Citation
Picture fables in verse

Material Information

Title:
Picture fables in verse
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1856 ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1856 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1856
Genre:
Fables ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
By the author of "Rambling rhymes."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026914120 ( ALEPH )
11845465 ( OCLC )
ALH6312 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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“RAMBLING RHYMES.”

AND NEW YORE.

bo
eS
ie
aoe
O
jane
C14

AUTHOR OF

IT aE a a nn = eee a a Te

EAA WE Er Ll: OE ahah









Some neighbour Pigeons live so well,

And longing much with them to dwell,
He washed his sooty feathers white,
And to the dovecot took his flight,—
But held his tongue and crammed his maw,
And none found out the false Jackdaw.
But soon as he began to chatter,
Away they drove him with a clatter!
3ack to his former friends he flew,

But none the whitened recreant knew.

=a





THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD.

FOWLER once while laying snares

To trap his victims unawares,

Mildly inquired what he was doing!

Said he, “I build a city fair

For all the songsters of the air,

From every evil to defend them,

Where peace and plenty may attend them.”
The bird believed the flattering strain

And quickly in the toils was ta’en,

Where liberty through lies was lost,

As men and birds find to their cost.





a

THE WOLVES AND THE SIGK ASS.

»jN sickness sore an Ass was laid,

9



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<1 While far and near the rumour spread
ewes

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That, ere another night should pass,
Grim Death would carry off the Ass.

Some Wolves, who solemn faces wore,

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Came rapping to the stable door,

And sought, with looks of great concern

’

The patient’s hapless state to learn.

Bias

_ The Colt, who watched his parent’s bed,
Came softly to the door, and said,
‘* My mother begs you will retire,

She’s better far than you desire!”



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To end his woes and stop his breath.

The King of Terrors heard the cry,

And, to his horror, soon drew nigh,

Demanding, with a visage grim,

The reason why he called on him.

Said he, ‘*I let my bundle fall,

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Which made me for assistance call.

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I humbly crave your worship’s pardon,

And beg you'll help to lift my burden.”





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THE ONE-EYED DOE.
® ONE-EYED Doe who pastured free

Fast by the margin of the sea,
Ale

Took, as she thought, the wise precaution

EM PENT Lees eee

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To keep her blind side next the ocean,



That on the land, with watchful eye,
Approaching danger she might spy.

Ah, fatal trust ! a cunning poacher

HLIGNVLS

With deadly weapon came to watch her,





And from the water, in his boat,
The unsuspecting Doe was shot,
Lamenting with her dying breath

The caution that had caused her death,







YOU

i]

BEFORE

Sa

ete eee

With clarion shrill, bold chanticleer

Scared him away in panic fear.

The Ass, courageous at the sight,

Pursued the Lion in his flight,

But found too far his courage bore him,

For round the monarch turned and tore him.
Cowards who thus provoke their fate,

Like the poor Ass may find, too late,

That courage false leads on to danger,

When on them turns the bold avenger.

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A AE ATE A A

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While bounding swiftly through a hedge,

Which threw him into such a rage

ile cursed the Bramble for a foe,

That he could use a stranger so.

The Bramble boldly cried, ‘* You thought

That I would serve your turn for nought!
sut know, we of the Bramble line,

Repel such handling, friend, as thine,
For laying hold, time out of mind,

lias been the custom of our kind.”

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THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK.



AC HUSBANDMAN whose new-sown corn,
ain ) Away by Cranes and Geese was torn,

A snare to trap the plunderers set,

And caught the robbers in a net.

A silly Stork among the rest,

Caught in the act, was sore distressed,
And pleaded he might not be slain

As he was neither Goose nor Crane.
‘‘That may be true,” the Farmer cried,
‘But you are found with thieves allied ;
Repentance comes a day too late,—

You all must share a common fate.”






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THE THIEF AND THE 006.

“Qf PROWLING Thief, on plunder bent,
we

} To rob a house at midnight went,
.

But roused an honest watchful Dog,
Whose barking much annoyed the rogue :
With bread he sought the Dog’s alhance,
But still he fiercer barked defiance,

As if, by insult more enraged,

lie felt his honour was engaged :

‘* You dirty scoundrel,” barked the brute,
** To think a gift would make me mute!
Men may be bribed, but Dogs disdain

To parter honesty for gain.”



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THE MAN BIT BY A DCG.
FURIOUS Dog had bit a Man,

Who to-a wise old woman ran,



Held for her skill in high repute,

Era

And famed for curing man and brute.
The crone prescribed a lump of bread,
Weil soaked into the wound that bled,

Which, when the furious dog had eaten,

wes

Would cure the man that he had bitten.

sop, who heard the sage advice,




Said, ‘All the dogs will seek a slice; ory



Your secret keep as well’s you can,

Or every cur will bite a man.”

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Begged of a Wolf, who saw his scrape,

‘l'o come and help. him to escape,

Eee

‘“* Poor Reynard!” thus began his friend,
‘“ Gladly would I assistance lend,”
And phrased away in strain provoking,

While Reynard in the well was choking.

cope rman ary ~~ mencmar pre ra

‘‘ Nay, prithee, friend,’ exclaimed the Fox,
‘““ Your pity my niisfortune mocks ;
Not words, but deeds, can mend the matter

When one’s up to the chin in water.”














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THE ASS AND THE LION'S SKIN.

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Me . N Ass who found a Lion’s skin





Fy }, Had snugly wrapped himself therein,

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And scared the flocks and herds away

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In consternation and dismay

r2

‘To fright his master next he tried,
Who soon his two long ears descried,
And brought a cudgel o’er his rump, i

With such a hearty thundering thump,

Mia Lay





That made him rue the rash assumption,
And feel the fruits of his presumption.
That for a Lion he might pass,

Iie made himself a greater ass! \Q);
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~ PROVIDE

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To drag them vut with all his force.

On Hercules the Clown then called

For instant help, and prayed and bawled.
On hearing all the clamour loud,

The god beheld him from a cloud :

Said he, ‘f You lazy, stupid lout,

Just try your strength to pull them. out ;
And ere you thus for help appeal,

Put your own shoulder to the wheel!”





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THE TWO GRABS.
ea PARENT Crab once left the water

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And as they sauntered crab-like, backward,

‘Reproved her child for motions awkward :

‘* A shambling, sprawling, graceless creature,

That moves against the laws of nature !”

‘‘ My dear mamma,” the Crab replied,
‘lo walk like you I’ve always tried ;
But if you would example show,

And teach some other way to go,,

With backwardness Pll never tease yon, .

But do my very best to please you.”









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THE PEAGOCK AND THE CRANE.

(O PEACOCK, of his plumage vain,
. \yo

Aud strutting past in all his pride,
Wath scornful look his neighbour eyed.
The Crane, his pride to mortify,
Observed he need not look so high ;
No doubt he was a splendid beau,.

So far as gawdy plumes could go,

But plainer birds, with wings to fly,
Who soared above the clouds on high
Were nobler, in his estimation,

Than strutting things of ostentation, —





but ere he fired the fatal shot,

This arm, arrested on the spot,

Down in a trice the weapon flung,

Hlis leg was by an adder stung!

Swift through his blood: the poison ran,
Which soon to mortify began ;

And when he saw approaching death,
He murmured with his parting breath,—
“© had I let the bird alone,

Secking its life ’ve lost my own!”





THE WOLF AND THE GRANE,
A HiUNGRY Wolf, once on a day,

Devouring greedily his prey,
Stuck in his throat an ugly bone,
Which made him wildly howl and groan,
And vow that he who eased his pain
A due reward, with thanks, should gain.
At length a Crane, the Wolf to free,
Pulled out the bone, and claimed his fee.
‘ Be glad I did not bite your head off!”
Exclaimed the rogue, and quickly made off.
So he who helps the thankless, gains
Ls labour only for his pains,

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HE Sun and Wind one day disputed

6 Which should the strongest be reputed,

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both agreed their strength to try

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Upon a Traveller passing by.
With driving showers the North Wind blew,
Ilis cloak the Traveller closer drew ;

Then through the clouds and vapours dun

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Down on him fiercely burst the Stn ;
Till flying to a grove’s retreat

He shelter found from wind and heat.

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Avoid extremes if you be wise

Ln timely flight your safety lees,







The Baidaned Ass, much to be pitied,
‘T'o share his load, the Horse entreated,
But, with a snort of lazy pride,

All his requests the Horse denied,

Tul, wearied far.beyond his strength

5

The helpless Ass fell dead at length

His master, as a last resource,
Laid the whole burden on the Horse.
And, for his comfort, something more,—

The Ass’s skin he also bore!





MAN, while angling in.a brook,

Caught a small Perch upon his hook,

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Vhich begged him in a humble strain
l'o throw it in the stream again.
‘« Some other season,” said the Fish,
“ When grown, I’d prove a dainty dish,
But now, so silly, young and slight,
1 scarce would make a single bite.”

J beg-your pardon,” said the Man,
‘* But I must keep-you while I can ;
Should I your liberty restore,

I never may behold you more !”

ise HLYOM SI. |

_ An nennmeess vata —enrme











TKE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS.
MAN who led a wretched life,

Caused by his Sons, who lived in strife

The strength of unity to each :-—

A bundle firm of sticks he made,

“Now, try your strength, my Sons,” he said, »
“lo break it through.” They tried in vain,

Its strength resisted every strain.

‘*Now take them singly.”- They began

Like reeds to snap them one by one.
‘*Wence learn, my Sons,” the father cries,

“What mighty strength in union lies,”





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Ile so annoyed her with his chatter.

“ Peace, noisy thing,” then cried the sheep,
“‘Tjeave me alone, or silence keep ;

Were I a dog,-full well you know

You would mot dare to use me so.”
“True,” said the Daw, ‘‘the reason’s plain,
You cannot do me harm again ;

I tease the helpless in my fun,

But all the strong and surly shun.”





aE

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Ts. THE.

WO Pots sat on a river's bank,

Of brass and earthenware their rank ;

, to their dismay,
ising tide swept both away!
The earthen Pot was much afraid

[lis brazen friend would lend him aid,

And begged he would his distance keep,

Nor help him on the waters deep

‘‘ For if we should but touch,”, said he,

‘* My brittle frame will shattered be.”
Ofi do the lowly suffer wrong,

Who jostle with the great and stron.

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THE OAK AND THE REED.

GUST of wind one stormy day

: Tore up and swept an Oak away,
Who saw, while down the stream descending,
A Reed before the tempest bending,
But, while it bent it kept its station,
Which filled the Oak with admiration.
‘* How can you stand the tempest’s shock,
Frail Reed, that breaks the sturdy Oak?”
The tree inquired. The Reed rejoined,
‘‘ I bend before the roaring wind,
While you, so stubborn, proud, and high,

Resist the storm, and there you lie!”





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THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

Ge LION once in kingly pride,

Upon a trembling Mouse was laid,
Which, pleading hard for liberty,
The generous beast at once set free.

t chanced the Lion, after that,

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In hunters toils one day was caught :

The Mouse, who heard his roaring noise,

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And knew his benefactor’s voice,
With teeth so sharp the meshes severed,

And gratefully his friend delivered !





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And cropt a Thistle by the way

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llis craving hunger to allay,

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And while he mumbled at his prize,

He reasoned thus, so sage and wise:

“The load 1 carry may delight

A nice or pampered appetite ;

To me the Thistle proves a feast,

More sweet than epicure can taste:

Let health and temperance bound my wishes,

Aud give the great thei dainty dishes.”





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THE GARDENER AND HIS DOG.
@RISKING beside a draw-well’s brink,
And stretching out his neck to drink,
A Gardener’s Dog fell headlong down,
A depth where he was sure to drown.
l}is master to his rescue ran,
When, thankless brute, be bit the man!
Who, thrown into a rage with pain, —
Just dashed him in the well again.
** Ungrateful wretch !” the Gardener said,
** To bite the very hand that fed
And would have saved you,—whiv Could bear it
I leave you to the fate you merit.”







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Full Text
fe rts
bt baie ee
Te ber or a
tt *

ey

Ag
ae
ey ty
yer
4a

Aass at




“RAMBLING RHYMES.”

AND NEW YORE.

bo
eS
ie
aoe
O
jane
C14

AUTHOR OF

IT aE a a nn = eee a a Te

EAA WE Er Ll: OE ahah



Some neighbour Pigeons live so well,

And longing much with them to dwell,
He washed his sooty feathers white,
And to the dovecot took his flight,—
But held his tongue and crammed his maw,
And none found out the false Jackdaw.
But soon as he began to chatter,
Away they drove him with a clatter!
3ack to his former friends he flew,

But none the whitened recreant knew.

=a


THE FOWLER AND THE BLACKBIRD.

FOWLER once while laying snares

To trap his victims unawares,

Mildly inquired what he was doing!

Said he, “I build a city fair

For all the songsters of the air,

From every evil to defend them,

Where peace and plenty may attend them.”
The bird believed the flattering strain

And quickly in the toils was ta’en,

Where liberty through lies was lost,

As men and birds find to their cost.


a

THE WOLVES AND THE SIGK ASS.

»jN sickness sore an Ass was laid,

9



Cmacl
<1 While far and near the rumour spread
ewes

if =|
ie |
cmt
i
iO
ia
=
Sa
oad
|
ea
-—
WY

That, ere another night should pass,
Grim Death would carry off the Ass.

Some Wolves, who solemn faces wore,

|
|

ee ee

Came rapping to the stable door,

And sought, with looks of great concern

’

The patient’s hapless state to learn.

Bias

_ The Colt, who watched his parent’s bed,
Came softly to the door, and said,
‘* My mother begs you will retire,

She’s better far than you desire!”



eee

aS cme ce



mal


a a ae

yaaa,

. “5 Ere oeny 4a
i l b Pr
= y, Bits
a at J 5

‘Sl

aay

eran

SS ee

To end his woes and stop his breath.

The King of Terrors heard the cry,

And, to his horror, soon drew nigh,

Demanding, with a visage grim,

The reason why he called on him.

Said he, ‘*I let my bundle fall,

—
or
Ez
>
O :
4
<
ee
4
=
<
fon
—
wn
we
ee
-
ae
ro)
oO
pa

“i
—
3
So ne

Which made me for assistance call.

> - <
I humbly crave your worship’s pardon,

And beg you'll help to lift my burden.”


a

THE ONE-EYED DOE.
® ONE-EYED Doe who pastured free

Fast by the margin of the sea,
Ale

Took, as she thought, the wise precaution

EM PENT Lees eee

om
bs 0
=
ye)
ee |
po

To keep her blind side next the ocean,



That on the land, with watchful eye,
Approaching danger she might spy.

Ah, fatal trust ! a cunning poacher

HLIGNVLS

With deadly weapon came to watch her,





And from the water, in his boat,
The unsuspecting Doe was shot,
Lamenting with her dying breath

The caution that had caused her death,




YOU

i]

BEFORE

Sa

ete eee

With clarion shrill, bold chanticleer

Scared him away in panic fear.

The Ass, courageous at the sight,

Pursued the Lion in his flight,

But found too far his courage bore him,

For round the monarch turned and tore him.
Cowards who thus provoke their fate,

Like the poor Ass may find, too late,

That courage false leads on to danger,

When on them turns the bold avenger.

gg AR SY
ao

CT ee eee Le











-

YOTVA 40

A AE ATE A A

a
While bounding swiftly through a hedge,

Which threw him into such a rage

ile cursed the Bramble for a foe,

That he could use a stranger so.

The Bramble boldly cried, ‘* You thought

That I would serve your turn for nought!
sut know, we of the Bramble line,

Repel such handling, friend, as thine,
For laying hold, time out of mind,

lias been the custom of our kind.”

<<
m
i)
nee
a
my

LON




















THE HUSBANDMAN AND THE STORK.



AC HUSBANDMAN whose new-sown corn,
ain ) Away by Cranes and Geese was torn,

A snare to trap the plunderers set,

And caught the robbers in a net.

A silly Stork among the rest,

Caught in the act, was sore distressed,
And pleaded he might not be slain

As he was neither Goose nor Crane.
‘‘That may be true,” the Farmer cried,
‘But you are found with thieves allied ;
Repentance comes a day too late,—

You all must share a common fate.”






ane

b= ae EL








>
‘cea
pa
oa
O}
ae
>
ae
ie
©
ve
po
a
w”

|
|
.
4 A

I
j 4

7 Va bane

THE THIEF AND THE 006.

“Qf PROWLING Thief, on plunder bent,
we

} To rob a house at midnight went,
.

But roused an honest watchful Dog,
Whose barking much annoyed the rogue :
With bread he sought the Dog’s alhance,
But still he fiercer barked defiance,

As if, by insult more enraged,

lie felt his honour was engaged :

‘* You dirty scoundrel,” barked the brute,
** To think a gift would make me mute!
Men may be bribed, but Dogs disdain

To parter honesty for gain.”



TZEEE

Eee ee est oes











ETT SIT a OE

CEST SL eee) ea

THE MAN BIT BY A DCG.
FURIOUS Dog had bit a Man,

Who to-a wise old woman ran,



Held for her skill in high repute,

Era

And famed for curing man and brute.
The crone prescribed a lump of bread,
Weil soaked into the wound that bled,

Which, when the furious dog had eaten,

wes

Would cure the man that he had bitten.

sop, who heard the sage advice,




Said, ‘All the dogs will seek a slice; ory



Your secret keep as well’s you can,

Or every cur will bite a man.”

Le
cE

> }
=
ead
mt }
—
= j

m

Begged of a Wolf, who saw his scrape,

‘l'o come and help. him to escape,

Eee

‘“* Poor Reynard!” thus began his friend,
‘“ Gladly would I assistance lend,”
And phrased away in strain provoking,

While Reynard in the well was choking.

cope rman ary ~~ mencmar pre ra

‘‘ Nay, prithee, friend,’ exclaimed the Fox,
‘““ Your pity my niisfortune mocks ;
Not words, but deeds, can mend the matter

When one’s up to the chin in water.”











eae eee eed

amc



THE ASS AND THE LION'S SKIN.

aria

Me . N Ass who found a Lion’s skin





Fy }, Had snugly wrapped himself therein,

“GUYMOD JH MOHS SGYOM 918 #

And scared the flocks and herds away

+

In consternation and dismay

r2

‘To fright his master next he tried,
Who soon his two long ears descried,
And brought a cudgel o’er his rump, i

With such a hearty thundering thump,

Mia Lay





That made him rue the rash assumption,
And feel the fruits of his presumption.
That for a Lion he might pass,

Iie made himself a greater ass! \Q);
ee Cs

.
yg
f 4

writ aN)
SdUOM #5100)
— ——_ eat §

i


~ PROVIDE

aaa

To drag them vut with all his force.

On Hercules the Clown then called

For instant help, and prayed and bawled.
On hearing all the clamour loud,

The god beheld him from a cloud :

Said he, ‘f You lazy, stupid lout,

Just try your strength to pull them. out ;
And ere you thus for help appeal,

Put your own shoulder to the wheel!”


STU eels



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- el
as)
©
oO |
— |
oO
ea
m4
p= a
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lad |
cog
uy
Cc
er
po
~~
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aS

THE TWO GRABS.
ea PARENT Crab once left the water

(5)

And as they sauntered crab-like, backward,

‘Reproved her child for motions awkward :

‘* A shambling, sprawling, graceless creature,

That moves against the laws of nature !”

‘‘ My dear mamma,” the Crab replied,
‘lo walk like you I’ve always tried ;
But if you would example show,

And teach some other way to go,,

With backwardness Pll never tease yon, .

But do my very best to please you.”






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THE PEAGOCK AND THE CRANE.

(O PEACOCK, of his plumage vain,
. \yo

Aud strutting past in all his pride,
Wath scornful look his neighbour eyed.
The Crane, his pride to mortify,
Observed he need not look so high ;
No doubt he was a splendid beau,.

So far as gawdy plumes could go,

But plainer birds, with wings to fly,
Who soared above the clouds on high
Were nobler, in his estimation,

Than strutting things of ostentation, —


but ere he fired the fatal shot,

This arm, arrested on the spot,

Down in a trice the weapon flung,

Hlis leg was by an adder stung!

Swift through his blood: the poison ran,
Which soon to mortify began ;

And when he saw approaching death,
He murmured with his parting breath,—
“© had I let the bird alone,

Secking its life ’ve lost my own!”


THE WOLF AND THE GRANE,
A HiUNGRY Wolf, once on a day,

Devouring greedily his prey,
Stuck in his throat an ugly bone,
Which made him wildly howl and groan,
And vow that he who eased his pain
A due reward, with thanks, should gain.
At length a Crane, the Wolf to free,
Pulled out the bone, and claimed his fee.
‘ Be glad I did not bite your head off!”
Exclaimed the rogue, and quickly made off.
So he who helps the thankless, gains
Ls labour only for his pains,

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HE Sun and Wind one day disputed

6 Which should the strongest be reputed,

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both agreed their strength to try

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Upon a Traveller passing by.
With driving showers the North Wind blew,
Ilis cloak the Traveller closer drew ;

Then through the clouds and vapours dun

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Down on him fiercely burst the Stn ;
Till flying to a grove’s retreat

He shelter found from wind and heat.

esac yg

Avoid extremes if you be wise

Ln timely flight your safety lees,




The Baidaned Ass, much to be pitied,
‘T'o share his load, the Horse entreated,
But, with a snort of lazy pride,

All his requests the Horse denied,

Tul, wearied far.beyond his strength

5

The helpless Ass fell dead at length

His master, as a last resource,
Laid the whole burden on the Horse.
And, for his comfort, something more,—

The Ass’s skin he also bore!


MAN, while angling in.a brook,

Caught a small Perch upon his hook,

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Vhich begged him in a humble strain
l'o throw it in the stream again.
‘« Some other season,” said the Fish,
“ When grown, I’d prove a dainty dish,
But now, so silly, young and slight,
1 scarce would make a single bite.”

J beg-your pardon,” said the Man,
‘* But I must keep-you while I can ;
Should I your liberty restore,

I never may behold you more !”

ise HLYOM SI. |

_ An nennmeess vata —enrme








TKE OLD MAN AND HIS SONS.
MAN who led a wretched life,

Caused by his Sons, who lived in strife

The strength of unity to each :-—

A bundle firm of sticks he made,

“Now, try your strength, my Sons,” he said, »
“lo break it through.” They tried in vain,

Its strength resisted every strain.

‘*Now take them singly.”- They began

Like reeds to snap them one by one.
‘*Wence learn, my Sons,” the father cries,

“What mighty strength in union lies,”


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Ile so annoyed her with his chatter.

“ Peace, noisy thing,” then cried the sheep,
“‘Tjeave me alone, or silence keep ;

Were I a dog,-full well you know

You would mot dare to use me so.”
“True,” said the Daw, ‘‘the reason’s plain,
You cannot do me harm again ;

I tease the helpless in my fun,

But all the strong and surly shun.”


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WO Pots sat on a river's bank,

Of brass and earthenware their rank ;

, to their dismay,
ising tide swept both away!
The earthen Pot was much afraid

[lis brazen friend would lend him aid,

And begged he would his distance keep,

Nor help him on the waters deep

‘‘ For if we should but touch,”, said he,

‘* My brittle frame will shattered be.”
Ofi do the lowly suffer wrong,

Who jostle with the great and stron.

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THE OAK AND THE REED.

GUST of wind one stormy day

: Tore up and swept an Oak away,
Who saw, while down the stream descending,
A Reed before the tempest bending,
But, while it bent it kept its station,
Which filled the Oak with admiration.
‘* How can you stand the tempest’s shock,
Frail Reed, that breaks the sturdy Oak?”
The tree inquired. The Reed rejoined,
‘‘ I bend before the roaring wind,
While you, so stubborn, proud, and high,

Resist the storm, and there you lie!”


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THE LION AND THE MOUSE.

Ge LION once in kingly pride,

Upon a trembling Mouse was laid,
Which, pleading hard for liberty,
The generous beast at once set free.

t chanced the Lion, after that,

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In hunters toils one day was caught :

The Mouse, who heard his roaring noise,

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With teeth so sharp the meshes severed,

And gratefully his friend delivered !


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And cropt a Thistle by the way

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And while he mumbled at his prize,

He reasoned thus, so sage and wise:

“The load 1 carry may delight

A nice or pampered appetite ;

To me the Thistle proves a feast,

More sweet than epicure can taste:

Let health and temperance bound my wishes,

Aud give the great thei dainty dishes.”


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THE GARDENER AND HIS DOG.
@RISKING beside a draw-well’s brink,
And stretching out his neck to drink,
A Gardener’s Dog fell headlong down,
A depth where he was sure to drown.
l}is master to his rescue ran,
When, thankless brute, be bit the man!
Who, thrown into a rage with pain, —
Just dashed him in the well again.
** Ungrateful wretch !” the Gardener said,
** To bite the very hand that fed
And would have saved you,—whiv Could bear it
I leave you to the fate you merit.”




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Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:38:36 PM Error Log for UF00002977_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:38:36 PM

12/15/2014 12:38:36 PM

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12/15/2014 12:38:36 PM 00000.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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