Citation
The Illustrated girl's own treasury specially designed for the entertainment of girls and the development of the best faculties of the female mind

Material Information

Title:
The Illustrated girl's own treasury specially designed for the entertainment of girls and the development of the best faculties of the female mind
Creator:
Tuck, H ( Printer )
Leighton, John, 1822-1912 ( Binding designer )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Ward & Lock ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Ward and Lock
Manufacturer:
H. Tuck
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
xvi, 480 p., <2> leaves of plates : ill. (some col.), ports.,charts ; 19 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Religious poetry, English ( lcsh )
Women in the Bible -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Handicraft -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Nature -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Months -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1861 ( lcsh )
Musical works -- 1861 ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1861 ( local )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1861 ( rbbin )
Signed bindings (Binding) -- 1861 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Music ( fast )
Hand-colored illustrations ( local )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Signed bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Includes index.
General Note:
Added t.p., engraved and hand-colored.
General Note:
Ill. engraved and signed: E. Evans.
General Note:
Binding design signed: "JL" <i.e. John Leighton.>
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026822262 ( ALEPH )
48011125 ( OCLC )
ALH2387 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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:





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LONDON: WARD AND LOCK, 158, FLEET STREET.



THE

TLEUSTRATED

GIRL'S OWN TREASURY

SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR

Che Guertainment of Girls

AND THE

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST FACULTIES
OF THE FEMALE MIND;

EMBRACING

BIBLE BIOGRAPHY OF EMINENT WOMEN;
RUDIMENTS OF ORNAMENTAL NEEDLEWORK WITH DESIGNS FOR PRESENTS;
TALES OF PURPOSE AND POEMS OF REFINEMENT;
CHAMBER BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING;
MUSIC, HISTORY OF FANS, VEILS, AND PURSES; PHENOMENA OF THE MONTHS,
AND WILD FLOWERS;

IN-DOOR EXERCISES AND OUT-DOOR RECREATIONS ;

BY THE

e
Eprron oF THE “InnusTrRaTED Boy’s Own Treasury.”

LONDON:
WARD AND LOCK, 158, FLEET sTRULT
*
M DCCC LXI.



PREFACE.

Recreative Education for Girls has scarcely received the attention
in Literature that it demands. Much in this department has been
done for Boys, for whom Science has been popularised, and active
Games multiplied; but their young sisters have been allowed to waste
too many of their home hours in frivolity and indolence, until they
indeed come to regard the great world as a Nursery, or a Vanity Fair.

Intellectual pursuits awaken neither the envies nor the jealousies so
apt to spring up in girlish bosoms. The more varied the range of ideas
in girls, the less room for conceit, presumption, and folly. Recreative
Education corrects bad temper, produces gentleness, feeds the ‘small
sweet charities,” and effectually counteracts the chilling apathy of
modern fashionable manners.

In Recreative Education we place foremost the culture of the heart.
It is of no mean consequence to prompt the susceptibilities of girls to
expand generously, and to elevate them above the narrow range of
common life. Nothing is more likely to do this than the study of
female character in its higher manifestations, especially in the Bible,
where every form of feminine virtue is to be found. Hence the Bible
Stories of Eminent Women in this volume. Following the Sacred
narrative with strict fidelity, the Writers interweave with the wonderful
Scriptural outlines such matter as, without any violation of truth, may
interest the feelings and the fancy of the young, and convince those
who have not yet taken delight in the Inspired Work, that it contains
the most marvellous and delightful, as well as the most amusing and
instructive, feminine episodes in the world.

The second department of this volume proceeds upon the assumption
that every little girl will be glad to have placed in her hands complete
rudimental instructions in all the branches of Ornamental Needlework.
No other teacher than this book will be necessary for any intelligent
girl to learn Crochet, Netting, Knitting, Embroidery, all thie varieties of
Lace and Wool-work, Tapestry, Braiding, Tambour, &c. ‘The Directions
given are full and clear; and the few choice Designs that accompany
them are easily worked out.

Paper Modelling can be learned from our Instructions and Diagrams,



iv PREFACE,

and by this means the drawing-room can be made gay throughout the
winter. Paper imitations of flowers, tastefully arranged in a vase, may
be made to exhibit a bouquet fit for an Empress. Here also will be found
constructed the Feather-screen for the winter fire, Omamental Paper for
the grate in summer, and splendid imitations of Porcelain in Sevres,
Ntruscan, Japanese, and Assyrian—all which may be produced with
positive certainty and facility.

Our third department consists of Readings selected with great care
from German and other poctry—from fairy lore and domestic life.

In describing Chamber Birds, and how to manage them, the Editor
has been guided by the conviction that girls will always love to have
birds in their homes; and, as it is just possible to make the little captives
happy there, the instructious show how this may be accomplished. But
at the same time, we have carefully urged on our fair young friends the
better part of studying birds in their own natural state of wild
freedom, where—

“Greater power have they the heart to reach,
To please, to soothe, to animate, and cheer;

Sweet lessons of content and hope to preach,
And waken holy thoughts and meniories dear.’”

With an aim to aid physical development, we give a set of
Calisthenic Exercises, with postural diagrams, that, when moderately
adopted as a pleasure, and not as a toil, will be found highly beneficial
to health and deportment.

The Aquaria is minutely described, as a means of studying curious
aquatic plants, insects, and reptiles,

In “Summer in the Woods” the young reader is taken to Nature’s
grandest solitudes, where the girl is brought face to face with the Creator
in His noblest works. She is also here taught the Phenomena of the
Months, and is led to the flowers of each in the succession in which
they spring forth in their lovely haunts.

Thus the Girv’s Own 'TREASURY will be found varied and interesting,
a book of refined occupation and elevated thought, and a companion that
the most sensitive and cautious parent may place in the hands of a
Girl, with perfect confidence in its capacity to amuse, instruct, refine,
and encourage in nearly every useful pursuit and elegant recreation,
both in and out of doors, throughout the year.



IN



DEX.

Che Mlustrated Girl's Olon

Creasurp of Bible Stories of Eminent Women.

PAGK
Drvoran 7 . : : : : . 6o
Estruer, QUEEN : . . . . . 37
JEHOSHEBA : : : . : . : jl
JEPHTHAH’S Davairen . : : : . . 26
JUDITH . : : . . : : 59
MRAM . : . . : 7 . 1b
hurn. : . . . . . . 5
Che Alusirates Gils Oo

Creasurpy of Fancy Work.
Beruw Work, Genera Insrrucrions IN . 7 : 107
Berlin Work, raised . : . . : . 107
” to iron . . : : : 108
Cross Stitch . . . . . . 107
German Stitch ‘ : . . : . 107
Trish Stitch . . . . . . 107
Tapestry Stitch . . : . . . 107
Tenth Stitch . . . . . . 107
Beruww Work, Marzerians rox . . . . 115
French-German Canvas . . . . : 113
Imitation Silk Canvas . . 7 : : 115
Java Canvas : . . . ‘ . Lid
Patent, or French Canvas . . : : . lis
Penelope Canvas : : . : % ., 113
Railway Canvas . : : : : . V4
Silk Canvas . . : . : . ils

Wools to use with Canvas 7 . 7 : . Li



vi INDEX,

/ PAGE
Bueaps : . . : : . 121
Beads, proper Canvas for . : : . : 122

» Bugles . . . : . . 122

x5 Cut. . . . . : . 122

» Faney : : : : . . 122

>> Metal . . ; . . . 122

1» ‘Seed : : : : . . 122

vy =O. PL” : : : . . . 121

» Pound : : : : . . 121
Bertia’s CHorce . . . . : . 79
Brarps (Silk). : . . . . : 118
Alliance. 7 : : . . . 119
Albert . . : . . . : 119
Kugenie Braid . . . . . 119
Russian ,, : . : : . . 118
Sardinian ,, ; : : : : : 119
Soutache ,, . . . . . . 119
Star ” . : : . : . 119
CrotH Work, Gexeran Insrrucrions UN : : . : 109
Application, or Applique Work : . . . 109
Braiding . : . . : . Loy
Patent Imperial Applique : : : ; 7 109
CHENILLES : 5
Embroidery Chenille . ; . . : 5
Wire = : ; ; : . 115
CRocHET : : : . . : : 83
Chain, to work under a - . : : : . 86
Cord, to work over. . . . . 86
Chain, to work in both sides of a . : : : 86
Chain-stitch : . . . : . 83
Colours, to work with several . . . . . 85
Double Chain-stitch . : : : . . 83
Double Crochet : 7 ; : : : 84
Edge, to Contract an : : : : . 85

» to Enlarge an . : : : : . 85
Hands, Position of the : . : . ; 83
Long Square Crochet . : . : . 85
Long Treble Crochet . . ; : 7 84
Ribbed Crochet . . . . . . 84
Short Double Crochet : . . : . 84

Short Treble Crochet . . . : . 84.



INDEX.

CROCHET, continued -—
Single Crochet
Slip Stitch .
Square Crochet
‘Thread, to join a
Treble Crochet

CrocHrr witH BEADS .
Cotton and Beads, to choose which will work well together . .
D’Oyleys, and similar articles, to mark the commencement of a round in
Foundation Chain, which is afterwards to be worked in set Patterns,

the simplest way of counting .
Jewelled D’Oyleys, to increase in
Square Crochet Pattern, to produce work of any dimension from? a

Corrons
Coloured Cottons
Crochet 7

Knitting ,,
Mecklenburgh T’ hread

Moravian s
Patent Glace 5
Royal Embroidery Cotton
Tatting ”

Corron Bratps
Kugenie Tape
French White Cotton ‘Braid
Italian
Mohair
Maltese
Russia Cotton
Waved
Worsted

DustaNns
Bible Markers
Bridal Glove Box
Crochet Flowers for my Aunt
mbroidered Shoe for Baby
Greek Purse
Gold-fish Globe Mat
Hand-Screen, in raised Berlin Work
Jewel Box for Mamma
Pen Wiper, for Papa’s W) riting- Table
Silk Net for the Hair . :
Vine-leaf Travelling Cap for my Brother . .

vil
PAGE

84
84
84
385
84

87
S7

37
87
87

17
118
118
WT
118
118
118
118
118

19
120
119
120
119
120
119
120
120

130
133
137
142
136
159
140
130
157
134
144
130



viii INDEX.

EMbROWERY ON Mvsiinx, GENERAL Instructions roi

Broderie Anglaise
Fancy Stitches :
Guipure

Hem Stitch
Mourning Hem Stitch
Satin >
Swiss Lace . .

FEATHER ORNAMENTS

IMPLEMENTS :
Beadwork Implements
Chenille ,, .
Crochet Implements .
Elliptic
Gauge .
Knitting —,,
Lucette, A.
Netting
Rug Needles
Tatting »
KNIrTING
Brioche Stitch . .
Cast-Off, to . . :
Casting On
Garter Stitch
Knit rapidly and easily, to
Moss Stitch

Plain Knitting : . .
Purling . . .
Libbed Knitting . . .
Round, to join a 2 . .

Stitches, to make

Slip, to

Stitch, to raise a

Sock, &e., to join the toe of a
Take in, to

Twisted Knitting

Lace Work, GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN.
Antwerp Lace

Barcelona Lace ‘ :
Brussels Lace : . .
Cadiz Lace .

PAGE
Tity
110
110
110
10
Li}
110
10



Lace Work, continued :

Close Diamond
Cordovan

English

English Rosettes
Escalier Stitch
Fan Lace
Florentine Lace
Foundation Stitch
Henriquez Lace
Mechlin Wheels
Materials, The
Open Diamond
Open Antwerp
Open English Lace

Roman »”
Spotted ”
Sorrento #

Spanish Rose Point
Valenciennes Lace

Venetian Spotted Lice

Venetian

Gold and Silver Beads .
Gold and Silver ‘hread and Braid :

Steel Beads
Violet .
White Articles

MISCELLANEOUS :—
Banner Screens, to make up
Carriage Bags, to make up
Crochet, Contractions in

Drawing Paper

INDEX.

MATERIALS, to l’reserve from Injury . .

Engraved Pattern, to inerease size of

Hand-Screens, to mount
Knitting, Coutractions in

Netting 7
Printer’s Marks

Ribbon for Trimming, to Quilt

Sofa Cushions, to make up
Tatting, Contractions in
Metan MArTeriats

Bourdon
Bullion.



x INDEX.

PAGE
Mera MATERIALS, continued :—

Brussels Net . . . . . . 121
Filet : : . : : . . 121
Guipure Net . . : . : : 121
Gold Braid. : . : : : 120
Gold Cord or Thread . . : . . . 120
Spangles . . : ° : : : 121
Silver Braid : . : , . . 120
Toile Cire . . : : : ‘ . 121
NETTING . . . : . . 91
Beads, to work with . . . : . : 95
Double Stitch . . . . . . 95
Diamond Netting. : . . . . 94
Embroidering on Netting . . . . 96
Fancy Stitches—Round Netting . : : . 92
Flanders Lace Work, General Instructions in : ; . 96
Grecian Netting : . . . : : 93
Ground Net . : . 7 . : 93
Honeycomb Netting . : . 7 . : 93
Long Stitch . : . . . : 95
Leaf Netting : . 7 - 7 : 95
Large Diamond Netting * . . . 7 94
Long Twisted Stitch . . . . . . 93
Mesh . . : . : . 95
Netting, Preparation ‘for 7 : . 91

Netting of six, eight, or ten sides, wi orking from the centre, to make a
piece of . : : : : : : 92
Oblong Netting . . . . . . 92
Plain Netting . . . . . 91
Spotted Diamond Netting 7 : . . : 95
Spotted Netting : : : : : . 94
Square —,, . . : ; . . 91
ORNAMENTAL Grate Parris 7 . : . . 71
Pont Lacy Work, Generar INsrrucrions 1 : . : 96
Bars . * . 7 =. . . 98
Brussels Edge . . . . . 97
Dotted Venetian Bars . : . . . 99
Edged ” % . . . . : 98
English ss . . . . : 99
Grounding ” 7 : : . ; 99
Little Venetian Edging : . : . . 97
Point Edge . . : . : . 97

Raleigh Bars . . : . . . 98



INDEX. xi

PAGE
Point Lace Work, continued :—

Point D’Alencon Bars . . 7 : . 99
Sorrento Edge : . . : : : 97
s> Bars : : : : . . 98
Venetian Bars : : : : : 98
>> Edging : . . : : ; 97
SiLtk MATERIALS 7 : : 7 : . 114
Chine Silk . . . : . . . 115
China . . ; . . . . 115
Crochet. . . : : : : 114
Dacca . . : : . . . 115
Filoselle . 7 : . . : . 115
Floss Silk . . . : . . . 115
Netting. : : : : 7 . 114
Ombre . . : . : . . 115
Sewing : . . . . 7 : 116
Soie D’ Avignon : . . . : 114
Tambour Work, General Instr actions i in . . : 112
Tapestry Work, General Instructions in : : : 108
TATTING, OR FRIVOLITE, GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN . . 105
Double Stitch : : . . . . 106
English ,, : : . : . : 105
French ,, : : . : . 106
Hands Position of the : : : : . 105
Loops, to join : . 7 : . . 106
Picot . : . . : . . 106
Tatting, to Wash —. . . : . . 106
TRIMMINGS . : . ° : : . 124
Banner Screens . . : . 7 . 125
Cords . : 7 . . . . 125
Fringes. : . . : 7 125
Gercrude, like Grerin im, with purse silk . . . . 124
Gimps : : : . : : : 125
Sereen Handles : . . : . 125
Sofa Cushions : : . . 7 : 124

Woots : : . . 7 .
Berlin Wool . . . . . . 116
Carpet Yarn . . . : : . 116
Chine Wool : : . > : » & . 7
Crewels . : 7 7 7 : L17
Crochet Cord . . . . . : ll7
Crystal Twine . : . . . . 117

»» Wools . : : : : . il



xii INDEX.

. PAGH
Woots, continued :—
Fleeey . : . : . . 116
Ombre Wool, or Shaded Wool . : : . : 7
Hutton’s Patent Orne Balls. : : ; : 117
Patent Knitting Wool : : : : : 116
Pearl Wool : : : : : . 7
Pyrenees. : . : : : . 116
Shetland . 7 . : : . . 116
Worsted and Lamb's Wool : . : : . 116
Parrer PLAstTIQUF, or Parrn MODELLING 7 . : 45
Church Font, Design for : . 7 7 . 156
Cottage, Design for . : : : . . 145
Lectern, or Lettern, Design for : 7 : 7 162
Materials and Implements : : : : . 146
Village Church, Design tor. : . : 7 150
Paper Fiowers, Arr oy Mopr_uinc . : : . 166
Porrcu Manis, or Imrrarion Porcensin 7 . : 175
Woop Suavincs, FLowrns or. : : . : es
Pink, Directions for . . : : . . 168
Rose ” . : : . : . 169
VELVET, PAINTING ON. : . : : : 175

Che Alustrates Gal's Olun







Creacury ot Readings in Prose and Poetry.
A Burial
Bessy andher Dog. : : .
Bird Talisman, the . . .
Birth of the Snowdrop : . .
Fans, a Flight upon . 7 7 .
Little Kate : . : . . .

N Little Girl's Lament, the : . . . . 296
Love : . : 7 . : . Boy
Miss Tabby . . 7 . : : 257
Moss Mantle : . . . . 7 282
My Mother’s Wateh . . : . : : 248
Queen Victoria, a Visit to 26
Silver Pencil, the. . . . . . 251
The Broken Flower . ‘ 7 . . 7 26)
Stockings, and their Antiquity . . : : 287
The Hedge Feast. - : . . ,

N The Road to Paradise . 7 : :



Two Rose Trees, the : . : . 7
Violet, the Fate of the : : 7 : : 285



INDEX. xiii

Che Allustrated Girl's Of
@esuswey af Bios any Bird-heeping.



PAGE

BrriisH Brrps . : : . . . 308
Blue Tit. . . . . . 340
Bullfneh . . . . . . 35

Blackbird, or Black Thrush. . . : : 346

” Story of . . : : ° . 349
Buatings . : : : . : . 357
Canary Finch . : : : . 305
Chafinch . : : : 7 : . 321
Cole Tit. : : . . 7 . 339
Crossbills and Buntings : . : . : 355

” Parrots. . . : . . 356
Cockatoos . : : : . : . 362

Vieldfare . . : . . : . 344
Goldfinch . 7 . . : . 312

Great Tit. . : 7 . rs 338
Greentinch . : : : - 7 . 326
Grosbeaks . . . : . . . 337

” the Cardinal : : : : . 337

” Pine . : : : 7 337
ilawfinch . . . : 7 . 7 228
Larks 7 : : . 7 359
Linnets : . . . . . . 322
‘Lories . . . . . . . B64
Macaws. 7 . : 7 : . 360
Missel, or Storm Thrush : 7 : . : 342
Mountain Finch : . . 7 7 : 3522
Meadow Lark : . . 7 . . 354
Nightingale : : > 358
Parrots . . : . . ° . 560
Parakeets . . : : . . . 364
Pipit or Woodlark . . : . . : 398
Robin Redbreast . 7 . : . . 360
Redwing Thrush : . : . . ° 345
Serin, or Citril Finches : . - . . 329
Siskin, or Aberdevine 7 7 . : . 330
Song Thrush . : : . . . 342
Thrushes . . . . : . & 7 342
Tits : : . . . ° . 337
Titlark, or Pipit : . : 7 . . 353
Toucans . . 7 : 5 : . 862

Woodlark . . . . . ° . 35!



xiv INDEX.

The Allustrated Girl's Of
Greasury of {n-door Exercises.

PAGE

CALISTHENICS . : : . . : 37h
Backboards 7 , : . : : 373
Club Practice . . . . . . 379
Dumb Bells . . 7 . : 7 372
Dumb Bell Practice : : - . 375, 388, 389:
Elastic Cord Exercises 7 . . . . 384
Long Backboard Exercises . . . . : 377
Balance Step : . 7 . : 354
Short Backboard Brercises . : 7 : . 378
Triangle, Exercises with the . . : : . 387
Walking . : . . . . 383
Wand, or Pole Exercises : . : : . 381

MARINE AND FresH- WATER AQUARIA : : . . 391

Music, How an Expr Sister MAY Traci A YOUNGER THE RUDIMENTS OF 400
Buss, or F'. Clef—Names of the Notes. . . 401
Brace, Bar, and Measure, and of Triple and Common Time : 409
Ledger Lines in the Treble Clef : : : 7 102

5, Bass Clef : : : 404
Notes and their Names in Bass and Treble Clefs . : . 405
» of the six different sorts of : : . : 406
5 of the Value of : , . . 407
5, of the Dotted, and of the Rests . : . . 408
Treble, or G. Clef—Names of the Notes . . . : 400
Che Alustrated Girl's Ob

Creusurp of Ont-door Recreations.

PHENOMENA OF THE Montus .
January. : . 7 . : 7 ALT
February . . . : . : : 421
March . : . . . . . 426
April . . . . . . . 432
May . . . : . : : 473
June : : 7 . " : : 443
July : . . . . . . 449
August . . : s . . : 452
September . . . . . : : 458
October, ‘ . ° . 7 7 466.
November . . . e : : . 471

ecem yar . . . ° . . . 476



SUMMER IN THE Woops:

Witp FLowers or tHe Monrus .
JANUARY—Archangel

Chickweed
Groundsel

Frsrtary—Catkin, Drooping

Dwarf, Elder
Daisy

Elder
Snowdrop

Marcu—Butter Burs
Common Coltsfoot

Dandelion .
Spurge Olive
Spurge Laurel

Aprit—Daffodil

Celandine
Crowfoot
Gowlan, or Gowan
Hawthorn

Marsh Marigold
Primrose

Vernal Speedwell
Wallfiower .
Willow

‘Wood Ansmones
Wood Sorrel

MAy—Auricula Primrose

Cowslip

Common Bugles
Cuckoo Flowers
Harebell Squill
Stitshwort .
Narcissus

Pale Daffodil .
Purple Columbine
Periwinkles
Polyanthus
Primrose

Scotti h Primrose
Wai cr Crowfoot
Wood Crowfoot

INDEX,



INDEX.

PAGR
Juxnzr—Broom . : : : , . 444
Bee Flower . . : - 7 7 447
Fly Ophyrs . a : : . 7 447
Gorse . . : . . - 446
Long Yellow Broom. ; : : . 445
Jury—-Alpine Fox-ail : . 7 : . 451
Bird-knot Grass 7 . 7 7 ‘ 451
Meadow Fox-Tail : : - - . 451
Silky Bent Grass : : - . . 451
Avoeust—F orget-me-not . 7 - . . 457
Melancholy Thistle . ; - 7 - 463
Purple Foxglove. : 7 : 7 54
Rosy Bay Willow Herb : . . « 455
Wild Teasel : : - : 7 458
Srprempen—Cyanus . . * : 461
Campion Cue koo Flower . . : ‘ 460
Common Agrimony . . . - 464
Common Shepherd’s Needle : : . 459
Field Scabious . . : : ° 461
Red Corn Cockle : : : . 460
Spatling Poppy : : - . 465
Small Bindweed ;: : . - 459
Strong-scented Lettuce . « : : 465
Yellow Goat’s-beard . . . 7 461
Ocroprr—Alpine Bartsia : . : - . 469
Dutch Clover : . 7 7 : 468

Evening Primrose . P : . ‘ 469 .
Field Marygold. : : 7 . AGT
Honeysuckle, Trefoil : : * . 468
Meadow Saffron. : : . . 470
Spouse of the Sun . : : . = AGT
Yellow-viscid Bartsia : . . : 469
NovemBer—Autumnal Saffron : . : - 473
Naked Flowering Crocus, . . . 473
Vernal Crocus. : 7 : : 473
Water Horehound : 7 : AT4.
DecrMBER—Black Briony —. : . . . 477
Red-cup Lichen . . . . - 478
Scarlet Conferva . ; . 7 478
Scarlet Cartilaginous Hely ella a ; : . * 478
Scarlet Peziza . . : 7 ° 479
‘Wake Robin 7 . 7 : : 479
Yew. . . . . . 478
Wild Brier Tree © : . - . 480

—6——



INTRODUCTION.

CuzErruL but wintry-looking sunshine streamed fitfully in
through the conservatory windows of the apartment, in which were
assembled Mrs. Selby and her young daughters, now at home for
the holidays.

“T have a surprise for you, girls!” said Mrs. Selby. ‘ Guess
if you can, what your Aunt Jane has sent you.”

Each guessed, but unsuccessfully. ‘We give it up, Mamma,”
they cried eagerly.

“ Very well; follow me.”

In the centre of an adjoining library stood a most exquisite piece
of furniture in English oak, inlaid and carved, and in itself an
elaborate specimen of workmanship.

Applying a key to a centre lock, Mrs. Selby threw open a pair of
folding doors, and revealed a Book-case and Cabinet; the former
furnished with richly-bound and illustrated volumes, and the latter
with a great variety of objects suitable for feminine employment
and recreation, all arranged in the daintiest order imaginable, on
shelves or in drawers, glass cases, and little odd nests and nooks.
Over the whole ran an ornamental scroll, in old English letters,

The Girl's On Treasury.

“ Now, girls,” said Mrs. Selby, “as this gift is intended by your
Aunt to be one of permanent interest and value, I expect you will
make it so by careful study.”

B



9 INTRODUCTION.

“ Indeed we will, Mamma.”

“ Well, then, let us begin this evening; and Bertha, as the eldest of
you, shall make choice of a subject.”

But the young ladies begged Mamma to take this privilege for
herself. She did so, and selected the following “ Bible Stories of
Eminent Women.”

“ Kvery young lady,” she said, ‘ought to be familiar with the lives
of Seripture female characters: they contain wonderful examples of
the highest and the gentlest feminine qualities—filial duty, sisterly
affection, patriotic self-devotion, domestic virtues, humility, patience,
resolution, piety, friendship, and truth. No other biographies in the
world can compare with them; and your Aunt’s object in preparing for
you the stories you are about to read, is solely to induce you to search
for yourselves the Sacred Treasury.”

“ This Book, this Holy Book, on every line
Mark’d with the seal of high divinity,
On every leaf bedew’d with drops of love
Divine, and with the eternal heraldry
And signature of God Almighty stamp’d
From first to last ; this ray of sacred light,
This lamp, from off the everlasting throne,
Mercy took down, and in the night of Time
Stood; casting on the dark her gracious bow,
And evermore beseeching us, with tears
And earnest sighs, to read, believe, and live.”—PoLox,



THE

ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

or

Hible Stories

or

EMINENT WOMEN.



“O, what makes woman lovely! Virtue, faith,

And gentleness in suffering ; an endurance
Through scorn or trial: these call beauty forth,

Give it the stamp celestial, and admit it
To sisterhood with angels.”
















THERE was a voice of mourning in Moab. A young man revelling
in the pride of youth and health was suddenly cut down in his prime.



6 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Yesterday he trod the carth a bright and glorious creature—now he lies
hopeless and motionless upon his flower-strewn bier. Around him are
weeping friends ; and the wail of hired mourners is the only sound which
disturbs the silence of the death-chamber.

At the head of the bier sat a melancholy group—his aged mother
Naomi, and her daughters-in-law. The years of Naomi had been many,
but the days of her pilgrimage had not been cloudless. Still, grief had
not bowed her down. Many a lightning shock had struck her, and
strewed the leaves of her beauty, and torn away her branches; but firm,
and trusting in her God, she bent to the blast only to arise more erect
than before.

Many years since a grievous famine drove her forth from her pleasant
home in Bethlehem to seek subsistence beyond the Jordan. Although
leaving her home for a strange land, the hope and courage of Naomi
failed not, for her husband, Elimelech, and two sons, Mahlon and Chilion,
were with her. Elimelech, being a man of rank, was well received by
Eglon, king of Moab, then ruler of Israel, which he had lately conquered.
by his arms, and who bestowed his young daughter Ruth upon Mahlon,
the eldest son of Naomi. Their happiness was short—Ehud dethroned
Eglon—poverty and death overtook the family of Naomi. Her heart
was filled with sharp anguish, but she knew her King, Jehovah, had
called her husband and sons, and her loyal heart submitted without a
murmur. Mahlon, her last son, now lies a corpse before her, but yet
she sits erect beside it.

Cast upon the floor in anguish of soul, her head buried in her mother’s
lap, Ruth, the widow of Mahlon, seems some tender flower, torn from
its resting-place by cruel tempests, and clinging for support to the
nearest thing. Orpha, widow of Chilion, sat on the cther side of Naomi,
wetting with her tears the long glossy tresses of the fair Ruth as she bent
over to comfort her, or looking up in wonder at the noble fortitude of
the high-souled Naomi.

Although Naomi bowed not at the storms of fate, there was a blight
at the core. She felt not her griefs the less that she gave them not
utterance. ‘The heart knoweth its own bitterness.” Apparently calm
she sat beside the bier of her last cherished one, her eyes fixed upon the
funereal linen which enveloped his body ; but her thoughts were sad, as
they recurred to her early home, her beloved husband, and darling boys.
Happier days arose before her ; loved forms came to view, and voices of



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, a

cherished lost ones were sounding in her ear. Mournful and lonely felt
she, then, when the death-trump summoning them forth aroused her, and
the last link which bound her to earth was torn away. Her heart
yearned for her home and friends of other days, and she inwardly
resolyed to leave the land where she had suffered so much misery, and
return to her loved Judea again.

A few days after the burial a train of camels was seen winding up the
side of a steep hill, which arose on the confines of Moab,—it was Naomi,
with her daughters-in-law, wending thcir toilsome way tothe land of Judea.
The females alighted upon the summit; and, while supper was preparing
under the oak trees, advanced to the brow of the hill, to gaze around
them. They looked upon a gloomy secne. Before them lay the Dead
Sea, —dark, stern, and motionless, — none could look upon its cold,
still surface, without a shudder. Bare, jagged cliffs, and hills of eyer-
lasting granite arose from its shores, shooting up their sterile peaks in
every direction. Orpah and the Princess Ruth gazed with sadness upon
this desolate scene, but a mournful smile broke over the face of Naomi.
“My daughters,” she said, ‘‘behold the famed salt sea! and, beyond,
the hills of Judea, my loved home, I sce thee at last! Now, Lord, let
thy servant depart in peace.”

This distant glimpse of the land they had chosen for a home was any-
thing but cheering to the forlorn young strangers; and turning from it
with a sigh, they gazed out over the verdant plains of Moab, adorned
with the glittering waves of the silver Arnon; over rich valleys, noble
temples, and cities now lighted up by the sun’s last rays.

“Oh, Moab, my country!” cried Orpah, stretching her arms towards
it, while tears rushed over her face,—‘‘ beautiful Moab ; I shall never
see thee more ; for the last time I gaze upon thy hills and palaces!”

Ruth gave not way to the passionate grief of her sister-in-law, but
stood, with her arms crossed, in resignation over her perfect form; her
lovely cheek pale with suppressed emotion, and her dark eyes fixed
mournfully upon the home she had left, thus brightly contrasted with
the one she was seeking.

“Naomi gazed upon her daughters-in-law, and her heart reproached
her for accepting their dutiful offer of accompanying her to Bethlehem.
They were young, and had many years of life and happiness before them ;
why should she tear them from their home and friends to follow her



8 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

footsteps to a strange land? ‘‘My daughters,” she said, advancing
toward them, ‘‘ pardon the selfishness of age and sorrow. I have suffered
my griefs so far to usurp all fecling—all thought—that not until now
have I seen the extent of the sacrifice you are making in leaving your
homes to accompany me. Return, beloved ones, ere it be too late, each
to her mother’s house ; there you will find wealth and repose, while with
me will be toil and care ;—and the Lord deal kindly with you, as ye have
dealt with the dead and with me!”

Ruth, without speaking, threw herself into Naomi’s arms and wept.
For one moment a flush of joy passed over the face of Orpah, but, check-
ing it, she turned to her mother-in-law, ‘‘ Nay, mother,” she said, “ask
us not to leave thee, for thou art old and lonely,’and we will return with
thee to thy land.”

‘Not so, my daughters. I have not many years to live, but ye are
young, and should marry again. In a strange land, alone, what would
ye do if I should die and leave ye? I have no more sons to give you to
protect you when I am gone.”

“Mother of my Mahlon!” said Ruth, raising her head from Naomi’s
bosom, where she had wept in silence—‘‘ Oh, bid me not leave thee !
With thee is every recollection of past happiness; past, never to return!
I have gazed with thee on his form in its pride, and with thee have I
wept in despair over his bier; can I then lose the light of that face
and that voice which ever brings his remembrance to my heart?” The
mother and widowed daughters lifted up their voices and wept. Soon,
however, Naomi resumed her solicitations, and Orpah, after many
passionate adieus, turned from her lonely mother and sister, and de-
parted—but Ruth clave to her. ‘Ruth, my daughter,” said Naomi
mournfully, ‘behold thy sister-in-law hath returned to her people and
her God ; follow her then, ere it be too late.”

““Entreat me not to leave thee!” exclaimed Ruth, pressing her
mother’s hand to her lips—‘ whither thou goest I will go; and where
thou lodgest I will lodge! Tell me not of my people and my God, for
thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Mother! where
thou diest I will die, and there I will be buried—and the Lord judge me
if aught but death part thee and me!”

Hour after hour passed away, and all were buried in sleep, except
Naomi and her faithful daughter-in-law. Upon the brow of the hill



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 9

they still remained in deep converse on high and holy matters; for Ruth
had asked her mother to instruct her in the faith of Israel.

Her memory stored with the traditions of her people, Naomi poured
into the wondering ear of the young Moabitess, the extraordinary history
of her race.

With mingled emotions of joy and sorrow Naomi stood on the shores of
Jordan. That stream, so celebrated in the history of her nation, told of
home and country. She remembered the day when she had passed it
with her husband and children—but now she had returned old, poor,
and lonely. Repressing these feelings, she strove to cheer up Ruth—
plucking for her the oleanders and myrtles with which its borders were
adorned, and pointing out to her notice the broken walls and ruined fanes
of Jericho; never to be rebuilt, under pain of God’s curse. A dark spot
were these gloomy ruins upon the fair plains stretching around it, now
rich with ripened harvest, and gay with the bright anemone and far-
famed rose of Jericho. A toilsome journey among hills and ravines
brought them in sight of Bethlehem. Yon green hill clothed with rich
groves of olive-trees, and crowned with graceful clusters of stately white
buildings, is indeed her home; but where are those whose noble forms
were at her side when, ten years before, she had left those walls? The
gate of Bethlehem was a noble structure, whose cool deep arch was the
favourite resort of the citizens for the purpose of talking over the news of
the day, or of gazing upon the travellers who passed through there.
Some of the friends of the bereaved widow were then seated there, who
gazed at her with earnest eyes as she rode along. ‘Time and sorrow had
done much to change her, but she was recognised at last. ‘‘ Naomi! Can
it be?” they cried. ‘Welcome, long lost Naomi—thy name speaks
truly now, for pleasant art thou to our sight once more.”

‘Call me not Naom, my friends,” said the widow, ‘call me Mara,
for bitterly hath the Lord dealt with me. I went out full, and the Lord
brought me home empty. Why then call my name Naomi, seeing the
Lord hath testified against me, and the Almighty hath afllicted me ?”

Q

Once more settled in her native home, the widow’s humble calmness
returned. Her friends were rejoiced to see her, and flocked around her,
endeavouring to alleviate her sorrowful fate. The years of famine and



10 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

trouble which they had seen left them little to give—but her own, and
Ruth’s industry, placed them above want.

Without the city gate arose a lordly mansion, surrounded by fields
and groves. This belonged to Boaz, a rich man, and relative of Elime-
lech, the husband of Naomi. To him she purposed to apply should she
need suceour, but for the present her humble wants were fully supplied.
During the time of barley-harvest Ruth observed her neighbours return-
ing each evening laden with grain gleaned from the fields around—why
should she not do the same, and thus add to the comforts of her mother-
in-law ? It was true her rank had prevented her from becoming familiar
with these menial offices, but she had devoted her life to her mother, and
determined to leave no efforts untried to soften her lot. Filled with
these thoughts she sought Naomi. ‘‘ Mother,” she said, ‘I see my
neighbours returning each evening laden with corn; let me, then, go
into the fields, and glean after any one in whose eyes I shall find
grace P”

“Go, my daughter,” said Naomi, ‘‘and the Lord bless thy kind
endeavours to lighten thy mother’s cares.”

The next day Ruth passed out of the gate, her heart joyous with the
idea of rendering her mother a service. It was a glorious morning, and
one moment she stopped to gaze out upon the fair and extensive view
spread beneath her. Over plain, hill, and vineyard the morning sun was
glancing, but she turned from the beautiful picture, and sighed, as her
eye fell upon the gloomy waters of the Dead Sea, which lay darkly gleam-
ing in the distance, for beyond its rocky shores arose the hills of her own
loved Moab. She turned hastily away, and sought the nearest farm.
It chanced to be the estate of Boaz, her husband’s princely relative.
Already were the reapers, each laden with a leathern bottle or gourd of
water, hastening to their work; and as they passed her, each turned to
gaze upon her stately loveliness. Ruth inquired for the overseer, and
proffered her humble request that she might glean in the fields that day.
Pleased with her sweet gentleness, he gave her the permission.

Soon after, the gates were thrown open, and Ruth, looking up from her
work, beheld a stately man approaching. His tunic of the softest wool,
his crimson silk girdle richly embroidered with gold and with silver, and
his mantle of the finest linen, proclaimed him a man of rank and wealth.
It was Boaz, the owner of the farm, ‘The Lord be with you,” he said
to the reapers as he passed.



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 11

‘The Lord bless thee,” they answered him. ‘ What lovely damsel is
this who followeth the reapers?” he asked. The overseer of the reapers
told him she was Ruth the Moabitess, and repeated what he knew of her
sad story. ‘‘ See to this young woman well,” said Boaz; ‘let her glean
among the reapers, for such picty deserves reward. Let her not follow
the men, for she is too lovely, but place her among my maidens.” Ruth
now approached, and Boaz called her to him.

‘‘Hearest thou, my daughter?” he said; ‘wander not about the
fields, but glean here in mine, and keep fast to my maidens. When thou
art athirst, ask the young men to draw for thee. Twill speak to them
that they treat thee well.” Ruth, grateful and surprised for this notice
from the master of the field, knelt at his feet and bowed her head before
him, saying, ‘‘ How have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest
thus kindly notice a stranger ?”

‘¢ All thou hast done to thy mother-in-law since the death of thy hus-
band hath been fully shown me,” said Boaz; ‘and how thou hast left
thy father and mother, and the land of thy nativity, and art come into a
people thou knewest not heretofore. The Lord recompense thy work, and
a full reward be given thee of the Lord God of Israel, under whose wing
thou hast come to trust.” The heart of the grateful Ruth swelled within
her. ‘‘ Let mealways find favour in thy sight, my lord,” she said, “ for
thou hast comforted me, and hast spoken friendly unto thy handmaid,
although I be not one of thy maidens.”

At mid-day the reapers all assembled to dinner, accompanied by Boaz.
Ruth was called, and was served by the master of the farm, who gave
her parched corn, bread, and vinegar with water, sufficient. When Boaz
departed, he gave Ruth into the care of the overseer, with a charge to
the reapers to leave a littie for her to glean as she followed. In the even-
ing all departed, and Ruth with them. She had beaten out her glean-
ings, which amounted to a bushel of barley. Smilingly she showed the
treasure to her mother-in-law, who in surprise exclaimed, ‘‘ Truly, thou
hast been successful, my daughter! where wroughtest thou to-day ?
Blessed be he who thus favoured thee.” ‘‘The name of the kind man in
whose field I gleaned was Boaz,” Ruth replied. ‘‘ Blessed be the Lord,
who hath not ceased his kindness to the living and the*dead,’’ said
Naomi. ‘‘ The man is a near kinsman to us. Keep, then, with his
maidens, Ruth, and wander not in other fields. The Lord will reward
thee, my child, for thy industry and thy piety.”



12 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The words of Ruth awakened a new hope in the aged widow’s heart.
She remembered the law of Israel, which, when a man dies, obliges the
next of kin to marry his widow, aud raise up an heir for his brother’s
name and estate.

“Our kinsman Boaz winnoweth barley to-night on the threshing
floor,”’ said Naomi to Ruth. ‘‘ Wash thyself, therefore ; anoint thee, and
put thy raiment upon thee, and get thee down to the threshing-floor ;
make not thyself known to him until he hath done eating and drinking ;
when he lieth down, mark the place ; and when he is asleep, lift up the
mantle which covers him, and lie down at his feet under cover, In our
nation, it is a token thou claimest the fulfilment of the law and his
protection.”

“All that thou biddest me I will do,” said the obedient, trusting
Ruth.

That evening Ruth took her way to the farm of Boaz. The threshing-
floor was a large level space in the field, surrounded by low walls and
barns. It was now piled with grain, among which the reapers were
busy, some driving oxen, others beating it out with a flail, or tossing it
on high that the wind might blow away the chaff, while the grain fell in
a heap on the ground. Boaz was there directing, and occasionally assist-
ing hismen, At nightfall they all partook of a feast together, master
and men. When all were satistied, they departed, some to their houses
in the city, some to rest among the straw under the wide-spreading
trees. Boaz had eaten and drank, for his heart was merry while thus
feasting with his men, and being weary, he threw himself upon a heap
of straw, and, spreading his large mantle over him, was soon asleep.
Ruth, who had been concealed, now approached. She feared not to follow
her mother’s directions, for she knew the wise Naomi understood the
customs of Israel well. Softly she came, and lifting his linen mantle,
laid herself down beneath its folds. At midnight, Boaz, in turning him-
self, awoke and discovered a woman at his feet—a woman who evidently
had a claim upon him, for she had sought the protection of his mantle.
“Woman! who art thou?” he exclaimed, in surprise and dread.

“Tam Ruth, thy handmaid,” she answered. ‘‘ Spread therefore thy
skirt over me, for thou art the nearest of kin to my husband.”

“Blessed be thou, my daughter,” said Boaz, ‘ for thou hast shown
more judgment and kindness in thy latter end than at the beginning, as
thou followest not young men, whether poor or rich, Now, my daughter,



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 13

fear not, I will do all thou requirest me, for I am thy near kinsman,
and all the city does know thou art a virtuous woman. Still, Ruth, there
is a nearer kinsman than I, whom thou knowest not: tarry this night,
and in the morning I will speak with him, and if he will perform unto
thee a kinsman’s part, and take thee to wife, it is well; let him do a
kinsman’s part according to law: but if he will not perform his duty to
thee, then will I, as the Lord liveth! Lie down until morning.”

Ruth laid quietly at her kinsman’s feet until daybreak, when she
gently arose to withdraw. Boaz, who was awake, called to her, “ Hold
out thy veil, and take a measure of barley,” he said. ‘Go not empty to
thy mother-in-law.”

Ruth was enveloped in a large linen wrapper, used as a veil, one end
of which she held out, while her generous relative poured into it six
measures of barley. Then, receiving his blessing, she hastily returned
home.

That day Boaz appointed ten of the elders of Bethlehem to meet him
at the city gate. It was the hour when he knew the other kinsman of
Elimelech would be there. He had saluted the elders, and they had
taken their seats, when the kinsman appeared. ‘ Ho, Peloni! turn aside
and sit down here,” cried Boaz. He obeyed the call, and Boaz addressed
him thus: :

“Naomi, who has lately returned from the land of Moab, intends
selling a lot of ground which belonged to her husband, our kinsman
Elimelech, Thou art nearest of kin, and I thought thou wouldest like
to purchase it, that it go not intoa stranger’s hand. If thou wilt redeem
it, it is well; if not, I, who am next of kin to thee, will redeem it.”
The kinsman, after thanking Boaz, declared himself willing to take it.
Boaz had hoped he would refuse, and thus let the matter be settled. He
said, ‘‘ With this land thou must take Ruth the Moabitess, as this land
was inherited by her husband, Mahlon, since dead; thou must take her
to raise up an heir to inherit Mahlon’s land, according to our Jewish
law.” ‘Nay, that I cannot do,” said the kinsman, “lest I mar my own
inheritance by bringing in a wife and more children to maintain. I give
thee my right as kin, for I cannot redeem{it.”

Boaz willingly agreed to take the land and Ruth. In fulfilment of the
law used on all such occasions, he plucked off his kinsman’s shoe, in token
he took from him the inheritance. Then, turning towards the elders and
people who were gathered around, he said, with a loud yoice—‘“ All ye



14 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

assembled here are witnesses, this day, that I have bought all that was
Elimelech’s, and all Chilion’s and all Mahlon’s, of the hand of Naomi;
moreover, Ruth, the Moabitess, the widow of Mahlon, have I taken to be
my wife, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance, that his
name be not cut off from among his brethren, and from the gate of his
city. Ye are witnesses this day!”

The elders and assembled people answered, ‘‘ Yea, we are witnesses !”

When all were silent, one of the elders spake in a solemn voice—‘‘ The
Lord make this woman, that is come into thy house, like Rachel, and like
Leah, which two did build the house of Isracl.”’

Ruth was married to Boaz, and lived a long and happy life with her
husband and mother. All that wealth and affection could bestow was
lavished upon the aged Naomi. Her ardent wish to behold a child of
Ruth, and heir of Mahlon, was gratified, fora son was born to Ruth.
The neighbours of Naomi gathered about her to offer their congratulations.
‘‘ Blessed be the Lord,” they said, ‘who hath not left thee this day
without a kinsman, and that his name may be famous in Isracl. He shall
be unto thee a restorer of thy life, and nourisher of thy old age ; for thy
daughter-in-law, who loveth thee, and who is better to thee than seven
sons, hath borne him.”

Naomi took the child, and laid it in her bosom, and became its nurse.

Thus did the virtuous Ruth reap the reward of her heroic sacrifice of
home and country, to solace the declining years of her aged, poor, and
afflicted mother-in-law. She partook of the promise made to Abraham,
and in her seed were all the nations of the earth blessed. From her were
descended David the King, a man after God’s heart; Danicl, beloved of
the Lord; and, above all, our blessed Saviour, according to the flesh,
Jesus Christ the Redeemer.

THE MORAL. .

The beauty of filial piety is brightly portrayed in the character of Ruth.
It was no light thing to leave home, and friends, to accompany an old
woman to astrange land; and to devote her time and her young sorrow-
ing days to the task of soothing the declining years of desolate old age.
Born to princely rank, according to the Jewish Rabbies, she refused no
menial service, nor to glean with the poor in the fields, in order to add to
the comforts of her sorrowing mother-in-law. With what gentle obe-
dience she obeyed her every command! She undertakes at her bidding



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 15

the difficult and delicate task of reminding Boaz of his duties towards her
as herkinsman. This conduct appears in our age very singular and ques-
tionable ; but, we must remember, the customs and laws of the Israelites
were very different from our own, and that which seems improper in this
day was then most commendable. May we all look upon our female aged
relatives with the kindness of the pious and humble Ruth.

MIRIAM.

Many and vast were the temples and palaces which arose in the ancient
city of Zoan, in Egypt; and among the most stately and gracefully pro-
portioned was the palace of Pharaoh, the king.

In a room of lofty dimensions, plated and carved with gold, richly hung
with embroidered stuffs, and filled with furniture of costly material, was
the king of this renowned and fertile land. But not at ease was he
among the regal trappings around him, nor cast he even one admiring
glance at all this splendour. Walking restlessly about the apartment, he
bent his brow, as if musing upon some subject which deeply annoyed
him ; for cares and vexations will intrude even inaroyal palace. In this
apartment, besides the king, were three persons. Near the door stood two
aged women, who cowered bencath their large dark mantles as if anxious
to screen themselves from observation; while at the window, which
opened upon a marble colonnade, was a man apparently absorbed in gazing
upon the vast area of brick and marble which lay beneath him, filled with
thousands of human beings, or the glittering waters of the Nile, which
flowed beyond.

“ Sesostris,” said the king, stopping abruptly before him, ‘‘ why dost
thou not counsel me in this matter? These Hebrew nurses whom thou
seest at the door have refused my command to put the male children to
death. Must I stoop to embrue my hands with the blood of these pitiful
crones ? Whatam I to do if they will not obey me? If I suffer this
Hebrew people to increase as they have of late, we shall be overrun with
them, and they will take possession of my country !”

“Nay, my brother and my king,” replied Sesostris, ‘‘it were not best
to permit them thus to multiply, as in case of war they will join the



16 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

enemy, and we shall be conquered. Can they not be forced to intermarry
with our people, so that in time we shall be one nation ?”

‘No, brother. They have other gods, other laws, and keep themselves
quite distinct. They also rely upon promises made by their God, as they
say, to their fathers, that they shall one day be a great people—con-
querors of Egypt mayhap!”

“They live too easy, O king. Give them all the heavy labour of the
land; let them be worn and wearied, and their haughty spirit will be
quelled, and by degrees they will die off.”

«Tt shall be done,” said the king. Then, turning to the women, he
said, ‘‘ And now, ye false and deceitful old women, leave my presence ere
I relent of my mercy towards you!” Silently and rapidly the ancient
females withdrew.

Task-masters were set over the children of Israel, and they were com-
pelled to work hard from morning to night, ‘‘in mortar, and in brick, and
in all service of the field.” Their lives were rendered bitter by this cruel
bondage; but it answered not the purpose of their master, for ‘ the
more they were afflicted, the more they multiplied and grew.” Deter-
mined to rid himself of this noxious race, Pharaoh now issued a decree
which brought anguish to every Hebrew bosom.

Thus ran the decree: “ Every son that is born ye shall cast into the
river; but every daughter ye may save alive.”

In a mud hut, on the banks of the Nile, dwelt a Hebrew and his wife ;
Amram and Jochebed, both of the house of Levi. Here, in secresy and
bitter sorrow, was the unhappy wife delivered of a son. There was no
joy in the house that a man child was born into the world, but groans
of anguish burst from his parents’ hearts that he was doomed to a
miserable death. No smiles heralded his coming ; tears fell upon his little
face, and sighs broke forth from the bosoms around him. Forthree months
Jochebed continued to conceal the boy. His merry laugh, which to other
mothers would be rich music, brought a pang to her. She dreaded lest
this sound}should bring the murderers to the door, and hushed him into
silence, Miriam, the daughter of Amram, although quite young, was of
great service to her mother, for she took charge of her other brother
Aaron, and assisted to keep the infant quiet. With a thoughtfulness
beyond her years, she parried all intrusion, even from their own kin,
lest his existence through their means should become known. He could
not, however, be always concealed, and his parents became aware they



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 17

.



were suspected. He had been heard to weep one night by a passer-by,

and Jochebed was continually questioned regarding him. She was advised

to obey the decree, lest the whole family should be punished, but reso-
c



18 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’s OWN TREASURY.

lutely refused, until one day informed the officers who put the decree in
execution were asking about her. Then it became evident they must
give up the child, or suffer with him, After many a solemn conference
together, this unhappy family came to the resolution of casting their
child out upon the river.

At her father’s bidding, Miriam brought from the river’s side an
armful of the reed papyrus, which she tore off in strips, and wove into
a stout basket. This her father covered with pitch, which rendered it
water-tight. While they were thus engaged with their work, the
unhappy Jochebed sat in a remote corner, pressing her boy to her heart,
tears of bitterness streaming in torrents from her eyes. Unconscious of
evil, the child smiled in its mother’s face, presenting by its joyousness
a strange contrast to his sorrowing family.

‘* Alas, how may he escape?” said the mother, sorrowfully. ‘ If the
waves do not engulf him, he will starve, or be devoured by a croco-
dile.”

“¢ Nay, dearest mother, I shall watch him too well. As the little ark
floats down the stream, I shall follow it, and guard it, even if it float
for days or months. Perhaps it may be wafted beyond the dominions of
this wicked king, and then I will take it up and nourish it. Trust the
boy to me, mother, I will risk my life to save him.”

The ark was finished. Miriam placed within a soft bed, and approached
Jochebed to take the child. Sad was the parting then between the
mother and her darling boy. Unable to see him go, she fled into an inner
room to vent her anguish in bitter sobs and groans. After a long last
kiss, Miriam and her father launched the frail bark upon the Nile.

‘“ Farewell, father,” said Miriam, fondly ; ‘‘ cheer up my mother, and
tell her to trust in God, who, I feel assured, will yet rescue the boy from
the hands of his enemies. Depend upon me. All that a tender, devoted
sister can do, shall be done.”

‘“‘ Farewell, Miriam,” said her father, while the tears fell down upon
his beard; ‘I trust in the Lord and in thee! May the God of Abraham
protect thee and strengthen thee!”

Hour after hour the tiny vessel floated on; the little occupant smiling
and playing with his i aly or amusing himself with the food which lay
near him, Hour after hour his firm-hearted sister walked on beside it,
under the blazing sun of E igypt, or sat upon a bank when it became ob-





BIBLE STORIES OF EMIN



structed in its course, or was lodged in the bushes which lined the river
side. Heat and fatigue unheeded, her eyes and thoughts were ff:
her charge alone, or lifted in prayer to God for its safety. At mid-day
the little barge was whirled among some rushes, in the outskirts of the
city, where it became stationary. Miriam conecaled herself behind a
pile of bricks, and sat down to watch it. Frequently she drew it to the
shore, and fed the child. At length sho drew it bencath the shade of
some palm trees which grew upon the bank, and sat down nearit, How
did her heart beat at every approaching step! dreading lest her charge
should be observed before the shades of night should enable her ouce
more to float it away from the city. But the hours passed on, and no eye
fell upon it. The Nile flowed slowly at her fect, its banks adorned by a
fringe of papyrus, whose tall and slender stalks bent to the
breeze, or raised aloft the plume-like blossoms which crowned their heads.
No sound disturbed the silence, except when the brilliant flamingo
stalked by her, flashing his scarlet and orange plumage to the sun, or
the stately ibis pursued its chase of the water-serpents among the
rushes,

A strong wind arose, and the waves were cast upon the shore.
Miriam started with horror as she beheld a drowned infant thrown upon
the sand; one of her own nation sacrificed to Pharaoh’s cruelty. An
instant passed, and, rushing through the blue lotus flowers whith floaicd
on the stream, an enormous crocodile pounced upon the child, opening its
dreadful jaws, the innocent was soon engulfed in the horrid chasm, and
the creature disappeared. Aroused by footsteps, Miriam turred her
head: a party of miserable Hebrews passed, half naked, and surrounded
by overseers, and bending beneath a load of brick and straw.







was passing, and she gazed with disgust, as she observed the pricsts
were leading in golden chains the sacred crocodile! The back of this
hideous monster was richly painted and gilded, while bracelets of gold
and of jewels adorned its shapeless legs. She watched him, as with hi
train he entered the temple. This superb edifice was surrounded }
noble porticoes, and was raised upon an elevated platform of mar }
A long avenue of sphinxes led to it, and before the cdifice*stood two
obelisks of rose-coloured granite, whose slender s
the heavens, and whose sides were carved ini
ceiling of this temple was painted blue, and sir







20 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

its sides richly carved, gilded, and painted. In the centre stood a tank
for the service of the sacred crocodile, while on one side was a room,
where, lying upon a costly carpet, he was waited on, and adorned by
people of the first rank in the city.

The sun was now sinking behind the hills of Ramases, when the sound
of female voices met the ear of Miriam. She arose with alacrity, and
looked forth. ‘‘ Now is my sweet brother safe,” she said, ‘‘ for surely
no female bosom could devise aught evil against so lovely a babe.”

The females approached, and by the richness of their apparel, and by
their numerous attendants, were ladies of high rank. Above the rest
was one distinguished for her graceful and majestic form. She was
beautiful also, and the rich blood called forth by exercise cast a bril-
liant shade over her slightly bronzed skin. As she came nearer, Miriam
discovered it was the princess Themestris. Then the heart of this loving
sister died within her. It was the daughter of Pharaoh, their relent-
less oppressor, who approached, who, if the child were discovered, would
not probably dare resist her father’s decree to saye a Hebrew infant.
Miriam looked around in despair; but the princess was near, and con-
cealment for her charge was vain.

Her heart upon the rack, Miriam saw the princess stand upon the
river’s bank, quite near the rushes among which was the basket contain-
ing her precious treasure. He was not observed, and she breathed free ;
but, weary and hungry, the babe just then awoke from slumber, and
uttered a feeble ery.

“© What noise is that ?” asked one of the ladies; and Miriam threw
herself upon the ground in anguish.

‘“Tt was the ery of a crocodile,” said another; ‘let us fly ere we be
devoured.”

“ Silence !” cried the princess.

The wail of an infant was distinctly heard.

“ Tt isa child,” said Themestris; ‘and now I discover a basket among
yonder rushes. Bring it hither, some of ye.”

The attendants hastened to obey her, and the basket was soon laid at
her feet. When opened, a babe of wondrous beauty lay within. It was
weeping bitterly, and raised its little hand, imploringly, at the curious
faces which surrounded its cradle. The princess gazed at the child, and
tears streamed from her eyes over her beautiful face.

“Oh my father, this is thy cruel policy!” she cried. Then turning



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 21

to her women, she said, ‘‘ This is doubtless one of the Hebrew children,
whose parents, forced to throw it into the Nile, have thus sought to pre-
serve it.”

“ Shall we throw it back again ?” asked one of the attendants.

“Throw it back again! Have you the heart for such a thing?”
exclaimed the princess in indignation.

“Tt is no doubt preserved by the gods for some especial purpose, and I
accept the charge. Osiris! god of the Nile! if thou hast sent this babe
to me, behold, I receive it, and will rear it as my own.”

Who shall describe the emotions which passed through the heart of
Miriam during this scene! Tears of gratitude and joy burst from her
eyes, and she knelt to thank that merciful God who had saved her
brother from destruction, and his parents from misery.

With a fortitude beyond her years, she left her hiding-place, and
approached the group. Sauntering carelessly along, she paused, as if
gazing at them; when one of the ladies, pitying her childish curiosity,
called her gaily to them.

‘Come hither, child, and see the young crocodile we have caught.”

Miriam came forward, uttering many expressions of admiration and
wonder,

“And is my royal lady going to adopt the child ?” she asked, dropping
her eyes to conceal the emotion which she feared would betray her.”

“She is: for she is as benevolent as she is beautiful.”

“Then, if she willlisten to her handmaid, I know a Hebrew nurse
who dwelleth near, and who is very skilful. I will fetch her, if the noble
princess please.”

“Tt is well thought of, girl,” said Themestris. ‘If it be a Hebrew
infant, a nurse of that nation were more fitting. Be quick, child, and
see thou hast her here by the time I have finished bathing in yonder
marble bath.” Miriam needed no spur, but springing forward was soon
on her way homeward. The basket had been many hours upon the
river, on account of its frequent stoppages; but Miriam was at her home
ina much shorter time. ‘O mother, mother!” she eried, ‘did I not
prophesy truly ? God hath saved our babe : he is, as I predicted, destined
to greatness, for the princess hath taken him.” Wer sud@en appear-
ance, and her unexpected good news, so overpowered her mother that she
almost fainted. Reviving soon, she was on her way to the spot; joy
enabling her to keep up with the bounding steps of Miriam. With a



SELRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



tolerable degree of fortitude Jochebed saluted the daughter of Pharaoh,
“Take this child,” said the charitable princess; “nurse it for me, and
let it want for nothing, for it is the adopted child of a princess. Thou
shalt be bountifully paid. Call him Moses, beeause he was drawn out of
the water.” Ag Jochebed received her child again, her emotion over-
came her, and she dropped her head upon that of the infant, while a
sudden pallor overspread her face. Miriam ran to her; and the princess
whispered, ‘Poor creature! doubtless she has been forced to give her
own child up to death, I hope this will awaken her affection, and heal
her wounded heart.” The princess and train returned to the palace ;
while Jochebed, supported by her heroic daughter, set out for her owa
now happy home.

By what simple means did God bring His purpose to pass! A tender
girl and a charitable female were apparently the preservers of this child ;
but God had selected them as fitting agents. And this infant—who that
looked upon him then, could imagine the mighty deeds he was destined
to perform? A great multitude was to be taken from a powerful and
unwilling nation; a countless army overthrown; king, and nation,
swept from the land, to give place to his wandering host ?

But I shall not touch upon the story of Moses, except where Miriam
is concerned. Who, after secing the heroic conduct of the young
Miriam, and her devotion to her brother, in which she certainly risked
her life, would imagine her capable of her after conduct? Who could
recognise the watcher by the Nile in the rebel of the Desert of Zin ?

“The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who
can know it?’ When the nurse of Moses was no longer needed, he was
taken to the princess, and soon raised to power. But he always clung to
his nation, and refused to be called an Egyptian, or the son of Pharaoh’s
daughter.

It is unnecessary to say anything more of the succeeding events of the
life of Moses; or of the wondrous miracles wrought by him before
Pharach to induce him to let his people go; as my readers are, or I hope
they are, sufficiently acquainted with them, Pharaoh was dead, and a
new king arose, who fully appreciated the worth of the Hebrews as
hewers of wood and drawers of water. It seemed for a time as if the
induced him to render the Hebrew’s
‘iam of great service to her country-




miracles only irritated the king, an
bondage more bitter. Then was M



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 23

men; confident in the promise of God, she inspired courage into their
hearts by her unswerving faith. As a reward for her trust in Him, God
bestowed upon her the gift of prophecy, and placed her beside her
brothers, Moses and Aaron, as leaders, instructors, and judges of the
children of Israel. The Hebrews departed; but were soon followed by
the Egyptian army, which perished in the Red Sea. The oppressed
people were free, but wanderers in the Desert.

Miriam was reverenced by all, as a prophetess; and enjoyed especial
honour as the sister of Moses, Zipporah, the wife of Moses, whom he
had left in the land of Cush, with her father, Jethro, had lately arrived
and joined her husband, and, of course, obtained much of the people’s
good-will as wife of their leader; and Miriam stood not alone in their
regard, or in that of Moses. She, however, reigned without a rival
when Moses judged the people; for he needed help, and Aaron was
engaged with his priestly duties. When the father of Zipporah arrived,
he advised Moses to lighten his toil by dividing his people in tens, fifties,
hundreds, and thousands, and by appointing rulers over each band.
Miriam then no longer saw herself a distinguished associate of her
brothers, as her office was divided, and she became merely one of the
many rulers. Forgetful she owed all to God, and that He might take
away His gifts, Miriam looked upon Jethro and Zipporah as usurpers
and rivals. Day and night she devised plans to overthrow their
counsels, She endeavoured to interest Aaron in her cause; and, much
attached to his sister, and of a gentle nature, he listened to her, and
pitied her, when, perhaps, he would have done better to have
reproved her.

The Israelites were now in the wilderness of Zin, a large, level plain,
surrounded by eminences which shot up their granite peaks to the
heavens. The twelve tribes were encamped by threes on each side of
this immense plain, haying at each corner the standards erected. Judah
bore upon his banner a lion, while the other three bore the figures of the
ox, eagle, and man. In the centre arose the wondrous Tabernacle,
glowing in purple, and blue, and scarlet and gold embroidery. It stood
within a large space, enclosed by a fence of linen curtains, suspended
upon pillars of brass. Within this enclosure stood the bragen sea, and
great altar of brass, and tables of marble. Miriam was sitting at the
door of her tent, uttering complaints of Moses in the car of Aaron, and
within hearing of many witnesses.



TIN ILLUSTRATED GIRL’$ OWN TREASURY.

i)
ee

‘Moses hath transgressed, seeing he hath married the Midian
woman,” said Miriam. ‘* Who is she that all honour her thus, as if
there were no other women in the camp? And who is her father, that he
deviseth mischicf against me ?”

“Tam sorry for thee, my sister, and will speak to Moses regarding
thee; for didst thou not save his life ?””

“Yea, what were Moses, were it not for me? He taketh too much
upon him. Hath the Lord only revealed His will by him? Hath He not
also given thee and me the spirit of prophecy ?”

“Yea, indeed He hath,” said Aaron.

Suddenly a cloud came down and rested at the door of the Tabernacle,
and the people knew the Lord was among them. Then every one stood
still in his place, and listened, as the Lord commanded Moses and Aaron
and Miriam to come into the court of the Tabernacle. Tremblingly they
obeyed the mandate, and walked up in silence, undisturbed, except by
the tinkling of the golden bells upon the robe of Aaron. They stood
before the Tabernacle in the face of the whole congregation. The tall
and stately figure of Moses was enveloped in a large mantle of white
linen, fringed with blue; while Aaron was arrayed in the gorgeous vest-
ments of the High Priest—the breast of his blue upper-dress dazzling
with the emblematic jewels, while the bottom was hung with scarlet
pomegranates and golden bells—his white linen mitre circled by a golden
band, and his girdle and linen under-dress richly embroidered with
searlet, and blue, and purple. Miriam glorying in her situation, and
expecting new honours, stood between them, with her head elevated so
that the golden horn which ornamented her forehead was erected on high.

“Hear now my words,” said the Lord. ‘If there be a prophet among
you, I, the Lord, will make myself known unto him in visions and
dreams only; but my servant Moses, who is faithful to me, shall be
spoken to, mouth to mouth—not in dark speeches as to you, but is
honoured above you by beholding the similitude of the Lord. Knowing
this, were ye not afraid to speak against my servant, Moses?” Then
trembled Aaron and Miriam, for they saw the anger of the Lord was
kindled against them.

The cloud departed from the sanctuary; they turned to gaze upon
each other, when, lo} they saw that Mian was a leper! The colour
was gone from her blooming check, and her skin was turned to the livid
hue of the dead! Aaron threw himself at the feet of Moses.



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 25

“ Alas, my lord,” he said, ‘‘I beseech thee, forgive us our sin, for
indeed we have spoken foolishly against thee. Take pity upon Miriam,
and do not let her remain thus as one dead ere the tomb hath closed
oyer her.”

Moses interceded for her with God. ‘‘ Hear her now, O God, I be-
seech thee,” he cried. The Lord refused to heal Miriam, but ordered
her to undergo the usual cleansing of lepers, and to live seven days with-
out the camp.

In the sight of all Isracl was the humiliated Miriam carried without
the limits of the camp, where a tent was erected for her. Here she
remained seven days, undergoing the usual lustrations and sacrifices of
those tainted with leprosy. Her long and beautiful hair was shaven off
—her clothes were washed as well as her body. Upon the seventh day
the priests visited her, and, after examination, she was pronounced
whole. The usual ceremony then followed, in which one of Aaron’s sons,
Miriam’s nephew, officiated. A vessel of pure water was brought, which
had been taken from a running spring. ‘The priest then took two birds,
one of which was killed over the water; a piece of cedar wood, some
scarlet wool, and a sprig of hyssop were, with the remaining bird, dipped
into the blood, and sprinkled upon Miriam. The bird was then let loose
in the desert. Being pronounced clean, Miriam was again led into the
camp. The next day she presented at the altar a lamb to be sacrificed,
and some oil. She was anointed with the oil after it had been offered
up, and the priests absolved her from all other duties.

Miriam was thoroughly repentant and humbled. Her character was
much improved by this chastening: and pride and ambition were for
ever at rest within her bosom. Let this one shadow upon her fair life
be forgotten, as she was one of God’s chosen agents for the furtherance
of His great and wonderful purposes.

The children of Israel once more broke up their encampment, and
journeyed through the wilderness. At Kadesh they again encamped in
the desert of Paran, and there Miriam died. The hill of Paran is a
remarkable pile of rocks, whose slender, jagged spires give it, at a dis-
tance, the appearance of a cathedral. In the side’ of this xock they cut
out a tomb for Miriam. It was richly carved within, while over the door
was her name, and the date of her death, surrounded with ornamented
work. Her body was bound with linen bands, and laid upon a bier: she



26 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

was followed to her tomb by her weeping relatives of the house of Levi,
and a train of hired mourners, whose death-wail awoke the desert echoes.
A carved sarcophagus, filled with spices, received her body—the door was
closed—the train dispersed, and the Israclites resumed their march,
leaving Miriam in her lonely resting-place.

THE MORAL,

Let us learn from the story of Miriam to crush unholy ambition. How
was her glory tarnished by this spirit! Surrounded by friends and
admirers, and exalted by God to a high office among her countrymen,
she strove to advance higher, and fell into the shades of humiliation and
Sorrow.

Remember the words of our Saviour’s apostle, who tells us, ‘ Godli-
ness with contentment is great gain.”

JEPHTHAW’S DAUGHTER.

THE majestic oaks, the herds and verdant pastures of Bashan, have
ever furnished, to the inspired prophets of Israel, types and figures of
richness and fertility. Age after age has passed away, nation has suc-
ceeded nation in earth’s pageant over these fair plains, cities have risen
on those river banks; but the nations have melted into the shadows of
the past, the cities have crumbled away, and all has changed save those
glorious oaks of Bashan, which still crown the summits of the hills
where their kindred flourished, and gaze down as of old upon the vales
and rivers beneath. Their day however must come, for Isaiah hath said,
“The cedars of Lebanon, and all the oaks of Bashan, shall be brought
low.”

Arrayed in all the gorgeous robes of her ancient glory, ere yet her
“time to weep” had come, the land of Bashan burst upon the gaze of
two persons as they gaincd the brow of one of the hills which separated
her from the land of Gilead.

“Ha! by Moloch, this isa glorious country,” said one,—a tall man
clad in a dark dress which fell to his sandalled feet, and in a corslet of
rusty stecl, and battered helmet. ‘¢ Behold those frowning mountains,”







BIBLE SLORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 27

he added; ‘see how they spring to the skies, and then sink down into
soft grassy slopes, losing themselves in these pretty green vales. Mark
how the glittering Jabbok, like a jewelled necklace, rests upon the bosom
of these verdant plains, reflecting upon its shining surface, city, and
tower, and marble palace.”

“Tt is,” returned his companion, a man of lordly bearing ; ‘ but my
heart, untouched by its loveliness, still fondly turns to Gilead.”

“What charm is there in Gilead, my lord, that you so cherish it?
Your kindred, as you tell me, have thrust you from your father’s house.”

“ He is old and powerless, Hazicl. I am not his lawful son. Child of
a favourite handmaid, I shared with her all his heart, even after he
married and was again a father. His wife ever looked upon my mother
and myself with envious eyes. Her dislike was infused into the bosoms
of her sons, and they, by every art, sought to wean my father’s favour
from me. At last they persuaded him to deny me all share of my patri-
mony, and finally to turn me from his house ?”

‘Shame on them! Had you no friends who might use their influence
for you?”

‘“‘T applied to the elders, and they refused my suit. I, who so faith-
fully had served them, who had kept at bay the neighbouring nations,
and raised the fame of Gilead to its present height !”

“Oh, they were purchased by your brothers’ gold!”

“From my infirm father and my brothers I expected nothing, but
from my country I surely had a right to look for justice. So keenly did
I feel my fellow-citizens’ ingratitude, that I shook the dust from off my
feet upon the city, anc left it, vowing never to return.”

‘A brave resolye, my noble Jephthah! Think no more of such false
friends, and turn to those who, with open arms, are waiting to receive
you. Trust yourself to my direction, and, by Baal! the citizens of Gilead
shall rue the day they ever injured Jephthah !”

“Gently, my friend. Ere I join your band, I must exact that I never
be required to attack my countrymen.” ‘‘ We are too proud to number
the celebrated Jephthah among us, to .refuse anything he may demand.”

The new friends descended the hill, and advanced toward a large cave,
whose yawning mouth opened into the dark bosom of the mountain. As
they entered, deafening shouts of ‘Welcome Haziel! welcome noble
Jephthah !”” awoke the echoes of the vault.

The Ammonites had long meditated an inroad into Gilead, and now



28 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

that Jephthah, the only man they feared, was expelled the city, they
commenced an attack upon its borders, Many divisions of the Gileadites
were sent against them, but they were repelled, and the enemy entered
the land and directed their march towards the city. The brothers of
Jephthah had all been defeated, and had withdrawn themselves into the
city, where they were the scorn of all. The defeated soldiers, now en-
camped without the walls, were disheartened with their repeated unsuc-
cess, ‘¢O that the noble Jephthah were here,” said one of the soldiers,
“and Ammon would not shame us thus!” *‘ Yea,” said another, ‘ had
we but Jephthah for our captain, we should soon repel the invaders !”

The murmurs spread through the camp and reached the city.
‘Where is Jephthah?” became the public ery. Shouts of derision
against his brothers, and disapprobation against the elders who had
turned the warrior from the city, resounded from every quarter. From
rumours they rose to open rebellion, and the elders and Jephthah’s family
were obliged to fly from the wrath of the people and shelter themselves
in a fortified tower. In front of this the populace assembled, vowing de-
struction upon the elders unless Jephthah were placed at the head of the
army. The elders, to appease them, promised to send messengers after
him into the land of Bashan. Messengers were accordingly despatched.
After several days passed in great suspense, they returned with Jeph-
thah’s refusal to aid his ungrateful city. ‘‘Go yourselves!” cried the
people to the elders—‘ take with you Jephthah’s reereant brothers, and
upon your knees entreat him to return and redeem us from that destruc-
tion you could not avert |”

Forced to obey, these proud old men, who as rulers of the city had
seen all at their feet, now reluctantly prepared to seck out him they
had so deeply injured, and pray him to forgive them and return.

“ Noble Jephthah!” said their spokesman, as the deputation was pre-
sented to the exile, ‘‘ you see before you the elders of your city, who,
finding their messengers unhecded, have come this weary journey to seek
your aid against the Ammonites, who press us sore.”

“Truly, for men of age, your minds are very changeful,” said
Jephthah, bitterly. ‘How short a time is it since ye thrust me from
your doors, and now ye come thus far to seek me! Once it was my
pleasure and my highest joy to do your bidding, but ye repelled me ;
and now ye come in your distress to pray me to return ?”

0 noble Jephthah, pity that distress which brings us here! Reject



BIBL STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 29



us not. Onr hosts call upon you to take their head, as their chosen
captain. ‘The name of Jephthah once resounding before our walls, the
dreaded sound shall strike our foes with terror, and Gilead shall be free!



30 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Turn not away. Wilt thou see Gilead low? wilt thou see thy home, thy
fricnds, doomed to destruction ?”— What home! what friends?” said
Jephthah, gloomily.—‘‘ Behold thy repentant brethren here,” said the
elder, pointing to a group of young men who just then entered the gate,
“they yield their gold, their all!”

“No, no!” exclaimed Jephthah, in violent agitation, motioning them
pack, ‘*Do not let them come! Icannot see them. Years of humilia-
tion, of reproach, and of injury rise before me and shut my heart against
them. I cannot sec them!”

There was silence in the court, and the dejected young men turned to
retire.

“And yet, as a follower of the just God of Isracl, I must forgive.
Young men, return! Ido forgive you, for ye are my father’s sons; but
stay not here if ye wish Gilead well. Repose in yonder rooms—there
shall my people minister to your wants.” Jephthah waved his hand,
and his degenerate brethren crossed the court to the interior apartments.

“©O Jephthah, I deemed your heart were formed of nobler nature than
thus to harbour vengeance,” said the elder reproachfully. ‘Ye then
reject us—refuse to aid your native city, and thus devote us all to
slaughter! Remember your aged father—your daughter!”

“Ha! my sweet young child! I had forgotten her—I must to her
rescue, indeed. My fathers, accuse me not of cherishing revenge? It
is my only wish to act according to the laws of God. Forgive me that
T have grieved ye thus, but you know noé all the suffering my late exile
has cost me!”

Hazicl, who had stood with his hands folded in the loose sleeves of
his searlet dress, an attentive listener to all that passed, now saw with
alarm that Jephthah was relenting. ‘My friends, your time is wasted
in vain words,” he said, advancing to the elders. ‘ All ties between the
noble Jephthah and yourself are broken by your own strong arm. Ye
sent him poor and sorrow-stricken from your walls ; I took him in, clothed,
fod, and cheered him, Think ye he can thus lightly leave me ?”

Jephthah seemed torn with conflicting emotions, ‘Elders of Gilead,”
at last he said, ‘ ye must return alone!”

“Nay, nay, Jephthah!” they cried, knecling before him; “listen to
the ery of your perishing country! Come with us! Do not refuse our
prayer !”

When Jephthah beheld the rulers of his city upon their knees before



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 31

him; those august old men to whom since childhood he had looked as if
to very gods—their robes of state in the dust, their venerable beards
dropping with tears, and their aged hands lifted to him for suceour—he
thought his heart would have burst within him.

“Rise! rise, my lords!’ he eried, mingling his tears with theirs as he
stooped to raise them; ‘ Do yourselves not the great dishonour as to kneel
tome. Igo; Iam yours!—Receive me again as your son, and I will
follow you to death!”

Jephthah was wrapped in their warm embraces, and blessed and thanked
by the happy elders.

‘Farewell, Haziel!” he said, turning towards his friend. ‘‘ Farewell,
Jephthah the ingrate! Jephthah the tool!” said Hazicl, bitterly.

“Speak not thus, thou son of Napthali!” said the elder. ‘Thou
scest thou art known under thy bandit disguise. What dost thou here
when war threatens Isracl? and thou, son of the great house of Issachar!
and ye, noble youths, whom I see around me!” continued the elder, ad-
dressing the assembled band of Haziel; ‘‘ follow the steps of Jephthah, I
entreat ye, ere it be too late. Here is an honourable opening by which
ye may retrace your path. In this coming war, your lost honour and
fallen fortunes may be retrieved, and ye be worthy yet of your lofty race!”
The elders each addressed the young men, urging them to return with
them. Their patronage and protection was promised them, with honour-
able posts in the war. Jephthah’s entreaties were joined to theirs, which
were in a measure successful. Haziel and some of his friends agreed to
accompany Jephthab, and they followed the triumphant elders to the
camp at Mizpeh.

Shouts of joy welcomed Jephthah’s arrival, from the soldiers. He was
led by the elders towards a magnificent tent of scarlet, bordered with
gold. ‘‘ Enter, great Jephthah, the tent of the captain of our host,” said
the elder. ‘May the God of Israel be with thee, and make thee con-
queror over Ammon!” Jephthah paused before the entrance of the tent,
and turning, addressed them thus—‘‘ Ye have promised me, O elders of
Gilead, the post of captain over your armies; but how know I, when I
return from the wars, ye will not thrust me out as before? Ere I con-
sent to lead you to battle, ye must agree unto these two ie ay i
be not only captain in war, butrulerin peace. Ifyenowmakeme jadge
over Gilead, I will take the command of yout armies; if not, I will re-
turn to my stronghold.”



32 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The elders willingly agreed. An altar was raised in the centre of the
host, in front of the tent of Jephthah, and there, before the assembled’
army, and before the Lord, whose name was called upon to witness the
compact, he was installed as judge and captain over Gilead. The elders
repeated before the people the conditions they had agreed upon between
themselves and Jephthah, and then turning towards him, said—‘‘ The
Lord be witness between us, if we do not so, according to thy words.”
The grateful acclamations of the men of Gilead testified to their joy at
kis elevation over them.

Determined not to await the coming Ammonites, Jephthah immediately
marched to meet the foe. Wherever he appeared the people, become
more confident now they beheld him at the head of the army, hastened
to join his forces. After winding through a defile in the mountains of
Gilead, Jephthah beheld against the distant horizon the banners, and
spears, and glittering chariots of the Ammonites. Here he halted and
drew up his men in order of battle. Although his faith assured him the
Lord would give him the victory, Jephthah was anxious it should be a
bloodless one, and resolved by negociation to induce the Ammonites to
retire. Many men, newly elected leader of an army, who knew much
was expected from them, would be eager to signalise themselves by some
warlike exploit; but Jephthah’s conduct was ruled by the laws of God
rather than of man, and he sent to demand of the Ammonite king the
cause of his appearance in arms. Admitted into the tent of the king,
Jephthah’s messengers thus addressed him :—

“ Thus sayeth Jephthah, captain of the Lord’s host, to the king of the
children of Ammon—Why is it that thou has come up to fight me in my
land? Have I evil-treated thee? If I have injured thee, speak, and
I will repay if it be in my power.”

“Go, and tell your leader,” replied the king, ‘‘ I come to recover those
lands which the children of Israel took from me when they came up out
of Egypt.”

“What land was this, O king?” asked the messenger. ‘The richest
part of my inheritance have they ravished from me; that fertile tract
whose bounds three rivers lave, the Jabbok, Arnon, and Jordan. Restore
this portion peaceably, and I will return to Ammon. If ye refuse, they
shall be mine by force, my chariots shall crush your ranks, and seize
them from your hand.”

The messengers departed, and repeated to Jephthah all that had becn



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 33

spoken by the king of Ammon. Fully instructed by their captain, they

“again stood before the king and said—‘ Thus saith great Jephthah, 0
king, Israel took not this land from the children of Ammon, nor of the
Moabite, their ally ; it was in possession of Sihon, king of the Amorites,
and from them they conquered it. Nor would they have thus bereft him
had he granted them that peaceful passage through his land which they
requested.” Jephthah then rehearsed the facts relating to their march,
and to their battle with the Amorites. ‘‘ Wilt thou then ask from us the
land given to us by our God? Take what thy own god Chemosh giveth
thee. Zippor, king of Moab, did never strive to regain these lands, and
now dost thou come to take them, after Israel hath possessed them three
hundred years? Thou dost me wrong to war against me, and the Lord
the Judge be judge this day between the children of Isracl and the chil-
dren of Ammon!”

The king of Ammon would not harken longer to the messengers, but,
breaking up the conference, angrily dismissed them.

Trumpets now resounded from every side, and they rushed to meet
each other in deadly strife. Then was heard ‘the thunder of the
captains, and the shouting.” The ground shook under the roar of the
chariots, and tramp of armed men, camels, and elephants. ‘The war-horse
was there in his strength ; ‘‘ who swallowed the ground with fierceness
and rage,” who mocketh although ‘the quiver rattled against him, and
the glittering spear and shield.” In the whirlwind of battle, Jephthah
ior one moment forgot his trust in God, and tempted Him to fight upon his
side; he yowed a vow before the Lord, and said, ‘‘ If Thou shalt, without
fail, deliver the children of Ammon into my hands, then it shall be, that
whatsoever cometh forth of the doors of my house to meet me, when I
return in peace from the children of Ammon, shall surely be the Lord’s,
and I will offer it up for a burnt offering!” A rash vow which Jephthah
ever after deplored, and which if he had reflected one moment he would
not have made. Jephthah suffered from his first error, evil communica -
tion ; he had “ stricken hands” with idolaters, and while residing with
them had witnessed their frequent sacrifices to their gods, and forgot he
spoke to a God who delighted not in such vows. Into this grievous
error he had not fallen if he had shunned instead of making friends of
the sons of Baal.

‘Lhe children of Ammon fled before the host of Jephthah. They were

D



384 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

pursued into the heart of their country, and twenty cities conquered, and
the whole land completely subdued.

The city of Gilead was filled with rejoicing that their enemy was
repelled, and its streets were crowded with the citizens, eager to behold
the triumphant entry of their victorious leader. Jephthah approached,
seated in a brazen chariot surrounded by his steel-clad warriors. His
robe of blue, embroidered with gold, was bound by a broad girdle of
golden mail, a sword hung in chains from his side, and shoes of brass
defended his feet ; a scarlet mantle fell from his shoulders, and around
his héad was a band of steel chain-work, from which projected in front
ahorn of gold, giving him a fierce and terrible appearance. When the
procession arrived before the house of Jephthah, the gate was thrown
open, and a group of young girls came dancing forth, mingling their
jocund music with the cheers of the populace. What saw the conqueror
in yon joyous train, that he started as if a shot from the enemy’s archers
had stricken him ?—why bowed his lofty head unto his bosom? At the
head of the youthful train came the hero’s daughter, his only child,
holding aloft the swect-sounding timbrel, and attired, as became a ruler’s
daughter, in a robe of divers colours, richly embroidered with gorgeous
feather-work, and gold, and silk of varied dies. bound her dark tresses, and her tiny feet were strapped in scarlet sandals.
Smiles lighted up her fair face, and her soft dove’s eyes beamed with filial
tenderness when raised to her lordly father.

Behind her were the maidens of Gilead, clad in white, with chaplets
of red roses; their slender ankles circled with silver bells. Like leaves
from a gay parterre swept onward by a summer breeze, these lovely
flowerets floated in mazy whirls until beside the chariot of the conqueror.
The daughter of Jephthah approached her father; and when the people
looked to see him fold her in his embrace, with a frantic start he rent the
bosom of his gilded robe, and, covering his head with his mantle, he
groaned with anguish. ‘My father!” said a gentle voice beside him.
‘Alas, my daughter!” cried the conqueror, with a burst of agony—
from my high estate of joy thou hast brought me low down in the dust !””
There was deep silence while he spoke—‘‘O God, forgive me: my child
forgive me! When I faced the children of Ammon in battle, I vowed,
if the Lord would deliver them into my hands, I would offer up, as
sacrifice unto him, the first that came forth from my house to meet me!
Thou art the first-—my child! my only one!”



BIRLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 36

A deep consternation fell wnon the hearts of all, when this rash vow
was heard—on all, save upon that fair and gentle creature who was the
victim. With brow unblanched, and with a glow of gencrous self-
devotion, she said to Jephthah— My father, if thou hast opened thy
mouth to the Lord, do unto meas thou hast vowed. Thy God hath made
thee conqueror over thy enemies; the children of Ammon have fallen
before thee ; and if I am to be the price of victory, take me, and do unto
me according to thy vow. I die for my country and for my father: in
that death there isno bitterness.’”’ At the request of the elders, who now
approached, Jephthah descended from his chariot, and, accompanied by
them and his daughter, he entered his habitation. Here he threw him-
self upon the ground, covered his head with dust, and refused all his
child’s endeavours to comfort him.

Many days were passed in sorrow and in deep perplexity by the
people of Gilead. At last, it was determined by a council of elders, that
a deputation of their number should be sent to Shiloh, in order to obtain
the advice of the priests of the tabernacle upon this difficult and unhappy
matter. The time of their absence was passed in great anxiety by the
people, and in deep humiliation and anguish by Jephthah. Their
approach was at length descried from the watch-tower; they entered the
city, and, followed by a train of eager citizens, sought the unhappy
Jephthah, who still remained upon the ground as they had left him,
clothed with sackcloth, and covered with ashes. :

“Hear, O Jephthah, the message of the high-priest of Israel!”
said the chief of the elders; ‘¢ Unlike a*worshipper of Israel’s God, thou
hast vowed to offer in burnt sacrifice the first that came to mect thee
from thy house. Such offerings are an abomination to the Lord, and to
punish thee for thy rashness He hath sent thy daughter forth.” Jeph-
thah answered with a groan of anguish.

‘« This sacrifice being forbidden by our laws, the person offered. can be
redeemed with money, and for a youthful female the priests demand ten
shekels.”’

“She may then be saved ?”’ And the people were preparing to shout
for joy, at her deliverance, when a wave from the elder’s hand restrained.
them.

“Thou hast said, such, coming forth to meet thee, shall surely be the
Lord's, and, by the laws of our holy Moses, things thus devoted cannot be
redeemed.” A sigh burst from many a bosom when they heard this



36 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

eruel sentence. ‘ Listen, Jephthah, to thy daughter’s destiny : thou hast
devoted her to be the Lord’s, and as the Lord’s her days must be spent
in His service. She is henceforth for ever dead to the world, and dead to
thee! She must be taken to Shiloh, where in perpetual virgin seclusion
her days must pass in the service of the tabernacle. She belongs no
more to man, but must be kept as holy to the Lord.” With this decree
the people were satisfied, and Jephthah was relieved. Still his daughter
was lost to him for ever, and if not called upon to die, was doomed to a
lonely life. How bitterly was hisrash vow now repented! His cherished
child, she whom he looked upon as the light and comfort of his declining
years, must be to him as dead! To her this destiny was worse than
death. She had wrought her soul up to the great sacrifice of her life,
but thus to lose home, and all held dear—to sce none else but strangers
near her—to surrender that fond hope, so cherished by her countrywomen,
of being the Saviour’s mother, brought to her young bosom a chill, as if
from the tomb. Her fair brow was but a moment clouded. No
reproachful word came from her lip, but with a smile of heroie fortitude
she turned to Jephthah—‘ Cheer thee, my father! I am raised from
death,” she said. ‘‘ My life, devoted to my God, and given for my
country, must be a happy one ; for God will not willingly afflict His child.”
Jephthah threw his arms around his daughter, wetting her glossy locks
with bitter, tears. ‘Remember, thou hast many duties, and many
honours, father! Thou art a judge of Israel. Thy brow is surrounded
by a halo of glory, and thou hast much to render life dear to thee. Thou
wilt forget this anguish soon, and, in worshipping thy God, and in thy
country’s service, wilt find peace at last.”

Jephthah strained her to his heart in speechless sorrow. How could
he part with this sweet child so lately restored to him! now become far
dearer as her filial tenderness, her heroism, and her religious faith
became thus known to him. The maiden turned towards the elders.

“T bow to the high priest’s deerce, as a most righteous one,” she said ;
‘Cand I will yield me to his will. This only I would ask, Give me some
little time for preparation, to take farewell of all the friends and scenes
so dear ? After this, I will accompany ye to Shiloh.”

The elders willingly acceded to her request, and then departed.

Some time was passed in preparation, and in endeavours to soothe the
sadness of her father; and then the daughter of Jephthah, accompanied
by her young female companions, her friends and attendants, set out



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 37

upon a pilgrimage among the city’s environs, to bid farewell to all those
friends and places among whom her childhood’s happy days were spent.
She passed from one spot to another among the beautiful mountain
scenery of Gilead, bidding an adieu to every cherished scene.

With her companions she bewailed her hapless lot, and mourned that
she must lose the hopes of seeing the promised Savivur among her
descendants. She then returned to her father’s house, who solemnly
surrendered ker into the hands of the elders, and was taken to Shiloh.

The loss of Jephthah’s daughter was annually commemorated by the
daughters of Israel at Gilead. Every year, upon the anniversary of this
sad event, they walked in procession through the same paths she had trod
with them, when bidding her early home adieu. The character which
we have endeavoured to render familiar to the minds of our readers, is
full of fruitful incident for reflection ; and it is impossible to feel other-
wise than deeply impressed by the dutiful obedience of the heroine of our
subject to the stern dictates of Jephthah’s rash vow.

QUEEN ESTHER.

*Twas night in Persia. Elam’s burning god had passed to other lands,
leaving his starry train ‘to rule the night.” Arcturus and all his sons
were out, Orion and the Pleiades shedding soft brilliancy over many
a perfumed vale, mourtain, and desert lone. Gently their rays were
flung over the stately city of Susa, and fairy gardens of the royal palace.
Here flowers, rare and lovely, were giving forth their fragrance to the
night. Myriads of roses, jessamines, myrtles and sweet oleander, glow-
ing pomegranate, almond, graceful chinar and citron, were gathered in
gorgeous groups, or bending over the silvery and gushing fountains.

A royal banquet-hall arose in this sweet Eden. Gorgeous in its mag-
nificence, it was worthy its royal master. The floor was a rare mosaic
of marble and porphyry and alabaster, which gave it the glow of a rich
painting. Pillars of marble encircled the apartment, suspended to which
by silver rings were hangings of rich stuffs, of white and green, and
scarlet, looped up with silver cords. A table in the form of a crescent
occupied the centre of the room, covered with every rare viand and



38 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

delicious fruit, with delicately-seulptured vases and cups of gold and silver
set with precious stones, bearing the most exquisite wines of Helbon
and Damascus, the sweet water of Choaspes, sacred to the royal table.

Around this luxurious board, reclining upon silver couches covered
with purple cushions, were the chief nobles of the court of Artaxerxes.
In the centre was the monarch, arrayed in robes of scarlet and purple,
adorned with gold and jewels, and wearing the royal tiara, of cloth of
silver and purple silk twisted, which bore a short plume, erect in front.
Next the king sat his seven councillors, the heads of the seven noblest
families in Persia, descendants of the conspirators against the usurper,
Smerdis, the Magian, and privileged, in memory of the confusion of that
hour, to wear the plumes which decorated their white linen turbans
aslant.

A dazzling light was thrown over the richly-laden table by silver
chandeliers, while the hall resounded with music and merry laughter.
This was the seventh day of the royal feast—a feast given by the king
to all his officers and nobles, in commemoration of the peace which his
unremitted efiorts had procured to the one hundred and twenty provinces
of his vast kingdom. Silence was commanded atthe table, and the king
spoke :

“This is the last day of the feast, my lords,” he said; ‘let it in joy
and mirth execed the rest. Stint not the wine, ’tis parent of wit and
merriment.”

Loud applauses followed this gracious address from their monarch ;
the golden flagons were replenished, and jewelled cups flashed in the
light.

“ Bravely hath my lord spoken of wine,” said his favourite, Memucan,
who sat next to him. Butif I dared hazard an opinion, there exists a
more powerful thing than wine.”

“What may that be, Memucan?” said his royal master. ‘‘ Say on!”

“Tt is the king,” said the favourite. ‘ Man is lord of the earth, you
say; he planted the vineyard, and maketh the wine, and doth not the
king command all men ?”

‘« Yes, wine is strong, and the king is strong; but I know what excel-
leth both in power,” said Prince Admath.

“ Speak on,”’ said the king.

“It is woman, my lord, If mankind rule the world, doth not woman
rule him? He that planteth the vine, and the king who commandeth



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 39

sea and land, owe their existence to her. A man leayeth his mother and
country for his wife. For her he will hold as dust all gold and gems,
and every precious thing of the earth. Will not a man labour more
faithfully for the woman of his love than for his king? Yea, he will
rob, and spoil, and brave the dangers of the sea, the fury of lions and
the terrors of darkness, to gain treasure to lay at a woman’s feet! Men
have lost their wits, have become slaves, haye sinned and have perished,
for woman’s sake. Even the king, commander of the earth, does not he
in turn obey a woman? ‘Then acknowledge, O king! and ye, O lords!
that woman hath more power than wine or the king.”

Universal applause crowned the orator, and the sparkling cups were
once more filled high to the honour of woman. A momentary silence
succeeded the clamour, during which a deep sigh was heard in the apart-
ment, All started at this unusual sound in the banquct-hall, and the
king, turning, beheld beside him his cup-bearer, a Hebrew captive, who
stood with his arms folded in his linen mantle, his eyes fixed pensively
on the ground, and his whole figure so expressive of mournful musing
as to present a complete contrast to the merry and gaily-dressed
courtiers.

“ How now, Nehemiah ?” said the king ; ‘* Why art thou so sad ? Why
this heart-sorrow when all are so gay ?”

‘“¢ Let the king live for ever!” said the captive Hebrew ; ‘‘ and let my
lord not rebuke me: for why should not my countenance be sad when the
place of my fathers’ sepulchre lieth waste, and the gates are consumed
with fire ?”

“Nay, do not mar our joy bythy gloom. Cheer up, Nehemiah! Come,
tell us which thou thinkest strongest in the world—wine, the king, or
woman ?”

‘‘They are all excellent in strength, my lord: but, O king, there is
something more powerful tian these!” said the Hebrew.

‘And what may that be?” asked the king, smiling to the courtiers,
who all looked forward expecting some amusement at the captive’s
reply.

‘“‘ Truth is stronger,” replied the Hebrew. ‘‘ Earth and Heaven bow
to the power of Truth. In wine, and the king, and woman, is error and
death; but Truth endureth always, and conquereth for evermore. True
is the earth to her seasons, and swift and true the stars in their cowrse.
In the judgment of Truth there is no unrighteousness; but the children



40 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

of men are wicked. Truth is the strength, and kingdom, and power,
and majesty of all ages. Blessed be the God of Truth!”

The Hebrew was silent; a sudden awe fell upon the assembly, and
they exclaimed, as if with one voice, ‘‘ Great is Truth, and mighty above
all things!”

‘Well hast thou spoken, Hebrew,” said the king. ‘I here pro-
nounce thee conqueror in this our argument, and will give thee any boon
thou shalt ask!”

The Hebrew, with a silent ejaculation to his God, knelt before
Artaxerxes. “If it please thee, O king,” he said, ‘ let me be sent to
Judea with power to rebuild our holy temple, and the God of Truth shall

bless thee evermore ?”
“Thy request is granted. Remind me of this to-morrow, and I will

write the fitting orders.”

With many thanks, and a heart filled with gratitude to God, the
Hebrew fell back behind his beneficent master.

“The Hebrew is wise,” said the king; ‘‘ but he has thrown a shade
over our mirth. Come, fill up, my lords; let us drink to woman. I
give you the fairest in Persia, Queen Vashti!”

When they had drank, Prince Memucan observed : ‘* We drink to her
beauty, my lord, upon our faith in your taste; for the lovely queen hath
never blest our eyes.”

‘Tis true,” said the king; ‘but you shall judge for yourselves. I
will force you to acknowledge her pre-eminence. id the lord chamber-
lain appear.”

“Repair to the Women’s Court,” said the king to the lord chamber-
lain, who stood before him, ‘Bid Queen Vashti appear in her royal
robes, with the crown upon her head, that all may behold her beauty and
confess my taste unquestioned.”

The chamberlain bowed, and departed. Passing through the starlit
garden, whose fresh air and sweet odours were grateful after breathing
the heat and fumes of the banquet-hall, he was admitted through a
large gate into a marble court, with its usual adornment of a whispering
fountain and vases of rare flowers. Around this were built the rooms
appropriated to the women of the palace. A large saloon fronted the
gate, from which echoed the silvery laugh and melodious tones of female
voices,

Here Queen Vashti held a feast to the ladies of the court, and the



PILLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 41





Bt yt}
GLE” SZ



By

wives of those princes who sat at the king’s table. The walls of this
apartment were richly painted, or adorned with delicate flower-work,
carved in cedar, and brightly gilded. Gorgeous Babylonian carpets



42 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

were spread upon the marble floor, and the softened light of alabaster
lamps, reflected from silver mirrors, threw a gentle moonlight radiance
over the room and its fair young group.

A circle of ladies surrounded a table upon which was placed all that
could tempt a fastidious palate. Grapes, and wine, and pomegranates,
Arabian dates, and all that was rare and delicious was before them.
Upon a raised seat sat Queen Vashti. Tall and commanding, she looked
the sovereign. Her dress was of golden tissue, while from the royal
tiara, glittering with jewels, fell a rose-coloured veil spotted with gold.

When the chamberlain entered, she started in angry surprise. ‘ What
means this intrusion upon our privacy?” she said, haughtily.

The lord chamberlain, with a lowly obeisance, delivered the king’s
command for her to appear before the princes in the banquet-hall. The
queen gazed upon him a moment in silence, while her brilliant eyes
flashed fire, the colour grew deep upon her cheek, and her bosom was
stirred with deep emotion.

“Do I hear you aright, my lord ?”

“You do, most royal lady. The king expects you.”

“Ts the king mad?” she cried, with a burst of wrath; for her spirit
was out in allits power. ‘What! does he bid me, the queen! descend
from her state, to appear in the midst of a drunken revel ? Doth he bid
a delicate lady come forth from her privacy to submit to the wanton
gaze of his idle, half-inebriated courtiers? Return, my lord; there is
some mistake in this.” And the self-willed lady drew her veil around
her and resumed her seat, panting with all the anger of outraged dignity
and womanly delicacy.

‘Nay, royal Vashti, hear me,” said Harbona. ‘It is the king’s
command, and I dare not return without the queen.”

“How! do ye stand arguing with me thus, as if ye deemed I would
obey this insolent command!” and the diamonds in her tiara flashed not
more vividly than the eyes of the ireful queen, while gazing upon the
trembling cunuchs.

“You will not thus rebel against—”’ began Abagtha, but he was cut
short by the enraged queen rising from her seat, her glittering robes
falling around her.

“Begone, slave!” she cried, stretching her hand majestically towards
him ; ‘“ begone! and tell your king T wil not come!”

With trembling lips the chamberlain bore to the king his queen’s

?



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 43

refusal to appear before him, The wrath of the king was loud and deep.
“She refuses to come!” he exclaimed. ‘Is my royal will disputed ?
and I bearded by a subject in my own palace °”

Soon a decree went forth into all the hundred and twenty provinces
over which Artaxerxes reigned, that Vashti, the queen of Persia, was
repudiated, for refusing to comply with the king’s commands. ‘The fate
of Vashti was thus soon decided; and she was sent from the palace in
disgrace.

How gentle a touch will sometimes set in motion the machinery of
the world! These events, apparently unimportant except to the actors,
were big with the fate of the Jews who were spread over Persia and
Media.

In the suburbs of the city of Susa, by the river’s side, and conecaled
from view by a grove of stunted cypresses, stood a lone hut, formed of
mud which was hardened in the sun, and thatched with date leaves.
Here resided Mordecai, once a man of wealth in Judea, but subsequently
carried captive to Babylon with his king, Jeconia, when the country was
conquered by Nebuchodonosor. Mordecai now gained a scanty sub-
sistence by labouring in the city, and lived in this retired spot in order
to escape notice. When the news of the king’s deerce reached him, his
heart bounded with joy. He now saw a way open ‘or the advancement
of his people, and with many a silent prayer and ejaculation of praise
he sought his home. The hut of Mordecai, wretched as it was in appear-
ance, contained a jewel of inestimable value. Here dwelt a Jewish
maiden of rare beauty, who, upon the death of her father, was left to the
care of her uncle Mordecai. Determined to place his peerless niece upon
the list of virgin candidates, he lost no time in seeking her.

The next day Mordecai sought Hegai, the lord chamberlain, in whose
core the candidates were placed. Concealing his relationship, he told
him ofa jewel ‘‘ worth all her tribe,” of whose abode he was acquainted,
and offered to lead her to him, when he might judge if she were fit to
enter the ranks of the candidate maidens. Hegai appointed a time and
a place for the meeting, and the sanguine Hebrew spent his last beral
in purchasing rich robes to deck his favourite.

The eunuch gazed with delight upon his beauteous charge, and took
her small white hand in his, and led her into the presence of Artaxerxes.
Like the evening star she beamed upon the king, all brilliancy and soft~
ness. ‘he monarch raised her as she knelt before him.



44 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

“Bring hither no more maidens, Hegai,” he said, gazing with eestacy
upon the lovely Esther; ‘‘ this is my queen; earth can give no fairer.”

The important news soon flew over the palace and city. Hsther was
chosen queen, and the royal crown was placed upon her head.

Haman, the brother of Vashti, now aroused all his energy to compass
his plans. Revenge for his sister’s degradation, and an ambitious wish
to advance himself to power, were the mainsprings of his actions. His
first step was to obtain the king’s confidence. This, with extreme cun-
ning, he contrived to do. He was placed above all the nobles of the
court; and the king even sent forth a decree, commanding all, at the
approach of Haman, to bow down and worship him asa god. Exulting
in his suecess, Haman now, with renewed hope, endeavoured to accom-
plish the destruction of Esther, hoping by his influence to induce the
king to place Vashti again upon the throne.

Soon after the decree in his favour, Haman, clad in costly robes of
purple and scarlet, on an Arab courser, whose velvet housings were
embroidered with gold, rode through the city, with a long train of
followers, to satisfy his insatiable pride by the adoration of all whom he
passed. He rode loftily out of the gate, around which was collected a
crowd of slaves and idlers, who bowed themselves to the dust at his
approach, crying, ‘Hail, Haman! son of Mythra!” One alone stood
erect, gazing with a calm brow at the pageant as it passed. Haman was
astonished at his daring, but supposing him some stranger, ignorant of
the king’s command, satisfied his malignity by frowning darkly at the
offender. The next day the same thing occurred. All were prostrate
except the stranger, who stood proudly with folded arms as Hamar
passed. The slaves who stood around and marked the anger of Haman,
expostulated with Mordecai—for he it was—upon his singular conduct.
They urged the king’s decree and the power of Haman, and warmed him
of the danger of offending the haughty favourite. ‘To all this Mordecai
vouchsafed no reply, and, when Haman again rode forth, stood among the
knecling group, like some tall tree erect amid the wreck of forests.
Haman was galled beyond endurance.

“What, slave!” he cried, riding fiercely up to him, ‘know you not
the king’s command ? Down there, and kneel before me!”

“T bow not to mortal, my lord,” said the Hebrew, calmly; “to my
God alone my knee is bent in adoration.’ And, folding his linen robe
around him, he slowly strode away.



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT: WOMEN. 45

Haman’s wrath was great, but his nature was wily; and detecting a
smile among his followers, he smothered his ire and rode on, devising
some sure and cruel punishment to the man who dared to resist his will.
Calling to his side one of his trusty servants, he asked him the name of
the offender.

“It is Mordecai, my lord, a Jew, and we do suspect a relation of the
queen; for messages have gone between them, and Hegai said he brought
Esther to the palace.”

“A Jew, and a relative of the queen!” thought Haman. ‘Esther is
in my power, and the throne is mine! for Haman is not so weak as to
work for another ; no, my fair sister, thou art but my agent, and when
the king is dead, my faithful Macedonians, whom I have secreted in the
city, will place me upon the throne of Persia !”’

Haman asked no more questions, but, bending over his horse, whis-
pered to his slave—

‘Bring me the surety of all you say, and a golden darick shall reward
you.”

A few days after this, Haman rushed eagerly into his sister’s presence.

“Joy, joy, Vashti!” he cried; ‘thy rival is in my power, and thou
shalt see her blood flow at thy feet!”

“Ha! what sayest thou?” exclaimed the queen.

“¢T have discovered her well-kept secret at last. Vashti, Esther is a
Jewess! a despised, captive Hebrew!”

‘‘Then shall I be avenged, Haman! I breathe free once more!” and
shaking back her neglected locks, the face of Vashti beamed with
triumph.

“Yes, she is of that hated, obnoxious race. As yet the king knows it
not, nor shall he, until my plans be arranged.”

“Quick, tell me all!” exclaimed the eager princess.

“Listen. I will work upon the king against the Jews. I will repre-
sent them as a dangerous race, which it is the king’s duty to extermi-
nate. I can guide Artaxerxes as a child, by his own good qualities ; for
the benefit of his country he would sacrifice his dearest friend. A decree
goes forth for the massacre of the Jews,—Mordeeai and Esther share the
fate of their people, and Vashti mounts the throne of Persia!”

“Oh, soul-ravishing news! Now I shall know that peace which fled
my bosom while my rival lived and was beloved!”

‘“‘Vashti,” said Haman, with a withering frown, ‘‘remember thy oath!
If we require the king at thy hands, strike sure!”



46 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

With a wild shrick, the unhappy woman fied into an inner room.

By the wiles of Haman, his revenge was gratified, and the voice of
mourning was heard throughout Persia, when the king’s cruel deeree,
consigning to death all Jews, both young and old, was known. The
despair of Mordecai was great. He rent his clothes, and putting on a
garment of sackcloth, covered his head with ashes, and placed himself
before the king’s gate, uttering loud moans and lamentations.

The queen, meanwhile, was ignorant of all that was to befall her
people, nor knew she of her uncele’s distress, until informed of it by her
maids and chamberlains, who beheld him as he mourned at the gate.
He implored his niece, if she would save her people, to sue to the king
for mercy. The lovely Esther was much distressed at this news, and.
saw not how to obey her uncle’s request; for she knew it was death for
any one to enter the king’s presence uncalled; and thirty days had
passed since she had been sent for. How, then, could she see him to
implore mercy ?

Esther, however, at once resolyed to offer her life as a sacrifice to her
country. She would brave the king’s laws, and perhaps fall a victim to
his anger; but, should she have made an effort to save Judah from
destruction, and, her duty done, she could die in peace.

Three days did the sons of Isracl in Susa fast and pray to God to avert
the calamity, and to soften the heart of Artaxerxes, that the queen might
find favour in his eyes. On the fourth day Mordecai directed his steps
to the palace. It was yet early, and the palace gates were not open.
Weary and faint with three days of fasting and of woe, he threw himself
upon the ground, and, concealed by the pillars of the gate, indulged in
mournful meditation and prayer.

His thoughts were interrupted by the arrival of two persons whom he
recognised as Bigthana and Teresh, two chamberlains of the court. They
seated themselves near to Mordecai, and entered into conversation with-
out perceiving him.

“Of all the villanous deeds of which our employer, Haman, has been
guilty,” said Bigthana, ‘this murder of the Jews and the innocent
queen are the worst.”

“Tet them die!” said Teresh, gloomily ; ‘‘they are Jews, and deserve
death.”

“‘T care not much for the Jews,” replied Bigthana, ‘but it does scem
a pity this gentle creature should be massacred ; however, I am sure the
king will prevent it.”



-

BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 47

“¢ His leave will not be asked,” said Teresh, with a sneer. ‘In the
confusion of the day it s my province to see that she shares the fate of
her people. Haman hopes to excuse himself to the king afterwards, and
even place Vashti upon the throne.”

“But if he should not be pardoned?”

“Then the king des, and the Macedonians will be called in.”

The guards arrived to open the gates, and the dark conspirators passed
through. Their career of guilt had now, however, drawn to a close.
Mordecai, who had overheard all, denounced them to the soldiers as
plotters against the king’s life, and they were speedily loaded with chains,
and cast into a dungeon to await the king’s pleasure. An account of
this event was despatched to Esther by Mordecai, who sent a relation of
it to the king; but he, satisfied the men were in his power, gave no heed
to the particulars of the plot. The day arrived which was to decide the
fate of the captive Jews. Queen Esther, willing to risk her life for the
hope of saving her people, prepared to enter the king’s apartment
uncalled. If he were wroth, her instant death would follow; but if he
felt inclined to grant the boon she came to ask, he would stretch forth
his sceptre in token she might approach and present her petition. The
queen’s gentle spirit shrunk from her enterprise ; but once more resorting
to her closet in prayer, she came forth strong in the Lord, The queen
and her maidens were arrayed in the costliest robes. Radiant with
beauty, and smiling cheerfully, although her heart was heavy, Queen
Esther, followed by a train of lovely maidens, entered the forbidden
courts of the king.

Artaxerxes was sitting upon his ivory throne, glittering with gold and
jewels. He wore the royal robe of Persia, purple, with stripes of silver.
A tiara of the same was surrounded with a diadem of priceless gems,
while his scarlet tunic was one brilliant mass of jewels and gold.

As the king gazed upon Esther, his heart softened, for he loved his
gentle queen.

While each eye was watching him with intense interest, he stretched
out his golden sceptre towards her. Ina mild voice he said, “What
wouldest thou, Queen Esther ?”

Tears of joy were in every eye, and smiles upon every face,,when the
king pronounced these words. The queen reviving, with an effort
advanced, and touched the sceptre—she was safe !

Moyed by her loveliness and her distress, Artaxerxes‘descended from his



48 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

throne, and embracing her, bade her to be comforted, and speak freely
her mind, and he would grant her request, were it half his kingdom.

“Tf it seemeth good to the king, let my lord come to my banquet to-
morrow, and bring with him the lord Haman, where I will demand my
boon, which is of great importance, touching even my life.” The king
promised to be there ; and Queen Esther, with a glad and grateful heart,
withdrew.

Great was the pride of Haman then! He was invited to feast with the
king and queen! he, a stranger and adventurer, had arrived at the high
honour of being the guest of the queen, at her own request—an honour
she had not conferred on any of the princes and nobles of the court.
Inflated with vanity and triumph, Haman was passing from the palace,
to give orders for new and sumptuous attire for the banquet, when, be-
hold! there, in the king’s gate, sat Mordecai, who, when the others
around kissed the dust at his feet, stood erect, unmoved! What a check
to all his greatness!

That night, the king being restless, awoke very early and commanded
the records of the palace to be brought him. There he beheld the ser-
vice rendered him by Mordecai, when he secured the conspirators.

“ Have the traitors been examined ?” he asked.

“No, my lord.”

“Let it then be done instantly, for I see by these papers Mordecai
aceuses some great lord of the court as their employer. Surely I have
been very negligent! Hath the man been rewarded who discovered
the conspiracy ?”

“He hath not yet, O king!”

The door was opened, and Haman entered. His gallows was erected,
and he now came to win from the king permission to hang his enemy
upon it.

“Come hither, Haman,” said Artaxerxes. ‘What shall be done with
he man whom the king delighteth to honour ?”

The proud heart of Haman exulted, for he thought the king intended
to confer some new favour upon him.

‘For the man whom the king delighteth to honour,” said the wily
Haman, ‘let the king’s royal robes be brought, and the horse which the
king rideth upon, and the crown royal. Let this apparel and horse be de-
livered into the hands of the king’s most noble prince, that he may array
with these the man whom the king delighteth to honour, and bring him



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 49

on horseback through the street of the city, and proclaim before
him, ‘Thus shall it be done to the man whom the king delighteth to
honour !’”

Then the king said to Haman,—

‘‘Make haste, and take the robes and the horse, as thou hath said,
and do even thus to Mordecai, the Jew, who sitteth at the king’s gate.”

The heart of Haman stood still when he heard these words. Must he
exalt the enemy whom he came to destroy! Must he show himself to
the world as groom to the despised Jew! He rushed from the king’s
presence almost a maniac. Haman could not resist the king’s mandate.
The humiliating ceremony was enacted, and then, with his head covered
in anguish, he fled to his own house.

The queen’s chamberlain now arrived to escort Haman to the banquet.
Arrayed in his most costly robes, and smoothing his brow, Haman fol-
lowed him into the queen’s presence. Unsuspecting the queen’s know-
ledge of his arts against her nation, he advanced with a confident smile
to the raised seat occupied by his royal master and Queen Esther. That
smile was the last the face of Haman wore.

“ And now that we are assembled at thy request,” said Artaxerxes,
“what is thy petition, Queen Esther? It shall be granted thee, even
were it half my kingdom, for I have sworn it.’

Then Esther, the queen, kneeling before him, said,

“Tf Ihave found favour in thy sight, O king! and if it please my lord,
let my life be given to me at my petition, and that of my people, at my
request. For we are all sold, I and my people, to be destroyed, to be
slain, and to perish !”

“ And who is he,” said the king in his anger, ‘‘ who doth presume in
his heart to devise anything against thy life? I understand thee not.
Who are thy people ?”

How sank the heart of Haman within him!

“Know, then, O king, Iam a Jewess! My adversary is this wicked
Haman, who hateth me and my kin, and hath beguiled thee to give us
all to slaughter.”

Then was the king’s wrath too great for words, for he remembered the
scene in the temple, and saw through the designs of Hamana He cast a
withering glance upon his ungrateful favourite, which caused him to
shrink and writhe with despair.

“Ho! my guards!” cried the king, rushing to the door of the hall.

E



50 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI/S OWN TREASURY.

He was met by soldiers, who brought in chains the two chamberlains,
Bigthana and Teresh, who had conspired against him.

“Here are the men whom thou didst command to be examined,
O king,” said the head officer, They have confessed the wicked Taman
did hire them with rich gifts to practise against thy life and the
queen’s.”’

“Seize the villain!” cried the king, in a voice of thunder. ‘ Bring
him forth, and let him die like a dog!”

‘Behold, my lord, said the officer, ‘‘ there stands without a gallows
fifty cubits high ; if it please thee, we will hang him thereon.”

The wretched Haman had sunk upon his knees before the queen, to
implore her protection, and finding she was turning from him, he grasped.
her hand, and entreated her to hear him,

“Ha, wretch!” cried the king when he entered, ‘‘ wilt thou insult
the queen before our eyes? Away with him to death!”

Haman was dragged forth and hanged upon the gallows which had
been prepared for Mordecai. The Jew was called into the king’s pre-
sence.

*‘Here is my signet ring, Mordecai,” said the king. ‘It was once
Haman’s; itis now thine. Take it, and with it all the wealth, and
power, and rank of Haman. I cannot revoke my decree; but thou shalt
have soldiers and arms to defend thy people against those employed by
the wicked Haman, who, seeing this preparation, will not dare to strike.
Save as many as thou canst. I have promised to Nehemiah the govern-
ment of Judea. See that he hath men and money to rebuild his holy
city, for I would do all I can to recompense my queen and the Jews for
my unjust decree.” Then bounded the hearts of Esther and her uncle
for joy. Kneeling to the good king, they kissed his hands in devout
thankfudaess for his generous conduct, and then lifting their eyes above,
poured out their grateful souls to the Giver of so much good, who had
shown Himself so powerful to save !

THE MORAL.

Esther is another beautiful example of the duty we owe our guar-
dians and aged relatives. She left her quiet home to face the snares and
dangers of a court, not refusing to obey her uncle when he requested. her
to become one of the candidates. Her patriotism, and her trust in God,



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 51

are worthy of great commendation. When in all the state and dignity
of royalty Esther did not forget Mordecai, whom she cherished and
obeyed, as if she were still the lowly Haddassah.

JEHOSHEBA.

Maw calls himself the Lord of Creation; yet, powerless and fragile as
woman may appear, she hath ever borne equal sway with him over the
destinies of the world.

At the period of our story, Judea was divided into two kingdoms,—
Israel and Judah. Each kingdom saw itself under the despotic sway of
awoman. Jezebel reigned in Isracl, and Athaliah, her daughter, in
Judah—both women of lawless passions and haughty spirit, and, withal,
idolatrous worshippers of Baal and Astaroth.

These were only queens dowager—for, Joram, the son of Jezebel, was
sovereign of Samaria; and Athaliah’s son, Ahaziah, governed Jerusalem.
Being much engaged in wars with Edom and Syria, their country was
left to the tender mercies of these fierce: and cruel women, ‘They were
universally detested ; but the people, knowing there was no redress, sub-
mitted in silence. Jezebel’s persecution of the holy prophet Elijah, after
his signal defeat of the prophets of Baal, is well known. ‘So let the
gods do to me, and more also,” said Jezebel to Elijah, by a messenger,
“if I make not thy life as the life of one of the prophets thou hast slain
by to-morrow morning!” Elijah fied into the wilderness, and threw
himself down beneath a juniper-tree, where he prayed to die, rather
than to live under the sway of that cruel woman. Her wicked and un-
just conduct towards Naboth united all classes against her, and acecle-
rated her doom.

Ahab took possession of the land of the murdered Naboth.

God sent Elijah to Ahab and Jezebel, to reproach them for thei
wickedness, and uttered prophecies of their downfail, which were after-
wards fulfilled.

But we are not here narrating the story of Jezebel, but of her equally
wicked daughter, whose son, Ahaziah, king of Judah, had left the army in
command of Jehu, a man of great valour, anda skilful soldier. God’s pur-
poses were not yet fulfilled upon the wicked house of Ahab: by hishumility,
he averted the evil from himself; but the time was come to destroy the



52 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

rebellious race from the land. Elijah was commissioned to anoint Jehu
king of Isracl, in place of Joram. He sent the young prophet, who had
attended him to Damascus, to fulfil the mission.

According to his instructions, the youthful prophet repaired to Ramoth
Gilead. Jehu and the other captains were feasting in the guard-rocm
when the prophet entered. ‘Ihave an errand to thee, O captain!”
he said.

“‘ Unto which of us?” asked Jehu.

“¢ Even unto thee, Jehu, son of Jehoshaphat!”

Jehu arose, and followed the prophet into aninner room. The prophet
opened a horn of perfumed oil, and poured it on his head, saying—“ ‘thus
saith the Lord God of Israel, ‘I have anointed thee king over Isracl.
Thou shalt be my avenger, to smite the house of Ahab. And thou shalt
avenge me of Jezebel, who hath shed the blood of my servants. ‘The
dogs shall eat her in the portion of Jezreel!’” His mission over, the
prophet opened the door, and disappeared.

Jehu was a favourite with the soldiers, and the son of Jezebel was
hated ; so that they joyfully received the news, and determined to pro-
claim him at once. For want of a throne, they covered the stairs, which
ran up outside the house, with their scarlet mantles ; and, placing Jehu
on high, sounded upon their trumpets, and proclaimed Jehu king of
Israel.

The warder upon the watch-tower of Jezreel reported to Joram the
approach of a body of horse and chariots. Joram knew not whom they
were, or if they came in peace or war.

“Let some one go out to meet them, and ask the leader if he come in
peace,” said the king.

The horseman apyroached Jehu, who was standing in his chariot.
‘Thus asks king Joram,” he said, “Is it peace?”

“What hast thou do to with peace?” replied Jehu. ‘Get thee
behind me.”

The messenger did as he was ordered, and joined the train of Jehu.
A second messenger was despatched, who also remained with the ap-
proaching party.

The city now became alarmed, and gathered upon the walls to watch
the troop. Joram sent for the watchman to inquire more particulars.
‘ that of Jchu, the son of Jehoshaphat, for h2 ever driveth furiously.”



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 53



“Tt is Jehu,” said the king ;

3?

“Cand perhaps bearer of news from the
army. Make ready the chariot, and I will ride out to meet him.”



+

’
54 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’$ OWN TREASURY.

Joram and Ahaziah, the kings of Israel and Judah, each in his chariot,
left the city, and met Jehu just by the vineyard of Naboth the Jezreel-
ite. Then sank the heart of Joram within him when he recollected it,
for many prophets had denounced judgments against him and his
house, for the great iniquity of his father and mother. The chariots
stopped.

“Ts it in peace thou comest, Jehu?” asked Joram.

“What peace is there for any,” said Jehu, ‘‘ when the wickednesses
and witchcraft of thee and thy mother, Jezebel, are so many?”

“Treason! Treachery !—O Ahaziah,” cried Joram, and turned to fly ;
but an arrow from Jehu, the avenger, brought him low,—and he sank
down dead in his chariot.

“Throw him upon the field of Naboth,” said Jehu to his captain,
Bidkar. ‘‘ Now have the words of the Lord come to pass, which thou
and I heard when we rode behind Ahab: ‘I haye seen the blood of
Naboth,’ said the prophet; ‘and I will revenge me here, in this very
field,’ saith the Lord.”

When Ahaziah, king of Judah, saw the deed, he fled; but was pursued
by the people of Jehu.

“¢ Smite him also in his chariot,” cried the avenger! And Ahaziah was
soon dead. ‘Bury him,” said Jchu, ‘for he is the son of the good
Jehoshaphat, but deserves death for his mother’s sake, and because he
joined himself with the ungodly Joram.”

Eager for sovereign power, and devoid of natural feeling, Athaliah
resolved, when she heard the death of her son, to seize upon the throne.
The natural heirs, however, stood in her way ; and these, although they
were her own grandchildren, she doomed to death.

Jehosheba, the sister of Ahaziah by another mother, was a woman of
great and good qualities, and tenderly attached to her brother. She wept
sorely for his death, and acted a mother’s part to his young orphans.
She was wife to Jehoiada, the high priest of the temple, and lived with
him within the precincts of the holy house. ‘ Ahaziah hath been some
time dead,” she said one day to her husband, ‘and I have not seen any
preparations towards anointing his son as king in his stead. Canst thou
tell me, Jehoiada, why it is not done ?”

‘Had thine illness not prevented thee from visiting the palace,
Jechosheba, thou wouldest have known,” replied the high priest, in a sad
accent.



or
or

BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN,

‘What! is the young Zezron dead ?” she asked, in alarm.

“Not yet,” said her husband, gloomily. ‘‘ Now that thou art strong
enough to hear the terrible news, know that Athaliah hath seized upon
the sovereign power, and imprisoned the young princes in the palace.”

This was a great shock to the tender heart of the princess. ‘ Alas,
my sweet young nephews!” she said, while tears bedewed her face,
‘“‘they are in the hands of a cruel tigress, Can we not do something,
Jehoiada? Let me go to Athaliah, and surely she will listen to my
prayer, and let them depart to their uncle’s or to my care; for I fear
me she will not yet be satisfied with this cruclty.”

“No, Jehosheba, seek not Athaliah; thy prayers, be well assured,
cannot soften the heart of that accursed woman.”

“She surely will not imprison all those noble young princes for
life.”

“Alas! their lives will not be long, I fear!”

Jehoiada turned from his wife’s tears, and retreated to the temple.
Here he bent in prayer to God that He would look in pity upon Judah,
and avert from it the threatened evil; for Jchoiada had not revealed to
Jehosheba the fact of the intended massacre of the innocent princes,
which had been told him in confidence that morning by the captain of
the royal guard.

That night Jehosheba, unable to sleep, arose and walked in the marble
court before her apartment. There she remained some time, reflecting
upon the situation of her nephews, to whom, particularly the young
Joash, then just a year old, she was very much attached. She could not
rest easy without doing something for them; and was busily resolving
plans for their benefit, when she was aroused by the sound of trampling
horses and the rattle of armour. She ascended the wall, and beheld a
troop of soldiers enter the palace-gates. Soldiers at midnight! Her
heart sank, and she fell back against the parapet in a cold tremour. ,

What could it mean! Some deadly event was in progress, and her
thoughts turned with affright towards the royal children. But Athaliah
could not be so cruel—so wicked! A sudden shrick as from a death-
stroke awoke the silence of night. Jechosheba started as if her own
heart had been pierced. She turned toward the palace, where a miser-
able scene met her view. From the balconies and terraces of the women’s
apartments were children and females rushing apparently in the wildest
aftright. Some soldiers ran in pursuit of them, whom the wretched



56 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

princess recognised as the queen’s own band, who were notorious for per-
forming every bloody deed which the queen might dictate.

The cries of children and women almost aroused the princess to mad -
ness ; for she doubted not the cruel Athaliah had given over the young
princes to slaughter. Could she stand there and look on without helping
them? But what availed her feeble arm against those ruthless men ?
Jehosheba rushed from the wall, and had nearly regained her apart-
ment, when another loud wail arrested her steps, and she determined, at
whatever risk, to seck the palace, and endeavour to save one of her
nephews. There was a private way, built by Solomon, which led to the
palace ; and over this Jehosheba wildly rushed, resolving to die with, or
save her nephews. She sought the women’s apartments, and found the
court filled with soldiers.

“You cannot pass in, lady,” said one.

“ Away! Iam the Princess Jehosheba!”

At the majestic wave of her hand the soldiers gave way.
sight met her eye on entering the rooms. Dead and dying children, and
nurses who had faithfully defended them, were lying around. Bloody
and brutal soldiers opposed her path, but Jehosheba struggled through ;
for she had thought of the infant Joash, and sought to conceal him, at
least. The deadly deed would have been over ere this, but there were a
few devoted servants of the house of David who resisted the soldiers’
bloody purpose. All were killed, except those in the last apartment. At
the door stood two faithful eunuchs, disputing the soldiers’ entrance.
Jehosheba endeavoured to foree her way through.

‘‘Forbear, princess,” cried one of the eunuchs, ‘the fiends will kill
you also.”

Jehosheba was not to be daunted. She pushed aside their swords, and
entered the apartment. She gazed wildly around; there were several
children and young persons there of the royal blood, all weeping, and
clinging to their attendants in the greatest terror.

Cowering in a corner sat a nurse, pressing in her arms an infant. It
was the young Joash, now the only living child of Ahaziah. Jeshosheba
seized the infant, and, concealing it under the wrapper she wore,
beckoned the nurse to follow, and rapidly left the room. The faithful
eunuchs were dead ; and the soldiers, busy with their prey, cared not to
stop her, for they were not ordered to murder any except the royal chil-
dren. Struggling through blood and ribald soldiers, and severely



BIBLE STORTES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 57

wounded, the heroic Jehosheba at last saw herself in the temple-
court.

Jchoiada was awakened from his slumber by sobs of anguish. He
arose hastily, and beheld his beloved Jehosheba covered with blood,
lying senscless upon the floor, while a strange nurse and infant were
weeping over her

Six years was Joash concealed in the temple ; the secret of his escape
from the massacre being only known to his aunt, uncle, and nurse. In the
temple there was more security than in any place in Jerusalem, for it was
then only frequented by a few faithful Jews, the remainder of the people
repairing to the idol fanes which Athaliah had reared in many places.
The glory had departed from the house of God ; its gold was stripped off
—its walls broken down, and the golden utensils decorated the altars of
Baal. At the end of these six years, Jehosheba thought the favourite
moment had arrived to restore Joash to the throne of his fathers. Atha-
liah, by her rapacity, her cruelty and unlicensed passions, was univer-
sally detested, and the people began to sigh for release from her tyranny.
The measure of her iniquities was full, and God had commanded her
downfall. Jehoiada, as a preliminary step, called to his council some
of the Levites whom he could trust, and some oflicers who he knew were
disaffected towards Athaliah. After swearing them to secresy in the
temple, he revealed to them the fact of the existence of one of the royal
princes. They were all rejoiced at the news, and vowed to serve him, and
place him upon the throne. These were commissioned to go to the several
towns and cities of Judah, and collect all the Levites who had been
dispersed, and send them to the temple. All the nobles of Judah who
had fled from Athaliah’s tyranny were also to be informed of the con-
spiracy. All was ready. The day arrived, and the people, summoned
by the high priest on pretence of an unusual fast, crowded the courts
before the temple. Each one who was in the secret was instructed in his
part. They were divided in three bands—one was placed at the court
gate, and one at the outer gate, while the third encircled the young
prince. The courts were filled with people, who awaited in silence the
commencement of the religious ceremonies of the day. Jehoiada, the high
priest, entered the upper court from a side cloister, leading by the hand
a young boy of seven years, and followed by the princess Jehosheba and
his nurse. The high priest advanced to the head of the steps leading to
the lower court, that all might behold him.



68 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

“Ye men of Judah!” he said, ‘‘ ye have heard how our God hath sworn
He will establish the throne of David for ever, and hath said David shall
never want an heir to his throne; then why suffer ye the daughter of
Jezebel, the seed of Sidon, on the throne of our glorious king?” A mur-
mur of astonishment interrupted Jehoiada. ‘Men of Jerusalem, I have
called ye here this day to know if ye will serve Baal or Jehovah.”

‘¢-We will worship the Lord our God!” cried several voices.

‘And I have called ye here to know,” continued Jehoiada, “if ye will
serve the daughter of Jezebel or a son of David ?”

“ Down with Athaliah!” exclaimed a few who were in the secret.

“Behold, then, this youth. Itis Joash, your lawful prince, the son
of Ahaziah ; saved from the massacre by the heroism of his aunt, the
princess Jehosheba, who is here to corroborate the tale.”

Loud acclamations of joy, which seemed to come from the hearts of all,
resounded from the throng. The high priest then placed the prince
against the marble column, the usual stand of the king when in the
temple ; and after anointing him with the holy perfumed oil, placed the
diadem of David upon his head. Then the silver trumpets sounded, and
the sweet singers of Israel burst into hymns of praise, and the joyous
multitude shouted, ‘‘God save the king !””

Athaliah, like all tyrants, was of a very suspicious nature. Her spies
had informed her of the unusual concourse in the temple, and she had
been uneasy the whole morning. Aroused by the shouts and clangor of
trumpets, she repaired to the temple through the king’s passage ; and
when there, a blasting sight met her view. Placed in the centre of that
spacious court was a crowned king, around whom stood a circle of armed
guards ; while the people were crowding to do homage to the son of David.
The striking resemblance of the noble child to her son, Ahaziah, the
presence of Jehosheba and his nurse, whom she recollected, revealed to
her the truth—the boy had been secretly reared, and the people had con-
spired to place him upon her throne. The most demoniac passion took pos-
session of her. She stamped and tore her robes—‘ Rebellious wretches!”
she cried ; ‘ tortures shall follow this! Ho! my guards! treason!”

“Take that accursed woman hence!” said the high priest, ‘(and slay
her without the temple.”

Athaliah was slain, and Joash reigned in her stead.

THE MORAL,
May we all imitate the heroism of Jchosheba when called upon to



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 59

undertake any difficult or dangerous achievement. She turned from the
gaieties of a court to live in a retired and humble manner within the
temple, where she practised a faith then despised by all. At the ery of
innocence she rushed to the rescue, heedless of the assassin’s sword or the
queen’s displeasure. This her generous devotedness was of the greatest
benefit to her country, for in her nephew’s reign the idols were over-
thrown, and the true worship prevailed. Let us not think of our own
peril when we may succour the poor or the oppressed.

JUDITH.

Amonc the great and glorious cities of the East, Ecbatana stood con-
spicuous for strength and beauty. In her extent and power, and the
multitude of her palaces, she could not compete with Nineveh or Babylon ;
but there was a grace in her architecture and beauty in her situation, as
she reclined at the foot of a lofty mountain range, her white buildings
showing brightly against the green back-ground, which won from every
traveller expressions of admiration as he gazed. She was the pride of
Media; and Arphaxad, the king, had newly fortified it to withstand
a siege which was designed against.it by Nebuchodonosor, king of the
Assyrians, from whom he had rebelled, and who was advancing with
great force against them.

Vain were the precautions of Arphaxad. ‘Howl, oh gate; ery, oh
city!” Thy beauty and thy strength could not save thee! One after
another fell her seven walls, and her towers, and Ecbatana was laid low
in the dust. Arphaxad fled to the mountains, but was pursued by the
Assyrian—his darts pierced through the unfortunate king, and he died
with his last look fixed in anguish upon his ruined Ecbatana, which lay
smoking before him ; while his horsemen, his chariots, and his wealth fell
into the hands of Nebuchodonosor.

The victor returned in triumph to Nineveh, where he feasted his army
for twenty days. The feasting over, he prepared his war-chariots once
more, breathing. slaughter against those nations who had refused to assist
him in his siege of Kcbatana. One of the doomed peoples was the
Hebrews.

The approach of this great army, headed by the famous general Holo-



60 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

fornes, brought dismay to the hearts of Isracl and Judah; still the idea
of submission was not for an instant harboured by this resolute people.
They were strong in the consciousness of right, when they refused to
assist in the downfall of Media; and resolved, whatever might betide,
never to bow down to the gods of Assyria. Hoping their powerful King,
Jehovah, would appear in their fayour, they humbled themselves before
Him, and ‘cried to God with great fervency.” The inhabitants of
Jerusalem were clothed with sackcloth, and, with ashes on their heads,
remained night and day before the temple, fasting, and offering gifts to
the Lord, that He might show Himself as the ‘shield of triumph.”

Still no earthly means were neglected to repel the invading army.
They were expected to come through the hills of Galilee, and upon the
strongholds, situated among them, they depended for protection.

All the passes were fortified and victualled for a year, and it was in
these passes that Holofornes first found himself checked in his glorious
career.

A noble widow dwelt here in Bethulia: her husband, Manasses, was a
man of wealth and rank, but while overseeing his men in the barley-
harvest, was struck by the sun and died. Judith, his widow, never ceased
to mourn for her husband, to whom she was tenderly attached, and still
wore widow’s apparel, and fasted and dressed in sackcloth except on the
feasts of new moon, and other festivals of Israel. By the strength and
elevation cf her character, she comforted her town’s-people, and infused
into their hearts some of her own courageous spirit in this dire ex-
tremity.

Sadly did they gaze upon their cisterns and founts in the city, as day
by day the waters diminished, and provisions failed ; and they knew they
must die a dreary death, or be given to the enemy who were raging for
them below. At last the water failed, and the citizens fell fainting in
the streets, and many died each day. Then the people, rendered weak
by suficring, called upon their rulers to surrender to the Assyrians, this
being now the only hope for their lives, They assembled in a tumultuous
manner before the house of Ozias, the governor of Bethulia, erying, ‘God
be judge between us and you. You do us a great injury that you do
not require peace of the children of Assur. We have no helper. God
hath sold us into the hands of Holofornes. Send for him, then, and give
him the city as a spoil, and we will be his slaves, for this is better than
to die of thirst, and see our wives and children die!”



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. G1



Weeping and groaning were heard on all sides, and they “ eried to God
with a loud voice,” saying, ‘We take to witness against you, heaven
and earth, and God, the Lord of our fathers, if ye do not surrender
quickly.”



62 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

“ Brethren, be of good courage,” said Ozias. ‘ God will not forsake
us utterly. Let us endure five days, and in that time God may look in
mercy towards us. If at the end of these days there come no help for
us, I will do as it may seem good to you.”

The citizens were pacified with this promise, and departed each to his
own dreary dwelling, there to struggle for life five days ere they be given
up to slavery, or perhaps death. In silence they awaited their doom—
hope for assistance from on high nearly deserted them, and sighs alone
disturbed the mournful silence of the so lately animated city. After the
dispersion of the people, Ozias received a request from the noble widow,
Judith, praying his presence at her house, accompanied by Charmis and
Chabris, when she would show him a way to save the city. They imme-
diately repaired thither.

‘Hear me now, ye governors of Bethulia!” said Judith, when they
were seated. ‘‘ The words which ye have spoken to the people this day
are not right, saying ye will deliver the city to the enemy, unless God
help us within five days. Who are ye, that thus promise the help of
God, and tempt Him thus? Ye know ye cannot find the depth of the
heart of man; how, then, can ye pretend to know the mind of God, who
hath made all things—or how comprehend His purposes? God is not
a man, that he may be forced or threatened from His purpose, and if He
do not save us within five days, He may after that. Let us call upon
Him to help us, and He will, if it please Him, for we worship no other
God but Him, and He will not despise us, nor let Judea be wasted.
Hear me, and I will do a thing which few women would do, but which
is now the only way to save the nation. Accompany me this night
to the city gate, and let me and my waiting-woman pass forth ; and,
within the days which ye have promised to deliver the city to the
Assyrians, the Lord will save Israel by my hand! Inquire not ye of mine
act, for I will not declare it unto you till the things I propose shall be
finished.”

“Go in peace,” said the governors, ‘‘ and the Lord God before thee, to
take vengeance on our enemies !”

She then arose, and having anointed herself, she plaited her ‘hair,
adorned it with jewels, and arrayed herself in one of her rich dresses
which she had not worn since the death of her’ husband, Manasses ;—her
feet were decorated with sandals of scarlet and gold, while bracelets,
chains, and rings ornamented the rest of her person. She was a woman



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 63

renowned for beauty, and now that her majestie person was attired in
costly and graceful raiment, she well might hope to attract the notice of
the Assyrian general.

Having laden her maid with a bottle of wine, a cruse of oil, a bag of
parched corn, and bread, and lumps of figs, she sct out from the city
gate, and ere long was challenged by the enemy’s sentinel.

‘*Who art thou? Whence comest thou? and Whither goest thou?”
he said.

“Tam a Hebrew woman,” replied Judith. ‘I have fied from the
city to the Assyrian camp, to go before Holofornes, the captain of your
army, and show him a way to take the city, and pass through the hill
country without the loss of a man.”

The man gazed upon her in astonishment, so beautiful and magni-
ficently dressed, and alone. ‘‘ Thou doest well to save thy life by fleeing
to Holofornes,” he said. ‘‘Follow me, and I will conduct thee to his
tent; and when thou standest before him, be not afraid, but say all thou
wilt and he will entveat thee well.”

It was now quite dark, and Holofornes came from the tent, his servants
bearing silver lamps before him. The general lifted her from the
chariot, and led her into the tent. In the centre stood a couch, above
which was a rich canopy of cloth woven with purple and gold, and
emeralds and precious stones. Holofornes seated himself, and motioned
Judith to take a place beside him ; but she threw herself upon the ground
before him, imploring his mercy and protection. The Assyrian com~
manded his servants to raise her, saying, ‘‘ Woman, be of good comfort ;
fear not in thy heart, for I never hurt anything which is willing to
serve King Nebuchodonosor, the king of all the earth. If thy people
that dwelicth in the mountains had not set light by me, I would not
have lifted up my spear against them. But now, tell me, why thou art
fled from them and come to us? Here thou art safe, for none shall do
thee hurt, but entreat thee well, as they do the servants of our king,
Nebuchodonosor.”

‘Remember the words of thy servant,” said Judith, ‘and suffer thy
handmaid to speak in thy presence. If thou wilt follow the words of
thine handmaid, God, through thee, will bring wonderful things to pass.
We have heard of the wisdom and policy of Holofornes ; and it is every
where reported that thou art the most powerful and excellent man in all
Assyria, and mighty in knowledge, and wonderful in feats of war. Thy



6 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

servant is religious, my Lord, and serveth God night and day, and He
will reveal to me the moment when the people eat forbidden things, and
consume the first-fruits of the corn, and tenths of wine and oil, which
have been sanctitied and reserved for the priests who serve the Lord in
Jerusalem—things not lawful for our people to touch with their hands.
Now, then, my lord, be guided by me. Permit thy handmaid to go out
in the plain each night to pray, and God will tell me when they have
done this sin, and I will tell thee; then shalt thou go forth with thine
army, and thou shalt have an casy victory.”

Holofornes was astonished at all he heard. He thanked Judith for her
offered services, and declared himself ready to act as she might dictate,
while the officers and nobles who stood around, declared, ‘‘ There was
not such a woman on the whole face of the earth for beauty or wisdom.”

At the evening feast, Holofornes called Judith to a seat near him.

At her request, he gave orders to the guard to permit Judith to go out
and in to her prayers without the camp, that she might unmolested
watch for the propitious moment to attack Bethulia. Judith then retired
to a tent prepared for her, where she reposed until midnight; when she
arose, and followed by her maid, went out in the valley to pray, she
revolved the great project for which she had come,

On the fourth day, Holofornes made a great feast. Calling Bagoas, his
confidential servant, to him, he said, ‘Go, now, and persuade this
Hebrew woman whom I have placed in thy charge to come unto my
feast and drink with me. It is a shame to have this splendid woman
here and not share more of her company; truly, she will laugh us
to scorn.”

Bagoas sought Judith. ‘Fair damsel,” he said, ‘art thou afraid of
my lord that thou comest not into his presence ? Come and drink wine,
and be merry with us, and be made this day as one of the daughters of
Assyria, which serve in the house of Nebuchodonosor.”

Radiant in beauty, and in rich attire, Judith entered the banquet
tent, and seated herself on a couch spread with soft furs which her maid
had prepared for her, opposite to Holofornes. The Assyrian gazed in
rapture, and resolved to leave nothing undone to gain this beauteous
Hebrew to himself.

“Drink and be merry with us, Judith,” he said. ‘Be not afraid of
me, for my heart is filled with love for thee. Thou art the fairest of
women, O Judith.”



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 65

“T will drink, now, my lord,” said Judith, ‘“becauso my life is
magnified in me this day more than all the days since I was born.”

Judith so excited the Assyrian by her beauty and wit, that he drank
more than he had ever been accustomed, and Judith foresaw he would be
in a state fitting for her purpose. When the feast was over, and the
guests departed, Bagoas dismissed the servants, while he closed the tent,
and left Judith alone with Holofornes.

The Assyrian, insensible to the presence of his charming guest, had
thrown himself on his couch, where he now lay in a drunken slumber.
She listened—all was silent, and she approached the couch. The
terrible enemy, her country’s destroyer, was before her; one blow of
her hand, and Israel would be free !

“Shall I slay the sleeping?’ murmured Judith, “thou who wast so
kind to me—whose words of love but now have met mine ear? Yea,
bloodhound! thou that wouldst slay my brethren—that wouldst demolish
our holy temple! thy hour is come! If that form be erect to-morrow—
if that arm be stretched out, Isracl is lost! O, Lord God of all power!
look down upon me now, and bless the work of my hand, for the
exaltation of Jerusalem!”

At the head of the couch hung a falchion. Judith, taking the weapon
in one hand, and the hair of her drunken foe in the other, and exclaim-
ing, ‘¢O, Lord of Israel, strengthen me this day!’ smote off the Assy-
vian’s head. At her signal her maid entered, who, tearing down the
jewelled canopy, wrapped the head in it, and placed it in her bag. Fol-
lowing her mistress, they left the camp unmolested, as if for their usual
prayer, and hastened up to the gate of Bethulia.

“Open! open now the gate!” eried the successful Judith to the guard.
“God, even our God, is with us, to show His power yet in Jerusalem,
and for the downfall of Assyria!” The watchman ran down joyfully to
admit her, and brought her to an open space near the gate, where stood
the governors and a large concourse of people around a large watch-fire,
who had thus been waiting and watching for her since the evening of
her departure. ‘ Praise! praise God!” cried Judith, advancing towards
them. ‘‘ Praise God, for He hath not taken away His mercy from the
house of Israel, but hath destroyed our enemies by my hand this night!
Behold the head of Holofornes! As the Lord liveth, who kept me in
my way as I went, my countenance hath deceived him to his destruction,
and yet the Spirit of God hath preserved me from sin. ”



66 TIE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The people were astonished ; they gazed on the heroic woman in silence,
and then, as if by one impulse, bowed themselves and worshipped God.

“‘Hear me now, my brethren,” said Judith; “take this head and
hang it upon the highest place of your walls; and in the morning send
out all the soldiers from the city, as if to make a sally upon the Assyrians
—but go not down. Then shall they assemble themselves and put on
their armour, and go to the tent of Holofornes to awaken him; and lo,
when they find him so mysteriously dead, fear will fall upon them, and
they shall fly. Then pursue them, ye Israelites, and they shall be a spoil
to your arms.”

Judith related minutely all she had done since leaving the city. The
people listened attentively, and when she finished they shouted aloud for
joy, and accompanied her with all honour and reverence to her home.

When the morning broke, the head of Holofornes was hung out upon
the wall, and the Israclites assembled without the gates. As soon as
they were perceived the Assyrian guard ran to awaken their captains.

‘Awaken our lord, Holofornes,” they said to Bagoas; ‘ for the slaves
have the boldness to threaten battle. Let us go up and destroy them.”

Bagoas knocked at the tent, but receiving no answer, ventured to enter,
when the headless body of their general met his astounded view. Crying
with horror, and rending his garments, he ran to the tent of Judith, and
her absence confirmed all his suspicions.

‘* Treason, treason !”’ he cried, rushing out among the soldiers; ‘the
slaves have dealt treacherously, and this Hebrew woman hath brought
shame upon the house of Nebuchodonosor. Holofornes is slain!”

‘‘ Holofornes is slain!” re-echoed through the camp, and the soldiers
trembled at the sound. The people rushed madly about. Confusion
prevailed ; and, in spite of all the efforts of their officers, the panic spread
from rank to rank, and the army fled, half of them knowing not all that
had happened, but only hearing that the avenging God of the Hebrews
was pursuing them.

The inhabitants of Bethulia rushed out after the fugitives, and sending
messengers to the towns around, the people ran out, and soon the mise-
rable Assyrians were assailed on all sides by the people of the hill-country
of Galilee, and of the sea-coasts. Thousands were slaughtered, and
Israel was free !

_ Great was the joy of the inhabitants of Jerusalem at their deliverance,



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 67

and the name of Judith of Bethulia was in every one’s mouth, with terms
of wonder and praise.

Accompanied by a long train of the priesthood, and the great and good
of Jerusalem, Joacim, the high priest, arrived before the gate of
Bethulia, to do honour to Judith, who came forth to meet him, and
knelt before him.

‘ Arise, my daughter,” said the high priest. ‘* Thou art the exalta-
tion of Jerusalem! thou art the great glory of Isracl! thou art the joy
and rejoicing of our nation! Thou hast done much good in Israel with
thy hand; and God is pleased therewith. Blessed be thou of the Al-
mighty Lord for evermore!’ And all the people cried, “« Amen!”

The people in grand procession ascended to the city, and up the marble
steps of the temple, and through its magnificent courts into the glorious
space which surrounds the temple itself. Here were offered their sacri-
fices and burnt-offerings, and free-offerings. Judith felt a glow of grati-
tude to God as she gazed around her upon the sculptured marble, the
altar of brass, and the brazen laver, and marble tables, and other rich
furniture of the court, and as she beheld the graceful temple, whose
richly-embroidered curtain was raised, giving her a view of golden fur-
niture, and scarlet and purple within ; for she remembered that her feeble
arm, made strong by God, had saved all these sacred things from the
hand of the enemy. The high priest was there in his splendid robes of
blue and purple, and scarlet embroidery, adorned with jewels, and bor-
dered with golden bells and scarlet pomegranates; while around him
stood the sons of Levi, in their blue-fringed robes of white lien—alto-
gether a glorious and most wonderful array.

THE MORAL,

In judging the conduct of Judith, we must keep in mind the different
manners which prevailed in those days. We cannot but wonder and
admire when we reflect upon all she hazarded for her country. She
endangered more than life, for if discovered, she ran the risk of death,*or
of living in degradation and sorrow. She perilled her fair fame ; which,
to a woman, was worth more than existence. The task which she under-
took was odious, yet she shrank not from it, for she knew if the conqueror
lived, her country was lost.

We may not be called to such a trial, but in whatever strait, when
self is the sacrifice, let us pray for strength to look to the good of others
before our own.



68 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

DEBORAH,

Nieut with her lustrous stars, her silence and repose, had passed away,
and soft-eyed dawn, heralded by gentle zephyrs, and breathing out per-
fume, arose from Asia’s mists like the poet’s Venus from the sea, all
smiles and gladness, Each flower threw out its fairy petals, and wafted
forth its fragrant incense to the day. Almond and citron blossoms,
brilliant pomegranate and oleander, tossed the dew from their delicate
heads, and shook their fragile branches in the morning breeze. The
birds were on every bough singing their rejoicings to the coming day:
for as yet the sun had not appeared, but clouds of rose and purple told of
his near approach, and threwa softened radiance over plain, and hill, and
valley. A clear and gentle river—Kishon, ‘that ancient river, the
river Kishon,” wound through the verdant plain. By its side arose a
sloping hill, whose summit was crowned by a grove of oaks and elms,
among whose shadows a lordly temple was just made visible as the sun’s
first rays fell on the hill-top, while all below still lay in shade. The
rising light revealed its snowy porticoes and lofty arches, and graceful
columns of rare proportion; then passing down the hill shone on a pro-
cession of solemn worshippers who were winding along the river’s bank,
and ascending to the temple above. Conspicuous among the throng were
the sacred oxen, who, gaily decorated with ribbons, and wreathed with
roses, were led by young boys clad in white robes and crowned with
garlands. Behind them came a train of women dancing and singing to
instruments of music; while preceding and around the victims were
several hundred priests, whose black robes threw the only shadow over a
landscape now brightly illumined by the broadly risen sun, The pro-
cession ascended the hill; the temple doors were thrown open ; the priests
entered, and advanced to the altar. There, upon two pedestals, stood the
gods they came to worship. ‘The one, a man cast in brass, having
an ox’s head—the other of marble, and in human shape, clothed in a coat
of golden mail, wearing a crown and wielding a sword; the former was
Moloch, and the latter Baal. ‘To these gods of metal and stone the priests
and people had come to ask for protection from a powerful enemy, who
in predatory bands made inroads upon them, and carried away flocks, |
and people, and goods.

Reader, canst thou say in what land arose this temple, these images of
marble, and these idol worshippers? Canst thou believe it was in Israel ?



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 69







































































































































































In the promised land? Alas, it was the dear-bought land of Canaan,
and these deluded idolaters were the sons of Judah, once God’s own
peculiar people !



‘

70 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

The last of the priests had but just entered the temple when, bursting
through their ranks and uttering shrieks of terror, a woman, one of the
dancers, threw herself before the statues; it was Jael, the wife of Heber
the Kenite—the roses which had wreathed her lank locks had fallen on
her shoulder, and the white fillets were waving in disorder over her
sallow shrivelled cheeks in bright contrast to their tawny hue. “0,
Baal, save us!” she cried in distraction. ‘‘ Now save us, for the enemy
is upon us!”
came pressing confusedly into the temple. ‘The Canaanites are upon
us!” they cried—‘‘ O, Moloch, shield us!”

Eager to save themselves from the invaders, the priests hastily closed
the iron-studded doors of the temple, heedless of the many shricking
women whom they thus cruelly shut out. Their hopes of admission
vain, the worshippers fled to the groves or down the hill, followed by the
affrighted oxen and their youthful leaders.

Jael arose from the ground, and endeavoured to pass out of the door.
“O my child!” she cried: ‘‘ my Zillah is without: O let me go forth
and shicld her, or die with her!”

The priests however were bent upon saving themselves from harm, and
the wailings and passionate entreaties of the miserable mother were un-
heeded by hearts as hard as the marble gods they worshipped.

At last the shouts of the enemy and cries of their victims were hushed,
and the noise of trampling steeds receded. The temple doors were slowly
opened, and, their safety being ascertained, the priests of Baal came forth.
There was nothing to be seen near them, but afar off they deseried a
band of horsemen riding rapidly away, each bearing a captive upon his
horse, while behind them the sacred oxen were goaded onward by a
powerful escort. As the last of the horsemen turned the wood which hid
them from sight, it was perceived he bore away upon his horse a young
girl, who, with arms uplifted, was loudly calling for aid. In her strug-
gles a scarlet girdle fell to the ground ; Jacl swiftly ran down the hill,
and hurriedly examined it.

“They have taken my daughter!” she cried, with a burst of wee.
“0, Zillah, that I could have died to save thee !”?

Prostrate on the ground, the miserable woman threw dust upon her
head, invoking curses upon the Canaaunites, and vowing deep vengcance
for this cruel wrong.



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 71

During these troubles the judge of Israel died, and Deborah became a
‘¢mother in Israel.” Deborah, the widow of Lapidoth, was a woman of
a strong and masculine mind ; more capable of ruling the affairs of the
nation than many of her countrymen. Of this they were well aware ;
and came to her for counsel in any emergency. The piety of Deborah
was great, and her God had bestowed upon her the gift of prcphecy ;
thus using her as a means of keeping the faith in Israel, and drawing
her country-people from the dreadful crime of idolatry, inte which they
had fallen. The grief of Deborah at their delinquency was great ; as
she foresaw the certain punishment their guilt would bring upon them.
The present distress with which the country was afflicted had been
threatened them by their prophetess ; but she was unheeded except by a
few, who still worshipped at the tabernacle which was stationed at
Shiloh,

Jabin, king of the Canaanites, was harassing Isracl sorely, by maraud-
ing parties led by his general Sisera. During the confusion which pre-
yailed, every one came for counsel to Deborah; and in course of time
she was elected judge of Isracl. Her dwelling, which was near to
Shiloh, was a long, low, stone building, arranged in a square, around a
court paved with marble.
the rooms, the pillars of which supported a baleony through which access
was obtained to the upper chambers. From the centre of this court
arose a lofty palm-tree ; its smooth stalk bore no branches—but from the
summit, circles of enormous leaves, some eight feet long, spread out like
a vast canopy, throwing a cooling shade over court and balconies. Be-
neath this tree was the favourite seat of Deborah, the Prophetess and
Judge of Israel. Here she commanded a view of all her premises, and here
her people obtained ready access to her through a wide gateway opposite.

One morning, Deborah resorted to her favourite palm-tree, and placed
herself upon her usual seat, which was a long divan of costly structure,
having cushions covered with embroidered silk. Her dress was a dark
coloured stuff of Damascus, having a deep border of gold embroidery,
confined with a girdle wrought with scarlet and jewels; a bandeau was
around her head, from which projected a short horn of gold, supporting a
veil of thin muslin of India, which fell to her feet. She was surrounded
by many of her people, who had come to her for judgment. A voice of
wailing was heard outside the gate, when, followed by a large concourse



72 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

of people, Jacl, the wife of Heber the Kenite, entered the court. She
wore a sackcloth dress woven of black goats-hair, confined by a rope
girdle, while her dark locks were thickly strewn with ashes.

“©O help me, noble lady ;” she eried; ‘‘ help me, great Deborah! for I
am stricken unto death!’ With a deep groan she sank on the ground
before the feet of the prophetess.

“What moves thee thus, Jael?” asked Deborah, raising her. ‘‘ Why
art thou thus mourning in sackcloth ”

““My daughter, my sweet child Zillah, hath been carried away by the
enemy !” she exclaimed weeping. Others, joining their cries to hers, be-
wailed the loss of relatives, or cattle, and entreated Deborah for help
against the invaders. Deborah listened while the outrage at the temple,
just related, was described.

“And is it to me, a worshipper of Jehovah, that the children of Baal
come for succour ?” she said, with indignation. ‘ Away! Go to your
gods for aid. I will not raise a hand to save you!

“Do you not know, have ye not heard, that God has sworn He will
punish you if ye forsake Him? Have ye forgotten the words of holy
Joshua, who said,—‘ If ye forsake the Lord and serve strange gods, then
will He turn and do you hurt, and consume you ?’”

While Deborah addressed her people, the mists of error departed from
before their eyes. ,

“We are guilty before the Lord!” they cried in terror. ‘ We will
indeed serve the Lord our God, and His voice alone we will obey !”

“Away then!” eried Deborah. ‘ Prove your sincerity! Cut down
your groves,—throw down your images,—that the anger of the Lord be
no more hurled against you. If ye truly obey Him, I will pray Him to
raise up an army, and destroy your enemies from off’ the land.”

The words of Deborah, whom they all reverenced as a prophetess, so
excited the people, that they ran hither and thither, stopping not, until
all their temples were demolished, groves hewn down, and idols de-
stroyed ; the gods they worshipped in the morning were broken to frag-
ments and reviled in the evening. Deborah, like a wise governor, was
determined to take advantage of the newly-awakened zeal of her people.
She sent for Barak, the son of Abinoam, a valiant and faithful soldier,
who had always distinguished himself in fight. He'came at her bidding,
and found her on her usual seat at the foot of the palm-tree.

“The people have turned from the error of their way, have left their



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 73

gods, and will worship Jehovah,” said the prophetess. © ‘* The Lord hath
revealed to me He will accept them, and will chastise those that have
atllicted His chosen people. He commands thee to assemble an army, and
attack Jabin the Canaanite.”

Barak looked irresolute, and said—‘‘ The enemy hath not left a shield
or spear among us: and he hath nine hundred chariots of iron !”

“ What, Barak! knowest thou not we have the Lord on our side ?
What are spears and chariots to Jehovah? Thou art as the spies who
feared the Amalekites. ‘We are not able to go up against this people ;
for they are stronger than we!’ they said; and what replied Joshua—
‘ Fear ye not the people of this land; their defence hath departed from
them, and the Lord is with us; fear them not!’ hus also saith
Deborah—fear them not. Assemble ten thousand men of the children of
Zebulon and Naphtali, and the Lord will deliver Jabin’s host into thy
hand. Ascend to the fort upon Mount Tabor, and I, Deborah, to whom
the Lord hath given dominion over the mighty, will draw to the river
Kishon, Sisera, the Captain of Jabin’s army, with his chariots and mul-
titude ; and there will I deliver him into thy hands.”

Barak still doubted. ‘The people have been so terrified and sub-
dued by the Canaanites, that they will not assemble at my call. If thou
wilt go with me, then i will go, for the people will believe the Lord hath
sent thee; but if thou wilt not go, then will not 1.”

“Twill go with thee, O faint of heart!” said the heroic Deborah ;
“ but know, for this thy want of trust in God He will take the victory
from thee, and give it toanother. The Lord hath revealed to me He will
sell Sisera into the hand of a woman.”

Deborah arose immediately, to prepare for her journey. Sandals of
leather embroidered with scarlet and jewels were laced upon her feet ; a
turban guarded her head from the sun; anda large mantle was folded
around her. At the gate her favourite animal awaited her ; a white ass,
one of those which, on account of his hue, was reserved for princes and
nobles alone. ‘Ihis gentle ergature was gracefully proportioned, its legs
were long and slender, and its body covered with a coat of glossy silvery
hair. Accompanied by Barak, and a train of followers, Deborah made
a tour of the country; exhorting the people to arise and .go to battle
against the king of Canaan. Her words and appearance enabled her soon
to assemble ten thousand men; which was all she required. These she
placed upon Mount Tabor to lie in wait for the enemy.



74 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

According to her promise, Deborah drew Siscra and his troops to the
foot of Mount Tabor. She caused the fact of the assembling of Isracl
to be told to Jabin, who sent Sisera with a large body of men towards
the river Kishon. Deborah and Barak had, in the meanwhile, ascended
Mount Tabor, where their men were concealed in the fort or among the
groves, from the observation of the enemy.

Mount Tabor arose in an abrupt, cone-shaped hill, many hundred feet
above the plain of Esdraclon ; its sides were clothed with oaks and syca-
mores, and its summit crowned by a fortress. On the walls of this fort
Deborah stationed herself to look out for the enemy. Here the whole
land of Israel seemed spread out before her. Below, she looked upon the
verdant plains of Galilee, watered by the Kishon and the Jordan, and sur-
rounded by a band of mountains; while on one side glittered the sea of
Galilee, and on the other stretched the bright waters of the great Medi-
terranean. The sun of that day, on which the prophetess had predicted
the approach of the Canaanites, was declining, when she descried their
advance guard emerging from a defile between two of the hills bordering
the Galilean sea. The plain was soon covered with their numerous host.
Onward they came, band after band; their iron chariots rumbling as the
roaring of the great deep in a storm. At their head came Siscra. Tis
chariot was overlaid with carved gold, and adorned with gay painting,
while from each side projected a glittering scythe. Three white horses
bore him swiftly on; their backs covered with stecl armour, and their
heads decorated with a high ornament of feathers and painted leather.
Sisera, a tall and powerful man, was standing in his chariot supported
by his spear. THis body was completely covered with a closcly-fitting suit
of mail, formed of golden scales—a bow and quiver hung at his back; a
dagger in its brazen sheath was suspended by chains from his crimson
girdle ; while his head was protected by a helmet of leather wrought with
gold. An armour-bearer sat at his feet, by the side of his chariotecr,
who bore his sword and shield of leather, bound and studded with brass.
Sisera encamped his band for the night gn the banks of the iishon, in-
tending to attack the Israclites in the morning.

That night Deborah spent alone in the battlements, buried in medita-
tion and prayer. Pious as she was, Deborah was mortal, and, as she
reflected upon all she had done for the Israelites, and looked around upon
the army she had collected, and on the ruined idol-fanes dimly visible
in the moonbeams, which at her command fell to the ground, and



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 75

thought upon the victory promised her, a fecling of triumph swelled her
heart, and she forgot she was but an instrument in the hands of the Lord.
“O my soul, thou hast trodden down strength!” she said; ‘‘ Sisera, thy
hours are numbered ! thou art mighty in men of war, and in chariots and
horsemen, but our God hath spoken; and the horse and the rider will be
overthrown this night. Thou shalt fall by the hand of a woman, and
Deborah’s name shall rescund in the land!” Deborah now sought out
Barak. ‘Awake! arise, Barak!” said she. ‘Up! for this is the hour
when God shall deliver Sisera into my hands.”

The Israelites were soon assembled in front of the fort. The priests
then stood before them to address them according to the commands of
Moses, ‘‘ When thou goest into battle before thy enemies, O Israel!”
they said, ‘‘and seest horses, and chariots, and a people more than thou,
be not afraid of them! for the Lord thy God is with thee, which brought
thee out of the land of Egypt.”

“Ts there a man here,” cried Deborah, looking upon the assembled
band, “that is fearful and faint-hearted! Let him return to his house,
lest he infect his brethren, and their heart be as faint as his.” With
one voice the people vowed to face the foe manfully; and were imme-
diately led down the hill. In the dead midnight hour, the Canaanites
were awakened from a sleep they had indulged in from contempt of their
foe, by tremendous shouts. A terrible clangour of trumpets was in their
ears; they arose in a fright, and in looking up beheld the lights the
Israelites carried, which to their alarmed imaginations scemed stars
descending from heaven upon them. A panic prevailed. ‘ The stars
are fighting against us!” they cried; ‘‘ hear the shouting of their angry
God! Let us fly!” Sisera and some of his officers rallied their men,
and led them against the Israelites. The little band was sorely op-
pressed: but God, who was fighting for them, now brought a new and
terrible enemy against the Canaanites.

While engaged in combat they suddenly became aware they were
standing in water. They looked around—it had risen to their knees—
the chariots were filled, and their ranks could hardly keep their fect.
At once there rose a terrible ery. ‘¢ The river, the river is rising! Fly
ere ye perish!” The children of Israel had been early warned,by their
prophetess, and had retreated up the mountain; but the unhappy
Canaanites, after struggling awhile with the waves, were, with all their
mighty host, swept away and drowned.



76 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

Sisera fled in his chariot, but finding the waters rising fast, he aban-
doned it, and ran up to a neighbouring eminence. For many hours he
wandered about, and, when the day dawned, found himself at some
distance from the scene of action. He was in the plain of Zaanim.
Before him he beheld an encampment of tents, which, from their pecu-
liar construction, he knew belonged to the Kenites, and he felt assured
of safety. At the door of one stood a woman, towards whom he ran for
protection. Pursued by an avenging God, Siscra had been sent to the
tent of his foe. It was the encampment of Heber the Kenite, whose
family had joined the israclites, and she to whom the marauder flew for
safety was his bitter enemy, Jacl. She recognised him at once as the
rayisher of her daughter, and the oppressor of Isracl, and rejoiced to see
him approaching.

“Turn in, my lord! turn in to me,” she said. He gladly entered, and
threw himself exhausted upon a pile of mats, which she had spread for
him.

‘Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink,” he said, ‘‘ for | am
very thirsty?”

Jael opened a skin bottle, and poured him out some milk, and gave him
with it bread with butter in a dish of carved gold, which her husband
had taken in war. After he had eaten, she, at his request, threw over
him a pile of clothes to conceal him from view.

“Stand in the door of the tent, good woman,” said Sisera, ‘‘and if
any man doth come and inquire of thee, ‘Is any man here ?’ thou shalt
say, ‘No.’ If Iam sayed this day it will go well with thee, for Jabin
shall reward thee, and give thee a place in his palace. Then thou
mayest rule the Israelite women, for there are many in our houses whom
we have carried away captive!”

Jael, repressing the various emotions with which her bosom was burst-
ing, as she saw her enemy in her power, now, in a voice of affected
indifference, asked, ‘Saw ye anything, my lord, of Zillah, a young girl
who was taken from the temple of Baal when the sacred oxen were
carried away ?”

“Aye, indeed; she is in my house, and is as goodly to look upon as
the goddess Ashtaroth. When I left home I made a yow to Moloch to
sacrifice her and several others at his altar, if he brought me safe to
Hazor again.”



BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. G7

Jacl rushed from the tent. ‘Now, God, I thank thee!” she cried,
“that my enemy and Israel’s oppressor is in my power. Zillah, thou
art saved! for Sisera shall not return. In thy place he shall be saeri-
ticed to the gods! Moloch! I devote him to thee! Baal! give strength
tomyarm! O Jehovah! pardon me! Why eall I upon false gods ? Thou
alone art the only true God, and now that Thou hast given me my enemy
in my hand, I will worship Thee alone.”

Jacl returned to the tent, and lifted up the curtain of the doorway.
Her enemy was plunged in adeep slumber. Fearful some of his followers
might wander there and rescue him from her hand, and knowing her
daughter’s life was the price of his safety, she resolved to put him to
death, and thus render Isracl free from one who had cruelly used them.
She tore out one of the large nails with which the tent-ropes are
fastened to the ground, and with a hammer smote the robber on the
head. In triumph, Jael rushed from the tent. Barak was riding rapidly
past.

“Ho! Barak!” she cried, ‘‘ come, and I will show thee the man
thou seekest.” Barak followed her into the tent, and beheld dead before
him, Sisera, the redoubtable oppressor of Israel. ‘‘ Praises be to God !”
he cried, “who hath this day subdued Jabin, king of Canaan, before
the children of Isracl! Truly did Deborah declare he should die by the
hand of a woman. I thought the prophecy alluded to her, but to Jael
is this honour due. Come with me, that I may show Deborah and the
princes this thy noble act.”

The next morning saw Deborah at the height of her glory and popu-
larity. She was again seated under her palm-tree, surrounded by the
princes and nobles of Israel, who gave to her the honour of freeing Israel
from their oppressors. Deborah’s heart bounded ; but checking all
pride, she said, ‘‘ Not to me,—not to Deborah be the glory, my lords ;
let us ascribe it all to our merciful Jehovah, of whom I am the humble
instrument. But where is our good General Barak? Is he still in
pursuit of Sisera ?”

Deborah looked up, and beheld Barak approaching, leading Jael; both
were crowned with garlands, followed by men bearing a corpse upon a
bier, and women dancing, and singing triumphant songs.

“Behold the deliverer of Israel!” cried Barak. ‘Sing praises to
Jacl, for she hath slain Sisera, the enemy of Israel. Blessed above women
be Jael, the wife of Heber!”



78 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Jacl was hailed as Israel’s avenger by all the people when the death of
Sisera by her hand became known. For one moment a pang smote the
heart of Deborah, when she thus saw the glory given to another; but she
was a woman of too lofty a spirit and devoted piety to envy another. “I
am punished,” she said, ‘for my proud thoughts of yester-night.”
Throwing off all feeling save joy for the death of Sisera, she approached
and greeted Jael as a saviour in Isracl. Then taking her timbrel, burst
out into a triumphant song.

THE MORAL.

One of the most striking features in the character of Deborah is her
fearless avowal of the truth. ‘While all the country was given up to
idolatry, she upheld the religion of Jehovah. In the presence of the
worshippers of Baal she was not ashamed to avow her own faith publicly,
however unfashionable it had become, but declared herself decidedly
upon the Lord’s side. Nor did she swerve from the duty of showing
them the error of their way, but severely rebuked them for their,
wickedness. Let us endeavour to imitate her example, and when in the
company of unbelievers, testify to the truth as it isin Jesus, unabashed
by sneers, and unawed by persceution.





BERTHA’S CHOICE.

Tus “ Bible Stories” finished, Bertha, the eldest of the young
ladies, chose from the Cabinet a book of Faney Work, of which they
all knew very little, their school-time naving been filled up with other
and more substantial studies. It happened that they were desirous to
celebrate their present holiday season by making a few presents to dear
relatives and friends, therefore Bertha’s choice was received with delight,
and very glad they all were to find that the Cabinet contained all the
material for the work which was described. The snow was falling fast
from the leaden clouds that overspread all the sky without, but snow
and cold were quite forgotten when Mrs. Selby’s daughters gathered
about the work-table, before a brilliant fire. Mamma had been busy
spreading before them a variety of rich and beautiful fancy materials,
taken from the Cabinet. She now resumed her easy chair, and read
aloud a few sentences on the history and value of domestic and orna-
mental needlework, showing that it brings daily blessings to every home,
though unnoticed, perhaps, because of its hourly silent application. Ina
household each stitch is one for comfort to some person or other; and
without its ever watchful care home would be a scene of discomfort
indeed. In its ornamental adaptation, it delights the eye, amuses the
mind, nay, Sometimes cheats grief of its sorrow; but, more than all,
gives bread to thousands. The women of every nation, from time
immemorial to the present, have beguiled their hours with the needle,
from “the embroidered hangings of the temple, and the garments of
fine needlework for kings’ daughters,” worked with gold, and silk, and
precious stones, to the mocassins and festive ornaments of the savage
embroidered with beads. Upon all classes and in all climes this simple
instrument has bestowed a varied charm.

In past times, Queen Elizabeth and her bevy of maidens might



80 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.

possibly have amused themselves with this art; for John Taylor, in
1640, writes of needlework, thus— :

*¢ All in dimension, ovals, squares, and rounds,
KR
So that art seemeth nearly natural,

In forming shapes so geometrical.”
#

By no other art than that of the needle can “shapes” so entirely
geometrical be formed. Among the “treasures of needlework” in
ancient times may be mentioned the corslet sent by Amasis, king of
Egypt, to the Lacedeemonians, and described by Herodotus as made of
linen with many figures of animals, inwrought and adorned with gold
and cotton-wool; each thread of this corslet was composed of three
hundred and sixty threads.

Another “ treasure” was the veil of Minerva, embroidered by virgins
selected from the best families in Athens, which, after being carried in
procession with great pomp and ceremony round the city, was hung up
in the Parthenon, and consecrated to Minerva.

>

Coming to another age, a “treasure” still remains to us in the
tapestry worked by Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror, highly
valuable as an historical picture, and a truthful representation of the
events which preceded and accompanied the Conquest. It is still pre-
served at Bayeux, in Normandy, and consists of a web of cloth upwards
of two hundred feet in length, and about twenty inches in breadth, with
borders top and bottom. The horses are worked in colours of blue,
yellow, green, and red; but the whole is interesting and spirited.

In the Fishmongers’ Hall, in London, is a tolerably well-preserved
specimen of needlework, on a linen ground. The work itself is splendid,
and must have been magnificent when used as a pall at the funeral of
Sir William Walworth, in 1381. It is now much faded in colour, and
the gold dimmed by age, but altogether it is an exquisite specimen of
needlework of that or any other period.

An old poet advises ladies to employ themselves with the needle.

6 Tt will increase their peace, enlarge their store,
To use their tongues less, and their needles more ;
The needle’s sharpnesse profit yields and pleasure,
But sharpnesse of the tongue bites out of measure,”



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LONDON: WARD AND LOCK, 158, FLEET STREET.
THE

TLEUSTRATED

GIRL'S OWN TREASURY

SPECIALLY DESIGNED FOR

Che Guertainment of Girls

AND THE

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BEST FACULTIES
OF THE FEMALE MIND;

EMBRACING

BIBLE BIOGRAPHY OF EMINENT WOMEN;
RUDIMENTS OF ORNAMENTAL NEEDLEWORK WITH DESIGNS FOR PRESENTS;
TALES OF PURPOSE AND POEMS OF REFINEMENT;
CHAMBER BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING;
MUSIC, HISTORY OF FANS, VEILS, AND PURSES; PHENOMENA OF THE MONTHS,
AND WILD FLOWERS;

IN-DOOR EXERCISES AND OUT-DOOR RECREATIONS ;

BY THE

e
Eprron oF THE “InnusTrRaTED Boy’s Own Treasury.”

LONDON:
WARD AND LOCK, 158, FLEET sTRULT
*
M DCCC LXI.
PREFACE.

Recreative Education for Girls has scarcely received the attention
in Literature that it demands. Much in this department has been
done for Boys, for whom Science has been popularised, and active
Games multiplied; but their young sisters have been allowed to waste
too many of their home hours in frivolity and indolence, until they
indeed come to regard the great world as a Nursery, or a Vanity Fair.

Intellectual pursuits awaken neither the envies nor the jealousies so
apt to spring up in girlish bosoms. The more varied the range of ideas
in girls, the less room for conceit, presumption, and folly. Recreative
Education corrects bad temper, produces gentleness, feeds the ‘small
sweet charities,” and effectually counteracts the chilling apathy of
modern fashionable manners.

In Recreative Education we place foremost the culture of the heart.
It is of no mean consequence to prompt the susceptibilities of girls to
expand generously, and to elevate them above the narrow range of
common life. Nothing is more likely to do this than the study of
female character in its higher manifestations, especially in the Bible,
where every form of feminine virtue is to be found. Hence the Bible
Stories of Eminent Women in this volume. Following the Sacred
narrative with strict fidelity, the Writers interweave with the wonderful
Scriptural outlines such matter as, without any violation of truth, may
interest the feelings and the fancy of the young, and convince those
who have not yet taken delight in the Inspired Work, that it contains
the most marvellous and delightful, as well as the most amusing and
instructive, feminine episodes in the world.

The second department of this volume proceeds upon the assumption
that every little girl will be glad to have placed in her hands complete
rudimental instructions in all the branches of Ornamental Needlework.
No other teacher than this book will be necessary for any intelligent
girl to learn Crochet, Netting, Knitting, Embroidery, all thie varieties of
Lace and Wool-work, Tapestry, Braiding, Tambour, &c. ‘The Directions
given are full and clear; and the few choice Designs that accompany
them are easily worked out.

Paper Modelling can be learned from our Instructions and Diagrams,
iv PREFACE,

and by this means the drawing-room can be made gay throughout the
winter. Paper imitations of flowers, tastefully arranged in a vase, may
be made to exhibit a bouquet fit for an Empress. Here also will be found
constructed the Feather-screen for the winter fire, Omamental Paper for
the grate in summer, and splendid imitations of Porcelain in Sevres,
Ntruscan, Japanese, and Assyrian—all which may be produced with
positive certainty and facility.

Our third department consists of Readings selected with great care
from German and other poctry—from fairy lore and domestic life.

In describing Chamber Birds, and how to manage them, the Editor
has been guided by the conviction that girls will always love to have
birds in their homes; and, as it is just possible to make the little captives
happy there, the instructious show how this may be accomplished. But
at the same time, we have carefully urged on our fair young friends the
better part of studying birds in their own natural state of wild
freedom, where—

“Greater power have they the heart to reach,
To please, to soothe, to animate, and cheer;

Sweet lessons of content and hope to preach,
And waken holy thoughts and meniories dear.’”

With an aim to aid physical development, we give a set of
Calisthenic Exercises, with postural diagrams, that, when moderately
adopted as a pleasure, and not as a toil, will be found highly beneficial
to health and deportment.

The Aquaria is minutely described, as a means of studying curious
aquatic plants, insects, and reptiles,

In “Summer in the Woods” the young reader is taken to Nature’s
grandest solitudes, where the girl is brought face to face with the Creator
in His noblest works. She is also here taught the Phenomena of the
Months, and is led to the flowers of each in the succession in which
they spring forth in their lovely haunts.

Thus the Girv’s Own 'TREASURY will be found varied and interesting,
a book of refined occupation and elevated thought, and a companion that
the most sensitive and cautious parent may place in the hands of a
Girl, with perfect confidence in its capacity to amuse, instruct, refine,
and encourage in nearly every useful pursuit and elegant recreation,
both in and out of doors, throughout the year.
IN



DEX.

Che Mlustrated Girl's Olon

Creasurp of Bible Stories of Eminent Women.

PAGK
Drvoran 7 . : : : : . 6o
Estruer, QUEEN : . . . . . 37
JEHOSHEBA : : : . : . : jl
JEPHTHAH’S Davairen . : : : . . 26
JUDITH . : : . . : : 59
MRAM . : . . : 7 . 1b
hurn. : . . . . . . 5
Che Alusirates Gils Oo

Creasurpy of Fancy Work.
Beruw Work, Genera Insrrucrions IN . 7 : 107
Berlin Work, raised . : . . : . 107
” to iron . . : : : 108
Cross Stitch . . . . . . 107
German Stitch ‘ : . . : . 107
Trish Stitch . . . . . . 107
Tapestry Stitch . . : . . . 107
Tenth Stitch . . . . . . 107
Beruww Work, Marzerians rox . . . . 115
French-German Canvas . . . . : 113
Imitation Silk Canvas . . 7 : : 115
Java Canvas : . . . ‘ . Lid
Patent, or French Canvas . . : : . lis
Penelope Canvas : : . : % ., 113
Railway Canvas . : : : : . V4
Silk Canvas . . : . : . ils

Wools to use with Canvas 7 . 7 : . Li
vi INDEX,

/ PAGE
Bueaps : . . : : . 121
Beads, proper Canvas for . : : . : 122

» Bugles . . . : . . 122

x5 Cut. . . . . : . 122

» Faney : : : : . . 122

>> Metal . . ; . . . 122

1» ‘Seed : : : : . . 122

vy =O. PL” : : : . . . 121

» Pound : : : : . . 121
Bertia’s CHorce . . . . : . 79
Brarps (Silk). : . . . . : 118
Alliance. 7 : : . . . 119
Albert . . : . . . : 119
Kugenie Braid . . . . . 119
Russian ,, : . : : . . 118
Sardinian ,, ; : : : : : 119
Soutache ,, . . . . . . 119
Star ” . : : . : . 119
CrotH Work, Gexeran Insrrucrions UN : : . : 109
Application, or Applique Work : . . . 109
Braiding . : . . : . Loy
Patent Imperial Applique : : : ; 7 109
CHENILLES : 5
Embroidery Chenille . ; . . : 5
Wire = : ; ; : . 115
CRocHET : : : . . : : 83
Chain, to work under a - . : : : . 86
Cord, to work over. . . . . 86
Chain, to work in both sides of a . : : : 86
Chain-stitch : . . . : . 83
Colours, to work with several . . . . . 85
Double Chain-stitch . : : : . . 83
Double Crochet : 7 ; : : : 84
Edge, to Contract an : : : : . 85

» to Enlarge an . : : : : . 85
Hands, Position of the : . : . ; 83
Long Square Crochet . : . : . 85
Long Treble Crochet . . ; : 7 84
Ribbed Crochet . . . . . . 84
Short Double Crochet : . . : . 84

Short Treble Crochet . . . : . 84.
INDEX.

CROCHET, continued -—
Single Crochet
Slip Stitch .
Square Crochet
‘Thread, to join a
Treble Crochet

CrocHrr witH BEADS .
Cotton and Beads, to choose which will work well together . .
D’Oyleys, and similar articles, to mark the commencement of a round in
Foundation Chain, which is afterwards to be worked in set Patterns,

the simplest way of counting .
Jewelled D’Oyleys, to increase in
Square Crochet Pattern, to produce work of any dimension from? a

Corrons
Coloured Cottons
Crochet 7

Knitting ,,
Mecklenburgh T’ hread

Moravian s
Patent Glace 5
Royal Embroidery Cotton
Tatting ”

Corron Bratps
Kugenie Tape
French White Cotton ‘Braid
Italian
Mohair
Maltese
Russia Cotton
Waved
Worsted

DustaNns
Bible Markers
Bridal Glove Box
Crochet Flowers for my Aunt
mbroidered Shoe for Baby
Greek Purse
Gold-fish Globe Mat
Hand-Screen, in raised Berlin Work
Jewel Box for Mamma
Pen Wiper, for Papa’s W) riting- Table
Silk Net for the Hair . :
Vine-leaf Travelling Cap for my Brother . .

vil
PAGE

84
84
84
385
84

87
S7

37
87
87

17
118
118
WT
118
118
118
118
118

19
120
119
120
119
120
119
120
120

130
133
137
142
136
159
140
130
157
134
144
130
viii INDEX.

EMbROWERY ON Mvsiinx, GENERAL Instructions roi

Broderie Anglaise
Fancy Stitches :
Guipure

Hem Stitch
Mourning Hem Stitch
Satin >
Swiss Lace . .

FEATHER ORNAMENTS

IMPLEMENTS :
Beadwork Implements
Chenille ,, .
Crochet Implements .
Elliptic
Gauge .
Knitting —,,
Lucette, A.
Netting
Rug Needles
Tatting »
KNIrTING
Brioche Stitch . .
Cast-Off, to . . :
Casting On
Garter Stitch
Knit rapidly and easily, to
Moss Stitch

Plain Knitting : . .
Purling . . .
Libbed Knitting . . .
Round, to join a 2 . .

Stitches, to make

Slip, to

Stitch, to raise a

Sock, &e., to join the toe of a
Take in, to

Twisted Knitting

Lace Work, GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN.
Antwerp Lace

Barcelona Lace ‘ :
Brussels Lace : . .
Cadiz Lace .

PAGE
Tity
110
110
110
10
Li}
110
10
Lace Work, continued :

Close Diamond
Cordovan

English

English Rosettes
Escalier Stitch
Fan Lace
Florentine Lace
Foundation Stitch
Henriquez Lace
Mechlin Wheels
Materials, The
Open Diamond
Open Antwerp
Open English Lace

Roman »”
Spotted ”
Sorrento #

Spanish Rose Point
Valenciennes Lace

Venetian Spotted Lice

Venetian

Gold and Silver Beads .
Gold and Silver ‘hread and Braid :

Steel Beads
Violet .
White Articles

MISCELLANEOUS :—
Banner Screens, to make up
Carriage Bags, to make up
Crochet, Contractions in

Drawing Paper

INDEX.

MATERIALS, to l’reserve from Injury . .

Engraved Pattern, to inerease size of

Hand-Screens, to mount
Knitting, Coutractions in

Netting 7
Printer’s Marks

Ribbon for Trimming, to Quilt

Sofa Cushions, to make up
Tatting, Contractions in
Metan MArTeriats

Bourdon
Bullion.
x INDEX.

PAGE
Mera MATERIALS, continued :—

Brussels Net . . . . . . 121
Filet : : . : : . . 121
Guipure Net . . : . : : 121
Gold Braid. : . : : : 120
Gold Cord or Thread . . : . . . 120
Spangles . . : ° : : : 121
Silver Braid : . : , . . 120
Toile Cire . . : : : ‘ . 121
NETTING . . . : . . 91
Beads, to work with . . . : . : 95
Double Stitch . . . . . . 95
Diamond Netting. : . . . . 94
Embroidering on Netting . . . . 96
Fancy Stitches—Round Netting . : : . 92
Flanders Lace Work, General Instructions in : ; . 96
Grecian Netting : . . . : : 93
Ground Net . : . 7 . : 93
Honeycomb Netting . : . 7 . : 93
Long Stitch . : . . . : 95
Leaf Netting : . 7 - 7 : 95
Large Diamond Netting * . . . 7 94
Long Twisted Stitch . . . . . . 93
Mesh . . : . : . 95
Netting, Preparation ‘for 7 : . 91

Netting of six, eight, or ten sides, wi orking from the centre, to make a
piece of . : : : : : : 92
Oblong Netting . . . . . . 92
Plain Netting . . . . . 91
Spotted Diamond Netting 7 : . . : 95
Spotted Netting : : : : : . 94
Square —,, . . : ; . . 91
ORNAMENTAL Grate Parris 7 . : . . 71
Pont Lacy Work, Generar INsrrucrions 1 : . : 96
Bars . * . 7 =. . . 98
Brussels Edge . . . . . 97
Dotted Venetian Bars . : . . . 99
Edged ” % . . . . : 98
English ss . . . . : 99
Grounding ” 7 : : . ; 99
Little Venetian Edging : . : . . 97
Point Edge . . : . : . 97

Raleigh Bars . . : . . . 98
INDEX. xi

PAGE
Point Lace Work, continued :—

Point D’Alencon Bars . . 7 : . 99
Sorrento Edge : . . : : : 97
s> Bars : : : : . . 98
Venetian Bars : : : : : 98
>> Edging : . . : : ; 97
SiLtk MATERIALS 7 : : 7 : . 114
Chine Silk . . . : . . . 115
China . . ; . . . . 115
Crochet. . . : : : : 114
Dacca . . : : . . . 115
Filoselle . 7 : . . : . 115
Floss Silk . . . : . . . 115
Netting. : : : : 7 . 114
Ombre . . : . : . . 115
Sewing : . . . . 7 : 116
Soie D’ Avignon : . . . : 114
Tambour Work, General Instr actions i in . . : 112
Tapestry Work, General Instructions in : : : 108
TATTING, OR FRIVOLITE, GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN . . 105
Double Stitch : : . . . . 106
English ,, : : . : . : 105
French ,, : : . : . 106
Hands Position of the : : : : . 105
Loops, to join : . 7 : . . 106
Picot . : . . : . . 106
Tatting, to Wash —. . . : . . 106
TRIMMINGS . : . ° : : . 124
Banner Screens . . : . 7 . 125
Cords . : 7 . . . . 125
Fringes. : . . : 7 125
Gercrude, like Grerin im, with purse silk . . . . 124
Gimps : : : . : : : 125
Sereen Handles : . . : . 125
Sofa Cushions : : . . 7 : 124

Woots : : . . 7 .
Berlin Wool . . . . . . 116
Carpet Yarn . . . : : . 116
Chine Wool : : . > : » & . 7
Crewels . : 7 7 7 : L17
Crochet Cord . . . . . : ll7
Crystal Twine . : . . . . 117

»» Wools . : : : : . il
xii INDEX.

. PAGH
Woots, continued :—
Fleeey . : . : . . 116
Ombre Wool, or Shaded Wool . : : . : 7
Hutton’s Patent Orne Balls. : : ; : 117
Patent Knitting Wool : : : : : 116
Pearl Wool : : : : : . 7
Pyrenees. : . : : : . 116
Shetland . 7 . : : . . 116
Worsted and Lamb's Wool : . : : . 116
Parrer PLAstTIQUF, or Parrn MODELLING 7 . : 45
Church Font, Design for : . 7 7 . 156
Cottage, Design for . : : : . . 145
Lectern, or Lettern, Design for : 7 : 7 162
Materials and Implements : : : : . 146
Village Church, Design tor. : . : 7 150
Paper Fiowers, Arr oy Mopr_uinc . : : . 166
Porrcu Manis, or Imrrarion Porcensin 7 . : 175
Woop Suavincs, FLowrns or. : : . : es
Pink, Directions for . . : : . . 168
Rose ” . : : . : . 169
VELVET, PAINTING ON. : . : : : 175

Che Alustrates Gal's Olun







Creacury ot Readings in Prose and Poetry.
A Burial
Bessy andher Dog. : : .
Bird Talisman, the . . .
Birth of the Snowdrop : . .
Fans, a Flight upon . 7 7 .
Little Kate : . : . . .

N Little Girl's Lament, the : . . . . 296
Love : . : 7 . : . Boy
Miss Tabby . . 7 . : : 257
Moss Mantle : . . . . 7 282
My Mother’s Wateh . . : . : : 248
Queen Victoria, a Visit to 26
Silver Pencil, the. . . . . . 251
The Broken Flower . ‘ 7 . . 7 26)
Stockings, and their Antiquity . . : : 287
The Hedge Feast. - : . . ,

N The Road to Paradise . 7 : :



Two Rose Trees, the : . : . 7
Violet, the Fate of the : : 7 : : 285
INDEX. xiii

Che Allustrated Girl's Of
@esuswey af Bios any Bird-heeping.



PAGE

BrriisH Brrps . : : . . . 308
Blue Tit. . . . . . 340
Bullfneh . . . . . . 35

Blackbird, or Black Thrush. . . : : 346

” Story of . . : : ° . 349
Buatings . : : : . : . 357
Canary Finch . : : : . 305
Chafinch . : : : 7 : . 321
Cole Tit. : : . . 7 . 339
Crossbills and Buntings : . : . : 355

” Parrots. . . : . . 356
Cockatoos . : : : . : . 362

Vieldfare . . : . . : . 344
Goldfinch . 7 . . : . 312

Great Tit. . : 7 . rs 338
Greentinch . : : : - 7 . 326
Grosbeaks . . . : . . . 337

” the Cardinal : : : : . 337

” Pine . : : : 7 337
ilawfinch . . . : 7 . 7 228
Larks 7 : : . 7 359
Linnets : . . . . . . 322
‘Lories . . . . . . . B64
Macaws. 7 . : 7 : . 360
Missel, or Storm Thrush : 7 : . : 342
Mountain Finch : . . 7 7 : 3522
Meadow Lark : . . 7 . . 354
Nightingale : : > 358
Parrots . . : . . ° . 560
Parakeets . . : : . . . 364
Pipit or Woodlark . . : . . : 398
Robin Redbreast . 7 . : . . 360
Redwing Thrush : . : . . ° 345
Serin, or Citril Finches : . - . . 329
Siskin, or Aberdevine 7 7 . : . 330
Song Thrush . : : . . . 342
Thrushes . . . . : . & 7 342
Tits : : . . . ° . 337
Titlark, or Pipit : . : 7 . . 353
Toucans . . 7 : 5 : . 862

Woodlark . . . . . ° . 35!
xiv INDEX.

The Allustrated Girl's Of
Greasury of {n-door Exercises.

PAGE

CALISTHENICS . : : . . : 37h
Backboards 7 , : . : : 373
Club Practice . . . . . . 379
Dumb Bells . . 7 . : 7 372
Dumb Bell Practice : : - . 375, 388, 389:
Elastic Cord Exercises 7 . . . . 384
Long Backboard Exercises . . . . : 377
Balance Step : . 7 . : 354
Short Backboard Brercises . : 7 : . 378
Triangle, Exercises with the . . : : . 387
Walking . : . . . . 383
Wand, or Pole Exercises : . : : . 381

MARINE AND FresH- WATER AQUARIA : : . . 391

Music, How an Expr Sister MAY Traci A YOUNGER THE RUDIMENTS OF 400
Buss, or F'. Clef—Names of the Notes. . . 401
Brace, Bar, and Measure, and of Triple and Common Time : 409
Ledger Lines in the Treble Clef : : : 7 102

5, Bass Clef : : : 404
Notes and their Names in Bass and Treble Clefs . : . 405
» of the six different sorts of : : . : 406
5 of the Value of : , . . 407
5, of the Dotted, and of the Rests . : . . 408
Treble, or G. Clef—Names of the Notes . . . : 400
Che Alustrated Girl's Ob

Creusurp of Ont-door Recreations.

PHENOMENA OF THE Montus .
January. : . 7 . : 7 ALT
February . . . : . : : 421
March . : . . . . . 426
April . . . . . . . 432
May . . . : . : : 473
June : : 7 . " : : 443
July : . . . . . . 449
August . . : s . . : 452
September . . . . . : : 458
October, ‘ . ° . 7 7 466.
November . . . e : : . 471

ecem yar . . . ° . . . 476
SUMMER IN THE Woops:

Witp FLowers or tHe Monrus .
JANUARY—Archangel

Chickweed
Groundsel

Frsrtary—Catkin, Drooping

Dwarf, Elder
Daisy

Elder
Snowdrop

Marcu—Butter Burs
Common Coltsfoot

Dandelion .
Spurge Olive
Spurge Laurel

Aprit—Daffodil

Celandine
Crowfoot
Gowlan, or Gowan
Hawthorn

Marsh Marigold
Primrose

Vernal Speedwell
Wallfiower .
Willow

‘Wood Ansmones
Wood Sorrel

MAy—Auricula Primrose

Cowslip

Common Bugles
Cuckoo Flowers
Harebell Squill
Stitshwort .
Narcissus

Pale Daffodil .
Purple Columbine
Periwinkles
Polyanthus
Primrose

Scotti h Primrose
Wai cr Crowfoot
Wood Crowfoot

INDEX,
INDEX.

PAGR
Juxnzr—Broom . : : : , . 444
Bee Flower . . : - 7 7 447
Fly Ophyrs . a : : . 7 447
Gorse . . : . . - 446
Long Yellow Broom. ; : : . 445
Jury—-Alpine Fox-ail : . 7 : . 451
Bird-knot Grass 7 . 7 7 ‘ 451
Meadow Fox-Tail : : - - . 451
Silky Bent Grass : : - . . 451
Avoeust—F orget-me-not . 7 - . . 457
Melancholy Thistle . ; - 7 - 463
Purple Foxglove. : 7 : 7 54
Rosy Bay Willow Herb : . . « 455
Wild Teasel : : - : 7 458
Srprempen—Cyanus . . * : 461
Campion Cue koo Flower . . : ‘ 460
Common Agrimony . . . - 464
Common Shepherd’s Needle : : . 459
Field Scabious . . : : ° 461
Red Corn Cockle : : : . 460
Spatling Poppy : : - . 465
Small Bindweed ;: : . - 459
Strong-scented Lettuce . « : : 465
Yellow Goat’s-beard . . . 7 461
Ocroprr—Alpine Bartsia : . : - . 469
Dutch Clover : . 7 7 : 468

Evening Primrose . P : . ‘ 469 .
Field Marygold. : : 7 . AGT
Honeysuckle, Trefoil : : * . 468
Meadow Saffron. : : . . 470
Spouse of the Sun . : : . = AGT
Yellow-viscid Bartsia : . . : 469
NovemBer—Autumnal Saffron : . : - 473
Naked Flowering Crocus, . . . 473
Vernal Crocus. : 7 : : 473
Water Horehound : 7 : AT4.
DecrMBER—Black Briony —. : . . . 477
Red-cup Lichen . . . . - 478
Scarlet Conferva . ; . 7 478
Scarlet Cartilaginous Hely ella a ; : . * 478
Scarlet Peziza . . : 7 ° 479
‘Wake Robin 7 . 7 : : 479
Yew. . . . . . 478
Wild Brier Tree © : . - . 480

—6——
INTRODUCTION.

CuzErruL but wintry-looking sunshine streamed fitfully in
through the conservatory windows of the apartment, in which were
assembled Mrs. Selby and her young daughters, now at home for
the holidays.

“T have a surprise for you, girls!” said Mrs. Selby. ‘ Guess
if you can, what your Aunt Jane has sent you.”

Each guessed, but unsuccessfully. ‘We give it up, Mamma,”
they cried eagerly.

“ Very well; follow me.”

In the centre of an adjoining library stood a most exquisite piece
of furniture in English oak, inlaid and carved, and in itself an
elaborate specimen of workmanship.

Applying a key to a centre lock, Mrs. Selby threw open a pair of
folding doors, and revealed a Book-case and Cabinet; the former
furnished with richly-bound and illustrated volumes, and the latter
with a great variety of objects suitable for feminine employment
and recreation, all arranged in the daintiest order imaginable, on
shelves or in drawers, glass cases, and little odd nests and nooks.
Over the whole ran an ornamental scroll, in old English letters,

The Girl's On Treasury.

“ Now, girls,” said Mrs. Selby, “as this gift is intended by your
Aunt to be one of permanent interest and value, I expect you will
make it so by careful study.”

B
9 INTRODUCTION.

“ Indeed we will, Mamma.”

“ Well, then, let us begin this evening; and Bertha, as the eldest of
you, shall make choice of a subject.”

But the young ladies begged Mamma to take this privilege for
herself. She did so, and selected the following “ Bible Stories of
Eminent Women.”

“ Kvery young lady,” she said, ‘ought to be familiar with the lives
of Seripture female characters: they contain wonderful examples of
the highest and the gentlest feminine qualities—filial duty, sisterly
affection, patriotic self-devotion, domestic virtues, humility, patience,
resolution, piety, friendship, and truth. No other biographies in the
world can compare with them; and your Aunt’s object in preparing for
you the stories you are about to read, is solely to induce you to search
for yourselves the Sacred Treasury.”

“ This Book, this Holy Book, on every line
Mark’d with the seal of high divinity,
On every leaf bedew’d with drops of love
Divine, and with the eternal heraldry
And signature of God Almighty stamp’d
From first to last ; this ray of sacred light,
This lamp, from off the everlasting throne,
Mercy took down, and in the night of Time
Stood; casting on the dark her gracious bow,
And evermore beseeching us, with tears
And earnest sighs, to read, believe, and live.”—PoLox,
THE

ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

or

Hible Stories

or

EMINENT WOMEN.



“O, what makes woman lovely! Virtue, faith,

And gentleness in suffering ; an endurance
Through scorn or trial: these call beauty forth,

Give it the stamp celestial, and admit it
To sisterhood with angels.”










THERE was a voice of mourning in Moab. A young man revelling
in the pride of youth and health was suddenly cut down in his prime.
6 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Yesterday he trod the carth a bright and glorious creature—now he lies
hopeless and motionless upon his flower-strewn bier. Around him are
weeping friends ; and the wail of hired mourners is the only sound which
disturbs the silence of the death-chamber.

At the head of the bier sat a melancholy group—his aged mother
Naomi, and her daughters-in-law. The years of Naomi had been many,
but the days of her pilgrimage had not been cloudless. Still, grief had
not bowed her down. Many a lightning shock had struck her, and
strewed the leaves of her beauty, and torn away her branches; but firm,
and trusting in her God, she bent to the blast only to arise more erect
than before.

Many years since a grievous famine drove her forth from her pleasant
home in Bethlehem to seek subsistence beyond the Jordan. Although
leaving her home for a strange land, the hope and courage of Naomi
failed not, for her husband, Elimelech, and two sons, Mahlon and Chilion,
were with her. Elimelech, being a man of rank, was well received by
Eglon, king of Moab, then ruler of Israel, which he had lately conquered.
by his arms, and who bestowed his young daughter Ruth upon Mahlon,
the eldest son of Naomi. Their happiness was short—Ehud dethroned
Eglon—poverty and death overtook the family of Naomi. Her heart
was filled with sharp anguish, but she knew her King, Jehovah, had
called her husband and sons, and her loyal heart submitted without a
murmur. Mahlon, her last son, now lies a corpse before her, but yet
she sits erect beside it.

Cast upon the floor in anguish of soul, her head buried in her mother’s
lap, Ruth, the widow of Mahlon, seems some tender flower, torn from
its resting-place by cruel tempests, and clinging for support to the
nearest thing. Orpha, widow of Chilion, sat on the cther side of Naomi,
wetting with her tears the long glossy tresses of the fair Ruth as she bent
over to comfort her, or looking up in wonder at the noble fortitude of
the high-souled Naomi.

Although Naomi bowed not at the storms of fate, there was a blight
at the core. She felt not her griefs the less that she gave them not
utterance. ‘The heart knoweth its own bitterness.” Apparently calm
she sat beside the bier of her last cherished one, her eyes fixed upon the
funereal linen which enveloped his body ; but her thoughts were sad, as
they recurred to her early home, her beloved husband, and darling boys.
Happier days arose before her ; loved forms came to view, and voices of
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, a

cherished lost ones were sounding in her ear. Mournful and lonely felt
she, then, when the death-trump summoning them forth aroused her, and
the last link which bound her to earth was torn away. Her heart
yearned for her home and friends of other days, and she inwardly
resolyed to leave the land where she had suffered so much misery, and
return to her loved Judea again.

A few days after the burial a train of camels was seen winding up the
side of a steep hill, which arose on the confines of Moab,—it was Naomi,
with her daughters-in-law, wending thcir toilsome way tothe land of Judea.
The females alighted upon the summit; and, while supper was preparing
under the oak trees, advanced to the brow of the hill, to gaze around
them. They looked upon a gloomy secne. Before them lay the Dead
Sea, —dark, stern, and motionless, — none could look upon its cold,
still surface, without a shudder. Bare, jagged cliffs, and hills of eyer-
lasting granite arose from its shores, shooting up their sterile peaks in
every direction. Orpah and the Princess Ruth gazed with sadness upon
this desolate scene, but a mournful smile broke over the face of Naomi.
“My daughters,” she said, ‘‘behold the famed salt sea! and, beyond,
the hills of Judea, my loved home, I sce thee at last! Now, Lord, let
thy servant depart in peace.”

This distant glimpse of the land they had chosen for a home was any-
thing but cheering to the forlorn young strangers; and turning from it
with a sigh, they gazed out over the verdant plains of Moab, adorned
with the glittering waves of the silver Arnon; over rich valleys, noble
temples, and cities now lighted up by the sun’s last rays.

“Oh, Moab, my country!” cried Orpah, stretching her arms towards
it, while tears rushed over her face,—‘‘ beautiful Moab ; I shall never
see thee more ; for the last time I gaze upon thy hills and palaces!”

Ruth gave not way to the passionate grief of her sister-in-law, but
stood, with her arms crossed, in resignation over her perfect form; her
lovely cheek pale with suppressed emotion, and her dark eyes fixed
mournfully upon the home she had left, thus brightly contrasted with
the one she was seeking.

“Naomi gazed upon her daughters-in-law, and her heart reproached
her for accepting their dutiful offer of accompanying her to Bethlehem.
They were young, and had many years of life and happiness before them ;
why should she tear them from their home and friends to follow her
8 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

footsteps to a strange land? ‘‘My daughters,” she said, advancing
toward them, ‘‘ pardon the selfishness of age and sorrow. I have suffered
my griefs so far to usurp all fecling—all thought—that not until now
have I seen the extent of the sacrifice you are making in leaving your
homes to accompany me. Return, beloved ones, ere it be too late, each
to her mother’s house ; there you will find wealth and repose, while with
me will be toil and care ;—and the Lord deal kindly with you, as ye have
dealt with the dead and with me!”

Ruth, without speaking, threw herself into Naomi’s arms and wept.
For one moment a flush of joy passed over the face of Orpah, but, check-
ing it, she turned to her mother-in-law, ‘‘ Nay, mother,” she said, “ask
us not to leave thee, for thou art old and lonely,’and we will return with
thee to thy land.”

‘Not so, my daughters. I have not many years to live, but ye are
young, and should marry again. In a strange land, alone, what would
ye do if I should die and leave ye? I have no more sons to give you to
protect you when I am gone.”

“Mother of my Mahlon!” said Ruth, raising her head from Naomi’s
bosom, where she had wept in silence—‘‘ Oh, bid me not leave thee !
With thee is every recollection of past happiness; past, never to return!
I have gazed with thee on his form in its pride, and with thee have I
wept in despair over his bier; can I then lose the light of that face
and that voice which ever brings his remembrance to my heart?” The
mother and widowed daughters lifted up their voices and wept. Soon,
however, Naomi resumed her solicitations, and Orpah, after many
passionate adieus, turned from her lonely mother and sister, and de-
parted—but Ruth clave to her. ‘Ruth, my daughter,” said Naomi
mournfully, ‘behold thy sister-in-law hath returned to her people and
her God ; follow her then, ere it be too late.”

““Entreat me not to leave thee!” exclaimed Ruth, pressing her
mother’s hand to her lips—‘ whither thou goest I will go; and where
thou lodgest I will lodge! Tell me not of my people and my God, for
thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God. Mother! where
thou diest I will die, and there I will be buried—and the Lord judge me
if aught but death part thee and me!”

Hour after hour passed away, and all were buried in sleep, except
Naomi and her faithful daughter-in-law. Upon the brow of the hill
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 9

they still remained in deep converse on high and holy matters; for Ruth
had asked her mother to instruct her in the faith of Israel.

Her memory stored with the traditions of her people, Naomi poured
into the wondering ear of the young Moabitess, the extraordinary history
of her race.

With mingled emotions of joy and sorrow Naomi stood on the shores of
Jordan. That stream, so celebrated in the history of her nation, told of
home and country. She remembered the day when she had passed it
with her husband and children—but now she had returned old, poor,
and lonely. Repressing these feelings, she strove to cheer up Ruth—
plucking for her the oleanders and myrtles with which its borders were
adorned, and pointing out to her notice the broken walls and ruined fanes
of Jericho; never to be rebuilt, under pain of God’s curse. A dark spot
were these gloomy ruins upon the fair plains stretching around it, now
rich with ripened harvest, and gay with the bright anemone and far-
famed rose of Jericho. A toilsome journey among hills and ravines
brought them in sight of Bethlehem. Yon green hill clothed with rich
groves of olive-trees, and crowned with graceful clusters of stately white
buildings, is indeed her home; but where are those whose noble forms
were at her side when, ten years before, she had left those walls? The
gate of Bethlehem was a noble structure, whose cool deep arch was the
favourite resort of the citizens for the purpose of talking over the news of
the day, or of gazing upon the travellers who passed through there.
Some of the friends of the bereaved widow were then seated there, who
gazed at her with earnest eyes as she rode along. ‘Time and sorrow had
done much to change her, but she was recognised at last. ‘‘ Naomi! Can
it be?” they cried. ‘Welcome, long lost Naomi—thy name speaks
truly now, for pleasant art thou to our sight once more.”

‘Call me not Naom, my friends,” said the widow, ‘call me Mara,
for bitterly hath the Lord dealt with me. I went out full, and the Lord
brought me home empty. Why then call my name Naomi, seeing the
Lord hath testified against me, and the Almighty hath afllicted me ?”

Q

Once more settled in her native home, the widow’s humble calmness
returned. Her friends were rejoiced to see her, and flocked around her,
endeavouring to alleviate her sorrowful fate. The years of famine and
10 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

trouble which they had seen left them little to give—but her own, and
Ruth’s industry, placed them above want.

Without the city gate arose a lordly mansion, surrounded by fields
and groves. This belonged to Boaz, a rich man, and relative of Elime-
lech, the husband of Naomi. To him she purposed to apply should she
need suceour, but for the present her humble wants were fully supplied.
During the time of barley-harvest Ruth observed her neighbours return-
ing each evening laden with grain gleaned from the fields around—why
should she not do the same, and thus add to the comforts of her mother-
in-law ? It was true her rank had prevented her from becoming familiar
with these menial offices, but she had devoted her life to her mother, and
determined to leave no efforts untried to soften her lot. Filled with
these thoughts she sought Naomi. ‘‘ Mother,” she said, ‘I see my
neighbours returning each evening laden with corn; let me, then, go
into the fields, and glean after any one in whose eyes I shall find
grace P”

“Go, my daughter,” said Naomi, ‘‘and the Lord bless thy kind
endeavours to lighten thy mother’s cares.”

The next day Ruth passed out of the gate, her heart joyous with the
idea of rendering her mother a service. It was a glorious morning, and
one moment she stopped to gaze out upon the fair and extensive view
spread beneath her. Over plain, hill, and vineyard the morning sun was
glancing, but she turned from the beautiful picture, and sighed, as her
eye fell upon the gloomy waters of the Dead Sea, which lay darkly gleam-
ing in the distance, for beyond its rocky shores arose the hills of her own
loved Moab. She turned hastily away, and sought the nearest farm.
It chanced to be the estate of Boaz, her husband’s princely relative.
Already were the reapers, each laden with a leathern bottle or gourd of
water, hastening to their work; and as they passed her, each turned to
gaze upon her stately loveliness. Ruth inquired for the overseer, and
proffered her humble request that she might glean in the fields that day.
Pleased with her sweet gentleness, he gave her the permission.

Soon after, the gates were thrown open, and Ruth, looking up from her
work, beheld a stately man approaching. His tunic of the softest wool,
his crimson silk girdle richly embroidered with gold and with silver, and
his mantle of the finest linen, proclaimed him a man of rank and wealth.
It was Boaz, the owner of the farm, ‘The Lord be with you,” he said
to the reapers as he passed.
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 11

‘The Lord bless thee,” they answered him. ‘ What lovely damsel is
this who followeth the reapers?” he asked. The overseer of the reapers
told him she was Ruth the Moabitess, and repeated what he knew of her
sad story. ‘‘ See to this young woman well,” said Boaz; ‘let her glean
among the reapers, for such picty deserves reward. Let her not follow
the men, for she is too lovely, but place her among my maidens.” Ruth
now approached, and Boaz called her to him.

‘‘Hearest thou, my daughter?” he said; ‘wander not about the
fields, but glean here in mine, and keep fast to my maidens. When thou
art athirst, ask the young men to draw for thee. Twill speak to them
that they treat thee well.” Ruth, grateful and surprised for this notice
from the master of the field, knelt at his feet and bowed her head before
him, saying, ‘‘ How have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest
thus kindly notice a stranger ?”

‘¢ All thou hast done to thy mother-in-law since the death of thy hus-
band hath been fully shown me,” said Boaz; ‘and how thou hast left
thy father and mother, and the land of thy nativity, and art come into a
people thou knewest not heretofore. The Lord recompense thy work, and
a full reward be given thee of the Lord God of Israel, under whose wing
thou hast come to trust.” The heart of the grateful Ruth swelled within
her. ‘‘ Let mealways find favour in thy sight, my lord,” she said, “ for
thou hast comforted me, and hast spoken friendly unto thy handmaid,
although I be not one of thy maidens.”

At mid-day the reapers all assembled to dinner, accompanied by Boaz.
Ruth was called, and was served by the master of the farm, who gave
her parched corn, bread, and vinegar with water, sufficient. When Boaz
departed, he gave Ruth into the care of the overseer, with a charge to
the reapers to leave a littie for her to glean as she followed. In the even-
ing all departed, and Ruth with them. She had beaten out her glean-
ings, which amounted to a bushel of barley. Smilingly she showed the
treasure to her mother-in-law, who in surprise exclaimed, ‘‘ Truly, thou
hast been successful, my daughter! where wroughtest thou to-day ?
Blessed be he who thus favoured thee.” ‘‘The name of the kind man in
whose field I gleaned was Boaz,” Ruth replied. ‘‘ Blessed be the Lord,
who hath not ceased his kindness to the living and the*dead,’’ said
Naomi. ‘‘ The man is a near kinsman to us. Keep, then, with his
maidens, Ruth, and wander not in other fields. The Lord will reward
thee, my child, for thy industry and thy piety.”
12 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The words of Ruth awakened a new hope in the aged widow’s heart.
She remembered the law of Israel, which, when a man dies, obliges the
next of kin to marry his widow, aud raise up an heir for his brother’s
name and estate.

“Our kinsman Boaz winnoweth barley to-night on the threshing
floor,”’ said Naomi to Ruth. ‘‘ Wash thyself, therefore ; anoint thee, and
put thy raiment upon thee, and get thee down to the threshing-floor ;
make not thyself known to him until he hath done eating and drinking ;
when he lieth down, mark the place ; and when he is asleep, lift up the
mantle which covers him, and lie down at his feet under cover, In our
nation, it is a token thou claimest the fulfilment of the law and his
protection.”

“All that thou biddest me I will do,” said the obedient, trusting
Ruth.

That evening Ruth took her way to the farm of Boaz. The threshing-
floor was a large level space in the field, surrounded by low walls and
barns. It was now piled with grain, among which the reapers were
busy, some driving oxen, others beating it out with a flail, or tossing it
on high that the wind might blow away the chaff, while the grain fell in
a heap on the ground. Boaz was there directing, and occasionally assist-
ing hismen, At nightfall they all partook of a feast together, master
and men. When all were satistied, they departed, some to their houses
in the city, some to rest among the straw under the wide-spreading
trees. Boaz had eaten and drank, for his heart was merry while thus
feasting with his men, and being weary, he threw himself upon a heap
of straw, and, spreading his large mantle over him, was soon asleep.
Ruth, who had been concealed, now approached. She feared not to follow
her mother’s directions, for she knew the wise Naomi understood the
customs of Israel well. Softly she came, and lifting his linen mantle,
laid herself down beneath its folds. At midnight, Boaz, in turning him-
self, awoke and discovered a woman at his feet—a woman who evidently
had a claim upon him, for she had sought the protection of his mantle.
“Woman! who art thou?” he exclaimed, in surprise and dread.

“Tam Ruth, thy handmaid,” she answered. ‘‘ Spread therefore thy
skirt over me, for thou art the nearest of kin to my husband.”

“Blessed be thou, my daughter,” said Boaz, ‘ for thou hast shown
more judgment and kindness in thy latter end than at the beginning, as
thou followest not young men, whether poor or rich, Now, my daughter,
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 13

fear not, I will do all thou requirest me, for I am thy near kinsman,
and all the city does know thou art a virtuous woman. Still, Ruth, there
is a nearer kinsman than I, whom thou knowest not: tarry this night,
and in the morning I will speak with him, and if he will perform unto
thee a kinsman’s part, and take thee to wife, it is well; let him do a
kinsman’s part according to law: but if he will not perform his duty to
thee, then will I, as the Lord liveth! Lie down until morning.”

Ruth laid quietly at her kinsman’s feet until daybreak, when she
gently arose to withdraw. Boaz, who was awake, called to her, “ Hold
out thy veil, and take a measure of barley,” he said. ‘Go not empty to
thy mother-in-law.”

Ruth was enveloped in a large linen wrapper, used as a veil, one end
of which she held out, while her generous relative poured into it six
measures of barley. Then, receiving his blessing, she hastily returned
home.

That day Boaz appointed ten of the elders of Bethlehem to meet him
at the city gate. It was the hour when he knew the other kinsman of
Elimelech would be there. He had saluted the elders, and they had
taken their seats, when the kinsman appeared. ‘ Ho, Peloni! turn aside
and sit down here,” cried Boaz. He obeyed the call, and Boaz addressed
him thus: :

“Naomi, who has lately returned from the land of Moab, intends
selling a lot of ground which belonged to her husband, our kinsman
Elimelech, Thou art nearest of kin, and I thought thou wouldest like
to purchase it, that it go not intoa stranger’s hand. If thou wilt redeem
it, it is well; if not, I, who am next of kin to thee, will redeem it.”
The kinsman, after thanking Boaz, declared himself willing to take it.
Boaz had hoped he would refuse, and thus let the matter be settled. He
said, ‘‘ With this land thou must take Ruth the Moabitess, as this land
was inherited by her husband, Mahlon, since dead; thou must take her
to raise up an heir to inherit Mahlon’s land, according to our Jewish
law.” ‘Nay, that I cannot do,” said the kinsman, “lest I mar my own
inheritance by bringing in a wife and more children to maintain. I give
thee my right as kin, for I cannot redeem{it.”

Boaz willingly agreed to take the land and Ruth. In fulfilment of the
law used on all such occasions, he plucked off his kinsman’s shoe, in token
he took from him the inheritance. Then, turning towards the elders and
people who were gathered around, he said, with a loud yoice—‘“ All ye
14 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

assembled here are witnesses, this day, that I have bought all that was
Elimelech’s, and all Chilion’s and all Mahlon’s, of the hand of Naomi;
moreover, Ruth, the Moabitess, the widow of Mahlon, have I taken to be
my wife, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance, that his
name be not cut off from among his brethren, and from the gate of his
city. Ye are witnesses this day!”

The elders and assembled people answered, ‘‘ Yea, we are witnesses !”

When all were silent, one of the elders spake in a solemn voice—‘‘ The
Lord make this woman, that is come into thy house, like Rachel, and like
Leah, which two did build the house of Isracl.”’

Ruth was married to Boaz, and lived a long and happy life with her
husband and mother. All that wealth and affection could bestow was
lavished upon the aged Naomi. Her ardent wish to behold a child of
Ruth, and heir of Mahlon, was gratified, fora son was born to Ruth.
The neighbours of Naomi gathered about her to offer their congratulations.
‘‘ Blessed be the Lord,” they said, ‘who hath not left thee this day
without a kinsman, and that his name may be famous in Isracl. He shall
be unto thee a restorer of thy life, and nourisher of thy old age ; for thy
daughter-in-law, who loveth thee, and who is better to thee than seven
sons, hath borne him.”

Naomi took the child, and laid it in her bosom, and became its nurse.

Thus did the virtuous Ruth reap the reward of her heroic sacrifice of
home and country, to solace the declining years of her aged, poor, and
afflicted mother-in-law. She partook of the promise made to Abraham,
and in her seed were all the nations of the earth blessed. From her were
descended David the King, a man after God’s heart; Danicl, beloved of
the Lord; and, above all, our blessed Saviour, according to the flesh,
Jesus Christ the Redeemer.

THE MORAL. .

The beauty of filial piety is brightly portrayed in the character of Ruth.
It was no light thing to leave home, and friends, to accompany an old
woman to astrange land; and to devote her time and her young sorrow-
ing days to the task of soothing the declining years of desolate old age.
Born to princely rank, according to the Jewish Rabbies, she refused no
menial service, nor to glean with the poor in the fields, in order to add to
the comforts of her sorrowing mother-in-law. With what gentle obe-
dience she obeyed her every command! She undertakes at her bidding
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 15

the difficult and delicate task of reminding Boaz of his duties towards her
as herkinsman. This conduct appears in our age very singular and ques-
tionable ; but, we must remember, the customs and laws of the Israelites
were very different from our own, and that which seems improper in this
day was then most commendable. May we all look upon our female aged
relatives with the kindness of the pious and humble Ruth.

MIRIAM.

Many and vast were the temples and palaces which arose in the ancient
city of Zoan, in Egypt; and among the most stately and gracefully pro-
portioned was the palace of Pharaoh, the king.

In a room of lofty dimensions, plated and carved with gold, richly hung
with embroidered stuffs, and filled with furniture of costly material, was
the king of this renowned and fertile land. But not at ease was he
among the regal trappings around him, nor cast he even one admiring
glance at all this splendour. Walking restlessly about the apartment, he
bent his brow, as if musing upon some subject which deeply annoyed
him ; for cares and vexations will intrude even inaroyal palace. In this
apartment, besides the king, were three persons. Near the door stood two
aged women, who cowered bencath their large dark mantles as if anxious
to screen themselves from observation; while at the window, which
opened upon a marble colonnade, was a man apparently absorbed in gazing
upon the vast area of brick and marble which lay beneath him, filled with
thousands of human beings, or the glittering waters of the Nile, which
flowed beyond.

“ Sesostris,” said the king, stopping abruptly before him, ‘‘ why dost
thou not counsel me in this matter? These Hebrew nurses whom thou
seest at the door have refused my command to put the male children to
death. Must I stoop to embrue my hands with the blood of these pitiful
crones ? Whatam I to do if they will not obey me? If I suffer this
Hebrew people to increase as they have of late, we shall be overrun with
them, and they will take possession of my country !”

“Nay, my brother and my king,” replied Sesostris, ‘‘it were not best
to permit them thus to multiply, as in case of war they will join the
16 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

enemy, and we shall be conquered. Can they not be forced to intermarry
with our people, so that in time we shall be one nation ?”

‘No, brother. They have other gods, other laws, and keep themselves
quite distinct. They also rely upon promises made by their God, as they
say, to their fathers, that they shall one day be a great people—con-
querors of Egypt mayhap!”

“They live too easy, O king. Give them all the heavy labour of the
land; let them be worn and wearied, and their haughty spirit will be
quelled, and by degrees they will die off.”

«Tt shall be done,” said the king. Then, turning to the women, he
said, ‘‘ And now, ye false and deceitful old women, leave my presence ere
I relent of my mercy towards you!” Silently and rapidly the ancient
females withdrew.

Task-masters were set over the children of Israel, and they were com-
pelled to work hard from morning to night, ‘‘in mortar, and in brick, and
in all service of the field.” Their lives were rendered bitter by this cruel
bondage; but it answered not the purpose of their master, for ‘ the
more they were afflicted, the more they multiplied and grew.” Deter-
mined to rid himself of this noxious race, Pharaoh now issued a decree
which brought anguish to every Hebrew bosom.

Thus ran the decree: “ Every son that is born ye shall cast into the
river; but every daughter ye may save alive.”

In a mud hut, on the banks of the Nile, dwelt a Hebrew and his wife ;
Amram and Jochebed, both of the house of Levi. Here, in secresy and
bitter sorrow, was the unhappy wife delivered of a son. There was no
joy in the house that a man child was born into the world, but groans
of anguish burst from his parents’ hearts that he was doomed to a
miserable death. No smiles heralded his coming ; tears fell upon his little
face, and sighs broke forth from the bosoms around him. Forthree months
Jochebed continued to conceal the boy. His merry laugh, which to other
mothers would be rich music, brought a pang to her. She dreaded lest
this sound}should bring the murderers to the door, and hushed him into
silence, Miriam, the daughter of Amram, although quite young, was of
great service to her mother, for she took charge of her other brother
Aaron, and assisted to keep the infant quiet. With a thoughtfulness
beyond her years, she parried all intrusion, even from their own kin,
lest his existence through their means should become known. He could
not, however, be always concealed, and his parents became aware they
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 17

.



were suspected. He had been heard to weep one night by a passer-by,

and Jochebed was continually questioned regarding him. She was advised

to obey the decree, lest the whole family should be punished, but reso-
c
18 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’s OWN TREASURY.

lutely refused, until one day informed the officers who put the decree in
execution were asking about her. Then it became evident they must
give up the child, or suffer with him, After many a solemn conference
together, this unhappy family came to the resolution of casting their
child out upon the river.

At her father’s bidding, Miriam brought from the river’s side an
armful of the reed papyrus, which she tore off in strips, and wove into
a stout basket. This her father covered with pitch, which rendered it
water-tight. While they were thus engaged with their work, the
unhappy Jochebed sat in a remote corner, pressing her boy to her heart,
tears of bitterness streaming in torrents from her eyes. Unconscious of
evil, the child smiled in its mother’s face, presenting by its joyousness
a strange contrast to his sorrowing family.

‘* Alas, how may he escape?” said the mother, sorrowfully. ‘ If the
waves do not engulf him, he will starve, or be devoured by a croco-
dile.”

“¢ Nay, dearest mother, I shall watch him too well. As the little ark
floats down the stream, I shall follow it, and guard it, even if it float
for days or months. Perhaps it may be wafted beyond the dominions of
this wicked king, and then I will take it up and nourish it. Trust the
boy to me, mother, I will risk my life to save him.”

The ark was finished. Miriam placed within a soft bed, and approached
Jochebed to take the child. Sad was the parting then between the
mother and her darling boy. Unable to see him go, she fled into an inner
room to vent her anguish in bitter sobs and groans. After a long last
kiss, Miriam and her father launched the frail bark upon the Nile.

‘“ Farewell, father,” said Miriam, fondly ; ‘‘ cheer up my mother, and
tell her to trust in God, who, I feel assured, will yet rescue the boy from
the hands of his enemies. Depend upon me. All that a tender, devoted
sister can do, shall be done.”

‘“‘ Farewell, Miriam,” said her father, while the tears fell down upon
his beard; ‘I trust in the Lord and in thee! May the God of Abraham
protect thee and strengthen thee!”

Hour after hour the tiny vessel floated on; the little occupant smiling
and playing with his i aly or amusing himself with the food which lay
near him, Hour after hour his firm-hearted sister walked on beside it,
under the blazing sun of E igypt, or sat upon a bank when it became ob-


BIBLE STORIES OF EMIN



structed in its course, or was lodged in the bushes which lined the river
side. Heat and fatigue unheeded, her eyes and thoughts were ff:
her charge alone, or lifted in prayer to God for its safety. At mid-day
the little barge was whirled among some rushes, in the outskirts of the
city, where it became stationary. Miriam conecaled herself behind a
pile of bricks, and sat down to watch it. Frequently she drew it to the
shore, and fed the child. At length sho drew it bencath the shade of
some palm trees which grew upon the bank, and sat down nearit, How
did her heart beat at every approaching step! dreading lest her charge
should be observed before the shades of night should enable her ouce
more to float it away from the city. But the hours passed on, and no eye
fell upon it. The Nile flowed slowly at her fect, its banks adorned by a
fringe of papyrus, whose tall and slender stalks bent to the
breeze, or raised aloft the plume-like blossoms which crowned their heads.
No sound disturbed the silence, except when the brilliant flamingo
stalked by her, flashing his scarlet and orange plumage to the sun, or
the stately ibis pursued its chase of the water-serpents among the
rushes,

A strong wind arose, and the waves were cast upon the shore.
Miriam started with horror as she beheld a drowned infant thrown upon
the sand; one of her own nation sacrificed to Pharaoh’s cruelty. An
instant passed, and, rushing through the blue lotus flowers whith floaicd
on the stream, an enormous crocodile pounced upon the child, opening its
dreadful jaws, the innocent was soon engulfed in the horrid chasm, and
the creature disappeared. Aroused by footsteps, Miriam turred her
head: a party of miserable Hebrews passed, half naked, and surrounded
by overseers, and bending beneath a load of brick and straw.







was passing, and she gazed with disgust, as she observed the pricsts
were leading in golden chains the sacred crocodile! The back of this
hideous monster was richly painted and gilded, while bracelets of gold
and of jewels adorned its shapeless legs. She watched him, as with hi
train he entered the temple. This superb edifice was surrounded }
noble porticoes, and was raised upon an elevated platform of mar }
A long avenue of sphinxes led to it, and before the cdifice*stood two
obelisks of rose-coloured granite, whose slender s
the heavens, and whose sides were carved ini
ceiling of this temple was painted blue, and sir




20 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

its sides richly carved, gilded, and painted. In the centre stood a tank
for the service of the sacred crocodile, while on one side was a room,
where, lying upon a costly carpet, he was waited on, and adorned by
people of the first rank in the city.

The sun was now sinking behind the hills of Ramases, when the sound
of female voices met the ear of Miriam. She arose with alacrity, and
looked forth. ‘‘ Now is my sweet brother safe,” she said, ‘‘ for surely
no female bosom could devise aught evil against so lovely a babe.”

The females approached, and by the richness of their apparel, and by
their numerous attendants, were ladies of high rank. Above the rest
was one distinguished for her graceful and majestic form. She was
beautiful also, and the rich blood called forth by exercise cast a bril-
liant shade over her slightly bronzed skin. As she came nearer, Miriam
discovered it was the princess Themestris. Then the heart of this loving
sister died within her. It was the daughter of Pharaoh, their relent-
less oppressor, who approached, who, if the child were discovered, would
not probably dare resist her father’s decree to saye a Hebrew infant.
Miriam looked around in despair; but the princess was near, and con-
cealment for her charge was vain.

Her heart upon the rack, Miriam saw the princess stand upon the
river’s bank, quite near the rushes among which was the basket contain-
ing her precious treasure. He was not observed, and she breathed free ;
but, weary and hungry, the babe just then awoke from slumber, and
uttered a feeble ery.

“© What noise is that ?” asked one of the ladies; and Miriam threw
herself upon the ground in anguish.

‘“Tt was the ery of a crocodile,” said another; ‘let us fly ere we be
devoured.”

“ Silence !” cried the princess.

The wail of an infant was distinctly heard.

“ Tt isa child,” said Themestris; ‘and now I discover a basket among
yonder rushes. Bring it hither, some of ye.”

The attendants hastened to obey her, and the basket was soon laid at
her feet. When opened, a babe of wondrous beauty lay within. It was
weeping bitterly, and raised its little hand, imploringly, at the curious
faces which surrounded its cradle. The princess gazed at the child, and
tears streamed from her eyes over her beautiful face.

“Oh my father, this is thy cruel policy!” she cried. Then turning
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 21

to her women, she said, ‘‘ This is doubtless one of the Hebrew children,
whose parents, forced to throw it into the Nile, have thus sought to pre-
serve it.”

“ Shall we throw it back again ?” asked one of the attendants.

“Throw it back again! Have you the heart for such a thing?”
exclaimed the princess in indignation.

“Tt is no doubt preserved by the gods for some especial purpose, and I
accept the charge. Osiris! god of the Nile! if thou hast sent this babe
to me, behold, I receive it, and will rear it as my own.”

Who shall describe the emotions which passed through the heart of
Miriam during this scene! Tears of gratitude and joy burst from her
eyes, and she knelt to thank that merciful God who had saved her
brother from destruction, and his parents from misery.

With a fortitude beyond her years, she left her hiding-place, and
approached the group. Sauntering carelessly along, she paused, as if
gazing at them; when one of the ladies, pitying her childish curiosity,
called her gaily to them.

‘Come hither, child, and see the young crocodile we have caught.”

Miriam came forward, uttering many expressions of admiration and
wonder,

“And is my royal lady going to adopt the child ?” she asked, dropping
her eyes to conceal the emotion which she feared would betray her.”

“She is: for she is as benevolent as she is beautiful.”

“Then, if she willlisten to her handmaid, I know a Hebrew nurse
who dwelleth near, and who is very skilful. I will fetch her, if the noble
princess please.”

“Tt is well thought of, girl,” said Themestris. ‘If it be a Hebrew
infant, a nurse of that nation were more fitting. Be quick, child, and
see thou hast her here by the time I have finished bathing in yonder
marble bath.” Miriam needed no spur, but springing forward was soon
on her way homeward. The basket had been many hours upon the
river, on account of its frequent stoppages; but Miriam was at her home
ina much shorter time. ‘O mother, mother!” she eried, ‘did I not
prophesy truly ? God hath saved our babe : he is, as I predicted, destined
to greatness, for the princess hath taken him.” Wer sud@en appear-
ance, and her unexpected good news, so overpowered her mother that she
almost fainted. Reviving soon, she was on her way to the spot; joy
enabling her to keep up with the bounding steps of Miriam. With a
SELRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



tolerable degree of fortitude Jochebed saluted the daughter of Pharaoh,
“Take this child,” said the charitable princess; “nurse it for me, and
let it want for nothing, for it is the adopted child of a princess. Thou
shalt be bountifully paid. Call him Moses, beeause he was drawn out of
the water.” Ag Jochebed received her child again, her emotion over-
came her, and she dropped her head upon that of the infant, while a
sudden pallor overspread her face. Miriam ran to her; and the princess
whispered, ‘Poor creature! doubtless she has been forced to give her
own child up to death, I hope this will awaken her affection, and heal
her wounded heart.” The princess and train returned to the palace ;
while Jochebed, supported by her heroic daughter, set out for her owa
now happy home.

By what simple means did God bring His purpose to pass! A tender
girl and a charitable female were apparently the preservers of this child ;
but God had selected them as fitting agents. And this infant—who that
looked upon him then, could imagine the mighty deeds he was destined
to perform? A great multitude was to be taken from a powerful and
unwilling nation; a countless army overthrown; king, and nation,
swept from the land, to give place to his wandering host ?

But I shall not touch upon the story of Moses, except where Miriam
is concerned. Who, after secing the heroic conduct of the young
Miriam, and her devotion to her brother, in which she certainly risked
her life, would imagine her capable of her after conduct? Who could
recognise the watcher by the Nile in the rebel of the Desert of Zin ?

“The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who
can know it?’ When the nurse of Moses was no longer needed, he was
taken to the princess, and soon raised to power. But he always clung to
his nation, and refused to be called an Egyptian, or the son of Pharaoh’s
daughter.

It is unnecessary to say anything more of the succeeding events of the
life of Moses; or of the wondrous miracles wrought by him before
Pharach to induce him to let his people go; as my readers are, or I hope
they are, sufficiently acquainted with them, Pharaoh was dead, and a
new king arose, who fully appreciated the worth of the Hebrews as
hewers of wood and drawers of water. It seemed for a time as if the
induced him to render the Hebrew’s
‘iam of great service to her country-




miracles only irritated the king, an
bondage more bitter. Then was M
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 23

men; confident in the promise of God, she inspired courage into their
hearts by her unswerving faith. As a reward for her trust in Him, God
bestowed upon her the gift of prophecy, and placed her beside her
brothers, Moses and Aaron, as leaders, instructors, and judges of the
children of Israel. The Hebrews departed; but were soon followed by
the Egyptian army, which perished in the Red Sea. The oppressed
people were free, but wanderers in the Desert.

Miriam was reverenced by all, as a prophetess; and enjoyed especial
honour as the sister of Moses, Zipporah, the wife of Moses, whom he
had left in the land of Cush, with her father, Jethro, had lately arrived
and joined her husband, and, of course, obtained much of the people’s
good-will as wife of their leader; and Miriam stood not alone in their
regard, or in that of Moses. She, however, reigned without a rival
when Moses judged the people; for he needed help, and Aaron was
engaged with his priestly duties. When the father of Zipporah arrived,
he advised Moses to lighten his toil by dividing his people in tens, fifties,
hundreds, and thousands, and by appointing rulers over each band.
Miriam then no longer saw herself a distinguished associate of her
brothers, as her office was divided, and she became merely one of the
many rulers. Forgetful she owed all to God, and that He might take
away His gifts, Miriam looked upon Jethro and Zipporah as usurpers
and rivals. Day and night she devised plans to overthrow their
counsels, She endeavoured to interest Aaron in her cause; and, much
attached to his sister, and of a gentle nature, he listened to her, and
pitied her, when, perhaps, he would have done better to have
reproved her.

The Israelites were now in the wilderness of Zin, a large, level plain,
surrounded by eminences which shot up their granite peaks to the
heavens. The twelve tribes were encamped by threes on each side of
this immense plain, haying at each corner the standards erected. Judah
bore upon his banner a lion, while the other three bore the figures of the
ox, eagle, and man. In the centre arose the wondrous Tabernacle,
glowing in purple, and blue, and scarlet and gold embroidery. It stood
within a large space, enclosed by a fence of linen curtains, suspended
upon pillars of brass. Within this enclosure stood the bragen sea, and
great altar of brass, and tables of marble. Miriam was sitting at the
door of her tent, uttering complaints of Moses in the car of Aaron, and
within hearing of many witnesses.
TIN ILLUSTRATED GIRL’$ OWN TREASURY.

i)
ee

‘Moses hath transgressed, seeing he hath married the Midian
woman,” said Miriam. ‘* Who is she that all honour her thus, as if
there were no other women in the camp? And who is her father, that he
deviseth mischicf against me ?”

“Tam sorry for thee, my sister, and will speak to Moses regarding
thee; for didst thou not save his life ?””

“Yea, what were Moses, were it not for me? He taketh too much
upon him. Hath the Lord only revealed His will by him? Hath He not
also given thee and me the spirit of prophecy ?”

“Yea, indeed He hath,” said Aaron.

Suddenly a cloud came down and rested at the door of the Tabernacle,
and the people knew the Lord was among them. Then every one stood
still in his place, and listened, as the Lord commanded Moses and Aaron
and Miriam to come into the court of the Tabernacle. Tremblingly they
obeyed the mandate, and walked up in silence, undisturbed, except by
the tinkling of the golden bells upon the robe of Aaron. They stood
before the Tabernacle in the face of the whole congregation. The tall
and stately figure of Moses was enveloped in a large mantle of white
linen, fringed with blue; while Aaron was arrayed in the gorgeous vest-
ments of the High Priest—the breast of his blue upper-dress dazzling
with the emblematic jewels, while the bottom was hung with scarlet
pomegranates and golden bells—his white linen mitre circled by a golden
band, and his girdle and linen under-dress richly embroidered with
searlet, and blue, and purple. Miriam glorying in her situation, and
expecting new honours, stood between them, with her head elevated so
that the golden horn which ornamented her forehead was erected on high.

“Hear now my words,” said the Lord. ‘If there be a prophet among
you, I, the Lord, will make myself known unto him in visions and
dreams only; but my servant Moses, who is faithful to me, shall be
spoken to, mouth to mouth—not in dark speeches as to you, but is
honoured above you by beholding the similitude of the Lord. Knowing
this, were ye not afraid to speak against my servant, Moses?” Then
trembled Aaron and Miriam, for they saw the anger of the Lord was
kindled against them.

The cloud departed from the sanctuary; they turned to gaze upon
each other, when, lo} they saw that Mian was a leper! The colour
was gone from her blooming check, and her skin was turned to the livid
hue of the dead! Aaron threw himself at the feet of Moses.
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 25

“ Alas, my lord,” he said, ‘‘I beseech thee, forgive us our sin, for
indeed we have spoken foolishly against thee. Take pity upon Miriam,
and do not let her remain thus as one dead ere the tomb hath closed
oyer her.”

Moses interceded for her with God. ‘‘ Hear her now, O God, I be-
seech thee,” he cried. The Lord refused to heal Miriam, but ordered
her to undergo the usual cleansing of lepers, and to live seven days with-
out the camp.

In the sight of all Isracl was the humiliated Miriam carried without
the limits of the camp, where a tent was erected for her. Here she
remained seven days, undergoing the usual lustrations and sacrifices of
those tainted with leprosy. Her long and beautiful hair was shaven off
—her clothes were washed as well as her body. Upon the seventh day
the priests visited her, and, after examination, she was pronounced
whole. The usual ceremony then followed, in which one of Aaron’s sons,
Miriam’s nephew, officiated. A vessel of pure water was brought, which
had been taken from a running spring. ‘The priest then took two birds,
one of which was killed over the water; a piece of cedar wood, some
scarlet wool, and a sprig of hyssop were, with the remaining bird, dipped
into the blood, and sprinkled upon Miriam. The bird was then let loose
in the desert. Being pronounced clean, Miriam was again led into the
camp. The next day she presented at the altar a lamb to be sacrificed,
and some oil. She was anointed with the oil after it had been offered
up, and the priests absolved her from all other duties.

Miriam was thoroughly repentant and humbled. Her character was
much improved by this chastening: and pride and ambition were for
ever at rest within her bosom. Let this one shadow upon her fair life
be forgotten, as she was one of God’s chosen agents for the furtherance
of His great and wonderful purposes.

The children of Israel once more broke up their encampment, and
journeyed through the wilderness. At Kadesh they again encamped in
the desert of Paran, and there Miriam died. The hill of Paran is a
remarkable pile of rocks, whose slender, jagged spires give it, at a dis-
tance, the appearance of a cathedral. In the side’ of this xock they cut
out a tomb for Miriam. It was richly carved within, while over the door
was her name, and the date of her death, surrounded with ornamented
work. Her body was bound with linen bands, and laid upon a bier: she
26 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

was followed to her tomb by her weeping relatives of the house of Levi,
and a train of hired mourners, whose death-wail awoke the desert echoes.
A carved sarcophagus, filled with spices, received her body—the door was
closed—the train dispersed, and the Israclites resumed their march,
leaving Miriam in her lonely resting-place.

THE MORAL,

Let us learn from the story of Miriam to crush unholy ambition. How
was her glory tarnished by this spirit! Surrounded by friends and
admirers, and exalted by God to a high office among her countrymen,
she strove to advance higher, and fell into the shades of humiliation and
Sorrow.

Remember the words of our Saviour’s apostle, who tells us, ‘ Godli-
ness with contentment is great gain.”

JEPHTHAW’S DAUGHTER.

THE majestic oaks, the herds and verdant pastures of Bashan, have
ever furnished, to the inspired prophets of Israel, types and figures of
richness and fertility. Age after age has passed away, nation has suc-
ceeded nation in earth’s pageant over these fair plains, cities have risen
on those river banks; but the nations have melted into the shadows of
the past, the cities have crumbled away, and all has changed save those
glorious oaks of Bashan, which still crown the summits of the hills
where their kindred flourished, and gaze down as of old upon the vales
and rivers beneath. Their day however must come, for Isaiah hath said,
“The cedars of Lebanon, and all the oaks of Bashan, shall be brought
low.”

Arrayed in all the gorgeous robes of her ancient glory, ere yet her
“time to weep” had come, the land of Bashan burst upon the gaze of
two persons as they gaincd the brow of one of the hills which separated
her from the land of Gilead.

“Ha! by Moloch, this isa glorious country,” said one,—a tall man
clad in a dark dress which fell to his sandalled feet, and in a corslet of
rusty stecl, and battered helmet. ‘¢ Behold those frowning mountains,”




BIBLE SLORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 27

he added; ‘see how they spring to the skies, and then sink down into
soft grassy slopes, losing themselves in these pretty green vales. Mark
how the glittering Jabbok, like a jewelled necklace, rests upon the bosom
of these verdant plains, reflecting upon its shining surface, city, and
tower, and marble palace.”

“Tt is,” returned his companion, a man of lordly bearing ; ‘ but my
heart, untouched by its loveliness, still fondly turns to Gilead.”

“What charm is there in Gilead, my lord, that you so cherish it?
Your kindred, as you tell me, have thrust you from your father’s house.”

“ He is old and powerless, Hazicl. I am not his lawful son. Child of
a favourite handmaid, I shared with her all his heart, even after he
married and was again a father. His wife ever looked upon my mother
and myself with envious eyes. Her dislike was infused into the bosoms
of her sons, and they, by every art, sought to wean my father’s favour
from me. At last they persuaded him to deny me all share of my patri-
mony, and finally to turn me from his house ?”

‘Shame on them! Had you no friends who might use their influence
for you?”

‘“‘T applied to the elders, and they refused my suit. I, who so faith-
fully had served them, who had kept at bay the neighbouring nations,
and raised the fame of Gilead to its present height !”

“Oh, they were purchased by your brothers’ gold!”

“From my infirm father and my brothers I expected nothing, but
from my country I surely had a right to look for justice. So keenly did
I feel my fellow-citizens’ ingratitude, that I shook the dust from off my
feet upon the city, anc left it, vowing never to return.”

‘A brave resolye, my noble Jephthah! Think no more of such false
friends, and turn to those who, with open arms, are waiting to receive
you. Trust yourself to my direction, and, by Baal! the citizens of Gilead
shall rue the day they ever injured Jephthah !”

“Gently, my friend. Ere I join your band, I must exact that I never
be required to attack my countrymen.” ‘‘ We are too proud to number
the celebrated Jephthah among us, to .refuse anything he may demand.”

The new friends descended the hill, and advanced toward a large cave,
whose yawning mouth opened into the dark bosom of the mountain. As
they entered, deafening shouts of ‘Welcome Haziel! welcome noble
Jephthah !”” awoke the echoes of the vault.

The Ammonites had long meditated an inroad into Gilead, and now
28 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

that Jephthah, the only man they feared, was expelled the city, they
commenced an attack upon its borders, Many divisions of the Gileadites
were sent against them, but they were repelled, and the enemy entered
the land and directed their march towards the city. The brothers of
Jephthah had all been defeated, and had withdrawn themselves into the
city, where they were the scorn of all. The defeated soldiers, now en-
camped without the walls, were disheartened with their repeated unsuc-
cess, ‘¢O that the noble Jephthah were here,” said one of the soldiers,
“and Ammon would not shame us thus!” *‘ Yea,” said another, ‘ had
we but Jephthah for our captain, we should soon repel the invaders !”

The murmurs spread through the camp and reached the city.
‘Where is Jephthah?” became the public ery. Shouts of derision
against his brothers, and disapprobation against the elders who had
turned the warrior from the city, resounded from every quarter. From
rumours they rose to open rebellion, and the elders and Jephthah’s family
were obliged to fly from the wrath of the people and shelter themselves
in a fortified tower. In front of this the populace assembled, vowing de-
struction upon the elders unless Jephthah were placed at the head of the
army. The elders, to appease them, promised to send messengers after
him into the land of Bashan. Messengers were accordingly despatched.
After several days passed in great suspense, they returned with Jeph-
thah’s refusal to aid his ungrateful city. ‘‘Go yourselves!” cried the
people to the elders—‘ take with you Jephthah’s reereant brothers, and
upon your knees entreat him to return and redeem us from that destruc-
tion you could not avert |”

Forced to obey, these proud old men, who as rulers of the city had
seen all at their feet, now reluctantly prepared to seck out him they
had so deeply injured, and pray him to forgive them and return.

“ Noble Jephthah!” said their spokesman, as the deputation was pre-
sented to the exile, ‘‘ you see before you the elders of your city, who,
finding their messengers unhecded, have come this weary journey to seek
your aid against the Ammonites, who press us sore.”

“Truly, for men of age, your minds are very changeful,” said
Jephthah, bitterly. ‘How short a time is it since ye thrust me from
your doors, and now ye come thus far to seek me! Once it was my
pleasure and my highest joy to do your bidding, but ye repelled me ;
and now ye come in your distress to pray me to return ?”

0 noble Jephthah, pity that distress which brings us here! Reject
BIBL STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 29



us not. Onr hosts call upon you to take their head, as their chosen
captain. ‘The name of Jephthah once resounding before our walls, the
dreaded sound shall strike our foes with terror, and Gilead shall be free!
30 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Turn not away. Wilt thou see Gilead low? wilt thou see thy home, thy
fricnds, doomed to destruction ?”— What home! what friends?” said
Jephthah, gloomily.—‘‘ Behold thy repentant brethren here,” said the
elder, pointing to a group of young men who just then entered the gate,
“they yield their gold, their all!”

“No, no!” exclaimed Jephthah, in violent agitation, motioning them
pack, ‘*Do not let them come! Icannot see them. Years of humilia-
tion, of reproach, and of injury rise before me and shut my heart against
them. I cannot sec them!”

There was silence in the court, and the dejected young men turned to
retire.

“And yet, as a follower of the just God of Isracl, I must forgive.
Young men, return! Ido forgive you, for ye are my father’s sons; but
stay not here if ye wish Gilead well. Repose in yonder rooms—there
shall my people minister to your wants.” Jephthah waved his hand,
and his degenerate brethren crossed the court to the interior apartments.

“©O Jephthah, I deemed your heart were formed of nobler nature than
thus to harbour vengeance,” said the elder reproachfully. ‘Ye then
reject us—refuse to aid your native city, and thus devote us all to
slaughter! Remember your aged father—your daughter!”

“Ha! my sweet young child! I had forgotten her—I must to her
rescue, indeed. My fathers, accuse me not of cherishing revenge? It
is my only wish to act according to the laws of God. Forgive me that
T have grieved ye thus, but you know noé all the suffering my late exile
has cost me!”

Hazicl, who had stood with his hands folded in the loose sleeves of
his searlet dress, an attentive listener to all that passed, now saw with
alarm that Jephthah was relenting. ‘My friends, your time is wasted
in vain words,” he said, advancing to the elders. ‘ All ties between the
noble Jephthah and yourself are broken by your own strong arm. Ye
sent him poor and sorrow-stricken from your walls ; I took him in, clothed,
fod, and cheered him, Think ye he can thus lightly leave me ?”

Jephthah seemed torn with conflicting emotions, ‘Elders of Gilead,”
at last he said, ‘ ye must return alone!”

“Nay, nay, Jephthah!” they cried, knecling before him; “listen to
the ery of your perishing country! Come with us! Do not refuse our
prayer !”

When Jephthah beheld the rulers of his city upon their knees before
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 31

him; those august old men to whom since childhood he had looked as if
to very gods—their robes of state in the dust, their venerable beards
dropping with tears, and their aged hands lifted to him for suceour—he
thought his heart would have burst within him.

“Rise! rise, my lords!’ he eried, mingling his tears with theirs as he
stooped to raise them; ‘ Do yourselves not the great dishonour as to kneel
tome. Igo; Iam yours!—Receive me again as your son, and I will
follow you to death!”

Jephthah was wrapped in their warm embraces, and blessed and thanked
by the happy elders.

‘Farewell, Haziel!” he said, turning towards his friend. ‘‘ Farewell,
Jephthah the ingrate! Jephthah the tool!” said Hazicl, bitterly.

“Speak not thus, thou son of Napthali!” said the elder. ‘Thou
scest thou art known under thy bandit disguise. What dost thou here
when war threatens Isracl? and thou, son of the great house of Issachar!
and ye, noble youths, whom I see around me!” continued the elder, ad-
dressing the assembled band of Haziel; ‘‘ follow the steps of Jephthah, I
entreat ye, ere it be too late. Here is an honourable opening by which
ye may retrace your path. In this coming war, your lost honour and
fallen fortunes may be retrieved, and ye be worthy yet of your lofty race!”
The elders each addressed the young men, urging them to return with
them. Their patronage and protection was promised them, with honour-
able posts in the war. Jephthah’s entreaties were joined to theirs, which
were in a measure successful. Haziel and some of his friends agreed to
accompany Jephthab, and they followed the triumphant elders to the
camp at Mizpeh.

Shouts of joy welcomed Jephthah’s arrival, from the soldiers. He was
led by the elders towards a magnificent tent of scarlet, bordered with
gold. ‘‘ Enter, great Jephthah, the tent of the captain of our host,” said
the elder. ‘May the God of Israel be with thee, and make thee con-
queror over Ammon!” Jephthah paused before the entrance of the tent,
and turning, addressed them thus—‘‘ Ye have promised me, O elders of
Gilead, the post of captain over your armies; but how know I, when I
return from the wars, ye will not thrust me out as before? Ere I con-
sent to lead you to battle, ye must agree unto these two ie ay i
be not only captain in war, butrulerin peace. Ifyenowmakeme jadge
over Gilead, I will take the command of yout armies; if not, I will re-
turn to my stronghold.”
32 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The elders willingly agreed. An altar was raised in the centre of the
host, in front of the tent of Jephthah, and there, before the assembled’
army, and before the Lord, whose name was called upon to witness the
compact, he was installed as judge and captain over Gilead. The elders
repeated before the people the conditions they had agreed upon between
themselves and Jephthah, and then turning towards him, said—‘‘ The
Lord be witness between us, if we do not so, according to thy words.”
The grateful acclamations of the men of Gilead testified to their joy at
kis elevation over them.

Determined not to await the coming Ammonites, Jephthah immediately
marched to meet the foe. Wherever he appeared the people, become
more confident now they beheld him at the head of the army, hastened
to join his forces. After winding through a defile in the mountains of
Gilead, Jephthah beheld against the distant horizon the banners, and
spears, and glittering chariots of the Ammonites. Here he halted and
drew up his men in order of battle. Although his faith assured him the
Lord would give him the victory, Jephthah was anxious it should be a
bloodless one, and resolved by negociation to induce the Ammonites to
retire. Many men, newly elected leader of an army, who knew much
was expected from them, would be eager to signalise themselves by some
warlike exploit; but Jephthah’s conduct was ruled by the laws of God
rather than of man, and he sent to demand of the Ammonite king the
cause of his appearance in arms. Admitted into the tent of the king,
Jephthah’s messengers thus addressed him :—

“ Thus sayeth Jephthah, captain of the Lord’s host, to the king of the
children of Ammon—Why is it that thou has come up to fight me in my
land? Have I evil-treated thee? If I have injured thee, speak, and
I will repay if it be in my power.”

“Go, and tell your leader,” replied the king, ‘‘ I come to recover those
lands which the children of Israel took from me when they came up out
of Egypt.”

“What land was this, O king?” asked the messenger. ‘The richest
part of my inheritance have they ravished from me; that fertile tract
whose bounds three rivers lave, the Jabbok, Arnon, and Jordan. Restore
this portion peaceably, and I will return to Ammon. If ye refuse, they
shall be mine by force, my chariots shall crush your ranks, and seize
them from your hand.”

The messengers departed, and repeated to Jephthah all that had becn
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 33

spoken by the king of Ammon. Fully instructed by their captain, they

“again stood before the king and said—‘ Thus saith great Jephthah, 0
king, Israel took not this land from the children of Ammon, nor of the
Moabite, their ally ; it was in possession of Sihon, king of the Amorites,
and from them they conquered it. Nor would they have thus bereft him
had he granted them that peaceful passage through his land which they
requested.” Jephthah then rehearsed the facts relating to their march,
and to their battle with the Amorites. ‘‘ Wilt thou then ask from us the
land given to us by our God? Take what thy own god Chemosh giveth
thee. Zippor, king of Moab, did never strive to regain these lands, and
now dost thou come to take them, after Israel hath possessed them three
hundred years? Thou dost me wrong to war against me, and the Lord
the Judge be judge this day between the children of Isracl and the chil-
dren of Ammon!”

The king of Ammon would not harken longer to the messengers, but,
breaking up the conference, angrily dismissed them.

Trumpets now resounded from every side, and they rushed to meet
each other in deadly strife. Then was heard ‘the thunder of the
captains, and the shouting.” The ground shook under the roar of the
chariots, and tramp of armed men, camels, and elephants. ‘The war-horse
was there in his strength ; ‘‘ who swallowed the ground with fierceness
and rage,” who mocketh although ‘the quiver rattled against him, and
the glittering spear and shield.” In the whirlwind of battle, Jephthah
ior one moment forgot his trust in God, and tempted Him to fight upon his
side; he yowed a vow before the Lord, and said, ‘‘ If Thou shalt, without
fail, deliver the children of Ammon into my hands, then it shall be, that
whatsoever cometh forth of the doors of my house to meet me, when I
return in peace from the children of Ammon, shall surely be the Lord’s,
and I will offer it up for a burnt offering!” A rash vow which Jephthah
ever after deplored, and which if he had reflected one moment he would
not have made. Jephthah suffered from his first error, evil communica -
tion ; he had “ stricken hands” with idolaters, and while residing with
them had witnessed their frequent sacrifices to their gods, and forgot he
spoke to a God who delighted not in such vows. Into this grievous
error he had not fallen if he had shunned instead of making friends of
the sons of Baal.

‘Lhe children of Ammon fled before the host of Jephthah. They were

D
384 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

pursued into the heart of their country, and twenty cities conquered, and
the whole land completely subdued.

The city of Gilead was filled with rejoicing that their enemy was
repelled, and its streets were crowded with the citizens, eager to behold
the triumphant entry of their victorious leader. Jephthah approached,
seated in a brazen chariot surrounded by his steel-clad warriors. His
robe of blue, embroidered with gold, was bound by a broad girdle of
golden mail, a sword hung in chains from his side, and shoes of brass
defended his feet ; a scarlet mantle fell from his shoulders, and around
his héad was a band of steel chain-work, from which projected in front
ahorn of gold, giving him a fierce and terrible appearance. When the
procession arrived before the house of Jephthah, the gate was thrown
open, and a group of young girls came dancing forth, mingling their
jocund music with the cheers of the populace. What saw the conqueror
in yon joyous train, that he started as if a shot from the enemy’s archers
had stricken him ?—why bowed his lofty head unto his bosom? At the
head of the youthful train came the hero’s daughter, his only child,
holding aloft the swect-sounding timbrel, and attired, as became a ruler’s
daughter, in a robe of divers colours, richly embroidered with gorgeous
feather-work, and gold, and silk of varied dies. bound her dark tresses, and her tiny feet were strapped in scarlet sandals.
Smiles lighted up her fair face, and her soft dove’s eyes beamed with filial
tenderness when raised to her lordly father.

Behind her were the maidens of Gilead, clad in white, with chaplets
of red roses; their slender ankles circled with silver bells. Like leaves
from a gay parterre swept onward by a summer breeze, these lovely
flowerets floated in mazy whirls until beside the chariot of the conqueror.
The daughter of Jephthah approached her father; and when the people
looked to see him fold her in his embrace, with a frantic start he rent the
bosom of his gilded robe, and, covering his head with his mantle, he
groaned with anguish. ‘My father!” said a gentle voice beside him.
‘Alas, my daughter!” cried the conqueror, with a burst of agony—
from my high estate of joy thou hast brought me low down in the dust !””
There was deep silence while he spoke—‘‘O God, forgive me: my child
forgive me! When I faced the children of Ammon in battle, I vowed,
if the Lord would deliver them into my hands, I would offer up, as
sacrifice unto him, the first that came forth from my house to meet me!
Thou art the first-—my child! my only one!”
BIRLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 36

A deep consternation fell wnon the hearts of all, when this rash vow
was heard—on all, save upon that fair and gentle creature who was the
victim. With brow unblanched, and with a glow of gencrous self-
devotion, she said to Jephthah— My father, if thou hast opened thy
mouth to the Lord, do unto meas thou hast vowed. Thy God hath made
thee conqueror over thy enemies; the children of Ammon have fallen
before thee ; and if I am to be the price of victory, take me, and do unto
me according to thy vow. I die for my country and for my father: in
that death there isno bitterness.’”’ At the request of the elders, who now
approached, Jephthah descended from his chariot, and, accompanied by
them and his daughter, he entered his habitation. Here he threw him-
self upon the ground, covered his head with dust, and refused all his
child’s endeavours to comfort him.

Many days were passed in sorrow and in deep perplexity by the
people of Gilead. At last, it was determined by a council of elders, that
a deputation of their number should be sent to Shiloh, in order to obtain
the advice of the priests of the tabernacle upon this difficult and unhappy
matter. The time of their absence was passed in great anxiety by the
people, and in deep humiliation and anguish by Jephthah. Their
approach was at length descried from the watch-tower; they entered the
city, and, followed by a train of eager citizens, sought the unhappy
Jephthah, who still remained upon the ground as they had left him,
clothed with sackcloth, and covered with ashes. :

“Hear, O Jephthah, the message of the high-priest of Israel!”
said the chief of the elders; ‘¢ Unlike a*worshipper of Israel’s God, thou
hast vowed to offer in burnt sacrifice the first that came to mect thee
from thy house. Such offerings are an abomination to the Lord, and to
punish thee for thy rashness He hath sent thy daughter forth.” Jeph-
thah answered with a groan of anguish.

‘« This sacrifice being forbidden by our laws, the person offered. can be
redeemed with money, and for a youthful female the priests demand ten
shekels.”’

“She may then be saved ?”’ And the people were preparing to shout
for joy, at her deliverance, when a wave from the elder’s hand restrained.
them.

“Thou hast said, such, coming forth to meet thee, shall surely be the
Lord's, and, by the laws of our holy Moses, things thus devoted cannot be
redeemed.” A sigh burst from many a bosom when they heard this
36 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

eruel sentence. ‘ Listen, Jephthah, to thy daughter’s destiny : thou hast
devoted her to be the Lord’s, and as the Lord’s her days must be spent
in His service. She is henceforth for ever dead to the world, and dead to
thee! She must be taken to Shiloh, where in perpetual virgin seclusion
her days must pass in the service of the tabernacle. She belongs no
more to man, but must be kept as holy to the Lord.” With this decree
the people were satisfied, and Jephthah was relieved. Still his daughter
was lost to him for ever, and if not called upon to die, was doomed to a
lonely life. How bitterly was hisrash vow now repented! His cherished
child, she whom he looked upon as the light and comfort of his declining
years, must be to him as dead! To her this destiny was worse than
death. She had wrought her soul up to the great sacrifice of her life,
but thus to lose home, and all held dear—to sce none else but strangers
near her—to surrender that fond hope, so cherished by her countrywomen,
of being the Saviour’s mother, brought to her young bosom a chill, as if
from the tomb. Her fair brow was but a moment clouded. No
reproachful word came from her lip, but with a smile of heroie fortitude
she turned to Jephthah—‘ Cheer thee, my father! I am raised from
death,” she said. ‘‘ My life, devoted to my God, and given for my
country, must be a happy one ; for God will not willingly afflict His child.”
Jephthah threw his arms around his daughter, wetting her glossy locks
with bitter, tears. ‘Remember, thou hast many duties, and many
honours, father! Thou art a judge of Israel. Thy brow is surrounded
by a halo of glory, and thou hast much to render life dear to thee. Thou
wilt forget this anguish soon, and, in worshipping thy God, and in thy
country’s service, wilt find peace at last.”

Jephthah strained her to his heart in speechless sorrow. How could
he part with this sweet child so lately restored to him! now become far
dearer as her filial tenderness, her heroism, and her religious faith
became thus known to him. The maiden turned towards the elders.

“T bow to the high priest’s deerce, as a most righteous one,” she said ;
‘Cand I will yield me to his will. This only I would ask, Give me some
little time for preparation, to take farewell of all the friends and scenes
so dear ? After this, I will accompany ye to Shiloh.”

The elders willingly acceded to her request, and then departed.

Some time was passed in preparation, and in endeavours to soothe the
sadness of her father; and then the daughter of Jephthah, accompanied
by her young female companions, her friends and attendants, set out
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 37

upon a pilgrimage among the city’s environs, to bid farewell to all those
friends and places among whom her childhood’s happy days were spent.
She passed from one spot to another among the beautiful mountain
scenery of Gilead, bidding an adieu to every cherished scene.

With her companions she bewailed her hapless lot, and mourned that
she must lose the hopes of seeing the promised Savivur among her
descendants. She then returned to her father’s house, who solemnly
surrendered ker into the hands of the elders, and was taken to Shiloh.

The loss of Jephthah’s daughter was annually commemorated by the
daughters of Israel at Gilead. Every year, upon the anniversary of this
sad event, they walked in procession through the same paths she had trod
with them, when bidding her early home adieu. The character which
we have endeavoured to render familiar to the minds of our readers, is
full of fruitful incident for reflection ; and it is impossible to feel other-
wise than deeply impressed by the dutiful obedience of the heroine of our
subject to the stern dictates of Jephthah’s rash vow.

QUEEN ESTHER.

*Twas night in Persia. Elam’s burning god had passed to other lands,
leaving his starry train ‘to rule the night.” Arcturus and all his sons
were out, Orion and the Pleiades shedding soft brilliancy over many
a perfumed vale, mourtain, and desert lone. Gently their rays were
flung over the stately city of Susa, and fairy gardens of the royal palace.
Here flowers, rare and lovely, were giving forth their fragrance to the
night. Myriads of roses, jessamines, myrtles and sweet oleander, glow-
ing pomegranate, almond, graceful chinar and citron, were gathered in
gorgeous groups, or bending over the silvery and gushing fountains.

A royal banquet-hall arose in this sweet Eden. Gorgeous in its mag-
nificence, it was worthy its royal master. The floor was a rare mosaic
of marble and porphyry and alabaster, which gave it the glow of a rich
painting. Pillars of marble encircled the apartment, suspended to which
by silver rings were hangings of rich stuffs, of white and green, and
scarlet, looped up with silver cords. A table in the form of a crescent
occupied the centre of the room, covered with every rare viand and
38 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

delicious fruit, with delicately-seulptured vases and cups of gold and silver
set with precious stones, bearing the most exquisite wines of Helbon
and Damascus, the sweet water of Choaspes, sacred to the royal table.

Around this luxurious board, reclining upon silver couches covered
with purple cushions, were the chief nobles of the court of Artaxerxes.
In the centre was the monarch, arrayed in robes of scarlet and purple,
adorned with gold and jewels, and wearing the royal tiara, of cloth of
silver and purple silk twisted, which bore a short plume, erect in front.
Next the king sat his seven councillors, the heads of the seven noblest
families in Persia, descendants of the conspirators against the usurper,
Smerdis, the Magian, and privileged, in memory of the confusion of that
hour, to wear the plumes which decorated their white linen turbans
aslant.

A dazzling light was thrown over the richly-laden table by silver
chandeliers, while the hall resounded with music and merry laughter.
This was the seventh day of the royal feast—a feast given by the king
to all his officers and nobles, in commemoration of the peace which his
unremitted efiorts had procured to the one hundred and twenty provinces
of his vast kingdom. Silence was commanded atthe table, and the king
spoke :

“This is the last day of the feast, my lords,” he said; ‘let it in joy
and mirth execed the rest. Stint not the wine, ’tis parent of wit and
merriment.”

Loud applauses followed this gracious address from their monarch ;
the golden flagons were replenished, and jewelled cups flashed in the
light.

“ Bravely hath my lord spoken of wine,” said his favourite, Memucan,
who sat next to him. Butif I dared hazard an opinion, there exists a
more powerful thing than wine.”

“What may that be, Memucan?” said his royal master. ‘‘ Say on!”

“Tt is the king,” said the favourite. ‘ Man is lord of the earth, you
say; he planted the vineyard, and maketh the wine, and doth not the
king command all men ?”

‘« Yes, wine is strong, and the king is strong; but I know what excel-
leth both in power,” said Prince Admath.

“ Speak on,”’ said the king.

“It is woman, my lord, If mankind rule the world, doth not woman
rule him? He that planteth the vine, and the king who commandeth
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 39

sea and land, owe their existence to her. A man leayeth his mother and
country for his wife. For her he will hold as dust all gold and gems,
and every precious thing of the earth. Will not a man labour more
faithfully for the woman of his love than for his king? Yea, he will
rob, and spoil, and brave the dangers of the sea, the fury of lions and
the terrors of darkness, to gain treasure to lay at a woman’s feet! Men
have lost their wits, have become slaves, haye sinned and have perished,
for woman’s sake. Even the king, commander of the earth, does not he
in turn obey a woman? ‘Then acknowledge, O king! and ye, O lords!
that woman hath more power than wine or the king.”

Universal applause crowned the orator, and the sparkling cups were
once more filled high to the honour of woman. A momentary silence
succeeded the clamour, during which a deep sigh was heard in the apart-
ment, All started at this unusual sound in the banquct-hall, and the
king, turning, beheld beside him his cup-bearer, a Hebrew captive, who
stood with his arms folded in his linen mantle, his eyes fixed pensively
on the ground, and his whole figure so expressive of mournful musing
as to present a complete contrast to the merry and gaily-dressed
courtiers.

“ How now, Nehemiah ?” said the king ; ‘* Why art thou so sad ? Why
this heart-sorrow when all are so gay ?”

‘“¢ Let the king live for ever!” said the captive Hebrew ; ‘‘ and let my
lord not rebuke me: for why should not my countenance be sad when the
place of my fathers’ sepulchre lieth waste, and the gates are consumed
with fire ?”

“Nay, do not mar our joy bythy gloom. Cheer up, Nehemiah! Come,
tell us which thou thinkest strongest in the world—wine, the king, or
woman ?”

‘‘They are all excellent in strength, my lord: but, O king, there is
something more powerful tian these!” said the Hebrew.

‘And what may that be?” asked the king, smiling to the courtiers,
who all looked forward expecting some amusement at the captive’s
reply.

‘“‘ Truth is stronger,” replied the Hebrew. ‘‘ Earth and Heaven bow
to the power of Truth. In wine, and the king, and woman, is error and
death; but Truth endureth always, and conquereth for evermore. True
is the earth to her seasons, and swift and true the stars in their cowrse.
In the judgment of Truth there is no unrighteousness; but the children
40 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

of men are wicked. Truth is the strength, and kingdom, and power,
and majesty of all ages. Blessed be the God of Truth!”

The Hebrew was silent; a sudden awe fell upon the assembly, and
they exclaimed, as if with one voice, ‘‘ Great is Truth, and mighty above
all things!”

‘Well hast thou spoken, Hebrew,” said the king. ‘I here pro-
nounce thee conqueror in this our argument, and will give thee any boon
thou shalt ask!”

The Hebrew, with a silent ejaculation to his God, knelt before
Artaxerxes. “If it please thee, O king,” he said, ‘ let me be sent to
Judea with power to rebuild our holy temple, and the God of Truth shall

bless thee evermore ?”
“Thy request is granted. Remind me of this to-morrow, and I will

write the fitting orders.”

With many thanks, and a heart filled with gratitude to God, the
Hebrew fell back behind his beneficent master.

“The Hebrew is wise,” said the king; ‘‘ but he has thrown a shade
over our mirth. Come, fill up, my lords; let us drink to woman. I
give you the fairest in Persia, Queen Vashti!”

When they had drank, Prince Memucan observed : ‘* We drink to her
beauty, my lord, upon our faith in your taste; for the lovely queen hath
never blest our eyes.”

‘Tis true,” said the king; ‘but you shall judge for yourselves. I
will force you to acknowledge her pre-eminence. id the lord chamber-
lain appear.”

“Repair to the Women’s Court,” said the king to the lord chamber-
lain, who stood before him, ‘Bid Queen Vashti appear in her royal
robes, with the crown upon her head, that all may behold her beauty and
confess my taste unquestioned.”

The chamberlain bowed, and departed. Passing through the starlit
garden, whose fresh air and sweet odours were grateful after breathing
the heat and fumes of the banquet-hall, he was admitted through a
large gate into a marble court, with its usual adornment of a whispering
fountain and vases of rare flowers. Around this were built the rooms
appropriated to the women of the palace. A large saloon fronted the
gate, from which echoed the silvery laugh and melodious tones of female
voices,

Here Queen Vashti held a feast to the ladies of the court, and the
PILLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 41





Bt yt}
GLE” SZ



By

wives of those princes who sat at the king’s table. The walls of this
apartment were richly painted, or adorned with delicate flower-work,
carved in cedar, and brightly gilded. Gorgeous Babylonian carpets
42 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

were spread upon the marble floor, and the softened light of alabaster
lamps, reflected from silver mirrors, threw a gentle moonlight radiance
over the room and its fair young group.

A circle of ladies surrounded a table upon which was placed all that
could tempt a fastidious palate. Grapes, and wine, and pomegranates,
Arabian dates, and all that was rare and delicious was before them.
Upon a raised seat sat Queen Vashti. Tall and commanding, she looked
the sovereign. Her dress was of golden tissue, while from the royal
tiara, glittering with jewels, fell a rose-coloured veil spotted with gold.

When the chamberlain entered, she started in angry surprise. ‘ What
means this intrusion upon our privacy?” she said, haughtily.

The lord chamberlain, with a lowly obeisance, delivered the king’s
command for her to appear before the princes in the banquet-hall. The
queen gazed upon him a moment in silence, while her brilliant eyes
flashed fire, the colour grew deep upon her cheek, and her bosom was
stirred with deep emotion.

“Do I hear you aright, my lord ?”

“You do, most royal lady. The king expects you.”

“Ts the king mad?” she cried, with a burst of wrath; for her spirit
was out in allits power. ‘What! does he bid me, the queen! descend
from her state, to appear in the midst of a drunken revel ? Doth he bid
a delicate lady come forth from her privacy to submit to the wanton
gaze of his idle, half-inebriated courtiers? Return, my lord; there is
some mistake in this.” And the self-willed lady drew her veil around
her and resumed her seat, panting with all the anger of outraged dignity
and womanly delicacy.

‘Nay, royal Vashti, hear me,” said Harbona. ‘It is the king’s
command, and I dare not return without the queen.”

“How! do ye stand arguing with me thus, as if ye deemed I would
obey this insolent command!” and the diamonds in her tiara flashed not
more vividly than the eyes of the ireful queen, while gazing upon the
trembling cunuchs.

“You will not thus rebel against—”’ began Abagtha, but he was cut
short by the enraged queen rising from her seat, her glittering robes
falling around her.

“Begone, slave!” she cried, stretching her hand majestically towards
him ; ‘“ begone! and tell your king T wil not come!”

With trembling lips the chamberlain bore to the king his queen’s

?
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 43

refusal to appear before him, The wrath of the king was loud and deep.
“She refuses to come!” he exclaimed. ‘Is my royal will disputed ?
and I bearded by a subject in my own palace °”

Soon a decree went forth into all the hundred and twenty provinces
over which Artaxerxes reigned, that Vashti, the queen of Persia, was
repudiated, for refusing to comply with the king’s commands. ‘The fate
of Vashti was thus soon decided; and she was sent from the palace in
disgrace.

How gentle a touch will sometimes set in motion the machinery of
the world! These events, apparently unimportant except to the actors,
were big with the fate of the Jews who were spread over Persia and
Media.

In the suburbs of the city of Susa, by the river’s side, and conecaled
from view by a grove of stunted cypresses, stood a lone hut, formed of
mud which was hardened in the sun, and thatched with date leaves.
Here resided Mordecai, once a man of wealth in Judea, but subsequently
carried captive to Babylon with his king, Jeconia, when the country was
conquered by Nebuchodonosor. Mordecai now gained a scanty sub-
sistence by labouring in the city, and lived in this retired spot in order
to escape notice. When the news of the king’s deerce reached him, his
heart bounded with joy. He now saw a way open ‘or the advancement
of his people, and with many a silent prayer and ejaculation of praise
he sought his home. The hut of Mordecai, wretched as it was in appear-
ance, contained a jewel of inestimable value. Here dwelt a Jewish
maiden of rare beauty, who, upon the death of her father, was left to the
care of her uncle Mordecai. Determined to place his peerless niece upon
the list of virgin candidates, he lost no time in seeking her.

The next day Mordecai sought Hegai, the lord chamberlain, in whose
core the candidates were placed. Concealing his relationship, he told
him ofa jewel ‘‘ worth all her tribe,” of whose abode he was acquainted,
and offered to lead her to him, when he might judge if she were fit to
enter the ranks of the candidate maidens. Hegai appointed a time and
a place for the meeting, and the sanguine Hebrew spent his last beral
in purchasing rich robes to deck his favourite.

The eunuch gazed with delight upon his beauteous charge, and took
her small white hand in his, and led her into the presence of Artaxerxes.
Like the evening star she beamed upon the king, all brilliancy and soft~
ness. ‘he monarch raised her as she knelt before him.
44 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

“Bring hither no more maidens, Hegai,” he said, gazing with eestacy
upon the lovely Esther; ‘‘ this is my queen; earth can give no fairer.”

The important news soon flew over the palace and city. Hsther was
chosen queen, and the royal crown was placed upon her head.

Haman, the brother of Vashti, now aroused all his energy to compass
his plans. Revenge for his sister’s degradation, and an ambitious wish
to advance himself to power, were the mainsprings of his actions. His
first step was to obtain the king’s confidence. This, with extreme cun-
ning, he contrived to do. He was placed above all the nobles of the
court; and the king even sent forth a decree, commanding all, at the
approach of Haman, to bow down and worship him asa god. Exulting
in his suecess, Haman now, with renewed hope, endeavoured to accom-
plish the destruction of Esther, hoping by his influence to induce the
king to place Vashti again upon the throne.

Soon after the decree in his favour, Haman, clad in costly robes of
purple and scarlet, on an Arab courser, whose velvet housings were
embroidered with gold, rode through the city, with a long train of
followers, to satisfy his insatiable pride by the adoration of all whom he
passed. He rode loftily out of the gate, around which was collected a
crowd of slaves and idlers, who bowed themselves to the dust at his
approach, crying, ‘Hail, Haman! son of Mythra!” One alone stood
erect, gazing with a calm brow at the pageant as it passed. Haman was
astonished at his daring, but supposing him some stranger, ignorant of
the king’s command, satisfied his malignity by frowning darkly at the
offender. The next day the same thing occurred. All were prostrate
except the stranger, who stood proudly with folded arms as Hamar
passed. The slaves who stood around and marked the anger of Haman,
expostulated with Mordecai—for he it was—upon his singular conduct.
They urged the king’s decree and the power of Haman, and warmed him
of the danger of offending the haughty favourite. ‘To all this Mordecai
vouchsafed no reply, and, when Haman again rode forth, stood among the
knecling group, like some tall tree erect amid the wreck of forests.
Haman was galled beyond endurance.

“What, slave!” he cried, riding fiercely up to him, ‘know you not
the king’s command ? Down there, and kneel before me!”

“T bow not to mortal, my lord,” said the Hebrew, calmly; “to my
God alone my knee is bent in adoration.’ And, folding his linen robe
around him, he slowly strode away.
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT: WOMEN. 45

Haman’s wrath was great, but his nature was wily; and detecting a
smile among his followers, he smothered his ire and rode on, devising
some sure and cruel punishment to the man who dared to resist his will.
Calling to his side one of his trusty servants, he asked him the name of
the offender.

“It is Mordecai, my lord, a Jew, and we do suspect a relation of the
queen; for messages have gone between them, and Hegai said he brought
Esther to the palace.”

“A Jew, and a relative of the queen!” thought Haman. ‘Esther is
in my power, and the throne is mine! for Haman is not so weak as to
work for another ; no, my fair sister, thou art but my agent, and when
the king is dead, my faithful Macedonians, whom I have secreted in the
city, will place me upon the throne of Persia !”’

Haman asked no more questions, but, bending over his horse, whis-
pered to his slave—

‘Bring me the surety of all you say, and a golden darick shall reward
you.”

A few days after this, Haman rushed eagerly into his sister’s presence.

“Joy, joy, Vashti!” he cried; ‘thy rival is in my power, and thou
shalt see her blood flow at thy feet!”

“Ha! what sayest thou?” exclaimed the queen.

“¢T have discovered her well-kept secret at last. Vashti, Esther is a
Jewess! a despised, captive Hebrew!”

‘‘Then shall I be avenged, Haman! I breathe free once more!” and
shaking back her neglected locks, the face of Vashti beamed with
triumph.

“Yes, she is of that hated, obnoxious race. As yet the king knows it
not, nor shall he, until my plans be arranged.”

“Quick, tell me all!” exclaimed the eager princess.

“Listen. I will work upon the king against the Jews. I will repre-
sent them as a dangerous race, which it is the king’s duty to extermi-
nate. I can guide Artaxerxes as a child, by his own good qualities ; for
the benefit of his country he would sacrifice his dearest friend. A decree
goes forth for the massacre of the Jews,—Mordeeai and Esther share the
fate of their people, and Vashti mounts the throne of Persia!”

“Oh, soul-ravishing news! Now I shall know that peace which fled
my bosom while my rival lived and was beloved!”

‘“‘Vashti,” said Haman, with a withering frown, ‘‘remember thy oath!
If we require the king at thy hands, strike sure!”
46 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

With a wild shrick, the unhappy woman fied into an inner room.

By the wiles of Haman, his revenge was gratified, and the voice of
mourning was heard throughout Persia, when the king’s cruel deeree,
consigning to death all Jews, both young and old, was known. The
despair of Mordecai was great. He rent his clothes, and putting on a
garment of sackcloth, covered his head with ashes, and placed himself
before the king’s gate, uttering loud moans and lamentations.

The queen, meanwhile, was ignorant of all that was to befall her
people, nor knew she of her uncele’s distress, until informed of it by her
maids and chamberlains, who beheld him as he mourned at the gate.
He implored his niece, if she would save her people, to sue to the king
for mercy. The lovely Esther was much distressed at this news, and.
saw not how to obey her uncle’s request; for she knew it was death for
any one to enter the king’s presence uncalled; and thirty days had
passed since she had been sent for. How, then, could she see him to
implore mercy ?

Esther, however, at once resolyed to offer her life as a sacrifice to her
country. She would brave the king’s laws, and perhaps fall a victim to
his anger; but, should she have made an effort to save Judah from
destruction, and, her duty done, she could die in peace.

Three days did the sons of Isracl in Susa fast and pray to God to avert
the calamity, and to soften the heart of Artaxerxes, that the queen might
find favour in his eyes. On the fourth day Mordecai directed his steps
to the palace. It was yet early, and the palace gates were not open.
Weary and faint with three days of fasting and of woe, he threw himself
upon the ground, and, concealed by the pillars of the gate, indulged in
mournful meditation and prayer.

His thoughts were interrupted by the arrival of two persons whom he
recognised as Bigthana and Teresh, two chamberlains of the court. They
seated themselves near to Mordecai, and entered into conversation with-
out perceiving him.

“Of all the villanous deeds of which our employer, Haman, has been
guilty,” said Bigthana, ‘this murder of the Jews and the innocent
queen are the worst.”

“Tet them die!” said Teresh, gloomily ; ‘‘they are Jews, and deserve
death.”

“‘T care not much for the Jews,” replied Bigthana, ‘but it does scem
a pity this gentle creature should be massacred ; however, I am sure the
king will prevent it.”
-

BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 47

“¢ His leave will not be asked,” said Teresh, with a sneer. ‘In the
confusion of the day it s my province to see that she shares the fate of
her people. Haman hopes to excuse himself to the king afterwards, and
even place Vashti upon the throne.”

“But if he should not be pardoned?”

“Then the king des, and the Macedonians will be called in.”

The guards arrived to open the gates, and the dark conspirators passed
through. Their career of guilt had now, however, drawn to a close.
Mordecai, who had overheard all, denounced them to the soldiers as
plotters against the king’s life, and they were speedily loaded with chains,
and cast into a dungeon to await the king’s pleasure. An account of
this event was despatched to Esther by Mordecai, who sent a relation of
it to the king; but he, satisfied the men were in his power, gave no heed
to the particulars of the plot. The day arrived which was to decide the
fate of the captive Jews. Queen Esther, willing to risk her life for the
hope of saving her people, prepared to enter the king’s apartment
uncalled. If he were wroth, her instant death would follow; but if he
felt inclined to grant the boon she came to ask, he would stretch forth
his sceptre in token she might approach and present her petition. The
queen’s gentle spirit shrunk from her enterprise ; but once more resorting
to her closet in prayer, she came forth strong in the Lord, The queen
and her maidens were arrayed in the costliest robes. Radiant with
beauty, and smiling cheerfully, although her heart was heavy, Queen
Esther, followed by a train of lovely maidens, entered the forbidden
courts of the king.

Artaxerxes was sitting upon his ivory throne, glittering with gold and
jewels. He wore the royal robe of Persia, purple, with stripes of silver.
A tiara of the same was surrounded with a diadem of priceless gems,
while his scarlet tunic was one brilliant mass of jewels and gold.

As the king gazed upon Esther, his heart softened, for he loved his
gentle queen.

While each eye was watching him with intense interest, he stretched
out his golden sceptre towards her. Ina mild voice he said, “What
wouldest thou, Queen Esther ?”

Tears of joy were in every eye, and smiles upon every face,,when the
king pronounced these words. The queen reviving, with an effort
advanced, and touched the sceptre—she was safe !

Moyed by her loveliness and her distress, Artaxerxes‘descended from his
48 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

throne, and embracing her, bade her to be comforted, and speak freely
her mind, and he would grant her request, were it half his kingdom.

“Tf it seemeth good to the king, let my lord come to my banquet to-
morrow, and bring with him the lord Haman, where I will demand my
boon, which is of great importance, touching even my life.” The king
promised to be there ; and Queen Esther, with a glad and grateful heart,
withdrew.

Great was the pride of Haman then! He was invited to feast with the
king and queen! he, a stranger and adventurer, had arrived at the high
honour of being the guest of the queen, at her own request—an honour
she had not conferred on any of the princes and nobles of the court.
Inflated with vanity and triumph, Haman was passing from the palace,
to give orders for new and sumptuous attire for the banquet, when, be-
hold! there, in the king’s gate, sat Mordecai, who, when the others
around kissed the dust at his feet, stood erect, unmoved! What a check
to all his greatness!

That night, the king being restless, awoke very early and commanded
the records of the palace to be brought him. There he beheld the ser-
vice rendered him by Mordecai, when he secured the conspirators.

“ Have the traitors been examined ?” he asked.

“No, my lord.”

“Let it then be done instantly, for I see by these papers Mordecai
aceuses some great lord of the court as their employer. Surely I have
been very negligent! Hath the man been rewarded who discovered
the conspiracy ?”

“He hath not yet, O king!”

The door was opened, and Haman entered. His gallows was erected,
and he now came to win from the king permission to hang his enemy
upon it.

“Come hither, Haman,” said Artaxerxes. ‘What shall be done with
he man whom the king delighteth to honour ?”

The proud heart of Haman exulted, for he thought the king intended
to confer some new favour upon him.

‘For the man whom the king delighteth to honour,” said the wily
Haman, ‘let the king’s royal robes be brought, and the horse which the
king rideth upon, and the crown royal. Let this apparel and horse be de-
livered into the hands of the king’s most noble prince, that he may array
with these the man whom the king delighteth to honour, and bring him
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 49

on horseback through the street of the city, and proclaim before
him, ‘Thus shall it be done to the man whom the king delighteth to
honour !’”

Then the king said to Haman,—

‘‘Make haste, and take the robes and the horse, as thou hath said,
and do even thus to Mordecai, the Jew, who sitteth at the king’s gate.”

The heart of Haman stood still when he heard these words. Must he
exalt the enemy whom he came to destroy! Must he show himself to
the world as groom to the despised Jew! He rushed from the king’s
presence almost a maniac. Haman could not resist the king’s mandate.
The humiliating ceremony was enacted, and then, with his head covered
in anguish, he fled to his own house.

The queen’s chamberlain now arrived to escort Haman to the banquet.
Arrayed in his most costly robes, and smoothing his brow, Haman fol-
lowed him into the queen’s presence. Unsuspecting the queen’s know-
ledge of his arts against her nation, he advanced with a confident smile
to the raised seat occupied by his royal master and Queen Esther. That
smile was the last the face of Haman wore.

“ And now that we are assembled at thy request,” said Artaxerxes,
“what is thy petition, Queen Esther? It shall be granted thee, even
were it half my kingdom, for I have sworn it.’

Then Esther, the queen, kneeling before him, said,

“Tf Ihave found favour in thy sight, O king! and if it please my lord,
let my life be given to me at my petition, and that of my people, at my
request. For we are all sold, I and my people, to be destroyed, to be
slain, and to perish !”

“ And who is he,” said the king in his anger, ‘‘ who doth presume in
his heart to devise anything against thy life? I understand thee not.
Who are thy people ?”

How sank the heart of Haman within him!

“Know, then, O king, Iam a Jewess! My adversary is this wicked
Haman, who hateth me and my kin, and hath beguiled thee to give us
all to slaughter.”

Then was the king’s wrath too great for words, for he remembered the
scene in the temple, and saw through the designs of Hamana He cast a
withering glance upon his ungrateful favourite, which caused him to
shrink and writhe with despair.

“Ho! my guards!” cried the king, rushing to the door of the hall.

E
50 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI/S OWN TREASURY.

He was met by soldiers, who brought in chains the two chamberlains,
Bigthana and Teresh, who had conspired against him.

“Here are the men whom thou didst command to be examined,
O king,” said the head officer, They have confessed the wicked Taman
did hire them with rich gifts to practise against thy life and the
queen’s.”’

“Seize the villain!” cried the king, in a voice of thunder. ‘ Bring
him forth, and let him die like a dog!”

‘Behold, my lord, said the officer, ‘‘ there stands without a gallows
fifty cubits high ; if it please thee, we will hang him thereon.”

The wretched Haman had sunk upon his knees before the queen, to
implore her protection, and finding she was turning from him, he grasped.
her hand, and entreated her to hear him,

“Ha, wretch!” cried the king when he entered, ‘‘ wilt thou insult
the queen before our eyes? Away with him to death!”

Haman was dragged forth and hanged upon the gallows which had
been prepared for Mordecai. The Jew was called into the king’s pre-
sence.

*‘Here is my signet ring, Mordecai,” said the king. ‘It was once
Haman’s; itis now thine. Take it, and with it all the wealth, and
power, and rank of Haman. I cannot revoke my decree; but thou shalt
have soldiers and arms to defend thy people against those employed by
the wicked Haman, who, seeing this preparation, will not dare to strike.
Save as many as thou canst. I have promised to Nehemiah the govern-
ment of Judea. See that he hath men and money to rebuild his holy
city, for I would do all I can to recompense my queen and the Jews for
my unjust decree.” Then bounded the hearts of Esther and her uncle
for joy. Kneeling to the good king, they kissed his hands in devout
thankfudaess for his generous conduct, and then lifting their eyes above,
poured out their grateful souls to the Giver of so much good, who had
shown Himself so powerful to save !

THE MORAL.

Esther is another beautiful example of the duty we owe our guar-
dians and aged relatives. She left her quiet home to face the snares and
dangers of a court, not refusing to obey her uncle when he requested. her
to become one of the candidates. Her patriotism, and her trust in God,
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 51

are worthy of great commendation. When in all the state and dignity
of royalty Esther did not forget Mordecai, whom she cherished and
obeyed, as if she were still the lowly Haddassah.

JEHOSHEBA.

Maw calls himself the Lord of Creation; yet, powerless and fragile as
woman may appear, she hath ever borne equal sway with him over the
destinies of the world.

At the period of our story, Judea was divided into two kingdoms,—
Israel and Judah. Each kingdom saw itself under the despotic sway of
awoman. Jezebel reigned in Isracl, and Athaliah, her daughter, in
Judah—both women of lawless passions and haughty spirit, and, withal,
idolatrous worshippers of Baal and Astaroth.

These were only queens dowager—for, Joram, the son of Jezebel, was
sovereign of Samaria; and Athaliah’s son, Ahaziah, governed Jerusalem.
Being much engaged in wars with Edom and Syria, their country was
left to the tender mercies of these fierce: and cruel women, ‘They were
universally detested ; but the people, knowing there was no redress, sub-
mitted in silence. Jezebel’s persecution of the holy prophet Elijah, after
his signal defeat of the prophets of Baal, is well known. ‘So let the
gods do to me, and more also,” said Jezebel to Elijah, by a messenger,
“if I make not thy life as the life of one of the prophets thou hast slain
by to-morrow morning!” Elijah fied into the wilderness, and threw
himself down beneath a juniper-tree, where he prayed to die, rather
than to live under the sway of that cruel woman. Her wicked and un-
just conduct towards Naboth united all classes against her, and acecle-
rated her doom.

Ahab took possession of the land of the murdered Naboth.

God sent Elijah to Ahab and Jezebel, to reproach them for thei
wickedness, and uttered prophecies of their downfail, which were after-
wards fulfilled.

But we are not here narrating the story of Jezebel, but of her equally
wicked daughter, whose son, Ahaziah, king of Judah, had left the army in
command of Jehu, a man of great valour, anda skilful soldier. God’s pur-
poses were not yet fulfilled upon the wicked house of Ahab: by hishumility,
he averted the evil from himself; but the time was come to destroy the
52 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

rebellious race from the land. Elijah was commissioned to anoint Jehu
king of Isracl, in place of Joram. He sent the young prophet, who had
attended him to Damascus, to fulfil the mission.

According to his instructions, the youthful prophet repaired to Ramoth
Gilead. Jehu and the other captains were feasting in the guard-rocm
when the prophet entered. ‘Ihave an errand to thee, O captain!”
he said.

“‘ Unto which of us?” asked Jehu.

“¢ Even unto thee, Jehu, son of Jehoshaphat!”

Jehu arose, and followed the prophet into aninner room. The prophet
opened a horn of perfumed oil, and poured it on his head, saying—“ ‘thus
saith the Lord God of Israel, ‘I have anointed thee king over Isracl.
Thou shalt be my avenger, to smite the house of Ahab. And thou shalt
avenge me of Jezebel, who hath shed the blood of my servants. ‘The
dogs shall eat her in the portion of Jezreel!’” His mission over, the
prophet opened the door, and disappeared.

Jehu was a favourite with the soldiers, and the son of Jezebel was
hated ; so that they joyfully received the news, and determined to pro-
claim him at once. For want of a throne, they covered the stairs, which
ran up outside the house, with their scarlet mantles ; and, placing Jehu
on high, sounded upon their trumpets, and proclaimed Jehu king of
Israel.

The warder upon the watch-tower of Jezreel reported to Joram the
approach of a body of horse and chariots. Joram knew not whom they
were, or if they came in peace or war.

“Let some one go out to meet them, and ask the leader if he come in
peace,” said the king.

The horseman apyroached Jehu, who was standing in his chariot.
‘Thus asks king Joram,” he said, “Is it peace?”

“What hast thou do to with peace?” replied Jehu. ‘Get thee
behind me.”

The messenger did as he was ordered, and joined the train of Jehu.
A second messenger was despatched, who also remained with the ap-
proaching party.

The city now became alarmed, and gathered upon the walls to watch
the troop. Joram sent for the watchman to inquire more particulars.
‘ that of Jchu, the son of Jehoshaphat, for h2 ever driveth furiously.”
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 53



“Tt is Jehu,” said the king ;

3?

“Cand perhaps bearer of news from the
army. Make ready the chariot, and I will ride out to meet him.”
+

’
54 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’$ OWN TREASURY.

Joram and Ahaziah, the kings of Israel and Judah, each in his chariot,
left the city, and met Jehu just by the vineyard of Naboth the Jezreel-
ite. Then sank the heart of Joram within him when he recollected it,
for many prophets had denounced judgments against him and his
house, for the great iniquity of his father and mother. The chariots
stopped.

“Ts it in peace thou comest, Jehu?” asked Joram.

“What peace is there for any,” said Jehu, ‘‘ when the wickednesses
and witchcraft of thee and thy mother, Jezebel, are so many?”

“Treason! Treachery !—O Ahaziah,” cried Joram, and turned to fly ;
but an arrow from Jehu, the avenger, brought him low,—and he sank
down dead in his chariot.

“Throw him upon the field of Naboth,” said Jehu to his captain,
Bidkar. ‘‘ Now have the words of the Lord come to pass, which thou
and I heard when we rode behind Ahab: ‘I haye seen the blood of
Naboth,’ said the prophet; ‘and I will revenge me here, in this very
field,’ saith the Lord.”

When Ahaziah, king of Judah, saw the deed, he fled; but was pursued
by the people of Jehu.

“¢ Smite him also in his chariot,” cried the avenger! And Ahaziah was
soon dead. ‘Bury him,” said Jchu, ‘for he is the son of the good
Jehoshaphat, but deserves death for his mother’s sake, and because he
joined himself with the ungodly Joram.”

Eager for sovereign power, and devoid of natural feeling, Athaliah
resolved, when she heard the death of her son, to seize upon the throne.
The natural heirs, however, stood in her way ; and these, although they
were her own grandchildren, she doomed to death.

Jehosheba, the sister of Ahaziah by another mother, was a woman of
great and good qualities, and tenderly attached to her brother. She wept
sorely for his death, and acted a mother’s part to his young orphans.
She was wife to Jehoiada, the high priest of the temple, and lived with
him within the precincts of the holy house. ‘ Ahaziah hath been some
time dead,” she said one day to her husband, ‘and I have not seen any
preparations towards anointing his son as king in his stead. Canst thou
tell me, Jehoiada, why it is not done ?”

‘Had thine illness not prevented thee from visiting the palace,
Jechosheba, thou wouldest have known,” replied the high priest, in a sad
accent.
or
or

BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN,

‘What! is the young Zezron dead ?” she asked, in alarm.

“Not yet,” said her husband, gloomily. ‘‘ Now that thou art strong
enough to hear the terrible news, know that Athaliah hath seized upon
the sovereign power, and imprisoned the young princes in the palace.”

This was a great shock to the tender heart of the princess. ‘ Alas,
my sweet young nephews!” she said, while tears bedewed her face,
‘“‘they are in the hands of a cruel tigress, Can we not do something,
Jehoiada? Let me go to Athaliah, and surely she will listen to my
prayer, and let them depart to their uncle’s or to my care; for I fear
me she will not yet be satisfied with this cruclty.”

“No, Jehosheba, seek not Athaliah; thy prayers, be well assured,
cannot soften the heart of that accursed woman.”

“She surely will not imprison all those noble young princes for
life.”

“Alas! their lives will not be long, I fear!”

Jehoiada turned from his wife’s tears, and retreated to the temple.
Here he bent in prayer to God that He would look in pity upon Judah,
and avert from it the threatened evil; for Jchoiada had not revealed to
Jehosheba the fact of the intended massacre of the innocent princes,
which had been told him in confidence that morning by the captain of
the royal guard.

That night Jehosheba, unable to sleep, arose and walked in the marble
court before her apartment. There she remained some time, reflecting
upon the situation of her nephews, to whom, particularly the young
Joash, then just a year old, she was very much attached. She could not
rest easy without doing something for them; and was busily resolving
plans for their benefit, when she was aroused by the sound of trampling
horses and the rattle of armour. She ascended the wall, and beheld a
troop of soldiers enter the palace-gates. Soldiers at midnight! Her
heart sank, and she fell back against the parapet in a cold tremour. ,

What could it mean! Some deadly event was in progress, and her
thoughts turned with affright towards the royal children. But Athaliah
could not be so cruel—so wicked! A sudden shrick as from a death-
stroke awoke the silence of night. Jechosheba started as if her own
heart had been pierced. She turned toward the palace, where a miser-
able scene met her view. From the balconies and terraces of the women’s
apartments were children and females rushing apparently in the wildest
aftright. Some soldiers ran in pursuit of them, whom the wretched
56 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

princess recognised as the queen’s own band, who were notorious for per-
forming every bloody deed which the queen might dictate.

The cries of children and women almost aroused the princess to mad -
ness ; for she doubted not the cruel Athaliah had given over the young
princes to slaughter. Could she stand there and look on without helping
them? But what availed her feeble arm against those ruthless men ?
Jehosheba rushed from the wall, and had nearly regained her apart-
ment, when another loud wail arrested her steps, and she determined, at
whatever risk, to seck the palace, and endeavour to save one of her
nephews. There was a private way, built by Solomon, which led to the
palace ; and over this Jehosheba wildly rushed, resolving to die with, or
save her nephews. She sought the women’s apartments, and found the
court filled with soldiers.

“You cannot pass in, lady,” said one.

“ Away! Iam the Princess Jehosheba!”

At the majestic wave of her hand the soldiers gave way.
sight met her eye on entering the rooms. Dead and dying children, and
nurses who had faithfully defended them, were lying around. Bloody
and brutal soldiers opposed her path, but Jehosheba struggled through ;
for she had thought of the infant Joash, and sought to conceal him, at
least. The deadly deed would have been over ere this, but there were a
few devoted servants of the house of David who resisted the soldiers’
bloody purpose. All were killed, except those in the last apartment. At
the door stood two faithful eunuchs, disputing the soldiers’ entrance.
Jehosheba endeavoured to foree her way through.

‘‘Forbear, princess,” cried one of the eunuchs, ‘the fiends will kill
you also.”

Jehosheba was not to be daunted. She pushed aside their swords, and
entered the apartment. She gazed wildly around; there were several
children and young persons there of the royal blood, all weeping, and
clinging to their attendants in the greatest terror.

Cowering in a corner sat a nurse, pressing in her arms an infant. It
was the young Joash, now the only living child of Ahaziah. Jeshosheba
seized the infant, and, concealing it under the wrapper she wore,
beckoned the nurse to follow, and rapidly left the room. The faithful
eunuchs were dead ; and the soldiers, busy with their prey, cared not to
stop her, for they were not ordered to murder any except the royal chil-
dren. Struggling through blood and ribald soldiers, and severely
BIBLE STORTES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 57

wounded, the heroic Jehosheba at last saw herself in the temple-
court.

Jchoiada was awakened from his slumber by sobs of anguish. He
arose hastily, and beheld his beloved Jehosheba covered with blood,
lying senscless upon the floor, while a strange nurse and infant were
weeping over her

Six years was Joash concealed in the temple ; the secret of his escape
from the massacre being only known to his aunt, uncle, and nurse. In the
temple there was more security than in any place in Jerusalem, for it was
then only frequented by a few faithful Jews, the remainder of the people
repairing to the idol fanes which Athaliah had reared in many places.
The glory had departed from the house of God ; its gold was stripped off
—its walls broken down, and the golden utensils decorated the altars of
Baal. At the end of these six years, Jehosheba thought the favourite
moment had arrived to restore Joash to the throne of his fathers. Atha-
liah, by her rapacity, her cruelty and unlicensed passions, was univer-
sally detested, and the people began to sigh for release from her tyranny.
The measure of her iniquities was full, and God had commanded her
downfall. Jehoiada, as a preliminary step, called to his council some
of the Levites whom he could trust, and some oflicers who he knew were
disaffected towards Athaliah. After swearing them to secresy in the
temple, he revealed to them the fact of the existence of one of the royal
princes. They were all rejoiced at the news, and vowed to serve him, and
place him upon the throne. These were commissioned to go to the several
towns and cities of Judah, and collect all the Levites who had been
dispersed, and send them to the temple. All the nobles of Judah who
had fled from Athaliah’s tyranny were also to be informed of the con-
spiracy. All was ready. The day arrived, and the people, summoned
by the high priest on pretence of an unusual fast, crowded the courts
before the temple. Each one who was in the secret was instructed in his
part. They were divided in three bands—one was placed at the court
gate, and one at the outer gate, while the third encircled the young
prince. The courts were filled with people, who awaited in silence the
commencement of the religious ceremonies of the day. Jehoiada, the high
priest, entered the upper court from a side cloister, leading by the hand
a young boy of seven years, and followed by the princess Jehosheba and
his nurse. The high priest advanced to the head of the steps leading to
the lower court, that all might behold him.
68 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

“Ye men of Judah!” he said, ‘‘ ye have heard how our God hath sworn
He will establish the throne of David for ever, and hath said David shall
never want an heir to his throne; then why suffer ye the daughter of
Jezebel, the seed of Sidon, on the throne of our glorious king?” A mur-
mur of astonishment interrupted Jehoiada. ‘Men of Jerusalem, I have
called ye here this day to know if ye will serve Baal or Jehovah.”

‘¢-We will worship the Lord our God!” cried several voices.

‘And I have called ye here to know,” continued Jehoiada, “if ye will
serve the daughter of Jezebel or a son of David ?”

“ Down with Athaliah!” exclaimed a few who were in the secret.

“Behold, then, this youth. Itis Joash, your lawful prince, the son
of Ahaziah ; saved from the massacre by the heroism of his aunt, the
princess Jehosheba, who is here to corroborate the tale.”

Loud acclamations of joy, which seemed to come from the hearts of all,
resounded from the throng. The high priest then placed the prince
against the marble column, the usual stand of the king when in the
temple ; and after anointing him with the holy perfumed oil, placed the
diadem of David upon his head. Then the silver trumpets sounded, and
the sweet singers of Israel burst into hymns of praise, and the joyous
multitude shouted, ‘‘God save the king !””

Athaliah, like all tyrants, was of a very suspicious nature. Her spies
had informed her of the unusual concourse in the temple, and she had
been uneasy the whole morning. Aroused by the shouts and clangor of
trumpets, she repaired to the temple through the king’s passage ; and
when there, a blasting sight met her view. Placed in the centre of that
spacious court was a crowned king, around whom stood a circle of armed
guards ; while the people were crowding to do homage to the son of David.
The striking resemblance of the noble child to her son, Ahaziah, the
presence of Jehosheba and his nurse, whom she recollected, revealed to
her the truth—the boy had been secretly reared, and the people had con-
spired to place him upon her throne. The most demoniac passion took pos-
session of her. She stamped and tore her robes—‘ Rebellious wretches!”
she cried ; ‘ tortures shall follow this! Ho! my guards! treason!”

“Take that accursed woman hence!” said the high priest, ‘(and slay
her without the temple.”

Athaliah was slain, and Joash reigned in her stead.

THE MORAL,
May we all imitate the heroism of Jchosheba when called upon to
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 59

undertake any difficult or dangerous achievement. She turned from the
gaieties of a court to live in a retired and humble manner within the
temple, where she practised a faith then despised by all. At the ery of
innocence she rushed to the rescue, heedless of the assassin’s sword or the
queen’s displeasure. This her generous devotedness was of the greatest
benefit to her country, for in her nephew’s reign the idols were over-
thrown, and the true worship prevailed. Let us not think of our own
peril when we may succour the poor or the oppressed.

JUDITH.

Amonc the great and glorious cities of the East, Ecbatana stood con-
spicuous for strength and beauty. In her extent and power, and the
multitude of her palaces, she could not compete with Nineveh or Babylon ;
but there was a grace in her architecture and beauty in her situation, as
she reclined at the foot of a lofty mountain range, her white buildings
showing brightly against the green back-ground, which won from every
traveller expressions of admiration as he gazed. She was the pride of
Media; and Arphaxad, the king, had newly fortified it to withstand
a siege which was designed against.it by Nebuchodonosor, king of the
Assyrians, from whom he had rebelled, and who was advancing with
great force against them.

Vain were the precautions of Arphaxad. ‘Howl, oh gate; ery, oh
city!” Thy beauty and thy strength could not save thee! One after
another fell her seven walls, and her towers, and Ecbatana was laid low
in the dust. Arphaxad fled to the mountains, but was pursued by the
Assyrian—his darts pierced through the unfortunate king, and he died
with his last look fixed in anguish upon his ruined Ecbatana, which lay
smoking before him ; while his horsemen, his chariots, and his wealth fell
into the hands of Nebuchodonosor.

The victor returned in triumph to Nineveh, where he feasted his army
for twenty days. The feasting over, he prepared his war-chariots once
more, breathing. slaughter against those nations who had refused to assist
him in his siege of Kcbatana. One of the doomed peoples was the
Hebrews.

The approach of this great army, headed by the famous general Holo-
60 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

fornes, brought dismay to the hearts of Isracl and Judah; still the idea
of submission was not for an instant harboured by this resolute people.
They were strong in the consciousness of right, when they refused to
assist in the downfall of Media; and resolved, whatever might betide,
never to bow down to the gods of Assyria. Hoping their powerful King,
Jehovah, would appear in their fayour, they humbled themselves before
Him, and ‘cried to God with great fervency.” The inhabitants of
Jerusalem were clothed with sackcloth, and, with ashes on their heads,
remained night and day before the temple, fasting, and offering gifts to
the Lord, that He might show Himself as the ‘shield of triumph.”

Still no earthly means were neglected to repel the invading army.
They were expected to come through the hills of Galilee, and upon the
strongholds, situated among them, they depended for protection.

All the passes were fortified and victualled for a year, and it was in
these passes that Holofornes first found himself checked in his glorious
career.

A noble widow dwelt here in Bethulia: her husband, Manasses, was a
man of wealth and rank, but while overseeing his men in the barley-
harvest, was struck by the sun and died. Judith, his widow, never ceased
to mourn for her husband, to whom she was tenderly attached, and still
wore widow’s apparel, and fasted and dressed in sackcloth except on the
feasts of new moon, and other festivals of Israel. By the strength and
elevation cf her character, she comforted her town’s-people, and infused
into their hearts some of her own courageous spirit in this dire ex-
tremity.

Sadly did they gaze upon their cisterns and founts in the city, as day
by day the waters diminished, and provisions failed ; and they knew they
must die a dreary death, or be given to the enemy who were raging for
them below. At last the water failed, and the citizens fell fainting in
the streets, and many died each day. Then the people, rendered weak
by suficring, called upon their rulers to surrender to the Assyrians, this
being now the only hope for their lives, They assembled in a tumultuous
manner before the house of Ozias, the governor of Bethulia, erying, ‘God
be judge between us and you. You do us a great injury that you do
not require peace of the children of Assur. We have no helper. God
hath sold us into the hands of Holofornes. Send for him, then, and give
him the city as a spoil, and we will be his slaves, for this is better than
to die of thirst, and see our wives and children die!”
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. G1



Weeping and groaning were heard on all sides, and they “ eried to God
with a loud voice,” saying, ‘We take to witness against you, heaven
and earth, and God, the Lord of our fathers, if ye do not surrender
quickly.”
62 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

“ Brethren, be of good courage,” said Ozias. ‘ God will not forsake
us utterly. Let us endure five days, and in that time God may look in
mercy towards us. If at the end of these days there come no help for
us, I will do as it may seem good to you.”

The citizens were pacified with this promise, and departed each to his
own dreary dwelling, there to struggle for life five days ere they be given
up to slavery, or perhaps death. In silence they awaited their doom—
hope for assistance from on high nearly deserted them, and sighs alone
disturbed the mournful silence of the so lately animated city. After the
dispersion of the people, Ozias received a request from the noble widow,
Judith, praying his presence at her house, accompanied by Charmis and
Chabris, when she would show him a way to save the city. They imme-
diately repaired thither.

‘Hear me now, ye governors of Bethulia!” said Judith, when they
were seated. ‘‘ The words which ye have spoken to the people this day
are not right, saying ye will deliver the city to the enemy, unless God
help us within five days. Who are ye, that thus promise the help of
God, and tempt Him thus? Ye know ye cannot find the depth of the
heart of man; how, then, can ye pretend to know the mind of God, who
hath made all things—or how comprehend His purposes? God is not
a man, that he may be forced or threatened from His purpose, and if He
do not save us within five days, He may after that. Let us call upon
Him to help us, and He will, if it please Him, for we worship no other
God but Him, and He will not despise us, nor let Judea be wasted.
Hear me, and I will do a thing which few women would do, but which
is now the only way to save the nation. Accompany me this night
to the city gate, and let me and my waiting-woman pass forth ; and,
within the days which ye have promised to deliver the city to the
Assyrians, the Lord will save Israel by my hand! Inquire not ye of mine
act, for I will not declare it unto you till the things I propose shall be
finished.”

“Go in peace,” said the governors, ‘‘ and the Lord God before thee, to
take vengeance on our enemies !”

She then arose, and having anointed herself, she plaited her ‘hair,
adorned it with jewels, and arrayed herself in one of her rich dresses
which she had not worn since the death of her’ husband, Manasses ;—her
feet were decorated with sandals of scarlet and gold, while bracelets,
chains, and rings ornamented the rest of her person. She was a woman
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 63

renowned for beauty, and now that her majestie person was attired in
costly and graceful raiment, she well might hope to attract the notice of
the Assyrian general.

Having laden her maid with a bottle of wine, a cruse of oil, a bag of
parched corn, and bread, and lumps of figs, she sct out from the city
gate, and ere long was challenged by the enemy’s sentinel.

‘*Who art thou? Whence comest thou? and Whither goest thou?”
he said.

“Tam a Hebrew woman,” replied Judith. ‘I have fied from the
city to the Assyrian camp, to go before Holofornes, the captain of your
army, and show him a way to take the city, and pass through the hill
country without the loss of a man.”

The man gazed upon her in astonishment, so beautiful and magni-
ficently dressed, and alone. ‘‘ Thou doest well to save thy life by fleeing
to Holofornes,” he said. ‘‘Follow me, and I will conduct thee to his
tent; and when thou standest before him, be not afraid, but say all thou
wilt and he will entveat thee well.”

It was now quite dark, and Holofornes came from the tent, his servants
bearing silver lamps before him. The general lifted her from the
chariot, and led her into the tent. In the centre stood a couch, above
which was a rich canopy of cloth woven with purple and gold, and
emeralds and precious stones. Holofornes seated himself, and motioned
Judith to take a place beside him ; but she threw herself upon the ground
before him, imploring his mercy and protection. The Assyrian com~
manded his servants to raise her, saying, ‘‘ Woman, be of good comfort ;
fear not in thy heart, for I never hurt anything which is willing to
serve King Nebuchodonosor, the king of all the earth. If thy people
that dwelicth in the mountains had not set light by me, I would not
have lifted up my spear against them. But now, tell me, why thou art
fled from them and come to us? Here thou art safe, for none shall do
thee hurt, but entreat thee well, as they do the servants of our king,
Nebuchodonosor.”

‘Remember the words of thy servant,” said Judith, ‘and suffer thy
handmaid to speak in thy presence. If thou wilt follow the words of
thine handmaid, God, through thee, will bring wonderful things to pass.
We have heard of the wisdom and policy of Holofornes ; and it is every
where reported that thou art the most powerful and excellent man in all
Assyria, and mighty in knowledge, and wonderful in feats of war. Thy
6 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

servant is religious, my Lord, and serveth God night and day, and He
will reveal to me the moment when the people eat forbidden things, and
consume the first-fruits of the corn, and tenths of wine and oil, which
have been sanctitied and reserved for the priests who serve the Lord in
Jerusalem—things not lawful for our people to touch with their hands.
Now, then, my lord, be guided by me. Permit thy handmaid to go out
in the plain each night to pray, and God will tell me when they have
done this sin, and I will tell thee; then shalt thou go forth with thine
army, and thou shalt have an casy victory.”

Holofornes was astonished at all he heard. He thanked Judith for her
offered services, and declared himself ready to act as she might dictate,
while the officers and nobles who stood around, declared, ‘‘ There was
not such a woman on the whole face of the earth for beauty or wisdom.”

At the evening feast, Holofornes called Judith to a seat near him.

At her request, he gave orders to the guard to permit Judith to go out
and in to her prayers without the camp, that she might unmolested
watch for the propitious moment to attack Bethulia. Judith then retired
to a tent prepared for her, where she reposed until midnight; when she
arose, and followed by her maid, went out in the valley to pray, she
revolved the great project for which she had come,

On the fourth day, Holofornes made a great feast. Calling Bagoas, his
confidential servant, to him, he said, ‘Go, now, and persuade this
Hebrew woman whom I have placed in thy charge to come unto my
feast and drink with me. It is a shame to have this splendid woman
here and not share more of her company; truly, she will laugh us
to scorn.”

Bagoas sought Judith. ‘Fair damsel,” he said, ‘art thou afraid of
my lord that thou comest not into his presence ? Come and drink wine,
and be merry with us, and be made this day as one of the daughters of
Assyria, which serve in the house of Nebuchodonosor.”

Radiant in beauty, and in rich attire, Judith entered the banquet
tent, and seated herself on a couch spread with soft furs which her maid
had prepared for her, opposite to Holofornes. The Assyrian gazed in
rapture, and resolved to leave nothing undone to gain this beauteous
Hebrew to himself.

“Drink and be merry with us, Judith,” he said. ‘Be not afraid of
me, for my heart is filled with love for thee. Thou art the fairest of
women, O Judith.”
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 65

“T will drink, now, my lord,” said Judith, ‘“becauso my life is
magnified in me this day more than all the days since I was born.”

Judith so excited the Assyrian by her beauty and wit, that he drank
more than he had ever been accustomed, and Judith foresaw he would be
in a state fitting for her purpose. When the feast was over, and the
guests departed, Bagoas dismissed the servants, while he closed the tent,
and left Judith alone with Holofornes.

The Assyrian, insensible to the presence of his charming guest, had
thrown himself on his couch, where he now lay in a drunken slumber.
She listened—all was silent, and she approached the couch. The
terrible enemy, her country’s destroyer, was before her; one blow of
her hand, and Israel would be free !

“Shall I slay the sleeping?’ murmured Judith, “thou who wast so
kind to me—whose words of love but now have met mine ear? Yea,
bloodhound! thou that wouldst slay my brethren—that wouldst demolish
our holy temple! thy hour is come! If that form be erect to-morrow—
if that arm be stretched out, Isracl is lost! O, Lord God of all power!
look down upon me now, and bless the work of my hand, for the
exaltation of Jerusalem!”

At the head of the couch hung a falchion. Judith, taking the weapon
in one hand, and the hair of her drunken foe in the other, and exclaim-
ing, ‘¢O, Lord of Israel, strengthen me this day!’ smote off the Assy-
vian’s head. At her signal her maid entered, who, tearing down the
jewelled canopy, wrapped the head in it, and placed it in her bag. Fol-
lowing her mistress, they left the camp unmolested, as if for their usual
prayer, and hastened up to the gate of Bethulia.

“Open! open now the gate!” eried the successful Judith to the guard.
“God, even our God, is with us, to show His power yet in Jerusalem,
and for the downfall of Assyria!” The watchman ran down joyfully to
admit her, and brought her to an open space near the gate, where stood
the governors and a large concourse of people around a large watch-fire,
who had thus been waiting and watching for her since the evening of
her departure. ‘ Praise! praise God!” cried Judith, advancing towards
them. ‘‘ Praise God, for He hath not taken away His mercy from the
house of Israel, but hath destroyed our enemies by my hand this night!
Behold the head of Holofornes! As the Lord liveth, who kept me in
my way as I went, my countenance hath deceived him to his destruction,
and yet the Spirit of God hath preserved me from sin. ”
66 TIE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The people were astonished ; they gazed on the heroic woman in silence,
and then, as if by one impulse, bowed themselves and worshipped God.

“‘Hear me now, my brethren,” said Judith; “take this head and
hang it upon the highest place of your walls; and in the morning send
out all the soldiers from the city, as if to make a sally upon the Assyrians
—but go not down. Then shall they assemble themselves and put on
their armour, and go to the tent of Holofornes to awaken him; and lo,
when they find him so mysteriously dead, fear will fall upon them, and
they shall fly. Then pursue them, ye Israelites, and they shall be a spoil
to your arms.”

Judith related minutely all she had done since leaving the city. The
people listened attentively, and when she finished they shouted aloud for
joy, and accompanied her with all honour and reverence to her home.

When the morning broke, the head of Holofornes was hung out upon
the wall, and the Israclites assembled without the gates. As soon as
they were perceived the Assyrian guard ran to awaken their captains.

‘Awaken our lord, Holofornes,” they said to Bagoas; ‘ for the slaves
have the boldness to threaten battle. Let us go up and destroy them.”

Bagoas knocked at the tent, but receiving no answer, ventured to enter,
when the headless body of their general met his astounded view. Crying
with horror, and rending his garments, he ran to the tent of Judith, and
her absence confirmed all his suspicions.

‘* Treason, treason !”’ he cried, rushing out among the soldiers; ‘the
slaves have dealt treacherously, and this Hebrew woman hath brought
shame upon the house of Nebuchodonosor. Holofornes is slain!”

‘‘ Holofornes is slain!” re-echoed through the camp, and the soldiers
trembled at the sound. The people rushed madly about. Confusion
prevailed ; and, in spite of all the efforts of their officers, the panic spread
from rank to rank, and the army fled, half of them knowing not all that
had happened, but only hearing that the avenging God of the Hebrews
was pursuing them.

The inhabitants of Bethulia rushed out after the fugitives, and sending
messengers to the towns around, the people ran out, and soon the mise-
rable Assyrians were assailed on all sides by the people of the hill-country
of Galilee, and of the sea-coasts. Thousands were slaughtered, and
Israel was free !

_ Great was the joy of the inhabitants of Jerusalem at their deliverance,
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 67

and the name of Judith of Bethulia was in every one’s mouth, with terms
of wonder and praise.

Accompanied by a long train of the priesthood, and the great and good
of Jerusalem, Joacim, the high priest, arrived before the gate of
Bethulia, to do honour to Judith, who came forth to meet him, and
knelt before him.

‘ Arise, my daughter,” said the high priest. ‘* Thou art the exalta-
tion of Jerusalem! thou art the great glory of Isracl! thou art the joy
and rejoicing of our nation! Thou hast done much good in Israel with
thy hand; and God is pleased therewith. Blessed be thou of the Al-
mighty Lord for evermore!’ And all the people cried, “« Amen!”

The people in grand procession ascended to the city, and up the marble
steps of the temple, and through its magnificent courts into the glorious
space which surrounds the temple itself. Here were offered their sacri-
fices and burnt-offerings, and free-offerings. Judith felt a glow of grati-
tude to God as she gazed around her upon the sculptured marble, the
altar of brass, and the brazen laver, and marble tables, and other rich
furniture of the court, and as she beheld the graceful temple, whose
richly-embroidered curtain was raised, giving her a view of golden fur-
niture, and scarlet and purple within ; for she remembered that her feeble
arm, made strong by God, had saved all these sacred things from the
hand of the enemy. The high priest was there in his splendid robes of
blue and purple, and scarlet embroidery, adorned with jewels, and bor-
dered with golden bells and scarlet pomegranates; while around him
stood the sons of Levi, in their blue-fringed robes of white lien—alto-
gether a glorious and most wonderful array.

THE MORAL,

In judging the conduct of Judith, we must keep in mind the different
manners which prevailed in those days. We cannot but wonder and
admire when we reflect upon all she hazarded for her country. She
endangered more than life, for if discovered, she ran the risk of death,*or
of living in degradation and sorrow. She perilled her fair fame ; which,
to a woman, was worth more than existence. The task which she under-
took was odious, yet she shrank not from it, for she knew if the conqueror
lived, her country was lost.

We may not be called to such a trial, but in whatever strait, when
self is the sacrifice, let us pray for strength to look to the good of others
before our own.
68 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

DEBORAH,

Nieut with her lustrous stars, her silence and repose, had passed away,
and soft-eyed dawn, heralded by gentle zephyrs, and breathing out per-
fume, arose from Asia’s mists like the poet’s Venus from the sea, all
smiles and gladness, Each flower threw out its fairy petals, and wafted
forth its fragrant incense to the day. Almond and citron blossoms,
brilliant pomegranate and oleander, tossed the dew from their delicate
heads, and shook their fragile branches in the morning breeze. The
birds were on every bough singing their rejoicings to the coming day:
for as yet the sun had not appeared, but clouds of rose and purple told of
his near approach, and threwa softened radiance over plain, and hill, and
valley. A clear and gentle river—Kishon, ‘that ancient river, the
river Kishon,” wound through the verdant plain. By its side arose a
sloping hill, whose summit was crowned by a grove of oaks and elms,
among whose shadows a lordly temple was just made visible as the sun’s
first rays fell on the hill-top, while all below still lay in shade. The
rising light revealed its snowy porticoes and lofty arches, and graceful
columns of rare proportion; then passing down the hill shone on a pro-
cession of solemn worshippers who were winding along the river’s bank,
and ascending to the temple above. Conspicuous among the throng were
the sacred oxen, who, gaily decorated with ribbons, and wreathed with
roses, were led by young boys clad in white robes and crowned with
garlands. Behind them came a train of women dancing and singing to
instruments of music; while preceding and around the victims were
several hundred priests, whose black robes threw the only shadow over a
landscape now brightly illumined by the broadly risen sun, The pro-
cession ascended the hill; the temple doors were thrown open ; the priests
entered, and advanced to the altar. There, upon two pedestals, stood the
gods they came to worship. ‘The one, a man cast in brass, having
an ox’s head—the other of marble, and in human shape, clothed in a coat
of golden mail, wearing a crown and wielding a sword; the former was
Moloch, and the latter Baal. ‘To these gods of metal and stone the priests
and people had come to ask for protection from a powerful enemy, who
in predatory bands made inroads upon them, and carried away flocks, |
and people, and goods.

Reader, canst thou say in what land arose this temple, these images of
marble, and these idol worshippers? Canst thou believe it was in Israel ?
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 69







































































































































































In the promised land? Alas, it was the dear-bought land of Canaan,
and these deluded idolaters were the sons of Judah, once God’s own
peculiar people !
‘

70 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

The last of the priests had but just entered the temple when, bursting
through their ranks and uttering shrieks of terror, a woman, one of the
dancers, threw herself before the statues; it was Jael, the wife of Heber
the Kenite—the roses which had wreathed her lank locks had fallen on
her shoulder, and the white fillets were waving in disorder over her
sallow shrivelled cheeks in bright contrast to their tawny hue. “0,
Baal, save us!” she cried in distraction. ‘‘ Now save us, for the enemy
is upon us!”
came pressing confusedly into the temple. ‘The Canaanites are upon
us!” they cried—‘‘ O, Moloch, shield us!”

Eager to save themselves from the invaders, the priests hastily closed
the iron-studded doors of the temple, heedless of the many shricking
women whom they thus cruelly shut out. Their hopes of admission
vain, the worshippers fled to the groves or down the hill, followed by the
affrighted oxen and their youthful leaders.

Jael arose from the ground, and endeavoured to pass out of the door.
“O my child!” she cried: ‘‘ my Zillah is without: O let me go forth
and shicld her, or die with her!”

The priests however were bent upon saving themselves from harm, and
the wailings and passionate entreaties of the miserable mother were un-
heeded by hearts as hard as the marble gods they worshipped.

At last the shouts of the enemy and cries of their victims were hushed,
and the noise of trampling steeds receded. The temple doors were slowly
opened, and, their safety being ascertained, the priests of Baal came forth.
There was nothing to be seen near them, but afar off they deseried a
band of horsemen riding rapidly away, each bearing a captive upon his
horse, while behind them the sacred oxen were goaded onward by a
powerful escort. As the last of the horsemen turned the wood which hid
them from sight, it was perceived he bore away upon his horse a young
girl, who, with arms uplifted, was loudly calling for aid. In her strug-
gles a scarlet girdle fell to the ground ; Jacl swiftly ran down the hill,
and hurriedly examined it.

“They have taken my daughter!” she cried, with a burst of wee.
“0, Zillah, that I could have died to save thee !”?

Prostrate on the ground, the miserable woman threw dust upon her
head, invoking curses upon the Canaaunites, and vowing deep vengcance
for this cruel wrong.
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 71

During these troubles the judge of Israel died, and Deborah became a
‘¢mother in Israel.” Deborah, the widow of Lapidoth, was a woman of
a strong and masculine mind ; more capable of ruling the affairs of the
nation than many of her countrymen. Of this they were well aware ;
and came to her for counsel in any emergency. The piety of Deborah
was great, and her God had bestowed upon her the gift of prcphecy ;
thus using her as a means of keeping the faith in Israel, and drawing
her country-people from the dreadful crime of idolatry, inte which they
had fallen. The grief of Deborah at their delinquency was great ; as
she foresaw the certain punishment their guilt would bring upon them.
The present distress with which the country was afflicted had been
threatened them by their prophetess ; but she was unheeded except by a
few, who still worshipped at the tabernacle which was stationed at
Shiloh,

Jabin, king of the Canaanites, was harassing Isracl sorely, by maraud-
ing parties led by his general Sisera. During the confusion which pre-
yailed, every one came for counsel to Deborah; and in course of time
she was elected judge of Isracl. Her dwelling, which was near to
Shiloh, was a long, low, stone building, arranged in a square, around a
court paved with marble.
the rooms, the pillars of which supported a baleony through which access
was obtained to the upper chambers. From the centre of this court
arose a lofty palm-tree ; its smooth stalk bore no branches—but from the
summit, circles of enormous leaves, some eight feet long, spread out like
a vast canopy, throwing a cooling shade over court and balconies. Be-
neath this tree was the favourite seat of Deborah, the Prophetess and
Judge of Israel. Here she commanded a view of all her premises, and here
her people obtained ready access to her through a wide gateway opposite.

One morning, Deborah resorted to her favourite palm-tree, and placed
herself upon her usual seat, which was a long divan of costly structure,
having cushions covered with embroidered silk. Her dress was a dark
coloured stuff of Damascus, having a deep border of gold embroidery,
confined with a girdle wrought with scarlet and jewels; a bandeau was
around her head, from which projected a short horn of gold, supporting a
veil of thin muslin of India, which fell to her feet. She was surrounded
by many of her people, who had come to her for judgment. A voice of
wailing was heard outside the gate, when, followed by a large concourse
72 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

of people, Jacl, the wife of Heber the Kenite, entered the court. She
wore a sackcloth dress woven of black goats-hair, confined by a rope
girdle, while her dark locks were thickly strewn with ashes.

“©O help me, noble lady ;” she eried; ‘‘ help me, great Deborah! for I
am stricken unto death!’ With a deep groan she sank on the ground
before the feet of the prophetess.

“What moves thee thus, Jael?” asked Deborah, raising her. ‘‘ Why
art thou thus mourning in sackcloth ”

““My daughter, my sweet child Zillah, hath been carried away by the
enemy !” she exclaimed weeping. Others, joining their cries to hers, be-
wailed the loss of relatives, or cattle, and entreated Deborah for help
against the invaders. Deborah listened while the outrage at the temple,
just related, was described.

“And is it to me, a worshipper of Jehovah, that the children of Baal
come for succour ?” she said, with indignation. ‘ Away! Go to your
gods for aid. I will not raise a hand to save you!

“Do you not know, have ye not heard, that God has sworn He will
punish you if ye forsake Him? Have ye forgotten the words of holy
Joshua, who said,—‘ If ye forsake the Lord and serve strange gods, then
will He turn and do you hurt, and consume you ?’”

While Deborah addressed her people, the mists of error departed from
before their eyes. ,

“We are guilty before the Lord!” they cried in terror. ‘ We will
indeed serve the Lord our God, and His voice alone we will obey !”

“Away then!” eried Deborah. ‘ Prove your sincerity! Cut down
your groves,—throw down your images,—that the anger of the Lord be
no more hurled against you. If ye truly obey Him, I will pray Him to
raise up an army, and destroy your enemies from off’ the land.”

The words of Deborah, whom they all reverenced as a prophetess, so
excited the people, that they ran hither and thither, stopping not, until
all their temples were demolished, groves hewn down, and idols de-
stroyed ; the gods they worshipped in the morning were broken to frag-
ments and reviled in the evening. Deborah, like a wise governor, was
determined to take advantage of the newly-awakened zeal of her people.
She sent for Barak, the son of Abinoam, a valiant and faithful soldier,
who had always distinguished himself in fight. He'came at her bidding,
and found her on her usual seat at the foot of the palm-tree.

“The people have turned from the error of their way, have left their
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN, 73

gods, and will worship Jehovah,” said the prophetess. © ‘* The Lord hath
revealed to me He will accept them, and will chastise those that have
atllicted His chosen people. He commands thee to assemble an army, and
attack Jabin the Canaanite.”

Barak looked irresolute, and said—‘‘ The enemy hath not left a shield
or spear among us: and he hath nine hundred chariots of iron !”

“ What, Barak! knowest thou not we have the Lord on our side ?
What are spears and chariots to Jehovah? Thou art as the spies who
feared the Amalekites. ‘We are not able to go up against this people ;
for they are stronger than we!’ they said; and what replied Joshua—
‘ Fear ye not the people of this land; their defence hath departed from
them, and the Lord is with us; fear them not!’ hus also saith
Deborah—fear them not. Assemble ten thousand men of the children of
Zebulon and Naphtali, and the Lord will deliver Jabin’s host into thy
hand. Ascend to the fort upon Mount Tabor, and I, Deborah, to whom
the Lord hath given dominion over the mighty, will draw to the river
Kishon, Sisera, the Captain of Jabin’s army, with his chariots and mul-
titude ; and there will I deliver him into thy hands.”

Barak still doubted. ‘The people have been so terrified and sub-
dued by the Canaanites, that they will not assemble at my call. If thou
wilt go with me, then i will go, for the people will believe the Lord hath
sent thee; but if thou wilt not go, then will not 1.”

“Twill go with thee, O faint of heart!” said the heroic Deborah ;
“ but know, for this thy want of trust in God He will take the victory
from thee, and give it toanother. The Lord hath revealed to me He will
sell Sisera into the hand of a woman.”

Deborah arose immediately, to prepare for her journey. Sandals of
leather embroidered with scarlet and jewels were laced upon her feet ; a
turban guarded her head from the sun; anda large mantle was folded
around her. At the gate her favourite animal awaited her ; a white ass,
one of those which, on account of his hue, was reserved for princes and
nobles alone. ‘Ihis gentle ergature was gracefully proportioned, its legs
were long and slender, and its body covered with a coat of glossy silvery
hair. Accompanied by Barak, and a train of followers, Deborah made
a tour of the country; exhorting the people to arise and .go to battle
against the king of Canaan. Her words and appearance enabled her soon
to assemble ten thousand men; which was all she required. These she
placed upon Mount Tabor to lie in wait for the enemy.
74 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

According to her promise, Deborah drew Siscra and his troops to the
foot of Mount Tabor. She caused the fact of the assembling of Isracl
to be told to Jabin, who sent Sisera with a large body of men towards
the river Kishon. Deborah and Barak had, in the meanwhile, ascended
Mount Tabor, where their men were concealed in the fort or among the
groves, from the observation of the enemy.

Mount Tabor arose in an abrupt, cone-shaped hill, many hundred feet
above the plain of Esdraclon ; its sides were clothed with oaks and syca-
mores, and its summit crowned by a fortress. On the walls of this fort
Deborah stationed herself to look out for the enemy. Here the whole
land of Israel seemed spread out before her. Below, she looked upon the
verdant plains of Galilee, watered by the Kishon and the Jordan, and sur-
rounded by a band of mountains; while on one side glittered the sea of
Galilee, and on the other stretched the bright waters of the great Medi-
terranean. The sun of that day, on which the prophetess had predicted
the approach of the Canaanites, was declining, when she descried their
advance guard emerging from a defile between two of the hills bordering
the Galilean sea. The plain was soon covered with their numerous host.
Onward they came, band after band; their iron chariots rumbling as the
roaring of the great deep in a storm. At their head came Siscra. Tis
chariot was overlaid with carved gold, and adorned with gay painting,
while from each side projected a glittering scythe. Three white horses
bore him swiftly on; their backs covered with stecl armour, and their
heads decorated with a high ornament of feathers and painted leather.
Sisera, a tall and powerful man, was standing in his chariot supported
by his spear. THis body was completely covered with a closcly-fitting suit
of mail, formed of golden scales—a bow and quiver hung at his back; a
dagger in its brazen sheath was suspended by chains from his crimson
girdle ; while his head was protected by a helmet of leather wrought with
gold. An armour-bearer sat at his feet, by the side of his chariotecr,
who bore his sword and shield of leather, bound and studded with brass.
Sisera encamped his band for the night gn the banks of the iishon, in-
tending to attack the Israclites in the morning.

That night Deborah spent alone in the battlements, buried in medita-
tion and prayer. Pious as she was, Deborah was mortal, and, as she
reflected upon all she had done for the Israelites, and looked around upon
the army she had collected, and on the ruined idol-fanes dimly visible
in the moonbeams, which at her command fell to the ground, and
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. 75

thought upon the victory promised her, a fecling of triumph swelled her
heart, and she forgot she was but an instrument in the hands of the Lord.
“O my soul, thou hast trodden down strength!” she said; ‘‘ Sisera, thy
hours are numbered ! thou art mighty in men of war, and in chariots and
horsemen, but our God hath spoken; and the horse and the rider will be
overthrown this night. Thou shalt fall by the hand of a woman, and
Deborah’s name shall rescund in the land!” Deborah now sought out
Barak. ‘Awake! arise, Barak!” said she. ‘Up! for this is the hour
when God shall deliver Sisera into my hands.”

The Israelites were soon assembled in front of the fort. The priests
then stood before them to address them according to the commands of
Moses, ‘‘ When thou goest into battle before thy enemies, O Israel!”
they said, ‘‘and seest horses, and chariots, and a people more than thou,
be not afraid of them! for the Lord thy God is with thee, which brought
thee out of the land of Egypt.”

“Ts there a man here,” cried Deborah, looking upon the assembled
band, “that is fearful and faint-hearted! Let him return to his house,
lest he infect his brethren, and their heart be as faint as his.” With
one voice the people vowed to face the foe manfully; and were imme-
diately led down the hill. In the dead midnight hour, the Canaanites
were awakened from a sleep they had indulged in from contempt of their
foe, by tremendous shouts. A terrible clangour of trumpets was in their
ears; they arose in a fright, and in looking up beheld the lights the
Israelites carried, which to their alarmed imaginations scemed stars
descending from heaven upon them. A panic prevailed. ‘ The stars
are fighting against us!” they cried; ‘‘ hear the shouting of their angry
God! Let us fly!” Sisera and some of his officers rallied their men,
and led them against the Israelites. The little band was sorely op-
pressed: but God, who was fighting for them, now brought a new and
terrible enemy against the Canaanites.

While engaged in combat they suddenly became aware they were
standing in water. They looked around—it had risen to their knees—
the chariots were filled, and their ranks could hardly keep their fect.
At once there rose a terrible ery. ‘¢ The river, the river is rising! Fly
ere ye perish!” The children of Israel had been early warned,by their
prophetess, and had retreated up the mountain; but the unhappy
Canaanites, after struggling awhile with the waves, were, with all their
mighty host, swept away and drowned.
76 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

Sisera fled in his chariot, but finding the waters rising fast, he aban-
doned it, and ran up to a neighbouring eminence. For many hours he
wandered about, and, when the day dawned, found himself at some
distance from the scene of action. He was in the plain of Zaanim.
Before him he beheld an encampment of tents, which, from their pecu-
liar construction, he knew belonged to the Kenites, and he felt assured
of safety. At the door of one stood a woman, towards whom he ran for
protection. Pursued by an avenging God, Siscra had been sent to the
tent of his foe. It was the encampment of Heber the Kenite, whose
family had joined the israclites, and she to whom the marauder flew for
safety was his bitter enemy, Jacl. She recognised him at once as the
rayisher of her daughter, and the oppressor of Isracl, and rejoiced to see
him approaching.

“Turn in, my lord! turn in to me,” she said. He gladly entered, and
threw himself exhausted upon a pile of mats, which she had spread for
him.

‘Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink,” he said, ‘‘ for | am
very thirsty?”

Jael opened a skin bottle, and poured him out some milk, and gave him
with it bread with butter in a dish of carved gold, which her husband
had taken in war. After he had eaten, she, at his request, threw over
him a pile of clothes to conceal him from view.

“Stand in the door of the tent, good woman,” said Sisera, ‘‘and if
any man doth come and inquire of thee, ‘Is any man here ?’ thou shalt
say, ‘No.’ If Iam sayed this day it will go well with thee, for Jabin
shall reward thee, and give thee a place in his palace. Then thou
mayest rule the Israelite women, for there are many in our houses whom
we have carried away captive!”

Jael, repressing the various emotions with which her bosom was burst-
ing, as she saw her enemy in her power, now, in a voice of affected
indifference, asked, ‘Saw ye anything, my lord, of Zillah, a young girl
who was taken from the temple of Baal when the sacred oxen were
carried away ?”

“Aye, indeed; she is in my house, and is as goodly to look upon as
the goddess Ashtaroth. When I left home I made a yow to Moloch to
sacrifice her and several others at his altar, if he brought me safe to
Hazor again.”
BIBLE STORIES OF EMINENT WOMEN. G7

Jacl rushed from the tent. ‘Now, God, I thank thee!” she cried,
“that my enemy and Israel’s oppressor is in my power. Zillah, thou
art saved! for Sisera shall not return. In thy place he shall be saeri-
ticed to the gods! Moloch! I devote him to thee! Baal! give strength
tomyarm! O Jehovah! pardon me! Why eall I upon false gods ? Thou
alone art the only true God, and now that Thou hast given me my enemy
in my hand, I will worship Thee alone.”

Jacl returned to the tent, and lifted up the curtain of the doorway.
Her enemy was plunged in adeep slumber. Fearful some of his followers
might wander there and rescue him from her hand, and knowing her
daughter’s life was the price of his safety, she resolved to put him to
death, and thus render Isracl free from one who had cruelly used them.
She tore out one of the large nails with which the tent-ropes are
fastened to the ground, and with a hammer smote the robber on the
head. In triumph, Jael rushed from the tent. Barak was riding rapidly
past.

“Ho! Barak!” she cried, ‘‘ come, and I will show thee the man
thou seekest.” Barak followed her into the tent, and beheld dead before
him, Sisera, the redoubtable oppressor of Israel. ‘‘ Praises be to God !”
he cried, “who hath this day subdued Jabin, king of Canaan, before
the children of Isracl! Truly did Deborah declare he should die by the
hand of a woman. I thought the prophecy alluded to her, but to Jael
is this honour due. Come with me, that I may show Deborah and the
princes this thy noble act.”

The next morning saw Deborah at the height of her glory and popu-
larity. She was again seated under her palm-tree, surrounded by the
princes and nobles of Israel, who gave to her the honour of freeing Israel
from their oppressors. Deborah’s heart bounded ; but checking all
pride, she said, ‘‘ Not to me,—not to Deborah be the glory, my lords ;
let us ascribe it all to our merciful Jehovah, of whom I am the humble
instrument. But where is our good General Barak? Is he still in
pursuit of Sisera ?”

Deborah looked up, and beheld Barak approaching, leading Jael; both
were crowned with garlands, followed by men bearing a corpse upon a
bier, and women dancing, and singing triumphant songs.

“Behold the deliverer of Israel!” cried Barak. ‘Sing praises to
Jacl, for she hath slain Sisera, the enemy of Israel. Blessed above women
be Jael, the wife of Heber!”
78 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Jacl was hailed as Israel’s avenger by all the people when the death of
Sisera by her hand became known. For one moment a pang smote the
heart of Deborah, when she thus saw the glory given to another; but she
was a woman of too lofty a spirit and devoted piety to envy another. “I
am punished,” she said, ‘for my proud thoughts of yester-night.”
Throwing off all feeling save joy for the death of Sisera, she approached
and greeted Jael as a saviour in Isracl. Then taking her timbrel, burst
out into a triumphant song.

THE MORAL.

One of the most striking features in the character of Deborah is her
fearless avowal of the truth. ‘While all the country was given up to
idolatry, she upheld the religion of Jehovah. In the presence of the
worshippers of Baal she was not ashamed to avow her own faith publicly,
however unfashionable it had become, but declared herself decidedly
upon the Lord’s side. Nor did she swerve from the duty of showing
them the error of their way, but severely rebuked them for their,
wickedness. Let us endeavour to imitate her example, and when in the
company of unbelievers, testify to the truth as it isin Jesus, unabashed
by sneers, and unawed by persceution.


BERTHA’S CHOICE.

Tus “ Bible Stories” finished, Bertha, the eldest of the young
ladies, chose from the Cabinet a book of Faney Work, of which they
all knew very little, their school-time naving been filled up with other
and more substantial studies. It happened that they were desirous to
celebrate their present holiday season by making a few presents to dear
relatives and friends, therefore Bertha’s choice was received with delight,
and very glad they all were to find that the Cabinet contained all the
material for the work which was described. The snow was falling fast
from the leaden clouds that overspread all the sky without, but snow
and cold were quite forgotten when Mrs. Selby’s daughters gathered
about the work-table, before a brilliant fire. Mamma had been busy
spreading before them a variety of rich and beautiful fancy materials,
taken from the Cabinet. She now resumed her easy chair, and read
aloud a few sentences on the history and value of domestic and orna-
mental needlework, showing that it brings daily blessings to every home,
though unnoticed, perhaps, because of its hourly silent application. Ina
household each stitch is one for comfort to some person or other; and
without its ever watchful care home would be a scene of discomfort
indeed. In its ornamental adaptation, it delights the eye, amuses the
mind, nay, Sometimes cheats grief of its sorrow; but, more than all,
gives bread to thousands. The women of every nation, from time
immemorial to the present, have beguiled their hours with the needle,
from “the embroidered hangings of the temple, and the garments of
fine needlework for kings’ daughters,” worked with gold, and silk, and
precious stones, to the mocassins and festive ornaments of the savage
embroidered with beads. Upon all classes and in all climes this simple
instrument has bestowed a varied charm.

In past times, Queen Elizabeth and her bevy of maidens might
80 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.

possibly have amused themselves with this art; for John Taylor, in
1640, writes of needlework, thus— :

*¢ All in dimension, ovals, squares, and rounds,
KR
So that art seemeth nearly natural,

In forming shapes so geometrical.”
#

By no other art than that of the needle can “shapes” so entirely
geometrical be formed. Among the “treasures of needlework” in
ancient times may be mentioned the corslet sent by Amasis, king of
Egypt, to the Lacedeemonians, and described by Herodotus as made of
linen with many figures of animals, inwrought and adorned with gold
and cotton-wool; each thread of this corslet was composed of three
hundred and sixty threads.

Another “ treasure” was the veil of Minerva, embroidered by virgins
selected from the best families in Athens, which, after being carried in
procession with great pomp and ceremony round the city, was hung up
in the Parthenon, and consecrated to Minerva.

>

Coming to another age, a “treasure” still remains to us in the
tapestry worked by Matilda, wife of William the Conqueror, highly
valuable as an historical picture, and a truthful representation of the
events which preceded and accompanied the Conquest. It is still pre-
served at Bayeux, in Normandy, and consists of a web of cloth upwards
of two hundred feet in length, and about twenty inches in breadth, with
borders top and bottom. The horses are worked in colours of blue,
yellow, green, and red; but the whole is interesting and spirited.

In the Fishmongers’ Hall, in London, is a tolerably well-preserved
specimen of needlework, on a linen ground. The work itself is splendid,
and must have been magnificent when used as a pall at the funeral of
Sir William Walworth, in 1381. It is now much faded in colour, and
the gold dimmed by age, but altogether it is an exquisite specimen of
needlework of that or any other period.

An old poet advises ladies to employ themselves with the needle.

6 Tt will increase their peace, enlarge their store,
To use their tongues less, and their needles more ;
The needle’s sharpnesse profit yields and pleasure,
But sharpnesse of the tongue bites out of measure,”
THE

ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

or

Haucy Cork.











bs till the world be quite dissolved and past,
So long, at least, the needle’s use shall last.”


ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTIONS

IN

FANCY NEEDLEWORK

CROCHET.

POSITION OF THE HANDS.

THE crochet-hook is held lightly in the right hand, between the thumb
and the forefinger. The hook should be kept in a horizontal position,
never twisted round in the fingers. The work is held close to the last
stitch, between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand; the thread,
crossing the fore and middle fingers of that hand, is held firmly between
the latter and the third, and a space of about an inch is maintained
between the fore and second fingers. A very slight motion of the left
wrist, by which the second and third fingers are drawn back, suflices to
lay the thread over the hook, and then a movement of the thumb and
forefinger towards the middle one forms the thread so Jaid into a new
chain-stitch. Thus, the chain-stich is made without any movement of
the right hand, which not only gives a much more elegant appearance to
the hands, but also enables the lady to work much faster than she would
if both hands were constantly moving.

CHAIN-STITCH.

Make a slip-knot at the end of the cotton, insert the hook in it; place
your hands in the position already described, and make the requisite
number of stitches as directed. °

DOUBLE CHAIN-STITCH.

This is a stronger and firmer stitch than the ordinary one; and as it
resembles braid, is sometimes termed braid-stitch. When you have done
two ordinary chain-stitches, besides the one on the needle, inst the hook
in the first of those two, draw the thread at once through them both :
then continue to insert the hock in the stitch just finished, as well as the
loop on tt already, aud draw the thread through both,
84 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

SLIP-STITCH.
Insert the hook in a stitch, (having already one loop on it,) and draw
the thread through both. This stitch is frequently used to pass from one
part to another of a round, as by it there is hardly any depth added.

SINGLE CROCHET.
Having one loop on the hook, insert the latter in a stitch or chain, and
draw the thread through in a loop. You have now éwo on the hook.
Draw the thread through both.

SHORT DOUBLE CROCHET.

Having one loop on the hook already, pass the thread round it, and
insert it in the stitch to be worked. Draw the thread through. You
have now two loops on the needle, besides the thread passing round it,
which we may call another. Draw the thread through all three at
once.

DOUBLE CROCHET.

Begin as for the last ; but when you have the three loops on the needle,
draw the thread through two only. This leaves one besides the newly
formed one. Draw the thread through both.

SHORT TREBLE CROCHET.

Pass the thread twice round the needle, before inserting it in the stitch.
Draw the thread through, which is equivalent to four loops on the hook.
Draw the thread through two; which leaves two and the new one. Draw
the thread through all three together.

TREBLE CROCHET.

Work as for the last, until you have four loops on the hook. Draw
the thread, then, through ¢wo only at a time, so that it will take a treble
movement to get them all off the needle.

LONG TREBLE CROCHET.

Pass the thread three times, before drawing it through the stitch, thus
having five loops on the needle. Draw the thread through two at a
time, until all are taken off. This will require four movements.

SQUARE CROCHET.

Square crochet is either open or close. Close consists of three consecu-
tive double crochet stitches. For an open square, do one double crochet,
two chain, miss two. Thus cither takes up three stitches, so that the
foundation-chain for any piece of square crochet may be reckoned by
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 85

multiplying by three, and allowing one stitch over. A piece of fifty
squares would require a hundred and fifty-one foundation chain.

LONG SQUARE CROCHET.

By this method any ordinary square crochet pattern may be done on
an increased scale. Allow four chain for the foundation of every square,
with one extra. Then a close square will be four treble crochet stitches :
an open square, one treble crochet-stitch, three chain, miss three.

TO CONTRACT AN EDGE.

This may be done while working double crochet, treble crochet, or long
treble. In any one of these, do half the complete stitch, but instead of
completing it, twist the thread round the needle again, until, on bringing
it through the next stitch, you will have as many as before. Finish the
stitch in the ordinary way ; by this means you have worked two stitches
at the bottom, and one only at the top. This stitch is frequently used

in forming flowers.
TO ENLARGE AN EDGE.

This is also chiefly done when imitating natural flowers. It may
occur with a double, treble, or long treble stitch. In either case work the
next shortest stitch to it, on the side instead of on the chain-stitch.
Suppose there is a long treble stitch, and you wish to increase the edge.
Do a treble crochet stitch, inserting your hook in the side of the long
treble: then a double crochet on the side of the treble, and a single
on the double. Thus, with one stitch only on the chain, or last row, you
would have four at the edge. This is much smoother and flatter than
working four stitches in one.

TO JOIN A THREAD.
Always manage to do this in any but chain stitches.

RIBBED CROCHET.

This is always worked backwards and forwards; and is produced by
inserting the hook in the back of the chain, instead of the front, as
is usual. Finish a stitch with the new thread, leaving a short end
of both, of it and the old one, which hold in as you work.

TO WORK WITH SEVERAL COLOURS. ‘
This is always in single crochet. Hold in those threads not in use, at

the back of your work, occasionally working over them, so that the loops
may not be too long. When a new colour is to be introduced, finish the
86 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

old stitch with it. Thus, if two scarlet three green were ordered, you
would work one complete scarlet. Begin the next stitch with the same ;
but instead of using scarlet to draw through two loops on your hook,
to complete the stitch, you would draw green through. So if only one
stitch of a colour is ordered, you do not do the perfect stitch, but you
finish one, and begin the next with it. Sometimes in working over cord
in several colours it is desirable to have the part covering the cord
in one colour, and the upper or chain-like part in another. ‘To do this,
begin the stitch with one colour, and finish with another. The upper
half of the stitch is always of the old colour. Thus three and a-half
green one and a-half white, would be three perfect green; then begin
the fourth stitch white, but finish it in green. The fifth stitch all
white.
TO WORK OVER CORD.

Frequently done in making mats, baskets, &e. Told the cord along
the top of the work, insert the hook as usual, and bring out the loop of
wool, under the cord. Finish the stitch over the cord.

TO WORK IN BOTH SIDES OF A CHAIN.
Along the top of every lire of crochet is the appearance of a chain,
or succession of tambour stitches. Usually the hook is inserted in the

front one only of these; but occasionally in both, where strength is
likely to be required.

TO WORK UNDER A CHAIN.

The hook is inserted under, instead of im a stitch: it will then slip
nackwards and forwards.

CROCHET WITH BEADS.

This is so comnion now, for jewelled d’Oyleys, mats, and other articles
in cotton-work, as well as for those in silk and metal beads, that direc-
tions for these will certainly be acceptable.

It must be remembered that beads are dropped on what is always con-
sidered the wrong side of a piece of crochet. In working from an
engraving, therefore, work from left to right.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK, 87

Beads may be placed on any kind of stitch. A chain-stitch will re-
quire one; a single crochet, the same; a double crochet, two; a treble
crochet, three; along treble, four. All are put on after bringing the
thread through the stitch. Insc, de, tc, lt ce, a bead is put on with
each movement.

TO INCREASE IN JEWELLED D’OYLEYS, ET.

Do one chain-stitch where an increase is required, instead of two s ¢
in one. Thus you avoid a hole, always produced by the other method, in
sc. In these d’Oyleys, the pattern is made in beads, on a cotton ground.
As it is requisite that the beads should set very flat, any increase must
always be in the cotton stitches.

TO CHOOSE COTTON AND BEADS WHICH WILL WORK WELL TOGETHER.
The cotton should be as thick as it is at all easy to get the beads over.
If they run on too easily, the work will not look well,

TO MARK THE COMMENCEMENT OF A ROUND IN D’OYLEYS, AND SIMILAR
ARTICLES.

Take a bit of coloured thread if the ground be white, or vice versa,
and draw one end of it through the last stitch of the first round, as you
form it. Continue to draw it through the front part of the chain of
the last stitch of every round. By doing this from the beginning, the
plan is easily kept: otherwise it will be found a constant trouble to mark
the stitch terminating the round, although the accuracy of the pattern
depends on it.

THE SIMPLEST WAY OF COUNTING A FOUNDATION CHAIN WHICH IS
AFTERWARDS TO BE WORKED IN SET PATTERNS,

Instead of counting the entire length of stitches, which is both trouble-
some and confusing, count in the number required for a single pattern,
and then begin over again. Thus, if each pattern requires twenty-five
chains, count so far, and then begin again: this will ensure your having
the proper number to complete patterns.

TO PRODUCE WORK OF ANY DIMENSIONS REQUIRED FROM A SQUARE
CROCHET PATTERN.

Choose a hook with which you can work easily ; and cotton according

to the following scale, for which the Boar’s Head crochet cottons of
88 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Messrs. Walter Evans and Co. have been used, with Boulton and Sons’
tapered crochet-hooks :—

No. of No. of Stitches No. of
Cotton, to the Inch, Hook.
1 10 15
2 12 16
4 14 17
8 15 18
12 47 18
16 18 20
20 20 21
24 23 21
30 26 23
36 28 24
KNITTING.

CASTING ON,

Hold the end of the cotton between the third and little fingers of the
left hand, and let it pass over the thumb and forefinger. Bend the lat-
ter, and straighten it again, so that in the operation the thread shall be
twisted into a loop. Now catch the cotton over the little finger of the
right hand, letting it pass under the third and second, and over the fore-
finger. Take up a knitting-needle, and insert it in the loop on the fore-
finger of the left hand; bring the thread round the needle; turn the
point of the needle slightly towards you, and tighten the loop, while
slipping it off the forefinger. Take the needle now in the left hand,
holding it lightly between the thumb and second finger, leaving the
forefinger free. This needle is kept under the hand. ‘The other rests
over the division between the thumb and forefinger of the right hand,
and the thumb lightly pressing against it, holds it in its place. The
forefinger has the thread carried from the left hand over the nail of it.
Insert the point of the right-hand needle in the loop of the left-hand
one; put the thread round it, and let it form alcop. Transfer the loop
to the left-hand needle, but without withdrawing the other needle from
it. Again put the thread round, to form a fresh loop, which slip on the
left-hand needle, and repeat the process,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 89

PLAIN KNITTING.
Slip the point of the right-hand needle in a loop, put the thread round
it, and draw it out in a new loop.

PURLING.

Slip the right-hand needle through a loop, in front of the left-hand
one, so that its point is the nearest to you. The thread passes between
the two, and is brought round the right-hand one, which is drawn out
to form a loop on it. The thread is always brought to the front before
purl stitches, unless particular directions to the contrary are given.

TWISTED KNITTING.
Insert the needle in the stitch to be knitted, at the back of the left-
hand one, and, as it were, in the latter half of the loop. Finish the
stitch in the usual way.

TWISTED PURLING,
Insert the right-hand needle in the stitch, not crossing the left-hand
one, as is usual, but parallel with it. When the loop is on it, it can
return to its usual place, and be finished like any other purled stitch.

TO MAKE STITCHES.

To make one stitch, merely bring the thread in front before knitting a
stitch, as, in order to form the new stitch, it must pass over the needle,
thus making one. To make two, three, or more, pass the thread round
the needle in addition: once, to make two; twice, to increase three ; and
so on; but when the succeeding stitch to a made stitch is purled, you
must bring the thread in front, and put it once round the needle, to
make one stitch.

TO TAKE LN,

(Decrease.)—Either knit two as one, which is marked in receipts as
k 2 t; or, slip one, knit one, pass the slip-stitch over the knitted.
This is either written in full, or decrease 1. When three have thus to
be made into one, slip one, knit two together, and pass the slip over.

TO SLIP.
Take a stitch from the left to the right-hand needle, witho&t knitting.

TO RAISE A STITCH.
Knit as a stitch the bar of thread between two stitches,
90 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

TO JOIN A ROUND,

Four needles are used in stockings, mittens,- gloves, and any other
work which is round without being sewed up. Divide the number of
stitches to be cast on by three. Cast a third on one needle. Take the
second needle, slip it into the last stitch, and cast on the required number.
The same with the third. Then knit two stitches off from the first
needle on to the third. The round being thus formed, begin to use the
fourth needle for knitting.

TO JOIN THE TOE OF A SOCK, ETC.

Divide the entire number of stitches, putting half on each of two
needles, taking care that all the front ones are on one needle, and the
sole on another. Knit one off from cach needle as one. Repeat. Then
pass the first over the second. Continue as in ordinary casting off.

TO CAST OFF.

Knit two stitches; pass the one first knitted over the other; knit
another; pass the former over this one. Continue so.

BRIOCHE STITCH.

The number cast on for brioche stitch must always be divisible by
three, without a remainder. Bring the thread in front, slip one, knit
two together. It is worked the same way backwards and forwards.

GARTER STITCH.

Plain knitting in anything which is in vows, not rounds. ‘The sides
appear alike.

MOSS STITCH,

Knit one, purl one, alternately. In the next row let the knitted stitch
come over the purled, and vice versa.

TO KNIT RAPIDLY AND EASILY.

Hold the needles as near to the points as possible, and have no more
motion in the hands than you can avoid. Keep the forefinger of the
left hand free to feel the stitches, slide them off the needle, &e. The
touch of this finger is so delicate that by using it constantly you will
soon be able to knit in the dark.

RIBBED KNITTING,

Knit and purl alternately so many stitches as two. In rounds the

knitted must always come over the knitted, and purled over purled. But
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 91

is rows, the purled stitch will be done over the hnitted, and vice versa.
Thus if you end a row with a purled stitch, that stitch must be [iitied
at the beginning of the next row, to make it right.

NETTING

PREPARATION FOR NETTING.

Take a piece of fine string or strong cotton, and knot it to make a
stirrup, to go over one foot, and come up to a convenient distance from
the eyes. Ora shorter one may be pinned to the knee, or to a lead
cushion, Waving filled the necdle, fasten the end of the thread in aslip-
knot on the stirrup, and you are ready to begin.

a, PLAIN NETTING,
OOOO Pass the thread thus joined to the stirrup over the fore,
Cee second, and third fingers of the left hand, the forefinger
OOO.0.6.4 being close to the knot, and the mesh held under the
Woes thread, and straight along the finger. Pass the thread
OOVOGG. under these fingers, and catch it up with the thumb.
Leave it to hang over the hand in a loop, pass the necdle up through the
loop over the fingers, wder the mesh, and under the foundation thread
or the stitch to be worked. Draw the needle through; in doing which
you form a loop, which catch over the fourth finger of the left hand.
Gradually let the thread off the three fingers, and tighten it into a knot,
to form itself close to the mesh. Then gradually tighten the loop still
over the fourth finger, taking care not to let it go until it is nearly
drawn tight. This is the elementary stitch in netting—the only one—
from which every pattern is compounded. If well done, the stiteh will
just be tight enough to allow the mesh to slip from it, and the knot will

be quite close to the mesh. It forms a diamond.
SQUARE NETTING.

To produce a piece of netting, which shall be square,
and in which the holes shall be of the same shape, begin
on one stitch ; in this net two. Turn, and dé one stitch
in the first, and two in the last. Turn again, and work

a stitch on every stite#h but the last; in this do two.
Continue until you have, along one side, as many holes but one as you


92 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

require. For instance—if in your pattern you have thirty-six, you want
thirty-five only. Now do a row, stitch for stitch, without any increase.
‘This makes the corner square. After this, net the last two stitches of
every row together, until you have but one.

OBLONG NETTING,

| This term is applied, not to the stitch, but to the shape
_ of the work when done, the stitches being square, as in

the last. Proceed as for square netting, until you come

to the plain row; after this, decrease at the end of
! every second row, but in the alternate ones énerease, hy
doing two in one, until, up the straight long side, you have as many
squares as your design requires, /ess one. Do another plain row; and
then decrease at the termination of every row, until you net the two last
stitches together. To prevent the possibility of mistaking one side for
the other, when alternately increasing and decreasing, put a bit of
coloured silk on one side to mark it.

TO MAKE A PIECE OF NETTING OF SIX, EIGHT, OR TEN SIDES, WORKING
FROM THE CENTRE,

Begin with half the number of stitches that you mean to have sides,—
3 for a hexagon, 4 for an octagon, and so on. Close into a round, and
do two stitches in each stitch. You have now as many stitches as sides.
Do two again in each one: you will thus have, alternately, a large and
asmall loop. Work round and round, with one stitch in every long
loop, and two in every small loop, until you have the required size.

FANCY STITCHES—ROUND NETTING,






S This stitch is particularly strong, therefore especially
@ suitable for purses, mittens, ke. From the mode of
@'@ working it contracts considerably, and will require at
ook least a fifth more stitches than plain netting with the

re) same mesh, to make any given length. Begin as for
plain netting, but draw the needle completely out from under the mesh,
without inserting it in the stitch ; then pass it through the loop on which
you are to work, turning the needle upwards and towards you. Tighten
the stitch, as in common netting,

Ps
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 93

HONEYCOMB NETTING.

This requires four rows for a perfect pattern, and must
have an even number of stitches. 1st row—amiss the first
stitch, and net, instead of it, the second; then the first:
now net the fourth, and afterwards the third. Repeat
to the end of the row. 2nd row—plain netting. 3rd
row—net the first stitch plain, then miss one; net the next; net the
missed stitch : repeat, until you come to the last stitch, which net plain.
(This row, it will be observed, is exactly like the first, but with a plain
stitch at the beginning and ending of the row, to throw the holes into
the proper places.) 4th row—plain netting. Repeat these four rows
as

ieee ne LONG TWISTED STITCH.

Do arow of round netting with a fine mesh ; a plain row
we aes with a mesh double the size ; and then another row like
Nee the first. (Very useful for purses.)
I oun



GRECIAN NETTING.

For this two meshes, one seven. sizes larger than the
8 other, are required. Thus,—6 and 13; 10 and 17; and
es so on. Do one plain row first with the large mesh.
Second row—small mesh, Draw the needle ais from



put the — in the first i in the usual a ection, and slip it on to
the second, which draw through the first. Bend the point of your needle
down, to take up the first loop again which runs across it ; and which you
will take up by pointing your needle downwards and then towards you.
Finish the stitch. There isa small loop then found at the side, which you
net plainly. The alternate repetition of these two stitches forms the row.
The third row is in plain netting, with the large mesh. The fourth is
the same as the second; but, as in the honeycomb stitch, one plain stitch
must be worked at the beginning and end of the row.
GROUND NET.

ners This requires an even number of stitches. Fiast Row—

y one stitch, plain netting, one with the thread twice round
“|! the mesh alternately to the end. Second—a long stitch,
(that is, where the thread has been put twice round the
needles,) a plain stitch, alternately. Third Row—make


94 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

a double stitch, and draw the needle entirely from under the mesh;
insert it in the right-hand hole of the last row but one (that is, in the
line of holes immediately under that last made.) Catch up the first loop
of the last row, and draw it through that of the previous row, and net it:
this will cause the second loop of the last row to be also partly drawn
through. Net this, which is a very small stitch, in the ordinary way.
Repeat these two stitches throughout. The next row is like the second ;
the fifth like the third, except that a plain stitch is done at the begin-
ning and end of the row.

SPOTTED NETTING,

Do a stitch on your foundation with the thread twice
jround the mesh; then two stitches with it only once

UNI
) i round the mesh. Repeat these three stitches in workiug
CO backwards and forwards. After the foundation row, all






a

(#8, three stitches must be worked on one loop.

DIAMOND NETTING.

Ss First Row—one plain stitch, one double one (with the
> I) thread twice round the mesh) alternately. Second Row
& i —In the preceding row, the stitches are alternately short
oc 4 and long; this row is in plain netting, but every alter-
Peo nate loop is worked not close to the mesh, but so as to
make the ends even. Third Row—one double stitch, one plain stitch,
alternately. Fourth Row—one long stitch, one plain one, alternately.

Wi

SS

LARGE DIAMOND NETTING.

Meienateiguccton The number of stitches required for this pattern is 6,




Gennaio and one over. First Row—1 double, 5 plain, repeat to
waren) the end, which is a double stitch. Second Row—1 plain
Wace netting, 1 long, draw out the mesh ; 4 more plain netting,
DOCS ROR draw out the mesh. Third Row—1 plain, 1 long stitch

double, 3 plain double, 1 plain. Fourth Row—2 plain, 1 long double
2 plain double, 1 plain. Fifth Row—2 plain, 1 long double, 1 plain
double, 2 plain. Sixth Row—3 plain, 1 long, 2 plain. Seventh Row—
3 plain, 1 double, 2 plain. Eighth Row—3 plain double, 1 plain, 1 long
double, 1 plain. Ninth Row—2 plain double, 2 plain, 1 long double,
1 plain. Tenth Row—2 plain double, 3 plain, 1 long double. Eleventh
Row—I plain double, 4 plain, 1 long double. Twelfth Row—1 long,
5 plain,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 95

SPOTTED DIAMOND NETTING.
This is worked with two meshes, one being half the
size of the other. The spot is made by working a plain
stitch in the same loop asthe last, with the small mesh.
Four stitches are required for each pattern and an extra
one in the entire length. First Row—1 double, 2 plain
with spot, 1 plain. Second Row-—1 plain, 1 long double, 1 plain with
spot, 1 plain double. Third Row—1 plain, 1 long double, 1 plain double,
1 plain. Fourth Row—1 plain, 1 plain with spot, 1 plain, 1 long.
Fifth Row—1 plain with spot, 1 plain, 1 double, 1 plain with spot.
Sixth Row—lI plain with spot, 1 plain double, 1 plain, 1 long double.
Seventh Row—2 plain, 1 long, 1 plain double. Eighth Row—1 plain,
1 plain with spot, 1 plain, 1 long.
LEAF NETTING.





Rane OY Each pattern requires five stitches, and four extra in the
Miele length,—two at each edge. First Row—3 plain, 5 plain
caneneens

ae se all in one loop, 5 plain in next. Second Row—take on
AN




iN
NOUN them as one; 4plain. Third Row—plain. Fourth Row
—2 plain, increase 4 in each of the next two loops, 1 plain. Fifth Row
—1 plain, 9 together as one, 3 plain. Sixth Row—plain. This descrip-
tion does not include the extra stitches at the ends, which are always in
plain netting.

OOO
y your needle, at once, the 9 extra loops made, and work

DOUBLE STITCH.

Pass the thread twice round the mesh, instead of once, thus making a
long stitch.

LONG STITCH.

Used when some of the stitches in the preceding row have been double
stitches. To work so that the loops of this row shall be even, the knot
must not be drawn close to the mesh, in working on the single stitches
of the previous row. These stitches are termed long stitches,

TO WORK WITH BEADS.
A long darning-needle must be used, instead of the ordinary netting-
needle, and the beads threaded on for every separate stitch.
MESH. ‘
This term is applied equally to the instrument on which the loop is
formed, and to the loop or hole so formed.
96 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

EMBROIDERING ON NETTING,

This is done either in simple darning, which only permits such geome-
trical patterns as can be worked by counting threads ; or by real embroi-
dering of flowers, leaves, and other designs, in chain stitch. To do this,
have the pattern drawn on light-coloured crape, which tack over the
surface of the netting, and put the latter into a small hand-frame. The
instrument used for the work is a tambouwr-needle ; and it is to be done
in the ordinary tambour-stitch. Very generally, in this sort of work,
the flowers, leaves, stems,—in short every part of the design,—are edged
with a line of chain-stitch in the finest gold thread.

When all the embroidery is done, draw out the thread of crape, as you
would those of canvas in working on canvas and cloth.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN FLANDERS LACE WORK.
This consists of various fancy stitches, done on a ground of netting.

The diagrams show the manner in which they are worked, the only
difficult one being cloth-darning.



This is used much in ancient church-lace. It is worked so that every
square has two four-threads crossing it in each direction. To do this,
begin at the left-hand corner; and, in either direction, take as long a
line as possible. Never cross over two threads, even in turning a corner ;
and join on always with a weaver’s knot, so that no appearance of a join
exists at all

A glance at these engravings will show the way in which the various
designs are done.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN POINT-LACE WORK.

The leading stitch in all varieties of Point Lace is the ordinary button-
hole, or overcast stitch: worked at regular intervals, or perfectly close,
it forms the basis of three-fourths of all the stitches used in the manu-
facture of Point. The various stitches may be sub-divided into three
classes—Edges, Bars, and Laces. We treat of them in regular gradation.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 97

BRUSSELS EDGE.



A series of buttonhole stitches, about ten to the inch,
ach stitch being allowed to form a small loose loop.

Work from left to right.

{
|
| VENETIAN EDGING.

if On the single loose buttonhole stitch of last edge, do

four tight stitches.

LITTLE VENETIAN EDGE.
On the single loose Brussels edge stitch, do one tight
stitch.



SORRENTO EDGE.
The loose buttonhole stitch beiyg worked, do a tight
me on it: then another loose, and tight one at half the
listanee.. One-eighth and one-sixteenth of an inch.are
he proper distances.

POINT EDGE,

Six loops are arranged to form a point. Take one stitch
@ ‘rom the extreme left, to make a loop the size seen in the
mgraving. Fasten it on the foundation, and work it
ack so as to have a double bar of thread. Cover this
| vith close buttonhole stitch, making on the first half of it
the two Raleigh dots. seen in engraving. When this loop is thus
finished, make the second without dots: then form the third, but only
half cover this with buttonhole stitch. Take a stitch in the middle of
the centre loop, and then of the left-hand one, to form two more loops.
Cover the one entirely with buttonhole stitch, adding the two dots: the
other only partially. Make a loop to connect these two, and form the
point ; cover this, making four dots on it; and work down the halves of
the other loops, doing two dots on each. A wider edge may be made, on
his prineiple, by doing four loops for the basis, or even five, decreasing
H
98 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

one, of course, in every row. To keep the loose loops in their places,
while working them, hold them on the paper, or toile coire, with a fine
necdle.
BARS. :
These are used to connect the flowers, &c., with the edge of Point
Lace, and to form a solid piece of it. There is an infinite variety of

fancy bars; and they can, by a little ingenuity, be varied to any extent.
The basis is the

RALEIGH BARS,

Begin as for a Venetian, and after every cighth of
tenth stitch, instead of bringing the needle through the
loop, slip it under the bar, and bring the needle up on
the right-hand side, leaving a loop of thread about one

@ and a-half inches long, which must be held down, to
keep it in its place: then pass the needle six times round the right-hand
side of the loop; and when drawn up this will form a knot, thick on one
side, and with the single thread on the other. Slip the needle through
it, above the bar, and continue to work it in the ordinary buttonhole.
This peculiar knot is what is called a Raleigh knot.




VENETIAN BARS.

A bar of one, two, or more threads, closely covered’
with buttonhole stitches. They are either simple lines,
or branched bars. In the latter, work on the principal
line until you come to the branch. Make that bar, and
cover it, before finishing the main line.

EDGED VENETIAN BARS.
The same bars, with Brussels or Venetian edge worked
on them.

SORRENTO BARS.

Neq; Two threads so closely twisted together as to appear
; like one.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK, $9



DOTTED VENETIAN BARS.

: After every fifth or sixth stitch of an ordinary Venetian
: | bar, put in a needle, to hold the thread out, while cover-

ing it with buttonhole stitch.

POINT D’ALENGON BARS.
The ordinary herringbone stitch, with the thread
twisted once, twice, or oftener, according to the depth to
be filled in.

ENGLISH BARS,
This is simply darning between two lines of Venctian
or Brussels edging. The needle is always put in the
stitch, from the upper side, downwards.

GROUNDING BARS, a

These are all formed of varieties of Venetian bars,
dotted with Raleigh.



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN LACE WORK,
For forming flowers, arabesques, §e., or filling up spaces.
BRUSSELS LACE.

A succession of rows of Brussels edge, worked on each
other, and backwards and forwards,



VENETIAN LACE,

This is a series of rows of Venetian edging, but as it is
inconvenient to pass round the needle constantly, and it
aq| can only be worked from left to right, it is usual to alter-
Med) nate the Venctian, worked in that direction, with Brus-
sels done in the opposite.


100 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

SORRENTO LACE.

The same stitch as Sorrento edging ; it can be worked
only in one direction, therefore it is necessary to fasten
off at the end of every row. The short stitches of one
row are worked on the long ones of the previous.



ENGLISH ROSETTES.

These resemble, as nearly as possible, a spider’s web.
They are worked on six, eight, or ten threads, according
to the space to be filled in. Take twisted threads across
the space to be filled, at regular distances. Let them all
eross in the middle, and after the first; slip the needle
under im the single thread, and over when twisting it back again, thus
uniting them as you proceed. In twisting the last thread stop in the
centre, and make a tight buttonhole stitch to secure it. Now work the
spot, passing the needle first under two threads, + then under the last of
the two, and the next so that the thread goes round one bar, and under
two; repeat from the cross, until the spot is large enough, when finish
twisting the incomplete bar, and fasten off.

OPEN ENGLISH LACE.’

Made on dowble the number of bars. The diagonal are
SAL sincte threads, and must be made first; the upright and
WASH) orizontal lines are of twisted threads, and the spots are
a vorked when forming the latier, just as described in
‘nglish lace. Great accuracy of distance is required
between these threads, otherwise they will not all cross in the same
places; and it will be impossible to form the spots.





ENGLISH LACE.

Fill up a given space with twisted threads evenly
placed about the cighth of an inch apart, diagonally, and
jul in the same direction. In crossing each one of these,
you make the spots belonging to that particular’line thus:

oass your needle completely under the line of threads,
and in an opposite slanting direction. (See cut.) Fasten it by a tight
buttonhole stitch on the braid, and twist back on the single thread till
you come to where it crosses. Cross over this twisted thread and pass
the needle under the single thread on the other side of it. Again cross,
and slip your needle under the twisted part of the new bar. Continue


FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 101

thus, always putting the needle under the new bar, and over the old,
until your spot is large enough. Then twist on the single thread until
you come to another crossing, when make the spot as before. Every
line is thus completed. Be careful to twist the threads perfectly in this
and the next stitch.
HENRIQUEZ LACE.

Make two parallel lines, darning spots at intervals,
mw) across the two, very near each other, of twisted thread.
Miss about three times the space that is between the tw,
and do another pair, and be sure the spots are on a line

pmaseas! with the others. Repeat until in one direction you have
tilled the space. Begin to make the bars in the opposite direction, Do
one, with the needle wnder those you cross in going, and over in returning,
taking the space between the spots ; and be sure to make one twist between
the two close bars, which will keep them at proper distances from each
other. In making the second pair of cross bars, darn the space between the
pairs, to correspond. The entire of all should be filled bythe darned dot.



CORDOVAN LACE.

Very similar to the preceding ; but on three bars, and
therefore considerably easier to darn. Both these laces
must be done with very fine thread. Hvans’s boar’s head
erochet cotton, No. 150, is particularly suitable for the
purpose.



VALENCIENNES LACE,
Simply darning ; done very finely and closely.

FOUNDATION STITCH.

The ordinary buttonhole stitch, worked over a bar of
thread, taken from right to left. The stitches are to be
as close to each other as possible. The stitches of one
row are taken each between two of the preceding.



CLOSE DIAMOND
f| In this and the following eins the design i is pro-
| duced by leaving at regular intervals a long stitch; that
is, instead of taking a stitch after every one of the pre-
i] vious row, to miss two, which forms a hole. Be careful
to miss the spaces evenly.


102 TIE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

OPEN DIAMOND.

Just like the preceding, but that the diamond has nine
holes instead of four.

uae
ae

a
9 0000
Ne A



ANTWERP LACE.

oi a The holes are so arranged as to form a succession of
em! a diamonds. It requires six rows to make one pattern.
ta lst—Do 4 stitches, leave space for 4; do 11, leave space
for 4, 2nd—Leave the space over 4, work 4 on the loop,
10 over the 11, and 4 more on the next loop. 38rd—Like
1st, with 11 on centre 12 of 18. 4th—Seven stitches, miss space of 4;
4 over the centre of 11; miss the space of 4; do 4 on the loop (this being
succeeded by 7, makes 11). 5th—Eleyen stitches; miss the space over 4,
17 more stitches. 6th—Like 4. This makes a perfect diamond.




OPEN ANTWERP.

1st Row—Hight close stitches; leave a loose loop over
Wi] the space of 5. End with 8. 2nd—Five close over centre
| of 8, and 2 on centre of loop. 38rd—Two cn centre of 5,
5 over 2, and the loop at each side of it. 4th—Begin with




i] 2 stitches on the loop before the 5; 4 on 5, and 2 more on
next loop. 5th—Two on loop, 5 on centre of 8. 6th—Two on centre
of 5; 5 over 2.

ESCALIER STITCH.

In this, the holes fall progressively. Do 9 close stitches
and miss the space of 8. In the next row, do 6, miss the
space of 3, and afterwards do 9, beginning on loop. In
the third, begin with three: and so on. In all these
three last stitches there is no bar across.



CADIZ LACE.

In the first row work six close stitches, miss the
space of two; do two, and again miss the space of
two. In the second row work two on each loop, and miss
the stitches. These two rows, worked alternately, form
the stitch.


FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 103

FAN LACE.
First Row—6 stitches and miss the space of 6. 2nd—
5 stitches on 6, miss the same space as before. 3rd Row
—Miss the stitches, and do 6 stitches on the bar. 4th

Row—like 2nd.



BARCELONA LACE.

The first row is like Sorrento edging. In the second
‘here are four stitches on the long space, and the short is
nissed, These two rows are alternated.

SPOTTED LACE.

Work two close stitches, miss the space of four. In
he second and following rows, work the two on the centre
of the loop.

VENETIAN SPOTTED LACE,

A serics of diamonds of Venetian bars, in each of which
here are four spots of English lace.

FLORENTINE LACE.

Nine close stitches, miss for four; repeat this, and it
makes a foundation. 1st row of pattern—(working back)
—4 stitches on loop, leave a loop across the 9. 2nd—9
on loop, leave loop of 4. 38rd—(working back)—Do 4
stitches on loop, and 4 more on the centre of 9. 4th—
3 stitches on the small loop, 8 more on 4, 3 more on next loop, and leave
a loop over the 4 stitches. These four rows comprise the pattern.



ROMAN LACE,




Begin with 5 stitches close together, leave space for 4,
MUNG] Next Row—4 in the loop, and 4 on the 5. 3rd—Leave

amy) a loop over 3 centre of 5 in first row}; do 5. 4th—4 on 5,

Nw!
muy fiq| 2d 1 more on loop. Sth—Like 3rd, but the loop is to
y

nat

aA BNR) 5. over 5 of 3rd row, so that the holes do not fall in the
same place. ‘The alternate rows are always alike. The repetition of
these, with the 3rd and 5th, form the pattern.
104 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

MECHLIN WHEELS.

Work Venetian bars, at equal distances, in one dirce-
tion of the space to be filled." In crossing them with
other bars, form wheels: you must cover the thread with
buttonhole stitch to the outer line of the wheel; then
carry a thread round, passing the needle through the

bars equidistant from the cross, and hold the round so formed in its

place, with a needle, while covering it with buttonhole stitch. The
wheels sometimes have spots, like dotted Venetian ; sometimes Raleigh
* dots.



SPANISH ROSE POINT.

The very thick and heavy raised work
which characterizes the most valuable
lace. It is used to edge flowers, leaves,
and arabesques ; and is never of the same
thickness throughout ; while the thicker F
and heavier it isin the centre, the richer it is thought. Evans’s Mora-
vian cotton, No. 70, is used for it. Take six lengths, and sew them
down at the beginning of the edge you wish to finish, by taking stitches
across the cotton; after a few stitches, add three or four lengths more
cotton, so as gradually to increase the thickness to the centre, when, in
the same way, diminish the thickness. Having thus prepared the founda-
tion, cover it closely with buttonhole stitch (always done with Evans’s
Mecklenburgh thread, as no other material gives the requisite shiny
appearance). In doing this, add Raleigh dots, or fancy loops, at inter-
vals, to finish the edge.



THE MATERIALS

For point lace have, for the most part, been made on purpose for it.
The cottons are those of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co., Boar’s Head
cotton manufacturers, of Derby. That these materials have been exclu-
sively used in the periodicals may, perhaps, be considered as a proof how
admirably they are adapted for the work. A complete set comprises
their Boar’s Head, Nos. 40, 50, 70, 90, 100, 120, and 150; Moravian,
No. 70; and Mecklenburgh, Nos. 1, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160.

Besides threads there are various braids used. The French white
cotton braid, of different widths; the Italian and Maltese. These last
FANCY NEEDLEWORK, 105

are in fact linen laces, made on a pillow, about a quarter of an inch wide.
The Maltese has a dotted edge; the Italian, a straight one.

Some lace has no foundation but a thread. This is the case with all
Spanish Point. The outlines are then made in Mecklenburgh, No. 1.

The patterns may be drawn on coloured paper, under which linen is
pasted.

French braid is put on, unless very wide, by running it along the
centre ; but Italian and Maltese must be sewed on at both edges.

A knowledge of the stitches we have given will enable a lady not only
to make new lace, but so perfectly to repair and alter the old, that she
may make handsome articles of dress out of what would appear mere
Seraps.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN TATTING, OR FRIVOLITE.

The great simplicity of this kind of work, and the
easiness with which it can be executed, without straining
the eyes, particularly recommend it to invalids and elderly
people.

There are only two stitches, and these are generally
used alternately. They are the English and the French
stitch.



POSITLON OF THE HANDS,

The shuttle being filled with cotton, leave about half-a-yard at the
end. Hold the shuttle between the thumb and the first and second
fingers of the right hand, and the thread, an inch or two from the end,
between the thumb and first finger of the left. Pass the thread round
the fingers of the left hand (holding them rather apart), and bring it
up again between the thumb and forefinger, thus making a circle.

ENGLISH STITCH.

Let the thread between the left hand and the shuttle fall towards you.
Slip the shuttle downwards under the loop, between the first and second
106 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

fingers, and draw it out with a slight jerk towards the right, in a hori-
zontal position, when a loop will be formed on it with the thread which
was passed round the fingers of the left hand. Hold the shuttle steadily,
with the thread stretched out tightly, for if you slacken it, the loop
instantly transfers itself to this thread, and becomes a tight instead of a
slip knot. While holding it thus stretched out, work up the knot, with
the second finger, till it comes close up to the thumb.

FRENCH STITCH.

Instead of letting the thread fall forward, throw it back in a loop over
the finger of the left hand, and pass the shuttle up between the thread
round the fingers and this loop. Draw it up, and complete it as the other.

DOUBLE STITCH.

These two stitches, worked alternately.

PICOT.
j) ‘This is the little loop, or purling, ornamenting the
edge. It is made with a gilt purling-pin. Lay the
point of the pin parallel with and close to the edge of the
stitches. Pass the thread which goes round the fingers over
ud! the pin before making the next stitches. All the picots
on one loop of tatting ought to be made without withdrawing the pin.




TO JOIN LOOPS.

They are always united by the picots, which should be
on the first of any two to be joined. In it draw the cot-
ton which goes round the fingers of the left hand, and

slip the shuttle through this loop; tighten the cotton
i again over the fingers, and continue.

Someumes a needle and thread are used in joining patterns. In this
case leave a longer thread to begin with, and then thread the needle on it.

TO WASH TATTING.

Cover a bottle with flannel, on which tack the tatting ; rub it with a
lather of white soap, and boil it; rinse it out, and pull it very carefully
out before ironing. A piece of clean linen should be laid over it, between
it and the iron.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 107

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN BERLIN WORK.

The following stitches are those most generally used in work on
canvas :

TENTH STITCH.
From one hole, to the next above it on the right hand
side. This stitch and one across a hole, but still in the
same direction, are also used in putting on beads.



CROSS STITCH.

Stitch crossing two threads, both in height and width.
When a line of it has to be done, all the half stitches
should be done, and then all crossed: but each finished
is you proceed.

TAPESTRY STITCH.

A single stitch over one thread in width, and two in
height.



IRISH STITCH.

‘A nice grounding stitch. Alternately you take straight
stitches across two threads, and fur threads in height ;
the four threads are, however, one above and one below
iui the two. In the next row, the four-thread stitch is on a.
MEVEUEUEUE) line with the two; and vice versa.



GERMAN STITCH.
Somewhat similar to the last, but in a sloping direction :
alternately with and without missing a hole.
There are variations in these stitches, but none of con-
sequence.



RAISED BERLIN WORK.
Done over meshes, such as those used for netting. Thread the needles
with as many colours as you have shades; and do each line in the flower
or other design, as you go on, beginning at the bottom. Every stitch in
108 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

this is across one thread in length and two in width. Make a knot at
the end of your ncedleful, and bring the needle up in front of themesh.
Take a tent stitch to the left. Put the wool round the mesh, and take
another tent stitch to the right. Put the wool round the mesh, and pro-
ceed with the next stitch taken to the left. Sew a thread of canvas be-
tween every two rows. Do not withdraw one mesh until the next row
is worked. Raised work requires to be cut by such experienced hands,
that it is always best to send it to a warehouse to be done; and the
Berlin pattern from which it was worked must accompany it, as a guide
to the cutter.

Working on canvas with a cloth ground requires them both to be put
in a frame, allowing for the cloth stretching considerably more than the
canvas. The usual way, when the design is worked, is to draw out the
threads. But it is better to cut them off as closely as possible. Any
parts in the interior of a group in which the ground is seen, should be
worked in Berlin wool, exactly to match the cloth. The work has thus a
raised appearance: if the threads are drawn out, on the contrary, the
stitches appear loose.

TO IRON BERLIN WORK,

This is frequently necessary, when a piece of work has been long in
hand. If at all crooked, it should be first damped, and stretched in a
frame, in the contrary direction. To iron it, lay a piece of the same
canvas on a clear linen cloth, and on it your work, face downward, and
very even. Lay adamp cloth over the back, and iron it very smartly
and rapidly. If there is any silk in it, the iron must not be too hot.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN TAPESTRY WORK.

This term applies, in modern needlework, not so much to the tapestry
stitch, as to designs in two or three seté colours without any shading.
Banner screens, ottomans, and chairs, look particwlarly rich in this sort
of work, which, when several colours are used, has something of the rich,
yet chaste effect, of painted glass. Maize or gold-coloured silk, with
crimson and blue (Royal), is a favourite combination, or gold and rich
claret only. When gold is used with two or more other colours, the
effect is greatly heightened by the former being entirely surrounded by a
single line of black. The design is thus, in fact, outline in black. In
technical phrase, cut with it.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. ‘ 109

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN CLOTH WORK.

Many pretty articles are worked simply by braiding on cloth. They
are ottomans, sofa cushions, music stools, urn mats, slippers, and a great
variety of other articles. Formerly, every lady had to prepare her own
pattern, and either mark it on the material or run the braid on over a tissue
paper, which had to be torn away. Now this, as well as muslin work, is
done by pointing, if numbers are required, or by other simple processes
for single articles. It is both cheaper and better, therefore, to have it
done at shops.

Children’s dresses and cloaks, and every article in merino, should also
be marked for braiding on the material. The experienced hands who
now perform this, adapt the design to the particular shape required.

BRAIDING
Is the usual mode of ornament; and any of the braids we have named
may be used. The end is always to be drawn in to the wrong side; and
points, curves, &c., formed with great care, stitches being taken across
the braid, not along the centre. Use a long needle, and for putting on
Russia braid, take strands of silk out of a length of the braid, previousl¥
cut off.
APPLICATION OR APPLIQUE WORK.

This, being finished with braid, may be considered as forming a part
of it. A design is cut or stamped out in one material, which is laid on
another with a species of gelatine. Velvet is often put on cloth, or one
colour of the latter on another. The edges are then finished with silk or
gold braid or cord—two materials being used for this purpose ; itis rather
expensive, but very handsome.

HOPH’S PATENT IMPERIAL APPLIQUE

Is the ingenious invention of Mr. G. C. Hope, of Hastings. All the
articles usually sold for braiding are to be had in this material, in which,
in the same piece of cloth, the pattern is in one colour, on a ground of
another. It is very effective, especially with the Alliance braid or gold
cord; and is little more expensive than ordinary cloth. Every genuine
piece has ‘‘ Patent Imperial Applique” stamped on it. The colours are
perfectly fast, and do not rub off, as a would-be imitation does. ®
110 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR EMBROIDERY ON MUSLIN.

The stitches used in this are—Two over-cast (satin-stitch) or buttonhole
stitch, sewing over, and various fancy stitches, of which we give diagrams.

BRODERIE ANGLAISE.

The simplest sort of work on muslin, suitable for children’s drawers,
petticoats, &e. The design is formed entirely of holes cut out or formed
by piercing them with a stiletto; previously to this they are traced, then
sewed closely. To make it strong, a stout thread, such as Evans’s Boar’s
Head, No. 10, or 16, ought to be sewed in.

Buttonhole, or over-cast stitch, is the ordinary stitch known by that
name. Itis sometimes graduated, to form leaves, flowers, or scallops.
In this case, each stitch is taken rather longer, or shorter, than that pre-
ceding it. This, like satin-stitch, must be raised thus :—

To Raise Work.—After tracing the outlines accurately, take long
stitches backwards and forwards, in the space to be afterwards covered
over, making it thickest in the middle, or widest part. Take care to
keep this within the outlines,

% SATIN STITCH.
A series of stitches taken across any leaf or petal, closely and regularly.
GUIPURE,

This term is applied now to embroidery on muslin, held together by
bars, and all the muslin ground cut away.

SWISS LACE.

Muslin and lace worked together so that the latter forms the ground
and the former the pattern, all that which covers the ground being cut
away after the work is done.

FANCY STITCILES,
4} Point d’Echelle.—A series of small holes, close toge-
ther, forming the edge of a design in Swiss lace.
: |\Vorked with a rather coarse neeedle, and fine thread,
f|two or three stitches being taken in every hole formed by
fijthe needle. The edge is then sewed over.





WEM-STITCH.
Draw out four threads, and sew over three of those in
q|the opposite direction, to form a bar, from one edge to the
other. Sew down the next three. Continue thus. Some-
times hem-stitch is done when it is impossible to draw out
threads, not being ina straight line. In that case, with


FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 111

a coarse necdle, work the holes to resemble this. The edges must after-
wards be sewed over, to keep the holes clear.

MOURNING WEM-STITCH. :

For Handkerchiefs.—Leaving sufficient cambric for the
hem, draw out nine threads, and leave three, alternately,
for any depth you wish it to be. Take a thread longer
than the side of the handkerchief, and having fastened
it on, at the right hand, pass your needle backwards
under the third and fourth threads from the edge, lifting up on the point
the first and second. Thus the two first of every four threads come
before the others. Each line must be done with a single needleful of
thread, fastened off at the end. Then the bar of three between must be
sewed over, on the wrong side, a single stitch being taken between every
four threads.

thea nant
79299229999



FANCY STITCILES.

No 1.—Draw three threads and leave three alternately,
in both directions, on the space to be ornamented. Sew
over the three threads, on the wrong side, for bars; and
draw spots at intervals, as seen in the engraving.



No. 2.—Draw four and leave four each way. Half
cover one bar, and then take the thread across the space.
Work the half of this bar, and round the corner, and
cross the thread already found in the space with another
< to form the cross. Cover the half of the bar to which you
have taken the needle, and proceed to put the cross in another square.



No. 3.—Draw out six threads, and leave twelve, in
both directions. Then work round every three of the
twelve to form the whole into four bars,



No. 4.—Prepare like last. Make the two outer three
into bars, but darn the inner six, backwards and forwards
from the centre, to make a single one, These can be
varied by working spots in the squares.


112 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

No 5.—Draw out three, and leave four both ways.
Make the threads into bars, and carry the middle diago-
nally across, to make the lines seen in the engraving.



No. 6.—In squares formed of Venetian bars (see
Point Lace stitches, p. 96). Make a cross as for English
lace spots, instead of which work a Venetian dot between
every two threads.

No. 7.—A space filled with lace on which, instead of
English spots, four of Venetian dots united in the centre
are worked. The worker’s ingenuity may be exercised
in producing other stitches from these.



GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS IN TAMBOUR WORK.

The instrument is a needle with a point like that of a crochet hook,
screwed into an ivory handle. The small steel serew which secures
the needle in its place is kept by the thumb in holding the instrument,
as it then forms a sort of guide in twisting the hook. The material to
be tambour must be stretched in a frame. ‘The stitch exactly resembles
the ordinary chain-stitch. A pattern may be worked entirely on one
fabric. ‘Thus veils are worked, and muslin dresses. But generally one
material is applique on another, as muslin on lace. Hold the thread
under the work with the thumb and first finger of the left hand, close
under the place where the pattern begins. Insert the hook with the
right, and draw up a loop of the thread. Holding the loop on the hook,
again insert it, a little in advance, and draw up a fresh loop through the
one already formed. Continue this until the work is done. Outlines
are always the first parts to be done ; and this section of any flower or
leaf, being completed, fill it up or finish it before proceeding. Where
the whole design has to be outlined or edged with a particular material,
however, as with gold thread, this must be done last. To fasten off, draw
the thread on the wrong side, and work with a common needle.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 113

MATERIALS FOR BERLIN WORK.

The term generally applied to work done on canvas with wools, silks,
or beads. The following are the principal kinds :-—

PENELOPE CANVAS.

There is, in this canvas, alternately a large and small
#as§/ space between the threads. This forming a guide to the
eye, it is much the easiest canvas to work upon. The
numbers in which it is made are 5-8, 10-6, 12-7, 14-8,

iH| 16-9, 18-10, 19-11, 20-12, 22-13, 24-14, 10-15, 40-17,
50-18. ‘Lhe lower figure of each pair indicates the number of stitches in
an inch. Cross stitch only can be worked on Penelope canyas, except with
beads.



PATENT OR FRENCH CANVAS

Has the threads placed at even distances. The sizes are
the same as in the Penelope.



PATENT OR FRENCH GERMAN CANVAS

Has every tenth thread of a different colour. This assists the eye ; but
as the material itself is not nearly so good as the French, and as, in
particular, it has the defect of not having the horizontal and diagonal
lines at equal distances, it is very little used. Never attempt to work
anything round, such as a wreath, on German canvas, as it would
become oblong.
SILK CANVAS
Always has the threads at equal distances. It is made in various
widths, from two inches for braces, to three-quarters of a yard or more.
It is made black and white. In purchasing canvas, lay it over some
material of a different colour, to see if there are many knots or irregu-
larities in the threads. White silk canvas is usually of a beautiful
pearly colour.
IMITATION SILK CANVAS. a

A much cheaper material than the real. It is often used for large
pieces of work, and looks very well when new. Afterwards it may be
grounded on Irish or German stitch.

I
114 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

RAILWAY CANVAS.

A coarse, claret canvas, used for banner screens and
other such purposes. It has eight threads to the inch,
and is 20 inches wide. Worked in cross stitch with
eight-thread wool. Must be worked in a frame, or it
will crease.



JAVA CANVAS.

This has no holes between. It is, in fact, more like a cloth woven
with double threads each way. It is little used. We have brown,
salmon, and stone before us, all very coarse; and a finer dark blue.
Some is three-quarters of a yard wide ; the coarsest, five-cighths.

WOOLS TO USE WITH CANVAS.

No. 20 is the coarsest size that can be properly used with four-thread
Berlin wool. Nos. 16 and 18 are well adapted for cight-thread ; and
14 may be used with this wool by those who do not pull their hands too
tightly. If they do, it is necessary to cross the stitches twice in one
direction. For coarser numbers than 12, the wool must be used twice
in both directions. Filoselle is equal in thickness to eight-thread Berlin,
therefore can be used in the same way.

SILK MATERIALS.

CROCHET SILK.

A hard-twisted silk, used for knitting and crochet. The sizes varv
from 1 to 5; the latter being the finest. Nos. 1, 2, and 3, are the most
common. Observe, there is an immense difference both in the quality
and price of crochet silk. Some work into a substance with scarcely
any more gloss thancotton. In all respectable Berlin houses, the maker’s
name is attached to every skein. Pearsall’s silks hold a high position,
both for quality and tint.

NETTING SILK

Is not twisted so hard as crochet silk. The crochet silk is, however,
often used for it.

SOIE D'AVIGNON.
This is extremely fine silk, sold in reels. It is suited for the very
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 115

finest (or fairy) netting. It is not generally obtainable, but is frequently
mentioned in the periodicals.
CHINE SILK.
Netting or crochet silk shaded in more colours than one. Sold in
reels or skeins.
OMBRE SILK.
Silk shaded in tints of one colour only.

FLOSS SILK,

Sold in short twisted skeins. A very beautiful material, used in
working flowers, &e.

DACCA SILK.

Used much in embroidery ; it is asort of medium between the hard-
twisted crochet silk and the floss, which it rather resembles ; but it is
put up in longer skeins.

FILOSELLE.

A soarse fabric, not of pure silk, although extremely brilliant, and
capable of receiving the finest dyes. It is sold in large skeins, each
weighing about a quarter of an ounce. Used much in tapestry and the
coarser sorts of embroidery.

CHINA SILK.

A very fine silk, sold on very small reels.

SEWING SILK.
Sold in long skeins.
CHENILLES.
This beautiful substance presents the appearance of velvet. It is
made in various thicknesses.
EMBROIDERY CHENILLE
Is not much coarser than crochet silk. Itis greatly used in embroidery
on canvas, satin, or cloth. [
There are gradations from this size to the thickness of a finger. The
very thick is called Rolio Chenille.
WIRE CHENILLE. %
This is made in as many thicknesses as the other. A wire is worked
in the centre of it, so that it can be formed into loops, leaves, &c.
116 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

WOOLS.

The ordinary kinds are Shetland, Berlin, fleecy, and carpet yarn ;
also worsted, lamb’s wool, and Pyrenees,

SHETLAND.
A very fine wool, used for veils, scarfs, shawls, &c. It is not very
much twisted.

PYRENEES,

This wool is of nearly the same thickness as Shetland, but more
twisted. The dye of the coloured Pyrenees is remarkably beautiful and
fast, owing, it is said, to some peculiar property of the waters on the
mountains whence it derives its name. It is rarely met with genuine
in this country.

BERLIN WOOL.

Only procurable in two thicknesses, four-thread and eight-thread, com-
monly called single and double Berlin. There are at least a thousand
shades of this wool.

FLEECY.
A cheaper wool than Berlin, and now obtainable in a number of beau-
tiful colours, It is made in two-thread, four, six, eight, ten, and twelve-
thread, and is sold by the pound.

CARPET YARN,
A cheap wool, used much for comforters and other articles for the
soldiers in the Crimea.

WORSTED AND LAMB’S WOOL.
Used for knitting stockings, &e.

PATENT KNITTING WOOL.

Patented by Whytock, Edinburgh. This wool is sold in bales of
various sizes, each exactly calculated to do some certain piece of work
—as an antimacassar, a table cover, &e. It is dyed so, that by fol-
lowing the arrangements, the pattern, in varied colours, will appear.
The balls are either of worsted or Berlin wool. The latter are the most
expensive. Directions are sold with each ball. The knitting is always
moss-stitch.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 117

HUTTON’S PATENT ORNE BALTS.

An improvement on the former. Some are adapted for crochet and
some for knitting.

CREWELS,

Fine wool, sold in tightly-twisted skeins, like crochet silk. Used for
samplers. Very little used. It is suitable, however, for embroidering
on muslin.

CRYSTAL WOOLS
‘Are wools round which bright gold or silver paper, or foil, is wound.
This gives them a very gay appearance. They are sometimes called
spangled wools.

PEARL WOOL.

This is a dye of modern invention. The wool is alternately white’and
coloured, in one, two, or three colours, each not more than a quarter of
an inch in length. It is a variety of Berlin made in four-thread or

eight-thread,
CHINE WOOL.

Wool shaded in various colours.

OMBRE WOOL, OR SHADED WOOL.
Shaded in one colouring. Observe that every colour but blue is pretty
in this dye.
CRYSTAL TWINE,
A fine cord, sold in balls, either coloured, or to imitate pure gold or
silver. The two latter are called gold twine and silver twine.

CROCHET CORD.
This is just like window-blind cord, but white, and of various thick-
nesses ; covered with wool or silk, in crochet, for mats.
Caruntille, a fine wire used in flowers.



COTTONS.

_ KNITTING COTTON,

A soft, but twisted cotton; used for a variety of purpéses, Sold by
the pound.
BOAR’S-HEAD CROCHET COTTON.

Manufactured by Messrs. W. Evans and Co., of Derby.. It is a par-
118 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

ticularly firm, even, and well-twisted material, and washes extremely
well. The numbers run from 1 to150. It is the cotton in which all the
erochets and other valuable designs in that popular periodical, the
Famity Frrenp, are worked, and therefore should always be procured
if it is of consequence to produce articles exactly similar to the pattern.
Every reel of the genuine Boar’s-Head has a boar’s head on the label, at
the top of it. This device being the family crest of the manufacturers.

TATTING COTTON.
A softyet strong cotton, suited for thiswork, and manufactured exclu-
sively by the same firm.

MECKLENBURGH THREAD.
This is a linen thread, used in many designs. It should also find a
place in the workbox of every lady, as it should be used in mending
linen, cambric, &e. Itis known as Evans’s Mecklenburgh thread.

ROYAL EMBROIDERY COTTON.

This is used for the very fashionable embroidering and Broderic
Anglaise, on muslin, long-cloth, or French cambric. It is sold in packets,
each containing a dozen skeins; and is, like all the others, the manu-
facture of Messrs. Walter Evans and Co.

MORAVIAN THREAD

Is a soft, untwisted cotton, varying in the number of threads composing

a strand.
EVANS’S PATENT GLACE THREAD.

This thread has a perfectly smooth and shining surface, and is particu-
larly adapted for sewing.
COLOURED COTTONS.
These are French: They are scarlet, rose, greens, browns, lilaes, blues,
and black ; but the scarlet, rose, and black are the only colours that will
really wash well,

BRAIDS, (SILK)

RUSSIAN BRAID
Is flat, and with even edges. Each knot is ofone colour only, The best
is firm, even, and glossy,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 119

ALLIANCE BRAID,
This is the same plait as the Russian, but of two colours; one at each
edge. It is considerably dearer than Russian.

SARDINIAN BRAID.
The same plait, but of two or more colours blended ; and not, like the
Alliance, each one-half the width of the braid.

STAR BRAID.
This braid appears like a succession of diamonds ; the edges, therefore,
are in points. It is an extremely pretty braid.

EUGENIE BRAID,
This appears as if crimped, or waved with irons.

ALBERT BRAID
Is more properly a fine fancy cord. For sofa cushions and ottomans it
has a much richer effect than flat braid, especially if two shades or colours
are laid on close together.
SOUTACHE.

A French name for very pretty ornamental braids, often combining
gold and silver with chenilles, silk, &e. They are made in every variety
of shade and pattern. Sold in pieces of about thirteen yards long.

Broad silk braids, used for aprons, children’s dresses, &ec., are rarely
found in England.

COTTON BRAIDS.

FRENCH WHITE COTTON BRAID.
The.term French applies to the plait, which looks as ifwoven. The
best comes from Paris, and is very firm, even, and close; varies in size
from No. 1 (very narrow) to No. 14.

MOHAIR BRAID.
Narrow, closely woven, brown or blaek silk braid, for chains.

RUSSIA COTTON BRAID 7

Is plaited like the hair formed into what is called the Grecian plait. It
is used for children’s dresses.
120 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

WAVED BRAID
1s another variety, used for the same purpose.

EUGENIE TAPE
Is a cotton braid, crimped like the Eugenie braid. It is nearly one-
third of an inch wide.
ITALIAN BRAID.

An insertion, made on the pillow, of Evans’s Mecklenburgh thread.
Used in making or mending Italian Point Lace.

MALTESE BRAID.
The same, made with a dotted edge.

WORSTED BRAID,

That usually sold is narrow, and intended for braiding antimacassars,
&c. It is in various colours, and washes well. It can also be had wider,
for children’s dresses.

MATERIALS IN METAL.

GOLD BRAID,

The Parisian is much superior to the English for flexibility and purity.
It is made in various widths. The English braid is usually Russian
plait. It may be had either pure, or washed. The former only can be
used for any article intended for durability.

SILVER BRAID
Is very little used. —
GOLD CORD OR THREAD.
Sold in small skeins, varying from No. 0 (the finest) to No. 6. This,
also, is of various qualities. It is sometimes sold on reels.
Silver thread is not so much used, but it is very pretty for purses, &e. ;
either for bridal or mourning purses.

BOURDON.

A cord, covered with gold or silver, used much by the Parisians in
“erochet, with coloured silks. It is made in various sizes, and is ex-
tremely brilliant, but not very durable.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 121

BULLION.
This is either dead or bright gold. It isa sort of tube of gold, used
in embroidery. It also is of two qualities. 4

SPANGLES,
Though little used, yet make pretty decorations in embroidery.

All these materials should be kept in silver, and then an outer cover-
ing of blue paper ; and, especially, not be exposed to gas.

FILET.
A French material exactly imitating netting. It is both black and
white, and with the mesh of various sizes. To get a piece to imitate
square netting, it must be cut on the cross.

GUIPURE NET.
A faney net which, laid under muslin and applique, gives the appear-
ance of bars.
BRUSSELS NET.
A very soft fine net, used in Swiss Lace.

TOILE CIRE.

An oil cloth, much used in muslin work ; it is green on one side, and

black on the other. If good, it is very thin and flexible. It differs
much in quality, the English generally being thick and hard. -

BEADS.

“0. P.” We cannot at all discover the origin of this extraordinary
name for the large beads. ‘They were at first used principally for mats
and table covers; for which indeed, on account of their rough sharp
edges, they were singularly unfit. They make beautiful pendant vases
for flowers, decorations for chandeliers, and similar articles. ‘They are
sold in bunches of 12 strings; they are either clear or opaque. If the
latter, it would appear that they are painted on the inside, with a colour
different to that of the glass itself. They are technically termed CLEAR,
and Frutep. ‘The latter are always dearest. They are manufactured in

Bohemia.
POUND BEADS.

These are like seed beads, except in size. Those in most general use
122 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

are distinguished at No. 1, 2, and 8. No. 1 is rarely used, except for
grounding mats worked in wools and silks. No. 2 is used for tables,
ottomans, table borders, and such things. No. 3 is fit for footstools,
handscreens, and fine articles. The greatest variety of colours and
shades is to be had in this size. It is next to seed beads in its dimen-
sions, All these are sold by the ounce.

SEED BEADS,

Very small beads, for crests, cigar-cases, and very delicate work

generally, Can only be used with proper beading or jeweller’s needles,
and fine white silk, Sold in small hanks of ten strings each.

CULT BEADS.
These, instead of having a round smooth surface, are cut in angles.
They are more brilliant as well as more expensive than the ordinary
kinds, Black, ruby, and garnet are the colours usually obtainable.

FANCY BEADS
Are almost infinite in their variety of form, size, and colour. Many are
used in ornamenting mats and fancy baskets. Some, which are round,
are of plain glass, silvered or gilt, to look like gold, silver, or stecl
beads. The flat-round ones, termed sequins, both gilt and of coloured
glass, are used much in trimming head-dresses. All are sold by the string

or bunch.
METAL BEADS

Are gold, silver, steel, and blue steel. The two former may be had
either cut or round, the last-named kind being considered the best.
They are~sold in small bunches, marked trom 2 to 12. The sizes from
9 to 12, being very large, are not generally to be obtained.

BUGLES
Are tubes of glass, varying both in length and thickness. The black
and white are used for trimming articles of mourning. Coloured bugles
have lately been introduced. Green, purple, bronze, and blue. They
are sold by the ounce or pound.
PROPER CANVAS FOR BEADS.
With No. 1, Canvas No. 18.
», No. 2, Canvas No. 19.
», No. 3, Canvas No. 22.

Although classed under these three heads, the beads which will work
FANCY NEEDLEWORK, 123 .

together are not always of one size. Canvas must always be selected
which will suit the largest beads of the size.

IMPLEMENTS.

FOR CROCHET.

A needle of ivory, bone, or steel, with a hook at the end; whatever
the material, the hook should be rounded at the end, and quite free from
sharpness. We use Boulton and Son’s tapered hooks, numbered from
12 to 24, including all the numbers; 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24, make an
excellent and serviceable set.

FOR KNITTING.

Needles (or pins, as they are sometimes called,) of bone, ivory, or steel.
They should be evenly thick throughout, except the ends, tapered to a
point without any sharpness. Some have knobs of ivory to prevent the
work from slipping off at one end. Unless when, from the size of the
work, long needles are indispensable, shoré ones will be found by far the
most convenient.

FOR TATTING.

Either a shuttle of tortoiseshell or ivory, or a netting-needle, with
a purling pin, attached by a small chain to a ring, which slips over the
thumb.

FOR NETTING.

A netting-needle, of ivory, wood, or steel, with a round or flat mesh ;

the former are measured in a gauge, the latter by the width.

A LUCETTE
Isasmall ivory instrument, something in the form of an Irish harp,
used for making little chains. As they can now, however, be had ata
lower price than the silk required for making one costs, the lucette is
very little used.
FOR BEADWORK.

Pound beads can be put on with fine ordinary needles, but the beading-
needles, or jeweller’s needles, are used for seed-beads. These latter
are pieces of silver wire twisted from the middle, which leaves a loop
forming the eye.
124 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

ELLIPTIC
Needles, used for embroidering, have oval eyes.
RUG NEEDLES,
Or Tapestry needles, have long eyes and blunt points.

CHENILLE NEEDLES
Have the same description of eyes, and sharp points.

GAUGE,

This is an instrument for measuring the size of knitting-needles,
netting-meshes, and crochet-hooks. The two former articles are gauged
by being slipped down into the holes, when they are, respectively, of the
numbers which the holes are marked. ‘The crochet-hooks are measured
by slipping the widest part of the hook itself into the narrow channel
before the hole. The bell gauge is the least expensive of all good gauges,
and is the one by which our own designs are written. Those in ivory are
as durable, but more expensive. The eagle card-board gauge is now
unobtainable ; and, being of so fragile a material, was never so service-
able as the others,

TRIMMINGS.

FOR SOFA CUSHIONS.
Four tassels, and a length of cord 24 or 3 yards, form what is called a
sect. We show the leading kinds.



Dresden. Grecian, Eugenie. Chenille,

GERTRUDE, LIKE GRECIAN, WITH PURSE SILK.
These are the most expensive. They are exti emely beautiful, in every
combination of colours,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK, 125

FOR BANNER SCREENS.

1} yards of gimp, j-yard of fringe, 2 pairs of tassels, connected by a

cord 5-8ths long, and 2 yards of cord, all to match.
GIMPs
Are made in all varieties of pattern and colour. They trim screens and
baskets very prettily.
SCREEN HANDLES,
Gilt, ivory, or passementerie,— of which last we give an engraving.



The last named are very splendid, and should combine all the colours
used in the screen, They are only obtainable in Paris.
FRINGES.

Silk or bullion. The latter are twisted, the former have the threads of
silk loose. The price depends on the closeness, and the depth; 3 inches,
so_much ; 34, so much more ; and so on.

CORDS
Are made in such infinite varicties, it is impossible to enumerate them,
They are of every thickness, and almost of every material.

TO PRESERVE MATERIALS FROM INJURY.

STEEL BEADS,

If these show any indication of rust, wear them in your pocket for a
few days. It will remove any specks, especially if you are near a
fire.

GOLD AND SILVER BEADS.

Keep them wrapped up in silver-paper, so that no two bunches rub
against each other. They should then be wrapped in coarse brown
paper, and kept in a tightly-closed box.
126 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

GOLD AND SILVER THREAD AND BRAID
Should always be kept in silver-paper, and away from air or gas.
Rubbing them slightly with jeweller’s paper will brighten them.

WHITE ARTICLES,
As fringe, ribbon, silk, &c., are best kept in the very coarsest brown
paper, and in a closed box.
VIOLET.

It is impossible to prevent this beautiful colour from fading; but if
kept in silver-paper, and away from air or gas, it will be preserved as
long it canbe. Silks, and silk braids of all colours, should be kept in
covered boxes.

TO QUILL RIBBON FOR TRIMMING.

Allow nearly three times as much ribbon as the length required ; have
a piece of narrow tape to run it on; take a stitch or two to fasten the
tape and centre of the width of the ribbon; make a small plait towards
the right, and another close to it, but not folding over it, to the left ;
run them down lightly, through the tape; and this double plait being
made, leave about half the length of ribbon plain, before making another.
This looks very much handsomer than a fuller quilling. A gold or faney
cord should afterwards be run along the centre to hide the stitches.

TO MAKE UP SOFA CUSHIONS.

The cushion should not be too soft, as much of the beauty of the work
is then hid. Cut a stout calico lining, on the cross, and cover one side
of each piece with fine wadding; of this make the bag, and fill it with
down. ‘This is much the finest way of making the pillow. If the cover-
ing is in white silk canvas, it should be lined with white satin. The
back may be of tabaret, satin, or velvet. Make the worked part and the
back into a case, in which slip the pillow. Finish with cord or gimp,
and tassels.

TO MAKE UP CARRIAGE BAGS.

Very nice frames are sold for these. They are of a stout dark calico
on the outside, and nice striped ditto inside, with a handkerchief pocket.
The sides are of leather; and the upper part of the frame and the handles
are of the same. The work should be one piece for both sides—the can-
vas or cloth edges turned in at the sides, and sewed to the edges of the
bag. At the top, the edge of the canvas must be laid under the leather,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 127

which is stitched down over it. The handles are merely tacked on.
They must be removed for mounting, and afterwards carefully sewed
down in the same places, over the canvas. Cover all the seams, and the
edges of the leather along the top, with a fine silk cord. Observe that
the work must be made to fit the frame, not the latter to fit the work, as
frames are made only in certain gradations of size, except to order; and
what is called an out size, even if smaller, always is more expensive.

TO MAKE UP BANNER SCREENS.

These are either mounted on a pole, or on an apparatus for fastening to
the chimney-piece. In either case the work must be lined with silk of
the same colour as the ground, the bottom cut into a handsome scalloped
form, with a handsome fringe, the sides finished with gimp, and two
pairs of tassels; the top draped with cord. The trimming for a banner
screen must always be made expressly for it. Whether with a pole or
chimney fitting, the top is always sewed on gilt rings run on the pole.

TO MOUNT HAND SCREENS.

Wire frames, silk or satin fancy cords, or quilled ribbon, fringe, and
handles are requisite. If the screens be transparent, as netting, both
sides of the frame must be covered with satin. If white silk canvas,
one side with white satin, and the other with silk or satin of the colour
of the fringe. Then sew on the work very evenly. Add the fringe,
and, afterwards, the ribbon or cords and handles. Two cords, at least,
should be used. One to match the fringe, and the other of a lighter
material, such as chenille and satin blended.

TO INCREASE THE SIZE OF AN ENGRAVED PATTERN.

It is frequently necessary to give, in the periodicals, a design which
cannot be engraved of the full size. This causes some trouble to those
who cannot readily enlarge'a pattern for themselves. The method of
doing it is, however, very simple. Take a piece of paper, the full size
required for the article, and rule lines across it, at equal distances,
throughout the length and width. Rule the same number of lines, also
at equal distances, on the reduced pattern. The squares will of course
be much smaller. It will be easy, with this aid to the eye, to get every
scroll and flower in a square of the small pattern into the same space of
the large one. When half of a collar or any other article is marked,
if the other half corresponds with it, as it usually does, it ought to be
transferred to tracing-paper, by means of which the other half may be
taken.
128 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY,

DRAWING PAPER
Used for taking off patterns should be, noté the tissue paper, but very
thin bank post, or ¢raciny paper—a paper rendered transparent with oil.
It may be purchased of any artist’s colourman.

CONTRACTIONS IN CROCHET.
ch. Chain-stitch.
deh. Double chain-stitch, or braid-stitch.
sl. Slip-stitch.
se. Single crochet.
sde. Short double crochet.
de. Double crochet.
ste. Short treble crochet.
te. Treble crochet.
lte. Long treble crochet.
m. Miss.

CONTRACTIONS IN TATTING.

D. Double stitch ; one French and one English
P. Picot.
J. Join.
Loop, Any number of stitches drawn up.

CONTRACTIONS IN KNITTING,

K. Knit (plain knit.)

P. Purl.

M. Make (increase.)

K 2t. Knit two as one. K 3t. Knit three as one.

D1. Decrease one, by taking off a loop without knitting ; then knit
one, and pass the other over it.

D2. Decrease two; slip one; knit two together, and pass the slip-
stitch over.

Sl Slip.

R. Raise.

T.K. Twisted knitted stitch.

T.P. Twisted purl stitch.

CONTRACTIONS IN NETTING.
Pn. Plain netting. The ordinary stitch.
Dn. Double stitch. The thread twice round the mesh.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 129

Ln. Long stitch. A stitch in which the knot is not to come close up
to the mesh.

D. Draw out the mesh, (before the row is completed.)

M. Miss.

PRINTERS’ MARKS,
In the directions for every kind of work.

These consist of crosses X—sometimes printed as the ordinary let-
ter X ; asterisks *—daggers +. They are to indicate repetitions in any
row or round. ‘Two similar ones are placed at the beginning and end of
any part to be repeated, and the number of times is written after the
last. Thus x 3 de, 5 ch, miss 4, X 3 times, would, if written in full,
be 3 de, 5 ch, miss 4; 3 dc, dch, miss 4; 3 de, 5 ch, miss 4.

Sometimes one pair of marks is used within another—thus x 5 de,
3 ch, miss 2; * 1 de, 3 ch, miss 2 * twice; 4 de, 2 ch, miss 1 x twice.
This written at length, would be 5 de, 3 ch, miss 2, 1 de, 3 ch, miss 2 ;
1 de, 3 ch, miss 2; 4 de, 2 ch, miss 1; 5 de, 3 ch, miss 2; 1 de, 3 ch,
miss 2; 4 de, 2 ch, miss 1.

This example will show how much valuable space is saved by the adop-
tion of these very simple and comprehensible terms.

Round.—A line of work beginning and ending at the same place, with-
out turning back.

tow.—A line of work which requires you to turn it in order to recom-
mence. Example:—We speak of rows in a garter, and rounds in a
stocking.

* said Mrs. Selby, ‘‘having made ourselves acquainted

“And now,’
with all the stitches used in Fancy Needlework, and with the proper
materials and how to keep and use them, we come to afew useful and

elegant designs.”
130 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

DESIGNS.

VINE LEAF TRAVELLING CAP FOR MY BROTHER.

Materials.—Rich brown cloth, black velvet leaves, small steel rings, black silk,
gold braid, and thread.

This cap, which may be used for either a travelling or a smoking
cap, is done in application. Our young ladies will doubtless
remember the small rings which, covered with crochet, were used some
time ago for purses. The bunches
of grapes in this design are formed.
in the same way; covered with
crochet, and sewed on the cloth. The
leaves are of velvet, stamped out,
and appliqué on the cloth, bordered
with gold braid on the outside, and
with thread on the inside.

For a travelling cap there should
be no ears, and, as warmth is an
object, it should be wadded; but for
a smoking cap, ordinary bed-tick is
the best lining, with sarsnet inside
it. The tick makes it nice and firm; and should be brought down within
an inch of the edge.

The cars of the travelling cap are made separately, and are not orna-
mented, as they are frequently tucked in the cap.

The tassel, of passementerie, is made to unite all the colours of the eap
itself.



HWAND-SCREEN IN RAISED BERLIN WORK.

Materials.—% of a yard of white silk canvas, } yard wide; a suitable Berlin
pattern, a paper of rug needles, some ivory meshes, and all the silks and Berlin wool
that may be required for the pattern. 3

The demand there is at the present moment for raised Berlin work (or
velvet wool work, as it is sometimes called), would go far to prove the
truth of the adage, that there is nothing new under the sun: this very
work haying, a year or two ago, been considered quite out of date, since
FANCY NEEDLEWORE 151

little or none of it had been done for many previous years. By raised
Berlin work, we wnilerstand a piece of work done from a Berlia pattern
in which the principal parts, what-
ever they may be, are worked in
relief.

In a flower piece, the flowers
themselves are thus raised. In the
design we sclect for our hand-
sereen, the bird only is worked in
relief. You will begin, therefore,
by placing the canvas very evenly
in a frame, and doing all those
parts of the design which are to be
worked in the usual way. Then
remove the canyas, cover up those
parts completed, and begin by
threading, with the different wools,
as many needles as you haye
shades. A stitch in raised work
ocenpies as many threads as an
ordinary cross-stitch, that is, two
in height, and two in width. Take
the needle threaded with the first
shade used at the lower part of the



pattern, and the left hand side; hold a mesh evenly along the canyas
below the line of two horizontal threads to be worked, and slip the end
of the wool under the mesh. Insert the needle under two threads in
height, and one in width from /eft to right, keeping the end of the wool
on the right of your stitch, Now take a similar stitch from right to left,
inserting the needle two threads in width from the first stitch, and
bringing it out én the same place. Pass the wool round the mesh, and
you are ready to do the second stitch, and all the following ones, in pre-
cisely the same way. When a new shade is to be introduced in the row,
instead of passing the wool of the old one round the mesh, leave it hang-
ing over it, and introduce the new one under the mesh. At any distance
in the same row, a shade may be re-introduced merely by bringing it
again under the mesh. When one row is done, proceed to the next with
anew mesh; and it will be found convenient not to withdraw the mesh
132 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

from a row until two or three lines beyond it are completed. The meshes
should be wide in proportion to the dimensions of the flower or other
pattern to be worked, but never less than half an inch. It follows, as a
matter of course, that raised work requires a much larger quantity of
wool than an ordinary piece of Berlin work.

When all the pattern is completed, the canvas, if not silk, will require
grounding ; but all small articles, such as pole and hand-sereens, should
be done on silk canyas. Cutting the raised work is an art of itself, and
requires much more practice than any amateur is likely to possess to do
it well. It is usual to send the work to a shop, accompanied by the
original pattern, and to have it done there by people accustomed to it.
Those who like to try for themselves must have a pair of long thin
scissors, with which they eut the loops; and then the mass of ends must
be formed into the shape of the natural article. In flowers, for instance,
each petal must be thinned at the edges, and raised in the middle; in
birds, the head must be rounded ; the form of the wings, tail, and body
perfectly preserved. A large glass bead makes the eye of the bird.

If done correctly, there should be no ends, knots, or other irregularities
on the wrong side of this raised work. Each stitch appears, at the back,
in the form of a V, and all are as distinct as in a Berlin pattern, the ends
being entirely on the right side. For better security, it is advisable to
brush over the back of the raised work with thick gum-water. It must
be borne in mind that the thicker and more raised the work, the oftener
it may be re-cut, and thus renovated.

There are several other ways of doing the stitch of raised work; but
after giving a fair trial to all, we have found that described in our pre-
sent article the best and firmest than can be done; and for this reason
we have no hesitation in recommending it.

The screen, when completed, must be stretched on a hexagon wire
frame, covered with satin, and trimmed like the netted ones, with fringe,
cord, and handles, Ivory handles are the most suitable for anything
that is worked in white silk canvas,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 133

BIBLE MARKERS.

Materials.—1 reel Boar’s Head Cotton No. 40. Two pennyworth of finely-

perforated card-board ; 2 strings of fine seed pearls; 1} yards of purple, watered or
stout sarsnet ribbon.

For the Long Cross, which is composed of three separate crosses, cut
out in perforated board the cross, the same size as in engraving. Then



two others, cach a size less. On the smallest work the pearls. Then sew
this beaded cross on to the next-sized cross; then on to the largest.
Double up the end of the ribbon so as to hide it under the transverse part
of the cross. Now sew the latter on to the ribbon. Cut ott three other
crosses. Place one on the other, and sew on to the back.

The Medieval Cross is of one picce of board only. Cut it to the size
of the engraving. Pearl it, and sew as directed for the largest cross.
134 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



PEN-WIPER FOR PAPA’S WRITING TABLE.

Materials.— Messrs. Walter Evans & Co.’s No, 20 Boar’s Head Cotton; a piece
of velvet four inches square; half an ounce of beads of each kind, namely, white
chalk, crystal, and about forty beads of cut garnet, all to be of the same size; a tiny
piece of gold paper, the size of the engraved star; two yards of narrow ribbon at a
halfpenny or a penny per yard; and some fine cloth or coloured flannel to make the
circles for absorbing the ink, and a piece of black stiff net (such as is used for lining
curtains of bonnets) of the same size as the velvet.

First cut in gold paper the size and shape of the engraved star, then
cut a circle of velvet a little over three and a-half inches in diameter.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 135

Tack this circle on to the net, then bind both together at the edge with the
ribbon; then mark the centre and place the gold star upon it. Tack
down the point of cach leaf with one single stitch, and secure it in the
same way in the centre. Now thread four garnet beads, and mark each
division of leaf with four garnet, then thread six garnet, and tack each
centre of leaf until within a small portion of the point. At the end of
these garnet place three chalk beads. Now fill up the remainder of each
leaf with crystal beads—but to terminate at the point of leaf with two or
three chalk beads, as may be required.
The centre is formed by

,
threading eight chalk beads 7
and letting them icin raised ;
I \

loops across, for about four i : | ae a

loops, then reversing them, \ Vv /

so as to form a raised \ 3

centre. ie co .
The detached sprigs are | -~ ~

made by threading four <

erystal beads, making a an

slanting stitch to the right
the length of these four

beads, then four beads and f A \
a slanting stitch to the left. jo \ ;
Then two beads and a

straight stitch for the stem. J>

Then again four beads on
each side, and two beads straight, to finish the stem.

Hor the edge, Run the ribbon up and down in a zigzag form, so that
when drawn up very close it forms a small pointed trimming ; sew this on
to the edge; and for the bead circles, thread seven crystal beads; place
the needle upwards through the two first beads, which will draw them
up in acircle ; sew these down on the ribbon ; then sew one white chalk
bead in the centre,
136 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

EMBROIDERED SHOE FOR BABY,

Materials.—White kerseymere, a skein of green ombré silk, a skein of scarlet or
lilac ombré ditto, and one of coarse white sewing silk; also flannel and soft jaconet
muslin, for lining.

This pretty little shoe is formed of three pieces ; namely, the sole, the
toe, and the heel-piece. The two latter are embroidered. On the toe
is a small bouquet of flowers and leaves, worked in common embroidery
stitch, the shading of the silk producing the requisite variations. Over
the instep another small group of flowers is worked. Itound the ankle
is a line of herring-bone, done
with the green silk.

When all the embroidery is
finished, cut out a lining for each
part in flannel and muslin; stitch
the front neatly over the instep, on
the right side, with white silk;
put on the sole on the wrong side,
and scalop the edge round the
ankle, in overcast stitch, adding
buttons and button-holes. Cork
soles may be used if preferred.



JEWEL-BOX FOR MAMMA,

Materials—Thick common cardboard; white gros de Naples, and white satin,
# yard of each; white satin cord; ribbon, 1 inch wide; one yard of deep white
fringe; l reel of white soie @ Avignon; 6 skeins of gold thread; and a skein of
pale blue silk.

The foundation of this pretty box is made of cardboard, which may be
easily cut out from the engraving. ‘Ten pieces are required, namely,
four for the sides, all of the same dimensions, 7 inches at the top, 43 at
the bottom, and 5 deep, gradually sloping equally at both sides, from
the widest to the narrowest part. The piece for the lid will then, asa
matter of course, be 7 inches square, and that for the bottom 43. The
shape of the four pieces forming the stand can be well scen in the en-
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 137

graying; at the upper and narrowest part they are 43 inches, and about
half an ineh deep.

The cardboard for this box should be of a kind too thick to sew; the
edges should, therefore, be gummed
together and bound over with strips
of cotton. The inside is then to be
lined with silk, and the outer part
with satin, a lining of flannel being
placed between both these substances 7
and the cardboard. The edges will \
be sewn together, and covered with
the ornamental cord, inside as well as
out. The lid of the box must be nicely
wadded, to raise it, and over the satin
covering one of darned netting is laid.
It must be done in the square stitch,
with the white silk, and a pattern darned on it in gold and blue. A
quilling of white satin ribbon trims the lid of the box; it is laid rather
within the edge, which is finished with the same ornamental cords as the-
other parts.

Square netting is begun on one stitch, in which two are worked ; then
turn the work, and do one in the first stitch and two in the last. Work
backwards and forwards, always doing two in the last stitch of the row,
until you have the required length up one side ; then net the last two
together, at the end of every row, until one stitch only remains.



BRIDAL GLOVE-BOX.

Materials.—A cardboard frame, 4 ivory feet, white satin, silk wadding-cord,
ribbon and fringe ; and for the embroidery ombré lilac, pink and green silks, white
ditto, a small quantity of three shades of orange, small bugle nearls, a little white
embroidery chenille, gold thread, and bullion.

This glove-box is beautifully embroidered at the top, with a bouquet
of narcissus, lilacs, and ears of barley. The narcissus is embroidered
in white Dacea silk, veined with the faintest possible green ; the centre
of the flower in orange, with a little scarlet for the edge of the cup.
The pearl bugles are used for the barley ears, each one being svérrounded
with white chenille, and with the beard represented by morsels of gold
bullion, about half an inch long, at the point of each pearl, The bunch
of lilacs is, as a matter of course, worked in lilac silk, with a small pearl,
138 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.



surrounded by bullion, in the centre of each. The veinings of the
leaves are in gold thread and bullion.

The frame of this box is in strong cardboard, with a lining of flannel,
both inside and out, between it and the satin. The scams inside are
covered with white cord; the same matcrial covers the outer seams and
runs along the edge. The outside of the lid is stuffed to a considerable
thickness with fine wadding, over which the embroidered satin is placed.
The border is of quilled ribbon, with white fringe round the sides,
headed with a handsome cord.

GREEK PURSE.

Materials,—5 skeins of Napoleon blue silk, 3 skeins black ditto, and 10 skeins of
gold thread No. 1, marquise garniture, and a fine hook. Work entirely in single
crochet.

With the blue silk make a chain of 5, close it into a round, and do
two stitches in every stitch for two rounds. Join on gold.

1st Rouwnd.— + 2 blue on 1, 1 gold, + 10 times.
2nd Round.— + 2 blue on 2, 2 gold on 1, + 10 times.
. 8rd Round.—-+ 2 blue on 2, 3 gold on 2, + 10 times.)
4th Round.— -+- 3 blue on 2, 3 gold on 8, + 10 times.
5th Round.— + 3 blue on 3, 4 gold on 38, + 10 times.
6th Round.— +- 4 blue on 3, 4 gold on 4, + 10 times.
7th Round.— + 4 blue on 4, 5 gold on 4, + 10 times,
8th Round.— +- 5 blue on 4, 5 gold on 5, 4+ 10 times.
9th Round.— + 5 blue on 5, 6 gold on 5, + 10 times.

10th Round.— + 6 blue on 5, 6 gold on 6, -+ 10 times.

11th Round.— + 6 blue on 6, 7 gold on 6, + 10 times.

12th Round.— + 7 blue on 6, 7 gold on 7, -+ 10 times.

13th Rowund,— + 8 blue (on 7 blue, and the first of 7 gold), 5 Id, 1
more blue, + 10 times.
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 139

14th Round.—-+ 9 blue (over 8 and 1 gold), 3 gold, 2 blue, + 10 times.

15th and 16th Rounds.—All blue.

17th Round.— + 4 blue, 2 gold, 4 bluc, + 14 times.

18th Round.— + 3 blue, 4 gold, g
3 blue, + 14 times.

19th Round.— + 2 blue, 6 gold,
2 blue, + 14 times.

20th Rownrd.— 4-1 blue, 8 gold,
1 blue, + 14 times.

21st Round.— +- 1 blue, 2 gold,
1 blue, 2 gold, 1 blue, 2 gold, 1 ble,
++ 14 times.

22nd Round.— + 4 blue, 2 gold,
4 blue, + 14 times.

23rd Round.—All gold. Join on
black.

24th Round.— + 5 blue, £ black,
7 blue, 10 gold, 2 blue, + 5 times.

25th and 26th Rounds. — The
same.

27th, 2th and 29th Rounds. —
+ 2 blue, 10 black, 7 blue, 4 gold,
5 blue, + 5 times.

30th, 31st, and 32nd Rounds.—Like 24th,

88rd, 84th, and 35th Rounds.—Like 27th.

Repeat ‘hese 12 rounds, substituting gold for black, and black for
gold; and then do them again in the Gpiginal colours, which will bring
you to the 60th round, all gold.

Repeat backwards from 22nd to 17th inclusive; then 4 rounds of Se,
and 2 of + 1 De, 1 Ch, miss 1 + in blue only. |

Epatne.—Gold + Se under a chain, 1 Ch, miss 1 chain, and 2 De, §
De under next chain, 1 Ch, miss 2 De, and the chain between them, -+
repeat all round.

2nd Row.—Black, Se on every stitch of last round.

Run the cords in the two rounds of open crochet, covering, the ends
with the small slides. Add the tassel.

Many other colours would look well worked in this design. A rich
green or claret might be substituted for blue; and with the latter ground
use blue for black ; or groseille would make a rich ground.




140 THE JLLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



GOLD-FISH GLOBE MAT.

This Mat is intended for a globe whose dimensions are thirty-one inches round
the thickest part. But for whatever size it may be required, be careful to let the
bottom of the Mat extend rather more than an inch beyond the size of the bottom of
the globe; then it can be made of any size, small or large, as required. Three
shades of emerald green four-thread Berlin wool, half an ounce of each shade;
one ounce of shaded scarlet, eight-thread wool; one reel of No. 10 Evans’s drab
Boar’s-Head Cotton; 20 yards of white skirt cord, the size of ordinary blind-cord.
Nos. 1 and 2 Penelope hooks.

With lightest green make 14 De stitches over the end of the cord. and
double it in as small a circle as possible, by uniting: this makes one row.
Work seven more rows, increasing in the first three rows, by working
two stitches into every stitch of the preceding row; then increase at
regular intervals throughout the bottom of the Mat, as may be required.
After working cight rows with the lightest shade, work eight rows of
next shade, then five rows of the darkest shade; draw the cord tight, at
an interval of every 12 stitches in this last row: this will form an edge
to stand up round the bottom of the Mat. On this, with the same colour,
work six rows without increasing, drawing the cord after every few
stitches. This rim, as indeed all the rest, must be perfectly smooth and
even,
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 141

With next shade lighter work a row, increasing one in every fourth
stitch, being careful not to draw the cord in this or either of the follow-
ing rows; then two rows without increasing, then one row, increasing
one in every fifth stitch. Then, with lightest shade, one row without
increasing; then cut off the cord, and fasten it neatly. Then 5 chain,
De into every fourth loop (that is, having two clear loops between each De
stitch) ; fasten off neatly, and turn the whole inside out, having the right
side of the work for the globe to stand in.

For the Border,
With Drab Cotton ; No. 3 Hook.

1s¢ Row.—1 L under the 5 chain, 5 chain, 1 more long wnder same,
5 chain, repeat.

2nd and 3rd Rows.—1 L under every 5 chain, with 5 chain between
each,

4th Row.—The same, only making 6 chain.

5th Row.—The same, only making 7 chain.

Keep the inside of the mat in front, turn down the border all round
at the last 5 chain row, having the outer edge of the border turned to the
outside of the mat.

Eight-Thread Scarlet Wool; No. 1 Hook.

Make under every 5 chain, 1 stitch thus:—Place the hook under the
5 chain, draw the wool through, and then through the loop on the hook ;
then twist the wool over the hook, and draw tt again through the loop on
the hook. All this forms but one stitch, and must be worked very
loosely, so much so, that each loop is full an inch long; it looks like a
small ruche of wool when finished. When this row is completed, pull
the outer edge out well, then the row now done will have the appear-
ance of being worked on the surface of the cotton.

Now, wnder every 7 chain, work two stitches precisely the same.

The border now resembles a frill, which must be arranged and pinned
on the edge of the mat, as shown in the engraving; then sew it neatly
through with green wool.
142 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.



CROCHET FLOWERS,—HEARYT S-EASE.—FOR MY AUNT.

Materials.—Violet-coloured wool, 1 skein ; yellow ditto, and green, two shades
of each, and 1 skein; a skein of coarse black sewing silk, and some very fine green
wire.

Those who prefer it may use fine chenille instead of Berlin wool for
these flowers ; that material giving the rich velvet-like surface peculiar
to the heart’s-case. It is, however, indispensable that flowers made of
chenille should be kept under a glass shade, as the least particle of dust
destroys them.

For each flower cut five pieces of wire four inches long. The wire is
about the thickness of Evans’s boar’s head cotton, No. 40.

The Purple Petals.—8 Ch; take the wire, and hold it in the left hand
parallel with the chain, working it in at every stitch; miss 1, 1 Se in
the next, 1 semi-double crochet in next, 2 De in the next two, 2 De in
one in the next, 2 Tc in one in the next, 5 Te in the last; fold the wire,
and work down the other side of the chain; 2 Te in the first, 2 De in
the next, 1 De in each of the two next, 1 semi-double in the next, 1S¢
FANCY NEEDLEWORK. 143

in the last. Slip stitch at the end, on the first Se, and make one chain.
Cut off the wool, leaving about 13 inches. Twist this a little, with the
two ends of the wire.

Make two purple petals.

A semi-double stitch is begun like a double crochet, but after drawing
the loop of wool through the chain, when three threads are on the needle,
bring a loop of wool through all three at once. It forms a medium stitch
between a Sc anda Dc. We need scarcely remind our readers that the
first stitch of a chain is never counted.

Small Yellow Petals, of which two are required for every flower.
7 Se with the darker yellow ; hold in a piece of wire, and work on one
side of the chain, 1 Sc, 2 semi-double, 1 De, 2 De in one, 5 De in the
last : on the other side,—2 De in one, 1 De, 2 semi-De, 1 Se, 1 slip on
the first Sc, 1 Ch; cut off the wool, leaving a small end, and twisting it
with the wire.

Large Yellow Petal, with the lighter shade. 6 Ch; hold in a piece of
wire, and work on the chain, 1 Se, 1 semi-double, 1 De in the next, 1 Te
in the same, 1 Te in the next, and on this Te a De must be worked; 1
Te in the last, 1 De on it, 5 more Te in the same, 1 De on the last, 1 Te
on the first chain-stitch on the other side, 1 De on it, 1 Te and 1 De on
the next, 1 semi-double on the next, 1 Sc on the next; 1 slip-stitch and
a chain to finish. Cut off the wool, and twist all the ends together; take
a piece of wire 3 inches long, bend it in half, and slip both the points
through the heart of the flower; cover the stem with dark green wool.
Take a needleful of black silk, and work five long stitches on the large
petal, and three on the small ones, making them of unequal lengths, and
radiated from the base.

To make a group of Heart’s-ease well, a variety of specimens should be
introduced. Some may be entirely purple or golden; and larger or
smaller than the directions given.

The leaves should be made of several shades of green; and two may
be allowed for each flower. 20 Ch; take a piece of green cannetille, the
length of a finger, slip the end in the last chain stitch, and work over it,
on the chain, 2 Sc, 2 Sde, 2 De, 1 Sde, 1 Se, 1Sde, 5 De, 1 Sde, 1 Se,
1 Sde,1De. Bend the wire, and work on the other side of the chain,
3 Sc in one, 1 De, 1 Sde, 1 Se, 1 Sde, 5 De, 1 Sde, 1 Se, 1 Sde, 2 De,
2Sde, 2Se. Slip a stitch at the end, in the first Sc; make one chain,
and cut off the wool, twisting the end in, with the ends of wire.
lit THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Wires
OR

ile Ape.
ily if ae
( ee
Weare ah
Nae ln viva Secal



f

SILK NET FOR THE HAIR.

Materials.—Chenille, silk braid, and plain twist are all used for this purpose.
Beads can be added if desired; but the net looks in better taste without. The net
from which the engraving is taken, is made of chenille. A flat mesh, haJf an inch
in width, a steel netting needle a quarter of a yard in length; or, if a finer diamond
is wished, take a mesh a full quarter of an inch in width, and begin on a foundation
of 16 stitches.

Net 8 loops on a foundation ; then net 16 rows. These will count per-
pendicularly 8 diamonds. Cut the netting from the foundation, but not
cut off the cotton ; pick out the knots ; tie a loop of cotton into the centre
of the square, by which to pin it to the table ; now net round this square
8 rows, or 4 diamonds, counted perpendicularly: the net is then com-
plete, unless it is desired to be larger. Now run in and tie the elastic ;
then slightly damp it, place it over a pie-plate, draw the elastic tight,
and hold it before the fire to raise the pile of the chenille; when made
with plain twist or braid, it is not needed to hold it before the fire.
PAPER MODELLING. 145

[While Mrs. Selby’s two younger daughters were still busy with the
fancy needlework, on which they had been some days rather closely
engaged, the elder girls began to turn their attention to other elegant
arts, described as follows in the book of Fancy Work. ]

PAPIER-PLASTIQUE, OR PAPER MODELLING.



WELTY
YWAlAtcar”



Fig. 1. 3

All that is wanted in Papier-Plastique, is a penknife, a ruler, a few
punches, a piece of lead, and a little thick gum and clean cardboard.

There is no disagreeable smell to contend with, arising from the nature
L
146 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

of the materials employed, and yet ornaments of a first-class description
may be produced, the production of which is neither difficult nor costly ;
the value of any piece of modelling being proportionate to the time spent
uponit. One other advantage paper modelling possesses is its durability.
Leather work is, generally, too large to cover with glass shades, and soon
the dust takes off its freshness and beauty. Wax flowers, alas! soon
*« fade as a leaf,” and their leaves are always falling ; but an article once
made in cardboard is liable to none of these disadvantages.

The sketch introduced (fig. 1) represents a neat Gothic Lodge or Cot-
tage, and can be executed in about a day.

THE MATERIALS AND IMPLEMENTS.

1. Provide yourself with a penknife which is fast in its handle when
opened, and not what is called ‘ ricketty.” The blade should be shaped



thus (fig. 2), -for a straight-edged bevelled front cuts with greater cer-
tainty and precision than any other shape.

2. Haye a piece of willow, or soft pine-wood will do, planed perfectly
flat and smooth: it should be about one foot wide and two feet long.

3. A piece of hard wood should be procured for a straight-edge, other-
wise the knife would be apt to cut it when the work is being executed:
it should be about one foot long and two inches broad with the edges
bevelled down thus 2———.

4. Procure a piece of lead, cast in a mould, about four inches square
and half an inch thick.

5. In modelling church-work a few round punches, like fig. 3, are



required to pierce the foil-work of the windows; they may be obtained
from No. 1 to any desired size.

6. Dissolve cne ounce of the best white gum in as much water as will
PAPER MODELLING. 147

cover it. Itshould be rather thick, or considerable annoyance may arise
from it not adhering well and quickly.

7. The cardboard used is either ‘‘ Bristol”? or ‘‘ Turnbull’s ;”’ the latter
is a little the whitest. It may be had in various thicknesses to suit the
purpose for which it is required. Three leaves thick will do for small
models, but four thicknesses are best for larger ones. It is best to have
two, three, and four, for the thin is required for light ornamentation.

Care must be taken that the hands are always dry and clean on com-
mencing work, and too much attention cannot be paid to the manner of
joining the different pieces of board together; the manipulator should
not put on so much gum as will ooze out when the pieces to be joined are
pressed together, but by applying the brush to portions along the in-
tended joint, those portions may be lightly spread by drawing the finger
along. The gum should appear to cling to the finger rather than to wet
it only.

The cottage may thus be formed. Take clean white cardboard, No. 3,
and draw upon it a representation of the pattern, as fig. 4, only double



3 4,
every dimension (the size of our page does not admit of a full-sized draw-
ing). The lines which are dotted thus ...... are to be half-eut through
from the outside. The lines marked thus .. .. .. are to be half-cut from

the inside. The black portions are to be cut

entirely out. The dotted lines, where the porch®
comes, are not to be cut, but they merely show ty
where the porch which is to be formed, as fig. 5, ($= “ve wee 7
is put on; the marginal pieces serve to secure it |} |
to the larger building when bent into form, as LL
well as to secure the roof to it. 5.


148 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The window and door openings are to be backed by pieces cut to fit, as
figs. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12:

7 8 9. 10.
the black portions of which are also cut out, and behind them small

i

11. 12.









pieces of glass, or what answers much better, thin tale,—the
diamond panes being scratched lightly upon it previous to fix-
ing, as in fig. 13. When these are dry, they are to be placed
in the four elevations, and weighted down in their proper place [:
until dry; the labels over the windows are to be cut as repre- 43
sented and gummed on. Then, when all is dry, mark the quoin-work
round the windows (fig. 14) in a very irregular way, as
also at the angles of the building ; and then it may be bent
at the angles ; and the flap, A, joined to the back of B, and
secured thus by setting the house on end, inserting the |
straight-edge over the joint, and leaving it for ten minutes A
undisturbed. The porch may now be fixed to the main 14,
building ; its doorway is open, but the door shown in the drawing must
be put to the house, being bent a little open; it can be secured by the
flange.

The next thing to be done is to
form the roofs to porch and to
main building, which is done thus:
procure a piece of card double the
size of fig. 15, half cut through
the centre, but only very faintly ;
cut the lines which are intended
to represent the tiles or slates ;
these slight scratches are to be
reversed, as shown in fig. 15. A "15,






PAPER MODELLING. 149

similar piece should be made for the porch of the requisite size (see fig.
16): these may now be secured to the side walls and gables, to E
the flanges left, and suffered todry. During this time cut four
patterns, like fig. 17, and when ready put them on the ends, or
rather a little under the projections of the roof, as shown in
the perspective drawing ; a pendant should be cut of the shape
shown, of tolerably titel board, and inserted at the point where
the barge-boards mitre. These small things are best applied
by a pair of spring pincers, similar to fig. 18, which can be 16.
formed of a piece of tin or brass, bent into the required form.

‘We now come to the chimneys. These are formed of No. 2 board,
half cut, like fig. 19, doubled, and gummed.

Small portions like these are best secured while 47,

the gum is drying, by wrapping round them a piece of cotton. As many
of these must be formed as will represent the number of flues. A base
must then be cut (fig. 20), making
the sides, C D, so large as to admit @e
the number of flues: this isto be bent
' round the flues, the portions notched
out being fitted to the pitch of the roof, before bending. A small fillet,
===, half cut at the corners, is now to be put near the top of the
chimney ; and, when the whole is dry, it is to be secured to the roof. A
small band, to represent the plinth of the building, must be
neatly put round the whole; but care must be taken that it
should stand on a level surface while this is being done: thig
will give a neatness to its finish, for should the building not be
exactly true on its lower edge, it may be rendered so by the
plinth. The whole should now be fixed on crimson velvet,

or ona black polished stand. Never colour any portion LALIAL
of the work; it is not «esthetic in principle, nor good as a 20,
matter of taste. Many atolerably good model has been spoiled by colour
being put upon the slates, doors, &c.

The work is done in cardboard; and no attempt should be made to
make it appear what it is not. No skill will ever make the cardboard
roof convey to the mind the idea of its being slate, nor the doors wood :
indeed, the beauty of the work is its whiteness and sharpness of out-
line.





19,






















































ti



TN
TT irae





Our next lesson, in this elegant art, will be embodied in working out
the design above, which represents a neat Village Church, and which,
when carefully executed, forms a very effective ornament for a drawing-
room table or sideboard.

In order to model any building, it is necessary to have a plan from
which the various measurements may be taken; as also an elevation of
PAPER MODELLING. 151

each side, should the sides be different. The following diagram
represents the Plan of the Church, for which we are about to give the
directions.



The first thing to be done is to construct the Nave (fig. 2) ot the building:
this, and the Chancel, fig. 9, must be formed by taking a piece of No. 3
cardboard, and marking out a pattern three-times the size of figs. 2 and 9
respectively (our pages will not admit of full-sized drawings, except in
case of the details, which are all given of the proper size for copying.)

The above drawing explains itself; the original being three times the
size. All the black portions are to be cut entirely out. The dotted
lines are to be half-cut and the firm lines are cut entirely through. On
bending this into shape, it will be found to form the entire Nave, in-
cluding the turret and roof-—the latter is only intended for a foundation
roof, as it does not project at the eaves; the true roof must be made a
little larger, so as to give the necessary brow to the eaves, and must be
marked into squares as directed in our article on the Gothic Cottage
before described.

Before bending this into shape, the labels should be put ®n over the
windows. The branches of foliage, represented at the end of the labels,
are best provided by coarsely pricking the cardboard at each terminal
with a large needle; this produces a careless roughness, which is best
TREASURY,

THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN

152



154 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

suited to produce the desired effect. The door represented in the south
side is to be cut through everywhere, except where the dotted lines
occur , this will serve to hinge the door, which should be bent in a little,
as though open. The braiding and hinges may be formed by passing the
needle over the surface strongly, so as to indent it a little. The
operator will see there are small portions at the sides of the bell-turret
which require to be made up.

Our next business will be to form the Chancel.

Fig. 9 represents the shape of the foundation. The roof in this case,
as in the Nave, is merely to secure the true roof, and to give solidity to
the structure. Fig. 10 is the fwil-s’ze shape for the small windows, and
tig. 11 represents the eastern or Chancel window.

The foil-work is to be punched with one of the small punches referred
to in our last article; and after punching those portions, the remainder
is to be carefully cut out with a sharp knife. Figs. 3, 4, 10, and 11 are
now to be secured behind the body work, and backed with marked tale.
The whole should now be put together, and secured by the flanges left
for that purpose.

Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8 show the crosses, and other details; the position of
which will be easily understood from the perspective view.

When dry, the roofs should be marked and put on. A book partially
opened, and made to ride upon the top of the roof while drying, is the
best contrivance for securing an even pressure.

Small pieces of two thicknesses of cardboard are next to be put down
each gable, and finished at the springing with small picces similar to
fig. 5, the two wings being bent backwards.

The Porch should next be formed like fig. 12, which represents its
full size. The black portions are cut out. Use the punch for the tre-
foils and heads of the open wood-work.

Like the Nave and Chancel, it should have an outer projecting roof.
The proper number of jbuttresses should be forméd, according to the
patterns—fig. 13 and fig. 14; the latter is for the Chancel. The posi-
tion of these are indicated on the plan.

By bending the card at the cuts, which are represented by the dotted
lines, these will form the buttresses, with the exception of small pieces
at the slopes, which are to ke made to fit. The best way to put the
buttresses together is to gum the flanges A and B, and to secure them
until dry with a little cotton wound round them.
PAPER MODELLING. 155

The modelis now 14 3
complete, withthe »~>————_
exception ofanar-
row piece to form
the plinth, and
which must be the
last thing done.

It is frequently
necessary, where
joints do not fit
accurately, to use
a stopping of gum
water and chalk,
mixed to the con-
sistency of putty. This must be very sparingly used, or it soils the
model.

The engraving on next page A FIG.2. B
represents a Font, such as
would be suitable for a Church
designed in the Middle or
Decorated period of architec-
ture. The drawing is made
to a scale of one-cighth the |}
size required for an actual
font; but as a very suitable
object for exhibiting Papier-
Plastique work, it would be
best to make it of the size here
represented.

The framework consists of
four parts — The Traceried
Panels; the Octagon Shaft ;
the Steps; and the Bowl, not © D
shown in the plate.

The way to construct such an ornament is as follows :—Take a strip of
cardboard eight times the length of from A to B (fig. 2); half-cut it at
the equal distances represented by A, B, and on the last leave a piece to
answer as a flange to secure it together. Cut out with punches all the







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1
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1
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1
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PAPER MODELLING. 157



round or cusp parts of the design carefully; having jist cut one out on a
spare piece of cardboard—with this as a pattern, mark out on each of
the eight sides of the font the work previous to punching. Two punches
only will be required for the execution of the work, the rest being care-
fully cut withaknife. Cut out entirely the pieces shaded, and back the
same with a piece of crimson velvet.

Next, from the sloping part at the bottom of the Bowl (fig. 8); the lines
marked thus —.—.—.— being half-cut from the front, and
158 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

from the back. Only four compartments are shown in the diagram, but
cight must be made, corresponding in their angles to those shown. These



when ‘doubled and secured by the flange O, will form the slope. The
parts extending beyond the wedge-shaped piece, both top and bottom,
are for the purpose of securing it to the Font at the top and the Pedestal
at the bottom.

The Pedestal must be cut as fig. 4. The squares here marked are to
receive the tracery work, according to the pattern shown in the centre of
the first cut, and these are to be backed with plain card or velvet.
These backings should be done before the card is finally bent at the
angles, and weighted down until dry.

It will be unnecessary to give any drawings for the Steps, as our young
ladies will see at once how to form them. Each step should be formed
separately, and then the one placed upon the other; the half-cutting
being formed at the angle of the step, and then a small piece half-cut
and applied with gum, internally, to the angles, when the step is bent to
shape, will secure them u that position.
PAPER MODELLING. 159

The moulding at the FIG. 5.
base of slope is to be formed. 37 _
of a strip of cardboard [7
(fig. 5), half-cut as follows,
sufliciently long to admit ,
of waste. This must be
neatly mitred when put on with a good sharp knife, or what is better, a
razor.

The strip when formed and gummed should be held in its place until
dry, by winding cotton round it, and it should be perfectly dry pre-

viously to attempting to cut it, otherwise it will come to picces.

The Fringe at the bottom of the large octagon needs no further explana-
tion than that it is formed chiefly with the small round punch and the
knife.

The Mouldings of the top and bottom of the richly-traccried panels
are to be formed of strips of card half-cut, as shown in fig. 6. B is to be
gummed on the;
back of A, and A FIG. 6.
the extra slope:0n |e errs
C, shown in fig. 1,
must be formed
by putting a piece
on after the large
moulding is secured to the body of the Font.

The base mould upon the Steps, intended as a. finish to the Pedestal, is
to be formed as fig. 7.
The piece Z, will serve [.
to attach it to the step, [2
and the pieces § will
secure it to the Octagon
Shaft. It will be ob-
served also that one of
the lines is marked
—.—.—.-— , this
must be half-cut from the back. ’

The Bowl may be formed of a piece of cardboard the shape of fig 8.
The flanges P, Q, will serve the one to secure it to the top and the other
to a bottom, which must be put on.









160 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



The top is to be formed of a plain piece of cardboard, with an octagon
hole cut in a little smaller than that formed by the bowl when bent into
shape, and the outer edge ought to be half-cut, and bent down a little,
so as to form the second slope on the top moulding of the Font; it will
PAPER MODELLING. 161











i {ui A
z na vt baat

‘
N
LO Shy;
































































162 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

serve to secure it to the other; of course the bowl is to be fixed to the
top previously to putting the latter into place.

It will be well to cut a piece of deal the thickness of the steps, and
put under them, as it serves to make them stand steady.

‘We apprehend ladies will have no difficulty in making this beau-
tiful ornament, except it be in transferring the tracery to their own card-
board ; but this is comparatively easy when properly understood, and by
the use of a pair of fine compasses the circle is easily got. The length
of one side of the triangle is obtained and laid on, and the other two
made equal to it; within this produce the two inner circles, and on the
outside of the triangle strike the three outer circles, and you have the
foundation of all the other work, which is all designed upon geometric
principles of equal division and arrangement.

The foregoing drawing represents a Lectern, or Lettern, as it is some-
times called, a piece of ecclesiastical furniture used for holding the Bible
or other large book while the minister reads. They were pretty gencral
before the Reformation, but were very rarely used after that period until
of late. In most modern restorations, however, they are introduced.
Sometimes the top part is but a plain board, covered with embroidery
and fringe, but their usual form is either pyramidal or gabletted. Gene-
rally they are made to revolve on the top of the upright shaft, thus giv-
ing additional facilities to the officiating minister to read from the various
books required alternately during the service. They were made of wood,
metal, and stone; a very fine example of the first-named material is to
be found at Ramsey, in Huntingdonshire, and at Bury. Brass ones may
be found in St. Paul’s Cathedral, Southwell Minster, and other places.
A very common form for those executed in metal is that of an eagle
spreading her wings.

We have selected this piece of church furniture as being peculiarly
adapted to papier plastiques ; and we feel persuaded young ladies will not
regret any trouble they may take in its execution, as it will yield them
a very elegant little model, and one which, although it cannot be applied
to the use for which it was originally designed, may nevertheless be of daily
use as a Scripture monitor. We have seen very small books, published.
by the Religious Tract Society, called Daily Bread, Dew Drops, and the
like, of a size suitable for furnishing this little affair, and we fecl sure
many of our readers will not grudge the time and care needed once a
PAPER MODELLING. 163

week or so, to remove the glass shade and ‘turn over a new leaf;” such
an ornament, devoted to such a purpose, might thus become edifying not
only to the taste, but to the mind, and be the means of riveting on the



memory many a precious truth. An old divine has somewhere said,
“With thy watch, wind up thy soul.” Now, this being a daily duty,
surely if we can spare time to set the wheels of our watch in motion, we
164 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

ought not to neglect to set the wheels of thought in motion also, by wind-
ing up our mantelpiece monitor. We will now describe its con-
struction :—

The upper part, or that upon which the books rest, must be formed of
the size and shape of fig. 1. Two of the compartments only are filled in.
it will be observed that the dotted line, thus .—.—.—, is to be half
cut and bent back. The inner line, A, must be cut through, and the
centre panel cut out, while the lines at the angles are only half cut. This
leaves a kind of framework; behind this framework, a little less than
the entire side, the pieces of tracery are gummed on—by this means they
appear sunk. The back of the punched and eut work must be covered
with small pieces of crimson velvet, neatly secured with a little gum.
When this is done, and all is dry, bend it into square, and secure it
there by a small flange left on one of the sides for that purpose; then
put it upon a piece of square cardboard a little larger than the square of
the above work, and gum along the edge of this a ledge to prevent the
book slipping.

The top may now be covered with a piece of card a trifle larger than
the book-board, and finally mounted with a small pyra-
mid, fig. 2, The flanges B and C will serve to secure
the top and bottom. If the two points of the pyramid
be run through with a fine needle, and held by cotton,
and then a little gum be applied inside, the whole will
dry into form. Fig. 2.

The crocketed buttresses may be formed of pieces of cardboard of the
size and shape of fig. 3; they must be half-cut at the angles, and very



$



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f
1
1
.
t
7
‘
o
J





Fig 3. T
slightly across 8 T. Then bend the whole of the points back a little so
that they shall not be able to return to their original position: this will
make them converge together when the work is bent square and secured
there by the flanges. A small quantity of gum must now be applied to
PAPER MODELLING, 165

the extremity of the points, and these may be secured together until
dry by a simple nooze in a piece of cotton. The crocket-work up the
angles of these pyramids is best formed by pricking a few rows of holes in
a straight line and then severing these pieces with a sharp knife thus :—

Fig. 4.

These fringes are then to be carefully cut to the right length of the slope,
and secured there, one at a time, by good strong gum; do not attempt to
fix another until the last is dry, or you will
certainly disarrange what otherwise might be
good work.

We now come to the flying buttresses which
rise from the pinnacles. As will be seen from
the drawing, they are four in number, and
when put together form a cross as plan.
Fig. 4 shows one of these drawn geometri-
cally.

The upright lines are merely scratched on
the surface. When these pieces are fixed to
the octagon shaft with strong gum, the pin-
nacles may be applied. in a similar way, and
afterwards the large crocketing, fig. 5, on the
upper edge of the flying buttresses. The
required curve will be obtained by bending
them a little before fixing.

The small band and the base are so simple
as to need no further explanation than the
drawing gives—the wave edging is also clearly
shown, and is to be fixed round the under
edge of the book-board.





Fig. 5.



—_—<—-—
166 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

THE ART OF MAKING AND MODELLING PAPER
FLOWERS.

This is a charming art for young ladies, and one that may be easily
acquired. Frost and snow may reign around us and nip the tender
blossoms in our gardens, still our homes can be made gay with delightful
representations—so real that only the touch can discern the difference—cf
Flora’s children. Our first instructions shall be for the formation of the
pomegranate.

The Pomegranite is a beautiful
flower to model, and is of a bril-
liant scarlet, of a peculiar tint,
and will amply repay the pupil for
the care bestowed in making it.
There is another beautiful and
delicate variety of this flower,
which is white, much more
crimped at the edges, and most
beautifully marked with scarlet ;
it is rather searce in this country,
but an elegant flower for a vase.
This flower requires but two pat-
terns for the petals, and about 35
to 40 form a flower, 20 of No. 1,
and 16 of No. 2. Place the
petals No, 1 on a piece of crape ;
fold them in two, and erimp between the fingers and thumb the
upper part of the petals. Fold them together lengthways, and bring
the upper edges forward. Proceed in the same way with petals No. 2.
Then take a piece of middling-size wire, bend the end a little, and roll
round it some paper to the shape and size of a plum-stone, and cover
with some scarlet paper; after which, fix the petals No. 1 with some
cement and silk in rows of threes and fives together. Then proceed with
petals No. 2 in like manner ; after which draw on the calyx (which may


PAPER MODELLING. 167

be purchased ready prepared) of nearly a similar colour to the flower.
Finish by preparing the thickest wire by covering it with reddish brown
paper for the stem, in imitation of bark (or woody stalks); then cut







, g iy)
Ff vin
—\I

Zz

the stalk of your flower about an inch long, just sufficient to,attach it to
the stem. This flower grows in trusses of three and four together, with
two or three buds above them (which may also be obtained ready pre-
pared), and which will give great effect to its appearance.
168 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

FLOWERS OF WOOD-SHAVINGS.
DIRECTIONS FOR A PINK,

Procure some thin deal shavings, and cut cach petal on the cross of
the shaving; cut 15 of the size marked No. 1, 15 of No. 2, and 10 of
No. 8, which are the outside leaves. Tie a very narrow strip of shaving

O



on the loop of the wire stalk, as at No. 4, curling the top of the stamen
slightly with the edge of the scissors (the wire drawn from ribbon-wire is
the best for this purpose); tie on the fifteen small leaves round the loop
of the wire, then fifteen of No. 2, and lastly the ten large ones. Bind
all firmly on with white thread ; cut out the calyx as at No. 5—observe
FLOWERS OF WOOD-SHAVINGS. 169

to, cut it on the length—and with some strong gum touch the edges
slightly to join it up the side, after it is tied on the wire; then thread a
strip of the slightest shaving, and twist it round the wire to the end of
the stalk, fastening on the grass like leaves with each twist.

A very beautiful vase of flowers can be made in this manner, as all
flowers can be imitated in wood-shavings. We give this Pink as being
the most simple to commence with.

TO MAKE A ROSE OF WOOD-SHAVINGS,

Cut out 14 petals same as No. 3, and 18 of No. 2; then 20 of the
larger size. Cut them on the length of the shaving, and curl them
slightly at the edge with the scissors; then form a loop of wire as at
No. 6, and haying twisted a strip of shaving round it, commence to tie
on the petals with some strong thread. Tie on the fourteen small ones ;



then the next size, and so on till the flower is complete. Cut the Rose
leaves also on the length, and vein them with the scissors, holding the
points a little apart so as to give the vein a raised look. Gym them on
the wire stalk, which form same as design No. 7. Be careful to bind the
spray neatly to the main branch with a slight strip of the shaving, and
fasten off by a little gum at the end.
170 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

FEATHER ORNAMENTS.

Fire Sereens composed of the wings of pheasants, or other game, are
both pretty and useful, and when hung at the fire-side, below the bell-
pull, form a nice addition to the deco-
rations of a drawing-room. The wings
must be cut off when the bird is fresh
killed, and as near the body as possible ;
being careful not to rufile the feathers. .
When cut off, the wing, stretched out,
has this appearance :-—










thus :—

When sewed, lay the screen on a table
right side down, and, having placed a
double paper over the sewing, press it
with a hot iron. When that side is
done, turn the sereen, and place a
weight on the right side to give it a
flat back; it is then fit to attach to
the handle; a gilt one looks best. Form bs
rosettes of the large searlet chenil, and sew one on each side, so as to
cover where the handle joins. A pair of scarlet chenil tassels and silk
cord are required, as seen in design: the screen is hung by the loop of
cord.


lil

ORNAMENTAL GRATE-PAPERS.

The accompanying illustration, when drawn upon paper and cut out,
will require some amount of patience and perseverance from our little
ladies; but it will be amply repaid by Mamma’s approbation when the
grate is adorned with it.

The materials required for each paper are, two sheets of white tissue-
paper, and some paste or mucilage.

The instruments required are, a sharp pair of fine-pointed scissors, a lead
pencil (I, or F F), needle and sewing cotton, and a circular punch (0).

Lo prepare the materials, take two large shects of tissue-paper, and
paste or gum them very neatly together by their longest sides, so as to
form a large shect.

When dry, fold the paper in the centre, and double it again ; mark off
the exact distance of each bar or pattern with a pencil, and rule the
paper according to the design given; then tack it along the spaces
between each bar, so as to prevent it moving during the process of cutting
out. Sketch the design according to pattern or taste, and then proceed to
cut out all the shaded parts with a sharp pair of scissors, taking care not to
sever the connecting pieces ; but if they should be divided by accident, the
two parts must be neatly joined with a little gum or paste and tissue-paper.

In marking off the design, it may be some guide to the ladies to
inform them of the dimensions of each part of a paper, according to the
accompanying design, (See next page.)

‘When the paper is folded and tacked—

No. 1 should measure 64 inches long and 2 inches wide.

”? 2 ” ” 9 ” 2? 45 2?
» 3 ” ” 1i3 ” ” ey ”
” 4 ” ”) 16 ” ” oF 2)
”»> 5 ” ”»> 152 ” ” 3 9
” 6 ” ? li ” ” 13 ?
” 7 ” ” liz ” ” 3 ”
» 8 ” 19; ” ” 2 ”

x

‘When all the shaded parts have been cut out, and the design finished
hy punching the parts that require it in Nos. 5, 6, 7, and 8, the basting-
threads must be removed, the paper carefully opened out, and, the top
being neatly tied with a piece of thread, the ornament should be sus-
pended to a nail driven in the chimney, hung over a piece of wood like a
cross, and placed over a heap of faded grate-shavings, or thrown over a
stiff sheet of dark-coloured paper arranged on purpose.














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173

POTICHIMANIE; OR, IMITATION PORCELAIN,

The result of this work is, what it professes to be, an excellent imita-
tion of every sort of porcelain—Sévres, Etruscan, Japanese, Assyrian.
No one can fail to suceced in this charming art who studiously follow the
rules we shall lay down.

The materials required for Potichimanie are—

Glass vases.

Sheets of paper printed in various designs.
Varnish.

Dissolved gum-arabic.

Prepared colours,

Paint brushes.

Essence of lavender, or turpentine; and
Fine scissors.

The vases are of plain glass, in various forms, some with and some
without lids. At present these vases are too often inelegant in
shape, as from the nature of the work it is necessary to have the neck
large enough to admit the hand. Thus the graceful shape of the
Etruscan vase is not yet achieved in Potichimanie. We think, however,
that ere long some plan will be devised to remedy what we cannot help
regarding as a great defect.

The vases are of various shapes and sizes, as seen in our engraving.

The sheets of paper are coloured and printed in various designs.
Some have figures and other subjects in the graceful Etruscan style ;
others exhibit dragons, trees, flowers, birds, and similar things, in
Chinese design; the researches of Mr, Layard have furnished us with
eccentric Assyrian figures and decorations; and again there are me-
dallions, and other subjects exclusively French, besides borders of all
these different sorts.

The first operation is to cut out the figures, birds, &e., with extreme
care; and we may observe, en passant, that beginners should always
select such subjects as are tolerably compact. Running patterns, with
the various parts connected only by long stems and flowers with the
pistil and stamens projecting, are considerably more dificult to arrange
than simpler patterns. Every part of the ground of the paper must be
174 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

cut out—such as the space between the body and the bended arm, in any
figure where that occurs ; so that, in fact, nothing is left but what could
be done by. the brush were the vase to be a painted one.

Now lay all the materials on the table, including a clean towel, some
soft old linen, and a small bason of warm water.



Fold a sheet or two of blotting-paper into several thicknesses, lay one
of the subjects on it, and, with one of the brushes, cover the painted
side of it with gum in every part. Of course, your vases have been
previously thoroughly washed, and well dried. Put the paper inside
the glass, rubbing down every part with your nail, so that no air may
be left between the paper and the glass, as this would ruin the work.
Proceed in this way with each figure, flower, or other design, until
sufficient patterns are placed on the glass; borders may be added or not,
PAINTING ON VELVET. 175

according to the fancy, but they must always be of a character to
harmonize with the rest of the design.

When all these are perfectly dry, examine them to see that no air-
bubble is left. Then add a coating of gum at the back of the figures,
without touching the glass. Let this also dry. Then a coat of varnish
must be added, and this also must be done without touching the glass.

After thoroughly drying this, remove with a wet cloth any spots of
gum or varnish that may have fallen on the vase, and mix the colouring
with sufficient essence of lavender to make it ren freely. Pour the
liquid into the vase, which you will twist round and round until it has
adhered to and completely coloured every part. Pour the remainder
out, let it dry, and then add another coat of varnish. The vase is then
completed.

It is asserted that a vase so prepared will hold water. It may be;
but we do not counsel the trial. An inner vessel, filled with water,
might readily be placed in the larger one, for flowers.

In the vase, in the centre of our engraving, it will be observed that
the ground of the upper and lower part is black, and that of the centre
only alight colour. When this effect is to be produced, the colour must
be applied with brushes, and not poured in as we have before directed.
Each part should also dry before the next band is applied.

The choice of the ground is always a matter for much consideration, as
on it greatly depends the truthful hue of the china.

. PAINTING ON VELVET.

Axone the various accomplishments for young ladies of the present
day, no fancy work is perhaps more elegant, produces a better effect, and
is, at the same time, more easily and quickly performed, than painting on
velvet. Possessing all the beauty of colour of a piece of wool-work, it is
in every way superior, as the tints used in this style of painting do not
fade; and an article which it would take a month, at least, to manufac-
ture with the needle, may be completed in four or six hours, on white
velvet, with the softest and most finished effect imaginable.

The first thing necessary to be done, after obtaining the colours and
the velvet (which should be cotton, or more properly velveteen, as most
common cotton yelvets are not sufficiently thick, and silk velvet, besides
176 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

the expense, is not found to answer), is to prepare the formula for the
group intended to be painted. Get a piece of tracing or silver paper the
size of the cushion, mat, or screen you wish to paint, then lay it carefully
upon the group you wish to copy, and trace through. Should the paper
slip, the formula will be incorrect ; it will be therefore well to use weights
to keep all flat. Having traced your flowers, remove the thin paper,
and, laying it on a piece of cartridge-paper the same size, go over the
pencil-marks by pricking them out with a fine needle, inserted in a cedar
stick. Now that you have your whole pattern pricked out clearly upon
a stiff paper, take eight or nine more pieces of cartridge-paper, of the
same size as the first, and laying them one by one, in turn, under the
pricked pattern, shake a little powdered indigo over, and then rub with
a roll of list or any soft material. The indigo, falling through the
punctures, will leave the pattern in blue spots on the sheet of paper
beneath ; then proceed in like manner with the remaining formulas until
you have the self-same pattern, neatly traced in blue dots, on them all.
Next, with a sharp penknife, you must cut out the leaves, petals, and
calices of the group, taking care to cut only a few on each formula, and
those not too near together, lest there should not be suflicient room to rub
between the spaces, and that, for instance, the green tint intended for
the leaf should intrude on the azure or crimson of the nearest convolvulus ;
for in this sort of work erasure is impossible.

The following diagrams will show how the formulas should be cut, so
as to leave proper spaces. The shading denotes the parts cut out.

Some leaves may be cut out in two halves, as the large ones in the
pattern ; others all in one, as the small leaf; but it is chiefly a matter of
taste. The large leaves should, however, generally be divided. In cach
formula there should be two guides—one on the top of the left-hand side,
the other at the bottom of the right-hand corner—to enable the formulas
always to be placed on the same spot in the velvet. For instance, as in
formula 2, A and B are the two guides, and are parts cut out, in formula
2, of leaves, the whole of which were cut out in No. 1; and therefore,
after No. 1 is painted, and No. 2 applied, the ends of the painted leaves
will show through, if No. 2 be put on straight; if, when once right, the
formula is kept down with weights at the corners, it cannot fail to match
at all points. Care should, however, be taken never to put paint on the
guides, as it would necessarily leave an abrupt line in the centre of the
leaf. While cutting out the formulas, it isa good plan to mark with a
PAINTING ON VELVET. 177

cross or dot those leaves which you have already eut out on the formulas
preceding, so that there will be no confusion, When your formulas are
all eut, wash them over with a preparation made in this manner—Put into
a wide-mouthed bottle some resin and shell-lac—about two ounces of
each are suflicient’; on this pour enough spirits of wine or naphtha to
cover it, and let it stand to dissolve, shaking it every now and then; if
it is not quite dissolved as you wish it, add rather more spirits of wine ;
then wash the formulas all over on both sides with the preparation, and
let them dry. Now taking formula No. 1, lay it on the white velvet, and
place weights’on each corner # keep it steady; now pour into a little
saucer a small’ quantity of the colour called Saxon green, shaking the
bottle first, as there is apt to be a sediment; then take the smallest



Formula l. Formula 2,

quantity possible on your brush. Now begin on the darkest part of the
leaf, and work lightly round and round in a cireular motion, taking care
to hold the brush upright, and to work more as it were on the formula
than on the velvet; should you find the velvet getting crushed down and
rough, from haying the brash too damp, continue to work lightly till it
is drier; then brush the pile the right way of it, and it will be as smooth
as before. Do all the green in each formula in the same manner, unless
there be any blue-greens, when they should be grounded with grass-grecn.

Next, if any of the leaves are to be tinted red, brown, or yellow, as
autumn leaves, add the colour over the Saxon green, before you shade
with full green, which will be the next thing to be done; blue-green
leaves to be shaded also with full green. Now, while the green is
yet damp, with a small camel-hair pencil vein the leaves with ultra-
marine. The tendrils and stalks are also to be done with the small

N
178 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

brush. You can now begin the flowers; take, for instance, the convol-
vulus in the pattern. It should be grounded with azure, and shaded
with ultramarine (which colour, wherever used, should always be mixed
with water, and rubbed on a palette with a knife); the stripes in it are
rose-colour, and should be tinted from the rose saucer. White roses and
camellias, lilies, &c., are only lightly shaded with white shading ; and if
surrounded by dark flowers and leaves will have a very good effect.
Flowers can easily be taken from nature in the following manner :—
AA, DD, is a frame of deal, made light, and about two feet long, and



eight or ten inches in width. The part DD is made to slide in a
groove in A A, so that the frame may be lengthened or shortened at
pleasure. A vertical frame, ©, is fixed to the part D, and two grooved
upright pieces, BB, fixed to the other part. These uprights should be
about nine inches high, and C half that height. There is also a piece of
wood at the end A of the frame, marked E, witha small hole for the eye,
and there is a hole in the top C opposite to it. Sisa piece of glass sliding
in the grooves in BB. In the hole H is placed the flower or flowers to
be copied. If a group is wished, more holes should be made, and the
flowers carefully arranged. The eye being directed to this through the
hole in E, it can be sketched on the glass by means of a pencil of litho-
graphic chalk. It is afterwards copied through by slipping the glass
out, laying it on a table, and placing over it a piece of tracing-paper.
When traced on the paper, proceed as before to make the formulas.

Of course, so delicate a thing as white velvet will be found at length
to soil. When this is the case, it can be dyed without in any way
injuring the painting.

——_~ >
HELENA’S CHOICE.

WHILE the Needlework patterns were proceeding, Mrs. Selby’s third
daughter, Helena, grew weary of her task, and eagerly proposed to read
“something entertaining” while her ‘sisters worked. Helena loved
light literature as much as she hated tasks or labour of any kind.
To be sure, while the novelty lasted of turning over and over the
brilliant and beautiful fabrics which her Aunt had so munificently pro-
vided for the Fancy Work, and even so long as she was engaged in
learning various stitches and methods of working, it was all very well;
but when a set pattern of some complexity had to be systematically
studied, and perseveringly worked out,—oh! that was quite a different
thing; then her fingers ached; so did her eyes, so did her head. She
was restless and uneasy, until there came into her thoughts the
recollection of a book that she had seen in the Cabinet, “ Readings in
Prose and Verse;” instantly all languor fled—all aches. “ dZight she
take out that book and read it aloud? She was sure there were
delightful verses in it, and nice tales—”

“No, my dear,” said Mamma, firmly. ‘You began the crochet
flowers, and you must persevere until they are finished. But, to
lighten your toil, if such you xow find it (though you recollect how

enthusiastically you commenced), your sister Marion shall read aloud
180 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY. '

the book you covet. I have looked into it, and it will do very well to
amuse you all while your fingers are busily employed. But remember
what a philosopher says upon reading :—‘.\ proper and judicious
system of reading is of the highest importance. Two things are neces-
sary in perusing the mental labours of others; namely, not to read too
much, and to pay great attention to the nature of what you do read.
Many persons peruse books for the express and avowed purpose of
consuming time; and this class of readers forms by far the majority of
what are termed the reading public; others, again, read with the laud-
able anxiety of being made wiser, and when this object is not attained,
the disappointment may generally be attributed either to the habit of
reading too much, or of paying insufficient attention to what falls under
their notice.’”

Helena then resumed her work, and tried to finish it patiently, while
thoughtful, quiet, little Marion, who was just turned eleven, and had
gained the reputation at school of being a particularly careful and
expressive reader (no slight praise), delighted her Mamma and sisters
with occasional readings from the following entertaining Tales and

Poems,
THE

ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

Readings mm glrose and Aloctey,



Oh! give to me a pleasant book
That’s fit for mental feeding;

Lost earthly joys |’ll calmly brook
For undisturbed reading.
183

THE ROAD TO PARADISE.

‘Way does that child keep waiting
‘And weeping here so late P

‘The hospital is closed now;
“Why knocks she at the gate?”

“Pm seeking for my mother—
‘My mother kind and dear!
‘Two months ago they bore her,

‘All sick and fainting, here.”

‘¢ Thou poor, poor, wretched maiden,
“Wor thee my heart is sore ;

“Thy mother, whom thou seekest,
“Thow lt find, O nevermore!

‘Deep in the cold earth buried,
‘¢She lies a week and more.”

So answer’d the old guardian,
And quickly closed the door.

The child still stood there sobbing ;
She understood no word

Of all the mournful story
Which she had just then heard.

Then late she homeward wanders
To pass the dreary night,

And wait, with throbbing bosom,
The first faint rays of light.
184 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

And in the morning early,
Once more she weeps, and stands
Still at the gate, loud knocking,
Though sore her little hands.











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‘‘O guardian,—cruel guardian !
“©O let me in, I pray!

“‘T cannot rest at home now,
‘Since mother is away !”

“Thy mother, wretched maiden,
“To Paradise is gone!
‘OTis there that thou must seek her—

199

“Her earthly race is run:
THE ROAD TO PARADISE. 185

Once more the gate he closes,
The child alone does stay,

Deep thinking, how she’ll find now
To Paradise the way.

Si

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Her little feet quite naked,
Her clothing light and thin,
She walks along the rough path,
Her eyes with weeping dim.

And still, to all who meet her,
She gently says,—‘‘ I pray,

“To Paradise, O tell me,
“Which is the shortest way?”
THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

But each replies,—‘‘ Poor maiden !
“Thy way is rough and wild;
‘Tis God alone can guide thee :—

‘May He protect thee, child!”

But none can tell her truly
Where that dear place can be;

Yet still she wanders onwards,
And asks unceasingly.

And now the dark night sinking,
Has spread its gloom around ;

She folds her hands in prayer,
And kneels upon the ground.

Then on the golden corn-sheaves
She lays her weary head,

And sleeps, till o’er the wide fields
The morn his light has shed.

Once more she wanders onwards
Upon her dreary way ;

Still asking, from each traveller,
To Paradise the way.

Deep moved, each passing stranger
Prays blessing on her head ;
And pious mothers load her
With gifts of fruit and bread.

From place to place, still farther
She wanders on forlorn,

Till sore and tired with walking,
Her little feet are torn.
THE ROAD TO PARADISE, ‘187

Her hair flies round her wildly,
Her cheeks are sunk with pain,
Her clothing light is dripping—
Wet through with storm and rain!

Now weeks and days are over,
Since from her distant home

That little maid had wander’d,
Thus lone and far to roam.

And now her strength and courage,
Poor child, begin to fail ;

Her limbs are faint and weary—
Her face is deadly pale!

‘When, see! a convent’s turrets
Proud mounting to the sky,
In morning’s light now glancing,

‘With golden cross on high.

With feeble step she nears it,

She hopes for comfort here ;
And at the door, half frozen,

She kneels and knocks with fear.

A Sister steps forth quickly,
And asks, with friendly tone,—
‘What seck’st thou here, poor maiden,
‘¢So friendless and alone ?”

“My mother I am secking,
“‘ Who’s left me many a day ;
‘But none, alas, can tell me
“To Paradise the way!”
188 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

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‘Thou poor, poor, lonely orphan!”
The bride of heaven then said ;

As through the door, with pity,
The little maid she led.

But, O how sorely trembles
At once that feeble child ;
She sinks, from death o’erpower’d,
An angel soft and mild.
The Sisters, full of pity,
Bring all their convent’s store ;
And nought is left neglected
Her senses to restore.

Then on their knees, all weeping,
They fall, deep moved, around ;
Its way, that child so weary,
To Paradise had found.
189

THE BIRD TALISMAN,

THERE was once an old hermit who lived in a hut near the source of
the Ganges. He was very kind to all birds and beasts; and they were
so accustomed to him, that the very wild beasts were neither afraid of
him nor would hurt him. One day, as he sat by the stream watching

_ two daws that were flying about and playing together in the air, one of
the birds happoned to fall into the water, which was very rapid, and was
swept away by the stream, and would have been drowned if the old







hermit had not run to its help, and, stepping into the water, pulled out
the daw with his hooked staff.

He laid the bird“in the sun, and as soon as it was dry, the two daws
flew away to a high rock, just, above where the Ganges rises. The
hermit saw them fly into a little cave, half way up the rock, and pre-
sently come out again, and fly back towards him; they alighted close to
him, and fone of them laid a ring down at his feet. He picked it
up and put it on his finger, and he was immediately astonished to hear
the daw speak to him and say, ‘‘ Good hermit, please to accept this ring
for having saved my life, and for your kindness to all poor birds and
beasts ; it is a magic ring, cond whoever wears it can understand the
language of birds, and all birds will do whatever he orders them when
190 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

he shows them the ring. Can we do anything to serve you?” The
hermit answered, ‘Yes; I was formerly king of Cashmere, and was
dethroned by my son-in-law, and obliged to conceal myself in this dis-
guise. I should like, before I die, to hear some news of the queen—my
paughter, and of my former kingdom; and if you can fly over the
mountains to Cashmere, and bring me back some news, I shall be for
ever thankful.”

Away flew the two daws, and were out of sight in a moment, and for
some days the hermit saw no more of them; but one evening, as he sat
at the door of his hut, he saw two black specks in the,sky, which, as ©
they came nearer, turned out to be the two daws. They perched on the
bench by his side, and one of them said, ‘‘ We have brought you sorrow-
ful news from Cashmere, The queen, your daughter, is dead, leaving
one little daughter; and the king is married again; and, from what we
heard from the parrot that belonged to the late queen, the present queen
is very unkind to her step-daughter; and there is reason to fear that as
soon as the king leaves his capital to go and hunt in the mountains, the
wicked queen will take the opportunity to kill your little grand-daughter,
or get rid of her in some way.”

The old hermit was very much grieved at this account, and could not
sleep all night for thinking aboutit. In the morning, the two daws
came, as usual, to fly about the banks of the stream. As soon as he saw
them, he beckoned to them, and they flew to him. “ Take this ring,”
said he, drawing the magic ring from his finger, ‘“ and carry it to my
grand-daughter, and tell her, when she wants help or advice, to call to
any bird she sees, and they will no doubt advise her and help her; it is
the only help I can give her.” ‘ We will go to her,” replied the daws,
“and give her the ring; and we will stay with her, and do all we can
for her, and, if possible, we will bring her to you.”

Away flew the two birds with the ring, over the tops of the mountains,
and across the plains, till they came to the palace of the king of Cash-
mere. They flew straight to the chamber of the little princess, whom
they found feeding her parrot ; they laid down the ring before her, and
she put it on her finger, and was immediately able to understand what
the birds said, and to hold conversation with them.

The two daws told the little princess all that the old hermit had told
them, and the parrot told her all that had happened when her grandfather
lost the kingdom, The poor little princess cried very much, and said
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 191

she should be very glad to go to her grandfather, “for,” said she, “ the
queen is so unkind to me, and never lets me see my father without being
present, so that I dare not complain to him; and the queen sets every-
body against me, and nobody loves me, nor cares for me, except my dear
old parrot.” ‘My dear child,” replied the parrot, stooping down from
her perch to give her a kiss with her great horny bill—‘ you may always
depend on my loving you as if you were myown child, and I had hatched





you myself—for I was here when you were born, and your poor mother
before you. As for what these worthy birds say about taking you to
your grandfather, it will be a difficult and dangerous undertaking ; but
after the king goes on his hunting expedition to the mountains, it will
not be safe for my dear child to remain here in the power of that wicked
queen.” It was then settled that the two daws should roost in the
palace garden, and should be always within call, in case they should be
wanted ; and the old parrot promised to keep a good watch in the palace,
and find out whether the queen was planning any mischief against the
princess.

Soon after this, the king set off on his grand hunting expedition to the
mountains ; and the very next day the two daws brought word to the
parrot that the queen’s favourite slave, Baboof, was busy gathering plants
in the garden, and that they had seen him gather some hemlock, some
henbane, some opium poppies, and several other poisonous plants. As
soon as the parrot heard this, she flew out of the window, and having seen
192 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

what Baboof was doing, flew straight to the queen’s apartment, where
she concealed herself, to watch the queen’s proceedings. Presently
Baboof brought in his bundle of poisonous herbs, and the queen chopped
them up, and set them to boil in a pot, on a pan of charcoal that was
burning in the chimney. She then took some flour and sweetmeats out
of a box, and made a cake, and kneaded it up with the liquor from the
poisonous herbs in the pot. She then set the cake to bake on the char-
coal, and the parrot stole away without being perceived, and flew to the
princess’s apartment, where she found the twodaws. ‘There is no time
to be lost,” cried she ; ‘‘ if the princess stays here any longer, she will be
poisoned. The queen is at this moment baking a poisoned cake for her.
Come, my dear child, let us escape at once.” The princess immediately
rose in great alarm, and ran to the door, the three birds following her ;
but the door was locked. The window was too high above the ground
for the princess to get out of it, and, besides, there was a sentinel in the
garden, just opposite the window. Before they could determine what to
do, the queen came, and unlocking the door, entered the room with a
nice-looking cake in a dish. She did not sce the two daws, because they
flew out of the window as the queen come in at the door. ‘‘ Here isa
cake for you, my dear,” said the queen, ‘‘ which I have made with my
own hands ;” and so saying she put it on the table, and went out, locking
the door after her. As soon as she was gone, the parrot called the two
daws, and told them to take the cake, and throw it over the garden-wall
into the lake, which they did, and then came back. The princess re-
mained locked up all that day, and her usual meal was not brought to
her ; but the two daws gathered some figs for her in the garden, and she
and her three birds made a very good supper of them. In the morning,
the queen came to see whether the princess was dead, and when she saw
her still alive, she was furious, and seizing her by the hair}; began to beat
her, and tried to get her hands round her neck to strangle her. In the
mean time, the parrot flew out of the window straight to the queen’s
nursery, where the queen’s little baby was in his cradle. The parrot
picked up a lighted stick from a fire that was burning on the hearth,
and set fire to the window-curtains, and then flew along the passages
leading to the princess’s apartment, screaming, “ Fire!—Fire! The
nursery is on fire !—the little prince will be burnt to death!” And all
the slaves in the palace began to ery, ‘‘ Fire!—Fire!” All this did not
take two minutes; and the queen had not been able to strangle the
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 193

princess, when she heard the outery, and immediately leaving the
# princess lying on the floor, ran to the nursery to save her own child.

The little princess rose from the ground as well as she was able; and
the parrot screaming to her that now was the time to escape, she ran out
of the door and down stairs into the garden, where she was joined by the
two daws, and the old parrot scufiled along before them and led the way
to a little door in the wall. The princess with some difficulty drew back
the bolt and opened the door; and going through this, they found them-
selves on the shore of the lake. There were two swans floating near the
shore, and the parrot told the little princess to show them the ring, and
order them to take her to the other side of the lake. As soon as the

iy SSEA









swans saw the ring which the princess held up to them, they swam
towards her, bowing their heads and asking what she wished them to do.
“Take me across the lake,” said she. They immediately placed them-
selves side by side, and the princess, wading into the water, placed her-
self between them, with one arm over each of their backs; and so sup-
porting herself, almost up to the shoulders in the water, she floated
between the swans, and they carried her safely over to the other side
with the parrot sitting quite dry and comfortable on her shoulder, and
the two daws flying overhead.

When they reached the other side, the princess landed, and the swan
took leave of her and swam back again. The princess found a retired
place among the rocks, and taking off her clothes, spread them to dry in

0
194 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

the sun; and the parrot told one of the daws to sit on the top of the rock
and keep watch, while the other flew back at the princess’s desire to see
what had become of the queen’s baby, and the nursery that was set on
tire.

By the time the clothes were dry the daw came back,’and told the
princess that no harm had happened to the child, and that the fire was
extinguished. He also said that the palace was in great confusion ;
Baboof and all the slaves running about everywhere looking for the
princess, and that a reward of fifty pieccs of gold was offered to whoever
would bring her to the queen.

The parrot begged the princess to put on her clothes and follow her,
for that they had a long way to go before they should be safe from their
pursuers. So they all sct out; the daws flying high in the air, and keep-
ing a good look-out on cvery side, and the old parrot leading the way
before the princess over the rocks. They soon reached a large wood ;
and while one of the daws flew high over the trees on the look-out, the
other came down into the wood, and flew along the pathway in advance
of the princess. They met several people in the wood; but the daw in
advance always called out in the birds’ language, and the princess hid
herself in the bushes till the persons they. met passed by. Nobody took
any notice of the birds.

So they travelled on till the princess was quite tired out and hungry.
The parrot then called down the daw that was ilying overhead, and
asked him whether he had scen any signs of water; and he said thcre
was a little cascade falling from a rock not far to the right. The parrot
told the two daws to sce if they could find any fruit in the wood, and to
bring it to the princess at the cascade; and then persuaded the princess
to rise and follow her, tired as she was. They soon heard the noise of
the waterfall, and, guided by the sound, made their way to the foot of a
rock, down which the water fell into a rocky and decp bason ; here the
princess drank her fill, and so did the parrot ; and then they sat down on
the grass to wait for the daws, who soon made their appearance with as
many figs and grapes as they could carry. These were soon eaten by the
princess and the parrot, and, as the daws had found them at no great
distance, they were not long in bringing a fresh supply, and ey all
made a very hearty meal. The place was so pleasant and so retired, that
they determined to rest there till the next day; and the birds busied
themselyes in collecting dry leayes and grass to make a bed for the
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 195

princess, who soon learnt to make herself useful too; and before night
they had all collected a very comfortable heap of litter under a brow of
the rock which kept off the falling dew. On this heap the prinecss lay
down, and was soon fast asleep. The three birds went to roost in a tree
close by, and took it in turns to keep watch all night.

In the morning, the whole party breakfasted on figs and grapes, and
resumed their journey in the same order as the day before. Towards
noon, and when they had been travelling on in silence for some time, the
daw in advance saw a man coming to mect them, and immediately called
out to warn the princess. She heard the cry of the daw, but could not
understand what he said, but sceing him come flying back, and making
a loud cawing, she thought something was wrong, and hid hersclf in the
bushes till the man was past; she then rejoined the birds, but found she
could not understand a word they said; at last she perecived that she had
lost her magic ring, which being too large for her slender fingers, had
slipped off, unperceived, in the course of the morning’s walk. She held
up her hands to show the parrot that the ring was gone; and great was
the grief of all—the little girl crying, the parrot scrcaming, and the two
daws cawing in mournful concert. At last the parrot made signs to the
princess to follow her, and they all turned back the way they came,
carefully looking for the lost ring, but in vain; for they reached the
cascade without seeing anything of the ring.

Tt was now evening, and the daws having gathered some figs and
grapes for supper, the little princess lay down to sleep on her bed of the
night before. She felt very unhappy at being no longer able to con-
verse with her dear birds, but she soon cricd herself to sleep. In the
morning they all set out again to search for the ring. While they were
thus employed, the two daws came suddenly upon a soldicr lying under
atree. ‘ Here isa man!” cried one, ‘‘fly back and warn the princess!”
‘Who goes there?” cried the soldicr, jumping up; and as he rose, the
daws saw the lost ring glittering on his finger. Immediately the charm
worked, and the daws were obliged to answer the soldicz’s question.
“‘ We are two unfortunate daws, at-your service,” said they. The soldier
was astonished to hear the birds talk, and exclaimed, ‘‘ How is this?
How can birds like you talk?” “Sir,” replied one of them, ‘you have
a magic ring on your finger, which enables you to understand what we
say, and compels us to answer your questions.” ‘Docs it?” said the
soldier, “ then tell me what princess you were talking of, just now?”
196 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

**The Princess of Cashmere,” answered the daw. ‘ Why there is a
reward of fifty pieces of gold for whoever finds her!” said the soldier—
““Ts she anywhere hereabouts ?”? The poor daws were very unwilling
to betray the princess, but they could not resist the magic of the ring ;
so they were foreed to confess that the princess was close at hand, and
the soldier immediately proceeded to look for, and soon found her. He



seized her by the arm, and, in spite of her tears and cries, dragged her
along the path, the three birds following with many doleful cries. By
and by, they reached the shore of the lake, where they found a boat
moored. Into this the princess was forced to go, and the soldier getting
in himself, the parrot managed to scramble in, and hid herself under one
of the seats. The soldier rowed the boat across the lake, and the daws
flew overhead. They landed near the postern door of the palace, and
knocking at the door, it was opened by Baboof, who grinned horribly
when he saw the princess, and led them immediately to the queen’s apart-
ment, while the three birds concealed themselves in the garden.

The queen gaye the soldicr the promised reward, and ordered Baboof
to lock the princess up in her own room, and to set guards opposite both
the door and the windows, to prevent her escaping again. She then
inquired of the soldier how he had found the princess; and he told her
how he had found a magic ring in the wood, which enabled him to
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 197

understand the language of birds; and how he had learnt from the daws
where the princess was. As soon as the queen heard of the magic ring,
she offered the soldier fifty more pieces of gold for it, which he gladly
accepted, and went his way.

The queen was delighted at getting possession of the magic ring—for
she had often heard of it in her youth, and knew that it formerly
belonged to the famous enchanter, Moozuffer, and that, at his death, it
had been carried away by the birds, and concealed, that no other person
might rule them as Moozuffer had ruled them in his lifetime, by means
of this ring. Looking out of the window, she saw the two daws sitting
mournfully on a tree in the garden, and holding up the ring to them,
called them to her, and ordered them to go to the forest on the other
side of the lake, in the midst of which they would find an immense rock,
with perpendicular sides. At the foot of this rock, they would find a
pomegranate-tree growing, in the trunk of which was inclosed a living
toad. She told the daws to bring her one of the pomegranates from this
tree; and she told them, also, to swallow a pomegranate secd each, for
the seeds of that pomegranate were an antidote to every poison, and
unless they swallowed one, they would perish in the next service she
required of them, which was to fly up to the top of the rock, and bring
her a piece of the gum of a poisonous tree which grew there. The two
daws flew away to the forest, and soon found the pomegranate-tree grow-
ing at the foot of the rock. They tapped at the trunk with their bills,
and listened, and heard the toad croak inside the tree. They then swal-
lowed some of the seeds that lay scattered under the tree, and having
gathered each a pomegranate, they flew to the top of the rock, which
they found quite bare of all plants, or living things, and scattered over
with the skeletons of birds, which had been poisoned by the smell of the

_ poison-tree, in flying over the rock. On the highest point of the rock
grew one small, stunted tree, from the bark of which dropped a black-
looking gum. One of the daws picked up a picce of the gum, and then
they both flew back to the palace, carrying the gum and the two pome-
granates. One of the pomegranates they dropped amongst a thicket of
bushes in the garden, and the other they carried, together with the gum,
to the queen, who immediately swallowed one of the pomegranate-seeds
herself, and gave another to Baboof, who was with her, to prevent being

poisoned by the smell of the gum, which she then put into a golden box,
and sealed it up.
198 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

As soon as the daws left the queen, they flew straight to the little
princess’s window, where they found the parrot. They told her what
they had done about the.poisonous gum and the pomegranates, and they
all agreed that a new attempt would be made to poison the princess ; and
to be prepared for this, the daws went and fetched the pomegranate
which they had dropped in the garden. The parrot pecked a hole in it,
and ate one of the seeds herself, and then carried the pomegranate to the
princess, who was sitting crying in a corner, and made signs to her to
. eat one of the seeds. The princess did not like to do this, for the pome-
granate was exactly of the colour of the skin of a toad, and did not look
at all tempting; but the parrot made so many signs, and coaxed the
princess so, that she at last swallowed one of the seeds, and the parrot
hid the pomegranate under the bed. She had hardly done so, and,
hearing the key turned in the door, concealed herself also, when Baboof
entered, with a loaf of bread and a jar of water, which he put on a table,
and went out. As soon as he was gone, the parrot came from under the
bed. The princess was very hungry and thirsty, but was afraid to eat
or drink, though the parrot, knowing that the pomegranate-seed was an
antidote to the poison, did all she could by signs to encourage the princess
to eat. While the parrot was making a great fuss, pecking the bread,
and sipping the water, and making all sorts of impatient noises, the two
daws flew in at the window, with the magic ring in one of their ills.
As soon as the princess touched the ring, she immediately understood
what the birds said, and they told her how they had recovered the ring ;
that when Baboof came in with the loaf, they had flown out of the win-
dow, and perching in a tree opposite the queen’s window, they had seen
the queen sitting there, playing with her little boy, who pulled the ring
off her finger, and rolled it along the window-seat, and at last let it fall
out of the window ; that the queen immediately left the window, to send
one of her slaves to pick up the ring; but before she could do so, and
without being seen by any one, the daws picked it up, and brought it to
the princess. Great was her joy at being again able to talk with her
birds, and when they had told her all about the poisonous gum, and the
antidote, she was no longer afraid to eat the bread and drink the water,
and after making a hearty supper she went to bed.

In the morning, Baboof came to see whether the princess was dead,
and was much surprised to find she was alive, though she had eaten so
much of the poisoned bread. He said nothing, however, but went down
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 199

to tell the queen, who was in the garden, looking again for the ring
under the window from which the baby had dropped it. The parrot told
one of the daws to go and listen to what they said; and accordingly the
daw went slily, and hid himself in a bush close to the queen, where he
could hear all that passed. The queen was very much surprised at the
princess escaping the effects of the poison, and said she must have some
talisman, or charm, about her. ‘‘ However,” said she, ‘ to-night you
shall take her to the balcony that looks on the lake, and throw her into
the water, with a stone round her neck; and in the morning we will
pretend she has died in the night, and have a false funeral, and a coffin
filled with rubbish, which we will bury.”

The daw flew back to tell this dreadful news to his companions, and
they consulted together without telling the princess, for fear of fright-
ening her, at first; but when they had settled their plans, they then told
her not to be alarmed, but to leave everything to them, and they would
save her life.

There lived just outside the palace walls, in a hut on the shore of the
lake, a poor fisherman, who used to spread his nets in the water, below
the walls of the palace; and the little princess had often sat in the
balcony with her attendants, and watched him fishing, and often used to
buy his fish of him, and draw it up with a basket and string, and let
down the money in the same way, so that she had made quite a friend-
ship with the old man. The parrot used to be of these parties—for she
was very fond of fish—and the old fisherman and she were on very good
terms. ‘To this old fisherman’s hut the parrot and the two daws now
flew, taking the ring with them, and putting the ring on the old man’s
finger, so that he could understand what she said, the parrot told him
that his little patroness was in need of his assistance to save her life.
The old man immediately said he would do anything for her, even at the
risk of his own life. He was then told the whole state of affairs, and
promised to obey all the parrot’s orders.

The parrot and the old fisherman settled between them what was best
to be done to save the princess. The old man said that he would lay his
nets under the baleony, so as to catch the princess as soon as she should
be thrown into the water; and that she might float on the surface instead
of sinking, he hit on,the following plan :—He took a number of corks
from an old net, and told the parrot and the two daws to fly with them,
one by one, to the princess’s room, and tell her to cut them into small
200 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

pieces, and string them on a piece of twine, and wra this round and
round her body, so as to form a sort of jacket, by means of which she.
would be able to float in the water, in spite of the weight of the stone
that Baboof and the queen had talked of tying round her neck. But to
make sure, the fisherman sent the princess a little sharp knife, by means
of the parrot, and sent her word to keep it concealed under her sleeves,
to cut away the stone from her neck. When all this was prepared and
settled, the parrot flew back with the ring and one of the corks to the
princess, and the daws followed with as many pieces of cork as they
could carry, and they all three flew backwards and forwards with the
corks till they had brought as many as would be wanted. The little







li

Ti

princess cut the corks in pieces, and strung them on a piece of strong
twine which the fisherman sent her ; and she obeyed the directions brought
by the parrot—wrapping the corks round and round her body, and con-
cealing them under her pelisse. By the time this was done, it began to
grow dark, and by and by Baboof made his appearance, and told the
princess she must come with him. He led her by the hand through the
garden, and up to the baleony overlooking the lake ; and as they passed
through the garden he picked upa large stone, and wrapped itin a hand-
kerchief; and when they reached the balcony, he suddenly tied the
handkerchief round her neck, putting his hand on her mouth to prevent
her erying out, and at the same time lifted her over the balustrade, and
TIE BIRD TALISMAN. 201

threw her into the water. .But she was prepared for this, and in an in-
stant, as he was lifting her up, she cut the handkerchief with the knife,
so that the stone fell into the water at the same time with herself, and
sank to the bottom, while she floated by means of her cork jacket. It
was quite dark, and Baboof hearing the splash, and then all being still,
thought she had sunk to the bottom, and left the balcony to tell the
queen what he had done. In the mean time, the old fisherman was lying
concealed with his boat under the projection of the baleony, and had
spread his net so that whatever fell from the balcony should be within it.
As soon, therefore, as he heard the splash, he began quietly to draw in
his net, and soon brought the floating princess to the side of his boat, and
lifted her in. He then rowed quietly away to his own hut, and landed
with the princess. He showed her into a little room, where a comfort-
able bed was prepared for her, and where she found the parrot and the
two daws already arrived. They had accompanied the princess in the
dark to the balcony, and when they had ascertained she was safe in the
boat, they had flown on before to the fisherman’s hut. ‘The little princess
went to bed immediately, for her clothes were all wet ; and as soon as she
was in bed, the old man brought her a plate of bread and fish for her
supper, after eating which, and giving some to her three birds, she fell
asleep.

In the morning, the old man went a fishing, leaving her locked up in
the hut, and the two daws flew to thé palace to get intelligence. ‘Lhey
found everything in a bustle in the palace, with a grand funeral pre-
paring, and looking in at the window of the princess’s room, they saw a
magnificent coffin lying on the bed, with wax tapers all round it, and
the attendants in deep mourning. They flew back to the princess with
this news, and the parrot said to her—‘‘ Now, my dear, you may rest
here in peace till we can get an opportunity of escaping to your grand-
father. The queen thinks you are drowned; and I am sure we may
trust the old fisherman.” As she said this, the old man came in with a
great basket of fish, of which he chose the nicest for the princess to eat,
and took out the rest to sell in the city. With the money he got for the
fish he bought food and other necessaries, and enough cloth to make the
princess a complete suit of common clothes, which she cut out and made
for herself.

The late queen had taught the little princess to work, and she soon
made herself a very neat suit of clothes, such as poor people’s children
202 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY. ,

wear ; for the old fisherman and the parrot thought she would be safer in
that disguise. They also told her to keep indoors, for fear of heing scen
and known by anybody. There was, however, a little garden at the
back of the fisherman’s cottage, in which she was allowed to go; and
she managed to pass her time pleasantly enough between doing the work
of the house, mending the nets—which the fisherman taught her to do—
and playing with her birds. Every day the old man went a fishing,
and, with the money he got by selling his fish, he bought whatever was
necessary for the little houschold, and everything prospered with them’
foratime. But the season for catching the best fish was nearly over,
and by and by he was less successful in his fishery, and at last he had
great difficulty in getting enough to eat. The fruit season was over, too,
so that the daws were unable to find any fruit for their mistress, and the
household began to be reduced to great distress. One day, the old man
came home from fishing without having caught a single fish, and he was



just sitting down with the little girl, to dine on a little bit of mouldy
bread, which was all he had left in the house, when the two daws flew in
at the window, with each of them a piece of gold money in their bills,
which they laid onthe table, and then told the princess how they had
got it. They said that they had been flying all about the palace garden,
to see if they could find any fruit left, and had perched to rest them-
selyes on the top of an old chimney. They peeped down the funnel,
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 203

which was very wide and short, and saw something glittering at the
bottom, and ‘one of them flew down, and found himself in the royal
treasury, with quantities of jewels and money scattered all about. He
called to the other to come down, and they each picked up a piece of
gold, and flew up the chimney with them, and so home. ‘The old man
was delighted at the sight of the gold, and said he considered it the
princess’s own money, for the king, if he knew it, would be glad to give
her a thousand times as much if she wanted it; so he immediately went
out and bought provisions, and whatever else was wanted. While the
money lasted, they all lived as comfortably as possible ; and when it was
all spent, the daws went and got some more. One day the little princess
was playing by herself in the garden, and looking up, she saw a gipsy
woman looking at her over the low wall of the garden, As soon as the
woman saw that she was observed by the princess, she began to bow
down her head, and kiss her hand to her very humbly, and said—* Oh,
my sweet young lady !—give me a morsel of food, for I am starving to
death.” The princess ran to the house and fetched her a piece of bread,
and handed it to her over the wall, when the gipsy suddenly threw a
cloak over the little girl’s head, and wrapping it round her face, so that
she could neither see nor ery out, she caught her by the arm, and pulled
her over the wall. Then, folding the cloak close round her, she threw
her like a bundle over her back, and ran off with her, threatening to cut
her throat if she made any noise. She was carried in this manner a long
way, and felt almost stifled by the cloak. When at last she was set
down, and the cloak unwrapped from round her, she found herself in a
wood, surrounded by a large family of gipsies, who had a fire of sticks
burning on the ground, and two or three small tents pitched, and several
asses grazing close by. The woman who had kidnapped her told her not
to ery, and no harm should happen to her; that she should be taken to
a grand city, and sold to some great prince or princess, and live in splen-
dour and'riches all her life; but if she tried to escape, or give any alarm,
she should be murdered. As soon as the woman had concluded this
speech, the gipsies took down their tents, and packed up everything, and
loading their donkeys, set off without delay. The little princess was put
on the back of one of the asses that carried the bedding, and in this
manner she rode very comfortably, but was much frightened and very
unhappy. She looked all around in hopes of seeing her two daws, but
they were not to be seen. She was afraid the gipsies would steal her
204 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

ring; so she took an opportunity, when she was not observed, to slip it
into the folds of her hair, under her turban, and fastened it there. They
travelled in this way till some time after dark, when they halted in a
retired wood, where they lighted a fire and pitched their tents. The
gipsies sat down to a very good supper, of which the princess partook,
and afterwards she slept in one of the tents.

The princess awoke very early in the morning, and secing the gipsy-
woman and children who slept in the tent with her fast asleep, and the
door of the tent open, she stepped softly out, thinking to run away, but
was stopped on the outside by a growl from a large dog, which lay a few
yards from the tent-door. She saw that if she attempted to escape, the



dog would fly at her, or, at least, waken all the gipsies by his barking ;
so she stood quite still, and the dog lay quiet, only keeping his eye fixed
on her. Just then she heard a woodpigeon cooing in a tree overhead,
and, looking up, she saw the bird perched on a bough just above her.
She immediately drew the ring Wat of her hair, and held it up to the
pigeon, making a sign to it to come down and perch on her arm, which
it did. Then, for fear of awakening the gipsies, she whispered to the
pigeon to fly to the old fisherman’s hut, and tell the parrot and the daws
what had become of her ; and cutting off a lock of her hair, she told the
pigeon to take it to the old fisherman as a token. Away flew the pigeon,
and the princess returned into the tent, and lay down again, carefully
hiding the ring in her hair as before. By and by the gipsies got up and
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 205

prepared breakfast, after which everything was packed up, and they
resumed their journey, the princess sometimes walking with the gipsy
children, and, when she was tired, riding on one of the asses. The gipsy
woman who had stolen her often talked to her, and told her how well off
she would be if she was bought as a slave by some great prince at Lahore,
where they were going. So they journcyed all day, only stopping to dine
and rest, during the hottest part of the afternoon, in a shady grove of
trees. A little before sunset they came to a wood, where there was a
spring of water, and here they unloaded the asses, and made preparations
for passing the night. The princess was allowed to walk about by her-
self, but the dog that had watched her in the morning was ordered by
signs to go with her; and he seemed to understand very well that he
was not to let her escape, for if ever she quickened her pace, or seemed
to be going too far from the tents, the dog began to growl.

At last she sat down under a tree at the outskirts of the wood, and as
she was looking towards the way they had come, she saw what seemed a
strange-looking bird flying towards her: as it came nearer, she saw it
was not one bird, but three, all flying in a bunch together; and when
they came still nearer, she saw that it was her dear old parrot and the
two daws. The two daws held the two ends of a stick in their claws,
and the parrot held the middle of it in her beak, and by the support of
the stick, and helping herself along by flapping her wings, she made a
very good flight of it. As soon as they were within hearing, the little
princess began to call out to them, and when the parrot heard her voice
she let go the stick and flew down to the princess, and, perching on her
shoulder, kissed her over and over again. The two daws, too, dropped
the stick and came down and perched on a bush out of the dog’s reach,
and told the princess how glad they were to see her again. ‘They told
her also how the woodpigeon had brought news of what had become of
her to the fisherman’s hut, and that they had immediately set out after
her, asking all the birds they met whether they had seen her, and so
tracing her out without much difficulty. | They said the old fisherman
seemed to understand they were gone,to find her, and had received the
lock of hair in token that she was alive and safe.

While she was thus eagerly talking with her birds, she did not per-
ceive that two of the gipsy children, who were a little older than herself,
had stolen after her behind the bushes, till they suddenly rushed out,
and before the parrot could fly out of their way, they had caught her,
i
206 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.
a

and began to run back to the tents with their prize, etying out that they
had caught a parrot. The princess followed, crying, and begging them
to give back her parrot; but they did not mind her. However, just as
they came to the tents, and as the elder gipsies came out to see what was
the matter, the parrot managed to bite their fingers, so that they let her
go, and she flew up into a tree out of their reach. The gipsy woman asked.
. what was the matter, aud the princess told her that the parrot was hers,.
and had found its way after her all the way from home, and that the
other children had taken it from her; and she cried very much, and said
the parrot was the only friend she had, and begged the woman to let her:
have it. “Well,” said the woman, ‘if you will be a good girl, and not
make yourself unhappy, so that you may look vole when we
come to sell you at Lahore, you shall keep your parrot.â„¢ She then
ordered the other children not to meddle with the parrot, which then
came down from its tree. As for the two daws, they kept always not
far off, in case of need.

Before going to bed that night, the gipsy woman brought some leaves
out of the wood and boiled them in a pot, and with the liquor she washed
the princess’s face, and arms, and legs; and her skin turned ag/brown as
that of the gipsies themselves. ‘There, my dear,” said the woman,
“vou will now pass for a gipsy; if people saw you with that pretty
white skin of yours, they would guess you did not belong to us, and we
should not be allowed to keep you.” When the princess was in bed the
parrot roosted by her side, and before she went to sleep comforted her as
well as she could, and told her that she need not be afraid of the gipsies,
who would be sure to use her well that she might look well when she
came to be sold, and bring a good price.

And so it was; for the gipsies were very kind to her, and took great
care of her. They travelled on many days, pitching their camp at night
in quiet, out of the way of public places. The princess often saw her
two daws flying overhead, but she took no notice of them, for’fear of
being seen by the gipsies. One afternoon the whole party were sleeping
in the shade, when the princess was awakened by the parrot pinching her-
ear with her bill. As soon as she opened her eyes, she saw the two daws
fluttering and screaming amongst the branches of a thicket not far off,
and crying out—‘‘A tiger! atiger! Awake! awake!” ‘Wake the
gipsies!” cried the parrot, ‘or the tiger will be uzon us.” The'princess
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 207

jumped up, and began screaming as loud as she could—‘‘A tiger! a
tiger! Awake! awake!” and the gipsies were soon awakened.

At this moment, the princess saw the eyes of the tiger glaring at her
from under a bush, but, just as he was going to spring, one of the gipsies
caught up a bundle of dry reeds, and lighting it at the tire where the pot
was boiling, flung the reeds all in a blaze into the tiger’s face, which so
frightened him, that he turned off with a loud roar, and bounding across
the plain with great swiftness, was out of sight in a very few minutes.

The next day they left the wooded country and entered on the desert.
They travelled all day without seeing a living creature or a living plant.
It was one vast plain of dry sand, and the only sign they saw of any
living thing having ever been there before, was the skeletons of camels
and horses, and once or twice the skeletons of human beings lying half
buried in the sand. They pressed on with all speed, for they knew that
it was a long way to the nearest well, and that unless they could reach
it, they must perish with thirst. They were already suffering very much
from drought, and the poor donkeys were almost exhausted, when they
saw a clump of palm-trees at a distance, and the gipsy woman told the
princess to cheer up, for the well was under those trees. The donkeys
seemed to know it, for they pricked up their long ears and began to bray
and to quicken their pace. It took them, however, a long time to reach
the trees, and by the time they got there they were all, both man and
beast, quite exhausted, and could barely drag themselves to the well.
The first gipsy that reached it looked eagerly in, but there was not a
drop of water to be seen—the well was dried'up. They were all struck
with despair, for they knew there was no other well within many miles,
and they were dying of thirst and unable to move a step. The parrot
was dreadfully alarmed, but seeing the two daws perched in one of the
palm-trees, she flew to them, and begged them to fly about in all direc-
tions, and try whether they could find water, or their poor princess would
perish with thirst. The daws flew different ways, and after some time
came back and told the parrot they could not find any water, but they
had been fortunate enough to find a number of water-melons growing in
a valley not far off.

The parrot told the princess, who was lying by herself under a tree, to
rise and follow the daws, who showed her the way to the water-melons.
The gipsies were too much exhausted, and too much taken up with their
own sufferings, to pay any attention to her movements, so nobody tried to
if

208 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

stop her. She had the greatest difficulty in dragging herself along
through the hot sand, but at last she reached the water-melons, and
seizing the first she saw, soon quenched her thirst with its refreshin;y
juice. She gave some to the three birds, and then, being quite refreshed
and strengthened, she gathered two more of the melons, and hastened
back with them to the well. The gipsy woman was so delighted at the
sight of the melons, that she clasped the little princess in her arms, and
almost stifled her with kisses. The two melons were divided amongst
the other children, and then the princess showed them all the way to the
water-melons,—donkeys, dogs, and all; and a delightful feast they all
had, for the ground was covered with them. The poor dogs had suffered



most from thirst, and it was a strange sight to see them lapping up the
juice of the melons that were given them. The camp was pitched by the
side of the melons, and next morning, after another hearty meal on them,
they set off on their march, taking care to load the donkeys with as many
melons as they could carry, for fear they should find the well dry at the
next stage, which, however, was not the case; and they crossed the
remainder of the desert without further difficulty or adventure. They
were all doubly kind to the little princess, now that she had saved their
lives,‘and the gipsy woman told her that she would restore her to liberty
if she could, but that her husband would not let her. ‘‘ But do not fear,”
she said; ‘I will take care that you shall only be sold toa good mistress,
who will bring you up well, and make you happy.”
this conversation, they came in sight of the towers and minarets of the
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 209

great city of Lahore. They encamped in a grove not far from the gate
of the city, and the gipsy woman haying mixed some white powder,
which she took out of a little box, with some water washed the princess
with it, and her skin became as white as before it was dyed brown.

The next morning the gipsy woman took the princess into the city
with the parrot on her arm, and after going through a great many streets,
they reached a bazaar where was the slave-market. The slaves were
sitting on the ground all round a large hall; an old man with a white





































beard sat in the middle of the hall on a carpet, smoking a pipe, and he
had before him a number of account-books and pens and ink. To him
the gipsy woman brought the princess, and after whispering a few words
to him, she took tke princess to one side of the hall, where were seated
several little slave-girls, some white and some black, under the care of
a very cross-looking old woman, who grumbled a good deal about the
princess bringing her parrot with her; but the gipsy woman told her
they were to be sold together, and, promising to come for her in the even-
ing if she was not sold, she left her in charge of the old woman.

The little princess felt both fear and sorrow at being left in the hands
of strangers, and she sat on the ground amongst the other slave children
as much out of sight as she could; she hugged her parrot in her arms

P
#

210 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURE.
£

and kept her hidden in the bosom of her little gown,-for fear she should
be taken from her. Several persons who came to buy slaves looked at
her, and asked her price of the old man who managed the sales, but the
price he mentioned was too high for them. At last a lady with a very
forbidding countenance came by, and after looking at her, went to the
old man to ask her price. The old woman who had charge of her, on
seeing this, said, ‘‘ I hope that lady will not buy you, for she is the worst
mistress and the most cruel woman in all the city. It is only last week
that she drove a poor little negro slave-girl to such desperation by her
ill-usage, that in trying to escape over the walls of the court of her house
she fell to the ground and was killed.” ‘‘Oh,” said the little princess,
‘‘ pray do not let me be sold to her.” ‘I will not,” said the old woman,
“if I can help it: but the old man can sell you if he pleases.” ¢ At
least,” said the princess, ‘‘do not let me be sold without the gipsy woman
knowing; for I saved her life; and the lives of all her family, and I am
sure she will not let that horrid woman have me.” Now, the parrot heard
all this, and putting her head out from under the princess’s gown, she
whispered in her ear, ‘I will go and fetch the gipsy woman ;” and she
flew straight out at the door of the bazaar, and from thence over the
houses, till she came to the gate where they Van

had entered the city. A little way outside this . \
gate shefound the gipsies encamped, and flying
to the gipsy woman, she alighted onthe ground
at her feet, and taking the hem of her gown
in her bill, gave a pull at it, and then began
to shuffle along the ground towards the gate,
chattering and making all sorts of signs with
her head that the gipsy should follow her.
The gipsy saw what she wanted, and followed
her towards the city gate, and the parrot kept = __ SRPâ„¢>/ J
flying before her, and then perching, till she brought her all the way to
the gate of the bazaar. Just as they got there they met the ill-looking
lady coming out, holding the princess by the arm, who was crying
bitterly ; and there was a crowd of people about the gate of the bazaar,
crying shame on the lady, and calling her a murderess and all sorts of
names, and saying that it was a shame she should haye the little girl,
for she would kill her as she had so many other slaves, As soon as the
princess saw the gipsy woman she made a spring, and, escaping from the







THE BIRD TALISMAN. 211

grasp of the ill-looking lady, she threw herself into the arms of the gipsy,
and begged her not to let her be sold to that dreadful woman. The
gipsy was moved, and assured the princess she should not be sold to her ;
but the ill-looking lady said, ‘‘She is sold to me already; I have paid
for her, and here is the receipt.”” And she drew a bit of paper from her
bosom and held it up in her hand, when the parrot, flying suddenly over
the heads of the crowd, snatched the paper from her hand, and flew away
with it out of sight, and hid itat the top of a mosque close by the bazaar,
and then flying back again, perched quietly on the top of the gate of the
bazaar, where she could see all that took place. By this time the dis-
turbance was so great that the cadi, or judge, who lived near at hand,
heard of it, and came to the bazaar with all his men, to see what was the
matter, and to keep the peace. Some cried one thing, and some another ;
the ill-looking lady declared she had bought the little girl, and the gipsy
woman declared she had not sold her, and the people cried out it was a
shame to let that vile murderess have her. The cadi ordered them all to
be brought before him, and said to the ill-looking lady, “If you have
bought the little girl, show me the receipt.” She declared that the receipt
had been snatched out of her hand by a parrot, and carried away. ‘I
don’t believe that,” said the cadi, ‘‘and unless you produce the receipt,
I shall give up the little girl to the gipsy woman.” It was in vain that
the ill-looking lady repeated what she had said ; those who had not seen
the parrot declared it was not true ; and those who had would not say any
thing about it, so the princess was restored to the gipsy woman, and the
ill-looking lady went away looking worse and more dreadful than ever,
for she had lost her victim and her money too. The judgment of the
cadi was given in the street, under the windows of his own house; and
the princess was no sooner delivered to the gipsy, than a black slave
came to her and told her the cadi’s wife wanted to speak to her. She
followed the slave, leading the princess by the hand into the cadi’s house,
and they were brought to the cadi’s wife, who was sitting in a room with
a baleony over the door of the house, with her little daughter by her side,
who was about the same age as the princess, and who, haying seen what
had passed in the street, and being much taken with the appearance of
the princess, had begged her mother to Suy her. This was soon managed;
the cadi’s wife offered the gipsy woman a handsome price, and the
princess was so much pleased with the looks of the cadi’s little daughter,
and of her mother, that’she begged the gipsy woman to sell her to them,
“
212 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’s OWN we

a was accordingly done; and the gipsy departed it her money,
taking leave of the princess, and telling her she was in good hands and

would lead a happy life. After she was gone, the two little girls came *

into the balcony to look at the departing crowd, and the parrot, which
was watching all that took place from her perch over the gate of the
bazaar, soon perceived her little mistress in the balcony, and flying to
her, perched on her shoulder. The cadi’s daughter was much surprised,
but the princess soon explained to her all about the parrot, and begged
to be allowed to keep her, which was immediately granted. The two
little girls became much attached to each other, and led a very happy life
together, learning the same lessons, and playing and taking their meals



together, and sleeping in the same room; for though the princess was
really the slave of the cadi’s daughter, she was treated just as if she had
been her sister; and before many days the princess had told her all her
story, and had even let her into the secret of the magic ring. One even-
ing after supper, the parrot said to the princess, ‘‘ My dear, I think we
had better let your grandfather know where you are; he must be very
anxious about you, and to-morrow morning I will send the two daws,
who roost every night on the minaget of the neighbouring mosque, to give
him intelligence of what has happened to you, and to learn what are his
wishes concerning you.” The princess gave her consent, and early the
next morning she wrote a letter to her grandfather, and gave it to the
parrot, who carried it to the daws, and told them to lose no time in taking

‘
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 213

it to the old hermit at the source of the Ganges, and in bringing back an
answer.

The old hermit had begun to be very uneasy about his grand-daughter
when, one evening, the two daws made their appearance with the princess’s
letter; and the old hermit, after having read it, wrote an answer and
delivered iti to the daws, who, having stayed one day at the hermitage to
rest from their journey, flew back again to Lahore, and carried the
hermit’s letter straight to the apartment of the two little girls.

This was the hermit’s letter :—

“To my dear Grandchild, whom I have never seen, but whom I love
for her poor mother’s sake,—I am rejoiced to hear that after so many
troubles and dangers you are happy and in good hands. Perhaps the
best thing for you is that you should remain where you are with your
young friend ; but if anything happens to prevent this, and you are again
in want of counsel or assistance, beyond what your faithful parrot can
give you, do not forget to send again to your affectionate grand-
father.”

The two little girls continued to live very happily together, and
became more and more attached to each other. The cadi and his wife
were made acquainted with the princess’s rank, and treated her with the
greatest kindness and respect ; but they told the two little girls to keep
all the cireumstances a close secret, for fear the wicked queen of Cash-
mere should hear of her, and renew her persecutions ; and it was agreed
that she should continue to go by her slave-name Shereen. One day, as
they were sitting at their work in the room of the mother of Zuleika,
(for that was the name of the princess’s friend,) the cadi came home from
attending the king’s court, and looked very grave and melancholy. His
wife asked him what was the matter, and he said there was very bad
news from Cashmere. It was reported that the king had suddenly died,
and that the queen had proclaimed her little boy king, and had declared
herself regent in his name. ‘The little princess was very much shocked
and grieved to hear of her father’s death, and rati out of the room to
conceal her trouble, and Zuleika followed to console her. A few days
afterwards, as the cadi’s wife and the two little girls were sitting at the
window, they saw a great crowd coming along the street, and when it
came near, they perceived a grand procession of men in splendid dresses,
with horses and camels, and in the midst of them, on a camel covered
with embroidery, rode the ugly negro, Baboof, all over jewels and finery,
#
214 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

and carrying in his hand a letter, wrapped in cloth ofl geld. The princess.
was much alarmed at the sight of him, and hid herself till the procession
had passed. When the cadi came home from court, he looked graver
and sadder than before ; and being asked by his wife what the procession
was, he told her it was an embassy from the queen of Cashmere, who had
sent a most insolent letter to the king of Lahore, claiming tribute from



him, and, in case of refusal, threatening war. He said, likewiso, that
the king was very angry, and had torn the queen’s letter, and thrown it
on the ground, and had ordered the embassy to depart, and that prepara-
tions were making on every side for war.

The cadi’s wife often sat with the two little girls at the window,
watching the troops marching through the streets to join the army ; and
the parrot was generally of the party,—for though she was not so young
as she had been, she was very fond of looking at the soldiers, and would.
ruffle up her feathers and scream with delight at the noise of the drums
and cymbals, One day, long after the departure of the last of the troops,
as they sat looking up the empty street, the parrot said, in a melancholy
voice, ‘‘ I wish we could have some news of those charming warriors
who are gone to fight in our defence.” Then, suddenly brightening up,
she cried, ‘‘ How foolish of me to forget the daws! they will bring us
news without fail ;” and away she flew to find the daws, and sent them.
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 215

off to follow the army, and bring back news of the war. On the third
evening after this, the two daws flew in at the window, worn out with
fatigue and alarm. As soon as they had taken a little food and water,
which the princess gave them, they told her that they had witnessed a
great battle between the two armies; that the king of Lahore had been
completely defeated, and his army dispersed; and that the army of the
queen was in full march for Lahore, and would arrive the next day.
The princess repeated all this to the cadi’s wife, who was in the greatest
grief and alarm, and who sent for her husband from the court, and told
him what she had heard, and that it was by magic that she was ac-
quainted with it; but she could not tell him more. At first he dis-
believed her, and thought she had dreamt it; but seeing how alarmed she
was, and knowing that she was a wise and good woman, he was convinced
at last, and immediately went out to consult with the king’s council
what was best to be done. He did not come home till late at night,
when he told his wife that the council had resolved, if the news were
true, to submit to the queen’s army, in order to save the city from de-
struction. The cadi’s wife immediately went to the princess, and said
to her—‘‘ The queen’s army will be in possession of the city to-morrow.
It will not be safe for you to remain here—we must send you away to
some place of safety.”

While the cadi’s wife was talking to the princess—who was weeping
with fear and with grief at having again to quit such kind friends—the
cadi was hastily summoned to attend the king, who had escaped from the
battle, and who was holding a council to consider of the terms of peace

/y which were offered by the enemy. The council was a very short one,
and the cadi soon returned, and told them that the enemy would grant
them peace, and spare the city, on payment of tribute and a very heavy
ransom. Indeed, the sum demanded was so great, that it could only be
raised by a general contribution of all the gold, silver, jewels, and other
valuables, including horses and slaves, to be found in the city. ‘ We
shall be reduced to poverty,” said the cadi, ‘‘ but we shall save our lives,
and the enemy will leave the city in peace.” ‘‘ Oh, then, Shereen need
not be sent away,” cried Zuleika, ‘‘ for she will be quite safe here.”
The cadi looked very sorrowful, and shook his head, and said that all the
neighbours knew that his wife had bought Shereen for a slave at a high
price, and she would be one of the first to be demanded in payment of
the ransom; that the house would be searched, as well as every other
216 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

house in the city, for valuables that might be concealed, so that they
could not hide her in the house; and that there was no place of safety to
send her to out of the city, which was surrounded by the enemy’s soldiers.
Having said this, the cadi went out, leaving them all in greater grief
than before. But the old parrot, who had listened to all that passed,
stepped down from her perch on to the princess’s shoulder, and kissing
her, bid her not ery, for she knew a safe place to hide her in. The two
daws, she said, lived in a ruined mosque, near the back of the garden.



This mosque had only one minaret left, at the top of which was a little -
chamber, where she would be quite safe; but of the stairs which led to it,
the lower half had fallen down, and the only way to get up into it would
- be by aladder. ‘‘ Ifour friends,” said the parrot, ‘‘ will make a ladder
of some of the silken cords of which I see plenty amongst the furniture of
this place, the two daws will fly with it to the top of the minaret, and I
can fasten one end to the bottom of the remaining stairs, and let the other
end down to you ; but the ladder must be made as light as possible, or
the daws will not beable to carry it.” The princess repeated all this to
the cadi’s wife, and all three immediately set to work to make the rope
ladder. The parrot took a little ball of twine in her claws, and flew. up
to the lowest of the remaining stairs of the minaret, and letting the ball
fall down, while she held the end of the twine above, it unrolled as it fell.
She then flew down after it, and picking it up, flew with it to the princess,
and showed her how much was unrolled, and that gave them the length
necessary for the rope ladder. .Zuleika sat in the window looking down
the street, to give notice ifthe officers of the king should make their ap-
pearance to search the house; but they had many houses to search first,
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 217

and by the time it grew dusk in the evening the cadi’s wife and the
princess had made a ladder of silk-cord, long enough and sufliciently
strong to bear the princess’s, weight. As soon as it was dark, the cadi’s
wife and the two little girls went with the parrot secretly into the garden,
and to a terrace ‘overlooking the ground in which the ruined mosque
stood, which was very near the garden+wall. They found a ladder in
the garden, by which they reached the ground outside—the parrot having
previously ascertained from the daws, who were on the watch, that all
was safe. As soon as they were under the minaret, the princess gave the
rope ladder, which she had wrapped round a small stick, to the two daws, ~
_and told them to fly up with it. Each of them took one end of the stick
in its claws, and tried to fly up; but, though the silk-cord was so fine
that the ladder made a very small bundle, it was too heavy for the poor
birds, and they came fluttering to the ground with it. ‘The parrot tried
to help them, but she was such a clumsy flier, that she only got in their
way, and made matters worse. They were all in despair, and were just
going to return to the garden, when they heard a frightful shriek just
over their heads, and on looking up, they could see, against the faint
light of the sky, a large bird fly to the top of the ruin, and perch there.



It was an enormous owl. ‘‘ The talisman! the talisman!” cried the
parrot—‘‘ give me the talisman!” and snatching the ring from the
princess, she flew up and touched the owl with it, to his great astonish-
ment. The old parrot then, with a most important voice, ordered the
owl to take up the rope ladder and carry it up to the top of the minaret,
which he did, and then, bowing his great horned head to the parrot,
asked if there were any more commands for him. ‘ None,” said the
218 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

parrot, ‘‘ except to keep watch in this ruin at night, and give notice if
any danger approaches ;” and so the owl was dismissed. The parrot
then managed to carry the rope ladder down the remaining stairs, and
twisted one end of it firmly round an old nail in the wall of the staircase,
and let the other end fall down to the ground. ‘The princess and her two
friends were standing below, and having taken leave of each other with
many kisses and tears, she began to climb the ladder ; and as soon as she
was safe atthe top, she pulled it up after her, and her friends returned to
the house, leaving the princess in her new retreat with her three birds.
She could not see what sort of a place it was, but wrapped herself up in a
cloak she had brought, and soon fell fast asleep.

The princess was awakened by the sun shining in through a doorway
in the wall, and found herself in a very little round chamber, which
communicated with the gallery outside by means of the doorway ; and.
on one side, in the stone floor, was an opening communicating with the
stairs, and through which she had come up. She was afraid to go out
into the gallery, for fear of being seen—for the cadi’s wife and the parrot
had charged her on no account to run any risk of being seen. The
daws were gone in search of food, and the parrot, as soon as she and the
princess had breakfasted on some provisions she had brought with her,
flew down into the garden to hear how things were going on. She found
the place in a great commotion. The king’s officers were in the house,
searching for valuables. The cadi produced all his gold, silver, and
jewels, and whatever else was of value. His horses were brought from
the stables, and all the slayes were mustered in the court, that the
officers might choose those that were worth seizing. Having chosen
such as they thought worth taking, they were going away, when a
slave-girl, who was amongst those that were taken, cried out to the
officers—‘‘ There is another slave-girl somewhere in the house, who is
worth more than all of us put together; but she is the favourite, and
they have hid her.” ‘The officers asked what her name was. ‘ We call
her the parrot-girl,” said she, ‘because she always has a nasty old
parrot with her: there it is,” said she, pointing to the parrot, ‘and you
may be sure the parrot-girl is not far off.” It was jealousy that made
the slave-girl so spiteful. The cadi said to the officers, ‘‘I have such a
slave, but where she is I do not know; my house is open to you, search
everywhere.” It was true he did not know where she was; all his wife
had told him was, that the princess had gone to a safe place, and he did
THE BIRD TALISMAN, 219

not wish to hear more, that he might be clear of blame. The officers
searched everywhere in vain; at last they said they supposed she had
run away, and would probably be caught before long; so, taking their
spoil with them, they departed, leaving the house stripped of all its most
valuable furniture, and with only a few old slaves, not worth taking
away. As soon as they were gone, Zuleika ran to her mother, and said,
“Oh, mamma! Shereen may come back now!” ‘‘No,” said her
mother, ‘‘she is much safer where she is; it will not be safe to bring her
back till the enemy’s army is gone.” Zuleika was very sorry to hear
this, but she begged her mother to let her go and visit the princess at
night, to which she at last consented, if there should be no appearance
of danger. ‘Oh!’ said Zuleika, “those dear birds will watch, so that
we cannot be surprised.”” She then sent by the parrot a note to the
princess, prortising to come and see her as soon as it was dark, and to
bring some provisions with her.



Nearly all day the princess sat in her little chamber, sometimes talk-
ing to the parrot, or working, and sometimes reading a book she had
brought with her. At last she perceived a loose stone in the chamber
wall, and pushing against it with her hand, it gave way and fell out,
leaving a square hole in the wall, through which she could look into the
garden of the cadi’s house. As soon as she found this out she was
delighted, and still more when she found that through this hole she
could see the window of the room in which she and Zuleika used to sleep..
220 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.

It seemed very long before night came, but at last it grew dark, and the
parrot having set the two daws and the great owl to watch on different
sides of the ruin, flew to the garden to fetch Zuleika, who was waiting
on the terrace with her mother. ‘I will wait for you here,” said her
mother ; ‘‘send the parrot back to me presently, and when it is time for
you to come away, I will send her to call you.” Zuleika then went
down. the ladder, and was soon under the minaret; upon a signal from
the parrot, the rope-ladder was lowered, and Zuleika climbed up, car-
rying with her a basket full of all sorts of provisions. The two little
girls flew into each other’s arms, and after some little time the basket
was opened, and they sat down to supper, and an excellent supper they
made, for they had neither of them been able to eat any dinner, for
thinking of the pleasure of meeting that evening. The parrot flew back
to the terrace to the cadi’s wife, and the princess showed Zuleika the
hole in the wall, and begged her to come often to her bedroom window,
that she might see her and make signals to her. By and by the parrot
came back, and said it was time to go, and Zuleika, after many kisses,
returned as she came.

The ransom of the city was so large, that it took a good many days to
collect it; for many of the citizens tried to conceal their valuables, and
it took the king’s officers a long time to search all the houses of the city.

All this time the princess passed in her little chamber at the top of
the minaret, with her three birds. She often sent the daws with little
notes and messages to Zuleika, who generally sat in the window of her
bedroom, where the priricess could see her through the hole she had
made in the wall, and through which she could put out her hands and
talk to Zuleika with her fingers, as well as the distance would allow,
without any other person being able to see her hands, which would have
endangered her being discovered, but the ivy covered the minaret so
thickly that the hole in the wall could not be seen from any other point
than Zuleika’s window. The three birds were also a good deal occupied
in bringing their mistress provisions from Zuleika, who was not allowed
to repeat her visit for two or three days, for fear of discovery. Her
next visit to the minaret was late at night, because she had to wait till
the moon was gone down, and she and the. princess had so much to say
to one another, that it was almost morning before they parted, and the
princess was so sleepy that she forgot to draw up the rope-ladder again
after Zuleika’s departure. The next morning, the parrot awoke before
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 221

her, and having sent the daws off in search of intelligence to the Cash-
merian camp, she herself flew to the cadi’s house to get her mistress’s
breakfast. The parrot had not been long away, when the princess was
awakened by a horrid laugh, which sounded close to her, and she was
struck with terror when she saw coming through the opening which led
to the stairs, a head and shoulders. She knew the face too well; it was

trl Met
Lt tty







that of the spiteful slave-girl who had attempted to betray her to the
officers when they searched the cadi’s house, and who had always been
her enemy.

“Ha, ha! my fine parrot-girl,” cried she, ‘‘I have found you out,
have 1? I will soon deliver you to those that will be glad to get you,
and who will give me a good reward, too!” She then sprang into the
chamber, and before the princess had recovered from her amazement, she
seized her and bound her hand and foot with her own scarf, which she
tore in two for the purpose, and then saying, ‘‘I think you will hardly
be able to escape before I return,” she went down the rope-ladder, and
as soon as she reached the ground, with a violent jerk she pulled it from
the nail to which it was fastened above, and down it fell through the
trap-door. The spiteful slave gathered up the rope-ladder, and carried
it away with her in great haste, leaving the princess lying helpless at
the top of the minaret, and without any means of getting down to
escape, even if she had not been bound hand and foot. How the slave-
girl came to discover her was thus :—She herself had managed to escape

”
222 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

‘that very night from the building in which the slaves who had been
seized to make up the ransom were kept, and had found her way to the
ruined mosque, in hopes of being able to conceal herself there. Finding
the rope-ladder hanging down inside the minaret, she climbed up to see
where it led to, and finding the princess asleep, it immediately came into
her head to betray her to the king’s officers, for she not only hated her
out of jealousy, but she knew that a reward was offered for all runaway
slaves, and that if she delivered up so valuable a slave as the princess,
she should not only be forgiven herself for running away, but probably
be set at liberty besides by way of reward.

The slaye-girl never stopped till she came to the building where her
fellow-slaves were confined, and going straight to the gate, she desired
the porter to take her to the keeper of the slaves. When she appeared
before him, he began to threaten her with punishment for running away ;
but she interrupted him, and said, ‘“‘ What will you give me if I find you
‘arunaway slave worth one hundred pieces of gold?” ‘If you can do
that,”’ said the keeper, ‘‘ you shall be set free yourself, and have five
pieces of gold; but if you deceive me, you shall be beaten on the soles of
-your feet till you can neither walk nor stand.” ‘I consent,” said the
girl, ‘but there is no time to be lost; come with me, and bring a ladder
with you as long as this rope-ladder which you see, and I will deliver
into your hands the favourite slave of the cadi’s wife, who is well worth
the money I mentioned.” The keeper immediately sent two or three
soldiers with a ladder to accompany the girl, who brought them straight
to the foot of the minaret. The ladder was then raised, and one of the
soldiers went up, but he found the chamber empty, and no-traces of the
princess except a few articles of furniture with which Zuleika had sup-
plied her, and the fragments of her scarf, which appeared all torn to
pieces, and stained with blood in several places. This the man brought
down with him; and after searching all the ruins in vain, they returned
to the keeper of the slaves, who was greatly enraged, and ordered the
spiteful slave to be beaten on the soles of her feet for deceiving him; but
she cried out that she had not deceived him, and said that if the cadi’s
house was searched again the parrot-girl would be sure to be found, as
she could not have had time to go far, and would certainly take refuge
there, in whatever manner she had escaped. While this wasgoing on, the
king himself came to the slave prison to see how many had been collected,
and asking what was the matter. The keeper told him all that had

a
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 223

happened. The king was very angry when he heard that the cadi’s slave
had been concealed, and swore that unless she was found his own daughter
Zuleika should be seized in her place: and he immediately sent an officer
of his guard and a number of soldiers to search for the princess, and if
they could not find her they were ordered to seize Zuleika instead.
Accordingly, they went at once to the cadi’s house, and searched it and
the gardens thoroughly, but no princess could they find. Zuleika and her
mother were much alarmed, fearing that the princess’s retreat in the
minaret might be discovered; but they soon found out, from what the
officer said, that it had been searched already without finding her; and
though this relieved their fears in some degree, they were greatly troubled.
to think what had become of her, especially when he showed them the
bloody pieces of her scarf. But what was their dismay when the officer
declared he had orders to seize Zuleika, and take her away as a slave!
And, in spite of the cries and tears of both mother and daughter, she was
carried off to the slave prison! As she passed through the court-yard to
her cell, she saw the spiteful slave-girl led away by two of the attendants
to receive the punishment her wickedness so richly deserved, though she
was unjustly sentenced to it by the keeper of the slaves.

How it came to pass that the princess was not found in the minaret
where she had‘been left, bound hand and foot, was thus: As she lay
helpless on the floor, she saw a pair of great staring eyes looking at her
through the hole in the wall through which she used to watch Zuleika’s
window. At first she was frightened, but in a moment she perceived it
was the great owl, who was perched amongst some ivy outside, and was
looking through the hole. She immediately bethought herself of the
talisman, and managed to lift her fastened hands up so as to present the
ring to the sight of the owl, and cried out, ‘Oh, owl! owl! help me for

. the sake of this!”” The owl no sooner saw the talisman and heard these
words, than he came to the princess and asked what were her commands.
“Unbind my hands and feet,” said she, ‘if you can.” The owl could
not untie the pieces of scarf that bound her, but with his strong hooked
bill and sharp claws he tore them off, and in so doing he could not help
slightly wounding the princess, which caused the stains of blood on the
pieces of scarf found by the soldier who climbed up in search of her. No
sooner was she free, than she looked round for some means of escape; but
there were none (the ladder being gone) unless she would jump down to
the ground, and the minaret was much too high for her to venture so
224 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

desperate aleap. ‘‘Oh, owl! owl!” cried she again, ‘‘cannot you help
me to get down from this place, before my cruel enemy returns?” The
owl was one of that sort almost as large as an eagle, but of course he was
not strong enough to support the weight of the princess in the air, or he
would have carried her down to the ground, so he replied, ‘‘ Wait a
moment, fair princess, and I will call my wife, who is. taking her
morning’s sleep amongst the ruins close by, and I think we two together
can give you support enough with our wings to bring you safely to the
ground.” Then going out to the balcony, he screeched in his shrillest
tones to his wife to come and help him, till all the ruins echoed; and
presently a great female owl came flitting to the balcony, and said,
‘What is the matter, my lord? Whyhave you awakened me at this time
of day?” The he-owl then answered by pointing with his bill to the
talisman on the princess’s finger, who had followed him to the balcony,
and addressing her said, ‘‘ There is no time
to be lost. Take firm hold of my legs with
one hand, and of my wife’s legs with the
other, and throw yourself boldly from the
balcony upon that leafy bush below; we
can support you with our wings enough to
break your fall.” The princess grasped the
legs of the owls, and threw herself from the
balcony. Down they went all three with a
tremendous rushing of wings, and the prin-
cess fell on the springy branches of the bush
without receiving any hurt at all, and on
letting go the legs of the owls, they flew up
again to the ruin, while she scrambled
through the branches to the ground. As
soon as she was clear of the bush, she looked about to see which way she
had better go to escape the danger of pursuit, when she caught sight of
the soldiers, who were just coming towards the ruin to take her. For-
tunately, they could not see her, and she immediately darted away on
the opposite side to that by which they were coming, and keeping out of
sight, she ran with all her speed towards a little winding lane which she
saw before her, with garden walls on each side of it. She had/run some
way up this lane, when, just as she came nesr a door in the left-hand
wall, it was slowly and cautiously opened, ard she had but just time to


THE BIRD TALISMAN. 225

hide herself behind a fig-tree which grew out of the wall, when she saw
a woman slave come out of the door, and, after looking up and down the
lane, walk rapidly up it. As soon as she was out of sight, the princess
came from behind the fig-tree, and as she passed the door, seeing that
it was not quite shut, she pushed it cautiously open and peeped in, and
seeing that within was a large garden, closely planted, and that nobody
was in sight, she thought she should be safer if she could hide herself
there for the present, than if she went she knew not where up the lane.
So she went into the garden, and, leaving the door as she found it, she
hastened to conceal herself in the nearest clump of trees. She had hardly
done so, when she heard the door shut, and, peeping out, she saw the
same slave, who had just returned, bolt the door and proceed towards
the house, of which she could see the roof at the other end of the garden.
She now felt herself comparatively safe; but, to be safer still, she climbed
up into a large cypress-tree, the thick foliage of which completely con-
cealed her, and there she determined to wait till night, and then to
endeavour to reach the eadi’s house, where she was sure Zuleika and her
mother would give her protection if they could. Indeed, she had no
where else to go to.

Long and weary was the day; but night came at last. The princess
did not, however, venture from her hiding-place till past the middle of
the night, when she thought she should be less likely to meet anybody
on her way to the cadi’s house. She then came down from the tree, and
unbolting the garden door, she went into the lane, and returning by the
way that she had come in the morning, she soon found herself in the open
ground surrounding the ruined mosque. She made her way, as well as
she could guess in the darkness, towards the cadi’s garden, hoping to find
some means of climbing over the wall, and so getting in without being
observed by any of the slaves; but just as she was passing the ruined.

. mosque, she saw her friends, the owls, come flying over her head in the
faint starlight. She called out to them, and asked whether they had
seen anything of the parrot or the twodaws? ‘‘ Yes,” said the owl,
perching on a wall, ‘‘ they are all three roosting here in the ruin, and
have been flying about all day looking for you.” ‘Oh, bring me to
them!” said the princess; and the owl, flying into the ruin, soon re-
appeared with the parrot fluttering after him. The parrot flew into the
princess’s bosom with an hysterical scream, and said, ‘‘Oh, my dear
child, have I found you at last? I feared some terrible misfortune had
Q
226 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

happened to you.” The princess then told her how she had escaped, and
that she was now going to try to get into the cadi’s garden, but the parrot
interrupted her, and told her of poor Zuleika’s being seized for a slave
instead of her. She was overwhelmed with grief at hearing this, and
declared that she would go and give herself up to save Zuleika; and in
spite of all the parrot could say, she instantly set out to fulfil her deter-
mination, for she could not bear to think that she had brought such a
calamity on Zuleika and her mother. ‘‘ Well, my dear child,” said the
parrot, ‘if you are bent on destroying yourself, at least I will go with






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you; but first I will tell the daws to remain about this ruin, that, in case
of need, we may know where to find them.” Having done this, the
parrot nestled under the princess’s cloak, and she left the ruin, and going
into the nearest street, went straight to the door of the cadi’s house and
knocked loudly. After some time, an old slave put his head out of the
window, and asked whowasthere. ‘Itis I, Shercen,” said the princess,
“let me in.” ‘The old slave opened the door, and, by the princess’s
desire, took her to the women’s apartment. She was admitted by
Zuleika’s nurse, who, as soon as she saw her, began to lament Zuleika’s
misfortune, and to tell her what had happened ; but the princess stopped
her, and said, ‘‘ I know it all, but she shall not suffer for me: I am come
to give myself up.” She then desired the nurse to take her to Zuleika’s
mother ; and this was done, when the princess, throwing herself into the
arms of the cadi’s wife, told her'she was come to give herself up, and to
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 227

save her friend. The cadi’s wife kissed her, and wept over her, but did
not oppose her design, for she knew it was the only way by which her
daughter could be restored to her. But now the poor princess, not having
eaten all day, and being quite exhausted with all she had undergone, fell
in a swoon on the floor. The cadi’s wife had her put to bed, and as
soon as she came to herself, she begged for a little food, which was given
to her; and she then fell asleep, and did not awake till broad daylight.
As soon as she had breakfasted, the cadi’s wife took her to her husband,
who was informed of her noble behaviour, which he praised very highly ;
and, after taking a mournful and pathetic leave of the cadi’s wife, he led
her away by the hand, and took her to the slaye-prison.”* They were
immediately taken to the keeper, to whom the cadi was relating the
object of his visit, when they were interrupted by the arrival of the
vizier, who had come to inspect the slaves. ‘The keeper referred the cadi
to the vizier, who, when he had heard what he had to say—being no
friend of his—declared that it was impossible to let Zuleika go, for there
was so much difficulty in raising the ransom for the city that the king
had given him orders to seize and make slaves of any he could ‘lay
his hands on, so that both Zuleika and Shereen must be kept. It was in
vain that the cadi entreated, and threatened, and tore his beard with rage
and grief. He went straight to the palace, and complained to the king
that his daughter had been seized as a slave ; but the king said there was
no help for it, the money must be raised, and that he would sell the cadi
himself if any person would buy him.

The only comfort the two little girls had in their misfortune, was, that
they were confined together in the same cell. It was a very small one,
with a little window in it just large enough for the parrot to go through.
Through this window the parrot went to learn the news in the city, and
to carry a note from Zuleika to her mother. When she came back, she
told the princess that the cadi could not raise money enough to redeem
Zuleika, and that in a day or two all the slaves would be taken to the
Cashmerian camp, and that the enemy’s army would then immediately
march back to Cashmere, with all their spoil; so that there was the
greatest danger of the princess falling again into the hands of her greatest
enemy. ‘“‘ There is but one hope,” said the parrot: ‘‘ Give me your ring,
and I will send the daws with it to your grandfather: they will tell him
all that has happened, and he is so wise that he will know how to help us
if any help is possible ; but he can do nothing for us without the ring, for
228 THE ILLUSERATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

that gives command over all the birds of the air, and it was with this
ring that the famous enchanter, Moozuffer, ruled over the birds, and by
their help worked so many wonders.” The princess.gave the ring to the
parrot, and she immediately flew with it to the ruin, and calling the
daws, ordered one of them to fly with all speed to the hermitage at the
source of the Ganges, and to give the hermit the ring, and tell him all
that had happened. She told the other daw to keep in the neighbourhood
of the camp, and to fly after the army whenever it marched. Having
given these instructions to the daws, she returned to the slave-prison.

Next morning the slaves were taken to the camp, and delivered to the
Cashmerian general, and the army immediately marched on its return
to Cashmere. The two little girls were carried together in a close litter,
and the parrot with them ; but for want of the ring the poor bird and her
mistress were no longer abie to converse together, which was a great grief
to them.

In this way they travelled many days, till at length they arrived
within a day’s journey of Cashmere. Here the army halted in a great
plain, and the queen came from the city, with all her court, to recéive
her victorious army, and to see the spoils of war they had brought with
them. The army was all drawn up in grand array, and the treasures,
the gold, silver, and jewels, rich silks and shawls, beautiful horses, and
the slaves which had been brought from Lahore, were placed in front of
the general’s tent, where they formed a splendid spectacle. The queen
sat in her howdah on an elephant most gorgeously caparisoned, and rode
in front of the long lines of soldiers, attended by the general and all her
court. When she came opposite the place where the slaves were drawn
up, her eye fell upon the princess, and she started and turned pale.
Baboof sat behind her in the howdah, and turning to him, she whispered
something, and pointed out the princess to him. At first he seemed
struck with astonishment, but in a few moments he descended from the
howdah, and going to the general, said there was one amongst the female
slaves to whom the queen had taken a great fancy, and whom she would
take to wait on herself, but the rest of the spoil should be sold to defray
the expenses of the war. Baboof then went straight to where the princess
stood trembling (for she saw at once that the queen had recognised her),
and, taking her by the arm, ordered his followers to take charge of her,
when a wonderful sight was seen.
THE BIRD TALISMAN. 229

High up in the air appeared a flock of mountain cagles, flying all close
together, and in the midst of them was a large, dark object. They came
rapidly over the plain; and, sweeping over the heads of the multitude,
a man was seen, suspended in a sort of chair by means of long, slender



poles, and cords, which the eagles held in their claws, and seemed to obey
the voice of the old man— who wore a hermit’s dress—and to follow all
his directions. Hovering over the spot where the queen, the general,
and all the court were looking up, in speechless astonishment, the old
hermit called out, in a loud voice: ‘‘ General! faithful servant! Murad!
look up, and behold your ancient master! I know, that when others
were faithless, and I was driven from my kingdom, you were faithful
still, and.that it was to your absence alone that my defeat was owing ;
nor did you take service under the usurper till after my retirement.
I call upon you, now, to obey your old master, and to help him against
the vile woman who disgraces the throne.” At first, the general thought
it was a vision; but presently recognising the voice and features of the
old king, he drew his sword, and cried out, with a loud voice: ‘‘ Sol-
280 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

diers! Our old king comes back to us from heaven ; let those who are for
me and for the king, hold up their hands!” The soldiers raised a
tremendous shout of ‘‘ Long live the king!” and brandished their wea-
pons over their heads. Baboof quitted the princess ; and hastily climbing
up to his place on the royal elephant, ordered the driver to hasten with
all speed to the city. The driver obeyed, and the queen and Baboof
would have escaped; but the general ordered some of his cavalry to
pursue the elephant. They soon came up with him! and the archers
aiming at the driver, ordered him to stop, on pain of being shot.



The king then turning to the crowd of slaves, cried out, ‘‘ Where is
my dear grandchild ?” and the next moment the princess threw herself
at his feet. He took her into his arms, and kissed her, and was going
to take her with him on one of the elephants, when she begged him to
let Zuleika come with them. This was granted; and the old king,
with the princess and Zuleika, proceeded at the head of the army to take:
possession of his ancient capital. You may be sure that the parrot was.
not left behind, but sat proudly on the princess’s arm, bowing graciously
to the shouting people in the streets; while the two daws flew joyously
overhead, to resume their old roosting-place in the palace garden; and
the flock of eagles flew back to their home in the mountains.

The first thing the princess did after her arrival at the palace, was to
beg her grandfather to send to Lahore for Zuleika’s father and mother,
who came with joy to rejoin their daughter, and had a house given them
THE BLUE-BOTTLE FLY. 231

close to the royal palace, so that the two little girls saw each other every
day, and passed most of their time together. Neither did the princess
forget her old friend, the fisherman, who, at her request, was appointed
by the old king captain of the royal pleasure-boats.

THE BLUE-BOTTLE FLY.

Lavinta, lost in discontent,
Frowning, beside the casement leant,
And looked upon the gloomy sky
‘With an impatient, restless eye.

“Oh, what a dreary summer day,
No butterfly is out to play ;
The daisies are half drowned in rain;
The dull grey clouds unmoved remain ;
I see not, hear not one fair thing,
But hidden linnets chirruping.”

Upon the window-pane, there moved
A large blue-bottle fly, that loved
To talk as elder folk will talk,

Still moralising in his walk—

‘© foolish girl, that pines in vain
For beauties vanished by the rain ;
Sees not the troops of flies that dance
Around, and court her roving glance.
Our heads so brown, our eyes so black,
Our fine waxed legs and shining back ;
Our wings transparent, that displays

Reflected gold and purple rays:
My flies, she notes not, for our dress

Is but a household loveliness.”

The neatness that around them dwell,
In airy hall or secret cell—

For all is fair that God hath made,
Dwelling in sunshine or in shade ;

The forms that shallow thoughts despise,
Prove the Creator good and wise.
bo
bo

THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



BESSY AND HER) D0 G.

BY MARY BENNEIT.

Bessy was always wandering ;

Whilst to her pretty self she’d sing
Many a rhyme—Heaven knows who taught her—
Hour by hour, where no one sought her.
Sometimes on the skirts of a lane,
Bareheaded in a rapid rain ;

Sometimes lagging down the hill,

A nutshell at the brook to fill;

Or a-bed on mossy steep,

Lulling herself and doll to sleep ;

Now in the wood, now in the meadow,
In the light, and in the shadow,

e
BESSY AND HER DOG. 233

No one thought, no one cared,
How the little Bessy fared.

Was she hungry, was she fed,
Was she alive, or was she dead ;
*Twas no matter; her grief or glee
Moved not a heart that I could see.

And yet, before her friends were dead,
A cotter in the hamlet said

(In answer to a mother’s prayer)

He’d guard the orphan child with care.
But when the mother Jay in dust,

The cotter broke his holy trust:

And like a little gipsy wild

Roamed the poor ragged orphan child.

A friendless dog, a famished hound,
Bessy had in the hamlet found ;

And fed it daily as she could

‘With scraps from her own wretched food.
The dog was of a noble kind ;

It had a fond and grateful mind :
Happy, he rested at her feet,

Listening to her pratilings sweet,

Her voice of freshest native song ;

Or roamed with her the mead along,

Or gambolled round, or rushed away,
Scattering the timid sheep in play ;

Or tore between his teeth the clover,
Until some bee assailed the rover ;

Or climbed the hill to view the down,
Bark o’er it, and then scamper down :
All tricks of fun that pleased the child,
And many a lonely hour beguiled.

And well she loved the friendless hound,
And oft would clasp his neck around ;
And pillow her head on his shaggy ears,
In mirth, in sleep, in laughter, in tears.
234

THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

There came a glorious summer day,

And the child and dog roamed far away ;
They came to a stream more deep than wide,
Transparent as glass thrice purified.

How Bessy stretched her round blue eyes!
Verily here was a blithe surprise !
Forget-me-nots had starred the stream
‘With beauty, like an angel’s dream :

She looked in their eyes, these blue star flowers,
And they in hers ; oh, holy powers!

How the young spirit sprang to life,

‘With its own feebleness at strife.

New fancies kindled, and new love,

As she looked below, and looked above,

To the heaven above, and the heaven below,
Underneath the water’s flow.

A verdurous bank, bent green and steep,
The matchless stream to guard and keep ;
Sentinel weeds of stately form

Kept watch and ward in calm and storm ;
A purple beech-tree overhung ;

Wild tresses of the willow swung

Heavy on every passing wind ;

And oak and elm met close behind.

Among the weeds the child crept down—
She hardly knew could waters drown—
And wading in, how pleasant was

The soft cool stream, and merry buzz

Of the water-flies and honey-bees,

And wasps and hornets under the trees ;
She could live for ever with that fair water,
As it were her mother, and she its daughter.

No harm feared she, the happy child!
Singing her simple ditties wild ;
LOVE. 233

And prattling gaily, as she bound

With the long grass her posy round ;

Till bending down where glustering grew
Forget-me-nots of fairer blue

Than any elsewhere in her view,

(Angel of Death! they were thine own),
She slipped upon a treacherous stone,
And sank deep in the lovely stream,
Under the evening’s golden gleam.

The mournful midnight fast drew near ,
Weeping for Bessy tear on tear—

For, cold as the Norland winter snow,
She lies among the rocks below.

Hark! the howl of her dog is heard,
Startling many a sleeping bird ;

The moon grows old, the dog still lies
Midst the forget-me-nots—and dies.

LOVE.

_ Gop hath given me store of love;
* All the things that breathe and moye,
L love, I love.

T love the earth, I love the sky;
The sweets that bloom, the sweets that die,
I love, I love.

I love the trees, songs, birds, and flowers;
The summer and the winter hours:
I love the fairies and the moon;
The balmy eve, the sunny noon,
I love, I love.

I love the sun; the brave, free blast;
Repose, and thoughts of trouble past :
I love the rich, I love the poor;
The tatter’d beggar at my door,

L love, I love.
I love the friends of love and truth;
Childhood, old age, and merry youth:
I love the good, the great, the free;
In all things I some charm can see,
But, most of all, whoe’er loves me,

I love, I love.
2386 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.
















































































































































































Betlasts.—Is your story true, Sir?
Arden.—I know not, yet it might
e
And the world never the worse.
Oxp Pray.

Homzwarp bound from Australia!

We had passed, as we thought, through all the many perils and dis-
comforts of a long sea voyage, borne up and comforted by the hope, a
fallacious one as it proved, of passing our Christmas-day in England ;
but, as it has been often and wisely said, ‘‘?homme propose et Dieu
dispose :” and so it was with us.

Christmas had dawned upon the world, bringing, let us hope, to all
who hailed its blessed advent, some ‘tidings of comfort and joy.” The
THE TWO ROSE TREES. 937

sun had risen above the wild waste of waters, and crested each wave with
gold; the sea-gulls, with their strange unearthly cry, rose, and fell, and
dropped like snow-flakes into those watery furrows ploughed by a
mightier hand than man’s; huge fish showed their silver sides for a
moment, caught the sun’s rays, and then, as from a spear-blade, darted
downwards into the recesses of the deep.

“A fine day for Christmas,” said our captain; and we answered in the
affirmative, though with a melancholy air.

A melancholy air ?

It was Christmas, and the ‘‘Crosus,” an old tub that had long since
had its day, as we had found to our cost, was making slow way along its
trackless and seemingly interminable path. Yes! it was Christmas-day!
and we had not yet passed Cape Finisterre. Whatwas to be done. We
had all of us, from Colonel Thomas, our stately chief passenger, down to
little Tom Snead, the smallest of cabin-boys, made up our minds that we
should spend our Christmas at home. And here we were, already entered
upon that blessed day, making snail’s progress through those waves whose
toss and tumble have been made so famous in seamen’s songs.

Keep Christmas we must—that was a matter decided upon; the captain
—and a better heart never beat beneath blue jacket—expressing this
determination the loudest. ‘‘I’ve a wife and children waiting for me at
home,” said he; ‘‘and am as anxious to see the white cliffs as any of you;
but, as there’s no help for it, we'll keep our Christmas here as merrily as
possible.”

And amerry Christmas we had of it—mountains of food and rivers of
drink vanished like ice-built castles before the sun; for once on board
the ‘‘Croesus” the iron-band of discipline was unloosed; and the honest
face of the captain was seen everywhere aiding and abetting, not only in
the enjoyment of his passengers, but in the jollity of his crew, till, as he
triumphantly said, ‘‘there was not a heayy heart nor an empty stomach
aboard.”

Night! a winter’s night,—yet not one of those wild and stormy nights
that'terrify honest folks ashore, when the fierce wind pipes aloud, and
men and women (bless their hearts!) draw nearer to the fire, and with
its glow upon their faces, and a brighter glow upon their hearts, offer up
a fervent prayer for ‘all poor souls at sea.” No, there was a wind, it is
true, whistling its world-old tunes as it climbed aloft among the rigging
and shook the rattling shrouds: but the whole scene was one of beauty,
2388 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

one rather for man’s reverence than awe. The moon, that ‘‘ empress of
the silent night,” glided grandly over her jewelled floor, while her light
dropped like a silver veil from her radiant face, and fell upon the happy
group upon the ‘‘Cresus’” deck. A group, be it understood, quite dis-
tinct from the ‘noisy one in the forecastle; from which, caught up by the
wandering wind, might be heard at times the rough chorus of some old
sea-song, or the boisterous laughter that followed the well-told yarn.
The members of our group, which consisted of some dozen persons, were
certainly more decorous if not more fervent in their enjoyment. Our
captain was, as we haye said, a thorough seaman—almost as much a part
of the sea as the petrel that skimmed with iron pinion its storm-vexed
waves; a good seaman with a bad ship; the ‘‘ goodness” of the one
having, fortunately for us, counterbalanced the ‘‘ badness” of the other.
The mate was an old ‘‘sea-dog”’ as the saying is, as salt as junk and as
hard as the ship’s biscuit, to which dainty edible his skin presented no
jnapt resemblance, both in colour and consistency. The passengers were
various in kind, as passengers should be to lend variety to a long sea-
voyage. The army was represented by Colonel Thomas, or rather by the
gallant colonel’s lady, who, or mess-table gossip had sadly belied her, was
the gallant commander’s commander, and therefore might very logically
be entitled to position as the head of his regiment; it had also another
representative in the person of a young lieutenant, who had made him-
self, as Mrs. Colonel Thomas said, ‘‘ peculiar” in his attentions to a
beautiful girl, daughter to an honest and evidently well-to-do German
merchant, both returning home from Sydney after an absence of two
years. Mr. Schubert was a tall, fine-looking Saxon, with large blue eyes
and a fine open face ; he was seated next the captain, while his daughter,
an exquisite flower from the same stock, nestled, bird-like, to her father’s
side. The rest of the company was made up of some half-a-dozen pro-
sperous diggers ; afew who had not been so prosperous; a Sydney “buck,”
who had made the voyage to ‘‘show himself” in Regent-street, and then
return with the next mail; a Jew, who carried a Tom Tidler’s ground
along with him, and was ever busy in his search for gold and silver ; and
a mysterious drab-coated red-handkerchiefed person, who, we had all
agreed, for what reason it was hard to determine, to be a kind of ‘“detec-
tive officer.”

The day had passed away cheerfully; and, as we all pronounced it
‘Ca sin and shame” to leave the deck on such a night, the captain pro-
THE TWO ROSE TREES. 239

duced a ‘“‘mighty bowl” of his own brewing, and there, beneath the
broad light of the moon and her attendant stars, we sat, silent, all of us,
for a time ; the memories of some, no doubt, travelling backward into the
past; while, with others, hope was anticipating the home-happiness to
come,

The captain broke the silence :—

‘This will never do: ifthe moonlight breeds melancholy, we had better
go below at once,—a day begun so happily must not end sadly, especially
when that day happens to be Christmas.”

His voice broke the charm; and half-a-dozen tongues hastened to
assure him that sadness was far from being the feeling experienced ; and
that they—we—one and all of us—were grateful for the efforts he had
made for our amusement and comfort.

“T drink,” said the captain, hastily interrupting our acknowledg-
ments, ‘‘to those friends we have left behind us.” The toast was
rapturously responded to, especially by the successful diggers.

Here a burst of laughter came from the distant forecastle. ‘* No sad-
ness there,” said the German, motioning with his hand, and laughing
himself.

“Certainly not;” and the captain laughed in chorus. ‘A sailor
enjoys the present—and he has every right to do so; for who knows
what the next hour may have in store for him? His life is made up of
dangers past and dangers to come, and he makes the most of the
interval.”

“Captain!” began the colonel’s lady, in a sharp voice, as giving the
word of command.

‘¢ Madam !””

‘« Have they no care for their souls ?”

‘ their keeping. Your true sailor, even when one eye is looking into his
glass, keeps the other fixed on the compass.”

‘So that he may intoxicate himself,” sneered the colonel’s lady.

“By degrees!” laughed the captain: and the lady’s reply was lost in
another burst of meriment from the forecastle.

“‘ That’s a yarn from Bill,” said the mate; who, it was cela but
for the ‘dignity of office,” would fain have been among them. ‘A
better hand at that kind of thing than Bill never reefed a sail or pulled a
rope.”
240 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’s OWN TREASURY.

‘CA pleasant fellow,” said the young lieutenant.

“And useful,” put in the captain. ‘Such men keep the crew in
good humour; and, as all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, I’ve
found my adyantage—”

“In what?” asked the colonel’s lady.

‘Tn having a ‘tell-tale’ aboard.”

“< Suppose somebody spins us a yarn ?” suggested the Sydney exquisite
as he leant lazily backwards, puffing his cigar; ‘(for my part I’m quite
ready—”

‘Fire away, then!” said the captain—

«To listen to it.”

‘Let each contribute to the general amusement,” was the proposal of
the German merchant ; ‘the first to be called upon shall be decided by
lot.”

“Aoreed !” cried the captain.

“‘T will write down the names,” said a young Australian, tearing a
leaf from his note-book for the purpose.

‘Put them in my hat,” proposed the captain.

“And Miss Gertrude will draw for us all.” This suggestion was from
the lieutenant.

Mr. Schubert glanced down fondly at his daughter, and held out his
hand for the hat containing the slips of paper.

“Have you passed it round?” drawled the antipodean dandy, without
changing his recumbent position.

“Let us have the story first,” said the captain, ‘‘and we'll pass the
hat round afterwards. Miss Schubert, the fate of one of us is in your
hands.”

This speech was followed by an involuntary sigh from the young lieu-
tenant.

The pretty Saxon dipped her taper fingers into the hat, and handed a
slip of paper to the captain.

‘Mr. Bluff,’—the mate started in alarm—‘‘be good enough to pass
the lantern!” and raising the paper to the light, the captain commenced
its examination.

“Name! name!” was called from the circle.

“Miss Gertrude Schubert!” and the captain turned towards her.
“¢ We shall be delighted to follow so fair a leader.”

“Come, Gertrude,” said her father, at the same time drawing her
THE TWO ROSE TREES. 241

slight form yet closer to his own, to which she seemed to cling like one
of those delicate tendrils which lend a beauty in return for support.
“¢ Come, Gertrude, never draw back; you have had scarcely time to have
forgotten all your nursery lore ; tell us something fitting for this glorious
Christmas night, in which, as it seems to me, the heavens have come
nearer, that they may look more lovingly upon the earth.”

‘CA love-story :” hinted the lieutenant.

Gertrude shook her head ; glancing archly through her curls, that fell
in a golden net-work over her sparkling eyes.

“T am too old to remember much of the nursery; and too young to
think much about love.”

“ That generally comes without thinking,” said the captain. ‘Only
tell us a something half as graceful and pretty as yourself.”

‘And as German,” whispered the father.

“*T detest German stories,” said, sotto voce, the colonel’s lady.

‘Tt has been said,’”’ remarked the lieutenant, ‘‘that while we English
claim dominion over the sea, and the French dominion over the earth,
the Germans remain masters of the air—from whose mystic realms
they weave those beauteous webs of imagination and fancy, creating
beings so delicate and ethereal that we never, or seldom—” (here the
lieutenant glanced at Gertrude)—‘‘see them upon earth.”

‘‘T know one story,” hesitated Gertrude.

“Go on,” said the captain, with his sunniest smile.

“T may perhaps think too highly of it, because of those lips from
which I first heard it—it was told me by my mother.”

The arm of the father pressed his daughter yet closer to his heart. Was
it that for the moment he feared that she, too, might fade away from
his side as another had done on just such a moonlight night ?

The daughter felt the caress, and pressed the rough hand unseen by
those around ; then, with a cheerful voice and a smile breaking like a
rainbow through her tears, she added, ‘‘The story has, however, one
merit, that all will allow—it is short.”

Our little circle gradually contracted as the voice of Gertrude, at first
hesitating and indistinct, swelled into a musical and louder utterance ;
even the lazy gentleman from Sydney lent an attentive car, as, beneath
the placid moon, and amid the hoarse murmur of the restless sea, the
Story or tHE Two Rose Trzxs was told by the little German maiden,
as follows:—

R
242 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Soft and balmy as the sleep of innocence was the delicious summer eve
that saw Franz Von Hiigel conduct his young and newly-married wife
to their pleasant and sequestered home, among the vine-clad hills near
Brohl, a little town upon the banks of the Rhine. The tired day was
already resting its weary head upon the lap of night; labour was over,
and a blissful peace was stealing into each happy human heart ; a gentle
breeze just rippled the glassy surface of the Rhine, upon whose bosom a
few boats, with a scarcely-perceptible motion, were gliding towards the
quaint old town, the spire of whose church rose black against the sky,
while through its windows flamed the red rays of the setting sun, which
also invested with a momentary splendour some grey old ruins, that
seemed to tremble on the very edge of a beetling cliff, gazing downwards
as though contemplating their own decay, as mirrored in the Rhine
below.

The two lovers sat upon a rising mound, over which nature had thrown
a soft mantle of green embroidered with star-like flowers; an arm of
each encircled the other, and from the sights and sounds around they
seemed to draw ever a fresh delight. A something that, beautiful in
itself, yet served to minister to a still more beautiful wedded love—a
nature luxuriant and fertile was around them, the silence disturbed only
by the distant voices and laughter—labour’s music—of the peasants
returning from their work in the fields, or by the lowing of tired oxen,
and the creaking of heavy wheels as the waggons passed along the narrow
road. All, as I have said, breathed of a tranquil happiness—a happiness
scarcely less tranquil than that which rested in the hearts of Franz and
his beloved.

They had sat thus for some time, enjoying that delicious silence when
two hearts beat in so holy a sympathy that it would seem almost pro-
fanity to break it by any utterance of the tongue. But, as Franz turned
his eyes from Ida’s, his young wife’s, face, and gazed once more over the
broad landscape, upon which the shadows were deepening fast, the heavy
foliage of the trees growing darker and more massive, as the sun sunk
lower and lower beneath the horizon, till only the fringe of his golden
mantle was left upon the evening sky—Franz started as from a reverie ;
and the shade of an anxiety for the first time crept over his face. ‘Ida,
the evening breeze grows chill, the dews are falling ;” and he brushed
away the drops that had already begun to show like diamonds among
her hair. ‘‘ Let us go in—you are all too delicate to be abroad so late.
THE TWO ROSE TREES. 243

Sce!” (and he pointed towards the garden), “your sister-flowers have
gone to sleep—closing their petals, or eyelids shall we say, till they are
opened anew by the warm.kisses of the morning sun.”

His young wife made no answer. Her eyes were fixed upon the heavens,
watching the waning light.


She turned towards him with a smile—a ripple of brightness—that
enhanced, if possible, the loveliness of the face.

- “T was thinking, Franz, of the happiness of heaven; it must indeed
be great, to surpass our present happiness on earth.”

“Tt is lasting, Ida; and —”

“¢ And shall not ours be so? My love can never change ; and yours—”

‘Ts changeless as the love that watches over us now ;” and he pointed
upwards towards the blue sky, from which already the bright stars were
glancing—then took her hand.

“Your hand is cold, Ida; let us go in—eyen the birds have sought
their nests.”

“Hush!”

She pressed her white finger upon Franz’ lips, as from a neighbouring
bush the song of the nightingale—that soul of melody—broke forth,
touching the very heart of the silence with its magic sound.

They sat and listened—till, from the very surfeit of delight, the very
fulness of a perfect joy, sprang tears.

“Come Ida!” and Franz, with a gentle violence, raised her slight
form from the bank, her waist still encircled by his arm, “our fireside
has also its charm; see, its red light is flashing through the windows a
welcome and a rebuke.”

The happy girl, leaning upon her lover’s arm, passed across the velvet
lawn towards the house, passing with a light step the fountain, in whose
centre stood a Naiad erect, in marble nakedness—an emblem of woman’s
purity—her cold finger pressed upon her lip, while about her fell the
watery veil—bright, broad, and sparkling as the pinions of an angel.
They, the husband and wife, had reached the glass doors that opened
upon the lawn, when Ida paused before two small rose trees that were
lying upon the ground, the earth still clinging to their roots, as waiting
the gardener’s friendly care.

“The rose trees!” she said. ‘TI told Carl to leave them here, saying
that we ourselves would plant them.”
244 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

‘CA foolish superstition, dearest.”

“But surely a pretty one. Is it not sweet to connect our love with
the life and beauty of this exquisite flower?’’ And, raising the nearest
plant, she placed its single flower against her cheek.

‘*You pale its loveliness,” her husband laughed, and took the small
rose tree from her hand. ‘I will set this beside the window here, and
eall it Ida.”

‘And this I will christen Franz,” smiled back the happy wife, as she
placed the second rose tree in the earth.

It was done. And the lovers gazed upon the trees. ‘‘ May their life
abide with our love,” said Franz, ‘‘an emblem of its purity and
strength.”

‘Rather, may their lives be linked with ours; but for our love, it is
not of earth, and will last beyond the grave.”

‘Be itso. Then let these beautiful trees fade only as our earthly life
shall fade.”

Was it fancy ?—but a cold breath seemed to have touched his cheek,
and a voice to murmur in his ear an echo to his words, ‘‘shall fade.”
He looked at Ida; but her eyes were fixed upon the two rose trees, whose
leaves had drooped, and whose heads hung heavily towards the ground.
‘Their strength will soon return,” whispered Franz; ‘‘ with the morrow
will come the change.”

‘“‘The change!” again the same voice made echo in his ear. Franz
shuddered, and drew his young wife towards him—yet, even as he did
so, his heart misgave him; for it seemed as though the crimson blood of .
the flower had already mingled with hers, and was burning brightly—
too brightly—in her cheek.

For the first time a terrible doubt entered into the heart of her lover ;
with eager hands he drew the little mantle close about her, nor again
remoyed his protecting arm until they had entered the house.

The song of the nightingale had ceased—a chill wind was rustling the
bushes; the marble Naiad looked coldly forth from her watery shroud,
and the heavy night’s dew fell upon the earth. The rose trees had
slightly raised their drooping heads, but the centre of each flower was
full of pearly drops, that, gliding over the velvet leaves, fell slowly on
the fresh-turned mould—like a shower of human tears.

* * * * * *

‘‘A sad story,” said the captain.
THE TWO ROSE TREES, 245

“Proceed, Miss Gertrude,” begged the young lieutenant.

Mrs. Colonel Thomas tossed her head and nudged her husband; she
was answered by a snore., The colonel was asleep.

A prolonged ‘‘ Hush!” from the company, and Miss Schubert recom-
menced her story.

* * * * * *

It was a twelvemonth after the evening I have endeavoured to describe
that my mother was hastily summoned to Franz Von Hiigel’s house.
Ida Stralenheim had been my mother’s schoolfellow, and womanhood
had ripened the friendship of their youth ; and now Ida Von Hiigel was
ill—‘‘dangerously ill,” the messenger said, and desired to see my mother
—to speak to her of Franz—always of Franz—for Ida’s love had banished
all other thought than the pang of parting with one dearer, far dearer,
than life. Old Carl, the gardener, was the messenger, and, as they
journeyed over the rough road that leads from Fornech to Brohl, he
poured the sad story of a young life’s decay into my mother’s sorrowing
heart. ‘‘ His lady had faded gradually,” he said, ‘‘from the day of her
arrival at her new home, not for want of tenderness or loving care; oh!
no; his master’s life was bound up in hers—that any one might see ;”’
and the old man drew his sleeve across his eyes and relapsed into silence.
‘Tell me, Carl,” said my mother, after a long and mournful pause, “is
Ida, is your young mistress past hope ?”

The domestic reined in his horse for a moment as he answered, ‘‘ For
my master there remains but one hope,” he pointed upwards, “‘the hope
that all who have so loved on earth shall meet again there. I am an old
man, and feel the earth already slipping from beneath my feet; but I
shall yet live to mourn with my master over the graye of his young
wife.”

Brohl was in sight, and through a mist of tears my dear mother
approached the well-known house. Its aspect was changed since last
she had seen it; there was no longer an air of cheerful life—no fireside
to throw its ruddy weleome through the window-panes—the garden,
thanks to Carl, was well ordered, as of old—and the marble Naiad still
glanced coldly through her veil—but there was a sense of desolation
about both garden and house, a want of the active presence of human
life, which all feel so strongly, but which words are too weak to describe;
the mournful consciousness of an all-pervading sorrow was felt by my
mother as, ushered by Carl, she entered the doors and passed up the
246 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

stairs of the house. At the foot of the stairs, Carl fell back respectfully,
and signed to my mother to ascend alone—she did so—to be met on the
landing by the pale faces of women, attached servants of the house, in
the ghastly terror of whose faces my mother read the fatal words ‘too
late.” Overcome by a sadden faintness, she leaned for support against
the wall; no word was spoken—the eye could read that all was over,
that the desolation was complete. An aged woman, poor Ida’s nurse,
came forward, and, taking my mother’s hand, led her towards the half-
open door of the room which she, the old woman, had just quitted.
Silent as shadows the other women stood around as my mother cast an
awe-struck look within—for she, too, was young, and was new to the
presence of Death. Within that darkened room aman was half stretched
upon—half kneeling by—a bed, his dark hair scattered in wild disorder
over the pillow, his arms embracing ——. My mother drew back, and
softly closed the door ; she had seen those long golden ringlets mingled
with his darker locks, and the thin white arm that he, himself, had
placed about his neck. She drew back, and with a bursting heart followed
old Gretchen to the room below, and sinking into a chair gave free vent
to her tears—the blessed relief of tears that moisten the éyes of sorrow
and calm the fever of the heart.

It was poor Ida’s favourite room, and books and music were scattered
everywhere about; but, absorbed in her sorrow, my mother never glanced
aside, but sat weeping—weeping in her chair. How long she remained
thus absorbed in her grief she did not know; but she was startled by a
hand laid gently on her shoulder. She looked up, and Franz Von Hiigel
was standing by her side; his face was pale, changed, almost hardened by
the unutterable greatness of his grief. My mother rose quickly, but in
doing so rested, inadvertently, her hand upon a guitar upon the table;
her touch fell upon the strings light asa snow flake, yet, with a sudden
snap, they parted, and the guitar lay voiceless on the table.

“¢Tt is dead, like its mistress,” said Franz, with a wan smile; ‘like
her it has passed away in music, and no hand shall touch it more.”
Then, taking my mother’s hand, he continued—‘‘She was your friend ;
vou loved her, as who indeed did not? You shall see her ence more.
‘Yes—there is yet time—come.”

He had dropped my mother’s hand, and in obedience to his summons
she moved towards the door. ‘‘ Not there!” he said, ‘‘she is not there!”
and, seizing my mother’s hand, he led her to the window that opened on
THE TWO ROSE TREES, 247

the lawn. ‘See!—the rose trees!”—and, with a cry of anguish, the
strong man bent his head, and buried his face in his hands.

Yes, the rose trees were there; but, as Franz directed my mother’s
eyes towards them, a change came over the smaller of the trees; its
flowers, as though shaken by a sudden wind, had trembled for a moment
on their slender stalks—then drooped in seattered leaves upon the ground
—the rose tree was dead!

Could it be that the angel of death, as it bore its prize heavenwards
had paused for a moment by the side of that beautiful flower, to gather
bouquet to adorn its sister angel’s breast P—it may be so—and the same
icy touch that had chilled the warm heart of Ida had struck at the life
of her favourite flower.

* * * * * *

‘And her husband P—Did he live ?—could he live?” broke in the
young lieutenant. ‘You shall hear,” said Mr. Schubert, with a melan-
choly shake of the head; and Gertrude, after a timid glance around the
listening circle, resumed.

* * * * * *

A few months only had elapsed, and the pretty house on the Rhine
bank had again changed its aspect. It was a day of more than usual
brightness, and children were tumbling about on the close-cut lawn,
chasing the sunbeams, that seemed delightgd to play with beings almost
as sunny as themselves. At times the children gathered about the foun-
tain, and splashed each other with its sparkling water—then a chiding
voice would be heard from the open window, a lady’s head appear, and a
warning finger shaken by the happy mother, whose chiding seemed so
like praise that it only increased the wild antics of the fairies on the
grass.

But the children have paused in their play, startled by a ery of sur-
prise from the gardener (no longer old Carl), who, leaning on his spade,
was attentively contemplating some object on the ground. In a minute
he was surrounded, and a chorus of eager voices demanded the cause of
his sudden cry.

Hans leaned over his spade, and pointed to a rose tree at his feet.

‘ eldest boy, in answer to the gardener’s glance.

“True, Master Wilhelm; but I thought it looked awkward there,
without a companion ; so I removed it to this end of the garden, where
248 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

there are rose trees in plenty. It’s strange,” he continued, ‘‘it’s the
proper season for transplanting—and yet, this rose tree is dead!”

The present proprietor of the house was a distant relative of the Von
Hiigels—he had purchased the place of its former master, a widower,
who, it was said in the neighbourhood, had ‘gone to travel,” to forget a
heavy grief. From Hans the gardener, and the children, we will step
into the house, and visit Mr. Bernhold, the new proprietor, in his study.
He is sitting with an open letter in his hand, apparently lost in some
sad recollection. ‘The letter is, nevertheless, a short one, and bears the
official signature of one of the small towns in the Tyrol, It encloses a
paragraph cut from some local paper, which runs as follows :—‘‘ Yester-
day, Brandt, the hunter, brought into the town the body of a man found
dead upon one of the highest ledges of the mountain. It is supposed he
must have perished in the last great snow-storm, which to have. met
must have been certain death in those exposed regions. The deceased
was known by sight to many of our hunters, who had often seen him
wandering alone in the least-frequented of the mountain paths. No
papers of any kind were found upon him, nor other article to lead to his
identity, excepting a thin gold locket, tightly grasped in his hand. It
is of the plainest workmanship, and contains nothing but a braid of fair
hair, and a few withered rose leaves.”

Â¥

MY MOTHER’S WATCH.

Trcx, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick, tick,
My mother’s watch keeps going ;
Though small it be, it teaches me
A lesson worth my knowing.
My father placed it in her hand—
Of love an early token ;

With placid brow she pledged a vow
Through life was never broken.
And now they sleep beneath the scd,

Each tick tells me in sadness,
I should prepare to meet them there,
And wake where all is gladnes:.
THE HEDGE FEAST.

Wuere the bees and butterflies /
Skim the weedy down, ‘

Five merry little children
Gathered from the town.

From dark and gloomy alleys,
From sickly lanes and rooms,
Drearier and sadder
Than a place of tombs.

Ragged little Johnny,
Merry little Jim,
Crooked little Barney—
How sweet the fields to him!

Matty, with her white head,
Bonnet all awry ;

Katie with sweet fancies
Glittering in her eye.

They have roamed the meadow,
They have roamed the wood,

Seeking nuts and blackberries,
For their pleasant food. ;

With their nuts and blackberries,
And lumps of bread and cheese,
On a mossy hedge-bank
Now they sit at ease.
250

THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

Drinking from the brooklet,
Neath the hawthorn tree,

Clear it ran as innocence—
Fresh and bright and free,

The hawthorn shook sweet odours
Like a blessing down,

From the pure white blossoms
Of its leafy crown!

Plump white lambs were gather’d
Neath its cloven stem,

And the happy children
Nestled close by them.

And the thrush sang loudly
On the hawthorn spray,

And the brooklet ever
Made music on its way.

I watched unseen, oft sighing,
To think what simple joy
Was here, that earthly riches
Might seek in vain to buy.

How easy to be happy,
Where nature doth suffice!
Wealth and grandeur were not
Found in Paradise.
251

THE SILVER PENCIL.

A CHAPTER ON CONTENTMENT.

Lirtrr Emily Roberts was in a reverie. She had just been reading,
and had laid her book aside to indulge in a little quict reflection. The
parlour was neatly and plainly furnished. There was a comfortable
carpet on the floor, cane-seated chairs, and a centre table, with a solar
lamp. You could sce that taste, not wealth, made the elegance of the
apartment.

Presently the little girl began counting on her fingers, ‘‘ Highteen—
twenty-seven ?—Oh, that’s so little !”’ she said to herself. ‘‘ Now, if I
was only a grand rich lady, not poor, like mamma, how happy would it
make me to keep giving presents to little girls that wanted them.
Suppose, for instance, I was {standing by a jeweller’s shop, with a
purse full of money, and I should see me—that is, me now, Emily—look-
ing in at the window, I should say, ‘Come here, little girl —~ ”

‘‘ Would you, my dear?” said some one, gaily, close behind her; and
two soft white hands were held tightly over her eyes, so that she could
not think who it was for an instant.

“Guess,” said the voice.

“Oh, I know you now! It’s Aunt Clara—please let go.”

So Aunt Clara released the young lady, and sat down in the window-
seat beside her.

Miss Emily was a little vexed at having been overheard. Children
are all dreamers, but they are very sensitive about haying their thoughts
known. Bué Aunt Clara was very amiable, and very fond of her little
niece, so they were soon on good terms again.

‘Now tell me all about it,” said the lady. ‘‘ What would you give
the child at the jeweller’s shop ?”

‘“CWhy, I was thinking how very much I should like a silver pencil.
All the girls at our school have them, and I asked mamma for one. But
she told me how careful she had to be, and that she could not buy any
thing that was unnecessary. I haye a very good wooden one, but it is
25% THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.

so long, it sticks out of my apron pocket. And then it always wants
mending, and I haye no knife.”

“Very distressing, truly,” said her aunt.

‘“Why don’t you save your pocket money, and get one yourself?”

“T am trying to do that, but I bought a paint-box out of it, and
threepence a week is not much.”

“Very true,” answered the lady; ‘so you want a silver pencil very
much.”

“Yes, indeed, Aunt Clara, I shouldnt have a thing to wish for; if
somebody would only give me one, I should be perfectly contented.”

‘“‘Take care what you say, Emily. That is a very strong expression ;”
and a shade almost like sadness flitted over the beautiful face of the lady.
“T wish any one could secure me contentment at so small a price.”

“Once, when I was a little girl like yourself, I remember wanting a
silver thimble. I had no kind mother, as you have, and lived with an
aunt who was rigidly economical. Your father, my brother Edward,
was at school, and I was sent to board with her. Still, people in the
country used brass thimbles, and accomplished a great deal with them
too. But I had seen one of silver, with a beautiful rim of oak leaves,
Alice Patterson had sent from London, and I wanted one too. It was
astonishing I had never been so worried before about the black streak the
thimble left upon my finger! You have no idea how the sharp edge cut
in, from the very moment I saw the beautiful gift Alice Patterson had
received. Why do you laugh, Miss Emily ?”

Emily could not help it. She was thinking how often she had found
fault with her wooden pencil after the same fashion, since her quarter
commenced at Miss Percival’s school.

‘Well, to go on,” said Aunt Clara, ‘‘I thought I should be perfectly
happy if I could have that thimble. I sounded my aunt once, by saying,
‘Don’t you think I could hem faster with a silver thimble?’ It was a
warm summer afternoon, and I had a pile of towels to do.”

«¢¢What does the child mean?’ said aunt Lucretia, looking over the
top of her spectacles. ‘Silver thimbles, indeed! What would your
father say to such notions ?’”

‘¢So I saw that was hopeless, and I began to think about earning it.
I lay awake from seven till nine many a night planning ways and means.
Sometimes I thought I would offer to help Nancy in the kitchen for a
penny a week. Then that I would pick up apples in the orchard, with
THE SILVER PENCIL. 2583

the same enormous payment for a bushel. So you see pennies were hard
to get in those days.”

“But did you ever have the thimble?” questioned Emily, anxiously.
The fate of her own wishes seemed to hang upon the response.

“Oh, it came in the most unexpected way imaginable. Papa brought
it the next time he came. Some good-natured lady friend had suggested
that I was old enough now to be taught to sew, and chose it for him.
You should have seen how proud Aunt Lucretia was, and how surprised
papa must have been, when she exhibited a whole shirt I had just com-
pleted for him, she arranging and basting every seam. To be sure,
there was no French-plaited bosom, but it was a creditable performance
for a child eight years old; much better than I could do now,” she added,
shrugging her shoulders, as she glanced at her white and jewelled
hands.

‘And were you so very, very happy?”

“‘T don’t think I was. The novelty of the thimble was gone after I
had shown it to Nancy, and the stable-boy, and the two little girl
acquaintances I was allowed to have. Then I began wishing for a pair
of small scissors of my own; after that a knife; then a ribbon-yard
measure, in an ivory temple. Finally, nothing would do but a complete
work-box.”’

“Oh, that must have been all you wanted!” exclaimed the little
listener, to whom the vision of a rosewood work-box, with crimson
lining, and furnished with ivory winders, came in a moment; such an
one as she had often longed for.

‘By no means,” answered Aunt Clara, rather seriously. ‘‘ By that
time I fancied myself old enough for a parasol; and, after glorying for a
few weeks in one large enough to cover me, with a brown centre and a
broad white fringe—how ridiculous I must have looked !—sun-shades
first came in fashion, and my ambition centred in one.

“‘Tt’s a sad confession for your greedy little ears, but even after I was
married, I found I wasn’t as contented ‘as I expected to be. I wanted
mahogany furniture; and when we were rich enough for that, nothing
but rosewood would do. Philip gave me a saddle-horse, and then I
wanted a carriage and pair!”

“ But now,” said the child, “you have everything in the world, Aunt
Clara. You are contented now, I’m sure.”

Her aunt laughed, ‘Ask your unele if I didn’t tease his life out just
254 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

now for a country home. But there is the carriage, and I must leave a
message for your mamma. I hope some fairy will send you a silver
pencil, my dear.”

‘When Mrs. Roberts returned she found her little daughter standing at
the window, from which she had seen the beautiful carriage, with its.
elegantly-dressed occupant, depart.

“T have been thinking, mamma,” she said, ‘‘whether you are not
happier, after all, than Aunt Clara, with everything so lovely around
her. She does not seem a bit contented, and I never hear you wish for
anything, plainly as we live.”

“¢ Having food and raiment, let us be contented,” said Mrs. Roberts,
quietly, alluding to the Sunday-school lesson Emily had that morning
repeated. ‘Clara, with all her wealth, is not to be envied. It is a
cheerful, reasonable spirit that makes our happiness, after all.”

“She told me a great many things,” continued Emily, resolutely,
“and it made me think of what cook used to tell the beggar girl, ‘The
more you have. the more you want.’”

Some of my little readers may be interested to know, that Miss Emily
found a nice little box on her plate the next morning, and that she drew
from the pink wool that lined it a beautiful silver pencil-case, on which
was engraved—

‘CEMILY—FROM HER AUNT CLARA.”

But we rather doubt whether all her wishes were satisfied in its pos-
session.
THE LITTLE MOTHER.

“On! take us to our Mother’s room,”
Two little voices said,

‘We have not wished her yet ‘ Good night,”
Oh! take us not to bed.”

The tears fell from their sister’s cheek,
She led them past the door,

And whispered with a broken voice—

‘Dear Mother is no more.”

‘¢ Where is she, then? Oh! tell us where
Our Mother dear is gone?
She surely lov’d us both too well
To leave us here alone.”

‘She ’s gone to Heaven,” the maiden said,
“She watches from the sky ;
And you shall go, if you are good,
And see her by and by.”

“Oh! who will ene Mother now?”
Each little mourner cried;

‘¢T’d rather than our Mother dear—
God took all else beside.”

She kiss’d their little quivering lips,
She kiss’d each dearest brow,

And whispered with a gentle yoice—

“Tl be your Mother now!”
THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

to
or
a

Oh! sacred was the smile of love
That flush’d her pallid face;
It seem’d as if the Mother’s soul
Took then the sister’s place.

“Dear ‘little Mother,’ ” both replied,
“We'll love you and obey ;

And pray that God will never more
Let us a wrong word say.

“And we-will thank Him in our prayers,
For having kindly given
A darling Mother on the earth,

As well as one in Heayen !”

That night she took a Mother’s part,
She wiped their tears away ;

And led them to their little room,
Their evening prayers to say.

And while she watch’d beside the bed,
And kiss’d them when asleep ;

She heard a voice as if from Heaven—
‘Be faithful—do not weep!”

And often when with household cares
Her heart had vainly striven,

This thought her failing strength renew’d,
“¢ Mother looks down from Heaven !/’

God give thee, little Mother, strength,
Thy heavy lot to bear ;

Angels, smile on her smiles of light,
And tend her with your care.
MISS TABBY!

Miss Tanpy was a wee, wee kitten, about the length of your hand,
with the usual number of very weak, trembling legs, and a small pointed
tail, that stuck straight out, as if to balance the unsteady little body to
which it belonged. Her age was precisely one fortnight, and she had just
been taken from the basket in which she and her mother lay coiled up
together, and carried in the servant’s apron to the drawing-room to be
admired. Her mother followed, of course, to see that no harm happened
to her, for she knew human beings were scarcely fit to be trusted with
such precious creatures as kittens, especially such a one as this; for
though Pussy loved all her children, yet the rest of her family being, like
herself, perfectly black, she thought little Tabby the most beautiful
kitten that was ever seen; and, as parents sometimes will, loved and
prized her more than them all on this account.

The whole party got safely down again from that first visit to the
drawing-room. Tabby’s beauty had been praised, though not half so
much as her mother thought it deserved, and she was right glad to have
her all to herself again.

Time passed on; and the kitten grew handsomer, and stronger and
more intelligent, every day. Her mother was delighted, and yet at
times almost frightened, lest the alarming precocity of intellect which
she imagined her darling exhibited should prove prejudicial to her
health, if not, indeed, as maternal fears occasionally suggested, even to
her life.)y'And sometimes, in fits of depression, she expressed these
anxieties to Tabby’s grandmother, who lived with them. But the old
lady, who had brought up scores of kittens, only laughed at her; or,
when she thought little Tabby was more indulged than was good for her,
would exclaim, peevishly,—‘‘ How you do spoil that child! she’ll never
be good for anything you may depend uron it.”

Remarks of this sort vexed Pussy very much; but she knew grand-
mamma was getting old and infirm, and that she never had an amiable

s
258 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

temper. So she bit her lips, and said nothing; the expression of any
irritation that she might feel being confined to the tip of her tail, which
did at times jerk about rather angrily, while her aged parent was pro-
pounding her severe views on the educational and moral training of
young people. Then she would beckon Tabby out of the room, and have
a good romp with her in the garden, till they were both tired. And as
the little thing lay fast asleep, she would sit winking in the sunshine, and
purring, and saying to herself that, after all, there never was such a
kitten as Tabby! There was such an air about all she did: in the way
in which she licked her paws, and ran after her tail, and drew up her
little whiskers at cat’s meat! And when she wakened, and jumped
about her mother, and bit her cheeks, and pulled her tail, and clawed
her on the face till it brought tears into her eyes, Pussy only smiled, and
said to herself, “‘What delightful spirits the child has!”

Tabby’s spirits were sometimes too much for her grandmother.
Several days together she was wakened out of her after-dinner nap,
before it was half over, by the outrageous merriment of her grand-
daughter ; and this made her excessively cross. But one morning, when
the sun shone in upon them, so bright and warm that little Tabby was
nearly beside herself with glee, she so far forgot herself in her friskiness
as to jump right upon her grandmother’s back, as she sat basking upon
the floor. Upon which the old lady turned round, and gave her such a
box on the ear as made her head ring for full ten minutes after, and put
an effectual stop to such impertinences for the future. Having a will of
her own, Tabby did not dike having her play spoiled in this way; but
seeing there was no help for it, she comforted herself with the pleasant
fiction of doing as she pleased when she was grown up.

Our kitten was a frequent visitor to the drawing-room; for the ladies
of the house were sensible people, and were fond of cats. She generally
enjoyed herself very much when there; for she was permitted to do just
as she thought proper, and had all sorts of gratifying attentions paid her.
But, one day, when she was about three weeks old, she complained when
she came down stairs that she had been nearly suffocated with a saucer
of milk, which the ignorant, though well-meaning ladies had set her
down to, and into which she had popped both mouth and nose, in sheer
ignorance what to do with it, as she had never drunk milk before. She
told her mother it had made her cough and sneeze in a very unpleasant
manner ; but that a pat of butter, to which she had found her own way
MISS TABBY. 259

on the table, was so exceedingly good, that she had eaten a large piece of
it without any difficulty at all; and if she might have her own way,
she would never agains sit down to a meal without this delightful
viand forming a part of it. Her mother laughed, and hoped she would
not be ill after her excesses. But grandmamma was cross, and threat-
ened her so, with bilious attacks and nobody knows what, that Miss
Tabby was fairly frightened, and vowed she would never again eat
butter, if—(licking her lips as she said it)—she'could possibly resist it.

She was very fond of the ladies who took so much notice of her, and
often said, if they had proper pains taken with them they would be almost as
agreeable as cats. For human beings, they appeared to her very intelli-
gent. Her mother shook her head doubtingly at this; but her grand-
mother—who had a low opinion of the whole race, and never neglected
any opportunity of putting a slight upon these ladies, for whom she pro-
fessed the greatest aversion—told her it was perfectly ridiculous; when
she was older she would know better, and find, as she herself had done,
that human beings, of every rank and age, were characterised in the
highest degree by treachery, deceit, and cruelty—vices which she
abhorred! And then she told Tabby how her poor old grandmother had
once been as young, and beautiful, and almost as silly as herself. That
ladies—and even gentlemen, who do not generally know how to behave
themselves towards cats, had patted and stroked her, and made her
cough and sneeze in saucers of milk, before she had the slightest idea of
how to take it properly; and, by their flattering ways, had led her to
think as favourably of them as her grandchild now did. But no sooner
was she old enough to take care of herself, and had been taught to lap
milk, wash her face, and do other little things useful both to herself and
her mother, than, spite of all their pretensions of friendliness, she was put
into a Basket one evening, jolted along she did not know how many
miles, and then turned out in a strange house among vulgar people ; and
she never saw one member of her own family again.

She was proceeding to assure her horror-stricken hearer, who” had
never dreamed of the existence of such depravity, that a similar fate
would inevitably be hers at last, but stopped short to catch a mouse that
she had heard squeaking in the corner; and after playing with it half
an hour before eating it, was so tired, that, instead of finishing her lecture,
she fell fast asleep, leaving Miss Tabby secretly resolving that she
would never learn to lap milk, or do anything for herself, seeing the
260 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

acquisition of these accomplishments had been attended by such terrible
consequences to her grandmother. ’ ;

Grandmamma was right. Little Tabby was spirited away from her
home and friends. And it fell out thus:—

There was a dreadful giant in that neighbourhood, whose name was so
hard, that no one could pronounce it. There was a large brass plate all
over his front door, and he drew the teeth of all the people who were
unfortunate enough to get into his den. Everybody was frightened of
him ; and as he walked along the street, making a noise like thunder, he
often saw Tabby sitting on her own door-step in the sunshine. She was
very much afraid of him, and used to run away when she saw him
coming. But he spoke kindly to her, and pretended to admire her so,
that at last she ventured to let him come near her. He stroked her back,
and said, ‘‘ Puss—chit-chit,” in as gentle a voice as he could ; when just
as she was rubbing herself against his boot, he suddenly stooped down,
seized her round the waist, dropped her into his pocket, and ran straight
home to his castle, where he keeps her to this very day!

But whether he intends to eat little Tabby, or only make her catch
mice for him, I really cannot say. Grandmothers are sometimes right,

young may dislike their teachings.

SWEDISH MOTHER’S HYMN. {

TueERE sitteth a dove so white and fair,
All on the lily spray,

And she listens how to Jesus Christ,
The little children pray.

Lightly she spreads her friendly wings,
And to heaven’s gate hath sped,

And unto the Father in heaven she bears
The prayers which the children have said.

And back she comes from heaven’s gate,
And brings—that dove so mild—
From the Father in heaven who hears her speak,
A blessing on every child.
Then children lift up a pious prayer,
It bears whatever you say
To that heavenly dove, so white and fair,
All on the lily spray.
261

THE BROKEN FLOWER.

Au, Margaret! poor Margaret!
She a little flower had set

In a little pot that stood

On a narrow shelf of wood

In a ware-room, on the edge

Of a narrow window-ledge.

She had purchased‘it by stealth
Out of her small hoard of wealth,
Of halfpenny and casual penny
Saved I think unknown to any,—
Saved to buy this little flower
Looked and longed for many an hour.

Ah, Margaret! poor Margaret !

The plant at eve she duly met,

And hanging o’er it tenderly

Oft laughed with joy its growth to see,
And sooth, it grew up beauteously.
Florists, botanists, may jeer

If this word of praise they hear ;

Let them, if they will, deride,

Lovely grew her London Pride.

Here a clustering heap of leaves,

Ah! now over them she grieves ;

Here a fresh, green, tender stalk,

(Of its grace how she would talk!)
There a crowd of flowerets small
Drooping from the green stalk tall.
White those flowers, with crimson spots ;
But—brittle ware are flower-pots.

Through open window shone the sun—
The flower looked a happy one ;
When a gust of wind swept by,
Though it was now ’mid July ;
262 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

From the window-ledge it falls,
Rattling ’gainst the high brick walls.
Down it falls! Oh, Margaret !

She has lost the flower she set!
‘Weep she may for days and hours—
Weeping will not heal her flowers.
Heeding neither laugh nor jest

To her lips the stem is prest ;

With its green juice blends her tears
(Margaret has seen few years).

Ah, Margaret! poor Margaret!

Not soon will she her loss forget.

‘Oh, my flower—my flower!” weeps she,
‘No other one will be to me

The little root I set in May,

The pretty flower I lost to-day.”

For aught I know she’s grieving yet—
Ah, Margaret! poor Margaret!

OH! SMILE ON THY BROTHER!

Ox! smile on thy brother with sisterly fondness,

When duties abroad claim his morning ‘‘ good-bye:” »/

*T will fling round his pathway a halo of sweetness,
And kindle fresh hope in his anxious-lit eye.

Oh! smile on thy brother, as careworn, and wearied,
Slow footsteps announce his return to the door:

’*T will amply repay him for trials encountered,
And quicken the manful endurance of more.

There is virtue and health in a loved sister’s smile,
That can influence deeply the young budding mind ;
There is that which can early and softly beguile
To all that is sacredly good and refined.

!
/
/
263

A VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA.

“Tr a fairy would but*come, and tell me to wish whatever I liked, I
know what I would wish!” cried little Lizzie.

‘And so do I,” said Edward.

“And so do IJ,” said Fanny.

‘And what would my little folks wish?” asked their papa, who had
just then entered the room.

“Why, papa,” cried they all at once, ‘‘ we would all wish to be kings
and. queens,”

“Yes, to wear a gold crown and look fierce,” said Edward.

‘And have a sceptre in one’shand and ride in a gold coach,” cried
Fanny.

“And to wear dresses all made of silver and gold, and covered with
diamonds,”’ cried little Lizzie.

‘¢ What silly little children I have,” said their papa: ‘“Do you think
that kings and queens have nothing else to do but wear fine clothes and
ride in golden coaches ?”

‘And live in grand palaces, papa, and sit on thrones made of ivory,
like King Solomon. Did you ever see the Queen, papa?” continued
Edward, looking earnestly up in his father’s face.

“Very often, Edward.”

“Oh, papa!” cried they all, pressing round him, ‘‘then you who have
seen a real live queen can tell us all about her. What was she dressed
in, and how came you to see her, and did you not feel very frightened,
and did she look very fierce, and was she surrounded by soldiers,
anda

“Stop, stop, children,” cried their father, laughing; ‘how can I
answer all these questions at once ?”

“Well, then, we will be very quiet, and only ask you one thing ata
time; but sit down, do sit down, dear papa. And I will begin first,”
said Edward, ‘‘ because I’m the eldest.”

‘‘Wouldn’t you rather see the Queen than have me describe her to
you ?” said their papa.

‘Can little children ever see the Queen, papa? and could you take us to
see her? O! how nice that would be!”

‘* But we have no grand frocks,” said Fanny and Lizzie.
264 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

‘‘ Never mind that,” replied their papa; ‘‘ you know I promised you all
that if you were good children you should see London this summer; and
while there I think I can arrange for you to see the Queen.”

“Oh! papa, see Queen Victoria, the real Queen, not a wax-work
queen ?” said Fanny.























‘Yes, my dear, you shall see our own Queen Victoria.”

“Well, papa, I am happy; I’d rather see the Queen, a real. grand
Queen, than all the lions and elephants you told us about that are in the
Zoological Gardens.”

‘Very well, children, I am glad you are so pleased; so now set to
work and learn your lessons, or you will not be able to go out with your
mamma at twelve o’clock.”

Edward, Fanny, and Lizzie Grey, had lived all their lives in the
country; they had never seen a large town, and knew nothing of the
world outside their own large garden, and the woods which surrounded.
it. That is, they knew nothing of the world as it is in great towns: of
noise and bustle, and grand shops and fine houses, and balls and
coaches, and servants in gay liveries—of all this they knew nothing.
They knew plenty about the country world; they could tell where to
look for the first primrose or violet, where the little robin had built its
nest, and where to look for the nice wild strawberries. They always
knew exactly how many pretty white lambs there were in the home-field,
VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA. 265

how many chickens the old black hen had hatched that morning, or how
many of the pretty little yellow goslings the great grey goose used to take
with her to swim on the large pond.

So you see they did know something; but about kings and queens
they were sadly ignorant, until, on Edward’s last birthday, one of his
aunts had sent him, from London, a large picture-book containing the
procession of Queen Victoria to open Parliament, the Coronation of
the Queen, and several other fine pictures, all painted in very bright
colours. Besides this, their mamma used sometimes to lend them an old
book of hers containing pictures of Queen Elizabeth, and other great
people; so the children had looked so often at these books that they at
last took it into their little heads that kings and queens must always be
dressed in scarlet and gold, and ride in gilt coaches, and that, although
the country was very pleasant, still it must be far more delightful to sit
_ all day with crowns on their heads, and haye fine servants and soldiers
around them.

After their papa’s promise that they should sce the Queen, all their
play hours were taken up in talking over this much-expected treat.
Edward begged some yellow paper of his mamma, and made himself
a crown with it ; then he would put on an old red cloak of nurse’s, and
with a hoop-stick with a piece of yellow paper on the top for a sceptre,
would pretend to be a king, and make Fanny and Lizzie come and bow
before him,

One day Edward was seated on what he called his throne, which was
nothing more than two or three boxes piled one on the other, and an old
table-cover put over them, and Fanny and Lizzie were to come up to
him very slowly, and, bending on one knee, were to say, ‘‘ May vt please
your Majesty—”

Edward told them they were to look very serious, and were not to dare
to smile, and he tried to look as fierce as he possibly could himself. But
both the little girls were fonder of laughing than of looking serious, and.
therefore, although they did manage to screw up their mouths as they
were approaching King Edward, (as their brother made them call him,)
directly they knelt down and began to say—

“May it please——your——” little Lizzie could look grave no longer,
but burst out laughing, and Fanny joined her.

Then the fierce king grew very angry, and stretched out his sceptre to
punish the offenders, when, sad to say, ashe reached forward, his throne,


266 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

which was not very firmly established, gave way, and king, sceptre, and
throne were seen rolling together on the ground.

His Majesty cried very much, for in his fall he had cut his nose, and
made it bleed; and mamma, who came in to see what all the noise was
about, forbade their playing any more at such dangerous games.

So after this they were obliged to content themselves with talking
about kings and queens, and settling what they should each say to Queen
Victoria when they saw her.

“Tf she looks very fierce at me,” said little Lizzie, ‘‘I’m sure I shan’t
be able to say a single word.”























‘Oh! you two needn’t speak at all,” said Edward ; ‘leave the speak-
ing to me—you shall see how Pll do it.” And then he seated Fanny in
agreat arm-chair, and told her to hold up her head like a queen; and he
went outside the door, and then came in marching as he did at his drilling -
lesson, and marched up to his little sister, and kneeling down, said ina
very grave tone—‘‘ May it please your Majesty.”

“¢ Ts that all that people ever say to queens ?” asked Lizzie.

“Oh! I don’t know,” said Edward, ‘‘ but Queen Victoria will under-
stand what I mean by that very well.”

Then Lizzie wanted to sit in the arm-chair and be queen; but when
Edward and Fanny came marching up to her, she couldn’t help laughing ;
so Edward told her she would not do for a queen, for queens never laughed.

The days passed away very quickly, and one morning their papa told
them he hoped to arrange all his business so that they could start for
London the next week.
VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA. 267

There was plenty of packing then to be done; large empty boxes which
had been shut up for years were now opened and dusted, there were new
things to get—in fact, all was bustle at Beech Grove ; for mamma, papa,
Edward, Fanny, Lizzie, aiid nurse, were all going to London for six
weeks, and everybody knows the quantity of things that everybody takes
with them at such times.

At last the wished-for day arrived. The nearest station was six miles
from Beech Grove; so John, the farming man, had been sent off early in
the morning with all the boxes in the spring cart. Then, after breakfast,
mamma, nurse, and the three children got into the pony phaeton, papa
mounted the old grey mare, and the children said good-bye to Beech
Grove for the first time in their lives.

After the children had passed through the village and over the common,
everything was new to them, and when they reached the railway station,
great indeed was their wonderment at all they saw. Poor Lizzie was
very frightened at the noise, and kept quite close to nurse, and I think
if you could have known-what was passing in her mind, she was half
wishing herself at Beech Grove again.

They had a very long journey to go, and the children were all very
tired long before it was ended. The noise gaye Fanny and Lizzie a
headache ; and:even Edward, who had made up his mind not to be tired,
could not help wishing that London was not quite so far.

When they did get to London, it was worse than ever. Such a noise!
people screaming, horses prancing, men pushing, bells ringing. What
could it all mean ?

‘Ts there going to be a battle, papa?” said Edward, clinging to his
father’s arm.

Mr. Grey smiled, and explained to his little boy that this noise and
confusion happened every time a train arrived at the station, and so
Edward was no longer frightened, but said to Fanny and Lizzie, ‘‘Ain’t
you glad we don’t live at a station ?”

They soon got a coach and drove to a comfortable hotel, and right glad
were they all of a nice cup of tea, and after that of a nice sound sleep in
a comfortable bed.

Oh! the wonders of London to little folk (or, indeed, big folk either,
who have not seen it before).
There was St. Paul’s, into which Edward said he was sure they could
268 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

put the whole village of Beech Grove, church and all. Then the British
Museum, where the children, whose ideas of a museum were limited to a
certain little cabinet of shells and fossils which their papa kept in his
study, were lost in amazement as to how there could be anything left in
the world after so much had been collected.

And the bazaars! What would Goody Brown say, thought Fanny, if
she could but see a bazaar. Goody Brown lived in the village of Beech
Grove, and kept a little shop for the sale of dolls, tops, whips, and other .
toys, and was rather proud of her ‘“‘toy warehouse” as she used to
eall it.

They went also to the Tower of London, where they were much delighted





with everything, but especially with the large figures of the sovereigns
of England on horseback; and Edward whispered to Lizzie as they gazed
with some degree of awe at the figure of Queen Elizabeth, ‘‘ You see I
was right ; kings and queens do look fierce, and never laugh.” Then the
river, with its forests of ships! Edward asked his papa why all the ships
in the world came to London, and went nowhere else.

So his papa told him, that although a great many ships did come to
London, still there were many hundreds more in the world that never
came there at all; and then Edward thought what a large place the
world must he, and what a tiny little bit of the world was Beech
Grove.
VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA. 269

. They had not been in London more than a fortnight, when one morning
their papa told them he was going to take them to Windsor, to see the
Queen, the very next day. Everything else was forgotten directly.
St. Paul’s, Museum, Bazaars, Tower, Ships—What were they all com-
pared to a living queen ?

‘Shall we wear our dancing frocks, mamma?” asked Fanny.

‘No, my dears,” said Mrs. Grey, laughing. ‘‘ You can wear your
blue frocks and tippets.”

Lizzie looked disappointed.

‘“‘ Perhaps,” whispered Fanny, ‘‘Queens like everybody who go to see
them to be dressed quite plainly, so that they themselves may look more
grand.” -

They went by railway from London to Windsor. Long before they
got there Mr. Grey pointed out to his children the fine old castle of
Windsor, which can be seen from a great distance. ‘‘I see a flag on the
tower,” said Edward. ‘‘Yes,” replied his father; ‘‘whenever the Queen
is staying at the castle that flag is put up, and it is taken down directly
she goes away. ‘That flag is called the Royal Standard, or the Standard
of England.”

And now they are at Windsor, the town where the Queen lived! The
children were rather surprised to see such an ugly dirty-looking town;
but their mamma told them to have patience, and wait until they had
seen the castle and the park.

At last they saw the entrance to the castle; and Mr. Grey went and
asked some questions of the soldier on duty, who told him that the Queen
and some of the royal children were driving round Virginia Water.

Mr. Grey then ordered a fly to take them there, and after a good lunch,
they all set off.

Virginia Water is a very beautiful part of Windsor Park. It is about
five miles from Windsor, and there is a large piece of water several miles
long, and soft grassy walks on either side, and fine trees growing close
down to the water. The children were delighted with the fine old park
of Windsor, through which they drove to get to Virginia Water. It
seemed to bring back all their old love of the country, and when, after
driving about four miles, Mr, Grey dismissed the carriage, and said
they would walk the rest of the way, and that the man was to wait there
270 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

for their return, the children capered about on the green grass like little
wild things.

Herds of deer were grazing quietly in the distance, hundreds of little
grey rabbits were jumping about, birds were singing, bees were humming
—everything looked bright and lovely.

“And is this beautiful place the Queen’s park ?” asked Edward.

“Yes, my boy,” said his papa.

“‘And may anybody come in it that likes

COV ess

“Then I’m sure, Edward,” said Lizzie, ‘‘the Queen can’t be so very
fierce, after all.”

They were now at the little iron gate which led into Virginia Water.

And when they entered, and saw the clear bright water, with the
beautiful little model of a man-of-war all decked out with gay flags
floating on it, they were more and more delighted.

Here were also plenty of pretty little brown squirrels springing from
bough to bough, and altogether so many things which reminded them of
home and Beech Grove, that, although they had seen many things in
London to swprise them more, yet here they felt really happy and at
home again.

Mamma was now afraid that the children would tire themselves with
running about so much, so she sat down under a large spreading elm-tree
close to the water, and calling them all to her, opened a bag of nice
biscuits, which they were all soon busy in emptying.

“Papa, dear, when shall we see the Queen?” said Lizzie.

‘Very soon, I hope, Lizzie.”

«¢ Will she be angry with us for eating biscuits in her garden, papa?”

“T think not, my child.”

‘¢ But how shall we know when she is coming, papa ?”

“Why,” said Edward, ‘‘first you will hear guns firing, then drums
beating, and then all the soldiers will come galloping by, and then the
grand Queen will come: is not that it, papa?”

‘We shall see, Edward,” said his papa, laughing.

Just then a sound of horses’ hoofs was heard at some little distance
—and through the trees might be seen a little pony carriage coming
that way. .

‘‘Here is somebody else coming to see the grand Queen, I dare say,”
said Fanny.

99)
VISIT TO QUEEN VICTORIA. 271

Mamma put away the biscuit bag and stood up; so did papa, and so did
the three children, .

On came the little pony carriage, it passed quite close to where the
children stood. In it was a kind, pleasant-looking lady, and a little boy
and girl.

The lady was very simply dressed, and wore a plain straw bonnet;
and the little boy and girl were dressed very much like Edward and
Fanny.

“Take off your cap to that lady, Edward,” said his father.

Edward did as his father bade him, and Mr. Grey took off his hat and
bowed.

The lady smiled very sweetly and bowed in return, and nodded kindly
to the children. When the pony carriage had passed, Edward said to his
papa, ‘‘ Who was that nice, kind-looking lady, papa?”

Mr. Grey smiled—‘‘ The greatest lady in the land, Edward.”

‘¢ What do you mean, papa?”

“T mean, my dear, that that kind-looking lady was no other than our
good QuEEN VicrorrA; and the little boy by her side will, if he lives, be
one day King of England.” ;

‘But she is not grand, and she is not fierce-looking, and she is like
our dear Aunt Kate,” cried all the children at once.

‘Very true, all very true,” said Mr. Grey; ‘‘and yet, notwithstanding
all that, she is Queen Victoria. Don’t look so surprised, my dear children,
but learn what a great mistake you made when you all foolishly thought
that to be a queen it was necessary to be dressed in silver and gold, to be
very grand, and to look very fierce.”

“A good queen rules not by fear but by love, and all Queen Victoria’s
subjects love her most dearly, not on account of her palaces, her crowns,
or her grandeur, but for her many virtues, and for the pattern she has
set us of being, not only a good Queen, but a dutiful daughter, an affec-
tionate wife, and a good mother.”

‘‘Well,” said little Lizzie, as they were returning to London that
evening, ‘‘I would rather have that kind-looking lady for a Queen than
that fierce-looking Queen Elizabeth we saw in the Tower.”

“And so would I,” said Fanny.

“And I think so would I,” said Edward.
THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.



aN ;
wan

om %
THE DEW DROP.
SParKiine like a diamond bright,
In the morning’s golden light,
Nestling where the flowers unfold
In their cups the choicest gold ;
While from Nature’s secret mine
Gems appear with rays like thine.
Here the violet, in its bed,
Rears its lowly, humble head ;
And it speaks of modest worth
Better than the pride of earth!
And the little grassy blade,
In the hours of solemn shade,
From the gloom has wrought a ray
Looking for the coming day ;
While with upward-turning eye,
Forth it looks with stars to vie.
Thus in life’s oft changing field,
Night-born dews their brightness yield
Thus in humble life is seen
Matchless worth of ray serene ;
Thus shall Virtue find its gem—
Truth—the purest diadem.



?
273

THE BIRTH OF THE SNOW-DROP.

Far away among the vine-clad hills of sunny France, there lived a
poor woman with her only child. She was a soldier’s widow, and gained
a scanty subsistence by working in the vineyards, Little Renie was only
able to follow his mother in her labours; but he loved to sit under the
vines, and see the rich purple clusters of grapes that hung among the
green leaves like bunches of amethysts.

The widow dearly loved her little son, and often seating him upon her
knee after the labour of the day was over, she told him of his father ;
how he was a good man and a brave soldier, who had died fighting for
his country ; and then she would sob and press the child to her bosom,
as she related how handsome the soldiers looked marching on to the
sound of fife'and drum, and how not one of that gallant band ever
returned again.

Renie was much too young to understand all this; but as he grew
older he learned that his mother had left her home with a young soldier,
and that her father never forgave the marriage, or saw his daughter
again. The old man was living still in a distant province; but though
the heart of the lonely widow yearned for home, and with a mother’s
pride she longed to show her boy, yet she knew the stern nature of her
father, and dared not seek him to plead again for the pardon so often
denied.

At last the poor widow fell ill, and though it was the season when the
rich hue of the grapes deepened into perfection beneath the warm sun-
beams, she knew full well that she should not live to gather them.

The dying mother bade little Renie come very near to her, and then.
in faltering tones, whispered that she must leave him, and perform a
long dark journey alone. But the child, with violent sobs of grief,
clasped his arms about his mother’s neck, praying to go with her, and
not to be left behind.

Then the widow, whose strength was failing fast, comforted her child,
murmuring, ‘I will not leave you for ever, my son; we shall meet
again—in my Father’s house.” She spoke no more—and soon poor little
Renie was an orphan. T
274 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The peasants made the poor widow a grave in a quiet spot, and gave
the little boy a home among themselves; but day after day he threw
himself upon his mother’s grave and wept, refusing to be consoled.
Children gathered about and pressed him to join their sports, kind women
drew him to their bosoms and promised to cherish him, strong-hearted
men raised him up and bade him be of good cheer; but Renie turned
from them all to the cold, damp sod, exclaiming, ‘‘ She will not leave me
for ever; my mother will come back. I will wait for her here.”

‘When they saw all their comforting words were of no avail, they left
him, trusting that the natural joyousness of childhood would overcome
his grief; but when weeks passed on and brought no change, they learned
to respect the child’s sorrow; and the grape-gatherers, as they returned
from the vineyards with baskets of the beautiful fruit, paused in their
vintage song as they saw little Renie with his arms clasped about the
wooden cross upon his mother’s grave.

The leaves at length dropped dry and sere, and the snow rested upon
the hills; then Renie himself fell ill, and for many weeks he could not
rise from the little cot where a kind peasant and his wife nursed him
tenderly ; but during the tedious honrs of illness his mother’s image was
ever before him; and remembering her words, ‘‘ We shall mcet in my
Father’s house,” he resolved, when he grew strong again, to go and seek
her, as she did not return to him.

The snow had not yet melted in the valleys, though the sun was
shining warmly, when Renie feebly turned his steps orice more toward
the spot where his mother slept. He knelt down before the little cross,
and his warm tears fell fast upon the snow, when lo! just where the
tears had fallen, appeared a tiny blade struggling to pierce the crusted
ground; the boy tenderly scraped aside the snow that the little plant
might feel the sun, and another warm shower of tears fell upon it as he
did so, for he remembered his lost mother’s love for the flowers.

When Renie came again to the grave, he saw with surprise a group of
lovely white blossoms that seemed to bend sorrowfully over the sod.
The child knelt beside them, and a strange feeling of peace crept into his
heart,

“My mother has sent them from the land where she dwells,” he
thought, ‘to show that she has not forgotten me;” and a smile of hope
beamed on his sad, pale face, as he looked fondly on the flowers.

But when the peasants beheld this mysterious little plant blossoming
THE PIRTH OF THE SNOW-DROP. 275

in the midst of the snow, and of a kind they had never seen before, they
were filled with astonishment and awe.

“Tt is sent from the Spirit land,” they whispered, ‘‘ and born of
Renie’s tears ; see how each snow-white drop quivers upon its stem, like
a tear about to fall; his mother knows his sorrow, and would console him
thus.” :

- Gradually the grief of the little boy became more subdued, and hope
and cheerfulness beamed upon his face once more ; he loved to water and
nurture the tender blossoms, and soon the grave was covered with the
delicate and graceful flowers, gently bending towards the earth.

The good curé, who dwelt among these simple peasants, loved the little
motherless boy, and spoke often to him, explaining how the child must
one day join his mother, but she could no more come to him. Renie
listened to the good old man with interest; still the words of his mother
seemed ever present with him—

“‘ We shall meet in my Father’s house!”

And so one day the boy filled a basket with tufts of the Spirit flowers,
as the peasants called them, and going to the curé, said, firmly—

‘« My mother has sent me many messengers. See, I take some with
me to show the way, and I go to seek her in her Father’s house, where
she told me we should meet again.”

Then the good curé drew little Renie towards him, and told him of that
heavenly Father’s house where his mother awaited his coming; and as
he dwelt upon the love and goodness of that all-wise Parent, and the
eternal happiness prepared for His children, the boy was comforted, and
dared not wish his mother back to the home of that earthly father who
had cast her off.

Ag the kind teacher went on and spoke of the loneliness, and perhaps
the remorse, of the old man who had refused to forgive his child, little
Renie’s heart swelled with tears; and as a sense of peace filled his own
bosom, he longed to impart it to others. Suddenly he looked up with a
brightened countenance—

‘J will seek my grandfather,” he said, ‘and carry these flowers to
him; they are messengers sent to console us both; and when I tell him
my mother is gone home to her heavenly Father’s house, he will not be
angry with her any more, but will love me for her sake,”

The good curé blessed the little boy ;—the peasants gathered around
with gifts and many kind wishes and then Renie, after a last visit to
276 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRLS OWN TREASURY.

his mother’s grave, started on his journey, carrying with him the pre-
cious flowers.

He met with much kindness on his way; for all who listened to his
simple story willingly aided the little orphan boy. Many wished to pur-
chase the strange and beautiful blossoms which he carried, but Renie would
not sell them ; he regarded them with a love too holy to barter them for
money. But whoever did him a kindness was rewarded by a little tuft ;
and if he met any one in sorrow, he offered his simple tribute, strong in
the faith of its power to soothe.

The twilight was fast fading into night when Renie entered a shaded
lane, and, softly opening a wicket gate, carried his treasured flowers to
the well to water them, ere he sought a shelter for the night. The little
garden into which he had entered was overgrown with weeds, and the low-
roofed cottage wore an air of desolation. In the porch sat an old man,
who with thin, silvery hair floating on his shoulders, leaned heavily upon
a staff, and with mournful voice and shaking head constantly murmured
to himself,—

“My child, my child! I have driven you from me, and now am
broken-hearted. I shall never see you more—my child! my child!”

Little Renie heard these words; a gleam of joy illumined his heart ;
lifting his basket of flowers he stood before the old man, saying as he
offered them— ,

“Grandfather, see, I bring you consolation !”

The poor old man was for a time bewildered! but when he had heard
Renie’s story and read the letter of the good curé, he clasped the child in
his arms and shed over him mingled tears of penitent sorrow and
gratitude.

The weeds were uprooted, and the precious flowers planted in the
garden, where they grew and flourished in luxuriant beauty. When
Renie with his grandfather went to visit his mother’s grave, tufts of the
lovely blossoms met them at every turn, like the foot-prints of angels
leading them on, and each one to whom Renie had given the flowers
came out to welcome them as they passed.

When the next spring-time came, the hills were covered with the
delicate blossoms, and for many years the peasants named them, ‘‘Renie’s
Consolation.”
277

A FLIGHT UPON FANS.

Tue origin of Fans appears to us to date from the beginning—to be
as old as man’s ingenuity and the necessity for shade in a tropical climate,
and therefore as proper to the islands of the Pacific as to the south of the
Celestial Empire; though, in the first, we find it in the primitive shape
of a bird’s wing or a bunch of feathers, and in the other adorned with
the most curious and elaborate workmanship.

Scripture, by repeated references to the use of the fan as an instrument
for winnowing corn, proves that the Hebrews were intimate with it;
while the portraitures on the walls of the Egyptian Saloon of the British
Museum, descriptive of the domestic life of this ancient people, as well as
the inscriptions on some of the sepulchral tablets, bear witness to its
common use amongst them. It was from this nation that the Greeks and
Romans borrowed the fan; and from Italy, centuries afterwards, Cathe-
rine de Medicis introduced it in its present form at the court of France.

Previous to this period it resembled the flabellum of the ancients, or
the fans at present in use amongst the Chinese ladies, being composed
either of feathers mounted on a handle, or of painted silk or tiffany, like
hand-screens in the present day.

With us the fun is said to have made its appearance in the time of
Henry VIII., whose daughter Elizabeth seldom or ever appeared with-
out one; and the fine gentlemen of her days, like the macaronis in the
south of Italy in Selden’s time, were remarkably fond of appearing with
them; Shakespeare, in ‘‘Love’s Labour Lost,” alludes to this prevailing
foppery when he makes Costard exclaim of the courtier Boyet :—

“¢___ Q a most dainty man!

To see him walk before a lady and to bear a fan.”

Talking of Shakespeare reminds us that he has introduced a fan in the
hand of Margaret of Anjou, between 1445 and 1455, which is either an
anachronism, or else the supposition hazarded by some writers that it
was originally introduced from the East, in the time of Richard II., must

be correct ; but in the absence of any other proof of its use, we must hold
to our former data,
278 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

If I am not mistaken, a fan is mentioned in the inventory of Henry
VIII.’s wardrobe; but their use was not general till about 1572. The
handle of the fan in Elizabeth’s time appears to have been the most
costly part of it; and Roland White, in describing to his friend, Sir
P. Sidney, the Earl of Leicester’s reception of her Majesty at the Dazrie-
house, at Kew, in the year 1594, informs him that on her first alighting
a fine fanne, with a “handle garnisht with diamonds,” was presented to
her.

During the succeeding reign, and in the days of Henrietta Maria, the
feather fan assumed a more graceful, but not less expensive form than
those of the Elizabethan period ; and instead of being stiffened by a band.
‘of gold around cach stem, fell naturally and flowingly above a handle of
gold or silver filagree, and shaped like our present bouquet-holders, and
occasionally enriched with jewels.

Folding fans, of painted silk or paper, had also come into vogue; and
it was possibly with one of these that Frances, Countess of Somerset, hid
the conscious guilt in her face during the reading of the indictment
charging her with the murder of Sir Thomas Overbury, at the bar of the
House of Lords.

“ Whilst it was reading,” says Amos, in his account of this celebrated
trial, to witness which £50 were given for a corner of Westminster Hall
that would hardly contain a dozen, ‘the Countess stood looking pale.
Alas! what wonder, when the axe of the gentleman gaoler, though with
its edge turned from her, gleamed in front. She trembled and shed tears,
and at that part of the indictment where the name of Weston, the actual
perpetrator of the murder, was first mentioned, she put her fan before
her face, and there held it, covering her face till the reading of the
indictment was concluded.” This is not the only instance, as we shall
see, in which the exhibition of the passions in the bosoms of great ladies
have taken sanctuary behind this little screen.

Catherine of Braganza, and her suite of swarthy ladies, first introduced.
the use of the sun-fan into England ; those huge green shades that served
the purpose of a parasol, and which were not wholly exploded from the
promenade till the latter part of George III.’s reign.

The dress fans of the Merry Monarch’s period appear to have been as
expensively ornamented as any of those which had preceded them, and
Grammont has informed us of the value attached to French fans by the
ladies of the court.
A FLIGHT UPON FANS. ‘279

By this time the painting of these elegant trinkets had become a branch
of art, which the first-rate artists of those days, as now, were not above
exhibiting their skillin. Generally the subjects chosen for their adorn-
ment were of an Arcadian character, but sometimes love was mythologi-
cally treated, and the fan shone resplendent with all the pretty devices
which have rendered eloquent the valentine-letters of later days. At
others caricatures appeared on them, and in the reign of George II. we
find Loggan, the ex-dwarf to the Prince and Princess of Wales, who had
established himself, as a fan-painter, at the south end of the Parade at
Tonbridge Wells, sketching on his wares with such fidelity (Richardson
tells us) that they were immediately recognised as the most remarkable
characters that from season to season appeared on the walk.

The period when Watteau painted them and Addison wrote his ‘‘ Dis-
cipline of the Fan” appears to have been the meridian of its fashion, and
of the perfection of its use in England. Under no circumstances was a
lady dressed without it. It was as essential to her as to a Chinaman,
whether he be an itinerant shoemaker, or one of the 7,300 ambulatory
barbers of Canton, and its constant use familiarizing its fair owners with
all the graceful evolutions of which it is capable rendered it scarcely less
attractive in the hands of an English belle than in those of a Spanish
donna.

It must have been like another hand in that of a well-trained practi-
tioner, commanding, recalling, directing, caressing, and, from the pretty
monitory shake or mischievous lap of some local coquetilla to the flutter
expressive of so many emotions—of tenderest agitation, or indignant
anger—a, certain delicacy appertained to all its movements, full of piquant
and graceful power.

We have seen it screening fear and guilt in the pale face of the Countess
of Somerset; a little later, and the following anecdote of Queen Mary, so
illustrative of her want of good taste and good feeling, exhibits another
occasion on which (to use Madame de Genlis’s phrase), the fan afforded
‘a veil and a countenance” to the royal offender.

The only dramatic representation witnessed by. Queen Mary, who
encouraged every demonstration of public opinion which her father had
discountenanced, was the play of the ‘(Spanish Friar,” which he had
forbidden ; but the repartees in the drama happening to be such as the
spectators hearing them with preoccupied minds could readily apply to
the Queen, Mary was abashed, and forced to hold up her fan to hide her
280 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

confusion, all the while turning round to ask for her palatine, her hood,
or any article of dress she could recollect.

But to come down to yet more modern times for a final association in
connection with our subject, methinks Miss Burney’s ‘‘ Sweet Queen,”
throughout the long course of that loyal lady’s letters, never looks so
natural and womanly as on that one occasion, when, during the con-
gratulatory address of the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford, on her royal
husband’s escape from assassination, she softened, and shed tears ;
“which,” adds her Majesty’s biographer, ‘‘she would not, however,
encourage, but, smiling through them, dispersed them with her fan, with
which she was repeatedly obliged to stop their coursing down her
cheek.” ‘

But enough, we think, has been said upon our theme to show how much
more might be added to invest with fresh interest for some of our
readers this graceful trifle, which has so often induced mischief and
hidden pain, masked scorn, and covered blushes, and behind which
reputations have been whispered away and the tenderest confessions have
been uttered.

A. BURIAL,

Darx and gloomy lower the heavens,
Clothed in winter’s mournful grey;

Thick with snow the graveyard ’s covered,
Hard with frost the slippery way.

And four men are seen approaching,
Carrying death’s cold burthen there ;
From the hospital a coffin
With a maiden young and fair,

No procession follows after,
Only blasts of wind and snow

Blowing coldly on the bearers,
Therefore do they hurry so.
A BURIAL. 281













Now the lonely spot’s before them,
Where the grave lies ready made,

_And the earth falls dull and heayy—
Harshly sounds the sexton’s spade.

And the men depart, not even
The old sexton stays behind ;
Nought but the dry winter branches
Rustling in the cold north wind.

a
Miles away from that lone churchyard,
Sits an old and sickly man ;
Sits down bent and feebly trembling,
White his hair, his visage wan—

But his heart is glad within him
As his trembling accents say ;
‘Though I’m lonely, my young daughter
“Now lives happy far away!”
282 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

MOSS MANTLE.

You have learned from your books, of course, that the fabulous god-
dess Flora is said to have once reigned over all the flowers: and it was
in obedience to her command that a white rose was sent to bloom in a
little shaded nook near the confines of an elegant garden.

The White Rose was a timid flower, and listened without envy to the
tales which the bees and butterflies brought her, about the luxury and
style in which her garden-relatives were reared, while she modestly hid
her face behind the clustering foliage, when any one chanced to pass.

The owner of the fine garden was one day roaming through the woods,
and finding the Rose in her concealment, resolved at once to transplant
her to his own domain. He accordingly brought his gardener, who
carefully uprooted the trembling flower, and carried her in triumph to
the garden. Here she was planted in a fayourable spot, and nurtured
with unwearied care; but the timid Rose drooped and pined for her
home in the still woods, and for a long time all efforts to revive her
seemed in vain. When at last she ventured to raise her languid head
and look about her, she was dazzled and bewildered by all that she saw,
and felt quite out of place amid the brilliant galaxy of beauties by whom
she was surrounded.

Gradually, curiosity and admiration conquered her timidity, and she
found much to amuse her in her new home; she smiled at the frivolity
of the London Pride, that seemed to turn her delicately-painted leaves
toward the butterflies, hoping to win their admiration, and looked
lovingly upon the exquisite Rose Acacia, with whom she longed to claim
companionship ; while the many strange and splendid varieties of flowers
charmed and surprised her. She felt how utterly insignificant she
appeared in her simple white robe, and felt quite secure from Jae
vation among so many brilliant and graceful companions.

The simple Rose was quite unconscious that all this while she was
expanding into new loveliness herself, and never imagined that she was
considered by far the most choice and elegant inmate of the garden,
MOSS MANTLE. 283.

By and by the butterflies swarmed about her, with flattering words;
but she knew that they had honeyed whispers for every flower, and so
their praises were valueless; then the Zephyr murmured among her
leaves, and begged some of her fragrance to carry—as he said—to less
favoured climes, where her presence was unknown ; but she only bowed
her head and granted his request; for he was proverbially inconstant.

At length, the owner of the garden brought groups of visitors to see
the new flower; and when the modest Rose heard the extravagant
encomiums that were lavished. upon her, a blush of ingenuous shame
covered her face; and this was considered a crowning beauty. The poor
Rose was overwhelmed with the attentions she received, and frightened
at finding herself the centre of attraction; while her more brilliant com-
peers bloomed and sighed in vain. The jealousy of the flowers was
excited by their new rival, and they looked coldly upon her. The
Clematis used every artifice to supplant her; the China-pink regarded
her with aversion; and the Laurustinus murmured complainingly
“¢T die, if neglected.”

The dislike of her companions rendered the Rose very unhappy; she
endeavoured to conciliate them by her sweetness, and resolved upon the
first opportunity to petition the goddess Flora to restore her to her
sequestered home.

The season of the Festival of Flora arrived ; and all the flowers has-
tened to present themselves to their queen. Bashfully retiring behind
the brilliant group that clustered about the sovereign, the timid rose
lingered until all had been presented, and then slowly approached, her
cheeks glowing with blushes, and her graceful head bowed to the ground.

“Come hither, timid one,”’ said the queen; ‘‘ we have heard much of
your wondrous success, and the admiration you have awakened. How
like you the new home you have found ?”

“It is very beautiful,” murmured the Rose, ‘but I love it not; ob,
send me back to my home in the silent woods again!”

The flowers exchanged glances of surprise at these words; for they
marvelled why the Rose should wish to leave a spot where she was sur-
rounded with adulation and praise. The queen shared their astonish-
ment, and said, with a slight shade of displeasure in her tone,—

“Know you not it is our pleasure that you should dwell in the woods.
no longer? Ungrateful Rose! you, who are our youngest and favourite
child, why are you not happy, when surrounded by admiration and fed
‘with praise ?”
284 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

The Rose was silent for a moment, and a tear of wounded feeling,
which mortals would have called a dew-drop, fell upon her bosom: then
in low and faltering tones she spoke.

‘¢My queen,” she said, ‘‘those praises, that admiration, make my
unhappiness; in my secluded home the voice of flattery never reached
me; the bees and butterflies told me only of the splendour of my garden-
sisters, and the Violets and wild Daisies loved me, and were happy to
bloom in my shade. Now my sisters shun me; they think I prize the
praises that are unworthily bestowed upon me more than I do their love ;
they turn coldly away, and leave me to listen only to the flatteries I
despise, and the inconstant sighings of Zephyr, who never sought me
before. 1 do not care to be admired ; let me return to my home in the
woods again, and my sisters will love me once more.”

““Tt may not be,” said the queen, kindly ; for the faltering voice and
glowing cheek of the Rose left no doubt of her sincerity. ‘It may not
be—it is your destiny to dwell in the garden, and it must be accom-
plished ; but the modesty which now dyes your face in blushes shall
never become sullied by pride or boldness: it shall remain for ever as a
lasting charm, and a reproach to the envy and ill-nature of others.”

“We envy her no longer,” cried all the flowers, with one voice; ‘‘ we
will turn from her nomore. She has our warmest love, and deserves it
too, beyond all others flowers; for who else could have borne elevation
and flattery, injustice and envy, with so much gentleness and humi-
lity ?”

The grateful Rose turned toward them with a beaming face, and the
queen said, kindly smiling,—

“Are you satisfied now, little one, to return to your garden-home, or
have you still another request to prefer ?”’ ¢

‘*Grant me yet one more,” murmured the Rose, bending forward ;
‘since I may not return to my shaded home, bestow upon me a covering
to veil my face, as once did the clustering leaves in my own green
wood P”

“Ashamed of your blushes, are’ you?” asked the queen, playfully ;
“6well, choose what you will; veiled charms are always fairest.”

“Let it then be a mantle of moss,” returned the flower, thinking only
‘of the soft, close surface, which the humble weed presented.

“ The queen smiled, and gathering some of the moss from the bank
‘where she reclined, threw it in graceful drapery over the Rose; then,
struck with admiration, turned toward the flowers, exclaiming,—
THE FATE OF THE VIOLET. 285

“Said I not right, veiled charms are fairest ?”

The whole assemblage of flowers sent forth a musical shout of admi-
ration and delight.

“Your modest diffidence has but added to your charms,” they cried ;
‘nothing can exceed your loveliness; we acknowledge you Queen of
Beauty for ever.”

But the Rose shrank from their praises, and folding her moss mantle
more closely around her, hastened to conceal herself in the brilliant
crowd from their admiring gaze.

THE FATE OF THE VIOLET.

Tue happy Lucille arose early upon her birthday morning, and hastened
into the garden; there was to be a brilliant féte that evening in her
honour, and she wished to gather the newly-awakened flowers ere the sun
had stolen their freshness, that they might be woven into garlands, and
grouped in vases, to adorn the rooms. ‘‘ I am to be queen of the festival,”
soliloquised the young girl, as she passed like a humming-bird from
flower to flower, ‘‘ and will choose the fairest of these garden beauties to
wear in my bosom; I will adopt it for my own, and so emulate the
peculiar beauty for which it ismost admired, that I shall be called Lucille,
the rose, or the tulip, or whatever flower I may choose; the idea is so
pretty! but first I must find a perfect flower.”

Thus communing with herself, the young girl passed among the flowers,
culling the fairest, and filling the broad baskets which had been placed
to receive them.

Though all were beautiful, none seemed as yet worthy of her especial
choice; and she rested a moment against a marble basin, whence issued
a little fountain, and gazed upon the beautiful profusion of flowers which
surrounded her.

Just at her feet, and almost concealed by the long grass, grew a tuft of
deep blue violets, with the flowers embedded in soft green leaves; the
tears of morning yet trembled upon their bosoms, and their breath arose
like an incense of gratitude from the freshened sod.
286 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY,

Lucille looked down upon them and spoke :—

“You are winning in your gentle loveliness, sweet blossoms of the °
spring; and I would fain resemble you, but other flowers are fairer, and
perchance as sweet; won by their superior charms, I might regret my
choice, and neglected you would wither; hide yourselves, therefore, amid
your leaves, and if I find none lovelier I will return.”

A dew-drop fell from the violet’s cup like a tear of patient sorrowing ;
but the young Lucille bent her gaze upon the fountain, and the lovely
face which its clear waters reflected seemed. far too brilliant to find its
fitting emblem in the humble violet.

“T wish to be loved,” thought the young girl, ‘but I must also be
admired ; surely there is some other flower which combines the sweetness
of the violet with more brilliant charms;” and with a gay smile she
passed on,

Won by the gorgeous hues of a magnificent tulip, Lucille stooped to
admire it. ‘‘Here is a beauty that will attract all beholders,” she
thought; but as she bent towards it no breath of perfume welcomed her
—the splendid flower was void of fragrance.

“What avails beauty without sweetness,” she murmured, and sighing
sought again a perfect flower. The waving anemone, the brilliant jonquil,
the drooping columbine and stately lily, each in turn attracted her; but
in each there was something which the young girl cared not to imitate,
or’which left her a charm to desire, and still she found not what she
sought.

Suddenly she paused with a ery of delight, for, bathed in the dews of
morning, the graceful rose unfolded her rich petals to the sun and per-
famed the air with her sighs.

“Behold perfection!” exclaimed the young girl, putting forth her
hand to cull the tempting flower; but as she clasped the delicate stem, a
thorn pierced her finger, and she started in disappointed surprise.

‘‘These thorns would wound my heart,” she cried; ‘beautiful, yet
unkind, I dare not cull you, nor choose you as my emblem flower, for I
desire not to attract by loveliness and sweetness, only to wound by hidden
stings,” and again she passed on sorrowing.

Wearied with her fruitless search, Lucille threw herself upon a shaded
bank, and thoughtfully compared the varied charms of all the brilliant.
flowers that she had seen—then she remembered the gentle violets, and
eagerly sought the spot where they bloomed, . The sun had mounted high
STOCKINGS AND THEIR ANTIQUITY. 287

in the heavens when the young girl reached the fountain, and saw the
modest tuft at her feet.

‘“‘Fairest and sweetest,” she exclaimed ; ‘‘ behold, I have sought amid
all the flowers, and there are none like you. I find beauty without sweet-
ness, elegance without gentleness, brilliance without modesty. You, in
your gentle loveliness, far excel all others of your bright compeers.
Come, I will wear you next my heart; your fragrance shall refresh me
while your loveliness delights. Yes, I will strive to emulate your
modesty and sweetness, and thus deserve at lexgth to be called Lucille
the Violet.”

She knelt to cull the flowers, but they were withered. Unable to bear
the heat of noonday, they had drooped and faded; her choice had been
too long delayed, and now they could bloom no more. A fainting breath
of perfume was all that remained to tell of their wasted loveliness and
decay.

STOCKINGS AND THEIR ANTIQUITY.

Srocxines! It is an unpromising title, and we half fear lest our fair
readers should be tempted with an involuntary @ bas! to close the page
upon our homely subject.

But if the shoe could be made interesting, we do not see why its
legitimate companion, the stocking, may not; for, though it lacks the
antiquity of that article, and has neither scriptural nor classic associations
attached to it, there are sufliciently curious and amusing circumstances
connected with its history in our own country to tempt us with the belief
that, however commonplace it has become in the present, it is not incapable
of some touch of interest from the past.

In the most ancient delineations which the Anglo-Saxons have left us
of themselves (though the poorer folks went naked-legged and bare-
footed), we find the men of the richer classes wearing a straight stocking
which reached above the knee, while others have the leg covered half way
with a kind of bandage bound round it, or crossed diagonally with bands
of cloth; so that the cloth hose of the Normans were by no means a novel
introduction, though the short ones worn by the eldest son of the Con-
queror, and which procured him the sobriquet of Robert Cowrt-hose, might
have been, —
288 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

In the representation of Canute, copied by Fairholt from the MS.
register of Hyde Abbey, formerly in the collection at Stow, and which
was executed in the eleventh century, we find that monarch wearing -
stockings which nearly reach the knees, and which appear to be of two
colours, horizontally striped, and finished with a band at the top, not
unlike the fashion of those worn by Highlanders. These stockings are
shaped to the limbs, but in general the Saxon hose sat loose upon the leg,
like a groom’s buskin, while the chaussés of the Normans (which had
the advantage of being hose and drawers in one), were tight; and over
these they wore the cross garters of various colours with which our Saxon
ancestors had previously adorned the naked limb.

In one instance William himself is represented wearing red chaussés,
with blue garters and gold tassels; a fashion which had prevailed in
France ever since the reign of Charlemagne, who appears in ‘‘ Herbe’s
Costumes Frangois” wearing this portion of his dress identical with the
above description, save that his cross-garters are of gold.

When Henry I. dubbed Geoffrey of Anjou a knight at Rouen, velvet
hose were worn; for Dugdale quotes the ceremony from a monkish his-
torian of the period, and Strutt gives the knight’s dress in his ‘Manners
and Customs of the English.” Upon coming out of the bath he was
clothed in fine linen, over which he wore a gown of gold tissue, with a
tunic of purple upon that, furred with furs of a blood colour, with velvet
hose, and shoes wrought with gold upon his feet; and henceforth we find
that hose of this rich material were frequently worn on occasions of state
and ceremony.

Scarlet chaussés appear to have continued in favour with the Plantage-
nets, as well as garters of gold stuff; though these last articles were
worn of eine colours best contrasted with the stocking beneath.

Nor was this fashion, which Shakespeare subsequently made Malvolio
re-introduce (for all ages), wholly abandoned till after the reign of Charles
the Wise, in France, the exquisites of whose court, not content wich
wearing a red stocking on one leg and a white or blue one on the other,
further distinguished the right from the left by encircling it spirally with
a garter of quite an opposite colour.

We find no mention of this extraordinary fashion with oom till
the reign of the effeminate and foppish Richard II., when the churchmen
and wits at once assailed it; and Stow, amongst other articles of dress,
inyeighs against the ‘‘party-coloured hosen, white and red, and red and
STOCKINGS AND THEIR ANTIQUITY. 289

black, and so forth ;” and by this we are not to imagine chequered stock-
ings, but the singular contrast presented by a pair of odd ones (if we may
be allowed the use of so palpable an Irishism), one leg appearing in blue,
while its fellow was cased*in white; or it might be that one wore black
and the other yellow.

All this while we have been wondering how these harlequin-stockings,
which appear to have fitted the limbs as closely as the spangled suit of
that prince of pantomime, were put on, composed as they were of cloth,
silk, velvet, and other stuffs; they must have wanted all the elasticity
of modern hose; but the author of the ‘‘ Book of Kervyinge”’ in the office
of the Chaumberlyne, “‘ has outlined the manner of this procedure.”

“First,” says this authority, “‘ warm your soverayne hys pettycoate,
hys doublet, and hys stomachere, and then put on hys hosen, and then
hys schoone, or slyppers; then stryke up hys hosen mannerly, and tye
them,” &c.; directions which give a pretty clear idea that the stockings
of those days, in their clumsy magnificence, were neither laced nor
buttoned to the shape of the limb, but put on exactly as they are at
present.

In the reign of Edward I. we find the fashion of embroidering the
stocking in coloured silk, and threads of gold and silver, first introduced ;
but at the gorgeous, though fantastic court of Edward III.; and the fair,
brave Philippa of Hainault, the vary-coloured stocking again called forth
the severe remonstrances of the clergy and the bitter ridicule of the
satirists. One writer, describing the dress of the period, finishes a furious
philippic by declaring that the wearers of it look more like devils and
tormentors than men and women; and another, that the red side of a
gentleman affects him uncomfortably, and gives him the idea of his being
either half roasted, or at least a sufferer from St. Anthony’s fire.

One would have thought that the extreme length of the ladies’ dresses
in those days would have left them no temptation for indulging in the
vanity of stockings of different colours; but we find that they not onl
wore them, but cross-garters also.

With the accession of Henry IV. a change of fashion followed, and hose
‘were once more made to match; then came the white ones of the time of
Henry VI., but not to the exclusion of other colours. All this while
stockings had continued to be made on the old Norman type, the haute
chaussés of William the Conqueror; but in the reign of Henry VII. they
began to form a separate article from the upper garment of which they

; U

“
290 THE ILLUSERATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

had hitherto made a part, and were designated nether-stocks, and
stockings.

This separation has possibly caused the confusion we find with regard
to our subject in the next reign, in reference to the introduction of silk
stockings—the first of which are commonly, but erroneously, said to have
been worn by Elizabeth. Stow, indeed, who tells the story of Mrs.
Montague’s New Year’s Gift of a pair of knit silk stockings to her royal
mistress, which pleased her so much that, after a few days’ wear, she
declared she would never more wear cloth hose, continues, ‘‘ for you shall
understand that King Henry VIII. did wear only cloth hose, or hose cut
out of ell broad taffaty,* or by great chance there came from Spain a pair

_of silk stockings ;” but in the inventory of that monarch’s wardrobe we

find one pair of black silk and gold woven together, one of purple silk
and Venice gold woven like unto a cawl, and lined with blue sarcenet,
edged with passement ; one of purple silk and gold, wrought at Milan ;
one of white and gold hose, knit; and six pairs of black silk knit. And.
earlier we find hose of velvet and satin mentioned; so that, if we take
the word hose in the sense of stockings, the chances Stow talks of must
have been of pretty frequent occurrence. But some authors imagine
that this list refers to the upper covering of the leg, and not to the
stocking.

In the mean time this latter article was worn of various colours, in the
richest materials, often of gold and silver stuffs, and attached by points
or laces to the upper part of the dress; thus John Newchombe, the famous
clothier of Newby, in the reign of Henry VIIL., is described when he
went forth to meet the king wearing stockings of the same piece sewed
to his slops; and a law enacted by this monarch (a tyrant even in the ©
article of dress) ordains that no shepherd or husbandman, or common
labourer to any artificer, having no goods of his own above the value of
£10, were to wear any hose above the price of twelvepence the yard,
upon pain of imprisonment in the stocks for three days!

The reign of Elizabeth brought about a perfect revolution in the make
and material of our subject ; the silk stockings of Mrs. Montague—copied,
no doubt, from a pair of Spanish or Italian hose—were soon followed by
worsted ones, knitted by ‘‘one William Rider, near the foot of London-
bridge” —some say a city apprentice, but from the above address, and

* A thin kind of silk.
STOCKINGS AND THEIR ANTIQUITY. 291

his interest with the Mantuan merchant from whom he borrowed the
worsted_hose which served him for a model, we are fain to imagine him
a craftsman on his own account, perhaps one of the Company of Cappers,
whose knitted woollen hedd-coverings every person above seven years of
age was compelled to wear (by law) on Sundays; except women, “ lords,
knights, and gentlemen of twenty marks of land, or such as had borne
office of worship in any city, town, or place, and the wardens of the
London Companies.”

The experience of lady knitters will prove how easily the art of shaping
a stocking is acquired by any one conversant with the use of knitting-
needles, so that the first pair fashioned became the type of thousands ;
and while the patronage of the Earl of Pembroke, who is said to have
been the first individual who wore worsted stockings in England, brought
them‘into fashion with noblemen, the commoners so much approved of
them that their sale became very great, and in a short time spread all
over the kingdom.
wearing knitted stockings of black yarn; and the visitor to Penshurst
will remember one of the favourite Leicester, which exhibits him wearing
them of a bright scarlet.

‘With these stockings came the necessity for garters; and in the time
of Elizabeth, How, in his continuation of Stow’s Chronicle, tells us that
no person whatsoever wore them above the price of six shillings a pair,
but that in the next reign men of rank wore garters and shoe-roses at
more than £5 each! An old play of 1616 speaks of garters at four-score
pounds%a pair; and in the curious ballad of ‘‘ Green Sleeves”—the air of
which was so popular when Shakespeare wrote, that he mentions it twice
in the ‘‘ Merry Wives of Windsor,” and which contains many curious
particulars of female dress in the sixteenth century—we find the slighted
lover reminding the lady, who appears to have accepted his gifts, though
indifferent to the giver, amongst many other things, of

‘¢Crimson stockings all of silk,
With gold all wrought above the knee.”

And immediately afterwards, referring thus to the former article :—

“Thy garters fringed with the gold,

And silver aiglets* hanging by,
Which made thee blythe for to behold,
And yet thou wouldest not loye me,’

* Tags.
292 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

It is hardly possible that in the reign of Elizabeth—that patroness of
starched ruffs, stomachers that look like breastplates, and petticoats
resembling towers—that the end of the garter should have appeared
beneath the dress, as it does in that of an Andalusian ; and yet the verse
above quoted seems to have reference to some such fashion.

This ballad seconds the assertion of Stubbes, that in this reign ‘‘ nether-
stocks,” of Grenada silk, were worn, curiously knitted, with open seams
down the leg, with quirks and clocks about the ankle, and sometimes
interlaced with silver and gold thread.

From these luxurious innovations, the melancholy prophets of the
period took occasion to prognosticate the downfall of England, whose ruin .
seemed to them a natural result of these silken eclegances; and from the
lamentations of one of these, who seems to regard knitted stockings as
webs of destruction, and silken garters as bonds and chains, we learn that,
previous to the introduction of silk and worsted stockings, black kersey*
had been women’s wear, and that those who now affected silk garters had
formerly been content with list. Shakespeare has left us some curious
particulars connected with our subject. In the ‘‘ Taming of the Shrew”
we learn that even in his days serving-men wore white stockings, possibly
of linen, like the odd one Biondello speaks of in his description of the
appearance of Petruchio’s lackey, ‘‘ with a linen stock on one leg, and a
kersey boot-hose on the other, gartered with a red and blue list.”

Grumio speaks of the wife-breaker’s servants wearing garters of
“indifferent knit ;” so that in all probability these articles in the Eliza-
bethan period, whether of silk or worsted, were similar to those on which
aspirants in the art of knitting generally make their first essay in the
present, but that the ends were vary-coloured, or finished, like those of
the lady ‘‘ Green Sleeves” (before alluded to), with a fringe of gold or
bunch of aiglets. ; '

Vincentio, in the same play, speaks of velvet hose as a piece of
extravagance on the part of his son; so that the wearing of them was
till fashionable.

Ben Jonson, too, abounds in allusions to our theme, in the play of
‘“Kvery Man out of his Humour.” Fastidio, the beau, describing the
disasters which had befallen his dress in a duel between him and another,
observes, that not having time to take off his silver spurs, ‘‘one of the
rowels catched hold of the ruffle of my boot, which being of Spanish

* A woollen manufacture between cloth and stuff.
STOCKINGS AND THEIR ANTIQUITY. 293

leather, and subject to tear, overthrew me, and rends me two pair of silk
stockings which I had put on (being a raw morning), of a peach-colour
and another.” And Bobadil, in the same comedy, takes off his silk
stockings 40 pawn them, for the payment of a warrant against Downright.
This play was acted in 1599, so that one scarcely understands why Sir
Thomas Gresham’s gift of a pair of long Spanish silk stockings to Edward
VI. should have been so much noticed, as it is remarked they were, unless
there was some peculiarity in their length to distinguish them from ordi-
nary silk hose, of which Fastidio wears two pairs.

Nothing (considering how generally they were worn by ladies and
courtiers) gives us a more perfect conception of the poverty of James I.’s
wardrobe than the anecdote of his borrowing a pair from one of the
gentlemen of his court, and finding them such marvellously pleasant wear

_ that he danced them into holes. But this was on his accession to the
throne; a little later in his reign the wearing of silk hose had become so
common that no one pretending to gentility could make a decent appear-
ance without them.

In the mean time, the manufacture of worsted stockings was no longer
confined to the knitters. William Lee, M.A., of Cambridge, had con-
structed his ingenious frame for weaving them, some say from the
unworthy motive of injuring a townswoman, a native of Woodbourne,
in Nottinghamshire, whom he loved, but who discarded him; while the
more poetical version is, that having married the fair knitter, against the .
rules of his college, and being expelled, poverty—that pale, fierce, famished
goddess, whom the ancients worshipped (but so as to discover more fear
than love or reverence), because they regarded her as the mother of
industry and the useful arts—became in his case his inspiration; and
while watching the busy fingers of his wife, unequal, with all her industry,
to the task of their support, he is said to have conceived the stocking-
frame.

Nearly three hundred years have passed, but Nottingham still continues
to be famous for the manufacture of stockings; and thousands of families
are maintained, and half the world supplied with them, by the application
of the poor clergyman’s invention.

In the time of the Commonwealth, the coloured and embroidered
stockings of the two previous reigns were replaced by hose of sober black
but on the restoration of the “‘man, Charles Stuart,” the laxity of morals
had its type in the dress, and loose stockings came into vogue. These
294 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

were worn in folds upon the leg, and were gartered below the knee with
silken scarfs, tied behind or at the side ina bow, with flowing ends
finished with fringe or embroidery.

In the autumn of the same year, 1658, men wore what were called
stirrup-hose, two yards round at the top, and fastened to the petticoat
breeches, by points of ribbon, with another pair drawn over them to the
bottom of the knee, which were worn either bagging over the garter or
fell down like a flounce, in which case the top was usually ornamented
with embroidery or some fanciful pattern. All we learn from these absurd
and unbecoming modes is the fact that Charles possessed a very ill-shaped
leg, and sought by these contrivances to hide it.

After this period, we find the stocking in its natural shape—which,
indeed, the Roundheads had never abandoned, so that tight hose were
one of their distinguishing peculiarities; and except as regards material
and quality, with certain improvements in the shaping, no alteration has
occurred in the fashion of them since. In William III. and George IT.’s
time silk stockings with gold clocks were worn, as well as ones wrought
with silks of various colours; a fashion which obtained even as late as
1777, when gold and silver threads wrought into clocks and staring
flowers were very much affected by the beaux.

Ladies’ stockings were also adorned in the same manner; and this
tradition of a past mode lingers with us, but in very modest guise, at the
present, the better class of hosiery being generally ornamented with an
open-work or silken clock. The introduction of cotton into this country,
and its application to the manufacture of stockings, has been of important
benefit both to the vendors and wearers of this article; previously. no
choice existed between the expense of silk and the (to many) discomfort
of worsted hose, but at present this material affords every shade of fineness
and price, from the exquisite fabric at a guinea a pair to the full-sized
stockings at one shilling. But the numbers engaged in weaving them,
and the competition in the trade, keep the wages of the frame-work
knitters (as they were anciently called) very low. We would fain follow
one of these home, and see the process of stocking-weaving, but that
we have already occupied too much space, and must take farewell of a
subject which we trust may not have proved uninteresting to our girls.
295

LITTLE KATE.

Tuekn’s a sweet little countenance haunting me yet,
‘Whose innocent smiling I cannot forget ;

For the touch of her own little hand, soft and white,
Thrill’d my heart with sensations of hallow’d delight ;
And gazing upon her warm lips and bright eyes,

I felt from my soul this thanksgiving arise,—

“
As the bonnie blue eyes of my sweet little Kate.”

But wonder not she is so dear unto me,

For thy miniature sweet little sister I see,

In thy wee smiling face, and forget-me-nots blue
As the fairy flax-flowers, or the sky’s softest hue ;
For when the wee one look’d upon me and smil’d,
Oh! the mother I saw in the face of the child ;
And I pray’d, asI still pray, ‘“‘O God let the fate
Be happy and joyous of dear little Kate.”

I loved to behold her fall gently asleep,
And to stand where I knew the bright angels would keep
Their watch o’er the child; yet oft in the night
A sensation of fear would alloy my delight,
Lest the guardian angels from bright lands above,
Should pluck from life’s garden this blossom of love,

* And bear on their white wings to heaven’s bright gate
Our darling wee daisy, our sweet little Kate.

But, O Thou who knowest the secrets of all,

‘Who hearest the prayers that from loving lips fall,
Oh, spare her in mercy a blessing to be,

To the hearts of the lov’d ones so dear unto me!

Her presence, oh, may it affection impart,

As flower-like she twines closer still round my heart;
And her smile may it lead our hearts ever to heaven,
And to Him who this sweet little treasure has given.
296

THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

THE LITTLE GIRL’S LAMENT.

Is Heaven a long way off, mother ?
I watch through all the day,

To see my Father coming back,
And meet him on the way.

And when the night comes on, I stand
Where once I used to wait,

To see him coming from the fields,
And meet him at the gate.

Then I used to put my hand in his,
And cared no more to play ;

But I never meet him coming now,
However long I stay.

You tell me he’s in heaven, and far,
Far happier than we ;

And loves us still the same—but how,
Dear Mother, can that be ?

For he never left us for a day
To market or to fair,

But the best of all that father saw,
He brought for us to share.

He cared for nothing then but us—
I have heard my father say,

That coming back made worth his while
Sometimes to go away.

And if where he is now, mother,
All is good and fair,

He would have come back long ago,
To take us with him there,
bo
Ne]
-T

THE LITTLR GIRL’S LAMENT.

He never would be missed from heaven :
I have heard my father say

How many angels God has there,
To praise him night and day.

He never would be missed in heaven,
From all that blessed throng ;

And we—oh! we have missed him here,
So sadly and so long.

But if he comes to fetch us, then
I would hold his hand so fast,
I would not let it go again
Till all the way was past ;

He’d tell me all that he has seen,
But I would never say,

How dull and lonely we have been
Since he went far away.

When you raised me to the bed, mother,
I kissed him on the cheek—

His cheek was pale and very cold,
And his voice was low and weak.

And yet I can remember well,
Each word that he spoke then,

For he said I must be a dear, good girl,
And we should meet again !

And oh! but I have tried since then
To be good through all the day ;

I have done whate’er you bid me, mother,
Yet father stays away !

Is it because God loves him so ?—
I know that in His love,

He takes the good away from earth,
To live with Him above!
298 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

Oh! that God had not loved him so!
For then he might have stayed,
And kissed me as he used at nights,

When by his knee I played.

Oh! that he had not been so good,
So patient, and so kind!

Or, had we but been more like him,
And not been left behind!


MARIAN’S CHOICE.

Tue riches of Aunt Jane’s “ Girl’s Treasury,” were not exhausted
by Mis. Selby’s daughters when their winter holidays ceased, and they
returned to school; and therefore, when the longed-for summer arrived,
and bright June saw the happy family once more united at home,
Mamma was solicited to bring forth again the key of the elegant store-
house, that their inspection of its varied treasures might be completed.
Mrs. Selby then surprised them by opening a compartment unseen
before, ingeniously constructed, and stored with a great number of
natural objects. It would not, indeed, be easy even to enumerate
the beautiful and interesting specimens which were here neatly and
compactly laid out, in scientific order, with labels conveying concise

information. There were sea-shells, corals, and marine plants ; butter-
flies and moths, so lovely and fragile; beetles in their scaly armour;
skeletons of leaves, and dried flowers ; different kinds of feathers, furs,
&e. One long summer afternoon was spent in looking them over, and
as there was a microscope in the Cabinet to enable the girls to take a
more enlarged inspection than the unassisted eye could afford, the

hours fled in making most instructive and delightful observations.

The cases of objects were then closed, and a book was selected by
300 THE ILLUSTRATED GIKL’S OWN TREASURY.

Marian,—on Birds and Bird-keeping,—a subject in which she took
special interest. Mrs. Selby had some design of forming an Aviary at
one extremity of her drawing-room, and the young ladies were very
desirous to see it commenced, and to assist in its formation while they
were at home for the Midsummer. Small bird-cages were somewhat
objected to in this free and happy home, and Mrs. Selby was very
doubtful whether she and her daughters could manage a collection of

birds so as to ensure their health and happiness.


THE

ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY

OF

Hicds and Brrd-heeping.



Dull the heart, oh! dull,
That to the melody of early birds
Throbs not with holier transports of delight;
Nature speaks to us in articulate words,
And spreads her living scenes with glory bright;
All that can soothe the listening ear affords,
And all that can bewitch the ravish’d sight.



BRITISH BIRDS.

Wirt naturalists, who invariably possess tender and susceptible hearts,
the moral question of bird keeping is allowed very much to interfere'with
that pleasurable pursuit. Indeed, we know of several elegant writers,
and no less accurate observers of nature, who have given up bird keepin
from a sense of duty to the feathered creation; and the remark we once
heard, by one whose name has been carried on the wings of fame to all
corners of the world, was—‘‘I cannot purchase knowledge by the impri-
sonment of such free, wild, happy creatures. No! I should suffer as
much, perhaps more, than the birds, if I were to have them caged about
me; so what I now learn of their ways is gathered from the book of
nature out of doors, where to hear a lark carolling in the clear heaven
seemsa recompense forall the pains and penalties of our human existence.”

But as people do keep birds, and as the inhabitants of towns often have
no other mode of making acquaintance with the feathered tribes, we
purpose showing how the pleasure may be had in a purer form and with
less injustice to the merry songsters. The beau-zdeal of a lover of birds
is to have an aviary. And first, as to Finches :—

Unless you are learned in bird lore, you would not credit what variety,

beauty, cheerfulness, and familiarity are combined in a collection of
these. They are the hardiest of birds, their habits are very similar, they
eat the same kind of food, and, if properly selected, agree to the perfec-
tion of amity!

Suppose we give a list suitable for such a cage. Say two young Nor-
folk canaries, not first-rate songsters, for it would be a pity to put valu-
able canaries into any mixed collection ; then two' goldfinches; two
siskins ; one greenfinch, for his beauty more than his song; one chaflinch,
three linnets, two redpoles, two twites, two yellowhammers, a pair of
Jaya sparrows, one hedge accentor, one common sparrow, two lesser red-
poles, one hawfinch (to be watched at first to see that he behaves him-.
self, which he is pretty sure to do), and you have a couple of dozen of the
liveliest, merriest, most docile and tameable of all the birds to be found in
ithe British empire, to which you may add any other of the rarer finches,
as chance throws them in your way.

You; will find your pets grow tame, familiar, saucy; there will soon be
a bond of unity established between you and them; your voice and foot~
304 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

step will be hailed with rapturous bursts of bird music and delightful
“tweets” of recognition. With plenty of room for action, and of course









































































plenty to do—for birds, like ee are always tra —your little family
will live happily.
BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING. 305

We will first speak of the canary, as the most popular home-bird, and
hope our girls will give us due attention.

THE CANARY FINCH.

This most highly and deservedly valued of all cage songsters is not a
native bird, although, from its long domestication and breeding amongst
us, we have almost grown to consider it as such. It is said to have been
brought originally from the Canary Isles; and the manner of its intro-
duction into Europe, at the commencement of the sixteenth century, is
thus related :—

A ship, bound for Leghorn, having on board a number of these beau-
tiful finches, then first made an article of merchandize, was wrecked near
to the island of Elba, on which island the released birds found the
climate so congenial to their nature, that they settled and bred there,
and would probably have become completely naturalized, had not their
beauty and powers of song attracted the attention of bird-catchers, who
hunted them so assiduously that, after a while, not a single specimen
was left on the island. It was natural that the birds thus caught should
be sent first into Italy; and from that country, accordingly, we have the
earliest accounts of tame canaries; there, and in Germany, they are still
bred’ in greater numbers than in any other part of the European conti-
nent. It is from the Rhineland, and about Thuringia especially, that
we now derive our principal supply of imported birds; but some of the
choicest canaries’are those bred in this country, chiefly by small trades-
men and mechanics. Hair-dressers of the humbler sort, all over the
country, are almost to aman canary -keepers; wherever you see a barber’s
pole, you will be pretty sure to hear the melody of these feathered
vocalists ; and weavers, especially those of Spitalfields and Norwich, are
great fanciers and producers of these highly-prized birds.

In its wild or native state, the canary is a little grayish-brown bird,
with a tinge of olive-green pervading its plumage, melting off into

.greenish yellow on the under parts; some of the domesticated varieties
do not depart much from this original type, and such are generally con-
‘sidered to be the stronger and healthier birds—delicacy of tint too
frequently indicates delicacy of constitution. The jonquils, or jonques—
as the golden-coloured canaries are called—are indeed lovely creatures,

and lovely, too, is the cheek on which the hectic of consumption plays.
x
306 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

If you want a good strong canary, do not choose a pure jonque, but one
in whose plumage there is a due admixture of brown or greenish gray.

In the island of Madeira high shrubs of a thick bushy nature, and
trees, are the resting-places of these birds. They frequent the gardens
near to human habitations; and even their untaught melody is very
delightful, having in it many notes like both the nightingale and the
skylark, from neither of which birds could they have acquired them,
they not being natives of the island. The canaries sing while on the
wing, passing from tree to tree, and often in concert; each flock, for
they are gregarious, having its peculiar song. A pure wild song from
an island canary—in full throat, and in a part of the country so remote
from the haunts of man as to be quite unsophisticated—is unequalled by
any thing I ever heard in the way of bird-music. The pleasure of listening
to just such a strain as this, amid the balmy atmosphere of Madeira, can
be shared by few of us; but we have some very sweet songsters, too,
among our native woods and groves; and from our aviaries and cages do
these lovely birds of the Fortunate Isles ‘“‘discourse” such delicious
melody, that we need scarcely regret our loss of that pleasure. Indeed,
it is the opinion of most writers, that the song of a well-taught canary is
far superior to that of the wild bird; we think it almost impossible for
any bird-music to be sweeter, and richer, and fuller of melody, than the
song of a canary which has been instructed by a nightingale, as the
German birds frequently are; or by a skylark, under whose tuition those
bred in England are more commonly placed,

Perhaps the most esteemed of all the varieties, as far as colour is con-
cerned, are those birds in which the body is a clear yellow, or white, and
the wings, tail, and head—which should be crested—a rich, golden, dun
colour. Let them have plenty of good food placed within reach, such as
we shall describe under the proper head; give them pure fresh water,
changed daily; furnish them with little wicker nest-bags, hung here and
there among the shrubs, or in snug corners on the sides of the building ;
with, in the latter case, projecting ledges beneath, for the food, and for
the young ones to rest on, and also the old birds while feeding them.
In each of these bags put loosely some building materials—wool, cow’s
or other hair, fine dry hay, and the like, which should be previously
immersed in boiling water, to make sure that it contains no living
insects; let them have also clean sand, and a little powdered “chalk, or
mortar from an old wall; keep a sharp eye on all outlets and inlets, that
BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING, 307

no four-footed enemies, such as cats, rats, or mice, injure or frighten
them ; and remove all quarrelsome and pugnacious birds which may be
fellow-lodgers with them in the aviary; see, too, that their resting-
places are sheltered from cold draughts and droppings of moisture ;—do
all this, and if the birds are not comfortable and happy, you will have
the satisfaction of knowing that you have endeavoured to make them so.

In a room it is best to provide them with cages to build in, or good-
size boxes suspended to the walls, in which the nest materials can be
placed ; there should be young fir-trees in pots, or tubs, placed in the
corners, and plenty of perches projecting from the walls at different
heights, and especially about where the seed-boxes are hung; the room
should, if possible, have a southern aspect, and a strong wire net fitted
to the window, which, as soon as the warm weather sets in, must be left
open night and day. :

Canaries, like all other finches, are seed-eating birds. Rape and canary
seed are the best kinds to give them as a general diet; the summer rape
is to be preferred, not being so hot and oily as that sown in the autumn,
which is larger and blacker than the other. When they require rich
stimulating food, a small proportion of hemp seed should be mixed with
the others, and also a little hard-boiled yolk of egg chopped small; at
such times, too, a little raw lean meat, scraped fine, may be given occa-
sionally. And, in some measure to neutralize the heating effects of this
rich diet, let them have some green food, such as salad, water-cresses,
groundsel, &e. ; something of this kind is good for them all through the
hottest part of the year, and while it can be had, the cage or aviary
should never be without groundsel, of which they are very fond, both
green or in the ripe state. A special treat now and then is to mix up
some millet, summer cabbage, and canary seed, with bruised oats or oat-
meal, and place it in their feeding vessels; they will enjoy it greatly, as
they will a little stale bun or sponge-cake, with a small proportion of
seed of one or more of the above kinds, As a general rule, however, itis
best to keep to plain diet; it is mistaken kindness to over-feed with deli~-
cacies a feathered pet. Many are killed by such treatment. The prac-
tice of keeping a piece of sugar constantly between the bars of the cage
is a bad one; for although some birds will only peck it occasionally;
others are immoderately fond of sweets, and will take so much as to cloy
the stomach, and indispose them for food of a more healthful kind.

To young birds, if you have to feed them by hand, give wheaten bread,
308 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

crumbled, or biscuit grated fine, and mixed with bruised rape seed and
yolk of hard boiled egg; this should be moistened with a little water, so
as to make it into a stiff paste, and about four quillfuls given to each bird
ten or twelve timesa-day. If fed by the parents, the same preparation
may be used, only put the seed, previously boiled to take away its pun-
gency, in a separate vessel. As the young birds grow up and become
able to feed themselves, gradually decrease the quantity of paste and
increase that of the seed, mixing with it canary and a little linseed occa-
sionally—the latter is good for the voice.

The diseases to which the canary is especially liable are not numerous;
it is by no means so delicate a bird as is generally considered, and, if
properly fed and cared for, will live many years in confinement without
falling ill, or manifesting any decline of strength and vigour.

It may be affected with huskiness and loss of voice, which generally
proceeds from a cold; it sometimes comes on after moulting. If not
speedily attended to and cured, it will most likely become chronic.
Many a fine songster has been thus rendered mute and comparatively
valueless. The bird suffering under this disease should be kept in a
warm room, and fed upon rape and canary mixed with linseed. Ripe
plantain should also be given, and every morning about a teaspoonful of
boiled bread and milk with raw seed sprinkled over it. Sponge-cake
soaked in sherry wine is also good, and a little white sugar-candy or
extract of liquorice dissolved in the water. Before purchasing a bird
satisfy yourself that it is not thus affected, for if the huskiness be of long
standing it is quite incurable.

Constipation may be cured by giving the birds plenty of green food,
such as lettuce, water-cress, chickweed, &e.

Epilepsy is commonly the result of fear acting upon a constitution
enervated by too delicate a mode of treatment. At the slightest alarm,
and often when agitated or excited in any way, the bird will drop from
its perch as if dead. The quickest remedy is to plunge it in a bath of
cold water, and when it begins to recover, drop a little sherry wine down
its throat. The bath, if repeated every morning, will strengthen the
bird, as will a few drops of spirits of nitre in its water. When in the
fit some pull a feather out of the tail of the patient, but we scarcely think
this of much service.

Moulting sickness is an inevitable \isitation, which no amount of care
and attention will prevent or delay beyond the appointed time. Every
BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING. [309

year, in or about the month of September, sometimes earlier, your bird
sheds his old feathers and acquires new ones, and during the process,



which lasts from three to six weeks, according to the strength of the bird,
the state of the atmosphere, and other circumstances, it will be more or
less out of sorts. As the time for the annual change approaches, when
you see your pet begin to lose his vivacity, and to drop its feathers, your
first care must be to have it placed in a warm situation. Let the cage
be partly muflled with baize or flannel, so as to exclude all draughts, as
well as disturbing sights and sounds. Give it bread and milk, a little
beef, raw and lean, scraped fine, yolk of egg, and now and then a piece
of sponge-cake, and some ripe chickweed. Put a rusty nail in the water,
with occasionally a clove or a few shreds of saffron, or a piece of refined
liquorice. Should he moult with difficulty, let him have cake soaked in
sherry wine, and blow a little of the wine over his feathers every day.
This will invigorate him and assist their development. If it bea hearty,
strong bird, most likely matters will go on all right, and you will have
no occasion to resort to this. With all birds, however, the moulting
season is a critical time, and with weakly ones especially so. Then it is
that coarse sand or gravel at the bottom of the cage is more than ever
essential; and also, as there is generally a loss of appetite, such delicacies
310 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRL’S OWN TREASURY.

¢
as we have described, to tempt the palate and support the strength. The
first moult of young birds takes place when they are from six to twelve
weeks old; they then exchange the soft down and loose feathers with
which they are first covered for the perfect adult plumage, which in the
second moult undergoes considerable changes in colour. A good judge
can generally tell how many moults a bird has gone through by its tail
‘and wings, and thus an experienced eye has a certain criterion of the age
of a bird. .

Swoollen feet and claws in a canary nearly always result from the want
of opportunity to wash and bathe, or from a dirty state of the perches and
bottom of its cage; consequently they convey a reproach, mute yet
eloquent, on the neglect of its keeper. Let the bird have the required
opportunities, and remove the exciting causes of the unsightly and
‘disgraceful swellings, and they will soon disappear. Sometimes a little
anointing with salad-oil may be required to hasten the cure.

Insects, although not strictly diseases, are often the cause of them, and
may therefore be spoken of under this head. The most mischievous of
these are the red mites, a minute kind of bug, which are as great a
torment to birds as bed bugs are to human beings. When once they
get possession of .a cage they can seldom be driven out again. The most
minute hole or crevice is sufficient for them to breed and harbour in, and
all notices to quit are disregarded. Their principal time of operation is
the night, when they suck the blood of their victims, and so harass and
annoy them as frequently to cause the sitting hens to forsake their young,
and make the life of the cocks a burden and a misery. Under this
infliction the birds become restless and fidgety, especially as the night
approaches, and may be observed to peck frequently at various parts of
their body, and if examined it is probable that some of the tormentors
may be found lurking close to the skin, A pinch or two of strong Scotch
snuff, sprinkled under the wings and about the body, will generally
dislodge the intruders from thence; but the most effectual remedy is
to wash over these parts with a solution of white precipitate, taking care
to dry the bird well by the fire or in the sun. You must also change its
habitation. ‘The haunted house” had better be burned. Mahogany
cages are seldom or ever infested with either the red mites or yellow
lice, another kind of insect tormentor for which the above remedies should
be applied.

As a conclusion to this part of our subject it may not be amiss
BIRDS AND BIRD-KEEPING, 311

a few general directions, a due attention to which may often obviate the
necessity for a resort to more specific remedies, by preventing the diseases
which they are intended tocure. Choose for your birds a light, cheerful
situation ; let them have plenty of sunshine and fresh air, at the same
time carefully avoiding cold draughts. Be particular that their water is
clean and fresh, and that they are never without sand or fine gravel; do
not disturb them unnecessarily, nor alarm them by abrupt motions and
loud noises. Directly a bird begins to droop and refuse its food, try a
change of diet. The indisposition may be but slight, and a little judicious
treatment will probably prevent it becoming more serious. Remember
that groats and oatmeal, and liquorice in the water, are relaxing: bread
and milk, with mace and hemp, and alum and saffron in the water, are
binding and comforting to the bowels. A rusty nail or any picce of old
iron put into the water gives it a tonic property, as does also a leaf of
fresh rue, or a clove; the latter is warm and comforting, so is ripe plan-
tain seed. Linseed at once softens and strengthens the voice ; water-
cress, lettuce, and groundsel are cooling to the system, as are lettuce and
carrot seed, which are also purging, and should be given in spring to
carry off the ill-humours generated during the winter. A very little salt
occasionally is good as a purgative; a piece of bay salt placed between
the wires is best; the birds will take as much as may be necessary and
no more, but do not leave it for them to repeat the dose. It has been
found that sca-sand strewn at the bottom of the cage will answer the
purpose. Canaries should never be kept in a room with persons who
have infectious or contagious diseases, or epidemics of any sort. The
emanations from those afilicted with smallpox and measles have been
known to kill the birds. Sometimes a change of air will have a very
beneficial effect in bird-sickness, when other remedies have been tried in ©
vain, We have said nothing about broken limbs, and our syllabus of
hospital treatment would be very incomplete without some allusion to
such surgical cases. If the fracture is in the wing, tie it up with a piece
of soft worsted to keep it from trailing on the ground; if in the leg, wind
round it, so as to keep the detached parts together, a piece of thin gutta
percha, previously softened in warm water, so that it can be moulded
exactly to the shape of the injured part; put the bird in a low cage
without any perches, with nourishing food and water close at hand ; keep
t quiet, and in a week probably all will be well with it. It is not amiss
to have a separate cage for sick birds; this should be tolerably roomy,
312 THE ILLUSTRATED GIRI’S OWN TREASURY.

and lined inside with flannel; here, as in any other department of bird-
management, cleanliness is the great requisite, whether in cage, room, or
aviary ; whether in sickness or health, no success will attend the best
directed efforts without this. '

It takes from two to three months to teach a bird to whistle an air
perfectly.

THE GOLDFINCH.

‘Of all chamber-birds,” says a noted naturalist, ‘this is the most
delightful, alike for the beauty of its plumage and the excellence of its
song, its proved docility and remarkable cleverness.” There are several
other names by which the bird is known in this country, such as King
Harry, red-cap, proud-tail, having reference probably to its richly-tinted
plumage, and pert, proud bearing. In Scotland they term it goldie and
goldspink. Thus Burns alludes to it as

“The goldspink, music’s gayest child.’

Others have called it ‘‘the dapper finch,” and applied to it many
endearing epithets; which our readers, we are sure, will be ready to ec