Citation
Joseph and his brethren

Material Information

Title:
Joseph and his brethren
Creator:
Bross, Robert S., b. ca. 1831 ( Engraver )
American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
American Tract Society
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
80 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible Stories, English -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Brothers -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Biographies -- 1861 ( rbgenr )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1861 ( local )
Bldn -- 1861
Genre:
Biographies ( rbgenr )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Baldwin Library copy inscribed date: 1861.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved and signed by Bross.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026829750 ( ALEPH )
15369687 ( OCLC )
ALH2718 ( NOTIS )

Related Items

Related Item:
PALMM Version

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
























i
Fi i"
¥ a sy : n ‘ raat CREE Thy resricts |
. H 3
; 7 *
4 a ‘ : H
\ ve ea,
: a
- : “ hee
5 at j py
rn ~ FA Pee
AN ui rae B Sait: Ugeeimae Be lod
‘ 7 Pt . a pS h
4 53 ; coe BY \
¢ r F - 1 ind
" 4 Fi pina ; fae
, A ‘ se i : : ‘ Lie tate
7} : 4 4 ¥ rn ce Pea sctet f ie
et F aa §
$ - 3 i H a
* iy ‘ 3h
‘ ’ + 8 7 .
Bi say 3 . J ' Ms 4 : i , bf
ear Sane ri wih
‘i ‘ n - Fy ‘
7 : 7 ‘ \ ree Sire, Sind ‘ - Mp5 +} ¥ ie. iar 3
1 t 3 SPapel he eetigh a , "5
n f + - - : hae
> : aie r Rear Perea | ‘ % . 4
3 4g % rae 3 ba rar
: J S '
fi rl Md A 5 r co
r : ant
d - , gi
; ; eat oe
* a Si ‘ S ;
F , : : , 4 4 K
b al rT beet t * A
Hi pia hi : ? 5 wid
Steed Py
} ar
Ps . - aoe,
i " -
i,
> ti
/ 4 Pe ‘
> 3
a
& me
eft -
‘ 5 PT
: ;
iis
- f >
rs
n r
Z ve
. ;
z :
; ay
4
€4
: "
it
r > :
means F
4 $
3 oy bgt Ae
ri ‘ bi
a
7 i r
s
: a ae; i :
r - eee tis ei
: / i) p »
f pe sae TeES Ei iA peat Fs
o oe iy % f R
> 7
: F
eerie tf
, be’ r ante
Lt gee Ul we
eh 5 eh c F &
% : * whee
id ny > i i
i “ aig
x é : F
* -
ee 4 ‘ 3
e ‘ 2 nthe: r
| i i ; ) C 4 â„¢
‘ : rl
zea ba | 3 .
aes ee hi { 7 °
Pe F : ; , ‘Fteits| : i
Bo : - A cast 4













ean Ste
ERIS





ah

JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN,

,
y

2

MOK
We



. PUBLISHED BY THE

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
150 NASSAU-STREET, NEW YORK. ‘

i
\ «*



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
Jacob and his sons ee A,

‘CHAPTER II.
Envy and hatred in Joseph’s brothers .

CHAPTER III.
Joseph sold into Egypt

CHAPTER IV.
Joseph among strangers .

CHAPTER V.

Joseph’s unselfish life in prison

CHAPTER VI.
The chief butler’s ingratitude

CHAPTER VII.

From the prison to the palace

bb
ee

. 24

50



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII.

Joseph’s simple, every-day piety

The famine .
- The startling discovery

The arrival of Joseph’s

Jacob’s last days .

CHAPTER IX.
CHAPTER X.

CHAPTER XI.

friends

CHAPTER XIII.

CHAPTER XIV.

Jacob’s last prophetic words

The land of promise .

CHAPTER XV.

CHAPTER. XII.
The kind ruler and provider es

42

. 46

51

- 60

63

. 66

71

~ 8



JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER I.

JACOB AND HIS SONS.



tS oo er eee ae

ago there lived in the land of Ca-
naan—that delightful land, where the grapes hung in mag-
nificent clusters from the vines, and where milk and honey



6 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

were flowing all the year—a man, and the first description
of him would lead us to suppose he was a very happy man.

It is said of him that he “ was a plain man dwelling in
tents,” Gen. 25:27, living a happy, shepherd life, with a
large family of twelve sons around him. There he lived in
Canaan, making no display of his riches, assuming nothing,
and troubling himself little about the fashion of this world.
He knew that fashion and splendor and pomp rob life of
its usefulness and truest ease, and that they who would live ©
well and wisely must live plainly, using the good and pleas- -
ant things of the world, but caring little for what is un-
necessary and burdensome. —

So Jacob lived; but as no man can be happy when his
children do not help to make him happy, so this good plain
man Jacob soon found his pleasant home beginning to
change. His sons began to show their evil dispositions
when they were out of his sight. He might not have known
any thing about it, had not Joseph been grieved at their
conduct and reported it to his father.

It was far from Joseph’s intentions to make trouble for
his brothers, or to alienate from them any of their father’s
love; but their conduct was such, that he thought it his
duty to tell it to his father. Whether they knew that he
did so or not, we are not told; but they soon began to feel



JACOB AND HIS SONS. 1

unkindly towards Joseph, and in their hearts to blame him
when he had done them no wrong. They also saw that
Jacob felt a great tenderness for him, because he was “ the
son of his old age ;’ and more than that, they pereeived that
his lovely character had made him a favorite child. This
was more than their evil hearts could bear ; and when they
saw Joseph walking about in a beautiful gay coat his father
had given him, their hearts burned with jealousy, and they
felt as if they could do almost any thing to get him out of
the way. Filled with this jealous spirit, they commenced
ill-treating him, and thus their downward course began.
When we feel the first stirrings of jealousy in our hearts,
we should hasten to get the evil corrected before it over-
spreads and blights every thing within us. Perhaps you
have some friend—it may be even a brother Joseph—who is
loved more than you; and your heart is often stirred like
the ocean in a storm. There is a fever there worse than
the fever of the body—it is the fever of jealousy. Would
you have this fever allayed, so that you can quietly and
even happily see others loved more than yourself, the only
way is to get your heart filled with love, and then act out
this love to all around you by kindness and doing them
good ; not merely that you may be happy yourself, but that
you may make others happy. and be a blessing wherever you



8 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

go. This will make you lovely, and bring you all the friends
you need. | |

It is said of a great, but wicked man, that his first feeling
of hate sprung from jealousy. He was jealous of a friend,
and soon began to hate him ; and driven onward by jealousy,
he at length murdered him. Let us watch our hearts, and
especially let us bar the door against jealousy.



THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. Qe=

CRAriES ff,

ENVY AND HATRED IN JOSEPHS BROTHERS.

As evil feelings grow worse with time, unless removed
by the grace of God, this withering passion of jealousy grew
stronger and stronger in Joseph’s brothers. At last they
hated Joseph so much that they “could not speak peaceably
unto him ”—a dreadful state of things between brothers.

There is no doubt that Joseph was a kind, loving brother,
and that he did whatever he could to make his home happy.
There is no record of a reproachful look or word that he
ever gave one of his brothers. He did them no wrong, and
his only crime was being so much beloved by his father.
For this they hated him. |

Soon after they began to be jealous of him, God revealed
to him a strange dream; and like a simple-hearted child,
who meant no harm, he told it. He told his brothers that
he dreamed they were all out in a field together binding
sheaves, and that around his sheaf all the other sheaves
gathered and bowed down.

After this he dreamed another dream, and told it, as he



1U JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN. j



did the first. He said he had dreamed that the sun and moon
and eleven stars made obeisance to him. |

As his brothers talked over these dreams together, an-
other bad passion crept into their hearts. One would think
that jealousy was enough; but now envy comes in. “These
dreams are not common dreams,” thought the envious broth-



THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. 11

ers; “they mean something. Joseph is to be greater than
all of us. It is plain enough what these dreams mean.”

While tormented thus by jealousy and envy, the brothers
one day took their father’s flocks and led them to Shechem,
where the pasture was better. They were gone a number of
days, and Jacob began to be anxious about them; so he
called Joseph, and sent him off to see whether it was well
with them and with the flocks.

The innocent are seldom afraid, and Joseph promptly
obeyed his father, and started for Shechem. But when he
reached there, he could not find his brothers. A kind stran-
ger met him as he was wandering about, and told him he
would find his brothers in Dothan. Intent on his errand,
he went towards Dothan. When his brothers saw him in
the distance, alone and unprotected, the horrible thought
of murder took possession of some of their minds; and
quickly after this thought followed another—the thought
of telling a lie to hide the murder, telling their father that
a wild beast had torn him in pieces.

But Joseph’s time to die had not yet come. A great
many things were to happen before he died: he was to
come to greatness, and his brothers were to be the instru-
ments of his greatness; they were to take him by the hand,
and lead him directly to it. They did not intend any such



12 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

thing ; they had only mortal eyes, and could not see that
their own acts were to bring about the very events they
would have dreaded, could they have foreseen them.

But the all-seeing God, whose eyes are upon the ways
of man, marking all his goings, saw exactly what the end
would be; and more than this, He was regulating and con-
trolling the whole himself, and using these cruel brothers to
do his will. Oh what heart that has learned what God can do
for it, need fear? He may lead us by a way that we know
not. Darkness may be around us, and clouds above us, yet
we need not be afraid, for God is caring for us all the time.
By his overruling power, the bitterest thing in life can be
turned into the sweetest blessing ; and even our enemies may,
in his hands, bring us richer blessings than our friends.

Joseph, without suspicion of what was to befall him,
approaches his brothers. The plan to murder him was
quickly matured. But Reuben, who was the oldest son,
was moved with pity for his brother, and for his father too ;
and the idea struck him that, if Joseph could be thrown
alive into-a pit, it would do him no great harm; for as
soon as the others turned their backs and were out of the
way, he would help him out of the pit, and restore him to
his father. So the beautiful coat that Jacob had given him
was taken off, and he was thrown into the pit.



THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. 13

You nity’ imagine how a brother’s pleading cry rose |
from the pit, and how he begged to be taken out. But his
tears and pleadings did no good; they could not soften
hearts hardened by jealousy and envy; and there Joseph
remained in the pit. Poor Joseph! far from his father,
unpitied by his brothers, and left alone to die. His heart
sinks; he trembles.and prays, and Sr again ue begs to be
tiles out.

Ah, Joseph, you seem to be in a dreadful place, and it is
enough to break a tender heart to look at you; but there
is a guardian God close by your side; and though you are
in a pit, you are on the way to a ¢hrone, and such a throne
as few kings in this world have ever sat on.

Little friends, no matter how deep and dark may be the
pit into which you or I may be thrown, we need not be
afraid. God knows what is best for us. He knows the
character of every one of his children, and knows what is
necessary to prepare them to live and to die; and if we
trust in him, he will place us exactly where we can get the
ereatest good, and there we ought to be willing to be. Let
your prayer to God be, that his will may be done, and not
yours; and promise him that you will trust him to lead you
wherever he will. If God give you riches and honor and
friends, and many joys in life, be thankful to him; and if he



*4

14 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

give you poverty and shame and enemies and sorrows, still

be thankful. All the gifts of God, whether they be pleas-
ant or otherwise, will, if received by a thankful, loving,
trusting, obedient heart, work out for you an “exceeding -
and eternal weight of glory.” |

It may not always be easy for you ito realize this. But
when you open your eyes in heaven, when you there sit at
the Saviour’s feet, and hear from him how he redeemed you
and led you home, you will understand it. He will make
it all plain to you; and you will then thank him for the sor-
rows that oppressed your heart, for the tears you shed, and
for all the providences that seemed so mysterious. What
you do not know now, you will know hereafter. Vow you
must live by fazth.



JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT. 15

CHAPTER III.

JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT.

JosEPH was left in the pit for a time; and while he was
there, perhaps he had some idea that God would ingore,
and send come one to his rescue.

But the last hope seemed gone, when a company of Ish-
maelites came along. The brothers, still restless with jeal-
ousy and envy, began to talk of selling him; and at last
they lifted him out of the pit, and though is was worth
more than mines of gold to his father, sold him for twenty
pieces of silver.

Now Reuben’s plan to rescue him was of no use. “ ‘Oh,
what a pity,” you may say, “what a pity that Reuben had
gone away; what a pity that he allowed any thing to call
him off, when, if he had stayed close by the pit, he could have
saved him.” Pretty soon Reuben comes back, finds Joseph
gone, and in the extremity of his agony rends his clothes, and
exclaims, ‘“‘ The child is not: and I, whither shall I go?”
The brothers were as indifferent to his anguish as to
Joseph’s, but went on in their wicked work. They were
first jealous, then envious, and afterwards deceitful and



16 JOSEPH AND HIs BRETHREN.



hypocritical. To shield themselves from blame, they killed
a kid, dipped Joseph’s coat in the blood, and took it home
with them, and told their father they had found that coat
all soaked in blood. Ah, thought Jacob, this coat tells the
mournful story ; Joseph has been torn in pieces by wild -
beasts. And he rent his clothes, and put on sackcloth.

+

-.



JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT... | li

Though his sons saw him bowed down with grief, they
continued to wear a mask when they might have consoled
him by letting him know that Joseph was alive. This
would have been a great comfort to poor Jacob, but it was
withheld. All love to their father seemed lost in their evil
passions. And to all this they added the sin of hypocrisy ;
they pretended to mourn with their father, and tried to
comfort him, when they knew Joseph had not been slain,
but was on the way to Egypt. .

So itis that one sin leads to another. No heart ever
felt the full blight of sin in a moment, in an hour, or in a
day. One sin stains the soul, another makes the stain deep-
er and the guilt greater, and so an evil character is formed.
Children, let it be your prayer and mine that we may tremble
at the first approach of sin; that we may resist temptation,
and fly to the only safe place, the warm, quiet, sure hiding.
place under our heavenly Father’s broad wing of love.

There we may take our rest,
There undisturbed may hide,
Sheltered and sweetly pressed
Close to our Father’s side.

He loves to hide us there ;

He loves to feel us cling,
While round us all he folds
His broad, protecting wing.

, ete.
Joseph, ete »



18 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER IV.

JOSEPH AMONG STRANGERS.

THE next thing we hear of Joseph is, that the Ishmaelites
have taken him to Egypt, and sold him to Potiphar. There,
far away from home, without any friend near him, alone in
a land of strangers, he found favor in the eyes of those
around him. Potiphar was very much pleased with him, |
and the secret of it was, that the Lord was pleased with
him. It is said that “the Lord was with him,” and “he
was a prosperous man.” The truth is, no man is prosperous
if God be not with him; and we should all believe this, and
let our every-day prayer be, that God may dwell with us,
and that we may have no other prosperity than that which
comes from him. No man, no child can have any thing |
better said of him than this, “The Lord is with him.”

It seems that from the moment Joseph became overseer
in Potiphar’s house, every thing went on prosperously.
Whatever Joseph touched shone with a new lustre, even
with the bright blessing of God. Potiphar was a worldly
man, and did not care to please God ; yet it did not escape
his eye that it was a glorious thing to be a son or a daugh-



JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 19.

ter of God, even were there no life beyond this present life.
Joseph’s blameless character won his confidence. Though
he was a stranger, and had no credentials to prove that he
was a good, trusty young man, yet Potiphar soon gave up
every thing to his care, and made himself perfectly easy,
because he saw that the Lord was with Joseph and directed
his way.

If you want: the confidence of others, the sure way to
secure it is to have the love of God warming your heart
and shining in your life. Yet you will sometimes have
trials. The sun may shine very bright one day, and be
under a cloud the next day. When God wants to teach us
to trust entirely in him, when he wants to give us a new
lesson in faith, he sometimes takes the light away, and calls
us to walk in the dark, and believe all the time that he will
take care of us. He wants to teach us how to walk when
we have no sunlight nor moonlight nor starlight upon our
path. God can lead us in the dark as well as in the light.
He can see, and it makes no difference whether we can or
not; and God wishes us to believe him, take him at his
word, and, whenever it is his will, walk in the dark.

A mother was once trying to teach her child how to
trust God. His mind seemed slow to take in the idea of
faith; but she said, “I can teach you what faith is, Charley,



20 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

so that I think you will understand it. Get your hat, and
go out into the yard with me.”

Charley hurried to get his hat, and was soon out-doors
with his mother. |

“Now, Charley,” said she, “shut your eyes, and walk
right along.” |

‘“ Oh, mother, I can’t,” said he, “ there are ever so many
stones lying all around; and there’s that big tree that blew
down last week, I shall stumble over it and hurt myself.”

“Well, then, take hold of my hand and walk, but keep
your eyes shut.” |

Charley obeyed, and walked safely along, and did not
feel afraid. “I don’t feel afraid, mother,” said he ; “I can’t
see any thing myself, but yon can see, and I’ve got fast hold
of your hand.”

“ And you don’t feel at all afraid of getting hurt ?”

‘No, mother, for you can see, and you know just where
to lead me.” | 7 |

“But, Charley, suppose I should lead you in a rough
path, over stones, and among bushes.”

“ Oh, it would n’t hurt me, mother. I should know all the
time that it was you, and that you would n’t let me fall.”

This little boy’s answers may help to show what true
faith is. Charley had unwavering faith in his mother; and



JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 21

God asks of us to-have faith in him. If we can say, where-
ever we are led, that we know it is God who leads us, and
that he will never let us fall, this is one exercise of the faith
he requires of us.

It may be that Joseph needed more of this faith in God,
for the next thing we hear of him is that he is in prison!
Happily for him, he was there through no fault of his own,
but by the sin of another. It seemed a dark hour when he
was falsely accused, and thrown into prison ; but God is
good, and it is his plan to discipline us and try our faith, so
that we may be all he would have us to be... Yet we do not
always see this to be’so; and poor Joseph may have rea-
soned in this way: “What can all this mean? Every thing
went smoothly at first. I was treated with confidence, and
I saw that God had made my: cause his own. Now he has
left me, and there are none to care for me. Here I am in
prison, with no hope of getting out. What can it mean ?”

Ah, poor Joseph, you seem worse off than ever. You
are not only in a strange land, far away from home, but you
are in a prison; the last place in the world to give a man
comfort. Surely your prospects are dreary. The sky is
dark, the clouds are heavy, and you are under a terrible
storm. |

But in this world we can seldom tell, from the appear-



22 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

ance of things, what is going to happen. It is a blessed
truth that the God who made the sky can paint a rainbow
on it, and roll away the heaviest clouds, and let the sun
shine through. It does not take long for the great God to
change the face of things. It needs but his touch, his word,
and the whole is done.

My little friends, remember this. If you want relief
from some great trouble, or if you long for some great bless-
ing, look up to the Almighty God. If we were down in
Egypt, where no one knew or loved us, prayer could bring
us what we need. God knows exactly how to help his lit-
tle, weak, ignorant children, when they have neither the
strength nor the knowledge to help themselves. What they
have to do is to go where he-calls them to go, and trust in.
him for all the help they need.

As Joseph was a good young man, and the al was
with him, he no doubt prayed very earnestly in prison; yet
he doubtless said, “ Not my will, but thine, O God, be done.”
I think so, because that is the only kind of prayer that will
keep one quiet ; and Joseph was very quiet in prison. This
prison-life was a sudden change, and more than he could
explain; yet he was quiet asa lamb, He did not make any
ado, as people are apt to do when suddenly driven from
prosperity to adversity, or from a palace to a prison, He

*



JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 23

did not think himself worse off than any one else, and trou-
ble his brain and fret his spirit to see how he could get out
of prison. He went to work to comfort the other prisoners:
although his heart was full of his own sorrows, yet he was
touched with sympathy for the others; and when he saw
them cast down, he kindly asked, “Wherefore look ye so
sadly to-day ?” |

It seems that the keeper of the prison perceived just
what a character Joseph’s was, for he did not watch him at
all; and he not only let him take care of himself, but he
asked him to guard the others. He actually put all the
other prisoners under his charge; and Joseph made a trusty
keeper, because the Lord kept him. They only can safely
be trusted whom God trusts. Joseph was one whom God
chose to do his good pleasure; and little by little He used
him to work out his bright designs. Had Joseph been pin-
ing under his afflictions, or murmuring at his lot, God would
not have honored and blessed and trusted him as he did.
In his quiet, submissive heart, God could dwell, leading him
onward in the path in which He would have him go.



24 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

‘CHAPTER V.
JOSEPH’S UNSELFISH LIFE IN PRISON.

In prison, Joseph’s unselfish character shone brightly.
In going about the prison, he found his hands full ; just as
people always do when they have hearts of ready, quick
sympathy, and of earnest purpose to bless others.

T'wo important prisoners had been put in his charge, the -
“chief butler,” and the “ chief baker,” men who had served
Pharaoh the king, but were now in prison as criminals.
Both dreamed a dream in the prison, and were full of trou-
ble because there was no one to interpret it.

Believing that God would give him the power to help
them out of their difficulty, Joseph kindly asked them to tell
him their dreams. The chief butler’s dream was an omen of
good, but the chief baker’s dream had a sad interpretation.

As soon as the chief baker told his dream, Joseph per-
ceived its terrible meaning, and plainly told him what it
was: that the three baskets upon his head meant three
days; and that as the birds ate the baked meats out of the
upper basket, so they would eat his flesh as he hung upon a
tree.

J
Ay



JOSEPH IN PRISON 20



This was a hard truth, and the chief baker must have
trembled and turned pale as he listened to it; yet Joseph
did not withhold it, but in simple honesty and in the fear of
God told it all just as it was, though he did not know but it
would offend the chief baker and make him very angry.
Besides this, he must have shrunk from telling the prisoner



26 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

his doom ; for he had a kind, warm heart for all in trouble.
It was only pain to him to tell the chief baker he must die;
still he did it.

If all the world were like Joseph, there would be no
flatterers in it. If we were all so good and truthful and
plain-hearted, that we could understand and trust each
other, how delightful it would be; and how much nearer
we should get to that high standard we ought to reach, that
of loving our neighbors as ourselves. A plain, honest-
hearted friend, and no other, deserves the name of friend.
He will dare to say what will be painful to us, when neces:
sary, and will kindly tell us our faults ; and we may usually
rely upon him as just such a friend as we need. It is not
probable that any truthful, sincere Joseph will ever have to
tell us that we are to be hung upon a tree, and that the —
birds of the air are to eat our flesh; yet we may have to
hear what will greatly try us, and make our hearts ache.
Then we must rejoice in it all as very good, remembering
that the wounds of a friend are better than the kisses of an
enemy. Itseems that Joseph told the truth, and interpreted
the chief baker’s dream correctly ; for in three days the
poor prisoner was taken out of prison and hung.

The chief butler’s fate was very different. He had
dreamed of a grape-vine, laden with large, beautiful clusters



JOSEPH IN PRISON. 27

of grapes. He had dreamed of holding Pharaoh’s cup in
his hand as in former days, and of pressing the wine into
the cup. This dream, as Joseph interpreted it, foretold the
poor man’s restoration to the favor and employment of
Pharaoh. |

As the chief butler listened to the interpretation of his
dream, he must have loved Joseph; for people generally
love those who bring them good news. It is always pleas-
ant to tell people what they like to hear; we can run fast
when we have good tidings to carry; and no doubt Joseph's
eye lighted up, and his whole face beamed with happiness,
when he told the good news to the chief butler.

But Joseph was himself a poor prisoner; and no doubt
his heart thrilled with pain at the thought of his own sor-
rows. As he talked with the chief butler, and told him that
in three days he would be no more a prisoner, he added,
“ But think on me when it shall be well with thee, and show
kindness, I pray thee, unto me, and make mention of me unto
Pharaoh, and bring me out of this house; for indeed I was |
stolen away out of the land of the Hebrews: and here also
have . done nothing that wen should pub me into the dun-
geon.”

There is nothing in all the history of Joseph more beau:
- tiful than these few words of gentle pleading with the chief



28 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

butler. He simply asked the chief butler to think of him,
and speak a few kind words for him to Pharaoh. He said
nothing of the cruelty of his brothers. He only said, “I
was stolen away out of the land of the Hebrews.” He made
no complaint of being in prison, as he might havedone. He
could have said a great deal about the injustice of those
that had put him in prison, but all he said was, “I have
done nothing that they should put me into the dungeon.”

These beautiful words of Joseph should teach us always
to speak gently of others, and to cover their faults when we
can. When we are tried by those who return unkindness
for kindness, it is good to pour out all our grief into the ear
of some wise and good friend, and we may do it; but if we
are like Joseph, we shall not go from one to another, and
complain of the unkindness from which we are suffering.
As he said, so we shall say, whenever we have to give any
answer : “I have done nothing to deserve it.” This is enough
for us to say. There is One who, in his own time, and in
his own way, will say the rest; am save us “to the utter-
most.” Remember, that when you do no more than simply
tell the truth, and appeal to God, your heavenly Father
will speak for you. We may take a great deal of pains to
defend ourselves, but we shall never be well defended unless
we have God for our defender.



JQOSEPHVIN PRISON oO ~ 29

If you who read this story have not made a friend of
the creat God, and have never gone to him and leaned on
his bosom, and been hushed to rest when the little trials of
life were pressing heavily, go now, and lay your head on the
heart that beats for you as no human heart ever did. Love
Christ, and he will love you, and take you close to his side,
and be your friend and defender for ever.

a “=i ae
+



30 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER VI.
THE CHIEF BUTLER’S INGRATITUDE.

We are told in that good book whose words are all
truth, that if a true Christian does no more than, from love
to Christ, to give a cup of cold water to one who is thirsty,
it is remembered by Him whose eye sees the smallest thing.
Our almighty Friend has myriads of worlds to keep in. -
motion and regulate and control ; and it is very wonderful
that he should notice every little thing we do, and bless us
for it too, if it is done from love to him, though it seems to
us so very little. All we can say about this is, that it is
like our heavenly Father. I wish we could say, it is like
us. But in this world we do not always treat each other as
God treats us. We do not always remember each other.

How did the chief butler do? If we did not know, and
were asked what we supposed his conduct was, we should
‘say that the very first thing he did after his release, was to
talk to Pharaoh about J oseph, and plead his cause, and beg
that he might be taken out of prison. We should say that
he went immediately to work, and left no stone unturned
to get him out of prison.



THE BUTLER’S INGRATITUDE. 31

But the truth was, that as soon as he was safely out of
prison himself, he was troubled no more about Joseph. It
seems too much to be believed, and yet it is true he did not
say a word for his brother prisoner; he seems to have for-
gotten him entirely. Probably when Joseph asked him to
remember him, and tell Pharaoh about his case, he made
very fair promises, and led Joseph to think he should do
his utmost to reward him for his kindness. Yet what did
he do? Nothing. i .

How is it with us? Do our fathers and mothers, broth-
ers, sisters, and friends, feel in their hearts the sweet return
of all they have given us? They have held us up when we
were falling; they have wiped away our tears; they have
told us to be of good cheer; they have fed and clothed and
sheltered and cheered us, and the debt we owe them is very
great. Let us see to it that we pay it generously, and live
to bless others as we have been blessed.

If you would remember others, and never fail to render
them kindness and love, think how God has remembered
you; think how all the vast concerns of his great universe
have never led him for one moment to forget you. Think
of this as you ought, and there will never be any who will
have reason to say that you did not remember them, but
forgot them.



CHAPTER VII.

FROM THE PRISON TO THE PALACE.

JOSEPH was yet in prison, and why he was still there
was probably more than he could understand. He wondered
why he had never heard from the chief butler, and what he
had been about all the time, that he had not helped him out
of prison. 7

At last, after two long years, the sun begins to shine
through the dark sky and gild the prison walls. Whether
Joseph’s eyes, that had long been watching, saw the sunlight _
coming or not, we do not know.

Pharaoh dreamed that he stood on the bank of a river ;
and while he stood there, seven fat kine or cows came up
out of the river, and after them, seven poor, lean ones ; and
these lean ones ate up the seven fat ones. This was the
king’s first dream. Then he dreamed again that seven fine,
full ears came out on one. stalk, and after them, seven poor
ears; and that these bad ears devoured the good ears.

Now the king was puzzled, and troubled too. We some-
times think that any one who is “happy as a king,” must be
very happy; but the king of Egypt was in perplexity and



JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 33

fear, and nobody seemed to be able to help him. The first
thing he did to get out of trouble, was to call all the “magi-
cians” and “wise men” together. ‘“ Magicians” and “ wise
men” were imposing names, and Pharaoh thought these great
men could soon help him out of his troubles, for they had
the reputation of being able to do wonderful things, that no
one else could do. But how surprised Pharaoh must have
been, and how blank he must have looked, when he found
that with all their magic and wisdom they could do nothing
for him. They were men who made a great show of know-
ledge on every occasion ; but veal knowledge, and the show
of it, are two very different things. One is priceless sub-
stance, the other an empty shadow.

_ If these magicians and wise men do not know enough tc
help me out of these straits, who does? thought Pharaoh ;
and where shall I look next? The chief butler saw his per-
plexity, and all at once thought of Joseph, and remembered
his power to interpret dreams. He must have been heartily
ashamed to speak of him, when he had shown no kind
remembrance of him for two years; and he told the truth
when he called this forgetfulness a “ fault.” Joseph, his
friend and comforter, had been in prison two years, yet he
had done nothing for him, but stayed at court with Pharaoh

in ease and comfort. At last his slumbering thoughts are
Joseph, etc. 3



34 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

aroused, and he tells Pharaoh about the “ Hebrew servant ”
who had been with him in prison two years before, and how
he had interpreted the two dreams.

At any other time Pharaoh would have ciao the idea
that a servant, a Hebrew servant too, was able to interpret
dreams ; but when people get into great trouble, they are
generally glad enough of help from any quarter. To turn
from the magicians and wise men to_a Hebrew servant, no
doubt seemed to Pharaoh great condescension, especially for
a king; but in this case, he thought little of rank. This
did not enter into his mind, now that he was in trouble.

He sent in great haste for Joseph to come to court. Jo-
seph might have hesitated, and been afraid to go, not knowing
what it all meant; but he did not hesitate. He immediately
made himself ready, and went to Pharaoh to see what he
wanted. The king opened his heart to the Hebrew servant.
He told him what the difficulty was—that he had had trou-
blesome dreams, and could find no interpreter for them, and
that he had heard of his power to interpret dreams.

“It is not in me. God shall give Pharaoh an answer
of peace,” was Joseph’s humble answer, as he looked up to
God to enlighten and teach him what to say. And here we
may learn a lesson of strong faith-and beautiful humility.
“God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace.” Joseph



JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 35

was not afraid that his interpretation would prove false.
He knew that God would teach him what to say, and he
ventured boldly upon him.

In these days, no one is called of God to interpret
dreams, or to tell what lies in the future ; Joseph’s faith was
the faith of miracles, a faith which we are not now called
to exercise. Yet we are all, even the smallest and weakest
child, commanded to believe with our whole hearts, and
never for a moment to doubt the sure word of our heavenly
Father. He has made it very safe and easy for us to trust
him. His promises rebuke all our doubts, and command us
to believe and never be afraid that he will break his word.
Now let us all, as the children of God, believe in our Fa-
ther, and live a life of faith. |

Joseph’s reply to Pharaoh teaches us not only faith, but
humility. Pharaoh said to Joseph, “I have heard say of
thee, that thou canst understand a dream to interpret it.”
This was a great deal for a king to say to a Hebrew pris-
oner. If Joseph really possessed this power, it would at
once place him very high in the opinion of the king. Joseph,
if he had been so disposed, might have answered, “ Yes, my
lord, that is my gift. I interpreted the dreams of two pris-
oners while I was in your prison, the dreams of your chief
baker and chief butler ; and [ can now interpret yours, if



36 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

you will tell it to me.” Joseph might have replied in this
way to the king; but with true humility he answered, “ It
is not in me. God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”

Whatever good thing we do in this world, may we do it
as Joseph did. May we lay aside all pride in what we can
do ; may we never admire ourselves for it, as though we had
done some great thing ; may we be humble and lowly, and
always say, when flattered or praised, “It is not in me ;”
and may we understand, as Joseph did, that every good
thing is of God. A man or a child who trusts in himself is
very weak. They alone are strong who are strong in
God. ee

Joseph had this glorious strength. He interpreted the
dreams correctly, for God was with him. He told the king
there would be seven years of great plenty ; when every
thing would grow in great abundance, when the fields and
the gardens would be full of grain and fruit, and when
every thing would yield a hundred-fold. Then he told him
there would follow seven years of famine, and that the years
of abundance were given that he might prepare for the
famine. He told him he must select a wise, capable man to
help him get ready for this great famine; that he must put
the whole land of Egypt under the direction of such a ruler,
with officers under him; that these men must all work, and



JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 37

gather one-fifth of every thing that grew, and have it all
stored away for the hard famine that was to come.
Pharaoh listened to Joseph, and believed all he said.
If we look only upon the surface of things, we shall say
this was very strange. Pharaoh believe all that Joseph
told him! Why, who was Joseph? A young man, who
could not be expected to know as much as an old man.
He was a stranger too, from a foreign land. How could
Pharaoh trust him without knowing more about him? Ap-
pearances were very much against him: he had been brought
to Egypt, and sold there, and for more than two years had
been in prison. Yet Pharaoh did not turn away from him
when he interpreted the dreams. God was with him, and
the king saw it, and was impressed with the fact that he
was the very man to be at the head of affairs, and to pre-
pare them for the famine. So he said, “ Can we find such
a one as this is, 2 man in whom the spirit of God is?”
Then he turned to Joseph, and said, “Forasmuch as God
hath shown thee all this, there is none so discreet and wise
as thou art: thou shalt be over my house, and according
unto thy word shall all my people be ruled: only in the
throne will I be greater than thou.”
_ When he had said this to Joseph, he immediately gave
orders to have his dress changed ; he was arrayed in the



38 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

finest linen, a splendid chariot was given him to ride in,
and he was made ruler over all Egypt. The king also took
off his own ring, and put it upon Joseph’s hand; and he put
a gold chain about his neck ; and Joseph went out from the
presence of the king, clothed with all the emblems of au-
thority. | |

As he went away, and began the duties of his new office,
and as he rode in a chariot, honored by all the Egyptians,
he must have had a great many thoughts all to himself.
Before this, almost every thing had seemed to turn against
him. When the chief butler forgot him, there seemed to be
no one to remember him; but during all the long months
he was in prison God remembered him, and the eye that
never for a moment closes in sleep foresaw the time of his
_ poor prisoner’s deliverance. God was working it all out
for him. |

It seems to me I can almost see Joseph, as he sits in his
chariot-with a pleasant, yet serious face. Ah, Joseph, you
_ do not look quite happy yet. You have gold, and jewels,
and precious things ; you ride in a chariot, and have great
power ; but there is a shadow on your face, a sorrow in
your heart. You are thinking of your home in Canaan, of

your father ; and he, poor old man, is thinking of you, and

going down with sorrow to the grave, for he thinks he shall

=
<2
oe

- *
4 o ee
oe
- i
; , * x
8
« SS - ¥ -

i”



“ay

















see your face no more. But wait a, little longer, Joseph.
The God who has done-so much for you, can and will do

more.
_. And this is the way God treats all his true children.

Se
*. peur

We shall often be in sorrow and perplexity; the clouds will
gather above our heads, yet the same love that spread them

a





40 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

there will roll them away, and in due time show us why they
ever gathered there. It is hard to believe it, but it is true,
that the sorrows which make our hearts ache, the troubles
we cannot understand, are designed as blessings, and will
make us better and happier, if we bear them patiently, and
wait quietly for God to remove them when he pleases.
Though Joseph had been made almost equal with the
king, though he rode in a chariot, and dressed like a prince,
and had the homage of the whole Egyptian nation, yet no -
doubt his heart was often very heavy as he thought of his
father, and wondered if he should ever see him again.
Often too his prayer went up to God that he might once
more see his home, and throw his arms around his father’s
neck. Yet he did not give himself up to sorrow, and do
nothing but mourn and cry until he could see through all
his troubles ; he held up his head like a man, like a good
man, who knew that every thing would come out right if he
trusted. in God. He went to work, and performed all the
duties of. his office as ruler over the land of Egypt, hoetng
in God to take care of his sorrows.
This is a beautiful lesson for us. None of us can expect
_ to be wholly free from the troubles of life. They will in-
trude even into our brightest joys; and we shall often feel
our hearts in pain. We may have to carry the burden of

thw
af



JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 41

great sorrows. Oh, when the burden shall fall upon you or
me, may we look-up to God with a strong, trusting heart,
and not forget that we have a work in life, a mission to ful-
fil, and that God will sustain us under the burden, and help
us to do all he has called us to do. A few more years, and
you will be men and women ; life will bring you new joys,
but it will also bring you ame sorrows. Oh, then be strong,
and look up to God, and he will help you to do your work
of love in the world, whatever your:sorrows may be. He
will meet your case, and like Joseph, you will live an active
and useful life, and be kept from — the slave of verry
Sorrow.



42 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

Ws







CHAPTER VIII.
JOSEPH’S SIMPLE, EVERY-DAY PIETY.

JOSEPH gathered grain “as the sand of the sea,” it is
said, and he filled all the storeheuses with it, and made great
preparations for the famine. The whole seven years was



JOSEPH’S ACTIVE PIETY.— 43

no doubt a very busy time; and Joseph’s cool, steady head,
and quiet, trusting heart whe occupied in preparation for
the hard famine.

Probably Pharaoh was more and more convinced that
Joseph was just the man they needed for such a time. If
he was a man who thought much, and knew how to put
ideas together, he must have seen why it was that this He-
brew was sold into Egypt, why he was thrown into prison,
and how God was using him now to be a greater blessing
to the Egyptian nation than any other man in it.

And then, too, he must have had his eyes.open after this,
to see that even a poor Hebrew prisoner, who had the Lord .
for his God, could do a great deal more than all the magi-
cians and wise men. ‘Those who say the least often do the
most ; and there is nothing more beautiful than a life filled
with deeds of love that are never told. Remember this,
little friends, and never display what you do, nor seek a
reputation even for goodness. Be good, and do good with
all your might. Let every day of your life be filled with
acts of goodness, but let your lips be slow to speak your

own praise. The Pharisees sounded a trumpet before them ;

they made their good deeds public; even when they prayed,
they chose the corners of the streets, where they would be
observed. ‘Their reward was an earthly one, and a poor



44 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

reward it was. Joseph did not seek such a reward ; he did
not toil for a great name, and he never boasted of what he
dia... | .

If you and I were to spend all our lives in a prison, and
the good we did was shut up there, with no eye but God’s
to see it, our deeds would be as fair and our lives as shining
in the sight of God, as if we were seen of men and praised
through all the world. Whatever we do, God knows it;
let this be enough for us. One approving glance from God
is worth all that men and angels can say about us. Joseph
made no display of himself and his goodness. He served
God in simplicity, and lived a life of humble, unostentatious
obedience. ,

One thing we ought to notice particularly in Joseph:
he never separated religion from the duties of life. No
doubt he prayed, and talked much about God; but he also
toiled hard to gather grain; he worked to prepare for the
famine: there was more true religion in Joseph’s every-day
work than we perhaps have ever suspected.

To go to church all day on the Sabbath, to read God’s
word, and sing and pray, is only a small part of what we
have to do in this world. These might be called the luxu- .
ries of religion, not its toils, and self-sacrifice. If Joseph
were alive now, he would tell us the same thing. He would



JOSEPH’S ACTIVE PIETY. 45

tell us all to go to work; to give the hungry food, and the
naked clothes; to ease aching hearts, and start smiles upon
sad faces, and do whatever we can for needy ones around
us. This is the way Joseph would talk; for so he acted.
God has given us a beautiful world, with enough in it
for all to do; the child as well as the man may be a reaper
in the broad field. There is grain enough for us all to
gather; there is many a storehouse to be filled; no one
need say, “There is nothing for me to do.”
Each child, however young,
May do his little part;
May drive away the gloom
From a sin-darkened heart;

May “speak a word in season ;”
May do a deed of love;

And lead some wayward soul
To Him who dwells above.



46 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER IX.

THE FAMINE.

THE famine was severe, not only in Egypt, but in all the
surrounding country. Even in Canaan, the land of milk
and honey, they began to feel the pangs of hunger, with no
prospect of any thing to relieve them. And Jacob’s family,
those cruel sons, who years before had thrown their brother
into a pit intending to leave him there to die, were crying
for bread.

Jacob saw them looking at each other, as if they would
ask, “ What are we to do? Where are we to get bread to
keep us from starving?” And he told them he had heard
there was grain in Egypt, and advised them to go there and
buy bread before they all died of starvation. So all of
them but Benjamin started for Egypt. ‘“ You may all go but
Benjamin,” said Jacob; “I will keep him at home, for fear
something will happen to him.” Poor old man, his heart
clung to Benjamin. “Joseph is dead,” he said to himself;
“ Joseph is dead; I shall never see my darling child again;
and I cannot send my Benjamin away, for I may lose him



THE FAMINE. . | AT

too.” His remonstrances were so great that Benjamin was
left with him, and the other brothers all went to Egypt.

Joseph was the governor of the land; and it was he who
sold grain to all who came to buy. As he was selling one
day, who should come to buy but his brothers, ten of them;
and they all bowed down before him with great reverence.
Joseph immediately recognized them; but they did not know
him, nor imagine they were now fulfilling the dreams they
once so hated. When they sold Joseph, they felt sure they
would hear no more of him nor his dreams; but their selling
him was the very act that led on to the time when, as Jo-
seph dreamed, all their sheaves made obeisance to Joseph’s
sheaf. | |

There they stood, bowing before Joseph; and when he
looked upon them, and saw they were his brothers, what
thoughts rushed into his mind; how.all the past came before
him; and how his heart must have leaped with the desire
to say, “I am Joseph!” But he controlled his feelings for
a time, and looked quietly upon them. And that he might
bring their sins before them, and lead them to think of all
the wrong they had committed, he treated them very rough-
ly, calling them spies ; and he had them shut up under guard
three days.

There, in confinement, in a strange country, they thought



48 ~ JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

of the time when they sold Joseph; and when Reuben said,
“Did I not tell you not to do it? Don’t you remember
what I said, and how you would not hear me? Ah, my
brothers, you took Joseph out of the pit, and sold him; and
now we are all being punished for it. The lord of the land
has shut us up; when we shall get out of all this trouble no
one knows. We do not know but years of confinement are
before us.” And all the brothers talked together about their
cruel treatment of Joseph. They said, “ We saw his agony,
and his tears; we heard him plead to be taken out of the
pit, and sent home to our father. But we would not hear
him; we sold him, we sold our own brother; and now we
must meet our doom.”

Joseph heard all this; but they did not suppose he
understood their language, and they talked without any
restraint. It was too much for Joseph to bear, and he had
to go away to weep. He soon came back; and to make
their repentance deeper, he took his brother Simeon, and
bound him in chains before their eyes, and sent him away to
prison. ‘“ Now,” said he to his brothers, “I will keep this
man in prison, until-you go home and come back with Ben-
jamin. Bring anna here, and then I will believe ant
you are not spies.”

They had to do as Joseph told them, and go home with-



THE FAMINE. ez 49

out Simeon. Every hour they seemed to be getting deeper
and deeper into trouble. On their way home, they opened
their sacks of grain, and there they found their money, the
money they owed Joseph, and which should have been in
his purse. We paid for the grain, thought they, but here is
all the money in the top of our sacks. What can this mean?
Where will all this trouble end?

When they reached home, they told their father what
the governor of Egypt had said; and it was sad news for
poor Jacob. He had spent many years sorrowing for Jo-
seph; and now he was an old man, and his heart clung to
Benjamin; but the word had come. Ere long their food
would all be gone. He must give him up. Perhaps he
would never see him again. -How could he let him go!

_ Reuben tried to comfort his father, and promised to take
good care of Benjamin, and. bring him safely home again.

Jacob consented; and his last words to his children
were, “God Almighty give you mercy before the man, that
he may send away your other brother, and Benjamin. If I
be bereaved of my children, I am bereaved.” He was a
heart-broken father ; and now in his old age, his troubles
were more than he felt able to bear. - Left alone, without a
child to comfort him, he awaited the return of his children
with good or evil tidings.

Joseph, ete. 4



JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

or
©

He had sent a present to the lord of the land; and com-
forted himself with the thought that it might incline his
heart to mercy and kindness, as presents often do. Jacob
had, many years before, sent a present to his brother Ksau,
to appease his wrath. Perhaps he remembered this, and
thought that the governor of Egypt could be conciliated in
the same way. So he sent him a present, and waited to see
what would be the result.



THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. ol

CHAPTER Xs
ait Ee STARTLING DISCOVERY.

~Wuen Joseph knew that his brothers had come back to
Kegypt, he ordered them to be taken to his own house, and
a sumptuous dinner to be prepared for them. This made
them still more afraid. They feared that the governor had
some bad design against them, and went to his house with .
trembling : sin and fear go ‘together. “The wicked flee
when no man pursueth, but the righteous are bold as a lion.”
They alone who seek to do right in all things, are fearless
and courageous. Such can go into a lion’s den, or walk
through the fire.

It is no wonder that Joseph’s brothers trembled every
step they took. They first went to the steward of the house,
and told him their fears, and talked with him about the
money they had found in their sacks. ‘“ Oh, sir,” said they,
“we came indeed down to buy food. And it came to pass,
- when we came to the inn, that we opened our sacks, and
behold, every man’s money was in the mouth of his sack, our
money in full weight; and we have brought it again in our
hand.” In their distress, they were appealing to the stew-

«



o2 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

ard; but when Joseph pleaded with them to take him out
of the pit, they would not hear. Their hearts were hard,
and their ears were closed; and had the steward now
turned away from them, as they turned away from Joseph,
they would have been justly punished ; but he did not. He
answered them, “ Peace be to you, fear not: your God, and
the God of your father, hath given you treasure in your
sacks.” And to allay their fears still more, he brought
Simeon to them.

Soon Joseph came home, and he again met his brothers
without making himself known to them. ~ But his heart was
full of tender feeling when he asked, “Is your father well,
the old man of whom ye spake? Is he yet alive?” And
when he looked upon Benjamin, his youngest brother, and
said, ‘Is this your younger brother? God be gracious to
thee, my son,” his heart was so deeply moved that he had to
hurry to his own room to weep alone. :

It was a trying day with Joseph, for the memory of his |
home and his father came fresh upon him. The long years
of his exile in Egypt seemed like a dream. They had been
years of painful waiting to see what the end would be.
Now the feelings of a brother and a son were all stirred
within him, and it was a hard task for him to keep them
concealed.



THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. 53

But he not only concealed them, he did more: he
treated his brothers with sternness, that he might lead them
to repentance for all they had done. Still, this second
time of their coming, he had spoken a few kind words to
them; so that their fears were somewhat allayed, and they
began to think the worst was over. Perhaps the thought
of their past sins was less painful to them when their fears
were lessened. ‘They saw Simeon free; and there was no
reason to believe Joseph would keep Renita so they
could all go home together, and soon be free from all their
troubles. :

Joseph then made a feast for them; ‘and to their oreat
surprise, they were seated at the table in the order of their
ages. And when he sent them portions of the food from his
own table, Benjamin’s portion was five times as much as any
of the one Early the next eta he sent them all
away. ae

But they were étily a little way on shai journey home,
when a messenger came full-speed after them, to take them
back to Egypt. He accused them of rewarding evil for
gvood—of stealing a silver cup belonging to the lord of
Egypt. They were innocent of this; they did not know
what it all meant, and denied the severe charge, saying,
“God forbid that thy servants should do this thing.” Sure



od JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

2
' PRT NT EO IN a a OE ee
I NAV ai Zia - li / RP pers
3 i ; \\ et A rt et } fous lig /

ee



that none of them were guilty, they took down their sacks,
and opened them all; and there, in the top of Benjamin’s
sack, was found the cup. Overwhelmed with fear and
shame, they hastened back to the city; and went immedi-
ately to Joseph’s house, and fell down before him, asserting.
their innocence. And Judah said to Joseph, “ What shall



THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. 55

we say unto my lord? What shall we speak, or how shall
we clear ourselves ?” 3

Joseph answered them cata and told them that he
should keep for his servant the one in whose sack the cup
was found. =

Then they began to plead with fs They told him
that their father was in his old age; that J oseph was dead ;
and that they had promised to bring —* safely pack
again.

Judah pleaded that he might siti: saat be a servant in
Benjamin’s place. It was for his poor old father’s sake he
pleaded ; and Joseph could control his feelings no longer.
He sent away all the men who were standing around look-
ing on; and then he said, “Iam Joseph your brother, whom
ye sold into Egypt!” And he fell upon their necks and
wept aloud, so that all in his house heard him. Then his
brothers were troubled, and they stood aside, afraid to
come near him; but he drew them close to him, and sooth-
ed them with all the gentleness of a brother. He told
them not to be grieved, or angry with themselves; for God
had sent him into Egypt to save them all from a dreadful
death, and to provide for the Egyptian nation. “Go home,”
said he, “and tell our father that his son Joseph is the lord
of Egypt, and that he must come with you all, and live with



56 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

me in Kgypt. Tell him that I will nourish and care for
him ; and that we shall spend many good days together.”

My young readers, if you want to be truly generous to
those who have ill-treated you, imitate Joseph. He had
suffered very much from his brothers, but he gave them
nothing but kindness. Not one unkind word, and not one
reproach for all they had done to him, fell from his lips.
His character was sweetened by that blessed love which so
fills the heart that there is no room left for angry feelings,
and hate and revenge. If an angry feeling stir our hearts,
if unkind thoughts lead us to unkind actions, we have not
Joseph’s gentle, loving spirit. He really seemed to forget
all the unkindness his brothers had done him. He at least
so forgave it all, that the thought of having them around
him made him happy.

The Egyptians soon found out that his father and broth-
ers were coming to live in Egypt; and it would have been
strange enough if they had not understood it, for Joseph
was very busy preparing for them, and he in no way con-
cealed the happiness he felt.

He sent back his brothers to Canaan to bring their
father and all their families; and with them he sent wag-
ons loaded with provisions, and with every thing that would
be of service to them. And he sent his father a present



THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. oT

of ten asses laden with grain and bread and all the good
things of Egypt. When Jacob saw all these wagons and
asses and presents coming into Canaan, and when his sons
told him it was Joseph who was the governor of Egypt,
and that he had sent the wagons to bring them all to Egypt,
his heart fainted. And no wonder; it was too much to be
believed. After all these long vous: how can Joseph be
alive? thought he; did I not see his bloody coat? How
can he yet be alive?

His sons told him what Joseph had said, and gave him
.the messages of love, and the presents; and then Jacob
- believed it was true that Joseph was alive, and that he
would soon see his face.

It was not long before Jacob and all his family were on
their way to Egypt. On his way he offered sacrifices to
God. And God appeared to him in a vision by night, and
told him not to be afraid to go into Egypt. God said that
Joseph, his beloved son, would take care of him until he
died; and that the children of Jacob should become a great
nation in Egypt; and that after a good many years had
passed He would bring them back, to live in their own
happy land of promise.

After a few days’ journey, Jacob and his whole com-
pany reached Goshen; and then Joseph went in his chariot





58 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

AN\\\
ily aa

}

ih
f iH
(
x
\



to meet his father. Oh, what a meeting it was. As soon
as Joseph saw his father, he alighted from his chariot and
fell upon his neck and wept a long time. (

It probably was not long before Jacob and Joseph had
a comforting talk that satisfied them both, and made them
trust in God more than ever. Joseph no doubt told his



- THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. a9

father — God had led him; how he had put him in prison,
and then taken him out, and put him on a throne. Joseph
and his father were more than ever convinced that the best
way to do in this world is to trust in God, and let him lead -
us how and where he will. }

_ May we all learn this same lesson, and may it be graven
on our hearts. We do not know how to lead ourselves:
but God our Father knows how to do it, and he cannot make
any mistake. He may sometimes lead us in a way that may
seem strange. It may be so dark that we see no light before
us, but we may be sure it is the best way, because it is
God’s way. When we cannot understand where we are
going, or what our heavenly Father is doing with us, when
we are in trouble and afraid, let us think of Joseph.
There is no pit so deep that God cannot help us out of it;
no prison so strong that he cannot break its bars. Each
trial is a pit into which he casts us for our good. Each
sorrow is a prison in which he locks us, that when his pur-
poses are accomplished, with his own mighty hand he may
unlock the door and let his captives go free. ¥.



60 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER XI.
THE ARRIVAL OF JOSEPH’S FRIENDS.

As soon as his father and brothers had come, Joseph
went to the king to inform ‘him of it, and took five of his
brothers with him to present them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh
met them kindly, and extended to them his royal favor. The
name of Joseph was an honored name with Pharaoh and all
the Egyptian people, and Jacob and. his family needed no
other passport to kingly favor than his great name. So God
receives us with favor for his Son’s sake.

Pharaoh talked kindly with the five brothers Joseph
presented to him, and asked them what their occupation
was. When they replied that they were shepherds, and
requested him to let them dwell in the land of Goshen, he
turned to Joseph as if he would put all honor upon him, and
said, “ Thy father and thy brethren are come unto thee:
the land of Egypt is before thee ; in the best of the land
make thy father and thy brethren ‘i dwell.”

They had no design of making a permanent home in
Kgypt; they came to remain only for a time, because the
famine was very great in Canaan. Goshen was at the en-



THE FAMILY IN EGYPT. 61

trance of Egypt, and there was some fine pasture land there.
_ This part of Egypt was all these shepherds asked, but Pha-
raoh answered them that. the whole of the land was before
them, and that they might shave the best of it to dwell in.
They surely needed nothing more to convince them of Jo-
seph’s high position of honor in Egypt.

After this’ Joseph brought in his father, and introduced
him to Pharaoh; and Jacob blessed Pharaoh, returning him
thanks, and estates for the blessing of heaven upon him.
Pharaoh appears to have been struck with his reverend ap-
pearance. It is probable that time and his deep sorrows
had made furrows in his face, and whitened his hair. As
he came before the king, he might have appeared to be a
very old man, bending low under age and affliction; and ©
perhaps this prompted the question, “ How old art thou?”
Certain it is that many long years of affliction prompted the
sad answer: “The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a
hundred and thirty years: few and evil have the days of
the years of my life been, and have-not attained unto the
days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of
their pilgrimage.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went
out from his presence. No doubt his heart was full of bless-
ing for all the good that had been wrought out for Joseph.
He no longer said, “ An evil beast hath devoured him: Jo-



62 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

seph is without doubt rent in pieces ;” but he blessed God,
and blessed Pharaoh, that he was alive and was ruler over
all the land of Egypt. His last years seemed his best years ;
and yet he said of them all, that they had been the years of
his “pilgrimage.” He regarded himself as a pilgrim, tarry-
ing only for a night, on his way home to heaven.

So should we all view ourselves. The world is very
fair, and life is very sweet, and we may pluck the flowers and
delight in their sweetness as we pass along; but we ought
to become heaven-bound pilgrims, and never forget that we
are going home to Christ. This will make it pleasant for
us to live, and pleasant for us to die. If we keep the eye
of faith fixed upon the celestial city, no path that leads to it
will seem a very difficult or dreary path for us to walk in.

“Tis by the faith of joys to come
We walk through deserts dark as night.”
The light of the celestial city is reflected upon our path ;
and lighted all the way, we journey home to heaven. With
Christ for our friend, it is sweet to be pilgrims, sweet to
know that we are journeying rapidly to our home.

If you are not happy pilgrims, if you have never asked
Christ to wash you in his precious blood, do it now ; and
then you will love to feel that you are pilgrims going home
to heaven.



THE KIND RULER. 63

CHAPTER XII. 2
THE KIND RULER AND PROVIDER.

Jacos and his family gratefully accepted the kindness
of Pharaoh, and retired with their flocks to Goshen. and
there they lived while the famine continued to rage.

_ Instead of abating, the dearth grew more severe ; and
in the third year there was a new cry for bread. The
Egyptians had eaten all they had themselves stored, and
they cried to Joseph for bread, bringing him their money.
So long as it lasted they were supplied with food. But
money soon failed, and in the extremity of their hunger they
said to Joseph, “Give us bread ; for why should we die in
thy presence? for the money faileth.” Joseph told them to
bring him their cattle for pay, and they should be supplied
with grain. Fainting and hungry, they did not stop to dis-

pute with him, but brought their cattle, and received bread
in return. |

They were supplied in this way for a year ; but the next
year they began again to feel the famine. They were indeed
in a pitiable condition: their bread was gone, their money
gone, their herds of cattle gone; and what could they do?



— eS
64 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

They went to Joseph, and said, “We will not hide it from
my lord, how that our money is spent; my lord also hath
our herds of cattle; there is not aught left in the sight of
my lord, but our as and our lands. Wherefore shall we
die before thine eyes, both we and our lands? buy us and
our land for bread, and we and our land will be servants
unto Pharaoh.” Joseph met their necessities as well as he
could. He wished to act worthy of the trust Pharaoh had
committed to him, while he yielded to the requests of the
people so far as it lay in his power. The Egyptians could
not have had a kinder ruler and provider than Joseph.

It might have seemed hard to the Egyptians to yield all
they had—their money, their cattle, and their lands—to
Pharaoh. They might have questioned his wisdom, and
made bitter complaint of the terms, but they willingly gave
all to satisfy their hunger. Now there is a deeper hunger
than the Egyptians felt, the hunger of the soul. There is
also a kinder Provider than Joseph. He offers us “ living
bread,” “without money and without price ;’ and they who
have never gone to him, and asked for it, are famishing.
The great Ruler of heaven has a storehouse full of bread,
and all who will go to him may have their hunger. satisfied.
It is not necessary to take a long journey, or to carry any
costly gifts, with which to purchase this living bread. The



a:

THE KIND RULER. 65

kind Provider knows we are poor, and he offers us his riches
“without money and without price ;” and wherever we are,
we may take them without the weariness or expense of a
long journey. Our blessed Provider is rich, and he is every-
where, dwelling all around us, ready to hear us when we
cry. ;
And yet there is a sense in which, if we would gain
Christ, the Bread of heaven, we must give him our all:
“Here, Lord, I give myself away ;
‘Tis all that can do.” | c

We must not hold back from him our money, our cattle, our
lands, or ourselves. All we have an are must be the Lord’s,
or we are “none of his.” Go to this kind Saviour, and give
him your hearts, your all. He waits to hear you ask for
the bread of life, and to give you that of which if you eat
_ you will never hunger.

Joseph, ete. 5



66 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER XIII.

JACOB’S LAST DAYS.

JAcoB continued to dwell in Goshen, and was happy and
prosperous there. Though he had expected to go to his
grave without seeing Joseph, yet he lived seventeen years
with him in Egypt, nourished and supported by him. His
aching heart had a long and quiet rest, and the last years of
his life were smoothed by the hand of Joseph. The time of
his death drew near, and he called Joseph, and said to him,
“Tf now I kave found grace in thy sight, put, I pray thee,
thy hand under my thigh,” (the form of an oath,) “and
deal kindly and truly with me; bury me not, I pray thee,
in Egypt; but I will lie with my fathers, and thou shalt
carry me out of Egypt, and bury me in their burying-place.”

It is of little consequence where our bodies lie, for they
soon decay and go to dust; and wherever they are, they
will at last come forth from their graves at the voice of
God, ancl be remoulded and fashioned after Christ’s glorious
body, if on earth we were his followers, and died in the
hope of a blessed resurrection. So it matters little where
they are buried. And yet it is pleasant to die in our own



. +

JACOB’S LAST DAYS. e 67

land, and not upon a strange shore; and it is pleasant to
know that we are to lie by the side of a departed mother or
father or friend in a» family graveyard. Jacob doubtless
had these feelings, but other feelings too prompted the
request he made of Joseph. He knew that Canaan had
been given to his posterity ; that they would dwell in a land
where their fathers were sleeping, and that God would
remember his chosen people and give them a Saviour, the
Shiloh whom Jacob predicted; so he wished to be buried
there, with Abraham and Isaac. Joseph bound himself by
an oath to fulfil his father’s wishes, and bury him in the land
of Canaan. His simple promise would no doubt have been
enough ; but the oath made it surer, as Pharaoh would not
then interfere with it, but would willingly allow Joseph to
_ perform what he had sacredly promised with an oath.

Soon after this, Joseph took his two sons Manasseh and
Ephraim, and went to see his father. Jacob’s days were
nearly spent, but he “strengthened himself, and sat upon the
bed” to talk with Joseph. His last thoughts seemed to be
of Canaan. Resting upon the promise of God, he believed
that his posterity would have it for an everlasting posses-

- sion. His reason for this belief was, that God had said so; —

and this was enough to satisfy him. “God Almighty ap-
peared to me at Luz,” said he, “in the land of Canaan, and

Se:

‘a 2s
SOs





68g JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

blessed me, and said unto me, Behold, I will make thee
fruitful, and multiply thee, and I will make of thee a multi-
tude of people ; and will give thie land to thy seed after
thee for an everlasting possession.” Hae %

_ He then assured Joseph that ba would remember his
two sons in this great inheritance, that they should be as
his own: “As Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine,”
said he. Looking upon Joseph’s sons, whom he could not
distinguish, for his eyes were dim, he asked, “Who are
these?” When Joseph told him who they were, he kissed’
and embraced them; and as he reached out his hands to
bless them, he put hiss right hand on Ephraim’s head, and
his left hand on Manasseh’s head. - Joseph saw his father
lay his right hand on Ephraim’s head; and the right hand
being superior, he supposed his father intended to foretell
Ephraim’s superior strength and greatness. This troubled
him, not because he loved Ephraim less than Manasseh, but
he thought the younger should not have the superiority ;
and he said, “ Not so, my father: for this is the first-born ;
put thy right hand upon his head.” But Jacob refused, telling
him that while Manasseh should prosper and become of great
renown, Ephraim should be greater. .

It is God’s way to confer favors where he thinks best,
to dispense his gifts according to his own pleasure. He



JACOB'S LAST DAYS. 69

loves to honor the young as well as the old, the small as
_ well as the great. You who are yet young in years and
In wisdom may receive honor from God, and accomplish
much in the great work of doing good. God may put his
right hand on your head ; he may bless you above those who
are older. So you must not despise your ee or say it is
but little you can do.

Jacob blessed- both Ephraim and Manasith, ‘add foretold

the future greatness of both of them. In the sure conviction —

that his prophecy would be fulfilled, he told Joseph his two
sons would be so greatly blessed, that in future times the
Israelites would say, in their form of blessing, “ God make
thee as Ephraim and Manasseh.” Jacob then assured Jo-
seph that God would be with him, and would bring him
again unto the land of his fathers. “God shall be with
you,” said he; and this was a blessing above all blessings.
In these days, children, none can speak to you in the
spirit of prophecy; none can foretell future events, and say
what you are to be. But to those of you who are in the
good Shepherd’s fold, there comes a voice from these pages,
saying, “God shall be with you,” and bring you home to
heaven. And what more can any child ask thon this? If I
can say, “ God is with me,” if I can know this, it is enough:
for it comprehends all the blessings any heart can ask or





70 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

receiv If God be with you, you are safe and happy, and 3
you will have every thing that is for your highest good and
happiness, and nothing will harm or work against you.
Jacob could not have left a better legacy than this to
Joseph : “God shall be with you.” This was an inherit-

ance of far greater value than the entire land of Cone 2

and Joseph’s heart must have been satisfied in these pro- —
phetic words of Jacob: “ GoD SHALL BE WITH YOU.” — :



Se

JACOB’S PREDICTIONS. 71

'
f
;
§
t
'

ee

=
. SP aease
ae RE A

Ais a“!

{

\



“Sone

ae
CHAPTER XIV

JACOB’S LAST PROPHETIC WORDS.

J Aco, feeling that he was about to die, called all his
sons together, to speak the last farewell and foretell the his-
tory of their descendants. This power of prophecy, or of



*

72 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

seeing into the future, was a special gift from God. Jacob
could never have known what was te befall his posterity, if
God had not breathed this spirit of prophecy upon him. In
ancient times he often bestowed this gift; and upon Jacob
he now bestowed it largely, so that his last words were
prophecies. When his sons had all come together, he ome
to tell them the future history of their posterity.

He called Reuben his “first-born,” his “might,” “the
beginning of his strength ;” and yet he said of him that he
was “unstable as water.”- However good we may be, we
are “unstable as water,” if we are not firm and constant in
doing whatever is right. If our love and practise of right —
change as circumstances do around us, we cannot excel in
strength, any more than Reuben did.

Having finished his prophecy concerning Reuben, Jacob
prophesied of Simeon and Levi. He said, “ Simeon and Levi
are brethren ; instruments of cruelty are in their habita-
tions.” By this he meant that they were alike in their cruel
dispositions and plans for the injury of others. And with
regard to them in the future, he said, “I will divide them
in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel.” This prophecy was
all fulfilled : for the tribe of Simeon had but a small inher-
itance of their own in Canaan; their possession was little
more than a portion of that of Judah. And as to the tribe



o2 JACOB’S PREDICTIONS. 73

of Levi, they had no separate inheritance, but were scattered
among the different tribes. God did not allow this to be a
curse to them. _ They afterwards showed their zeal for God
by attacking the worshippers of the golden calf, and for this
Moses blessed them before he died. Exod. 32 : 26-29;
Deut. 33 : 8-11. otf

~ Of Judah, Jacob said, “Thou art he whom thy brethren
shall praise; thy hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies ;
thy father’s children shall bow down before thee.” He said
also, “The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a law-
giver from between his feet, until Shiloh come.” He thus
predicted his future valor and independence. ‘The tribe of
Judah early showed superior strength. They were gov-
erned by their own princes, and were always a leading tribe.
Jacob’s prophecy concerning Judah was fulfilled not only in
the supremacy of this tribe, in the fertility of their country,
and in the richness of their possessions, but in the continu-
ance of rule and authority in that tribe till Shiloh, the prom-
ised Messiah, was born in Bethlehem of Judah.

Joseph was called “a fruitful bough, even a fruitful
bough by a well; whose branches run over the wall.”
Jacob said also of him, “The archers have sorely grieved
him, and shot at him, and hated him.” ‘These words must
have pierced the hearts of Joseph’s brothers, as they recog-



74 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

nized themselves to be the cruel archers, grieving their
brother, and shooting at him, and hating him. Joseph had
suffered much from his brethren, yet Jacob said of him that
“his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were
made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob.” In
all this he referred to his strength and patience and forti-
tude in trouble, and then he foretold many great blessings
the Almighty would drop upon him.

All the prophetic words of Jacob were fulfilled in his
posterity. The different tribes had the different characters
Jacob described; and occupied the different portions he
assigned them in ‘the promised land.

When Jacob’s prophecy was finished, he closed this last
interview with his sons by charging them to bury him with
his fathers. He marked out even the spot where he wished
to be buried, the cave that was in the field of Machpelah.
Then, as it is written, “he gathered his feet up into the
bed, and yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his
people.”



.

THE LAND OF PROMISE. 75

CHAPTER XV.
THE LAND OF PROMISE.

WueEN Joseph saw that his father was dead, he wept
upon him, and kissed him. Probably the remembrance of
all that Jacob had suffered, and of the years of sorrowful
separation from him, made Joseph’s heart very tender, and
brought a flood of tears to his eyes. And perhaps his heart
was melted with thankfulness because he had had his father
with him for seventeen years, and had smoothed his way to
the grave. ! softy .

Tenderly caring for him in death as well as in life,
Joseph ordered his servants the physicians to embalm him.
In ancient times, great men had a numerous train of ser-
vants, and among them a physician. Joseph, being the
ruler of Egypt, had probably many physicians in his ser-
vice, and some who were skilful in embalming bodies. This
custom of preserving bodies was an Egyptian one, and was
practised generally in Egypt. It was more or less costly,
according to the rank of the deceased: 'Those of the high-
est rank were embalmed at a great expense, and the process
was a long one, seventy days being required to perform the



e. as
+

—
Les

16 * JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

whole. The body was filled with spices of various kinds,
and then immersed in nitre, where it lay many days. Dur-
ing all this time, Jacob’s family and the Egyptians mourned
for him. Joseph mourned in his heart, but the Egyptians ©
mourned ‘because mourning for the dead was an Egyptian
custom. |

After these days were over, Joseph sent to Pharaoh to
obtain permission to go and bury his father. And Pharaoh
said, “Go up, and bury thy father, according as he made
thee swear.” Joseph had so rilontti in the favor of God
and man, and had attained so high a position and so great |
a reputation, that many of those who were high in authority, ©
the governors of the different provinces and the principal
men of the land, swelled the funeral train. With these
went chariots and horsemen, and it was indeed “a very
great company.”

When they reached a spot called “the threshing-floor of
Atad,” they stopped to mourn for the dead. Why they did
not wait until they reached the grave, is not known; but as
they mourned seven days, and were a large company, some
other place than the grave might have been more desirable.
After the mourning was over, they carried the body of
Jacob to the grave, the cave of Machpelah, and buried it
just as Jacob commanded. These last duties to the dead

*



— i Ad Ddieal =
iy 5

THE LAND OF PROMISE. an

being finished, Joseph and all the funeral train returned to
Kgypt. | |

The parade and excitement of the funeral were past, and
now the fears of Joseph’s brothers revive. These fears had
once been kindly stilled. Joseph, great in forbearance and
brotherly love, had wept over his brothers, and promised to
befriend and care for them. While their father lived, they
seemed to have no apprehensions of danger ; but when they
were left orphans, and had no one to stand between them
and Joseph, they began to be afraid. They thought, Joseph
was kind to us for the sake of our father. He loved him,
and reverenced his age, and would not, by afflicting us, add
to the heavy weight of sorrow he had borne. But now he
is dead, Joseph will be free to punish us for all we did to
him. Oh, how we treated him! We would not give him
so much as.a kind word, and at last we sold him. We did
not know but we were selling him into the most bitter bond-
age; and it is not owing to our kindness that he has pros-
pered and come to great honor. |

Filled with fears, they sent a messenger to Joseph with
this message : “ Forgive, I pray thee now, the trespass of
_ thy brethren, and their sin; for they did unto thee evil:
and now, we pray thee, forgive the trespass of the servants
of the God of thy father.”



18 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

Joseph wept as he listened to this message. So far from
being disposed to use his power to punish his brethren, now
that their father was dead, his heart was the more inclined
to mercy, and his tears flowed as he thought of his brothers’
fears. After this, they all came and fell down before him,
offering to be his servants. Thus they again fulfilled Jo-
seph’s dream ; and though they little thought it, their sheaves
were making obeisance to Joseph’s sheaf. So we see how
God can overrule every thing. There is nothing we do that
he does not overrule in his own way, and for his own pur-
poses.

As Joseph’s prathifen prostrated themselves before him,
and offered to be his servants, he did not triumph over them
as he might have done. He stilled their fears, and quieted
their troubled hearts with his kind words. “ Fear not,”
said he; “for am I in the place of God?” Thus he humbly
disclaimed the right to judge them, and with comforting
words assured them of his love. Fearing they might brood
sorrowfully over the past and continue to chide themselves,
he told them that, dark and. unis as events might seem,
God overruled them all; that his being sold into Egypt had
been for the good of all, a that it was no longer necessary
to mourn over it. “You thought evil against me,” said he;
“but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this







THE LAND OF PROMISE 49

day, to save much people alive. Now, therefore, fear ye
not; I will nourish you and your little ones.”

We have reason to believe that until the day of a death
he fulfilled these promises to his brothers.

He lived to be a hundred and ten years old, and died in
the faith of his father Jacob. ‘“ God will surely visit you,”
said he, “and bring you out of this land unto the land which
he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.”

- Children, there is another goodly land which God has
promised to those who love him. It is a fair and glorious
inheritance, lying just over the river of death. It is but a
little way there, and but a little time before we who are
Christ’s redeemed ones shall pass through the gates into the
city of light, the land of promise. As the Israelites lived in —
Egypt a few years, so we live in the world, on our way to —
Canaan, to heaven. If we are the children of God, then
God, through the death of Christ, has given us a sure title
to this blessed land ; and “he will surely visit us,” and bring
us to the possession of our inheritance. As the children of
a king, we shall dwell for ever in that glorious city, “whose
builder and maker is God.” That heavenly land is not flow-
ing with milk and honey, like the earthly Canaan, but with
the pure river of life, that proceedeth from the throne of |
God and the Lamb. If we have been washed in the blood



80 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

of the Lamb, let us keep in view the goodly land we are
soon to possess. Yes, soon; for when a few’ months or
years are gone, we shall pass the river of death, and see,
rising before us, the mansions of light prepared for our hab-
itation. Yet a little while, and we shall be there, tuning
our harps, and singing our songs before Him who brought
us there.
Soon the evening shades will gather ;
Soon we ’ll turn our joy-lit eye

To the mansions of our Father,
To our blessed home on high.



4
co
9
wa
7”)
CG



ay ERENT I pena i



i
ay
is

Sod









Full Text
























i
Fi i"
¥ a sy : n ‘ raat CREE Thy resricts |
. H 3
; 7 *
4 a ‘ : H
\ ve ea,
: a
- : “ hee
5 at j py
rn ~ FA Pee
AN ui rae B Sait: Ugeeimae Be lod
‘ 7 Pt . a pS h
4 53 ; coe BY \
¢ r F - 1 ind
" 4 Fi pina ; fae
, A ‘ se i : : ‘ Lie tate
7} : 4 4 ¥ rn ce Pea sctet f ie
et F aa §
$ - 3 i H a
* iy ‘ 3h
‘ ’ + 8 7 .
Bi say 3 . J ' Ms 4 : i , bf
ear Sane ri wih
‘i ‘ n - Fy ‘
7 : 7 ‘ \ ree Sire, Sind ‘ - Mp5 +} ¥ ie. iar 3
1 t 3 SPapel he eetigh a , "5
n f + - - : hae
> : aie r Rear Perea | ‘ % . 4
3 4g % rae 3 ba rar
: J S '
fi rl Md A 5 r co
r : ant
d - , gi
; ; eat oe
* a Si ‘ S ;
F , : : , 4 4 K
b al rT beet t * A
Hi pia hi : ? 5 wid
Steed Py
} ar
Ps . - aoe,
i " -
i,
> ti
/ 4 Pe ‘
> 3
a
& me
eft -
‘ 5 PT
: ;
iis
- f >
rs
n r
Z ve
. ;
z :
; ay
4
€4
: "
it
r > :
means F
4 $
3 oy bgt Ae
ri ‘ bi
a
7 i r
s
: a ae; i :
r - eee tis ei
: / i) p »
f pe sae TeES Ei iA peat Fs
o oe iy % f R
> 7
: F
eerie tf
, be’ r ante
Lt gee Ul we
eh 5 eh c F &
% : * whee
id ny > i i
i “ aig
x é : F
* -
ee 4 ‘ 3
e ‘ 2 nthe: r
| i i ; ) C 4 â„¢
‘ : rl
zea ba | 3 .
aes ee hi { 7 °
Pe F : ; , ‘Fteits| : i
Bo : - A cast 4




ean Ste
ERIS


ah

JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN,

,
y

2

MOK
We



. PUBLISHED BY THE

AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
150 NASSAU-STREET, NEW YORK. ‘

i
\ «*
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.
Jacob and his sons ee A,

‘CHAPTER II.
Envy and hatred in Joseph’s brothers .

CHAPTER III.
Joseph sold into Egypt

CHAPTER IV.
Joseph among strangers .

CHAPTER V.

Joseph’s unselfish life in prison

CHAPTER VI.
The chief butler’s ingratitude

CHAPTER VII.

From the prison to the palace

bb
ee

. 24

50
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII.

Joseph’s simple, every-day piety

The famine .
- The startling discovery

The arrival of Joseph’s

Jacob’s last days .

CHAPTER IX.
CHAPTER X.

CHAPTER XI.

friends

CHAPTER XIII.

CHAPTER XIV.

Jacob’s last prophetic words

The land of promise .

CHAPTER XV.

CHAPTER. XII.
The kind ruler and provider es

42

. 46

51

- 60

63

. 66

71

~ 8
JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER I.

JACOB AND HIS SONS.



tS oo er eee ae

ago there lived in the land of Ca-
naan—that delightful land, where the grapes hung in mag-
nificent clusters from the vines, and where milk and honey
6 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

were flowing all the year—a man, and the first description
of him would lead us to suppose he was a very happy man.

It is said of him that he “ was a plain man dwelling in
tents,” Gen. 25:27, living a happy, shepherd life, with a
large family of twelve sons around him. There he lived in
Canaan, making no display of his riches, assuming nothing,
and troubling himself little about the fashion of this world.
He knew that fashion and splendor and pomp rob life of
its usefulness and truest ease, and that they who would live ©
well and wisely must live plainly, using the good and pleas- -
ant things of the world, but caring little for what is un-
necessary and burdensome. —

So Jacob lived; but as no man can be happy when his
children do not help to make him happy, so this good plain
man Jacob soon found his pleasant home beginning to
change. His sons began to show their evil dispositions
when they were out of his sight. He might not have known
any thing about it, had not Joseph been grieved at their
conduct and reported it to his father.

It was far from Joseph’s intentions to make trouble for
his brothers, or to alienate from them any of their father’s
love; but their conduct was such, that he thought it his
duty to tell it to his father. Whether they knew that he
did so or not, we are not told; but they soon began to feel
JACOB AND HIS SONS. 1

unkindly towards Joseph, and in their hearts to blame him
when he had done them no wrong. They also saw that
Jacob felt a great tenderness for him, because he was “ the
son of his old age ;’ and more than that, they pereeived that
his lovely character had made him a favorite child. This
was more than their evil hearts could bear ; and when they
saw Joseph walking about in a beautiful gay coat his father
had given him, their hearts burned with jealousy, and they
felt as if they could do almost any thing to get him out of
the way. Filled with this jealous spirit, they commenced
ill-treating him, and thus their downward course began.
When we feel the first stirrings of jealousy in our hearts,
we should hasten to get the evil corrected before it over-
spreads and blights every thing within us. Perhaps you
have some friend—it may be even a brother Joseph—who is
loved more than you; and your heart is often stirred like
the ocean in a storm. There is a fever there worse than
the fever of the body—it is the fever of jealousy. Would
you have this fever allayed, so that you can quietly and
even happily see others loved more than yourself, the only
way is to get your heart filled with love, and then act out
this love to all around you by kindness and doing them
good ; not merely that you may be happy yourself, but that
you may make others happy. and be a blessing wherever you
8 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

go. This will make you lovely, and bring you all the friends
you need. | |

It is said of a great, but wicked man, that his first feeling
of hate sprung from jealousy. He was jealous of a friend,
and soon began to hate him ; and driven onward by jealousy,
he at length murdered him. Let us watch our hearts, and
especially let us bar the door against jealousy.
THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. Qe=

CRAriES ff,

ENVY AND HATRED IN JOSEPHS BROTHERS.

As evil feelings grow worse with time, unless removed
by the grace of God, this withering passion of jealousy grew
stronger and stronger in Joseph’s brothers. At last they
hated Joseph so much that they “could not speak peaceably
unto him ”—a dreadful state of things between brothers.

There is no doubt that Joseph was a kind, loving brother,
and that he did whatever he could to make his home happy.
There is no record of a reproachful look or word that he
ever gave one of his brothers. He did them no wrong, and
his only crime was being so much beloved by his father.
For this they hated him. |

Soon after they began to be jealous of him, God revealed
to him a strange dream; and like a simple-hearted child,
who meant no harm, he told it. He told his brothers that
he dreamed they were all out in a field together binding
sheaves, and that around his sheaf all the other sheaves
gathered and bowed down.

After this he dreamed another dream, and told it, as he
1U JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN. j



did the first. He said he had dreamed that the sun and moon
and eleven stars made obeisance to him. |

As his brothers talked over these dreams together, an-
other bad passion crept into their hearts. One would think
that jealousy was enough; but now envy comes in. “These
dreams are not common dreams,” thought the envious broth-
THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. 11

ers; “they mean something. Joseph is to be greater than
all of us. It is plain enough what these dreams mean.”

While tormented thus by jealousy and envy, the brothers
one day took their father’s flocks and led them to Shechem,
where the pasture was better. They were gone a number of
days, and Jacob began to be anxious about them; so he
called Joseph, and sent him off to see whether it was well
with them and with the flocks.

The innocent are seldom afraid, and Joseph promptly
obeyed his father, and started for Shechem. But when he
reached there, he could not find his brothers. A kind stran-
ger met him as he was wandering about, and told him he
would find his brothers in Dothan. Intent on his errand,
he went towards Dothan. When his brothers saw him in
the distance, alone and unprotected, the horrible thought
of murder took possession of some of their minds; and
quickly after this thought followed another—the thought
of telling a lie to hide the murder, telling their father that
a wild beast had torn him in pieces.

But Joseph’s time to die had not yet come. A great
many things were to happen before he died: he was to
come to greatness, and his brothers were to be the instru-
ments of his greatness; they were to take him by the hand,
and lead him directly to it. They did not intend any such
12 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

thing ; they had only mortal eyes, and could not see that
their own acts were to bring about the very events they
would have dreaded, could they have foreseen them.

But the all-seeing God, whose eyes are upon the ways
of man, marking all his goings, saw exactly what the end
would be; and more than this, He was regulating and con-
trolling the whole himself, and using these cruel brothers to
do his will. Oh what heart that has learned what God can do
for it, need fear? He may lead us by a way that we know
not. Darkness may be around us, and clouds above us, yet
we need not be afraid, for God is caring for us all the time.
By his overruling power, the bitterest thing in life can be
turned into the sweetest blessing ; and even our enemies may,
in his hands, bring us richer blessings than our friends.

Joseph, without suspicion of what was to befall him,
approaches his brothers. The plan to murder him was
quickly matured. But Reuben, who was the oldest son,
was moved with pity for his brother, and for his father too ;
and the idea struck him that, if Joseph could be thrown
alive into-a pit, it would do him no great harm; for as
soon as the others turned their backs and were out of the
way, he would help him out of the pit, and restore him to
his father. So the beautiful coat that Jacob had given him
was taken off, and he was thrown into the pit.
THE ENVIOUS BROTHERS. 13

You nity’ imagine how a brother’s pleading cry rose |
from the pit, and how he begged to be taken out. But his
tears and pleadings did no good; they could not soften
hearts hardened by jealousy and envy; and there Joseph
remained in the pit. Poor Joseph! far from his father,
unpitied by his brothers, and left alone to die. His heart
sinks; he trembles.and prays, and Sr again ue begs to be
tiles out.

Ah, Joseph, you seem to be in a dreadful place, and it is
enough to break a tender heart to look at you; but there
is a guardian God close by your side; and though you are
in a pit, you are on the way to a ¢hrone, and such a throne
as few kings in this world have ever sat on.

Little friends, no matter how deep and dark may be the
pit into which you or I may be thrown, we need not be
afraid. God knows what is best for us. He knows the
character of every one of his children, and knows what is
necessary to prepare them to live and to die; and if we
trust in him, he will place us exactly where we can get the
ereatest good, and there we ought to be willing to be. Let
your prayer to God be, that his will may be done, and not
yours; and promise him that you will trust him to lead you
wherever he will. If God give you riches and honor and
friends, and many joys in life, be thankful to him; and if he
*4

14 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

give you poverty and shame and enemies and sorrows, still

be thankful. All the gifts of God, whether they be pleas-
ant or otherwise, will, if received by a thankful, loving,
trusting, obedient heart, work out for you an “exceeding -
and eternal weight of glory.” |

It may not always be easy for you ito realize this. But
when you open your eyes in heaven, when you there sit at
the Saviour’s feet, and hear from him how he redeemed you
and led you home, you will understand it. He will make
it all plain to you; and you will then thank him for the sor-
rows that oppressed your heart, for the tears you shed, and
for all the providences that seemed so mysterious. What
you do not know now, you will know hereafter. Vow you
must live by fazth.
JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT. 15

CHAPTER III.

JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT.

JosEPH was left in the pit for a time; and while he was
there, perhaps he had some idea that God would ingore,
and send come one to his rescue.

But the last hope seemed gone, when a company of Ish-
maelites came along. The brothers, still restless with jeal-
ousy and envy, began to talk of selling him; and at last
they lifted him out of the pit, and though is was worth
more than mines of gold to his father, sold him for twenty
pieces of silver.

Now Reuben’s plan to rescue him was of no use. “ ‘Oh,
what a pity,” you may say, “what a pity that Reuben had
gone away; what a pity that he allowed any thing to call
him off, when, if he had stayed close by the pit, he could have
saved him.” Pretty soon Reuben comes back, finds Joseph
gone, and in the extremity of his agony rends his clothes, and
exclaims, ‘“‘ The child is not: and I, whither shall I go?”
The brothers were as indifferent to his anguish as to
Joseph’s, but went on in their wicked work. They were
first jealous, then envious, and afterwards deceitful and
16 JOSEPH AND HIs BRETHREN.



hypocritical. To shield themselves from blame, they killed
a kid, dipped Joseph’s coat in the blood, and took it home
with them, and told their father they had found that coat
all soaked in blood. Ah, thought Jacob, this coat tells the
mournful story ; Joseph has been torn in pieces by wild -
beasts. And he rent his clothes, and put on sackcloth.

+

-.
JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT... | li

Though his sons saw him bowed down with grief, they
continued to wear a mask when they might have consoled
him by letting him know that Joseph was alive. This
would have been a great comfort to poor Jacob, but it was
withheld. All love to their father seemed lost in their evil
passions. And to all this they added the sin of hypocrisy ;
they pretended to mourn with their father, and tried to
comfort him, when they knew Joseph had not been slain,
but was on the way to Egypt. .

So itis that one sin leads to another. No heart ever
felt the full blight of sin in a moment, in an hour, or in a
day. One sin stains the soul, another makes the stain deep-
er and the guilt greater, and so an evil character is formed.
Children, let it be your prayer and mine that we may tremble
at the first approach of sin; that we may resist temptation,
and fly to the only safe place, the warm, quiet, sure hiding.
place under our heavenly Father’s broad wing of love.

There we may take our rest,
There undisturbed may hide,
Sheltered and sweetly pressed
Close to our Father’s side.

He loves to hide us there ;

He loves to feel us cling,
While round us all he folds
His broad, protecting wing.

, ete.
Joseph, ete »
18 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER IV.

JOSEPH AMONG STRANGERS.

THE next thing we hear of Joseph is, that the Ishmaelites
have taken him to Egypt, and sold him to Potiphar. There,
far away from home, without any friend near him, alone in
a land of strangers, he found favor in the eyes of those
around him. Potiphar was very much pleased with him, |
and the secret of it was, that the Lord was pleased with
him. It is said that “the Lord was with him,” and “he
was a prosperous man.” The truth is, no man is prosperous
if God be not with him; and we should all believe this, and
let our every-day prayer be, that God may dwell with us,
and that we may have no other prosperity than that which
comes from him. No man, no child can have any thing |
better said of him than this, “The Lord is with him.”

It seems that from the moment Joseph became overseer
in Potiphar’s house, every thing went on prosperously.
Whatever Joseph touched shone with a new lustre, even
with the bright blessing of God. Potiphar was a worldly
man, and did not care to please God ; yet it did not escape
his eye that it was a glorious thing to be a son or a daugh-
JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 19.

ter of God, even were there no life beyond this present life.
Joseph’s blameless character won his confidence. Though
he was a stranger, and had no credentials to prove that he
was a good, trusty young man, yet Potiphar soon gave up
every thing to his care, and made himself perfectly easy,
because he saw that the Lord was with Joseph and directed
his way.

If you want: the confidence of others, the sure way to
secure it is to have the love of God warming your heart
and shining in your life. Yet you will sometimes have
trials. The sun may shine very bright one day, and be
under a cloud the next day. When God wants to teach us
to trust entirely in him, when he wants to give us a new
lesson in faith, he sometimes takes the light away, and calls
us to walk in the dark, and believe all the time that he will
take care of us. He wants to teach us how to walk when
we have no sunlight nor moonlight nor starlight upon our
path. God can lead us in the dark as well as in the light.
He can see, and it makes no difference whether we can or
not; and God wishes us to believe him, take him at his
word, and, whenever it is his will, walk in the dark.

A mother was once trying to teach her child how to
trust God. His mind seemed slow to take in the idea of
faith; but she said, “I can teach you what faith is, Charley,
20 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

so that I think you will understand it. Get your hat, and
go out into the yard with me.”

Charley hurried to get his hat, and was soon out-doors
with his mother. |

“Now, Charley,” said she, “shut your eyes, and walk
right along.” |

‘“ Oh, mother, I can’t,” said he, “ there are ever so many
stones lying all around; and there’s that big tree that blew
down last week, I shall stumble over it and hurt myself.”

“Well, then, take hold of my hand and walk, but keep
your eyes shut.” |

Charley obeyed, and walked safely along, and did not
feel afraid. “I don’t feel afraid, mother,” said he ; “I can’t
see any thing myself, but yon can see, and I’ve got fast hold
of your hand.”

“ And you don’t feel at all afraid of getting hurt ?”

‘No, mother, for you can see, and you know just where
to lead me.” | 7 |

“But, Charley, suppose I should lead you in a rough
path, over stones, and among bushes.”

“ Oh, it would n’t hurt me, mother. I should know all the
time that it was you, and that you would n’t let me fall.”

This little boy’s answers may help to show what true
faith is. Charley had unwavering faith in his mother; and
JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 21

God asks of us to-have faith in him. If we can say, where-
ever we are led, that we know it is God who leads us, and
that he will never let us fall, this is one exercise of the faith
he requires of us.

It may be that Joseph needed more of this faith in God,
for the next thing we hear of him is that he is in prison!
Happily for him, he was there through no fault of his own,
but by the sin of another. It seemed a dark hour when he
was falsely accused, and thrown into prison ; but God is
good, and it is his plan to discipline us and try our faith, so
that we may be all he would have us to be... Yet we do not
always see this to be’so; and poor Joseph may have rea-
soned in this way: “What can all this mean? Every thing
went smoothly at first. I was treated with confidence, and
I saw that God had made my: cause his own. Now he has
left me, and there are none to care for me. Here I am in
prison, with no hope of getting out. What can it mean ?”

Ah, poor Joseph, you seem worse off than ever. You
are not only in a strange land, far away from home, but you
are in a prison; the last place in the world to give a man
comfort. Surely your prospects are dreary. The sky is
dark, the clouds are heavy, and you are under a terrible
storm. |

But in this world we can seldom tell, from the appear-
22 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

ance of things, what is going to happen. It is a blessed
truth that the God who made the sky can paint a rainbow
on it, and roll away the heaviest clouds, and let the sun
shine through. It does not take long for the great God to
change the face of things. It needs but his touch, his word,
and the whole is done.

My little friends, remember this. If you want relief
from some great trouble, or if you long for some great bless-
ing, look up to the Almighty God. If we were down in
Egypt, where no one knew or loved us, prayer could bring
us what we need. God knows exactly how to help his lit-
tle, weak, ignorant children, when they have neither the
strength nor the knowledge to help themselves. What they
have to do is to go where he-calls them to go, and trust in.
him for all the help they need.

As Joseph was a good young man, and the al was
with him, he no doubt prayed very earnestly in prison; yet
he doubtless said, “ Not my will, but thine, O God, be done.”
I think so, because that is the only kind of prayer that will
keep one quiet ; and Joseph was very quiet in prison. This
prison-life was a sudden change, and more than he could
explain; yet he was quiet asa lamb, He did not make any
ado, as people are apt to do when suddenly driven from
prosperity to adversity, or from a palace to a prison, He

*
JOSEPH IN EGYPT. 23

did not think himself worse off than any one else, and trou-
ble his brain and fret his spirit to see how he could get out
of prison. He went to work to comfort the other prisoners:
although his heart was full of his own sorrows, yet he was
touched with sympathy for the others; and when he saw
them cast down, he kindly asked, “Wherefore look ye so
sadly to-day ?” |

It seems that the keeper of the prison perceived just
what a character Joseph’s was, for he did not watch him at
all; and he not only let him take care of himself, but he
asked him to guard the others. He actually put all the
other prisoners under his charge; and Joseph made a trusty
keeper, because the Lord kept him. They only can safely
be trusted whom God trusts. Joseph was one whom God
chose to do his good pleasure; and little by little He used
him to work out his bright designs. Had Joseph been pin-
ing under his afflictions, or murmuring at his lot, God would
not have honored and blessed and trusted him as he did.
In his quiet, submissive heart, God could dwell, leading him
onward in the path in which He would have him go.
24 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

‘CHAPTER V.
JOSEPH’S UNSELFISH LIFE IN PRISON.

In prison, Joseph’s unselfish character shone brightly.
In going about the prison, he found his hands full ; just as
people always do when they have hearts of ready, quick
sympathy, and of earnest purpose to bless others.

T'wo important prisoners had been put in his charge, the -
“chief butler,” and the “ chief baker,” men who had served
Pharaoh the king, but were now in prison as criminals.
Both dreamed a dream in the prison, and were full of trou-
ble because there was no one to interpret it.

Believing that God would give him the power to help
them out of their difficulty, Joseph kindly asked them to tell
him their dreams. The chief butler’s dream was an omen of
good, but the chief baker’s dream had a sad interpretation.

As soon as the chief baker told his dream, Joseph per-
ceived its terrible meaning, and plainly told him what it
was: that the three baskets upon his head meant three
days; and that as the birds ate the baked meats out of the
upper basket, so they would eat his flesh as he hung upon a
tree.

J
Ay
JOSEPH IN PRISON 20



This was a hard truth, and the chief baker must have
trembled and turned pale as he listened to it; yet Joseph
did not withhold it, but in simple honesty and in the fear of
God told it all just as it was, though he did not know but it
would offend the chief baker and make him very angry.
Besides this, he must have shrunk from telling the prisoner
26 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

his doom ; for he had a kind, warm heart for all in trouble.
It was only pain to him to tell the chief baker he must die;
still he did it.

If all the world were like Joseph, there would be no
flatterers in it. If we were all so good and truthful and
plain-hearted, that we could understand and trust each
other, how delightful it would be; and how much nearer
we should get to that high standard we ought to reach, that
of loving our neighbors as ourselves. A plain, honest-
hearted friend, and no other, deserves the name of friend.
He will dare to say what will be painful to us, when neces:
sary, and will kindly tell us our faults ; and we may usually
rely upon him as just such a friend as we need. It is not
probable that any truthful, sincere Joseph will ever have to
tell us that we are to be hung upon a tree, and that the —
birds of the air are to eat our flesh; yet we may have to
hear what will greatly try us, and make our hearts ache.
Then we must rejoice in it all as very good, remembering
that the wounds of a friend are better than the kisses of an
enemy. Itseems that Joseph told the truth, and interpreted
the chief baker’s dream correctly ; for in three days the
poor prisoner was taken out of prison and hung.

The chief butler’s fate was very different. He had
dreamed of a grape-vine, laden with large, beautiful clusters
JOSEPH IN PRISON. 27

of grapes. He had dreamed of holding Pharaoh’s cup in
his hand as in former days, and of pressing the wine into
the cup. This dream, as Joseph interpreted it, foretold the
poor man’s restoration to the favor and employment of
Pharaoh. |

As the chief butler listened to the interpretation of his
dream, he must have loved Joseph; for people generally
love those who bring them good news. It is always pleas-
ant to tell people what they like to hear; we can run fast
when we have good tidings to carry; and no doubt Joseph's
eye lighted up, and his whole face beamed with happiness,
when he told the good news to the chief butler.

But Joseph was himself a poor prisoner; and no doubt
his heart thrilled with pain at the thought of his own sor-
rows. As he talked with the chief butler, and told him that
in three days he would be no more a prisoner, he added,
“ But think on me when it shall be well with thee, and show
kindness, I pray thee, unto me, and make mention of me unto
Pharaoh, and bring me out of this house; for indeed I was |
stolen away out of the land of the Hebrews: and here also
have . done nothing that wen should pub me into the dun-
geon.”

There is nothing in all the history of Joseph more beau:
- tiful than these few words of gentle pleading with the chief
28 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

butler. He simply asked the chief butler to think of him,
and speak a few kind words for him to Pharaoh. He said
nothing of the cruelty of his brothers. He only said, “I
was stolen away out of the land of the Hebrews.” He made
no complaint of being in prison, as he might havedone. He
could have said a great deal about the injustice of those
that had put him in prison, but all he said was, “I have
done nothing that they should put me into the dungeon.”

These beautiful words of Joseph should teach us always
to speak gently of others, and to cover their faults when we
can. When we are tried by those who return unkindness
for kindness, it is good to pour out all our grief into the ear
of some wise and good friend, and we may do it; but if we
are like Joseph, we shall not go from one to another, and
complain of the unkindness from which we are suffering.
As he said, so we shall say, whenever we have to give any
answer : “I have done nothing to deserve it.” This is enough
for us to say. There is One who, in his own time, and in
his own way, will say the rest; am save us “to the utter-
most.” Remember, that when you do no more than simply
tell the truth, and appeal to God, your heavenly Father
will speak for you. We may take a great deal of pains to
defend ourselves, but we shall never be well defended unless
we have God for our defender.
JQOSEPHVIN PRISON oO ~ 29

If you who read this story have not made a friend of
the creat God, and have never gone to him and leaned on
his bosom, and been hushed to rest when the little trials of
life were pressing heavily, go now, and lay your head on the
heart that beats for you as no human heart ever did. Love
Christ, and he will love you, and take you close to his side,
and be your friend and defender for ever.

a “=i ae
+
30 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER VI.
THE CHIEF BUTLER’S INGRATITUDE.

We are told in that good book whose words are all
truth, that if a true Christian does no more than, from love
to Christ, to give a cup of cold water to one who is thirsty,
it is remembered by Him whose eye sees the smallest thing.
Our almighty Friend has myriads of worlds to keep in. -
motion and regulate and control ; and it is very wonderful
that he should notice every little thing we do, and bless us
for it too, if it is done from love to him, though it seems to
us so very little. All we can say about this is, that it is
like our heavenly Father. I wish we could say, it is like
us. But in this world we do not always treat each other as
God treats us. We do not always remember each other.

How did the chief butler do? If we did not know, and
were asked what we supposed his conduct was, we should
‘say that the very first thing he did after his release, was to
talk to Pharaoh about J oseph, and plead his cause, and beg
that he might be taken out of prison. We should say that
he went immediately to work, and left no stone unturned
to get him out of prison.
THE BUTLER’S INGRATITUDE. 31

But the truth was, that as soon as he was safely out of
prison himself, he was troubled no more about Joseph. It
seems too much to be believed, and yet it is true he did not
say a word for his brother prisoner; he seems to have for-
gotten him entirely. Probably when Joseph asked him to
remember him, and tell Pharaoh about his case, he made
very fair promises, and led Joseph to think he should do
his utmost to reward him for his kindness. Yet what did
he do? Nothing. i .

How is it with us? Do our fathers and mothers, broth-
ers, sisters, and friends, feel in their hearts the sweet return
of all they have given us? They have held us up when we
were falling; they have wiped away our tears; they have
told us to be of good cheer; they have fed and clothed and
sheltered and cheered us, and the debt we owe them is very
great. Let us see to it that we pay it generously, and live
to bless others as we have been blessed.

If you would remember others, and never fail to render
them kindness and love, think how God has remembered
you; think how all the vast concerns of his great universe
have never led him for one moment to forget you. Think
of this as you ought, and there will never be any who will
have reason to say that you did not remember them, but
forgot them.
CHAPTER VII.

FROM THE PRISON TO THE PALACE.

JOSEPH was yet in prison, and why he was still there
was probably more than he could understand. He wondered
why he had never heard from the chief butler, and what he
had been about all the time, that he had not helped him out
of prison. 7

At last, after two long years, the sun begins to shine
through the dark sky and gild the prison walls. Whether
Joseph’s eyes, that had long been watching, saw the sunlight _
coming or not, we do not know.

Pharaoh dreamed that he stood on the bank of a river ;
and while he stood there, seven fat kine or cows came up
out of the river, and after them, seven poor, lean ones ; and
these lean ones ate up the seven fat ones. This was the
king’s first dream. Then he dreamed again that seven fine,
full ears came out on one. stalk, and after them, seven poor
ears; and that these bad ears devoured the good ears.

Now the king was puzzled, and troubled too. We some-
times think that any one who is “happy as a king,” must be
very happy; but the king of Egypt was in perplexity and
JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 33

fear, and nobody seemed to be able to help him. The first
thing he did to get out of trouble, was to call all the “magi-
cians” and “wise men” together. ‘“ Magicians” and “ wise
men” were imposing names, and Pharaoh thought these great
men could soon help him out of his troubles, for they had
the reputation of being able to do wonderful things, that no
one else could do. But how surprised Pharaoh must have
been, and how blank he must have looked, when he found
that with all their magic and wisdom they could do nothing
for him. They were men who made a great show of know-
ledge on every occasion ; but veal knowledge, and the show
of it, are two very different things. One is priceless sub-
stance, the other an empty shadow.

_ If these magicians and wise men do not know enough tc
help me out of these straits, who does? thought Pharaoh ;
and where shall I look next? The chief butler saw his per-
plexity, and all at once thought of Joseph, and remembered
his power to interpret dreams. He must have been heartily
ashamed to speak of him, when he had shown no kind
remembrance of him for two years; and he told the truth
when he called this forgetfulness a “ fault.” Joseph, his
friend and comforter, had been in prison two years, yet he
had done nothing for him, but stayed at court with Pharaoh

in ease and comfort. At last his slumbering thoughts are
Joseph, etc. 3
34 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

aroused, and he tells Pharaoh about the “ Hebrew servant ”
who had been with him in prison two years before, and how
he had interpreted the two dreams.

At any other time Pharaoh would have ciao the idea
that a servant, a Hebrew servant too, was able to interpret
dreams ; but when people get into great trouble, they are
generally glad enough of help from any quarter. To turn
from the magicians and wise men to_a Hebrew servant, no
doubt seemed to Pharaoh great condescension, especially for
a king; but in this case, he thought little of rank. This
did not enter into his mind, now that he was in trouble.

He sent in great haste for Joseph to come to court. Jo-
seph might have hesitated, and been afraid to go, not knowing
what it all meant; but he did not hesitate. He immediately
made himself ready, and went to Pharaoh to see what he
wanted. The king opened his heart to the Hebrew servant.
He told him what the difficulty was—that he had had trou-
blesome dreams, and could find no interpreter for them, and
that he had heard of his power to interpret dreams.

“It is not in me. God shall give Pharaoh an answer
of peace,” was Joseph’s humble answer, as he looked up to
God to enlighten and teach him what to say. And here we
may learn a lesson of strong faith-and beautiful humility.
“God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace.” Joseph
JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 35

was not afraid that his interpretation would prove false.
He knew that God would teach him what to say, and he
ventured boldly upon him.

In these days, no one is called of God to interpret
dreams, or to tell what lies in the future ; Joseph’s faith was
the faith of miracles, a faith which we are not now called
to exercise. Yet we are all, even the smallest and weakest
child, commanded to believe with our whole hearts, and
never for a moment to doubt the sure word of our heavenly
Father. He has made it very safe and easy for us to trust
him. His promises rebuke all our doubts, and command us
to believe and never be afraid that he will break his word.
Now let us all, as the children of God, believe in our Fa-
ther, and live a life of faith. |

Joseph’s reply to Pharaoh teaches us not only faith, but
humility. Pharaoh said to Joseph, “I have heard say of
thee, that thou canst understand a dream to interpret it.”
This was a great deal for a king to say to a Hebrew pris-
oner. If Joseph really possessed this power, it would at
once place him very high in the opinion of the king. Joseph,
if he had been so disposed, might have answered, “ Yes, my
lord, that is my gift. I interpreted the dreams of two pris-
oners while I was in your prison, the dreams of your chief
baker and chief butler ; and [ can now interpret yours, if
36 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

you will tell it to me.” Joseph might have replied in this
way to the king; but with true humility he answered, “ It
is not in me. God shall give Pharaoh an answer of peace.”

Whatever good thing we do in this world, may we do it
as Joseph did. May we lay aside all pride in what we can
do ; may we never admire ourselves for it, as though we had
done some great thing ; may we be humble and lowly, and
always say, when flattered or praised, “It is not in me ;”
and may we understand, as Joseph did, that every good
thing is of God. A man or a child who trusts in himself is
very weak. They alone are strong who are strong in
God. ee

Joseph had this glorious strength. He interpreted the
dreams correctly, for God was with him. He told the king
there would be seven years of great plenty ; when every
thing would grow in great abundance, when the fields and
the gardens would be full of grain and fruit, and when
every thing would yield a hundred-fold. Then he told him
there would follow seven years of famine, and that the years
of abundance were given that he might prepare for the
famine. He told him he must select a wise, capable man to
help him get ready for this great famine; that he must put
the whole land of Egypt under the direction of such a ruler,
with officers under him; that these men must all work, and
JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 37

gather one-fifth of every thing that grew, and have it all
stored away for the hard famine that was to come.
Pharaoh listened to Joseph, and believed all he said.
If we look only upon the surface of things, we shall say
this was very strange. Pharaoh believe all that Joseph
told him! Why, who was Joseph? A young man, who
could not be expected to know as much as an old man.
He was a stranger too, from a foreign land. How could
Pharaoh trust him without knowing more about him? Ap-
pearances were very much against him: he had been brought
to Egypt, and sold there, and for more than two years had
been in prison. Yet Pharaoh did not turn away from him
when he interpreted the dreams. God was with him, and
the king saw it, and was impressed with the fact that he
was the very man to be at the head of affairs, and to pre-
pare them for the famine. So he said, “ Can we find such
a one as this is, 2 man in whom the spirit of God is?”
Then he turned to Joseph, and said, “Forasmuch as God
hath shown thee all this, there is none so discreet and wise
as thou art: thou shalt be over my house, and according
unto thy word shall all my people be ruled: only in the
throne will I be greater than thou.”
_ When he had said this to Joseph, he immediately gave
orders to have his dress changed ; he was arrayed in the
38 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

finest linen, a splendid chariot was given him to ride in,
and he was made ruler over all Egypt. The king also took
off his own ring, and put it upon Joseph’s hand; and he put
a gold chain about his neck ; and Joseph went out from the
presence of the king, clothed with all the emblems of au-
thority. | |

As he went away, and began the duties of his new office,
and as he rode in a chariot, honored by all the Egyptians,
he must have had a great many thoughts all to himself.
Before this, almost every thing had seemed to turn against
him. When the chief butler forgot him, there seemed to be
no one to remember him; but during all the long months
he was in prison God remembered him, and the eye that
never for a moment closes in sleep foresaw the time of his
_ poor prisoner’s deliverance. God was working it all out
for him. |

It seems to me I can almost see Joseph, as he sits in his
chariot-with a pleasant, yet serious face. Ah, Joseph, you
_ do not look quite happy yet. You have gold, and jewels,
and precious things ; you ride in a chariot, and have great
power ; but there is a shadow on your face, a sorrow in
your heart. You are thinking of your home in Canaan, of

your father ; and he, poor old man, is thinking of you, and

going down with sorrow to the grave, for he thinks he shall

=
<2
oe

- *
4 o ee
oe
- i
; , * x
8
« SS - ¥ -

i”
“ay

















see your face no more. But wait a, little longer, Joseph.
The God who has done-so much for you, can and will do

more.
_. And this is the way God treats all his true children.

Se
*. peur

We shall often be in sorrow and perplexity; the clouds will
gather above our heads, yet the same love that spread them

a


40 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

there will roll them away, and in due time show us why they
ever gathered there. It is hard to believe it, but it is true,
that the sorrows which make our hearts ache, the troubles
we cannot understand, are designed as blessings, and will
make us better and happier, if we bear them patiently, and
wait quietly for God to remove them when he pleases.
Though Joseph had been made almost equal with the
king, though he rode in a chariot, and dressed like a prince,
and had the homage of the whole Egyptian nation, yet no -
doubt his heart was often very heavy as he thought of his
father, and wondered if he should ever see him again.
Often too his prayer went up to God that he might once
more see his home, and throw his arms around his father’s
neck. Yet he did not give himself up to sorrow, and do
nothing but mourn and cry until he could see through all
his troubles ; he held up his head like a man, like a good
man, who knew that every thing would come out right if he
trusted. in God. He went to work, and performed all the
duties of. his office as ruler over the land of Egypt, hoetng
in God to take care of his sorrows.
This is a beautiful lesson for us. None of us can expect
_ to be wholly free from the troubles of life. They will in-
trude even into our brightest joys; and we shall often feel
our hearts in pain. We may have to carry the burden of

thw
af
JOSEPH’S EXALTATION. 41

great sorrows. Oh, when the burden shall fall upon you or
me, may we look-up to God with a strong, trusting heart,
and not forget that we have a work in life, a mission to ful-
fil, and that God will sustain us under the burden, and help
us to do all he has called us to do. A few more years, and
you will be men and women ; life will bring you new joys,
but it will also bring you ame sorrows. Oh, then be strong,
and look up to God, and he will help you to do your work
of love in the world, whatever your:sorrows may be. He
will meet your case, and like Joseph, you will live an active
and useful life, and be kept from — the slave of verry
Sorrow.
42 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

Ws







CHAPTER VIII.
JOSEPH’S SIMPLE, EVERY-DAY PIETY.

JOSEPH gathered grain “as the sand of the sea,” it is
said, and he filled all the storeheuses with it, and made great
preparations for the famine. The whole seven years was
JOSEPH’S ACTIVE PIETY.— 43

no doubt a very busy time; and Joseph’s cool, steady head,
and quiet, trusting heart whe occupied in preparation for
the hard famine.

Probably Pharaoh was more and more convinced that
Joseph was just the man they needed for such a time. If
he was a man who thought much, and knew how to put
ideas together, he must have seen why it was that this He-
brew was sold into Egypt, why he was thrown into prison,
and how God was using him now to be a greater blessing
to the Egyptian nation than any other man in it.

And then, too, he must have had his eyes.open after this,
to see that even a poor Hebrew prisoner, who had the Lord .
for his God, could do a great deal more than all the magi-
cians and wise men. ‘Those who say the least often do the
most ; and there is nothing more beautiful than a life filled
with deeds of love that are never told. Remember this,
little friends, and never display what you do, nor seek a
reputation even for goodness. Be good, and do good with
all your might. Let every day of your life be filled with
acts of goodness, but let your lips be slow to speak your

own praise. The Pharisees sounded a trumpet before them ;

they made their good deeds public; even when they prayed,
they chose the corners of the streets, where they would be
observed. ‘Their reward was an earthly one, and a poor
44 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

reward it was. Joseph did not seek such a reward ; he did
not toil for a great name, and he never boasted of what he
dia... | .

If you and I were to spend all our lives in a prison, and
the good we did was shut up there, with no eye but God’s
to see it, our deeds would be as fair and our lives as shining
in the sight of God, as if we were seen of men and praised
through all the world. Whatever we do, God knows it;
let this be enough for us. One approving glance from God
is worth all that men and angels can say about us. Joseph
made no display of himself and his goodness. He served
God in simplicity, and lived a life of humble, unostentatious
obedience. ,

One thing we ought to notice particularly in Joseph:
he never separated religion from the duties of life. No
doubt he prayed, and talked much about God; but he also
toiled hard to gather grain; he worked to prepare for the
famine: there was more true religion in Joseph’s every-day
work than we perhaps have ever suspected.

To go to church all day on the Sabbath, to read God’s
word, and sing and pray, is only a small part of what we
have to do in this world. These might be called the luxu- .
ries of religion, not its toils, and self-sacrifice. If Joseph
were alive now, he would tell us the same thing. He would
JOSEPH’S ACTIVE PIETY. 45

tell us all to go to work; to give the hungry food, and the
naked clothes; to ease aching hearts, and start smiles upon
sad faces, and do whatever we can for needy ones around
us. This is the way Joseph would talk; for so he acted.
God has given us a beautiful world, with enough in it
for all to do; the child as well as the man may be a reaper
in the broad field. There is grain enough for us all to
gather; there is many a storehouse to be filled; no one
need say, “There is nothing for me to do.”
Each child, however young,
May do his little part;
May drive away the gloom
From a sin-darkened heart;

May “speak a word in season ;”
May do a deed of love;

And lead some wayward soul
To Him who dwells above.
46 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER IX.

THE FAMINE.

THE famine was severe, not only in Egypt, but in all the
surrounding country. Even in Canaan, the land of milk
and honey, they began to feel the pangs of hunger, with no
prospect of any thing to relieve them. And Jacob’s family,
those cruel sons, who years before had thrown their brother
into a pit intending to leave him there to die, were crying
for bread.

Jacob saw them looking at each other, as if they would
ask, “ What are we to do? Where are we to get bread to
keep us from starving?” And he told them he had heard
there was grain in Egypt, and advised them to go there and
buy bread before they all died of starvation. So all of
them but Benjamin started for Egypt. ‘“ You may all go but
Benjamin,” said Jacob; “I will keep him at home, for fear
something will happen to him.” Poor old man, his heart
clung to Benjamin. “Joseph is dead,” he said to himself;
“ Joseph is dead; I shall never see my darling child again;
and I cannot send my Benjamin away, for I may lose him
THE FAMINE. . | AT

too.” His remonstrances were so great that Benjamin was
left with him, and the other brothers all went to Egypt.

Joseph was the governor of the land; and it was he who
sold grain to all who came to buy. As he was selling one
day, who should come to buy but his brothers, ten of them;
and they all bowed down before him with great reverence.
Joseph immediately recognized them; but they did not know
him, nor imagine they were now fulfilling the dreams they
once so hated. When they sold Joseph, they felt sure they
would hear no more of him nor his dreams; but their selling
him was the very act that led on to the time when, as Jo-
seph dreamed, all their sheaves made obeisance to Joseph’s
sheaf. | |

There they stood, bowing before Joseph; and when he
looked upon them, and saw they were his brothers, what
thoughts rushed into his mind; how.all the past came before
him; and how his heart must have leaped with the desire
to say, “I am Joseph!” But he controlled his feelings for
a time, and looked quietly upon them. And that he might
bring their sins before them, and lead them to think of all
the wrong they had committed, he treated them very rough-
ly, calling them spies ; and he had them shut up under guard
three days.

There, in confinement, in a strange country, they thought
48 ~ JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

of the time when they sold Joseph; and when Reuben said,
“Did I not tell you not to do it? Don’t you remember
what I said, and how you would not hear me? Ah, my
brothers, you took Joseph out of the pit, and sold him; and
now we are all being punished for it. The lord of the land
has shut us up; when we shall get out of all this trouble no
one knows. We do not know but years of confinement are
before us.” And all the brothers talked together about their
cruel treatment of Joseph. They said, “ We saw his agony,
and his tears; we heard him plead to be taken out of the
pit, and sent home to our father. But we would not hear
him; we sold him, we sold our own brother; and now we
must meet our doom.”

Joseph heard all this; but they did not suppose he
understood their language, and they talked without any
restraint. It was too much for Joseph to bear, and he had
to go away to weep. He soon came back; and to make
their repentance deeper, he took his brother Simeon, and
bound him in chains before their eyes, and sent him away to
prison. ‘“ Now,” said he to his brothers, “I will keep this
man in prison, until-you go home and come back with Ben-
jamin. Bring anna here, and then I will believe ant
you are not spies.”

They had to do as Joseph told them, and go home with-
THE FAMINE. ez 49

out Simeon. Every hour they seemed to be getting deeper
and deeper into trouble. On their way home, they opened
their sacks of grain, and there they found their money, the
money they owed Joseph, and which should have been in
his purse. We paid for the grain, thought they, but here is
all the money in the top of our sacks. What can this mean?
Where will all this trouble end?

When they reached home, they told their father what
the governor of Egypt had said; and it was sad news for
poor Jacob. He had spent many years sorrowing for Jo-
seph; and now he was an old man, and his heart clung to
Benjamin; but the word had come. Ere long their food
would all be gone. He must give him up. Perhaps he
would never see him again. -How could he let him go!

_ Reuben tried to comfort his father, and promised to take
good care of Benjamin, and. bring him safely home again.

Jacob consented; and his last words to his children
were, “God Almighty give you mercy before the man, that
he may send away your other brother, and Benjamin. If I
be bereaved of my children, I am bereaved.” He was a
heart-broken father ; and now in his old age, his troubles
were more than he felt able to bear. - Left alone, without a
child to comfort him, he awaited the return of his children
with good or evil tidings.

Joseph, ete. 4
JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

or
©

He had sent a present to the lord of the land; and com-
forted himself with the thought that it might incline his
heart to mercy and kindness, as presents often do. Jacob
had, many years before, sent a present to his brother Ksau,
to appease his wrath. Perhaps he remembered this, and
thought that the governor of Egypt could be conciliated in
the same way. So he sent him a present, and waited to see
what would be the result.
THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. ol

CHAPTER Xs
ait Ee STARTLING DISCOVERY.

~Wuen Joseph knew that his brothers had come back to
Kegypt, he ordered them to be taken to his own house, and
a sumptuous dinner to be prepared for them. This made
them still more afraid. They feared that the governor had
some bad design against them, and went to his house with .
trembling : sin and fear go ‘together. “The wicked flee
when no man pursueth, but the righteous are bold as a lion.”
They alone who seek to do right in all things, are fearless
and courageous. Such can go into a lion’s den, or walk
through the fire.

It is no wonder that Joseph’s brothers trembled every
step they took. They first went to the steward of the house,
and told him their fears, and talked with him about the
money they had found in their sacks. ‘“ Oh, sir,” said they,
“we came indeed down to buy food. And it came to pass,
- when we came to the inn, that we opened our sacks, and
behold, every man’s money was in the mouth of his sack, our
money in full weight; and we have brought it again in our
hand.” In their distress, they were appealing to the stew-

«
o2 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

ard; but when Joseph pleaded with them to take him out
of the pit, they would not hear. Their hearts were hard,
and their ears were closed; and had the steward now
turned away from them, as they turned away from Joseph,
they would have been justly punished ; but he did not. He
answered them, “ Peace be to you, fear not: your God, and
the God of your father, hath given you treasure in your
sacks.” And to allay their fears still more, he brought
Simeon to them.

Soon Joseph came home, and he again met his brothers
without making himself known to them. ~ But his heart was
full of tender feeling when he asked, “Is your father well,
the old man of whom ye spake? Is he yet alive?” And
when he looked upon Benjamin, his youngest brother, and
said, ‘Is this your younger brother? God be gracious to
thee, my son,” his heart was so deeply moved that he had to
hurry to his own room to weep alone. :

It was a trying day with Joseph, for the memory of his |
home and his father came fresh upon him. The long years
of his exile in Egypt seemed like a dream. They had been
years of painful waiting to see what the end would be.
Now the feelings of a brother and a son were all stirred
within him, and it was a hard task for him to keep them
concealed.
THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. 53

But he not only concealed them, he did more: he
treated his brothers with sternness, that he might lead them
to repentance for all they had done. Still, this second
time of their coming, he had spoken a few kind words to
them; so that their fears were somewhat allayed, and they
began to think the worst was over. Perhaps the thought
of their past sins was less painful to them when their fears
were lessened. ‘They saw Simeon free; and there was no
reason to believe Joseph would keep Renita so they
could all go home together, and soon be free from all their
troubles. :

Joseph then made a feast for them; ‘and to their oreat
surprise, they were seated at the table in the order of their
ages. And when he sent them portions of the food from his
own table, Benjamin’s portion was five times as much as any
of the one Early the next eta he sent them all
away. ae

But they were étily a little way on shai journey home,
when a messenger came full-speed after them, to take them
back to Egypt. He accused them of rewarding evil for
gvood—of stealing a silver cup belonging to the lord of
Egypt. They were innocent of this; they did not know
what it all meant, and denied the severe charge, saying,
“God forbid that thy servants should do this thing.” Sure
od JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

2
' PRT NT EO IN a a OE ee
I NAV ai Zia - li / RP pers
3 i ; \\ et A rt et } fous lig /

ee



that none of them were guilty, they took down their sacks,
and opened them all; and there, in the top of Benjamin’s
sack, was found the cup. Overwhelmed with fear and
shame, they hastened back to the city; and went immedi-
ately to Joseph’s house, and fell down before him, asserting.
their innocence. And Judah said to Joseph, “ What shall
THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. 55

we say unto my lord? What shall we speak, or how shall
we clear ourselves ?” 3

Joseph answered them cata and told them that he
should keep for his servant the one in whose sack the cup
was found. =

Then they began to plead with fs They told him
that their father was in his old age; that J oseph was dead ;
and that they had promised to bring —* safely pack
again.

Judah pleaded that he might siti: saat be a servant in
Benjamin’s place. It was for his poor old father’s sake he
pleaded ; and Joseph could control his feelings no longer.
He sent away all the men who were standing around look-
ing on; and then he said, “Iam Joseph your brother, whom
ye sold into Egypt!” And he fell upon their necks and
wept aloud, so that all in his house heard him. Then his
brothers were troubled, and they stood aside, afraid to
come near him; but he drew them close to him, and sooth-
ed them with all the gentleness of a brother. He told
them not to be grieved, or angry with themselves; for God
had sent him into Egypt to save them all from a dreadful
death, and to provide for the Egyptian nation. “Go home,”
said he, “and tell our father that his son Joseph is the lord
of Egypt, and that he must come with you all, and live with
56 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

me in Kgypt. Tell him that I will nourish and care for
him ; and that we shall spend many good days together.”

My young readers, if you want to be truly generous to
those who have ill-treated you, imitate Joseph. He had
suffered very much from his brothers, but he gave them
nothing but kindness. Not one unkind word, and not one
reproach for all they had done to him, fell from his lips.
His character was sweetened by that blessed love which so
fills the heart that there is no room left for angry feelings,
and hate and revenge. If an angry feeling stir our hearts,
if unkind thoughts lead us to unkind actions, we have not
Joseph’s gentle, loving spirit. He really seemed to forget
all the unkindness his brothers had done him. He at least
so forgave it all, that the thought of having them around
him made him happy.

The Egyptians soon found out that his father and broth-
ers were coming to live in Egypt; and it would have been
strange enough if they had not understood it, for Joseph
was very busy preparing for them, and he in no way con-
cealed the happiness he felt.

He sent back his brothers to Canaan to bring their
father and all their families; and with them he sent wag-
ons loaded with provisions, and with every thing that would
be of service to them. And he sent his father a present
THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. oT

of ten asses laden with grain and bread and all the good
things of Egypt. When Jacob saw all these wagons and
asses and presents coming into Canaan, and when his sons
told him it was Joseph who was the governor of Egypt,
and that he had sent the wagons to bring them all to Egypt,
his heart fainted. And no wonder; it was too much to be
believed. After all these long vous: how can Joseph be
alive? thought he; did I not see his bloody coat? How
can he yet be alive?

His sons told him what Joseph had said, and gave him
.the messages of love, and the presents; and then Jacob
- believed it was true that Joseph was alive, and that he
would soon see his face.

It was not long before Jacob and all his family were on
their way to Egypt. On his way he offered sacrifices to
God. And God appeared to him in a vision by night, and
told him not to be afraid to go into Egypt. God said that
Joseph, his beloved son, would take care of him until he
died; and that the children of Jacob should become a great
nation in Egypt; and that after a good many years had
passed He would bring them back, to live in their own
happy land of promise.

After a few days’ journey, Jacob and his whole com-
pany reached Goshen; and then Joseph went in his chariot


58 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

AN\\\
ily aa

}

ih
f iH
(
x
\



to meet his father. Oh, what a meeting it was. As soon
as Joseph saw his father, he alighted from his chariot and
fell upon his neck and wept a long time. (

It probably was not long before Jacob and Joseph had
a comforting talk that satisfied them both, and made them
trust in God more than ever. Joseph no doubt told his
- THE STARTLING DISCOVERY. a9

father — God had led him; how he had put him in prison,
and then taken him out, and put him on a throne. Joseph
and his father were more than ever convinced that the best
way to do in this world is to trust in God, and let him lead -
us how and where he will. }

_ May we all learn this same lesson, and may it be graven
on our hearts. We do not know how to lead ourselves:
but God our Father knows how to do it, and he cannot make
any mistake. He may sometimes lead us in a way that may
seem strange. It may be so dark that we see no light before
us, but we may be sure it is the best way, because it is
God’s way. When we cannot understand where we are
going, or what our heavenly Father is doing with us, when
we are in trouble and afraid, let us think of Joseph.
There is no pit so deep that God cannot help us out of it;
no prison so strong that he cannot break its bars. Each
trial is a pit into which he casts us for our good. Each
sorrow is a prison in which he locks us, that when his pur-
poses are accomplished, with his own mighty hand he may
unlock the door and let his captives go free. ¥.
60 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER XI.
THE ARRIVAL OF JOSEPH’S FRIENDS.

As soon as his father and brothers had come, Joseph
went to the king to inform ‘him of it, and took five of his
brothers with him to present them to Pharaoh. Pharaoh
met them kindly, and extended to them his royal favor. The
name of Joseph was an honored name with Pharaoh and all
the Egyptian people, and Jacob and. his family needed no
other passport to kingly favor than his great name. So God
receives us with favor for his Son’s sake.

Pharaoh talked kindly with the five brothers Joseph
presented to him, and asked them what their occupation
was. When they replied that they were shepherds, and
requested him to let them dwell in the land of Goshen, he
turned to Joseph as if he would put all honor upon him, and
said, “ Thy father and thy brethren are come unto thee:
the land of Egypt is before thee ; in the best of the land
make thy father and thy brethren ‘i dwell.”

They had no design of making a permanent home in
Kgypt; they came to remain only for a time, because the
famine was very great in Canaan. Goshen was at the en-
THE FAMILY IN EGYPT. 61

trance of Egypt, and there was some fine pasture land there.
_ This part of Egypt was all these shepherds asked, but Pha-
raoh answered them that. the whole of the land was before
them, and that they might shave the best of it to dwell in.
They surely needed nothing more to convince them of Jo-
seph’s high position of honor in Egypt.

After this’ Joseph brought in his father, and introduced
him to Pharaoh; and Jacob blessed Pharaoh, returning him
thanks, and estates for the blessing of heaven upon him.
Pharaoh appears to have been struck with his reverend ap-
pearance. It is probable that time and his deep sorrows
had made furrows in his face, and whitened his hair. As
he came before the king, he might have appeared to be a
very old man, bending low under age and affliction; and ©
perhaps this prompted the question, “ How old art thou?”
Certain it is that many long years of affliction prompted the
sad answer: “The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a
hundred and thirty years: few and evil have the days of
the years of my life been, and have-not attained unto the
days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of
their pilgrimage.” Then Jacob blessed Pharaoh, and went
out from his presence. No doubt his heart was full of bless-
ing for all the good that had been wrought out for Joseph.
He no longer said, “ An evil beast hath devoured him: Jo-
62 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

seph is without doubt rent in pieces ;” but he blessed God,
and blessed Pharaoh, that he was alive and was ruler over
all the land of Egypt. His last years seemed his best years ;
and yet he said of them all, that they had been the years of
his “pilgrimage.” He regarded himself as a pilgrim, tarry-
ing only for a night, on his way home to heaven.

So should we all view ourselves. The world is very
fair, and life is very sweet, and we may pluck the flowers and
delight in their sweetness as we pass along; but we ought
to become heaven-bound pilgrims, and never forget that we
are going home to Christ. This will make it pleasant for
us to live, and pleasant for us to die. If we keep the eye
of faith fixed upon the celestial city, no path that leads to it
will seem a very difficult or dreary path for us to walk in.

“Tis by the faith of joys to come
We walk through deserts dark as night.”
The light of the celestial city is reflected upon our path ;
and lighted all the way, we journey home to heaven. With
Christ for our friend, it is sweet to be pilgrims, sweet to
know that we are journeying rapidly to our home.

If you are not happy pilgrims, if you have never asked
Christ to wash you in his precious blood, do it now ; and
then you will love to feel that you are pilgrims going home
to heaven.
THE KIND RULER. 63

CHAPTER XII. 2
THE KIND RULER AND PROVIDER.

Jacos and his family gratefully accepted the kindness
of Pharaoh, and retired with their flocks to Goshen. and
there they lived while the famine continued to rage.

_ Instead of abating, the dearth grew more severe ; and
in the third year there was a new cry for bread. The
Egyptians had eaten all they had themselves stored, and
they cried to Joseph for bread, bringing him their money.
So long as it lasted they were supplied with food. But
money soon failed, and in the extremity of their hunger they
said to Joseph, “Give us bread ; for why should we die in
thy presence? for the money faileth.” Joseph told them to
bring him their cattle for pay, and they should be supplied
with grain. Fainting and hungry, they did not stop to dis-

pute with him, but brought their cattle, and received bread
in return. |

They were supplied in this way for a year ; but the next
year they began again to feel the famine. They were indeed
in a pitiable condition: their bread was gone, their money
gone, their herds of cattle gone; and what could they do?
— eS
64 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

They went to Joseph, and said, “We will not hide it from
my lord, how that our money is spent; my lord also hath
our herds of cattle; there is not aught left in the sight of
my lord, but our as and our lands. Wherefore shall we
die before thine eyes, both we and our lands? buy us and
our land for bread, and we and our land will be servants
unto Pharaoh.” Joseph met their necessities as well as he
could. He wished to act worthy of the trust Pharaoh had
committed to him, while he yielded to the requests of the
people so far as it lay in his power. The Egyptians could
not have had a kinder ruler and provider than Joseph.

It might have seemed hard to the Egyptians to yield all
they had—their money, their cattle, and their lands—to
Pharaoh. They might have questioned his wisdom, and
made bitter complaint of the terms, but they willingly gave
all to satisfy their hunger. Now there is a deeper hunger
than the Egyptians felt, the hunger of the soul. There is
also a kinder Provider than Joseph. He offers us “ living
bread,” “without money and without price ;’ and they who
have never gone to him, and asked for it, are famishing.
The great Ruler of heaven has a storehouse full of bread,
and all who will go to him may have their hunger. satisfied.
It is not necessary to take a long journey, or to carry any
costly gifts, with which to purchase this living bread. The
a:

THE KIND RULER. 65

kind Provider knows we are poor, and he offers us his riches
“without money and without price ;” and wherever we are,
we may take them without the weariness or expense of a
long journey. Our blessed Provider is rich, and he is every-
where, dwelling all around us, ready to hear us when we
cry. ;
And yet there is a sense in which, if we would gain
Christ, the Bread of heaven, we must give him our all:
“Here, Lord, I give myself away ;
‘Tis all that can do.” | c

We must not hold back from him our money, our cattle, our
lands, or ourselves. All we have an are must be the Lord’s,
or we are “none of his.” Go to this kind Saviour, and give
him your hearts, your all. He waits to hear you ask for
the bread of life, and to give you that of which if you eat
_ you will never hunger.

Joseph, ete. 5
66 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

CHAPTER XIII.

JACOB’S LAST DAYS.

JAcoB continued to dwell in Goshen, and was happy and
prosperous there. Though he had expected to go to his
grave without seeing Joseph, yet he lived seventeen years
with him in Egypt, nourished and supported by him. His
aching heart had a long and quiet rest, and the last years of
his life were smoothed by the hand of Joseph. The time of
his death drew near, and he called Joseph, and said to him,
“Tf now I kave found grace in thy sight, put, I pray thee,
thy hand under my thigh,” (the form of an oath,) “and
deal kindly and truly with me; bury me not, I pray thee,
in Egypt; but I will lie with my fathers, and thou shalt
carry me out of Egypt, and bury me in their burying-place.”

It is of little consequence where our bodies lie, for they
soon decay and go to dust; and wherever they are, they
will at last come forth from their graves at the voice of
God, ancl be remoulded and fashioned after Christ’s glorious
body, if on earth we were his followers, and died in the
hope of a blessed resurrection. So it matters little where
they are buried. And yet it is pleasant to die in our own
. +

JACOB’S LAST DAYS. e 67

land, and not upon a strange shore; and it is pleasant to
know that we are to lie by the side of a departed mother or
father or friend in a» family graveyard. Jacob doubtless
had these feelings, but other feelings too prompted the
request he made of Joseph. He knew that Canaan had
been given to his posterity ; that they would dwell in a land
where their fathers were sleeping, and that God would
remember his chosen people and give them a Saviour, the
Shiloh whom Jacob predicted; so he wished to be buried
there, with Abraham and Isaac. Joseph bound himself by
an oath to fulfil his father’s wishes, and bury him in the land
of Canaan. His simple promise would no doubt have been
enough ; but the oath made it surer, as Pharaoh would not
then interfere with it, but would willingly allow Joseph to
_ perform what he had sacredly promised with an oath.

Soon after this, Joseph took his two sons Manasseh and
Ephraim, and went to see his father. Jacob’s days were
nearly spent, but he “strengthened himself, and sat upon the
bed” to talk with Joseph. His last thoughts seemed to be
of Canaan. Resting upon the promise of God, he believed
that his posterity would have it for an everlasting posses-

- sion. His reason for this belief was, that God had said so; —

and this was enough to satisfy him. “God Almighty ap-
peared to me at Luz,” said he, “in the land of Canaan, and

Se:

‘a 2s
SOs


68g JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

blessed me, and said unto me, Behold, I will make thee
fruitful, and multiply thee, and I will make of thee a multi-
tude of people ; and will give thie land to thy seed after
thee for an everlasting possession.” Hae %

_ He then assured Joseph that ba would remember his
two sons in this great inheritance, that they should be as
his own: “As Reuben and Simeon, they shall be mine,”
said he. Looking upon Joseph’s sons, whom he could not
distinguish, for his eyes were dim, he asked, “Who are
these?” When Joseph told him who they were, he kissed’
and embraced them; and as he reached out his hands to
bless them, he put hiss right hand on Ephraim’s head, and
his left hand on Manasseh’s head. - Joseph saw his father
lay his right hand on Ephraim’s head; and the right hand
being superior, he supposed his father intended to foretell
Ephraim’s superior strength and greatness. This troubled
him, not because he loved Ephraim less than Manasseh, but
he thought the younger should not have the superiority ;
and he said, “ Not so, my father: for this is the first-born ;
put thy right hand upon his head.” But Jacob refused, telling
him that while Manasseh should prosper and become of great
renown, Ephraim should be greater. .

It is God’s way to confer favors where he thinks best,
to dispense his gifts according to his own pleasure. He
JACOB'S LAST DAYS. 69

loves to honor the young as well as the old, the small as
_ well as the great. You who are yet young in years and
In wisdom may receive honor from God, and accomplish
much in the great work of doing good. God may put his
right hand on your head ; he may bless you above those who
are older. So you must not despise your ee or say it is
but little you can do.

Jacob blessed- both Ephraim and Manasith, ‘add foretold

the future greatness of both of them. In the sure conviction —

that his prophecy would be fulfilled, he told Joseph his two
sons would be so greatly blessed, that in future times the
Israelites would say, in their form of blessing, “ God make
thee as Ephraim and Manasseh.” Jacob then assured Jo-
seph that God would be with him, and would bring him
again unto the land of his fathers. “God shall be with
you,” said he; and this was a blessing above all blessings.
In these days, children, none can speak to you in the
spirit of prophecy; none can foretell future events, and say
what you are to be. But to those of you who are in the
good Shepherd’s fold, there comes a voice from these pages,
saying, “God shall be with you,” and bring you home to
heaven. And what more can any child ask thon this? If I
can say, “ God is with me,” if I can know this, it is enough:
for it comprehends all the blessings any heart can ask or


70 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

receiv If God be with you, you are safe and happy, and 3
you will have every thing that is for your highest good and
happiness, and nothing will harm or work against you.
Jacob could not have left a better legacy than this to
Joseph : “God shall be with you.” This was an inherit-

ance of far greater value than the entire land of Cone 2

and Joseph’s heart must have been satisfied in these pro- —
phetic words of Jacob: “ GoD SHALL BE WITH YOU.” — :
Se

JACOB’S PREDICTIONS. 71

'
f
;
§
t
'

ee

=
. SP aease
ae RE A

Ais a“!

{

\



“Sone

ae
CHAPTER XIV

JACOB’S LAST PROPHETIC WORDS.

J Aco, feeling that he was about to die, called all his
sons together, to speak the last farewell and foretell the his-
tory of their descendants. This power of prophecy, or of
*

72 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

seeing into the future, was a special gift from God. Jacob
could never have known what was te befall his posterity, if
God had not breathed this spirit of prophecy upon him. In
ancient times he often bestowed this gift; and upon Jacob
he now bestowed it largely, so that his last words were
prophecies. When his sons had all come together, he ome
to tell them the future history of their posterity.

He called Reuben his “first-born,” his “might,” “the
beginning of his strength ;” and yet he said of him that he
was “unstable as water.”- However good we may be, we
are “unstable as water,” if we are not firm and constant in
doing whatever is right. If our love and practise of right —
change as circumstances do around us, we cannot excel in
strength, any more than Reuben did.

Having finished his prophecy concerning Reuben, Jacob
prophesied of Simeon and Levi. He said, “ Simeon and Levi
are brethren ; instruments of cruelty are in their habita-
tions.” By this he meant that they were alike in their cruel
dispositions and plans for the injury of others. And with
regard to them in the future, he said, “I will divide them
in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel.” This prophecy was
all fulfilled : for the tribe of Simeon had but a small inher-
itance of their own in Canaan; their possession was little
more than a portion of that of Judah. And as to the tribe
o2 JACOB’S PREDICTIONS. 73

of Levi, they had no separate inheritance, but were scattered
among the different tribes. God did not allow this to be a
curse to them. _ They afterwards showed their zeal for God
by attacking the worshippers of the golden calf, and for this
Moses blessed them before he died. Exod. 32 : 26-29;
Deut. 33 : 8-11. otf

~ Of Judah, Jacob said, “Thou art he whom thy brethren
shall praise; thy hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies ;
thy father’s children shall bow down before thee.” He said
also, “The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a law-
giver from between his feet, until Shiloh come.” He thus
predicted his future valor and independence. ‘The tribe of
Judah early showed superior strength. They were gov-
erned by their own princes, and were always a leading tribe.
Jacob’s prophecy concerning Judah was fulfilled not only in
the supremacy of this tribe, in the fertility of their country,
and in the richness of their possessions, but in the continu-
ance of rule and authority in that tribe till Shiloh, the prom-
ised Messiah, was born in Bethlehem of Judah.

Joseph was called “a fruitful bough, even a fruitful
bough by a well; whose branches run over the wall.”
Jacob said also of him, “The archers have sorely grieved
him, and shot at him, and hated him.” ‘These words must
have pierced the hearts of Joseph’s brothers, as they recog-
74 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

nized themselves to be the cruel archers, grieving their
brother, and shooting at him, and hating him. Joseph had
suffered much from his brethren, yet Jacob said of him that
“his bow abode in strength, and the arms of his hands were
made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob.” In
all this he referred to his strength and patience and forti-
tude in trouble, and then he foretold many great blessings
the Almighty would drop upon him.

All the prophetic words of Jacob were fulfilled in his
posterity. The different tribes had the different characters
Jacob described; and occupied the different portions he
assigned them in ‘the promised land.

When Jacob’s prophecy was finished, he closed this last
interview with his sons by charging them to bury him with
his fathers. He marked out even the spot where he wished
to be buried, the cave that was in the field of Machpelah.
Then, as it is written, “he gathered his feet up into the
bed, and yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his
people.”
.

THE LAND OF PROMISE. 75

CHAPTER XV.
THE LAND OF PROMISE.

WueEN Joseph saw that his father was dead, he wept
upon him, and kissed him. Probably the remembrance of
all that Jacob had suffered, and of the years of sorrowful
separation from him, made Joseph’s heart very tender, and
brought a flood of tears to his eyes. And perhaps his heart
was melted with thankfulness because he had had his father
with him for seventeen years, and had smoothed his way to
the grave. ! softy .

Tenderly caring for him in death as well as in life,
Joseph ordered his servants the physicians to embalm him.
In ancient times, great men had a numerous train of ser-
vants, and among them a physician. Joseph, being the
ruler of Egypt, had probably many physicians in his ser-
vice, and some who were skilful in embalming bodies. This
custom of preserving bodies was an Egyptian one, and was
practised generally in Egypt. It was more or less costly,
according to the rank of the deceased: 'Those of the high-
est rank were embalmed at a great expense, and the process
was a long one, seventy days being required to perform the
e. as
+

—
Les

16 * JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

whole. The body was filled with spices of various kinds,
and then immersed in nitre, where it lay many days. Dur-
ing all this time, Jacob’s family and the Egyptians mourned
for him. Joseph mourned in his heart, but the Egyptians ©
mourned ‘because mourning for the dead was an Egyptian
custom. |

After these days were over, Joseph sent to Pharaoh to
obtain permission to go and bury his father. And Pharaoh
said, “Go up, and bury thy father, according as he made
thee swear.” Joseph had so rilontti in the favor of God
and man, and had attained so high a position and so great |
a reputation, that many of those who were high in authority, ©
the governors of the different provinces and the principal
men of the land, swelled the funeral train. With these
went chariots and horsemen, and it was indeed “a very
great company.”

When they reached a spot called “the threshing-floor of
Atad,” they stopped to mourn for the dead. Why they did
not wait until they reached the grave, is not known; but as
they mourned seven days, and were a large company, some
other place than the grave might have been more desirable.
After the mourning was over, they carried the body of
Jacob to the grave, the cave of Machpelah, and buried it
just as Jacob commanded. These last duties to the dead

*
— i Ad Ddieal =
iy 5

THE LAND OF PROMISE. an

being finished, Joseph and all the funeral train returned to
Kgypt. | |

The parade and excitement of the funeral were past, and
now the fears of Joseph’s brothers revive. These fears had
once been kindly stilled. Joseph, great in forbearance and
brotherly love, had wept over his brothers, and promised to
befriend and care for them. While their father lived, they
seemed to have no apprehensions of danger ; but when they
were left orphans, and had no one to stand between them
and Joseph, they began to be afraid. They thought, Joseph
was kind to us for the sake of our father. He loved him,
and reverenced his age, and would not, by afflicting us, add
to the heavy weight of sorrow he had borne. But now he
is dead, Joseph will be free to punish us for all we did to
him. Oh, how we treated him! We would not give him
so much as.a kind word, and at last we sold him. We did
not know but we were selling him into the most bitter bond-
age; and it is not owing to our kindness that he has pros-
pered and come to great honor. |

Filled with fears, they sent a messenger to Joseph with
this message : “ Forgive, I pray thee now, the trespass of
_ thy brethren, and their sin; for they did unto thee evil:
and now, we pray thee, forgive the trespass of the servants
of the God of thy father.”
18 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

Joseph wept as he listened to this message. So far from
being disposed to use his power to punish his brethren, now
that their father was dead, his heart was the more inclined
to mercy, and his tears flowed as he thought of his brothers’
fears. After this, they all came and fell down before him,
offering to be his servants. Thus they again fulfilled Jo-
seph’s dream ; and though they little thought it, their sheaves
were making obeisance to Joseph’s sheaf. So we see how
God can overrule every thing. There is nothing we do that
he does not overrule in his own way, and for his own pur-
poses.

As Joseph’s prathifen prostrated themselves before him,
and offered to be his servants, he did not triumph over them
as he might have done. He stilled their fears, and quieted
their troubled hearts with his kind words. “ Fear not,”
said he; “for am I in the place of God?” Thus he humbly
disclaimed the right to judge them, and with comforting
words assured them of his love. Fearing they might brood
sorrowfully over the past and continue to chide themselves,
he told them that, dark and. unis as events might seem,
God overruled them all; that his being sold into Egypt had
been for the good of all, a that it was no longer necessary
to mourn over it. “You thought evil against me,” said he;
“but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this




THE LAND OF PROMISE 49

day, to save much people alive. Now, therefore, fear ye
not; I will nourish you and your little ones.”

We have reason to believe that until the day of a death
he fulfilled these promises to his brothers.

He lived to be a hundred and ten years old, and died in
the faith of his father Jacob. ‘“ God will surely visit you,”
said he, “and bring you out of this land unto the land which
he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.”

- Children, there is another goodly land which God has
promised to those who love him. It is a fair and glorious
inheritance, lying just over the river of death. It is but a
little way there, and but a little time before we who are
Christ’s redeemed ones shall pass through the gates into the
city of light, the land of promise. As the Israelites lived in —
Egypt a few years, so we live in the world, on our way to —
Canaan, to heaven. If we are the children of God, then
God, through the death of Christ, has given us a sure title
to this blessed land ; and “he will surely visit us,” and bring
us to the possession of our inheritance. As the children of
a king, we shall dwell for ever in that glorious city, “whose
builder and maker is God.” That heavenly land is not flow-
ing with milk and honey, like the earthly Canaan, but with
the pure river of life, that proceedeth from the throne of |
God and the Lamb. If we have been washed in the blood
80 JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN.

of the Lamb, let us keep in view the goodly land we are
soon to possess. Yes, soon; for when a few’ months or
years are gone, we shall pass the river of death, and see,
rising before us, the mansions of light prepared for our hab-
itation. Yet a little while, and we shall be there, tuning
our harps, and singing our songs before Him who brought
us there.
Soon the evening shades will gather ;
Soon we ’ll turn our joy-lit eye

To the mansions of our Father,
To our blessed home on high.
4
co
9
wa
7”)
CG



ay ERENT I pena i
i
ay
is

Sod






xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20070909_AAAAAC' PACKAGE 'UF00003104_00001' INGEST_TIME '2007-09-09T17:08:41-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:05:20-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297828; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-19T11:13:25-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '1203631' DFID 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIL' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 32bf2e3490c4a98b29ca7ad19e5e7b88
'SHA-1' 6eb4be79f35e6fdd1c41e1c09750b88d6922f5e9
EVENT '2011-07-29T00:30:34-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'225602' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIM' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
e0b654f27a294b71fa762ae9254d04b2
9886f1d1e40ae70317a2ce42457754b72b52185d
'2011-07-29T00:31:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59851' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIN' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
c8f5e59793ea7a61ad8b555fd7842558
6db676f662a403b7a379b4bc1e27bb4f3f4f53e1
'2011-07-29T00:30:40-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28895772' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIO' 'sip-files00001.tif'
18eb59f6bdc8790e9dc56f2e5ad9a4a0
6091bf8e0eba318d67fef8c1d59ae6e4633d43fa
'2011-07-29T00:31:31-04:00'
describe
'23933' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIP' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
77bc279b605b0d01db8cf396fe0c23ad
54c3d61419cc0ebbe5ae92b116f3d9effaaa0b90
'2011-07-29T00:31:03-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'1245426' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIQ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c7063016f022045ebd37a9b5d119334a
23d7e83947fb691cff1471526dfea1dc0a02c18d
'2011-07-29T00:32:43-04:00'
describe
'99429' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIR' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
aceb82e1e41bb38723fb59dc0c4f16c9
cff218ac83e2a3246e98dcd699a371a8da18da0e
'2011-07-29T00:32:17-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32010' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIS' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
dee0f8abd71aed65a4b290bfc2f45aaf
f108f6dd596d19ecd156ad9f2936edb02fda3de6
'2011-07-29T00:32:33-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29903900' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIT' 'sip-files00002.tif'
35a592a8f2744422fef40fc33304564c
32bf2423e48972967b17a6ed5a820c68e9594960
'2011-07-29T00:31:50-04:00'
describe
'1170088' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIU' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
f7a878d33a750661a39951756a18c188
8adcd1444048b37426957301033a18654ec5ab43
'2011-07-29T00:31:33-04:00'
describe
'114037' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIV' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
bad1681b246df8e87eda145f67bccac2
c11cd94ed99c692fbb65ffa3722a0a0d38f4ee2a
'2011-07-29T00:32:19-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34619' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIW' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
32ede778d9be9746b60eedeab6969e55
72bf11fcca53acf40c769a106d7873d60f83e65f
'2011-07-29T00:29:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28092340' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIX' 'sip-files00003.tif'
6e846742b6bd2c83698062a078ca6e7a
aba81edc730fd45df8b3262854e4ef517ceedd22
'2011-07-29T00:31:35-04:00'
describe
'1076762' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIY' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
76dfbb9a0c78207b72ff3fa8b5d29c42
c52ad55d9eadfb3ea66466fbe11fcddaac3949ed
'2011-07-29T00:32:50-04:00'
describe
'204717' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAIZ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
00362812c2be10334bf15ae36f16bcbe
ee8ace965f43d4ce5fcb7080bf52ef36bbff583f
'2011-07-29T00:30:24-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71965' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
bd35b22a1eb47889d9e6b200d211e2b6
87b6da145c518f92101f9c4f613d3bc1e083012c
'2011-07-29T00:29:47-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25852976' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJB' 'sip-files00004.tif'
a1a74c01c25efa1f4decb38249f54856
a3450f1d42dc86df3b11263979831ce8320ff0fe
'2011-07-29T00:31:10-04:00'
describe
'1085945' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJC' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
5eaba0013be93e4159e3280510ba1650
9f8d746a5f8a59b8b8cca1c28df954ffe787ba59
'2011-07-29T00:31:32-04:00'
describe
'174456' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJD' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
49aa0d8e3ea6f2f8951d7ee593ff3e6e
7e7fb5a48d65ebfb937cc5de982f0fa7eadc5331
'2011-07-29T00:31:14-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2719' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
481970175c901f72daaf13a1e355f47d
0d72fa9d381530ff7f6a62abf18e6c27d850fc46
'2011-07-29T00:33:16-04:00'
describe
'63181' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJF' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
16e2301390b009097717296189e033bc
cfef6713c86dfcf11574694de0d5f018d4199ad6
'2011-07-29T00:30:31-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26072636' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJG' 'sip-files00005.tif'
7562de995e43201fd0470fc8bb3264d9
d5a6ed83029480a202cbe4cb9bc322fd3d016fc6
'2011-07-29T00:33:12-04:00'
describe
'122' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJH' 'sip-files00005.txt'
563e513bbb659c2b493740924e8f02aa
82f1dd38b51f76a0f5ef7d74a6c40068ff470054
'2011-07-29T00:31:23-04:00'
describe
'1023775' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJI' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
7306470673c5976c032ff748cb9c9841
d511bd62a2c1ee298a6e50206d36919e4409b16b
'2011-07-29T00:32:22-04:00'
describe
'152481' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJJ' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
8fce5e848e3c1af720ca1e651e1d4a20
27dc7384f7326074f359c6f1ddef3f779c76e53e
'2011-07-29T00:31:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12389' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJK' 'sip-files00007.pro'
db4435b93f2b8da4bde9cf9a1de0c38f
26e8ac7346e56f46b6790e452d8f0736503bf343
'2011-07-29T00:30:57-04:00'
describe
'57033' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJL' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
505f3b4a6abdaaf8acd6558022d94405
acde67db06eddd2009d36dd9e3fdc40d9ac35aaa
'2011-07-29T00:32:18-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24579708' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJM' 'sip-files00007.tif'
c3618ce8f8d108a98a9de12287197822
351d3a955cfe9276639a0f723bc532402ddbaba8
'2011-07-29T00:29:44-04:00'
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJN' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d3876eb3151245e5903b0b3cb523aabc
9baae8ed3f4bedc7f152a1e8472c8c7f38ffe299
describe
'1015098' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8e0fc2a3f91568239409a563093bb8b7
004c0e941e777f09c2109ea8b77458ce129775cb
'2011-07-29T00:31:21-04:00'
describe
'138050' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f01ddf187dd8e4637f00961f20a65424
96a540c688e81fbda13b118412104c6e0adc6572
'2011-07-29T00:32:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'14533' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2ec9aa5d9bdd0da0b3c92ecb3917f56a
b40895dfa734fc2eda8397a8bac1266462336189
'2011-07-29T00:32:26-04:00'
describe
'54081' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
57ddf07b5710b9f7eb1077920d7f4e1e
bee28605e7c66c54f2c9f21151115ba126943efd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24371756' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
b34b52c861cb65c66c6fe71a61394c8f
225511500c8cf6c48db60ae1ab52427bade28c43
'2011-07-29T00:32:23-04:00'
describe
'777' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
38b85ca11f9be343dc0fcac8f685fd30
6adf349ef7b8313c6bbaf7994f59869993196151
'2011-07-29T00:29:51-04:00'
describe
'1121796' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJU' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
a3cf58cab0776719cece49d479bfd3fd
11712bf3b8791107d28e93f2075d1f936576a3a7
'2011-07-29T00:29:56-04:00'
describe
'201142' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJV' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
968450bb491b1bfa4a0ddc136dc4b155
9217b3f5005cabe7b5b654d8a455e61fe6df0e29
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7445' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJW' 'sip-files00009.pro'
79b73166ceb32387a3c486066f29d645
e3271421911ef60a9d65604f5f4b336ea3fd3824
describe
'67986' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJX' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
ae154361ff70db8415d7641a6da964ec
a6e90d8680d66148716562099ebabb95a22f33dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26933460' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
bfe7fafed2a0e9da491d6a82eab23654
41bddd33eda4ef087fe8cc32f80bf89cff9582a6
'2011-07-29T00:30:59-04:00'
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAJZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
efb2be8ba6a932d1947f71ea89023aeb
31b2bea2593d7f3a81829160af4f75bd20eb8620
'2011-07-29T00:30:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1046926' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKA' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
c0868a2eec8c5cd6b4c392ecff2ba506
7a8d0588bb67d94cc9ba635f113685a1e9906c36
'2011-07-29T00:32:36-04:00'
describe
'226307' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKB' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
caa902879b6fe902d077fbc8b1ac34e8
bfcd1e9c91150e311c697c4df41eb095d31f1851
'2011-07-29T00:30:49-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35491' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKC' 'sip-files00010.pro'
73cd1ceeb2fb80d1e72e8b44c54972d0
fe5f975b4cd5c430a248e55c6808c361a23abe17
'2011-07-29T00:31:12-04:00'
describe
'84925' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKD' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
49cbf8268c53471256d8160dfe72f0de
7635b367ae93a41ca5e59b64a371fe4ca3072238
'2011-07-29T00:31:48-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25138788' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKE' 'sip-files00010.tif'
aef2d1b151dbe0042efe14b7d51890ea
9183a505656cd57d554fe88d01333b9d95715181
'2011-07-29T00:32:35-04:00'
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKF' 'sip-files00010.txt'
585b5a3c8d135efc0044b821ec577e1d
e50322558b3f7338d1a0fa0704a6263ab03a75e2
'2011-07-29T00:33:05-04:00'
describe
'1007804' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKG' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2a00f99cf91f3b4798103a01625ed146
4965c72b179e13d18a800b22d816431e9ed4ee4d
'2011-07-29T00:33:02-04:00'
describe
'246080' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
dc260bfafbbfeedfce4a73a96c5e7fc0
994c1128f3bea40ce29f42ddf07c5f6694868d88
'2011-07-29T00:30:01-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36681' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
2e179711bdba76aa95b4adfe30732c69
6a02cba9d0a00aa61e0d6eb6c0cff17e54fef255
describe
'91020' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKJ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
377d7c72c4dae31dc9911c47d4e5e09e
c1199bb75f038ef7039abb88560bce6737c6d4e6
'2011-07-29T00:31:43-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24200692' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKK' 'sip-files00011.tif'
428d8834a0cc8b57b3978a986757c344
9bae554723a8ed8d697e6d10ef5cde101106efb4
'2011-07-29T00:30:56-04:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKL' 'sip-files00011.txt'
fc0c04561c4a92d2076df6fab8f3025f
1ee57e6f794b425dbc3f57c61cfb9a164d42a39b
'2011-07-29T00:31:34-04:00'
describe
'1105072' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKM' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f438920a59d6849aa61d2793b65419a6
0fceafa16f377372e29b651a5e09c509f268a7b9
'2011-07-29T00:32:24-04:00'
describe
'139724' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKN' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e1783690f4d49f196694e6f2c987d420
b5cb8fb3e4b6673ba2b5dfeb24d44dfbe4616255
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10174' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKO' 'sip-files00012.pro'
da6007a09f2ad7b35114701c96c4138a
baf9673da973bae0be19b371e2db11e03ba606bc
'2011-07-29T00:33:01-04:00'
describe
'50854' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKP' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
70b36d9c4cfa1e5195f65d8dd631d970
90576411d80e653b354beb0d521abbe5a38eb93a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26530784' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKQ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
fdddaf7fa07689af8a50885827b7ea7c
266f0422b13fc641d0e887d79e0a1deb8e9329b3
'2011-07-29T00:32:01-04:00'
describe
'416' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKR' 'sip-files00012.txt'
043b130735f5efd041b73c962cd445cf
6663883bd84dab896c8475c882c26544bf0f8110
'2011-07-29T00:32:09-04:00'
describe
'1049408' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKS' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
afb783a1099f3245ee5560d7249bf988
37732e8fd82e46ff6204b801c2e98a096a364343
'2011-07-29T00:31:02-04:00'
describe
'217755' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKT' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
b8f79d2a3a36f602b168e8b219744838
1e1ebfd85ba56aa4146eac89c8e1d8f1ac9a7e8a
'2011-07-29T00:32:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27155' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0c1bfae2a4004ea05f065f2f4dba1fc7
e9c51004c6a2377658dfdb10c160357fa7f6d8a1
'2011-07-29T00:32:25-04:00'
describe
'78881' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKV' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
3ce35fc3a55cf96f345b3606ea76be5a
90db8129de3beba920cb441299ac159eaf58f508
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25198100' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKW' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7afb1a193010e59ee40ef48e95992daf
5d479de40c253bece8eb71ba4a0d1c29dd873a9a
'2011-07-29T00:30:09-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKX' 'sip-files00013.txt'
1f400b3e8c93bbceee97879a9b1d5aca
cb55461df3170f61741d58d7463b95c05c54fa1c
describe
'1025775' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKY' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
21baf41c20f9cf1d6b390ae243cc40f4
69a2fd8cd88ab6617f2f047410960cf3f178c158
'2011-07-29T00:31:29-04:00'
describe
'215630' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAKZ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
4df6b434bf6aad985a94f7675366550f
d00dcdca7aa5d8f3b1d3e1b2e4f1452e6ae7ad01
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10058' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALA' 'sip-files00014.pro'
03f881c812f0001dab5512b3f6c26335
9267b3df3b0326a9ee855dae6c54d91631ba8282
describe
'73335' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c04d00c84468ab83332cd4c13b6e96a9
901e3c590b44e36f4d3f33dec13106ea03f755b3
'2011-07-29T00:30:06-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24629812' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
0983f9711e435f9f0deea2d331e94db1
b17ab6212ddfa446fa4d67ace0eb641652820927
'2011-07-29T00:31:05-04:00'
describe
'413' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b468e1326ed0faabb56d0c573a320e8e
3a392401e45cf6723e2a163e26037f67fecb57f6
'2011-07-29T00:31:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1033327' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALE' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
843b668a072d0b9239122cd1e9fb34ce
e4716ebac557de439e90c4602778a02334661fed
'2011-07-29T00:31:40-04:00'
describe
'243762' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
48e355c2b3baa1f43b11d4b3ea15b9cf
55eddc03b4c3f1f1d6b79a49889ed1f4a7dc8b9d
'2011-07-29T00:31:16-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34915' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
061fb93a604ace32dda355f1d8363fe6
2d47692af252158d7ee8669138dbab14ff0d145e
'2011-07-29T00:30:32-04:00'
describe
'89849' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
94ddad9a0a1bb757bbfde4264e628f0f
38362eb7bb63b24147c67deaff778a2b3b398fa7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24811564' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
ec8f8892852b9cfd660b5839942d5f35
7c49e0cf596b6b694909d2b635ebdfa213643187
'2011-07-29T00:29:40-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALJ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
59efa2d5349dbd728fcb1543882fe693
f40f5bb786c33839cd84269b8ee767cda54ccfc7
describe
'1030321' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
00930937b7d92e0fe333212d98817eb0
092ce885183b7b3ffe1397956956c621f66c05bc
'2011-07-29T00:31:22-04:00'
describe
'231993' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e2216b5e91fcb320937556a0cd032c05
6f15cd5902c372bce677b7de83518e3202626461
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36122' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
ab7596e1a415d5daecf95c639d6ea5db
6e156c5c6427c0a95f39cac31a2a0a18d8bfb721
describe
'85948' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0dfc044fe67fa33818e894dbc378c8fc
d0b3445ba3fed76158ef2b8187dde62cfea2ee6e
'2011-07-29T00:30:35-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24739332' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
3f302d4a43383014a8fbe1e5463251c6
3ae20ce9015674d37a5ae633561ad45209c79be0
'2011-07-29T00:30:12-04:00'
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
3e76fd3ba875b835e2813748da909b5e
51686e3115f7bc29c9071c52a55b7d5ada3ab572
'2011-07-29T00:33:00-04:00'
describe
'1037313' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
b689a296bf06738f4bc0e7c84c4e0cbe
79757db36e69cd4a08e9dcfc776c37a651631825
describe
'246744' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
96d4be5ab5cd1d5e619e888dfd194f6b
2d23cfa92c6505637e87c4da25996e010362d0ac
'2011-07-29T00:33:04-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34838' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALS' 'sip-files00017.pro'
7dfda405eb2d6bb46db2b513b1cdaa47
d85ee65ee104b4260415aacb0921ab05995cd04a
describe
'89813' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
817d0ca4324e8b4e92905c18afd16f4f
9167ef3916e2b1d766ab8308261026ed50427106
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24907896' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c57734328d0bf07b14fbe0da2486dff3
070c7efe7d4ba1aef1c2d91866638ed41b74418f
'2011-07-29T00:30:14-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALV' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e7d0de8432ea14289a7dbdcdbff5fe32
9bb6815f223889da60da0b8b409e09c5446abbf7
'2011-07-29T00:32:03-04:00'
describe
'1082165' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALW' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7527ddd9a7b7c9de9f83eebab93caeb7
79298f381468bf733edabb0d57b0e549f5ad9f02
describe
'173774' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
2e9bf90de6d8f6cc0ac57b2bf48f1ed7
47b71d3581779e9ce84f9e6168155b0d6ad50dc8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'20213' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALY' 'sip-files00018.pro'
dafd97bc2e3dc68a4c6ad9b18b2f6795
19d431a92b92b91c15db75a478eff5ff9077dd84
'2011-07-29T00:32:20-04:00'
describe
'62859' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAALZ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
02d66280b4b0091acd1deb2a7289b668
13fb23414052706e67f2c28d4419fe6bb82f4128
'2011-07-29T00:31:28-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25981456' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMA' 'sip-files00018.tif'
50f3104e14f1701d57fcbe4941511439
29f08ec0b45d84d745c1518144b8536139ac5800
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMB' 'sip-files00018.txt'
56da4afb149569d47c13ce0999dca409
214288757d7de6f2febb21b0ca7c5a15cfe33c1e
'2011-07-29T00:31:57-04:00'
describe
'1052116' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
12bb9a40c3bfa34ff8490fc6ad417b99
d52baf820ff818a2ae775033771963b4466f8c74
'2011-07-29T00:31:46-04:00'
describe
'218687' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
9c39fb9da97aad8ca393ef48bec7db02
b14cd8c21ef3e8809f7a80cada87474ea80539ac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28624' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAME' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ba624b4ea4630ef110762d9ffbac3c22
c2b005418f54bd6098941f0f2c8dc6f229aecc5c
describe
'79138' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
a6ab9517a83aa4c918893ed6bd4b2011
7c847d6c61daa8abdcfbe76d6671a7d452e59f87
'2011-07-29T00:30:30-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25263460' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
db77196ae012901698ab1c4db22417c2
742c86b9b02f67d5e44f8a07c97668fb293060cf
'2011-07-29T00:30:45-04:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
14fd8668de7f61c8493f0045bfe97b40
ad7655e384425368a63006247529eb464d3035d0
'2011-07-29T00:31:07-04:00'
describe
'1076699' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMI' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
daf42aa26bbe1bf8bf539fda9509adec
69acea75540d055e7c3358161b48eb85b6b034d0
describe
'255856' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMJ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
3ca887f5f7a6a23eb0bbfa211b49325c
b72030d6b92b631080225735b961943c0a7b01ae
'2011-07-29T00:31:36-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10734' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMK' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0040b79c9661962841f3f497617e7bd7
1867f87a90d1fbc024c36dde0801ce48314d5074
describe
'84663' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAML' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
715505435dcd63255140588d9a544ae6
b5c143bb65ae0a2dfe11fe2af395bc2e44fd6fd4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25852412' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMM' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7d5effe26d31de2af4e876443bf94508
3bac81d33aef089c8b067262b2a9add52d9ce341
'2011-07-29T00:30:48-04:00'
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMN' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4eff846c2baa0ccac818dcab613db106
c56d8af45a1786f4648b4ccc075ef06928eee406
describe
Invalid character
'1036248' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMO' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
733541e5583b6280da7e804816db6fce
637c77b17ad683ed36e24924fbb94d27eac31a40
describe
'237776' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMP' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
6af89ecac847f28d557aa9ee2e8823a9
f60c30725eb032b26879a4bda40da9979f7dc0ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31833' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMQ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
60584d403ef9965ae7de7dd81d5b5f26
654c9ed5fbd0c4c8b425ff6392fa997c89e4782d
'2011-07-29T00:32:12-04:00'
describe
'85430' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3dc465c8836df1347279c0227e9668c8
4478c9654321e9ba23abb44c659a853db8d885c4
'2011-07-29T00:32:04-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24881840' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMS' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ec22172b6ecf6bb74d4e7629765c8d1c
4442b0e434498d15d4b26d80625c8c20200c0b51
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMT' 'sip-files00021.txt'
55a71a567afb71487fd2190ed65cce75
6f5dc4496d3b3de31db3c7f12dcb8f52926a3c8f
'2011-07-29T00:30:22-04:00'
describe
'1028935' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
b9a995ea419428e50ea60f86a4d5d87b
71fe3899ecb5021a99696a61e44348bcd76789dc
'2011-07-29T00:29:41-04:00'
describe
'217680' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
01fbd89190314cb18342f50e87212945
0131301459bba9829225d7eea490bb429d6184da
'2011-07-29T00:30:20-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29819' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMW' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3fd21def335772eaacb35e3bb50dc74f
fd76b3b207821b8e58fa404b25387659cf98908d
'2011-07-29T00:30:02-04:00'
describe
'79993' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMX' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
4e0b3713a5fb49703877f1ec82d35bda
ad2282b294a0dae899276c55d3ea91e97452b780
'2011-07-29T00:29:48-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24707896' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7740405f46e8658025e6a12d5ed39ca1
ebcd457fca510ccb3913ee95be54ae0b0aca28a8
'2011-07-29T00:32:29-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAMZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
dfe2894e2504a5bc057b921c084898e5
e98163ec49d40ab6a9888de3bf05ce60b3da9717
'2011-07-29T00:31:01-04:00'
describe
'1007317' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
0d282c66907f71cc847fa4e4e6300f12
6869128e06bc509123655daff9a300747d92c36a
'2011-07-29T00:31:42-04:00'
describe
'255920' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ac0cf3c0c40af19123d9868b74059ba2
ad56e3750f9e191b565d8b14aabbe12c62b0fd38
'2011-07-29T00:31:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34864' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8204a77c8fd61d3220e78d23a3c4e4e3
49409c7ce1fa8774913597f0b5b50cc8d9954cee
'2011-07-29T00:30:03-04:00'
describe
'92182' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAND' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8bd2cf013c6ea4874da42e85718f6379
b6efb3b2c04653411b9244336022bedca3029575
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24188216' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7c56460e7df221426544f9a37456debe
df005ce921f2be06ed79b277e791ade958f5d35e
'2011-07-29T00:29:42-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
9f51a22acaa7af9959aad2500894234b
44a2ee2dd1f4d98326fda38d496c2d9afe8555c0
describe
'1026228' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANG' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
142351e3debf88a3b9def28b934265b3
0c1dfbf043df084d999b0f42848987062dfcd7a1
describe
'205964' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANH' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
f92225cfa5872c2164a43d95131002b9
89237e608909ef28e876a1bd2d55f1085850cac9
'2011-07-29T00:29:46-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29785' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANI' 'sip-files00024.pro'
b7e1f5bc2a77a0d8785085566a6f2d0c
81c1f6308fdb3cca2645e8b11113d0f382a8b93c
'2011-07-29T00:33:14-04:00'
describe
'76944' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANJ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
a5d28201cb0717e857def061a5422be4
06f61d6660171c873d55155256ae4965a80ffa25
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24640336' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANK' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a2b52115f60bcd9766bc78d64bb20b0f
7441fa740cd1c8e67d23b61c49d12d2bb1b85e96
'2011-07-29T00:33:11-04:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANL' 'sip-files00024.txt'
96970840f1477bf72db916f039314938
371408eb5a91aa206009dda2a64cff42144d9c65
describe
'985138' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANM' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
071c0643d8b8edeb4282646c91c69587
e091bd3821f49aa5319c055fd957399a464d05f5
'2011-07-29T00:30:08-04:00'
describe
'243296' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANN' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
dcc03a485a42dd8feb9c67f175f3fedd
79e0223229c6b77d0e1616194b0ab0dadcc536f5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34211' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANO' 'sip-files00025.pro'
8af2f29a9f97a93e551eb766a358d2c9
68dfdb91fd2cb69726e36a2098eabb43249c8aec
describe
'91208' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANP' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
774e37923cc2dba06203c25c33dbe707
d09ba9835cd3776a3c337c9e28f022ec90ab0929
'2011-07-29T00:31:26-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23656200' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANQ' 'sip-files00025.tif'
8602f0ec57f00c423cc9662ed46c7adf
4bccbbc6776058e27c404415475abc4f3e1a9c73
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
5fdc76ddc5c986b9baf6146425e50d55
9ad87bd4dce3eccd4683a3543900941004501466
'2011-07-29T00:32:07-04:00'
describe
'1028028' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e2ed046eb33a3e926c8324fde4fe69f4
69c6c90368309079910cc9267187835e37cd67ac
describe
'217662' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fa70a989ff81dd36c5155ce36e7e86db
aa78e0cb623297f89dd031a42e9a8ea62b51c757
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35163' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
82aa1674bd8c5fc825c79be0c59ff111
c05c58de2071df5676ab1051af0c51887bb127d1
describe
'82545' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
60b9595316bfce359c2fe295bb853781
479b65cf159299d850327468bf068421dbc0db8c
'2011-07-29T00:30:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24684776' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1a4781a123a16cd05fb9dc8057949d07
6dd6e34978c1d10272beda55dde4f98e4d39f88a
'2011-07-29T00:32:11-04:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
939335016a474c7a1039ddc436f0e656
95f666a2357ad7279129a66c8f742e58b7f48be7
describe
'966083' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
2351394132e653a7fff34e2c14456f48
609b3ae83432722a99e62d72045e06cb9852e72f
'2011-07-29T00:32:21-04:00'
describe
'215447' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAANZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2b2c402ce02442bfdca9616fe9f27a6d
a15a08c758512ed061c07f0a18cc07e405c03046
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29436' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d40884db476dbc613e113634bae693dd
7d9ecec193123fd95537dffc3de9a1b229a48c00
describe
'79893' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
68c9bdf00e0e6fc4a3883baaf14f2968
66fabaec80e6e83fda1f2d604fa3a1b2105fc914
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23197964' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
fb8117542206b955f1712483d8008627
6d3e393af49971d34fd47f47076112638a83a330
'2011-07-29T00:30:46-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOD' 'sip-files00027.txt'
258066704f5e09eeca8e4ae4d7026b37
0d8c29ffa66458f74c03590ef162d00fd942161f
describe
'982596' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
fd13d3acbc49dbf26cf0b96a772f90a6
a73519a44dc4babb270836fb9fb09464c2a458b7
describe
'210558' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b2d75ff648e9b35ce3d31e4d5af62066
2c63074627b3c3599db7f8f8ae1f7c7767b1a8d6
'2011-07-29T00:29:37-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28616' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
614552ec37e31b376df116f70439a514
57aac26e746161880c58f374982d0e012db2f248
'2011-07-29T00:30:55-04:00'
describe
'78413' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7723911e6cabe8496fb2168d55b5facf
85cb7a80da0fc801d21ea2c0a038c92429e4e265
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23595304' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
957766be214a2598fc7e3a73808f2a9c
5b237f675bc66d006befe795480d3bdb4685f0af
'2011-07-29T00:30:25-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
7de4ee343a60020a52112bf8e9c95dc5
6a5cc42cee0c4cd425d1b98512e2bcbe9eab4654
describe
'1001938' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOK' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
2a603f12a841f2358ec5b24b4dfcf330
8abd1d88071f79acdcb83ce15e653c2e758d934f
'2011-07-29T00:30:05-04:00'
describe
'217980' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOL' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
25d12bf62888b811e71a9e32dfaf6f3f
3060e390637671f7f30bab7178a658e9037a6049
'2011-07-29T00:30:27-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'10061' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
e518267311c88b6c140badbc9b8145dd
6387dddf835be7124eb465c3da3127ed64828b8a
describe
'73585' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAON' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d45797eba8daf6ee6356652ddfabf2de
23435b14ba0632bc65dd239548ba145c3f693d69
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24057532' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOO' 'sip-files00029.tif'
54342e11b388f598e6aeeda570cccf06
7a38ac8209e655fd88d972ff986c98c988b63765
'2011-07-29T00:29:54-04:00'
describe
'407' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOP' 'sip-files00029.txt'
98e4983f02d4f5d776a0a7cfcbaaa203
74f04ffc07f0e155fccd8c510e0790a62369ac4f
describe
'1018929' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
b600720afab00808888c5af358fe902e
7bcbd8964a309ee960517c8ea8f26dac396d1f5a
'2011-07-29T00:30:00-04:00'
describe
'217436' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bd8870412079e53ce440999135cb7baa
43ba1b15e5b27ef4297ba3196039271b3e27f984
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35543' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b5fe9d9b1315038f21090e75fa04b633
5ebf2ee8f7965fd404fb2a7c0c3e81f541b5bdab
'2011-07-29T00:31:52-04:00'
describe
'80440' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d127a5923b8b63a94d867092534aafb9
46e397851db2fa35f52879c3a9983f99a6396880
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24466364' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
2ada07d682b0785a3b67cedc420ddeaa
f7498ea8bc5770284a393c80ec1133a702751fc7
'2011-07-29T00:31:20-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
26b757a6c4c0ca6ff3e1dbf9ac2ce680
31b6c99f9932a2d4789763d19b491847a9b23b85
describe
'996923' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
928d05ef03252fb5abd4b258950c636f
7031e3950ba79d5a19477c659efb3aa249bb90e0
'2011-07-29T00:29:58-04:00'
describe
'237438' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
39b9747ca2cbf79a7e8264d808b2c56a
a8da6e061ee9a7c3b77e1b063630861e04b3588a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33902' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
dba04e2e7c7e6ac01db49031c78d3c4f
4945d496a84591bcb0993dbeb97cd71baff119c6
describe
'89166' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAOZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a436066087a5a085da45afd8e8a0344c
590a0db57082e4634a43f1ca1bd8491e4ca33e14
'2011-07-29T00:30:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23939464' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1a47fe83f839ac78ee1d8a255702d720
3279aa0bea32f985fc39db19fcc061c707e307d1
'2011-07-29T00:29:39-04:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
deb389678ff8cf9ba01fd0c041eb605f
3b0ca63405f9571e87007324a91bacef4ef248b0
describe
'1266088' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPC' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
7e8b6ffc2dd6d7d318235450a1e6f016
39357352f0221ff2f0d3c71226b94776659418c2
describe
'204393' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPD' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
89839af3363b358d615712d765c045b9
fcb66577d5f0a089c0e20425aa3ed9e446ca789e
'2011-07-29T00:32:58-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36480' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPE' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b856f7c9fab5d6c3e1f1bf6f84a37ae6
fc06dd5d3b24ef404f754fbcbf30e32d5fcdbd05
'2011-07-29T00:30:50-04:00'
describe
'74203' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPF' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
de67a661c176888b93f5938cdd1facbf
6b0bce890051bcc7f5caac9ea2b37cd33cec1bbd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30397184' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPG' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c0f588e7185a19016ba576a544638742
4ce925728a2847388aadeca1d857458b211c463a
'2011-07-29T00:30:43-04:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
a9df1fd76ef67e0b010c156d06e4b929
25073444f928124d54ba22a0dcfe282d892297ca
describe
'1212839' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPI' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
72eb1ddeef3c311c4b8520c1114c7efa
0056bbf6232b362f2e065df4c26be13d8ccb7b56
'2011-07-29T00:33:10-04:00'
describe
'132965' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPJ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d8e89c8e118852dc86333ef414d89cc0
16b731a77103b4575838ed408dd221d600c2e230
'2011-07-29T00:30:44-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'11183' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPK' 'sip-files00033.pro'
07e6f3ee8da87bda51606405b89bf871
be385e8f82b4ec42fea5df364bb954543350fd65
'2011-07-29T00:31:41-04:00'
describe
'45789' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
45ca4ff5040f425afd29872d42b64817
e45a87a07065913e9e66cfcf06109882d63fa641
'2011-07-29T00:30:07-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29116008' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPM' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c7d03b9cc108192d09075ce7af64c1b6
d81668b9cb7d566c867cc4fa1f0bf680a2232339
describe
'472' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPN' 'sip-files00033.txt'
c496aa85a9867ffae4f586d023f8e357
67dac419b3b1d77ee98e885a7f46c00120b4e1d9
describe
'1035851' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8b069a377ae3ad82bc2700b969be2587
68f08d0da5cb36bf21ad5230e67da796854dece2
'2011-07-29T00:30:51-04:00'
describe
'202369' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
4229719971215f2b7e72d390652ffcdc
0f4c761a5b555e3b09fdd1794c0d6be8955163db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29748' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPQ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
20a13752d2fa976b5c3a7f833555facf
9541827e3ea2996943f37308ff59b1ec076489b3
describe
'76345' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPR' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3b3613957dd5280437b9315b70e8fd89
c2cccba14d51579578ae694a0ca26a02ba888c71
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24871828' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPS' 'sip-files00034.tif'
616e4b6cb092cebcd31dc494d4831b9f
7cb02e222d91c20f13cbe03a273b2a2a812d939c
'2011-07-29T00:33:13-04:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPT' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d314850b85105b15c3f663e3187e18f1
02b01462596729a63c0b1d4d5240884519d20d23
describe
'979311' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPU' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
30bf28efcb767f48b27401819af74f83
7563e7e1b8c6f88a9bf2454ddf8155c3caed875f
'2011-07-29T00:30:16-04:00'
describe
'235888' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPV' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
d7885a99d4c6de12a8c1f0bc162004a3
a1e491e0b9b05888d72c0fcaae30f30d2818a00e
'2011-07-29T00:31:11-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33883' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
be62fa4c0edb554e01e6e7e4536d8ea4
2837d1b1262b70e64478c40b441865d5236ba6d0
'2011-07-29T00:31:00-04:00'
describe
'88167' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPX' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
82082841c0cdbf31b04665b2f2ea6c87
842f8b1c5c8c026f313b8ca3830619110756fe3c
'2011-07-29T00:32:08-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'23515384' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPY' 'sip-files00035.tif'
4f1aa003eddb854c2fbe732ceddb7c73
cdcae401a8fe9d8891f0ed64e27dff927e61b3c9
'2011-07-29T00:30:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAPZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
dfe47ff5206c4ab239a92953adf00def
ed7717bfbc97f880324a75b75dd067036d831f5f
'2011-07-29T00:31:55-04:00'
describe
'1167196' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
d3e92a76786182e30bf240747cc7e52c
829bbe82540e6e6990b94acace777314a09f41b7
describe
'183340' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQB' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
1eb0f0e85be0c1294330e9e8ac9e2de6
308e2ed45ef1e713fff82abe175241465f5688bb
'2011-07-29T00:31:25-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28476' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
daea8305b9f42ed752853c0df8873aeb
94706b29b61a8608f42ad039d587146d89ea3e70
describe
'68963' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
351988c3b2c033220580bc3ad028fd7c
0602536a834b8961a21cfd6d5fd3daf6e93f6c89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28023072' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQE' 'sip-files00036.tif'
7715db5bbedaea9db15e57064c439df4
a7ca7e5a0c5e255e423567ee9dfbe60beac6b01b
'2011-07-29T00:29:55-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5dd55a038e8d2673876f1b940daa101d
b66dc74a799c9ae1dfeeb21007a91aaa9ee4dd8f
'2011-07-29T00:31:18-04:00'
describe
'1121285' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
48cea6c9b3d549e6d0845ad783778e5d
ed15f962417a12d3e2c6baf8e014b690ecd34838
describe
'200033' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQH' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
543cb3f61e05f19a2b14bf8a93515fd7
0621865f9d595851410cb58b4380ddb4ee250eaa
'2011-07-29T00:31:13-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36858' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9e1c942af3c54ee2d87c76771472b521
c844c6dea4f43cb9718ba9545d35065e3b304b80
describe
'76378' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
d25647a21ea0898deae11dd0597b684b
1447ea13fc1c5d37ddb3e51b779965066d4025eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26922100' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQK' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ce145b50b9e25c929c6afc0defc7980e
f664a1bbf26ecc2752d434b5d12984720af0d3d8
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQL' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f61a82411ce707b876e5a9041d45ccd7
ca30748059f26808a07f83671db285365d381d77
describe
'1159716' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQM' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
f4a0abdf91f18e879633398d1b3473df
46e849e5cf85a2ab5a3d4cf8dfb888dbe51e1ce3
describe
'213642' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQN' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
5457ebd34458a1b77065f56ec5d26873
3c267b5216944a93b941b510804d2a1a921f06fd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36057' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQO' 'sip-files00038.pro'
4b897396077a1b06b9c782eeda6bf479
b84fa1afd2c73ee99b6e293a04417761e0ec4411
describe
'79555' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQP' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0bfb407c59cef67ae5ce3c5c901941fd
48b1b33bd3b1f093bdea0f3bc87c4b32f82ca59b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27844704' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQQ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
90e8ef915009f696609b489a6b1847fb
f606890c4b1435170704961988193ff8eaedcf1f
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQR' 'sip-files00038.txt'
fef9bb9a86249dd394b8cf117d4bcc67
d7e107b333b0b234280210442a6a41499ce4dd22
'2011-07-29T00:32:44-04:00'
describe
'1143450' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQS' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
db433a813db07e7ae70a9a8da086b580
f7c428bfa12588087b27b30bf6a3a788f0dd4e9c
describe
'216203' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQT' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f13e75eef1537b4fa82ad021577046a0
ff19a753c4beeee3337a752a2aa37c256667bed5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35618' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQU' 'sip-files00039.pro'
3158f86c1c96040c4b5d25a8d2589733
801a565b5c474c7d214bdc79371a10c24ea1c025
describe
'79956' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQV' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
ca10b2daf9b1e9d7d6f6698876ce77de
0323bc23e2d2623693be2d537072d556b135dcd9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27454792' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQW' 'sip-files00039.tif'
37a71f16d26e4d3200903cfd055475ef
8569adbafd85730919cabd4ea90c0173ce042f08
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQX' 'sip-files00039.txt'
cd2baee240d069199928cf11a2a84124
f75bfb43e9c4bf2995695be41748e16ae1a53f9d
describe
'1140917' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQY' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
bf8002ad4b284337acd5e51884b81b31
326aa47c50d5d5c74e026cd41c814f607d5c34b7
describe
'217334' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAQZ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
66f0aa6f2e87b9ef21be086c6f3a4ab5
d4766cf59fe5d7fdd3bd484207772b730aeb8a9c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35288' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARA' 'sip-files00040.pro'
69067cd575fafc6a8751040525cc94c9
625ed72ccf1511ad886aaa3666089a2bf91b4635
describe
'79509' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARB' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
c356c721ba073f609d0d855969ff1051
9327150e4b6e2a9639a828d8e12b804e03a2114e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27393388' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARC' 'sip-files00040.tif'
16e31cb037bd33e6b988706e564c08bc
39a8a1fc5cf4c5ec85492d051dd5cd3eabb448bd
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARD' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ab3bae50247c9abc5fe7619ba07ec5af
5545ec3e4e2ea34f14e328290fdadda6e43061ea
describe
'1070543' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
4eb0a6a3e14d1c3004aad821005267a9
0e83dfad094fce6237ae4d2d223a49e1057042ee
describe
'217195' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARF' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
96c5d084cddc6f5cd8cbfe39be22a7b1
6f4bc61e676ce0b083dd67a82b4bf6b74faae3dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34978' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARG' 'sip-files00041.pro'
20321d9891a6b244b960aa5c968d8a03
81668c3644db1cb24a07fa94837c42a424c4922b
describe
'81864' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARH' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
aab33ce57bac9a80947cd3bb03eccd08
2b27cfd506521b526b04bc0ad965438194a53962
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25704688' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
91d47b5b3092545b7998c7a4c9034912
b5305776f4c0b04e4438cfe52b0ed99bd71446d9
'2011-07-29T00:32:16-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
0f03ad898a66a6debafca7e666fa9f3f
21c94fe2930ff7fa53b50e66c7f0bfc200c264dc
describe
'1195786' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
5d25ad063fb30cc820dd47fd86431fb7
62ff555ccc6b5ebb28bffdc0d861b0ab676ed048
describe
'226741' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
993d0dc59f1cdbf3df091477fb1c2036
e24aa8c4a6f2f5d8bc241fa3a9d4a00ace0b4e61
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34514' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
dd3372ef81fe91de69e44aac7cc3619c
359fb8bf8c316b60ed9abb098b97b5382e21b31f
describe
'81793' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARN' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
82c20e24abdc725d9a5f8ba99e317c11
7e3ecc8a5407add70f2ce29ab56a72380434d44d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28710548' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARO' 'sip-files00042.tif'
1dca6fb9bec6499ca3cef57b77bb3c97
773b9880c3c0187cefbff56e48a7d621e7a1149b
'2011-07-29T00:29:57-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARP' 'sip-files00042.txt'
4ed9605130c8b4f7b7fb2e54b3bfc899
7e9dc5bf31998e05bd125caf58daf1802edc0c88
describe
'1207512' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
2d46b877ba88ec1e1c10e45a982d3c9a
430a327cd0ae65a46c82bf191678deebbf79cc22
describe
'224962' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
5e7c611c0f6508da4f2f153feb791a1d
fc24a30ecd58b09a2245236c150e86504a79dc87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'8517' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARS' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f65d3e3616ff01ebf090147526507ab2
00de7f201c1c539bdd41816be78c2978ac8635ad
describe
'76651' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAART' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
d9e1bdc8357d224a0466494c04513753
61ab86ebbca098ffb042b1a4e49f8b268b57cd75
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28992504' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
81ef49c6f64952a0ab154d33a9bead4e
efdc7f2028c57dad4f5c285c8d30b161ce18e50e
describe
'344' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARV' 'sip-files00043.txt'
97bca006163dc59296d391125f6a13c9
e36f98400ceaf7d6098917f3f2d9cccd0d741afc
describe
'1213553' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARW' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
9f73084f7643afdf71d45745dd7cffcf
eaa7e679f9c47f789f84588282f7691f7f6ca18c
describe
'223268' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARX' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b36c9d89637234d2f109a141bf1cf3a6
5bf408d08482d068791f40de7bcedf9c424ec1b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36348' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARY' 'sip-files00044.pro'
185c58c25fa05f74070353a923ac2069
244aa4e6206e34181b91b5350a759b79b9ac9c77
describe
'80856' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAARZ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
25dae8f7d33c00318f32bcbb3394e1cd
3c416bf2bff87ee9395f738caef2d58003e22267
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29137632' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASA' 'sip-files00044.tif'
bc6213c82b9372efe2a6e4500a564e69
cdefd9d05c2c26cea14e5bc649b9110222896131
describe
'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASB' 'sip-files00044.txt'
661419120e1f0286f7a081244e698d64
4df20deed9e377fd280d5b68f5074fda4a1f3af7
describe
'1187343' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
515b9c226006cd4fb25511b9e3cd9181
37dd989212d6f3ad8cb54b4d3567bc40a38b4afa
describe
'160376' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASD' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
5e9593b26333f71c2af8434121db7dc1
825ab904b3bb53ecc99c8c7585243a98b83dfcb6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'18060' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e50d6e2b5effe3d1448ac99c6d430251
589dc8551cf53cbb2c465a770cc804d20ff63236
describe
'58681' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
181541784ee993370a3cb2836b5c6253
26f16729c920415f7e75d5edff1f08d2ba6ff0e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28509696' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
da0256c8d5015f7e5a1059b29075d3ff
3b3a1789e270f4c9fcdd639d973167ba0f3aff6d
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASH' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1248322a400f9bd55c47960f8d48656a
1c93a486876e488b8d22e793ca3524ef741e2bcc
describe
'1153958' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASI' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
92bec70e17c8b909ceb638ca7aae0562
1a1baf0afd479c23c5b3b092c6144baddd2f0e21
describe
'193156' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASJ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
fb2fe0255f4bf2715c7639cfbff03a15
5e39e0f7a7f0dce69ac887e4ea58177e8537fe76
'2011-07-29T00:32:47-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'6841' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
899e1ae5371b07487009d63dc42de73d
45440bbf23cc88e06ecf53f848ecc26e73f2910a
describe
'69717' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASL' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e10fd6bd22ecdb1cb8b816f8817209a1
a82e3f215a61a81ae8de693413b5b7971fb5f2db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27706452' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASM' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2f63211852b8a642b597ad89d09a3604
768bad2ccabc3541813d1546e50cbccbf0714ba6
'2011-07-29T00:32:38-04:00'
describe
'286' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASN' 'sip-files00046.txt'
6a6a7735495dc6a3d4d8e2b16e098b0e
d4adaf125c2269697c3fe91a151af00210443a67
'2011-07-29T00:32:14-04:00'
describe
'1124109' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASO' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
93c5e80435c78a82e3edc04fe6359186
204e34e6b1b45c9d19e22c7adc02dea308f3e7c2
'2011-07-29T00:31:49-04:00'
describe
'214883' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
8d43c332f209ef032254bbdd64c4340f
f8318a24e0871b98d3b8f54e5e51348b6cd49817
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35238' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASQ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d6227c506f4dbf715a013a58d04352ec
614df0320d584782f127e70af87d83a07e465317
describe
'79786' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASR' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
85f0a9c3d57c4f1940706ac914a9fcf9
1a35364349bf951a802c95169043ddc6b4c3c33e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26991252' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASS' 'sip-files00047.tif'
454d4307b7c8714ae6a09e7a45765d5b
82c5ad9d7340023e60e1f5227edd0b0f7ea77e40
'2011-07-29T00:30:18-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAST' 'sip-files00047.txt'
ddd3daf95d1db335d341498238021660
51fd7f83c1c174f562dbab8afa9da0ffb19297b3
'2011-07-29T00:32:31-04:00'
describe
'1039039' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
fec86da6ef91affefbdd8aa245807b78
d59be529fcb0c49f714b4d8f93cba16a940366af
describe
'221312' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7545429b0342331c7809ef526a0d3ac2
80897cb8f1853248cba55b37aad37a3801acf7cf
'2011-07-29T00:32:59-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33855' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
2d0184116457a1ac3c81470f56c9c779
d47a75ea31223a08e9e3e9fcb83ccb7db6f4fe5f
describe
'83154' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASX' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ca2dc92d45cbb893e8e4d759a9f282d9
70ac94d465aa75a9b5b44a5d0e1f7f4beda046cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24949532' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7a1471de3e3166b41b642c0bf035179f
7c40ab1eafdc862aeaf8c342a3676ccf78180ea3
'2011-07-29T00:32:40-04:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAASZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c981147d008fabafd932e2781bfc763a
d1f651a5aef1cb18bfa540d141aa71b72a9cb3a8
describe
'1033202' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c05688954fe0b9d8af0c056bca9b1223
418d18c8812705152737f1030e219e6bff25cda0
'2011-07-29T00:33:08-04:00'
describe
'163895' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8354343117f3a0e7abb1c9a73c9068b7
0201cead40ba915bf5279aba5ec38952c5710ac5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'19274' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
1cc5ee407deb0de132930ebdbfc95f82
c2ad34513168fbc31fd065914f9b434dedcf6874
describe
'62425' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
ba4c6574cc447864cc4e6258b7e6b20c
e80891de9289cce3780fe15a41ea5526ef7d0516
'2011-07-29T00:32:51-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24809272' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e9118a2ff7be5ba2680ab371cc490659
bbc7c5ff06f442d1bfb7fac227a5c3cc9d48c554
'2011-07-29T00:29:49-04:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0bcd4f0eef15fa208752cf2dabfe3ce9
c3c7fa3e3381e2832d5760f8cda2ab28733a272a
'2011-07-29T00:31:30-04:00'
describe
'1045554' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATG' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
2932dd19f4ee7f75c953656286bd6759
d556e247ce3fa23acfaa5b5e5e45fce20b1fd2f3
describe
'201742' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATH' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
6a1924ca571af2b2f44b3886d8257a37
5d62744a8263ea68eaba27f99883f76a4fa82b6d
'2011-07-29T00:32:54-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27194' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATI' 'sip-files00050.pro'
a5e10859c15effc28c2a4fac8d49d184
db6c57bdfe532c86798b0601dcc2d9d85843738a
describe
'77643' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATJ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
bc9ab54046ce00e475f7167454bd5652
323a13aa1e5acbc33fa70d017eae33b11c4d17d9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'25104772' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATK' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2e69084a4c5004e4942e712d65dd4bde
1733d5643dd67d6ea996f44390f5cfd4411bfdb2
'2011-07-29T00:33:15-04:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATL' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d75722c8ec0b4fdc26544c4359a73d20
fb188d291988d4147f766ef9e7726123534ca10e
describe
'1023946' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATM' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
df8f092d2fbd7d41b3310478b469e6a1
48a510d3e29d2b7610951dcb9c90efa76ca7280f
describe
'226539' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATN' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6f1df2cd2dcf5483e02c1be728fd7583
4990d71cf2aad1ae89c99ca8af5a4044da92bef0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34109' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATO' 'sip-files00051.pro'
2669ed0f66268479d0601ea4aa6bbe49
9c93efd7d682ce9358e3ae427e029a4faca48676
describe
'86506' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATP' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ac54718627892114df60fb49a32468a8
f37bef14aa4e65c1716f5df90ae7936f9f2673f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24588084' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATQ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
264d98d17368e6675da1b4e6bc18fcbb
277f40596b8e7c93c7f8ead77a2fae227b8a10d2
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATR' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2ce096d50f932b4cf21fa9b74adb03c0
86d58b738320cd6b4ad9c68fddeede8a16829ff7
describe
'1145153' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
37e46907b9a778c3c9e112d78ffc3df4
482f09b3c480e5dcf99e06d3fa7d7f42d886d1b2
describe
'212404' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
135170c262d65966905c0367ec5d05df
bab42b28182f858121a02183f75801c8ff194e12
'2011-07-29T00:31:56-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34447' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
91848ac103ba1e97db7c32f1edd32a4d
a05273aac13625923e5184fa1d06dad4b2a46a26
describe
'81389' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
171db9a308447108c49184e04a66ef29
9ab2b9cbb4e9700826ace4bea03424368bf00dae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27495168' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d696db3665a57f5f1df562bbe9fd72f2
6a2e0954d0b10fe35e2914113bffd003b36e20ee
'2011-07-29T00:30:38-04:00'
describe
'1364' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
0509ba7f4ced275324de1dabcf6f0add
e7363a79593496702947dc72d2c9ba380ad07e54
describe
'1020963' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATY' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
807b5916945871773fb24d7f78cb4046
fbd5adbc1bde6105b97ef8326ffcab189e665e3d
describe
'232172' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAATZ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
c4ab42b9ac11dacf440d84030ff37e8c
32d093f8ee4413d3d2833a564af15762e17eb27b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34485' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e2b7bb9a9f5b8686451270d63e657cf1
b19fd57e1d4d34d30547b070ca812c83d96231d8
describe
'85500' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUB' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
afd6fd884e78e556b43645a51fd290cb
4a6a6e38a4a87a36bd3b5293ce58d598bf3104e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24515068' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUC' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a0bacbedd430079ccb3eb75cacb59de7
10b4c37b86cce25e4655820837315a6fdcf14d15
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUD' 'sip-files00053.txt'
521a1e1f9e9d63f41b5ac6a4673df404
e3fb2ffb9d8a215e13fffb5e65730140c022329d
describe
'1174409' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
bc084e3cbf3e890dc743f1490c57ee27
618ac60056f2a26ac2c20786978443f2717bc87a
describe
'163241' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
e78c120efe6f31a5b3722aaa6becabb3
58a1f60bf18a34dc05f2728a9931d15cac47d562
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12138' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
b14f6c52c5716e566aecb328e4dc28b6
6d43535baa925d6bdd0f659b3ec97edfccbdf76c
describe
'57363' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
356393931b5d8f1acf5eb131a73cdaf4
7f9c88da7f103d4691d52755c0cc5b16da8070c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28194648' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
cc7703cc1f489abed79dadbbe7a4f1c4
6399f24049c6d4ed68c0d08c60da2fd8754d2ae5
'2011-07-29T00:33:06-04:00'
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
80bc9ea6938b84eec1895c787cd4b187
d3bdab49e295485d61c812c5d2dff2e611945dce
describe
'1187955' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUK' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
afceb8c163442aabf5916cd0333d8642
5a142b5dd87da456a8898acda6365eb15d9b3b18
describe
'219594' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUL' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ba37a3671f49b28ff6f92b451d0c2bda
1f56d97616cfdf559abae8a7419538f2af569661
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29233' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUM' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ad9df8fd76f08a09de7586090f5a551b
d72f921a36919ca8c1e67c5f64d0dd82bf459e03
describe
'77136' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUN' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fd0f52522ffacdd1490743e4f030f5bf
e6ff8ea8691d4bdcf2d2537878933b8e8812cf54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28522032' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUO' 'sip-files00055.tif'
3f8112adb77c2f2b2c0fd63e4fd3bb0c
de874b7f80c2c8936b21c9833c721be777666a26
'2011-07-29T00:30:53-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUP' 'sip-files00055.txt'
4a6808bb9bc647ac14b68ce78a9fd729
1da2b26b46bec0a164968369f3c45062a0dddea4
describe
'1169715' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ccd22b293d2f9b0dabe1f8e009d45323
9555e57ea7d2b0d6fb5ac32be5c4afb3e0ffbbf1
describe
'245940' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
db76d1a9974fc552f4271701c0cc0849
422d4b267d7b77799daa0e305243bee570af0e60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33500' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b8f0e248d0f1f128c660c1314185f671
9f4f9ea246d81f568c7fb0d659441ade62c76eee
describe
'87984' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
d9923f63f017592d33a5bfa820abe14d
0183f21d0fbaab71215d43cf4de2e91ee43ecdc6
'2011-07-29T00:32:42-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28085688' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0e4742d023f8d7f801a1c59c0836da22
a4bca6799d24d4fe56dd7c9a463ec511e1efba11
'2011-07-29T00:30:19-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
b943784814eab4a4ff83ea023e390e33
4a239849f13a19df65f5f87272432dd84ff0408f
'2011-07-29T00:30:41-04:00'
describe
'1204057' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
b3093487152b886e28cb1ccb23ffe889
e630e35cb813ad4707bc3afa29054a4e13880a3e
describe
'254126' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
90855cfefdcf0cb82b05b499b15d15ca
2ec1d94518679b43496ee464fab4d69d656d1640
'2011-07-29T00:32:10-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33933' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
69a07c081c8f608a2a652b4b5dbe32da
b7c0dc5465b1ef0c3ef8569b70ff6237a6f18340
describe
'87683' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAUZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a7aa4c216ea60a55dd83f743d1eeb5bf
02e9560fbc73d62fab776046f90f0abc687981f3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28909316' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3235287ff835022007bb7d9f6ab09fb5
f5e6d8a3ad1263a65c17157e1e09aef98d749f15
'2011-07-29T00:32:52-04:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
fce320d4b2966a687ae37bc0cbc8706d
c50fd8a5247e093cef88981f9e90a076e77bde32
describe
'1168139' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVC' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
5f080806ccdaf8791104807de31831c1
6bc781c0a110d631ac219fb1fcfac014e025adc1
describe
'257787' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVD' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
04e01b1971ad27416d9a710ff6fbfc59
91b893bd55c81d91d4250f22de34e1b71476ac3c
'2011-07-29T00:32:57-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12673' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVE' 'sip-files00058.pro'
c3d440d04b2a481d9dcd083f2aaa0c9e
c69b91f97af1dd80711ed444f45c73276506a95e
describe
'82947' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVF' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
c58e207d0903f70492478adb8aea7c2c
9184597327946da6d00a52444168f648a8c38e85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28047500' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVG' 'sip-files00058.tif'
28af5653cd245090aa9dba1dd303bdef
8ea9a42b0578e9f40c0bbe32b0e6d1eceaa9235d
'2011-07-29T00:31:08-04:00'
describe
'574' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
19efd28f85ffe91ef6c0ac55d24f6b1e
6ec922dc72530e037ef6f0d8a2da2ba81b5d8101
describe
Invalid character
'1118314' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVI' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
632576eae0624c59f57829961456c4e7
443bc162c0b8446c1824cf065eb132554099a55e
describe
'273966' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
69615aa894a6b5b27faac8c011aff1c7
710124efe8e23a14cd712502ced248ea7beb918e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33071' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVK' 'sip-files00059.pro'
b0a40dd8ca89500af2e2b6c2ffc30faa
44980e23b758c1ba48738ae40e854c183010a365
describe
'94361' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
cfe77ea1a50152523b6c30abe8558423
d4613c2f5359b9ec6146cde7cda6db1636767595
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26852356' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVM' 'sip-files00059.tif'
6a38912dc6cfa722dd7c6b920958b6e9
c46a76074143c875a8068e4a304fda98c2354e3c
'2011-07-29T00:30:33-04:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVN' 'sip-files00059.txt'
7621443a7cdc19cefde8e9f444759b82
e87d78d84059c7b80a48593aaaf7f404fbc63633
describe
'1134816' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
4dee7f003a7f7d320cc235348809f53e
8515d19372a369d00035e8c7ee154136907aa00d
'2011-07-29T00:30:13-04:00'
describe
'249095' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
c34290e0d2cae44a79f7049ff8776a5a
fc31387b06b333bda6325b1bd769f7592d84864d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34779' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVQ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
14b0062702a10941b97a62a4d317a802
ec5ebfcdac6ac9cdf7f1019ff51d39ffc4e613c8
'2011-07-29T00:32:05-04:00'
describe
'88878' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6774c631c0128d13c1a0ed11b21f8c55
9282da187e2e09ca6e14b371c045fdf6efa555cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27248112' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVS' 'sip-files00060.tif'
451c3875274eee80731be85d3e133732
7abea0ae17462a6232c82aa2bc9841d091b80e60
'2011-07-29T00:29:53-04:00'
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVT' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6dcc3b46cabc8714ad70c65d60c40ee9
f4a047ba15f5af2c7411ba7be25c6ba6bea6e5d6
describe
'1173568' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVU' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
05e727082ccfa0e64112c5afb946ee0a
1bbfca1e34caa3df35c9f6dcca4910b43e14eec1
describe
'270529' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVV' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
5e2615c745015876325cb6ca8d140c68
14830b0152ea826875b6c8dca91bc43fedc3094a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33343' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVW' 'sip-files00061.pro'
9e6ebb0e66c783b0a1c6095f4c7d27ce
cffe606f59008635015cf1b909764afb7e2af846
describe
'92629' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVX' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
e61db8cf7b3ca9ae73e0a5e1350661d6
9e791cf40179edbb3acc198663f68184716ac358
'2011-07-29T00:32:53-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28178516' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVY' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1283ae978d60dbefa119110bfbab19c8
723c97f509918c1617638c4910b3f91f4efb43bf
'2011-07-29T00:32:48-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAVZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
f3c4e5a6bf091b93a2688c503529db9c
74ee0ad80cac156ba0e9d43b527964f9049d24a3
describe
'1117317' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWA' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4d624054746d721bcafc0871311e35cb
3d583ac79b3b895837d5a745586a4a8c03846236
'2011-07-29T00:32:46-04:00'
describe
'240321' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWB' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
21dabef048415b89451e4e565a6730a3
06f2342d71ef65b34d70e28ec6fa96bfe3d21fcf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'9357' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
52f48afab62219724ec40b045e4f52c6
240e3b0beb94627e4659f63b0b017b6683e46c2e
describe
'77948' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b086ec763ef440f125ee9e3a46e5c1ff
d329fb28bf50987575060a542fd5d4c0d7431690
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26828424' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
05350cf0e0909c3aef143b879f79934c
49dcdb24927fce67d5b760e9d250928d4893c31c
describe
'376' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
c75ccaebb13b4d77bc2f408822493dbd
414b13644914c93e82e68f35dadf269b8f97a29d
describe
'1163086' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWG' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
274aefa70238bf2658006e1d22234c25
cd28714fa37835bab37a0306a3467852eca1a21c
describe
'248724' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWH' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
04cbf3441a81ef8edfbdd8c22fc8e38b
a8fb002e10d153678bbee9b3334b0e1258f0d421
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29543' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
8126b6c65206922c3c86479c6fb9c902
fb990dfb8f66724295002eb851f338ae633307e0
describe
'84253' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
fb73a9aee94ae1f2453a5ffaae03eff4
f5311d000f31c0acb27eb611fd6b065ec3d6c077
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27925824' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWK' 'sip-files00063.tif'
cfea94d1c29a97de2770168c5815fdcd
c5c2f84ba03fadfff86baf5b931cafcdaf2dbd51
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWL' 'sip-files00063.txt'
6a327bff7a94bd6f369352f066e83864
c0fda8650287860cdc244a605a1703a0196486d0
describe
'1129604' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWM' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1d188185d0715189ca57e07ee639269e
04e14c2b3024878542afcc941b5d1ff9fa881b94
describe
'245186' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
8599e619f2e4a47cdc27979d39512f11
58e612e75e6b3c3b3fc4157a29d5fa33601ef9b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29197' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWO' 'sip-files00064.pro'
d5de276f25b215217a137630222e07bc
1c3e0efc5b39a8a341438d960652d483bc78231e
describe
'86852' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWP' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
5c7c02f67de14b74473049006c8edc08
538a6739667a1e6daf7c9d0df4dc2e3d93b7de86
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27122608' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWQ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
3f141d2604b3a2c1112f8d0f9d8e360d
2677fcef16852893bb7f9c3ec107125fa48f65a8
'2011-07-29T00:31:06-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9826a92addb97df2ef559baae0ec0e8c
67ca76a37b39869a10c670a813a33342c3517742
describe
'1173962' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
17f34a6670e2af5ba622582502559af1
ce6a0dcb46bd67d8e8d320dc1bf9e1650792ccd3
describe
'281742' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWT' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
39af7427aa2ef23596051e0c136ec52e
5397053fc415e974f8440cc738ff47a2d01f10d1
'2011-07-29T00:30:39-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36565' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWU' 'sip-files00065.pro'
de4c712195bff797d8caa7470f3ba37b
38cc5114ad82200a9885761e4b2c894e8aece007
describe
'93873' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWV' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
2ba0b4e90e108dbc692e96e7c5b7c2bc
2e572027a3cc6759c9163a3a4bf80588d86c464e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28187740' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWW' 'sip-files00065.tif'
f4267fae789c13356d7d16f359f657c2
703b53035ab70533db648e2ad877bb74dd52ebe6
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWX' 'sip-files00065.txt'
1e982a531fcf6e5ffa008869dd8dba9a
5a5de88554065681b6e5eda42a3bfcafc081d2d5
describe
'1124869' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWY' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9680df1ad32ce57feaa3520e553c058a
a0670973ca854419f5a8062ac2c7013f6f6911fa
describe
'244817' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAWZ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
08844f407a696a0f92eb94fa016cb97a
af512b20a1ef44fb97052f3be4774807c0effe15
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34955' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXA' 'sip-files00066.pro'
a9816d879bd577a12f0cffdebdacd049
58a0b79e11fab3324c06736347759b7776a66424
describe
'85909' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXB' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
16e1d38545e993da21cbbb2146f640c6
c141dab5ee5e68b658bb200d39343248308d3be7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27008928' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXC' 'sip-files00066.tif'
2923fa33a2981669bc2fc02bd81a0dfe
4c9cfb1a0506a6db7d3974547d107cbd01d579bb
describe
'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXD' 'sip-files00066.txt'
b0ad81e6a1b10ad631473070f5302090
51f1cbe9d81db5dad50389c3a05c60167c2795b7
describe
'1138027' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
123a438709acb33b92a84b74fcbb92ea
eb2913e486eaeef03199fde0e6059a7a12e12960
describe
'249624' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
81501e591e865b4c1e5d74769dda095a
41c8bb0f3d7b7a0ccf3c56ebebe88e6fdf6bef04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28981' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
bb15bfd42b2c5033f54670dc26afc8ec
9334635c575a7d621ba2869e6b107cd57555f15c
describe
'85403' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
a6901e7fae6bb28146e1ec23c6e7c8ea
29386a419a0be93be71e649f9cede2c8b40797f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27324436' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
88deeb942dbd603720dbbf01501178ef
28ec1fa3947e12290aa340ee8df482d6e99daca3
'2011-07-29T00:33:07-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
b5d9cfde98633146453595e3c36acb19
542623addab2a65d9dee39c2fbdf9c8c286e3442
describe
'1186626' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXK' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
daba548498a1586b74738b8ffe5094da
6f9460a2e2f55f17b5ea11481743a110d27b5fc3
describe
'257869' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dd167f9933e596c30c11de0fd4675aec
16f2a94610bdcf7d86f61ad141bcb85a65e6b8e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36937' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXM' 'sip-files00068.pro'
43012871d36b5d7be5248d1dbea2b8f2
e21dc9fc6904b889908a578b4c33bd7f86e9853f
describe
'91018' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXN' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b3380efedab46aceda51648ecd5fb5a2
61d22d95d9ec35c50040eedb21ad80be5062248e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28491380' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXO' 'sip-files00068.tif'
25eebcb10dc7b777de4fb3e058f1504f
15cec5fbdd642b47b900940005529fe8251aef5d
'2011-07-29T00:30:54-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
6bb21bf514ee9cd52def76b4c5222888
c4cae5181fe4c2b876b3a6e932287103cead780d
describe
'1104007' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
046fb3ae5c018595187bdd074cab1371
dd5eaa2f3b25b2781597886ad6035407585095a6
describe
'214932' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0a772a714cd1f9028fab7fc099985186
e19cc75ebfd28c1c302c352087ad98550ff16240
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21317' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXS' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7da55466012e5164e35230bd354c080d
8751620059dd379dd97e38520349f5ef9768ec8e
describe
'76114' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
02a84d8354bea1544aeaf8a12c5eb72b
070f2a1c74caa09a88d8d16a56454a7410d7b9b5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26507476' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
10324ffdf2c7841bfaee5ece9c935740
c25ed0f9fb920fb9a73c74e50cc2d963696c468d
'2011-07-29T00:30:42-04:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXV' 'sip-files00069.txt'
b7f23b06c7e345a4e15281f67605efc3
5c8b6a6850052d1da037c25c48db391c7a2294b3
describe
'1213832' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXW' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
ac10d70b6c3f3217ce149d9eb2c8d2e0
bc1f5f5795a89e774e77ff6a8ea3994dc4fbbef1
describe
'219323' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXX' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
8549a7d71d4ba35a9c9d54808f700ed4
433b3b7407c48ce84055560d16d5424e15f8e2af
'2011-07-29T00:31:38-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30489' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXY' 'sip-files00070.pro'
8d9cc3d5586d9e5f27c72eac895eadaa
13717160b7bff80a8715354a82ce52ad52cf7ec5
describe
'78541' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAXZ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
159ad28bf5d4a3b9e9adf09fa723f70d
caa1dc78c0b74769320ccffec444beaf93cb259c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29143904' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYA' 'sip-files00070.tif'
9b58364a3a638abc1300fe85e3075c5d
1159ba69ab21ed350c5619977e575d1e3555e041
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYB' 'sip-files00070.txt'
3b2eb276e1c1c12029bd5c727bd78118
53a2287652c165a8464f74e97b74d4813fdf2b50
describe
'1145450' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYC' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
35e61dd3d49aec84bbab33719584aa04
a237ca780536570dbdf9f520e18d6061a8688603
describe
'274219' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYD' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1869a07f5b15b446a0a5ef7d67c13a38
cb9968f9df7bfb77c6277f8d6612f33510ac0b4f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36459' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYE' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a30110cc527c193d93f338678d4dfe1e
d832f1c7409b257a0a8102e3aa48e2bc7dea0f13
describe
'94008' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYF' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
81bbaac8d7e8c742b7c4287071695d61
b64da807b24d507373686bee46a3bace0c09ce69
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27503752' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYG' 'sip-files00071.tif'
184dd6a5f3b2d76d806ffbe83c9e1cff
dd93c4a382907fcbe2be814dfe7bcecb0a6d35a8
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYH' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6c13225f1a045c97297274bdc2242ad2
9e147ac0da456f9a540817a88344ae153ba455e4
describe
'1194205' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYI' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8828ae72215807f4ecbb34ee9a1ec22e
c1bf68b4e269aa119779cdad006a8e90ab5e1308
describe
'252324' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYJ' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
29ac87416fede7814e4e3ffbcc9e1ce8
501c179aa4cd8a471a0f6893c206ffc20539210e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35616' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYK' 'sip-files00072.pro'
5af18cd7fbdf3f8ab8d2aa758bbea3f2
63193a10d1132f19c29ed53eca1dcf4e0ab148a2
describe
'88529' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYL' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c0be1728930aebc39681ebe034b3d185
0ad81db696984b53b2c20e822a5e362eb5cdd349
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28673748' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYM' 'sip-files00072.tif'
0688296aa630beb468afb66c27a3381e
15f9b6e007342b995ecf72896b07eb48720fda94
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYN' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b85f481f0b9b2aac6d83dda80fbf6fa0
50c0c04aac0c7c6c7d743b542b084dd9c15a3cfb
describe
'1127314' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
8d0a946a46981a19643cedfd1f27a1be
88dfd1d28b20b91065b72aef1dc3d9cae26569c4
describe
'277078' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYP' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
2fadb195f9752a33e9f5f162299a7de9
fb130b8339f066a641e83648130cf796d25bf164
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35746' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c97f8da531bba229d9006fdbb74cb394
6375e34be5002e925b8762f6c3493ec57d6227c5
describe
'95070' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
a212b0c509d267df2cb0cda671c2403a
75df792396c4192de47fa9fdf36836df08fa8b6b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27068744' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYS' 'sip-files00073.tif'
3fdc936259983180bb5e5668a5375546
c87c3f70f4be5583cbd7e575fb262fff4969836b
'2011-07-29T00:32:28-04:00'
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYT' 'sip-files00073.txt'
7fb8d85c9810f27aaa3df4cc8c975b5e
ecf3dd2ad97f0c0f6052b8e1e79b61f65ac0691b
describe
'1147571' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYU' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
6d1f63605671ca105bf6a0e02bafe8db
bf4806fea086fcd9bd6960e911486cd62c1a1bcb
describe
'177849' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYV' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
c776f9e44194f5d0c160bf367fbd7072
797a06bd5d46b09b658153dad87a708867d6bb90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'12504' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYW' 'sip-files00074.pro'
3153b40b26c1bf7c0d6fe14ec7226f2d
0db9e2c9d44dbb80c2b568746951d3e9da88246a
describe
'61941' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYX' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
3e445db67497879a5aa0ad53c739a032
1e78fd5f833e411468692214a21145ff6f097ba0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27552232' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
37d1cda5d92bb9448fdae9d2a128db97
ae385fdfbced93d91c810b6592410eb80ad826ac
'2011-07-29T00:31:24-04:00'
describe
'508' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAYZ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
539d7b378c3a047d1df974967ac46122
13ee5b0806e1638dd1431a3e6279795a289991ae
describe
'1182820' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
52fa9ae73bda80c2302ba3108e662ce8
a759c3012f26b21b59667a2775082c6740552352
describe
'237156' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7ffc4ef2b9d785ef238144ad2bebf724
33b985b584d6c15200504aac5f15710164903a32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'7587' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e0cdb8939c7c996ec1cb0d36ea4865fc
48554fa07847a2ed14c5913fdea70725e8109498
describe
'76910' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
feec8106caf27b0a5f4f89e538438158
944be09efdac1d1111a21faeda2e5e61de25f185
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28399384' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
af0f50ed41cd5729599479f0e8fb4df7
f78c2cc4b7fc33d1642d7387030908c218e695b5
describe
'353' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
96b3be885e27295cda5dc6329ec423ac
85383562f344af59a602a131fc7a225d32ee4abc
describe
'1176464' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZG' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
9085d4d3e7179ab39f859a2003a7b62d
2fd3c7d904123ea2da3a87680761d8cf057a4527
describe
'250044' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZH' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d366e8abc6ec45db8f28f7fbc10702f8
975a95572f5c49c4312f5337cdb345b03e056633
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36514' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZI' 'sip-files00076.pro'
817c357eaaf005e1c9cf1bedb880eafa
74b21a5019cf8445d382d38ab28b133babce08fb
describe
'89493' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
aed5e612eb40aad4ee673fd3424ddfb3
d6f03eedb3ba51a2c137905e86969ddafc14327d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28248448' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZK' 'sip-files00076.tif'
2a6a3a6d009b40815ceaf43f28e5fb9a
6c18bba34aff20a92095a582070759673d937759
'2011-07-29T00:30:04-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZL' 'sip-files00076.txt'
840f4a4bdd216df12a4b3a2c3a72be01
207aff4ea101ff9e2315882ca5f509193d8a2def
describe
'1116258' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZM' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
94ddb8e4118dd55e698ec538ec16b175
966c27d4dd49a160d82e9c30bf22d5e3e7f9e4a8
describe
'258158' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZN' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
f0db24ebc8a36e45581383698dbcd6b4
341a8dd6ff13ee182e15630018c57ff92415a83a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35963' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
d0c55942401ceae46bba74ea6c5d83fa
c0a4d9424ec80ddcaf2fb44186f3ff6d4357388f
describe
'92312' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZP' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
afbb00d83cba340d930789a20f15a3a4
d57d3628bbb10bda7a5224ab713bd5d02378b1e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'26802936' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZQ' 'sip-files00077.tif'
f278bb5051ef85b1db2cdcb7b02d8ea8
f50c3eccbb862636a4404475cd6d6d7fab3f1a65
'2011-07-29T00:30:36-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZR' 'sip-files00077.txt'
ab91e49fed5b5519c6fe7a5f50db6442
0d23dd4ad20bf382f3cc1290c4bd092e16d6377e
describe
'1164104' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
4d97a75d1888256f79212af62b8b4a8f
c37c071e4b8a7ad5e9f665aa6589657bea0f8370
describe
'210170' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
56d91b9e4d80fa090a47e3c5e72f4a21
0d2dd0561cb374dfc7815ad31f221b538adc6547
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27207' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
e64543e01c4fac6d38e6c1a0015c4c28
8c8d45b740060c4088c0c89d083fb002eeb9f764
describe
'75226' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
afc5a4519457606b4a59c14561a856c3
e98bab6c356972f05c39947e62fd2373d23d13a1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27950468' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
da4f40f89500d5404386a1d187e4f621
8f052bfa4149182c000e718a360b36698236c9af
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
860455590ad44f798f5eeda78add8f9b
37cb0669be4d57d4accd624963d6ac5eb51a9006
describe
'1124829' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ba70e0e8bc667e8e5d3bc15c4c276bb8
0bea87d6d35c1ca47fb17d883bb652ef68731488
describe
'239936' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAAAZZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
3199026c2898dab37e34fbfe4ddc2a10
d412f4aaaece7fe9b5f501cd7c75518aea3b4f15
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28804' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
44408889bb86fd3787eaac8d81e6f48d
c8477c1cb444f3503a83a087b3d0a08a72f3dd61
describe
'83965' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
91b6c7c54da85bcb5112907cad3452ec
e84a7e57be564e006f75a53aad1c87a1f1b8661a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27008680' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
da80fd1e3562c9d2b25c96358346be74
d82ebcf14cbdd0af27e2a76cc790f0d8e00fbe4d
'2011-07-29T00:31:44-04:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
dccc0743e837c6d0b029ab0aec55fc74
fbe17118c5da579e2c66a218e2f3719a34a62bf3
describe
'1243094' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAE' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
de584f72faa42c0b47accf3e7f8e35f5
fc0c3a9b608d6878aa0b10d2e94d6794ef18219a
describe
'196575' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAF' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
f65cd4e4de1d7e357dc6bd711c9ad4cd
01e1f01ee10f661a355ff84ae7b2a1b6a0a59475
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34076' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAG' 'sip-files00080.pro'
fae97187b8ae0e8b9c9447c318d07d86
35d8e7e4561ed9d888f18404c2e3a72c510f06f2
describe
'72759' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAH' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
bc4df94d78a58df19958fd7b997dfc42
7aebb47e36937e99fa66fa580da6ab48042381a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29845032' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAI' 'sip-files00080.tif'
cab40567c28bd1fdb00f9ba83abef71c
276ecfebc1ed00469450c46fe4654f21836671bb
'2011-07-29T00:32:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAJ' 'sip-files00080.txt'
7e039e360e507a0c2087c5f6a11ed192
246239a121ced53e1f67da9191ec214ae16c167b
describe
'1186016' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAK' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
b155b82e3ca82c463a3d92ad441eaa7b
f2632887574387300b365791146f14603d710cb6
describe
'211157' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAL' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
280d5b3f926eaa00b55a3d17468e2abc
2d520b797ae73a89cb57e38ea801684853ff2d34
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'34290' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAM' 'sip-files00081.pro'
97f8c15d7e3b6ed1b661e532dd39cc68
bff393bf7256b4550409ffab0177cc1db2401d00
describe
'75496' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAN' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
7e270d13c7a34b57d1c2cebe3cae506b
50c8d91ac42571b255b1a617b131ec373bb93154
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'28476148' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
83b2e1e365293b3b29e79c27ee2a1806
efe2f8fe18da5cf4feb95bdc8f0f7b87f868a3e7
'2011-07-29T00:32:13-04:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAP' 'sip-files00081.txt'
de5987e5e7ec5267afe16cf5bf814cfa
0dbd33531d7292f16bc2457151ee05e418d29ba1
describe
'1279470' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
582f90b7e80e5f71fa2d999d50040044
534135b73275b5f35d56383745e74413fd11426e
describe
'225844' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
98d5337f3e7b5ba929ebee53e8598694
6c17e95e5a7e8985a6127df04690554fe9f38ba7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36427' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
b76e9d5ff8702b67e45a802bc44e33b9
af53af4bd3cf18071b410d33ee7f6ed6cfd5c903
describe
'78882' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
2bc757b1761609897bccf7c03290a1cf
def1b60c5268231556f495c797dee2b409ade304
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30718740' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
31f3bcd29f56acff9403d31fbbac0029
0a7cbb591f6e58b54cd9d93715500365c260eb30
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAV' 'sip-files00082.txt'
8ad028be8851be87d908cc594e63dbfd
9cca6f875127d0fd1fd894e54b1e4fd1faa3eb9e
describe
'1260947' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
222263537f9d6a3f50a2d239349fb9c2
f22efe5fa9295589deff4e443ac57bca9b6a3d65
describe
'232982' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
c159a0b64045ed36156a9fd2e10622f5
34a904f2a83e49caf280dc3e4bfa18a997687574
'2011-07-29T00:29:45-04:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'36837' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4e5a6d766260030e698c2c96c85cba0c
2ff0cf1c70d3845b28416a048a83d3a501a007d7
describe
'80624' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABAZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
22c0aee797cd0dad1a0975b2087cc5cc
9df086f6c164693727045a9afd44bc659a37c447
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30273772' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
382fac09155a4b2f9e5d7e78070dcd26
065e80ad2716d8efc118c90e557812a39dc8abee
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
2460c25eafcbe2aab0f6dcd78d4256b0
e25b1a763b0c3c324beaa121d489f203cd26e534
describe
'1139994' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBC' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bde5ee3707239e9832c351cc83d4c4c2
6dfa9b72f02d46de724121fae8be19274a8fbba5
describe
'158100' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBD' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
8c81792fc89c791d5aad77e290f1ed0a
97bffc40a21a9501603f9078333c9bc02f5ca37a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'13549' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBE' 'sip-files00084.pro'
c84991b61b51148b4630990e1ff8ab8c
577e406afd1cfd348eb20689d8a98ae05cf0636e
describe
'57353' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBF' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4ed682f94163304f7a5699dec66d7a93
fd66047d1694e9feaaf3c7825de2a87c02f70710
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'27369188' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBG' 'sip-files00084.tif'
d1acfaee7bcbbcffc63ddef27404d351
a1175a1f382454a253c09451b6d123725887009c
describe
'600' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cb4b9a98e07a141d650246cfcb5f211e
8eed854ba12c5ca4849d01407d6603cadbcd14d3
describe
'1382846' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBI' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
3df5f48da7bb55edf131a1a6e398e311
55ad9cdd74fd3df694ded8ac80040f65e01f4861
describe
'119875' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
87f9d437c8bb323f205d91f4d9ee5dfd
2932bad2180510fe7f67180cbef355b4de62c0f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'39619' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9ddd79a1da9afdc288779289e13b2f75
42152989c5bc07358a0eac7f2bf68e8d490d021c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'33195876' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
7ea3e4db800493323fc777f2debb5771
b5f177daa895a509757012cfcedd89fbd1f0071a
'2011-07-29T00:32:06-04:00'
describe
'1292759' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
492c75cd33532cbc48938ac3a3c87fa5
7d88b6800bac2678a309d2d02f0506aab9281d46
describe
'237566' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7c6d7c57560df6423e0a2b2a3c098c4f
f6fb1b454f1c29b411c76178842e9c9549565d6e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'63165' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBO' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
d97dc2646e80dda47dc23790689b045e
d372130b5e7beb4caf9ba8a12ec1d9456cce0e40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31035576' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBP' 'sip-files00086.tif'
3928451a051d65a95427788928394d8b
0a7d5e60d3265fdcdf30c3fe5a0302a3bda32f5a
'2011-07-29T00:30:21-04:00'
describe
'115161' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBQ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
06e41cc3e1151e1ade22140db3736411
4fc0d7d297e284f5523cfcb9315452520a6b554d
describe
'59949' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBR' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
b82497b7e50ed367eaf840749ebaab23
ba3a38c17072d8c610a02acff8b44dc14826de4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'207' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBS' 'sip-files00087.pro'
12aaadf66a961f750d88bfd2ac179cf1
2d884de879b2798f568068b5262488a288b7bc02
describe
'22591' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBT' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4d301f4cfd25d0ca7b6f01c8fcd77ea1
ae54effd4e0ff3a32cb58f705a1a250f429e2254
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2773024' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBU' 'sip-files00087.tif'
2f06835a47c819b5acd12d156de73fec
41397be7592672378b9d228354db1fce67f94469
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBV' 'sip-files00087.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'48' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBW' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
64ece4ff94d5a90a36816e0f0ded0987
037f83a0379959ce956ba38c8b66fef3b4475b2f
describe
'146908' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABBX' 'sip-filesUF00003104_00001.mets'
c53d58211d3c25080c7d86dc77d5d233
1c4af79946632ae556d6ad1a32c2f5333b2e3850
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T11:01:09-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'153619' 'info:fdaE20070909_AAAAACfileF20070909_AAABCA' 'sip-filesUF00003104_00001.xml'
17ef1e93ec32b354a4c5c227571a3f34
98d701056247c025c845eab57ee7c2c4230553f1
describe
'2013-12-19T11:01:08-05:00'
xml resolution