Citation
Tales for the young

Material Information

Title:
Tales for the young
Creator:
Embury, Emma C ( Emma Catherine ), 1806-1863
Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Engraver )
Thomas Nelson & Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
Edinburgh
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
192 p., <5> leaves of plates : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Blind children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Rich people -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece and added t.p. signed: W. Dickes.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Miss E. Embury.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026681106 ( ALEPH )
45964854 ( OCLC )
ALG6109 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text







TALES FOR THE YOUNG.





‘>The kind care of tho ptrysscau and bumane gaoler rescued me from

this fr»ghiful malady.’?—Page 191.



TALES FOR THE YOUNG.

LY

MISS KB EMBOURY.

me et
A

Ms. ety wr. & ie >
sss et eee ee
*€ Father” suid Cunstance, *‘ t wish you would have the flowirs
planted just in the same spots next yeur. "—-Pagd 29.





T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON AND EDINBURGH.





TALES FOR THE YOUNG.

t



BZondort:
T NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH.

MDCCCLIIL.





CONTENTS

PAGH.
CONSTANCE LATIMER; OR THE BLIND GIRL, o eee @
THE SON AND HEIR, eco eco eco oo cee 77
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY, eee Pas _— me ess 1227
WEWTON AINSLIE, oe es eco oes cee 165



CONSTANCE LATIMER.



CONSTANCE LATIMER;

OR,

THE BLIND GIRL.

a

CHAPTER I.

Amone the many fine mansions which have
recently disappeared before the rage for public
improvement was one, which from its com-
manding situation on the banks of the Hudson,
and the unobtrusive beauty of its appearance,
deserved to have been spared. Standing on a
little eminence which sloped gradually down to
the water’s edge, and completely imbosomed in
trees, Latimer Cottage, with its picturesque out-
houses, formed one of the most beautiful points
of view as seen from the river, and attracted
many an admiring glance from the roadside



10 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

traveller. But a wide, naked-looking avenue,
destitute of every green thing, now runs through
that once verdant lawn; the place of the per-
fumed flower-garden is supplied by the paved
footpath, with its inodorous kennel; the cot-
tage, with its cheerful apartments and quiet
library, has disappeared, to make room for the
dark and dirty warehouse; and hundreds of
busy feet now hurry to and fro over the spot
once consecrated by the happiness, and hallowed
by the grief, of human hearts.

Charles Latimer was the son of a rich East
India merchant, and had been originally edu-
cated for the bar. His passion for literature
led him to adopt this profession rather because
it was a gentlemanly way of doing nothing,
than with the expectation of deriving from it a
livelihood; for he well knew that the only son
of a man whose income far exceeded his. most
profuse expenditure was not likely to require
it; as a means of support. The sudden death of
his father, however, just as he had completed
his studies, changed the tenor of his fortunes.
He found himself the only representative in



OR, THE BLIND GIR. Il

America of one of the most extensive commer-
cial houses in the world ; and, when he consi-
dered that several years must necessarily be
consumed in settling the affairs of a concern
which had its agencies in England, France, and
India, he determined to relinquish his profes-
sion rather than give up a business for many
years past extremely lucrative.

But Latimer was one of the few who look
upon wealth as a means rather than an end.
He eared not to devote all his noble energies to
the task of making haste to be rich ; but, satis-
fied with regular and steady profits, which ena-
bled him to indulge all his elegant tastes, he
mingled with the toils of business the pleasures
of social and literary life. For several years
after the death of his father he continued to
reside in the same mansion, surrounded by the
old family servants, dividing his time between
the counting-house and the library, or occa-
sionally mingling in the gay scenes of which he
was so bright an ornament. But accident threw
him in the way of a young and lovely southern
belle, and he soon found his home had never



12 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

looked so cheerful as it did when gladdened by
the presence of his fair bride.

Brilliant im conversation, sufficiently well-
informed to join in the discussion of any ordi-
nary topic, and gifted with that tact which
enables a woman to turn aside the ball when it
éxceeds her grasp, there were few more attrac-
tive than the beautiful Mrs. Latimer. The
total want of energy of character, which she
owed to her Inxurious southern habits, was 4
fault not likely to be discovered in the day of
prosperity.

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. Latimer
set himself to the task of modernizing and
adorning his father’s villa. Its proximity to
the city, which enabled him to combine the ad-
vantages of town and country life, decided him
to make it his permanent residence; and in a
very few years he found himself the happy pos-
sessor of the loveliest home, the prettiest wife,
and two of the sweetest children that ever
blessed a mortal’s lot.

At the time when our story commences,
Julian, the younger child, was a lively, rosy





An 8 \ery fow years ne found himself the happy powessor of the loveliest home, the pretiles wife,
end ten af tha dwenteat shideen shad ewe blepeed escheat blade



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 13

little fellow, of perhaps three years of age} With
the bold blue eye and open brow of fearless
innocence. Constance was about two years his
elder; but who ever beheld that child and
paused not to look again and again ere they
found language to describe her loveliness? Hers
was a face of perfect beauty. The broad white
forehead, the delicately-pencilled brows, the
straight nose, the exquisitely-chiselled lips, and
the perfect oval of its contour, might have made
it a model for a sculptor; while the wonderful
transparency of the complexion, the delicate
rose-leaf tint upon the cheek, the soft brown
hair curling thick upon the snowy neck, and,
above all, the superb eyes so beautifully shaped,
and filled with an indescribable expression of
frankness, tenderness, and truth, made it no
less a study for a painter.

How seldom are the characters of children
properly and discriminately studied! A certain
mode of discipline is usually adopted ina school
or family, to which all its members are required
to submit, and which is expected to benefit all
in an equal degree; while every judicious mo-



14 CONSTANCE LATIMER,

thea can state, as the result of her own experi-
ence, that no two children will bear precisely
the same kind of culture. The modern system
of forcing the mental faculties to unnatural
growth, and attempting to ingraft the moral
virtues by the same hotbed process, have been
productive of incalculable evil The mental
powers are weakened by being overtasked, the
moral perceptions blunted by the vain attempt
to infuse abstract ideas, the physical organiza.
tion disordered by a total neglect of all bodily
training, and the result of the instructor's la~
bours is total disappointment. Im nine cases
out of ten the precocious child ends by becom-
ing the dull, self-conceited man. If parents
would be content with weeding out the early
springing vice of insincerity, as the only effort
at moral culture, and awakening the spirit of
inquiry as the only attempt at mental improve-
ment during the first years of their childhood ;
if they would turn -their little ones into the
fields instead of the school-room, and teach them
the beneficent power of the Creator by familiar.
izing them with his wonderful works, they



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 15

would reap a rich reward in the healthy, haa@y,
and active minds which would afterward be
brought to the labour of learning. The plan of
education might almost be limited to that of
the early Persians; and if our sons were only
taught in boyhood “to ride on horseback, draw
the bow, and speak the truth,” the result would
probably be less physical infirmity and more
mental strength.

Such were the ideas with which Mr. Latimer
began the work of instruction, and never was
teacher blessed with a more docile pupil than
the little Constance. Gifted with that exqui-
site delicacy of perception which frequently
accompanies extreme delicacy of organization,
she required no stimulus to the acquisition of
knowledge. Young as she was, every faculty
seemed already awakened, and only waiting to
be employed. The endless variety of the
painted flower, the changeful beauty of the in-
sect wing, the various shapes of the leaves
which strewed the autumn paths, and the mul-
titude of voices by which nature breathes her
music through the summer bowers, were all to



16 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

hee objects of interest and inguiry. It was,
indeed, beautiful to behold that fair childish
face bending with eager glance over some newly-
discovered wonder, or brightening with delight
as some new truth snddenly dawned upon the
rapidly-developing mind. But all these truths
were taught by example rather than precept,
The pages of Nature were the only books her
father employed for the purposes of mental eul-
tivation, while the foundation of all-moral im-
provement was laid by forming the habit of
self-examination—a habit easily acquired by an
ingenuous child, whose spirit has never been
crushed by fear. An occasional impulse of im-
patience, er 2 momentary preference of selfish
indulgence, formed the subject, not of a lecture,
but of a cheerful conversation between father
and daughter, which resulted in her perfect
comprehension, not of metaphysical subtleties,
but of some of the most essential truths in
morality.

“ You are a happy child, Constance,” said her
mother one day, as the little girl was carolling
a broken birdlike melody



OR, THY BLIND GIR. 17

“ T know it, mother,” was the laughing re
sponse.

“Surely you vught to be happy if any one
on earth could be so,” said her father; “you
have nothing to trouble you.”

““ Yes I have, father,” said the child, while a
sweet gravity stole over her sunny face,

“ And, pray, what ever troubles you, Con-

stance ?”’
“ My passions,” was the earnest and innocent

reply.



18 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

CITAPTER IT.

** Death shouid come
Gently to one of rentie mould like thee,
As light winds, wandering through groves of bloom,
Detach the delicate blossoms from the tree."”-—BrYANrT.

“Yor ask me of my enjoyments and of my
prospects. I can only say, that the present is
full of happiness, and the future of promise.
I am sometimes almost terrified at the magni-
tude of my own blessings; for while my sym-
pathies are continually awakened by the mis-
fortunes of others, my own lot remains entirely
unclouded. Health, fortune, and domestic bliss
all combine to render me as happy as mortal
ean ever be. Yet you will wonder when I tell
you that I am sometimes disposed to look upon
all this calm as but the prelude to a fearful
tempest. When I consider how little I have
merited all my good fortune, I canr:ot help fan-
cying that these blessings ure only lent me for



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 19

a season, in order to prove me more severely by
their bereavement by-and-by. I feel that Iau
making to myself idols, and I cannot but fear
that I shall, ere long, be taught the bitter les-
son of humiliation, which all must learn who
give to the creature the worship due only to the
Creator. You will think me fanciful, but Iam
sometimes more desponding than those who
have to encounter real evils; as the brighter
the sunshine, the darker will be the shadow
cast by an intervening object.”

Such were the sentiments expressed by Mr.
Latimer in a letter toa friend in Europe, when
six years of uninterrupted happinesshad dawned
upon Latimer Cottage; but, alas! misfortune
already hovered over them, and never was a
deeper shadow flung from her dark wing

One fine spring afternoon, as Mr. Latimer sat
reading aloud the popular poem of the day,
while his wife was busied with her needle-work
beside him, they were startled by the sudden
entrance of Constance, who, panting with her
speed, and flushed with excitement, threw her
self into her mother’s arms, and burst into a



20 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

passion of tears. It was long before her pa-
rente’ kind soothings could quiet her troubled
feelings, or induce her to relate the cause of
such unwonted sorrow. She told a simple, but
touching tale. When the children went out to
walk after dinner, the nurse had taken them to
Mrs. Morden’s cottage, where they frequently
went to distribute their childish charities.
They found the poor woman seated near the
coffin of her baby, and holding in her arms
another child soon to be stretched beside ita
playmate.

“ Oh, mother, I cannot tell you how I felt,”
sobbed Constance; “ I was not afraid, and yet
I did not dare to touch little Mary, though I
have so often played with her tiny hands when
she was alive; she looked so white, and when
Margery put her hand in hers she was s0
dreadfully cold.” The child had never looked
on death before; and when they told her that
little Mary would never more open her eyes,
but must now be laid in the dark cold earth,
never again to be looked upon by the kind mo-
ther who now watched beside her, she gave way



On, THE BLIND GIEL. 21

to the utmost violence of terror and grief.
Her parents listened to the tale with earnest
sympathy.

“Of what disease did Mary die, Constance ?”
asked her father.

“TI believe Mrs. Morden called it scarlet fever,
father; and the face of the sick boy on her lap
was very red.”

A pang shot through the hearts of both her
parents as she spoke.

“ Was Julian with you ?” said Mrs. Latimer,

“Yes; but he did not seem to notice any-
thing; he ran about just as he used to do when
we went there to gather strawberries, and he
tried to make the poor sick boy play with him.”

The tears of childhood vanish far sooner than
the sympathy they excite; and, long after Con-
stance had ceased to think of the dead child,
her parents brooded over her narrative with ap-
prehensions which neither dared breathe to the
other. Mr. Latimer, with ‘his usual kindness,
hastened to the cottage of his poor neighbour,
and found the second child just expiring with
scarlet fever of the most malignant kind. The



22 SONSTANCE LATIMER;

atmosphere of the apartment was polluted by
the feverish breath of the little sufferers; for
the mother, in her ignorant caution, had ex-
claded every breath of pure air, lest it should
incease the virulence of the disease. ‘“ And in
that dreadful room my two darlings have just
been shut up !” exclaimed the anxious father
as he gladly emerged into the fresh evening
breeze.

His fears were not unfounded; twenty-four
hours had scarce elapsed when Julian’s rosy
cheek wore a deeper hue, and his blue eye was
suffused with the crimson tint of fever. Ere
the next morning’s sun had dawned upon the
sieepless pillow of the alarmed parents, the fever
spot burned the delicate cheek of Constance
also. Who shall describe the anxiety of that
doting father and mother? Who may enter
into the depths of the human heart, and describe
the workings of that most common, but, alas!
most fearful of all human pangs, the anguish
of a devoted parent? The buoyancy of spirit,
which was one of Mrs. Latimer’s strongest cha-
racteristics, prevented her from yielding to ter-



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 23

ror and despondency—as soon as her husband ;
but the moment he saw the drooping form of
his darling boy, and heard the low moan of
his: sweet Constance, hope vanished from his
heart.

The children had wept.so much at their se-
‘paration when first taken ill, that the physicians
deemed it advisable to place them both in one
apartment. It was, indeed, a melancholy sight
to behold those fair creatures so prostrated by
disease, and to feel assured that on the frail
tenure of their lives depended the whole future
comfort of two noble hearts. Julian refused to
leave his mother’s bosom for an instant, while
Constance lay in her little bed with her hand
clasped in her father’s, and her dim eyes fixed
with unutterable tenderness upon her brother.
Hour after hour, day after day passed away,
and brought no change. No change did Fsay ?
Alas! did an hour ever pass without bringing
change to all of us? The fever was most vio-
lent in its attack upon Julian; and, after ten
days of such anguish as none but a parent can
know—such anguish as whitens the darkest



24 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

locks, and withers the greenest heart, Constance
was pronounced out of danger, but Julian lay
like a waxen image in the cold sleep of death.

In proportion to her vain hopes was Mrs.
Latimer’s grief. She would not believe that a
creature so beloved could die; and it was not
till nature sank exhausted, after a succession of
fainting fits, that her feelings could be in the
slightest degree composed. The father looked
upon the lifeless form of his lttle one with
agony unutterable ; but he heard the broken
accents of his daughter, and while he felt that
{in His dealings God had remembered mercy, he
tried to say, in sincerity of his heart, “ Thy
will be done.”

Constance was unable to rise from her bed
when the body of her brother was about to be
borne to the tomb; but she pleaded so earnestly
to look once more upon his sweet face, that her
father bore her in his arnis to the chamber of
death. Never did the king of terrors assume a
lovelier form. His forehead was as fair as if it
had never known the touch of pain; his eyes
as gently closed, and his lips as placidly folded,



OR, THE BLIND GIRL 25

as if the little boy had been laid down to sleep
after the fatigues of a merry game. Constance
looked long and earnestly on the lifeless body
of her lost companion. Her frame shook as
with an ague fit, but no tears fell.from her ¢yes;
and her father, startled by the sudden rigidity
of her features, placed her in bed just as she
was seized with a frightful convulsion. The
dead was borne to its last resting place while
the fate of the living was yet undecided ; but,
alas! a more fearful doom than that of death
awaited Constance. The violence of her spas-
modic attack had produced amaurosis, or para-
lysis of the optic nerve, and her brother’s life-
less form was the last object that ever her eyes
beheld. Every means that medical skill could
devise was resorted to, but in vain; and Con-~
stance arose from her sick bed only to find her-
self totally and helplessly blind.

For a long time hope struggled in the hearts
of her parents. Like him who, dwelling at the
mountain’s foot, mistakes the darkness of the
impending avalanche for the shadow of the
cliff—the very magnitude of their calamity



26 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

rendered them doubtful of its existence. But
when, at last, hope was crushed beneath the
dreadful certainty of evil, no words can express
the utter desolation of their hearts. “ Why,”
exclaimed the agonized father, “ why, when the
Almighty sped the arrow that destroyed my
child’s precious sight, did he not also take her
useless life ?” Imagination is too feeble to por-
tray such anguish. The Grecian painter’s veil
must be drawn over such unutterable woe.



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 27

CHAPTER III,

“ The day.too short for my distress; and nig,
E’en in the zenith of her dark domain,
Is sunshine to the colour of my fate.” Youna.

Monrus passed away; the glow of health once
more dwelt upon the fair child’s cheek, and her
lip again wore its rosy tint, but the light of her
glorious eyes was quenched for ever. ‘Iiney
were still as deeply blue—-still as deeply fringed
by their long dark lashes; the disease which
had destroyed them had not impaired their ex-
ternal loveliness, but their expression had for
ever departed. They were still beautiful, but
it was the beauty of the unlighted alabaste:
vase.

The effect of this misfortune upon the child’s
character was very remarkable. At first ske
wept unceasingly, and complained bitterly of
the darkness. “I can see nothing,” she would



28 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

say, “ but a dark, dark room, with a tittle white
form extended in one corner.” Her imagina-
tion afforded the only organ of vision, and
memory offered objects to its gaze. Her mind
appeared to have acquired a sudden maturity.
The absence of all outward things seemed to
make the eye of the spirit more clear and pene-
trating. Childish things were put away, and
she spoke with the earnestness, the tenderness,
the energy of a woman. Library after library
was exhausted for her amusement; but, alas!
they who find in the common exercise of their
sight a world of enjoyment, of which they are
scarcely sensible, can form but a faint idea of
the terrible privation of the blind. For them
the light of the sun is darkened ; the moon has
withdrawn her ray; the beauty of the earth is
vanished; the loveliness of household faces has
departed; the familiar places have become
strange; and, as one walking in the Valley of
Death, every step is faltering and uncertain.
To Constance this utter darkness was peculiarly
painful, for she remembered too vividly the
last object on which her eyes had rested, and



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 29

the emphatic language of Scripture might here
be used literally, for it was, indeed, “ The sha-
dow of death upon the eyelids.”

“‘ Father,” said Constance, as he led her one
pleasant evening along the garden-walks, “ I
wish you would have the flowers planted just
in the same spots next year, for I have learned
to know them by the touch of the leaf as well
as by their ;erfume, and I can almost fancy I
see them since I-have become so familiar with
them.” ‘The promise was readily given, and
Constance continued: “ When first my eyes
were darkened, the image of poor little Julian
was always before me; but now I try to think
of other things. I try to remember how the
sky looked, and the different coloured flowers,
and oftener still I try to bring before me your
face and mother’s. I am sure I shall never
forget them; but I am afraid I shall forget
many other things which I used to take little
notice of when I could see them every day.”
Mr. Latimer’s heart was full, but he mastered
his emotion, and patiently set himself to the
task of imprinting on her mind those ideas



30 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

which, at her age, are usually evanescent, but
which now required to be graven as with a
sunbeam. But those mysterious compensations
which Providence usually vouchsafes to those
who suffer under great privations were already
hers. Her sense of hearing had become exceed-
ingly acute, her touch extremely delicate. She
learned to distinguish the different trees by the
Various sounds made by their leaves as they
rustled in the wind. The flowers she recog-
nised by their perfume, or, if they were desti-
tute of fragrance, she could pass her slender
fingers over their petals, and at once discover
their names. Music, which had always been
her delight, now heesme her passion ; and three
fourths of her time was spent beside her mother’s
piano, or listening to her father’s voice, as, with
swelling heart, he sang to her the songs she
loved Her ear became so accurate that she
was soon able to mingle her own sweet tones
with the music; and no one who looked upon
the child, as she sat in her delicate beauty
amid the costly luxuries which decked her
home, singing some plaintive melody, would



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 31

have imagined that the portals of so glorious
a temple had been for ever closed against
earthly objects. But a more touching picture
was sometimes presented, when, thinking her-
self alone, the fair creature over whom six
summers had not yet passed would wring her
little hands, and exclaim, in that thrilling tone
which the blind so soon acquire, “ What shall
I do! oh, what shall I do!” Would that this
were entirely a fancy sketch; would that the
portraiture of this gentle child owed its coiours
to imagination only, and was not shaded by the
deeper tints of sad reality!

The next four years were passed by Constance
in a monotony so unvarying, as far-as regarded
external things, that the pen of her historian
finds little to record. But the change that
gradually came over her spirit might form a
noble study for a philosopher. She knew that
she was beautiful, for she heard it murmured
from every lip; but each expression of admira~
tion was uttered in a tone of sympathy which
her delicate ear did not fail to detect, and the
lesson of humility was learned along with that



32 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

which might have taught her vanity. She
knew, too, that her voice was as musical as a
bird’s, and this was one of the chief blessings
of her darkened lot; for the little blind girl’s
ear had now become endued, as it were, with a
double sense, and great would have been her
privation if she could not have expressed her
innocent feelings in tones of sweetness. She
sang beautifully, and never was music more
expressive. She had learned, too, to weave
baskets, (a favourite resource of the blind,) as
an amusement to her many vacant hours; but,
alas! with these acquisitions she was obliged
to be content. The fountain of knowledge
seemed sealed to her for ever, and she was fain
to rest satisfied with an occasional draught of
its pure waters from the hand of another. In
spite of all her efforts at cheerfulness, she began
to feel life a heavy burden, which daily grew
more intolerable. At nine years of age she had
all the weariness of spirit which belongs only
to earth’s care-worn children, when time has
blanched the sunny hair, or sorrow seared the
lonely heart. Her mother, given up to grief,



OR, THE BLIND GIRL 33

lad gradually sunk into such infirm health,
that there was but little prospect of her pro-
longed life; and when Mr. Latimer thought of
the probable fate of his beautiful and helpless
child, he was almost tempted to yield to utter
despair. “ She will have plenty of useless
wealth,” said he to himself; “‘ but who will
protect her when we are gone ? Who will guard
that delicate frame from the rude contact with
a harsh and unfeeling world?” He had not
yet learned to believe that “ God ever tempers
the wind to the shorn lamb.”

One day, while in his counting-room, Mr
Latimer was addressed by a gentleman distin
guished for his philanthropy, who, utterly ig-
norant of his domestic misfortunes, applied for
pecuniary assistance in forming an institution
for the instruction of the blind. Mr. Latimer’s
feelings were almost too powerful for words, as,
grasping his new friend’s hand, he vehemently
proffered half his fortune if the project could be
accomplished. “ Only let me see my child res-
cued from the depth of darkness into which she
is sinking, and half my fortune shall repay your

c



34 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

labours,” he said, as he added his name to the
list of subscribers. On his return he commu-
nicated the occurrence to his wife and daughter.
Far different was the manner in which the two
received it.

“ You would not sureiy‘send Constance away
from us to a place where everybody would be
received, and where she must live like the
poorest among them ?” said her mother.

* You will let me go,’’ exclaimed Constance,
her cheek flushing and her lip quivering with
unwonted excitement. “ Oh, father, I should
be so happy if I could only learn to be less
helpless; when will they be ready to receive
pupils ?”’

“Will you be content, Constance, to feel
yourself alone among the many who, like your-
self, are deprived of one of life’s best blessings ?
Will you not pine for the devoted attention,
the nndivided care of your parents ?”” asked the
father.

“Oh! father,” replied the child, “ how little
you know of my feelings. Should I not be
happier if I did not require your attentions ?”



on, THE BLIND GIRL. 35

Her father sighed, but answered not. He
could not avoid observing, however, that from
that moment 2 new hope seemed to have arisen
in her heart, and that her despondency was ra-~
pidly giving place to a nervous restlessness of
manner, which betrayed how deeply the cur-
rent of her feelings had been stirred.

At length the benevolent founders of the in-
stitution were enabled to carry out their scheme,
and among the first of their pupils was Con-
stance Latimer. Great was the opposition she
encountered from her mother, who dreaded the
privations her child must undergo in an insti-
tution which could provide comforts but not
luxuries; but Constance withstood all attempts
to turn her from her purpose, and left her home
without one sigh of regret.

“Tf I can learn anything, father,.my short
pbsence will be for the future happiness of-us
all; if I cannot, I shall not long be a burden
zo you,”’ said she, as the carriage stopped, and she
gvas carried in her father’s arms to her new home,

The extreme beauty of the child and her
frinning manners awakened the warmest in-



36 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

terest in all who looked upon her. The num-
ber of pupils was as yet few, and Constance at
frst found her situation rather irksome; but
when the plan of instruction was once made
clear to her, nothing could exceed her happi-
piness. Once in each week she returned to
her father’s house, and even her mother ac
knowledged she had never seen her so cheerful,
It was, indeed, delightful to hear her animating
expressions of joy as on each successive Saturday
she sat down between her parents to relate the
new acquirements of the past week. The al.
phabet, the first principles of arithmetic, the
notes of music, were acquisitions worth the
wealth of the Indies to her. Gradually, but
surely, she progressed in the path of knowledge;
every step required guidance, but every step
brought her nearer the goal of all her hopes.

If he be a benefactor to mankind who causes
two blades of grass to grow where only one
grew before, what gratitude do those deserve
who devote all their talents and energies to the
task of ameliorating the condition of those whom
God has so fearfully stricken !



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 37

Never was 2 creature so changed as Constance
appezred aiter a years’s sojourn at the Institu-
tion for the Blind. She had applied the fine
powers of her mind most diligently to the
labour of learning, and great had been her suc-
cess. It was now her pleasure to exhibit to
her happy parents her accurate knowledge of
grammar, arithmetic, geography, and music.
Above all, it was her delight to stand by her
father’s side in the library, and while her
finger traced the words on the page as ra-
pidly as the eye could have noted them; to
read in hersweetest tones the pages of the Book
of Life.

“ Her presence is now a perfect jubilee in
my house,” said her father to one of the patient
teachers who had opened so many sources
of enjoyment to her. “ Formerly I almost
dreaded to enter my door, for I could not bear
to behold the hopeless sadness depicted in my
poor child’s face; but now the day of her
visit is lonked upon as a holyday in the
family. May God forgive my bitter repin-
ings, and teach me to be grateful for the good-



38 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

ness which has thus mingled mercy with chas-
tening.”’

Constance anxiously sought to make herself
mistress of every branch of knowledge. She
would ponder over the embossed maps until her
fingerg had made her perfectly familiar with
the form of a country and its most prominent
objects of interest; then her next Saturday’s
visit to her home enabled her to learn from her
father’s lips all that his library could afford of
other information on the subject. She thus
became thoroughly versed in the history, as well
as geography, of every quarter of the globe.
N’ental arithmetic was peculiarly suited to her
reflective habits; but music still continued to
be her chief delight, and it was wonderful to
see how rapidly she progressed. Her dread of
ever, being idle led her also to acquire the vari-
ous kinds of handicraft practised among the
pupils, and it was not long before she could
frame a rug, weave a basket, and even occupy
herself in needlework.

et us pause for a moment, and contemplate
ihe blind girl in her former and in her present



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 39

circumstances. At the period which is usually
the sunniest of all ages, we see her sitting in,
utter darkness, beneath the shadow of despair,
and exclaiming, in the heart-rending accents of
hopeless misery, “‘ Who will show me any good ?”
Now we behold her moving in the pleasant
light of contentment, and hiving up knowledge,
as the bee stores honey, to be the support of the
wintry days of life.

To crown the happiness of Constance, her
home once more echoed to the- voice of child-
hood. A brother had been born since her
abode in the institution, and she felt as if he
had been sent to supply the place of her little
Julian. this event on the health of the mother, who, in
the new exercise of maternal duties, seemed to
lose that burden of grief which had almost
crushed her to the earth. A stranger who
should have looked in upon that little house-
hold of love, as they were grouped in the li-
brary on a Saturday evening, when Constance
touched her guitar in accompaniment to her
sweet voice, and the babe sat on her mother’s



40 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

knee, stretching its little hands towards hér in
childish glee, while her father looked on with
tenderness too deep for words, would have
deemed them perfectly happy.



on, THE BLIND GIRL. 41

CHAPTER IV.

** When I look

On one 80 fair, I must believe that Heaven

Sent her in kindness, that our hearts might waken

To their own loveliness, and lift themselves

By such an adoration from a dark

And grovelling world. Such beauty should be worshipped,

And nota thonght of weakness or docay

Should mingle with the pure and holy dreams

In which it dwells before us.""—PFERCIVAL,
{r was on her fourteenth birthday that Con-
stance returned to her father’s house, skilled in
all the wisdom which could be communicated
to the blind. Her person had developed into
that pure, classical beauty of which her child-
hood had given promise. Tall and delicately
formed, with a face of exquisite sweetness, her
soft brown hair parted smoothly on her fair
forehead, and shedding its bright tendrils on
her snowy neck, she was, indeed, a picture of
innocent loveliness. The expression of her
countenance was so gentle, and the long lashes

which usually shaded the pale cheek, and con-



42 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

cealed the rayless eyes, gave such an air of pen-
siveness to her appearance, that she excited the
interest of all who looked upon her.

In addition to her various acquisitions in
learning, and her wonderful skill in music, her
heart had taught her a new and sweeter lore.
Possessed of the most ardent feelings and a pas-
sionate love for Nature, who always spoke to her
in music; condemned to feed so much upon her
own thoughts, and to find her swect and bitter
fancies uninterrupted by any external object,—
is it wonderful that the blind girl learned
the language of poetry, and became the lyrist
of emotions which were too powerful for com-
monspeech? BHer knowledge of music and her
delicacy of ear enabled her to adapt airs with
great facility. It soon became no unusual thing
for her, after sitting silent a few minutes, to
take her guitar, and sing her own simple words
to some remembered melody. It is true, she
was little more than a child in years; but the
fearful calamity which had cut her off from the
enjoyments of her childish days had made her
prematurely wise in feeling. Her heart way



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 43

filled with all the gushing tenderness, all the
deep though unawakened energy of a woman’s
nature, combined with a purity of thought and
fancy which rarely outlasts the full development
of intellect. There is too much of evil mingled
with the good of this world’s wisdom ; too much
unholy fire is blended with the light of truth;
and rarely can the mind be illumined by the
one without bearing some blackened trace of con-
tact with the other. But Constance had escaped
all knowledge of evil. She was like the pure
and stately lily, growing whiter in the sunshine
which withers the roses that surround it. Poetry
was the natural language of her unsullied heart;
she breathed in numbers because her whole soul
was attuned to harmony. The harp was not
discordant because it had lost a string, for a
master-hand had touched the remaining chords,
and attuned them to discourse the sweetest of
a!l earthly music.

One of her first efforts in verse was a little
song addressed to her brother. Alfred was now
a lovely little boy of some four years old, and
most tenderly attached to his sister. He had



44 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

learned to guide her feet to unfrequented spots
with as much care as if he knew the full extent
of her privation ; and when she took her guitar,
or seated herself at the piano, his usual station
was upon a cushion at her feet. One afternoon
he had thrown himself on a sofa beside her,
and fallen asleep with his head in her lap. She
busied herself for some time in tracing with her
finger the outline of his features; but, suddenly
desisting, and brushing away the involuntary
tear, she sung to a plaintive melody the follow-

ing words :—

Is thy check fair, my brother?
Are thine cyes bright?
Hast thou the smile of our mother,
Her rememberei smile of light?
Art tou like the gentle vision
That comes to my sleeping eyc,
When my heart in dreams elysian
Clasps its lost one in yonder sky?

Vainly I ask, my brother,
No lip can tell;
The tmaged form of another
In my memory still must dwell;
In vain with impaticnt fingers
Thy features I seek to trace,
#fis look in my soul still lingers,
And in thine I find Julian's face



OR, THE RLIND GIRL. 45

Who cannot sympathize with the father,
who stood without, listening to the sweet voice
and touching complaint of his gifted child ?
Wealth, such as might purchase a prince’s
ransom ; beauty, such as immortalized a Helen;
genius, that might have won the laurel of a
Corinna, all were given as if to show the utter
worthlessness of those things which the world
prizes when unaccompanied by the most com-
mon of God’s blessings. ‘The shrine was a
glorious one; the music of the sanctuary was
not wanting; but the sacred lamp of the temple
had been extinguished, never to be relighted
till kindled by the flame of immortality.

Constance did not relax in her exertions tu
acquire knowledge. Her memory never allowed
nny thing to escape its grasp; and her father’s
unremitting kindness in reading to her for
hours together enabled her to obtain a vast
deal of elegant literature, which otherwise
would have been a sealed book. The pages of
the poet and the historian were alike familiar
to her; and perhaps, to her sensitive mind,
the graphic sketches of the one and the har-



46 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

monious strains of the other derived a peculiar
charm from being always expressed in the
tones of a father’s tenderness.

“ Your voice is sorrowful, dear father,” said
she one day, as her father paused after an
hour’s reading; “I am afraid you have some
new trouble, for your tones are lately full of
sadness.”

“You are a quick observer, Constance,” re-
plied he; “ but do you not think your imagina-
tion’ sometimes misleads you ?’”

“No, father, no; the ear that has learned
to detect every shade of feeling, evcn as your
eye marks every gradation of colour, is not to
be deccived; the faintest change in your voice
is to me as evident as if I could see the cloud
upon your brow. Nay, dear father,” continucd
she, “I cannot bear to hear you sigh; give me
my guitar, and I will sing to you the song I
made yesterday, when Alfred ran with a little
green leaf in his hand to tell me spring was
coming.

They tell me spring is coming
With her wealth of buds and flowers,



OR, THE BLIND Gish. 47

But I hear no wild bee humming
Amid the leafy bowers;

And till the birds are winging
With music from cach trec,

Till the imsect tribes are singing,
Spring is not spring to mc.

They tell me spring is waking
All nature from her slecp,
That streams, their ice-chains breaking,
Once more to sunshine leap;
But the mountain brook rejoices
In music through the Iea,
I must hear earth’s many voices,
Or “tis not spring to mc."

“Did you sing that sweet but melancholy
song to cheer me, Constance ?”’ said her father.
“ Alas! think you the recollection of my child’s
misfortunes can comfort me?”’

“ Dear father,’’ replied she, “I did not mean
to utter the voice of complaint; earth is so full
of music to mine ear that I sometimes think I
am almost as happy as if mine eye divided its
enjoyments. You know not how rich is the
melody to which God opens the ear of the
blind. Listen!’ and the gentle girl touched a
simple accompaniment of chords, while she



48 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

sung, in 2 strain of triumphant music, the fol-
lowing words :—

Earth speaks in many voices: from the roar
Ot the wild cataract, whose ceaseless din
Shakes:the far forest and resounding shore,
To the meek rivulet which scems to win
Its modest way amid spring‘s pleasant bowers,
Singing its gquict song to charm carth’s painted flowcra

Earth speaks in many voices: from the song
Of the free bird which soars to heaven's high porch,
As if on joy’s full tide it swept along,
To the low hum that wakens when the torch
Summons the insect myriads of the night
To sport their little hour and perish in its light.

Earth speaks in many voices: music breathes
In the sweet murmur of the summer breeze,
That plays amid the honeysuckle’s wreaths,
Or swells its diapason mid the trees
When cve's cold shadow stcals o’cr lawn and lea,
And da;s‘s glad sounds give place to holicr minstrelsy.

Earth speaks in many voices: and to me
Her every tone with melody is fraught;
Fier harmony of tints I may not see,
But every breath awakes some pleasant thought;
While to mine car such blissful sounds are given,
My spirit dwells in light, and dreams of yonder heaven



ON, THE BLIND GIRL. 49

CHAPTER V.

“Though Fortund’s malice overthrow my state
My mind exceeds the compass of her whecL”"
SHAKSPRARE.

CoNSTANCE was not deceived when she thought
she discovered sadness in the tones of her father’s
voice. The cloud had been for several months
deepening on Mr. Latimer’s brow; and though
invisible to the rayless eye of his affectionate
child, yet she was not insensible to the chill
which it threw upon his cheerful spirit. In his
devoted attention to his daughter he had allowed
his business to be chiefly transacted by others,
and he found that the unfaithfulness of agents
abroad and the imprudence of partners at home
had involved him in engagements he should
find it extremely difficult to fulfil, He had
never before known the want of money, and his
proud spirit was goudcd almost to madness by
D



50 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

the necessity of asking for pecuniary supplies.
But one of those seasons of commercial distress
which occasionally occur in all mercantile coun-
tries, and are felt in every quarter of the globe,
now ensued, and the consequence to Mr. Latimer
was total ruin. The energy with which he had
borne his earlier misfortunes seemed now utterly
to fail him. Not that fortune was to him of
more value than every other blessing; but, with
a wife in infirm health, a son in early infancy,
and a daughter hopelessly blind, he felt that
poverty was an evil of far greater magnitude
than he had ever before dreamed. His high
sense of honour forhade him to compromise
with his creditors. He knew that he had
property sufficient to pay all his debts at home;
and he doubted not that his foreign affairs, if
properly arranged, would enable him to satisfy
all demands abroad. But, in order to complete
these arrangements, it would be necessary for
him to leave his family penniless and wander
off into distant lands. The struggle of feeling
stretched him at last on a bed of sickness, and
it was from his delirious ravings, during a severe



On, THE BLIND GIRT. 51

attack of fever, that his family learned the fatal
truth.

A good constitution enabled him to withstand
the violence of his disease; and, immediately
upon his convalescence, he set himself seriously
to the task of retrenchment. One of those sin-
gular but not unfrequent changes, which make
the character of woman always a beauty and a
mystery, now occurred in the mind of Mrs. Lati-
mer. For a whole week she gave herself up to
the deepest despair; then, as if she had indeed
found sorrow to be knowledge, she dried her
tears, and never allowed another murmur to
escape her lips. Laying asideall her habits of
luxurious self-indulgence, she devoted herself to
the consolation of her husband, and witnessed
with perfect composure the rapid vanishing of
her costly furniture and plate. A small house
in the city was taken and furnished in the
simplest manner. The kindness of a creditor,
who had often shared the hospitality of the
ruined family, adorned their humble abode with
the piano and guitar, which were so essential to
the bereaved Constance, but no other articles of



52 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

Jaxury found their way within its walls. As if
she had never known their use, Mrs. Latimer
seemed totally regardless of the want of those
elegancies to which she had been accustomed
from her cradle. Her thoughts were only for
her husband and her children. For them she
sought, with all a woman’s tact and tasteful man-
‘agement, to make their new residence look like
the home of comfort, if not of wealth; and Mr.
Latimer felt that even in this sorrow the hand
of Providence had provided asolace. Well may
the mourner believe in the beautiful system of
compensations which prevails throughout the
universe; for never was man compelled to drink
of the bitter fountain of Marah without finding
some kind hand to throw the branch of healing
into its distasteful waters.

For a few days the little Alfred wondered at
the change, and complained for want of the
broad green lawn; but the sorrows of childhood
are as evanescent as the joys of maturer years,
and he soon forgot the privations in the novelties
of his situation. To Constance the change in
their circumstances brought no selfish regrets.



OR, THE BLIND GIEL. 53

It was long since external things had been to
her a source of enjoyment; and though the
bustle of a city was exquisitely painful to an ear
so acutely sensitive to the melody of nature, yet
she would have felt not a momentary pang if
she could have been insensible to the alteration
in her father. With renewed health Mr. Lati-
mer’s strength of mind had returned; but the
cheerful tone and elastic step, for which his
daughter used to listen so anxiously, were no
longer heard. Constance knew that his . foot
now fell heavily on the narrow stairs; and, in-
stead of the full rich tone she was accustomed
to hear, his voice now sounded in her ear like
the monotonous and melancholy music of the
distant sea.

The acquirements which Constance had re-
garded merely as means of amusing her heavy
hours became, at this time, ofactual use. It was
not long before the place of those costly trifles,
which had decorated their former abode, was
supplied by neatly-framed articles of use and
ornament, woven by the delicate fingers of the
blind girl. Mrs. Latimer, in the fulfilment of



54 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

her duties as a housekeeper, found full employ-
ment for a great part of the day, and all the
plain sewing which was required in the little
household was, therefore, performed by Constance.
Nor was this all; for her knowledge of mental
arithmetic and rapidity in calculation enabled
her to be of great assistance to her father in the
arrangement of his private accounts; while her
poetry and music, like the harp of David, served
to chase from the minds of all the demon of de-
spondency.

At the expiration of a year all Mr. Latimer’s
debts at home were fully paid, and he was left
penniless. But his high-toned feelings would not
allow him to rest satisfied until his name was
rescued from disgrace abroad ; and, borrowing a
sum of money sufficient to secure the comfort of
his family until his return, he embarked for
England, resolving to visit every place where he
had ever established an agency. This was the
hardest of all bis trials. Te knew that several
years must elapse before he could revisit his
home; and when he looked upon his lovely
daughter, now verging towards womanhood,



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 55

his courage almost failed him. He thought of
her destitute situation in case he was never per-
mitted to return, and the picture of her unequal
conflict with a selfish world almost overpowered
his imagination. But he believed he was ful-
filling the dictates of conscience; and, silencing
every regret, he bade adicu to all he held dear on
earth.

How deeply Constance felt the loss of that
devoted parent it is in vain to describe.. It seemed
as if the last glimmer that had cheered her
darkened life was now extinguished. But she
was not one to sit down content with fruitless
repining, when it was possible to act as well as
to suffer. A plan had been secretly maturing
in her mind, which she now determined to put
into practice, since the only obstacle to its ac-
complishment was removed by her father’s
absence. This was a scheme for procuring pupils
to be instructed in music, and thus obviating the
necessity of making use of the money which she
knew her father, at the expense of his proudest
feelings, had secured for the maintenance of his
family. In vain did her mother oppose what



56 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

she, naturally enough, considered a hopeless
attempt. Constance was not to be moved from
what she believed to be her duty,and hermother
was at last induced to write, by her dictation,
to a gentleman connected with the Institution
for the Blind, and whose extensive charities were
well known.

“Drak Srr,— Yourwell-established reputation
as the friend of the affiicted induces me to ad-
dress you on a subject of vital interest to one
suffering under the severest of all privations. I
am totally blind; and but for that noble insti-
tution of which you are a member, should have
been utterly helpless. I am now well versed in
all the knowledge which could be imparted to
me. Music has been my especial study, and I
may refer you to my instructors for assurances
of my capacity to teach it, which my father’s
misfortunes have induced me to attempt as a
means of support. I can teach but I cannot
seck out pupils; and if, amid th : multitude of
urgent claims upon your time, you can find a
moment’s leisure to bestow upon her who walks,



OR, THE BLIND GIBL. &7

even at noonday, in the shadow of night, your
kindness will not be unrewarded.”

The letter also contained her address, and
was signed by herself, her mother guiding her
hand.



58 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

CHAPTER VI.

**Pensive grrace

Was in every motion, and her look

Had something sacred in it, that declared

How pure the spirit in that form enshrined,

Like light that dwellcth in the diamond gem.”—S. P. ©
Tu apartment was brilliantly lighted up, and
a smile of welcome sat upon the lips of his
cheered family, as Mr. Wilson entered his home
at the evening hour. The large arm chair was
rolled to his favourite corner, and the children
of all ages, from the fair girl of eighteen to the
noisy boy of three years, clustered round their
father as he took his accustomed seat. But an
unusual shade of pensiveness was on his brow,
and tears glistened in his eyes as he pressed the
hand of his daughter, which rested fondly on
his knee. “I have seen this evening,” said he,
in answer to their anxious inquiries, “a picture
which has thrilled my very heart.”



OR, THE BLIND GIEL. 59

“Oh, tell us, father, tell us,’”’ echoed from the
group.

“YT received a letter yesterday,’ replied he,
“from one whom I well recollect as having been
one of the first pupils admitted into our institu-
tion for the instruction of the blind—I mean
Constance Latimer.”’

“What, that beautiful little girl you once took
me to see when she was taking her music
lesson, and who, you told me, refused to wear
the ornaments with which her mother had
loaded her, because they excited the envy of
the poorer pupils?”

“The same, Gertrude; she was then the heiress
of an immense fortune, and her father one of
the wealthiest as well as worthiest men in the
community. Ile has since become bankrupt,
and, after having sacrificed every thing to redeem
his honour here, has left his family in poverty
that he might fulfil his engagements in Europe.
I determined to answer her letter in person,
and glad am I that I did so. I was directed to
a house in street; a healthy-looking
little fellow, about six years of age, opened the

?





GO CONSTANCE LATIMER;

door for me, and conducted me into one of the
smallest but neatest parlours I ever entered.
The tables and mantel-piece were adorned
with various kinds of fancy articles, such as are
usually manufactured by the blind; and upon
a stand in the corner lay a pile of those large
volumes, printed in embossed letters, which
constitute the Bible for the blind. By the fire
sat a lady, pale and sickly in her appearance,
but extremely graceful in her address, while
near the window was a low seat occupied by the
loveliest figure ITever beheld. Constance Lati-
mer is about two years younger than yourself,
Gertrude, and might serve a painter as a model
four a personification of modesty. Her beauty
is wonderful ; I never saw any thing like it;
the recollection seems to me almost dreamlike.”

“You are quite enthusisatic father,” said
Gertrude, smiling.

‘“€No wonder, my child,” replied Mr. Wilson ;
“this lovely young creature is totally blind,
and yet she applied to me to assist her in pro-
curing pupils in music, that she might thus be
enabled to support her mother and brother with-



OR, THE BLIND GIRL 61

out encroaching on the small sum which her
father left with them, and which, shesaid, hehad
only obtained by incurring new obligations.
The heroic virtue of a delicate girl, who thus
forgot her own terrible privations in the wish to
spare her father’s feelings, almost overpowcred
me. I listened to her plans with wonder, and
left her with a feeling of bewilderment, for the
whole scene seemed rather like a phantasy of
the imagination than a picture of re:l life.”

“Oh, father, let her teach me music,” said
little Emily, as she clambered on his lap; “I
will be very good, and not trouble the poor
blind lady; do, dear father.”

“‘Let me accompany you when next you visit
her,” said Gertrude.

“I met Mrs. Latimer in public,” said Mrs.
Wilson, “ when she was the gayest and most
brilliant woman in society; but years have
passed since then; she has gone through much
suffering; and if our slight acquaintance may
now be renewed without an appearance of intru

sion, I should be glad to proffer her the hand
of friendship.”



62 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3;

“J knew your hearts,” returned Mr. Wilson,
‘and I was assured I need only tell my story
to awaken as much enthusiasm in you as my
little Gertrude accused me of feeling.”

Two pupils were secured to Constance in this
happy group, and the unremitting exertions of
Mr. Wilson during the next three months in-
creased their number to twenty, so that an in-
come of fifteen hundred dollars was secured to
the family by the labour of her who, at first,
seemed the most helpless of its members. As
she could not go abroad to give lessons, she was
necessarily much confined to the house, and de-
barred from that exercise which had always
been so essential to her health; but early in the
morning she might frequently be seen, guided
by the hand of her brother, along ‘the pleasant
walks of the Battery, or crossing to the heights
of Brooklyn to listen to the melodies of nature.
The family of Mr. Wilson did not relax in their
interest for the noble-minded girl. An intimacy,
such as probably never would have arisen in the
days of her prosperity, now existed between
Constance and the amiable Gertrude; and



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 63

many a quiet evening, afier the fatigues of a
day’s labour in teaching, was spent by the blind
girl in the cheerful parlour of her friend. It
was on one of those evenings, during the early
part of their acquaintance, that Constance sung
the following song addressed to Gertrude:

Tady, they tell me thon art fair,
They say the rose blooms on thy check;
The rose’s blush I have forgot,
Its breath alone to mean speak.

Lady, they say thine eye's soft blue
With heaven's own tint is flashing bright;
Alas! I have forgot that huc,
My ky is always clothed in ni;zht.

Vady, they tell me thou art good,

Thy heart in virtue's cause beats high ;
T know this tale at least is true,

My ear assists my darkened eye.

Little I know of beauty’s form,

The dimpled mouth, the snowy skin,
But I can learn from step and voice

If gentie be the heart within.

I know thou'rt one whom all may love,
Though thy fair brow I ne‘er may sce,
And can I donbt thou wilt allow
The blind girl's claim to sympathy.

But their intimacy had not lasted many



62 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

months, when Gertrude was compelled to claim
the sympathy which Constance so plaintively
«lesired for herself, for she was taken violently
ill, and for many days her recovery was deemed
hopeless. The heart of the blind girl had so
few objects of affection, that it clung to each
with a tenacity which made it almost death to
sever its clasp. Nothing could exceed her pas-
sionate regret when she found that, though Ger-
trude’s life was spared, a severe inflammation
had fallen upon her eyes, which confined her
to a darkened room, and threatened her with
total loss of sight. “Oh! mother,”’ exclaimed
she, when first the tidings were communicated
to her, “ how will Gertrude bear that dreadful
darkness? No one can imagine its horrors ;
though so young when I was stricken, jet to
this hour I shudder when I remember the awful
blackness which enveloped me—a_ blackness
broken only by the white and stiffened~ form
whichimagination presented to me. Oh, mother,
mother! I cannot bear to think of Gertrude’s
sufferings.’ Alas! none but the God who had
smitten her knew the bitter feelings which Con-



OR, THE BLIND GIRN. 65

stance had hidden in her heart of hearts. She
had come out brighter from the furnace ofafflic-
tion, but no one could tell how fierce had been
the fire which had purified her of all earthly
dross.

AU her leisure hours were devoted to her sick
friend ; al] that sympathy or affection could de-
vise for her amusement was tried ; and during
the many days her eyes were bandaged, Ger-
trude learned much of the handicraft which has
been appropriated to the occupation of the blind.
She delighted to hear the blind girl sing ; and
many a song did Constance frame for the amuse-
ment of the half-impatient invalid. During one
of her visits she for the first time heard, in the
course of conversation, that beautiful line from
the Arabic, “ The remembrance of youth is a
sigh.” The sentiment was too poetical to escape
her sensitive mind, and the ideas which it awak-
encd were expressed in a language which had
now become habitual.

Oh, yes, we may weep over moments departed,
And look on the past with a sorrowful eyc,

For who, roving on, through the world weary-Learted,
But knows “the remembrance of youth is a sigh ?"

E



66 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

Though earth still may wear all its verdure and flowers,

Though our pathway still bloom ‘neath a bright sun-
mer sky,

Yet the serpent lies hid in life's sunnicst bowcra,
And still ‘‘the remembrance of youth isa sigh.”

Zhen surely the heart whose best pleasures have vanished,
As spring birds depart when cold winter draws nigh,

The bosom whence hope’s sweet illusions are banished,
Mast feel ‘‘ the remembrance of youth Is a sigh.”

Too early have faded my moments of gladness,

Ere the freshness and morning of life have gone by,
Too early my days have been shrouded in sadness,

And to me “the remembrance of youth is a sigh.”

There was one who took a deeper interest in
the blind girl during her attendance on Gertrude
than he dared to avow. This was Mr. Wilson’s
eldest son, who had just returned from the tour
of Europe. Young, talented, and enthusiastic,
there was something peculiarly fascinating to
his romantic nature in the history of the beauti-
ful Constance. Seated unnoticed in a remote
corner of the dimly-lighted apartment, he lis-
tened for many an hour to the sweet fancies and
pure thoughts which filled the measure ofher dis-
course with Gertrude. She seemed the very im-
personation of his boyish dreams. Her beauty,
her strength of mind, her poctical genius, he:



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 67

graceful manners, nay, her very helplessness,
were all powerful attractions to him. He gazed
upon her delicate loveliness until it almost
seemed to him that the fable of Pygmalion was
realized. But, dangerous as this intercourse
might be to him, it was to Constance perfectly
harmless. The passions of our mortal nature
seemed effaced from her breast, while only the
gentler affections seemed left ; and she welcomed
Edward Wilson as a brother, without dreaming
that there could be any stronger feeling.

A few weary months of darkness were all that
Gertrude was destined to endure. The disease
in her eyes abated, and once more she was per-
mitted to behold the light of day. Ifanything
could have disturbed the equanimity of Con-
stance’s contented temper, it would have been
the exuberance of her friend’s joy. Every
moment she was exclaiming aloud at some new
delight afforded her by her newly-recovered
sense. But, whatever Constance felt, her well-
disciplined mind taught her at once to repress
all fruitless regret, and, in sympathy with her
friend, to forget her own privations,



68 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

“My brother loves you, Constance,” said Ger-
trude, a few weeks after her recovery, as she
beheld his irrepressible agitation at hearing one
ofher songs. ‘“ Well, Gertrude, is that strange?”
replied the pure-hearted girl ; “do not you love
me too ? I think,”’ added she, “ that I regard your
brother as I might have done Julian had he
lived to man’s estate.”

“Nay, Constance, but it is not thus Edward
loves you; he looks on you as one with whom
he would share his future fortunes ; he would
make you his wife, Constance,” said Ger-
trude.

“ Never, Gertrude! never!” exclaimed she,
vehemently ; “do you forget that the glory of
my life has departed, and that I must hereafter
grope my way in hopeless darkness? No, he
would not think of it ; do not talk so wildly again,
Gertrude ; I have no such dreams, and I would
not have the quiet current of my life disturbed
by vein imaginations.”

The next time Constance took her guitar at
her friend's bidding, she sang the following
song :-—



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 69

Like the wind harp whose melody slumbers,
Unwakened by mortal hand,

Till the soit breeze called forth its sweet numbers,
I.ike tones from a seraph's land;

So my lips ever echo the feelings
Which nature alone may impart,

I know nought of passion's revealings,
Then wake not my slumbering hearc

Like a lake lying far on the mountain,
Where foot of man scales not its height,
Fed only by Heaven's pure fountain,
And only refiecting Heaven's light:
So my soul's quict depths give back only
The feelings where chilahood has part;
Bless'd with friendship, my life is not lonely.
Ther. wake not my slumbering beart.

The song was breathed into other ears than
those of Gertrude. Edward had stolen to hear
the lay, and it uttered a mandate which he dared
not disobey. “ No,” said he inwardly, “ the pure
course of that life should never be disturbed
by more earthly affections than those which
awake in life’s bright infancy. The daughter’s
and the sister’s love ; the friendship of a heart
unacquainted with the wilder passions of human-
ity ; such alone should be the habitants of that
gentle bosom.” Witha degree of heroism to-

tally unappreciable by colder hearts, he schooled



70 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

himself to look on Constance as a lovely sister,
whose helplessness might naturally awaken a
deeper interest than fraternal tenderness. If
his heart sometimes beat thick, and his pulse
quickened as he gazed upon her exceeding love-
liness, he mastered his emotion and reaped ‘his
reward in the approval of his conscience.



Ok, THE BLIND GIR. 71

CHAPTER VII.

“You beara gentic mind, and heavenly blessings
Follow such creaturcs.""—SHAKSPFEARF.
Titr Latimer family found many friends will-
ing to aid in rescuing them from a life of toil
and privation, but the noble heart of Constance
spurned the thought of dependence. Her pupils
increased in number, and she was happy in the
certainty that, whatever might be her father’s
success, she should never more be a burden to
him. Mr. Latimer had written regularly to
his family, and occasionally sent small sums of
money ; but, unwilling to excite false hopes, he
said nothing of his pecuniary affairs, and they,
of course, concluded that he had nothing favour-
able to communicate. His stay was prolonged,
month after month, until three years had
elapsed, when he at length intimated his inten-
tion of returning. Great was their joy when the



72 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

tine drew near to receive that beloved father.
Everything that affection could suggest was pre-
pared to welcome him ; and, when he did re-
turn, though Constance could not see the re-
newed cheerfulness of his countenance, her first
exclamation was, “Oh, father, you have won
back your own glad voice !”

Mr. Latimer had devoted himself to the settle
ment of his affairs with a zeal and diligence
that gained the good-will of all who had ex-
pected to suffer by his failure. Facilities of all
kinds were afforded him, and, after the most
unremitting toil, he succeeded in satisfying
every claim. A small remnant of his once vast
fortune still remained ; and a successful specu-
lation, which presented itself at the moment
when he was preparing to embark for his native
land, more than trebled its amount. “I am
not rich,” he replied to his wife’s anxious in-
quiries, “ but I have enough of this world’s gear
to raise us far above want; henceforth I shall
devote myself entirely to my family, and relin-
quish all attempts at commerce.” But what
were his feelings when informed of the heroic



OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 73

conduct of his darling Constance ! She had care-
fully concealed from him her success asa teacher,
lest he should be made unhappy by the idea of
the toil which she was enduring; but now,
when all privation was at an end, he learned
from the lips of Mr. Wilson the whole story of
her energy and heroism. He learned that to
the patient, self-denying labour of his blind
child, the child for the sake of whose suppose
helplessness he most regretted his loss of for-
tune, his family had been indebted for every
comfort, during three long years, while the
money which, at the sacrifice of so much pride,
he had borrowed for their subsistence, had been
paid in less than six months after his departure.
“« And this creature,” exclaimed he, in a trans-
port of feeling, “this angelic creature I would-
have consigned to the grave in my first
moments of despair; this is the child for the
preservation of whose darkened life I dared to
murmur against Providence.”

Mr. Latimer’s first wish was to possess him-
self once more of his beautiful cottage ; but the
work of improvement was begun, and the home



Pages
74-795
missing
from
Original






THE SON AND HEIR.






THE

SON AND HEIR.

** IIe that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity.”



My earliest recollections are those of poverty
and sorrow. I saw my father wasting talents
of the noblest order in a constant struggle for a
bare subsistence ; and my mother, a gentle and
delicate creature, who might have been the or-
nament of palaces, daily condemned to the
merest drudgery of existence. The circumstances
which led to such distress it is needless to re-
count. The childhood of my parents had been
passed amid the most gorgeous. scenes of
wealth and luxury; but the birth of their only
son found them “steeped in poverty to the very
lips.’ Is it any wonder then, that to my



80 THE SON AND HEIR.

infant mind, wealth should have scemed the
greatest earthly good ?

Children that are brought up in the midst of
affluence are like greenhouse plants; they de-
velop slowly, and require the constant care of
the cultivator: but the children of the poor,
reared amid privation and suffering, are like the
hardy plants that find their nourishment in the
crevices of the rock; they evolve rapidly, and,
perhaps, partake too much of the nature of the
indurated soil that fed them. I soon learned to
look upon the world around me with an eye of
thought. He who is not too young to suffer is
old enough to reflect, and many a bitter hour
have I spent in contrasting the degradation of
my own lot with the splendour of others. The
poor who have minds suited to their stations
—they who have been poor from their earliest
generation—are comparatively happy; their toil
procures all that with them constitutes enjoy-
ment; but if there be an evil which exceeds all
others in bitterness, it is poverty when it falls
upon a refined and sensitive spirit.

My father died broken-hearted when I was



TIIE SON AND HEIR. 81

about twelve years of age. A neighbouring law-
yer, who accidently became acquainted with our
distress, took me into his house as a menial—yes
—I do not hesitate to confess it. I was charit-
ably allowed to brush his boots and makc his fires,
while my mother obtained a miserable pittance
by doing coarse sewing for the shops. The two
sons of my master were older than myself, but I
was not long in discovering how infinitely in-
ferior they were in intellect. My father had
laboured diligently to cultivate my mind, and
the facility with which I acquired knowledge
was a solace to his pride, even while it added
new stings to his poverty. I was, therefore, far
more advanced in education than most boys of
iny age; and many a time, as I stood behind
the chair of my young masters, obeying their
capricious commands, have I been compelled to
restrain the bitter sneer that rose to my lip at
their palpable ignorance. My boyish vanity soon
induced me to make some display of my rare
acquirements; and the consequence was, that I
was often compelled to sit up half the night pre-
paring Latin exercises for which my masters



82 THIF SON AND HEIR.

were to be applauded on the morrow. This was
undoubtedly the worst thing that could have
befallen me. Circumstances would otherwise
have subdued my towering spirit, and reduced
me to the level of my situation; but now a con-
sciousness of my own superiority took entire
possession of my mind. I felt that I was born for
betterthings; and, while I cherishedaboyish con-
tempt for my youthful tyrants, I felt an innate
certainty that the time would come when, from a
superior station in society, I should look upon
them as my inferiors in rank as well as intellect.

Such a state of things was, however, too un-
natural to last long. A blow given by one of
my young tormentors, and returned by the proud
menial, led to a discovery of the peculiar ser-
vices which were required of me. Mr. M., who
was really a generous and liberal-minded man,
after carefully ascertaining the extent of my
nequirements, removed me from my servile
station to the equally laborious, but more hon-
ourable situation of clerk in his office. I received
no salary; but, when my master found that my ser-
vices would enable him todispense with onc of his



TIIE SON AND HEIR. 83

hired assistants, he offered to give me instruction
in his profession as an equivalent, and his offer
was gladly accepted. Behold me, then, at the
age of fifteen, copying deeds in a lawycr’s office,
wearing my master’s cast-off clothes, pursuing
my studies at moments stolen from sleep, yet
cherishing as lofty dreams of ambition, as if I
had been heir to the proudest name and largest
fortune in the kingdom. My ambition was not
for fame; proud as I was of my mental supe-
riority, I never desired to be distinguished for
learning and talent; wealth was all I asked.
My situation brought me into continual con-
tact with wealth and rank,and little did the
titled clients of my master think that the poor
clerk whowrotc out their cases, often with a smile
of contempt at their paltry subjects of litigation,
concealed beneath his shabby exterior a spirit
destined, because determined, -to rise. “ Possunt
guia posse videntur” has ever been my motto.
I believe that the mind of man,with its strangely
complicated energiesand lofty aspirations, isequal
to any undertaking; and where the w7zW is un-
faltering, the power cannot be found wanting.



84 TIE SON AND IIEIR.

Liow vividly dol recollect all the occurrences
of that period. Youth is generally a season of
enjoyment; and, therefore, it is that, when we
look back to it in later years, we can scarcely
ever recall its details. We remember some
events, perhaps, but how few are they in com-
parison with those we have forgotten! We
recur to the season of youth with a feeling of
vague and indistinct pleasure, for the footprints
of joy leave too slight an impression upon the
sandy desert of our hearts not to be easily effaced
by the next whirlwind of emotion. But when
our early life has been unhappy it is very differ-
ent. When we grow up amid privation and
suffering; when our souls are consumed by the
fire of secret discontent even from our childhood;
when we are daily compelled to endure the
“proud one’s contumely,” and to have our best
feelings trampled on by those who, born with-
out hearts themselves, can never learn that
others may be less fortunate; when such have
been the events that have measured out our
youth, we never forget them.

It happened one day that Mr. M. was un-



THE SON AND HEIR. 85

avoidably absent from the office, and several
gentlemen were awaiting his return; so that
in addition to the half dozenclerks usually found
there, the apartment was occupied by a number
of his clients. Among others I observed the
Hon. George Fitzroy, and easily perceived from
his manner that he was exceedingly impatient
of the delay. I was at that moment busily en-
gaged in finishing the papers which I knew he
came to obtain. Wishing to spare him some
unnecessary detention, I approached him, and
in a low voice said, “ We have almost finished
your papers, sir, and if you will have the good-
ness to send in half an hour, they will be ready.”
Kying me with a look of ineffable scorn, and
raising his voice so as to be heard by every person
in the room, he exclaimed, “We, sir! We / pray
who are we ? My business is with Mr. M., not
with a hireling !” Maddened wfth passion, my
first impulse was to fell him to the earth, but
my upraised arm was caught by a fellow-clerk.
The violence of my emotion was too great even
formy robust frame ; the blood gushed in torrents
from my mouth, and I fell senseless at the feet



86 TIIE SON AND HEIR.

of my insulter. I had broken one of the minor
blood vessels, and for many weeks was unable
to leave my room ; but even there, in the soli-
tude of a sick chamber, with death watching
beside me, IE vowed to be revenged. I never
stretched out my hand to injure the scorner, yet
my vow was gloriously fulfilled. Time,that slow
but sure avenger, brought an opportunity that
the utmost refinement of hatred could scarcely
have anticipated. Fifteen years afterward, when
I was presiding with almost unlimited authority
over one of the richest provinces in British India,
the Hon. G. Fitzroy, beggared by extravagance,
and an outcast from his family, was occupying
the humble station of my under secretary! Yes,
I saved him from starving, and, until the day of
his death, the proud fool received the wages of
servitude from the hands of the lawyer’s hire-
ling.

Such were the insults and mortifications that
goaded me almost to madness, and would have
crushed me into an untimely grave, had I not
been supported by the hope that the hour of
triumph would come. That hour did come.



THE SON AND HEIR. 87

I have lived to trample upon those who would
have trodden me under foot; aye, and to be
crushed too, even in the moment of success, by
a blow as unexpected as it was inevitable.

I was twenty-one vears of age when an office
of considerable trust and profit under government
was bestowed uponmymaster. Oneofhissons was
at first employed as his secretary, but it wassoon
discovered that young M. could only be saved
from an ignominious dismissal by substituting me
in his place. The appointment was accordingly
transferred to me, with a salary of three hun-
dred pounds a-year. Could the newly-fledzed
butterfly, as he lifts himself upon his golden
wings far above the earth on which he so lately
crawled, be endowed with human feelings, me-
thinks he would feel as I did then. For the
first time I was independent; nay, more, I was
rich—richer with that poor three hundred a-year
than I have since been with an income of fifty
thousand. Everything, even our own emotions,
must be appreciated by comparison; and cer-
tainly the man who, for the first time in his life,
receives the means of a comfortable live‘ihoua,



88 THs SON AND HEIR.

as the fruit of his own industry, is happier than
he will ever be again, though he should in after-
life become the possessor of millions.

I was now enabled to rescue my mother from
a life of toil ; and never shall I forget the ex-
quisite sensations which thrilled my heart when
I brought her from the miserable lodgings
where she had wasted the best years of her life
to the plain but comfortable abode which we
were now to occupy together. From my infancy
I had been accustomed to consider wealth the
source of happiness, and now the one favour
which I had received from the hands of fortune,
had been the means of procuring me the sweet-
est pleasure which the heart of man is capable
of enjoying. Is it any wonder then, that I still
determined to pursue the career of wealth ?
Everything served to keep alive the love of gold
in my heart. My new situation threw me con-
stantly in the way of that peculiar class of men
whose every look is indicative of moneyed im-
portance ; whose very complexion seems satur-
ated with gold dust; I mean the East India
merchants. I soon learned that the shortest



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My new situation threw me constantly in the way oF suas perurtar class of men whose very
the Fast India merchants, —Page 88,

inilicative of monied importance,



THE SON AND HEIR. 89

possible road to wealth was to be found in India,
and there I determined to seek it.

All my leisure time was now devoted to the
study of the various Indian dialects. An old
merchant, who had resided many years in the
country, offered to assist me, and, no doubt, was
as much gratified to find a ready listener to his
marvellous tales, as I was to obtain a capable
guide in the new path which seemed opening
before me. He was a man of very singular
character. Possessing a mind of wonderful en-
ergy, he would have distinguished himself in
any profession to which he had applied himself;
but he had been early devoted to a business
life, and repugnant as it was to his elegant taste,
he soon learned to adapt himself to circum-
stances, and forgot that he had ever had a wish
beyond his counting-room. Ht happened with
him, as it doubtless does with many others:
compelled to sacrifice his first hopes, he devoted
all his energies to the work that he was ealled
to perform ; and as a man of ardent temper-
ament can never be médiocre in anything, he
soon became as eager in the pursuit of wealth



90 THE SON AND HEIR.

as he might otherwise have been in the acqui-
sition of fame. He was now an old man, and
money was everything to him. To pile guinea
upon guinea was his only pleasure; and no
sooner did he learn the similarity of my feel-~
ings, than I became his chief favourite.

His house had however another attraction
for me. His only surviving relative was an
orphan niece, whom, since his return from India,
he had taken home as his adopted daughter.
Young, beautiful, and artless asa child, Emily
Halford appeared to me like a creature of an-
other sphere. It is true I had scarcely looked
upon 2 woman when I beheld her; but even
now, after the lapse of so many years, when so
many visions of youth, and beauty, and mental
loveliness, are bright in my recollection, there
is still no form like hers. Mr. Halford early per-
ceived my attachment. ‘“‘ You love my niece,”
said he ; “I am not surprised ; she is a charm-
ing girl, and I would rather bestow her ona
man like yourself, who, born poor, possess the
capacity of making a fortune, than on the heir
of a princely estate, if the follies and extiava-



THE SON AND HEIR. 91

gances of modern education were a part of the
inheritance.. The husband of my niece will
be the heir of my fortune, but not until he shall
have merited it; my gold is the fruit of indus-
try, and it shall never go to enrich the idle.”
Alive only to the consciousness that I was per-
mitted to win the affections of Emily, I was
utterly regardless of the old man’s Jast words.
Alas ! I remembered them bitterly enough soon
after.

I should have loved Emily if she had been
friendless and destitute. There was a graceful
and womanly tenderness in her manner, which
to me was irresistible. Sordidness and selfish-
ness have ever characterized my dealings witb
men, but never have I forgotten my almost
chivalrous veneration for the pure and noble
nature of woman. After a brief interval we
were married; and as it had been arranged
that Emily should still reside with her uncle, a
very material change immediately took place in
my mode of life. Had I hoped to derive any
pecuniary advantages, however, I should have
been much disappointed ; a set of pearl ornaments



92 THE SON AND HEIR.

was Mr. Halford’s only marriage gift. I was
now, apparently, on the very pinnacle of good
fortune.- Living, if not in the midst of the re-
finements of rank, at least surrounded by all
the magnificence of opulence, who would ever
have recognised in the happy husband of the
beautiful heiress, the ragged and squalid serving
boy? Emily was devotedly attached to me, and
there was something inexpressibly delightful in
the consciousness that, among the cold and self
ish beings who made up my world, one heart
was found to love me with a deep and ‘isinter-
ested affection.

Our happiness was first interrupted about a
year after our marriage by the illness of my
sweet wife. The sudden death of our infant
boy, who lived just long enough to awaken a
mother’s tenderness in her bosom, seriously
affected her health, and she was just recover-
ing from a long fit of sickness, when we were
called to mourn the death of her eccentric but
kind old uncle. He had been talking cheer-
fully with us all the evening, smoked several
pipes of his rose-scented Turkish tobacco, drank



THE SON AND HEIR. 93

his usual quantity of old Madeira, and the next
morning he was found lying cold and stiff in
bed, apparently in the very posture in which
he had composed himself to sleep. We mourned
for him with a genuine sorrow; for, singular
as were his habits, no man possessed a kinder
heart ; and, if that heart had been contracted
by trafficking with his fellow-men, and his na-
turally fine intellect subjected to the iron bond-
age of selfish avarice, it was the fault of those
who chained to the galley of commerce a spirit
that might else have aspired to the loftiest
realms of undiscovered truth.

But the worst of our misfortunes was yet to
come. Mr. Halford had frequently thrown out
hints of his intention to procure for me a situ-
ation in India; and, although I expected, of
course, to benefit by his wealth in future, I
was still desirous to push my own fortunes. It
was, doubtless, a fear lest the possession of im-
mediate wealth should induce me to relax in
my habits of industry that induced him to make
so singulara will. Upon examining his papers,
three several copies of his will were found in



94 THE SON AND HEIR.

different, but equally secure places, as if he
were resolved to guard against all contingen-
cies. After a few trifling legacies to old do-
mestics, he bequeathed the whole of his fortune
to me, but with this singular proviso—the
whole of the property, including landed estate,
stocks, furniture, plate, &c., was given in trust
to his executors, to be paid into my hands as
soon as I should give satisfactory proof that I
was worth fifty thousand pounds, acquired by
my own exertions. In case of my death be-
fore the requisite sum was obtained, a certain
portion was allotted to my wife, and the re-
mainder appropriated to the endowment of
several charitable institutions. Thus [ found
myself the heir to a magnificent fortune, but,
at the same time, with no other means of pro-
viding for my family than the salary which I
received from my secretaryship. Irritated as
I was by this absurd bequest, my anger knew
no bounds when [ found that even the house
we occupied, with its furniture and plate, was
to be sold, and the proceeds added to that al-
ready overgrown fortune, which was not to be



THE SON AND HEIR. 95

mine until I should be able to do without
it. I was compelled to remove to my former
abode, still occupied by my mother ; but I en-
tered it as if it had been a prison. The fetters
which luxury weaves around us are like the
bonds with which the Lilliputians confined the
sleeping Gulliver ; separately, each might be
broken by the turning of a finger; it is the
vast number of invisible chains fastened upon
us by the factitious indulgences of wealth that
renders us powerless beneath them. Little
more than two years before, I had tasted in
these humble apartments the first sweet draught
from fortune’s cup; and now, when her over-
flowing chalice seemed offered to my lips, only
to be withdrawn ere I could quaff one drop,
my impatient spirit was almost maddened by
the disappointment. My poor Emily used
every effort to reconcile me to my situation.
Though her life had been passed amid all the
comforts of affluenct; and mine amid all the
evils of poverty, yet she cheerfully relinquished
the luxurious habits which to her were a se-
cond nature, while I could not reconcile myself



96 THE SON AND HEIR.

to their loss, though I had scarcely yet learned
to enjoy them. Unwilling to pain her gentle
nature, I endeavoured to appear contented ;
but only those who can fully enter into my
passionate desire for wealth, could understand
with what loathing I looked upon my present
mean conditioft From the time I left Mr.
Halford’s house I never enjoyed a single re-
past. The rich damask, the massive silver
dinner-service, the splendid china, which alone
had cost more than the whole of my present
income—all had vanished from my table, and
I was weak enough to feel their loss as severely
as if they had been as essential as the food to
which they were the accompaniments.

I was soon to be punished for my folly. The
death of Mr. M., my first patron, deprived me
of my only dependance—the salary which I
received as his secretary. Judge, then, of my
situation. I had taken up all the arrears of
my salary in order to furnish anew my hum-
ble habitation for the reception of my wife,
and I now found myself absolutely penniless.
Even now my blood boils at the recollection of



THE SON AND HEIR. 97

that period. In vain I sought for emp:oyment;
the very eagerness with which I desired it
seemed to prejudice those who might other-
wise have engaged my services ; for, in nine
eases out of ten, the wealthy consider poverty
so great a temptation to dishopvesty, that they
can seldom bring themselves to confide in the
integrity of apoor man. The conditions of Mr.
Halford’s will were also prejudicial to my cha-~
racter, for the mass of mankind are always ready
to attribute the worst motives and causes to
that which seems incomprehensible. Day after
day my affairs became more desperate, until, at
length, it was only by the sale of our useless
furniture and my wife’s ornaments that we
were preserved from starvation. I knew that
Mr. Halford had applied for a situation for me
in the service of the East India Company, but
no answer had been returned to his application;
and, rendered half mad by the rapid diminu-
tion of our little stock of money, I resolved to
apply to one of the executors of Mr. Halford’s
estate. He was a stern, hard-featured man,
who had begun life as a cabin-boy on boarda
G@



38 THE SON AND HEIR.

mean-of-war ; and, having weathered many 2
stiff gale, he had no idea of any distress beyond
that which the animal frame might suffer. He
listened with the utmost coolness to my im-
passioned appeal, and calmly replied, that, as
the estate had been given to him in trust, he
was not at liberty to dispose ofit “ But my wife
—my mother, are starving !” I exclaimed ; “ give
me only a hundred pounds for present necessities.”

“Impossible, young man,” was his reply ;
““ vour chances of obtaining the estate are very
trifling, and it is my duty to fulfil the wishes
of the testator. An industrious man never
need have a starving family ; there are plenty
of employments for those who choose to seek
them. I cannot dispose of the funds of my
late friend ; but, as you are in distress, here is
asum which will relieve you for the present.
You need not consider it a loan; you will pro-
bably never be able to repay it.” So saying,
he handed mea bank bill for five pounds, I
need not say how indignantly I spurned his in-
sulting charity, and, dashing the bill in his
face, hurried from the house.



THE SON AND HEIR. 99

Cursing, in 2 paroxysm of rage, the fool who
had given me a fortune in expectancy, only to
render more bitter my present misery, I hast-
ened home. What a scene there presented it-
self! My landlord had been, during my
absence, to demand his rent; his harsh and
unfeeling violence terrified my helpless family,
and I entered the house only to look upon the
dead body of my second infant, and to behold
my wife in strong convulsions. The fearful
strength of my agony produced the same effect
that excessive rage had done in earlier life, and
again a ruptured blood-vessel stretched me upon
a bed of sickness. Many weary weeks passed
before I was again conscious of surrounding
objects. The agitation of my feelings brought
on a fever, which spent its strength upon my
brain, and, during the paroxysms of my de-
lirium, I was continually raving about my
dying Emily. How great was my delight when
the first object on which my eye rested, with
a glance of recognition, was my wife—pale, in-
deed, and languid, but evidently restored to
health.



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'2012-01-13T21:36:38-05:00'
describe
'8664340' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOE' 'sip-files00009.tif'
0c4c32cd0417f11313fc3dbd41bd9e81
abfc0c7ffe06d76674c8402b61f9b3c141cf1f3b
'2012-01-13T21:28:46-05:00'
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOF' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b3fb6816b53d541c5548e3c23d72dfa2
18b871b41c97ec9e75594e3944c11820c5e5b4c4
'2012-01-13T21:33:26-05:00'
describe
'28600' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
229b58842b60e3284e826e2d1b21e943
d5aacdadfff916127369ffe81312ec6297a6d993
'2012-01-13T21:29:20-05:00'
describe
'948037' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOH' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
f3df4bb04dc856e006882f5f719c58be
c23d821fc13690528342a9b9e491173352d6b133
'2012-01-13T21:31:37-05:00'
describe
'131552' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOI' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
fb48dab70b6fbf13cd5e190f8a3ea050
c82a3359eae8fe3cf6a1267319cceed60a446de3
'2012-01-13T21:36:22-05:00'
describe
'29852' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
9f826deb3150572b5c60c2ba669a6f1b
a96b623fb783bfff51e37e6e098affc22f840426
'2012-01-13T21:34:59-05:00'
describe
'63972' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
584a9dd3e63eb01459f2f24c72ac9812
36bc55712982446beb7c3fd4e3191dfa0a587526
'2012-01-13T21:31:28-05:00'
describe
'8666896' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
4ab55d9db680394ed57c991fc72d2ba3
dbe6ae9092c42887d31c0f5bf0fe4ccffa0acf44
'2012-01-13T21:36:35-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
3917b36ec2d68b4cea3e405deb9a5ad9
2dbcbde6f719b4ba404800bf7c003ca2d3da383b
'2012-01-13T21:34:40-05:00'
describe
'34520' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJON' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f19e3b6812293b84e2a7f1797525361d
121cf786b4738adc56dceb198eb685f6fb4d67eb
describe
'939060' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9af7147c93c1af5ccfb7ab76216f8a56
64b73277e1b5f6937324f88324d87f3f8fdb4fc3
'2012-01-13T21:28:19-05:00'
describe
'129709' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6fe19d88b9bbf16f142102f35324619e
ec6537045a8dd95e2053abadfb0e69f7caf10b8c
'2012-01-13T21:36:27-05:00'
describe
'30133' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
542c0695b761a497e783c429f2918a5e
e3270da4caf8a998f5c4d3f572dbf3ddedae0991
'2012-01-13T21:27:56-05:00'
describe
'63680' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
6372c5a4cc32b7c098c1e2741f314976
379f9d08dd2004cb49d64105249604d93e568ac3
'2012-01-13T21:32:26-05:00'
describe
'8666756' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
f7f58b697f48b8f44bdcbe7f3442e103
c9d176746e33d135772561dce4596906b0fa6427
'2012-01-13T21:33:50-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
dd2c7d7292c9f2111bdaf6a9a0cd8aab
6efff0dff31402ea37c23683d9ba979a79ff3aea
describe
'34312' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4d5888d465f0cb37c820b6436c2c5f56
e08ff59fc52a87f5bc35843172cd0fa93f12917a
'2012-01-13T21:33:36-05:00'
describe
'909090' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
bc4dc24e02bc1139d765e23caf384d56
b040409ba3b89f9e5b285c6467304d954cc3c8a3
'2012-01-13T21:29:33-05:00'
describe
'127023' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6d0b4759aa55e233b5acec6cd819abeb
e75971e6c81c36f97d9b7c472c0785a758550e14
'2012-01-13T21:32:59-05:00'
describe
'28068' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e80f536c3e4dd7611a0536a17d363b4b
71b8b1c6adeac9332c8655f1206f2e8300ee7f27
'2012-01-13T21:31:43-05:00'
describe
'63908' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
c252836bffcebdabe6f8e0cb5928fee4
d21f210b3d2f143225a7d56ec7ab2ab9dccadf86
'2012-01-13T21:33:11-05:00'
describe
'8667276' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJOZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d49ea41c8799064ad3aa74cb3e925e9a
770150f024f0cac2f42fa1efdcfe54cf47aa07c2
'2012-01-13T21:32:54-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
501438637d3504c60cdeffd1c552e562
0c5517b7454cd21805fcf8876fb3fca76d2da7e0
'2012-01-13T21:28:40-05:00'
describe
'965502' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPB' 'sip-files00012c.jp2'
baf1ba7f2cda2c2b3a959913fc30188c
9e6a56b10eed26f40f8c8705ffe4df8dfded0430
'2012-01-13T21:36:08-05:00'
describe
'95300' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPC' 'sip-files00012c.jpg'
701f6ded79050b5b46ae5bedb3d129bb
2b8b40d301ed22ba75ed0d48bd21194632df3390
'2012-01-13T21:32:20-05:00'
describe
'6743' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPD' 'sip-files00012c.pro'
bb14671c84075accece6a52ef4da09ba
45ca00d1db592bc9884d1686c36ff10d5f84a1d7
'2012-01-13T21:32:55-05:00'
describe
'45048' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPE' 'sip-files00012c.QC.jpg'
77d3339ea834cbbb700dd324a7b9f932
f84dc39520bb0c57464be61434da9b71744d9fa1
'2012-01-13T21:34:17-05:00'
describe
'8665932' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPF' 'sip-files00012c.tif'
7672adfcae468b421f35ee4a7e3f998b
22de429c2e28f240559ce7388bf0b9a43b28c32f
'2012-01-13T21:32:44-05:00'
describe
'310' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPG' 'sip-files00012c.txt'
1b38846a899769c62e87d10c8a566396
401ac243598feae304320015f9623e130f6b4647
'2012-01-13T21:36:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'29394' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPH' 'sip-files00012cthm.jpg'
c28b270b9abfe5230bba3043d0237986
369e9878184f3c6b6df5b50ff403bf2fbf8ab1c6
'2012-01-13T21:33:13-05:00'
describe
'35104' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8b7e2b435ceaf782bbee8b607f0d23e4
1a2019f5e53efa224487bc0f49fbeacc821bcf10
'2012-01-13T21:34:57-05:00'
describe
'861681' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPJ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
ccdf7c68ce9db41f047a8314330278f1
697c5bc79a8997be58b7a63079c060f0634ccef3
'2012-01-13T21:36:17-05:00'
describe
'120688' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPK' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
363d8141b9bbc7af541f491f76000f38
86a7c8969a3cb449cd99588a3cfc5ecd55eca23e
'2012-01-13T21:29:36-05:00'
describe
'30123' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPL' 'sip-files00013.pro'
2ca7cd29567115c7951bea73efc588ee
fa199772f825156527b1c30a8c261b94d1ba0d26
'2012-01-13T21:29:52-05:00'
describe
'57730' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPM' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
e058f30ab5b7af5562c752aafb409940
8be0045d1633ebc0c995c3b409608432a59dd3e5
'2012-01-13T21:36:41-05:00'
describe
'8665860' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPN' 'sip-files00013.tif'
9468afcace5fb9ff6c37b9e52231adf7
bcc3b8a076068ae8ab27a3c9fc69e381c37f29cb
'2012-01-13T21:28:45-05:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a15d696cb91fe9002171381f95602258
8a41280ac7f7bcfbd1d080c5e34bc34bbb57aa77
'2012-01-13T21:28:44-05:00'
describe
'31738' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
96e4e64ba700d00ddf3c5bb315c5a356
56a626a1b507ab97aa4e50cf0daac45583e63e1d
'2012-01-13T21:31:48-05:00'
describe
'971264' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPQ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
a950404a307caf5dd712e6e5e5068cb4
c4039a541bb02d9f81c4514edb390798155afcb4
'2012-01-13T21:32:40-05:00'
describe
'134094' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPR' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
5a485ab07a68287b05b4b6aad10daeec
7dd5b8bc7883dbcaced92f566f9c58db47290aae
describe
'30733' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPS' 'sip-files00014.pro'
57a663e68847b02d0f8f4282998b1b99
7e337b35902a46297b96787ea11fa19877c34b92
'2012-01-13T21:33:57-05:00'
describe
'65261' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPT' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8420b9909463a3301708cb16948367d1
8b50d55621febeff7ca00e4056252aa84e2e4ac5
'2012-01-13T21:33:02-05:00'
describe
'8666960' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPU' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f5432e632fcbba6e49d6ac1cc449c0b0
555ec0968c07481ffb0218ed983bf2af31f538a2
'2012-01-13T21:31:19-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPV' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7844cb131da1825eef1644e0d3bb591d
bdc829ff7436cd8cb81d8f270791a9bf7d63d02a
describe
'34747' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPW' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
46792631ecf592134d48f4974e8e3434
bc86e61354a2e0682007897b1d2101187f53474a
'2012-01-13T21:35:10-05:00'
describe
'944801' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPX' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
482f9610b3ce6740e7d9239fa7c21c8c
cf0f0c7ac14ac469184d26ecfc4963820b02db57
'2012-01-13T21:29:43-05:00'
describe
'130237' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPY' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
feba1aec7cd6dd606ff9ab88d108278e
25db22a41d9547024f3430549adca7aa0a382354
'2012-01-13T21:30:47-05:00'
describe
'29237' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJPZ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
0499c68739476cf4f17672aec5d2efbc
eed5a636bedcbd8a19a4d143db67b5147812a275
describe
'64227' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQA' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9d5ade60ea3c0b075d0ff419e4c4a926
0be5a13ce785370915d6a218a4bb1b671d5d23b9
'2012-01-13T21:33:56-05:00'
describe
'8667280' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQB' 'sip-files00015.tif'
8dc58eea171b92fd20052e08f9e2d55a
956f87007be53571d89b4ca26f998658be2c6199
'2012-01-13T21:30:50-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQC' 'sip-files00015.txt'
888acf4261d084be7f3e6ce7e8a526db
3563f055e466fb8af04b7bbf0bfb1c7d43d79555
'2012-01-13T21:32:49-05:00'
describe
'34790' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQD' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
4d1eeb88584a4fd5562a4f2244af876a
85d3170898a3ba8de8c0487e78fefdd49da0e04f
describe
'951817' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQE' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
5d0517e2f21f65094e2a24a13ed10798
043393a3188397a829483b04afa611c38b1d7ac6
describe
'131154' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQF' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
953360b9f2f1193d9612c40957b9d68b
9f38719a986fd3ac3945644350f6422b58cc56e1
'2012-01-13T21:34:54-05:00'
describe
'28957' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQG' 'sip-files00016.pro'
7f637b65eb4a7091a49164c5d5bf4304
bf9e6c6b40da0922c6f8ffbf1483f34f92aff4b3
'2012-01-13T21:30:40-05:00'
describe
'63612' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQH' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
240595cf3eb87e7294c83fa9f79f5b82
df93ac8f1dc405b7612d75c89f069f05756308b7
describe
'8667112' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQI' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b9bd20d95d17b195c3a1bc3041f33a97
2abd5b5d98b3c77f1facf5a73f115b3a61d65ed6
'2012-01-13T21:30:32-05:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQJ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
ade1bb97718d47471221891108d71b6d
962e91f6becabfeaf5b799b32cfbe88360e6650c
'2012-01-13T21:35:12-05:00'
describe
'34878' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQK' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
79521e1ee55d1ca5d6fb320d99fb1abd
9aea53fb9343a1b159c7bfb774b4c5e1c551b327
'2012-01-13T21:31:16-05:00'
describe
'337939' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQL' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a5f5a0840dc20e50a795fc03e2ef2863
21a6007287aa2a28970d7e4fc347dce065150560
describe
'60714' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
7cad5e4353e97b3dffc90f53807fc2af
6986582dabfb1ed132ba94574a06c26de11ac4fb
describe
'10657' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQN' 'sip-files00017.pro'
8b33659883c876ff9c424681189371cb
de7ec07444ad2375ca63edaebcdc1081ba4fe248
'2012-01-13T21:36:12-05:00'
describe
'36653' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQO' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
dcef3898dcdfba311481e536375b5aac
75f72295dae82bf4d5189b657a6ad9f83b0fd91a
'2012-01-13T21:33:58-05:00'
describe
'8663000' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQP' 'sip-files00017.tif'
dcc526fc8e24ee9b77a8c03e448a78ab
ec97a6cbabdb682a476f7a2bdb589c99a13f1687
'2012-01-13T21:31:29-05:00'
describe
'434' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQQ' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a39da79676a8924ccb7e724634fcbaaf
1285d15de3cfd3b1a428266318cecce1150e9f56
'2012-01-13T21:32:38-05:00'
describe
'25427' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
39efc0ebc3e442ef165507b8953fa89a
246c8a5345cb48ee9f68d2b5cd248e78860e3e3f
'2012-01-13T21:31:31-05:00'
describe
'721355' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQS' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8e58ff1ef1668126e03ab541b84ed073
25e93b07e37803dc64f6c87cb7d7c57a66910068
'2012-01-13T21:34:22-05:00'
describe
'105083' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
9f9fc185143649ec08382e54f778babb
9f936877fcecdff8c15eeca2b985c5bfad42b3d8
'2012-01-13T21:33:09-05:00'
describe
'23857' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQU' 'sip-files00018.pro'
92cb45ad5c47b5f44f22f6a663286005
22cdc8ab445f4a04b1b11550ebf4e00bfc9e5e64
'2012-01-13T21:27:51-05:00'
describe
'53679' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
5dd3aba8afc4c58562caa75e34bc5d4c
bdedd4c72ddb1fe12632fa32705e0a196650b7c7
'2012-01-13T21:33:20-05:00'
describe
'8665460' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c7e1b822481646dff520969947aadd1d
0276d88d70c163786f5abf1abf767cf98c8384e8
'2012-01-13T21:29:18-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
215de44b6e6ebc18aac7dc4e8730039e
7c86023d1b30c1df05f91a3bd98ca1bee64034a9
describe
'30987' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQY' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
2fb555dc7dcb3e730d2f2c86306c8cbd
8c439dd2f827ab86d02fb053ddae13cc9bae65a4
'2012-01-13T21:34:09-05:00'
describe
'952944' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJQZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e975c7bdfff6f644888a9f921a98f07a
282f386dd65c3462ee2cd1bfb63f9b29db27185d
'2012-01-13T21:30:02-05:00'
describe
'130846' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d038aa14bd97bc6ab9f082b0e9756c79
9867b9d39f8a36e7dd59629f49ad9150f930bb00
'2012-01-13T21:36:28-05:00'
describe
'29635' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRB' 'sip-files00019.pro'
d1d1cf65d5c94175beec9e6bc2bb9a90
64d7ccbbd8daf2334450f6e89e96ff8b9c86d13f
'2012-01-13T21:32:58-05:00'
describe
'63318' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
027c89e371a8bc9d004a900815ab2c86
a422a4d70b7e85799c90a859ec0d4074321ed7ca
'2012-01-13T21:32:18-05:00'
describe
'8666856' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRD' 'sip-files00019.tif'
038090fe1d50797aec08667825290b1c
5766b3e829397c7ce1e1fc9581cc8f354b87b2ef
'2012-01-13T21:34:02-05:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRE' 'sip-files00019.txt'
cc686d7596be18b9324ef5af21c2242d
3d1bec3010d1461d1e6d6a88e5bc572cdbdc8d08
'2012-01-13T21:28:05-05:00'
describe
'34414' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
88926d2f64945b211d27b5a0c41103c3
fc2299611348fefd4b8bdd7e0552289e77300107
'2012-01-13T21:28:35-05:00'
describe
'930723' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRG' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
3b233683b248b0aa6a9c55cc5f1588e1
3c76745fde237b0722b0130e8d12a26d7e89a783
'2012-01-13T21:31:10-05:00'
describe
'129112' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRH' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
4f05d30f5e2c3d721e555ed4b16077e7
ce19db6396f649372082ce7eb132b08a62e27cbd
'2012-01-13T21:33:15-05:00'
describe
'28946' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4ff510257e48b9171f3422bec81355db
004234c8129e99be2a1ff4dae9ec6314dcd4c32e
'2012-01-13T21:35:46-05:00'
describe
'62795' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRJ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
eb393ff46d54b4f9b6c7ecd738764608
38180e61bc8c73f2d3ef76c3b5f138ba99071278
'2012-01-13T21:34:39-05:00'
describe
'8666908' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
1a75d0cb94e25379e57fb885012ec823
6de0b0fa99f44ad038f65ee46fddd1e43e145e0b
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRL' 'sip-files00020.txt'
92c7f2a35f2053f5ca14570f93e40063
761561b5acd89cbb7871de80d1e30440cb15e087
'2012-01-13T21:32:42-05:00'
describe
'34270' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRM' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
53a0315c61218e89c2157eee6a7b7a9d
3bc1f43ff083e01512b784d6abcbb29462424860
describe
'851295' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRN' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
cdad85800fd474eb133138f296da3fad
2f43af75508a41cf60ccf15fc02ff09b6a4a9cb9
'2012-01-13T21:36:06-05:00'
describe
'119675' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRO' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
130fee684cb426c60420a82081fce34e
aef4d41dd94ec26a8ecd452f15a691abadc03c02
'2012-01-13T21:35:35-05:00'
describe
'27272' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRP' 'sip-files00021.pro'
d5bc17a69483a259f726c257c0cd51d4
b2a88375dd9ea3288c71282483fec64a93ff1878
'2012-01-13T21:31:52-05:00'
describe
'59799' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRQ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1aa6145743850713d40b29fae7844a7a
d1c46c00fed0703e1272dc7420bdd89758b78ac6
describe
'8666484' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0da482e2e801ce118af719719f5dc09a
2fff80d9d062b2d916fea48ea49b5ff60d38b0cf
'2012-01-13T21:31:04-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRS' 'sip-files00021.txt'
985291fbda1b4790ec408b8af1510094
099cd9cda55b68c160748125490bbce6d7845937
'2012-01-13T21:27:34-05:00'
describe
'33303' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRT' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
31f3b75f57f4060be145ad0ca7cf03b8
79c9cef07bf4bfc33546495afa112fe516909973
'2012-01-13T21:35:00-05:00'
describe
'918791' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRU' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f94c1404bddac442130af6058d5e7a9b
b1e3564ceffbf2432205bf9d2331468e6bfa5897
'2012-01-13T21:35:05-05:00'
describe
'126697' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRV' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
8c04a6a1d9941dc8f6b239115e818e06
f41d64131b2a2aade0024b3b1422e1a6980ee4f1
'2012-01-13T21:28:29-05:00'
describe
'29277' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRW' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4f8cb6be766d088684595fee90bd4f02
a600f1af48dcd459b213f51b0bebc55dc3c06598
'2012-01-13T21:30:39-05:00'
describe
'61578' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRX' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
1cf18d4a60cc1580e967df8dac473f01
ca7d2c732cb5f9aa708048b47fdd50de29446074
'2012-01-13T21:32:46-05:00'
describe
'8666652' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
4d4b8d85d44e6907a20b501f59b737f8
63053f42fa59e64d30462e28ef743f64526c3687
'2012-01-13T21:31:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJRZ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
881eac0213c86dfed9183f9f5289bb63
e011b8d47a5acdd346ed9179e6cf3499556d9192
'2012-01-13T21:34:05-05:00'
describe
'33836' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSA' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
31466b180d3af07ae92ad18c4d2251da
6e9eea47b82e92eb4208566ffad91af45981b857
'2012-01-13T21:32:12-05:00'
describe
'916724' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSB' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
40d75c63f1fe20585bb61ca209bfa386
a3decc39a58b38c6fda5f7db13bd4a77111a128d
describe
'126273' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSC' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
23317f552695423d1d3d467fcef36986
225b2daebb13d8dbeeb1a090ac08cca94386758d
'2012-01-13T21:35:16-05:00'
describe
'29254' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSD' 'sip-files00023.pro'
adaf544253ca7ae23610a720d3415126
284532987ed179c9ef1a5b051b67b279420492a9
'2012-01-13T21:28:53-05:00'
describe
'62199' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSE' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
7eed43591ee1a28871d237e2dd358714
40572aa63958c2291756cf1b25b60f365158c85f
'2012-01-13T21:35:57-05:00'
describe
'8666440' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSF' 'sip-files00023.tif'
57fe36e282dfa574330559f3f957556c
8cc7c5a15c680ca7879740e5b8c9a8e7935b7383
'2012-01-13T21:33:59-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSG' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0040aef19c55b442954019f877585c5d
ed44b9cec75446ae0162c98c8c098a28d2f922b3
'2012-01-13T21:36:15-05:00'
describe
'33647' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSH' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
637fd9070d18c209c65f186d71999557
640f229906408cc34b4964529ac9a99a51969239
'2012-01-13T21:33:47-05:00'
describe
'935259' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
6896fffd26825084f90d16da101aac77
6da90502cccb174d43b633e9c73bbd088954e6b6
'2012-01-13T21:29:58-05:00'
describe
'129403' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSJ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a01535f3069eaad83119a07d6e0e7e86
fefc6f4eac9fd35031cced1b4a8e7a02fc525f2f
'2012-01-13T21:35:40-05:00'
describe
'29836' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSK' 'sip-files00024.pro'
01732c1ca4b781b12365714cabc9f826
ce9cf12711e78237d03d0efeba015b5fe03a5f20
'2012-01-13T21:27:43-05:00'
describe
'63829' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSL' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6d46ad384765947a036c55f26aad6702
7048a46c45b297947cc070186d5b82b4ac5dc47e
'2012-01-13T21:32:34-05:00'
describe
'8666748' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSM' 'sip-files00024.tif'
51c67e26d0a9bd1a7fe50d3687fe3241
dbde6bc3ca7437cb2d6b4bf2759259fe07d3bb9e
'2012-01-13T21:29:07-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSN' 'sip-files00024.txt'
799e50fe19fa443c487dcd541a522d8d
ca0a79da26db6ff1f6167eeb267382bcef378a1f
'2012-01-13T21:30:21-05:00'
describe
'34427' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSO' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
62cf30460c64197b052c04df1dbef897
e0da12951a1652894517f1a75765e4b7f72c751a
'2012-01-13T21:36:24-05:00'
describe
'936216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSP' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e083f28fbe28d9aa4f4c4e75a67557ad
8486bf22a5ad71982f4a72c93ef033e358fea937
'2012-01-13T21:30:08-05:00'
describe
'129803' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSQ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8feedfe0c63fa30b87cd934f71d40e5f
88d15c1826b2dd1eab1237b650c2f79c0cf667bc
'2012-01-13T21:28:36-05:00'
describe
'30444' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSR' 'sip-files00025.pro'
59d2c921133377e409f07c1bb06c1f3d
60585908ecf8f3edda33a3520a40680a8ce4b5e1
'2012-01-13T21:34:43-05:00'
describe
'63577' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSS' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
0a26698c12faac480cd268a823325e48
fd07fbff0eaef03fafc998b9a6f8b7646e99516a
describe
'8666864' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJST' 'sip-files00025.tif'
77892fc675e8250b79a261d96c0d90ff
96fbeabc1310ba5ec985a8d07842eb66c462ef6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSU' 'sip-files00025.txt'
51f7348bd32c00a8eb662d6a73287875
e8b92d580e1ddd728936a51c2e85663928ed0c62
'2012-01-13T21:30:11-05:00'
describe
'34167' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSV' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
26ae8a08c20a486489631f3f854efeb1
915a11ab8fdabf9d05266dd45f4cf3571e9fede6
'2012-01-13T21:30:44-05:00'
describe
'408884' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSW' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
65c944a52bd27689878956ddea2ef52f
4d151ac12063acd7e38b3d5165d171428d038759
'2012-01-13T21:34:06-05:00'
describe
'68475' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSX' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
61092b5383dcbe3259c9436a413117d4
295e65e1161d8be4d070cc1c7cfc99d46cc27090
'2012-01-13T21:35:33-05:00'
describe
'13108' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSY' 'sip-files00026.pro'
47991e75813a9e0d8107bb166941b638
7e8c4acd106fca92e53e53d3ab5f31797142c5c4
'2012-01-13T21:29:25-05:00'
describe
'37940' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJSZ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
77882530a566a99e5523ea2bda33da97
c2bbe9fda0254422fe9b66ebf24bcdfcfdfad81d
'2012-01-13T21:31:06-05:00'
describe
'8662868' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTA' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b33f1edce554afb7ae24ba3a2d997eb4
7329ff30b3db3b2f7047595505705070348e3470
'2012-01-13T21:30:48-05:00'
describe
'516' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
103d0404f154405b6568f05aea879640
76a745162d0504bdfa3ca508789d4e1b6c91f274
'2012-01-13T21:31:12-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'25555' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTC' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
289a0ca40afed2bef7c20196c7373eb5
1fe229373e38600e8157cb1d36ccf797d49ad1ac
'2012-01-13T21:29:44-05:00'
describe
'670402' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTD' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
4bdeacf41e0b2df8b7a53fe93606c66a
78309cf7ba862a618a9c12d44af989208580a135
'2012-01-13T21:32:07-05:00'
describe
'98624' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTE' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
e2e5d8994099f8937e12e374d708a2f5
d96d9c2861b0a52b69063511f23da42398f6a335
describe
'22374' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTF' 'sip-files00027.pro'
b6bdb2c5c52aea6c6919be7814618c77
20d4ba3c62284af738cdbb42067fb398e4b92e26
'2012-01-13T21:31:33-05:00'
describe
'51292' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTG' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f620c37b70fb5c7b1052eeef3f234827
0e02fed1b47baab1422447bf1e4167cf1b299eff
'2012-01-13T21:33:41-05:00'
describe
'8665080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTH' 'sip-files00027.tif'
2613a5b86b4a9af13523641c6141f82d
4a7c0204d25f16380bc15f37d43d9ae0e0dacbdb
'2012-01-13T21:28:17-05:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTI' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ec47afad31f11e3967f89e117b941e7c
5f58105a4bcf9d7a8bf350bf9f58bc0795e4568a
describe
'30195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTJ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f6da4998ea81ec5a1d5b4b1cfb7cdb56
cc862924894caa4ef55e5cd26a36a9118e82cde1
'2012-01-13T21:30:04-05:00'
describe
'933483' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTK' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
ada3b92332b12c4e3f23ef71449f1168
57d5587cd833570749df0eb171c661c783bdc734
'2012-01-13T21:35:39-05:00'
describe
'128885' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTL' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
4f37fe5c929d5b2762dbf86e0e1c4f36
99637a4d055f3c93365a2c0630f5e59b77e6be44
'2012-01-13T21:35:18-05:00'
describe
'30255' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTM' 'sip-files00028.pro'
0a495666039fee820ffc9eee80deb7e0
f2daa2dff15079726ab17107b92e107b7443e230
'2012-01-13T21:30:28-05:00'
describe
'62886' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTN' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
da8fd1b58a8778a423ad72d3039084da
d8eef124d8c5a8535214acb91df270e4c4dec460
'2012-01-13T21:28:26-05:00'
describe
'8666592' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTO' 'sip-files00028.tif'
aac5c412f5acb6f2c6de1e4f43377b27
036b6dd0af554933d6331f485a63d1ed8bdf3bbd
'2012-01-13T21:29:04-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTP' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b2b54f32e0afa15ad19f284df7b6eb7e
399d6dfb4fe8fedf6219b26c44504c0018a75841
'2012-01-13T21:33:31-05:00'
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
8fa42d5ad422df8ba8420c704536e5c2
b439eb1e84dc6aca49faba0d7cd6dd57a632a52e
'2012-01-13T21:36:03-05:00'
describe
'909479' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTR' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d00283eb91e9996584fde851e8ddf7d7
d7870f524fe60a79d7dd088d29d0cda34a16d1dd
'2012-01-13T21:28:51-05:00'
describe
'125464' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTS' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
26fc9030909a45537a10e4f84e0fe69c
322ca61d701e611e2b772a78614037176f3a4ed7
'2012-01-13T21:29:27-05:00'
describe
'29618' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTT' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9f2c14569318295c6900180032c48886
c8ac13d11e6bbab8878a357f34c7ac0afe599fc6
'2012-01-13T21:34:38-05:00'
describe
'61105' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTU' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
73c7f109b82947dac9d0ef627887a68d
44e2c52f09ac01a3157b70bca7c2298753bb1d42
'2012-01-13T21:34:19-05:00'
describe
'8666376' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTV' 'sip-files00029.tif'
4cbde802eae7813525cd5512ecbdbbfd
6eb2aed86580ed8e78f5ba3ddb7d1fb1b45d8ac6
'2012-01-13T21:30:46-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTW' 'sip-files00029.txt'
623431279e0aa4da439faf4a1d6166ac
11c663649da8fd79721ab78d8c7523a7ed66846a
'2012-01-13T21:29:39-05:00'
describe
'33268' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTX' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
c0420378ffb67b81fe5b617f7496d742
8e9cb01ba0fc78b7353ac9e9b252afbea9cb4fca
'2012-01-13T21:28:22-05:00'
describe
'924245' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTY' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c57c7674d1b6b8b14757c6cc2c329531
5eb6ae5eaaf11c09c0c9c826142176cc15d959ed
'2012-01-13T21:28:33-05:00'
describe
'127564' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJTZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
b37b5e8da389b7523d92bceeb54b62d8
75cd1bd3c85ae1fe51a80fafbcc47790ecf2be92
'2012-01-13T21:32:32-05:00'
describe
'30081' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUA' 'sip-files00030.pro'
e868e26535e3e88fa50714417a09b894
0ac60abe73adf21c37c18f27b92383f88c216b1a
'2012-01-13T21:30:19-05:00'
describe
'62006' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUB' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
27d9a636f299ef14d0cdb390829523de
d0221a3df6a25fbc4bb1dec94a5bf7cd641b089b
'2012-01-13T21:34:00-05:00'
describe
'8666212' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUC' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3f7d29656d420d6e0e67d4714ff284c7
aeab18452b08371314f9558f68bb4fa42bc17739
'2012-01-13T21:27:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUD' 'sip-files00030.txt'
c0c0afe84daf7862743bf82fa1ca60b3
b59b5b44924713d24f31a92eb458bd68c0c75f45
describe
'33076' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUE' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
ccae186d02995e448cbc04a77c6a3c71
ed97017636f8a397e5e1b80dcad594b26f4cf6c5
'2012-01-13T21:36:39-05:00'
describe
'903422' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUF' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f0eb7d3ddc9512c56de75069c0eb57f7
9e44eab2cefb15ee1c3b7c7141ded2f3507cfd4e
'2012-01-13T21:28:28-05:00'
describe
'126011' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
e976382a56fee475019143505cf581f7
5103c0405998293e125c4b242e49af64d1f0ff9a
'2012-01-13T21:27:45-05:00'
describe
'29784' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUH' 'sip-files00031.pro'
485252273053b0d1fa22b76bd5628c04
1e0a5ecac8416775423d3c407ce1e46c41be832f
'2012-01-13T21:32:14-05:00'
describe
'61842' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
7b8c15c6bae56cc8f884dce811a4b3fe
b459191b81d5d01efa281e5faa7d6e84347223d5
describe
'8666320' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
207de26c4bc1007219039e8894224405
884098c90e065b9b337f3100ed94d1ec2936d726
'2012-01-13T21:31:11-05:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
01edcd0ae60965b2932ce82edf37fdeb
10962e4c931ad6333b5b4fc08a63057ddd7e5c85
'2012-01-13T21:29:45-05:00'
describe
'33007' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUL' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b9782211af11ca79e579ae6e00a233f6
0293ebc50d89e5ae42d6722417ed18a04a28ce3b
'2012-01-13T21:29:38-05:00'
describe
'933612' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
426c9dccef7f39e81b445d8e77c3a3ae
6cf72cd47b35a170da0b553f4bbe35f2fec504bd
'2012-01-13T21:33:14-05:00'
describe
'129205' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
939523d4f08f528b8f4092c849bfb203
dd0ab8e3773502c191665b042ec23b2f8ee0c5b8
'2012-01-13T21:27:36-05:00'
describe
'30299' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
5191619373c2b8c34e16a0a8e542b255
88350cca2a29b49235f34ac2d1188a7c4d65563f
'2012-01-13T21:35:30-05:00'
describe
'63945' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUP' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e4b714d4280744f406ce65e9f5330a0e
2b67e5056e4bd60f0b9abc60795c9b2b256437cf
'2012-01-13T21:28:27-05:00'
describe
'8666812' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4868eba38c422c45cf1985856e61be02
858570f82172160ee02e3107f445004c118b600e
'2012-01-13T21:36:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
44b9daad84fc10020f486a82aad3de0b
d72468764533c0c4ff42ad3066d720eab916dd4f
describe
'34550' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
c5aad623e2fd5074c1bfa2c479fd75e3
29a37e6e8f40b76217fbec9e36527351ab9425ab
'2012-01-13T21:30:25-05:00'
describe
'933079' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUT' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a9897297284c4378dd75b82b99de4285
5fa1002353f2bda76007cb9bcbf379dea5f6078f
'2012-01-13T21:30:18-05:00'
describe
'129414' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
cae800703fd97558efc261b5ff86ed4c
7ad473e1bff2d2fbe77ea7abe86217afa52a5543
'2012-01-13T21:29:42-05:00'
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
ecc37da81975c2a01f80fdc96e983c83
746ee25510072f866cb46dc0f4193cfe8334286c
'2012-01-13T21:33:44-05:00'
describe
'63752' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
2cbb27bcca6c0d68eec5bfcdeaff5cc5
5b1fbabfcc77dbf66b66f77bd820eaf60b181705
describe
'8666852' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
879b3a11115e9d8b17704ccd41c160f2
e3e5fd395672c318cf30764364c6117a40263f9f
'2012-01-13T21:30:10-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUY' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e5f8381c1c2fb85763c4bd7572e4bde9
97ef4658ae4e76102079cafb41ed3be3a9f7feda
'2012-01-13T21:35:09-05:00'
describe
'34379' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJUZ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
c55900dd944221ff897b12cafe51f6c7
16cf763dfd3de781b2cedb230794b020c7aaf3ea
'2012-01-13T21:34:15-05:00'
describe
'824543' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVA' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
fe973da9c04ba4b306b4140469a8d48d
446942a5587011602def97f70b3f582228c5c0ff
'2012-01-13T21:29:15-05:00'
describe
'116216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVB' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
6ed4cbd8b27412d971730bd1fd71f716
638a28bf4d641892e30e8f9870b8357a0361ccba
'2012-01-13T21:30:23-05:00'
describe
'27013' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVC' 'sip-files00034.pro'
a2b6f1c410830681a0deb18ab92ecb44
6a292b1ce5b3dbd33fdfda1271e03076ec752539
'2012-01-13T21:35:48-05:00'
describe
'57999' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVD' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
b2094de9d3d8b07b3767c7e49ca6a814
915e73e5cb740c02f11e3df1c4913b246fe0b9e0
'2012-01-13T21:32:57-05:00'
describe
'8666148' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVE' 'sip-files00034.tif'
c6d5b0d64a73c60258ecaa851ee838cc
aa73ca3dbafb89fa9760efb2079c03a4a3f9a783
'2012-01-13T21:28:50-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVF' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4a84f1ad6d64ed084b8faeb8a129d38f
12ecf1dd325206c412eacbfe314eacb03b665d43
'2012-01-13T21:27:53-05:00'
describe
'32709' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVG' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
156dc7efe29c6a76e24d8e04985b3c72
9c31cdecdca0c4926410616a90b122010a709ef2
'2012-01-13T21:28:34-05:00'
describe
'892296' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVH' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
37b6ae7153f99ed0bc9a0cfff611a7cf
f10bb8edf1deb893f85432a2d7e236f5f7960742
'2012-01-13T21:27:55-05:00'
describe
'124527' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVI' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
8b75ef1d122df8eeda800fffabe0bf6d
87ac07241fee48944b3dfafb9959c4b4088be53a
'2012-01-13T21:33:37-05:00'
describe
'29599' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVJ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
87c91753f652ca9abe4df9b68edd99b8
109309b14b2dbf98b00202f860d3f17ec483d601
describe
'60822' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVK' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
b7bb4208c807b91ba1da767888024ade
6d8ce9db34712112e89809b1ae8d8562c1d71452
'2012-01-13T21:29:48-05:00'
describe
'8666216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
c8eabeaf8274cd5043d216730b341015
55fcd0208db5d0e3812538579ee8d662ff995815
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVM' 'sip-files00035.txt'
fadda1c2cf543b0c92dd2af50b1c2d1e
c812dc422f13817823bd41fdd39741c81205d0a8
'2012-01-13T21:28:24-05:00'
describe
'32746' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
77fab8a059ae45940e5d0b0813ca0667
414e76b590d7ec1d457f101ebddb27cf2c7f176c
'2012-01-13T21:28:21-05:00'
describe
'913104' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
d45d71d3a6c10739515ac57e37270efd
0eb5938d545e9b38b00568bc1d7aa6d6c5981dc4
'2012-01-13T21:35:34-05:00'
describe
'125444' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
43fec63e6c6ee509cc49e28c36b16492
25491fd8aa39d5e5c5fb7ef54357cf174dda91fd
describe
'29828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1aa6554e3c4e516a58a0da6555650abc
5ad5dc6d0295f6b018351e11e9fe3331efd881a4
'2012-01-13T21:34:13-05:00'
describe
'61215' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVR' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9916221c97fd025a15f794604db150b6
8ca49bac96123911524eeb11c6f0afeb1e022870
describe
'8666436' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e22bc66481b6a9d778e9d8f2d28e543e
0daa30331a0ac83b74e182258790e72ec22a602b
'2012-01-13T21:35:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVT' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c18c8d0c4692cb91c6f2c9fe1b2a51b8
455c415f9fa2e327ccb05eef17fe202e74208162
'2012-01-13T21:35:45-05:00'
describe
'33256' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVU' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
f6a847ffb6d46f28e6b172dfde856f45
bb8f4b4282346ec3f41353d599b1564e1c4e85d4
describe
'874658' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
46922f4ed5fc8533d06b52ee73b12f79
fe2d60f7f9b49312674913aa515d64f4bde7c7f8
'2012-01-13T21:34:18-05:00'
describe
'122244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
4e1aa8615d6af3152e3a543109bc3448
48f2f28b3645c33b77de840562af3da81d05518f
describe
'28676' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVX' 'sip-files00037.pro'
26fc4aac1dc7ff3eb6fdec66f5ef9cf9
24f82658390b3efc7d68c19259264a9615b0b9f5
'2012-01-13T21:29:28-05:00'
describe
'59908' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVY' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
645388ec13c63569b08b6b35881e39dc
1fcfac661c5b1c7a7ead98c47930348e3422f2f8
describe
'8666264' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJVZ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1314d61f85d16bd9f409d43d543156ff
c0a2f7618b4da2f1e9ce07e730e8e831e78cc7d8
'2012-01-13T21:33:40-05:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWA' 'sip-files00037.txt'
bbd585379b17093c5ca7197f42e30a4f
6f6d33309e28a38f6828293cb9bebcd0787afdad
'2012-01-13T21:33:42-05:00'
describe
'33239' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWB' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e349c676dc9784ae2ef96f8fde057632
890e001f2169addd539bdb2785e19910ba8d4ef2
'2012-01-13T21:27:54-05:00'
describe
'856737' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWC' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
faf23821feb0ae44fbf2f419b7628091
937aee98630320a8d8845f436b9688a7640facd4
'2012-01-13T21:30:49-05:00'
describe
'120821' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWD' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
fc141c1776e5c997bde94bfc4a2a2c83
c777ec468b29a7c715d5959a09baf7858157b34b
describe
'28733' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWE' 'sip-files00038.pro'
631e51919d928c0d6a24caf599fb5b59
be662f87cde7b1869d5acda869d65fc07f7f4fef
describe
'60057' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWF' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
c85ad1046f66f538da96c8b766d9a00e
67606352eb0ee73bfb449118fe550b996ba59997
'2012-01-13T21:30:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWG' 'sip-files00038.tif'
81f02ccfc3fbd374a83989f8ac3a5741
5d88407d57732449c32299e9f43487218917af6e
'2012-01-13T21:35:25-05:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWH' 'sip-files00038.txt'
5d53a8276af091f8e8fd46aae19f4300
991a69a415e9fa2c5c612dc8e7d55414d6392959
'2012-01-13T21:33:25-05:00'
describe
'32922' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWI' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1a098c8400d84c188cfc6d650ece8b17
ce55ccb3b68efa33dbf96b88019a0bf01467505d
'2012-01-13T21:34:29-05:00'
describe
'859469' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWJ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
4f189786d91ed9981141628202a99629
56a889f89ead4e6d28fb802796fdea4bd1c763ac
describe
'121475' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWK' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f4e4e17982dfd5d993d194e57fbdaba9
a77763e8e19b8fc7696196d3ebf90f017f48f34f
describe
'29555' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWL' 'sip-files00039.pro'
488076407306f20b435aa3a8c01ae19b
4c08740c37de22e9ff7468b7ce5363115a5a6fbf
'2012-01-13T21:36:05-05:00'
describe
'60653' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWM' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
e5ac27df4088fa1820f2ee3e1c3f056c
7f01ce9a4930845716d28930ac14f6592d7934e5
describe
'8666340' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWN' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f3cf39d0822a536ae85cbc422f487edc
7034ff6c98af310dcae64aa9ae763d39ff83181c
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f09aaf909ff3a343eb50fc1a062dc7e4
9a25324ac7857f2b14ce4589c56aa2c50f9e4d4f
'2012-01-13T21:31:32-05:00'
describe
'32964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWP' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d117208b509c711474cf0eb54ecd3a6b
06323b3891385998c3e4e976904a5b24dfd1cfc2
describe
'163580' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWQ' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
e1895a0836a3c687b2016668384b1e35
74f442e39bab52d168d2c13a58aee7db764069e4
'2012-01-13T21:36:10-05:00'
describe
'40316' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4a13b62c6d8d825077f632898114eadb
74382e350d452a541a23cc85d93778847b214f2f
'2012-01-13T21:31:50-05:00'
describe
'5388' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWS' 'sip-files00040.pro'
c989f9a796f3ff366fd7bd606904cf80
4813d3499f7bce3c5b9e9f21f4c62708d3fc91c6
'2012-01-13T21:30:26-05:00'
describe
'26773' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWT' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f164192029b8d506a56407f80e4a42b6
4b3eada69344c2dc9ef26ddf62c93f5982bc4882
describe
'8661276' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWU' 'sip-files00040.tif'
cd3789a003e208fdef3001943814fc31
e0b566eec304e20e06673dd6021efdc019a0f73c
'2012-01-13T21:36:14-05:00'
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWV' 'sip-files00040.txt'
1af28eb1fca8d6ef25eac920bc194534
c8d81c9a0383a4a2f276f5bfbfbb92c227dbd7c1
describe
'21727' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWW' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d78764e4714195ae0b0f1392d84d01fc
4b601fffc2a9a39ebb95c91283b1bc9804375d19
describe
'693149' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWX' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
219ba60dd4cda37e92ce1abdd6f07abf
420b5b5f39099d63c05dd121215e5d5daa476627
'2012-01-13T21:32:13-05:00'
describe
'100622' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWY' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
f71bb61777f4acd415dcae9020c5da76
67af80f63ed9c78ac38203decf8cdc300636a29a
'2012-01-13T21:29:21-05:00'
describe
'27110' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJWZ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
52c25f50ba4ca6f3e952ae0dbc773176
3d987bf6ec94ff328c4cf815b63821ea93ec403d
describe
'51247' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXA' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
1756ca0de74a51be78c4faa1de922591
42c9aaeb9f9d585a26085c9455ca318aa585eada
'2012-01-13T21:28:08-05:00'
describe
'8664952' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXB' 'sip-files00041.tif'
88b8fa07e6ef4a1023f62e912c311409
02338b39f2bc58b33664eb48530e1bd220a6ac7e
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXC' 'sip-files00041.txt'
c048e0642ae4fd0b000ea90f58cc7752
9d542fb191002b311cae564c48a397a059a527e2
'2012-01-13T21:29:40-05:00'
describe
'29657' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXD' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
559d32d68987f0a66713c661b3206245
38fbc5c86b37e93c05f7d176a58eed6fc1076b33
'2012-01-13T21:35:26-05:00'
describe
'887326' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXE' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
803c407bf63dabfb7d28456c393c5f9c
a4a8ec85dac311bb3b49834a6d92ae49e219e12d
'2012-01-13T21:33:28-05:00'
describe
'124134' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXF' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
8b809581d9dcf945d464da73c218e8fc
a9449fd305f1bd2e52255326fc1375f6e53f74c4
'2012-01-13T21:29:49-05:00'
describe
'30371' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXG' 'sip-files00042.pro'
40f44c2636a1992800dca08d3f8e63a8
39b4209fc0969d1dc2168c9b0b4475658f1b22e5
'2012-01-13T21:28:20-05:00'
describe
'61234' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXH' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
17d22d127320b4c297a105dc98e748ec
f25556a4eb8be7e3d2864b45ee79956ec64372be
'2012-01-13T21:29:54-05:00'
describe
'8666368' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXI' 'sip-files00042.tif'
567dd486289097234f3d15480830e293
89d80020a9d310d9e975b9864c8a59f4345844ea
'2012-01-13T21:34:14-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXJ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b8085867b99642d068fb6401ee38a714
8dd22f9e85cff0fded85e59e0d022b5af6b976e7
'2012-01-13T21:35:13-05:00'
describe
'33028' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXK' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
747e04c01d4f1bd335f0304c2020158e
1ec0ba321771b5b22e17f3ce7083f0a3ac4cb41f
describe
'883931' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
cefb63e8ae2729482d617ec093945793
b38c411574dffdc419089db97e9e9bfb38769454
describe
'123485' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXM' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
97cbf326bea0d959ed13b7cf40a311aa
b61d911209ce13f5022f3d54125b33023413cc56
describe
'30101' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXN' 'sip-files00043.pro'
14e4bc33aff8b77bc0cf4cbeb8411244
6e63d71c917df59078e8ba7541a50c6bc62929f5
'2012-01-13T21:35:51-05:00'
describe
'61009' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXO' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
1595d1d9ae6305a7db7ffb75ada589ce
2a769dfde83d44bac4214f605e022e7e73416bd2
'2012-01-13T21:31:44-05:00'
describe
'8666392' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXP' 'sip-files00043.tif'
235f66299c83c54c7206c959f629eb63
2e18730d9e7780942fab8b69c8744663717129ad
'2012-01-13T21:30:13-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXQ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
eb81b6a9978225607169bb81d884fca8
a1a2857584a6709704f3c3ad1a218c00641029c5
describe
'33003' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXR' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
cb0d940e10ad1cda2e2323a8462b0dab
24ac624aba98a0b4be3bbb0b949b260871bdcf3c
'2012-01-13T21:35:54-05:00'
describe
'704842' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXS' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
51ab4e18b92cc031768db44ef604bab6
f0c7128c165c2776bcb10722f2dab0da48ada3ec
describe
'103864' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXT' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
1b8b53f474f9765ca12a6e7a95565c70
351c6a8d5e6efeef6e2bde3acc89bd5acbfa0099
'2012-01-13T21:34:25-05:00'
describe
'28269' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXU' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b8564c68943c2f694dda5126c1bcac41
78d3fad8b80e46d6a6702c6521c0ba240a519d17
describe
'50741' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b6d545e200283215cf00db199c4a4541
085cb70544175ea808561ddb9439e9f723d39431
'2012-01-13T21:35:44-05:00'
describe
'8664816' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXW' 'sip-files00044.tif'
7a97915e4216b8e5213a5013581c734b
9cd3ebbc6cdf538bfcb4bfc17105bea070f19ac8
'2012-01-13T21:30:42-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXX' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2623ea5c4f0ab1020af494f07cec3adc
c9bbbd8a31b059df572379ee9021a992362f4c12
'2012-01-13T21:31:51-05:00'
describe
'29536' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXY' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
66d1facab374f0a366a5d6ce68f6925d
35cfd697788f52712d106ccb639953e86946ac37
'2012-01-13T21:31:23-05:00'
describe
'894774' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJXZ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
dc9412967c7616155868b5a6736ef976
aa8c72e1415972a7b11feee7e5bdd9abf48b8f45
'2012-01-13T21:30:36-05:00'
describe
'125192' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYA' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a76b1c6cdc0d4c251efd67e391bc24b3
44c662abed6a83d9b02c5ae363ca0d4e4099fa77
'2012-01-13T21:33:00-05:00'
describe
'29461' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYB' 'sip-files00045.pro'
41fb9fedf438be555eef83c3d905511b
07a958b8782a5f39bd24fc89f5efe4fef2f19530
'2012-01-13T21:29:19-05:00'
describe
'61261' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYC' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
956f3069b17719554c84feb4a0565796
da6546a269a09bb815abc6e824e0bb52794e836f
'2012-01-13T21:33:32-05:00'
describe
'8666336' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYD' 'sip-files00045.tif'
03ce55d5e2240ff3dbba57091ed1e458
31bdbe50670245891bac63e6f36be265126634f9
'2012-01-13T21:33:43-05:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYE' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d131bb878eae3faa70090046c13acde6
53689d76e3ebd4b6549df15308fbb02237d1fc72
'2012-01-13T21:30:15-05:00'
describe
'32963' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYF' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
8a8ce42ea9a2273166cce52baf8b4928
eea3b6912f8fa68413e71a4ecd5172e2e8a0187b
'2012-01-13T21:28:43-05:00'
describe
'758528' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYG' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
53d7f2e08b0195d888c025e0014a3844
775b5927138fd44a720b1126f1695470ae86df0a
describe
'109517' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
a2b328d26f3509c6b8ade883aa7bc9cd
63e0616f21440d906c5a76ea9205cfdb5c72dbce
'2012-01-13T21:30:31-05:00'
describe
'26795' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYI' 'sip-files00046.pro'
b467c8acd9b0c27cde06c1ced09efe1a
3bf81770921c23941f1c78a8606c5b4efa9450c2
'2012-01-13T21:32:45-05:00'
describe
'55044' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
1a7fbf3c5cbff78a2d79e1b02af2f142
02c1c281863ef189134be309f2bf433a74add31b
describe
'8665780' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
54882c7b1976662f17ed3679522eb9b3
6445e1f1e60e082539471cd6ffb150d8cbd7ccc8
'2012-01-13T21:31:20-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYL' 'sip-files00046.txt'
dc988cf5532b07dcdc7f13d186185db6
a45f447f53d53d50b0ea34716fe16b92d8b831e6
describe
'31954' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5621551d6eca294cf682fcfa2ef6eadc
f82fd4ecc808d9c127ae7f4666b7a7a5d5b6ddc4
'2012-01-13T21:32:31-05:00'
describe
'652308' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
cebb5204d4b30026e79b8cbbb877cb4d
67ee89dfee629a9462ccd596ca6e8273b58a6fdd
'2012-01-13T21:29:01-05:00'
describe
'97164' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
5512e4d4885df953a88602a7be216027
f4a61574739d18373f12da002abb5ca5629410ab
'2012-01-13T21:28:23-05:00'
describe
'26282' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYP' 'sip-files00047.pro'
58f792504b6c5ce24c56fecfc0cb972a
400d65b2c46f3ee44fbba8d603bf895864c4f0a3
'2012-01-13T21:33:19-05:00'
describe
'49251' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
19b3758633f235aee9ace96c7fe66ef0
943e4588f0e4c346cdbf3c277c248b7d6f37eb3c
'2012-01-13T21:28:54-05:00'
describe
'8664796' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYR' 'sip-files00047.tif'
a1cd33f606c0a355ffe950010973abce
571dfa5653e40e35509b5fa6f68d8a44012b8df2
'2012-01-13T21:36:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
090cb6aaa9326bf3f2f577066d636983
62ecd4c0e4eedf9088186a5626dd452c939f6e14
'2012-01-13T21:30:07-05:00'
describe
'29444' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYT' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
77ad1e8af96c8e84af0e89eed1621895
758f432b79180ab50b63501a7d948e32e03c7689
describe
'643830' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2a7d5719b593aab3487093130bf708a6
a5b3c9eb1ebf727f6c168bec4bb9e51032e98cdc
'2012-01-13T21:34:07-05:00'
describe
'95442' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
9190fa9a5e017754c97ac425118ec566
85c0a7242ba13e803b642f0320663cc855497285
'2012-01-13T21:29:08-05:00'
describe
'31063' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
df0b172b6e276c3038f97f80d0695446
ec35c1ecb335e1ce83877a7776961130b4a90eac
'2012-01-13T21:34:34-05:00'
describe
'45875' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYX' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
cabba9c2f76e035ab279e7b45005700c
b8cc2e066d113261b3b314cf011ca4c7d10c61d3
describe
'8664192' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
245f991a23fdb7bc9b4c58f84bf48b68
5dc50954d869eb6757bdbda1b59687ef9a67fea5
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJYZ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
6f5447053b3bc0b6bec858017da0f9df
7668b6767fac1dac0a41ea745187e8255c5bf3dd
'2012-01-13T21:30:17-05:00'
describe
'28374' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZA' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
52d09782408a23813f3c0f10bc8b09a4
84f7b7d8d8f00d719595a5f1a8f1ea67c56fda7b
'2012-01-13T21:32:33-05:00'
describe
'645726' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZB' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e4896d2cd697daad90488af8f391bcec
4fcaa2202b900e1ac6fac89691427cead0ace35b
describe
'95643' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZC' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
363d0bf41171a8d957aecb8b2c1d654c
31e159055e33f9015592212ad1121888d2dec922
'2012-01-13T21:29:23-05:00'
describe
'22625' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
b2b55f16578c9a1f6053d2beb6536ebf
aa65d6687a3964b5ea460b402d1d24805377f386
describe
'49971' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZE' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
1275463d5df4aefbc95d9b2ce3622b67
af6011f5983172015b0668b43f72dce4a6291b76
describe
'8664808' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZF' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4df3f17156b1cd683bc8676b3b0d6042
fb8d1b71f14d2f69f9f3b28f70e83fe200a0bc82
'2012-01-13T21:34:37-05:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZG' 'sip-files00049.txt'
f9110dd7e2a66fb1262e40d09ecc4d68
36dec10d66c2dc102255d1a2ef73ebfb96c3b166
'2012-01-13T21:34:32-05:00'
describe
'29246' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZH' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
d42d6524798b8ef11e5371f8cd62572b
696feabfca7cb30fcfe0c2175c0228fbfc89a2a7
describe
'897756' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZI' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
bae3a0bc60f321c5ecc8d3d0085a4e49
be61a745d5be97b84747fdbfe27e7abc2724a63c
describe
'125625' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZJ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
98f54302c0ced3c9b9e6c15fc9d48538
afe33ed5154f282721975633840f1efed465a77a
describe
'30986' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZK' 'sip-files00050.pro'
22a122c183c6f47f76e5df366b1a3bdf
66cf291fa818266ef9e7f78f873514d9ea866d09
'2012-01-13T21:30:37-05:00'
describe
'61057' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZL' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b6f2d79739fd7429b23651d160660801
4b4e54463b544c84b90a13b548a920f090299ca1
'2012-01-13T21:34:56-05:00'
describe
'8666152' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00050.tif'
b3a516365ad5ddd058688149b3fcfd68
cc15b0546923a97e3f973e426aa48273b13590a6
'2012-01-13T21:31:54-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00050.txt'
0a37abe6a0c6680cf26d345ee9ee9ca9
e7b52c612781c323c0d12c6d283a483304314f2b
'2012-01-13T21:36:31-05:00'
describe
'32602' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
59d0e405b882c39de24cc0b1dea89b74
fb773be0e68bd4bd9a40b7b8673e96d6dea0f6c9
'2012-01-13T21:28:42-05:00'
describe
'865089' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1293a34afab9aca151ee61f2a944eb9d
1dbedaca0e1023a72461a0ae86a034d64db0862f
describe
'121158' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
a5009d822172303451b432f5f7b2bb83
7a26827f7de7e2c4db84b7be2b19d7fb17939c20
'2012-01-13T21:35:06-05:00'
describe
'29697' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
2e9fde1a3130fcf14a3af89ce62262b4
c3ee659a13550d45f21f55415135cced0c74c090
'2012-01-13T21:35:58-05:00'
describe
'59758' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
a89836ed9e9e5b41b66fd983f84431f9
612952ed8c964818aeac9b7f1f58d79c1a2af9ca
describe
'8666208' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
e118ab86b3850f316f63b885c5a3785d
30621eb199381081fa285606024b678ec3510f4a
'2012-01-13T21:31:58-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00051.txt'
3e8111821df353e1b2aef4c576dd256b
bbaf6c6f52ebb41c6204ae88109f72f1137baeea
'2012-01-13T21:32:05-05:00'
describe
'32728' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
f27b20eb686ccaf693c4f9c654972373
cb48087d077b889a5d444c6e21bd8091d52e3564
describe
'881209' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
2b34c11fd05a9f593084d2f322ac0dd0
4e74571ff92dd93b761406bff1a0d5b9a929aa60
describe
'123005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c2685862ca07a84759cadf3d597003fb
63242cdb5560952772c13583b32d29ce1e61fe67
describe
'30033' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00052.pro'
544c5357bf5a46554ecfe3552f7af33d
c92386a258c891bdc9322859e87ba24c5a2ebbaf
describe
'60143' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
22339c9fe9a15341b64fb222b0c37b84
55bb0aef919639fa44f6be0f049d5bbd8079b3d1
describe
'8666220' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f29dd9fdfe04a013e8dc1e039ed99fa0
ece75e2f8d4a90be37b5bcd1fd88a65cfaecf408
'2012-01-13T21:34:55-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00052.txt'
7d091fb76ef3ea22d7c2ce698b608f49
a2d213c1698c364dcd52f9aaaf5e565f63f6ac67
'2012-01-13T21:30:22-05:00'
describe
'32438' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
2cf6f6ab02b4f69306948163e1fd0835
c934b19a5650a4f58a291f40edfba40b0b0017a5
'2012-01-13T21:28:37-05:00'
describe
'857816' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
f0b6968ef3ddca9a0a4e78f827cff0b7
40706f4cb85679a090381ca51f24394e84012f50
describe
'120562' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
e4995d450726ed2b6956ca8216012d02
de2b44be80c0fc2f49107f303c32e85f1f5f5cc6
describe
'29601' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00053.pro'
96f5061b2bae878651ec58a53cbe1f61
759240877b846c381a5e2c1a18ca6cb2c35f2ca2
'2012-01-13T21:30:41-05:00'
describe
'59127' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
32bc42607b6e28430afa0cb1884ff6ce
fc04af51785038a48e8e41aff6f22cfd2985904c
'2012-01-13T21:31:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00053.tif'
c5f66d36a037693aa6c3561b62149e5e
c3e41f4219f6dcbed5cbaed5d16195f3337591b5
'2012-01-13T21:29:09-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00053.txt'
80d64017e2474fa4754b6a5117dfc946
bdbaf21b214b9d2b5b245bcab548f9ddf928d25c
describe
'32447' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c64ebe30d897837203810e527af1c05d
b4c7935642dbf71c7bace306fd77a1d2d60d8e2e
'2012-01-13T21:34:47-05:00'
describe
'874708' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
cc19f5565431452648ff611141a6fcdc
743e72b12cffd6932e292dcfc49984dae16669d0
'2012-01-13T21:35:52-05:00'
describe
'122844' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
760612b64df84868f4769aadc8a95262
4004228d6c14fb6f787922143286e3ca56f19ff9
'2012-01-13T21:27:41-05:00'
describe
'29944' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00054.pro'
d5bdcb101aacc270a30df735b27232b8
ec03a7337e4fb3122aebdc2dd3b19d314d22734a
'2012-01-13T21:27:57-05:00'
describe
'60088' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
4f3f9eb638a99142c61354d29005d9fd
2808de211167dad6add4a0740da06c66a4b37512
describe
'8666248' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a78559b50832aabecb88b94f710e1a0a
c25cafec46a610035f5636af426dd6ac9e2e5fb1
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00054.txt'
9196023592eb68ba1ca46e8479dd288c
361373f42a5f48e9c9f03dde30c95810cc9c1fce
'2012-01-13T21:31:00-05:00'
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
6fbc471178242134088704102e094fb6
d4603e3256549dc5fc06a52bf55b4c5602bf2e81
'2012-01-13T21:34:03-05:00'
describe
'862399' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
940a5f4d2e883fae6195930ba9daee66
69e096c7e9f9223fb3f01afed5eacf0cef94536d
'2012-01-13T21:28:04-05:00'
describe
'120557' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
e71133c3de01387c1a7a85aca835fe26
971b95c35e1f3cc691b0b8e08011f6d823452303
describe
'30111' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00055.pro'
32c325489e6ddbd5ad40a4768c15f607
da7ff1151bea892928687026c694cfa7c99c3bef
describe
'59211' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
2e2a27295d1f4984dec89aa099588e0b
40534533248b15324e1b5a1037b5f15377f4c49b
'2012-01-13T21:31:53-05:00'
describe
'8666192' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00055.tif'
932079f9b175b48b4d3c1b67d77c3d71
c483923cdfbc30b7b9eb4859b8fc09ff283e78fd
'2012-01-13T21:31:38-05:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00055.txt'
01fc5b228bb0bccfe1c2856295f55270
c1d0bcd455822a5da3aee755a1a7bf0618727f47
describe
'32500' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
2766f5ec358ec9920994c5ece79a4115
61c5059ef099e33c6c8fd510603ec83ff2e3043f
'2012-01-13T21:33:54-05:00'
describe
'803210' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
16f8dbe7c530dff9c0aa9ed347a2ff69
826394ae137bf494e660dd64769a5db9dd75b4d6
describe
'114808' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
7a36d7a9f201e9caea64d52ff1e2bfa4
d980cc30071a3e0cc23e50187d8d43ea411a8fc8
describe
'28307' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00056.pro'
cd94dd22699dc625f880cc241fca4047
a5cf7b0d37526cf10fe56fcef6806939ecc67cf3
'2012-01-13T21:34:11-05:00'
describe
'56267' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
51fc494ded31f8e67bd2f99a0d3d773d
86a98567f1feb38040cc2f98d5bcca7fcbc5c8ab
'2012-01-13T21:27:39-05:00'
describe
'8665692' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00056.tif'
40f2d107eb3928eb599269be3b23f866
6c1d220e1cf0f74fddf76708a3ba251087ad3d55
'2012-01-13T21:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00056.txt'
3de913beaecac8d5fa2d489cde4521b6
87fe334ba040b012bcadb34b0b6d0d16c7c5445b
'2012-01-13T21:32:51-05:00'
describe
'31574' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
85370c2a53a81b845597eef8cbc4292e
51cd07617188225c7087129aeef37f040149d60f
describe
'155162' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
2ea61844d05e3ef2acc2b3b41d9010c4
ac5246c452a4adccd258aa54baf531b87b7b465a
'2012-01-13T21:33:22-05:00'
describe
'39166' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
94b5819a08e5c642b6988803782a30c5
3136558a5bd0086c37396ec2a7394b4280b0b336
describe
'5625' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00057.pro'
8487d83c25c56f5f2f1c57e3f0b4f5da
0821ef332812c6f4314e495a7e8a15a3f7fc1e39
describe
'26477' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
12eeedd563a98cb960de35ce4525ed67
7275923f03da7b8d217c0324a33a83faff3a0de0
describe
'8661308' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
403a8cbd2d58198b1a906cf17426423a
e39af1facdbba59db9cafc87b26c40391c81d150
'2012-01-13T21:31:47-05:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00057.txt'
1e1942485916e6a334185143f2907e21
17731454be4735251901c107e1fcce4581e15b04
describe
'21801' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ef0da617b12fdeb7af5c9b24e08bde67
c90701f68d62cc4971d3d629b8fba76f096fbeb9
'2012-01-13T21:28:16-05:00'
describe
'631354' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
2885f4aea27c7d743b183e9861c49c42
5a55e8aaf64f3d17020ca020464f6f1122ece76a
'2012-01-13T21:31:56-05:00'
describe
'94560' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
abc0bcff8f964a5ebaa686efb8cec34d
48aedccd5b9f34b9a3589d4ff482b851da8996a5
'2012-01-13T21:34:42-05:00'
describe
'23666' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00058.pro'
5099828590f0fc92137af5cfbbda2081
0d8e33d71c0dd510d366685b8639133d0704859d
'2012-01-13T21:36:42-05:00'
describe
'48646' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
d59c1485ab99018e7e47ee2a1b98dbb1
654fc41f2beff5a6069c48770c42aa4e23f8815a
'2012-01-13T21:28:59-05:00'
describe
'8664528' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
f6e23b263eb5f521bcd6ca147fcbbdd0
83b7d324fb9bbf15ce4d7cf7cee734a6ad8811f3
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7518efe382b59d4b61bd0d20d2bc60a7
1f686415618057bc61cf68cdb06b9e16459465da
describe
'28993' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
cac465ae3b6cf912bf2132abc3cae24e
9c757c77dff819b71a87e2f58ecae7eabd5cf7f6
'2012-01-13T21:28:13-05:00'
describe
'803243' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
e9ca6313081f3fef8c3edc488add6184
4ee32dfebb0006b90ff2c16f51cc85cfb4257442
describe
'114857' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
8755490b7b41ea34488d6923c7080cda
5f9d8b1025f8c990eb61dc118b6ad3b51dfee560
'2012-01-13T21:31:55-05:00'
describe
'28005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00059.pro'
489405a3b0368db322c11355218e67ab
b2aa4e6eac0b825eae7f27a26c81f8e5eae0cca1
'2012-01-13T21:28:57-05:00'
describe
'57136' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
e4961d026c56d544cb06d1fac413dc1e
7cabe1d600d324193747e019ad1e3c519dec32f9
'2012-01-13T21:31:22-05:00'
describe
'8666096' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c573fbf9649b49e23dbc1d5a8a3d923b
4948ec2e03df9743946f9592a4db61ffcee0b7be
'2012-01-13T21:29:46-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00059.txt'
726f7fd1b370aa00978ca4166eba2bf3
786c9291c1bad5c0a0e5e348a175e9918998cd9c
'2012-01-13T21:33:34-05:00'
describe
'32244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4358eab3a7f0e6ff2aa2308c054dc9ab
46b144174a3bfcf84e27cb3881c19a8dd798b1ee
'2012-01-13T21:32:23-05:00'
describe
'857953' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8ce59d6fd816d10387f7b9a2f0866bdf
3e45b3db335c1e3d1bdb496e393c2a84a8079511
'2012-01-13T21:31:46-05:00'
describe
'120440' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
bd41806259f48fc40be4095b7bd833e7
c38804a07c975562200d10891b1aacca3989a087
describe
'29709' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00060.pro'
701670d905726b75e82095b2965b5a23
eb5fae9619402b7f70d16152946508cec57b3572
describe
'59048' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6b1a9275702d1b4054ceef1c14eee2c0
b062adb3f34430f92f2a225d7b4f2cb44987eb4f
'2012-01-13T21:29:03-05:00'
describe
'8666200' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00060.tif'
f4f9ded0114ad04090c03e6e6d5ed63e
554566f273eeb8d32ed9bec299dbb52e89da77f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00060.txt'
476240bd3d077940a56efe30524eb094
10c650c0659450ceecc48a8af9802eca4ffc6a04
'2012-01-13T21:36:25-05:00'
describe
'32779' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c9c75ae87a0b58058a65551a3adea08c
55eb37935211a316b4540be8108fcb84a405c70e
describe
'815396' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
4ea646ded209b36ac3e916c901dab898
3446b447a2915e623caa1dc96c2c7e2a9f4205df
'2012-01-13T21:34:46-05:00'
describe
'115853' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e738f4247c8341647fef8fbe8811b873
193a395ae159a28ab448cb96f5367104b4d4a6fa
describe
'28172' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
d1c5da1ae878d41764caa60523832458
0147ba22bf5cdd7ed3700b2a7349b43715db6339
'2012-01-13T21:34:21-05:00'
describe
'57482' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3579766f1f359abf999a39d300c3fa51
0b125fb7b1caa077e517f031ceb20191a9e7100f
'2012-01-13T21:34:35-05:00'
describe
'8665828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2f5543c3f5354accb436832f211270cd
ee0ec1b72592f0547ba1d1a2c15d78893f849b58
'2012-01-13T21:36:33-05:00'
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00061.txt'
74d1b60b6161349f026a9cb31408d591
97cacbb9899a1647d6cc9f8ae7e62f8cc4e7a6b9
describe
'31617' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
6db60caae87be290ab9dc2d6af5e089f
e1adc8df4c6830aed9392850c0e1d661e83906c6
'2012-01-13T21:27:40-05:00'
describe
'876135' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1e1de65438edefd8b7750210f3bb8b99
acd6497bda4b8db25457a3dc2bd6cb2c4fa0c061
describe
'123022' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
cd6ecad62c6cc1b56ce633e33bf87f45
06adf27fd212fa766db470c011140b5063db15c0
describe
'30352' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
1e965cda930c2d6897a921d630cd5751
fb684926ab0f61dfb85b7011fa738535e89cf678
describe
'59920' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
2494b19d0994e4937fc415a5c0e9d3cf
efacbf72466b252a5d5b01e0c0ba714625cd58bf
'2012-01-13T21:33:35-05:00'
describe
'8666244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00062.tif'
1e327e62397b35f3c1fe07608f63e571
2c3c9da4345d849f09b44991b51256bebb286311
'2012-01-13T21:32:48-05:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00062.txt'
1117ca14bd2235b52e9cb4f1235fb9fc
9e600925284bf5bc12b369ab73e653f94618cfe4
'2012-01-13T21:35:02-05:00'
describe
'32762' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
668da0ee8a43988975a99d2519f2d8f0
49b0e9b9f29cf26027afd43e8ef1b16d16a05f83
'2012-01-13T21:33:48-05:00'
describe
'629771' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
0fd27aea6c075d1ad54ead6bae8fb0f7
ffb776e385d6eafaeb403a1e33771467399d978b
describe
'94592' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a419b41dfd3522e0ee67d9046ad4f95c
1ec975795f91fd689f58832200f3504d4afd642e
'2012-01-13T21:34:52-05:00'
describe
'28945' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00063.pro'
084e2d3f9bd3b9f22e77f1a88e4e6dac
4dcd9436d38c22a3f55d170da7abf89d24742049
describe
'47293' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d3b6586a18b54c479123d5007991c017
2a6aa84239de4bd9987d0ccc0d2d4cfe07625741
describe
'8664600' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c72ce74bb15dd6306bf626e438c6e8d4
5b88a84955319f2e9db8c2115a57c19c089276e5
'2012-01-13T21:29:34-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00063.txt'
f6bb959105fef3818df7f2ad80608b8f
ca141624768d5732e1c7520846178b6c1d6469e2
describe
'29167' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
cd5fbcb155b1f4964a16876628f265ed
df67143e0e18371f6ff217399bd2a92451faa740
describe
'895168' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
8caaa53cb165a5da9c9ecb46257ae544
514575718698067c50107e15d19a4d84acedfc27
describe
'125176' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
aaeacb2e52f13093b52df711bc73d038
40d3322a1d0e3b0fbc5e9e824b634bd250863791
'2012-01-13T21:36:32-05:00'
describe
'30214' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00064.pro'
439b0624367cc4f76cffc395df5472de
ae5fadccc3a913c6d485caf3ab8ae4fd27db965a
describe
'60794' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
739951235d14b3eb4e2dc6df03f92c09
e90529f4b9621b8f0e37bbdf22a5704c70acd25b
'2012-01-13T21:29:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00064.tif'
be55f4d784bc29c60015749ca1abb14f
b92d277c2c945f8baef6f467d9d476e7c3a88df6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00064.txt'
66b282db7673ff226fc61f5b7c3b45f0
d11edabeb9cb65f1feb22229da1d9a7af1afda29
describe
'32732' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
d8e553c09724f1d3b8a8d329dce11b96
92cafe986d17190a63c4cbad79775904acbab79c
'2012-01-13T21:28:58-05:00'
describe
'832560' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
749a536bd2537a328a493b48ef00fd92
2c20727ed0d86c98f0fdd2a8efc47717b4c3bb29
describe
'117732' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
dcffa5dd8ee101b03e4f06bd727a6bb1
92ca0bcb03ab1755c79fd3db1c5205d1d6617164
describe
'30965' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00065.pro'
12b3331b506d5893c877defe79b72b97
9e626c741b824e13d18713376de427eab6e7f50c
'2012-01-13T21:28:10-05:00'
describe
'57350' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
be7f3318b59fc749592b765e2fe406cd
c8223bef018fd38803b0bbe4fe86611c77673825
'2012-01-13T21:33:55-05:00'
describe
'8665968' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00065.tif'
5fd4e88eb42f81e2e3a2f986d0a422f0
1c9b50de095485281e9d58dd6dd98a7238e47661
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00065.txt'
e4c622fa828ce566e00198540f337a47
1af692c7942fd009d25382fd42f80faa529bf326
describe
'31851' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
189d4d6297711591a0ffb2920e17ee0e
dff52f454db344ea5485c62540c96330116a214c
describe
'873970' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
ab1a0259b5bc376307f02da8a615e329
ac5d38bf33c641812ceb99549de0bf2259361626
describe
'122175' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
df7816f929b334f9654f8d659cae30e2
b4486ba58a4df4e4ac09764d2a76a9aab4ea69a7
'2012-01-13T21:31:27-05:00'
describe
'35141' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00066.pro'
004eef99b9a06ee378f817ae85ab4d00
efbfea9fa13e0aaedb7b7b966de59bd7576a2ebe
describe
'58732' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
69c16450606d1209157534241c5dc6e6
de2f40263b74ea84dcccdb075dde7b3278e2035b
describe
'8665900' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7edb2a6f924e41af73e26be93987b15d
6286f464076facd0a42a817a9e40bcc38b331f4d
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7a59b8abc58fe38bf724b883c24694ec
29c63f8887a82dcf9184281e7e259efd64410295
describe
'31902' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
dd7c6ff671ff5369c71d4a7731ab65c2
5f8a467ec35d9867f1c871b04635a49b86235473
'2012-01-13T21:29:31-05:00'
describe
'880770' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
a07105c2bcbe517ada04c77830287600
2ec890a65f00a229218e7a29c9455a2342645969
describe
'123253' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
2ddd73f197731f6ecc1933139e42bb9d
31f92e328fc36180f2054edd42a31785cbd119c7
'2012-01-13T21:32:17-05:00'
describe
'29985' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
7effa399688d0339839a55401fcc9426
d2874f69ba7de4e47c974ca029ae26dccc574f9d
describe
'60115' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1aca5f9fabe7c93fbb3f7f3842485061
03a230895a0798ae370b8bc9e7da2dd7fc505150
'2012-01-13T21:34:28-05:00'
describe
'8666172' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00067.tif'
32bc5a91beebd022b6b8bac7d5b5c946
44068a6c5f941fd20c21fc58d6cdffebc2e90dcf
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00067.txt'
2a6ce7578646f6b7dba2e1278927bb10
876b6e34fffca9b9809ee452c38acdd63df37da3
describe
'32534' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKED' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
9e46a063017c524c15b8ceb8037b9e1c
ad69cdee4ad88e7f256de7ad7066112bb7a91f68
'2012-01-13T21:36:09-05:00'
describe
'807138' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
c5e776e33feceafb04747424198fba9c
cc24cb9738ff7204792af31cc1b5b50fcb8fd0ef
describe
'115212' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4b1f134c34596c85839c6fcc412fbf7a
d69587c8552b9617cddd372fce65e44212edd17c
describe
'27286' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00068.pro'
36be174014d209aed4c4f483e4b14237
5d122948041bf9c82ffcea01a47f64a4679d9639
describe
'58221' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
bdb91b5c937d3b5f77fe15da887a2d67
0e8706eb2d55b9ded7a050fc3039abcc96fafc15
'2012-01-13T21:29:16-05:00'
describe
'8666080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00068.tif'
9b348eb82525abad8883886e98988e62
2e084d9147b106d67096bcfcccb9cd7065881484
'2012-01-13T21:27:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d0936c05c808f66ae1416d7bed5389ce
a104db8de3a47827a94860071902631dfe97c1f1
describe
'32583' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
037996a2f852027952f75001c975a0cd
8276047ba2412fa1b14ed08671bbbf247acd52e2
describe
'775578' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
18dfc55e019116869f61b0a9ce309b52
3cd73615af87a5ce86ee1a189bf669893c7c6789
describe
'111067' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
6d99cd3ef48cbbd2d9b83eaa7b13e14d
901eb5553dfecaabca771112d22cfa3be003a46c
'2012-01-13T21:36:02-05:00'
describe
'32428' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00069.pro'
e6c9887886624f9a68b30cef2af374e0
5cf563e5f358a730672e97bd94098b240115e497
describe
'53736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
97c14a29721d5e4bf3ce0a993172d9ed
d02cacf9d717ded73694a22891eb1052e27bda87
describe
'8665064' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00069.tif'
558273b2f15c94a8d8ef462216ec4e45
1b0ad9e1c0ca9bca6b01f2f8e8e71f991c41ef03
'2012-01-13T21:32:21-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
77fed6cfb0fb2e8cc774e3adec253c9b
b23ea7928da22017b06468a66f0d4199d063a7ea
describe
'30287' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKER' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
e3095662a1d0585c458ed6ce5b63b4b4
9068a98dfc87b26f2e8f4d85e7cb9a24bcd513d2
describe
'272605' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKES' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
e457055a5680c734efe7583eb01cddb5
d71b5d8e867e987e5ce040b36432791784529c42
'2012-01-13T21:35:56-05:00'
describe
'53168' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKET' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
73889763cd29603ea066f8698c3d8fff
929286d37de90517dac78725d7d2fa3aadf1d88e
describe
'9469' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00070.pro'
bc8406402e5d73419c219a95770712ab
f49c58af5b6eb1e8902ee9232027170575aa9673
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
50817bbe4a5cee00d4d0e19f69a9ca53
a2090dc9c3717e42f70c55b45685b4b5cbcd062a
describe
'8662052' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00070.tif'
96f9c3cb6366b492bedaaecb05d0e2b2
4618bb409d6638062de3bd24b38e1353da5f7642
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d5bae53d9058bf4b5d2268fe702a6ff4
7e23da41dd78a3aedebf7521ea358f1191825720
describe
'23262' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4d2ad4924c0e9fadc2d7e62fed9605be
8553d2c1b293f5d59f050eca4f71d8e63a17f464
describe
'660671' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
da20d1f23a4e800e395926bc324e18cc
73d044c7e7ce38aab2622fa872537c0e50ef3c2b
describe
'98721' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
26a268e4a65ccc2ef9701c84dce0c063
8122943a04cbdea5c4e39db1c0105cf60629a865
'2012-01-13T21:33:08-05:00'
describe
'23614' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00071.pro'
93b788e0be34f066830988739a8f0d43
811a8f39bd2d03e4e1234714b72bca492dd93acb
describe
'50665' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a70e977065b3e6a6a7be02edf8de8fb1
2d8277bb22973b2b4ba88c792d4d7376b561e5aa
describe
'8664856' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00071.tif'
db38762305e43994a2a2a7ec78c09fda
0961db4fddb667ede336e23378678fbaaeb6be47
'2012-01-13T21:35:55-05:00'
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6716f6fcb3b7979d3562f6c47d009053
2a9b6f442537ed1c9daa688a98875d6c3783ea07
describe
'29552' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
331e998406307b290350f62343939e5b
ad93e561787ade0e323edf1bbe50d4ae7c399c96
'2012-01-13T21:27:59-05:00'
describe
'847628' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ad5acd5ac450a939fa9f1f00d0ddae92
d15d0aefcf9f21c6ca02a084829a483e34212366
describe
'119684' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
bfb23eb2c939788f1c8f3489b6ff57df
b8ca561587d9a248fa44b25f44338da72038bdba
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d627fb701d4d6c18195a4783f8e0dd35
2ff2944dc5412d965e7339bdebae09f3483506b2
'2012-01-13T21:34:24-05:00'
describe
'58930' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a757f57a7f82eff1a330051155ed733c
186172b7b28a68de6d5b7a72fdcfc68f343bc3d0
describe
'8666036' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2664690ea7052c4a63a27c3a262b4e49
164b776d81e70b3b364beb6e49cb82def2fafc1a
'2012-01-13T21:32:50-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00072.txt'
fbb3b07d6d7a9a7e88a3e6a8bc582fd4
4ba38dd093d2703eb6aae299e6df016898a5b23b
'2012-01-13T21:31:30-05:00'
describe
'32426' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
2f3c18fc95a225cb773ab96e0fe05f72
76c82cd40470076bb9082700fdf3e00cac799141
'2012-01-13T21:32:04-05:00'
describe
'859397' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
4e84dd21e74038581387032522a3dfdf
df09f67591ddd4a8f14969bc100b73b28c11882d
'2012-01-13T21:29:32-05:00'
describe
'121780' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
75dfdf3467ba235d5858234cf2e1415f
05495e57f95ec4cf7285aab7fe23213f38c9fd21
'2012-01-13T21:27:50-05:00'
describe
'30345' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a94d5389f297f194ce644292b97bb0bb
76cee00b3b6d736556ac470941ee086d25bdc057
describe
'59988' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
23328e23b951321e489beffd3178fc86
ca6b95701f822c88ff4244c2ee5cc9093e344b5d
describe
'8666272' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8df3e33abb4730046d5caddda78fa56b
f81595f2b3446726d50d3cd5f86cabc6fb4d27e0
'2012-01-13T21:32:39-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00073.txt'
41d547e9d1147620a504a5dd03a4c9bd
800159b0ce5b52154240d8e9179bc0ec6748b2a9
describe
'181925' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00073a.jp2'
00b507b68b428f9ac116ad4451e740e6
241e3fbccab606db2c5e0e77678f064cc3a5880d
describe
'41574' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00073a.jpg'
84472df079e5b1c43781423bdebef949
d4c4197455823b9b417fd3dd17824f970112f3af
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00073a.pro'
c82a7d04bfa9dd370daf7897c9bd37be
5c810253c561dad4f43f62079a11ba6d2fb640e2
describe
'28970' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00073a.QC.jpg'
9f92d205d8409d7e9e1328cfc105d6a2
15d7272261071c202e96d73f0e2c970fb914bf06
describe
'9099888' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00073a.tif'
1d56b1b4f612e56ff3da2084434a1395
d1ecc8988ab5e88003cb15e8500b0b193d8a302e
'2012-01-13T21:31:02-05:00'
describe
'46' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00073a.txt'
255b3f67ff323017a3d8cddc69b6877f
b005bab5452082d1e2fe06ef9060611e11cca7d1
describe
'23355' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00073athm.jpg'
3e41a6172933ce73cdaf05b175798a6d
3bf0ea92a719ec2076eaf5ce5332c8bf09f65272
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9575d912dd74df6a4ac5ab7ed0439138
d52c46a080e083a4cab7f071df25181be81150a1
'2012-01-13T21:30:45-05:00'
describe
'4724' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
01be3cd67cc24157da56c062da540fa8
82c035feb77dd13688d12ff74102bba443dee461
describe
'20245' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
46f479980b78c5931de268ff4e07fbb1
7f225f6e51986772446d8363da069c26028f115e
'2012-01-13T21:30:20-05:00'
describe
'18751' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6173b8f66d1196c4ee5da4f61f1d4d8b
eebda9159c60fe9fa8a943426486218f4c8acf86
describe
'8659880' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00074.tif'
3d5ec5f08d614a34005b2308a1abdff5
5e7b526f48540dbe774357b7823bc194be2dcab9
'2012-01-13T21:35:37-05:00'
describe
'18345' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
b3feab3760eee7ccce57b40c70ef97ae
7b14ba85815df741017c382ce71df008da27ffed
'2012-01-13T21:34:53-05:00'
describe
'29512' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
fbc08b85168240a5ee31faa75c6585ff
8d3b1deb16f8091b65c6abc38945be637c68a3f5
describe
'23391' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
16d8f0672c838832e884f82cbe62be8d
3a7638be6fdc22cfeab54b9cf04deb3088cd13bf
'2012-01-13T21:34:10-05:00'
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00077.pro'
bc8a8e524e1ce055c4e4b19e14f42615
16f105ba6dd30dbde69b803e53ad21adffa6e1f1
describe
'20082' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
5b6ed6dff6d00e45fcd7c06d9fc7e26b
97a9a4f66f778ccfa49e0ebbe35ee1f339ba0449
'2012-01-13T21:36:20-05:00'
describe
'8660128' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
fb10c8112a88e7a7a7050f63d724f2ae
dce5108db422ef5cc53cf577fd90a064c7afa28b
'2012-01-13T21:30:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00077.txt'
158db2544cca332da1f02487488a4b2c
879a2aaa1c73fdc01db617880d557fb68b2852c2
'2012-01-13T21:31:39-05:00'
describe
'19165' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
eb8def0f729a5d974837e3d8e748ff70
9ebf3b52fc6b60dab34c493ec96b151108635028
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
71ecc242f00f9842f4175501fab3a979
c76f49c4101a2e3563477b1e0995fe0a3787e267
describe
'20183' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
4ea76e7ccbc49dbe507745e33bb7275f
7a1828a2bcf1459a7f45de88546c191ca7416683
'2012-01-13T21:33:07-05:00'
describe
'18728' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
2b13a0e3e029d00975ed4fcd32212155
cc8dbf8ed46c7cac3e540e734e5fa15d2f9b61b6
'2012-01-13T21:28:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
58b43a6f1171a5a1a51d7aa281daacc1
425263ba21f3cbc7e4765973507bfec16aa69903
describe
'18342' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f5c277becab0671b7ba63d5deed23012
5c8faba0830c98baef8ea3d8da6cc9a72cb882b5
'2012-01-13T21:27:48-05:00'
describe
'501432' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
6d71ba5aff7feea666cdf943c47396be
6e9d2c9907f381bf12c43ca0869c5468e9e76591
'2012-01-13T21:33:04-05:00'
describe
'79929' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
b70c6c2724d7986493f3c4f25e5cd65d
f1daf4f823cb3ec1f740d7817d557d67bb390717
'2012-01-13T21:32:30-05:00'
describe
'17963' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00079.pro'
10aaa8ae72c7d0cebbda97b24d96113e
750d5d5b20bb765e0b5143bdc764d45aa8238162
describe
'43338' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
5a86cb8f98adf07aa24677b0fe67d8ea
5ca3e445ff8b4cb5702725f1944e909935ac3e8c
describe
'8663856' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00079.tif'
3301426f2e14a441ba16c37f17e7446f
1e0e21f122c6fd957faab2aa578da323686abd43
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
e126b73f2bcf428b6ecce53a572e54a0
1a97c53a53ed52a97463275fd01c6ffd3e07a54d
describe
'27288' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
e70413bffff0a17dad396cb75f55cac1
1ed711a4c0042360cf7f0aee481605a1bb4e215a
describe
'814492' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
5862101ad3cb107b615e6542f6466ba3
bc6b04dabba8d7983f4e519794091c88c1aa92fc
describe
'116261' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
6c14ee71d99064b7f32dc5528e6ff036
ba2a0a0faacac59eafd4b0595c75b9e5f6d280f4
describe
'29649' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
f770f3c1178a109713449c979affe4e4
af954f27ebb477134d52c7bf0bdc91e9d214a1fb
'2012-01-13T21:35:47-05:00'
describe
'57635' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0a80874cf19a5846f9787cc5d8385846
7d3a04c7b8a5b6d06b6e8b0734c154d76ed59812
'2012-01-13T21:29:02-05:00'
describe
'8665752' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b125615aeb7a68842d12ebdaed27dacf
043571b939333d427202129142f73f0893bb9af9
'2012-01-13T21:31:15-05:00'
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00080.txt'
0d2642f0d52fe873fb670d207059578d
01c80ce5859c2db450d6d8f443c6890966695944
'2012-01-13T21:28:39-05:00'
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
43fb25fd44ba1941b9d2821155ea62db
b99a8948fee6a31f900b5f033512706f024d2fb7
describe
'845783' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
0543e9f28d7153bd918b7582f6222af6
28b55996a589fe2dd1282b70261bb2517b7db68e
'2012-01-13T21:28:01-05:00'
describe
'120047' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
bc1a80570282c77273509e04b78da481
f5ea985402fff61a76627437667c52c9ceee3f05
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4b763d786c86a7c870253c8ab1bd1c72
37325b45c2c19f041820bc69c06cf6ce2f9119dc
describe
'58568' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
87959f861b1f342f641f71484e91c3e2
1af26acd7c317f50515ed0c20fbf39467bfd0d4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00081.tif'
3cdbd7a996143709fcd060231bb8059a
225f3551ddc7c0cb22bcba21b46a00091d93e9e8
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00081.txt'
a2f4867dcecd7be49698ef706c2225f3
6671bb61bf830bc213c807e9e9fa275488004467
describe
'31983' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
6fd56c8951caf3dfeff2b31e2be79410
127d071404db8497ae22eac1d4149fed21b0c842
'2012-01-13T21:36:36-05:00'
describe
'828323' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
289a87cd5ca86575824ba01e84701308
2233dc447e575b8a517a4c981f7d0af6a539a90c
describe
'118457' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c49cfd551bd6e934eabc25d2efe048fe
9d58be9b8097a5b8f923bc3f05d5a0cadd2e7946
describe
'30799' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
f1b38477e67b3f8742129d7a9098d9a4
757ceffccb25c0026393b98ddeeb1b60e1fbafaa
describe
'57335' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
01f49b1aaa93001e79c2b023d34b1382
7769b14d635186fb43612c2e83afa7405a0f8a4f
describe
'8665688' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00082.tif'
08b1fc8765b413bc09529b1015ca3f0a
8ffb9e8f8ef54bdaa81fb001168a47982d96b118
'2012-01-13T21:28:49-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00082.txt'
2768cbe310461580f619b00287de0811
dfd0f934ae84b1cea5113994348da9299025f0b8
describe
'31282' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d1bba47296fb883009a75100e5d63531
99722b8ecd59da561fdea5a1b082536a8a8e66e6
'2012-01-13T21:31:18-05:00'
describe
'854014' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
f6100d57c68c646fdd04a55687a887e8
cae67cf17813959553a35a8134ff469271bb909d
describe
'120227' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4ac97e7009d855dd94c8bbba00e8f82a
5ea942a380df8b708db029069f845af4b2300ef8
'2012-01-13T21:31:17-05:00'
describe
'31326' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00083.pro'
d17c7a3349ae0f1bd3f75cf161e7b8bd
23bbde625c9c2f2d4f49c25699b2ca9bd1340b86
'2012-01-13T21:28:52-05:00'
describe
'58226' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
e0cd539d69ef39fb3c9fccf875a990d2
e01b88332ab776ebfcfc770345e6fbbc99acce07
'2012-01-13T21:28:47-05:00'
describe
'8665872' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
716d75d98c6ec8070359b4ca91e00c50
e53a8a2bedfe21d367967a0cda246351013031a0
'2012-01-13T21:28:30-05:00'
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
ff102f7a07d619f8ca0fffdd29aaba3b
db21aec8ea91fe4c2c6ce701412c22fe2b280c41
describe
'31992' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fa588d5ce4164913f74860741d0065a5
dd6007dcb291631391011fef8b399e6b8aebc96e
'2012-01-13T21:35:19-05:00'
describe
'891385' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
2f59afa4b46ff779f1fe44423df6b44a
28ed6d1600ebf3f03ed165d32d470f79e2ed9c23
describe
'124195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
c20cdc7c90f26b4fb2d8c937d69f782b
6d8b7e16767ece51741abe75b6b91668843aac2d
'2012-01-13T21:31:36-05:00'
describe
'29691' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKID' 'sip-files00084.pro'
ff7f808b5f6a66b7d6b5f30e797ba88b
ed870b35412c5ad2c529cb5d96288e29b87e75ff
'2012-01-13T21:29:37-05:00'
describe
'62412' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
9c69970065d729643cfdcd80c9c81c40
7a3e863afcaa7a87bb7acb14628a827c245925f2
describe
'8666388' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7167e1de914483952fc93acac671fed2
fb338b909f8ce6d4b654d51498d4e2899f746283
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00084.txt'
cba7d974ecc389b964a4015194767c5a
4c6047067c768af37c952e56baa9537a39a1b9dd
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
13ef633624cafcf61ba765fe683a3d59
59c4f1e1b59c488cda739ca28725e53053e77314
'2012-01-13T21:29:13-05:00'
describe
'921160' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKII' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
2c561a6bdbe9e51ab9d71bd698541ca3
a95d88c42ad1ae7fdd16fbacec150dd026eb1b49
describe
'128097' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
97c3c6dfa9d94ffbd8c6f80edd79d5a4
d05e6bfc41604db14158949d41cf47f53791ef8a
describe
'30850' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00085.pro'
515248f6873bfc2c13c579997d759a6f
7f39cfc428b1a7c1f76143948ae3944657da1d60
describe
'61555' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
28ef925667643ab6b22ca5b4b8aa7c5c
e1de2c0c8fc9ed737cb9158ec8a44d94232d8a32
'2012-01-13T21:32:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00085.tif'
617d2e81291c0ea563099586f436a4df
a592cd0923fca4ba96b1013d0eca540e4059c71b
'2012-01-13T21:36:30-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ebe2704f43921c6dd52e88c795aec3f7
113f7bd64cec1efdef65c28ef69b2a69944b6fcd
describe
'33275' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
894a037fc9659e06698627b0b09ccb87
a277f51ce37c00c4e3b6cf392b924877c267e81e
describe
'906909' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
4465ab5cf63d5b0ed140afd29abffc80
65b05c5d2aae6963cfb23042698b02bff69b2096
describe
'126517' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
166b5c35a5ecdcfa9f8716b652132e87
dc9289b0ad2924fe8858d2e4d50cdc93008d1443
'2012-01-13T21:28:38-05:00'
describe
'29574' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00086.pro'
1658353d1a481296a2792a9197a97393
95b6e44634a410bcf92ee97630da5b6a13f469fe
describe
'63117' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
b125ccc72fdd8e524353469946ac9749
1e2f652c247c456c2ddd4952f005f14bc2821250
'2012-01-13T21:35:27-05:00'
describe
'8666444' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5336eed0aa4b20823e82c9734dc9fec9
14ccc6cf5ee0b057946757ceb6bfc2f390144ab5
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00086.txt'
5c7ced2f442c9eadd7c5e956b0939c3c
8cf3d6869a36b7ef4b9cbdcc383fee0024956f46
'2012-01-13T21:27:49-05:00'
describe
'33738' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
b3661a1a621830cf91b9695ede704d8a
e05f33b4cb94c1430c6420f817a5aa8d55863ba1
'2012-01-13T21:30:38-05:00'
describe
'909207' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
191940d8820aa2714a750b29b550028c
e83e9d977ada25b1544260c545ab88ea5cc37cee
'2012-01-13T21:33:10-05:00'
describe
'126355' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
60e13557de31af52950fd8e5b89f743e
ef68cda4beab14029545c7bf48890b7b64db4506
describe
'30587' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00087.pro'
07c30bfb4e120fd1a7f85ee5d46ec35d
c0638b29615121a9e3504d6681d48f91cf26a5a1
'2012-01-13T21:28:32-05:00'
describe
'61067' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
def355794c76a8787b1ee554c9ccade2
39bb19b8117719108da552bc0ab2de4808a3ed20
'2012-01-13T21:34:49-05:00'
describe
'8666052' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
e1aa4109927be0b0ac08caaa4ede3392
4f502e0298a678648f4448df6308a7b8fa89662e
'2012-01-13T21:31:24-05:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
bb449cac103067bf8e90a95f4df6a015
2de7812a8fefe4bf0905000324b39137c800ab71
describe
'32815' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
7b03d25ed0acf63562df4c2740d674ad
44d7ea7ff9f277ebe3a6e0463fd8783094d87a9b
describe
'932349' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
926815b193d353c3e84106921ee89711
10fecff58d2a9faf5681c985e70c490bd75bd1b8
'2012-01-13T21:28:31-05:00'
describe
'128949' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
ff182d79ec24847ab98b09c1e267bfec
7c93ffdfffebe88e0ea69f4c30a0b41020a6f333
describe
'30245' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
c5768059184384ee18485193bc9200da
2837488687806feaf7c6aecf6d7e7b4162be6821
describe
'62530' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
422bea9cc6e639f3addb3e3c035f055d
fc29ef21d63d3735340d2bf425b2617f80030f87
describe
'8666540' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ca578fd33c78118c2525712ee299ad2d
0087561f10cc3203fee02eb3b890b41d545cd66e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
5314b423401fca908f260929fecb2ab5
77b17eb459ca808d7fd56d1c52caa50986e89ecb
describe
'982194' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00088c.jp2'
896372d7f685032874ab3f0a02d85880
34da8970f1f1a5099cf5a101f860de2a32e66787
'2012-01-13T21:32:10-05:00'
describe
'92724' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00088c.jpg'
933e8168e0e34a87c49d14d61d74936e
6ecf332667128ec4324c0c8e26b374aed843dc94
describe
'8200' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00088c.pro'
0e7d682dd62cf60a0e7cfa4f16488602
aa040d45bff9b8dffdc2d6fd4f34ef4c29d580fc
describe
'41740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00088c.QC.jpg'
87c05a06250ce983716e9f1d50f12f9c
3e83a40a26b4145fa1f221f3b3af7bed5dd3c72f
describe
'8665016' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00088c.tif'
91efb2c91b0bf553424b294555900976
ba3f7ce9598c0fd3a7e088eb3b3c77e8f87f18f8
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00088c.txt'
1582bbecc7837f46e5d1399a5e4b445c
dd9c2297ed71ce1cdd5dd7c7e547a8229b70098e
describe
Invalid character
'27749' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00088cthm.jpg'
ac256246fc857e7d35cc74b5e38063d2
958ad3ef7ab4ab694b43b5f23a1a0f3af6cc8cef
describe
'33562' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a93705194c5bbf41ae3e86eebfe7725e
14035b724c0dd10cd431fe7c5b7c747763eb6303
describe
'926744' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
bac010488f363c6f06af31301d7a9477
b92e39fd4ed75160648f78e6b27ff63e335a8c63
describe
'127706' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
42107f0693c78fd7e749f73e6d038cef
0cc873bfe6e392495d9d2419bb1443226dd16fc6
describe
'30066' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00089.pro'
4df056af1f0b7250dfb89e700821694a
a251441f2d7c20ca059b01894cfcc2ad2f2eda6b
describe
'62821' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
d905897880cf9031cbb09025081d6a63
956ac3b0bc5d6f9cd37d2625654c2749c7d3de6b
describe
'8666360' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
52fa2fbea0d0b34998e6dcf79f10de23
f9dde7ab23439194fb3ddbaab6c8fbd4f7b11936
'2012-01-13T21:35:24-05:00'
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
72299221cf6ae2dc3586702ca29b8b9a
d3744e5fc483ed1733017f10d12bfff449e2c378
describe
'33624' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
674cb5cb55f4499dbbfd2cf970ee6187
a6872d6ed25ae7ed2aadf9d6626e4bb5fe955ccc
describe
'893001' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
35acc63437e9301c97b8e26ec0e3ea6f
a074cb659975e6e08f79b9c69e6d78ce7b5591ab
'2012-01-13T21:34:51-05:00'
describe
'124286' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
fc48b7977447d490339287153c84ff4a
ffd38cca9874453c3a0ab9f5c24a99637f9fe95a
'2012-01-13T21:29:00-05:00'
describe
'30136' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
6962311dc93c22720b828207946f6bf8
2f43f19ad4888233a99557158118aeada36c502a
describe
'60342' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
adb2356de3a9dcabd70c55ec6c10dabc
fc2049bfc19aa5da56dceadb85d7c0454792437a
describe
'8666064' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
f73c15dc16db251bf7e3c6cc0c36a7a6
de8610adf4b281755f9b4e758c8a6ed0b29248e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
b8f0fa20007463132a54eb7a7e7d5bce
2a540bcf0c0dbb320476dc4476de0f854d771ee5
'2012-01-13T21:29:06-05:00'
describe
'32834' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
354cf863412892e0ddfbe5a38a8034cc
61dc8af5715a6b08dc9ea185bd9de3a3f4b0be77
describe
'880118' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
e8f8b5f2aec2a55591d2b9e99334e483
6ab5643adc74853031e0a758247becf317e3a30e
'2012-01-13T21:27:42-05:00'
describe
'122108' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
543bd3c8858c6065e29c7b487545b0d6
a326c5d62dc3e5c59385dd8d7e309defbd8531a3
describe
'29157' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
338bb752b99aeb960ec88427b3a82457
b39f119a68b05c38710648c5e3b420b2e613d887
describe
'59909' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8a3c466ca709b22392e92f57dd49495e
b1477bd97868dddf1bed9083c259d4c8d84b034e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6cf3e4b78ee34fca9925a47d8dc79aec
d597deb9a5dd5bd8f8839f9f9528bf42963cb775
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
2d81fe010c448482cd94a309bc0de280
a0d46e33bb6470ea65b4522971ff7ca10270f753
'2012-01-13T21:34:48-05:00'
describe
'32702' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
1d9306d17675477b8bad4a1216e70a96
35597b5e6b1cf44f075ec5642fea70b5a21cf215
'2012-01-13T21:35:49-05:00'
describe
'854411' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
a19f857a4a3d53074378cc253e1aba22
0e49a0fc346454573e8933dbea1e1e4f8f289dc0
describe
'119503' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
41a59a13548849ef25909679c3189543
799eeec63693726738a3eb549ee65862e8fb72b0
describe
'29450' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
2ad5cd46fd4a70332b6e94a0aa398d00
084e86e3fc65cf43c30c4bb33ad7863cc174a99e
describe
'58311' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
9a4e21a0ada9ec763555d3b7ad52017d
2514433309575960b97f9169cd5d3c4b1234d5d1
describe
'8665936' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
f9f1e15d85bdc2bd76a303abeb48600e
01408f3bbb053f6be459065ca9295ec6be6786ed
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
5c808de4d97a93728a6b955b49a65986
bb7dce2010a3e31848321f0fd568ba483ce34196
describe
'32419' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
cd221159e44f1a4b796df85f1ab16a22
365a29850cd84108c4ac47bbe96741bc49c88d43
describe
'862478' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
aa60878893366072f65eca97442f706b
9feb14b76c8f0b6cec1688ce4b86390cc13ed3d9
describe
'121407' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
45ab6dfd5f09fc05ec1a9d2eb7df0a0a
ab5e93ca75bd09d5f4ec09fe679f421fa4e3f246
'2012-01-13T21:36:23-05:00'
describe
'30198' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
9331697624bed89bce0e08531ba2fb4e
73a201d6233f1a86b4b8660530fb6c4e3ee561f5
describe
'58687' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
acece78aee0b67d4c6044d129169b541
c0bc9c31c82081d0474cd5e0dd0cc817c2ef5991
describe
'8666120' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
4a168f7cf52b2a841361237eaa7fa7d0
c6aa294d1e4a00a3ceb59170095396b634b7434d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
39789819463ba409d6506b474d02712f
fcb10089353379106b4c158566e87edc3ac31318
describe
'32411' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
629a292e1a7b8ef24f591a1bf8ee9a68
6b33c067443ff636446358cba354ad60b51c8699
describe
'861729' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
0b78e73b8ecfe88dd2b32df65dd3a3bd
56fbac441a48167a63d208bcbd36a39e8a414359
describe
'120508' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8e48f901980543fa39f4175172c104b7
c8c1ffd3bb672c70e5bf28236e61d5a1f418df54
describe
'30065' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
769d5bcd80a58b29a455d7e4e4b39b62
56641265114be52bbcfdc5689218cb54f5df537c
describe
'58549' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
f3b492f791680cb3e06abf63af72daa7
62d5d91dfba34bb748de136cf4de599f3a1d4990
'2012-01-13T21:32:37-05:00'
describe
'8666020' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a69ebc31d79cebcc994f75d1239fd63f
0fbb8b7112c567213a0c5985a9d5474fba2f60c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
1dbac265e1f1db2c4a3229564ceddd5b
e8031c9486f0d0e5249ab642752b82bd7496b631
'2012-01-13T21:36:29-05:00'
describe
'32463' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b71182352ed8d42a2dd76cccafb33abf
9551ac2f0c3ae3b15efae832464a8e609ccb37ae
describe
'855840' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
8bb9ebfbfe73e04b8a77ac1349c32693
667ee32c6fedc16d1f2d54fca54140f5c77def34
describe
'120057' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
acf9883ae9ecffa58f665ab95dba2dd1
ef03457d4fad068c31640174067400601e880140
describe
'29992' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
17a598168659c20ab93119d143aea16d
b699d650d8da696000d7b1251d6aff57a60f4c26
'2012-01-13T21:30:54-05:00'
describe
'58374' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
e9bf981c49a6816aabc39e9379380427
6857bbef2e4afe4384677dd09fe68776030c4094
describe
'8665880' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
16e7179d11234db0983d4fc8e032c695
9b82888b3f63272c7fefbe0e4a54e9c25ae177fe
'2012-01-13T21:31:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
f5d4f0e9e347cb29ba4d97bb3e21d936
1f9e2977a00e26393a3da2c57e423aa518f3c397
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0148a34dfb93974f0355e91150f1aa98
f5880343cb3f47ed6588ed0093f5927ea7dc6322
describe
'875158' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
a69ccde938df5aa907c7843c073f2490
fdcd3f8b578b22ff7a6103b4a53a74c2a3ad7e50
'2012-01-13T21:35:42-05:00'
describe
'121828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
51e83e6e137b52b69f03ba4e6069b9ad
a2861086df0354f2abc046142fd839d3333957ee
describe
'29420' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
75404f9669fdf6dfd753d53b6d326bce
2539b786dbd1ee8dbb41d04ef839504632cf0c17
describe
'59630' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
19474742431513327ff55b3a39168506
335b7032fa692808c9cea221af7a2d48351282f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
ab028a219c4c247ff7a8e0c20e436e83
2d8bb86480aa88ff0858a21d96667c4fc1309fe5
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
1d9ee46dcbfc8fd44446c1d755368f9f
6c477df4b3566923c050682d73199d6767935c1d
describe
'32654' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
50d9cfd852f448914ec9034524f95399
8e15ac622b038601ff9d3a77d5a4d61fe5ca91bf
describe
'901969' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
56d836f996ebab140aa6a068d0d2f381
f2f7d9cdb5395af16fe0e60fbe3b319e7c890185
describe
'125321' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
01dfb59b1644f8a4eeed010089b21a81
fffae30f04d60eb83549cb9d6f8813df38dd9d27
describe
'30301' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9f283af5341b4abf653325cd29548e60
ccf92b5831fbe37bbcbd9494ea5244a7bae53580
describe
'60669' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
985d1144d3263a1938a32a85f012b70b
bd7ca390f689994316f21a44964664b3423fcad2
'2012-01-13T21:34:27-05:00'
describe
'8666128' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
f34683f78d93617a52aa8f85100ea9d9
72283e0d9877468bc2cff014b26683b788126f45
'2012-01-13T21:31:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
007847e827c042b4f2fd58bca4be47a1
7c411fb5de4c43d01981890374e5ae807aaa84a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e8e93dfd889c7b183a6054d518090a64
c1d1f53213b32385440f3e7a28a4be547af10494
describe
'874612' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
90befb5336f37f965dc66da78c2fe200
7022e79116574b8cf25809ef948fc9837ebfe522
describe
'122333' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
5c8cecaf85a44c4b41d2db7e152b4812
9f348457fdc64bf89798fdf4ff8b7ac27cb86263
'2012-01-13T21:36:13-05:00'
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKME' 'sip-files00098.pro'
13602deafa3b36dc73d8157df16575ee
979119f2957494800f2ced75b00d80fd9d379413
describe
'59806' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
91ff7a5d381903a326c99f25316f3960
4f9b344734f691788ccc9befc7900784d834686a
describe
'8666160' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
d6d35598f055a9c9a58cc39ee0b0b41c
549d6f99a6e1a4c58c70d70d14287329efa296fc
'2012-01-13T21:29:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c0639d02d76ca11d39307a4d88f89b9d
8d905bfd947bbe44ac9c5f7920ec19b4bf5dc4cb
describe
'32580' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
f56948b94bf507ec1bcc3732ac968d2d
91767ddfb903db914f199fd8f9712165bb679803
'2012-01-13T21:28:15-05:00'
describe
'862804' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d2c460600cb1466e9862fadcec80ce23
b70decc06c4daaf27475ef0900fffc08c79713ea
'2012-01-13T21:29:24-05:00'
describe
'120930' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
83c92a7274b9c47956e21fa270f908ee
27cfbb619a4ce61a9af91698208364a69d415caa
'2012-01-13T21:35:59-05:00'
describe
'28736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKML' 'sip-files00099.pro'
4337677d451d0143521561b595f4acad
c9f50c03e7d3d40b34d3fac80d93bf44cfff8996
describe
'59676' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
4c488002c40c6dad055dfdb74d209ea8
2a1688f5097892382756717cbab21c489dba3dc0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
fe3a205250362018d4476df38661e008
3186942ebb26c64d8bc86ddf32332118b3460283
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6c16db38cbeeb665336356e215cab7b0
fe747b62990ee6a3cb9319105a0d933c6f74f87d
describe
'32531' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
621407755c26d1b6ed46bf7266b88882
c0736968f7ef8b60acb690c4c413218ca4a76bd9
describe
'861687' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8a84ca8b4b469f63ff17d153eb4bf00d
dba5bbf0193d15359bd333c77a8460d79aeb760f
describe
'120239' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
7cb0ebbb4eff455f68e1c30c7069b263
2dc3bc5a6b117af7d184e0beb91f3088dc62a8ed
'2012-01-13T21:30:59-05:00'
describe
'28941' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
88fd3559158e734c613fb5531233f332
ef30e25fae36d6b30a5d449c2230b353029a58ab
describe
'59245' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c23c1ac57d69067b168607fbac39eec5
6168d27ee6e717e8e7fdaefa0d8c2425bb120891
'2012-01-13T21:34:01-05:00'
describe
'8666040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b1f704728442331b1fa41e6216b699be
6d71c7e7a1ce9c230bd228a1070a9a539d474bc4
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
bdc30e5cad7b5b6de78c13bc925d58c1
adae6f7c4836f51f85e692013c05f1b50c2e12e2
'2012-01-13T21:34:45-05:00'
describe
'588191' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00100c.jp2'
59d03ffa0fc712012cf49e9d0063ca3b
45843854e9270d9bda693c1b739158c2cc6bb721
'2012-01-13T21:29:12-05:00'
describe
'89763' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00100c.jpg'
f7e0602b32a87000b581842c0411a955
03abcc0159b43ed39f68348841b02982a0d20acf
'2012-01-13T21:34:04-05:00'
describe
'7878' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00100c.pro'
080fb74d06c8e31fd992719bc2ae2071
ef089fe8c71b33de66c4d94fce56c5a35be81588
describe
'45297' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00100c.QC.jpg'
02d3938a556349aca1b61135b6ea27ac
dd97019e07ea53cd438656acbae834bff2c611eb
describe
'8664412' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00100c.tif'
5a5cc86abf7cb51e29978975a0f6a893
021fd091e27e1bd20c5ec5028eee1bfce2fbd400
describe
'352' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00100c.txt'
ca742c8eed739c0bf2ce3d0dbde4e5d5
436dfe17b065eff90f0621f2ace7409493f2d65f
describe
Invalid character
'28839' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00100cthm.jpg'
2da477ca863d6d488cd13d6ebc918776
6030d6232231341f741c7c20630b5ae8e8a93e63
describe
'32251' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKND' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
633fd5727c7b9a68abc6b3dc153d0071
c55f0d4f5c2baeed9bd553168755295cc2b19a5f
'2012-01-13T21:30:24-05:00'
describe
'809244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
eb85ba7f2188d17dadb6ece90e1edf45
76adc21b4ab1e3c7fa3a0109356654cd7e503d2f
describe
'114094' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
fd25f413779a262a6ec00b75523a9644
1e5f0d2e7d7ef7ff362aa3645329e718dbca01cb
describe
'28796' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00101.pro'
63e457556e1f253c4a0e6807146266de
fad6fd60ec4320b87aed83f30505e1812b9b44fe
describe
'56115' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
05da4625af53259e1fb1745b4039f6d6
aa54a258e6f7a3f25b000745426c439ecafbc942
describe
'8665796' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00101.tif'
e3f96563f026f534bff622cdd6ecb31f
1d1ac6f75b0065a30829883aab75df660477787b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
d042062cf0193ddfb0299169d1b8484a
1d487c5b0e77476d3d8019e68b7860831ba9d990
'2012-01-13T21:35:07-05:00'
describe
'31469' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
2d5fa40db2b39311b3d5246dbfb192ea
57ff3d15312ea35daf7add13655d0c7e5d0d42b0
describe
'850629' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
96930a124d5ef244a50021c7442ae043
a5d68a8fc1de7712fae94600b1db95672b4f8254
'2012-01-13T21:32:22-05:00'
describe
'119576' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f5eabf3126578c351c9b9168b2cc2cfd
f785630f9a5b8169568f528688893a5a6aae2be3
describe
'29680' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fcbeb1aa83d1ea550a5bfc3854779867
2e99551607cc294ff48e915254a07c2e91407a3e
describe
'58174' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
06f67984c6ace59838760662556d8307
88ae48a0029488d3eac25d452f5c5cb70253154e
describe
'8666032' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00102.tif'
c8e3f97d15cac5f00014e775d00e9315
f53ea9083050207e276fb2f1bc470ae462518504
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
70a93cfbf84655cdfa1a0ded7834aebc
01a3b57ca48a567371fec446acd05daeeb5c7ff3
'2012-01-13T21:32:01-05:00'
describe
'32399' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c69cb034baa3d1dc56541896c66baa21
9f873b36baa39bf2cd2762dd625840d1dd44ab6e
'2012-01-13T21:30:14-05:00'
describe
'845812' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
f53d27d0acb7681685d15c1b12620f1b
ebe7980606c73d1ed2a66f8c98604758d57f8941
describe
'119363' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
2a011012e796eb44535d56b71cfdb665
d62cd978ddc40ac5351764da002298b9fcd7c9b9
'2012-01-13T21:30:03-05:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00103.pro'
26cce4ad941d7fe343f9acdc57d62487
d3c0d8cc860bb5d71787ae18eb2eeef85d5a9cd4
describe
'58062' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
74cda0e9a895c826c805ea846ed43646
a0d6fc2a9ac66bc554d7fb64c15c2a2180cd88f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4952024d23528e86bc125ec8cc6a937a
96e3b7acf0f91ac210b996b659b40097505a0e03
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
55f738c1d88fc7db1f556bf74d25181e
042bcf340af91777224befd79bc06a0459dc49a4
'2012-01-13T21:28:12-05:00'
describe
'32272' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f0d97cced62d274cd8f889fafbc582f3
a990781bf359174f06cdc3d5fc8e39c1a41fd279
describe
'818571' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
3f46ed6e68ba292451cf2a12a3f511be
907cc6b3f9c9acf8b460133bfdf86feb8dddeb39
describe
'116456' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
c6acded6d9dc50f63124cd42f698ef98
97c13b0843593e7df10e1b6231d6217271bc7d10
describe
'29742' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0988b9ca103cd75e767750aabcd5fa15
76e2dd99e42009503899e218d27c5fb1aa4c1b44
describe
'57005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
b80d0e57735446492044b9206c7257fe
f2bf9dbc69cfaf9eb484d8d2f58b1e59edd3bc0d
'2012-01-13T21:31:21-05:00'
describe
'8665748' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00104.tif'
4812b7c934b86674b3b8a2b466c03f11
b6a7f27b04282af9cb578c8de022dc530387cd8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00104.txt'
c6db30b77aa692ad086dc4a1593fed69
8027fa30fedede7274c5d1ebb205d7f9f31bb42a
describe
'31806' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
41dad3d7054dc0fc82dc82454637b2b6
00623525f905443a0e4417fa6f99a561463f999a
describe
'831671' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c40da7ee4352c50b6a0602eef22716da
3217077d4800e3564f4027ce693946d022e60c09
'2012-01-13T21:33:17-05:00'
describe
'118278' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
f48a6093574296676230b9b72b09a554
b9c796ce66a52a2f0de33310f26d3453ff4c7d3d
describe
'30625' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00105.pro'
e35ce048f73f2dfec40e79fc3affa4c6
98cc08a76ffd9a74b7c6399987ab2ca64c5a4e69
'2012-01-13T21:29:30-05:00'
describe
'57195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d73df43d74e4e8a95b30534d2ecb3cb6
a34ca15948dc388d82441600e61bc82b81adbd8a
'2012-01-13T21:32:00-05:00'
describe
'8665832' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00105.tif'
64025c62130ffa5482daa56da5b100d0
1de98e6712bf19a1b1dd47b0beaa914d41115295
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00105.txt'
08e6e122a56c2a5a95b0799f94a60e6c
3393b028a7ecf55b6f3b9f82b77bde8a07bcbe4f
'2012-01-13T21:29:59-05:00'
describe
'31668' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
76e8a0a88621bf7d193e633b09193c90
cbe8d7272d2d177725f2c88c4515be919226e40c
describe
'819731' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKON' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
a3c119726d88468ff5b98d84a820c390
7717a58350e582d626e07e14e9a20bcead7eae49
describe
'115827' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
de7f02d692dfc6be052e400991a23984
e4a0312e5455d5fdb64a6b7778679f54f62624c4
describe
'29359' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00106.pro'
1a6ada52b3eb2d2b577a0e8218a1bed6
844c059d650bc6fae11e9c17566b2aab607f5cb5
'2012-01-13T21:34:31-05:00'
describe
'56603' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
59253b0618dd1fc6bbcd4fd6c16d2e38
ce349108d222acc082ab763c0b87dd3b2c162e9e
describe
'8665580' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b10d135ad5396903ed8543856eaf5de8
fb009ffc3386608416a9b6ba39f822c45933217c
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00106.txt'
bf96bf1d32f10398ef2eedd45027ef45
24e2b6956ccdc879d9055abcbfcdb709798cdefc
describe
'31599' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
41ab81386b317d4b31c0dbdbe1aa8755
a3dd2c77a61d47e71d587b67cf12fd15bd6b382b
'2012-01-13T21:32:09-05:00'
describe
'844215' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
d26a516b88e571f8867d3d716accdda4
2d0e9ac44d77fade55759facbdc21a5a8ade3418
describe
'118962' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
95ba636b08d6ec15349033b5c5d26167
ecc855891fc0688674558850d6444b9f11f1780b
describe
'29805' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00107.pro'
7afa403708ebb8d1a62b29bbffcc57dc
93edfbcb54fbb7d5053107546d9d2fc1feafde7c
'2012-01-13T21:35:29-05:00'
describe
'57615' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
d91f32b3bc413fd00608f48d1ffcff64
03d4bbf2d6f22694422d04a2570ae52e9dcf441c
describe
'8665972' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00107.tif'
3db94fb77252ee4ee79a34799ad1e589
fe876d0e808e8d13959b1508bf876c438108b0be
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
56452fdfbf955e7c00216a76c0a86e58
fc35d7dea38635c21ce06de960ef2dd2e1511e24
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
31ba5c106f471070dc0e1ee619aba08a
aeabc7cc81e0e43bf188c8fd5208eceadafa8a15
describe
'846767' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
4b08d9f5a2d92111e3ec561c35991593
70dd2500f41a7551853d9b7230114bead8db5c09
describe
'119087' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
af8d49221e58a071392b71b8720a2fd2
2ed738ad313a8fb9fb5c7b981156ae37030a97f0
describe
'29633' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00108.pro'
899deb67e61798b5c151b32b6992cc26
ebbe20f0f6a7b4e86a257f18492eaad52f28c070
describe
'58365' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
0467a4e58c7253d13d5def5e4a529c9e
99d172559713b330b5e5ae7a02a4780a3bdb93b9
'2012-01-13T21:29:10-05:00'
describe
'8665948' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00108.tif'
635ef4ea0a84cd3774c385ad206f2562
cd0c97aceb07e18dc80f65fa7ac39e875cd4575d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00108.txt'
0b59f935d7aa678d1ab60c7c7d6e6083
798d66697c4658bef435fc2bbda860cc18af8086
'2012-01-13T21:33:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ce103454acb5edf417293db591e67d80
109a2d322859a076e89fc2a4dd864bd18807764e
describe
'850309' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
9f147a253cf41aac0ef09f42d14a2337
4135c048a1fd43f438977b9afc121279469e5f3f
describe
'119734' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
84a83382c2960b117085efbfcd7425ff
99d3e8f0bf0d61daacef786941a4c32925127612
describe
'29572' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00109.pro'
49e265bab7c2e9c2808a76f87e1d8e15
2f5371f7995985276a1beb08b3f2f8c7727d9580
describe
'58392' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
3b6d3f662ccc682ba82144df31c876a7
908194daf4999ea42234953ece31e89d82bffa06
describe
'8665960' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00109.tif'
9c8cb1e659891a660d45c85afbd80295
942147dfc97000d4734edd2e60f6021b8dbdea04
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00109.txt'
f98695d72a28bab33e883be1c73388c7
16afc9671fa7ac92c7e2d14fcfa01ecaf7035084
describe
'32205' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
e6885d59fcb727a8ff436dcf305ec373
85f6f28a00978e295785cea8f8005f3024ea93f1
describe
'844157' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
a81cff28f0115e399d6cb9acb47807a4
dd43d2137b18d6e636224a990c13b849f54acdca
'2012-01-13T21:31:41-05:00'
describe
'118997' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
642baadb3a43841f55d6668a8a8ae80e
810f7a824a4bc7d4de55d7dbf1db0fd202490585
describe
'30083' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00110.pro'
fcd56855ffd24b6ab80923cd08a8edf7
c9e8abd14294e24a4d0d84409457d0d57e82fa9b
describe
'57525' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
58969814383138b20e78bf04c572df4d
3e4c7393c1b06c4d9d688b15804003a89e2f95fe
describe
'8665708' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
04cb53dcdcb9b562236510faa124b6ed
1dad96b05a803f265e17d6b11918379862c45a36
'2012-01-13T21:33:12-05:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00110.txt'
1752db2b4a94da63a1840ce782a74386
b901addc37492f9b0b5f0da34e93aa51d26d9738
'2012-01-13T21:32:15-05:00'
describe
'32093' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f2c6837f0be376b35684169df3ce0563
d354b73f8e70971e2f5af9c3856df14386df5039
describe
'825672' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
5581f398350fe3faafe62e94d0748483
167286bd690fbbbd314c0259ff840135c1f4c63f
describe
'117086' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
45a6b6317a31929adb009a00127b0bf2
d27916707a06867abfb7557a66a89a500299f07e
'2012-01-13T21:30:52-05:00'
describe
'29795' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00111.pro'
499cfbea1c1f358b66ac44510705874b
48c715b967f4e0f83349a45f1d9a9053b50bca70
describe
'57098' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
8a55dcb0ff45595f8fdeca4d530c1c00
5bb15b6869d0e4f0dbe5399ca02ceb0040869166
describe
'8665736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
8a4dda965de8710129fc52a27cf43bee
3b5afbd362e6287d801336d02ba33b7f0f684854
'2012-01-13T21:32:11-05:00'
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
fbd3ec90ecc5604185c9e1b6dbf5a9c5
a0e7885f2b33e7552d395d7d95852cf75bffd30d
describe
'31714' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
e2d37f94168d9415320686a621911b01
fbee297c7fc8e6a641a0a054f950453ce49476c8
describe
'856446' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
141fb4a3163d86e1c5c976a5299b649b
4907a074d4ddd1cc9b57d4c5bf9aaa51499b7fa5
describe
'120007' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
55ca1f38f771f5badfe55f99381a6380
83804c1fd55382e4f6b24722afd16aff4421b562
'2012-01-13T21:33:23-05:00'
describe
'29563' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00112.pro'
1343624db80f88973b244f2e9b0d25c7
1c37a1c2540bbb73b3a5e92449e6221f919cfae6
describe
'59261' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
82ff5600850ed370abff7ddf048fb1c6
6b85db012600b809f9bf51ffc6ce2cfe893d4a51
describe
'8665908' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8f0a9475b703e03fa8477f9ed217c8bf
dd5877d15d59ac4ba1a54c80821246b5a247333b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00112.txt'
cc95cf13628f4dd4c6e1a654897aeb76
fd58f9ae34842a2e67b44a5e0ad2263fabe85bac
describe
'32141' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
84149fe467984096c2c340d2e9d76485
c2e225e4dce09ed52f77eb03e75671e006d4dd29
describe
'856437' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ea2d38c88922fe545746188f7b3443fa
1b52eb46b224620cee75ca2df95dce2c01141ba6
describe
'120677' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
a1373dbb0321cf163d6b0a3027d9ae1a
be8114d6e6b8a6db089569092fe89c190b4047c4
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00113.pro'
4125df52d5ef23970025cc99c56100ff
039788c3cb751f1069faf1e33ab4bd553817d056
describe
'58770' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
a1708bfa95cbdfef57354bb2b5900fe1
b4d5f32badee8c3b476d542e7a2a99d141f9dedf
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
3d0725c8b1bf0fa404ddd82bd83d01bd
44bf116063842f004db5382d6b60fb1dcaa49c8f
'2012-01-13T21:35:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
389d12220c107070fb36805dc6a5007c
85e29ce4d4169c8ed925fa7e4141c07034632715
describe
'32511' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
e3c92f373583b123a9ae40692fbaa5bc
7dee71507c86e72249d4a27d9f6cec16e7a363b3
describe
'863850' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
14a00a204382dc5311893eba8925054b
c5931e4ba7a8e8bf7e9385cfa9bd8042a70104f5
describe
'120779' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
44d3ba519117f84ece52e80f5eac4cb1
09850ca3b686ff1d3b1631815b867df8cd46f08f
describe
'30463' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00114.pro'
4369db63c115275d6cdb79833e0a2274
086659c9dba0fdcdf2d4f0a639b26c282fef357d
describe
'57847' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
4dd5191885c2c23b7c1ed85811cda238
c849a397d7610688526b05b6c40236aec8b4ab67
'2012-01-13T21:36:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e33008523883dd3f8061b27e3aafaa73
af7b56a234d66590974131dcfb24df88f8caa300
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00114.txt'
52c87b37deb096a9a650b1c292bd41b3
a19355707f8afa759768afce53e94bf95a21bbcf
describe
'31930' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
e43bb2bf4018423733de4ba68d6de87a
91d64ff1984cf522ae78f3bfaa648cbb60a9db4a
'2012-01-13T21:28:48-05:00'
describe
'869973' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
074d4bdf94a15253563c83628c83403f
ace953657048f12eb64547eb0381ffd461c3bb2f
describe
'121708' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
44d4aad2044c432e8a739418edfa4db3
f42904b6fb67c5f800ad63681e3bd90ee2fadc93
describe
'30404' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00115.pro'
4be4101c695c889a265095c0a088245c
0628d2feda73f7b229dec187557c9bd65e78da56
describe
'58132' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
5a78f532c7ed278fd57843d7bedc77ce
049d1df83414c591f9884c0f554f930db61605ca
describe
'8665920' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00115.tif'
a859ef4aa2adee1b74822ef506f49744
b4d4c429192b45d086d750019a6e8a1b017d71b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00115.txt'
e518214ffae608ea8f9d412cbb9d71d1
c597222936a5fd33d5de15773934b44b06f3f738
describe
'32091' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
135b6888dca4d16aab464ec64833ae3c
70b529f26d0445e129d2b7ed644155bd73ed8e68
describe
'866130' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
5d88a53c0326ed4897ba599976a9d7a1
5bf59b73d56f4eb3241ba3e1c1aaf0015d48689b
describe
'121076' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9b14b9e36f036a3706353d005945e428
28c0eb0ece839969233da41d407f90097564b995
'2012-01-13T21:31:45-05:00'
describe
'30526' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8b4651fa045abce4c9fe224134df2881
996337e795d7e9834b7043b9306eeb23b707a9d2
'2012-01-13T21:30:58-05:00'
describe
'58055' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
62e0c53237706f64d88d2dd0a5f3fa6a
d82ca06bb17306143517382234526e8480f1231a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
b782b0841eb91411752b4b54e0a2898a
809fdb932d03393339986a526a88f916dafe9f63
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c158c14f60248ec5c63294189973303e
6a912ee1751d1786c29356b7cf8c034bb3117170
'2012-01-13T21:31:13-05:00'
describe
'31839' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
3faf643bcc014ffc74a9ed28a975099d
09fa7b9c5277b1675b253b0695d8c2330951fcf1
describe
'794693' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
6bb92f9feb168942be553d74eda34be8
d494db963cbe3f9cb118728c62a5507226ea8959
'2012-01-13T21:29:41-05:00'
describe
'112991' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
be9caab7e03adb06ab0a89fe79ed8a24
fd20b4fe9ddaaa4fa10dbc01571bacd5650d2481
describe
'28432' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00117.pro'
55e85bb4e8d3c0690b43c9cff4dfe256
fb30b927f177aae8e0f129972545aaa22341041f
describe
'54117' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c221aac570bc34fc4296fdb7d517b0bd
70720672fe29e4decf7f40757d54f1d7bbe58be1
'2012-01-13T21:30:06-05:00'
describe
'8665264' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
c36ee01130801420216fdb2299e766a6
aa6a72d626041c0189cdc1cb0cac7f567970578f
'2012-01-13T21:32:16-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00117.txt'
32d211c521c0a5b00488b534320a9e43
c1ccde246033cca312ab48d95d8619a3d4b9641c
describe
'30776' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
234ff8eb234186c9c3f44843ab888628
865336e2658fdeb2d0ecda3729d25e203eae7204
'2012-01-13T21:34:50-05:00'
describe
'852137' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
6fbe0ff7963d4c19420fce272823fa5a
5be0edd23f2c6964b07ffa84ffe9521998c6140b
describe
'120213' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
66dd3693315d0d1bdffee463fa6108a8
638a7eab424f18d390dbc0d65e27f2b6dde46ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00118.pro'
5c42d097b17105daa5651a66c109d120
6279133d5f81c87da3ecc7e32bb1da3ffff0b393
describe
'59039' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
42c510e6ae67ffcced68f0dd8ab51b5f
7485a08fcc59618bc406b3708001a8c41c962694
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
abd931567bfe5a1751762079ade098c5
c953a09f0d9c09d463bbcae785dab46a1797a2a3
'2012-01-13T21:32:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00118.txt'
cf6745315a25b573283bd6a2f23aa67b
3345b512f233e910adf4296158578bef30f871a3
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
f18ebcda4d883004fd7999b78ebad29d
0a1d7786f4ac7ea15016ce0713bb2d559e56da56
describe
'839071' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
beee2a252f63a98c19b89a618e5a6b47
c7e2c2f2b7351a367e95562c346e6aceeec0ed92
describe
'118254' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
ab287d70335d6e2519790de97b810d68
717555e9b8b2ef8f1e8bf0207c792423cdd00055
describe
'29859' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
cc216fee739db77176d4cc5fd088d2e2
6334bc6c88f86d463efb26f046f4bfae38623ff4
describe
'57481' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
cd89d184dcf1b82346f6486a46dae985
452f0ca2dae8df4be93cb25b53bfb4c478110558
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00119.tif'
704af9fa10b37abb02ce8f44ecef9610
d4adaede2bf77c772d08f9e1f0ced129e1804814
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
5b377c649d598ccca01835e3f99cd495
021c81ae749b9cd21735af862d7c2747ecc62d5b
describe
'31752' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
f4cbdea6d2b98fcc4f17a1e847176ea8
6b0a3e02a6d01f0e95608341e7f099682a32b947
describe
'825670' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4a7cc20321abe868635bd3426f4c1f38
3ea3fcd328fcce0575c23fbe8d809015cd8280f9
describe
'117141' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
dc92a0a4e7c7d08f28fda00ec84e430c
3fbdf5a668df209a56f58f694547a73b7695deda
'2012-01-13T21:27:44-05:00'
describe
'29169' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
751390998b39150a02cc610b6f0c9253
8c3b4e1956918dec2880cc5e25d03d79f60f23a7
describe
'57508' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
35ac2366a02cf852b1faaf40f7f568ca
3b110c26b0d076c4fb651422374e40ec025afb59
describe
'8665888' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
22987df38ad336e67ea27faf7c8f81d6
51897fdcfb33926daa4193a23f4cc3f2896ecc2f
'2012-01-13T21:36:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
c415bcda0b55e6a10e2409b6a76a2c6d
039b9f47930e679e4089edd43e4a32ec63882720
describe
'32127' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
4a0e8b171a07861d13864ecc7227a37f
2c6f098913c34e49dcd0715f6cc65292bfe39230
describe
'858448' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
681b5543087ae4d8c0c9aa71643e2d6d
7dbc57ef1dcde3001a3db2176dce7b1b5744ab0b
describe
'120959' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
c421695656eaa9b3b7c83e8b345913a1
63653aea0fd38872b7e9bb96197fc6a4847271f0
describe
'30064' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
fce00169d57f37b26a7e62403f37b1ac
4523eaef7b236156c8af2f35ea1cc43814081700
describe
'58201' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
2ef36eb4769dba37536581e72aa8b8d6
bafd4e480fe357ebd0f8abba78f9b1c82c978c41
describe
'8666004' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00121.tif'
bcc7208feb61563666d430503038484f
9e20fa657490c62d7698db43e2bfd488eed60fdf
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKST' 'sip-files00121.txt'
830a013a4ca3b50fc7addb886eb13dc6
11885ca6e33fc99281b0b6b8a181eb90dc95007e
describe
'32206' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a39b402f8276dc989b2b912283130638
618428060958b71cc01ef28094fbecacf32b9c1f
describe
'814964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
0d8f0c66212fc821bf1ddfba86fee4ea
c9502c157d16e1f49efbce0c656c94b34ccac53d
describe
'115019' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
e63ab9aff02aef2b3e814ac91b31e613
85f9c3eaf2c70598ed0dbdd97f57728ef8e1069e
describe
'28427' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00122.pro'
30d014032974305797d297baf626babe
6b96268e901ba3dcf5218567032d23a153d5219a
describe
'57061' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
97c6185c57507a751499b8ad7972cabe
608b2765850d847b870ea1fece1f6fed0d5fe576
'2012-01-13T21:30:33-05:00'
describe
'8665592' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
f08692e4c6c139b17dda500d223f0442
ee3a9e4063009c7401d471167ad135ba155adc7a
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00122.txt'
6c4fb4eaab929a2a0db770a6b78f5684
65a6465c97d79d9042c81171dd11b95d45c22928
describe
'31624' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
6ab1a31c5e103343ce3fa733141ad226
2048139f82a5248a20df7b4a292d49302ead69df
describe
'853373' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
c672570c30bc426a5677d3223972764b
dd24fbc2ffb726f51234cbba279e2a2365f8af5b
describe
'120356' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
423dba815e85712c49d29f6c50542c5b
3e00269fb020ba9f3e5af9b7d7803da903386fa4
'2012-01-13T21:35:23-05:00'
describe
'30312' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00123.pro'
f12780079b4e19087da402d031e2a290
f7803ccd89e160cb024ca1e44f17555b3f19838a
describe
'58525' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
05a337a25478fd55223865566474528f
57af9404dd4a0cccbd8973b61813c4f833db67a9
'2012-01-13T21:34:44-05:00'
describe
'8665988' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00123.tif'
924f1283e0169298b1aa6199106040b7
c9dccb7948f1e19086aa0eb4d7e24b4f305a7d57
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00123.txt'
03e519f5ee7dbe3119628b778e280a43
87dd04eb4870499c254e727582275bff408efefd
describe
'32024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
d1b10858c4f65f9739832fa662551c45
3a4a45e7f278b9a1acb74baff088bd4d6568f808
describe
'819539' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
8f47399dcc6349a268bd8d326a7f8b3b
ecbd70da452020b834d33a63397c87101f836c14
describe
'116071' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
fa86758a847bec030d4bcc348780c178
89683b5516f1530c1eb407efa477ae2ce2ce615d
describe
'29598' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00124.pro'
00fb258d2dd6dc969d96e60093d7be78
c5500eb1cb13dfb7f11c5d8c41dc2d7ca06ae35c
describe
'55993' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
70e2f7169870a0fcdc94f7ef5e02549b
412db4e4140ff60325c93a4b7779c04f9e79ca75
describe
'8665660' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
9fa488cd178f6c3623c1b699410e0a31
4b492bbff8626ccef56592a330ca3980fd5ee66c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00124.txt'
5e7369e6e038270510b78384bca92fc9
affde3cdfbdf5478e9be9ca23b02273597f80865
describe
'31724' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d30143de19bd10626923eb2b17403328
89e4790b8331b364d97eb993d6917c6a8e89a991
describe
'844257' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
e52a1564dc900bd331e62e36e944e86e
8b2e26cb8804e1f2a627901a560006be842b658a
describe
'119519' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
28cf849637d7ae6b77201515a22fe11c
24e4bb81bae1b38541e4591e05f7cfefd01da502
describe
'29809' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
c1ad7e5c45b64f40f468743c42dae4fc
3f9d7c16f85856e475eb6ea00bbb1f467ba18ffe
describe
'57788' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4fc8dd2c37e147c81a587b8d1d417556
fa73d07d861f0637262af5181557d5bfdc329dc2
describe
'8665844' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f61e5fcdcf35eec571f1e1c2d3d17d76
50ec677b0765766cdc82346a624313861f0682bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8e73c3853f1ab75c8936b9d13aceeaf7
1ab332c2ed19f7234fb7885c0a72f3fc86f718d6
describe
'196029' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00125a.jp2'
9fee388ef2c51dd3c1372182c77c5103
0048accd3ea49b0ff5a81f6e0dc3c3704bcae717
describe
'43021' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00125a.jpg'
b0cc4f04a2f97fd8ce8eab63908af6bb
b300b6c752455f5cbe789973c12ae65d50500eb9
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00125a.pro'
5f2b8101a0dc855b08e050031e51e58a
d285007a6b83baabd1e2947e2bfbddb11ee25a61
describe
'29545' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00125a.QC.jpg'
fdb4920dc6a662cc8afe7151ab8cd6e5
a44ccb349bb3e240caf968f13734706799cac17d
describe
'9110656' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00125a.tif'
5cb8c9df978cb7aa4359c9856c0d32a0
fe4fed2825f75317c9a3f171da54d95de328c7c4
'2012-01-13T21:33:39-05:00'
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00125a.txt'
00ff9b4e72fa8f737c70cddaaea2a47c
343ce76df0e30044db4fcdcd8b0a4ae5ddad3656
describe
'23594' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00125athm.jpg'
60b2094367c0d285dae9b65e93f985a2
f46dd8c0ad40df64bd3a06a1e559f40cc8358c4c
describe
'31804' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
62567b603c1a12f10348f9163e292df9
c132867d4251767c9c7899d6c3df2782b0f034a3
describe
'20177' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
ff8b406be4579ef40de5cbee65ed749a
07b9f7ab054e35a5f46357e7338e4ed62baa1f63
describe
'18722' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
3fdf66aeb1f150b0f0fae0221573cc50
c5ed8e2209129748e5b6b0f9eff26bf4a12ece13
'2012-01-13T21:32:52-05:00'
describe
'8659872' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6db369d07124deba91a7dafd616085de
e9501c93067b7c3a782040d2daa2ec2c1b61642a
'2012-01-13T21:27:46-05:00'
describe
'18336' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
a5d5b34302ff7b9783951a3aa6f5dc2a
57f8ef8486981b30eb18ae76a936f0d36ecc5002
describe
'400901' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
22913e6b3d6229f554d12e4f7293d105
25fc398e72a116328ee21fc233da486266872d74
'2012-01-13T21:32:35-05:00'
describe
'66935' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
d9e7906756c4b4e226708041923f1b5c
3e582cc30d97aaba2e294a08737d2a6bcd9b3ab0
'2012-01-13T21:36:11-05:00'
describe
'14725' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00129.pro'
fca38ff8fc24a22d7b4024df0642b5e0
8c4d0def12093d2e6f9e9003a6df3480b72cd20c
describe
'37586' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
ec57aa0a37026789b08e7c391317582b
4537a4a63833e562c7a78740ee5b1c563cac841c
describe
'8663060' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00129.tif'
6dfd9e54377b635b66b572d44ed624f3
86a5c2028d4a3d2597305c098dabfb0e80cb0a77
describe
'716' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00129.txt'
aa821492cb801acacffe316b073cd9ec
7fe86cf3f0ea26aab3cd6988fa3f719a03d59949
describe
'25732' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
64ebd991f693b761caf9f328f9e0b2fd
715b8c0df8183f017b01f42ee5b1df3d02acb6c7
describe
'835937' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
1249f7e42886264e1fa30db6d7ce0d77
86d47b09e3ceb8cf938e1a4558bbbf426d9784d6
'2012-01-13T21:31:26-05:00'
describe
'119090' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
708ca6fd13c9bc56bc0b42713f361891
9b0e0c3214d6d5d83621185a19a1bf14324c0852
'2012-01-13T21:32:06-05:00'
describe
'30336' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00130.pro'
de745ff378ad9b6021ec73e0586287aa
359d4ed389cfdb392427f2c8a6a2a250f92a0212
describe
'58306' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
440ed5d9cf8a614b34507d30ac87ceaa
bb68ecc91546048f5cd1d1019c1b6d3d7a459ed5
describe
'8665892' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
f2d3b0d1ee3a7c96ace7b3d133ff932e
5337eb084bcf1880ba7af2c60435860e54fd8fd7
'2012-01-13T21:33:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00130.txt'
eaf0ded4b12fb3576cfb548eda49c726
5a4f117fa7da9d2c1a77190e20217a6ff6ca124c
describe
'32143' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
721de08ebea749df2ef4547042d94eff
632f512e218c220fb2cb1ee2f3f9aca817d451d2
describe
'836083' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
6657a92ec43ab3550f331f38c12cad1b
669d0e0f828eea0e4f81f4481408f22fb0b43931
describe
'118991' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
4d45e3a62f9aea3c12df09c1660d062c
376349a4160ad21b1c4704f0496f264f9749ca0b
describe
'30289' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
1f054c5929db7385847abddcd1e2d631
6ec5f8ae82af48c808d7dd670a089a4f1600c3d0
'2012-01-13T21:30:29-05:00'
describe
'57837' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
d11a136a43c25c3b632a4e26e33d35fc
55a1bf9d2db7ca62d142a3f6e7ea793f52e3ccb6
describe
'8665928' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00131.tif'
f6726b5c1077e598bf508eff8c0aefe8
529ac2a0840082028139a30551fd4fc597957539
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00131.txt'
1932da045e96278d869e24560f966fb6
d1c1e0ccc6df638cc4cbf3e0c36d906688ea92dc
describe
'32040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
d2a781c08c1790b5695e5bb8702a08cc
17d32bfeb2d7ea033567515fa0c4806167dd6482
'2012-01-13T21:35:31-05:00'
describe
'846528' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
755b79506625c016f5a4151e27fb258a
2d3944eb222d1f6465aad5fb73f6e2daab1e866b
'2012-01-13T21:34:16-05:00'
describe
'118937' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
66730fe2ccbe37fc957cb5755296c03f
295866caa8eee09e9317dfeeee9c9fbb6468c509
'2012-01-13T21:34:36-05:00'
describe
'28851' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00132.pro'
24398bf3f5bef1b335e571b6667ac8b7
005108c187d52929dfd76b3c3e644c03ff5644c5
describe
'58130' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
4c9c00f52242d27baf49cc64c289a884
bf2acf7d1d3d72f0f3f5f1aa1d19f968dcb50528
'2012-01-13T21:34:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b623cc7c9f85db6045245587ee640fd2
d18116a1c2377edc2704b44bdd391beff4e07f18
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00132.txt'
362700d9f7dee15cbd10ffa9c44ae876
f67387cfafde1a52f882af6cd5bb34866592f8f1
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
963755a7fef991989dd5d7584c32fce4
6c3234da2b03608c68f81eb4e55bf30062785a3c
describe
'847730' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
936f57c1e64f55927fb51909d8562256
7ab399b5e5d0ed8a0d92941c7cf0baa9d99327b6
describe
'119552' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
4c62c0504acb6ac5ff4f6f0e70a0003f
b11e27a2e5196f76855121c1800a247a4449d0e4
describe
'29250' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00133.pro'
c38d80c20fb921f66eec51d60997edad
24e3b1ca27a32cac7e16855aa96b28f7604aa5f4
describe
'58610' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
34206786f42f45177a64e48851769102
5cfe30fd0c4fca6133b4b292f20a27aec6f21492
'2012-01-13T21:33:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00133.tif'
0d09278a4be3c2b3b8b6a2abbdb2345e
cc4627d5b283f3d4e761c6454a72052f4fc39c3b
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00133.txt'
5f661a9c37ea1a154a8d2db2bf42ccaf
e75e0cdedc689b230556e65fdd5ae94a8b295443
describe
'197450' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00133a.jp2'
7e37553acba253f097177d6e7e0d0926
6cbc969ebbc221db3972e03db29ce4ff43051c1e
'2012-01-13T21:27:47-05:00'
describe
'43216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00133a.jpg'
9bf01d756c706a95825e1e37a695262e
6081e765ee4628d22b4472dc94713a8b6ea8fef6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00133a.pro'
be2075b94f6558956a38ccb49192c3fb
ce01d69a8c5dfa12aad10886c7e6eea85a0c2944
describe
'29626' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00133a.QC.jpg'
e22a4abf4a73d629d00c0c6870c02e88
be58f85993508b413c70ded07c4e5b875da008c8
describe
'9111080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00133a.tif'
5c2b674bfe9da733c4bb1de97a7ee648
1a76095bcd407863d96f26cd7303dbdeada9abb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00133a.txt'
75a9558805ab097e90e43f4781d9adba
025e6ac0078e7c8d3d134bd6af9d41d26241f413
describe
'23667' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00133athm.jpg'
a6ab26a201e923ee5fecc9e1b0ddf4e6
7e4208f0b16ec1888c95900cd3cbd7866472eb65
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
85f04df825f2b36db93ff5e528f5c61c
b015a8d0a083935286a832314941b8b1e6de0058
describe
'868990' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
65c781fc529ee155a15a1b89a5bfd918
c2f08778ced3e67bed6f571283f5591ae7c8a2d6
describe
'121168' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
70809f2d38cba67853a527ea95182d72
335b904353b5a3117cdb2d796c3413bc48adc388
describe
'30192' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00136.pro'
46d21ceb1d95d15577e6aad5942c3d22
35aa1f7268808f9ed3997e16231f496f3166060b
describe
'58247' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
e8c2a8ce682c88cd5899d8085fdfd5ac
ed8d10d871b5e9c31de289d14a654b6f1ecd5962
describe
'8665984' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00136.tif'
32b9aa94bc22819e05632f069388c7a0
1db6545049c9a3235522f329d0ce7e4b647c9dcb
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00136.txt'
7eadfd80664fe5a8adcaaad3834832ed
b455c16310acc64a0ae86467a2b2b45bd87c8012
describe
'32421' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
5bc9969ab7e1267be078437baee99d22
6e1f675f8b161543912893e194d9f67613b25d8c
describe
'802347' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
9f6838798ea36bf8c940a162e461b9f2
4cbe808e611e69867a2de1dfe9061dc4b0b69a27
'2012-01-13T21:30:34-05:00'
describe
'114318' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
f139cf400a2da5ac8c49bf14a881eec8
a5e7ef27cf830be7de24bbf1cfd1743f84acdbe7
'2012-01-13T21:36:26-05:00'
describe
'28021' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00137.pro'
6bd278731baa7c58dd26dbc56e5d7d20
003eb05342ddd90a1a006558d11059d259e018d1
describe
'56550' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
f839fc4d5c741a114f82487850083fc2
4e382144d57dcf93f8aa9be0822f9dbcaeb9db2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
c81215c477be5adc2fc19e08df713d6a
635e2124c041db5cb1ede2ba60916a76e5532def
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00137.txt'
fe775207016d81b47510468911348e21
acbb6db3e181f8fda09c414e8866f87ef2f581f4
describe
'32005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
26274039952504e804a69aac133921fd
5e99c74ac5ab9e16ccbcc9de76354b371e011a8a
describe
'663609' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
110bc7decb01de381432ccf428937fdf
910f5d1642ead5257ebaa945d6d903c5776a351b
describe
'98216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
c9c999b0c13cbb0f77e0a9550b6ef84f
ee578cf698375e3f64f2d1caffc28b5ee74ed9cc
describe
'22890' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00138.pro'
4f9894bef68a152e68921ceaaa1fa747
81c330e6782f2411d931bf068ce01a4abe6767ed
describe
'50310' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b8f94aed5d5b7931847a97db35380bb0
1724b317353a5f11bae20cabbc0b10fe310bef8b
describe
'8664944' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
a29ef9464fee4a520c5ff54dbb95b747
593fb52a024c2dcb217515bc32d39ddf387e8d7f
'2012-01-13T21:31:59-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00138.txt'
e1e5d4cf3392437e68780b28c31637f8
e1c6a93f315a39e612260d7a80bba4c2a2c76bd9
describe
'29682' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
6defcafb2dc16c8f05fa17e057025c5d
35b35454e5a929462ce7d87a0cf14272d9f1b6d1
describe
'610556' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
7444e7515e77be110a272e0a6f14559f
a05bb5439909f265fc126fa4325b00e19af62bb1
describe
'90969' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
776d7fd5f58d2845e3c65db2567cbfbc
25bdb80362ecb5e9a9f35768e72553bd69299de2
'2012-01-13T21:31:49-05:00'
describe
'23244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00139.pro'
06b83a9f98e5b2f3fa032bcdd0140e1e
8f77a6ba829c5869a991b33d5e379a6fda52623c
describe
'46352' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
511a6a86e93aa5889f5e0a94c4c53437
1fe9b2ae25e3b67f4c73c44383a14520da99b6a5
describe
'8664400' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00139.tif'
98802e602a89ebbec559eae5dc514675
721d402ea91a0545a618f40d9e28bff457a6a005
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00139.txt'
0a4a56638124636d1e4bc446ee036a03
bc879b43f698127770f91839ec6d8d8399335e5d
describe
'28575' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
2dea0c0f2ace3bb6cb738f0b8365f826
0b9310a0c48b34d51878eba63f6b173f11e42dcc
describe
'875602' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
c619c2add6fbdf749e502d6ba1d5f4c6
090186124305a69a93203ebf7264ca3db1c99dbd
describe
'122134' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
0c5f0ce2be4e18e9d0dc1cd7e72c6a3a
f1d0a475e2c9c5e1da35568e4f6d749c9af9199c
describe
'30651' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3a51750472633052018ecd564ad47d0d
c1078e9726e04a3caf56afee449b82aee19e9c06
describe
'58305' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
fe2c18f7517f86cbd9214e8b8c8a1882
15abbcd543a4d93b637233d224526c70720ee5f1
describe
'8666016' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a98173e2a079cbdf3806d5fc73ecc3cc
97291e0e4c2e5da395ac386d325d4e9207da6fff
'2012-01-13T21:29:11-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00140.txt'
b5faf069b082191bad97916e6bc84421
51055e879a5cfc65861bbbe49124e641b635e85b
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
2c964c5bca12b1ef2500e5def426c19c
42b311a34a764ca05f76a47ed31cb439c2f689db
describe
'839096' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5203ca8392ad4a81520432b36a5a9579
bda9737a207a515b224263acb4aa65cd46c4c3f0
describe
'118298' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
5e7dc72427037bb16e376674c47e02aa
5acf1bd0498fbbd44764ee014928074e20753f5b
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
90ad0dfb5ae2d65f1877d09bb86c4a53
8096cd864a19c8223255852ef48da2237783d078
describe
'57189' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
948e815d2a3c2e781f05c9a8e1fcfc35
85d4177160c5dfa9cfe83c6cb9aa81421fd7b02e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00141.tif'
8bdd237d3dc92ef651c676cd3d6171f8
8e1589e2027ef22c5cc41239eed545ae215b1fe4
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00141.txt'
70551944087b9d7e4d8f621740c062a7
6da60bdc959f215adea5fb461604caf41e956c57
describe
'32285' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
07de78de64a29f3f8788e11b2c03cbda
d164855322bd2db152a4209602fa468f46468acf
describe
'878758' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
69daef3ae7b3b0116af692cd9d7373f3
680cb27d9f7e3e8be423771a278c0abf27371bdc
'2012-01-13T21:35:11-05:00'
describe
'122519' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
83f75cc8c72b3e0c573c6b9d9907cdf6
1b7106d55dba51df855e9e04752760afe725cc31
'2012-01-13T21:35:03-05:00'
describe
'30273' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
678ce60b087d5d3dad43b79d3dfd83db
d93aa55817c656d9fed8861e2b4fb9dac3dacaa7
describe
'59797' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
da162a293eef1f8c551495cfadae16e9
7ae2411eb0adfefe4347bc306b35dcfb5d712a7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00142.tif'
da0225e3db3b4f7143a9427c5f0d5925
e9244e3e3c21b52235f7931b01485d942ca3551d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00142.txt'
761d5dea1d54a4ad78382f1c3e3ec223
4f05bc1a8399fc675db3f8c62a3648b790d15c45
describe
'32712' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
f6c271300bfbf0decb62c9ed632bde04
064b9c29755cdcf8455910ea35a099631b979780
describe
'894986' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
7f61b843a3077264c5a19245a981914a
5250d66f30e15a3037daff79189459ab204692bf
describe
'123857' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
f25c8fbdb11963a91d6668bed47eb8e2
7b0b4f0001c6ffcb62966f77d5e4362518910e8c
describe
'30989' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00143.pro'
731479a33b3038f46ed05e7c60199e4a
3a7868641cbdcf3e76c2719f59aaedd06615c01d
describe
'59978' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
d4324113115a82cc7632a58af93151ac
af19ac506ee8fd555af394aa548956e07296f9c3
describe
'8666228' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ee8a18da633081e3ed0868c77b4bd004
7ed7b9c970a5afe48c2e22e020a36d937488c7ef
'2012-01-13T21:31:07-05:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00143.txt'
0ebf8d0e952e428a177279006ca08c9c
246a4e827a53f9e76711cb939dd4f306cc72e233
describe
'32875' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
5143d60b8167463a28cc2f36bafc6bcf
b5c844760412cc80cf30d0b735b352eb5c921bde
describe
'866293' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
40f8e240395f3e48267cf7f309abddb7
93acf33bcb15fdd443e8c81629d2310fbb2c6f71
describe
'120292' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ff7d0b65cae0ff48807770eeeaba469b
4a1f4fd716e28080be8524f8c004e41e46636a1c
describe
'29653' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
e9edbbfac7a3ce91a5f23502a9a951c0
a0679a88aa2eed095f85bc5740dc2025d333ce4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
677802a833f5cde490df9f1b797f8574
b9579fac54a25c432f0838cd69e47e878319483e
describe
'8666144' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0d5b3fd32cd757e97204a33cb56bbbc0
2710211b032352a2a561d4a37cf24a26288776da
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00144.txt'
16850c0da5b72072c5f3e2446df9eafd
b65000a0d0e072892c3c418465ad7bf9b09136f4
describe
'32656' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
b7862b92b95658f8a02c0efa6b3468bc
9919893ccd95aca4f9711d0ca812451449e63afe
describe
'874929' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
1793391a7580d9259bcf650cc5d9819f
f5c9d954d6afb90683f3af9eda128b63288a5239
'2012-01-13T21:30:55-05:00'
describe
'122416' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
839d5cece425900c382b56fc3d04cd45
420b43369ab4fc95896547ea81bc76f616544aae
describe
'30058' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00145.pro'
aaec638394224a40ea39728af65b3dce
ea9f61ce89d047dfaa3c60bdd8d9d77d4d376504
describe
'59191' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
4088e21a9ac990c4999809dd8d34591c
20d0fee2ab2e1d43934d798a20d9ee82caec0c9c
describe
'8666072' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00145.tif'
b395e372e0751feee8b097cb026f6e8b
5091382b3d0530b0c37bba42e063687d63cd1618
'2012-01-13T21:32:53-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
468279ed548a19eed00c1d7639a0bc9f
bd11ed5229cf42dcdf3de86103620386eaa49f4d
describe
'32663' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
72cc090a301eb628ca569c533740a18d
80387b4992f1a0b3b7ad5b739d662bbe6f20c15d
describe
'863047' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
441a39006887bbb9c028f5d57add6b3a
0d7bcfe89e3b369bf8be1d5c9c83ec37a146c3ec
describe
'120594' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
8a1dcf0d01b087e0f00559e7e9228287
57395fc5c29fde96ccbeab2f88874902254b9501
describe
'30693' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00146.pro'
e51bb023d7a897396c4a0e61a65cd615
925320aca67fa768e6a1552d9cdcb0dc822705d1
describe
'58138' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
997913531c51e92a30566105d604fe74
f238cacb371c91bf12d5378c2414bdff889ee8d5
describe
'8665684' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00146.tif'
c3e149fc33b55a787c7abce8fa5ef70d
c1a248687c543103ab6e14424ebf87359cf56bd8
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
33dfdf5020ea5fc38c11ef3d5da9bb75
ffa65080398d48edb99e508ac677d15d9f29f5a1
describe
'31963' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
c7199e5c988bedae3039c77bec836f12
0d9f4ad7c1ee2cec06687b39952df55823ac03e4
describe
'430928' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
08992d79650ca9993efd61a13797e73d
aaae20f4c4e3d5e0ec4e56950ce220a8d8b26e92
describe
'70517' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
2293c8512e428ae8868db190d590ee8f
b5b7138c2b70bc1dc682f97079c4ace074d9621c
describe
'16658' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
f50f8d1eae5fbe2ebcf8c2247de3f191
ca13ddc7291148f4471bb2451a0b9703e87c4c90
describe
'37562' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
aaf9ed250161be7e94369bb00e0d8060
845fbcfc9c9356baad608e67aa981ad70ed1a752
'2012-01-13T21:34:08-05:00'
describe
'8662740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00147.tif'
a917d9aab17fe9dd400a0279caa7108a
351d6b571c3f3aa9506e46bc1d1018093f56ae1a
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00147.txt'
a656c1f7dd086a84a507938ebcbf6c1d
8a9bcbe86b3faa49b9d1aef4a9df50de66215251
'2012-01-13T21:36:34-05:00'
describe
'25126' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
67560f0bd51ee1f4a5ca53fbabdf7d14
585488917b39986cc8ce2132acdc18ecc43e1dd9
'2012-01-13T21:27:35-05:00'
describe
'569402' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
bf2ff43855809acf5f4efc0aa29f1797
ae5ae3212650d01ed3a7802397a2126834208504
describe
'87951' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
6c34df416f41b006527dc7031698f480
b4a13ae1921f2ffdaf8fd84b0e44997753b70f00
describe
'19876' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
49d53e88ff610eee92dbb2d0da184dae
8c5e467253b1c1f6128f5a544e7061f796091eb4
'2012-01-13T21:30:56-05:00'
describe
'45523' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d2a85e55c26fc4f4497c4d52c24bda7a
334e280dbc5b18d703b934e70ba80ff9a7572be7
describe
'8664364' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
06dfe41121548fee38a738440a68ccc5
644ee5149e22bb522588eafb4b54f7d638288196
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
a7e61bf97d2e7b3d1bff5724e3031514
f04ce76933271c5f44b7aa2bbb59c0ef40cf3ca5
describe
'28362' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
31a186f94aa2e4b4231b5284bb132a1d
c548a354946e90af18bfdd67ffacc17234060d5a
'2012-01-13T21:28:06-05:00'
describe
'839433' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
5f2d006cdc1dd067a640f524ccdb9cce
74507782060ccae9aebc01228ab003d2365d24e3
describe
'117472' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
20e2fa74f7b939da5b38575de180c112
d104086bef8e7ee57b3b2c3c029c344b4ce50f63
describe
'29094' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
b30fcf91fed3bab81e6d15c75c150cc1
e525bb26f980e8927fd099442797d64a7937a063
describe
'57211' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
04a6a8daefd2bebcfbd778f673886d6b
c841347b832048b7a10f3c8e040418202ff1c63c
describe
'8665996' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e0546c19acdc8d82c5c473ec66ca44a0
5a2c37ff0ec0790c46ec718a8bdb527cafe4f756
'2012-01-13T21:28:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
368d4d500f5467b9591c2bd4b7f3100a
2af43b5093a1032533a6f99714a684acd78d745e
describe
'32246' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
ed4665a02d930000bbc00b67dc0f3022
bd4b46edb2871f4dc4feed5a8a2f00aed37aa064
describe
'860272' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
6b25ee095987826858ae6539f17ebc74
4578d9ef61847ea31eb10b448db312d7e3d63b1e
describe
'120506' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
b88af90e7ba00ea322f920ce11a9af0e
e024c543dc2aa4bf1607ae8a62ddffe2bba5f6cd
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00150.pro'
c57ce4d07d248e2d8f261a134b7edab1
134371197cd36ccbade72e7ce7aca21926aa1ab8
describe
'58177' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
fe1efe46f0089ad24dc533b5382a3f85
e46b87962a609fbf2b35374d49eb23a350f9cd4a
describe
'8665728' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
7512d0ba9ceab6fb28eea556c3e013a6
4e5ab0437ead0dc2dba65ed1853da123efd0a50d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c3967ed26748d272eae86bfd8772b0af
9413fdfe67353a3322570df0f26cae6a7872b321
describe
'32230' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
e0f219b4b45d614032729d838b0df4d2
5238dd46ae430ca851f7c4e44009752b422675dd
describe
'831798' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
8b7c8912a99d06ac11810ad8b3d45afb
b8b5cd14314e3c6f4691684368005cae9b34ddec
describe
'117420' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
1766755dc73f7fea3f257a3e8b935fa5
c4cb2245abea48e1d544957dbb1e8394df9921c4
describe
'28563' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAB' 'sip-files00151.pro'
8b839b7893d6882f02b2cdc85a5b490a
7a0162d4bcb9f533e1f808021ea590998a15e465
describe
'57399' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAC' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
7acb2bc7969b4a246990a1cea12a3bd0
9d0d7781ba6a1e06f34611450e68a6ab736775b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAD' 'sip-files00151.tif'
50fa2b79873b679b7c70c5e8b8c91a95
25e796e51316fd5964382dc01df94e600dbdc929
'2012-01-13T21:35:28-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAE' 'sip-files00151.txt'
c8f6cc90e785fa426ca772045b70eadb
d08fcbbc7311fde074192c3bce69987c1394d72a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAF' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
72cac47aca91cf0d39529e5bf7a5b893
418bde16227c6ba15b32bb5b38dd76e3826ba2ea
describe
'827210' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAG' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
ebace7cb083573a32f9726bf213a00f4
35532cd832008ce47a13aaf2f4d85a81db5e8640
describe
'117210' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAH' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
380fa7b8cfbcee3ff77925a90e19d113
5667e81c4dd06c8de85fc3b360591e2193cc52b3
describe
'27968' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAI' 'sip-files00152.pro'
1c032456ff8a263e39e3bfdbee06f4e2
c214090d9fc535c0c3b7e4621ab13c4c453a83eb
describe
'58214' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
8b33c1d18916d44c6acef4c3d08de445
ec29edcd89e7d57ebb7ef94204066c2b00dea66b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAK' 'sip-files00152.tif'
88a05410c9707dd70daf5ad0df7933b8
a5fbdce24814616aaa1b8622497681149030ed61
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAL' 'sip-files00152.txt'
58532a1d92f198f47e19dd9ce8f512a0
bccffa886560ceaaf7bdb0c52cd120f3013aef4b
describe
'32427' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAM' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
19e4e44b87610dbf7b32c67d2b5505a6
97eab0086f69fa40dfba6ad399e7afa02224ff50
describe
'895616' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAN' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
ab29c8a8781cbbf23ed4197725a1d7c4
1cf71428f82f8922205b37543a4ba823bbe6f6e5
describe
'125169' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAO' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
d049fe24ee0f3bb4e64d5646632cf60b
dcd2657e2e883bff9636e554417fca95cd320723
describe
'30399' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAP' 'sip-files00153.pro'
cac35cd8701726cc19907c0db1136698
a858a75faae78f0f3fcf99a7acbeca94718bbbe2
describe
'60859' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
b25e96a6becca0bd0863877078ab65bd
fdb232982b515e0d2e42bf4d3355ec6f02d6afae
describe
'8666608' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAR' 'sip-files00153.tif'
6bced8263719a319972bb3db134514c9
3e7e42b16a4e49776d76e559bef175ab3afe8115
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAS' 'sip-files00153.txt'
9a7fb85829938c5bafd65a4e19d55df1
3a88d25cbd5dd6c353a3a304c5b0eeeb5736ed97
describe
'33614' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAT' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
a67c417a6ea547d896b75376b397b0b8
8bf64fea6dd04d3c22d072518a5a89d7371445f8
describe
'810952' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAU' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
0b337c5ea77f5b6d1b91b4085862205e
f5545e30908939574099ef490ca19b9809601dec
'2012-01-13T21:29:22-05:00'
describe
'114195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAV' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
cd127fd53ef7efa1d1626de4e6ae1baf
29401a1779e19ae6b1d85d51af7762d345ead76e
describe
'29054' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAW' 'sip-files00154.pro'
dc22ef9933c5fb8d72b27867356f9ca9
7beaf4b4e62f9f0261376bb898d785cb1ffd4213
describe
'56123' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAX' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
ec1a52979adb8706dac4e5b66a4f56cc
5e972346950bc80a3a2a06043ed2b40f42a73a4b
'2012-01-13T21:34:26-05:00'
describe
'8665656' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAY' 'sip-files00154.tif'
206c9605af2a9800aa4bb99729f708b9
d9b4ea5d5db9b91a1222345774a5883029f1e793
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
1447c9cef582c944d0255d9daf77f87b
e7f5c820b0d122886a5d9d1ef896c575b63d327f
describe
'695325' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBA' 'sip-files00154c.jp2'
20eb53ea3dc58b8d45fbef40cf2274fe
763ba0b9540eb8ba6f7544675aa8d7c88379ee8b
describe
'71380' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBB' 'sip-files00154c.jpg'
a7e3fd14e83135211e8141bce4a82199
4b422769e8d0885046e2f71551db9b13cd8dc18e
describe
'2587' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBC' 'sip-files00154c.pro'
d3cce97750c86213e7e144e1ea9d2d6f
a93768c238f3948a3ef66df70d6dff3615093b64
describe
'35682' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBD' 'sip-files00154c.QC.jpg'
9c2285e366cdfbdc1f2d6cc62bb614b1
b8f43f1484b6e10029399f0d9906b12319fd095e
describe
'8663732' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBE' 'sip-files00154c.tif'
9ae9584490d68c8572db0a5fb3debaeb
81007ab1bb7254c3ad70e18f568f20db74116c34
'2012-01-13T21:35:15-05:00'
describe
'127' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBF' 'sip-files00154c.txt'
551bc1da45995a079c3a737e1ab3ee1e
afc01a6705c14a80e54fa77bb9cad5aa19028b92
describe
'25461' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBG' 'sip-files00154cthm.jpg'
71cebca8befe3cc7bbe676bef0ba7134
16203d56e45da45a0c33454bca9c5606d760a8c4
'2012-01-13T21:30:35-05:00'
describe
'31547' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBH' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
6c3025d50255a907479f5e63ada68b37
f52b6066a362ad5e77d211a00572d5ccbed69f50
describe
'729888' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBI' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
bd7f3877c051a738c9e7005eb732088a
bfc0646d85b63300ab7f3756b6980461fd730f85
describe
'106669' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
e9825585ccd43a63ba861503fe914dc4
e22ca1cd0972054a9e1f23c7577f52c8486e4d76
describe
'27027' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBK' 'sip-files00155.pro'
146be62d4cdd842786dacd4f52bdb8d0
35084d5031fc2c9124fd6ed615a7fcfccee27f98
describe
'53623' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBL' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
66830d5980153da9b1b7301431e26dd4
9f75215e21433080bde165a1de016c3b32cf5999
describe
'8665508' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBM' 'sip-files00155.tif'
9374b1dd3237b6a516535e6be1c170f2
143d25878a052b30d2f53d962ae8723623031e7a
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBN' 'sip-files00155.txt'
20870dfe1cefc48a96ffb59233d65a9d
bbe6a23d3372e996b586f631b411db5859f6f694
describe
'31273' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBO' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
7fa0bf37560fee300bf385ead548d21a
4d60827c8b080a33c8adb77e58cb5816cb4105f3
'2012-01-13T21:32:56-05:00'
describe
'397037' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBP' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
e6ba09a55c12e6adbe732ae69a57eb89
6764c58caac2f2022368a00e095a1356d6d04332
describe
'67093' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
af9f06cc24e07efd086780efef795707
9942b30077cb682e99da21b75fb2f0e3d84d4e4e
describe
'14600' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBR' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e9a74c890b460b9d9bc855b702f4a250
677291f70eeda5b18cc65056a11d02e3bc475b3f
describe
'37853' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBS' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
8cc6ff9b7b0a4da8f260310b353e29b8
1deb101f0b41ac08eebaa162ae457319aaa8590b
describe
'8662824' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBT' 'sip-files00156.tif'
9195c94dff4f3048b10f00dc603c1fbc
29f65ac083dc90c8e2031df987821e9c9b445b3d
describe
'574' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBU' 'sip-files00156.txt'
7e371e13d0a1d177b482f42bfb1bb93b
0b9551a3445ff6d6086dc62101b7271d7364532d
describe
'25122' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBV' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
35f2230ce822ab7deb1b55fe47e03490
dcc1411f1847e769f65bb7cda4bb77f46be01206
describe
'552811' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBW' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
9508e00deed949f2bcc433b6b7e36a66
4f6dea58143978dda4e569bf73ac5185db3f73d8
describe
'86025' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBX' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
a5d513445013d92cf0deb9c07069ee51
f62fd7882c9496909b1f19ef6ba9e2af54af674c
describe
'21151' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBY' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3d35182ea9db4b6f87aace302a83c7a0
22e2939d503e3e019384931de011fc821dce566f
describe
'45160' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
adb737f2ae8cdae12f983822060ec24b
cf6605e7743b04d1a70a5d168e985e60ba684d9b
describe
'8664276' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCA' 'sip-files00157.tif'
30de1af06638d78c04cf5c57f46a856a
c2d5f970e7545e65d211ef317fc429e3eb20a517
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCB' 'sip-files00157.txt'
55370532f283bb714697ffb3834621d0
0fd57a33d4d40f758e2560a03cbc154586b4dd5c
describe
'28304' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCC' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
c66e9105f297f8945da2331b35bc0476
0e6bb2e5f848bb4f051829158bbb81242ceb800d
describe
'838088' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCD' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
78ca901d8c7ef121fe025ca9f3488315
6e7b469055cdcbbc4f0c1015e38b262f3d106325
describe
'118101' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCE' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
8287943428bdcdae1a6cce7e6e3a66f4
0733116562627277c45f166cc5885e1ea8aa4579
describe
'30353' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCF' 'sip-files00158.pro'
1177359536575bab41fec5b67ae4157b
0c598c870cb3b9e0b3712a4bd2da83c433339b6f
describe
'57370' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCG' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
fb5a201df097b59b12ba98c5cb12fed1
8e4a04ffcc45a2bd5f2e9b1681656a428a92335a
describe
'8665676' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCH' 'sip-files00158.tif'
c2a628d3020e775f8f121a53885779a3
b62df39abbf5859e8cdca3e60d2ee79f7d0983e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCI' 'sip-files00158.txt'
b59c6c8e79c2e4fd2aa1112a5f1c5b54
927c2381d5762eaca7d143af2d8fc1ef45c1ac3e
describe
'31733' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
2e6ce8febd9003339f44551a0ce79d16
c346e438b02bfcac973fe4e9d4c6cd6f5be16454
describe
'815720' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCK' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
fd253c40ac00fdb550a3f5eb7dd11485
7629ba7cf276a856ca34ae37b290318b1b0b020e
describe
'116300' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCL' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
47f6f6af5a32c1cddaa4b9f94862ade5
5da79aeeb5b00fd5260c9dfd44de6428ba403dd0
describe
'29185' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCM' 'sip-files00159.pro'
4cc8771be30ed790a961eb6195202118
b24540aa9e36e4bcbcc302d11679ae8a46add840
'2012-01-13T21:31:42-05:00'
describe
'56963' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCN' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
33e6fb81c6c7bd99e4aefc4b33e8857d
b0679025108d94fa6461486e03ea39031590b33d
describe
'8665720' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCO' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7cf9e3e859233dfbfbe466d89ec29212
2faa246190bbb2ae0eba00270850d627613c0415
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCP' 'sip-files00159.txt'
221af452a99e7ad7b9c9f8c6ac048538
e781159da71d22235d16e0610136ede8fe1c3574
describe
'31798' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
99c0a928f757ee465acf8f0cc17d7f09
2fb10cb94cd3d85354194ce1951bdf9b6786af0e
describe
'792270' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCR' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
c3f28648e760c7d0b23cb30286132145
f288432fccca6b2c6706d0e96e58b0ed8a828c29
describe
'113637' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCS' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9b8213cd9f891b522f0828541c4cdfab
c30c271460fa99f157bb4fcba96a492828566892
describe
'29455' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCT' 'sip-files00160.pro'
1e0903a235c407430ee4680ae82fe421
a6f411534c15d611d79bf8393818c56fa7af40bb
describe
'55891' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCU' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
4a1419be4cd5a2dbe2e8652dfc886523
f64d09c7dd8d21554241f657d1086d2b3efa04f9
describe
'8665800' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCV' 'sip-files00160.tif'
681b1975a71e48a57be377ee91049593
a480a3c9948dbdbf8d148321cf0e4adeeeb80dce
'2012-01-13T21:32:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCW' 'sip-files00160.txt'
ab583d202296224c94d457e334dd9fb5
bf49df5b6594ce3ac5763fbb0bbdf95de6daf4ef
describe
'31630' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCX' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
2ed1ba32a84d0d42e9cd5a4b6ea01167
dc1c25cca04f6466b1856dabf9eb2c86a04a04da
'2012-01-13T21:34:12-05:00'
describe
'784017' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCY' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e56d778a46a2fba4aee013d4ebd33b61
2b1825f8efc4b6543146e7fc897e987c21d88a8d
describe
'112935' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
b9591a43d6b7ef37637e3b0fe95546b4
d854b6f1e2e3cb44a8939cc42fd8926813bedc68
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDA' 'sip-files00161.pro'
ff09c72d1d0253b04ab3a4402a4ea1f4
7a97ec85ef3f66f2ba74533659dad0aa72d712a2
describe
'55843' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDB' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
9084991438f805c8e9bf5c9dd13ceb4f
a445cc59a49652166c6148ba07a07b9e8861a7a9
'2012-01-13T21:28:18-05:00'
describe
'8665548' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDC' 'sip-files00161.tif'
3a398a63a78a2ac85014879ed125e420
273cc367e619f3fb71443a456b541f4b274cf584
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDD' 'sip-files00161.txt'
f95346a712481fa2b498cc74f5e77a65
c09cb458e0c6dc6c28cc8dfb9922cf4375c1bcd3
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDE' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
7bae7c7640a6f872396830389976d0cf
dcddd5e9e07196df5bb1fa0f56a97350fa4d8603
'2012-01-13T21:33:01-05:00'
describe
'775399' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDF' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
af0ed80f39ec15be6102fabefaac5455
91602ba2a816f8800a73d9ddef69aae41d9deba7
describe
'112315' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDG' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
42e88d0be7a8c35fc6632465a4dc714e
ca017562f40863ed75f3b2024b254098f14c4ace
describe
'28657' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDH' 'sip-files00162.pro'
717bdf049db86e4b94171b64c91495d3
20ba792d5aa7565582e9d57e4f7291bc5fde8549
describe
'55368' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDI' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
7c9fd3996e70d455abf6e08111b20b06
719d5c925048f28c5564073f1208e9105b61a708
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
cb5d4b29ada1c40c5a2268eb50520647
5fa1fdc9b1cfe358bfe463f670b83353e103eea9
'2012-01-13T21:34:23-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDK' 'sip-files00162.txt'
3f6ecdc25da9508526b3405976f2f44a
5ea7cf40eb6614721c4dc05b9a07d41d01bdcddd
describe
'31736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDL' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
15a7f006a418f85520d5a59925e88f8e
198c02d20da70f44f13723cbdded9f7ed0ba29bd
'2012-01-13T21:33:30-05:00'
describe
'803872' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDM' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
ef5ab19a6dd9f81d5251a85cd525abf1
9ee641858d9f38852495c9323d5c7dd91c3a237c
'2012-01-13T21:35:41-05:00'
describe
'115841' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDN' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
8eb1bac3068b9d47528a311fa93db481
1118f3e5a81d846b0edaabfe14e3d96cda47376d
describe
'29645' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDO' 'sip-files00163.pro'
26eb06fd93da3dafbd2d21c92a3cc68e
b4ce1179a31e7811ba309b69321d5d003ff95f50
describe
'56934' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDP' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
756e7a4a814090d92f019c97d7bd0b6b
27162d1376e36112d684d47ea04060dff7eaa321
describe
'8665772' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
fb1752a84086d938b115d277f3f5c32c
ff335f7827a7f022cba36705e6b8450b9dad6947
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDR' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c46293cd5f1ca9e5574bbdf1f30d3bf7
7fc3da8d2e7b7d5569e1e8f7e9d40ddac4dcb169
describe
'31663' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDS' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
73462d0488f4dba51ed1ba65a169c113
f2dcfeff549760f6d249aef6bd31b5fbd32a6ee1
describe
'218989' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDT' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
6c1d298c2c5ca79429d2d5af76dc86ca
a9140ffbda530b71944f5be2269210ba7a8e0fe1
describe
'46567' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDU' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
2d08abc20e053d9f0743534ce6894d0c
ac2149e71cf4799148ffec4473058f5e752082a4
describe
'7790' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDV' 'sip-files00164.pro'
1d711c88fae84ee61578b0d051090b9f
f5d38e7b00053e0fe5c6db84535d77eff8022862
describe
'29179' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDW' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
453518396326d7d90f614d3b817faa45
767574aae89aab6fc0396bd5817beba159a24ddd
describe
'8661496' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDX' 'sip-files00164.tif'
cc9696a5c33046f2c60ab23297dfdfd7
8fcdbd43155678cb3b0634166d2d6d8e89b5dd15
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
222307adf84d3dbcfebbb28295a1a55b
e1e1acde074f7e59d66972efedd6341e68170132
describe
'22127' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
c4d616fb3752e99c63484de8f9b46209
b32b8756cf87e02efaeb6e4b077c35ecd8bc6766
describe
'27926' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEA' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
8a986c22e2a75eb8a12a3907f50c76d4
81a7864cd850fd62d9b0d8df026aa883eca14021
describe
'23529' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEB' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
6201c48c35439cd9e2e29b9733fe0650
5f3e84c082cdef7c0efc87ebd11c949a803ad22a
describe
'648' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEC' 'sip-files00165.pro'
8d326fcb7546812b3a1274f06f090118
9e236650b33ae312f7954bd1aefff417e6410cdd
describe
'20385' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALED' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
ed2d18cad0f896e5f40b2c213fa8adb2
6fb45884d00e4c5394a5e0f3ae06affb2f0b1a0f
describe
'8660244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEE' 'sip-files00165.tif'
17a420431c05886f789454e0c771c603
6c40f5be3bc1d7ebf518f4424c585b53a83ad793
'2012-01-13T21:29:53-05:00'
describe
'47' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEF' 'sip-files00165.txt'
39e6527708eb0f64afe1ed314e1a5f81
25429e4924d4bf1071eafed6db1440ad1ac173b5
describe
'19040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEG' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
9f4bc9eb75d76523b5c4c619bf92dfc3
d895159c748e95441af6a5dba32988e484022421
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEH' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
9040c0f96d5da98a14ca39d1d0de5171
c6030262fa2fd179767d233049f29c96b23d425f
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
0bf44b56a65d6a7077899a1a3891fdea
4242180584650ef0f90884d56892e5cb09c7f3c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
e079d13452de0bbe027b0df297cdec13
205f62cb06629e1a22832fbcef41f2eca724899c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEK' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
eb816932541fb98d455a37d8b993c962
d61a7ccd16f246aca42a16387bd7ea8cc58872b4
describe
'472986' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEL' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5454eb16b6d3da82a252636316b77d54
2086ada5e54ac30bec21e1c046ba1a453c42006b
describe
'76293' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEM' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
6fb8a60f24d6387728c30c1219715b92
90e58302688fdf89c7ac80852638132418beb0b9
describe
'17034' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEN' 'sip-files00167.pro'
5db159fca82a63d82ea2c0f65b8a767b
c81e34b7f4601ce4644f3a9eca21ffb0a555688a
'2012-01-13T21:34:58-05:00'
describe
'41330' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEO' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
4eb25ea24e444e191a0cb9409f6e395f
05a8c47b86e138b3d33bfff1d0fd5afcd56fea3e
describe
'8663492' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEP' 'sip-files00167.tif'
ed079cfe71e4174fe75c2669dc452faf
7b0e3d1fb1c3a50b47e5f2bc88c30a71c1f5199e
'2012-01-13T21:30:12-05:00'
describe
'691' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
2468580ff7f5c144ce87ae5cfde74d1b
d2b977904d2d06c8835a5711a860337b1bb75ebc
describe
'26397' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALER' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
e899194c7b544c6d6a8d262be04952be
10bec6d41f0d65ba3fdb041aaf795bce4f26bf11
describe
'863396' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALES' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
77e625e555972f36484135e56436e19b
c3b49c01c0917adf77b3234a25ce2a1381a4fed6
describe
'120989' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALET' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
de72a7277e905a31e518ade3438e5508
1f9910695fb9707d8dab815c5f35dd9620502782
describe
'30059' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEU' 'sip-files00168.pro'
459c9eb5285b87b442ea0773351ed20b
ac4ca2bf7ada5c7ecd09f31647f94f8a5eab2eed
describe
'58956' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEV' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
15131d726d532ccd5c2f7af3b45d3719
126ccbefe12558a740a417e70ab36e977cf8a1c4
describe
'8666088' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEW' 'sip-files00168.tif'
a4c9d48d12ee2e0e428dcc6832ad06ce
abd74a4b0321254ed52edc6cc137c248c10fdf7f
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEX' 'sip-files00168.txt'
50ae25d791adf6f291526ad3f1c2bd87
ac915be5c10b3dd842dba4111cf69770653e1579
describe
'32647' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEY' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b31b202b67e34b769c53fa787337f2d7
c9a239796464c35465c6a22c071dbb027ff7e2fb
'2012-01-13T21:29:47-05:00'
describe
'828634' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
cf780ce0fd55c84bab44f91ff4d79db8
cad4fb7a882b21407771d3ddeb30a8f8168aa6f6
describe
'117195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFA' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
4173e2fc079f3a54f62db7d0d7928caf
1a92b58eb09e4eae6d1a22a6cf24812fa5211b2d
describe
'29338' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFB' 'sip-files00169.pro'
fa37093ff38b412f773e6f3a6a1bbc84
6b2e5fafcd0e2b2192b02ca33a4b7bf19bb9e638
describe
'58481' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFC' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
3ed6f84078e642726ad30f88fe068085
e8d8802e2cb7ee6e00cc68d2c13c1ed8d0b34434
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFD' 'sip-files00169.tif'
a3e0da96833aa51578eabe08ec5e116e
85108ecf2f61b773ddb01f99c69ff5d7254e59c1
'2012-01-13T21:35:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFE' 'sip-files00169.txt'
be708ff5497faa5a91b7ddf5c8c51fd0
778b82861d0695fdcea0dd1f172030c97ac3ea01
describe
'32585' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFF' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
c17181d0cc087f47146eadf719a6e22c
dee8689cafd7d7f5203b4c1fccc290f7a85270b0
describe
'858303' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFG' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
5679f89258db3100df336a74d73fc941
d45263cd87eea7505243a9be9593d10ad2a59872
describe
'121097' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFH' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
69f53b1995dfbb36badc63ccb31da261
edfcf7343ceb63f0b00c30c54f66dc5461883e0e
describe
'30070' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFI' 'sip-files00170.pro'
3c610fe5387f1a0a8fe5155005130aa1
69bca36473add5879c0779ffe50848b917261025
describe
'59292' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
863fa3660e04502f394414366c9b8213
5db3c2aa1f1b71ddc87eac95409f242c4783aed1
describe
'8666196' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFK' 'sip-files00170.tif'
b6ff6f82f4c1705b9233e77ae8bddc51
d9170a03130a31aedfd631bc276dc4be252ab8d3
'2012-01-13T21:33:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFL' 'sip-files00170.txt'
9fd34da997257713665f4ac71356932f
ae018787640fb2bf4caf7f33f83eff1e27187403
describe
'32975' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFM' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f8341e6e55b30d7e1f2dc658705a6103
2b0d3c41cbb1727fa72198d49dad8c5872cfadfd
describe
'862557' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFN' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
a7e4735c4c4d44b67793119fef3ee637
edc658c5b601d98eb8f2071d5cffe6ca088e95ec
describe
'122064' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFO' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
04212aedd802cb04f90eb0bf993f4d91
b5d81671af607a1d01b0d153159d2a3c9db9ca7f
describe
'30541' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFP' 'sip-files00171.pro'
8e3670ec7297e89c2dc53b1aca942e16
42105ed58f058780791edfb367a3a0b39ffb99c5
describe
'59480' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
982f164d1eb718081e3d10f8525578c0
0c992ba40060e09d7a6c9de1a7d738dfd569d639
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFR' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9961692969b6a26f8126f0857d7f2e9b
df4580d884008e9403f9ba5d1097803ed66c0e4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFS' 'sip-files00171.txt'
979571f6f6256d0cf4d8e03413c88c75
1a098b10780b936bc268b619b56d3729bbe461d0
describe
'32521' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFT' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
b06874c126d4cd6c3cb53ebabe9b502a
1417f90963a1f45c6faca0cf55e0f03250601705
'2012-01-13T21:33:06-05:00'
describe
'796707' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFU' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
855bdd35acdd490e8612fc1cfb41f7ab
3339f8c3a5dc547a7d6e1aff0f3e1e542b4c2a30
describe
'113048' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFV' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
470f9237945ecd57f9564e426e058ddd
735fde0fe897ca225c7972ecc2d74b9484a2949c
describe
'28433' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFW' 'sip-files00172.pro'
fe99b491eba554e3139a22d973d232e4
3ea69501105f82349120485fafe5f8aabbdb111f
describe
'55742' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFX' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e92e978d29584bc0019b62698a5b0b5a
0ff6c7ed5d08b9f36ebfc82b53a02f7ef9fb1daa
describe
'8665648' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFY' 'sip-files00172.tif'
a492afeb60fb06aa0e7b0b2c1a86e82d
b3f691454c153d90bee51e3c4bca7e4ac7b36417
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
1c42488f43a9f189cd8c4760cddae204
64d1fcf61c8601d63051ccc5e8cdcbc1e5abb2df
describe
'31706' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGA' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
6e74311aa5767df1868d934504fdd641
468056b80a33178340137119b08ed732a043382d
describe
'839958' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGB' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
bef75bddb8c2b484bb8f3c33c8a5b0f6
1a8a4fd72a9677d13e0253d18e5a42133a73a325
describe
'118511' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGC' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
14698ee9f2849931cb7dbd5b681669ef
5a3e00eca5f0ed570e1d2cd15091645022372930
describe
'29912' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGD' 'sip-files00173.pro'
670c92a7e17d3d5f2a68ce9423054b53
3095cda60ddac768849bfcb087753f6c3a840ed3
describe
'57810' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGE' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0d95840f1e983432ca666156990b968f
2b433d742a04af789562bec48ca35421539df698
describe
'8665764' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGF' 'sip-files00173.tif'
4da85bbe6b67664342aa4329465866d0
698f02022162064b4d0b5c8846ff055d0e80af1f
'2012-01-13T21:32:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGG' 'sip-files00173.txt'
ca8b55d4d2f129b196479514dff4c1e9
c12930dfd5d134fd47c48908f94ff07e57feb40c
describe
'31824' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGH' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
77686beaa671d85f87ab671aa1724a9d
6f9563f81dd19f70fde014c8d973edb855d7d798
describe
'837077' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGI' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
420b4d4542dc2a8bed5c38a39bab6962
49d8563c7f9e346bb57a7d77a825f5cc271a0548
describe
'118110' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
860a51d0c7455833e841e65b25a710b2
45cc8f1dd4fb2baa5fa1eb107023916757256aec
describe
'29838' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGK' 'sip-files00174.pro'
0f44ada90b7b2afcffc5ed031173e09a
820c2745342dcbd244aacdb2de471c13a65b27c4
describe
'57746' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGL' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
c9a8e3869ea8bb4b00f0d91b702840f2
e1c8fac2d555ed5ca86ebcaeddbe8e6a83c288c3
describe
'8665712' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGM' 'sip-files00174.tif'
33bbb6d88c418db322357b2124099dd9
14c243a97ef504e34dee3465267b7b3c116d88ae
'2012-01-13T21:27:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGN' 'sip-files00174.txt'
84956eb10521ff1d837fe6a1a927cb05
09f236caddac1918994a4e57ced17d2a7653b9cb
describe
'31923' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGO' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
dea5ecbfb93177842cede5fb6de76730
9a176fe71196227cc8ae60d8e81530205eb85992
describe
'824261' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGP' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
ab3def2537a1568314e85c4cad8de918
54197f599ee2517f82e68b6c569c53cbc4414b68
describe
'117631' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
3d0597abefb96fb3c6d1d68aecbac64f
aee22d6d2b257c43491472a029b572ef55fec635
describe
'29770' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGR' 'sip-files00175.pro'
6c9009e4baa2cabf5c9e5e2509099688
1bc92b1994086fc5f6af50ce3c355c2cc41ed26c
describe
'57549' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGS' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
7b3df183b5444c5759af8d69e3620317
c06ea1e85c4f99ef8e6945163a3166858e00fe1e
describe
'8665868' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGT' 'sip-files00175.tif'
a9cba16b24a73ea9753ec027352593d4
74bf497f76c72201425c73ee96378fe743bb0df7
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGU' 'sip-files00175.txt'
2c1cf1aa5e9f7b6fad231de1f5b2165e
01fdaa091d8aa01dffcd0814b7961d7a9b373f92
describe
'31775' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGV' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
bc428def0e22c94f694382bc74990801
b96b4c4051afa4befad9b81d0974d3fb41c38069
describe
'839864' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGW' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c020dbaaea628b8b86203ccf31666f4d
ad97b1d0a5c9797529a0d9d4ad6cbf2d61cd523f
describe
'118825' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGX' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
90e5cc6511c17e92ea9656f9f9284e99
bcd620a75f5d01f903ddead5add7d0fb4858730d
describe
'30223' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGY' 'sip-files00176.pro'
54fbefc141bcfa7ca77949cd55cf6465
2e69a3f86ea40aac9639c47a26cd1fd7a7e687ec
describe
'57429' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
e7a4eb91a06c5f9d4de85971bf3ebc46
ad504536e1afa334b2f6d4a2341bdc28f9738cf9
describe
'8665740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHA' 'sip-files00176.tif'
dd51c452132a054288dc22442e0887f0
2b3e1dd1346dae95c76b227eb3a214e3b72a54c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHB' 'sip-files00176.txt'
cde14dbb8c05655f8c074b2356bb16e3
ce601d7e24acb65b4e9fc8d72bde6ddfbfcb3dfd
'2012-01-13T21:32:43-05:00'
describe
'31769' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHC' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
9f3111271145650199ec667c01278407
cfc4306a1941305238ba19b6f7ec07f46231ac8e
describe
'823403' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHD' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
d97700313e1fa1efdfa1fe63c9e6eb5c
2e5dff8aeaacf751e55ea5f17eb94bcbfdc82682
describe
'116389' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHE' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
e13ed0933de51ba156ed80bf3f54eaa9
7839d4f70754b5c02cffea14b7a45d8bd34bae13
describe
'29669' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHF' 'sip-files00177.pro'
f0c5e9de227ac4a8a5de79b6cb6b9d48
14af1e3b263284e1589b50355cb12d8962f7f89f
'2012-01-13T21:35:36-05:00'
describe
'56197' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHG' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
02c4f5e22d877325ee881d78dab499cb
2483b1aabac955be04292af33f46a53e5cb92275
describe
'8665552' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHH' 'sip-files00177.tif'
b007ffb41545059490039e41ff3e7030
b245e2606bd03d0bb8c925c410b78bec87c21ad2
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHI' 'sip-files00177.txt'
aba892b56ade59579c0bce9515b1e916
a72dcaa879683629d0ff2af6e64530cf748dd4c9
describe
'31328' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
7eabf0a3f421677d4ea8e95a2d2646c4
a1d526292b258272041b009da1f0a05d3ccca2c6
describe
'853337' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHK' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
83082e6b7d99c8d56a0a071c960822ed
551dbbfe1adf503cdcb3b7f9e8e921fadd813997
'2012-01-13T21:31:08-05:00'
describe
'119498' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHL' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
6796441e2f6ec1d8d0f134021695ff88
b65e9dec6bc5bd1961ce4a58b215a91ab2d9f5a6
describe
'29511' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHM' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2b2cdf0d9df3d45ed01cc4e77074cfe0
6702f2355121e15d0dc90fabe919065c6b427563
describe
'57175' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHN' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4667b1216f0e23ede98dd42114e99409
ce1a09eea4c63dfdc63b8051433663030bda24cf
describe
'8665816' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHO' 'sip-files00178.tif'
a82f3ff71940456a3d6bcea64dd86f2b
328ddc669396bf72dc58dc7c34d349e3931598eb
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHP' 'sip-files00178.txt'
be036ff9860932324c8d3e4b7cf5510d
714a54d0e31ce9da726bce26c7c17396fba3b6f9
describe
'32131' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
ec7dc4e5091b31f38076044500d311ed
228d139d1f8cd2793a3e304b53c4bb59885ba594
describe
'847085' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHR' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
fe4fb30222d768002b0d8794d9359d01
2bef2f2a38c79fcb5a683c873f471d38597ece74
describe
'117951' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHS' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
843ae50d2eeba67040827e69a0e72178
1a6e4c54033b78adae260a944cbfa76348a392cd
describe
'29284' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHT' 'sip-files00179.pro'
12711ac0d2d3015c3fa384e50fdb75ae
235017a722d3449918f29a131504b40afd4a6a41
describe
'57000' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHU' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
2b36461034179c48529c36306f2e1fa3
d135edb8fc11f79e5c05d9f94f5bf6b02abf341a
describe
'8665808' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHV' 'sip-files00179.tif'
b44e9916647efeb7ff5b2137767839da
1f6964a254b622d8c261b6e56e07912f408a881d
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHW' 'sip-files00179.txt'
122bb6dbc89d691d2b2636136ebc338f
83077c78733c4dfdb3ec6adc544953eca2fe7755
describe
'32135' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHX' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
7bc190fca10e3374c2f7a86428d5c612
5aaf6e6034ccf20a023bb1842253742621fc6e92
describe
'862607' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHY' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
1ff52d9d6f58bd43d1ceff7506c3a545
9432b399f247bdac305b30c6eb7a8d11c5788a5a
describe
'121251' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
6956e9131ec793bebb36c06d17f8f686
136584d9273feb0a90a99042ef6b47c9efd988bc
describe
'29855' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIA' 'sip-files00180.pro'
7b72c0db29206d0a91166fa92260050c
087b616186f8d8706ae411939c8c20c32249d7f3
describe
'58999' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIB' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
62393d4cd9164a0e5d8b0ac5edfeb85e
0b6af373aa502448caad9d710b9c070e0d023ee6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIC' 'sip-files00180.tif'
33b2cdfcd8ae212530de8dec2ac8544c
27ce74a90d4898c40d6fa8806c2954afd53445e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALID' 'sip-files00180.txt'
39bdfbbb0ba5fa9ef36415c0ad155023
1161c58f9f931000df59c6ca11309e84241a5f59
describe
'32377' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIE' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
610754f5a9126773a11c1241bf62787a
80ac0fbd5c3a08d07a3a2f021ef6608557b159d8
'2012-01-13T21:33:53-05:00'
describe
'854903' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIF' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
c05d1f942a98b0a6f7b5819818c50b01
e9b5c22503cf718a661e954a607de32b66b38e5b
describe
'119495' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIG' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
2a3cb73edee4806c87c11dff93140172
45acd42dd58761c2f00acf4360dbd14754932d48
describe
'29667' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIH' 'sip-files00181.pro'
1097ef34abba4e82ee821b80a4a6e7e9
7b9af459b613103d2f0a986267c88be2e0050f5d
describe
'59312' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALII' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
2d04bbadf71f9eff2cd38f3476b881dd
fd414c22914c396c84ce364d01a754de4853a352
describe
'8665992' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00181.tif'
ef6b41517df6cd2130571f79c2816b03
51cadd4999c5d30850c533286a414ba5e8a7adab
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIK' 'sip-files00181.txt'
250ba8e3745e904a1886630fb9a01665
7680651210d01cd149c5d007dc6bcf4f7c9e2a24
describe
'32200' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIL' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
ca213188fd7105feb693276be5aa78b6
7ebd61c8c53239319e989a83d8fa18e35e36b64a
'2012-01-13T21:36:07-05:00'
describe
'844684' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIM' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
daf7f228975e76f4019a153dbad53548
e3758ae85495cb5ac5f18c2de13b121f419b2033
describe
'118467' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIN' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
7822eff506c1c87b9bf8a4881d750607
ff4bd33457a1a98796b88148eec365cd7d88489d
describe
'29431' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIO' 'sip-files00182.pro'
ac8fab36f685558a3d1f70c550e1e212
df56003ea4a6557ee97f0d9d1af309ea0b80cf9e
describe
'57378' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIP' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
7ede13e19655210eb841764a5eee8556
0284df0a8a3712002fe3e22c98bbde2373c7ac72
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
3a6d40bca0f83b0cb17c0485650513a0
fa812632ff213355e2febdb1d91965754dcd2dd3
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIR' 'sip-files00182.txt'
83a5a3f099176ca5bd61800a242424fa
286e65cec579a2e14a8133ee4c6a054a1337d228
describe
'31858' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIS' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
29fa5acd151de3e631ed714d42d5951b
53e40b807c2e0a4db1432cc837b74d7a500b9e55
describe
'855674' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIT' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
04fdebeaa22c4d664bd2ce5cbf5b3d53
be689bdacb64c3e9f0a9b8ade4a98a007bc033a4
describe
'119845' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIU' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
95ebef86e18800f71e472bd9216050a8
3b31daea14fb74434adab302c12257c3ed86bee0
describe
'30314' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIV' 'sip-files00183.pro'
ab716f119919ac53ff8c3a64df2f920b
6af3b43e1c8cac99aae13fd263f5c37fb982a85a
describe
'57385' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIW' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
8be0c7cd7967eff556a0d4304aed200d
4162c66af27cb27a3aa0a25645770169fb8e84d6
describe
'8665724' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIX' 'sip-files00183.tif'
2e0bf79343522c651d5bda98406f125d
9614c9d3a6d31afa76e378423e23faa2992ee169
'2012-01-13T21:28:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIY' 'sip-files00183.txt'
156e96f761239e779c82b6702c5c22ea
c1e06bb8736f0fda2d5878241150e386963f50cc
describe
'31677' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
9d6c660c5d31b2fcc3bd95d18a8208d5
ccf63ab4c72e2618d0ae3cd45c681ccb0b91ff4e
describe
'879528' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJA' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
cced1ce50d63e87a03465f371d4f6bd3
938e6c114262a07e1ab8330376a804f07e4c1105
describe
'122226' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJB' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f10468aab2d971106f859018d21d477c
8a567eddbdad52b8cab107027adab74ddee4a8f7
describe
'30605' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJC' 'sip-files00184.pro'
47f07295df3ce80b40a6241d97b13276
7fa8068f11decc10f551b47653f1389bf67e04ac
describe
'59002' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJD' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
626735bcdedf4f812359c176c342a940
8cec6061bec18b47cb09582263556667a07fc528
describe
'8666044' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJE' 'sip-files00184.tif'
f57a226f74c76e0c7a245ae9eb50d87d
e8554ff4b37f7257d0997e5c0319800fc0db7230
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJF' 'sip-files00184.txt'
7aa40db2d6f5eff1e173acfbe093571c
31337648a6133c1245df7d62a67cdc19949f5320
describe
'32579' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJG' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
faab16875bce1040ee7e2c0271ed2c12
6650d16a3beb5df71090431360f327b9e99067d3
describe
'844516' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJH' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
bb0ca109925728e664a5a46b673bc8d6
0030ea0ccfb9b673d8947717f6d9e61051aba1c2
describe
'119199' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJI' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
75a140a1bdac0b0d709a12897a867953
4466c4d6c1f8f31e895d27b8ecf1c0cf270c3440
describe
'29090' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00185.pro'
700de33e4b7f88d2e03f11e3665c8a34
84e238a77aa0bc405782da525c514223f04cc27a
describe
'58108' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJK' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
db3ab4adc7ebaadf3902ac49d59dc150
375adcfc24d495431fa0c38126b2dd96dfbeff8e
describe
'8666008' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJL' 'sip-files00185.tif'
6f447b7cba3ef50697bf747793ef6354
da9ab65032f6eabf6a8bbd620eb7cca709b675be
'2012-01-13T21:32:27-05:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJM' 'sip-files00185.txt'
92587f71a3bc6136e5d87ffe8ab0c688
db81e9697380d37268121941b81bec79f806c6df
describe
'32258' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJN' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
f84f10fd61609229c621af9e37666cc3
dd7f2c592a7607bf04834b76118c24dfa33da42c
describe
'865610' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJO' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
fc12b581a03e3179e158f741edbbe479
07654fec9bc6c2a1598b04e74e6cc71e32c6c55b
describe
'120430' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJP' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
0539a4d22a65be33bbca7d632a99cad5
b9992827758d9eccb148f0ab1c7c1d00066bd461
describe
'29731' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00186.pro'
d0df6f51d1c8d96a0b71853e9c3597fa
a20d030f0fa501c5c06c4e1eee3ecc338149a162
describe
'58425' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJR' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
c32eaa7a9d982693c59e4cf73127b8a0
28487954c3ca0b48f8eed571c3a098bfb0d089fe
describe
'8665916' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJS' 'sip-files00186.tif'
35464f9181a8e487ca5ff678967fbb7d
f54868e1ac081d3efd835a2b008c501717949666
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJT' 'sip-files00186.txt'
eae5b995cf9af1f122e25ee26bcfc85c
a0da8f9259a9a720e0f79e79c2877b9808fe6eb5
describe
'32515' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJU' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
281e085025c1701718ecc369db5f4e36
c01eada0067d750d20c213ad527eb321589c0c93
describe
'866370' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJV' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
3c2697131fe5b71eca4fe843cfea2991
497407586c976ca41dc444dc92dfcbfd5eec44da
describe
'120971' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJW' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
5a7dfc20e0b635b359dddf8a760d7315
c0bd104ab34f8ca300b4c0e0bb540e327cc52937
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJX' 'sip-files00187.pro'
935bf19115394100d665ff18332bbf96
ec2d6344336e980657189aa059a841dc978c5112
describe
'59316' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJY' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
82d628ad507bb512d37ecc1509fe8b3b
6ac03590b25258b98d8cb7cb8b12dcc8f52b5883
describe
'8666140' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
b33cdaa177b37d689401c2a7c5a0746b
072f4b993e50005b6212e6d654548a7477b589c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKA' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f7f7ae85c23fee04cadba0117604c8ab
70f2b2f964b0b3383220bf0f8e7d4fefa7da19ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKB' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
4ee3a0804a2e63a5390d06e9037b24a2
91f9b633c278713070ab5f8b2f4a0f88dda9fc60
describe
'870954' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKC' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
489fc8cd81984972334a5cbb68bb9dad
058a32367a9438a04e7b5b13f5cd829c3e884706
describe
'122157' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKD' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
094bfed60de8c9e35b742e374cc4a932
db5d61fef13dc82a225864c62f32fed9298baef0
describe
'30736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKE' 'sip-files00188.pro'
94bd363b1b3dd40371831044d7745131
b9bbe225cae67d11adaade290c0fd6374e7774c1
describe
'58253' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKF' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
b543406e18c88484b83a8d97c2f1d40c
30efbf8e08e601db0227f0e6f7f39c60f32d8dc9
describe
'8665696' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKG' 'sip-files00188.tif'
eaed340e63f66724ba90e7fbdb087af6
71882e07b0c51bfef085931b8b271779b9be010e
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKH' 'sip-files00188.txt'
b8fe243c52545ef47c7a30002696b7d7
ea054c6be43159419f1750a93d753d2be4224319
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKI' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
c61ab6bb902cd1a1580364d011bec000
1f15286c93331ebbb94c09a81eadf98e0f3d5df5
describe
'822827' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
8234893049bc5a00ee89964697fb163f
c2f2a8c0ace1189fa84dba4d3519c8e9b1a4a119
describe
'115632' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKK' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
509deea8180b02eae7e1eb9230d6895e
f10dd2ee5923d7fbc1d34938f97f609a3e6bff0d
describe
'28812' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKL' 'sip-files00189.pro'
64010760943fe3fa873dce4b74e637a4
013c8bb3001ea44294ce4c264e934bf0c1b742a3
describe
'56530' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKM' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
056462c33a5b30142af376a517cec4eb
6d2901e46ceddc262c021c20c7e3961c24e4e935
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKN' 'sip-files00189.tif'
0e63b72d5573db25f4fc320e6e19a3f0
56547316931942b81de26eb98053e45d5996aed2
'2012-01-13T21:33:45-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKO' 'sip-files00189.txt'
aaa0ae7a56ea7ec233bd58a2feb67b3b
eedf1724c54664f7c9824dbea12b8024bd8f0da6
'2012-01-13T21:36:21-05:00'
describe
'31849' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKP' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
371b78e5c4bd69ddd33a9eb75fd5c449
b74f44f9f25b82c41acb73e243ab3cf867052fd6
describe
'861391' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
ef0be6d20983486f72f0cb4ec03f8c90
a4b0220e387725430e3173795145a44a2f115362
describe
'120325' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKR' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
e781ab3983e9ba15a961d62185d2a387
ad292a9fc24712ee59f5533781d36fcf00f22adc
describe
'29636' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKS' 'sip-files00190.pro'
8ad6fe1fc8e5f9c29cbffaa37ca76366
df8201d8d88976ec25b3482cc4eeeff9e95d31ed
describe
'59061' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKT' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
42c171c7c9ee8b50b143bfed37437b7c
666b504efbdb8d6bf57675e968634b42c520293d
describe
'8666176' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKU' 'sip-files00190.tif'
4a276b67704e6f1c94b5a61e4fd0af92
e0a677d6ce63d2cc44ce8aaa5ff1cd0ae363e5e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKV' 'sip-files00190.txt'
c6db17c672adbf5b600880df42be917a
17e63102b4fd9154b36972cde161cb66980534ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKW' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
da7c35aa46b7a0447d402a98aec5029c
1cfeda764be7ccb47048a3ac5ae07ddea9e972c7
describe
'875080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKX' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
4039bf1460fdad2ee04242d0bdcb9574
6ccbe0661b39a8ef4f2f3d7ac0f9422906565d3c
describe
'121848' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKY' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
d18a2fb6e7b36741607297fc0d7077fa
65b8ca84209c9edc4d101b1fdb303cc6927d9556
describe
'30692' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
f5ff4d2d77e987313df6602d569bb135
43556bbdb97de4f1b41f6c882ad51257b6153d82
describe
'58968' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLA' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
b7d0624bf2b2826c1c0d0bed1e580b10
2010a8a7c30141962776aa7ff32095e7cc376540
describe
'8666292' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLB' 'sip-files00191.tif'
93755a2e2887e07b243a0735c30044ba
dfd6e45d90d949760f3b90e417eeaefcb53e4c34
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLC' 'sip-files00191.txt'
5820ea3bc39489a03e8a7c7c60c3fdf3
beb210f5ae552eff2a0ca4608ddef810488762de
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLD' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
83e7596efb16b519bf4d522047eead45
52ccfe94d7b64fcde2c44d18f9b92b98f127eee2
describe
'593907' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLE' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
bc3e0bcb24f957c6c7304e9cb72b6515
c16479b334b17bb5b8ffe12cc52fb0734cac94fb
'2012-01-13T21:35:08-05:00'
describe
'90317' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLF' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
864aa43d18e234f62c2e94a03c1f9de8
b922387187b573509c1c59061ccf627992560393
describe
'20630' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLG' 'sip-files00192.pro'
5efc6d896a26953255f6b5402d5f32e3
edfcd3b163fe2df40c4aa09c72565453c82ecb08
describe
'45806' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLH' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ab3b72e91b56ecfc430632d0bcefafa2
0c44f78e3de7999ac5b2b7d17b1568d44259e21e
describe
'8664072' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLI' 'sip-files00192.tif'
e33951eb64dd1137847ff3ed26ac3cfe
0862a963a9345ed0d1c5c28a071552fd772bdf75
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
b0d46d9ef226b0e6d5b1e27f0c25b5b8
0a16ac9fc340eda24f0fe521e3fa9d9da9587260
describe
'28213' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLK' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
677719e46f03a86826a4b0361dec12c0
899adcbd1c401fae0d3cd617bfe07ec149a44a0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLL' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
a039a22028a59510543ae5dfcff6b939
cef31d6fecc1c4b0406a00fab45f590da4bb5e19
describe
'285339' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLM' 'sip-filesUF00002787_00001.mets'
6f8ddff4316bd6d56ca0b1bd364d1671
842e778ed655bc1a27d251c00716eb59bb301866
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T14:16:41-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'370681' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJBfileF20090311_AAALLP' 'sip-filesUF00002787_00001.xml'
df96d2f20fe70a99a8fa9acfbb8df671
a18d5ed216cceb31cfd22f0d4edc0aa4b1b48cd5
describe
'2013-12-13T14:16:44-05:00'
xml resolution










Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM Error Log for UF00002787_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000a.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000a.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000b.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000b.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000d.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000d.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000e.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00000e.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00012c.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00012c.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:02 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:03 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00073a.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00073a.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00088c.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00088c.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:04 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00100c.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00100c.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:05 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:06 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:06 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:06 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:56:07 PM













TALES FOR THE YOUNG.


‘>The kind care of tho ptrysscau and bumane gaoler rescued me from

this fr»ghiful malady.’?—Page 191.
TALES FOR THE YOUNG.

LY

MISS KB EMBOURY.

me et
A

Ms. ety wr. & ie >
sss et eee ee
*€ Father” suid Cunstance, *‘ t wish you would have the flowirs
planted just in the same spots next yeur. "—-Pagd 29.





T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON AND EDINBURGH.


TALES FOR THE YOUNG.

t



BZondort:
T NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH.

MDCCCLIIL.


CONTENTS

PAGH.
CONSTANCE LATIMER; OR THE BLIND GIRL, o eee @
THE SON AND HEIR, eco eco eco oo cee 77
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY, eee Pas _— me ess 1227
WEWTON AINSLIE, oe es eco oes cee 165
CONSTANCE LATIMER.
CONSTANCE LATIMER;

OR,

THE BLIND GIRL.

a

CHAPTER I.

Amone the many fine mansions which have
recently disappeared before the rage for public
improvement was one, which from its com-
manding situation on the banks of the Hudson,
and the unobtrusive beauty of its appearance,
deserved to have been spared. Standing on a
little eminence which sloped gradually down to
the water’s edge, and completely imbosomed in
trees, Latimer Cottage, with its picturesque out-
houses, formed one of the most beautiful points
of view as seen from the river, and attracted
many an admiring glance from the roadside
10 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

traveller. But a wide, naked-looking avenue,
destitute of every green thing, now runs through
that once verdant lawn; the place of the per-
fumed flower-garden is supplied by the paved
footpath, with its inodorous kennel; the cot-
tage, with its cheerful apartments and quiet
library, has disappeared, to make room for the
dark and dirty warehouse; and hundreds of
busy feet now hurry to and fro over the spot
once consecrated by the happiness, and hallowed
by the grief, of human hearts.

Charles Latimer was the son of a rich East
India merchant, and had been originally edu-
cated for the bar. His passion for literature
led him to adopt this profession rather because
it was a gentlemanly way of doing nothing,
than with the expectation of deriving from it a
livelihood; for he well knew that the only son
of a man whose income far exceeded his. most
profuse expenditure was not likely to require
it; as a means of support. The sudden death of
his father, however, just as he had completed
his studies, changed the tenor of his fortunes.
He found himself the only representative in
OR, THE BLIND GIR. Il

America of one of the most extensive commer-
cial houses in the world ; and, when he consi-
dered that several years must necessarily be
consumed in settling the affairs of a concern
which had its agencies in England, France, and
India, he determined to relinquish his profes-
sion rather than give up a business for many
years past extremely lucrative.

But Latimer was one of the few who look
upon wealth as a means rather than an end.
He eared not to devote all his noble energies to
the task of making haste to be rich ; but, satis-
fied with regular and steady profits, which ena-
bled him to indulge all his elegant tastes, he
mingled with the toils of business the pleasures
of social and literary life. For several years
after the death of his father he continued to
reside in the same mansion, surrounded by the
old family servants, dividing his time between
the counting-house and the library, or occa-
sionally mingling in the gay scenes of which he
was so bright an ornament. But accident threw
him in the way of a young and lovely southern
belle, and he soon found his home had never
12 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

looked so cheerful as it did when gladdened by
the presence of his fair bride.

Brilliant im conversation, sufficiently well-
informed to join in the discussion of any ordi-
nary topic, and gifted with that tact which
enables a woman to turn aside the ball when it
éxceeds her grasp, there were few more attrac-
tive than the beautiful Mrs. Latimer. The
total want of energy of character, which she
owed to her Inxurious southern habits, was 4
fault not likely to be discovered in the day of
prosperity.

Immediately after his marriage, Mr. Latimer
set himself to the task of modernizing and
adorning his father’s villa. Its proximity to
the city, which enabled him to combine the ad-
vantages of town and country life, decided him
to make it his permanent residence; and in a
very few years he found himself the happy pos-
sessor of the loveliest home, the prettiest wife,
and two of the sweetest children that ever
blessed a mortal’s lot.

At the time when our story commences,
Julian, the younger child, was a lively, rosy


An 8 \ery fow years ne found himself the happy powessor of the loveliest home, the pretiles wife,
end ten af tha dwenteat shideen shad ewe blepeed escheat blade
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 13

little fellow, of perhaps three years of age} With
the bold blue eye and open brow of fearless
innocence. Constance was about two years his
elder; but who ever beheld that child and
paused not to look again and again ere they
found language to describe her loveliness? Hers
was a face of perfect beauty. The broad white
forehead, the delicately-pencilled brows, the
straight nose, the exquisitely-chiselled lips, and
the perfect oval of its contour, might have made
it a model for a sculptor; while the wonderful
transparency of the complexion, the delicate
rose-leaf tint upon the cheek, the soft brown
hair curling thick upon the snowy neck, and,
above all, the superb eyes so beautifully shaped,
and filled with an indescribable expression of
frankness, tenderness, and truth, made it no
less a study for a painter.

How seldom are the characters of children
properly and discriminately studied! A certain
mode of discipline is usually adopted ina school
or family, to which all its members are required
to submit, and which is expected to benefit all
in an equal degree; while every judicious mo-
14 CONSTANCE LATIMER,

thea can state, as the result of her own experi-
ence, that no two children will bear precisely
the same kind of culture. The modern system
of forcing the mental faculties to unnatural
growth, and attempting to ingraft the moral
virtues by the same hotbed process, have been
productive of incalculable evil The mental
powers are weakened by being overtasked, the
moral perceptions blunted by the vain attempt
to infuse abstract ideas, the physical organiza.
tion disordered by a total neglect of all bodily
training, and the result of the instructor's la~
bours is total disappointment. Im nine cases
out of ten the precocious child ends by becom-
ing the dull, self-conceited man. If parents
would be content with weeding out the early
springing vice of insincerity, as the only effort
at moral culture, and awakening the spirit of
inquiry as the only attempt at mental improve-
ment during the first years of their childhood ;
if they would turn -their little ones into the
fields instead of the school-room, and teach them
the beneficent power of the Creator by familiar.
izing them with his wonderful works, they
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 15

would reap a rich reward in the healthy, haa@y,
and active minds which would afterward be
brought to the labour of learning. The plan of
education might almost be limited to that of
the early Persians; and if our sons were only
taught in boyhood “to ride on horseback, draw
the bow, and speak the truth,” the result would
probably be less physical infirmity and more
mental strength.

Such were the ideas with which Mr. Latimer
began the work of instruction, and never was
teacher blessed with a more docile pupil than
the little Constance. Gifted with that exqui-
site delicacy of perception which frequently
accompanies extreme delicacy of organization,
she required no stimulus to the acquisition of
knowledge. Young as she was, every faculty
seemed already awakened, and only waiting to
be employed. The endless variety of the
painted flower, the changeful beauty of the in-
sect wing, the various shapes of the leaves
which strewed the autumn paths, and the mul-
titude of voices by which nature breathes her
music through the summer bowers, were all to
16 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

hee objects of interest and inguiry. It was,
indeed, beautiful to behold that fair childish
face bending with eager glance over some newly-
discovered wonder, or brightening with delight
as some new truth snddenly dawned upon the
rapidly-developing mind. But all these truths
were taught by example rather than precept,
The pages of Nature were the only books her
father employed for the purposes of mental eul-
tivation, while the foundation of all-moral im-
provement was laid by forming the habit of
self-examination—a habit easily acquired by an
ingenuous child, whose spirit has never been
crushed by fear. An occasional impulse of im-
patience, er 2 momentary preference of selfish
indulgence, formed the subject, not of a lecture,
but of a cheerful conversation between father
and daughter, which resulted in her perfect
comprehension, not of metaphysical subtleties,
but of some of the most essential truths in
morality.

“ You are a happy child, Constance,” said her
mother one day, as the little girl was carolling
a broken birdlike melody
OR, THY BLIND GIR. 17

“ T know it, mother,” was the laughing re
sponse.

“Surely you vught to be happy if any one
on earth could be so,” said her father; “you
have nothing to trouble you.”

““ Yes I have, father,” said the child, while a
sweet gravity stole over her sunny face,

“ And, pray, what ever troubles you, Con-

stance ?”’
“ My passions,” was the earnest and innocent

reply.
18 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

CITAPTER IT.

** Death shouid come
Gently to one of rentie mould like thee,
As light winds, wandering through groves of bloom,
Detach the delicate blossoms from the tree."”-—BrYANrT.

“Yor ask me of my enjoyments and of my
prospects. I can only say, that the present is
full of happiness, and the future of promise.
I am sometimes almost terrified at the magni-
tude of my own blessings; for while my sym-
pathies are continually awakened by the mis-
fortunes of others, my own lot remains entirely
unclouded. Health, fortune, and domestic bliss
all combine to render me as happy as mortal
ean ever be. Yet you will wonder when I tell
you that I am sometimes disposed to look upon
all this calm as but the prelude to a fearful
tempest. When I consider how little I have
merited all my good fortune, I canr:ot help fan-
cying that these blessings ure only lent me for
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 19

a season, in order to prove me more severely by
their bereavement by-and-by. I feel that Iau
making to myself idols, and I cannot but fear
that I shall, ere long, be taught the bitter les-
son of humiliation, which all must learn who
give to the creature the worship due only to the
Creator. You will think me fanciful, but Iam
sometimes more desponding than those who
have to encounter real evils; as the brighter
the sunshine, the darker will be the shadow
cast by an intervening object.”

Such were the sentiments expressed by Mr.
Latimer in a letter toa friend in Europe, when
six years of uninterrupted happinesshad dawned
upon Latimer Cottage; but, alas! misfortune
already hovered over them, and never was a
deeper shadow flung from her dark wing

One fine spring afternoon, as Mr. Latimer sat
reading aloud the popular poem of the day,
while his wife was busied with her needle-work
beside him, they were startled by the sudden
entrance of Constance, who, panting with her
speed, and flushed with excitement, threw her
self into her mother’s arms, and burst into a
20 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

passion of tears. It was long before her pa-
rente’ kind soothings could quiet her troubled
feelings, or induce her to relate the cause of
such unwonted sorrow. She told a simple, but
touching tale. When the children went out to
walk after dinner, the nurse had taken them to
Mrs. Morden’s cottage, where they frequently
went to distribute their childish charities.
They found the poor woman seated near the
coffin of her baby, and holding in her arms
another child soon to be stretched beside ita
playmate.

“ Oh, mother, I cannot tell you how I felt,”
sobbed Constance; “ I was not afraid, and yet
I did not dare to touch little Mary, though I
have so often played with her tiny hands when
she was alive; she looked so white, and when
Margery put her hand in hers she was s0
dreadfully cold.” The child had never looked
on death before; and when they told her that
little Mary would never more open her eyes,
but must now be laid in the dark cold earth,
never again to be looked upon by the kind mo-
ther who now watched beside her, she gave way
On, THE BLIND GIEL. 21

to the utmost violence of terror and grief.
Her parents listened to the tale with earnest
sympathy.

“Of what disease did Mary die, Constance ?”
asked her father.

“TI believe Mrs. Morden called it scarlet fever,
father; and the face of the sick boy on her lap
was very red.”

A pang shot through the hearts of both her
parents as she spoke.

“ Was Julian with you ?” said Mrs. Latimer,

“Yes; but he did not seem to notice any-
thing; he ran about just as he used to do when
we went there to gather strawberries, and he
tried to make the poor sick boy play with him.”

The tears of childhood vanish far sooner than
the sympathy they excite; and, long after Con-
stance had ceased to think of the dead child,
her parents brooded over her narrative with ap-
prehensions which neither dared breathe to the
other. Mr. Latimer, with ‘his usual kindness,
hastened to the cottage of his poor neighbour,
and found the second child just expiring with
scarlet fever of the most malignant kind. The
22 SONSTANCE LATIMER;

atmosphere of the apartment was polluted by
the feverish breath of the little sufferers; for
the mother, in her ignorant caution, had ex-
claded every breath of pure air, lest it should
incease the virulence of the disease. ‘“ And in
that dreadful room my two darlings have just
been shut up !” exclaimed the anxious father
as he gladly emerged into the fresh evening
breeze.

His fears were not unfounded; twenty-four
hours had scarce elapsed when Julian’s rosy
cheek wore a deeper hue, and his blue eye was
suffused with the crimson tint of fever. Ere
the next morning’s sun had dawned upon the
sieepless pillow of the alarmed parents, the fever
spot burned the delicate cheek of Constance
also. Who shall describe the anxiety of that
doting father and mother? Who may enter
into the depths of the human heart, and describe
the workings of that most common, but, alas!
most fearful of all human pangs, the anguish
of a devoted parent? The buoyancy of spirit,
which was one of Mrs. Latimer’s strongest cha-
racteristics, prevented her from yielding to ter-
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 23

ror and despondency—as soon as her husband ;
but the moment he saw the drooping form of
his darling boy, and heard the low moan of
his: sweet Constance, hope vanished from his
heart.

The children had wept.so much at their se-
‘paration when first taken ill, that the physicians
deemed it advisable to place them both in one
apartment. It was, indeed, a melancholy sight
to behold those fair creatures so prostrated by
disease, and to feel assured that on the frail
tenure of their lives depended the whole future
comfort of two noble hearts. Julian refused to
leave his mother’s bosom for an instant, while
Constance lay in her little bed with her hand
clasped in her father’s, and her dim eyes fixed
with unutterable tenderness upon her brother.
Hour after hour, day after day passed away,
and brought no change. No change did Fsay ?
Alas! did an hour ever pass without bringing
change to all of us? The fever was most vio-
lent in its attack upon Julian; and, after ten
days of such anguish as none but a parent can
know—such anguish as whitens the darkest
24 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

locks, and withers the greenest heart, Constance
was pronounced out of danger, but Julian lay
like a waxen image in the cold sleep of death.

In proportion to her vain hopes was Mrs.
Latimer’s grief. She would not believe that a
creature so beloved could die; and it was not
till nature sank exhausted, after a succession of
fainting fits, that her feelings could be in the
slightest degree composed. The father looked
upon the lifeless form of his lttle one with
agony unutterable ; but he heard the broken
accents of his daughter, and while he felt that
{in His dealings God had remembered mercy, he
tried to say, in sincerity of his heart, “ Thy
will be done.”

Constance was unable to rise from her bed
when the body of her brother was about to be
borne to the tomb; but she pleaded so earnestly
to look once more upon his sweet face, that her
father bore her in his arnis to the chamber of
death. Never did the king of terrors assume a
lovelier form. His forehead was as fair as if it
had never known the touch of pain; his eyes
as gently closed, and his lips as placidly folded,
OR, THE BLIND GIRL 25

as if the little boy had been laid down to sleep
after the fatigues of a merry game. Constance
looked long and earnestly on the lifeless body
of her lost companion. Her frame shook as
with an ague fit, but no tears fell.from her ¢yes;
and her father, startled by the sudden rigidity
of her features, placed her in bed just as she
was seized with a frightful convulsion. The
dead was borne to its last resting place while
the fate of the living was yet undecided ; but,
alas! a more fearful doom than that of death
awaited Constance. The violence of her spas-
modic attack had produced amaurosis, or para-
lysis of the optic nerve, and her brother’s life-
less form was the last object that ever her eyes
beheld. Every means that medical skill could
devise was resorted to, but in vain; and Con-~
stance arose from her sick bed only to find her-
self totally and helplessly blind.

For a long time hope struggled in the hearts
of her parents. Like him who, dwelling at the
mountain’s foot, mistakes the darkness of the
impending avalanche for the shadow of the
cliff—the very magnitude of their calamity
26 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

rendered them doubtful of its existence. But
when, at last, hope was crushed beneath the
dreadful certainty of evil, no words can express
the utter desolation of their hearts. “ Why,”
exclaimed the agonized father, “ why, when the
Almighty sped the arrow that destroyed my
child’s precious sight, did he not also take her
useless life ?” Imagination is too feeble to por-
tray such anguish. The Grecian painter’s veil
must be drawn over such unutterable woe.
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 27

CHAPTER III,

“ The day.too short for my distress; and nig,
E’en in the zenith of her dark domain,
Is sunshine to the colour of my fate.” Youna.

Monrus passed away; the glow of health once
more dwelt upon the fair child’s cheek, and her
lip again wore its rosy tint, but the light of her
glorious eyes was quenched for ever. ‘Iiney
were still as deeply blue—-still as deeply fringed
by their long dark lashes; the disease which
had destroyed them had not impaired their ex-
ternal loveliness, but their expression had for
ever departed. They were still beautiful, but
it was the beauty of the unlighted alabaste:
vase.

The effect of this misfortune upon the child’s
character was very remarkable. At first ske
wept unceasingly, and complained bitterly of
the darkness. “I can see nothing,” she would
28 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

say, “ but a dark, dark room, with a tittle white
form extended in one corner.” Her imagina-
tion afforded the only organ of vision, and
memory offered objects to its gaze. Her mind
appeared to have acquired a sudden maturity.
The absence of all outward things seemed to
make the eye of the spirit more clear and pene-
trating. Childish things were put away, and
she spoke with the earnestness, the tenderness,
the energy of a woman. Library after library
was exhausted for her amusement; but, alas!
they who find in the common exercise of their
sight a world of enjoyment, of which they are
scarcely sensible, can form but a faint idea of
the terrible privation of the blind. For them
the light of the sun is darkened ; the moon has
withdrawn her ray; the beauty of the earth is
vanished; the loveliness of household faces has
departed; the familiar places have become
strange; and, as one walking in the Valley of
Death, every step is faltering and uncertain.
To Constance this utter darkness was peculiarly
painful, for she remembered too vividly the
last object on which her eyes had rested, and
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 29

the emphatic language of Scripture might here
be used literally, for it was, indeed, “ The sha-
dow of death upon the eyelids.”

“‘ Father,” said Constance, as he led her one
pleasant evening along the garden-walks, “ I
wish you would have the flowers planted just
in the same spots next year, for I have learned
to know them by the touch of the leaf as well
as by their ;erfume, and I can almost fancy I
see them since I-have become so familiar with
them.” ‘The promise was readily given, and
Constance continued: “ When first my eyes
were darkened, the image of poor little Julian
was always before me; but now I try to think
of other things. I try to remember how the
sky looked, and the different coloured flowers,
and oftener still I try to bring before me your
face and mother’s. I am sure I shall never
forget them; but I am afraid I shall forget
many other things which I used to take little
notice of when I could see them every day.”
Mr. Latimer’s heart was full, but he mastered
his emotion, and patiently set himself to the
task of imprinting on her mind those ideas
30 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

which, at her age, are usually evanescent, but
which now required to be graven as with a
sunbeam. But those mysterious compensations
which Providence usually vouchsafes to those
who suffer under great privations were already
hers. Her sense of hearing had become exceed-
ingly acute, her touch extremely delicate. She
learned to distinguish the different trees by the
Various sounds made by their leaves as they
rustled in the wind. The flowers she recog-
nised by their perfume, or, if they were desti-
tute of fragrance, she could pass her slender
fingers over their petals, and at once discover
their names. Music, which had always been
her delight, now heesme her passion ; and three
fourths of her time was spent beside her mother’s
piano, or listening to her father’s voice, as, with
swelling heart, he sang to her the songs she
loved Her ear became so accurate that she
was soon able to mingle her own sweet tones
with the music; and no one who looked upon
the child, as she sat in her delicate beauty
amid the costly luxuries which decked her
home, singing some plaintive melody, would
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 31

have imagined that the portals of so glorious
a temple had been for ever closed against
earthly objects. But a more touching picture
was sometimes presented, when, thinking her-
self alone, the fair creature over whom six
summers had not yet passed would wring her
little hands, and exclaim, in that thrilling tone
which the blind so soon acquire, “ What shall
I do! oh, what shall I do!” Would that this
were entirely a fancy sketch; would that the
portraiture of this gentle child owed its coiours
to imagination only, and was not shaded by the
deeper tints of sad reality!

The next four years were passed by Constance
in a monotony so unvarying, as far-as regarded
external things, that the pen of her historian
finds little to record. But the change that
gradually came over her spirit might form a
noble study for a philosopher. She knew that
she was beautiful, for she heard it murmured
from every lip; but each expression of admira~
tion was uttered in a tone of sympathy which
her delicate ear did not fail to detect, and the
lesson of humility was learned along with that
32 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

which might have taught her vanity. She
knew, too, that her voice was as musical as a
bird’s, and this was one of the chief blessings
of her darkened lot; for the little blind girl’s
ear had now become endued, as it were, with a
double sense, and great would have been her
privation if she could not have expressed her
innocent feelings in tones of sweetness. She
sang beautifully, and never was music more
expressive. She had learned, too, to weave
baskets, (a favourite resource of the blind,) as
an amusement to her many vacant hours; but,
alas! with these acquisitions she was obliged
to be content. The fountain of knowledge
seemed sealed to her for ever, and she was fain
to rest satisfied with an occasional draught of
its pure waters from the hand of another. In
spite of all her efforts at cheerfulness, she began
to feel life a heavy burden, which daily grew
more intolerable. At nine years of age she had
all the weariness of spirit which belongs only
to earth’s care-worn children, when time has
blanched the sunny hair, or sorrow seared the
lonely heart. Her mother, given up to grief,
OR, THE BLIND GIRL 33

lad gradually sunk into such infirm health,
that there was but little prospect of her pro-
longed life; and when Mr. Latimer thought of
the probable fate of his beautiful and helpless
child, he was almost tempted to yield to utter
despair. “ She will have plenty of useless
wealth,” said he to himself; “‘ but who will
protect her when we are gone ? Who will guard
that delicate frame from the rude contact with
a harsh and unfeeling world?” He had not
yet learned to believe that “ God ever tempers
the wind to the shorn lamb.”

One day, while in his counting-room, Mr
Latimer was addressed by a gentleman distin
guished for his philanthropy, who, utterly ig-
norant of his domestic misfortunes, applied for
pecuniary assistance in forming an institution
for the instruction of the blind. Mr. Latimer’s
feelings were almost too powerful for words, as,
grasping his new friend’s hand, he vehemently
proffered half his fortune if the project could be
accomplished. “ Only let me see my child res-
cued from the depth of darkness into which she
is sinking, and half my fortune shall repay your

c
34 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

labours,” he said, as he added his name to the
list of subscribers. On his return he commu-
nicated the occurrence to his wife and daughter.
Far different was the manner in which the two
received it.

“ You would not sureiy‘send Constance away
from us to a place where everybody would be
received, and where she must live like the
poorest among them ?” said her mother.

* You will let me go,’’ exclaimed Constance,
her cheek flushing and her lip quivering with
unwonted excitement. “ Oh, father, I should
be so happy if I could only learn to be less
helpless; when will they be ready to receive
pupils ?”’

“Will you be content, Constance, to feel
yourself alone among the many who, like your-
self, are deprived of one of life’s best blessings ?
Will you not pine for the devoted attention,
the nndivided care of your parents ?”” asked the
father.

“Oh! father,” replied the child, “ how little
you know of my feelings. Should I not be
happier if I did not require your attentions ?”
on, THE BLIND GIRL. 35

Her father sighed, but answered not. He
could not avoid observing, however, that from
that moment 2 new hope seemed to have arisen
in her heart, and that her despondency was ra-~
pidly giving place to a nervous restlessness of
manner, which betrayed how deeply the cur-
rent of her feelings had been stirred.

At length the benevolent founders of the in-
stitution were enabled to carry out their scheme,
and among the first of their pupils was Con-
stance Latimer. Great was the opposition she
encountered from her mother, who dreaded the
privations her child must undergo in an insti-
tution which could provide comforts but not
luxuries; but Constance withstood all attempts
to turn her from her purpose, and left her home
without one sigh of regret.

“Tf I can learn anything, father,.my short
pbsence will be for the future happiness of-us
all; if I cannot, I shall not long be a burden
zo you,”’ said she, as the carriage stopped, and she
gvas carried in her father’s arms to her new home,

The extreme beauty of the child and her
frinning manners awakened the warmest in-
36 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

terest in all who looked upon her. The num-
ber of pupils was as yet few, and Constance at
frst found her situation rather irksome; but
when the plan of instruction was once made
clear to her, nothing could exceed her happi-
piness. Once in each week she returned to
her father’s house, and even her mother ac
knowledged she had never seen her so cheerful,
It was, indeed, delightful to hear her animating
expressions of joy as on each successive Saturday
she sat down between her parents to relate the
new acquirements of the past week. The al.
phabet, the first principles of arithmetic, the
notes of music, were acquisitions worth the
wealth of the Indies to her. Gradually, but
surely, she progressed in the path of knowledge;
every step required guidance, but every step
brought her nearer the goal of all her hopes.

If he be a benefactor to mankind who causes
two blades of grass to grow where only one
grew before, what gratitude do those deserve
who devote all their talents and energies to the
task of ameliorating the condition of those whom
God has so fearfully stricken !
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 37

Never was 2 creature so changed as Constance
appezred aiter a years’s sojourn at the Institu-
tion for the Blind. She had applied the fine
powers of her mind most diligently to the
labour of learning, and great had been her suc-
cess. It was now her pleasure to exhibit to
her happy parents her accurate knowledge of
grammar, arithmetic, geography, and music.
Above all, it was her delight to stand by her
father’s side in the library, and while her
finger traced the words on the page as ra-
pidly as the eye could have noted them; to
read in hersweetest tones the pages of the Book
of Life.

“ Her presence is now a perfect jubilee in
my house,” said her father to one of the patient
teachers who had opened so many sources
of enjoyment to her. “ Formerly I almost
dreaded to enter my door, for I could not bear
to behold the hopeless sadness depicted in my
poor child’s face; but now the day of her
visit is lonked upon as a holyday in the
family. May God forgive my bitter repin-
ings, and teach me to be grateful for the good-
38 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

ness which has thus mingled mercy with chas-
tening.”’

Constance anxiously sought to make herself
mistress of every branch of knowledge. She
would ponder over the embossed maps until her
fingerg had made her perfectly familiar with
the form of a country and its most prominent
objects of interest; then her next Saturday’s
visit to her home enabled her to learn from her
father’s lips all that his library could afford of
other information on the subject. She thus
became thoroughly versed in the history, as well
as geography, of every quarter of the globe.
N’ental arithmetic was peculiarly suited to her
reflective habits; but music still continued to
be her chief delight, and it was wonderful to
see how rapidly she progressed. Her dread of
ever, being idle led her also to acquire the vari-
ous kinds of handicraft practised among the
pupils, and it was not long before she could
frame a rug, weave a basket, and even occupy
herself in needlework.

et us pause for a moment, and contemplate
ihe blind girl in her former and in her present
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 39

circumstances. At the period which is usually
the sunniest of all ages, we see her sitting in,
utter darkness, beneath the shadow of despair,
and exclaiming, in the heart-rending accents of
hopeless misery, “‘ Who will show me any good ?”
Now we behold her moving in the pleasant
light of contentment, and hiving up knowledge,
as the bee stores honey, to be the support of the
wintry days of life.

To crown the happiness of Constance, her
home once more echoed to the- voice of child-
hood. A brother had been born since her
abode in the institution, and she felt as if he
had been sent to supply the place of her little
Julian. this event on the health of the mother, who, in
the new exercise of maternal duties, seemed to
lose that burden of grief which had almost
crushed her to the earth. A stranger who
should have looked in upon that little house-
hold of love, as they were grouped in the li-
brary on a Saturday evening, when Constance
touched her guitar in accompaniment to her
sweet voice, and the babe sat on her mother’s
40 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

knee, stretching its little hands towards hér in
childish glee, while her father looked on with
tenderness too deep for words, would have
deemed them perfectly happy.
on, THE BLIND GIRL. 41

CHAPTER IV.

** When I look

On one 80 fair, I must believe that Heaven

Sent her in kindness, that our hearts might waken

To their own loveliness, and lift themselves

By such an adoration from a dark

And grovelling world. Such beauty should be worshipped,

And nota thonght of weakness or docay

Should mingle with the pure and holy dreams

In which it dwells before us.""—PFERCIVAL,
{r was on her fourteenth birthday that Con-
stance returned to her father’s house, skilled in
all the wisdom which could be communicated
to the blind. Her person had developed into
that pure, classical beauty of which her child-
hood had given promise. Tall and delicately
formed, with a face of exquisite sweetness, her
soft brown hair parted smoothly on her fair
forehead, and shedding its bright tendrils on
her snowy neck, she was, indeed, a picture of
innocent loveliness. The expression of her
countenance was so gentle, and the long lashes

which usually shaded the pale cheek, and con-
42 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

cealed the rayless eyes, gave such an air of pen-
siveness to her appearance, that she excited the
interest of all who looked upon her.

In addition to her various acquisitions in
learning, and her wonderful skill in music, her
heart had taught her a new and sweeter lore.
Possessed of the most ardent feelings and a pas-
sionate love for Nature, who always spoke to her
in music; condemned to feed so much upon her
own thoughts, and to find her swect and bitter
fancies uninterrupted by any external object,—
is it wonderful that the blind girl learned
the language of poetry, and became the lyrist
of emotions which were too powerful for com-
monspeech? BHer knowledge of music and her
delicacy of ear enabled her to adapt airs with
great facility. It soon became no unusual thing
for her, after sitting silent a few minutes, to
take her guitar, and sing her own simple words
to some remembered melody. It is true, she
was little more than a child in years; but the
fearful calamity which had cut her off from the
enjoyments of her childish days had made her
prematurely wise in feeling. Her heart way
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 43

filled with all the gushing tenderness, all the
deep though unawakened energy of a woman’s
nature, combined with a purity of thought and
fancy which rarely outlasts the full development
of intellect. There is too much of evil mingled
with the good of this world’s wisdom ; too much
unholy fire is blended with the light of truth;
and rarely can the mind be illumined by the
one without bearing some blackened trace of con-
tact with the other. But Constance had escaped
all knowledge of evil. She was like the pure
and stately lily, growing whiter in the sunshine
which withers the roses that surround it. Poetry
was the natural language of her unsullied heart;
she breathed in numbers because her whole soul
was attuned to harmony. The harp was not
discordant because it had lost a string, for a
master-hand had touched the remaining chords,
and attuned them to discourse the sweetest of
a!l earthly music.

One of her first efforts in verse was a little
song addressed to her brother. Alfred was now
a lovely little boy of some four years old, and
most tenderly attached to his sister. He had
44 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

learned to guide her feet to unfrequented spots
with as much care as if he knew the full extent
of her privation ; and when she took her guitar,
or seated herself at the piano, his usual station
was upon a cushion at her feet. One afternoon
he had thrown himself on a sofa beside her,
and fallen asleep with his head in her lap. She
busied herself for some time in tracing with her
finger the outline of his features; but, suddenly
desisting, and brushing away the involuntary
tear, she sung to a plaintive melody the follow-

ing words :—

Is thy check fair, my brother?
Are thine cyes bright?
Hast thou the smile of our mother,
Her rememberei smile of light?
Art tou like the gentle vision
That comes to my sleeping eyc,
When my heart in dreams elysian
Clasps its lost one in yonder sky?

Vainly I ask, my brother,
No lip can tell;
The tmaged form of another
In my memory still must dwell;
In vain with impaticnt fingers
Thy features I seek to trace,
#fis look in my soul still lingers,
And in thine I find Julian's face
OR, THE RLIND GIRL. 45

Who cannot sympathize with the father,
who stood without, listening to the sweet voice
and touching complaint of his gifted child ?
Wealth, such as might purchase a prince’s
ransom ; beauty, such as immortalized a Helen;
genius, that might have won the laurel of a
Corinna, all were given as if to show the utter
worthlessness of those things which the world
prizes when unaccompanied by the most com-
mon of God’s blessings. ‘The shrine was a
glorious one; the music of the sanctuary was
not wanting; but the sacred lamp of the temple
had been extinguished, never to be relighted
till kindled by the flame of immortality.

Constance did not relax in her exertions tu
acquire knowledge. Her memory never allowed
nny thing to escape its grasp; and her father’s
unremitting kindness in reading to her for
hours together enabled her to obtain a vast
deal of elegant literature, which otherwise
would have been a sealed book. The pages of
the poet and the historian were alike familiar
to her; and perhaps, to her sensitive mind,
the graphic sketches of the one and the har-
46 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

monious strains of the other derived a peculiar
charm from being always expressed in the
tones of a father’s tenderness.

“ Your voice is sorrowful, dear father,” said
she one day, as her father paused after an
hour’s reading; “I am afraid you have some
new trouble, for your tones are lately full of
sadness.”

“You are a quick observer, Constance,” re-
plied he; “ but do you not think your imagina-
tion’ sometimes misleads you ?’”

“No, father, no; the ear that has learned
to detect every shade of feeling, evcn as your
eye marks every gradation of colour, is not to
be deccived; the faintest change in your voice
is to me as evident as if I could see the cloud
upon your brow. Nay, dear father,” continucd
she, “I cannot bear to hear you sigh; give me
my guitar, and I will sing to you the song I
made yesterday, when Alfred ran with a little
green leaf in his hand to tell me spring was
coming.

They tell me spring is coming
With her wealth of buds and flowers,
OR, THE BLIND Gish. 47

But I hear no wild bee humming
Amid the leafy bowers;

And till the birds are winging
With music from cach trec,

Till the imsect tribes are singing,
Spring is not spring to mc.

They tell me spring is waking
All nature from her slecp,
That streams, their ice-chains breaking,
Once more to sunshine leap;
But the mountain brook rejoices
In music through the Iea,
I must hear earth’s many voices,
Or “tis not spring to mc."

“Did you sing that sweet but melancholy
song to cheer me, Constance ?”’ said her father.
“ Alas! think you the recollection of my child’s
misfortunes can comfort me?”’

“ Dear father,’’ replied she, “I did not mean
to utter the voice of complaint; earth is so full
of music to mine ear that I sometimes think I
am almost as happy as if mine eye divided its
enjoyments. You know not how rich is the
melody to which God opens the ear of the
blind. Listen!’ and the gentle girl touched a
simple accompaniment of chords, while she
48 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

sung, in 2 strain of triumphant music, the fol-
lowing words :—

Earth speaks in many voices: from the roar
Ot the wild cataract, whose ceaseless din
Shakes:the far forest and resounding shore,
To the meek rivulet which scems to win
Its modest way amid spring‘s pleasant bowers,
Singing its gquict song to charm carth’s painted flowcra

Earth speaks in many voices: from the song
Of the free bird which soars to heaven's high porch,
As if on joy’s full tide it swept along,
To the low hum that wakens when the torch
Summons the insect myriads of the night
To sport their little hour and perish in its light.

Earth speaks in many voices: music breathes
In the sweet murmur of the summer breeze,
That plays amid the honeysuckle’s wreaths,
Or swells its diapason mid the trees
When cve's cold shadow stcals o’cr lawn and lea,
And da;s‘s glad sounds give place to holicr minstrelsy.

Earth speaks in many voices: and to me
Her every tone with melody is fraught;
Fier harmony of tints I may not see,
But every breath awakes some pleasant thought;
While to mine car such blissful sounds are given,
My spirit dwells in light, and dreams of yonder heaven
ON, THE BLIND GIRL. 49

CHAPTER V.

“Though Fortund’s malice overthrow my state
My mind exceeds the compass of her whecL”"
SHAKSPRARE.

CoNSTANCE was not deceived when she thought
she discovered sadness in the tones of her father’s
voice. The cloud had been for several months
deepening on Mr. Latimer’s brow; and though
invisible to the rayless eye of his affectionate
child, yet she was not insensible to the chill
which it threw upon his cheerful spirit. In his
devoted attention to his daughter he had allowed
his business to be chiefly transacted by others,
and he found that the unfaithfulness of agents
abroad and the imprudence of partners at home
had involved him in engagements he should
find it extremely difficult to fulfil, He had
never before known the want of money, and his
proud spirit was goudcd almost to madness by
D
50 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3

the necessity of asking for pecuniary supplies.
But one of those seasons of commercial distress
which occasionally occur in all mercantile coun-
tries, and are felt in every quarter of the globe,
now ensued, and the consequence to Mr. Latimer
was total ruin. The energy with which he had
borne his earlier misfortunes seemed now utterly
to fail him. Not that fortune was to him of
more value than every other blessing; but, with
a wife in infirm health, a son in early infancy,
and a daughter hopelessly blind, he felt that
poverty was an evil of far greater magnitude
than he had ever before dreamed. His high
sense of honour forhade him to compromise
with his creditors. He knew that he had
property sufficient to pay all his debts at home;
and he doubted not that his foreign affairs, if
properly arranged, would enable him to satisfy
all demands abroad. But, in order to complete
these arrangements, it would be necessary for
him to leave his family penniless and wander
off into distant lands. The struggle of feeling
stretched him at last on a bed of sickness, and
it was from his delirious ravings, during a severe
On, THE BLIND GIRT. 51

attack of fever, that his family learned the fatal
truth.

A good constitution enabled him to withstand
the violence of his disease; and, immediately
upon his convalescence, he set himself seriously
to the task of retrenchment. One of those sin-
gular but not unfrequent changes, which make
the character of woman always a beauty and a
mystery, now occurred in the mind of Mrs. Lati-
mer. For a whole week she gave herself up to
the deepest despair; then, as if she had indeed
found sorrow to be knowledge, she dried her
tears, and never allowed another murmur to
escape her lips. Laying asideall her habits of
luxurious self-indulgence, she devoted herself to
the consolation of her husband, and witnessed
with perfect composure the rapid vanishing of
her costly furniture and plate. A small house
in the city was taken and furnished in the
simplest manner. The kindness of a creditor,
who had often shared the hospitality of the
ruined family, adorned their humble abode with
the piano and guitar, which were so essential to
the bereaved Constance, but no other articles of
52 CONSTANCE LATIMER}

Jaxury found their way within its walls. As if
she had never known their use, Mrs. Latimer
seemed totally regardless of the want of those
elegancies to which she had been accustomed
from her cradle. Her thoughts were only for
her husband and her children. For them she
sought, with all a woman’s tact and tasteful man-
‘agement, to make their new residence look like
the home of comfort, if not of wealth; and Mr.
Latimer felt that even in this sorrow the hand
of Providence had provided asolace. Well may
the mourner believe in the beautiful system of
compensations which prevails throughout the
universe; for never was man compelled to drink
of the bitter fountain of Marah without finding
some kind hand to throw the branch of healing
into its distasteful waters.

For a few days the little Alfred wondered at
the change, and complained for want of the
broad green lawn; but the sorrows of childhood
are as evanescent as the joys of maturer years,
and he soon forgot the privations in the novelties
of his situation. To Constance the change in
their circumstances brought no selfish regrets.
OR, THE BLIND GIEL. 53

It was long since external things had been to
her a source of enjoyment; and though the
bustle of a city was exquisitely painful to an ear
so acutely sensitive to the melody of nature, yet
she would have felt not a momentary pang if
she could have been insensible to the alteration
in her father. With renewed health Mr. Lati-
mer’s strength of mind had returned; but the
cheerful tone and elastic step, for which his
daughter used to listen so anxiously, were no
longer heard. Constance knew that his . foot
now fell heavily on the narrow stairs; and, in-
stead of the full rich tone she was accustomed
to hear, his voice now sounded in her ear like
the monotonous and melancholy music of the
distant sea.

The acquirements which Constance had re-
garded merely as means of amusing her heavy
hours became, at this time, ofactual use. It was
not long before the place of those costly trifles,
which had decorated their former abode, was
supplied by neatly-framed articles of use and
ornament, woven by the delicate fingers of the
blind girl. Mrs. Latimer, in the fulfilment of
54 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

her duties as a housekeeper, found full employ-
ment for a great part of the day, and all the
plain sewing which was required in the little
household was, therefore, performed by Constance.
Nor was this all; for her knowledge of mental
arithmetic and rapidity in calculation enabled
her to be of great assistance to her father in the
arrangement of his private accounts; while her
poetry and music, like the harp of David, served
to chase from the minds of all the demon of de-
spondency.

At the expiration of a year all Mr. Latimer’s
debts at home were fully paid, and he was left
penniless. But his high-toned feelings would not
allow him to rest satisfied until his name was
rescued from disgrace abroad ; and, borrowing a
sum of money sufficient to secure the comfort of
his family until his return, he embarked for
England, resolving to visit every place where he
had ever established an agency. This was the
hardest of all bis trials. Te knew that several
years must elapse before he could revisit his
home; and when he looked upon his lovely
daughter, now verging towards womanhood,
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 55

his courage almost failed him. He thought of
her destitute situation in case he was never per-
mitted to return, and the picture of her unequal
conflict with a selfish world almost overpowered
his imagination. But he believed he was ful-
filling the dictates of conscience; and, silencing
every regret, he bade adicu to all he held dear on
earth.

How deeply Constance felt the loss of that
devoted parent it is in vain to describe.. It seemed
as if the last glimmer that had cheered her
darkened life was now extinguished. But she
was not one to sit down content with fruitless
repining, when it was possible to act as well as
to suffer. A plan had been secretly maturing
in her mind, which she now determined to put
into practice, since the only obstacle to its ac-
complishment was removed by her father’s
absence. This was a scheme for procuring pupils
to be instructed in music, and thus obviating the
necessity of making use of the money which she
knew her father, at the expense of his proudest
feelings, had secured for the maintenance of his
family. In vain did her mother oppose what
56 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

she, naturally enough, considered a hopeless
attempt. Constance was not to be moved from
what she believed to be her duty,and hermother
was at last induced to write, by her dictation,
to a gentleman connected with the Institution
for the Blind, and whose extensive charities were
well known.

“Drak Srr,— Yourwell-established reputation
as the friend of the affiicted induces me to ad-
dress you on a subject of vital interest to one
suffering under the severest of all privations. I
am totally blind; and but for that noble insti-
tution of which you are a member, should have
been utterly helpless. I am now well versed in
all the knowledge which could be imparted to
me. Music has been my especial study, and I
may refer you to my instructors for assurances
of my capacity to teach it, which my father’s
misfortunes have induced me to attempt as a
means of support. I can teach but I cannot
seck out pupils; and if, amid th : multitude of
urgent claims upon your time, you can find a
moment’s leisure to bestow upon her who walks,
OR, THE BLIND GIBL. &7

even at noonday, in the shadow of night, your
kindness will not be unrewarded.”

The letter also contained her address, and
was signed by herself, her mother guiding her
hand.
58 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

CHAPTER VI.

**Pensive grrace

Was in every motion, and her look

Had something sacred in it, that declared

How pure the spirit in that form enshrined,

Like light that dwellcth in the diamond gem.”—S. P. ©
Tu apartment was brilliantly lighted up, and
a smile of welcome sat upon the lips of his
cheered family, as Mr. Wilson entered his home
at the evening hour. The large arm chair was
rolled to his favourite corner, and the children
of all ages, from the fair girl of eighteen to the
noisy boy of three years, clustered round their
father as he took his accustomed seat. But an
unusual shade of pensiveness was on his brow,
and tears glistened in his eyes as he pressed the
hand of his daughter, which rested fondly on
his knee. “I have seen this evening,” said he,
in answer to their anxious inquiries, “a picture
which has thrilled my very heart.”
OR, THE BLIND GIEL. 59

“Oh, tell us, father, tell us,’”’ echoed from the
group.

“YT received a letter yesterday,’ replied he,
“from one whom I well recollect as having been
one of the first pupils admitted into our institu-
tion for the instruction of the blind—I mean
Constance Latimer.”’

“What, that beautiful little girl you once took
me to see when she was taking her music
lesson, and who, you told me, refused to wear
the ornaments with which her mother had
loaded her, because they excited the envy of
the poorer pupils?”

“The same, Gertrude; she was then the heiress
of an immense fortune, and her father one of
the wealthiest as well as worthiest men in the
community. Ile has since become bankrupt,
and, after having sacrificed every thing to redeem
his honour here, has left his family in poverty
that he might fulfil his engagements in Europe.
I determined to answer her letter in person,
and glad am I that I did so. I was directed to
a house in street; a healthy-looking
little fellow, about six years of age, opened the

?


GO CONSTANCE LATIMER;

door for me, and conducted me into one of the
smallest but neatest parlours I ever entered.
The tables and mantel-piece were adorned
with various kinds of fancy articles, such as are
usually manufactured by the blind; and upon
a stand in the corner lay a pile of those large
volumes, printed in embossed letters, which
constitute the Bible for the blind. By the fire
sat a lady, pale and sickly in her appearance,
but extremely graceful in her address, while
near the window was a low seat occupied by the
loveliest figure ITever beheld. Constance Lati-
mer is about two years younger than yourself,
Gertrude, and might serve a painter as a model
four a personification of modesty. Her beauty
is wonderful ; I never saw any thing like it;
the recollection seems to me almost dreamlike.”

“You are quite enthusisatic father,” said
Gertrude, smiling.

‘“€No wonder, my child,” replied Mr. Wilson ;
“this lovely young creature is totally blind,
and yet she applied to me to assist her in pro-
curing pupils in music, that she might thus be
enabled to support her mother and brother with-
OR, THE BLIND GIRL 61

out encroaching on the small sum which her
father left with them, and which, shesaid, hehad
only obtained by incurring new obligations.
The heroic virtue of a delicate girl, who thus
forgot her own terrible privations in the wish to
spare her father’s feelings, almost overpowcred
me. I listened to her plans with wonder, and
left her with a feeling of bewilderment, for the
whole scene seemed rather like a phantasy of
the imagination than a picture of re:l life.”

“Oh, father, let her teach me music,” said
little Emily, as she clambered on his lap; “I
will be very good, and not trouble the poor
blind lady; do, dear father.”

“‘Let me accompany you when next you visit
her,” said Gertrude.

“I met Mrs. Latimer in public,” said Mrs.
Wilson, “ when she was the gayest and most
brilliant woman in society; but years have
passed since then; she has gone through much
suffering; and if our slight acquaintance may
now be renewed without an appearance of intru

sion, I should be glad to proffer her the hand
of friendship.”
62 CONSTANCE LATIMER 3;

“J knew your hearts,” returned Mr. Wilson,
‘and I was assured I need only tell my story
to awaken as much enthusiasm in you as my
little Gertrude accused me of feeling.”

Two pupils were secured to Constance in this
happy group, and the unremitting exertions of
Mr. Wilson during the next three months in-
creased their number to twenty, so that an in-
come of fifteen hundred dollars was secured to
the family by the labour of her who, at first,
seemed the most helpless of its members. As
she could not go abroad to give lessons, she was
necessarily much confined to the house, and de-
barred from that exercise which had always
been so essential to her health; but early in the
morning she might frequently be seen, guided
by the hand of her brother, along ‘the pleasant
walks of the Battery, or crossing to the heights
of Brooklyn to listen to the melodies of nature.
The family of Mr. Wilson did not relax in their
interest for the noble-minded girl. An intimacy,
such as probably never would have arisen in the
days of her prosperity, now existed between
Constance and the amiable Gertrude; and
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 63

many a quiet evening, afier the fatigues of a
day’s labour in teaching, was spent by the blind
girl in the cheerful parlour of her friend. It
was on one of those evenings, during the early
part of their acquaintance, that Constance sung
the following song addressed to Gertrude:

Tady, they tell me thon art fair,
They say the rose blooms on thy check;
The rose’s blush I have forgot,
Its breath alone to mean speak.

Lady, they say thine eye's soft blue
With heaven's own tint is flashing bright;
Alas! I have forgot that huc,
My ky is always clothed in ni;zht.

Vady, they tell me thou art good,

Thy heart in virtue's cause beats high ;
T know this tale at least is true,

My ear assists my darkened eye.

Little I know of beauty’s form,

The dimpled mouth, the snowy skin,
But I can learn from step and voice

If gentie be the heart within.

I know thou'rt one whom all may love,
Though thy fair brow I ne‘er may sce,
And can I donbt thou wilt allow
The blind girl's claim to sympathy.

But their intimacy had not lasted many
62 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

months, when Gertrude was compelled to claim
the sympathy which Constance so plaintively
«lesired for herself, for she was taken violently
ill, and for many days her recovery was deemed
hopeless. The heart of the blind girl had so
few objects of affection, that it clung to each
with a tenacity which made it almost death to
sever its clasp. Nothing could exceed her pas-
sionate regret when she found that, though Ger-
trude’s life was spared, a severe inflammation
had fallen upon her eyes, which confined her
to a darkened room, and threatened her with
total loss of sight. “Oh! mother,”’ exclaimed
she, when first the tidings were communicated
to her, “ how will Gertrude bear that dreadful
darkness? No one can imagine its horrors ;
though so young when I was stricken, jet to
this hour I shudder when I remember the awful
blackness which enveloped me—a_ blackness
broken only by the white and stiffened~ form
whichimagination presented to me. Oh, mother,
mother! I cannot bear to think of Gertrude’s
sufferings.’ Alas! none but the God who had
smitten her knew the bitter feelings which Con-
OR, THE BLIND GIRN. 65

stance had hidden in her heart of hearts. She
had come out brighter from the furnace ofafflic-
tion, but no one could tell how fierce had been
the fire which had purified her of all earthly
dross.

AU her leisure hours were devoted to her sick
friend ; al] that sympathy or affection could de-
vise for her amusement was tried ; and during
the many days her eyes were bandaged, Ger-
trude learned much of the handicraft which has
been appropriated to the occupation of the blind.
She delighted to hear the blind girl sing ; and
many a song did Constance frame for the amuse-
ment of the half-impatient invalid. During one
of her visits she for the first time heard, in the
course of conversation, that beautiful line from
the Arabic, “ The remembrance of youth is a
sigh.” The sentiment was too poetical to escape
her sensitive mind, and the ideas which it awak-
encd were expressed in a language which had
now become habitual.

Oh, yes, we may weep over moments departed,
And look on the past with a sorrowful eyc,

For who, roving on, through the world weary-Learted,
But knows “the remembrance of youth is a sigh ?"

E
66 CONSTANCE LATIMER;

Though earth still may wear all its verdure and flowers,

Though our pathway still bloom ‘neath a bright sun-
mer sky,

Yet the serpent lies hid in life's sunnicst bowcra,
And still ‘‘the remembrance of youth isa sigh.”

Zhen surely the heart whose best pleasures have vanished,
As spring birds depart when cold winter draws nigh,

The bosom whence hope’s sweet illusions are banished,
Mast feel ‘‘ the remembrance of youth Is a sigh.”

Too early have faded my moments of gladness,

Ere the freshness and morning of life have gone by,
Too early my days have been shrouded in sadness,

And to me “the remembrance of youth is a sigh.”

There was one who took a deeper interest in
the blind girl during her attendance on Gertrude
than he dared to avow. This was Mr. Wilson’s
eldest son, who had just returned from the tour
of Europe. Young, talented, and enthusiastic,
there was something peculiarly fascinating to
his romantic nature in the history of the beauti-
ful Constance. Seated unnoticed in a remote
corner of the dimly-lighted apartment, he lis-
tened for many an hour to the sweet fancies and
pure thoughts which filled the measure ofher dis-
course with Gertrude. She seemed the very im-
personation of his boyish dreams. Her beauty,
her strength of mind, her poctical genius, he:
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 67

graceful manners, nay, her very helplessness,
were all powerful attractions to him. He gazed
upon her delicate loveliness until it almost
seemed to him that the fable of Pygmalion was
realized. But, dangerous as this intercourse
might be to him, it was to Constance perfectly
harmless. The passions of our mortal nature
seemed effaced from her breast, while only the
gentler affections seemed left ; and she welcomed
Edward Wilson as a brother, without dreaming
that there could be any stronger feeling.

A few weary months of darkness were all that
Gertrude was destined to endure. The disease
in her eyes abated, and once more she was per-
mitted to behold the light of day. Ifanything
could have disturbed the equanimity of Con-
stance’s contented temper, it would have been
the exuberance of her friend’s joy. Every
moment she was exclaiming aloud at some new
delight afforded her by her newly-recovered
sense. But, whatever Constance felt, her well-
disciplined mind taught her at once to repress
all fruitless regret, and, in sympathy with her
friend, to forget her own privations,
68 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

“My brother loves you, Constance,” said Ger-
trude, a few weeks after her recovery, as she
beheld his irrepressible agitation at hearing one
ofher songs. ‘“ Well, Gertrude, is that strange?”
replied the pure-hearted girl ; “do not you love
me too ? I think,”’ added she, “ that I regard your
brother as I might have done Julian had he
lived to man’s estate.”

“Nay, Constance, but it is not thus Edward
loves you; he looks on you as one with whom
he would share his future fortunes ; he would
make you his wife, Constance,” said Ger-
trude.

“ Never, Gertrude! never!” exclaimed she,
vehemently ; “do you forget that the glory of
my life has departed, and that I must hereafter
grope my way in hopeless darkness? No, he
would not think of it ; do not talk so wildly again,
Gertrude ; I have no such dreams, and I would
not have the quiet current of my life disturbed
by vein imaginations.”

The next time Constance took her guitar at
her friend's bidding, she sang the following
song :-—
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 69

Like the wind harp whose melody slumbers,
Unwakened by mortal hand,

Till the soit breeze called forth its sweet numbers,
I.ike tones from a seraph's land;

So my lips ever echo the feelings
Which nature alone may impart,

I know nought of passion's revealings,
Then wake not my slumbering hearc

Like a lake lying far on the mountain,
Where foot of man scales not its height,
Fed only by Heaven's pure fountain,
And only refiecting Heaven's light:
So my soul's quict depths give back only
The feelings where chilahood has part;
Bless'd with friendship, my life is not lonely.
Ther. wake not my slumbering beart.

The song was breathed into other ears than
those of Gertrude. Edward had stolen to hear
the lay, and it uttered a mandate which he dared
not disobey. “ No,” said he inwardly, “ the pure
course of that life should never be disturbed
by more earthly affections than those which
awake in life’s bright infancy. The daughter’s
and the sister’s love ; the friendship of a heart
unacquainted with the wilder passions of human-
ity ; such alone should be the habitants of that
gentle bosom.” Witha degree of heroism to-

tally unappreciable by colder hearts, he schooled
70 CONSTANCE LATIMER 5

himself to look on Constance as a lovely sister,
whose helplessness might naturally awaken a
deeper interest than fraternal tenderness. If
his heart sometimes beat thick, and his pulse
quickened as he gazed upon her exceeding love-
liness, he mastered his emotion and reaped ‘his
reward in the approval of his conscience.
Ok, THE BLIND GIR. 71

CHAPTER VII.

“You beara gentic mind, and heavenly blessings
Follow such creaturcs.""—SHAKSPFEARF.
Titr Latimer family found many friends will-
ing to aid in rescuing them from a life of toil
and privation, but the noble heart of Constance
spurned the thought of dependence. Her pupils
increased in number, and she was happy in the
certainty that, whatever might be her father’s
success, she should never more be a burden to
him. Mr. Latimer had written regularly to
his family, and occasionally sent small sums of
money ; but, unwilling to excite false hopes, he
said nothing of his pecuniary affairs, and they,
of course, concluded that he had nothing favour-
able to communicate. His stay was prolonged,
month after month, until three years had
elapsed, when he at length intimated his inten-
tion of returning. Great was their joy when the
72 CONSTANCE LATIMER ;

tine drew near to receive that beloved father.
Everything that affection could suggest was pre-
pared to welcome him ; and, when he did re-
turn, though Constance could not see the re-
newed cheerfulness of his countenance, her first
exclamation was, “Oh, father, you have won
back your own glad voice !”

Mr. Latimer had devoted himself to the settle
ment of his affairs with a zeal and diligence
that gained the good-will of all who had ex-
pected to suffer by his failure. Facilities of all
kinds were afforded him, and, after the most
unremitting toil, he succeeded in satisfying
every claim. A small remnant of his once vast
fortune still remained ; and a successful specu-
lation, which presented itself at the moment
when he was preparing to embark for his native
land, more than trebled its amount. “I am
not rich,” he replied to his wife’s anxious in-
quiries, “ but I have enough of this world’s gear
to raise us far above want; henceforth I shall
devote myself entirely to my family, and relin-
quish all attempts at commerce.” But what
were his feelings when informed of the heroic
OR, THE BLIND GIRL. 73

conduct of his darling Constance ! She had care-
fully concealed from him her success asa teacher,
lest he should be made unhappy by the idea of
the toil which she was enduring; but now,
when all privation was at an end, he learned
from the lips of Mr. Wilson the whole story of
her energy and heroism. He learned that to
the patient, self-denying labour of his blind
child, the child for the sake of whose suppose
helplessness he most regretted his loss of for-
tune, his family had been indebted for every
comfort, during three long years, while the
money which, at the sacrifice of so much pride,
he had borrowed for their subsistence, had been
paid in less than six months after his departure.
“« And this creature,” exclaimed he, in a trans-
port of feeling, “this angelic creature I would-
have consigned to the grave in my first
moments of despair; this is the child for the
preservation of whose darkened life I dared to
murmur against Providence.”

Mr. Latimer’s first wish was to possess him-
self once more of his beautiful cottage ; but the
work of improvement was begun, and the home
Pages
74-795
missing
from
Original
THE SON AND HEIR.
THE

SON AND HEIR.

** IIe that soweth iniquity shall reap vanity.”



My earliest recollections are those of poverty
and sorrow. I saw my father wasting talents
of the noblest order in a constant struggle for a
bare subsistence ; and my mother, a gentle and
delicate creature, who might have been the or-
nament of palaces, daily condemned to the
merest drudgery of existence. The circumstances
which led to such distress it is needless to re-
count. The childhood of my parents had been
passed amid the most gorgeous. scenes of
wealth and luxury; but the birth of their only
son found them “steeped in poverty to the very
lips.’ Is it any wonder then, that to my
80 THE SON AND HEIR.

infant mind, wealth should have scemed the
greatest earthly good ?

Children that are brought up in the midst of
affluence are like greenhouse plants; they de-
velop slowly, and require the constant care of
the cultivator: but the children of the poor,
reared amid privation and suffering, are like the
hardy plants that find their nourishment in the
crevices of the rock; they evolve rapidly, and,
perhaps, partake too much of the nature of the
indurated soil that fed them. I soon learned to
look upon the world around me with an eye of
thought. He who is not too young to suffer is
old enough to reflect, and many a bitter hour
have I spent in contrasting the degradation of
my own lot with the splendour of others. The
poor who have minds suited to their stations
—they who have been poor from their earliest
generation—are comparatively happy; their toil
procures all that with them constitutes enjoy-
ment; but if there be an evil which exceeds all
others in bitterness, it is poverty when it falls
upon a refined and sensitive spirit.

My father died broken-hearted when I was
TIIE SON AND HEIR. 81

about twelve years of age. A neighbouring law-
yer, who accidently became acquainted with our
distress, took me into his house as a menial—yes
—I do not hesitate to confess it. I was charit-
ably allowed to brush his boots and makc his fires,
while my mother obtained a miserable pittance
by doing coarse sewing for the shops. The two
sons of my master were older than myself, but I
was not long in discovering how infinitely in-
ferior they were in intellect. My father had
laboured diligently to cultivate my mind, and
the facility with which I acquired knowledge
was a solace to his pride, even while it added
new stings to his poverty. I was, therefore, far
more advanced in education than most boys of
iny age; and many a time, as I stood behind
the chair of my young masters, obeying their
capricious commands, have I been compelled to
restrain the bitter sneer that rose to my lip at
their palpable ignorance. My boyish vanity soon
induced me to make some display of my rare
acquirements; and the consequence was, that I
was often compelled to sit up half the night pre-
paring Latin exercises for which my masters
82 THIF SON AND HEIR.

were to be applauded on the morrow. This was
undoubtedly the worst thing that could have
befallen me. Circumstances would otherwise
have subdued my towering spirit, and reduced
me to the level of my situation; but now a con-
sciousness of my own superiority took entire
possession of my mind. I felt that I was born for
betterthings; and, while I cherishedaboyish con-
tempt for my youthful tyrants, I felt an innate
certainty that the time would come when, from a
superior station in society, I should look upon
them as my inferiors in rank as well as intellect.

Such a state of things was, however, too un-
natural to last long. A blow given by one of
my young tormentors, and returned by the proud
menial, led to a discovery of the peculiar ser-
vices which were required of me. Mr. M., who
was really a generous and liberal-minded man,
after carefully ascertaining the extent of my
nequirements, removed me from my servile
station to the equally laborious, but more hon-
ourable situation of clerk in his office. I received
no salary; but, when my master found that my ser-
vices would enable him todispense with onc of his
TIIE SON AND HEIR. 83

hired assistants, he offered to give me instruction
in his profession as an equivalent, and his offer
was gladly accepted. Behold me, then, at the
age of fifteen, copying deeds in a lawycr’s office,
wearing my master’s cast-off clothes, pursuing
my studies at moments stolen from sleep, yet
cherishing as lofty dreams of ambition, as if I
had been heir to the proudest name and largest
fortune in the kingdom. My ambition was not
for fame; proud as I was of my mental supe-
riority, I never desired to be distinguished for
learning and talent; wealth was all I asked.
My situation brought me into continual con-
tact with wealth and rank,and little did the
titled clients of my master think that the poor
clerk whowrotc out their cases, often with a smile
of contempt at their paltry subjects of litigation,
concealed beneath his shabby exterior a spirit
destined, because determined, -to rise. “ Possunt
guia posse videntur” has ever been my motto.
I believe that the mind of man,with its strangely
complicated energiesand lofty aspirations, isequal
to any undertaking; and where the w7zW is un-
faltering, the power cannot be found wanting.
84 TIE SON AND IIEIR.

Liow vividly dol recollect all the occurrences
of that period. Youth is generally a season of
enjoyment; and, therefore, it is that, when we
look back to it in later years, we can scarcely
ever recall its details. We remember some
events, perhaps, but how few are they in com-
parison with those we have forgotten! We
recur to the season of youth with a feeling of
vague and indistinct pleasure, for the footprints
of joy leave too slight an impression upon the
sandy desert of our hearts not to be easily effaced
by the next whirlwind of emotion. But when
our early life has been unhappy it is very differ-
ent. When we grow up amid privation and
suffering; when our souls are consumed by the
fire of secret discontent even from our childhood;
when we are daily compelled to endure the
“proud one’s contumely,” and to have our best
feelings trampled on by those who, born with-
out hearts themselves, can never learn that
others may be less fortunate; when such have
been the events that have measured out our
youth, we never forget them.

It happened one day that Mr. M. was un-
THE SON AND HEIR. 85

avoidably absent from the office, and several
gentlemen were awaiting his return; so that
in addition to the half dozenclerks usually found
there, the apartment was occupied by a number
of his clients. Among others I observed the
Hon. George Fitzroy, and easily perceived from
his manner that he was exceedingly impatient
of the delay. I was at that moment busily en-
gaged in finishing the papers which I knew he
came to obtain. Wishing to spare him some
unnecessary detention, I approached him, and
in a low voice said, “ We have almost finished
your papers, sir, and if you will have the good-
ness to send in half an hour, they will be ready.”
Kying me with a look of ineffable scorn, and
raising his voice so as to be heard by every person
in the room, he exclaimed, “We, sir! We / pray
who are we ? My business is with Mr. M., not
with a hireling !” Maddened wfth passion, my
first impulse was to fell him to the earth, but
my upraised arm was caught by a fellow-clerk.
The violence of my emotion was too great even
formy robust frame ; the blood gushed in torrents
from my mouth, and I fell senseless at the feet
86 TIIE SON AND HEIR.

of my insulter. I had broken one of the minor
blood vessels, and for many weeks was unable
to leave my room ; but even there, in the soli-
tude of a sick chamber, with death watching
beside me, IE vowed to be revenged. I never
stretched out my hand to injure the scorner, yet
my vow was gloriously fulfilled. Time,that slow
but sure avenger, brought an opportunity that
the utmost refinement of hatred could scarcely
have anticipated. Fifteen years afterward, when
I was presiding with almost unlimited authority
over one of the richest provinces in British India,
the Hon. G. Fitzroy, beggared by extravagance,
and an outcast from his family, was occupying
the humble station of my under secretary! Yes,
I saved him from starving, and, until the day of
his death, the proud fool received the wages of
servitude from the hands of the lawyer’s hire-
ling.

Such were the insults and mortifications that
goaded me almost to madness, and would have
crushed me into an untimely grave, had I not
been supported by the hope that the hour of
triumph would come. That hour did come.
THE SON AND HEIR. 87

I have lived to trample upon those who would
have trodden me under foot; aye, and to be
crushed too, even in the moment of success, by
a blow as unexpected as it was inevitable.

I was twenty-one vears of age when an office
of considerable trust and profit under government
was bestowed uponmymaster. Oneofhissons was
at first employed as his secretary, but it wassoon
discovered that young M. could only be saved
from an ignominious dismissal by substituting me
in his place. The appointment was accordingly
transferred to me, with a salary of three hun-
dred pounds a-year. Could the newly-fledzed
butterfly, as he lifts himself upon his golden
wings far above the earth on which he so lately
crawled, be endowed with human feelings, me-
thinks he would feel as I did then. For the
first time I was independent; nay, more, I was
rich—richer with that poor three hundred a-year
than I have since been with an income of fifty
thousand. Everything, even our own emotions,
must be appreciated by comparison; and cer-
tainly the man who, for the first time in his life,
receives the means of a comfortable live‘ihoua,
88 THs SON AND HEIR.

as the fruit of his own industry, is happier than
he will ever be again, though he should in after-
life become the possessor of millions.

I was now enabled to rescue my mother from
a life of toil ; and never shall I forget the ex-
quisite sensations which thrilled my heart when
I brought her from the miserable lodgings
where she had wasted the best years of her life
to the plain but comfortable abode which we
were now to occupy together. From my infancy
I had been accustomed to consider wealth the
source of happiness, and now the one favour
which I had received from the hands of fortune,
had been the means of procuring me the sweet-
est pleasure which the heart of man is capable
of enjoying. Is it any wonder then, that I still
determined to pursue the career of wealth ?
Everything served to keep alive the love of gold
in my heart. My new situation threw me con-
stantly in the way of that peculiar class of men
whose every look is indicative of moneyed im-
portance ; whose very complexion seems satur-
ated with gold dust; I mean the East India
merchants. I soon learned that the shortest
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inilicative of monied importance,
THE SON AND HEIR. 89

possible road to wealth was to be found in India,
and there I determined to seek it.

All my leisure time was now devoted to the
study of the various Indian dialects. An old
merchant, who had resided many years in the
country, offered to assist me, and, no doubt, was
as much gratified to find a ready listener to his
marvellous tales, as I was to obtain a capable
guide in the new path which seemed opening
before me. He was a man of very singular
character. Possessing a mind of wonderful en-
ergy, he would have distinguished himself in
any profession to which he had applied himself;
but he had been early devoted to a business
life, and repugnant as it was to his elegant taste,
he soon learned to adapt himself to circum-
stances, and forgot that he had ever had a wish
beyond his counting-room. Ht happened with
him, as it doubtless does with many others:
compelled to sacrifice his first hopes, he devoted
all his energies to the work that he was ealled
to perform ; and as a man of ardent temper-
ament can never be médiocre in anything, he
soon became as eager in the pursuit of wealth
90 THE SON AND HEIR.

as he might otherwise have been in the acqui-
sition of fame. He was now an old man, and
money was everything to him. To pile guinea
upon guinea was his only pleasure; and no
sooner did he learn the similarity of my feel-~
ings, than I became his chief favourite.

His house had however another attraction
for me. His only surviving relative was an
orphan niece, whom, since his return from India,
he had taken home as his adopted daughter.
Young, beautiful, and artless asa child, Emily
Halford appeared to me like a creature of an-
other sphere. It is true I had scarcely looked
upon 2 woman when I beheld her; but even
now, after the lapse of so many years, when so
many visions of youth, and beauty, and mental
loveliness, are bright in my recollection, there
is still no form like hers. Mr. Halford early per-
ceived my attachment. ‘“‘ You love my niece,”
said he ; “I am not surprised ; she is a charm-
ing girl, and I would rather bestow her ona
man like yourself, who, born poor, possess the
capacity of making a fortune, than on the heir
of a princely estate, if the follies and extiava-
THE SON AND HEIR. 91

gances of modern education were a part of the
inheritance.. The husband of my niece will
be the heir of my fortune, but not until he shall
have merited it; my gold is the fruit of indus-
try, and it shall never go to enrich the idle.”
Alive only to the consciousness that I was per-
mitted to win the affections of Emily, I was
utterly regardless of the old man’s Jast words.
Alas ! I remembered them bitterly enough soon
after.

I should have loved Emily if she had been
friendless and destitute. There was a graceful
and womanly tenderness in her manner, which
to me was irresistible. Sordidness and selfish-
ness have ever characterized my dealings witb
men, but never have I forgotten my almost
chivalrous veneration for the pure and noble
nature of woman. After a brief interval we
were married; and as it had been arranged
that Emily should still reside with her uncle, a
very material change immediately took place in
my mode of life. Had I hoped to derive any
pecuniary advantages, however, I should have
been much disappointed ; a set of pearl ornaments
92 THE SON AND HEIR.

was Mr. Halford’s only marriage gift. I was
now, apparently, on the very pinnacle of good
fortune.- Living, if not in the midst of the re-
finements of rank, at least surrounded by all
the magnificence of opulence, who would ever
have recognised in the happy husband of the
beautiful heiress, the ragged and squalid serving
boy? Emily was devotedly attached to me, and
there was something inexpressibly delightful in
the consciousness that, among the cold and self
ish beings who made up my world, one heart
was found to love me with a deep and ‘isinter-
ested affection.

Our happiness was first interrupted about a
year after our marriage by the illness of my
sweet wife. The sudden death of our infant
boy, who lived just long enough to awaken a
mother’s tenderness in her bosom, seriously
affected her health, and she was just recover-
ing from a long fit of sickness, when we were
called to mourn the death of her eccentric but
kind old uncle. He had been talking cheer-
fully with us all the evening, smoked several
pipes of his rose-scented Turkish tobacco, drank
THE SON AND HEIR. 93

his usual quantity of old Madeira, and the next
morning he was found lying cold and stiff in
bed, apparently in the very posture in which
he had composed himself to sleep. We mourned
for him with a genuine sorrow; for, singular
as were his habits, no man possessed a kinder
heart ; and, if that heart had been contracted
by trafficking with his fellow-men, and his na-
turally fine intellect subjected to the iron bond-
age of selfish avarice, it was the fault of those
who chained to the galley of commerce a spirit
that might else have aspired to the loftiest
realms of undiscovered truth.

But the worst of our misfortunes was yet to
come. Mr. Halford had frequently thrown out
hints of his intention to procure for me a situ-
ation in India; and, although I expected, of
course, to benefit by his wealth in future, I
was still desirous to push my own fortunes. It
was, doubtless, a fear lest the possession of im-
mediate wealth should induce me to relax in
my habits of industry that induced him to make
so singulara will. Upon examining his papers,
three several copies of his will were found in
94 THE SON AND HEIR.

different, but equally secure places, as if he
were resolved to guard against all contingen-
cies. After a few trifling legacies to old do-
mestics, he bequeathed the whole of his fortune
to me, but with this singular proviso—the
whole of the property, including landed estate,
stocks, furniture, plate, &c., was given in trust
to his executors, to be paid into my hands as
soon as I should give satisfactory proof that I
was worth fifty thousand pounds, acquired by
my own exertions. In case of my death be-
fore the requisite sum was obtained, a certain
portion was allotted to my wife, and the re-
mainder appropriated to the endowment of
several charitable institutions. Thus [ found
myself the heir to a magnificent fortune, but,
at the same time, with no other means of pro-
viding for my family than the salary which I
received from my secretaryship. Irritated as
I was by this absurd bequest, my anger knew
no bounds when [ found that even the house
we occupied, with its furniture and plate, was
to be sold, and the proceeds added to that al-
ready overgrown fortune, which was not to be
THE SON AND HEIR. 95

mine until I should be able to do without
it. I was compelled to remove to my former
abode, still occupied by my mother ; but I en-
tered it as if it had been a prison. The fetters
which luxury weaves around us are like the
bonds with which the Lilliputians confined the
sleeping Gulliver ; separately, each might be
broken by the turning of a finger; it is the
vast number of invisible chains fastened upon
us by the factitious indulgences of wealth that
renders us powerless beneath them. Little
more than two years before, I had tasted in
these humble apartments the first sweet draught
from fortune’s cup; and now, when her over-
flowing chalice seemed offered to my lips, only
to be withdrawn ere I could quaff one drop,
my impatient spirit was almost maddened by
the disappointment. My poor Emily used
every effort to reconcile me to my situation.
Though her life had been passed amid all the
comforts of affluenct; and mine amid all the
evils of poverty, yet she cheerfully relinquished
the luxurious habits which to her were a se-
cond nature, while I could not reconcile myself
96 THE SON AND HEIR.

to their loss, though I had scarcely yet learned
to enjoy them. Unwilling to pain her gentle
nature, I endeavoured to appear contented ;
but only those who can fully enter into my
passionate desire for wealth, could understand
with what loathing I looked upon my present
mean conditioft From the time I left Mr.
Halford’s house I never enjoyed a single re-
past. The rich damask, the massive silver
dinner-service, the splendid china, which alone
had cost more than the whole of my present
income—all had vanished from my table, and
I was weak enough to feel their loss as severely
as if they had been as essential as the food to
which they were the accompaniments.

I was soon to be punished for my folly. The
death of Mr. M., my first patron, deprived me
of my only dependance—the salary which I
received as his secretary. Judge, then, of my
situation. I had taken up all the arrears of
my salary in order to furnish anew my hum-
ble habitation for the reception of my wife,
and I now found myself absolutely penniless.
Even now my blood boils at the recollection of
THE SON AND HEIR. 97

that period. In vain I sought for emp:oyment;
the very eagerness with which I desired it
seemed to prejudice those who might other-
wise have engaged my services ; for, in nine
eases out of ten, the wealthy consider poverty
so great a temptation to dishopvesty, that they
can seldom bring themselves to confide in the
integrity of apoor man. The conditions of Mr.
Halford’s will were also prejudicial to my cha-~
racter, for the mass of mankind are always ready
to attribute the worst motives and causes to
that which seems incomprehensible. Day after
day my affairs became more desperate, until, at
length, it was only by the sale of our useless
furniture and my wife’s ornaments that we
were preserved from starvation. I knew that
Mr. Halford had applied for a situation for me
in the service of the East India Company, but
no answer had been returned to his application;
and, rendered half mad by the rapid diminu-
tion of our little stock of money, I resolved to
apply to one of the executors of Mr. Halford’s
estate. He was a stern, hard-featured man,
who had begun life as a cabin-boy on boarda
G@
38 THE SON AND HEIR.

mean-of-war ; and, having weathered many 2
stiff gale, he had no idea of any distress beyond
that which the animal frame might suffer. He
listened with the utmost coolness to my im-
passioned appeal, and calmly replied, that, as
the estate had been given to him in trust, he
was not at liberty to dispose ofit “ But my wife
—my mother, are starving !” I exclaimed ; “ give
me only a hundred pounds for present necessities.”

“Impossible, young man,” was his reply ;
““ vour chances of obtaining the estate are very
trifling, and it is my duty to fulfil the wishes
of the testator. An industrious man never
need have a starving family ; there are plenty
of employments for those who choose to seek
them. I cannot dispose of the funds of my
late friend ; but, as you are in distress, here is
asum which will relieve you for the present.
You need not consider it a loan; you will pro-
bably never be able to repay it.” So saying,
he handed mea bank bill for five pounds, I
need not say how indignantly I spurned his in-
sulting charity, and, dashing the bill in his
face, hurried from the house.
THE SON AND HEIR. 99

Cursing, in 2 paroxysm of rage, the fool who
had given me a fortune in expectancy, only to
render more bitter my present misery, I hast-
ened home. What a scene there presented it-
self! My landlord had been, during my
absence, to demand his rent; his harsh and
unfeeling violence terrified my helpless family,
and I entered the house only to look upon the
dead body of my second infant, and to behold
my wife in strong convulsions. The fearful
strength of my agony produced the same effect
that excessive rage had done in earlier life, and
again a ruptured blood-vessel stretched me upon
a bed of sickness. Many weary weeks passed
before I was again conscious of surrounding
objects. The agitation of my feelings brought
on a fever, which spent its strength upon my
brain, and, during the paroxysms of my de-
lirium, I was continually raving about my
dying Emily. How great was my delight when
the first object on which my eye rested, with
a glance of recognition, was my wife—pale, in-
deed, and languid, but evidently restored to
health.
00 TARE SON AND HEIR.

When she believed my strength equal to the
agitation which she knew the tidings would
occasion, she gave into my hands a letter received
some weeks before. It contained my appoint-
ment to a clerkship in India. ‘How gladly it
was accepted I need not say; but, as some time
had elapsed since its date, I was compelled to
arouse all my energies to prepare for my im-
mediate departure. By pledging my anticipated
salary, I raised money enough to pay off my
debts; and, having settled my mother in a com-
fortable abode, Emily and myself bade adieu to
England.

Again were all my expectations awakened
India, that El Dorado of my imagination, was
before me, and my present elevation of spirit
was more than equal to my recent despair.
Who can wonder at my thirst for gold? From
my childhood want had been my constant com-
panion. [I had seen all that I held most dear—
father, mother, wife,—suffering from poverty;
and now, as if it were decreed that the demon
of avarice should take full possession of me, a
princely fortune was held out as the reward of


Se

‘Tho tatikue oF a sem voyage «cre extremely harassing to my poor
Emily, alveady enfeebled by sickness and asxiety; but to me, every
day added new vigour, because ovcry setting auu found me nearer tc
the goal of my hopes.—-Pagre 101.
THE SON AND HEIR. 101

my old age, solely upon the condition that I
devoted the best years of my life to the acqui-
sition of wealth. I had prayed for riches; aye,
prayed with that bitterness of spirit which turns
the language of supplication into blasphemy.
My prayer was answered :—

“*Evertere domos totas optantibus ipsis
Di faciles.”

The fatigues of a sea voyage were extremely
harassing to my poor Kmily, already enfeebled
by sickness and anxiety; but to me, every day
added new vigour, because every setting sun
found me nearer to the goal of all my hopes.
Upon my arrival in India, I found my situation
a very subordinate one, but I cheerfully entered
upon its duties, feeling assured that the advan-
tages of an intimate knowledge of many Indian
dialects, and a thorough acquaintance with
English law, would soon render me of essential
service to my superiors in office. I was not
disappointed. A question relative to some
obscure point of law, and which involved con-
siderable property, became the subject of dis-
cussion in the office where I was employed:
102 THE SON AND HEIR.

The opinion which I ventured to give differed
very materially from that of several lawyers
then present; but an appeal to the highest
authority decided the question in my favour.
From that time my reputation was established,
and I was allowed to do the duties of my office
by deputy, while my time was devoted to the
more important and far more lucrative duties
of a special pleader.

To crown my desires, I had not been long in
India when I became the father of a living son.
I cannot describe the sensations that overwhelmed
me when I gazed on the delicate features of my
infant boy. What a picture did my imagination
portray of his future life! “He shall never
dream,” thought I, “of poverty; his life shall
be like a fairy tale; all the luxuries of wealth
shall surround him from his cradle; and if I
am compelled to wear soul out in toil, my boy
shall inherit a fortune which even the princes
of his native land mightenvy.” I seemed now
tc have a new motive for exertion. The sum
which Mr. Halford’s will required me to obtain
seemed trifling compared with the magnificent
THE SON AND HEIR. 1c3

desires that had now arisen in my heart, and I
resolved to make a fortune equal to that which
had been bequeathed to me, and then bestow both
on my son.

But the joy of a father could not render me
insensible to the anxiety of a husband; and
the pallid cheek of my beloved wife soon gave
occasion to my most earnest fears for her safety.
Day after day her step became more languid,
her form more attenuated, and I soon became
fatally convinced that she was withering beneath
the baneful influence of the climate. In vain I
implored her to return to her native land; gentle
and yielding in every thing else, she was resolute
in her determination to remain with me. “It
is useless,” was her reply; “before we left
England the germ of death was planted in my
bosom ; my return could only prolong my life
2a few short months, and so brief a respite would
be too dearly purchased by a separation from
you. If I could regain my health and strength,
if my native air could enable me to live long
enough to watch over the infancy of our sweet
boy, I would go; but it may not be; my days
104 THE SON AND HEIR.

are numbered: let me, then, enjoy the few that
are left-me; let me still share your tenderness,
and look upon your face until my eyes shall
close for ever.” The most stony heart would
ache for me if I could adequately describe the
state of my feelings during the few short weeks
that she remained with me. I have suffered the
most violent paroxysms of grief, I have been
crushed beneath the weight of accumulated afflic-
tions; but never, save that once, have I known
the awful stagnation of feeling with which man
looks upon the dying features of her whom he
has loved with the most idolatrous affection.
It was a sort of catalepsy of the heart ; life was
there, but the active principle of life seemed
extinct for ever. In less than six months from
the birth of my boy he was motherless, and I,
desolate!

I have often wondered at the singular, and,
as it almost seems, unlimited faculty of endu-
rance which belongs to the complicated nature
of man. Evils, which, when seen at a distance,
seem capable of crushing him to the earth, when
they actually fall upon him scarcely turn him
THE SON AND HEIR. 105

from his path. He bends beneath the storm,
and then rises up and pursues his way as if un-
scathed. But, alas! who has not learned the
poet’s bitter truth ?

‘The heart may break, yet brokenly live on.”

The tempest bursts upon our heads; the whirl-
wind of passionate emotion sweeps away all. those
vague dreams which, in lesser afflictions, had been
our solace; our hearts are buried in the ruins of
hope’s stately fabric, and, for a time, we helieve
ourselves the victims of utter despair. But days
passon; time familiarizes us with grief; it becomes
our daily companion, and we learn to bear its un-
welcome.society with patience. Thesmilerevisits
the lip, the eye again looks forwardinto the future;
hope rears once more her fairy structure in our
hearts, and, to common eyes, all is again “ fair
seeming.” Like the ivied ruin, the desolation
of our hearts is hidden by the new pleasures
which are daily budding in the sunlight of the
world; and even while we sicken at the ruin of
departed joy, we yield ourselves up to the delu-
sion of coming happiness. But never can our
spirit’s thirst be thus quenched. Still must we
196 THE SON AND HEIR.

atruggle, still toil on in search of the well-spring
in the desert, and we shall find it only in that
hour when the desires of our mortal nature are
merged inthe newly-awakened powers of immor-
tality.

Soon after the death of Emily, my anxious
fears led me to imagine that my son, too, was
drooping beneath the sultry sky of India, and
I determined to send him to England, there to
be nurtured under the watchful eye of my
mother. His nurse, the widow of a British
soldier, gladly consented to return to her na~
tive land, and with a heavy heart I intrusted
him to the faithful creature, promising an ex-
travagant reward if she gave him safe into the
hands of my mother. I knew no rest, day or
night, until I heard of his arrival. My mother
wrote that his health was very precarious; but,
once assured that he was in England, I would
not allow myself to doubt of his future welfare,

Hitherto, my life has been characterized by
sorrew, but never by guilt. My father had im-
parted to me his own strict integrity ; and, with
him, it was not enough to act towards his
THE SON AND HEIR. 107

neighbour only as the law prescribed ; there was
a tribunal in his own bosom that taught him to
abide by the dictates of equity and justice. In
the midst of the most abject poverty, I had
learned the noblest lessons of high-toned ho-
nour. In my day of want and humiliation I
never forgot them ; in my hour of prosperity
they vanished from my remembrance. My in-
tegrity was built upon the sand of worldly
honour, and not upon the rock of Christian
morality ; what marvel, then, that it could not
withstand the secret sapping of the Jdesetting
sin ? The incidents of my life in India are
such as I could not relate without a feeling of
degradation, such as I would not willingly en-
dure. Let me not be misunderstood. I never
have committed an action which, at a human
tribunal, could condemn me. If we should
judge of wrong according to the interpretation
of the law, then I have riever wronged my
neighbour ; but, alas! my conscience bears.
fearful testimony against me. It is a trite re-
mark, that the criminal who dies in the hands
of the hangman is often less guilty, if judged
108 THE SON AND HEIR.

by the laws of equity, than many of the jury
who condemned him. The poor wretch steals
to save himself from famishing ; the miser
cheats to add to his daily increasing hoard.
The former breaks the laws of the land, and is
punished; the latter only violates the law of
equity, and is safe. Leta man have sufficient
cunning to overreach his neighbour without
overstepping the boundaries of legal right, and
he will, in all probability, be honoured for the
very price of his guilt. Such is the state of
society : we ask not whence the wealth was
derived—it is enough that the jewelled hand
presses ours in cordial kindness—our vanity is
flattered, and conscience slumbers on her post.

My desire for gold became an absolute pas-
sion. My fondness for ostentation would not
allow me to live parsimoniously ; but he who
does not scruple to avail himself of every
means cannot fail to become rich in India ;
and, although my establishment abounded in
all those expensive luxuries so essential in a
voluptuous climate, the stream of wealth was
for me rapid and abundant. My salary was
THE SON AND HEIR. 109

moderate, but my perquisites (for such I con-
sidered the exactions which my knowledge of
their dialects enabled me to wring out of the
rich natives,) were enormous, and to these
were added the great profits of my law busi-
ness. Skilled in all the thousand subtleties of
the law, I was celebrated for the adroitness
with which I could make “the worse appear
the better cause ;’ and it may be supposed,
that in a country proverbial for its habits of
litigation, I was never without employment.
He who had an unjust cause to support could
generally afford to pay the largest fee, and i
was therefore the champion of injustice from
the time I first commenced my career as @
pleader until, laden with wealth and wearied
with subtleties, I renounced the bar for ever.

I heard frequently from England, and though
my mother’s letters were always desponding,
yet I attributed this to her habitual melan-
choly, especially as she never designated any
particular with which my son suffered. The
world would think me a madman if I were to
relate my wild and extravagant dreams respect-
110 THE SON AND HEIR.

ing that idolized though almost unknown boy.
Determined that he should be surrounded from
infancy by ail the superfluities of wealth, I
had given orders to my banker in London to
purchase for mea splendid country residence
as soon as opportunity offered. He soon in-
formed me that he had procured one of those
fine old baronial castles which are the glory of
the English villages. It had b-en fitted up in
a style of great magnificence, aud the peculiar
fancy of the proprietor had led him to furnish
it in the antique taste ; but his debts having
exiled him to France, he gladly disposed of
it for little more than half its cost. I imme-
diately wrote to my mother to take possession
of her new abode, and to provide a household
suited to its splendour. Such was my foolish
vanity. Iwished that my son should be reared
not only in wealth, but in the midst of what
might seem hereditary magnificence. In this
happy republic, where I have spent the last few
years of my miserable life, such a feeling could
scarcely be understood. Here, the man who
had been the architect of his own fortunes is
THE SON AND HEIR. Lil

entitled to as much consideration as if his ge-
nealogical tree had been the growth of cen-
turies; but in England it is very different.
There the parvenu is a sort of pariah. Fortun-
ately for my pride, I belonged to an ancient,
though not a noble family, and I wished that
my son should never learn the. abyss of want
and woe which had yawned between its past re-
spectability and its present opulence.

Years passed away. I continued to accu-
mulate wealth with almost unexampled ra-
pidity ; there was not the slightest interruption
in the current of my prosperity ; and the only
source of anxiety now was the health of my son.
Yet I was far from being happy. MUHarassed by
avarice, that most tormenting of passions, I
knew no enjoyment save the accumulation of
wealth, At first my heart rebelled against the
tyranny with which I subjected all its affec-
tions to that one passion. The charms of
female society were almost irresistible. I felt,
though the loss of my Emily was irreparable, I
might yet find some shadow of happiness with
a gentle and affectionate companion; but the
112 THE SON AND HEIR.

idea was suppressed ere it scarce suggested it-
self. Never, thought I, shall another child
call me father, or claim from me a portion of
the heritage destined for the son of my Emily.
Such was the strange, the almost phrenzied
folly with which I devoted myself to the at-
tainment of the one object—the accumulation
of wealth for the son whom I had scarcely
seen, and whose weak health, I was assured,
rendered his life very precarious. In fact, my
mother’s letters became more and more unsa-
tisfactory. She sometimes spoke of his im-
proved health, but there was a tone of des-
pondency pervading all her letters for which I
could not account. My questions respecting
his education were either evaded or answered
in such a vague manner that I received no
information. I determined, therefore, to wind
up my concerns and return to England ; but,
notwithstanding my desire to see my boy, that
rapacity which perpetually urged me to adda
little more to my hoard delayed my departure
untii nearly fifteen years had elapsed since I
consigned him to another’s care. At length |
THE SON AND HEIR. t13

tore myself from my favourite pursuit, and fol-
iowed by the curses, “not loud, but deep,” of
all with whom I had had dealings, I left India.
My wealth trebled the sum for which I had
originally toiled, and my heart yearned with
unutterable tenderness towards the object for
whom I had so fondly laboured.

After a tedious voyage I was once more in
sight of my native land, I would not apprize
my mother of my arrival, because I wished to
appear unexpectedly before her, and thus to
assure myself, ifpossible, that she had conformed
to my wishes regarding my child. How exult-
ing were my feelings as I once more trod my
native soil, I had left it a beggar; I returned
with a fortune that might support regal magni-
ficence; but, alas! a moment’s reflection taught
me that I had been rich in the treasures of the
affections when I last looked upon its shore, and
that now I was all but beggared in heart. My
first care was to demand my fortune from Mr.
Halford’s executor. How the creature stared
when I showed him the testimonials of my

overgrown wealth. He was mean enough to
i
114 THE SON AND HEIR.

attempt an apology for his former conduct, but
with cool contempt I directed him to place his
papers in the hands of my agent, and to com-
niunicate with me, if necessary, through him.
Stopping only a few hours in London, I bent
my course with all possible speed to the village
of & , the residence of my mother and son.
With what unutterable fondness did I yearn to
look upon the object of my long-suppressed
affection. He was now sixteen, and I ;}'ctured
to myself the graceful stateliness of figura, the
open brow, the frank manliness of demeanour
which characterize a well-educated boy of that
age. Ly the time I arrived at S——, imagina-
tion had portrayed his lineaments so minutely,
that I felt assured I should know him at a single
glance; and every passing equipage, every dis-
tant wayfarer was examined with anxious
curiosity, lest I should accidentally pass my son
unrecognised. It wasa bright and balmy after-
noon in June when I reached the little village.
Leaving my carriage and servants at the inn, I
walked alone towards the stately building whose
antique turrets had greeted my eyes at some


THE SON AND HEIR. 115

miles’ distance. As I entered the extensive park
1 paused to look upon the lovely scene. The
mellow light of the declining sun gave redoubled
vichness to the soft greensward, and flung the
shadows of the ancient oaks in lengthened lines
across thelawn. Peacocks, with plumage glit-
tering like the jewelled turban of an Eastern
rajah, were stalking majestically beneath the
branches; and from afar came the cawing of a
rookery, a sound dearer to an Englishman than
all the music of Italy, because always connected
with idcas of family antiquity. My heart beat
quick when I reflected that all these evidences
of an ancient and princely heritage had sur-
rounded the childhood of my son—the son ofthe
serving boy—of the lawyer’s hireling! Yes, I
felt prouder at that moment of having been the
founderof my own fortunes, than if [had actually
inherited that noble castle with all its appanages.
Like Napoleon, when he proudly answered the
vain attempt of the Austrian emperor to prove
him descended from an ancient line of princes—
“No, I have no claim to hereditary distinction;
Iam the Rodolph of my race.”
116 THE SON AND HEIR.

As I approached the house I heard a soft low
voice singing what appeared to be fragments
of a legendary ballad. The sound proceeded
from a small pavilion, wreathed with ivy and
honeysuckle, which stood in a little thicket on
one side of the lawn. Advancing towards it I
caught a glimpse of a face of almost infantile
beauty ; but my approach had been discovered,
for the singer, uttering a faint cry, darted through
an opening on the opposite side and disappeared.
A quantity of flowers, a flageolet, and a half-
finished wreath lay on the ground. Who could
it be? Probably some young friend whom my
mother had taken as a companion; and imme-
diately a thousand ideas of childish partialities
and foolish attachments alarmed my sensitive
pride. A splendid alliance for my son, a con-
nection of the highest attainable rank, had long
been my favourite day-dream; secretly fretting
at the folly of exposing him at so immature an
age to female influence, I walked towards the
house. Sending a servant to request my mother’s
presence, but without announcing my name, I
seated myself in a beautiful apartment, which.
THE SON AND HEIR: 117

opened into a conservatory filled with the
choicest flowers. In afew minutes she entered,
Time had made sad ravages in her once beautiful
person; and yet, whilecontemplating the change
in her, I was foolish enough to be surprised and
pained when I found that she did not recognize
me. When I left her she had just begun to
tread the down-hill path of life; she had now
apparently travelled to the very verge of the grave;
was it surprising, then, that her dimmed eye
should have failed to recognize the son who had
left her in the vigour of early manhood, and who
now returned with the furrowed brow of prema-~
ture age? [had believedthat habitual melancholy
had soblunted hersensibilities, that Imightsafely
venture to appear before her without preparation;
I was greatly astonished, therefore, at her exces-
sive emotion when I made myself known to her.

“My son—my son!” exclaimed I, before she
found words to address me; where is my boy?
is he well ?”

“Well,’’ she faltered, “but—”

“But what?—speak! has any thing befailen
him ?”
118 THE SON AND HEIR.

Looking into my face with an expression I
never shall forget, she uttered a few broken
words, but suddenly paused. The casement
near which she stood was darkened for an instant,
and a slender childlike figure sprang through.
It was the person I had seen in the pavilion ;
the face was that of my lost Emily. I gazed
more intently ; powers of Heaven! it was the
face of a beautiful idiot! The truth burst upon
me like a thunderbolt; my boy—the heir to all
the fruit of my protracted toil—was an idiot!

For the third time I was visited by that dread-
ful prostration of all my powers which twice
before brought me to the brink of the grave.
My- brain reeled—my eyes swam—all the blood
in my body seemed rushing with torrent-like
fury to my head, and bursting with irrepressible
violence from every possible vent. The next
moment I lay senseless at the feet of my ill-
judging mother and my unhappy son.

For many weeks I was confined to a bed of
sickness. A sort of stupor fell upon me. I
was conscious of what was passing around me,
but I had not the power of making known my
THE SON AND HEIR. 119

conciousness ; and my eyes, too, were totally
darkened, so that I could not distinguish be-
tween day and night. My mother nursed me
with the tenderest care, and there was often a
light step around my bed, and a hand of femi-
nine softness upon my brow, which I knew
must be the step and hand of my son. Words
cannot describe the sensations that thrilled me
when I felt him near me. The love which I
had so long hoarde@ up in my heart—the hor-
ror which I felt at finding that treasured love
had been lavished upon an idiot ; the sudden
and awful overthrow of all my ambitious hopes
—the sickening recollection of my ill-gotten aud
now useless wealth—all united to awaken emo-
tions which made my very soul quiver beneath
his gentle touch. At times I heard his sweet
voice warbling, in some distant corner of my
apartment, snatches of old ballads or wild me-
lodies, for which he framed words as he sung ;
words wild and incoherent, but full of gentle
and tender feeling. Had he been a stranger,
my soul would have yearned towards the help-
less and interesting boy ; but the destruction
120 THE SON AND HEIR.

of my own proud hopes was too present with
me, and my heart grew faint as I listened to
his flutelike tones.

At length I was once more enabled to leave
my couch, but my eyes were still darkened ;
the violence of my disease had spent its strength
upon my sight, and it was a matter of doubt
with my physicians whether I ever should re-
cover that inestimable gift. = was, however,
able to leave my room, and, led by my mother
er some attendant, began to take short walks
about the lawn. I soon found that my boy’s
light step was generally beside me. His natu-
rally tender disposition enabled him readily to
Jearn the lesson of affection which my mother
taught him during my illness ; and, as he gra-
dually overcame his timidity, I often felt his
soft hand in mine as he gently urged me to-
wards some favourite retreat. Strange as it
may seem, it was with the utmost difficulty
I could endure his presence. A vague horror
thrilled my frame whenever he approached me,
and it required all my self-command to conceal
it. It was long before I cculd summon resou-
THE SON AND HEIR. 121

lution to inquire why this dreadful affliction
had not been made known tome. The child’s
health was such during infancy as to preclude
any hope of long life. Several years, of course,
elapsed before they could accurately ascertain
his unhappy situation ; and when, at last, sus-
picion became certainty, the belief that the
delicacy of his constitution had assuredly des-
tined him to early death prevented my mother
from afflicting me with the tidings of his mental
imbecility. She at first trusted that the death
which continually menaced him might spare
me the pain of learning his distressing situ-
ation ; and when, at last, she found that his
improved health rendered it necessary that I
should be made acquainted with the truth, she
shrunk from the painful task and deferred it
from day to day, as if the blow would be
lighter from being so long suspended. I did
not blame her! the mischief could not now be
repaired. What might have been my situation
had I known the truth, it was vain now to
imagine. Now all was lost ; the infirmities of
premature age were upon me ; I wasa wretched
1922 THE SON AND HEIR.

worn-out man ; the widowed father of an idiot
boy ; the heirless possessor of incalculable
twealth.

Slowly my sight returned to me; and then
did I learn to love my helpless son. His face
was the face of hi-sweet mother; the liquid
blue eye, the rosy lip, the transparent com-
-plexion—all were hers, even to the delicately
moulded hand and foot. Such a face in a pic-
ture would have seemed the portrait of a beau-
tiful female. Tlte prevailing expression was
pensiveness ; and it was only in moments of
glee, when chasing the butterfly, or snatching
the honey-bee, that his vacant look of imbecile
mirth transformed his beautiful countenance
into that of a gibbering idiot. Had he died
then, methinks my punishment would have
been sufficiently severe ; but an all-wise Pro-
videsnce had decreed that he should be the
innocent instrument of torture to my guilty
spirit. Think what must have been the an-
guish with which I looked on him, surrounded
with all those luxuries with which my vanity
had encompassed him. To see him wandering,
TIIE SQN AND FITIR. 193

with vacant look, through the painted halls and
marble staircases, or seated at a table loaded
with rich plate and costly dainties, but, witb
infantile helplessness, receiving every mouthful
from the hands of an attendant. No one can
imagine the passionate pleasure which I once
felt in thus lavishing upon him al] the super-
fluities of wealth, and no one can form an idea,
therefore, how all these trifling circumstances
added to the bitterness of my punishment.

Yet he was one of the purest and gentlest
creatures that ever dwelt on this dark earth.
Guileless as at the hour of his birth, he seemed
to have inherited, with his mother’s beauty,
all her meekness and tenderness. Many a time
have I looked apon him, as he was walking be-
side me, with downcast eye and pensive brow,
and almost deemed it impossible that so rich sa
casket should be destitute of the precious gem
of intellect. Many a time has a faint hope
dawned in my heart that it might not be irre-
coverably lost, when a sudden bound after a
passing butterfly, or a leap into the thicket
after a flower, would chase all expression from
124 THE SON AND HEIR.

his countenance, and he would return with the
blank smile or meaningless gravity of hopeless
idiocy.

He lived long enough to knit my heart to him
with a tender and strange affection; and then,
as the finishing stroke of punishment,. he fell
beneath the long-suspended dart of death.

About a fortnight before his decease he acci-
dentally discovered the miniature of his mother,
which I always wore about my neck; uttering
a wild cry of joy, he snapped asunder the ri-
band to which it was suspended, and, tying it to
his own neck, refused to relinquish it. When
1 endeavoured to ascertain his meaning, I learned
from his wild rhapsodies that, night after night,
such a form visited his dreams. “She comes
to me,” said he, “and kisses me, and points to
the stars ; and, when she leaves me, she beckons
me to go with her—and oh! I do so long to go.”
This little incident deeply affected me. [I al-
lowec him to keep the picture, and hour after
hour he would sit gazing on his treasure.

He died even as a rose falls from its stem.
No sickness, no fevered pulse, no glazing eye,
TUE SON AND HIM. 125

gave. token of his approaching dissolution. We
were seated one evening in the large window
which looked out upon the lawn, when sud-
denly I recollected that it was his birthday. Just
seventeen years before I had been transported
with delight by the tidings that I was a father.
My emotions overpowered me, and, covering my
face with my hands, I gave free vent to my
tears. I felt his arm upon my neck and his
soft lip upon my forehead, but still I stirred not.
At length he stretched himself at my feet, and
laid his head on my knee, as he was wont to
do when overpowered with slumber. I removed
my hands from my face, and looked on him ;
his cheek was paler than usual, but his cyes
were closed in such deep repose that I scarce-
ly breathed lest I should disturb him. Sud-
denly he raised his hand, and without opening
his eyes, pointed to the star which was just
rising in the heavens. “She is there,” mur-
mured he. Witha strange feeling of mingled awe
and tenderness I gazed intently upon his face;
such a change came over it as only one fearful
hand can make—my idiot boy was dead!
Pages
126-127
missing

from

Original
THX

VILLAGE TRAGEDY.



‘ Every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in
ali things.”—1 Cor. ix. 25.



CHAPTER If.

“ There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue on its outward parts.”
Merchant of Venice.

In our rapidly growing country a village seldom
retains its identity long. House after house
springs up, as if built by the genius of Aladdin’s
lamp ; soon the white spire of a church is seen
peeping from among the trees; anon a broad
square building, dignified by the title of court-

house, displays its clumsy front in the maip
r
130 TILE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

avenue—I beg pardon—strect, I should say ;
and in Jess than ten years from the time the
first dwelling was erected, the village is merged
in a large and flourishing town, modern in
everything except its ludicrously classical name,
Such has been the case with thelittle village of
D’Autremont, which, but a few years since,
was to be found in the northern part of the
State of New-York. D’Autremont had received
its name in honour of a rich French emigrant
who formerly owned the tract of land on which
the village was built; but, if he could have
arisen from his quiet bed in the little church-
yard, he would have been as much puzzled to
recognize his patronymic in the designation of
Otter-mount, into which it had been corrupted,
as would old Montaigne to discover Azs in the
name of Montoyne, so common on Long Island.

In one of the most beautiful situations of the
village, on the summit of a hill which com-
manded a view of the whole adjacent country,
and at whose foot ran a clear and rapid stream,
stood a large stone house, evidently the abode
of rustic opulence. The kitchen, with its pro-
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 131

jecting oven on the side, was at some distance
from the house, but connected by an open
piazza, which, in winter, might be converted
into a covered passage; and the immense barns,
cornricks, and stables which stood in the clover-
field, all bore testimony to the wealth of the
master. James Churchill was, in fact, the rich-
est farmer in that part of the country. His
father had been 2 painstaking, penurious man,
and the son had faithfully trodden in his steps.
Honest and upright in all his dealings with his
fellow-men, he was yet so rigid and exacting,
that he was as much feared for his inflexibility
as respected for his integrity. Every man
knew that so long as he fulfilled his engage-
ments, he was safe in the hands of Churchill ;
but if sickness or blighted crops compelled him
to defer his payments, he was well assured that
Churchill would have “ judgment, and not
mercy.” All feared him, therefore ; and if, as
it sometimes happened, a farmer required a
temporary loan, he resorted to almost any ex-
pedient rather than that of assuming an obli-
vation to James Churchill. When Walter
132 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

Howland mortgaged his large farm, therefore,
every one was amazed ; and while they severely
censured the old man, they warmly sympathized
with the son, the young Walter, who thus found
himself burdened with a heavy debt at his first
outset in life.

In a village where there are so few subjects
of interest, everything is discussed, and every-
body’s affairs examined with a degree of earnest~
ness almost unknown in a great city. There is
always something approaching to a unity of
interests and feelings in a small community.
Every man has somewhat of a brotherly regard
towards his neighbour, and the love of gossip,
which in the city degenerates into scandal, in
the country seems merely a deep interest in the
welfare of each individual. It was soon rumoured
that the demon of strong drink had taken pos-
session of Mr. Howland, and that to this fatal
propensity he owed the embarrassment which
had compelled him to mortgage his pro-
perty. Every one pitied his son, especially
when, at length, the old man began to carry his
shame abroad,
THE VILUAGE TRAGEDY. 133

It was just three weeks after Walter had
brought home his young wife, to occupy the
place which had been left void by the death of
his mother, that his father was found lying
on the roadside senseless from intoxication.
Churchill first discovered him in this situation,
and in the pride of his own uprightness, was
about to pass, like the Levite, “on the other
side,” but thinking that a severe lesson might
perhaps reclaim him, he ordered one of his
blacks to carry him home on the wheelbarrow.
The negro, delighted with the task, grinned from
ear to ear, and after dropping his burden seve-
ral times in the muddiest parts of the road,
finally reached Walter Howland’s door just at
noon, when all the labourers of the farm were
assembled to dinner.

** Massa Churchill sen’ you present, massa
Howland ; but he say, next time he fine old
man drunk in de road he leave him dere like a
dog,”’ said the negro with a loud guffaw.

As he spoke, he lifted one side of the wheel-
barrow, and the gray head of the old man fell
heavily upon the grass. Walter happened to be
Pages
134-135
missing

from

Original
i36 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

Walter listened to the verdict in silence. As
he left the court he encountered Churchill in a
deep gien at the foot of the hill on which stood
his house. Calmly, as if conscious that he had
not outstepped the limits of justice, Churchill
faced his young adversary, and, with a slight
salutation, was about to pass, when Walter
stopped him. His features were swollen with
passion, and his voice was hoarse with suppressed
emotion, as he said,—* Beware, Churchill : you
have trampled the hoary head into the dust ;
think you your own gray hairs will lie lighter
upon yourtemples? I tell you,man, if my father
dies, you owe me a heavy retribution. I am
not yet mad, but God knows what I may be.
Pass on, and remember my warning.”

Notwithstanding Churchill’s inflexible ideas
of justice, and his firm belief that he was acting
in perfect equity towards the Howlands, yet his
heart smote him as he beheld Walter’s agitation ;
and he entered his own door saddened rather
than elated by his victory. He looked around
his own fireside ; there sat his wife in all her
matronly comeliness ; his daughter, whom he
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 137

had once hoped to see married to the very
man he was now persecuting ; his son, but
little younger than the only child of the un-
happy Howland ; and his stern feelings were
subdued. Still he was conscious that his con-
duct had been instigated only by a strict sense
of justice, not by any dislike to the individuals,
and the pride of his nature soon conquered his
unwonted softness.

He sat down in moody silence—a silence un-
broken by his expectant family, for Churchill,
though a good, was not a kind man, and even
in his own household was as much feared as
loved. It was not until after his two children
had left the room, that his meek wife ventured
to address him.

* You are troubled, James; what has gone
wrong with you ?”

“Nothing,” was his cold reply ; “the trial
is finished, and Walter Howiand will pay
dearly for his insolence.”’

“ James, James, you are too hard upon that
young man; depend upon it no good will
come of it,” said the kind-hearted woman.

A frown was on his brow as he turned hastily
138 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

towards her; but when he looked upon her
placid countenance, and remembered her un-
varying gentleness during more than thirty
wedded years, he checked the harsh reply that
rose to his lips, and answered, “ You know no-
thing about it, Annie ; you are a good woman,
but no lawyer.”

“TI can feel what is right,” said she earnestly,
* and I would rather relieve the afflicted than
oppress them.”

“Say no more, Annie,” cried the stern hus-
band; “old Walter Howland has given himself
up to drunkenness, and the fruits of my honest
toil shall never be wasted for the encourage-
ment of vice. He owes me money, and it shall
be paid to the last cent.”

The gentle spirit of his submissive wife dared
no further to gainsay his will; and Churchill
sat down to his evening meal, satisfied in his
own mind that he had only done his duty.
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 139

CHAPTER IT.

*TNl have my bond ; I will not hear thee speak,

I'll have my bond, and, therefore speak no more.

Tl not be made a soft and dull-eyed fool,

To shake the head, relent, and sigh, and yield
rs.””

Merchant of Venétze.

Tue situation of Walter Howland was far more
distressing than Churchill could have supposed.
The illness of his father, and the damages which
he had been compelled to pay Churchill, to-
gether with costs, lawyers’ fees, &c., had con<
sumed all the money which was originally in-
tended to pay the interest of his mortgage. The
day of payment arrived, and Walter found him-
self compelled to ask a delay of payment for -
three months. His very soul writhed with
anguish, for Walter was.a proud man, when he
thus stood before Churchill as a suppliant ; but
strange to say, for once he was merciful, and
340 THE-VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

The next three months passed rapidly away
—too rapidly for Walter Howland. Misfortune
seemed to have set her mark on him ; nothing
prospered in his hands ; the blight, the mildew,
or the worm, destroyed his unripened grain and
the fine fruit which his farm had always pro-
duced, so that, at the expiration of the time
allotted for the payment of his note, he found
himself totally unable to make any provision for
it, or even to pay the additional interest due on
the mortgage. Again he was under the ne-
cessity of suing for delay, and again he was not
denied. A second note for double the amount
of the first was received by Churchill in lieu of
the money, and the evil day was once more de-
ferred. Walter well knew that to the influence
of the kind-hearted Mrs. Churchill he owed this
forbearance, and he was not ungrateful ; but his
hatred to her husband was not to be appeased.
He never looked upon his father that he did not
curse Churchill as the cause of his dreadful im-
becility. “I told him if my father died he
should pay me aheavy retribution. What does
le not owe me now ?”’ exclaimed he one day as
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 14}

he beheld his father seated childlike upon the
floor. “ Let him take heed of himself,” he added
gloomily ; “ while he practises forbearance, so
will I; but the time will come when both his
debt and mine must be paid.”

Walter Howland possessed one of the kind-
est hearts in the world ; but there was a host of
powerful passions in his bosom, of whose very
existence he was unconscious, because they had
never been called out. If ever man was actu~
ated by two principles, one of evil and another
of good, that man was Walter Howland. When
influenced by the good principle, (and so he
had been nearly all his life,) it was impossible
to be more noble-minded and upright; but there
was sometimes an outbreak of passion, which too
clearly showed that the evil, though latent, was
inherent. Yet habit is so essentially a second
nature, that, in all probability, he would have
lived and died utterly ignorant of the dark part
of his own character, had it not been for the
untoward circumstances in which he now found
himself.

Wading through debt is like toiling through
142 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

the Slough of Despond ; every effort-to advance
but plunges one more deeply in the mire. Wal-
ter soon found his utter imability to meet his
engagements, and there was but one thing left
for him to do. -He must relinquish his farm,
and retire to a smaller one which his wife had
recently inherited from her father. When the
third quarter became due, he signified his in-
tention to his unrelenting creditor, and Chur-
chill accepted his offer. The original mortgage
was about five thousand dollars, and the interest
now due amounted to two hundred and twenty-
five dollars. Walter proposed to sell his farm
at public auction, and, after paying his debt to
Churchill, with the residue of the purchase-
money to stock his new one.- The day was
fixed, and Walter, trusting to Churchill’s well-
known integrity, did not even take the precau-
tion to procure the presence of a friend at the
auction. Muchas he hated Churchill, he firmly
believed that he would deal justly, and he
rested satisfied to wait the result.

Just before the hour when the sale was to
commence, the village was visited by one of
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 143

those dreadful storms of wind which sometimes
sweep over our northern counties. The sky
became black as night ; the growl of the dis-
tant thunder sounded through the forest like the
roar of some immense wild beast ; the lightning
flashed fearfully, and the voice of the wind, at
one moment like the shrill shriek of mortal
agony, at another like the feeble wailings of a
dying infant, awoke the deepest terror in all
who listened to its threat. At length the wind
arose in its terrific might. Trees that had
braved the storms of a hundred winters bent
like reeds before its rushing strength. On it
went, bearing with ituptorn saplings and boughs
twisted from every tree in the forest ; unroofing
dwellings ; prostrating outhouses and stables ;
overthrowing the cattle in the fields, and stifling
their cries of distress with its own fierce roar,
until its fury was exhausted. Ofcourse noone
ventured to expose himself to this elemental war,
and it was generally supposed the sale would
be deferred. But Churchill was not a man to
be turned from his purpose ; all the advantage
which the law would allow him he rigorously
144 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY

exacted, and such an opportunity of making 3
bargain was too tempting to be resisted. He
awaited the coming of bidders until two houra
after the time appointed for the sale, and then
became himself the purchaser of the Howland
farm for the sum of five thousand dollars. about
half its real value.

The rage of Walter, when apprised of this
transaction, knew no bounds. He openly ac-
cused Churchill of having cheated him of his
property, and vowed vengeance against him in
the most violent manner. Whatever Churchill
felt about its justice, he well knew that the sale
had been a legal one ; and irritated by the
abuse which Walter had lavished upon him, he
sent an order that the farm should be vacated
within three days. Walter positively refused ;
and the consequence was, that a writ of eject-
ment was issued against him, so that he was
absolutely turned out of doors with his family
to seek another residence as he best could. The
paroxysm of rage into which Walter was thrown
exasperated the officer who served the writ, and
his duty was performed in the harshest manner.
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 145

But there was yet another aggravation to his
misery. His father had been rapidly declining
in health, and now, terrified by the violence of
the officer and the anger of his son, he had cow-
ered down in a corner of the kitchen, with his
face buried between his knees. When ready to
depart, Walter went in search of him, and vain-
ly besought him te arise. At length, wearied
with importuning him, he stooped and gently
lifted the old man’s head ; it fell with a lead-
like weight upon his breast—his father was
dead! Even the officer was horror-struck as
Walter reappeared bearing his dead father in
his arms. He spoke not until he had placed
the body carefully- in the waggon which was to
convey him to his new home ; then, turning to
the man, he said, “ Go to your employer, and
tell him his work is done. I am homeless and
fatherless, now comes the hour of retribution.”

Deeply was Mrs. Churchill grieved when she
heard of these proceedings. She had known
Walter Howland from childhood; she had once
hoped to have seen him wedded to her only

daughter ; but though Walter hadloved another
K
146 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

better, yet, for Lucy’s sake as well as for his
own, she felt a deep interest in his welfare.
But vainly did she now attempt to influence her
husband to gentler measures. To James Chur-
chill’s narrow mind misfortune always wore the
semblance of guilt, and he firmly believed that
Walter’s recent distresses were owing to some
Misconduct. In fact he hadimbibed a suspicion
(most unjustly, however,) that Walter had fallen
into his father’s evil habits. His gloomy de-
meanour, his moody language, his mysterious
threats, were all considered as evidences of oc-
casional intoxication, for Churchill’s cold heart
could little understand the fiery passions that
actuated his young adversary.

As the chameleon changes its colour to suit
the hue of the object on which it is placed, so
the human heart seems, by a singular faculty, to
adapt itself to any circumstances, whether they
be good or evil. Where strong passions exist,
the transition from good to evil is but too easy.
The good is a passive, but the bad an active
principle, and therefore it is that we sometimes
behold a life of unblemished integrity suddenly
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 147

stained by some strangely inconsistent crime.
It has been gravely doubted by some philoso-
phers whether a sudden impulse of evil could
overcome long-continued habits of virtue ; and
when instances have occurred to prove the fact,
they have avoided the inference by asserting
that those apparently virtuous habits were but
the arts of hypocrisy. Alas! had they studied
men as well as books, they would have learned
but too well how—

“In amoment we may plunge our years

In fatal penitence, and, in the blight

Of our own soul, turn all our blood to tears,
And colour things to come with hues of light.”
148 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

CHAPTER IIT.

“Ts there a murderer here? No—yes, I am!"
Richard ITT.

Ir will be remembered that Churchill had pur-
chased the Howland farm for a sum equivalent
to the original mortgage ; and Walter, who had
fully calculated upon paying off all his debts by
the proceeds of the sale, found himself still
hampered by the note which Churchill held for
the amount of the unpaid interest money. He
had been but a short time settled in his new
abode, when he was surprised by a visit from
Churchill. .As he rode up to the door, and was
about to alight from his horse, Walter hurried
out to meet him, but not in kindness.

“Come nota step nearer, Churchill,” said he,
in a voice of suppressed passion; “come not 3
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 149

step nearer ; this house shall never be polluted
by your presence while I am its master.”

Churchill, still influenced by his unjust sus-
picions, fixed his eyes on Walter’s face, and,
mistaking the tremulous frame and bloodshot
eye of smothered rage for the effects of intem-
perance, sternly replied, “ Icome to demand my
own; give me my money and [I shall never
darken your doors; but, mark me! not one
penny of the proceeds of your soil shall find its
way into your pocket until my noteis paid. I
came prepared to make some amicable arrange-
ment with an industrious and unfortunate
neighbour, but with Walter Howland the drunk-
ard I have nothing to do.”

Walter rushed forward with uplifted arm,
but his foot struck a stone in the path, and he
fell directly before Churchill’s horse. With a
grim smile the old man bade him mind his
footing another time, and rode off.

The next day, as Walter was busily engaged
in the field stacking his hay, he perceived
Churchill again approaching, but not now alone.
The officer who had served the writ of eject-
156 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

ment .accompanied him; and before Walter
could recover from his surprise, he found his
hay seized for debt. Without a word of expos-
tulation, he quietly allowed them to depart with
it; then calling his labourers about him, he
paid their wages and dismissed them.

“T have no further need of you,” said he;
“my land may as well lie fallow as be tilled for
that old rascal ; and no plough shall ever cross
my fields while he lives to claim the fruits of my
labour.” There was asort of unnatural calm-
ness in his manner, which betokened fearful re-
sults; but the ignorant labourers only wonder-
ed at his tranquillity, and departed.

From that hour his character seemed entirely
changed. The endearments of his wife, and
the playfulness of his infant, were alike unheed-
ed. He wandered about the woods with his
gun in his hand from daybreak until sunset.
His cheek became sunken, his eye haggard, his
hair and beard untrimmed, and his whole ap-
pearaace was that of one haunted by an evil
spirit. Even the seizure of his cattle and stock
of hit farm by the inexorable Churchill failed to
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 15]

arouse him to any exertion, and he seemed as
if his distresses had actually stupified him.

Months passed away in this manner, wheu
one bright November morning he took his gun,
and, as usual, proceeded towards the woods.
Heretofore he had always returned at sunset ;
but now hour after hour passed on, the gray cf
twilight deepened into the dusk of night, and
still he came not. Terrified at his unwonted
delay, his unhappy wife sat at the door listening
to every sound until long after midnight ; when
suddenly he rushed out of the neighbouring
thicket, and, springing into the house, threw
himself on the floor, exclaiming—

“Thank God, he has escaped ! my hands are
yet clean.”

All attempts to learn where he had been were
unavailing. His clothes were wet with dew,
and his rifle still loaded; but he refused to
answer any question, and remained on the floor
with his face hidden between his hands, until
the morning sun shone brightly through the
unclosed window. He then rose, and dressing
himself with unusual. care went out in the
152 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

direction of a neighbouring inn. He had not
been long in the tavern when Churchill en-
tered. Walter evidently had expected him, and,
to the surprise of all present, as he entered
Walter extended his hand to him:

“You have escaped a great danger, Mr.
Churchill,’ said he ; “let me congratulate you.”

Looking at him with very natural astonish-
ment, Churchill could only account for his
unwonted civility by believing him intoxi-
cated. Spurning his proffered hand, therefore,
he replied,—

*“ Yes, I have escaped the danger of losing my
money by an idle drunkard,” and turned away.

Walter’s face became perfectly livid, as he
looked after him. Raising his hands high above
his: head, he cried,—

“Stay, Churchill, and listen to me for the
last time: I have wrestled fearfully with the
demon which you have conjured up within my
heart; I have struggled to trample down the
fiend, and I came to you to-day in all the full-
ness of forgiving, ay, and of repentant feeling.
But the strife is past; you have spurned my
TWEE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 153

hand of friendship ; when next that hand is
extended, it will not be in kindness ; you have
turned your back upon me, but when we. next
meet, by all the fiends of hell I swear, it shall
be face to face.” As he spoke, he strode hastily
from the room, and returned to his gloomy
home.

A few weeks after this memorable meeting,
the whole village was thrown into consternation,
in the depth of night, by the horrible tidings
that Churchill had been murdered! Between
twelve and one o'clock at night, a knock
was heard at Churchill’s door. Having de-
manded who required admittance at that un-
reasonable hour, he was answered by a hoarse
voice,—“ I have a letter for Mr. Churchill ; be
so good as to open the door and take it.” He
immediately rose, and without waiting to dress,
stepped to the door, unclosed it, and received a
rifle ball through his body. He uttered one
groan, and fell instantly dead. Terrified by the
report of the gun, Mrs. Churchill started from
her bed, and, as she groped her way into the
passage, stumbled over the dead body of her
husband. The neighbours were soonassembled,
154 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

and, while all stood in mute horror round the
body, a suspicion of the murderer flashed across
the minds of more than one. A meaning look
was exchanged between them, and in a few
minutes a sleigh, filled with some of the indig-
nant witnesses of the dreadful scene, started for
the Redfield farm. It was about three in the
morning when they arrived at the humble
abode of Walter Howland, He appeared to
have heard their approach, for at the first knock
he arose and opened the door for them. They
told him that Churchill had been murdered ;
but his countenance betrayed no emotion, not
even the ordinary horror that might have been
expected in a stranger, on hearing of such an
event.

Looking eagerly in her husband’s face, his
wife exclaimed,—“ Walter’s rifle has been at
the gunsmith’s these three weeks ; we have no
gun in the house.”

“You are mistaken,” said Walter, coolly ;
“ there is young Morton’s rifle in the east room,”
and then quietly proceeding to dress himself,
he asked what they wanted with him.

“You are suspected to have had a hand in


‘ho uttered a loud shriek and fained on the floor.—rage 156.
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 155

this murder, Howland,” said one of his visi-
tors.

“Ts it so?” asked he, and 2 strong smile
flitted over his dark face as he spoke. “ Well,
I am ready to attend you. Whoever be the
murderer, Churchill has at last paid the debt
he owed me for my father's death ; yet I would
it had been a lighter penalty.”

“Oh, Walter, what will become of us if you
have done this wicked thing ?” cried his un~
happy wife. ‘Speak, Walter, and tell them
you are not the murderer.”

“They would not believe me, Mary,” was
his calm reply.

The wretched woman looked earnestly in his
face ; then as if she read inhis countenance the
confirmation of his guilt, uttered a loud shriek,
and fainted on the floor. Giving her to
the care of a servant, he turned to the men, and
said, “Let us go now; her grief would only
unman me, and I wish to confront my enemies
boldly.” During this time some of the persons
who had thus volunteered to apprehend How-
land were engaged in searching for evidences of
156 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

the murder. His horse was found panting ia
the stable, as if it had been ridden hard ; a rifle
stood in the east room, loaded, but moist ; and
blackened with powder, as if it had been re-
cently fired, and then reloaded without clean-
ing; but there were no other circumstances
which tended to fix the guilt upon him, had it
not been for his oft-repeated threats. His well-
known hatred to Churchill, however, prejudiced
every mind against him, and before the sun
rose, Walter Howland was atenant of the county
jaiL
TIME VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 157

CHAPTER IV.

“ All that I can do ts nothing worth,
Since that my penitence comes after a]],
Imploring pardon."

Fie v.

S1x weeks elapsed before the trial came on, and
his stern spirit sunk beneath the horrors of a
lingering imprisonment. His wife had never
risen from her bed since the hour when he saw
her lie like a crushed worm at his feet; and
just two days before the trial, the miserable
man learned that she was no more. From the
moment that he heard of her death, he seemed
to lose all anxiety about his trial. Asif life had
lost every charm for him, he prepared to re-
sign it as calmly as if he had been already
convicted ; and when the day arrived, he ap-
peared at the bar to all outward seeming as
calm as the most ordinary spectator.
158 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

Though at first view of the case his guilt
scemed indisputable, yet, strange to say, it was
found next to impossible to prove it. The evi-
dence was entirely circumstantial,and, of course,
there was as much proof in favour of his inno-
cence as of his guilt. His acquittal or condem-
nation, therefore, depended entirely upon the con-
struction given tothe facts stated by the witnesses,
and the responsibility of the jury was, indeed, a
fearful one. His oft-expressed hatred and fre-
quent threats, however, were strong presump-
tive evidence against him ; and after along and
patient investigation, he was convicted and sen-
tenced to death. He had stood immoveably
calm during the whole trial, but when he heard
the fatal doom pronounced upon him as a mur-
derer, his face became pale as ashes ; he rocked
backwards and forwards for a moment as if his
feet refused to bear the weight of his emaciated
body, and then fell heavily to the earth. When
he recovered from his swoon, he was in the
convict’s cell.

The consolations of religion, which had been
repeatedly proffered to him, were now no longer
THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 159

refused, and the remorseful spirit of the un-
happy man was bowed in deep humility at the
foot of the cross. The day of his execution ar-
rived, and found him perfectly resigned. “I
have but one earthly care,” said he to the cler-
gyman who attended him. “ My boy, my in-
fant boy ! who will look to his safety, and res-
cue him from the degradation that awaits a
felon’s son ?”” THis very soul seemed to quail
within him when he learned that Mrs. Chur-
chill, the widow of the man he had murdered,
had promised to be a mother to his more than
orphan boy. He shuddered as he fervently ex-
claimed, “ My God reward her!” Placing a
paper in the hands of the kind old minister, he
continued : “ Thispaper contains my confession ;
it may rescue my memory from the stain of
ruthless barbarity, and it will not be made pub-
lic until after I shall be beyond the reach of
shame. Farewell.”

The confession was in the following words :

“TI shall now describe the murder of James
Churchill. Yes, in a cool deliberate manner I
murdered him! Called him from his- sweet.
1606 TMNE VILLAGE TBAGEDY.

slumbers and from the bosom of his wife—never
more to return to her fond embrace—to sink
him in the grave. Yes, his own floor I bathed
with his warm blood, and his soul I hurried off
to another world. I heard the new-made
widow’s groans, and the wretched orphan’s cries,
which pierced my flinty heart. My God forgive
ine, and wash the crimson stain from my af-
flicted soul.

“TI was aggravated to this crime by injuries,
personal abuses, and insults, but they are no ex-
cuse forme. I had some time calculated on his
destruction, and one day, a few weeks before his
death, he went to A , and I expected him
to return in the evening. I loaded a gun, and
waylaid the road between his house and mine,
in the woods west of M‘Coy’s tavern. Herel
tarried until late at night awaiting his return,
but he did not come. I first took my stand
behind a root, and then, for my better accom-
modation, behind a pine-tree, and had he come,
I surely should have shot him. While I here
stood, I had some reflections ; the sweet even-
ing breeze gently pressed the lofty forest, and


THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 161]

the tall pines could bend beneath the power of
Hicaven, but my obdurate heart remained un-
moved.

“The next day, I went to A , and there
I saw Mr. Churchill, and I felt very glad he
had escaped. After reflecting on the subject
and getting no satisfaction, I fixed my eye on
him again, and I could not spare him. Accord-
ingly, in December, I watched the state of the
snow that I might not be tracked, and on the
29th I thought the thing wasripe. In the af-
ternoon I loaded a rifle, and placed it in a bed-
room where no person slept, and where I could
reach it from the window if occasion should re~
quire. I then rode to A , fourmileseast ; Mr.
Churchilllived about four miles west ofmy house.
i wasabout the village till afterteno’clockat night,
I then rode home, stopped at the bars opposite
my house, dismounted, and had serious reflec-
tions on the course I was pursuing. After a
considerable pause, I resolved to go; I never
allowed mysclf to give back in any undertaking.
I then went to the window, and took out the

gun—no one of my family knew it—and rode
L




162 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY,

at asmart trot to Churchill’s. I fastened my
horse, took out my knife and rubbed my flint,
that it might not miss fire. I took the mitten
off my right hand, and put it in my pocket,
I was careful not to drop anything whereby I
might be detected. I then stepped to his door,
which opened near the head of his bed, and
stood five or six minutes on his dgor-stone. All
creation seemed locked in slumber, and one
dread silence reigned through all the works of
God.

“ Now my bold heart even trembled at the
thought of an act so desperate, and every vibra-
tion of my soul seemed shrinking beneath the
horrors of the scence.

“T rapped at his door, and shuddered at the
noise I made, and was on the very point of retire
ing, when his wife, I think, awoke him, and heex-
claimed, ‘Whoisthere ?’ I endeavoured to alter
my voice, and answered, ‘I have a letter for
you; have the goodness to open the door anu
take it.’ He arose, and, as he opened the door,
as soon as I saw his white dress, I shot at ven-
ture. I took no sight, and had the gun by my
TIIE VILLAGE TRAGEDY. 163

side. I think the muzzle was not more than
three or four feet from him. I then heard him
exclaim, ‘Oh, my God!’ and I heard no more
of him. I then returned to my horse, and
every step was marked with care, lest I should
fall or lose anything, as it was slippery. The
shocking cries and shrieks of the family broke
the midnight silence, and rent the air with
horror, which I heard ata considerable distance.
I then rode with great speed home. [I dis-
mounted and loaded my gun in haste, and set
it into the window whence I had taken it; then
I put out my horse, went to bed, and went to
sleep. Before day, the neighbours of Mr.
Churchill called on me and informed me
he was murdered in his own house.”

Before this confirmation of his guilt met the
eye of his fellow-beings, the unhappy man had
gone to answer for his crime at the throne of
God! His fate affords a striking illustration of
the fact that the love of the wine cup is not the
only form which intemperance assumes. His
father’s appetite for strong drink may be re-
garded as the original cause of all his misfor-
164 THE VILLAGE TRAGEDY.

tunes ; but in the inordinate love of gold which
influenced his oppressor, and the unrestrained
indulgence of revengeful passions which made
him a murderer, we only behold, under dif-
ferent disguises, the hideous mien of the same
insidious and deadly vice.
NEWTON AINSLIE
NEWTON AINSLIE

Nor many years since a friend of mine was visit-
ing the state prison at , when his attention
was attracted in a remarkable degree by one of
the convicts, who appeared to be officiating as
clerk in the apothecary’s room, which formed
a part of the establishment. The man was of
low stature, with a warped and shrunken body,
and limbs so attenuated, that they seemed
scarcely able to bear the weight of his small
frame. But this distorted trunk was surmount-
ed by a head so fully developed, it would have
thrown a phrenologist into ecstasies. His fore-
-head was high and broad, his eyes piercing and


168 NEWTON AINSLIF.

intelligent, his features delicately formed, and,
but for an habitual expression of moroseness,
which seemed to brood over his countenance, it
would have been eminently handsome. My
friend fell into conversation with him, and soon
discovered him to possess remarkable intelli-
gence. He seemed a good classical scholar, and
quite familiar with the more abstruse parts of
modern learning. But the book which he was
reading when first addressed showed the pecu-
liar tendency of his mind. It was a mathe-
matical work of a high order, and his own an-
notations in pencil on the margin showed that
he read understandingly. It was something so
strange to hear a common felon devoting his
leisure time to such pursuits, that my friend
was jnduced to make some inquiry respecting
his history, but .the man rather evaded his
questions, telling him it was too long a story to
relate with all its details, and that he would
much rather discuss mathematics. Unwilling
to wound his feelings, Mr. said no more on
the subject, but when they parted he asked if
there was anything he could do to ameliorate


NEWTON AINSTIFE. 169

his condition. “ Only one thing, sir,” said the
prisoner ; “ I am desirous of obtaining * Vew-
ton’s Principia, if you will lend me a copy of
that work, it is all I require.” Mr. » who
knew it would be impossible to procure such 4
book in that town, promised to send it to him
as soon as he should arrive in New York, and
writing the man’s name in his pocket-book,
bade him farewell. : A few days after, and in-
scribing in it the name of “Newton Ainslie,
from one who will not soon forget their prison
mecting,” sent it under cover to the gaoler, as
the prisoner had directed.

Two years afterwards a parcel was left at my
friend’s door, which, when opened, was found
to contain the book which he had sent to the
convict. Beneath the original inscription was
written “ Newton has promised to remember him.” The parcel
also contained a manuscript, written in 2 clear,
bold hand, which, with my friend’s permission,
is now given to the public.

“You were desirous, sir, of iearning my his-
tory, and, as I could not then enter into a de~


170 NEWTON AINSLIE

tail of my feelings as well as my actions, I was
unwilling you should judge me by deeds alone.
Iam not now about to extenuate my faults; I
only seek to trace. their gradual development.
My father was a farmer in Pennsylvania, who,
by dint of industry and economy, managed to
provide his family with every comfort. He had
but two children, of whom I was the elder.
While yet an infant, I met with an accident
which reduced me to a state of perfect help-
lessness for many years. I was, therefore,
necessarily the object of my mother’s peculiar
care ; and day after day I lay in my wicked
cradle, listening to the songs which she sung
and the tales which she told for the amusement
of her crippled boy. Yet her household duties
calledheroften from my side, and many a lonely
hour did I spend in pain of body and weari-
ness of spirit. I longed for occupation, even as
the labourer pants after repose, and my very
soul grew thick as the loud halloo and merry
laugh of my brother broke upon mycar. It
was in these long dreary seasons of solitude that
my fierce passions were nourished. The germs
NEWTON AINSLIE. 171

of many an evil feeling were in my heart, but
had I mingled with my fellows, and endured
the wholesome discipline of collision with others,
many of them would have been crushed ere
they sprung into vigorous life. Never tell me
of domestic education for a boy ; itis fitting for
a delicate girl, who would be preserved from
the contamination of evil example, and who
shouldeverbe like the‘ dove wearing silver wings,’
but for a boy it is worse than folly. A hard
and stony road it will be his lot to travel—a
fierce and bitter conflict it will be his task to
wage, and he should be disciplined at times for
the struggle. The tender cares of a mother,
her fond indulgence of every wayward fancy,
are not the means by which a hardy character
isformed. But when to all the evil results of
domestic indulgence is added the consciousness
of inferiority to one’s fellows, the necessity of
entire dependence on others, and the consequent
envy of more favoured companions, is it any
wonder that the deformed are usually dis-
tinguished by an acerbity of temper, or a morbid
sensitivenes of character, which enhances their
172 NEWTON AINSLIF.

sufferings while it diminishes the sympathy of
their friends.

“My temper was naturally bad, and my
mother’s injudicious kindness had made it infi-
nitely worse. I brooded over my privations,
until I almost hated every one who was more
fortunate than myself. My father, busied with
his farm, had little leisure to think of the help-
less little cripple who cumbered the chimney
nook, and [had noother feeling towards him than
the most entire indifference. With my brother
I was always quarrelling. Heused to enter the
house with a bound and a shout which were al-
most distracting to my delicately organized
brain. The sight of his robust frame and glow-
ing cheek seemed an aggravation of my misfor-
tune, and I envied him too much to regard him
with affection.

“When I was about ten years of age, how-
ever, my prospects were materially altered. A
new teacher was appointed for our district
school, who was to ‘ board round,’ as it is termed
in the country; in other words, to reside a
month in each family which furnished pupils,
NEWTON AINSLIF. 173

so that the burden of his support might fall
equally upon all. As I could not go to school,
this at first seemed of little consequence to me.
My mother had taught me to read, but our
scanty stock of books offered few temptations
to pursue literature as a pleasure, and I never
dreamed that a solace for my privations might
be found in such things. When it became our
turn to receive the master, I was certainly
pleased to discover that my brother had spoken
truth when he said that the schoolmaster was,
like myself, a ‘lame hunchback.” Lere was
one, at least, who could not laugh at my defor-
mity, and I felt a sort of liking for him from the
first moment that he limped into the house and
I beheld his shapeless shadow projected on the
sunny floor beside my couch. He was a man of
great learning, and much kindness of heart.
Compassionating my helplessness, he undertook
to instruct me after his day’s task was com-
pleted,and never did a month pass so rapidly.
He told me of things which my wildest fancy
could never have imagined. He showed me
maps, which seemed to bring the whole world
174 NEWTON AINSLIE.

around the poor cripple’s bed, and I never shall
forget the exquisite delight with which I pored,,
day after day, over those pictured semblances
ofearth’s remotest bounds. My instructor had
the art of making study a pleasure, because he
possessed, in an eminent degree, the power of
simplifying his explanations, so as to adapt
them to the humblest capacity. The month
Was quite too short for both of us, for my at-
tachment to study had evidently won his re-
gard, and my mother’s persuasions induced my
father to make arrangements for his remaining
with us during his stayin the country. It was
during that winter I discovered a pursuit so
engrossing as to fill up every hour of my
hitherto wearisome life. Mr. Hinton, my
teacher, was 2 mathematician, and though com-
pelled by the duties of his station to put aside
such abstruse studies, he yet turned to them
at every jJeisure moment with passionate eager-
ness. He found in mea pupil worthy of his
attention. From the moment when the mys-
teries of calculation were first opened to my
view, I became a devoted student. With al-
NEWTON AINSLIE. 175

most unequalled rapidity, (for I had no amuse-
ment-to distract my thoughts,) I made myself
master of the elements of algebra, and having
thus laid the foundation, I proceeded to erect
the beautiful superstructure of science. None
but 2 mathematical mind can comprehend the
fascination of such pursuits. I no longer
pined for the fresh air and the green earth. If
I looked out upon the sky, it was no longer to:
behold its blue vault decked with the gorgeous
clouds of sunset, or studded with the silver stars
of night. Lines and circles, curves and angles,
traced themselves on everything I beheld. My
wnind was replete with the technicalities of the
ecience, and I have worked out many a problem
with the heavens for my slate, and fancy’s
wand my pencil.

“T had been slowly recovering the use of my
limbs during the period of which I have spoken,
and when I was fourteen years of age, I found
myself, at length, able to walk short distances
with the aid of a staff No one who has always
frolicked in all the exuberance of boyish spirits,
and felt the glow of health in every limb, can
176 NEWTON AINSLIE.

imagine the feeling with which I went out for
the first time alone among the hills. A weight
seemed removed from my breast ; I breathed
as if inhaling a purer air,and my heart throbbed
with delight such as I had never before en-
joyed. Yeteven at that moment the perversity
of my nature made itself felt. As I was creep-
ing along with feeble step, my brother sprang
past me, calling to me to ‘ stand out of his way,
for he was running a race with his dog.’ IL
looked after him with a feeling of unutterable
bitterness, and, seating myself on a stone by the
roadside, burst into a flood of tears.

“T will not dwell longer on my boyish life.
Four years after I recovered the use of my limbs
my mother died. She had lived long enough
to see the result of her patient cares in my be-
half, and she was spared the grief of beholding
me arrive at man’s estate thus dwarfed and ‘de-
formed. Her death severed the only tie which
bound me to my family, and when I saw the
mould Jaid upon the bosom which had so often
pillowed my aching head, I felt that I was now
utterly alone on earth. My brother, who had
NEWTON AINSLIE; eT

now become one of my father’s most efficient

labourers, often taunted me with my idle ha-
bits. Heaven knows, it was not idleness that
chained my hands and fettered my fcet when
all others were busied in the labours of the field.
I would have given the wealth of the Indies for:
the strength of limb and robust frame of those’
who despised me. But my pride was roused
by continual reproaches, and I resolved, if pos-
sible, to provide for my own subsistence. At
first I entertained the hope of becoming an as-
sistant to my friend Mr. Hinton, but his narrow
stipend would not allow this’ He offered, how-

ever, to take me into the school, and teach me
his method of instruction, so that I might ob-

tain a similar situation in another part of the
country. Such was my course of life during
the next two years, presiding over riotous boys
all day, and returning with fresh zest to my
mathematical studies as soon as my task was
ended.

“T soon became thoroughly wearied of such a
life. My temper became still more soured by con-
tinued conflict with unruly and turbulent spirits,

M
172 REWTON AINS®.IE.

and nothing but my friend’sarguments prevented
me from sinking intoutter despair. I hadalmost
determined to give up all idea of becoming a
schoolmaster, but he told me of its many ad-
vantages in enabling me to obtain a finished
education. He spoke of the certainty of my
success in the higher branches of mathematics,
and finally mentioned the names of the many
distinguished men in our own country who
owed their first rise in the world to an humble
village school. These arguments were irre-
sistible: The thought of gaining an eminence
which would enable me to look down upon the
objects of my present envy would have nerved
me to every exertion.

_ “My father’s second marriage at length made
my home so intolerable, that I resolved to quit.
it.. I obtained afew hundred dollars from him.
in eu of my future interest in the farm, and
departed for . Here I entered college, and
supported myself by acting as private tutor to
students less qualified than myself. It was a
hard and toilsome life. Sixteen hours out of
the twenty-four were devoted to the instruction


NEWTON AINSLIE. 179

of others, and the prosecution of my own studies,
The rest of my time was required to renovate
my exhausted frame, and give me new strength
for the next day’s toil. I becameso completely
absorbed in mental occupation, that external
things scarcely made any impression upon me:
I ate to supply the wants of nature but rarely
knew what was set before me. My book lay
upon my knees, while my hands mechanically
lifted food to my mouth. I walked, simply be-
cause my feeble body demanded constant exer-
cise to preserve its frail organs from disease, but
my eye wandered with vacant gaze over the
beauties of the summer landscape, or the un-
sullied snow of Nature’s winter robe. I lived
in a world of thought : the outward world was
a place in which I only moved and breathed.
At the expiration of the allotted term I left
collegé, a graduate, loaded with honours, and
penniless,

“For some time I continued to give private
lessons in , but my ungovernable temper,
which had several times brought me into slight
difficulties, at length deprived me of that means


180 NEWTON AINSLIE.

of support. The father of one of my pupils had
said something which I construed into an insult,
and the severe and bitter invective with which
I attacked him in the public streets incensed
him to such a degree that he threatened me
with personal chastisement. He was an old,
white-haired man, and I should have forborne
with his age; but passion overcame me, and
feeble as I was, I laid him prostrate on the
pavement. Fortunately, he was not injured,
but public opinion was too strong against me,
and I was obliged to leave the place.

“ T next sought refuge in New York, that EI
Dorado ofall hungry aspirants after wealth, and
obtained a situation as assistant in a classical
school. I boarded in the family of my em-
ployer, and was not long in discovering that his
daughter was one of the loveliest creatures =
had ever beheld. Her’swas thatdelicate beauty
that we admire forits very fragility ; and her
timid gentle disposition well suited her sweet
countenance. I loved her not only for her
beauty, but for the very gentleness which made
her so unlike myself. Living in the midst of
NEWTON AINSLIE. 181

a kind family, there was nothing to call forth
the violence of my temper ; and asthe principal
of the school was never in the same apartment
with me, my impulses of passion among the
boys were totally unknown to him. He found
me of great assistance to him, and therefore re-
garded me with a degree of respect to which I
had never before been accustomed. His opinion
of me was greatly altered, however, when I came
to ask him for his daughter’s hand. It wasnot
my poverty to which he objected, nor my sta-
tion, for it was like his own, but it was my
personal appearance. He could not give his
daughter to one who seemed more like the in-
cubus of a disturbed fancy thana man. I had
been too much accustomed to contempt to
wonder at his feelings on the subject; but I
was not the less determined to be revenged on
him. The opportunity was in my power, for I
knew that his daughter loved me. It was
strange, passing strange, that the fair and deli-
cate Lucy Lincoln, whom but to look on was
love, should have bestowed the treasures of her
innocent tenderness on the dwarfed and
ts&2 NEWTON AINSLIE.

deforméd scholar. There is no clue to the laby-
rinth of a woman’s heart; but it may be that
my nmiisfortunes awakened her pity, while my
intellectual powers commanded her respect;
and where such feelings are combined, love is
not far distant. From whatever fountain that
pure affection sprung, I know that its deep,
strong current diffused a freshness over my
blighted life, and even in my most desolate
fortunes preserved for me one green spot on
which hope might bloom. Her father was a
man who concealed his kindliest feelings under
a stern manner, and Lucy feared, far more than
she loved him. Overcome by my passionate
entreaties, she consented to a clandestine mar-
viage, and three months after he had insulted
me by his rejection of my suit, I informed him
that the ‘incubus’ was his son-in-law. His
indignation fully équalled my expectation, and
we were, of course, obliged to seek another abode,
I offered myself as candidate for the appoint-
ment of teacher in a district school about thirty
miles from the city, and was fortunate enough
to secure the situation
NEWTON AINSLIE. 183

“There began my greatest misfortunes. Hither-
to I had been restrained by the guidance of
others, but I was now left to my own discretion.
I had continued my mathematical studies, and
had found one of my chief pleasures in the
power of demonstration. There was something
peculiarly attractive to me in a science which
admitted of such close analysis, such exact evi-
dence; and like most persons who devote them-
selves exclusively to one pursuit, I learned to
look with contempt on every other. Nothing
seemed to me worth attention which could not
be as clearly proved as my researches into the
exact sciences ; and the consequence was, that I
learned to doubt everything that could not
be tested by the senses or explained by the in-
tellect. Im the village where I resided lived
# man of no great talent, but possessing extreme
subtlety in argument. This man was an avowed
infidel, and had been the friend of Paine.
He foumd me me a fit subject for his attacks,
and a very short time was sufficient to convince
me that Christianity was but a fable, and its
followers the worst of fools.. With the ill-judg-
184 NEWTON AINSLIE.

ing zeal of a new convert, I was not satisfied
with enjoying my own belief, or rather disbelief,
in silence. I commenced. by banishing the
Bible from the school, and discontinuing the
weekly scripture lessons which had heretofore
been prescribed. This gave offence to some of
the most influential men in the place, and I
was requested to return to the old system. In-
stead of doing this, I attempted to prove, logi-
cally and demonstratively, that to do so would
only be to fill the children’s heads with vague
and erroneous ideas. I tried to convince them
that a child’s mind should beleft quite unbiassed
by the religious opinions of his elders, so that,
when he arrived at the years of discretion, he
might be enabled to view impartially the va-
rious opinions that had prevailed in the world,
and select as his creed that which seemed to
him most rational. Iwell remember the answer
of a shrewd, unlettered old farmer: ‘I don’t
know anything about your book-learning, Mr.
Ainslie,’ said he, ‘but I know this much—if I
should leave my field to lie fallow, without
putting in cither plough or spade till I was
NEWTON AINSLIE. 185

ready to sow my wheat, I should havea pretty
good crop of weeds to take out before I could
find room for the seed.” We parted in mutual
dissatisfaction, and the result was my dismissal
from the schooL

“ Necessity drove metoseekanotherhome. I
left my wife and infant, promising to return for
them as soon as I should have obtained the
means of our future subsistence; but two
months elapsed before I was able to redeem my
promise, I returned to witness a spectacle
that almost drove me to madness. I found the
house destitute of food or fuel, my wife lying in
the delirium of fever, and my little one a corpse.
A neighbour to whom I had once done some
service, assisted me to procure some comforts
for my wife, and I was obliged to wait until
her recovery before we could proceed on our
journey. Our new abode lacked many of the
comforts which we had found in our village
home. A rough unpainted cabin, which offer-
ed but slight resistance to the driving wind and
rain, was the best house that my limited salary
allowed me to procure. A ragged patch of
186 NEWTON AINSLIE.

pround, overgrown with nettles, was the garden
spot, and a rough common, on which the cot-
tage stood, afforded scanty pasture to the
half starved cow which a wealthy farmer
had appropriated to my use. ‘To this wretched
abode I removed with my poor feeble wife. The
death of our little one lay heavily upon her
heart, and alas! she had also learned hy this
time how frail must be her dependence upon
me for happiness. It is true, I was never cruel
to her; she never suffered from my irritable
temper, as I thought ; but I can remember now
a thousand instances of petulance and ill-temper
on my part, and of gentle submission on her’s.
She never complained, but her joyousness of
spirit was gone, her step moved heavily about
the house, her cheek became more and more
sunken, and her voice assumed that plaintive
tone which speaks of secret sorrow.

“ Under her supervision, however, our dreary
home soon assumed anew aspect. The house
was neatly whitewashed, vines of rapid growth
were trained around the door and windows, the
nettles in the garden gave place to a goodly array
NEWTON AINSLIE. 137

of potato-vines and cabbage-heads, and before
long ‘ the master’s house’ was the admiration

of the neighbourhood. TI had learned some
wisdom by experience, and was careful not to
intrude my scepticism upon the notice of my
new patrons ; but notwithstanding my caution.
in this matter, there were constant disturbances
between us. My temper had not been improved
by my wandering and unsettled life. Com-
plaints were constantly made of the severity of
my punishments, and I was thus led into con-
tinual quarrels with the parents of my pupils.
“ Among my scholars was one of a most ma~-
lignant disposition. Cool and calm, even at the
moment of greatest irritation, he never forgave
an offence, and never failed to revenge it. Some
improper conduct in school induced me to de-
tain him after the rest were dismissed, when I
determined to cbtain the assistance of a negro
who laboured in my little garden, and give
him a severe flagging. I locked him in the
room, and went in search of the black, but
when I returned the boy was gone. I looked
into the room without entering it, discovered
188 NEWTON AINSLIE.

that he had escaped by a window, and resolved
to double his punishment the next day. The
boys were in the habit of coming to me early in
the morning for the key of the room, while
I seldom visited the school until it was time to
commence the exercises of the day. As I opened
the door the morning after the boy’s escape, I
disturbed a group of boys who stood behind it
apparently engaged in the contemplation of a
map that usually hungthere. I walked to my
desk to ring for order, when, for the first time,
I beheld the object of theirattention. Directly
behind the door, so placed as not to be seen until
one had entered the room, was a large carica-
ture of myself, drawn with a piece of coal on
the white wall, and beneath it was written, ‘ As
crooked in mind as body. I stood speechless
with rage ; but just at this moment the offender
entered the room. Hewasan athletic fellow, of
perhaps sixteen years of age, and trusting to his
superior personal strength in case I attempted
chastisement, had doubtless come to sate his re-
venge by the sight of my discomfiture. As he
passed me his eye twinkled with malicious
NEWTON AINSLIE. 189

yleasure, and asneer was onhislip. I snatched
up a round ruler which lay upon my desk, and
struck him with all the violence of passion.
The ruler was loaded with lead—the blow felt
upon his temple—a slight convulsion passed
over his features, and he fell senseless to the
floor.

“ The revulsion of my feelings it would beim-
possible to describe. Terror, shame, remorse,
all struggled in my breast, as I sought in vain
to restore the unhappy boy to consciousness. In
the mean time the alarm had been given, and
while my poor wife was assisting me to chafe
his temples, I was startled by the approach of
acrowd ofmen. My first impulse was to con-
ceal. myself, and hurrying out of the back gate
I hid myself in the woods. What a day was
that! alone in the midst of a solitary forest,
with the guilt of murder upon my conscience.
The rustle of a leaf, the crackling of a branch
beneath my feet, made me tremble and grow
pale. When night came on, exhausted with
excitement, I crept towards my home ; but my
movements had been anticipated, and as I
190 NEWTON AINSLIE.

silently stole.in at the gate, I found myself in
the gripe of a constable.

“ Twas six weeks in prison before my trial
cameon. In the mean time the boy had re-
covered, but only to suffer. a living death—he
was 2 hopeless idiot !

“ Oh, if I could describe the horrors of that
trial, my worst enemy would pity me. Think
what must have been the sufferings of my proud
spirit when I was placed as a mark for the
finger of scornand loathing. Everyact that I had
ever committed from the impulse of passion was
brought up in testimony against me: when,
finally, the lawyer for the prosecution arose to
speak—wheh his mighty intellect was exerted
to heap execration on my head—when I heard
the torrent of splendid eloquence, which seemed
gathering its force only to overwhelm me
utterly, I could no longer withstand the tumult
of my feeling. Tears, ay, tears that burned on
my cheeks like molten lead, fell from my eyes,
and the sentence which condemned me.-to a
felon’s cell sounded like a reprieve, for it res-
cued me from the eyes of those who were curs-
ing me in their hearts.
WEWTON AINSLIE. 191

“fT was sentenced to ten years’ imprison-
ment, the firstyear to be spent in a solitary cell.
Before six months of my punishment had ex-
pired, I was removed to a ward in the hospital, a
maniac. The kind care of the attendant physi-
éian, and judicioustreatment on thepart of ahu-
mane gaoler, rescued me fromthis frightful ma-
lady, but it was long ereI recovered sufficiently
to leave my bed. My wife, my gentle Lucy, had
sunk under her misfortunes, and found in an
early grave the peace which earth could never
now afford: She left a letter to be given mein
case my reason was ever restored: it contained
an earnest and touching appeal in behalf of
Christianity - it besought me, by the love I bore
her, to search diligently for the truth, and it
contained a farewell so full of Christian hope,
that my heart melted as I read it. I have
obeyed her dying request; I have sought the
truth, and I have found it where alone it must
be found—in the Book of Truth—the Holy
Scriptures.

“Since my recovery, I have been employed
in the hospital belonging to the prison, because
my strength would not permit of manual la-
192 NEWTON AINSLIE.

bour. Five years of my prison life are already
spent, but I shall never liye to breathe again
the air of freedom. The lofty aspirings of an
intellectual nature, the proud hopes of literary
ambition, and the burning thirst after worldly
distinction are all dead within me. My iove
for books still continues, but merely as a means
oflightening the heavy burden of my existence ;
and as I am sensible of the gradual decay of my
physical powers, I rejoice in the thonght that
my spirit will soon escape from the cumbrous
tenement which has so long shut it out from
the light of Heaven.”’

Thus.ended the manuscript. Another hand
had added the words, “ Newton Ainslie died
on the 15th of January, 18—.”

— ee
EPINRURGI: PRINTED BY T. NELSON AND SONY,



xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000278700001datestamp 2008-12-08setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Tales for the youngdc:creator Embury, Emma C ( Emma Catherine ), 1806-1863Dickes, William, 1815-1892 ( Engraver )Thomas Nelson & Sonsdc:subject Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Blind children -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Rich people -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Friendship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Prisoners -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )dc:description b Statement of Responsibility by Miss E. Embury.Frontispiece and added t.p. signed: W. Dickes.dc:publisher T. Nelson and Sonsdc:date 1853dc:type Bookdc:format 192 p., <5> leaves of plates : ill.; 14 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00002787&v=00001002225829 (aleph)AAA3078 (ltqf)ALG6109 (ltuf)45964854 (oclc)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage Scotland -- EdinburghEngland -- London