Citation
Red snow and other parables from nature

Material Information

Title:
Red snow and other parables from nature
Creator:
Gatty, Alfred, 1809-1873
R. Clay, Son and Taylor ( Printer )
Bell and Daldy ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Bell and Daldy
Manufacturer:
R. Clay, Son, and Taylor
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
187 p., [4] leaves of plates : ill. ; 13 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1862 ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1862 ( local )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Citation/Reference:
Wolff, R.L. 19th cent. fiction,
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Alfred Gatty.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026781015 ( ALEPH )
21279629 ( OCLC )
ALH0574 ( NOTIS )

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RED SNOW

AND OTHER

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THIRD SERIES.



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RED SNOW

AND OTHER

PARABLES FROM NATURE.

THIRD SERIES.

BY

MRS. ALFRED GATTY,

AUTHOR OF “‘ AUNT JUDY’S TALES,’’ &C.

‘“« Trust me, that for the instructed, time will.come
When they shall meet no object but may teach
Some acceptable lesson to their minds
Of human suffering, or of human joy.’’
WorbDswortH.

LONDON:
BELL AND DALDY, 186, FLEET STREET.

M.DCCC.LXITI.

[ The right of Translation is reserved. }



LONDON =
R. CLAY, SON, AND TAYLOR, PRINTERS,
BREAD STREET HILL.



RED SNOW.



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RED SNOW.*

**Or tu chi se’, che vuoi sedere a scranna,
Per giudicar da lungi mille miglia
Con la veduta corta d’una spanna?”—DANTE.

** And who art thou, that on the stool wouldst sit

To: judge at distance of a thousand miles,

With the short-sighted vision of a span?”
Cary’s Translation.
Litrte Siegfried, the widow’s son, climbed day
by day up the hill which overlooked his mother’s
cottage, and rambled about on the top, running
after birds and insects, and gathering the beauti-

ful wild-flowers that grow on the Swiss Alps.

There the dark blue gentians, and the Alpine
rose,y as it is called, and campanulas and salvias,

* Protococcus nivalis. + A dwarf rhododendron.

B 2



4 RED SNOW.

are almost as common as the cowslips and daisies
of English fields, and, from the brightness of
their colours, make the hill-sides look like gardens,
instead of uncultivated ground.

Little Siegfried’s father had been killed in
battle, some months before his child’s birth, and
so, when he came into the world, he was cradled
in tears instead of smiles ; and what wonder if
he grew up less thoughtless and gay than other
boys of his age.

It was his mother who had first shown Sieg-
fried where to climb the hill, and where to find
the finest flowers ; and had made him look at the
hills still higher than their own, by which their
valley was enclosed, and had pointed out to him
Mont Blanc in the distance, looming like a
shadowy giant in the sky.

For thus and thus had her husband shown her
all these things, during the few happy months of
their marriage, before he was called away to the
wars ; and on the same heights where the child
now roamed after flowers, his parents had sat
together among theni, in quiet summer evenings,



RED SNOW. 5

sometimes talking, sometimes’ reading, always -
praising God for the happiness he was permitting
them to enjoy. ;

But having thus led her child to the spot so
fondly endeared to herself, and bidden him rejoice
in the sights and scenes of Nature, and told him
of the protecting God of goodness who ruled over
all, the widowed mother went back alone to her
cottage, to weep out in secret her re-awakened
grief. Siegfried, meanwhile, amused himself on
the flowery heights, his new play-ground; and
after he had gathered for his mother the nosegay
she had asked him to bring, he lay down on the
soft turf, and looked round at the hills, and up to
the snowy sides of the huge Mont Bianec, (of
which he could see so much more here than down
in the valley below,) till it took possession of his
fancy as something wonderful and grand ; some-
thing far beyond the flowers, bright and lovely as
they were.

And ever afterwards, day by day, when he had
had enough of chasing and rambling, he used to
lie down in the same place, and look at the hills



6 RED SNOW.

in the same way, that he might feel again what
he had felt at first.

Yet he found no sameness in the sight. The
clouds that sometimes lifted themselves up from,
and at other times came down over, the moun-
tain, were never quite alike. ‘he shadows that
flitted across it varied from day to day in their
shape and size and course; and the sunshine that
broke over it was of many different tints, and lit
it up in a thousand different ways. At one time
it was wrapt in a silvery haze; at another the
air became so clear, that the child could see the
glittering of the snow atoms, as they seemed to
dance in and out, like the stars in the sky.

So Siegfried never wearied of watching the
huge mountain, but got to love it more and more,
with a love mixed with respectful awe, and a feel-
ing as if it had some sort of life and consciousness.

At last, one day, when his mother was putting
his little basket in his hand, that he might go on
the hill as usual to play, he asked her if he might
go to the top of Mont Blanc instead, and if she
would show him the way.



RED SNOW. a

It was no wonder that the good widow smiled,
as she told him that neither he nor she were able
to climb up such a terrible mountain. But she
did smile; and although she noticed how the
little face flushed over as she spoke, she thought,
naturally enough, that this was because of his
disappointment So, kissing him lovingly, she
said, “ You must be a great strong man, Siegfried,
before you can scramble up the heights of Mont
Blanc; and even for great strong men the way is
very dangerous. And even if you were there,
you would find nothing but cold and snow and
misery ; neither life nor flowers: our own hills
are as pleasant again.”

So Siegfried went away. with his basket ; but
instead of running about and picking flowers, he
threw himself at once upon the ground, and
looked at the mountain, and cried, for he felt
very sorry at what his mother had said, Pre-
sently, however, he wiped his eyes, and looked
again ; then sprang up and stared before him as
if surprised. All the distance was bathed in
bright sunshine, and the air was more transparent



8 RED SNOW.

than usual, and, lo! a round rosy-coloured patch
was Visible on the far-off snows. He had never
seen it before. What could it be? He thought
he knew; and running hastily down to the cot-
tage, threw open the door, and shouted in delight,
“ Mother! there is a rose on Mont Blanc!”

Siegfried’s mother did not laugh now, for she saw
the child was excited ; and she was grieved for him.
Ah! he had only half the love that should have been
his ; she must console him as best she could ; he
was not like other boys, she knew—and thinking
this, she took him on her knee, and tried to ex-
plain to him that it must be only some accidental
light from the sky that caused the rosy patch,
for that no vegetation of any kind grew on the
sides of the snowy mountain ; there could be no
roses there; and she knew that it often looked pink
in the evening sun—only now it was not evening.

Siegfried was silent for a few seconds, and
hung down his head ; but presently he murmured
out, “ Why ?”

“ Ah, Siegfried!” cried the mother, “is it not
enough that God chooses it to be so? Itis He



RED SNOW. 9

who sends the everlasting snows there, and the
flowery herbage here.”

“JT am very sorry for the mountain,” persisted
little Siegfried, sadly ; so sadly that his mother
grieved for the fanciful child, and asked should
she go up with him again to the hill, and see the
rosy patch on the snow herself? On which the
smiles came back to Siegfried’s face, and they
went away together very happily, and with the
basket as usual ; for, said the mother, “ You came
back empty-handed to-day, Siegfried, and brought
me no flowers.”

But, by the time they reached the old spot,
heavy mists had come down over the landscape,
and neither Mont Blanc nor its rosy patch could
be seen. Even Siegfried laughed at the journey
they had had for nothing, and, after filling his
basket, was contented to return home; but in
doing so, he began to talk again.

“Tf we had fewer flowers, Mother, we should
be quite as happy, and then the great mountain
could have some too. I wish God would make
things equal,”



10 RED SNOW.

“Tush, little Siegfried, hush!” cried his
mother, in a half whisper ; “God has a right to
do what He pleases, and we must not dispute
about it, nor wish it otherwise. He chooses that
there shall be desolate places as well as pretty
ones in the world; outcast ends of the earth, as
it were, which nobody seems to care for, as well
as happy valleys. I am afraid it is the same with
human beings—men and women, I mean—which
is much worse. I am afraid there are many out-
cast, God-deserted men, as well as desolate moun-
tains. But you are too young to understand
such things.”

‘he mother sighed as she spoke. Verily, she
did not understand such things herself.

And so they walked on a few steps farther,
and then the boy began again,

“At any rate, the top of the mountain is
nearer Heaven than our hill, Mother. It goes
right into the blue.”

“No, no,” cried the widow, passionately ; “it
only looks to be so. It is no nearer the real
Heaven than we are. If it were, oh! would I



RED SNOW. ll

not have gone there long ago, at the risk of life
itself!”

The child looked up surprised at his mother,
for she spoke in tones very unusual to her; and
seeing how sad her face was, he wondered to
himself if she, also, were fretting that Mont Blanc
was so miserable and forlorn.

And, snatching the nosegay from the basket,
he flung the flowers as far into the air as he
could, exclaiming, ‘There! I wish you had wings,
and would fly away to the mountain, and make it
look beautiful, too!”

Nothing more was spoken between them, but
after little Siegfried had said his evening prayers,
and gone to bed, and while the mother was sitting
alone in the chamber below, she heard a sound
of crying ; and, going up-stairs, found the boy in
tears, the only account he could give of which
was, that he could not help thinking about the
poor outcast, God-deserted mountain.

Now, she had not called the mountain God-
deserted. That was his own disturbed idea; a
confusion he had got into from what his mother



12 RED SNOW.

had said. But how hard this was to explain!
How painful to touch the chords of a subject
which jarred so cruelly against the natural hopes
and faith of a gentle heart !

How difficult also for one who had known the
stern realities of sorrow, to ‘feel along” the
more delicate “line” of an infant’s dreamy griefs !

He was soothed by degrees, however, and after
she left him, her thoughts soon wandered away
from what she felt to be his fanciful troubles
about the desolate mountain, to her own strug-
gles with her desolate heart.

The next day was Sunday, and Siegfried was
able to walk to the somewhat distant church, and
even to repeat a few of the prayers, and listen,
now and then, to bits of the sermon, when his
mother thought there was something he could
understand, and drew his attention to it.

But on this particular day there was no need
for her to call his attention to the preacher ; nay,
had she been able, she would have been very glad
to have prevented his hearing him at all. But
how could he help hearing, when the pastor, ad-



RED SNOW. 13

dressing his flock, asked if there was a single one,
young or old, amorg them, who had not gazed
hundreds and hundreds of times at the giant
mountain of their land—the snow-covered, inac-
cessible heights of Mont Blanc ?

Siegfried and his mother looked at each other,
and his heart leapt within him, to think that now,
at last, he should hear something about his mys-
terious friend; and, clasping his mother’s hand
tightly in his own, he listened for every word.

But, alas ! for what he heard. The pastor, after
describing the mountain in all the magnificence
of its size and form, painted it as being, neverthe-
less, the region of hopeless desolation ; the abode
of everlasting lifelessness and despair. Cold,
hard, insensible, what could rouse it from its
death-like torpor? ‘The life-giving sun shone
upon it from day to day, from age to age ; but no
influence from its rays ever penetrated that
frozen bosom. The dews fell upon it, the storms
burst over it, equally in vain. Unmoved, it lifted
up its gloomy crest to Heaven, as if defying its
very Maker to touch the stony depths and bid



14 RED SNOW.

the waters flow, or warm and soften them into
life and gladness!

Siegfried was already in tears, but what fol-
lowed was still worse, for the pastor now called
upon his congregation to consider whether there
was not something in the moral world of which
the insensible mountain was but the too faithful
type? And then he answered himself, Yes !—
the hardened human heart, the wicked natural
heart, the Pharaoh-heart of the multitude, on
whichthe sunshine of Divine Grace and the storms
of Divine Wrath were equally poured out in vain.

Yet, that “ offences must needs come,” he was
well aware ; that such God-deserted beings as he
had spoken of, must come up and be cut down,
he knew: “vessels of wrath. appointed to de-
struction.” But, oh! might none of the congre-
gation now before him be of the number of those
lost ones! Might all there present take warning
henceforth, as they turned their eyes to the stiff-
necked hill of their native country, and flee from
the wrath of the Lamb !

Siegfried’s sobs had by this bist become so



RED SNOW. 15

uncontrollable, that the neighbours were dis-
turbed ; and the widow thought the best thing
she could do, was to rise up and leave the church
with her child.

There was no use in arfuing with him ; he was
both too young and too much distressed ; added
to which, his mother was scarcely less pained
by the stern words than he was.

She, too, could have wept to think of “ vessels
of wrath appointed to destruction,” and longed to
hope against hope for the world of her fellow-
creatures. In the material world she had but
little interest, for she knew but little about it,
and had not sufficiently considered the text which
says that “God’s mercy is over a// His works ;”
not limited to one class of creatures, or even to
one sort of life.

Feeling as she did, therefore, she entered into
no discussion with her boy, but through the
home evening contrived to divert his mind, by
reading him pleasant stories of good people who
had lived in favour with God, and had died full
of hope and peace.



16 RED SNOW.

Nevertheless, Siegfried’s last thought, as he
fell asleep, was not of comfort and joy in the
righteous, but of pity and almost love for all the
wretched things for whom there seemed no hope.

The next day, his mother would fain have per-
suaded him to remain below in the valley, and
seek some new amusement, but finding she could
not reconcile him to the idea of forsaking his
favourite haunt, she gave way, though with a
sigh ; and so, after his little daily tasks and helps
to her were ended, he climbed up the heights as
usual. |

It was well that he had promised his mother
to teaze her no more about the matter. Other-
wise, on that day, he would have made more fuss
shan ever, for, when the sun was at the highest,
the rosy flush reappeared on the distant snow,
only not now confined to one small patch, but
spread in broad tracts of delicate colour, which
threatened to cover the whole mountain with its
Aurora-like tint,

Once or twice Siegfried’s resolution to keep his
promise nearly gave way, but he held out man-



_ RED SNOW. 17

fully even to the last, contenting himself, on his
return into the valley, with inquiring of a neigh-
bour’s son, whom he met driving home his
father’s cattle, why some of the snow on the hills
looked pink? At first the boy said he didn’t
know, but presently he recollected that he had
heard it said, that red snow fell sometimes out of
the sky. Very likely that was it; but what it
was, or what became of it, he had no notion.
Only it went away as it came.. Nothing ever
stopt on the hill but the snow that was always
there.

Hearing this, Siegfried had no longer even a
wish to speak to his mother about it. She would
say it was because the mountain was so cold and
hard, no good thing, even from Heaven, could
stay upon it!

And thus a day or two passed, and the tracts
of rosy colour grew fainter, and finally disap-
peared, as the farmer’s son had said was always
the case; and Siegfried never spoke about it
again, but sat on the hill-side daily, wondering
and dreaming to himself.

C



18 RED SNOW. —

But he was interrupted at last. One morning,
when the snow looked colder and whiter than
ever against the blue sky, and he had been sitting
for a while, with his face hidden by his hands, a
voice he did not know called to him, asking what
he was doing. And when he lifted up his eyes,
a stranger stood between him and Mont Blanc.

A child always answers “ Nothing” to such a
question, for children never feel thinking to be
doing anything.

But the stranger would not be so easily satis-
fied, and smiling, persisted in his inquiries.

“ What are you thinking of then, little boy ?
One must be either doing or thinking while one
is awake. And I want you to talk to me. I
have come from such a long way off, and am so
weary.”

Here the stranger seated himself by Siegfried’s
side on the grass.

“First,” continued he, “I want you to tell me,
if you can, whether I can get to the town o \.
through the pretty valley here at the bottom of
this hill? Then, I want you to tell me for whom





RED SNOW. 19

you have picked this basket of flowers? Then,
why you are on this wild hill-side alone? Then,
what you think about when you cover up your
face with your hands? Now, then, can I get to
the town through the valley ?”

The voice that asked was so good-natured, and
the smile on the stranger’s face so kind, that
Siegfried was won at once, and looking full at his
new friend, and smiling himself, nodded assent to
this first question.

“Does your nod always mean yes, little boy ?”
asked the stranger, amused.

Siegfried nodded again.

“Very good. Now we understand each other,
Will you answer my other questions ?”

Siegfried gave another nod, and then they both
laughed, and the stranger went on.

“For whom have you gathered the flowers ?”

“For my mother.”

“ And why are you here alone?”

“To play.”

“ What, alone? Why?”

“T have nobody else to play with.”

Cc 2



20 RED SNOW.

“And what is it you think of when you sit
with your face covered up ?”

Siegfried’s heart melted within him, and, point-
ing by a sorrowful nod to the giant mountain, he
answered, “TI think of it.”

“Of it? What can you find in ¢ to think
about ?”

“Tam so sorry for it!” cried little Siegfried,
passionately; “so sorry it is so miserable and out-
cast, and that God will let nothing grow there,
while we have all these flowers ! ”

And once more he tossed the flowers contemp-
tuously out of the basket.
| “Ah, little boy,” said the stranger, putting his
arm kindly round the child, and drawing himself
nearer to him. “ You must answer another ques-
tion now. Who put such strange fancies into
your head? Who told you this about the poor
mountain ?”

“They all say so,” murmured Siegfried. “The
pastor preached about it on Sunday, and mother
says so, too, and the farmer’s son, and everybody ;
and I am so sorry, so very sorry!”



RED SNOW. 21

The young voice died away, as it were, in
regret.

“And why do you care so much about the
mountain, little boy ?”

Siegfried looked up, puzzled for a fhoment, but
very soon out came the simple, child-like answer,
“T look at it so much when I come,up here to
play.”

It was the stranger’s turn now to fel his eyes
moisten, as he thought of the solitary child send-
ing out his heart into the inanimate creation
round him.

Extremely interested, therefore, he made a few
more inquiries, and, by degrees, brought out a
part, at any rate, of what Siegfried’s motker and
the pastor between them had told and taught of
outcast countries and God-deserted men. All
was confusion in the child’s account, but the
drift of it could easily be discovered.

Without making a single remark, however, the
stranger smiled again, and said, quite cheerfully,
“T will tell you a secret, little boy. Neither the
pastor, nor your mother, nor the farmer’s son,



33 RED SNOW.

were ever up the mountain, I suspect, so they
cannot know very very much about it.”

“ T wanted to go, but they would not let me,”
interposed Siegfried. ‘They said I was not able
to get up.”

“They said right,” replied the stranger. “ But
I, you see, am older and stronger, and could go;
and I have been.”

Quietly as he purposely spoke, the effect of
what he said was, as he expected, very great.
Siegfried jumped up; then sat down; then once
more started from his seat, and was far more
anxious to run down the hill and tell his mother
the news, than to remain quietly where he was,
and hear what more the stranger had to tell. He
allowed himself to be controlled, however, and
his friend went on talking as if he had not been
interrupted.

“ And the place is neither lifeless nor deserted.
God sends it the beautiful red snow plant instead
of flowers. I have been gathering it for days.”

As he spoke, he unfastened from the leathern
strap that went across his shoulders a small tin



RED SNOW. 23

box, and, opening it for a moment, let Siegfried
peep at a bright carmine-coloured miss of some-
thing within.

The child was speechless at first, overpowered
by admiration and delight, but presently eX-
claimed, “Then that was what I saw!” adding,
gently, “ And it really came down from Heaven,
then?” He was thinking of what the farmer’s
son had said.

“ All good things come from Heaven, that is,
from the God of Heaven,” answered the stranger.
“But thisis as much a plant as the Alpine rose
by your side. It did not drop down from the
sky, but grows in the very snow itself, and covers
over miles and miles of the hill you thought so
desolate. God sends good things everywhere,
though not everywhere alike.”

Oh, the joy of such a doctrine! The simplest
child could understand it, and be glad! All was
explained now, too; the rosy patch and the broad
tracts of colour were both accounted for, and
Siegfried was as happy as he now believed the
mountain to be. And, embracing his new friend,



24 RED SNOW.

he forthwith beyan such a blundering account of
what he, and his mother, and the farmer’s boy,
had thought about the rosy patch, that the
stranger could do nothing but laugh, and at last
stopped him by exclaiming, “Then you see you
were all wrong; but never mind. Take me to
your mother’s cottage, and we will tell her all
about it, too, and I will show it to you both, for
even you have not really seen it yet.”

Siegfried’s mother welcomed the friendly
stranger whom her son brought to her door with
all the heartiness of a Swiss welcome; and not the
less when she found he was an English traveller,
on his way to a neighbouring town to visit a well-
known officer there, who had been deprived of
a limb in the same action in which Siegfried’s
father had lost his life.

And as the town was but a few miles off, and
the summer evenings so long, the stranger was
easily persuaded to rest for a few hours in the
Swiss cottage, and tellthe widow and her son the
history of his adventures on Mont Blanc, and of
the red snow plant he had brought from it. Not



RED SNOW. 25

that telling its history only would have been
enough ; nor was there anything ejther beautiful
or wonderful-looking in the red, jelly-like mass
in the tin box, when looked at only with the
naked eye. The stranger had me ‘nore in store
for them than that,

“Tam going to show you,” he siemens at last,
and after busying himself in unpacking that re-
vealer of secrets, a microscope,—‘ that God has
sent many more gracious things into the world
than people commonly think ; because so many
more than our natural eyes are able to see. Do
you like to know this, little Siegfried ?” he added,
turning purposely to the child. |

Siegfried nodded his heartiest nod of assent,
and the widow said, with a smile, “You should
have asked that question, Sir, of me. It is I
who have not believed, because I did not see.
He has had an instinct of the truth all along.”

“ Well, then, good Mother,” replied the stranger,
“you shall see and believe what will, I think,
comfort you for life—namely, that God makes the
very wilderness to burst forth and blossom like a



26 RED SNOW.

rose: that there are no outcast ends of the earth,
uncared for by Him; no desolate corners where
His goodness is not shown forth.”

As he spoke he finished the last adjustment of
the microscope, and touching the red jelly in
the tin box with the fine point of a porcupine’s
quill, he placed the tiny morsel so obtained in a
glass, to be looked at, and called to Siegfried to
have the first peep.

The widow, struck as she had been with the
stranger’s words, had her own doubts as to what
there could be to be seen, for she had not been
able to detect anything on the porcupine’s quill,
but she said nothing, and very soon Siegfried’s
shouts of delight announced that something, at
any rate, was there.

And, truly, what there was, was a very pretty
sight. Four or five bright little red balls, and
two or three colourless ones among them, were
lying like gems in the few drops of water which
had been put in to keep them separate.

The child believed at once, but at the first
moment the mother could scarcely credit what



RED SNOW. 27

she saw. That this should be a bit of the shape-
less stuff she had looked at in the tin box—it
was marvellous indeed.

' The stranger now proceeded to explain. He
told them that each of the red balls was a perfect
plant in itself. That it was a little colourless
bag, finer than gold-beater’s skin, filled with a
red substance, which shone through, That,as soon
as it was full grown, the red substance within
divided into four, eight, and sometimes sixteen
separate red balls, of course of the tiniest size
possible, all which immediately began to grow
very fast, and grew, and grew, and grew, till the
little bag in which they lived could hold them no
longer, but burst, and dropt them out.

“These,” said he, “are the young plants;
and when each of ¢hem is full grown, the same
thing happens again. The red substance in each
divides into other tiny balls, and, as these grow,
they burst out from the parent bag, (called a ce/i,
properly,) and begin life for themselves. And
thus comes another generation of the ball-like
plants, and so another and another ; and all this



28, RED SNOW.

so quickly, that, in a few hours, millions of them
have sprung from a few single cells. So now,
little Siegfried, you know why, when you looked
the second time at the rosy patch, it had spread
into those great broad tracts of colour which, in
fact, covered over miles of the poor snow with
its beauty. It was no wonder, was it?”

No, that was no wonder ; but that such things
were, of which so many people did not know, was
a wonder from which the good widow could not
easily recover. Besides, she was thinking of the
pastor having made such a mistake.

As for Siegfried, he had not lived long enough
to know why he should be so much surprised
about the red snow plant; was ita bit more
really strange than the growth of the Alpine rose,
which astonished nobody? So his chief feeling
was extreme delight at there being something on
the mountain to make amends for its want of
flowers.

“ And now,” said the stranger, “is there any-
thing more you would like toask?” __

The mother was about to speak at once, but



RED SNOW. 29

hesitated and drew back. She knew so little;
she feared to seem so ignorant and foolish.

Reassured, however, she begged to be told how
the marvellous plant could live amiflst nothing but
snow ; could come up, and bring forth a thousand
fold, with nothing to nourish and gupport it ?

The stranger repeated the word #zothing” with
a smile. ‘

“‘ Nothing, because we see nothing !”

“Ah, see what a bad habit is!” cried the
mother. “I had forgotten already. Then you
think there may be things I do not know of, in
what we call the cold, barren snow?”

“ Ay, ay,” was the answer; “germs of life,
hidden and buried, perhaps, for years; seeds
scattered no one can tell how or when ; and salts
and chemical properties, needing only some acci-
dent of a sunbeam, or dew, or state of the very
air, to make all work together, and the frozen
surface to become moist, and the red snow plant
to spring up by millions.”

Here he paused, and seeing little Siegfried
looking wistfully at him, as if trying to under-



30 RED SNOW

stand, he took him on his knee caressingly, and
said, “That microscope is a very curious thing, is
it not?”

The child nodded his “ yes”’ as heartily as ever,
and then laid his head, contentedly, on his friend’s
shoulder, while he went on talking.

“Yes ; it is very curious, for it shows us quan-
tities of things we could not see without it; but
the best lesson it teaches is, how much more
there may be of which, even with its help, we
can see and know nothing ; for, although there is
a limit to our power of seeing God’s works, no
naturalist dares to think he has reached the limits
of the works themselves. In this life we cannot
hope to know a hundredth part of the creations
which surround us. You can believe this now,
good Mother ?”

“With all my heart,” was her answer.

“ And, further,” he added, “ you can judge now
for yourself, that even of the things we do what
we call see with the naked eye, there are a great
many of which we can never know anything like
the real truth, without such aid as this (pointing



RED SNOW. ‘D1

to the microscope). What was the red snow
plant to you at first? A piece of shapeless
jelly. What did it become to your more enlight-
ened eye? A living organism, unmistakably from
Almighty hands, endowed with a system of life,
if not of life-enjoyment, peculiarly its own. This
is something to have discovered, certainly, but is
it all? Ah! as I tell it, I feel how imperfect the
account is—how much remains behind. All we
have done is but to have made a step or two out
of complete ignorance.

*¢¢The rest remaineth unrevealed.’

Yet. a glory comes into our hearts from the
thought of the worlds beyond reach of our present
senses, like the reflection from lightning below
our own horizon, and both faith and hope ought
to be strengthened.”

The widow did not speak.

“‘T have one word more to say,” continued the
stranger guest, “if you will allow me to say it,
and can forgive the old traveller for preaching as
well as teaching. I have taught you something of



32 RED SNOW

God’s doings in the natural world, which has
given you comfort and hope. What, then, you
believe of His works, believe also of His mercies.
If you cannot find a limit to the one, suspect
and hope that the other, too, may be infinite—far
beyond our comprehension. Will you try and
take this last lesson to heart ?”

The poor mother’s eyes filled with tears. She
had passed tremblingly through life, and sadly
needed the good counsel. ;

After a short pause, her counsellor went on,
firmly, but very kindly :—

“You have seen how weak and short-sighted
the natural eye is; can you for a moment sup-
pose that the spiritual eye is more far-seeing and
better able to acquaint you with God's purposes
and doings? Are His works to be infinite, and
His mercies bounded, so that a man can point to
the limit, and say, Here God’s mercy ceases ;
here there is no hope—but only everlasting lifeless-
ness and despair ? Oh, good Mother, to whom is
entrusted the rearing of a very tender plant, take
heed what you teach, and foster in it, above all



RED SNOW. 3a

other virtues, the charity which ‘hopeth all
things,’ and then can both believe and endure.”

The lesson was not spoken in vain even then,
and it was never forgotten. And Siegfried grew
on, and the stranger revisited the cottage many
times, and by-and-by aided in the education of
the child whose acquaintance he had made in so
singular a manner. And, after many years, the
young man, Siegfried, became a teachér himself —
a pastor—though not in his own country.

But never, through a long life, did he forget
his early hopes, and fears, and fancies, about
the desolate mountain, nor the lesson he learnt
from the stranger traveller. And into whatever
scenes of darkness and ignorance he forced hig
way; whatever he met with of sin and sorrow;
however often baffled, thrown back, and disap-
pointed, he never despaired ; for he used to recall
the past, and take comfort to himself by thinking,
“Tt may be God’s will yet, that the red snow
plant may one day burst into life on the cold
hill-side.”







WHEREUNTO?

D2







%

WHEREUNTO ?

**T see in part
. That all, as in some piece of art,
Is toil cdoperant to an end.”—TENNYSON.

“THis is dreadful! What can I do?”

“Why, follow me, to be sure! Here! quick!
sideways ! to the left! into this crevice of the
rock! there! all’s right !”

“Oh, it’s easy to talk, when people can trip
away as lightly as you do. But look at me with
the ground slipping away wherever I try to lay
hold.”

“Come along; all’s right,” repeated the Crab

(for such was the speaker) from his crevice in the
rock,



38 WHEREUNTO ?

And all was right certainly, as far as he was
concerned ; but as for the poor Star-fish, who was
left on the sand, all was as wrong as possible, for
he was much too hot ; and no wonder.

It was a low tide—a spring tide—and even for
a spring tide, a particularly low one ; for there
was very little wind astir, and what there was,
blew off the shore.

So the rocks were uncovered now, which sel-
dom tasted the air, and the stems of the great
oarweed, or tangle, which grew from them, were
bent into a half-circle by the weight of their
broad leathery fronds, as, no longer buoyed up
by the sea, they lay trailing on the sands.

What a day it was, to be sure! one of those
rare, serene ones, when there is not a cloud in
the delicate blue sky, and when the sea lies so
calm and peaceful under it, that one might almost
be persuaded to believe nothing would ever again
ruffle its surface. The white-sailed vessels in the
distance, too, looked as if they had nothing in
the world to do for ever, but to float from one
beautiful end of the world to the other, in secu-



WHEREUNTO ? . 39

rity and joy. Yet delicious—unsjeakably deli-
cious—as the day was, it brought discomfort to
some who lived under it. The numpberless star-
fishes, for instance, who had been unexpectedly
left stranded on the shore by the all-too-gently-
retreating waves, how could they rejoice in the
beautiful sunshine, when it was streaming so
pitilessly on their helpless limbs, and scorching
them by its dry cruel heat? And as for the
jelly fishes, who had shared a similar fate, they
had died almost at once from the shock, as the
wave cast them ashore ; so of the merits of the
delicious day they knew nothing at all.

All creatures did not suffer, of course. The
Crab, for instance, who had given such good ad-
vice to his friend (if he could but have followed
it), did very well. In the first place, he liked the
air nearly as well as the water, so that being left
high and dry on the shore now and then was
quite to his taste. Moreover, he could scuttle
off and hide in a crevice of the rocks whenever
he chose. Or he could shelter under the large
sea-weeds, and because of his hard coat was even



40 WHEREUNTO ?

able to take a short walk from time to time, to
see how matters went on, and observe how far
the tide had gone down ; and if the sun did hap-
pen to bake him a little too much, he had only
to run off to a pool and take a bath, and then was
as fresh as ever in a minute.

And now, just as the tide was at the lowest,
where it was likely to beat about for some time
without much change, two other creatures ap-
peared on the sands, and approached the very
spot where the Star-fish lay in his distress, and
near which the Crab was hid. Now there was a
ledge of rocks here, which would have furnished
seats for dozens of human beings, and from
the front of it grew almost a forest of oarweed
plants.

What the creatures were who came up to this
place and stopped to observe it, I shall not say ;
but one of them remarked to the other, “‘ Here
again, you see; the same old story as before.
Wasted life and wasted death, and all within a
few inches of each other! Useless, lumbering
plants, not seen half-a-dozen times in the year;



WHEREUNTO ? Al

and helpless, miserable sea-creatures, dying in
health and strength, one doesn’t know why.”

As the creature who spoke, said this, it lifted
up two or three tangle fronds with a stick it car-
ried in its hand, and then let them flop suddenly
down on the sand; after which it,used the end
of the same stick to chuck the unhappy star-fish
into the air, who, tumbling by a lucky accident
under the shelter of the tangle, was hid for a time
from sight.

“ And so we go up, and so we go down, our-
selves,” continued the creature ; “a good many of
us, with no more end in life, and of no more use,
that one can see, than these vile useless sea-
‘weeds ; coming into the world, in fact, for no
earthly purpose but to go out of it, in some such
wretched manner as this !”

And here the creature kicked three or four
more stranded star-fishes across the narrow
sands, till he had fairly kicked them into the
sea ; muttering as he did so, “ What did you come
into the world for, I wonder, and you, and you,
and you? Purposeless life and purposeless death



42 WHEREUNTO ?

—the fate of thousands. And I for one as use-
less as any of them, but at any rate having the
grace to acknowledge that the world would get
on quite as cleverly without meas with! Where-
unto, whereunto, whereunto ? Answer it if you
can!” As the creature finished speaking, the two
moved on together; but what the companion
answered was never exactly known ; for though
the voice sounded as if in dispute, what was said
was not heard by those who were left behind,
for they began at once to chatter among them-
selves.

And first out popped the head of the Crab
from the crevice he had taken shelter in; and he
cocked his eyes knowingly, first to one side, and
then to the other, and began to talk ; for he had
always plenty to say for himself, and was remark-
ably bold when there was no danger. “Miserable
sea-creatures !” was his first exclamation, repeat-
ing what the land-creature had said. “ I suppose
I am included in that elegant compliment. I
say! where are you, old Lilac-legs? Have you
contrived to crawl away after all? Come out of



WHEREUNTO ! 43

your corner, or wherever you are, for a bit. Who
was the creature that was talking such nonsense
just now? Only let me come across him, that’s
all! Helpless sea-creatures, indeed! I should
like to have seen Aim hiding in a crevice as nim-
bly as I can do! He’d better not come within
reach of me any more, I ¢an tell him!”

It was all very weil for the Crab@o sit outside
the rock looking so fierce, and brushing his
mouth so boldly with his whisker-like feelers,
now that there was nobody to fight*with. How
he would have scuttled away sideways into his
hole, if the creature had reappeared, every body —
can guess.

“You happy fellow !” answered the meek voice
of the Star-fish, Lilac-legs ; “you can afford to
joke about everything, and can do whatever you
please. You have so many things in your favour
—your stiff coat, and your jointed legs, and your
claws with pincers at their ends, and your large
eyes. Dear me, what advantages! And yet I
have an advantage too, and that a very great one,
over you all, so I shall not grumble, especially



44 WHEREUNTO ?

not now that I am in the shade. That sun was
very unpleasant, certainly ; I felt something be-
tween scalded and baked. Horrible! but I am
sheltered now. And how did that come to pass,
do you think?”

The Star-fish paused for an answer; but the
Crab declared he couldn’t think—had no time for
thinking ; it was too slow work to suit him. So
Lilac-legs told him how she had been vhucked
into the air by the stick, and how she had come
down in the midst of the tangle, and fallen under
_ shelter. “So you see,” added she in conclusion,
“that you were quite right in saying what non-
sense the creature talked. Why, he said he was
as useless as these vile useless sea-weeds, and
had come into the world, like them, for nothing’;
whereas, don’t you see, he was born to save me,
which was something to be born for, at any rate,
that’s quite clear; and so was the vile useless
sea-weed, as he called it, too. I, with my advan-
tages, can tell them both that !”

“ You go in and out, and in and out, over peo-
ple’s remarks, till you make me quite giddy, I get



WHEREUNTO ? 45

so puzzled,” replied the Orab; “and then you are
always talking of your advantages,’ he continued,
whisking his feelers backwards and forwards con-
ceitedly as he spoke, “and I can’t make out what
they are. I wish you would say at once what
you mean.”

“Oh, my advantages, you want todcnow about?”
answered Lilac-legs. “Well, I certainly have one
in each leg, near the end, with which I—but I
don’t think I can describe it exactly. You have
several advantages yourself, as I told you just
now, and we have one or two in common ; for
instance, the loss of a leg or two is nothing to
either of us; they grow again so quickly; but
still J am very helpless now and then, I must
admit! on the sand, for instance—it is so soft—
and the more I try to lay hold, the more it slips
away. Still these advantages in my legs make
amends for a good deal, for at any rate I know
my own superiority, and there’s a great comfort
in that ; I can’t explain, but you may safely take
it for granted, that with my advantages, I know
a good deal more than you give me credit for. I



46 WHEREUNTO ?

know, for instance, that the poor ignorant creature
need not consider himself useless, since he was
the means of chucking me here, and that this
fine old tangle hasn’t lived for nothing, since it is
sheltering me.”

“How conceited some people are with their
advantages !”” murmured a silver voice from one
of the tangle fronds. “If the tangle had come
into the world for nothing but to shelter you,
there would have been a fuss to very little pur-
pose, indeed! Can’t your advantages tell you
there are other creatures in the world quite as
important as yourself, if not more so, you poor
helpless Lilac-legs ? Do you know who is speak-
ing? It is the blue-eyed limpet, I beg to say—
the Patella pellucida, if you please. J have an
advantage or two myself! My coat is harder -
even than the crab’s, and it is studded with a
row of azure spots, as bright as the turquoise
itself. That zs something to reflect upon in
one’s solitude, I can assure you! and the tangle
plants are the natural home and food of our lovely
race. The creature was ignorant enough in calling



WHEREUNTO ? 47

them useless, therefore, of course; but you were
not much wiser in thinking they were put into
the world to shelter you. I flatter myself I have
said enough! To be the home and the food of
beings like us, is cause sufficient—almost more
than sufficient, I venture to think—for the exist-
ence of any vegetable that fringes these shores,
And while they live for us, our turquoise-gemmed
backs are, in return, their highest ornament and
pride. The whole thing is perfect and complete.
Anybody with half an eye, and a grain of under-
standing, may see that!”

“ Oh, the narrow-mindedness of people who
live under a shell!” murmured a score of whis-
pers, in unison, from another tangle frond close
by. “Oh, the assurance of you poor moveable
limpets in talking about your home, when you do
but stick to first one part of these vast leaves
and then another, moving from place to place,
and never fairly settling anywhere? Home, in-
deed, you call it? What sort of a home is it,
when an unlucky chance can force you off at any
moment, or some passing creature pick you from



48 WHEREUNTO ?

your hold? The pretension would be disgusting,
if it were not so absurd. Think of mere travel-
lers, as one may say, talking of their lodging-
house as if it was their own, and belonged to
them by a natural right !—how ridiculous, if not
wrong! We* can afford to speak—we, of whose
dwelling-places it is the foundation and support.
Talk of the useless tangle, indeed! Yes, the
creature was ignorant indeed who said so. Little
he knew that it was the basis of the lives of
millions. Little he knew of the silver net-work
we spread over it from year to year, or of the
countless inhabitants of the beautiful web—a
fairy-land of beings, so small, that the crab can
scarcely see us, yet spreading so far and wide,
and accomplishing so much; but that is because
we work in unison, of course. We never quarrel
among ourselves, as some folks do—not altogether
unlike the crab in the crevice yonder. We work
to one end, so we are sure to continue strong.
Useless tangles, forsooth! when they have been

* Flustra membranacea (Johnston), now Membranipora mem-
branacea (Busk).



WHEREUNTO? 49

the foundations of colonies like ours from the
beginning of the world! Of course the thing is
clear enough to those who choose to look into it;
any one who knows zs, can tell people what the
tangle is in the world for, I should think!”

“Hear how they talk,’ murmured another
shell-fish,* no distant relation of the blue-eyed
limpet who had spoken before, and who lay
hidden in the midst of the twisted roéts by which
the tangle stem held fast to the rock; “ hear how
the poor scurfy creatures talk, to be sure, as if
there was nobody in the world but themselves.
But anything can talk, which has so many mouths
to talk with. J could say a good deal myself, if
I chose to try, with only one; but I don’t care
to let out my secrets into everybody’s foolish
ears. Much better hold my tongue, than let cer-
tain people, not a hundred miles off, know I am
here. I don’t fancy being sucked at by star-
fishes, or picked out of my place by crab’s claws.
Of course I know what the tangle is in the world
for, as well as anybody else. For while they are

* Patella levis.
E



50 WHEREUNTO ?

fighting merely about his flapping leathery ends,
here I sit in the very heart of the matter; safe
in the roots themselves, knowing what’s what
with the cleverest of them. Useless tangle, the
creature said—useless enough, perhaps, as far as
he could tell, who only looked at the long, loose,
rubbishy leaves; but those who want to know
the truth of the matter, must use their eyes to a
little more purpose, and find out what’s going on
at the roots. Ah, they’d soon see then what the
tangle is for! I don’t speak of myself alone,
though of course I know owe very sufficient
reason why the tangle is in the world, if I chose
to say. Am I right, little Silver-tuft, in the
corner there, with the elegant doors to your
house ?”

Now, little Silver-tuft,* the coralline, piqued
herself particularly on the carving of the curious
doors which guarded the front of every one of

* Cellularia reptans (Johnston), now Canda repians (Busk).
*‘Coralline” is an inaccurate term, being strictly applicable
only to the vegetable Corallinas. But it has been used for so

long for some sorts of Zoophytes, thatit is difficult to substitute
another word.



WHEREUNTO ? 51

the numberless cells in which her family lived;
so she was flattered by the compliment, and
owned that the limpet was right*in the main.
She was, nevertheless, rather cool in her manner,
for, thought she to herself, “The rough fellow
forgets that he is but a lodger heré, as the sea- ©
mat said of his blue-eyed cousin; whereas every-
body knows that IJ am a Jdond-fide inhabitant,
though with a little more freedom of movement
than people who stick to their friends so closely
as to cover them up! No offence to the sea-mat,
or anybody who can’t help himself. Neverthe-
less, my fibres being firmly interlaced with the
roots, [ am here by right for ever. These limpets
may talk as they please, but nobody in their
senses can suppose the tangle came into the
world merely to accommodate chance travellers
like them, even though they may now and then
spend their lives in the place. But vanity blinds
the judgment, that’s very clear. Roots and plants
have to grow for such as myself and my silver-
tuft cousins, however ; but that’s quite another
affair. There’s a reason in that—a necessity, I
K 9)

4 hen!



52 WHEREUNTO ?

may say; we want them, and of course, there-
fore, they are here. The thing is as straight-
forward and plain to anybody of sense, as—”

But, unfortunately, the simile was lost; for a
wave of the now-returning tide interrupted Sil-
ver-tuft’s speech, by breaking’ suddenly over the
tangle with a noisy splash. It drew back again
for a bit immediately after; but, meantime, hoth
plants and animals were revelling in the delicious
moisture, and for a few moments thought of
nothing else. And just then, hurrying along the
narrow strip of sand that yet remained exposed,
as fast as their legs could carry them, came the
land-creature and its companion.

Before, however, they had passed the spot
where they had stopped to talk when the tide
was low, another wave was seen coming; to avoid
which, the friends sprang together on the ledge
of rock, and from thence watched the gathering
water, as it fell tumbling over the forest of tangle
plants. And again and again this happened, and
they remained to observe it, and see how the
huge fronds surged up like struggling giants, as



WHEREUNTO ? 53

the waves rushed in below; and how by degrees,
as the tide rose higher and higher,’their curved
‘stems unbent, so that they resumed their natural
position, till at last they were bending and bow-
ing in graceful undulations to the swell of the
water, as was their wont.

And, “Look at them!” cried the creature's|
companion. “For the existence of even these
poor plants in the world, 1 could give you a
hundred reasons, and believe that 4s many more
might be found. Of their use, I could tell you
a hundred instances in proof; there is not one
of them but what gives shelter tothe helpless,
food to the hungry, a happy home to as many as
desire it, and vigour and health to the element
in which it lives. Purposeless life, you talk of!
Such a thing exists nowhere. Come, I will ex-
plain. To begin—but see, we must move on, for
the wind as well as the tide is rising, and we might
chance to be caught. Follow me quick, for even
we might be missed ; and, besides, it is cowardly
to shirk one’s appointed share of work and well-
doing before one’s time. For if the vile sea-



54 WHEREUNTO ?

weeds are able to do good in the world, how
much more—’

But here, too, the discourse was cut short by
the roar of a breaking wave, which carried the
conclusion out of hearing.

People talk of the angry sea ; was he angry
now at what he had heard? No, he was only
loud and in earnest, after all. But undoubtedly
he and the risen wind between them contrived
to make a great noise over the tangle beds. And
he gave his opinion pretty strongly on the sub-
ject in hand. For, cried he, “ You foolish crea-
tures, one and all! what is all this nonsense
about? Who dares to talk of useless sea-weeds
while I am here to throw their folly in their face ?
And you, poor little worms and wretches, who
have been talking your small talk together, as if
it was in your power to form the least idea of
anything an inch beyond your own noses—well,
well, well, I won't undeceive you! There, there!
believe what you like about yourselves and your
trumpery little comforts and lives; but if any
really philosophical inquirer wants to know what



WHEREUNTO ? 55

see-weeds are in the world for, and what good
they dv, I will roar them the true answer all day
long, if they please—to keep me, the great sea, |
pure, and sweet, and healthy! There, now, that’s
the reply! They suck in my foul vapours as
food, and give me back life-supportifig vapours in
return. Vile and useless! What fool has called
anything so? Only let me catch him—thus—”

Bang !—with what a roar thaty wave came
down ! and yet it did no harm—didn’t even dis-
lodge the Crab from the new crevice he had
squeezed himself into for the present. And as
to Star-fish Lilac-legs, she was spreading herself
out in the rocking water, rejoicing in her re-
gained freedom, and telling all her friends of her
wonderful escape, and of the creature who had
been born into the world on purpose to save her
from an untimely death.

It was avery fine story indeed; and the longer
she told it, the more pathetic she made it, till at
last there was not a creature in the sea who
could listen to it with dry eyes.







PURRING,
WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.



Hy
iu

Hi
Ny

Sse 1: PK or)
aM MAAK Nils! AR
«AAPM A i; a et BA \ }



PURRING WHEN YOURE PLEASED.



+

PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED,

“Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.”—
Matt. xii. 34.

TuHey had been licked over hundreds of times by
the same mother, had been brought up on the
same food, lived in the same house, learnt the
same lessons, heard the same advice, and yet how
different they were! Never were there two kit-
tens more thoroughly unlike than those two!
The one, with an open, loving heart, which never
could contain itself in its joy, but purred it out
at once to all the world ; the other, who scarcely
ever purred at all, and that never above its
breath, let him be as happy or as fond as he
would.



60 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

It was partly his mother’s fault, perhaps, for
she always set the children the example of re-
serve ; rarely purring herself, and then only in a
low tone. But, poor thing, there were excuses
to be made for her ; she had had so many troubles.
Cats generally have. Their kittens are taken
away from them so often, and they get so hissed
about the house when people are busy, and the
children pull them about so heedlessly, and make
the dogs run after them—which is so irritating—
that really the wonder is they ever purr at all.

Nevertheless, her not feeling inclined to purr
much herself was no good reason for her think-
ing it silly or wrong in other people to purr when
they were pleased; but she did, and she and her
purring daughter were always having small tiffs
on the subject.

Every morning, for instance, when the nice
curly-headed little boy brought the kittens a
saucer of milk from his breakfast, there was sure
to be a disturbance over the purring question,
for, even before the saucer had reached the floor,
Puss Missy was sure to be there, tail and head



PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 61

erect and eager, singing her loudest and best,
her whole throat vibrating visibly ; while Puss
Master, on the contrary, took his food, but said
very little about it, or, if ever tempted to express
his natural delight, did it in so low a tone that
nobody could hear without putting their ears
close down to him to listen.

Now this was what the mother cat called keep-
ing up one’s dignity and self-respect, so it can
easily be imagined how angry she used to get
with the other child. “Wretched little creature!”
she would say to poor Puss Missy, who, even
after the meal was over, would lie purring with
pleasure in front of the fire ; “what in the world
are you making all that noise and fuss about ?
Why are you to be always letting yourself down
by thanking people for what they do for you, as
if you did not deserve it, and had not a right to
expect it? Isn’t it quite right of them to feed
you and keep you warm? What a shame it
would be if they left you without food or fire! I
am ashamed to see you make yourself so cheap,
by showing gratitude for every trifle. For good-



62 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED,

ness’ sake have a little proper pride, and leave
off such fawning ways! Look at your brother,
and see how differently e behaves !—takes every-
thing as a matter of course, and has the sense to
keep his feelings to himself; and people are sure
to respect him all the more. It keeps up one’s
friends’ interest when they are not too sure that
one is pleased. But you, with your everlasting
acknowledgments, will be seen through, and de-
spised very soon. Have a little more esteem for
your own character, Ido beg! What is to be-
come of self-respect if people are to purr when-
ever they are pleased ?”

Puss Missy had not the least notion what
would become of it in such a case, but she sup-
posed something dreadful ; so she felt quite hor-
rified at herself for having done anything to bring
it about, and made a thousand resolutions to
keep up her dignity, save self-respect from the
terrible unknown fate in store, and purr no more.

But it was all in vain. As soon as ever any-
thing happened to make her feel happy and com-
fortable, throb went the little throat, as naturally



PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 63

as flowers come out in spring, and there she was
in a fresh scrape again! And the temptations
were endless. The little boy's cousin, pale, and
quiet, and silent as she was, would often take
Puss Missy on her knee, and nurse her for half-
an-hour at a time, stroking her so gently and
kindly—how could any one help purring ?

Or the boy would tie a string, with a cork at
the end of it, to the drawer-handle of a table, so
that the kittens could paw it, and pat it, and
spring at it, as they pleased—how was it possible
not to give vent to one’s delight in the intervals
of such a game, when the thing was swinging
from side to side before their very eyes, inviting
the next bound ?

And when there was nothing else to be pleased
about, there were always their own tails to run
after, and the fun was surely irresistible, and well
deserved a song.

Yet the brother very seldom committed him-
self in that way—that was the great puzzle, and
Puss Missy grew more perplexed as time went
on. Nay, once, when they were alone together,



64 PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED.

and her spirits had quite got the better of her
judgment, she boldly asked him, in as many
words, “Why do you not purr when you are
pleased?” as if it was quite the natural and
proper thing to do. Whereat he seemed quite
taken by surprise, but answered at last: “ It’s so
weak-minded, mother says; I should be ashamed.
Besides,” added he, after ashort pause, “to tell
you the truth—but don’t say anything about it—
when I begin there’s something that chokes a
little in my throat. Mind you don’t tell-—it would
let me down so in mother’s eyes. She likes one
to keep up one’s dignity, you know.”

Had Mother Puss overheard these words, she
might have been a little startled by such a result
of her teaching: but, as it was, she remained in
happy ignorance that her son was influenced by
anything but her advice.

... Yet, strange to say, she had that choking
in the throat sometimes herself! ...

But, at last, a change came in their lives. One
day their friend, the curly-headed boy, came
bounding into the kitchen where Puss and her



PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 65

kittens were asleep, in raptures of delight, followed
by the pale, quiet, silent cousin, as quiet and
silent as ever. The boy rushed to the kittens at
once, took up both together in his hands, laid
one over the other for fun, and then said to the
girl, “Cousin, now they’re going to give us the
kittens for our very own, just tell me which you
like best, really? I’m so afraid you won’t choose
for yourself when they ask you, and then, if I
have to choose instead, I sha’n’t know which you
would rather have! And I want you to have
the one you like most—so do tell me before-
hand!”

“Oh, I like them both!” answered the girl, in
the same unmoved, indifferent tone, in which she
generally spoke.

“So do I,” replied her cousin ; “but I know
which I like best for all that ; and so must you,
only you won’t say. I wonder whether you like
to have the kittens at all?” added he, looking
at the pale child a little doubtfully ; then whisper-
ing, as he put them both to her face to be kissed,
“Cousin, dear, I wish I could see when you

F



66 PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED.

were pleased by your face! See! give a smile
when the one you like best goes by. Do—won’t
you—this once—just for once?” .....

It was in vain! He passed the kittens before
her in succession, that she might see the mark-
ings of their fur, but she still only said she liked
both, and, of course, was glad to have a kitten,
and so on; till, at last, he was disheartened, and
asked no more.

It is a great distress to some people when their
friends will zo¢ purr when they are pleased ; and
as the children went back together to the draw-
ing-room, the little boy was the sadder of the
two, though he could not have explained why.

And then, just what he expected happened,—
the choice between the two kittens was offered
first to the girl; but, instead of accepting it as a
favour, and saying “Thank you” for it, and being
pleased, as she ought to have been, she would say
nothing but that she liked both, and it could not
matter which she had ; nay, to look at her as she
spoke, nobody would have thought she cared for
having either at all!



PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 67

How was it that she did not observe how
sorrowfully her aunt was gazing at her as she
spoke ; aye, art with a sorrow far beyond anything
the kittens could occasion !

But she did not; and presently her aunt said,
“ Well, then, as she did not care, the boy should
choose. On which the poor boy coloured with
vexation ; but when he had sought his cousin’s
eyes again and again in vain for some token of
her feelings, he laid sudden hold on Puss Missy,
and cuddled her against his cheek, exclaiming :

“Then I will have this one! I like her much
the best, mother, because she purrs when she is
pleased !”

And then the little girl took up Puss Master,
and kissed him very kindly, but went away with-
out saying another word,

And so a week passed ; and though the children
nursed their kittens, they never discussed the
question of which was liked best again, for a shy-
ness had sprung up about it ever since the day
the choice had been made. |

But at the end of the week, one sunshiny

F2



68 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

morning, when the boy was riding his father’s
pony, and only the little girl was in the house, her
aunt, coming suddenly into the school-room, dis-
covered her kneeling by the sofa, weeping a silent
rain of tears over the fur-coat of Puss Missy,
who was purring loudly all the time; while her
own kitten, Puss Master, was lying asleep un-
noticed by the fire.
* zs * % %

Now, the pale, silent little girl had been an
orphan nearly two years—father and mother
having died within a few weeks of each other ;
and she had been ever since, till quite lately,
under the care of a guardian, who, though married,
had no children, and was more strict and well-
intentioned than kind and comprehending ; so
that, between sorrow at first and fear afterwards,
joined to a timid, shrinking nature, she had,
without knowing anything about it, shut herself
up in a sort of defensive armour of self-restraint,
which, till now, neither aunt, nor uncle, nor even
loving cousin, had been able to break through.

But they had gently bided their time, and the



PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 69

time had come at last, and Puss Missy pointed
the moral ; for, with her aunt’s arms folded round
her, and a sense of her comforting tenderness
creeping into the long-lonely heart, she owned
that she had fretted all the week in secret be-
cause—actually because—i+ was so miserable to
nurse a kitten who would not purr when he was
pleased |
*% % * *
Anybody may guess how nice it was, ten

minutes afterwards, to see the little girl, with the
roused colour of warm feeling on her cheeks,
smiling through her tears at the thought of how
like the unpurring kitten she had been herself !
Anybody may guess, too, with what riotous joy
the loving boy-cousin insisted on her changing
kittens at once, and having Puss Missy for her.
very own. And how, on the other hand, he set
to work himself, with a resolute heart, to make
Puss Master so fond of him that purr he must,
whether he would or no ; and how that, now and
then, by dint of delicate attentions, such as choice
morsels of food and judicious rubbing under the



70 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

ears, he worked the creature up to such a pitch
of complacency, that the vibrations of his throat
became, at any rate, visible to sight, and percep-
tible to touch.

Truly, they were a very happy party; for
after Puss Master took Puss Missy for friend,
confidante, and adviser, he grew so loving and
fond, that he could not help showing his feelings
- in a thousand pretty, pleasant ways: and the
mother-cat herself relaxed by degrees; perhaps
because she found her kittens were not taken
away—partly, perhaps, because Puss Missy’s open-
heartedness stole into her heart at last, with a
sense of comfort—who knows? Certainly she
left off scolding and lecturing, and would not only
watch their gambols, but joinyin them at times
herself, And if neither she nor her son ever
purred quite so much, or so loudly as their
neighbours, the reason, no doubt, was only that
tiresome choking in the throat !

Why, the pale little girl herself complained of
having felt something very like it, during the sad
two years before her kind aunt made her happy



PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 71

again! It always used to come on when she
wanted to say what she felt.

And, perhaps, there is always something that
chokes in the throat when people do not purr
when they are pleased.

Let us hope so!







THE

VOICES OF THE EARTH.







THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

‘ *
“Let every thing that hath breath, praise the Lord.”
Psalm cl. 6.

“Wouxp that I could pass away, and cease to
be!” murmured the Wind, as it performed its
circuits round the earth, long ages ago. “ Would
that I could cease to be! Since the creation of
man, existence has become insupportable.”

“ Thou art mad!” cried the Mountains and Val-
leys, over whom the wind was passing, with its
outcry of lamentation. “Is not man the glory
of the world, the favourite of Heaven? Surely
thou art mad, or else jealous of the greatness of
others—jealous of the master-piece of creation.
Oh thou, ungrateful and unwise, to whom is



76 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

committed the privilege of refreshing the earth
and its inhabitants, why turn aside to hold judg-
ment and condemn? Enough that thou fulfil
thine own appointed work, and, in so doing, exist
to the glory of the Creator.”

“Yet, hear me in patience,” wailed the Wind.
“Tt is for the honour of man, and the glory of
his Creator, that I am so troubled. Hence comes
all my misery. I, who know no rest but in His
will, and once went on my way rejoicing,—I now
am, of all creatures, the most miserable. Oh
earth, with thy mountains and valleys, and forests,
and fast-flowing rivers and seas, do me justice !
Thou knowest it was not so with me of old, when
I was first called into being. Thou knowest with
what joy I roamed over thy confines, and beheld
the universal beauty that then was spread around ;
how tenderly I whispered through thy flowers,
how joyfully I carried up their fragrant odours
as a thank-offering to heaven; how merrily I
sported on the hills, or taught the branches of
thy lofty trees to bow, as in obeisance to Him
who made them! Thou knowest that I even



THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 77

failed not in due obedient love, when storms
were needed ; whether to drive the sluggish va-
pours through the sky, or rouse the sea itself to
healthy action. When have I ever failed? Have
I not always fulfilled His word? For even now,
in these my days of misery, I carry gut unweary-
ingly the great decree. Still I bear aloft from
tropical seas, in ceaseless revolution round the
world, those vapours which must ‘descend in
northern latitudes as dew, or rain, or snow. Still
I labour—still I love to labour’ in the way or-
dained. But woe for me! another burden than
labour is upon me now! Woe for the pollution
I have suffered, since the earth was overspread
by the wretched race of men! Woe for their
civilized lands, which I must needs pass through !
Woe for the cities, and towns, and villages, their
haunts and habitations, which I cannot avoid !
Woe! for I bear thence in my bosom the blas-
phemies of the multitudes, and am laden with
the burden of ingratitude, denial, and doubt.
Woe that I must spread these black results of
misguided reason from pole to pole! Woe that



78 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

I must carry up the jests of the scorner and the
oaths of the intemperate, as incense from man to
his Maker : from man formed in His image, and
boasting in his faculties of sense! Oh that I
could pass away, and cease from being! and that
with me might perish these fruits of an evil heart
of unbelief!”

“Thou hast numbered curses,” breathed the
Mountains and Valleys in reply; “and alas! that
such should ever defile thee, thou messenger of
blessing. But this is not all thou bearest upon thy
wings. Other outpourings stream into thy bosom ;
other voices are wafted upon thee to the skies ;
other sounds are spread by thee from pole to pole.
Hast thou weighed in the balance, against the
utterances of the rebellious, the prayers of the
faithful, the childlike, and the pure; the stedfast
avowal of martyrs; the daily thanksgiving of
saints; the songs of holy praise and joy?”

“Yet what are these but what are due, and
more than due, ten hundred thousand fold?” ex-
claimed the angry Wind. “What merit can you
find in these? How strike a balance between



THE VOICES OF THE EARTH, 79

them and the unnatural sin which says, ‘There
is no God’? All His works every where have
praised Him from the beginning: only among
men is there silence and doubt. And shall the
remnant take credit for not joining in their sin?
Inanimate creation and the beasts have never
swerved from their allegiance. What room is
there for boasting in man? Has he done more
than these, from the foundation of theworld ?”
“But he alone of all creation, with a free, in-
telligent will.’—The words came ‘up in soft re-
sponse from the Earth, and spread like harmony
upon the air.—‘“ He alone of all creation, with a
free, intelligent will. Merit there can be none,
indeed; but acceptability—where can it ever be
found, but in the free-will worship of a spirit
which has choice? And if choice, then, of
necessity, liberty to err. And with liberty to err,
comes, alas! the everlasting contest between right
and wrong. Yet why do I say, ‘alas’? Obedi-
ence to a law which cannot be resisted is not the
service of the heart—not the highest tribute to
the Creator’s glory. Far dearer to Him may be



80 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

the struggle by which the human will is subdued
to unison with the will Divine, in anticipation of
that day when all its wisdom shall be made
known. Have patience, then, with the contest
between good and evil, so long as the good is
accepted of Heaven ; and while this is so, be con-
tented to labour and to be!”

“ Yet listen once again,” sighed the Wind. “I
have been jealous for the glory of the Maker, it is
true, and troubled for the honour of man. But
Tam also wretched for myself. Oh Earth, Earth,
Earth! The Creator has made His human fa-
vourite mortal! The mountains stand fast for
ever, the hills cannot be moved, the very trees
survive from generation to generation ; but man
—the chosen—passes away like a shadow ; he
cometh up and is cut down as the grass; I go
over him, and his place knows him no more. Alas
for the misery lam doomed to share! The breath
of the dying has passed into my soul for ages ; it
is borne upon every breeze; it has tainted every
air. I am filled with those bitter agonies, and
loathe my very being. Would that I could pass



THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 81

away into nothing, and be as though I had never
been, that so I — taste no more ais vile dis-
honour of death.

“Thou judgest with the judgment of those
who see and know but in part,” came up the
soothing answer from the Hills. ‘What, if the
dying breath, which falls so sadly on thy breast,
releases from its prison-house of clay some spirit
more etherial than thine own, some @ssence sub-
tler far than thine, -which thou must bear before
the mercy-seat? Shall not the Judge of all the
earth do right? Canst thou not trust the Al-
mighty with His own? Why grieve for the last
sigh of perishing flesh, if it be also the first breath-
ing of a freed immortal soul? How rail at death, if
it is He who strikes the chord of everlasting life?”

-«“ Yet once more hear me, and be just,” per-
sisted the Wind. ‘Not the breath of the dying
only overwhelms me with this wild desire to be
at rest. The breath of the living who suffer on
is even worse. The sigh of natural grief, which
none can blame ; the moanings of the afflicted in
mind, body, or estate; the outcries of the op-

G



82 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

pressed and desperate ; the shrieks of madness
and of pain, the groanings of despair ; all, all are
outpoured on me! Those dreadful voices haunt
me from all sides. This mass of human woe cor-
rodes my soul. I meet it'in the cottage, and pass
through to find it in the palace; I rush from the
battle-field to the cloister, but in vain! for no se-
clusion can shut out man from sorrow. Wherever
the chosen creature is found, there must I gather
up the voices of grief; for lo! as the sparks fly
upwards, so man is born to trouble. Oh that I
might pass away for ever, and cease to know the
wretchedness I have no power to avert !”

“Yet wait, wait, wait,’ implored another whis-
perer from the Earth. “ What, ifin human sorrow
may be found an answer to the riddle of human
guilt? What, if amidst its saddest cries, thou
carriest up the voice of heartfelt penitence on
high? Wilt thou not weigh against the transient
earthly grief the joy in heaven for one repenting
sinner? Or, if amidst the mortal agony of the
righteous, the triumph-songs of faith grow loud
as those the angels sing round the throne,—‘ Thy



THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 83

will, Thy will, Thy will — doing or suffering—
Thy will be done ;—wouldst thou not fear to take
away the one, lest the other perchance should fail
from off the earth ? Watch well the balance be-
tween suffering and its fruits ; but while these
rise acceptable on thee to Heaverf, well mayst
thou rest contented in thy work, and rejoice both
to labour and to be.”

“Yet is man—the favourite—of all creatures
the most wretched,” moaned the Wind, “since he
alone must purchase happiness with pain.”

“Unjust! unjust!” expostulated the Earth.
“Thou keepest record of men’s sighs, hast thou
no consciousness of the unceasing breathings of
simple, natural joys? Yet, number the one by
thousands, and by tens of thousands of the other
will I answer and refute thy words. The peace-
ful respirations of health, unnoticed and, alas !
how often, unthankfully enjoyed through years,
count them if thou canst! Count them as they
float to thee, while the night hours pass over the
sleeper’s head: count them when he wakes with
the young daylight to a fresh existence. Count

a2



84 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

the laughs of frolic childhood. Count the mur-
murs of happy love. Count the stars if thou wilt,
but thou canst never count the daily outpourings
of common earthly joys. Alas for those who
judge of life only by startling periods, and are
deaf to the still small voices, which tell of hourly
mercies, hour by hour !”

“Yet once more listen,” cried the Wind, “for
more and worse remains behind. The utterances
of vice—oh innocent Earth, in whom the glory of
the Creator is yet left visible to all!—I sicken at
the thought of what I know ; of what I bear unwil-
lingly about. The loathsome words of sin—the
lies of the deceiver—the prating of the fool—the
seductions of the dissolute—the showts of drunken
revelry—the songs of the profane—the gifts of
speech and thought misused to evil :—those voices
horrible to God and man... . / a

* Be they as dust before thee, and thou as the
angel of the Lord scattering them!” shouted a cry
of indignation from the Earth. “ Yet wait, wait,
wait! For thyself, be thou still contented to
labour and to be. Wouldst thou be wiser than



THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 85

the Judge? Wilt thou lose patience, while He
yet forbears? No! watch the balance as be-
fore, and weigh the evil and the good. And so
long as the prayers which the faithful pour on
thy bosom outvalue the words of the scorner ;
so long as the blessings of the rithteous float
above the curses of the blasphemer; so long as
the voice of penitence follows close upon the ut-
terances of sin ; so long as pious submission makes
harmony of the cries of grief; so long as thou
carriest up daily thanksgiving for unnumbered
daily mercies ; so long as souls of saints are
breathed up to Heaven by death :—so long be
thou contented to have patience, and labour and
be.”

“But should the day ever come,” shouted the
Wind in return, “when the balance is reversed ;
when vice, only tolerated now, becomes trium-
phant ; when sin reigns on the altars, and no man
pulls it down ; when the voice of the good man’s
worship is drowned in the bad man’s scorn, and
I cannot lift it to the skies ; when the wretched.
curse God and die, and men have forgotten to be



86 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

thankful ;—then, then at last wilt thou acknow-
ledge the justice of my complaints, and help me
.to pass away in peace? Promise this, and till
then I will watch the struggle, and be contented
to labour and to be.”

And the Earth paused and consented, and the
Wind fled satisfied away.

4 a

Lenvoi to the Reader.

And he is still careering round the world ; still
gathering in “the Voices of the Earth ;” still
watching the struggle between good and evil. In
our public walks he meets us face to face. In
our private chambers he is with us still. There
is no secret corner where he cannot come ; no
whisper which is not breathed into his ear. It
behoves us well, then, to be careful, lest, by
thoughtlessness or sin, we add weight to the
wrong side of the scales. For if the balance
should ever incline to evil, and the wind cease to
blow,—what sould become of the world ?



THE

MASTER OF THE HARVEST.







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THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST.

*

“That which thou dost not understand when thou readest,
thou shalt understand in the day of thy visitation ; for there are
many secrets of religion which are not perceived till they be
felt, and are not felt but in the day of a great calamity.” —JEREMY
TaYLor.

Tue Master of the Harvest walked by the side of
his corn-fields in the early year, and a cloud was
over his face, for there had been no rain for
several weeks, and the earth was hard from the
parching of the cold east winds, and the young
wheat had not been able to spring up.

So, as he looked over the long ridges that lay
stretched in rows before him, he was vexed, and
began to grumble, and say “the harvest would be



90 THE MASTER OF THN HARVEST.

backward, and all things would go wrong” At
the mere thought of which he frowned more and
more, and uttered words of complaint against the
heavens, because there was no rain; against the
carth, because it was so dry and unyielding ;
against the corn, because it had not sprung up.

And the man’s discontent was whispered all
over the field, and all along the long ridges whero
the corn-seeds lay ; and when it reached them
they murmured out, “How cruel to complain !
Ave we not doing our best? Have we let one
drop of moisture pass by unused, one moment of
warmth come to us in vain? Have wo not seized
on overy chanes, and striven every day to be
ready for the hour of breaking forth? Are we
idle? Are we obstinate? Are we indifferent ?
Shall we not be found waiting and watching?
How eruel to complain!”

Of all this, however, the Master of the Harvest
heard nothing, so the gloom did not pass away
from his face. On the contrary, he took it with
him into his comfortable home, and repoated to
his wife the dark words, that all things were



THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST, a

going wrong; that the drought would ruin the
harvest, for the corn was not yet sprung,

Ani still thinking thus, he laid his hond on his
pillow, and presently fell asleep.

Bat his wife sat up for a while by the bedside,
and opened her Bible, and read, “The harvest is
tho ond of the world, and the reapers aro the
angols,”

‘Phen she wrote this text in ponoil, on the Ay-
leaf at the end of the book, and after it the date
of tho day, and after the date the words, “Oh,
Lord, the husbandman, Thou waitest for the
procious fruit ‘Thou hast sown, and hast long
patience for ié! Amon, O Lord, amen!”

After which the good woman knelt down to
pray, and us she prayed she wept, for she knew
that she was very ill.

But what she prayed that night was heard only
in henven,

And so a few days passed on as before, and the
house was gloomy with the discontent of its
master; but at last, one evening, the wind
changod, the sky became heavy with clouds, and



92 THE MASTER OF THN HARVEST,

before midnight there was rain all over the land;
and when the Master of the Harvest came in next

_ morning, wet from his early walk by the corn-
fields, he said it was well it had come at last, and
that, at last, the corn had sprang up.

On which his wife looked at him with a smile,
and said, “How often things came right, about
which one had been anxious and disturbed.” To
which her husband made no answer, but turned
away and spoke of something else.

Meantime, the corn-seeds had been found ready
and waiting when the hour came, and the young
sprouts burst out at once; and very soon all
along the long ridges were to be scon rows of
tender blades, tinting the whole field with a
delicate green. And day by day the Master of
tho Harvest saw them and was satisfied; but
because he was satisfied, and his anxiety was gone,
he spoke of other things, and forgot to rejoice.

And a murmur arose among them,—*Should
not the Master haye welcomed us to lifo? He
was angry but lately, because the seed he had
sown had not yet brought forth; now that it has



WHE MASTER OF {HE HARV, 93

brought forth, why is he not glad? What more
does he want? ‘Have we not done our best?
‘Are we not doing it minute by minute, hour by
hour, day by day? From the morning and even-
ing dows, from the glow of the midday sun, from
the juices of the earth, from the breezes which
freshen the air, even from clouds and xain, are we
not taking in food and strength, warmth and
life, refreshment and joy ; so that one day the
valloys may Inugh and sing, because the good seod
hath brought forth abundantly? Why does he
not rejoico?”

‘As before, however, of all they said tho Master
of the Harvest heard nothing ; and it never struck
him to think of the young corn-blades’ struggling
life. Nay, once, when his wife asked him if
the wheat was doing well, he answered, “Very
fairly,” and nothing more. But she then, bocause
the evening was fine, and the fairer weather had
revived her failing powers, said she would walk
out by the corn-fields herself.

And so it came to pass that they wont out
together.



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AND OTHER

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THIRD SERIES.
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RED SNOW

AND OTHER

PARABLES FROM NATURE.

THIRD SERIES.

BY

MRS. ALFRED GATTY,

AUTHOR OF “‘ AUNT JUDY’S TALES,’’ &C.

‘“« Trust me, that for the instructed, time will.come
When they shall meet no object but may teach
Some acceptable lesson to their minds
Of human suffering, or of human joy.’’
WorbDswortH.

LONDON:
BELL AND DALDY, 186, FLEET STREET.

M.DCCC.LXITI.

[ The right of Translation is reserved. }
LONDON =
R. CLAY, SON, AND TAYLOR, PRINTERS,
BREAD STREET HILL.
RED SNOW.
hee

Â¥
7


RED SNOW.*

**Or tu chi se’, che vuoi sedere a scranna,
Per giudicar da lungi mille miglia
Con la veduta corta d’una spanna?”—DANTE.

** And who art thou, that on the stool wouldst sit

To: judge at distance of a thousand miles,

With the short-sighted vision of a span?”
Cary’s Translation.
Litrte Siegfried, the widow’s son, climbed day
by day up the hill which overlooked his mother’s
cottage, and rambled about on the top, running
after birds and insects, and gathering the beauti-

ful wild-flowers that grow on the Swiss Alps.

There the dark blue gentians, and the Alpine
rose,y as it is called, and campanulas and salvias,

* Protococcus nivalis. + A dwarf rhododendron.

B 2
4 RED SNOW.

are almost as common as the cowslips and daisies
of English fields, and, from the brightness of
their colours, make the hill-sides look like gardens,
instead of uncultivated ground.

Little Siegfried’s father had been killed in
battle, some months before his child’s birth, and
so, when he came into the world, he was cradled
in tears instead of smiles ; and what wonder if
he grew up less thoughtless and gay than other
boys of his age.

It was his mother who had first shown Sieg-
fried where to climb the hill, and where to find
the finest flowers ; and had made him look at the
hills still higher than their own, by which their
valley was enclosed, and had pointed out to him
Mont Blanc in the distance, looming like a
shadowy giant in the sky.

For thus and thus had her husband shown her
all these things, during the few happy months of
their marriage, before he was called away to the
wars ; and on the same heights where the child
now roamed after flowers, his parents had sat
together among theni, in quiet summer evenings,
RED SNOW. 5

sometimes talking, sometimes’ reading, always -
praising God for the happiness he was permitting
them to enjoy. ;

But having thus led her child to the spot so
fondly endeared to herself, and bidden him rejoice
in the sights and scenes of Nature, and told him
of the protecting God of goodness who ruled over
all, the widowed mother went back alone to her
cottage, to weep out in secret her re-awakened
grief. Siegfried, meanwhile, amused himself on
the flowery heights, his new play-ground; and
after he had gathered for his mother the nosegay
she had asked him to bring, he lay down on the
soft turf, and looked round at the hills, and up to
the snowy sides of the huge Mont Bianec, (of
which he could see so much more here than down
in the valley below,) till it took possession of his
fancy as something wonderful and grand ; some-
thing far beyond the flowers, bright and lovely as
they were.

And ever afterwards, day by day, when he had
had enough of chasing and rambling, he used to
lie down in the same place, and look at the hills
6 RED SNOW.

in the same way, that he might feel again what
he had felt at first.

Yet he found no sameness in the sight. The
clouds that sometimes lifted themselves up from,
and at other times came down over, the moun-
tain, were never quite alike. ‘he shadows that
flitted across it varied from day to day in their
shape and size and course; and the sunshine that
broke over it was of many different tints, and lit
it up in a thousand different ways. At one time
it was wrapt in a silvery haze; at another the
air became so clear, that the child could see the
glittering of the snow atoms, as they seemed to
dance in and out, like the stars in the sky.

So Siegfried never wearied of watching the
huge mountain, but got to love it more and more,
with a love mixed with respectful awe, and a feel-
ing as if it had some sort of life and consciousness.

At last, one day, when his mother was putting
his little basket in his hand, that he might go on
the hill as usual to play, he asked her if he might
go to the top of Mont Blanc instead, and if she
would show him the way.
RED SNOW. a

It was no wonder that the good widow smiled,
as she told him that neither he nor she were able
to climb up such a terrible mountain. But she
did smile; and although she noticed how the
little face flushed over as she spoke, she thought,
naturally enough, that this was because of his
disappointment So, kissing him lovingly, she
said, “ You must be a great strong man, Siegfried,
before you can scramble up the heights of Mont
Blanc; and even for great strong men the way is
very dangerous. And even if you were there,
you would find nothing but cold and snow and
misery ; neither life nor flowers: our own hills
are as pleasant again.”

So Siegfried went away. with his basket ; but
instead of running about and picking flowers, he
threw himself at once upon the ground, and
looked at the mountain, and cried, for he felt
very sorry at what his mother had said, Pre-
sently, however, he wiped his eyes, and looked
again ; then sprang up and stared before him as
if surprised. All the distance was bathed in
bright sunshine, and the air was more transparent
8 RED SNOW.

than usual, and, lo! a round rosy-coloured patch
was Visible on the far-off snows. He had never
seen it before. What could it be? He thought
he knew; and running hastily down to the cot-
tage, threw open the door, and shouted in delight,
“ Mother! there is a rose on Mont Blanc!”

Siegfried’s mother did not laugh now, for she saw
the child was excited ; and she was grieved for him.
Ah! he had only half the love that should have been
his ; she must console him as best she could ; he
was not like other boys, she knew—and thinking
this, she took him on her knee, and tried to ex-
plain to him that it must be only some accidental
light from the sky that caused the rosy patch,
for that no vegetation of any kind grew on the
sides of the snowy mountain ; there could be no
roses there; and she knew that it often looked pink
in the evening sun—only now it was not evening.

Siegfried was silent for a few seconds, and
hung down his head ; but presently he murmured
out, “ Why ?”

“ Ah, Siegfried!” cried the mother, “is it not
enough that God chooses it to be so? Itis He
RED SNOW. 9

who sends the everlasting snows there, and the
flowery herbage here.”

“JT am very sorry for the mountain,” persisted
little Siegfried, sadly ; so sadly that his mother
grieved for the fanciful child, and asked should
she go up with him again to the hill, and see the
rosy patch on the snow herself? On which the
smiles came back to Siegfried’s face, and they
went away together very happily, and with the
basket as usual ; for, said the mother, “ You came
back empty-handed to-day, Siegfried, and brought
me no flowers.”

But, by the time they reached the old spot,
heavy mists had come down over the landscape,
and neither Mont Blanc nor its rosy patch could
be seen. Even Siegfried laughed at the journey
they had had for nothing, and, after filling his
basket, was contented to return home; but in
doing so, he began to talk again.

“Tf we had fewer flowers, Mother, we should
be quite as happy, and then the great mountain
could have some too. I wish God would make
things equal,”
10 RED SNOW.

“Tush, little Siegfried, hush!” cried his
mother, in a half whisper ; “God has a right to
do what He pleases, and we must not dispute
about it, nor wish it otherwise. He chooses that
there shall be desolate places as well as pretty
ones in the world; outcast ends of the earth, as
it were, which nobody seems to care for, as well
as happy valleys. I am afraid it is the same with
human beings—men and women, I mean—which
is much worse. I am afraid there are many out-
cast, God-deserted men, as well as desolate moun-
tains. But you are too young to understand
such things.”

‘he mother sighed as she spoke. Verily, she
did not understand such things herself.

And so they walked on a few steps farther,
and then the boy began again,

“At any rate, the top of the mountain is
nearer Heaven than our hill, Mother. It goes
right into the blue.”

“No, no,” cried the widow, passionately ; “it
only looks to be so. It is no nearer the real
Heaven than we are. If it were, oh! would I
RED SNOW. ll

not have gone there long ago, at the risk of life
itself!”

The child looked up surprised at his mother,
for she spoke in tones very unusual to her; and
seeing how sad her face was, he wondered to
himself if she, also, were fretting that Mont Blanc
was so miserable and forlorn.

And, snatching the nosegay from the basket,
he flung the flowers as far into the air as he
could, exclaiming, ‘There! I wish you had wings,
and would fly away to the mountain, and make it
look beautiful, too!”

Nothing more was spoken between them, but
after little Siegfried had said his evening prayers,
and gone to bed, and while the mother was sitting
alone in the chamber below, she heard a sound
of crying ; and, going up-stairs, found the boy in
tears, the only account he could give of which
was, that he could not help thinking about the
poor outcast, God-deserted mountain.

Now, she had not called the mountain God-
deserted. That was his own disturbed idea; a
confusion he had got into from what his mother
12 RED SNOW.

had said. But how hard this was to explain!
How painful to touch the chords of a subject
which jarred so cruelly against the natural hopes
and faith of a gentle heart !

How difficult also for one who had known the
stern realities of sorrow, to ‘feel along” the
more delicate “line” of an infant’s dreamy griefs !

He was soothed by degrees, however, and after
she left him, her thoughts soon wandered away
from what she felt to be his fanciful troubles
about the desolate mountain, to her own strug-
gles with her desolate heart.

The next day was Sunday, and Siegfried was
able to walk to the somewhat distant church, and
even to repeat a few of the prayers, and listen,
now and then, to bits of the sermon, when his
mother thought there was something he could
understand, and drew his attention to it.

But on this particular day there was no need
for her to call his attention to the preacher ; nay,
had she been able, she would have been very glad
to have prevented his hearing him at all. But
how could he help hearing, when the pastor, ad-
RED SNOW. 13

dressing his flock, asked if there was a single one,
young or old, amorg them, who had not gazed
hundreds and hundreds of times at the giant
mountain of their land—the snow-covered, inac-
cessible heights of Mont Blanc ?

Siegfried and his mother looked at each other,
and his heart leapt within him, to think that now,
at last, he should hear something about his mys-
terious friend; and, clasping his mother’s hand
tightly in his own, he listened for every word.

But, alas ! for what he heard. The pastor, after
describing the mountain in all the magnificence
of its size and form, painted it as being, neverthe-
less, the region of hopeless desolation ; the abode
of everlasting lifelessness and despair. Cold,
hard, insensible, what could rouse it from its
death-like torpor? ‘The life-giving sun shone
upon it from day to day, from age to age ; but no
influence from its rays ever penetrated that
frozen bosom. The dews fell upon it, the storms
burst over it, equally in vain. Unmoved, it lifted
up its gloomy crest to Heaven, as if defying its
very Maker to touch the stony depths and bid
14 RED SNOW.

the waters flow, or warm and soften them into
life and gladness!

Siegfried was already in tears, but what fol-
lowed was still worse, for the pastor now called
upon his congregation to consider whether there
was not something in the moral world of which
the insensible mountain was but the too faithful
type? And then he answered himself, Yes !—
the hardened human heart, the wicked natural
heart, the Pharaoh-heart of the multitude, on
whichthe sunshine of Divine Grace and the storms
of Divine Wrath were equally poured out in vain.

Yet, that “ offences must needs come,” he was
well aware ; that such God-deserted beings as he
had spoken of, must come up and be cut down,
he knew: “vessels of wrath. appointed to de-
struction.” But, oh! might none of the congre-
gation now before him be of the number of those
lost ones! Might all there present take warning
henceforth, as they turned their eyes to the stiff-
necked hill of their native country, and flee from
the wrath of the Lamb !

Siegfried’s sobs had by this bist become so
RED SNOW. 15

uncontrollable, that the neighbours were dis-
turbed ; and the widow thought the best thing
she could do, was to rise up and leave the church
with her child.

There was no use in arfuing with him ; he was
both too young and too much distressed ; added
to which, his mother was scarcely less pained
by the stern words than he was.

She, too, could have wept to think of “ vessels
of wrath appointed to destruction,” and longed to
hope against hope for the world of her fellow-
creatures. In the material world she had but
little interest, for she knew but little about it,
and had not sufficiently considered the text which
says that “God’s mercy is over a// His works ;”
not limited to one class of creatures, or even to
one sort of life.

Feeling as she did, therefore, she entered into
no discussion with her boy, but through the
home evening contrived to divert his mind, by
reading him pleasant stories of good people who
had lived in favour with God, and had died full
of hope and peace.
16 RED SNOW.

Nevertheless, Siegfried’s last thought, as he
fell asleep, was not of comfort and joy in the
righteous, but of pity and almost love for all the
wretched things for whom there seemed no hope.

The next day, his mother would fain have per-
suaded him to remain below in the valley, and
seek some new amusement, but finding she could
not reconcile him to the idea of forsaking his
favourite haunt, she gave way, though with a
sigh ; and so, after his little daily tasks and helps
to her were ended, he climbed up the heights as
usual. |

It was well that he had promised his mother
to teaze her no more about the matter. Other-
wise, on that day, he would have made more fuss
shan ever, for, when the sun was at the highest,
the rosy flush reappeared on the distant snow,
only not now confined to one small patch, but
spread in broad tracts of delicate colour, which
threatened to cover the whole mountain with its
Aurora-like tint,

Once or twice Siegfried’s resolution to keep his
promise nearly gave way, but he held out man-
_ RED SNOW. 17

fully even to the last, contenting himself, on his
return into the valley, with inquiring of a neigh-
bour’s son, whom he met driving home his
father’s cattle, why some of the snow on the hills
looked pink? At first the boy said he didn’t
know, but presently he recollected that he had
heard it said, that red snow fell sometimes out of
the sky. Very likely that was it; but what it
was, or what became of it, he had no notion.
Only it went away as it came.. Nothing ever
stopt on the hill but the snow that was always
there.

Hearing this, Siegfried had no longer even a
wish to speak to his mother about it. She would
say it was because the mountain was so cold and
hard, no good thing, even from Heaven, could
stay upon it!

And thus a day or two passed, and the tracts
of rosy colour grew fainter, and finally disap-
peared, as the farmer’s son had said was always
the case; and Siegfried never spoke about it
again, but sat on the hill-side daily, wondering
and dreaming to himself.

C
18 RED SNOW. —

But he was interrupted at last. One morning,
when the snow looked colder and whiter than
ever against the blue sky, and he had been sitting
for a while, with his face hidden by his hands, a
voice he did not know called to him, asking what
he was doing. And when he lifted up his eyes,
a stranger stood between him and Mont Blanc.

A child always answers “ Nothing” to such a
question, for children never feel thinking to be
doing anything.

But the stranger would not be so easily satis-
fied, and smiling, persisted in his inquiries.

“ What are you thinking of then, little boy ?
One must be either doing or thinking while one
is awake. And I want you to talk to me. I
have come from such a long way off, and am so
weary.”

Here the stranger seated himself by Siegfried’s
side on the grass.

“First,” continued he, “I want you to tell me,
if you can, whether I can get to the town o \.
through the pretty valley here at the bottom of
this hill? Then, I want you to tell me for whom


RED SNOW. 19

you have picked this basket of flowers? Then,
why you are on this wild hill-side alone? Then,
what you think about when you cover up your
face with your hands? Now, then, can I get to
the town through the valley ?”

The voice that asked was so good-natured, and
the smile on the stranger’s face so kind, that
Siegfried was won at once, and looking full at his
new friend, and smiling himself, nodded assent to
this first question.

“Does your nod always mean yes, little boy ?”
asked the stranger, amused.

Siegfried nodded again.

“Very good. Now we understand each other,
Will you answer my other questions ?”

Siegfried gave another nod, and then they both
laughed, and the stranger went on.

“For whom have you gathered the flowers ?”

“For my mother.”

“ And why are you here alone?”

“To play.”

“ What, alone? Why?”

“T have nobody else to play with.”

Cc 2
20 RED SNOW.

“And what is it you think of when you sit
with your face covered up ?”

Siegfried’s heart melted within him, and, point-
ing by a sorrowful nod to the giant mountain, he
answered, “TI think of it.”

“Of it? What can you find in ¢ to think
about ?”

“Tam so sorry for it!” cried little Siegfried,
passionately; “so sorry it is so miserable and out-
cast, and that God will let nothing grow there,
while we have all these flowers ! ”

And once more he tossed the flowers contemp-
tuously out of the basket.
| “Ah, little boy,” said the stranger, putting his
arm kindly round the child, and drawing himself
nearer to him. “ You must answer another ques-
tion now. Who put such strange fancies into
your head? Who told you this about the poor
mountain ?”

“They all say so,” murmured Siegfried. “The
pastor preached about it on Sunday, and mother
says so, too, and the farmer’s son, and everybody ;
and I am so sorry, so very sorry!”
RED SNOW. 21

The young voice died away, as it were, in
regret.

“And why do you care so much about the
mountain, little boy ?”

Siegfried looked up, puzzled for a fhoment, but
very soon out came the simple, child-like answer,
“T look at it so much when I come,up here to
play.”

It was the stranger’s turn now to fel his eyes
moisten, as he thought of the solitary child send-
ing out his heart into the inanimate creation
round him.

Extremely interested, therefore, he made a few
more inquiries, and, by degrees, brought out a
part, at any rate, of what Siegfried’s motker and
the pastor between them had told and taught of
outcast countries and God-deserted men. All
was confusion in the child’s account, but the
drift of it could easily be discovered.

Without making a single remark, however, the
stranger smiled again, and said, quite cheerfully,
“T will tell you a secret, little boy. Neither the
pastor, nor your mother, nor the farmer’s son,
33 RED SNOW.

were ever up the mountain, I suspect, so they
cannot know very very much about it.”

“ T wanted to go, but they would not let me,”
interposed Siegfried. ‘They said I was not able
to get up.”

“They said right,” replied the stranger. “ But
I, you see, am older and stronger, and could go;
and I have been.”

Quietly as he purposely spoke, the effect of
what he said was, as he expected, very great.
Siegfried jumped up; then sat down; then once
more started from his seat, and was far more
anxious to run down the hill and tell his mother
the news, than to remain quietly where he was,
and hear what more the stranger had to tell. He
allowed himself to be controlled, however, and
his friend went on talking as if he had not been
interrupted.

“ And the place is neither lifeless nor deserted.
God sends it the beautiful red snow plant instead
of flowers. I have been gathering it for days.”

As he spoke, he unfastened from the leathern
strap that went across his shoulders a small tin
RED SNOW. 23

box, and, opening it for a moment, let Siegfried
peep at a bright carmine-coloured miss of some-
thing within.

The child was speechless at first, overpowered
by admiration and delight, but presently eX-
claimed, “Then that was what I saw!” adding,
gently, “ And it really came down from Heaven,
then?” He was thinking of what the farmer’s
son had said.

“ All good things come from Heaven, that is,
from the God of Heaven,” answered the stranger.
“But thisis as much a plant as the Alpine rose
by your side. It did not drop down from the
sky, but grows in the very snow itself, and covers
over miles and miles of the hill you thought so
desolate. God sends good things everywhere,
though not everywhere alike.”

Oh, the joy of such a doctrine! The simplest
child could understand it, and be glad! All was
explained now, too; the rosy patch and the broad
tracts of colour were both accounted for, and
Siegfried was as happy as he now believed the
mountain to be. And, embracing his new friend,
24 RED SNOW.

he forthwith beyan such a blundering account of
what he, and his mother, and the farmer’s boy,
had thought about the rosy patch, that the
stranger could do nothing but laugh, and at last
stopped him by exclaiming, “Then you see you
were all wrong; but never mind. Take me to
your mother’s cottage, and we will tell her all
about it, too, and I will show it to you both, for
even you have not really seen it yet.”

Siegfried’s mother welcomed the friendly
stranger whom her son brought to her door with
all the heartiness of a Swiss welcome; and not the
less when she found he was an English traveller,
on his way to a neighbouring town to visit a well-
known officer there, who had been deprived of
a limb in the same action in which Siegfried’s
father had lost his life.

And as the town was but a few miles off, and
the summer evenings so long, the stranger was
easily persuaded to rest for a few hours in the
Swiss cottage, and tellthe widow and her son the
history of his adventures on Mont Blanc, and of
the red snow plant he had brought from it. Not
RED SNOW. 25

that telling its history only would have been
enough ; nor was there anything ejther beautiful
or wonderful-looking in the red, jelly-like mass
in the tin box, when looked at only with the
naked eye. The stranger had me ‘nore in store
for them than that,

“Tam going to show you,” he siemens at last,
and after busying himself in unpacking that re-
vealer of secrets, a microscope,—‘ that God has
sent many more gracious things into the world
than people commonly think ; because so many
more than our natural eyes are able to see. Do
you like to know this, little Siegfried ?” he added,
turning purposely to the child. |

Siegfried nodded his heartiest nod of assent,
and the widow said, with a smile, “You should
have asked that question, Sir, of me. It is I
who have not believed, because I did not see.
He has had an instinct of the truth all along.”

“ Well, then, good Mother,” replied the stranger,
“you shall see and believe what will, I think,
comfort you for life—namely, that God makes the
very wilderness to burst forth and blossom like a
26 RED SNOW.

rose: that there are no outcast ends of the earth,
uncared for by Him; no desolate corners where
His goodness is not shown forth.”

As he spoke he finished the last adjustment of
the microscope, and touching the red jelly in
the tin box with the fine point of a porcupine’s
quill, he placed the tiny morsel so obtained in a
glass, to be looked at, and called to Siegfried to
have the first peep.

The widow, struck as she had been with the
stranger’s words, had her own doubts as to what
there could be to be seen, for she had not been
able to detect anything on the porcupine’s quill,
but she said nothing, and very soon Siegfried’s
shouts of delight announced that something, at
any rate, was there.

And, truly, what there was, was a very pretty
sight. Four or five bright little red balls, and
two or three colourless ones among them, were
lying like gems in the few drops of water which
had been put in to keep them separate.

The child believed at once, but at the first
moment the mother could scarcely credit what
RED SNOW. 27

she saw. That this should be a bit of the shape-
less stuff she had looked at in the tin box—it
was marvellous indeed.

' The stranger now proceeded to explain. He
told them that each of the red balls was a perfect
plant in itself. That it was a little colourless
bag, finer than gold-beater’s skin, filled with a
red substance, which shone through, That,as soon
as it was full grown, the red substance within
divided into four, eight, and sometimes sixteen
separate red balls, of course of the tiniest size
possible, all which immediately began to grow
very fast, and grew, and grew, and grew, till the
little bag in which they lived could hold them no
longer, but burst, and dropt them out.

“These,” said he, “are the young plants;
and when each of ¢hem is full grown, the same
thing happens again. The red substance in each
divides into other tiny balls, and, as these grow,
they burst out from the parent bag, (called a ce/i,
properly,) and begin life for themselves. And
thus comes another generation of the ball-like
plants, and so another and another ; and all this
28, RED SNOW.

so quickly, that, in a few hours, millions of them
have sprung from a few single cells. So now,
little Siegfried, you know why, when you looked
the second time at the rosy patch, it had spread
into those great broad tracts of colour which, in
fact, covered over miles of the poor snow with
its beauty. It was no wonder, was it?”

No, that was no wonder ; but that such things
were, of which so many people did not know, was
a wonder from which the good widow could not
easily recover. Besides, she was thinking of the
pastor having made such a mistake.

As for Siegfried, he had not lived long enough
to know why he should be so much surprised
about the red snow plant; was ita bit more
really strange than the growth of the Alpine rose,
which astonished nobody? So his chief feeling
was extreme delight at there being something on
the mountain to make amends for its want of
flowers.

“ And now,” said the stranger, “is there any-
thing more you would like toask?” __

The mother was about to speak at once, but
RED SNOW. 29

hesitated and drew back. She knew so little;
she feared to seem so ignorant and foolish.

Reassured, however, she begged to be told how
the marvellous plant could live amiflst nothing but
snow ; could come up, and bring forth a thousand
fold, with nothing to nourish and gupport it ?

The stranger repeated the word #zothing” with
a smile. ‘

“‘ Nothing, because we see nothing !”

“Ah, see what a bad habit is!” cried the
mother. “I had forgotten already. Then you
think there may be things I do not know of, in
what we call the cold, barren snow?”

“ Ay, ay,” was the answer; “germs of life,
hidden and buried, perhaps, for years; seeds
scattered no one can tell how or when ; and salts
and chemical properties, needing only some acci-
dent of a sunbeam, or dew, or state of the very
air, to make all work together, and the frozen
surface to become moist, and the red snow plant
to spring up by millions.”

Here he paused, and seeing little Siegfried
looking wistfully at him, as if trying to under-
30 RED SNOW

stand, he took him on his knee caressingly, and
said, “That microscope is a very curious thing, is
it not?”

The child nodded his “ yes”’ as heartily as ever,
and then laid his head, contentedly, on his friend’s
shoulder, while he went on talking.

“Yes ; it is very curious, for it shows us quan-
tities of things we could not see without it; but
the best lesson it teaches is, how much more
there may be of which, even with its help, we
can see and know nothing ; for, although there is
a limit to our power of seeing God’s works, no
naturalist dares to think he has reached the limits
of the works themselves. In this life we cannot
hope to know a hundredth part of the creations
which surround us. You can believe this now,
good Mother ?”

“With all my heart,” was her answer.

“ And, further,” he added, “ you can judge now
for yourself, that even of the things we do what
we call see with the naked eye, there are a great
many of which we can never know anything like
the real truth, without such aid as this (pointing
RED SNOW. ‘D1

to the microscope). What was the red snow
plant to you at first? A piece of shapeless
jelly. What did it become to your more enlight-
ened eye? A living organism, unmistakably from
Almighty hands, endowed with a system of life,
if not of life-enjoyment, peculiarly its own. This
is something to have discovered, certainly, but is
it all? Ah! as I tell it, I feel how imperfect the
account is—how much remains behind. All we
have done is but to have made a step or two out
of complete ignorance.

*¢¢The rest remaineth unrevealed.’

Yet. a glory comes into our hearts from the
thought of the worlds beyond reach of our present
senses, like the reflection from lightning below
our own horizon, and both faith and hope ought
to be strengthened.”

The widow did not speak.

“‘T have one word more to say,” continued the
stranger guest, “if you will allow me to say it,
and can forgive the old traveller for preaching as
well as teaching. I have taught you something of
32 RED SNOW

God’s doings in the natural world, which has
given you comfort and hope. What, then, you
believe of His works, believe also of His mercies.
If you cannot find a limit to the one, suspect
and hope that the other, too, may be infinite—far
beyond our comprehension. Will you try and
take this last lesson to heart ?”

The poor mother’s eyes filled with tears. She
had passed tremblingly through life, and sadly
needed the good counsel. ;

After a short pause, her counsellor went on,
firmly, but very kindly :—

“You have seen how weak and short-sighted
the natural eye is; can you for a moment sup-
pose that the spiritual eye is more far-seeing and
better able to acquaint you with God's purposes
and doings? Are His works to be infinite, and
His mercies bounded, so that a man can point to
the limit, and say, Here God’s mercy ceases ;
here there is no hope—but only everlasting lifeless-
ness and despair ? Oh, good Mother, to whom is
entrusted the rearing of a very tender plant, take
heed what you teach, and foster in it, above all
RED SNOW. 3a

other virtues, the charity which ‘hopeth all
things,’ and then can both believe and endure.”

The lesson was not spoken in vain even then,
and it was never forgotten. And Siegfried grew
on, and the stranger revisited the cottage many
times, and by-and-by aided in the education of
the child whose acquaintance he had made in so
singular a manner. And, after many years, the
young man, Siegfried, became a teachér himself —
a pastor—though not in his own country.

But never, through a long life, did he forget
his early hopes, and fears, and fancies, about
the desolate mountain, nor the lesson he learnt
from the stranger traveller. And into whatever
scenes of darkness and ignorance he forced hig
way; whatever he met with of sin and sorrow;
however often baffled, thrown back, and disap-
pointed, he never despaired ; for he used to recall
the past, and take comfort to himself by thinking,
“Tt may be God’s will yet, that the red snow
plant may one day burst into life on the cold
hill-side.”

WHEREUNTO?

D2

%

WHEREUNTO ?

**T see in part
. That all, as in some piece of art,
Is toil cdoperant to an end.”—TENNYSON.

“THis is dreadful! What can I do?”

“Why, follow me, to be sure! Here! quick!
sideways ! to the left! into this crevice of the
rock! there! all’s right !”

“Oh, it’s easy to talk, when people can trip
away as lightly as you do. But look at me with
the ground slipping away wherever I try to lay
hold.”

“Come along; all’s right,” repeated the Crab

(for such was the speaker) from his crevice in the
rock,
38 WHEREUNTO ?

And all was right certainly, as far as he was
concerned ; but as for the poor Star-fish, who was
left on the sand, all was as wrong as possible, for
he was much too hot ; and no wonder.

It was a low tide—a spring tide—and even for
a spring tide, a particularly low one ; for there
was very little wind astir, and what there was,
blew off the shore.

So the rocks were uncovered now, which sel-
dom tasted the air, and the stems of the great
oarweed, or tangle, which grew from them, were
bent into a half-circle by the weight of their
broad leathery fronds, as, no longer buoyed up
by the sea, they lay trailing on the sands.

What a day it was, to be sure! one of those
rare, serene ones, when there is not a cloud in
the delicate blue sky, and when the sea lies so
calm and peaceful under it, that one might almost
be persuaded to believe nothing would ever again
ruffle its surface. The white-sailed vessels in the
distance, too, looked as if they had nothing in
the world to do for ever, but to float from one
beautiful end of the world to the other, in secu-
WHEREUNTO ? . 39

rity and joy. Yet delicious—unsjeakably deli-
cious—as the day was, it brought discomfort to
some who lived under it. The numpberless star-
fishes, for instance, who had been unexpectedly
left stranded on the shore by the all-too-gently-
retreating waves, how could they rejoice in the
beautiful sunshine, when it was streaming so
pitilessly on their helpless limbs, and scorching
them by its dry cruel heat? And as for the
jelly fishes, who had shared a similar fate, they
had died almost at once from the shock, as the
wave cast them ashore ; so of the merits of the
delicious day they knew nothing at all.

All creatures did not suffer, of course. The
Crab, for instance, who had given such good ad-
vice to his friend (if he could but have followed
it), did very well. In the first place, he liked the
air nearly as well as the water, so that being left
high and dry on the shore now and then was
quite to his taste. Moreover, he could scuttle
off and hide in a crevice of the rocks whenever
he chose. Or he could shelter under the large
sea-weeds, and because of his hard coat was even
40 WHEREUNTO ?

able to take a short walk from time to time, to
see how matters went on, and observe how far
the tide had gone down ; and if the sun did hap-
pen to bake him a little too much, he had only
to run off to a pool and take a bath, and then was
as fresh as ever in a minute.

And now, just as the tide was at the lowest,
where it was likely to beat about for some time
without much change, two other creatures ap-
peared on the sands, and approached the very
spot where the Star-fish lay in his distress, and
near which the Crab was hid. Now there was a
ledge of rocks here, which would have furnished
seats for dozens of human beings, and from
the front of it grew almost a forest of oarweed
plants.

What the creatures were who came up to this
place and stopped to observe it, I shall not say ;
but one of them remarked to the other, “‘ Here
again, you see; the same old story as before.
Wasted life and wasted death, and all within a
few inches of each other! Useless, lumbering
plants, not seen half-a-dozen times in the year;
WHEREUNTO ? Al

and helpless, miserable sea-creatures, dying in
health and strength, one doesn’t know why.”

As the creature who spoke, said this, it lifted
up two or three tangle fronds with a stick it car-
ried in its hand, and then let them flop suddenly
down on the sand; after which it,used the end
of the same stick to chuck the unhappy star-fish
into the air, who, tumbling by a lucky accident
under the shelter of the tangle, was hid for a time
from sight.

“ And so we go up, and so we go down, our-
selves,” continued the creature ; “a good many of
us, with no more end in life, and of no more use,
that one can see, than these vile useless sea-
‘weeds ; coming into the world, in fact, for no
earthly purpose but to go out of it, in some such
wretched manner as this !”

And here the creature kicked three or four
more stranded star-fishes across the narrow
sands, till he had fairly kicked them into the
sea ; muttering as he did so, “ What did you come
into the world for, I wonder, and you, and you,
and you? Purposeless life and purposeless death
42 WHEREUNTO ?

—the fate of thousands. And I for one as use-
less as any of them, but at any rate having the
grace to acknowledge that the world would get
on quite as cleverly without meas with! Where-
unto, whereunto, whereunto ? Answer it if you
can!” As the creature finished speaking, the two
moved on together; but what the companion
answered was never exactly known ; for though
the voice sounded as if in dispute, what was said
was not heard by those who were left behind,
for they began at once to chatter among them-
selves.

And first out popped the head of the Crab
from the crevice he had taken shelter in; and he
cocked his eyes knowingly, first to one side, and
then to the other, and began to talk ; for he had
always plenty to say for himself, and was remark-
ably bold when there was no danger. “Miserable
sea-creatures !” was his first exclamation, repeat-
ing what the land-creature had said. “ I suppose
I am included in that elegant compliment. I
say! where are you, old Lilac-legs? Have you
contrived to crawl away after all? Come out of
WHEREUNTO ! 43

your corner, or wherever you are, for a bit. Who
was the creature that was talking such nonsense
just now? Only let me come across him, that’s
all! Helpless sea-creatures, indeed! I should
like to have seen Aim hiding in a crevice as nim-
bly as I can do! He’d better not come within
reach of me any more, I ¢an tell him!”

It was all very weil for the Crab@o sit outside
the rock looking so fierce, and brushing his
mouth so boldly with his whisker-like feelers,
now that there was nobody to fight*with. How
he would have scuttled away sideways into his
hole, if the creature had reappeared, every body —
can guess.

“You happy fellow !” answered the meek voice
of the Star-fish, Lilac-legs ; “you can afford to
joke about everything, and can do whatever you
please. You have so many things in your favour
—your stiff coat, and your jointed legs, and your
claws with pincers at their ends, and your large
eyes. Dear me, what advantages! And yet I
have an advantage too, and that a very great one,
over you all, so I shall not grumble, especially
44 WHEREUNTO ?

not now that I am in the shade. That sun was
very unpleasant, certainly ; I felt something be-
tween scalded and baked. Horrible! but I am
sheltered now. And how did that come to pass,
do you think?”

The Star-fish paused for an answer; but the
Crab declared he couldn’t think—had no time for
thinking ; it was too slow work to suit him. So
Lilac-legs told him how she had been vhucked
into the air by the stick, and how she had come
down in the midst of the tangle, and fallen under
_ shelter. “So you see,” added she in conclusion,
“that you were quite right in saying what non-
sense the creature talked. Why, he said he was
as useless as these vile useless sea-weeds, and
had come into the world, like them, for nothing’;
whereas, don’t you see, he was born to save me,
which was something to be born for, at any rate,
that’s quite clear; and so was the vile useless
sea-weed, as he called it, too. I, with my advan-
tages, can tell them both that !”

“ You go in and out, and in and out, over peo-
ple’s remarks, till you make me quite giddy, I get
WHEREUNTO ? 45

so puzzled,” replied the Orab; “and then you are
always talking of your advantages,’ he continued,
whisking his feelers backwards and forwards con-
ceitedly as he spoke, “and I can’t make out what
they are. I wish you would say at once what
you mean.”

“Oh, my advantages, you want todcnow about?”
answered Lilac-legs. “Well, I certainly have one
in each leg, near the end, with which I—but I
don’t think I can describe it exactly. You have
several advantages yourself, as I told you just
now, and we have one or two in common ; for
instance, the loss of a leg or two is nothing to
either of us; they grow again so quickly; but
still J am very helpless now and then, I must
admit! on the sand, for instance—it is so soft—
and the more I try to lay hold, the more it slips
away. Still these advantages in my legs make
amends for a good deal, for at any rate I know
my own superiority, and there’s a great comfort
in that ; I can’t explain, but you may safely take
it for granted, that with my advantages, I know
a good deal more than you give me credit for. I
46 WHEREUNTO ?

know, for instance, that the poor ignorant creature
need not consider himself useless, since he was
the means of chucking me here, and that this
fine old tangle hasn’t lived for nothing, since it is
sheltering me.”

“How conceited some people are with their
advantages !”” murmured a silver voice from one
of the tangle fronds. “If the tangle had come
into the world for nothing but to shelter you,
there would have been a fuss to very little pur-
pose, indeed! Can’t your advantages tell you
there are other creatures in the world quite as
important as yourself, if not more so, you poor
helpless Lilac-legs ? Do you know who is speak-
ing? It is the blue-eyed limpet, I beg to say—
the Patella pellucida, if you please. J have an
advantage or two myself! My coat is harder -
even than the crab’s, and it is studded with a
row of azure spots, as bright as the turquoise
itself. That zs something to reflect upon in
one’s solitude, I can assure you! and the tangle
plants are the natural home and food of our lovely
race. The creature was ignorant enough in calling
WHEREUNTO ? 47

them useless, therefore, of course; but you were
not much wiser in thinking they were put into
the world to shelter you. I flatter myself I have
said enough! To be the home and the food of
beings like us, is cause sufficient—almost more
than sufficient, I venture to think—for the exist-
ence of any vegetable that fringes these shores,
And while they live for us, our turquoise-gemmed
backs are, in return, their highest ornament and
pride. The whole thing is perfect and complete.
Anybody with half an eye, and a grain of under-
standing, may see that!”

“ Oh, the narrow-mindedness of people who
live under a shell!” murmured a score of whis-
pers, in unison, from another tangle frond close
by. “Oh, the assurance of you poor moveable
limpets in talking about your home, when you do
but stick to first one part of these vast leaves
and then another, moving from place to place,
and never fairly settling anywhere? Home, in-
deed, you call it? What sort of a home is it,
when an unlucky chance can force you off at any
moment, or some passing creature pick you from
48 WHEREUNTO ?

your hold? The pretension would be disgusting,
if it were not so absurd. Think of mere travel-
lers, as one may say, talking of their lodging-
house as if it was their own, and belonged to
them by a natural right !—how ridiculous, if not
wrong! We* can afford to speak—we, of whose
dwelling-places it is the foundation and support.
Talk of the useless tangle, indeed! Yes, the
creature was ignorant indeed who said so. Little
he knew that it was the basis of the lives of
millions. Little he knew of the silver net-work
we spread over it from year to year, or of the
countless inhabitants of the beautiful web—a
fairy-land of beings, so small, that the crab can
scarcely see us, yet spreading so far and wide,
and accomplishing so much; but that is because
we work in unison, of course. We never quarrel
among ourselves, as some folks do—not altogether
unlike the crab in the crevice yonder. We work
to one end, so we are sure to continue strong.
Useless tangles, forsooth! when they have been

* Flustra membranacea (Johnston), now Membranipora mem-
branacea (Busk).
WHEREUNTO? 49

the foundations of colonies like ours from the
beginning of the world! Of course the thing is
clear enough to those who choose to look into it;
any one who knows zs, can tell people what the
tangle is in the world for, I should think!”

“Hear how they talk,’ murmured another
shell-fish,* no distant relation of the blue-eyed
limpet who had spoken before, and who lay
hidden in the midst of the twisted roéts by which
the tangle stem held fast to the rock; “ hear how
the poor scurfy creatures talk, to be sure, as if
there was nobody in the world but themselves.
But anything can talk, which has so many mouths
to talk with. J could say a good deal myself, if
I chose to try, with only one; but I don’t care
to let out my secrets into everybody’s foolish
ears. Much better hold my tongue, than let cer-
tain people, not a hundred miles off, know I am
here. I don’t fancy being sucked at by star-
fishes, or picked out of my place by crab’s claws.
Of course I know what the tangle is in the world
for, as well as anybody else. For while they are

* Patella levis.
E
50 WHEREUNTO ?

fighting merely about his flapping leathery ends,
here I sit in the very heart of the matter; safe
in the roots themselves, knowing what’s what
with the cleverest of them. Useless tangle, the
creature said—useless enough, perhaps, as far as
he could tell, who only looked at the long, loose,
rubbishy leaves; but those who want to know
the truth of the matter, must use their eyes to a
little more purpose, and find out what’s going on
at the roots. Ah, they’d soon see then what the
tangle is for! I don’t speak of myself alone,
though of course I know owe very sufficient
reason why the tangle is in the world, if I chose
to say. Am I right, little Silver-tuft, in the
corner there, with the elegant doors to your
house ?”

Now, little Silver-tuft,* the coralline, piqued
herself particularly on the carving of the curious
doors which guarded the front of every one of

* Cellularia reptans (Johnston), now Canda repians (Busk).
*‘Coralline” is an inaccurate term, being strictly applicable
only to the vegetable Corallinas. But it has been used for so

long for some sorts of Zoophytes, thatit is difficult to substitute
another word.
WHEREUNTO ? 51

the numberless cells in which her family lived;
so she was flattered by the compliment, and
owned that the limpet was right*in the main.
She was, nevertheless, rather cool in her manner,
for, thought she to herself, “The rough fellow
forgets that he is but a lodger heré, as the sea- ©
mat said of his blue-eyed cousin; whereas every-
body knows that IJ am a Jdond-fide inhabitant,
though with a little more freedom of movement
than people who stick to their friends so closely
as to cover them up! No offence to the sea-mat,
or anybody who can’t help himself. Neverthe-
less, my fibres being firmly interlaced with the
roots, [ am here by right for ever. These limpets
may talk as they please, but nobody in their
senses can suppose the tangle came into the
world merely to accommodate chance travellers
like them, even though they may now and then
spend their lives in the place. But vanity blinds
the judgment, that’s very clear. Roots and plants
have to grow for such as myself and my silver-
tuft cousins, however ; but that’s quite another
affair. There’s a reason in that—a necessity, I
K 9)

4 hen!
52 WHEREUNTO ?

may say; we want them, and of course, there-
fore, they are here. The thing is as straight-
forward and plain to anybody of sense, as—”

But, unfortunately, the simile was lost; for a
wave of the now-returning tide interrupted Sil-
ver-tuft’s speech, by breaking’ suddenly over the
tangle with a noisy splash. It drew back again
for a bit immediately after; but, meantime, hoth
plants and animals were revelling in the delicious
moisture, and for a few moments thought of
nothing else. And just then, hurrying along the
narrow strip of sand that yet remained exposed,
as fast as their legs could carry them, came the
land-creature and its companion.

Before, however, they had passed the spot
where they had stopped to talk when the tide
was low, another wave was seen coming; to avoid
which, the friends sprang together on the ledge
of rock, and from thence watched the gathering
water, as it fell tumbling over the forest of tangle
plants. And again and again this happened, and
they remained to observe it, and see how the
huge fronds surged up like struggling giants, as
WHEREUNTO ? 53

the waves rushed in below; and how by degrees,
as the tide rose higher and higher,’their curved
‘stems unbent, so that they resumed their natural
position, till at last they were bending and bow-
ing in graceful undulations to the swell of the
water, as was their wont.

And, “Look at them!” cried the creature's|
companion. “For the existence of even these
poor plants in the world, 1 could give you a
hundred reasons, and believe that 4s many more
might be found. Of their use, I could tell you
a hundred instances in proof; there is not one
of them but what gives shelter tothe helpless,
food to the hungry, a happy home to as many as
desire it, and vigour and health to the element
in which it lives. Purposeless life, you talk of!
Such a thing exists nowhere. Come, I will ex-
plain. To begin—but see, we must move on, for
the wind as well as the tide is rising, and we might
chance to be caught. Follow me quick, for even
we might be missed ; and, besides, it is cowardly
to shirk one’s appointed share of work and well-
doing before one’s time. For if the vile sea-
54 WHEREUNTO ?

weeds are able to do good in the world, how
much more—’

But here, too, the discourse was cut short by
the roar of a breaking wave, which carried the
conclusion out of hearing.

People talk of the angry sea ; was he angry
now at what he had heard? No, he was only
loud and in earnest, after all. But undoubtedly
he and the risen wind between them contrived
to make a great noise over the tangle beds. And
he gave his opinion pretty strongly on the sub-
ject in hand. For, cried he, “ You foolish crea-
tures, one and all! what is all this nonsense
about? Who dares to talk of useless sea-weeds
while I am here to throw their folly in their face ?
And you, poor little worms and wretches, who
have been talking your small talk together, as if
it was in your power to form the least idea of
anything an inch beyond your own noses—well,
well, well, I won't undeceive you! There, there!
believe what you like about yourselves and your
trumpery little comforts and lives; but if any
really philosophical inquirer wants to know what
WHEREUNTO ? 55

see-weeds are in the world for, and what good
they dv, I will roar them the true answer all day
long, if they please—to keep me, the great sea, |
pure, and sweet, and healthy! There, now, that’s
the reply! They suck in my foul vapours as
food, and give me back life-supportifig vapours in
return. Vile and useless! What fool has called
anything so? Only let me catch him—thus—”

Bang !—with what a roar thaty wave came
down ! and yet it did no harm—didn’t even dis-
lodge the Crab from the new crevice he had
squeezed himself into for the present. And as
to Star-fish Lilac-legs, she was spreading herself
out in the rocking water, rejoicing in her re-
gained freedom, and telling all her friends of her
wonderful escape, and of the creature who had
been born into the world on purpose to save her
from an untimely death.

It was avery fine story indeed; and the longer
she told it, the more pathetic she made it, till at
last there was not a creature in the sea who
could listen to it with dry eyes.

PURRING,
WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.
Hy
iu

Hi
Ny

Sse 1: PK or)
aM MAAK Nils! AR
«AAPM A i; a et BA \ }



PURRING WHEN YOURE PLEASED.
+

PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED,

“Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.”—
Matt. xii. 34.

TuHey had been licked over hundreds of times by
the same mother, had been brought up on the
same food, lived in the same house, learnt the
same lessons, heard the same advice, and yet how
different they were! Never were there two kit-
tens more thoroughly unlike than those two!
The one, with an open, loving heart, which never
could contain itself in its joy, but purred it out
at once to all the world ; the other, who scarcely
ever purred at all, and that never above its
breath, let him be as happy or as fond as he
would.
60 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

It was partly his mother’s fault, perhaps, for
she always set the children the example of re-
serve ; rarely purring herself, and then only in a
low tone. But, poor thing, there were excuses
to be made for her ; she had had so many troubles.
Cats generally have. Their kittens are taken
away from them so often, and they get so hissed
about the house when people are busy, and the
children pull them about so heedlessly, and make
the dogs run after them—which is so irritating—
that really the wonder is they ever purr at all.

Nevertheless, her not feeling inclined to purr
much herself was no good reason for her think-
ing it silly or wrong in other people to purr when
they were pleased; but she did, and she and her
purring daughter were always having small tiffs
on the subject.

Every morning, for instance, when the nice
curly-headed little boy brought the kittens a
saucer of milk from his breakfast, there was sure
to be a disturbance over the purring question,
for, even before the saucer had reached the floor,
Puss Missy was sure to be there, tail and head
PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 61

erect and eager, singing her loudest and best,
her whole throat vibrating visibly ; while Puss
Master, on the contrary, took his food, but said
very little about it, or, if ever tempted to express
his natural delight, did it in so low a tone that
nobody could hear without putting their ears
close down to him to listen.

Now this was what the mother cat called keep-
ing up one’s dignity and self-respect, so it can
easily be imagined how angry she used to get
with the other child. “Wretched little creature!”
she would say to poor Puss Missy, who, even
after the meal was over, would lie purring with
pleasure in front of the fire ; “what in the world
are you making all that noise and fuss about ?
Why are you to be always letting yourself down
by thanking people for what they do for you, as
if you did not deserve it, and had not a right to
expect it? Isn’t it quite right of them to feed
you and keep you warm? What a shame it
would be if they left you without food or fire! I
am ashamed to see you make yourself so cheap,
by showing gratitude for every trifle. For good-
62 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED,

ness’ sake have a little proper pride, and leave
off such fawning ways! Look at your brother,
and see how differently e behaves !—takes every-
thing as a matter of course, and has the sense to
keep his feelings to himself; and people are sure
to respect him all the more. It keeps up one’s
friends’ interest when they are not too sure that
one is pleased. But you, with your everlasting
acknowledgments, will be seen through, and de-
spised very soon. Have a little more esteem for
your own character, Ido beg! What is to be-
come of self-respect if people are to purr when-
ever they are pleased ?”

Puss Missy had not the least notion what
would become of it in such a case, but she sup-
posed something dreadful ; so she felt quite hor-
rified at herself for having done anything to bring
it about, and made a thousand resolutions to
keep up her dignity, save self-respect from the
terrible unknown fate in store, and purr no more.

But it was all in vain. As soon as ever any-
thing happened to make her feel happy and com-
fortable, throb went the little throat, as naturally
PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 63

as flowers come out in spring, and there she was
in a fresh scrape again! And the temptations
were endless. The little boy's cousin, pale, and
quiet, and silent as she was, would often take
Puss Missy on her knee, and nurse her for half-
an-hour at a time, stroking her so gently and
kindly—how could any one help purring ?

Or the boy would tie a string, with a cork at
the end of it, to the drawer-handle of a table, so
that the kittens could paw it, and pat it, and
spring at it, as they pleased—how was it possible
not to give vent to one’s delight in the intervals
of such a game, when the thing was swinging
from side to side before their very eyes, inviting
the next bound ?

And when there was nothing else to be pleased
about, there were always their own tails to run
after, and the fun was surely irresistible, and well
deserved a song.

Yet the brother very seldom committed him-
self in that way—that was the great puzzle, and
Puss Missy grew more perplexed as time went
on. Nay, once, when they were alone together,
64 PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED.

and her spirits had quite got the better of her
judgment, she boldly asked him, in as many
words, “Why do you not purr when you are
pleased?” as if it was quite the natural and
proper thing to do. Whereat he seemed quite
taken by surprise, but answered at last: “ It’s so
weak-minded, mother says; I should be ashamed.
Besides,” added he, after ashort pause, “to tell
you the truth—but don’t say anything about it—
when I begin there’s something that chokes a
little in my throat. Mind you don’t tell-—it would
let me down so in mother’s eyes. She likes one
to keep up one’s dignity, you know.”

Had Mother Puss overheard these words, she
might have been a little startled by such a result
of her teaching: but, as it was, she remained in
happy ignorance that her son was influenced by
anything but her advice.

... Yet, strange to say, she had that choking
in the throat sometimes herself! ...

But, at last, a change came in their lives. One
day their friend, the curly-headed boy, came
bounding into the kitchen where Puss and her
PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 65

kittens were asleep, in raptures of delight, followed
by the pale, quiet, silent cousin, as quiet and
silent as ever. The boy rushed to the kittens at
once, took up both together in his hands, laid
one over the other for fun, and then said to the
girl, “Cousin, now they’re going to give us the
kittens for our very own, just tell me which you
like best, really? I’m so afraid you won’t choose
for yourself when they ask you, and then, if I
have to choose instead, I sha’n’t know which you
would rather have! And I want you to have
the one you like most—so do tell me before-
hand!”

“Oh, I like them both!” answered the girl, in
the same unmoved, indifferent tone, in which she
generally spoke.

“So do I,” replied her cousin ; “but I know
which I like best for all that ; and so must you,
only you won’t say. I wonder whether you like
to have the kittens at all?” added he, looking
at the pale child a little doubtfully ; then whisper-
ing, as he put them both to her face to be kissed,
“Cousin, dear, I wish I could see when you

F
66 PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED.

were pleased by your face! See! give a smile
when the one you like best goes by. Do—won’t
you—this once—just for once?” .....

It was in vain! He passed the kittens before
her in succession, that she might see the mark-
ings of their fur, but she still only said she liked
both, and, of course, was glad to have a kitten,
and so on; till, at last, he was disheartened, and
asked no more.

It is a great distress to some people when their
friends will zo¢ purr when they are pleased ; and
as the children went back together to the draw-
ing-room, the little boy was the sadder of the
two, though he could not have explained why.

And then, just what he expected happened,—
the choice between the two kittens was offered
first to the girl; but, instead of accepting it as a
favour, and saying “Thank you” for it, and being
pleased, as she ought to have been, she would say
nothing but that she liked both, and it could not
matter which she had ; nay, to look at her as she
spoke, nobody would have thought she cared for
having either at all!
PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 67

How was it that she did not observe how
sorrowfully her aunt was gazing at her as she
spoke ; aye, art with a sorrow far beyond anything
the kittens could occasion !

But she did not; and presently her aunt said,
“ Well, then, as she did not care, the boy should
choose. On which the poor boy coloured with
vexation ; but when he had sought his cousin’s
eyes again and again in vain for some token of
her feelings, he laid sudden hold on Puss Missy,
and cuddled her against his cheek, exclaiming :

“Then I will have this one! I like her much
the best, mother, because she purrs when she is
pleased !”

And then the little girl took up Puss Master,
and kissed him very kindly, but went away with-
out saying another word,

And so a week passed ; and though the children
nursed their kittens, they never discussed the
question of which was liked best again, for a shy-
ness had sprung up about it ever since the day
the choice had been made. |

But at the end of the week, one sunshiny

F2
68 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

morning, when the boy was riding his father’s
pony, and only the little girl was in the house, her
aunt, coming suddenly into the school-room, dis-
covered her kneeling by the sofa, weeping a silent
rain of tears over the fur-coat of Puss Missy,
who was purring loudly all the time; while her
own kitten, Puss Master, was lying asleep un-
noticed by the fire.
* zs * % %

Now, the pale, silent little girl had been an
orphan nearly two years—father and mother
having died within a few weeks of each other ;
and she had been ever since, till quite lately,
under the care of a guardian, who, though married,
had no children, and was more strict and well-
intentioned than kind and comprehending ; so
that, between sorrow at first and fear afterwards,
joined to a timid, shrinking nature, she had,
without knowing anything about it, shut herself
up in a sort of defensive armour of self-restraint,
which, till now, neither aunt, nor uncle, nor even
loving cousin, had been able to break through.

But they had gently bided their time, and the
PURRING WHEN YOU’RE PLEASED. 69

time had come at last, and Puss Missy pointed
the moral ; for, with her aunt’s arms folded round
her, and a sense of her comforting tenderness
creeping into the long-lonely heart, she owned
that she had fretted all the week in secret be-
cause—actually because—i+ was so miserable to
nurse a kitten who would not purr when he was
pleased |
*% % * *
Anybody may guess how nice it was, ten

minutes afterwards, to see the little girl, with the
roused colour of warm feeling on her cheeks,
smiling through her tears at the thought of how
like the unpurring kitten she had been herself !
Anybody may guess, too, with what riotous joy
the loving boy-cousin insisted on her changing
kittens at once, and having Puss Missy for her.
very own. And how, on the other hand, he set
to work himself, with a resolute heart, to make
Puss Master so fond of him that purr he must,
whether he would or no ; and how that, now and
then, by dint of delicate attentions, such as choice
morsels of food and judicious rubbing under the
70 PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED.

ears, he worked the creature up to such a pitch
of complacency, that the vibrations of his throat
became, at any rate, visible to sight, and percep-
tible to touch.

Truly, they were a very happy party; for
after Puss Master took Puss Missy for friend,
confidante, and adviser, he grew so loving and
fond, that he could not help showing his feelings
- in a thousand pretty, pleasant ways: and the
mother-cat herself relaxed by degrees; perhaps
because she found her kittens were not taken
away—partly, perhaps, because Puss Missy’s open-
heartedness stole into her heart at last, with a
sense of comfort—who knows? Certainly she
left off scolding and lecturing, and would not only
watch their gambols, but joinyin them at times
herself, And if neither she nor her son ever
purred quite so much, or so loudly as their
neighbours, the reason, no doubt, was only that
tiresome choking in the throat !

Why, the pale little girl herself complained of
having felt something very like it, during the sad
two years before her kind aunt made her happy
PURRING WHEN YOU'RE PLEASED. 71

again! It always used to come on when she
wanted to say what she felt.

And, perhaps, there is always something that
chokes in the throat when people do not purr
when they are pleased.

Let us hope so!

THE

VOICES OF THE EARTH.

THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

‘ *
“Let every thing that hath breath, praise the Lord.”
Psalm cl. 6.

“Wouxp that I could pass away, and cease to
be!” murmured the Wind, as it performed its
circuits round the earth, long ages ago. “ Would
that I could cease to be! Since the creation of
man, existence has become insupportable.”

“ Thou art mad!” cried the Mountains and Val-
leys, over whom the wind was passing, with its
outcry of lamentation. “Is not man the glory
of the world, the favourite of Heaven? Surely
thou art mad, or else jealous of the greatness of
others—jealous of the master-piece of creation.
Oh thou, ungrateful and unwise, to whom is
76 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

committed the privilege of refreshing the earth
and its inhabitants, why turn aside to hold judg-
ment and condemn? Enough that thou fulfil
thine own appointed work, and, in so doing, exist
to the glory of the Creator.”

“Yet, hear me in patience,” wailed the Wind.
“Tt is for the honour of man, and the glory of
his Creator, that I am so troubled. Hence comes
all my misery. I, who know no rest but in His
will, and once went on my way rejoicing,—I now
am, of all creatures, the most miserable. Oh
earth, with thy mountains and valleys, and forests,
and fast-flowing rivers and seas, do me justice !
Thou knowest it was not so with me of old, when
I was first called into being. Thou knowest with
what joy I roamed over thy confines, and beheld
the universal beauty that then was spread around ;
how tenderly I whispered through thy flowers,
how joyfully I carried up their fragrant odours
as a thank-offering to heaven; how merrily I
sported on the hills, or taught the branches of
thy lofty trees to bow, as in obeisance to Him
who made them! Thou knowest that I even
THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 77

failed not in due obedient love, when storms
were needed ; whether to drive the sluggish va-
pours through the sky, or rouse the sea itself to
healthy action. When have I ever failed? Have
I not always fulfilled His word? For even now,
in these my days of misery, I carry gut unweary-
ingly the great decree. Still I bear aloft from
tropical seas, in ceaseless revolution round the
world, those vapours which must ‘descend in
northern latitudes as dew, or rain, or snow. Still
I labour—still I love to labour’ in the way or-
dained. But woe for me! another burden than
labour is upon me now! Woe for the pollution
I have suffered, since the earth was overspread
by the wretched race of men! Woe for their
civilized lands, which I must needs pass through !
Woe for the cities, and towns, and villages, their
haunts and habitations, which I cannot avoid !
Woe! for I bear thence in my bosom the blas-
phemies of the multitudes, and am laden with
the burden of ingratitude, denial, and doubt.
Woe that I must spread these black results of
misguided reason from pole to pole! Woe that
78 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

I must carry up the jests of the scorner and the
oaths of the intemperate, as incense from man to
his Maker : from man formed in His image, and
boasting in his faculties of sense! Oh that I
could pass away, and cease from being! and that
with me might perish these fruits of an evil heart
of unbelief!”

“Thou hast numbered curses,” breathed the
Mountains and Valleys in reply; “and alas! that
such should ever defile thee, thou messenger of
blessing. But this is not all thou bearest upon thy
wings. Other outpourings stream into thy bosom ;
other voices are wafted upon thee to the skies ;
other sounds are spread by thee from pole to pole.
Hast thou weighed in the balance, against the
utterances of the rebellious, the prayers of the
faithful, the childlike, and the pure; the stedfast
avowal of martyrs; the daily thanksgiving of
saints; the songs of holy praise and joy?”

“Yet what are these but what are due, and
more than due, ten hundred thousand fold?” ex-
claimed the angry Wind. “What merit can you
find in these? How strike a balance between
THE VOICES OF THE EARTH, 79

them and the unnatural sin which says, ‘There
is no God’? All His works every where have
praised Him from the beginning: only among
men is there silence and doubt. And shall the
remnant take credit for not joining in their sin?
Inanimate creation and the beasts have never
swerved from their allegiance. What room is
there for boasting in man? Has he done more
than these, from the foundation of theworld ?”
“But he alone of all creation, with a free, in-
telligent will.’—The words came ‘up in soft re-
sponse from the Earth, and spread like harmony
upon the air.—‘“ He alone of all creation, with a
free, intelligent will. Merit there can be none,
indeed; but acceptability—where can it ever be
found, but in the free-will worship of a spirit
which has choice? And if choice, then, of
necessity, liberty to err. And with liberty to err,
comes, alas! the everlasting contest between right
and wrong. Yet why do I say, ‘alas’? Obedi-
ence to a law which cannot be resisted is not the
service of the heart—not the highest tribute to
the Creator’s glory. Far dearer to Him may be
80 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

the struggle by which the human will is subdued
to unison with the will Divine, in anticipation of
that day when all its wisdom shall be made
known. Have patience, then, with the contest
between good and evil, so long as the good is
accepted of Heaven ; and while this is so, be con-
tented to labour and to be!”

“ Yet listen once again,” sighed the Wind. “I
have been jealous for the glory of the Maker, it is
true, and troubled for the honour of man. But
Tam also wretched for myself. Oh Earth, Earth,
Earth! The Creator has made His human fa-
vourite mortal! The mountains stand fast for
ever, the hills cannot be moved, the very trees
survive from generation to generation ; but man
—the chosen—passes away like a shadow ; he
cometh up and is cut down as the grass; I go
over him, and his place knows him no more. Alas
for the misery lam doomed to share! The breath
of the dying has passed into my soul for ages ; it
is borne upon every breeze; it has tainted every
air. I am filled with those bitter agonies, and
loathe my very being. Would that I could pass
THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 81

away into nothing, and be as though I had never
been, that so I — taste no more ais vile dis-
honour of death.

“Thou judgest with the judgment of those
who see and know but in part,” came up the
soothing answer from the Hills. ‘What, if the
dying breath, which falls so sadly on thy breast,
releases from its prison-house of clay some spirit
more etherial than thine own, some @ssence sub-
tler far than thine, -which thou must bear before
the mercy-seat? Shall not the Judge of all the
earth do right? Canst thou not trust the Al-
mighty with His own? Why grieve for the last
sigh of perishing flesh, if it be also the first breath-
ing of a freed immortal soul? How rail at death, if
it is He who strikes the chord of everlasting life?”

-«“ Yet once more hear me, and be just,” per-
sisted the Wind. ‘Not the breath of the dying
only overwhelms me with this wild desire to be
at rest. The breath of the living who suffer on
is even worse. The sigh of natural grief, which
none can blame ; the moanings of the afflicted in
mind, body, or estate; the outcries of the op-

G
82 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

pressed and desperate ; the shrieks of madness
and of pain, the groanings of despair ; all, all are
outpoured on me! Those dreadful voices haunt
me from all sides. This mass of human woe cor-
rodes my soul. I meet it'in the cottage, and pass
through to find it in the palace; I rush from the
battle-field to the cloister, but in vain! for no se-
clusion can shut out man from sorrow. Wherever
the chosen creature is found, there must I gather
up the voices of grief; for lo! as the sparks fly
upwards, so man is born to trouble. Oh that I
might pass away for ever, and cease to know the
wretchedness I have no power to avert !”

“Yet wait, wait, wait,’ implored another whis-
perer from the Earth. “ What, ifin human sorrow
may be found an answer to the riddle of human
guilt? What, if amidst its saddest cries, thou
carriest up the voice of heartfelt penitence on
high? Wilt thou not weigh against the transient
earthly grief the joy in heaven for one repenting
sinner? Or, if amidst the mortal agony of the
righteous, the triumph-songs of faith grow loud
as those the angels sing round the throne,—‘ Thy
THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 83

will, Thy will, Thy will — doing or suffering—
Thy will be done ;—wouldst thou not fear to take
away the one, lest the other perchance should fail
from off the earth ? Watch well the balance be-
tween suffering and its fruits ; but while these
rise acceptable on thee to Heaverf, well mayst
thou rest contented in thy work, and rejoice both
to labour and to be.”

“Yet is man—the favourite—of all creatures
the most wretched,” moaned the Wind, “since he
alone must purchase happiness with pain.”

“Unjust! unjust!” expostulated the Earth.
“Thou keepest record of men’s sighs, hast thou
no consciousness of the unceasing breathings of
simple, natural joys? Yet, number the one by
thousands, and by tens of thousands of the other
will I answer and refute thy words. The peace-
ful respirations of health, unnoticed and, alas !
how often, unthankfully enjoyed through years,
count them if thou canst! Count them as they
float to thee, while the night hours pass over the
sleeper’s head: count them when he wakes with
the young daylight to a fresh existence. Count

a2
84 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

the laughs of frolic childhood. Count the mur-
murs of happy love. Count the stars if thou wilt,
but thou canst never count the daily outpourings
of common earthly joys. Alas for those who
judge of life only by startling periods, and are
deaf to the still small voices, which tell of hourly
mercies, hour by hour !”

“Yet once more listen,” cried the Wind, “for
more and worse remains behind. The utterances
of vice—oh innocent Earth, in whom the glory of
the Creator is yet left visible to all!—I sicken at
the thought of what I know ; of what I bear unwil-
lingly about. The loathsome words of sin—the
lies of the deceiver—the prating of the fool—the
seductions of the dissolute—the showts of drunken
revelry—the songs of the profane—the gifts of
speech and thought misused to evil :—those voices
horrible to God and man... . / a

* Be they as dust before thee, and thou as the
angel of the Lord scattering them!” shouted a cry
of indignation from the Earth. “ Yet wait, wait,
wait! For thyself, be thou still contented to
labour and to be. Wouldst thou be wiser than
THE VOICES OF THE EARTH. 85

the Judge? Wilt thou lose patience, while He
yet forbears? No! watch the balance as be-
fore, and weigh the evil and the good. And so
long as the prayers which the faithful pour on
thy bosom outvalue the words of the scorner ;
so long as the blessings of the rithteous float
above the curses of the blasphemer; so long as
the voice of penitence follows close upon the ut-
terances of sin ; so long as pious submission makes
harmony of the cries of grief; so long as thou
carriest up daily thanksgiving for unnumbered
daily mercies ; so long as souls of saints are
breathed up to Heaven by death :—so long be
thou contented to have patience, and labour and
be.”

“But should the day ever come,” shouted the
Wind in return, “when the balance is reversed ;
when vice, only tolerated now, becomes trium-
phant ; when sin reigns on the altars, and no man
pulls it down ; when the voice of the good man’s
worship is drowned in the bad man’s scorn, and
I cannot lift it to the skies ; when the wretched.
curse God and die, and men have forgotten to be
86 THE VOICES OF THE EARTH.

thankful ;—then, then at last wilt thou acknow-
ledge the justice of my complaints, and help me
.to pass away in peace? Promise this, and till
then I will watch the struggle, and be contented
to labour and to be.”

And the Earth paused and consented, and the
Wind fled satisfied away.

4 a

Lenvoi to the Reader.

And he is still careering round the world ; still
gathering in “the Voices of the Earth ;” still
watching the struggle between good and evil. In
our public walks he meets us face to face. In
our private chambers he is with us still. There
is no secret corner where he cannot come ; no
whisper which is not breathed into his ear. It
behoves us well, then, to be careful, lest, by
thoughtlessness or sin, we add weight to the
wrong side of the scales. For if the balance
should ever incline to evil, and the wind cease to
blow,—what sould become of the world ?
THE

MASTER OF THE HARVEST.




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THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST.

*

“That which thou dost not understand when thou readest,
thou shalt understand in the day of thy visitation ; for there are
many secrets of religion which are not perceived till they be
felt, and are not felt but in the day of a great calamity.” —JEREMY
TaYLor.

Tue Master of the Harvest walked by the side of
his corn-fields in the early year, and a cloud was
over his face, for there had been no rain for
several weeks, and the earth was hard from the
parching of the cold east winds, and the young
wheat had not been able to spring up.

So, as he looked over the long ridges that lay
stretched in rows before him, he was vexed, and
began to grumble, and say “the harvest would be
90 THE MASTER OF THN HARVEST.

backward, and all things would go wrong” At
the mere thought of which he frowned more and
more, and uttered words of complaint against the
heavens, because there was no rain; against the
carth, because it was so dry and unyielding ;
against the corn, because it had not sprung up.

And the man’s discontent was whispered all
over the field, and all along the long ridges whero
the corn-seeds lay ; and when it reached them
they murmured out, “How cruel to complain !
Ave we not doing our best? Have we let one
drop of moisture pass by unused, one moment of
warmth come to us in vain? Have wo not seized
on overy chanes, and striven every day to be
ready for the hour of breaking forth? Are we
idle? Are we obstinate? Are we indifferent ?
Shall we not be found waiting and watching?
How eruel to complain!”

Of all this, however, the Master of the Harvest
heard nothing, so the gloom did not pass away
from his face. On the contrary, he took it with
him into his comfortable home, and repoated to
his wife the dark words, that all things were
THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST, a

going wrong; that the drought would ruin the
harvest, for the corn was not yet sprung,

Ani still thinking thus, he laid his hond on his
pillow, and presently fell asleep.

Bat his wife sat up for a while by the bedside,
and opened her Bible, and read, “The harvest is
tho ond of the world, and the reapers aro the
angols,”

‘Phen she wrote this text in ponoil, on the Ay-
leaf at the end of the book, and after it the date
of tho day, and after the date the words, “Oh,
Lord, the husbandman, Thou waitest for the
procious fruit ‘Thou hast sown, and hast long
patience for ié! Amon, O Lord, amen!”

After which the good woman knelt down to
pray, and us she prayed she wept, for she knew
that she was very ill.

But what she prayed that night was heard only
in henven,

And so a few days passed on as before, and the
house was gloomy with the discontent of its
master; but at last, one evening, the wind
changod, the sky became heavy with clouds, and
92 THE MASTER OF THN HARVEST,

before midnight there was rain all over the land;
and when the Master of the Harvest came in next

_ morning, wet from his early walk by the corn-
fields, he said it was well it had come at last, and
that, at last, the corn had sprang up.

On which his wife looked at him with a smile,
and said, “How often things came right, about
which one had been anxious and disturbed.” To
which her husband made no answer, but turned
away and spoke of something else.

Meantime, the corn-seeds had been found ready
and waiting when the hour came, and the young
sprouts burst out at once; and very soon all
along the long ridges were to be scon rows of
tender blades, tinting the whole field with a
delicate green. And day by day the Master of
tho Harvest saw them and was satisfied; but
because he was satisfied, and his anxiety was gone,
he spoke of other things, and forgot to rejoice.

And a murmur arose among them,—*Should
not the Master haye welcomed us to lifo? He
was angry but lately, because the seed he had
sown had not yet brought forth; now that it has
WHE MASTER OF {HE HARV, 93

brought forth, why is he not glad? What more
does he want? ‘Have we not done our best?
‘Are we not doing it minute by minute, hour by
hour, day by day? From the morning and even-
ing dows, from the glow of the midday sun, from
the juices of the earth, from the breezes which
freshen the air, even from clouds and xain, are we
not taking in food and strength, warmth and
life, refreshment and joy ; so that one day the
valloys may Inugh and sing, because the good seod
hath brought forth abundantly? Why does he
not rejoico?”

‘As before, however, of all they said tho Master
of the Harvest heard nothing ; and it never struck
him to think of the young corn-blades’ struggling
life. Nay, once, when his wife asked him if
the wheat was doing well, he answered, “Very
fairly,” and nothing more. But she then, bocause
the evening was fine, and the fairer weather had
revived her failing powers, said she would walk
out by the corn-fields herself.

And so it came to pass that they wont out
together.
4 ‘TH MASTER OF THE HARVEST,

And together they looked all along the Iong
green ridges of wheat, and watchod the blades as
they quivered and glistened in the breeze, which
sprang up with the setting sun. Together they
walked, together they looked; looking at the
same things, and with the same human eyes;
even as they had waiked, and looked, and lived
together for years, bub with a world dividing
their hearts ; and what was ever to unite them?

Eyvon then, as they moved along, she murmured
half-alond, half to herself, thinking of the anxiety
that had passed away,—“Thou visitest the earth,
and blessest it ; Thou makest it yery plenteous.”

To which he answered, if answer it may be
called, —* Why are you always so gloomy? Why
should Seripture be quoted about such common
things?”

And she looked in his face and smiled, but did
not speak; and he could not read the smilo, for
the life of her heart was as hidden to him as the
life of the corn-blades in the field,

And s0 they went home together, no more
being said by either ; for, as she turned round, the
THE MASTER OF THE HARVES?, 95

sight of the setting sun, and of the young freshly-
growing whoat-blades, brought tears into her
eyes.

She might never see the harvest upon earth
again; for her that other was at hand, whereof
tho reapers wero to be angels.

And when she opened her Bible that night she
wrote on the fly-leaf the text she had quoted to
her husband, and after the text the date of the
day, and after the dato the words, “Bless me,
even me also, oh my Father, that I inay bring
forth fruit with patience !”

Very peaceful were the next few weeks that
followed, for all nature seemed to rejoice in the
weather, and the corn-blades shot up till they
were nearly two fect high, and about them the
Master of the Harvest had no complaints to
make,

But at the ond of that time, behold, the earth
began to be hard and dry again, for once more rain
was wanted ; and by degrees the growing plants
failed for want of moisture and nourishment, and
lost power and colour, and became weak and
96 TOM MASINR OF THI HARVEST.

yellow in hue. And once more the husband:aen
bogan to fear and tremble, and once more the
brow of the Master of the Harvest was over-
clouded with angry apprehension.

And as the man gob moro and more anxious
about the fate of his crops, he grew more and
more irritable and distrustful, and railed as be-
fore, only louder now, against the heavens, because
there was no rain; against the earth, because it
lacked moisture ; against the corn-plants, because
thoy had waxed feeble.

Nay, once, when his sick wife reproved him
gently, praying him to remember how his fears
had been turned to joy before, he reproached her
in his turn for sitting in the house and pretend-
ing to judge of what she could know nothing
about, and bade her come out and see for herself
how all things were working together for ill.

And although he spoke it in bitter jost, and she
was very ill, she said she would go, and went.

So once more they walked out together, and
once more looked over the corn-fields ; but when
he stretched out his arm, and pointed to the long
THE MASTER OF HE HARVEST. 97

ridges of blades, and she saw them shrunken and
faded in hue, her heart was grieved within her,
and she turned aside and wept over them.

Nevertheless she said sho durst not cease
from hope, since an hour might renew the faco
of the earth, if God so willed; neither should
she dare to complain, even if the harvest were to
fail.

At which words tho Master of the Harvest
turned round, amazed, to look at his wife, for her
soul was growing stronger as her body grew
woaker,and she dared to say now things she would
haye had no courage to utter before,

But of all this he knew nothing, and what he
thought, as he listened, was, that she was as weal
in mind as in body; and what he said was, that
a man must be an idiot who would not complain
when he saw the bread taken from under bis very
eyes !

And his murmurings and her tears sent a
shudder all along the long ridges of sickly corn-
blades, and they asked one of another, “ Why
does he murmur? and, Why does she weep? Are

a
98 THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST.

we not doing all we can? Do we slumber or
sleop, and let opportunities pass by unused? Are
we not watching and waiting against tho timos of
tofreshing ? Shall we not be found ready at last?
Why does he murmur? and, Why does she woop?
Is she too, fading and waiting? Has she, too, a
master who bas lost patience ?”

Meantime, when she opened her Bible that
night, sho wrote on the fly-leaf the text, “Where-
fore should a man complain, a man for the punish-
ment of his sins ?” aud after the text the date of
the day, and after the date the words, “hou
dost turn thy fuee from us, and we are troubled:
buf, Lord, how long, how long?”

And by and by camo on the long-delayed times
of refreshing, but so slowly and imperfectly, that
the change in the corn could scarcely be detected
for a while. Novortheless it told at last, and
stems struggled up among the blades, and burst
forth into flowers, which gradually ripened into
ears of grain, But a struggle #6 had boon, and
continued to be, for tho measure of moisture was
seant, and the due amount of warmth in tho air
THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST. 99

was wanting. Nevertheless, by struggling and
effort the young wheat advanced, little by littlo,
in growth ; propsring itsclf, minute by minute—
hour by hour—day by day, as best it could, for
the great day of the harvest.—As best it could!
Would tho Muster of the Harvest ask more?
Alas! he bad still something to find fault with,
for when he looked at the ears and saw that they
were small and poor, he grumbled, and said the
yield would be less than it ought to be, and the
harvest would bo bad.

‘And as more weeks went on, and the same
weather continued, and the progross was very,
very slow, he spoke out his vexation to his wife
at home, to his friends at the market, and to the
husbandmen who passed by and talked with him
about the crops.

And the yoice of his discontent was breathed
over the corn-ficld, all along the long ridges where
the plants were labouring, and waiting, and watch-
ing. And they shuddered and murmured,—
“How cruel to complain! Had we been idle,
had wo been negligent, had we been indifferent,

HQ
100 THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST.

we might have passed away without bearing
fruit at all, How cruel to complain!”

But of all this the Master of the Harvest heard
oothing, so he did not cease to complain.

Meantime another week or two went on, end
people, as they glanced over the land, wished that
a few good rainy days would come and do their
work decidedly, so that the corn-ears might fill.
And behold, while the wish was yet on their lips,
the sky became charged with clouds, darkness
spread over the country, a wild wind atose, and
the growling of thunder announced astorm, And
such a storm! People hid fron it in cellars, and
closets, and dark corners, as if now, for the first
time, they believed in a God, and were trembling
at the new-found fact; as if they could nover
discover Him in His sunshine and blessings, but
only thus in His tempests and wrath.

And all along the long ridges of wheat-plants
drove the rain-laden blast, and they bent down
before it and rose up again, like the waves of a
Jabouring sea. Ears over cars they bowed downs
curs above ews they rose up. They bowed down,




THE MASTER OF THE THARVES?. 101

as if they know that to resist was destruction :
they rose up, as if they had a hope beyond the
storm. Only here and there, where the whi:
winds were strongest, they fell down and could
not lift themselves again, So the damage done
was but little, and the general good was great.
Bat when tho Master of the Harvest: saw here
and there patches of over-weighted corn yet
dripping from tho thunder-showers, he grew
angry for them, and forgot to think of the long
ridges that stretched over his fields, where the
corn-cars were swelling and rejoicing.

And he came in gloomy to his home, when his
wife was hoping that now, at last, all would be
well; and when she looked at him the tumult of
her soul grew beyond control, and she knelt down
before him as he sat moody in his chair, and
throw her arms round him, and cried out,—f It
is of the Lord’s mercies that we are nob utterly
consumed. Ob, husband! pray for the corn and
for mo, that it may go well with us ati the last!
Carry me upstairs!” And his anger was checked
Dy fear, and he carried her upstairs and laid her on


102 THY MASTER OF THE HARVEST,

tho bed, and said it must be the storm which had
shaken her nerves. But whether he prayed for
either the corn or her that night, she never knew.

‘And presently came a new distress; for when
the days of rain had accomplished their gracious
work, and every ono was satisfied, behold, they
did not cease. And as hitherto the ery had gone
up for water on the furrows, so now men’s hearts
failed them for fear lest it should continuo to
overflowing, and lest mildew should set in upon.
the fall, rich cars, and the glorious crops should
he lost.

‘And tho Master of the Harvest walked out by
his cornfields, his face darker than evor, And
he railed against the rain, bocause it would not
coase; against the sun, because it would not
shine ; against the wheat, beeause it might porish
hofore the harvest.

“But why does he always and only complain 1”
moaned tho corn-plants, as the now terror was
breathed over the field. “Have we not dono our
best from tho first? And has not merey beon
with us, soonor or later, all along? When
THE MASTER OF THM HARVEST, 103

moisture was scant, and we throve but little,
why did he not rejoice over that little, and wait,
as-we did, for more? Now that abundance has
come, and we swell, triumphant in strength and
in hope, why does he not share our joy in tho
presont, and wait, in trust, as wo do, for the
futuro riponing change? Why docs he always
complain? Has he himself some hard master,
who would fain reap where he has not sown, and
gather where ho has not strawed, and who has no
pity for his sorvants who strive?”

But of all this the Master of the Harvest heard
nothing, And when the days of rain had rolled
into weeks, and the weoks into months, and the
autumn set in, and the corn still stood up green
the ridges, as if it never meant to ripen at all,
the boldest and most’ hopeful became uneasy,
and the Master of the Harvest despaired,

But his wife had xisen no more from her bed,
where she lay in sickness and suffering, yet in
pation’ trust; watching the sky through the
window that faced hor pillow; looking for the
relief that came at last. For even at the eloventh


104 THE MASTER OF THE MARVEST.

hour, when hope seemed almost over, and men
had half leaned to submit to thoir expected
trial, the dark days began to be varied by a few
hours of sunshine; and though those passed
away, and tho gloom and rain returnod again, yet
they also passod away in their tu, and tho sun
shone out once more.

And tho poor sick wife, as she watched, said to
those around her that the weather was gradually
changing, and that all would come right at last ;
and sighing @ prayor that it mighh bo so with
horself also, she had her Bible brought to the
bod, and wrote in the fly-leaf the text, “Some
thirty, some sixty, some an hundredfold ;” and
after the text the date of the day, for on that dey
the sun had boon shining steadily for many hours.
And aftor the dato the words, “Unto whom
much is given, of him shall much bo required ;
yet if Thou, Lord, bo extreme to mark iniquity,
© Lord, who may stand?”

And day by day the hours of sunshine were
more in number, and the hours of rain and dark-
ness fewer, and by degrees the green corn-cars
THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST, 105

ripened into yellow, and the yellow turned into
gold, and the harvest was ready, and the labourers
not wanting. And the bursting corn broke out
into songs of rejoicing, and cried, “ At least we
have not waited and watched in vain! Surely
goodness and merey have followed us all the days
of our life, and we are crowned with glory and
honour. Where is the Master of the Harvest,
that he may claim his own with joy?”

But the Master of the Harvest was bending
over the bed of his dying wife,

And she whispered that her Bible should be
brought, And he brought it, and she said, “Open
it at the fly-leaf at the end, and write, ‘It issown
in corruption, it is raised in incorruption
sown in dishonour, it is raised in glory : i
in weakness, it is raised in power:
natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.’” And
she bade him add the date of the day, and after
the date of the day the words, “O Lord, in Thy
meroy say of mo—She hath done whatshe could!”
And then she laid her hand in his, and so fell
asleep in hope.



106. THE MASTER OF



a WARY.



And the harvest of the earth was gathered into
barns, and the gathering.day of rejéicing was over,
and the Master of it all sat alone by his fire-side,
with his wife's Bible ou his knee, And he read
the texts, and the dates, and the prayors, from
the first day whon the corn-seeds were held back
by drought; and as he read, anew heart seemed
to burst out within him from the old one—a
heart which the Lord of the other Harvest was
making soft, and the springing whereof He would
bless.

And henceforth, in his going out and coming
in from watching the fruits of the earth, the
toxts, and the dates, and the prayer
present in his mind, often rising to his lips ; and
he murmured and complained no more, let the
seasons be what: they would, and his fears howe
cyor great; for the thought of the late-sprung
seed in his own dry, cold heart, and of the
long-suffering of Him who was Lord and Master
of all, was with him night and day. And niore
and more as he prayed for help, that the weary
struggle might be blessed, and the new-born





were ever
THE MASTER OF THE HARVEST, 107

watching and waiting not be in vain; so more
and more there came over his spirit a yearning
for that other harvest, where he, and she who had
gone before, might be gathered in together.

And thus,—in one hope of their calling,—the
long-divided hoarts were united at last,

THE DELIVERER.



THE DELIVERER.

* Sages, leave your contemplations,
Brighter visions bean afar.” —Crmismas HY3N.

For years there had been abroad over the earth,
a whisper that a Deliverer was about to arise: a
Deliverer who bad been promised from the earliest
ages of the world, Some mighty man or king,
some sage or conqueror, who would bring back
lost justice, goodness, and happiness to the
suffering race of men, and begin a reign of ever-
lasting peace.

And the hearts of all whom the whisper reached,
caught fire at the thought; for who so dull as
not to know his own wretchedness, or not see
that things around him might be better than
112 THE DELIVERER.

they were? Ah! men knew it but too well.
Death, sickness, the nocessity of labour, labour
destowed in vain, wronged affections, the triumph
of might over right, wars and tumults, houschold
divisions, and the thousand other miseries of life,
had from year to year in every age unfolded to
each man in succession, as he awoke to reason,
the strange, sad fact, that some prevailing dis-
order existed in the world in his own particular
day; whilo at the same time a strong instinct in
his soul, told him, that it had nob always been
50,—ywould not be so for over,

So the whisper of a Deliverer stole into all
hearts with a promise of better things in store ;
but, obsoure and indefinite, it was interpreted by
many minds in as many different ways, according
to the bent of different wishes and feolings,
Only in one thing all agreed, namely, that at tho
advent of this Mighty One, sorrow and evil should,
flee away, and joy und peace be spread over the
earth as the waters cover the sea.

‘A. Deliverer!—what should he deliver them
from, if not from the death so abhorrent to every
THE DEDIVERBR. 113,

instinct of their being; from tho grinding sick-
nesses which mado life a burden even to the
young; from the toil that kept the strong man
back from ease and enjoyment ; from the disap-
pointments which racked the tenderest and best
emotions of their hearts ; from the chains of un-
just oppression ; from the ‘strife of parties and
of tongues; from the weakness of their own
souls, which left them a prey to evil imaginations
from within and a thousand temptations from
without?

Truly such life was but 2 weariness at the
best: and “Oh for a Deliverer!” was the ory
that went up from each man’s heart as his own
particular burden bore him down, Oh that the
cverlasting doors were lifted up, that the King
of Glory might come in, and touch tho arth
with some magic sceptro, restoring all things to
order and joy !

But tho name of the Mighty One was to be
called “Wonderful, Counsellor, The Mighty God,
‘The Everlasting Father, The Princo of Peaco.”
And the government was to be upon his shoulders,

I
114 THE DELIVERER,

although he was to be a son, and born a child.
‘Where, then, but in palaces could he be expected,
or looked for ; whore but-in palaces brought forth
and nurtured? Surely, kings must be his nursing
fathers and thoir queens his nursing mothers,
Oh happy parents of a happy child !—who great
enough, who high enough to be so favoured ?
Yet the child of these great ones was to be
greater and mighticr than all, to rule and triumph
over all !—A King of kings, a Lord of lords!
Well might the longing eyes of hope be fixed on
palaces and regal halls! Well might the mur-
mured question arise, “Can this be He?” when
the ory of a new-born prince was heard within
their walls! What wonder if Sybil and Poet
sang, by anticipation of His fame!

But ever as the children of these great ones
grew up to manhood, they merged by the com-
mon lot of suffering and sin into common men,
and hope was darkened: yet though darkenod
uot extinguished—and the Deliveror yas. still
looked for as before.

Some, however, there were, who found in the


THE DELIVERER, 115

titles “ Wonderful, Counsellor,’ another mesning
and another aim, ,Kingly the Deliverer might
be by influonce and character, but not necessarily
in his human birth, The kingship of man’s
noblest faculiy—Reason—might be at hand, to
overthrow all kingships of mere blood ;- the
triumph of mind over material things, the king-
ship of intellect over brute passion and force.

‘The poor wise man who saved the city, but
had neither thanks nor honour for his pains, was
a type of a state of things now at last about to
pass away. And the midnight oil had not been
wasted, nor the brain racked in vain, if this were
so indeed: if the day and hour were at hand
when He should be exalted as universal Coun-
sellor, whom wisdom had made fit to rule; and
He be called Wonderful who was great by the
seorets of his mind.

‘And as Sages and Philosophers meditated on
these things, there glowed in their bosoms aspi-
rations which bordered on devotion, And they
strotched out supplicating hands to the Unseen
Ruler of all, asking that the Wonderful, the

12


116 THE DKLIVERER.

Counsellor, might bring them light and truth
indeed, and conquer with those arms alone the
ignorance and errors of the world.

Oh for the rising of that day, when the real
majesty and power of the human mind should
be revealed to the ignorant multitude in all its
magnificence! Here is tho only greatness worth
the name! Hero the only power fit for universal
rule!

But year after year the wise man died as the
fool, and his children followed him, and neither
among them had the Doliverer axisen, but must
be looked for as before,

‘Again: “Prince of Peace!” mused others.
In this, all is comprehended, The conquering
spoken of is but the overcoming of all wish for
strife; the rulo in store, the sovereignty of love,
suppressing all desires but that for universal
Joy.

‘Ah! surely, when the Deliverer came it would
be to make all men happy alike, and pour a heal-
ing balsam into every wound! Then would all
the old griefs bo buried and forgotten, and the


THE DELIVERER, 17

soothed minds of contented men trouble them-
selves no more with struggle and labour.

Oh for the dawning of that morn when each
man should be king and kingdom to himself, and
the world resound once more to the songs of re-
joicing which gladdened tho golden age! Had
not the Sybils so spoken, and had not the Poet
sosung? Then should every man sit under his
own vine and his fig-treo, and poor and rich alike
cease from the land, for all should be equal and
all happy.

But whence should such a Deliverer be looked
for—where be expected to arise ?—Alh! surely only
in some happy spot of Nature, some valley peace-
fal and beautiful as that of Cashmere, among a
race of pastoral simplicity, in some perfect
household, where disturbance was never known,
and one mind prevailed. Thence alone could
come He who would cause the cruel swords of
war to be turned into ploughshares, and spears
into reapinghooks, and animate ond inanimate
nature to join in one general song of joy.

So these looked to the lovely valleys and the


118 THR DELIVERER.

qutict nooks of nature for the magie spot where
discord had nevorentered. But they, too, looked
and waited in vain—yet looked and waited on as
before, and called upon Nature herself to confirm,
their hopes.

And the inanimate arth awoke at last to the
consciousness of some great approaching event,
and listened to the whisper of deliverance, evon
a8 before she had snffered and sunk under the
ancient curse, And spring by spring, as she
adorned herself in beauty, putting on yerdure
and flowers, the senso of the Mighty Ono who
was to restore and renovate her lost glories
swelled through every pulse. But sho could not
be troubled with tho discordant expectations of
men, ... Come as He will,” sho oried, “as King,
as Conqueror, as Sage, as God: thus, thus, thus,
in my bloom and beauty, do I make myself meet
and ready for His advent ; thus, thus, thus am I
worthy to receive my Lord and King! When
He comes shall not all the hills leap for joy, and
the valleys Inugh and sing, and the trees of the
forest rejoice 2”
THE DELIVERER. 119

So spring after spring she adorned herself in
hope, and, summer after summer, sho glowed with
longing expectation ; but spring and summer fled
away and no Doliverer had come. And when the
sap must return back again to the roots of trees
and plants, and flowers and leaves decay, and a
torpor as of death prevail over them for a while,
ghe wept with tears of regret while they took
sad leave of each other, but said—* With a new
season there will be hope once more.” And
Harth echoed the words, but, cold and desolate,
ghe felt no confidence, and showed no signs of
hope. Only the Evergreens cheered her up, for
said they, “ While better things cannot be had,
be contented with us ; at any rate wo will remind
you of what is to come.”

Oh ignorant man and ignorant earth alike!
While darkness was over the mind of one, and
deadness over the face of the other—when the
eyes of the common world were fixed on earthly
palaces, and the thoughts of the wise on the
fruits of earthly wisdom ; yea, when the lovers
of pleasure hoped for a Deliverer in scones of
120 {HE DELIVERER.

earthly onjoyment—behold, God had chosen “tho
foolish things of the world to confound the wise ;
...the weak things of the world, to confound
the things which are mighty; ... and base
things of the world, and things which are do-
spisod,” had He chosen, “that no flesh should
glory in his presence.”

‘Turn aside your oyes from earthly grandeurs,
ye prisoners of hope! Pat away from your
hearts the confidence of human wisdom ! Gene-
ration after gencration had passed away, and the
whole world lay yet in wickedness, for “in the
wisdom of God, the world by wisdom knew not
God ;” and not many wise men after the flesh,
not many mighty, not many noble, are called by
Him.

And then, lo! in the stable of a village inn,
where the beasts of the field were wont to take
their rest, a weary foot-worn maiden had lain
down for shelter and ease, for no other room
could be found, And hark to the ory of a new-
born babe which rose thence, unnoticed by the
busy world without! 'The first-born of a mother,


THE DELIVERER. Wi

whose husband earned their bread by daily toil—
what mattered this common birth to other men ?
Yet—hark to another ery which went up amidst
the wailings of the lowly child: a ory of thanks-
giving and praise. “Glory be to God in the
Highest, and on earth peace, good-will toward
“Unto you is born this day, in the city
of David, a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord !”
And they who sang this glad Hosanna were the
angels of Heaven !

Oh day of glory and delight! the Deliverer had
come at last ; the day of redemption was there ;
but what was the sign whereby the long-expected
Mighty One might be known? Had kings at
last given birth to him? Had sages at last
found him ?

‘Nay !—to simple shepherds abiding in the field,
keeping watch over their flocks by night, was the
news declared, amidst the shining of the glory
of the Lord; and the sign whereby He was to be
known, was, that He should be found wrapped
in swaddling clothes, and lying in a manger.

Oh ignorant mon and ignorant earth alike!




122 THE DELIVERER.

-When the ory of that helpless infant broke forth
in the shed of tho village inn, who, untaught of
Heaven, conld have droamt, that at that moment,
and thus, the Desire of all nations had come
among men?

Yet thus, thus, thus, in the counsels of God it
was decreed it should be! ‘Thus at Ilis first
coming He should come, an Example to all men.

Aye! thus, thus, thus—in poverty and lowli-
ness, Thus, thus, thus—while Nature lay torpid
aud hopeless, and half the world was winter-
wrapt in snow, ‘Thus, thus, thus—with healing
on his wings, bub not the healing they sought
for: not 2 deliverance from death or sorrow, not
a freedom from toil or pain, not even a ransom
from temptation and sin; but, behold, by the
strength and wisdom of God’s right hand, and
tho power of His holy Spirit, to make mon
through all these things “ more than conquerors.”

‘We strive after signs and wonders, we look for
visible manifestations, we long for sensible ex-
periences, and when unanswered we fall back
without a hope; but how often, and often, and
THE DELIVERER. 123,

often, must tho lesson of the Advent be repeated.
Not always where and how we look for Him does
the Divine Ono make His presence known to
ourselves, Not always even when we are hopeful
and carnest, Not always when in confidence we
cry, “Thus, thus, thus, am I meet to receive my
Lord and King,” doos He come indeed.

‘Then hang up the holly, the ivy and the yew,
over the Christmas snows, as memorials of a hope
which human reason could never teach. Not by
the glories of summer was the Comforter ushered
into the world. In tho season of cold and of
darkness He came to His own, In tho winter
and humiliation of our souls, when the robes of
earthly righteousness have been laid aside, it
may be He will draw near again. When learning
and research cannot find Him, it may be He will
yeycal Himself to the simple in heart. When
the expectations of great men perish, He may
come with healing on His wings to the soul of
the lowly and meek.

INFERIOR ANIMALS.














INFERIOR ANIMALS,
INFERIOR ANIMALS.

“How? when? and whence? ‘The gods give no reply.
Let so it és sufico, and cease to question why.”
Gonrue,



Waar do they say?—what do they say?—what
do they say?—

‘What can they Auve to say, those noisy, cawing
rooks, as they sail along the sky over our heads,
gathering more and more friends as they go, to
the appointed place of meeting?

‘What have diay to say ?—~What have we to say,
they may equally ask, ‘They have life, and Jabour,
and food, and children to say their say about ;
and if they do not say it in what we are pleased
to call Innguage, they say it in a way intelligible
to each other, which is all that is wanted.
128 INFERIOR ANIMALS.

That they do understand each other's say is
clear, for they are collecting frown far and near in
large numbers for a definite objoct—viz. that of
assombling in some field, or open pasturage, or
park, where they will settle down together for
upwards of an hour, and walk or hop about, as if
thoy had sorious thoughts of giving up fying
altogether, and taking to an earthly life; saying
a say, all the while, whoreof we are altogether as
ignorant ay they would bo of ours rowud o large
dinner-table, if they had the opportunity of
hearing it,

We call their say noisy cawing; what thoy
would call ours round tho large dinner-table one
cannot guoss; but, if they concluded it had no
meaning, because they did not happen to under-
stand it, their judgment would not be worth much,

‘As to the noises, there is not much to choose
between them in the manner of agreeableness.
Nay, of the two, porhaps the din produced by hu-
man voices is the more discordant and confused,

If you never thought of this before, O reader,
think of ib now, aud take an early opportunity
INFERIOR ANIMALS. 129

of listening, and judging for yourself, Listen, not
as listening to the meaning of what is uttered,
but to tho mass of noiso as mere noise. Liston
to it, as you might imagine a rook to do, ignorant
of human speech, and judging only of the hubbub
of sounds; and then own to yourself—for con-
science will foree you so to do—that thero is
neither sweetness nor sublimity, neither me-
lody nor majesty, in the shouting, and piping,
and whistling, and hissing, and barking, of closely
intermixed human voices and laughter.

Alas, for the barriers which lie so mysteriously
between us and the other creatures among whom
we are born, and pass out short existence upon
earth !—Alas !—for a desire for intercommunion
is one of the strong instincts of our nature, and
yot it is one which, as regards all the rest of
creation, but our human fellow-beings, we have
to unlearn from babyhood.

See tho little child as she babbles to her cat on
the rag, and would fain be frinds with the soft
plaything. Observe in every action how she ex-
pects it to understand her, and return her love,

x
130 INFERIOR ANIMALS.

Look at the angry disappointment, if a vicious
bite or scratch’ disturb the security of the affec-
tionate dream, It is not pain alone the child
fecls, let the matter-of-fuet observer say what he
will: there is the vexation of hurt feelings as
well. Puss should not haye behaved so to her;
puss, with whom she had so gladly shared her
breakfast of milk; puss, whom she had nursed
on her knee; puss, who must have known how



And then follows the lesson —it may have
been given before, but it has to be given again 5
and while mamma tells her little one that poor
pussy does not know what she means, cannot
hear what she says, cannot talk as she can, has
no sense to know how much she loves her, and
therefore is not to blame for biting, although she
must be slapped when she does it, to make her
remembor not to do it again ;—behold! how the
wistful eyes of the listening child haze over with
a dull dreaminess, ag she becomes more and more
perplexed, It ig all fur too puzzling for her to
understand, and when she turns again to puss—


INFERIOR ANIMIAIS. 131

as if by looking ab her to make it out—Io! the
yeil between tho two natures remains as thick as
before; neither the bite, nor any thing else, has
been explained.

But, practically, the unlearning of the instinct
has begun, and so, practically, the lesson goes on,
until we get so used to it, wo forget it was over a
lesson at all ; and only a fow of us, here and there
in grown-up life, are haunted, as they stand among
the lower forms of creation, by a painful wonder
at the gulph which lies between.

‘That the lower should not fully understand the
higher; that fizy should not understand ws, is com-
prehensible enough; nay, is a necessity involved
in the very idea of a lower and higher; let the
philosophers rave as they will at the chains
thereby hung around their own necks, But that
the higher should not fully understand tho lower;
that we should not fully understand them, is a
mystery indeed, and one of which no solution has
been offered.

What more natural than that the dog should
not know much about his master? What more

K2
132) INFERIOR ANIMALS.

strange than that the master should know so little
of his dog? In one sense, of course, he knows all
about him, é.¢, the uses he can put him to, and
what he may expect from him; but of the inner
world of the dog's lifo, his feclings and motives
of action, he knows almost nothing. Nay, even of
his physical capabilities he has no complete idea.
Who has ever explained by what power a dog
will take a short cut across the country, to the
honse where his master is, although he has never
been the road before? or why he never,even byany
accident or mistake, brings back any but the stone
his master threw—thrown perhaps with » gloved
hand, and into wet meadow grass, and not found
for several minutes?

Verily,in more than one senso, we are “strangers
and pilgrims upon carth;” for, from the first mo-
ment of waking to conscious thought, we find
ourselves in a country where all utterances but
our own are to us a blank; all the creatures
strange ; all life unintelligible, both in its begin-
ning and its end: all the present, as well as the
past and fature, a mystery.


INFERIOR ANIMALS, 133,

“Only children,or child-like men,” says Novalis,
“have any chance of breaking through the charm
which holds nature thus as it were frozen around
us, like a potrified magic city.” Oh, if this be
true, who would not be a child again? Reader,
can you hear this and remain unmoved, or shall
you and I become children in heart once more ?
Come! own with me how hateful were the lessons
which undeceived us from our earlier instincts of
faith and sweet companionship with all created
things: and let us go forth togother, and for a
while forget such toaching.

Hand in hand, in the dear confiding way which
only children use, let us go forth into the fields,
and read the hidden seerets of the world. Clasp
mine firmly as I clasp yours. See, there is magic
in the action itself! So wo placed our hands in
those of our parents; so our children love to
place theirs in our own. So, then, even so, let us
two walk trustingly and lovingly together for a
while, and join again the broken threads of old
foclings, wishes, friendships, and hopes.
134



RIOR ANIMALS.

Hush ! is it a parliament, or a congregation, or
what, that darkens over yonder field? Aro rook-
politics, or rook-faith, or rook domestic hopes
and fears, the subjects of that everlasting cawing,
those restless movements, those hoppings and
peokings, and changes of position ?

Cower down here with me by this hole in the
hodge j—let us lean against this old elm-roob and
look through, See! the honeysuckle is twined
in the thorn above over our heads, and is giving
out its scent around us, as if to bid us weleome,

Oh, dear companion, do you see the dark glossy
creatures at their play? Their play? am I not
bold to do so? They have come here for some
object,—with some distinct intention and pur-
pose. Yonder, in the tall oak that overlooks the
field in tho opposite corner, I see the sentinel
guard, who will never stir from his post, until
tho assembly has dispersed, unless he hears or
sees symptoms of danger or interruption, and
then he will dash owt and fly among ther, making
his warning ory, so different from all others, that
any one who has once heard it, will recognise it
INFERIOR ANIMALS. 135

again, We must whisper our remarks very
softly then, or he may give notice of our presence
here, and all the flock may forsake the field.

How solemn and grave, yet how keen and
attentive he looks! How patient and observant !
Contented not to join the fun himself, so that he
may but promote it, Unsellish, dark watchman,
are you paid for your trouble, and if so, how? Or
do you do it out of love and affection for your
brethren, expecting love and affection from them
in return, on some future occasion, when one of
them will watch, and you be allowed to play?
Play, [still say ; but can this be only play indeed ?
Surely something graver and more important than
play must have brought these diffrent: companies
and families from their often distant homes, to
this spot?

Alas! how vain are my questionings ! nature
remains mute around me, and man is ignorant
and unable to answer, Yes! ignorant and unable
to answer, let him say what he will.

Hear this, oh you philosophers,—you lights
of the world, with your books and papers and




136 INFERIOR ANIMALS.

diagrams, and collected facts, and self-confidence
unlimited! You who tum the bull’s eye of your
miserable Janthorns upon isolated corners of the
universo, and fancy you are sitting in the supreme
light of creative knowledge. Hear this; you are
ignorant and unable to answer; or disprove it if
you can, by showing me that you do know this
one simplo thing which puzzles me now! Tell
me what the rooks are doing and saying ; thoso
inferior animals about whom you, in your wisdom,
ought to know every thing. ‘oll me that, and I
will own that your eyes have been opened indeed,
and that you are as gods, knowing good and
evil.

‘Tell me what these grand assemblies are for ;
tell me how they are called ; tell me how they
are conducted; tell me by what message the
distant colonies aro warned of the particular spot
and hour of meeting. Tell me by what rules the
place is chosen, ‘Tell me how the messenger is
instructed. Tell me by what means he delivers his,
message, Tell me why they meet on level ground
and walk like men, and not rather in their own
INFERIOR ANIMALS, 17

deep woods, where they might fly and roost on
branches, and run no danger, and need no guard ?

Tell me what do they say, what do they say,
what do they say, when they moot at last, and
whether they are there for business or for play.
Toll me these things, and then I will listen to you
when you point out to me the counsols and the
workings of the Creator of rooks and men.

But, miserable guides, miserable comforters ave
yeall! Better a thousand times to be a child as
Lam now, lying under this twining honcysuckle,
and listening reverently to the unknown mur-
murs in the field! But oh! twining honeysuckle,
why do you breathe out only scent around me?
Stoop, stoop, stoop! I know you know! Why
not whisper in my eax, then, what they say?

Tell me, what do they say? Childlike I ask,
childlike must T always ask in vain?

But hush for a moment! some one speaks;
some stranger interrupts us already !—calls
“gentlemen!” as if gentlemen were here, Oh!
80, 0, go, whoever you may be. There are no
gentlemen hero—only children : children for ono





138 INTERIOR ANIMALS,

brief hour of weary grown-up life. Leave us ;
Jet us dream our dream in peace.

But how is this? I sco no one near, yet the
voice is louder than before. Companion, where
are you? Look! here is no disturbanos in the
field ; the sentry sits firm at his post; tho rest
are hopping, pecking, jumping as before ; and yet
Lhear—oh, what do I hear !—a voice—and from
among the rooks themselves! Have my senses
loft mo, or have I received another? Any how
the spoll is broken at last, and language, language,
language, resounds on every side! Quick, then,
my tablets! Let me record what I see and hear.

One among them comes forward—a crowd sur-
rounds him—he is congratulated—he inclines his





head—he thanks his friends for a reception so far
boyond his merits or his hopes. .., Oh folly ! are
they aping the mockeries of mon? Wait ! he is
serious once more, and here on my tablets I
record,

WHAT THE ROOK SATS,



fore, of these creatures,—
whom we equally fear and dislike, is


INVERIOR ANINALS. 139

decidedly the mest useful of all subjects of study.
How can it be otherwise? ‘Their treatment of
us, and our feelings to them, ean never be placed
on a proper footing, until we know something of
the nature of the people thomselves. In fact,
my friends, I base my whole inquizy upon these
two assumptions; first, that ib is desirable to
ascortain the exact truth on the subject ; secondly,
that it is possible to ascertain tho exact truth
upon any subject, if one chooses to try.

“Whoever goes along with me on these points,
will be so good as to riso from the ground by a
hop, and give acaw....

- “Thank you, thank you, gontlemen, for your
applause! My recognition of our common capa-
Dilities is acceptable to you I perceive. Unlimited
faith in thom is indeed the keystone of all know-
ledge... . Thank you, thank you, once more !”

—But I—tho transcriber of this arrogant non-
sense—am ready, as I listen to their senseless
caws, to throw down my tablets in despair.
Ob! to think of finding the false glozings of
philosophical conceit among the birds of the


140 INFERIOR ANIMALS,

aix, and as woleome as... but hush! he speaks
again,

“How, when, whence, and why, then, are the
questions we must putand learn to answer. How
came this creaturoin the land, and whence ? when
was ho first our foo, and wiy? Why also is he
here at all?

“These are difficult. questions indeed, and before
we answer them let us look at the facts of the
caso, Unhappily they are too well known toneed
much description. It is, and has been from time
immemorial (I have made inquiry of our oldest
relations), a aystem of encroachment on one side,
and retreat on the other. He comes near us and
we fly ; he pursues us again, and again we retire
before him. Old solitudes and woodland homes
ave invaded, and made public ; and we seek fresh
retreats, only to be driven out afresh. It is a
terrible position, and a time will certainly come
when we must seck a new world, or cease to exist,
unless some remedy for the threatened evil can
be found.

“Now the way of our yielding our placo to man
INFERIOR ANIMAIS, 144

is fear. We can none of us deny it: a cowardly
terror which seems to have possessed our race as
far back as our oldest grandsires can recollect.

“Bub the way of this far? What is that?
Well! Tam told on all sides that it is our sense
of man’s superiority to ourselves, Hence we gi
way, overawed by his presence. And here I will
at once confess that T was for a long time myself
ag firm a believer in this old tradition as any of
you can be at the present moment. When I
beheld ancient woods deserted, ancient homes
forsaken, how could I fail to tromble before him
who, Iwas told, was the mighty cause of such dis-
turbance? But thanks to the awakened spirit of
inquiry, I emerged at last from the labyrinth of
what I now believe to be an old wife's tale.

“The wiy of our giving way, was fear: that
was obvious cnough ; the why of the fear, man’s
superiority. So it was said, at least; but of this,
what proofs? wes wy next demand ; and no one
could give moan answer! Here was a position for
an intelligent creature! Every thing mysterious,
unknown, and taken for granted ; nothing proved.




142 INFERIOR ANIMALS,

Tshouted for proofs till I was hoarse, but every
one turned away silent. Who can wonder, then,
that my next inquiry was a doubt. Js man

* superior to ourselves after all? No one can show
me the fact by proofs. May not this old tradition
then be a mere myth ? the delusion of timid minds
imposed upon weak ones for truth? My friends !
tho moment when I asked myself these questions
was the turning-point of ray life, Henceforth I
resolved to inquire and inyestigate for myself, and
tho result of my labours I am going to place
defore you,

“Yet, lest you should accuse me also of mere
assertion-making, let me guide you into examin-
ing the matter fairly for yourselves.

“Now all common obsorvation is against the
superiority of man, While we fly swiftly through
the sky, behold him creeping slowly along the
ground. While we soar to the very clouds, a
brief jump and come down again is all his
utmost efforts can accomplish, though I have
seen him practising to get highor and higher, in
his leaps, as if at a game. And at all times,
INFERIOR ANIMALS, 143

if one of his legs is up, the other is obliged to be
down, or the superior creature would be apt to
tumble on his nose. Yet it is in this miserable
lop-sided manner he moves from place to place,
unloss he can get some othor being, more skilful
than himself, to carry him along.

« Again, while we are clothed ina natural glossy
plumage, available equally for summer or winter,
behold man, not possessing in himself the means
of protection against any sort of weather what-
ever! Neither the warmth of summer nor the
cold of winter suit his uncomfortable skin. In
all séasons he must wear e/oties, Clumsy ineum-
brances, with which he is driven by a sad neces-
sity to supply the place of the feathers or fur with
which every other creature on earth but himself
is blessed, What sort of superiority is this ?

“One more instance out of many, and I shall
have said enough for the present. It is one, the
force of which every philosophical mind will
appreciate, While we ave satistied with ourselves
and all around us, man is ever discontented and
uneasy, seeking rest in everlasting change, but






144 INFERIOR ANIMALS.

neither finding it himself, nor allowing it to
others, as we know to our bitter cost.

“Ah, my friends, if restless dissatisfaction be a
proof of suporiority, who would not be glad to be
an inforior animal ?

“Now then, have I shaken tho old faith in the
old tradition? If'so, you will be better disposed
to accept the new. Whoever is satisfied of this,
ct him soar from the ground and give a caw !”

—What a rising of durk forms in the air; what
an outburst of caws! Verily “tis a beautifal Jan-
guage after all, and beautifal creatures they are
themselves! Only I am not sure I do not like
them better so, than in the would-be wisdom of
men, Yes! if they had bué the sense not to sit
in judgmont upon things beyond ‘their power !
.. - But hush! he speaks again.

“One objection remains to be answered, It
was suggested by a keen-sighted friend, now, I
am proud to say, a warm supporter of my views.
In some of tho unmannerly invasions of our
promisos already alluded to, painful events occur,
While standing under our roosting trees, these
INFERIOR ANIMALS. 45

creatures, men, will occasionally level at us sticks,
of the most contemptible size, but which, owing to
some contrivance which I have not at prosent
had the time to investigate, make suddenly an
abominable banging noise and a very unpleasant
smoke» And no sooner do our youngsters see
and hear all this, than some of them are pretty
sure to fall down upon the ground, as if crouching
at the very fect of our foo. All fathers of fami-
lies here present will admit the trath of this
description and know the terrible result. The
prostrate young ones are carried away unresist-
ing, and aro never heard of more.

“Now this has actually been brought forward
as a proof of the superiority of man; though in
what way wanton cruelty proves superiority, I
confess I am unable to see. But what cannot we
flatter ourselves we have proved when our minds
are warped by a theory! I, looking at the fact
with an unprejudiced eye, see in it nothing but
the miserable fruits of a delusion encouraged
through so long a succession of ages, that ¥
have transmitted to our very offspring an in-

u


146 INFERIOR ANIMAZS.

heritance of paralysing fear! For, observe, it is
rerely—very rarely the grown-up bird who is the
victim of this terror, Only the tender and sus-
ceptible young ones, with no experience of life to
counteract the insane cowardice which our obsti-
nate adherence to the old wife's tale has bo
queathed to their constitutions.

“Enough of this. I pass now to the pleasanter
part of my task! The statement of a theory
respecting the origin of men, which affords a
beautiful and consistent explanation of all the
puzzling facts we have been considering, and opens
up a vista of triumph to the whole rook race!”

~-Meroy ! what thunders of applause !—I am
deafenod, but curiosity is awakened at last-—
‘What folly!—Yet if ingenuity wore wisdom... .
Well, well, if it were, judges would be overruled
by barristers, and a thousand unjust verdicts
become law. Again he opens his bill.

“My friends, man is not our superior, was
never so, for he is neither more nor less than a
degencrated brother of our own race! Yes, T
yenture confidently to lock back thousands on




INFERIOR ANIMALS. 147

thousands of generations, and I sve that men were
once rovks! Like us they were covered with
feathers, like us lived in trees, flew instead of
walking, roosted instead of squatting in stone
doxes, ‘and were happy and contented as wo aro
now!

“This is a bold proposition, and I do not ask
you to assent toitatonce. Butifon testing it in
various ways, you are forced to admit that by it
you are able to explain things hitherto inex-
Plicable, and to account for things otherwise un-
accountable, though ocular proof cannot be had,
then I insist that you cannot reasonably roject
my solution without offering me a better one in
exchange. Jf things are not s0, how are they ? is the
ground I stand upon. For remember we have
already laid down the maxim that every thing
ought to ve and can be explained.

“Well! here then I advance another step for-
ward.- I give an explanation (supported of course
by facts), and I challenge you cither to accept it,
or to answer the searching inquiry, ‘// Vhings are
not so, how are they?’ Gontlemen who see tho

L2
148 INFERIOR ANIMATS,

justice of this remark, will, perhaps, afford me a
congratulatory caw.

Almost unanimous, I declare ! and my yener-
able friends who hositate—well, well—it is from
tho young I look for support. A natural distaste
to disturbance of idens comes on with declining
years, Thank you, gentlemen, again; the voices
of my young supporters are loud and impres-
sive,”

—Oh, birds of the air, the world and the vanities
and follies of it aro as deep in your hearts as in
ours! But again he resumes—

“The test I begin with is this. Supposing that
my theory be true, and that men are degenerated
rooks, what would be the condition of their minda,
what their feeling and conduct towards us, the
original race? Would not the painful sense of
degradation, in the first place, cause them to be
restless and uneasy with their present condition,
as in fact we see they are? And would it not in
the second place stimulate them to an incessant
craving for re-ascociation—a desire to be with us,
among us, of us, and like us, once more? What
INFURIOR ANIMALS. 149

more natural then than that they should pursue
ug with almost tiresome pertinacity (a fact imex-
plicable on the theory of man’s superiority), and
that when we retreat before them in fear, they
should still follow us, not, however, as we have
for so long imagined, with evil intent, but with
the outstretched arms of love?

My friends, I feel the moisture tremble in my
eyes at the thought of the gross misconceptions
we have cherished with respect to this much
maligned human race, How eruel, how cold we
must haye appeared to them | How heartless—
pardon my cmotion! ... Give me encourage-
ment by an approving caw... .

-—Louder than cyer, only hoarse with sup-
pressed emotion, Tho dream of nonsense is
becoming real and exciting! Te speaks—

“ Ani now, even for the terrible loss of our young
ones, an explanation dawns; and their probable
fate becomes clear; and happily it is one, of
which, in the midst of parental regrets, we cannot
but be proud. Yes! I boldly picture to myself
those lost young ones, carried away to become










150 _ ESFERIOR ANIMALS.

the friends and instructors of the race we have
dreaded as enemies. I do not hesitate to imagine
them tenderly nursed and watched in the stone
boxes into which we cannot sce, but which they
inhabit as homes—every movement an object of
interest to their captors, every action creating
admiration, and made a subject of imitation—and
I see no improbability in the picture |For if, as
Ishall presently show by unanswerable proofs,
men ate imitating not only our appearance, but
our vory customs and manners, their being able
to doso can only be attributed to the instructions
imparted to them, whethor by example or pre~
copt, by our own offspring—for who else can
have taught them? Ages may pass away before
the re-union of the two races takes place, but
when it does (and I look forward to it in con-
fident faith), i will be our own children who
will haye been the means of bringing tho
Yng-parted brethren together: those children
who once fell down in fear at the feet of
men, and over whose fate, hitherto, the voil
of an impenetrable mystery has been thrown,


INFERIOR ANTMATS, 151

My friends, it is my proud delight at this
moment to lift that veil, and reveal to the
affoctionate mourners the bright and pleasurable
reality !

“And thus the mysteries of man’s pursuit,
and apparent ill-usage of us, become in the light
of my theory natural and intelligible facts, But
you have a right to reply. ‘Clear as all this
tcould be, if the thing itself could be, that stili
remains to be shown. By what possible means
could birds ever degenerate into men 1?

“Nothing can be more reasonable than the
inquiry ; nothing more conclusive I bolieve than
tho oxplanation I am able to give.

“ At this very moment, then, my friends, we are
ourselves living examples of a first step in the
same direction! Here we are assembled from all
quarters of the country, having deserted our trees
and woods, to meet in an open field, as men meet ;
walk lopsided as they walk, with one leg up and
the other down; or jump in short hops instead
of using our wings. What account can we give
of this? To descend to the earth for a few mo-
152. INVERIOR ANIMAL.

monts for food, sticks, or wool, as they are needed,
is one thing ; to prolong our stay upon it, as we do
now, is a matter of dangerous choice. Alas ! indo-
lence and a fatal tendency to yield to the ease of
the moment, are the causes of our own conduct;
and so they wore, I can have no doubt whatever,
of the degradation of our ancestors. Ages indecd
may pass away without any perceptible effect
being produced upon the individuals of a race,
by the bad habits in which all are indulging, In
fact, where a gradual change is oreeping over
all, it attracts the attention of none, But heap
ages upon ages, and other ages upon them, ina
succession to which the century-lives of our grand-
fathers are a tiny fraction of time, and what then?
Any thing is possible in the course of such a
period. Can any one disprove whatI say? If so,
let him caw it publicly out ; if not, Jet him hold
“his tongue. You are silont: I perceive that you
assent.

Now, then, let us imagine a race of bygone
rooks, less energetic even than ourselves ; nay,
we will, if you please, imagine them-with some
INFERIOR ANIMALS, 153.

temporary weakness in their wings (such devia-
tions from a general standard are quite possible),
and indulging gradually more and move in the
of afforded to the evil by this pernicious habit,
of ground-walling. There seems to mo to be no
great difficulty in believing that a weakness so
indulged should gain ground in proportion to the
extent of the indulgence, until, in the course of
the long ages alluded to, and by many inherit-
ances of increased want of power, the mischief,
once trifling, became insurmountable, and a race
incapable of using their wings at all, arose

“ Now itis well known to youall, by observation
of our young ones, that wings grow by use. After
the young brood make efforts at flying, those
necessary appendages increase, Thus much there-
fore is clear. Practice brings power, and power
brings on growth and enlargement. And, in a
similar manner, want of practice brings a fulling
away of strength, and diminution in size, Why
then should there be any insuperable difficulty
in farther belioving it possible that the never-
used and consequently constantly diminishing












154 INFERIOR ANIMALS,

wings of generation after generation, should dis-
appear at last entirely as wings, leaving only the
outer bone remaining, as a sort of claw whereby
to lay hold on what was wanted—bared of all its
beauty and ornament,—in fact, the long uncouth
arm of the present man?

“And I can hardly doubt that in a similar
manner, the other unused feathers on back and
breast and legs, would also gradually fail. No air
blowing through them, no freedom of action, no
battling with tho breeze. On the contrary, a
stuffy life in close stone boxes, inclosed on all
sides. Well might wings diminish in size, and
feathers decrease in quantity, until at length, in
the naked, claw-armed, bare-legged croature, not
a trace of them could be found!

“very probability is in favour of such a result,
provided you only allow time enough for the irn-
perceptible action of the change.

“And now reflect upon tho miserable creature
presented to your imagination! Enlarged, it is
true, in length, for his lazy habits encourage that
sort of feeble growth ; and the power which once





INFERIOR ANIMALS, 155

produced feathers, must needs develop in some
other form! But behold him—a featherless, thin-
skinned biped—neither beast, nor bird, nor fish ;
wandering, shivering, over the fuco of the earth,
needing help from overy other creature around
him, yet nover satisfied with any thing he gets!
Need I fill up the picture further, or will not
every one recognize at once in this miserable
animal the portrait of the superior being, Man?”

—Well may the listoners caw ! well may thoy
wheel round and round in exulting flight. I myself
grow giddy and confusod. Am I then half con~
yinced {Yet for an imperfect being to hope to
fathom the higher nature? Bah! what balderdash
of folly! But hark, he has begun afresh —

“That such a degeneration is possible is there-
fore clear ; and of the thousand difficulties cleaved
away by the establishment of this fact, I will offer
you one more

“You must all admit that one of the most
puziling whys in connexion with man, is, wily
he wears clothes? & habit which, viewing him
asa perfect animal, it would be impossible to














156 INFERIOR ANIMALS,

account for, but which, on the contrary, con-
sidering him as a degenerated one, is just what
might be expected. He had his natural clothes
once, like the rest of the animals of the earth;
he has lost them now, through the disease of his
doterioration, and must supply himself with tho
miserable make-shifts of dress,

“My friends, time does not allow me to give
you now more than a few examples of my collec-
tion of proofs, the extent of which is enormous;
for even after my own convictions wore fixed for
ever by the discoveries I have already named, I
neyer relaxed in my researches ; but being unable
to be personally in more places than one at a
time, I employed in active investigations several
distinguished friends ; I will mention particularly
Mr, Raven-wing, Mr. Yellow-beak, and My. Grey-
leg. Furnished with a complete understanding
of what J believed and wished to be proved, these
gentlemen have been unremitting in their efforts
to procure corroborative facts; of which therefore

1 will, bofore I conclude, mention a few of the
most striking.
INFERION ANIMALS, 157

“‘Mr, Rayen-wing’s particular line was to find
evidence of attempts on the part of man to re-
cover the colour of the original race, namely,
black; and to this end he did not shrink even
from the distasteful task of approaching those
vast masses of men’s stone boxes, which they
call cities, towns, or villages, in order that he
might observe the proccodings of their inhabi-
tants, And he came back to me absolutely over-
whelmed with what he had met with, Blk in
all the streets strnggling to overpower every other
hue. Black quiescent on the pavements and
walls, Black rising triumphantly into the air
from the mouths of those smaller boxes, which
are placed on the summit of the larger ones, ap-
parently to raise their height—of which singular
fact I shall have more to say by-and-bye.

“Black also the usual colour of tho coverings
with which men protect their heads from the
outer air. Black even the clumsy boots which
cover theit feet. Black pretty nearly everything,
everywhere, Mr. Raven-wing positively declared.

“And on another occasion, in some parts of the
158 r



RIOR ANIMALS,

country, he eame upon whole races of-men who
Ioft their homes every morning at an early hour,
white, but returned to them every evening black,
having accomplished this transformation during
the course of the day, But by what means this
significant change was effected, he could not
precisely ascertain; for the places to which
theso creatures resorted for the purpose were
either deep holes in the earth, into which they
descended, and soon disappeared from sight, or
large dark inclosures, full of fire and heat and
smoke, into which no bird could follow them and
live; 80 that all he knew of them was that every
thing there being black, people became blackened
who remained there long enough. Alas! what
sufferings men endure in their struggles to be-
come like ourselves, it is pitiful to reflect upon!
‘And the repetition of the endurance is not the
least remarkable fact of the case. For unhappily
the desired result appears to last for only the
period of one day. ‘These men emerge from these
stone boxes next morning, pallid as before, again
to go forth to similar haunts, and undergo the
ANVERIOR ANIMALS, 159

samo tortures, to bring back for tho same short
time the coveted colour to their cheeks !

“All these circumstances, gentlemen, fell under
Mr, Rayen-wing’s personal observation, and of
them, therefore, no doubt can be entertained.
But it is fair to tell you also, that he did, in the
course of his travels, hear of another class of
facts, highly corroborative of these, but of which,
as depending upon hearsay evidence, I cannot so
positively speak, That hearsay evidence went to
show that there are, already existing in the
world, a class of men whose black colour remains
with them for life,—nay, who transmit it to their
offspring, so effectual have been the means used
by their ancestors in acquiring it, Singular and
interesting as this circumstance is, if true, I do
not wish to dwell upon it. Imperfect evidence
is the one thing in the world on which no fair
inquirer likes to build.

“On the other hand, Mr, Yellow-beak’s mission
was to obtain proofs of man's endeavour to resume
his life in érees ; and of this some very interes
ing instances were adduced, In the same cities


160 INFERIOR ANIMAIS.

or towns which wore the seat of Mr. Raven-
wing’s investigations, Mr. Yellow-beak discovered
narrow, upright, and very much elongated brick
boxes, no thicker than the stems of our large
trees, and in many cases strongly resembling
them in formation, only destitute altogether of
branches and leaves, And out of the tops of
these Mr. Yellow-beak noticed to issue those same
columns of black smoke, as he was told it was
called, which Mr. Raven-wing had observed be-
fore, and which is evidently one of the many con-
trivances by which man is endeavouring after a
restoration to the appearances of his lost primeval
state,

“Indeed my esteemed and acute friend satisfied
himself that there was, at the present day, going
on among men, a series of systematic and unre-
mitting efforts for areturn to the lust forests and
the original condition ; of which efforts these
stem-like buildings farnish a notable example.
Let some ingenious plan be devised for the con-
struction of branches on each side, and there can
be no possible reason why men should not, in the
INFERIOR ANIMALS. 161

course of time—but, mark me—I do say in the
course of time—roost in these brick trees, as they
did of yore in the natural ones, In fact, that this
will eventually take place, and that men will
makertheir homes in the branched chimneys of
cities, I see no difficulty in supposing; nor
that this will be one most powerful step towards
a return to the common interests and hopes be-
tween ourselves and them.

“Mr. Grey-legs’ information was of a miscella-
neous character, He was out early one morning,
hear a large village, and having fixed his attention
on one of those smaller boxes usually placed on
the others to raise the height of the building, ho
all at once observed craerging from its mouth a
living creature, My friends, it is a solemn and
important fact that this creature was élack all
over. Black as a black feather coat could have
made him, Bluck in his skin, black in his clothes,
black in the arm which lifted itself up and waved
round and round, triumphantly, something also
Dlack, and more like a bird’s feather than ang
thing clse, ‘The gesture was triumphant, and the

xu
162 EXFERIOR ANIMALS.

voice scarcely less so,—Sweep-o-oh! Sweep-ch!
Sweep-oh! Some fecble attempt, we may sup-
pose, at a rotun to the caw of their bettor days,
yet, in its monotony, indicating a common origin
of languago,

“Mr. Grey-legs’ observations were especially
valuable, however, in his discovery of more than
one place near great towns, in which attompts
are frequently made, on the part of our poor
degenerate brothers, towards bringing to perfec-
tion a substitute for the lost power of soaring in
the air. Clumsy as the machine or al/oon used
for this purpose is, the mere fact of its invention
forms one of the most invaluable links in the
chain of evidence of man’s determination to ©
yotmn as poor ad possible to the hubits and
manners of his forefathers. Weary of his degrada-
tion, he is, no doubt, at the very moment we are
avoiding and fearing him, longing te make known
tous his sense of his misery, and to obtain assist-
ancy and hope for the fature. But, among othor
things, the total loss of our language, consequent
upon 2 long cessation of intercourse, vemuins as
INFERIOR ANIMALS, 163,

an almost insuperable difficulty between us, The
sounds he emits now from his bill-less mouth are,
in truth, an unmeaning jargon, to which it is ab-
solutely painful to listen. It serves his present
necessities, we may presume, as orders seem to be
given and takon between one individual and an-
other; but beyond this it is mere jaw, and jaw
with as little music in it as meaning.

“There is, in fact, ‘neither sweetness nor sublimity,
neither melody nor majesty, in lhe shouting, and piping,
and whistling, and hissing, and barking of cloely in-
termite human voices and laughter?”

—Where am I?—where am I?—what am I
about? Is some mocking echo repeating my former
words? But, hush once more, for the ‘voice is
speaking again :—

“This is but the faintest outline of what will
be laid before you hereafter, if, indved, we ever
meet again as now. These points meanwhile ar:
established as facts which amit of uo dispute :—
man’s degradation from his original brotherhood
with ourselves ; his yearnings for 1c-assoviation ;
his constant efforts in that direction. And for

M2
164 ANVERIOR ANIMALS.

my own part, Iam equally satisfied of the proba-
bility of his success in those efforts. I venture
confidently to anticipate futurity, and [sce him
mounted in his brick-roosting homes, growing
wings and feathers, because they have become
a necessity; while, as the long ages pass over,
and his present vile habits die out from want of
use, he will gradually lay sside the unmeaning
jargon which he has fallon into since he ceased
to be one of us, and return to the original caw
* of his happier state,

“Alas! my friends, that for us, personally, these
bright visions cannot be realized! We shall none
of us behold that glorious day! I speak it with
regret, As long as we can hope to last, men will
probably remain the thin-skinned, clothes-wear-
ing creatures our grandsires remember them ;
still hop lop-sided on the ground, and only oeca-
sionally, and by very clumsy machines, soar to
the sky. But I find no difficulty in looking for-
ward through innumerable successions of ages to
a time when men will again, through gradual
successive developments of down and feathers,
INFERIOR ANIMALS, 165

become again swift-fying birds of the air; our
friends, companions, brothers—rooks, in fact, like
ourselves. All observations tend to show that a
change in that direction is already at: work, nay,
has been so for a considerable longth of time, and
that with increasing symptoms of success, as the
observations of Mr, Raven-wing, Mr. Yellow-beuk,
and Mr, Grey-legs, must have convinced you.
All probability therefore is in favour of that suc-
cess becoming one day complete,

“ But, in the meantime, knowing the peculiar
relations between their race and ours, and antici-
pating the day when they shall become one,
should it not be our endeavour to...” .

= What silenos is this, which has oat short the
sentence, and which neither their caws nor the
voice of the speaker break again? How is this?
—where am I?—Do I wake or dream?

I peep through the hedge once more, but see
nothing but a bare, deserted field. Gone, gone,
all gone. ‘The green pasture lies void and empty
under the setting sun, A deathlike silence is
around, or so it seems to me. Only the constant
166 INFERIOR SNIMALS.

honeysuckle wearies not of breathing out its
sweetness round my head. Companion, where
are you? Alas! no hand is clasped in mine,
Alone, then, have I been dreaming somo foolish
dream, or is some one in secret sympathizing
with me still?

—Ah! memory re-awakens by degrees. I recall
the book that was lying upon. my desk when I
issued forth into these fields ; and the thought of
the first temptation of man flashes from another
book upon my soul.

Woe upon us! The world grows old, and lifo
is repeated from age to age, and the same sins
are sinned. Still we desire to be as God in know-
ledge; still the hand writes in fire upon our
walls, “Exeept ye become as little children, ye
shall not enter into the kingdom of Heaven.”




THE GENERAL THAW.
ea ee. eee ae ek ene. ee


THE GENERAL THAW.

“Ah! when shail 21 men’s good
Re each man's role, and universal Peace
‘Lie lilce a shaft of light across the Jand t!"—Trxs vsox,

Icy, Snow, and Water,—only think of such near
neighbours—blood selations, so to speak, from
the creation—squabbling about their rights and
dignities, and which was best of the three ; in-
stead of living pleasantly together, giving and
taking in turn, as the case might be.

But so it was, and the facts were these, It was
a very, very hard winter that year, and the ice on
the mill-dam grew so thick and strong, and was, ,
besides, so remarkably smooth and fine, that it
forgot its origin, and fancied itself a crystal floor.




170 THE GENERAL THAW.

Only think what nonsense! But there is no
nonsense people will not be ready to believe,
when they once begin to meditate upon their own
perfections.

And so, fancying himself a crystal floor, the Ice
got to look down upon the Water which flowed
underneath him, as an impertinent intruder ; and
considered it a piece of great familiarity, on the
part of the Snow, to come dropping upon him
from the sky.

In fact, his head was so full of his own import-
ance in the world, that it seemed to him, every-
body else ought to be full of it too, and keep at
arespectful distance, and admire him. And he
made some very unpleasant remarks to this
effect. :
For instance: “I should be much obliged to
you,” observed he one day to the water which
ran into the dam from the stream, “if you would
have the goodness to turn yourself in some other
direction, when you find yourself coming near
me. Over the fields to the right hand, or to the
left; or into the ditches, if you please ; anywhere,
THE GENERAL THAW. i71
in fact, but just under me. You fidget me to
death with your everlasting trickling and move-
ment, Pray amuse yourself in some other way,
than by disturbing people in such a position as
mine. I dare say you haye no notion of how dis-
agreeable you make yourself to others: you are
go used to your own ways, yourself. But the
truth is, I can bear it no longer, and you must
carry your restlessness somewhere else—it dis-
tracts my attention from my friends !”

Now the “friends” he spoke of were the
skaters and sliders, who did nothing but praise
his beauty as they darted along on his surface,
making beautiful figures as they went.

“But J wish,” answered the Water, as it kept

running in, “that you would not talk nonsense,
but leave me a little more elbow-room, instead of
pressing so close upon me that I get thinner and
thinner every day. If you don’t, I shall certainly
break out if I can, and be at the top myself. Tve
no notion of being kept down by my neighbours,
however grand and polished they may be. Just
take care of yourself, and look out. If the springs
172 THE GENERAL THAW.

on the moors should get loose, and the streams
fill and come in here with a rush, I should lift
you up like nothing, and silly enough you would
look. Turn in another direction, indeed !—into
the ditches if I please—many thanks for the
pleasant suggestion—and all to accommodate
you! Why, I should as soon think of sinking
into the ground, and I hope I know my own level
better than that! Meantime, I give you notice.
If you won’t be obliging yourself, you must ex-
pect no favour from me, and it will be good-bye
to your beauty and grandeur if I can only squeeze
through !”

“ Tf!” shouted the Ice, in a mocking tone.

“If? well, if!” echoed the Water in a rage.
“Stiff and strong as you are, it only wants a
thaw in the hills to send a torrent your way, and
the whole thing’s done. But what do you know
about thaws, and hills, and torrents, and the force
of pent-up water, fixed in one place as you are,

“Now if you were to ask my advice.....
who know so much more than you do.....
THE GENERAL THAW. 173

and could give youa hint ortwo..... upon
yielding gracefully to necessity ..... it would
be greatly to your advantage. .... IBY go 0 0"

But the dut died away, and was lost ; a even
while the Water was talking, some of it was
freezing ; and as it froze, its voice got thinner
and thinner, till at last it could not be heard
at all!

Meantime, the Ice got thicker and thicker, and
more conceited every minute. And said he,
“Tt cannot be worth my while to trouble myself
with what is happening underneath me! There
the water is, and there he must remain, let him
brag and chatter as he will; he at the bottom,
and I at the top. As to making out what he
means by his long talk, that’s hopeless. He stuck
fast in the middle of the story himself. I wish
he would get out of the way; but as he won’t,—
well,—there he must stay, I suppose—he at the
bottom, and I at the top. He’s all in a muddle
with his 7/s and his threats. But one cannot ex-
pect firmness of mind from anything so restless
as he is. It needs some solidity of character to
17-4 THE GENERAL THAW.

maintain one’s position in life. Rolling stones
gather no moss. J sit firm. And here come my
friends tu do me honour, I declare!”

And come they did; and in such quantities,
that the mill-dam Ice had never felt half so grand
before.

It was really the prettiest sight in the world!
Here, were beautiful ladies in chairs, pushed
along from behind by gay young men. There,
other young men were skating or sliding ; some-
times shooting by like stars, sometimes stooping
to hit balls, which flew half across the large ex-
panse of ice by the effort of one blow ; sometimes
cutting figures, which the eye could scarcely
follow, so rapid and brilliant were the movements.
While, in a separate corner, children were sliding
and shouting, tumbling down, laughing, and get-
ting up again, as happy as any of the others.

Really the Ice, on whom this pretty scene took
place, must be excused for feeling a little vain.
It seemed to him as if it was all done in compli-
ment to himself ; for, you see, he had never been at
school to learn any better, and find out how insig-
!
THE GENERAL THAW. 175

nificant everybody is to his neighbour.—* That I
should be treated with such honour and distinc-
tion! that I should be the supporter of such a
brilliant assembly! that I should be necessary
to the happiness of such crowds!’ Such were
the Ice’s reflections from time to time, as his
friends continued their sports. Talk he could
not, for he was lost in a rapture of delight; and
he felt that, as life could have nothing more to
give, he wished it might last on in this way for
ever. Poorlce! He thought only of himself!
As to the trickling of the water underneath him,
it fidgeted him no longer. “ What can I or my
friends care for such trifles ?” was his consolatory
reflection.

So it trickled away unattended to, and pre-
sently the day closed in, and the company went
away home. And then, as night drew on, the
wind veered to the south, and a drizzle of snow
began to fall. It was very light at first—mere
snow-dust, in fact, and in the darkness the Ice
knew nothing of what was happening, for feel it
he could not But by degrees the drizzle turned
176 THE GENERAL THAW.

into flakes, which dropped with graceful delay
through the air, and said to themselves as they
did so, “How we shall be admired by the world
when it awakes! It isn’t every day in-the year
it?s so beautifully drest. It’s only now and then
it has visitors from the skies. Do let us cover it
well over, so that it may find itself white alto-
gether for once!”

Which they did ; and when the morning came
not a bit of the mill-dam Ice was to be seen.
Indeed, he might have gone on all day, fancying
it was night (for everything was dark to him, as
he lay underneath in the shade of the snow-fall),
but that one or two luckless urchins, who wanted
to slide, came and kicked some of it away with
their feet.

And then he found out the truth. There he
was, covered up with a great white sheet, and
couldn’t see out! His béauty, his friends, his
glories, where were they now! He thought of
yesterday, and his heart almost broke! Oh!
who had dared to send these miserable Snow-
flakes to disfigure him thus? Never was inso-
THE GENERAL THAW. 177

lence like this! The trickling of the water below
was a trifle, a mere nothing by comparison !

The Snow-flakes were amazed. “We come of
ourselves, nobody sent us,” murmured they, as
they still kept falling gently from the sky, and
dropping like eider-down on the ice; “and we
have the right to come where we please. Who can
hinder us, I wonder? The clouds are too heavy
to carry us all, so some of us come down. My
sisters and I were nearest, so here we are. We
don’t understand your rudeness. You ought to
be flattered that we choose to come,—we, who
are used to be carried about by the breezes, and
live in the clouds! But such a reception as this,
why, it hurts the feelings, of course!”

“ The feelings!” shouted the Ice, half ready to
crack with vexation; “you to talk of feelings,
who have flung yourselves uninvited on my face ;,
beggarly wanderers as you are, without house or’
home ; and have spoilt my beauty and happiness
at once! . .”

He couldn't go on; the words stuck fast as he
tried.

N
178 THE GENERAL THAW.

“ Begearly wanderers!” echoed the Snow-flakes,
almost losing their temper as they repeated the
words: “now see what comes of being low-born,
and envious, and vile. See what it is to live in
the dirty hole of an carthy world! You don’t
know the good when it comes to you, you dreary
motionless lump of ignorant matter! Beggarly
wanderers, indeed! This to us, who are carried
about by the breezes, and live in the clouds of
the sky! Dear us! Who would lower them-
selves to your level by choice? And beauty,—
you talk of beauty, as if we could find any here
but what we bring ourselves. Fancy the beauty
of dingy, dirty stuff like this earth of yours !
But, of course, you know no better ; and what is
worse, you won’t learn when you might. Oh
dear, what it is to be low-born, and envious, and
vile! Oh dear, what it is to belong to the winds
and the skies, and to find one’s self in an alien
land !”

“Tf the winds and the skies are so fond of you,
let them come and take you away,” cried the Ice.
“TI ask only one thing—Begone! Begone with
THE GENERAL THAW. 179

your mincing conceit and your beauty, you are
not worthy that I should hold you up.”

“You braggart! we should like to hide you
and cover you over for ever,” muttered the Snow-
flakes. “And we don’t intend to go for your
pleasure and whim. Here we are, and here we
shall stay, let you squall and bawl as you will.
We at the top, and you at the bottom ; and there
you may remain!”

And such seemed likely to be the case; but
by and bye, when all the clouds had passed over,
and no more snow was falling, and the sun had
begun to shine, a party of skaters and sliders
came and stood on the bank of the dam.

And said they one to another,—first, “ What a
pity!” and then, “But the snow is not very
thick ;” andthen, “It surely might be shovelled
away if we had but two or three men with shovels
and brooms.” So they sent for two or three men
with shovels and brooms, and these swept and
shovelled, and shovelled and swept, till a great
space of the ice was left clear, and the snow was
laid in heaps on the sides.

N2
180 THE GENERAL THAW.

It was a very hard case for the snow! Such a
poor, soft, delicate thing to be so ill-used,—it was
really cruel work! Pushed, and flung, and dirtied,
and shovelled about till she was ready to melt
with self-pity.

But there is no helping one’s fate, so she lay
along the sides of the mill-dam, grumbling and
groaning—the only satisfaction she could get.

“So inhospitable to visitors any how,” cried
she; “and so stupid to visitors like us! But
this comes of leaving one’s station to mix with
things below. And to soil my lovely colour with
their hateful besoms and brooms! And to
squeeze me, and throw me about with their
odious shovels, as if 1 was dirt! Ah! we who
belong to the sky should never come near the
earth, that’s very clear. People here don’t know
what it is to be delicate and refined. Oh mercy!
what comes next?...”

She might well exclaim. The party of sliding
boys had quarrelled,—a sort of fun-quarrel among
themselves. So there was just now a rush to the
side of the dam, a seizing, and pommelling, and
THE GENERAL THAW. 181

squeezing of snow into lumps by a dozen active
little hands; and then the balls were let fly in
every direction ; and some hit necks, and others
faces, and others jackets, and others caps: and
all got messed and broken, and thrown about.
There is no knowing when the fight would have
ended, if the skaters had not interfered.

The scattered, begrimed morsels could not
utter a single word. But the Ice talked fast
enough. “Now you have got your deserts,” cried
he gaily. “Now you see what it is to come and
boast over your betters. Oh, you’re too delicate
and refined for earth, are you? Well, then, keep
in the sky. Nobody wants you here—I told you
that before. See, now, you have to sit in a corner,
and watch how the world admires me! You
wanted to hide me for ever, did you, you poor
soft, foolish thing? But my friends knew better
than that, and now you've got your deserts. I
shall have you all in order one of these days.
You and the water below, with his fidgety spite.
What a droll idea it is! Why you Joti want to
be at the top, if—poor dears !—you only could.
182 THE GENERAL THAW.

And you can’t see—poor blind things !—that J’m
the only one fit to stand alone !”

«We will soon see to that,” growled the Water
from below, and surely rather louder than usual.
“JT feel what I feel, and you'll feel it presently,
too. If I can’t stand alone, I can bide my time.
We both want to be at top, do you say? And
who are Joth, if you please ? Are you classing me,
with my strength, and that flimsy snow, together ?
What a judge you must be!”

“Ag if strength was the only merit!” mur-
mured what still remained of flaky snow on
the ice. “What a coarse, earthy notion! But it’s
just what one might expect; they’re all alike
down here, Water and Ice and all; no fit com-
panions for us: but we’ve found that out too
late. We lowered ourselves to come down,—the
more’s the pity, ’m sure!”

Were there ever three creatures so silly as the
Water, the Snow, and the Ice? I dare not
answer, No.

Well, before the day was over, the skaters had
asked each other, as they passed and repassed,
THE GENERAL THAW. 183

“Was there not a softness on the ice ?”—“ Was
not the snow less crisp?” But all was perfectly
safe, so people did not stop to talk then : only, as
they went home, they agreed that a thaw was
coming.

Which remark, the Ice, not hearing, knew
nothing about. So he never suspected why the
water underneath was more fussy than ever, but
thought it was all out of spite to himself; so he
raved and scolded away ; boasting that his friends
should one day help him to get rid of i#, as they
had done just now of the snow. “It’s a great
thing to have powerful friends!” cried he,
triumphantly.

But the water gurgled and giggled, and made
no answer.

The truth was, that one or two springs in the
hills had got loose from a few hours’ thaw ; and
a strong stream, though not a torrent, was pour-
ing into the dam. And presently there was a
ery for room.

“More room! more room! make much more
room! You stiffnecked Ice, do you hear ?”
184 THE GENERAL THAW.

And now the contest began.—‘“ I shall not give
way an inch, you noisy vagabond Water He

—“Tf you don’t, I shall wash you away.”

—“You shall wash the world away first. £
shall maintain my position.”

—‘We shall see about that in a minute.”

And so they went on, while the Snow-heaps
whimpered at the sides, “ What a coarse-minded
couple they are! What it is to be low-born and
vile! We are quite unfit to be here!”

Meantime, the water poured in, and kept
swelling more and more; till at last there was a
heaving upward—in spite of ail he could do—of
the crystal floor; and by and bye a sharp crack
rang along its surface, from one end to the other.

He could not maintain his position after all!

And now came another, and another, and these
were along the sides, as the lift-up came ; and at
one corner in oozed the water itself. It had no
chance of bragging, however; for as fast as it
touched the surface.it froze, and was turned to
ice:

So this was all the Water could do then, for
THE GENERAL THAW. 185

the thaw in the hills had stopped. But the Ice
never rallied again, because of those horrible
cracks, He was laughed at on every side—he,
who had boasted so much! For the Water below
and the Snow above, who were ready enough to
teaze each other at other times, were willing to
join together now in spiting a common foe. Such
is the way of the world!

And when a real general thaw came in the air,
and all over the country, as it soon did, and the
sliders and skaters withdrew—oh, dear, those
were dismal days for the poor deserted Ice !—
“My friends forsake me,” crid he, “and my foes
rejoice! Those cracks have broken my heart!
I believe it is melting away.”

And it was; but the Snow-flakeg were the first
to disappear, and then the Ice became wet outside.
And said he, “The water has squeezed through,
I declare! This comes of keeping bad company ;
but, anyhow, the Snow-flakes are gone, and that’s
civil at least. Zhey did what they were asked,
and that’s something.”

Now the Water had not squeezed through, and
186 THE GENERAL THAW.

the Snow-flakes had not been civil; but the
cleverest people make mistakes sometimes.

And presently the Water below found the pres-
sure upon him not quite so great. There wasa
little more room to move in. So said he, “Dear
me! this is good, My friend the Ice is giving
way. ‘Better late than never, we'll say. He’s
coming to reason at last.”

But the Ice was not coming to reason—he was
only melting away. And as he got thinner and
thinner, he struggled less and less with the
Water; and said he, “We shall all live to be
friends and neighbours at last, I believe.”

But they lived to be far more than that, for
one day they found themselves brothers! For
when the ice got so thin that the water poured
over the sides, it broke into a thousand fragments,
and went rolling and tumbling about, dissolving
away every minute. And the snow-heaps which
had stuck on the sides fell in too, and they all
rolled about together, Ice and Snow and Water
in one. And they wept, and rolled, and tumbled,
and tumbled, and rolled, and wept; and, cried
THE GENERAL THAW. 187

they, “What have we been doing? What folly
have we been talking? Scolding, and thwarting,
and boasting, when, my friends—my dear, dear
friends—we are all of us brothers together ! ”

It was a long and happy embrace: it is going
on still! But, oh! what a pity they did not find
the truth out sooner! Let those who are brothers
by nature think of this, and not wait for Zhe
General Thaw—Death.

THE END.

R. CLAY, SON, AND TAYLOR, PRINTERS,
BREAD STREET HILL.
*

Part

— jp 4.
ek as






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'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJA' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8ab7e8f6a09ce97c2e255b4209e19069
1a12d7109513c8476a55cf2305ced5487e7f0368
'2011-12-16T17:25:05-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d883afd7e1ebabef740b3b8ffceced74
1fa98ec71f4c72dc630a352367f30423c4596b48
'2011-12-16T17:29:02-05:00'
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
2d5ac7c0b1c4edbc92f4686e38267aa8
d0afb3e603dcc0ac0f5079d139f905521be59f78
'2011-12-16T17:23:35-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJD' 'sip-files00062.txt'
524a84a9adad51bd0d1c43ae6b46971a
03de19d7606c3adfe1030e1dfd59cea2c8611b21
'2011-12-16T17:25:39-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJE' 'sip-files00063.txt'
af8813afda038c76afc10aab462da98a
4029655c64533e60ff0b24b60e8929591f32fcd5
'2011-12-16T17:26:59-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJF' 'sip-files00064.txt'
b7527d71643b2ba4a9254a9d9536e80d
27600fd3a2cd9bbab7eeabf4e392aeff8e1ea9ca
'2011-12-16T17:28:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJG' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5802fb797377888bae4ece8777db20f7
6798d3aa82390221fd84341f29650949ef9c68a6
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
a29c2918012da24d92c0fe1d4b27af8d
70f88adfcab4cb7c7610748a3cc392b30e3706f0
'2011-12-16T17:28:17-05:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJI' 'sip-files00067.txt'
f030a50ff2552e155641550531ec6a90
d52db17c972418fae65a25859e309f534777b03c
'2011-12-16T17:28:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJJ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
4f1c5a16d7ff96c1bc4403f79323cbf2
baf253a77448baa9c701bc12647868658767e52a
describe
'67' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJK' 'sip-files00070.txt'
7ca96ae60437b4317ebc9af09b22785e
9425d22380fd186b5e6d0f4af41aa758dd0039f3
'2011-12-16T17:27:40-05:00'
describe
'134' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJL' 'sip-files00073.txt'
1ddfa8a166f9960af6ced97dd41fc4f6
e41848c21be4387e6c74b610e630cbb8c369020d
'2011-12-16T17:30:04-05:00'
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
c3c7f28c14603b70b6477f180bd2d588
e9a1ff294bd40d32f965f494baf99b205c907daa
'2011-12-16T17:26:47-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
33673682827ab2ff3b7b8d165ccd5b4c
d237154f81d39c4032a2150980e1001fb4257d9f
'2011-12-16T17:29:10-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
5d2f395ff251d0d460c0fd6860e650b8
37e8c341e1f84f1b9173eac43ef687060c9ae284
'2011-12-16T17:27:19-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
9316690252fc09b8ca7b34c58f69fc9d
d35e0d81d8a8b6c7834f1f0600cbda7a599d78f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f7ae743a64bdb843a3d793178f345561
efbf1b6a7c3f9db90f93a4410e3c50167f834625
'2011-12-16T17:24:41-05:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b2ee941387090112c89be91e1209e1e4
fde2c081f23f6b6adaf117c26bea6554dd049a6b
'2011-12-16T17:24:17-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJS' 'sip-files00080.txt'
dd7e34412ba9ccbae1a97b47d08b8037
598d2dcff4170a4e1c4e6b8b84e42de6a7a75133
'2011-12-16T17:26:46-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJT' 'sip-files00081.txt'
84a35fde654dc8df5f86704ebd611a02
034bd0e53a77c1348dceedcbba7eb044e0e08169
'2011-12-16T17:26:07-05:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d38845c4fa6f5605348844f0fdeb5812
c9332c13c5883c6533c79b551270d953785c55db
'2011-12-16T17:27:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
aade58cd4a88b20df0c01af73a1bb482
8b38c13f1b7b2c80a4710fe4f1987afe083842ad
'2011-12-16T17:23:44-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
aff591aeee1bdc1196d8e819023154a3
20b159920dddc1a5de41aaa9be713df07333bb35
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
3a6fd1ad7157c780c398a718e8dc0ec2
f541a11b946d07862bfaeacf9b71c03adf0ce014
'2011-12-16T17:27:26-05:00'
describe
'267' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJY' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c51ef815e146ab0a993f7d91656fdc61
40595e05e479c51b6df638e1fa190b43bec828cf
'2011-12-16T17:27:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVJZ' 'sip-files00088.txt'
32e55dc04225b671fd179a9f685746a5
4bcfd129ba23782ab07305084fa69352b7533a45
'2011-12-16T17:24:40-05:00'
describe
'739' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
75ab0fb82080ffc812ca693d6730fa41
04c6507c1203a501674916b5a002f76af5f489cb
'2011-12-16T17:30:32-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKB' 'sip-files00091.txt'
60294347e4359ef4b7943182c0cd4112
786235096e1fbce463109a61bb28efb068524dd4
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ff85105147f41767e6c42f20e60c75ad
0981716f4075476bd281e746f942aa930ad27ce0
'2011-12-16T17:23:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKD' 'sip-files00093.txt'
573dc50bd56a16ba13821d9b56aa3803
27a6296254fa1555065ef1db4ae4112db42b3546
'2011-12-16T17:25:59-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKE' 'sip-files00094.txt'
4172e34f47ecdb997dc244ac52fa1ba9
ffa2dc79a16cb5895859a58b76e8f616080aabaa
'2011-12-16T17:24:07-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKF' 'sip-files00095.txt'
da0b3ec212612227af8f6e3e8e6675b1
0937625bc477fbf244a080899c7e1b44fb7a77f0
'2011-12-16T17:28:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKG' 'sip-files00096.txt'
86a95f66cbd06bcded5cef9f04c03083
4d76e0d0f788ba278fce449f05584801028f625e
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKH' 'sip-files00097.txt'
1421d378225a4d4dff0f52202ecce586
745bfe731335ee055f01db403390798a8462f545
'2011-12-16T17:29:20-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKI' 'sip-files00098.txt'
0858448ba6f3faa1110b3d9966878309
f52fce912da03e4f78233f6cd16a76f146304e0d
'2011-12-16T17:25:20-05:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKJ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
3183c6d7bf63dedebaf71d9d38718df8
a309e18c52b1dc49a4a5a9478af7dd7cff248e9f
'2011-12-16T17:25:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKK' 'sip-files00100.txt'
bb14eb2274c6fa5f902bea334fbab4b8
b077c2787b6be90405191005b416142051f643f6
'2011-12-16T17:23:28-05:00'
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKL' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8022749a79bcd0099df254cf3ed961b5
847470594ce11bd263b5676fd4473eadaae8867c
'2011-12-16T17:27:14-05:00'
describe
'72' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
988b622baca15c830775c216573ff14a
5f1666229654bf512e246109ad8d070789b17e87
'2011-12-16T17:23:15-05:00'
describe
'143' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKN' 'sip-files00105.txt'
b68194332b2c021d182815b13e70c410
7960622e787c1f61c731b807e0aa043446344d8c
'2011-12-16T17:26:37-05:00'
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKO' 'sip-files00106.txt'
38d9f573dfa15f6c51d557428f62b9fd
1a955c3dce8489f52e0526954a25232b1f5e5a87
describe
'788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKP' 'sip-files00107.txt'
2f5d2c41f7c37203a54779ee63b7cc87
a91b4e8fa2a58215f48d2470435ee5940f072491
'2011-12-16T17:30:06-05:00'
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
219afdfeda35c71166d5020f418e6eba
4349b6cfd7ba8ba7fa1284a3cfd4c7a6ef426004
'2011-12-16T17:25:07-05:00'
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
a13d1f8abaafb7237472a6e5588cdc68
346e12d905df147455ba4a62952b81f91d70a31e
'2011-12-16T17:26:21-05:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKS' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3e79c9437c4d69713cd11138c69d9b95
42ddf4377d31d9d7c87668d1f498b71366f6c07f
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
5534a135937abd075cc7f1fb8ec4876c
fe217c2818c9c5d9734e6284ded37917525f4a35
'2011-12-16T17:26:15-05:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKU' 'sip-files00112.txt'
6c6e232ed378c6f8ee95898a38bf1627
3aff485c34534404a2c1bc34db9da84688442304
'2011-12-16T17:24:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKV' 'sip-files00113.txt'
42f8b020f967acb5b7d7991d2604a98b
6c8e7ac0f912d964c694defc7ab135d1c89508df
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKW' 'sip-files00114.txt'
bca252ce406d644e0144d35c7aa80511
029d045ce933ab160d424669f3e1c359b9a687d6
'2011-12-16T17:29:06-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKX' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4a2d774a28e17772d1893c441ba2eb40
e26794739109b1f65e46a7689c8ebdef97ab0535
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
9956d1344df83d65bf3de5b9c99160a7
b1fd20aae5f308f45c210ed5458713722246ffc8
'2011-12-16T17:24:24-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'836' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVKZ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
441430506d60cf119fd5406c56ab276f
7603f6a2ede2509dda82211679fc7f53ffacad53
'2011-12-16T17:23:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLA' 'sip-files00118.txt'
df0ae1a2f386d1cbdead01f717899a1f
0add3c44cdf627ac385ac54e980b974abbe40032
'2011-12-16T17:27:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLB' 'sip-files00119.txt'
0bd2d5ef9705b2e96aa67a7e055e4a0d
072058097d74153fddf5770e7ffc8a300441a29d
'2011-12-16T17:24:54-05:00'
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLC' 'sip-files00120.txt'
146ae249ab3dbdbf3b61027b07c28d58
81bb974759ef9199587f2f5db85eabd158e78273
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLD' 'sip-files00121.txt'
6377a7187dd5769e1e02ff2649ae7b24
1a558483e088700e0a851a7ee24afdd0179f546c
'2011-12-16T17:28:39-05:00'
describe
'858' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
84b562443e9f6d632a2d3ab3ab6af866
18f530e9949f1e1f53a145e47cd355ed3105fc03
'2011-12-16T17:26:42-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLF' 'sip-files00123.txt'
60c87991aa0eeb6a7aaf1129e6635e41
307bdc817035d49e3458818cbbea160e2d3778ae
describe
Invalid character
'218' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
653f20caca267d8dd84359a1f9aa58f9
ead79f3cc6321a7864e79756348a231e9070129d
describe
'39' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLH' 'sip-files00126.txt'
9f78a6e09ff59409cdc2d88c6117fe00
f34046cdae3ec330951ac22e246a9f3b7a1ab1a9
describe
'576' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
70b106e031ae6ebb8741d03a0dc2932f
565098704d7dc275cf53b92e2b61e10fee894214
'2011-12-16T17:23:31-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLJ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
da4aabac306a8c43d393e23878b133c6
a3ea5c4d272ab6c13aa89163b076a0fca2a0baf0
'2011-12-16T17:25:31-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'835' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLK' 'sip-files00130.txt'
4c8ce4d28ec66214356fe7df04778c6e
e4e7c7c43fbdbcc28b25fea0bb83e8eb24a0a3e9
'2011-12-16T17:25:13-05:00'
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e5d44dbdca6902f5a0e769a31cfc2319
1fb3190ae3ab2723565e1119c5aac7fc3a4dde5f
'2011-12-16T17:23:53-05:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
2401f4103afe3b31093bc78894d04dad
8ec1c373a7b0b4a5baf1256cecea15fca20051df
'2011-12-16T17:29:49-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'986' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d195aea930788e6aa3e12abbb1f1a7fa
d90dabf39ac2b38f2d6c1c12e2968b11b2b0a79a
'2011-12-16T17:27:02-05:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLO' 'sip-files00134.txt'
019ed9ed2ca01fa72fc2f41f8b2f8f24
3c0a482435af41ed890906201214af73a242119e
'2011-12-16T17:25:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLP' 'sip-files00135.txt'
a0c2d967b947410c0fe5fd0dab8e2520
adf2680631844ef1d4770c874f8bc6bdf3d2c620
'2011-12-16T17:24:05-05:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLQ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
c3306b07d7bbc63c022145e472edfd03
9f6304ff4e017730019b0f422b6694875c7b8525
'2011-12-16T17:23:18-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLR' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a365eb32e931f08e8ad3cfb49b866eef
f0d186cc32f85837d1f5edc21a8ec8089b4bd5a6
'2011-12-16T17:29:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLS' 'sip-files00138.txt'
e4c6823e69aa904c769a7a8916578882
5eca525a0653ed9998b85b00c94df1bfbe15dff3
'2011-12-16T17:26:09-05:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
54885dbff2263e178152c36f13e9445e
8a62104cc4b9001d5950ca3d93acfb2b891bff44
'2011-12-16T17:25:06-05:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLU' 'sip-files00140.txt'
46feaab680677f08f758d5a51adb7a34
aec5d1eaeaf74137c8e5f5a287b3cc044d521fd1
'2011-12-16T17:29:00-05:00'
describe
'42' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLV' 'sip-files00142.txt'
8dcb0e4d255416953d0e3d6e5ed71559
a9fcda3ee4ed130b693bee59e066fe91ed794713
'2011-12-16T17:28:35-05:00'
describe
'229' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLW' 'sip-files00145.txt'
4376b6031be09fcd78baa52e8f98a47b
67564b21c2dbf05160a0dce3ca32b29de9dfd3b7
describe
'571' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLX' 'sip-files00146.txt'
916ad9100500db9b86ab16bd2bb26168
913b24d48939fca49727c4e198654d3c1ab0fa4f
'2011-12-16T17:23:32-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLY' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ca155f1c2f4cb5a7b870c72d343acee2
4960d36d74c27399ff82a0c662c92e3f47f0dff6
'2011-12-16T17:28:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVLZ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
bf281f71c92f4a69e018eec24ae6f714
13b3dd8ccdb46eed4dec53d284b48b38345d0862
'2011-12-16T17:27:52-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
2e59e026cec7f5ae73861e313f499262
a53eade75074fce930bcca87d7a657b2c87e42a5
'2011-12-16T17:24:42-05:00'
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMB' 'sip-files00150.txt'
aed4e43246c5dbed0aca2c7626f68eb3
904328f5ea0ac9d2756dbaacc6a8f70c6c43775f
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
16267a7caba0bd04b119eeb0b6b78b58
f102e206a72e37f3a785bf2d8c8c69d5dca3de75
'2011-12-16T17:25:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
f2ef4dbd88d50bdcf852c10fad3f0a72
cbc8456705eac7054ad3cbf8a584bc9e06651cb7
'2011-12-16T17:24:39-05:00'
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVME' 'sip-files00153.txt'
9c3c5a8d68a6ff876ba5b6da6e3f722f
03c317e899d77f55d008b5f003e5d9528b04399a
'2011-12-16T17:24:37-05:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMF' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e84eb216d7f05a5d4db4c8690327f643
106495107ac997fa5490463626afd2a031ae7444
describe
Invalid character
'928' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMG' 'sip-files00155.txt'
254f8a9898c59873c885669d9ea6a052
2b46b759ad6ad513686e27ff28d69b6b999e38d1
'2011-12-16T17:24:01-05:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMH' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f636809109e7d82517d8ad9649c4b4a6
09050be9c176e369848b75d0afb2a766a9e507f9
'2011-12-16T17:24:26-05:00'
describe
'684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMI' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c5680e287718cc71931710a09829cefa
80ba3b8d5fa145635cc267ccfcfc04e395dc1577
'2011-12-16T17:27:36-05:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMJ' 'sip-files00158.txt'
aaefa64ec47903cf278db808262a8426
3869664745be1d511bce9599772262c7ec095b56
'2011-12-16T17:24:59-05:00'
describe
'913' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMK' 'sip-files00159.txt'
3f0b7a4d23a0dbe0775c350a5f74825b
c8a5a55847cc96649f06701fa8b98da93f1c6aab
'2011-12-16T17:24:08-05:00'
describe
'899' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVML' 'sip-files00160.txt'
af48f29e5e1ecf44bcf48a05e168ce2f
f65fe7208d6260f531a4793e11a7cc47e5393ff6
'2011-12-16T17:27:35-05:00'
describe
'855' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMM' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c4107b43f86920bcce0972bafdb821c9
c6dcf777a43668414b85d0684487eb753c8ba602
'2011-12-16T17:29:17-05:00'
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMN' 'sip-files00162.txt'
7142d6b1437e5c990847598f70335263
9c8a883c386e0a1334dbf364a4522c572edb9aeb
describe
'978' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMO' 'sip-files00163.txt'
1004143f3a1bc292cb6a502dfb05a1ea
dd67b5a7af5a49f05a0a8991c385f5d8b3d6de53
'2011-12-16T17:29:54-05:00'
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMP' 'sip-files00164.txt'
a2b356184bc2d50470d72a0bdf827315
c6d33ff1d04c31c57d6c9fa9bf9ae43325bab10b
'2011-12-16T17:25:58-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMQ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
d7e5ccefbd74396a88ba846162651a31
afb0feb0325babbdf589263a4b16c9d4df051a30
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMR' 'sip-files00166.txt'
4bcb321ffb50a9c7596c25bec03c0188
72a9a76a2e33f97e124e68023a6c361fb51611d9
'2011-12-16T17:26:28-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMS' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4e9c5772b8dac8ca0c96b55177788a32
8c1776bf7dd5a22cacbbe398333b1f0c5272be55
'2011-12-16T17:24:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMT' 'sip-files00168.txt'
922e7cd34d758db83f361db61647fbf6
176a638a90e666cd35df0a1b60ccf34447d607e1
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMU' 'sip-files00169.txt'
7cd857a62de9f315373b433719018c95
757ee4e0e9980477d923855990cff703aedf996a
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMV' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6441f616a0ee966906d5eee0b115cf94
c7c1375944ab4f2f339dd18539b37fc2c5442ef2
'2011-12-16T17:25:53-05:00'
describe
'778' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMW' 'sip-files00171.txt'
24ef998d596d6b6c665d5ada71770cc8
54a44418e15d8f707808e73d2396e91d95dda6ca
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMX' 'sip-files00172.txt'
d95666745fd2a34349122a3b4051238f
f37484d529546c8424af9eedcf8e6c207c2171cc
'2011-12-16T17:30:22-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
54bdf515752ddaff9f567c6dbabb79d5
924ff204b09e7805e3cd84df25e1b0680c8d45f8
'2011-12-16T17:29:14-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVMZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
8f8853cca4cbc0d816f9f8a20b510857
919b8b379aa36e76911bc785397568591119eb16
'2011-12-16T17:25:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
5e7a26771db93252815701d821fcac2c
596418b931e2694a1cc9f90995e84fb6824ba34b
'2011-12-16T17:24:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNB' 'sip-files00176.txt'
842241abed001724650e26e990b7aa90
f40311d279c7777382aff110260bdd83bffeb916
'2011-12-16T17:29:05-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNC' 'sip-files00177.txt'
f6eecdfd2e9e777ee772448b344c32f6
197705a0bd6bebb9914abe410f86b6d57959d540
'2011-12-16T17:24:03-05:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVND' 'sip-files00178.txt'
cca54508d2f18d6b04fde0bcd93cb520
e515f8de318fc62a8f2306c18e388b881b37518d
'2011-12-16T17:24:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNE' 'sip-files00179.txt'
24ed2114d57d748ccb45a26289d05a94
3c9e4103268d584f2745eaf264a0cca4971037f0
'2011-12-16T17:30:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNF' 'sip-files00180.txt'
58259196b84481ee31ea40dcfac5773e
1ae09b36da2538bb497630b77a5a8ea0b52f1246
describe
Invalid character
'925' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNG' 'sip-files00181.txt'
616dd3069ee3a016f238259a128ce177
2f635dc628b4eaf0a80a5b7d3c02539d17517bbb
'2011-12-16T17:28:48-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNH' 'sip-files00182.txt'
8e705e80bc1e7fd9a459537946433a94
c106768b684b6de32c4245a928999a065882d410
'2011-12-16T17:26:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNI' 'sip-files00183.txt'
c06c9dbfc841abdcb1e6244c4f77fb1e
3dcbffb8f261c4573b0154c1a518284edada62eb
'2011-12-16T17:23:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNJ' 'sip-files00184.txt'
a7afe384d0dbfecb0aee7def297045ba
711d9393b64782a00cd292766da1bfc509e464e7
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNK' 'sip-files00185.txt'
1e8bb9481e2b7f83c6f3d2f54a7c4253
4239705bb8ee04ad3f5e2d5f8b24565c04162f4e
'2011-12-16T17:25:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNL' 'sip-files00186.txt'
ca0ba3c236ac436c672f7f0b059c92b3
4ea2aac3f3595d3533920dba3cd4ed95d14b455a
describe
'565' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNM' 'sip-files00188.txt'
aba18a6cc50e552cd8fd42a57bf2d676
aaaa1d2c34b61c70fcbdec42c61f15f9f95b8263
'2011-12-16T17:28:06-05:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNN' 'sip-files00189.txt'
e672d952839dfe9ddb54f5a3f6ec3d5c
b2e3ff75a55aa8ac57cb099f72346a6192b4cc80
'2011-12-16T17:24:33-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNO' 'sip-files00190.txt'
922fdecc59f7ccffc173bb78c549f19d
0b9c6903bd3b0d07415189e5e9500580c643f6bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNP' 'sip-files00191.txt'
bbcd8be8c76e20ae15a8e6a007845f2f
0da3147a5727c0884aed6f7b13fc19df40801cc4
'2011-12-16T17:30:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNQ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
8f198e7a8a28e58032e3f8d0d9f55c16
a88eb2f724fa73d081943ba80e95cd370da9c622
'2011-12-16T17:30:19-05:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNR' 'sip-files00193.txt'
1358d0e8d0fbecd64b25a52c0c6303c3
6f42630effd125b2265b2b101687a142601146cf
'2011-12-16T17:23:49-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNS' 'sip-files00194.txt'
f06bba1512c6828dff2b07ae1ed5cbe0
d07f5fae06c8560d31cf483bb32f0251314e8dac
'2011-12-16T17:26:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNT' 'sip-files00195.txt'
02f925c9dd6a34e47213f898b173a929
aff623380cc14fee204e008e2ff0e49c53456e6e
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNU' 'sip-files00196.txt'
8ebe4c7050759dd472ccbf23c9b3c220
1e6d993f73110764d253fd96ee7058f2951dd3e8
'2011-12-16T17:28:07-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
877167ef072c793d2928704ce6fd6976
256102150e3bd7375f0235ee348d25b2ec6fec8e
'2011-12-16T17:28:18-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNW' 'sip-files00198.txt'
5d662c8921393b88a71b4d165c797e8f
6f6f3bdff97acdb85544b035f7997be555737905
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNX' 'sip-files00199.txt'
8c39006345d9f89e8c7cfa23d1d5e622
a29320d92483b50436a123003cdd4dbcad7d446a
'2011-12-16T17:30:30-05:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNY' 'sip-files00200.txt'
d9cb86f01e5036973b602d89474f11aa
2f12493a6a0472e447b1886d8c3d753a029019be
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVNZ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
910de6f58954c9b7b5a824430e8a5c34
cfe1739c75d6a873856ab41f03ef90b9495f7a3d
'2011-12-16T17:27:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOA' 'sip-files00202.txt'
a25486aba7cde8890cd3cfe90fd5460e
f1594a7325aca8b8193c49d570be358b87a9c576
'2011-12-16T17:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOB' 'sip-files00203.txt'
2f5fc2982e4fac7fe7c9122d010b1083
44037d4bcbc1681b46bae46f496290dde0169b0e
'2011-12-16T17:24:35-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOC' 'sip-files00204.txt'
baa8f44eb730bd9992c9b7c09eeb7916
07a7a12a374dfa44d7d3ece35a98189ed605ec09
'2011-12-16T17:24:11-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOD' 'sip-files00205.txt'
5bd0c49b49e8f782248bd66480e52247
f3c76c50c9660e73b780b950b14c54c83bcae42f
describe
'551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOE' 'sip-files00206.txt'
953df67e6cd896f153fe6bbd7970217b
47fa2bb938cef8285a60260952b0519fdc4c9200
'2011-12-16T17:29:43-05:00'
describe
'356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOF' 'sip-files00001.pro'
bcf4dc3811f50fb01be5de1d1b3b08f4
15b568f02c27bf2fd4853bd15ccb8e5f83a880d4
'2011-12-16T17:24:27-05:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOG' 'sip-files00008.pro'
4e0442ad0c2c12716164f2a55f92f1bf
cd410e607824765ce8468332c5a782f8940e97ef
'2011-12-16T17:28:30-05:00'
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOH' 'sip-files00011.pro'
49ca31ec813235d3e3917cb58ad70cb6
7e40917305262693912a253a3bc8a12e0750f721
'2011-12-16T17:29:31-05:00'
describe
'10266' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOI' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1f42aca280440ad697b17751e7714415
6b2d6f25157e69fc578290200edcfb2b8dd01e72
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOJ' 'sip-files00013.pro'
5feb6019d54aedcd0aee28b43d57b4b4
67f7feff77e86a272831076276204e3ce1a08f3d
describe
'496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
70a6a657b5b461aa53bf3a4c0c2a24c5
911ffea428defb71f52cfae5ff62b78112635627
'2011-12-16T17:23:45-05:00'
describe
'17143' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOL' 'sip-files00016.pro'
dfa7dd68194fff1c7f1e77c4a7e8f824
fc4958f5c4188197eb9ce103e68bff1dbf9eca26
'2011-12-16T17:26:06-05:00'
describe
'26212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0e32a031e96f13de793f0873e0b50843
f1242551100a837c19d006e11aa4938a2265c61e
describe
'26314' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVON' 'sip-files00018.pro'
f2b8751310661e0f9251f81c1f6aac16
5f930d0f9e9c52725c4250bc345f7ffee3f07fb8
'2011-12-16T17:29:32-05:00'
describe
'27138' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOO' 'sip-files00019.pro'
3db6dd80ce08a0dc95d493e7cc332100
b9d516dd3b9860b0cb789b277c65239ced376e09
describe
'26881' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
48d54a9eb872d92b3859fea8bc299f16
c7ce5dc92e373d9fbf7c440475a289ca8a933abc
'2011-12-16T17:25:14-05:00'
describe
'27332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOQ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d0c0c5a764fc58fcdac725ac4c23f6fb
f43c5fa6a405852fa62896a9cda9be39a9dd6874
'2011-12-16T17:26:20-05:00'
describe
'25189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
b3ecd1274f126bd7bd2b83256a612c8b
20ec9a410d1e9fc235f849742370d9584eb7057a
'2011-12-16T17:24:10-05:00'
describe
'26748' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOS' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a86a23cc492d9f6a2358f3b9322b7bd4
783471b74ebd400eefc2ebd4c71601d7c8fa392c
describe
'27426' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOT' 'sip-files00024.pro'
09fbd31c92b176642dd2e8e721b815f9
1515505acd36bf80f85cbd474be59f2e9c476bc4
'2011-12-16T17:27:44-05:00'
describe
'26694' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
50d773f1584faa6e0b6e294c2c76e97d
f1c015116668a382ad2888b492a2d443ca02dec5
'2011-12-16T17:24:32-05:00'
describe
'27812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOV' 'sip-files00026.pro'
ca36f965dfb1de779bfe90311d052500
8409f0ef3ce7de7cf9004a5f7d2798d81423e038
'2011-12-16T17:23:20-05:00'
describe
'26605' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e5f2c22b99c2593f4265b85498f661ac
0a94f3459e7766206734c2aaf68388e4b683104f
describe
'25180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOX' 'sip-files00028.pro'
a19f783248ac3d896f6de2c7a0dfba4b
836a55f378ea9766d2f764770218542e2d6ec0a0
'2011-12-16T17:27:46-05:00'
describe
'26102' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOY' 'sip-files00029.pro'
dc35df366df7933dead04f20118db86a
ce832ff85f5137bdeb2b2069cbe3c82dc353ee23
describe
'25149' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVOZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c9766b550c3532907fdd9513034c6ecc
0a31ba254c1803e164386dd98c260c6e3644fe6f
'2011-12-16T17:24:06-05:00'
describe
'25292' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPA' 'sip-files00031.pro'
bbc4cec5b920329fa2181179c9f85b8f
68a3c498063fc747064b4ac6f01fd1a805fdda26
'2011-12-16T17:27:22-05:00'
describe
'21880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPB' 'sip-files00032.pro'
90aa8394a0a6f112518b9f0300453b49
9d22d0406941533e04aee6e2f4b80a554b675abf
'2011-12-16T17:26:26-05:00'
describe
'23874' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPC' 'sip-files00033.pro'
005f3b173d114ae30d8e7d320d00741b
6bbb64ff4b7a02d1d7f07b1d814f797134569cce
'2011-12-16T17:30:08-05:00'
describe
'23896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f4a684928104744abc7f6cfc51c3daa7
952d2529584056f3ae51cb4963b503fa94509f4a
'2011-12-16T17:23:55-05:00'
describe
'25074' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPE' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0c7278545991d18c9b55ea3f448ff3cf
18218ae7a1ed4eaa06ab00fbb4cf0ef7cccf4168
'2011-12-16T17:25:51-05:00'
describe
'25357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e4407039ce8e7436ddbe06241c43055e
0423f09968369748659a8d3f87fc4038d438d049
describe
'26924' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPG' 'sip-files00037.pro'
347e7e8beb2d7ec0ae0acb05624501ef
f7e1797b68d0b79da6087ff013adab8bdaaa918b
'2011-12-16T17:24:58-05:00'
describe
'26673' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
e16ba70b0758539451d451d0db85091e
6e3adc91ab48c9dec628413d2e08df537d12d0d0
describe
'26064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPI' 'sip-files00039.pro'
b1d5f82209218a36707fd2dc347d8e6a
0c31555ab59151fc54d4476577477ec80d9a0726
'2011-12-16T17:23:42-05:00'
describe
'27315' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
6c649d641310e337b93def7df009ae39
c391e8a9e6e0dfe1c6ebfb2f68908a197331ed07
describe
'25831' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPK' 'sip-files00041.pro'
5e4b7ba525659a40fa9bb0705aeeb699
ab57a2821bed238160a6bbc746aaa9d97c22f351
describe
'25461' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPL' 'sip-files00042.pro'
d87af4b147ef385dfe589fcd3abdcb53
f2920ceb074cfdbc60a6c8d83ac50e537c755488
describe
'26070' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
99d6b7b09224a0c699cde9de76c66007
800a61ba7ea78ba4c75fd822be6599fe213cd4eb
'2011-12-16T17:27:07-05:00'
describe
'24614' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPN' 'sip-files00044.pro'
fe6dbd26dfb1d9ffad25e498506b9263
54758d13109e09cf0e0acaec5abba64bb46d0640
'2011-12-16T17:25:35-05:00'
describe
'26372' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPO' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6dad999c3b139ab66bda49c2bcce6d61
877c3f55851cee1ff56edc978d847bae8e9b5e46
'2011-12-16T17:28:47-05:00'
describe
'25201' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPP' 'sip-files00046.pro'
42d1adf56d3f5220b675077dd55b9fd2
f0bcfcb6e4d412b25a9686c7bace9a4b4b8f49d0
'2011-12-16T17:25:09-05:00'
describe
'642' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
ab2be30740073fe740b2ab2fc148b000
0c268dd384deebc37612d1a595f32c736c49e364
'2011-12-16T17:26:08-05:00'
describe
'13156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPR' 'sip-files00050.pro'
16310969a5c53471440a5ae969e78f5d
e0a6e635237760189d29d53e06e5c3657dbfb310
describe
'27137' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPS' 'sip-files00051.pro'
c9fd9f09a44288af07580c40e8108fdc
948e78f12a27c1f352670bb964c83947ba1f5de9
'2011-12-16T17:25:52-05:00'
describe
'27759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPT' 'sip-files00052.pro'
72da7a7b545a1494a79304764a25c0fc
a3368a21832a745cdb3948457bf06fe169bf98a6
'2011-12-16T17:29:35-05:00'
describe
'26180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPU' 'sip-files00053.pro'
cd18edf2c983d0aad860a55eabf9c5b3
7e4dc97741c8282b91340f2076d994ca123c981f
describe
'26640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPV' 'sip-files00054.pro'
8090b46a14dff345381ba4988e220b94
32a791555e46b32b68b698b95acac3916613d785
describe
'26830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d4b1e9207f55b7bfd3540360add247ca
995883f16d2ac2316ef69668326e0e5f3dc096b5
'2011-12-16T17:25:22-05:00'
describe
'26856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
98abda472069d7b1ca3b98aa17a5b9cb
d702ae0741cad839a0497a4472fda64158b4096c
describe
'26898' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
4ce14d3642fd78fcb07bfed1fe16b2ac
4488055d7ff15624b2ab521612adabcbb71b8c26
'2011-12-16T17:30:20-05:00'
describe
'27036' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVPZ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
9dd6c435fee4a292f7ced1b94f67a079
339417ea001c1160d1f4a073ee3253b78fe474f7
describe
'27248' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQA' 'sip-files00059.pro'
ff096ef5f1a049ae0a06688f53c5c92f
16f42221706be54b7cfcc4aa9bf4aa067aa6db5f
'2011-12-16T17:24:47-05:00'
describe
'27389' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
a75c5f7d0c36ff1f2679333230d45d3d
a04f5e5a7ace60f0f2597dc02f36b60c44fbda2e
describe
'27293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQC' 'sip-files00061.pro'
83904f004a2ffd2f929d6d321efdf5b0
51c68885f13a413610c04c6e91a3ae14fcd12f1b
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQD' 'sip-files00062.pro'
03f863b9584bc43c8fd10b8082a7065c
ff4873bcdc4209ce416aa708a5c62aa422ea8f04
'2011-12-16T17:26:24-05:00'
describe
'29058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQE' 'sip-files00063.pro'
5f4b21a6c998085968dd9dd66820bd1f
17e7791587ff87170e2a461ab5c3feeb2081d622
describe
'27979' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQF' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6ea84af3fbd07338797448542ee96d8c
ec4c7483af547bcc764501f63b1e98099bfbda74
'2011-12-16T17:26:14-05:00'
describe
'27602' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQG' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4c1e470f9ded042d05efeae9939e5e12
9aaed2a7d766faa031a7ad3e5687438eef81ad33
'2011-12-16T17:23:33-05:00'
describe
'27352' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQH' 'sip-files00066.pro'
0d2f01e9d7efccfe855ad300b42441b9
71a6f8b571ac7d9a9312fe557b6e0da507a80e31
'2011-12-16T17:26:32-05:00'
describe
'26360' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQI' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c7807ec30012ae57c04d22504669fc16
27723e54298d8e1f4d787660565a939a651d8ad3
'2011-12-16T17:26:01-05:00'
describe
'25546' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQJ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
e5bab6f78ad1075e5c5c9ee7524de233
2b19a86d77531bc2785148e5ed55f148d2130412
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQK' 'sip-files00070.pro'
e254b5c8a0684109ff3357a948cad14a
d1a8289b27ffad5b3b7ca0771a023035632fbc20
'2011-12-16T17:29:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
f215acbfeafc982b9e13348a33799ea0
b33184000b052a4c9156f63f160424e048d26861
describe
'15904' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3e032e3d65c3eddb3852b7199bb6a3d5
a4d72bf42de1517c198f4f2c115148653c751624
'2011-12-16T17:28:25-05:00'
describe
'27616' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQN' 'sip-files00075.pro'
b253af4561e2ed26705f605aead8b205
9bc1aed8a2b07856d6028c4197dac91dec3b484d
describe
'27878' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQO' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ef765ae083eefa632b052877aa95e846
5b436691dc982664e9f1451e75074cfed6cf3b9d
'2011-12-16T17:27:32-05:00'
describe
'27989' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQP' 'sip-files00077.pro'
638b0533af72c8da451d2a71ef78b4db
8cad28922c05db606be259ae76c2d11751a09a16
describe
'26501' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQQ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ad4e76588d1320ee3412ec6c1a5758b1
79277c0308f167d580e6fd98b6ce707cbcface41
describe
'26661' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
c56927ab80a085f97f0b8252d4e2068f
03e0f4ff7425db7ef7d3544ffc1112e841a9790a
describe
'26730' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQS' 'sip-files00080.pro'
05e36b7f07dd596cabae02727e50ebbc
531cb6bef5d6a43ef41fa223678ed89aa90d014b
'2011-12-16T17:23:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQT' 'sip-files00081.pro'
9e47a17e519a2f6e2041964e320487df
bcf7113e3b4bcb7d8f178091482130da3802192e
'2011-12-16T17:25:28-05:00'
describe
'25418' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQU' 'sip-files00082.pro'
1532a458654e1591ea3a08e084e91ebd
1eb79b5052389e665c828503cc8e98d0bf305689
describe
'26632' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ab904cf2480ca9efaf867301a19752c0
79ae6dafca43c1ccd7e72aa14e6ea53eda8cb761
'2011-12-16T17:23:25-05:00'
describe
'25878' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQW' 'sip-files00084.pro'
93c592b0d06b5e89428bcd69f5e99065
da91dcc636884974d085f08226bfbc91496982da
describe
'27121' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQX' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d5cd965c3dec035926b10802b115a4e8
caf851b27c4b84ef871633267c081939563a1156
'2011-12-16T17:29:41-05:00'
describe
'5959' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
2db049a16ce61b7f64bc40747a89f370
d07425b4cbfd8e8a84a693c1f7f6b8d2576f0ddd
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVQZ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
634e1c5113d262e575e2da91d44d6665
4366080ab41a932b7906419d9db1c82145d33178
describe
'16432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
7e50a812184cd7a753862a0d295f8514
8a41701a571093655a73ec45e0b2689a50cd500a
describe
'27751' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRB' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6278a1a0a8ce02c99d22753b4e9d7fc8
0583b8d950678fe1bdc630a96a58e88b9757d7a3
describe
'27891' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRC' 'sip-files00092.pro'
0553754991154b6f024c7f086085b0db
f7f4fbd90ffccf90182c5bb4db8ba1cb67bf4a23
'2011-12-16T17:27:17-05:00'
describe
'27415' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRD' 'sip-files00093.pro'
bebf6633484b825b0da8f0b82cbe40af
94dd3b49afdddce843a26e227db286f648074fcf
'2011-12-16T17:24:44-05:00'
describe
'27761' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRE' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b239a8e54b116caaeaca3e17b3ca2774
ef498e5024578697d5796ec7be4328bf9683a6fb
describe
'27656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
19e478879d43855d29cd87163c319c0c
4cc7554022396228a04cf88a23f2014e2df1c0be
describe
'27611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
27ec5319daf08cf8b8816bdd9c36b158
20c445d54192144430c0d061dbc0e08161e095f4
'2011-12-16T17:25:12-05:00'
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRH' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1663bd857490ac2ce8efa2b02282cef7
d8fbe0f0c2adc7d4a29a34eb4cc5d1ed65aa6973
'2011-12-16T17:27:11-05:00'
describe
'27367' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRI' 'sip-files00098.pro'
db478e1900c7327b07d0f95248432f47
a4fb3ccaae0020b9f6268098c6e02b7e86f177c3
'2011-12-16T17:28:57-05:00'
describe
'27642' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRJ' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4bb19c860da56496479977e918be7f87
e9d9f48b466845117c0fe38c4621c3774fedfa45
'2011-12-16T17:27:01-05:00'
describe
'26769' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRK' 'sip-files00100.pro'
644f54b629fffa38b6c1f363366a6a9e
6d4c74ce99122899e95b98fa10cb03053775ef27
'2011-12-16T17:24:49-05:00'
describe
'22490' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRL' 'sip-files00101.pro'
257fef303cf71a5f1f00b4c89a75a339
0f38a808eb966ef7ed04e76cd92dcf419596f142
'2011-12-16T17:30:03-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRM' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7db930ccef5faec661c12aef5059b513
58673ab3859a5b16f92afa96e3d90c65c4d0d79d
'2011-12-16T17:27:08-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRN' 'sip-files00105.pro'
f82e98c06b59cca4e2a25bf697cb7efd
423cf63efa1a724633b8597b197cfd3ab5d5b4e4
'2011-12-16T17:26:17-05:00'
describe
'18644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRO' 'sip-files00106.pro'
b01cf30e68914d8b8c2d320d2cfd337b
40fd02c8d563d307d04fbe2991365e98c2d4160f
describe
'17870' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
34c3c8a02d642571cd8f1af5bac3413a
02101bd972e10f4cb50531924b75b9dfe14f8dfe
'2011-12-16T17:27:30-05:00'
describe
'19692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRQ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
acb5ead9067efe9e33ab5160c17c9777
de3e1626ec6ce8c31e8ed9720982366e943a79e0
'2011-12-16T17:28:14-05:00'
describe
'23128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRR' 'sip-files00109.pro'
d3e59129dcd9d77590dba688e4c7dc91
972ff1b4c96766854b156d9be8f8d7613fc23e11
describe
'23754' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRS' 'sip-files00110.pro'
7fea54715c2abd52b8c76bd58d618fdf
0289929bfb720c54ff0ef64b86f5e82bb24e03a7
describe
'23369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRT' 'sip-files00111.pro'
52de5a4b935af07c4d369045ebe67c2e
3eabf8d1fad75bbf83c2c1acc274b0a0b1ecfec0
'2011-12-16T17:27:24-05:00'
describe
'22806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRU' 'sip-files00112.pro'
74262313b22fea29a20fb780a322e369
3259c230bcb1e6a3c605dbbb03fec634aec7b394
'2011-12-16T17:26:00-05:00'
describe
'24121' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
941b0f1dc4ff07aa388e946880d076a6
b53f550367822cef4d604f38c0a9f2fc90ac7809
describe
'23076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRW' 'sip-files00114.pro'
75921fa2028abbba946f0a8b6473c8bc
826a91a1dc5954cfe44a85c1425adea37adb2908
describe
'23210' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRX' 'sip-files00115.pro'
59067df2281d1a0de96361ab9428f5a9
78cff98f4137c2da1b8c6791a4709d34a61e5724
'2011-12-16T17:23:58-05:00'
describe
'22593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRY' 'sip-files00116.pro'
75d3298ce2e81a6058565fda827c6f69
07c8d5f6fb0634b0587211ddd4bd4809363d2730
'2011-12-16T17:30:37-05:00'
describe
'19431' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVRZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
53b76aedf48c4a9dc05d49a7c97b1080
c72c86565c99e4cec127489d3a03c8c9eddb3579
describe
'24106' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSA' 'sip-files00118.pro'
89f8c6d757dbce944bc269c5b866e573
57d64e6c035f237b476368165851ed33cc049e85
describe
'24401' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSB' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a543bf95028e7c6abaaff30cbe4ef4e8
519582d1826ee745e6dc3f70920fea396e4c14ac
describe
'22966' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1ae816cc5bcc4de3228d34567c577e9f
2393ddbdb6993e1dc51b74cf814698b9bd2d00b0
'2011-12-16T17:30:34-05:00'
describe
'23285' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSD' 'sip-files00121.pro'
a99bc93dd154e50ca15bd3020d860ca5
4f18aec74e247f4db45d9c6065e550c200fc88e3
'2011-12-16T17:28:21-05:00'
describe
'19293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSE' 'sip-files00122.pro'
2987b81c496b19aafb47cc5ef9eee287
615776bcca47cffc313ff235ef516af98f8716b1
describe
'21154' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSF' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e59dec7465407ff30422989ac4761d78
f380e5b9b4b275bd510218e0d384712b7a6d0c56
describe
'4644' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSG' 'sip-files00124.pro'
e757c605bbcb5a01fa7d031cb9448777
343bde8a8d71663d3a6ec727f23ccb54db7238bb
describe
'590' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSH' 'sip-files00126.pro'
fc6b6f2d765354a80d79af71962f65f2
86a670af004707d9e4d3ec6364e3bd6dc9b8a4c1
'2011-12-16T17:24:25-05:00'
describe
'12793' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSI' 'sip-files00128.pro'
cec0e89bb71de3e3d3e78fa4ecfef753
efaa2ec9ff98bcc0169e0ef5ace63aaeb0903a66
describe
'22406' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSJ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2d8508828052d019657ce9480f4ddfd2
6901e8976686afc6f57697314c5efce1ee862bbf
describe
'18399' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSK' 'sip-files00130.pro'
d1d1a0d1b9e30ea217de59c1ef9ea917
088fbff847892afb66c04e34510f04acf11522ed
describe
'23681' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSL' 'sip-files00131.pro'
eca640b43d22a3ad4b3787339f039efa
f7ef4db3acf9bdd69179709911a74e00c8caa68c
describe
'19331' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSM' 'sip-files00132.pro'
5a8a17a824ffb28aa2875db25357fbfd
2252efff6e91e35ba862b3ad72320f768aece9a6
'2011-12-16T17:27:15-05:00'
describe
'22935' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSN' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6608b2981aff4b364da6e836929c2570
21e4821b2a39280c90b7b338eac8e40d5209a239
describe
'19428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSO' 'sip-files00134.pro'
5ddacae133ae7fa7d081261d7006b542
ce30d7b20e41795fd3d20b5533b751d09f69113b
describe
'23546' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSP' 'sip-files00135.pro'
5ceba6f4674f89e9cdfe603c1465e031
aca58ba33bfc82a39605f0ba260448d478052bcf
'2011-12-16T17:26:13-05:00'
describe
'23455' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSQ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
f2e4da73f872f9e412d5b8626093b439
a0d6a89d4079f2a0593e2016ff472c110b43b047
'2011-12-16T17:25:44-05:00'
describe
'23821' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSR' 'sip-files00137.pro'
ae7f086ba81cfaaebc0951ead8fabe9e
a28cff891b89f96d2a7fa11987913771dc6499cd
'2011-12-16T17:24:19-05:00'
describe
'23364' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSS' 'sip-files00138.pro'
8e688745823750e0c769c2bd28df99b5
e279f2e3df7dd311ad1ef3925b097f07e50fc51b
'2011-12-16T17:30:36-05:00'
describe
'23536' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVST' 'sip-files00139.pro'
c32e5a224dabdda400563599cf0dacb4
8da021062ea1a3082d40ab1ceda7cbc123123cb5
'2011-12-16T17:29:04-05:00'
describe
'22007' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSU' 'sip-files00140.pro'
21289353f3b5f3844ba0af9efe1e6c8b
65a4271b32cbf11781348dc6348a51c9af628e6e
'2011-12-16T17:26:29-05:00'
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSV' 'sip-files00142.pro'
a54a070afa358e1695f09a91cc06d165
aa6dfadecb28b7aff04b758172f85f2e4f3d0792
describe
'2948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
1ef0f21a63c5a052bb506e8fdd329621
b0a9bb08b312f092e5ab5f790975a52343be68c6
describe
'12762' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSX' 'sip-files00146.pro'
43ebb9254e9731844b629a7cadd9b352
6e95a34d91c7d904ad47c1f951ba009d5376ea4c
describe
'22880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSY' 'sip-files00147.pro'
d4f79c76c30055cc36c33ddb4dbdcb49
d651e19793c97a71eaa213d93a1e9b83bc1585c9
describe
'23411' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVSZ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
85ec5bd3bc598be173501ff1997ab5b2
33f0247c7802c75af84b2a14f4ad1230930680f2
'2011-12-16T17:23:22-05:00'
describe
'22464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
0ac061493b381d5f342216bde46f63cc
dba383f2fd9467bbb424d2dadcd1095fd5c46695
describe
'24117' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTB' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d75c18d58595d229e3b5f66568cf8c85
510906be837d9e876d8a4b90c33ad940659281ea
'2011-12-16T17:25:54-05:00'
describe
'17160' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTC' 'sip-files00151.pro'
205f03498550fcb202cbb31fe024da8e
6e33086dced76e5a86ad0214ac2309bc99955a7f
describe
'22003' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTD' 'sip-files00152.pro'
9250781fb69b28ad46ceac7b8cbb86b4
3a049028459f19289d4741a58ef14acf0efae150
'2011-12-16T17:28:42-05:00'
describe
'22014' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTE' 'sip-files00153.pro'
0b76c8b4d102fdbdb3513eb9d19c846c
f4df84bdf41889c7dffc25f82d6e5d608a13d1b1
describe
'21690' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
52950107d8c018d88f646e32334d91fd
81a1cf22e0591b882aaa41225f08b5a3396566f9
'2011-12-16T17:28:29-05:00'
describe
'21493' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTG' 'sip-files00155.pro'
4606a3295e64a4a86ea775eb52dc22b1
03dbc3db35c67067b625490d753d63d2a5d9b66c
'2011-12-16T17:24:28-05:00'
describe
'19064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTH' 'sip-files00156.pro'
27165766dae9cc29b83ad1c30939ef08
8032ae6224015e5256ad8f3ad5bee5f420c1997e
describe
'15629' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTI' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3ea54076e475cb7927bd0ed27e504ab1
71a312d2cb1477e6d6e0c5b3f2026b002b39ea8c
'2011-12-16T17:28:41-05:00'
describe
'19828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTJ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
e8dd498735863983125bff423713e0cf
58b6cfdf6643435fafab3a7fbf1b5db7af371e54
describe
'21046' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTK' 'sip-files00159.pro'
c11dd397faae7df66d0a0b8891610e57
34966cbd5326609f1a5bc6b84eb9675c3e86e62c
'2011-12-16T17:25:48-05:00'
describe
'20228' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTL' 'sip-files00160.pro'
55df89f124ce04df6acc0f75acc63aff
02662bb040a939cf114833dc64abbeea0f29bf33
describe
'19531' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTM' 'sip-files00161.pro'
299de633e0fb1fcaebf3dd7851104de7
0be091c1b49e56363287fd28580fb34735a5311c
'2011-12-16T17:28:08-05:00'
describe
'22741' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
cb5c1a985cc7f0c6533798217eef5b82
4ca85ccfc1a7675a1870985e6f0796def1a97841
'2011-12-16T17:29:55-05:00'
describe
'22381' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTO' 'sip-files00163.pro'
b55e740640c5e92af3e8524d44b780f7
7cd108ff62ce0106c82dbde81d9b5257c4b2fa63
'2011-12-16T17:25:34-05:00'
describe
'20714' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTP' 'sip-files00164.pro'
f38f6249549e151e78bea77156b68588
043f6350d5c5a2be53fbd58a434915a0c917e004
'2011-12-16T17:24:38-05:00'
describe
'22631' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
6cbb4a250183d2e3618837035a32fc88
8f9185a7f037195f26ae1094b5d38f900a3ccf68
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTR' 'sip-files00166.pro'
3febdd8b40d690b416dc233f61f7ecda
d72ee1482afd0ca1065d766c15de80e0e8836aac
'2011-12-16T17:25:38-05:00'
describe
'24126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
13c65006e0afd36df07f60bcde4c61ef
9e44a892ed6034d175074e4e38d264b9d58d7e94
'2011-12-16T17:26:41-05:00'
describe
'19698' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTT' 'sip-files00168.pro'
1faaacb872b2f1e9023f24ead1d4db6b
5c50b40407cb9a51083b1cbebb890c7ed233fa2c
describe
'23725' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTU' 'sip-files00169.pro'
4aa5470a5a370a1fe495920c0e27307c
1fedef5c6fd557b81fbb8dd083d93291f29ecfeb
describe
'23941' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTV' 'sip-files00170.pro'
d07522d97c81a2e2165fb8930e7cc47f
8720067ba09755ce03c4ff8ea2d8e376bf99ee98
describe
'17761' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTW' 'sip-files00171.pro'
27a5b9d8acabcfa0f5afe5c68d5a72cc
6a37d883333c4d99608a96611eec1abe9309c931
describe
'24337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTX' 'sip-files00172.pro'
cc3b713e4f3f17893a90c297ee873e37
c07f2c9b5c1f414ede3e710b8aa017c568126cb5
'2011-12-16T17:26:30-05:00'
describe
'25784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTY' 'sip-files00173.pro'
d55acd5da66462b58e2426088f6bd0e8
a7e40066a4cddd100f7ef1031baafd76763ee9cf
'2011-12-16T17:25:32-05:00'
describe
'24638' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVTZ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
7a795c16cdd8db01bec89b795ff62f69
5835dac223215afb1d1850c1d4bf91f455b25ca2
'2011-12-16T17:23:26-05:00'
describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUA' 'sip-files00175.pro'
2b0b24051ebd5062a06019b20cfc176a
d51c94748f90ca0e34bfabaa729146571be72220
describe
'18610' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUB' 'sip-files00176.pro'
8365675dff6300849d594fc5027ef9e3
8476ca942763388079ec19851937857a335389a8
'2011-12-16T17:26:22-05:00'
describe
'23931' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUC' 'sip-files00177.pro'
cb120a4caf4ab8f502c547ac290c95bf
be851fc88206c1d9a366d781ee3e68e97a129aad
describe
'23977' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
682d524b158da0d31216b7b8502fc124
cc995aa9d9833afcc5b5a2e9e6e4ee1c8b0cceb1
describe
'24929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUE' 'sip-files00179.pro'
ad0a29e4c9dbce2648e3bca46cae4ec9
6d8110b37620ed7c5f6c97c5403849d355dad29c
describe
'25842' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
996190eb0e9a0b6c3152a20d63a490cf
4b6b45a17537dffb15a3ca747746d192f03894c3
describe
'21095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUG' 'sip-files00181.pro'
bb42160c18ddb78032f3c00713bc2cc2
a51ed4636a88aae23b335c2f7e7353fec8abe2b4
'2011-12-16T17:25:46-05:00'
describe
'20835' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUH' 'sip-files00182.pro'
88fbb1904a75ddfcfadde48269eccbbb
7e196bb27fc84949bddc94a2af22c9eaf50e6f3d
describe
'25161' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUI' 'sip-files00183.pro'
769ce188bcd61904413309904b71f2a8
9be97377d9edd0f67d0712fba872d3938e75e536
describe
'23242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUJ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
a225db7a9033008fc8435cf1b28757f9
3974f4e8d4b82d9dcf503fffc07df16cb7711a77
describe
'15900' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUK' 'sip-files00185.pro'
56505f8b69b2a4b74140501dbd38b4be
5d8eee4a15b8019d6518a274680be4ef622c0ee7
'2011-12-16T17:25:21-05:00'
describe
'679' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUL' 'sip-files00186.pro'
578988f0df9a7ec03f09909658e98c74
43542385bf236a1291756a366e6e375e3660daf1
describe
'12633' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUM' 'sip-files00188.pro'
fdddce497ef0af54241c0d3944d38e06
ebb156e76ca717b9cbe0de0290b45db7b9d30af9
describe
'26484' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUN' 'sip-files00189.pro'
fcc4a5493e1419255b0b4372f0a7fc44
b27a5503773a20617ee388de85e03a52a7974566
describe
'28740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUO' 'sip-files00190.pro'
e48de23ed3bf7e98a04d024040a3f348
33426cd6deb5d71c30bdad5a11cebaa6918f89bc
describe
'27680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUP' 'sip-files00191.pro'
35dcaf9bf3ac38b453f415458a6206a4
4dbf9a155ef277b43a287170df4433530f9cabb4
'2011-12-16T17:24:52-05:00'
describe
'28152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUQ' 'sip-files00192.pro'
1a1dc87ce63a37dbe6c42561cedbd740
903dc0ef9626da4ccbb0de0f3555da3063279c14
'2011-12-16T17:23:59-05:00'
describe
'28510' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUR' 'sip-files00193.pro'
a1d600a47c79d9284353f5d0e1982f1a
febf51cd5b0237da82b8243f9d705480f5e8ab83
describe
'28365' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUS' 'sip-files00194.pro'
ffff3cafadea56dbcd6b95737d66ceb1
cbe7ecdfa4fc10653dd8a0b160b41559175d6d7b
'2011-12-16T17:23:40-05:00'
describe
'27445' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUT' 'sip-files00195.pro'
7e7b569c43b63becee581c040b378ea6
967597ae49bd7ab98b746f6c05fbf4eeddc8f758
describe
'26953' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUU' 'sip-files00196.pro'
e70bcd3c764cfd83ec63342e1f91d3e7
caab129f86e53f05a15ff0763cf29e995c7d805b
describe
'28140' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUV' 'sip-files00197.pro'
3c692ce1cbd263180895aa87eafac684
250f644e4ea2e09864fe1dd7b5fb207e83801432
describe
'25984' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUW' 'sip-files00198.pro'
e7dc0a672c164f9551e932c4171b2316
d114f6fa5f7029d7229bc089e8eeea21d27feb87
'2011-12-16T17:25:57-05:00'
describe
'27804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUX' 'sip-files00199.pro'
231e1317ac9e0ab33c7c376773558ddc
c2227294971a76d2c95312a9a4aa12d38fa98a7d
'2011-12-16T17:26:25-05:00'
describe
'28828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUY' 'sip-files00200.pro'
98effbefe75a9ff7b2911b5fdf4c0631
81cf6cc42ae1ff61d855f3ae4db373c016e213b7
describe
'26831' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVUZ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
6e56e2d52e548cc3f9b263d7a1e4035a
e7497d6fa023ab55f40ecaeb1638f28f4da41e30
describe
'24886' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVA' 'sip-files00202.pro'
b60c9cb9d50ae558dc9073e4b2f3cf69
443e5d7c30fdfe027d2732540be14e97f4c48158
'2011-12-16T17:25:36-05:00'
describe
'26630' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVB' 'sip-files00203.pro'
b0419f76c10f22356d0f15793c6a3068
2ab45d445bd77cf38ceeef97208228dc62bab95b
'2011-12-16T17:25:30-05:00'
describe
'27333' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVC' 'sip-files00204.pro'
be4c28a9183d86f6e891633e966a4a7d
0f699fb7c7a55e4ef9366d5b5898446eb8c29e6f
'2011-12-16T17:30:09-05:00'
describe
'27994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVD' 'sip-files00205.pro'
f7a13ae86980955829bf89b62cdee11c
b6e62cacfb11c4f59cf207a4030e8e8aea8e7afb
describe
'12818' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVE' 'sip-files00206.pro'
d78747857b69ea0dde6f5ff5c2a2b545
905eaf5dc23da36c2733cf54ef511bd18f0f2d12
'2011-12-16T17:23:39-05:00'
describe
'754342' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVF' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
33de778bb764f40c24cbfe03cac353e2
1de492f4e28696f4a3a1a8319dc5c9868773fe0d
'2011-12-16T17:27:28-05:00'
describe
'658266' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVG' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c475d6563930da599be8c8911802363d
9a9a981b0ff0aabef3eeec3e4d6f57260314f8cf
'2011-12-16T17:25:10-05:00'
describe
'714767' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVH' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
45946b286a34288c2e09ffae4ae9c141
ecc159a1462d8dc0b697950f4faa4f7ebd560b7a
describe
'654040' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
469e2aface49b69e26cb22214e216bc0
9fa5b4f7184a554c6c141edba87033025f1e67cf
describe
'673834' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVJ' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f8a638372c151f7e012435a5cd0771fc
11ed374638977d30c5b7b4a69a8ba043b61341e7
'2011-12-16T17:24:12-05:00'
describe
'658373' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVK' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
9336b30e7f46cc9c345e3bf8f0ef702d
3e8f8ce35f49ecf6f6d947e87b86bb2e7e78d6a0
'2011-12-16T17:27:53-05:00'
describe
'682626' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVL' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f364e856fc23a9294c09b65eb5c07a45
03c0300582c50027ab8c985e3dc9f21007c63899
describe
'708928' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
e6eba17139dbfa0706f3d7e286ab32f6
aeeaf049dfd471cd3d3793f6b05b943dbfc16788
'2011-12-16T17:29:28-05:00'
describe
'700321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVN' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d8c0c271134de77dc64a1b25e183ccac
6d1caaec128a39bb5897ce94648bdcf4d826e222
describe
'700826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVO' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
29e8dcf21ac1a2159d1500d6d719317a
2f9977d2a864d81d997873d1d40a27c57ea8eb71
'2011-12-16T17:28:24-05:00'
describe
'701036' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVP' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e1dc727e8aa47a1d54c9fce3f0d75494
835550600557cd2df6e75272040d06481eb9e90a
describe
'710950' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVQ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
a2ff3718472e25e63d063925406f6a1d
895dd2f2371ae8589002db722a69b7f738b5ed48
'2011-12-16T17:28:04-05:00'
describe
'691020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b2667141acd4516a1c011f762542af90
dba814f9a5d848410fbe3d68a705e590de0175b1
'2011-12-16T17:25:42-05:00'
describe
'698252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
33e46ee10469b923afab191edb1e3a58
4c288a3baea0689838dc80dc9331980bf218dffd
describe
'702586' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e20b4c418c59947743cf5f83bc672ccc
ae7e0bfb666f9f36f04b3343926bb2260dc426e2
'2011-12-16T17:26:05-05:00'
describe
'714664' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
8539bf3f7dc0728ddb4bcd91b64efd33
d9c12e18bedc5e17f401ff7c18aec458bf6a3165
'2011-12-16T17:25:19-05:00'
describe
'1140332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
3d9a51ecf5a7a0c956f1440b94443868
5383a9e5172dbb380ad27edcfc9eeeb3d0d38d30
describe
'1174768' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVW' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
bdb7336963b4d8c68d58bbaed67744db
483d598016bdceab555071ef9ff7b7535bb1daf7
describe
'714572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
3985a68ea4b0f4b3a34a84615f7fa586
e0b4ad69d2e91c248b2a643db1eaabcd320d517e
describe
'705201' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVY' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
b9598ac28f9ffea2254f093df2896e5a
1263c44e01906466210e8617d1fdc78fe51c7f0a
describe
'696439' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVVZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
bd366dc6edc96634ef105eff03377014
dde99d3a6af0112b314788a85d6758184e8fc58c
'2011-12-16T17:25:00-05:00'
describe
'701695' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWA' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
cc143f366066db533c2e7b91d3966480
5f40558164f98d24942b97afc81192d83d77da75
'2011-12-16T17:29:50-05:00'
describe
'691550' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWB' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d2fed9b14ac48845ff7a9e0653b50b65
3b0427fc7ea85d38b03d0e680ebb80127338865f
describe
'718755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWC' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
329e1932abf502401365a3187ccc3f67
e36a3699af8351f2b17adf5d3416523bd75d76f1
'2011-12-16T17:27:06-05:00'
describe
'692096' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWD' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
9b0b484bb6605d32df043b7f186fb070
2a2f84047a378da54a54e824b7626bca09d140e7
'2011-12-16T17:28:46-05:00'
describe
'684396' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
d54a7d15a5d372225127d3f66be2297f
31913be07bbfe756a1b2b9c19aed113309c041cf
'2011-12-16T17:29:39-05:00'
describe
'664665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
5731f861f156c7df37426626d0e78d4f
95c099968ef6851a645cb4a19237a682141962bd
describe
'698046' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWG' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
cbef0af514fc2e90557631d88fe679a7
19245729628f136de2581adcd65b767f26515210
'2011-12-16T17:23:36-05:00'
describe
'672210' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
c84092cfff5f630b201f04ea51785814
86449a93ce8ed1b3f4729bd883ad60d322ba54d4
describe
'702601' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a1d261d2ab3407ccf4e613aa76d97e2f
a441ef5f8b2552181ad6e4f650a31cb501a24380
'2011-12-16T17:23:50-05:00'
describe
'662985' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWJ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
47420d8cfe87297f29930f33d8f9c364
85c96fc19c98f67d9d068aef7822daf6aad1e8ed
describe
'708962' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWK' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
8e6f6c9309790d2c27080a1ecac2fb96
69865389a834ba119a00ecb7e811e2a3817161cc
'2011-12-16T17:25:11-05:00'
describe
'699485' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWL' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
487c8f3d23be114dab9d50c5d8c31f19
91c24484edfffcacfaea15c19dea2ad53611304b
describe
'698503' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
a8bb60d28baecf2b9d9c2e2ae3fa7886
a35cdf9c2fad1623b03b162d627eb77b7ab3365b
'2011-12-16T17:28:03-05:00'
describe
'707772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWN' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
738b18a3254d32dba8aaba4f4d23d233
23a93602b45b1c6b9274c1e62bf33d2a7a49ae85
describe
'702085' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWO' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
b0639bc8cd0f853f71b2ae729ec32c22
10acd39ff0e010d8bbd6a19bae887b77a3d42d8d
'2011-12-16T17:28:15-05:00'
describe
'705689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWP' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
f9b4540eeaadb14e038d9568dcff577d
1f6cc1c3c7f6b90acce655c1580ef642f5155c21
'2011-12-16T17:27:21-05:00'
describe
'703029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWQ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1765d6dd6061571ca429714509c4df73
39a31439bee2e8f4e2fd127247dd0cb17f1e8c2e
describe
'677088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
510e77efe6195b1992a092bff64e615c
8d7dda066ee35e384cf460c32fbce4f2a8e78a6c
'2011-12-16T17:30:16-05:00'
describe
'701544' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWS' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
14ee42ec376cd1289ec76440a223fc7c
4dab18e372e7df844c4faf8b49a275603e0f0c1d
describe
'679994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWT' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e68dceeb1ccead66a499d2c3cded7be1
a0d4dee775757bf8ef4bef5225594f876bc2c3f8
describe
'697712' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
36138df0d00dca08676f394094f7283e
627a1ae5291b8ccc70631584a8f395313026b178
describe
'670214' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ac54c17ffb1ed2ef3d0557f05bacebb0
0c32d7c5f4bcbf7b2c69e68c0ea2f24b479d8abd
describe
'714613' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWW' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
eb7bef9869e75ef9de7b4fe1ae06fc2a
d50a199ed5826143f24f79b509a31eccf8da10b4
'2011-12-16T17:28:38-05:00'
describe
'689507' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWX' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
7aa81e0c44a95481af5625e238e2c4a3
96685784dd255d18c2168f07ee4686ce43514483
'2011-12-16T17:23:46-05:00'
describe
'693645' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWY' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
533c3b5c1acb3d8a302f96942381c7ca
06983e2d2accbca66e76fdc64c667b18d56d3f50
describe
'668842' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVWZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
b479b969852b53fd3736f4004623dba8
38ae10a7ff91e1e707a456544f5b047faba7ba80
describe
'720814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXA' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
caaeb2d8d84da86867d7c10e19cadcd7
e4645eab810c156dfcb89b0c8f27b0e2e800d59e
'2011-12-16T17:25:45-05:00'
describe
'675303' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXB' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8688e2365a7a31678ba3fe488250a0c3
8de01dff7100db2cf01a0ef19c0e3362bfd2e57b
'2011-12-16T17:25:29-05:00'
describe
'718144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXC' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
92c3a8547e2f731a30f5f254fee0772f
5fdc5c2834227b415e6f64c48b2ac212d215d14f
'2011-12-16T17:24:34-05:00'
describe
'688456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXD' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5b6f3da0567c0f6dd41f2795ccf508d4
33dad2d441116c502526e358480fbde521bef902
describe
'693223' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
afcd44012c96ff44b84727c15c864153
a353bac0b77696c1e4b1ee0f03dd1e54a41fe5d6
describe
'692454' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXF' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
16cc2c27e4cc99ec642e3a9b7b6aed3f
61845e9b12d92ebc7f4a4d3c5a7346df80f07123
describe
'706927' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXG' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f73f02c93b3a9b44e0a52d0965cc9174
de1816abcdda2e1101a877653ce8aae5e8718f7e
describe
'687966' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXH' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ff5f5cc5171c465b1002f18379837a44
f272cca17e8e6a28d1b7dd08c5b06df316095967
describe
'706938' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXI' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f75f2c18ec18eb8dcc407506678fe116
0e82df39f595afc33ceaa6dc0203d91dd39d2071
'2011-12-16T17:25:47-05:00'
describe
'677630' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a982bb076fd5e032a0c79de21b9f882b
70ed6aa26f15e0839111ac2d6e28d5fb5835d294
describe
'714061' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXK' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a64e737de60fe1b17c634e7982dc1ea2
31c9730c5104f4c47701e9d9521289a8bb089420
'2011-12-16T17:24:48-05:00'
describe
'694179' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXL' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
9095e30341cad2964957962385687a57
e8340dbd4655bcd1ba436f8cdc081b5bd9cdaf93
'2011-12-16T17:24:51-05:00'
describe
'715705' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
8dbe4025fa8d9d0a99d02f2689640ebe
5d5e03299b37f8d8615f19873cfd273f30538e81
describe
'685811' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXN' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
672c1eb0fecc2dce426a6a0238bf1700
68586b03defaeb7d5130b0e0834e65dc77080388
'2011-12-16T17:25:02-05:00'
describe
'685889' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXO' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
01cff1ede9ba9a0fd37accff9b88cfaa
35fe2f3226978cef4489244e890480462a8fdcd7
describe
'578403' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXP' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ced895ef069183dbf28ed69215afbebe
c878397196485952739dba90381006cfd78e3278
describe
'711418' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXQ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4733b7f4ce076a39d980d5e0763be538
c6595f969b9dd04c3e99e2daa11736f6231f27da
describe
'710306' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXR' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
049d0e43d383290cea650de3b21b2490
823af2786c327da20507a24d35b9859c38b3f52f
describe
'695634' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXS' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
b563266e27141b49944186dec8129417
33aed98b2f8e22f8047867bb96e6d1e993157cc8
'2011-12-16T17:24:02-05:00'
describe
'684940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXT' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
3de31b0f4fa566381705428d1af5d0c7
5aefea6902588f931a1dc65ad369c351d7e01c59
describe
'704659' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
5878dd3a9914b8e5fb2f9811e3a226bc
63fea59d6a10957307d9fb8eb2a029e6ed7aaa22
describe
'702606' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
cdb9626852d0fbbd9cba3c0af9798c03
cb2d7fc1a4e644bcdd8d9ba0ab1c5cb52f896c11
describe
'696986' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXW' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
75fea9948e72affb2295a08219960ad3
2aaf33833e969f263d2f36420be04d6bde434901
describe
'686345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXX' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
bd8bc6f6c8080cfc7f1fec38dc1f13c4
d7d81b3faba341006bff6c8a453369c6fdd9ef61
describe
'706219' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
bfac92e6b64f844b68f4fd84e877fd70
d95f3855c3b10a92c0a7e79d9e7098bb126cb566
describe
'657838' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVXZ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6c41a3ebb7f2126daefa9efe2e301f06
0dd975aa1157738a82d11b96fd231f524f0f3595
describe
'713098' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYA' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
838bcf932f1f950ab7566c0d61348b2b
c9eab08c67a423f7c81263d555bc3fa97bb42b80
describe
'678452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
8e9397fae5423c8f3863c52d9fafcf4c
a11a9b6cea6e1f99bb30e361a52a299c30f9c0bf
'2011-12-16T17:26:04-05:00'
describe
'709851' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
381a58d0553751bd40ada74022dcc590
a4f8c6aedf5bd5a07eff799031e9112b183ec617
describe
'682397' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYD' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c8c65a077474fd344fbb3076601ece7b
3a9cfa8a3a0bfeac2e4a34ee62c8698ab70d40d1
describe
'686321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYE' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b7c3926cb5206ba23dab46c3aa0305bc
1044ba70dec544064d030f39676616e25e7fb276
describe
'565211' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYF' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
4f7f3b0db5a676e67245c4bb07b68e91
7344727864b31891c22c4d9992ccf1b82c3e95aa
describe
'709412' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
34202a240dcb0c7b80426682a30b604e
03d219615a76bf63abfc3acc9d73304222979b77
'2011-12-16T17:28:51-05:00'
describe
'171787' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9a7267fb3bf5659405637b451299402c
c645ff7e06745fb90a6169e71e50e8dd76f6bb32
describe
'178755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYI' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d9b705979e97b0a0327c03555912eafb
6557ea274a6aa3e862e6d9910feee329ee3298b2
describe
'171404' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYJ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d60761d7d945b1bc28f8c85cb5b68b5e
b148d5652d301f3e2ad18c97f2699585b31d46a9
'2011-12-16T17:25:16-05:00'
describe
'176325' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYK' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b6deacbcbd16ec6aadf0d6538c169e35
5dcb506e83986170d27e4782cee3bf037a7a11c6
describe
'170378' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6edc967c9fa991a04d54397a47d9f884
a8dc8b2de033cf282a85271de874c89890c48538
describe
'177919' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYM' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4cd09217934d507890dfb97bf1be4d40
87685726fce40345ef08de76dcca182858d68a8a
'2011-12-16T17:30:00-05:00'
describe
'171447' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYN' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
8ba82c022e96d5c052536593cd099ef8
bd827f8420c5ead9446afc1fd4712077bf916db2
describe
'171427' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d7748dd480ed2b973998cfcc57c052cb
dd5166bd030949ecedaa0d64d6969e86ec0a3eb0
'2011-12-16T17:24:09-05:00'
describe
'170063' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYP' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
02eaea5165bb3011210658a1436978b4
2436b642c59aeaa573de3c3ceccd2be11141ca18
'2011-12-16T17:25:04-05:00'
describe
'171063' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYQ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f1301a3da7c7e2f9a2ea026c670cc127
f063bb2c78dde4d344aa70a98c7916b3076adb9f
describe
'169136' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYR' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
c1bf3044763d9b60280e28858758d685
09288c764e80e62c51d67fd49800530d799455a5
describe
'174252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYS' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
782829e0ad95cb78470e84fd471f496b
2e23cd7cf3a46938992b8368a61d2de3e44647fc
describe
'172156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYT' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8da3411dc7e95ac354b629e5866328f1
0a725f684257edf09be39fd30f9ccd27caf1fbef
describe
'173209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2d6b6222f777c673cc2b04840ddace4d
4c73b1acccdf6bb3e6a866eb04de18eb07147975
describe
'695967' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYV' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
03c939c3878d78fab7327ba84f1f2a96
43a7023214c141a20d1df17b21bcbc28843334b4
describe
'185428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
7d021343b9a9fb1517461dda03e1cd3c
e9ead56f561f0cdd7ba71e458f721f0ac631283f
describe
'44947' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYX' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
237dc04c35d9e852b83c393a79e5b59b
038edc950628709089ebd587848d09477f81d0df
'2011-12-16T17:29:51-05:00'
describe
'43727' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYY' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
07c988fa820f19f4783bd58ecede07c5
51c5bb25b352ae77c270a0867f72c4e40c04de76
'2011-12-16T17:28:26-05:00'
describe
'43619' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVYZ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
293a9e4d2c3a5fd467559522d66e8b1a
3db48ba78dc215e811828c5e3be5003348c92874
describe
'42491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZA' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f0588ce316062c019349f776f5bb40b9
6706cc9ac7c6d0cb7fc59378f1c5e286e1df1700
describe
'43222' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZB' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
84669c137c8710623c1cfe2f4c8f0baa
912d2b7293ad997ce21ef8e137f83ee97f8acec2
describe
'42307' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZC' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
35e48b84dd3ad43f18cca406dc2491c6
74f08d12522a42d423a17b7ebf03f38303daee20
describe
'42504' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
c77ea6ac6c8b3d2b988d10b1117254c6
dc2dd670b9a232528b5512d34baa91fe6369b091
'2011-12-16T17:29:26-05:00'
describe
'43321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZE' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
950a47809ac77f19c7cfe74cdd42ff57
023fee9c7db813b6ec9e1d0cbbc6822c099f5fad
describe
'39654' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZF' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
61b948f60908d5d3b5bc3811c9fe558a
2e830c3ac8aa4c569caaba20a85e3672cbe0e9be
describe
'44135' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZG' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
ccc3dfffe6283f76afe0873134824447
e4d7b4f8a972135c98b26fb25bd6d1ae227d2989
'2011-12-16T17:25:03-05:00'
describe
'41066' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZH' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e811d45c710efcb296d15f71777d8954
8f8dddf266ce5dcb969c6e3e134b9297e36b4c90
'2011-12-16T17:24:04-05:00'
describe
'44034' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZI' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
44d9a81a1111996c59b3035d28051126
8872969f38c1c8c27611d716d8bdbba6aff32412
describe
'40805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
dda9449899d9bd68c7beebac8280777d
cd59ca30f4a75453555c39cbcf3bdfa5b0922b52
describe
'42681' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZK' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5c08b08afa4ad15066336041ca76f19e
a8376d0879f1e34bbaaf8a30256dfb5ab8914114
'2011-12-16T17:28:34-05:00'
describe
'42150' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZL' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
10eeb29fd1872154eadc61dab058a424
ea3918ad71f92d6f458f8020caf55e6bbf789ff8
describe
'43297' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a04fbf6e4b75d901edf304152688d2ba
7415c2e0c8a1ce905e52e98ffe81101f1fde1284
describe
'41868' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bfe6e8cb3e068c30667d7ec2b39839b8
b8972bc6a739dc041c188c3424e6758d9f2cacb4
describe
'42137' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZO' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
3a086fd3a758036ff04311a55da4b282
0512a2d9e62e299054cd266c4e8446512fa689f0
'2011-12-16T17:29:19-05:00'
describe
'41894' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZP' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
7d04690ef51d6db79347454dec281957
8bf65a45e5d4c3a763c65e9865dbf9bb2f0edb6f
'2011-12-16T17:25:50-05:00'
describe
'37410' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b3657f56b3d05ab4f9c784cdadfaecea
47cd6e2868e02907ff025417a9bc158ef21ba160
'2011-12-16T17:28:52-05:00'
describe
'41761' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZR' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
2073458eff84a59669d3bb1577186155
d012d9ec35b8a9e18eaaa66395afba5431cc43e0
'2011-12-16T17:23:23-05:00'
describe
'41568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZS' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
a88b2400f2c3f0131f001ddc26101e19
5bf891b20aa7bed52253127db4f48ce0f30484f3
describe
'41497' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZT' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
beab7448b5cc57110d07754cd1b927ac
2fa291b0f46e7a9dfecf1177da5659d77043679f
describe
'44669' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZU' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
3d3fd972eec012138c54c8e6fdde003e
fe99dbce568e5dd4d88075e6cf50ae2ad7b4ae6b
describe
'43507' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZV' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
65f96d49a69203f1deeae278c3be15f6
d32e5a59d9e43f8d3d74de2d71cf9b53b5cfefa6
describe
'42723' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZW' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
fd2de93afef25bc86aaa0c89b086be07
39904c091025fdfb82a5a7b60e5c411e84937f14
describe
'42256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZX' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
7a8f8de63e21ee398256ee2e695675d9
b9fd03cbe3f80db03f16557e65c8bc9f9da0c22f
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZY' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c2884e3fd3789e01f00bbcc38257d5ea
c05799803c139b0ead0e211b2792b7f59d2eb205
describe
'37954' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABVZZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
a66a1d109e4083337655546a3c5b3ecf
d11bc0e891d679141744e67e08a097f361d71f14
'2011-12-16T17:28:33-05:00'
describe
'43626' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAA' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e359a58dff97816251afde99036b138f
f25888014e978e71145fa8463e348627a7b65dcb
describe
'41862' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAB' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1fb439f447a67656692892472f0ff71c
6e3f31331e0e14488b2d7d2dff3c281b4b1c68e8
describe
'38991' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAC' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
52a46fb5664d5dc27661d8b6e0b73c01
b8d3d5feb74b4ec5b987f12d3db36053175afd85
'2011-12-16T17:30:31-05:00'
describe
'41251' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
11acf44a925c03db1dc63bcc5b78584d
06fced294db53ad32dfe4f63a632271d81df175d
'2011-12-16T17:27:13-05:00'
describe
'40283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAE' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
512c1d7fff9d2fb0340071cf30a476f9
7b0c20079dbecf4cd8d0a1d426c4680c5aef0c77
describe
'42819' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
acc5d37ff739eef89bffb16ee2e33fc2
4d9f2234c33df2f4c225c8f598cb27b10c0f214a
describe
'39262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAG' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1ea51ac41c20447ca69da61ed96e2833
343e02ab14fe7f78f70ceecc29f952534e5129d6
describe
'45434' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAH' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
7fb72ddb92a4f81322be477bfcf783c8
3c7e3ec21c90a0c91a4ea316c13a0a07b8e01c1b
describe
'43846' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAI' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
2454c5880b9f2fcbddf084a992cce547
f9696b776c3e71da4dad3942a7bfd6fdf5629acd
describe
'44878' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5790674930f90f7bd23611c1d0634ddd
5acacdd21169b22711c3a0a6a5cf7b7f6450b4e4
describe
'44159' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAK' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
f77fe4cbdc57eece7be1ed16c4e176ef
2c0c669125373e2973c73529d767775b178fb3d4
describe
'43378' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
83e04f426b7c6edafc4017a51c8e69eb
956d3153ffb32991cb1aaaff7a55bcb01ad56c05
describe
'42827' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAM' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
57782f9e3bec469051fedace1d7e8c4e
c23cc9b3efd58c9bd9574025778ff8345eb3cd11
describe
'43177' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAN' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
d6d85292d60c36d4b3fc965b6c5217dc
6aefa1673add18e81ae32314d0592568f17d0dc7
describe
'44647' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
1a7074e2691be21ddc1eb674fe50248d
95a5e6121137b5939b86a112dc0c97f2b6d12b94
'2011-12-16T17:23:51-05:00'
describe
'41964' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAP' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5d16a22d9123f1a982191a56d59529db
cfa0095e93014806b6cfa547091ab9b23f8f67cc
describe
'43867' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAQ' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
ccb07a225c1ac82315d52cd6b7ac1267
e82dedb5a1c1e3df7d7443fe956b61eca641dbf5
'2011-12-16T17:24:23-05:00'
describe
'42676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAR' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
97594b7c164b3bf1b9d5b3ae9c2c5a74
d5756ccbcef94c9818133dfdb9c58767ed6500a8
'2011-12-16T17:29:13-05:00'
describe
'43611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAS' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
1c52d9039e6143953399baec5f6a3e4c
92586cfaa9e844248369e1654d597dc13d31a7c9
describe
'43700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAT' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
2a6562062b9bd7e84c3a3b2d357fc213
d71d5ac211466b5b7292c4284ec19831c5451071
describe
'42808' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAU' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
585e222033715db7b11c0beb7105b135
34200673f491d45e842bd319b02584c66d0e41d2
'2011-12-16T17:29:01-05:00'
describe
'42019' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAV' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
3829eca10631ee78c26a7a48771186f4
27f43706811dbdf37230c7b118e200b539c2582f
describe
'41694' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAW' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
54565089a1d6aa7238826e3f30547151
510cb53dccc49e2231274efcd503c780bbb776a7
describe
'41826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAX' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
d83f4e6bf9950a208b504330077dd3a8
cc62dca4ab4f27d64f7a3ab7f6358edea2b8ad33
'2011-12-16T17:24:57-05:00'
describe
'42346' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAY' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
597141e5c7395f13d3e0281056cabf2d
a9adc4ec482530d1d82fd410ee2966fabf25e588
'2011-12-16T17:29:03-05:00'
describe
'42231' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWAZ' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
d65de5cddfc90d821576df75801c756c
f2a4f47473fdcaf19f00a2862dfd8a526ba6bed6
'2011-12-16T17:28:36-05:00'
describe
'42512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBA' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
93c77357c80b7488561dc68a753e11eb
74a806fdb5e84c702741725ba0aa3ea44aded4d2
describe
'41884' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBB' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
2657d741f1fa95ffc297667e88de8d6f
7579db112907c4247702feea27807cca76be0979
describe
'40378' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBC' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
67ba439e3364262680f235670fcf29f2
d7afdc5928ce11bbb35fc7205e83584f3486434b
'2011-12-16T17:27:03-05:00'
describe
'41143' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBD' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
1ecc41a5a10bc3ad0d5ec02d4fa5e57b
b8a516b3f6169a5c556f3295c36f788c78af77ba
describe
'43830' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBE' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
19620b3c6cefafc89ffe7877dad476df
7aeb3e6e61017f94525227f7303d0ff135370ac7
describe
'41657' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
27ce19452095eab8177a8475bedeaab0
e8625a03f41e81bc4a8f68ddcf8d083ad33f9bcf
describe
'40676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBG' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
e2d9d0f748cbec4d6c5ace076b88cba1
717b907e0863acb15f9f63801dfe47a6f33314d7
'2011-12-16T17:28:40-05:00'
describe
'43674' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBH' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
b5106f034ec2be09e7f95c20b289b63b
a031ac0608595012fa5e4d35e656632ce4476193
describe
'44572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBI' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
c76424e06f4fe61e4a5263ee430991aa
af0338f81ff076eeb5264bfcc3f2aaaf4428fb3c
describe
'43465' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBJ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
56f3e6242f1f556f242bdff647f235fe
33754c382d509a502102083381c416fcbecfc47a
describe
'43745' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBK' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
fac4b1c9f20e7b294e5fbf08721b7d0d
1fe330d91530938a3434dc89d8f4b4355656b67f
describe
'43605' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBL' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
ea46b5bdba1279b1a8e10b03b24f968d
1ad2d8480c853870c704b9a4f86c8a59f7b0393a
describe
'43389' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
7d3f73b62c8f951fb3f11697beb23c4d
3abe64008ad3bca87e1172c2b46f0692a667f971
describe
'41833' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBN' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
ebbaa2b19f748eff5bf2a05d6c6e0ab1
e66a70dff168e31436f5bb499da28c9246d1e064
describe
'42536' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBO' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
0b3028e39f858adf50e103073b353c27
7df6e354ae3626695e345f6e4a4dd90be20b4741
describe
'42449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBP' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
b5172b8a2341e982b4b67f72e2705fb0
395a6d3186fd330762814db814e3d5b04eced36f
describe
'43148' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBQ' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
7086dd700bf959df18e6c1657198336b
f919463c03c5942595668771fdaf92f08529ae7e
describe
'41527' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBR' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
02efc1247973717395ff76d49b77cc12
ad301f8c7ceae436ded67745dffb2bcfd470dd64
'2011-12-16T17:25:33-05:00'
describe
'42275' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBS' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
57d09a0ac727893528c6bef44e10fc79
e4d407855c68addf65e5d80cda6e6a6976c73f79
describe
'40893' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBT' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
32aec9622da977619ba7e0d4a568295a
ef237d8cb4ccf880f32bdb3d93843246b91ac796
describe
'41125' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBU' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
248c5258df3a769c7d54e9d413dbc7af
0bcab798dce0456be5161707731acf4c90d700ef
describe
'42792' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBV' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
ebcd27bd0a22f34b18dc9b3942a1df7a
51dcf830d94ad1e7cd0ec35b229cbfd4bfa14a1d
describe
'43193' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBW' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
ebf7fef88ff82d3efa521be52c881569
98e23f878628ed85af668d12acba4dadd9a7ca85
describe
'42936' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBX' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
2baa533da03cd0908a352e0f0eff0073
fb61890622c2ce3f4debacee87ff9fab69988d15
describe
'42311' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBY' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
6bc6894b0630bf68f7fa22a6dc28e5e5
33ef79b2170ee189a87b6c8dbb0bdf0e455cf57d
describe
'182029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWBZ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
79b4d5298ac3fa0365337551acaf6c7d
856d16eb84b1258e2956ecb2d543b13e7a2825bc
describe
'181551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCA' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
600d6efeccc8727135cf5289f89fd2f8
ed5f416f4d750e2a3bdcdaaa102de875f453a305
describe
'177813' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCB' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
766a2df57131200f699fa19acb0da8a9
55092580314101a3e4566cd2a76a0a58a1f48ed7
describe
'179405' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCC' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
3784e4bfa1567e30b0b9ecd91f310dfc
4367d75411345409e78f5ee2c7a1284d1ac19bbb
describe
'181091' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCD' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
9f933e39835bd1a903084aaa224cbf5f
cbb0f1bbac86c642545a8c5f42c8f6ec6c6c78b6
'2011-12-16T17:24:00-05:00'
describe
'181085' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCE' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
e52a6070a1dfd002502b978dab377c1d
b72cc6599ec70ced71b7d537f66c87ec1f841931
describe
'179059' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCF' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
a27817a9ef1f54ec70e3976c7aaa1f85
37d74128cd86a988bbe8b988262b3bf0412ff72f
describe
'181142' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCG' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
b51449ab3a981586d6c355e205aab7be
b9ae9bf1b0f4e5919263a743622af2b3559cdb01
describe
'185844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCH' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
ce9c238e491ba9207217b7c8fb9d2a1b
e5a0a319f9afa01ad8d63c3136a70e15441a72f1
'2011-12-16T17:29:40-05:00'
describe
'167457' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCI' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b2c21070b54cf92e3f67e68093bd46f5
60e89e58fda37d110842c1896fc4d16d7db7903e
'2011-12-16T17:25:15-05:00'
describe
'182258' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCJ' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
2d963551de3d0079e5895ae1c5fc0000
0fb9fc68d54e0fcc9793aec95bbc417c604d2fde
describe
'183483' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCK' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
c469b21621e6b573feb7b043a71a3f84
0f6246df263bb05f1f758497746b051f29fa01ee
describe
'181125' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCL' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
a2a133f79c605ab5ccdf04da69cbec21
2ec9559ec5aae4cf34cf665254d54fbf8223bb69
describe
'169400' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCM' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
d54a615516fce7c63436943f66640459
b8cc8091d879904a718eaa72f4880a7b24f69803
describe
'181676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCN' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
32b943c4f9a2c467a6c19eb2b73af225
c5e156f5fae15dc3739853469d21911b07faff64
describe
'183114' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCO' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2d1625cb13828d0e7eee4dfcc697a661
224d1642d305bba3912d38a270e0ff44a5e1824f
describe
'184701' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCP' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
026a00e90a07f94167fa76d49d68c507
3f83a92b335b4a1c8aaf160b4d756dded1983b01
'2011-12-16T17:25:25-05:00'
describe
'188871' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCQ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
d049266be003b0c432d2758ccc877512
5be4b7bfaf716d5d286a5e4e323b725b369a6ec8
'2011-12-16T17:23:34-05:00'
describe
'776079' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCR' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
bda0b05cfcb65e0dbcfefa7b4aaa0ee2
813f82680aeb446a121c30d35da5ae8ce4a37fc4
describe
'756845' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCS' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
60d20858909f48ed21095adfd5385664
59b7094a6c9f44a9176268675c77a529a2a15198
'2011-12-16T17:29:24-05:00'
describe
'117248' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCT' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
17bbe9322054c5ab38cc5f1c04db4008
30807ba288270afc1201e5bd14a5e216d31dc924
'2011-12-16T17:24:43-05:00'
describe
'18114824' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCU' 'sip-files00001.tif'
99f72364867e46dd10648f27e6e994e9
1d4001201ed49ea878734c611b7f3427e6b89693
describe
'15806780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCV' 'sip-files00002.tif'
d38b44c88c6614d73d42acb53b36f1e0
3459cb018e90111280d5d359513db4bc087f31dc
'2011-12-16T17:24:36-05:00'
describe
'5729568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCW' 'sip-files00003.tif'
11a78fd04c7e98d7a9893fb144b12949
84b41876b933ec51de6c2e297b08d7661ae36c0e
describe
'5242304' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCX' 'sip-files00008.tif'
4c4dacabc9c0d66f2fc13296b6a5c367
5010db771cb611ad4fc1d9862e7ca4acea991148
'2011-12-16T17:25:41-05:00'
describe
'16182016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
79077a459ef88c5666ea6aafe6e2f3b4
4809488e628124f2c5c2b215c29b463bd0c3ce07
'2011-12-16T17:30:15-05:00'
describe
'5277048' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWCZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
f36eeb30e19050a3b8e066779219a73e
e64ac99b3a76155c80438192247ba805536cc111
'2011-12-16T17:25:49-05:00'
describe
'5637056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDA' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3b6f67195f2eee1411cb848d9d06db26
73a262c72826f9be7e529ca32c9667e94027a24f
describe
'5679976' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
3b5e0a68a5090943c48af510b9fd405e
b5afba7dfa14b16e409800a66672d90e28ea06c1
'2011-12-16T17:24:16-05:00'
describe
'5610520' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDC' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7f4d276cdfb223b4b5e3350b8eac36aa
83ece2d8f7b06058a3476073f3e7a6d5728191d0
describe
'5618048' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDD' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f68c210ff0f991a649c78a92ca6bb481
e50d2b0882d6311a6aebf175eb2518251bb17628
'2011-12-16T17:30:35-05:00'
describe
'5621908' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
f332193d45ff2d03816ef8e524c1f83b
afc4e78cf7717dd3039a5efcc76d76548e742418
describe
'5700848' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDF' 'sip-files00018.tif'
faeaccf1cf2e6d082c06b5792981a7f0
83688dff8b13e2e0d14122dcfdb4ca72316d3f7f
describe
'5542192' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
760bc5411f738eed675a8a2c7ab9c98f
5795f2de95285cb624afa7f5c923b6ab98bc9beb
'2011-12-16T17:27:33-05:00'
describe
'5599332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDH' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1cbdb62763582c622024d70eaae739f2
005fbcbe7ead483ca7f2e748febdba880e7d3f6e
'2011-12-16T17:30:38-05:00'
describe
'5634436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
638dc5fbd09c536056a5f4641a6fa488
38ebf58838ab91512bc17843c334c2026b92d79e
describe
'5730096' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDJ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
864c5f581b7b41360c49d387f59b14dc
1288b06bb08b6452bb310589ed34181787181f20
'2011-12-16T17:30:24-05:00'
describe
'9135388' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDK' 'sip-files00023.tif'
437b362954dfa7afccb142b39e742ff6
a5ea1940f72fcdd326ab64cc3d00b1c9a8dadf50
'2011-12-16T17:23:19-05:00'
describe
'9410460' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
25661be11c4e9fc8160b931d6b79ee83
c987655dd29bcae756b2bc8246901bd945112ed1
describe
'5729776' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDM' 'sip-files00025.tif'
fa1db943643fac2ed2b68038c981c42e
3548c27f4e0534b9b7b5042c9a6902527a58ef92
describe
'5654496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDN' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2a97538a3560709a665e38c20a745a39
8e1a6aa8d2f110745bc77e43d0de7e9f61349968
describe
'5584444' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
f096061e32fb8f80c4bb675e0412328f
c84c8b898d5ae6dc043f7f5dee3bfa2ad6a1cd0f
describe
'5626244' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
a72d8ff9c1af877cc2e9e738a0f0bfaf
5187008b7e9c1fc44c72b791d70efb2533bd0301
describe
'5545508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDQ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
eb751d9f6468559806b9f2da2d4ef6f2
a08a93dea1ac1e4d39561517e1c222ce081a7538
describe
'5763408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDR' 'sip-files00030.tif'
89406b2d8c548a4d0e4136d1474924cf
1566d6b561e649e9c27740ea494327d66cbe1172
describe
'5550208' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDS' 'sip-files00031.tif'
f0abade4048e038cf77eff53b0617315
ceae12b6e19acef462702279cf147156af4759a5
describe
'5488032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
5403ff0167936e4e3594985a22c191c6
61664fc0c039770c48ef9ce83ebaa3d99baf2aa0
describe
'5329828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDU' 'sip-files00033.tif'
6cecef8db8234f8397fd5ab015fd0eba
aff38ec2b6b21f7938785ee892722f8b993d6147
describe
'5596928' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
bfa0d57a81650215a7e8620dcf656ae5
3f58560add08634d35482f7917672ba7d0025827
describe
'5390984' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDW' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6b77e07a554b9f9718ed99f130012478
31a764eb05373f0086cb93631e3fb83569eef7ec
describe
'5634540' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDX' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3e4c9f3499b2601015bebfd078161dc4
106e73e394ddfcca115cd15660a5227dbe4c9962
'2011-12-16T17:29:36-05:00'
describe
'5317256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
95f822bd523dedb177fbc995d659d001
f65f8bf5cd4b97c7f7360083d38c6d9d5460ef8c
describe
'5684692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWDZ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8e165ac9ef2669e81aa82047c040b4cb
aa7c6b29f5b173556af5b36180c388764876ec5e
describe
'5609032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEA' 'sip-files00039.tif'
81f71df556628057a5be7c054ec7e4fe
529badcdbdc7e90aff954b353e194431cce72fbd
describe
'5601232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4907275fce99b47cb29ec8949b90695c
06111a55cc5a8750e4431f3aafe722c7ab9a5ea4
'2011-12-16T17:27:29-05:00'
describe
'5675088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEC' 'sip-files00041.tif'
fc7c0d6bcaf5fd89719ec38903302d1c
52eecb6802873b41d108ff1fb797ab55c52c3db5
describe
'5629256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWED' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7119fb971248b864c3cb824f53b50240
abc8192e2f6c19fd5c5f1006cc764a59c4fc5d9c
'2011-12-16T17:24:14-05:00'
describe
'5658516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c75eeaccf9f790d181d49b27e72d1c13
d893ab6d5982f3725bddacd737fa499081c75acd
describe
'5637396' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEF' 'sip-files00044.tif'
eb18273033e18055aef1c9aa6568f1ba
fc997384b60916dec37b64d4ff51912da6eefc80
'2011-12-16T17:26:12-05:00'
describe
'5429552' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e7a186d1b4c6d188be9d613b88a14360
be699bc0e1f48c35eecc6b6dafb3d29879b741a6
'2011-12-16T17:27:48-05:00'
describe
'5625108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEH' 'sip-files00046.tif'
5ef46df3afdb97d2f5537e6a7716abf1
a4098c416edb917d123310de4d1eba49a66dd010
'2011-12-16T17:30:33-05:00'
describe
'5448152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEI' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d368a55f810185417df084c74afd2bbe
1dcc89222ae93a664bb7a01e49d3ce15236328d1
describe
'5591816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEJ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f625847a403b67da222bffbacce04517
89f87408d6cf8a117aa4d4fe5d21d80dfbad965c
describe
'5370284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEK' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5052bd8be8c444e96aa889de5f23a971
afd296f00bf337c7182906adc1079c50e33b0e0a
describe
'5728636' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
9dfcc6f665bcf3fd2c94204877a8e26b
1baea3895ed8a5402c41482db1cab35e6c0a6cf1
describe
'5529664' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEM' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4c3e6107b9616a0063935631af4d53d0
d5a40d2abcfaa90a315cbacd5dba0acc21480edb
'2011-12-16T17:28:58-05:00'
describe
'5562412' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEN' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d841cbf4f58c2b2d00daf983d4209bff
aea1ceb5b0e475038ba3e969408751653e2c6546
'2011-12-16T17:29:27-05:00'
describe
'5363556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEO' 'sip-files00053.tif'
12cb27efbacd1d3466259101e2b9a93a
de1020ba901897c8c587d8adbfbf9ad7df17e23b
describe
'5780084' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEP' 'sip-files00054.tif'
106b0775d8140f986aef20c8dada5185
d51cef746c685d49c13c2846d443d349ebdfbec4
describe
'5415516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEQ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
784f5aea26c9c6194deaebbf0c165482
28133328789bebe86040332af8b04534af983f1a
describe
'5757640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWER' 'sip-files00056.tif'
495e42d47b0513e066d875ac9b33e588
8516b99361fd388ac110a4fc70abe64284ebce92
'2011-12-16T17:24:22-05:00'
describe
'5521588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWES' 'sip-files00057.tif'
41f374fd44f80c0d4592cbba8398e1d6
66ae883750cbd8d3bcd8f347362d78a104a2270d
describe
'5559084' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWET' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8ebfe3efea135f0b1e602534f7856b7c
2cf9719cdb47f61e732748d85f3fccab82994ad0
describe
'5552660' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEU' 'sip-files00059.tif'
5f129879f804970f386cb81e4ad84046
c9215bc3fc87a3dcae8f92376a64c256fa91fe4b
describe
'5668340' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
7099cfc4477f4469e2e01a1d46dd93bb
da0a030b04abac96f7339701cb3d6a088f50ce5d
describe
'5517268' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEW' 'sip-files00061.tif'
8b79f07c0ec17ceb784e670288b183f6
25cdcc48df3b51b3803a04afa5514df3ff4558de
describe
'5668544' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEX' 'sip-files00062.tif'
502819b6fbc3f49fb1b62415700f5119
cf131c5a8213b56c0988cab106d69e152f292c91
describe
'5436044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c898f4147927def007129af7b9bc038e
27721d29358b0cb894406e889b98ccd60afbb0d5
describe
'5726464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWEZ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3cc1433d027ec32b7eb655e64e1c4c65
64a21fe3f4c9823eaf9ed5f25e02648cc7785461
describe
'5566732' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
3af63b568b8b4ea87749533f3dc28f3d
3c2444d7dd85acbba33046347fae7021c8c99fee
describe
'5739000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
d5ad8835912a771615be73144e31ca10
2412d7d6accd227eff79b211f5f59b8d8bf2b730
'2011-12-16T17:25:01-05:00'
describe
'5500812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFC' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d1fc6d4c282813696b8f0eab77290145
426419561be52e772cf8c56a13536acb3975fad6
describe
'5499672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFD' 'sip-files00068.tif'
26c60764d3661cf48480825c9c7d8800
79a2b7143de2980a6071ee44447d7a7b4a07aafe
describe
'5419940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFE' 'sip-files00069.tif'
649035071a59197c2cb8f561fd1f3ea0
b7b71545c56ecff79a45f83c1162fcc55437ab6e
describe
'5701312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFF' 'sip-files00070.tif'
2aca806290d0b197259586a427a4fc50
4aba2c4a970a5b9b0810375570576e18af9064a1
describe
'17058044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFG' 'sip-files00073.tif'
65f3243a93c6b171f65a6a7d4f24bebd
c35c320294a684ffb8ab5a422aadc1d77ea83df8
describe
'5577272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFH' 'sip-files00074.tif'
85fc257db8f87cbb128999682674bfb5
091016503cff42b7c2bddd46cd1443849d81cfb2
describe
'5493144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a7c4d7b7ff3e4fc76b95a243ae33736b
63b7765e0105bc00f3cddd7252db9d02358523df
describe
'5650480' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFJ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
bf5928e06e4a3bd15625630af61810f1
d60274897f688a064a41f9dfd39ca846603a1682
describe
'5634564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
08e02bf1c33904c7c441cf3a33d00d11
6a4a8324518dfc08a339760018e74dcbaec07a11
'2011-12-16T17:24:29-05:00'
describe
'5588784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFL' 'sip-files00078.tif'
405ccb0cd9ab9e0066640d40b6e9db36
a91552b7e2de48eb4f65e08fccf9137a975b426b
describe
'5503764' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFM' 'sip-files00079.tif'
4a40d2f026b2e8e84357698ea3b4fcb1
c854885c0355ffa3a85d616410d027aa798ffd18
'2011-12-16T17:24:15-05:00'
describe
'5662880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
3729084d19f16ff35824fb065cd3e44b
1892d61b2a00b7228774817ba8514cfaa9f679e5
'2011-12-16T17:26:19-05:00'
describe
'5276100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
ce137daedfe83232c10e5bddc9854872
31b9b0c98cb569ae0dc507ec085692c5f9d2960a
describe
'5717916' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
9f7ee4b25b6b7fc09576f697f95c237d
21f366cc091e4536d0a476a894b6a1756d0509f4
describe
'5441376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6dc1f5e9036cd57c7e2716c6dc5eb991
83af712d7970fe7e9aaf7b4187ed82d29dec91f3
describe
'5691736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFR' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1b6674dc216998e0c500bfcbeecfd3e7
19d33f0c6069adcdfcc3b3805d8ac516f574a6b9
'2011-12-16T17:23:14-05:00'
describe
'5472464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
710db619e265255dd9f51f6b5fbbd2dd
b10204b590011ba71da091692d56f57670b5abc1
describe
'5500588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
85f047add5135ac13b502fe4f18c7566
74bf5ec0a6115964accc3ed781a936e4d3949191
describe
'5393736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
25a2c4cb464eada08b7e58b879345035
bb4a3c1218de5335b6552697fb2230eeaaa7f184
describe
'5684284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1c8651bb38194b2084ba01287c696378
90196f495eb08976bef0ef72a2ebe68d9575eb46
describe
'1382168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFW' 'sip-files00089.tif'
a6f90f9f2dc4018fcda8d1ad4ba9f76f
e6bb232589374bdf63f48e46cc1a03ecde6ad6ba
describe
'1443464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
5ddcfab129bd34c40d978ec6788b82d5
1eb594861f16c42dce30610bec7002c7106c4a41
describe
'1384724' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFY' 'sip-files00091.tif'
e6183b0f55ee9be201cc4951433046dc
d50ff8072f32d9e39abc7f3c1fa5bc09ac4b1112
describe
'1423704' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWFZ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
afd2d641a6a18997e5418d88854dbfe8
faacc7289b6e0217730244863cf5dd3df643c3a2
describe
'1376896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
9d9d090902b3e4e29215b77139257f9e
d96d4180adecc8af8c637bbdd396fd54b6853878
describe
'1437076' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
ae93f5395d6e142e11eb2a43e10b0f62
654ac5c563778bd31719dccb647b2d250d49c153
describe
'1384472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGC' 'sip-files00095.tif'
5474609060595b523e9bfb7348cc6184
68a46ead030b4ff7c63e25e86afc9c6fbf62ae91
describe
'1384948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGD' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ae2fa4cd9e51307db7e318db9b51fe88
36e0a8e0f478577849e4d77a65abca6c96ff3927
describe
'1373472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGE' 'sip-files00097.tif'
5f158f11b99425f112448f6dd33a501f
4d81733b57dbaf8021c89cce739ce1ce33c02d4f
describe
'1382528' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9f3a7a3395ad23d0f26dd0f6058165c0
76140d9904e0c22b873b8fd2908a2f64ca6f1e8e
describe
'1366312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGG' 'sip-files00099.tif'
b1843952ac32ff5167d940a0fb70b418
fc3df5538f41b0f073e18fd8b33c167ccf90bd97
describe
'1408036' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGH' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c56b35ff1c93f55b0a15810d4fad662b
a75923bb38bc1e01be0bb260eeb5118471f4871b
describe
'1390144' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGI' 'sip-files00101.tif'
05440eba24ecedad2efd861b147ec006
08909deca887c211ceb0b9e85d2f61945584d1f6
describe
'1397164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGJ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
168fce33e659571cc2d3c2f60302274a
9a97f1fa57edf8fb662c58e4672d018e94aab30b
'2011-12-16T17:29:47-05:00'
describe
'16713788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGK' 'sip-files00105.tif'
c393f04d307fde68fe3434896eaea04d
a1fe52d9fb9e4577bc3f3a5920cbb57873a86bab
describe
'1494916' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGL' 'sip-files00106.tif'
42ef18f2d762407da95d5ff869b3f465
3ba82c8714b8f5a833fbbb7479c7b6fc28210b2f
describe
'373016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGM' 'sip-files00107.tif'
08444e14c97661f6d14ee3f271730a99
999a250148a46f1b8730dc447255627f6cb9519e
describe
'364456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGN' 'sip-files00108.tif'
14f684d2e821b6121d8a0d4317f2dedb
639dde6b8440d8b196b642829c2516633b39a3d0
describe
'362568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGO' 'sip-files00109.tif'
0ff7f6c97a1a63e18f8980e68754beb3
cd9accd6b4dea3c0202f92a6adbca162e18fd15f
'2011-12-16T17:28:43-05:00'
describe
'354064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGP' 'sip-files00110.tif'
8942861dfa0e21f33316e49f5ccd9b9c
a2572f8780ec096f73169cb8ef452e2967525148
describe
'359804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGQ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
74917c7edb7e720256d5199bf0b0bb10
1b8ba95cf4dab4f92b13310c0884a279a48e50cb
'2011-12-16T17:29:30-05:00'
describe
'351428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGR' 'sip-files00112.tif'
397cffa6f7ac7a77225ea59a1c2c14c4
ee54268eb73eaac32075183d93588c7b7d786094
describe
'354092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8d28e52a6c2953d2bc99d587c1dce8a6
bad041343b24476ee5c00c5dd704d2c7f32694ac
'2011-12-16T17:28:10-05:00'
describe
'360440' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGT' 'sip-files00114.tif'
63a4369e4457cc976498daacbd2c4ece
c1956dd57e9fa030d6ad3bb64884f046a2b63be4
'2011-12-16T17:27:41-05:00'
describe
'331060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGU' 'sip-files00115.tif'
6b65e7164973089b5525ac37a876d5be
c35c5a82094868f844b3aba7f963dd60a83fc7f0
'2011-12-16T17:26:55-05:00'
describe
'366932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGV' 'sip-files00116.tif'
0f537360fdb9e6484a6041d33abb2237
d805a9771d719232f1fce84fe899bf4b03ffac1b
'2011-12-16T17:27:18-05:00'
describe
'342448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGW' 'sip-files00117.tif'
cd271a709ab7b9cc31ebf3232093f9b3
8ea65a1949447ed7c369abd763ae380aa5c3b9b4
'2011-12-16T17:30:10-05:00'
describe
'365640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
73147cc1b1e582054b31ad68a3979a6e
80b973e838c414abc9d11201fcaf4e7f3efb33a7
'2011-12-16T17:24:13-05:00'
describe
'340404' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
bf220d386da662b024b7d9f739baf2cb
d6a00107dc8c2d05585084c156d2f9fdb20e8fdd
describe
'355624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWGZ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
619c9e2f4d93ad18e2bcb057f4e647c6
433114f176aead2eefa0b2d1384827bbb935757e
describe
'351264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHA' 'sip-files00121.tif'
057927864120894feab21b409d4b6ece
202beec9c73b6a3d5d638fef3f72149ada857665
describe
'360516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHB' 'sip-files00122.tif'
d22bcd86ec97dd0a0ef9b6e76181283f
8e86353677c41e11f82d619dcf071900814108a9
'2011-12-16T17:28:50-05:00'
describe
'348388' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHC' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1b904c7f47242963c3c2242f7794807d
6f32ea415831c6ea4e22058bf4f3f2c048f08b25
describe
'348156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHD' 'sip-files00124.tif'
f34ae6fdc8e676352f332f569bb2f366
51f0a60abc756f60b3a37cbd7ef6e603a2d9c041
describe
'345600' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHE' 'sip-files00125.tif'
24be80316d129c91a2ea731dbca1acb3
f4216bcbef5157b321d96f68197ba61acb855460
describe
'308788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
50c55ca1c67558aad3cbee9ff4b191f2
b078aa9b5ac931e16c253eec6afb6a29a0d3dee3
describe
'342096' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHG' 'sip-files00127.tif'
e3296a176c8bcb15a674dad376e1f30e
fc5842958cd7fb307076ab4e397940970ff579ca
'2011-12-16T17:30:07-05:00'
describe
'344528' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a1857399c1834d34e4ee4c654f320f15
7854f69d29ff7d72bab0f08d9bdc9e03309a46ba
describe
'347204' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHI' 'sip-files00129.tif'
4fa3e486ad9ce81de2d8d2f2bfa9f6e9
de5dbbeb98e30d79b876121542b2d68638c15d73
'2011-12-16T17:26:56-05:00'
describe
'370588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHJ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
13baf826f569f44133ad6ac26140ba86
90877fd54fcb9ada5dbc1c9d9ae498b11fa283f0
describe
'362628' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
c980ec3754877f719adfa91c79536e0c
b71e5a8ee88d294da7eed4f699e9aba27f5482c5
describe
'355756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
9d3f7651e48d4c5eee9c797d02e79560
d928a5678c686a09ef999c7ce689be98fcae9da2
'2011-12-16T17:29:33-05:00'
describe
'351272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0e4a08ef4425266d2a92d754d00bb56e
fac274c0d58098b614dc7e2855fc229518e14060
describe
'365740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHN' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c53ac79f9bb5842f8a00661bc237d471
e38b9c8f1cd7b24359690c89b584f0190aa3e038
'2011-12-16T17:29:23-05:00'
describe
'317488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHO' 'sip-files00135.tif'
2e9ce78ec6802a88b6a1d390eadcd298
3adb9b3dd546615f02414c24528b543545c361da
describe
'363108' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHP' 'sip-files00136.tif'
c70860adc3024515e4125c759ee757a6
9e80d326dd7de63b60288ca831e0228197ebd6b9
describe
'347892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHQ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
fd93566c8f15d6127dc2bed90b7d1550
2e22d7e55fb2f95971871cde41b722809b8148c9
describe
'325640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHR' 'sip-files00138.tif'
3405c562b1c4131b8f03f9316a3298ab
d4fce2a53c0cca1fb99f07a102552266e521aec2
describe
'343892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHS' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f983c20829dc9ebe3dbd77e9cb6de350
8665602735ecb8d2576729bf9e7b1b1c87a3b25b
describe
'335392' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHT' 'sip-files00140.tif'
4a3b9f23df0782f9f4030c8e631c89dc
9f8f0a57ee9a71eca5207b6ace008e3903b9bbec
describe
'352128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHU' 'sip-files00141.tif'
8590c22c0fd6e5469a6480cd316f0bce
e4e31424d6a69c7f658d15b953281c832d68ecaa
describe
'322780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHV' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0356195767d18fd2bc1aa35c58ab7d43
0e4a0043d1befd708bae4d87c2878b835da7c266
describe
'1102080' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
c960a4ee5bef90d8bb0559617240cc93
e1454ae549503519c1c56318955f42e0a5875e3f
describe
'362880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHX' 'sip-files00146.tif'
62a68f92054a6fb2cb1159fba5a1bedf
c515fece0beb6bf46623bbe49a4400e5e9cf9491
'2011-12-16T17:26:02-05:00'
describe
'373012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
96a7085fbd93fe712408bd2e4c49660c
abf18b5bdad6c86bd0afb955b19ce3b9e49aa438
'2011-12-16T17:24:31-05:00'
describe
'367952' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWHZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
ed703936628e9a8ef554334c17ad4298
57189d10a93e8ded250973c72c5bf5f8ec17f0c3
describe
'360612' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIA' 'sip-files00149.tif'
fb0b1f3d8936e31eb3fbab6bada4f8ee
684e90eef8511982b2539120721277f7f79e0fbf
'2011-12-16T17:29:07-05:00'
describe
'356752' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIB' 'sip-files00150.tif'
b0bb0fe8c1fd322344f97a705bd4ada1
348d60e17992438e815d4d70172ba9c4be10710f
describe
'358740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIC' 'sip-files00151.tif'
0205fa556d45ad8781881f30d92cb8b4
fc072d4cd5891dcfeff8fb9dc7bb8f2b3f5ee4ac
describe
'370164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWID' 'sip-files00152.tif'
71fef2ccdda5bcb43ecd678709d82162
5dfcf5060a3b385e788e83c4c881c69450f77f24
'2011-12-16T17:30:27-05:00'
describe
'349244' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
8bc11f000bb919259961b19677db81fb
f7088578c76499f20c2ff5c9c2e73d98bbf2558a
describe
'364684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIF' 'sip-files00154.tif'
acdbf662cc41dd3efb0a4cb9d5bc99dd
25ff6d22ea9bff2d402f94d2974eb2fecd941dd5
describe
'355844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIG' 'sip-files00155.tif'
4ca56b4e594d1ebaf032c42cec3b2cbe
924e1a3cf117e7d27fdd823556a7d469a912003d
'2011-12-16T17:23:27-05:00'
describe
'362472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
44d68233803339d662b7a333308db2f5
f4a399928465c6127d9eb357cc446857067238b8
describe
'362700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWII' 'sip-files00157.tif'
e96a2e80a3f3c671e5683db718c982d0
d0a5f77a8bd1775ff071b3eaa6a0f3dac1c86bf2
describe
'356100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
b2cca320e7ecc9942f0c6091fbcdedc2
3fe3dfd05841c07565acf5ffa5f301d8d22fb46c
describe
'349528' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIK' 'sip-files00159.tif'
c32fcc0c20d7a3e18c20170266c42743
00ea9122c025568eb92eeadaf99ec53c0bfa57b1
describe
'346860' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIL' 'sip-files00160.tif'
2c8b450c5e4518bc2345e36324af2535
fd7d84fc285739e9203825f8ed569ec1a09acfaf
describe
'347944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIM' 'sip-files00161.tif'
84cd7032ece2438439293f8e8b67eabb
b4f047430f4e574b1cc2f4528b130c72c545fa71
describe
'352100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIN' 'sip-files00162.tif'
779921846584de694371e24b775d490d
82dbc619d9dd24e3fa2503aa0c3b5c1014cdf3a1
describe
'351632' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIO' 'sip-files00163.tif'
d7d99ecbe0f15c5ba81a8e5e53657626
6a7b5a0f2231cd60b22d0f2f4294bf06e5f4e5f5
describe
'354200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIP' 'sip-files00164.tif'
5d427893bb717e18024768ac8405acdc
1064b2f1ce5cfb7b1c89c792d3efab8b09628828
describe
'349100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIQ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
765731c6e6f1276af881afe075816e58
4e63d12a9a30572cfc156a74e53519ec6e73e958
describe
'336736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
71f7bd4e6421b0e6761bc46813e602e8
feae1452d978787426aaa66f9e01739b5766de8e
describe
'342488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIS' 'sip-files00167.tif'
7ea47c86b471111c4bc5a8bfda1b2919
4a63420ca1b8427b46ef37fa209f52e305e6acc2
'2011-12-16T17:28:22-05:00'
describe
'364432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIT' 'sip-files00168.tif'
491c6e5fc003b7ce3513bf52e3ed4841
f58e67c0a036b00d5be6da37925f37fe9fb9f163
describe
'346320' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d3d09f56e8b1a035300891b8f5424ed2
204760810f18a04e87983028454d2d6c3ca99620
describe
'338688' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIV' 'sip-files00170.tif'
6ab82a051949506977a0594c16e3848f
f07ac1f53fca3d17c2e64564d09bf2c3fe6382aa
'2011-12-16T17:25:40-05:00'
describe
'363856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9edb3fa2ac245487e42e4352afe7dece
3c73fd0be3fef738d1b023558fd7bf032afb46c2
describe
'370016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
46dfcaf409b2bcedb6779f62e146d0d7
6f1b4ae91267064d85838671a571d26f03390d51
describe
'361376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIY' 'sip-files00173.tif'
a07e1c33489142b63d094897bcd25fa7
e10ef3648c519b6606475488de1e0d582b1350f9
describe
'363012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWIZ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
08564f1ebf4c1f06487aea1095b12fd5
eeeede36384e97272c5da20eb72f0765abc40b22
'2011-12-16T17:25:56-05:00'
describe
'362572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
21438ed4a63b548f92fd463fa532f610
001f5bb14356607e9d4348d042c2d5288ead74ca
describe
'360588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
1771b01d65f940ecf8800a7d8efe43b8
566ef9e2fd78d5bc6fe62e6ea4e98010360047c2
'2011-12-16T17:26:45-05:00'
describe
'348124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
2ecd5354795215bf2865bb956df919be
0c370f37735f9c5c2cdf32a35998383a7c2ec774
describe
'353848' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJD' 'sip-files00178.tif'
2d8b7fd62b60b5ed86422ba524902e17
70ba2fb35f328e2542790abf8bff5124cad598f9
describe
'352744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJE' 'sip-files00179.tif'
2c201ee37839d1a38ee27e050dec9b1f
2fe46cb471ee8c6573faa0c1728e490aa74d1dc2
describe
'358176' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJF' 'sip-files00180.tif'
db144efae7bfd62be7e9fc0afe5dda7b
60203d322f558b5c9503cea32574ed7560309e2f
describe
'346276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJG' 'sip-files00181.tif'
262d532fd3f77e55c31b7a3129d98540
6c7fb3298896056eef2989470d61e77b67b1dbce
describe
'352844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
07912e86ae8977595e85e88fa0420945
dff94f7b7c29fd2490926b34fdcab50a687f021c
describe
'341016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJI' 'sip-files00183.tif'
8e3bef919b9f3c6170466f87c34204c3
b3d9548f06bd2b2fa9af9cb2e5775d94da62ac1e
describe
'343348' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJJ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
dffc986e2643f45ac3fc6237f60dd596
6790173de5f04b4a0d7d4109761c4ce1310553a9
describe
'354768' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJK' 'sip-files00185.tif'
4319802c9f9dea77005f810bc61142ce
0afc9ebef554e23da3263f5ce7f8739bde61568a
describe
'357892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJL' 'sip-files00186.tif'
a66bffeb7f714e58df9f714fdbb62903
48c6d250a5650ae2148a5f1b3aa271ed7f32fdb6
describe
'353264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJM' 'sip-files00187.tif'
5f2c5c72a57d17aa486d83d77a87544b
16ef08d80ed05b7a8d432829a809ff87ab26dd1d
describe
'349872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJN' 'sip-files00188.tif'
f703fc86a8c9f4e42b0b296b7e15b43e
49c8aceecfc0dc698fa5d7b04ced03b1bf90ed3b
describe
'1469060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJO' 'sip-files00189.tif'
aeabe964a6fce0caaf71a49a2bf32709
371caf90b3cb7de7df175a17d0d480ebff82037e
describe
'1464440' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJP' 'sip-files00190.tif'
e7d4a577e8124d340481f137bbad3032
d0d35831f9b5820b2b6740b2a89de3ad3159c8da
describe
'1434704' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJQ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
062b5b9b0fb4fce5f437f56b962c33a7
9f236fe137859e4fedf3186140c7c7b8a12748b2
describe
'1448696' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJR' 'sip-files00192.tif'
e1888f2c8040e3fb9149d32054fb4c61
1e46ec53f8ad38a0bb374675f4566babe6475809
describe
'1463692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJS' 'sip-files00193.tif'
6f66b911f15d6dad67bd446b08126ffb
135a07a6b04a7b8bd37dadb74155a748a29bd7e0
describe
'1461452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJT' 'sip-files00194.tif'
d64579e0e1e26319b2cfe5274c2fb664
2daec2cd2a70890eca4bc8e9d35fc7af3d10e48e
describe
'1445180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJU' 'sip-files00195.tif'
59b4dfe58f3dd5cdb8b829464a9417e5
0338cb117d7d43206925cbb31bf16c6544b8fc40
describe
'1461832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJV' 'sip-files00196.tif'
0de96b34ad2f274c674e88506d50b904
f09bce44cd8afbe642f9ef677041892a3b47eb3a
describe
'1500032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
13487dd60c3074022cfaa1f002d56b49
7a485ab01c2b6cc1344e7d3417345ba3587d2c2f
describe
'1353500' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJX' 'sip-files00198.tif'
e5a2362cd7187acb63d93aa953b70ee1
670760007d797f351476ea7d27661734d15274b1
describe
'1470400' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJY' 'sip-files00199.tif'
7232abe35b7dcc409d22d946640cd8b7
f0c7cf2d37d82f17573d0b9a4d8663fd6c013abd
describe
'1480188' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWJZ' 'sip-files00200.tif'
e6ae861094ae7a31876e68cd80c68645
4cd7f3ce5e474f01766fe69abe40a9fcf5f3b17c
describe
'1461580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKA' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a15de49934d4b0e67bb5bf5e88a36769
00eb2f11dd4553c5ec21804ecc149e35588233ff
describe
'1368292' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKB' 'sip-files00202.tif'
15cd8edd93c241f7130f77905117213d
b84355d5d524538b2394441a4ff6f900b66c8066
describe
'1465904' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKC' 'sip-files00203.tif'
5f3064c52c9391640e756223037093f7
6419bcfe9f80d41a20ea4ff5a6c6b2108665cce6
describe
'1477276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKD' 'sip-files00204.tif'
7cfc924673c7e161f53e00d5189f1d2c
a6da0c1ec2dbf380ec1f1dd789b52b72670118b4
'2011-12-16T17:26:33-05:00'
describe
'1490104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKE' 'sip-files00205.tif'
264750439421dd0827539673b11be975
dab1af44c9c9348ec24d1bb30ee4146aec32769d
describe
'1521832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKF' 'sip-files00206.tif'
2b7100f1bb4fc407255d1b8161deae06
a268902b32fa4bd98536b5ac93db9ebf1ca7c6e8
'2011-12-16T17:23:16-05:00'
describe
'18645352' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKG' 'sip-files00207.tif'
e4e4b06b04e4331894a2067aaa79ee30
0793dca5d11dd2919f5490cf456798729dfebd75
'2011-12-16T17:28:55-05:00'
describe
'18172004' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKH' 'sip-files00208.tif'
7256d23124272fdc64abf71ee5e20261
44401bd0942c7310d04dc8ef668270585e0deb72
'2011-12-16T17:27:57-05:00'
describe
'2820124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKI' 'sip-files00209.tif'
78ff14b6d62a2c10f7e25fd13cb49265
af3dea8ea618a6b92c75e0a02d353117b070b5f9
'2011-12-16T17:24:30-05:00'
describe
'369625' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKJ' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
d04bf565b31849262a1361771e866297
b38b6c8b41c535ce338c7d834ef7d87b6891f0f2
'2011-12-16T17:29:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70663' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKK' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3b62858c0cbcbc65ea7cefd808596ff2
28275c3a7c237a20b6fb984a6be20e6f3fdd2354
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'152965' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
e82f58eff5e2fcaba2089900905e5681
897d0f1a0e23da4303c7aea2815e1a5eea26b19f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104798' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKM' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
affa1dcebb54ef88a65de3dad0b42042
560f3a88aecb6e44319036c5e3c3a9c5ac58f22d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
96419a0514b41bb124e6035229bb6847
11a2394d6b6561f166c23a03103847b4c73b3b2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'118091' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKO' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
ed134c6408f76f42939fe12a7c3cf986
5c8b5a96175dc60d3d97e469be834dbc41b27b40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKP' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
8b79c936858792ad10abd979133195bd
85bd5c74f933ec0d675eca6c3da41c7b3a58a6cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69309' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f9105813ccd5bd0881218b34ffdd9c57
8c470e90c01698d5c96f27de48f879829592897c
'2011-12-16T17:26:44-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKR' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
5126d5202617d87466bd1d50738aecf6
1e7cd91401a8d4dcb4a5c40f134723b69f025841
'2011-12-16T17:27:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'145473' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e2bff6c7d993760e20f58e1c29fdc340
94629c15d32bdf87db9f6614b449860e3d5c650e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205479' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
08b14f8202cb408eb516ffe41cc5b7f8
44c2be301739989e39d87b954e581bcb1783b524
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200363' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKU' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
96a86fe4655322910e378bbe095c42e6
27cd292957030f993b95757e3e82df0d3c435e6c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
94343b4ff75137f234c1aea0f04413d3
0055a06c86c8f7fb70959844e47509f062a81490
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194779' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKW' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
68a37b7408356654009d6078942d2219
1b48f4842775832832a51c5bf452fb1629239468
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKX' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
ed592d87901cb5151aaedbbc36d6f791
18ff0392fa5fd3385f4434fc613e99bae92d4019
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189775' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
7ba6a18ea19a2e6865d62746dce787cf
5c716d4b4d100fff685725af5549f9978e71d87e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189267' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWKZ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ce2113fce0d8a88d2bfa5bf1264b0022
ecfe4be16c3f69024b6009126715eb9c3b6ff88d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
38a3a86d15f44129051d1d8037d4f4fb
c40f65507736a5cf511062e0634887b538706ffc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202722' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLB' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
af8ae0db3ea4cd13017de4034d2dc8be
22190ce184663555ccd1a674ff42dd624bc24a2b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLC' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
6914235d922aa778c569a011b225434e
cebae158543e23f6c879404a0dc744392a2a3ddf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6960bca7c3a7fbe1acb8ccf0a726ab06
9d3c6fb8b325e58ee8e61710bdf862b5f0049e91
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'187168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLE' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
31dff71f348aec7ac6924c1ddf8efeb9
ae3dc8d49150256d37893dda918006c1464bad27
'2011-12-16T17:27:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205687' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLF' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
6cb775a0cdb1a8e886215bf1402e6ea5
89fee2fa605154b058fd96c5f67fa570938d5b19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
1459165b6ee751ee9984384e21ed5b52
dc9769e1fd19bc98b9bb6e5188e404f04aa0357b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204575' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
d8ecc4915dc27a0eae1e550032aa07f8
db7680a39b91132c3bb17af51a019f10c717074b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'183714' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLI' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
41cce90f1e3076051b9cbc6fd65b1737
de590341405e98f27c42f7987c0ffc2a902ff768
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200974' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
099349713815cfe38a54f767c40c0ca8
c2300ac82694de781e714498bf3063df45a737eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLK' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0c4aaa067c3b74797d2d4d3f7c6fd5ca
207caae42f9199d4488cdd31dd28a2461118ccc3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208877' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
f19a3b150e8ef5106fd5869217569627
33e164631df798579003fb21e3a35011a0ef3f27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196688' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
4015a68ecceda521817a29dde5dc40b4
dbccb6da0b1a09cde6aea32cdb479d5ee80f6671
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213444' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
c6833b453c37b61c377632ebe3326d66
18f704fd79aaabfdadb8dc59af3acb534e669d9e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191949' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
b36b9f672ce78a4ba042723836159715
f9e0623b90e2158cc2f45b503a3b6517856e11c3
'2011-12-16T17:24:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204518' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
1657d6afb6c7a7749b76b6ad7e72670b
ae47eb05e55dd19b5c9223e97d027a0540215b83
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205696' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
f9663a08c77030e1c82524b2705b7e8f
4227637497f115901f12f6a072fc14153a59316b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194610' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
01bc51ce4a9780b37b10c8c7947904ae
8f5a8b20f3d76de37bfc8140bdbecff21c33b26d
'2011-12-16T17:27:58-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191102' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e3f66b4876004ad9c13aa23fdcb3aa72
6b1f2809c94f5cf257ef5a0e68c443f3aa87bb86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199471' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
0b2d262e45e61a3d77e1eb2952a6a81b
08586a0687b7c5607044fd475481ccf2091f793d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189055' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
da87e7139f2e08c714e35f91b7073a4e
8ce23a3e8dc3dab0a9ec2ff3b1bda8388ad658a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199391' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
73579993713c429bd15ef9276c597509
216b44233e363f3238a2c7235f58a5975bf6e20f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186313' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a1fc43b8322173d3178d281b58d92291
dd817e4474590305e9ac42f1b986e6fd97e3c469
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73793' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
cb80d6aa2646b0fb914d5f5572a50c5f
88b50f4a568691835c8f5f085a5d9dd0c30e29f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70161' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
128bb85f493cee0b00c42ff02774c750
b5923d43adff8534f61f894cbcff98d8f91078b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68766' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
89f773c586ab32f32febcfd6444c1f13
47662accedbccbdb5501c0ca2789570579e2ce56
'2011-12-16T17:27:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'126489' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8a0204cd3d8d26793865731bcee77bbd
bf15ba5a5c2ac2a8c032305ebc8f64050a5d38fe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211077' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e947986857a0d36a2390c2adb09e626b
0c061e5be6f168feff902cc0701ea8375f97fbbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0d01f13ee102d9d928f9cf4cba43d822
9c1e45218ac927dbf6272021296ad7b3d251622e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
197cec7ea12b98c34d32f81e0aa6d328
c793fc5bde885d14b7992c04b4d9e53ec8d9af2f
'2011-12-16T17:28:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWME' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
df2d2cde32c8ac6b353b7909acd9fafc
2708b69cfce6cc5f83255e01c173b85bc8548997
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d573ea967537e663fcecf91a47c55fbe
f28c97f66d353148aa40a790373d3f23b39a439e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'186606' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a36598d333d7f94e8d74962fb8f6ff7d
9714e7c38cca7dbc341b241901ea5f7e8e80c8b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207829' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
0a504aed1292b85627926543ed0ac40b
7e614deb6bcf6be89e7a8626bd0e871ca1f11852
'2011-12-16T17:26:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205254' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f562109798232d3c8c1d14b3465449bb
000b549005277257dc7277a3c1901a83583be247
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210494' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ccec1390ea652e36383391db7aa6bada
18c923bf86532861faab6a5783de7bb5a75bd873
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMK' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
1fa09e83994a38bb4772075542846980
44b1b3107783be8d306635d5fae16552e0f9ec15
'2011-12-16T17:28:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'211075' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWML' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
89241eeca6dc02aa0c82ad1e62444629
508eae7b155e2c2600721ad4a77c399e72b897a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'191670' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMM' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
8248cf93d27c4351b162961b026aeea6
1866a2cc44664423169de73be60f1ad8ae7168a8
'2011-12-16T17:29:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203409' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMN' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
cf3e978a1a722b72f0d02b036fa2b8f2
b56885e12d1a50e573a636a45c782350e959a440
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200459' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMO' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
1324374aef37eff8807e3b8cedc1bf64
2662eb3c92bfddb10f1e9227a0bbd37ba34360a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213154' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMP' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
77f3b83b9726bd4f0d63d79085667bc4
611d3dbef3fe2bc02d000dab9208ba077106d58a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202706' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
3485e079ba10aa7bb2410f07de4c80cc
a04b736ad9bcaaa6312ac06b001fb30211f93809
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215834' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMR' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6d754dda7233523b1c1ddb54b9ee12c9
99443de75aa52adde140d88983f1df11fb7da9dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'185080' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
1d267022922b397d27cfa776887d09b8
0267495051017379a3e1181c738c005f31ccfe3e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73870' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
ae6d9c4973f7e77f3ff94920b8405f28
1cff4475a9a8cc685f5c72b78e7746147c5f5a2d
'2011-12-16T17:28:44-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70329' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMU' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
7d904c8eddbe2fcecf39d3e5735f417c
813d3cb3fdf6d7e1421adb3fa88d2fb0ca69e1f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207041' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
a80fbeb2f61cd21a3f2aac44f1795390
1ef71db49c778dfae75029701d013ebe151f61ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'154633' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
78e87490f917d167da37dfc897fd90f9
0ad0fd78f81a92cb0cf5f319e9098b892e02250f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'212429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7137d387589779b78652956e630811d8
a2aa3647574d90d0eb4199950dd457079787bf12
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195945' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a1f26fbc5db2bdb5f8c5f0c4bc2a87e9
a689f53449e295200a8f0e20847fe9d58619d6ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210592' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
5b8c09ed3ce2d0db001428059e7172ba
d158491891321a4c7b6dbef15321c692d3ae64c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'195492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNA' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3d977932e66190363bfa32e3412e1f6b
6a16bae1c306c20cba2411def6a1a3d04ea04700
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197925' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e952b087023a1cce8733c804d860b0d4
2713c62ddaa8655e5a5eda41aa03f79de2e839c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192819' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNC' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
063365f2c17328edbb51e12ee152cfc1
108d6148063a8e937722772b2dd2f43c66c706b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'216643' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWND' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
94cc82f00bbf14040735eb16f9fc6d6a
590e58a6af1f856ee6863980c3433f496f721ca6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189801' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
7a64025c54e1b303b3db1d2650d34fd1
6abc89e33cdfe2dfde18bf5581947da8e739688f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'216387' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2254ecc6f7c48b1bc27eb2878876aab9
a29436780b8ea209f13d3038b3e0b4cbd2097a84
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198298' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNG' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
92a871315d5425a754c04e2c9eb6ee0e
2a529ca2cf9e5a68786f71fc5c44d1a88fad8384
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'213134' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
e89b467e8b4abc65af31b26a79612981
83431b32d871ed1773a07f7265777f57062b66f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106407' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNI' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
3c8988311cf179b7e1442354dfec76f6
8c85ed3e76fcbe272f7459ffe8181d9e405cf47f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
efa30cebbbe66686c3d606dfced19d32
40ab156a248dccfcaf286a9cc39cbb167e5d9d31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75794' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
d427707f2d4a5ec30340cceea051e5c3
51a7ae7a29bf2cb35b291639db75caca697da21c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71299' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
18bec02681479a5f8beae680994a4751
b3116cb30b802ec013451bdc70c577619475430f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'152023' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNM' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
d0b14be22b9c014e4a953af92d944053
1cb1f92c80f60b4bab5e70d635bb9527568fc5af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a71a6e0fa12df18fee10ca3a400c7a5f
cc3446738b29285fcf19fe6bb1a3b50a3c7029ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193533' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
6a9cfac06b9d05f26ea2ba5037744176
ced3296daf8359cc8b6c636cf9db2ca5ac6ddb78
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNP' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
d873401124a9aab75f6e31979b21e910
148741271da1279bc91f4820d4386dd927b4ee11
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207915' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
20b67fb023dc5404599a594803dff2c9
d6ad16ba21bdf3f92b4049a3511c996e9430637c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'188767' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNR' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
b7d4f478a60a95099460f84f3d194607
2b4dacb6f7f0ea39cf68b50a353590a259f880fb
'2011-12-16T17:29:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'196363' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
bf130932dd58484654009a42dc349806
b9bcad685fa234d59b157492dc15543b76686a58
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
4c53634c306f8daf5e1135161201647f
6063b3f2761d82dadf6b59708bf7195579be1fca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197279' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
d5dccc90fc8d93f91ea13b2cf8f3b640
b91c74a554ae2d9664a2761cdd77e454b303f644
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201536' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
3f8498e852f80016dc73dd9529893e3c
310e3b18cc440ed992792ff99cfe9a72cff86ac8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNW' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a59213952aa111b598047f3a60aaa20d
d03df84ee88f39a91d832d0f60a055445c18acde
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'175554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
e7600bc4a8cffd3a455fb2f4a09569e3
8f988b565f86af59df5a9aa5d4f7a08e23f28d6a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0d98f0caa9ac3adbeb74c5d933f9f066
55f689b79e1946e1da2d9f0e907ea50adf15fff7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269866' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a791fc467142d027d68c7810f2faa723
470a5eea793da402a11b9e4c3d81d02b9688d4ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'141714' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOA' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
28955c58b39c3e1f275b3cf53d04b922
0b61b516e35c386842989e0aa1c2859a6e2a2659
'2011-12-16T17:23:56-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'222279' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOB' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c39ab3f76f713a8874b4828bafc40651
166e1254edb53c77d6fec4546f805f697c3d420c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205194' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOC' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
17d9ad044ab34b5b9e796b2fbf579c30
710537d7d367497b7483c871bcf50fd5edfe64fc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203325' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOD' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
771b36f21174769e631c16a4e174c479
762aa0254d0369cc06483d39cc82a03b8d42c98b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204499' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOE' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
1a74b6837321e8a63ee198565b65e7b0
94fedc8eee94e4b5ad7642c78bfb8abceab1c086
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOF' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
a9bba8b12838c4e76606d144064e9993
d902fcce77b947bc0e18300ad7e21a28f7cafd28
'2011-12-16T17:29:59-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174537' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOG' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
dc552c42c6b68760c4f9facdd92bed34
a1eeed02b9d0a09e01cb2be7fb81cfc2b6742b1a
'2011-12-16T17:30:28-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'176120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOH' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
593783ff872456fbb484c838a13b59ac
403967449c44279b31e70850b2993961ae528556
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOI' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
89d5bb7f87e99e2f7b3ea3925f22744a
3074fa5c0ee3bc076f02d132afcebed019a07c4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
a209575e739f0ba0b6fb25d8c17ab082
60c020c1352933f913bab7ba756f2a6bc8cc1e85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'227258' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ae8266a0e90a4ad09f24ed5848b66cc7
c4caaf93292493bd1edb5bbef2af29417ffaeb62
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231486' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOL' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
efe198996cedc9b48b23d375860f1334
1edc91878afc2b2ecdc9c7cd210be930934981bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233473' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
fd1bc86ea037987fb57739048984eb35
e9229fc48b3d4df32c3dcb3570cc4edb9497ae12
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWON' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
2c726410366f44541db8564cfb87bba8
f70dc258a0f562eb9dedc7591941553851874a74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'242974' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
5601f006054d7b165b4597e89b76a6a3
e4f725b098df87ebc716eefebbfcde1a26bd6c82
'2011-12-16T17:26:38-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'172632' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOP' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
f6ca52f33c384ba9041a0a3c9307c6e3
644a09cc5a971d3bbc18b97b4158fe3651311dc5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'221436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
0c2aac20c2c996cd63146ffe1cb538f2
0df6295c497ec119079365d5d6999529dd9551ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247418' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
0810acc6ba9059221e032f3bab9b6ec2
8e6b75d27f009f41eabea50b91eba5ecd2120683
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107941' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOS' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2a70f5122a8255dd424dce316abf69d2
66e2708432428c001c3db2b2256a492c7d089f49
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58418' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOT' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
0af2045a365381fdadc8d22397ab115c
69da07d347017ebe6881b84482e17609c17dd2af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67612' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOU' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
09d9444c8c8ced6051af4dc9a8e2ae9a
a76643d54df77499bdc506122736ddc0dc26679d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'67757' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOV' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
b93b6b1cd5c69a79185b0053353028f2
8cbd9d60d3a9ee50c90e21565b2cdff35fca9d8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'147858' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOW' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
ee732bf0641165dc48cc2ba1ad25faaa
25530428a56459abe3952890d5dc1eb9c13cf00a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201819' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
86443f59fb48c4da032f5ad180871768
55f3ce7537707f4f27442a664b68e7fb12388d82
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOY' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
dc63e9d0a8ef72082934fb779018eaaf
91fd8d8057dc1d4a6119d83c0988d73eed05a6b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231934' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
aba09512d27982d040c5bbc82988aeb0
fd19b1e522bd401ebd7d8794684182aa89c5ecc2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200833' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPA' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3627f0a14181d5e2b3549ea4eb3e518a
d0af26380e3b89eca8050543a2735d8cce3f39a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'174746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPB' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e075c3d1d238964a41ec7a33e1a0891f
0a818943d45dbbb8f1a19ef644d5d2f692af2e2f
'2011-12-16T17:26:35-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226686' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPC' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
050f01806e03ecce6b4c34710c28f665
2b72f2f013c79423a742e48b0b28f23df9752a32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231975' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPD' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
3469e82c4e37c4e29f39a847ce9ccab0
f5d4342224d728035febd5bc63ebbfdb5a189287
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230446' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e0102e94a1bb1b1ae3f7cb4c9afc37ca
ef3c3e9dfb65a89decb6756bb0f7b610a7c0e619
'2011-12-16T17:24:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'197585' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPF' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
debc40022ec1fccd1d35f7e37da35beb
3e91d0e8f500627947e1a3166b93cefd8340c2fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPG' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
9e3992ce1fdbfa62f2b0893796598976
2daebbbb0f47eafe23179fd3109539651588124a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202009' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPH' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
35a0daa5d79d117011206a06ab423c2f
28ce0a7f10b93789ca659c7c8d308b26ae8dbf10
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'158422' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPI' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
004043da303a38910ba1dcb3d9176c05
707e3bbf0b40902bf8ff95bf550d73799ebe771b
'2011-12-16T17:28:54-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71326' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
b41efa7f02df0daad64e6837dd332fef
b035707aa426691ef566cf31b4050473b953edbf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPK' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
3e0bccb704e146c6f220d1a3e7563eb0
a73013b554e6cad9a9396e9f5d0bb501eb7590e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'333744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPL' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
a9ebc0863636458380f5274bc35d9d5f
a5c03162ad00bc063c936bcb281511569d0a486d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'167124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPM' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
053acfd52c773c64d5488834d9192ad6
f141cfaf6c29c1d27fd12a7d3cd7c396164fa212
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'204959' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPN' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
c29a0170f43ec0cf5761463d78e8a6d9
0661679044172f9c95d32b155994b6fedcd71070
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'202989' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5f8315f387b3f9be0acec00437a21682
69b20a63f9a58b6d4cf40f4982f65bffdd6f5951
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234109' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPP' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8e44ca234eebe318b3275a9af77d884e
e9958892366eead8858adb2efb53bee9aee378c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'198336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
fdccdda26414b9609db8b88dfb31561c
f138e5c33103b91f9917075aadfb21cb345612ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPR' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
621b8566738b224c00869e4774f11fb7
9cf0ccd40fbb8d4249f77836784da135a8df7d8d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'194653' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPS' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
a803efb6d26272c2b401f8e596fa3e69
f3a1cd42fe56f045efebd602ef4112450cc8b4f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'201777' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPT' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
6f0547eccfa25fb333c27faa91eef84f
6594eace34accff91bc48f5f5f6c4215e82bdcf7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPU' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
e0d189022ff385c096ead96fd42c23c3
4b9a834aabe9c3a8ddc1bc861d6599f6a3d9e18b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'184381' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPV' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
d83211ddce55044c95bbc06183aa0b80
faaee03946675b9b82d05f37b17410b04be24aa1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229525' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPW' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
a9bdd4cd90f3957574cc4bbf271977a6
1247023823707519bc2e2b4ef782d19571fff391
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219074' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPX' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
d4e738c954f00fceb2593c858faf1f9b
9e3b274fe618b7d3222dfc75937814b5e7e64f97
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'228953' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPY' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
51907288f9d1ef3e10477b60ddcab283
b5e7765b33ac26da8929728d8187a8880fdf517f
'2011-12-16T17:30:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'192332' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e0f8617a60f0c65eba7e9c90b142d7d1
ec258430deae9408a290fbf07afff360a4167d6f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'239317' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQA' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
b762ae73d3ee7e2e2fd8f76cb43f0eb6
4ca874760a2e1bd47d49968ca3468638560c0d49
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199129' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
24273e0a0ebf156bc0a7695b7ac1e2d7
ceb2d9e4cec31363aa81bf315b6baf5ddd87ea11
'2011-12-16T17:27:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQC' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
4fa2bd82cfabf9f4b165cdcf7a406e26
e6d8a7558e5ab978ffb638dd40028014ee1b000b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'215181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQD' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
172195f2a6b17e364b370e78bb201255
48c6e7876cf6601e52b214af76e0062b0b3d5378
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'206383' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQE' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
0927fc566ed6966345744dd7d4bcc962
a4cbbbe0e86cde60708fba1d9bd2cdbd97fc7b90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238534' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQF' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
bd4a0ed91d6ee5f1cdd591e9c9b6a007
70b08952d57a5abdbddb85e36f8fe56bd355bedc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181927' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQG' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
006f1e4ce77b5407e7392690a423dd84
286ef640dc1e11144415346804beefa90d91c87f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199737' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQH' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
62f0796475237b2c05a924b57c78086b
43f5a92a15e35db1606b56279fa14462e509ae0e
'2011-12-16T17:27:25-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'224929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQI' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
2e93bc3034592f765aafc00e682f74b0
7f916d68ae293eef638edcf0f19d0b3e49147ebb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209439' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
dd3523815274b6581c9c4ae54bd0382f
d007d41df8ef7a40be2c8e98c6d9f6c854733055
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'190213' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQK' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
3707c0dc34f15f89061d34a74a1b2e5d
04bfe2ec62bb9ae3e3f0ba95cdaeeef082bbb7d2
'2011-12-16T17:30:21-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200497' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQL' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
1edf5d86a9412790df8902a21d9b808a
00845af3da81aa1cd47e6075bf63184687f302ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'233678' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
7ec1bf8f26583b731e8d96cbde99fe96
695ec4101a2827a3e0471c7eaa2dfce609990851
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231086' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQN' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
802ee0b0e2f376a74658eaccca196d25
de6355cb961d2abc3f64d82714933344497d709c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
f08615ac7a2c69e08da7e56f7111f2ba
cee75272a0497a3282635ac15be4107042cffc2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'199150' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQP' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
30194fb79de5fa44f9a9a3f42cf8fa9f
2e779723f4298828aadf62cf9d996a60ec233050
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'235480' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
4ff70e5e7465af68e51be967d653faca
5d36a065cf1b5eb2bdd854d09e9cf2ef2acf5957
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'189324' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQR' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
712f25a3f58258befbed9d63851595c6
967ebd657e6603e624090ec6940f53e6d190d05c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'209331' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQS' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
46b6ab8770941e1bf07923ae50de5976
8eb23c7d106c4d3cc4e215fce7fd056777b196dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'181908' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQT' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
01ac7a31aa0154d35224a9e1d8a1c6a9
88b51b42ac77be7e82cd3d586f6a7faaf82f4528
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'180133' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQU' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
8d19152ff20ce838f2756d9509a4f3ca
cb3c968aad7052578a2f187d4a74c994ed7c30be
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'253845' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQV' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f971d86b3d13d66ae8c4e2b21f5b65d1
813b1ee68face694347fd0dee2fa50a0f5b73c5c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'203494' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQW' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
34b9f9e79ec73f75c188078235964b70
38721f1abb779b3fa14b2948030fcb2d3f129337
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'214839' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQX' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
2f7943400d0898c5162dd8d2c26b5e45
464f02e268812f509b4361544738b2b98488da06
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208633' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQY' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
49b61f4fde84057b8109f636e4b1746b
f42e3b8774cf32185fab20cbad480aa674a9b601
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'179406' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
f6122e999b2c9ccc95d07e22e9285dbf
547a09c8e7eb7b5b08369a78c5ef0323c457e3c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRA' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
6ef945ecf74d4e9c948f3f995306d15f
9a7d6023ea913e28d084b6f70b8365b9ccacb8a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54465' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRB' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
111d8869a1c684107fae1478e01d4e74
6b1822ff411ea114d2d9ad120eadb6a5c48c1b1c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'146231' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRC' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3ee5a6edd9136cb3fe6e080044b53869
99439d7002514c60b98d55d66ead5fc9b82275ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'167977' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRD' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
ddc185b0402026c97a581425c5589482
e11fd5e7fcc2aae125257df2900bfd0635ae54f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'210583' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRE' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
9433bd142df13a5cd133ceab5deda3ae
e45d113c273a96d3736a18e0b04f81335bbe46bf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231966' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRF' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
5e593a96b74825c58da38ac332fb4d63
46a4e9abd057f6133aaa6b0a099b6fe49d809e94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229829' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRG' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
4ed8d0fd844145859643f9639c600f0f
cccdc3246ae958a1b80d17f0c6d31fcdc9269895
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251987' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRH' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
350374ebe28da57532bcd8f756974850
6610076acaf676d4a9c10976970b0448ba9efb52
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'214289' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRI' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
23e364b74ae5658958725ff6847e8942
096f27f9e38a99b8d2cd056ed06c231c4ebfd87a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'208026' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
39ed9c4a39d3e6a8eb13bff0f1686b97
8e147e277d8ff0458c25dda9b35e9be7b597e336
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRK' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
700b4412fde2f177dec169fd6c4e1e0a
bfda68115bd0d6e35ac836f3be92b68b6a08b979
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRL' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
c1c7ad6b6d2db538d70a5292396b9ed7
8c31308f1265471875c9775722708c234612c75f
'2011-12-16T17:23:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'214655' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRM' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
63093a517c695db7d738a95b06c489f3
86f2a8113f9c2a99c66fed9dcb681f267561ba9f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234873' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRN' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
0836891a174c1f08821bbc0855451865
4b3284609eab0bde9e0a901e47f080f7ce21c175
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'226011' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRO' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
672956dc5f29cdc04f6eb39e6c6df1ef
505001a5a0ebcfb94cb07d3ee857348f1bd8a974
'2011-12-16T17:29:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'237037' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRP' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
5defbf56100ab86d582557ed14155859
36cb168d02c5ef787c3fca244bfabbff35531f73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'193253' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
6ac8f98fe76ba456c87360c90aebdbbb
1c4e10e6e14ff0ea3bac3c7bdb729efd41f78116
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'225782' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRR' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
0e4c5bb4ace835d4a9e915c8696d57b0
4fee6a02edede8103ed04feaaab4ba7bd9e7f8dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'205663' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRS' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
e687c3541a25e4a99d7e1282e4982062
eaf617c3f4a13c3fe81a26697b36d4719c79c9c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'242887' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRT' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
90597d173b0626fb325cb3981229aaae
2c88b13b90182adb3c144cff5dcc61f73cc2a37f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'161362' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRU' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
38ab8aba060fe8536895fc677fdad55b
3f7adc8cf34e65686dbe0dab71aba923c5a49288
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'140557' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRV' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
62c5d40d5406b6885ffbf24d45611902
751a260575afa276b069ef415ddcaedfbab05dbd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278757' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRW' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
a57405af86fdbe87fb26a471001b085a
4c6973809073998b32defbe648b0c7627057adbe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68433' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRX' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
1cec253abc5c171472526441cf465e76
12d4b918e4dd0f738f373338ec0ef1087c5f69e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRY' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
75fe6d82650133ef1a773caac4b21fa5
1e22dd890015c1a04c414fd2fe1d16db3bd4e7bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32506' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
9442041a7fca6a758855f3428fab1ad3
c589b1b8b8ff384cd6aced1088168a6cfa19c3c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26653' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSA' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
afce1a6a1d16f73fc91658bb881c3ce6
9fb8d4b325677e969b550a4af8ede794cbc7bdd9
'2011-12-16T17:28:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'52516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSB' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
72fb90a355e719cca8872ca71d2cdbe9
5911cfc193960e2ef7ab7f3b7cf65935ebbb25a7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34767' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
1e6289c0e6fc17c5e17b31445bbb8f70
800058c527ee8a5e05bafc48642ccedcb1c330e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75687' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSD' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
cf814381d02a914ba41b8be29513ba6d
bc265bf34fa952d3bafc95238817dd4d8a2aa160
'2011-12-16T17:29:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'43530' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
217497e82f4eb297a79a435ea048ec10
a7cca45cb79546f2046fbea822133602a0b71471
'2011-12-16T17:26:49-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
16367b64a050f3ec549fe30f91fb196f
3e59199b3c05d4da23503bc088342b93466588ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSG' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c9132a64fe7b1f1363bc9bb0ce979d48
46339a62d9b72f979bdd45fd7e73bc753fce43bf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'22993' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
cffe0f6824c66210a1b7528393bf3cae
187cf2b754b3d15082eaf0f74471c585a65d4a68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54005' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
5cb7c0224f2d8682c56759f0602caee5
e4b144fc51708c43ed6b48eed4a17313b107bcd6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77134' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
89927705cc30d8ab74fd739bccc4a069
052f86d0cfd415fe70f5e4113e8ba65897f5a53c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77215' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSK' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
bc6dca8b3839ce67298b5b438282789c
74427ac86a678c5bec4020aceb93ea6963356046
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77366' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSL' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
017c2318f37a5e21966b5f05812173a8
de1a68ccd2f128397fd0d2ea89ff057502695b05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
e176f5ddb7319172bf11bdfe7ccca45b
3d6ab3fcdf4b953e29acf2e3b707f1e90abd6256
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSN' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
8a42d9abd6d347c4e1ea17214da43be9
5a41b0a2821f72f3864cf0495ab469d713747ea5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
9ea414f1951328275ea6c35d1324d21b
886d75d561956d9f7ab091c8623f2c5beda48c51
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSP' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
f659a16f98ba390d3ffa77109fa9ac94
42e5ed43e53f4e09544373c5c025029d5ef3e39c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75505' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4b879916a7bd5492c06ed98885ba4a5c
d75c5a6348a7c49bf19b8f661bf064d75750f69b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76679' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b662a4c08671d9f0e713bbf625ae87e6
0f1cee00c51ae819857c3288008e73cc82840af4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74727' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSS' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
dce3a7f6a1e20e207bc62e486013eb92
c1001297a2683a06e1fd7256a31c7ff67bac25b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76143' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWST' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
d44483ce9cfe4fb8ccc345b2e9cdf9a1
7b144abb60d5a82218d2785cb0414012e2bba437
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72362' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
99fc21f64fc9fe69a3e6e5a4d5de4541
e13392828c067c6a69486be62613edb9ee1e70c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79372' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
f172d2789dd5ed754b2f36285f433d0d
1ddb1d50cd4c1f0b42a8502bdb40ae3aa2889e07
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSW' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
76fc2ea8c74db5afb156c44d776d2f71
1ffc7f3eab91b35285d6d940c156223f5e57ece3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78347' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
036ee2585c739f7309160cdc95b54103
899bf7a7c11d533d708e6bd64172d6bcb763acd0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSY' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b5afdd548b68fbb15991c31c4bb2b9e6
671612215603dac2402c2901600a4903bad02749
'2011-12-16T17:30:02-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76399' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7504f5749cc737dd3b1f70b7a1786822
8568a825d706504477d602d6c6347e5f01bc6167
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTA' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
949fa8427c3ae147833e993ce35ae5c2
ebbfc7c0aa41e427be932c6fe10ce92a4dc558c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
5e2ff19654fb3e6720a186121f68e49f
af4f0fa8d4f3b10408a2b63a4f8a3d67abebb061
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTC' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
172d130fe823da9b40f2ccb24dc28efa
6f7fa51141c14752835d2d3068026b3ae8f6884a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82217' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTD' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
84ec751495c5fed9751c98981557ef27
fbef9e0b3940a19cd71f0e4d5002879b0caf6b8d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72842' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
80d8154028301c3e9343d44d2ec0b7c9
1c0c347977f4c9d2d82373975e5c2d442814a5bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77279' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTF' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
3e59b854884bb91dc30db6ead68260b7
dfbe59e334d0ac117ccb593a792407fd0eb67fd1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTG' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0877ec8590097a02fd2204093a566e59
c5ca6562d965bc0a6caa1fc24bbd60daecb5dc2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74178' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTH' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
29f2a8bd78a303b0d3be1b0855043170
144ba0e9d015661d67df70fa3dc01b7b5bcb4747
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71493' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTI' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8aa27133f5efc644800e9c08868ff3a7
6907f4bf8767d07e0c21e4a942150ab06f50714f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76153' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c750ea062c8849e4893463204c155694
42bfdca86a9b24af4743bcb65aac0f54d588c860
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72177' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTK' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
6f79e9e8038b13a1033b8c67d5397be0
3cb5f7045bf1d73a8a4cdea6ea392d02f6152601
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75728' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTL' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
116c81e79b5ef1135de025da8be06339
f1570c3fbd43c4d7e5006582f8b43422788a883a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1f7d459bde09a5acfeaebfdd8b0fa7a6
7164b88b2e5edf89b65748d4791186ba971167c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24679' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
04cdce53a004bbe2f61d88e0c0bb6c4b
438097d3a1957a3a4658270535a5be6982734436
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
8427b8967b5e89214411865e7b631265
16dea65e672de3ac4577acbd7b3b68e24db6905c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23131' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTP' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
8b386dd0fe422e83a6016dbabfd85b1e
b4d37c83990f996882deb9df000f74457505bea7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49431' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b98893a5c30b01bac49a76de942fe730
519fde54a9f573eb1a387dc6f6a84522dbfad6c2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f6998f0bd5bd8ea6674e3ee45359036d
478af1be79ff667ca36ad55c252b939bda6c9059
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77979' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTS' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
615570534aff50ed77e2eb2d078b2660
79cc860cf0d998af61effbbea72c7c678bd23e1e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77731' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f0e8edbe7bc933ca366c6b40df9ac9a5
c0ecdcb623d78d4b492ab7018bb2e0ed24b26334
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
77d42d5c8cc518d47b73ebcac4428ca4
f2b97f8df84a92c2c351b9fde7644663b5864088
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80445' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTV' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bb9d2e3e2207280ea84b6f4f3bdd234f
72af61df918808567212737e8e8ddbf807ffc937
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'70569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e9849b93330888fa0bd66e7cb636e8c2
38a3b71d081e1f2cd2602a0a062128a2d29418ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80185' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
828462aec5be5d9db3e57bd9db4bd563
dcbc31a2a4ce4d792c9f3b34c54be430e44586fb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78803' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
06479ab69ec78ba95f1481810effb63c
0e49b2f9e895995bcd2c841db262619ee35a2566
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
869e50da9f72969ea1dc7ee6b7f9e90a
80e500d5d9a4b4d240d847ab2e3d45aaf61cd58b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75368' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUA' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1e8e2bc0c562f95a51b4042778f0f587
6b56e8c15fdb7767326cec4a6094a221ec453079
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80917' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
12fcd04c892826344421ae829e1fc3cb
3b478f7ea5db27782e0facdaec5ffbc2835dbbc6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74958' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUC' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
92eb63e2849d7fa9268688512b8c3a5f
93ea4e10099d2c27c7cab1ea3a852ff1d7b1e77f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74873' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUD' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d959f15a8bf9a237cd84b6ec4f0955cb
6b728d82efac84f1e29699b9c94e67e5cf72eef1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1c10654045b8e4915ec51598de457847
e95cbaef626ce8c3753d5e399bae9cbe6144aa2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80522' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUF' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
eb679f1c16ac846f003c2bedcccdb795
2149b97efdd666544f18d5b0189889b0c582d6bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77643' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUG' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b38eac0971c1d28dcdcd2d244660d83b
1575779509f4aa40d3a4debf3d0182bb98bfe9f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82703' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b2c0b9eab8c212b8e133900e53a1b51d
97c73666b43be6fbbe519a59adc9d3da8dfd56e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71482' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUI' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
4cff37495acfb482b5e563cceb83387e
49d3a6b7b2864f69e1c8493ea0ec2179babb9b94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25478' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c93e4b2d2ce88de6eea46f72ef8a8b54
389d04d98bbf70644fb449b113816ba62defc22a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25107' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUK' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
59e4143e8fcb6fd8be9df2f154baf093
4050089c1e460b8ba2c707566a79d2a0ecd38594
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71558' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
bed4427ab9c8bc4eb2e98b780eb41aa3
fc3219c15c8a876b30e2114425b83d91c7b8118f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58642' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUM' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
02b1ac8829e2d53d7d7bceb853f1b841
cc64c664aa6a62648da37c56784fc46a97b427d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82563' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUN' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2cf030ff0977063e60d0238c8714e2f6
ff978106d5a4aa9ef744ad3b0e6471d06eef6ca1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74906' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUO' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f74719f9d167e0387d1727b59be7ba05
b4371f67f23d08e33b9240e8edb43678ae87d70a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
0dc460a7649de1a774bada3a8b92865a
1af89c6a8de3c96cce4a43bbb88d8bfb8545248f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73494' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
3de25f60d8a5ae0358279c76d836739b
f927e68e493500d8441714b4ecffc0e8ea410fa5
'2011-12-16T17:29:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76513' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUR' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
f3f3380220726ac47368fd300d3f3e27
497e43237b1e8f4799726b03768237bd8a901dda
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
80949c4d6d7a95b78c2396a4a110b7e9
111f5d6032a71e8b5e6c03b8d4658f346bbf6371
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84089' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
5dd6949b0f2bd861961c2ca27ce74020
6da0c6af5dea9adcc3ab9477aff22d5036d1cb24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUU' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
ca7edf6c13cfd679bdda04d0a1c2406c
43feb9c910f18faa7b6b1a340771934aea30bc94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83663' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2b3332d050ba42f9ff8bce887a9df99c
9349d594f28827c4043ae94cdddd767ea5225de6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
ed6b3af9b024dadeea3f36ea2b5e6736
c356b6231f35d6df1f2bee7758ed8aa14394b4b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81915' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUX' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
e2eaf63ac491b8a61ecf31db9e86fdd9
6564ed32dcf480952e8f8260c2a7267ece0e522e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39263' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
222223629c0e87df5dfb36e41bf189aa
7041eab8669495356a3d96a5a2ee81a01571d831
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25612' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
6c00653645b91970f2c8be6d9e88d5bc
fa8a5506acabd50b7012ba0d57275dd21492ac2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27629' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVA' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
dfbc3fab123891db8017fdb61900dece
3b05ca0c3b2fcb1db55f37c8afed03f5cb4d1ff8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24637' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
b4072cc1b3de5d53bbf02cff97b4f354
d64ee6c30e82961d20cdb09d4b81556f8090bb82
'2011-12-16T17:27:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58595' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVC' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
9414771622aa98facbec8b029d2b7579
60283277d1377d26292cff0151a4997d7138bdd4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVD' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
7e5ade73076c318b64330a05bc5dc794
859f02d117724834140e86e27b3fb540065f7d9d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76738' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ef9bca6e245144a2192777c916315b93
5f157896aade5f320556e99af9a87b6e3abf4d56
'2011-12-16T17:23:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80762' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVF' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
f79f8545b6425872c6ef6c6c83bed076
6a896f99d80d9147f809d4f731aa4bc79a3f3537
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78462' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
6187a08d59e47a990243fddd00a2db32
f41e39fb8c5a4caba8601b5ac86ccaf469268015
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77175' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVH' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f1d6ee4efc5dc40a6f51130de15eaff0
cd92822151d046b0e9e8fc00683630f060b394ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79236' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVI' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
80edecad091adac767e2910d3c1e1869
91051ecea6545f3afed8d21f783444b264aa7821
'2011-12-16T17:23:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78620' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
ceaf4b254e5c1a3dcf30053d914b76bf
9c708325ff854394ce1bd62499321d9264d44b2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79926' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
8ae0f5dcf9672b2d6f2c1a4ec3d34ce0
2482b07b1a00a20990c959b5663cd13b1c99fbe8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79626' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
e8861c8b47b685dacbe17e358b0bdb65
7a560353bcda93fbd0dba417be78a791beebe285
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75648' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c81660a84238998c35f5c5888c7ee562
71a8857cd5d3360b83b03a6b397cbbf157e2b90e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73230' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVN' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
416f11959ae3bacb59a5d36babd31be9
e428cc9fb6cd98f6345acc68ba8538a0d47901e0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29083' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVO' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
9aa56b0aaadc02dbdf35bab864201f86
54b8fb1aa02f4c2ea2830e928ae912b3e22f15e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVP' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
0f22be9154c3723bd86e6049358fbcf1
532b3b52fe008122c37a4c8f90d8838faf8e9103
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f5f34bc459dbdee74e5f96a610c6555d
c30000a2fe3ac8a6c12055c42fedcd3334d5c6ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80651' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
49a1c7040740a318e3d0ace68eeb3358
96e37983d8c6400b7ef464d19474ff152273fbcd
'2011-12-16T17:30:29-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVS' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8076e0b18c8d7a1505dd6f5fe34d16c6
636a09828b48afeafbd462028fe31a5e7144b04e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81661' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
a0697549dec5186db9d85a6310eee91e
123d32049d0a2356f3ef8316edc31aa90f952394
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVU' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
529a13cb4afe70e3047780b85a96e401
6be5facae83faa98b493c752521fb79b6a38c0fb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78655' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVV' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
b67e37e27af85d474d8872b2de219c53
4b16fa8f0e28f5df96e603be3c203f5b197d2ed7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76824' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVW' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
77ad8c31879171b1437735a6287173d5
8cb56dc2ed0ff0bfc3d0faa6ffe7d72084fe954d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80393' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVX' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
f84897d4c98b838bb30828ca33ee9963
a13868b7b5c9b73d4ea93926c23364f67a822dcb
'2011-12-16T17:26:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
f5b4d7ded6335a402f2d5a1c4a674576
63734b66412793d2acb150d794310c34a924c9f8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
8f016cf7972c0c6ec56e9a26be6d10ec
78db2a46a5498e1ebfea842eb53d9a5ead4b8f73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82691' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWA' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
37ef31a816179fe9d42bc4fc5dce61a2
a2a8539bd0e09e0480dadc548d6ea4057616a8db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88636' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWB' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
fe0751a0ab20d0c915d2013ef7c5d509
117d639e7aa47c98335a4eeef2c479d1b6c827bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87310' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWC' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
5c10701e7333ed27ce802f4e08a73b1e
057e9659b0476a88a8f319e5664e48ac618776f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90541' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f9c1bff6107646c0da97437f81c9f0fe
a21e1bc8a8a0829ac33c6dfbbb915ba3329c2862
'2011-12-16T17:30:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89934' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWE' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c687bf7c6d1e86633cc87412ad3b5c4c
45ef91199b7e86a155c4ed9ebd6a01b6442ec6a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
a53a752a22b9f0ee2bf966468cf24b17
f2399cbd70e5adafd6298689bd8041d6082da848
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
0a9e1262bb13683341f9f9039ab0dcc7
3cbd1336e3e134554923ffc7bba6697c43b3723f
'2011-12-16T17:27:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWH' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
de45baff1ab7ca7c09ea04c55f4d858b
6fe1be78c3151566340c038852a3ecc89acb883b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'41458' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
5632bb36d7d6ada56e7bfd91837d65b8
ca2ab4294f6914c382049724b1198d8f84848dbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'22178' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
5d788f1e399123f3e4c7dea76ad75767
e583922dae4e484d6d0a2ba7fe40624fc15562e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25390' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWK' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
81761d3969564df5d3b144c79de2eedc
547bd1a211f3555878e1a633cc0534aab8e7d881
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'22209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
953fe2848e591e4e5e3a26b355f1a25e
45c9d9d536c54b1ea6c99ce64fe35b265aa2d41f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWM' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
802358385b4b3aea696a98b4dfd76085
87ae450fd856a748e261d85557c93b54a80a11eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
cdf2e6b3c896bdf673b7bda811119916
df7aba0ec9d74522a4c2b5362334b480cd6aa068
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75608' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWO' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
9c8717a83aa9bd8b384662fa551c5e66
053c2115fb0103e3a9f99adeb47462d1f07a4051
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWP' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
819c0c434a4c51b280e75a84615a6b9d
7e92c168409b07ae35de9d20fabb2fe00f187328
'2011-12-16T17:29:22-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80710' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
12140435c58ca82417e24645366f7f9f
7e0a52035e4344bf197459f574a883b410ccfa99
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76498' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
19aff89667772b04ba8206f1eaa37562
b83533fd327a2e1ddbe3933db3a305c9f5fab21d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80695' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
5de414e1b82f857fc17a70810824298a
13a0633d268c13dce68bff44d95850ddba732992
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWT' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
63e846fb8c621c8823ae9f881ef59c44
f529972b778a77dbb79949cde23234a5afe07919
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83555' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWU' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
d4e4413e182b99ad086e80b63269fdd1
228f9c9c256fbca9fd803c0dd146e1389b108c96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79805' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWV' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
610ac9df2e69c84bd64ec3c9b8a74df0
f40b03520bef8dc07b9c73512d2a975ea53d3fdd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83042' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWW' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
cbde67f82cfa1de2d7c09d7c1401d96e
3bfa0634d58c3a97895347f6148432a807eac160
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82506' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWX' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
902e0d372c2c669c426e195f4b3e0aae
5165a43927ca98553932f4969be8eadb9e6847bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74105' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWY' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a4a25159e7f117b5aed9dbc0c9be8e59
66a9f27406f562e334405a0851e94ba382feb4da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23752' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
af8fd47a71c487a32ea3ef2ba8809679
80c8b01338974a3e80503a6e940aebc545aad042
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26486' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXA' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
92327b16172655f5f803c8ea18cbdb14
d4ce9bc714f3d128c6e6b55c508bcc179352e096
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101511' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXB' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
b35cfdb3d7481e4c6984fb3c50f313ea
2a337e744383dc8ad33b1f53ca6eb5250a99b90d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'58755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e56c97252471be371b966b527feb767d
59003e915f9717058250101ef4384428b356e2c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
0c0e78b587e7a96c7ddca51c8df9fbc6
f8c781b404ccf4f8143b818eed6768391c829826
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80963' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXE' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
efcd602d757d03ce603d5e35e51d5126
005d480751dffbd4ccc1da6d5321404614eb9db4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84563' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
3f08b4dcb9a24814af5634b498a50888
8dbd00a4f39b66d3333bd7eb78faf5b6259b632d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXG' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
c3abdbe01d74e56b4cb56c5f33202a31
1e8666eb3684096bc1678bc4bb60f331fa2e5fb4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXH' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
bc5735659de50e9078c1cfecd188553d
cb6bb72f8406949efa425cb633204ac5c3874b5b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'76517' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
b59f7d2033394cc31aef47b95da91d90
ec130c4810e71b371c2fa13bb867cad4ebe3c94f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81487' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
f7e6fbc2fd325961dc4d59f76f73b0f9
19b068e56d16fd108a9769f17b95b3f70a6eb59e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81354' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXK' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
3f43e3531715ae0b7e6c0b397bb386fa
30ab5c8d569ddb39b15d9d355ba82f3c9391e7da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79835' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXL' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
a3b2d0e4fc6d5548270ba483acbbbb9e
72cb5e1412758aa0b865eca4f2849e3a942d0698
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82849' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXM' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2bdd30017ed44eaeb53005109c825ade
7cc24d85127456b99711c1da5a08cc66d8d927e0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80226' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
aa17d0d282854c1eacd1af4505ec83ae
5b3fd2578b708f2ded18757e54a196051bedda4c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXO' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
9a6df916383508dedbe046f550b29274
924a45f51f4bf2f2d3900fd0f96cfc7ec0c03c3f
'2011-12-16T17:28:32-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77090' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
23e91b1b46fdbd09cb8d1021eb62d3f6
6081466a81907e80ba4a020f104b18916ae01c3c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
8538c2c5fcc10a1ed5cae150be1f0147
da15f95dd714dfc45da5fc6702b6f7d4c24af381
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81574' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXR' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
d0d88f61ff5accf891092fd74f9c076e
715c17b67106d70afe0400c153a62bd278d3efa7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a8feabd2c4893e61bb5b375df511d2f7
7e8ab3082bf526ccc244030da6471b241348e65d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88908' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
4356e578bc132d05bf1f90e8514c9741
7ff23486bdcb8f02f0b83b48dfbc7709e5b6625c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82486' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXU' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
1a3d008288188432297d18663bb29825
ef127b2330fcf502ec78bc795edb957383ea23d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88009' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXV' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
905e27ef302c527b679deee1fa130d51
452aa6f07120f428da264779070d3066b9b3bffb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79725' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXW' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
e93093381107187fcefc3c8b9eea3e57
ec8507775698d9f3d529be653e8347d7724dc45a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
6b2aba541f2ec607410fe512781830c7
a04fa97b8e9fe02ef79fabd3e4aadd4b4bcc3d8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80085' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXY' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
62860fe47f3c91d2dd324ea982a9d5c4
ff29cab95d982899c2927cbb01a8bb56695ec8b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84887' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWXZ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
d43ed4ddfa533d1f3ca31a7e4ebad2b7
d70d32d2491bf182e65c2f3ee3411fd01251e49b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
9f8c52cfdbf39e79044d55436a946706
ac98b80a8050edc3ccd5c3893330aaf1b41da27f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYB' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
984d52c614fbad0ae70f4eda44326b15
d9a5c519abba1c7c54d2b97c06c3035bdd5c62ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82331' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
2d02c56aae895e4ce3c549796a3f4126
16ed05713306c275f68124a7d5e66b5526645f89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYD' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0a88664063312fe204c24faa6824439e
6d7554d03acc23a836b80ff126faa04cb0c1a83b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYE' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
9933bab03bd6afc7bdab4e4d346d4403
b198b305257e06d5239c3da0f37437593a3d1264
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79142' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYF' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
28cdf180ffb7b8384940ae5351a5f3cf
db3bd7a9efba661bb1b5ae8341907a8827b622d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85024' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYG' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
2cf1e3ef26335ffcb88423c41706c036
aa775172ab3b301256b457d614cb9e002edd764f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81327' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYH' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
235e20444205e2204a43ac9cd648e3a7
fe9a325897a92409d6678ad75d05999924e9ba3a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYI' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
080dc6fb40fbf3ece1f8d499fca95054
864fd009c4221518ef88c42708626e7a4a793477
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79686' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYJ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
a3d92d5fd995421b2b24a684fab4be44
59044c59f220350b7f1b3422f8e03125407b3bea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77578' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYK' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
5c733eb224a2092aa9cc2fd14d02fc5e
5d0f07f28b50cb379eb05848828d396985f80f37
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYL' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
2856d49c45b55d73d35f2143da38dafc
4898b273a50b3af3e63ac6eb8e69730637ceca79
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81397' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYM' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
3a2213ee3ae284e878df950eb87dac56
f6a9e97ceeaa9c70a61ff04043bd1ddd804b350e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86377' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
12aef668d828a912370c7fcde8328a1a
cd394a5d4ff7a01d2b7e4d816241d378acb7e9f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84918' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYO' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
5019802677fd83f72587b69d4c89ba37
cc0539e8febdaa5477091779b96f50be3a780189
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'66371' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYP' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
7b7ce6464b486533209511b1694e19d4
d2edc164a63220a27f4599a85393ab774519b4a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26105' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYQ' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
34bc85ba90bb1ccd0125a0d6de595328
33fd3a4b1c667e214dd9ea777d5100b2d428144e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21798' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYR' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
a91ae70157f527898de50b94b2a9405f
26d58762ed443c3efd6c2650f6abef5c0545e7df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'57300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYS' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
9386cbf720b539c81550ad1791740fea
6ab6321e2c08ed5a4c93268c6e0a36d0cde56124
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'68254' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYT' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
63657d9507fc2f0a24e21c9da077eb6b
ed654a62d51b7c9f235a41cd1aca604b71c868a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'75611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYU' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
3cae70d5f4e05246b61c528a5b1a1283
656990d7044fef940336d8879c619a220113b558
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYV' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
e523d304bf3d33ecf94cec4e94265877
6e33c9cb5960e1b240fae304eaaf0eb3e534b11d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79777' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYW' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
66182b232eedc363c592f6f620756f5a
2afb51807d7d271b41cbb7c586cf0ffc6cc4e82a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80734' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYX' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
b973a43ec8269ba32d3d8523349eb18b
071b2d25aa70f07405519ffb14b18c3e09503c80
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77545' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYY' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
cb2403de2210d45cf5b8ae01dcb7bc19
4a00c9ceaa894be89bdeddac311049352271c4c7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74734' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWYZ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
197b38904da2a9b2a3ecb4f2956cfb50
7fce4df179086ab1b6d9ea4b8e073da55d3a7452
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80178' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZA' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
86efef81f833d3b1e6e7c4445ce07e51
70bf4426f866ee9fc392dd779f1fc61d4261bb24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78038' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZB' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
2206bf95e4d12db559768bf7b839caf8
afdaef7a2c507488da5bad907d0bedc7edba8dcf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82677' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZC' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
980397152ab6aee948e6f0baac6b84ca
b54ef70c1d0fbb21315793d26ac84e478d92e60e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'78427' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZD' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
8910af94e5f18ab10219b3f4b9802e31
741592c7c62f040b02086e3ce0dc313dbb3c09d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79311' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZE' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
fa63d2d3330fc708887eec0a693ec5a2
706dce0c4ca99b1dfe8545c94873507c6e7d3dc5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80045' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZF' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
088a64b58a9c618deab2afbc4ec46499
3a26a30181dd579c50072b98f304282ef9a3af5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73955' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZG' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
4e0a7a872a5bd60656edbd7659b7b60e
5ad99be5b06c970fad7f3fb788771a12982a99b3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'74563' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZH' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
5cbfde1f619f67e442fc69ea0c639c8b
a59eba887c59777363255192b2d7505b37ca3a02
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'73094' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZI' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
0be22ec8e7fdedff393e24cbdf74384d
ee858c7fcf90732a997ebf23717b24f76828b87b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'80324' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZJ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
64a0ff848c1dcc7ffc292d0fe28da8df
5f473d7ba19dda073dd9f931ba63b998830bdaf2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48628' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZK' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
a6463f4ccb75e3364bb90cdc2df9a6c9
2091ce68db4d676f6ca00e21346a198656f6adee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'44202' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZL' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
bef7b6116b5379b1423a8810ce73b618
a5238e979cc7014025820bdb67c74f0bce2c8327
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'69808' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZM' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
4fa557fd9ee7de9cd573228d59ed905d
081803c4f62ef21d81509acf120b27d64871329d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26053' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
66eeecf0c6b0a59fa8b4c5e5a2d225db
ce9aaadbabb7fc37c5d2f9434c5fe6691a35131b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZO' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
a03db3644592a6675b6725602219185f
96e47323b78efcb3a66909ed21b0a33f081c5c4a
describe
'321330' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAUfileF20080530_AABWZP' 'sip-filesUF00003223_00001.mets'
dbac232fd202686b6e55f3da22185def
8f58568c9c7748494b3255769a8886a741dc1fa0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T02:51:54-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.












Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM Error Log for UF00003223_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:36 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:37 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:38 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:39 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00146.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00146.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00147.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00147.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00148.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00148.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00149.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00149.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00150.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00150.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00151.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00151.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00152.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00152.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00153.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00153.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00154.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00154.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00155.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00155.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00156.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00156.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00157.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00157.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00158.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00158.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00159.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00159.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00160.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00160.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00161.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00161.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00162.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00162.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00163.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00163.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00164.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00164.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00165.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00165.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00166.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00166.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00167.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00167.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00168.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00168.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00169.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00169.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00170.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00170.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00171.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00171.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00172.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00172.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00173.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:40 PM 00173.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00174.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00174.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00175.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00175.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00176.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00176.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00177.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00177.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00178.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00178.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00179.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00179.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00180.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00180.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00181.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00181.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00182.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00182.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00183.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00183.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00184.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00184.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00185.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00185.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00186.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00186.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00187.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00187.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00188.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00188.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00189.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00189.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00190.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00190.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00191.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00191.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00192.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00192.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00193.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00193.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00194.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00194.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00195.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00195.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00196.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00196.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00197.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00197.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00198.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00198.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00199.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00199.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00200.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00200.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00201.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00201.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00202.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00202.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00203.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00203.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00204.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00204.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00205.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00205.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00206.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00206.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00207.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00207.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00208.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00208.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00209.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM 00209.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:37:41 PM