ee

NTE



THE AUSTRALIAN BOY.









WHERE are people in the world who not only |
On eat cats, Snakes, toads, and other animals |
without being cooked, but human flesh! Hog
shocking it is, and wicked ! |

This boy who is lying on the grass lived in Anal
tralia, where the people do such things. But a|
missionary took him into his family, and he soon
learned to read. *

One day he stole some bread which was in the
oven, after which he was afraid, and ran away.
When the teacher asked him why he ran away, he
said, “Me stole bread; me feel very bad.” 3



ee ee ee ne ore

MISSIONARY SCENES. T7





SNAKE WORSHIP.

N India the people worship a god in the form
i of a snake. Shesh wanted to see this god,
and his heathen teacher told him to repeat a prayer
before the idol eight thousand times, and he would
see him; but Vishnu did not come. After this, he

| repeated a prayer one hundred and sixty-five times
| a day, but still the god did not come. Then he
| went to other places, and said more prayers, but
; | they were all in vain.

.
i

At last he went to Calcutta, and there he hear d

| of the Lord Jesus Christ. Then he gave up his
| idols, and became a Christian.





78 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



= SYP DE- Da Le

WANTING TO DO GOOD.

CWS LITTLE boy came to the house of a good
a a :
XE missionary who lived on one of the islands
of the Pacific. “I want to ring the bell for the
house of God,” said he. But they had there no
such bells as we have. They use a hollow piece

of wood, which they strike upon with a stick to

make a noise. This calls the people to church and
the children to school. About three years later
the boy came again, saying, “I wish to become a

man of God, and join the church.” Once more he |}
came, and said he wished to go far away and) |
preach the gospel about Jesus Christ. And he went. |

:

eee ae ae

paar pe



ONCE ee





MISSIONARY SCENES. 79



THE BURMAN BOY.

(6% N a very hot day, a missionary in India sat
XP by the door of his house. When any one
passed, who was willing to stop, he told him there
was a better religion than that of Brahma. By and
by, a man leading a little boy came along. The
boy wanted to stop, but the father would not.

| But the man’s wife was a Christian, and when she
died she left the Gospel of Matthew for her hus-
| band to read. He read it, and soon after, brought
| his boy to be instructed in the new religion. Both
became Christians, and died suddenly of the chol-
| era, talking of the Lord Jesus and trusting in him.



80 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



AN INDIAN TENT.

(SHIS is the tent of an Indian; rather small,
% certainly, but large enough to eat, drink, and
sleep in. A flat stone laid on the ground is the
fireplace, and the smoke goes off through the roof.
There is no need of windows.

In this tent lies a sick man. He is a “medicine
man,” that is, a doctor, and head man of the tribe.
He used to be a strange doctor, beating on a drum,
and doing other foolish things to cure sick people.
After he became old, he heard the missionaries
tell about Jesus. Then he left off his bad ways, and
became a Christian. He died trusting in the Saviour.





MISSIONARY SCENES. 81



IDOLS.

[WERE are three men hard at work. They
rf are making idols. But what does the Bible
say about this? “Thou shalt not make any graven
images. Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them,
nor serve them.” And these men are doing just
what God tells them not to do. One is sawing a
log, another is making a serpent, and the third is
shaping the head of an elephant.

The people bow down before these images and
worship them. They pray to a piece of wood.

Let us pray for the heathen, and send mission-
aries to teach them the only living and true God.














82 . GHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

HEATHEN MOTHER.

~ ee
on

Ds) FEW years ago, as a missionary in Afra
Hd was traveling, he found a poor, feeble, ol
woman sitting all alone by the side of the oad
He asked why she sat there. She told him that
she was old, and could not work any more, so ie
children had left her there to die. The fifth co m
mandment says, “Honor thy father and mother
but these people had never heard of it. Poor ol
woman! -

The religion of the heathen is very cruel.
leads them to let.their parents starve to dea

when they can work no longer.



MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 83

=
SSE



LAZINESS.







HIS young man, who is sitting on the ground,
_& with an old hat and no shoes, is lazy and
‘poor. When he was a little boy he had no mother
pe make home a pleasant place for him; so he went
an ong idle boys, and learned their bad tricks and
V vicked words.
_ First he began to think that it was very brave
te ‘learn to smoke cigars, and was rarely seen with-
ut one in his mouth. Oh, how sick it made him
t first! but he soon got over it, and smoked all
day long. This made him thirsty, and he must
rink beer and cider. But these did not satisfy
c. long; so he drank brandy, and became at last
m serable and poor —a warning to all.



84

I lphesese oo S
ih ri ee aa
Hs

Mh a

penn

ee --- ob
oe
a yA



._ THE BEGGAR.

Oe oy do you suppose this little begga
NMS boy, Bill White, is thinking about? H

has a clean, pleasant face, though his clothes an







ragged and old. There he sits, leaning on hi
basket, and his thoughts are something like th ose
“Oh, dear. I wish I was not a beggar boy
I hate to go to people’s houses, and ask for. col
victuals. They look sharp at me, just as_
was a thief. I never was a thief, and I never w
be a thief. Mr. Waldron says he was a poor b 8
once. I wonder if he was as poor asI am. I wi
ask him to let me work for him. I can work ¢
fast as a man, and I will not beg. any more.” |
Ought not that boy to be encouraged?















MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 85

THE SPELLING CLASS.

Be ERE is Miss Smith, and a part of her little
: G flock. They dearly love her, and are always
pet to obey her.

_ In this class are three girls and two boys. They
a spelling, and some of the words are pretty hard,
‘such as d-e-l-i-g-h-t. Little Totty spells it d-e-l-i-t-e,
and none can spell it rightly. So their kind teacher
| does it for them.

E My little friends are not always careful to im-
: prove their time while they are at school, and they
4 will be sorry for it when they grow older. In the
last great day, we must all give an account of our-
selves to God.

_ Shall you be ready?



CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.





MY PUSSY.

* OU never saw such a kitten as I have got.
~ I call her Malta. She is a first-rate mouser,
and sometimes she catches birds and squirrels. I
have to scold her hard when she does so, although
I suppose she knows no better.

Malta is very fond of milk. I give her a cupful
every night. After she has sipped it up, we have
a good frolic.

Kittens can not learn to read or to work, as I can.
It is because they have no souls. I must not play
all the time, as they do, but strive to be useful, and
be prepared for heaven at last.







MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 87



ERRAND OF LOVE.

(SHESE children are going on an errand of
Ob kindness. Maggie and John are carrying a
large basket which their mother has filled for
widow Jones; and little Totty wants to help too;
so she takes hold of one side. Happy children,
who are thus early taught to do good!

Widow Jones is poor and sick. She likes to have
these little folks come to see her, because they are
pleasant and kind. They always expect she will
tell them at least one Bible story, for widow Jones
loves the Bible, and almost knows it by heart. Its
precious words give her great joy.








88 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

TEMPTATION.







- oe sinners entice thee, consent thou not.”

i Bill Price is enticing little Robbie to do
wrong. He is trying to make him play truant
from school, and tells him that no one will know it.

Go away, Bill Price. You ought to be ashamed
of yourself to do such a mean, wicked thing. Bill
promises to give Robbie all sorts of good things
if he will go with him, and Robbie hesitates. He
ought to say, “No, I will not go with you, and dis-
obey my kind mother;” but he wants to go, and he
wants to stay. “A wise son maketh a glad father,
but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.”



MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 89



THE CAGE.

(OIL HO has not seen a squirrel house with its
WM‘ wire wheel ?

How funny the squirrel looks running on the
wires! Now he is up, then he is down. When he
is tired, he darts into the house and gets some-
thing to eat, and then comes out again. Now he
sits still, his little bright eyes looking right at you,
with both cheeks full, and nibbles away at his
nuts.

God has given strong teeth to these little crea-
tures, so that they can bite nuts and get the meats.
In the summer, they lay up food for the winter.









90 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



LEARNING TO SEW.

“ Op LEASE, mamma, let me sew.”

Pe “Yes, dear, you may. There, take this
needle and piece of calico.”

“Oh, dear! the thread will not stay in the needle,
mamma. Please to thread it for me.”

Her mother threaded it, and Susie began again.

“There, mamma, see that stitch; it is as little as
yours.”

“That is right. Be careful, or the thread will
come out again.”

“ How nice I can sew! I can do all your sewing
when I get bigger. Shan’t I be a useful little girl?”





MISCELLANEOUS SCENKS.

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THE SICK MOTHER.

RS. MAY has been sick a long time. She

has suffered much pain, and is very weak.

But it has been a great comfort to her that Carrie
has been so thoughtful, and done so much to re-
lieve her. She keeps the room tidy, and gives her
mother the medicine which the doctor left for her.





92 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE RUMSELLER.

WVHE man who stands behind the counter is a_
C rumseller; the other is a temperance man,
who has come in to talk with him. He tells him
that rumselling is a wicked business. He asks him
to look about and see the families of his customers.
How poor they are! Besides, the men are them-
selves being ruined for this world and the next. ||
Boys, too, go to his shop, and get beer, ale, and ||
cider. Soon they will want brandy. They will find
at last, that “it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth
like an adder.”





MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 93

"eS



THE PLEASANT CALL.

(8) Ay. ELL, Mary, how do you do this morn-
Â¥y ing? I always find you at work in your
neat kitchen. How are the children ?”

“They are well, thank you, and have gone to
school. It is a long way to the school house, but
they are never willing to stay at home.”

_ “Tam glad to hear it,” replied Mrs. May. “Do
they go to the Sabbath school too ?”

“Yes, indeed, ma’am, and they don’t need any
urging to go. The Sabbath school helps me
greatly, too, in training them.”





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CHILDREN’S

PICTURE BOOK.

PUBLISHED BY THE
AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,

28 CORNHILL, BOSTON.


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GOING TO CHURCH,

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MISCELLANEOUS SCENES,



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THE NURSERY. 5

OUR BABY. we

A HAT do you think we have got at our
house? You can’t guess—so I will tell
you. It is a little baby, and his name is Johnnie!
He looks so sweet, that I love him very much.
He has blue eyes, but only-a very little hair. And
his hands — oh, how beautiful they are, with such
tiny nails! His fingers are just as fat as they can
When I take hold of his hand, and say, “ Lit-
tle brother!” how he does jump and crow, and want
to come to me! But Susan will not allow it, for
she says I shall let him fall.
I am glad that we do not live in India, where
they throw little babies to the crocodiles.



et
6 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



' THE CRADLE.

\ NE day my father brought home a cradle for

ip

Se

our baby. It is made of willow, like a bas-
ket, and I can rock it very easily.

I have read that in some countries they have
no cradles. So the mother takes a long piece of
cloth, and ties the two ends to a tree. Then she
puts her baby in it, and the wind rocks it while
she is at work. Once, when a baby was asleep,
a large bird came and pecked its face. Its mother
heard it ery, and drove away the bird. I sup-
pose that God watched over the baby, and saved
| it from being killed.

I shall ask him every day to take care of our
baby — dear little Johnnie!


THE NURSERY.

“I















JOHNNIE’S BATH.

UR Johnnie gets a real good washing in a



tub every morning. Sometimes, when the
water is cold, he don’t much like it; but mother
tells Susan not to omit it, because it will make him
grow strong. After he is washed, she rubs him
with a towel, which makes him nice and warm.

I went with my mother one morning to the
“ Home for the Friendless,” and we saw more than
a dozen babies washed. They were orphan chil-
dren. When they were dressed, the nurse put
some of them on rocking horses — two on a horse.
They were very much pleased.

i


BEGINNING TO WALK.

Mw ERE is our Johnnie, just beginning to walk.
Don’t he look funny? He wants to go to
mother, but he is afraid. Mother calls him to
come, and holds out both hands. He knows that
she will not let him fall, so he starts right off; but
I think he would fall if she did not catch him.
Mother says that is just the way with every
body in the world. God made us, and we are his
children. If he did not watch over us every day,
and take care of us, we should die. She says we
ought to trust God, just as the baby trusts her.



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i

THE NURSERY.





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RIDING GRANDPA’S CANE.

“ (3 ET up, Bonnie, get up, Bonnie!” What a

er noise little brother does make! He has a
whip in his hand, and is riding grandpa’s cane all
over the house.

Do hear him! “Whoa, sir! Get up, horsy!”
Mother says, that little boys must play somewhere,
and he can not play in the yard because the snow
is so deep.

: Johnnie used to play on the Sabbath; but he
does not do so since he learned my verse, —

“TIT must not work, I must not play,
Upon God’s holy Sabbath day.”
10 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



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Madan
FISHING IN THE WASH-TUB.

7) AST summer I went with father and mother
LS to the sea shore. We used to go out in the
boat every day, and catch fish. Johnnie wanted
to fish too; but father said the fish would pull
him out of the boat. ;

When Susan was washing clothes, Johnnie got
grandpa’s cane, and fastened to it a string and a
crooked pin. Then he dropped it in the tub, and
made believe he was catching fish. |
THE NURSERY. 11



THE CUT FINGER.



! ( NE day Johnnie found a knife open on the

| table, and he thought he would try to make
a little boat. He had seen the larger boys using
their jackknives, and he wanted to do what they
| did. ;

He went out to the wood-shed, and got a piece
of pine wood, and began to whittle; but very soon
he cut his finger, and then he ran to mother, crying
| with pain.


12 CUILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



MY VISIT.












AM going to see Bessie White. I love her
& better than any of the other girls. My aunt |
likes Bessie, too, for she says that she is a good
girl, and always tries to do right.

What a nice time we shall have! I have gota
new book. It is, The First Lessons of Gentleness
and Truth. I have read it all through; and I shall
like to read it again with Bessie. The sun is very
hot, but my hat_is better than a parasol, because I
do not have to carry it in my hand.

Bessie lives near the church where I go every
Sabbath. She and I are in the same class in the
Sabbath School. We have a dear teacher, who is
always pleasant and good to us. How delightful
it is to learn about Jesus and heaven! ,



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DRINKING TEA.

. OUR mother is very kind, Bessie, to let us

54 drink tea by ourselves.”

“Yes, mother is always kind. She says she
likes to see us happy. When we have washed the
dishes, and put up the table, we will read your
new book. Do you like reading better than play-
ing with dolls ?” 7

“J.like both. I did not bring my dolls, because
I thought that you would like the book best.”

“So I should; and mother says we may read it
aloud to her. After that she will tell us a story.
She tells beautiful stories; but I think the best ones
are from the Bible. She told me about Joseph,
and Samuel, and Daniel, and, best of all, about

Jesus, who was once a little babe in the manger.”












14



CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



PLAYING IN THE WOODS.

W ¥ OW nice it is to live so near the woods!
rf Bessie, and I, and her two cousins have
come to play under this old tree. There are
plenty of berries all about us, but they are not
ripe yet. I suppose there are children who have
never been in the woods at all.

A poor woman came to my aunt’s door to beg.
She had a baby, and she set it down on the grass.
The grass was green, and the baby put its hand
out, and felt of it. Then it rolled over, and laid
‘its face on it. It seemed pleased with the grass.

I suppose it never saw any before:




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THE VISIT. 15



THE FLOWERS.

VIGRS. WHITE, do look at our beautiful flow-
(VE ers! Bessie -and I gathered them in the
woods. All little girls love flowers— don’t they?
My sister Jennie did. She is dead, now, you
know; but mother says she lives in heaven, where
the flowers are the sweetest, and never fade.

She used to gather flowers every day, and carry
them to her teacher. Mother had a beautiful rose
tree, and often gave my little sister one of the roses.
She died before she was six years old; and when
she was laid in the coffin, mother put a bud from
off the rose tree in her hand.










16 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



MRS. WHITE READS TO US.

ee are Bessie and I standing by her moth- |
SOR, or while she reads this story : — |

“ A company of young persons were traveling in |
Ireland, and wanted a guide. A little girl, named |
Grace O’Gara, offered to show them up the moun-
tains, saying that she knew the paths, for she went
up with the goats every day.

“The travelers liked Grace, and were pleased to
hear her talk. She loved the Lord Jesus; and
when they asked questions, she answered them
from the Bible, which she learned while watching
the goats. By her constant reference to the Bible,
they were led to read it, and became Christians.

“*Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings Thou
hast perfected praise.’ ”












THE COUNTRY. 17



MY UNCLE’S FAMILY.

T is vacation in school, and my father has sent
me to visit at my uncle’s in the country. They
have a baby, too, not so old as our Johnnie. She
is a little bit of a thing, but she. knows me already.
Auntie sits by her cradle, and sings,

‘*¢ Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber,’?

and she goes right to sleep.

Auntie is very kind, and plays with us every day.
But how I do love to sit with uncle, and hear him
tell about Moses that was put into the ark of bul-
rushes, and Daniel who was cast into the lion’s den!






18 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE MORNING WALK.

ron don’t know Betty, that lives at my un-

cle’s —do you? She goes out to walk with
me and Allie almost every day. Allie is my little
cousin Alice; she is two years old.

Auntie says ‘it will make us strong to walk, and
I really think it does, for I and Allie grow bigger
every day. Betty says.we must be good, or God
will not love us; and I mean to be. I have learned
a long verse in my new Bible: “Suffer little chil-
dren to come unto me, and forbid them not, for of
such is the kingdom of heaven.”






THE COUNTRY. 19



FEEDING THE CHICKENS.

ifs NE, two, three, four, five; how many chick-
ens we have got, Tommy! Auntie says
we may have them for our own. I wish that great
rooster and the black hen would not eat up all the
corn. Poor little chickies! If you don’t eat faster
you will not get much breakfast.

Uncle says we must not be greedy when we eat.
Johnnie May ate so much cake one day when his
mother was away, that he was sick for a long time;
the doctor was afraid he would die.


20 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

MAKING GARDEN.

AND Susie have a garden of our own, all to
ourselves. We planted a good many seeds,

but they do not all come up.
Uncle and aunt have come to see us. They
call us their little gardeners! You ought to see

our rose-bush. It has a great many roses on it.
And then we have seven pots with nice plants in
them. How nicely they grow! We must put
them in the shade, or the hot sun will kill them.
My aunt says our hearts are like a garden, and we

must not let the weeds grow in it.






:
|
| THE COUNTRY. os



SCHOOL.

CN )ETERE do you think I have been to-day?
I have been at school. Some of the schol-



ars are almost as large as the teacher. Some are
very small, and only just beginning to read.

Miss Lane looked very pleasant. In the morn-
ing, she told us to take our Bibles, and turn to the
first chapter of Genesis. Then she read and talked
about how God made the world. Then she prayed
that we might be good children, just as mother
does at home.






22, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

Treen
fa



THE FAULT.

(% H dear! I meant to be so good, and now I
N have done something that Miss Lane has for-
bidden. I don’t like to tell what it is. She keeps
a book with all our names in it, and she has given
me a bad mark. I must cry, but I should not have
thought she would. I don’t like her as well as I did.

And the girls all looked at me. Perhaps they
will not play with me any more. But they seemed
sorry, and so did Miss Lane. Well, I suppose she
thought she must mark me. She asked me if I
thought God would be pleased with me.




THE CONFESSION.

DID not mean to tell auntie about the bad
mark. She is so kind, and I did not want to
make her feel badly. When she asked me, “ How
has my little girl got along to-day?” I could not
keep from crying. And then I told her all about it.
“Miss Lane gave us a short lesson, and said we

must repeat every word perfectly. I did not know

mine, and so I looked in the book.
“Oh, auntie, I never will try to deceive again.
Will you forgive me, and ask God to forgiveme, too?”


24 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE BEGGAR CHILDREN.

‘¥- WENT to the door one morning to see the
Se snow that fell in the night; and there were
widew Jones’ little boy and girl just coming up
the steps. Their clothes were ragged, and they had
no stockings, and but very poor shoes. Their mother
was very sick, and had sent them here to ask for food.
My aunt is kind to every body; so she filled their
basket. Afterward she went to see Mrs. Jones, and
carried some nice broth. The doctor says, if aunt
takes care of her, she will soon be well again.











THE COUNTRY. 25



THE SMOKER.

; OW that boy looks who is standing by the |
Er post! He has no coat; and I do not think
he combs his hair very often. He has a cigar in his
mouth, and is smoking. I should not think that
boys would like tobacco. I do not like to smell it.
The gentleman who is passing with his sons sees
this poor lad, and bids them take warning by him.
He tells them that tobacco is a slow poison, that it
makes a man sickly and poor, and leads to intem-
perance








26 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

THE AGED.

CHS UNTIE, see that aged man and woman! How
XG very old they are! I met him in the market |
the other day. He gave me a large, red apple, and
said he hoped God would bless me. I love old
people, when they are good — don’t you, auntie? It
makes me think of a verse in my Sabbath school
lesson: “The hoary head is a crown of glory, when
found in the way of righteousness.” My teacher
told us the meaning. She said it was living as God
wishes to have us, and obeying his commands.


THE COUNTRY. 27




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THE TEA TABLE.

OW nice it is to have the tea all ready when

we come home! We are very hungry, and
the bread and butter are good. Susie forgot to brush
her hair, and auntie tells her she had better do it
before she comes to the table. Poor Trip is hungry,



though he waits quietly by my aunt’s chair, until
she is ready to feed him.

But the best of all is the singing. We always
sing at my uncle’s after tea, at evening prayers.
To-night Susie and I are going to sing,

‘“‘T want to be an angel.”


28 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE SHEEP.

VIG Y aunt told me and Tommy that, after break-
“WA fast, she would show us something that
would please us. So we got ready in a minute, and
she took us out through the yard, up the street,
and over the hill, and there we saw uncle’s sheep.
There are ever so many of them!

How the lambs did play! They would throw
each other down, then spring up again and scamper
away across the field. |

Some of the sheep are very large, and their wool

will soon be cut off and made into clothing.









THE COUNTRY. 29

——s



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SELLING THE LAMB.

SN’T it too bad? Our lammie Carlo has been
¢b sold to the butcher, and carried off to be killed!
Tommy and I cried, and Susie and Betty cried, too.
It was so cunning, and played with us every day.
It followed us all about the house. Uncle said it
had become troublesome, and he would give us
another.

My aunt says that the lamb is a type of Christ.
“ Tle was led as a lamb to the slaughter.” It was
for us, because we are sinners.




CHULLDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



BUILDING THE NEST.

OW busy these two birds are! It is a beau-
tiful morning in spring, and they have found
a nice place for their little home on that branch of
the tree.

I hope no bad boy will find it, and rob them of
their treasure. I am sure our Johnnie would not
be so cruel.

God takes care of the birds. He notices even
the fall of a little sparrow, as the Bible tells us.
‘The kindly-feeling and generous boy will never
disturb a bird’s-nest.





PTET rere

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GOING TO CHURCH. 31



THE SHADY PATH.

ACH HEN the Sabbath morning came, the sun
shone brightly, and the air was fresh and
“Come, Annie,” said her aunt, “we will
walk to church this morning ;” and soon they were
on their way.
_ “What a nice, shady path this is, aunty!” said
Annie; “how cool and pleasant!” Just then a
robin opened his little mouth, and sung sweetly.
If birds sing praises to their Creator, much more



should we, to whom he has given souls that will
never die.




32 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.





THE WALK.

i S Annie and her aunt walked to church by the |
AX pleasant path, they talked about the Sabbath.

“Do you know, my dear, that the Saviour rose |
from the grave on the morning of Sunday, or the ||
Christian Sabbath ?”

“Yes, auntie, I have read about it in my Testa-
ment, and I like Sabbath days, for then I always
go to church and Sabbath school.”

All good people love the Sabbath and the house |
of God. The Psalmist says, ‘A day in thy courts
is better than a thousand” God is displeased with
those who dishonor his holy day.






GOING TO CHURCH. 33




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THE GRAVEYARD.

. C{ HALL we go through the graveyard, auntie ?”

gS) “Yes, dear, if you would like to do so. Our
graveyard is a pleasant spot. Do you know that
two of your cousins are buried there ?”

“No, auntie. Will you show me the place?”

“This is where your dear grandfather was laid,
and there beside him are the graves of your little
cousins. But it is only their bodies that were put
in the ground. Their souls never die. When
Lillie died, she said, “I want to go to heaven now,
but I want you to come too, mother.” We believe
that both she and Jennie are with the Saviour.
34 CUILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.







THE CHURCH.

CMC S Annie and her aunt drew near the church,
& they found many others who were going
there too; so they went. in quietly with the rest,
and took a seat. The minister was already in the
pulpit, and a lady was playing on the organ while
the people were coming in. A nice carpet covered
the floor, and every thing looked very neatly.

In some parts of this country where but few
people live, there are no churches, but sometimes
there is a Sabbath school: I have heard of children
who went more than five miles in the winter to
attend one. Would you do it?




GOING TO CHURCH. 35



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A PILGRIM.

“RP

if ia O you remember, Annie, what the minister
D> said about our being pilgrims ?”

“Yes, aunty. He said we are all going on a

journey through this world to another country.
The journey is our life, and the country where
we are going is heaven. I have a beautiful story
about it, called the Pilgrim’s Progress.






36 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



- THE BARREN FIG TREE.

> HAT did the minister say about the fig
© tree, Annie ?”

“He said that we should not be like the barren
fig tree, that had leaves, but no fruit. We must
always do good things, and think good thoughts,
and that would be bringing forth good fruit.”


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GOING TO CHURCH.

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TVG Y New Year’s present from father was a

‘VU beautiful Bible, and I have begun to read it
through. How many nice stories there are in it!
I can not tell the number. Father says that if I
ask God to make me wise, as Solomon did, he will
do it. But I think I had rather be like little Samuel.
When God called him, he said, “ Speak, Lord, for thy
servant heareth:? I wish God would speak to me ;
but he don’t speak to people now, only in the Bible.

I like to read all the stories, but those about

J esus I like best. 3


38 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



OUR VESSEL.

HIS is a fine vessel. How trim it looks, with
Or its tall masts, and white sails, and many ropes!
It is all new, and is just setting out on a long
voyage. Iam going in it. Would you like to go
with me? She has many people on board. There
are the captain and his two mates, the carpenter,
and ten sailors. These take care of the vessel and
passengers.

Do you know that our life is like a voyage? God
is our Captain. If we go on in the way he leads
us, he will bring us all safely to our heavenly
home. z




THE SAILOR BOY.

or .. is Tom MHalyard climbing up the

W/L, shrouds of the vessel. He is one of the
sailor boys on board our ship. He has been sent
aloft to fasten some ropes that have got loose
among the rigging. You see he is looking back,
to hear what the mate says. “Ay, ay, sir,” he
shouts in reply, and away he goes. He does not
wait, and say, “I don’t want to,” as some boys do.
He obeys at once. Just so should we boys do to
our parents, for the Bible says, “Children, obey
your parents in the Lord, for this is right.”




40 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK,



THE NAUTILUS.



Ww O you see that curious thing sailing upon the
; IE ' water yonder? What can it be? It looks
something like a snail, but it has long legs hanging
down upon each side, and a pair of sails standing
upright.

This wonderful little sailor is called a Nautilus.
His shell is the house in which he lives. It is very
light, and is easily carried along by the wind, or
paddled by his long legs. Throw something to-
wards him. There, he has turned his mouth down
into the water, and sunk out of sight. God has
thus given him the means of escaping from danger.
How good he is to every living thing!


Ee
|

“SCENES OF TRAVEL. 41



THE SWORD-FISH.

Ee. is another of the inhabitants of the
sea, not so pretty as the nautilus. It is the

|| Sword-fish. He gets his name from his long bony

snout, as hard asivory. This is a terrible weapon.
Even the whale is afraid of it, and is often killed
by it.

See him dart through the water. There, he has
| struck the vessel, though not very hard! Some-
times the animal pierces the bottom with his
sword, and sinks the vessel. An old ship was
once being repaired, and one of these swords
was found sticking right through her solid tim-

ber.


42 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE CAPTAIN’S INSTRUMENTS.

Neen Ee ae

HEN we are out on the ocean, far away |

from the land, how do you suppose the
captain knows which way to steer the vessel? I

will tell you. This long instrument that you see |

on a stand is a telescope. It magnifies objects
which are far away, and thus enables us to see
them. Then there is the globe, on which is traced
the land and water. Besides these he has a com-
pass, which shows which way we are going.

The Bible is our telescope. Through it we can see ||
heaven. It is our globe. It shows us what to ||

seek, and what to shun. It is our compass, too.
It never varies, but guides us always, if we obey it,
to the port of peace.




SCENES OF TRAVEL. 43



THE STORM.

H, how the wind blows! The sails are all
taken down and lashed to the spars. The
lightning flashes across the heavens. The vessel
rolls; the passengers are seasick, and wish they
were on the land. Let us ask God to help us.
The Psalmist describes such a gale; he says, “ He
| commandeth and raiseth the stormy wind, which
lifteth up the waves thereof. They mount up to
the heavens ; they go down again unto the depths.”


44. CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



Sf



THE ISLAND.

YNRULY God heard our prayer in the midst |
Or of the storm, and no serious accident has
befallen us. The night has gone, and is followed
by a pleasant day. But what do we see before us?
We are coming near to a beautiful country. There
are mountains whose peaks shoot far up into the
sky, with green valleys lying at their feet.

I wonder if any people live there, and what kind |
of people they are. |




SCENES OF TRAVEL. 45



‘THE CAPTAIN AFRAID.

UR captain says that this island is inhabited
by savages. What if they should attack us!
With a glass we can see boats afar off, and they are

coming this way. The captain has got out his

pistol, and if they attempt to come on board, he
will say, “ Keep off, or I will shoot you!”

Perhaps missionaries have come to this island.
If they have, they will teach the people to love God,
to give up their wickedness, and love the Lord
Jesus Christ. Then we shall have nothing to fear.




46 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



INHABITANTS.

OP von strange-looking men these are! Did
you ever see any like them? ‘They wear

no clothing, and their bodies are curiously marked
all over. We do not see any spears or weapons of
war. They seem so friendly that the captain has
allowed them to come on board. One of them sits
on the side of the vessel, and is taking hold of a
rope. The other tells us that “Mikenari” live in
the huts on the little plain. How glad I am to
hear that missionaries have come to this island!

MNT ES YE IP PAE EEE



SCENES OF TRAVEL.







THE PRESENT.

HE captain is giving a hat to the chief. What
Op do you think he will do with it? He can not
wear it, unless he takes off his feathers. All savages
like to wear feathers and other ornaments.

Many years ago, a traveler from America stopped
at the Sandwich Islands. On the Sabbath he at-
tended church, and was much amused as he saw
one man walk in with the skirts of a coat tied
around him, and another with only one boot on.




48 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE PICTURE.

Mh) PICTURE of the captain’s wife hangs in
AC our cabin. The chief never saw one before,
and is delighted with it. On being told how it
was drawn, he was very desirous to be made on
paper too. |

So here you see them. The chief stands by a
table, and the captain, with pencil and paper, sits
on a stool. The chief is laughing, and we fear the
captain will not get a good likeness.

Have you a picture of your little sister or brother,
whom God has taken to a heavenly home?






ee
SCENES OF TRAVEL. 49

S\

WSS

eee



SHIPWRECKED.

N what a dreadful condition our poor vessel
lies!’ A sudden gale blew us out of our course,
and in the darkness of night we struck upon a
rock. The waves dashed over the deck, and have
carried away every thing that was not made fast.
There are people on the land, but they can afford
us little help. We fear that the vessel will break
up. Is there any one on board who is +willing to
risk his life to save the rest ?
Jesus Christ has done far more than this. We
are all sinners; but he died for us.








50 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK. -































OUR ISLAND HOME.

3 ) SORE than a year has passed since our vessel
AY was wrecked. We have been hard at work,
and now you see our pleasant island home. We
have formed ourselves into families, each living in
a house by itself.

The large house with a veranda in front is our
chapel. Here the friendly people come every Sab-
bath, and we teach them from the Bible. We think
that some of them love the Saviour, and try to
please him. We are happy here, but we should
like to see our native land again.


SCENES OF TRAVEL. 51



















GOING HOME.

Ope are now starting for home in a vessel

MM‘ that stopped at the island to get cocoa-
nuts and oranges. The seamen were surprised
when they found white men here. In going out
of the bay, the vessel ran aground. So we threw
out ropes, which the natives seized and pulled
with all their might. But the people are sorry to
have us go, and some accompany us in their boats
a long distance.


52, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE CRUEL BOY.

CYAMES is a cruel boy. He is trying to catch
it the poor fly that never injured him. Once he
stuck a pin through a fly, and fastened it to the
window seat. There it buzzed and whirled round
and round in great pain, while James stood looking
on. The fly suffered much, and tried to get away.

_A pirate who was about to be hanged said that
when he was a boy he always liked to torment flies,
toads, cats, and other animals. ‘Thus his heart grew
hard, until he became a murderer.


WK
SSX C |
A
SEC NN tl
EA \ \ A
CANS
=
SSG

\
\N
NS
Ni
“S

Xs
—
NY N . AN

‘\ IA X’E[









THE DISHONEST BOY.

O you see this boy? His name is Howard,



and he has got into a baggage car to steal.
He feels that it is wrong, and is looking behind
him to see if the gentleman and lady have noticed
him. But God has seen him.

Howard began to be a thief at school, when a
very little boy. He stole pens, pencils, knives, and
other small things. When he grew older, he took
money from the store where he was a clerk. Now
he is called a thief, and no one will employ him.


54 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE RAGGED BOY.

, Oe ye a ragged fellow this is!”
\ Yes, he is, indeed, and he goes by the

name of “ Ragged Jim.” He always looks just about
the same. Just such a looking boy we used to see
selling papers in the streets. But he did not like
to be ragged: there was no one to care for him.
After he had sold papers a while, he bought a suit
of clothes for himself, and was as neat and tidy a
boy as any you would wish to.see.
God will help those that help themselves.


~~”

= Ul ee SO

i +

— = =) Ue

-— —"

——

3
|
;
.







THE IDLE BOY.

OES this boy look as though he would ever

AP get his lesson? There he sits at his desk,
half an hour at a time, with his book in his lap,
and crying because his lesson is hard. He is not a
vicious boy; he is only idle. Charley will never be
much of aman. It is too much trouble for him to
study, and too much trouble to work.

There is much in the Bible about work. “Work
while the day lasts.” “The idle soul will suffer
hunger.” “Six days shalt thou labor, and do all
thy work.”

W ork is honorable, but idleness is sinful.




56 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



> me

= sr



THE DILIGENT BOY.

NHIS is Robert, the diligent boy. When told
Oe to do any thing, he sets about it at once, and
will not allow other things to take up his time and
make him forget it. His teacher loves him, for he
is one of the best scholars in school.

Robert’s father is dead; so he tries to do all he
can for his mother. She is very happy in her son,
and can trust any thing to him. Here he is work-
ing in the garden among some choice plants. He
can play when his work is done.

al a a i i sl
BOYS. 57





THE THOUGHTFUL BOY.

Oy AMIE HARRIS had been sitting some time
i by the window, his eyes fixed upon the clouds,
which he watched very closely. At last he spoke:
“Mother, how curiously the clouds look! See, the
sun shines on some places, and don’t on others.
Why don’t it shine every where alike?”

Jamie is always thinking, and asking the reasons
of things, but he is not troublesome about it. So
his mother takes pleasure in teaching him. He
asks a great many questions about heaven, and
God, and Jesus Christ.






58 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE BOOK OF ANIMALS.

“8 VER since I went to the Aquarial Gardens,

te I have wanted to read about animals.
Don’t you, brother? How sorry I was for that
poor bear, that had only just room enough in his
cage to turn round in! Father said that his home
was in a cold country, where there was ice all the
year. I want to read about bears.”

“But wasn’t you glad that the lion was in a
cage? How ugly he looked when he was fed, and
the tiger too! Father says that tigers and cats
are the same kind of animals.”

“T have a book, sister, which is a history of ani-
mals. Let us sit on the grass and read it.”




THE MENAGERIE. 59



——YADE. SON mili =’ —..

THE BEAR.

N the frozen regions of the North the White
Bear is found. It makes a house for itself by
digging a hole in the ice or snow. But why don’t
it freeze to death? Because it is fitted by its
Creator for the climate where it lives. God has
covered it with a warm coat of long, coarse fur.
He has given it large, soft paws, so that it can walk
easily on the ice.
| Bears dive into the water, and catch fish and
| seals. They have a strong affection for their
| young, and, when attacked, will fight for them
| till they are themselves killed.
















60 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE ELK.

YB ime years ago, the Elk, or, as it is some-
: times called, the Moose-deer, lived in all the

New England States. Now it is found chiefly in
Maine. It is a great, awkward-looking animal,
with a hump on its back, and branching horns on
its head. These horns are often a yard long.

The Indians used to value the Elk very highly.
Its flesh was their food. Clothes were made out
of its skin, and also a covering for their tents.
The horns were made into dippers and other need-
ful articles. Every part of the animal was useful
to those poor people, who had so few of the com- |}
forts and productions of civilized life.

nee oto

es

a aera


THE MENAGERIE. 61



ee a a ee ene ee ee





THE KANGAROO.

Hi Kangaroo was found in New Holland by
CY? the people who first sailed around the world.
It is of a singular form, having a small head, a
large body, with short fore legs, while the hinder
ones are more than a yard long. Grass is its
principal food, and it laps water like a dog. It
leaps like a frog, sometimes twenty feet at once.
Kangaroos are hunted by dogs, and when one is
about to be caught, he will sometimes seize the
dog, and hug it to death. If the dog overtakes it
in the water, the animal will draw the dog under

ee Se

// and drown it.






62



THE LION.

(SHE Lion is called the king of beasts. It is

A, large and strong, being, when full grown,
eight feet long and four feet high. It can run with
a buffalo in its mouth.

Lions keep pretty quiet in the daytime, but at
night they steal softly about to catch their prey.
They roar terribly when they make an attack.

The Lion very much resembles a cat, and has
just such claws, only larger.

Did you ever read the story of Daniel in the
den of lions? Can you tell why it was that he
was not killed by them?


“s+. <.

se.





THE MENAGERIE. 63



FIELD MICE.

SHE little animals that are eating the grain
Oy are mice; not of the kind that runs about our
houses, in the closets and pantries, tasting of many
things they ought not. These live in the fields,
and make their nests in the tall grass and grain.
They pick out the seeds, and lay them away care-
fully for winter.

The farmers do not like to have mice make nests
in their fields, for though they are so little, they do
much mischief. Their nests are round, with a small
opening on the top. Who told them how to build
thus, so that if the nest is thrown down, the little
ones will not fall out ?


THE OPOSSUM.

Once this is a new style of traveling in-

deed! An Opossum giving a ride to her
little family. This animal is a little larger than a
cat. The Creator has formed the mother with a
pouch in which she carries her little ones; but
oftener she takes them on her back, hanging by
their tails. The Opossum climbs from tree to tree
by means of its tail, which is twisted around the
branches.

Did you ever hear of a boy’s “ playing ’possum”?
That is when he tries to deceive by pretending to
be what he is not. ‘The Opossum, when the hunter
is after him, will lie down and pretend to be dead.






THE MENAGERIE. 65



| a \
Deri I

THE PEACOCK.

YSHE Peacock is called a “silly bird;” I sup-
Or pose it is because it struts about, and spreads
its tail, and seems to say, “Look at me: see how
fine I am.” |

A gentleman sent home to his children a pair of
peacocks. The male walked about with his tail
spread grandly, while the female was a plain-look-
ing brown bird. One day the male flew into the
yard, all bloody; his long tail was gone. Some cruel
boys had caught him, and pulled out all his bright
feathers. He was so much hurt that he soon died.


66 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK



THE QUAGGA.

2 SUPPOSE that my little friends will think
that this animal is a zebra; butitis not. zebra is not so large, and the stripes are more regu-
lar, and of a deeper color.
This is the Quagga of South Africa. It is a
fierce animal, and goes about the country in large

droves. The natives eat the flesh. The Quagga

had not been tamed until a hunter thought he
would try it, and contrived to catch some of them.
After a few days of kicking and running away,
they were obliged to yield, and soon were broken
to the saddle and harness.




THE MENAGERIE. 67



THE RHINOCEROS.

HE Rhinoceros is a large, clumsy animal,

having a shape somewhat like that of a hog.
Its skin is very thick and tough, so that it will
resist a spear, and it is said even a musket ball
can not pierce it. Upon its snout is a very stout
and sharp horn of ivory, sometimes two.

The rhinoceros often engages in battle with the
elephant. Its thick hide defends it from the power-
ful blows of its adversary’s trunk, and the thrust
of his great tusks. Sometimes he will dash at the
elephant and rip open his side with his sharp horn.
Many think that the unicorn mentioned in the
Scriptures was the rhinoceros.


68 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

S \S
as T NX
CBE.

GERSES

THE SQUIRREL.

Wc E- my little readers visit Boston Common in the
pb summer, they will surely see some gray squir-
rels hopping about on the ground, and running up
the trees. They are pretty little creatures, with a
Sharp nose, whiskers like a cat, bright eyes that
keep a sharp lookout, and a large, bushy tail.

One day a little boy sat there with some chestnuts
in his pocket. He threw one of them upon the
ground, and one of the squirrels came and ate it.

The boy then laid a nut upon his knee; and Bunny |

crept cautiously up and seized that too. At last
the boy opened his pocket, and in went the squirrel
out of sight.




THE MENAGERIE. 69

SES]

|

\ \ Seer =
\ .

NS SOY
YS ee



THE TIGER. —

HIS fierce-looking animal, with black and yel-
CP” low stripes, is a Tiger. It is nearly as. large
as the lion, but it has no mane. Its skin, which is
valuable, is spyead on the floors, in China, and used
to sit on. The Tiger roams about among the
bushes and tall grass, and is ready to attack any
traveler it may chance to find.

Mr. Lindley, the missionary from Africa, saw
many tigers, but none attacked .him. One day, a
large one came and seated itself on the hill oppo-
site his house. There he watched, thinking, per-
haps, to catch one of the children for supper, until
he was killed.




70 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE ZEBU.

MPYHIS sleepy-looking animal, with long ears and
Or short horns, 1s called the Zebu, or Sacred
Bull of India. It is generally white, or of a cream
color. Sometimes it is no larger than a dog, but
commonly is as big as an ox.- The people think it
is very wicked to kill one, or eat any of the flesh.
Some of the white bulls are made to carry heavy
burdens, but others walk about from place to place
and help themselves to any thing they like. If one
of them lies down in the road t6 rest, the traveler
is obliged to go around it, or wait until the lazy
animal chooses to get up. How foolish it is to pay
so much veneration to a brute beast !




















THE HINDU BOY.

C 5 HEATHEN boy, whose name was Shun-
kuru, one day found a little book by the
road-side. It was a part.of the New Testament,
and told of Jesus Christ, who died on the cross for
sinners. He wanted to know more about Jesus.
So he traveled a very long journey, and at last
found a missionary who instructed him. Then he
began to love Christ, and went from town to town
to read the Bible to others.
Afterward he became a Christian minister, and
went home to teach his friends the way of life.
His aged mother also became a Christian.




72, CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE AFRICAN BOY.

OF an natives of Africa had no knowledge of the
6

true God until missionaries went there and 7

hgtes\r>
diel olay view

taught them. They are. negroes, and have woolly
hair and thick lips, and for this reason some people
despise them, as though they were to blame for
being what God made them. But they are human
beings, and have immortal souls. Jesus died for
them as well as for white men, and in heaven they
will be “made white in the blood of the Lamb.”

Men, women, and children are stolen, every year,
and brought to this country to be sold as slaves;
many die on the way.

“= ges homes Bid Geesedenr*
hee settee ht


ee ee

PT eR



MISSIONARY SCENES. 13



A PRAYING MILL.

. Cn can this picture mean ?, 1 don't

think you can guess. This man sits on
fhe: A watching a praying machine, which is
being turned round by the water which runs out
of that pipe. |
A praying machine! What is that? Prayers
are written upon this box, and every time it turns
round, the owner imagines that he prays once.
So, the faster it turns, the more prayers he offers.
Thus the man is saved the trouble of praying himself.
Surely God ‘will not hear such prayer as this.
He looks upon the heart.






TA. - CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



GOING TO SCHOOL.

On these boys running to school. They live ||
¢-) in Southern India, where it is very hot. There ||
the people are all dark colored. They do not wear |}
clothing, as we do, but have only a piece of cloth |
around their bodies. —

Let us go into the school house. Here are no |
desks, or seats, or books, or slates. The children |
learn the A B C by making letters in the sand
with their fingers, and they recite their lessons in
the same way.

But what have they upon their backs? They |
are books made of dried leaves. 3
MISSIONARY SCENES. 75

Yy,

ga

ae

Pe czas tcond ne ets u



MEKHIEL.

(Vern was a little Nestorian boy who
| A, lived far away in Persia. His home was
up in the mountains, with his father and sister.
The father was a good man, and used to take his
| boy to the plains in the winter, so that he might go
to school. |

| He had learned much about. the Testament be-
|fore he was eight years old. Once, when some
robbers were taking away his father’s coat, he said,
“Give them your cloak also, father, as the Lord
Jesus has said.” He wanted to be a missionary,
but God took him to himself.





|
|


76 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

ae ete el Se Se 8 ee

NTE



THE AUSTRALIAN BOY.









WHERE are people in the world who not only |
On eat cats, Snakes, toads, and other animals |
without being cooked, but human flesh! Hog
shocking it is, and wicked ! |

This boy who is lying on the grass lived in Anal
tralia, where the people do such things. But a|
missionary took him into his family, and he soon
learned to read. *

One day he stole some bread which was in the
oven, after which he was afraid, and ran away.
When the teacher asked him why he ran away, he
said, “Me stole bread; me feel very bad.” 3
ee ee ee ne ore

MISSIONARY SCENES. T7





SNAKE WORSHIP.

N India the people worship a god in the form
i of a snake. Shesh wanted to see this god,
and his heathen teacher told him to repeat a prayer
before the idol eight thousand times, and he would
see him; but Vishnu did not come. After this, he

| repeated a prayer one hundred and sixty-five times
| a day, but still the god did not come. Then he
| went to other places, and said more prayers, but
; | they were all in vain.

.
i

At last he went to Calcutta, and there he hear d

| of the Lord Jesus Christ. Then he gave up his
| idols, and became a Christian.


78 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



= SYP DE- Da Le

WANTING TO DO GOOD.

CWS LITTLE boy came to the house of a good
a a :
XE missionary who lived on one of the islands
of the Pacific. “I want to ring the bell for the
house of God,” said he. But they had there no
such bells as we have. They use a hollow piece

of wood, which they strike upon with a stick to

make a noise. This calls the people to church and
the children to school. About three years later
the boy came again, saying, “I wish to become a

man of God, and join the church.” Once more he |}
came, and said he wished to go far away and) |
preach the gospel about Jesus Christ. And he went. |

:

eee ae ae

paar pe
ONCE ee





MISSIONARY SCENES. 79



THE BURMAN BOY.

(6% N a very hot day, a missionary in India sat
XP by the door of his house. When any one
passed, who was willing to stop, he told him there
was a better religion than that of Brahma. By and
by, a man leading a little boy came along. The
boy wanted to stop, but the father would not.

| But the man’s wife was a Christian, and when she
died she left the Gospel of Matthew for her hus-
| band to read. He read it, and soon after, brought
| his boy to be instructed in the new religion. Both
became Christians, and died suddenly of the chol-
| era, talking of the Lord Jesus and trusting in him.
80 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



AN INDIAN TENT.

(SHIS is the tent of an Indian; rather small,
% certainly, but large enough to eat, drink, and
sleep in. A flat stone laid on the ground is the
fireplace, and the smoke goes off through the roof.
There is no need of windows.

In this tent lies a sick man. He is a “medicine
man,” that is, a doctor, and head man of the tribe.
He used to be a strange doctor, beating on a drum,
and doing other foolish things to cure sick people.
After he became old, he heard the missionaries
tell about Jesus. Then he left off his bad ways, and
became a Christian. He died trusting in the Saviour.


MISSIONARY SCENES. 81



IDOLS.

[WERE are three men hard at work. They
rf are making idols. But what does the Bible
say about this? “Thou shalt not make any graven
images. Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them,
nor serve them.” And these men are doing just
what God tells them not to do. One is sawing a
log, another is making a serpent, and the third is
shaping the head of an elephant.

The people bow down before these images and
worship them. They pray to a piece of wood.

Let us pray for the heathen, and send mission-
aries to teach them the only living and true God.











82 . GHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

HEATHEN MOTHER.

~ ee
on

Ds) FEW years ago, as a missionary in Afra
Hd was traveling, he found a poor, feeble, ol
woman sitting all alone by the side of the oad
He asked why she sat there. She told him that
she was old, and could not work any more, so ie
children had left her there to die. The fifth co m
mandment says, “Honor thy father and mother
but these people had never heard of it. Poor ol
woman! -

The religion of the heathen is very cruel.
leads them to let.their parents starve to dea

when they can work no longer.
MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 83

=
SSE



LAZINESS.







HIS young man, who is sitting on the ground,
_& with an old hat and no shoes, is lazy and
‘poor. When he was a little boy he had no mother
pe make home a pleasant place for him; so he went
an ong idle boys, and learned their bad tricks and
V vicked words.
_ First he began to think that it was very brave
te ‘learn to smoke cigars, and was rarely seen with-
ut one in his mouth. Oh, how sick it made him
t first! but he soon got over it, and smoked all
day long. This made him thirsty, and he must
rink beer and cider. But these did not satisfy
c. long; so he drank brandy, and became at last
m serable and poor —a warning to all.
84

I lphesese oo S
ih ri ee aa
Hs

Mh a

penn

ee --- ob
oe
a yA



._ THE BEGGAR.

Oe oy do you suppose this little begga
NMS boy, Bill White, is thinking about? H

has a clean, pleasant face, though his clothes an







ragged and old. There he sits, leaning on hi
basket, and his thoughts are something like th ose
“Oh, dear. I wish I was not a beggar boy
I hate to go to people’s houses, and ask for. col
victuals. They look sharp at me, just as_
was a thief. I never was a thief, and I never w
be a thief. Mr. Waldron says he was a poor b 8
once. I wonder if he was as poor asI am. I wi
ask him to let me work for him. I can work ¢
fast as a man, and I will not beg. any more.” |
Ought not that boy to be encouraged?












MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 85

THE SPELLING CLASS.

Be ERE is Miss Smith, and a part of her little
: G flock. They dearly love her, and are always
pet to obey her.

_ In this class are three girls and two boys. They
a spelling, and some of the words are pretty hard,
‘such as d-e-l-i-g-h-t. Little Totty spells it d-e-l-i-t-e,
and none can spell it rightly. So their kind teacher
| does it for them.

E My little friends are not always careful to im-
: prove their time while they are at school, and they
4 will be sorry for it when they grow older. In the
last great day, we must all give an account of our-
selves to God.

_ Shall you be ready?
CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.





MY PUSSY.

* OU never saw such a kitten as I have got.
~ I call her Malta. She is a first-rate mouser,
and sometimes she catches birds and squirrels. I
have to scold her hard when she does so, although
I suppose she knows no better.

Malta is very fond of milk. I give her a cupful
every night. After she has sipped it up, we have
a good frolic.

Kittens can not learn to read or to work, as I can.
It is because they have no souls. I must not play
all the time, as they do, but strive to be useful, and
be prepared for heaven at last.




MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 87



ERRAND OF LOVE.

(SHESE children are going on an errand of
Ob kindness. Maggie and John are carrying a
large basket which their mother has filled for
widow Jones; and little Totty wants to help too;
so she takes hold of one side. Happy children,
who are thus early taught to do good!

Widow Jones is poor and sick. She likes to have
these little folks come to see her, because they are
pleasant and kind. They always expect she will
tell them at least one Bible story, for widow Jones
loves the Bible, and almost knows it by heart. Its
precious words give her great joy.





88 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

TEMPTATION.







- oe sinners entice thee, consent thou not.”

i Bill Price is enticing little Robbie to do
wrong. He is trying to make him play truant
from school, and tells him that no one will know it.

Go away, Bill Price. You ought to be ashamed
of yourself to do such a mean, wicked thing. Bill
promises to give Robbie all sorts of good things
if he will go with him, and Robbie hesitates. He
ought to say, “No, I will not go with you, and dis-
obey my kind mother;” but he wants to go, and he
wants to stay. “A wise son maketh a glad father,
but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.”
MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 89



THE CAGE.

(OIL HO has not seen a squirrel house with its
WM‘ wire wheel ?

How funny the squirrel looks running on the
wires! Now he is up, then he is down. When he
is tired, he darts into the house and gets some-
thing to eat, and then comes out again. Now he
sits still, his little bright eyes looking right at you,
with both cheeks full, and nibbles away at his
nuts.

God has given strong teeth to these little crea-
tures, so that they can bite nuts and get the meats.
In the summer, they lay up food for the winter.






90 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



LEARNING TO SEW.

“ Op LEASE, mamma, let me sew.”

Pe “Yes, dear, you may. There, take this
needle and piece of calico.”

“Oh, dear! the thread will not stay in the needle,
mamma. Please to thread it for me.”

Her mother threaded it, and Susie began again.

“There, mamma, see that stitch; it is as little as
yours.”

“That is right. Be careful, or the thread will
come out again.”

“ How nice I can sew! I can do all your sewing
when I get bigger. Shan’t I be a useful little girl?”


MISCELLANEOUS SCENKS.

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THE SICK MOTHER.

RS. MAY has been sick a long time. She

has suffered much pain, and is very weak.

But it has been a great comfort to her that Carrie
has been so thoughtful, and done so much to re-
lieve her. She keeps the room tidy, and gives her
mother the medicine which the doctor left for her.


92 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.

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THE RUMSELLER.

WVHE man who stands behind the counter is a_
C rumseller; the other is a temperance man,
who has come in to talk with him. He tells him
that rumselling is a wicked business. He asks him
to look about and see the families of his customers.
How poor they are! Besides, the men are them-
selves being ruined for this world and the next. ||
Boys, too, go to his shop, and get beer, ale, and ||
cider. Soon they will want brandy. They will find
at last, that “it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth
like an adder.”


MISCELLANEOUS SCENES. 93

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THE PLEASANT CALL.

(8) Ay. ELL, Mary, how do you do this morn-
Â¥y ing? I always find you at work in your
neat kitchen. How are the children ?”

“They are well, thank you, and have gone to
school. It is a long way to the school house, but
they are never willing to stay at home.”

_ “Tam glad to hear it,” replied Mrs. May. “Do
they go to the Sabbath school too ?”

“Yes, indeed, ma’am, and they don’t need any
urging to go. The Sabbath school helps me
greatly, too, in training them.”


94 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



THE THUNDER-STORM.

“ M,ROTHER, do you see that black cloud? |
XS I really think there will be a thunder- ||

storm. I am sorry that we did not go home be-

fore. There, did you hear the thunder? Iam so |

afraid! Let us run fast.”

“You forget, sister, that hymn in the Songs for |

the Little Ones :—

‘When the black cloud rises high,
When it spreads along the sky,
When the forkéd lightnings fly,

And the thunders roar,
Never will I feel alarm;
God can shield me from all harm,
In the sunshine or the storm:
Him will I adore.’ ”

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THE STORY.

YOUSIN Alice is telling a true story to
Dora, Lewis, and Phemy.

One day in winter, a man took his little son with
him to visit a neighbor who lived two miles off.
The men drank until they became tipsy. Then
the father started for home with his child, but the
spirit made him weak and sleepy; so he lay down
and would go no further. It was very cold, and
the boy was afraid his father would freeze; so he
took off his little overcoat and spread it on him,
then his jacket, then lay down, and put his arms
about him. Thus the child died to save his father.
Jesus Christ died for us.




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96 CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK.



LOOKING IN THE GLASS.

YoITTLE Ellis is looking at herself in the glass
Ea in Mrs. May’s dressing room. Her face is
dark, and her hair curly, and some despise her be-
cause God made her so. Often has she cried be-
cause of the taunts and abuse she has received on
this account.

Ellis is thinking of this now. “They say God
made every body; so I suppose he made me. I
wonder why he made me black.” Take courage,
Ellie. He will not despise you. Love and obey
him, and you shall be his own child in heaven.
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