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Christian principle in little things

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Title:
Christian principle in little things a book for girls
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1861
Language:
English
Physical Description:
163 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Girls -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Color printed cloth (Binding) -- 1861 ( local )
Bldn -- 1861
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Color printed cloth (Binding) ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

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University of Florida
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48101308 ( OCLC )
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CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLE

LITTLE THINGS.

@ Buok far Girls,

«© Teach me, my God and King,
In all things Thee to see ;
And what I do in any thing,
To do it as for Thee.

«* This is the famous stone
That turneth all to gold ;
For that which God doth touch and own
Cannot for less be told.’’
LTerbert.

LONDON:

tT. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW:
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

MDCCCLXI.






CONTENTS.

Chapter. Page,
I. THE OLD AND THE NEw, eee eee vee ar 1

Il. Tue Lity anp Tre Tuory, ... “ee eee 18
III. HeARING AND Done, eee 100 eee ese 35
IV. SELF-WILL, aes oon eee soe eee 54
V. THE WANDERING LAmp, son aoe a ose 69
VI. Tie ConQUEST, ... oes eve eee os 89
VIT. Tur DISAPPOINTMENT, — eee eee oes e» 100
VIIT. PLEASING CHRIST, eee ese eee -. «©1118
1X. Tre CHRIsSTIAN’s MOTIVE, .... we bac vee =: 126

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CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLE
IN LITTLE THINGS.

CHAPTER I.

THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“Emma, did you look into the geography
when you answered the question that Mary
Green missed ?”

An indignant blush spread over the face of
Emma Alston. |

“What do you mean, Julia Summers?”

“Don’t look at me so. I don't mean any
harm,” said the young girl who was addressed
as Julia Summers. “I don’t believe you
looked in the book; but some one said you
did, and I thought I would ask you.”

“ Who said I did ?”
~ “Mary Green.”

“Did Mary Green say so?”

1



2 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“She said she was quite sure you stole.a
look into the book before you answered.”

Emma’s face was again crimsoned with
indignation, and with anger too. “The mean,
contemptible girl!” she said. “Mary Green
knew I didn’t look in the book. She knew
there was not a word of truth in what she
said.”

“Now, Emma, you are really a little too
severe,’ said Julia. “I don’t think Mary
would say what she knew to be an un-
truth. I daresay she thought you looked in
the book. I suppose she was so vexed at
missing the question herself. that she could
not see very straight. I suspect she looked
through coloured glasses, as mother sometimes
tells me I do when things don’t go right.”

“It was very untruthful in her to say I
looked in the book.”

“JT am sorry I told you of it,” said Julia.
“T would not if I had known it would make
you so angry. I would not mind it so much,
if I were you.”

“Do you think you would like to be
accused of such a mean, contemptible thing?”

“TI don’t suppose I should like it. But then



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 3

it need not trouble you so very much. Not
one of the girls will believe it. They know
it is not like you. Whatever faults you may
have, they know very well that you are above
such little, mean deceptions. Even Mary
Green won’t believe it herself to-morrow, when
she comes to reason; I am sure she won't.”

“But she had no business to say such a
thing,—the hateful creature!” said Emma, her
passion steadily rising at the thought of the
wrong that had been done her, and of the
mean and ungenerous action of which she had
been accused. “I wili never forget it as long
as I live.” |

Julia Summers looked surprised. After a
moment's silence she said seriously, “I should
not have thought you would have said that.”

“Why not?”

“You know why.”

An expression flitted across Emma’s face,
indicating a consciousness of the nature of the
“why” alluded to by her companion. She
replied, half-angrily, half apologetically, “But
it is So very provoking.”

This conversation teok place while Emma
and Julia were vatunine Tro school. Having



4 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

reached the gate of Mr. Alston’s house, the
two girls separated.

Emma hastened to her own room, and there —
sat down to think over in solitude what she
had just heard. Her anger was not softened
by these solitary meditations. On the con-
trary, for a timé it rose higher and higher.
Emma was naturally high-spirited. She
scorned what she considered a mean action.
To be accused of an act which she regarded as
very mean was more than she could bear, and
a temper easily irritated was fully aroused.
She sat for some time nursing her resentment,
and fanning the flames she should have sup-
pressed, resolving that she would not speak to
Mary Green for a week, and that she would
never forget it.

While thus engaged she heard the voice of
her Aunt Fanny calling to her from the foot
the stairs.

“Emma! Emma! are you not coming
down?” she said.

Her aunt’s cheerful tones—for very cheer-
ful they were——chafed instead of soothing the
disturbed spirit of Emma, who was half angry
that any one should be cheerful when she was



THE OLD AND THE NEw. 5

so very wretched. Prompted by this feeling,
she made no reply to her aunt’s call.

“Are you not coming down, Emma?” said
Miss Alston again, after waiting a moment
for an answer. “ We have some news for you.
Come,— hear what it is.” |

“JT don’t want to hear any news,” said
Emma, impatiently.

“What! not good news?”

“Not now. I only want to be let alone,”
said Emma, in the same tone.

Emma felt, some wish to know what the
good news was; but she would not yield to it.
It might restore cheerfulness to her mind; and,
like many others in similar circumstances, she
was perversely determined not to be happy
then, Because another had wronged her and
made her unhappy, she would make herself
far more wretched, by yielding to a spirit of
bitter resentment.

Her aunt, seeing the mood she was in, left
her to herself, and the storm raged on. But,
like all storms, its fury was spent at last, and
then there was a calm. In the lull Emma
heard a still, small voice in her soul whisper-
ing, “ Doest thou well to be angry?” “ But



6 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

it is so provoking:” replied the spirit of self-
justification. But the voice, unheeding the
extenuation, again demanded, “Doest thou
well to be angry ?”

Next the words of Julia Summers occurred
to Emma’s mind,-—“I should not have thought
you would have said that.”

“ What did I say ?”’ Emma now asked her-
self. She had been thinking only ef what
Mary Green had said of her. Now conscience
demanded that she should take a candid re-
view of what she had said of Mary Green.
She had keenly felt the injustice of Mary’s
accusation ; but was it not at least possible
that she had herself been equally unjust? She
had asserted that her school-fellow knew that
she did not look in the book,—that she knew
she was saying what was not true. This cer-
tainly was a very grave charge ; and was she
sure it was just? How would she like to be
accused of falsehood while making a statement
which she believed to be true? If this accusa-
tion was unjust, was it not worse than that
which had produced such a tumult of anger
and indignation in her own breast ?

Again, had she not said that she would



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 7

never forget it? What was this but say-
ing that she would never forgive Mary ?
How then could she pray that night, “Forgive
me my debts, as I forgive my debtors?” The
tables were now fairly turned, and anger had
giver. way to self-reproach. In this state of
mina Emma took up her Bible, and the first
passage which met her eye was this: “There-
fore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a
certain king, which would take account of his
servants. And when he had begun to reckon,
one was brought unto him which owed him
ten thousand talents: but, forasmuch as he
had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be
sold, and his wife and children, and all that he
had, and payment to be made. The servant
therefore fell down and worshipped him, say-
ing, Lord, have patience with me, and I will
pay thee all. Then the lord of that servant
was moved with compassion, and loosed him,
and forgave him the debt. But the same
_ servant went out, and found one of his fellow-
servants, which owed him an hundred pence ;
and he laid hands on him, and took him by the
throat, saying, Pay me that thou owest. And
his fellow-servant fell down at his feet, and



8 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

besought him, saying, Have patience with me,
and I will pay thee all. And he would not;
but went and cast him into prison, till he
should pay the debt. So when his fellow-
servants saw what was done, they were very
sorry, and came and told unto their lord all
that was done. Then his lord, after that he
had called him, said unto him, O thou wicked
servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because
thou desiredst me: shouldest not thou also have
had compassion on thy fellow-servant, even as
I had pity on thee? And his lord was wroth,
and delivered him to the tormentors, till he
should pay all that was due unto him. So
likewise shall my heavenly Father do also
unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not
every one his brother their trespasses,”’
Kmma’s eyes were blinded by tears ere she
had completed the reading of this passage.
She saw in this parable, as in a mirror, her
own conduct and the guilt of an unforgiving
spirit. Very fresh in her mind was the re-
membrance of that time, not many months
ago, when she first felt the greatness of her
sins and her need of forgiveness. How much,
as she hoped, had been forgiven her! How



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 9

then could she say of a trifling—or even of
any—offence, “I cannot forgive or forget it?”

“How very wrong I have been!” was now
her silent confession. “ How could I beso re-
sentful and unforgiving? It was, after all, only |
a trifle that I was called upon to forgive, while
I have had so much forgiven. No wonder
Julia said that she did not expect this from
me.” In tears and prayers of humble peni-
tence, Emma sought the forgiveness of her
Saviour, feeling that she could now from the
heart forgive Mary Green.

Her feelings were only partially calmed
when the tea-bell rang. Emma knew that
her father always required punctuality at
meals, and she hastened down to take her
place at the table. Only her father and her
aunt were there. Her two younger sisters,
Mary and Grace, were spending the day with
their cousin Susie,

“Tt seems you did not think the news I
brought worth coming down to hear?” said her
father, after they had been seated a short time.

Emma blushed. She did not know that her
father was in the house, and that he had heard
her impatient answer to her aunt's call.



10 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“ What news, father?” she said.

“What news, eh ?” said her father, smiling.
“You would like to know, would you? Well,
I came home half an hour before the usual time
for the pleasure of telling you, and then you
would not even come down to hear it.”

“YT didn’t know you were in the house,
father.”’

“ But you did know that your aunt called
you to come down. I have half a mind not
to tell you what it is.”

Had Emma felt as she did on her return
from school, she would probably have brought
forward some plea of self-justification. Such
might have been the case had only self-
reproach succeeded to this state of mind; for
self-reproach and penitence are very different
things. But Emma was now really penitent
and humbled, and, like all true penitents, was
ready to acknowledge the wrong she had done. |

“T own that I was sadly out of temper
then, dear father,’ she said. “I know I ‘don’t
deserve to hear the news; but I should very
much like to know what it is, if you are
willing to tell me.”

“You shall know, my dear,” said Mr. Alston,



THE OLD AND THE NEW. Il

kindly; for he was pleased to see his daughter
acknowledge her error so frankly. “Mr. D.
returned from N. this afternoon, He saw
Lewis, and learned from him that he intends
to come home next week to spend three
months with us.”

“Coming home next week to stay three
months !’’ repeated Emma, slowly, as if she
could not at once realize all that-the words
meant. -
“Yes, my dear. What do you say to that ?”

“JT am very, very glad,” said Emma, a
bright smile lighting: up her face; “but some-
how I think I don’t more than half believe it.
It is too good to believe. Three long months!
Only think of 18! Why has he not told us
before? Why has he not written us about
it?” -

“He made up his mind orily the day before
he saw Mr. D. Some circumstances have oc-
curred leading him to change his plans. He
thinks he can pursue his studies to advantage
at home for the next three months. For my
own part, | am very well pleased that he has
come to this decision. He has not been at
home for more than a week at a time for



12 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

years ; and I think this long visit may prove
of advantage in many ways.”

Emma’s face now assumed a grave—almost
troubled—expression; and as soon as tea was
over, she returned again to her own room.

172

“Three months! Three long months!” she
murmured, as she seated herself at the little
table, upon which her Bible still lay open at
the passage she had been reading. She cast
her eyes upon it and heaved a deep sigh.

“Dear brother Lewis!” she said. “I am
sure I am glad—very glad; and yet I don’t feel
glad, either. How much he will find out about
me in that long three months——how many
things I could wish that he should never know!
What would he have thought had he been
here to-night? I am sorry that I ever wrote
that letter. I am sure he will not believe it,
after he has been here much less than three
months. He will expect so much and find so
little.” |

To explain that letter, which was now the
occasion of so much regret, it will be necessary
to give the reader something of the history of
Emma Alston. “Emma was motherless, as we
have said. She had two sisters, younger than



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 13

herself,— Mary and Grace, Her only brother,
Lewis, was her senior by a number of years,
The place of mother had been in some measure
supplied by her Aunt Fanny, her father’s
sister.

Though Lewis was Emma’s only brother,
she had in fact seen very little of him. An
uncle, after whom he was named, and who was
more abundantly supplied with this world’s
wealth than his father, had, years before,
undertaken to educate Lewis. He had left
home to reside with his uncle when his eldest
sister was very young; and from that time
only brief visits were made to his paternal
home. During these visits he had always
treated his sisters very kindly, and done much
to make himself beloved by them. Emma
loved him dearly, and, besides, was very proud
of him; for she had not failed to discover
what every one else knew, that he was a
young man of great promise.

But his last visit, six months before, had
differed from any that had:preceded it. He
had come home the same, yet not thesame. A
new love had been enkindled in his heart,—a
love for Him who is altogether lovely. It was





Page
Missing
or
Unavailable



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 15

instruction at home and in the Sunday school,
and the voice of conscience and the whispers
of the Spirit had often been heard in her |
heart. But after this last visit from her
brother her thoughts dwelt more frequently
on these themes. Words which he had dropped
occasionally were often recalled, together with
the tone and manner which had given them
their impressiveness.

Emma now read the Bible a great deal, and
often prayed to be led by the Spirit and
taught how to become a child of God. We
will not follow her mind through all its
struggles at this period, but will simply state
that after a time the hope dawned upon her
soul that she had become a lamb of the Saviour’s
flock,

About four weeks previous to this evening,
she had written to her brother; and that letter
had contained an intimation of this hope.
This was the letter which Emma now wished
had never been written. A few further par-
ticulars of Emma’s history will explain this
wish.

Emma’s: mother died when she was quite
young. From that time she and her sisters



16 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

had been under the care of her Aunt Fanny.
This aunt was very fond of her brother's
children and assiduous in her attentions to
their many wants. But she was often unduly
indulgent, and destitute of the firmness and
decision necessary to secure the obedience and
subdue the will of her little charge.

Under this inefficient discipline, the natural
faults of Emma’s disposition rapidly developed.
She was often selfish, self-willed, and irritable.
At this period many of the acts proceeding
from this disposition had become fixed habits
of sturdy growth. When Emma first indulged
the hope that she had become a Christian, she
flattered herself that she should at once be-
come changed in all these respects. But she
soon learned her error. Fixed habits were
not to be so easily uprooted and overcome.
Of this she had that night had one sad proof.
Many similar proofs she had had of the weak-
ness of her best resolutions and the power of
sin in her soul. -

Had Emma the night previous been in-
formed of her brother’s expected visit, pro-
bably no sad thoughts would have mingled
with her joyful anticipations ; but now her



THE OLD AND THE NEW. 17

mind was oppressed with sorrow and dis-
couragement. Before she left the tea-table
the question. suggested itself, “ Could Lewis
believe that I am a Christian, had he seen me
to-night and known how I felt on my return
from school ?”

It was under the influence of this feeling
that Emma wished the letter had not been
written which made her brother acquainted
with the new hope that had sprung up in her
heart. She felt sure that in this long visit he
would see much that was wrong in her dis-
position and conduct; and what would he think
of her? In answer she had received a kind,
brotherly letter, which she had cherished as a
precious treasure, and had read over and over
many times.

Another week passed, and the appointed
day brought Lewis Alston to his home. Emma
received him with unmingled pleasure ; for
the feelings of that night had passed away.



18 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

CHAPTER II.

THE LILY AND THE THORN.

For a week all went on very smoothly.
Kmma had ever been desirous of securing
her brother’s good opinion and approbation.
During his very brief visits at home, she had
been accustomed to put a double guard upon
herself, that he might not see anything to
disapprove. She had usually been pretty suc-
cessful. He had never remained long enough
for the novelty aud the restraint of his pre-
sence to wear away. To this, probably, her
success was mainly owing. She was not less
eager to secure his good opinion at the present
time; but the length of his stay made the task
more difficult. The passions which could be
kept under strong restraint for a week might
rebel were the term of this restraint lengthened.
And so, indeed, it proved.

“Where is my dress, Bridget ?” said Emma,
as she entered the laundry one morning, ten
days after her brother’s arrival,

“In the basket,” said Bridget, shortly.

*In the basket!” repeated Emma, her



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 19

cheeks reddening. “I told you to iron it
yesterday.”

“TI didn’t know you were my mistress,”
was the impertinent reply. .

The flush of anger deepened on Emma’s
face.

“How provoking!” she said. “I want
that dress to put on this minute. Why didn't
you iron it yesterday?”

“T could only do half the ironing yesterday.”

“ But you might have ironed that. I told
you to do it.”

“TI know you did. Maybe if you had
asked me it would have been done.”

“ You lazy creature !” said Emma, losing all
temper. “If I were Aunt Fanny, you should
not stay in the house another day.”

“That's true enough ; for then I wouldn’t
stay in the house another day,” said Bridget,
coolly.

“ Hold your tongue !” said Emma, who was
now so angry that she hardly knew what she
said, , :
At this moment she heard a step behind
her. Turning, she saw her brother, who was
passing the door on his way to the garden.



20 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

“What is the matter, Emma?” he asked,
calmly.

She was too angry then to feel any mortifi-
cation ; and she began, in an excited manner,
to tell him how impertinently she had been
treated by Bridget. .

“T can’t wait to hear all the story now,” he
said, after listening a moment. “I have a
letter to write before the mail goes out. You
will find me in the arbour in the garden just
an hour from this time,” he added, taking out
his watch. “Suppose we make an appoint-
ment to meet there; and then I will hear all
you have to say about this affair which has
disturbed you so much, Will you come ?”

“Yes,” said Emma, now partially quieted
by the calmness of her brother’s manner.

As the dress was not to be had, Emma went
up to her room, without saying anything more
to Bridget. At first she felt very angry ; but
soon feelings of anger were exchanged for
those of self-reproach by a process similar to
that which took place when she was so angry
with Mary Green. Calm reflection showed
her that she had herself been much to blame.
In the first place, she had aroused Bridget’s



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 21

natural obstinacy by imperiously ordering her
to iron the dress; and then she had become
very angry at the fruit of her own folly.
Viewing the matter in this light, she began to
feel exceedingly mortified that her brother had
overheard (as she supposed) her violent. lan-
guage to Bridget. Then she began to dread
the meeting in the arbour. What would he
think of her? What would he say to her?
At last she determined not to go there at ail,
though she was not quite clear that this was
exactly right.

She did not see Lewis again till dinner-
time ; and then she carefully avoided meeting
his eye.

“Stop a moment, Emma,” he said to her,
as she was passing him in the hall after dinner.
“You didn’t meet me in the arbour this
morning.”

“No,” said Emma, colouring.

“Why not? Didn’t you promise me you
would ?”

“T know it, but—but— ”

“ But what ?”

Emma blushed still more deeply.

“JT didn’t feel inclined to do it, and I sup-



92 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

posed there was no obligation to do so,” she
said, hesitatingly.

-“Ts not one under obligation to do what
one agrees to do?”

“To tell the truth, Lewis, I was ashamed
to go,” replied Emma, feeling that something
must be said in explanation of her conduct.

“JT think one ought to do what one agrees
to do, even if it does not happen to be quite
agreeable,” said her brother gravely.

“Tam sorry I didn’t keep my word with
you. Please excuse me this time, won't
you?”

“ But are you sorry 2?”

“To be sure I am.”

“Then prove it, will you, by meeting me
there at three o'clock. I have something I
wish to say to you.”

Emma would gladly have excused herself
from this appointment, but she did not see how
she could; so she agreed to do as her brother
wished. She felt very unhappy till the
arrival of the appointed hour. Lewis had
something to say to her. What was it?
Would he reprove her? He had never done
so; but then she had never given him such



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 93

occasion—had never so laid herself open to
reproof. Again she thought of that letter,
and wished she had not written it. She felt
sure her brother must think she was greatly
self-deceived. She was very unhappy—at
that moment wretched and unhappy rather
than truly penitent ; for she thought more of
her brother's opinion of her than of the judg-
ment of her Lord and Saviour.

At three o’clock she repaired to the arbour.
Lewis was not there; but a moment after she
heard him open the garden-gate. He paused
by a bed of lilies and gathered some.

“You are true to your engagement this
time,” he said, as he approached.

He sat down by Emma's side, and placed
the lilies in her hand.

“They are delicate and beautiful, are they
not?” he said.

The kind, gentle tone in which this question
was asked reassured Emma. It did not seem
at all like an introduction to a reproof. She
looked up into -his face, and, smiling faintly,
replied,—

“Yes, very.”

Her brother smiled too.



24 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

“Do you know who has said, ‘ I am the rose
of Sharon and the lily of the valley?’” he
asked, after a moment’s silence.

The question was put in that deep, musical
voice which had so much of soul in it, and
which always vibrated along the chords of
Emma's heart.

“Yes,” said Emma softly, “it is Jesus.”

“This is what he says of himself. Do you
know what he says of his people?” he asked,
in the same tone. . “This is what he says—
“As the lily among thorns, so is my love
among the daughters. The lily has no
thorns, you know. It may be pricked and
torn, but it cannot tear and prick in return.
So it was with the Lily of the Valley:
‘Though he was reviled, he reviled not again;
though he suffered, he threatened not.’ So it
is with all his lilies in proportion as they are
like him. Christ’s lilies should have no
thorns with which to prick and wound. They
may be among thorns, but they should not be
thorns themselves. Does my dear sister wish ~
to be one of Christ’s lilies ? ”

Emma had hid her face in her hands, and
now she sobbed aloud.



THE LILY AND THE THORN. _ 25

“T knew it would be so,” she said at last,
restraining her tears.

“Knew it would be how?”

Emma hesitated, and then resolved to free
her mind. |

“I knew when you came I should be sorry
I had written you that letter.”

“What letter ?”’

“The last letter I wrote you.”

“What! that welcome letter which told me
you hoped that Christ had become your Friend
and Saviour. I trust you do not regret that
choice.”

“That is not what I mean. But I have so
many faults. When you learn how many
faults I have, I fear that you will not believe
that I love the Saviour.”

“You are thinking of the thorns.”

“Yes, Lewis, I am not a harmless lily. I
have many thorns, and they often wound and
pierce my friends.”’

“ And yourself too.”

“ Ah, that they do.”

“ Did you hear all I said to Bridget?” asked
Emma timidly, after a moment's silence.

“T heard quite enough.”



26 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

Emma’s tears flowed afresh.

“QO Lewis, what did you think?” she
said.

“T thought, of course, that you were very
much to blame. I thought the thorn was very
visible. I thought, too, if Christ was changing
that thorn into one of the lilies, you would
soon feel very sorry for this outburst’ of
passion.”

“T am sorry, dear brother. But I do wrong
so often that I sometimes fear it is all wrong
with me.”

Lewis drew Emma close to his side, and
said tenderly, “ My dear sister, don’t you think
the Lord Jesus knows what thorns he has
undertaken to transform into lilies? Don’t you
think he knows all he undertakes to do when
he invites poor, wretched sinners to come to
him and be saved?”

“Then you are not quite discouraged about
me? ” said Emma, looking up doubtingly into
her brother’s face.

“No, Emma; and what is better still, and
much more to the point, 1 don’t think the
Lord Jesus Christ will cast you off. His
patience with us poor, wayward sinners is



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 27

wonderful. Hear what he has promised to do
for those who believe in him.”

Lewis took his Bible from his pocket, and
read—“ That he might present it to himself
a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle,
or any such thing; but that it should be holy
and without blemish.”

“This, dear Emma,” he said, “is what we
shall be when the work which Christ will do
for us is completed. You must remember this
work has a small beginning, like a grain of
mustard-seed ; but in the end it is a great
tree. Doubtless you have many faults, though
I have been with you so little I have dis-
covered only a few of them. The question is
not if you have faults, but how do you treat
these faults? How do you feel in relation to
them ?” |

“T think 1 am very sorry when I do wrong
said Emma ; “ but the worst of it is, my SOLTOW
does not tevent me from doihg wrong again.
I was angry with one of my school-fellows
about a week before you came home, and said
some severe things about her. I was after-
wards so sorry that I thought I never should
do the same thing again. But this morning



28 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

I was very angry with Bridget. I am
atraid, after all, 1 am not very different from
what I used to be; I do so many of the same
wrong things.”

“Let us look a little further into this sub-
ject,” said Lewis, “and see in what respects
you are the same that you used to be, and in
what you are changed. Will you give me all
the particulars of the event which happened
the week before I came home? I have special
reasons for making this request.”

Emma complied with her brother’s wishes.

“I suppose,” said Lewis, when she had told
the story, “that at first you felt towards Mary
very much as you would have felt a year ago,
had the same thing happened then.”

“T think I did—just the same.”

“Then so far there was no change. Now
let us inquire into your feelings and conduct
afterwards, when you had had time for reflec-
tion. I wish you to take a careful review of
these, and then tell me if they were in any
way different from what they would have been
a year before.”

“TI felt very sorry for my angry feelings,”
said Emma, after a thoughtful silence. “1



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 29

remembered how much I hoped had been for-
‘ given me, and felt how wrong it was not to
forgive. Ishould not have had these feelings
a year ago. Then, when father reproved me
at the tea-table, I freely confessed that I had
done wrong, instead of justifying myself by
relating the provocation I had received, as I
should once have done. The next day I
treated Mary Green as kindly as I could, and
told Julia Summers that I was sorry for what
I had said about her.”

“Then it seems there are indications of
some kind of a change, even in this incident,
which you justly regard as a sad fall into sin.
All are sinners; but the Bible divides man-
kind into two classes—penitent and impeni-—
tent sinners. When Christians fall into sin,
they are truly penitent for it, while others are
not. Others may be sorry they have done
wrong, for many reasons, but they are not
truly penitent. God alone can read your
heart, my dear Emma, and see whether it is a
truly penitent one; but I hope that you were
truly penitent for your anger towards Mary
Green.”

« At the time I thought I was very sorry,’



30 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

said Emma, “and I meant to be very watchful,
and hoped that I should not soon be angry
again,”

“On what ground did you hope so? Was
it that you intended to be very watchful and
careful ?” |

“T suppose so.”

“Then I think you may here find the chief
cause of your failure. Do you think that all
your watchfulness and care can change the
thorn into a lily.” |

“No; but must I not be careful and watch-
ful?”

“Certainly ; but you must not trust in that
care and watchfulness—you must not rely
upon them as your security. Let me illustrate
this by supposing a case. Let me suppose
that you were involved in a lawsuit in which
a great deal of property was at stake—indeed,
all that you possessed in the world. We will
suppose it to be a very intricate case—one in
which there are many papers to be examined,
and many puzzling questions to be settled.
We will suppose that you understand very
little about the matter, and that the case seems
to you involved in inextricable confusion. You



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 3l

know not how to take even the first step to
get out of your difficulties.

“ At this juncture, a person in. whom you

have perfect confidence steps forward and
offers to take the case into hisown hands. He
reminds you that you do not understand the
subject, and are ignorant what steps to take.
He assures you that he is perfectly acquainted
with the case, and knows exactly what must
be done to secure a favourable issue; and he
engages to bring you safe through, if you will
trust the business with him, and agree care-
fully to obey all his directions. Sensible of
your own weakness and helplessness, you
gladly accept of this offer.
_ “ By-and-by he puts some papers into your
hands, directing you to make a fair and legible
copy of them. You set about the task ear-
nestly and diligently, and take much pains to
have the work welldone. But would you rely
for the success of your cause on: the correct
copying of these papers?”

“Certainly not. All my hope of success
would rest on the skill and faithfulness of the
friend who had undertaken my case.”

“Suppose you should reason that, as all



32 THE LILY AND THE THORN,

your hope of success rested on that friend, it
was of no consequence if you did copy the
papers negligently and incorrectly ?”

“That would be most base and ungrateful.
Besides, the agreement was, not only that I
should trust the case entirely in his hands, but
also that I should implicitly obey his directions.”

“Then your duty would be to copy the
papers carefully and correctly ?”

“ Certainly.”

“ But while doing this, your whole reliance
would be upon your friend, and what he had
undertaken to do for you, and not upon the
way in which you discharged this duty.”

“That is very plain.”

“Yet is there not one sense in which your
success would depend upon your obedience to
the directions of your friend ?”

“T think there is,” said Emma thoughtfully.
“Tf I refused to submit to his direction, I
should have reason te expect that he would
abandon my cause.’

“You would also expect that your ror
would have its place in securing the desired
result, but only as an instrument which he
would employ and guide to that end.”



THE LILY AND THE THORN. 33

“That, too, is very plain.”

“Now, this is an imperfect illustration of
the relation in which you stand to Him whom
you have chosen for your Saviour and Friend.
You have trusted your case to him. You
have put the thorn into his hands to form it
into a lily. That is his work,—not yours.
You struggle with your evil passions and
mourn over your ill success. It is as if you
took the thorn into your hand, and said dis-
consolately, ‘Ah, I never can make it a lily.’
It is true that you never can; but Christ can.
You have forgotten that this work is his, and
have been trying to do it yourself. You can
no more re-create your soul in God’s image than
you could create it at first. Of all Christ’s
lihes it is true that they are ‘born not of
blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the
will of man, but of God.’

“But you may ask, ‘If Christ must do so
much, what have 1 to do?’ Just what you
had to do in the case supposed,—obey his
directions. One of these is, ‘Watch and pray,
that ye enter not into temptation.’ If you
obey, he will employ that watchfulness and

prayer as one of the instrumentalities by
3



34 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

which he will change the thorn into a lily.
But you must not trust in these. You must
trust only in Him into whose hands you have
put your case. It is by this united trust and
obedience that we gain the victory over sin.
Our resolutions to watch and pray must be
coupled with a sincere reliance upon Christ as
our Almighty Helper. Was it not here that
you failed the other day?” .

“TIT am afraid I relied too much on the
watchfulness I intended to exercise.”

-“ This isa very common mistake. While you
watch and strive against sin, never forget who
it is that has undertaken your cause. Rest
all your hopes of success on what he will do
in and for you. Watch and pray in the same
spirit in which you would obey the directions
of your friend in the case I have supposed.
You will then find that you do get the victory
over sin and are becoming more like Christ ;
_ and the rapidity of the change will be in pro-
“ cannot separate true faith and obedience.
They always go together. In the case I have
supposed, you would expect your friend to
cast you off if you refused to obey his direc-



HEARING AND DOING. 35

tions. So Jesus Christ will have nothing to
do with those who will not honestly strive to
obey him. It is in vain that we profess to
trust him if we do not obey him; yet it is by
a simple reliance upon him that we obtain
grace to obey his commandments.”

CHAPTER IIL

HEARING AND DOING.

THE next day was the Sabbath. In the after-
noon the minister preached from the words,
“For even Christ pleased not himself.” It
was a seasonable lesson, and moved Emma’s
feelings very much.

“ Haven't we had a good sermon this after-
noon?” said she to her brother, after their
return from church.

“ Yes, a very good sermon,” said Lewis,
his countenance beaming with an expression
manifesting his appreciation of it.

“Tf it were only Sunday every day,” said
Emma, “and we could hear such sermons as
that, I think we might grow good very fast.” |



36 HEARING AND DOING.

Lewis smiled ; but there was something in
the smile that said, “1 am not of your opi-
nion ;’ and Emma so construed it.

“Don’t you think so?” she asked.

“T do not.” | | .
“Why not? When I hear such sermons it
seems as if they took away all wrong feelings
_ out of my heart. If I could only hear them

every day!”

“Then perhaps you might not discover your
mistake, which would be a great calamity.”

“What mistake?” said Emma, looking a
little puzzled.

“The mistake of supposing that listening to
such truth will do the work of removing wrong
thoughts and feelings from your heart.”

“But will not the preaching of the gospel
dothis? I thought that was the design of it.”

“Did you notice Mr. N. ?”

“Yes; he slept during the whole of the
sermon.”

‘Do you think the preaching of the gospel
this afternoon had any effect to make him
better ?”’

“Of course not,” said Emma, smiling; “ for
he did not hear it.”





HEARING AND DOING. 27

“Then hearing is necessary, if we would be
profited 2?”

“ Certainly.”

“Ts that all that is required ?”

“We must hear with earnest attention.”

“Ts that all?”

“T suppose we must hear not only with
attention, but with pleasure.”

“And is that all?” repeated her brother
earnestly.

Again Emma looked puzzled, and this time
did not reply.

“As you cannot answer the question, we
~ must look elsewhere for an answer,’ said her
brother. ‘I think we can find it here,” he
continued, taking out his Bible and opening
it. “The Apostle James tells us very plainly
that something more is wanted. This is what
he says: ‘But be ye doers of the word, and
not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.
For if any man be a hearer of the word, and
not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his
natural face in a glass: for he beholdeth him-
self, and goeth his way, and straightway for-
getteth what manner of man he was. But
whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty,

—



38 HEARING AND DOING.

and continueth therein, he being not a foreet-
ful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man
shall be blessed in his deed.’

“In this passage you will find the reason
why I do not think we should become good by
being always employed in listening to sermons.
If such a thing were possible, how should we
ascertain whether we were doers or only hearers
of the word? By ‘hearers,’ I suppose the
apostle means those who listen to the word with
attention and even with pleasure and delight.
But he plainly tells us that among those
hearers there are two classes. The one class
ONLY hear. They do not go home to practise
what they hear. They may enjoy and admire
the sermon, and perhaps wish they could listen
to such a one every day. But during the
week, when the occasion comes that the sermon
should be remembered and reduced to practice,
they do not think of it then. They are for-
getful hearers, and might see themselves in
this mirror: ‘For he beholdeth himself, and
goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth
what manner of man he was.’

“The other class also listen with pleasure
and delight. But they do more than this.



HEARING AND DOING. 39

They hide the word in their hearts, and, as
occasion offers, they try to practise it. They
answer to the description, ‘ But whoso looketh
into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth
therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a
doer of the work, this man shall be blessed
in his deed.’

“Our Saviour described these two classes
of hearers in his parable of the sower. In
that parable he tells us of those who heard
the word with joy and yet were not doers of
the word. ‘They brought forth no fruit. But
he describes another class, who received the
word into good ground, and brought forth
fruit, some a hundred-fold, some sixty, some
thirty.

“Jt is not when listening to the word that
we are most likely to discover to which of
these two classes we belong. I suppose you
have sometimes thought that the trials, cares,
and temptations of the week are a great hin-
drance to your being good. Isn’t it so ?”

“Yes, Lewis ; I have often thought so.”

“Yet these trials and temptations are just
what you need to prove whether you are a
hearer only or a doer of the word. If these



40 HEARING AND DOING.

are met in a right spirit, they will greatly ad-
vance your progress in holiness. The doing
of the work is as necessary to the growth of
grace in the soul as the hearing of it on the
Sabbath. When we hear such a sermon.as it
has been our privilege to listen to this after-
noon, we should hide it in our hearts and
seek for occasions to practise it during the
week.”

“Now I shall havetwo hours—two full hours
—all to myself; and that will be long enough to
read this book quite through,” said Emma, the
next Wednesday afternoon, as she seated her-
self by the pleasant window of the upper hall,
with a book which her cousin Mary had that
day lent to her.

She had read the first chapter, had decided
that the book promised to be very interesting,
and was eagerly dipping into chapter second,
when her ear caught the sound of pattering
footsteps on the stairs. She did not feel very
amiable at the prospect of an interruption,
and mentally exclaimed, “There's Grace!
What a little torment she is sometimes! She
has come to tease me for something, I daresay.



HEARING AND DOING, 41

That’s always the way when I don’t want to
be interrupted !”

By the time this soliloquy was ended, Grace,
with a skip, hop, and jump, had reached her
sister's side.

“O Emma,” she said,—her round, dimpled
face flushed with pleasurable excitement,—
“vou don’t know what grand times we are
having this afternoon! Cousin Susie wants us
to play that Miss Kate [Grace’s favourite doll]
is going to be married. Isn’t it funny? We
are going to call on the bride and bring her
presents, you know, and have such an amusing
game, and we want you to come to the play-
room and help to dress Miss Kate.”

All this was said with breathless eagerness,
and then little C:ace paused. There were two
reasons for this. The first was want of breath
to say more; the second, a chill of disappoint-
ment as she observed that Emma, who had
raised her eyes from her book only for an in-
stant, was now absorbed in it again, and ap-
parently altogether unmindful of what she was
saying. |

But Grace was not so easily baffled when
she had once set her heart upon obtaining



42 HEARING AND DOING.

an object. After taking breath, she pulled
Emma’s dress, and said, imploringly,—

“Now, do come, Emma. That’s a dear, good
sister. It will take you only a very little
while.”

“Don’t you see I am busy, Grace? Come,
go away, and don’t tease me.”

“Now, Emma, do come. We want you so
much !”

The tones were very moving, and the blue
eyes were already swimming at the thought
of disappointment.

“T am sure, Grace, you and Susie and
Mary can manage to dress your doll without
me.”

“So we could other days; but you know
Kate is a bride to-day, and we want her to
look very nice. We don’t know how to dress
brides.”

There was a look of grave concern on the
little upturned face which would have pro-
voked a smile from one less annoyed than
Emma. The urgency of little Grace was not
without its effect even upon her. She wavered
for a moment, looked first into the blue eyes
which were watching her as earnestly as if



HEARING AND DOING. 43

the fate of a kingdom depended on her deci-
sion, and then at the book in her hand. The
last look decided the question, and decided it
in favour of self-pleasing.

“No, I can’t go,” she said. ‘“ You must
dress your own dolls.”

“Oh, don’t say so! We won’t ask you to
stay long—only a very, very little while.”

“ Misfortunes never come single,” is an old
adage. Whether it be true or not, it is certain
that sins never do. With this decision on the
part of Emma to please herself came an in-
creased feeling cf vexation at Grace for inter-
rupting her quiet.

“Go away, you little torment!” she said,
quite angrily. “I tell you I will not be in-
terrupted.”

At this moment Emma heard her brother
coming up stairs. He crossed the hall and
went into his own room, without seeming to
notice either herself or Grace.

The big tears rolled down the cheeks of
little Grace, as she turned slowly from her
sister. Thicker and faster they came as she
descended the stairs. When she reached the
foot, they broke out into sobs which came up



44 HEARING AND DOING,

from the very bottom of the heart, that was
not yet used to disappointment. To her the
bridal dress of doll Kate was a matter of as
grave importance as her own might be some
years hence. She threw herself down on the
lowest step and sobbed and cried for a few
minutes. ‘Then she arose, and, brushing away
the tears, went to inform Susie and Mary of
the ill success of her mission.

“ Never mind,” said the independent Susie.
“We can dress Kate without any of Emma’s
help. If she doesn’t choose to come, let her
stay away.”

“ But she would have made Kate look so
nice,” sobbed the still grieved child.

“Tam sure Kate will look very nice with-
out any of her help,” said Susie with an in-
dependent toss of her head, as she proceeded
to search Mary’s work-basket for a needle and
thread, with which to work out the fulfilment
of her own prophecy.

Emma tried to be deaf to the sobs of her
little sister, as they came up to her from the
foot of the stairs. But they reached her ears
in spite of her, and, what was still more
annoying, they reached her conscience also.



HEARING AND DOING. 4S

She tried to read as if nothing had occurred
to disturb her ; but the inward monitor would
not suffer it, and she was compelled to listen
to its voice. “That act of yours,’ it said,
“was a selfish, unsisterly, unchristian act.



You may call it only child’s play,—only help-
ing to dress a doll, a very small affair, indeed.
But you know that you might have made
your little sister very happy by a trifling self-
denial, and gained a yet warmer place in her
loving little heart. Hear her sobs! Are you
not ashamed of yourself ?”

When all was quiet again, Emma tried to fix
her attention upon the book and feel the same
interest in it that she had felt before this in-
terruption ; but she could not. The honest
verdict of conscience would come between her
and it and divert her mind from the story.

At last she suffered the book to drop on ber
lap, while she fell into a fit of musing. It
was something in this way :—“TI declare it is
too bad that one can’t take a bit of comfort
when one sets out to do so, That little teaser
has contrived to get my mind off my book,
anyhow. I suppose I need not have answered
her quite so sharply ; but then it was so pro-



46 HEARING AND DOING.

voking to be interrupted. I wish Grace did
not always want something when I am par-
ticularly busy.”

In this tone, partly of vexation and partly
of self-dissatisfaction, Emma carried on a con-
versation with herself. Notwithstanding the
faithful admonition of conscience, she had no
very distinct apprehension of the wrong she
had done. She saw it just clearly enough to
produce an uneasy feeling of self-reproach,
mingled with the vexation of losing the enjoy-
ment of her bock; but no feeling of genuine
penitence was produced.

At this moment the door of her brother's
room opened, and he came into the hall. In-
stead of going down stairs, he came slowly to
the place where Emma was sitting.

“T wonder if he heard what I said to Grace?”
thought she, as he approached. She gave a
quick glance into his Tace, to see if she could
there read an.answer to this query. But she
could not. If he had heard, his face told no
tales.

“ What are you doing, Emma?” he asked.

“ Reading,” said Emma.

“ Reading?” he repeated in a sceptical tone.



HEARING AND DOING. 47

Emma blushed as she looked down upon the
book which lay half closed in her lap.

“Twas reading a short time ago,” she said;
“but I believe I was thinking just now when
you came out of your room.”

“ Do you find the book interesting?”

“T believe so. I hardly know yet.”

“Was it of that you have been thinking?”

Emma looked into her brother’s face. His
eyes were fixed upon her in a way that made
the blood rush to her face. Was he reading
her thoughts ?

“T can't say I was thinking of my book,”
she replied.

“Since that does not furnish you with sub-
jects of thought, shall I give you one?” he
asked.

Emma. assented.

Her brother took a paper from his pocket,
wrote a few words upon it, folded it several
times and handed it to Emma. He then went
‘down stairs, and was out of sight before Emma
had unfolded the paper.

It contained only five words; but the tears
came to her eyes as she read them; for they
were these,—“ Even Christ pleased not him-



43 HEARING AND DOING.

self”’—-the words of the text the last Sabbath
afternoon,—the text of the sermon to which
she had listened with so much pleasure.

All that her brother had said to her about
doing as well as hearing was at once recalled
to her mind. “A forgetful hearer,’ she mur-
mured. Where is the doing? Why did I
not think of that sermon and that text this
afternoon? JI heard the word with pleasure
and delight; but where is the fruit? How
hateful the thought of pleasing one’s self looked
to me last Sabbath afternoon, when compared
with the self-denial of the blessed Saviour!
Yet how have I pleased myself this afternoon!
If this truth had been in my heart when
Grace came to me, I could not have answered
her as I did. Lewis heard what I said to her,
no doubt, and has taken this way to reprove
ine. He could not have done it more effect-
ually than by leaving me with these words to
show me how unlike Christ I am.”

Emma’s heart was now truly melted and
penitent. While meditating in this strain, a
merry peal of laughter from the playroom
reached her ears. This aroused her.

“This is only feeling,’ she said. “Itis not



HEARING AND DOING 49

doing. Can I do anything for Grace to show
that I am sorry for my selfishness? Kate is
dressed ere this, no doubt. What can I do? Ah:
I know,” she said, after a moment’s reflection.
Brushing away the tears which still fell, she
left her seat and hastened into her own room.

She was soon surrounded with bits of silk,
ribbon and artificial flowers. Being skilful
in such work, fifteen minutes sufficed to pro-
duce a very respectable and not untasteful
article of miniature millinery, which was
desioned to be Miss Dolly’s bridal hat. She
then put on her sun-bonnet and repaired to
the place where the children were playing.
As she approached, she hid the offering she
Tad brought under her shawl.

“T have come to pay my respects to the
bride,” she said, as she drew near the group.

Grace, whose loving little heart was in-
capable of retaining for any length of time
either vexation or resentment, caught her sis-
ter’s hand.

“Tam so glad you have come!” she said
She had already quite forgiven Emma for the
disappointment she had caused, though she
had felt it keenly.



50 HEARING AND DOING.

“Ts the bride to take a wedding-tour ?”
asked Emma, as Grace led her forward to where
the doll sat in state to receive congratulations
and presents.

Mary and Grace looked as if this were some-
thing they had not thought of; but Susie
promptly answered,—

“To be sure she is. She starts to-morrow.”

“Then this will be just what she needs,”
said Emma, holding up the tiny hat.

“A bridal hat! A bridal hat!” exclaimed
all the girls at once. -

“What a beauty!” said Mary.

“Jt is just the thing,” said Susie.

“Tt is better than if she had made the
dress,” said Grace ; “for Susie did that very
nicely, but she could not make such a hat.”

“There, Miss Kate! What do you say to
that?” said Susie, holding it up before the
bride, who certainly looked at it in a very
dignified way, such as no doubt became a
bride.

“Try it on,” said Mary.

This was done; and all the girls danced with
delight to see how very becoming it was.

In the midst of the uproar, a voice was

4



HEARING AND DOING. 51

heard just behind them, asking, very plea-
santly, ‘What is all this noise about ?”

“QO Lewis,’ said Grace, bounding towards
him and catching hold of his hand, “ we are
just as happy as we can be !”

“So I should think,’ said Lewis, looking
down on her beaming face and patting her on
the cheek. “But you haven't told me yet
what all this noise is about.”

“Oh, Emma has just brought us a bridal
hat for Kate, and it is such a beauty! and I
am so glad I don’t know what to do.”

“Not a very common complaint,” said
Lewis, laughing.

“ You must come and see the bride,” said
Grace.

Lewis suffered himself to be led forward
into the presence of that dignified personage ;
and he made his little sister very happy by a
well-timed compliment on her appearance.

All this time Emma kept herself a litle
on one side,—feelings of humiliation and of
pleasure struggling for the ascendency and
by turns lighting her face with smiles and
dyeing her cheeks with blushes. At last she
ventured to raise her eyes to her brother’s



52 HEARING AND DOING,

face. Their eyes met, and he smiled. There
was something in that smile which made her
heart throb. He came up to her, and said,—

“Come with me to the house, Emma, I
think it is plain that these little folks will be
happy enough without our help the rest of the
afternoon.” He drew her hand within his
arm as he said this, and they walked towards
the house.

“Well, Emma, what do you think about
hearing and doing?” he asked.

“T forgot the doing,” said Emma, with a
shade of sadness in her tone.

“ But you remembered it after a time, and
you have made your little sisters very happy.”

“TI did not think of it till you reminded
me of it. I acted very selfishly when Grace
came to me. I please myself before I think.”

“When you are reminded of your duty, let
your action be right, as it was this afternoon.
You will find this the best of all methods for
learning to practise what you hear. There is
nothing helps the digestion of the word, so
that it will cause us to grow in grace, like the
doing of it. On the Sabbath you listened to
the doctrine that Christ pleased not himself.



HEARING AND DOING. 53

To-day, after you became sensible of your
error, you tried to follow his example. On
which occasion do you think you best pleased
your Saviour ?”

“It was but a little thing,’ said Emma ;
“only making a doll’s hat.”

“And therefore you think it so small that
your Saviour will overlook it?”

“TI don’t know. It seems like a little
thing.”

“ We make sad mistakes sometimes on this
point. Nothing can be a small thing, or an
insignificant trifle, that has an effect upon our
moral and religious character. When you
sent Grace away so roughly, it was not a trifle ;
for it involved the principle of self-pleasing.
[t showed you to be a forgetful hearer of the
truth you so much admired. It made you
unlike your Saviour.

“When you repented, and made that hat to
please your sister, 1t was not a little thing.
It was fruit from the word. It was an act
done, I trust, to please your Saviour. If so,
it could not be a trifle. Our ever-present
Saviour saw you in the midst of that playing
group as surely as he sees you in church or m



54 SELF-WILL.

your closet. If it was your desire to please
him, his approbation and his smile were there
also. ‘“ Was it a small thing to win these?”

“Oh, no,” said Emma, the tears filling her
eyes. “If I could only see what I call small
things in that light!”

“This is the ight in which they should be
viewed. ‘To please his God and his Redeemer
should be the work of the Christian’s life.
But life is mostly made up of small things.
We seldom find an opportunity to do any
great deed. But we can please Christ in small
things every day and every hour. You may
serve him in the smallest act, when it is done
with a desire to please him. By doing this
you will grow to be like him, and the thorn
will be changed into the lily.”

CHAPTER IV.

SELF-WILL.

“How would you like to take a ride with
me to-day?” said Lewis to Emma, at the



SELF-WILL. 55

breakfast-table, one morning in the course of
the next week.

“T should like it very much. Where are
you going?

“| think of riding over to visit Uncle Dennis,
and I thought you might like to go with me
to see your cousin Lucy?”

“Indeed I should.”

“ Then get ready as soon as you have finished
your breakfast ; for we must be off in an hour
at furthest.”

“Did you hear what Uncle Dennis said to
me just before we came away?” inquired
Emma of her brother, as they were returning
home at night.

“No. What was it?

“ He said he should bring Cousin Lucy over

vin a few days to spend several weeks with us.”

“Indeed! I suppose you are very glad?”

“T am glad, and yet I am sorry,” said
Emma, thoughtfully.

“And why sorry? Don’t you enjoy your
cousin Lucy’s visits?”

“Yes,—generally. We have sometimes
been very happy together ; but we don’t always
get on smootiily.”



&§ SELF-WILL

“Why not?”

“For several reasons.”

“What is one of them?”

“One of them, I think, is that Lucy likes so
very much to have her own way.”

“And another is that her cousin Emma
likes so much to have her own way too. Is it
not so?” asked Lewis, looking into his sister’s
face.

“T suppose it is,” said Emma, blushing.

“By what do you suppose your cousin Lucy
is governed, when she is mistress of her own
actions, and not controlled by circumstances
or the authority of her parents and teachers?” -

“By her own will, I think.”

“And by what is my dear sister Emma
governed?”

Emma did not reply.

“Do you know who says, ‘ My sheep hear
my voice, and I know them, and they follow
me?” |

“Tt is Jesus,” said Emma, in a subdued
tone.

“Who are his sheep?”

“Those who love and cbey him.”

“When self-will speaks demanding one



SELF-WILL. 57

thing, and his voice is heard requiring a con-
trary thing, which will his sheep hear and
obey?”

“They will obey him, I suppose.”

“ Don’t you think you will get on pleasantly
with ‘your cousin, if you listen to the voice of
the kind Shepherd instead of the promptings
of your own self-will?”

“TI suppose so, But I fear I shall not
always do this. I am still sometimes very
self-willed; and I fear I shall show this more
than ever when cousin Lucy comes.”

“Then, my dear sister, you must watch and
pray, that you may not enter into temptation;
for it is written, ‘ Blessed is the man that en-
dureth temptation.” If you are one of the
Saviour’s lambs, you earnestly wish that your
self-wiil may be subdued and that God’s will
alone may rule your heart. If your cousin
is more than ordinarily self-willed, her visit
will afford you an excellent opportunity to
discover and watch against and subdue self-
will. I trust you will be disposed to make the
best possible improvement of this opportunity.”

“T believe you always see some good to be
derived. from everything,” said Emma.



58 SELF-WILL.

“Why should I not? Have I not the best
authority for doing so? Do not,‘all things
work together for good to them that love God?”

Uncle Dennis did not forget his promise.
The next week he brought his daughter Lucy
to spend the vacation with her cousin Emma.
The first two days passed away very plea-
santly.

“Come, Emma; let’s take a walk,” said
Lucy to Emma on the third afternoon.

“ Aoreed,” said Emma. “ Let us go as far
‘as Mr Dalton’s and take a peep at his garden.
I know it must look beautiful after the rain
we have had.”

“ But I do not wish to go in that direction,”
replied Lucy. “I want to go down to the
river this afternoon. We can go to Mr,
Dalton’s another time.”

“And we can go down to the river another
time,” said Emma, whose self-will was sud-
denly aroused by her cousin’s opposition to her
proposal.

“ But I want to go there this afternoon.”

“And I want to see Mr. Dalton’s garden
this afternoon. JBesides, the grass is damp
in the walk to the river,’ said Emma, who



SELF-WILL. 59

wished to fortify her position by a show of
reason. | |

“ Nonsense! the grass is not damp. It has
had plenty of time to dry since the rain. We .
are not obliged to wear thin shoes, either.
Mother says we had better not wear them in
such walks. So for the river, I say.”

Lucy laid aside her work and left the room;
but Emma did not rise to follow her. Per-
ceiving this, Lucy paused and turned round
when she reached the door.

“Come, Emma; are you not going?” she said.

“ Not to the river.”

“Well, I am going to the river. If you
will go with me, very well; if not, I will go
alone.”

Emma had not expected this. She thought
her steady determination to go nowhere else
but to Mr. Dalton’s would bring Lucy to
terms and gain her consent to her wishes.
But it had produced an opposite effect, and
had strengthened her cousin in her resolution
to go nowhere but to the river. She now
regretted that she had so positively declared
she would not go in that direction; but, hav-
ing said it, she would not draw back.



60 SELF-WILL.

Lucy, on her part, did not exactly fancy the
idea of a solitary walk to the river. In fact,
she would really have preferred to have re-
mained at home, if Emma would not go with
her. But she had said that she should go,
and go she would.

Emma did not feel quite at ease after Lucy
had gone. But she had not much time for
reflection during her cousin’s absence ; for
several things occurred to occupy her atten-
tion. She had just resumed her sewing, from
which she had been called away, when
Lucy returned. She came bounding into
the room, holding in her hands a beautiful
bouquet. :

Emma did not expect that Lucy would
enjoy her solitary walk very much; but the
first glance at her face showed that she had
enjoyed it. Emma was vexed rather than
pleased at this discovery. Lucy’s face told of
something more than enjoyment. It told of
triumph too, and a malicious satisfaction in
that triumph. She had indeed enjoyed the
walk ; but, not content with this, she had come
home to enjoy teasing her cousin for refusing
to go with her. Circumstances had given her



SELF-WILL. 61

the power to do this, and she intended to
make the most of them.

“There, Miss Emma!” she said, holding up
her bouquet triumphantly; “isn’t that beauti-
ful? Is it not better than looking over the
wall at the flowers in Mr. Dalton’s garden?
Now don’t you wish you had gone with me?”

Emma was much disturbed by her cousin’s
air of triumph, though she tried hard not
to show it. She was too much vexed to own
she wished she had gone with her.

“TI don't wish any such thing,” she replied.

“Neither do J,” said Lucy, with a toss of
her head. “I had the best of company, and
did not miss you at all.”

Here Lucy paused. She was sure her
cousin would be very curious to know who
had accompanied her, and she intended that
she should be obliged to ask before her curi-
osity was gratified. Emma was both desirous
to know and unwilling to ask. But curiosity
conquered ‘sullenness.

“What company?” she inquired, after a
moment's silence.

“What company? Cousin Lewis, to be sure.
Didn’t he act the agreeable to perfection? He



62 SELF-WILL.

knows how to treat a guest civilly, if his sister
doesn’t.”

Emma’s cheeks flushed ; but she made no
reply. Lucy maliciously enjoyed her discom-
fiture, and perversely went on in the ungracious
work of increasing it.

“ But I haven’t told youall,” she eontinued.

“When we came home, Lewis took me
round past Mrs. Crawford’s. When she saw
your brother, she called to us and invited us
to come in. Cousin Lewis at first declined ;
but she said,— |

“« You really must come in with your young
friend. My very best cherries are now in
perfection, and I hope you Will come in and
have some.’

“ Lewis thanked her, and we went in. You
never saw such a dish of cherries as she sét
before us. I think I never tasted any equal®
to them. I thought of you, but comforted
myself with the reflection that you might be
looking over the wall into Mr. Dalton’s gar-
den, which would make amends for all.”

mma writhed under her cousin’s raillery,
but said nothing.

“After we had eaten as many cherries as



SELF-WILL. 63

we wanted,” continued Lucy, “ Mrs. Crawford
invited us into her beautiful garden; and there
she gathered for me this beautiful bouquet.”

“ How came Lewis to go.with you?” Emma
now ventured to ask.

The question reminded Lucy that here was
another point on which it was in her power to
tease Emma, and “pay her,” as she called it,
- for not going with her. :

“ {met him at the door,’ she replied. “He
wished to know where I was going, and why
I was going alone. I told him how particu-
larly amiable and obliging my cousin Emma
was this afternoon; for I did not wish him to
suppose that I really preferred a solitary walk.
Learning how the case stood, he courteously
offered me the benefit of his company, which
considerate offer was gladly accepted; and we
enjoyed the pleasantest walk imaginable, as
one usually does in such company.”

It was a little too much for Emma to
know that Lewis had been made acquainted
with her disobliging conduct to her guest.
She was forced to leave the room hastily to hide
the tears which could no longer be repressed.

Emma found much food for bitter reflection



64 SELF-WILL.

on reaching her room. She was exceedingly
disturbed by Lucy’s triumphant rehearsal of
the pleasures derived from the walk that she
had refused to share. Her cousin had obtained
a great triumph over her. But, worse than
this, she could not rid herself of the uncom-
fortable reflection that the annoyance had
been the result of an act on her part which
could not be justified... She was conscious
that she had been disobliging and uncourteous
to a guest, whose preferences should have met
with greater consideration. But that which
rendered her most unhappy was the knowledge
of the fact that her brother had been made
acquainted with the whole affair, and that her
conduct had been placed before him in a very
unfavourable light.

The retrospect of the afternoon filled the
mind of Emma with vexation and ill humour.
She was vexed with herself, for she felt that
she had acted foolishly ; she was much vexed
with Lucy for the way in which she had tri-
umphed over her; and she was even a little
_ vexed with Lewis for making himself so
agreeable to Lucy and so greatly promoting
her enjoyment.



SELF-WILL. 65

She was really unhappy. She was really
very sorry too for the part she had acted ; but
she was not penitent forit. It1is quite possible
for one to feel very sorry for doing wrong
and yet not feel the least true penitence. It
is possible to feel much self-reproach even
without penitence. Some imagine that all
sorrow for sin 1s repentance ; but it 1s a very
great mistake. Had Emma been truly peni-
tent that afternoon, all feelings of vexation and
wounded pride would have been removed from
her heart. Pride and penitence cannot dwell
there together. When one enters, the other
must depart. But Emma’s heart was full
of wounded pride that afternoon, and no
change had taken place when the bell sum-
moned her to tea. She felt particularly un-
amiable towards Lucy ; but no opportunity of
manifesting the feeling occurred that night.

The next morning Lewis, Emma, and Lucy
were in the sitting-room together. Lewis was
reading the morning paper ; Emma was sewing,
and Lucy was seated by a stand at a little dis-
tance from them, trying to arrange between
sheets of paper some flowers she wished to press.
She worked very diligently for some time ;

5



G6 SELF-WILL.

but, having had little practice, she had not ac-
quired the skill which practice alone can give.
Though she tried hard, she could not place
the flowers on the fair white page so that they
would look as did the specimens in Cousin
Lewis’ herbarium, or even in her cousin
Emma’s,

“Emma, I do wish you would come and
help me!” she exclaimed at last, discouraged
by her want of success. “I can’t get them
to please me. They look so stiff and awkward! -
Come; you know how to do this a great deal
better than I do.” |

Emma did not feel at all disposed to comply
with this request. Her vexation with her
cousin had not passed away. Besides, these
very flowers had formed a part of the bouquet
which Lucy had the day previous held up
before her so triumphantly ; and she was
secretly glad that she could not arrange them
as she desired.

“T can’t help you,” she said. “I am very
busy sewing.”

“Will you accept of my assistance?” in-
quired Lewis, looking up from his paper.
“ Perhaps I shall do as well as Emma.”



SELF-WILL. 67

“Thank you, Cousin Lewis. You will do
a great deal better than Emma; for you know ~
more about it. 1 consider that I am the gainer
by her refusal to assist me.”

This was said in a tone of triumph which
did not escape the observation of Emma or
lessen her vexation.

With the assistance of Lewis, the -flowers
were soon placed entirely to Lucy’s satisfacticn.

“That will do nicely now,” she said. “I
shall know much better how to manage next
time, for the instruction you have given me.
I am very much obliged to you.”

“You are quite welcome,” said Lewis, with
a pleasant smile. “It igs a service which
brings its own reward, to instruct a pupil who
is so attentive and apt to learn. If you will
come with me to the library, I will show you
some fine specimens I found and pressed yes-
terday morning.”

“Thank you,” said Lucy.

As they were leaving the room, she asked,
“Don't you extend this invitation to Emma ?”

“TIT do not,” said Lewis, gravely. “You
know she is very busy this morning and can-
not be interrupted.”



68 SELF-WILL.

This was said in a tone which Emma felt
was intended to convey reproof. She was sure
that her brother had been watching her con-
duct and had disapproved of it, and that he
intended to express that disapprobation by in-
viting Lucy to see his flowers, and excluding
her from the invitation. Even the assistance
rendered to Lucy might have been intended
as a silent reproof for her own disobliging
refusal. She was very unhappy while left
alone in the sitting-room ; but, though un-
happy, she was not yet penitent.

Still, while left to her own reflections, she
resolved upon a change in her outward beha-
viour. She would be more obliging and amia-
ble to Lucy. She was rendering herselt very
unhappy, and. forfeiting her brother’s approba-
tion. This last consideration had great weight
in leading her to decide upon a more amiable
and conciliatory course. .

When Lucy returned, Emma, by a strenuous
effort, concealed her irritated feelings, and
during the remainder of the day assumed a
manner more kind and obliging. But Emma's
feelings of self-will and vexation with her
cousin had not passed away. They were simply



THE WANDERING LAMB. 69

concealed and placed under strong restraint.
Her spirit was not calmed, but chafed and
_ fretted by this restraint, so that it seemed to
her the more she tried to feel amiable the
more unamiable she felt.

CHAPTER V.

THE WANDERING LAMB.

In the afternoon of the next day Lucy pro-
posed a walk to a grove in the neighbourhood,
to which Emma consented.

“Stop a moment,” said Emma, when they
reached the back door of the hall; “I must
look for Grace and take her with us.”

“You may spare yourself that trouble,”
said Lucy. “I don’t want Grace to go with
us. It is a bother to have a child always
tagging after one ; and she shan’t go.”

A brief explanation of the moral position in
which Emma now stood may be necessary.
The declaration that Grace should not go with
them had aroused her self-will. But then she
had firmly resolved not to be wilful again on



70 THE WANDERING LAMB.

any such point. She must not insist upon
Grace’s going, merely to have her own way.
Fortunately, as she regarded it, inclination in
this case was backed by duty. She could
gratify her own self-will and shelter herself
from the charge of doing so under the plea
of duty. |

“Grace must go with us,” she replied,
though not in a very gentle or conciliatory
manner. “ Aunt Fanny has gone out, and
she told me to look after the children.”

“You can leave them with Bridget.”

“She told me not to let them trouble
Bridget, as she is very busy this afternoon.
Mary has got hold of that book Lewis gave
her this morning, and I know her well enough
to be sure she will not leave it till she has
read every word. So if we don’t take Grace
with us she will have nothing to do but trouble
Bridget.”

At this moment Grace came skipping to-,
wards them. |

“Q Emma,” she said, “where are you
going ?”

“We are going to the grove,” said Emma.
“Do you want to go with us?”



THE WANDERING LAMB. 71

“Qh, yes, yes!” said Grace, clapping her
hands with glee.

“T don’t want you to go,” said Lucy.
“Come, be a good girl and stay at home with
Mary.”

“Mary is reading and won’t speak to me,”
said Grace. “I want to go with you.”

“T don’t want you to go with me,” said
Lucy.

“ How unreasonable you are!” said Emma.
“T tell you what it is, Gracie is going with us ;
so there is the end of the business.”

Lucy was roused by this positive assertion,
not made in the most conciliatory manner.

“You need not say going with ws,” she re-
plied ; “for I am not going if she does.”

“Now, Lucy,” said Emma, “aren’t you
ashamed of yourself? You know I can’t go
and leave Grace. It would not be right; and
Aunt Fanny would not like it.”

These arguments failed to produce their de-
sired effect upon Lucy; for she saw plainly
that Emma was simply gratifymg her own
self-will while entrenching herself behind the
plea of duty. She therefore persisted im say-
ing that she would not go if Grace did.



“I
bo

THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Was there ever such a wilful and ‘obstinate
gir] !” exclaimed Emma.
‘People that live in glass houses should not

a

throw stones,” retorted Lucy. “I wonder
who was wilful and obstinate the day before
yesterday ?”

“That has nothing to dowith it,” said Emma.
“You know I have the right on my side this
time. Gracie ought to go to the grove.”

“Take her there, then,” said Lucy, turning
to leave them.

When Grace saw the difficulty of which she
was the innocent occasion, with a spirit of
brave self-denial worthy of an older head and
heart, she pulled her sister's hand, saying,
“Call her back, Emma, and tell her I am not
going. I don’t want to go if she doesn’t want
that I should.”

“YT shall do no such thing. Let her go.
There is one comfort; I know I am in the
right this time.”

- Lewis came round the corner of the house
just in time to hear the last sentence; and he
now stood looking calmly and inquiringly into
his sister’s flushed face.

“That is a great deal to be certain of,



THE WANDERING LAMB. 73

Emma, with such wicked and deceitful hearts
as ours,” he said, in a grave tone.

Emma looked somewhat embarrassed ; still,
she said, confidently, “I am sure I am right
in this case.” |

“T don’t know what the case is,” said her
brother, in the same tone ; “but, judging from
your manner, I should fear that you were all
wrong instead of all right.”

“Let me tell you about it, and then you
will think differently. I am sure you will say
I have done right.”

“Very well; I will listen to you in a mo-
ment.” |

So saying, he drew from his pocket a small
paper of sugar-plums, which he gave to Grace.

“Thank you, Lewis,” said Grace, when she
had discovered what the paper contained.

“ Well, if you thank me, just take them out
to the arbour in the garden and eat them

there, will you?” ~
“Yes, that I will,” said Grace, bounding
away.

Lewis seated himself on the bench of the
portico, and invited Emma to take a seat by
his side,



74 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Now tell me,” he said, “ how you make it
out, in spite of your flushed face and angry
tones, that you are quite in the right.”

Emma blushed at this reference to the tem-
per she had exhibited, but told her story with
a good degree of self-confidence.

«We can seldom decide upon the character
of an action by looking only at the surface of
things,” said her brother, after listening to
her recital. “Suppose I had come up a few
minutes sooner, while you were discussing the
subject, and had offered to take charge of
Grace while you and Lucy went to the grove.
Do you think the arrangement would have
pleased you?”

Emma was silent; for she was conscious
that such a turn of affairs would have been
very unsatisfactory to her.

« Answer the question to yourself, if not to
me,” said her brother, after a pause. “ Sup-
posing it thus answered, I will go on. You
understand perfectly that the motive makes
an action right or wrong. You know that
kindness and courtesy to our guest require us
to consult her wishes, and yield to her pre-
ferences whenever it is proper to do so. If



THE WANDERING LAMB. 75

_ you felt as you ought to have done this
afternoon, you desired to do this; and duty
alone compelled you to oppose her wishes, If
such were your feelings, it is obvious, in the
case I have supposed, you would have been
gratified by my offer to take charge of Grace,
that Lucy might enjoy the walk in her own
way. Is not this point clear?” |

“Yes,” said Emma in a subdued tone.

“ On the other hand, if self-will was at the
bottom of the whole, and duty was only used
as an entrenchment behind which self-will
could operate, shielded from the charge of ob-
stinacy, the case would be very different. ~ I
wish you to see this difference clearly. On
the first supposition, there was no wufulness
in the act. You opposed your cousin’s wishes
only from a sense of duty On the second
supposition, self-will was the reigning motive,
- and you were only too glad that duty and in-
clination took the same road and that self-will
was kept in countenance by duty. In the
latter case you could not have been gratified
by a proposal to take charge of Grace; for
this would have baffled self-will. Is not this
plain?”



76 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“ Yes,”

«Are you willing to tell me candidly
whether you would have been gratified by
such a proposal? Would ‘it have pleased or
vexed you?”

“JT fear it would have vexed me.”

“Then can you not see that you were grati-
fying self-will under the plea of duty?”

“T do see it,” said Emma frankly. “ But
if you did not know any of the circumstances,
why were you so sure in the first place that I
was some way in the wrong ?”

“TJ judged so by your manner and the tone
of your voice. If you had been prompted by
a sense of duty and not by self-will, you would
have been kind and conciliatory, and your
manner would have been calculated to convince
your cousin that you were actuated by a sense
of right, and not by a desire to have your own
way under the pretext of duty.

“Vou are not the first, dear Emma, who
bas made this mistake Many a person,
under the plea of duty, is simply obeying the
dictates of an indomitable self-will. But the
temper and conduct of such a one will usually
reveal the spirit by which he is actuated. He



THE WANDERING LAMB, V7

will be proud and imperious, ready to condemn
others, while he boasts that, he is in the right.
Just as the temper and spirit exhibited by you
this afternoon revealed the motive by which
you were actuated, so will such a man reveal
the motive by which he is governed. Self-will
1S ever proud and imperious ; and its nature is
not changed when it puts on the garb of re-
higion, But the man who seeks not to do his
own will, but the will of his Father who is in
heaven, will be conciliatory while he is firm,
courteous while he is decided; and humble
while he is earnest. He will be patient of
contradiction, and ready to yield his own will
when it is only his will, and not duty, that he
is called upon to surrender.”

After this conversation Emma left her
brother, more dissatisfied with herself than
ever. He had made it very plain that she
had been governed that afternoon by the old
spirit of self-will. It was not pleasant to find
that all was wrong where she had been so
sure that all was right.

For the next two days everything went
wrong with Emma. Causes of vexation were
constantly occurring. Though she often com-



78 THE WANDERING LAMB.

manded herself sufficiently to restrain the out-
ward tokens, yet her mind was constantly
~chafed and irritated, and she was restless and
unhappy.

Everything went wrong in the closet as well
as elsewhere. Whenever Emma visited that
sacred spot, she did so with the painful con-
sciousness that she was quite in the wrong,
without any clear perception how she was to
get right. In this manner two or three days
passed away.

One afternoon Lucy joined her little cousins,
Mary and Grace, in their playroom. Emma
felt no disposition to go with her, but, when
left to herself, repaired to her favourite seat
by the window of the upper hali. She took a
book with her for a companion ; but the book
proved scarcely more attractive than the society
of her cousin and _ sisters. A discontented,
dissatisfied, restless mood unfitted her for any
enjoyment. se

After she had been seated there a short
time, her brother came up stairs. He was pass-
ing on to his own room ; but, observing Emma
sitting alone, he turned and came up to her.

“You seem to be disengaged,” he said.



THE WANDERING LAMB. 79

«Will you come to my room? I have two
engravings I wish to show you.” —

“With pleasure,” said Emma, her counte-
nance lighting up; for few things gave her
more satisfaction that an invitation to her
brother’s room. Lewis placed a chair for her
by his table.

“T think you have not seen this,” he said,
taking a engraving from a portfolio and placing
it before her.

“T have not,” said Emma, looking at it.

“You understand what it represents, do
you not?”

Emma examined it attentively. It repre-
sented a mountain covered with broken rocks
and precipices, accessible only by a steep and
difficult footpath. Amidst this scene of deso-
lation a solitary lamb was wandering. Emma
thought it looked timid and frightened, and
as if it were torn and bleeding, perhaps from
a fall amid those rocky heights. At some
distance from it a man was carefully wending
his way along the precarious footpaths.

“Tt represents a stray lamb wandering on
a desolate mountain, I think,” said Emma.
“That man, I suppose, is the shepherd, going



§0 THE WANDERING LAMB.

in search of it. Poor thing! It looks as if
it needed help. See, it is torn and bleeding.
It could never find its own way out of that
desolate place.”

Lewis removed this engraving and placed
another in its stead. The scene was the same,
—the same wild mountain and jagged rocks
and precarious footpaths, the same lamb, and
the same kind shepherd. But in this last en-
graving the lamb was not wandering alone
among the rocks; it was safely folded in the
arms of the shepherd, who was making his
way down the steep descent.

Emma gazed earnestly. “What a contrast!”
she caia after a short silence. “ How safe,
comfurtable, and happy the poor thing looks
in the arms of the shepherd!”

“ Does this scene remind you of anything?”

Emma looked up to her brother. Again
she bent her eyes upon the engraving, her face
wearing a thoughtful expression.

“ Does it not remind you of the Good Shep-
herd whose mission it is to seek lost or wan-
dering lambs ?”

“ Yes,” said Emma seriously.

“1 want to ask you one question. Do you



THE WANDERING LAMB. 81

not think there is a wandering lamb in this
room, whom the Good Shepherd is calling to
return to him 2”

The manner in which this question was
asked—so gentle, tender, and affectionate—
moved Emma more than the question itself.
A flood of tears was the only reply.

Lewis had been standing leaning on Emma's
chair. He now seated himself by her side,
and, taking one of her hands in his own, held
it with a gentle pressure, which of itself spoke
a volume of tender sympathy and affection.
Emmafelt the soothing and calming influence of
this simple act. She soon looked up and said,—

“ O Lewis, I am so very, very unhappy!”

“ Christ’s lambs always are when they wan-
der from him,” was the reply, in a tone of
gentle sympathy and kind concern. |

“But what shall I do?”

Lewis answered by pointing to the lamb in
the arms of its shepherd.

“T wish I were there!” said Emma, the
tears flowing afresh.

“Why are you not there? The Shepherd's
arms are ever open to receive the returning
wanderer. Can you doubt his love for the

6



82 THE WANDERING LAMB.

lambs for whom he has laid down his life?
Have you not heard his call ?”

“But I have been so very wicked! and I
am not penitent as I ought to be.”

“T see how it is,” said her brother.

He removed the last engraving from before
Emma and placed the first in its stead.

“You see that poor wandering lamb again ?”’
he said.

“ Yes,”

“ And the shepherd not very far from him,
as before ?”

“Yes.”

“Do you think he could hear the shepherd
were. he to call him ?”

“T think he might.”

“Tf he heard the call of the shepherd, would
he not at once make his way towards the place
from whence the call came?”

“T think so.”

“ Suppose, instead of doing this, he should
reason in this way :—‘I am ashamed to have
my shepherd find me, away on this desolate
mountain, all torn and bleeding. I must get
back part of the way before I go to his arms.
If I could only reach the foot of the mountain



THE WANDERING LAMB. 83

and get part way back to the fold, then I
would run right to the shepherd ; but I can’t
go to him here;’ and the little lamb hides away
in the crevice of a rock when the shepherd
calls, intending to find its own way almost to
the fold before it goes to him. What would
you think of such a lamb ?”

“JT should think it was very foolish.”

“Why ?”

“It could not find its own way out of the
mountain and half-way back to the fold. If
it could do all that, it would not need the help
of the shepherd ; for that would be the hardest
part.”

“That is true,” said her brother smiling.
“But can’t you see how very true it is in your
own case? You have just been trying to do
the hardest part yourself without any help.
You are wandering on the mountain of sin,
bleeding and torn; but you say, ‘I cannot let
the.Good Shepherd see me in this plight. I
must get out of the mountain first. I must
get somewhere near the sheepfold, and try to
wash away some of the stains I have contracted
in the waters of deep repentance, before I can
present myself to the Shepherd.’



8-4 THE WANDERING LAMB.
>

“For some days past you have been trying
to get out of the mountain and find your way
back to the sheepfold, instead of going to the
Shepherd and asking him to take you back-
When you have been reading and meditating,
it has not been to find your Shepherd and
fly to his arms, but it was that you might
find the way down the mountain for yourself
and get ready to go to him.

“ But the plan did not work at all. Christ’s
wandering lambs must be willing to go to him
as they are, torn and bleeding. Like the poor
lamb, you found yourself every hour becoming
more and more bewildered. You found no
food in the Bible, no help in prayer. Every
day you grew more unhappy, and your spirit
more chafed and irritated, less able to bear
vexations and trials and to exhibit the Chris-
tian temper. Is this a correct picture?’ Or am
I quite mistaken in regard to the state of
your mind the last few days?”

“Indeed, you are not mistaken. Had you
read every thought of my heart, you could not
have described my case better. I don’t know
how you could understand my feelings so
well.”



THE WANDERING LAMB. 85

“One may well be familiar with a road he
has often travelled,” replied Lewis, a shade
of sadness stealing over his countenance.
“But tell me,” he asked, “is the poor lamb
weary of its efforts to find its own way down
the mountain, and willing to be carried in the
arms of its Shepherd?”

“Oh, yes,” said Emma. “But how shall l
get there ?”

“How did you get there in the first place?
Did you wait till you were very penitent and
felt as you ought, before you went to Jesus?”

“Oh, no. I tried that plan at first.”

“And how did it work ?”

“Tt did not work at all. The more I tried
to make my feelings right, the harder my
heart became.”

“What did you then do?”

“T had to go to Jesus just as I was,”

Lewis turned over the engraving repre-
senting the lamb in.the arms of its shepherd.
There were some lines written on the back of
it. They were these :—

* Just as Iam, without one plea
But that thy blood was shed for me,
And that thou bid’st me come to thee,
O Lamb of God, I come!



86 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Just as I am, and waiting not
To rid myself of one dark blot,—
To thee, whose blood can cleanse each spot, —
O Lamb of God, I come!”

“Was that the way you came?” asked
Lewis, when Emma had read the lines.

‘“‘T hope so.”

“In the same way you must go now. The
sinner who has never repented, and the sinner
who has repented and wandered, must both
come in the same way. It is the lamb folded
in his Saviour’s arms that weeps the tears of
genuine repentance for sin. I will present
you with these two engravings. If you
please, you may now take them to your own
room.” |

Emma took the engravings to her room and
laid them on her own little table, by the side
of which she sat down to reflect on all her
brother had said to her. She thought of the
sweet invitation, “Come unto me, all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give
you rest.” She felt that it was the call of the
Good Shepherd. She fell on her knees and
entreated that he would bear her in his arms |
back to the fold—that he would give her a
penitent, humble, and contrite heart,—that he



THE WANDERING LAMB. 87

would subdue her pride and self-will and teach
her to be meek like himself. —

He who loves his lambs and watches over
them with a tender care, who is never far
from them even when they wander, heard her
prayer. Emma left her chamber that after-
noon with a peace in her heart which had not
been there for many days. The penitence
which she had struggled in vain to obtain now
melted and subdued her heart. The tears
flowed when she thought of the self-will she
had exhibited and the wrong tempers she had
indulged.

The next morning Lucy, who had been
adding some new specimens to her herbarium,
brought it to Emma to exhibit them to her.
As Emma turned over its leaves, her eyes fell
upon the flowers that had formed a part of
the bouquet obtained from Mrs. Crawford’s
garden. ‘Two or three involuntary tears were
the tokens of the penitence now felt for
the self-will and angry passions of that
afternoon. That incident had cost her tears
before; but those were tears of vexation
——these were tears of penitence. And how
different they were! While the one chated



88 THE WANDERING LAMB.

and irritated, the other humbled, subdued,
and relieved.

Lucy observed the tears, though Emma
brushed them quickly away. She supposed
that her cousin still felt vexed about the
occurrences of that afternoon, and that the
flowers had proved an unpleasant reminder.
She had herself, after her vexation with Emma
had passed away, felt some self-reproach for
teasing her cousin so much; and she now
expressed this feeling by saying,—

“T am sorry, Emma, I teased you so on my
return from the walk to the river. I daresay
these flowers remind you of it.”

“No, Lucy; it is not that.”

“Then it was my telling your brother what
had passed between us.”

“No; I was vexed about it at the time,
but am not now.”

“But I saw the tears start to your eyes
when you looked at the flowers.”

The effect of this assertion was to bring the
tears afresh.

“There! you are weeping now,” said Lucy.

“It is,” said Emma, after a moment’s silence,
“because I feel so sorry when I think how



THE CONQUEST. &9

self-willed I then was. When these flowers re-
minded me of it, I could not helpshedding tears,”
“Ts that all?” said Lucy, carelessly.
“Ts it not enough?” said Emma. “I think
the remembrance of wrong-doing may well
bring tears of penitence.”

CHAPTER VI.

THE CONQUEST.

“THERE is the carriage coming round the
corner,” exclaimed Lucy as she and Emma were
together in the sitting-room that afternoon,
A moment after she added, “ It is father himself,
and mother too. I am.so glad! But—”

“A gloomy ‘but,’ I should think, by the
way it has chased the sunshine from your
face,” said her cousin Lewis, smiling.

“JT am only afraid they have come to take
me home,” replied Lucy. “In that case I
could hardly be glad to see them.”

“Nor I,” said Emma. “ But we shall not

let them have you.”



90 THE CONQUEST.

Lewis now left the room to meet his uncle
and aunt, and was followed by Emma and
Lucy. They were quickly joined by Mary
and Grace, who from the back-yard had seen
the carriage as it came up, and lastly by Aunt
Fanny, who came from another part of the
house to welcome the guests.

When they were all quietly seated in the
pleasant parlour, Lucy went up to her father
and said, “I hope, father, you have not come
to take me home?”

“No, pussy, no fear of that. You don't
suppose we want you at home? We shall be
greatly obliged to your Uncle Lewis and your
Aunt Fanny if they wili keep you off our
hands a week or two longer.”

“Why, father,” said Lucy, laughing, “one
who did not know you would think you were
really glad to be rid of me.”

“ T am not talking to those who do not know
me,” said Mr. Dennis, smiling kindly.

“Who is that stopping before the gate?”
said Emma, addressing her Aunt Fanny.

“T don’t know,” was the reply. “ He seems
to be a pedlar. He has a pedlar’s cart.”

“See! he has only one leg,” said Emma.



THE CONQUEST. 91

“Oh, that is Gordon,” said Lucy, who had
been drawn to the window by Emma's inquiry.
“Don’t you know him?”

“No.”

“He calls at our house very often. Mother
usually buys something from him, because she
pities him.”

“That is true,’ said Mrs. Dennis. “He
had one limb taken off two years ago, and he
has been obliged to take this way of supporting
his family. He is an honest, deserving man,
and Mr. Dennis and I make it a point to buy
from him when we are in want of anything
he has to offer.”

By this time Gordon had reached the door.
Mrs. Dennis went out into the hall to inquire
if he had linen handkerchiefs. Ascertaining
that he had some, she proposed to go out to
his waggon, and invited Aunt Fanny to go with
her. Aunt Fanny declined, on the plea that
she was not in want of anything in his line at
that time. Mrs. Dennis went out to the wag-
gon, followed by Emma and Lucy, who felt a
natural curiosity to take a peep at the pedlar’s
stock in trade.

After Mrs, Dennis had made her purchase



92 THE CONQUEST.

and returned to the house, the cousins still
stood by the cart, examining a pile of muslins
which had attracted their attention. They
were soon joined by Mr. Dennis.

“ What are you looking at, girls?” he asked.

“ At these muslins,” said Lucy.

“ Anything pretty there?”

“Yes, sir; some of them are very pretty.”

“Weil, girls I'll tell you what I'll do,” said
Mr. Dennis, with a mischievous twinkle in his
eye. “TI will give each of you a dress, on one
condition.”

“What is it, father?” asked Lucy, eagerly.

“That the dresses shall be alike. You must
both agree to choose one from the same piece.”

“ Agreed,” said Lucy. “But I wish Aunt
Fanny and mother were here to help us to
choose.”

“Take them all into the house,” said the
pedlar. This suggestion was easily followed,
as the entire assortment did not comprise more
than half a dozen pieces.

They were soon laid upon the sofa in the
pariour, and one after another drawn over the
large easy-chair to mark the effect. A
brown and a buff were thus displayed,



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CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLE

LITTLE THINGS.

@ Buok far Girls,

«© Teach me, my God and King,
In all things Thee to see ;
And what I do in any thing,
To do it as for Thee.

«* This is the famous stone
That turneth all to gold ;
For that which God doth touch and own
Cannot for less be told.’’
LTerbert.

LONDON:

tT. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW:
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

MDCCCLXI.
CONTENTS.

Chapter. Page,
I. THE OLD AND THE NEw, eee eee vee ar 1

Il. Tue Lity anp Tre Tuory, ... “ee eee 18
III. HeARING AND Done, eee 100 eee ese 35
IV. SELF-WILL, aes oon eee soe eee 54
V. THE WANDERING LAmp, son aoe a ose 69
VI. Tie ConQUEST, ... oes eve eee os 89
VIT. Tur DISAPPOINTMENT, — eee eee oes e» 100
VIIT. PLEASING CHRIST, eee ese eee -. «©1118
1X. Tre CHRIsSTIAN’s MOTIVE, .... we bac vee =: 126

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CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLE
IN LITTLE THINGS.

CHAPTER I.

THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“Emma, did you look into the geography
when you answered the question that Mary
Green missed ?”

An indignant blush spread over the face of
Emma Alston. |

“What do you mean, Julia Summers?”

“Don’t look at me so. I don't mean any
harm,” said the young girl who was addressed
as Julia Summers. “I don’t believe you
looked in the book; but some one said you
did, and I thought I would ask you.”

“ Who said I did ?”
~ “Mary Green.”

“Did Mary Green say so?”

1
2 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“She said she was quite sure you stole.a
look into the book before you answered.”

Emma’s face was again crimsoned with
indignation, and with anger too. “The mean,
contemptible girl!” she said. “Mary Green
knew I didn’t look in the book. She knew
there was not a word of truth in what she
said.”

“Now, Emma, you are really a little too
severe,’ said Julia. “I don’t think Mary
would say what she knew to be an un-
truth. I daresay she thought you looked in
the book. I suppose she was so vexed at
missing the question herself. that she could
not see very straight. I suspect she looked
through coloured glasses, as mother sometimes
tells me I do when things don’t go right.”

“It was very untruthful in her to say I
looked in the book.”

“JT am sorry I told you of it,” said Julia.
“T would not if I had known it would make
you so angry. I would not mind it so much,
if I were you.”

“Do you think you would like to be
accused of such a mean, contemptible thing?”

“TI don’t suppose I should like it. But then
THE OLD AND THE NEW. 3

it need not trouble you so very much. Not
one of the girls will believe it. They know
it is not like you. Whatever faults you may
have, they know very well that you are above
such little, mean deceptions. Even Mary
Green won’t believe it herself to-morrow, when
she comes to reason; I am sure she won't.”

“But she had no business to say such a
thing,—the hateful creature!” said Emma, her
passion steadily rising at the thought of the
wrong that had been done her, and of the
mean and ungenerous action of which she had
been accused. “I wili never forget it as long
as I live.” |

Julia Summers looked surprised. After a
moment's silence she said seriously, “I should
not have thought you would have said that.”

“Why not?”

“You know why.”

An expression flitted across Emma’s face,
indicating a consciousness of the nature of the
“why” alluded to by her companion. She
replied, half-angrily, half apologetically, “But
it is So very provoking.”

This conversation teok place while Emma
and Julia were vatunine Tro school. Having
4 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

reached the gate of Mr. Alston’s house, the
two girls separated.

Emma hastened to her own room, and there —
sat down to think over in solitude what she
had just heard. Her anger was not softened
by these solitary meditations. On the con-
trary, for a timé it rose higher and higher.
Emma was naturally high-spirited. She
scorned what she considered a mean action.
To be accused of an act which she regarded as
very mean was more than she could bear, and
a temper easily irritated was fully aroused.
She sat for some time nursing her resentment,
and fanning the flames she should have sup-
pressed, resolving that she would not speak to
Mary Green for a week, and that she would
never forget it.

While thus engaged she heard the voice of
her Aunt Fanny calling to her from the foot
the stairs.

“Emma! Emma! are you not coming
down?” she said.

Her aunt’s cheerful tones—for very cheer-
ful they were——chafed instead of soothing the
disturbed spirit of Emma, who was half angry
that any one should be cheerful when she was
THE OLD AND THE NEw. 5

so very wretched. Prompted by this feeling,
she made no reply to her aunt’s call.

“Are you not coming down, Emma?” said
Miss Alston again, after waiting a moment
for an answer. “ We have some news for you.
Come,— hear what it is.” |

“JT don’t want to hear any news,” said
Emma, impatiently.

“What! not good news?”

“Not now. I only want to be let alone,”
said Emma, in the same tone.

Emma felt, some wish to know what the
good news was; but she would not yield to it.
It might restore cheerfulness to her mind; and,
like many others in similar circumstances, she
was perversely determined not to be happy
then, Because another had wronged her and
made her unhappy, she would make herself
far more wretched, by yielding to a spirit of
bitter resentment.

Her aunt, seeing the mood she was in, left
her to herself, and the storm raged on. But,
like all storms, its fury was spent at last, and
then there was a calm. In the lull Emma
heard a still, small voice in her soul whisper-
ing, “ Doest thou well to be angry?” “ But
6 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

it is so provoking:” replied the spirit of self-
justification. But the voice, unheeding the
extenuation, again demanded, “Doest thou
well to be angry ?”

Next the words of Julia Summers occurred
to Emma’s mind,-—“I should not have thought
you would have said that.”

“ What did I say ?”’ Emma now asked her-
self. She had been thinking only ef what
Mary Green had said of her. Now conscience
demanded that she should take a candid re-
view of what she had said of Mary Green.
She had keenly felt the injustice of Mary’s
accusation ; but was it not at least possible
that she had herself been equally unjust? She
had asserted that her school-fellow knew that
she did not look in the book,—that she knew
she was saying what was not true. This cer-
tainly was a very grave charge ; and was she
sure it was just? How would she like to be
accused of falsehood while making a statement
which she believed to be true? If this accusa-
tion was unjust, was it not worse than that
which had produced such a tumult of anger
and indignation in her own breast ?

Again, had she not said that she would
THE OLD AND THE NEW. 7

never forget it? What was this but say-
ing that she would never forgive Mary ?
How then could she pray that night, “Forgive
me my debts, as I forgive my debtors?” The
tables were now fairly turned, and anger had
giver. way to self-reproach. In this state of
mina Emma took up her Bible, and the first
passage which met her eye was this: “There-
fore is the kingdom of heaven likened unto a
certain king, which would take account of his
servants. And when he had begun to reckon,
one was brought unto him which owed him
ten thousand talents: but, forasmuch as he
had not to pay, his lord commanded him to be
sold, and his wife and children, and all that he
had, and payment to be made. The servant
therefore fell down and worshipped him, say-
ing, Lord, have patience with me, and I will
pay thee all. Then the lord of that servant
was moved with compassion, and loosed him,
and forgave him the debt. But the same
_ servant went out, and found one of his fellow-
servants, which owed him an hundred pence ;
and he laid hands on him, and took him by the
throat, saying, Pay me that thou owest. And
his fellow-servant fell down at his feet, and
8 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

besought him, saying, Have patience with me,
and I will pay thee all. And he would not;
but went and cast him into prison, till he
should pay the debt. So when his fellow-
servants saw what was done, they were very
sorry, and came and told unto their lord all
that was done. Then his lord, after that he
had called him, said unto him, O thou wicked
servant, I forgave thee all that debt, because
thou desiredst me: shouldest not thou also have
had compassion on thy fellow-servant, even as
I had pity on thee? And his lord was wroth,
and delivered him to the tormentors, till he
should pay all that was due unto him. So
likewise shall my heavenly Father do also
unto you, if ye from your hearts forgive not
every one his brother their trespasses,”’
Kmma’s eyes were blinded by tears ere she
had completed the reading of this passage.
She saw in this parable, as in a mirror, her
own conduct and the guilt of an unforgiving
spirit. Very fresh in her mind was the re-
membrance of that time, not many months
ago, when she first felt the greatness of her
sins and her need of forgiveness. How much,
as she hoped, had been forgiven her! How
THE OLD AND THE NEW. 9

then could she say of a trifling—or even of
any—offence, “I cannot forgive or forget it?”

“How very wrong I have been!” was now
her silent confession. “ How could I beso re-
sentful and unforgiving? It was, after all, only |
a trifle that I was called upon to forgive, while
I have had so much forgiven. No wonder
Julia said that she did not expect this from
me.” In tears and prayers of humble peni-
tence, Emma sought the forgiveness of her
Saviour, feeling that she could now from the
heart forgive Mary Green.

Her feelings were only partially calmed
when the tea-bell rang. Emma knew that
her father always required punctuality at
meals, and she hastened down to take her
place at the table. Only her father and her
aunt were there. Her two younger sisters,
Mary and Grace, were spending the day with
their cousin Susie,

“Tt seems you did not think the news I
brought worth coming down to hear?” said her
father, after they had been seated a short time.

Emma blushed. She did not know that her
father was in the house, and that he had heard
her impatient answer to her aunt's call.
10 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

“ What news, father?” she said.

“What news, eh ?” said her father, smiling.
“You would like to know, would you? Well,
I came home half an hour before the usual time
for the pleasure of telling you, and then you
would not even come down to hear it.”

“YT didn’t know you were in the house,
father.”’

“ But you did know that your aunt called
you to come down. I have half a mind not
to tell you what it is.”

Had Emma felt as she did on her return
from school, she would probably have brought
forward some plea of self-justification. Such
might have been the case had only self-
reproach succeeded to this state of mind; for
self-reproach and penitence are very different
things. But Emma was now really penitent
and humbled, and, like all true penitents, was
ready to acknowledge the wrong she had done. |

“T own that I was sadly out of temper
then, dear father,’ she said. “I know I ‘don’t
deserve to hear the news; but I should very
much like to know what it is, if you are
willing to tell me.”

“You shall know, my dear,” said Mr. Alston,
THE OLD AND THE NEW. Il

kindly; for he was pleased to see his daughter
acknowledge her error so frankly. “Mr. D.
returned from N. this afternoon, He saw
Lewis, and learned from him that he intends
to come home next week to spend three
months with us.”

“Coming home next week to stay three
months !’’ repeated Emma, slowly, as if she
could not at once realize all that-the words
meant. -
“Yes, my dear. What do you say to that ?”

“JT am very, very glad,” said Emma, a
bright smile lighting: up her face; “but some-
how I think I don’t more than half believe it.
It is too good to believe. Three long months!
Only think of 18! Why has he not told us
before? Why has he not written us about
it?” -

“He made up his mind orily the day before
he saw Mr. D. Some circumstances have oc-
curred leading him to change his plans. He
thinks he can pursue his studies to advantage
at home for the next three months. For my
own part, | am very well pleased that he has
come to this decision. He has not been at
home for more than a week at a time for
12 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

years ; and I think this long visit may prove
of advantage in many ways.”

Emma’s face now assumed a grave—almost
troubled—expression; and as soon as tea was
over, she returned again to her own room.

172

“Three months! Three long months!” she
murmured, as she seated herself at the little
table, upon which her Bible still lay open at
the passage she had been reading. She cast
her eyes upon it and heaved a deep sigh.

“Dear brother Lewis!” she said. “I am
sure I am glad—very glad; and yet I don’t feel
glad, either. How much he will find out about
me in that long three months——how many
things I could wish that he should never know!
What would he have thought had he been
here to-night? I am sorry that I ever wrote
that letter. I am sure he will not believe it,
after he has been here much less than three
months. He will expect so much and find so
little.” |

To explain that letter, which was now the
occasion of so much regret, it will be necessary
to give the reader something of the history of
Emma Alston. “Emma was motherless, as we
have said. She had two sisters, younger than
THE OLD AND THE NEW. 13

herself,— Mary and Grace, Her only brother,
Lewis, was her senior by a number of years,
The place of mother had been in some measure
supplied by her Aunt Fanny, her father’s
sister.

Though Lewis was Emma’s only brother,
she had in fact seen very little of him. An
uncle, after whom he was named, and who was
more abundantly supplied with this world’s
wealth than his father, had, years before,
undertaken to educate Lewis. He had left
home to reside with his uncle when his eldest
sister was very young; and from that time
only brief visits were made to his paternal
home. During these visits he had always
treated his sisters very kindly, and done much
to make himself beloved by them. Emma
loved him dearly, and, besides, was very proud
of him; for she had not failed to discover
what every one else knew, that he was a
young man of great promise.

But his last visit, six months before, had
differed from any that had:preceded it. He
had come home the same, yet not thesame. A
new love had been enkindled in his heart,—a
love for Him who is altogether lovely. It was


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THE OLD AND THE NEW. 15

instruction at home and in the Sunday school,
and the voice of conscience and the whispers
of the Spirit had often been heard in her |
heart. But after this last visit from her
brother her thoughts dwelt more frequently
on these themes. Words which he had dropped
occasionally were often recalled, together with
the tone and manner which had given them
their impressiveness.

Emma now read the Bible a great deal, and
often prayed to be led by the Spirit and
taught how to become a child of God. We
will not follow her mind through all its
struggles at this period, but will simply state
that after a time the hope dawned upon her
soul that she had become a lamb of the Saviour’s
flock,

About four weeks previous to this evening,
she had written to her brother; and that letter
had contained an intimation of this hope.
This was the letter which Emma now wished
had never been written. A few further par-
ticulars of Emma’s history will explain this
wish.

Emma’s: mother died when she was quite
young. From that time she and her sisters
16 THE OLD AND THE NEW.

had been under the care of her Aunt Fanny.
This aunt was very fond of her brother's
children and assiduous in her attentions to
their many wants. But she was often unduly
indulgent, and destitute of the firmness and
decision necessary to secure the obedience and
subdue the will of her little charge.

Under this inefficient discipline, the natural
faults of Emma’s disposition rapidly developed.
She was often selfish, self-willed, and irritable.
At this period many of the acts proceeding
from this disposition had become fixed habits
of sturdy growth. When Emma first indulged
the hope that she had become a Christian, she
flattered herself that she should at once be-
come changed in all these respects. But she
soon learned her error. Fixed habits were
not to be so easily uprooted and overcome.
Of this she had that night had one sad proof.
Many similar proofs she had had of the weak-
ness of her best resolutions and the power of
sin in her soul. -

Had Emma the night previous been in-
formed of her brother’s expected visit, pro-
bably no sad thoughts would have mingled
with her joyful anticipations ; but now her
THE OLD AND THE NEW. 17

mind was oppressed with sorrow and dis-
couragement. Before she left the tea-table
the question. suggested itself, “ Could Lewis
believe that I am a Christian, had he seen me
to-night and known how I felt on my return
from school ?”

It was under the influence of this feeling
that Emma wished the letter had not been
written which made her brother acquainted
with the new hope that had sprung up in her
heart. She felt sure that in this long visit he
would see much that was wrong in her dis-
position and conduct; and what would he think
of her? In answer she had received a kind,
brotherly letter, which she had cherished as a
precious treasure, and had read over and over
many times.

Another week passed, and the appointed
day brought Lewis Alston to his home. Emma
received him with unmingled pleasure ; for
the feelings of that night had passed away.
18 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

CHAPTER II.

THE LILY AND THE THORN.

For a week all went on very smoothly.
Kmma had ever been desirous of securing
her brother’s good opinion and approbation.
During his very brief visits at home, she had
been accustomed to put a double guard upon
herself, that he might not see anything to
disapprove. She had usually been pretty suc-
cessful. He had never remained long enough
for the novelty aud the restraint of his pre-
sence to wear away. To this, probably, her
success was mainly owing. She was not less
eager to secure his good opinion at the present
time; but the length of his stay made the task
more difficult. The passions which could be
kept under strong restraint for a week might
rebel were the term of this restraint lengthened.
And so, indeed, it proved.

“Where is my dress, Bridget ?” said Emma,
as she entered the laundry one morning, ten
days after her brother’s arrival,

“In the basket,” said Bridget, shortly.

*In the basket!” repeated Emma, her
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 19

cheeks reddening. “I told you to iron it
yesterday.”

“TI didn’t know you were my mistress,”
was the impertinent reply. .

The flush of anger deepened on Emma’s
face.

“How provoking!” she said. “I want
that dress to put on this minute. Why didn't
you iron it yesterday?”

“T could only do half the ironing yesterday.”

“ But you might have ironed that. I told
you to do it.”

“TI know you did. Maybe if you had
asked me it would have been done.”

“ You lazy creature !” said Emma, losing all
temper. “If I were Aunt Fanny, you should
not stay in the house another day.”

“That's true enough ; for then I wouldn’t
stay in the house another day,” said Bridget,
coolly.

“ Hold your tongue !” said Emma, who was
now so angry that she hardly knew what she
said, , :
At this moment she heard a step behind
her. Turning, she saw her brother, who was
passing the door on his way to the garden.
20 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

“What is the matter, Emma?” he asked,
calmly.

She was too angry then to feel any mortifi-
cation ; and she began, in an excited manner,
to tell him how impertinently she had been
treated by Bridget. .

“T can’t wait to hear all the story now,” he
said, after listening a moment. “I have a
letter to write before the mail goes out. You
will find me in the arbour in the garden just
an hour from this time,” he added, taking out
his watch. “Suppose we make an appoint-
ment to meet there; and then I will hear all
you have to say about this affair which has
disturbed you so much, Will you come ?”

“Yes,” said Emma, now partially quieted
by the calmness of her brother’s manner.

As the dress was not to be had, Emma went
up to her room, without saying anything more
to Bridget. At first she felt very angry ; but
soon feelings of anger were exchanged for
those of self-reproach by a process similar to
that which took place when she was so angry
with Mary Green. Calm reflection showed
her that she had herself been much to blame.
In the first place, she had aroused Bridget’s
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 21

natural obstinacy by imperiously ordering her
to iron the dress; and then she had become
very angry at the fruit of her own folly.
Viewing the matter in this light, she began to
feel exceedingly mortified that her brother had
overheard (as she supposed) her violent. lan-
guage to Bridget. Then she began to dread
the meeting in the arbour. What would he
think of her? What would he say to her?
At last she determined not to go there at ail,
though she was not quite clear that this was
exactly right.

She did not see Lewis again till dinner-
time ; and then she carefully avoided meeting
his eye.

“Stop a moment, Emma,” he said to her,
as she was passing him in the hall after dinner.
“You didn’t meet me in the arbour this
morning.”

“No,” said Emma, colouring.

“Why not? Didn’t you promise me you
would ?”

“T know it, but—but— ”

“ But what ?”

Emma blushed still more deeply.

“JT didn’t feel inclined to do it, and I sup-
92 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

posed there was no obligation to do so,” she
said, hesitatingly.

-“Ts not one under obligation to do what
one agrees to do?”

“To tell the truth, Lewis, I was ashamed
to go,” replied Emma, feeling that something
must be said in explanation of her conduct.

“JT think one ought to do what one agrees
to do, even if it does not happen to be quite
agreeable,” said her brother gravely.

“Tam sorry I didn’t keep my word with
you. Please excuse me this time, won't
you?”

“ But are you sorry 2?”

“To be sure I am.”

“Then prove it, will you, by meeting me
there at three o'clock. I have something I
wish to say to you.”

Emma would gladly have excused herself
from this appointment, but she did not see how
she could; so she agreed to do as her brother
wished. She felt very unhappy till the
arrival of the appointed hour. Lewis had
something to say to her. What was it?
Would he reprove her? He had never done
so; but then she had never given him such
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 93

occasion—had never so laid herself open to
reproof. Again she thought of that letter,
and wished she had not written it. She felt
sure her brother must think she was greatly
self-deceived. She was very unhappy—at
that moment wretched and unhappy rather
than truly penitent ; for she thought more of
her brother's opinion of her than of the judg-
ment of her Lord and Saviour.

At three o’clock she repaired to the arbour.
Lewis was not there; but a moment after she
heard him open the garden-gate. He paused
by a bed of lilies and gathered some.

“You are true to your engagement this
time,” he said, as he approached.

He sat down by Emma's side, and placed
the lilies in her hand.

“They are delicate and beautiful, are they
not?” he said.

The kind, gentle tone in which this question
was asked reassured Emma. It did not seem
at all like an introduction to a reproof. She
looked up into -his face, and, smiling faintly,
replied,—

“Yes, very.”

Her brother smiled too.
24 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

“Do you know who has said, ‘ I am the rose
of Sharon and the lily of the valley?’” he
asked, after a moment’s silence.

The question was put in that deep, musical
voice which had so much of soul in it, and
which always vibrated along the chords of
Emma's heart.

“Yes,” said Emma softly, “it is Jesus.”

“This is what he says of himself. Do you
know what he says of his people?” he asked,
in the same tone. . “This is what he says—
“As the lily among thorns, so is my love
among the daughters. The lily has no
thorns, you know. It may be pricked and
torn, but it cannot tear and prick in return.
So it was with the Lily of the Valley:
‘Though he was reviled, he reviled not again;
though he suffered, he threatened not.’ So it
is with all his lilies in proportion as they are
like him. Christ’s lilies should have no
thorns with which to prick and wound. They
may be among thorns, but they should not be
thorns themselves. Does my dear sister wish ~
to be one of Christ’s lilies ? ”

Emma had hid her face in her hands, and
now she sobbed aloud.
THE LILY AND THE THORN. _ 25

“T knew it would be so,” she said at last,
restraining her tears.

“Knew it would be how?”

Emma hesitated, and then resolved to free
her mind. |

“I knew when you came I should be sorry
I had written you that letter.”

“What letter ?”’

“The last letter I wrote you.”

“What! that welcome letter which told me
you hoped that Christ had become your Friend
and Saviour. I trust you do not regret that
choice.”

“That is not what I mean. But I have so
many faults. When you learn how many
faults I have, I fear that you will not believe
that I love the Saviour.”

“You are thinking of the thorns.”

“Yes, Lewis, I am not a harmless lily. I
have many thorns, and they often wound and
pierce my friends.”’

“ And yourself too.”

“ Ah, that they do.”

“ Did you hear all I said to Bridget?” asked
Emma timidly, after a moment's silence.

“T heard quite enough.”
26 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

Emma’s tears flowed afresh.

“QO Lewis, what did you think?” she
said.

“T thought, of course, that you were very
much to blame. I thought the thorn was very
visible. I thought, too, if Christ was changing
that thorn into one of the lilies, you would
soon feel very sorry for this outburst’ of
passion.”

“T am sorry, dear brother. But I do wrong
so often that I sometimes fear it is all wrong
with me.”

Lewis drew Emma close to his side, and
said tenderly, “ My dear sister, don’t you think
the Lord Jesus knows what thorns he has
undertaken to transform into lilies? Don’t you
think he knows all he undertakes to do when
he invites poor, wretched sinners to come to
him and be saved?”

“Then you are not quite discouraged about
me? ” said Emma, looking up doubtingly into
her brother’s face.

“No, Emma; and what is better still, and
much more to the point, 1 don’t think the
Lord Jesus Christ will cast you off. His
patience with us poor, wayward sinners is
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 27

wonderful. Hear what he has promised to do
for those who believe in him.”

Lewis took his Bible from his pocket, and
read—“ That he might present it to himself
a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle,
or any such thing; but that it should be holy
and without blemish.”

“This, dear Emma,” he said, “is what we
shall be when the work which Christ will do
for us is completed. You must remember this
work has a small beginning, like a grain of
mustard-seed ; but in the end it is a great
tree. Doubtless you have many faults, though
I have been with you so little I have dis-
covered only a few of them. The question is
not if you have faults, but how do you treat
these faults? How do you feel in relation to
them ?” |

“T think 1 am very sorry when I do wrong
said Emma ; “ but the worst of it is, my SOLTOW
does not tevent me from doihg wrong again.
I was angry with one of my school-fellows
about a week before you came home, and said
some severe things about her. I was after-
wards so sorry that I thought I never should
do the same thing again. But this morning
28 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

I was very angry with Bridget. I am
atraid, after all, 1 am not very different from
what I used to be; I do so many of the same
wrong things.”

“Let us look a little further into this sub-
ject,” said Lewis, “and see in what respects
you are the same that you used to be, and in
what you are changed. Will you give me all
the particulars of the event which happened
the week before I came home? I have special
reasons for making this request.”

Emma complied with her brother’s wishes.

“I suppose,” said Lewis, when she had told
the story, “that at first you felt towards Mary
very much as you would have felt a year ago,
had the same thing happened then.”

“T think I did—just the same.”

“Then so far there was no change. Now
let us inquire into your feelings and conduct
afterwards, when you had had time for reflec-
tion. I wish you to take a careful review of
these, and then tell me if they were in any
way different from what they would have been
a year before.”

“TI felt very sorry for my angry feelings,”
said Emma, after a thoughtful silence. “1
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 29

remembered how much I hoped had been for-
‘ given me, and felt how wrong it was not to
forgive. Ishould not have had these feelings
a year ago. Then, when father reproved me
at the tea-table, I freely confessed that I had
done wrong, instead of justifying myself by
relating the provocation I had received, as I
should once have done. The next day I
treated Mary Green as kindly as I could, and
told Julia Summers that I was sorry for what
I had said about her.”

“Then it seems there are indications of
some kind of a change, even in this incident,
which you justly regard as a sad fall into sin.
All are sinners; but the Bible divides man-
kind into two classes—penitent and impeni-—
tent sinners. When Christians fall into sin,
they are truly penitent for it, while others are
not. Others may be sorry they have done
wrong, for many reasons, but they are not
truly penitent. God alone can read your
heart, my dear Emma, and see whether it is a
truly penitent one; but I hope that you were
truly penitent for your anger towards Mary
Green.”

« At the time I thought I was very sorry,’
30 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

said Emma, “and I meant to be very watchful,
and hoped that I should not soon be angry
again,”

“On what ground did you hope so? Was
it that you intended to be very watchful and
careful ?” |

“T suppose so.”

“Then I think you may here find the chief
cause of your failure. Do you think that all
your watchfulness and care can change the
thorn into a lily.” |

“No; but must I not be careful and watch-
ful?”

“Certainly ; but you must not trust in that
care and watchfulness—you must not rely
upon them as your security. Let me illustrate
this by supposing a case. Let me suppose
that you were involved in a lawsuit in which
a great deal of property was at stake—indeed,
all that you possessed in the world. We will
suppose it to be a very intricate case—one in
which there are many papers to be examined,
and many puzzling questions to be settled.
We will suppose that you understand very
little about the matter, and that the case seems
to you involved in inextricable confusion. You
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 3l

know not how to take even the first step to
get out of your difficulties.

“ At this juncture, a person in. whom you

have perfect confidence steps forward and
offers to take the case into hisown hands. He
reminds you that you do not understand the
subject, and are ignorant what steps to take.
He assures you that he is perfectly acquainted
with the case, and knows exactly what must
be done to secure a favourable issue; and he
engages to bring you safe through, if you will
trust the business with him, and agree care-
fully to obey all his directions. Sensible of
your own weakness and helplessness, you
gladly accept of this offer.
_ “ By-and-by he puts some papers into your
hands, directing you to make a fair and legible
copy of them. You set about the task ear-
nestly and diligently, and take much pains to
have the work welldone. But would you rely
for the success of your cause on: the correct
copying of these papers?”

“Certainly not. All my hope of success
would rest on the skill and faithfulness of the
friend who had undertaken my case.”

“Suppose you should reason that, as all
32 THE LILY AND THE THORN,

your hope of success rested on that friend, it
was of no consequence if you did copy the
papers negligently and incorrectly ?”

“That would be most base and ungrateful.
Besides, the agreement was, not only that I
should trust the case entirely in his hands, but
also that I should implicitly obey his directions.”

“Then your duty would be to copy the
papers carefully and correctly ?”

“ Certainly.”

“ But while doing this, your whole reliance
would be upon your friend, and what he had
undertaken to do for you, and not upon the
way in which you discharged this duty.”

“That is very plain.”

“Yet is there not one sense in which your
success would depend upon your obedience to
the directions of your friend ?”

“T think there is,” said Emma thoughtfully.
“Tf I refused to submit to his direction, I
should have reason te expect that he would
abandon my cause.’

“You would also expect that your ror
would have its place in securing the desired
result, but only as an instrument which he
would employ and guide to that end.”
THE LILY AND THE THORN. 33

“That, too, is very plain.”

“Now, this is an imperfect illustration of
the relation in which you stand to Him whom
you have chosen for your Saviour and Friend.
You have trusted your case to him. You
have put the thorn into his hands to form it
into a lily. That is his work,—not yours.
You struggle with your evil passions and
mourn over your ill success. It is as if you
took the thorn into your hand, and said dis-
consolately, ‘Ah, I never can make it a lily.’
It is true that you never can; but Christ can.
You have forgotten that this work is his, and
have been trying to do it yourself. You can
no more re-create your soul in God’s image than
you could create it at first. Of all Christ’s
lihes it is true that they are ‘born not of
blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the
will of man, but of God.’

“But you may ask, ‘If Christ must do so
much, what have 1 to do?’ Just what you
had to do in the case supposed,—obey his
directions. One of these is, ‘Watch and pray,
that ye enter not into temptation.’ If you
obey, he will employ that watchfulness and

prayer as one of the instrumentalities by
3
34 THE LILY AND THE THORN.

which he will change the thorn into a lily.
But you must not trust in these. You must
trust only in Him into whose hands you have
put your case. It is by this united trust and
obedience that we gain the victory over sin.
Our resolutions to watch and pray must be
coupled with a sincere reliance upon Christ as
our Almighty Helper. Was it not here that
you failed the other day?” .

“TIT am afraid I relied too much on the
watchfulness I intended to exercise.”

-“ This isa very common mistake. While you
watch and strive against sin, never forget who
it is that has undertaken your cause. Rest
all your hopes of success on what he will do
in and for you. Watch and pray in the same
spirit in which you would obey the directions
of your friend in the case I have supposed.
You will then find that you do get the victory
over sin and are becoming more like Christ ;
_ and the rapidity of the change will be in pro-
“ cannot separate true faith and obedience.
They always go together. In the case I have
supposed, you would expect your friend to
cast you off if you refused to obey his direc-
HEARING AND DOING. 35

tions. So Jesus Christ will have nothing to
do with those who will not honestly strive to
obey him. It is in vain that we profess to
trust him if we do not obey him; yet it is by
a simple reliance upon him that we obtain
grace to obey his commandments.”

CHAPTER IIL

HEARING AND DOING.

THE next day was the Sabbath. In the after-
noon the minister preached from the words,
“For even Christ pleased not himself.” It
was a seasonable lesson, and moved Emma’s
feelings very much.

“ Haven't we had a good sermon this after-
noon?” said she to her brother, after their
return from church.

“ Yes, a very good sermon,” said Lewis,
his countenance beaming with an expression
manifesting his appreciation of it.

“Tf it were only Sunday every day,” said
Emma, “and we could hear such sermons as
that, I think we might grow good very fast.” |
36 HEARING AND DOING.

Lewis smiled ; but there was something in
the smile that said, “1 am not of your opi-
nion ;’ and Emma so construed it.

“Don’t you think so?” she asked.

“T do not.” | | .
“Why not? When I hear such sermons it
seems as if they took away all wrong feelings
_ out of my heart. If I could only hear them

every day!”

“Then perhaps you might not discover your
mistake, which would be a great calamity.”

“What mistake?” said Emma, looking a
little puzzled.

“The mistake of supposing that listening to
such truth will do the work of removing wrong
thoughts and feelings from your heart.”

“But will not the preaching of the gospel
dothis? I thought that was the design of it.”

“Did you notice Mr. N. ?”

“Yes; he slept during the whole of the
sermon.”

‘Do you think the preaching of the gospel
this afternoon had any effect to make him
better ?”’

“Of course not,” said Emma, smiling; “ for
he did not hear it.”


HEARING AND DOING. 27

“Then hearing is necessary, if we would be
profited 2?”

“ Certainly.”

“Ts that all that is required ?”

“We must hear with earnest attention.”

“Ts that all?”

“T suppose we must hear not only with
attention, but with pleasure.”

“And is that all?” repeated her brother
earnestly.

Again Emma looked puzzled, and this time
did not reply.

“As you cannot answer the question, we
~ must look elsewhere for an answer,’ said her
brother. ‘I think we can find it here,” he
continued, taking out his Bible and opening
it. “The Apostle James tells us very plainly
that something more is wanted. This is what
he says: ‘But be ye doers of the word, and
not hearers only, deceiving your own selves.
For if any man be a hearer of the word, and
not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his
natural face in a glass: for he beholdeth him-
self, and goeth his way, and straightway for-
getteth what manner of man he was. But
whoso looketh into the perfect law of liberty,

—
38 HEARING AND DOING.

and continueth therein, he being not a foreet-
ful hearer, but a doer of the work, this man
shall be blessed in his deed.’

“In this passage you will find the reason
why I do not think we should become good by
being always employed in listening to sermons.
If such a thing were possible, how should we
ascertain whether we were doers or only hearers
of the word? By ‘hearers,’ I suppose the
apostle means those who listen to the word with
attention and even with pleasure and delight.
But he plainly tells us that among those
hearers there are two classes. The one class
ONLY hear. They do not go home to practise
what they hear. They may enjoy and admire
the sermon, and perhaps wish they could listen
to such a one every day. But during the
week, when the occasion comes that the sermon
should be remembered and reduced to practice,
they do not think of it then. They are for-
getful hearers, and might see themselves in
this mirror: ‘For he beholdeth himself, and
goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth
what manner of man he was.’

“The other class also listen with pleasure
and delight. But they do more than this.
HEARING AND DOING. 39

They hide the word in their hearts, and, as
occasion offers, they try to practise it. They
answer to the description, ‘ But whoso looketh
into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth
therein, he being not a forgetful hearer, but a
doer of the work, this man shall be blessed
in his deed.’

“Our Saviour described these two classes
of hearers in his parable of the sower. In
that parable he tells us of those who heard
the word with joy and yet were not doers of
the word. ‘They brought forth no fruit. But
he describes another class, who received the
word into good ground, and brought forth
fruit, some a hundred-fold, some sixty, some
thirty.

“Jt is not when listening to the word that
we are most likely to discover to which of
these two classes we belong. I suppose you
have sometimes thought that the trials, cares,
and temptations of the week are a great hin-
drance to your being good. Isn’t it so ?”

“Yes, Lewis ; I have often thought so.”

“Yet these trials and temptations are just
what you need to prove whether you are a
hearer only or a doer of the word. If these
40 HEARING AND DOING.

are met in a right spirit, they will greatly ad-
vance your progress in holiness. The doing
of the work is as necessary to the growth of
grace in the soul as the hearing of it on the
Sabbath. When we hear such a sermon.as it
has been our privilege to listen to this after-
noon, we should hide it in our hearts and
seek for occasions to practise it during the
week.”

“Now I shall havetwo hours—two full hours
—all to myself; and that will be long enough to
read this book quite through,” said Emma, the
next Wednesday afternoon, as she seated her-
self by the pleasant window of the upper hall,
with a book which her cousin Mary had that
day lent to her.

She had read the first chapter, had decided
that the book promised to be very interesting,
and was eagerly dipping into chapter second,
when her ear caught the sound of pattering
footsteps on the stairs. She did not feel very
amiable at the prospect of an interruption,
and mentally exclaimed, “There's Grace!
What a little torment she is sometimes! She
has come to tease me for something, I daresay.
HEARING AND DOING, 41

That’s always the way when I don’t want to
be interrupted !”

By the time this soliloquy was ended, Grace,
with a skip, hop, and jump, had reached her
sister's side.

“O Emma,” she said,—her round, dimpled
face flushed with pleasurable excitement,—
“vou don’t know what grand times we are
having this afternoon! Cousin Susie wants us
to play that Miss Kate [Grace’s favourite doll]
is going to be married. Isn’t it funny? We
are going to call on the bride and bring her
presents, you know, and have such an amusing
game, and we want you to come to the play-
room and help to dress Miss Kate.”

All this was said with breathless eagerness,
and then little C:ace paused. There were two
reasons for this. The first was want of breath
to say more; the second, a chill of disappoint-
ment as she observed that Emma, who had
raised her eyes from her book only for an in-
stant, was now absorbed in it again, and ap-
parently altogether unmindful of what she was
saying. |

But Grace was not so easily baffled when
she had once set her heart upon obtaining
42 HEARING AND DOING.

an object. After taking breath, she pulled
Emma’s dress, and said, imploringly,—

“Now, do come, Emma. That’s a dear, good
sister. It will take you only a very little
while.”

“Don’t you see I am busy, Grace? Come,
go away, and don’t tease me.”

“Now, Emma, do come. We want you so
much !”

The tones were very moving, and the blue
eyes were already swimming at the thought
of disappointment.

“T am sure, Grace, you and Susie and
Mary can manage to dress your doll without
me.”

“So we could other days; but you know
Kate is a bride to-day, and we want her to
look very nice. We don’t know how to dress
brides.”

There was a look of grave concern on the
little upturned face which would have pro-
voked a smile from one less annoyed than
Emma. The urgency of little Grace was not
without its effect even upon her. She wavered
for a moment, looked first into the blue eyes
which were watching her as earnestly as if
HEARING AND DOING. 43

the fate of a kingdom depended on her deci-
sion, and then at the book in her hand. The
last look decided the question, and decided it
in favour of self-pleasing.

“No, I can’t go,” she said. ‘“ You must
dress your own dolls.”

“Oh, don’t say so! We won’t ask you to
stay long—only a very, very little while.”

“ Misfortunes never come single,” is an old
adage. Whether it be true or not, it is certain
that sins never do. With this decision on the
part of Emma to please herself came an in-
creased feeling cf vexation at Grace for inter-
rupting her quiet.

“Go away, you little torment!” she said,
quite angrily. “I tell you I will not be in-
terrupted.”

At this moment Emma heard her brother
coming up stairs. He crossed the hall and
went into his own room, without seeming to
notice either herself or Grace.

The big tears rolled down the cheeks of
little Grace, as she turned slowly from her
sister. Thicker and faster they came as she
descended the stairs. When she reached the
foot, they broke out into sobs which came up
44 HEARING AND DOING,

from the very bottom of the heart, that was
not yet used to disappointment. To her the
bridal dress of doll Kate was a matter of as
grave importance as her own might be some
years hence. She threw herself down on the
lowest step and sobbed and cried for a few
minutes. ‘Then she arose, and, brushing away
the tears, went to inform Susie and Mary of
the ill success of her mission.

“ Never mind,” said the independent Susie.
“We can dress Kate without any of Emma’s
help. If she doesn’t choose to come, let her
stay away.”

“ But she would have made Kate look so
nice,” sobbed the still grieved child.

“Tam sure Kate will look very nice with-
out any of her help,” said Susie with an in-
dependent toss of her head, as she proceeded
to search Mary’s work-basket for a needle and
thread, with which to work out the fulfilment
of her own prophecy.

Emma tried to be deaf to the sobs of her
little sister, as they came up to her from the
foot of the stairs. But they reached her ears
in spite of her, and, what was still more
annoying, they reached her conscience also.
HEARING AND DOING. 4S

She tried to read as if nothing had occurred
to disturb her ; but the inward monitor would
not suffer it, and she was compelled to listen
to its voice. “That act of yours,’ it said,
“was a selfish, unsisterly, unchristian act.



You may call it only child’s play,—only help-
ing to dress a doll, a very small affair, indeed.
But you know that you might have made
your little sister very happy by a trifling self-
denial, and gained a yet warmer place in her
loving little heart. Hear her sobs! Are you
not ashamed of yourself ?”

When all was quiet again, Emma tried to fix
her attention upon the book and feel the same
interest in it that she had felt before this in-
terruption ; but she could not. The honest
verdict of conscience would come between her
and it and divert her mind from the story.

At last she suffered the book to drop on ber
lap, while she fell into a fit of musing. It
was something in this way :—“TI declare it is
too bad that one can’t take a bit of comfort
when one sets out to do so, That little teaser
has contrived to get my mind off my book,
anyhow. I suppose I need not have answered
her quite so sharply ; but then it was so pro-
46 HEARING AND DOING.

voking to be interrupted. I wish Grace did
not always want something when I am par-
ticularly busy.”

In this tone, partly of vexation and partly
of self-dissatisfaction, Emma carried on a con-
versation with herself. Notwithstanding the
faithful admonition of conscience, she had no
very distinct apprehension of the wrong she
had done. She saw it just clearly enough to
produce an uneasy feeling of self-reproach,
mingled with the vexation of losing the enjoy-
ment of her bock; but no feeling of genuine
penitence was produced.

At this moment the door of her brother's
room opened, and he came into the hall. In-
stead of going down stairs, he came slowly to
the place where Emma was sitting.

“T wonder if he heard what I said to Grace?”
thought she, as he approached. She gave a
quick glance into his Tace, to see if she could
there read an.answer to this query. But she
could not. If he had heard, his face told no
tales.

“ What are you doing, Emma?” he asked.

“ Reading,” said Emma.

“ Reading?” he repeated in a sceptical tone.
HEARING AND DOING. 47

Emma blushed as she looked down upon the
book which lay half closed in her lap.

“Twas reading a short time ago,” she said;
“but I believe I was thinking just now when
you came out of your room.”

“ Do you find the book interesting?”

“T believe so. I hardly know yet.”

“Was it of that you have been thinking?”

Emma looked into her brother’s face. His
eyes were fixed upon her in a way that made
the blood rush to her face. Was he reading
her thoughts ?

“T can't say I was thinking of my book,”
she replied.

“Since that does not furnish you with sub-
jects of thought, shall I give you one?” he
asked.

Emma. assented.

Her brother took a paper from his pocket,
wrote a few words upon it, folded it several
times and handed it to Emma. He then went
‘down stairs, and was out of sight before Emma
had unfolded the paper.

It contained only five words; but the tears
came to her eyes as she read them; for they
were these,—“ Even Christ pleased not him-
43 HEARING AND DOING.

self”’—-the words of the text the last Sabbath
afternoon,—the text of the sermon to which
she had listened with so much pleasure.

All that her brother had said to her about
doing as well as hearing was at once recalled
to her mind. “A forgetful hearer,’ she mur-
mured. Where is the doing? Why did I
not think of that sermon and that text this
afternoon? JI heard the word with pleasure
and delight; but where is the fruit? How
hateful the thought of pleasing one’s self looked
to me last Sabbath afternoon, when compared
with the self-denial of the blessed Saviour!
Yet how have I pleased myself this afternoon!
If this truth had been in my heart when
Grace came to me, I could not have answered
her as I did. Lewis heard what I said to her,
no doubt, and has taken this way to reprove
ine. He could not have done it more effect-
ually than by leaving me with these words to
show me how unlike Christ I am.”

Emma’s heart was now truly melted and
penitent. While meditating in this strain, a
merry peal of laughter from the playroom
reached her ears. This aroused her.

“This is only feeling,’ she said. “Itis not
HEARING AND DOING 49

doing. Can I do anything for Grace to show
that I am sorry for my selfishness? Kate is
dressed ere this, no doubt. What can I do? Ah:
I know,” she said, after a moment’s reflection.
Brushing away the tears which still fell, she
left her seat and hastened into her own room.

She was soon surrounded with bits of silk,
ribbon and artificial flowers. Being skilful
in such work, fifteen minutes sufficed to pro-
duce a very respectable and not untasteful
article of miniature millinery, which was
desioned to be Miss Dolly’s bridal hat. She
then put on her sun-bonnet and repaired to
the place where the children were playing.
As she approached, she hid the offering she
Tad brought under her shawl.

“T have come to pay my respects to the
bride,” she said, as she drew near the group.

Grace, whose loving little heart was in-
capable of retaining for any length of time
either vexation or resentment, caught her sis-
ter’s hand.

“Tam so glad you have come!” she said
She had already quite forgiven Emma for the
disappointment she had caused, though she
had felt it keenly.
50 HEARING AND DOING.

“Ts the bride to take a wedding-tour ?”
asked Emma, as Grace led her forward to where
the doll sat in state to receive congratulations
and presents.

Mary and Grace looked as if this were some-
thing they had not thought of; but Susie
promptly answered,—

“To be sure she is. She starts to-morrow.”

“Then this will be just what she needs,”
said Emma, holding up the tiny hat.

“A bridal hat! A bridal hat!” exclaimed
all the girls at once. -

“What a beauty!” said Mary.

“Jt is just the thing,” said Susie.

“Tt is better than if she had made the
dress,” said Grace ; “for Susie did that very
nicely, but she could not make such a hat.”

“There, Miss Kate! What do you say to
that?” said Susie, holding it up before the
bride, who certainly looked at it in a very
dignified way, such as no doubt became a
bride.

“Try it on,” said Mary.

This was done; and all the girls danced with
delight to see how very becoming it was.

In the midst of the uproar, a voice was

4
HEARING AND DOING. 51

heard just behind them, asking, very plea-
santly, ‘What is all this noise about ?”

“QO Lewis,’ said Grace, bounding towards
him and catching hold of his hand, “ we are
just as happy as we can be !”

“So I should think,’ said Lewis, looking
down on her beaming face and patting her on
the cheek. “But you haven't told me yet
what all this noise is about.”

“Oh, Emma has just brought us a bridal
hat for Kate, and it is such a beauty! and I
am so glad I don’t know what to do.”

“Not a very common complaint,” said
Lewis, laughing.

“ You must come and see the bride,” said
Grace.

Lewis suffered himself to be led forward
into the presence of that dignified personage ;
and he made his little sister very happy by a
well-timed compliment on her appearance.

All this time Emma kept herself a litle
on one side,—feelings of humiliation and of
pleasure struggling for the ascendency and
by turns lighting her face with smiles and
dyeing her cheeks with blushes. At last she
ventured to raise her eyes to her brother’s
52 HEARING AND DOING,

face. Their eyes met, and he smiled. There
was something in that smile which made her
heart throb. He came up to her, and said,—

“Come with me to the house, Emma, I
think it is plain that these little folks will be
happy enough without our help the rest of the
afternoon.” He drew her hand within his
arm as he said this, and they walked towards
the house.

“Well, Emma, what do you think about
hearing and doing?” he asked.

“T forgot the doing,” said Emma, with a
shade of sadness in her tone.

“ But you remembered it after a time, and
you have made your little sisters very happy.”

“TI did not think of it till you reminded
me of it. I acted very selfishly when Grace
came to me. I please myself before I think.”

“When you are reminded of your duty, let
your action be right, as it was this afternoon.
You will find this the best of all methods for
learning to practise what you hear. There is
nothing helps the digestion of the word, so
that it will cause us to grow in grace, like the
doing of it. On the Sabbath you listened to
the doctrine that Christ pleased not himself.
HEARING AND DOING. 53

To-day, after you became sensible of your
error, you tried to follow his example. On
which occasion do you think you best pleased
your Saviour ?”

“It was but a little thing,’ said Emma ;
“only making a doll’s hat.”

“And therefore you think it so small that
your Saviour will overlook it?”

“TI don’t know. It seems like a little
thing.”

“ We make sad mistakes sometimes on this
point. Nothing can be a small thing, or an
insignificant trifle, that has an effect upon our
moral and religious character. When you
sent Grace away so roughly, it was not a trifle ;
for it involved the principle of self-pleasing.
[t showed you to be a forgetful hearer of the
truth you so much admired. It made you
unlike your Saviour.

“When you repented, and made that hat to
please your sister, 1t was not a little thing.
It was fruit from the word. It was an act
done, I trust, to please your Saviour. If so,
it could not be a trifle. Our ever-present
Saviour saw you in the midst of that playing
group as surely as he sees you in church or m
54 SELF-WILL.

your closet. If it was your desire to please
him, his approbation and his smile were there
also. ‘“ Was it a small thing to win these?”

“Oh, no,” said Emma, the tears filling her
eyes. “If I could only see what I call small
things in that light!”

“This is the ight in which they should be
viewed. ‘To please his God and his Redeemer
should be the work of the Christian’s life.
But life is mostly made up of small things.
We seldom find an opportunity to do any
great deed. But we can please Christ in small
things every day and every hour. You may
serve him in the smallest act, when it is done
with a desire to please him. By doing this
you will grow to be like him, and the thorn
will be changed into the lily.”

CHAPTER IV.

SELF-WILL.

“How would you like to take a ride with
me to-day?” said Lewis to Emma, at the
SELF-WILL. 55

breakfast-table, one morning in the course of
the next week.

“T should like it very much. Where are
you going?

“| think of riding over to visit Uncle Dennis,
and I thought you might like to go with me
to see your cousin Lucy?”

“Indeed I should.”

“ Then get ready as soon as you have finished
your breakfast ; for we must be off in an hour
at furthest.”

“Did you hear what Uncle Dennis said to
me just before we came away?” inquired
Emma of her brother, as they were returning
home at night.

“No. What was it?

“ He said he should bring Cousin Lucy over

vin a few days to spend several weeks with us.”

“Indeed! I suppose you are very glad?”

“T am glad, and yet I am sorry,” said
Emma, thoughtfully.

“And why sorry? Don’t you enjoy your
cousin Lucy’s visits?”

“Yes,—generally. We have sometimes
been very happy together ; but we don’t always
get on smootiily.”
&§ SELF-WILL

“Why not?”

“For several reasons.”

“What is one of them?”

“One of them, I think, is that Lucy likes so
very much to have her own way.”

“And another is that her cousin Emma
likes so much to have her own way too. Is it
not so?” asked Lewis, looking into his sister’s
face.

“T suppose it is,” said Emma, blushing.

“By what do you suppose your cousin Lucy
is governed, when she is mistress of her own
actions, and not controlled by circumstances
or the authority of her parents and teachers?” -

“By her own will, I think.”

“And by what is my dear sister Emma
governed?”

Emma did not reply.

“Do you know who says, ‘ My sheep hear
my voice, and I know them, and they follow
me?” |

“Tt is Jesus,” said Emma, in a subdued
tone.

“Who are his sheep?”

“Those who love and cbey him.”

“When self-will speaks demanding one
SELF-WILL. 57

thing, and his voice is heard requiring a con-
trary thing, which will his sheep hear and
obey?”

“They will obey him, I suppose.”

“ Don’t you think you will get on pleasantly
with ‘your cousin, if you listen to the voice of
the kind Shepherd instead of the promptings
of your own self-will?”

“TI suppose so, But I fear I shall not
always do this. I am still sometimes very
self-willed; and I fear I shall show this more
than ever when cousin Lucy comes.”

“Then, my dear sister, you must watch and
pray, that you may not enter into temptation;
for it is written, ‘ Blessed is the man that en-
dureth temptation.” If you are one of the
Saviour’s lambs, you earnestly wish that your
self-wiil may be subdued and that God’s will
alone may rule your heart. If your cousin
is more than ordinarily self-willed, her visit
will afford you an excellent opportunity to
discover and watch against and subdue self-
will. I trust you will be disposed to make the
best possible improvement of this opportunity.”

“T believe you always see some good to be
derived. from everything,” said Emma.
58 SELF-WILL.

“Why should I not? Have I not the best
authority for doing so? Do not,‘all things
work together for good to them that love God?”

Uncle Dennis did not forget his promise.
The next week he brought his daughter Lucy
to spend the vacation with her cousin Emma.
The first two days passed away very plea-
santly.

“Come, Emma; let’s take a walk,” said
Lucy to Emma on the third afternoon.

“ Aoreed,” said Emma. “ Let us go as far
‘as Mr Dalton’s and take a peep at his garden.
I know it must look beautiful after the rain
we have had.”

“ But I do not wish to go in that direction,”
replied Lucy. “I want to go down to the
river this afternoon. We can go to Mr,
Dalton’s another time.”

“And we can go down to the river another
time,” said Emma, whose self-will was sud-
denly aroused by her cousin’s opposition to her
proposal.

“ But I want to go there this afternoon.”

“And I want to see Mr. Dalton’s garden
this afternoon. JBesides, the grass is damp
in the walk to the river,’ said Emma, who
SELF-WILL. 59

wished to fortify her position by a show of
reason. | |

“ Nonsense! the grass is not damp. It has
had plenty of time to dry since the rain. We .
are not obliged to wear thin shoes, either.
Mother says we had better not wear them in
such walks. So for the river, I say.”

Lucy laid aside her work and left the room;
but Emma did not rise to follow her. Per-
ceiving this, Lucy paused and turned round
when she reached the door.

“Come, Emma; are you not going?” she said.

“ Not to the river.”

“Well, I am going to the river. If you
will go with me, very well; if not, I will go
alone.”

Emma had not expected this. She thought
her steady determination to go nowhere else
but to Mr. Dalton’s would bring Lucy to
terms and gain her consent to her wishes.
But it had produced an opposite effect, and
had strengthened her cousin in her resolution
to go nowhere but to the river. She now
regretted that she had so positively declared
she would not go in that direction; but, hav-
ing said it, she would not draw back.
60 SELF-WILL.

Lucy, on her part, did not exactly fancy the
idea of a solitary walk to the river. In fact,
she would really have preferred to have re-
mained at home, if Emma would not go with
her. But she had said that she should go,
and go she would.

Emma did not feel quite at ease after Lucy
had gone. But she had not much time for
reflection during her cousin’s absence ; for
several things occurred to occupy her atten-
tion. She had just resumed her sewing, from
which she had been called away, when
Lucy returned. She came bounding into
the room, holding in her hands a beautiful
bouquet. :

Emma did not expect that Lucy would
enjoy her solitary walk very much; but the
first glance at her face showed that she had
enjoyed it. Emma was vexed rather than
pleased at this discovery. Lucy’s face told of
something more than enjoyment. It told of
triumph too, and a malicious satisfaction in
that triumph. She had indeed enjoyed the
walk ; but, not content with this, she had come
home to enjoy teasing her cousin for refusing
to go with her. Circumstances had given her
SELF-WILL. 61

the power to do this, and she intended to
make the most of them.

“There, Miss Emma!” she said, holding up
her bouquet triumphantly; “isn’t that beauti-
ful? Is it not better than looking over the
wall at the flowers in Mr. Dalton’s garden?
Now don’t you wish you had gone with me?”

Emma was much disturbed by her cousin’s
air of triumph, though she tried hard not
to show it. She was too much vexed to own
she wished she had gone with her.

“TI don't wish any such thing,” she replied.

“Neither do J,” said Lucy, with a toss of
her head. “I had the best of company, and
did not miss you at all.”

Here Lucy paused. She was sure her
cousin would be very curious to know who
had accompanied her, and she intended that
she should be obliged to ask before her curi-
osity was gratified. Emma was both desirous
to know and unwilling to ask. But curiosity
conquered ‘sullenness.

“What company?” she inquired, after a
moment's silence.

“What company? Cousin Lewis, to be sure.
Didn’t he act the agreeable to perfection? He
62 SELF-WILL.

knows how to treat a guest civilly, if his sister
doesn’t.”

Emma’s cheeks flushed ; but she made no
reply. Lucy maliciously enjoyed her discom-
fiture, and perversely went on in the ungracious
work of increasing it.

“ But I haven’t told youall,” she eontinued.

“When we came home, Lewis took me
round past Mrs. Crawford’s. When she saw
your brother, she called to us and invited us
to come in. Cousin Lewis at first declined ;
but she said,— |

“« You really must come in with your young
friend. My very best cherries are now in
perfection, and I hope you Will come in and
have some.’

“ Lewis thanked her, and we went in. You
never saw such a dish of cherries as she sét
before us. I think I never tasted any equal®
to them. I thought of you, but comforted
myself with the reflection that you might be
looking over the wall into Mr. Dalton’s gar-
den, which would make amends for all.”

mma writhed under her cousin’s raillery,
but said nothing.

“After we had eaten as many cherries as
SELF-WILL. 63

we wanted,” continued Lucy, “ Mrs. Crawford
invited us into her beautiful garden; and there
she gathered for me this beautiful bouquet.”

“ How came Lewis to go.with you?” Emma
now ventured to ask.

The question reminded Lucy that here was
another point on which it was in her power to
tease Emma, and “pay her,” as she called it,
- for not going with her. :

“ {met him at the door,’ she replied. “He
wished to know where I was going, and why
I was going alone. I told him how particu-
larly amiable and obliging my cousin Emma
was this afternoon; for I did not wish him to
suppose that I really preferred a solitary walk.
Learning how the case stood, he courteously
offered me the benefit of his company, which
considerate offer was gladly accepted; and we
enjoyed the pleasantest walk imaginable, as
one usually does in such company.”

It was a little too much for Emma to
know that Lewis had been made acquainted
with her disobliging conduct to her guest.
She was forced to leave the room hastily to hide
the tears which could no longer be repressed.

Emma found much food for bitter reflection
64 SELF-WILL.

on reaching her room. She was exceedingly
disturbed by Lucy’s triumphant rehearsal of
the pleasures derived from the walk that she
had refused to share. Her cousin had obtained
a great triumph over her. But, worse than
this, she could not rid herself of the uncom-
fortable reflection that the annoyance had
been the result of an act on her part which
could not be justified... She was conscious
that she had been disobliging and uncourteous
to a guest, whose preferences should have met
with greater consideration. But that which
rendered her most unhappy was the knowledge
of the fact that her brother had been made
acquainted with the whole affair, and that her
conduct had been placed before him in a very
unfavourable light.

The retrospect of the afternoon filled the
mind of Emma with vexation and ill humour.
She was vexed with herself, for she felt that
she had acted foolishly ; she was much vexed
with Lucy for the way in which she had tri-
umphed over her; and she was even a little
_ vexed with Lewis for making himself so
agreeable to Lucy and so greatly promoting
her enjoyment.
SELF-WILL. 65

She was really unhappy. She was really
very sorry too for the part she had acted ; but
she was not penitent forit. It1is quite possible
for one to feel very sorry for doing wrong
and yet not feel the least true penitence. It
is possible to feel much self-reproach even
without penitence. Some imagine that all
sorrow for sin 1s repentance ; but it 1s a very
great mistake. Had Emma been truly peni-
tent that afternoon, all feelings of vexation and
wounded pride would have been removed from
her heart. Pride and penitence cannot dwell
there together. When one enters, the other
must depart. But Emma’s heart was full
of wounded pride that afternoon, and no
change had taken place when the bell sum-
moned her to tea. She felt particularly un-
amiable towards Lucy ; but no opportunity of
manifesting the feeling occurred that night.

The next morning Lewis, Emma, and Lucy
were in the sitting-room together. Lewis was
reading the morning paper ; Emma was sewing,
and Lucy was seated by a stand at a little dis-
tance from them, trying to arrange between
sheets of paper some flowers she wished to press.
She worked very diligently for some time ;

5
G6 SELF-WILL.

but, having had little practice, she had not ac-
quired the skill which practice alone can give.
Though she tried hard, she could not place
the flowers on the fair white page so that they
would look as did the specimens in Cousin
Lewis’ herbarium, or even in her cousin
Emma’s,

“Emma, I do wish you would come and
help me!” she exclaimed at last, discouraged
by her want of success. “I can’t get them
to please me. They look so stiff and awkward! -
Come; you know how to do this a great deal
better than I do.” |

Emma did not feel at all disposed to comply
with this request. Her vexation with her
cousin had not passed away. Besides, these
very flowers had formed a part of the bouquet
which Lucy had the day previous held up
before her so triumphantly ; and she was
secretly glad that she could not arrange them
as she desired.

“T can’t help you,” she said. “I am very
busy sewing.”

“Will you accept of my assistance?” in-
quired Lewis, looking up from his paper.
“ Perhaps I shall do as well as Emma.”
SELF-WILL. 67

“Thank you, Cousin Lewis. You will do
a great deal better than Emma; for you know ~
more about it. 1 consider that I am the gainer
by her refusal to assist me.”

This was said in a tone of triumph which
did not escape the observation of Emma or
lessen her vexation.

With the assistance of Lewis, the -flowers
were soon placed entirely to Lucy’s satisfacticn.

“That will do nicely now,” she said. “I
shall know much better how to manage next
time, for the instruction you have given me.
I am very much obliged to you.”

“You are quite welcome,” said Lewis, with
a pleasant smile. “It igs a service which
brings its own reward, to instruct a pupil who
is so attentive and apt to learn. If you will
come with me to the library, I will show you
some fine specimens I found and pressed yes-
terday morning.”

“Thank you,” said Lucy.

As they were leaving the room, she asked,
“Don't you extend this invitation to Emma ?”

“TIT do not,” said Lewis, gravely. “You
know she is very busy this morning and can-
not be interrupted.”
68 SELF-WILL.

This was said in a tone which Emma felt
was intended to convey reproof. She was sure
that her brother had been watching her con-
duct and had disapproved of it, and that he
intended to express that disapprobation by in-
viting Lucy to see his flowers, and excluding
her from the invitation. Even the assistance
rendered to Lucy might have been intended
as a silent reproof for her own disobliging
refusal. She was very unhappy while left
alone in the sitting-room ; but, though un-
happy, she was not yet penitent.

Still, while left to her own reflections, she
resolved upon a change in her outward beha-
viour. She would be more obliging and amia-
ble to Lucy. She was rendering herselt very
unhappy, and. forfeiting her brother’s approba-
tion. This last consideration had great weight
in leading her to decide upon a more amiable
and conciliatory course. .

When Lucy returned, Emma, by a strenuous
effort, concealed her irritated feelings, and
during the remainder of the day assumed a
manner more kind and obliging. But Emma's
feelings of self-will and vexation with her
cousin had not passed away. They were simply
THE WANDERING LAMB. 69

concealed and placed under strong restraint.
Her spirit was not calmed, but chafed and
_ fretted by this restraint, so that it seemed to
her the more she tried to feel amiable the
more unamiable she felt.

CHAPTER V.

THE WANDERING LAMB.

In the afternoon of the next day Lucy pro-
posed a walk to a grove in the neighbourhood,
to which Emma consented.

“Stop a moment,” said Emma, when they
reached the back door of the hall; “I must
look for Grace and take her with us.”

“You may spare yourself that trouble,”
said Lucy. “I don’t want Grace to go with
us. It is a bother to have a child always
tagging after one ; and she shan’t go.”

A brief explanation of the moral position in
which Emma now stood may be necessary.
The declaration that Grace should not go with
them had aroused her self-will. But then she
had firmly resolved not to be wilful again on
70 THE WANDERING LAMB.

any such point. She must not insist upon
Grace’s going, merely to have her own way.
Fortunately, as she regarded it, inclination in
this case was backed by duty. She could
gratify her own self-will and shelter herself
from the charge of doing so under the plea
of duty. |

“Grace must go with us,” she replied,
though not in a very gentle or conciliatory
manner. “ Aunt Fanny has gone out, and
she told me to look after the children.”

“You can leave them with Bridget.”

“She told me not to let them trouble
Bridget, as she is very busy this afternoon.
Mary has got hold of that book Lewis gave
her this morning, and I know her well enough
to be sure she will not leave it till she has
read every word. So if we don’t take Grace
with us she will have nothing to do but trouble
Bridget.”

At this moment Grace came skipping to-,
wards them. |

“Q Emma,” she said, “where are you
going ?”

“We are going to the grove,” said Emma.
“Do you want to go with us?”
THE WANDERING LAMB. 71

“Qh, yes, yes!” said Grace, clapping her
hands with glee.

“T don’t want you to go,” said Lucy.
“Come, be a good girl and stay at home with
Mary.”

“Mary is reading and won’t speak to me,”
said Grace. “I want to go with you.”

“T don’t want you to go with me,” said
Lucy.

“ How unreasonable you are!” said Emma.
“T tell you what it is, Gracie is going with us ;
so there is the end of the business.”

Lucy was roused by this positive assertion,
not made in the most conciliatory manner.

“You need not say going with ws,” she re-
plied ; “for I am not going if she does.”

“Now, Lucy,” said Emma, “aren’t you
ashamed of yourself? You know I can’t go
and leave Grace. It would not be right; and
Aunt Fanny would not like it.”

These arguments failed to produce their de-
sired effect upon Lucy; for she saw plainly
that Emma was simply gratifymg her own
self-will while entrenching herself behind the
plea of duty. She therefore persisted im say-
ing that she would not go if Grace did.
“I
bo

THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Was there ever such a wilful and ‘obstinate
gir] !” exclaimed Emma.
‘People that live in glass houses should not

a

throw stones,” retorted Lucy. “I wonder
who was wilful and obstinate the day before
yesterday ?”

“That has nothing to dowith it,” said Emma.
“You know I have the right on my side this
time. Gracie ought to go to the grove.”

“Take her there, then,” said Lucy, turning
to leave them.

When Grace saw the difficulty of which she
was the innocent occasion, with a spirit of
brave self-denial worthy of an older head and
heart, she pulled her sister's hand, saying,
“Call her back, Emma, and tell her I am not
going. I don’t want to go if she doesn’t want
that I should.”

“YT shall do no such thing. Let her go.
There is one comfort; I know I am in the
right this time.”

- Lewis came round the corner of the house
just in time to hear the last sentence; and he
now stood looking calmly and inquiringly into
his sister’s flushed face.

“That is a great deal to be certain of,
THE WANDERING LAMB. 73

Emma, with such wicked and deceitful hearts
as ours,” he said, in a grave tone.

Emma looked somewhat embarrassed ; still,
she said, confidently, “I am sure I am right
in this case.” |

“T don’t know what the case is,” said her
brother, in the same tone ; “but, judging from
your manner, I should fear that you were all
wrong instead of all right.”

“Let me tell you about it, and then you
will think differently. I am sure you will say
I have done right.”

“Very well; I will listen to you in a mo-
ment.” |

So saying, he drew from his pocket a small
paper of sugar-plums, which he gave to Grace.

“Thank you, Lewis,” said Grace, when she
had discovered what the paper contained.

“ Well, if you thank me, just take them out
to the arbour in the garden and eat them

there, will you?” ~
“Yes, that I will,” said Grace, bounding
away.

Lewis seated himself on the bench of the
portico, and invited Emma to take a seat by
his side,
74 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Now tell me,” he said, “ how you make it
out, in spite of your flushed face and angry
tones, that you are quite in the right.”

Emma blushed at this reference to the tem-
per she had exhibited, but told her story with
a good degree of self-confidence.

«We can seldom decide upon the character
of an action by looking only at the surface of
things,” said her brother, after listening to
her recital. “Suppose I had come up a few
minutes sooner, while you were discussing the
subject, and had offered to take charge of
Grace while you and Lucy went to the grove.
Do you think the arrangement would have
pleased you?”

Emma was silent; for she was conscious
that such a turn of affairs would have been
very unsatisfactory to her.

« Answer the question to yourself, if not to
me,” said her brother, after a pause. “ Sup-
posing it thus answered, I will go on. You
understand perfectly that the motive makes
an action right or wrong. You know that
kindness and courtesy to our guest require us
to consult her wishes, and yield to her pre-
ferences whenever it is proper to do so. If
THE WANDERING LAMB. 75

_ you felt as you ought to have done this
afternoon, you desired to do this; and duty
alone compelled you to oppose her wishes, If
such were your feelings, it is obvious, in the
case I have supposed, you would have been
gratified by my offer to take charge of Grace,
that Lucy might enjoy the walk in her own
way. Is not this point clear?” |

“Yes,” said Emma in a subdued tone.

“ On the other hand, if self-will was at the
bottom of the whole, and duty was only used
as an entrenchment behind which self-will
could operate, shielded from the charge of ob-
stinacy, the case would be very different. ~ I
wish you to see this difference clearly. On
the first supposition, there was no wufulness
in the act. You opposed your cousin’s wishes
only from a sense of duty On the second
supposition, self-will was the reigning motive,
- and you were only too glad that duty and in-
clination took the same road and that self-will
was kept in countenance by duty. In the
latter case you could not have been gratified
by a proposal to take charge of Grace; for
this would have baffled self-will. Is not this
plain?”
76 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“ Yes,”

«Are you willing to tell me candidly
whether you would have been gratified by
such a proposal? Would ‘it have pleased or
vexed you?”

“JT fear it would have vexed me.”

“Then can you not see that you were grati-
fying self-will under the plea of duty?”

“T do see it,” said Emma frankly. “ But
if you did not know any of the circumstances,
why were you so sure in the first place that I
was some way in the wrong ?”

“TJ judged so by your manner and the tone
of your voice. If you had been prompted by
a sense of duty and not by self-will, you would
have been kind and conciliatory, and your
manner would have been calculated to convince
your cousin that you were actuated by a sense
of right, and not by a desire to have your own
way under the pretext of duty.

“Vou are not the first, dear Emma, who
bas made this mistake Many a person,
under the plea of duty, is simply obeying the
dictates of an indomitable self-will. But the
temper and conduct of such a one will usually
reveal the spirit by which he is actuated. He
THE WANDERING LAMB, V7

will be proud and imperious, ready to condemn
others, while he boasts that, he is in the right.
Just as the temper and spirit exhibited by you
this afternoon revealed the motive by which
you were actuated, so will such a man reveal
the motive by which he is governed. Self-will
1S ever proud and imperious ; and its nature is
not changed when it puts on the garb of re-
higion, But the man who seeks not to do his
own will, but the will of his Father who is in
heaven, will be conciliatory while he is firm,
courteous while he is decided; and humble
while he is earnest. He will be patient of
contradiction, and ready to yield his own will
when it is only his will, and not duty, that he
is called upon to surrender.”

After this conversation Emma left her
brother, more dissatisfied with herself than
ever. He had made it very plain that she
had been governed that afternoon by the old
spirit of self-will. It was not pleasant to find
that all was wrong where she had been so
sure that all was right.

For the next two days everything went
wrong with Emma. Causes of vexation were
constantly occurring. Though she often com-
78 THE WANDERING LAMB.

manded herself sufficiently to restrain the out-
ward tokens, yet her mind was constantly
~chafed and irritated, and she was restless and
unhappy.

Everything went wrong in the closet as well
as elsewhere. Whenever Emma visited that
sacred spot, she did so with the painful con-
sciousness that she was quite in the wrong,
without any clear perception how she was to
get right. In this manner two or three days
passed away.

One afternoon Lucy joined her little cousins,
Mary and Grace, in their playroom. Emma
felt no disposition to go with her, but, when
left to herself, repaired to her favourite seat
by the window of the upper hali. She took a
book with her for a companion ; but the book
proved scarcely more attractive than the society
of her cousin and _ sisters. A discontented,
dissatisfied, restless mood unfitted her for any
enjoyment. se

After she had been seated there a short
time, her brother came up stairs. He was pass-
ing on to his own room ; but, observing Emma
sitting alone, he turned and came up to her.

“You seem to be disengaged,” he said.
THE WANDERING LAMB. 79

«Will you come to my room? I have two
engravings I wish to show you.” —

“With pleasure,” said Emma, her counte-
nance lighting up; for few things gave her
more satisfaction that an invitation to her
brother’s room. Lewis placed a chair for her
by his table.

“T think you have not seen this,” he said,
taking a engraving from a portfolio and placing
it before her.

“T have not,” said Emma, looking at it.

“You understand what it represents, do
you not?”

Emma examined it attentively. It repre-
sented a mountain covered with broken rocks
and precipices, accessible only by a steep and
difficult footpath. Amidst this scene of deso-
lation a solitary lamb was wandering. Emma
thought it looked timid and frightened, and
as if it were torn and bleeding, perhaps from
a fall amid those rocky heights. At some
distance from it a man was carefully wending
his way along the precarious footpaths.

“Tt represents a stray lamb wandering on
a desolate mountain, I think,” said Emma.
“That man, I suppose, is the shepherd, going
§0 THE WANDERING LAMB.

in search of it. Poor thing! It looks as if
it needed help. See, it is torn and bleeding.
It could never find its own way out of that
desolate place.”

Lewis removed this engraving and placed
another in its stead. The scene was the same,
—the same wild mountain and jagged rocks
and precarious footpaths, the same lamb, and
the same kind shepherd. But in this last en-
graving the lamb was not wandering alone
among the rocks; it was safely folded in the
arms of the shepherd, who was making his
way down the steep descent.

Emma gazed earnestly. “What a contrast!”
she caia after a short silence. “ How safe,
comfurtable, and happy the poor thing looks
in the arms of the shepherd!”

“ Does this scene remind you of anything?”

Emma looked up to her brother. Again
she bent her eyes upon the engraving, her face
wearing a thoughtful expression.

“ Does it not remind you of the Good Shep-
herd whose mission it is to seek lost or wan-
dering lambs ?”

“ Yes,” said Emma seriously.

“1 want to ask you one question. Do you
THE WANDERING LAMB. 81

not think there is a wandering lamb in this
room, whom the Good Shepherd is calling to
return to him 2”

The manner in which this question was
asked—so gentle, tender, and affectionate—
moved Emma more than the question itself.
A flood of tears was the only reply.

Lewis had been standing leaning on Emma's
chair. He now seated himself by her side,
and, taking one of her hands in his own, held
it with a gentle pressure, which of itself spoke
a volume of tender sympathy and affection.
Emmafelt the soothing and calming influence of
this simple act. She soon looked up and said,—

“ O Lewis, I am so very, very unhappy!”

“ Christ’s lambs always are when they wan-
der from him,” was the reply, in a tone of
gentle sympathy and kind concern. |

“But what shall I do?”

Lewis answered by pointing to the lamb in
the arms of its shepherd.

“T wish I were there!” said Emma, the
tears flowing afresh.

“Why are you not there? The Shepherd's
arms are ever open to receive the returning
wanderer. Can you doubt his love for the

6
82 THE WANDERING LAMB.

lambs for whom he has laid down his life?
Have you not heard his call ?”

“But I have been so very wicked! and I
am not penitent as I ought to be.”

“T see how it is,” said her brother.

He removed the last engraving from before
Emma and placed the first in its stead.

“You see that poor wandering lamb again ?”’
he said.

“ Yes,”

“ And the shepherd not very far from him,
as before ?”

“Yes.”

“Do you think he could hear the shepherd
were. he to call him ?”

“T think he might.”

“Tf he heard the call of the shepherd, would
he not at once make his way towards the place
from whence the call came?”

“T think so.”

“ Suppose, instead of doing this, he should
reason in this way :—‘I am ashamed to have
my shepherd find me, away on this desolate
mountain, all torn and bleeding. I must get
back part of the way before I go to his arms.
If I could only reach the foot of the mountain
THE WANDERING LAMB. 83

and get part way back to the fold, then I
would run right to the shepherd ; but I can’t
go to him here;’ and the little lamb hides away
in the crevice of a rock when the shepherd
calls, intending to find its own way almost to
the fold before it goes to him. What would
you think of such a lamb ?”

“JT should think it was very foolish.”

“Why ?”

“It could not find its own way out of the
mountain and half-way back to the fold. If
it could do all that, it would not need the help
of the shepherd ; for that would be the hardest
part.”

“That is true,” said her brother smiling.
“But can’t you see how very true it is in your
own case? You have just been trying to do
the hardest part yourself without any help.
You are wandering on the mountain of sin,
bleeding and torn; but you say, ‘I cannot let
the.Good Shepherd see me in this plight. I
must get out of the mountain first. I must
get somewhere near the sheepfold, and try to
wash away some of the stains I have contracted
in the waters of deep repentance, before I can
present myself to the Shepherd.’
8-4 THE WANDERING LAMB.
>

“For some days past you have been trying
to get out of the mountain and find your way
back to the sheepfold, instead of going to the
Shepherd and asking him to take you back-
When you have been reading and meditating,
it has not been to find your Shepherd and
fly to his arms, but it was that you might
find the way down the mountain for yourself
and get ready to go to him.

“ But the plan did not work at all. Christ’s
wandering lambs must be willing to go to him
as they are, torn and bleeding. Like the poor
lamb, you found yourself every hour becoming
more and more bewildered. You found no
food in the Bible, no help in prayer. Every
day you grew more unhappy, and your spirit
more chafed and irritated, less able to bear
vexations and trials and to exhibit the Chris-
tian temper. Is this a correct picture?’ Or am
I quite mistaken in regard to the state of
your mind the last few days?”

“Indeed, you are not mistaken. Had you
read every thought of my heart, you could not
have described my case better. I don’t know
how you could understand my feelings so
well.”
THE WANDERING LAMB. 85

“One may well be familiar with a road he
has often travelled,” replied Lewis, a shade
of sadness stealing over his countenance.
“But tell me,” he asked, “is the poor lamb
weary of its efforts to find its own way down
the mountain, and willing to be carried in the
arms of its Shepherd?”

“Oh, yes,” said Emma. “But how shall l
get there ?”

“How did you get there in the first place?
Did you wait till you were very penitent and
felt as you ought, before you went to Jesus?”

“Oh, no. I tried that plan at first.”

“And how did it work ?”

“Tt did not work at all. The more I tried
to make my feelings right, the harder my
heart became.”

“What did you then do?”

“T had to go to Jesus just as I was,”

Lewis turned over the engraving repre-
senting the lamb in.the arms of its shepherd.
There were some lines written on the back of
it. They were these :—

* Just as Iam, without one plea
But that thy blood was shed for me,
And that thou bid’st me come to thee,
O Lamb of God, I come!
86 THE WANDERING LAMB.

“Just as I am, and waiting not
To rid myself of one dark blot,—
To thee, whose blood can cleanse each spot, —
O Lamb of God, I come!”

“Was that the way you came?” asked
Lewis, when Emma had read the lines.

‘“‘T hope so.”

“In the same way you must go now. The
sinner who has never repented, and the sinner
who has repented and wandered, must both
come in the same way. It is the lamb folded
in his Saviour’s arms that weeps the tears of
genuine repentance for sin. I will present
you with these two engravings. If you
please, you may now take them to your own
room.” |

Emma took the engravings to her room and
laid them on her own little table, by the side
of which she sat down to reflect on all her
brother had said to her. She thought of the
sweet invitation, “Come unto me, all ye that
labour and are heavy laden, and I will give
you rest.” She felt that it was the call of the
Good Shepherd. She fell on her knees and
entreated that he would bear her in his arms |
back to the fold—that he would give her a
penitent, humble, and contrite heart,—that he
THE WANDERING LAMB. 87

would subdue her pride and self-will and teach
her to be meek like himself. —

He who loves his lambs and watches over
them with a tender care, who is never far
from them even when they wander, heard her
prayer. Emma left her chamber that after-
noon with a peace in her heart which had not
been there for many days. The penitence
which she had struggled in vain to obtain now
melted and subdued her heart. The tears
flowed when she thought of the self-will she
had exhibited and the wrong tempers she had
indulged.

The next morning Lucy, who had been
adding some new specimens to her herbarium,
brought it to Emma to exhibit them to her.
As Emma turned over its leaves, her eyes fell
upon the flowers that had formed a part of
the bouquet obtained from Mrs. Crawford’s
garden. ‘Two or three involuntary tears were
the tokens of the penitence now felt for
the self-will and angry passions of that
afternoon. That incident had cost her tears
before; but those were tears of vexation
——these were tears of penitence. And how
different they were! While the one chated
88 THE WANDERING LAMB.

and irritated, the other humbled, subdued,
and relieved.

Lucy observed the tears, though Emma
brushed them quickly away. She supposed
that her cousin still felt vexed about the
occurrences of that afternoon, and that the
flowers had proved an unpleasant reminder.
She had herself, after her vexation with Emma
had passed away, felt some self-reproach for
teasing her cousin so much; and she now
expressed this feeling by saying,—

“T am sorry, Emma, I teased you so on my
return from the walk to the river. I daresay
these flowers remind you of it.”

“No, Lucy; it is not that.”

“Then it was my telling your brother what
had passed between us.”

“No; I was vexed about it at the time,
but am not now.”

“But I saw the tears start to your eyes
when you looked at the flowers.”

The effect of this assertion was to bring the
tears afresh.

“There! you are weeping now,” said Lucy.

“It is,” said Emma, after a moment’s silence,
“because I feel so sorry when I think how
THE CONQUEST. &9

self-willed I then was. When these flowers re-
minded me of it, I could not helpshedding tears,”
“Ts that all?” said Lucy, carelessly.
“Ts it not enough?” said Emma. “I think
the remembrance of wrong-doing may well
bring tears of penitence.”

CHAPTER VI.

THE CONQUEST.

“THERE is the carriage coming round the
corner,” exclaimed Lucy as she and Emma were
together in the sitting-room that afternoon,
A moment after she added, “ It is father himself,
and mother too. I am.so glad! But—”

“A gloomy ‘but,’ I should think, by the
way it has chased the sunshine from your
face,” said her cousin Lewis, smiling.

“JT am only afraid they have come to take
me home,” replied Lucy. “In that case I
could hardly be glad to see them.”

“Nor I,” said Emma. “ But we shall not

let them have you.”
90 THE CONQUEST.

Lewis now left the room to meet his uncle
and aunt, and was followed by Emma and
Lucy. They were quickly joined by Mary
and Grace, who from the back-yard had seen
the carriage as it came up, and lastly by Aunt
Fanny, who came from another part of the
house to welcome the guests.

When they were all quietly seated in the
pleasant parlour, Lucy went up to her father
and said, “I hope, father, you have not come
to take me home?”

“No, pussy, no fear of that. You don't
suppose we want you at home? We shall be
greatly obliged to your Uncle Lewis and your
Aunt Fanny if they wili keep you off our
hands a week or two longer.”

“Why, father,” said Lucy, laughing, “one
who did not know you would think you were
really glad to be rid of me.”

“ T am not talking to those who do not know
me,” said Mr. Dennis, smiling kindly.

“Who is that stopping before the gate?”
said Emma, addressing her Aunt Fanny.

“T don’t know,” was the reply. “ He seems
to be a pedlar. He has a pedlar’s cart.”

“See! he has only one leg,” said Emma.
THE CONQUEST. 91

“Oh, that is Gordon,” said Lucy, who had
been drawn to the window by Emma's inquiry.
“Don’t you know him?”

“No.”

“He calls at our house very often. Mother
usually buys something from him, because she
pities him.”

“That is true,’ said Mrs. Dennis. “He
had one limb taken off two years ago, and he
has been obliged to take this way of supporting
his family. He is an honest, deserving man,
and Mr. Dennis and I make it a point to buy
from him when we are in want of anything
he has to offer.”

By this time Gordon had reached the door.
Mrs. Dennis went out into the hall to inquire
if he had linen handkerchiefs. Ascertaining
that he had some, she proposed to go out to
his waggon, and invited Aunt Fanny to go with
her. Aunt Fanny declined, on the plea that
she was not in want of anything in his line at
that time. Mrs. Dennis went out to the wag-
gon, followed by Emma and Lucy, who felt a
natural curiosity to take a peep at the pedlar’s
stock in trade.

After Mrs, Dennis had made her purchase
92 THE CONQUEST.

and returned to the house, the cousins still
stood by the cart, examining a pile of muslins
which had attracted their attention. They
were soon joined by Mr. Dennis.

“ What are you looking at, girls?” he asked.

“ At these muslins,” said Lucy.

“ Anything pretty there?”

“Yes, sir; some of them are very pretty.”

“Weil, girls I'll tell you what I'll do,” said
Mr. Dennis, with a mischievous twinkle in his
eye. “TI will give each of you a dress, on one
condition.”

“What is it, father?” asked Lucy, eagerly.

“That the dresses shall be alike. You must
both agree to choose one from the same piece.”

“ Agreed,” said Lucy. “But I wish Aunt
Fanny and mother were here to help us to
choose.”

“Take them all into the house,” said the
pedlar. This suggestion was easily followed,
as the entire assortment did not comprise more
than half a dozen pieces.

They were soon laid upon the sofa in the
pariour, and one after another drawn over the
large easy-chair to mark the effect. A
brown and a buff were thus displayed,
THE CONQUEST. 92

but received little attention from either of the
cousins.

“T like that best,” said Lucy, as a delicate
pink was spread out in graceful folds,

Emma said nothing.

Next a blue muslin was shown.

“T like that best,” said Emma, emphatically.

A mischievous smile played about the cor-
ners of Mr. Dennis’s mouth.

“T don’t,” said Lucy. “TI like the pink best.”

“ And I should like the blue,” said Emma.
“T like ita great deal better than the pink.”

“Do take the blue, Cousin Lucy,” said
little Grace, eagerly. “Emma has wanted a
blue muslin a long time.”

“Let her have it, then. I want the pink.”

“But you know you must both choose the
same, or you cannot either of you have one.”

“Do let Emma have the blue and Lucy
the pink,” said Mrs. Dennis, appealing to her
husband. “It can’t make any difference to
you which they choose.”

“No,” said Mr. Dennis, firmly. “I have
stated the condition, and I shall not recede
from it. They are all pretty, and I choose
that the dresses shall be alike.”
94 THE CONQUEST.

The cousins looked perplexed.

“That blue is very pretty,” said Mrs. Dennis
to Lucy. - “I should think you might be satis-
fied with it.”

“JT don't think it pretty at all,—the old
faded thing!”

“It is not an old, faded thing,” said Emma,
with some indignation in her tone. “Jt is
simply a very pretty, delicate blue.”

At this moment Emma’s eyes fell on Lucy’s
herbarium, lying on the table near which she
stood. Instantly it recalled the walk to the
river, her self-will on that occasion, and her
sorrow for it afterwards,

“{ must not let self-will govern me now,”
she thought. “After all, the pink is very
pretty, though I do want the blue ;” and
again Emma cast a longing eye at the blue.

“T think you will have to take all the mus-
lins back,” said Mr. Dennis, addressing the
pedlar. “These young ladies do not seem to
be in a fair way to agree in their choice.”

“Don’t be discouraged, uncle,”
‘‘ Perhaps we shall agree yet.” -

“ But you want the blue, and Lucy wants
the pink. How are you to agree?”

said Emma.
THE CONQUEST. 95

“ Perhaps one of us will change her mind.”

“It won't be me,” said Lucy resolutely.

There was a moment’s struggle, and then
Emma said, “It will be me. I think the
blue is very pretty; but the pink is pretty
too. Let us both choose that.”

“T am glad you have come to reason at
last,” said Lucy, in a tone of triumph, not
calculated to conciliate her cousin.

But Emma was not in a state of mind to
feel easily vexed; and to this ungenerous
speech she replied, pleasantly,—

“J think we shall both like our dresses, I am
sure I am much obliged to my uncle for mine.”

As she said this, she met the eye of her
brother, and received from him a glance of
approbation which she felt sire would make
that pink muslin a, favourite with her to the
end of its days.

A dress for each was measured from the
pink, and Mr. Gordon took his leave. Soon
after, Mr. Dennis came up to Emma and
said,— |

“Tt was a little too bad after all, not to let
you have that blue dress. I almost regret ad-
hering so firmly to the condition first proposed.”
96 THE CONQUEST.

“You need not regret it,’ said Emma
earnestly. “Iam now well satisfied with the
pink ; and I think I would not change it if I
could.” |

This was quite true; for the muslin was
already becoming dear to Emma as a memento
of victory,—a victory over herself,—the
noblest of all achievements.

“T must own,” continued her uncle, “ that
I felt a mischievous desire to see how you and
Lucy would manage under such a condition.
I thought it possible 1 might escape as well as
the minister who promised to pray for rain,
like a certain prophet of old, when all his
people could agree when they were ready for
it. Of course they were never all ready to-
gether, and so the minister was silent. I
didn’t know but my purse might be equally
safe when defended by the proposed condition.”

“T hope you are not disappointed at the
result?” said Emma archly.

“Not at all,” said her uncle, with a good-
humoured smile. “My loss has been the
pedlar’s gain; and this benevolent considera-
tion will enable me to bear the consequences
of my miscalculation with becoming heroism.”
THE CONQUEST. 97

Emma laughed.

“T only wish,” continued her uncle, his face
assuming a graver expression, “that my
daughter had acted as nobly as my niece.”

After her uncle and aunt had gone, Emma
went into the parlour to remove the pink
muslin, which was still lying upon the sofa. It
was dusk; and as she passed through the hall
she paused at the front door to take one more
look at it.

“Well, what do you think of it ?” said her
brother, coming up at this moment.

“Tt is beautiful,” said Emma, with a glow-
ing face. “I really believe, after all, that I
shall think more of it than I should have
thought of the blue.”

“Very likely; it is the trophy of a vic-
tory” |

“A victory!” said Emma. “I suspect Lucy
thinks she had the victory.”

“The choice was hers; the victory, yours.
You have met and conquered an enemy,—a
sort of Goliath in war, who aforetime, on cer-
tain occasions, has proved more than a match
for you, and whose name is Self-will.”

“What a brother you are!” said Emma. “
7
98 THE CONQUEST.

do believe you read every thought of my heart
this afternoon.”

“Only those to which your tell-tale
face gave the clue,” replied her brother,
smiling.

Emma went up stairs with the muslin, and
Lewis sat down at the door. Little Grace
soon came to him and took her favourite place
on his knee. There was a thoughtful ex-
pression on her round and usually laughing
face; yet it was not a stranger there; for
Grace could think sometimes as well as laugh
and play.

She soon looked up, and said, earnestly,
“ Lewis, I want to ask you a question.”

«Well, dear, what is it?”

“You know we sometimes say, when we
have done wrong, that we are sorry ?”

“Yes.”

“Ts everybody sorry just alike ?”

“What has put that question into your
head?”

“You know the other afternoon Lucy
wanted to go to the river, and Emma wanted
to go to Mr Dalton’s. I heard them talk-
ing about it this morning, and they both said
THE CONQUEST. 99

they were sorry ; but I think they were not
sorry just alike.”

“Why not?”

“You know this afternoon Emma wanted
the blue muslin and Lucy the pink; but Emma
gave up her wish and Lucy wouldn't.”

“Tg that the reason you think they were not
sorry alike this morning?”

“« Yes,”

“Which do you think was sorry the right
way?”

“T think Emma was.”

“Why?”

“Because she gave up her way to Lucy
this afternoon. My teacher says if we have
the right kind of sorrow for doing wrong we
shall be careful not to do it again.”

“Your teacher is quite right. That kind
of sorrow is what the Bible calls repentance.
You must remember that; for you will want
to know what the Bible means when it tells
us to repent.”

“Oh, yes ; for my teacher says, if we don’t
repent, we cannot be the lambs of Jesus. I
think Emmais one of his lambs.”

“What makes you think so?”
100 THE CONQUEST.

“ Because I think she was sorry the right
way this morning. Don’t you think she is
one?”

“T hope so. But I want to know what my
dear little Gracie thinks of herself. Do you
think you are one of Christ’s lambs ?”

“T hope so. I want to be one,” said Grace
earnestly. “ But hark! Aunt Fanny is calling
me to go to bed ; so give me a good-night kiss.”

“Stop one moment. When you say your
prayers to-night, remember you are speaking
every word in the ear of Him who has said,
‘Suffer little children to come unto me,’ and
that he hears each word, and knows each
thought, and never forgets his lambs. You
will think of that, won’t you?”

“Yes. Good night.”

“ Good night.”

CHAPTER VII.

THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

Lewis had a college friend who was spend-
ing a vacation at home, about ten miles from
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 101

Mr. Alston’s. This friend had given him a
warm invitation to visit him and bring with
him his sister Emma, as he had a sister near
her age. The Thursday after Uncle and Aunt
Dennis left, Lewis proposed to visit this friend
on the following day, and take Emma and Lucy
with him. Like most girls in similar circum-
stances, the cousins talked of little else on the
day preceding that appointed for the visit.

“What if it should rain to-morrow?” said
Emma in a tone of apprehension, as a few
suspicious clouds appeared towards sunset.

“Then it would water the earth,” said her
brother, smiling, “and add much to the beauty
of your flower-beds.”

Emma was very fond of her flowers; but she
evidently was not pleased at the prospect of
their being benefited in this way.

“T am afraid it will rain to-morrow,” said
Lucy ; “for it will be Friday.”

“Ah! you are a little superstitious, then?”
said Lewis.

“No,” said Lucy blushing a little; “I don’t
really think there is anything in it. Mother
once had a servant who was always talking of

bad signs and good signs, and unlucky Fridays,
102 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

and things of that sort; and, though I don’t
believe in them, I can’t help thinking of them
sometimes.”

~ “T once,” said Lewis, “ saw a list half a yard
long of fortunate undertakings commenced on
Friday; so take courage.”

“Can’t we go on Saturday if it should rain
to-morrow?” asked Emma.

“No,” said Lewis; “father wishes to use
the horse and carriage on Saturday.”

“Then can’t we go next week ?”

“ My friend leaves home on Monday.”

“Then it must be to-morrow, or not at all,”
said Lucy.

“That seems to be the alternative,’ replied
Lewis.

The first sound that greeted Emma’s ears on
awaking the next morning was the pattering
of the rain on the windows. |

“There, Lucy! it is all over?” said she to
her cousin, who was rubbing her eyes, as yet
unconscious whether they were to open on a
bright or a dark day.

“What is all over?” she asked drowsily.

“ Our drive and visit. Don’t you hear the
rain on the windows?”
THE DISAPPOINTMENT, 103

This piece of intelligence quickly finished
the work of awaking Lucy.

“Oh, itis too bad!” she said.

“T know it. Whata disappointment!” said
Emma.

“ Well, it can’t be helped,” said Lucy.

That rainy day was a settled affair, leaving
no place for alternations of hope and fear. It
rained,—rained in a steady, determined way,
which forbade the most remote hope that it
would not rain all day.

“Do you think it rains because it is Friday?”
said Grace, who had listened to the conversa-
tion the night before. |

“ Doesn’t it rain other days beside Friday?”
asked her brother. |

“Tt rained on Saturday last week,” said
Grace, “when Mary and I wanted to go
and see Cousin Susie so much, and had to
stay in the house all the afternoon because it
rained so.”

“Tf it rained only on Friday,” said Lewis,
“we should certainly have to call it the lucky
day; for what could we do without rain? But
all this talk about lucky and unlucky days, and
bad and good luck, is very heathenish.”
104 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

“Why is it heathenish?” asked Mary.

“Because it is appropriate language for
those only who believe that the world is go-
verned by some kind of chance. Those who
have been taught that there is a great, wise, —
and good God, who governs everything, and
without whose permission nothing can hap-
pen, should feel that no such thing exists
as luck or chance. Every day of the
week is in his hands, and every event of
every day.”

Emma and Lucy were both much disap-
pointed ; but Emma felt it most keenly. It .
was naturally more easy for Lucy than for
Emma to turn from one source of. enjoyment
to another, and cheerfully submit to what she
could not help.

Emma’s heart had been very much set upon
going with her brother ; and, disappointed in
this, every employment and occupation seemed
dull and uninteresting. If she had firmly re-
solved to overcome this feeling, and had re-
solutely set about some employment, she would
soon have found herself becoming interested,
and cheerful feelings would have taken the
place of listless indifference. But she yielded
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 105

to this state of mind, and spent the day in
restless inactivity.

“Come, Emma,” said her cousin to her, as
she was yawning over a book in the afternoon,
“let us try a lesson in drawing. Let us see
if we can copy that cottage in your drawing-
book. I mean the one we were trying to do
when we were interrupted by Aunt Fanny.”

“JT don’t feel inclined to draw,” replied
Emma.

“T wonder what you do feel inclined to do
to-day? I believe I have proposed half a dozen
different things this morning, but you have
not felt disposed to do any of them. You
have done nothing but mope all day. I don’t
like moping. Do you, Cousin Lewis?”

Cousin Lewis was reading a newspaper.
When thus appealed to, he looked up and
said,—

“I don’t like moping at all; and, if you
please, I will give you a practical proof of the
sincerity of this assertion; for it is said a man
is known by what he does rather than by
what he says.”

“ What do you mean by a practical proof?”
asked Lucy.
106 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

“Tf you will all take your seats around this
table, I will show you what I mean.”

Lucy, and Mary, and Grace, all gathered |
around the table, full of the most eager
curiosity to know what Lewis was going
to do.

“ Won't you come too, Emma,” said Grace.

Emma was about to comply with this invi-
tation, when Lucy said,—

“Oh, let Emma alone. She likes moping,
you know.”

This awakened Emma’s obstinacy, and she
determined not to join them.

“Do come, Emma,” said Grace again.

“No urging,” said Lewis. “ The invitation
is free to be accepted or refused.”

“What is to be done?” asked Lucy.

“Will you bring me an old newspaper,
Mary?” said Lewis.

“What sort of a paper ?”’

“Anything that may be cut up.”

Mary left the room, and soon returned with
the newspaper.

“Now, let each of us have a pair of
scissors,’ said Lewis.

These were soon obtained.
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 107

Lewis then divided the newspaper into
several parts, and gave to each a part.

“Now each of you cut out any words you
choose to take.”

“What is to be done with them?” asked
Lucy.

“They are to be placed in a pile on the
middle of the table.

“What is next to be done with them?”

“That I will explain by-and-by. The first
thing is to form the pile.”

“What words shall we cut out?” asked
Mary. —

“Any you choose.”

“Dog? Will that do?” said Grace.

“Yes; that will do. Cut the dog out.”

Grace laughed heartily while she took up
her scissors to cut out the word.

“Calico, Will that do?” said Mary.

“Yes; anything will do—especially any
word in common use.”

The scissors were diligently plied, and soon
quite a little pile of words was accumulated
on the centre of the table.

“That is enough,” said Lewis, laying down
his scissors.
108 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

The others followed his example.

“What now?” asked Lucy.

“ Kach of you must take six words from the
pie. Take the first you lay your hand on.”

All did as directed.

“Now, each one must form some kind of a
sentence which shall contain all the six words
she has drawn from the heap.”

“Calico, California, cost, gold, cheap, lady
—these are my words,” said Lucy. “Whata
medley! I can’t make anything out of them.

“What are yours, Lewis 2?”

“Florins, water, whisky, wise, eight, case,”
replied Lucy.

“Not much better than mine, I should
think,” said Lewis.

“T think Lewis ought to form his words
into a sentence first, to show us how,” said
Mary.

“Tt is a vote,” said Lucy.

“ Well, here it is,” said Lewis. “Any wise
person will see it is a clear case that eight
florins may soon be saved by drinking water
instead of whisky.”

“That's good,” said Mary, clapping her
hands.
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 109

“Tt is quite a little temperance speech,” said
Lucy.

“It is your turn now, Cousin Lucy,” said
Grace.

Lucy, after studying for a while the words
which had fallen to her lot, looked up with a
glow of pleasure on her countenance, indicating
that she had arrived at a satisfactory result.

“ Read it off,” said Lewis.

“It won't cost much California gold for a
lady to buy a cheap calico.”

“That is good, too,” said Mary. “Now I
will try.”

In this way the game went on, amid many
pleasant jokes and merry peals of laughter.

Emma soon became interested and wished
to jointhem. She wished to join them because
they seemed to enjoy it so much; but this was
not the only reason. Lucy’s remark about
her moping had served to show her that she
had been in the wrong that day in giving way
to listless inactivity instead of joining in what-
ever might promote the happiness of her cousin
and the rest of the weather-bound members
of the family. She had certainly been selfish.
Convinced that she had been wrong, she
110 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

wished to begin at once to do right; and this
was one reason why she wished to join the
group at the table. |

After the thought of doing so was suggested,
it cost her a struggle to act upon the sugges-
tion. It was humbling to her pride to own
that she wished to join them after refusing to
do so. - But she most feared some cutting
remark from Lucy.

At last she went up to the table,—half
timidly, however,—and addressing her brother,
said, “May I come, Lewis?”

“Tired of moping, eh?” said Lucy, pro-
vokingly. |

Emma felt inclined to turn away; but
Lewis instantly arose, and, gently seating her
in his chair, said, “It will give us great plea-
sure to have you join us.” He then crossed
the.room to get a chair for himself, which he
placed by Emma’s side.

“Now, Emma,” he said, “take six words
from the pile in the centre.”

Emma did so, and, soothed by he1 brother's
kind attentions, soon forgot the vexation occa-
sioned by her cousin’s remark.

The game went on some time longer,
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. J11

until Lewis, observing that Grace began
to look tired, proposed that they should
move.

“Let us go to our playroom, Gracie,” said
Mary.

“Do go with us, Cousin Lucy,” said Grace;
“and you too, Emma.”

“Lucy will go with you,” said Lewis. “I
want Emma to remain till she has constructed
one more sentence. You know she has hardly
done her part.”

“T don’t think,” said Lewis, after they were
gone, “that I can find the words I want here,
I shall have to vary the plan a little.”

He took a piece of paper from his pocket
and a pencil. The paper he cut into thirteen
pieces, writing a word on each. He then
pushed them along to Emma.

“Will you form a sentence out of those
words ?” he said.

“T will try.”

Emma examined the words, and made one
or two unsuccessful attempts to form them into
a sentence.

“Shall I do it for you?” asked her brother.

“Tf you please.” |
112 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

“ How does it read?” he asked, after placing
the words.

Emma read, “Thou visitest the earth, and
waterest it: thou makest it soft with showers.”

Emma looked at her brother, half puzzled,
half conscious,

“Do you mean anything by giving me that
sentence?” she said, after a moment’s silence.

_ “ T¢ means something, does it not ?”

“Yes, certainly.”

“What does it mean ?”

Emma looked grave; then, blushing, she
said, “I suppose you meant, by giving it to
me, to let me know you do not think I have
borne my disappointment to-day in a right
temper.”

“What J think is comparatively of little
consequence,” replied Lewis, seriously.

“T fear I have been a little self-willed to-
day,” said Emma, after a moment’s silence.

“ A little self-willed !” repeated her brother.
“You acknowledged yourself very self-willed
the other day, because you opposed your will
to the will of your cousir when it was unkind
and uncourteous to do so. Will you call it
being only a little self-willed to oppose your
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 113

will to the will of your Father in heaven? It
was his will to visit the earth, and water it,
.and make it soft with needed showers; and
because his will, and not yours, was done, you
have indulged in moody discontent, refusing to
enjoy yourself or promote the enjoyment of
others.”

“Q Lewis, what a serious matter you
make of it!”

“ My dear sister,” said Lewis, very gently,
“the Christian looks upon all sin as a serious
matter.”

“How hard it is to keep right!” said
Kmma, sadly.

“Very true.” :

“ But sometimes it doesn’t seem so hard.”

“ At what times ?” |

“ Tt has not seemed so for a week past. I
could bear a good deal, and it did not seem
hard to yield to Lucy.”

“Jt may be you began to think it was be-
coming so easy to keep right that you ne-
glected to watch and pray. While the lamb
is carried in its shepherd’s arms its course is
easy. Watchfulness and prayer are, if I may
so express it, the two arms by which our faith

8
114 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

clings to Christ. Neglecting these, we wander
from him ; and then indeed it is hard to keep
right. He commands us to watch and pray,
and we must obey him.”

“ But sometimes,” said Emma, “ when I am
trying very hard to do right and watching
myself closely, I do not succeed at all. The
harder I try, the worse I grow.”

“ Yes,—I understand what you mean.

“The more I strove against its power,
I sinn’d and stumbled but the more,’

is your experience on these occasions; is it
not ?”

“ Yes,—just that.”

“This is because you are then striving in
your own strength, and not trusting in Christ
for all your help.”

“There is something here I believe I do
not understand as I should. In regard to
this trusting and striving, I fear I sometimes
put one in the place of the other.” __

“Very likely. It is a common mistake.”

“ How is it to be avoided ?”

“ By putting each of them just where God
puts them. He has united watching and
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 115

praying with trusting alone for help and suc-
cess to his promised grace. If we separate
them, our sad failure will testify against us
that we are not walking in the way of his tes-
timonies. If we watch and pray in our own
strength, we shall certainly fall. If we neglect
to watch and pray, with the presumptuous
hope that trusting in Christ will take their
place, we shall be equally sure to fall. Let
me try to make this plainer by an illustra-
tion. '

“Let us suppose that you and I are walk-
ing together over a difficult mountain-pass.
You are a stranger to the road, unable to
meet its difficulties or pass over any part of
it, unaided, in safety. Iam perfectly familiar
with it and am sure of my footing, having
travelled safely over it many times. I offer
you my hand, assuring you, if you will walk
carefully and keep hold of my hand, you will
be perfectly safe. You do so, and get on very
well. You step carefully as you would do if
you had not hold of my hand; while, at the
same time, your sole dependence for getting
safely over the mountain is the assistance you
receive from me. Were you to let go my
116 THE DISAPPOINTMENT.

hand, you would expect to be dashed down
the next precipice. You unite personal watch-
fulness with implicit trust.

“ Now suppose, after you had gone on in
this way for a time, you should let go my
hand and depend upon your own careful walk-
ing. In that case you would leave off trust-
ing to my help, and trust in yourself; would
you not?”

“ Certainly 1 should.”

“This is what you have done when you
have failed to put all your trust and hope in
Christ’s care of you, and have placed your
dependence on your own prayers and watch-
fulness. Is it strange that you have fallen at
such times ?

“ But suppose, on the other hand, you should
say to me, ‘ Lewis, I can never get over this
mountain without your help; and since I am
so entirely dependent on you, it is of no use
for me to exert myself. I will not try to walk
any more. You may do all, and carry me
over the mountain,’ and you should sink down,
refusing to take another step. Should I not
say to you, ‘If you take this course, I shal]
leave you just where you are? If you want
THE DISAPPOINTMENT. 117

my help, get up and walk. Use your own
strength so far as it goes. Walk carefully,
look well where you place your feet, and trust
in me for all the rest.’ In this last case your
conduct would resemble that of one who should
rely upon Christ to the neglect of earnest
watchfulnéss and prayer.

“In going over the mountain you used
your own feet, walking carefully along the
path, while you trusted for your security to
the hand that held you. So it is with the
Christian while he walks in God’s highway of
holiness. He walks carefully, watchfully, and
prayerfully ; yet he trusts not to his care and
watching and praying, but to the hand that
holds him up. His prayer is, ‘ Hold thou me
up, and I shall be safe.’ His trust is that God
will keep the feet of his saints. While he
walks in this path, he is safe. If he begins
to trust in himself, he will fall.

“YT think you were making the first of these
mistakes at thestime we had that conversation
about the lost lamb in the mountains. You
were trying in your own strength to overcome
sin and return from your wanderings. You
found you could not do it, and you went just
118 PLEASING CHRIST.

as you were to the Good Shepherd, and found
it was very easy to walk in the right path
while he held you up. Am I correct?”

“Yes; I am sure you are,” replied Emma.

“ But after a time you fell into the opposite
mistake. You were less earnest and diligent
in watching and praying,—forgetting that the
Good Shepherd would not do for you what he
had commanded you to do for yourself; and so
you again fell into sin. Is it not so?”

“Yes ; I think I see it clearly.”

“Tet it teach you, my dear Emma, ear-
nestly to watch and pray, while at the same
time you trust with your whole heart in Him
who has promised to give grace to those who
seek it.”

CHAPTER VITI.

PLEASING CHRIST.

ONE morning Emma and Lucy came in to-
gether from the garden. Lucy was going to
her room to write a letter to her sister. Emma
was on her way to the kitchen, to see if her
PLEASING CHRIST. 119

Aunt Fanny did not require her assistance
there. A slight difference of opinion had
arisen between them in relation to a topic
they were discussing. As they separated on
the back portico, Emma returned a sharp re-
tort to some irritating remark just made by
Lucy.
At this moment Lewis came up the steps
on his return from a morning walk. Emma
turned quickly at the sound of his footsteps,
and coloured deeply when she saw him.

“JT did not know you were so near,” she
said, with visible embarrassment.

“What if you had known it?” said Lewis.

“Probably I should not have spoken just
so to Lucy,” said Emma, after a moment's
hesitation.
“Why not?”



“ That; is a very vague and unsatisfactory
answer. Can’t you give me something a little
more definite?”

“T could, I suppose.”

“Well, then, let us haveit. Come out to
this end of the portico, where we shall be un-
‘interrupted, and tell me why you would not
120 PLEASING CHRIST.

have spoken so had you been aware that I
overheard you.”

Emma suffered Lewis to lead her to a seat
at the further end of the portico.

“Now for your answer,” he said, when they
were both seated. |

“Really, Lewis,” said Emma, “I don’t think
it necessary that I should give you the reason.
I am sure you know it already. You know
how much I love you and desire your appro-
bation.”

“Your love is certainly highly valued, my
dear sister,’ said Lewis, taking Emma’s hand
affectionately. .“ But tell me, do you think
you. love me better than the Lord Jesus
Christ ?”

“TI hope I do not,” said Emma, seriously.

“But you know that he was present, and
heard what you said to your cousin.”

“T did not think of it.”

“If you had thought of it, that is, if you
had had as distinct an impression of his pre-
sence as you had of mine when you heard my
step on the portico, do you think you would
have said what you did ?”

“Tam quite sure I should not.”
PLEASING CHRIST. 121

“Would it not, then, be well for you to do
as David did? He says, ‘I have set the Lord
always before me.’ ”

“I know that he is everywhere,” said
Emma ; “ but it is difficult to feel always that
he is really present.”

“Suppose that you had lived on earth when
Jesus dwelt here in human flesh, and that he
had called you to be his disciple, to follow him
in all his journeyings and abide where he
abode. Can’t you imagine what many of
your thoughts and feelings would have been?”

“JT think I can imagine some of them.”

“Do you not feel that his presence would
have had an all-controlling influence over you?
That his least command would have been
promptly obeyed? That each day and hour
you were in his presence it would have been
your great object to please him in everything?
Don’t you think that a look of approbation
from him would have been your greatest pos-
sible reward, and one reproving glance would
have made you weep bitterly, as Peter did?
Do you think, with his eye upon you, it would
have been possible for you to speak and act as
you now sometimes do?”
122 PLEASING CHRIST.

“T am sure it would not,” said Emma, ear-
nestly. “It seems to me it must have been
a blessed thing to have been one of his dis-
ciples,”

“ But do you not hope you are one of bis
disciples ?”

“JT meant when he was on earth,—when
he was with his disciples.”

“It is, dear Emma, essentially the same
thing in every age to be his disciple; and he
is always with his disciples. He says, ‘And
lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end
of the world,’ and also, ‘If a man love me, he
will keep my words, and my Father will love
him, and we will come unto him, and make
our abode with him,’

“Tt is this presence of Jesus, dear Emma,
which you need most to realize. Those who
most realize it become most like him. Behold-
ing him by faith, they are changed into the
same image.”

“ But when he was on earth he was a man,
and as such loved and sympathized with his
disciples.”

“ Very true ; and he is still the same,—the
same yesterday, to-day and for ever. If you
PLEASING CHRIST. 123

are his disciple, you have the same interest in
his human sympathies as Peter, James, and
John. It has been observed that, though his
human nature is at the right hand of God
upon the throne, his divine nature is unlimited,
fills all worlds, and is present in every dwell-
ing of every disciple in this world. His divine
nature thus brings continual information to
his human heart of everything that is going
on in the hearts and history of his people ; so
that his human heart beats towards us just as
if he were sitting by our side. In the Epistle
to the Hebrews we are urged to faithfulness
in duty by the consideration of the human
sympathy of Christ for his disciples :—‘ For
we have not a high-priest which cannot be
touched with the feeling of our infirmities, but
who was in all points tempted like as we are,
yet without sin.’ ”

The tears filled Emma’s eyes. “What a
sweet truth,’ she said, “if one could only
realize it!”

“Tt will help you to realize it if you will
often ask yourself how you would feel if Christ
were on earth, and you were permitted to
follow him as his disciples were. You are
12-4 PLEASING CHRIST.

sure that you would try to please him in
every thought and act. Do just the same
thing now, remembering he really is present
with you. Remember what he said to Thomas:
—-‘ Because thou hast seen me, thou hast be-
lieved: blessed are they that have not seen and
yet have believed.’ If you cherish such a sense
of his presence, you will find it more powerful
to keep you from sin than the presence of any
human being. We too often treat right and
wrong as abstract ideas, instead of avoiding
every sinful act as that which will displease
an ever-present God and Saviour.”

“ I wish I could realize in this way the con-
stant presence of Jesus,” said Emma, earnestly.

“Tt must be done by faith. Faith is to
the soul what the senses are to the body. It
must be done by a simple, firm belief of his
own declarations. He assures his disciples
that they shall see him, though the world do
not,—that he will manifest himself unto them,
—that he will love them and dwell in them
by his Spirit. We must take hold of these
assurances with a simple and childlike faith.

“The Christian is distinguished from all
others by a simple desire to please his God
PLEASING CHRIST. 125

and Saviour. Others may do the same things,
but not from the same motive. Their motives
are—to please themselves, to obtain a favour-
ite object, to gain the approbation of a friend
or the good opinion of the world at large.”

“Ts it wrong to desire the approbation of
our friends ?”

“Tt is not wrong, but it is not a Christian
motive; it is not holiness. It is shared by
the unbeliever, and powerfully influences the
conduct of those who have no love to God, and
prompts them to do many things amiable and
pleasing in themselves, There is no more of
holiness in any act than there is of a desire to
please God in that act. For example, were
you to do a right act only from a desire to
gain my approbation, without any regard to
God’s will or pleasure, there would be no holi-
ness in it. It might be displeasing to God,
because he might see that your desire for my
approbation was greater than your desire to
please him.” |

“Ts is not easy to be deceived in regard to
our motiyes ?” inquired Emma. |

“Tt certainly is. Even Christians often
think they are doing what is pleasing to God
126 THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE.

when they are only seeking the praise and
commendation of their fellow-men. But only
that is pleasing to God which is done from a
desire to please him.”

“How shall a Christian avoid this mis-
take ?”

“By setting always before him, as the
leading motive to every action, the DESIRE TO
PLEASE GoD.”

“May we not also desire the approbation of
our friends ?”

“Certainly ; we may and should desire it.
But if you would be governed by the Chris-
tian’s motive, however much you may desire
the approbation of your friends, you will desire
the approbation of your Saviour far more.”

CHAPTER IX.

THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE.

‘T HAVE something here for you, Lucy,” said
Lewis, coming into the house an hour after
berakfast one morning.
THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE. 127

“Qh, what is it?” exclaimed Lucy eagerly.

“A letter,” he said, holding it up.

“A letter from home?”

“Yes ; from your father. There are some
hard things in it, judgin® from the feeling of
it,” he added smiling, as he handed it to his
cousin.

“ Hard things in a letter,” said Emma, “I
am not sure that I should wish to have it.”

“You must remember that hard things
and hard words are not the same,” said her
brother.

“ By this time Lucy had opened the letter,
and was holding up, triumphantly, two bright
crown pieces.

“There, Emma! what do you say to the
hard things now?’ she exclaimed a moment
after. “ Half of them belong to you.”y

“Indeed! Well, as they are nob hard
words, I shall be quite ready to take my
share.”

“Hear what father says. Is he not a funny
man? ‘I“senda crown-piece to you and
one to your cousin Emma. You may spend
them exactly as you choose, without any con-
dition. You can buy: any article you please ;
128 THE CHRISTIAN ’S MOTIVE.

and as to coiour, you are at liberty to choose
pink, blue, red, green, yellow, or any shade
or combination of shades that strike your
fancy.”

The girls both laughed heartily.

“He was thinking of the muslins,” said
Lucy. “But here is your crown, Emma.
How shall you spend it?”

“] have not thought ofthat yet.”

“What can we buy here?” inquired Lucy.

“Not many fancy articles, I imagine,” said
Emma. .

“T think I can help you out there,” said
Lewis. “Iam going to Crofton this afternoon,
and it has been my intention to invite you
and*Emma to go with me. Perhaps you will
there be able to find what you want.”

“Oh, that is pleasant!” said Emma,

“Tg there a bookseller’s shop in Crofton?”
inquired Lucy. |

“A small one,” replied Lewis, “but large
enough, I presume, to exhaust your finances.”

“Then we can spend our money for books,
if we choose.. Suppose each of us should get
a book?”

After discussing the subject, the cousins
THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE. 129

put on their bonnets and went into the
garden.

“Who is that?” asked Lucy, pointing to a
little girl with a basket on her arm, who
was passing through the gate into the back
yard. |

“Tt is Nancy Green,” said Emma. “ Her
mother is a very poor woman who lives half a
mile from here. J wonder what she is coming
here for?”’

‘She has cherries in her basket.”

“ Let’s go and see what she wants.”

“Do you want to buy any cherries, ladies?”
asked the little girl, as the cousins came to-
wards her. |

‘‘T don’t know,” said Emma. “How came
you by cherries? You have no cherry-trees.”

“Mrs. M. gave them to me, ’cause I helped
her to do her work, and take care of the baby
last week, when she was washing.”

« Ah, that’s it, and now you want to sell
them?”

“Yes. Will you be so good as to ask
Miss Alston if she will buy them? Please
ma'am, tell her I want to sell them very

much.”
9
130 THR CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE.

Emma went into the house, but soon re-
turned to say that her aunt did not wish to
buy the cherries. .

Nancy looked very much disappointed.

“Did you tell her how much I wanted to
sell them?” she asked.

“T told her what you said.”

“T’m so sorry she don’t want them. I’m
’fraid I sha’nt be able to sell them,” said
Nancy, sadly. “I’ve tried everybody I could
think of; and they all have trees.”

“Tf you can’t sell them, you can eat them,”
said Lucy. “I’m sure I shouldn't object to
doing that if they were mine.”

“Then wont you buy some of them
maam?” asked Nancy, eagerly.

“Oh, no,” said Lucy, laughing. “I don’t
want them enough to buy them. I’d rather
keep my money for something else; but if
they were mine I would rather eat them than
sell them.”

The little girl eyed Lucy’s dress, which was
very neat and pretty, from head to foot; then
looking down upon her own, which was much
faded and worse for wear, she said, sorrowfully,
“Tf suppose you would rather eat them than
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 131

sell them ; but you never had to stay away
from school for want of something to wear.”

“Ts that the reason you don’t go to school?”
asked Emma.

“Yes. Mother says I may go if I can earn
money enough to buy me a new frock. She
says I sha’nt go any more, looking so, for all
the girls to laugh at me, and call me a beggar’s
brat. She said I might sell the cherries if I
could, and that would help to buy a dress;
but I’m afraid I can’t sell them.”

Emma thought of the bright crown-piece ;

but she thought, too, of the book it was to
purchase, and how much she had congratulated
herself on having the money to spend when
they went to Crofton. On the other hand, she
thought of the poor little girl and of her disap-
pointment. She thought how many books she
had already that had been given her by her
kind father, and brother, and uncles and aunts,
and that she could not want another so much
as Nancy Green wanted a dress ‘to wear to
school. |

“ What do you ask for your cherries?” she
inquired. | .

| “Sixpence a basket. There are five baskets.”
132 THE CHRISTIAN S MOTIVE.

“That will be two shillings and sixpence
just half my money, was Emma’s calculation.

Again Emma thought of the book, and was
resolving to keep the money, when she recalled
the conversation of her brother about pleasing
her Saviour.

“Tf my Saviour were by my side now,” she
thought, “what should 1 do? Poor child!
how sad she looks! It is as much as she can
do to keep from sobbing outright, and more
than she can do to restrain the tears. Jesus has
commanded me to deny myself. Should I not
deny myself now? Iam sure Lewis would
approve of my helping the poor gil.

“T have half a mind to buy these cherries,”
she said to Lucy in a whisper. “ Half the
money your father gave me will buy them.”

“You buy them! What do you want with
all those cherries? J should think you would
rather have a book such as you can get for
five shillings.”

“So I should. But I want to help this
poor girl. It is so hard that she can't have a
dress to wear at school, and she will be so
disappointed if she can’t sell the cherries! I
think I will buy them.” |
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 133

“You will be a foolish girl if you do, and
will be sorry enough for it, I daresay, when
we go to Crofton this afternoon.”

“T.don’t think I shall be sorry.”

“But how are you going to pay for them
with your crown-piece? The little girl can’t
change it, of course.”

“TJ ghall ask Lewis to change it. He will
do it with pleasure.”

Lucy knew how Emma loved her brother
and how highly she valued his approbation,
and she thought she possessed the clue to her
conduct.

“No doubt he will, and praise you for

?

your benevolence, too,” she said. “1 suppose
you would pay half-a-crown any time to geta
few words of praise from that paragon of a
brother.”

Emma looked thoughtful. Lucy’s words
had suggested a topic for self-examination.
She knew that she valued her brother's appro-
bation very highly, and that she had thought
of it when resolving to take the cherries.
After all, might it not be that she was more
anxious to please her brother than her Saviour?
Her heart was very deceitful; how could she
134 THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE.

certaiuly know? At last the thought suggested
itself, “If I don’t let Lewis know anything
about it, I can then be sure that my
leading motive is not a desire for his appro-
bation.”

During this time the little girl, who had set
her basket of cherries on the ground, stood
leaning against the gate. She could not
hear what passed between Emma and Lucy;
for they had gone back a few steps and had
spoken in an under-tone. She might be
standing there to rest, or she might have a
suspicion that they were consulting about the
cherries, and determine to wait the issue. At
all events, she made no movement to leave.

“ Come,” said Lucy, who remarked Emma’s
thoughtful air, “don’t stand there in a brown
study. Send the girl away. You don’t want
the cherries.”

“Yes, I do,” said Emma, who had now quite
decided to take the cherries, and also not to
let her brother know it, if she could get the
money changed in any other way.

At this moment she saw a market gardener,
with whom she frequently dealt, passing on
the other side of the road. The crown piece
THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE. 135

was in her pocket, and she quickly resolved
to ask him to change it.

“Will you let me pass out?” said she, step-
ping up to the gate, against which Nancy was
still leaning.

The little girl stepped aside, and Emma ran
out of the gate and across the road.

“Will you be so kind as to change this
crown piece for me, if you please, said she,
accosting the market gardener. :

“T will change it for you with plea-
sure.”

He put the five shillings into her hand, took
the crown piece, and bade her good-morning,
without asking any questions.

“ What did you want from the gardener’s
cart?” said Lucy, when Emma came back.

“T got him to change my crown piece.”

“T thought you were going to ask Lewis
to change it ?”

“Tt was less trouble to ask the gardener.
Lewis is engaged in his studies at this hour,
and doesn’t like to be interrupted.”

Emma now turned to Nancy and informed
her that she was going to buy her cherries.
The little girl’s sad and weary look was ex-
586 THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE.

changed for a glow of satisfaction, lighting up
her whole face.

“ T shall have the frock now,” she said.

“But half-a-crown is not enough to buy
you a warm dress,” said Lucy.

“ Not quite, ma’am; but mother said if I
could get so much she would manage to get
the rest.”

“Will you stay here,” said Emma, “ while
I go into the house for a basket.”

A. moment after, she returned with the
basket, into which the cherries were quickly
emptied. »She then put three shillings into
the little girl’s hand, saying, “ It’s sixpence
too much; but no matter, you are welcome
to it.” |

“Tt is not right

17?

said Lucy, when the girl
had gone. “I don’t think you had any busi-
ness to spend the money so.” .

“Why not?” said Emma. “ Uncle said we
were to spend it for anything we chose,—
pink, blue, green, or red; and I have chosen
to spend half of it for something red.”

Lucy could not help laughing at this, not-
withstanding her vexation.

“Won't you have some of the cherries ?’
THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE. . 137

said Emma, holding out the basket to
Lucy.

Lucy liked cherries ; but she was vexed
with Emma for getting them, and was resolved
to show her vexation by not tasting them.
Besides, she thought it would be out of cha-
racter to seem ready enough to eat them after
saying so much against buying them, and she
was determined to maintain her consistency
by refusing to partake of them.

“Do take some,” urged Emma.

“No,” said Lucy, turning away.

“Where are you going ?” inquired Emma.

“Up to my room, to finish the drawing |
commenced yesterday.”

Emma did not follow Lucy to the house.
She turned aside into the garden and took her
basket of fruit to the little arbour. There
she sat down, to consider what she should do
with it.

She now remembered, what she did not
think of when she bought the cherries, that
her Aunt Fanny did not wish Mary or Grace
to eat any, because they were not well, and
that she had assigned this as the principal
reason for not taking them herself. She did
138 THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE.

not think her aunt would be pleased to have
her bring them into the house. Then, too,
Lewis was not to know anything about it ;
and he would be likely to find it all out if
she carried them to the house. Her cousin
Lucy would not eat any; and, if she would,
they two could not eat them all, Emma was
really perplexed; but a happy suggestion soon
came to her relief.

“T have it!” she said, jumping up and
clapping her hands, “It’s just the thing!
The cherries are mine, to do just what I like
with them; and I will carry them to Martha
Read. Fruit is almost the only thing she
can eat; and I know she cannot easily get
any.”

Martha Read was the eldest child of a poor,
respectable, and pious family residing near
Mr. Alston. She was the victim of consump-
tion, and was now rapidly declining. Emma
had been sent there by her aunt with straw-
berries several times during the season of
them; for it was well known to the family
that she relished little else but fruit, which
the doctor said she might eat freely.

Emma at once acted upon the suggestion.
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 139

The eyes of Mrs. Read filled with tears as the
basket of cherries was presented to her.

“Nothing could be more acceptable,” she
said. “They will be worth almost their
weight in gold to poor Martha. She has had
no fruit for two days, and has no appetite for
anything else. You can hardly realize what
they will be worth to her.”

This glad and grateful reception of her gift
was beyond the expectation of Emma; for she
could not realize what a luxury, and even
necessity, fruit was to the poor, feverish
invalid,

As she was leaving with the empty basket,
Mrs. Read said, “Tell your aunt that I am
very much obliged to her.”

Emma had not stated distinctly that the
cherries were her own gift; and Mrs, Read
naturally considered her only as the messenger
of her aunt. She blushed, but did not correct
the mistake.

“T am glad I have not told any one,” she
said to herself, as she tripped home with a
light heart. “If I had told the whole story,
perhaps Annt Fanny, and Lewis, and Mrs.
Read would have praised me and called me a
140 THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE.

generous girl, and their approbation would
have made me proud and self-important. Is
not this the reason, Christ has said, ‘ Let not
thy left hand know what thy right hand
doeth?’ Is it not because we are so apt to
seek the praise of men, instead of thinking
only of what will please God? I am glad no
one but Lucy knows anything of it; and she
knows only a part, and, as she is vexed about
it, will not be apt to tell what she does
know.”

Emma’s peaceful heart bore testimony that
she needed not the praise of men to make her
happy. She had honestly striven to act only
from the motive of love to Christ; and a sweet
sense of her Saviour’s approbation was her
reward. The approbation of her fellow-men
might have made her vain and proud. Not so
the approbation of her Lord and Master. It
brought with it an humble, calm, holy peace,
such as Emma had seldom known. She felt
how sweet it was to act from the motive
known only to the Christian,—a desire to do
the will and pleasure of his Redeemer.

The hours sped quickly, bringing the time
appointed for their ride to Crofton.
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 141

“Where shall I leave you?” asked Lewis,
turning to Lucy as they drove into the prin-
cipal business street. ‘“I suppose your busi-
ness here is to spend that crown piece?”

“There! it is just as I said,” thought Lucy.
“ He doesn’t say anything to Emma about her
crown piece. He knows she has parted with
it. I was sure she would tell him. I suppose
he is thinking how much more benevolent his
sister is than Iam. Well, I have a right to
do what I choose with my money. I don’t
care what he thinks,—not I. I can’t afford to
pay half-a-crown just to have him call me a
good girl, if Emma can.”

Lucy was so busy with these thoughts that
she forgot to answer her cousin’s question till
he repeated it.

“T want to go to the bookseller’s shop,”
she then replied. “I shall spend my money
for a book, if I can find one that pleases me.”

“Shall I leave you at the bookseller’s shop?”
said Lewis, turning to Emma. |

“Tf you please,” said Emma, with a slight
blush.

Lewis left them at the bookseller’s shop,
while he proceeded to transact the business
142 THE CHRISTIAN S MOTIVE.

that had brought him to Crofton. Lucy found
not a large, but well-chosen, assortment of
books of the class from which she wished to
select. She found at least half a dozen five
shilling books that she would have liked to
purchase very much; but, as she could pur-
chase only one, she turned them over until the
six candidates for her choice were reduced to
two. Between these two she found it very
difficult to choose. |

“ How provoking it is,” she said to Emma,
“that you parted with your crown piece! If
you had not, you could have taken one and I
the other of these two. I say, it is too bad!”

But it could not be helped ; and Lucy was
obliged to decide which she would take.

Emma looked over the cheaper books, but
found none she cared to buy.

When Lewis returned, he found the girls
ready to go with him. No allusion was made
to the books on their way home. Emma was
not disposed to introduce the subject, and
Lucy was not; for she had a jealous feeling
that Emma with her half-crown had purchased
a share in her brother’s approbation in which
she had no part.
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 143

“ Are you not going to show me your pur-
chase?” said Lewis to Lucy soon after their
return. |

“ Certainly,” said Lucy, “if you wish to
see it.” |

She ran up to her room, and soon returned

with the book.
“You have done well,” said Lewis, after
examining it. “I am glad to see that you
choose books which combine instruction with
amusement.”

Lucy seemed much pleased with her cousin’s
commendation. |

“Now let me see your book, Emma,” said
Lewis.

“T didn’t buy one,” said Emma, blushing.

“Didn't you?” The tone was expressive
of some surprise.”

“You know my uncle gave us the money to
spend as we liked,” said Emma, half apologe-
tically.

“ Certainly ; I know that. But I had re-
ceived the impression that you and Lucy had
both resolved to buy a book.”

“Then he doesn’t know what Emma did
with her money,” thought Lucy. “I supposed
144 THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. |

she had told him ; but probably she is wait-
ing for a good opportunity. I wonder what
she has done with the cherries! I thought
they would appear at dessert to-day.”

What Emma had done with the cherries
continued to be a mystery to Lucy. ‘“ Have
you had any cherries lately?” she said to
Grace the next day, to ascertain if she knew
anything about them.

“No,” said Grace, “not since last Monday.
We had some nice ones then; but they made
Mary and me almost sick, and Aunt Fanny
says she hopes we won’t see any more this
year.”

It was evident that Grace knew nothing of
the cherries; and the mystery remained un-
solved.

Two days after, as Lucy was sitting in the
garden, helping her Aunt Fanny to gather
some strawberries, Lewis joined them.

“ Aunt Fanny,” he said, “ I] have this morn-
ing been commissioned to bear to you very
heart-felt expressions of gratitude for one of
your benevolent acts.”

“T cannot imagine who has given you such
a commission,” said Aunt Fanny.
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 145

“Mrs. Read. I called there this morning
to inquire for Martha.”

“Mrs. Read! There must be some mistake.
I have not sent anything to poor Martha for
some time, and feel that I deserve censure
rather than commendation.”

“You must forget some of your good deeds,
I think,” said Lewis, smiling.

“No, indeed!” protested Aunt Fanny. “I
don’t do so many that I can afford to forget
any of them.”

“But Mrs. Read told me this morning that
three days ago you sent a large basket of
cherries there. She said they were highly
acceptable and were a great comfort to
Martha.”

“Mrs. Read must have mistaken the source
from whence they came.”

“T don’t understand how she could be mis-
taken. She said that Emma brought them
from you.”

As Lewis said this, Lucy started ; and her
face wore a look of sudden intelligence which
suggested to her cousin that she might know
something of the matter.

“Do you know anything about Emma's
10
146 THE CHRISTIANS MOTIVE.

carrying cherries to Mrs. Read?” he
asked.

“No,” said Lucy: “I didn’t know what
Emma did with her cherries.”

“What cherries ?”

“The cherries she bought of Nancy Green.”

“Then she bought cherries of her ?”

“Yes. Didn’t you know it? I supposed
she told you all about it.”

“This is the first I have heard of 1t. How
many did she buy 2”

“Five baskets.”

“Did she give you no reason for buying
them ?”’

“She said she bought them because Nancy
wanted to sell them so much. She wanted
the money to help to get a dress to wear at
school.”

“T remember now,” said Aunt Fanny, “ she
came in that morning to see if I would not
buy some cherries of Nancy Green, and seemed
disappointed when I declined. She must have
bought them herself and carried them to
Martha Read; but she said nothing about it.”

“ Did she spend a part of that crown piece
to get them ?” asked Lewis.
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 147

“T suppose so,” said Lucy, feeling half
vexed ; for she was not exactly pleased that
it had fallen to her lot to inform Lewis of
Emma’s self-denial.

Lucy had now discovered what had become
of the cherries. But, if light had been thrown
upon this part of the subject, it was only to
involve another part of it in greater mystery.
She could not understand the secret of Emma’s
conduct. Her motive could not have been, as
she had supposed, to obtain her brother’s ap-
probation ; for it was now evident she did not
intend that he should know anything about
it. What, then, could be her motive?
It was a motive Lucy could not appreciate ;
for she had never felt its power in her own
heart.

On leaving the garden, Lewis repaired to
the sitting-room, where he found Emma alone,
engaged with her sewing.

“ Emma,” said he, “I have come here to see
if I can find the rightful owner of certain
thanks, all claim to which has been denied by
the individual to whom they were sent. As I
have been intrusted with the care of them, I
wish to get them off my hands, as soon as I
148 THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE.

can find to whom they belong; for I never did
like to have the care of other people’s pro-
perty ; so, if I have found the right person at
last, let me unburden myself at once.”

Emma looked at her brother inquiringly.
“You have made quite a speech for you,” she
said playfully ; “but I don’t know what you
are talking about.”

“Then I will be more explicit. Mrs. Read
commissioned me this morning to bear to Aunt
Fanny very warm expressions of gratitude
for a basket of cherries which proved to be a
most timely and acceptable gift to her sick
daughter. Aunt Fanny disclaims all know-
ledge of the matter ; and so 1 bring the thanks
to you, to whom, it seems, they of right belong.”

“How do you know they belong to me?”
said Emma, blushing and looking somewhat
confused.

“A chain of circumstantial evidence has led
to the detection of the real donor; and, if
further confirmation were needed, that becom-
ing blush would supply it. But tell me, Emma,
why did you keep it a secret ?”

“T had my reasons,” said Emma,

“ And are the reasons private too?”
THE CHRISTIAN’S MOTIVE. 149

“You know we are not to let our left hand
know what our right hand doeth.”

“Do you suppose this means that we are in
no case to let our charitable acts be known?”

“YT donot. But I thought in my case the
rule had a special application.”

“How so? Come; tell me all about it.”

“Seeing you have found out so much about
it, I may as well tell you the rest,” said Emma,
after a moment's hesitation.

She then told her brother how Lucy’s taunt
had awakened the fear that she thought too
much of his approbation, and how she had
resolved to mention it to no one, that she might
be more sure that her great motive was to
please her Saviour.

Lewis listened with earnest attention, and
when Emma had finished her story he kissed
her affectionately.

-“My dear Emma,” he said, “I might be
jealous of any other rival, but it would be the
joy of my heart to know that you loved your
Saviour a thousand times better than you love
me. You were quite right in being thus
jealous of your own motives. The love of
praise and approbation is too often the leading
150 WHAT WILL IT cost !

motive. We can never feel too deeply that
only a holy motive can produce a holy act,
and that we please our Saviour only when we
seek to please him.”

CHAPTER X.

WHAT WILL IT CosT ?

ONE beautiful afternoon, a few days later,
Emma and Lucy took their sewing out into
the little arbour in the garden, which was a
favourite resort. Their intercourse was usually
very pleasant ; but sometimes a difference of
opinion or of plans would arise. This was the
case on the present occasion. Lucy became a
little vexed and made an irritating observa-
tion. Emma was about to retort in the same
temper,.when she suddenly stopped short and
remained silent. Lucy at this instant thought
she heard a slight noise near by. She had
seen Emma's flushed face and kindling eye,
and had anticipated what she was going to
say.

“Did you think you heard some one?” she
WHAT WILL IT cost? 151

asked, believing it was the supposed approach
of some person that had arrested Emma’s
words.

“No.”

“T thought you did.”

“Why so?”

‘“ Because you were going to say something,
and stopped short. I supposed you thought
you heard Cousin Lewis coming, and were
going to say something too amiable to be said
before him,” was Lucy’s sarcastic reply.

Emma coloured. “I was not thinking of
Lewis,” she said; “ but—”

“ But what?”

After a moment’s hesitation, Emma, replied,
“T was thinking of One I knew was present;
and the thought of Him did keep me from
saying what I was about to say.”

Lucy looked at Emma worderingly. She
could not easily mistake the meaning of her
words ; yet her cousin spoke of that presence
with a sense of reality that puzzled her. To
her it was something vague, uncertain, unreal;
to her cousin—at least at that moment—it
seemed to be a living, real presence that had
power to hush the voice abvut to utter an
152 WHAT WILL IT cosT?

unkind word, and change the teelings also;
for it was evident that Emma was no longer
irritated.

“T am not quite sure I understand you,”
she said, after a moment’s silence.

“You know who it is that is ever present.”

“T supposed you meant that. I know God
is ever present, but I never can realize it.
You stopped short just as if you felt that
some one you feared to offend was close by
your side.”

“ ane was precisely the way I did
feel.’ |

“Does God seem so near to you as that?”
asked Lucy, seriously.

“ Sometimes he does,” said Emma; “ when
I feel as I wish to feel, then it seems so.”

«¢ As you wish to feel, Emma? Does it
give you pleasure to feel that God is so very,
very near ?”

“Tndeed it does,” said Emma,—a falling
tear and a beaming smile, each in its own
way, attesting her sincerity.

Lucy looked still more wonderingly at her

cousin.
“T should not think it would make you
WHAT WILL IT COST? 153

happy,” she said. “I should think it would
make you afraid.”

“ Afraid of what ?”

“Of offending Him.”

“Tt does; but that is just what I desire,
I want to be afraid of sin. I wish I were
only a great deal more afraid of it; and |
should be, if I could always feel that God is
very near. But sometimes I forget it.”

“Would it make you happy always to
remember it ?”

“Indeed it would.”

“But what if you had been doing wrong?”

“Then, if I felt that God was very near, I
could go directly to him and tell him of my
sorrow, and ask him to keep me from doing
So again.”

At this moment the voice of Aunt Fanny
was heard, calling Emma to come into the
house and render her some assistance. She
promptly obeyed the summons, and Lucy was
Jeft alone in the arbour with her work and
her thoughts. The latter were more serious
than usual.

She was not, however, left long to her
solitary reflections. Lewis came into the
154 WHAT WILL IT cost?

garden, and seeing Lucy alone in the arbour,
he went to her.

“Where is your inseparable companion?”
he asked.

“Emma is gone into the house. Aunt
Fanny called her.”

Lewis had observed Lucy’s thoughtful
appearance as he approached.

“You seemed in deep thought when I came
up,” he said. ‘Shall I be asking too much
if I inquire what you were thinking about ?”’

This was said in a manner well calculated
to win the confidence it asked. Lucy was
much attached to her cousin Lewis. He had
been very kind to her, and had contributed in
many ways to make her visit a pleasant one.
It was easy to talk with him, and she had
often been led to express her sentiments and
feelings on various subjects with much ease
and freedom ; for he had a peculiar faculty of
drawing her out. It seemed harder to speak
of what was now occupying her thoughts, yet
mingled with this reluctance was a strong
desire to do so.

“T was thinking of Emma,” she said, after
a moment's hesitation.
WHAT WILL IT Cost? 155

“What of Emma ?”

“She puzzles me sometimes.”

“Why does she puzzle you?”

“JT hardly know. She does not always
seem just as she used to do.”

“What is the difference ?”

“Tcan hardly tell. I don’t always see any
difference ; but sometimes I do. I did just
now.” :

“ And what was it just now?” asked Lewis,
wishing to draw Lucy out.

“Why, you know, I vex her a little some-
times,” said Lucy, blushing. “JI did so this
afternoon. She was about to give meas good
as I gave, when she stopped short. I supposed
that she heard some one coming, but she
owned at last it was the thought of the pre-
sence of God. We had some talk about it, and
she said that it made her happy to think of
God and to feel that he was very near.”

“Did this seem strange to you ?”

“It did. JI don’t think it was so with
Emma once.

“You are undoubtedly correct. We can all
of us remember the time when it was not so
with us. You recollect that when Adam sinned
156 WHAT WILL IT Cost?

in Paradise he tried to hide from the presence
of God among the trees of the garden. We
are all naturally lke Adam. We wish to
hide away from God. The thought of his
presence troubles us. We seek to hide from
him by trying to forget him. Some succeed
so well that they are seldom troubled with
thoughts of God; others often think of him
and are troubled. But there are some who
are not what they were by nature. Such love
to think of God, and it is the joy of their
heart to draw nigh unto him. Can you tell
me what it was that made Adam afraid of
God ?”

“Tt was sin.”

“When one is afraid of God now, what is
it that makes him so?”

“Sin; but you know, Cousin Lewis, that
we are all sinners,”

“That is true. I suppose the thought of
your heart at this moment is, that as all are
sinners, all must feel uncomfortable when they
realize the presence of a holy God. Is it not
go 3”

“Yes, it does seem so to me.”

“But you know there are two classes of
“WHAT WILL IT cost? 157

sinners in the world,—forgiven and unforgiven
sinners. To the unforgiven sinner, God is an
angry God and Judge, before whom he may
well tremble. To the forgiven sinner, he isa
reconciled God, a tender Father, who invites
him to draw near without fear.

“Tt is said of Adam and Eve, ‘And they
heard the voice of the Lord God walking in
the garden in the cool of the day.’ Probably
that voice was to them a familiar sound, and
all the pleasures of Eden were inconsiderable
in comparison with the thrill of delight with
which they had listened to that voice when
the Lord came to commune with them. At
all events, we may be perfectly sure that
Adam and Eve in some way held delightful
communion with God before they sinned, and
that even in Paradise this was their chief
joy. They knew no fear in approaching unto
God. But, after they had sinned, how dif-
ferent! Then they feared, and trembled, and
hid themselves; and this feeling has been
shared by every unforgiven sinner from that
day to this. .

“But let me turn your thoughts to a
brighter page. All that was lost in Paradise
158 WHAT WILL IT cosT?

has been restored by the suffering and death
and mediation of Christ. Among these re-
stored blessings is that of communion with
God,—the privilege of drawing nigh unto him
and of realizing that he is nigh unto us, with-
out fear or trembling. Every one who
believes in Christ has this privilege. There
is nothing for him to fear in drawing nigh
unto God. He need not fear the wrath of
God; for Christ has stood in his place and
borne for him all that wrath. He is forgiven
for Christ’s sake, and he may now commune
with God as did Adam before he fell. Once
he thought of God with fear and trembling ;
now he thinks of him with pleasure and
delight. The Holy Spirit, dwelling in his
heart, brings him indeed very nigh unto God ;
for God dwells in him by his Spirit.”

“Permit. me, dear cousin, to ask, How is it
with you? Can you draw nigh unto God as
a forgiven, a pardoned sinner, or do you shrink
from him as unforgiven and unpardoned ?”

The question was asked very affectionately
and tenderly. It was answered only by tears.

“Will you not speak to me freely?” said
Lewis, after a moment’s silence.
WHAT WILL IT cosT? 159

“You know I am not a Christian, Cousin
Lewis,” said Lucy, with emotion; “but I wish
I knew how to become one !”

“Were you ever really in earnest to learn
how ?”

“You know | can’t make myself a Christian.”

“Who can make you one ?”

“God can make me one by his Holy Spirit,
if he chooses,” |

“ And whom does he choose to make Chris-
tians ?”

“T don’t know.”

“Don't know! MHe has told you very
plainly to whom he will give his Holy Spirit.
This is what he says: ‘Ask, and it shall be
given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and
it shall be opened unto you. For every one
that asketh receiveth ; and he that seeketh
findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be
opened.’ ”

“Will every one that asks for it, receive it?”

“Yes; but they must ask honestly and
earnestly.”

“ What do you mean by ‘honestly?’”

“JT mean they must really want what they
ask.”
160 WHAT WILL IT Cost?

“That is plain and reasonable.”

“Yet many ask for the Holy Spirit to make
them Christians who don’t want what they
ask for, and, of course, don’t get it. They
want to be saved from everlasting punishment
and go to heaven; but they don’t want to be
Christians at all. If the Holy Spirit renews
their hearts, they will become true penitents
and will be heartily sorry for all their sins
against a holy and good God. Bnt they have
no wish for this deep and hearty sorrow for
sin. So far are they from wishing to feel it,
if the thought of their sins begins to trouble
them they turn away from the subject as
soon as they can. If the Holy Spirit renews
their hearts he will incline them to forsake
all their sins. But they do not wish to for-
sake them. They love them and wish to keep
them. One is proud, and he does not wish to
be humble. One is self-willed, and he does
not wish any other will than his own to
govern him; he does not wish the Holy Spirit
to lead him to Christ, that Christ may govern
him and rule in his soul. It is plain that
such cannot ask honestly for the Holy Spirit.”

What do you mean by asking ‘ earnestly?’”
WHAT WILL IT cost? 161

“He must desire it with his whole heart.
He must want it more than he wants anything
in the world beside. This, certanly, is most
reasonable. God’s gift of the Holy Spirit to
a poor, dying, lost sinner is worth infinitely
more than anything the world can offer to
that sinner: ‘For what shall it profit a man
if he shall gain the whole world and lose his
own soul?’ Do you not think it perfectly
reasonable that God should require us to ask
honestly and earnestly for the Holy Spirit, the
most precious gift which can be bestowed ?

“TI think it is,” said Lucy, very thought-
fully. |

“Do you think you ever asked for it in this
way ?”’

“T am afraid not. I never thought that to
be willing to be a Christian meant so much.
T used to take it for granted I wished to be
a Christian.”

“You must count what it will cost you to
be a Christian ; and you must also count what
it will cost you not to be a Christian.”

“Ah, Cousin Lewis,” said Lucy, with a
startled look, “I am afraid that would cost

me too much.” 14
162 WHAT WILL IT cost?

“Iam afraid so too,” said Lewis gravely.
“T will leave you to think of this seriously,”

So saying, he pressed Lucy’s hand affec-
tionately and left the arbour.

The next day Lucy returned home.

Not many weeks after, Lewis’s three months
vacation came to a close. It had been long
enough to render him very dear to Emma.
How she prized that season of intercourse
may be gathered in part from a letter written
to her brother a few weeks after he left home.
With an extract from this letter we shall take
leave of Emma Alston and her brother Lewis.

“T can’t tell you,” Emma writes, “how
much I miss you. I have lost your society;.
but you have left behind much that I shall
never lose. I hope I loved the Saviour before
you came home; but in many things you have
taught me how to live as a Christian. I am
never tempted to say anything to wound
another without thinking of our first talk in
the arbour about the lily and the thorn. J am
never moved by an eloquent sermon without
bemg reminded of what you said of hearing
and doing, and of your giving me the text of
the previous Sabbath to practise upon. If I
WHAT WILL IT cost ? 163

wander from the path, I think of our talk
about those engravings, which I carefully pre-
serve in my portfolio. I often think of what
you said about doing everything to please an
ever-present Saviour. I believe the kind
Shepherd sent you home to teach a poor,
ignorant lamb; and I thank you for all the
pains you took with me.
** x x * *

“When you get to be a minister, I hope I
shall hear you preach, and that it will do me
as much good as the talks we have had to-
gether. I often wish you were here; but I
am very glad that He, whom you have helped
me to love better than ever, is always here,
and that I can realize that He is ever near
me more than I used to do.

* * * * *

“T visited Cousin Lucy last week. She
often mentioned you, and with tears in her
eyes spoke of the conversation you had -with
her in the arbour. I think she has many
serious thoughts.”

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describe
'14124' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
1cdaeed215ab30959f3f478fd722a31c
e7595dc0c326c95ca815252e2cbe6ee43e196c33
'2012-05-27T23:55:38-04:00'
describe
'147359' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCL' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
b2fd6170e7b852c4592dbcbb3f76e29b
cf235fbb11cec11b9488c37d228d1f5811798866
'2012-05-27T23:55:25-04:00'
describe
'1048248' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCM' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a3296e073503be22888615c035c87904
186e60e1dc91699b897819829381e352525c8d3b
describe
'14328' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
a39aafb7e3d37a53addb51d270b0a6bb
a5ad9655858748ada08d305368b4021d57bad0ab
'2012-05-28T00:00:25-04:00'
describe
'30279' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
27b8acee1ca4963ae04d3676b94b6fe5
e25be8bad965285b432281c2e4585c491e58e87c
'2012-05-28T00:01:45-04:00'
describe
'8650954' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
14c4b4d1c02485f60956ad3b0c026b3f
361154bd820521a4cf16bf81f542bb2c758370b4
'2012-05-27T23:59:51-04:00'
describe
'17529' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
1e648b0cf1dbbb2bf23bc083e5c9b82f
b4c78a8631e33a3592f2a3aa7bbf5355ec646260
'2012-05-27T23:56:51-04:00'
describe
'26027' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCR' 'sip-files00088.pro'
edecf50be6c8f983b0f63be5ef4c0800
1836a0f4b16304e1e978040e9a21ddab629785cd
'2012-05-27T23:59:19-04:00'
describe
'8323406' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
7601c8b55fbdb7f492191a2f6f6d8893
af03743185f9008a53d5062b6f7cc45271450c2c
describe
'8574726' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCT' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2614bd5d3279fcefb5bd27ef49658f03
4e8c8855bc0167221efc218b47d9fabdd72d96b3
'2012-05-27T23:57:48-04:00'
describe
'9049226' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCU' 'sip-files00147.tif'
6318c9807fb0f485fadcee2e03014777
5fd71458484cf41626ef47c6d97ead66a4907b81
'2012-05-27T23:59:50-04:00'
describe
'52384' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
55db0d6cdebd1973c541aa3c376b07c4
621c0838b2c4b08e5b874a7141d9b3236c977555
'2012-05-27T23:55:56-04:00'
describe
'49946' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCW' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a6fba5b57cdb778007867789dc9ab697
d65c22a6e0dc64f5404b3e1ab78c5a8ece282367
'2012-05-27T23:56:40-04:00'
describe
'8025070' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCX' 'sip-files00039.tif'
60fd5b6327585dc13594f984d0e03247
73fd8baf38d1ab9e537322fcb10a84061de9dbc7
'2012-05-27T23:55:39-04:00'
describe
'8707058' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCY' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b6aaf9f0ce7c63dd4f0f4bb35afad037
f06afec31e87202d304eda3123b55d468cc78960
'2012-05-27T23:56:20-04:00'
describe
'1115964' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLCZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
63dace1e475ec5ab9aa934c12a679a93
11ba8e2b693ac745411649d546aca28d9012cd95
'2012-05-27T23:59:40-04:00'
describe
'45598' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDA' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
977fd3937f16063b5d15f133958198c0
646a6f7cb9124af2cee4a9b5358f17e040a7c89c
describe
'8795234' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDB' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f217aba621129e43cfc6f3d76c124a31
0b30cd0d3e8a7f544de3493d75d5f4243c9525f3
'2012-05-28T00:00:11-04:00'
describe
'189906' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDC' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
579f98e6bbd398082dc7ee31db1acafd
d94d69bcd617352ede8d2606686996fb1f36b025
'2012-05-27T23:55:42-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDD' 'sip-files00008.txt'
266fd20cf460bf8a8b40f1a8eb682bc9
8da618bf4bf8b228cbe5afb1187d6475862cca38
'2012-05-27T23:58:38-04:00'
describe
'8941304' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDE' 'sip-files00140.tif'
0fee6b76c317bbdf4d527791ded85cbc
4fbb593da5d19b801b1a23ded144900c6f00fdce
'2012-05-28T00:01:41-04:00'
describe
'28008' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDF' 'sip-files00116.pro'
833ca768d4e3cd3a5bd3e15728436eaa
39f5109d7e325ceb5de3d28f106fa4c4b6ed6493
'2012-05-27T23:57:29-04:00'
describe
'151078' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDG' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
47cf961612e8624a6eb1d0147245601c
0386eaca00697ece0022b5fef537a656469bc1bb
'2012-05-27T23:55:53-04:00'
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDH' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1459a8df42503446ee0caab7629ad987
d4a88e2a8d6da908192d4870c7e7144eea4b7876
'2012-05-27T23:57:07-04:00'
describe
'61647' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a397e52c45fe4eaf64a14e9fca045d50
d0c5480ebac11d5cc8764ef01aca0d2dfa516bab
'2012-05-28T00:01:30-04:00'
describe
'1111035' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c7b2950f6b2c76f522069c4d320ddc31
7e8e8f1aa3dbeb3aa9344e97cdb7cf136f13b21c
'2012-05-28T00:00:27-04:00'
describe
'138564' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDK' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6d2023cc35a30e0092f0f34d721fa029
50e5636eeb1f1495d8a149686468ee33523cabb4
describe
'14907' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDL' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
053c62da1bdd71b0528f17465f48a439
fab5033afa6e365cf40b8d8a644c2b799601342a
'2012-05-28T00:01:56-04:00'
describe
'138471' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
96442e23d772884f08373df6fd37ff63
b7a1fd45e4216f38f4fe392aa56de856ca9c9cd1
'2012-05-27T23:55:20-04:00'
describe
'30301564' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDN' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
f902ce15c94acdb05d6aca3fdebacc6e
2875f4c186f870c79f3923ca79dc619ae14555c3
'2012-05-27T23:58:01-04:00'
describe
'622272' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
fe85fab50518e5174246ba6009b6f43e
b1b51afd0ad173a5bfaf73a1c2bdf95ac6d06379
'2012-05-28T00:00:12-04:00'
describe
'8169334' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDP' 'sip-files00088.tif'
861ca7b69fc93be345130330a5d434e1
e22529026d4eef1258369b3132056a82477baca5
'2012-05-27T23:57:21-04:00'
describe
'148131' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDQ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
06f5c3cbc4538c49d7e30ac1a680929b
808d39b27448b66b10ea475582792a3919559909
describe
'11801' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDR' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
854c123bf0d15e3456cf0f07673bf3d4
6ac295c52e9097c4a710e3454bb41706f59e5bce
'2012-05-27T23:54:58-04:00'
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDS' 'sip-files00147.txt'
da2fff2d98a30324f9a69ce6e21b2409
760b02858900f2d1a361797752f2fe2579e3dd83
'2012-05-28T00:01:24-04:00'
describe
'23686' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDT' 'sip-files00108.pro'
026fdf7ed1515772ce182b40687af88a
a08c5a894e917ec9ea476680892e2f5e2749169e
describe
'49073' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
2d82de7ad1511003c64636fd86453374
57bc2a4afd8cd7863f32a9b1e0baa5ecc36daa11
'2012-05-27T23:57:37-04:00'
describe
'29133' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
f4a549f1e7387e7f6c87a7f35dd2c6d5
bd3a45366b344fd5404ab2c0163d45d0dac2c0e1
'2012-05-28T00:00:55-04:00'
describe
'136560' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDW' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
e7cfb3b0f0df6f213504ff7e47afb57f
0beeeac64eb4022bfb70de7d658a2da51dc73a6c
'2012-05-27T23:55:14-04:00'
describe
'28046' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDX' 'sip-filesiv.jp2'
421b2b665e4244cd66a3ab62fd4ac567
231d2bbd1d46a916139836c810f3bebc2b8e2c7e
'2012-05-27T23:58:31-04:00'
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
eeec3c769133d8cc1bf7c50e642f0ca4
5bf2aa5dbe68fd3cc459d3020bddc11a8bae1987
'2012-05-27T23:59:17-04:00'
describe
'23343' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLDZ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
144f39e191ff159a6c1f17bf733e6e9a
4ed23e61581dc455b5e0ffd945f15662cafbb1a6
'2012-05-27T23:56:44-04:00'
describe
'1087405' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
8ff1c750e5caacdbe3dd440cda5bc431
c2274e90f3a53e39257a2a8b471f2f896d60a7b1
'2012-05-27T23:58:46-04:00'
describe
'1057896' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0ae37ccd7989a8a20d2bb19efc5e25da
0973f7896f81d5be94f4d71d12c50a6203d8cf6c
'2012-05-27T23:59:15-04:00'
describe
'1125940' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEC' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
9db79a1a03da3c18d3ff5d2d7fabe36a
7580e17dfe33b3c99c58cf554019b85abf241570
'2012-05-27T23:55:10-04:00'
describe
'53103' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLED' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
f3af927282de9ea13d36a46d206c0f54
bed1311298cebca57918f3fee4a2746bb2a727ff
'2012-05-27T23:57:24-04:00'
describe
'15824' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
8f3d82384eb1a3fa7c4b75a7fb60f00c
75ca32c103350480db32133709b9ba7962bed748
'2012-05-27T23:58:03-04:00'
describe
'17498' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
38a96cc3e9ccacc3d7ebb8f797f3fae5
cf5a257c077eac0d4e2aa25096fc484a8392ef98
describe
'47445' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEG' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
e68b868024f4bccdf53ad616b3bc6cb0
8ee1f8f906835b51c168f2cad77227e0f406b73e
'2012-05-28T00:00:09-04:00'
describe
'988651' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEH' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f899059e1914323bd9bf609b936bf582
0e0afb92527a1d1807b66a9a775d3a0fefb94b70
'2012-05-27T23:59:29-04:00'
describe
'148672' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEI' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
4ab537c7cf0483919fc57f949e712ab5
7c7bac60a24cf4702300d92296e2b8a11092329c
'2012-05-28T00:01:04-04:00'
describe
'28563' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEJ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2f783c26f9d15850b678ffa1c59d4bae
98f6fa7ad3ca01026f9865b978b02475f2ae67b7
'2012-05-27T23:57:58-04:00'
describe
'151051' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
83a7f7bd89efe0f5e771d1de56864845
0f0a9d579281c228948b5a79fc84f34af2c96b67
'2012-05-27T23:56:38-04:00'
describe
'144115' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEL' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
fa3975059206614e0210302d4e5e628b
53241ef4d921e0ce59af9cf1978b79f19187562c
describe
'15578' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
da699434d03c7dcac58b8b05aa2feecd
9f8cdbe352c91ee74ec036e34aba034ac9e6cfac
'2012-05-27T23:58:57-04:00'
describe
'64514' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEN' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
650818b995eeb3756829b6bff2a057a0
7edd54ef3d4b11ebe02407ec8c7695f4d11810ec
'2012-05-27T23:56:50-04:00'
describe
'94508' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEO' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
facc1a82f040ce55de4cfa0e9c73d618
cfa35230e7f91cb70169305756cc9bec2897bfbe
'2012-05-27T23:57:12-04:00'
describe
'14474' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEP' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
22f1a236de2ff1b00e0dc00992878eaf
2bd490a094ec4c7b3dbb86a5708ef80ad731c472
'2012-05-27T23:57:30-04:00'
describe
'1005956' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6e819d6b56d5830756c48ab09f7683d3
bef9efabd12c839d39ac25f69e2d93901787afa5
'2012-05-27T23:58:16-04:00'
describe
'18620' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLER' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
3b6f66a04dcd3ca18dae28678b581678
6a2b413f57d96adeccca4a10fe694ea94b8877de
'2012-05-27T23:58:47-04:00'
describe
'36282' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLES' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
c3cd1b282665b0338d729f317e368927
9f97ab5a2cd28652299fcc29ed559abb1be6609e
'2012-05-27T23:56:48-04:00'
describe
'897954' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLET' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
707718ee7f9b243a4f4ce568cd5c3d58
5f715973f1829ade71ad4a9d5f32c71f36be6ccf
'2012-05-28T00:00:15-04:00'
describe
'9131406' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEU' 'sip-files00153.tif'
ee86feb3756557c46d915d05b2cd4762
0ad72ea6c378c6a6bfa4a141ef63b047200a90a5
describe
'26556' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e5c12fedae934bfcaedc7adc43dba7e9
00d91c81e168395b0966cef53db9cdb15f3743e5
describe
'1141618' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
1bd14f82b127a7c1d25d1586a33e3ab4
4474bec35c1bf842c463f4a363a412fb2dd0dab5
'2012-05-28T00:01:17-04:00'
describe
'103364' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEX' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
ec94c5474e026052712ae5d23f970b74
4efcfbb2974716b71d08390b8026ca94aab9e6a9
'2012-05-27T23:55:28-04:00'
describe
'135888' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEY' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
584e38aeae5af9bf4e1d69bcd68ae4a9
bf69ab8c666a08a68caec659f023b7d3dad3138c
'2012-05-27T23:59:33-04:00'
describe
'152762' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLEZ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
03b817475ae221f71e4591f657ca4ce6
c2021bc5352f5f1afee77764a3507076e7121338
'2012-05-28T00:01:42-04:00'
describe
'141143' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFA' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
93bb1d63f7cb81d2cb10ecf71274c896
1f5e347318fc5095ccb11dddb6c4dadd28e6cdd9
'2012-05-27T23:59:28-04:00'
describe
'1319983' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFB' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
b15a21099be282748d071d7b6a96a358
a61091e6a72cdd2cffec5224d3e188794afb9039
'2012-05-27T23:55:07-04:00'
describe
'1019196' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFC' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
b76a2c5a28d1096c6232c2d4b86cf492
79f114fddbe4ed7cd0529db7fca576dd8ef3fa3d
'2012-05-28T00:00:53-04:00'
describe
'14755' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFD' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
e870cbd4ad9be42abe701af8a0720344
c4cbc075056f6f8b51766cde3978dc0a9971cd94
'2012-05-27T23:58:12-04:00'
describe
'992538' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
a08fc6c2dd4fba6af5e4e4ebb42887e4
b4e4460963461a0c66ba8c43d7a7b568a78bc190
'2012-05-28T00:00:30-04:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFF' 'sip-files00097.txt'
28f6672b478701210fe3972ee0a0a07f
35847f17b0a27f5597ab14cd5efe18044587f758
'2012-05-27T23:54:53-04:00'
describe
'15357' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFG' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
0c334dfacd0d2f5b9376fc3633c3e90b
640b07dcab5edc90682ca917fcd29dcc4e88a99c
'2012-05-27T23:56:42-04:00'
describe
'965637' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2e8cfb946a284eceb440141ca81ba3f6
e6b765f021179522e80de06d72a1c2e8b4da3137
'2012-05-27T23:56:45-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
31667137b46c4b6574ba37db79e52529
09f3679f164e6deb01978f9aa1f66b38c665f205
'2012-05-27T23:59:20-04:00'
describe
'149086' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFJ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
6ba07303cae6687c86fd55027b42a9f4
4c86f0fcb082b59b993a381c9ab77e4fd8ca17ce
'2012-05-28T00:00:56-04:00'
describe
'8698312' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFK' 'sip-files00064.tif'
f0723b254c74778ba095f497a0e494f9
1c3775e448b116b0454c100dcfb9c24b5bbb667f
'2012-05-27T23:59:43-04:00'
describe
'118' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFL' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
9ae1768497ad8b95ee07fb075aadb7e4
b51c9ec6027156d73c6e39669210e122580c73d9
describe
'14511' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFM' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f5501b0d9cf68f7f68508f9811111118
c1acd6cddbfcb2ddb6f82ba374255305b2bcdfaf
'2012-05-28T00:01:25-04:00'
describe
'68410' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
00ab2a176b20f6eb449245247e4f8a3a
9c8e7776481d60f8f0f8bf72d6179dedca29e4ca
'2012-05-27T23:59:09-04:00'
describe
'70663' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFO' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
5afb47e62c2b54be54dc960c95e78eec
533b7cbcd96b677e78e91091d62104870f71e273
'2012-05-27T23:55:37-04:00'
describe
'28399' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
460ad871ef9e1cfe046f970ec61f2bb8
14b2830201f3b3c239ee6b1a915815b6f516f63d
'2012-05-27T23:57:09-04:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFQ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
e90112eb2286907bf6f9a75adcf8aa63
a630802bd0d18a4c46847ecca18fbcd2cecf7b19
'2012-05-27T23:59:35-04:00'
describe
'19825' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFR' 'sip-files00126.pro'
41c5edb245e90ac20800ef2bff21117a
f2f32082de852dfd888c85ae08d7681ad4d29168
describe
'8139180' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFS' 'sip-files00026.tif'
4646fac2b8ef12a3b50f0932c9af558d
738384c7f7688d4c8ded4f7885eee98eb7b44646
'2012-05-27T23:56:05-04:00'
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
51a55a54e80947503c337220e2fa6317
d4fe4f6d2265d4ff68a61c7440584bf590061db0
'2012-05-28T00:00:14-04:00'
describe
'120165' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
b06022137b5d4f88252324be941411d4
ad619083757ab7c967ef341d82dd6028f760d5cd
'2012-05-28T00:00:43-04:00'
describe
'29630' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFV' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3554152a73a2979ea87544fde4cc0a9e
df3ad3740c79785ed817bb2f6d945c5b7527fc27
'2012-05-28T00:00:06-04:00'
describe
'8252932' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFW' 'sip-files00005.tif'
070e60d624d162264acef6b6b9dfb815
8adec1bf0a55be3639810e88fa1054c6832ef5f6
'2012-05-27T23:58:42-04:00'
describe
'139951' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFX' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
ece49910879226aea05891920f661255
09bd0b791c47f643cbbc93aa8de7c79a64558c7b
'2012-05-27T23:56:32-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
a6d0c5ec4f525163b6cc0468f6d7450f
9775a20c774f22f384c210fcf437052979d98ea7
'2012-05-28T00:01:31-04:00'
describe
'138645' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLFZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
1cb9fcc59d376b8da3b3698b8d4add20
5cd0591b08aed2d0441555f8fd80ff0c60a62974
'2012-05-28T00:00:00-04:00'
describe
'1069421' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGA' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
dbaad681eeb7371e21ab3a0eb6175f09
c652df6a35ecd3aab13f4cd5e5ac6a21217a40b7
'2012-05-27T23:55:02-04:00'
describe
'8643256' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
723a314d69fda7a1986fd6b53dccd362
2d924165f2ef45e9cdbc9ed99471c4cc4bddeaf7
'2012-05-27T23:57:39-04:00'
describe
'43790' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGC' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
591cb270d6493b29edf6ebf0feb7291f
63dd4baa1134b164fd84a304aac1995249ee0258
describe
'22966' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGD' 'sip-files00118.pro'
410f9b613e76d41c956d329964c120e7
7798ad20aeafd8ea5b33a9b442195ade7360bd65
'2012-05-27T23:56:49-04:00'
describe
'1009707' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGE' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
0e050f7ca7401b26c3010006310dce98
1d6b81e4a7701f4463006823f52dfcbf913a5f65
'2012-05-27T23:57:32-04:00'
describe
'29160' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
8f487704aeef24adb4cad39fbb9127d7
ad64451862014921487be0dcdada44cb6ece1b2c
'2012-05-28T00:00:50-04:00'
describe
'956473' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGG' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
a75c4122582e1d4c8768d47ce34ca551
f17ed6b22a268b033f1276df87981d54cbe96c74
'2012-05-27T23:55:45-04:00'
describe
'1103705' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGH' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
f046fee434dd1af4371f22c5df01787a
1f8ed45905444efd0d5edd39670b57b1da8fa8f0
'2012-05-27T23:55:54-04:00'
describe
'53408' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
cea23a41a9e76cb06fcb3e965bfaedb5
0b216925c448aceb409c153efae03ee6e430fc40
'2012-05-28T00:00:46-04:00'
describe
'1092767' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGJ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
17c4b55d1f309424b42863edee64ac09
a426858aedff5f4c99b074300581e498d922c9b4
'2012-05-27T23:59:18-04:00'
describe
'981414' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGK' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6a12aee5b31f645aaea153119e66fa8d
8ddd427d1a8aeeb6e4d2bdecbb47fa29e8bf05b4
'2012-05-27T23:57:00-04:00'
describe
'18470' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
da2b0e26e90df5b377b042e91965c164
e39fd2ecbea2f93c495fba618b2da29a9dcc58e4
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
3a99a46608dcd398d07312d17ea65c10
cfaa0881b2dcf6d2afece4f65f6e6a8e796c6e8f
'2012-05-28T00:01:14-04:00'
describe
'7568824' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ccfa921f1efa9396f86593aaa68f7d8e
93ab843736d3cc6e68f6b01de11bfcfa851867b0
'2012-05-27T23:56:25-04:00'
describe
'1086778' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
60bf9ebca22c56f617b7cb5d5254aabb
0744369e4aab8fdd9363fde1f132ad6199f619d4
'2012-05-27T23:59:31-04:00'
describe
'153175' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGP' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
ec7150802a2889f4686f7658d8b1e97c
fb2ff8a03275a28b00ba7fb5704ea6525b92f5c1
'2012-05-27T23:55:01-04:00'
describe
'4885' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGQ' 'sip-filesvi.jpg'
e351a618d8f1ac9a2cc0d56b894fa46f
644adeac3495571b27d1f056d5fc368bd395e80a
'2012-05-27T23:56:22-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
6c08470e08841ed5de518e8e011886f5
d9674fa79ac3e3822296317cc12bcd9771dff381
'2012-05-27T23:59:12-04:00'
describe
'48109' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
4b4cde5cf4b47fa3a7750739e3db05c2
4bacc240710542da71997b793719df21c1ae0b4e
'2012-05-28T00:01:16-04:00'
describe
'1017826' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a411d19aad1886e4b23171d9f90e1789
6c90c706747be4ace00a47efc273046c1b5d5fb9
'2012-05-27T23:57:08-04:00'
describe
'8486004' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4b939bea4b34de7e266afbf6a34ecdc6
1262fb30eab91778ac3152eda6a908cbc41fb3ad
'2012-05-28T00:00:37-04:00'
describe
'16144' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGV' 'sip-filesiithm.jpg'
fb40e839dd7edad97cc0ae74365a2bfb
48c309841494c39a56e730b6e630e7954287f2bf
'2012-05-27T23:58:32-04:00'
describe
'8241004' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGW' 'sip-files00002.tif'
a8a48482a9081e76b8d5a277d33c132e
6cf4454c7a17456f53daeb43b67aa340f34e257e
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGX' 'sip-files00149.txt'
bc47d75f27abddf493452c1b58f01852
b98517db605988035a974db421773ddc0bdf4b09
'2012-05-28T00:01:38-04:00'
describe
'1025684' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
62835173ae080d5b8e4f27de5a5ce4f1
d09d7707517786eb8a5d49851eaed33375b5a332
'2012-05-27T23:56:15-04:00'
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLGZ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
0a6f4385bb0a729aee3db4ee25686f0c
d706f60fc6271cf04c7ce03fd2fda05bfee1aa9d
describe
'8843034' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHA' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ceb438b9f155706a6d90809cdef40238
ac25299b3af0aeefe9c36b37041711882bc90c01
'2012-05-27T23:59:37-04:00'
describe
'122156' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHB' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
485b85ba0da588cb799a7c52b169022e
e61e15cc594589dcd9afe811c3dfccb34187cb6f
'2012-05-28T00:01:48-04:00'
describe
'7958412' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHC' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c74a87f8c5ddb2897fc5e9d69a2a610e
6573c9fbcc3b31caff3c180a489d47a6a4aa3bad
'2012-05-27T23:58:25-04:00'
describe
'135188' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHD' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
1b52f3b07b80f5b4108e597da16b9f89
622849e98312260d8deea30cac9f1f0ef3829c46
'2012-05-27T23:54:59-04:00'
describe
'147827' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
91135c0d27a31d7c9f827de7cfed1a41
14fb1be62a1cbf4c72d5047be8b3f26263164148
describe
'15072' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHF' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
90cd20f7ef2bb97a87b0696fb5c0dfa4
d69ef58d4cbd426303d057e171ffebdd0e335bad
describe
'7933448' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f68fc8e40b7e88fd507bd96267d1208d
870868beb842d22fc880364adcaced129ae0c886
'2012-05-27T23:58:20-04:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5dfec2a06ce2c17455872b7765f6bc06
7c52e4c9db98f7bc972cee85d50a7cd9ad26d9eb
'2012-05-28T00:01:54-04:00'
describe
'1133809' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
4cf566a4cbaf0f737ca678e24fc60175
4bcc14142478c9a9421f6ba5bccb094beaf67b99
describe
'143053' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
78bb3326ef6659b5cb7aa91b5dbd88d3
d8f7f72ccba8272bb2b886763760d52eea17bd3d
describe
'8811168' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHK' 'sip-files00138.tif'
cbc7af9b950e4fbbabb45e90bf49e8e9
9acc0b1d787a44fd90e3a879291c3fe50c5b11f7
'2012-05-27T23:58:04-04:00'
describe
'12663' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
7519a885ca48d8c65a59885d3c2167bc
f2c65ecbd52c7c55ab280ea18b45da155a492d8f
'2012-05-28T00:01:20-04:00'
describe
'144841' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHM' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
17a140c86996788a53bf168a746794a4
b9ecacbc89b16d748e8f36ca7b26ee22c64e7209
'2012-05-27T23:59:47-04:00'
describe
'956122' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
5e59f26955cb7b125f3ba1ab07c75d6f
3252efb976f6776452c236033844abf4fad55247
'2012-05-27T23:57:38-04:00'
describe
'22779' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHO' 'sip-files00099.pro'
ea87f0522cb3fd2ea3d4b1f3edbead71
6ee585db0bb8b02c69543e60dbfa113abb9eb4f7
'2012-05-27T23:57:28-04:00'
describe
'8685988' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHP' 'sip-files00018.tif'
eb2dbdcf1aded81a67b4cabd6e462519
c15cf77b7b45272156d5f459036d07dbc1da7025
'2012-05-28T00:01:01-04:00'
describe
'1096567' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHQ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
de1f4e958c0e5c331c5f12b9ae2a0738
8725b9d3826350f8b44731275b89c64cc3d749a6
'2012-05-28T00:01:13-04:00'
describe
'30728' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHR' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e6f9deb2eaeef90bd1ef705f47ee9938
ad1d323b80c6718fcc1273aa01f8da60cb6353fa
'2012-05-28T00:01:51-04:00'
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHS' 'sip-files00108.txt'
b94bb829840f39e7d9014ea1283c32e4
22e7f24e2fbe2927888b63b01888de56f7e99ff0
describe
'30218' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
2d2d756aa505efd1cf424bea2bf684af
6271b81e975d60d935ed780322b60a40565d0cd9
'2012-05-27T23:59:58-04:00'
describe
'44202' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHU' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b744e781230786ee117da9edf0e78a9f
8b15570efb21a5879302090c2cdccce28235ad0d
'2012-05-28T00:01:47-04:00'
describe
'2872' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHV' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
9167dc34b423b9b18ab4e17e36e69290
73a967ebe565852d52bd381e6195132c697bcde8
'2012-05-27T23:55:18-04:00'
describe
'15941' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
549c31928294bb40cf90ef8c03424462
4cd272962b6b71f617dd52013af0d222535f1461
'2012-05-28T00:00:22-04:00'
describe
'50567' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHX' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
12c4adae5fb1950c52726c345f4020bd
f84255372bc94331d8c88681ab3a00af2bccc6ea
'2012-05-28T00:00:29-04:00'
describe
'14388' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHY' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
bf8ea073890a106dd7629fdd5c062981
25ec2aabf4320e45d561114d8e88404c9ae83e4e
'2012-05-27T23:55:06-04:00'
describe
'24686' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLHZ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
941f5dc9e02a6412e82d8e2232437b0d
856b9b99ccaf664e0c8f13083dbf859e15d04ec0
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIA' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
c9908604c8a7ddc8435171a0daabcbbd
617de08291879cb5728f65a4847d0c2db812ce24
'2012-05-27T23:56:52-04:00'
describe
'53795' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIB' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
d98ac37848ef5f200609b88c87f34e1d
4fe8cc26d64d943c4ff5692402958dd0c861cbef
describe
'1025389' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIC' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
2e8c72c20ae90a6d1d32d31b8adfc6c9
a5fc7e25f5aa7a26d88d1e7a24f1b6d9279043b7
'2012-05-27T23:58:43-04:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLID' 'sip-files00055.txt'
cfba6aa3c27a4c426b4bd559000188e2
ce7ea387d791229f2a3661fac681d169b826f561
'2012-05-27T23:55:59-04:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIE' 'sip-filesi.QC.jpg'
533db1d9a52d6a73f2d0e51ceac01bb0
9aad16b5f8321a514d62ebe98b4750736c97857d
describe
'138866' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
59d6d0b3398a453e8160bd7df0dd94a1
73e33db65853cc4f183f7cc52f274e43fbd9075b
'2012-05-28T00:01:49-04:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIG' 'sip-files00093.txt'
f34f00495ca5dff2b6a608b18021e1cf
83df01b5d0a8fa7e681e258597dacf8abbe4e97e
'2012-05-28T00:00:48-04:00'
describe
'137752' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIH' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fc5cd3305f372f7dfc48a52e255c442e
0f253eb670743ce29743bf341f23bf791d11491a
describe
'135860' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLII' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3f1411b82fe205104b3c9c637975c15a
b24b27d3cce161d10f23be71ada4f0bcb266943e
'2012-05-27T23:57:02-04:00'
describe
'15161' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIJ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
9ef88c35844a2eb8e49db3d9b16c13e4
2c7798370136f677152b5aa84ec43d57eee42048
describe
'1046499' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
688ecd160448551acba046a919a57931
3eb70f81db085c865606b5dcd30c3ac07b4b3e60
'2012-05-28T00:01:59-04:00'
describe
'28929' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIL' 'sip-files00027.pro'
fcf3e58cf931627bc347af13bf59d1c9
fa5b0269345a7d91ca02ac924ce0643f816782db
'2012-05-27T23:59:34-04:00'
describe
'8652668' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIM' 'sip-files00080.tif'
65ff9d34a666f841285cb063cf672375
10c5033b41c44dbc0384163d1dcae9b839f6756e
'2012-05-27T23:57:16-04:00'
describe
'1118916' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIN' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
6e1096ef10933346302ce60e5827bb6a
ad9468a181d70cf7865244fc24cb59acda6d1dca
'2012-05-27T23:58:44-04:00'
describe
'9400474' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
c97a47590f3c87f710ebe12237206e31
a6c90a08d93af4811469f41e0ce9f8f5a820eb5a
'2012-05-27T23:58:36-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIP' 'sip-files00104.txt'
81df61749ec810c858c75ad188a8e7e7
5a44b4cdbc881cbd6593ba7bfeba8768566b5c3b
'2012-05-27T23:59:01-04:00'
describe
'1233511' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIQ' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
6e27280601f37263d58fb0cd86412ea6
34261be2bf363f32f0cabb9efc1773c1f605dbbc
describe
'991221' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIR' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d218af98d530ff555edf477353e159d8
42c2a68a10b730744ad4263430518d9c365c125b
describe
'26062' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIS' 'sip-files00135.pro'
2602cab6fc108bfd8fc225cb7b133b6d
6e9eaacae41643121c533447f5e60adfecd792c7
'2012-05-27T23:57:49-04:00'
describe
'939598' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
39664dc0c2608460c402b3ee7684771b
2a67781b3924eaec1791ec5f71c5881407288f49
'2012-05-27T23:59:26-04:00'
describe
'25888' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIU' 'sip-files00156.pro'
114a1f1e456dc59892c781fb0deddbe5
8d2729a4b54bfa98318277d641822e9b776e0236
describe
'7913496' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
7eb56cc82df7f622a8cdcf60e92e7504
0f328b72e8d2ef784ad1033100cb35f5f0af046d
'2012-05-27T23:59:21-04:00'
describe
'126265' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIW' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
143f40f694645cfe11ff2a4d3d5e752e
64ac571e338baca069c269ec1131a749b490281d
'2012-05-27T23:55:36-04:00'
describe
'123912' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
592e7eec0ddf7d3d4f759f41063cf8dc
02239de3e472e5eb27c6df8b59aac51d4982cf44
describe
'140856' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIY' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
a178461cf4e6c2d87ce3b2a64dc04856
dadf92251a2eb437e3e0146372d95fe317ec2ef9
'2012-05-28T00:01:36-04:00'
describe
'1024749' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
82363841bcf88300e86f6f293dcf5cc5
d8f8840bbe678d0cead4c4a25a1ab13301e0e45d
describe
'27626' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJA' 'sip-files00015.pro'
4a83b746a0fa25cc9a3029e8e74bf716
3d8e65512af4d1881552ab4895bbe91ced7d0833
describe
'36798' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJB' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
186101416365b96761e548930f0972ed
7c3e1c530672ca546d73e41c8dfd3a300f12f0a9
'2012-05-27T23:58:40-04:00'
describe
'43681' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJC' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
0342523bfce78f892ad0cd3cce05a311
4f261ea3da65876c9411662e3cdfc9e8efe91589
describe
'30492' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJD' 'sip-files00160.pro'
e1830c99d8e36c153899632d1d9bc861
7bfb2af2fe92a84c1fee54443ccec5a506f3292f
'2012-05-27T23:55:33-04:00'
describe
'1074725' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJE' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
a90d90bada7ae12f49969c88553f0261
8190e6f1a6bf5abdc8ab7416b039f5feebebdc03
'2012-05-28T00:01:35-04:00'
describe
'1102313' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJF' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
05c2f3e1a9a339441e765824ebe39e09
4629d220ef103fc0af41e04a777b32546437e186
describe
'28654' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJG' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8f62d3b6e6936c19f89c205558039a30
0c02c67681b9f721f725b2ed96d2a7bf658baf9d
describe
'158954' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
120ea052f3ed12c2d283447f3a9e5950
8b491e0007e20b10a4d8c3539c9ce3c1d0189ebc
'2012-05-27T23:58:51-04:00'
describe
'69660' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJI' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
2a8aa36e4117e9f56e4bc75d6f8866c4
ed4ffea4d114753a50f3b21a30679beb01513c1d
'2012-05-27T23:59:44-04:00'
describe
'50514' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
518f40974146241f5cedd4abf8b633d4
92a0b21df7e86aef02fb1c4af2b0faf0e15ec5a7
'2012-05-28T00:01:15-04:00'
describe
'16789' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
6886404a6d2165576f5710584c9cf6f3
20cc3c3217a288678caa42424baf3e16457b1189
'2012-05-28T00:00:42-04:00'
describe
'28396' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJL' 'sip-files00083.pro'
804ff75d62bbbca30d2d76f8fc0387af
067d8ca142f9c5bc25ede3c8de414e442cbb66ce
'2012-05-27T23:57:06-04:00'
describe
'36701' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
9f4a830c885e7b9307e42b3dd72e7e76
b4ae2cfef15f5a9c4de656f2cdeba55fb86b28de
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJN' 'sip-files00062.txt'
5a166fd814e86a2188e177e2ce9acb55
c6147e3772b530c6c5619f704edd21e767dbc9e9
'2012-05-28T00:00:16-04:00'
describe
'7723656' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJO' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e64df77b575934584617f8bc0b248689
3b5bb123f70c4aafbd9d578e3a7d56f325ef5da6
'2012-05-27T23:59:41-04:00'
describe
'1092962' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
88dc2ab3805b98d2465c3392280ec944
247a3852257e08e70cae2a2d5a79cfdf303c78b3
'2012-05-27T23:58:50-04:00'
describe
'26202' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
78c644fc4adde565956a69839b1566bc
e9847583cf462088581eb79623f49bc0ccf893e6
describe
'8707042' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJR' 'sip-filesv.tif'
75d67e75035c763178b169377ccd86fe
b422864ae03ea14d50cfa8c4b9a36fccbc6d93c1
'2012-05-27T23:56:55-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
81af4fbe2aff0fe8759bbf7aeb284295
39fe037eb59411ab7a983c3fa2896f0b7826b58d
'2012-05-28T00:00:26-04:00'
describe
'146135' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
e45d7d3610bcc1eb0461ce797b508fe6
30e3a6b922e20ae4ac00dfcdd41f8aaae1dd5a3b
'2012-05-27T23:58:14-04:00'
describe
'1081580' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJU' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
431f9ec0d7d61364f4a92adbdeca21dd
1d50c05e375baebae6c70b5188e6a736f1686f9f
'2012-05-27T23:59:55-04:00'
describe
'51306' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJV' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
110bdb7d2801eb6cf7ec7de8e3696636
ea572655052dd6ac3417e9da945fd5408669c704
'2012-05-27T23:58:07-04:00'
describe
'27625' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1e3ab0fa21aa78d3f709f8127af80a7d
1d0a6164458446b394cd889e449d8f7626a6485e
'2012-05-27T23:58:52-04:00'
describe
'1000805' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJX' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
aa6fbe26d9a0884e38b58ea2ff2515eb
7091b6100d6ac6eafd670636161d020adb9f0c30
'2012-05-27T23:58:48-04:00'
describe
'8305962' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJY' 'sip-files00067.tif'
411a742e6c9d497f7223607e97b38a97
8b17c8c4aa705eaa0f41c221c640231f7d1640d4
'2012-05-27T23:59:57-04:00'
describe
'153089' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
a5afb63d83ea500767ac2772b101595e
f39a9cbaee26b9526ec6fff5d508ef95a3589bbf
'2012-05-27T23:56:37-04:00'
describe
'1073570' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKA' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
745605a6de301202c4dbbcb2a5b4a092
8b8efc65928fccbc6d50fb7ca7e52127da792418
'2012-05-28T00:00:01-04:00'
describe
'14260' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
a5328b246da954c34d06701c56f290ee
a7a5b7256b36b2b28de3a41df38de5bafd14e60d
describe
'8722132' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKC' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d568257c9419fc27b9ee7629a8f8ff36
4cee5332203c1f0edf06b69e38acde3d38dd61a0
'2012-05-28T00:00:08-04:00'
describe
'68280' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKD' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
e8352044a87ccf4685dc40455eefee32
bd7b006ff1a20cb70ad473195a6d4a4aaee319b5
'2012-05-28T00:01:37-04:00'
describe
'16968' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKE' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
72676698590eb8f11690377655c239bb
1d88d0172220b0835917da1d9182201b28dd23db
describe
'31683196' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKF' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
f54d10779579cc54ff2b8708bec4f6eb
4a33555aeff05d978a363ed88820500aa04fe112
'2012-05-27T23:55:16-04:00'
describe
'15803' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
34395003cebb817126adf51f2a5a8328
5546e52ee0215a9ab0025a2e8de681f5d6ce2f1e
'2012-05-27T23:58:09-04:00'
describe
'151496' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKH' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f371a9b649a1205715ed7274949ff5ec
d421f0151d865404ae5eb9a319da6693205c8030
'2012-05-28T00:01:02-04:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKI' 'sip-files00145.txt'
54a51429e0bd7f88aa9c4e7a515d02a6
cc417ec50206e4b2a393e77fd0a1a64d008f1663
'2012-05-27T23:56:43-04:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKJ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
3a6ee422a92e062035671dbfea8f3e79
4ee72bb2ef2987560cab4021633f35f1228df739
'2012-05-28T00:01:10-04:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKK' 'sip-files00024.txt'
f914cc035de7919105a567ba9af82fc6
dd359682e689d782fb923812097f937c22f64ad3
'2012-05-27T23:56:17-04:00'
describe
'8646136' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKL' 'sip-files00061.tif'
b62abfb812ad6b419185cb40019a986d
01289e5f9b352e3e5731857f879868ca8eb39a0f
'2012-05-28T00:00:41-04:00'
describe
'8592756' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
45c8cda4f94395573c7dbb92448d1d76
f18594ea6bf31ca3e83c103225ed0971e5809dbc
'2012-05-27T23:56:29-04:00'
describe
'2641660' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKN' 'sip-files00014.tif'
dc340f63192f3f21c2841b8448ee0878
ff62228505de3ac4c6d1746597731e935ccdb91e
'2012-05-27T23:56:27-04:00'
describe
'36642' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
7e77c85715add27a627eb69d08f1e965
a85b2db6fcab012d67691502981d7f5deb4c4ab4
'2012-05-27T23:56:39-04:00'
describe
'1105590' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
e0b360ad944b9afacd15b471de6258d9
87b861f5fea59e0fd4a71bf163f69fd3bb938605
'2012-05-28T00:01:40-04:00'
describe
'943138' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKQ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
61ef0f08fe3e17ae1fcff3dba790e204
448a08fcac996a416bd794e0ad4d97c61e6b1c97
'2012-05-27T23:55:34-04:00'
describe
'49900' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
ebe59d3c6644cff2fc7eaa57179e7545
1f579bb00f5a3bcbed653d289c2faad1459b9a84
'2012-05-27T23:58:56-04:00'
describe
'8806660' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKS' 'sip-files00099.tif'
11305e516ea024c7025b01991143bc18
88afd892604d188057fe081eaa18953d3aa706f2
describe
'131181' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKT' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
4c08dc9673599e13553b8b5f41250404
28a11d36bad4e3051e8b47e5e0a98af2b92705d5
'2012-05-28T00:01:43-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5114bc6342e0de2b09b889d4ab1087ba
523de295cd1fa7a9b62340387f6cf9d659a12bc9
'2012-05-27T23:57:44-04:00'
describe
'1043554' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKV' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
e3bb1f7eb72ecd73a31dc562c5af3de3
0d03556690cf70723570075edbe53cdd1ba1b496
'2012-05-27T23:57:59-04:00'
describe
'26527' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
43c56c4ed95424575c84638fc6ab57a9
9c81236c62c514eff02d93e9a2735fd8a549477b
describe
'26308' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
5fb67939538f4c236a00b9804ef9e762
8359cee2e152800043d350f9b5fa64993dd0723e
describe
'26312' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKY' 'sip-files00030.pro'
3aa476630b883eb7b83bc676fe51098a
60dd57ec19edcf856f8650bd77c80581fc0e4289
'2012-05-28T00:00:18-04:00'
describe
'25974076' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLKZ' 'sip-filesii.tif'
666a06505c30dc5f4f315b49ab582c15
ffd296f8a6eb746c4eb631c5a4f777be76e26279
'2012-05-27T23:59:27-04:00'
describe
'8976250' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLA' 'sip-files00095.tif'
16e1ade1d2af2e338efde102a074a516
cc9c64a954f9a0234d07e35ecacd39095ec44d24
describe
'13830' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLB' 'sip-filesv.QC.jpg'
df5dda51ee262a9fdfcbf8efa65beffe
f52adf946019f667cf4718585c0b17a872f6b1c3
'2012-05-27T23:59:42-04:00'
describe
'124697' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLC' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
94848a44487b4bd44b948bf5f42ce6fd
ea55873d8a1558043a616be4284024e88f59b6cc
describe
'141085' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLD' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
b0c583712f2e31ec84402fde3107b10a
ee081d399a9404957e36c454967b2ebca2b690cb
'2012-05-27T23:58:49-04:00'
describe
'39305' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
17cf6b3da24f657a0a3813b5a26ca507
2bda7fcfee528b4c2329d89df1c83a031373379c
'2012-05-27T23:58:39-04:00'
describe
'8954556' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLF' 'sip-files00122.tif'
ddf6494ba4f18a897563355992ea0896
69f0dd30dee96b0f2b4a7e8b20fa03a7800a8f1a
'2012-05-27T23:56:46-04:00'
describe
'51706' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d1073adeaaaa572017a94c48d3007bae
eadfeed0a4b52b5372288f17ad5a9ddff7b39d92
'2012-05-28T00:00:05-04:00'
describe
'7759490' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLH' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e3f1049f1a243bb913f8e926b4704b4a
b42f00d3420c4c25931cdfa7038a7e140503a5a2
'2012-05-28T00:00:28-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLI' 'sip-files00002.txt'
2c11bc15a4999554a9daf1752a48a1c6
c94246ffd12f3eeeac3cb3c83f15a456175fe916
describe
'143936' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
9463d06330660526295d486cda48d30b
bfd6a8319d2f4fbcb2ece914bee53c438b37e433
'2012-05-27T23:58:58-04:00'
describe
'981995' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLK' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
ec41064a744b5ce54d07714249e34e86
3e6a55d0f590e9a753004fd484ce55af2104eb4c
'2012-05-27T23:57:43-04:00'
describe
'8624239' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
8079c24e6bd415384ff55be989416c36
26e993318f7a9ece285dc898695d56a6403bfc4d
'2012-05-27T23:57:26-04:00'
describe
'29116' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLM' 'sip-files00031.pro'
55a1b23450dec4cf309ff86c50945fad
9f0628e116fd0adbecbcb8613eff0572fb053264
'2012-05-27T23:54:57-04:00'
describe
'1021165' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
931274bd610c7083a1dbc9243edf2977
8d2ab9a291e8fb7ee7ce90edd4f0a45d7e26056a
'2012-05-27T23:57:04-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLO' 'sip-files00088.txt'
fd4f70334c21e3671b1d40fafd3ff489
a43d6b41fcf0e7a24b05a9f502b16b5f8ce03168
'2012-05-28T00:00:23-04:00'
describe
'55525' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLP' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
0e2929b7d4d31b8583b6500e89376fd6
e50e9482c85d22796160a17367c25af517ae8529
'2012-05-27T23:56:12-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5eb5f25c470ff7d4640cbaf37340d6ab
c4c4b63d04e2911c095d884e311d69cfd6cba0f8
'2012-05-27T23:55:31-04:00'
describe
'1130665' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLR' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
dcf22db364ecb576204b0a99791cfa84
2d4175c6100dafb603a0202ce606881cb612e4c9
describe
'998904' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
480958fee248dac95016162846676c05
cb0aae48cded118abca77a6ebe5f2dd258280cb2
'2012-05-27T23:58:35-04:00'
describe
'36921' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
284b594545ebb288171ea1d789c02e20
0c7d238805eb049e7e665ac559206eb3bd0ff6cf
describe
'9205706' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLU' 'sip-files00136.tif'
b803afb272ac18da4cbfac7c0297c597
cc2ed0d17034b2ea452b81e997326e70213e2768
'2012-05-28T00:00:44-04:00'
describe
'31098636' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLV' 'sip-filescover3.tif'
0202440914457e7c913c0074cbd91982
52e1b54027759db10a5e1c26681f31ac0c239518
'2012-05-28T00:00:35-04:00'
describe
'27788' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
78a5d49d01d8cb20cb5c97904ed20e40
973128472e4882c51d2dc7308bc4299cf50c653d
describe
'36278' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLX' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
a70565e8551ceca1fcaf18efd6820259
fdb2a4bc318f19a3358757d411af790c59daa2ca
describe
'48927' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLY' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
58d0e74fb7ed46288e0d9ec8f791b8e0
f670048f462aa631e7f87656ee0ca6ba83dbcf11
describe
'1014479' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLLZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
dc771a8efed2725d07eddec080f4c8a9
b1d4da353f848e00130800a0ae4f5194ffe963fb
'2012-05-27T23:57:05-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMA' 'sip-files00156.txt'
a7b45ab024a3af19a0349addb35a975c
8c3541c972bef13c2a538c807f338bdc50526f05
'2012-05-28T00:01:53-04:00'
describe
'25042' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
75c9968e83e14a4ae14b202509512017
fed4064cbf2058213ca647cf31e916b853c0a52d
describe
'9070961' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
232d6a4908fec5d3e0e83f2f958602b2
454fb547053f7f774030183113243e5342a9d0e0
'2012-05-27T23:58:27-04:00'
describe
'26986' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMD' 'sip-files00066.pro'
70005e180e963d90dc4f753a195d703f
f3a3c486c46a5de1f9351118bb943cc992564b04
'2012-05-27T23:59:49-04:00'
describe
'375808' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLME' 'sip-filesiii.jp2'
eddfcb72796be74ba58916b362fa979b
00a8124e12764d4a41851d97e2a8e59a881f9e31
describe
'52616' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMF' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
13e4d56fe85e46218aa857d71fc089fd
99e3c0c627bd3d7a92a68aa472fd49a22eed3846
'2012-05-27T23:57:11-04:00'
describe
'975125' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f3a4d4e748a3bf5fb6a67f938118e635
0e637e3ecec7a22b1335f2416b1c9ed38145af83
'2012-05-27T23:56:21-04:00'
describe
'1048604' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
fc7fb25aa9cab85bcb92c66b2e6588e1
b7a9c2eafb34ba0264356c1616b8b53ea6346e26
describe
'25292' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMI' 'sip-files00127.pro'
20330d59e29c3837d86901535c09d623
de0bb7b59709b465f2b98428a2f9e13df3afa2a6
'2012-05-27T23:59:14-04:00'
describe
'144779' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2b92e32f5afa926002eb257bbe39adc9
2f3aac19c43baf9f1353162fb8ef49c5f6d96d48
'2012-05-27T23:58:34-04:00'
describe
'53488' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMK' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
79da44d1930ee995a8b4ab5d98a2159b
107c07b441649295450b8a4641964bc1f0a522f4
describe
'54748' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLML' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d5c40a5dab4f7cdcd2b94b351b4230d4
8ef6b41d526bc75c9a3031f9d84ebe4776fafd67
'2012-05-28T00:01:33-04:00'
describe
'8749221' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMM' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c8a849540a8e5ba02ae42249dfb66f09
53652f36917a94344bb1af020c3b0de0d9c90add
'2012-05-27T23:57:10-04:00'
describe
'29184' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
cd0590547499f40ba849b115d50c6d19
3f7612d3290df985cfddad026483240aed503299
describe
'1039589' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
6c7e2cb8c932b3ee2955b2feb56163e3
b2f0ac44c6a92b1b7a4af2252281457cbec7e205
'2012-05-27T23:59:54-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
467b6136e2eb396b29da3560c86f4d15
6c9da43061111839b4b5fe8be438ac53c5a92c6f
describe
'8898644' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
5dbacfb5ca193868039428a958fd2523
9a70e417f817becadc9412462bf2177eb4326a4d
'2012-05-27T23:59:00-04:00'
describe
'30814' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
39ae2a3b303b8c29e5faed69dad7faf7
1771b44503837a68cbaa231681dea60256541763
'2012-05-27T23:58:02-04:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
10533a08f5dcabda5fdfaf53298c8b2a
46f1f6f8d672f436ee7930e4eb86c1ea7e903d93
describe
'8580370' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
bf37d7b09e72ce25f3f3d5aebcfadb63
be9b9b1bc83789a9f0449d93dcd006a75854f7ce
describe
'1082181' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMU' 'sip-filesii.jp2'
cc36cb34c915d28343aa177aede9db65
1333c50df8c07721f334f07290f0da0a382a5918
describe
'45780' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
efbc7808644baf8b546e8f8506cf98cf
e5ee36b5d9f3948d05e36587509a5803304c1144
'2012-05-27T23:56:18-04:00'
describe
'39013' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b06b5136f911b2145ece61981e759a6d
9162a683087483682a732cab1c662ff3d8deeed2
'2012-05-27T23:57:13-04:00'
describe
'7154648' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
a30614696ad8bc89e6792dca14c3b5aa
a7ea84ca67941aa7fd5ee33eaa70f48fa035e638
'2012-05-27T23:59:32-04:00'
describe
'24987' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMY' 'sip-files00155.pro'
7314800a5f091dc6440f42b1972de35e
a651f35c771b07557fce74ec61f099b925e00822
describe
'13154' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
a247d9d4579f0ba47534495535b704f7
232483a3e57fe92bacf0a5a63c5663e91964487a
'2012-05-28T00:00:54-04:00'
describe
'8226456' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
856ceeaa3d0d92f6d90287c559a639f3
b0b1a3faeaff572be192d82b2b3b1916ea8ddde1
'2012-05-27T23:57:19-04:00'
describe
'985328' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
56d368b8094aa970745b501fadc77883
799def6e073621a00921eb5aad7518edee4de6f9
'2012-05-27T23:55:55-04:00'
describe
'138430' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
668d53491bb8d3be4a033d758bfeba6d
b9bfd1154b86fbc973d88a2124ab24cc62469011
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLND' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9219bc418c3e21183cb5c2a7939abbb4
81e47643eb4ae8d889dbad5b734890cb79d97aff
'2012-05-27T23:58:28-04:00'
describe
'22677' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNE' 'sip-files00107.pro'
1a0d47a9a05f49c20ef503bda92f6d20
8487244a59dfb1e82c8e9b82fe5e53af8a3fedcb
'2012-05-28T00:00:17-04:00'
describe
'154516' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNF' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
b03936ff44a9bed4aaed92e8afdffda8
69032dee7b0d663ce18f1a0e50c1c66ea573db0a
describe
'13410' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNG' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
fd34b22438b50f178d8fe8f251a19553
3fbb7a89c7771703ba51bbb1e386c64871ad7b04
'2012-05-27T23:57:46-04:00'
describe
'29180' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
753fd0f7a51c0ba5576bc13cfad48366
a64e8363749a372363820d742115b93f52277f32
describe
'23036' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8b3835cf761a47c4d6c3dc30c09115ab
32e0058b05f719de84d03a323148c69bcda175ff
describe
'15490' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
179046879e4ee62fb1c098ec9d0ba5a5
079914a67edd2fea7c9a7c73472855795ca97386
describe
'127173' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNK' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
44769bf059746fcc15ff125796c56a4f
41942de16c257a06dfe52de61afc503a931b209d
describe
'58692' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNL' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
2b1d8cfb854f509d6e86d0d63bbd4975
d630b67e97fe86411aa0a0f7214ff420fadc8515
'2012-05-27T23:59:39-04:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNM' 'sip-files00136.txt'
810948dd8a63eafb89bf148c9a2ea6ed
6ccecb303780ea105181c85a76bb3324ce4eb0db
describe
'1098650' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNN' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
21032cd5bb555b7ec6e249f4bf10929f
8e1de0208d3b6cd4535f0dfdb89ac53f9b672cc2
'2012-05-27T23:56:47-04:00'
describe
'1071368' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNO' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
26fead7420085ab08d54042d14b585ee
387e8579ec69c27e27e4afc5ba60070c0e8f7d5b
'2012-05-27T23:56:56-04:00'
describe
'44063' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b2a77a67fc67b46acf578aff4698a200
de82860f97871b855b80afc537272dc3944e2aed
describe
'70227' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
560c904518fcb1939e96fa9ad369fe7e
dfaac52bd6a8482dfb476a1d473b8a1775c4eb8c
'2012-05-27T23:55:15-04:00'
describe
'14762' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNR' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c83ae201deda54abfd8087658b4e3e92
bfe3932b685f187efbf8ef12ccdaebe7492a6211
describe
'14854' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNS' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
0ed1d109fee2a77cac4b4c5f55ded88c
1fef2e614c4d902fb3b51c8ac6e805a3ba80261e
describe
'7841426' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
832e2a15c0890730328d33b1dea470e6
2f14641fbd89f7aea1d3ac515b4634d44c453b26
'2012-05-27T23:59:25-04:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
623be45b4420db5ad609c5e0256334da
e7d6e632253fcc67988fe674d638a40bea3a898a
describe
'54173' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNV' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
71cd0264fdb20b084dd7b2a9132e0285
fa9e843e2b794f22c181044be5ab8dadf082350a
describe
'51850' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a8c29020703c61a98074eb1e401c578f
47418470b087690efe576d293368de74a6e71f74
'2012-05-27T23:55:57-04:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNX' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e9b3f1f402abe3c16c6b512ffb5c2ee9
585a149e1c07d10be5ff04bb9d202573ec8c5551
describe
'27559' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNY' 'sip-files00032.pro'
fdf26556bd338d57ab825b6c9bfd3780
e173f2f0530e632c3ce1b12cf8e83c6ca08b6b9a
describe
'8754122' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLNZ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
e25ede0c505772bb003979ece614004b
59b255b77721b47dcc056fd036f0addd7c3f7a57
'2012-05-27T23:54:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
bfc57b68e8d48f4fe32d92bc2d615b5f
b548869e5bf72497658c10abb3decba45fca4510
'2012-05-28T00:00:07-04:00'
describe
'996625' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOB' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
4860b11980e18b755fd39b25f10fca14
a168dc508618b9d6e5fd5fd9705fda8f73666bdb
describe
'1081089' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOC' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
d9a8ce023af2bcf4659ab5042d39b9b3
05cecc4ca0c3fc9930a1e15a5d9c246292ee176a
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOD' 'sip-files00078.txt'
e54ba03b9445a962acadc35f58e162cb
1c54f2a1a6c2a31d4d9a244ff2d10c51b43ae56a
describe
'14931' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
677f315a460ab202b0cc891150d9dac6
276e54af35efa7078d337311c5eea0df0b593d76
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOF' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ab8c8ed1cab8683d929d0ee96e62ebf2
68a8f93abaf5f5bf850f3944cc810449ae062f0c
'2012-05-28T00:01:23-04:00'
describe
'1020683' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOG' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e126ea5571ae5fe9bf976cbd5745e39a
3f47a4da99fa4e7666b687dbca23697839033bd8
'2012-05-28T00:00:52-04:00'
describe
'124558' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOH' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
57f8ada77702b80fee85fefc08202d56
f2d32d774615af1cd0fddcf52c2e91948a6d2582
describe
'16563' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOI' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
79ea6c34cb54e607516c83c3379cb0e5
fd32d7ac47d9c967740815a154a5da57d8cc9142
describe
'148613' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOJ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5d3c5b04944fbf706fc65c7cf7ac458d
8563f47646efc2136282222f50e97ebd82a54b4e
'2012-05-27T23:57:27-04:00'
describe
'8389514' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOK' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f861016d5637810745e954252d659eaa
212033890035b9b8f609d52ad6063f81e84e5ede
'2012-05-27T23:57:56-04:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOL' 'sip-files00148.txt'
7daf1fef74d4fa00b6195af6cc42088e
ba80e2aa7ded5e498d3b29c98a4b36c366dd88c5
'2012-05-28T00:00:04-04:00'
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOM' 'sip-files00150.txt'
07f682de184e2b7794a8cb237f0b0475
3eff9fb8cd556047dee1a6512ccec649f2b8d72f
describe
'1037781' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLON' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
d1d94ca80928d624e38b90845e03db72
e8a64d18e6be389fd084211934c938a38a284173
'2012-05-27T23:55:12-04:00'
describe
'1024016' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOO' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
0db2ad9940624f97b8fedf5d74e5b8ba
b7930bca381d17ece0461f7232717d6ac04dc4ef
'2012-05-27T23:58:15-04:00'
describe
'70620' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
6d4a55219ff41f4b3db982f73358b12b
23d04f1a6246fdd9f5f2bc73d1d180e3e8e7ac83
'2012-05-27T23:56:57-04:00'
describe
'1136438' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOQ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5b6ab0deef6a42eea6fae7162d55eb90
8bd326ca47221422037cc518f47cf36bd1c38116
describe
'8903198' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOR' 'sip-files00159.tif'
71c118c623aadbfad9860f7da92d6371
8e0b8d5a1e7dea6e44520906208e709c3bcd290b
'2012-05-28T00:00:03-04:00'
describe
'25604' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOS' 'sip-files00037.pro'
dcf880af13dd58a12df0df639a83394e
ccfcdab0650698576b3f28e68d24bcbd95ba7739
'2012-05-27T23:56:26-04:00'
describe
'17381' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOT' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
cf981596be76ded217764036e42b9465
1710093b2aeece387a4c113fff135705f765cf2d
describe
'28830' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOU' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
f56a2493033d88706d07a703e5ba70ce
9758543dfa664a0c0676b683ee21a19e5e6b4833
describe
'1099752' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOV' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b61d1921d495af629ffd420db2989abc
2dd82488d506314055f75b1a2226585c90907b63
'2012-05-27T23:58:54-04:00'
describe
'8497706' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
4ee33876d94c6c5647a6cc782d6f7aeb
97aaa2c377fddf873ce0ee5e4bce4c9f0157a95b
'2012-05-27T23:56:03-04:00'
describe
'15236' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
e4fc4e37f49fafee1ce1ff99313d2efb
acaa8a487eae44a6dfef3ca00e0fc07e6d6eea2a
describe
'8778206' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOY' 'sip-files00116.tif'
4c27a7390856143721181072adca88dc
c2d2ff7336d3edcc507ca40b79b46035ca555ad2
'2012-05-27T23:57:18-04:00'
describe
'12356' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLOZ' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
046d8445cc6270fa1fea5640b4158a2a
11f9d016431d0c7af5c82058906ce3e0aaf53c1b
describe
'52219' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPA' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
6b23f5ba6e1c2fbb61d171103b96e353
dc89faff9691d06efe0e3a484d18ed8a280700d9
'2012-05-27T23:56:13-04:00'
describe
'42969' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPB' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
8496f4fb0303bfa840553fe6bd816d44
953c686997d1f9bdb13f720676f17b0de4d89a74
'2012-05-27T23:57:25-04:00'
describe
'153309' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
5252cf6f7a09c11b9afb8ffea7789c73
7c9301e1d1e66b4affce0cd5d30bf57700dc8681
'2012-05-27T23:57:42-04:00'
describe
'1028823' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPD' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
59dc10b69c6e7ea46c3476b6f082cd90
e0d337b5867de2fc1bf62731bc6989c01e13feee
describe
'28458' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPE' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8d9c525ee134828ef8cf2ecd14b99675
30ae0ab8d9d12da6f7e7fa3f80a11738f12a352b
'2012-05-27T23:58:26-04:00'
describe
'1262483' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPF' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
0efbcb41cf3a01a6643d8727020d0eff
ef6a011c1a438a827c4dae2670188ee4879144a5
'2012-05-27T23:57:15-04:00'
describe
'57491' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPG' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
852293df912c0a68e12dd29f00a7addd
03b4108ade864528204dc22ef72362bd388f02ce
describe
'56617' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPH' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
608ff6d2f903e7c203a012cffa45dd51
2de887f3a704c0652810cd10d3fa689ffc77cf5d
describe
'148930' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPI' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
cea28259dd6da71301d1deaeeba2f914
25adf67c82335ad9065bdf68200063c6c0ed68b1
describe
'59143' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
46d08c6b96a3ec8c8d8c26526b5b4d17
9dd9e8149a9aba50205a8a03b8dcf707bdf71da1
'2012-05-27T23:55:11-04:00'
describe
'14453' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPK' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
74631c2625fe857c081fc4f696ab913e
b26395311c832b537e60c2b828230e1bea3bdba7
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a50abca3733f091550f2920654bd1ebb
d583920c1ecdabd5b31bbedfdf268247a2dc8dcd
'2012-05-27T23:59:10-04:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPM' 'sip-files00134.txt'
78a08316a13b494c6ea1e72853181078
31e7cf86660d142ff9ba32746fc4c1d27888bea3
describe
'466168' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPN' 'sip-files00100.tif'
4c00b96c6b36fdb9347e0f57ac03c008
19d2f4fd2bed48bc62448a3d58e0d5653fa7bb08
describe
'2823' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPO' 'sip-filesi.jpg'
cb772322191261f7380af1c3ea0b44fe
125820a4a0fe0f0d13e2d89656617b880f86fd8e
'2012-05-27T23:59:52-04:00'
describe
'26790' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
13b60bdd4144102bc4553b08051d02ed
be0702ff23d2e4cc0e585483debe1eac4bfd9af8
'2012-05-27T23:57:35-04:00'
describe
'26397' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
fb5701cfb62b9e4b05ce941041a2381b
13bb9e714e56b7a5ff5c57069123724c5611644f
'2012-05-28T00:01:27-04:00'
describe
'14751' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPR' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
4658e7004b6c3fed5bab09da8184c2b7
383298feb7feed8310958e989c3db88687731b6c
'2012-05-27T23:59:30-04:00'
describe
'262065' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPS' 'sip-filesUF00003126_00001.xml'
8f7599b5342b17e978824657bd7ce260
0f221d01589e059aa53b67285c1dd73236f1228e
'2012-05-28T00:01:09-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T09:05:30-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'225940' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPV' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
6686cad927fd96f20bea1fded8944293
af804d2836ce9032adc31882eff0b1313b6c6019
'2012-05-27T23:58:17-04:00'
describe
'105406' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPW' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
e7ce98dc0da65dcd62a4c749431e4b4c
f762d07295a146292fdc6d3e26289da7bef8e01a
describe
'263327' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPX' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
a3da7faa1a843ef59966d570c9226f48
e374d70d6253a8678508acec297e28ea05651497
'2012-05-27T23:55:44-04:00'
describe
'194096' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPY' 'sip-filesii.jpg'
93dca115932ed486eb34e72f2b28c591
e041cb7c4b11f4c116d3afd2dc06245f05952663
describe
'45921' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLPZ' 'sip-filesiii.jpg'
0fbd65e3b94f30c506b3cf9f65891568
db853dbb7112523dbe2f7f996d2ae5edc91358cc
describe
'3521' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQA' 'sip-filesiv.jpg'
8521afc1a5d51d99f8fad5ec253edc68
93e34191cf6d5aea29aaabeebeb13a36f463b5f5
'2012-05-28T00:01:58-04:00'
describe
'33612' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQB' 'sip-filesv.jpg'
44004f0e6ece4a92541bd8f1547907c3
6de531ae55d2c8ed03e7717c2d59f667660beae7
describe
'90491' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQC' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
252420f0149bc3b05fcb74eab6b945ae
a3ba23c4a3412b0440e7b4a4f0d972436fef982a
describe
'141411' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQD' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
e4f522e78dcbe05d33c320a6787f92c8
0804e37a7179129fb5b8cff3b144d7194da1e537
'2012-05-28T00:01:00-04:00'
describe
'116778' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQE' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
0cf20ffddb878339952f61e978f56b4e
b26c18c415398ccef9e415f20f600902cf51a66f
'2012-05-27T23:55:27-04:00'
describe
'146454' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
d8a88ec1a852743e952b4d92177ee2ef
93bcadab43d242979c01618343e80d1aaf0704e5
describe
'147741' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
83bf106d276f17654118808d673c3f7c
a78f40df6899d045104f96322c396f659f95c971
'2012-05-28T00:00:58-04:00'
describe
'145765' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
519af63b45af0345d2d455f5fea055b5
05c24a568b42da44a5f1af50746a1255ed4ec135
describe
'152490' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
8d8ebfa7b22285abd7d47763b38b508e
2bb8c4d5db930c5d4b8c510d991ac042e35ae3a6
'2012-05-27T23:56:34-04:00'
describe
'121873' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQJ' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
530bca88727472c44d39a30b9fe7ca1a
db44c0f5567083943dd5797d2040c7ec400039c3
'2012-05-27T23:55:35-04:00'
describe
'136592' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b2a88251b8e88fbea5f4f3c160d82087
ab0b22d9db70c76785a9d4ee923495dee9d3acae
'2012-05-27T23:59:36-04:00'
describe
'128764' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQL' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
28797942505c7b1a7ca539ec9e8754b8
201e0fd9896cd6fafef709e0d68775da5f1a0454
describe
'145363' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7ee8a0a9d36c08ca7ed435d150848c62
580603db1083a2057ae7f0889c9b800f4eb5b9df
'2012-05-27T23:58:53-04:00'
describe
'140003' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f4b7a85a4ec57efd2ef82284fd451f78
c3065024e15aee31e92c8e6f4859e57b796fe527
describe
'145639' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
38befd62f1a6c047a0271acd42f97a43
3aa5285f980e8623f118d1d50dd4662883a6f3d9
describe
'165188' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQP' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b9c48987b514d5278c4be55c13742d4e
462e0c721d075c65bfc505fe9d77f161eac30547
describe
'143358' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
f41b952deac5a6fa2310dc1de58f27a7
176b07e25a969a57d3dc2327d8c4102c90ce82d0
describe
'121831' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQR' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
0959740ef1a7d28023e8c1d12795d934
09a0ec414ab6d6b340c34161dfcb745f25cc5fb5
describe
'141973' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f0efe18dc6d857b680b4b4459ef3134d
e829528e47346b69262b78b2699b2903691b03e5
describe
'152827' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2af6b7ca224eea2d20c73d0eb3d6c981
11c23dad7c532b703fba003c2d968c6a90889e19
describe
'144314' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
40d7f612d593690ea665e04f54de9ca6
018af449b8341d7e2063eafceef36b062f27446e
describe
'141199' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c877dd79a8a11454de7624b9483100dd
d5b4745dd44845b6b59edf70c33afccec6eec236
describe
'145931' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b82ce75a09dda620a10aba4b5c015cb7
f0b888dc729ff448524ed94011fd26b703c9494f
describe
'153504' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQX' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
250e1d1f25f6763812484c4505991bfe
44909c202b7bcd677c8e00593a35806ead318ae4
describe
'142544' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
97f5bbb546b5d05c0c9947af8064d89d
b9f63a1caf4ed16b1a96bb128f6fe709f898ecae
describe
'136447' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLQZ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
ed55984559b933c51de66aeeda748cd2
96812471bab2cb6973b8fcb1e4f14ea9c9001950
describe
'153777' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRA' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
5f8d2af2edccda572d3a8eeff1b71c07
475e58c99906fc33b2351e3f4a2b16144918b7a7
describe
'147008' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
b746076a0004e9c77819c329e918a899
29a0784dd6c5b1597d56515a5178b3ebd86408c4
describe
'131716' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
a29435c377ffe31840435d976db5640f
2db263aab4a6886d061097d1011c4a41b79e48df
'2012-05-28T00:00:31-04:00'
describe
'137331' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRD' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
735d2faeb56a936bfb590e34947a90d9
6c59309ac2f5da2509943e5e4f543a502913b517
describe
'145289' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8f46f1e7fdfd4268b8db05e727b37ed7
7d9b7634e74ef69ad1832fe86ce3c5018b333953
'2012-05-27T23:57:41-04:00'
describe
'136453' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRF' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
73afe69227bc6d827a9618639f8637ef
a15a401b56fd521a01d184e27d541ffc3acdba00
describe
'118355' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRG' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ccde6a975b1cba871302361290220c48
919e45f80d6a99d9c6c2c1213fc5fb54a1a479a8
describe
'117640' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRH' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
a9c1055ea49ddff670ea0cead3c56241
d6e199f5410b529d36f9d3c5f45b5fd558b3c787
describe
'151755' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
b3bce6ca65b7e3b46646a4bc250a1b1f
14f767c32d0b36529bdd2df6797d8f8d842609b9
'2012-05-27T23:56:00-04:00'
describe
'137274' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
0474250c35d626d88ce7cbb05a035a20
2370acf2c313dbe70c744b8a6a5eba1267cb76d9
'2012-05-27T23:55:30-04:00'
describe
'138682' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
7841051c68c0caf5ac27c616da1a2c0b
79623b697265f8e985b7ec81471ac509780a76ea
'2012-05-27T23:54:54-04:00'
describe
'147152' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
465f1b9170601968f70ccab382c9010b
469b71d39cf6732f33be0176dd1a3b4abc31d205
'2012-05-27T23:59:59-04:00'
describe
'153980' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
9543c2b0ed4cf54af59d25a1e329befc
9d495355599da1ca90754dca1321ec7dfe55489e
describe
'155229' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
95e851d708df57d0914b1373b04022f3
60c7afc5256faa32d7a2461c083b97ea18deb0b7
describe
'167352' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRO' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
84933418765b24f272f3dd8de51aa78e
d4bb31c84ebd1c127abbd8e1640a007722c8d5ad
'2012-05-27T23:57:52-04:00'
describe
'145194' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
76c2bd57861cfa9d97be6b37e14e0c23
947a4d8e5943d24251c21520b0019b8a032588e2
'2012-05-28T00:00:40-04:00'
describe
'146146' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
389a7340f3f576e6ee501b62698e267b
b0d1830994cff63fd1bce1ae43cf58edce8e7dca
'2012-05-27T23:58:45-04:00'
describe
'162053' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
164e880a1e6050adfff347d3e2784aa4
ec3ffd6842c303b8501f3a5e2a19983740fe9d97
'2012-05-27T23:55:08-04:00'
describe
'139052' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
02f5f47112c12a6f0ebca3d425ed0fc9
1a0abc160f55775dd2c26393f79bff53dfff1473
'2012-05-27T23:59:03-04:00'
describe
'141817' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
791711a07f3223eeba85f120f2e17d71
e24e3fbff18bf57fd369592cfeb075eed3854e04
describe
'154304' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
3b549d4abe987e7aee8d0181a4e103d5
8746f3f70cd43b18a28677ebc846854e500abb37
describe
'155348' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRV' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
afd438fa4e0dbdc9a9f7f03646acf1e3
0a2a257df97d6c5cf70fe9db845295cde2578930
describe
'156180' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRW' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
bca69c7346e58c682108b945725c0ad5
468a8fb97770e38447568d36b0de216b36d4506a
'2012-05-28T00:01:05-04:00'
describe
'139665' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRX' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
825a1177c28a5495a58519042892b6de
aba982207a4825995b8fddac418571d12a72191a
describe
'144681' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRY' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ac67a922736c65cf03e3ba83bc2f7b02
ab0cb236aedd761d3782b69cac2019c26f4ee661
'2012-05-28T00:00:02-04:00'
describe
'143100' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLRZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
b66edb0abc6d719ef25c92f31c087728
a8fa5abd66254ef62e1a043c23d0e3661c90eb4f
describe
'149447' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
fc44e6f999134ca75464f6b980f3c315
0c12bb8b6fb95caa5abc071d8f7badd0cf1e38ed
describe
'127276' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f125ae0f293638f83fa901b857af4fe2
48f33e16e516b4e55de046a2aa3d5d2a5c779f40
describe
'140072' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSC' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
1b420211e83e4db3d35cee952a3db215
9f389ce6bb8c3871436f8d0d0171b224a6b50894
describe
'147879' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3caf95e2ca4b3c3170ec45a3f841c8bf
67f4cb6c5efe7fb4e4a10db0c6134e321ce5536e
describe
'140818' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
844c63a2b0d768493804ac1ce513f222
21a867f155799a3796a284c2920257fa1aef3cb7
describe
'112540' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSF' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0cc169dfc633737b63a5413e748ada29
2272e7c729bfe569d5b36e210e151d88cb36dc9a
describe
'142376' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c90de5711bef9f36281d610867f1950e
a5738052a4fcf10777a699ef6f1bf6f47f445ea9
'2012-05-27T23:57:45-04:00'
describe
'138976' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
6c7e7b2073ec8bca8c24ac4bf0828545
ac45f7abcac4357a777b7a9475d728be3965f940
describe
'140773' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
102298956c74e7e74c42c3dac36e0c1a
0b436e8592cc2d45b0b07224cd1c5861ce9b7040
'2012-05-27T23:56:07-04:00'
describe
'129781' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSJ' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
189c7f339e596a9effe1f37a2123b45f
5c425a49da167348211dca8044115e5432020d1c
describe
'125092' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
6909d1d9e2fc020762ac5a5d1401ff09
f155ed0b5e73a7710150d2bc24bdfe44cf59c288
describe
'113479' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSL' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
f9ffe45c323427209eb0d4184da919b6
c233d65e667b498d8f364c0d44e424d59e131e5f
'2012-05-27T23:55:09-04:00'
describe
'150003' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSM' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
feeb6e6b600006ec1d40858ddc2a416c
8c61dbad33a11b56e663bf7afba36870d0c4b312
describe
'133524' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSN' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
ebac3af63c02d02178e73a3055045579
7444ed433a73fe4839c89ec0d918019982e4f67c
'2012-05-27T23:58:55-04:00'
describe
'138620' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSO' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6353baca9db6b7a449b07fc61ee41360
d366879963ad742fc1c7d7a024b416dd7feda391
describe
'156521' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSP' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5ddacb55cf14fe0a840c96443cac9276
6d066806278784778b282c6d68b30146cc483193
'2012-05-27T23:58:13-04:00'
describe
'125794' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSQ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
247d1c281696169156d2fa8134a0cf55
ba0a56e61c4d729cf40a25916c72b5851b6358c5
'2012-05-27T23:55:49-04:00'
describe
'118015' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
cbd39d81534fd0072a37af755915dd49
c00740275d152da7c2140ea3869842bdf89bd90d
describe
'124028' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSS' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
8c69bbcd66ef3491f19b0f4afa390da7
d837a3afb008f8d8d61c6d0a4db47b0b488fea55
describe
'142199' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLST' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fc80b51b1a87594662c72167fb34434e
11344e93a2709dd9b1e5265bf2f25465c47aeeb8
describe
'143808' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
bb61e1411d4f90eb648b756fda7b5f2a
30fbd4201112675f8e63dd4e39d5d784e8856e93
'2012-05-28T00:00:10-04:00'
describe
'126045' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSV' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
292f30b906a67af2587917a9fd106752
dd1c191253f87d1cb34d0fed719c6cfedffde9b2
'2012-05-27T23:58:19-04:00'
describe
'142150' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
e018ab145a522e83c26c819967a1ad9f
7173a6535c71b192f681e053668389bd2c034456
describe
'134324' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSX' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
53bb6654bc269f8976379172f8ef6dc6
98555802fc239cb5f9fc5b99b2577f20e9c71d51
describe
'132101' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSY' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
a8d84bd3932d79572c8aa19f65dc3087
2ec50310847ae9e128aa11925c9aea60b5123a02
'2012-05-27T23:58:59-04:00'
describe
'160749' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLSZ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
929a63601129ce5589f3735652d632e1
605c87a589f996a0beafc8de3a07430aa25ed671
describe
'145813' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTA' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
f5d65a64583a05a480c0a5bbebe3fa71
78c7226785ff108fd88bc9c154ca5bd43cdc39aa
describe
'162138' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTB' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
da18bb94418d83df5422b84663f20053
dd9a49e90147b934c18fc295e4dda37c018be168
describe
'124271' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTC' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
90b323a046e84d6c20c8cce154b22dc1
df0694bcc40ff629d23302a21f1c537e8be822a1
describe
'133537' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTD' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
f86738c2a5a3994c73ec0bb9c8c01ee5
15703b09a4bfbed3542ecfee04f7915b9fc0a0b2
describe
'153042' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTE' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
0e681e3ca487fe00754d93faae9d0766
fd298c8b12443238d979929c9b0e69dd5253579f
'2012-05-28T00:00:57-04:00'
describe
'132170' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
08977f03d71b273d37075aeaa1ee1c04
4f5ce8a84e705d7687bd10afbb22af2ea933603a
'2012-05-28T00:00:47-04:00'
describe
'159094' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTG' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
444b717302e5f75f8f6cdbdd3c815ff4
2d4c662418f819b83271aca90145390b77c2eb75
'2012-05-27T23:58:37-04:00'
describe
'149364' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTH' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
6a6e29410ce2f8b503f931e020d7d3b3
0370ad9d2055561b4d1526a4383f7abb13926ba7
'2012-05-28T00:01:44-04:00'
describe
'107339' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTI' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
d4f7cf652501973f8c8940181053c940
f9cb0517fc0d26ad40756dca44566aebd18466b3
describe
'132545' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
8b701635769a0dd41a03c64321e0ff82
ed38d9f8056fd55b476d723c49db219c7281cbaa
describe
'135655' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTK' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
3b29ed6a63bd776a97230ab345a71ef0
72de7ab057941ed5977e86a9a32254f4fdd460dc
describe
'123257' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTL' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
4e4f31f196dc69d960f58b407b2bc8d5
95f58b2b0d93780224385d6c8ef6f6f1777435e1
describe
'143018' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTM' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
4e6d46a7c98346982028db3a7dcdbcf3
402d5860f044a356cbebac78105171939a9a4cbf
'2012-05-27T23:59:53-04:00'
describe
'150218' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTN' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
6080fc12eec5af1a2b3b941212ceb962
63f2d0e7233f7b5f6f4acd88a6bc61fa47d7053f
'2012-05-27T23:57:50-04:00'
describe
'148116' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
16d46e0f159df16dd447e8168a3f183a
78f91b43e430c701d66bdd27f58ec946eeb4bbb7
'2012-05-27T23:58:21-04:00'
describe
'151520' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTP' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
51c0acd7b9308a7cbbc760dc8db7d265
bad5f6cc5f3e9a8f7d6f1ac7eafae352a076d400
describe
'134823' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b77b56fd8f7c654b38ba880cd97ff620
45f82aa5e4f205383da564b635ef60a78b0b3db7
describe
'141539' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
a989bfedec0f3592fa03db5d9acefecd
05b3efce07e47b3dcbfccd400523f0b143001fe8
describe
'149916' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2f4f66c95ae9ec81c8e1398ee30ca35c
91dca547fd74fc8d81ebc9ddc620fe0c819b3d8c
'2012-05-27T23:55:17-04:00'
describe
'146967' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTT' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
1e879edf3ee03c3e9325bb5b1d853b61
aef0fd8fb0bcfc64c7b6864d14eee19f0eb18b3a
describe
'150081' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
409f5f03d04b135505cf3594c0b3b12d
880f61e512b50d1578cc7d47225d92d4529cdd69
describe
'140576' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
37f0383d2313923b4baf1ff49cd6ee49
05e31b87be489fa7e6251d8390a795816b9d4db1
'2012-05-27T23:56:53-04:00'
describe
'135297' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
84c583722507558dcab7a6a5a501e8bf
40a8832f297c137bc2f5eec04c15631b2e6c207c
describe
'148544' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTX' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
8aa25dcc023b611f4d51dbfc70b3455b
a205827f3bb706c28bfeb903a4172f81d542a4f1
'2012-05-27T23:55:00-04:00'
describe
'146533' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
63b140af207aeedb75a441a9e70cd0e0
3d4fcef5b9bd78d5fce9c24055c4165913fcfa94
describe
'120886' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLTZ' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
f38bac25d8c1e626e2a13b2a512f347b
26cbb3c35485846e4bd9d8051d49ef7253bd7ede
describe
'131205' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
d657afabade29b97a290392079276d88
cc315a45b1251406c2bcc5fb0bea0f6d160eeb4b
'2012-05-27T23:59:08-04:00'
describe
'122670' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUB' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2557d408f730e771debcada359ec0604
5f9c8b75c5b22ee03431e3e7682ed0ee2c6daeb8
describe
'129146' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUC' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
e918540538b003548df2271920ec6ddb
94888c1c4a4e8462f27540e7fc143a08e1d0b244
describe
'140112' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUD' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
c43e71dc141f7eeab9e3dd89a8836789
bee4ef4b838896f6be580f1ae90f8834ae8109ea
describe
'134240' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUE' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
45f7b93d3eb04843aa87dc06cfd9db63
e32430f57ff0f6b7729bdf586f6356a743697c69
describe
'149843' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUF' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
20394bd3e783b54b4760fb24e8ff4957
3b4d19b0e0e191d8883e587dcbf57eb69412c066
'2012-05-27T23:57:57-04:00'
describe
'153117' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
6225b7d5e1cebcec73ac68a8490334fb
556e5527120e06193261527028c7f5b0398d72f3
describe
'123582' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUH' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
64b828638dfb084b879ff7acfb92c67b
082e856fb89dbabfa7a8f4ba76e03a7a8dc673e4
describe
'156447' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUI' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
0c6d1a39ee1db07548271ef4e21c5179
e592892142ae151372559b023a9a7a2eca953612
describe
'143306' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUJ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
e9593cace5be13f75bfdb2fab10d9805
b8e7c87468c15cada84971dd03392b5d79237271
'2012-05-27T23:56:01-04:00'
describe
'152550' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUK' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
a03fb8d75ca689d95fb1a622cf0ace5a
ce55a8b52206315a414a22ee1e844ee28cf09a99
describe
'118267' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUL' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
7a05fce3da00e9a147d385b104f2c8c3
2f2c68cbe78f89d699593faccf6a03c9588a8e92
'2012-05-27T23:58:22-04:00'
describe
'2946' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUM' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
08d64690281d1d56f1b3d5fa38b17122
01008f8d7f0fdd7cc52d8d2cb368babc86c6f3af
describe
'46171' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
a3d9f9cf5c68234d6fcf76994d8b5322
00970cfa1b259cea17c55997cb7243b0c83dc048
describe
'35482' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUO' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
ead157ab94e47e4ccd3297854ca3c8e7
2f4bba92dd03fea94a847e86bdd9e1516d7c6b46
'2012-05-27T23:57:36-04:00'
describe
'1295703' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUP' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
c70a45fe290c91ff4dcfa12456763595
305635232aaf9de8f8f0b086903410f941dbe357
describe
'12561' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUQ' 'sip-filesi.jp2'
355e3aaf64c95ec8beb8aeba47fdc8c3
a2edc0cf3f1ec732330f56083bf354d2cd107894
'2012-05-27T23:56:08-04:00'
describe
'251115' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUR' 'sip-filesv.jp2'
19bc68903d5627255f9627ab2692d200
164a2ea283bb52345514a69ddf6cd70aec33cd13
describe
'47525' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUS' 'sip-filesvi.jp2'
f6a3774c62045b57a444d0b482313192
6d4054c755688c95ecdb1ec40eac1e63d94ddbaf
describe
'734250' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUT' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
4ba9e90162eccee772b003d6426c79eb
91d91a37346c2b39ead67ac280f04cdd65989f70
'2012-05-27T23:59:04-04:00'
describe
'1027265' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUU' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
6ad44ac6aee8b09b29dbf39d6b12a961
84749ce7aa084340c08e8a69bb3886b8f273c342
'2012-05-27T23:56:24-04:00'
describe
'1053119' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUV' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
28a6641723ecb27c1721710d4e667a41
1697b36ffc77615109983a0832dce17af509b153
describe
'1076712' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUW' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
505ab42e8a2cabcf9dcdf7ea5b69651c
ef97c830610c72d7a57d02a3124aab346c87bc8d
'2012-05-28T00:00:39-04:00'
describe
'912482' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6dce3dfcb496dfdaffd90fa8fa249834
73048f2eebd268768e6fff24164700f8fe6dd202
'2012-05-27T23:56:33-04:00'
describe
'1014378' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUY' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
eba8269729672080b1461b2f7aa5f411
11f6662ea87cfe6aeb8719bb76a938dd29b2d3a1
'2012-05-28T00:01:06-04:00'
describe
'994325' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLUZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
0dba51050ccbce7b194972ccc0e44885
2865b0eb4a2a6ce6f3bd9e68f700c13897e4be56
describe
'997892' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVA' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
7e29c6cbd48641fadb5e111b86506140
0b8bb48176940e77faf65533bc1492c3f4ccd1b7
describe
'1010985' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
6fdced4da3b810f31e65110946378214
bc180d4057bee4172265b23206b27cae4f367263
describe
'1003458' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVC' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ecc815704d3b7c32d6b281c0d08c1ff4
d4ee7195dc096b1717156b891c6d6eade935a688
describe
'1012559' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
13f78f5922ab898e2e0f3f97c6838554
45dd72b120650cc7a6c15cc9a6c13e68c8286f3a
describe
'1076172' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
309de58da37045ebe806f19caacf9715
98f6ad2750fc1bf85883c5ac50e3ad0950670eca
describe
'1050965' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cd7e1a6b5f31e63e0be28bdf3b3bd544
212ac4d1cdbd31d2e746dd246610bd751d86c51b
describe
'1082900' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVG' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
4c95d1a1a97b464a8120f4a746312362
b5e50723ffa6619758081d255bbc0e2188233dcf
'2012-05-27T23:56:04-04:00'
describe
'1079818' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fcfe714e0cbf49bc3adc3b6471d2a314
840958773f9fa22ac01a2c545578b111513f558b
describe
'1077520' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
3cbf3f28bf330b39d38859760c55dd8e
2b9559500211345f4d6feadb905e09647423610f
describe
'1030632' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVJ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
ac7be8a911261e427ad8f50bd54a0292
0568e5373817748d4ac0d71ac6bcf7cabec7faa6
describe
'1035042' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
0fbc35ca21988485fd271cf866e36d1a
7c2f9bee85c7c43ef6ed9c28b0e4548b045cc741
'2012-05-28T00:00:21-04:00'
describe
'1047107' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
52887e6b1107b33bd43db0ef1956e96a
1cca866074577f489dec4a5114366e1c2cf2907f
'2012-05-27T23:58:23-04:00'
describe
'1033809' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVM' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b31fdf5fb5886bf66420ee8769a7332a
b24c0447a92a98eaef9fe93254fd6feb4c68776a
describe
'891350' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
3f5deddd7c5671595e8b85d7fdbb79c8
a5441ea0df4ce0022d1aecf0399301ae7675a9ef
'2012-05-27T23:55:21-04:00'
describe
'962465' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
e9d8f2868644848e276df1efb8e8987a
01998cd8cc4eab93e52f493f694d30af7610a0ad
describe
'1002127' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
dffe441d2c2aa6dafa72d85b1b7ecf2b
a4f9a9be9a82eb73f87297ac4614a126a0e80564
describe
'1050103' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVQ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
407f2d9d58b5a3ce8a3f2fbdac984249
0932c58c7be0e65f0d54a2b9a89cd4ccb2627baa
'2012-05-27T23:57:40-04:00'
describe
'967662' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b326c37d7e6fc896533baebbbb3baf80
68b57f8cd0b7bb7250d753189e34b83f99c94f2e
describe
'1022113' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVS' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
59465bb0a8f5dfcc009e1d4f54f68252
e2063ffd6ef4f6814303601d7afeb92fceeaccbb
describe
'969471' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3ad4d6f5789eadb42daad149936ca827
66b8797e4e9a6a6c3ff388c8533a977311fc3f97
describe
'954424' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1fef325492349695108caa08dedf517c
d6e8da4242340824570695b1c697d088705bb64f
describe
'1004667' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVV' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
c2a2e7c17d4b7eb0bfc5c0ca3c8bce48
36f1c170759cfdbca1e65dada33b69503e298668
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVW' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
e7f9ad6ed9ea27afce395aa1cc7b7f60
7260b151ee9bdca2fcdf8bc19a87af013c69bc38
describe
'946048' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
1f092d8d473d61c0befd9406cbe7f36b
aa489aef433a38f6fc477161b1e2529a00202b0e
describe
'920778' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVY' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
bf77f054c1edd141e5cda207ad67ade0
3909d87107a7019207b4a7539b0a7da376be89e1
describe
'1031608' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLVZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
505b4daba5a5b49b3a1ec800f14a7c3a
bfb6f30f7eb2dcb0142d65f41709f57d1f45bc81
describe
'1079998' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWA' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
cbddf07ba48d4ea902e63b765661ec36
78f2fc40e19f9e236f38765ff61db9df82217b3d
describe
'1086798' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
18a4cc2cab647fea00d89e7a3ff7110d
e439099bc9d995567c40ffe94800dcde680e516a
describe
'1093766' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWC' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
74b12e7bd867df7e7326a63c243a2ada
03cb0ed8c51d8979be0f999c147eb2c1c6e31d6c
describe
'1062171' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a445ce29171d30ac6c8909b3e3dc8b4c
ec2394388738401ac5c1ac2dd6c74250724bd26f
describe
'1080226' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWE' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
549b53e6cd24d7eb3a2f621daa035e01
af2d47669a753c7fb9ff974cfda09277c3f747e7
describe
'1075027' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0d6d61cf200e64c6f1d1efe25c11697e
b90445577ae271bc98f1ab364d2b4a356f439f5c
describe
'1050674' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWG' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6d87e02d3ff0fc566277380a285241e7
304e7f35f121efa279e283150c0e56c6fb817ba8
describe
'1042098' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
191658f745d316c9b46ce2f6c782a61d
df5081c68da51195cf1a0aaa316b5a9010aa351d
'2012-05-27T23:56:36-04:00'
describe
'1040623' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWI' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
55b78afb47effa88f5860d9a4304dfaf
e6b116d854106e810c6c5e3bbc0a9d3b264e4e23
describe
'1102342' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWJ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5dbe5458cba1d2263941481b820c946c
cc9752739c42f1b9554edb4fb783abe63b0fa9f8
describe
'1109955' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWK' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
ce7ea8bcdc84f0e839c4df761f726a13
3cdaf2057e37e672d283f3826bda104b7d0e2cc8
describe
'1070427' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWL' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
0ff25cceba48ccd72a38638eec6ff4a0
aeb815b383b9b43a2484f0cd94dbf84135d0f26f
'2012-05-28T00:01:19-04:00'
describe
'1083959' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
0a8ca7b096a86b24d2e5f3747e94a69c
d91f466872bc537c923ec041e561f917f69c25fc
describe
'1076222' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
66d575b73a171343d827d8a0e348c8e8
7bddfffcceee81f1fe96a379ba093e2d30e2369e
'2012-05-27T23:55:43-04:00'
describe
'1112460' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
861cb72b52629bea5cf3a9a54814272a
ee3d60bea24b4243ebc3647335ae84e1658cf676
describe
'1073825' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWP' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
349d9673aacbe592c3a4b22472b471d6
1d1f1f53ffdf6a103e036e074b53412109dd29f1
describe
'1059614' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
050812a858fe708cc8ca62b2a86df297
a08a9319001825e6fd884ba3f7850c0737285805
describe
'1096660' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWR' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d4f957c101a58398e9b4e833d2173b9b
6bc242eb805e415651b177404d7d12705465527f
describe
'1048190' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWS' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
18835e9d156a9c987975fa07022b1902
c9bc232a9c172b269ae98f0491b304a588af2268
describe
'1081082' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWT' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
e51496be8e04c0b31f70e3f17bd5ae8b
5bbc6927ff7201c04e96e46169f218488e828f3d
describe
'1080904' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWU' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9344315f4cae6daa5e5fdc588b3283f2
932a8ab6dcaaf40691f3b03849ec624991c6976e
describe
'1061666' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWV' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6529fb8195191949eba2e6c5d0fef6e7
200987355735c7a5564a4334a96e069fb7e51e66
describe
'1058072' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWW' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
b07803f2902da030266605183f5c2a14
7b12eeea0f820f5476690177cd2666f72ba25747
describe
'1090109' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c8dd74467af216393007dd7a4de2aa29
19838b2f15b703a813a68e0124ae230fed0541a0
'2012-05-27T23:59:48-04:00'
describe
'1035795' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
6ddecaa34472dfed5d04eb3e9a8efd49
bfeac6decc5455a5325b7f7bc278203369130e46
describe
'1064599' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLWZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
53837d4b35df0cb5b6f88bbeb951169e
98bb808023c9ab30b5a9de4e606a7d85198c985c
describe
'1100904' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXA' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
8d97139c123e61a461549ab5930b558e
3f74b610ed8ba0eedf691bdf24d3526ff828b35d
describe
'1095443' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXB' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
4f35560988567d2005af6203ad5d1d1c
c6ede02dc00acaed0847d61d78ff3fd40ff7cfc5
'2012-05-27T23:56:19-04:00'
describe
'1099681' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXC' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
9dd1e9af9db993afd02fab52082a0c82
eedf4d4401deb39a5e5e9976ba6baa3c6be02802
describe
'1037936' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXD' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
56f0409488dd665802b87bb78f71252f
8c340fb0a3358f38563b248286382b8ff8373efb
describe
'1078507' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXE' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
79cdcfba13d9365637d9e1eadd00d9c3
2923a0c73759ba23ff4118fdd7f3b26a41f9de5e
describe
'1098882' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXF' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0332fb045f6044b3a262f423d44d1566
07131fef2acf835feace46d454071dcec74ade9d
describe
'1087093' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXG' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f5141adb54170b7ab662cb6d74fced2d
003fa7218b4c8c80bd8c1bb6020ca55a5560f10a
'2012-05-28T00:00:49-04:00'
describe
'1069931' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
845c4b4824e3f1d1fa52e6fb7cfa1900
20b7ac33da187132b35c80b827283564f0bfd5ae
describe
'1030298' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXI' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
392ce49a2aafb5db69e57f02206e04f2
cafd702d0ff9da217b464f27810be7e3f10953ec
describe
'1101029' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXJ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0a7f1d9614aa0bbe84a2dbad4d1fe5f7
9dfb90ed936737050ba5a849e84c61a1ad76d706
describe
'1077936' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
e2a2dc78ee804ff70a7be626fb6fbf9b
2f85ecb2780b9f42aac7b11b336bc748bf33065e
describe
'1096737' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXL' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
4f78bc17f142a1751519895c4051e455
f5d9f326ce448f3aef473999cc6ef8eb61529e3a
describe
'1032033' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
884352dedca98b506c1dd7d7248ad0f9
fa588a5a8f2b571d47677f2417a22b5a52717226
describe
'1040535' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
54163a27b9700e0464c7a3808422c026
3db84a87df2d9f4cebd7647eed53ebb6a298d41c
describe
'1118839' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a573b3ddf1e8da216418c181169f4217
e3ddc8b4565e512aff5bba05ca2e0d0f2f083479
'2012-05-28T00:01:28-04:00'
describe
'1096796' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXP' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ef53b5e3f7ef9c13d7409623a045e27c
ac8593914c550a50ecdc0a5199f14eb54a012b46
describe
'1098067' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
8ed2f6a613ecdc2bf8ea1939aa600b7f
c1419843ee7b5f50a149ba28b1c1efff6ecec3fe
describe
'1111842' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXR' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
7bd8afbbf7802ac7fac405a538c27e42
4dc8301113340c7d5ed2af0c63153700e565298e
describe
'850891' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXS' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
63567ff063bf267e14155e59b3d87640
33a414ed1ff108228f71869933818cf8c182da9a
describe
'1096142' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXT' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
3332aebef464c72b82a1e8ee9aa11993
2d93f5256830c46adefe8f48bb7f695a2cf60bbf
'2012-05-27T23:56:02-04:00'
describe
'1096140' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6cbe6afd47bb5472b681fd7cd3196553
734ad39f8b223c0dcebc02b98276675510ac33d0
describe
'1093601' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXV' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b7c3a1ad9262311c72d5f2cfe2a2e430
d39fb4795c120be7e2b23bd8f076671b0f4a558a
describe
'1115475' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXW' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
85817ea28d7e31ba374774bd05f3e711
99d7db273367ea5213365e718fd896bd8e7d394c
'2012-05-27T23:55:23-04:00'
describe
'1125805' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXX' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
71b1b3fe9f18ae09781459a3d926cc2e
0b9993f9c076be70fa8bf3b209d63999fd289d9f
describe
'1150227' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXY' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e7e6391001e0aec3b3584046e381180e
ed3a25aeebaf63630b65e161fe95e6cb03f3b903
describe
'1123888' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLXZ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
f9fbe0e82ed433c2054ea5ddc48bff3a
9eb557d6cd32fbd215cca9f534ba01f87fa50e48
describe
'1100918' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYA' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
953f20eefe3dc55dfad8394740161e8b
66dc3a06b49ba349a173372a879d1ae96cf80542
'2012-05-27T23:59:13-04:00'
describe
'1130220' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYB' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
9cc8b9737b20c2d51512bcf46b525e68
310241893b6fc1096878e384aad7dbb889843267
describe
'1117178' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYC' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
115b4e53b1bc99094f637e6891b95e3b
ce9141cdc909d2572b42118f0a9773c238fd8c95
describe
'1113677' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
5900ee25510c18240d9d5dfa58ce8c1d
4a7d4851fcf9e1bea50da8a1c7f0d3499f7adc0c
describe
'1117847' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYE' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
ec6d03317bc7f2f22c523d307bab3993
4b98aabe461ad501961f55d6be450104e9171aa6
'2012-05-28T00:00:51-04:00'
describe
'1115914' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
72e4892bc8ac16d44c42d24772581288
fe3edd2494a2478015d3e2d660e638b457b5b4d8
describe
'1089316' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYG' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
27f394e6426feb11216b96e18aa859c8
db640c7587c6e9cfd3fea513183b2b9165bf12f8
describe
'1065047' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYH' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
4a15a5cee278cbfe55527d8b02e1f12d
d61f906889c689a006c520f4add0bd5852864f92
'2012-05-28T00:01:34-04:00'
describe
'1184189' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
f88f55319dbc151653d63463a2a3ce5a
f30ad8ced24642ef701ab203f9260634a2d7c8e0
describe
'909926' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYJ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
36fbea1fb4ccb4658e77eae2588dfc95
313e45e5b7a9134788e4561561d3c84bd4e65b59
describe
'996363' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYK' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
4300f4d48b03c6e492d1e763789aaa55
a88f1ebcd713338ce8f22bccc6877df6493f7152
'2012-05-28T00:00:32-04:00'
describe
'1140011' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYL' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
f0d9da6bfbc627a7e272e39f15052df0
68d825153a33f026e6aaa61168727fbb0886aab6
'2012-05-27T23:57:47-04:00'
describe
'1025446' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYM' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
980fa754701189aeedc5cbaabda7b8b2
d0c7e18ba972e9a695af54b70d2f7fdbc5fea493
'2012-05-27T23:54:55-04:00'
describe
'1136887' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYN' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3345baee6b48fc6c07a1db6669db10be
b5fa58073c8dd5f1a08dea93f2bf6c7286dd748f
describe
'1142941' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYO' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
16930fd605312aa124838c7d90f9a1b8
1bdf615c316f6ce51dc635c8d975c96500222c11
describe
'959994' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYP' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
6f37f218ba7363aff049548d9c871309
a735d2180d89645032a994da449f5e1c74ee99f4
describe
'1117701' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYQ' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
737d4b985e98bbd03bca90229f07d023
fa0cf7c7c165406e22e9c775395f31535335e9ce
'2012-05-28T00:01:03-04:00'
describe
'1158715' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYR' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
f1e0bdc7d2bb2a1c9376fb280a00db8d
ed45166658585c708d0265eb854b7cda3adf1978
describe
'27448' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYS' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a381bb66a2a2bfe96d6894f2f9084fa2
d686d26f369a25e809d517e7d57cd1d149cd094d
describe
'29606000' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYT' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
14755cce969515f9fd74b9b3682ae65b
0aef17f594ceb42c83035984632fcca6b82a86af
describe
'8777364' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYU' 'sip-filesi.tif'
8d8956782e1a583f379d4c437401d9f4
89ed807d860ec6bd48b35c9f511cef71380055bb
describe
'8526272' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYV' 'sip-filesiii.tif'
39caf8585e00fa98507b5ad12f9d1216
51aa97ef5c53bcef79775c28bf5a75e7d470e7fb
describe
'8559380' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYW' 'sip-filesiv.tif'
843356280f8587863f4f2655b6d64def
2a8e8b3eef45cc7c5eefd04e87dc5c698949c761
'2012-05-27T23:57:51-04:00'
describe
'8299413' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYX' 'sip-filesvi.tif'
48c7eed2e21df4d771b4120df4f97483
e9f88dfe7e6f79ef7aba5be5e720c0199726c671
'2012-05-27T23:56:09-04:00'
describe
'8276940' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
ffdf407499dfbb45eb12a08565b56633
489f9153dd8b18e5d88f73f2042e9095baa9e772
'2012-05-27T23:55:05-04:00'
describe
'8447392' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLYZ' 'sip-files00003.tif'
987470c0a5dc2174b3be5ea10729033f
f7df98ddba3068ae3c4717c57cae3422e74d1420
describe
'7303522' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZA' 'sip-files00006.tif'
4ca39d71059c66fc6a800caab70306fb
560b87a4345c4c0b1f43c7d6ad883cce45a84541
describe
'8138316' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZB' 'sip-files00007.tif'
94316d780dc909403919f853208e02ca
3b31d42aaefae33fba28711893f64af21c5d1f81
'2012-05-27T23:59:23-04:00'
describe
'8005744' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
6734a12e19ac0df13c5907957a21aa37
5b60bc90df2550729e90381d8774764d5f9bae03
describe
'8110972' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZD' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5c13fc9e8ff8578ee806ee7d5db2a225
a184ffc264799bd6af650bf66c0505dead3c5e22
'2012-05-27T23:57:53-04:00'
describe
'8050380' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZE' 'sip-files00012.tif'
11cf5263624fda258f7cf236f7d418f3
dfbf1a0447f0741ebea268d42af49bcb7c9463ae
'2012-05-27T23:58:18-04:00'
describe
'7963356' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
21b68c6cd595066c2d05674c85aed108
8a37da71e4d3cd167cbb4c4499fd1fff5a309e79
'2012-05-27T23:57:55-04:00'
describe
'8123560' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZG' 'sip-files00015.tif'
81b5bceab8e01b5aa97220fe92ff29cc
992d638f1dbf91060951d870d48ab27f71b73480
describe
'8633152' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
75665e4104001abaa6d428435b730944
7b107c82600e0b9033eeecb2b8cbb369918370ac
describe
'8819356' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZI' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c5b8aa0218aa8b00cd4e9786c3912b9b
72037ba9e46bdb45ed767c9d0fdbcc8b3de10de0
'2012-05-27T23:56:10-04:00'
describe
'9007968' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
01b8833ad66ed30a6a08989258295a68
767db9b5cd9db329f2219b08663d58678e03c83d
'2012-05-27T23:57:34-04:00'
describe
'8811724' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZK' 'sip-files00021.tif'
eb1f89fd94f704cdfd5b6897725ecbca
465e86a50398952efa772ca2fa45d55539251493
describe
'8268460' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZL' 'sip-files00022.tif'
fbce1d3706824e8391d8a95807854636
ce91fba76782ad71af4335c9295be55ed345530b
describe
'8192696' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a63de804a6cc7741d5a38f472c49c8a4
f75109bfe3f2d6eb9a93d6460611fc78d7a003dc
describe
'8302652' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1cbd6c839b19bf009d29afe51f23136e
5b3ca62dd7c8565282e68ffb1cfacfe698c5b238
'2012-05-28T00:01:55-04:00'
describe
'8399784' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fba7ff638ea57c565c6a60c1ffa2e58b
26324d4f8e3a262d57c79d840c1641a834fd5c8d
describe
'8293460' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
7482d77eeebaf9212de24a85cc55491c
c54a76557f402dda42f420b0720d79fc671828d9
describe
'7878884' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6187721d3765fb18a3bae31b1aafa283
c25c1b0fca2d3a45c31ccd6e0427e24b11cb2cbf
describe
'8040696' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
029e2abcb59514319798000fcece6f44
1ac3a8251abfdbdedd17c2b04102ed66c27a784d
'2012-05-28T00:01:22-04:00'
describe
'8424276' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
0d650b709b9353180e1f5882c9051e36
4db949900db3be1742bc4c56b336b93ed4f841a3
'2012-05-28T00:00:13-04:00'
describe
'8399032' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZT' 'sip-files00035.tif'
8e2432a36ee2ced0e88f816171bc75a0
0d847dea1f0e9bf7ac76aecbf4bd58a0a97607eb
describe
'7764364' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZU' 'sip-files00036.tif'
740b60de3bc857d04817cdefad34a49c
c0f7962fca949b221780c889e635cd1f0cdc2e26
describe
'8201240' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
5d25da30b0164fdb5ca5da0a28c14e02
c31051cb52b49348d16637d887c967d278cd951a
describe
'7639138' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
5b7794ad34ecd0d5ad34b7e1e1c4ab4e
f3226f6477ce2f3edeeb15a08a22301c7206f0ba
'2012-05-28T00:01:08-04:00'
describe
'8063282' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZX' 'sip-files00043.tif'
62943e5ad33c0c64cd815d9b19db3bfb
231cc5d241b2e6dc0b81c45a800ab8d4aef22e0c
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZY' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e12e4e8df23c3f3c7b363a0c33218f6a
7dd4ba0185706349595eba253445dd6ce235621a
describe
'7187416' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABLZZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
98e76594dc86d0035d74e7c62114524b
582ad35f86400a9fd1fc5fd8fc51f1d91629ab6a
describe
'8195828' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAA' 'sip-files00047.tif'
c05b815d52c3fd729054253109612355
aecfaec6da7ff48b5c656486b03d4376503a991b
describe
'7572098' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
adfac74e5f25a737fffea3fae4e33a59
37de1992624ea73bef4b9d77ee8c44696a796547
'2012-05-27T23:55:41-04:00'
describe
'7520468' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAC' 'sip-files00049.tif'
c7e4a4df24782ac57985c39b3dbbf4fc
234ecdf47269806ddd8338e52597f36214b98cca
describe
'8140750' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
76c620b64da3c62ba93f16e7f9afcc41
ff8a35d9a4a7d6b3b4720bb8366a2fcac47df6fa
describe
'7855840' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAE' 'sip-files00051.tif'
6a20c85a79b37a5111eef2ffc566d27e
7e63f4a5bfa21ce2273f49c39a47766fb88fcd30
'2012-05-27T23:58:24-04:00'
describe
'8257018' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAF' 'sip-files00052.tif'
14fbdd063c995fec7fe91a649e398506
3d0bbb5d34057dfc2a808ce4721beef02dcb613e
describe
'8432104' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6527df78b5d0ce99aeb6804c99a3e750
7321cba2eebbd281d3b2502475d692c6e3b1c36a
describe
'8863490' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ffcd136058be87492e7d47e075a0cb22
8597e6032658b54667b2bab972c81235edf017ac
'2012-05-27T23:57:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
610f872dc616dbbff09f8a48c6345c13
ef183b413a047a4f44cf13bd9439dc2377b3700c
describe
'8656556' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
bd9ad0ef0cc56de3df10803b4c39c902
c8b11718f7c9fb4ac7ea1d9d83e9e552897549ab
'2012-05-27T23:56:11-04:00'
describe
'8501154' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
aa8d74726d69752ead104b5f93d128c9
468f3956758011619777a7107a1be8cd568ca705
describe
'8389956' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAL' 'sip-files00062.tif'
5d074445773208d2efcf8f0a49f47a47
9a35045ecc3a1e7e8c249f5db02150a5056ae893
describe
'8604054' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
eff5897278fc224605fb9f7eaf9e85c0
53a2f114197eafb659a3bc31206c07176acf9ba1
'2012-05-27T23:59:45-04:00'
describe
'8409286' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAN' 'sip-files00066.tif'
395ceacbe130557d563e2d3d1e1baf87
dc9e289fe94df49c46168295fdeaa41ff8858245
'2012-05-27T23:55:26-04:00'
describe
'8081346' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f857ca7e8e0e36ed7151c4ba6ad03000
4a1601205bcf479a6768d3fae905c780e4b44cff
'2012-05-27T23:55:03-04:00'
describe
'8672890' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAP' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8368b77b47967bebdc2e4fe6faf985d9
722793c55e43df226d5857f0267b0eb728a793d5
'2012-05-28T00:00:38-04:00'
describe
'8328730' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAQ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
5235ab762580800b32af597861d4d103
f0ec199f5286b6a3d23ede28ad227f85b1dfc870
describe
'8822642' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAR' 'sip-files00071.tif'
551c31ea8e3d79bb9d3b0dc1b9224da9
487045e4e2fe49fb4bc514f139c0b6ea437b0abf
describe
'8601676' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAS' 'sip-files00072.tif'
83403397d0a5f01a71802ddd215cdb6d
88392fe716294c16b130d676f77bea057aaadb07
describe
'8883910' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAT' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f2118ff538c0f78ae56014157b76d084
2e9055957343dc2df5aec3281d0ea467ac283220
'2012-05-27T23:57:14-04:00'
describe
'8051644' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
6953908c22eaab3db4e0d950eeb3827f
67b8c9d22f5fefc68066bc66eb64a7cac7a9f6e0
describe
'8747444' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAV' 'sip-files00075.tif'
6bfafff4bed44e3d34d2b5eea1a2c7d6
3b1a1326a22d63fd96ba6f8d9cfe4b09fa55f3c8
'2012-05-27T23:56:35-04:00'
describe
'8567294' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAW' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2eadb8cb54a869eeace6fda67c753329
3e41fbd1af83faa3827ac3a4282006ecde88d486
'2012-05-27T23:59:56-04:00'
describe
'8675682' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAX' 'sip-files00077.tif'
d95f3af7e7e6a64e0c4542eedb9bcc1a
ed0101cb6699f6c976b76cebc9b0190fd2e79d1c
describe
'8201738' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAY' 'sip-files00078.tif'
c93eeab699149a2858a9b0918f0a13cd
350c8cc10978ddef5b5dd6c04f3bf9d494cbb0e3
'2012-05-28T00:01:29-04:00'
describe
'9095320' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMAZ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
fef12947ff1b0e96a0dea5461736ac9f
d5964ed635294e03fd60372db361784f17fdd05e
'2012-05-27T23:56:06-04:00'
describe
'9137132' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBA' 'sip-files00081.tif'
8b57a11b5391015f7893a41aeb628d51
ab7c3ff9125ae606edde23428b8287ee2a295a02
'2012-05-27T23:58:05-04:00'
describe
'8613770' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
466177e729fe50f3247b14a108fab408
2a2d9d6cfae3a302e773808e6c243d595abdd904
describe
'8903426' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBC' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a6ab7ae6146e0a5fd3cdc04972461bcb
9e142f66b0f8dc6c7fc540f62e518d5277ee2a61
'2012-05-28T00:01:21-04:00'
describe
'8594392' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBD' 'sip-files00084.tif'
2cca1c91d5062a0b94e4fb8ed1b9d4c6
6fef26ed38644f39e7bd4c1ee08116cb3d1286cc
'2012-05-27T23:56:31-04:00'
describe
'8808806' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
d6b32b08a923070ba2bff7c5a82ed602
38153b03a0df9aa174c5f5fe830ead0971401007
describe
'8392764' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBF' 'sip-files00086.tif'
ad0cb29f7948e61a68eea8ca60f64b65
5a62386fe746b31f403948053a4368c1967bf192
describe
'8940698' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
b908811b17077c5865acc3624805cf63
d731fbdebd870021b24419f4c3910ec7775143d5
describe
'8784070' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBH' 'sip-files00089.tif'
6aa18e6ae4b8baf48dd3e04010c2c78c
dd38d03917fa7887786e76b0cdfd11255bcfdb61
'2012-05-27T23:56:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
3dcd98f62a49042f564e324ce7199784
6fdd7fb3878fc82359620de668b845afa185ffa4
describe
'8468332' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBJ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
5f1a7b83f3fca50c4d19e05ff26e9a1f
82cc66af8beb6948e43e75768479a51f034aed76
describe
'8725030' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ce1b1cc876d28371bcba2af21039ae77
01dca7769e80d20251681560c473b6c721ff88de
describe
'8290126' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBL' 'sip-files00098.tif'
8e51fe1353288d0504fb092a9ec57340
f9f25696e8d7c51b30acab7cc83aef01ebd93da9
'2012-05-28T00:01:57-04:00'
describe
'861598' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
60edc1c264022a1bcab5bf7d7f835871
b31faa25740d05f2c1290ae02660f966e2b4fcc7
describe
'798720' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBN' 'sip-files00102.tif'
29fb65a088dbbd7c539e63273636bf5d
03ca42e5b208b65d24b0c7bfc6c28e0d9295d9a0
describe
'8763883' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBO' 'sip-files00104.tif'
65e769e9cb5fbceccd771bef28394688
49e5c6ec9f790d0d13b6b61e6b081cd2e3a6bb6d
describe
'8801246' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBP' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e82e44f429134c141d2f08555cf53b65
b07c3223f0379d6eeaca2b266590927d2fdec423
'2012-05-27T23:55:58-04:00'
describe
'8464903' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBQ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
3ccbc1bf1aa0e958e7c1341ef31d72be
3e01c8a92b9c06edf1ba4a29592d5a3d6e083c62
describe
'8878144' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4478956f8c4c55df8abb3270631482bc
a9a9b4065d24187653638c1db06054034e59772a
describe
'8718402' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBS' 'sip-files00108.tif'
ba9858e1fa1e6aaa6b611476c419f652
11472c30461c88d404a2c04228d060649a6e50a0
'2012-05-27T23:59:06-04:00'
describe
'8697093' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
94bf56abdb7e37d13a1e751a3ad3ae85
4d7af7129699baaf9bf9f48773902fda4509a6fd
describe
'8726398' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBU' 'sip-files00111.tif'
e91fb7403eeb5c7d039a8891adc20a1a
dcb0f5e6a8f4d793955177e465d34292f242f22e
'2012-05-27T23:58:29-04:00'
describe
'1001116' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
0e1aa32ae8a54dea77a833ac13aedd08
7d4d2a6d097ffa345b519a182bb7f48c8796f31e
describe
'1017234' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBW' 'sip-files00113.tif'
2cb0d91037002482adfabed8326e01ab
23315d432e3fb4a6f45a06144513930e9f65f6b7
'2012-05-27T23:57:20-04:00'
describe
'8808645' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBX' 'sip-files00114.tif'
c7d97cc62ee3b481bedadde6a4c8185c
45ad1700c298dec4c44b36411c21418a21678d14
'2012-05-27T23:57:31-04:00'
describe
'8260074' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBY' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2842c2e744050371416ea0df2362f3ed
b231e9cc909654825d66e160865ad01678eeb557
'2012-05-27T23:55:19-04:00'
describe
'8892626' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMBZ' 'sip-files00119.tif'
06bdd0e58637a6c9470a9cfef2942dcc
0b3cc988be21601e67d94db076d32d39e3bf6113
describe
'8801826' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCA' 'sip-files00120.tif'
5921e4dac9d895bafa94d9adca85e449
77a0b12713ec842f9a8cdd2aac4ba21125decd6f
'2012-05-27T23:56:28-04:00'
describe
'8745874' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
22cb055b64ce24888d5476d0e5cdb37e
1678c5f109c071dd9e3c28f11a0be9cacb8f91f6
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCC' 'sip-files00123.tif'
802485cbee21afe903755e0457efcbc7
8956a6406d967ba2513e1e3a5b8a40025cf183b1
'2012-05-28T00:00:59-04:00'
describe
'8788644' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCD' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e59a99bdbebe4daba40cea1f189ebbec
d1d73ee9a3e9d8a5f6e5a96704056e4168f5aeae
'2012-05-27T23:59:46-04:00'
describe
'8559136' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCE' 'sip-files00128.tif'
70eff2ccc04d68e9322ae623ac3015e6
cdac69d6d619c6539f3196151e46c135a63fbb55
describe
'9004106' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCF' 'sip-files00129.tif'
9cce4c076100cc9d4854faac2998fb22
074dd0649fd999cbabebd557b209fbe6378e5d08
describe
'8833414' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCG' 'sip-files00130.tif'
6e57c6aa4cc35b1f562829e91bbeb05f
4533618a5846fb2f394d2eb13c528541ca58c985
'2012-05-28T00:01:32-04:00'
describe
'8769471' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCH' 'sip-files00131.tif'
62ba24c68c1218e51d5c258143b8d252
edac6022839b807ab375d78bc41834d608cd5076
describe
'8924181' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCI' 'sip-files00134.tif'
a7c138d7bf914f4766454a5f395e48cf
21e74b78b4c7f123a8c6fba441f7419e38bcf9e0
'2012-05-27T23:57:17-04:00'
describe
'9006809' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCJ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
d52be3d3f06eacb45e2f3c0a52fc7d33
add3a4b436ff16fc01a961fbca45c09c4171f11e
'2012-05-27T23:59:16-04:00'
describe
'8995186' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
67881321d0007bdc4021f5e29c09d4c1
c33c74a79c72809802990924e0daacc9b6c3abdc
describe
'9042125' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCL' 'sip-files00139.tif'
aa8e79ea29aa039526bb0abe3b471d5f
9b535c3f94964c1b44527e9e592630f9a3b0a07c
'2012-05-28T00:00:33-04:00'
describe
'8822282' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCM' 'sip-files00141.tif'
833b764d8b7fdc9ed618db1d770fdf22
37e350a75b5268af6865cb3ad58252170bd2f433
'2012-05-27T23:58:33-04:00'
describe
'8913216' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
db67cee90fb3f74adeae4253955499d8
4b13edbfb06dcce034249bfdfe5f9ad28eed99a0
describe
'8946652' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCO' 'sip-files00144.tif'
cfeb345737589618a489a20d76e42749
05d8e19cd317d42f375ac0bd3b4579e33fcbcd1e
describe
'8931506' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCP' 'sip-files00145.tif'
ddc54ff5a3853df28418746dc4f3be99
149b10bb4170322c85a97e40bca996ec2fffb681
'2012-05-28T00:00:24-04:00'
describe
'8914304' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCQ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
6abef8da09bb373e69e1485514a60c40
eb1f8915f11a277b94dd654fcd880cb0d78fe84f
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
bf73f87281a09aba95726ed170a3f001
a4df478d35086442cbca6f6dc36f5a3397df28c4
'2012-05-27T23:55:24-04:00'
describe
'8955338' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
baf1de591276a2b866caa8598636237e
ac765da02b65ec70babc1f3c22e6dcf9ade4e1c0
describe
'819260' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCT' 'sip-files00150.tif'
793c8851add165b16ea671442a78d6ac
163fc9eeb8bc76d24f4cb5c8c5c0597ebded68a4
describe
'937648' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCU' 'sip-files00151.tif'
2ac9dc66e47cca69308f5f23d70f3af4
deb1223cb27154f95f99d096f334a17f75cadb27
'2012-05-27T23:57:23-04:00'
describe
'9283436' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCV' 'sip-files00152.tif'
548633f4dcc485d3763a49f42b6dd55a
e839cd90d0054f53cfdaa7f6cccb1bbf34b7801a
'2012-05-27T23:59:38-04:00'
describe
'9124058' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCW' 'sip-files00154.tif'
ec2acba7acdaa3875732f166c8af90c5
d4aad35dd6fe50af4cfac4a1bc09f1c6b3b55e78
describe
'9250958' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCX' 'sip-files00156.tif'
20977ddad2f48b57ae3e51fb468ed0ed
c5bce1a6a7297ef37d220b64b643bd4f43387486
'2012-05-27T23:59:22-04:00'
describe
'9099090' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCY' 'sip-files00157.tif'
43f0da6131f89dba983468b80c6f046e
be92eaaa4aee0ade2154e3820187f96ed8ef611a
describe
'9147830' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMCZ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
94d5ec5f0d2e8d063dc7bced647c7bcf
6c2c1308af859eba0e38334c7fa968a950202ad6
describe
'8945516' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDA' 'sip-files00160.tif'
555fa77a7c00061264bc77ebaa6ed7fc
bcad05b2e3c92d3a99747c17e81ec4937d2cb54f
'2012-05-27T23:55:52-04:00'
describe
'9011618' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDB' 'sip-files00161.tif'
816f4a52fd2879cb7994fcb21230166b
ce8c6d07e12daa8eb9f8c7f41b098dd62f05edce
describe
'9273620' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDC' 'sip-files00162.tif'
1a3d5df7cea0212d28fcb43505fe7a1b
1471888e1e4d6ef7e0d71793cbd1e8323be73543
describe
'9161810' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDD' 'sip-files00163.tif'
0a03886f1adf697f51f12c29d797aeb6
40a523406b18aa7b5dbc374e741012ceaeb42761
'2012-05-28T00:01:26-04:00'
describe
'8991962' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDE' 'sip-files00164.tif'
ee11a6fd135f49697cfc9d7890ecddf4
28c39991ad649bbc26ba402a428dea68ffe61aa4
'2012-05-27T23:55:47-04:00'
describe
'4561676' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDF' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
d29f7bf7943a2a3270cd07e6bbfdf7d5
6cf167fdce00ec2b0667dcb877fca6e755af2b03
describe
'845' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDG' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
bb183488cb29cb2252aef99237dee994
c55f22ddce6cc3da71540c3816466953ce4bcc20
describe
'4409' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDH' 'sip-filesii.pro'
63b96c34c9c088f50a9ac9d79852dd5e
c0a34358862e7c5889406889d6569248158221c9
describe
'9890' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDI' 'sip-filesiii.pro'
48d07f3bd23547aa3163e6cd12ba3189
ebd8b07609f235b92654286388d1be28e95423e0
describe
'15479' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDJ' 'sip-filesv.pro'
1402727893d845c4fc87d7944a9605d8
33a7df5d6c8bfdc7cbf5531c9378ea74631a03de
describe
'27202' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDK' 'sip-files00002.pro'
218dfac346f7f56ee9b7d315e0ee441d
6bcbba9bab8ac7f396140d0bb430772d653cfdf5
describe
'27545' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDL' 'sip-files00003.pro'
62aa9d4380a66f515f300ef664edc1b1
88b0de735bcd1901b8e1553d2b76b44bc0a841a4
describe
'27475' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDM' 'sip-files00004.pro'
7b30d08fa7900d63cdaa86c74985fb5e
d2f2f949d98f99147acff4ff151a072880cb7091
describe
'27213' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDN' 'sip-files00005.pro'
aa358065c64990857385400ac3b455d4
27ad3abd14bd876cb808732375d855024397347d
'2012-05-27T23:57:01-04:00'
describe
'28977' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDO' 'sip-files00006.pro'
59d3e251133a53225e6ab1e79dd625eb
e6688955b04effb84f1cc696f700d894639add21
describe
'30261' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDP' 'sip-files00007.pro'
7eed1378a87f336c011430adffabf06a
350dc52c68691607808cb44557f74b4bb6958ee4
describe
'27924' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDQ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
f8ba9effbd949fc14c499f20aa15119e
399db7d9c5a85601cdd985584c2139b8418676e2
describe
'27032' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
17e3c17154e359eb5994428fb79d2300
4a11b5359a68fafce89016bb07caf23378cec519
describe
'28662' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDS' 'sip-files00013.pro'
40a989c479f265c4e9d4419d30c9fceb
66b7807a9d8c9ae9600860e568251a1f0a594626
describe
'30187' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDT' 'sip-files00016.pro'
37ea8f13c689589afdfe74028adb8f6e
1d8eabed5a23a5c07e0030a1b96738ba602af9b8
describe
'23139' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c0d7fe54d21a8ae7e83df561907ce44d
b50c23d6b2e16f9a08b44e47865fa6e00ac59c2c
describe
'26369' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
3d26a0dc4e78807656648772550f847f
43796e56f528bdc7760146001e6c954cdd364020
describe
'23767' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5b92f64369cdf8ad08a70b3268e2e764
78633747ca3a2abb3e04cfe17781bf813e49424e
describe
'29141' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDX' 'sip-files00020.pro'
486b6d15e86f484357437026ad048c0c
cf858bd3c7ddd1aa039c6c30cda81d7d0674a93a
describe
'25774' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDY' 'sip-files00022.pro'
605d1199c8b347cb79c3001c7f6db241
496fd267f050ba044407a8539978f6e060879bd8
describe
'26124' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMDZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
03b75aa156b758bb454cae11b2fcc368
0147928f5bd20dde5c588af5084754b4ba51f2a2
'2012-05-27T23:59:07-04:00'
describe
'28311' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEA' 'sip-files00024.pro'
16746af030f5076fe0abd68687303c75
1a7f2bca20012f8983123ca3463045cece3df61b
describe
'26118' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e9d375388cc92df4ed9c0614ed43b799
51b60532fbb2b82a48cfb1abd33db78331f5dfb8
describe
'29127' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
68f1c2c5e8c05a335f096bcd49984d1f
83b060a2476a4c802bf864937a697156c6492fbe
describe
'29949' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMED' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7dc8355082477be6c7278b2337062b62
c0ef29068859bed9c921b8b548139183a84749ad
describe
'22508' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEE' 'sip-files00035.pro'
1eddaa3619776be0cf2f6732d701013c
89dbd4648084798a69607f3b581d1203cc3d4b8d
describe
'24264' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEF' 'sip-files00036.pro'
33e53bd4d4174c1806f3020141996545
a108944694eb9a14ca5be68a6878dbcf9553e1b7
describe
'30101' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEG' 'sip-files00038.pro'
875504b84e80865779f4b856b7addccc
57b96c21b7158c2b2cb211c6000a65621614c75e
describe
'29001' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
3264d3664ee7b9e43b29ff8c4bdd29df
0e2c8804aea3be5ed88676f991060718d21c7e33
describe
'27967' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEI' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ac19d707ad60ae4b13e5610f905b93b2
182e5fec031799234ebcc8648e8ff33cc77ca53c
describe
'24808' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
0adbe223ec2ed0acf5e3767efcd064ff
00f1a1d8fad449ae93dad712406bc685dc301de5
'2012-05-27T23:58:30-04:00'
describe
'27648' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEK' 'sip-files00043.pro'
d0b57605800c4654d803f346a86f0f68
4500a968736c9ef4a6f677153cb4aad272a0d45f
describe
'28545' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
8bfc4e784c4c6666c932f3003efee969
6d71eddc67a386804bfe68da7dbcb341b696aa44
'2012-05-27T23:58:41-04:00'
describe
'30697' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEM' 'sip-files00045.pro'
137c811621edd047b20e337f94fa5dfa
b76af64e7acb082f8d0809ab05c089072b60d189
describe
'27816' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEN' 'sip-files00046.pro'
8a25e71f9ee18562d9ac8ef75609b4c7
a75eb798670d2ddc9d9930b366a02746eee6f6d8
describe
'25643' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
b04e70e7288552fb5985d043bcf2fcb0
bb36cb1a8cefed784e1c309eef3289b60bbc1448
describe
'29761' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEP' 'sip-files00048.pro'
7e5e51c94fe91354697efb6501e336eb
48c1f149c1c4ad34da2e7cf1ffa76a154b4015bd
'2012-05-28T00:01:18-04:00'
describe
'28748' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEQ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e72483da5919c74c2dd8efa44825c4ec
4bda5f0a206a8855ee2eaf62b9c89251616d6fe6
describe
'25992' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMER' 'sip-files00050.pro'
63588c2a15b6f23a054023b048075427
5bfd7d5d971aacefa7ec29fdd33db13923dff1cb
describe
'27039' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMES' 'sip-files00051.pro'
39f702a3e7afae94f26e373bb417af88
599027ada2a70b437fee67f71c35344dd4b9fafe
describe
'29211' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMET' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2f77b6f93c9fac4a8038da817766aa33
becc46c34da91ffc4ec332432be9cd3cd70b417b
describe
'21967' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEU' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a63bccebf1e159ac687a2f4dabecba84
bb22c6e840ce248e998dc3312166982007844558
describe
'23219' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
91b0c69251fe891d150de0be0e37466c
7125a8ff21cc1cd26d4ddf35bd5e4d7206b7b1b1
describe
'21776' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
487830acc5960df90661d7e3ff7f8de2
a280e3ddf5dad8e908d19c99577893f722127d44
describe
'28800' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a996ca10db99a453190048d1b26853a7
67b9ac5aba7b605a186a1f980d5cb2543d1f4249
describe
'26824' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEY' 'sip-files00059.pro'
d6ebf1aa863da42d34bb10388c921070
382b856804d9f5c5a903833e8be0c0a90a1ee46e
describe
'28468' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMEZ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
3b01bf3e341b9a0b0fca8e6ec9f31269
d7a4d3dad371a05e3ee82ceb6a4dea06e249c2de
describe
'27220' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFA' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1228f10cced9a30376170fdb19187e14
2663c71b410b5afb93e92b221b8192f01c0aae97
describe
'29132' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFB' 'sip-files00063.pro'
71f433cb3d94a9545bb7bf878ffb4b6c
ede4f85ba1774c72618a9cd029eca520d4c68ab9
describe
'30730' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
80c08ddc91378e577f2c634a21f6288e
25d9008e8c5ea6ea264e3f4ebcf563d585adbe2e
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFD' 'sip-files00067.pro'
dbfec42db82b39cc7ddeda740b2f462d
418a93ffde6d3a5dfb78c61077c7d7307ac3e6c0
describe
'29842' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFE' 'sip-files00068.pro'
d39ff52ddb06f4e8888385ba9205428e
6a3232c248a33114e68da10eff9f74749426cb6f
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e1eed52354b06fc5d7964650e2a00a3c
fe209c10f4b35a14e26db57b96237c8e6c01be8f
describe
'26032' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2236112c9f1e0b8845b14466e9553c13
efa159032be1e9ea45cfc34f932a1d000796a4d2
'2012-05-28T00:01:46-04:00'
describe
'26636' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
4e913802ba1a5589d8334721f28ae359
af900c274b8be7f4283c4eef6a4487c961c917a4
describe
'24953' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFI' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ba99dcc32a9dbaaaf9064dccd587d4aa
10bf13aaee76caca7c2db73517a09640e47020d6
describe
'29076' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFJ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
789d3f0abf0cfa467820e6d0dd867f50
06f82d56ee3ae80322c64db2487b818c04a5abe0
describe
'27794' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFK' 'sip-files00076.pro'
df8b468f417824bd9bae5b3c36f7e49d
0b9e143b67c0849d5b844385676cf03097a2418c
'2012-05-27T23:55:32-04:00'
describe
'30193' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFL' 'sip-files00077.pro'
cd42fa52dbcff00e14a63926ee52dcf9
05787dfa9485b3446297e094cd28c1c184ee5afb
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
5a442db311205e67a212a79ca8b6fcc2
6830a62d175c01083801e93189c4e28b003b7c2a
describe
'27469' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
37aed450e19a93b8b6697f46abc08658
9a91a743e5ae23af7dc8ce3a8e64e37dda0a0167
describe
'27606' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
72b7c70af98faf4a837715a3fd26d68f
fe0427509e23598eca903a0230081aad3a28f6e6
describe
'23845' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
92bd94a14fee4e0715099d705632bf2e
5b1681162811639f45f661409028f5d554aefb09
describe
'28845' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFQ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
2a20d68ee850625c83172dfbcc5c7e2d
a8ed27dd0563fb3af1c32ef48a06b66b1a5f8d51
describe
'28424' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ab5c3b0c153bc4c693b1b649b405e2a4
e4c097d9f45a38af4595e20f2fac67f68491b2b7
describe
'28721' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
06834fb9a5b0df491c4ba003aa3b6f93
50f0bdff80150912714e819f5913aac17717eeea
'2012-05-28T00:00:20-04:00'
describe
'27488' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFT' 'sip-files00090.pro'
7cec09da37f89b365778532ca0ff94e2
f30edf5c5b10dbb90f3ce4c9c319bd0904dd37ea
describe
'26685' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFU' 'sip-files00091.pro'
3afc3102a9bf97856121ca2527196d33
1ff7e585054e08ffc2472ce9c305f3872db17a53
describe
'27396' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
038f523c149720166bee7a501f653d3e
f00a381834ca709310df81f86865592e48fe2792
describe
'26429' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFW' 'sip-files00093.pro'
8871b29e33724522e35b7b0821563c4d
155ff80f4f3459e0250164a59980726574d967d5
describe
'27374' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFX' 'sip-files00094.pro'
a10d2d6bf282c198d7f7061c52ca68f3
e9eb9355ff230eee59a111d6a66907ed6e9515bc
describe
'27434' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFY' 'sip-files00095.pro'
88b0b61d5cf069085cef59fa427a854c
60bd5fc45edfe94e0269f7361210c46328715b5f
describe
'28521' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMFZ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
17f66f8087cea9bde482f2338d4925b1
a04b5e9db7f8386eee35f0a6dddb8dc06580db0c
describe
'26261' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
79d465a73b2fea5160ceb77b12d54cae
e233e1d74a9d6ebef65963dc8e44c1e6f900a930
describe
'24367' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGB' 'sip-files00098.pro'
605070687ad3cbfb719a2aa55de70ae2
ed0825fb2af002a21e8c233f052d9b3d36ef75d8
describe
'21386' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGC' 'sip-files00100.pro'
bdc969c3c38e19bb57e8063420c72e12
a57f27b20f35be95912b5d8243874b1d68a873d9
describe
'29169' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGD' 'sip-files00101.pro'
50f307c213f271ff5fdea40a6367e299
df93bae2d0ac5d3e2f090ddf616fccf477396610
describe
'24738' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGE' 'sip-files00102.pro'
4b9570599cb9a0d262504da53b0654ce
eb4f6a1f7411481131ecb7f045f970d063b9dd10
describe
'26215' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGF' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ac338c79bcd5c6ae9d55272840cbe50d
c981a24ec9abdaeb02d517c579791015625adb16
describe
'28609' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGG' 'sip-files00104.pro'
b87168c4d588a8a3e8635adf05e87160
eb7cf9f9af3a7229b1f66e368d8caa4bf9541a26
describe
'26012' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGH' 'sip-files00105.pro'
ddadc1cf584e17c80552d969473edd79
cd1d3e9d1ca3a60c44dfce3f6ffddd7b30613a68
describe
'23018' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c7fdd997ae026fdc00c0ec5b27a4c889
b196957aedd17681309fca0742b255a31f1aae33
describe
'27061' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGJ' 'sip-files00109.pro'
9ece98d12627425e6bbfe9ccce2a8f0f
589d8dfaced83a3a2cd09460dd7d9c62d9008025
describe
'26737' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9de315e678d336dfa885bfe3ed8106bd
35fa96e721d4fac27b0ca142058d288790884069
describe
'26728' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGL' 'sip-files00112.pro'
da7e4ee91bed8446a1dcc51e328c8381
7dd2b654d321013fad146db699d9cd85bf802619
describe
'25239' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGM' 'sip-files00113.pro'
7d4efaf3e5137ca6d4b345191f8ba10c
0b3c3984693f8e0de6a174319bac12fbebfe10ea
describe
'25120' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGN' 'sip-files00114.pro'
a126d0544d4be6f770509b0e6242fbbd
c620758a9da33810998348187a22041c87b0e3aa
describe
'30073' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGO' 'sip-files00115.pro'
df905981c2f3b94fa87af02553a861ac
7e1cb02bc16e3f6cda5df848a3d8d587bda50929
describe
'24898' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGP' 'sip-files00119.pro'
21cbceb5f54f44404c7fdd859c1730d9
97a91355a15acf663c0bc06575dfacdd9482019e
describe
'25341' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGQ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
aec5e51e2a54f1c4153a245d7a824b0d
6861cc18b56c47dc7a58e4490e2dfe69ceea3fa0
describe
'25949' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGR' 'sip-files00122.pro'
6833de0493fa277e316ad3e8b8308d63
083ae609d6361cfcedca1e1805b920d0830f233f
describe
'29762' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
50d28f9fb7ad5752ae67b11e52c90300
37c0a116dfa516779d6414ebd8a8475b7c85ebf2
describe
'29088' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGT' 'sip-files00125.pro'
9091dd53e43e1cb81295c2f4e72643b2
7fca85790279e6e9471548dd3e05beb7b242736b
describe
'25202' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGU' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4e10e0af4c7aba2f83277b8e5c45ed80
31799ce7e9f82c24abaae899c790221fa3781750
describe
'23825' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGV' 'sip-files00129.pro'
24db3ed17cd9ab22c34193b95d72354b
543ffca3ee20f0ba21f5688fd3ac59dd87728bb4
'2012-05-28T00:01:39-04:00'
describe
'27944' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
b252522cd8454ae8c86276235e790fde
b20c5360a43602aade552316cfde588fc4fe08e2
describe
'28236' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGX' 'sip-files00132.pro'
aaabfed442ef56f004a96c7482c219b6
5f651f6123b245e1a7c7112ed536b886393c02b1
describe
'27130' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGY' 'sip-files00133.pro'
6db59b08ecad0f8c11ebc0ef9951d161
c3c1fc3e46044d4c76b1063eb16d199996887595
describe
'28520' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMGZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
61487285fddc7490c2037526763aadbf
598625bb7cbeb7d97f8745b575100d6fcd8da813
'2012-05-28T00:01:52-04:00'
describe
'27679' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
e3b92491a88c678b4b481c1e2f00725c
d87adbef3bf80d60295b0aee9ae464da95d6e4f5
describe
'28177' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHB' 'sip-files00141.pro'
ce9a574b16df11b714f66d19d719d21f
20891b21188b4939154b16294d4a893f607823b0
describe
'28831' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHC' 'sip-files00142.pro'
00130fee9b0368106cd118243c85f7f4
b7edcad5a11a96aea308988771187ac161ac14af
describe
'22639' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHD' 'sip-files00143.pro'
8df7a0cdde0ca061ec9f62f96e5336ce
706f23526e959acc90fad502846e9dae0fc1f5be
'2012-05-28T00:01:07-04:00'
describe
'26472' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
b7c8b52127d148a0585ae4de4ccebf6d
4862c4535338b33a036c50ff3dc0854a0e1a698d
describe
'25212' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHF' 'sip-files00145.pro'
fa45f71a6e690b7a294318145848b80e
9753460e4ca0f37d64952bf7462203d91bf04de7
describe
'23712' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHG' 'sip-files00146.pro'
30bc36561e74096406eeba29eae378ab
2f4562c906dcad0412be1177983a0de324ea4e7e
describe
'28782' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHH' 'sip-files00147.pro'
3519fcdd4e2dd51ab022dfbc8c75dca2
4f1efe322a6275374763207f64ddf819f9749e4a
describe
'28350' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHI' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d7d718fb9b1a965565f875493277f8e5
dc2fbe5e55d5c31dcc7eefe3767eb1d2e62398e8
describe
'22962' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHJ' 'sip-files00150.pro'
caa7c8a7bdfa7552d07ffe4c515f7090
b2f23703431e94f344b391f09ff09c7bb7b63a7f
describe
'25123' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
964b9ad54433e83a0a1806595ff1b918
8019f3b24a240c8bb4b6c3e300031f8b47aad3cf
'2012-05-27T23:55:50-04:00'
describe
'24285' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHL' 'sip-files00152.pro'
2beec44bd952d14216b64a44854e0579
d7e74c3772f5afc72439f9c3b7ff80856ec72199
describe
'26153' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHM' 'sip-files00154.pro'
83a86c115b4642b7e983b577d6bc749c
79bd014f6c6026a100a4b74c5dcb960617baa3f9
describe
'29115' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHN' 'sip-files00157.pro'
1da18baff35ca70311731b5e3ea9e4d5
4fe4597b88274f2758b6210f1a84af0d31959c48
describe
'29890' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHO' 'sip-files00158.pro'
079e374b399833a826940299aefdd336
544d53c07d815ad93d105eef46f0304a9073f8cc
describe
'23122' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHP' 'sip-files00159.pro'
46acaf72f59ea4ec2823044bf022beb4
9c479878fe55acace42c43a71416e19950a92dc5
describe
'29868' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHQ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
a66cedc3c3f87b5f8775c5e029e7df60
63846a43d46e65a547ce6f58119c8217e3506c59
'2012-05-27T23:55:40-04:00'
describe
'23626' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHR' 'sip-files00163.pro'
b7caf876be8d613d8cd450b7e6238193
52f2ff8eba0d8e26e4f7e0928092fc2a68ab82a1
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHS' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a3e64ed8d3136b7db3b8d155651f9edc
5ea87135a5ba43f7205b06c576afd0fb12e6bb47
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHT' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
ce04653aebaeb57e39d6e2b56aeada62
5e075069d1929e862d6ba602c498adba7b722f8c
'2012-05-27T23:59:24-04:00'
describe
'558' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHU' 'sip-filesii.txt'
e31febd8a8b36e79b4a685c833a3c13e
9d9e7b1a76eee86e4d6ed5bd67ca2f10665ba08c
describe
Invalid character
'690' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHV' 'sip-filesiii.txt'
00e99db63e68aea1d8f06b583a88ce61
b3d1bcede9a0ec6540798e83d06eee9c75571960
describe
'735' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHW' 'sip-filesv.txt'
d83fd794a99866a7ed7247b3a228a2d1
f92f8c43308403fdfbee915469a15d5082a75888
describe
'647' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHX' 'sip-files00001.txt'
778bd7ec04c8e052d5c1848729622007
efcd6f0ef7124c22e7293b9dfacdc30d807c0e2d
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHY' 'sip-files00003.txt'
d4e05e5aa5c083d3da95c13165aba133
8c302a5e7b1c5f451adb872487e5864aac2cb847
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMHZ' 'sip-files00004.txt'
57db74aacda39f5305ede41471bcada6
2246bbc4c84dc103a75af6a18b48cb26288adc01
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIA' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5c30382da06992b5efb9cb488e018ba6
fdfcac50f8880ae49a227a2d5e80a99fa03e3014
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIB' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e2f056290ea526f955253023050c0f0b
2b15b89fefef643880903e7375ca151a07d99578
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIC' 'sip-files00007.txt'
1d14574bc18a6177c8407ca3576cb05a
1bac8ba93a89607f099777f78ea07d92c32a38aa
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMID' 'sip-files00009.txt'
81c4ad461fefde5be90a2ba1b1009318
68c54488024daac2157ecf998dc33cc5c6f7b6d7
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIE' 'sip-files00010.txt'
a4e3675760a767af7eb5d1da92823c69
6b6a4abde84278637b7de868a6bf99f7e1c08acb
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIF' 'sip-files00012.txt'
7d57bf61d5398d4f2a308afae4c8b9cb
e53b62df1d17a96c523bd0832eaea28a9accac68
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d4209aa6fdd812764d37fa88e31bf6a1
760aa51846b5e297820e05ee6a72ce9cb6910c88
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIH' 'sip-files00015.txt'
1ab4dc09518bd9b9fa3ece9d0120d3d9
2899c9ab448031a9d212bdb2ac00a6ecb6d8873a
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMII' 'sip-files00016.txt'
2d4ac93f8bab4e2c3e27f4ce378fb57b
15ca56dfca8d4ad7b52278c8d16fcbbe499d7af2
'2012-05-27T23:56:14-04:00'
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIJ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4bee906a3b8caf597a477b732451fdbb
6c4018e7c9d70634f2763a66adf6329f4a74bf67
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
73e44c8bbd232e19839f62e6f7208d42
773d39a28db743a46517d3a9bffcbf51031c28b5
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
f848ed4a41e9c9624e07169f1b1632f9
f763dcf9bdbf7474a2140d2aa01df5dd96d007d3
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
0f1fff09deedf6f3d660d67171ea4b4e
bcfbe4154845fd1420a145933b6741533cb405e8
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
f3721c6168812cc747c598592833e856
9b9838194b85be3e7a740cba4c80955b0437710e
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIO' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9fa819dff1822f0345d3c8d86afa4f78
7ac6ada52832872f86e1728a4236b0713d354310
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2c7a7b3e318596e6d71542c8c9eb5292
4060aa65dfa24b8bf9ba32a320b247866e22f046
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
a8808882e5258b7698b2e21d6c42accb
88b3f1b9f7e49b1cf0d01d2fcca3872e73c3a819
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIR' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4c312dcddc074eb33f123008c8c80e61
ede61b7376407d95f6a2d7a9576f570702fc6659
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIS' 'sip-files00030.txt'
bdab8b0fb868ff1dcbc429ad85fbc593
0c862eadbf9b663f74db0fa50ddb443a8df22652
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIT' 'sip-files00031.txt'
3b117f8daf6cf84cc44dc801af1c9b8d
d5e5ba144c9459f8296663f28d53ec8cad5d5071
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
87edb94ffedd394a4d708973fcda4f19
215074ec94e1b83b29f94ee1623de42cf7ea7eca
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIV' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e476b29158e0e01d00fc3f46ee05a69f
103263a93380723ae1e73b8aba3ee31f4d504048
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
8ca16dc0f7bed454df3ee9a47382dc30
873c90bd0db4a3204e8c33253c4ef5a01bef5cdc
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b6a6d565edeca10a003eae0e781d16b2
2507217aaa4b08f93c824955f12f6efa4cb2f6d7
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIY' 'sip-files00036.txt'
6cced0adb505f560c03fdfd794afe683
8feec81a76f11096cca3fe8a2064a3805738298c
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMIZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
19a07dd10ba0f1bf50aee8263d225800
30e13834965a1b6a5881873fe3554da4107933ad
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJA' 'sip-files00038.txt'
9b515f206b9a073dbc4d338c64fbee4f
37d7134e09e98c2654b84d470a0b4ff27291c1f5
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJB' 'sip-files00039.txt'
08b0c730aea31b4f300b2cac1ed89cc7
4933f9e82554631fced9622bdf79cb4ad70c53ac
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
31ec4aa9048f8e9e0aa5ea81777561f2
467ec6f0bf8cfb489558c98497fda81260838ce3
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
e75dd7be710153c7b17a93c32063c5da
55e6a321943d54b40fa94a4c2815e409311edf28
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJE' 'sip-files00043.txt'
dfce3777ebebaabbda92683d64ca0220
dae2dc3a559ee5a68c595a37b47b1f8a28273f06
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJF' 'sip-files00044.txt'
cd8994415ff756281a478684b7bc345a
26c36a52e2a2671b0d077d4e74813ad4d1d055a0
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJG' 'sip-files00045.txt'
208f3ec91ad7f75cb6d7c6a997b4e7d0
ac47d838fb64f03c51c43347d56441b39f9c6d75
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
a247f364a60184c4b198c5909053011a
d624e1d0e4e7364c074c8f017f55c41cef152e82
'2012-05-27T23:56:41-04:00'
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJI' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0da9d89b48ddab7c197c2d0b0eed10b7
84da2840d57fafc555ba634194dedace4b8ba27e
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJJ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4dc5d59e02893c634c2b586f56aaf71a
4a7625ed13fb1c9707d5d6549305822afabf47cb
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJK' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0029ba99f60855d80e30839cac9e0466
33789ba725c97f4b8caa85c42e567cc9c96b676a
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
aca36c2769298876a50615f4837fe640
6432cd3779a92ca0ceca54f3f4912a5c2c09431d
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJM' 'sip-files00053.txt'
5683f9b21ee2ec3775bc42dfa475c6f8
d11f74606611f22eb62050f3f9f75cd6847399cc
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
c693c5fc36695ee848e67c8603bb4372
0dc245e8918c799d6e5dfec8e63137f1d62a5d2d
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJO' 'sip-files00056.txt'
1aa30ef51aeb3a4787edb31d36d518df
8fa00b72ca9dbe7e45db90ce5db791fa422e72d7
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJP' 'sip-files00057.txt'
d84fcee1497eeede234749dd54619b29
d83c5afd73be9df813939724699dc475c6d612c5
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
207288d9845e9f90faf1ac50dc199a78
f6ab178f9877cb544f76fb1201c5caa918537f76
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJR' 'sip-files00059.txt'
f8d8e26c5fcb6cc784579abb8aa38751
76273f1112696a5ddbc884f8cf8a0b5852865ec9
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJS' 'sip-files00060.txt'
bd4c931d06a1e956879f71a0c3ee3ec5
fa31f21e15e928f61c3c9895b6e43e6141de28cb
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJT' 'sip-files00061.txt'
67bfb84b7a067fa87277542928540c26
1e57117ae5fcd417076320ecf399c26f6595da22
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
8b1363085ee5dce35e2e282f749eaf56
c7480a2945c1b13ad617b45433309c7640585d0a
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
62f86493c0e505676c1491f3438e678c
19f6aa48e21d59ad8c23853b167ab6daa0b8b637
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJW' 'sip-files00065.txt'
84e9c19425c2561fd5d4d3e8471c4d2b
27eac44848c6fdd48ae31dad4cfb334971b06b2a
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJX' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6f2045706c8f6b73b438378272cbe3d1
887e3e860f367634c2313580831bfffd25165623
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d2fa5fb11fa2ec306ed18829259212f8
e289c5310008c54f078b14603845699ea4f26cd0
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMJZ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
f969d23876789d3cdc2346ccdb7056c3
bb23170939bf825289bf0ec6b1e7bf046dae8522
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
1c61cf60764008de64660cb9f874daff
0fb6f01ceaa2b3e5023d61275ff74db380bb98d9
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKB' 'sip-files00072.txt'
e9c3643793c042d3f36e76775b2a46f9
66a1c908229babd72f49381f7c433af1915f0619
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKC' 'sip-files00073.txt'
87d53c254a559ec6c755c0af7e43f9fd
dc12ab4cb95e7dae540c43d5a8bcec05b0164d59
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKD' 'sip-files00074.txt'
b889c4fee3d4681cc50633456e21e542
2337a37a0c04b312e6d256ab7097099b3019f9a8
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKE' 'sip-files00075.txt'
01d2ceef6887dff328ca99fe25a442c0
0c9567404d655007d1ebbe6f4bb5bbd91781bbab
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKF' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e15f44c5c2e3fb216e07a35af67979ca
959368e3d7e71e15f7c3b30bf67aa1b5b8e0c9e2
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f444fbd573cd6018365dc4d11a1b7760
3ca96c2127a708111d4797939736fa9d6de3b399
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
34b55043c5489f65e26d7c8c5f8212f7
8841e10a391b31922b101bf00662c0229c016e16
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
ca73a248c56da0b2245c81e3d18a18d3
d7d99a0c7e07f519d727917a030f07167f851a0d
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
1a161e7a85553b86004f1fe0317f40b5
be594a73d8faf142052c49f2adf3f124e4349237
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKK' 'sip-files00083.txt'
1201cb4d4b311b10d54ccec8ac38ab87
886893d3a2cd13b00e859f1863dba34a77a505c7
'2012-05-27T23:56:16-04:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
213c19a1859a6abf6e5b8234436f9de6
c4c771998693a2af57930d9088e806151a7b17f3
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
dbcf2766b206585a3aa266aa7f64dfa9
eee8d3269bec5d1525711f0eeb488e4a24cf554b
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKN' 'sip-files00087.txt'
ceb22ac9e4fd24085d7e46828f75cc5a
926b239a77fed1e60c4bb3bd9e451cefe91e5714
'2012-05-27T23:59:11-04:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
c9f6c4ec1a262d0b5b0041063bfcf8de
e1fe4c8bbf74f762835c9cc1ed71c4a7742ba697
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKP' 'sip-files00091.txt'
afa46fa3a21ec52f7357c1c22c0fe15d
6aa1f4bcd9dda32b1159b3951668a3b90d6ac061
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
ffb15874d1bf3f0aa62a19fdb010e693
d787d61a23844cf688af5cfbe32a25254916a873
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKR' 'sip-files00095.txt'
dcbae778b8618d88d78ccd6492919e95
da3f34de9847cc5d82b74760544a9a0001f0dd2d
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
839bb850f7b5bf67537b78eead2ec200
0a63a8bee1d9f8e33caef3cfe086c55d5645cbbb
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKT' 'sip-files00099.txt'
41ab63efaf64770c0ed5feeebce4b8f2
fecafa1704885ef58c77a5fcd2f531394afcc0a1
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
4e8a210396cd9b1c7fb006d8105fd21d
11971c62c5f0edd1be0acc83fabccff940249532
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
5bff9b633cd1919c084a9aa56f4a25fd
81f5afd71ed3c97fdd0458bfa559cb38d6a387f0
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKW' 'sip-files00103.txt'
a22448e040ee14177feb11e97ad35c3d
a0befa64735b3f6680363373bd7d2dbfc7342839
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKX' 'sip-files00105.txt'
8559928a8f3e80a6ed70045249afbcc3
c1dd46a3d4c4cce2e4d5cf0e069588936ab8ef10
'2012-05-27T23:55:51-04:00'
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKY' 'sip-files00106.txt'
72b750961f932698860f4249d7426b6e
2643e039ea6db3e9780d395c5d3db2f53ab760ed
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMKZ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
aa69673922df8e39928ca862b2629096
d4d80b358ebb37c15338596bf22a9e4bb32efbef
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLA' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3b7e13e36924c8a9399bd2d2f97db95e
5091c3f8429cfda3eefae40ba536e133dafbb2f0
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
d4c99b5ed900eb9e3aecf15b932861e6
83a33fe9ba3ee429bb34ae63137860aecddeb726
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLC' 'sip-files00112.txt'
f1e38cd9caa4fa2ffc74ef45e9f8331a
57294973b23707b38dccc7c43fad86b37b2a0f8c
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a0aa92bb0adf534239796dacd0e19a4e
5089f2f7a19d9e8f02df9ee92b28b0d2f2a5b36f
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
d13b885d00a40822dd06d1f1df6ea857
9400bae980ecdd8262a6ba41eff052297fc03826
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLF' 'sip-files00115.txt'
5ea4046887ce4e4bccdab3005837d6d8
831b451c681a801d64e9033b6d63bae4e089d2f5
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLG' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4137259d4305cbdc758555b39d325d84
3312cebcdc1f2b4e4d4081458cda7dc2980a4549
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
742389afa407e89f51f3c291f5240179
548c2f5abcb41343f6404538173ac242d66966e9
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLI' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3dd23b773693cabde016e5a18d5fe3ef
2add963dcd9f94833169c63c6dc2fad5db96f6f5
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
abae7a365c375ac9f4889487c55deda2
3d9b0729aa861b6d7d2368aa2d8056a7a1165738
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLK' 'sip-files00120.txt'
1952ae4e87d2bc01f52d8d428e17d86f
76cd57e70ede6ff31a7afbadfea7642ed1d8760b
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLL' 'sip-files00122.txt'
311707f1fa5c39a4c088ea5b3975bc61
887c9f0c5b398b6ab83acc14439016215b5d6b1b
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLM' 'sip-files00123.txt'
3a59911b6358a3839050d9f0cc06c8aa
a3ba05c1844f4b555f76f3d82e941de329a8611f
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLN' 'sip-files00124.txt'
d06b0b8d9b9a7abd476877c297a6438c
f6afdb29d521c275082abc6d9f73db5e98bc96de
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLO' 'sip-files00126.txt'
ebde48b6ae7e5a008d5a8dfdfd7f1f27
69b3daad6d8f073bee6e1c0320496c750ce5a601
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
9afa5001cea05ec17d375c0f6e4c1334
4b521d11d76366f0980e3ced98c2faa991a0013e
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
d032a8976c975da6af0b162ef41e413d
bfe230dba3bfc57bff7870c7bd7aa6b91d8177be
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4c9a0ef4505195282ffe10cee51e2848
640f8163620a99531a26057d9ea3409b3132e183
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
03e592cb9cdfb26cb7a567d47e557878
cbf2f6cd6c533ee43a7c6ae0f100d040cdebdf8e
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
23e68c12ed57564b6aaa4a078e8041a9
5d7d841997efb963a8a1361a169e4d37a20c5acd
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLU' 'sip-files00135.txt'
c398475abda9fb03b47cf5fa00b7b878
7e80ec58d3dc9c14f4aa7d8f802b5ca3275cba69
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
fd9aef7f169048584a87b58c6d96719d
ec12835aca0ec16d87e77c3f6183af2b9fccb3e1
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
db0b849ee98c7afd17c45980a7ba81ff
761f8875b2ced6f4ee8c1cb1cdb0de4756765d28
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLX' 'sip-files00139.txt'
cd11a6d7a2b59f4e2579b46b4d8bfdac
1b32f6e05e8d81cdf41c8ae5ad4d87ab5b414f0f
'2012-05-27T23:58:08-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLY' 'sip-files00140.txt'
62daa969ebb1906e25ebe11952b8b2b6
b2a2f3150797d09a7338ab1dc0edbd6abc02bcb1
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMLZ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
e6fe0dcb6014c45d92a5d1f73f39ce02
7baa1777a25f45db42c0929b8b5245dcc27ba4f2
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMA' 'sip-files00143.txt'
264b5de4f8b7933baa43451e22d82f0b
79116cc5229cdf135554c533d412c319305ddce8
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMB' 'sip-files00144.txt'
bef3305c50ef4e57ab2c1050c3de269a
d1d8aec58d27f39d6a4421a67c154c4cc13caf8d
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMC' 'sip-files00151.txt'
386d09993f6016aec6c7492917239949
1a7d52963c062be74f8041ff8411ffaf6fe7a85b
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
d12640166b68a28b18fcf76a70f948f5
c04538fee4c7b387a4f3644a8bc8c110be51babb
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMME' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1fb6572c283dde55c59573dd5450abf5
d628c16e49cd9fa54c6e00a625c702f8595d23c9
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMF' 'sip-files00155.txt'
5416d488abdc5c8914177506191b16a5
58d90304c6ace60cab0e8f9274c98d0b6244c161
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMG' 'sip-files00157.txt'
487d26c1c9663114100a7fd995ae819f
032045adbe4d1fa657e817e7563869999043a525
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMH' 'sip-files00158.txt'
a9da0bf66f7050f6590040f7f7e71a55
ceb733c95b9cf613379a6a22c158d6ded59c5ada
'2012-05-28T00:01:11-04:00'
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
bcf3d9feff7c9da2e85ad343c2b19dc2
0fb9c2e098519578b1fcfb054154544234278a63
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f2d2bdb8c77540eb09e3499265dd2b1d
fe6f5a62024d3646dff4fe912ab58ded33e346d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMK' 'sip-files00161.txt'
9cea167a29fe50d42d289c0cb1730d72
049a0d591fc8f8d2649955b60ab40807f246137c
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMML' 'sip-files00162.txt'
0283efd2fcda8c5269ed2b88d2917984
fd03d90e328054d01d8c6aed820c6ea920ba3215
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMM' 'sip-files00163.txt'
e785ff54ad4ccb62f17a51238f42bc38
e45c7bed2f7ecd64855ea3afba34a2ee6d11055d
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ed845a4b4c755ff1e8c1294fce2f5abc
f7596f82bb75b5515751b6349c5fcb1b5765ec47
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMO' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'18296' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMP' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
8b547d9a7726eb3ea8bfd3880a858f57
0715633618380e42b777b3aa6532a69729b7cb9e
describe
'47095' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMQ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
fdd20062d798d6ae6f105d722903fe87
bf240cd2b6c4a35e8f1c58b8f6a68e7171b4dba8
describe
'30648' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMR' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
9a6ace59260f79f97b41310676323e82
b774dee1974739147ac9cd434948058e22385e5b
describe
'67015' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMS' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7b95f8aad020bc23dbda3d96e446363c
2dc3045515196b6efe996aa352d9c5a499c41af2
describe
'38020' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMT' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
8e7315d3eab5ca9c1284f8a77b0f5279
fb647381c7142aeea9c0f4bd17799a864c61e427
describe
'66069' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMU' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
823c3ebc981b10ed43b743600f6b0b39
7833b0c0586f06dd9f934c6c8a07ee5eaf96662f
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMV' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
08737abe45a25302d77888b460093069
d0018f61be46e1fc048d6df352f4ca9bc6fcf138
'2012-05-27T23:56:30-04:00'
describe
'42363' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMW' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
d68c366f2ede762b35eca899a9f4e849
151e5ecc673997df40e7791130a08e93feb69b27
describe
'63956' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMX' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
0d78b9dc3a4696166e137e77e5e2298e
4019fd59667b1eee23dfbdc8361e5e8db0ee7a19
describe
'45712' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMY' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
ac6c14a93b516f31c977d83967075ed5
098853433429d7d0e0cbdfe16646df0c0cd5ccbd
describe
'15842' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMMZ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
e06db8d89d9d1194d1fad383ccae37a1
5498b38d93b7f10508321b1aa6beb2e23d95c00d
describe
'71351' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNA' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
b3e7bba71e2df7ab84357c9ad7dffcf1
1e1c0e407e75920d10627a31e731056360be1762
describe
'39251' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNB' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
f8fcfae514eab2cb310bd13094d100fc
be84372a40f5394a335e2081a09535d11f158f83
describe
'54572' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
6f4d5bfc1190e625cdae39e1c0b2e4a8
ea01c03e2dad652181b546dc111d7417e74294cb
describe
'66937' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMND' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
05cecb93cab763fb83d1eb29ad9bcfa4
aab61235319337549f25d17bb5261f911a3e08a3
describe
'37467' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
764b2e93190de2235b3cd91bce81adc0
87d18a91c4366a4c4a70c391545fad7757d04c3c
describe
'38616' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNF' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
06488875261c993c5e2d7de7c4abb442
d787d2e1f5658b3c2622374daf292c5a056a0cce
describe
'38707' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNG' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f02b082f922056727c867c25dfa79654
8c91035860a2e34d5befb24b6ad92edbf94981d7
describe
'67311' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNH' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
bf89af10fa43fa44529c10e4f9d6b303
8defbf32f653814c848a61f9a5c7c534ae242bf4
describe
'39139' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
9cf21d3a85c1ba04de9e7197c98f1081
26ed984ccfd88f3bdda36c90c9b162858bf6e2fe
describe
'69598' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
de80d2c544869880b4e77b76b23487c7
34b44e802114f8ae80dfa623f18b284ee3a26deb
describe
'30006' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
4199ab376de7dade17cd9979defbc1f6
f22642a9bd96482d4545de968aadfbb23c2f30c0
describe
'24038' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
738b013724c7d91bb646e9c2f4e2bcb7
946f9dab6b45730473784a13819d1bebeb5bedb8
describe
'67416' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
164d46d056363d54a49bd3c45b80b06c
0e524066a3885dfa2e349b486bb117025d33ce47
'2012-05-27T23:55:13-04:00'
describe
'38064' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNN' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
462363ff50eed06bf7f3988624c23e1d
55f30ba39e8333a5a2395bec2801d430d0f17ff9
describe
'37815' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNO' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
cb562acbac90d2d5cc1b8404641b0eb1
bd20911ee07e3290c1b43ff348cdd6fcf71f61de
describe
'58299' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
bdfd9276d94d6b6dbdbe6acf92be7ac2
777727e6f07b12bf356ef5540e5691b8683145f3
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
8c080bebd3c50829c8decf5a4b699a16
31beff1eb78571871c01c919ed4d6d66c683a394
describe
'34937' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNR' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
a3473d10b4b77effa1a5738be104d579
f8e0ccce8c2c77303544a6a586231d6b16da4cee
describe
'66815' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNS' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
9eaea3feb7d4890be99cddfde54eceeb
2828130940064d2c20f6f8b08bd69b66c4b43dc0
describe
'63128' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
edb03dae7a41e1b17de7f3c8250ed308
e22aeb7a25c36b0a70f5e52018dbbe77705b9113
describe
'34989' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNU' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
e3b4d5feedd01a0525c16f89386e1fd1
1b28a799f43480b7af59d06cbe059cc8cf1b6503
describe
'67352' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNV' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ed45bbd547bebdcec96b073188cab9fe
9cfa7f41b67abd48c0d3b610214f270f9a88271d
describe
'65661' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
dab9fb22ab90766f5ebf9d57203270a8
7ed9ca4f55a73168ea9a4d3e71e95e8082038071
describe
'35815' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNX' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
645cb1d6b21ac047d5f70acd7a7ee55a
ae58f608f1b3df6fc7c45c0bd78e847056699504
describe
'69319' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNY' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
03f485af8ed92b8bd57390cd1e37a5ad
0ed743aa45d603fae8b13377850c095883878f23
describe
'38502' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0f98a6a7acf0cf5a6e354d19a5721b21
d2ca7dc975c2ed08c987b90d0d416d72863ffc02
describe
'35889' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOA' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
fa4ef48df8f01de10241a224f7dfd44a
350fbf91600a20f29760f65e56a32b753c3e500c
describe
'68681' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c025167f61d02554aee30b67972deda1
ffb6d4f6b89b5882a498de076bf91c6665da7d4e
describe
'37249' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
de3ab0f77e1ce7995215bc5968519fe1
183a383c5d70737e3ba0b8effb4c720d71537a24
describe
'67875' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOD' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
09fa89af5e734983445d0c5e71838061
8769eec0f45e8df6371bba8650a4fe161bc1aaa3
describe
'36855' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
871d671d84fdd9903cbe97479b6a8a1e
5a896d2d52a7d8c7dbaa1c8bef5eaed71f202522
describe
'40973' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOF' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
3bda720c98e88e1212166f66a85120da
867dc8a6b73a08ad28672d686ea39c1fda0d811d
describe
'69637' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
9356f1ded9d0f8a7d4fb14f02eb4f739
8bf2205e5d7e5b2623fbc196e2c8733e3aeae524
describe
'37744' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOH' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
124dc43636cae678bb759a90749dddd3
5e87763e7948683f5bb2071ce1c4b31a8f36af98
describe
'73480' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0513c5828ea0a8c9bd6141e95493d345
f73b06d53f8d1f966118629b3b98719c2e6894f9
describe
'39799' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
2594fbb50eb4fd3651df87ed79f13dd0
8785443560e75ac31d2a98c3dac00f306dc5476a
describe
'76223' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
572fb23a23bbd27189f925e789eb8aba
f19e422d4845c586bb982c81d6693ba0e509c0ac
describe
'67341' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOL' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
d3967b7d8a348bcf0671b8c0af318295
e2a37fb53fa6f83d0be6a34014b5102210ef05e3
describe
'38431' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
406dd63123678cd435d02ea788212b09
464429abd64eab5ff6f5d0a43c9c4c6483241c0e
describe
'72378' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMON' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
20c4562650e64179a24365103475ac7f
8c2c615fb06bc976dd61d7efec2ed32616f4f584
describe
'39547' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOO' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7a284e5cb67bbe93a3c138e17f6ec0e5
8bb78b8e16155b680037cf564ce408c8a10631dc
describe
'37656' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOP' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9758453c71fee2ab0312fa89dc931275
7a459aa73877c578ab70bb4e189b135a8d6245c2
describe
'33951' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b3a55de763bc146b5002f27da2a09b06
83275b0f820deab3388d503446c8eebe8986a2ec
describe
'63923' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOR' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b48d7ac9a7ef7726dbb9e37ef3ccc9af
abdce9af298ffe4875baeee441298ceb5bf18cfb
describe
'65623' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
226576edce904b0da8f3a3397ea4bba6
18990421a958a031fdc37c5dd5741b81966f0a99
describe
'54244' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5f3f44422ac638e68d8143843244a4fe
906a106c17caa9ca0dcb4f7a500c4c86cabc633b
describe
'52943' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOU' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
b7f20f22a8af4a960bd158913284ee1d
939049206a5942455ad73fee546f63c1332245ad
describe
'15848' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOV' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
41476d5092ba270e4ad7791c54b6db5d
c7bb21ed98aca988ce97626b3fb70b55a8e928ab
describe
'51184' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
207f7efc7238fa8387c45aea854e1159
3ca7c29c9d8f52516a6c20223a71db0f168d10ce
describe
'17421' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOX' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
34d06a129c62609c00a2e94b568d5c07
3d784b67fc0444b7f26dddd0df09285b54df0d2b
describe
'52044' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOY' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a226f8cc7ed9a82912c3b4cb76c1bbd5
cda87844bb2378c6566771452623c9c16bd255ee
describe
'17721' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
fd45ada3e42c03d02892d4bb5db5d398
1e5b7eab0bb2e7f9422dd76039a5c5de3307d9b8
describe
'44592' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPA' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
9b0ab7a1bfacb68a61db6a3a6f82089e
c65b878c249231b5096161d01c181cfc90bdd497
'2012-05-28T00:00:45-04:00'
describe
'50842' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPB' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
74bbb4a6ec656747a44a9cbe2c6fe02e
33eaf4f5e48abd19186ccd2752bbbc03e3657f49
describe
'15034' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPC' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
f67bd7ff611ae366a33122fbbcda7280
01fb70c5f737f4aefdea1e29f08f2090cf27375e
describe
'53381' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPD' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2f7c1aa36f993bb7709127df6c1bb412
d675e71bb2fad05a2fcffb76d804cf334602fd1e
describe
'16543' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPE' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
7ca7e102754f18c29b48501cef4fbc70
f454e0c735ab08574d85631b7b76a332969396ea
describe
'55463' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
1db04bb0a69c6bbd925493de49e4bac3
98fd4de673c8ca11818e5c9e02cf153f79b77a6d
describe
'20410' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPG' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
0a6b6d3b44ea90cec08efffeab5be284
434caf8edf0183f5d460eabffc5b1ae0bf0bc462
describe
'51421' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPH' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
9594b78a42b48ec3c6a25301c45f6cce
20c1cc8c7413dee22910b682e4df36eed1f2170e
describe
'17006' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8c51807a546e66d90111fd1d77f37afb
0e93e7da50fc264e22e6a267e4416db69dd63059
describe
'49748' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
871bf4cffbde9d253a0de9dd54bd47a4
1bc79b40d26814d8d20933ab07b8dc5bc931dbd4
describe
'14703' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
505fd8fc4208957c2bc98b15b4e54cfc
7584b604d38d0e53a0527863f5cc76ca4024f979
describe
'18838' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPL' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
829b47af6a34f2e421b486965be190f8
5a200aeb0f9fc0ce35aed8679760c7d60a2e4d0c
describe
'54285' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPM' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
3bdd71f853531a250005b01c6b0e9bb8
3283bba5cc63fb5dbb361098ec09645e278e0d14
describe
'18572' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPN' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
6e0bfb44999ef69f82d218a58b050014
10cbe158b748cd4074fb82979b591631765abab3
describe
'48716' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
42bea8c3f33cc9c15c68f936934abea4
0e70d8b0ce3a236a9c36180b4c3b8ba40bc8cfd8
describe
'50355' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
5cc18b40529dc18b6d33842569cbc917
a8165d1b1e407ddfb62209009548aafabf04c262
describe
'16771' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
02e46bfd8c9c1aa18d1894fdf80d271e
87b985ce9b4309076c3dfb7eb3f64995feaf3c5b
describe
'53073' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
37df344f04c158d28fdc361471315756
f26ff650e1b5a742b6fd655bd22f0675c9411b18
describe
'17212' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPS' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6bb9a5f52800719959a61d43e1f92a7f
7a4adc33f059c1240d88f2bfdb5d5721284c2b6a
describe
'49824' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPT' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
162061f816f027fdcc767d96382df842
219b46bbdb8936b7c8725e26bdb3e7a711f7d0e3
describe
'17192' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPU' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
2cb5a7e3cb4e2c5141b54120afeb3006
883864feed3332e7e40a42f07f6fdb1daeb783b5
describe
'43440' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPV' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1d3cd95fecb4af3bb18519a4a2359beb
439eeb36ba223f20c364d09ab43e29a0ffdec8d3
describe
'12559' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPW' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
e70b50cbb42fbab4830dc4c5b28e0144
f3dcd5eb0d7dc9fba65614c734df75bd29b3126d
describe
'13028' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
5c37413408d0c70c8e2814b615bf29ef
57cdd12bf379c950cecd711078ec974de5f5446d
describe
'12843' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7d448b79c1f1560409c1ad9647081e9e
b2bc7ce6a0fbfe66f462758e67310eb1841152ba
describe
'54021' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
ba140f2613878194c04b4e9b404cae35
b38e60940f0e43a395f0c3913dd4d8621b5ada7a
describe
'15099' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQA' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
d87a4888f0e186f7d754ccdda97377b6
c47078cc646df5d37d4032e25079bb13f48e9e21
describe
'14119' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQB' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
87554b4a45d9f7ed98ead955bae7c0e0
20e844f53892b060559956bf06a9c0290712b044
describe
'51014' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQC' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
31b586f3d464bc0c12fe40477a2a3153
fd5975517ab7d94023d7d307f03fa94849b0681e
describe
'15142' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQD' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
04fbb518583eb6a7c74e22ef409f1912
a31bc63b89aaf7f95bb5278184f9a4d12fe7c6e4
describe
'55901' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQE' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
ff9f3f2b216e3ad48e73c164f7e94888
a8b0ceef09857f560ccf7dc1bc1fc3db2f2f23b2
describe
'53618' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
539a5b828c757b901c3cc2c5b1226705
81b923066eb4e06828bcef84f15a3e8dfdb6a776
describe
'54028' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQG' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
182125502f02d0de56050e3edeb9e0a3
129e41d63bad61c6de16297f535c68f791fa6e34
describe
'15765' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQH' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
f78737f0cc2bdb35b2e29f027b857f8f
28a19e6f57dfa40d68e1b9ef7959fe37c21b479d
describe
'56650' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c0ad8e5bad0164e165708174c3d89782
e35521663263db46fabb71491f2e11828c64a0bb
describe
'58988' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
80f6e774ca5147bd327dd0cdd1a56058
9f7b4b55415710ba3538d78801cf677124eada7c
describe
'15613' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
a2b5bfad60dc188d84486b953f86a134
a8b3789aa0bc93e0159126a66a130d1ce301fc7d
describe
'53720' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
cb33b4f9e476726447790162205581a6
b742d5eb0362ee6c2a6da3cd24aec6da286dd475
describe
'15085' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQM' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
d3cd100cb931351c771e4bdd8d963019
008ea2de6fe729d16711f56bea51dd11d8e1578e
describe
'58075' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
1458e611785379abeee63d0d221cc95e
e6a69eb20009bb42f1ff4d9a768b2f142ec438a5
describe
'45751' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQO' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
9ea0cb104b5a1c0f122177955c5e4983
972848009b3a1ecdd46718b195c798f058bde632
'2012-05-27T23:57:33-04:00'
describe
'12992' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQP' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8b95f61661e729c4d1a39b4a5e9a10eb
856d28119a7dc891b22a705a11f92870f658d741
describe
'51071' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
34ba6a9d482d0b1d25833dd9b4960e3b
a4ac755549bb00d00f3f4408bdbf2855afe20430
describe
'14952' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQR' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
13660bbc0ac3981d33ab9ec65be63f23
e4df532d40f254895f04b200bc2d2406b3ef4247
describe
'49707' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQS' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
dc0f9176081b7a28db886597c4691e4b
33c01e35488996ad01b69ce85213f193e02c610b
describe
'14228' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQT' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
404b8e6ca34a1497a7428aeb5274a7c5
e08ea4661d75069d68368c010f613a39cd36500d
describe
'50901' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e61a43d22911f2d0c46d7f396c0b6f34
06f5d036443f8708caadb59a4af45b29cc288214
describe
'47076' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQV' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
72156a96b7eb857ad5edfa54fd8f8aec
245ebe06c42d480f685048f95cbea53c1ea41687
describe
'14100' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQW' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f8ca0ca6af9ae4cc4ebeda74ec681aa2
d00371de7c9c117cfa2b6dae604593abe6596b7b
describe
'55538' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
286d329514cdf08fdd97a4c568ad0977
ce2ff3b5edd52c53f7f1aa6351d9542e7b96778f
describe
'55280' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQY' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
ba346083678d2552c6db94b264e8c1d2
e8ba2df9eccd1f0d9defbf6f376e784f388256e4
describe
'50923' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
59997e265f74d3b45a3ed6c01cee6fc4
d74baf6c793cb924a58c5441f2eccc23b11722a9
describe
'55834' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRA' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
3b0e4da7468e42ce8829b23703e8407c
f2d696939bf55d137be84fa8301206d90be7888e
describe
'14983' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRB' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2cc2eadf0cb9bfbdc5910addb0fa575e
ac658aa5732225b198afa409fac1d5c767e1f840
describe
'51200' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
7a667283ac85441800c8f31e38f2c907
623bc6bf2ed66b59f3df32f5082b4f59f6f19f74
describe
'14071' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRD' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
3d19d9a0a93f6edecdf599b4c361bf80
54e92423677640a5a7fd94074b24f04a8a892fb7
describe
'51402' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRE' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7a9abc2d65ad0774266bd208d7363830
5945613c19fc4d9e5ac01bdf0cb015b52bd71122
describe
'15337' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
45c37103e8a2357831ffb064e29a2527
1fed55c6af4491339df8a6c484c6340504864066
describe
'13832' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRG' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
5cde654e5d79f667d309726f7382c74b
cedcfcd8f8c6ef681bc74c9885dbbd38ccc4f740
describe
'45260' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRH' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7b68495c50a130fd7291bca4cd161e46
723df5f3411575252ba1d119b929e3b17359bd89
describe
'13358' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRI' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c796b4db6bbe38e17d2c91375372129e
c50cf709a272075ea355e0aa77a64d92b2bffd2a
describe
'52835' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
ed9fe0463e47a5cc77976f8361ca53e4
3fc8ad3daa44af4a1c1a80238e1fea24707db7a7
'2012-05-27T23:58:06-04:00'
describe
'14594' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
e1c2d6db63c8b6614686716dfcdac224
672eb6c50a406410860bc8883f8eb622714c63cc
describe
'55320' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
a923bdf6f8f612cebd0d73e2de711189
e950d366c3d53baa3fd80258573115edcf2ef31a
describe
'16073' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRM' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
834cb7572b016c979f289da1a3489e3f
7b57ce245834aef22317879c8eddab1697bc7723
describe
'13345' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
822bd484783349c71d36d0f4504565f7
dd07444c7fe2feef7da94aeab9a039032ac13787
describe
'51066' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
0d53ae85c373ef5b83b285c6dc19ce22
509264aeda4dd150fb0c36193d68b4ed2faee7b6
describe
'54133' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRP' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
090194362b81b5e69be769bea11bfe4b
d2b51bdd5f69c623a49d6453f8332785807b2705
describe
'14820' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
5d5e9802ebf8b9208c57bf562626fef9
cd95195922241860369ea8b24273b73e23e36b76
describe
'15588' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRR' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9ff7c25bff946d0c15ce626c47a19c5e
ea8e5b5a85014ae036971645b8a18307f431374e
describe
'38774' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
4a29a48f4f0531392948e12ba0326bdd
13b435bdde43fbf3477247ee6a23f7cb2a1dc9bf
describe
'11605' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRT' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7e0696cdf620a2d90ecd9488d7ee61d2
b41ee9237d8e627d124053fb8727a8bc46d992c9
describe
'53194' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRU' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
92bf60dc0d29ebd0ebfdda5c22562403
ea78890afac41a3746453efb3ba416417cec86e9
describe
'16508' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRV' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
f08629e4b35b8a73eaba3bfcceaec141
f96dfb818a8bf22429121c787727928a1d7de6ea
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRW' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
19ba4e470f58f3107319e74e253cfee2
e39eeea70a8013a4fc65e28ec8e7404cb854ccbe
describe
'15076' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRX' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
1773b7fc87e91c0a301abbc6465bae5d
b80338c71b6c660a8a0d12f4682be789dc10be5f
describe
'49787' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRY' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
c495856db4eef9b5c9c14c0eb6dcb0fc
c8e8c74fc831d70be349fd4bfb42f4f8a8bd9188
describe
'15097' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
50867155469eabcf6a53558f987386fb
7a28ea3836c0e70a26f441c8a2e71734d64a5eaa
describe
'13946' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSA' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
0167487fb98002bf1309c822fa577a02
0e104defa409eb35a5ecb8f8f9ea6630bc04c6d3
describe
'51500' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSB' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
15564e3aea30fee94fa9c9d152c36f51
7a8a546540746f419976317dcc42a2c7410ea245
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSC' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
27ef634e0b4cb92c5e12f912133b3551
26a25f6665961cdc497c2f0d0600ef0ac8585865
describe
'53546' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
ab52cb8da0f6ae807c8b8aee8322d522
f46308c14f4ccbaac37412d147b35bf06d91c22d
describe
'15726' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSE' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
ea5b14de7e4b2686e2668acd2b12e116
b93d1575e8a78d5894401d11ba59efc91db7ecce
describe
'14413' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSF' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ca14de1c621b509c82c6cc293c861940
2e0cdf52fffc7a50cb4c36a14339da148f132685
describe
'48075' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
6528ae3c1703aabd5d4474f71a94acb6
813d86cc596deb32c4b885da557513c4d2f8d0e4
describe
'45824' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4db04116172062263429793d4e4fb762
f79704d0f0e04f8fbd844d138ca4eafd09b38d69
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSI' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
6d09a47d80bd10773121f5cd198ffdc0
2135354a345bfeeb03bafbff13a38669d155f6a1
describe
'12264' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5bd3b05f90df0131b686339c6b631711
a87d3e594ef2a2e8101b267f54bc2354af197659
describe
'53059' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSK' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
36058d463f1fbdd97e226892cfef009b
88dfe5eb6bae999f4c1ef429cdaccee2053a6105
describe
'15743' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSL' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4ad5feb7dbfd4a5a6de0d4156c852e57
16a89806fb5beeb94102f24359cf08b6c1c51c71
describe
'16963' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSM' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
4e92cf4dac5cdad996d7774b43d6168d
3f5041ad9fbf22c4e705a7d70ba309949ac11d83
describe
'49579' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e4f9518626af8bb87dd93465da0042fd
7f69ce95d980d44964bd3f86569c2b604a14e25c
describe
'14271' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSO' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
49a2728cd16c1eba3218b430653fb4cf
2bf293b6f26e4fb485f259e4797a95abe3afdaa2
describe
'50632' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSP' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
6872384987f6fc6514676cce99e2867e
8ec7b4187af75bd4c7da5050db61d489da41d1da
describe
'14066' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
958c2e466bee51cafdeb76c7267628af
7f99562cce980623580a3a2b1c01017b5af2eb1d
describe
'46797' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSR' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
00e952ff93591d661ac4ef2001bc2877
da2708249e1b6bd386a7c08b2a3bcc71e870240a
describe
'14092' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
271dfa126a52752a20011d2cc6404089
27d2e1a7289d8c571f5733d86c5ceba40b34617e
describe
'12880' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMST' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
042d9a94b1cb0833d69d87329718741d
f31277a5145aee33525244c407ed2297872af037
describe
'44731' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSU' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8f0f2e6d6612b7d89135755dbaa18b7d
8eaf27f5328458bd4ad4baa2d0b1800e14a64fa6
describe
'13731' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSV' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
898e738a36f4ffe609b6c4150ac05bf7
96b42d505b21b4a53639fc82c5a63a51fae70074
describe
'50970' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSW' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
d939ee97c3d7cf79054027bbcc2eeb34
30f4c16c03abb0bd2c7a39fcb21b7fb2d105231f
describe
'14825' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
6763704cfda1f75f6ea1bf43588c0d00
06af24b52c1413b46b187103952b1a73d2e808fb
describe
'51370' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
364d4915cb746337ae3f855490f57f56
5a650649452321a0eef21480ab01f6484979aea0
describe
'45152' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ac50ac8198f37be02364d1d09f15c3ca
4cab74c819029a9332c8335b4721cf4e4cbb5118
describe
'13903' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
da6fadfd812f2cc3717bf2ef4a6a896e
9d4a18273e2b8fe31cd4698b0662c77ce4e748e5
describe
'51444' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
3201c5f791e163bdba946d93870f5088
7296748acf126a7ab453a2aa6f43a8175b952ecf
describe
'48606' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
76439433272c827e8d85a75ebaccc265
3fb99a393ef651ce3e6f2694b2dda8805698dc38
describe
'15255' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTD' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
4c835a01e956265e7cb4def7fb2c800d
dfecd4ca55fffa63597a7fe8f97308595cac3733
describe
'46963' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTE' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
814dcc6b6bd8f92094a4f59dc749d0c1
ce708cdf0808bf00d489e4c80aca42d9d8aae192
describe
'14267' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
595b8fe866846b7bda65771955d1e6d8
b72d10e149a1e9951e3c36f1a0d4d7c0166def28
describe
'58992' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTG' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
fb10a1d9ef6a6d6b109039a284851362
b62f567bc67d9f9520d7a8b69e700cab37e7048d
describe
'16196' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTH' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
a5927703a9d55c2fbcfc3fcaa5817a42
d0499c62a2104e45f650394e61d3f527bb09efec
describe
'60669' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
a5a3507b5ae20c24c91c587793494694
6e1892677287c1188d5440fe6955bae28b101b46
describe
'45094' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
b83064cb85d5f3ed7d791447d36d39c7
5196cca4a623298e7d8c58b3a3eee598452d6557
describe
'13228' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTK' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e140b7b6e6cb4177cf573c0bef2a8263
2780009e6a57e8e66060a5f30f5b7750060c39ed
describe
'47580' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTL' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2d8c207c4e6a56f61f23ac4859981ead
1b0c28a356b2e3f3a46368ee6c08ee83364a58ce
describe
'13955' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTM' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
5a37a9baa60e5109f5bcfda12b596269
927375b30037dd9f773e2d9216a312cf1159f1ec
describe
'49293' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTN' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0b9fe5c521cdc52c81d0a545e4245166
9646629e6d92d7819d222c652446480b7ca168ef
describe
'14051' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTO' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
c394338e678ae88037d81f1f9bd85aea
7d4c9e9c6888e60ad70132e13600ca2ec66c3ab7
describe
'54602' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTP' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
cf58d9f6a3c28f3fd6fe2186629c83fb
98e67e38f05293f30e74b9445bc8edfa55941a13
describe
'16170' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
5c508af9e5b2d24baad1632eaa702a45
62276b7c11be2daf65034870c3d39293601ff4d5
describe
'56183' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTR' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
104a14df28ce382952628aa96a27bd15
c889f89a19b7f5969457b33e9d66902db3d0e3a0
describe
'15555' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTS' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d5a2ac0fa44b0dc0836c8ce4dbf9bd2b
f7bbbf683ff100eab64b31a5a5e4920403ccc696
describe
'39866' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTT' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
b14055b7f034d75d3248c17dfe31b71f
ea8f9fb14e32a996aed86b5334e4d28a9358e720
describe
'12541' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTU' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
7164495f88bb44117ceaad5d256dae7b
bc0e16f90366464ed2ee975ce892dcd13850d34a
describe
'49534' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
ec684bb209d622ca4248128c7bd9f8c7
c5fb593c8aa7f999ce0991eb9b03ad3a778db19b
describe
'14767' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTW' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
f7fc7f397b5f274a3e7f3a8327365d2e
98735ec51942429b4062b8b73c948e14f1cb17be
describe
'48141' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
42be7edc0b4baefb8aa5fbc7ed14b8b1
50cb885383849a9610e28749a36a8f9e8e5c42d1
describe
'14494' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTY' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
cec23d68b0acedabf198d99c7c0afe9d
334e4137334f317901343c08a58055d9fadbdc4a
describe
'45392' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
0a710bd4935f934eab0be1e2bdce0cfc
ddf11a1d90627e2bbafd894f5e0ec80d1a5a72b9
describe
'54632' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUA' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
23cacd6e2defad281e08c0e9d627f8d2
7e475a8a68ab9d9f0dcb1350bd76263bf84b8295
describe
'16273' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUB' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
463eaf18aa9f6c65baeb437c46f70b7f
7abfafbfbdb4aadbb9fb8ab038e2c57eac76cf0b
describe
'16063' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUC' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
f0f99a9618136a1cd41a6997b7c358aa
54ac60a087ddefff05ccce5beceb1179f9d581a8
describe
'52308' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
17a2b6acdf598fea629991ffd381b470
0c4895be70d8ffb6716cac71a5ff7610e7ba5f35
describe
'53576' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
2ea08307863e3b889879980d4011d103
33abc0f19b457675ff7b8adc4313bc2a543b75ae
describe
'14940' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUF' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
a4ba3b9d822591c9275e0e7612b38e2a
1b8b4712cf172c964fd8a9d5b36d3efe1cbfe7d7
describe
'50649' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUG' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
44b9c18fd2b3d87d39aa4d690ff7b6cf
8af7fd1aa8cc1bec2bfd433ca7ab280c1dca3d8a
describe
'14798' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUH' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
0c6f838372d6c9c0ca6a049cc4d0f898
0cc9e5ab74eda4ea3ba22f90d1b6f7bf7e218904
describe
'48114' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUI' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
f73ff66aaf61047944fba773f14010bd
73ef05cd82c2136d4a76705021d7cff42efa0d49
describe
'13827' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fb286f8852c599365af33cd8ff65fa3f
bc591cfd8dd05a655da67b03342759c30513c1f1
describe
'50143' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUK' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
7a0dd721aad2e9f31333499c44aa2d03
38e69d0cf41927b651ecc2149fd40a14743a0593
describe
'13658' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUL' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
2e822d72e3d2cd8498ee5cc4a42f4f06
cbf3ff8729c043650145d23b69f244ce7c109847
describe
'54856' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
a7344b8f38a064337da3515a54ffb5a2
e9b9963abae1b16c085962e638ab66fcb999b36b
describe
'14964' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
8d10311f4f7195feb7de49f6077eaae3
545b3a8346cbcedda94b3760a20ebf74c8b56306
describe
'52330' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUO' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
cc6e7b1ddf0f2a992bee747357431b32
af825da53446f9706dee7df93b908ed2516b70ba
describe
'14844' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUP' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
828aa4e4773020f058e7351ca3be693f
f8554b1a54171b1ab123ae50a6cc33db9ddf5e47
describe
'14680' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
75568b530744c2da45db4a3cd56bcf3f
e9f3bbed681d8cd3b986b4a51c97d95bd60e4703
describe
'14490' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUR' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
2730e686d45362324c8f2b89bc1f9013
434bd8049a1d3ffb370ce5cc612639260d072992
describe
'54092' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUS' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
93ca310f60eec05daf4a5139bdd1ef73
7c5246b3a9d8a914620e47982b909c8c315612d8
describe
'13304' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUT' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
ec1edac8445d7e4a00338f00ff78e68c
8ce06a282a1d9263cc4ed7e79d486bb7e83f75a0
describe
'51290' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUU' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
7537f3fffabab2aef89ea3e75da014c1
4c19e2663513205f1bbe3292da123d786243c07c
describe
'14184' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUV' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e2420b5e9409e41f21fb9c5282c35d01
b8c84bd8b4374023ca5b53c1ad2fa8402d62a0a1
describe
'49503' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUW' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d20bc009d69eefed620b112a49e44031
d763974733293bacd6f4e113927fd441c3de3094
describe
'14250' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUX' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
261df78af1cb942ee960b87ba1cd2f42
8778f6ed2edc73472757052827e687e3be86e73e
describe
'46208' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUY' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9e52a67eced007825c00ec4d94fa2ef5
4084ea8443b2889852bff27d29fdb1541d87ac50
describe
'14726' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
b12bf61a24e36608ebbd68ce9f1cd168
db8356f771d015c95d5f4707676cd9a137aee8d4
describe
'52116' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVA' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
7ea6485362b736a133bc4f9ddd6a0e54
23e70a28c83913856f1c505dd1a7e3821f4c9714
describe
'14586' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVB' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d2d5c3f6ffd0e912f87f682e68f78587
9a0079b7a8b29e969be8ec4eee6b313ddd64a69b
describe
'55828' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVC' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
7078a441485659b9b5886f5872011295
32d4cef4b0366ee5a9f136e72ae72eee8e23a7d5
describe
'31038' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVD' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
028a7e07816940de63be10488a9904b8
3b025818f86c64e62f377138faff58e67b7f645c
describe
'61875' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d20e47fadb4c99af4999718f0c85c870
5ab892d0b6e25de25b02bb3f7f12ef8c1f9f1047
describe
'31953' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVF' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
58701c2c2706639f81444b40c22b737b
8f9f6917f3139c1cbc8fe0ca79bafb4a2a82310f
describe
'12722' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVG' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
7515eace1aa2bd34b9f40b5a0cea0f83
82e19490f5ec4dc3a5f40ee7b60a4c3a08bad7e0
describe
'48335' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVH' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
53b8274a78085803e6442ea1b2db8d52
c0a8c99f9e8d42c2890dbecc720f686a1eda22fe
describe
'13134' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVI' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
92dca4259412fd514cd76bec878d6e85
dab1309a11f9ad05463ec02c4ba7113a48160e2f
describe
'50238' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
9c3b91d578ef7a92561d3f523a8258e6
62c1dd0eb6123ec1789cbc4930d1532e0e6f0ac1
describe
'13670' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVK' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
2e056b8b8269afdccef388a2ed3e2d45
dbe665b74b53e224c15ed884ab60fb0778ee00e9
describe
'47033' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVL' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c06d3b4f1dc02e6c99cc387119bc5ff5
dd6a036b7b3d534a2ea793b1a6a5bf38c998fa3b
'2012-05-27T23:58:10-04:00'
describe
'12206' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVM' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
88e7e7339e33de58a457f1a3e2a97dec
7463fb3c52308d125971b6fbe394973e0548582a
describe
'13785' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVN' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
6c3d98531fbe7916dd26a4d09dd4bd8a
c113110cbcbd050a62b8a9f30d425abe3ff061fd
describe
'54929' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVO' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a8d1e7879c5f01fa64c031b8a67d5452
f88ca2ad7ab6591669369b801e6377fe595f27f8
describe
'56412' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
527c66a94ca7ddcdad35ae9b1b916357
7b7c4773ed5aa9f2d0ce716509c2ebb2ce261cc3
describe
'14446' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
ae6a3c1778b74cc355b0610a8d3c1edb
790c5ecafea6000c15645505e879d6790c41b115
describe
'46081' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
6b5afdcfe18035082dc6b4d0e92ad0b6
21b3b6519d0030c610dafd3265c08fe6ba1b4e44
describe
'13021' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
c19f6cfd8f448b28703222aa812912b0
448cef78ee0aedc0957999c4671e516b27fb942c
describe
'56676' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
5737fe304e58c990b23f02fb87edb6ed
0a1de9d2dd2bea5c2233a6ef85890ef4f21daaa4
describe
'15431' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a7997653e13befe29776164404cc9647
2ebcf7f775b22b14c12bc097b44adeb3295a820f
describe
'50661' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
6dbf90c5f5acc534ce1f7b5308372007
d523b8ec085d5f8d159913c7f9c446720bd683e7
describe
'13551' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
ca569e93327dce9e6945f8377720a6d2
46c901a83acb61addb824c9c154557c6fc595680
describe
'55160' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a1df58004c1802a299104c9c2474759f
63ada1a61f1520a8fe0bd07f5e4bcea53383fddc
describe
'13361' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
410c41967bb7763695c7015a8545a17f
97f4530802ed01878cf492e1bc9b6d3fbd70a398
describe
'860' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
ebac22298894abbde9b68b1a32764b43
2121ef0959382d29943a80efcd2509a3cc9eb027
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWA' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
760f73b013aafc98c36e49fbaf29d9ac
1e84cf3a9a446a1b11b9881b7afba58144349e01
describe
'8708' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWB' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
f999ba81d5fb81502da0dba225d01d6c
4b7df21450f41782e235014e5ee615f04565752c
describe
'26273' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWC' 'sip-filescover3.QC.jpg'
d29f8566d831fbe7688a7e9ab74351ac
1e7e58332ea12f8076a71bd49fd23ebac8ccb0bc
'2012-05-27T23:55:48-04:00'
describe
'7009' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWD' 'sip-filescover3thm.jpg'
5feef656c7a35a032d92952fd5a2d87e
61bbdde1a6fa260b4020f3ade685bb277719bf6b
describe
'17935' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWE' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
469fd3efb9abb41102d19a94830ef017
66e077d3acccbe69dfc91e30ecf531db8a9526e5
describe
'51045' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWF' 'sip-filesii.QC.jpg'
dc99af2d8ccb78f2494176e81f9b7174
56f1c467c26864a110c00d7582fbf1747192ae16
describe
'15826' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWG' 'sip-filesiii.QC.jpg'
a18c613e9a5bd83c88d3411f6d0cf5ed
772559538d9f4cbcd431a703b75349c9b07f13e5
describe
'5741' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWH' 'sip-filesiiithm.jpg'
8f51824c78f497648b59a5851aec3452
45a16d59fa3331fb6890e3a55aa7167c7b7e0b1e
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWI' 'sip-filesithm.jpg'
499205f8a83148ebd854de5b21bf10de
1a9ec5fae2e35305cf3b52c6573ae151a2fa8c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWJ' 'sip-filesiv.QC.jpg'
aac73f46ba51c6d4f6edede533e67e7a
337bde5221f17de5ebc9f87854c721d1a7cf7087
describe
'485' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWK' 'sip-filesivthm.jpg'
82e8588d6d583bee3327233c634a4c39
cbe8bdc12640f62cfcbc4be1220a60979b0a099e
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWL' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
dc6f55fbd3f31bcc63f2b06839897048
8fbb222f0fd9518c871004599df24032a3a910c1
describe
'4429' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWM' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
ea90c11eff386c92cfd13a3a1c4edd16
0737e7e94ed778f92ebc8e892ddc6ae1780497a5
describe
'204012' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWN' 'sip-filesUF00003126_00001.mets'
0b38f977a56f11449c0c25c7dc27cb55
f622bd70bb99d41e65ec81f3c6b7b7daf52a0dc0
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T09:05:28-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'1632' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWO' 'sip-filesvi.QC.jpg'
640540c7fccc82f9a98024f079c021c1
3e08b4fa4b53c180796bc9e40ded3d295fa0aaf2
describe
'651' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWP' 'sip-filesvithm.jpg'
bb904682206d9763dfbc244a9da75927
9afaf543f2cd927c372aa54563fb30be5627c783
describe
'5621' 'info:fdaE20100409_AAAAJAfileF20100409_AABMWQ' 'sip-filesvthm.jpg'
9295011264335a7074fe523f9ef084f1
58410b71f4dc11cc90d5398305476ca356a3f740
describe