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Lessons on houses, furniture, food, and clothing

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Title:
Lessons on houses, furniture, food, and clothing
Series Title:
Instructor
Spine title:
Furniture, food &c. Instructor II
Added title page title:
Furniture, food, etc. : Instructor II
Creator:
John W. Parker and Son ( Publisher )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) -- General Literature Committee ( Publisher )
Savill and Edwards ( Printer )
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London
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John W. Parker and Son, under the direction of the Committee of General Literature and Education, appointed by the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
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Savill & Edwards
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Language:
English
Edition:
New and improved ed.
Physical Description:
iv, 288 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Dwellings -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
House construction -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
House furnishings -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Food -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Commerce -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
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Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
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England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

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Brittle Books Program

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University of Florida
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PLR el

Pe ole

oop eect te









LESSONS

HOUSES, FURNITURE, FOOD,
CLOTHING.

Â¥

BEING THE SECOND VOLUME

OF THE

INSTRUCTOR.



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THR COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.

NEW AND IMPROVED EDITION.

LONDON:
1852.
JOHN W. PARKER AND SON, WEST STRAND.



PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.







CONTENTS.

DWELLING-HOUSES, AND THE ARTICLES USED
IN BUILDING THEM.

|
j
}
|
|

Page
How to build a House............ 1
Bricks—Tiles—Slate............... 6
Stone—Marble—Lime............ 10
Timber used in Building......... 14
Metals used in Building :
Te eeeibin’ 19
ed ical cossceaunds 23

Page
Plaster, Paint, and Paper-

THE FURNITURE OF A DWELLING-HOUSE.

Household Furniture ............ 49
Mahogany :...........ccccsseeeeeeees 55
Metal Furniture: Iron......... 60
Cutlery :

Knives and Forks ............ 64
Scissors, Razors, and Pen-

ead aha kakdaehaiein 67
Od ee tcl 71
Ts cindinihindociansareaecens 74
Copper and Brass ............... 78
Copper and Brass Furniture... 81
How Buttons are made......... 85
Silver—Plate...................ece0 87
RS laden ictal AMER ceine's ke 93
FE I cnicvcndsasiabsbiccseoceenes 97
The Looking Glass ............... 102
REN dents saseabisiernessenscoseds 104
Earthenware................. ili 108
Earthenware (continued) ...... 111
A China Tea-cup .................. 114
sss ccscsecccessenees 118

| RAMNQAMY ns eeeeeesceeeeseeesenees 26
| Window-glass.......:........:::0006 29
How Water is obtained ......... 33
WN Ec tdscccicteeeestovecsces 38
| Lighting a Fire ..................... 4l
| What are Coals? ...........000... 45
TEs cnindsnitenccvacctiacns 123
FE II ie oscccanseninn saunheensne 128

Articles used in Cleaning :
Pearl-ash — Soda— Soap ... 131

How a Needle is made ......... 137
How a Pin is made............... 141
Clothes: Spinning and Weav-

AE: siichstiiniinetiibinindebandadens 145
Flax and Limen..................... 149
Linen (continued)............c06008 152
Cotton Clothing .................. 155
Cotton Clothing (continued)... 159
Silk and the Silk-Worm......... 164
Be GR a ciee. ss cscvccedgcesese 169
Woollen Clothing.................. 172

Woollen Clothing (continued) :
Broad-cloth and Stockings . 175

Lace Making.....................555 178
A Straw Bonnet .................. 182
A Beaver Hat .........0000...00006 186
GRBOD ....00cccncccnecd de qaltnnoes 190



—e ell

- Vv CONTENTS.

LESSONS ON FOOD.

Page
Of Food in general ...........-.+ 193
The Corn-Field.........-+::++-16++ 194
The Flour-Mill .........-.:-+++++++ 198
Bread .......ccccseeseeeeeeereeeeeeeees 202
Rice ..c.cseeceecseeeeecenseeceeereres 205
Meat .c.c...ccceceeseeeeeeerereeeeees 209
Milk—Butter—Cheese ......... 213
Poultry ......ccccceceeseeeeeeeseess 218
Fish .......ccccecceccsecerceeeeeereeeees 223
I i dc biieeepechobogt ener 228
Vegetables ......-:::.cescceceerseee 232
Brewing—Malt and Hops...... 237
Beer... .ccccccceceseecsseneenveecsers 241

Fruits (continwed) ......0+-ee 249
Wine-making ......-0:..esse eer 254
MOR oo. .cccceccccescereseesceesscoseres 260
Gugar .......cceeseeeeeeesssereeeeeres 265
Coffee; Chocolate .............+- 270
Spices .........sseseeeereeneeerteeeeees 274
Foreign-Fruits; the Orange,
Lemon, and Olive ............ 279
Dried Fruits ; Raisins and Cur-
FONTS o...cccecscosccovcecvesceces 282
British Commerce ........+0++++ 285



DWELLING-HOUSES.

AND

THE ARTICLES USED IN BUILDING THEM.



k ‘—~ meas
id x

Lussow I. How to Build a Bouse.

HovsEs are built: of bricks, mortar, tiles, slate,
stone, wood, and iron.
Cottages are small houses; mansions are large

houses.
A few houses built near each other make a

village: many houses built together form a town,
or a city.

A street is two rows of houses with a road
between them: most villages have but one
street: towns and cities have many streets.

Il, 7 ae B



2 HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE.

A church is a building dedicated to the public
service of God. A cathedral church has a
bishop’s throne. |

Every village or town has at least one church:
some large townsand cities have many churches.
In England, a townwhich has a cathedral church
is called a city.¢
_ Many persons are employed to build a house ;
as the bricklayer, plasterer, carpenter, plumber,
glazier, painter, and paper-hanger.

When men begin to build a house, they dig
out the ground, and lay bricks in rows, one upon
another, with mortarspread betweenthem. The
bricks first laid are called the foundation of the
house; and the rows of bricks are called walls. ©

Every house is surrounded by walls, and is
divided into stories or floors; and the stories
are divided into rooms. The lowest, or under-
ground part, is the cellar. The kitchen is also
under-ground in many houses. The story above
it, level with the earth, is called the ground-
floor; next is the first-floor: above this is the -
second-floor : and so on, until the top-floor, over
- which is placed the roof.

_ As the walls are built, strong beams of wood
are let into the brick-work, and supported by
upright posts. Upon these beams are placed’
smaller beams of wood, called rafters; and

â„¢~



\ "
~ \

HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 3

across the rafters are laid planks to form the
floors. Steps of wood, called stairs, lead from
floor to floor, and have side-railing, called
balusters, to prevent accidents by falling.

Frames*of wood for doors and windows, or
door and window-cases as they are called, are
also built in with the brick-work. Chimneys,
or passages for smoke, are built in the walls;
and slabs of stone for hearths, or fire-places,
are laid down with the floor.

The roof is commonly ofa sloping form, so
as to cause the rain to run off through pip



the ground. The roof consists of rafters, across.”

which are fastened thin slips of wood, or laths;
and upon these are placed tiles or slates. The
chimneys rise above the roof to convey away
the smoke. | |
When the outside walls androof of the house
are finished, the plasterer covers the inner walls
and top of the rooms with laths, upon which he
spreads plaster. The top is then called the ceiling,
The chimney-piece, or mantel, ‘of stone or
marble, is next placed at the opening of the
chimney into the room; and an iron stoye-grate
is fixed there, for holding the fire. ts
_ The small wooden frames of the wingows are
next glazed, or filled with gloss; so that we may.
see through them the beautiful hills, trees, and
B 2

\



HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE.

green fields. These windows are also made to
open, in order to admit fresh air into the room,
and keep it healthy.

The doors of wood are so hung, as to open
and shut, on moveable pieces of iron, called
hinges, fixed in one post; and they are fastened
by locks and bolts, which are thrust into the
other post.

Many thousands of nails, or little pieces of
iron, are used by the carpenter to fasten the
wood-work together throughout the house.

When the bricklayers and carpenters have
finished, the painter spreads over the wood-
work, with a brush, a mixture called paint; this
gives a cheerful appearance to the room, and
preserves the wood.

In this manner a house is prepared for dwell-
ing, or living in. Fire is next lighted in the
grates, and smoke is seen rising from the chim-
neys above the roof.

When the plaster of the walls is dry, the
paper-hanger covers them with paper of different
colours and patterns. Some of these patterns
are almost as amusing as pictures.

The several rooms being ready for furnishing,
the floors are covered with carpets, or painted
cloth, called floor-cloth. In the lower rooms are .
placed chairs, tables, and other furniture; and



“Sa
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 5 &
in the upper rooms, or chambers, are placed
bedsteads and beds, on which persons sleep.
Curtains, or blinds, are often added to the win-
dows, by which the glare of the sun can be shut
out during the day; and shutters keep off the
cold air by night.

Such are some of the contrivances which en-
able us to enjoy close shelter from wet and cold,
with health and comfort. Though the con-
trivances are our own, let us not forget that the
power to contrive is given to us by God; and
that the goodness of God causes the earth to
supply all the materials with which a house is
built. Let us then give to the Creator the praise
which is due.

QUESTIONS.

Of what articles are houses chiefly
built ?

How do men begin to build a
house ?

In what manner is a house di-
vided ?

How is the wood-work fastened
together ?

How do you ascend from one floor
to another ?

Describe a chimney.

Of what form is the top or roof of
a house ?

How are doors made to open
and shut, and how are they
fastened ?

With what articles is a house ge-
nerally furnished ?

What is the principal enjoyment
which a house affords ?

How do we contrive to build a
house ?

To what source are we indebted
for the materials with which a
house is built?





iP a
DB). anne LiL $-—~——-

Lesson IT. Bricks ; Tiles ; Slate.

Berore the art of making bricks was known in
England, houses were built of wood and stone,
and covered with reeds or straw, or heavy slabs
of stone. Houses are now generally built with
bricks, and covered with tiles or slates.

Bricks are made of clay, which is a kind of
earth, and is dug in many places. Clay is very
abundant round London, and millions of bricks
are made in the neighbourhood every year.

Bricks are made in open fields,in avery simple
manner. The clay is first mixed into a paste
with water, and with ashes, such as you see in
the fire-place. -Recollect that the remains of a

coal-fire, or ashes, are used to make bricks for
building houses.



BRICKS—TILES—SLATE. 7

The clay, or paste, when it has been made
ready by a woman for moulding, is handed to
the brickmaker, who stands beside the woman
before a bench.

‘he mould is a box of wood, fitting upon a
bottom, fixed to the brickmaker’s bench. ‘The
workman first sprinkles a little sand over the
mould: he then throws into it the clay, which
he works with his fingers, so as to fill up the
corners of the mould; then, with a wetted stick,
he scrapes off the clay level with the sides of the
mould. He next lifts the mould from the bench,
and shakes out of itthe newly-formed brick upon
a piece of board. Itis then placed upon a wheel-
barrow by a child, and when a certain number
of bricks are thus made, they are removed by
another workman to a place for drying. ‘The
engraving at the head of this lesson shows brick-
makers at work.

The workman whoshapes the bricks is calleda
moulder. An industrious moulder can,in along
summer's day, mould from five to six thousand
bricks. Butto do this, hemust begin at five o’clock
in the morning,and work till eight o’clock atnight.

The bricks are next placed in rows, one above
another, and at a little distance apart, so that the
air is admitied between the bricks to dry them.
They are, to prevent their drying too fast, and to



8 BRICKS—TILES—SLATE.

keep off rain, covered with straw. In fine weather
they will become, in a few days, hard onouges to
be removed for baking.

Bricks are commonly baked in stacks, made of
the bricks themselves, with cinders scattered be-
tween each layer. At one end of the stack is the
fire place, from which run flues, or open passages,
through the pile of bricks. The flues are filled
with wood, coals, and cinders. The fire is then
lighted, and spreading throughout the whole
stack, it bakes the bricks. -

Bricks are likewise baked in a kiln; that is,
by placing them upon flat arches, within walls,
and lighting a fire beneath them. The bricks are
thus left until the flame appears at the top of the
kiln, when the fire is slackened, and the kiln is
allowed to cool. This heating and cooling is
repeated until the bricks are sufficiently baked.
A kiln will hold about twenty thousand bricks.

Tiles, of various kinds and forms, are made
of finer clay than bricks; but they are moulded
and baked in a similar manner.

Slate for roofing houses is found in rocks of a
coarser kind of slate. The pits in which it is dug
are called quarries. Many of these quarries are
in North Wales, and in the following counties of
England: Westmoreland, Yorkshire, Leicester-
shire, Cornwall, and Devonshire.



BRICKS—-TILES—SLATE. 9

That slate which has the smoothest surface,
and splits into the thinnest plates, is best for
covering houses. ‘The slate used for writing is
of a still finer kind.

A slate-quarry is a great curiosity; and the
masses of slate, when the sun shines on them,
exhibit all the beautiful colours of the rainbow.

The pieces of slate are split from the rock by
iron bars and large hammers; they are next
shaped with edged iron tools, and scraped
smooth with a piece of thin steel. The slates
are then conveyed away in iron wagons upon
rail-roads. ‘These are roads which have iron-
work grooves, or ruts, in which the wheels of
the wagons run. Whart mare 0) B. .. BR

Great quantities of slate are sent every year
from North Wales, in ships, many thousand
miles across the sea to North America; for, in
North America, as well as in England, slate is
used for roofing housesg,

QUESTIONS.

What are bricks made of? — How are bricks baked in stacks ?
How is a_ brick shaped or | How are bricks baked in kilns ?
moulded ? What are tiles made of ?
How many bricks can an indus- | In what places is slate found?
trious man mould in a day? How are slates prepared for roof-
How are bricks prepared for ing houses ?
baking ? Where are slates sent to by sea?



10

Lesson ITI. Stone ; Marble; Lime.

STONE is dug out of deep pits, or quarries, in
many parts of the country. In Somersetshire
and Gloucestershire is found a kind called Bath
Stone, from the city of Bath being built with it.
Another kind of stone is found in the isle of Port-
land, on the south-western coast of England, and
is called Portland Stone. St. Paul’s Cathedral,
Somerset House,and many other public buildings
in London, are constructed with Portland Stone.
A third kind of stone is brought from Yorkshire.

Stone is found in immense rocky masses.
These are shaped into blocks, which are cut into
thin pieces with saws. Some stone is as soft as
paste when it is taken from the quarry, but it
becomes hard on being exposed to the air. ‘This
kind does not long keep its beautiful white or
yellowish colour, but soon decays.

All these kinds of stone are employed in
building churches and mansions. They are also
used for chimney-pieces and hearths of fire-
places, the steps of doors, and the sills of
windows, in houses. |

Stone is chipped into elegant forms by work-
men, called masons, with a mallet and chisel. In
this manner, also, are cut the letters upon tomb-
stones in churchyards.



STONE—MARBLE—LIMRF. ll

The labour of cutting and chipping stone is
very tedious. Wéften takes many weeks, and
even months, to form one pillar, such as we see
at the entrance to a church.

A very hard and lasting kind of stone, called
granite, is sometimes used for paving streets, and
for building. London and Waterloo bridges are
built with this durable stone. It is speckled,
black, white, and red ; and it glitters beautifully
when the sun shines upon it.

Marble is a more beautiful kind of stone than
-any yet mentioned. It is found in quarries, in
large blocks or masses; and is so fine in grain
that it is easily polished.

Marble is used for mantel-pieces and hearths,
and sometimes for floors. ‘There are many va-
rieties cf marble. Seme kinds are of one colour,
as white or black; others have stains, streaks,
and veins, of different colours. ‘That marble
which is quite white is most prized.

Beds of marble are common in most of the
mountainous countries of Europe. In England,
Derbyshire affords the greatest quantity and
finestkinds. Westmoreland and Devonshire also
yield fine varieties; and a beautiful green kind
is found in Anglesey, an island in Wales.

The finest kind of marble, used for mantel-
pieces, is called statuary, and is sometimes orna-



12 STONE—~MARBLE—LIME.

mented with elegant figures. These are sculp-
tured, or cut out from the suffe of the marble,
with sharp chisels, and they occupy much time
in cutting.

Marble is likewise used for tombs, and for
pillars in churches, temples, and palaces. The
purest marble is used for busts and statues,
such as are to be seen in churches, palaces, and
museums.

Lime is of important use in building, espe-
cially in making mortar, to spread between the
bricks. ‘To make mortar, the bricklayer pours
water upon quick lime, when it swells, cracks,
and becomes a white powder ; it is next mixed
with sand in hard and sharp grains, The mortar
thus made is used without delay, and, in time,
becomes nearly as hard as the bricks between
which it is spread. Mortar always contains
more sand than lime; and without the sand
mortar would not harden,

Lime is also used in making plaster and
whitewash, with which the walls and ceilings
of houses are covered.

Lime is likewise much used in making cement.
Good cement, spread over brick-work, becomes,
in a short time, as hard as stone. Houses built
of brick, and covered with this cement, are often
made to look as handsome as if built of stone.



=

STONE—MARBLE—LIME. 13

Lime is made by burning limestone in kilns,
which may bg s oking in many parts of the
open country. lime-kiln is a hollow building,
in the shape of a cup or a wine-glass upside down.
It is open at the top, and has a grate at the
bottom, above which is aniron door. Inthe grate
is placed fuel, as wood and coal, upon which is
laid limestone broken in pieces not larger than
the fist; upon the limestone is placed more wood
or coal; then limestone again, and so on, keeping
the kiln always full. The fire being lighted, the
pieces of limestone fall towards the bottom of the
kiln, as the fuel is burnt; and, in about forty-
eight hours, the limestone thus becomes quick-
lime. Itis then separated from the ashes of the



- fuel, and is ready for the bricklayer’s use.

The natural history of clay, slate, stone, mar-
ble, and lime, belongs to the science called
Geology, or the “ discourse of the earth,” as all
these substances are dug out of the earth.

QUESTIONS.

Why is some stone called Bath | What are the principal kinds of
stone ? marble ?

Why is another kind called Port- | What kinds of marble are found
land stone ? in England ?

For what parts of houses is stone | Name a few of the uses of marble.
employed ? Of what use is lime in building ?

What is granite used for? How is mortar made?

How is lime burnt ?





‘Lesson IV. Timber used in Building.

TREEs which are highly prized for their wood
are called timber. They form forests, which
grow in most countries, and supply the in-
habitants with materials for building houses.

The wood-cutter lays his axe to the root of
the tree, and after many blows, the tree falls.
The branchesare then cut off; the bark, orrough
outer covering, is stripped off; and the trunk of
the tree is cut into posts and planks. The above
engraving represents wood-cutters at work.

But Great Britain is so thickly inhabited,
that her forests would not supply timber enough
to build our houses. We therefore obtain large
quantities of timber from other countries, in
exchange for articles which our own country
produces in abundance.





TIMBER USED IN BUILDING. a

The timber employed in buildingis chiefly oak
and deal. Oak isthe strongest and most lasting
of all timber; and English oak ranks before all
other kinds. It is very durable in air, in earth,
and in water; and it is said that insects of this
country will not eat into the heart of oak so soon
as into other timber. Our finest oaks are raised
in Cumberland and Yorkshire.

Great quantities of white oak-timber are re-
ceived or imported into England from North
America. This oak is much cheaper than the
British ; and it is the kind commonly used in
houses, for the largest beams, and the posts and
sills of doors.

Oaks which grow in thick groups yield the
best beams, posts, and planking; for the trunks
often rise forty or fifty feet without branching out.

Deal, or the wood of the pine-tree, or fir, is
used more commonly than oak in building. Deal
is generally lighter, straighter, and of much
greater length than oak timber. It is also more
easily worked by the carpenter than oak; and
is named “ the Builder’s Timber.” It is called
white deal, red deal, or yellow deal, according
to its colour. |

Pines grow in almost every country, and few
trees are more useful to man. They not only
supply timber for building, when cut down, but



16 TIMBER USED IN BUILDING.

while growing, they yield turpentine which is
used in mixing paint.

The Scotch fir produces better timber than
any other pine; but it grows slowly, and not in
great numbers. Sweden and Norway, two very
cold countries, are nearly covered with forests
of fir-trees. There are also vast forests of firs
in North America. From these countries we
obtain our supply of deals.

The trees are cut down and thrown into the
nearest river, by which they float to the sea,
where they are taken into vessels, and thus
brought to England. In some places, the trees |
float down the river to saw-mills on the banks,
where the trunks are cut into planks before
they are brought to this country.

The most extensive pine-forest in Europe
covers the slopes of the mountains, and the
banks of the rivers, in the middle of Sweden
and Norway. This forest consists chiefly of
Scotch fir, which yields red and yellow deal;
and spruce fir, which yields white deal. Each
tree, when it has been cut down, is conveyed
’ to the water-side on a separate carriage, drawn
by horses, and driven by women. |

Many streams pass from the mountains through
forests of the finest pines. On the banks of these
streams, sawing-mills are built with the rough



TIMBER USED IN BUILDING. 17

trunks of large anager. The mills are worked
by huge wheels, w i¢hvare kept in motion by the
running water. In one of these mills is a
wheel, which drives at once seventy-two saws ;
and the saws are so placed as to divide a whole
tree into planks, in the same time that it would
take to cut a single plank by one saw.

The common mode of dividing a tree into
planks is by two men cutting it through with a
large upright saw; one standing in a pit, and the
other above him, as shown in the engraving at
the end of this lesson. But a saw-mill will cut
timber into planks thirty or forty times faster
than two men can in the above manner.

In some countries, as in Germany, timber is
floated down the rivers in immense rafts, con-
sisting of several layers of trunks of trees, placed
one on the other, and lashed together. These
rafts are often eight hundred feet long, and sixty
feet, wide; and their timber is worth many thou-
sand pounds. Little wooden huts are built upon
them, in which live the workmen and rowers,
who conduct the rafts down the river.

Houses, except the chimneys, are sometimes
built entirely of wood. In countries where the
pine-tree abounds, wooden houses are almost
universal, and last for many ages: stones and
bricks being only used there. for palaces and

II. C



18 TIMBER USED IN BUILDING.

publicbuildings. In Russia; ready-made wooden
houses are sold at fairs: they are set up for show
and taken to pieces for removal.



QUESTIONS.

What trees are called timber? In what respect does the timber of
What timber is chiefly used in Scotch and Spruce fir differ?

building ? Where is the most extensive pine-
In what counties of England does forest in Europe ?

the finest oak grow ? How are trees cut into planks ?
What kind of oak is commonly | How is a saw-mill worked ?

used in building ? Describe a raft of timber ?
Which tree affords deal timber? | In what country are wooden
Where do pines grow? houses most common ?

What kind of fir yields the finest
deal?



19

Lesson V. Metals used in Building:
Tron.

METALS are mostly found in veins, which run
through the earth; nearly as veins may be seen
through the skin, on the back of your hand.
The pits out of which metals are dug, are called
mines; the workmen are called miners; and
to dig in mines is to’ work them.

Metals are seldom found pure, or by them-
selves, They are mixed with other substances,
called ores, from which they must be separated
before they are fit for use.

The metals chiefly used in building, are iron
and lead ; both of which are found in abundance
in Great Britain. Iron is sometimes called the
“king of metals,” and is the most serviceable
of them all.

Iron is separated from the ore by melting in
furnaces; which are immense round buildings,
larger at bottom than above, with huge chimneys.
The ore is taken from the mine, and broken into
pieces; it is then mixed with limestone, and
thrown into the furnace upon lighted fuel. This
fire is blown with vast bellows; when the violent
heat mélts the ore above, while the iron drops
down through the fire, and collects at the bottom

C2



20 IRON.

of the furnace. More ore and fuel are supplied
above, and blown with the bellows, till the melted
metal nearly fills the furnace. It is then let out
by piercing the sides of the furnace; the metal
is allowed to cool, and is then melted again.

Some iron furnaces are two hundred feet
round the outside, and as high as a house with
three floors. ‘They are kept heated or burning
for many months, and even years, by continually
supplying ore; limestone, and fuel. In the ex-
tensive Butterley jron-works, 1 Derbyshire,
upwards of fifteen hundred men are employed,
as miners, furnace-men, and smiths.

Articles are cast by pouring the liquid iron
into moulds, and letting it remain till it is cool.
In this manner are sometimes cast vast beams,
which are used in building houses ; also fire-
grates, knockers, and bolts of doors, railings,
lamp-posts, and water-pipes. Balconies, or rails
before windows, are often cast in elegant forms
of iron. They last longer, and are much lighter
in appearance, than wooden rails.

Large columns are often made of cast-iron,
which are painted to imitate stone. The frame-
work of house-roofs is also sometimes of cast-
‘iron. Southwark and Vauxhall bridges, across
the Thames, and many other bridges in England
and other countries, are of cast-1ron.



IRON. 21

Very large quantities of iron, both cast and
wrought, are now used in the construction of
railways, and of the carriages and engines which
travel on them.

Wrought-iron is that which is heated in a
furnace till it becomes tough. It is then rolled,
hammered, and cut into bars, or thin sheets.
This iron will bend, and can he spread by
beating; but the form of cast-iron can never
be altered.

If we observe the smith at work in his forge,
we shall see that by putting a piece of iron in the
fire, and blowing the coals with the bellows, the
iron soon becomes red-hot, and so soft, that he
can shape it as he pleases: this he does by striking
it upon a block of hardened iron, called an anvil.
Or the smith can weld or join two pieces of iron,
by making them red-hot, and hammering them
together. By quickly dipping into water the
hot iron, the smith cools and hardens the metal,
which is then said to be wrought.

Nails and spikes, which are driven into the
timbers of a house to hold them together, are
made by rolling or slitting iron into rods. These
rods are of various sizes, to make spikes a foot
long, or the smallest nails, a quarter of an inch
in length. The iron rod is made red-hot, and,
while it is hot, each nail is drawn out, cut off,



22 IRON,

and flattened at the head. Another mode of
making nails is from sheet-iron, by a machine
which cuts nine hundred nails in a minute, or
fifty-four thousand nails in an hour.

The carpenter’s tools are mo stly of steel, which
is one of the hardest substances known. Steel
is made of pure iron, heated between charcoal,
and suddenly cooled, when it becomes very hard.
It is then ground upon a stone wheel, to a fine
edge ; in this manner, axes, chisels, saws, and
the like, are made.

Before edge-tools were made of iron and steel,
stones, flints, the horns and bones of animals,
reeds and thorns, were employed for such put-
poses as we now use tools. In some parts of
the world edge-tools are unknown in the present
day: and an axe, a saw, or a chisel, would be
a handsome present to a chief or ruler of the
natives.



QUESTIONS.
Where are metals found ? : In what way are large quantities
Which are the metals chiefly used of iron now employed ?
in building ? How is iron wrought?
Which is the ‘ king of metals?” | What is the difference between
Is iron found in Great Britain ? cast and wrought iron ?
How is iron separated from the | How does a smith join two pieces
ore? of iron?
How is iron cast ? Why does a smith dip the hot iron
What articles in a house are of | into water ?
cast-iron ? How are nails made ?
What other purposes is cast-iron | Of what are carpenters’ edge-tools
applied to? made?





23

Lesson VI. Metals used in Building:
Lead. |

LEAD is employed to cover parts of the roofs of
houses, and to make gutters, pipes, and spouts,

- to carry off rain-water. It is also used for tubes

———— ee ——————eEEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeee ee

in pumps, and for pipes to conyey water under-
ground,

Lead is abundantly found in Somersetshire,
Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Northumberland, and
several other parts of Great Britain. The mines
yield not only sufficient lead for our own use,
but large quantities which are exported to other
countries.

To obtain pure lead, the picked ore is broken
and washed. It isthen roasted in afurnace with
coals, so as only to soften it, and cause the im-
purities to rise from the ore like smoke, It is
next melted, when the liquid lead runs out into
moulds, and cools. More ore is then let down
into the furnace, from the top; and the melting
is thus sometimes continued for many days
together.

Sheet-lead is used on roofs,and is either melted
and cast, or rolled out by a mill. To cast sheets,
melted lead is poured upon large tables, with
raised edges. Upon the tables is spread sand,

which soon causes the metal to cool. The lead



24 LEAD.

thus cast, is next passed between two iron
rollers to reduce it to the required thickness.

There are also mills for reducing lead into
sheets by immense rollers, which are worked by
a steam-engine. A sheet of rolled lead, made in
this: manner, is from five to six feet wide, and
weighs about one thousand pounds.

Leaden pipesare made by bending flattedlead
until the edges meet, over an iron or wooden
rod; which on being drawn out, leaves the
passage for the water. Pipes are also cast by
pouring melted lead into a mould, in the middle
of which is a steel rod, to be taken out when
the lead has cooled.

Cisterns, for containing water, are commonly
made of sheet-lead, in wooden cases; but they
are unsafe for this purpose if they are left open
to the air. The water will then become coated
with white rust, which is poisonous. Such water
is therefore unfit for cooking food.

Although lead is in itself poisonous, itis of
important use in the arts. Paint is made from
lead. It is also used as glaze for earthenware.
Lead is likewise employed in making some
kinds of glass, in dyeing, and calico-printing.
These several uses of lead will be described in
future lessons. 3

The leaden toys for children, as coaches,



LEAD. 25

horses, &c., are cast in brass moulds, which
open; and within which are cut the figures to
be produced.

The powder used for polishing stoves is im-
properly named black lead; for it does not con-
tain a particle of lead, but is, in part, iron. It
not only polishes iron, but prevents it rusting
from damp. It is only found in one mine in
England, which is at Borrodale, in Cumberland.
When soft and fine, a pound weight of this sub-
stance is worth several guineas; and one thou-
sand pounds’ worth has been obtained from the
above mine ina day ! Drawing pencils are made
of this mineral: each pencil consisting of two
pieces of cedar-wood, glued together, with the
“lead” in a grove between them.

All substances dug out of mines are called
minerals ; and the natural history of such sub-
stances is called Mineralogy,

QUESTIONS.
For what purpose is lead used in | How is sheet-lead made?
building ? How are leaden pipes made ?
In what part of Great Britain is | What is black lead?
lead found ? Can you name any of the purposes
Is lead very abundant in this for which it is used?
country ? What is Mineralogy ?

How is pure lead obtained ?



26.

Lesson VII. Plastering, Painting, and
Paper-hanging.

Tue outer walls of the house are now built;
but much remains to be done before the house
will be fit to live in.

The ceiling and inside walls, which have
been covered with laths, are next plastered.
This is done by covering the laths with team T
mixed with hair; the use of the hair being to
make the plaster bind or hold together.

This coating is covered with finer coats, in
which are mixed fine cement and plaster of Paris,
to make the surface beautifully hard and white.

Ceilings are sometimes ornamented with ele-
gant plaster figures of leaves, flowers, shells,
&c., which are made in moulds, and fixed on
with cement. :

The plasterer uses but few tools to execute
this tasteful work; yet his art is requisite in
every kind of huibdine, With great skill, ‘he
makes plaster to imitate valuable marble, as
well as figures, which it would occupy much
time to cut in stone. ,

Paint is necessary to preserve the outside
woodwork of a house, as the window-frames}
door-posts, doors, &c. If the wood were not
painted, the heat of the sun would soon split it,



PAINT, 27

and fhe rain would cause it to decay, Wet and
the damp of the air would also rust and destroy
iron work, if not painted, Paint is therefore
as useful as it is ornamental.

The substances of which paint is made are
commonly obtained from metals and minerals ;
and the art of preparing them is a branch of
chemistry, White lead, of which white paint
is made, is produced from lead by the fumes of
vinegar, It is mixed with oil and turpentine,
and then becomes paint; and paint of all colours
is similarly prepared for laying on the wood-
work with a brush.

Yet paint is not entirely made of mineral sub-
stances, for the turpentine and oil.are vegetable
juices. Turpentine is extracted from several
trees, and abundantly from the pine, as you have
been told in the lesson on timber; the wood of
the pine-tree is, indeed, so full of turpentine, that
slips of it are burnt instead of candles; and the
oil used in painting is pressed from enon or
the seed of flax. The use of the turpentine aid
oil is to soak into and fill up the pores of the
wood, and to cause the paint to dry and harden.

The painter’s art is more difficult than plas-
tering. He sometimes colours the wood-work of
rooms to imitate fine woods, with beautiful veins
and knots, as they are seen ina plank. Thus



28 | PAPER-HANGING.

doors are painted toimitate mahogany me oak; —
and wood is veined or streaked to resemble —
marble. In these cases the paint is coated with —
varnish, which gives the surface a fine glossy
appearance.

Paper-hanging is an elegant covering for
walls, and increases the warmth of rooms. The —
paper is made from coarse rags, ground with ©
water to a pulp, shaken upon wire net, and
dried upon rollers. It is then stained, or printed, ~
by means of wooden blocks, with various
patterns and colours.

Such patterns often represent curious trees
and flowers, with views of charming countries.
These scenes are printed in their natural colours; |
and they remind us of the beautiful productions
with which God has enriched the earth for the
happiness of his creatures.

QUESTIONS.

What is done after the outer walls | What kind of oil is used in
of the house are finished ? painting, and how is it ob.
How are ceilings plastered ? tained ?
What is the use of hair in plaster? | What is the most difficult branch
What is the principal use of paint of the painter’s art?
on iron and wood-work ? How is paper-hanging made and
Of what does white paint consist? stained ?
What is turpentine, and how is it | What are often the patterns of
obtained ? paper-hanging ?







Lesson VIII. Window Glass.

Grass is one of the most beautiful inventions
ofman. It“ admits the light of the sun, and
excludes the violence of the wind.” Its manu-
> facture is very curious; for, although glass is
) transparent, not one of the materials of which
> it is made is so.
| One of the principal ingredients of all kinds
of glass is silex, or flint, piéces of which are often
seen on roads, or in thousands upon the sea-
shore, or beach. But these flints would be diffi-
cult to break ; and glass-makers use, instead of
them, sea-sand, which is flint already in powder.
Crown glass, used for glazing windows, is
made of fine white sand; kelp, or burnt sea-
weeds, containing soda; and quick-lime. These



30 WINDOW GLASS.

ingredients are melted in pots, placed in the
midst of a strong coal-fire, within a kind of oven.

When the mass is mixed, it is taken out, cooled,
picked over, and washed; it is then called frit.

A certain quantity of old broken glass is next

added to the frit, which is put into melting-pots, -

or ctucibles, to be placed in ihe furnace.

The furnace is a round-topped building, ter-
minating in a wide chitiney ; and is furnished
with holes all round, to put in and take out the
pots. Within this furnace, the frit in the pots

is placed amidst strong flames; it is allowed to ©

remain there until the dross rises to the top,
and is removed; when the mass in the pots
becomes clear, atid the glass is made.

The workman now dips one end of an iron

pipe into a pot, and takes. out glass enough in |

{

’
'

a lump to make a sheet. He then applies his |

mouth to the other end of the pipe, and blows
the soft glass into the form of a globe; just as

bubbles of soap-and-water are blown from a

tobacco-pipe. The globe is next taken from the |
pipe by another workman, upon an iron rod, |

to be flattened into a plate.



The glass is now held upon the rod to one of |

the openings of the furnace, until it has become

hot. The workman then twirls the rod, slowly
at first, and then more and more quickly, when



WINDOW GLASS. 31







the glass is also carried round upon the rod,

until it spreads out and becomes a circular foils
hot table. This spreading of the glass round the
rod may be compared to the circle which
spreads round a stone let fall in a pond of
water. The iron rod is then removed from the.
centre of the plate, and leaves a coarse thick
lump, called the bull’s-eye.

The glass is next placed in another furnace,
and gradually removed from the hottest to the
coolest part, till the plate is cold enough to be
taken out for use. But if the glass be cooled too
suddenly it will be extremely brittle.

The glass being thus made in round pieces, is
divided, and shaped into panes for windows ;
the centie, or bull’s-eye, being mostly used for
osky-lights, or garden-frames.

Glaziers cutglass by passing along its surface,
guided by a ruler, the point of a diamond;
‘which is the hardest substance known, and cuts .
or scratches every other.

- The clearest glass used for windows is called
plate glass, from its being cast upon metal
) plates, as lead is cast upon tables.

Plate glass is composed of fine white sand,
soda, and lime ; two metallic substances, named
manganese and cobalt; and fragments of good
‘glass. “These ingredients are melted together,



382 WINDOW GLASS.

and poured upon a hot copper-plate, upon a —
table. As the glass spreads, all roughnesses are
pressed out by passing a roller over it. The
glass is then removed to an oven, to be heated
and cooled gradually. Lastly, it is polished, by
grinding two plates together with finely-pow-
dered flints. |

It is difficult to produce a perfect plate of ©
glass, without specks, bubbles, or waves; and —
this makes a large plate very expensive.

The superiority of plate-glass windows to those —
of common glass is very great. Objects seen
through plate glass appear of their real forms,
as if no glass were before them; but when seen
through common glass, they seem more or less _
out of shape. Plate glass is also thicker, and
less liable to be broken, than common glass.

Glass is fastened into window-frames with a
kind of paste, called putty, made of whiting
and drying oil; it soon hardens, and will last
securely for many yéars.

QUESTIONS.

What is the principal ingredient of | How is window glass made in

glass ? round plates ?
Why is sand used instead of flints | How is glass divided?

in making glass ? Of what ingredients is plate glass
Of what ingredients is window made ?

glass made ? Why is plate glass so expensive ?
How is glass blown? In what respect is plate glass

superior to common glass?









Lesson IX. How Water ts obtained.

> Water is one of the greatest blessings which
' God has given to his creatures. It supports
every living thing. Neither man, nor any other
} animal that exists on the earth, could live without
/ water; and trees and plants would soon wither
~ and die, if they were not supplied with it.
Water is found in seas, rivers, lakes, and
| springs. Sea-water is salt and bitter, disagree-
If. D



34 HOW WATER IS OBTAINED.






able to the taste, and unfit for the drink of man, ©
Water from springs and rivers is tasteless and
fresh, and is used for domestic purposes. Al- ;
most every house 1s supplied with this kind of ©
water, for drinking, washing, and cooking food. 4
It is employed in brewing beer, making tea, and ~
boiling provisions. a

Springs are little collections of water, flowing
through cracks beneath the surface of the earth. —
Sometimes this water rises, and forms springs
above ground; as we often see them in beauti-
ful green valleys, and by the road-side, in the
country. To ensure @ better supply of water
than such springs afford, wells are dug to a great
depth in the earth, so as to reach these springs,
and sink so much below them as to form a store, —
or reservoir, of the water under-ground,

The form of the well is generally circular;
and to prevent the earth crumbling down, or
falling in from the sides, the well is lined with:
brick-work. As the water seldomrises to a great
height, there is letdown into it a bucket, fastened :
to a rope ona roller across the mouth of the |
well: when the bucket is filled, it is drawn up
by winding the rope again on the roller. Some
times two buckets are used; when, by drawing
one bucket up to be emptied, you cause the
other to descend to be filled. |

eo



HOW WATER IS OBTAINED. 35


















Wells are dangerous places, and many lives
have been lost by persons falling into them: we
should therefore be careful in approaching them.

They are of different depths, varying from a few
' feet, when only sunk to obtain the water froma
\land-spring, sometimes to three or four hun-
dred feet deep, when sunk or bored for the
‘deep-seated springs. The air at the bottom of
\deep wells is unwholesome.
_ The pump is a safer contrivance for drawing
“water than the bucket; as the mouth of the
‘well is not open when the pump is used. A
“pump consists of a hollow pipe, which is placed
‘in the well; and the water is drawn up the pipe
‘by a sucker, which is worked up and down by
ae handle.
Cities are generally built upon the banks of
rivers, from which water is conveyed to the
houses through pipes under-ground. Thus,
London is built upon the banks of the Thames;
4and, from the Thames and other rivers, this vast
‘city is supplied with upwards of twenty-nine
‘zillions of gallons of water every day.
| The mode of supplying houses with water is
‘ery simple. The water is first collected into a
“reservoir, or large basin, high above ground; it
“as then forced through the pipes, which are under
‘ground, and it rises through them to the same

D2



36 HOW WATER IS OBTAINED.

height as the reservoir. By these means every
room in a house may be supplied with water.
Water is hard or soft. Spring-water is hard,
and unfit for washing; but it is more refreshing
as drink than soft water, from the air which it
contains. This causes the bubbles to sparkle in
a glass of pump-water. Its hardness is caused
by its having flowed through lime in the earth;
and it is known that one grain of lime will
change two thousand gallons of soft into hard
water. River-water is soft, and rain-water is
still softer. Springsdo not freeze, because the
hardest frosts penetrate but a few inches into
the earth. Thus, water never ceases to flow







ii ee

ee a i ela

ne

A ee

HOW WATER IS OBTAINED. 37

under ground in the most severe weather; but
above ground, water freezes in pipes, and often
bursts them.

In some places, water is obtained by boring
the earth, and pushing down pipes until the

spring is reached; when the water rises up

through the pipes in abundance. These are
called Artesian wells.

How wonderful are the wisdom and goodness
of God displayed in the provision of water;
wonderful is the dispensation by which the
springs and rivers of the earth are made to sup-
ply the wants of man and the lower animals;
and by which the rains of heaven are sent to
make fruitful the fields and valleys, for man’s
subsistence and enjoyment!

QUESTIONS. | .-

Why is water one of the greatest | Describe a pump.
blessings we enjoy? Why is a pump a safe contrivance
Where is water found ? for drawing water ?

In what respect does sea-water | How are large cities supplied with
differ from that of rivers and water ?

springs ? Why does pump-water sparkle in
Describe a spring. a glass ?
Why are wells dug ? Why is spring-water hard °®
How is water drawn out of a! Which is the softest water ?
well? Why do not springs freeze ?

Do wells vary much in depth ? What are Artesian wells ?



38

Lesson X. Uses of Fire.

THE important uses of fire in various arts have
been already explained. Without fire we could
not prepare the materials for building a house.

Bricks could not be made without fire to bake
them. Metals could not be melted or wrought
without the heat of the furnace, and the smith’s
fire. Iron and lead would be useless, if they
were not separated from their ores by fire.
Carpenters’ tools could not be made to cut
without heat; and glass would be mere powder,
unless melted by fire. The attentive reader
has observed all these uses of fire in the pre-
ceding lessons.

Fire ensures us the countless comforts of heat
and light within doors. We enjoy its warmth
from the cheerful blaze of the parlour hearth;
and its beautiful light from the steady flame of
the candle or lamp.

Heat from fire makes dreary winter an agree-
able season: and when the sun hides his face,
and darkness covers the earth, the taper or lamp
lights up the air. Thus light adds to the length
of our lives, by making hours pleasant and
useful, which must otherwise be lost in dark-
ness, and given to inactivity or sleep.

It is to fire that we are indebted for almost

|
:



we

USES OF FIRE. 39

every comfort that we enjoy throughout the day.
Thus, our food owes its savour and nourishment
to heat. Bread could not be baked, if the oven
were not heated by fire. The refreshing drink
which forms our morning’s repast could not be
made without the aid of fire; for water must be
heated before it will extract the flavour of the
tea-leaf, or coffee-seed. By heat alone the meats
of the dinner are fitted for our use, as in boiling
and roasting; and most vegetables would be un-
wholesome without boiling. Beer, that refreshes
us when we are fatigued, is brewed by the aid of
heat. Cleanliness and health are promoted by
the washing of clothes, in which heat is neces-
sary. By heat many medicines are extracted
from plants, to restore health to the sinking
patient. And, when we are laid upon the bed
of sickness, what is more cheering to our droop-
ing frame than warm nourishment?

In all these domestic uses, fire is seen to ad-
vantage; and its other benefits are too numerous
to be explained here. But the effects of fire are
sometimes terrific from accident or carelessness ;
when a spark escapes from a blazing fire, orfrom
a lighted candle, it sometimes falls on something
which takes light, and fills the room with smoke
and flame. The fire spreads from floor to floor,
flames burst from the windows, and rise through



40 ACCIDENTS FROM FIRE.

the roof to the sky. In their progress, they
burn all the furniture and wood-work of the
house; and only the walls remain.

Let children beware of approaching too near
& blazing fire, or carelessly using a candle. The
sparks or flame of either will sometimes set their
clothes in a blaze; and the fire, if it be not
extinguished, will burn them to death. Playing
with fire, as lighting wood and paper, has caused
the destruction of many houses, and the loss of
many lives.

When accidents occur, and the clothes are on |
fire, it is recommended to wrap a table-cover, a
piece of carpet, a hearth-rug, a blanket, or any
other woollen substance, round the body; and
to avoid all currents of air, particularly an open
door or window. The person should also lie
down; else the flame will ‘soon ascend to the
arm-pits and throat, and thus cause death.

QUESTIONS.
Mention a few of the most im- | When is fire terrific?
portant uses of fire. Why is playing with fire dan-
What are the comforts of fire ? gerous ?

Of what use is fire in preparing | What should be done when the
food ?- clothes catch fire?



41

Lesson XI. Lighting a Fire.

THE common method of obtaining fire is by
striking flint and steel together, and thus pro- #
ducing a shower of sparks. By the violence o
the striking small portions of the flint and steel
fly off; the particles of the steel burn in passing
through the air, and form the sparks. These set
fire to the tinder, or burnt linen; from which, on
applying a match dipped in sulphur, we easily
_ obtain a flame, as sulphur readily takes fire.
In countries where the above use of flint, steel,
and sulphur is unknown, savages light their fires
_ byrubbing together two pieces of wood; in doing
_ which much time is lost. The saving of time by
_ lighting a match, therefore, shows the advantages
of acivilized country, like that in which we live,
over countries where the arts are unknown. _
In lighting a fire, we employ three.articles,
_ paper,wood, and coals. Paper being most easily
lighted, is first laid in the grate ; over this are
placed small sticks of wood,which soon take fire
from the lighted paper ; and above the wood are
laid coals.
_ At first, a thick smoke rises from the fire.
_ This is caused by the moisture of the wood, and
the pitchy damp of the coals; but the smoke
1s soon carried up the chimney by the draft of

LL

—— oe Eee eee eee ee



42 LIGHTING A FIRE.

air in the apartment, through the bars of the
grate.

As the fire increases, this thick smoke becomes
flame ; and the coals continuing to burn become
cinders, or red-hot without flame; the cinders
next fall to ashes, which are applied to useful
purposes, as the making of bricks; or they are
scattered over land to render it more productive.

A pair of house-bellows is asimple contrivance
for increasing the draught of air through a fire.

> 2y . “ae

This:causes it to burn brighter, and is called |
blowing the fire. The form of the bellows is |

well known, and it works as follows :—

When the top board is lifted up, the piece of
stiff leather, which covers the hole underneath,
is also lifted, and air is drawn into the bellows.

ge

Then, if the top board be pressed down, the air —

within will close the leather over the hole, so

that such air can only escape through the pipe |

or nozle to the fire.

By the chimney, the smoke is conducted away |

into the open air, where itsoon disappears. But,
many hundred years since, before chimneys were
known, the fire was lighted in the middle of the
room, and the smoke found its way out through
a hole in the roof. Thus the chimney is a con-
venience which our early ancestors did not pos-
sess in their houses.

a

tie Le



LIGHTING A FIRE. 43

Chimneys not only allow smoke to escape,
but also admit fresh and cool air“into rooms;
making houses more healthy to live in than if
the rooms were closely shut up. |

Stoves or grates are so contrived as to throw
the heat of the fire, which is contained in them,
to all parts of a room, and to make the air equally
warm throughout. Without stoves, much of the
heat of coal would be wasted or lost.

In winter evenings, a common fire is a cheer-
ful and instructive object. It gladdens us with
its warmth; and it reminds us how bountifully
the Creator has provided for our happiness at
all seasons. Forests supply us with fire-wood;
‘and the earth yields coal, which is the most
useful of all its treasures. The pitchy matter
of coal, when it is properly heated, furnishes the
gas of our lamps; and the smoke which bursts
from cracks in the coals of a fire is gas in an
impure state.

The boiling of water in a kettle, on a fire, is
a simple and ordinary process. The water first
becomes heated in the lower part of the kettle,
nearest the fire: it then rises up through the -
colder water, which, being heavier, sinks down,
and is fully heated in its turn. By degrees, the
water in the kettle becomes so hot, that the parts
next the bottom are changed into steam, or



44 LIGHTING A FIRE.
vapour, which rises in bubbles to the top. The
water then boils, and a beautiful transparent
vapour, or steam, can just be seen coming from
the spout of the kettle. When a thick, cloudy
vapour appears, the water in the kettle is de-
creasing, and will continue to decrease, until
the kettle is emptied, unless it be removed from
the fire. »

In a similar manner, but in larger vessels,
called boilers, is produced the steam that gives
motion to the steam-engine, which causes
vessels to move rapidly through rivers and seas,
and wheel-carriages to travel with great speed
along railroads.

Thus, by our fire-side, we may witness the
production of gas from common coal; while the
boiling of the kettle will acquaint us with the
method of making steam; and gas-lighting and
the steam-engine are two of the most useful
discoveries that have yet been made by man,

QUESTIONS.
>

How do you strike a light ?

What are the sparks ?

How is a fire lighted ?

Why does smoke rise from a fire
when it is first lighted ?

Why does the smoke disappear as
the fire burns ? :

Are the ashes of coals of any ser-
vice ?

How is a pair of bellows worked ?

Name the use of chimneys.
What are the advantages of stoves

or grates ?
Why 7 a common fire be con-
sidered an instructive object ?
How is a kettle of water boiled ?
How is steam produced ? j
Mention,a few of the uses of steam.
Which are the most useful disco-
veries yet made by man ?



45

Lesson XII. What are Coals?

Coats are the remains of forests which have
been swallowed up by the earth. They have
been buried for many hundred years, and have

become changed from growing trees to a black,

stony substance.
Coals are dug out of deep mines, and are

found in beds or layers, of different thickness,
and at various depths. Some of the coal-mines

=

of England are nearly one thousand feet below
the surface of the earth.

The substance of coal consists of charcoal,
bitumen, or pitchy matter and earth. That
coal which contains most bitumen burns with |

- most flame; and that coal which contains most
— earth leaves the greatest quantity of ashes.

No country, of the same size, in the world,
affords so much coal as England. We not only
possess sufficient coals for our own consumption,
but export great quantities to many parts of
Europe, and even to Egypt, and the Kast Indies.
And, although we are constantly digging and
consuming coals, it is known that rich stores of
coals are treasured up in the bowels of the earth
for man’s use, for many centuries to come.

The places which have coal-mines are called
coal-fields. The most important of these are the



46 WHAT ARE COALS ?.

Northumberland and Durham fields in the north
of England. Here are the Newcastle mines,
which yield the greatest quantity and best
quality of coals, or twenty-eight million tons’
weight every year.

The Newcastle coal is the rich caking kind,
which abounds in bitumen, softens in the fire,
swells, and throws out jets of flame; it burns
hollow, requires poking, and leaves cinders,
but few ashes. |

London is chiefly supplied with coals from |
the Northumberland and Durham fields.

The coals are conveyed from the mines in
wagons, upon railroads, to the banks of the rivers
Tyne, Wear, and Tees, where they are put into
ships, which convey them, by the river Thames,
to the port of London. In one year upwards of |
two million tons of coal have thus been brought -
to London by more than seven thousand vessels,

Coals are also conveyed to all parts of England
in boats upon canals. These canals are channels -
cut from rivers, in every direction. In Great
Britain, canals extend nearly three thousand
miles ; and the cost of cutting them has been
thirty millions of money.

A coal-mine is one of the greatest curiosities
of England. It consists of a deep pit, from which |
galleries are hollowed out in the direction in





WHAT ARE COALS? 47

which the coal lies under ground. In these gal-
leries the miners break down the coal with
pickaxes; it is then put into large iron buckets,
and drawn up by vast machinery to the mouth
of the pit.

A coal-mine resembles a little world under
ground: for men, women, and children work
there; there also are rail-roads, wagons, and
horses, &c. In the Newcastle mines, upwards
of eight thousand persons are thus employed

_ under ground.

The danger of working in coal-mines is very

great. The air is sometimes so unwholesome as

i

to suffocate the workmen: when they approach
this foul air with a light, it takes fire, explodes
with great violence, throws the workmen, with
horses and machinery, through the pit into the
air, and bursts forth’ at the mouth in flames.
To enable the miners to work in such places,
they use a lamp, covered with fine wire gauze,
called the safety lamp, which burns without set-
ting fire to the foul air. In places where the.
air is not so foul, the mine is lighted up by large
blazing fires, and by the men earrying candles
with them. Fresh air is let down through pipes
from the opening of the pit; by pipes also the

‘ unwholesome airis discharged from the interior





48

of the mine and replaced by fresh; so as to
allow the working to proceed in safety.

In digging, the miners
springs; and water sometimes rushes into the
mine, with tremendous force, and drowns the
The water must then be got out of the
mine before the working can proceed: this is
done by vast pumps worked by a steam-engine,
one stroke of which will raise as much water
as five hundred men could pump out.

Coal, when it has been heated in large tight:
iron pipes, produces gas that is burnt in lamps;
coal yields also tar, which is used to cover}
palings; and the remainder of the coal is coke,”
which burns without smoke. 2

Charcoal is what remains of wood after it has
been burnt in a close place. |

men.

QUESTIONS.

What are coals ?

Have the forests become changed
from growing trees to a black
substance ?

What does coal consist of ?

Which coal burns with most
flame ?

Which coal leaves most ashes ?

Is coal abundant in England ?

What is a coal.-field ?

Which counties of England pro-
duce the best coal?

WHAT ARE COALS ?













meet with many

How are coalsconveyed to London
and other places ?
What is a canal?

Describe a eoal-mine. 4
In what respect does a coal-mine ©
resemble a little world under

ground ?
Why is it dangerous to work ina —
coal-mine ?
How is coal-gas obtained ?
What is coke? 5

What is charcoal ?



THE FURNITURE

OF A

DWELLING-HOUSE.

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ibe = Lesson I. Household Furniture.

I HOUSE, when it has been built, is next to be
hiivithaneds or supplied with articles for daily use
, and convenience. These articles are generally
t moveable, and are called furniture; but a few,
}which are not moveable, as cupboards, shelves,
E and fastenings, are called fixtures.



Furniture is made of various substances; as
wood, metal, wool, and flax. It also includes
i: glass, cutlery, and the like.
E



50 THE FURNITURE OF A

The workman who shapes and fixes all wood-
work for ornament orconvenienee in the interior
of a house is called a joiner. The joiner, con-
sequently, makes the wooden fixtures, and is a
different man from the carpenter, who frames
and fits together the more rough and solid
timbers in building the house.

Cabinets, or ornamental boxes, were among
the first-made articles of furniture. The manu-
facturer of wooden furniture is generally called
a cabinet-maker. In the engraving he may be
seen at work: he is sawing a piece of wood, and
around him are various tools, and unfinished
articles of furniture.

The kinds of wood chiefly employed by him are
oak, beech, elm, walnut, and cherry, which eTrow
in England; deal, or planks of fir-wood, which
grows principally in the northern countries, as
explained in a previous lesson; and mahogany,
which grows many thousand miles distant, and
is brought in ships to this country, as will be
presently described.

Oak is sometimes used for tablesand drawers;
the common round kitchen table is generally
made of it. This wood lasts long, but it is
heavy, and hard to work; it is also as expensive
as mahogany,

Tables are sometimes made of deal; and



DWELLING-HOUSE. 51

wash-hand stands and tables for bed-rooms are
_ of deal, painted or japanned.

Beech and elm are often used for chairs and
tables, and the posts of bedsteads; sometimes
they are stained and polished to appear like
mahogany. Kitchen chairs are often made of
elm, without the stain. These woods are also
used for the frame-work of tables, which have the
upper parts of mahogany or other fine woods.

The walnut was called the “ cabinet-makers’
tree,” before mahogany was introduced into
England; and tables, chairs, bedsteads, and
drawers, were made of it. Its wood is taugh and
strong, beautifully marked, and easily polished:
but it is now seldom used.

The wood of the cherry-tree is sometimes used
for chairs; it is very close and prettily marked.

All wood used for cabinet-work ought to be
seasoned or hardened, so that it may not swell
with wet, nor shrink or crack with heat. On
this account, we see in the timber-merchants’
yards, piles of timberin planks, set up to become
seasoned by the air passing through them. The
furniture of a room is much exposed to the fire ;
and if the chairs and tables are made of un-
seasoned timber, they soon fall to pieces,

Cabinet-makers shape the furniture in sepa-
rate pieces, which they dove-tail together ; that

| E 2



52 THE FURNITURE OF A

is, they let or fit one piece into another, in the
form of the tail of a dove. They use wooden
pegs instead of nails; they fasten the pieces like-
wise with glue. Glue is a substance made by
boiling the skins of animals to a jelly. It is ap-
plied in a melted state, and hardens in cooling.
The surface of furniture is rubbed smooth, and
made to bear a high polish.

CERTAIN parts of furniture, as the legs and rails
of chairs, are turned, or shaped, by a machine
called adathe. This machine consists of chisels,
moved by wheels and a spring: and in using it,
the workman turns about the wood, so as to
shape it by the chisel.

The legs of tables, and .the large posts of bed-
steads, are likewise turned by the lathe. But the
ornaments of these posts, as leaves and flowers,
are carved, or cut with a sharp knife.

The seats of chairs are sometimes made of
platted willow, like basket-work; and sometimes
of soft rushes, which grow on the banks of rivers.
Chairs of a better description have their seats
stuffed and covered with the hair of the tails
and manes of horses, and sometimes they are
covered with leather.

The seats of chairs are also made of split and



DWELLING-HOUSE. 53

platted cane and bamboo, which grow abundantly
in warm countries, as India and China. In the
latter country, indeed, many houses are built
entirely of bamboo ; and nearly every article of
furniture is made of the same material.

Chests, or large boxes for holding clothes, are
made of various common woods. A chest of
drawers is a more convenient contrivance for
keeping clothes from dust. The drawers are so
many boxes without lids, which slide in and out
of a frame-work, to which they may be fastened —
infront by locks. As the drawers slide one above
another, they only occupy more height than a
single drawer would; and thus much space is
saved in the floor of a room.

Furniture that is well made will last for many
years, although itis in,use every day. Sometimes
insects bore little holes in the wood, and cause it
to decay and fall to pieces. But, in some old
mansions may be seen cabinets, chairs, and
tables, that were made a hundred years since,
and have been used by many generations of the
same family.

The person who sells furniture, fits up cur-
tains, and furnishes a house, generally, is called
an upholsterer.

In countries where the use of a chair, table,
and bedstead is unknown, the natives sit, eat,



54 FURNITURE.

and sleep upon the ground. We enjoy the com-
fort of a chair, on which we rest our wearied
limbs; of a table, on which our food is spread ;
and of a bedstead, on which we sleep at night.
Let us, therefore, be thankful to God, for the
blessings which we derive from His providence :
for, at His divine will, the tree grows in the

forest, and man fashions its timber into useful
forms.

QUESTIONS.

Can you tell me the difference be- | How do cabinet makers join fur-
tween furniture and fixtures ? | niture together ?

What description of work is done | Of what does glue consist ?
by the joiner ?

What description of work is done
by the carpenter ?

Why is a cabinet-maker so

ooo



How are the legs of chairs and
tables made ?



named ? Can you describe a lathe ?

Of what kind of wood is furniture | Of what materials are the seats of
made ?. chairs made?

Of what kind of wood is the round | Can you describe to me a chest of
kitchen-table made ? drawers ?

What was the walnut-tree for- | Will furniture last long?
merly called ? What is the person called who

Why should all wood be seasoned ? furnishes houses ?





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Lesson II. Mahogany.

MauoGany is the most useful of all woods em-
ployed in the manufacture of furniture. Almost
every house in England now contains some
article made of mahogany ; although the wood
has been used in this country little more than
a hundred years.

The mahogany tree grows in a warm climate.
England is too cold for it. It is one of the most



56 MAHOGANY.

majestic trees in the world; its trunk is of vast
size, and its arms spread very wide; as you may
see in the engraving. The trunk is most valu-
able for the size of its timber; but the branches
yield the most beautiful wood.

The finest kind of mahogany is that which is
known as Spanish mahogany, and is brought
from the West Indies: this is the rich and dark-
coloured wood whichis used for the best descrip-
tion of furniture. Another kind, knownas Hon-
duras mahogany, is brought from the flat and
marshy coasts of America: it is of a lighter
colour, and of less value than Spanish mahogany.

Mahogany-cutting is the principal occupation
of the British settlersin Honduras. The trees
are generally felled in the month of August.
Parties of labourers then cut their way through
the thick forest to the finest mahogany trees,
which they hew down about twelve feet from
the ground; a stage being raised round the
trees for the axe-man, who fells them.

The workmen next cut roads through the
forest, along which the trees are to be conveyed
upon four-wheeled trucks drawn by oxen, to the
nearest river. Sometimes miles of road, and
many bridges, are made to a single tree. And
the making of these roadsis the greatest portion
of the labour and expense of mahogany-cutting.



MAHOGANY. 57

The trees are next sawed across into logs, some
of which are of animmense size, and weigh many
thousand pounds. These logs are of different
lengths; some trees furnish only one log, while
from another trunk four or five logs may be cut.
The largest log of Honduras mahogany ever cut
was seventeen feet in length, and weighed nearly
thirty-four thousand pounds. The logs are then
cut with an axe, from the round form in which
they grow, to a square shape as we see them in
the timber merchants’ yards.

The logs are next conveyed upon the trucks
to the river during the night; for the heat of the
sun is too great to allow the oxen to work during
the day. Upon reaching the river the logs are
marked with the first letters of the owner’s
name, and are then thrown into the stream.

The logs float for many miles, and the work-
men follow them in boats, until the logs are
stopped near the mouth of the river before it
flows into the sea.

Each party then separates its own logs, and
forms them into rafts; thus they float on to the
wharf of the owner, where the logs are taken out
of the water again, smoothed with an axe, and
made ready for shipping, or conveying in ships
to various countries. Great quantities of maho-
gany are brought to England ; and in one year



58 MAHOGANY.

there have been received as many logs of maho-
gany as loaded fifteen large vessels. One of
these logs was worth a thousand pounds.

The choicest mahogany is too expensive to be
used in thick planks. The logs of this kind are,
therefore, cut into very thin pieces, called
veneers; these are laid, and neatly glued on wood
of an inferior kind, so as to make it appear like
planks of the handsomest mahogany. These
veneers show the beautiful curls and other
marks, which are somuchadmired in mahogany.
Of solid: mahogany, of an inferior kind, are
turned and carved the legs of chairs and tables.

The saw-mill, by which logs are cut into
veneers, is one of the most ingenious machines
everinvented. It consists of large wheels, edged
with fine saws, which cut through the wood with-
out wasting much of it. ‘These wheels, or saws,
are turned by a steam-engine, which has the
power sometimes of eighty men. In such a mill,
the largest saw is fifty feet round, and turns
ninety-five times in aminute! It will take off,
in three minutes, a sheet of veneer, nine or ten
feet long, and two feet wide; and some veneers
are but the sixteenth part of an inch in thick-
ness, or nearly as thin as a shaving.

All this work is performed with astonishing
nicety, and saving of the wood ; much of which



MAHOGANY. 59

would be wasted by the common saw, as saw-
dust. The expense of sawing mahogany into
veneers is very great; and the charge for saw-
ing a very large log will sometimes exceed five
hundred pounds..

Rosewood, another beautiful wood used for
making furniture, is brought from South Ame-
rica. It is named from its having, when fresh,
a faint but agreeable smell of roses. Its colours
are dark brown upona purple red ground; and
some of its markings are extremely elegant.
It is much heavier than mahogany ; and is ge-
nerally cut into veneers, which are used for
tables, the cases of piano-fortes, and the like;
_ but the legs of chairs, tables, and piano-fortes,
are turned and carved from solid rosewood.

QUESTIONS.

How long has mahogany been | What do you call a veneer ?

used in England ?

Can you describe the mahogany
tree, and tell me where it grows ?

Which is the finest kind of maho-
gany ?

Which is the inferior mahogany ?

- When is mahogany cut ?

What is the principal expense of
mahogany-cutting ?

How is mahogany cut into logs?

How is mahogany cut into ve-
neers ?

Can you describe a saw-mill for
cutting veneers ?

From what country is rosewood
brought ?

Why is rosewood so named ?

What are the colours of rosewood ?

What articles of furniture are
made from it?



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Lesson III. Metal Furniture: Iron.

Many articles of furniture are made of metal ;
as stoves, fenders, and fire-irons; candlesticks
and kitchen utensils. The metals used for these
purposes are iron, copper, and tin; and the
compounds called steel, brass and pewter.

Tron stoves are cast in Separate pieces, from
models, or patterns of the pieces, made very
smooth and exact in fine sand. The form of
the model is taken by pressing it in moistened
sand within boxes; the sand dries , hardens, and
becomes a mould, into which the melted iron is
poured; and the iron, being allowed to cool, is
taken out solid.

All the pieces being thus cast, they are filed



IRON FURNITURE. 61

or made smooth, and then fitted up, or put to-
gether, to form a complete stove, such as you
see in the opposite engraving. The bars, and
parts of the fronts of stoves, are sometimes made
of polished steel, and of very beautiful patterns.

Close or covered stoves for heating rooms,
and such as are used in laundries, are also of
cast iron; as are boilers, kettles, and sauce-
pans; irons for smoothing clothes; and the
machinery, wheels, and chains of a mangle.

A kitchen-grate, or range, is a very in genious
contrivance for cooking food. The fire-place is
in the middle; and the fire will not only roast
meat before it, and boil a kettle above it, but
will heat an oven on one side, and cause water
to boil on the opposite side. The smoke, in
passing up the chimney, turns a wheel as the
wind turns the shafts of a windmill; and this
wheel gives motion to a machine called a jack,
which turns the meat upon the spit before the
fire. Thus a fire is made to roast, boil, and
bake, as well as to heat a room at the same time.

Fenders are used to prevent cinders from
rolling off the hearth upon the wooden floor;
and without them all fires would be dangerous
in houses.

Fenders are of handsome open forms, such as _.
that in the engraving. ‘They are made of cast —

Â¥



62 IRON FURNITURE.

iron, or polished cut steel and brass. Each of
the latter kind is, at first, a plate of steel or
brass, out of which the pattern or open figures
are cut by the sharp stroke of a screw-press.
The plate is next hammered level, and ground
upon a stone wheel and polished. The fender
is then bent into the shape required: under-
neath it is placed a plate of rolled iron, sup-
ported upon claw or ball feet, to catch the
cinders ; and thus the fender is complete.

Fenders and screens are also made of wire
network, with a piece of bright metal at top and
bottom. These are very useful to guard against
the danger of hot cinders flying out of the fire,
and to keep children from approaching too near
the grate.

Every fire-place is supplied with a set of fire-
irons, which are a shovel, a poker, and a pair of
tongs. ‘'hese are made of common iron; or of
iron, case-hardened by heating, and then dipping
it into water. The common irons are ground
upon a wheel, rolled on stone, and roughly
polished. The most expensive kinds are made
of good steel, or fine iron.

Great numbers of all kinds of stoves are cast
at the Carron Iron Works, by the side of the river
Carron, in Scotland. This manufactory is the
largest of its kind in the world, and many hun-



IRON FURNITURE. 63

dred persons are employed init. A canal is
cut from the river to the works, where the
manufactures are put into boats, and conveyed
to the Carron, to be shipped in, large vessels,
and brought to England. These vessels return
to Scotland, laden with goods from the port of
London.

That useful machine, the coffee-mill, is made
of rolled iron. It consists of a kind of funnel, or
cup, in which is put the coffee; underneath is a
sharp-cut box of iron, or steel, with a notched
roller in it; this is turned by the handle outside ;
and as the coffee sinks from the cup, it is crushed
to powder by the roller turning in the box, and
falls out below. Many thousands of these mills
are made every year at Birmingham.

Locks are commonly made of iron. The outer
part, or box, is of cast iron; and the inner
works are of iron finely wrought.

Thus, we see that iron is as useful in furnish-
ing as it is in building a house.

QUESTIONS.

What articles of furniture are of | How are steel and brass fenders
metal ? made ?
What metals are used for making | How are fire-irons made?
them ? Which is the largest stove manu-
How are stove-grates cast ? factory in the world?
Can you describe a kitchen-range? | Can you describe a coffee-mill ?
Of what use are fenders ? Of what metals are locks made ?



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Lesson IV. Cutlery; Knives and Forks.

THE cutlery in common use in every house con-
sists of knives, forks, and scissors. The forms
of these articles are too well known to need de-
scription; for we employ a knife at each meal,
and scissors are in daily use. These, and all
other cutting instruments, are made of steel.

Steel is made by putting pure iron with
charcoal into clesé pots, which are placed in a
strong coal-fire in a covered furnace; where the
pots are allowed to remain until the iron has
become changed by the heat and the charcoal
into common steel.

But this steel is blistered, or full of little



KNIVES AND FORKS. 65

holes; and, to make it solid, it must be heated
and beaten with large hammers, when it will
become shear-steel. It is again heated, and then
tilted, that is, beaten with hammers upon anvils.
It is next passed, while red hot, between vast
metal rollers, which are worked by water, or
steam power.

Near Sheffield, where the finest steel is made,
are extensive mills, in which a large water-wheel
works hammers, weighing from three to four
hundred pounds, and causes them to strike from
one to two hundred times in a minute. In the
same mill is a tilting-hammer, which gives three
hundred strokes in a minute ; here, also, are im-
mense rollers for flattening the steel.

The finest steel is cast, by melting the blistered
or common steel in afurnace, and pouring it into
iron moulds to cool. It is then gently heated
again, and carefully hammered into bars.

All those articles which do not require a fine »
polish, and are of low price, are made of blistered-
steel. Articles of a better description are made
from shear-steel. The fipgpt kinds of cutlery.
are made from east-steel, as no other will bear
a high polish.

Table-knives are mostly made of shear-steel,
as we see by the stamps on their blades. Each
knife passes through sixteen hands, or one hun-

II. F



66 CUTLERY.

dred and forty-four stages of workmanship.—
Yet, so rapidly is all this done, that in the work-
shop at Sheffield, a dinner-knife is shaped in a
few minutes.

The cutting part of the blade of a knife is first
hammered out of a bar of heated steel. A piece
of iron is then struck on to the thicker end of the
blade, and forms the tang or shank, whichis fitted
into the handle. Two men, the maker and striker,
will form a great number of blades in a day.

The blade is next hardened by plunging it,
when red-hot, into cold water; but as the steel
then becomes too hard, or brittle, it is tempered,
or made softer, by again heating it. The blade
is next carried to the grinding-mill; and there
ground upon stone wheels of different fineness ;
these wheels are worked by the foot upon a
treadle, as in the knife-grinder’s barrow, seen
almost daily.

The blade is then polished upon a wheel
covered with leather; and the metal part of the
knife being now finished, it is fastened into a
handle of ivory, bone, wood, or other substance.

Forks are shaped from steel, at the anvil, and
the prongs are stamped out, hardened, tempered,
and ground upon a dry stone. Common forks
are of cast-iron, which being heated, hammered,
and polished, appears like steel. Of this metal



KNIVES AND FORKS. 67

are also cast annually many thousand pairs of
cheap scissors and snuffers.

The grindstone, or knife-grinder’s barrow, is
represented in the engraving; where the man, by
setting his foot upon the treadle, turns the large
wheel ; from this lines pass to the smaller wheel,
upon which he is grinding the knife. By this
contrivance, the man works with his hands and
foot at the same time.

QUESTIONS.

What articles are called cut- Which part of a knife is made
lery? | first?

How is steel made ? _ How is the blade hardened ?

Why is steel hammered and | How is the blade tempered ?
rolled ? | How is the blade ground ?

How is the finest steel made ? | How is the blade polished ? 1

Which are the principal kinds of Of what are knife-handles made ?
steel? | How are forks made ?

Of which kind of steel are table- Of what are common forks made?
knives made? | How is the grindstone worked? _



Lesson V. Cutlery; Scissors, Razors,
and Penknives.

A PAIR of scissors occupies more time in making |

than any other article of cutlery. It is made by

hand; and each pair passes through sixteen or
F 2



68 CUTLERY.

seventeen hands, including fifty or sixty kinds
of work, before it is ready for sale.

Each part of a pair of scissors is made from a
flat piece of steel ; the cutting part is first shaped
on the anvil; nextthe shank; and then the bows,
or holes for the fingers, are formed upon the
point of a small anvil.

The parts of scissors are next put into the fire
in little bundles, to be softened. ‘The shanks
and bows are then filed, and the hole is bored for
the screw to fasten the scissors in pairs. The
blades are next ground, and shaped on stone
wheels; they are then put in pairs, and- screwed
together. After this, the screw is taken out, and
the shanks and bows are hardened and made
bright. The screw is again put in, the edges of
the blades are sharpened, and the scissors are
finished with a polished steel instrument. These,
however, are but afew of the stages through
which a pair of scissors passes before itis com-
pleted.

Snuffers are made nearly in the same manner
as scissors, which they much resemble.

Razors are made of the finest steel; and each
razor passes through a dozen hands. After the
blade is formed itis hardened and then tempered
by heating, until it is of a straw-colour. It is
next ground and polished upon wheels, sv as



CUTLERY. 69

to make the blade hollow, and give it a very
fine edge.

The manufacture ofa penknife is divided into
three branches. ‘The first is the forming of the
blade, the spring by which it opens and shuts,
and the iron-work of the handle. The second
branch is the grinding and polishing of the blade.
- The third branch consists of fitting up all the
parts of the handle, and finishing the knife.

The handles of penknives are covered with
bone, wood, or horn, fastened with little metal
pins or rivets. Some handles are of the outside
of the rough horn of the stag: others are made
of horn, pressed between hot metal plates, and
thus ornamented with figures.

The fine edge of every blade is produced by
hardening. Common blades are not enough
hardened; so that when the first edge of the knife
is worn off, the rest of the blade is too soft to
be sharpened.

Common scissors of cast-iron, with the blades
slightly hardened, are sold by the manufacturer
at less than sixpence for a dozen pairs, or less
than a halfpenny a pair. Small knives with
handles are also cast, and sold at a halfpenny
each. These inferior articles are sent from
England, in vast numbers, to all parts of the
world,



70 CUTLERY.

Nothing excites the wonder of the natives of
uncivilized countries more than a knife or a.pair
of scissors, which is often a fit present for a
sultan, or chief. In such countries, travellers
sometimes exchange knives andscissors for gold
and precious stones.

British cutlery 1 is superior to that made in any
other country in the world. Great quantities of
table-knives are sentto the East and West Indies
and America; and knives are made in England
of various forms, according to the fashion of
different countries.

The finest cutlery is made in Sheffield and its
neighbourhood; where are manufactured great
quantities, said to be made in London, and sold
as “ Town made,” which we often see stamped
on blades. Cutlery is also made at Birmingham.

QUESTIONS.

What article of cutlery occupies |

most time in making?

How many hands does a pair of
scissors pass through in making?

Can you describe how a pair of
scissors is made ?

Can you tell me how a razor is
made ?

How is the making of a penknife
divided ?

How is the edge given to a
blade ?

Why cannot a common blade be
sharpened ?

Are not some scissors and knives
sold at very low prices ?

Is British cutlery of fine quality ?

Where is_ the finest cutlery
made ?



eat Hn gu a
a at eft

|

uc

.



Lesson VI. Zin.

Tn is one of the most useful metals in manu-
facturing the furniture of a kitchen. It is found
abundantly in Cornwall, at the Land’s End, or
western extremity of England. Its value has
been for many centuries known in this country.

The Pheenicians, an ancient people of Asia,
are. believed to have traded to Cornwall for tin
long before the period of the birth of our Saviour,
or more than two thousand years since. And
this early trade in tin, with other countries, is said
to have laid the foundation of British commerce.

In Cornwall the land is very barren, and corn
will grow in few places. But the mines there
yield abundance of tin; this is given in exchange



72 TIN.

for the corn of other parts of England, which
grow plenty of grain, but have no tin mines.
About two thousand tons’ weight are also sent
every year from England to other countries.

The quantity of this metal found in Cornwall
is very great. The working of the mines employs
many thousands of persons, and the owners
get very rich by their trade in tin.

Tin ore is found in veins, from which branch
lesser veins, like the boughs of a tree, until they
become as fine as threads. It is also found in
floors, or layers, and in grains and small masses,
in the natural rock.

Tin mines are not so deep as other mines: but,
in afew places, they have been carried far under
the sea. In these tin mines, the roar of the
waves sounds like thunder, and the water some-
times streams through the roof, and great care is
necessary to prevent its breaking in, in such
quantities as to drown the miners.

Upon the discovery of a spot containing tin
ore, the miners sink a pit or shaft, and follow
the vein under-ground in galleries; a shaft being
also sunk at every hundred yards to admit air.
Within the mine, large masses of ore are blown
off by gunpowder. The ore is then broken into
pieces, and put into large buckets, which are
hauled to the mouth of the principal shaft by a



TIN. 73

capstan. This consists of an upright roller,
around which winds a rope, with the buckets
fastened to it. From this roller projects a beam,
to the end of which horses or oxen are fastened,
and go their rounds, winding the rope round one
part of the capstan, and unwinding it from an-
other; and thus they pull up a bucket full of
ore, while an empty one is descending.

In some mines this capstan is worked by
steam. The mines are also drained by the steam
engine; and some of the largest engines in the
world are employed in pumping water from the
tin and copper mines of Cornwall.

When the ore is raised from the mine, it is
divided into shares, which are measured out by
barrows. The ore is next pounded or stamped,
in pits, by a mill; and from these pits it is carried
to a large vat, and washed in it by women and
children. Bee.

The ore is then heated in a furnace with char-_
coal and a little lime; and the pure metal, being
thus separated, is poured into moulds to cool.

QUESTIONS.

Where is tin most abundantly | Are tin mines very deep?
found in England ? | How do the miners proceed ?

What is said to have laid the foun- | How is the ore drawn from the
dation of British commerce ? mine ?

In what form is tin found in the | How is tin separated from its
earth ? ore ?

‘



74 ’

Lesson VII. Tin-ware.

TIN is one of the cleanest of metals, and will not
rust from damp. It is, therefore, much used for
coating other metals.

What are improperly called tin saucepans, are
made of sheet-iron dipped in melted tin, to pre-
vent the iron from rusting. Neither copper nor
cast-iron kettles or saucepans would be whole-
some to boil water or food in, if their insides
were not washed over with melted tin. Lead,
which is in itself poisonous, when it is mixed
with tin, forms pewter, of which drinking-pots
are made. Tin, mixed with quicksilver, is used
_ for “silvering,” or making looking-glasses. Pre-
parations of tin are also employed in dyeing,
and for various other useful purposes.

The art of making tinned vessels is called
tin-plate working. The tools used are few and
simple; as much depends upon the dexterity of
the workman. To form a saucepan, thetin-plate
is first cut into the proper size and pattern with
shears. Itis then shaped upon a block; the
two edges of the sides are laid one over the
other, and the workman, with a hot iron, melts
solder over the edges. When the solder cools
and hardens, the bottom of the saucepan is



, TIN-WARE. © 75
fitted in, and soldered like the sides. The
solder consists of lead and tin, and almost con-
ceals the seams of the vessel. To preserve the
shape of the vessel, iron wire is used at its mouth
or outer edge, and, by means of a hammer,
covered with a tinned plate. This adds much
to the strength and appearance of the vessel.

In the engraving, at page 71, the tinman is
at work upon a tea-kettle. Before him are the
soldering-irons and pot, and a large hammer ;
and on his right side are the shears.

Vessels made of tin-plate are much lighter,
and more convenient for use, than those which
are made of wood. Tinned vessels are, there-
fore, useful for carrying milk, for their small
weight, as well as for their sweetness and clean-
ness; and, with proper care, the coating of tin
lasts for a long time.

Sometimes tin-plate vessels are covered with
a kind of varnish, called Japan. Children’s
toys, such as little carriages and horses, are
made of thin tin-plate, painted and varnished.
These toys not only amuse children, but the
making of them furnishes employment for thou-
sands of industrious persons.

Block-tin articles are made by beating the
metal upon a stake with a polished steel
hammer, so that the surface appears smooth



76 TIN-WARE.

and silvery. In this manner are made dish-
covers, which are fine, clean, and durable.

Pewter is a mixed metal, consisting of tin
united to small portions of lead, zine, bismuth,
and antimony.

Pewter plates and dishes are formed by ham-
mering ; and spoons are cast in moulds. Pewter
articles are chiefly manufactured in London.
They are made and stamped according to law,
and exported to almost every part of the world.
Travellers have seen pewter dishes, bearing the
London stamp, in use in the middle of Africa ;
where the dinner of a king is served on pewter.

Britannia metal, of which tea-pots, spoons,
and candlesticks are made, consists chiefly of
tin, with small portions of copper and brass,
melted together. It is then poured into moulds,
or rolled into sheets. ,

Tea-pots are made of the sheet metal, which.
the workman bends over a model, while it
spins round. A clever workman can spin nearly
two hundred and fifty of these tea-pots in a
day: the spouts and handles are afterwards
added, as are the ornaments, which are stamped
or punched with presses. |

Drinking-pots and measures are either made
of the sheet-metal, or are cast; and turned in a
lathe. Spoons are cast singly in brass moulds ;



TIN-WARE. 77

and they are made and sold at home, as well as
sent abroad in greatnumbers. They are cheap,
cleanly, and lasting; and bear a polish nearly
equal to silver.

Britannia metal is first polished with brushes,
and wheels covered with leather: and is finished
by rubbing with the hand.

‘T'ea-pots made of this metal keep the heat
longer than earthenware tea-pots, and better
extract the flavour of the tea. The handles
are of bone or wood; for, if they were made of
metal, the boiling water in the tea-pot would
make them too hot to be held in the hand.

Tin is used not only for making domestic
utensils, but also for dyers’ boilers, for stills,
and many other implements employed in the
arts.

QUESTIONS.

Why is tin used for coating other | How are dish-covers made?
metals ? | Of what does Britannia metal
Why are copper and iron sauce- | consist?
pans tinned ? | How is a Britannia metal tea-pot
Of what is pewter made? | made?
What is tin-plate working ? | Why is the handle of the tea-pot
Can you describe the making of a | made of bone or wood?

saucepan ? : | How is a Britannia metal spoon

Of what does solder consist ? | made?

Why are tinned vessels so useful? | How is Britannia metal polished ?

How are pewter plates and dishes | Can you name a few other pur-
made ? poses for which tin is used ?





Lesson VIII. Copper and Brass.

CopPeR is a more handsome metal than iron,
lead, or tin. It is of a fine-red colour, with a
tinge of yellow, and it bears a high polish. It
is moderately hard, and is easily beaten with a
hammer into any form. Copper is much used
in manufacturing kettles and saucepans, which
are the bright and ornamental, as well as useful,
furniture of the kitchen.

Copper, mixed with another metal called
zinc, forms brass, and Prince’s metal, of which
candlesticks are made.

Copper also produces the light blue colour,
much used in staining paper for hanging rooms;
and it furnishes green paints for wood-work,



COPPER AND. BRASS. 79

Copper is obtained abundantly in Cornwall,
where the mines produce yearly upwards of ten
thousand tons of pure metal. It is found mixed
with ore, in veins among rocks; it is dug in
shafts and galleries, and hauled from the mine
as other metals are. It is generally found at a
much greater depth in the earth than tin; and
copper mines are liable to be flooded with water,
which is drained from them by sloping galleries,
or pumped up by the aid of steam engines.

To prepare copper ores for market, children
are employed to pick them from the rubbish
with which they are mixed. The large frag-
ments of ore are broken into smaller pieces by
women, and, after being again picked, are given
to girls, who, with a flat hammer, break the
copper ore into pieces not larger than the tip
of the finger. These pieces are next crushed
still smaller by passing them under a wheel; or
they are bruised by heavy weights or hammers
in a stamping mill, while a stream of water runs
through the broken ore, and carries with it all
that is sufficiently bruised. It is next shaken
in a kind of iron sieve while under water, the
earthy matter is washed away, and the copper
which:remains is piled up for sale.

The opposite cut shows the machinery for
these purposes, at Fowey Consols copper mines,
in Cornwall. ‘.

oo



80 COPPER AND BRASS.

The copper is reduced, or brought to the
state of metal, by fire; but, as Cornwall does
not contain sufficient coal for this purpose, the
copper ore found there is sent in ships to be
melted at Swansea, in Wales, where coal
abounds; for it is much cheaper to carry the
ore to the coal than coal to the ore.

The vessels which convey the ore to Swansea,
are laden back with coals to Cornwall. In the
vast works at Swansea, upwards of twelve
thousand persons are employed in digging
coals, in melting the copper, and in shipping
for its conveyance.

The ore, being picked and broken, is heated
ina furnace. It is next melted in a smaller
furnace, when the metal falls to the bottom; and
the kind of cinder which separates from it is cast
into masses, and used like bricks for building.

The copper is next poured into water two or
three times, to separate impurities, which are
chiefly sulphur, iron, and arsenic. It is then
cast into long pieces, which are broken up,
roasted, and melted with charcoal in the re-
fining-furnace ; lastly, it is cast into solid cakes,
or it is rolled by a mill into sheets, which are
sent in ships to the different markets.

Great quantities of sheet-copper are used for
sheathing or covering the bottom of ships, to



ae

COPPER AND BRASS. 81

defend them from sea-worms, and preserve them
from decay by the water.

Sheet-copper is also made into the large boil-
ing vessels, which are called coppers. quantity of copper is made into plates for en-
gravers. |

QUESTIONS.

What is the colour of copper ? | How are copper mines drained of
What furniture is generally made water ?

of copper ? Where is copper chiefly melted ?
How is Prince’s metal made ? How is copper made _ into
Where is copper found in Eng- | sheets ?

land ? | What is sheet copper principally
Is a copper mine generally deeper | _ used for ?

than a tin mine ?

Lesson IX. Copper and Brass Furniture.

THE manufacturer of copper vessels is called a
copper- -smith; and a tea-kettle is a good nye:
cimen of his woth, |

To make a tea-kettle, apiece of copper is cut
from the sheet with a pair of shears, and bent
into the requiredform; the seam is thensoldered
up over a coke fire. The vessel, when cooled, is
hammered upon a steel stake, until the seam is
smooth and the shape perfect. Two inches of
the copper are next beaten inward over a sloping
anvil, to form the top of the kettle, leaving an
opening forthe lid. Thelowerend is then turned
inward all round, and the bottom of the kettle is

II. G



82 COPPER AND BRASS.

put in, soldered, and hammered in the same
manner as the side.

The kettle is next beaten until it is bright.
The lid is then stamped out. The handle is cast,
and the spout is soldered up and shaped; and
both are soldered or riveted into their places.

Copper is of an unwholesome nature; and, if
it is allowed to get damp, it will become covered
with a light green rust, which is poisonous.

All copper vessels, unless the tinning is perfect,
are dangerous for use; and many persons haye
been poisoned by eating provisions kept in
copper pans, the tinning of which was worn off.

Copper is sometimes hammered into very thin
leaves to imitate goldleaf. It is this mock gold
which is laid on gingerbread, but children should
beware of eating what is called gilt gingerbread,
for the copper covering, or “ gilt,” is poisonous.

Great quantities of copper are coined into far-
things, halfpence, and penny-pieces. The copper
is rolled into sheets, out of which the round
pieces are cut by a press; and by another press,
both sides are stamped at the same time with
the patterns or dies cut in steel. At each press,
thirty thousand penny or halfpenny pieces may
thus be stamped, or coined, in a day.

The compound of which bells are made con-
sists of copper and tin; but house-bells haye



COPPER AND BRASS FURNITURE, 83

little copper in them. Of this compound, which
is called bell-metal, are also made preserving
pans, and pestles and mortars for pounding hard
substances.

Bronze, of which clocks, statues, and other
ornaments are made, consists of copper and tin,
with small quantities of other metals.

Brass is made by melting copper and zinc
together in clay pots, in a strong coal fire. It
is a cheap and handsome metal, and in colour
resembles gold. Many useful and ornamental
articles are cast in brass, which is also drawn
into fine wire, and cut into pins; and the pins
are whitened by boiling them with tin.

Brass is made in great quantities at Birming-
ham; and the manufacturer is called a brass-
founder. There are few houses in England in
which articles of brass are not seen. Some of
these are cast, as the heads of door-knockers,
the claw-feet of fenders, and the handles of
doors and drawers. The fine parts are finished
by filing, or with a steel chisel.

Other articles, such as finger-plates for doors,
and the fronts of fenders, are made of sheet-
brass. The elegant figures on them are stamped
by laying the brass upon the pattern, and letting
fall upon it a heavy weight, or hammer. Ina
curtain-pin, the stem is of brass, but the head is

G2



84 COPPER AND BRASS FURNITURE.

of iron, covered with thin brass stamped in
various figures. Lamps also are made of brass,
or of tin covered with brass.

Some kinds of brass-work are turned in a
lathe, others are burnished, or polished with a
hard stone, and soft leather. To give the metal
the fine rich gold colour which is so much ad-
mired in the brass ornaments of houses, the arti-
cles are dipped into a hot liquid called lacquer.

Many trinkets, brooches, watch-keys, and
chains, are also made of brass, and gilt; that is,
they are dipped in a liquid, in which a very
small portion of gold has been melted, so as to
imitate articles, which, being made of gold, are
of much greater value.

Prince’s metal is nearer to the colour of gold
than common brass. It is named from its in-
ventor, Prince Rupert, who lived about two hun-
dred years since, in Charles the Second’s reign ;
and of whom we read in the history of England.

QUESTIONS.
What is the maker of copper | Of what does bronze consist ?
vessels named ? How is brass made ?
How is a tea-kettle made ? Name a few articles made of
Why is gilt gingerbread poison- _ brass.
Ous ? How is brass-work polished ?
Can you describe the making of | How is brass gilt?
copper coin ? Why is Prince’s metal so named ?

Of what metal are bells made ?

—





85

Lesson X. How Buttons are made.

THE manufacture of buttons employs many thou-
.sand hands, and much curious machinery.

Metal buttons are chiefly made at Birming-
ham. They are formed of different metals.
The shanks, or rings, by which they are sewn to_
clothes, are of brass or iron wire, and the making
of them is a trade by itself. They are made
very rapidly; one kind of machine, which is
worked by asteam-engine, producing by a single
stroke eighty of these shanks in a minute.

Some buttons are cast in moulds, in shallow
boxes of sand; the shank is placed in the
middle of each mould, and becomes fixed there
as the metal cools. In this manner from six
to twelve dozen buttons are made, or cast, at a
time. White metal buttons are made of brass
and tin, and are whitened by boiling them with
grain tin and tartar. Plated buttons are made
from sheet-copper, covered with silver, or plated,
as will be presently described.

Buttons intended to be gilded are cut out of
sheet metal, as brass and zinc, or copper, by one
stroke of a fly-press. The edges are then rolled
between two pieces of steelin amachine, which is
worked very quickly by a boy; and the faces are



86 BUTTONS.

polished by the quick stroke of a steel hammer.
The shanks are next soldered on, several at a
time, and the buttons are then prepared for
gilding.

Buttons are gilded by putting them into a
strong acid liquid, in which are dissolved gold |
and quicksilver. The buttons are then taken
out, dried within a furnace, and burnished with
hard stones ata lathe. This gives them a rich
golden lustre, although so little gold is used in
the gilding, that less than five grains, when
mixed with the quicksilver, is made to cover a
gross, or one hundred and forty-four coat buttons.

The names of the buttons, and their makers,
are stamped on the back, as well as crests and
other figures on the front, by placing the buttons
between steel dies, on which the figures are cut
and letting a heavy weight fall upon the upper
die. In this manner are stamped the buttons of
servants’ liveries, and soldiers’ clothes; and a
manufacturer has many sets of dies for livery- |
buttons alone. The cutting of these dies is a
Separate trade from button-making.

Buttons are made of other substances besides
metal. Those which are covered with silk or
cloth consist of moulds, or thin round pieces of
hard wood or bone, with a hole in the middle.
They are cut by a machine from such chips of



BUTTONS.

87

bone as are too small for other purposes; and
a little girl at a machine can cut out many of
these moulds in a minute.

QUESTIONS.

Is not the making of buttons a
curious art ?

Where are metal buttons chiefly
made ?

How are the shanks of buttons
made ?

Can you tell me how some buttons
are cast ?

How are the shanks fixed in cast
buttons ?

Of what materials are white metal

How are plated buttons made ?

How are gilt buttons made?

How are the shanks fastened to
these buttons?

How are buttons gilded?

Is much gold used in gilding
buttons ?

How are names and figures
stamped on buttons ?

Are not buttons made of other
materials besides metal ?

buttons made ? | How are button-moulds cut?



Lesson XI. Silver; Plate.

SILVER and gold are called the ‘ precious metals,’
on account of their scarcity and the difficulty of
obtaining them; as well as the peculiar proper-
ties they possess. A small quantity of gold or
silver is readily taken in exchange for great
quantities of other metals; but neither silver nor
gold, in themselves, are so useful as iron, tin, or
copper, which metals contribute so greatly to
the conveniences and comforts of life. bh
Silver has been obtained from the lead mines



88 SILVER,

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of Great Britain; and it rarely happens that
lead is not mixed with some portion of silver.
Tt is found in various parts of Europe, as
Sweden, and Norway, France, and Spain. It
is dug in galleries under ground, some of which
are of very great length.

The richest silyer mines in the world are among
the mountains of the Andes, in South America.



SILVER—PLATE, e

Silver was once so plentiful in Mexico, that
tables, picture-frames, footstools, and jugs, in
common use, were sometimes made of solid
silver.

An extensive silver mine of South America is
represented in the print annexed to this lesson.
In the middle are seen the labourers employed
to carry up the ore, each of whom carries a
certain quantity strapped to his back; with this
load he climbs the rude ladders, which are
fixed nearly upright, and lead to the mouth of
the mine. |

Silver is found in the earth sometimes like
threads, sometimes in the form of leaves, and’
sometimes in large masses. It is rarely found
pure, being usually mixed with gold, mercury,
copper, tin, iron, or lead.

Silver is separated from these metals by wash-
ing and grinding the ore, and roasting it with
saltinafurnace. Itis then mixed with mercury,
or quicksilver, and put into the furnace, when
the mercury is dissolved by heat, and goes off
in vapour, and the pure silver remains. Silver
is extracted from lead by melting the ore in
the open air; the lead burns to ashes, and the
pure silver sinks. For most purposes, silver is
alloyed with copper, without which it would not
have sufficient hardness to sustain much wear.



90 SILVER—PLATE,

Silver is manufactured into articles for do-
mestic use: as tea-pots, drinking-mugs, waiters,
candlesticks, and spoons. Silver articles of
this kind are called plate. Tea-pots and mugs
are first shaped with a wooden mallet, then
beaten on a metal stake with a polished-steel
hammer, and finished by burnishing with steel
tools, stones, and leather.

The beautiful figures upon plate are raised
by chasing or embossing; that is, by striking
the silver with blunt steel punches in the shape
of the figures.

Much of the silver used in England is made
into forks and table and tea-spoons. These
articles are wrought upon the anvil, or cut out
of sheet-silver, and shaped by striking and
filing. The raised work is produced by placing
the articles, when red-hot, in a press, between
figures cut in steel. The marks upon the back
of silver articles are directed by law to be placed
there, in order to show that the silver is of the
proper fineness.

Great quantities of silver are coined into
crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences.
One pound of silver is coined into sixty-six
shillings.

Plated articles are those which are made of
common metal, as copper, and are coated with



SILVER—PLATE. 91

silver. The finest ware of this kind is made
at Sheffield, and is, on that account, called
“Sheffield plate.” Here costly breakfast, dinner,
and dessert services are made, and steel spoons
and forks are plated so as to be equal in ap-
pearance to silver. |

QF late years, too, some very clever imita-
tions of silver have been made by different
mixtures of the regulus of antimony, zinc, bis-
muth, and other metals, with lead. Spoons, forks,
candlesticks, and other articles for domestic use
have been made of these mixed metals, in very
elegant patterns, and they are now extensively
used in families where a taste for the elegances
of life prevail, but where silver articles of the
same kind could not be afforded.

Silver is prepared for plating as follows: —A
layer of silver is placed upon a layer of copper;
both are heated, and then flattened, by steel
rollers of tremendous power, into sheets the
thickness of writing-paper, or, if required, to
the thinness of silver-paper. This coating is
spread over the articles, which have been beaten
with a steel hammer, and polished.

A platea candlestick is made by first soldering
the tube or upright part, which is of copper,
coated with silver; the screws and slides are of
brass turned in a lathe, as in the nozzle or top of



92 SILVER—PLATE.

the candlestick, over which the silver coating is
folded: and the foot or bottom is stamped. The
raised ornaments are generally stamped hollow,
out of very thin silver; they are then filled with
soft solder, and fastened upon the candlestick
with a hot soldering iron.

The nicety of plate-working, or plating
articles, is truly astonishing. Although the
silver coatitig is extremely thin, it is spread
over the copper so dexterously, as to make the
article appear as if made of silver itself. Many
thousand pounds’ worth of silver are yearly
consumed in this mode of plating.

Great quantities of silver and gold are used
in making the cases of watches, the works or
inside of which are of fine brass and steel,
When therefore we speak of a silver watch, or
of a gold watch, we only speak of its case.

QUESTIONS,

Which are called
metals”? ?

Are silver and gold as useful as
other metals ?

In what countries is silver found ?

Where are the richest silver
mines ?

In what form is silyer found in
the earth ?

How is silver extracted from the
metals it is found mixed with ?

What domestic articles are made
of silver ?

What do we call plate ?

** precious

How is a silver spoon made ?

Is not much silver made into coin
or money ?

How many shillings are coined
from a pound of silver ?

How are the articles
Sheffield plate made ?

How is silver prepared for plat-
ing ? ‘

Can you tell me how a plated
candlestick is manufactured ?
Is not much silver used in plating ?
What do we mean when we

speak of a gold or silver watch ?

called





Lesson XII. Gold.

GOLD is the purest and most precious of all
metals. It is found in small quantities in
Europe; but it occurs abundantly in other
quarters of the earth. In some parts of Asia,
the domestic utensils, and ornaments of the
palaces of kings, are of solid gold; and, in
former times, the roofs and pillars of temples
were covered with plates of gold.

In some parts of Africa, gold is obtained by
digging up the soil, in others by collecting the
sand brought down by the rivers and torrents.
This is carefully washed by the negro women, in
large bowls, and the small grains of gold that are



94 GOLD.

met with, are preserved in quills. What is thus
collected is called gold-dust, and it passes from
hand to hand, in the purchase of salt, cloths, arms,
gunpowder, and other articles of European pro-
duce and manufacture, required by the negroes.

A certain portion of the coast of Africa has
been called the Gold Coast, chiefly with reference
to the great quantities of that precious metal
brought there by the natives to exchange for
Kuropean commodities. But gold is found in
the greatest abundance in South America,
where also the negroes search for it in the sands
and beds of rivers, as shown in the engraving.

In those countries where silver and gold are
found in abundance, the people are by no means
so happy as they are in countries where silver
and gold are but rarely found.

Gold is found mixed with a little copper or
silver, and is then called native gold. It is
separated by melting, and then refined until it
is perfectly pure. Gold is too soft to be used
by itself, so that it is mixed with copper or
silver, to increase its hardness.

The making of gold-plate resembles the ma-
nufacture of silver-ware.

Articles of jewellery, such as brooches, pins,
and rings, are rarely made of pure gold. They
usually consist of some mixture of metal with a



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describe
'43100' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
029d1794009535c1e0ac92f4a1890851
b688ccd7dcc52bff8c6fc79f9a7abf4868968617
'2011-08-18T17:08:48-04:00'
describe
'6946991' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ead9d10ebab9b41a89c771c3fe5dfd98
5516fd95f7cdb0a141791c0162a289313a229ba7
'2011-08-18T17:10:46-04:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7cac303f33e8410621da74913babde24
6735dbf50fd709bbdc947c9988bf9b0f1c08bc70
'2011-08-18T16:59:51-04:00'
describe
'12455' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
2f8fcee5e51a5f5f85c2cf8b858606d3
01e22e0d63ffc66d957aadea12a4985f1e599d34
'2011-08-18T16:56:49-04:00'
describe
'906920' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
b6058be7922fe19f1ff0a4f7d0156d7e
5c77c390762b7c4fb2d4c04efaa76f880ad3920a
'2011-08-18T16:59:09-04:00'
describe
'91991' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
08a9ad1463531e20f57d1dc4fdc9268c
235c95df0be3838a7ed45d2e3dbcd265fa9ea4a4
'2011-08-18T17:12:15-04:00'
describe
'31869' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGM' 'sip-files00010.pro'
4c7c637bbf498059bf36aee7969500d9
5e669ed8259326c94768d60060738afcf5477c8a
'2011-08-18T16:47:15-04:00'
describe
'33243' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGN' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
d2ef9d1cffb8a62d736ac48321afdfc4
5dd368d02c37b1bf6ef6768d6e22796ff96b0ffa
'2011-08-18T17:09:15-04:00'
describe
'7264629' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGO' 'sip-files00010.tif'
b4fabb78f73fa107b8e35fb0e286e17b
9ac1b0867b8fb701b6a9901e3d8993cf26aa8060
'2011-08-18T17:03:40-04:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGP' 'sip-files00010.txt'
05c4abe0d041f97054af6d5ba1970f6b
bb659ce7c2a550486c82bf2121d93c7fabf14b9f
'2011-08-18T16:58:27-04:00'
describe
'10312' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGQ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
924755057573553e542bd71a58c7b8b1
7f47130ac64bf81ac32fa4b0a11e7b31f32e5936
'2011-08-18T16:57:30-04:00'
describe
'883963' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
de6e457daee16c987cc7e762a04ca290
2503b555d84347964bca24c4d0933ef6c0d69845
'2011-08-18T16:58:54-04:00'
describe
'106523' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
2bf67debfa5dd05e3ae8b4e3c28b2aae
8c938ae66484884c90ce139446ccdd417e7f22fb
'2011-08-18T16:47:57-04:00'
describe
'18235' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
04b173a81b0a8aaf1f5e2d3ac12de4cc
9315ff6c8d0eceb75589b848231ed13d62def5d6
'2011-08-18T17:02:01-04:00'
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
867b4f44cda57b95314346288107d760
35bce6e9d5815905d0159b1bc4956f338b5e7f15
describe
'7080347' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
b490f71d0f514db466a55890b4479052
e55c2fe9900e9bda8488e3e392cd9ba76390ee31
'2011-08-18T17:01:47-04:00'
describe
'756' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGW' 'sip-files00011.txt'
1b6aaed69f7cdeb03735c6b2021edd1e
9b6ae83c636a9c7ec201033b01493d1227a55bce
'2011-08-18T17:05:09-04:00'
describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGX' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
7edeadc263a7b78b4f28387b43ff6401
7f0474af769fd30f2dc8a3386ac3f3a0905362fa
'2011-08-18T16:49:03-04:00'
describe
'896980' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGY' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d2e18244c7049f9eefb939592f1a30d9
ea3fbf6fa0eb867bd43838b4f9c9a568abcd3571
'2011-08-18T17:03:59-04:00'
describe
'112312' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRGZ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
baf535df37de354beb6671a4174172e6
0e5dd24a6e584c4d0825780fde592231a6e34755
'2011-08-18T17:10:17-04:00'
describe
'33527' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHA' 'sip-files00012.pro'
28f13211e932acb365372d0485ecf1a2
abec3bdece7a8aeabbf2af81d5bb63bd0844398d
'2011-08-18T16:53:57-04:00'
describe
'42863' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHB' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
57397279be6f6c2b1dc200ea9a164ddb
e1251198457e2b744e4e8c8e3a087877af2afde2
'2011-08-18T16:53:36-04:00'
describe
'7184885' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
715eddcafe4b3494899b98f4c8c9e982
e88077383ac7eb8362d5c45eb3d90131b652bf24
'2011-08-18T17:09:17-04:00'
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHD' 'sip-files00012.txt'
61a1b11e83f6b54ff25796bf9f8aaec2
4c62cd42a918501f9776387a354bac3b7a315397
'2011-08-18T17:02:08-04:00'
describe
'12331' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHE' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d26d33ccfe1d34e06faf79dca991adae
aa9bd32a8b9a9a57e3692891a3d61eaffc742c7d
'2011-08-18T17:12:25-04:00'
describe
'917105' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHF' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
2e938ea23bf9853cde3823d3c97a872a
f49523fc7852cd486ffc8ac803e4c18947c6583b
'2011-08-18T17:00:05-04:00'
describe
'117332' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHG' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
43dd0507ff12dd2c774ea892a416af5f
61460d10a89ccff8332bb6ecf41d09efe5871bd7
'2011-08-18T16:56:32-04:00'
describe
'33631' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHH' 'sip-files00013.pro'
3e7e34701cc2eb2c2e39b829a0b63b6b
420658f9bf86aa3d89ce0dc9d65d3562a5f0c0b6
'2011-08-18T16:45:22-04:00'
describe
'43839' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHI' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0dd72f045eada76dd993df7bd2507ad0
6da4f0ffb89c7254a2013490cf1e2f254493776d
'2011-08-18T17:00:23-04:00'
describe
'7345915' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHJ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
40e400f1fb531eb515999c3eb8012051
d2ae0a3b221bcfb66d81515e1540389a7d2e6a59
'2011-08-18T16:55:18-04:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHK' 'sip-files00013.txt'
098c667e8c0482410795f09f62df2276
ab9c87dbc8f3f28c1973f41b0462c36e8f43b982
'2011-08-18T17:08:04-04:00'
describe
'12144' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHL' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
cd5e22ca72c8e3be9b47e120ff92faeb
d1a93b033824f257f2dd9c98ba69a5020c8f25cb
'2011-08-18T16:48:00-04:00'
describe
'905252' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHM' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c86a4fa5ea49f585c81d8af278e9d322
0e8e4a882a374f556fe7ce45a1a7014e07878657
describe
'99672' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHN' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c392c02d53b60f0afda6911cf5eb8ad0
cb9f0a51bb03d681547be8233e263743ffce5bd5
'2011-08-18T16:54:30-04:00'
describe
'32230' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHO' 'sip-files00014.pro'
2507e8d58bc063656970343a95a6f3cb
0efb040128888f4a56cde7119d275be8eac1519f
'2011-08-18T17:04:02-04:00'
describe
'36867' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
9c66a0e2843812378276526a2d931683
ccb4787cd0c1c8e01022e6b39e2b8ae0acc7c3b5
'2011-08-18T17:07:58-04:00'
describe
'7250873' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d23f3663303540db7d2015aaba4831ff
fd85080168722a5edd9bb770128c5766b3da686a
'2011-08-18T17:08:14-04:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHR' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ec019b624564607b234a5a3ef51ea6e2
1cd924a316fba8caa95616f7ad972c550f2769c7
describe
'11013' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHS' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
1047b779b451a5f4e68985466907362b
b956c92420826accafb9ec28e383b059eac17c77
'2011-08-18T16:56:24-04:00'
describe
'889412' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHT' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
68b603aa72a046f1d2da409bdb1c10d3
0549c1f4a56d62f66dffa5e8f4531434a117bd69
'2011-08-18T16:42:07-04:00'
describe
'103918' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHU' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
a29ef968c320a86f3f31690719efdc5f
f9330267d5f10ec6d0eb82e4c4e2f34476e5b0ef
'2011-08-18T16:47:58-04:00'
describe
'31175' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHV' 'sip-files00015.pro'
eec0edf6d130e89ec33490152a04a596
f81145f00ef94e3b0958c67b7c7ee4054c247aae
'2011-08-18T16:43:20-04:00'
describe
'44746' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHW' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
8bae6abbc1fd347f32a1af3eeb0e262f
d51d7b7d2f891a7b441290c413fd92a6009cbe1a
'2011-08-18T16:58:32-04:00'
describe
'7124079' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHX' 'sip-files00015.tif'
870e9b0eac81fee7c2e4c3869200d7d7
0da412d9cb980974e13b5d8fb60ca7bc3d71f328
'2011-08-18T17:09:19-04:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHY' 'sip-files00015.txt'
77e36b65103e8a47879b6b151c999528
9dd43386e48efdfd8695c1b42191d82a03ca0501
'2011-08-18T16:55:37-04:00'
describe
'11681' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRHZ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
44d4d57ea6d1bdeb36e6406c981d840e
f0a94417a9cf53452fcb9a5f0a5718d300a77b9b
'2011-08-18T16:57:15-04:00'
describe
'893050' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIA' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
454d055f52f8d188e654d0ce13ebaca3
3925251d84cc9e1d3e6a3693f3d9255d90db413f
'2011-08-18T17:05:59-04:00'
describe
'109338' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIB' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
c78486d5b577d56213ecd7a5500a76df
6a1819df5412f33e4042da32a132e6c19603bbf2
'2011-08-18T17:11:05-04:00'
describe
'32667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIC' 'sip-files00016.pro'
506b816f9bc61fd831f9dd093f6a7e7f
8884f92e7ce1c365a97eb817e753c4a85301b743
'2011-08-18T17:05:37-04:00'
describe
'40053' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRID' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
ed021051efeccb0d6aa20496c0b35900
1a5313bc05c6d8f6cefac2952bb436b1c6181705
'2011-08-18T17:08:38-04:00'
describe
'7153629' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
8ea0c8dc739bd934356f2981b1c688a5
e58849f0bd9462f03b1005868d86cad802d987f0
'2011-08-18T16:59:05-04:00'
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIF' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b24c5aa000b7bd304b8b78b70763b1ec
0c84530f5f3ba03e8629cc700de923acfc4cfbd8
'2011-08-18T16:59:31-04:00'
describe
'12116' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIG' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
77ed0733cafbe366f1eb8290b83a58ba
0114417a7dc91215713df62f1fa94742fcd56786
'2011-08-18T16:55:32-04:00'
describe
'900215' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIH' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
5f4ac0ecfc4f0789627ae8ec77c1c284
ca7891e1ff0a3d3c78e06cc98826baf868d6c8c0
describe
'108073' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRII' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
473f9d45c970e36fd16a5bffd6e4f8f6
f4d5360ec3fc750f0d9ee56c38fd3db43fc9dbbc
'2011-08-18T17:00:53-04:00'
describe
'30923' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIJ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
514e76ea534725157f45d4cc3afd46bc
c68ca9266260560f83e3390b586741aeb4ffc833
'2011-08-18T16:58:28-04:00'
describe
'40592' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIK' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
eb666f2b529214695635a4a8cbc98724
66e3c277a9cced9e70c8515c1f108292bf358f5a
'2011-08-18T16:59:35-04:00'
describe
'7211209' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIL' 'sip-files00017.tif'
09db656abb33756f33291fc6b75dc908
03c94272f10dc43df33cc5839cad59caeb3efefd
'2011-08-18T17:01:36-04:00'
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIM' 'sip-files00017.txt'
444f922562ddfbf46b0233664dfcd880
b320975e969740096b89ecb9f8ba4efa4db6f92a
'2011-08-18T16:57:04-04:00'
describe
'12146' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIN' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d536f8b089ffce5ecda9db3064d9701e
a0a58629d3adcd272f227e532edc609e94f1c80a
'2011-08-18T17:04:57-04:00'
describe
'906276' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIO' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
57e662096957c9c9649857fc49c91272
35bf0348c8137337278615f6b20f2a20549b2e8a
'2011-08-18T16:59:43-04:00'
describe
'106697' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIP' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
78549a0dc80c1f66b81125ba3cab3ab8
f9790609badc4140d581ab7a688b402bf3b02299
'2011-08-18T16:56:50-04:00'
describe
'34890' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIQ' 'sip-files00018.pro'
ed35b2b1992b0969fa1b9f99bc2e5eed
d18708d2b88ec3a5d55f6f254978e7caa2e38b0c
'2011-08-18T16:57:54-04:00'
describe
'40456' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIR' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
64637bc30419ce6ddcd52dadfb91964b
b35fc84bb0aff8e1d8b51207484db889df8a7a86
'2011-08-18T17:05:47-04:00'
describe
'7259107' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIS' 'sip-files00018.tif'
bfcad21098a1ad662ccf58a78fd75a5e
aa83c2a8ae32f55b66182445317c344670522613
'2011-08-18T16:59:44-04:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
6c47006bd718763ed630d7dd5472568f
f42fb8251ac4e9a81880317f2511b89704089ef2
'2011-08-18T17:03:21-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'11759' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
db5aed1316c25f279551dd5d1527c128
1929c931e9b105a5c00883f086f3bc867ab955ed
'2011-08-18T17:03:25-04:00'
describe
'909317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIV' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
df080e90a1da68435fcd31c263b545f9
104b87aaa0e4cedf1d1e9650237306c0c87a0cf2
'2011-08-18T17:04:23-04:00'
describe
'109159' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIW' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e5497bb20d7f1f77c75ccd13cae172e4
e244d80842be1acc496c4104f44c3768729b49b2
'2011-08-18T17:00:19-04:00'
describe
'19850' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIX' 'sip-files00019.pro'
ea6df2245f7ba42c742bf2fc9b585673
b44e29e707517e531c74586c0156d6d77c725174
describe
'36793' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
5004eed6bc8fa9c8cebd4ab0868278d9
2cac6c27fae200f318bcf75e79ae3c9813f62f26
'2011-08-18T16:59:08-04:00'
describe
'7284239' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRIZ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
2584cc2aecaea608ca46d81b7c616bbd
c84a9ec054b655d5b0286dc19fd69960274c997c
'2011-08-18T17:10:53-04:00'
describe
'785' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJA' 'sip-files00019.txt'
588e3f2c359ec91a0dba37f5e578cbd2
c7268968a823a675edc1aef10fbfea6798cbb4ab
'2011-08-18T16:51:57-04:00'
describe
'10783' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJB' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
5e3687ad6885b4d3b35350b141fe4280
be2c53878ed1572a093cd95c711554338f4b380a
'2011-08-18T17:09:24-04:00'
describe
'886195' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJC' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
83aae2625d71c9fbef1d2cef010391ab
09dd531b3902c0cdbd83a27313112012457ba075
'2011-08-18T17:12:49-04:00'
describe
'114835' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJD' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
ce424ab2c509d2b0f730bb61398e4956
15bdd154ddc3d5cc257eaa80438f3a9a1d00dd33
'2011-08-18T16:55:01-04:00'
describe
'32637' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJE' 'sip-files00020.pro'
96d833140f95a265ead6801d0b76f5c7
96cbb16a7f8c319c966e986007efa4efb90a2df7
describe
'43497' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJF' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
b95640d207f854bd684712d0dc70b810
da8505dbc3aa4be2371f3f4af3fdcea2f439f42b
describe
'7096093' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJG' 'sip-files00020.tif'
6e4233c32209417e2bfb82cd61048c6f
e9ab9a13ae6452a23d226555240831ae17788bdc
'2011-08-18T17:02:03-04:00'
describe
'1314' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJH' 'sip-files00020.txt'
b1f70f3e2d75335f34299ba844c9c8f8
0b729ba5d92349a2566b2fe56419ee11f8b2c829
'2011-08-18T16:56:57-04:00'
describe
'13060' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJI' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
6974eb39e33cce66f30e5ac044a8e04c
0e1eb55327257bfa0ed26b5833e280b4cd6654ab
'2011-08-18T17:10:39-04:00'
describe
'900885' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJJ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
0cf5159a6b9960c855bbf041995dc637
628a732cf3e7a8f1730affc8652f3ad83808f07d
'2011-08-18T17:05:49-04:00'
describe
'116404' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJK' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
4714a492cb18dc7e284a89705904d656
fe030ab951d5645ac749803c7ce28e9952fb90b8
'2011-08-18T16:55:17-04:00'
describe
'32170' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJL' 'sip-files00021.pro'
074174e20937c1ed61019e35c1209714
5025ab34c2cb06e99b2c35f71342e1c469ec764f
'2011-08-18T17:09:45-04:00'
describe
'44950' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJM' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
2bddbd69d97a01da3588bb35c9cf2038
3a3423a36c5b3199aaa8bb18cd5bca84d3c0fd75
'2011-08-18T17:01:40-04:00'
describe
'7215739' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJN' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9f30fe5d65b79bc1fa4afb889a0868e7
72031dc33aceba47f703906b690ed81004793e8f
'2011-08-18T16:59:49-04:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJO' 'sip-files00021.txt'
7475b2baeb363554209ca96dbabed93a
4c066f08bd7333eca6b0e73aebbab58f3c6a3df4
'2011-08-18T16:46:02-04:00'
describe
'12567' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJP' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
7e2c7e7dc2d98d387e64f0949f9178bc
9c77dc2fc6995337276a2c0224d0fd45e09fa21b
'2011-08-18T16:56:59-04:00'
describe
'865427' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
79c3b5fb5b4d3b78a4baf9fa22d7b8b5
ee4b3d0636baff09e35a42c3a89d9af7e86443f6
'2011-08-18T16:59:23-04:00'
describe
'121992' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
d460451be264312692f38dba9df702b1
46ba2904cd9e73e6510d9d6a3882f54e2bcf9ee8
'2011-08-18T16:46:42-04:00'
describe
'34185' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJS' 'sip-files00022.pro'
6a4bed516f505b8e0a4f4608fcc325d3
ba9eb70451ecfcf2d7fec076d7318d277a93e590
'2011-08-18T17:00:51-04:00'
describe
'45830' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJT' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
4e5b41cdb98e6726e7201df4d52e98b6
f852a5359411be6e180cef092d0a14a8974b8867
'2011-08-18T16:57:46-04:00'
describe
'6929869' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJU' 'sip-files00022.tif'
04b00885af0b9a7c955354fc455345a8
11259a3ba55424c9d0bedae228bddbdc8fb05f6b
'2011-08-18T17:09:29-04:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJV' 'sip-files00022.txt'
b10cfb3ac31dfaeb6c29a16fc7f509ee
22d642d3888efaa10f380340b4d333d24606181f
'2011-08-18T16:55:14-04:00'
describe
'14257' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJW' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
b9e56accc037f25be5ef233fb0ab82c5
7a3cc8f5ff21fb2b203bd3fdb4bf7180addc2a6e
'2011-08-18T17:08:29-04:00'
describe
'877124' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJX' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
14815593ba1b732f2b54fdcede68c630
1e0f2778f9d7e75fd811154a8bc27d24820cecbd
'2011-08-18T17:11:09-04:00'
describe
'91417' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJY' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
0fe8e5dcf8edc0f8fb9280a83b2bb6d6
1dff079ee6a2807f7354934f3958d77129775d01
'2011-08-18T16:47:03-04:00'
describe
'18325' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRJZ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
6a9a68d0ebf05de1e7cbc6d8498852c7
83d3439e99e2e1089520667451875216f17f708a
'2011-08-18T17:09:48-04:00'
describe
'29098' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKA' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
96c2ba5ab23af184b439bb4fcc77cd08
11baa3da4b8f21d62eb9528d8e7258f7668ff6fd
'2011-08-18T16:56:54-04:00'
describe
'7025595' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKB' 'sip-files00023.tif'
d5704c7e7c37e4037b6294069e00fd0c
aa9f59c082478c6db92dad8c348929b6c8ec4182
'2011-08-18T17:02:23-04:00'
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKC' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5ac0295adc0441052d5b6b5ee86c1896
a750baeb635b1e8002eac8d777d8e7aa98ad68a0
'2011-08-18T16:58:04-04:00'
describe
'8500' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKD' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f0a6511775beb56c2e8e4f444541d5da
b7903296e42c609be43b6da07549227ae67f4c2f
'2011-08-18T16:43:33-04:00'
describe
'874904' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
484bbeb25112e4a9670cb1669cd19113
889f0ea13fdde33afa2f68c8d446490350a51954
'2011-08-18T16:54:08-04:00'
describe
'107221' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
2c531fb6237acc45a84c1949290b657f
a04a4745e91cc3aaaeb19e548d7b55bbe3adeb8e
describe
'28728' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKG' 'sip-files00024.pro'
7fc3351bd7694c79d0b62f8f1d01500d
e86de42f2d7bc89f7fd212ac651ac596a6033da6
'2011-08-18T17:07:22-04:00'
describe
'39635' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
307bb217690cc32aaecc4d3eaff00b57
2324b2e72fa5765e439458a2e8cdc300f8b1247e
'2011-08-18T17:00:47-04:00'
describe
'7005767' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKI' 'sip-files00024.tif'
6144d7c936e30136f34b48f8f26e675b
8a294f49835e0dc0c14b9615b4fd26d343564fe1
'2011-08-18T17:01:01-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKJ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
772ffd00d4e25f67f6628045ca76d79b
5707886271b05aa8aa55aca399a0afbbdb5bdf14
'2011-08-18T16:53:51-04:00'
describe
'11911' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
3e18b540e15d57314b91a91432cee1a0
5e276527c4430d496e50c643b31d92d9502f330d
'2011-08-18T16:53:22-04:00'
describe
'882005' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKL' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
babd793caa4db05fd210accb15329e47
862351a635fc0c5444c5cb6107afb8ab385a16f9
'2011-08-18T16:51:54-04:00'
describe
'120649' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKM' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8532e407832fe0b5cfab10cb8bad12d7
b3a7b27fd913b69e5b564851aa2fe289f328bcc0
'2011-08-18T17:12:01-04:00'
describe
'33381' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fa22c385979cf7a70d961e89e35ce41e
4c6d9f044748e9b72e46ffcb5a8d9103716bbc67
'2011-08-18T17:00:06-04:00'
describe
'45891' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKO' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b89f8137e560ffc3c85fba57544483f3
8939eb78a6475df747d919901f1b1685c3929c19
'2011-08-18T16:54:17-04:00'
describe
'7064905' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
15d590e592ed832598a9df067ffb0d01
90240ba56d91658dbf971496f1f520eee79565ce
'2011-08-18T16:54:56-04:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKQ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
87c141c246886aed0a81ef2b47661d3e
066f63b6bf2231c2f13c4fa1bf4fb89cc8d1154f
'2011-08-18T17:11:59-04:00'
describe
'13299' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
78e331ee8f77a9c7a860648c4463bbfe
38078dcf613ba1d38654cd073f285d57e4b60b81
'2011-08-18T16:54:21-04:00'
describe
'865803' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKS' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9d18b8d5b3e8dc9b78dff2c2575c82ea
d6d56b6fc4bfb42dd018ca6e17fd2a9c1713de4e
'2011-08-18T17:12:33-04:00'
describe
'114882' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
014aafd7e304c0015a2d394ef71ee032
74976389c145dcef763443091648bd787440b9ce
'2011-08-18T16:57:35-04:00'
describe
'32563' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKU' 'sip-files00026.pro'
229f2e302fb8982c4feb5875838fe0d9
f23d4a6a0655a86534503c17e8a7977643785762
'2011-08-18T16:47:53-04:00'
describe
'41781' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKV' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a81190a781a8978a7751774617cc4723
96efb42c5dc05a6e6325ced3d712348c214ea15f
'2011-08-18T17:07:38-04:00'
describe
'6932855' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKW' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b566d8e277e0afd34011b3fef2bca0a3
17df6a37044e1ddc001d2c8a0669965eec9b2c07
'2011-08-18T17:05:13-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKX' 'sip-files00026.txt'
aae54a9f49b957d1b3659008a2ed92e8
6e738d8e515a45ba4d0680469c4f032db61668fa
'2011-08-18T16:42:20-04:00'
describe
'12836' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKY' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
59c7a87891e305d11c3af0d804b256ff
3e34352db9fe9006701b9afa091d49e1d304f9f3
'2011-08-18T17:08:40-04:00'
describe
'877096' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRKZ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
b4f14acd189d29f5663e20674d7f4c9d
10af34a069f780867f4cc766baa72d1850d8ea0c
'2011-08-18T17:09:37-04:00'
describe
'110566' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLA' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
82a6683c7294139c33051360d3dd1756
c38f4e07343e50169ea344e4bd91c8e60b355055
'2011-08-18T17:00:44-04:00'
describe
'36857' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLB' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0f2b3ab000cdb3600872caa0422a3be1
4e32af94302f08b77b0c69949542fccf4f33e774
'2011-08-18T17:10:49-04:00'
describe
'40174' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLC' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
24b20a5d01dbc23e2191df52b51c793b
abfa749bd42bea44c57c995219ea958250a544d0
'2011-08-18T17:10:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
dd0ee70707a37647a8f52926e4e27e22
c673d481f437fbcb754ff4fc79fdeb6e2f2a9190
'2011-08-18T16:58:17-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLE' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4d2cee7060fdfd773c8ece96c28177e0
9c1076fc7051b9ffcac4b6e3024724b87a9e41ee
'2011-08-18T17:01:45-04:00'
describe
'11816' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLF' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
5a47bbb2ff076b12b31a0586eef92620
789f6ad97fdb8b5ee944b7f676b3016d87a4625d
'2011-08-18T16:42:18-04:00'
describe
'884831' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLG' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
5c2ed31db397f2f68c11cb70f798a74f
6f635994ca198da2146a483f219d9350e4da60c9
'2011-08-18T17:08:35-04:00'
describe
'105067' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLH' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
72073b11369f204407a5ab01e8d69e16
b498a55c17ff4c9963bb8240a8a7d039e9065e33
'2011-08-18T16:55:03-04:00'
describe
'28976' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLI' 'sip-files00028.pro'
aef33011045b2777d39f3b6ecb464017
58e42f17ed52d50eb6e6710a7e50763ff4c414da
'2011-08-18T17:11:00-04:00'
describe
'38604' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLJ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
54336049523a8c801e900cfa271ab791
115480f72af65c829ca8fe4f4f34e4b9d3398b1d
'2011-08-18T16:55:30-04:00'
describe
'7085329' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLK' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1d3ff32fbe52dad455e24f87f72b8840
8f063ddb9c8e509765935960ae9f4a4ebdcba7af
'2011-08-18T16:48:11-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLL' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b51f2187f7e2869e10cb60f1726a1f7d
1774deb981c27eba8f7ac38fb232b2efdebebdcf
'2011-08-18T17:02:30-04:00'
describe
'12178' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLM' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
6f3c7959d893260a4813b510954c372d
af64984157c2f0ad96c1292d60a35209c0e27ad0
describe
'873909' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6f9f98813593b1e044ede1c9b02efad7
249cd6ad3e44bba8b88c4eba33df2ab863a8e77a
'2011-08-18T16:44:26-04:00'
describe
'113670' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLO' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
2bc863bc521e9c56567b23985092ac64
5db5b44ab8d121dd3403756d3dc48683d5a12357
'2011-08-18T17:06:30-04:00'
describe
'31978' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLP' 'sip-files00029.pro'
06628839ce936f4e898e44fbd140e74d
063638c2bfe27a82fd180e6b32f97ec35b342ea0
'2011-08-18T17:02:43-04:00'
describe
'43219' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLQ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
65135141ff8ce9b369bcb04deb35a7ad
bdc5258585e526e79ec4ab3acd8b8e0f290c0612
'2011-08-18T17:04:35-04:00'
describe
'6997741' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLR' 'sip-files00029.tif'
282973e11aeee9c0a07d3b401b1456be
46be7ca2825b67f20e4724ede8fb2568b38a492b
'2011-08-18T16:52:36-04:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLS' 'sip-files00029.txt'
99a8af0f14e036b2f8b220f0a8fadee7
1d88892f09c0462c2bc3394e9010d6705315456a
'2011-08-18T17:02:35-04:00'
describe
'13886' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLT' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
16cb84ce511ea491978c5c0f844ec3c7
2c76df8fc957c02653a3670a5e95c40981a2da9a
'2011-08-18T16:43:18-04:00'
describe
'899333' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLU' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
beb703c7adca6d06fb8685adcd162a9a
7951b41c88015af2080a26a1b42ed0386bf62341
describe
'97109' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLV' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
549c516efc6b895468d409dab507fafe
bd86eb1e02c5ec77f8adffdbbf695fd516e82d9d
'2011-08-18T17:12:35-04:00'
describe
'29956' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLW' 'sip-files00030.pro'
964c52bbcd5b8428b17633c3c82002ba
65b5728492c439f56b94d2252370cf5c0b857022
'2011-08-18T17:09:35-04:00'
describe
'35692' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLX' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
322829a92763e809f4846ab2bd268278
cb631502e74616e1421ec42c102e1d672dc8cd31
'2011-08-18T17:12:22-04:00'
describe
'7203503' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
773350d0d18267858ac00aa0248618cd
23ba00b2c9878913092f2ba60ddf05ee7544c4ba
'2011-08-18T17:00:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRLZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4613b6439dcd3b6e9bbd11809307ee5f
ba442d88c16b14356ec68b748e15905d4854df6e
'2011-08-18T17:07:24-04:00'
describe
'10978' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMA' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
4537f401b37bfbefa8c566b91a9aa6fa
649e170c78ab4a0e791b98fa836045cd0b53dcc0
'2011-08-18T17:10:20-04:00'
describe
'886938' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMB' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
295eee65edb672d0899c9957ed8c8b41
1bc253de3b43579e48029d0fb90e078e24870e9f
'2011-08-18T17:07:40-04:00'
describe
'109656' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
9dddab5c24b9d9594a1268b5741bebb0
5f2424de6a4f16f3423f466d87cd183fa601de0c
'2011-08-18T16:47:04-04:00'
describe
'28934' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMD' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b6860e0903f02714c7cb854d9344779d
c1cc6c0b66b9547f8edfd94334b43106354b2b2a
'2011-08-18T16:51:05-04:00'
describe
'40007' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRME' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
95911797e9788f6752c831c7bd4e7269
191b28cba0e9502889d69eb0ba83137c03c78d3f
'2011-08-18T17:08:54-04:00'
describe
'7104207' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMF' 'sip-files00031.tif'
455abd6e0cc67edaa0635b3f730dc4c6
a88489047eb97f97efa741c79651c8b3334d41cf
'2011-08-18T17:08:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
775294d952228100be414c775245825c
fee6e93b5261fb6d34ee82845d38cf67ce8846ad
'2011-08-18T16:54:25-04:00'
describe
'12128' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMH' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
280a17c6560434f7885860dce122f850
b254785685de1a27ab04c787ee703b6cabba024c
'2011-08-18T16:54:46-04:00'
describe
'886187' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMI' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
5df200d54fbf6e052e3adf25253cd61d
0ae51a2b83df124b9991f4ed18a455361d0d68d1
'2011-08-18T16:58:42-04:00'
describe
'120107' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
d15ac8f21e012ca4d7bb1675d7991154
268ff92b76c2f02baf1a1d42cd85ef0468a0f9f8
'2011-08-18T17:02:20-04:00'
describe
'33283' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMK' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9f1b69f223882fa7fb1434f332290a43
ec3eb92fe6df11a80c7f5eb218edbba1e1a3f320
describe
'43779' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRML' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
965569e8b406d6d2722b4331ba7fdf36
6b2e0865f8547706d4eec75740e071216ebecc15
'2011-08-18T17:08:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMM' 'sip-files00032.tif'
673dddcb0c46b54ca94510209cabf9a1
89df17e23fa75f851d5e94a852956d5e1617b1f2
'2011-08-18T17:07:48-04:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMN' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7dcd9d24779b05a678f5f2736a6bca94
b83c9013dbda93a5114d67fb49321b918ffcfad3
'2011-08-18T17:06:02-04:00'
describe
'12880' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMO' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
5a552b1575ce174cb5608da7c8170aaf
ecb72d1779b2f1a842243090e8fc981a0e9edfbd
'2011-08-18T17:09:00-04:00'
describe
'898716' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMP' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
0a3c1c488b24b018c7b60e2d05355d2f
c67cd98782e4ffaf3fe4ae3551b90850d0f6b274
'2011-08-18T16:52:35-04:00'
describe
'102667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMQ' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
e3845e22bc02291b5aca4da1476e7ebf
1190a3e781be8bd069fff3de03c8e6f8c26bd221
'2011-08-18T17:03:20-04:00'
describe
'32591' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMR' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2a8a798dc7b2b648f02151a292b74160
eb9d2dff026bd60246491e901d01b07e5eaa379d
'2011-08-18T17:01:25-04:00'
describe
'37596' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMS' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
a6afb152c5bec4d0003b2884fa7c24e1
15eb4d4f4776f95a953b5fabf3ec145e44b21e1d
'2011-08-18T17:03:53-04:00'
describe
'7198831' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
777453cf38b7f28559d979b4242fb687
914cf8a16ff5736ada1dd04d100a0ca3ca25968b
'2011-08-18T17:00:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMU' 'sip-files00033.txt'
a40546666a8c55d13cb96468c2f6a6a4
2242c72a7190b9a4db84547dba65c10315a49107
describe
'11569' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMV' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
38dc71580b79c20127b8790a05c3561f
a5edfa4aff15e005362a90dc1dbe49426892854c
'2011-08-18T17:07:07-04:00'
describe
'880225' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMW' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
3ac317600985e4e2de1861f0f4eeb46a
3e9eac4f5c4c34d9a4ba2ca475cbac89684a0879
describe
'123699' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMX' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a698e6ac78284105f953edeb9bf67ddd
957fd9e5c61264e4ea11c971e9bbc9c2855e4ef5
'2011-08-18T17:07:18-04:00'
describe
'18594' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMY' 'sip-files00034.pro'
93d8f023e6a2612727943255beb859a6
9c5101b720a3d0abe759f528a48218abbb02120a
'2011-08-18T16:42:14-04:00'
describe
'42679' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRMZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6c00a0bfb0447034f17c028ade94cbdc
581d80143b0c21787afc1c6a80b20fc3753cbba8
'2011-08-18T17:10:02-04:00'
describe
'7050457' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNA' 'sip-files00034.tif'
d5d924f57f869e6c911de76be3fa348f
30bec0a3826c8698f54afb5b758208271c7e0ac5
'2011-08-18T17:10:24-04:00'
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNB' 'sip-files00034.txt'
9ec5c8070f6623279dd91e6ed7ed76fb
c1cf35e75cb4ec11d5defb692cd7fd42ffb1733f
'2011-08-18T16:46:27-04:00'
describe
'11416' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
57fa69ba3c6677ebdd2dfdfd29e9b69b
29bded1621e1fd278562a4f8f583ecca77b972de
'2011-08-18T16:47:05-04:00'
describe
'885193' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRND' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
671b0e5ed4150182951e1bb1cf285be5
1bc56a82a7ede5b5b007092fff673c3a46cc9f18
'2011-08-18T17:11:06-04:00'
describe
'124603' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
a94065d5029e4f35e94b058435dfb093
1ff3baac994f5e9e928f1dbcc44548a069c67f4c
'2011-08-18T17:08:58-04:00'
describe
'33582' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNF' 'sip-files00035.pro'
51c29783acf8de8a0a60860df9a7f465
097c55eff8fb2f00acebcf0bb60a8d5cb67201bc
'2011-08-18T17:10:18-04:00'
describe
'48473' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNG' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
953c9d2d9f9dc1b7788459d68bb6c642
49b1ceba218eca4b88e0074fca4e537606ddfab0
'2011-08-18T17:11:01-04:00'
describe
'7090119' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNH' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2816379c31a6a4a580f8a1ec9609bf63
d6493fb65f77348a07544786b5db9a23a67a590a
'2011-08-18T17:10:15-04:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNI' 'sip-files00035.txt'
c0d447b2604d9e2f4ca9be4b8ffb244e
4058c0922ab39280eae991e55de94eeda85d8851
'2011-08-18T16:58:09-04:00'
describe
'13108' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNJ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
9b7c83dbd7dbf862318b10af12a62ef4
92f72c560bd746058af67c36b05ffa8cb93d76c2
'2011-08-18T17:00:57-04:00'
describe
'889423' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNK' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
fa062af0ab9ba312dd25b9f76647cdfe
4f40d48e60bf96b4d6da616d4dfc326671a98b7c
'2011-08-18T17:00:39-04:00'
describe
'117570' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNL' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
40c43992233cbce67ba1126870972cbd
f5ebbb3e3b80ee04631923065fdc579a0caaae39
'2011-08-18T16:58:56-04:00'
describe
'32017' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNM' 'sip-files00036.pro'
32854545ae03377e763c3ed80292d9a1
ffdb5f68adb326f250096eb494284874e48bd3b5
'2011-08-18T16:55:43-04:00'
describe
'42401' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNN' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
0872d5d3ca6941b46faac4b4885a0065
24d4eac91d71631353dc062ac54843d2fb3e6dcb
'2011-08-18T16:59:48-04:00'
describe
'7124891' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNO' 'sip-files00036.tif'
2bff55a713bf377d080951b8c8648cf4
5790086cc29e477f3db78936beadd89a2a933840
'2011-08-18T16:58:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNP' 'sip-files00036.txt'
4f38ab0cc16c63b3ef3ea5400b18b0e3
8179879eb4f0f2c002a0a685756762a39f685859
'2011-08-18T17:11:21-04:00'
describe
'13535' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNQ' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
839effa2116c4b7c1d2cc811d27986aa
59ed529f423491beb3a59dbeab2347a450a900bb
'2011-08-18T16:46:00-04:00'
describe
'880404' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
ca7908f93e539371e6b72a3ed2b2d2d5
a655388eab640bcb5429c04c9e87ce47f7d69b3f
'2011-08-18T17:09:44-04:00'
describe
'108469' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
9368ddec3584c0a27fbf0f64e2e622a1
3d366b91708e9d6828f28ab57b2283ac3369c425
'2011-08-18T17:10:19-04:00'
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNT' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5b0d0aee76064743f5c81878ed5b7334
4cf649f4a25b6df8492c003db44b470fd11b2abb
describe
'40389' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNU' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a3449dd92df98dd793914ee35d75401e
f4e13cbcc6b3e1a4cdc852c71af675baf95bbdf9
'2011-08-18T16:44:01-04:00'
describe
'7050599' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNV' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ebb6759a07d4490a9916ba595185cd5b
e8aebe3e5bbace3a1315aee5de4cd795fd78a9ec
'2011-08-18T16:59:12-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNW' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f9a9c658bc6354a1166c3931a56f8c5b
212262e647a241dc5dca1d02acecafb95cb5aa4a
'2011-08-18T17:06:48-04:00'
describe
'12254' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNX' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1408c34770cf2c04fde49b8f3eb7289a
7b31617c3d860fa6e4dc7e57264339102c71fd3e
'2011-08-18T17:01:33-04:00'
describe
'889499' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c871c7d7d2009f15ce61683d499ab03f
42e41a46a52f09429d97c0eea72cc9597c9403c3
'2011-08-18T17:08:41-04:00'
describe
'118048' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRNZ' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a6944e491267c8aafa160a10a6c794f3
1cfbae15caf70d5f72e676da7c18865abd2618a3
'2011-08-18T17:11:04-04:00'
describe
'11335' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROA' 'sip-files00038.pro'
d50c3f058e96df69d0544172915d3433
932be326c2582d3491c63b465528875bfb61dfba
describe
'36901' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROB' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
0725d54abf91cac1ff244aa6f5a67293
595cf81ccf010161e8d12407f0ea34ff21ef892a
'2011-08-18T17:04:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9516c88ee21bbea42814a5c4624c87c7
f07942fcee5a4bc803c510f0a5d80b4fb9075a71
'2011-08-18T17:02:02-04:00'
describe
'467' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROD' 'sip-files00038.txt'
597c2f182a0b54fd46ce0f6da981968d
e2321dbfd750f62c909a2cfaeba7a8de100c74c0
'2011-08-18T17:00:48-04:00'
describe
'11756' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROE' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ec62b679ab1a2d1ae5aa857c136438c6
32586e583c1e99be714d9a054aaafc6594124a7c
'2011-08-18T17:02:31-04:00'
describe
'872540' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROF' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
716cd0e1bd76d04cc4cce9b6c3b673a4
da60f55539ccfe24588b08066a4226735d38c6d0
'2011-08-18T17:07:42-04:00'
describe
'115720' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROG' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
bece22713ea22f08d038ba5b5a8f8c26
17bf3109e6be9967542e04d60b789b26711b9c38
'2011-08-18T16:56:13-04:00'
describe
'33997' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROH' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f96695ffe954ae0b7d33f65f31b6e9c6
cb162bd0eb04d22d3295d195b2cda1baee1ad85e
'2011-08-18T17:10:45-04:00'
describe
'43851' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
5c1dbe49d5fa23c4413d4fe114a6e53d
fbd3c637d0923cdf79171971d9c04ef673c01f1e
'2011-08-18T17:08:17-04:00'
describe
'6987409' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROJ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
92a330fc05bce6ea863d8e3a7ade16a5
efbc6cf58c6361934c46fd5e2e7a1aceea459ae6
'2011-08-18T17:09:23-04:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROK' 'sip-files00039.txt'
ef1928174f5e5a534487515fe3826550
c2870de34e3ec37d0fa6c2e49fbcf61a562e48dc
'2011-08-18T17:06:53-04:00'
describe
'13100' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROL' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a2d0dcaa3a1f36c798e5fdb7e459a223
6c1cf89841388fee523a509624bbb6d8cd3f7336
describe
'874762' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROM' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
20db64c3a54f5b6b15c81a88fd8e02ba
c6f53d37d5bd321c227d2452fde296f1ef8b3dde
'2011-08-18T16:59:03-04:00'
describe
'114416' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRON' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6a223e57b147578a2d08eff66c8acc9c
8de488aaa5a97d706b1c8a11d5c3ada252062b95
'2011-08-18T17:08:27-04:00'
describe
'32182' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROO' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7218dcc98d614c8aa92348fd228ec85d
62d3b46b521de02bf0ef550df6e791a3b1ad6230
describe
'41816' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
9ea362f100438b3f5c8563e7c8114c7d
f2b1b4f30241d3375d905d5e5445828099d54a69
'2011-08-18T17:00:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
69082ce80ca7acb3597aea4e3f64ffa9
894c426f9f9c06d78d712e2e586d06fd086b2329
'2011-08-18T17:09:50-04:00'
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROR' 'sip-files00040.txt'
ed76b753bba48eb6e0d18d0abb7d6308
ef05c5f17bc3ddf67fd0acfeeaa5eb4c8d73dff1
'2011-08-18T17:05:44-04:00'
describe
'13622' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROS' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
6356a51634feb9abd3bd169a5692b5a8
f4e9de0b222e2f6664e39aaa7f06158b8056c066
'2011-08-18T17:11:03-04:00'
describe
'919915' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROT' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
037b66a29a6864da8e19f22a0a12b23a
64827eb40e9ff4f525b20ad736a77adbff89295b
'2011-08-18T17:02:32-04:00'
describe
'118081' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROU' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
0563954a451c39cf10697b4d56c37667
f846cb4253d5b0b0598ae4b3ab0767dfe9f8d724
describe
'17578' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROV' 'sip-files00041.pro'
169651a5bb37806ab1b4e4cf9d040b94
c10f51496c6b4dffb4a875373650f807a9a7e254
'2011-08-18T16:50:56-04:00'
describe
'40243' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROW' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
a474727f53eabd514c081f4df0ef39c9
cb1780150b4abb8e02e014288d2a527af835d41e
'2011-08-18T17:02:05-04:00'
describe
'7368625' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROX' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d052aa0570a15b5cbc5adc9d9dd00d07
2fcc25acf76a2579f02937cdb21a117b2307bb70
'2011-08-18T17:04:15-04:00'
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f32e719a2174d9c06b84e6ee52c6dae0
9bab9350bcb51f7d59bbbde0e543f06deb548dc9
'2011-08-18T17:06:58-04:00'
describe
'11418' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABROZ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
490e7f4992641e1c5a66d534fa76245f
855295218f9fa66a64869d9f1a6d3d645a0e770e
'2011-08-18T17:03:58-04:00'
describe
'883953' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPA' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
23edfa9e26e98a0d011eaf5ca4c97547
651c0c78f116a0954e3ce9dafc2bccbeeb9d7723
'2011-08-18T17:01:52-04:00'
describe
'94949' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPB' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
11ea872eab05bead66b1470a88cdd202
eb2ecdc7907f6250fe458d63c4a0ba8bcac502b8
'2011-08-18T16:58:43-04:00'
describe
'31306' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
3f640b88e5349fa97b306ebc417a8d8b
975a1c79782294a287262565b4d5e11ca6d067d3
'2011-08-18T17:03:13-04:00'
describe
'35289' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPD' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e9fe3db20015635872be110301e1b6e4
7c8e0e12643fe2bae883c9df8500b710a0831033
'2011-08-18T16:55:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPE' 'sip-files00042.tif'
bdca8a6ee1ca2185891b042b0a17bef6
8e9314519bb509d1fd4185cc4f1a816385d46ad3
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPF' 'sip-files00042.txt'
d0c715c470aaf00972da4cf5abfafe46
d352a7d11dc6f0341baf408fd369e03561f0440c
'2011-08-18T16:53:39-04:00'
describe
'10396' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPG' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
3a8058ae1d4206bbb1840e2d397aeb25
b86e3dacaf3e30e62b8ded7cad406324d2eceb23
'2011-08-18T17:00:13-04:00'
describe
'892086' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
62e6081174b36ab2a742e28b33e3880f
d12d7d4c0d77fc88ce98837fefec6d824be3543a
'2011-08-18T17:08:50-04:00'
describe
'105096' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
115f3d56e8647e9ec7265463bc6993fc
f7246a234320c8c40490d3b8c5be16d4af7b16b1
'2011-08-18T17:11:18-04:00'
describe
'30482' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
e4fa33a3dafa9a67c95a888d7b4e877d
917d68f44810b90f8e5e731cf781cf8f57050a60
'2011-08-18T17:09:46-04:00'
describe
'40461' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
d727c72ba2775f47bab21c5fce840492
2cfd5d70b10efa6004bafbcfe1fbcf413f5b9fdb
'2011-08-18T16:56:17-04:00'
describe
'7145583' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
96d6e6fba23f70d26384e0a872a3234a
32523f19ce193a8ddc2ca360cc03f05439794cf7
'2011-08-18T17:00:28-04:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
100b32a184b55a8e688bdc72be2ffeea
d85c695b4619e2944b431953e19c8972e22a165e
'2011-08-18T16:59:50-04:00'
describe
'12558' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
347d0a0286b592f78ef2c28fdab0ece7
ca0c0f8a6ae93c09fc051c9490f8aa5abb23f9e9
'2011-08-18T16:58:30-04:00'
describe
'861517' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
c5138755cb0219ebd6d1e38bbb57b7d5
7699e515ab3bf5be51575820e1d208c80af37756
describe
'117285' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
5b9bcf17f421231f35fb190f6639dad3
9e2b934d02acc7b4a37e8187a37a752db7b1c31f
'2011-08-18T17:06:49-04:00'
describe
'34801' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b92093b92d0be77c9ad74319aac20cce
fd6fb160e3a72f9c681fc0c5cf32609f027d2ff1
'2011-08-18T17:06:47-04:00'
describe
'43468' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9d761cf5ca908007ec97a172229d74ed
b38405d134c2d08c8babcc8bc5153469f31f0dfd
'2011-08-18T17:12:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3298bb9d0ce468d95f4294a389a2ff61
9f634384f0f468cae5032b045cfbda60f4a2218a
'2011-08-18T17:00:55-04:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
98adcf50feb8df5f31bba77a62c8f905
e716083cd329cc48a0d70306292b94fd58453278
'2011-08-18T16:54:52-04:00'
describe
'13379' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
89efd2f4f91379abc04c7ec9e46b3496
dfb57a261d8c8c9f52bf08fbcdd434a9d73171b0
'2011-08-18T17:10:52-04:00'
describe
'882268' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c5bff3973884e1a3202c6162ebdc57c1
3cd0ed417a02861dcd355b13ae5958119e70e20d
'2011-08-18T17:11:24-04:00'
describe
'91473' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
60b0942daa461cdb170506a4aec284a7
506c13e9eabfec707b6ab252d649c82c21ccddb8
'2011-08-18T17:02:07-04:00'
describe
'28931' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2e63bb9d11d33c2808b5d37ec3483953
bd18f3c498be51fa3befb30b5f7c1e1bdd5fae5b
'2011-08-18T16:41:10-04:00'
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e6ac5942b6707a5c14e9ba228ffd489f
987dae36573a08a5d83845e619f5d1bad5e64366
'2011-08-18T16:59:46-04:00'
describe
'7064925' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRPZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
bd6a8b5517725fbe7e4dc3240a387c98
6cf82ada49b48bce9ee025066022998e949a0330
'2011-08-18T16:57:12-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
8c4a8c83ec5c3f1d1cc83956d5d0757a
afd6e94e47d065f6edce1e7d3e285af77ca86d49
'2011-08-18T16:59:11-04:00'
describe
'10594' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bbf049d993fea2fd768ef879accd9ac6
4d0fb6c91ed450080994100303876d3646c6c3e9
'2011-08-18T16:55:56-04:00'
describe
'875782' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
36df1b15899b7a0befb458e04ed2157b
dd4c545d7bb741f925893369c7681faa7928adb9
describe
'113283' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6050b37b268438dac6099f5841fd6a69
91237903e475e31b464dd7e07ec578471741e1ad
'2011-08-18T16:57:59-04:00'
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
ec19e679fe0d675660d15dc0f088a48a
d332298c4b4f0b521ca91e2a73bc29dca414e3f6
'2011-08-18T16:57:58-04:00'
describe
'42205' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
2c6c2889e65dc675b22d55bfee86d5ab
f75f1b96e46c0e8e5d759e22669c4c88d90b9ce5
'2011-08-18T16:54:57-04:00'
describe
'7015633' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
392c2a108e41f7e314c1d65ffe15055d
381fea940233bd56f94797b85811c90b31d3d8bb
'2011-08-18T16:45:58-04:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3360dd61e1a88c3804bf7202bc5fa1d6
2f43258e271fa3fa855903da90b373396e3a013c
'2011-08-18T16:56:21-04:00'
describe
'12250' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
30fcd5a6e257d201d2898791b4e64966
79d207d52acb2b88234d1c853db91a73dcc9960f
'2011-08-18T17:01:18-04:00'
describe
'873111' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e7256b4c8dffd1c243bac498658e76ab
76e9bce274905f125a0db530fefc673fb9794721
'2011-08-18T17:00:01-04:00'
describe
'110646' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
43cd952d4babfc23af78b4c90e25f90c
c79b819beb2e1998bc4868b22409a4355b9e8dda
'2011-08-18T16:50:50-04:00'
describe
'32930' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
928eb58c3272e13aafc8dab4b998445e
88ff4bd9a18d906997b9ea28c58f3fbdd2504db2
'2011-08-18T17:08:55-04:00'
describe
'41756' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
bb91f28cc11591bf0ff93bf47c82053b
e7aa7accf8d91d8e550e66d2e45a0ce50ab20291
describe
'6991723' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQN' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b1a5c3aa6839321ec8438e3e5e2bd537
0a73f5bb5734519fde8ab46601bf58e6611d034b
'2011-08-18T16:59:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
b0ee852a3de778f144d60c192e3e5cd7
1b4dfb7daf23d49216be85cd4d54753f9d1ef94e
'2011-08-18T17:09:34-04:00'
describe
'12560' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0c6c6d9a9c7a9cb9f822b9f4479aea08
eedace232f18aa6d0e6260852fd2155d5e3d1dec
'2011-08-18T16:56:39-04:00'
describe
'875550' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
6f3b053f344533192f18e30bb7760b29
31c86f4204e42ceb6001b2fa696e38e93243ebd0
'2011-08-18T16:41:07-04:00'
describe
'112516' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1fa5f76a9332b133f70bd2be5b02863a
f99800223198229b5b46ad7ea9a15cf1c49a2a6c
'2011-08-18T16:46:24-04:00'
describe
'33107' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
633848122352ba878d42ae811c6520b4
20bf97eff062029db07fa8f87ad3e32a0819b1b8
'2011-08-18T16:54:47-04:00'
describe
'42687' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4dc0df4b5ab750f1e051532ee1c1c9ef
8b5271bf2df956a5821f6d8282cdcae1047b1cf6
describe
'7012027' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
a7f073d57a89522bf6226e327180c941
df113475da434699cfa453a1c1afdae05557236a
'2011-08-18T16:44:02-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
750ed4919fd9407a0682ff7c0023a76c
a62a5e2484bc550b750af1bb51dd2db9ca9d68ad
'2011-08-18T16:54:43-04:00'
describe
'12954' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
db46eb52f43f8de6b301ee7e29f3d5a7
0b964ab019278aec55243fba3a5362d5d5ba5a89
'2011-08-18T16:59:55-04:00'
describe
'870124' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
7504b547fb51f5c7fef885b48a1bb832
861a266489e9ad6bd4c49ba0842c5137f5cea30d
'2011-08-18T16:58:24-04:00'
describe
'106922' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1e3eda7562b20d92648d0900f1bd1d70
90a5f8bb627102f6d1b465f5b72d507beb2c1c2e
'2011-08-18T17:09:47-04:00'
describe
'37115' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRQZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
5dc41ffaf24a14a14442cdfcdc33eb3f
68b0724a30fbbc3a2891ea9956f0e58dd3dbad41
'2011-08-18T16:55:10-04:00'
describe
'38504' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
5a23e70f90be17edda94e6ecf1d3002f
ab922fa17340704f28365dc0773c7c0315a9fd6b
'2011-08-18T17:08:15-04:00'
describe
'6967889' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
84abd5c8ca8672f0da2b92ec57f60af8
f68ca7dca5acf113bc8d73e0e7fa8b6bd1a45397
describe
'1558' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
9c87890108dfcc5a353c99b0a6c46398
2ee24406e1a532e7d5bff24fcf0ae2ee055bd0f4
'2011-08-18T16:59:33-04:00'
describe
'12299' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRD' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
66577f3f51e03845ffbffa419a917101
d6b8476ca573de921753624f20b2c0bb964c0e42
'2011-08-18T16:59:29-04:00'
describe
'854479' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
9b9d1b8791488b53194120ae100704db
8f623a1af1e031e510ba6bdddfa425111464b3c0
'2011-08-18T16:42:17-04:00'
describe
'110672' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
46cfa90ad9c7a362172a9bee68a2ce58
0cda6726a8e3799153895434736af1acc2d5c3e3
'2011-08-18T16:54:51-04:00'
describe
'30286' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRG' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5e3f4124ee0494412c1fb589b0f29d4a
f1e65da3d1a8480d0da6e2484ad62d8042c00182
'2011-08-18T17:07:25-04:00'
describe
'41367' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
35007c8850a53dfe1f31ee15b0a5d05c
e8201662659508d3b92f7c252107632d2f5c7168
describe
'6842145' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRI' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0a3a56a78f1bb4db55050dd2abceb46e
cc1e248ead0615a22e23c1737277bcc71aa58d23
'2011-08-18T16:57:53-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRJ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
9be7a0048d021e6daeaf130271ddc273
859a642ac5ed40a4debc477cf406d853106fb331
'2011-08-18T16:48:35-04:00'
describe
'12711' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
9b543123806e2d422e537565b704e517
048dc8e2e4a10c8f947d64dbba6d0357a8f1e911
'2011-08-18T16:55:36-04:00'
describe
'877934' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
88018c9561c9ba801ca2971873dcb83b
428c1ef21460c38c37b06591a0474ebcd63cdfe8
'2011-08-18T17:07:53-04:00'
describe
'110238' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRM' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
6ccebeedcc3e9ab70f326e14bb4288ee
a0eb5a990e6c3ef24d3b54e3feea763c7f65bf9a
'2011-08-18T17:02:50-04:00'
describe
'31909' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRN' 'sip-files00051.pro'
45cc46cef2c6dbbf9f121b19c2215903
451fe2e2c9df2431afcd077d20f11dae1064c3c8
'2011-08-18T16:57:06-04:00'
describe
'41812' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRO' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
26838b59b2888fc46dc145b78820bf74
a61c75456d4ede68c1e15ded38d85c50a4780d4a
'2011-08-18T16:46:29-04:00'
describe
'7030295' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
028205b400ab3f68cc25af01c7729b77
55d6fdb72980606712bec3fb037e31fff3d44a54
'2011-08-18T16:54:35-04:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRQ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
b6b5073ea8039b5abadab6684b634839
ff0d557acf3dd4f27ea0b03bb3bacb6996216389
'2011-08-18T16:57:18-04:00'
describe
'13230' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRR' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b6eb20ad2011296fd3fb5f05cb776c27
596c3689c9821e2c0d2efc6a82ce9ff29b3db4dc
'2011-08-18T17:05:48-04:00'
describe
'888718' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRS' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
6542b328b2b7073708946b65255a3063
a9dfcf9004c24dc009a11c36688bcfca30721140
'2011-08-18T16:53:24-04:00'
describe
'107277' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRT' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
9445638feceb96141b49ce4ac6546966
b78d36e9b1d91e50e56a7123cd764328d09a0355
'2011-08-18T17:00:00-04:00'
describe
'31234' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRU' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9de01174e3af4a26e1e0d31aeef8e6cf
68c4c4429321bd64976a68f87d89080d18851567
'2011-08-18T17:01:02-04:00'
describe
'40904' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
133a103063ba592d7783ebf84ad3fdca
967889f86ba95dfe26a9717eb9a6a60001afdf52
'2011-08-18T16:44:44-04:00'
describe
'7116587' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRW' 'sip-files00052.tif'
d9ac0e7ef654d6b4ca97f8d6f1cdf3a7
877bb1dd2246810be33cc001e7a2e5afae5cecee
'2011-08-18T16:57:36-04:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRX' 'sip-files00052.txt'
e0e018cf2bd198bdedb30f8ceb7e525d
7a975944f3ea1a616f62e8e39805b64262678e73
'2011-08-18T16:58:49-04:00'
describe
'12535' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRY' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
b1ebd1d15a79a93ae41c43dae060c8eb
8ea412b4c764f692f7e58d2e38c6f4f6a95e3acf
'2011-08-18T17:03:16-04:00'
describe
'896418' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRRZ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8904a9226f36e36643ae65702c4993a3
e2e55fda1a8e8df26414018f7f6f52b64365eab3
'2011-08-18T16:43:07-04:00'
describe
'98704' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSA' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
24a7039340e33f50171a80c198294bea
224b4c376c3f27c92dfa2531fac3e11f3057d36e
'2011-08-18T17:08:39-04:00'
describe
'33519' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSB' 'sip-files00053.pro'
98f1d22c48b484dc29449e212cee8a7c
dbe5cfaea65342ce78899fa40e6fffe7ed2e7c23
'2011-08-18T17:07:34-04:00'
describe
'36124' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSC' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e3d0da25ce0288e68a83f0be2c6ea740
801042dc6f304451c1d1d0905418e4f8ed645348
'2011-08-18T16:45:45-04:00'
describe
'7180123' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
a27f94dedd0e5c58ab01d8879b040260
c3a6f2f8f77b691affc498985afab5c3f882ecc8
'2011-08-18T16:57:02-04:00'
describe
'1415' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSE' 'sip-files00053.txt'
7601b1bb7475e70bdca8f8253db7abae
e4c41c6d19bf590b161030b7d20bb7e9e28ff328
'2011-08-18T16:41:04-04:00'
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSF' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
41e68d38fdbb66bfabd52aa2db60747e
dc1cdb459f2fdf83ca6690e19dc0fdb1f94cbfd9
'2011-08-18T16:57:10-04:00'
describe
'919987' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSG' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
da957657f2eeb7bd953e9f1b918e22b6
986348f87ac02624a89f046e0dc4105e2f2d6368
'2011-08-18T16:55:34-04:00'
describe
'103907' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSH' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
82280149f6ad8d14aec5f671cd915bff
47abe5fe79f3aef1480d4bc1195037949945fc56
describe
'13165' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSI' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ce0b22aef3a76f676d9621cae0f8508c
cbdab3fdfb6cfdd00645713e2bc7933faee13171
describe
'35610' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSJ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
28a8508b76359a8bef3910cfe19175ee
559a4c3406cd503668c74d77f250074644d0e756
'2011-08-18T16:54:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSK' 'sip-files00054.tif'
287021d4fb155c69af9bb8506e668fd7
21a8673f6aedaad18b106ad5fb3c419ae2b3ca84
describe
'564' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSL' 'sip-files00054.txt'
fdd0e14182ad3a197bf4c7c62e8773a6
96fe6a238c42d2a6e4087a81db41b0fec8cf51e9
'2011-08-18T16:44:40-04:00'
describe
'10051' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSM' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
3134de65fcdd364a70f4ac4d000cd9e4
9e4360079f96c416f5e5de47ffbadef04e5ef688
'2011-08-18T16:57:39-04:00'
describe
'915867' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSN' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
40d411e71ad455b28a4dc764157dfea6
cb132b05bd1c6738868a7a5ec315f4f8ab11bfa0
'2011-08-18T16:58:31-04:00'
describe
'107226' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSO' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
7ecf6b40f05f7e9f783693e6d690db19
d1fe5a8e051bf584bcca284cd259c94278aa8fb3
'2011-08-18T17:05:53-04:00'
describe
'31590' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
2524cb9b41ae8acd28070dcd80eb3f1e
bd86f785c9bda1ef09b240b737fb3b4205f0cb1e
'2011-08-18T17:04:43-04:00'
describe
'40604' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSQ' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
b7f1f790730356aa4edac8977ebd0ea8
aae8ae8840c7a7d7f7157dc10364aa6ab1d0776c
'2011-08-18T17:09:13-04:00'
describe
'7335819' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSR' 'sip-files00055.tif'
75cf32bf94733732a6f17521ce97c58e
ca78ecf94f647b0a10f91d3da1bc303cd9480133
'2011-08-18T17:00:08-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSS' 'sip-files00055.txt'
080d3ad57b22a9467e6d233dcfefce6e
f7abce1e4b2dc37bbc67e94dbdb77753d848d898
'2011-08-18T16:51:30-04:00'
describe
'11544' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRST' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
055b2e4565084efd02c353bdbc5f2966
49ceee4e2bd98705b5732c6f5f19f3a01abfca01
'2011-08-18T17:03:19-04:00'
describe
'915121' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSU' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
cdaf26d9d5c81efe2482277345875a80
3181b53cab94896b3b2f62b334659f45e1159a9b
'2011-08-18T17:00:59-04:00'
describe
'115621' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSV' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
94d3e58527ac8de011a3191847e542c0
2fb32d96e40646e7cdfc7203b55eea65ec330816
'2011-08-18T17:09:18-04:00'
describe
'33227' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b8704ed6e2f2405f3707f67027ef0b93
bab348791555f9fe8948b31fe88df620a05e8965
'2011-08-18T17:05:08-04:00'
describe
'44748' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSX' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
fab53daf652769d71e9857954718bae4
55f43751d36177ae35a8e2f21023484685eebd46
'2011-08-18T16:57:17-04:00'
describe
'7330425' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
b9a4936507217ccb0b94e5e6b01670d3
9be08835d1e2cf63414216a6e5e4702f0413a143
'2011-08-18T17:12:08-04:00'
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRSZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
f99b084e32dfe0e3d905e2f22581f156
92e81d6f1adfd427e1e8bb8be6badc903642990c
'2011-08-18T17:02:19-04:00'
describe
'12132' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTA' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
cf5b01fe80e0cceb7c50a9f0e1672626
a2185644827417f900fac6bb41a35651e1bf6d64
'2011-08-18T17:11:20-04:00'
describe
'899379' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTB' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
84d3f36ac5b59f6dcd31986ff59c2382
8f5d788f2cef6a5733238eb4a68870bfec07aadd
'2011-08-18T17:04:49-04:00'
describe
'106000' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTC' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
cb9e89a8b643bd784c019a9ff6014020
422007bc719070043aff1a824ce272bb935e5024
'2011-08-18T16:45:44-04:00'
describe
'30804' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTD' 'sip-files00057.pro'
5e73d09bca110650330619fd5b7e2750
33b62fdd6ccf7226d1987ba777ee4cc1b1ac915e
describe
'42964' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
4b4cd8e52d237d7302d331b74e7eaf67
55b3f1de64de09f4447f1c682bb2da8246dc5b42
'2011-08-18T17:10:26-04:00'
describe
'7203793' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTF' 'sip-files00057.tif'
bb65460a50d09e69760939205200f873
c495126c3841cb4490780ea6f63cfbb98fa3349d
'2011-08-18T17:10:04-04:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ff2b380b6fb62ee6604f6a4fb10a9a70
1992e4ffed7bb059e2beefa5c67da7639636b718
'2011-08-18T17:02:37-04:00'
describe
'12115' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTH' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ae4f470da44ee03625ef6917e5e595d9
ea8505784298a7e8d6a9a30037a386c1521a9687
'2011-08-18T17:06:52-04:00'
describe
'889448' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
0f4cea5006d82d7dabf3d09ede3c40f2
64f84ad136b34f6b779c7d53a3f271e38fe20263
'2011-08-18T16:57:49-04:00'
describe
'107392' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f609046a22293bdcec9f552e41846e73
d97d4610bf96c6872082fb2fc32490437acde570
'2011-08-18T17:07:10-04:00'
describe
'31902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
37a10d09bda51df36f3c8b213e836f76
e871a760e04d4cc38a3add1f69cc0ff3b22d5195
'2011-08-18T17:10:57-04:00'
describe
'40635' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
54bd1a886fe829c29db8c7e4de3969bf
8de7fa1485cc55f8b2470669b1000d3c55cda9e8
'2011-08-18T16:54:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
901de7249d78cf22e3db1dae864eb3d4
cc6e0a2a212318009e39fd017c746e85543828db
'2011-08-18T17:07:15-04:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
ad84b307c3e360181347ad18078eb938
c3c2dbb043cecb11fe64880d69428d298643788d
'2011-08-18T17:04:12-04:00'
describe
'13236' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c77d705994ac60fe4e7d1b8dff22a2f0
c2ea2d64796981949f1d980e4fee39680cd3edf9
'2011-08-18T17:00:15-04:00'
describe
'904623' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
f103a1d2e2bf72f8144d66a92ee4d3f6
b2e146f2b7ed6bf99646c3e43c0410360267bd81
'2011-08-18T17:07:33-04:00'
describe
'76487' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
03a4139202c1d07253a7a2197ff54b2b
8b672afd625e9132d655fd6c130deca5c459b8f0
'2011-08-18T17:10:07-04:00'
describe
'29334' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTR' 'sip-files00059.pro'
276f8fa5ef68b1f981db860c4234c455
01259e5d925e2b3fa62fad401097fbc5aa6dd766
'2011-08-18T16:58:57-04:00'
describe
'28111' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTS' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
389d3b3ec9aece3fb70441f1d64e7c93
5231c4bf17c21f343e027855810c2d0d028fc247
'2011-08-18T16:54:05-04:00'
describe
'7245749' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTT' 'sip-files00059.tif'
ac607d2557620960c284fe87aaa50f1b
968a3d66448eec6ce170e178c95f43c1d9d44bc1
'2011-08-18T17:07:39-04:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
06f778115049b6acb96354c71c6a1377
865944b6e73dd4f6e9481630cb5169e042db7b39
'2011-08-18T17:08:20-04:00'
describe
'8182' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
04962ad4bd40e987c5be38938be847e0
a56b7f8ce0e4b72c1073d070f8228c3b0fdce4ca
describe
'911941' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d991ec750c0878fb57f93cf273d1c23c
cc5f7c5c0f85464431d8cdc3247839889dc0de4e
describe
'126100' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
ddc95d65706772ee7f93b59345508847
d5082be9aa52f52822a28d4c7ad462bbb858b3e8
'2011-08-18T16:55:53-04:00'
describe
'9455' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTY' 'sip-files00060.pro'
7754d823ae65231193881c0d8f00c45c
6bf46d15fc92a46ebcdd727a8e41d44d6c33caa0
describe
'39268' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRTZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
ccc99bf9ae68c5e057ccb5c05b20ec73
436458567b3a34678a1fee6911bd491f4d9569d0
describe
'7304481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUA' 'sip-files00060.tif'
fdcacc46e6598aec5a87d7868913aead
65a9163c3e9f6faa405fa47d19b413528ffcd834
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUB' 'sip-files00060.txt'
10b8c8d280e1dbdf7bf14c66961b5b7f
a0dcfc593dc69936cd9cefd82973ae305e452484
'2011-08-18T16:56:43-04:00'
describe
'11034' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
552ff91a9254da5c53ae3c1dbbc46675
cdabd8ca841c55bc695a13cc392f515be09ac621
'2011-08-18T16:58:41-04:00'
describe
'904618' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUD' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
bdb19965db05e08efd7e8d8dab03d569
f488cebf570442cdd616d16f3c9b74eeaa951271
'2011-08-18T17:00:56-04:00'
describe
'117507' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
76603b7bde9d4b57774ab50b967ab2e1
18f2dfa740edfb48a5cffaf3b0615ff2f0758b66
'2011-08-18T17:08:21-04:00'
describe
'33574' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUF' 'sip-files00061.pro'
9872e3949d5d5c86572269818aeba27e
17c089a2d21def63823352feca9349572dbd332e
'2011-08-18T16:59:58-04:00'
describe
'43938' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUG' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
ad8348c3df1a6318c2d978840bc6b6a1
096dfcad98e2f1f6b1d4abf099c905612ca1afb8
'2011-08-18T16:54:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUH' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1a4e1a84e36a1b654f8715f1d48803e2
1eefcfa6d3f664b19f6a31089de3970bc44b473a
'2011-08-18T16:57:22-04:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c03d78c1ec9a748a092f59496143d1a3
5c00d115660b9d74d6162ae96e25d47a206e844c
'2011-08-18T16:49:40-04:00'
describe
'12557' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUJ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
92d14a7c198e6a3a0f488681f2c12287
8ace00da8f7ce3c102d920976fedabce1c57b37e
'2011-08-18T16:53:38-04:00'
describe
'885617' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUK' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
45138e14bc9e1356fb100f3bcc43cb67
23865971b6fc3d1c60f7c897ddac8222053a7b6c
'2011-08-18T16:48:33-04:00'
describe
'114034' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
381ad33930d95894b1eb73c0f700703c
250b9415d1e3c91d5721d8329f85885e6149a62e
'2011-08-18T17:08:45-04:00'
describe
'32977' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUM' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0c8dbfcbefa5f85971fd50aac71c39d2
14df9c02a5cb9122898064b2d8514fe8325650f3
describe
'42071' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUN' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e39074b1e987baa5f831bc65a050d201
fd87ae2d3f405c7731f85e1b57aadd3d41263bd9
'2011-08-18T17:11:44-04:00'
describe
'7093895' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUO' 'sip-files00062.tif'
0c9bb21f29a0742d85343281192a23f3
0bdad8691009632b961a2fe48aa72cd4bd42a135
'2011-08-18T17:02:06-04:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
6736170706e6ed262e9ee1c96d744adb
a89683dcadecbc7ae32d8e06931896fc6bba4d93
'2011-08-18T16:43:46-04:00'
describe
'12586' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUQ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
9c81741d1bf210c6a72a860c47575a7d
be35a592463b52baf5b3b66d07fe1f30655f8f78
'2011-08-18T17:03:28-04:00'
describe
'874921' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5631cf7a1f4a7bc9e5b9af843f408949
c3d9923d65a3dde39e1db5bb40abb5bd9ea3d008
describe
'116633' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
e4fa4ff7d3f56b12173e6e0312145907
e53f635e147496de357c8217b1844d2692b9a2e0
'2011-08-18T16:44:15-04:00'
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUT' 'sip-files00063.pro'
2032ce21e0ddf2951eb8148d8488ed70
42d31402373527394648b4ae1d1f252f159f1287
'2011-08-18T16:58:44-04:00'
describe
'44039' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUU' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5b787204962dd1521f89470f0824bad1
4d330b71457df0901536a1a60221052e0c2a2ac8
'2011-08-18T17:12:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUV' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c35149b3a8f0972d8ae8415970d8ab3c
400d3e93fec637ff63c83ef3d7785b30795cba4d
'2011-08-18T17:09:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUW' 'sip-files00063.txt'
7a880dcd9a718184e278a4f5f5c2c0d5
42c209f3abc1acfcf48563cb0e096d94d405c7bb
'2011-08-18T17:04:38-04:00'
describe
'12887' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUX' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
c8d4217419b8eaaff0550700d26aedc9
389ac60d2d9c38f6c63c506db3ecd01b326522a4
describe
'897561' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUY' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
3dfb05a19c02b6d6cdaf5bd5a9049a9c
851b6b1ccf358faba2ab9dccf1a4e3a64347c266
'2011-08-18T16:57:51-04:00'
describe
'99066' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRUZ' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
502200795e2a499889e89901af80c2a3
46884052d80f4858ddd5717049336bf382468c64
'2011-08-18T17:04:18-04:00'
describe
'33134' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
bf65a3a6bc48e58e5745734c420b0670
76605bf1f896cc8253db6f841cbd1af793dc8872
'2011-08-18T17:00:21-04:00'
describe
'35329' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVB' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
7c4c3882bf71bbf72bb47d0544873f1f
7113ab7be2d0bbcf27410e744c6b72f86a071a30
'2011-08-18T17:01:29-04:00'
describe
'7190327' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
9633165720aa01c16630d34ac6568f92
c2c42f2bc63a00f84b54a18b3105a82a115b4b10
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVD' 'sip-files00064.txt'
7e2456cd60094118eb07ae5ffd35ba96
3eb307a9eb5d612109ac72f4aafbd10896fe41ff
describe
'10520' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVE' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
e82be48d146afed152f147e99992a6ee
8243828238743b9ec9fe11cd8fb926625418f722
'2011-08-18T17:05:34-04:00'
describe
'903687' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVF' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
530d8e477b7fe1774c4a0b5c96ba07e2
2e06c59bbc5662aa3164e38dcb24cff744a934d3
'2011-08-18T17:10:33-04:00'
describe
'112230' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
678811afe7c402fd541f1f3d99a237c7
cbaee51dd9731ddfc51334dc09ee511ff95d5882
'2011-08-18T17:00:33-04:00'
describe
'17306' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVH' 'sip-files00065.pro'
b1b1d09a25caefdaea8c4218f5314372
db77243c76b0efb2eb6dd937ac9b228c6b1b60ea
'2011-08-18T16:54:13-04:00'
describe
'38197' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVI' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4aa2957696f9340ae883cb5f15b66100
549173eb43548159005ed7100292f8971584116b
'2011-08-18T17:12:24-04:00'
describe
'7238323' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVJ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
da482deb75f4fd1696c23290e4286f14
5f901e141d8444cfac8e433decfa4f402744f31d
'2011-08-18T17:12:05-04:00'
describe
'687' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVK' 'sip-files00065.txt'
fd51edbced61096a75e5ed77802e515a
ed9b312dcbf0d16d7a37e804697e4c65e21c9121
'2011-08-18T17:06:59-04:00'
describe
'10893' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVL' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5cfae9cd38e18fcdd8687bc876d301cd
c66124565fa45169c076261cff6876f4b3b673e6
describe
'903632' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVM' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
2cc2e9eac5bbac037bd3478d5e61ec00
ba887eaa71627eb81ca76b9dde785da53daae6f0
'2011-08-18T16:54:00-04:00'
describe
'111279' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVN' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c00f31ddee2d1ddea46c69862f9c93e9
e4ec9598fec8c9be77d7c85619473b27d3d4ff70
'2011-08-18T17:01:14-04:00'
describe
'33173' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVO' 'sip-files00066.pro'
99f8e94ae648a894ffb55cd57cb3accf
2e90a29d0cbda34b4e37ef11d62b9ddaa7aee1a8
'2011-08-18T16:41:05-04:00'
describe
'42876' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
dadf5a6d0d710a00ce1d1063d5661135
ffdec4d0851dbfa48c07b6313262a3f2f1e972f9
'2011-08-18T17:01:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
0ffbe71a72d9c13e058897e9d663e93f
b6842b5e1a4831a61db5041a61ab2aa05a1e665e
'2011-08-18T17:08:25-04:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVR' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ad5b46f3fa14fd903f18ace2ad5a855d
782b95c40a8d7d0cb98b08584e565546f393826f
'2011-08-18T17:01:22-04:00'
describe
'12538' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVS' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
7396f2cc8d062a9df4c8378b683928b7
8f0da6c3d00b05b359650d96d7dc41b780a14277
'2011-08-18T17:06:23-04:00'
describe
'911905' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVT' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
bd7ba2fc19d9a60de3b1c1bcf1588bc9
f744c81f2f2570fb8e53282d949f827581e5f113
describe
'111776' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVU' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5b4ee3c399727704eee766fb23e1ead4
76f7f837fe6910c6ffd97ef991a17bd2fa0a8314
'2011-08-18T16:58:25-04:00'
describe
'32708' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVV' 'sip-files00067.pro'
abaa404256b820c1895d9b25a2393674
8f7fc3964c3a86fc40c0def79a750f7fba2a8a45
'2011-08-18T17:10:01-04:00'
describe
'42940' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVW' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
e459017694e468a33914d22851031621
105393fec55b498d141b3b728d817079d403569f
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVX' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d21471431e8801c4f19a333001af254d
cb5434659a613a731b670eec2b2eb68b620e471a
'2011-08-18T17:10:11-04:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVY' 'sip-files00067.txt'
0a3cff4d65578971b36bcc015f03a8e5
01d621dadf78b8302759d819a4d36fc5c0155621
'2011-08-18T17:11:26-04:00'
describe
'12651' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRVZ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
401d31e9e9b64f558e32a72434cb2422
ee4fb390286ab8ff369828c26e4c38cd52af5c9f
describe
'893815' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWA' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
7bdffee99ee586e904fb9ed4ab4e3e7a
fafab5a61048d39f7d5ccdd9ea5e80d0b9f896f5
'2011-08-18T16:53:10-04:00'
describe
'101645' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWB' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
163c09ea0934aa42544f4ee6b8786833
26b0f4d725e0e581c09169e4d24e3e9e0ab41a54
'2011-08-18T16:55:49-04:00'
describe
'33791' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWC' 'sip-files00068.pro'
64c1946070ce7d669049a3ec0ee5ef5d
d3258ff4876ef6ac248b876762c517a2fec4af7c
describe
'38000' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWD' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
12f7dceeff845e6eed28857fc35cf3d8
752bd0cd28b8116109605ec832e39fd5c6786223
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWE' 'sip-files00068.tif'
fe78646ce05175d40176ea564d6a41e2
c28a543413e6bdaebd7d38570f5ff9accae6c681
'2011-08-18T16:46:28-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWF' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d1802ffc97262eb305c8ed6b68dbf32f
b97da492be558dc529072b38fac7bb427aad2709
'2011-08-18T16:55:04-04:00'
describe
'11466' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWG' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
5db4bcb09442c77e4261b7f80164e99d
28d46611d982b5e69ee31dbda3f7f8bb0de63d8a
'2011-08-18T17:12:30-04:00'
describe
'909572' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWH' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
bde635c84e8e170d1526687a494e029c
e0800d7a751ff3c3a90818fbb4a20787367fc3bf
'2011-08-18T16:42:10-04:00'
describe
'112225' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWI' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
49fa835efaef9aeedd980eeba3af17c0
c04af24a1dc39c22a8e8283b7fd3643730ae4947
describe
'16318' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
9e8af03531c4b7a15c4d720cb06d0377
831e6eaec4f5d862148203bd638836299333a1fc
'2011-08-18T16:53:42-04:00'
describe
'37710' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWK' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
d2ecb209354a4f3e69e4d71b5a3a923a
02159b97c3a278a612e5c4044f4a8630eef87132
'2011-08-18T16:58:08-04:00'
describe
'7285603' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWL' 'sip-files00069.tif'
28fe80994f539195d4db1a57561fc410
1d4f6f4add812a7261bba8a994fbcfde6c09510e
'2011-08-18T17:11:57-04:00'
describe
'644' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
05b66bb870b10538308248c3cca862d7
a4c5717c8a8af095037016267ec7232786df5ff1
'2011-08-18T16:56:14-04:00'
describe
'10896' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWN' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
c30980230a183c6732419c0b9126f4bc
ccaa1724c8e0f2c5df9130a8d4b72fa47c5cccbe
'2011-08-18T16:58:59-04:00'
describe
'910848' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWO' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
939001ef9ef0c558ff75449f4ab1a639
f431c1332590c03b35c7f85ab55bc943c0b00f63
'2011-08-18T17:12:06-04:00'
describe
'113506' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWP' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
c6efcfa60b7019e78264140da291b0d6
f429921e9abd7d2c924b41f9286dfacf2a7bff7f
'2011-08-18T17:05:10-04:00'
describe
'33422' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWQ' 'sip-files00070.pro'
ea55cca58209eca041454b12c0da1cca
d67aa1a0a0d5b6475caf85effcaf3c70949daf5e
'2011-08-18T17:08:22-04:00'
describe
'42088' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWR' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
de3824f5b38dc008cf51ed349a499003
36150b8eaf3a677acad90ecd283526eb06bf09e7
describe
'7295795' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWS' 'sip-files00070.tif'
93f97bb0e90118340582e8609b6569ba
fbfc7e90ce2ab240a549b659b8cdbc108e778328
'2011-08-18T16:56:26-04:00'
describe
'1372' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
185a68f7145f421d4dd59ed3ecffd472
30b568c913ab5153216c8a8c92c992db3d2a7375
'2011-08-18T16:55:02-04:00'
describe
'12343' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
aeca5c34b74c15053867072e495931f7
eed7cf93acdfc0a720402e99abfbba528b67693d
'2011-08-18T17:06:50-04:00'
describe
'896424' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
85ff31421922f2859406597a05736715
2ee59fe6a83b6203bb722b6a15ac251d68bd23df
'2011-08-18T16:57:07-04:00'
describe
'112885' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWW' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
77ed5347e4a51487c588c9270f0737c1
cd814b66732cf2f9d56dde1e3b69d82fb1eca177
'2011-08-18T17:00:52-04:00'
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWX' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3369577c8d0bd931f7c9edaf027f3bcf
0728258e153638a56836757011d2f10424526681
'2011-08-18T16:55:07-04:00'
describe
'42050' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWY' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
430877d4edf21fd49d9a33a8d20126a5
f459702cb908c3b8f7cb562d6e8fad143075eee9
'2011-08-18T17:09:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRWZ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a026b6705d93c39c793894d0ae633fff
677e34e4ace93a30e14a35f54f8bdd1cda001878
'2011-08-18T17:03:18-04:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXA' 'sip-files00071.txt'
d2a889f4a4e85dda134e110f6fe42ade
67350a8b049de57b8dc6207f5f678bc2b6b5cf98
'2011-08-18T17:05:24-04:00'
describe
'12130' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXB' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
63fa85060d078d7b9b86d98024c1c561
2b1c81d5650eeb9ebb03da949bc2074c9ccbf418
describe
'892105' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXC' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
8eae14a56e6a9ffca6da11e82d4fba9a
770b2a3f483516246226efc8c6d5f567f5b1a667
'2011-08-18T17:08:00-04:00'
describe
'86298' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXD' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
15273e26deb6a24a6e0b4bc2aa347716
b19dc2e049103e6d3d7f01f737f3b6fc87afb98a
'2011-08-18T17:01:09-04:00'
describe
'28682' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXE' 'sip-files00072.pro'
4669aee52d12046f9e5ed202261c3dca
30e4e22444cbed37ac7c3bd71cce1201e83e966f
'2011-08-18T17:01:51-04:00'
describe
'32172' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXF' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
b15772f7c0acbeed426131a1ddbe41fb
0fca26c3cd1e3141d2649953c859cbadeba04313
'2011-08-18T16:44:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXG' 'sip-files00072.tif'
af3edcd9f8c24874f3ba9aae5f6e5c63
8474782ba841faa2fe68c9cf2569b0612601048f
'2011-08-18T17:00:02-04:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXH' 'sip-files00072.txt'
31b46db3c0365fbe9431e2bcd7529c03
e6a60754c9b40804516005dad42cd47be1995915
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXI' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
d0e8fbc497b2e65372477026c4bd3d33
d889f54f54c22bbfa19be26de404dca560459348
'2011-08-18T17:02:56-04:00'
describe
'908887' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXJ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
962966f554b427f4f6cf6624547e6445
2cfe79fcce609630ef7d4fa99941b6275c0ac813
describe
'109707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
066dd2e9c6075d411d70abadd95b95b6
963dfa5abf670ef92d9abefb8a72d0c89f5295ca
'2011-08-18T17:11:12-04:00'
describe
'32699' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXL' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a0cefd1580994711b055de5424bda479
2acb13a4bdbcb50e35b8799bb26f59c92018e5ce
'2011-08-18T16:55:15-04:00'
describe
'42106' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXM' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
2c777ce2fef751e48ccd861485fd20c5
d34e612a457a1a9503e14377098a675772536088
'2011-08-18T16:42:32-04:00'
describe
'7280103' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXN' 'sip-files00073.tif'
e9a1aad9d29a3722a1a7f462975f629a
4c6fed0342e0c4d26b033ecbee449c676e94d346
'2011-08-18T16:52:01-04:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXO' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ef54496ce97b4b25647a718e54cea4a5
5dae96d4e3963a48cdf4890195024f4594afabd0
'2011-08-18T17:12:20-04:00'
describe
'11912' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXP' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
afc862dd3181288a1b6f441f2a7f35c8
9aac3f07b045e43cdf29831b9a1eb8275ec94a89
'2011-08-18T16:53:35-04:00'
describe
'868317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXQ' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0286afc1100e42215d8e733610a417b4
650af089ac330920edabf435fb63c4580c09a66c
describe
'108667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5dfcdcfdacd940880a4f78f70f2da3e0
2b21523d4cc41977ccfdfed9eb7a6460ae3c87cd
'2011-08-18T17:07:46-04:00'
describe
'30871' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXS' 'sip-files00074.pro'
68dd85f32c2dc2c7bdaf1a4c94626f56
314529b64b4a27c522bb08a4115aab273c280932
describe
'41064' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXT' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
95e7c1b17ad1d3042187d84d47b47cbe
99f990d723e3ab83afdc2d35ee2db057ef81cdf5
'2011-08-18T16:56:03-04:00'
describe
'6953159' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXU' 'sip-files00074.tif'
f2fbba6e2333f1e351a4d461da1b33d9
67adef1fd87c737beaf9e600fdfc6cd70f2d2949
'2011-08-18T16:57:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
732d069136b83823eae72d78c3a39cd4
b15128f8e29f72d6f7f7c309510805b51831e8e1
describe
'12778' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXW' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
e503a2b8a73c70c3f579f336931a4b02
f33519713027cd7335d9a348128f6f036bba5517
'2011-08-18T16:41:22-04:00'
describe
'883870' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXX' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
1f21bcc355b44ea4a08d81d16111760e
5fb2be008be66bc6e254184d89e5b40b07a71edd
'2011-08-18T16:59:53-04:00'
describe
'97445' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXY' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
61a8045c11422b8df918a4bf7123a4e6
49ab08f49241afdf69c4bbe34297a2ef41ad6b64
'2011-08-18T17:08:19-04:00'
describe
'31818' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRXZ' 'sip-files00075.pro'
ca8d48b3bed654da3a20b2ee7cd77699
8c232ec3dc0f783d5ecd85a0c87f2e7ecf1596ff
'2011-08-18T16:58:18-04:00'
describe
'37873' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYA' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
fb51ab7df525dc2f3c8108ef75d6b46c
696f02f683660a53809d9dc8b085613960e3c1f9
'2011-08-18T17:12:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYB' 'sip-files00075.tif'
891994de40960b86e4aed4e773c0ce83
72f963aa46b98daea354f66ad9dc5eff9c7ac2d2
'2011-08-18T16:54:18-04:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b2a7d0efe5fd1ba1f5529b7260559b17
9eab137c66c5ec5e76c45fa9f8a31f9748ca7b37
'2011-08-18T17:08:52-04:00'
describe
'10371' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYD' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
9dbbcfa01c18040319a9fead103d8e07
425654841d2da966652bb9636c4ab5469c3f569e
'2011-08-18T16:59:28-04:00'
describe
'893786' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
ef09a88196017f09a57fb49293ff0d66
b3ed9e4b7d9eb478bce6c11d82204385f7abc5c4
'2011-08-18T16:54:32-04:00'
describe
'115942' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
1fef7f3a8ba74d96989e17b07614ee34
c784f2b3cde7961192d1e72f7776e491f6490972
'2011-08-18T16:50:57-04:00'
describe
'17997' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYG' 'sip-files00076.pro'
5ab09c0eb6ca85a7e82924fbd6d50248
8f84be150c0eeb6af917c905b02c02daf543545e
'2011-08-18T16:41:34-04:00'
describe
'38408' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
3d288b3ba5a5d3769afe6440b2360fbe
e5647fee89c34e943425554661ac2bdeb71a7b42
'2011-08-18T17:09:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYI' 'sip-files00076.tif'
892c7e4e8e8663612078a4bd87114c3c
82b60c21ec1183309f360929672cc385cd5c137c
'2011-08-18T17:11:29-04:00'
describe
'728' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYJ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
0f724b191f25eec5eaebab9721053a37
5bcafd2bdc6d07d615bf051f35a1a921499a0ab0
describe
'11124' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
b35e78d35008783b58c6ec73c5622a45
eafb7c212c7bb72c427c441b25ff688007e2896b
'2011-08-18T17:04:53-04:00'
describe
'865703' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYL' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9b21f7fda1b48e23e85ef71db8eec73c
2bf4429126d52239edbe87eb6e1472785c3b9fdf
'2011-08-18T16:58:58-04:00'
describe
'113828' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYM' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
9dcdbaf3bc1c1cb67e404e138545a2ff
5dd4d5d57606a25e625ac58ee3dc941e1a16a716
'2011-08-18T17:08:12-04:00'
describe
'33129' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYN' 'sip-files00077.pro'
db07d76f60fac3cefa239c92bcf63c21
23da467eaf3441780a642121d70658cff51bca72
'2011-08-18T16:59:19-04:00'
describe
'43969' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYO' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
c23902db6f0da3af9fa7bb2c34cd4616
35f2ccd3019aab6b49d28c470a449c66786f99cb
'2011-08-18T16:55:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
1ed4ec2747622794c35d2ebc412409aa
20703ca7f92a75414fdf7ae39fdd270f58d2486f
'2011-08-18T17:04:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYQ' 'sip-files00077.txt'
dee24fca371fb76501c58c8c08c43a67
0046c581d14e61fa12921b4d68d53084b24f5f5c
'2011-08-18T16:46:20-04:00'
describe
'12744' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYR' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
3bd2dc9db07a4368293280791926f505
438e4df9eef3cb861c15e008a16dd5571f12b741
'2011-08-18T16:53:52-04:00'
describe
'893816' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYS' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b73b2c6bb8978312f0dd98e24b56845d
3cbe7c5b6cef851a9cd56eac0c19b2d8c447760d
'2011-08-18T16:58:26-04:00'
describe
'109052' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6053938eb706c31cb1170a2989a15bfd
43d417ae26b8536c45db01a13bf6fbafebb90452
'2011-08-18T16:46:06-04:00'
describe
'32734' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYU' 'sip-files00078.pro'
c3cce72ef3c1a5343d6f8229ac128b92
ffe24d7495327ea38782eed60ef024edfeaa4f85
'2011-08-18T16:57:20-04:00'
describe
'39694' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYV' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
b6f8bbfa821920eab5f005092b7da542
bcc3d83ad2118f8a6fc978c3d4af62a85a92542d
'2011-08-18T16:56:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYW' 'sip-files00078.tif'
cfe3ab6659ff45afdf35fc98705de9ee
f9d6f47e2767da578118777c6d2d3b499610e2cb
'2011-08-18T16:59:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYX' 'sip-files00078.txt'
f7cc8ae9a711e34cd8a1f599898fe340
8287d5d9f56020c414e91a7624b85ed4a7319f3c
'2011-08-18T17:11:54-04:00'
describe
'11602' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYY' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
155ec45edf5c32ce3a5022b29b01f7d0
a8556e1677e31955b4e36ac6f2e28eebd71081e4
'2011-08-18T17:11:52-04:00'
describe
'910872' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRYZ' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
96f53bdd4726ac3aaf93fd7f01143138
fab103924cd649949f1ef53eb423adf18030c770
'2011-08-18T16:54:40-04:00'
describe
'105830' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
7949c81fbf789225ea081c548816b797
5aed1f42b453be452ba4afc57f6773883670e7e4
'2011-08-18T16:53:58-04:00'
describe
'30407' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZB' 'sip-files00079.pro'
40d7fc5f75cdb17add46431076b86bbf
64b873e83c8468bf3eaa88f34437fae9deb0fe65
'2011-08-18T17:01:21-04:00'
describe
'39026' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZC' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
1b687c5b211085436c126eddcd416adc
65dcb5524c86885ba11523eeae77372a6b4554a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZD' 'sip-files00079.tif'
88ad23d74e07a6c9dee886dc8f48b109
04ff8db5a01be169efce27305de06bf72a2e6f08
'2011-08-18T16:49:39-04:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZE' 'sip-files00079.txt'
9880c00d3e53cad36d6baf113071cf94
6b626940678f2734754095567b2fc73789778e93
'2011-08-18T16:41:45-04:00'
describe
'11158' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZF' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
209ceb0394ce71efc4c9cc21fe071a3a
7a5be3e5e1be68a43f1fcdac49e27a427b03e7a2
describe
'893095' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZG' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
2655d7812c9df4d3a6a579422a8ed904
aae521120f59c8376fe1c5dfb5a044444c8bd967
'2011-08-18T16:58:06-04:00'
describe
'110158' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZH' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
56049bcf3a06e9616f1eaaaa4dbeb476
2e3d97a6e918158e7a9ed0e89ded7c94423700f7
'2011-08-18T17:05:19-04:00'
describe
'32304' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZI' 'sip-files00080.pro'
1eea2e406eb5c72f5ccb4775fb536afc
c5648eb515690f6fa5471b189926b868cdaca20a
'2011-08-18T16:58:35-04:00'
describe
'41446' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZJ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
270d319ef7842c85c38b888d81945341
b87ba23e3ba7266866f45f5c67e5212f07b7ca92
'2011-08-18T17:09:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZK' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8a7111971adce3a4f15dfd3ca838d8d4
f8b5a4a855a8121175fdbff88862be369f16df76
'2011-08-18T17:06:36-04:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZL' 'sip-files00080.txt'
8ad360602f5046d7533ebc09b055888b
065ca1600b30ca32b13b48cdb02f31b40711ded9
'2011-08-18T17:01:30-04:00'
describe
'12552' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZM' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
78f4176918e29570ec87489396381d7f
908f5804335de056ce6853f47e8a3fc1c9dba7f1
'2011-08-18T17:02:54-04:00'
describe
'906918' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZN' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
6ec0bd7970c2fe6287c58a8f80481a15
2e437caabcd080224fae60c76d9dca28609a2df5
'2011-08-18T17:09:52-04:00'
describe
'109014' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZO' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
6cc384b20ba31ffcc1c5cc9942efc07e
3c36d15e0ab38b87f800b1afb3c43ef485df24b2
'2011-08-18T17:04:03-04:00'
describe
'31505' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a5a8111cd31c0084d44dfbb97f313fad
ddd38a3a4b7f37f6f6b3bf9ee637fee2574d7e5d
'2011-08-18T17:04:46-04:00'
describe
'41810' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZQ' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
88a820290f2770d951835f7970dcad4c
25815558d5ae553b2ae4119c000641f10591aa77
'2011-08-18T17:00:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZR' 'sip-files00081.tif'
00c69c3c9d896a46b6f152c8d7922325
428fb7e87e727a6d117d136fabc7141a2e6c9049
'2011-08-18T16:59:52-04:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
381df2b495925bb9ee144d998c6ae44f
406230822dab7438ad95a0a8e5bf3e53256f0f0b
'2011-08-18T16:45:09-04:00'
describe
'11961' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
fd78900f65836279447e1e59180898a2
87409a7b04c2e197f7cb89baa927a32160b61968
'2011-08-18T16:53:55-04:00'
describe
'899368' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZU' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
7b7a5a6b5e0dd4391f06f5a2d2606b57
cf7bca26663613adf3890e9a78441d107c381d1b
'2011-08-18T16:51:58-04:00'
describe
'97591' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZV' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
439ceeb734fc1723d6d18ce3697a1134
e8ee3fd3f178dd4bff95df9eb2446594598ed6ad
describe
'33960' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
d07907eb157f7fe056dce7a2b1f4651e
c971f98a203b6c0089c7314cc35b85ebd57d8a1f
'2011-08-18T17:12:39-04:00'
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZX' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
310f867449657dcf3b7eb1986561d364
795166da3ce52c8304b41f711b5a399c028097ee
'2011-08-18T17:00:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZY' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d51d924da69afe441e69131fb0b556b6
0c774f0f27522386c75d02a011cff6d9b684284d
'2011-08-18T16:54:12-04:00'
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABRZZ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
a80726ceb2353e7c9cbb385166cd9b60
1959746d34591ab3a52a5a95e1f2ce5b97e15719
'2011-08-18T17:00:09-04:00'
describe
'10493' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAA' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
346d6c1871c26c3715c9a3bfb014553c
905f4351a3a075026fe6707573e1368004596721
'2011-08-18T16:59:42-04:00'
describe
'899335' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAB' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
6fde32b3c40e1a863a49fbc50e086d07
395c57fe487cfc8595f0cb988c56eadbcbbf7fb9
'2011-08-18T17:02:45-04:00'
describe
'115632' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAC' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
cc5c1f6fabeaba192366b51f50f5165c
833d413c9b2234604336c04bed93cad3d1ca80d8
'2011-08-18T17:00:50-04:00'
describe
'16669' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAD' 'sip-files00083.pro'
8e0381fc3e090ab8891eb4e6c1e03040
521bd43a042e57b68fd3f92cea17ebe64c40e0b3
'2011-08-18T16:57:29-04:00'
describe
'37964' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAE' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5d8cbe470e8893bfa67a0b580685fc73
6992cfbee500cbb0170ccccc9a280343e6967699
'2011-08-18T16:55:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAF' 'sip-files00083.tif'
6507102e1913adff43af059ec9443a77
f0989ad2ae5b98367dcd5c1f8870c961efa8dff7
'2011-08-18T17:10:44-04:00'
describe
'721' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
feecb0ace5289720be1b5b19f09268f2
36cca312d6cc4ee0fa79bf1800cfff6630f4eefb
'2011-08-18T17:10:42-04:00'
describe
'11289' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAH' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
628d1257f3d028fabe61f37ae74fa22f
8d9782493ebf9875ec991348e08e9a6750f7929f
describe
'903235' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAI' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b6e366ca54cb1ca17b5872bb23099365
93e4f5a1dea1687099a7f039f5ecd90802e184dd
describe
'123673' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAJ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
130320ae3e0199595f8b553e8772712e
0e0f7185af1154bb54038a490a8e5658eb06c2d6
'2011-08-18T16:50:55-04:00'
describe
'33966' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAK' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4c1f6134924333680ad3f1e09714d09c
9afb2eaaf552b549f38e065a3eca1b6f9be10bfc
'2011-08-18T17:07:57-04:00'
describe
'45718' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
e6a30895b40af49ecb1138a3a7906c5e
7cece673dfdad57c6490d7445381ae99523a0b92
'2011-08-18T17:05:51-04:00'
describe
'7234699' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAM' 'sip-files00084.tif'
dfd78f0e1239952a90ef425c961c6057
34963c2736149a9724550abb452ddfaa63390d99
'2011-08-18T17:01:13-04:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAN' 'sip-files00084.txt'
9297706d756eddf74d532d503c185cc9
ee31cfdf1769bc0945003d99a774e89cfa110664
'2011-08-18T16:44:42-04:00'
describe
'12949' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAO' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
a4ca509a3a7e852ac1c6d5519a4e7537
59ca3740757b1883ce8a76212dd6d44a54920891
'2011-08-18T16:46:21-04:00'
describe
'912782' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAP' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e683e9436607db864c8e03a44232832f
0129a228609129e99d26aa25112201b9c7ae3952
'2011-08-18T17:04:27-04:00'
describe
'113601' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAQ' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
f744875616a56e2a0180a9069277bc7d
01dc4fb50378a410d424baef11973e8e5df1d343
'2011-08-18T16:54:14-04:00'
describe
'33015' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAR' 'sip-files00085.pro'
35e43ebd95f273a9e670c59575fa6bcc
f26bdf340d23c34624facd2bcf18887700fb4866
'2011-08-18T16:58:12-04:00'
describe
'43010' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAS' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9a8de2e4470cc636de63da11d53e003e
bf95f378df2a13181107de4766f25f4496cf2caa
describe
'7311375' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAT' 'sip-files00085.tif'
064761e4c5dd3d6991ae2f0985e623f4
0a80c078a212ec8ac79b1f7babd0de1f3b032335
'2011-08-18T16:59:38-04:00'
describe
'1321' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAU' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a6fe492ae1519f8477248cdf01a3da73
9661911a5747130c7a5e16e3f4c12cdf287fcdd3
'2011-08-18T17:07:05-04:00'
describe
'12285' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAV' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1e35041ba97fd5651bcf0886cc800d80
aab46d6f177b2288f44fecd0180a8137b8e97661
'2011-08-18T16:53:32-04:00'
describe
'922128' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAW' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
a92e96cb21bd720fcd6dc79d596225a9
b716ff82542a15d462e6d02c431807ae6ccfbb09
'2011-08-18T17:03:17-04:00'
describe
'102915' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAX' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
76a6a324f8006a3767ceff8c6020f62f
7bc585647832383ab01ec15103070df168df868f
'2011-08-18T17:03:44-04:00'
describe
'32368' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
1f92a010dd1ee37b887fb80cd85a3fc7
506d2f3437bf892c97d4f4c2cb1267cda7543b6c
'2011-08-18T17:02:14-04:00'
describe
'38597' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSAZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
1406990432006b534328da270ee79fd2
c8e6f4e0e0feea3ece5875caef399946ddca1664
describe
'7386319' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBA' 'sip-files00086.tif'
5aee342903b8dd455dd0c9f0ce714785
b744b509c79fa0ccf592bea6dbbe4cb80e9547b9
'2011-08-18T16:53:23-04:00'
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBB' 'sip-files00086.txt'
44ec3e587bbe487d1383e79ba1ad718a
ec41b4050c72e0b7eb47f9df025ba49e34f6a8df
'2011-08-18T16:54:37-04:00'
describe
'10659' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e202f088a9e023870632e1f1e83e5b68
a70d1854f69150edaaee185d3b08b07f8780d301
'2011-08-18T17:04:47-04:00'
describe
'907587' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBD' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
0e38293bd0fb9258bc2e3954364426d7
558364f872d8075026a13fb805296d39e4482772
describe
'113170' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
e1b9234be1605a21a7df53949613fcd1
a39e1deefea5d1d1ef8609050da6adf7e33a396a
describe
'33933' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBF' 'sip-files00087.pro'
78d3259be892a59b80e619a33d3108af
3fbd01f11bc0b413f87f7a9d2f4bb8eadab9dd46
describe
'42302' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBG' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
b44af069821a13465041a7489ed2de33
9f170464d2e6f9116d0caeb2335ca3883c401dfb
'2011-08-18T16:56:18-04:00'
describe
'7269661' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBH' 'sip-files00087.tif'
d0853cacab4365dbe715b5c02dd749fe
d4f9b172bdcedaf62034431507579fdf94364e53
'2011-08-18T17:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBI' 'sip-files00087.txt'
7244fd2ee44b6ccffef98616900ee7b8
b7ebe85cf93c4169d17e5db255cadf2cb3440926
'2011-08-18T17:09:20-04:00'
describe
'13019' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBJ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
8812abc84742153a15121c99a04d0daf
25875359434a72636b49e4a39eed78dddb561309
describe
'906904' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBK' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
f40cf238b0a546822986afcb3250a8c3
cc1e1ce7a9b2a1014beaabd3de256b5d5ddfd799
'2011-08-18T17:04:21-04:00'
describe
'112237' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
f528a37ba91368b523d6ae28ec951ff1
4ac50ab2f51b1023e3111ffe6c4b69dbcb6ed1e7
'2011-08-18T16:54:34-04:00'
describe
'33030' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
6946692c0e0bd25852758c1a5b279910
d990f2effe3660d4aaab9812fffe42442d9c4d17
'2011-08-18T16:56:48-04:00'
describe
'43032' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
63eb77b76f856ebe2faf0e0493f97c0a
13b0eded9af16c3d2dd827a1378db2e769b607ed
'2011-08-18T16:58:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
a4b46bc5a6110747c3dacde98f24ba31
2a70377ee88f4059ab1be1c3a6c3575df112ec7d
'2011-08-18T17:12:17-04:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
80256d6e5b1024cc20e3843e2cffc0a2
f8f313e096fc857adf644cccef27efad99f8ea82
'2011-08-18T16:58:48-04:00'
describe
'12140' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5cd575d1f7c779e734f3693d4ee98087
2e853f10a09d63ae32e31e4e809a14cc1f012367
'2011-08-18T17:12:16-04:00'
describe
'909570' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
7be96d46f82d2131642f7bb9ef78a0e1
91f23532548e4688ffa033fd2d537fe957585b61
'2011-08-18T17:05:15-04:00'
describe
'104366' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0443ef1abf8fdfb00ed2a5392fc48b09
e750a7c5d3d653f894973daf9508916dcb2a7173
'2011-08-18T17:10:00-04:00'
describe
'33567' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBT' 'sip-files00089.pro'
03e3514c4beb50c4a2b3ae3fb9bca6af
a5bedd31777977d7707b80a35e53c1410cb1fefa
'2011-08-18T16:56:11-04:00'
describe
'39430' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
9ea81c9783ef685f90a619e0f61c1b74
ac9b13a2ad5626d966716075105b3ef555a41e7d
'2011-08-18T16:59:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
cbda73bacb63f203208e6676f2299f3e
26681a833c49babd94a3de7b7e85332efae9656f
'2011-08-18T16:59:22-04:00'
describe
'1414' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
2139b55069df7ac04bdf13c9da0bbd79
9761cc1a38d24a4d2b3ed26608385908a335d057
describe
'11584' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
0aceaf1f31d08fb26dfba37aa6117325
45d0b95ddfe13227bee7f65026629244d00ca250
'2011-08-18T16:50:54-04:00'
describe
'907559' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
392b9b13d6bf165391bbb7153b0d1728
ab2a1b418b3833f7701a5b3047f7356d5d9a03b0
'2011-08-18T17:10:12-04:00'
describe
'106115' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSBZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
04809b8cfc41affa210aef764de4a3c7
5823170815f5f87795f7a15a80cf69859838801f
'2011-08-18T16:56:46-04:00'
describe
'30578' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c3e73799e4558759d8ec77a27ff139ba
8480b5c121772d05b1ff120208836b32cf33a564
describe
'39879' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
9b6b44c0f19e0a1e4153f4cb9fc6714e
0c8c6eff134132c52c4a44476517c25a7e4696e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
abae2a02275940250bb392b062b59309
0f365881549e297e75c94720ef698fc20cbed794
'2011-08-18T17:06:29-04:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
1d1890b6072097692681f3676ca8e543
083544cdcc1cbdf264087a3bfec9f15ef2f8141e
describe
'12687' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e487d842af3a7d63a16f1233622d9b2d
9c49b5e138535c78a7648f4c93fa1969cb66f671
'2011-08-18T16:57:03-04:00'
describe
'916911' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
d8b32ad2cedc84c805cc45ace7da7011
7158d8e2a7f1e771d73a3ed357e17bc37de63d4e
'2011-08-18T17:11:14-04:00'
describe
'114732' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
2d0168e25eb4d33ecfef556ff209aed4
0bdd4c7c292c62ae9df476153b46e1a876a688e9
'2011-08-18T16:53:41-04:00'
describe
'33059' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
6caaaeafbc1494bc9bf9bcf1cc914d43
bfe60d572fe0e53d1dbac97eb94bf3c665effe13
describe
'44102' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
8f36d9a97f06f4a794e30d76acd0f9cf
eba4ec9758f1ab18fa6475ad77908d82bc3588c7
'2011-08-18T16:49:14-04:00'
describe
'7344277' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
3aef7f601de443289db4a80b4a1bf9d1
190af35ea754a2b3a31fb5d8e59c4bd6f405254f
'2011-08-18T16:53:27-04:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
2741d5ded4646b648b6c22e6232f6a4d
662938a0f14ce39b46030830f7a5b21380e26dca
'2011-08-18T16:53:54-04:00'
describe
'12363' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
dfbdcc45c8284530f09a540b3ca58fe7
958d4091028c8a2ce5544e2e59d74ad4a2365c21
'2011-08-18T16:59:16-04:00'
describe
'895912' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5c9dc45c47823c191fcb3fce761f70e6
f7d0992a2a602cabc3fdd4e96bfb76cbc8eb7ede
describe
'92632' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
546b9e52c0dc8d7b5559c688081334bc
ca7825cfdc92e101ca8841d608b18db31bf2ad2b
describe
'30917' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
48fcd422314bffc984c72ef5a71dc72b
e38d6aba4ffa5068929afe2818279e2cff21044d
'2011-08-18T16:54:06-04:00'
describe
'33642' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
5798d2563443f4106f01543e0a79068b
bddec79861eb2c64e59981e2427215c9c78c7c52
'2011-08-18T17:04:39-04:00'
describe
'7177601' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
23469a1fc61926d359c8225841dee85b
5969a513dd59897703b3fa7cf6f112f6cc1e4571
'2011-08-18T17:04:13-04:00'
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
e226b0048890ecd3eb8fe2135d87ae84
41dd04bf26718774c71fa1faa92679e140b7939c
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
5dbe595e4c3df9d54d33596fb59424fb
2522930da4d25ed38914f17b98d9a404997383c8
'2011-08-18T16:46:05-04:00'
describe
'904350' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
cc2838859d974580977d48106ead2f77
5eb439248d01f6a10eac4de31814ecc0038b48ae
describe
'124373' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
adb9cfc14960fd2543c6421906db9cf5
2abfe8e8d30a65e63053e78038fe6d34dff6c8da
'2011-08-18T16:57:23-04:00'
describe
'9428' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
f0c9a09699c98666dbb0db4b6cafdcab
c48599bf12ca702b9eeb4463ed2c8c73080c6da7
'2011-08-18T16:47:41-04:00'
describe
'37301' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
17dd971c68f7dbee6058811c58cfb494
72e347fc364de53110bb32361819bc04025f079f
'2011-08-18T16:56:08-04:00'
describe
'7243851' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
09edd8a66b8766dd5e4806bf0ae7bbc1
d80ccebc8e262af1c99aa47b806eaeeb51226649
'2011-08-18T16:56:06-04:00'
describe
'373' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
fc6aa3437f792b16325a86bfd68b5f27
328882c988b8ad38e2c35863ffff1c3aae59df2e
describe
'10466' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSCZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
3d162ccf292a33a92763ff9c85dd65f6
0e99e885db98c1c783012210a3208c1d1f148e9d
describe
'883591' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
5162281392c5dae22ba767d68ffc2325
2f10e74fc36b41d94e3e130911499b51092ed2a3
'2011-08-18T16:57:24-04:00'
describe
'107696' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f312a1859879dee06640032f5350fcd7
90f27fa084ba64a1b6b1739d7e2415fb4849a86b
'2011-08-18T16:56:27-04:00'
describe
'31797' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
392961e9823e39fc18d2d6bf0e9f9c5c
d376dbb1a6522cc17778e7998be7275718ecb72c
'2011-08-18T17:01:39-04:00'
describe
'42182' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
bd8d661da9b86802872209bd086a2b55
980a95662cf58a7e17a9f74cb7d524c9e5110846
describe
'7075315' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b4c135d2e233371656277afabb5fd7b5
502c61785f54369e162fba07183b0d5a74ea42c8
'2011-08-18T16:53:50-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
db6795bbd6db849387da0ce2c4b56256
69baec4cac8094e1a577706207ea54236644c844
'2011-08-18T17:11:13-04:00'
describe
'12214' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
202319539c198f6ff1934ae6a6b547f8
d6807422767dee44ab894c4152e379d28b792458
describe
'907966' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ee6e80a97fba4e7b8361cef26a691796
5de8dfa98372c0257958055c8193ca5b28d6ee04
'2011-08-18T16:57:01-04:00'
describe
'106337' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
789801daa75c393059eaab0a807a8ddd
6f643c166e06181f34c18099553028a17af8eeee
'2011-08-18T17:11:25-04:00'
describe
'31129' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e47f47c7d396fe31b986bfbdf0d8824f
d4e7483be6175cc8d77f36bd31f71a8189ce778f
'2011-08-18T16:46:25-04:00'
describe
'40518' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
ff52cea141b331cf1290d09de303c0ea
8610e73460ac38fad307f0742f55708d2df28c95
describe
'7272983' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
041c7b04f00d969cb20c48011206773f
65db52a1ada000da85e2b98ea55a6b7d2896ed58
'2011-08-18T16:55:23-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
287665e68e70db2e57876b76b97ed79d
8277e14cb23ad0ba4fdfa53cf113ab84c18632a5
'2011-08-18T17:06:09-04:00'
describe
'11696' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
0a46f758633d368da1edf0abce9a4a89
c5ac926020298575c42fdf9b81b31328b56df901
'2011-08-18T16:53:33-04:00'
describe
'926290' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8c35ba428c5db8cd2d7d9c240a8786e8
581bedbb9a4c506f2cc61df80fd27792a68e9760
'2011-08-18T17:12:48-04:00'
describe
'113055' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
7115c727f859e022484d073e6562db42
340978dc108ad45ef1bbc4fd05d9ec93d485e427
'2011-08-18T16:53:25-04:00'
describe
'33646' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
c27687ead1308b432292d1f21f2b7f2b
ff670a2e9c212dd25c82a89f9b0e897db02891e8
'2011-08-18T17:04:59-04:00'
describe
'42536' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
8f1b6622c424731cf32c662083673f5a
35314476ea103a2edb0dee83ec0c8b59e0e015a5
describe
'7419387' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
edff465f68bda9d9eb1d3f3883c17dfb
6b8e3932392bdb64d6960d8f635458fb872d5e4b
'2011-08-18T17:02:10-04:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
08e096120b5dd3356dc055754cdf7db0
e36380117e5d4330c7d76c193ffc1785adb908f7
describe
'12173' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
aa358c436daaaa2d2eed0b9d9e4f7fc7
0b333ea994a27aca36fae9cffc365f145e56a692
'2011-08-18T16:42:08-04:00'
describe
'899374' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
aae64b0116409023f1b2f05ba170888f
08ef278b0dad46de97deb4db49f66d6fb9c72476
describe
'109331' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
40a447ff80229a461021467b41a4eb67
df651632c1627cc741a681f8686afbc52e0529c5
'2011-08-18T17:06:45-04:00'
describe
'39731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9647666f88f496bd08b195354de1e51f
27a9dd94dd7c109057039ace7cafa1b2234e0885
'2011-08-18T17:12:37-04:00'
describe
'40527' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
33430d134e98f5919153dfd165b88b70
157c30c9ac4a1d9a4ec8314c8c75791e8316d43d
'2011-08-18T16:58:37-04:00'
describe
'7204103' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSDZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
c1987d9d35adff3bc77c54bb2a7491c8
0a8b7e1388ab0c33b245b031dc3b7e5be79ab6cb
'2011-08-18T17:04:05-04:00'
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d41caa06a504df54e32c27ad6de1fff6
709a3f1ae51687ffcf5a50067aadb0ba128c71a5
'2011-08-18T17:03:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
ba6318d47a66b7cef3a9e9fa80ec80f2
1931eeee08b119fb90a545e8aa416252adde1fdb
'2011-08-18T16:55:24-04:00'
describe
'892951' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
b24d63a496a8cd03f9a70e5f66fd6e7d
f2ee1c65f3a45547d16fd7ec3b98ad05124ed8ff
'2011-08-18T17:10:38-04:00'
describe
'116581' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSED' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
9719c4608c04eb060c54ad4ee2243ac2
f4d7d96b769dd3fea36b905598b35a5f1a2f95e7
'2011-08-18T16:41:06-04:00'
describe
'16012' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
46fb3d34f2a185d5f220c6bd78dc81ef
af79ce9d0c74eba0e3b5589a7626a1e731e5ffa1
'2011-08-18T17:06:15-04:00'
describe
'39375' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5c05181f53e703e8b0acfd8a3875f658
06f93ce17495048e5ef6d283ce7a41b96c762329
describe
'7152283' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
6b7747eeb4dfc1bde0f598f0f6d246da
dce1bf2ccd555b298e7349410d207e4f1df54d91
'2011-08-18T16:50:25-04:00'
describe
'646' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
03b851e071f5a9ee3b04222a554b8fe1
3083b2824f857dda170f3b20f974e6c788065d1a
'2011-08-18T16:50:17-04:00'
describe
'11113' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
b6f669921c5726ed2aee739f4ba13056
f785d4fbb6cc819f45af7a5a1b8f83ce43bc842d
'2011-08-18T17:08:34-04:00'
describe
'881734' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ae1170aee78b658bfff9dd69b668c7dd
5a0159cee3d9b1c120b0748f9471ef85007ea570
'2011-08-18T17:10:47-04:00'
describe
'113017' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
b55892960ef5f080f45b0b42122eead1
ba8690b2075e11ab6294cb8a0460a682002d2601
'2011-08-18T16:56:41-04:00'
describe
'32954' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
989741a7c863c88596b2e3b7fea265e5
debdc32d109da4533a4e58d075fb00e853b5ea72
'2011-08-18T17:12:23-04:00'
describe
'43736' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0d9ceeb3d941b57cd1703bdd06b617cf
647864ce9aff7c7c26fdd6f0ac0d217576785ede
describe
'7062979' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ca3a1595adec89e2fe0d868607396911
28c24a042bb0ebd01e858e65a031424cda85fafe
'2011-08-18T16:55:09-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
f81838554284dcdfd9db87255446e1f5
d1056e5e2859a8a51212397240bc1ca714846cc5
describe
'12479' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3e97c2d904eba4e1a793d9dbb9d2c953
2a9142f2724d71ea3e6281d7428f57edb70ab135
'2011-08-18T16:55:45-04:00'
describe
'894184' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7782cc26a033e2221d9af954a18eefa9
c700d47981e3642cb7d4c7b318ecbd76579d654f
describe
'111032' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSER' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ac0efac42c20ffca2e5aee4109c03089
c871eed231adf602535eb8962773a0b54e4b7f31
'2011-08-18T16:43:47-04:00'
describe
'31202' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSES' 'sip-files00100.pro'
887939b625d64cfcbb0d9c786de54be7
31cbddd94d4092249b8489350c9777e805662b3c
'2011-08-18T16:41:56-04:00'
describe
'42379' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSET' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8320c39e0fdfc92774abc16364dda93d
647996d4124da809112c4e0cda6d425736a918d2
'2011-08-18T17:11:43-04:00'
describe
'7162275' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
437b3d62e7aa67d379e3514c3f59aa8d
e1cf0487bd63a1e07a67dd2804cd4e69b008ce1d
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
2c93bd017ec470bbb8f9b967c38bad65
0872283da45950bdfda191fd8c96cc7d4486cf43
'2011-08-18T16:59:39-04:00'
describe
'11825' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1273dd139dee44d9229701c5fd882d0b
059ae265466d78b35816989c18072d354eac34e4
'2011-08-18T16:44:45-04:00'
describe
'895490' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
f680099dffa07ce1a333e49726eceacc
478ad1f2401fce58667575cddfaaab72dc50e33e
describe
'111419' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
b027f2987e165b711f931eaf3ae7685f
02dc7a21cc80ef348f7847ebd1534d7ab47ef6d4
'2011-08-18T16:55:11-04:00'
describe
'36718' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSEZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
6b44905e55feef13f3252fc557c1eb6f
1c367b6284b3eea099fcd1566ab636de7baaffc3
'2011-08-18T16:42:42-04:00'
describe
'40788' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
e93d504b1bad891b432807edae6a9b0c
fc2ac7976d39e81e1a13ce9bf2ddac57013e28ba
'2011-08-18T16:50:35-04:00'
describe
'7173107' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
cf4c39c5b1f478daba9728edd3e6f374
b3a891fdfb3a3efb5368f6050888a3a274d42dfd
'2011-08-18T16:48:21-04:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
886b5c3cea1cdd778dbd5bc2a6073e93
8253cb34938ef7fb4e66227e72cc2d6d37acf794
'2011-08-18T17:06:44-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11793' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFD' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
be9e350c0695d0d91ea9f3ac0658dac4
32ebfe087473e4510ddf0e3fe47bfcca35c2e1f5
describe
'910094' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
daa3100ab256fc7c8f854c2bb2cd3f5b
c7df8b8533b7ca1bc7368bfbccabe160640d77b7
'2011-08-18T17:03:50-04:00'
describe
'124330' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f3507adc223d8f14cb0c3c08f55f415b
e2681f704a39d069da516822c6a1ea23777095a3
'2011-08-18T16:55:57-04:00'
describe
'18377' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2d31c38e8d91178fc34c594c0c161177
24aaa2460a5fb26ca3001bcf977135b615c222ff
describe
'40165' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
c0aaf1deb4732ba471a6ea447eafd85b
9ad6a37e259178ce124b401a1d789a1b2fdb242d
'2011-08-18T16:45:21-04:00'
describe
'7289373' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFI' 'sip-files00102.tif'
68dada33093cc660504887ee76157fb1
3579fadc152e5250c362e9b1b20047985139f51f
'2011-08-18T16:42:09-04:00'
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
4f0202d499087c963445174cecba2407
079e300b013cbf971fdc26e36b46ea70dcd28007
'2011-08-18T16:59:04-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11240' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
eeb5bf27b39374daeb8a5e192f78da78
c7c0d54f43274b1c412239e428cbb9ff6d41e2ad
describe
'876890' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4c321d15f0a130bf129bcb05204009bb
e93f0f2ee4d33426d371d0570e1844a27d9ee3b8
'2011-08-18T16:44:56-04:00'
describe
'117254' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
6dca0c846a623032dedb9836798d7000
ca33d7cf48ab11f050b1e284152f1b019d0e8f3f
'2011-08-18T17:07:13-04:00'
describe
'33050' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
97c1c5602b310aa9ee92d229e534c910
1630a0f83b4f6bb2fdaae412f98bd6d790305ef4
'2011-08-18T17:12:09-04:00'
describe
'44150' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
bc078f01d24f84303339f80bfc1ff5a7
587be728a1583474b5e4c9875f2454e04d95f807
'2011-08-18T17:10:41-04:00'
describe
'7023783' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
461305dff114ea409d589bd3bb6bb92d
ffc3c3379af016535809ac17756571f5abf41292
'2011-08-18T16:45:34-04:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
176cf4afaaf14fe9aad9b949d80f7168
b510b277ae3d97de464ef78161c29874245b1f2f
'2011-08-18T17:03:24-04:00'
describe
'12740' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
28f24db08b0b11eadff749fa25d6b0f5
879c381942e5f7e5db7c8929a987d25d7d4f3467
'2011-08-18T16:57:33-04:00'
describe
'883739' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
c064bcc9e694aca5ad79d206fd02d7b2
b3d6c22e1227f76e8fbae2ff7614a46b85f4e7ba
'2011-08-18T16:56:58-04:00'
describe
'112263' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
52b66781e1c48cf854622c9c2a933768
d5dcdb0c3c4737d219963ca4f2eb7e5607af852f
'2011-08-18T17:03:38-04:00'
describe
'31401' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
66a5dce3ed65a10881cc65329dd93a95
1ff363f189ab9dd103685aba2a4f5f010c5fe7a7
'2011-08-18T17:08:11-04:00'
describe
'43305' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
ddf02fc6e8db131140151311c28cc809
2ecd825832dc7dcc604bd6054b11999cf86f99b6
describe
'7078565' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
73f71ac7cb49024c3e721053c7760cfa
f629a98b63ac711998773372f2e5c3393079651a
'2011-08-18T16:56:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
b1f52c9d955e0c644511e7717146e964
1f11bd434814f3a3894661945784132c2f93f890
'2011-08-18T16:55:20-04:00'
describe
'12521' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
85bdab1bb6ee82546dbd76880476aaff
2f37186b255a3d08b334e3127a9586cc85bbfac2
'2011-08-18T17:09:55-04:00'
describe
'882602' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSFZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
5628e3c739ab720aca6230e584a9af74
952b6941058f10a5d1e8ccb7abb385f7b5f4d387
'2011-08-18T16:53:59-04:00'
describe
'110794' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
dd9525bdc489d69cc5ae5359bc08f310
197ad37f88ae2b4bdc95593f25ca55f799bdc981
'2011-08-18T16:57:26-04:00'
describe
'31633' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
4d75f18c4692a8e364a4cf4edf8bdb4f
fd65c10bb355706e8042e199e2e8503ccb8b96f0
'2011-08-18T17:08:13-04:00'
describe
'42166' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
e20f320ac90e5e711294e763cf3351a6
dd1bb0bb2ac088076732dd3348bebca9b9c95447
'2011-08-18T17:02:24-04:00'
describe
'7069787' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
9b0fe99d262bd87484d73322ab1fcdae
b23110216350fc1ea1760863c5e64d0ebf049bc5
'2011-08-18T17:07:09-04:00'
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
3e1d5f782c0d327b151e1ce5e51bdd6b
82fc87f1c9e625ac26b61b54686195cb28137b85
'2011-08-18T17:03:33-04:00'
describe
'12707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
8df6c2a18653c98ea03e313d079e2d41
5ea425d5f0fcc3b876287342127ca250f23abbc1
describe
'877494' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
b0b80b99cca68d92bb309f8a453f0680
2d67cdc5b6bc41f086b0176ba15f0ad42a55e06b
'2011-08-18T16:42:11-04:00'
describe
'107570' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
87dd275bacd440887ff7cc6d93043eec
6be403ebbbe27ba269e315cdd6da75c57e5ca68d
'2011-08-18T17:12:51-04:00'
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c4ec4746c437129958cf43ce5e11b183
1620531365ca58b8edf4f379e976f2a9b278b76f
'2011-08-18T16:54:28-04:00'
describe
'41117' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
c2cc406bcae61d1ff4ee386e622c21ae
f9f537d6e94ebe29a5ec2e6451d425ca4de078d8
describe
'7028739' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
f73b87f10e9c752c9f57b758f37a5fd1
47142612ec6c334229b6cf6f3ddbcbd6d67c8f1c
'2011-08-18T16:59:57-04:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
1ec1b8d148e7edd43fdbc47ddc53e646
b77cdb1a09b2260ca9c0bcdf738e0ca3885bed40
'2011-08-18T17:05:25-04:00'
describe
'12903' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e105d01e7c52266491ee1d0446ab1011
82237e9681c5e6e26a191a6774b785a542f223b2
'2011-08-18T17:06:11-04:00'
describe
'894052' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
72debd39370e486967074af06af71cc6
54344a9cba78483848ad704f47dbedeeab9416ca
describe
'91712' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9dfc36ff9385bfb5654e14ebd69ef991
3b7ae2c1f57c6f1b2e04e701f8f36e1ba1b439c9
'2011-08-18T16:59:30-04:00'
describe
'30372' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
1558ad9697db72d40a6badb1b6b115e9
bbd1d4d3cead75e24fec6ea94c166c7942dbe8d5
'2011-08-18T16:56:20-04:00'
describe
'34915' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1a6d59c7c817f84fc76a14a3a9e5cdf0
98ed093042e1efb8661195f3176cc39607c85356
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
6e4ecd67fa83fa88d5c15c0d68cabb37
7ba8e88bda737ebf691d8a90e0c6175b6660e9e8
'2011-08-18T17:11:58-04:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
7c36ee7af64bfa3ce1c5ce88603467fe
3e7d8e31688a5b5e25bd8d12a5c7219edafee199
'2011-08-18T17:06:25-04:00'
describe
'9692' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
a1acd3f932cd09dd59f4213977a0b76e
5eda3f792ef867c92f8d376e6e6e9b6fe4f472cd
'2011-08-18T16:58:23-04:00'
describe
'876722' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
6626b77afcf514ddc1c2ac6877775043
a62e1d12fe31a7d190340526a12f95cc87d5dbeb
'2011-08-18T17:03:06-04:00'
describe
'108070' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f55a0b40a3d56ab24a2a6d9c28619a4d
7e14a8130ae4c5567bae0baa1bc14a3bb106d493
describe
'32600' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
bf558632f55aaabab2dfb0a9cbdfa19b
340976d2b68c64737a43d4d928e1e8be91a43f3d
'2011-08-18T17:06:38-04:00'
describe
'40508' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e78f4e5e43c122d1bf3e7a50cdfb14e2
ce4cbbfef1ce7aeb1908e5224768a65768197079
'2011-08-18T17:07:20-04:00'
describe
'7020359' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
d821749bb48774e0851dd2eeb7563343
46198bae7c94796b718d6726c7e6086353502ce1
'2011-08-18T17:06:21-04:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSGZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
1695d3f94f616780aaa77de59af412bd
9593347cd530aca2fc6dae9f034a1e2c871ad447
'2011-08-18T16:46:41-04:00'
describe
'12228' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
953192128bf3ff95bd77f9a302c2e1dc
7a4d05ace8040d54783f8e4b30e5b1fba5e70211
'2011-08-18T17:00:49-04:00'
describe
'893464' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
ed4128eba45209fcab2e68f9db3a82f6
33aad768f662734d0f0e60c135f13811ad93d67a
'2011-08-18T17:01:57-04:00'
describe
'106131' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e541a673b74f235f7f85883441b28f26
40edab80adda0f13b7435cf0d88aaf650a2a3af9
'2011-08-18T16:52:37-04:00'
describe
'28881' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
dbbc89c09411e92105d1d09f1dada8ef
0cbd9afb3ae1b4bf24f9bd7c3837c6349c7354f4
describe
'40148' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
1000be8f60479b5a603138a602b88bd2
6c00c37a3f1607519c5d1f68ba070656d41ab38a
'2011-08-18T17:09:43-04:00'
describe
'7156579' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e8cbc73e16aaa174a051b725f16a85bc
96a340d112cdefd131e77a993b2e8bdf95f23fb5
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
ef2e7f27c86d3deb2fb98d152461b2e4
bf4f7d41a278aa9f3c2f76b13d21432b6133c649
describe
'11464' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
884bff266039cc2787fecdd997f084ab
b7510539b518f2acb3163cffec89aa68f057fd55
'2011-08-18T17:01:53-04:00'
describe
'905399' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d5f557fd44c6e7d97ee09006e7c90f1f
864a607afaac476b5509cb2a8763654c112686e8
'2011-08-18T16:58:15-04:00'
describe
'116242' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
8bf654faa4c151ba3909ef4f63a192c0
3af744838d83a8e7d8e212914b5cc79d54d46974
describe
'32769' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9fbcbc92cfd4e69a129fc1701531c531
d36acf95be0fc344bae28848595a5aeb99672a73
'2011-08-18T16:56:35-04:00'
describe
'45014' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
039128d196665bf6d7ccb5311f914aa5
f4837e799fe685b2e7df7b961c7e1dfcc8d67c83
'2011-08-18T17:12:02-04:00'
describe
'7251869' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
b005bbf340695340fc864e6533edbf39
65e3b1c6e4a05ffc31600415f067c015d8153511
'2011-08-18T16:54:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
2fc2d094102ff52e26913fc63e561712
02449876b2aff38e2cbed2c7085fb5e32f5aee54
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
7f4d8825653ca7cda21ac74a1f2f583c
fdec14c79559a1e2ee3b7edaf7b770152d1d3e6b
'2011-08-18T16:50:07-04:00'
describe
'906534' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
c248e80135bbdd290cd53d57b176eadb
f70d7b479abbb25db0270cd65f7508aa542c6ee2
describe
'117832' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
229fcefe93535c69a8bf37ee9a10a53d
df2ec4fa560effd50cdb3e3ddeffa12e96fc4368
'2011-08-18T17:11:45-04:00'
describe
'32953' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d0550534578450bdb2cb8d90d9a1bf83
2dafbf9229bd48d9ca18e86d83a7ed376b9b6fef
'2011-08-18T16:58:39-04:00'
describe
'45512' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
caf70c109ac1f4120d60435e7889613c
d1347b28d6fbdbf9aae3f9a7f70cf31c75994bf4
'2011-08-18T16:58:45-04:00'
describe
'7261571' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
eb975242fa7340390f2c42933b0cac20
5dda97b32548234c9c2a1c94e956168f7b9094b4
'2011-08-18T16:57:25-04:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
48c74b3a555fe371e05e7b6105677485
e721cb1ebe28a10f8ccfcd8afbfb5da81e4953e6
describe
'12581' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
9748ee109a7158ccaed51fe048bb40ed
be64a36150bca4b56a3c61d6213d793cc69bba67
'2011-08-18T17:09:42-04:00'
describe
'894151' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
0a1434fc598519d4b1d164640a00c06c
d3c5dca36936fb8d1528823cb7b48d7590b92158
describe
'111896' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c1f4afb61f3fe61b5e344bcdaac6bd1b
efce526f84bf40f899a97a7c1f6baaf7f5447170
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
ed7be58e7e52e915751bb847cacd3f55
03a641515a3cb8e719ae49a9d77e838f3452a9f5
describe
'40783' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSHZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
26e03857bec6786bd2acfef4dcc10d42
4a266cb37444da308ce58f57991f61d9e7a6bb22
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
b75d263802a9448078479043d1d57ff9
54d7bb6ff0ff25b2e9a02dfad8484d5574f26596
'2011-08-18T16:57:19-04:00'
describe
'1471' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4319a7f1d81c1f9cdfab8b246f8c9fa7
28dee4c8fa50df24cedd8d64fa514c7a73dc59f7
'2011-08-18T16:54:45-04:00'
describe
'11879' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cd2699cb0d6e834bd5d8a078c21aec64
d849404096b7d8ed2381aacddb804b790d7cc3b0
describe
'900387' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSID' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
0e8c31b2d2a0db83e7898defc648fab8
892d677c50119ce99785ce729df4c816ff6602a8
'2011-08-18T16:56:42-04:00'
describe
'117851' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
6bcec8b6d06f90c2b71732b76f0bced7
fc4569e024ddc39d37070fc5c7ceee256058b8f3
describe
'18724' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
b51a26ade14284350d221afc4d18db8f
109832afde1809f99eaa1dbb3625a2729c629f0b
describe
'39251' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
757ed89d99a56b8849666ed4effc1495
bdf0285cd1d7dd5a187e3bfbbdc10810d77920dc
'2011-08-18T17:08:02-04:00'
describe
'7211751' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
00ae0fc6b4475cdb7c05111449e259ef
000c85fcfc9f0e0bb966f2f8b71674dbd8b2d192
'2011-08-18T16:46:23-04:00'
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSII' 'sip-files00113.txt'
6573b7c9dda6861ad177ae0a2d2dc925
9170ca67365644eeea856bc31f4e9e0f6f34e7bf
'2011-08-18T16:50:59-04:00'
describe
'11659' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
efd49b8ef949e764785a21edf5e82367
d74f78bbb79d7d7bd7b0767f20fa1aa710c29f77
'2011-08-18T17:03:57-04:00'
describe
'885962' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5f520515e49004fc40aefe6a4bb52978
92517b5987c30e2c23298ac8dd9d622cb898b74c
describe
'119835' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
6aeb567dd7fcf720f89245d14080ad24
8c1a750beb7de230e0b8da4307c8413bff254e6b
describe
'33900' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
9a37310cde1d6a4061687b59dcd4337b
9effafd83df98b024f8d950b6a309fe5e968575b
describe
'44783' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
02fadc6418809e6f9f88ee395c4f9d71
a2eb6642b36ae2725890e83bb50d2ddf9163955d
'2011-08-18T16:55:55-04:00'
describe
'7097219' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
99fcf63a0c793fe6290d4f482d426c22
d03f51a605fce513437547d998cfcd86908e1257
'2011-08-18T17:10:30-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6267489d3004ccf7a5a34b16ff106767
fb86d0eba3c067e9a12b83dc6453ae1010b85dd7
'2011-08-18T17:04:36-04:00'
describe
'12708' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
26f2e5519e77f28ab4697d4cd35e6775
24e9095f058e883e3b20eaf08a26507952fe0359
'2011-08-18T16:47:59-04:00'
describe
'908688' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
53bdd97d538f626de93d7ce868ea96c5
0d0ea0e9bbffbbefff27f226dd175472cd3f5cca
'2011-08-18T17:03:29-04:00'
describe
'109321' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
65dd449f23c4379a057289937497b1c1
affcaa8672ea543d3ed8e63d82163bddc467f5ec
describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIT' 'sip-files00115.pro'
316990108a745d5c75264bbbd80a3a94
3efb74ba5c3b02818fd7d736740f335ed3192046
'2011-08-18T16:51:56-04:00'
describe
'39717' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
0eedf94509dd0c129867d1dea38c9d09
8f2c464997f3e4d26e66dc421198688b4a440737
'2011-08-18T17:07:00-04:00'
describe
'7278481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
66a065302bd902bace766bfb12cafddc
f48a5bafd0e0f59c8241ac4e09d8ffb225468d9c
'2011-08-18T17:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
c9114142b2cb21c90e3b6035a9cb743b
3521cae25ce19a9e167fc4cba65b5f5546976880
'2011-08-18T16:51:55-04:00'
describe
'11969' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
cb011996bb9694550b3c3c651c9001c3
1c070c350c13ad98ca238d55ead5b6c2a845a85d
'2011-08-18T16:41:09-04:00'
describe
'899421' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIY' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
49f1ef7cc5aab2b1fb63edc4cdab2c03
06cdc4d91be03a47f8c6d9538078b00765645e5f
describe
'118555' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSIZ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
67804ab1bd1feba6fab6aa0914aaf9bd
ee9025acdffedfd6fdfa631dcfc881c623e0bc64
'2011-08-18T17:04:25-04:00'
describe
'16848' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJA' 'sip-files00116.pro'
75f726ec081d3516acab3e89fd8ce1ef
ca457f905c836d6dee9efbe0c5b8103bd8ae04af
'2011-08-18T16:47:26-04:00'
describe
'39119' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
023c17421c634103f21fb443bebc6750
99e21f859590bdd574bf8fa64b16fa8df206e239
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
1553c89c53e3cf295815986698d6de4a
989e94c7d5425b7dae4036e408ab1d51cee6dbf1
describe
'670' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
a806af0273f54088f7b4a516d3e81180
21b95db69d2c170e642ad9f3da990d1359e9efdb
describe
'11284' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJE' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
1ee8211c8393b33432199e142d71dc7b
a0d476abd0abfde8fe06b3cedc062165b629360c
'2011-08-18T17:06:40-04:00'
describe
'899416' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ec532a0f9a0be60f3d83a8e26f082e1b
f9d1578c8c4a0c9ba4c897b40f927a0fb2be41a5
'2011-08-18T17:04:34-04:00'
describe
'113302' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
a2daae1d1a166bea1beb414dd5d104db
fcc8428777cfed52579a6961c657a5432330df08
describe
'31842' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
351d75cf433f1336667bfd5c82ce3833
c1f29b856056dde8dece99720fe27481fab7b176
describe
'43617' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJI' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
134a497d1ccaf8c4674bf1c3c3eff142
ad52b6e11cd2219d70442b2c376d0497b51144a9
'2011-08-18T17:02:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
cf906d0a2ddc671244a2c3f48bd21b15
1ed6450d422c9b540e0e2cc06b7e38841389a094
'2011-08-18T17:11:30-04:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
bebf574b17b79f89fa52640430107f81
76535beaee4785bf6db4dc4599e71900212638c2
'2011-08-18T17:10:37-04:00'
describe
'12635' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJL' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
4ff27c1b9f5b4f88b51528f84e4f1489
75ffa53e0930ba040849e87dd80751abee63ce51
'2011-08-18T16:53:40-04:00'
describe
'910369' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJM' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
91326a247838008859613f2c92089e3f
b9e5f0d5d1c1f47d5007d0f55065a167eb0596ea
'2011-08-18T17:01:24-04:00'
describe
'114707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
7d445c596360b9408fbf3b69be8ea413
76375480934466db92d1a0c3e1db84ee64c89286
'2011-08-18T17:01:12-04:00'
describe
'31461' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJO' 'sip-files00118.pro'
cb0095ec54bcaca60bd51e1e601cf7a4
6366f8249ac48d4ca704a4c2857e0389724b5ad2
'2011-08-18T17:05:46-04:00'
describe
'43378' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2408769c156776c29b4877470c1bfb49
b058e21d3f9a25cf6ed967eaa326ea62ae1dcf74
'2011-08-18T16:50:53-04:00'
describe
'7291989' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c5f998b463c984afbbef77cf13262ea6
b2fabd64c30fe4d5a275eaef3a588038ec2ac220
'2011-08-18T17:11:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJR' 'sip-files00118.txt'
35a03cc1127641cd233a4f6c793be1d8
4fc4494cf73f53f95ce623c70a7b638792ae5c23
'2011-08-18T16:58:36-04:00'
describe
'12005' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJS' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
0ad9a0f88b6e27e4a01505ed3df8dc44
8519f16c8605397d7291343ad57c7afbd385c9a2
'2011-08-18T16:54:59-04:00'
describe
'896160' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
62bba257ac56032a77e3a425eb4ac43c
b880a961c2e91fd9faed69693e0c1b0260761882
'2011-08-18T17:08:08-04:00'
describe
'103413' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJU' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
7546fc695c0a51c1a125b107efb5d66a
d4d4a40f4269e5e7f95ba6ad5f8875bddaf5bda6
'2011-08-18T17:01:04-04:00'
describe
'31466' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e27b3ba2fbb175b97ee570e8d498d411
5963ee0b06e9b7a31ad7465623df7852e4999441
'2011-08-18T16:57:48-04:00'
describe
'38580' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
d51c82ccb04ed4528a3aa49dcb8ebc7d
8e7c8017d4f3e8210061bfdd74d27ee95754f0da
'2011-08-18T16:47:56-04:00'
describe
'7178053' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJX' 'sip-files00119.tif'
a824f47956336b04e8e229707523b848
1f29f3c6c7f72a477480762b77366c42857f58c8
'2011-08-18T17:10:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJY' 'sip-files00119.txt'
88b0083252c20ffacefb7dab577ca4ac
4c7b4a5892dd3f888194d0c885a40cc07ab74bc5
'2011-08-18T17:03:55-04:00'
describe
'11438' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSJZ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
044b9cb27cad3263b3db95568240c602
35b8cca4dc428d942ae655e78e61d683c05e691b
'2011-08-18T17:08:32-04:00'
describe
'887469' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKA' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
d5f9d9592c291958228ff4b21c5f5dc2
d9c5251881c59071d5c34a74c14dc23de7212ea8
'2011-08-18T16:42:12-04:00'
describe
'115466' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKB' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
51f2a7f2fa3bdc7dbde67dcf8aebb07f
190433aad403c8192a54adcebc65e035b63270d8
describe
'33565' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKC' 'sip-files00120.pro'
69b48012b455530dc3ec0bc86f4bc71c
82e2adb4912746fd36d5a53d31134f8bf8d26098
describe
'43919' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKD' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8335a5ee6f721b9988ec0ff3da9f843a
fdbcfa46f003c5341445c741c54908107a2e439f
describe
'7108793' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKE' 'sip-files00120.tif'
8fcf4d557e44b72c89e3a90dc7268941
dd43e1e44815e3a980d874bdbf6328d86a81c48f
'2011-08-18T16:48:38-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKF' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6b29ad0400de8c6a3cbc5a5582d992e2
0fe3b36f3d12efb529f7076ec486dc42b4d85a95
'2011-08-18T16:53:45-04:00'
describe
'12906' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKG' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ebf354ca8142f99f7b3f6e52ed1eff1d
ac791cc9f948303365bd0486e81a868571b3f7f3
'2011-08-18T17:12:28-04:00'
describe
'884902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKH' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
05061640c1711a46189387373619d5d2
28d9d06276cce4eabafe5388484ffb8ba6df0bcc
'2011-08-18T17:07:27-04:00'
describe
'116052' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d88c116501484ba7e6129065d3fccd99
1fccfd8fd6b0ba2850ed30a4e06c67acff5cd43b
'2011-08-18T16:50:06-04:00'
describe
'34018' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
aa06649e7b86d7feffe3f15cb108cb0f
19ad2c87c7d53bc7aef19f9ec696f901c448d196
'2011-08-18T17:05:07-04:00'
describe
'45015' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d0f9414107123d816c88caaca49cb978
f3d595ff8fe9445446ef43911b7882e84953adbd
describe
'7088261' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKL' 'sip-files00121.tif'
447eff12add8630ec1ee600380de1add
44aaa870be40baff79c5d7502939f4759dfdd6f3
'2011-08-18T17:11:49-04:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5338c96c3a674332d66a8ac2afa0bd71
909f8ea528f70e34c96242993f34494f86b9095b
describe
'12982' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKN' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
af0a1cd0e3906f0d73c19bec64f1f4ae
224154fccc6ee098760fa8739ab4c2dcc613a0a9
'2011-08-18T17:02:21-04:00'
describe
'868707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKO' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
92e9031dd1d7efdf793456c13c135b9c
f939297972adf4effc550078b6b2cda942a77960
describe
'114383' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKP' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
127940701a54f2d3d3d11cc657ae290c
f8b453327f47c6a495b3470fbcebd3de8d18f3fb
'2011-08-18T17:08:01-04:00'
describe
'36512' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKQ' 'sip-files00122.pro'
134e0f1776f051b7f474f7f583c52341
4e9ca252e52f098f72329aa91de0630250776707
'2011-08-18T17:11:16-04:00'
describe
'41385' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKR' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ddccf07b56de47613062db1ecc27f377
69be4e00219504458eabcca0cdae080ba548c4c8
describe
'6956825' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKS' 'sip-files00122.tif'
8ff29bed9899f62246d57140a72bf5b9
285a7205245100b87fcf0b6220ab191775c8ac4a
'2011-08-18T16:55:51-04:00'
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKT' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2c9baafeebe4ecc1b63b426aa1d29b7b
79ed722a4fd51357a723f229ee831e60845ba0eb
describe
'13253' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
842cf7ba49f62cb8831c9904ada3a94c
e4f3839422e8e03d1a0ecbdc3183aca1ba9316d0
'2011-08-18T16:46:22-04:00'
describe
'888000' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKV' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
bd950785c825cfb16282de4ce8292491
ab38cf1e6b996d7cab3a4cc8ba1052d7177a289a
'2011-08-18T17:04:24-04:00'
describe
'125674' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKW' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
d8f2cdd8b7152b0be9a91e55057672ef
fe4b7c0c72e538045f6ab9c26acd76f0ffb5e05c
describe
'17341' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKX' 'sip-files00123.pro'
ae56bc4a94358178e858fc7a1b6c567e
76e3701fb6a6374b72f0b5498e76a5019b76a119
'2011-08-18T17:07:32-04:00'
describe
'40819' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
374e910c2ecb926fde024dd73d5f7aa8
22564f2269f35a31f617cefeb980c281d638b3ff
'2011-08-18T17:06:14-04:00'
describe
'7112715' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSKZ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
fbd3e18e72a33238df5316cbe54c6cd4
b290e4005116b269b440498998e05516e856bcfa
describe
'725' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLA' 'sip-files00123.txt'
74a2acb3ca7cf1ba46238d5c34eec05f
24dcf93ad468b7e195ce3688755978e3b2e602a6
'2011-08-18T17:08:03-04:00'
describe
'11674' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLB' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
f33a372553b52a40a5e92f26f8aa4823
4bc20ab922bf6c7a53a75a82e307cca8ae6c0134
'2011-08-18T16:48:36-04:00'
describe
'883526' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLC' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
9a5fb8e872bf2336446a3f8bf061204d
bd8ff351600cfbe2a581655d486500b074198dfb
'2011-08-18T16:56:16-04:00'
describe
'113259' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLD' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
b3d5ee81e6c47bac1d58234b60c1100a
431809e71ead3eec23d59874ffe547e57c4057d8
'2011-08-18T17:02:57-04:00'
describe
'32265' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLE' 'sip-files00124.pro'
901b1b061b61ae27a8ce9a8c8ec161f7
4f66185089baf685cfe429da02e77ce5ac71e8cd
'2011-08-18T16:58:02-04:00'
describe
'41336' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLF' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
228a0a4164cf1b89ac04e70ef0e36ca4
947356009a9cb21ea05271ce39f16be02f6319c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLG' 'sip-files00124.tif'
fb966d3ec1a68931765bf5e0f96ea43c
e3d532c3da539ce9846aab1cb1ce7f156cb6ae75
'2011-08-18T17:09:11-04:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLH' 'sip-files00124.txt'
97466963ed4d0f82815081900aa38a35
2595075cc7b7927c67776c1f59b60bd5758e98cc
describe
'12496' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLI' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
248a90e98f3aeb94cee8c5717e9fc7ac
f7dde088a19f97073d2df170dde519f315044e65
'2011-08-18T16:54:58-04:00'
describe
'883720' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLJ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
09935a0a83c9e097ec16e4950dc2ac14
fe1851af8b95d9968459d6106f2b71d2ff68380b
describe
'118088' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLK' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
f62c94063605312b165969fbef90ac11
67974052c29cfdce340c1d4e84a4745127a51dfc
'2011-08-18T17:01:11-04:00'
describe
'33046' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLL' 'sip-files00125.pro'
ecabd844b3a46ac80e5d45b200f24d23
efab5c2cc55a57bf61b3ad1e5f08af1cef802b9b
'2011-08-18T17:01:32-04:00'
describe
'45360' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLM' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
a1c85301e2f4c38a637ab079c07c8471
6ba4cf621b98b45def87a31648d9cfb31814efdc
'2011-08-18T16:44:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLN' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4c12d5d14f5b83e0ac8fc6c83ab442a4
c2ee103e3d36b9a9780dbb8cafa883ee8d35678e
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLO' 'sip-files00125.txt'
deba52bc13270ed6bb8402d93f94e460
982c96c3efb5d29fc301fc798f1af46f8b17d84e
'2011-08-18T16:56:55-04:00'
describe
'12564' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLP' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
0ef7b53f3f40d7e5ea6584c1956a3798
d0de457a4b8d4f87c39acd4b5aff5e53b54e436f
describe
'911311' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
53ac341a4a12be3bffe582b5f8cc44a0
ccd549448b828513041bce41a2654549d9d393ec
describe
'111712' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLR' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
1fdf00f454b31a038b999fa9d5d6e6eb
2bb586027149bee22db1061a5a360445ffd80f6d
describe
'32673' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLS' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1bb1c51dc8718fdfe7030043af4ba5ee
343b82e375b18c39ec700552c1fe051db14f7c56
describe
'40566' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLT' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
c4945bc73a7223f3cd7bac06fa63595e
b073f6987de7aebb1f39ab445a675fc1711f20c2
describe
'7299495' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLU' 'sip-files00126.tif'
c6d5158caca2b12b3c359fe6b461b86f
7cf89749f6a34dac9c9de8c24776ba1204895bee
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
34795e8270bff72cef51dd8c35b3b874
90f68ad1d7ae47f0abf83b3f6e5a3155205aa0ba
'2011-08-18T16:55:38-04:00'
describe
'11721' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLW' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
35aa2c0465ba74d4ad89bf4472848e77
1d34ab2532391f98b3fe91b3f476179474e841b1
'2011-08-18T17:12:18-04:00'
describe
'903047' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLX' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
01c460fb87a993ad1fcc091e51de62f5
6911e421884f56fa85f8a9bd842899abba6f705b
'2011-08-18T16:42:43-04:00'
describe
'105471' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLY' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
2655c53a4b69956d666a7402aefd57dd
b8ba2bd059c12ca4f5db8353d722a369a90d722c
describe
'34224' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSLZ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
030516c131c5c4e1e5761cea269b495f
0b7bc4719ddcc26ad9c6582bd50be13e6e150d1f
describe
'39051' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMA' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b738d604504881d318627da60ced3fc9
3aeb4e4917cbb5f65466a7465d5b9032767b80a7
describe
'7233507' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMB' 'sip-files00127.tif'
dc17eb90898614091ef60096410cfdb7
ae3e46d25bca74acf6446896faa10b85fff6d13b
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMC' 'sip-files00127.txt'
a94b27b8ea3c612dea8c1035e39ccd77
0bd3d077587afdf60a3b9004ec7ed02040e6cf62
describe
'12234' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMD' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3b25d69017b933d10a123d21d3c971de
2ca8aad0521c1a29fbbd188e9560efdccfcd5e41
describe
'901744' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSME' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
55e27274d6a31e75b02e06a6a554345c
adb85d49768b2debf6d46e53438def4924bc30c7
'2011-08-18T17:07:45-04:00'
describe
'122670' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
c6eaeeb9912598740805edbc32e254ef
8fe8a0e9ab109f0c34ca62c1b951d1f467e7f7c7
'2011-08-18T17:00:32-04:00'
describe
'17439' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMG' 'sip-files00128.pro'
09e5c5e048a19efcd9623150f58565a4
750f601c2019f0a30c77563a4a391c6e7c0c99e2
'2011-08-18T16:42:15-04:00'
describe
'39622' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
2145b2a81ab5dc0f0ec9841ff7f1b470
4b7714f42c9fb1b0e568d0fcba434c296fc71f31
'2011-08-18T16:58:07-04:00'
describe
'7222929' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMI' 'sip-files00128.tif'
37c9456bd8bb5db047d6d6bc45b9b980
221d542498ebb2956d6e5fd6e5161bb094e4ae52
'2011-08-18T16:56:05-04:00'
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMJ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
96ac5ef7224d40397d34072daf690265
3a06934d0ce7f555b326287b4a62b62e6544eafa
'2011-08-18T17:06:57-04:00'
describe
'11442' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMK' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
52fb267de2a0f5d4987f166dbfae0361
708c2608c742f1a5dadec7872fb991f95b9b061f
'2011-08-18T16:56:37-04:00'
describe
'901066' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSML' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
6335706dd014018c2444070a621ce756
298a46145ab774608072971fe1f9f4851dc9d0a4
describe
'116661' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMM' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
23b3e0d9ebf8225568c6c53254194096
f84a1021dafb86cae78b09c1de1327762db72405
'2011-08-18T16:44:13-04:00'
describe
'32273' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMN' 'sip-files00129.pro'
24411fe4e72c14f39d7fcfe4bc2f2c42
a51c45112a883f4192edc656f87edb1e7357bd53
describe
'43741' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMO' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
59518f1ac48fa6f8f270f8390237dc6b
875bf8674f0d36463ff3de71cf4b3553f21f1f8e
describe
'7217529' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
c262b5a6f5031290c7482368fb7db525
5a949eac912a59726adc7f429e9426f093cd04eb
'2011-08-18T17:07:54-04:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMQ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
8fc1d97e64735c3ffa4ddc9a2e839633
248ebee6f29b99d237a51d86829515ff6907e705
describe
'12458' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMR' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0c5985099a397139d78a41bfc80990c5
85d63e7c6ca63e76da6b92c9dd035030fb25c0ad
'2011-08-18T16:59:36-04:00'
describe
'894138' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMS' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b440eb08b3933db72808c4ed4652278e
e35cd8b2af087f269ec489ece531e8d0ff6e894e
'2011-08-18T17:04:04-04:00'
describe
'112677' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMT' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
9712c7dae63852ee197692baa5e2257a
52d995ba523f13374a3cf8e6f9027384ce218055
describe
'31144' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMU' 'sip-files00130.pro'
2df527fff3a765bf059befa1634aa634
7f4b303cf97597bc2b89e3d377b6427015b7bf39
'2011-08-18T16:55:48-04:00'
describe
'42566' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMV' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
ae85eb49ef0c084a123668ed58b1cc38
69d8b62b0893e2a27e2a6b99b0dfb0e16e800182
'2011-08-18T17:07:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMW' 'sip-files00130.tif'
351a1ff52fbe463ba85c0aa70d31cf6c
525b07006e6200a0e4fe4bdb85166d6969793378
'2011-08-18T17:01:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMX' 'sip-files00130.txt'
0971f76a5085fda24c4d92c39c96e39b
4fcdc2bbbb7a1a91d04597a7bb9ce6fbf7030bf7
'2011-08-18T17:09:08-04:00'
describe
'12281' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMY' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d066b6f56f6babff481c8ca64b225f1b
c954b8a4594644d6cbd42036a93f883f1274a7d9
describe
'905349' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSMZ' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9670d9015506cc14072235800f611afe
a6e3eb230b396e8cf1e28f686c0e63e400ed115a
'2011-08-18T16:54:10-04:00'
describe
'106323' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNA' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
464a97f1ef59852fea20588670d79c9f
b0ecd21da9ebdd0f45be90e1b8582afb51e8c654
'2011-08-18T16:44:57-04:00'
describe
'30788' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNB' 'sip-files00131.pro'
2df58242cbd7f76ab8e1150a6bf0136d
7aebe8924cf360cc50879d16a803819c8d369799
describe
'41287' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNC' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
3ac5f6e143067a26f2f0510e57f387ea
3d2f0bcf822fd7b470e643a8db538f6be0e38e29
'2011-08-18T17:12:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSND' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a28d3f80565368e5a6f76cb5cc8a5bcb
daea802c0d438e87f4969a913f8feba2a5002feb
'2011-08-18T17:00:42-04:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNE' 'sip-files00131.txt'
9799c810f2774858e683df92ee335b2b
a480e38096f4bc15fdeaa4f461c47389db88984e
describe
'11945' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNF' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
d2cafdb1d7c778848b38a729853cb78d
d02dc2e380e2aeafc57967878672888724be7f90
describe
'881789' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNG' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
906f9d73c96d2bda3a7c40acbd618f00
3425b3ccd3bbda4faf17c71c9eff6b67d5a39851
'2011-08-18T17:03:52-04:00'
describe
'99150' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNH' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
d81484e4af55504134b4120f041110b2
911c21328ea26149a249ce91c76c04c9a158d952
'2011-08-18T16:57:14-04:00'
describe
'31652' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNI' 'sip-files00132.pro'
3d71ce1c095ad7731d2ff2d24e0b6f93
65304f9fdba15d0ff4e347fbf2c11cd41e2e7259
'2011-08-18T17:04:45-04:00'
describe
'37816' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNJ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
9099bf9bbd100b394e85655da534a42a
f3d135466bcd1fe3f5c0026f3931ec64ac52c89b
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNK' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e6861efdf85b2d132eb6bb2f7558b2b6
95b1fcef2a30a4b4fa0253fd6ab5d9bfa80ccde7
'2011-08-18T17:05:43-04:00'
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNL' 'sip-files00132.txt'
21190f9cbc52cdc758499d715df18cff
5c0ca55bee85b33695f3e6ecf1088dc4d4e10528
'2011-08-18T17:01:59-04:00'
describe
'10874' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNM' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
06d4b1f0d600018c175f431174c3c7f5
aa819f24d0bfdc5faf51b3fb14ae394ef30e2e10
describe
'905957' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
00ce65c984ef395bc7881fb4e7d90bb2
f5705ad952feb2658f574703d2e31bc8c094c77d
'2011-08-18T17:05:50-04:00'
describe
'115335' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNO' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
18b8b0566ab2dbdfce446bf35db144fc
13b230b5b9d3e6f3615c7faba5eb90016c720b9f
describe
'15357' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNP' 'sip-files00133.pro'
2ca760202822fffc9db144612026c7f9
f338f881c4524c09f368733ce3461c7544f82121
describe
'37387' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNQ' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
f0f5dc356789a47de7c79fb79ddb888c
f6d73567847c4c990c700b5f17b27e9b69e04959
'2011-08-18T17:01:15-04:00'
describe
'7257459' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNR' 'sip-files00133.tif'
96b94d8ce2521d9eb54d885265b6ce84
6ead2204cc2e73898eff6e17c1f044d5cf496a98
'2011-08-18T17:03:43-04:00'
describe
'605' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNS' 'sip-files00133.txt'
a69ec9afb8bdc4525f6f66bd2888ae33
84ea7227c0a9ed38fb2291dd3ae0fbadd95769f7
'2011-08-18T17:08:44-04:00'
describe
'10664' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNT' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
2124d9a9680a2d7897b7277a360fb2df
2d6eee145cb2759fe5636c033a1bbc2c61f34062
'2011-08-18T16:46:01-04:00'
describe
'894098' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNU' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
7af868e772dc052bc57fac95973693fc
584b9a89cbee26d15e26b383acccfc25036f1655
describe
'117784' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
6707cbc1f8aef869e63c63ebfca1b5bd
adc1486c336698673801bfd0278f4fe4900465ea
describe
'33357' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNW' 'sip-files00134.pro'
dc68a966dab09fd8a6aacf63be550dce
d1be743d5797470f42415539f8168475e58b5fcf
'2011-08-18T16:57:52-04:00'
describe
'43773' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNX' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
3b54769d28e43a5ca1fce1d6081aeeba
4c2c3be9232a13ba25ac634159fa2dc556477c71
'2011-08-18T17:12:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
c38a8a52a3c77ea1f121a9c006b31a38
c2582f3b28bfbb5b7d5891efad59906daf448112
'2011-08-18T17:12:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSNZ' 'sip-files00134.txt'
fb8329a047fd1ea7e8f31ebe24d50ccc
d906958a39e6123b1b9633cea9b1307c57b86f3d
'2011-08-18T16:59:34-04:00'
describe
'12650' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOA' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
5b51b4b590f8916138f349a4137a9e67
19f5e51d2f68c145efd9b5c1320d5b4e323089be
'2011-08-18T17:08:26-04:00'
describe
'883677' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOB' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
5e50d2aeb2ec49121447416566a9406a
2f88823ee2617211785e252cc85670bfce935e58
'2011-08-18T16:54:16-04:00'
describe
'95798' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOC' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
e85dbfba04b13337c2b615cc936ec050
e7bbbca46c727fb6c228f5f26ba4a8992bf1f421
'2011-08-18T16:51:04-04:00'
describe
'30637' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOD' 'sip-files00135.pro'
6e72ca8f780995f40a4c2b857ff196f2
6263e58103a333c8e4b32a8309286d3dddf00a68
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOE' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4e562b6b4f0440fd41d306d33b0b9b2e
4ae6c1dd81dddcf5072aab6bcb75c8e838bc5e98
'2011-08-18T17:05:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOF' 'sip-files00135.tif'
030aeb49c5205e3f029ded294d353280
020617bb5213765f424f7e4e25db1db839be792b
'2011-08-18T17:01:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOG' 'sip-files00135.txt'
6f6799d52e730dc8769de9e770bece65
7dca7b43a3b48c043e36c1f695ba176a10e724b4
'2011-08-18T17:07:50-04:00'
describe
'10324' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOH' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
a7e3f90085d377f6a87d55580b90a0b9
d7495d694e2685ecee388836026176f8bc8a5459
'2011-08-18T17:01:41-04:00'
describe
'893483' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOI' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
16a4b6966cfd8b670f3ece3938d9fbfc
f67bfc176a3b6946d1e532384cd2185a5e633427
'2011-08-18T17:03:09-04:00'
describe
'117111' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOJ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
3666ea4f6026540e3dc086462bedb816
6121a8d48d1d9d419529eb8e680e8b89cb26b1ca
'2011-08-18T17:04:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOK' 'sip-files00136.pro'
de5080de65f0e44d3523a212e3a2b5f1
dffb70711357a4c7d4bb1767ba4ce7279978dbdc
'2011-08-18T16:42:06-04:00'
describe
'39983' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOL' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
5d0823c00b4ce7dd4292458fa32d7092
e54668f802cfce351e342b50556913980e913b84
'2011-08-18T17:01:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOM' 'sip-files00136.tif'
56c9620b2328e1232a96e74e53c7d111
fdc0cdd2fa16dde666cc96a8b0f001c32c5bb497
'2011-08-18T16:50:52-04:00'
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSON' 'sip-files00136.txt'
37aecbaeb9fd9dc99b5e6934d10e05e9
973f99e07a054e0fbb8363b97a2a893eb4c03cef
'2011-08-18T17:07:01-04:00'
describe
'11433' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOO' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
91919e19c776aab6bf9cb87c3501a8a3
013018f97d31c6b48a0eec3ee823aa05167747a2
'2011-08-18T17:04:37-04:00'
describe
'893521' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOP' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
7bae25e669555b861f5e5b265d8dad04
0b39038b3f9a457ed3b7c650a7c1ed7a50d2957d
'2011-08-18T16:43:58-04:00'
describe
'106902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOQ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
681267720db1734d5161f24dedc83ede
683ee3f009a40a97d0b3cdce1199e8e6280b8870
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOR' 'sip-files00137.pro'
fd05265700fc8a533cdaf750021cf54b
b48b8c867c26f41313c53efaa0cee0f24cadcf30
'2011-08-18T17:08:24-04:00'
describe
'40286' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOS' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
bfadb0e1759e951161b590842834edd5
c0161d4614368b3608bbee2e5bdf5cde10fc2435
describe
'7157321' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOT' 'sip-files00137.tif'
f0fdfbff25b89fa91340809112421dfe
2411dee969b56dec9e236162b2fc7eb4be2b3851
'2011-08-18T17:12:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOU' 'sip-files00137.txt'
43504f8a44906a6a4c498af18601dacf
9820afd0fd25a8fb36f830f2e7e1ec99b539a836
'2011-08-18T17:03:35-04:00'
describe
'12724' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOV' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
f9dc1ae85b29ca32768e7d241b704917
dd9aea5b73acef3e5871b6de8e39ee9774b50aae
describe
'872622' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOW' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
22d9ca5326d4c575f4568fb0c958716c
c62bfadfd9b295bf5295992186dd4378aa731dc4
describe
'112128' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOX' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
d914e9e2dc9101b1f4c6f9c9ad0ca293
1bf4585f4a198a238f1538a815ccfe07a794180b
'2011-08-18T17:02:12-04:00'
describe
'32433' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOY' 'sip-files00138.pro'
65a21d046a1af3f165f691778bc56d6d
66d3da9fb264a3c8b3d7d2ce3321c3eff6d69ccd
'2011-08-18T17:06:35-04:00'
describe
'43527' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSOZ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
6a8771f277310fbf132c2ae0126ee674
ced6dc570190b4a5a9d044dd361a156c67f4a02d
describe
'6989733' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPA' 'sip-files00138.tif'
569e0db566d87610e21644576c574195
a9161ad4f8ccd90af96c8c4ee9c31edb49d054a8
'2011-08-18T16:55:19-04:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPB' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2a5043bd7b5c712448e2f236d7c37ba9
b31fd3c30df4ded2e1b696b00595af6c7968642e
'2011-08-18T17:02:41-04:00'
describe
'12474' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
954906c2aa97e5c875ead62fa5061fb1
e08b7e4de4ed31063228e4c4f1e15c8a9904e285
describe
'888658' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPD' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
ecab2e138b99150c9d512c38e8a87b21
d749c17a00fb9fa97e1a289bef459cf4deac9804
'2011-08-18T17:02:18-04:00'
describe
'116045' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPE' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
511d376c157fcac707139e69a2f00d41
d42dbb5b844df57e12f9f189fe8f40caa26ce014
'2011-08-18T17:01:06-04:00'
describe
'34816' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPF' 'sip-files00139.pro'
7c3e1661dff4ca034673d78a06527bb5
a3c63112bd08108dcb8cc0fe6601d9eccb442bc2
describe
'43721' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPG' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
68e380977db3cd0c739dc0de75d61cac
595cf564d2d620b1c7e6de8e4ec27af925dbb055
'2011-08-18T16:41:57-04:00'
describe
'7117943' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPH' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f51cd0337513e062a9d62148a96a5bae
e4521ecd21d3e00c585055b85ca3ab1d14593cb7
'2011-08-18T16:57:37-04:00'
describe
'1399' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
bdb491b6b088b993097d20606fe84d6f
a0058996ba56000b57cc20db13aa9648d45ab983
describe
'12439' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPJ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
090c99947a414c7a0aaea0d8c3b7a07e
86164b7ebaf0bffe943c340a29db147b7c8b6bfe
'2011-08-18T17:12:26-04:00'
describe
'873566' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPK' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5469d78e611a1e4070893a28a4a2270e
ca1229b78bd3d675b8b74cbcc6222d91119053d1
describe
'110553' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPL' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
7edbb549af5364b8bffea71dde8c4e03
b53fc02216541af30d45dfcf77c15d4e33a28739
describe
'32434' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPM' 'sip-files00140.pro'
974c62d871fc6e7bd9f243c408ae40d0
aff27bbb0b5c5e526dc7528fa755a41a7de299d8
describe
'42160' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPN' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
176ac74a6f3b1a33a87ac2fb1a13d047
46ca75369524d53c69b947e3b3de5ea84d38ea97
describe
'6995635' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPO' 'sip-files00140.tif'
aab83c0fa97187c9c2c598bcd5662e48
e268471eec2708c6063ce5ae01e8e361f527d8ad
'2011-08-18T16:52:24-04:00'
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPP' 'sip-files00140.txt'
771a5189334540568af90b2e0cff1921
6e1141bb9b21a807e596cadddaec736e79c2cc83
'2011-08-18T17:07:12-04:00'
describe
'12627' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPQ' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
3e2609fecbe03e58662a539e71ad9170
0b43ef0ac0fc58a7b96adc2a75d8167d85516614
'2011-08-18T16:55:12-04:00'
describe
'873646' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPR' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
cc3acd3fab97e0ffe38710ac167cdd9c
fa862525ee1399493b1d61baa51d7e67d53f81ee
'2011-08-18T17:10:27-04:00'
describe
'81801' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPS' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
9b53cd0572dfd69df100a5f8cb1ebb04
63ef01741153d8d951326051a0dbacbb46764d06
'2011-08-18T17:02:28-04:00'
describe
'28371' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPT' 'sip-files00141.pro'
371f2cdb4da87211921d2c7bd08d3f2c
d48edd144296135cda235dbc821ed83da8242043
'2011-08-18T17:10:59-04:00'
describe
'31756' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPU' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1fba5fbdc5b8b8edd22c58f232ee75fa
e1a631270fa40368bb574c45932bdd5f57c2eab1
'2011-08-18T17:06:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPV' 'sip-files00141.tif'
85cc2110792ecc8e3d579081c2940f30
c3767b45331632ba7a88a2dc885403dbb2c1f058
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPW' 'sip-files00141.txt'
08439ba9803852b535881869b64c0c9b
8b33249a60d7d8145e70630cda87c4320b80dbb2
describe
'8813' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPX' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f8eb5b5d118aa3ea03709bfbefa52b13
179b19bd0366f10bfe38957819b54f3306b0f86a
describe
'871912' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPY' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
2d43ffbd73ce0ef52934c4686a2eea70
db2137bf1d983d90eddd026e8e66e09ff570c2dd
'2011-08-18T16:57:43-04:00'
describe
'105337' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSPZ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
ef9d85893fdc5efeea39fdf2390e1c5e
214e92fed118a85575f24186ef646dd4910d4dad
describe
'30582' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQA' 'sip-files00142.pro'
94cf6fc7a871f20fbdd9c7594d8c7fe6
fb188cf9f6e76792c1c16e91bd3c9948f2876125
'2011-08-18T16:59:32-04:00'
describe
'41068' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQB' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
0a1a211c4b43a71d362eb0a621437882
12fea54529b87b7e6cbe7f340e403406841a7594
'2011-08-18T16:58:10-04:00'
describe
'6981729' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a9cc2254b0d26754be40dc5c005d5d58
5dd18df02f30152b4876a8ee8823e73ad995f848
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQD' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4bdfafe4d15aebe161a467ea243c13d0
9bc9ff0b92a06dc8b166055647627c3696d73b3a
'2011-08-18T17:11:08-04:00'
describe
'12052' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
d876ca01c09ed12ea80742da8c7509e7
1e55cee3dea13fd3e142e01466530090ce01b1be
'2011-08-18T17:10:23-04:00'
describe
'888655' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
ca2756898634319a49f698d279088729
4929203dc5f512db9aad62ceacfa02ea7fe49abe
'2011-08-18T16:56:09-04:00'
describe
'116710' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
7aec6692e05cd19accd8a1b3e87d6895
0abb7bcddd16ca64517b942728561ce25613003a
'2011-08-18T16:54:24-04:00'
describe
'34281' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
b5ae7e1e615c955e2b8401a13ffe8c17
c9d63508970302967c0c916db10d19f761201d20
describe
'43796' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
ab8df3365dcddf3fba43cc297462557e
b6a647aacad0b392edb319ae6b90f117527b601f
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
09992091268800380b651c6a5d1db42f
09abcfbff27b3613f63b009841fc9bfd1298c2d3
'2011-08-18T16:58:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
5605876a49a92d6c379e9694e19c0668
e564ff8fb6af3fe7da75e1a3c2cfe816a9e43a95
'2011-08-18T16:42:19-04:00'
describe
'12652' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQL' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
41dbe09e3602592648a03778bd65d716
379172bddb1f96a053749150ab99a63fc7654177
describe
'884884' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQM' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
c72423c7f9d43f30e9a853906c5ff189
a40167514f27aa43d13fc6cca377c089c6ff28da
'2011-08-18T16:59:56-04:00'
describe
'104701' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQN' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
ce7aa9331a96c9fd54479e249b5d5730
0435c733490bd211fe50fecd830703f51ea38c92
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQO' 'sip-files00144.pro'
b58db5237493859ca40c5c3baaee11e1
358391d19c86dd42e6ed2ede5ea446a4ba9218c2
'2011-08-18T17:06:13-04:00'
describe
'40075' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQP' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
583ee02a6e675a2575e69edcd0802828
ecd0245c37c5fffe9a310b68abd0a9f61af50c9a
'2011-08-18T17:10:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQQ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
bc0ccffb2a1502210c098b0cf4c385e0
89019f0301ee9eee967e5b298f5137bd1c333eae
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
f09cbb1fde08ff1508ad2a507f538f0e
e883c8bb34642a6eaa69624daa28edab9c482cc1
describe
'12185' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQS' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
429979d2c6e459c2d4d20f593bc550bb
76a13a7e51dcfe16fb22b4f62dd64ccc596921d6
'2011-08-18T16:51:00-04:00'
describe
'895505' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQT' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
e5e4bba0b19bccecd4d87d0c993c90bb
b6e8df57eb3fb178ea6bfa7858e9cbac27b94708
'2011-08-18T16:55:31-04:00'
describe
'81321' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQU' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
910796d2448946916e09ed2c40118844
b32a58b968c268531e1af7b92fcea508ccb37ef8
describe
'26159' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQV' 'sip-files00145.pro'
ba6362d4748825b805bfbb7959b931ec
d84259fab3bb5cf659a8b2a82ef579d2880fa964
'2011-08-18T16:55:08-04:00'
describe
'30069' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQW' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
61643ae00a1bf3c614d9fc62b1da394d
b86725e87d86e8b8559e2d310b2aedb9b544adc5
'2011-08-18T16:46:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQX' 'sip-files00145.tif'
973d3e6f39229d77462ac362467fc19f
dcdc57e8535328bcd633b72a3d82613569826b51
'2011-08-18T17:00:30-04:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQY' 'sip-files00145.txt'
56586519ea11106c49f978b4dc318802
29334de7a31cfcf227107532899c37a90ee47cfd
'2011-08-18T17:09:54-04:00'
describe
'9124' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSQZ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
2187d4706d360c7ac713214f05556be8
fcdff973c048dd2e996ec40e653494d59927634d
'2011-08-18T17:05:31-04:00'
describe
'892950' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRA' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
21b65732e256d5b821ffe293744e4c2c
f2d2c6ade6e76c6ad041b86f469d0c8388398bac
'2011-08-18T17:10:40-04:00'
describe
'106742' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRB' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
90238e404faddbea30756e30d80296d7
d46216297cad04235490a9c136b50896d1f8150f
describe
'15594' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRC' 'sip-files00146.pro'
420bae8337cfa797105d5c8fcd760bda
f769dd386a341e5868ba7e0455b3bacebe22953f
'2011-08-18T17:09:31-04:00'
describe
'35853' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRD' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
3ab54d241bd187f0240f7da928d79f5d
b2856a0367cd1c851c2b190b4b168bcfd3268006
'2011-08-18T17:09:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRE' 'sip-files00146.tif'
f8d3b45787ace38120ea2747584d0c25
b6068d6fa1d7e7ebcb8775211f52fabcc6694e3e
'2011-08-18T17:11:39-04:00'
describe
'622' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRF' 'sip-files00146.txt'
75b8f7761d97d424e33edc05ea02da60
95229f47de9ae884f3acd3f1dc81f76e9899ed32
describe
'10705' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRG' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
137a166ba8351559203e9c1af6668d73
2719ead7c31015c6a24443c8f513f6574e45457e
describe
'887390' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRH' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
3b6f9854941a4a0f2595ec29f823d7ad
dda6e1eb7b0361f4bc5ff0e9a263f39cfd9e9807
'2011-08-18T17:05:14-04:00'
describe
'112628' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
3acb4b6ae24ba72b61f3a5e08ad54276
72a04f6accf94daa84de396dc03debfda768755a
describe
'33473' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRJ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
16960f89d6ab57172468bb6862812261
577a94acd75ea5830c495556faaf847d445e909e
describe
'43757' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRK' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
163c9c705f7d03268e1358a841390eb6
2b2863fda2ae33863a3a218cf58c1cd6a320c286
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRL' 'sip-files00147.tif'
cd6fa78dd39ccdbe56343772d5280865
35b684b4f918acfd4c96da8a212fe161eeb131e6
'2011-08-18T17:11:42-04:00'
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRM' 'sip-files00147.txt'
03557ffe4a59cc20b7a2d94982ee2140
3ce414d8e0d5b83a93f2229d70970f7f67bf7cbe
'2011-08-18T17:05:05-04:00'
describe
'12957' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRN' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
483d73c40cc7a1ddd8fa370d42c679ed
865f1302cb5c76595a913b9a01e7173a214c8622
describe
'881115' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRO' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
73392952827aea8f1853e35679699740
c829f73fdda4248bf95ac810ee48f169f22acea4
describe
'114789' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRP' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
77c7732adf0233989932d8b5afe9ce97
1a3cff8918298156990bc5a958bae4fd2798e3cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRQ' 'sip-files00148.pro'
7a58d4e3128eaf34c60e7124980ea322
575c3b89cf30c5fe8145debf88941bad5ba38c02
describe
'43834' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRR' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
0406a6e18d2434b46abe5f9827bf988e
9767663c2bfeaf3c4e47a9d1b12151b88388a4fa
'2011-08-18T16:55:59-04:00'
describe
'7057833' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRS' 'sip-files00148.tif'
89667b8f5d0d39a5b78fe12fb2c313a4
5877ce8e76f53994797df886b77aadecf30b8bb7
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRT' 'sip-files00148.txt'
3f6a9006cd356e873f69d8f2b1c3fe8e
bae594c4f0d82a409ffe0595f9e4938d18197059
describe
'12619' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRU' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
2a300f157d6ffb74155eee26ddf17d5d
3258d31e6cad453e5ae426e658f4afa3ab415b39
'2011-08-18T17:07:43-04:00'
describe
'886924' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRV' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
f1c2a740d7a1a1e3ae5553c50ab35673
c5f1b36750e7bb1138fffb3118fd9b12ecfc2b11
describe
'90924' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRW' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
5957f87b8204d97a299570815511b73c
45a1466e18c03455e9163203c4e41c670988e52a
describe
'30177' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRX' 'sip-files00149.pro'
d78de8bfd0e122e398dee5f9021e13b2
09ca0a82d39d595bd7a4bb22b7f0413c6e49bc72
'2011-08-18T16:54:54-04:00'
describe
'33573' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRY' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
81e2813a695657c25667a9573b5502f3
1f053895ec2d9cc3dcd6015c8e3dc3621a0b58e7
'2011-08-18T16:55:35-04:00'
describe
'7104227' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSRZ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
19dbe9a43b1595e763c29111ecc490a8
0df1a92e7c0d3cce80f538c1270bdc6f2b4ebc66
'2011-08-18T17:09:32-04:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSA' 'sip-files00149.txt'
010f108c330b825e8e00c56ab7efa0d6
0b83025ffb122f102ad0ecf36a7831a09e10efb9
'2011-08-18T17:08:06-04:00'
describe
'10707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSB' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d14b57f3ef4286e8d31d93a6742c38a0
8130cbdce3d930c753b754fe4479bd4f44ac31bd
describe
'884923' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSC' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
2653e6222e5b0797f0a30d881b68ea4b
299051810a4904706a9d3bf8e0c5d51ff2f666dc
'2011-08-18T17:11:07-04:00'
describe
'115115' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSD' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
ae89304fdc401c5d8bc0d5fca9a744d8
cc7e4ca431e8e352c370f7d8467d59542f5ef394
describe
'16626' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSE' 'sip-files00150.pro'
3c56871ccb2bcbae735a890db864ef8c
01e6f35c3e6e682072dce07a0a2f5a861c7e9a7b
describe
'39389' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSF' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
c17cc067fc285d5941f6df53a1579c69
918d490a0612d1f9e71d15fd21f173dca79fda15
'2011-08-18T17:09:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSG' 'sip-files00150.tif'
55b9fb4c789a75a0b240aa5f8cc71e26
974aeb997b60b14bbfdf2a4f5a2b9a2c8a56e726
'2011-08-18T17:04:52-04:00'
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSH' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4b7097c451f05285ccc2fcd97fca45a0
fff14f894619da62303679dcb6f089b3a949d64a
'2011-08-18T17:01:20-04:00'
describe
'11856' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSI' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
462aac4b6e77c393ccaf17751b336916
ed75074c858350b026dbcd346c13003b75824a62
describe
'867601' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSJ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
8c84a8e0aa8258ee460689e5f715b680
e57863f49c3e2f685308d09f7d4a92515b43bc92
describe
'116212' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSK' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f20c32681d2c655c5f6f0e2af0a44eda
53eee1f3f8bbd55ca15b012df1ed2aab057c8b84
describe
'34006' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSL' 'sip-files00151.pro'
4bf6235ac94e9ca1c5650ce38472dc17
189d5c141f11144cbaa394941b4c72d700ad08a7
'2011-08-18T16:58:55-04:00'
describe
'43844' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSM' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
20b060d46d856b95825191741db16e22
22f2edd7a99e29fa0ee1329826707037dfa7084d
'2011-08-18T17:12:44-04:00'
describe
'6947389' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
402f3a8c696c6832405e2038c348f0a2
bc3663512635d9b7ecba77fb67c0bfc3044ed16c
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSO' 'sip-files00151.txt'
feba8fc82cebe402282d58ae6313f59c
15db955a9489bfde76c93635acbd17c805d8de99
describe
'13261' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSP' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
e16e19cd5694a4f9eb2aeba59fca2616
44f394f2be6e6428a859e8d1b7e349ed86ff1c20
'2011-08-18T16:54:07-04:00'
describe
'838041' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSQ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
e6a9527e2f3c43d74358215202faeda5
4f986aaad74c477d20e1da7174ace0def004e27c
'2011-08-18T16:57:38-04:00'
describe
'111010' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSR' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
d4604219f4f125e886ca26f57998a146
73b643892cca3b2534200d6f84eb83f8ae6ab4dc
'2011-08-18T17:04:14-04:00'
describe
'32632' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSS' 'sip-files00152.pro'
666cb21b1574d08a2c08c4fa72189dc7
9f5904617ebedbe30f74bb25783a2cc49c7e6c78
'2011-08-18T16:54:31-04:00'
describe
'42578' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSST' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
6448cbd9a544d7b2c3be969155ff5a41
67d8d7c97b33c9e558afad98ed6ef26b4afcbed3
'2011-08-18T16:58:00-04:00'
describe
'6710881' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSU' 'sip-files00152.tif'
8d248d2e6aafb451ed2f7b84240189fb
7c32bce8eeb4f8e70b43712d105537d1c68cae35
'2011-08-18T16:57:13-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSV' 'sip-files00152.txt'
4845f0eba5477b75e851b9235bb04255
316f1b4a19ccb83aea5e63faff8a334c12f3a770
describe
'13352' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSW' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
9ddd617a13a46755ac1c8c096fbcda1e
9ec5be451b28badeeaae9482330aa9960c563b4c
describe
'916902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSX' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
778c1f3b840be1bb627d4871530c681b
aab87d549f1de53c808705d15523e139c564c564
describe
'112137' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSY' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
b90b1c7df0580c92efedefa5699db250
a58862da6aecf920d9c55e8f2a15f2226253bb80
'2011-08-18T16:59:40-04:00'
describe
'39025' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSSZ' 'sip-files00153.pro'
5f00e921d6a84a9d071d09187a31fc79
946aead6edae84ca2421876c241ff348031558fc
describe
'39317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTA' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
726e465f9d740197bb897810a9199172
95ad8d83edcbc6c64f65e7cba010129cd0189220
'2011-08-18T16:58:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTB' 'sip-files00153.tif'
1aa77106cb784c2c9fc9f879faf1e1ad
a781f9b737ae8165f60c6d3ab9d7c776030dfa26
'2011-08-18T16:54:01-04:00'
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTC' 'sip-files00153.txt'
8d50ba611001c8fd3b5d5fd883de34c7
88b6c538863106c528ce2a510a1a7e87e3ccc905
describe
'11096' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTD' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
214d93518c1636775af5fddfc60fb794
bb42e2559e40036de9b76130e06815b92637b597
'2011-08-18T16:59:47-04:00'
describe
'886941' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTE' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
31a4ccdc656da76624b938c01943f38c
a597ecfad72c4017a576bd2a10fd98e2a22cd930
describe
'95061' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
1e45b3eb845850c8f25eb0a93c23f472
4c462f5125629ce6b604a082c29d2494227382f6
describe
'18868' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTG' 'sip-files00154.pro'
da48db3ab7cdc82518e9637ffcab8ab0
36dc0fd091159fed98cd867dfd6b3ec0a3ec9b32
describe
'33973' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
af95ca4901af01da6811160e99630a49
2842f7ddb381f5c4c124f9954a1190aa69263c82
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTI' 'sip-files00154.tif'
bee90578f12bf04660ffb096ee8e150d
200d6b62206d73320fe726a62ac089179c32ed3e
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTJ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
db3a0e46338368e2ae1077717b0eb1c7
4d75c4c98ff6479ebbfeefe1d9e0159af64991a3
'2011-08-18T17:02:00-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11436' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTK' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
22dc6461928c2ccbfd033bb5b575a4f1
46560305bccebba4992acd9131bf320460056440
describe
'875167' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTL' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
0c3947078c94cf206308efc6c6fded12
45a5c7e50af7a82d6a35dbeed5601bea65a01290
'2011-08-18T16:58:20-04:00'
describe
'114992' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTM' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
f30e03f28db6a1424e2415f00d21cc41
f861de31b343842ba8b56bf7b9c4181858600c64
describe
'33652' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTN' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e22ea5e7ba0cf8d52f13691e9b3ab532
a15889186c38911be8bd24315152fd0b0d17a2b0
describe
'45126' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTO' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
826119fb122f4ad8c9f9a82807366a7d
a02799f7456835d74d911b46ac01c8884d1b6770
'2011-08-18T17:02:44-04:00'
describe
'7010265' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
2eff72d348051de1e5b2dd0977998ece
d3d717aca1dbc8246f000483a4adbe8b632bf7cf
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTQ' 'sip-files00155.txt'
e8e5d24c03f6950fba04efd640e71a09
48c0e3be3de4854bb0642819dc0e6908d5a291ed
describe
'13022' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTR' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
9cbe75e0097cbde1e766e25f114e94ab
c0514fcbd1ddb5113485f7ad003142273990806f
describe
'863741' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTS' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
d02e7e560a7eb53784125a0431dce1f0
118bd98207bfad7d541b2a5596dd693a11a61a08
describe
'101409' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTT' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
e507f2628efc0258ba73086cc4a114e5
32351b06b2ec660ac20e28b76beea516cae7846b
'2011-08-18T16:53:44-04:00'
describe
'32388' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTU' 'sip-files00156.pro'
ed41e1bcbf7f743bea0a4e59feac0a2b
ecdeef0dffd731948f2030d90385e4b0c2db68df
'2011-08-18T16:59:45-04:00'
describe
'37342' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTV' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
85a007e6290d63b86e4d325792ddafc1
e67707febbe7a94b80a7336b8d543950305907ab
describe
'6916483' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTW' 'sip-files00156.tif'
3f2b7b5f8d53db9fe9584fa692796256
4b0078578958762b578d09cb73f46efb8d6930cb
'2011-08-18T16:58:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTX' 'sip-files00156.txt'
48be889e5139efad993468a6ef2ae0db
4ee047bfda689f5e09c744f3dd3b092ffec89b21
'2011-08-18T17:01:44-04:00'
describe
'11698' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTY' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
359feaf69e1fd3db86c5874882d3b2d5
d59361506cf5a5e97e45da2831c49e9b384f3bf9
describe
'880065' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSTZ' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
36690e196eb4d6867c2d015fa699b129
7619a99b52bf6a02030f4cffc34cbd9fa5eea4dd
'2011-08-18T17:11:31-04:00'
describe
'119303' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUA' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
00e451a8aa8af151810d37910e9a59e2
a93ff22ad233ef561bcc3b3e1d9924b5d2ddaf6e
'2011-08-18T16:56:33-04:00'
describe
'18004' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUB' 'sip-files00157.pro'
10fed1afb07ef7033cc1b5e24a7c74f7
033537bf8eb29d7c3dc8fc607cd2cadcdfaa8158
'2011-08-18T16:55:41-04:00'
describe
'39911' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUC' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
71b95911915acaac08d165d3e7e0a063
a76eb2db339310f34cdeb2b29384646ed9a700c1
describe
'7049263' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUD' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b9e3c9137249314a807d65398973b680
a8e15cf64c1871d41a10759f397bf2eed562f262
describe
'712' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUE' 'sip-files00157.txt'
71b476004ed2655f050b213ca4404e42
b1340337714f628eb989441a047e2de6c5b54c8e
describe
'11830' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUF' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
16ad88266b79992e86b5893857f1a0cf
9977f979e1357f345ac8eab6584c7b43dacd2070
'2011-08-18T16:59:17-04:00'
describe
'853738' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUG' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
4099c3e962311c6790e9aa949e7c8752
ac905aa3bed53eccbba435cd7041a1f78e991ab9
'2011-08-18T17:10:32-04:00'
describe
'106535' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUH' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
aa23e44ee7f9746a02922e182373af32
b94064f9fcac458c80aac009c01a2fbdfe42b182
describe
'31356' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUI' 'sip-files00158.pro'
ffc38bb3932c4198f2d72730a969ebe9
5032c358d5220d731c90a1806215ce00ef19458d
'2011-08-18T16:47:54-04:00'
describe
'40560' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUJ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
6feac4606299bd2ef81dc4afd9a2705b
6c47d31e624363ef1f3f24fce367ad93441538df
'2011-08-18T16:55:21-04:00'
describe
'6836743' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUK' 'sip-files00158.tif'
2250ec4474db1f817f16b3dd263ef4d7
dd520470d998020367914f0ba0c62938d0d9f6f5
'2011-08-18T16:51:02-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUL' 'sip-files00158.txt'
ce1a210a602494c79d508b338e6a23c1
2a0ca7a8d9ac3ca71c04d0ebb22c46488d12cb8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUM' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
a00b38340499334c7253cd2885063b37
198a2f44c287fb5931cf959c6edad76d99cfe8ee
describe
'861209' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUN' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
2b3ddf1f22b7e7d00cba190155e0f0bb
d41b5914a9ba26c61b6f4d2a5c268864d015303c
describe
'104724' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUO' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
dd5233b4c69af37e1267075e677557b5
8822644fc5494d18033dce023a3aaa96873cb9d1
'2011-08-18T17:11:11-04:00'
describe
'34443' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUP' 'sip-files00159.pro'
8dee1d203ce42b1f0605454dd4acfc2d
a4385faf4242841a25a0b0260ac4b4489f6c23bc
describe
'39008' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUQ' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
aac66b678178971eaccc9e892a5d0e52
243f9f3308c3d959f9b20bcf3181fe70e62e4cc5
'2011-08-18T16:54:38-04:00'
describe
'6896339' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUR' 'sip-files00159.tif'
92bc907b49d84cc6b55cc6ba7150998e
cb4b5da4291e917abd7fa3960fbc49abb7f658cf
'2011-08-18T17:04:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUS' 'sip-files00159.txt'
339a1686fa7d1335e6dd2263ead4da55
030beee3f29b2696c921bd808dc164cf8345643d
'2011-08-18T17:02:25-04:00'
describe
'11589' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUT' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
897a374196194f6d93cddb4393e3deae
d313bf881176e36a3179db31242b574900623fb5
'2011-08-18T16:56:29-04:00'
describe
'879970' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
b74e1873a88f0dffb12b4a2536e83854
ebd5c37a252a7fda279d435440913961e1502027
'2011-08-18T16:58:53-04:00'
describe
'112637' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUV' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f81ea10c8a4822f585700aa724c30d6e
b72eb3eb881f24fbca36f89f9b81ac50becdf791
'2011-08-18T16:41:08-04:00'
describe
'16859' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUW' 'sip-files00160.pro'
928d91d546e9e338e096ac7a6f03521d
93c22820217c5d2e6504745816dc11108a35fe59
describe
'38665' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUX' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ab79c42448fcc64cf3d70a2fe1a4a59b
c0604322224dc1f910bb93764d8ab3171c8230db
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUY' 'sip-files00160.tif'
4b5d09d1be49377aab7cefdca9b64668
3407c634fe751276fa9fac616a8b47f20bfe9f36
'2011-08-18T17:12:32-04:00'
describe
'677' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSUZ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
acc38d6aa9e979678fc9d44631891a38
9c5e6f62f0b3db4c2023feb1edb19d2d1d0bc189
'2011-08-18T16:54:39-04:00'
describe
'11606' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVA' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7c1cdd610732f630d62e9eb06202f775
3142f49940ec221aa7d8938bd50c8f863e005993
'2011-08-18T17:09:05-04:00'
describe
'863761' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVB' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
2ef1a3b3bacd5ec9c66d9c580d8b9a7a
266a3e3846fb361c7935a7e46f6538b6734490e1
describe
'111617' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVC' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
3c3dc562e4ad7cc565192a4b6c524b54
2102976f72352c2fec48fcfde8e7b072a47cd313
describe
'31685' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVD' 'sip-files00161.pro'
4375abadd0480954dbf7665459dbdf0f
9bcf778a882c322731f00b809183b3a59e1317cd
'2011-08-18T16:49:24-04:00'
describe
'42282' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVE' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
aebe7926e3b21ffa342f5b4804750bd5
4f3169b1cbc785656f223556d2b16ab0f6bf4333
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVF' 'sip-files00161.tif'
c192645d7cfeabe898548130e4258d85
ffb295b96894600b15378087dbd5b9484d2d7061
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVG' 'sip-files00161.txt'
926e845e9186c539b70f9d3e8e50de5d
f62084747154229376ed632dc853c6fa5e521c27
describe
'12731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVH' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
97eda7650ea994a5fba9d1ff6af38584
b62131405e18214c6829f1f4727e35365f9a80c4
describe
'852161' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVI' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
9827590a153441723fb421237b957646
e5d822ac3bbdced9686bc65c0692f031dbdb8337
'2011-08-18T17:09:03-04:00'
describe
'112579' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVJ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
5612ecb4b4458f7317d4bf891b452a93
2eb475755abe968f68d3a98fed50250834ae7679
'2011-08-18T17:01:42-04:00'
describe
'32466' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVK' 'sip-files00162.pro'
19bd40152aaaaf06ff4d6b872e497d68
4f76bffabb0dec58bd63c1ce3e0b0575dfa89aeb
describe
'42791' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVL' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
a94aa1edb9a0972f8f78140bff03d1d5
5d6cf8fca945437842f500e8dc6b5f8efbd5928d
'2011-08-18T16:53:53-04:00'
describe
'6824029' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVM' 'sip-files00162.tif'
e5aff58e63c6cebd682e83274962bb88
755fd22df31d7bb25c5507d343dfcce92541cdae
'2011-08-18T16:46:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVN' 'sip-files00162.txt'
64edb08cd719e9d3b517be9d2e83ea0b
f93f477ad38c69e150f17fd8de794d39526018ef
describe
'13333' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVO' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
66556e01de5f9fd3a578ff417b8e6383
084b4a05f437c577108cd80364552c5e41ad1df6
'2011-08-18T17:09:41-04:00'
describe
'871885' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVP' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
c02497e0b867a9cb0a8b3ed8ae4e659f
1874448935cef26c3f87b4bc9912c1814f00fb11
'2011-08-18T16:54:03-04:00'
describe
'111968' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVQ' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
0376044c237120d379722a00639360b1
986ef7ee3aca070f27b46a5823bf71cb77249623
describe
'33487' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVR' 'sip-files00163.pro'
0b8ef91161a2ef5273fa975826ebbbd0
8430138469f0cd693d00d36b6b85c1480d58333a
describe
'43071' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVS' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
7a752718af8758dcdb1bc7bf1c58bfb4
b4690b683581ff274d02175e12fb7a587662a3c5
'2011-08-18T17:02:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVT' 'sip-files00163.tif'
43e5515f82f41f6686a74a35c65a95ea
90e9b10c79970ffed0f54181c119ec2b2247ca80
'2011-08-18T17:08:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVU' 'sip-files00163.txt'
d0824eb9cd5b01595321e4ca299d4edf
92c9c6526c4ba4d522e85cde9403e0644099000a
describe
'12879' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVV' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a9330686a1cba03c85cc632ce601ef31
f9b04620155c9f82d914382bb9a4cc133d8f1092
'2011-08-18T16:54:29-04:00'
describe
'857752' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVW' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
278c66a0eb4e249ec837519915b6f73f
c9547f552fc64ccf2544e5a80e9097c4bffab7de
'2011-08-18T16:59:20-04:00'
describe
'91958' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVX' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
02191d1db5511dffb45de881ae9468d5
8a96954365bd0a4ba8ee26af59a8b037e36b72c1
'2011-08-18T16:57:28-04:00'
describe
'31739' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVY' 'sip-files00164.pro'
9cd6614d12d430022bb4f368e5199059
a2f843d739c4b161c72af86bd4b1027ccb926697
describe
'34836' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSVZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
9aaaa696572d8ca9ec3dc4e13a7fff3f
f9f0126dc0361b89c135d34ec724a3a7ae2c4595
'2011-08-18T16:56:44-04:00'
describe
'6868491' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWA' 'sip-files00164.tif'
433f4ca82c364055dbe88e4752bb7d08
218dcb12c971a4c0a0fe2d89205b94c92890690d
'2011-08-18T17:11:22-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWB' 'sip-files00164.txt'
62f0eb9c57a2a98304ff4e509a9f3f28
46cfe4da2ea4b054855d9e794963d1d58273a797
describe
'10669' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
41ff06ce34a98067f75c6cd03ab832ff
164cabdad3d8e2333c8bcecab4ee4fe4f5b8bc7b
'2011-08-18T16:56:25-04:00'
describe
'867042' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWD' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
335440755c89a610a8084b4f30ce9264
c40aa0b1600d30ef3f2a4f4ada8fc008febafed8
describe
'115080' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWE' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
c4a79c51aff112e2d061bc91d43093ea
2fe88cec6290912e48d9bbcff83f45080ee89be7
'2011-08-18T16:59:37-04:00'
describe
'33485' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWF' 'sip-files00165.pro'
98736bd19485333ad5099ccaf14f1424
2e5e302cc45d73a492b2420fea70ddaf8223856f
'2011-08-18T17:11:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWG' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
34a96e2c035114baaebb113700ffedc7
ba849e27dd7c897a7ba1f975c656e187858cc2b0
describe
'6943101' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWH' 'sip-files00165.tif'
738840ebb999a40b036322feaa2b60d6
c84d8bdf8e0bd1431a248064281aa88221bb8e52
'2011-08-18T17:02:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWI' 'sip-files00165.txt'
e5f43646893353a1d20da01ef387fb1b
03a72eb25d9667a7785e2e2fb30cbe969dd2a83f
'2011-08-18T17:00:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWJ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
3471d3daefc001dd5c357e05ab1fda2c
55871d170366fb5c5d61ef8e1de64ba35f687090
describe
'879981' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWK' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
039d197694965d01e176f788ccf85d23
92df72dfdf6ca5ca23dccfddb4c982d910df7f57
describe
'115477' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWL' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
bc270ec5eadd2358066e3a10cb1f932f
4125c21b573c6c13f3bf4834c03b8a234a66456e
describe
'33786' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWM' 'sip-files00166.pro'
82719bd753d747195ee373c9dd182315
34f471265131042ba89487bf0125ad4808c85f18
'2011-08-18T17:00:34-04:00'
describe
'45166' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWN' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
1a602ca4a455e0a5195517a0a4244924
70182d39e0bd3605ccda14ebd8197946cbdc3b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWO' 'sip-files00166.tif'
44a4843bf83e2476d3ee1eea3b69a8bf
0ddf3cedd5c5c9b8b866de4947d8316587396694
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWP' 'sip-files00166.txt'
62b5de45b659284c95822fe4e16ce703
3ff68179e326bdda7516202ef9bde13b0b990c39
describe
'13010' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWQ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
6eb65b00aaa2a0ca212fa1ab3844e9fa
00c0dc1a9e4275942cdb7a782c97d1b7e681f244
'2011-08-18T16:58:46-04:00'
describe
'889999' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWR' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
9ad09127d183718e34979e60d5d3f6ea
3b636efb59d5ffe7ad98ea025f41f70a066f1b8b
describe
'114456' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWS' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
8b9a4f893d4066d6200c14e7788da291
7bb9e6e08e6c4c96ff91da96facf3b386f506975
describe
'32798' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWT' 'sip-files00167.pro'
b7dffcf138552e91d54971cbb63387d2
fd4d8c7f768ddbbf071f9c08b99fce29173be116
describe
'43449' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWU' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
842db28bf85d624a19acefc47ad7199d
6bc958e30d1b91fc5baf987f6229c93a79fa334f
'2011-08-18T17:07:14-04:00'
describe
'7129317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWV' 'sip-files00167.tif'
a2feded2894f424acd5468edfdaadbde
649e8eb0d3e3308859c8ec90442318049c283607
'2011-08-18T16:46:19-04:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWW' 'sip-files00167.txt'
71eb07f10619e5a450bc541d73b40d6e
3255969a6e1f8b073d6c462406e1a3b3eb455549
describe
'13089' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWX' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
fdc1e9679caa458adb148fd4c3a6c57c
a95d26e2382d81dbbd88d60cd927624d6ede80a7
describe
'903690' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWY' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
add660162942b8182767f6f6db7c908b
fafdbd9b029ed4528a950476f8e38de9905eb05a
'2011-08-18T17:10:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSWZ' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
93af242fbc157fcc94ca3c103dfe887e
9be287573b151bea53cc5d7574cb70492d77679e
'2011-08-18T16:59:13-04:00'
describe
'36586' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXA' 'sip-files00168.pro'
16226475049e58d795765ed25ca08627
28f6f9b9881511a13759ece61734b6789314b60b
'2011-08-18T17:10:21-04:00'
describe
'38559' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXB' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
3e24ba53eb1a9fd72f9fb944540832e5
dc0dcb7702a0ea9cd9d4b6572de920de9af8c79d
'2011-08-18T17:06:22-04:00'
describe
'7238543' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
1d8d47131e947397980fd02ad0a78a7a
0ab416da86f6a2155f2510eb4734d0002e7ca402
'2011-08-18T16:54:23-04:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXD' 'sip-files00168.txt'
41d508b62708f4ee6f0525a6c05c6ed0
5a9aecf979fa78beb486cda9c1c0131ef8f34f28
'2011-08-18T17:07:29-04:00'
describe
'11172' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXE' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
9e90cb4eb304032795bff78498be34ab
a6127b529da54b683fc56926da94289cd4443886
describe
'908547' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXF' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
e1f0f0e9ae4851e0f4ad6a6df387a3c9
7323461cf6783631b873c259f41e6b7c1606dbec
describe
'105461' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXG' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
d44e69c349d2ab2f22c92fef8d2d99f9
1b945720244d5d04200167b2eb20cb75d77df8e8
'2011-08-18T16:49:41-04:00'
describe
'19391' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
edeca083b441c3e1262c3833469b4c1d
b725a2dcfc76027686393827731a777ee77728fa
describe
'37656' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
889024d51c530c128470931b356832e0
b4d252ceb905a8d68148b34cf014b073a24db203
describe
'7277541' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXJ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
2f064d252459c00d4b1a738099bb73a3
a0d8a4a0f484bf44969b91fb8d4152686499b116
'2011-08-18T16:51:43-04:00'
describe
'765' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXK' 'sip-files00169.txt'
6567fd3802f5524de14c23f6302892f2
e680be7d097e5eef4e5c23a3eaee8caee016c345
describe
'11847' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXL' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
b132e66a85619a9eb1d4995c18a86bba
692d68f85785471521e039804eb4f781d3d0fdb4
describe
'882632' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXM' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
834f19f3a8e8a624324ab9989a7bc013
0052e6db3da616b7b91d35b36ac87eeb1b8de758
'2011-08-18T16:54:09-04:00'
describe
'111217' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXN' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
2b5e01e80e57d332fffeb1691453a81d
c337e584a45543d53ed5a38ace2c6ea99cc2ca1b
'2011-08-18T17:05:23-04:00'
describe
'32125' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXO' 'sip-files00170.pro'
49985fa2b97bf3b9f03b14cf872add7f
05c052bae954db1d55754cc26531718c704d5ccb
'2011-08-18T17:09:49-04:00'
describe
'41777' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXP' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
09fc9e7fb8bc11a83084dfd87c70bfa6
bd4928bf89ab0cb6e9889bed9f226348838b4856
'2011-08-18T17:06:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXQ' 'sip-files00170.tif'
73e43ff77551b33573a863fce270733f
52ffb024b342f805516b28d44bff40596ebe42cb
'2011-08-18T17:04:50-04:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXR' 'sip-files00170.txt'
1750c58fb643b3d76f9a617b4c62861a
b5cfdba8931a2870e2220b8098feedb99274bcd8
describe
'12674' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXS' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
36631187722bd0d7bbbb57e5da717f32
9ea7472b0ec971b0236d3657229d0f9c07cad7ca
'2011-08-18T17:01:43-04:00'
describe
'884888' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXT' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
3c72066e612625d42308c7ae7604c5ba
865a64f573a9ee9f1c996d226ada6c1ae81f9162
'2011-08-18T17:07:30-04:00'
describe
'114471' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXU' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
b53c15d3c696d2618dbf300b0fd2d16d
bd7307060ae62bc79a9d21cdd3f3f11fd79a7a66
'2011-08-18T16:57:42-04:00'
describe
'33278' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXV' 'sip-files00171.pro'
540e89d5f1deade733d3e99a1d366168
95f003c6585ee6ef1983c461d8acdbfe69805a7f
'2011-08-18T17:09:53-04:00'
describe
'43924' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXW' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
94199f2365d58769d2fd4896cdfbb061
e7a88c30b44262961dcd0291171a595b6d2be711
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXX' 'sip-files00171.tif'
e6b4756a02ea0d70211ff6720cb08abe
2fbc3de8c35667b01c189512e337b516c7af70d2
'2011-08-18T17:02:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXY' 'sip-files00171.txt'
8d23a5511f6ec58020fc9041368166a4
1fc5bfde4e160d9de95eb897e4054b8ecb778888
describe
'13211' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSXZ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d0b4dff9b661ca0602dc027985fd108d
80c43e3d27ed0f5ec795d07999553981b9ffb9d0
'2011-08-18T17:03:08-04:00'
describe
'891217' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYA' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
288108b0b46b7ab2377da2979b9bcb51
c87c922226566d620de205625445a13abeae163c
describe
'115688' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYB' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
f8d496a95dc9fe1aa3af876fe8e23f26
1fe61e46fdce274159c0b44367c1064f0b42d95c
describe
'33458' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYC' 'sip-files00172.pro'
04cf74061b59fa936f6d2e85b76c27aa
3ba6f482a1aa5106174c3ad9bed2664e0c55a9ae
describe
'44370' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYD' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
02f0f4241df210f4ec7afe23e87ca3c4
fe8b52d5ffdb5f748d549caba5e5d92239dd8b5f
'2011-08-18T16:48:34-04:00'
describe
'7138667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYE' 'sip-files00172.tif'
1b7bce698bff6291a52a9392c0aae460
f380ef58ea9ac2b2f7aa886a7dae431673d839cb
'2011-08-18T16:44:41-04:00'
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYF' 'sip-files00172.txt'
51d50606b65eb59c52c3fac08d58ed26
5f6b23c7109b701944182d54af2c38483f63b135
'2011-08-18T16:56:31-04:00'
describe
'12667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYG' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
d4b5b7ffa6a97bb24a69a4a95586cd33
45d5c154349a378489286faf4e93bb898eb3360c
'2011-08-18T16:47:42-04:00'
describe
'878757' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYH' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
352142ded38c7ad8f36a4dd6a9b6a9e7
b1046bc1ca7e4a32678dc52098dbef888b5d6330
'2011-08-18T16:59:07-04:00'
describe
'111485' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYI' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
93c69459792ca73ed8f3812284b3fbdb
dae130160d58098e2a0c52d34b13f18afca7b754
'2011-08-18T17:08:49-04:00'
describe
'32361' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
9f5beca0fe8098979dc2bba2f74c6994
646c150b14188d5346ede40a3d54c4ada6b87205
describe
'42920' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYK' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6f542b942e81e902594c02bfe1a260bc
0864a93282ac437c31d08d5d7f4cbe5a57767fe5
describe
'7036495' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYL' 'sip-files00173.tif'
59faaeb8dd153090dc20ac08f2315b3f
a934cb14235669293c916042d418e2acac57bc37
'2011-08-18T17:06:24-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYM' 'sip-files00173.txt'
04a8b29d061e228ed646b42debdec9dc
88d58006d0ede7d5b0667f12910e77570ee077cc
'2011-08-18T17:08:05-04:00'
describe
'12761' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYN' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
23956723c4e66f62472de27877d89a28
c459e5bc17d207c9ffbef5e30299920e9ba96397
'2011-08-18T16:58:19-04:00'
describe
'884338' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYO' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
1c322d2d8b444fe162703aad2070ebaf
3d61a5dd0e389af73dcb26da78212fca3026fe68
'2011-08-18T17:00:38-04:00'
describe
'87662' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYP' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
6bc5f6a3e4d348c1bb4c0df93ee2c8da
0cc944ecb2526ec28ee8435510ea3959ae8b081c
describe
'30584' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYQ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
5f3d4235a1b2422ca53aa52284e5a4d3
ce14b8a877606e1c2d7d1a0a1eb0ab7ddb391cd4
describe
'32941' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYR' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
59473a6b6172375d6ea23eb343136b43
0e27b6570416a1150dfc73391ec3c2439c6ac555
'2011-08-18T17:12:14-04:00'
describe
'7083603' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYS' 'sip-files00174.tif'
860ebaa6bbd07413d1be74b7a0f33b5f
47f1d5dc3c3beb65352ad6db4c67e66cab71c59e
'2011-08-18T17:00:12-04:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYT' 'sip-files00174.txt'
e9aea89eed2d0ef8184d6a6094df6fd8
1fbfa87d0ab4e58066c52ffc91d047a89cda87e2
'2011-08-18T16:52:12-04:00'
describe
'10692' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYU' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
d12a6b71d0bbc684be9b7b7093fcf432
e53d5abfbc704e422dbd62529d1be5c1ee6dca1a
'2011-08-18T17:09:33-04:00'
describe
'873552' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYV' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
505d34091b90fb4a7042cb689844a7aa
cb46ab223d408ff2a9c242aa50578d1875e56215
describe
'107315' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYW' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
d782637f4dc880e4f253fc42d216d861
ba7f3a92441885aab5ff01d1a507162b46eb7eb7
describe
'30903' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYX' 'sip-files00175.pro'
eae1ff08996f66bc19639bf078044094
229decbbd7f158317bd872286d6a7a359f781af0
'2011-08-18T16:56:38-04:00'
describe
'41766' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYY' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
1ce7273b1a1b0d28665b9edc56cd1804
4c1230e5cce8c7a132a9e6ca5a6d20bf773a3fe5
'2011-08-18T17:04:20-04:00'
describe
'6995031' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSYZ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
ae6b29f25c908a3e3cdab4046196c716
3104dfe428efa5e22d2bbd50ba34becf6be94769
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZA' 'sip-files00175.txt'
5ade316c58f692e806ff486722cd1e32
79292eda3dd1e05334d3f2f036a0e23bda3d4043
describe
'12989' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZB' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
d4b333b644a31eaa0137e4a7383415d1
b0e169f21cfa809fb26d9e4d4aa76b3d10da352c
'2011-08-18T17:07:37-04:00'
describe
'853936' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZC' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
8e105de8f9bada34575d1792712c4093
026d22f09a31b6be907ea9f3532aa6995610cff9
describe
'104669' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZD' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
f96d61d848810a19765acd13af4aebd5
dda337c13d9850d93792d8f11aa549c3985591bb
'2011-08-18T17:01:55-04:00'
describe
'34009' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZE' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7763e17c58d456079c6de52425421bf4
4bfe223868f3154076955ef8ade61b6d2026f1c5
describe
'37520' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZF' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
fd80d34e1dd1e8dbf1caa35a6b8fd878
cb511a00c0061454c9140106aaf205d3a2605d7c
describe
'6837935' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZG' 'sip-files00176.tif'
9ec63d4fd395ba823cea7d72b017f67e
236e886b6275a6ade50cfa6b9a8f5c5b19208293
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZH' 'sip-files00176.txt'
974d7bccb9acc855e3f72c93fd318cbd
284237d09a9d237fc62a11bab640825ba668fa89
describe
'11024' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZI' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
1446f1a2debdc8889175176f0c5a7f03
1aa26b65ba142a56c7be5918f34459bc0851ada7
'2011-08-18T17:04:56-04:00'
describe
'864861' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZJ' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
70d0cd5fc7f860eff1ddeb042aa24403
8616d5893f8fdd18cb62fadd8dc4c3147a1d8dde
'2011-08-18T16:52:49-04:00'
describe
'126807' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZK' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
eaa6f5ae67701dcf950a98e086038153
89be1fc9f7dc7ddc7b13df525d2be625b711d4cb
describe
'18030' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZL' 'sip-files00177.pro'
9eb4fa75c9a8b152fb821282ce78ec3a
3b0afa222fcd51d172aca5da4145296a6abd2158
'2011-08-18T17:08:30-04:00'
describe
'42383' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZM' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
ac9f9e82d0784fd3f71b528184068999
39b812f71b783320a3acddc78fae96c6df8f3513
'2011-08-18T16:57:27-04:00'
describe
'6925571' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZN' 'sip-files00177.tif'
e17134cd65bd67ed6e0ff34d02ecc4a0
5dea4098c603d23256bd346083a2646bcc6a6fd9
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZO' 'sip-files00177.txt'
9c8358d3a25201f2447fbcab3237c0a7
eac3a18c52e22f7666ee967c8946b64820c8855f
'2011-08-18T16:57:16-04:00'
describe
'13129' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZP' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
da508c0c2ffe20708826574af1b9dc07
c8475cb7636c134fdfbf0646db76093dde442b7f
describe
'855156' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZQ' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
8f88652435f08bc083d98009b4dc6fa3
93b841742e7d2cb31540b01768f45559f6f5522b
'2011-08-18T17:00:36-04:00'
describe
'111519' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZR' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
5efe72f9b75372a902e4fbd767722382
92a0427691352e84294c9d6a3df864524668c140
'2011-08-18T17:11:33-04:00'
describe
'31827' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZS' 'sip-files00178.pro'
0474fcf059537de17cc155fe059a8f42
4209e4c9d1942fca807c64a338e8a930bb4c0ad8
'2011-08-18T16:59:25-04:00'
describe
'42388' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZT' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
4bc2137f0ceb3d38fb0c6672ac67f5af
7e7f934ce735cce8fdba394118ca5d6916eda453
'2011-08-18T17:12:19-04:00'
describe
'6847803' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZU' 'sip-files00178.tif'
395b9c3bd86d1e12ca63eb5e59d58189
409bfbaa447fd76a0ef1c96f1612dac654675af1
'2011-08-18T17:08:10-04:00'
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZV' 'sip-files00178.txt'
36e9ea517a8c00cd79315ea9e75bf4fc
5446697474d42feb2cd7b2217fb69e52981004c0
'2011-08-18T16:45:59-04:00'
describe
'13217' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZW' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
13d514042ace4dfc3555c0b461acf005
83fd2f12c46928dfea364165cd6c613efaaa7d73
describe
'852669' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZX' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
7d68bcdb8941ab0bef7745203e99f5b0
7ae259a223c2c858c7c7c33432e5604e19efa0d6
'2011-08-18T17:10:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZY' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
3e1e314a7c131e4072094a8ec635a234
90b16adbf2d6736d69e77d980601b6061dc223e4
describe
'33949' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABSZZ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
945c82c5c377877973dff81889790f92
9c445a2cec019d0e2db836bc3afff5424a0a15dc
'2011-08-18T16:58:16-04:00'
describe
'36136' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAA' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
c5bd88947cbcd2eebb11782fbf51e93e
8ecf1dedd07c61d794dcb3612fec6d359ab3e854
'2011-08-18T17:00:43-04:00'
describe
'6827859' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAB' 'sip-files00179.tif'
d968d7d84c92acd9199965fccb2c32ff
cb422de3a3252ab86121b338feaf3fc9d27f913e
'2011-08-18T17:05:58-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAC' 'sip-files00179.txt'
fd3a5a581b1ff699ca9acddea8b0f6a0
e4f44a83677c5d197bbe7c3846469380e6d0d6f4
'2011-08-18T17:01:07-04:00'
describe
'11628' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAD' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2bc4ccd0171c35fdd0ab8a1a64a4b944
2a12d9b6822688e62be83f6e3583e4509802bc19
'2011-08-18T17:09:58-04:00'
describe
'881026' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAE' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
dd37a408b7a4c3306d78cc9cd89f1452
b700962546c625f14e0fd85d8e592cbf971a8c45
'2011-08-18T17:01:49-04:00'
describe
'112847' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAF' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
dbe5ee3a72aa1a76765d29fbb6b1f32a
d3586bd3ac164882fcc98f08b31ce93b4238d0be
'2011-08-18T17:00:03-04:00'
describe
'32580' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAG' 'sip-files00180.pro'
687833f56d977e07c1a40006cd71c7f3
0fb5cbc6701c10ef6694a3a7899a5be8e220d8b2
'2011-08-18T17:04:19-04:00'
describe
'43813' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c201ae0ba2d68567a7eb00fc75afb339
83e81cc420503553d227f5cc272e04a664920516
describe
'7054889' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAI' 'sip-files00180.tif'
7a5a715cdc27a5aa5b82d402e08e7d6c
ca1b67ba851e02bab6643fe37f81d7de95e2a19b
'2011-08-18T16:59:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAJ' 'sip-files00180.txt'
42daeadb4112472a0f88033498896fb9
6148b80e5710f76be0ab69ce17f4d0f42fc35ff8
'2011-08-18T16:56:30-04:00'
describe
'13025' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAK' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
b2e96354cb590dda8e08265abefa3fb7
42c4c39cceb353db65f612544f23850bb8a349f2
'2011-08-18T17:09:16-04:00'
describe
'861895' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAL' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
384ff65c459d4214fadc1fb9a4bf18d8
309ea445e7c8f539c6ed8ef2bf9b2c7e564b8fbc
describe
'114764' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAM' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
ad1aaa8cd0b1a2027ffbc56a69b51b16
6726af9079127ecf941052e99ca05bcc9f1de8ae
describe
'32487' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAN' 'sip-files00181.pro'
6ca4d4349acf79f4eec19433cf9dc418
91509de592b97868c4f5c08e4235fa096b28db7a
'2011-08-18T16:59:54-04:00'
describe
'44062' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAO' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
5fb4e796f4fb6d9858ddd9d6b9a6ba31
9350b1a5f9c2ed1a931c52c0c6ccc3bdaabcf058
'2011-08-18T17:01:34-04:00'
describe
'6902179' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e0b6e5bb8e10ab99bcd90c69efd8a58a
6e4b3c827a846629272604f6715359c695b27ad6
'2011-08-18T16:54:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAQ' 'sip-files00181.txt'
e5811d49aae53455b384504522cdc94d
a62f53cb9fc64fd7df745afdcdca10b5e1a63439
'2011-08-18T16:53:37-04:00'
describe
'13593' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAR' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
32ea2decd6a40620153880d1bb254fdb
dce10943753f237778230193941c609d0970b524
describe
'906989' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAS' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
743a16166047f13fc03b397097d9f54d
05f7bb2613fd234fe02d02a39e1d286c6ab51a1f
describe
'104641' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAT' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
fa0ab429ec959933d277950d33a1e54a
d74bc934f6f5484b85d4f3671a75a7ef3c0a0a1a
'2011-08-18T17:05:45-04:00'
describe
'35108' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAU' 'sip-files00182.pro'
10c2aa8b30d607b894460f483ae6d421
e2690347975f13fa1d68b1c21dc4e0b7dfaf17ad
'2011-08-18T16:49:04-04:00'
describe
'38023' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAV' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
51d831a8498141b91ca7d8725cdad58f
95688f8a5ceaaeac2e3550bc15b7b3fb72e744c2
describe
'7264765' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAW' 'sip-files00182.tif'
c32f73ee1c3769e45fe518d6701b0786
cc1ce05f8500cf5e1f8ed65aabd3425874e42a4c
'2011-08-18T17:05:21-04:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAX' 'sip-files00182.txt'
cfa82defe7f56896116265ad729d9376
888df2c235060851a775f95ded0cce3acd5cec61
'2011-08-18T17:11:02-04:00'
describe
'11426' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAY' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
0c65daa53dcf0fd0860e8705074c87f0
94abc516a4f23647ac9ccfb31cf893528bc72a64
'2011-08-18T16:55:25-04:00'
describe
'880855' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTAZ' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f64a20a22b350fd2a684b0f2fa9c38a9
5671a49fe7f1b8e9eb0f091391f4183b67477377
describe
'117281' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBA' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
b603345acd8af9ae2ba8f94a633e4423
7983e08384fd3a97867d4ff40f75daf7b414d8cc
describe
'18192' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBB' 'sip-files00183.pro'
c555726f7a4435be63452ec18124841d
c765c1f7e8d3236aa531f188cc90b49fbb9bc333
describe
'39636' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBC' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
11ab1b3e8016e159dc80eed6c30ad186
6a8c13b1ea409415a65506a69c40dfbb83ae6c0c
describe
'7053435' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBD' 'sip-files00183.tif'
a6d5212ab0714490b01cf61b8b5d6d52
bd1909cbd3ba807ab98ea9d30e3570298608348e
'2011-08-18T17:10:43-04:00'
describe
'724' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBE' 'sip-files00183.txt'
2d165bf941fb7e590fdcac5a314ad1bb
b93f4a1cc326a9436e8efd5fdd8f0314570391ea
'2011-08-18T17:11:53-04:00'
describe
'12481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBF' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
9121b4684c9f4485416a003e13b64c2b
a834fb2a7b933868053c1873f602da3ec18545dc
describe
'868441' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBG' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
50b4fbf6b79c01f1f6da7ee88ab51f1d
f6f130d1e9b65a430fa892e6d73553c50b9b0bdd
describe
'115728' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
cacb768494561baa3b10ae9a433e92cf
45991087850d1035b8a62209c2621f180a482bd3
describe
'33145' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBI' 'sip-files00184.pro'
995195ee61dfa015fee7d9f889170878
ad02f608c9cc47de672f8f46e7ed71db0711897d
'2011-08-18T16:43:59-04:00'
describe
'44652' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBJ' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
da7f84fdbd7247261e613ab1cfab884f
6ca07d59ef0f6b8f0df6d71a7571c04a58038bd8
'2011-08-18T17:11:36-04:00'
describe
'6954751' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBK' 'sip-files00184.tif'
b4c324df26f317e4b1a1652443c190a0
fd0d0ce5a1e0be6a47ca63073f839bddf9378872
'2011-08-18T17:01:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBL' 'sip-files00184.txt'
65a0b60428ed2422fb971ac51787bfc8
a7cf5b8fe03bc4a132a33e0ae9e023a47ed5baf0
describe
'13503' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBM' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
dcb54fecf388dfaf23696f003a82d70f
c4836a9564d34d878b2d9e5f5a5fb49927ebad05
describe
'859461' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBN' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
ce82fad657d9db38938ad3914de3ace7
da2118e2cd0a820e10d92d7448eaa22477673656
'2011-08-18T17:09:25-04:00'
describe
'111017' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBO' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
091ecafb32ad07fec55f5009668a5800
318a5364e120d8892548191539cfd350c8635028
'2011-08-18T16:58:05-04:00'
describe
'31389' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBP' 'sip-files00185.pro'
168ab9619aa75ca43da1a2b7e4b9622f
a80c1017cf5b774f9c605ebda759613f56dd43dc
describe
'42762' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBQ' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
e6003d0cbdaed4b9d0cd74657aed551a
1eed3d8368720b4115fd33549d336826794a2f9e
describe
'6882143' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBR' 'sip-files00185.tif'
5f6a908495b655d48c748b90bf39829e
7de9ea1339c63bb341e6a961d731a8921a6c23e4
'2011-08-18T17:03:30-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBS' 'sip-files00185.txt'
868b2448cacaeb6840b3dbf169e68206
3d2d17b4b0858b432a1077ba8ce64b00fb7858ae
describe
'13514' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBT' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
bac17a8ff990813e6581f2a8859e3cfc
de1d3feb64cf8b8e9f9455a66047413b6d0c392d
describe
'853773' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBU' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
ceb0033ef1f9ca09e8ebe4ebd0483d11
2fbe2eb79f250b38538fbfff6b45f5a1b932540f
describe
'86036' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBV' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
e74829320baa1e3e19338368f8b372ef
c7fe43d9e13a4e97e361bb91a9b92f6bcae4ce01
'2011-08-18T16:52:02-04:00'
describe
'29508' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBW' 'sip-files00186.pro'
fb9844945ea23b52e1c005fe22b0e363
15e6db93ebfa3a4be30b03be3a281392b0219532
'2011-08-18T16:44:27-04:00'
describe
'30072' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBX' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
fb04780f04dc57bcfb6638e8b04e554d
d12ccabf05577bcccaef3ff43ee5e3a23233330d
'2011-08-18T17:02:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBY' 'sip-files00186.tif'
afae0489157b5d3102b3821b09887602
436ab1293cc3b39de5efe44a9b8683d27505a05e
'2011-08-18T16:51:31-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTBZ' 'sip-files00186.txt'
d4ae1ed9a1448d8fe4e975c7ff634c40
53b7711e0b321ff6d4ce2284552333bfcc948aff
describe
'9924' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCA' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
5e2d85837b50767c0413801b1b7024f9
b862cfad9f6eb694c45f7a0e44ccb9cbc9e64c64
describe
'855831' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCB' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
7e90312a08ad39eab7cb068129849936
6064499e60a1f5de0390a8ea25d85257f6340b57
describe
'101885' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCC' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
511cedae4a8b5797aaa3ebd713fa7c45
acb22c6334bf901c2660b01b6015919049db9439
describe
'28923' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCD' 'sip-files00187.pro'
fb70ae73f6b456fca1a9d8cc5cc060ad
d7ab009e39f81a67c8102f0f96a23d51e9574f72
'2011-08-18T16:57:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCE' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
6dfbe0df30de0a40c89685b0a1f3f0ae
318f706df0a38c52c80b1099d6e41282f71df81d
describe
'6854615' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCF' 'sip-files00187.tif'
901a695cdef50229b9b3d41b85d8b9d3
6f3e53d0fa28a7437cf5e4a3509616717fc4528b
'2011-08-18T17:09:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCG' 'sip-files00187.txt'
f4bb819079b80e8efbbad51d3166ec1c
b863faaf0bbf36e8804ef4c62826890cbeb40e60
'2011-08-18T16:59:21-04:00'
describe
'12703' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCH' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
a8bb8fd1cd03a1b9af8dbcb1e9e554d7
0b736baa1717f803a091690f4b558a68a747a6a3
describe
'869367' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCI' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
5e065f354601f82a2ea7405fc672963d
82b34983b713dfb4502f1a7db57e315ea9f12cdf
describe
'110902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCJ' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
e59044f2a471547df12bddd3ea81bd40
256ce0371817a2ebf824ad0b37e997a2017557ed
'2011-08-18T17:04:00-04:00'
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCK' 'sip-files00188.pro'
acd6546535df5b7c854db298227dd5fa
4a166f2897fabe28e04c46f405b69b9b5cd8a2ab
'2011-08-18T16:55:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCL' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
52a3e0abddd5c8196223cd746c7d050b
4941db87388f54143d525bd3466ea94e5b5c2be6
'2011-08-18T17:10:54-04:00'
describe
'6961395' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCM' 'sip-files00188.tif'
428d372ca4ff51c977ee7f5d77e698c0
de21db42199d3318b8ac45b9a3965a929e989e08
'2011-08-18T16:56:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCN' 'sip-files00188.txt'
03ec53889aea10138d02acae5ef33178
d6478b017fc468eed043b2d3c512a41139fa2a6b
describe
'12814' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCO' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
2a3768db5132b940cf59c9e0526641e6
7d74ece30cc2e9ea1f9d74f4652602153dff8499
'2011-08-18T17:11:27-04:00'
describe
'866665' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCP' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
40ccee6a2e81464d5b5a6f4fb0c6641e
5ef4cb922aaa7015160223ab053e92f31ee6c526
describe
'106667' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCQ' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
086fc7ad47e83669a5d430c9ac5bdb41
633d7bdd6fb10bc73f30ac98444e2e4f79c77e3a
'2011-08-18T16:58:29-04:00'
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCR' 'sip-files00189.pro'
a4b5ca008359aeaae9dcc481b5ccd745
737f536baf30ee88acc5fe630f016997dea4352b
describe
'40831' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCS' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
f125a1222902155ed2b938f469d2237a
50a8ccd6f12a377d9fa514e211a8f265f89076b4
'2011-08-18T17:06:55-04:00'
describe
'6940257' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCT' 'sip-files00189.tif'
6d57e3fc09aa1ce0e4c592d340954f5a
d1b790f3a7b36d8f076ecf40a8c3d2e94325983f
'2011-08-18T17:09:59-04:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCU' 'sip-files00189.txt'
de4c483dae321066da34589b6b472a89
82099568a53b7cef61453f1862e5af4c504df4d4
describe
'12876' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCV' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
8622050aa4125dca1dcaab57270b5d8f
314c14c51d13e0634820a88f61e23d85dcd71663
'2011-08-18T16:55:44-04:00'
describe
'874901' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCW' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
5255b6472f652dc82fef4f164b8dcc3e
073ee38285701b4a0994c0575d5d030e9342dcd2
describe
'100406' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCX' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
df6afe4df78f3323e8f272fadfcadebc
6f7793468bde45bb18ce4aaa284e8dcc7d40619c
'2011-08-18T17:01:00-04:00'
describe
'33181' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCY' 'sip-files00190.pro'
e1f164945dd6221ef8853f495e8dc142
e8ff04aa255899d45b655537b96d775a5818d861
describe
'36620' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTCZ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
a3b9154753018307b013d53e2ff10ff2
e4348b6ffd327d26ec831b7e0a3e078108796224
describe
'7006055' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDA' 'sip-files00190.tif'
330074cc54d695b7005dfcb4c489b4c1
2be32c8e3594e5b8765a5e8a71369bc28b3dc88e
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDB' 'sip-files00190.txt'
aa4bd30dceb3f18bc9a2ecd14eff9833
76002dfcb2683ee163c888b9afdce79c2f4d86d3
describe
'11513' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
d6c173370c8dd9b1e29228538c64dcb1
a5ddca9fa3c8dc7a5a195be1436c5c6e6cd47ff3
describe
'850434' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDD' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
f99b9b0b4eaffc0a4d30356dbaeef3ad
8fc8e5c008e6454226c9e107e0fa903915f32e50
describe
'126267' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDE' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
d8f817b06e6196dadc9b306c160f42cc
5ea75c963c7be3e6c3a725025421990b067b9628
describe
'17813' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDF' 'sip-files00191.pro'
2844f1ca9d37e0ce9271c44dc42d62ad
bc6f0854ed12806977f6487ec1f957396771703a
describe
'40521' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDG' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
80491811dc7eeb82cf27521c1a4cd728
481fcee4fe2727919a9338290352af17cae527b2
describe
'6809915' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDH' 'sip-files00191.tif'
42dc9020aa8fbd9c502701d8a044b2e5
aa150079ce040df5676cf1ab9c8d1675093040ee
describe
'707' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDI' 'sip-files00191.txt'
d319ca2dc1fe46eb8197f4033520a04b
52a9cf08cb9ed5d17eb2d0ecf26bf8dcfc70cabf
describe
'12833' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDJ' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
84753167ab7802129038cd3ba03253d4
d84442a71bad104a3ff19384af4ad9a8d37ca192
'2011-08-18T17:10:31-04:00'
describe
'873640' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDK' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
a6e42d5504fa264f4c0ff07f744e208c
9b504c527ca06d3b9be46197959968912a5b4b74
'2011-08-18T17:11:23-04:00'
describe
'112518' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDL' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
59e3d1cb47049817bd4f234f568be385
6cca1d61f78dba6900d1fdae7c8f3cca92964c2f
'2011-08-18T16:57:40-04:00'
describe
'31753' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDM' 'sip-files00192.pro'
e564fcbef11171612dcdf0b2ea37c3ca
bb59c295d5a112f4b8d930d2e348d3c016033426
describe
'42109' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDN' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
9d053617ce3782313ecd539cd0c62139
bebc5e93dd57104bcf8ef92d2cf2d8cd1e6453a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDO' 'sip-files00192.tif'
3daf7b1f627fde8430db1fa3335aeea5
0617ae3fd2ea9211ea60750a882de5c8a408b544
'2011-08-18T16:48:52-04:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDP' 'sip-files00192.txt'
8b3d52b7bd8ea549bcd8dbc861848f27
a508cfb8718c55ffc7a6017cad0e728f6968bb1a
'2011-08-18T17:12:13-04:00'
describe
'12562' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDQ' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
82661398b57b5d39e4819ac641d234c9
40dbf294c5387e5f44c64707c6987d00afd27841
'2011-08-18T17:07:44-04:00'
describe
'866222' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDR' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6a4cbd2e2459e96adf9b07b432ae4d18
9ebea503a5161167197158a3b95bac9006396432
describe
'112333' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDS' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
7a814963c2aa3e41511c0ceffe8e651a
8a442eb4d9df298c25fe44db163808d8037a2ad5
'2011-08-18T17:10:29-04:00'
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDT' 'sip-files00193.pro'
2f732037f28231d873ccabab81c39458
1ab270e78d967637621f402908366c932a2fdfb2
'2011-08-18T16:53:26-04:00'
describe
'42264' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDU' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e2e52187b09011e7cb15352d882794d8
f264c736590784762b2f3601464eefea4b49ee74
'2011-08-18T17:07:52-04:00'
describe
'6936619' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDV' 'sip-files00193.tif'
73ed2c08b8dd76e19eb70747dcea659c
9d72379b361d3cf03bdcc8a8437d30be35a4270c
'2011-08-18T16:46:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDW' 'sip-files00193.txt'
334048bf8e0c197ada6819dbef7e1ee3
7f0bfbf2500a22b158e48d901b8d60fe179a7cd4
describe
'12754' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDX' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
ecfa96963f850f51bc205b490142b3f2
42449e9f84d872c9e0b0700204751a1f08f9d27c
describe
'846580' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDY' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
9fcfb2fcbed13d06c0ba005ac40d99e4
d7e682de1a2d0f1b106d126c5089d120a2d4471f
describe
'106491' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTDZ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
0414b6f75bff7f329755d753c90578ed
0e576974fe74ed5e69a159b2f4738b6788e8fe39
'2011-08-18T17:06:46-04:00'
describe
'34940' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEA' 'sip-files00194.pro'
3b53028222bfa31451535886c30da84f
53c734ae7e903565db96f39c4b0aa6b261d98bc2
describe
'38847' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEB' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
b3b757f5298fa8c2f1111e9569654d3f
1ba9c1a499b8682236592330317dfbdfbb7e7294
'2011-08-18T16:53:21-04:00'
describe
'6779181' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEC' 'sip-files00194.tif'
bdc8e90e9747857b775b72024b4db6bb
d066953d4f3b2b65b5a66fd3ee1d1b4196e4ccb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTED' 'sip-files00194.txt'
250cd286cac3ded5669636f2522c3943
815b6dac76adbd1ab575d0e48bfea7293b37c46a
describe
'12413' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEE' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
b8bc585438ca8c430c0b11a05d319030
f2a03f7b246d30ea37a4b5ccd170d44a02d9be7d
'2011-08-18T17:02:09-04:00'
describe
'874431' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEF' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
85e24710979780e3fb8a39716675406a
573e73c0b6f62e1ce6cd4cb0713328b54c16a90c
'2011-08-18T16:56:28-04:00'
describe
'106978' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEG' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
ebd71846406fe994aeddcee24f419d04
1c7a9bc4a3b4294b8853a27f5ca8e64045cecdf0
'2011-08-18T17:08:28-04:00'
describe
'30168' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEH' 'sip-files00195.pro'
0c5d51f365d77d76a9d6b697f2afafc9
516364ed7d4b10550c8c7a8cb1522ffaf07070f5
'2011-08-18T17:00:40-04:00'
describe
'40493' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEI' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
c615f347734a8a0e6dc77c1f3b2cb6ce
269547598a13261dc4b95f1b85e49a205da5c42c
describe
'7002055' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEJ' 'sip-files00195.tif'
da828a592b3ce9fbed40b6cf53e6f49a
f24c6cd599e85d153f880095e5f3224d8bdc1de8
'2011-08-18T17:10:56-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEK' 'sip-files00195.txt'
440898348b09869b37861ef58222b731
2090477cd66a60ca8584937f8b75249dd254c5cd
'2011-08-18T17:00:18-04:00'
describe
'12379' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEL' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
2e1286704afdcee6db7b691079713918
a9ac016fba8d3f14e860f4235243ccff1fca392b
describe
'838810' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEM' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
430238bbe4cc2573d0f52d640db98dbe
3be9c7b45aa3cf5df4bc1ca0a73295f511d6d4d7
'2011-08-18T17:07:23-04:00'
describe
'118566' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEN' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
1c62e6669d1ae9a1e1a1741d4045959e
b7fcb2e8c8a7b79625f60b5269358a07ab17670c
describe
'34429' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEO' 'sip-files00196.pro'
5608a0a284234d051bee7721f2b2f988
ca720653b2b2bf5e3c056b7273ef06d3c9675875
describe
'44781' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEP' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
376d5579b8aaeed3af1d06b0cf44a719
1c8313edb8ead2fd292724d425b969b3bc6d1fe0
'2011-08-18T17:01:54-04:00'
describe
'6717311' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEQ' 'sip-files00196.tif'
6e85028242f7cfc859b991af9d997ec3
54f7be417a8a6031c079ce6882ad7260c8575bff
'2011-08-18T16:53:56-04:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTER' 'sip-files00196.txt'
5fb0957a41f3de69c94740df02c62c60
7f188e6e369d4c5dc5633de023bf63b3575dfaf8
describe
'14047' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTES' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
9f441f4f988be4fbf1c9079b92e85f3a
63503c4722bd8ae423150269f40fb38c73c9fa61
'2011-08-18T17:06:07-04:00'
describe
'873526' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTET' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
5d0af2e17b30897dc5427c52263884b8
bdb9d7b028af1a3afa18893cfbc1bff431c17f05
'2011-08-18T17:09:14-04:00'
describe
'70878' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEU' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
20f1e953cd081dcafbda076efe443e91
28ad9c2fd9f72797de1ba3a322f8a2cf5813749b
describe
'24512' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEV' 'sip-files00197.pro'
fddb9015f9d4a90e69112e6a41b7e880
2ff5912ca25c8e8fa6c084e7f462e487c19072d2
'2011-08-18T17:04:44-04:00'
describe
'25330' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEW' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
7d5956a9130c0e3cb789cdd58ecaf70f
4f9a1db9e3e37c0025fe421948ca875afefc27d9
'2011-08-18T16:50:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEX' 'sip-files00197.tif'
2719b7ea3a7a82826801a6507115c94b
897400b0f2f98badee8fef38259ead51085c58d0
'2011-08-18T17:01:37-04:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEY' 'sip-files00197.txt'
a71dda7e959d9db12e30a5e2d6c8fae0
8f70fe1be0a0ff4a72f3d60aa2ebf63d87aac9fa
'2011-08-18T17:01:46-04:00'
describe
'7798' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTEZ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
4093a6bccb57d1947d656884ac097c3d
d795de45dc90cce917b90c4e00f4320e4c6f710a
'2011-08-18T16:53:46-04:00'
describe
'861939' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFA' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
237df5194640bddc9be16ba19bb4a7d0
ccc0a708273ebc0cb31884ab165600e4ef943373
describe
'97126' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFB' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
3ce47e5c75f376a7e153dfcbfe2bf001
35510bb9b3cb3993fbc9804ac210b3f8dcf00e7a
describe
'27577' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFC' 'sip-files00198.pro'
c9fd45a28a6792a8724fc9f9e1452f9a
56d546db1eea66d061c7096d623f657034274a85
describe
'36026' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFD' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
dc45daecda7d4c4b10cbba08e6633ac5
0fb9a916f89263d1f97a547043fb043b1e287a07
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFE' 'sip-files00198.tif'
d9ef1386a4ee84d4530216920684de67
f1b4e0204c6dfa24f43d1977e1331dcca247488d
'2011-08-18T16:56:53-04:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFF' 'sip-files00198.txt'
c7e7cb3027d361afb69eea868927cb6b
0188adf386fbbf2bc200393d89662b21fc8d5f04
'2011-08-18T16:56:45-04:00'
describe
'11994' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFG' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
e00b902b66298f0214d5c5be2cae448f
493dd413ffe06422cb9e86a41380aa4c4d09a159
'2011-08-18T17:02:16-04:00'
describe
'874448' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFH' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
a81e61bbc984dbe7978ffce8ce1a55f4
e638ac9210d74132f4c61ab6c613b7375a73c382
'2011-08-18T17:02:42-04:00'
describe
'91017' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFI' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
4b25f3b39881036aa1375c36e9e7fe2a
1f7d14d9e85fe04938953f827c6b8b5b415b7f57
'2011-08-18T17:06:08-04:00'
describe
'28724' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFJ' 'sip-files00199.pro'
3b9b36294fa43ea575ca1f558ed26d7a
7b6e5bfccbc1c26362962a0e456a31e7b7daa74d
'2011-08-18T17:11:48-04:00'
describe
'33593' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFK' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
6ac7bc551a4a29a5f201875025f9f29f
5e00ca3d2356b7dd1453db7f9d378e73382a16d5
'2011-08-18T17:02:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFL' 'sip-files00199.tif'
48fbadc557eb13a0c387df4762f293d8
b7f7da499c67b3eba6dc8b41847d97dea9f7f042
'2011-08-18T17:01:16-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFM' 'sip-files00199.txt'
32cace55956ae287c9fa35b8b0d09432
38b321893020989a5da8d7c752360951b92bdd96
describe
'10779' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFN' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
b49698dc6541cfdd2fdbda1744579e16
66494beff2857679fad62fcea431c3b85216418e
describe
'877507' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFO' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
1834218b0a7fb740bf2246f20ffe25bf
641e6d92e6efa3cde7cd4d385fdbf65af4e6ce95
describe
'118146' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFP' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
80e71e1b70634d3d1ef14f81240a7768
6207b67b34abfede4276785f4bc801a63ae201f6
describe
'33872' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFQ' 'sip-files00200.pro'
dd054bd101eaeaf0d6a768bea95dd395
80b43d40b4dfc466322a86e09b1ca37e9f92ed47
'2011-08-18T16:59:06-04:00'
describe
'46317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFR' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
c0f820b41671c583b5085f57eb179654
77482e9a54e64f80e55908b5aa17d1e17e2b2b96
'2011-08-18T17:04:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFS' 'sip-files00200.tif'
802459c2307ec9b9240ecd5ea143f146
5393f75f8a0caea1b4c7af7fb816412e5b5ef5ea
'2011-08-18T17:01:17-04:00'
describe
'1424' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFT' 'sip-files00200.txt'
ff800a7fd700749d3cc1b2385f7df3b2
8301174f87d5d904a028e5e9d68c86cd634dbd32
describe
'14214' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFU' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
a77013f33e51e538c5cffcc3b0862b9e
ccd7d3d3114af44ee199b12403016e8f9f3b06ae
'2011-08-18T16:53:43-04:00'
describe
'877450' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFV' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
ab19eaac7b3c0b421604aff8f8236ce7
15fc9f0ca3e8a0285ecc08060b1ecbef911698aa
describe
'109476' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFW' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
e26c571556e29351e2ae3fa2560bf64b
b6f2b6de10b3a3dd1c66ef8b12470425a7868d18
describe
'33248' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFX' 'sip-files00201.pro'
361d581fb8b4117effb14be717ebcb10
64043f2ffb01e362f2208a859c674ad2d9fed8a3
'2011-08-18T16:55:28-04:00'
describe
'41739' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFY' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
e4909efd8a005ed8d3235fff87b1fd0e
69241b0fbda2f8a36fd40993fed6f457f6b69267
'2011-08-18T17:08:43-04:00'
describe
'7026289' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTFZ' 'sip-files00201.tif'
73796e9dd633b6fc2d4a46dfe4cf9eb1
ed8ee546ae97005720b7007e6639c863662367bc
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGA' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3175daef85b0f7c4196311a3ef9de0b2
ea1f14bd6eb2906eb099ccfc1b866ef928bb34f9
'2011-08-18T17:02:36-04:00'
describe
'13018' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGB' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
c2398e8a8570b6d2a8f772cfdb263284
a361e431d1bb4b1b36dbaea4d518ff474342c700
describe
'878565' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGC' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
13e3a1ccaca5cbde890710fc0cb0ef4a
98680e7803568fe0fd20ab4d5aab4560379ee597
'2011-08-18T17:00:17-04:00'
describe
'92240' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGD' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
0ec9e587ef2502f1ee1d60027eef90ca
cac8d04ec06304282de2b8ef64084511113edb7e
describe
'32648' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGE' 'sip-files00202.pro'
9440978f4b23a61dd6d314e1afa84b99
148c26a8cf512a284c0ea92272e3fabe8e6aab40
'2011-08-18T17:01:05-04:00'
describe
'35004' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGF' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
21af9242bdacc54bf797343104e3fb29
15f108999fbfb885d4163d126137ea63571712dd
describe
'7037109' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGG' 'sip-files00202.tif'
c2f648b227e1cc0113d8e7b1bfd3e04d
b52671c67a5ba119fc69cd5bab14141c63fd729f
'2011-08-18T16:58:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGH' 'sip-files00202.txt'
761d3294ca27731372e21e0c653b2bbf
3325d5e9fa6549d59cc35d460c5a95a261570ae4
'2011-08-18T17:00:14-04:00'
describe
'9784' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGI' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
5046ed1bb7fa6acaae4b72e758511a4c
093f90d2d78a28759a087514f55d5e87c7ee7411
'2011-08-18T16:51:06-04:00'
describe
'868528' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGJ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
8c48dffdf84113b1bef3fd73595d5d89
0b49a1b92adc917cdf2444b907676a02a6d1a382
describe
'113407' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGK' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
88eebe22dd6e75f075b1a4d6277da42e
9b8f17c2635c34a11654beeca7097ce99a205f02
'2011-08-18T16:50:37-04:00'
describe
'13283' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGL' 'sip-files00203.pro'
e58438a41ed2693a671aac3ec0e843af
137f9376c49ccc2d3479b1a07c64fd61ef00924f
'2011-08-18T16:54:53-04:00'
describe
'36243' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGM' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
ec2c30b11579a6dace36f9d96920d507
956a6c61582aa93ad89b74d047ba5e80a588cd1f
'2011-08-18T17:11:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGN' 'sip-files00203.tif'
027f769aef83d58ff3d3d081e72a3170
a2d0db7ff547d036259ef5d781f5f2d30c70e679
'2011-08-18T16:58:47-04:00'
describe
'530' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGO' 'sip-files00203.txt'
20c2b3cec151730226a010e3bd75b8ce
0b522d3910427304e4a21d60728c1b9b0606fadf
describe
'11286' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGP' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
ab49e12a11d2bfcbc20f2f745ce481ae
a56f17d41a908851e105ef050cc22bdfef161195
describe
'877505' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGQ' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
582bfd1c239b9a3f74593976fe3d47ff
eb983898f6f556c2325379570c7c91fef40b6b06
'2011-08-18T16:56:23-04:00'
describe
'112928' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGR' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
c759f65e6bebe7657cdf2b05b2d51d36
269bbd6c5602eb41a1f7acb384498778e827e129
describe
'32575' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGS' 'sip-files00204.pro'
ed5fa09305dd07f6581b7c9373fba8de
d6e27309b7fc4eddbc1ca02c469c8bdc46050625
describe
'43483' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGT' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
16e201ffc88a9bc9c4b0f90554e83394
ec1d838f12b5a8f83b09909f799f6edb54a62f98
'2011-08-18T16:46:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGU' 'sip-files00204.tif'
516a9192963b32b47244adea65d9e302
d3b0b457c9a664fee92dbcf09e0edded88b0c126
'2011-08-18T16:57:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGV' 'sip-files00204.txt'
66657222041e770b0d890d5a30eb361b
f620f6b0a440e1bd4aa12150299da3e56c3e9a65
describe
'13542' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGW' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
080e1d8a8551f39069c721f612c9fa14
286933769d7a138607262b622efd91b8732127cf
'2011-08-18T17:11:32-04:00'
describe
'882516' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGX' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
ca9be8fe21fa082d0856c4e4dc7c6efa
701c60b82b8173ec18556d034de73ce1711dafe6
describe
'107967' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGY' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
b7101220092916fa68c80a1d50992ff0
0145dd604a6051e02c56e6a8bd2dca492eb38e45
describe
'31951' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTGZ' 'sip-files00205.pro'
e89da9780a3d49aacb38f0a082a5993f
a7f07fbeb901dace9f3b4f63e9a51579c2c79dc7
describe
'40586' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHA' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
8f1a11ee774bdc841b79331d6ba74dca
3a5d56ccd92965f4b27d6b84e3d247dcd14a6ae3
'2011-08-18T16:43:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
476712257abac1c8d8d3bf2d891f692f
d86e0d4866a0e0a6ac456fea74d8e2b8387fd65a
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHC' 'sip-files00205.txt'
8ae66c64e7ad5754fc07b69c54f83455
ae3dbeea49c74eb39e7bf68721c36e74b9cba997
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHD' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
b2abfb6b9bf1ece613704566b76067fe
1dbee1ea1c48db2faf69183d3d3d7974ed103c47
'2011-08-18T17:03:04-04:00'
describe
'862815' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHE' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
65a2c9aa17286bb1f524383327f2c26a
df2280c1c1989db09a6a11bf6f1c052dc4b621a3
'2011-08-18T16:49:38-04:00'
describe
'102987' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHF' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
11abaa701846129dda8245207ea95ea4
602f42da4a88670108732b9c3ae297f610183420
describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHG' 'sip-files00206.pro'
13fe8e6f79dbae9ef426d26110206468
6402d29a98a8a4e9d0964cb970aee2b3b16bf889
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
cde5eeffbecebc832951342222c9a7e4
c901b2618696953c7499cdc4632293992f9bea26
describe
'6908951' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHI' 'sip-files00206.tif'
f3e226bfdc5d838124667c64e61d0d92
28a1b32f5597e1afad18b2e801d6377ba6d4bbd9
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHJ' 'sip-files00206.txt'
1f433ec214bb218b3e6571ce02feaf45
b7f162627e9239229ee4e9e633e28fedcbb50ad5
'2011-08-18T16:46:52-04:00'
describe
'10810' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHK' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
9ea5f4f4b5bbe5ba8561cba641487020
fac9f2efc7a8b4450115b931c6cb5e89a09139cb
'2011-08-18T16:43:06-04:00'
describe
'883584' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHL' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
e74ac90ff64d3b6d65116d57cc4743db
4803c000b5cd1dce9efca6cb2821657328a4387d
describe
'119158' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHM' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
c0cc2e42edaef8f828135778c6bba23c
02eb964c6630469caeeb66af86bb50f7ba069ef9
describe
'12758' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHN' 'sip-files00207.pro'
e50f0398331cb5b88a6134b6f1c0133d
c2199439a3369c12a78852e355b3b8c8c80cbea0
describe
'39231' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHO' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
07e3aac775d2be153d649c3b9c7aad27
3215e74f784e317251bed092b73c9378ace8ab7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHP' 'sip-files00207.tif'
d51da27521c31a64d87b592d28d3868d
34f2439d517050667f912d605638c9483872bbbc
'2011-08-18T17:08:23-04:00'
describe
'515' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHQ' 'sip-files00207.txt'
0fa78ef93b31c3c57c03d0135674ab03
7a777e305c2fbd59ecb785384df62103884ae424
'2011-08-18T17:07:06-04:00'
describe
'10957' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHR' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
8ac8c2cb499fa65b610027985bbc7a83
5e74f879e383e8ea50385bd24e3021370508801d
'2011-08-18T16:53:47-04:00'
describe
'856411' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHS' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
3ba80d8bf78e2646082779122bed3932
1e17a465ad12a82d2c255f412806d9fc68b0287b
'2011-08-18T17:07:19-04:00'
describe
'115839' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHT' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
3bc69eb80e9ca679d419bfb8fc286757
f98677209b10ad08b2cbfcd40478bf29f0eb8074
describe
'33538' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHU' 'sip-files00208.pro'
db157b07241020d315e5f8b5ad21f428
f45e83f83ae2c1b0e24e72ad9acec7256e48c28d
describe
'45863' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHV' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
13e02dcdf6a22c8cf7563a5dad918e29
a35cf40e973a2fcb0ea1a12ca100463f24766fdf
describe
'6858079' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHW' 'sip-files00208.tif'
8546c1d2610ed00b144154467756b93b
b531cebba5379224bf22bb129ab24aa09a402753
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHX' 'sip-files00208.txt'
42f72a04e09e31f704e48bc5ec66cf1c
4bd9cfb30cc25afe97c447fe9e932b1a65a621d8
'2011-08-18T16:57:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHY' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
8d439701a542950925bf3d3ddb09ea1b
48d60cf168a4909f63c1ec687e5ec7fa78ee6ce5
describe
'855176' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTHZ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
3ff165f06dc3babf31fae400bb5c32d6
f806d97747764fcb4f637ae3f071e3f4f949a2aa
'2011-08-18T17:12:29-04:00'
describe
'111823' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIA' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
090fc1ca9f0fe1fb57b74993dd58404b
61f63046a1111dbc01173264fbb7675966e413b6
describe
'32425' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIB' 'sip-files00209.pro'
159da880e066964aad65ef4085ac27ff
b201eca85b7444fa8839d015ea1d7d754d6e15a1
describe
'44225' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIC' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
d195282452014dbd13f7880e60651e50
a747af234e13a1a3b4f2ce57ef4e4230ee7c9b2b
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTID' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d3191ce91864ef3afe8a764fb3a878b0
b1e52ecf90c7d2444c877ba3fa37dcc8d5ac0ad8
'2011-08-18T17:02:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIE' 'sip-files00209.txt'
e4ad1ae737919a71304dc6f9c1349b68
e2a9989443912cb7f862472ae4b84e7c633f1ccb
'2011-08-18T17:01:26-04:00'
describe
'13216' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIF' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
6679fd3b99fd7ded8e969dd20f2f27a1
df5e8e38d792246962b8a0044c0037cfa0463d9c
'2011-08-18T17:11:47-04:00'
describe
'837902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIG' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
40e3d460589eea0a3a556986ead78e65
21c6fbf7c194d67a87aa65034f2b932e6842ceb0
'2011-08-18T16:51:03-04:00'
describe
'83731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIH' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
161a12ae3c04f33ea0199a67eba7ea43
bf95e3f6ab1a06dbb05586134dedb10d78d10b57
describe
'31548' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTII' 'sip-files00210.pro'
d93328cc7afb3f7ab6325d5e45931301
70df50211a70d7a84905454fc87a40b93e12b411
describe
'30820' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIJ' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
95f8be5a3cde588af7a68d7b098a6b3e
cfe8f764544d137d0fd2a55db23d66bac4ca2e46
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIK' 'sip-files00210.tif'
f0b9082a93c07ab3930a1901fefae405
357fc07b76c02e2105b00e741ad356d776626805
describe
'1374' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIL' 'sip-files00210.txt'
d5215278cc4c6a80f6229ac0028c7d66
9f9f2e312d031bde276ef5003bc3cac367c6b402
'2011-08-18T16:45:46-04:00'
describe
'9831' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIM' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
dd33192e0a70b24f47477b85fb5bbf10
328609b7022c359a6d6e184974de202224858b60
describe
'851695' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIN' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
f77434abbf11dde03b4ecdcc4e2660f7
1bc4997a35bc6367f4664a27d2633873d841fee1
describe
'112054' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIO' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
46da63af4775d1642ce7274e47900a3f
2b1a0c6e4df9eb666b1703c608fdb4a0fde22ed5
'2011-08-18T17:08:57-04:00'
describe
'32742' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIP' 'sip-files00211.pro'
214bd219573b827d285d6f2e140e9945
57384d1e2026869e9754ee4f949062a67b7565b1
'2011-08-18T16:57:08-04:00'
describe
'43556' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIQ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
d56d96e48fedf772b8811d129f249174
39d52be67ce71308ae2f3541fb6b9d567a046623
'2011-08-18T16:55:58-04:00'
describe
'6820085' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIR' 'sip-files00211.tif'
6834faf87554074c4c27f646cbb6974d
70fd46b5b10eaa5b9787c99470f8c0b03d19b3a9
'2011-08-18T16:43:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIS' 'sip-files00211.txt'
fd9a4b79aaa3b0d6f2294393c70751d4
d313b14143c35253181743f9b83acdff014ba929
describe
'13656' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIT' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
a5691f63e3608c26db6c4c141e582788
6a40f7c659ad1bb725a784a3b65c19bfe7c00828
'2011-08-18T16:54:15-04:00'
describe
'841630' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIU' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
cf9e679f46c206910b6cf7065665ea72
a4491abffdbcef919bbfd58ff7a240148ba3ed63
describe
'112960' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIV' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
cad78bc04d7e2d67fc5a018e380ba5cd
9f28068017dc1420bff9fddff4ac261149a9e3d9
describe
'32199' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIW' 'sip-files00212.pro'
43499246995c415487f4fb6e2e06186c
6e06eb676ee988be4af536b3033d75dc2de43bf2
'2011-08-18T17:02:26-04:00'
describe
'43409' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIX' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
b4a872dd746f526e026bf87c8b274c8c
f4bc8438fe06538254f6c090a6fd45f3d819fac5
describe
'6739481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIY' 'sip-files00212.tif'
d97a1341dfdbab8c8545a584334a09a7
e99a1e554af14a51754e6568cb8d7df076756aa8
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTIZ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
7ef7c3bf9851e387bb031e998570fc6a
79c62122013883cd64b69ec9eade107ce761cff5
'2011-08-18T16:59:59-04:00'
describe
'13282' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJA' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
001ad839572c2b16b39dad70f00cd720
ded37b396da7315baddeacc16b5cbd0fe326f59d
describe
'858963' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJB' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
903e103d74640aa448bacabb3ac03d48
aae63a79d6aec676a9fdef003f5d6cca311e798c
'2011-08-18T17:03:37-04:00'
describe
'92472' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJC' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
44dbc5b0dba7225ad33b75d81b115f69
4005d1b6018fb0c3b4504da84e9b192db36d5655
'2011-08-18T16:46:18-04:00'
describe
'31388' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJD' 'sip-files00213.pro'
4f931a654e38675168d277e9d729d972
d05c1e469df5f0fca9e4b407be10658492fb5fb7
describe
'31943' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJE' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
6923ea55b35367e3cf01be5bcc98fea8
0e43780c15317a92ce633e036a2486df5f0a525d
describe
'6878215' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJF' 'sip-files00213.tif'
7e749391a908b8534dae04ce11dc7bd9
a311a5d70950ab160864d03bb290ccdc6e32d740
'2011-08-18T16:58:40-04:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJG' 'sip-files00213.txt'
3023c9886297bb8f78506f0a0c428f75
1187749c448bc840ad3940f5b2a0c78e7fd91967
describe
'10199' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJH' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
4edcb4abfbe45275fe2ea2fd78a276c3
de15978e3550b8377b5432aa2c6161ed0cb07d79
'2011-08-18T17:05:33-04:00'
describe
'876706' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJI' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
a328228f07f484d6374008588561d564
84429d451d7b17312dd8112dd6871d37178972a5
'2011-08-18T16:52:00-04:00'
describe
'114968' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJJ' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
b477a387727faf0b50fc70fb394b0322
5441cd4f43804e0cc195bbef2a43868727fe6bdc
describe
'32016' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJK' 'sip-files00214.pro'
962e61f8647a4cb5b05949b0457965f0
d2bcd79649f96d867ee0a17f3eb77201755e8d07
'2011-08-18T17:05:00-04:00'
describe
'42034' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJL' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
1247f95c6abfec7adad0e4d4257f95c4
7bf06add419d77070614498c4be34a08e5dee6b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJM' 'sip-files00214.tif'
aa321e8e87c61da7deb282a983e39200
4bcdd56007c2d46959592e3a8fcbeaf5dc4a6165
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJN' 'sip-files00214.txt'
01faa8e544c6f8a82562ec4cc06fc2b6
b4375c0a4939a72e7bd5e50d8790897c1487d3fc
'2011-08-18T16:56:34-04:00'
describe
'13133' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJO' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
c678ac6fc5956f8dc96eefdad8701344
9a90f59646841e050ef0ec651d2ad6f5abbbbdb0
describe
'859422' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJP' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
685647166f9869c1438d1a9f3e1efacf
da313fb4d42662592b24f70fe7aa5c4bf137a965
'2011-08-18T17:07:55-04:00'
describe
'116591' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJQ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
b8fb14d852c87dd8ca13d791aa8b4daf
6ca3d940b894fddb4e1e2452e210e00184d819f7
'2011-08-18T16:48:22-04:00'
describe
'32279' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJR' 'sip-files00215.pro'
469640304862f57ef4394ada45595aa7
f5bd7b23b62273e9c670ad9e206dd2ef72c22255
'2011-08-18T16:48:37-04:00'
describe
'44218' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJS' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
128e963c5ffd2aa93d40aa4b76254fc4
60e2e771fe361d3cd52c2e5fd2cf3ac2d7c3300c
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJT' 'sip-files00215.tif'
8462adf7ee3e2fff5ff0ee90fe62d055
51248d0c412b50b46e4b2dda5b02cb6660d502d8
'2011-08-18T16:49:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJU' 'sip-files00215.txt'
2f51672ca020bac10e0df2ae93095690
14cb88e476b1feaeb9bbce89300845b7bef398d3
describe
'13630' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJV' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
1a34303e3652a666a45b4dec1ad11503
908a41eb4ac482b0107510d86f708d0854290f29
'2011-08-18T17:05:35-04:00'
describe
'881690' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJW' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
1eeef44c3f312cca8280dd41e6871946
8155b9b69eb8b54ef0da46bf4b34310de5a88ec6
describe
'115958' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJX' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
068ac8fa136a0b8dd2ab54ed2f681607
1e1c428fb8c7fe2a13a8e70043866f9a067f3ef3
describe
'32221' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJY' 'sip-files00216.pro'
52cd79bf3d6db0c0c3984ed541b41590
8a296124c556087f11783534ad9a0e10aba49b1c
describe
'42902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTJZ' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
c3217a001aee29750dcc9aae818bf91e
56f6ae0583156c6eff7fa9ee7950d9dd668070d6
'2011-08-18T17:07:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKA' 'sip-files00216.tif'
6e9b9468d5051bbc8678ac8a55cf78d9
6513e66aee2dd3eb0a29ce27e26fde524f855386
'2011-08-18T16:56:12-04:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKB' 'sip-files00216.txt'
12f5f880ecb49fae4541c0dc506466b1
15312be99886cb05d5c679deee062906b0f6d682
describe
'12827' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKC' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
1ac41a92a392c40c92aef7299a2720f3
b3611c82784e68e64ea34d5e8519db03afb025c3
describe
'862387' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKD' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
1dea8fe80c1e51e97904c6a7910c39ca
028bf3aef456bcf02bf8fa8fd5094c5032bf2a4a
describe
'98588' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKE' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
a8deca269de0bfdb048d84cdf76bc38d
f041e44118005d0d02eb883b178a1a116c1f1d54
describe
'32458' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKF' 'sip-files00217.pro'
b4a84530b40c99d564bfe66113d40c1f
d1fa0a8bafc5ea1a1e9d8b0e271f2001e7b0daef
'2011-08-18T16:58:03-04:00'
describe
'34780' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKG' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
736b75256a612f745717a024ad680e26
de4e1e7e4bbb091f3764ff6fc46372617aba29e8
'2011-08-18T17:03:34-04:00'
describe
'6905627' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKH' 'sip-files00217.tif'
1240bf8ba50765a030cb3e151191678a
a2e69f10986c162bcf08e1ed99651a4ab91d24a6
'2011-08-18T16:55:00-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKI' 'sip-files00217.txt'
67f7d44919b8dfa684b5baaa49bd3d7d
41fa513d83285698c696ee872be3320f1b537632
describe
'10923' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKJ' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
d305395955ae04ddf32ce8928997368e
f0a262ea2b1dd822f668dea9f2e9b97bdc3deb3c
describe
'882636' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKK' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
7a691291ae9ddacdc84190bebf0bcee6
ba308b928a9e0d35d0941fcee0565167ae981b72
'2011-08-18T17:05:04-04:00'
describe
'108582' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKL' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
6dda969d509ba9ad1cd8d02bb3ed3ca1
9c39fb079efeef365f37bf3a5999f0be3b922081
describe
'17178' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKM' 'sip-files00218.pro'
3565f178c4066e58d3049569e34c3bc4
37ee61683debf15350ccc54a73e971e4782c0546
describe
'36234' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKN' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
9b4331a2f66596d3ac363de6b2aff5f1
6f19de838d1119276ddfd5c19ad96c3c33d82f2e
'2011-08-18T17:06:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKO' 'sip-files00218.tif'
4b35d21271d53037e6ce582ca7a605be
4100b8140fe5e24b33e509634c325fe6f35863cf
'2011-08-18T17:02:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKP' 'sip-files00218.txt'
8e82a4b743a5369b6c4cde681d8abe7f
649db6e5f8b60be7faad3e1e8c787438ad0d68bd
describe
'11209' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKQ' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
38d56068cae476415f34974ec143cb23
253ff94edc42b6bb710206319031c01e85bf4f82
'2011-08-18T16:57:11-04:00'
describe
'853692' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKR' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
516fc841b6cf284be866ce286f3fdc28
316a39a56e63a9bcf3b172086c7aa6da7ba327f4
'2011-08-18T16:44:28-04:00'
describe
'112753' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKS' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
6915f41fe8d116c7ef9b9151c8d23363
f17f4c19455c98bb6cd92221c6cc10f1deef642c
describe
'32232' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKT' 'sip-files00219.pro'
8d7b246b7a24f45840ef17e296295b2e
f2a92d3554c1ef1d8b9826cde9c0520d3cf80c54
describe
'44322' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKU' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
2ffd4d6c6e548c2209dc62dfc867ffd2
975dc1e7020ddab8e632998f3cd4487b0f093f29
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKV' 'sip-files00219.tif'
346b2b17f919eabbf47cf1a1dbb7a1a6
f480d8e44114f38e7bce166b1eb4d744df9aa267
'2011-08-18T16:56:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKW' 'sip-files00219.txt'
d263696fbb53c8a165d189d7c68b423e
d59430b9f8612702dd0d6d3a82ae27b54e49fb23
describe
'13498' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKX' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
9a687b84766172c94f42ab4902081c78
11bf4dd6cc7fbee8c99decbaedcf204c1b9eedf2
describe
'850445' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKY' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
60d8347484197648e0665bcacf3af3ed
e76a4005aa28c88f515f21c5955001529280e4fa
'2011-08-18T17:00:20-04:00'
describe
'114066' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTKZ' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
0e25313da13b835090806d13e702768b
d79b7ae68c1af77ccf4b28586acde8eaf016d6da
describe
'33052' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLA' 'sip-files00220.pro'
eee6cbd2b623218b45bec85b5666309e
66ea08a4039db68047893dd9497ca8d3d82d5fd7
describe
'41919' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLB' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
454e6ae1d22b7f633ba3805e164cb3ee
db6147962f6eddf603c078c361b94a0001568bd1
'2011-08-18T17:04:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLC' 'sip-files00220.tif'
bff896934c167bb447fa3466e1c31b25
542af494a522d3a60f466ba6bdc777b012805503
'2011-08-18T16:54:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLD' 'sip-files00220.txt'
ddd5b8a08dd9e205454cd8c7b485d765
27485b5bad303cc4591b1e1c5b0ca8e8557d5c1c
describe
'13605' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLE' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
d00acaf446e7ec5cd3f9d08850f72e03
cf8d62792a6107b24fa7b766857ea4d34410d7a2
'2011-08-18T17:06:04-04:00'
describe
'867604' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLF' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
47dd1946bbde876371b40e6ba6e82ca1
4d84b15bd1879390061b00140c7ec2c5fe17a050
describe
'116514' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLG' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
3a302b4131383e8097eba7b252399699
2d11271b0730f3f8bbfef9ba77b6611f32dbcceb
describe
'32406' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLH' 'sip-files00221.pro'
66166e45201a18744d0833267c75d87a
ebfb156aff33748ef96d1452aa6650311dc92266
describe
'45104' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLI' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
fb7664c8431ffd54ae9f78837c4b5583
6f5ebe1dcc6aad8e39d73ad9f20128df3a21ce1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLJ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
f9c99646aa2ee732102abdefaee0d0c6
38b7fbf9b38834aaf909c3a1a65057bfd883d4a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLK' 'sip-files00221.txt'
174d99ff5595256757e08c6f71f97b9b
f7d953cf1fdc1fd962b449871178b89032e66b96
'2011-08-18T16:54:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLL' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
f70c2eb9839ff7d170742678769f7ad4
4c163123fb3aad9425214a74358f447cb1e7052e
describe
'876636' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLM' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
eeb4a61c9831eb81fd015f613d17ea62
818835af7e1ae70f06a4ee6409dd5602e05f22f3
'2011-08-18T16:52:34-04:00'
describe
'87131' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLN' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
dc7846ce4f63ff7c2ecbebcc3e858477
580b7af18be7fefa91a574ae37873ea3937306e9
describe
'33681' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLO' 'sip-files00222.pro'
b703c9c324ed97fee8667e5a9324e795
b16105d38c422f25b5f7b6797c43c9bc46d2f4e7
'2011-08-18T16:54:11-04:00'
describe
'33343' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLP' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
30e295e014cfee2e1a322bf286e15d6b
585016b82990e3fbdbd962147530a417dd004b36
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLQ' 'sip-files00222.tif'
c06fbc81e3c946a0d1a83681e85451bc
f1813186d2d6c3dc3e5c569e51c6259dc74ea9ee
'2011-08-18T17:11:56-04:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLR' 'sip-files00222.txt'
acfad5c3bb93b65395028f8b69264304
004f15d5b035f0c0edf672279a5b04aa4fb20936
'2011-08-18T17:07:49-04:00'
describe
'9734' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLS' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
cb921aee6b2060df446ca2b56dd63e4e
27ddfdbdfff3af1d9f17dfef96abf78883314bf9
'2011-08-18T17:10:50-04:00'
describe
'869223' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLT' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
cd60270e116cb53d274f9e804906caf7
eeb7b093f8cd947a95c8c6e8c98a2c92f202168d
describe
'118951' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLU' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
e97cfca75f5839b01ab872a6e4aca50e
3e2ba073fc545d3020fca72c7298855d087bd549
describe
'17916' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLV' 'sip-files00223.pro'
5d589dd627131dd276d15f5ceca04d0f
e80927620ed74a65d79fa56071503bd92f682c2d
'2011-08-18T16:55:33-04:00'
describe
'41048' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLW' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
eeab9201529eaa52ff8895768a0559c4
44afd26bf1d6d05106ce214aa8b0894b2a090e23
describe
'6960301' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLX' 'sip-files00223.tif'
8da8549621d904adc660ac3af6ca4ba1
2cf0dcbb5652cc3e7d99ee309a1a86f9ea3d6c11
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLY' 'sip-files00223.txt'
2b1c33d494ce43e33c51517e8acc558f
0dea01a7b9792e0d5115c06257c7282c71d703fb
describe
'12568' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTLZ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
cf7d3a6116e25c71ec8ad296d3d709c8
30681dd4b80e260d77a02a6e700be3c43a62916a
'2011-08-18T17:11:34-04:00'
describe
'852211' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMA' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
0edc92b516c9d7de197edb6e0214a22a
554e286ec702bade42e8e5de3dd7eb2174fb71cd
describe
'119631' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMB' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
fa11fc25efa7e039abc72ae03d672963
fb63e9511aac60a74bcaf06a9c0bf4f8bcdadcde
'2011-08-18T16:42:54-04:00'
describe
'34549' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMC' 'sip-files00224.pro'
509ccd593fae3e2a95dcdf20ae598756
cb8239093976c6f583ac47a2037b41e00e5abb58
describe
'48607' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMD' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
e6014ef416e0fbc7cbbc6b5d318704c8
47cab568839c8c4024644fae3374f028ee46449a
'2011-08-18T17:12:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTME' 'sip-files00224.tif'
5d78236ac0309bd635832109e9d213fa
a2e0585cae8dbe3be2f5194e004f351b36b38e7a
'2011-08-18T17:08:53-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMF' 'sip-files00224.txt'
70f4c8d7148e1bc7d5d10a627952b2bd
3bf3dfbb1fde8dec115b1f30fd10d29094a08a07
'2011-08-18T17:06:34-04:00'
describe
'13529' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMG' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
544e4609e116d574f810f98219672a4d
a02e02549dcf3c0c3e745fe7f9121bff171e73b6
describe
'886049' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMH' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
142543b86b4cf4f43ad95b56831af2d8
c3f4268540023a09436cea816368f6e1e014c88d
describe
'115678' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMI' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
9f8f97f7c7f585c7883349d47a6b2eaa
76c47e392126bb4e016d9ae61a53ef0dcfebf9fb
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMJ' 'sip-files00225.pro'
075207de223d3d3cd351c9175c324c51
2c6949f02aa380e95cb679df823d6433a774db52
'2011-08-18T17:10:06-04:00'
describe
'47687' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMK' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
906562f28ab293ae64b3c6c13e52578d
b1bd13d9390caa96bc63b5f0f295db39bcbd6aef
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTML' 'sip-files00225.tif'
4b238c64c81a853bec80f38e69ad2e1c
070f2d6b88cbf4bc8b0304e7a46cb907d1f92882
'2011-08-18T16:55:06-04:00'
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMM' 'sip-files00225.txt'
8ee01dd5c30fc47cc2249df90b250e5c
6de33545dbf350b0f66f416b7393806c57212c0e
describe
'12553' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMN' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
02aaa88502cd22e2ebe09ee6005ffab8
d605a2b37dd44ce722c270cf1fe6430f62b436f0
describe
'871181' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMO' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
59c067dd19497e81e3f6298478990ca3
8022b6cca6eeb9772320560133d080e9a8a50c16
describe
'117725' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMP' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
a2e609b2721e4a2a1f75419f31864075
0af59053100d557a1be1abbaabcd008921299484
describe
'32749' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMQ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
b502b16e69e3b91305e6dd899dcf5f2e
799392108122beb9acba36218bdc97f4140ff97f
'2011-08-18T17:06:12-04:00'
describe
'44728' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMR' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
83dcce13cf6d829084ab1b3e851c127b
60b6eae6fa861d10568e8082e8f7c0561099e3b4
describe
'6977251' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMS' 'sip-files00226.tif'
f6e1973362f319a7ebf9f40eee8c1763
41300064b78eb7a7e5b35f7ebb3fee18240e7798
'2011-08-18T17:05:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMT' 'sip-files00226.txt'
9a84f20b8efa4c29d013876cd05eeeb9
5b398fe3719267bf395cab8315a04738e21b13fb
describe
'13273' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMU' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
ba3ac45b7bc55e4e3a7c5ea09033ac21
5622ce2ac9227c08ec3e6308d040eee0e8908f7b
describe
'866714' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMV' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
2fbb0c634162e795f193edf74e0b348b
7531e06b8bf24bf29652df6eb01a2d17cf6dc5ec
describe
'92034' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMW' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
13502ec3905d8d775cbc275155843cce
de2974a28f8070eee674ee066469024b11644726
describe
'34378' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMX' 'sip-files00227.pro'
2f30ee7596725fc1399805cfa7323917
8723a698922c95632a768aa94e69b4909c20c1ce
describe
'32922' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMY' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
be7412270f0490cb1102dc16e9df2609
669232845d0d5f7cc4fb0026ddcfaecf3477c150
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTMZ' 'sip-files00227.tif'
6c384f99601671513074fe15ae66d02d
fc47156adf0108b6843c0912f09845de31c97e4d
'2011-08-18T16:57:57-04:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNA' 'sip-files00227.txt'
c16aec2f490e1a163d56f9c9cde2e1e3
8656a701715f5ead17a1d93a728fc7f0b6482707
'2011-08-18T16:42:13-04:00'
describe
'10409' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNB' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
d3105b6a562ba61d284f11fe7ce9c7f2
520f0b77cb2974d2a6e419a0638d581c3611f193
'2011-08-18T17:03:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNC' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
a7c35c934a6a138163bf56aee1743478
8738eff7a28fe3a8aaea718d507cf02a2240abd4
'2011-08-18T17:00:07-04:00'
describe
'119384' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTND' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
18061cd8e0baf5f120296cbc983aa17a
0d2a50bd767bcc5b70c5ab96d14503e1e1c09c75
'2011-08-18T17:10:10-04:00'
describe
'18200' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNE' 'sip-files00228.pro'
63e27727f63211488b9e9df930b00f28
78867a4d41b0e1ec75a01d701440213d7b937351
describe
'40829' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNF' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
be1002a616584f971f81ef6fb7c183ad
5aa1e675e3ba27e10628552d8fa2848d3bf4c858
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNG' 'sip-files00228.tif'
280ed23f0c31f0f315a9364a95e4602f
cc41f7ff03fdd97463fc0e9d2d50cb8d11c380f2
describe
'745' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNH' 'sip-files00228.txt'
69ef736ff073e6cbdc37bcb9e62bfd81
a580ad9c6577adf95c664bcdf1d08fba4b85630a
describe
'12206' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNI' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
90af4414c3aa138d94e63005e6331480
ace7dc4f97a7b17fe2177da7f1800c74a80cec7d
'2011-08-18T17:02:59-04:00'
describe
'858974' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNJ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
d91556203ac2e7dcc8e0fe1de36b8633
bc4a9d417cb56b200f8ea8672ce553ef0bed9134
describe
'119196' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNK' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
4b473cab9e06697e6e1fbb6442862228
f5e825e14d728a41a14ebf7e124eb0e4bd4beeda
'2011-08-18T16:54:36-04:00'
describe
'32833' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNL' 'sip-files00229.pro'
5cafd3b14e8276840bfc06fc56bfcfc0
b5b362538f45d39335220f1b7cadb4696d8cdece
'2011-08-18T16:55:29-04:00'
describe
'44475' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNM' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
6f66732b4ab227cb51bbc50dc085d142
fca0e17bfb3672682707de8dda6998dbe184f172
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNN' 'sip-files00229.tif'
158469f2fb17275d6281894bbcd56f0c
e0e079a671a1472fd84ba3ef7791d414c3fe66e1
'2011-08-18T16:56:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNO' 'sip-files00229.txt'
21a69ca5eceeb1f7e834ca8b6c8a1817
b7b9d35080adfebeaf75094907fe6aedc7426642
describe
'13493' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNP' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
9d1d823ec53265fa19e8d06cea7d6026
afc928fba05845416f0aca7b64bb0544412a3de7
'2011-08-18T17:05:32-04:00'
describe
'846907' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNQ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
e5587058bfad96b4cbad4c3db88fc482
342e240dfcc8bfac096ab1e9d1659795df86763a
describe
'108552' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNR' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
4e3fb0caa6edca0594c0311459596315
55413c7e5fd3e19cb6783d2708ad83d3a4998b08
'2011-08-18T17:04:11-04:00'
describe
'30359' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNS' 'sip-files00230.pro'
1546b1a40587da830fab62715140f887
b9ac77f197895112bdbf4a62195ebc11e6c7457c
describe
'41536' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNT' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
77f1eba1083709724ccf68ba8d32b703
f47ff8e03056f719fba770bcb1f0bd7904533cd3
describe
'6782557' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNU' 'sip-files00230.tif'
df4cc502cb7e0c4c51a0cde76cfb757b
f68f46e7cd4d55ca7b526b2153a832cc30ded981
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNV' 'sip-files00230.txt'
167f02ee8c48099cc90283d797c555a3
a7688b218d0196dbabebe3beda806087b28432d2
describe
'13381' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNW' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
fd3b9db9aa40553c004addd9f1307132
4fd7c55a2044dd4f76ceed4c48dd4ced8c8f1917
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNX' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
4a715cab0e1e3a5655b17d29dff8ba93
0d654842a6a12a57fa941bd85c5e1ba738121e67
describe
'111051' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNY' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
dd95c631765a81c73a3979aeb5807fbb
c31f16ac024bdc030f3bbcfbcffc09ceaa060d7b
describe
'32003' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTNZ' 'sip-files00231.pro'
aa019a0f4bb0c4e58f19542d1b2eccf4
8c9d86d83f844ba17a8e40a6e2b75a27800db645
describe
'42314' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOA' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
b672b760de328ca50e14c605f0b28863
b4a30ecde09708c179c6cf3f5453a64c71535145
'2011-08-18T17:06:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOB' 'sip-files00231.tif'
dd0ef4f1380417760bd360b3447aee68
e6e6ceaea2ed345f42414e89dba433ecadee3bf7
'2011-08-18T16:57:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOC' 'sip-files00231.txt'
4dc4b65f87d24c3de7126fe6a61795cf
091ab451fd8a31a167b86da0babe1290e2c7dc2d
describe
'13202' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOD' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
33bc042944b0d1044b833f53f8e8b019
6c171857fb103e1c2d619833d7e0eab2be2bb3bd
describe
'883717' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOE' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
c2d5c3b6e7a37f201a522e97d5b4f3da
636bdd11784f9e57f713f507b40a360919d8296f
describe
'104302' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOF' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
cf44bcec9825fee40045a7475d9ab7e5
a24d2f3f734d563bd4b30d595d9c5249b534047b
'2011-08-18T16:56:47-04:00'
describe
'37793' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOG' 'sip-files00232.pro'
60fbb85d90f62ef127633ef68cc51ddb
1418564f4c3e658e61995b2bdf46c8f7e3642041
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOH' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
1fa768d39b1bbcb22c6d9e09660f09d8
889f44c88c08d6114812fd69b49ee50a517e4fc2
'2011-08-18T16:53:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOI' 'sip-files00232.tif'
69e949ef176919eabb34f413213f3829
f5e292ba56e0d20b09ff25edda45250eae847b08
'2011-08-18T16:44:00-04:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOJ' 'sip-files00232.txt'
5fc8fd35cd90d164ee7ada01efab9589
0d9bd7f4642be3422baae848265ee930a870fe4e
describe
'11282' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOK' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
07a3dad63fec30a5dd9c17cb98d7a794
8a8612429a035b0298e6b11954ed38c047ed52f9
describe
'906105' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOL' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
9572069c521ee098144626d70d47355f
9faabbd1be4fe23937858a247b3395e0d52ae729
'2011-08-18T17:01:35-04:00'
describe
'119128' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOM' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
a471c0a15dfdca94d65e663b522049db
fe4f45ea414c038c08bb635d30622203eb6d942c
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTON' 'sip-files00233.pro'
3e0252d8d4017eb0ff6e9856f4ac9ede
3bc8f8aa86eb31bc97e6942491e82530d5b7be8a
describe
'39935' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOO' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
8e656a2957ef180827e41c33198c8934
efa5f9cf4fc41d8b4da9af7039f1b0dfdb3edc1c
describe
'7257683' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOP' 'sip-files00233.tif'
d3dd3f17e856c0f27762164e73741262
f630cfd26716e9626d417d7910cf464fe223e405
'2011-08-18T16:57:41-04:00'
describe
'713' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOQ' 'sip-files00233.txt'
f9a057c07e5dc8bf4fa1378b72393f08
173d8cbfaddb9f4bc8fda9bef4bc3707a9528230
describe
'10956' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOR' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
f12624ad813d31a9371e4ebd0780c519
1bae6435396a0508ac58d019e5910365b05712c2
describe
'845131' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOS' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
b1abdb5cfc298d6615e03f994d181b55
1ce9ccb29019d191921f8014d563cd042584b3aa
describe
'113122' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOT' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
b5b8e63917d6460c9dd239feba39a65d
a0c4c496db4fec01d36bb589b17f47ab9fa624bd
describe
'32980' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOU' 'sip-files00234.pro'
af3e6318e19a04580de4f4c90cd5a7dc
bc0d33d9c50084e6ad7b8578738b96b1eefc87ac
describe
'42650' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOV' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
edec3f40a958baa98414b98ffdd545ef
52c3545587472730547d5c04c23853159a55d8e6
describe
'6767863' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOW' 'sip-files00234.tif'
aa035292f3200d7a3d301842dfa943d3
59713f46edcccbd812789b4d61e982a35c395468
'2011-08-18T16:55:50-04:00'
describe
'1351' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOX' 'sip-files00234.txt'
d984aea7f4bcfd1682af3ab2f0edd57e
c8c05661e04fe4a04e2497a566e1ce8b14338a89
describe
'13545' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOY' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
26f3f595ecb27af2d19d86a1e9d2aca0
fef11dd7181b6faf31c1e93d517c13ce9e6a1ff2
describe
'886051' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTOZ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
dab36f6a16e89c0bbd022c5175938867
48808e3def138a62d7ebad6b2cbc42a0e3ae41b2
describe
'118775' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPA' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
c2ce6fd9ebbce4d8d81bdba3e33b7926
339e53d54d8b5866330a757bf44ec676c17dfb25
describe
'34247' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPB' 'sip-files00235.pro'
30d8c9e89efe4508eba585ad595c7b29
4556c5404f75fd4d6cdcc94c7c729933ada8c06c
describe
'45096' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPC' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
e62954c71cfcff252641a9a078140328
5d50d5ae2b7c4ee1034474c2d48645e97752bb8e
'2011-08-18T16:56:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPD' 'sip-files00235.tif'
c7d4fbe166114826506c08354a18ae38
3d592d7cfbcfa2a34f3d6b8c80196e3b41df2a5e
'2011-08-18T17:00:46-04:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPE' 'sip-files00235.txt'
c6cc10ec8671602214de96dd57de21f3
a467808c7f9350e6e101f64099f158a6488a58ba
describe
'12961' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPF' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
22c60bc85938fb8fb8d544834df68e13
356ff6c4c09b212b11c424fc395a1c32b4a2d5cc
'2011-08-18T17:02:33-04:00'
describe
'861893' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPG' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
e3eb5e97710d95cf0cddc7d878df99b8
002966ad608de295157f49c91cc71e9af07b80f3
'2011-08-18T17:02:39-04:00'
describe
'106533' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPH' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
ab9cd313174e7baa2325e205f38cd566
867f06d3b8847860a5dd47b62e4f65df3e0c1add
describe
'37662' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPI' 'sip-files00236.pro'
114581dcd3a10c88b1bef4d736a99cc1
65e78f6decbdaf29330d6f22349d18f611eeaa79
describe
'39440' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPJ' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
555a06a2fcf47fe3eaf0220385697d00
ebfd94ce6f3dc7f355023b19b3d4beb59b70a041
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPK' 'sip-files00236.tif'
c726d2cf66f9f2887ec5a5b7de7c95e1
f84517a637bfb42524571f2783c332bb6699613e
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPL' 'sip-files00236.txt'
361ff897ff78cd0d69f3b40f6c88ecf8
a56777af455b9aa1ee1b923c25e107985be3a457
describe
'12019' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPM' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
f1a396b13c7bccd2d873161c650c0f75
5640f9129278726b6d8654f47b18c562a9156658
describe
'875201' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPN' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
50817da1102da088721a5b52b0b76190
d5e1d1c46e50426aa8dba6fe7cfc16616c07fbe5
'2011-08-18T17:06:32-04:00'
describe
'128999' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPO' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
786de381ff2f8da039dec8db73fa2d49
ce3f6503242df5dad231c86c9f779dce69ff4698
describe
'17961' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPP' 'sip-files00237.pro'
87b0f8973294362052ffe49df62ce9d2
a17b82ca4d3b74dd159743dd0cfc978d8922b068
describe
'42875' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPQ' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
68338ac6977d74fd4342804724d41f6c
782644f468d4f29624351a26cc00e368d17836ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPR' 'sip-files00237.tif'
253c96f766a251ceefefb362f1a96ab6
50dfd1796149a6a32b182539db7901d7b49303e5
'2011-08-18T16:58:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPS' 'sip-files00237.txt'
be5a2bcb4d347628950f96823afdf86d
44736d5988aa0cf55242ab64c8b925930bf92621
'2011-08-18T17:10:03-04:00'
describe
'12462' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPT' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
0e706b7bdf892857e4fa9f547858f898
9dc7204ba3bab099c8cdaa07586a5ac113d96fc1
describe
'870132' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPU' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
faf3cf08d9ef5f8f73e03521f24b018e
5e5962f86b42bf54d05aec7f5f49743d010902d1
'2011-08-18T17:06:05-04:00'
describe
'119489' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPV' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
b54f68b97d257d077fdd6c427393df97
9ee90140c18ccc92aac8986772aaaaf0d1c678e8
'2011-08-18T17:11:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPW' 'sip-files00238.pro'
33d69e660bc79c7ee801749590f83047
48a10b457dcda1ebe240d6cd0d2ab41352d92ea1
describe
'45538' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPX' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
a06376df64d575601e2175685363c89e
c4d672261a19e43942c746c7ea0f91d9dee7f952
describe
'6967615' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPY' 'sip-files00238.tif'
26a13e9fda673ee111f2858738271e42
d4709628ee53586d7a5966b19af84d28c2a00035
'2011-08-18T16:57:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTPZ' 'sip-files00238.txt'
4242affda744a3e707ea34070f7fb746
5c26405b12308c1a34359f33bfdada974714ee62
'2011-08-18T17:11:55-04:00'
describe
'13449' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQA' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
95fba4d6148159ce219610a063e8ed5b
e5609c2a199784fbc209360e3d58a30b0487bedd
describe
'881788' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQB' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
22d342017e99aa3658abda1ad45107f0
0a7b7ae94d6e076f0b84dd4e45543857dfaab9ea
describe
'122349' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQC' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
a20fae5985680f94d7cea31ca0c79891
e89fdc72de4a4e2b63b6f64dbb6d648bc7c5ad13
'2011-08-18T16:44:47-04:00'
describe
'34575' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQD' 'sip-files00239.pro'
9fd315ddcf88dacb2c8c033857d3c2c7
4848774b7d00c298d2b8fb6b56b30fdb6ec33d47
describe
'46884' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQE' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
4988c5cf69ef184811d12b6e9cc456b9
cacb4922b861639874e3dbfddb2e11a79d76d718
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQF' 'sip-files00239.tif'
c03ec2f7ea97f787ca59272c1b838486
a16b001a51d1cf47c4866c700d5029bfa3b4b359
'2011-08-18T17:07:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQG' 'sip-files00239.txt'
139a7ca8e9a8f2a8324be6fab63003e7
c864312edb42fa328934588a76fcacd227fb200b
'2011-08-18T17:09:12-04:00'
describe
'13589' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQH' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
18767188b31aec2173ccc4db75f0780d
4b441c088cd9bee07b7c334c9d264d3f820622fa
describe
'873578' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQI' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
d9d98317d21e2690a88a632c82fe9761
da9468ce3380a6fbe3e938730065227474234d95
describe
'122957' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQJ' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
9fe7fad5f2a22a05a1fa1baf4800a8b6
711fc4f20977340193ad8885eef26da5f530fd62
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQK' 'sip-files00240.pro'
04da3b7b681140a6b0a16c031c4cb6d7
b3a50b437b10389a0dad4a144e934909294a187d
describe
'46731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQL' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
a78f5925039fe67de29cda3ba3898b2a
2c5a595941195f5a2b28dd603d3add42303b4ee4
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQM' 'sip-files00240.tif'
4599c1a490d8cecf14f8a18ed23e2070
b8c6c08463a86f6f27c9e31071a186a1f3252565
'2011-08-18T16:55:39-04:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQN' 'sip-files00240.txt'
895a389c8a1448a7e617cf8b207ed20e
4bf12a800814a288cc8b101a737b3740e0d54668
describe
'13594' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQO' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
1eea8e2f5c5f24b374e8e4fba46d3027
60e5126384c81d19af4a336ff423981f9f1f8000
'2011-08-18T17:04:16-04:00'
describe
'884895' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQP' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
2e3bb6e7b9fb8f46ca5f5067505a2f65
ecee252d3e962889a8415368f4db30f9ab7f8726
describe
'111055' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQQ' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
c458e49c0b384f23ed566657ab843b41
3ff007e75fe109f23f669e2b0bf956de89daab43
describe
'33017' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQR' 'sip-files00241.pro'
1da3c1b7107ebd58c3b165ad3ae508a4
1d19c07fbba24b1441e4a22854f030c3330a74fe
'2011-08-18T17:05:54-04:00'
describe
'41193' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQS' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
291b069ae22c0cdcc9013cd825421e5c
bb49a43eb3f727f5b5e005bf3c4a65a2a6383cac
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQT' 'sip-files00241.tif'
f05ccb92e37fc061d007028cea3204ec
33ce1691b3a6dafa761c056d6d254206b72bfe5c
'2011-08-18T16:47:55-04:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQU' 'sip-files00241.txt'
32c305b5dddd2768e6519917909f7efb
ceed10c3d78e9c165bf8a7ab6677c9bc44351234
describe
'12220' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQV' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
68b4d8fb0233be840d01577b1cf03e6f
456fcabacad03378f2e2c04d11467639113a5724
'2011-08-18T17:10:35-04:00'
describe
'861969' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQW' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
47fbb14e15d2891df7417f1ea1ffc1df
3e2f3a3e97699ee9868339847922dcb202bd32ca
describe
'105503' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQX' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
bcd62b51a02229177f45aecadb2b51da
2e3c2c2cb74bff84388c12245b2fe2e464010814
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQY' 'sip-files00242.pro'
06b5af5925754d80a423ed5975a3b5be
8577718151075c9a27b3107fb29247994c3a4515
'2011-08-18T16:58:38-04:00'
describe
'39575' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTQZ' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
723514a53e4e7eb15dacf0c40a026696
c72abeb842dcda6b39eb44d4e798cf497f5b7dbb
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRA' 'sip-files00242.tif'
6f574e098a5b6fa48248e3a92fa70348
46fec027d0c9dd35503af79874f6fbaa07185206
'2011-08-18T16:50:58-04:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRB' 'sip-files00242.txt'
ca87d3fd69a9e98d21bc15d744ebe1fc
d24de116872c6c6d79ce28070ca037ac3399879c
'2011-08-18T16:47:52-04:00'
describe
'12419' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRC' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
46a81d301930fa8b4da3d9efc39ab8c7
a9d44ee3140d3ba2e1475b45cb056a3c499e4c7b
'2011-08-18T16:55:54-04:00'
describe
'866206' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRD' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
18b682eae10c24ca00957dffe4be605c
08a5b647ca1b96e24bc9677b24a26080facc358e
'2011-08-18T16:56:22-04:00'
describe
'113662' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRE' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
c439d60caf353af5a35d45a064a3ff20
628c3d5777b327dcd11e3172525c1bab75065a52
'2011-08-18T16:54:26-04:00'
describe
'32354' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRF' 'sip-files00243.pro'
716350d5314f7265622a08f553e8ff45
9b7162b830ce69e391ad681577af812a622b8d87
describe
'43249' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRG' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
a7f126d39404cd54181021b5e6d06d7f
0bd50d4ec7a80f96758f19b86177b3b93a1ff396
'2011-08-18T16:46:39-04:00'
describe
'6936391' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRH' 'sip-files00243.tif'
88694a0d5ee44f46ef810a46fa1997e4
b048241a8aeaa2a4fb755d8b30e1fe20071d519a
'2011-08-18T16:55:40-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRI' 'sip-files00243.txt'
77cd1a36206f7650af1a2ea92124306d
6c49e91a11f4a8b146a881fee4963f3e1cc0f32e
describe
'12873' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRJ' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
f5a9120fe66a476d8816751f3e3557f5
77eb6ebffd055bc67bdf42aceb1d3f18c9c2b731
describe
'891233' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRK' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
8bffb2756227e8833ad64dba95569cb7
bc66d09170f9b45815cbaae9705cdc538d067d08
describe
'112074' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRL' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
d58a55590e0028001b37ef7e15441fdb
504d8ff56ec4a46ee81aa636de0608c075048501
describe
'32819' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRM' 'sip-files00244.pro'
21a2ffe9e119f0e3112650de1b5d015d
727692ea2e550c3e3eeffac16183e2f80db18ebe
describe
'42262' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRN' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
18b6b3be1dea19b85b8074479004db03
0dfea7439d54545257046fc41a691463e0046ea8
'2011-08-18T16:54:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRO' 'sip-files00244.tif'
e3c65e62fc7d58e726e699e462e56205
8574d7fac94123af4af479039e1e0195b9771c08
'2011-08-18T17:04:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRP' 'sip-files00244.txt'
8790d092ebed3ea3a71420fe52c556c0
dd599f4d1d9b847062db49930f2a2f9c23c7a119
describe
'12215' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRQ' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
5ec70e3e18a52c1f9cfb31f9208a5508
076309809d71170c51c58bcfb5e9c9b101e9aae9
'2011-08-18T17:04:30-04:00'
describe
'876574' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRR' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
e9a08daac7a571262eb056f7b4f03d4a
4a148ad5146e93ab3e0d41977d504686efccf6a6
describe
'83822' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRS' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
17eb25d5a6de86e1b045011869ca784a
d6afd437ea21a622771aa8a310ef5a72b82570ad
'2011-08-18T16:57:56-04:00'
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRT' 'sip-files00245.pro'
a63e86dda6a28455a4c3eac242bc1837
cf566696aebb6d470dc478cc34513e7bb762a266
describe
'30423' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRU' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
d4a806242c3367b11ccadfd9e33bca04
0c3f0c54e997d7183662f15ce29a632296ee21ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRV' 'sip-files00245.tif'
4d564ea757d65649081cd5b38052b5d3
88cec5cfff2af66a04dca0e8c62a66ac190ff82e
'2011-08-18T16:45:23-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRW' 'sip-files00245.txt'
b39aa2039d79c0d0a1095e00eb712cde
b59264f11945cb64d38fb7405b30fa6ef87f5ef2
'2011-08-18T17:03:39-04:00'
describe
'9678' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRX' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
5bb9f14c9c5ad93f02d6ba15a1b70b28
a2c30d4a79882a96c9ddccbf46fa1561fa4772e7
describe
'891225' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRY' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
c9dd11e4c301cf71918cd839ae96377e
c006d18713dedcc25c8889d3707b5655f0fde51a
describe
'111618' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTRZ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
eeaff8a84376e3604ea2c1a26a440d41
e59326ce2d87dd1572c03c9bb2000844bd860f99
describe
'16759' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSA' 'sip-files00246.pro'
68eca18f7b22f13611dff61f5e48b052
1fa2a82145868e5f96b6f4ac26ad0824f21f649c
describe
'37322' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSB' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
feb87cf50865a485c582603f2bac521b
4cdf4dc892df2687222bd4a1ee5d55a79713c7a9
'2011-08-18T16:50:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSC' 'sip-files00246.tif'
04d43ce252636fda9322c10964147358
eddba6fe8a30989c4551bfee51687b7262462639
describe
'700' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSD' 'sip-files00246.txt'
aa9e3c74383f2d1b838ad98b5035775d
de73d2d81c5f788d91c139928da2772ee80061f8
describe
'11040' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSE' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
b0b7ed72c23dc770279e39a4d96f7655
cd0f0cac0c852df27f2b22168f2d131a3180a84c
describe
'894146' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSF' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
d42452788d7c53fefbdd38bf6378331d
1cda60719c408bb68c151b594db07a9f6f6e0358
describe
'116062' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSG' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
b80a877aa3cbf0cc953e4b03706e3180
1150dd6925027388b3a99092c61f97777ae323f5
describe
'33685' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSH' 'sip-files00247.pro'
d0bfd5e4f23b00ddd6ef0f290eb2d884
521e6bbeabc02ac32f3ef0702674755a059ba7a0
describe
'44711' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSI' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
e55d5466a75ff2bfde86a6f6349c15bb
023a906420f1890b2e6d2a8cce6004c03923067f
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSJ' 'sip-files00247.tif'
4f42c888b50b90e722b0d4cfcdfbd49b
0c50df96d5d3b01dba0ef28c57db5c5fe5302934
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSK' 'sip-files00247.txt'
262d760d99d696d1608a08cb5c58dceb
eba77362e9df427f7eeddf43994640a865481056
describe
'12861' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSL' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
9c355e92f94d339981720f6855f31174
e81f8358fb06e8760608ef187861bfba2e60a3b9
describe
'883703' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSM' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
f694223b59da9eb5f4201362cd0ae09c
bd9bbba661aa7d6041ad92cc5b7c49878ac7b999
describe
'113304' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSN' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
4ad59720804431bb1e3da9a5db612696
6d4555fc16cd7ba009aacbb92ddc885b32f5864d
'2011-08-18T17:10:05-04:00'
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSO' 'sip-files00248.pro'
4db86f562e2c85f1bf0a61344a49de80
ff9d6d31012fe82c394f2890d231eac8d2678efd
describe
'42799' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSP' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
cac23b5aa075a4f79c0fcaca0e218274
a8c221d4dcd52f9df77ef785a68c72e8e5003a6d
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSQ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
c9f01b0a1a191649300eb22db3128b1f
17bf265362422a60d1e640e08d425a56a5919592
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSR' 'sip-files00248.txt'
2fa095390e4e427634104a77be97fec4
c6b6b2f39e80efaf8c6180c07fa3474b314a90e8
'2011-08-18T16:53:48-04:00'
describe
'12362' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSS' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
f53106b05566eadeb5ba0bdedbec3951
d754ec58357d68a687d8bddad7e734597c68cbc3
describe
'879447' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTST' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
dec35fb4673092752fb2b366a5743d18
fd55d10f91c0a4b51e6996d12fce07cc063c11f1
describe
'97570' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSU' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
e91488ef0fb5e1483746e48eee8f79f8
0cf2a3f947f3eea31b9a3898b84e1cfad5bf3f9f
describe
'34116' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSV' 'sip-files00249.pro'
532a2dfdda2bf3156a0b98a63135a488
a2eb0c862de9f6491b1d671d6cd0b40344a1cdaf
'2011-08-18T17:12:36-04:00'
describe
'34745' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSW' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
a34808e9dfb0a9289b505310fc270fd1
65120a6217d00e2eed8d88250aa52d54ec93b145
describe
'7044415' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSX' 'sip-files00249.tif'
096094c273d4b3da55c490a4126d4fe1
3ff729465c365896836911503e5631c82c71d215
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSY' 'sip-files00249.txt'
1495b8fcba7eb703900b5239d8a50e09
69072b668bd14e1e3f355614e86c2f01d892068c
describe
'10341' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTSZ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
c8851649b43d719e852d7ea398205921
f273a3acc79fd2cc2ee623bb78796cd2dce4ea2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTA' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
85cafbae8da52f616822b20399e6ab2e
33ac94b3215393e6d9710bbe3213bec599e995b8
'2011-08-18T17:05:22-04:00'
describe
'117830' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTB' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
24171c277a07c2c7d12b212ea361ba5b
20bdd17d697f6ad0ec9043f30152b4fd42f2ef90
describe
'16309' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTC' 'sip-files00250.pro'
8fbc8772d8b38a363bb5028f38b7e5a4
e5969fbb86d247fd91540e854c2a1413e8c88812
describe
'39541' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTD' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
8e67b96294ce80e116e34965e6625d14
b4889575650d976b45fe56832bd075eae104b145
'2011-08-18T17:10:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTE' 'sip-files00250.tif'
292588cd4fd34770bff77c44391065dc
babe28a59f510508cb1d27199959526102127d1d
describe
'723' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTF' 'sip-files00250.txt'
7a32baf32ced918d56729eabea2bd75e
f7efd2175235cb51ab97f1db0e8d55dec852cc71
describe
'11700' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTG' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
ba716add849e676dd90fa013fe8e3671
e60c7c6f427c8b894d8abfc1d9916fc2f6aaa36c
describe
'884917' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTH' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
03b4aff74e92546edb0f9f14301ac274
2d539f145e520b613ed1a9ce5216be6a5b11e333
describe
'115481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTI' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
048a950d28b6b5a91c93ca9de031bd78
daaf989aeebb9e8688b196608e63666d247fe98c
describe
'33902' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTJ' 'sip-files00251.pro'
3791fdd21bd0a4859416e8a1a3489246
46ad1d2c8a987a5ef25b6be099a6b3d72fc4e764
describe
'44701' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTK' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
8fe80281334feff77bbfea3af5bb6360
41359aae8b44f7e870c2d13ee28d8d6b24cac8b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTL' 'sip-files00251.tif'
ee0e1e90b6e7874ad3fc9dbd59c214fb
9d39b3cd69f38d2f7d9bd0b36db07bc7329a5120
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTM' 'sip-files00251.txt'
0cd4fe7fdd98dc4e4da6f14f10ca424e
ba2d786cd6bf9c3a0fa0eddf411061da5826a485
describe
'13050' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTN' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
7997f5d7c360e3190bf4a73fc2fac3e5
eb807c0956e26cbde1208657d9f18859134399ea
describe
'881791' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTO' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
844780a00ed684494a4f14d423547c6c
89d78362ba88645f73f158d3f36a41cef7fed0da
'2011-08-18T17:02:22-04:00'
describe
'114449' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTP' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
efb8b2670445fae2c1b31ff06ac922da
2207f2a36fd1f276d538b7ab927f49f7217b1765
'2011-08-18T17:03:07-04:00'
describe
'32615' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTQ' 'sip-files00252.pro'
3d05135f920f818529cb9881410006fd
6765c8e7cbca7f38df83cdd64691eb5521f967f7
describe
'44092' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTR' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
f7681a57b18a48011ae3c68e14afed05
0b967a0836115b9c21270b2cf0a5c9567a3d53b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTS' 'sip-files00252.tif'
da2693142ee2851e12da32ce49841582
de89d02ba431a38c5c14dc2ebbf339d5a7e783c6
'2011-08-18T16:54:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTT' 'sip-files00252.txt'
205e25874eaa83cabf6719a4af399857
eda8eebb908b34bb03e9f25cf3bfe4bd9a75631a
describe
'13224' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTU' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
883ccb743b4fd8507b8673ad948c8e9c
80b1d17a6cb788b8c1df34bff8806673f298a6b3
describe
'859897' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTV' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
6fa95945457ba25dc1cecec28b013d41
4a397f4616f68055ba606dc082a57e1ab2f5113d
describe
'110287' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTW' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
487be76e30e77e79a1e94ad77d1e2947
4ac656d52fde18cc7a0e249bf5cf630985140a2b
describe
'32420' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTX' 'sip-files00253.pro'
a5ff6c00c386f330aa6e4f2d4ac6bf4d
137227480aa5cabe66aa10474552b93a7be3065f
describe
'41978' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTY' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
42f6754d2b55c5ff92c06475f40364c8
96f9c7e9f6d631dc1b7ad56d5365b1732c1259da
describe
'6885691' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTTZ' 'sip-files00253.tif'
134ec6edff90eef27e0772b48fffa4bd
f07d7acbaabb30e3c2ce9ca59d5bcdf66894ec85
'2011-08-18T17:08:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUA' 'sip-files00253.txt'
c21b21ab2af0f234ac43b2645ed4ae11
65166d5a002c90140caf4680c32df614594464c3
describe
'13200' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUB' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
6515beb99bae59d0cd70f4f8bb1499d9
1e2dc031604e6086d9681e4b3c5b7eb6e9faf0e7
describe
'861970' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUC' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
2b1372daf761a0fb610bd6d58a6a15e6
22fc6e61a793943ad2defc74826570742d82352e
'2011-08-18T16:51:01-04:00'
describe
'95743' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUD' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
bcaa10d38a96dc8eed83f36e11f21c39
dff598d3a90bc2c5a53d29d646c74ceb63df5e0f
'2011-08-18T16:58:22-04:00'
describe
'35825' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUE' 'sip-files00254.pro'
af8caf6e9e536d62bc1a3ed18d372dc2
12abb1cee25d56d321db9f9eca283740b0c7f62b
describe
'33830' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUF' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
7ed9dbe900c351934501972712350416
be6ca25b670b6a52a93b5ad9090b267a38c76914
describe
'6902441' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUG' 'sip-files00254.tif'
5f5e687a8f62123d44d7cdab0dc5ac66
0b0cda7a24614ce3529a72e98e4738d66dbcccab
'2011-08-18T17:02:13-04:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUH' 'sip-files00254.txt'
a426804b1a45fd70454a653da116b26a
3e733eb364d9704afb6e4c776f9b859fed35c98e
'2011-08-18T16:49:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUI' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
5bb8acf947a146e74315253dec42a960
38d5960eb342354ce09e6b56945a45ae55d49f05
describe
'898919' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUJ' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
3fd231fb7e2b73d9c43874bfe9eff303
7bbae09207ebdd74b9519169e3e86c6f3cc423db
describe
'121291' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUK' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
403bcc7ce6c450f63a1bbd36d4026778
8c6806117fa848e1220d48d5d15f469f5b678722
'2011-08-18T16:44:14-04:00'
describe
'33229' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUL' 'sip-files00255.pro'
424a75fe2179bd860a762f113462a665
6675afab5d841011c480cfcc3318cbcde37d608c
'2011-08-18T17:03:54-04:00'
describe
'46867' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUM' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
ef6c2a902ea831711954033052eab1b6
163597c03ab2240f3168304e635d608178a1bd85
'2011-08-18T17:02:34-04:00'
describe
'7200069' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUN' 'sip-files00255.tif'
9db842a50528431044a5df0c1280489c
a05549ab909bcf61682214d142680eed17b4c3b7
'2011-08-18T17:12:43-04:00'
describe
'1384' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUO' 'sip-files00255.txt'
a0e7940f707abf0838249505898ef7ce
a625e6b087066af99f5e9c129009881d26b98d9b
describe
'13164' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUP' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
e069dcbb1c5a82720b301b4542b1d073
077c1f56ca9d51dd9f930c4048208d49eec5ffbb
describe
'896491' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUQ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
7f6f9f8244864c04878c3a059874139a
26552774461f9511f98601cc19fc14de542a9b98
describe
'116547' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUR' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
2d82eba72ca8900d19086a91c5866b86
7569bddf61b453d13b77ef81900ae070e9ac3406
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUS' 'sip-files00256.pro'
a3181d7f685935a85d6ddaeb40a16802
f7190888324fed54f1931653ab483b0d3076244e
describe
'44993' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUT' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
9736e9913d5f452e5b6361bb43baa495
8c961fb771f706d409ab0d4293f768660974b604
describe
'7180983' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUU' 'sip-files00256.tif'
837026287be11dcade067a142ade1c65
09a50463ba284f162fabb8b64cc51470c2cb23b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUV' 'sip-files00256.txt'
4130cc0b55c61b10639df6ebaab59a4a
05cab74591137657c9b3a18df3a26a6d6a898171
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUW' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
f75718773f092979fcad0ba98ea2a2de
1fca593aa2a8141470853fcbf281b352a96564c5
describe
'882583' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUX' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
7bfcb52d68e223a8edabd115c604ef74
317fb9a8603b76858179ebf076e91f2269fd319f
describe
'116066' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUY' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
43890f723db82713dc078fb43f858167
08bba6993f8acae649ef4a1f683a251862b1a075
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTUZ' 'sip-files00257.pro'
96599c6b19dbeb40ad50b64fed89a185
d6ed0418688849cbe8fa524eaa4af9518427f0c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVA' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
427f8adabbd4786e5e0a7adda446f155
33742b488860da27b99afb94d501917454c4be0c
'2011-08-18T16:56:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVB' 'sip-files00257.tif'
4ed86f357b6d6057f83c1005d6f6a037
d97221364ca0b40180af178e08b8b838c5cb5884
'2011-08-18T17:01:23-04:00'
describe
'1397' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVC' 'sip-files00257.txt'
e3e656f8b3ad6ccecfb3623999cd4300
84fac9acbe672ad4f1dab24ea1aa0725e757b1c2
describe
'12649' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVD' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
c072521f65588f00f75e4c1872529025
4a575842315f774b90b0ce466429d756f61baee3
describe
'869352' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVE' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
959b252919d91b662af797f63324db2b
3c0d3c59c717b327b018d77ea6516c985b81464c
'2011-08-18T16:59:26-04:00'
describe
'86837' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVF' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
e55013eacfcc2c02deafa22e59ec52c6
cda7c0b555a522632dbae7e120f9531661ca721f
'2011-08-18T17:12:04-04:00'
describe
'33723' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVG' 'sip-files00258.pro'
2219582a687af6cf83aaa5a3a2858591
455cb2e464d06db7985926f5e1429569cd296973
describe
'31012' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVH' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
da3141c555912b1591a7e55ca0449858
e8a2a8eb749877ecd08aa4255857bd007cd463fc
'2011-08-18T17:06:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVI' 'sip-files00258.tif'
8c2270f5527e4f099c84d4e76baca7e3
68491818b7ba49cc9f9b6e09ca3958920f92b0d3
'2011-08-18T16:42:31-04:00'
describe
'1472' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVJ' 'sip-files00258.txt'
5f4af203cecc79287a7a569e2b76d96d
a1fd9e7bfaa4ccac24776cad0651aeaade04fe2c
describe
'9323' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVK' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
46448a83c3d4a1679c23cf056a60ef33
daf10d01e59b992da9f26be47cdaef6eaae2364d
'2011-08-18T17:06:10-04:00'
describe
'874950' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVL' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
d5b14e9b4e715f1f6ef09cee2aac4d6c
642f1fa1159e35658e617cbfa40179c155585827
'2011-08-18T17:09:40-04:00'
describe
'106325' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVM' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
62777e9f98eedcf02b59ab08cadc75ea
2aaec852fc6dcdad4098974b42aae81c806a26c1
describe
'15097' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVN' 'sip-files00259.pro'
68dbf5f79d96d423f59105d7f780ed61
36e1c45e88c2b679241f0ffba89c853186c2b819
'2011-08-18T17:04:09-04:00'
describe
'35823' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVO' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
f996ba2612662b7a4498f0307ef81c82
a17cbd7c0d250744ee2caabc4ed6c2d4a11b4ddc
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVP' 'sip-files00259.tif'
1f27dca0a9ff4940485e4a44f2938c41
e3a5557a73ea24fa39f729066ba5797115ce562e
'2011-08-18T17:08:59-04:00'
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVQ' 'sip-files00259.txt'
d441c7538eae49275ab9d0543f296987
8721cf00284da0c6c86b32f4e3ba82fc8b2acebb
describe
'11317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVR' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
fd53b352f4d87b985eb0245f4c8833fb
10c5072d928e801f7fa581bb1257adcad6752310
describe
'876884' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVS' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
d849aee305b6fb489e91731edacac38f
3e57b7bdf7984b2d01c8820a091fb9e94b6be59f
describe
'112782' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVT' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
808d6c23fc4ddcfb1303275b7d061c02
69c9cffe035981b32aecf4ccf831d56a65ce9b65
describe
'32337' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVU' 'sip-files00260.pro'
fde67d3c346c10827b527dd2ceba9eda
d214f5fe1ee16ce23fbabf92acdc9ac1db507a60
describe
'43685' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVV' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
8272f03a9f1242b5c99300c2c2328249
09f22d89563175b86c13145b6a7865ca3cd760eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVW' 'sip-files00260.tif'
230197d05fc2d42809ba5acb1ba2a436
bf3601723f1b03bd69427efae7530c6423075491
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVX' 'sip-files00260.txt'
450541b04a7b2073ef6b5e66920cc179
de24aad23860c23b6eb63a50170e6f5c89c8d782
describe
'12705' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVY' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
9dbcadf2e1c4a18798679a8dbb727f10
365cd54975e22f299e60a74c9e9c8266627c0141
'2011-08-18T17:06:51-04:00'
describe
'882633' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTVZ' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
8a681b133a854f5678f865df78d92f9a
12ea3ca6b7a631ad8df6fe1bc18da6a38c226f2a
describe
'112685' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWA' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
79645b3ac532c3f4d4a5cb2278696bc1
24b49473439cc64ef25694c53013c04b55118814
describe
'33009' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWB' 'sip-files00261.pro'
dce4ad83228e0830f56de19fb1d52014
0bac04170880785ce73d27e36e44f33fa1fdcf38
'2011-08-18T16:44:16-04:00'
describe
'42324' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWC' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
fb291f105d1dcfd554a3ae3fe5110afd
ac015a51ab0096964dfcf27ef046392a669ea440
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWD' 'sip-files00261.tif'
7dcc2dadf4d3d2b80aac6cfade9f507f
be4dbdd4846af2eb5dc67a7fb79d8188cc204472
'2011-08-18T17:08:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWE' 'sip-files00261.txt'
7ecaacd52ed89ef9bb4c6c61a441dfc6
b9ef7af4e906149ef51a201ca9e9c8dce129665e
describe
'12565' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWF' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
a5ef5422cbfa098d12c15906e06e12e6
b2c8f46b086ef1ae884123051caaf02f2db53a4e
describe
'879405' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWG' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
8147d128d05648e2f5fb4ac65479da4b
3c15fadb58cfeefcb294d69645af66ee8de99088
describe
'122581' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWH' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
d57f2a9bfab84f1f6ba936ec5eacc12a
f77956b75283671f9c17c756c09f2d282542a94e
describe
'35572' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWI' 'sip-files00262.pro'
c63f76cb5428c22c91cfcdb09870c6b0
c5067a0e2389152ee6571c2403f150db8754899f
describe
'47824' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWJ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
346493fa5b8041c810b179d3d57126ce
b2babf1d1494d663690bf7d1dd6710c4d03f71f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWK' 'sip-files00262.tif'
37ea1673fc2ea508598250630a497d57
59320bc5d12704f82e8c07ff507e7a7019e740c3
'2011-08-18T17:00:27-04:00'
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWL' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5dae0a1a3a413183a55dc9dfa069d9a4
1cbdee80e27c968b8b1bf6438c47599ca2862fbf
describe
'13758' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWM' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
489a5cff3c2b6ed0c2307956d1c27a1e
e84eaf673e956ae6ddeb246ae9e5abf671a484d9
describe
'889173' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWN' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
8a3fb2cdb6babfcf1d43ab0894882b81
72a64ddb4348bc8b553821bfb545f2cd794d197c
describe
'117730' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWO' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
f25e6bd2ed728f215a72ea10a6f7441d
d20f18783bc436be1718b03aabc5b381a66d4458
describe
'33390' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWP' 'sip-files00263.pro'
c6c93f61fe7acbd1986abdfd6349e756
a385e03e1471a136b8acba4fc2e3e4247292a6ca
describe
'44734' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWQ' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
9073c409a503222df8f004bafad87532
e11ab6734b555702b02bfb19c287e294e3ee1feb
describe
'7122791' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWR' 'sip-files00263.tif'
2d472a2db3acc1ea699b1efc18e254b6
66245c7e5fcf7bc4e11859375fa22a9210553ad7
'2011-08-18T17:00:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWS' 'sip-files00263.txt'
dafc40fe1dec2bafbd4aef7588f33293
5e29b9bf504b14e7db09e97ec3b46fd71df7f7f4
describe
'13434' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWT' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
ad263515131204dc877dffb2655600cd
d843d80f08676af2141a3724ffea78b7f2297683
describe
'914267' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWU' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
3c666ff129f3436c73652b02564c4e8b
2f58e427f55881346390c02a9a5fd9b4165b9b2f
describe
'96789' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWV' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
044d8f2d962355c5e5d37346be71a973
992897315a27fe0b9bdcd25f0d8eddbe2d1b53d0
describe
'39468' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWW' 'sip-files00264.pro'
e1b8d17e00b8cc98a1d8c6aba58629b7
d4a0948d834049197080e28ced94d40076db2fa7
describe
'33560' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWX' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
fa8e3adac7c024218e0f65c4f0cbd775
bac326f437cf7ae0a227cc24effe2406455b683d
describe
'7323065' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWY' 'sip-files00264.tif'
63b90db9aeaae0b669f138edf5eae5da
c2e6490b01ad1cfb917a58a897b098c169a92d24
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTWZ' 'sip-files00264.txt'
db0044fe9031455450b54845813020d6
207e4ec3095beac82a06f0f56f3ffcba086ee7cd
describe
'10014' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXA' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
3940cb65ff4e6048bb58050b23e93fc6
6d456d74470560110d33bf66230d38c2b1b690f0
describe
'902722' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXB' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
d710eb61c00ecb6936c759613a755334
4e8c980ed3d4b121f5baa1455f80ce95df310ecb
'2011-08-18T17:03:42-04:00'
describe
'112099' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXC' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
77ead59ee4e174c0863d301834add9d3
a719fc3684faac41cd66077df499e9b773986d24
describe
'30449' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXD' 'sip-files00265.pro'
5920c442d236214c899d0fc916365613
ba15022821e4519cb1134c7c98dcd82157b9dda9
describe
'42796' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXE' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
9c6bab8ef389d454fbb1a1b1e51f2741
94f75135e9e9cca1a7a82d0db9c3e103e1083c35
describe
'7230755' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXF' 'sip-files00265.tif'
10c867a5c97cdc3da39e6ae75ae567dd
4ac7c3996a0a3cc42c6b1df6ff7df0ae639227b4
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXG' 'sip-files00265.txt'
03b7208b630a2799b8b3ac922e92afb2
c3f2458747ba90bd084c1d6dfc2429febf5e7078
'2011-08-18T16:54:33-04:00'
describe
'12129' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXH' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
faf512872f95cc1814e9876a5d729227
83b3ce9c251688f31891e7f913a815b49e73923f
'2011-08-18T16:54:50-04:00'
describe
'889192' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXI' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
5e095825508dcbb83bca0ec9acc79e3d
82e6f9879346c116d06dae190d87b9a2f7923376
describe
'121670' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXJ' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
c5e6283d0ff5322eb0ae0971ce5190f0
ec3487b287c6ce2490031c63c5169468d6e87fba
'2011-08-18T17:12:03-04:00'
describe
'34539' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXK' 'sip-files00266.pro'
74b1ddc9590a1dcc1358faa3b1c9a3cd
3bf6f0f665a6bcf60f63b041c9540b76c1371f4f
describe
'47812' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXL' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
00df537f068d7f47def0b07d5fbb14de
4fd95a1238747d43e442d6044285ce8c88cff315
describe
'7122529' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXM' 'sip-files00266.tif'
b526b55e17b5fd7cc4ce89fd99e88bcd
e279c4529a90db2ac8e81032b41d55037eac7597
'2011-08-18T17:01:48-04:00'
describe
'1425' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXN' 'sip-files00266.txt'
3d4b64461419b05b1cf470fb9d095dd5
d1f9acb31c82dab5adddeb2988c3e2827e23fd41
'2011-08-18T17:04:33-04:00'
describe
'13169' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXO' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
abfd828346bf72c41c1bcc310e1d9093
d56d1bbd9784e2e7f0aaeb36a754557803c02916
'2011-08-18T17:11:28-04:00'
describe
'877500' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXP' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
1f43484d1c9c90c82f31e0e6b24b1d95
45291fb7cb6dad169f9aee204de73587d3638a74
describe
'116076' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXQ' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
f0fd39935458f7014a563bcd52d9db20
bdce9f383c8e50f612114be16a29aa1301133ab1
'2011-08-18T16:54:42-04:00'
describe
'33317' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXR' 'sip-files00267.pro'
e60657cc0a71c263be7189fd84f88d1b
e4f9b121f777117811818eea931b831a3aadcf58
describe
'45192' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXS' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
ac3041801712bdc037715a7a3163b9c0
da14d36b29f4a5dbcd9e5dc789361876aca850c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXT' 'sip-files00267.tif'
185d0c78cb86e4e62d75537540469f93
7c72fb5deea30c62e52fb78b2706a1828f152182
'2011-08-18T16:50:19-04:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXU' 'sip-files00267.txt'
ad7139c9c99fd336b9c6ddee35d1e361
27414adb238d11d6201d22ee225d8e7c0c160c46
describe
'13950' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXV' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
41f4b1bc618dff259fd72b6a4bac3e34
76b6566ad2addf9687e80abeb0c12f541a420fd7
'2011-08-18T17:09:26-04:00'
describe
'873612' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXW' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
f4e2b91944de8257de6432098accb7f0
6a48b1cf08fd9ec10a9921eb8039139bcfa8901b
'2011-08-18T16:57:00-04:00'
describe
'115089' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXX' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
3c8dc2ce3569518bcd0fc50bd6f4cbe2
44037241e2fa7e60449b56ce905722bc3cfe2db9
describe
'32539' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXY' 'sip-files00268.pro'
280c6e71cbc6bfb356b4fea04970c9d4
e93dbe7e369198ad21e7b1a3873200b139a03a29
'2011-08-18T17:09:01-04:00'
describe
'44642' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTXZ' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
9cf7da96fab798f493be02ab9e9f2c1a
32dcfa84f0b8b616b8904fe84231914bb2672238
'2011-08-18T16:42:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYA' 'sip-files00268.tif'
590ccd9691c6d170bcf10547df983c20
8ed3244924dc6638d631511d6b24d501f1ab3549
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYB' 'sip-files00268.txt'
a66b8c4bdf8755ae1152bac543d45757
4e0d5ad63d235e718b29f7a9f7d7a3b8d5bbe092
describe
'13345' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYC' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
501bf532d3edba9f2601355391651322
731a36939490bec406b79d13193d5e9e3904649f
describe
'876867' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYD' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
4b7b8b15f96ece8e82f7d10794ee5985
bf8356e30f63377e9d83daff586d07730f11106b
describe
'97462' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYE' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
9735026592e80e62aa36fc76978e587c
4994d9677f71132e3ce53b22c4fbfb5686ddf59a
describe
'34959' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYF' 'sip-files00269.pro'
50dd21dc578d3c7e651e83f8fb17602b
19370cf94aec94aa13b34d8db65718ba3c865d45
describe
'35828' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYG' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
31b4aa753aacbd14f30ad55e12a9904d
9ef8f69f8b83d27431b4ac4aa9cda11af0385ca7
'2011-08-18T17:06:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYH' 'sip-files00269.tif'
1223b7f62df8343240d810dfc478efbb
4ef56c1de1d57e57d502df6338bc6efa9a1486e4
'2011-08-18T17:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYI' 'sip-files00269.txt'
4cf5f927e67cc593cc4e5a7c2fe6f67e
e3325d62186022b91c2a6996b739dba57a27e087
describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYJ' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
048becd0392ca0c0a5bf6eef021d2dea
6682b8b49000ae8af015f64cb28ed27f1c0d8d72
describe
'869359' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYK' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
a1c410b47072d2ba95fc2fa377324a66
7086e7371a14de727011f312d4bcd20039f6eab9
describe
'106493' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYL' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
1f58d0c31bb6c39fb89e6d10b1d0052d
7f529d8903811483fdd78d6329298baee416ec63
describe
'15881' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYM' 'sip-files00270.pro'
bcf02fdffab5ff919bd08b4c300d3b5a
25656f06ef759b3ce219682e564a30f9e550bf13
describe
'36717' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYN' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
b7471b71278fe852fdd5c832bf566626
ccd02465974bd8a18d65881a485a59806196e83b
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYO' 'sip-files00270.tif'
8904f59472ea0df3cb100725c0219ca8
71a79c71426a072121c019c0c33c153d97be2d37
'2011-08-18T17:09:57-04:00'
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYP' 'sip-files00270.txt'
a47194a2732a5101b47b2bc0b797998a
0f25cd6feaa1fd7df6f865cf2f0e3faa0cca876b
describe
'11432' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYQ' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
d57487e52da6d09fdeed73118ffc936c
cb37ab63c02b5f2ca0abc07d7fe889eb53d4218f
'2011-08-18T17:01:50-04:00'
describe
'880025' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYR' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
b6f4ee18f090fe5b985f840e50c1ce5c
097ba569c18dfa7653e6816206ae307b1b9befc0
'2011-08-18T16:55:26-04:00'
describe
'120303' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYS' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
b65296452319ef0cf9792a93b9c25244
a21e482a88da092fb95762853339dd60728eec1c
describe
'34374' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYT' 'sip-files00271.pro'
80f83007aa46e49a008a371aed4f9e8b
6b0918e25ebe3ccf7055f7b2cfc71a9602e38e27
'2011-08-18T17:00:58-04:00'
describe
'46559' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYU' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
50a8f048d66379a170ce9f5534f89bc1
af950204c12f77af39fbeeb1ad511885b3dcfbd1
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYV' 'sip-files00271.tif'
a94aa2ae789b14866684454be65baf50
2aff73e51fd0ed4437697607b105b45c28f9e7ed
'2011-08-18T17:07:56-04:00'
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYW' 'sip-files00271.txt'
ee76eaaef6f683015f56cb63028e3627
634d1133d662a8b3e121565a3499b2cb8d805686
describe
'13595' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYX' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
31580869a4db32b0298c4189e672f314
b9a2d0bc7a3388946a1f36faff2f94373e0e6a11
describe
'894123' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYY' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
4a61a0627494793f5f5f75ca8eac0797
a9d00fbc63d5a540e22905084a35a51d04504140
describe
'113797' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTYZ' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
51f0cb11010f9244a56aa270994cf9a8
7e385c0ec1b55cbd6b73995cca43fd1589a99286
'2011-08-18T17:09:04-04:00'
describe
'33089' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZA' 'sip-files00272.pro'
0ff5e82ec4cf8b6f0d1beb1b7b090907
1dbe6bc78ef43902adb23871d6c792e4f3acb46e
describe
'43811' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZB' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
4353add037df73511ead4ac5aa0a7c7c
fcbe6db88f7bcd8551dbc2c3d444a0880dccf88d
'2011-08-18T17:12:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZC' 'sip-files00272.tif'
d4e953f5ad76c59f9b65dc695d6db8a4
e18b1a06f98bf0a68c0d1df9338749c0abb28de3
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZD' 'sip-files00272.txt'
a117396bc703c36257729ce0fe1665bb
12c9c2c385f80042d6d386734404b368be11730c
describe
'12322' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZE' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
f93071a49aa7746ce2765254b2814281
29eed79c1d89632a113c842a7a9db36c702bff75
describe
'874443' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZF' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
5256f6e065ffccb44a9a51c8ead7e817
9b2d3c7a622a35c4c5cc6b272b130d9aad594ebb
describe
'118443' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZG' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
7357204b669d640bae3bd06173ab0448
aa36eaaccaa0584117be2c94db398e848b57bc50
'2011-08-18T17:08:42-04:00'
describe
'34502' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZH' 'sip-files00273.pro'
efe525e25483146e56b033e02833d698
384f3930ab5fd2334e8732cd24d09bd8989b9ffe
describe
'45630' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZI' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
bd4d0d702c2417fc3ed35b6de668042a
82a1e23c08282a402e7fc81df5b17518d386199e
'2011-08-18T17:11:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZJ' 'sip-files00273.tif'
bf95413c373003d0f17fe33a2360312b
6b3c1c0402bc52ae1e71633cfdcd84f00384133e
'2011-08-18T16:51:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZK' 'sip-files00273.txt'
90b14873a54b11e9d5bf3f17fdbc07e6
b805011110909c4a964dd5a58ad15d3d022d3ac7
describe
'13603' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZL' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
457c4413c5da38bb083471dfc20f13f1
68a8e835dac239c4f3d48775b0c553b1a153ea15
'2011-08-18T17:11:10-04:00'
describe
'896117' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZM' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
ab92ddbf1dc1e9757f84414a657b552d
080369fbc174840672b48ff69000446e86f3296a
describe
'103631' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZN' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
da9a90cbda20fac0f7c855337c20ede6
8ece0bde5d97d9469835e8a3a76f0b70f09bf3d8
'2011-08-18T17:03:36-04:00'
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZO' 'sip-files00274.pro'
d86d56669949c4c57ccd77a874096770
1f3df65704d3df9e10b81f63ae239ba084a19dd8
describe
'38527' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZP' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
c5afd3528c4b99909af5b697c64b18bb
b1072f9476e3e276af12391246949e7b046e5069
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZQ' 'sip-files00274.tif'
0c9186e3cdff0e84899ef9fcd4638f7d
890908e0aa353a5662a8208cc9417b5c7284839c
'2011-08-18T16:58:34-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZR' 'sip-files00274.txt'
3dd21ae95d6bcbe0502dfa9779884457
a95a7730ff28a342c9d0868c755b2d2b3a2e1786
describe
'11022' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZS' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
28cea084ccdf1440c1272e7eeeb71418
318b60ea098ec06b0f7797a0a9525016b223d7f3
'2011-08-18T17:05:38-04:00'
describe
'868786' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZT' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
a681b69c8964fc93b95ee899db2eaad5
960c01370cda727906a67c75ab1cb1697187340a
describe
'98263' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZU' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
e1ed19782a2897a91562a263e349ee85
144b3c5d579961864faeb6ffde5395cede721475
describe
'34094' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZV' 'sip-files00275.pro'
9a3c5ecbbe68545937f14110f9194391
f2694702e91fbdd1b0cf224321117b06894d9d14
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZW' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
3b90c76cd76d541e3ee5212ec6d53283
1ef4f21bbc67dad17954bf7cbca314369b5a0f89
'2011-08-18T16:49:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZX' 'sip-files00275.tif'
30aa3167413edda556c60d96d9227f08
c5ed8b3cfc3b493a88bc0e04644accf8926e2f80
'2011-08-18T16:57:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZY' 'sip-files00275.txt'
6c1e349ac31261fbc34080838c248d06
dc60a03265269e28d62c84b681a8e84c4a850e6c
describe
'11644' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABTZZ' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
bc5a4e94b9cb91f33c6ea6d72275e3d2
e840e1922b6ef6069455cd1d3ef690b895e0b992
describe
'865073' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAA' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
81ae5ff293f92639e0ae19f5c8dc1197
69a33cadf450f3d3ec2c779e25e1fb44c1957183
describe
'115198' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAB' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
391e2c70af9299393f78e10cd5240745
3e170b520193a3b10f8b3dfb28a966702237c9ad
describe
'32890' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAC' 'sip-files00276.pro'
5e6c59147e11880eeca055d9fa27c22f
9e29e98d38667aa2d5860292cf84c52632a9ad34
describe
'43081' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAD' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
49fdd56241f711c23ce2ee6c973c8cbd
d2e64c2a608c9b1c1481dfc6315c5adc057213a4
'2011-08-18T17:00:25-04:00'
describe
'6927155' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAE' 'sip-files00276.tif'
1483247b2a2a7cd17eb144571d0fb44c
294135988e187edaa24b7f7e0da11791571a1f19
'2011-08-18T17:06:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAF' 'sip-files00276.txt'
11980c4086d578087f5989350f146431
aea39c870442031c180c5655d61e4dfa9d65f563
describe
'13349' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAG' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
fe1e24ef4bfae0a28c047ed02c3e2369
bda48137abfdca5e0442053339d81ef392d000f7
describe
'875182' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAH' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
691433b39b9754799aba17ab95a22843
c1f86bf2ec91bb022968425eff51fabadcc49685
describe
'118932' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAI' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
618c0e6bea9139b2cf30e8bb54f5cf11
6230220ad4cb9d893973adcd7f8d535846580803
'2011-08-18T17:04:10-04:00'
describe
'34110' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAJ' 'sip-files00277.pro'
4ceda7a641e41b711c1a789cec4b5db6
cfea9cb8cef50b491bf8960d77a49831e24d4ea7
describe
'45788' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAK' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
1b70ffad4192b84626cd5e790e94af0c
90c0988b5e3ca4dcbe13121355b60c361c5a22b9
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAL' 'sip-files00277.tif'
00bed9d0cda4c5b6480ecd746cd689bf
3a20508ff444ab103a3631f14734b389097e5c90
'2011-08-18T17:03:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAM' 'sip-files00277.txt'
c4c5b793ded405ce716ff538ce5ce9e8
3521a79ce0b438c2fbc50f4965a8adf2090ad8e2
'2011-08-18T17:12:46-04:00'
describe
'13638' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAN' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
a9ed4847e243019c8e4db6ea4eec7a20
8698bd6edbed23824f88437dc15ca283ef0291e2
describe
'879372' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAO' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
753c416725ac4eba7ec5f05eb77f3db3
4596c6697fb474115587bdc94b612170d9980be7
'2011-08-18T17:03:05-04:00'
describe
'117348' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAP' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
fa6fba131da28ce2949f1d335aae1e19
de90a888daeec1bddaebbe9ccc1b004bb1d931d9
describe
'34243' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAQ' 'sip-files00278.pro'
1fb634bf48c57a1d9f9d25ceee68d47d
2bd20e136cddff7730f0f87c80ad7e0cdf77bcc9
'2011-08-18T17:11:40-04:00'
describe
'44845' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAR' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
f9ffab1b45afc26c5d47c54d5b8ad85b
83b40fc47658f158861f398fa7049a9a5b983644
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAS' 'sip-files00278.tif'
a9bdc8090051e96d538912ed840fd969
e43e0e3fad1b79eaa98df1da54b85fdbbe3b1a55
'2011-08-18T16:54:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAT' 'sip-files00278.txt'
84713d73702267c0789fd9eb0e388c46
39608a07b16a2050d3865c3d296781533a7f8280
'2011-08-18T17:09:22-04:00'
describe
'13065' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAU' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
5279f6c31321118a3baa045e1face1db
764b4372659cd18a4d5ce86f049eefff5943c08b
'2011-08-18T17:07:47-04:00'
describe
'900491' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAV' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
cb3105461d06241ca8d6c83ef2fd9930
f1e6bee3188c58d5f80d05810f75af34c7dab677
describe
'89789' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAW' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
7e7da10bcf074f9b607604464cb9a624
342d4446e3fcf1124ae88c615f040eae23de3472
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAX' 'sip-files00279.pro'
caf6d33bccf355dc9c3bebeba4f944df
5b2ebc51d325e499240ea551af6d2c2eeaf687e4
describe
'32249' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAY' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
071c366602b170798d896aec3b2f15c0
4aa66ba2dcc2c12d277bd00a39896330d3bc1ac3
'2011-08-18T17:07:35-04:00'
describe
'7212683' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUAZ' 'sip-files00279.tif'
a621a4386edc66d3e98fd62c6fe76f04
5783fb5871ca16c6870ccb49e5d3cbe547a2937e
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBA' 'sip-files00279.txt'
bcefe07a649621ac88709b15bbde7cfa
225bf73a80e7c3a26f04e4ef7dd10e41053f5624
'2011-08-18T16:53:49-04:00'
describe
'9773' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBB' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
6f21d29df532509bf0d4914c4e88a7c0
d5d569e471086b003a6b6cf51daa31b2a56ef04b
describe
'891774' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBC' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
e5021ade666c66fbb730b2f7130e7860
257f2b05b3e437ef4b8d61c4d735957772e9863c
'2011-08-18T16:52:59-04:00'
describe
'115020' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBD' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
5ade8467e72d8b4240dcf31e38321f82
87c467fac6dd81fbd81cc284513366c0df9cf842
describe
'31891' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBE' 'sip-files00280.pro'
40ba6e6b428b2b85a3d4863ca8f076fb
a10be72959d8d2c07ec81cabcaa9304bb53287bc
describe
'44942' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBF' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
2c29a2d42bfbfc69430bc13f6f5b688b
7405ec6e71169f648b336878e6c905e8d3ea79c9
describe
'7143451' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBG' 'sip-files00280.tif'
36ac9d9049908477652323d1ee15fe86
c2a7af2242ffc7271b3d468b157c7532bdc0c0ee
'2011-08-18T17:11:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBH' 'sip-files00280.txt'
a528ce902cdf654a31c47bbe23dd685c
5ccf6352fc3284f54b4d6ee3c28537df0d771c8b
describe
'12367' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBI' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
cb756f1a36e0aaf159b32cb6ac6a0d1a
93305bdc4deb7420a3e273cb2624b5e6af708eab
describe
'887887' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBJ' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
6ae30487876041a1218c82f1c2be1e0d
6d9d6ca41a65cc9cd8b97d1b06b413878fc03615
describe
'115533' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBK' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
ac5213393daf6d49cfe5fdd6acb7dc0d
41463a4250c2069793222a54432364ddeed54938
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBL' 'sip-files00281.pro'
a2c933c4e9bcd007bbb153dc9ae89bbb
ba457d8fa499f1cdc62b2daf80d8bc678bb573ed
describe
'44326' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBM' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
2d309952343adacf068bfc5f496b74e9
f4e7bfaf1c084fb9d06517e63fb569a36fd5f816
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBN' 'sip-files00281.tif'
5025a39d87f59107ebbe4c1a63593b91
8d185c1e5d81f27417aed50646cd80ee0c271b62
'2011-08-18T16:55:13-04:00'
describe
'1383' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBO' 'sip-files00281.txt'
2fd0e6341bd46b69720786d6dfff0af9
ead0a046c22a236416e43bb67a4b335437b829f1
describe
'12577' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBP' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
881cc086d57764012685aafe3cacda55
5259ed54f18379106f0cb1c4ee8c5bb30e72d189
describe
'878555' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBQ' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
cd65af362a27923cc0deacafd0b619c9
1f22c86c850903ecb859dbecc1feb871fa156b64
describe
'116497' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBR' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
c6ccfcbbdfd89078310705845cc7b02f
467ce164f9c0ae6b8181c92a837f03c40d6c8884
describe
'32500' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBS' 'sip-files00282.pro'
5ecedbf922a689607363aa936111bc10
3c089588059360aa95c4b03cb769246bfe51eba8
describe
'44731' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBT' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
d6c845e8ec3368f856a2f6ee3d7fb325
88c254747ae67dbafeff3693151b4853e34acca5
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBU' 'sip-files00282.tif'
0c94ad795d1d22f9c83fadcfaf508b76
493c45b9c72af5ee988ac85cd0eaedcf94823497
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBV' 'sip-files00282.txt'
a3c461206a8ce65db89aa748f97f4232
905e3a6cbbb081ab66c883c33cd01e2c462bb2f8
'2011-08-18T17:11:51-04:00'
describe
'12584' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBW' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
39a3f865f2e4cc4f961ae390e5891c42
c2b74adf9eb0d9a3ad764f932191576b29d5e795
describe
'967027' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBX' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
6837f5c7a8b532a091d883d11d8e985d
37fb117d406d35064aef8d180987534bfa98c27d
'2011-08-18T17:04:54-04:00'
describe
'86361' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBY' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
dbd848aa6dc0e0d4635584d5706bc3f5
8f4973a9ecc03294c7905eb48eb4e357ce5f0e33
'2011-08-18T16:43:44-04:00'
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUBZ' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
318d44871d58a71ec3dc88a4698bd421
62fb85a0028257dd29fec090403dd3e812c354c1
describe
'19111' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCA' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
3e44cede1f6114a7af29f8436be60bc6
6c582d941ff4a9f2349b2d43c18c69488a27d883
describe
'23211092' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCB' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
1fbc4dda4df10e07af4e3a4df2bb59c5
5241d5ed6132d04745335d11b9c6a6cc3ae4ec9b
'2011-08-18T16:59:10-04:00'
describe
'4525' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCC' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
abeb55cdcbd1d6bcb56e531c4f347b37
04eedbbc93305251810e950c0135ab49a8424f43
describe
'939695' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCD' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
cb5646813ed2c168bf2d51ac73026033
56a5f204ffc2d3a2b81d326ed0cefb206867a268
describe
'89592' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCE' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
7c258eb306f71704b6abaef9a7545dd4
de7e36fc5e6ff5174ab4df8a32ba626e0c13154a
describe
'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCF' 'sip-filescover4.pro'
15c3ff4dd5456d956b118de3192183bf
f8acbfc9940b878960fda2d7278afd98bf262195
describe
'19473' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCG' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
5f59e92c34bc602ea4743f46d9e88622
af3d21cb18e335b7b69412b9cbb74bc981479f2c
describe
'22562636' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCH' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
6153a8c263624698ae8cbff358ccc58a
0e3d0b09bc3583dd8b8d304b9908e0c1b64ebd95
describe
'4481' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCI' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
0aa82168359ba1ca392faa50dccbc0b4
61c407a8926ce9afed386874f4aaa16ed4adbdfe
describe
'47658' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCJ' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
74bd037d6ef0181592f13248917a33f2
7b03566d0d2903f8d26d27a01c0e6e68460bdd3c
describe
'46452' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCK' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
189fc4fe54ecc82d9b4f5f935ed55cee
7498950165051a7c0e3d7f167ef516e1b9e6d68e
describe
'542' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCL' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
7391c16a1c7927519ea64ada40fdadec
4c8b7ac40c6d7c5611aa350be76bdb921f77699a
describe
'10763' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCM' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
28b188ae0cf1ef20b2db4480f2225bfb
21bdfc5479959daae38241413b40cee3c86bd28b
'2011-08-18T16:44:58-04:00'
describe
'1145440' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCN' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
08a6b5cd2386db4980b58437a7fa4110
ff9f8a97e28af73e0206afb14cadab07d5437ec8
describe
'60' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCO' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
038ecbeb5f0d80ee04f74227519bd6fe
8d55e98fc4119b4a590de713a92d3e49cc7806d0
describe
'4059' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCP' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
d93a66519ac72b0c1db2598c3efdfb22
2cd3b2d9ae0b144aea612d52e7ceeb2fdfa1e505
describe
'473040' 'info:fdaE20080804_AAAAASfileF20080804_AABUCQ' 'sip-filesUF00002785_00001.mets'
db07a19323fc9ba163b50708321fbd68
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describe
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PLR el

Pe ole

oop eect te



LESSONS

HOUSES, FURNITURE, FOOD,
CLOTHING.

Â¥

BEING THE SECOND VOLUME

OF THE

INSTRUCTOR.



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THR COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.

NEW AND IMPROVED EDITION.

LONDON:
1852.
JOHN W. PARKER AND SON, WEST STRAND.



PRICE TWO SHILLINGS.

CONTENTS.

DWELLING-HOUSES, AND THE ARTICLES USED
IN BUILDING THEM.

|
j
}
|
|

Page
How to build a House............ 1
Bricks—Tiles—Slate............... 6
Stone—Marble—Lime............ 10
Timber used in Building......... 14
Metals used in Building :
Te eeeibin’ 19
ed ical cossceaunds 23

Page
Plaster, Paint, and Paper-

THE FURNITURE OF A DWELLING-HOUSE.

Household Furniture ............ 49
Mahogany :...........ccccsseeeeeeees 55
Metal Furniture: Iron......... 60
Cutlery :

Knives and Forks ............ 64
Scissors, Razors, and Pen-

ead aha kakdaehaiein 67
Od ee tcl 71
Ts cindinihindociansareaecens 74
Copper and Brass ............... 78
Copper and Brass Furniture... 81
How Buttons are made......... 85
Silver—Plate...................ece0 87
RS laden ictal AMER ceine's ke 93
FE I cnicvcndsasiabsbiccseoceenes 97
The Looking Glass ............... 102
REN dents saseabisiernessenscoseds 104
Earthenware................. ili 108
Earthenware (continued) ...... 111
A China Tea-cup .................. 114
sss ccscsecccessenees 118

| RAMNQAMY ns eeeeeesceeeeseeesenees 26
| Window-glass.......:........:::0006 29
How Water is obtained ......... 33
WN Ec tdscccicteeeestovecsces 38
| Lighting a Fire ..................... 4l
| What are Coals? ...........000... 45
TEs cnindsnitenccvacctiacns 123
FE II ie oscccanseninn saunheensne 128

Articles used in Cleaning :
Pearl-ash — Soda— Soap ... 131

How a Needle is made ......... 137
How a Pin is made............... 141
Clothes: Spinning and Weav-

AE: siichstiiniinetiibinindebandadens 145
Flax and Limen..................... 149
Linen (continued)............c06008 152
Cotton Clothing .................. 155
Cotton Clothing (continued)... 159
Silk and the Silk-Worm......... 164
Be GR a ciee. ss cscvccedgcesese 169
Woollen Clothing.................. 172

Woollen Clothing (continued) :
Broad-cloth and Stockings . 175

Lace Making.....................555 178
A Straw Bonnet .................. 182
A Beaver Hat .........0000...00006 186
GRBOD ....00cccncccnecd de qaltnnoes 190
—e ell

- Vv CONTENTS.

LESSONS ON FOOD.

Page
Of Food in general ...........-.+ 193
The Corn-Field.........-+::++-16++ 194
The Flour-Mill .........-.:-+++++++ 198
Bread .......ccccseeseeeeeeereeeeeeeees 202
Rice ..c.cseeceecseeeeecenseeceeereres 205
Meat .c.c...ccceceeseeeeeeerereeeeees 209
Milk—Butter—Cheese ......... 213
Poultry ......ccccceceeseeeeeeeseess 218
Fish .......ccccecceccsecerceeeeeereeeees 223
I i dc biieeepechobogt ener 228
Vegetables ......-:::.cescceceerseee 232
Brewing—Malt and Hops...... 237
Beer... .ccccccceceseecsseneenveecsers 241

Fruits (continwed) ......0+-ee 249
Wine-making ......-0:..esse eer 254
MOR oo. .cccceccccescereseesceesscoseres 260
Gugar .......cceeseeeeeeesssereeeeeres 265
Coffee; Chocolate .............+- 270
Spices .........sseseeeereeneeerteeeeees 274
Foreign-Fruits; the Orange,
Lemon, and Olive ............ 279
Dried Fruits ; Raisins and Cur-
FONTS o...cccecscosccovcecvesceces 282
British Commerce ........+0++++ 285
DWELLING-HOUSES.

AND

THE ARTICLES USED IN BUILDING THEM.



k ‘—~ meas
id x

Lussow I. How to Build a Bouse.

HovsEs are built: of bricks, mortar, tiles, slate,
stone, wood, and iron.
Cottages are small houses; mansions are large

houses.
A few houses built near each other make a

village: many houses built together form a town,
or a city.

A street is two rows of houses with a road
between them: most villages have but one
street: towns and cities have many streets.

Il, 7 ae B
2 HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE.

A church is a building dedicated to the public
service of God. A cathedral church has a
bishop’s throne. |

Every village or town has at least one church:
some large townsand cities have many churches.
In England, a townwhich has a cathedral church
is called a city.¢
_ Many persons are employed to build a house ;
as the bricklayer, plasterer, carpenter, plumber,
glazier, painter, and paper-hanger.

When men begin to build a house, they dig
out the ground, and lay bricks in rows, one upon
another, with mortarspread betweenthem. The
bricks first laid are called the foundation of the
house; and the rows of bricks are called walls. ©

Every house is surrounded by walls, and is
divided into stories or floors; and the stories
are divided into rooms. The lowest, or under-
ground part, is the cellar. The kitchen is also
under-ground in many houses. The story above
it, level with the earth, is called the ground-
floor; next is the first-floor: above this is the -
second-floor : and so on, until the top-floor, over
- which is placed the roof.

_ As the walls are built, strong beams of wood
are let into the brick-work, and supported by
upright posts. Upon these beams are placed’
smaller beams of wood, called rafters; and

â„¢~
\ "
~ \

HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 3

across the rafters are laid planks to form the
floors. Steps of wood, called stairs, lead from
floor to floor, and have side-railing, called
balusters, to prevent accidents by falling.

Frames*of wood for doors and windows, or
door and window-cases as they are called, are
also built in with the brick-work. Chimneys,
or passages for smoke, are built in the walls;
and slabs of stone for hearths, or fire-places,
are laid down with the floor.

The roof is commonly ofa sloping form, so
as to cause the rain to run off through pip



the ground. The roof consists of rafters, across.”

which are fastened thin slips of wood, or laths;
and upon these are placed tiles or slates. The
chimneys rise above the roof to convey away
the smoke. | |
When the outside walls androof of the house
are finished, the plasterer covers the inner walls
and top of the rooms with laths, upon which he
spreads plaster. The top is then called the ceiling,
The chimney-piece, or mantel, ‘of stone or
marble, is next placed at the opening of the
chimney into the room; and an iron stoye-grate
is fixed there, for holding the fire. ts
_ The small wooden frames of the wingows are
next glazed, or filled with gloss; so that we may.
see through them the beautiful hills, trees, and
B 2

\
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE.

green fields. These windows are also made to
open, in order to admit fresh air into the room,
and keep it healthy.

The doors of wood are so hung, as to open
and shut, on moveable pieces of iron, called
hinges, fixed in one post; and they are fastened
by locks and bolts, which are thrust into the
other post.

Many thousands of nails, or little pieces of
iron, are used by the carpenter to fasten the
wood-work together throughout the house.

When the bricklayers and carpenters have
finished, the painter spreads over the wood-
work, with a brush, a mixture called paint; this
gives a cheerful appearance to the room, and
preserves the wood.

In this manner a house is prepared for dwell-
ing, or living in. Fire is next lighted in the
grates, and smoke is seen rising from the chim-
neys above the roof.

When the plaster of the walls is dry, the
paper-hanger covers them with paper of different
colours and patterns. Some of these patterns
are almost as amusing as pictures.

The several rooms being ready for furnishing,
the floors are covered with carpets, or painted
cloth, called floor-cloth. In the lower rooms are .
placed chairs, tables, and other furniture; and
“Sa
HOW TO BUILD A HOUSE. 5 &
in the upper rooms, or chambers, are placed
bedsteads and beds, on which persons sleep.
Curtains, or blinds, are often added to the win-
dows, by which the glare of the sun can be shut
out during the day; and shutters keep off the
cold air by night.

Such are some of the contrivances which en-
able us to enjoy close shelter from wet and cold,
with health and comfort. Though the con-
trivances are our own, let us not forget that the
power to contrive is given to us by God; and
that the goodness of God causes the earth to
supply all the materials with which a house is
built. Let us then give to the Creator the praise
which is due.

QUESTIONS.

Of what articles are houses chiefly
built ?

How do men begin to build a
house ?

In what manner is a house di-
vided ?

How is the wood-work fastened
together ?

How do you ascend from one floor
to another ?

Describe a chimney.

Of what form is the top or roof of
a house ?

How are doors made to open
and shut, and how are they
fastened ?

With what articles is a house ge-
nerally furnished ?

What is the principal enjoyment
which a house affords ?

How do we contrive to build a
house ?

To what source are we indebted
for the materials with which a
house is built?


iP a
DB). anne LiL $-—~——-

Lesson IT. Bricks ; Tiles ; Slate.

Berore the art of making bricks was known in
England, houses were built of wood and stone,
and covered with reeds or straw, or heavy slabs
of stone. Houses are now generally built with
bricks, and covered with tiles or slates.

Bricks are made of clay, which is a kind of
earth, and is dug in many places. Clay is very
abundant round London, and millions of bricks
are made in the neighbourhood every year.

Bricks are made in open fields,in avery simple
manner. The clay is first mixed into a paste
with water, and with ashes, such as you see in
the fire-place. -Recollect that the remains of a

coal-fire, or ashes, are used to make bricks for
building houses.
BRICKS—TILES—SLATE. 7

The clay, or paste, when it has been made
ready by a woman for moulding, is handed to
the brickmaker, who stands beside the woman
before a bench.

‘he mould is a box of wood, fitting upon a
bottom, fixed to the brickmaker’s bench. ‘The
workman first sprinkles a little sand over the
mould: he then throws into it the clay, which
he works with his fingers, so as to fill up the
corners of the mould; then, with a wetted stick,
he scrapes off the clay level with the sides of the
mould. He next lifts the mould from the bench,
and shakes out of itthe newly-formed brick upon
a piece of board. Itis then placed upon a wheel-
barrow by a child, and when a certain number
of bricks are thus made, they are removed by
another workman to a place for drying. ‘The
engraving at the head of this lesson shows brick-
makers at work.

The workman whoshapes the bricks is calleda
moulder. An industrious moulder can,in along
summer's day, mould from five to six thousand
bricks. Butto do this, hemust begin at five o’clock
in the morning,and work till eight o’clock atnight.

The bricks are next placed in rows, one above
another, and at a little distance apart, so that the
air is admitied between the bricks to dry them.
They are, to prevent their drying too fast, and to
8 BRICKS—TILES—SLATE.

keep off rain, covered with straw. In fine weather
they will become, in a few days, hard onouges to
be removed for baking.

Bricks are commonly baked in stacks, made of
the bricks themselves, with cinders scattered be-
tween each layer. At one end of the stack is the
fire place, from which run flues, or open passages,
through the pile of bricks. The flues are filled
with wood, coals, and cinders. The fire is then
lighted, and spreading throughout the whole
stack, it bakes the bricks. -

Bricks are likewise baked in a kiln; that is,
by placing them upon flat arches, within walls,
and lighting a fire beneath them. The bricks are
thus left until the flame appears at the top of the
kiln, when the fire is slackened, and the kiln is
allowed to cool. This heating and cooling is
repeated until the bricks are sufficiently baked.
A kiln will hold about twenty thousand bricks.

Tiles, of various kinds and forms, are made
of finer clay than bricks; but they are moulded
and baked in a similar manner.

Slate for roofing houses is found in rocks of a
coarser kind of slate. The pits in which it is dug
are called quarries. Many of these quarries are
in North Wales, and in the following counties of
England: Westmoreland, Yorkshire, Leicester-
shire, Cornwall, and Devonshire.
BRICKS—-TILES—SLATE. 9

That slate which has the smoothest surface,
and splits into the thinnest plates, is best for
covering houses. ‘The slate used for writing is
of a still finer kind.

A slate-quarry is a great curiosity; and the
masses of slate, when the sun shines on them,
exhibit all the beautiful colours of the rainbow.

The pieces of slate are split from the rock by
iron bars and large hammers; they are next
shaped with edged iron tools, and scraped
smooth with a piece of thin steel. The slates
are then conveyed away in iron wagons upon
rail-roads. ‘These are roads which have iron-
work grooves, or ruts, in which the wheels of
the wagons run. Whart mare 0) B. .. BR

Great quantities of slate are sent every year
from North Wales, in ships, many thousand
miles across the sea to North America; for, in
North America, as well as in England, slate is
used for roofing housesg,

QUESTIONS.

What are bricks made of? — How are bricks baked in stacks ?
How is a_ brick shaped or | How are bricks baked in kilns ?
moulded ? What are tiles made of ?
How many bricks can an indus- | In what places is slate found?
trious man mould in a day? How are slates prepared for roof-
How are bricks prepared for ing houses ?
baking ? Where are slates sent to by sea?
10

Lesson ITI. Stone ; Marble; Lime.

STONE is dug out of deep pits, or quarries, in
many parts of the country. In Somersetshire
and Gloucestershire is found a kind called Bath
Stone, from the city of Bath being built with it.
Another kind of stone is found in the isle of Port-
land, on the south-western coast of England, and
is called Portland Stone. St. Paul’s Cathedral,
Somerset House,and many other public buildings
in London, are constructed with Portland Stone.
A third kind of stone is brought from Yorkshire.

Stone is found in immense rocky masses.
These are shaped into blocks, which are cut into
thin pieces with saws. Some stone is as soft as
paste when it is taken from the quarry, but it
becomes hard on being exposed to the air. ‘This
kind does not long keep its beautiful white or
yellowish colour, but soon decays.

All these kinds of stone are employed in
building churches and mansions. They are also
used for chimney-pieces and hearths of fire-
places, the steps of doors, and the sills of
windows, in houses. |

Stone is chipped into elegant forms by work-
men, called masons, with a mallet and chisel. In
this manner, also, are cut the letters upon tomb-
stones in churchyards.
STONE—MARBLE—LIMRF. ll

The labour of cutting and chipping stone is
very tedious. Wéften takes many weeks, and
even months, to form one pillar, such as we see
at the entrance to a church.

A very hard and lasting kind of stone, called
granite, is sometimes used for paving streets, and
for building. London and Waterloo bridges are
built with this durable stone. It is speckled,
black, white, and red ; and it glitters beautifully
when the sun shines upon it.

Marble is a more beautiful kind of stone than
-any yet mentioned. It is found in quarries, in
large blocks or masses; and is so fine in grain
that it is easily polished.

Marble is used for mantel-pieces and hearths,
and sometimes for floors. ‘There are many va-
rieties cf marble. Seme kinds are of one colour,
as white or black; others have stains, streaks,
and veins, of different colours. ‘That marble
which is quite white is most prized.

Beds of marble are common in most of the
mountainous countries of Europe. In England,
Derbyshire affords the greatest quantity and
finestkinds. Westmoreland and Devonshire also
yield fine varieties; and a beautiful green kind
is found in Anglesey, an island in Wales.

The finest kind of marble, used for mantel-
pieces, is called statuary, and is sometimes orna-
12 STONE—~MARBLE—LIME.

mented with elegant figures. These are sculp-
tured, or cut out from the suffe of the marble,
with sharp chisels, and they occupy much time
in cutting.

Marble is likewise used for tombs, and for
pillars in churches, temples, and palaces. The
purest marble is used for busts and statues,
such as are to be seen in churches, palaces, and
museums.

Lime is of important use in building, espe-
cially in making mortar, to spread between the
bricks. ‘To make mortar, the bricklayer pours
water upon quick lime, when it swells, cracks,
and becomes a white powder ; it is next mixed
with sand in hard and sharp grains, The mortar
thus made is used without delay, and, in time,
becomes nearly as hard as the bricks between
which it is spread. Mortar always contains
more sand than lime; and without the sand
mortar would not harden,

Lime is also used in making plaster and
whitewash, with which the walls and ceilings
of houses are covered.

Lime is likewise much used in making cement.
Good cement, spread over brick-work, becomes,
in a short time, as hard as stone. Houses built
of brick, and covered with this cement, are often
made to look as handsome as if built of stone.
=

STONE—MARBLE—LIME. 13

Lime is made by burning limestone in kilns,
which may bg s oking in many parts of the
open country. lime-kiln is a hollow building,
in the shape of a cup or a wine-glass upside down.
It is open at the top, and has a grate at the
bottom, above which is aniron door. Inthe grate
is placed fuel, as wood and coal, upon which is
laid limestone broken in pieces not larger than
the fist; upon the limestone is placed more wood
or coal; then limestone again, and so on, keeping
the kiln always full. The fire being lighted, the
pieces of limestone fall towards the bottom of the
kiln, as the fuel is burnt; and, in about forty-
eight hours, the limestone thus becomes quick-
lime. Itis then separated from the ashes of the



- fuel, and is ready for the bricklayer’s use.

The natural history of clay, slate, stone, mar-
ble, and lime, belongs to the science called
Geology, or the “ discourse of the earth,” as all
these substances are dug out of the earth.

QUESTIONS.

Why is some stone called Bath | What are the principal kinds of
stone ? marble ?

Why is another kind called Port- | What kinds of marble are found
land stone ? in England ?

For what parts of houses is stone | Name a few of the uses of marble.
employed ? Of what use is lime in building ?

What is granite used for? How is mortar made?

How is lime burnt ?


‘Lesson IV. Timber used in Building.

TREEs which are highly prized for their wood
are called timber. They form forests, which
grow in most countries, and supply the in-
habitants with materials for building houses.

The wood-cutter lays his axe to the root of
the tree, and after many blows, the tree falls.
The branchesare then cut off; the bark, orrough
outer covering, is stripped off; and the trunk of
the tree is cut into posts and planks. The above
engraving represents wood-cutters at work.

But Great Britain is so thickly inhabited,
that her forests would not supply timber enough
to build our houses. We therefore obtain large
quantities of timber from other countries, in
exchange for articles which our own country
produces in abundance.


TIMBER USED IN BUILDING. a

The timber employed in buildingis chiefly oak
and deal. Oak isthe strongest and most lasting
of all timber; and English oak ranks before all
other kinds. It is very durable in air, in earth,
and in water; and it is said that insects of this
country will not eat into the heart of oak so soon
as into other timber. Our finest oaks are raised
in Cumberland and Yorkshire.

Great quantities of white oak-timber are re-
ceived or imported into England from North
America. This oak is much cheaper than the
British ; and it is the kind commonly used in
houses, for the largest beams, and the posts and
sills of doors.

Oaks which grow in thick groups yield the
best beams, posts, and planking; for the trunks
often rise forty or fifty feet without branching out.

Deal, or the wood of the pine-tree, or fir, is
used more commonly than oak in building. Deal
is generally lighter, straighter, and of much
greater length than oak timber. It is also more
easily worked by the carpenter than oak; and
is named “ the Builder’s Timber.” It is called
white deal, red deal, or yellow deal, according
to its colour. |

Pines grow in almost every country, and few
trees are more useful to man. They not only
supply timber for building, when cut down, but
16 TIMBER USED IN BUILDING.

while growing, they yield turpentine which is
used in mixing paint.

The Scotch fir produces better timber than
any other pine; but it grows slowly, and not in
great numbers. Sweden and Norway, two very
cold countries, are nearly covered with forests
of fir-trees. There are also vast forests of firs
in North America. From these countries we
obtain our supply of deals.

The trees are cut down and thrown into the
nearest river, by which they float to the sea,
where they are taken into vessels, and thus
brought to England. In some places, the trees |
float down the river to saw-mills on the banks,
where the trunks are cut into planks before
they are brought to this country.

The most extensive pine-forest in Europe
covers the slopes of the mountains, and the
banks of the rivers, in the middle of Sweden
and Norway. This forest consists chiefly of
Scotch fir, which yields red and yellow deal;
and spruce fir, which yields white deal. Each
tree, when it has been cut down, is conveyed
’ to the water-side on a separate carriage, drawn
by horses, and driven by women. |

Many streams pass from the mountains through
forests of the finest pines. On the banks of these
streams, sawing-mills are built with the rough
TIMBER USED IN BUILDING. 17

trunks of large anager. The mills are worked
by huge wheels, w i¢hvare kept in motion by the
running water. In one of these mills is a
wheel, which drives at once seventy-two saws ;
and the saws are so placed as to divide a whole
tree into planks, in the same time that it would
take to cut a single plank by one saw.

The common mode of dividing a tree into
planks is by two men cutting it through with a
large upright saw; one standing in a pit, and the
other above him, as shown in the engraving at
the end of this lesson. But a saw-mill will cut
timber into planks thirty or forty times faster
than two men can in the above manner.

In some countries, as in Germany, timber is
floated down the rivers in immense rafts, con-
sisting of several layers of trunks of trees, placed
one on the other, and lashed together. These
rafts are often eight hundred feet long, and sixty
feet, wide; and their timber is worth many thou-
sand pounds. Little wooden huts are built upon
them, in which live the workmen and rowers,
who conduct the rafts down the river.

Houses, except the chimneys, are sometimes
built entirely of wood. In countries where the
pine-tree abounds, wooden houses are almost
universal, and last for many ages: stones and
bricks being only used there. for palaces and

II. C
18 TIMBER USED IN BUILDING.

publicbuildings. In Russia; ready-made wooden
houses are sold at fairs: they are set up for show
and taken to pieces for removal.



QUESTIONS.

What trees are called timber? In what respect does the timber of
What timber is chiefly used in Scotch and Spruce fir differ?

building ? Where is the most extensive pine-
In what counties of England does forest in Europe ?

the finest oak grow ? How are trees cut into planks ?
What kind of oak is commonly | How is a saw-mill worked ?

used in building ? Describe a raft of timber ?
Which tree affords deal timber? | In what country are wooden
Where do pines grow? houses most common ?

What kind of fir yields the finest
deal?
19

Lesson V. Metals used in Building:
Tron.

METALS are mostly found in veins, which run
through the earth; nearly as veins may be seen
through the skin, on the back of your hand.
The pits out of which metals are dug, are called
mines; the workmen are called miners; and
to dig in mines is to’ work them.

Metals are seldom found pure, or by them-
selves, They are mixed with other substances,
called ores, from which they must be separated
before they are fit for use.

The metals chiefly used in building, are iron
and lead ; both of which are found in abundance
in Great Britain. Iron is sometimes called the
“king of metals,” and is the most serviceable
of them all.

Iron is separated from the ore by melting in
furnaces; which are immense round buildings,
larger at bottom than above, with huge chimneys.
The ore is taken from the mine, and broken into
pieces; it is then mixed with limestone, and
thrown into the furnace upon lighted fuel. This
fire is blown with vast bellows; when the violent
heat mélts the ore above, while the iron drops
down through the fire, and collects at the bottom

C2
20 IRON.

of the furnace. More ore and fuel are supplied
above, and blown with the bellows, till the melted
metal nearly fills the furnace. It is then let out
by piercing the sides of the furnace; the metal
is allowed to cool, and is then melted again.

Some iron furnaces are two hundred feet
round the outside, and as high as a house with
three floors. ‘They are kept heated or burning
for many months, and even years, by continually
supplying ore; limestone, and fuel. In the ex-
tensive Butterley jron-works, 1 Derbyshire,
upwards of fifteen hundred men are employed,
as miners, furnace-men, and smiths.

Articles are cast by pouring the liquid iron
into moulds, and letting it remain till it is cool.
In this manner are sometimes cast vast beams,
which are used in building houses ; also fire-
grates, knockers, and bolts of doors, railings,
lamp-posts, and water-pipes. Balconies, or rails
before windows, are often cast in elegant forms
of iron. They last longer, and are much lighter
in appearance, than wooden rails.

Large columns are often made of cast-iron,
which are painted to imitate stone. The frame-
work of house-roofs is also sometimes of cast-
‘iron. Southwark and Vauxhall bridges, across
the Thames, and many other bridges in England
and other countries, are of cast-1ron.
IRON. 21

Very large quantities of iron, both cast and
wrought, are now used in the construction of
railways, and of the carriages and engines which
travel on them.

Wrought-iron is that which is heated in a
furnace till it becomes tough. It is then rolled,
hammered, and cut into bars, or thin sheets.
This iron will bend, and can he spread by
beating; but the form of cast-iron can never
be altered.

If we observe the smith at work in his forge,
we shall see that by putting a piece of iron in the
fire, and blowing the coals with the bellows, the
iron soon becomes red-hot, and so soft, that he
can shape it as he pleases: this he does by striking
it upon a block of hardened iron, called an anvil.
Or the smith can weld or join two pieces of iron,
by making them red-hot, and hammering them
together. By quickly dipping into water the
hot iron, the smith cools and hardens the metal,
which is then said to be wrought.

Nails and spikes, which are driven into the
timbers of a house to hold them together, are
made by rolling or slitting iron into rods. These
rods are of various sizes, to make spikes a foot
long, or the smallest nails, a quarter of an inch
in length. The iron rod is made red-hot, and,
while it is hot, each nail is drawn out, cut off,
22 IRON,

and flattened at the head. Another mode of
making nails is from sheet-iron, by a machine
which cuts nine hundred nails in a minute, or
fifty-four thousand nails in an hour.

The carpenter’s tools are mo stly of steel, which
is one of the hardest substances known. Steel
is made of pure iron, heated between charcoal,
and suddenly cooled, when it becomes very hard.
It is then ground upon a stone wheel, to a fine
edge ; in this manner, axes, chisels, saws, and
the like, are made.

Before edge-tools were made of iron and steel,
stones, flints, the horns and bones of animals,
reeds and thorns, were employed for such put-
poses as we now use tools. In some parts of
the world edge-tools are unknown in the present
day: and an axe, a saw, or a chisel, would be
a handsome present to a chief or ruler of the
natives.



QUESTIONS.
Where are metals found ? : In what way are large quantities
Which are the metals chiefly used of iron now employed ?
in building ? How is iron wrought?
Which is the ‘ king of metals?” | What is the difference between
Is iron found in Great Britain ? cast and wrought iron ?
How is iron separated from the | How does a smith join two pieces
ore? of iron?
How is iron cast ? Why does a smith dip the hot iron
What articles in a house are of | into water ?
cast-iron ? How are nails made ?
What other purposes is cast-iron | Of what are carpenters’ edge-tools
applied to? made?


23

Lesson VI. Metals used in Building:
Lead. |

LEAD is employed to cover parts of the roofs of
houses, and to make gutters, pipes, and spouts,

- to carry off rain-water. It is also used for tubes

———— ee ——————eEEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeEeee ee

in pumps, and for pipes to conyey water under-
ground,

Lead is abundantly found in Somersetshire,
Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Northumberland, and
several other parts of Great Britain. The mines
yield not only sufficient lead for our own use,
but large quantities which are exported to other
countries.

To obtain pure lead, the picked ore is broken
and washed. It isthen roasted in afurnace with
coals, so as only to soften it, and cause the im-
purities to rise from the ore like smoke, It is
next melted, when the liquid lead runs out into
moulds, and cools. More ore is then let down
into the furnace, from the top; and the melting
is thus sometimes continued for many days
together.

Sheet-lead is used on roofs,and is either melted
and cast, or rolled out by a mill. To cast sheets,
melted lead is poured upon large tables, with
raised edges. Upon the tables is spread sand,

which soon causes the metal to cool. The lead
24 LEAD.

thus cast, is next passed between two iron
rollers to reduce it to the required thickness.

There are also mills for reducing lead into
sheets by immense rollers, which are worked by
a steam-engine. A sheet of rolled lead, made in
this: manner, is from five to six feet wide, and
weighs about one thousand pounds.

Leaden pipesare made by bending flattedlead
until the edges meet, over an iron or wooden
rod; which on being drawn out, leaves the
passage for the water. Pipes are also cast by
pouring melted lead into a mould, in the middle
of which is a steel rod, to be taken out when
the lead has cooled.

Cisterns, for containing water, are commonly
made of sheet-lead, in wooden cases; but they
are unsafe for this purpose if they are left open
to the air. The water will then become coated
with white rust, which is poisonous. Such water
is therefore unfit for cooking food.

Although lead is in itself poisonous, itis of
important use in the arts. Paint is made from
lead. It is also used as glaze for earthenware.
Lead is likewise employed in making some
kinds of glass, in dyeing, and calico-printing.
These several uses of lead will be described in
future lessons. 3

The leaden toys for children, as coaches,
LEAD. 25

horses, &c., are cast in brass moulds, which
open; and within which are cut the figures to
be produced.

The powder used for polishing stoves is im-
properly named black lead; for it does not con-
tain a particle of lead, but is, in part, iron. It
not only polishes iron, but prevents it rusting
from damp. It is only found in one mine in
England, which is at Borrodale, in Cumberland.
When soft and fine, a pound weight of this sub-
stance is worth several guineas; and one thou-
sand pounds’ worth has been obtained from the
above mine ina day ! Drawing pencils are made
of this mineral: each pencil consisting of two
pieces of cedar-wood, glued together, with the
“lead” in a grove between them.

All substances dug out of mines are called
minerals ; and the natural history of such sub-
stances is called Mineralogy,

QUESTIONS.
For what purpose is lead used in | How is sheet-lead made?
building ? How are leaden pipes made ?
In what part of Great Britain is | What is black lead?
lead found ? Can you name any of the purposes
Is lead very abundant in this for which it is used?
country ? What is Mineralogy ?

How is pure lead obtained ?
26.

Lesson VII. Plastering, Painting, and
Paper-hanging.

Tue outer walls of the house are now built;
but much remains to be done before the house
will be fit to live in.

The ceiling and inside walls, which have
been covered with laths, are next plastered.
This is done by covering the laths with team T
mixed with hair; the use of the hair being to
make the plaster bind or hold together.

This coating is covered with finer coats, in
which are mixed fine cement and plaster of Paris,
to make the surface beautifully hard and white.

Ceilings are sometimes ornamented with ele-
gant plaster figures of leaves, flowers, shells,
&c., which are made in moulds, and fixed on
with cement. :

The plasterer uses but few tools to execute
this tasteful work; yet his art is requisite in
every kind of huibdine, With great skill, ‘he
makes plaster to imitate valuable marble, as
well as figures, which it would occupy much
time to cut in stone. ,

Paint is necessary to preserve the outside
woodwork of a house, as the window-frames}
door-posts, doors, &c. If the wood were not
painted, the heat of the sun would soon split it,
PAINT, 27

and fhe rain would cause it to decay, Wet and
the damp of the air would also rust and destroy
iron work, if not painted, Paint is therefore
as useful as it is ornamental.

The substances of which paint is made are
commonly obtained from metals and minerals ;
and the art of preparing them is a branch of
chemistry, White lead, of which white paint
is made, is produced from lead by the fumes of
vinegar, It is mixed with oil and turpentine,
and then becomes paint; and paint of all colours
is similarly prepared for laying on the wood-
work with a brush.

Yet paint is not entirely made of mineral sub-
stances, for the turpentine and oil.are vegetable
juices. Turpentine is extracted from several
trees, and abundantly from the pine, as you have
been told in the lesson on timber; the wood of
the pine-tree is, indeed, so full of turpentine, that
slips of it are burnt instead of candles; and the
oil used in painting is pressed from enon or
the seed of flax. The use of the turpentine aid
oil is to soak into and fill up the pores of the
wood, and to cause the paint to dry and harden.

The painter’s art is more difficult than plas-
tering. He sometimes colours the wood-work of
rooms to imitate fine woods, with beautiful veins
and knots, as they are seen ina plank. Thus
28 | PAPER-HANGING.

doors are painted toimitate mahogany me oak; —
and wood is veined or streaked to resemble —
marble. In these cases the paint is coated with —
varnish, which gives the surface a fine glossy
appearance.

Paper-hanging is an elegant covering for
walls, and increases the warmth of rooms. The —
paper is made from coarse rags, ground with ©
water to a pulp, shaken upon wire net, and
dried upon rollers. It is then stained, or printed, ~
by means of wooden blocks, with various
patterns and colours.

Such patterns often represent curious trees
and flowers, with views of charming countries.
These scenes are printed in their natural colours; |
and they remind us of the beautiful productions
with which God has enriched the earth for the
happiness of his creatures.

QUESTIONS.

What is done after the outer walls | What kind of oil is used in
of the house are finished ? painting, and how is it ob.
How are ceilings plastered ? tained ?
What is the use of hair in plaster? | What is the most difficult branch
What is the principal use of paint of the painter’s art?
on iron and wood-work ? How is paper-hanging made and
Of what does white paint consist? stained ?
What is turpentine, and how is it | What are often the patterns of
obtained ? paper-hanging ?




Lesson VIII. Window Glass.

Grass is one of the most beautiful inventions
ofman. It“ admits the light of the sun, and
excludes the violence of the wind.” Its manu-
> facture is very curious; for, although glass is
) transparent, not one of the materials of which
> it is made is so.
| One of the principal ingredients of all kinds
of glass is silex, or flint, piéces of which are often
seen on roads, or in thousands upon the sea-
shore, or beach. But these flints would be diffi-
cult to break ; and glass-makers use, instead of
them, sea-sand, which is flint already in powder.
Crown glass, used for glazing windows, is
made of fine white sand; kelp, or burnt sea-
weeds, containing soda; and quick-lime. These
30 WINDOW GLASS.

ingredients are melted in pots, placed in the
midst of a strong coal-fire, within a kind of oven.

When the mass is mixed, it is taken out, cooled,
picked over, and washed; it is then called frit.

A certain quantity of old broken glass is next

added to the frit, which is put into melting-pots, -

or ctucibles, to be placed in ihe furnace.

The furnace is a round-topped building, ter-
minating in a wide chitiney ; and is furnished
with holes all round, to put in and take out the
pots. Within this furnace, the frit in the pots

is placed amidst strong flames; it is allowed to ©

remain there until the dross rises to the top,
and is removed; when the mass in the pots
becomes clear, atid the glass is made.

The workman now dips one end of an iron

pipe into a pot, and takes. out glass enough in |

{

’
'

a lump to make a sheet. He then applies his |

mouth to the other end of the pipe, and blows
the soft glass into the form of a globe; just as

bubbles of soap-and-water are blown from a

tobacco-pipe. The globe is next taken from the |
pipe by another workman, upon an iron rod, |

to be flattened into a plate.



The glass is now held upon the rod to one of |

the openings of the furnace, until it has become

hot. The workman then twirls the rod, slowly
at first, and then more and more quickly, when
WINDOW GLASS. 31







the glass is also carried round upon the rod,

until it spreads out and becomes a circular foils
hot table. This spreading of the glass round the
rod may be compared to the circle which
spreads round a stone let fall in a pond of
water. The iron rod is then removed from the.
centre of the plate, and leaves a coarse thick
lump, called the bull’s-eye.

The glass is next placed in another furnace,
and gradually removed from the hottest to the
coolest part, till the plate is cold enough to be
taken out for use. But if the glass be cooled too
suddenly it will be extremely brittle.

The glass being thus made in round pieces, is
divided, and shaped into panes for windows ;
the centie, or bull’s-eye, being mostly used for
osky-lights, or garden-frames.

Glaziers cutglass by passing along its surface,
guided by a ruler, the point of a diamond;
‘which is the hardest substance known, and cuts .
or scratches every other.

- The clearest glass used for windows is called
plate glass, from its being cast upon metal
) plates, as lead is cast upon tables.

Plate glass is composed of fine white sand,
soda, and lime ; two metallic substances, named
manganese and cobalt; and fragments of good
‘glass. “These ingredients are melted together,
382 WINDOW GLASS.

and poured upon a hot copper-plate, upon a —
table. As the glass spreads, all roughnesses are
pressed out by passing a roller over it. The
glass is then removed to an oven, to be heated
and cooled gradually. Lastly, it is polished, by
grinding two plates together with finely-pow-
dered flints. |

It is difficult to produce a perfect plate of ©
glass, without specks, bubbles, or waves; and —
this makes a large plate very expensive.

The superiority of plate-glass windows to those —
of common glass is very great. Objects seen
through plate glass appear of their real forms,
as if no glass were before them; but when seen
through common glass, they seem more or less _
out of shape. Plate glass is also thicker, and
less liable to be broken, than common glass.

Glass is fastened into window-frames with a
kind of paste, called putty, made of whiting
and drying oil; it soon hardens, and will last
securely for many yéars.

QUESTIONS.

What is the principal ingredient of | How is window glass made in

glass ? round plates ?
Why is sand used instead of flints | How is glass divided?

in making glass ? Of what ingredients is plate glass
Of what ingredients is window made ?

glass made ? Why is plate glass so expensive ?
How is glass blown? In what respect is plate glass

superior to common glass?






Lesson IX. How Water ts obtained.

> Water is one of the greatest blessings which
' God has given to his creatures. It supports
every living thing. Neither man, nor any other
} animal that exists on the earth, could live without
/ water; and trees and plants would soon wither
~ and die, if they were not supplied with it.
Water is found in seas, rivers, lakes, and
| springs. Sea-water is salt and bitter, disagree-
If. D
34 HOW WATER IS OBTAINED.






able to the taste, and unfit for the drink of man, ©
Water from springs and rivers is tasteless and
fresh, and is used for domestic purposes. Al- ;
most every house 1s supplied with this kind of ©
water, for drinking, washing, and cooking food. 4
It is employed in brewing beer, making tea, and ~
boiling provisions. a

Springs are little collections of water, flowing
through cracks beneath the surface of the earth. —
Sometimes this water rises, and forms springs
above ground; as we often see them in beauti-
ful green valleys, and by the road-side, in the
country. To ensure @ better supply of water
than such springs afford, wells are dug to a great
depth in the earth, so as to reach these springs,
and sink so much below them as to form a store, —
or reservoir, of the water under-ground,

The form of the well is generally circular;
and to prevent the earth crumbling down, or
falling in from the sides, the well is lined with:
brick-work. As the water seldomrises to a great
height, there is letdown into it a bucket, fastened :
to a rope ona roller across the mouth of the |
well: when the bucket is filled, it is drawn up
by winding the rope again on the roller. Some
times two buckets are used; when, by drawing
one bucket up to be emptied, you cause the
other to descend to be filled. |

eo
HOW WATER IS OBTAINED. 35


















Wells are dangerous places, and many lives
have been lost by persons falling into them: we
should therefore be careful in approaching them.

They are of different depths, varying from a few
' feet, when only sunk to obtain the water froma
\land-spring, sometimes to three or four hun-
dred feet deep, when sunk or bored for the
‘deep-seated springs. The air at the bottom of
\deep wells is unwholesome.
_ The pump is a safer contrivance for drawing
“water than the bucket; as the mouth of the
‘well is not open when the pump is used. A
“pump consists of a hollow pipe, which is placed
‘in the well; and the water is drawn up the pipe
‘by a sucker, which is worked up and down by
ae handle.
Cities are generally built upon the banks of
rivers, from which water is conveyed to the
houses through pipes under-ground. Thus,
London is built upon the banks of the Thames;
4and, from the Thames and other rivers, this vast
‘city is supplied with upwards of twenty-nine
‘zillions of gallons of water every day.
| The mode of supplying houses with water is
‘ery simple. The water is first collected into a
“reservoir, or large basin, high above ground; it
“as then forced through the pipes, which are under
‘ground, and it rises through them to the same

D2
36 HOW WATER IS OBTAINED.

height as the reservoir. By these means every
room in a house may be supplied with water.
Water is hard or soft. Spring-water is hard,
and unfit for washing; but it is more refreshing
as drink than soft water, from the air which it
contains. This causes the bubbles to sparkle in
a glass of pump-water. Its hardness is caused
by its having flowed through lime in the earth;
and it is known that one grain of lime will
change two thousand gallons of soft into hard
water. River-water is soft, and rain-water is
still softer. Springsdo not freeze, because the
hardest frosts penetrate but a few inches into
the earth. Thus, water never ceases to flow




ii ee

ee a i ela

ne

A ee

HOW WATER IS OBTAINED. 37

under ground in the most severe weather; but
above ground, water freezes in pipes, and often
bursts them.

In some places, water is obtained by boring
the earth, and pushing down pipes until the

spring is reached; when the water rises up

through the pipes in abundance. These are
called Artesian wells.

How wonderful are the wisdom and goodness
of God displayed in the provision of water;
wonderful is the dispensation by which the
springs and rivers of the earth are made to sup-
ply the wants of man and the lower animals;
and by which the rains of heaven are sent to
make fruitful the fields and valleys, for man’s
subsistence and enjoyment!

QUESTIONS. | .-

Why is water one of the greatest | Describe a pump.
blessings we enjoy? Why is a pump a safe contrivance
Where is water found ? for drawing water ?

In what respect does sea-water | How are large cities supplied with
differ from that of rivers and water ?

springs ? Why does pump-water sparkle in
Describe a spring. a glass ?
Why are wells dug ? Why is spring-water hard °®
How is water drawn out of a! Which is the softest water ?
well? Why do not springs freeze ?

Do wells vary much in depth ? What are Artesian wells ?
38

Lesson X. Uses of Fire.

THE important uses of fire in various arts have
been already explained. Without fire we could
not prepare the materials for building a house.

Bricks could not be made without fire to bake
them. Metals could not be melted or wrought
without the heat of the furnace, and the smith’s
fire. Iron and lead would be useless, if they
were not separated from their ores by fire.
Carpenters’ tools could not be made to cut
without heat; and glass would be mere powder,
unless melted by fire. The attentive reader
has observed all these uses of fire in the pre-
ceding lessons.

Fire ensures us the countless comforts of heat
and light within doors. We enjoy its warmth
from the cheerful blaze of the parlour hearth;
and its beautiful light from the steady flame of
the candle or lamp.

Heat from fire makes dreary winter an agree-
able season: and when the sun hides his face,
and darkness covers the earth, the taper or lamp
lights up the air. Thus light adds to the length
of our lives, by making hours pleasant and
useful, which must otherwise be lost in dark-
ness, and given to inactivity or sleep.

It is to fire that we are indebted for almost

|
:
we

USES OF FIRE. 39

every comfort that we enjoy throughout the day.
Thus, our food owes its savour and nourishment
to heat. Bread could not be baked, if the oven
were not heated by fire. The refreshing drink
which forms our morning’s repast could not be
made without the aid of fire; for water must be
heated before it will extract the flavour of the
tea-leaf, or coffee-seed. By heat alone the meats
of the dinner are fitted for our use, as in boiling
and roasting; and most vegetables would be un-
wholesome without boiling. Beer, that refreshes
us when we are fatigued, is brewed by the aid of
heat. Cleanliness and health are promoted by
the washing of clothes, in which heat is neces-
sary. By heat many medicines are extracted
from plants, to restore health to the sinking
patient. And, when we are laid upon the bed
of sickness, what is more cheering to our droop-
ing frame than warm nourishment?

In all these domestic uses, fire is seen to ad-
vantage; and its other benefits are too numerous
to be explained here. But the effects of fire are
sometimes terrific from accident or carelessness ;
when a spark escapes from a blazing fire, orfrom
a lighted candle, it sometimes falls on something
which takes light, and fills the room with smoke
and flame. The fire spreads from floor to floor,
flames burst from the windows, and rise through
40 ACCIDENTS FROM FIRE.

the roof to the sky. In their progress, they
burn all the furniture and wood-work of the
house; and only the walls remain.

Let children beware of approaching too near
& blazing fire, or carelessly using a candle. The
sparks or flame of either will sometimes set their
clothes in a blaze; and the fire, if it be not
extinguished, will burn them to death. Playing
with fire, as lighting wood and paper, has caused
the destruction of many houses, and the loss of
many lives.

When accidents occur, and the clothes are on |
fire, it is recommended to wrap a table-cover, a
piece of carpet, a hearth-rug, a blanket, or any
other woollen substance, round the body; and
to avoid all currents of air, particularly an open
door or window. The person should also lie
down; else the flame will ‘soon ascend to the
arm-pits and throat, and thus cause death.

QUESTIONS.
Mention a few of the most im- | When is fire terrific?
portant uses of fire. Why is playing with fire dan-
What are the comforts of fire ? gerous ?

Of what use is fire in preparing | What should be done when the
food ?- clothes catch fire?
41

Lesson XI. Lighting a Fire.

THE common method of obtaining fire is by
striking flint and steel together, and thus pro- #
ducing a shower of sparks. By the violence o
the striking small portions of the flint and steel
fly off; the particles of the steel burn in passing
through the air, and form the sparks. These set
fire to the tinder, or burnt linen; from which, on
applying a match dipped in sulphur, we easily
_ obtain a flame, as sulphur readily takes fire.
In countries where the above use of flint, steel,
and sulphur is unknown, savages light their fires
_ byrubbing together two pieces of wood; in doing
_ which much time is lost. The saving of time by
_ lighting a match, therefore, shows the advantages
of acivilized country, like that in which we live,
over countries where the arts are unknown. _
In lighting a fire, we employ three.articles,
_ paper,wood, and coals. Paper being most easily
lighted, is first laid in the grate ; over this are
placed small sticks of wood,which soon take fire
from the lighted paper ; and above the wood are
laid coals.
_ At first, a thick smoke rises from the fire.
_ This is caused by the moisture of the wood, and
the pitchy damp of the coals; but the smoke
1s soon carried up the chimney by the draft of

LL

—— oe Eee eee eee ee
42 LIGHTING A FIRE.

air in the apartment, through the bars of the
grate.

As the fire increases, this thick smoke becomes
flame ; and the coals continuing to burn become
cinders, or red-hot without flame; the cinders
next fall to ashes, which are applied to useful
purposes, as the making of bricks; or they are
scattered over land to render it more productive.

A pair of house-bellows is asimple contrivance
for increasing the draught of air through a fire.

> 2y . “ae

This:causes it to burn brighter, and is called |
blowing the fire. The form of the bellows is |

well known, and it works as follows :—

When the top board is lifted up, the piece of
stiff leather, which covers the hole underneath,
is also lifted, and air is drawn into the bellows.

ge

Then, if the top board be pressed down, the air —

within will close the leather over the hole, so

that such air can only escape through the pipe |

or nozle to the fire.

By the chimney, the smoke is conducted away |

into the open air, where itsoon disappears. But,
many hundred years since, before chimneys were
known, the fire was lighted in the middle of the
room, and the smoke found its way out through
a hole in the roof. Thus the chimney is a con-
venience which our early ancestors did not pos-
sess in their houses.

a

tie Le
LIGHTING A FIRE. 43

Chimneys not only allow smoke to escape,
but also admit fresh and cool air“into rooms;
making houses more healthy to live in than if
the rooms were closely shut up. |

Stoves or grates are so contrived as to throw
the heat of the fire, which is contained in them,
to all parts of a room, and to make the air equally
warm throughout. Without stoves, much of the
heat of coal would be wasted or lost.

In winter evenings, a common fire is a cheer-
ful and instructive object. It gladdens us with
its warmth; and it reminds us how bountifully
the Creator has provided for our happiness at
all seasons. Forests supply us with fire-wood;
‘and the earth yields coal, which is the most
useful of all its treasures. The pitchy matter
of coal, when it is properly heated, furnishes the
gas of our lamps; and the smoke which bursts
from cracks in the coals of a fire is gas in an
impure state.

The boiling of water in a kettle, on a fire, is
a simple and ordinary process. The water first
becomes heated in the lower part of the kettle,
nearest the fire: it then rises up through the -
colder water, which, being heavier, sinks down,
and is fully heated in its turn. By degrees, the
water in the kettle becomes so hot, that the parts
next the bottom are changed into steam, or
44 LIGHTING A FIRE.
vapour, which rises in bubbles to the top. The
water then boils, and a beautiful transparent
vapour, or steam, can just be seen coming from
the spout of the kettle. When a thick, cloudy
vapour appears, the water in the kettle is de-
creasing, and will continue to decrease, until
the kettle is emptied, unless it be removed from
the fire. »

In a similar manner, but in larger vessels,
called boilers, is produced the steam that gives
motion to the steam-engine, which causes
vessels to move rapidly through rivers and seas,
and wheel-carriages to travel with great speed
along railroads.

Thus, by our fire-side, we may witness the
production of gas from common coal; while the
boiling of the kettle will acquaint us with the
method of making steam; and gas-lighting and
the steam-engine are two of the most useful
discoveries that have yet been made by man,

QUESTIONS.
>

How do you strike a light ?

What are the sparks ?

How is a fire lighted ?

Why does smoke rise from a fire
when it is first lighted ?

Why does the smoke disappear as
the fire burns ? :

Are the ashes of coals of any ser-
vice ?

How is a pair of bellows worked ?

Name the use of chimneys.
What are the advantages of stoves

or grates ?
Why 7 a common fire be con-
sidered an instructive object ?
How is a kettle of water boiled ?
How is steam produced ? j
Mention,a few of the uses of steam.
Which are the most useful disco-
veries yet made by man ?
45

Lesson XII. What are Coals?

Coats are the remains of forests which have
been swallowed up by the earth. They have
been buried for many hundred years, and have

become changed from growing trees to a black,

stony substance.
Coals are dug out of deep mines, and are

found in beds or layers, of different thickness,
and at various depths. Some of the coal-mines

=

of England are nearly one thousand feet below
the surface of the earth.

The substance of coal consists of charcoal,
bitumen, or pitchy matter and earth. That
coal which contains most bitumen burns with |

- most flame; and that coal which contains most
— earth leaves the greatest quantity of ashes.

No country, of the same size, in the world,
affords so much coal as England. We not only
possess sufficient coals for our own consumption,
but export great quantities to many parts of
Europe, and even to Egypt, and the Kast Indies.
And, although we are constantly digging and
consuming coals, it is known that rich stores of
coals are treasured up in the bowels of the earth
for man’s use, for many centuries to come.

The places which have coal-mines are called
coal-fields. The most important of these are the
46 WHAT ARE COALS ?.

Northumberland and Durham fields in the north
of England. Here are the Newcastle mines,
which yield the greatest quantity and best
quality of coals, or twenty-eight million tons’
weight every year.

The Newcastle coal is the rich caking kind,
which abounds in bitumen, softens in the fire,
swells, and throws out jets of flame; it burns
hollow, requires poking, and leaves cinders,
but few ashes. |

London is chiefly supplied with coals from |
the Northumberland and Durham fields.

The coals are conveyed from the mines in
wagons, upon railroads, to the banks of the rivers
Tyne, Wear, and Tees, where they are put into
ships, which convey them, by the river Thames,
to the port of London. In one year upwards of |
two million tons of coal have thus been brought -
to London by more than seven thousand vessels,

Coals are also conveyed to all parts of England
in boats upon canals. These canals are channels -
cut from rivers, in every direction. In Great
Britain, canals extend nearly three thousand
miles ; and the cost of cutting them has been
thirty millions of money.

A coal-mine is one of the greatest curiosities
of England. It consists of a deep pit, from which |
galleries are hollowed out in the direction in


WHAT ARE COALS? 47

which the coal lies under ground. In these gal-
leries the miners break down the coal with
pickaxes; it is then put into large iron buckets,
and drawn up by vast machinery to the mouth
of the pit.

A coal-mine resembles a little world under
ground: for men, women, and children work
there; there also are rail-roads, wagons, and
horses, &c. In the Newcastle mines, upwards
of eight thousand persons are thus employed

_ under ground.

The danger of working in coal-mines is very

great. The air is sometimes so unwholesome as

i

to suffocate the workmen: when they approach
this foul air with a light, it takes fire, explodes
with great violence, throws the workmen, with
horses and machinery, through the pit into the
air, and bursts forth’ at the mouth in flames.
To enable the miners to work in such places,
they use a lamp, covered with fine wire gauze,
called the safety lamp, which burns without set-
ting fire to the foul air. In places where the.
air is not so foul, the mine is lighted up by large
blazing fires, and by the men earrying candles
with them. Fresh air is let down through pipes
from the opening of the pit; by pipes also the

‘ unwholesome airis discharged from the interior


48

of the mine and replaced by fresh; so as to
allow the working to proceed in safety.

In digging, the miners
springs; and water sometimes rushes into the
mine, with tremendous force, and drowns the
The water must then be got out of the
mine before the working can proceed: this is
done by vast pumps worked by a steam-engine,
one stroke of which will raise as much water
as five hundred men could pump out.

Coal, when it has been heated in large tight:
iron pipes, produces gas that is burnt in lamps;
coal yields also tar, which is used to cover}
palings; and the remainder of the coal is coke,”
which burns without smoke. 2

Charcoal is what remains of wood after it has
been burnt in a close place. |

men.

QUESTIONS.

What are coals ?

Have the forests become changed
from growing trees to a black
substance ?

What does coal consist of ?

Which coal burns with most
flame ?

Which coal leaves most ashes ?

Is coal abundant in England ?

What is a coal.-field ?

Which counties of England pro-
duce the best coal?

WHAT ARE COALS ?













meet with many

How are coalsconveyed to London
and other places ?
What is a canal?

Describe a eoal-mine. 4
In what respect does a coal-mine ©
resemble a little world under

ground ?
Why is it dangerous to work ina —
coal-mine ?
How is coal-gas obtained ?
What is coke? 5

What is charcoal ?
THE FURNITURE

OF A

DWELLING-HOUSE.

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ibe = Lesson I. Household Furniture.

I HOUSE, when it has been built, is next to be
hiivithaneds or supplied with articles for daily use
, and convenience. These articles are generally
t moveable, and are called furniture; but a few,
}which are not moveable, as cupboards, shelves,
E and fastenings, are called fixtures.



Furniture is made of various substances; as
wood, metal, wool, and flax. It also includes
i: glass, cutlery, and the like.
E
50 THE FURNITURE OF A

The workman who shapes and fixes all wood-
work for ornament orconvenienee in the interior
of a house is called a joiner. The joiner, con-
sequently, makes the wooden fixtures, and is a
different man from the carpenter, who frames
and fits together the more rough and solid
timbers in building the house.

Cabinets, or ornamental boxes, were among
the first-made articles of furniture. The manu-
facturer of wooden furniture is generally called
a cabinet-maker. In the engraving he may be
seen at work: he is sawing a piece of wood, and
around him are various tools, and unfinished
articles of furniture.

The kinds of wood chiefly employed by him are
oak, beech, elm, walnut, and cherry, which eTrow
in England; deal, or planks of fir-wood, which
grows principally in the northern countries, as
explained in a previous lesson; and mahogany,
which grows many thousand miles distant, and
is brought in ships to this country, as will be
presently described.

Oak is sometimes used for tablesand drawers;
the common round kitchen table is generally
made of it. This wood lasts long, but it is
heavy, and hard to work; it is also as expensive
as mahogany,

Tables are sometimes made of deal; and
DWELLING-HOUSE. 51

wash-hand stands and tables for bed-rooms are
_ of deal, painted or japanned.

Beech and elm are often used for chairs and
tables, and the posts of bedsteads; sometimes
they are stained and polished to appear like
mahogany. Kitchen chairs are often made of
elm, without the stain. These woods are also
used for the frame-work of tables, which have the
upper parts of mahogany or other fine woods.

The walnut was called the “ cabinet-makers’
tree,” before mahogany was introduced into
England; and tables, chairs, bedsteads, and
drawers, were made of it. Its wood is taugh and
strong, beautifully marked, and easily polished:
but it is now seldom used.

The wood of the cherry-tree is sometimes used
for chairs; it is very close and prettily marked.

All wood used for cabinet-work ought to be
seasoned or hardened, so that it may not swell
with wet, nor shrink or crack with heat. On
this account, we see in the timber-merchants’
yards, piles of timberin planks, set up to become
seasoned by the air passing through them. The
furniture of a room is much exposed to the fire ;
and if the chairs and tables are made of un-
seasoned timber, they soon fall to pieces,

Cabinet-makers shape the furniture in sepa-
rate pieces, which they dove-tail together ; that

| E 2
52 THE FURNITURE OF A

is, they let or fit one piece into another, in the
form of the tail of a dove. They use wooden
pegs instead of nails; they fasten the pieces like-
wise with glue. Glue is a substance made by
boiling the skins of animals to a jelly. It is ap-
plied in a melted state, and hardens in cooling.
The surface of furniture is rubbed smooth, and
made to bear a high polish.

CERTAIN parts of furniture, as the legs and rails
of chairs, are turned, or shaped, by a machine
called adathe. This machine consists of chisels,
moved by wheels and a spring: and in using it,
the workman turns about the wood, so as to
shape it by the chisel.

The legs of tables, and .the large posts of bed-
steads, are likewise turned by the lathe. But the
ornaments of these posts, as leaves and flowers,
are carved, or cut with a sharp knife.

The seats of chairs are sometimes made of
platted willow, like basket-work; and sometimes
of soft rushes, which grow on the banks of rivers.
Chairs of a better description have their seats
stuffed and covered with the hair of the tails
and manes of horses, and sometimes they are
covered with leather.

The seats of chairs are also made of split and
DWELLING-HOUSE. 53

platted cane and bamboo, which grow abundantly
in warm countries, as India and China. In the
latter country, indeed, many houses are built
entirely of bamboo ; and nearly every article of
furniture is made of the same material.

Chests, or large boxes for holding clothes, are
made of various common woods. A chest of
drawers is a more convenient contrivance for
keeping clothes from dust. The drawers are so
many boxes without lids, which slide in and out
of a frame-work, to which they may be fastened —
infront by locks. As the drawers slide one above
another, they only occupy more height than a
single drawer would; and thus much space is
saved in the floor of a room.

Furniture that is well made will last for many
years, although itis in,use every day. Sometimes
insects bore little holes in the wood, and cause it
to decay and fall to pieces. But, in some old
mansions may be seen cabinets, chairs, and
tables, that were made a hundred years since,
and have been used by many generations of the
same family.

The person who sells furniture, fits up cur-
tains, and furnishes a house, generally, is called
an upholsterer.

In countries where the use of a chair, table,
and bedstead is unknown, the natives sit, eat,
54 FURNITURE.

and sleep upon the ground. We enjoy the com-
fort of a chair, on which we rest our wearied
limbs; of a table, on which our food is spread ;
and of a bedstead, on which we sleep at night.
Let us, therefore, be thankful to God, for the
blessings which we derive from His providence :
for, at His divine will, the tree grows in the

forest, and man fashions its timber into useful
forms.

QUESTIONS.

Can you tell me the difference be- | How do cabinet makers join fur-
tween furniture and fixtures ? | niture together ?

What description of work is done | Of what does glue consist ?
by the joiner ?

What description of work is done
by the carpenter ?

Why is a cabinet-maker so

ooo



How are the legs of chairs and
tables made ?



named ? Can you describe a lathe ?

Of what kind of wood is furniture | Of what materials are the seats of
made ?. chairs made?

Of what kind of wood is the round | Can you describe to me a chest of
kitchen-table made ? drawers ?

What was the walnut-tree for- | Will furniture last long?
merly called ? What is the person called who

Why should all wood be seasoned ? furnishes houses ?


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Lesson II. Mahogany.

MauoGany is the most useful of all woods em-
ployed in the manufacture of furniture. Almost
every house in England now contains some
article made of mahogany ; although the wood
has been used in this country little more than
a hundred years.

The mahogany tree grows in a warm climate.
England is too cold for it. It is one of the most
56 MAHOGANY.

majestic trees in the world; its trunk is of vast
size, and its arms spread very wide; as you may
see in the engraving. The trunk is most valu-
able for the size of its timber; but the branches
yield the most beautiful wood.

The finest kind of mahogany is that which is
known as Spanish mahogany, and is brought
from the West Indies: this is the rich and dark-
coloured wood whichis used for the best descrip-
tion of furniture. Another kind, knownas Hon-
duras mahogany, is brought from the flat and
marshy coasts of America: it is of a lighter
colour, and of less value than Spanish mahogany.

Mahogany-cutting is the principal occupation
of the British settlersin Honduras. The trees
are generally felled in the month of August.
Parties of labourers then cut their way through
the thick forest to the finest mahogany trees,
which they hew down about twelve feet from
the ground; a stage being raised round the
trees for the axe-man, who fells them.

The workmen next cut roads through the
forest, along which the trees are to be conveyed
upon four-wheeled trucks drawn by oxen, to the
nearest river. Sometimes miles of road, and
many bridges, are made to a single tree. And
the making of these roadsis the greatest portion
of the labour and expense of mahogany-cutting.
MAHOGANY. 57

The trees are next sawed across into logs, some
of which are of animmense size, and weigh many
thousand pounds. These logs are of different
lengths; some trees furnish only one log, while
from another trunk four or five logs may be cut.
The largest log of Honduras mahogany ever cut
was seventeen feet in length, and weighed nearly
thirty-four thousand pounds. The logs are then
cut with an axe, from the round form in which
they grow, to a square shape as we see them in
the timber merchants’ yards.

The logs are next conveyed upon the trucks
to the river during the night; for the heat of the
sun is too great to allow the oxen to work during
the day. Upon reaching the river the logs are
marked with the first letters of the owner’s
name, and are then thrown into the stream.

The logs float for many miles, and the work-
men follow them in boats, until the logs are
stopped near the mouth of the river before it
flows into the sea.

Each party then separates its own logs, and
forms them into rafts; thus they float on to the
wharf of the owner, where the logs are taken out
of the water again, smoothed with an axe, and
made ready for shipping, or conveying in ships
to various countries. Great quantities of maho-
gany are brought to England ; and in one year
58 MAHOGANY.

there have been received as many logs of maho-
gany as loaded fifteen large vessels. One of
these logs was worth a thousand pounds.

The choicest mahogany is too expensive to be
used in thick planks. The logs of this kind are,
therefore, cut into very thin pieces, called
veneers; these are laid, and neatly glued on wood
of an inferior kind, so as to make it appear like
planks of the handsomest mahogany. These
veneers show the beautiful curls and other
marks, which are somuchadmired in mahogany.
Of solid: mahogany, of an inferior kind, are
turned and carved the legs of chairs and tables.

The saw-mill, by which logs are cut into
veneers, is one of the most ingenious machines
everinvented. It consists of large wheels, edged
with fine saws, which cut through the wood with-
out wasting much of it. ‘These wheels, or saws,
are turned by a steam-engine, which has the
power sometimes of eighty men. In such a mill,
the largest saw is fifty feet round, and turns
ninety-five times in aminute! It will take off,
in three minutes, a sheet of veneer, nine or ten
feet long, and two feet wide; and some veneers
are but the sixteenth part of an inch in thick-
ness, or nearly as thin as a shaving.

All this work is performed with astonishing
nicety, and saving of the wood ; much of which
MAHOGANY. 59

would be wasted by the common saw, as saw-
dust. The expense of sawing mahogany into
veneers is very great; and the charge for saw-
ing a very large log will sometimes exceed five
hundred pounds..

Rosewood, another beautiful wood used for
making furniture, is brought from South Ame-
rica. It is named from its having, when fresh,
a faint but agreeable smell of roses. Its colours
are dark brown upona purple red ground; and
some of its markings are extremely elegant.
It is much heavier than mahogany ; and is ge-
nerally cut into veneers, which are used for
tables, the cases of piano-fortes, and the like;
_ but the legs of chairs, tables, and piano-fortes,
are turned and carved from solid rosewood.

QUESTIONS.

How long has mahogany been | What do you call a veneer ?

used in England ?

Can you describe the mahogany
tree, and tell me where it grows ?

Which is the finest kind of maho-
gany ?

Which is the inferior mahogany ?

- When is mahogany cut ?

What is the principal expense of
mahogany-cutting ?

How is mahogany cut into logs?

How is mahogany cut into ve-
neers ?

Can you describe a saw-mill for
cutting veneers ?

From what country is rosewood
brought ?

Why is rosewood so named ?

What are the colours of rosewood ?

What articles of furniture are
made from it?
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Lesson III. Metal Furniture: Iron.

Many articles of furniture are made of metal ;
as stoves, fenders, and fire-irons; candlesticks
and kitchen utensils. The metals used for these
purposes are iron, copper, and tin; and the
compounds called steel, brass and pewter.

Tron stoves are cast in Separate pieces, from
models, or patterns of the pieces, made very
smooth and exact in fine sand. The form of
the model is taken by pressing it in moistened
sand within boxes; the sand dries , hardens, and
becomes a mould, into which the melted iron is
poured; and the iron, being allowed to cool, is
taken out solid.

All the pieces being thus cast, they are filed
IRON FURNITURE. 61

or made smooth, and then fitted up, or put to-
gether, to form a complete stove, such as you
see in the opposite engraving. The bars, and
parts of the fronts of stoves, are sometimes made
of polished steel, and of very beautiful patterns.

Close or covered stoves for heating rooms,
and such as are used in laundries, are also of
cast iron; as are boilers, kettles, and sauce-
pans; irons for smoothing clothes; and the
machinery, wheels, and chains of a mangle.

A kitchen-grate, or range, is a very in genious
contrivance for cooking food. The fire-place is
in the middle; and the fire will not only roast
meat before it, and boil a kettle above it, but
will heat an oven on one side, and cause water
to boil on the opposite side. The smoke, in
passing up the chimney, turns a wheel as the
wind turns the shafts of a windmill; and this
wheel gives motion to a machine called a jack,
which turns the meat upon the spit before the
fire. Thus a fire is made to roast, boil, and
bake, as well as to heat a room at the same time.

Fenders are used to prevent cinders from
rolling off the hearth upon the wooden floor;
and without them all fires would be dangerous
in houses.

Fenders are of handsome open forms, such as _.
that in the engraving. ‘They are made of cast —

Â¥
62 IRON FURNITURE.

iron, or polished cut steel and brass. Each of
the latter kind is, at first, a plate of steel or
brass, out of which the pattern or open figures
are cut by the sharp stroke of a screw-press.
The plate is next hammered level, and ground
upon a stone wheel and polished. The fender
is then bent into the shape required: under-
neath it is placed a plate of rolled iron, sup-
ported upon claw or ball feet, to catch the
cinders ; and thus the fender is complete.

Fenders and screens are also made of wire
network, with a piece of bright metal at top and
bottom. These are very useful to guard against
the danger of hot cinders flying out of the fire,
and to keep children from approaching too near
the grate.

Every fire-place is supplied with a set of fire-
irons, which are a shovel, a poker, and a pair of
tongs. ‘'hese are made of common iron; or of
iron, case-hardened by heating, and then dipping
it into water. The common irons are ground
upon a wheel, rolled on stone, and roughly
polished. The most expensive kinds are made
of good steel, or fine iron.

Great numbers of all kinds of stoves are cast
at the Carron Iron Works, by the side of the river
Carron, in Scotland. This manufactory is the
largest of its kind in the world, and many hun-
IRON FURNITURE. 63

dred persons are employed init. A canal is
cut from the river to the works, where the
manufactures are put into boats, and conveyed
to the Carron, to be shipped in, large vessels,
and brought to England. These vessels return
to Scotland, laden with goods from the port of
London.

That useful machine, the coffee-mill, is made
of rolled iron. It consists of a kind of funnel, or
cup, in which is put the coffee; underneath is a
sharp-cut box of iron, or steel, with a notched
roller in it; this is turned by the handle outside ;
and as the coffee sinks from the cup, it is crushed
to powder by the roller turning in the box, and
falls out below. Many thousands of these mills
are made every year at Birmingham.

Locks are commonly made of iron. The outer
part, or box, is of cast iron; and the inner
works are of iron finely wrought.

Thus, we see that iron is as useful in furnish-
ing as it is in building a house.

QUESTIONS.

What articles of furniture are of | How are steel and brass fenders
metal ? made ?
What metals are used for making | How are fire-irons made?
them ? Which is the largest stove manu-
How are stove-grates cast ? factory in the world?
Can you describe a kitchen-range? | Can you describe a coffee-mill ?
Of what use are fenders ? Of what metals are locks made ?
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Lesson IV. Cutlery; Knives and Forks.

THE cutlery in common use in every house con-
sists of knives, forks, and scissors. The forms
of these articles are too well known to need de-
scription; for we employ a knife at each meal,
and scissors are in daily use. These, and all
other cutting instruments, are made of steel.

Steel is made by putting pure iron with
charcoal into clesé pots, which are placed in a
strong coal-fire in a covered furnace; where the
pots are allowed to remain until the iron has
become changed by the heat and the charcoal
into common steel.

But this steel is blistered, or full of little
KNIVES AND FORKS. 65

holes; and, to make it solid, it must be heated
and beaten with large hammers, when it will
become shear-steel. It is again heated, and then
tilted, that is, beaten with hammers upon anvils.
It is next passed, while red hot, between vast
metal rollers, which are worked by water, or
steam power.

Near Sheffield, where the finest steel is made,
are extensive mills, in which a large water-wheel
works hammers, weighing from three to four
hundred pounds, and causes them to strike from
one to two hundred times in a minute. In the
same mill is a tilting-hammer, which gives three
hundred strokes in a minute ; here, also, are im-
mense rollers for flattening the steel.

The finest steel is cast, by melting the blistered
or common steel in afurnace, and pouring it into
iron moulds to cool. It is then gently heated
again, and carefully hammered into bars.

All those articles which do not require a fine »
polish, and are of low price, are made of blistered-
steel. Articles of a better description are made
from shear-steel. The fipgpt kinds of cutlery.
are made from east-steel, as no other will bear
a high polish.

Table-knives are mostly made of shear-steel,
as we see by the stamps on their blades. Each
knife passes through sixteen hands, or one hun-

II. F
66 CUTLERY.

dred and forty-four stages of workmanship.—
Yet, so rapidly is all this done, that in the work-
shop at Sheffield, a dinner-knife is shaped in a
few minutes.

The cutting part of the blade of a knife is first
hammered out of a bar of heated steel. A piece
of iron is then struck on to the thicker end of the
blade, and forms the tang or shank, whichis fitted
into the handle. Two men, the maker and striker,
will form a great number of blades in a day.

The blade is next hardened by plunging it,
when red-hot, into cold water; but as the steel
then becomes too hard, or brittle, it is tempered,
or made softer, by again heating it. The blade
is next carried to the grinding-mill; and there
ground upon stone wheels of different fineness ;
these wheels are worked by the foot upon a
treadle, as in the knife-grinder’s barrow, seen
almost daily.

The blade is then polished upon a wheel
covered with leather; and the metal part of the
knife being now finished, it is fastened into a
handle of ivory, bone, wood, or other substance.

Forks are shaped from steel, at the anvil, and
the prongs are stamped out, hardened, tempered,
and ground upon a dry stone. Common forks
are of cast-iron, which being heated, hammered,
and polished, appears like steel. Of this metal
KNIVES AND FORKS. 67

are also cast annually many thousand pairs of
cheap scissors and snuffers.

The grindstone, or knife-grinder’s barrow, is
represented in the engraving; where the man, by
setting his foot upon the treadle, turns the large
wheel ; from this lines pass to the smaller wheel,
upon which he is grinding the knife. By this
contrivance, the man works with his hands and
foot at the same time.

QUESTIONS.

What articles are called cut- Which part of a knife is made
lery? | first?

How is steel made ? _ How is the blade hardened ?

Why is steel hammered and | How is the blade tempered ?
rolled ? | How is the blade ground ?

How is the finest steel made ? | How is the blade polished ? 1

Which are the principal kinds of Of what are knife-handles made ?
steel? | How are forks made ?

Of which kind of steel are table- Of what are common forks made?
knives made? | How is the grindstone worked? _



Lesson V. Cutlery; Scissors, Razors,
and Penknives.

A PAIR of scissors occupies more time in making |

than any other article of cutlery. It is made by

hand; and each pair passes through sixteen or
F 2
68 CUTLERY.

seventeen hands, including fifty or sixty kinds
of work, before it is ready for sale.

Each part of a pair of scissors is made from a
flat piece of steel ; the cutting part is first shaped
on the anvil; nextthe shank; and then the bows,
or holes for the fingers, are formed upon the
point of a small anvil.

The parts of scissors are next put into the fire
in little bundles, to be softened. ‘The shanks
and bows are then filed, and the hole is bored for
the screw to fasten the scissors in pairs. The
blades are next ground, and shaped on stone
wheels; they are then put in pairs, and- screwed
together. After this, the screw is taken out, and
the shanks and bows are hardened and made
bright. The screw is again put in, the edges of
the blades are sharpened, and the scissors are
finished with a polished steel instrument. These,
however, are but afew of the stages through
which a pair of scissors passes before itis com-
pleted.

Snuffers are made nearly in the same manner
as scissors, which they much resemble.

Razors are made of the finest steel; and each
razor passes through a dozen hands. After the
blade is formed itis hardened and then tempered
by heating, until it is of a straw-colour. It is
next ground and polished upon wheels, sv as
CUTLERY. 69

to make the blade hollow, and give it a very
fine edge.

The manufacture ofa penknife is divided into
three branches. ‘The first is the forming of the
blade, the spring by which it opens and shuts,
and the iron-work of the handle. The second
branch is the grinding and polishing of the blade.
- The third branch consists of fitting up all the
parts of the handle, and finishing the knife.

The handles of penknives are covered with
bone, wood, or horn, fastened with little metal
pins or rivets. Some handles are of the outside
of the rough horn of the stag: others are made
of horn, pressed between hot metal plates, and
thus ornamented with figures.

The fine edge of every blade is produced by
hardening. Common blades are not enough
hardened; so that when the first edge of the knife
is worn off, the rest of the blade is too soft to
be sharpened.

Common scissors of cast-iron, with the blades
slightly hardened, are sold by the manufacturer
at less than sixpence for a dozen pairs, or less
than a halfpenny a pair. Small knives with
handles are also cast, and sold at a halfpenny
each. These inferior articles are sent from
England, in vast numbers, to all parts of the
world,
70 CUTLERY.

Nothing excites the wonder of the natives of
uncivilized countries more than a knife or a.pair
of scissors, which is often a fit present for a
sultan, or chief. In such countries, travellers
sometimes exchange knives andscissors for gold
and precious stones.

British cutlery 1 is superior to that made in any
other country in the world. Great quantities of
table-knives are sentto the East and West Indies
and America; and knives are made in England
of various forms, according to the fashion of
different countries.

The finest cutlery is made in Sheffield and its
neighbourhood; where are manufactured great
quantities, said to be made in London, and sold
as “ Town made,” which we often see stamped
on blades. Cutlery is also made at Birmingham.

QUESTIONS.

What article of cutlery occupies |

most time in making?

How many hands does a pair of
scissors pass through in making?

Can you describe how a pair of
scissors is made ?

Can you tell me how a razor is
made ?

How is the making of a penknife
divided ?

How is the edge given to a
blade ?

Why cannot a common blade be
sharpened ?

Are not some scissors and knives
sold at very low prices ?

Is British cutlery of fine quality ?

Where is_ the finest cutlery
made ?
eat Hn gu a
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Lesson VI. Zin.

Tn is one of the most useful metals in manu-
facturing the furniture of a kitchen. It is found
abundantly in Cornwall, at the Land’s End, or
western extremity of England. Its value has
been for many centuries known in this country.

The Pheenicians, an ancient people of Asia,
are. believed to have traded to Cornwall for tin
long before the period of the birth of our Saviour,
or more than two thousand years since. And
this early trade in tin, with other countries, is said
to have laid the foundation of British commerce.

In Cornwall the land is very barren, and corn
will grow in few places. But the mines there
yield abundance of tin; this is given in exchange
72 TIN.

for the corn of other parts of England, which
grow plenty of grain, but have no tin mines.
About two thousand tons’ weight are also sent
every year from England to other countries.

The quantity of this metal found in Cornwall
is very great. The working of the mines employs
many thousands of persons, and the owners
get very rich by their trade in tin.

Tin ore is found in veins, from which branch
lesser veins, like the boughs of a tree, until they
become as fine as threads. It is also found in
floors, or layers, and in grains and small masses,
in the natural rock.

Tin mines are not so deep as other mines: but,
in afew places, they have been carried far under
the sea. In these tin mines, the roar of the
waves sounds like thunder, and the water some-
times streams through the roof, and great care is
necessary to prevent its breaking in, in such
quantities as to drown the miners.

Upon the discovery of a spot containing tin
ore, the miners sink a pit or shaft, and follow
the vein under-ground in galleries; a shaft being
also sunk at every hundred yards to admit air.
Within the mine, large masses of ore are blown
off by gunpowder. The ore is then broken into
pieces, and put into large buckets, which are
hauled to the mouth of the principal shaft by a
TIN. 73

capstan. This consists of an upright roller,
around which winds a rope, with the buckets
fastened to it. From this roller projects a beam,
to the end of which horses or oxen are fastened,
and go their rounds, winding the rope round one
part of the capstan, and unwinding it from an-
other; and thus they pull up a bucket full of
ore, while an empty one is descending.

In some mines this capstan is worked by
steam. The mines are also drained by the steam
engine; and some of the largest engines in the
world are employed in pumping water from the
tin and copper mines of Cornwall.

When the ore is raised from the mine, it is
divided into shares, which are measured out by
barrows. The ore is next pounded or stamped,
in pits, by a mill; and from these pits it is carried
to a large vat, and washed in it by women and
children. Bee.

The ore is then heated in a furnace with char-_
coal and a little lime; and the pure metal, being
thus separated, is poured into moulds to cool.

QUESTIONS.

Where is tin most abundantly | Are tin mines very deep?
found in England ? | How do the miners proceed ?

What is said to have laid the foun- | How is the ore drawn from the
dation of British commerce ? mine ?

In what form is tin found in the | How is tin separated from its
earth ? ore ?

‘
74 ’

Lesson VII. Tin-ware.

TIN is one of the cleanest of metals, and will not
rust from damp. It is, therefore, much used for
coating other metals.

What are improperly called tin saucepans, are
made of sheet-iron dipped in melted tin, to pre-
vent the iron from rusting. Neither copper nor
cast-iron kettles or saucepans would be whole-
some to boil water or food in, if their insides
were not washed over with melted tin. Lead,
which is in itself poisonous, when it is mixed
with tin, forms pewter, of which drinking-pots
are made. Tin, mixed with quicksilver, is used
_ for “silvering,” or making looking-glasses. Pre-
parations of tin are also employed in dyeing,
and for various other useful purposes.

The art of making tinned vessels is called
tin-plate working. The tools used are few and
simple; as much depends upon the dexterity of
the workman. To form a saucepan, thetin-plate
is first cut into the proper size and pattern with
shears. Itis then shaped upon a block; the
two edges of the sides are laid one over the
other, and the workman, with a hot iron, melts
solder over the edges. When the solder cools
and hardens, the bottom of the saucepan is
, TIN-WARE. © 75
fitted in, and soldered like the sides. The
solder consists of lead and tin, and almost con-
ceals the seams of the vessel. To preserve the
shape of the vessel, iron wire is used at its mouth
or outer edge, and, by means of a hammer,
covered with a tinned plate. This adds much
to the strength and appearance of the vessel.

In the engraving, at page 71, the tinman is
at work upon a tea-kettle. Before him are the
soldering-irons and pot, and a large hammer ;
and on his right side are the shears.

Vessels made of tin-plate are much lighter,
and more convenient for use, than those which
are made of wood. Tinned vessels are, there-
fore, useful for carrying milk, for their small
weight, as well as for their sweetness and clean-
ness; and, with proper care, the coating of tin
lasts for a long time.

Sometimes tin-plate vessels are covered with
a kind of varnish, called Japan. Children’s
toys, such as little carriages and horses, are
made of thin tin-plate, painted and varnished.
These toys not only amuse children, but the
making of them furnishes employment for thou-
sands of industrious persons.

Block-tin articles are made by beating the
metal upon a stake with a polished steel
hammer, so that the surface appears smooth
76 TIN-WARE.

and silvery. In this manner are made dish-
covers, which are fine, clean, and durable.

Pewter is a mixed metal, consisting of tin
united to small portions of lead, zine, bismuth,
and antimony.

Pewter plates and dishes are formed by ham-
mering ; and spoons are cast in moulds. Pewter
articles are chiefly manufactured in London.
They are made and stamped according to law,
and exported to almost every part of the world.
Travellers have seen pewter dishes, bearing the
London stamp, in use in the middle of Africa ;
where the dinner of a king is served on pewter.

Britannia metal, of which tea-pots, spoons,
and candlesticks are made, consists chiefly of
tin, with small portions of copper and brass,
melted together. It is then poured into moulds,
or rolled into sheets. ,

Tea-pots are made of the sheet metal, which.
the workman bends over a model, while it
spins round. A clever workman can spin nearly
two hundred and fifty of these tea-pots in a
day: the spouts and handles are afterwards
added, as are the ornaments, which are stamped
or punched with presses. |

Drinking-pots and measures are either made
of the sheet-metal, or are cast; and turned in a
lathe. Spoons are cast singly in brass moulds ;
TIN-WARE. 77

and they are made and sold at home, as well as
sent abroad in greatnumbers. They are cheap,
cleanly, and lasting; and bear a polish nearly
equal to silver.

Britannia metal is first polished with brushes,
and wheels covered with leather: and is finished
by rubbing with the hand.

‘T'ea-pots made of this metal keep the heat
longer than earthenware tea-pots, and better
extract the flavour of the tea. The handles
are of bone or wood; for, if they were made of
metal, the boiling water in the tea-pot would
make them too hot to be held in the hand.

Tin is used not only for making domestic
utensils, but also for dyers’ boilers, for stills,
and many other implements employed in the
arts.

QUESTIONS.

Why is tin used for coating other | How are dish-covers made?
metals ? | Of what does Britannia metal
Why are copper and iron sauce- | consist?
pans tinned ? | How is a Britannia metal tea-pot
Of what is pewter made? | made?
What is tin-plate working ? | Why is the handle of the tea-pot
Can you describe the making of a | made of bone or wood?

saucepan ? : | How is a Britannia metal spoon

Of what does solder consist ? | made?

Why are tinned vessels so useful? | How is Britannia metal polished ?

How are pewter plates and dishes | Can you name a few other pur-
made ? poses for which tin is used ?


Lesson VIII. Copper and Brass.

CopPeR is a more handsome metal than iron,
lead, or tin. It is of a fine-red colour, with a
tinge of yellow, and it bears a high polish. It
is moderately hard, and is easily beaten with a
hammer into any form. Copper is much used
in manufacturing kettles and saucepans, which
are the bright and ornamental, as well as useful,
furniture of the kitchen.

Copper, mixed with another metal called
zinc, forms brass, and Prince’s metal, of which
candlesticks are made.

Copper also produces the light blue colour,
much used in staining paper for hanging rooms;
and it furnishes green paints for wood-work,
COPPER AND. BRASS. 79

Copper is obtained abundantly in Cornwall,
where the mines produce yearly upwards of ten
thousand tons of pure metal. It is found mixed
with ore, in veins among rocks; it is dug in
shafts and galleries, and hauled from the mine
as other metals are. It is generally found at a
much greater depth in the earth than tin; and
copper mines are liable to be flooded with water,
which is drained from them by sloping galleries,
or pumped up by the aid of steam engines.

To prepare copper ores for market, children
are employed to pick them from the rubbish
with which they are mixed. The large frag-
ments of ore are broken into smaller pieces by
women, and, after being again picked, are given
to girls, who, with a flat hammer, break the
copper ore into pieces not larger than the tip
of the finger. These pieces are next crushed
still smaller by passing them under a wheel; or
they are bruised by heavy weights or hammers
in a stamping mill, while a stream of water runs
through the broken ore, and carries with it all
that is sufficiently bruised. It is next shaken
in a kind of iron sieve while under water, the
earthy matter is washed away, and the copper
which:remains is piled up for sale.

The opposite cut shows the machinery for
these purposes, at Fowey Consols copper mines,
in Cornwall. ‘.

oo
80 COPPER AND BRASS.

The copper is reduced, or brought to the
state of metal, by fire; but, as Cornwall does
not contain sufficient coal for this purpose, the
copper ore found there is sent in ships to be
melted at Swansea, in Wales, where coal
abounds; for it is much cheaper to carry the
ore to the coal than coal to the ore.

The vessels which convey the ore to Swansea,
are laden back with coals to Cornwall. In the
vast works at Swansea, upwards of twelve
thousand persons are employed in digging
coals, in melting the copper, and in shipping
for its conveyance.

The ore, being picked and broken, is heated
ina furnace. It is next melted in a smaller
furnace, when the metal falls to the bottom; and
the kind of cinder which separates from it is cast
into masses, and used like bricks for building.

The copper is next poured into water two or
three times, to separate impurities, which are
chiefly sulphur, iron, and arsenic. It is then
cast into long pieces, which are broken up,
roasted, and melted with charcoal in the re-
fining-furnace ; lastly, it is cast into solid cakes,
or it is rolled by a mill into sheets, which are
sent in ships to the different markets.

Great quantities of sheet-copper are used for
sheathing or covering the bottom of ships, to
ae

COPPER AND BRASS. 81

defend them from sea-worms, and preserve them
from decay by the water.

Sheet-copper is also made into the large boil-
ing vessels, which are called coppers. quantity of copper is made into plates for en-
gravers. |

QUESTIONS.

What is the colour of copper ? | How are copper mines drained of
What furniture is generally made water ?

of copper ? Where is copper chiefly melted ?
How is Prince’s metal made ? How is copper made _ into
Where is copper found in Eng- | sheets ?

land ? | What is sheet copper principally
Is a copper mine generally deeper | _ used for ?

than a tin mine ?

Lesson IX. Copper and Brass Furniture.

THE manufacturer of copper vessels is called a
copper- -smith; and a tea-kettle is a good nye:
cimen of his woth, |

To make a tea-kettle, apiece of copper is cut
from the sheet with a pair of shears, and bent
into the requiredform; the seam is thensoldered
up over a coke fire. The vessel, when cooled, is
hammered upon a steel stake, until the seam is
smooth and the shape perfect. Two inches of
the copper are next beaten inward over a sloping
anvil, to form the top of the kettle, leaving an
opening forthe lid. Thelowerend is then turned
inward all round, and the bottom of the kettle is

II. G
82 COPPER AND BRASS.

put in, soldered, and hammered in the same
manner as the side.

The kettle is next beaten until it is bright.
The lid is then stamped out. The handle is cast,
and the spout is soldered up and shaped; and
both are soldered or riveted into their places.

Copper is of an unwholesome nature; and, if
it is allowed to get damp, it will become covered
with a light green rust, which is poisonous.

All copper vessels, unless the tinning is perfect,
are dangerous for use; and many persons haye
been poisoned by eating provisions kept in
copper pans, the tinning of which was worn off.

Copper is sometimes hammered into very thin
leaves to imitate goldleaf. It is this mock gold
which is laid on gingerbread, but children should
beware of eating what is called gilt gingerbread,
for the copper covering, or “ gilt,” is poisonous.

Great quantities of copper are coined into far-
things, halfpence, and penny-pieces. The copper
is rolled into sheets, out of which the round
pieces are cut by a press; and by another press,
both sides are stamped at the same time with
the patterns or dies cut in steel. At each press,
thirty thousand penny or halfpenny pieces may
thus be stamped, or coined, in a day.

The compound of which bells are made con-
sists of copper and tin; but house-bells haye
COPPER AND BRASS FURNITURE, 83

little copper in them. Of this compound, which
is called bell-metal, are also made preserving
pans, and pestles and mortars for pounding hard
substances.

Bronze, of which clocks, statues, and other
ornaments are made, consists of copper and tin,
with small quantities of other metals.

Brass is made by melting copper and zinc
together in clay pots, in a strong coal fire. It
is a cheap and handsome metal, and in colour
resembles gold. Many useful and ornamental
articles are cast in brass, which is also drawn
into fine wire, and cut into pins; and the pins
are whitened by boiling them with tin.

Brass is made in great quantities at Birming-
ham; and the manufacturer is called a brass-
founder. There are few houses in England in
which articles of brass are not seen. Some of
these are cast, as the heads of door-knockers,
the claw-feet of fenders, and the handles of
doors and drawers. The fine parts are finished
by filing, or with a steel chisel.

Other articles, such as finger-plates for doors,
and the fronts of fenders, are made of sheet-
brass. The elegant figures on them are stamped
by laying the brass upon the pattern, and letting
fall upon it a heavy weight, or hammer. Ina
curtain-pin, the stem is of brass, but the head is

G2
84 COPPER AND BRASS FURNITURE.

of iron, covered with thin brass stamped in
various figures. Lamps also are made of brass,
or of tin covered with brass.

Some kinds of brass-work are turned in a
lathe, others are burnished, or polished with a
hard stone, and soft leather. To give the metal
the fine rich gold colour which is so much ad-
mired in the brass ornaments of houses, the arti-
cles are dipped into a hot liquid called lacquer.

Many trinkets, brooches, watch-keys, and
chains, are also made of brass, and gilt; that is,
they are dipped in a liquid, in which a very
small portion of gold has been melted, so as to
imitate articles, which, being made of gold, are
of much greater value.

Prince’s metal is nearer to the colour of gold
than common brass. It is named from its in-
ventor, Prince Rupert, who lived about two hun-
dred years since, in Charles the Second’s reign ;
and of whom we read in the history of England.

QUESTIONS.
What is the maker of copper | Of what does bronze consist ?
vessels named ? How is brass made ?
How is a tea-kettle made ? Name a few articles made of
Why is gilt gingerbread poison- _ brass.
Ous ? How is brass-work polished ?
Can you describe the making of | How is brass gilt?
copper coin ? Why is Prince’s metal so named ?

Of what metal are bells made ?

—


85

Lesson X. How Buttons are made.

THE manufacture of buttons employs many thou-
.sand hands, and much curious machinery.

Metal buttons are chiefly made at Birming-
ham. They are formed of different metals.
The shanks, or rings, by which they are sewn to_
clothes, are of brass or iron wire, and the making
of them is a trade by itself. They are made
very rapidly; one kind of machine, which is
worked by asteam-engine, producing by a single
stroke eighty of these shanks in a minute.

Some buttons are cast in moulds, in shallow
boxes of sand; the shank is placed in the
middle of each mould, and becomes fixed there
as the metal cools. In this manner from six
to twelve dozen buttons are made, or cast, at a
time. White metal buttons are made of brass
and tin, and are whitened by boiling them with
grain tin and tartar. Plated buttons are made
from sheet-copper, covered with silver, or plated,
as will be presently described.

Buttons intended to be gilded are cut out of
sheet metal, as brass and zinc, or copper, by one
stroke of a fly-press. The edges are then rolled
between two pieces of steelin amachine, which is
worked very quickly by a boy; and the faces are
86 BUTTONS.

polished by the quick stroke of a steel hammer.
The shanks are next soldered on, several at a
time, and the buttons are then prepared for
gilding.

Buttons are gilded by putting them into a
strong acid liquid, in which are dissolved gold |
and quicksilver. The buttons are then taken
out, dried within a furnace, and burnished with
hard stones ata lathe. This gives them a rich
golden lustre, although so little gold is used in
the gilding, that less than five grains, when
mixed with the quicksilver, is made to cover a
gross, or one hundred and forty-four coat buttons.

The names of the buttons, and their makers,
are stamped on the back, as well as crests and
other figures on the front, by placing the buttons
between steel dies, on which the figures are cut
and letting a heavy weight fall upon the upper
die. In this manner are stamped the buttons of
servants’ liveries, and soldiers’ clothes; and a
manufacturer has many sets of dies for livery- |
buttons alone. The cutting of these dies is a
Separate trade from button-making.

Buttons are made of other substances besides
metal. Those which are covered with silk or
cloth consist of moulds, or thin round pieces of
hard wood or bone, with a hole in the middle.
They are cut by a machine from such chips of
BUTTONS.

87

bone as are too small for other purposes; and
a little girl at a machine can cut out many of
these moulds in a minute.

QUESTIONS.

Is not the making of buttons a
curious art ?

Where are metal buttons chiefly
made ?

How are the shanks of buttons
made ?

Can you tell me how some buttons
are cast ?

How are the shanks fixed in cast
buttons ?

Of what materials are white metal

How are plated buttons made ?

How are gilt buttons made?

How are the shanks fastened to
these buttons?

How are buttons gilded?

Is much gold used in gilding
buttons ?

How are names and figures
stamped on buttons ?

Are not buttons made of other
materials besides metal ?

buttons made ? | How are button-moulds cut?



Lesson XI. Silver; Plate.

SILVER and gold are called the ‘ precious metals,’
on account of their scarcity and the difficulty of
obtaining them; as well as the peculiar proper-
ties they possess. A small quantity of gold or
silver is readily taken in exchange for great
quantities of other metals; but neither silver nor
gold, in themselves, are so useful as iron, tin, or
copper, which metals contribute so greatly to
the conveniences and comforts of life. bh
Silver has been obtained from the lead mines
88 SILVER,

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of Great Britain; and it rarely happens that
lead is not mixed with some portion of silver.
Tt is found in various parts of Europe, as
Sweden, and Norway, France, and Spain. It
is dug in galleries under ground, some of which
are of very great length.

The richest silyer mines in the world are among
the mountains of the Andes, in South America.
SILVER—PLATE, e

Silver was once so plentiful in Mexico, that
tables, picture-frames, footstools, and jugs, in
common use, were sometimes made of solid
silver.

An extensive silver mine of South America is
represented in the print annexed to this lesson.
In the middle are seen the labourers employed
to carry up the ore, each of whom carries a
certain quantity strapped to his back; with this
load he climbs the rude ladders, which are
fixed nearly upright, and lead to the mouth of
the mine. |

Silver is found in the earth sometimes like
threads, sometimes in the form of leaves, and’
sometimes in large masses. It is rarely found
pure, being usually mixed with gold, mercury,
copper, tin, iron, or lead.

Silver is separated from these metals by wash-
ing and grinding the ore, and roasting it with
saltinafurnace. Itis then mixed with mercury,
or quicksilver, and put into the furnace, when
the mercury is dissolved by heat, and goes off
in vapour, and the pure silver remains. Silver
is extracted from lead by melting the ore in
the open air; the lead burns to ashes, and the
pure silver sinks. For most purposes, silver is
alloyed with copper, without which it would not
have sufficient hardness to sustain much wear.
90 SILVER—PLATE,

Silver is manufactured into articles for do-
mestic use: as tea-pots, drinking-mugs, waiters,
candlesticks, and spoons. Silver articles of
this kind are called plate. Tea-pots and mugs
are first shaped with a wooden mallet, then
beaten on a metal stake with a polished-steel
hammer, and finished by burnishing with steel
tools, stones, and leather.

The beautiful figures upon plate are raised
by chasing or embossing; that is, by striking
the silver with blunt steel punches in the shape
of the figures.

Much of the silver used in England is made
into forks and table and tea-spoons. These
articles are wrought upon the anvil, or cut out
of sheet-silver, and shaped by striking and
filing. The raised work is produced by placing
the articles, when red-hot, in a press, between
figures cut in steel. The marks upon the back
of silver articles are directed by law to be placed
there, in order to show that the silver is of the
proper fineness.

Great quantities of silver are coined into
crowns, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences.
One pound of silver is coined into sixty-six
shillings.

Plated articles are those which are made of
common metal, as copper, and are coated with
SILVER—PLATE. 91

silver. The finest ware of this kind is made
at Sheffield, and is, on that account, called
“Sheffield plate.” Here costly breakfast, dinner,
and dessert services are made, and steel spoons
and forks are plated so as to be equal in ap-
pearance to silver. |

QF late years, too, some very clever imita-
tions of silver have been made by different
mixtures of the regulus of antimony, zinc, bis-
muth, and other metals, with lead. Spoons, forks,
candlesticks, and other articles for domestic use
have been made of these mixed metals, in very
elegant patterns, and they are now extensively
used in families where a taste for the elegances
of life prevail, but where silver articles of the
same kind could not be afforded.

Silver is prepared for plating as follows: —A
layer of silver is placed upon a layer of copper;
both are heated, and then flattened, by steel
rollers of tremendous power, into sheets the
thickness of writing-paper, or, if required, to
the thinness of silver-paper. This coating is
spread over the articles, which have been beaten
with a steel hammer, and polished.

A platea candlestick is made by first soldering
the tube or upright part, which is of copper,
coated with silver; the screws and slides are of
brass turned in a lathe, as in the nozzle or top of
92 SILVER—PLATE.

the candlestick, over which the silver coating is
folded: and the foot or bottom is stamped. The
raised ornaments are generally stamped hollow,
out of very thin silver; they are then filled with
soft solder, and fastened upon the candlestick
with a hot soldering iron.

The nicety of plate-working, or plating
articles, is truly astonishing. Although the
silver coatitig is extremely thin, it is spread
over the copper so dexterously, as to make the
article appear as if made of silver itself. Many
thousand pounds’ worth of silver are yearly
consumed in this mode of plating.

Great quantities of silver and gold are used
in making the cases of watches, the works or
inside of which are of fine brass and steel,
When therefore we speak of a silver watch, or
of a gold watch, we only speak of its case.

QUESTIONS,

Which are called
metals”? ?

Are silver and gold as useful as
other metals ?

In what countries is silver found ?

Where are the richest silver
mines ?

In what form is silyer found in
the earth ?

How is silver extracted from the
metals it is found mixed with ?

What domestic articles are made
of silver ?

What do we call plate ?

** precious

How is a silver spoon made ?

Is not much silver made into coin
or money ?

How many shillings are coined
from a pound of silver ?

How are the articles
Sheffield plate made ?

How is silver prepared for plat-
ing ? ‘

Can you tell me how a plated
candlestick is manufactured ?
Is not much silver used in plating ?
What do we mean when we

speak of a gold or silver watch ?

called


Lesson XII. Gold.

GOLD is the purest and most precious of all
metals. It is found in small quantities in
Europe; but it occurs abundantly in other
quarters of the earth. In some parts of Asia,
the domestic utensils, and ornaments of the
palaces of kings, are of solid gold; and, in
former times, the roofs and pillars of temples
were covered with plates of gold.

In some parts of Africa, gold is obtained by
digging up the soil, in others by collecting the
sand brought down by the rivers and torrents.
This is carefully washed by the negro women, in
large bowls, and the small grains of gold that are
94 GOLD.

met with, are preserved in quills. What is thus
collected is called gold-dust, and it passes from
hand to hand, in the purchase of salt, cloths, arms,
gunpowder, and other articles of European pro-
duce and manufacture, required by the negroes.

A certain portion of the coast of Africa has
been called the Gold Coast, chiefly with reference
to the great quantities of that precious metal
brought there by the natives to exchange for
Kuropean commodities. But gold is found in
the greatest abundance in South America,
where also the negroes search for it in the sands
and beds of rivers, as shown in the engraving.

In those countries where silver and gold are
found in abundance, the people are by no means
so happy as they are in countries where silver
and gold are but rarely found.

Gold is found mixed with a little copper or
silver, and is then called native gold. It is
separated by melting, and then refined until it
is perfectly pure. Gold is too soft to be used
by itself, so that it is mixed with copper or
silver, to increase its hardness.

The making of gold-plate resembles the ma-
nufacture of silver-ware.

Articles of jewellery, such as brooches, pins,
and rings, are rarely made of pure gold. They
usually consist of some mixture of metal with a
GOLD. 95

small portion of gold, or of some metal plated
with gold. Gold is easily coloured: it is made
pale with silver, and dark with copper.

Metal articles are gilded by dipping them in
mercury and gold melted together, and then
heating and burnishing them. These articles
are said to be gilt, as silver-gilt, or brass-gilt.

A great quantity of gold is consumed in gild-
ing picture and looking-glass frames, and in
ornamenting the ceilings, wainscot, and furni-
ture of palaces, mansions, and the houses of
- the great.

This kind of gilding is done with gold-leaf:
that is gold hammered so thin that twenty-five
little sheets of the leaf do not weigh five grains:
and upwards of two hundred thousand sheets,
placed one upon another, are not more than an
inch thick.

To form gold-leaf, the gold is first reduced
into thin slips; these are cut into pieces and
beaten upon an anvil; they are next beaten
between vellum, or thick, fine skin, and then
between very thin ox-gut, called “ gold-beater’s
skin,” till the sheets of gold are of a certain size.
The gold-beater employs three hammers of dif-
ferent weights; and the fine skin which he uses
is afterwards fit to apply to cuts and slight
wounds,
96 GOLD.

Gold wire consists of very fine silver wire
covered with gold. Silver may be drawn out
into wire as fine as a hair, without breaking,
and some silver wire is not more than half the
thickness of a fine human hair. It has also
been proved, that one ounce of gold is sufficient
to gild a silver wire more than thirteen hundred
miles long. Gold thread, of which gold lace is
made, consists of threads of yellow silk covered
with flattened gold, which is closely wound upon
them by machinery.

In this country, the principal use of gold is
for coining into money, as sovereigns and half-
sovereigns. One pound of gold is coined into
forty-six sovereigns.

Although all persons do not possess articles
of silver and gold, the manufacture of them
employs many thousand hands, and is, there-
fore, a great benefit to our country,

QUESTIONS.

Which is the purest and most’ Of what do articles of jewellery
precious of all metals ? | consist ?

In what countries is gold found? | How are metal articles gilded ?

Why is a certain part of Africa | How is gold beaten into leaves ?
called “ the Gold Coast ?” | Are not leaves of gold very thin?

Whefe is gold most abundant? — Can you tell me how gold lace is

How is gold found in South Ame- made ?



rica ? . | What is the principal use of gold
For what articles is it chiefly ex- in this country ?
changed ? How many sovereigns are coined

_ Why is gold mixed with other from a pound of gold ?
metal for use ?
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Lesson XIII. The Bed.

A BED is the most useful article of the furni-
ture of a house. We enjoy its comforts every
night; when, having first praised God for-his
providence during the day, and prayed for his
blessings in the night, we lie down to sleep.
Beds are used in all countries: but they are
made of very different materials. Insome cold
countries, the natives sleep upon the warm hajry
skins of animals spread upon the ground. In
other countries, beds consist of bags filled with
dried grass, straw, or the dried leaves of trees.
The ancient Britons slept upon skins spread
on the floors of their rude dwellings. Dried.»
rushes and heath were then used instead (i
II. H
98 THE BED.

skins: and next was used straw, upon which
the early kings of England slept. Straw beds
are used to this day; and labourers in some
parts of England and Scotland sleep upon chaff
beds.

A good bed usually consists of the short and
soft feathers of, geese, inclosed in a cotton or
linen bag, called a tick. These feathers are such
a8 we sometimes see blown about upon village-
greens, or commons, where much poultry is kept.

Fine feathers are better than other materials
for stuffing beds, on account of their softness
and warmth. Feathers likewise, after being
pressed down, spring up; as, when you bend a
feather, or press a feather bed, it will rise again.
Teathers are but slightly pressed together by
lying on them; and they are so light, that by
shaking them, as in making a bed, they are as
soft as before they were lain upon. |

These feathers are plucked from tame geese,
three or four times during the year. In England
the finest feathers are supplied from Norfolk and
Suffolk; an inferior kind is brought from’ Ire-
land. Great quantities of feathers are also sent
from the port of Dantziec, in Prussia, on which
account they are called “ Dantzic feathers.”

The Canada wild-goose, in the coldest parts

® of North America, also yields very fine feathers,
THE BED. 99

which are much prized for beds. Thousands
of these geese are shot in a year at Hudson’s
Bay; they are pickled, dried, or salted, and
put into barrels to keep for eating, and their
feathers are sent to England.

Before feathers are fit for beds, they are
picked, dried, and dressed, to cleanse them of
the oil which they contain.

Beds are sometimes stuffed with feathers
mixed with down, which is the finest feathery
covering plucked from the breast of the goose
and duck. ‘The down of the eider-duck is most
prized for its softness, warmth, and lightness.
It forms the lining of the nest of the eider-
duck, in Greenland and Iceland, two of the
coldest countries in the world. The natives
collect this down from the nests; and the female
bird again strips her breast of the remaining
down, to supply a new lining.

The mattress, upon which the bed is laid, is
stuffed with harse-hair, or the fine wool of
sheep. The palliass is filled with straw, closely
packed; and when placed upon the bedstead, it
‘firmly bears the mattress and bed, which are
laid above it. i |

The use of bed-clothes, such as sheets,
blankets, and counterpane, is to keep us warm
during the night. In the day-time, we keep the

H 2
100 THE BED,

body warm by exercise or labour ; but at night,
when we lie still, the heat would soon escape
from the body, and it would become cold, did
not the covering of bed-clothes prevent it.

- Sheets are called linen, and are made from
the dried fibres or fine threads of flax, a plant
which is grown in fields in England and other
countries.

Blankets are made of wool. They are named
after Thomas Blanket, the first man who made
them. The hairs of woo] are rough, and un-
pleasant to the skin. On this account, we do
not sleep between woollen blankets, but
between smooth sheets of linen or flax.

Quilts, or counterpanes, are usually of thick
cotton. The modes of spinning and weaving
flax, wool, and cotton, will be explained, when
we describe the making of articles of clothing. |

The bedstead has been already mentioned.
It commonly consists of four posts, placed a
certain distance apart, and supporting a kind
frame, upon which are laid the palliass,
mattress, and bed.

Around the bedstead are hung curtains, to
keep out the cold air at night. These curtains
are called the furniture of the bed. They are ge-
nerally made of rough woollen stuff, or of cotton,
ornamented with yarious figures and colours.
THE BED. : 101

The pattern of leaves, flowers, fruit, and the
like, on bed-curtains, is printed from wooden
blocks, upon which the figures are cut. These
blocks are covered with colour, and are stamped
upon the cotton, or calico, which then shows
the figures, or pattern. Sometimes calico is
printed by passing it round copper rollers, on
which the pattern is engraved, and covered with
colour. The calico, when thus printed, is
glazed, or made to bear a shining surface, by
passing it between smooth rollers.

In countries where the art of calico-printing
is not known, printed cottons are much admired
by the natives, and are worn by their rulers as
robes. For this purpose many thousand yards
of cotton are sent every year to those coun-
tries, in exchange for articles which our country
does not produce.

Rest and sleep are necessary for our health;
.and the bed enables us to enjoy those blessings.
But too much sleep leads to idleness, and is
hurtful to the mind and body.

The sluggard wastes many hours in bed; but
the good man, when he awakes in the morning
refreshed with sleep, rises to praise God for
his safety during the past night, and then
‘ begins the business of the day.
102 THE BED.

QUESTIONS.

Of what materials were the beds | Of what are sheets made ?
of the early Britons made ? Of what are blankets made ?
Of what does a good bed consist? | Of what is the quilt made ?
How are feathers obtained ? Of what does a bedstead consist ?
What is down ? Why are curtains used ?
What kind of down is most | Howare curtains or bed furniture
prized ? printed ?
With what material is the mat- | How is bed furniture glazed ?
tress stuffed ? What are necessary for our health?
With what is a palliass filled ? | What follows from too much
Of what service are bed-clothes? | sleep?

Lesson XIV. The Looking-glass.

A LOOKING-GLASS is a handsome article of fur-
niture. Looking-glasses of great size are only
to be seen in large houses; but in almost every
house there is a looking-glass large enough to
show the face.

A pane of plate-glass in a window-frame
shows the face of the person who looks in it, as
does the polished surface of a mahogany table;
but neither of them shows the face so clearly as
the looking-glass.

A looking-glass is a plate of smooth glass.
It is covered at the back with very bright metal,
which shines through the glass,andmakesamore
THE LOOKING-GLASS. 103

brilliant surface than the window-pane, or the
polished table. It is the metal which so clearly
reflects the light, and shows the face; for the
glass only preserves the surface clear and flat.

The mode of making plate-glass has been
already explained. Fora looking-glass, a plate
that has been very highly polished is chosen.

The glass is then “silvered,” by placing it
upon tin-foil, which is tin rolled and hammered
into very thin sheets; over which is poured a
mixture of tin and quicksilver. Weights are
then placed upon the glass, upon which the
metal sticks, and becomes hard.

The plate, or looking-glass, is then finished;

and is put into a frame, with a board behind it,
to prevent the silver-coating being injured.
. Looking-glass frames are made of the wood of
the lime-tree; the beautiful figures on them are
carved, or cast in plaster, and laid on. To gild
these frames, fine glue, or size, is brushed over
the wood; gold leaf is then carefully laid upon
the surface, and when dry it is burnished.

QUESTIONS.
Of what does a looking-glass con- | Of what use is the glass ?
sist ? Of what materials is the frame of
. How is the glass “ silvered ?”’ a looking-glass made?

Of what use is the “ silveriug?” | How is the frame gilt ?

Mm -
104

Lesson XV. Carpets.

CaRPET is a thick kind of stuff, made wholly |
or partly of wool, of different colours: and used
to cover the floors of rooms.

Carpets are made in various parts of Great
Britain: and the art of making them is called
carpet-weaving. They are named from the
places at which they are manufactured : as Kid-
derminster carpet, made at Kidderminster, in
Worcestershire ; Wilton carpet, first made in
Wiltshire; Axminster carpet, in imitation of
Turkey carpets, made at Axminster, in Devon-
shire ; Scotch carpet, in Scotland.

Brussels carpeting was first made at Brus-
sels, the chief town of the Kingdom of Belgium;
but it is now made in England. Turkey carpets
are brought from Turkey, a large country of
Kurope and Asia.

Carpets are woven by machines, which are
formed of many pieces. The wool, of which
they are made, is first prepared. Afterit is taken
from the sheep’s back, it is sorted or picked; then
cleaned, or scoured; and next combed. It is
next laid straight, and drawn into regular
threads; these are spun or twisted into yarn,
and scoured and dyed of various colours. The
CARPETS. 105

carpeting is then made by weaving, or working
the threads of yarn across each other. The
long threads are called the warp, which is
double; and the cross threads are the woof.

Carpets used for covering bed-rooms and
stairs are very simply made. They consist of a
striped woollen warp, on a thick woof of hempen
thread; the surface thus being woollen, and the
under-part, or inside, being coarse string or
cord. Kidderminster carpet is made entirely
of two woollen webs, worked together in such a
manner as to produce certain figures. Brussels
carpeting is used in parlours and handsomely
furnished rooms. In this kind the woollen
surface is worked upon a warp and woof of
strong hempen thread; but both sides are not
alike, as they are in stair-carpeting. #

In making Brussels carpeting, the weaver
takes to every two threads of hemp about ten
woollen threads of different colours. The
hempen thread does not appear upon the upper
surface; but the woollen threads are drawn up
into little loops, over wires, which are afterwards
taken out. Thus you will find the upper surface
of Brussels carpeting to consist of close rows
of these woollen loops. Sometimes the loops
are made long, and cut through the top: in
which manner hearth-rugs are made.
- .
‘ 3

106 | CARPRTS.

Wilton and Turkey carpets are made very like

~~ Brussels carpeting. But Turkey carpets are en-

Stirely woollen; the loops are very long, and are

“always cut. On this account, Turkey carpets

have a longer woollen surface, are warmer than
other kinds, and are softer to tread upon.

In forming the figure on a carpet, the weaver
copies a pattern which is drawn upon paper.
Beside him, sorted in different colours and
shades, are laid the woollen threads, which he
takes up, according to the figure to be woven,.
and nearly as a painter takes up his colours.
In working a rose, for example, the weaver
takes up different shades of green woollen thread
for the stalk and leaves, and shades of pink for
the flower.

All carpets are not made of the same width.
Stair-carpeting is made to suit the width of the
stairs. Kidderminster and Brussels carpetings
are of different widths; they are made in pieces
many yards long; and,to fitthem to cover rooms,
the widths are sewn closely together. Hearth-

re rugs and Turkey carpets are made in one pieceyy

*= Carpets are more used in England than in -
* any other country. Before they were made
here, the floors of rooms were covered with
dried rushes. Carpets are now seen in every
house, and many thousands of men, women,
CARPETS. 107

and children, are constantly employed in
making them,

Floor-cloth, or oil-cloth, which is used in
passages and kitchens, is canvas thickly painted
with oil-colour. Canvas js a coarse and strong
hempen cloth. To make canvas into floor-cloth
it is stretched upon large wooden frames, and
covered with paint of one colour. The figures
are then printed from patterns upon wooden
blocks, and a separate set of blocks is used for
each colour.

In countries where carpets are little used, the
floors are covered with matting, made of fine
driedrushes, various kinds of grass, and the fibres
of plants and trees, platted or woven.to ether.

Mats, which are placed at doors, are erally
made of rope, or of coarse hemp, twisted or
knotted together; there are also other kinds of
mats, which are made of dried rushes; and the
skins of avimals, with the wool or hair left on
them, are often used as mats.

QUESTIONS.
What is carpeting made of? | How are the figures woven in a
Where are carpets made in Eng- carpet ?
land ? Are carpets much used in Eng-
How is a carpet made? | land ?

What are the long threadg-called ? | What is floor-cloth ?
What are the cross threads called? | How is floor-cloth printed ?
In what respect does Brussels Of what does matting consist ?
differ from other carpeting ? What are door- mats commonly
P : made of ?
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ei XVI. Lar oe

PotTeEry, or Earthenware, such as plates, dishes?
drinking mugs, cups, and saucers, and articles
of that nature, is named from its being chiefly
made of clay, which is dug out of the earth, and
mixed with flint.

Fine earthenware is made in a part of Staf-
fordshire called the Potteries; and it is, on that
account, named Staffordshire ware. Women and
children, as well as men, are employed in making
this ware. They live in cottages, and are, in
general, healthy, industrious, and well behaved.
They are usually hired by the year, and allowed
a fortnight’s holidays in winter; when the frost
is very severe, they cannot follow their work.

The clay for making Staffordshire ware is
EARTHENWARE. 109

chiefly procured from Dorsetshire and from
Devonshire; and the flints from a particular
part of Kent. Similar ingredients are also
brought from other parts of England.

The flints are first burnt in a kiln resembling
a lime-kiln; and, while hot, they are quenched
in water, and broken into small pieces. They
are then ground in mills, with water, to the
thickness of cream. ‘The clay is next mixed
with water, passed through fine sieves, then
mixed with the flint-liquid.

This liquid mixture of clay and flint is passed
through sieves, and put into brick troughs, be-
neath which fires are made; and there it remains
until it becomesathick paste. Itis then worked,
or ground in a mill, or beaten with wooden
mallets. The paste is next cut into small pieces,
which are thrown together with great force, so
as to drive out the air bubbles and make it quite
smooth and solid. Ifthe air be not quite driven
out, the earthenware, when baked, will be rough
and blistered,as we sometimes see common ware.

The paste is then made fit for working into the
articles intended to be made. Cups, basins, and
other round vessels are first shaped upon a ma-
chine called the potter’s lathe. This consists of
a round board, which is made to turn by a rope
and large wheel with a handle, worked by a boy
a's

110 EARTHENWARE. ~
while the potter holds a lump of clay upon the
round board, which, as it turns, shapes the vessel.

In the engraving, the woman hands the clay
to the potter, who shapes it upon the lathe.

When half dried, the vessels are again turned
upon another kind of lathe, which is like that
used by the turner in wood, and is worked by
the foot, like a knife-grinder’s wheel.

Handles of cups and mugs, and spouts of
jugs, tea-pots, and other vessels, are made in
moulds, and fastened to the vessel with moist
clay. ‘The articles are then dried in a warm
room, or in a stove, and rubbed smooth with
coarse paper.

Articles that are not round are made of the
thick paste, rolled out, like dough, into thin
sheets, and then pressed into moulds. In this
manner, also, are made raised figures, as, for in-
stance, of animals and flowers, which are fixed
with wet paste upon drinking-jugs, and the like.

Plates and dishes are beaten or rolled out of
lumps of clay, and then turned upon the mould
or block of the potter’s lathe.

QUESTIONS.

Why are plates, dishes, and the | How is clay prepared for earthen-
like, called Staffordshire ware ? ware ?

How is it made? How are cups and basins made ?

How are flints prepared for earth- | Howare handles and spouts made?
enware ? How is a plate or dish made ?
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Lesson XVII. Earthenware (continued).

THE vessels, being quite dry, are put into
baked clay cases, in the shape of band-boxes,
and are piled up in a kiln, or oven, with a fire
in the middle. Here the vessels are baked until
they are white, or the colour of descutt, by which
name they are called.

The ware is next dipped into a hot liquid,
called glaze, and again dried and put into the
oven, where the heat converts the glaze into
the glossy coating which we see upon crockery-
wate. The articles, if of common white ware,
are now finished.

The yellow, or queen’s-ware, 1s made of the
same materials as the better sort. It is dipped
1i2 - EARTHENWARE.

in yellow glaze, which contains much lead.
The common yellow ware, called delft, was first
made at the town of Delft, in Holland.

_ The patterns are printed upon the biscuit ware
in a simple manner. They are put on plates and
dishes by first printing the pattern upon soft
paper from a copper-plate, nearly as the pictures
in books are printed. The wet picture is laid
upon the biscuit, the ink in which it is printed
adheres to the ware, and the paper is washed
away. The ware is then glazed and baked, and
is fit for use.

In the engraving, the man is printing the
patterns at a press, and the four women are
placing patterns upon the biscuit.

The patterns upon common earthenware are
chiefly printed in blue, which stands the heat
of the oven better than any other colour, and is
pleasing to the eye.

Before the art of printing upon earthenware
was understood, and cheaply executed, plates,
dishes, and basins, were of plain white ware;
but we have our plates now generally covered
with landscapes or figures of animals.

This improvement has added to the comforts
of the kitchen, and the ornaments of the table.
It has also extended our trade in earthenware
with other parts of Europe; and well-made and
EARTHENWARE. 113

printed ware is now so cheap, as to be seen in
nearly every cottage in England.

Stone-ware is the strongest kind of pottery,
and is nearly as hard as flint. The best is
made at Lambeth, near London; where drink-
ing-jugs, pickle-jars, and bottles with handles,
are manufactured in great numbers. They are
glazed by throwing salt upon them, while they
are baking in the kiln.

Common red-ware is made of clay, some-
times coloured with red-lead, and is the coarsest
kind of pottery.

The finest Staffordshire ware was first made
by a Mr. Wedgwood; and is on that account
also called Wedgwood’s ware. It is of the blue
pattern, and is now nearly in as common use as
white ware was some years since. Mr. Wedg-
wood long employed all the inhabitants of a
village in Staffordshire in making this beautiful
ware: he was a kind master, and an excellent
man. |

Another kind of Wedgwood’s ware resembles
fine stone. Of this are made pestles and mortars,
used by druggists, ornamented jugs, vases, &c.

Great quantities of pottery are yearly sent
from England to all parts of the world; and its
manufacture is very profitable. Even common

earthenware is sent to very distant countries.
TT, I
114 EARTHENWARE.

Captain Clapperton, when travelling in the
middle of Africa, and dining with a sultan, had
a piece of meat served up in a white wash-hand
basin of English manufacture.

QUESTIONS.

How is earthenware baked ? | What is delft-ware ?

How is the queen’s-ware made? | Whyis Wedgwood ware so named?

How are the patterns printed upon | How is stone-ware glazed ?
earthenware ? | Is earthenware sent from England

Why is blue so much used in to other countries ?

printing earthenware ?



Re ee ee

Lesson AVITI. A China Tea-Cup.

THE finest and hardest kinds of pottery are
called porcelain, and china; for this ware was
first made in China, a large country in Asia,
and that from which tea is brought.

British porcelain, or china-ware, is made at
Derby, at Worcester, in Staffordshire, and in
other parts of England. It consists of the finest
clay and flint, which are ground and mixed
with other substances.

At Worcester, these ingredients are ground
by a vast iron roller, which weighs upwards of
four thousand pounds. After this they are
burnt, and then ground at a mill, mixed with
water, and passed through very fine sieves. The
liquid mixture is then put into troughs, with fires
beneath them, where it remains until it is the
A CHINA TEA-CUP. 115.

thickness of clay; it is then beaten, cut into
pieces, and thrown together, as in making
earthenware.

The articles are shaped upon the potter’s
lathe, and then dried gradually. They are next
turned at the lathe, till they are diminished in
thickness about one-half. The ware is then
burnt nearly sixty hours in kilns; when taken
out it is called discuzt, and is ready for painting.

If you look at the patterns upon a fine china
tea-cup, you will see that the figures are of
their natural colours. ‘The trees and hills are
green, the brick houses are red, the feathers of
birds are of many colours, and even the faces of
men, women, and children, are of the colour of
our own skin. To paint all these patterns of
so many colours, and to fix them upon the cup,
so that they will not wear or rub off, is the most
difficult branch of manufacturing china.

The colours for painting china are obtained
from various metals, as from iron, copper,
cobalt, and others. They are mixed with water,
or very fine oil and turpentine, and laid on the
china with fine hair-brushes, as in painting a
picture. The strongest colours, or those which
will best bear heat, are mixed with water, and
are first laid on the biscuit, which is then
dipped in glaze, and a second time fired in the

I 2
116 A CHINA TEA-CUP.

kiln. The articles are allowed to cool, and are
taken out of the kiln; the more delicate colours
are mixed with turpentine, and laid upon the
glaze with a camel-hair pencil; and the china
is then fired a third time.

If the articles be left too long in the kiln, the
colours will be injured. Great quantities of
china are spoiled in this manner; and, on this
account, fine china is very expensive.

The gold figures and ornaments are laid on
porcelain with gold-leaf, or gold in powder,
mixed with honey or gum-water. The chinais
then set in an oven, that the gold may be burnt
in. The gold lines upon small articles, as cups,
saucers, and plates, are first traced by a wheel.

Lastly, the china is burnished, or highly
polished, with a very hard but smooth stone,
called agate, and with sheep skin, white lead, and
vinegar. This is done by females with such care,
that they do not touch the china with their hands
without covering them with clean white linen.

Porcelain, or china, is of a whiter colour, and
much lighter than earthenware. It is likewise so
thin as to be transparent; that is, the light can
be seen through it. Very thinchina sometimes
cracks; but it should bear strong heat, as china
vessels are used for holding boiling liquids.

The paintings upon porcelain are often very
A CHINA TEA-CUP. 117

beautiful; and plates are sometimes so elegantly
painted, as to be sold-for one guinea each. Jars
and vases, such as we see on chimney-pieces,
are often painted at a great expense. Images,
or figures of china, are shaped with the hand,
and carefully coloured. The painting, gilding,
and burnishing of china, furnish an ingenious,
healthy, and profitable employment to vast
numbers of girls and women.

Fine porcelain is made in various countries
besides England; and each kind is usually
ornamented with scenes of the country in which
it is manufactured. The colours are finer than
those on British porcelain; but the figures on
the ware made in China are badly drawn.

A china vase was made some years since, in
France, which cost one thousand pounds. The
Duke of Wellington has a dinner service, which
was made in Germany; on the plates are
painted pictures of the principal battles in
which the Duke has been engaged.

QUESTIONS.

Why is China so named ? _ How is china made so thin ?
Where is British porcelain, or How is china hardened ?

china, chiefly made ? - How is much china spoiled?
What is china made of ? | Why is fine china so expensive ?
How are the ingredients pre« How is china painted ?

pared ? | How ‘is tif gold laid on china?
Can you tell me in what state | How are the painting and gilding

china is called biscuit ? | made to last on china?

How is a tea-cup shaped ? | How is china burnished ?


Lesson XLX. Glass-ware.

Tuer art of making window-glass has been
already described; so that you will easily
understand how glass articles, such as drinking-
vessels, bottles, and vessels of that kind,are made.

The ingredients of this glass are nearly the
same as those of window-glass. The best glass
was formerly made with common flints, burnt
and ground; it was therefore called /lint-glass,
or crystal, from its beautiful clearness. Sand is
now used instead of flints, with pearlash. To
these are added litharge, or red-lead; both of
which cause the mixture to melt more readily,
improve its brightness, and enable it to bear
extreme heat.
GLASS-WARE. 119

The London flint-glass, celebrated for its
brilliancy when cut, contains much red-lead;
which makes the glass so soft as easily to
scratch, Another substance, called glass-soap,
is used to rid glass of any foul colour, or tinge,
and make it perfectly clear.

Drinking-glasses, decanters, salt-cellars, and
other small articles, are made of the best flint-
glass. Wine-bottles are made of common green
glass, manufactured of coarse sand and burnt
sea-weed, or kelp, with many impurities; no
pains being taken to clear this glass, as is done
with the finer kinds.

The ingredients of flint and common glass
are melted in pots and furnaces, nearly in the
same manner as those of window-glass, already
described.

To make a glass vessel, a wine-glass, for ex-
ample, the workman dips a hollow iron rod, or
tube, into the melted glass ; which he shapes by
blowing through the tube, and by rolling it*on
an iron plate. The article is then taken upon
a smaller iron rod. The workman also uses an
instrument like a pair of sugar-tongs, to give
the glass, which is as soft as clay, its particular
form; and, while the glass is red-hot, he can cut
it with scissors as easily as he cati cut leather.

In this manner a wine-glass is formed” in
120 GLASS-WARE.

separate pieces—namely, the bowl which holds
the liquor, the stem, and the foot; all which
are joined together while the glass is hot.

A glass being made, and cooled, must be
heated again, and gradually cooled; for if this
was not done, glass would fly to pieces with
the least change from heat to cold, and break
with a scratch or touch. ‘To prevent this, the
glass articles are placed in trays in an oven,
with a fire at the end, from which they are gra-
dually drawn out. In the engraving is shown
a workman shaping a vessel; another at the
furnace ; and a third, placing articles in the oven.

Common green bottles are made in moulds,
to keep them nearly of the same size.

Glass intended to be cut, or ornamented, is
made very thick, as the pattern is cut out from
the surface. This is done by grinding the glass,
at small wheels of stone, metal, or wood. The
glass is held to the edge or surface of the stone
wheel, and then to an iron wheel covered with
sharp sand. The pieces are ground or chipped
out by the quick motion of the wheels; and the
glass is then polished with brushes fastened
upon other wheels,

In this: manner are cut the best wine-glasses,
salt-cellars, and decanters, all of which are first
blown, or shaped, of great thickness. But an
GLASS-WARE. 121

inferior kind of these articles is made, by cast-
ing the glass in moulds.

A visit to a glass-house, where glass-ware is
made, will be very amusing. You may there
see the glass-blower form the red-hot lump of
glass into articles of beautiful shapes. Witha
few instruments, he twirls, divides, and joins
the soft glass with ease and safety: upon cool-
ing, the glass becomes as hard and clear as
crystal; after which its surface is cut and
polished, to show all the colours of the rainbow.

By the addition of various substances, the
glass-blower can tinge glass with different
colours. Other articles destroy the clearness of
glass: the white clock-face is a specimen; for
it consists of glass, with the addition of tin.

Decanters are closed with pieces of glass,
called stoppers; the surface of which, as well as
the inside of the neck of the decanter, is ground
rough upon a wheel, so as to fit tightly, and
keep out the air.

Corks are also used for closing bottles. These
consist of the dried bark of the cork-tree, burnt
or scorched in a strong fire, and cut up into
smooth round pieces. These are squeezed into
the mouth of the bottle, and prevent the escape
of the liquor, as well as the entrance of air,
which might spoil its flavour.
122 GLASS-WARE.

QUESTIONS.

Why is the best glass called flint- | Why are glass articles cooled,

glass ? heated, and cooled again ?
What are the ingredients of fine | How is glass cut?

glass ? How is glass polished ?
What is glass.soap used for ? How is glass coloured ?
Of what are wine bottles made ? How are stoppers fitted to de-
How is a wine-glass made ? canters ?

Of what do corks consist ?

We have now gone through the manufacture
of the principal articles of furniture in a dwelling-
house; as the cabinet-work ; the iron-fittings,
as the stove-grates; the tin, copper, and brass-
ware, or kitchen utensils; cutlery, or articles of
steel, as knives, forks, and scissors; and costly
plate of silver and gold.

We have also seen how we are provided with
the comforts of a feather-bed: and how are made
the beautiful looking-glass, and the carpet which
affords warmth and ornamentto ourrooms. Next
are the processes of making earthenware, china,
and glass articles, which are used at every meal
of the day.

In all. these branches of manufacture, British
artisans excel ; and accordingly, houses in Britain
are better furnished than in any other country.

Let us next consider various articles which
are in common use; and which, though not,
strictly speaking, furniture, contribute to the
many comforts of a house.
ssh ‘i on

=



Lesson XX. The Candle.

THE candle need not be described ; as we all
have often noticed its steady flame at night.
There are many methods of producing light,
but that of a candle or lamp is the most conve-
nient and useful. A fire affords light, but only
in one spot; while a lighted candle may be
carried safely from place to place.

Candles are made of tallow, or wax, with
cotton wicks. The tallow used by the candle-
maker consists chiefly of the fat of oxen and
sheep, which is harder when cold than the fat
of other animals. This fat is melted in a large
boiler, and then purified. It is next, while hot
and liquid, taken out of the boiler in buckets,
124 THE+«CANDLE.

and put into casks to cool. Itis then called
tallow ; great quantities of which are sent from
Russia to this country, in exchange for cotton
goods, and other articles which are made in
England.

The cotton of which the wicks of candles are
made is chiefly received from Turkey, in ex-
change for linen goods of British make. This
cotton is finely spun, and is used by the candle-
maker in the form of skeins, which, when cut
into pieces ‘of certain lengths, form wicks.

The threads of the wicks are then laid smooth,
and slightly twisted, except at the top, where is
a kind of loop, such as we see in a common
candle, before the cotton is lighted. Several of
these wicks are hung by the loops upon long
rods or sticks, to be dipped into the tallow.

The hard tallow is now taken from the casks,
and is again melted in a boiler. Itis then, while
quite hot, ladled into a box lined with lead, and
called the dipping-mould.

The workman next takes in his hands a cer-
tain number of sticks, or rods, upon which the
wicks are hung: he dips them two or three times
into the liquid tallow; and he then hangs up
the rods with the dipped wicks to cool. |

This dipping is repeated, until the candles
are thick enough. Between each dipping, the
THE CANDLE, 125

tallow cools; and the maker weighs the candles
upon the rods until they are of the proper
weight; as four, six, eight, or ten to a pound.
Candles thus made are called dips. In the en-
graving, the candle-maker is at work at the
dipping-mould ; and beside him are candles
Seiiey cape to tradi,

Moulds, or candles of a better quality, are
made by pouring the finest melted tallow into
pewter pipes or moulds, through which the wick
is placed. Several of these moulds are fixed in
a frame like a wooden stool, with a shallow
trough at the top. ‘The candle-maker pours the
melted tallow into this trough; it then runs into
the moulds, and cools with the wick in the
middle. The frame is set aside; and when the
tallow is hard, each candle is drawn from its
mould. In the engraving, the candle-maker to
the right is removing two sets of the mould-
frames.

Besides the common dipped and the mould
candles, there are others made of tallow to burn
during the night without being snuffed. These
are called rush-lights; for the wicks are made
of split and peeled rushes, such as are used for
the seats of chairs, ~~. ae"

These rushes are found by the iilan of

streams, and under hedges. In sonie parts of

*
126 : THE CANDLE.

the country, the cottagers gather the rushes,
and having split and peeled them, dip them in
common grease, to burn instead of candles.
They give a clear, good light, and are much
cheaper than candles with cotton wicks.

Candles are likewise made of white wax, with
cotton wicks. The wax is made by bees; when
taken from the hive, it is of a yellow colour; it
is bleached or made white by laying it on linen
cloth upon grass, open to the air, the dew, and
the sun.

To make candles, the wax, when soft, is
placed around the wick, and then rolled upon
a smooth wooden table, until the candles are
quite round.

Candles are also made of spermaceti, which
is the fat of the long-headed whale, and is mixed
with tallow or wax.

Let us now sce how the flame of the candle is
produced. When you light the cotton, the heat
of the flame melts the tallow, which rises through
the threads of the wick and burns. More of
the tallow is then melted, and rises; and so,
the tallow is melted and burned, until the whole
of the wick is consumed.

In tallow-candles, the wick is so large, that
the flame will not quite burn it away; but a
black snuff is left at the top. This must be cut,

a
THE CANDLE. | 127

or snuffed off, to allow the candle to give a clear
light. Wax-candles do not require to be snuffed:
for the flame burns all the wick.

A pair of snuffers is made like a pair of
scissors, with a little box on one side, It cuts
off the black snuff, and shuts it into the box.
You have been told how snuffers are made of
fine steel and of common iron.

Tallow and wax are obtained in some coun-
tries from trees which grow there. A tree grows
in China, called the tallow-tree, from the kernels
of which tallow is extracted; and in South
America is found the wax-palm, the trunk of
which is coated with wax. Where the art of
candle-making is not known, the leaves and
branches of trees are dipped into the above
grease, and made into torches. ‘The branches
of the pine-tree are used for the same purpose,
as already explained.

QUESTIONS.
What are candles made of? How are wax-candles made ?
Of what does tallow consist ? | What is spermaceti ?
Where is cotton brought from? | How is the flame of a candle pro-
How are tallow candles made? | duced?
Why are mould-candles so called? | What is a pair of snuffers like?
What are rush-lights ? Are not tallow and wax obtained
Where are rushes found? from some trees ?

How is wax whitened ?
wh 128

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Lesson XXI. The Lamp.

Lamps are hollow vessels to hold oil and cotton
wicks which burn and give light. The cotton is
placed in the oil, and put through a small pipe,
so that the end of the wick rises above the sur-
facé of the oil. This end is lighted, and sucks
up the oil through the threads. of the cotton,
which burns with a steady flame. In this
manner, the cotton burns until it is consumed,
or until there is no more oil in the lamp. A
small and single lamp, such as is often burnt in
bed-rooms during the night, is shown upon the
lady’s work-table in the engraving.
THE LAMP. 129

Lamps intended to hang from the ceiling, or
stand upon the tables of sitting-rooms, are made
in various forms, handsomely gilt and orna-
mented. Some of this description may be seen
in the engraving. Sometimes the oil is con-
tained within hollow balls; from which it flows
through pipes, and rises to the cotton, which is
in the form of a ring. Around the flame is a
glass chimney, which gives the air an upward
current, and causes the flame to burn more
steadily and brightly than it would do if wholly
exposed to the air.

In other lamps, the oil is in a large hollow
ring, from which it flows along pipes to the
wick in the middle. This kind of lamp stands
upon an upright pillar; it is also covered with
a large ground glass, which shades the light
from the eyes. A specimen of this kind of lamp,
which is much used to read by, may be seen on
the table to the left of the engraving.

In a lantern, the lamp or candle is covered
with a glass frame, through which the light
shines, and may be carried through the air with-
out being blown out. The lantern used in the
stables is sometimes made of thin horn, which
is stronger than glass, and sometimes of wire
gauze, which has the advantage of not being
easily broken. It would not be safe to carry a

II. K
130 THE LAMP.

candle or lamp into a stable, or many other
places, except in a lantern, as sparks from the
flame might set fire to the hay or straw, or other
combustibles. The lights in the streets are
also enclosed in glass lanterns, and may thus
be kept burning in all weathers.

Oil, which is burnt in common lamps, is the
fat of the whale, an immense animal which
swims in the sea, like a fish. The whale is
chased by men in boats, who kill it with spears,
and then cut off the flesh, and convey it to land
in ships. The flesh, when boiled, yields the oil.
Besides oil, the whale supplies the substance
called “ whalebone,” which is worn in women’s
stays, and used in making umbrellas.

Gas is now used for lighting streets and large
buildings. It burns much brighter, and is less
expensive than oil.

QUESTIONS.
What is a lamp? What kind of lamp to use to read
How is the wick placed in alamp? by ?
How does the vil flow to the | What are the uses of a lantern?
wick? ' What is oil ?
How does the oil burn in the | How is oil obtained from the
wick ? whale ?

Why have some lamps glass Is not gasmore advantageous than
chimneys ? oil for lighting the streets ?

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Lesson XXII. Articles used in Cleaning.
Pearl-ash ; Soda; Soap; Brushes.

SEVERAL articles are wanted to keep a house
clean and in order. Water will not clean floors,
and wash clothes, unless pearl-ash, soda, or soap
is mixed with it.

Pearl-ash is a whitish and lumpy kind of salt.
It is made by burning the stalks of plants, and
the wood of trees, in countries where timber is
plentiful. Green vegetables and weeds, when
burnt, produce the greatest quantity of ashes.

In the manufacture of this substance, the
ashes of the plants and trees are mixed with
boiling water, which dissolves the salt they con-
tain. This liquor is put into open iron pans,

K 2
132 ; PEARL-ASH.

and dries up; leaving a substance called pot-
_ ash, which, when burnt in a furnace, becomes
pearl-ash.

Great numbers of oak and pine-trees, in the
vast forests of Russia and America, are burnt
for making pot-ash.

The pot-ash and pearl-ash, used in England,
are chiefly sent to this country in large barrels
from Canada, in North America, where wood is
very abundant.

Large quantities of pot-ash are also made from
the ashes of wood-fires in houses. In the winter,
the ashes are saved, and laid in heaps under
sheds; and in summer the pot-ash is washed
from them, and burnt into pearl-ash.

Soda is made by burning plants which grow

in salt-marshes, or on the sea-shore; the ashes »

of the plants being washed and burnt, as in
making pearl-ash. Soda is also procured from
salt, which is found in immense masses under
the earth’s surface.

Soda is used in washing linen, and in cleaning
the floors of houses. Great quantities of soda
are also consumed in making soap, which is
the most serviceable article used in cleaning.

The kinds of soda used in soap are barilla and
kelp. Barilla is obtained from the ashes of a
bushy plant, which is cultivated upon the Spanish
SODA AND KELP. 133

shore of the Mediterranean Sea. The plants are
torn up and dried like hay; they are then burnt
with straw and reeds, over holes in the earth,
into which the soda runs in a liquid form, and
_ hardens.

Kelp is procured from the ashes of sea-weeds,
which are collected upon the rocky shores of
Scotland, and burnt in kilns, or holes in the
ground, surrounded with stones. This is espe-
cially the case in the Orkneys and Hebrides,
where almost the whole population are so em-
ployed from May to September in each year.
Thus, we see that Providence causes even the
weeds upon the sea-shore to benefit man.

Soap cannot be made without barilla or kelp;
and the finest sort of kelp is also used in making
glass, as we have already explained. Soap and
glass are two of the most ingenious and useful
of all manufactures.

Soap is made as follows. ‘The soap-boiler first
breaks the Spanish barilla, or Scotch kelp, into
pieces, or it is coarsely ground by a horse-mill.
He mixes the barilla, or kelp, with quick-lime ;
he then throws the whole into a large wooden
or iron vat, and fills them up with water.

- When the water has become strongly impreg-
nated with the barilla or kelp, it is drawn off;
the vats are then filled up with water, which,
134 SOAP.

after standing, is let off as before. This liquor
is called soap-lees, or soap-boiler’s ley.

Oil, or tallow, is then put into a large iron
boiler, and melted with a certain quantity of
ley ; till, by long continued boiling, the mixture
thickens into a soapy paste. Such of the liquoras
does not mix with the oil or tallow, is pumped off,
and more ley is added. The mixture is boiled, as
before, into a thick paste. Itis then taken out of
the boiler, and poured into wooden frames; it be-
comes hard on cooling,and is cut into bars for sale.

Soap is of various colours. The mottled kind,
which is streaked or veined like marble, is made
by adding water to the soap-paste, which is, at
first, of a dark colour. Yellow soap is made by
adding resin and common fish oil. Soft soap is
made by boiling pot-ash, water, and oil together.

It is the soda which causes the water and oil
or tallow to mix in making soap. The sodaalso
gives to soap its cleansing quality: it causes it
to dissolve in water, and to remove grease from
linen in washing. The oil or tallow lessens the
sharpness of the soda, and prevents it from in-
juring the hands of those who use the soap.

The finer kinds of soap for washing the skin,
are made with oil of almonds, palm-oil, suet, or
butter, mixed with as little soda as possible,
and scented with perfume.
SOAP—STARCH. 135

Soap is made in most large towns in England.
The buildings in which it is boiled occupy much
ground, and the smell of soap-boiling is offensive;
so that soap-houses are commonly built upon the
borders of towns. Large fires are kept in soap-
houses, and they have very tall chimneys, which
greatly increase the draft through the fires, and
carry up the smoke,which would otherwise annoy
the inhabitants of the neighbourhood. Scores of
such chimneys may be seen upon the banks of
the river Thames, and around London, and
other cities. Several of these are the chimneys
of soap-houses; others, the chimneys of glass-
houses, iron-foundries, breweries, and factories
of various kinds.

Starch, which is used by laundresses, is made
from damp and injured wheat, unfit for human
food. The grain is soaked in vats of water, till
it becomes soft; it is then put into coarse bags,
and from it is pressed a milky juice, which falls
to the bottom of the vat, and, being collected
and dried, forms the starch.

Brushes are very useful in cleaning houses.
They are made of bristles or strong hairs, and
whalebone ; these are cut very fine, to an even
surface, and fastened with wire into backs of
wood.

Brooms, for sweeping the floors of houses, are
136 BRUSHES.

made of fine long bristles, which are chiefly taken
from the top of the hog’s back, and principally
obtained from Russia and Prussia. In these
countries, vast herds of hogs run wild in the
forests; their bristles are valuable for making
brooms and brushes; their skins are made into
saddles for riding; and their flesh is excellent
food.

Brush-making is an ingenious art. The holes
for the hairs, and the handles and blocks of
brushes and brooms are en at a lathe, with
great rapidity. |

QUESTIONS.

What is pearl-ash ? Of what use is barilla or kelp in
How is pearl-ash made ? soap ?
Where is pearl-ash chiefly made? | Of what use is tallow in soap ?
How is soda made ? Where is soap made ?
What is barilla ? , Why have soap-houses tall chim-
Where is barilla chiefly made ? neys ?
What is kelp? Can you tell me from what starch
Where is kelp made? is made ?
What are the principal uses Of | How is the starch obtained from

barilla and kelp? the grain ?
How is soap made? How are brushes made?
How are mottled and yellow soaps | What are bristles?

made ? . Where are bristles chiefly ob-

tained ?
137

Lesson XXIII. How a Needle is made.

NEEDLES are employed to sew clothes together ;
and pins are useful to fasten clothes in wearing.
Both are in daily use; and, assmall as are needles
and pins, many thousand persons are always
employed in making them. Indeed, needles and
pins are so useful that the most beautiful dresses
could not be made or worn without them.

Needles are made of soft steel-wire, which is
first cut with large shears into pieces or lengths.
These pieces of wire are fastened in a bundle,
and rolled upon thick iron plate until they are —
straight. They are next pointed, by grinding
them upon a stone wheel. When pointed, the
wire is again cut into bits of the length of the
needle to be made.

The eye is next made, by flattening one end of
the needle upon a small anvil, and then striking
it with a sharp steel punch; when the eye is
complete.

The head of the needle is then bent back with
fine pincers, and the hollow part, or gutter, on
each side of the eye, is made with a fine file: the
head of the needle is next filed smooth. In this
manner, very fine needles are quickly made,
by women and children.

The eyes of large needles are made by a fly-
138 HOW A NEEDLE IS MADRE.

press. What are called “gold-eyed needles,”
are made by dipping the heads in gold dissolved
in very strong spirit. When a needle cuts the
thread, the eye is not properly finished.

The eye and the hollow part being made, the
needles are again straightened by rolling,as when
they were first cut from the wire. Many thou-
sands together are next put into a cast-iron ves-
sel; and, being made red-hot, they are dropped
into cold water. They are next taken out of the
water, and kept upon a hotiron plate, until they
are nena with bluerust. By this heating and
cooling the needles are hardened and tempered.

Each needle is again straightened by strokes
of a small hammer upon an anvil.

The needles are now ready for scouring. This
is done by placing many thousands together upon
coarse cloth, smeared with oil, soft soap, and fine
flour-emery. The cloth and needles are then tied
up in rolls, which are moved backward and for-
ward, as clothes are rolled in a mangle. This is
done for two or three days, when the needles
are taken from the cloth clean and bright.

The needles are next laid straight; not with-
the fingers, but by shaking many thousands of
them together in an iron tray. To arrange them
by hand would occupy so much tine, as greatly
to increase the expense of manufacturing them.
HOW A NEEDLE IS MADE. 139

All the heads of the needles are next placed
one way, and all the points another: those with
broken eyes and broken points being picked out
and thrown aside. The whole is done by women
and children, with astonishing quickness.

The needles are next polished upon a blue
stone ; and are then made up in little packets
for sale.

The finest needles are made at Whitechapel,
in London; and Whitechapel needles are so
celebrated, as to be prized in the middle of
Africa. At Hathersage, a small village in Der-
byshire, whole families are employed in needle-
making. Children are taught to place and sort
the needles, when they are very young; as they
grow up, they work at other branches of needle-
making, and are thus able to assist their aged
parents with their earnings.

Common needles are sold ata very low rate;
although, in making, they pass through many
hands.

The finest needles are beautifully made and
polished. In their manufacture we see how a
substance of little cost may be worked into arti-
cles of great value. Thus a pound of iron is
worth only one half-penny ; but when the iron is
made into steel-wire, it may be formed into many
140 HOW A NEEDLE IS MADE.

thousand needles; and these will be worth much
more than their weight in gold.

Needlework, or the use of the needle, is the
most serviceable employment for females. Little
girls should learn to use the needle when they
are very young: it will make them neat in their
dress, and happy by the fire-side at home.

As they grow up to be women, needlework
will afford them many comforts, and help them
to earn their own living.

As they grow old, they will find needlework a
pleasure: it will not tire them like hard labour;
but it will make them cheerful, and contented
with that station in which it has pleased God
to place them.

QUESTIONS.

What are needles made of ? Where are the finest needles

How are needles pointed ? made ?

How is the eye of a needle | What is the value of a pound of
made ? | iron ?

How are needles hardened and | To what extent and how may its
tempered ? value be incrcased ?

How are needies scoured or Mention some of the advantages
polished ? of needlework.




Lesson XXIV. How a Pin ts made.

THE art of making pins is very ingenious; but
it is easier to make a pin than to make a needle.

Pins are made of brass wire, which is first
hardened, cleaned, and beaten. The wire is then
straightened by a woman, assisted by a boy or
girl; and it is next cut up with shears into
lengths for six pins each.

A man sharpens the ends of these pieces of
wire, by grinding many of them at once, upon a
steel-faced wheel, cut like a file; and afterwards
upon another wheel of a finer kind. This is
called pointing.

Both ends to the pointed wire are now cut off
142 HOW A PIN IS MADE.

with shears, to the length of a pin. The re-
mainder of the wire is then pointed at both ends,
which are cut off, and make two more pins.
And the rest of the wire, being pointed at each
end, is cut into two more pins; so that, in three
cuttings, six pins are made from each length of
wire. A man, his wife, and child, usually work
together in pointing, at which they can earn
from six to seven shillings a day.

The heads of the pins are next made by twist-
ing, or spinning, fine soft wire round a mould,
which is the size of the stem of the pin. The
workman cuts off the heads as fast as they are
spun; and he can cut eighteen thousand heads
in a day. The heads are next heated in an iron
ladle, until they are red-hot, and then hardened
in cooling.

The head is fixed on the body of the pin by
women and children. Each person dips the sharp
end of the shank of the pin into a tray-full of
heads, and taking up one head, she passes it to
the blunt end of the shank. She next places the
head upon a steel stake, and lets fall upon it a
hammer, which is seed by a cord and treadle,
worked by the foot. In the engraving, a woman
and girl are seen heading pins by this machine.
The blow of the hammer fastens the head on the
shank ; and from fifteen to twenty thousand pins
HOW A PIN IS MADE. 143

may thus be headed in a day by one person. In
some pins, the head and shank are of one piece,
so that the head is not liable to come off. These
pins are made by a machine, which punches
them out of solid wire, at the rate of sixty pins
in a minute.

As the pins are made of brass wire, they have
to be whitened or tinned. For this purpose the
pins are first put into pickle, to clean them and
make them rough. They are then put into a
boiler with cream-of-tartar and water, and tin in
small grains. The pins are boiled for about two
hours, when they become coated with tin. They
are next taken out of the boiler, and put into a
barrel, with bran and water to wash them ; and
then shaken in bran to dry them. In the en-
eraving, a girl is seen turning a barrel of pins.

The pins are next collected in wooden bowls,
and are ready for placing in rows upon paper.
This is done by women and children. The paper
is folded in two lines; the pins are then taken
from the bowl upon a comb, which catches the
heads between its teeth: they are next fastened
between two pieces of iron, and pushed through
the paper very quickly.

Thus, we see that even so small an article as a
pin passes through many hands in making. But
there would be much time lost, if one person cut
144 HOW A PIN IS MADE.

and pointed the wire, spun and put on the heads,
tinned the pins, and placed them on paper.
And a pin, if made by one workman, would cost
nearly four times as much money as it now
costs, when it is made by several persons.

Pin-making employs many thousand persons.
Whole families work at it, and children are
useful in all its stages. They assist to straighten
and point the wire; to twist, cut, and fix on the
heads ; to whiten the pins, and to stick them
upon paper for sale. In this manner children
are taught to earn their own living, at an early
age.

A pound weight of pins of the common size,
or “elevens,” contains nearly five thousand five
hundred pins.

QUESTIONS,
Which is easiest to make, a pin or | How many pins will the machine
a needle ? make in a minute ?
What is a pin made of? If pins be made of brass wire, why
How is a pin pointed ? do they appear white?

How is the head of a pin made? How are pins stuck on paper?
How is the head fastened on the.| Why are several persons employed

shank ? to make a pin ?
Are not some pins made by a | How are children useful in pin-
machine? — making ?

How is this done ? How many pins weigh a pound ?
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Lesson XXV. Clothes. Spinning and
Weaving.

THE comforts which we derive from clothing
naturally make us curious to learn the sources to
which we are indebted for them. The earth, and
certain animals that feed on it, yield the mate-
rials, which man, by aid of the superior faculties
which God has given him, contrives to fashion
into clothes.

Clothes are made of linen, cotton, silk, wool,
and the fur and skins of animals.

Linen is made of flax, which grows in fields,
and resembles grass. Cotton grows upon plants
and trees. Silk is made by a worm. Wool grows

upon the sheep’s back. The fur of animals is
i]. L
~

146 SPINNING.

made into hats. The skins of animals are tanned
into leather, and made into boots and shoes.

Flax, cotton, and silk, consist of fine fibres ;
and wool is in fine hairs. These articles are
made into clothing by spinning and weaving.

Spinning is the art of twisting these fibres
together into threads, or fine cords. Weaving
is the art of mixing and joining these threads, |
to form cloth. The most simple contrivance
for spinning these materials, is the spinning-
wheel. This consists of a wheel, round which
runs a band, joined to a spindle; and with it is
used a distaff, or stick, round the end of which
is lapped the flax, or material to be spun.

The spinster holds the distaff in her left hand
and fastens the fibre to the spindle: she then
sits beside the wheel, which she puts in motion
by placing her foot upon the treadle beneath.
As the wheel turns it causes the spindle, which
is round, and sharp at one end, to spin upon its
point like a boy’s top. The spinster, in the
meantime, draws the fibres from the distaff, and
passes them between her finger and thumb to
the spindle. Upon this is fixed a small wooden
reel, called a bobbin, round which the fibres
are wound in an even thread, as the wheel and
spindle turn. In this manner, flax is spun into
thread, and made ready for weaving.
SPINNING AND WEAVING. 147

By the spinning-wheel only one thread is
spun at a time, but very curios and beautiful
machines, driven by steam-engines, are also
used for the same purpose. ‘These spin a vast
number of threads, in the time that one can be
spun by the wheel; for by their aid thousands
of spindles are kept moving at the same time.

Weaving, respecting which some lessons have
already been given in the first volume of Zhe
Instructor, consists in forming threads into a flat
web, or cloth, by interlacing one thread with
another. Those threads which form the length
of the cloth, are called the warp: and the
threads which cross the warp, are called the
woof, or weft. The machine at which cloth is
woven is called a loom.

The warp is first prepared by winding off
the threads from the reels, or bobbins, of the
warping-mill. It is then taken off, and stretched
upon rollers. The weaver next raises, by a
treadle, one half of the threads of the warp,
separating them from the other half, and passes
between them the shuttle, which carries with it
the cross threads, or woof. He then raises the
other half, and, the shuttle passing between them
again, the threads are interlaced. This is the
most simple kind of weaving, and is called plain
weaving.

L2
148 SPINNING AND WEAVING.

But the machines or looms by which cloth is
woven, are now principally worked by a water-
wheel or a steam-engine, instead of by hand.
These are called power-looms; and without
further trouble they perform every opcration
after the spinning, till the cloth is made, with a
great saving of time and materials. Indeed, the
saving of spinning and weaving by machinery is
so great, that articles are sold at a much cheaper
rate than they could be if made by hand: and
the comforts of clothing are thus more widely
diffused. *

These are the general methods of spinning
and weaving. By attending to them, we shall
better understand how various substances are
made into different kinds of clothing.

QUESTIONS.

From what sources do we obtain
the materials for our clothing ?

Name a few of the articles of which
clothes are made.

In what does spinning consist ?

In what does weaving consist ?

Which is the most simple contri-
vance for spinning ?

Can you tell me how the spindle
and wheel work together ?

What is the use of the distaff?

How does the spinster pass the
thread from the distaff to the
spindle ?

How is the thread wound off the
spindle?

Can more than one thread be spun
at once by the wheel ?

How does a machine spin more
threads than the wheel ?

What is the warp of cloth ?

What is the woof of cloth ?

In what manner is the warp pre-

pared ?

How is the woof made ?

What is the difference between a
hand and a power loom ?

In what consist the advantages
of spinning and weaving by
machinery ?
——————— EE

eee

149



Lesson XXVI. Flax and Linen.

Fiax, from which linen is made, grows in
almost every country. It is cultivated in Lin-
colnshire, Somersetshire, Yorkshire, and other
counties of England, as well as in Scotland;
and Ireland produces nearly all the flax of which
“ Trish linen” is made.

Great quantities of the seed from which flax
is raised, are imported from North America, _
Russia, and Holland; and flax is a chief article
of trade with Russia.

Flax is a plant which grows about three feet
high, having slender, upright, hollow stalks, with
a fibrous rind, from which linen is made. Flax
is sown in March or April; it blooms, as in the
above engraving, in June or July; and it ripens

and is pulled in August.


150 FLAX AND LINEN.

Flax requires much preparation before it can’
be worked into cloth. Itis first passed through
a sort of comb, to free the stalks from the leaves
and seed-pods: some of the best seeds are saved
for sowing, and the inferior kind is lint-seed, or
linseed, from which is pressed oil used in
painting, and for various other useful purposes.

The flax is tied in bundles, and soaked in [
pits of water, until the rind separates easily from —
the stalk; and then it is spread out thinly to |
dry. tis then broken, or pressed with rollers,
in mills, turned by water-wheels; these not only
break the flax, but clean and straighten it.

Lastly, the flax is further cleaned, and drawn
through a kind of iron comb, into smooth fibres,
when it is ready for the spinster.

In this manner, flax is prepared for spinning
and weaving into cloth. But flax for making
cambric, fine lawn, sewing-thread, and lace, is
dressed more carefully. After itis broken it.is
scraped and cleaned, with a blunt knife, upon
leather; it is then taken to the spinster, who
straightens and dresses it with a brush before it
is spun.

Linen cloth, or shirting, is chiefly manufac- |
tured in the North of Ireland, where many mil- |
lions of yards are made yearly. On_ this
account, the cloth is commonly called “Irish.”


FLAX AND LINEN. 151

The principal linen-manufactories are at Bel-
fast and Coleraine.

When the linen is taken from the loom, it is of
alight brown colour, and requires to be whitened
or bleached. Thisis done by boilingand washing

the cloth several times in pearl-ash and water,

and vitriol and water. Between each washing it
is dried upon grass bleach-fields. It is then
rubbed in soap-lather, and washed in spring-
water: lastly, when the cloth is beautifully
white, it is dried, made up into pieces, mostly
twenty-six yards long, and packed in boxes
for the market.

Lawn is a finer kind of cloth than Irish linen.
Holland cloth is not bleached ; and is, on that
account, called brown holland. Linen goodsare
also made in Lancashire and Yorkshire ; and at
Aberdeen, Dunfermline, and other places in
Scotland.

QUESTIONS.
. *
From what is linen made? Is the flax dressed at the mill?
. In what counties of England does | How is flax prepared for cambric?
flax grow ? Where is Irish linen chiefly made P
Sp Is any flax-seed imported into | How is linen bleached?
England from other countries ? | What are lawn and brown hol-

How does flax grow ? land ?
Of what part of flax is linen made ? | At what places are linen goods
For what purpose is flax soaked made ?

in water ?


13 52

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Lesson XXVII. Linen (continued).

SHEETING, damask table-cloths, toweling, and
all linen goods, not of the kind called Irish, are
made of the finest quality in Yorkshire. The
flax of which these articles are made is chiefly
imported from Russia, and spun at Leeds, in
Yorkshire. While it is raw yarn, or before it is
woven, it is bleached by boiling it with pearl-ash
and water; it is repeatedly washed and dried,
and passed through the bleaching-liquor, to
whiten. It is then spread upon the grass for
three weeks; and, at Barnsley, near Leeds,
one hundred acres of ground may often be seen
thus covered with the thread for weaving.
After the cloth is taken from the loom it is


LINEN. 153

calendered between iron and paper rollers: itis
then passed under heavy stone chests, as linen
is rolled in a mangle.

Table-linen, or damask, is a very fine cloth,
ornamented with flowers, fruit, birds, and other
figures, which are produced nearly by the same
means as the patterns ofacarpet. They are woven
in a draw-loom, by lifting one portion of the
warp out of the way while the other is wrought
and filled with the weft. The part raised is then
lowered, and other threads of the warp are lifted ;
and so on, until the pattern is woven. ‘Table-
linen is highly bleached and calendered, which
gives it a beautifully white and glossy appear-
ance.

In the opposite engraving, the weaver is at
work upon table-linen; in his hand is the
shuttle; his feet are upon the treadles, and be-
hind him is a wheel for winding the threads
upon the bobbins.

Cambric is made of the finest flax, and is
woven like cloth. It is bleached and dressed
with great care, and this gives it a glossy sur-
face. The finest cambric is made in France;
but cambric nearly as good is made in Ireland.
Cambric is also made of cotton, in Scotland ;
but it is neither so smooth nor so expensive as
that which is made of flax.
154 LINEN.

These are the principal linen fabrics which
are used for clothing. But there are many other
articles made of flax, such as the very stout
cloth called canvas, which is used for the sails
of ships, and coarse cloths for bags and other
articles.

Many years since, flax was spun by the wheel
into thread, in private families; and thus, they
in part made sheeting, table-linen, and toweling
for their own use. This kind of work is now
done in much less time, in large factories, by
means of steam machinery. The articles are of
finer quality, and are sold at a cheaper rate;
while the making of them furnishesemployment
and subsistence to many thousand persons.

Yet, in some parts of the country, the good
housewife may be seen spinning at her wheel
by the cottage-door, to this day; where she
appears contented and happy.

QUESTIONS. .

What linen goods are made in | How is cambric made?

Yorkshire ? What is the difference between
From what country is the flax cambric made of flax, and that
imported ? which is made of cotton ?
Where is the flax spun ? What coarse articles are made of
How is the flax bleached ? linen ?
How is the glossy surface givento | What are the advantages of
linen ? spinning being done in large
How are the patterns woven in factories ?

table-cloths ? Is the spinning-wheel now used ?


Lesson XXVIII. Cotton Clothing.

Corton is a downy vegetable substance, im very
fine fibres. It is the produce of plants and —
small trees, which are much cultivated in the
warm countries of Asia, Africa, and America ;
cotton also grows wild in many of these
countries, but then it is of little value. Cotton
will not grow in England, the climate of our
country not being sufficiently warm.

Many articles of clothing are made of cotton.
Common gowns are of cotton, printed with
various colours and patterns ; calico is white
cotton cloth ; and stockings are made of cotton,
bleached or whitened.

The common cotton-plant grows in the East
156 COTTON CLOTHING.

Indies, to the height of three feet; itis downy,
and, while young, sweeét-scented. It bears a
pale yellow flower, with five red spots at the
bottom ; and it yields a pod about the size of
a walnut. This pod ripens in September, when
it bursts and lets out the downy cotton, in which
the seeds are contained.

Cotton is sown and reaped, like corn; and
few plants are more useful. It supplies clothing
to all the quarters of the world; and the
natives of the countries where it is cultivated,
eat the seeds as food.

There is a kind of cotton-plant which grows
_in the West Indies, from four to six feet in
height, and produces two crops every year;
each plant yielding at the two gatherings about
one pound of cotton. Cotton likewise grows
upon trees ; but this kind is not so fine as that
which grows upon plants.

In the engraving prefixed to this lesson are seen
the cotton-plant in flower, and‘the cotton-tree.

The cotton,when collected from the pod, con-
tains the seeds and pieces of husk, all which
must be cleared away before it is fit for spin-
ning; and this is done in the countries where
the cotton is grown.

The seeds and husks are sometimes picked out
by hand, but generally by passing the cotton
COTTON CLOTHING. 157

through a machine calleda gin, with which aman
can cleanse sixty-five pounds in a day; but, by
hand, he can only pick one pound in that time.

This machine consists of two or three fluted
rollers, which are set in motion by the foot
upon a treadle, as in the spinning-wheel. ‘The
cotton is drawn in between the rollers, which
press out and separate the sceds.

Cotton is also cleansed by another kind of
machine, called a saw-gin; this consists of a
roller covered with fine saws, which tear the
cotton from the seeds.

When the cotton is thus cleansed, it is
gathered up, and, by means of screws, it is
forced into bags. These are sewn up, pressed,
and made of as small size as possible, so as to
occupy little room in the ships in which they
are sent to other countries. In this manner,
nearly two hundred and fifty million pounds of
cotton are brought to England, in the course of
the year, chiefly to Liverpool, from which place
the cotton is conveyed on cars upon a railway,
to be spun at Manchester.

After the cotton is received in this country,
it is again picked or cleansed by hand. It is
beaten with wands, and then carded, or passed
between rollers covered with fine wire brushes,
called cards. The cotton is then drawn out
158 COTTON CLOTHING.

through an instrument shaped like the mouth-
piece of a trumpet, for the purpose of laying
the fibres even.

The cotton is next passed between rollers,
and slightly twisted; it is then called roving,
and is wound upon the bobbins, or reels.

The cotton, or yarn, as it is now named, is
further drawn and spun upon the stretching-
frame, and is wound into pieces called cops.

The yarn is next taken to the mule spinning-
frame: here it is stretched and spun at the same
time, so as to make the size and twist of the yarn
even throughout; and this is repeated until the
yarn is reduced and spun to the proper fineness.

In spinning, the yarn is joined from the cops
by children, called piecers, who attend upon each
frame, and likewise join any yarn that may be
broken in stretching or twisting. The stretching
part of the frame is turned by a hand-wheel;
but the spindles are moved by bands joined to
water-wheels, or a steam-engine. The number
of spindles on a frame is frequently three hun-
dred: the spindles and threads, in turning, are
said to travel, altogether, through a thousand
miles a minute; and by them a pound of cotton
may be spun nearly to the length of ten miles!

The yarn produced by mule spinning is the
most perfect: it is used in making the finest
COTTON CLOTHING. 159

articles, as lace and hosiery; and, when twisted,
is wound into small balls, or upon reels, by
machinery, and employed for sewing.

QUESTIONS.

What kind of substance is cotton ?

How is cotton produced ?

What are the principal articles
made of cotton?

In what countries does the cotton-
plant grow?

Why will not cotton grow in Eng-
land ?

Why is the cotton-plant so useful ?

Does not cotton also grow upon
trees ?

How is cotton cleansed ?

Can you describe a cotton-gin ?

Why is cotton picked by a gin
rather than by hand?

Can you describe a saw-gin ?

How is cotton sent to England ?!

What quantity is brought in one
year ?

How is cotton carded, and what
is a card ?

How is cotton spun at the
frame ?

How is the finest yarn produced,
and for what articles is it
used ?

Lesson X XIX. Cotton Clothing
(continued).

The spinning-frame is a wonderful piece of
machinery. It spins a vast number of threads
of any fineness or hardness, leaving man merely
to feed the machine with cotton, and to join the
threads when they happen to break. It was
invented by Mr. Arkwright, who, by his inge-
nuity and industry, from a poor boy, became
one of the richest merchants in the kingdom.

The spinning-frame consists of two pair of

sy
160 COTTON CLOTHING.

rollers, which are worked by machinery. The
lower roller of each pair is furrowed or fluted
lengthwise, and the upper roller is covered with
leather. The cotton roving, after passing through
the first pair of rollers, is received between the
second pair, which turns three, four, or five
times faster than the first pair. By this means
the roving is drawn out into a thread, which is
twisted by the spindles, worked by the same
machinery as the rollers.

The use of the spinning-frame has much in-
creased the manufacture of cotton goods. Before
its invention, there were not more than thirty
thousand persons employed in the cotton manu-
facture ; but now there are upwards of a million
persons engaged in the different branches.

Cotton-yarn, which is used for coarse articles,
is spun by a machine called a jenny. That
which is spun by water-wheels is very regular
and strong, and is used for the warps of heavy
goods, as fustians and stout éalicoes.

After the yarn is spun into twist, it is wound
upon a reel into hanks, one of which measures
eighty-four yards; the size of the twist being
known by the number of hanks to the pound.
Yarn can be spun as fine as two hundred hanks
to the pound; but in water-twist and jenny-
spinning, it seldom exceeds sixty or seventy
COTTON CLOTHING. 161

hanks. After the thread is wound into hanks,
itis bleached, and is then fit for weaving.

The hanks are next wound upon bobbins,
each thread having a separate bobbin; and the
bobbins are placed in a frame to be wound off
upon the warping mill.

In weaving cotton goods, the warp is first
dressed, by moistening it with flour and water,
to prevent its rubbing. The warp is then placed
in the loom, and woven, in the manner already
described: the clothis, in make, open and coarse,
or fine and close, according to the fineness and
quantity of woof used.

After the cloth is woven, it is taken from the
loom, and drawn over hot iron rollers, to singe
off the rough pieces of cotton. It is then pressed
with heavy iron rollers, to give it a fine gloss.

In this manner is spun and woven cotton cloth,
of which frocks, gowns, and handkerchiefs are
made. It is printed in various colours and pat-
terns,by the same'means as bed-furniture,already
described; and so rapidly, that a piece of cotton,
twenty-eight yards in length, may be printed in
a roller press, in four or five minutes.

Stockings are also made of cotton, but are
knit or woven, at a frame or loom, in a different
manner from cloth. A stocking has not cross-
threads like cloth, but is made of one entire

II. M
ay

162 COTTON CLOTHING.

thread; this is formed into loops in regular rows,
and the loops of each row are drawn through the
loops of the row above it. The stocking-frame
consists of many hundred pieces, and with it the
weaver can make a great number of loops or
meshes, in a minute.

Stockings are chiefly made at Derby, Leicester, |

and Nottingham, the cotton being spun at Man-

chester. They are mostly woven of single thread,

of all degrees of fineness. Each stocking is |
woven in one open piece, and is afterwards —

joined in the leg and foot.

The largest cotton-spinning factories, or mills,
are at Manchester; and in each factory from six
hundred to one thousand men, women, and chil-
dren, are sometimes employed. The mills are
long buildings, five or six stories high. The
carding and roving machines are placed on the
first floor; the stretching-frames are on the next
floor, and so on, as the machines improve the
fineness of the yarn.

The machines in the several floors are worked
by a steam-engine, or by water-wheels, placed
at one end of the building. The main shaft
turns the carding, roving,and spinning machines.
The rattling noise of thousands of small wheels
is like the sound of hail-stones, falling upon a

large sky-light; and the thousands of little
COTTON

CLOTHING. 163

spindles keep up a constant hum. Yet, in some
mills, the wheels of the machinery are as bright
as a polished stove, and the whole building is
free from dust and dirt.

Cotton goods are made in large quantities,
in England, Scotland, and Ireland; and they
are sent to all countries of the globe. Although
the cotton has been brought many thousand
miles to this country, these goods are sold at
lower prices than if they were magle in the
countries where the cotton grew. ‘The modes
of spinning and weaving, are, in those coun-
tries, mostly ill-contrived and clumsy, and much
time is lost in using them. But the fine
machinery of the British factories produces the
most beautiful cotton fabrics in the world.

QUESTIONS,



Who was the inventor of the spin-
ning-frame ?

Can you describe a spinning-
frame ?

How many persons are employed
in making cotton goods in Great
Britain ?

What is done after the yarn is
spun into twist ?

When is the cotton bleached ?

How is cotton prepared for the
warping-mills ?

How is cotton woven into cloth ?

How is cotton printed ?_

How is a cotton stocking made ?

Where are cotton stockings chiefly
made?

Is a stocking made in one piece ?

Where are the largest cotton spin-
ning-mills ?

What kind of building is a cotton-
mill ?

How are the machines worked
throughout the building ?

Are cotton goods as well made in
other countries as in our own ?

What is the reason of this?

M 2


Lesson XXX. Silk, and the Silk-worm.

SILK is the most beautiful material of which a

articles of clothing are made. Yet silk is worn
or used by almost every one. It is woven into
robes for the sovereign upon his throne; and
there is scarcely a person in the civilized world
who does not possess some article of silk.

The account of the production of silk, or its
natural history, is very entertaining.

Silk is a fine and delicate fibre, which is spun
by a kind of caterpillar, called the silk-worm,
such as is seen in the figure to the right, in the
upper part of the engraving. But this little
creature undergoes several changes before it
spins the silk, for which it is so much prized.

Silk-worms are hatched by the heat of the


THE SILK-WORM. 165

sun from eggs which are laid during the sum-
mer by a grayish moth. These eggs are about
the size of a grain of mustard seed; and the
silk-worm, when hatched, is only the hundredth
part of a grain in weight.

The silk-worm is fed upon the leaves of the
mulberry-tree. In thirty days it devours above
an ounce of these leaves; and in twenty-eight
days it becomes forty times longer than when
it was hatched.

While it remains in the state of a caterpillar,
the silk-worm changes its coat four times; and
when full grown, it is from twe to three inches
in length. Ji may then be seen to have twelve
rings round its body, sixteen legs, and seven

mall eyes on é¢ach side of the head. Behind the
jaws are two openings, through which the worm
draws the yellow gum of which it spins the silk.

During all these changes, the silk-worm con-
tinues to increase in weight, so that it is now
nine thousand times heavier than when it was
hatched !

The worm next spins itself up in a small silky
bag, called a cocoon, such as is shown in the
middle of the engraving. It begins by spinning
thin threads, which it covers with loose, or floss
silk,in an egg-form. Within this, the worm spins
a firm yellow ball, which is the valuable silk:
166 THE SILK-WORM.

and many persons who have examined this ball
of silk with attention, are of opinion, that its
thread will reach two thousand feet in length.

In spinning, the worm employs its mouth
and front legs to guide and fasten the threads;
and it smears the inside of the cocoon with gum,
like that from which the silk is spun.

The ball being'finished in ten days, the
spinner rests; and then changes into a form, ©
without a mouth, or eyes, legs, or wings; with |
a smooth brown skin. This is shown in the |
first figure of the engraving.

Silk-worms remain in this state from fifteen
to thirty days, when they throw off their silky -
coverings, and re-appear as large grayish |
moths. ‘They then lay hundreds of eggs for
the next year, and die in two or three days:
after. The male and female moth, and eggs,
are the lower figures in the engraving.

Let us consider how wonderfully the wisdom |
of God is displayed in the life of this little worm.
Its food, as you have been told, is the leaf of the
mulberry-tree; and Providence, as if to ensure |
the silk-worm a certain supply, has so ordained |
it, that no other insect will eat the mulberry-
leaf; while the beautiful silky nature of this leaf
makes it better adapted than any other for the
worm to spin into a long thread of silk.
THE SILK-WORM. . 167

Again, the silk-worm does not wander abroad,
as other caterpillars do, but crawls slowly about
the spot where it is placed and fed. This tame-
ness lessens the cares of those who keep silk-
worms, and secures the produce of their labours,
or the silk. Although shut up in the cocoon,
the silk-worm still lives; and when it becomesa
moth, it does not gnaw away the covering to re-
gain its liberty, which would break the fibres and
render the silk of little value: but it moistens
the inside of its dwelling; loosens, without break-
ing, the thread of the silken ball; and with its
hooked feet pushes aside the fibres, and escapes.

The silk is, however, generally secured by
placing the cocoons in a warm oven, and thus
destroying the worms within them. Buta few
are allowed to live, that they may become
moths, and lay eggs for the next year.

Silk-worms are bred in various countries.
The finest silk is obtained from those worms
which are rearéd in China. They are also
reared in the East Indies, and in Persia, and in
some parts of Europe, as in Italy, and in the
warmest parts of France. Silk-worms are also
kept in England, but only for amusement, as
they produce little silk.

In some parts of China, the silk-worms feed
in the open air, upon mulberry-trees, and are
168 7 THE SILK-WORM.

left to themselves, until man gathers their silken
balls. But their silk is not so fine as that spun
by worms under shelter.

The Chinese also keep silk-worms in very
clean rooms, heated by stoves; they place them
in rows of little trays, and feed them by day
and night. They are put upon matting, in a
dark room, to spin; when this is done, the
cocoons are collected into heaps, and cleared of
dirt and dead leaves, The silk is then wound
off, packed in bales, and sent in large quantities
to other countries ; a cargo, or ship-load of this
silk, being worth many thousand pounds.

In the East Indies, silk-worms are reared
in lattice-work sheds resembling our summer-
houses. The worms are placed in shallow
boxes, made of bamboo; and each worm is put
to spin in a small cell of plaited bamboo.

To wind the silk off the cocoons, they are
put into hot water; a person gathers several
ends of the silk, and winds them upon a reel
into a thread. How delicately fine, then, must
be the silk, for a single thread consists of many
fibres as they are spun by the worm! It is
next wound into skeins, packed into hanks,
and is then called raw silk.

To obtain one pound of reeled silk, is said
to require nearly three thousand worms; and
THE SILK-WORM. 169 7

this pound may be woven into fourteen or
fifteen yards of silk, such as that of which
dresses are made.

QUESTIONS.
What do you mean by the natural! than any other for the silk-
history of silk ? worm’s food ?
How is silk obtained ? In what countries are silk-worms
IJow are silk-worms produced ? reared ?
What is the food of the silk- | Where is the finest silk produced?
worm ? How is silk brought to this
How much heavier is the silk- country ?
worm, when full grown, than | How is silk wound off the co-
when hatched ? coons ?
How does the worm spin its silk? | How many worms are required
How is abundance of food ensured | to produce a pound of silk ?
to the silk-worm ? How many yards will a pound
Why is the mulberry-leaf better | produce?

Lesson XXXI. Salk Clothing.

SILK is a very important article of trade and
manufacture; for it furnishes employment to
great numbers of persons.

After raw silk is received into this country, it
is first twisted into threads called singles. It
is next made into trams, by twisting together
two or more singles; and this kind is used for
the weft or cross threads. The other kind of
thread, or organzine, is made by twisting singles
170 SILK CLOTHING.

by machinery, into stronger threads, which are
used for the warp or length of the fabric.

This business is called throwing the silk, and
is chiefly carried on at Macclesfield, in
Cheshire; and in the West of England. The
throwing mills are worked by steam-engines,
and many of the ¢hrowsters are girls or boys.

Silk, when wound from the cocoons, is of dif-
ferent shades of orange and yellow, and white,
These are not sorted, as the silk is scoured and
dyed after it is thrown. |

The silk is now ready for the weaver, who
warps and weaves it into elegant fabrics, in
nearly the same manner as linen and cotton
are woven, Slight articles of silk are woven by
women and children.

Silk goods are made in different parts of Eng-
land. Silk and satin for gowns, are made by
plain and figure weaving at Spitalfields, in
London ; the beautiful lustre is given to satin,
by passing it over heated rollérs. Here, also,
are woven shawls and pocket-handkerchiefs,
the latter in pieces of seven together; and
ribands, in pieces of thirty-six yards long.

Ribands are principally made at Coventry, a
large town nearly in the middle of England;
where there are upwards of ten thousand looms,
SILK CLOTHING. 171

which produce ribands equal in fitteness and
pattern to any in the world.

Silk stockings are made of the finest China
silk, at Derby and Nottingham, by machinery,
which performs twice as much work as the old
contrivances, and occupies less room.

Silk pocket-handkerchiefs are made at Ban-
dana, in the East Indies, and are sent in great
numbers to England to be printed. Bandana
handkerchiefs are also made in England and
Scotland, of cotton and of silk sent from India,
to which country they are exported; and large
quantities of these handkerchiefs are used by the
natives of India, and by the Chinese. This is
considered as a striking instance of that skill
and industry by which Great Britain has become
the first manufacturing country in the world.

QUESTIONS.

Why is silk an important article | Where are silk and satin made for
of trade? gowns ?

What is first done with raw silk? | What silk articles are made at

What is throwing the silk ? Spitalfields ?

How is it made into trams, and | In what part of England are
what are they used for ? ribands chiefly made ?

What is organzine, and what is it | Where are silk stockings made?
used for ? Where are Bandana _ handker-

Where is most silk thrown in this chiefs made ?
country ? Are not Bandana handkerchiefs

When is the silk dyed ? also made in England ?


Lesson XXXII. Woollen Clothing.

THE sheep is one of the most useful among the
domestic animals. Its carcass affords us whole-
some meat ; its skin is made into parchment and
leather; and its fleece, or wool, yields, every
year, excellent materials for making clothes,
The sheep of each country of the earth pro-
duce different kinds of wool. The wool used
for clothing in this country is partly grown in
Britain, and partly obtained from abroad.
British wool is both long and short; the long
is the fleece of the Lincoln sheep ; and the short
is the fleece of Southdown and Norfolk sheep.
British wool is not so fine as foreign wool.
It is mostly harsh and wiry, and unfit for making
WOOLLEN CLOTHING. 173

cloth, unless it be mixed with foreign wool, as
that received from Saxony,in Germany. The
sheep which yield this wool are of the Merino
kind, celebrated for their fine fleeces. A great.
quantity of very fine wool is also obtained from
New South Wales, and some from the Cape of
Good Hope.

In England, after the wool is sheared from
the sheep’s back, in the manner shown in the
engraving, it is usually sorted into ten different
finenesses, and then washed.

Long wool is used for worsted spinning. It
is first passed through hot combs by hand, or
by machinery, so as to make the hairs lie even.
It is then formed into bundles, which are passed
through rollers, and stretched into skeins,
These are made into roving, or loosely twisted,
nearly in the same manner as cotton.

The wool is now ready for spinning into
worsted, which is done by rollers and spindles,
nearly as cotton‘is spun. Indeed, worsted spin-
ning is very similar to cotton spinning, but the
preparation of the long wool is made by comb-
ing, instead of carding. Worsted was named
from its having been first spun at the village of
Worsted, in Norfolk.

Short wool is wrought into the finest cloth
for men’s wear. It is first washed, and then
174 WOOLLEN CLOTHING.

carded, by passing it between rollers with fine
cards, during which the wool is sprinkled with
oil, to soften it. It is thus prepared for spin-
ning into yarn, and weaving into cloth.

Broad cloth is woven from sixty to sixty-three
inches wide, and in pieces from forty to sixty
yards long. When it is taken from the loom,
the web is loose and open, and the cross threads
may plainly be seen. The cloth is now to be
fulled or thickened. It is first scoured with
‘water and a kind of clay called “ fuller’s earth,”
to cleanse it from the oil which was used in
carding the wool: and then taken to the fulling-
mill, where it is placed in troughs of water, and
beaten with large wooden hammers. The blows
of the hammers bring the hairs closer together,
by causing them to entwine with each other,

QUESTIONS.
What benefits do we derive from | What is long wool used for ?
the sheep ? How is wool combed ?
Do all sheep yield the same kind | How is wool spun into worsted ?
of wool ? Does not worsted-spinning resem-
Of what kinds of wool is clothing ble cotton-spinning ?
made ? What is short wool used for ?
What are the kinds of British | What is done after cloth is
wool ? woven ?

Is foreign wool finer than British | How does beating full or thicken
wool ? cloth ?

SR
175

Lesson XXXIII. Woollen Clothing (con-
tinued.) Broad-cloth and Stockings.

ArtER the cloth is fulled, it is dried, and then
dressed, by passing it under a roller turned ra-
pidly, and covered with the heads of a large kind
of thistle, called the teasel, which is grown in
fields near to the places where cloth is manufac-
tured. This process draws out the ends of the
wool, combs off the coarse and loose pieces from
the cloth, and raises an even pile, or nap, upon |
the surface. When the teasels become filled with
flocks of wool, which they have drawn from the
cloth, they are removed from the roller, and chil-
dren pick out the flocks with a steel comb. The
dressing of a piece of cloth consumes from
fifteen hundred to two thousand teasel-heads.

The nap is cut off by a shearing-machine:
and the cloth, after being brushed by rollers,
covered with hair-brushes, is pressed between
hot metal plates, to give it a smooth surface. It
is then in a state fit for the market.

Broad cloth, such as coats are made of, is
principally manufactured in the northern and
western counties of England. Great quantities
are made in a part of Yorkshire, called “ the
clothing country,” where it is taken to market, |
like other produce; and sold in large buildings,
176 BROAD-CLOTH AND STOCKINGS.

called “cloth halls.” Very fine broad-cloth is
also made in Wiltshire, in Gloucestershire, and
in other parts of the West of England.

Worsted is woven on the frame into stockings,
which are chiefly made in the counties of
Leicester and Derby. For speckled stockings,
part of the wool is dyed black, and mixed with
the white in combing. Angola, or gray stock-
ings, are made of worsted and cotton, separately
cleaned, and torn into fleecy pieces. Part of
each is then dyed blue, and another part black:
they are mixed together by carding, and then
spun into yarn, and woven into stockings.

Bombazine, which is principally worn as
mourning, is made with a warp of silk, and a
weft of worsted. It is mostly manufactured at
Norwich; where, likewise, stuffs of worsted
only are made. :

The hair of some kinds of foreign goats is
also spun and woven into clothing. Fine shawls
are made from the silky hair ‘of the goat of
Cashmere, in the East Indies. The goats of
Thibet, likewise, afford a very delicate wool,
which is much prized for making shawls,

Wool is generally dyed before it is woven ;
but some cloth is dyed in the piece. The dyes
are obtained from the leaves, wood, bark, and
roots, of certain plants and trees, most of which
BROAD*CLOTH AND STOCKINGS,

177

grow in foreign countries; but scarlet is pro-
duced from a small insect called cochineal.

It may here be remarked, that rags, or little
pieces of linen, cotton, and woollen cloth, which
are not taken care of by thoughtless persons, are,
however, of great importance, and are used for
many purposes. They are, therefore, not only
collected in this country, but large quantities
are brought from various parts of Europe.

Woollen rags are washed, ground, and torn
by a mill into flock, for stuffing common beds.
These rags are also picked, and mixed with
fresh wool in making yarn. If the rags are
much worn or decayed, they are spread over
land to make it more fruitful.

Linen and cotton rags are boiled and
bleached, and make a strong and white paper,
which is in general use.

QUESTIONS.

How is broad-cloth dressed ?

What is the teasel, and can you
explain its use ?

How is broad-cloth finished for
the market ?

In what parts of England is broad-
cloth made ?

How is broad-cloth sold in York-
shire ?

Where are worsted stockings
chiefly made?

How are speckled stockings made?

Il,

How are Angola stockings made ?

Of what materials is bombazine
made?

What is the hair of goats used
for ?

When is wool dyed?

How are dyes usually made?

How is wool dyed scarlet ?

Why should we be careful of
rags ?

Can you name some uses of
rags ?

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Lesson XXXIV. Lace-making.

LACE is a very elegant part of dress; and the
making of itis a very ingenious art. In England,
it is principally made in the counties of Bucks, |
Northampton, Leicester, and Nottingham. :
Lace is made of thread or cotton; and by hand,
or by machinery worked by steam. Thread-lace
is knit by hand; but its knitting differs from
that of stockings. In making a stocking, only one
thread is employed; but lace is made of many —
threads, according to the pattern and breadth.
The pattern of lace is first drawn upon parch-
ment; itis then fastened to a cushion, or pillow,
with pins, which are stuck according to the lines
of the pattern to be worked. ‘The threads are
LACE-MAKING, 179

next wound upon small bobbins, and one end is
tied to each pin. The lace-maker then throws
the bobbins and threads over and under each
other, in various directions, so that the threads
twine round the pins, and thus form the many
holes, or eyes, which produce the figures.

This kind is called pillow-lace; and little
girls are taught to make it in schools. In the
engraving the lacefmaker is seated, with the
lace-pillow in her lap.

But thread-lace, made in this manner, is ex-
pensive; and instead of it, bobbin-net lace, of
cotton, is now much used. This kind is made
by frames or machinery, in which brass bobbins,
in brass carriages, are made to pass one thread
round another, so as to form meshes with six
sides, which may be seen by examining a piece
of the net. Indeed, this machine works as the
bobbins are worked on the pillow, in hand-lace-
making. The little bobbins of the frame are
kept supplied with thread by a winding-engine,
which fills fifty at once: and every four or five
machines employ a boy or girl as a winder.

Some of the bobbin-net machines are worked
by hand; while others are moved by a steam
engine, or by a water-wheel. The weavers who
work at them are paid according to the number
of holes or meshes in the lace, which varies

| N2
180 LACE-MAKING.

from 320 to 520 in the square inch. Each
machine produces in one day about ten yards
of plain net, from five to ten quarters wide.

Bobbin-net is, however, plain and in broad
pieces. To form it into lace, it is separated
into narrow strips, by drawing a thread. The
figures are then worked by hand, chiefly by
women and girls, in villages. The lace is
stretched on a frame, and the workers sit round
it, putting in the sprigs and borders.

Some machines make the net in slips, and
work in the pattern at the same time; thus
producing figured lace.

Great quantities of British net are bought by
foreigners, who figure and finish it, as lace, in
their own countries. Only a quarter of the net
made in England is used in this country; the
remainder is sent to various parts of Europe,
and even to North and South America.

Many thousand persons are employed in
making bobbin-net, in and round Nottingham.
Hand-machines are worked in shops, and at
home; for each machine occupies but little
space. Women and children work at their
homes; and embroidering bobbin-net lace is
the chief employment in the villages throughout
the county of Nottingham.

Cotton-lace was formerly but little esteemed
LACE-MAKING. 181
for its meshes were thick, with loose, downy
cotton. ‘To remove this the lace is now passed
rapidly through the flame of gas, which pene-
trates and clears every mesh without the smallest
injury to the lace. This is done by machinery,
which is worked by water-power.

Twenty-five years since, the art of making
bobbin-net was unknown. It is now an im-
portant trade; and there are employed in it
upwards of two millions of money, and above
two hundred thousand persons. Indeed, Eng-
land may be said to make bobbin-net for the
rest of the world.

QUESTIONS.

In what counties in England is
lace principally made ?

Of what materials is lace made ?

How is thread-lace made ?

How are the figures worked in
thread-lace ?

How is bobbin-net or cotton-lace
made ? :

Of what shape are the meshes of

_ lace?

How many yards of net can be

made at a machine in one day?

Is all the bobbin-net used in this
country ?

How is this net made into lace ?

How are the figures worked in
cotton-lace ?

How is cotton-lace made clear ?

How long has bobbin-net been
made?

Is not the bobbin-net trade very
extensive ?

Are many persons employed in
making bobbin-net ?
182

Lesson XXXV. A Straw Bonnet.

A WELL-MADE straw bonnet is a neat article of
female dress, and costs but little money. It
consists of the dried stalks or straw of wheat,
platted and sewn together; so that a bonnet
can be made by a single pair of hands, at
home.

Straw-platting, or preparing the straw for
making into bonnets, furnishes profitable em-
ployment for industrious females. It is chiefly
carried on in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire,
Hertfordshire, and Essex, where more than two
hundred thousand females are engaged in it.
Children, when three or four years old, are
taught to plat in schools kept by aged women.
They learn to get their own living in about two
years, for platting only requires the quick use
of the hands and fingers. 7

Ripe wheat straw is generally used for bon-
nets. The farmer’s labourers draw out the
straws in the barn, and cut off the ears of corn
for the thresher. They then sell the straw to
the platter at about two-pence the pound.

The straw is next stripped of the leaves that
sheathe the stalk, cut into proper lengths,
sorted, and tied in small bundles. These are
A STRAW BONNET. , 183

dipped in cold water, and whitened or steamed
in a close box, with fumes of brimstone.

The straws are cut again to eight or ten
inches in length, and tied with straw intosmaller
bundles than before. They are then taken to
the plat-market for sale,

The straws are next to be split, or made
ready for the platters. This is done by pushing
each straw upon a pointed wire, which has
sharp teeth; and splits the straw into as many
strips as there are teeth. |

The straws being split, are flattened, by
passing them between small wooden rollers,
worked by a handle, called a plat-mill.

The platters next work the straw into dif-
ferent plats, by using their second fingers and
thumbs, and their forefingers in turning the
plat. The patterns or plats are numerous: as,
the Dunstable or whole straw; the rustic, of
four coarse straws, for common bonnets and
hats; the Devonshire, of seven straws; and the
fine seven, and double seven; the straws in
making the doubles being wetted, to cause them
to stick together. Other plats have seventeen
and twenty-one straws; and the Diamond has
twenty-three straws.

The plat is worked and sold in scores, or
pieces of twenty yards long; and three scores,
184 A STRAW BONNET,

or sixty yards, will make a bonnet, A good
platter can make half-a-score a day, so that it
will occupy her a week to make enough plat
for a single bonnet.

Sometimes the plat is bleached. It is next
sewed and made _ into bonnets, which are
blocked and pressed; a wire ig put into each
bonnet to keep its Shape, and it is lined for
sale.

This is the common mode of making an
English straw bonnet. The Leghorn, or Tus-
can bonnet, which is also much worn in Eng-
Jand, is made in a part of Italy, called Tuscany.
In that country, women and children sit picking
and platting straws at the cottage doors; and
they even plat while taking a walk.

These bonnets are sent to England platted,
and sewn in large, flat circular forms, called
hats. The plat is made of slender wheat-straw,
the stalk being pulled from the earth before
the grain begins to form, as it is then far more —
valuable than it would be if allowed to remain
and produce corn. It is fine enough to plat
closely without being split, and is so used that
a complete hat can be made of one piece, the
turns being sewn together with raw silk. Hats
made of this plat are called Leghorn, many
A STRAW BONNET. 185

thousands of them being shipped from the sea-
port of that name.

Italian straw is also imported into England,
and made here, as in Tuscany, by women and
children, into plat: and then sewn into bon-
nets. Some kinds of grasses are also used in
platting; and straw is grown in England to
produce a very fine plat, without being split;
so that English hats or bonnets are nearly as
lasting as those made in Tuscany.

Straw-platting is both profitable and amusing
employment for women and girls. It does not
tire them as hard labour would; nor need the
platters, except in winter, be shut up in rooms.
They are most healthy and cheerful; and the
produce of their work, when sold at market,
enables them to enjoy many comforts, and to
provide for sickness and old age.

QUESTIONS.

Of what kind of straw are bon- | How many yards of plat are re-

nets made ? quired to make a bonnet ?
In what does straw-platting con- | Where is Tuscan plat made?

sist ? Why are Tuscan bonnets called
How is the straw whitened ? Leghorn ?
How is the straw split ? Are not Tuscan bonnets made in
How is the straw flattened ? this country ?

How is the straw worked into | Are grasses used in platting ?
plat ? What kind of employment is
Are there many patterns of plat ? straw-platting ?


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Lesson XXXVI. A Beaver Hat.

Hats, such as are generally worn by men and
boys, are made of the fur of hares and rabbits,
and wool, with only a small quantity of beaver;
when we speak of a “beaver hat,” you must
not suppose it made entirely of beaver.

The hat-maker first beats the fur upon a kind
of wire sieve, with the catgut string of a long
bow, so as to work the fur together, and clean
it from dust; He then presses it with his hands,
to curl it, and to make the hairs entwine with
each other. A three-cornered piece of paper is
then laid over the fur, and pressed with it, until
both can be formed into a cap, with a high
crown, shaped like a sugar-loaf. More fur is
A BEAVER HAT. 187

then laid over the cap, which is sprinkled with
water, and wrought with the hands until it is
firm.

The cap is next taken toa kind of sloping
vat, or trough, with an open kettle of hot water
and vitriol in the middle. The workman dips
the cap into this liquid, and works it upon the
sloping boards of the vat, until it is thickened
as is shown in the engraving. Felt, or wool,
prepared like the fur, is next added to the cap
with a brush, and the fine beaver-wool is then
slightly laid on.

The hat now receives its proper shape; the
crown being first formed upon a block; and next
the brim. It is next dried, and the nap, or fur, |
is raised by a wire carding-brush. The hat is
then tied upon its block, and boiled and dyed.

The hat is next stiffened with glue upon the
inside of the crown and brim; it is then steamed,
brushed, and ironed, till it bears the proper gloss.
The brim is cut round, the crown is tied up in
gauze paper, and the hat is then ready for lining
and binding, or finishing, by women.

The finest hats, or those which are covered
with beaver, are made in London. Second-rate
hats are covered with nutria, which is a fur
resembling beaver.

Hats are also made almost entirely of wool,
188 A BEAVER HAT.

in great numbers, at Manchester, and sent to
America at three shillings each! These hats,
in making, pass through eighteen hands; from
the owner of the sheep that furnishes the wool
to the hatter who sells the hat to the wearer.

Beaver fur, or wool, is a very expensive article,
It is the short, close, and downy hair of the
beaver, an animal in shape like a large water-rat,
The natural colour of the fur is dark brown.

Of beavers, we may read many amusing stories
in books of Natural History, as in The Book of
Animals. They live together upon the banks of
rivers, in colonies, or companies; they gnaw
down large trees, asa man would cut them ; and
build houses of sticks, mud, and stones, with
their paws.

Beavers are hunted for their skins, or caught
in traps, in the coldest parts of North America;
and their coats are of most value in winter, The
under fur of the middle-aged or young animals,
called cub-beavers, is most prized; it is the
finest, most glossy, and best takes the dye.

Nutria, is the name given to the fur of the
coypou, which is an animal very like the beaver.
It is found in the rivers of South America, and
nearly a million skins are sent to Great Britain
in one year. The fine fur is cut from the under
A BEAVER HAT. 189

part of the animal, and is commonly worth three
guineas a pound to the hat-maker.

Most hats are dyed black; but some are drab,
and others white. The latter are worn in sum-
mer, as they are not only light in appearance,
but keep off the heat of the sun, and are cooler
' to the wearer than black hats. For the same
reason, white dresses are worn in summer, in
preference to coloured clothes.

In warmer countries than England, men com-
monly wear hats made of straw, dried grass, and
chips, or light shavings of wood platted together.
In China, Japan, and other warm climates,
these hats are worn with very wide brims, to
shade the wearer from the scorching sun.

The art of platting such hats is also known
to the poor natives of many wild countries; and
some of them make, by hand, finer plat than is
produced in civilized nations.

QUESTIONS.

Of what is a beaver hat made? | Arenot cheap hats made of wool?
How does the hat-maker cause the | What is beaver ?
fur to hold together ? | What kind of animal is the
What is the first form of the hat? | @ beaver ?
How is the cap thickened ? Where are beavers found ?
What is the material called felt, | What is nutria?
and how is it used in hat- | Why are white hats worn in sum-
making ? mer ?
How is a hat shaped ? Are not hats sometimes made of
Where are the best hats made ? straw and other materials ?


190

Lesson XX XVII. Shoes.

TuE shoes generally worn are made entirely of
leather of various kinds; and leather is the
tanned skin of certain animals, as oxen, calves,
sheep, goats, and swine.

Hides, or skins for making leather, are sent
to this country, from all quarters of the world.
Great numbers of hides are received from Russia
and from South America, where horned cattle
and horses run wild in thousands.

The art of tanning is simple, although the
process occupies much time. It is carried on in
places called tanneries; these are yards with
pits sunk in them; the skins are soaked in the
pits; and around them are buildings, open at
the sides, in which the skins are dried. There
are tanneries in almost every part of the king-
dom, but the most extensive are those at
Bermondsey and Deptford, in the neighbour-
hood of London, which lave béen established
several hundred years.

When the skins have been prepared, by soak-
ing them in pits of ltme and water, the hair,
wool, fat, and fleshy parts come off. The latter
are dissolved in water, and become a kind of
jelly, which, when dried, forms glue.

The skins are left in the pits for some time,
SHOES. 191

until they become very soft, when they undergo
what is properly called tanning. This is done
by steeping them in water, with the bark of the
oak-tree, and a substance called tannin, which
has been extracted from oak-bark and gall-nuts.
The skins, when first put into the pit, are white ;
but, in time, as the tanning liquor is made
stronger, they become of a brown colour, and
are then Jeather.

The thick sole-leather of shoes and boots is
made of particular hides; and, when tanned and
dried, is as stiff as a board. Butthe upper-leather
is curried after it has been tanned. Currying is
besmearing the skin, or leather, while moist, with
thick common oil, which softens the leather, and
helps it to keep out wet. The leather, as we see it
in the upper part of a newly-made boot or shoe,
is made black, by dressing it with copperas.

Men’s boots and shoes are made of calf-leather;
but those worn by women, are of sheep-leather,
dressed and dyed of various colours. Kid-leather,
of which the finest shoes and gloves are made, is
the skin of the young goat dressed with great
care. Handsome morocco-leather, such as books
are often covered with, is made in this country of
goat skins, which are brought from Morocco, in
Africa, andare tanned with a very astringent root.
Russia-leather, which is used for a similar pur-
192 SHOES,

pose, is ox-skin, dressed with the tar extracted
from the birch-tree, which gives the leather its
peculiar smell. Great quantities of leather are
used for making harness ; and the finest kinds
are much employed in binding books.

Shoe-making is so common a trade, that it
need not be explained to you; for every person
wears boots or shoes, and they are made in
every town and yillage.

QUESTIONS.

Of what is leather made ? | Of what kind of leather are wo-
Where are hides received from ? men’s shoes made ?
Where are the most extensive | What skin is kid-leather ?

tanneries found ? Of what skin is morocco-leather
How is sole-leather made ? made ?
How is upper leather made ? How is morocco-leather dressed ?
How is leather curried ? What is Russia leather ?
How is leather coloured black ? What gives Russia leather its pe-
Of what kind of leather are men’s culiar smell ?

boots and shoes made ? Name any other uses of leather

besides shoemaking.

ee ee.
LESSONS ON FOOD.

na ee

Lesson Il. Of L£ood in General.

WHEN God first created man, He caused also
the earth to produce all things for man’s sub-
sistence.

We have read how the earth supplies man
with timber, stone, and metals for building
houses, and making furniture; and how it
yields materials for his clothing. Let us now
inquire how the earth, in its abundance, supplies
him also with food and nourishment.

Water springs up in the valleys; corn, of
which I>read is made, grows in the wide fields;
oxen and sheep, whose flesh is used for meat,
feed in the green pastures; fruits grow and
ripen, and vegetables flourish in the gardens;
fish swim in the seas, rivers, lakes, and streams;
and fowls fly in the air.

How abundantly are these good things pro-
duced in due season! They are all supplied to
man’s hands. Man only contrives the means of
converting them to his use. He draws water by
the pump or well. He sows in the bosom of the
earth the seed of corn: then comes rain which
waters it, and causes it to spring up and increase

Il. 0
194 FOOD OF MAN.

many thousand fold; and when it ripens man
gathers it into store. He kills the beasts, birds,
and fishes, for his food; and he gathers the
fruits when they have ripened.

Let us, therefore, praise God for all these
blessings: for without His divine will, the water
could not rise from the earth, nor the rain fall
from heaven. The seed would not then spring
up and increase, nor the fruit grow and ripen;

and the beasts, birds, and fishes, would perish, |

QUESTIONS.

How are all things provided for ' How does man obtain water ?

man’s subsistence ? How does man obtain corn for |
How does the earth supply the bread ?

wants of man? Are not all good things supplied to
How does the earth supply man man’s hands?

with food ? Is not waterthe chief nourishment
Do not the sea and air also supply | of all things that grow ?

food ? |

Lusson II. The Corn-field.

A FIELD of corn, as wheat, barley, oats, or rye,
is a beautiful scene. When the corn is very
young, it is green and refreshing to the sight;
when it is growing ripe, it is of a rich golden
colour, and gladdens us with the hope of plenty.

|

)


THE CORN-FIELD. 195

Wheat is commonly sown, during the winter
season, in land which has been prepared for it
by ploughing. After lying some time in the
ground, the grain shoots upward, in green
blades; the blades grow into stalks, and out of
them shoot other stems as well as leaves.

The ear containing the grain forms itself by
degrees, and is enclosed within the two upper
leaves of the stalk: these leaves dry and drop off
as the stalk grows strong enough to supportitself.
The stalk has four stout knots, which enable it to
bend without breaking. The wheat-stalk grows
upward of four feet high, to keep the grain from
the damp ground, which would cause it to rot.

The corn then waves in the field, and the
ears, being of full size, begin to turn yellow,
and to ripen with the heat of the sun.

The corn is next reaped with the sickle, and
when cut, is tied into bundles, or sheaves, which
are set up in the field to dry. In a few days of
fine weather, the crop is carried in wagons to
the barn or stack-yard. The sheaves are there
laid closely together, and if not housed in the
barn, the stack is covered, or thatched with
_ Straw, to keep it from the rain.

__ The corn is next threshed, to separate it from

_ the straw, and from the husks, which contain the

grain. This is sometimes done by aman with a
0 2
196 TilE CORN-FIELD.

flail, but more commonly by a machine, which
is worked by horses, and not only threshes out
the corn, but cleans it from the husks, and
dresses it for market. ‘The wheat is then put
into strong sacks, and is ready for grinding.

The straw is next tied into large bundles,
called trusses. It is useful for thatching, and
for cattle to sleep upon.

The stubble, or short stalks, which are left
in the field after reaping, are ploughed into the
ground, or collected, and used as manure, so
that no part of the stalk is wasted.

Wheat, in growing, has some dangers to
escape, before the farmer can calculate upon a
good crop. When it is very young, the ear is
often injured by blight: it is also liable to be
attacked by a small insect called the wheat-fly;
but the wheat-fly is sometimes killed by three
other kinds of flies, and thus the wheat is saved. |

Wheat grows to a great extent in Britain; but
not in sufficient abundance to supply our wants.
Corn is, therefore, imported from other coun-
tries, which are not so thickly inhabited as our
own. In exchange for the corn, we send various
zoods made in this country, as cotton and wool-
len cloths, cutlery, and the like.

The growth of wheat is one of the principal
concerns of the farmer’s life. In autumn, he
THE CORN-FIELD. 197

rises with the early sun, to plough and prepare
the ground for the seed-grain. ‘This he next
sows, and patiently waits until the green blades
spring up from the earth.

How bountifully is the providence of God
displayed to us, from seed-time to harvest? Al-
though the seed lies in the earth during winter,
the severest frosts do not reach and kill it: even
snow is a covering of warmth to the ground.
And-what care of man is shown in appointing
the harvest time, by which the farmer is enabled
to gather in the ripened corn, before winter
comes to strip the earth of its clothing !

QUESTIONS.

What kinds of grain are called
corn ?

At what time of the year is wheat
sown ?

How does wheat grow ?

How is the ear of wheat formed ?

How does the wheat- —m support
itself ?

How is the wheat reaped and
dried ?

How is the wheat threshed ?

Flow is the wheat separated from
the straw and husks ?

What is done with the straw ?
What is done with the short stalks
left in the wheat-fields ?

What are the dangers to which
wheat is exposed in growing ?
How is the wheat saved from the

wheat-fly ?
Is enough wheat grown in Britain
for her supply ?

Describe the growth of wheat.
Does neither frost nor snow kill
the seed-wheat in the earth ?

How is the care of man shown?

_-_ ~~ OS


Lesson III. Zhe Flour-mill.

THE wheat having been sold, is next ground by
the miller into flour for making bread. This is
done by a wind-mill, which is turned by the
wind; or by a water-mill, which is worked bya
stream.

In each mill the grinding part consists of}
two large circular stones, placed one over the
other. The lower stone is fixed while the upper
stone is turned very fast by a metal spindle,
which is moved by the wheel-work of the mill.
The grain is made to run into a hole in the
THE FLOUR=MILL. 199

upper mill-stone, and it is ground between the
stones into powder, and then thrown out at the
sides.

The surfaces of the mill-stones which are op-
posite to each other are made rough, and the
space between the two is very small. ‘The stones
are farthest apart in the middle, and come gra-
dually nearer towards the edges. When the corn
is first put in, it is only bruised; but, as the
stones continue to turn, and it gets nearer the
edges, it is cut smaller and smaller, and, at last,
it is finely ground just before it comes out from
between them. The stones can be set very near
together to grind finely, or further from each
other to grind coarsely.

When the corn, after being ground, comes
from between the stones, it is called meal. It is
then a mixture of flour and bran, the bran being
the skin of the grain, broken into thin flakes by
the operation of grinding. The bran is separated
from the flour, by bolting, or sifting it through
fine wire-gauze, turned by machinery.

The flour is then put into sacks, and is ready
for the baker. But in many parts of England,
private families bake their own bread. The
farmer commonly sends a part of his wheat
to the miller, to be ground into flour, and then
bakes it into bread at home.
200 THE FLOUR-MILL.

The wind-mill is turned by the four cross
pieces to be seen outside the mill. These are
called sails, and are frames provided with can-
vas to catch the wind, which keeps them in
motion. As they move round, they turn wheels
inside, connected with the spindles of the mill-
stones. ‘hese are very large and heavy; and
the upper stone sometimes weighs more than
nineteen thousand pounds. Although so heavy,
it is made to go round more than fifty times in
a minute.

In some large wind-mills, the sails turn round
twenty-five times in a minute, and carry round
the stones one hundred and sixty-two times in
a minute, grinding a load, or ten sacks of wheat,
in two or three hours.

The water-mill is worked. by a large wheel,
with flat or float-boards projecting from the rim.
The water of the mill-course is then made to fall
from a height over the wheel, and its weight
striking the float-boards, causes the whole wheel
to turn, and thus to work the machinery inside
the mill.

The water is collected by flood-gates, which
partly block up the mill-course; and the stream,
in falling over the wheel, causes the roar which is
heard when the mill is working. Sometimes the
water passes under the wheel, which is then
THE FLOUR«MILL. 201

turned by the force of the current. Tor, water
has great force in running, as may be seen
when it carries along a boat, or anything float-
ing on it.

It is amusing to watch how regularly the
wind turns the wind-mill. But we should be
careful, and not go too near the huge sails; they
sweep round with great force, and persons haye
been killed by them, who have approached too
closely. The engraving at the head of this
lesson represents the wind-mill in common use.

It is also dangerous to go very near the bank
of the mill-stream, as the water is very deep,
and might drown you if you were to fall into it,
while you were watching the wheel of the mill.
The engraving on the next page shows a water-
mill of ordinary construction.

QUESTIONS,

How is wheat ground.into flour? | Of what service is the canvas on
Which is the grinding part of the | the sails?

mill ? | Are not mill-stones very heavy ?
How is the corn ground between | How many times is a mill-stone
the mill-stones ? turned in a minute?
How is corn ground coarsely ? How is the water-mill worked ?
How is corn ground finely ? Of what service are the boards
In what state does the corn come ;__ across a water-wheel ?

from between the mill-stones ?
How is the bran separated from
the flour ?
What is the use of the large cross
pieces outside a wind-mill, and |

Does not the water sometimes run
under the wheel ?

Why is it dangerous to approach
the sails of a wind-mill ?





what are they named ?
202

et i

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8 Wate LL) a ii Se 2 Pi Ni
f y a ally ui i ; oe



Lesson IV. Bread.

In bread-making, the goodness of the bread de-
pends upon the quality of the flour, and its
lightness depends upon the skill with which it
is mixed. The finest and whitest bread is made
with the best flour only: ordinary bread is made
with flour of the first and second qualities; and
brown bread contains a portion of the bran,
which gives the bread its brown colour.

To make bread, the baker forms yeast and
warm water mixed with the flour into dough, in

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BREAD. 208

the manner already described by Mrs. Gibbs, in
her conversations with her children. When the
dough is light enough, it is cut and weighed
into lumps, each of which is divided into two
pieces, which are laid one upon the other to
forin a loaf.

The loaves are next to be baked in the oven.
This is an arched, hollow place, built with
bricks, and having a floor of tiles, and an iron
door at its mouth, or entrance.

To bake the bread, the oven is heated by fire ;
the loaves are then set upon the oven floor, side
by side, but not one upon the other. The door
of the oven is then shut, and kept closed until
the bread is baked, that is, until the upper part
becomes brown or crusted. The under part rests
upon the tile floor of the oven, andis also crusted,
but is harder and sweeter than the upper crust;
while the loaves, being placed close together, are
not crusted at the sides, except where they are
nearest the sides of the oven. The bread is next
taken out of the oven, and left to cool.

Biscuits are made with fine flour, and of very
stiffdough. It is cut into pieces, which are flat-
tened and stamped, and then laid upon the tiles
of the oven to bake. Biscuits are made use of
instead of bread, for the food of ships’ crews.
These biscuits keep good foralong voyage; but
204 BREAD.

bread would only keep a few days. At Ports.
mouth, biscuits are made for the British navy by
machinery, in one-third of the time they could
be made by hand.

Bread isthe usual food of all civilized people;
but it is rarely made so well as in England. In
some countries of Kurope, bread is partly made
of the bark of trees during winter, and of the
beech mast, or fruit of the beech tree, ground to
powder. In other parts, black bread is eaten;
the peasantry bake one large loaf for the whole
week, and cut it up with small saws.

In England, bread was formerly made of rye,

barley, and oats, ground into coarse meal; but
this bread was heavy, and very inferior to the
Wheaten bread, now common in every town
and village.

Wheat, from which bread is made, is more
nourishing than any other grain. Wheaten
bread is very light and wholesome; and it is the
daily food of all classes of personsin this country.
It nourishes alike the rich and poor; and helps
to support the strong man in his labour through-
out the day. It forms part of his cheerful meal
in the morning, at mid-day, and at night; and
bread has been deservedly called the “ staff of
life.” Children should be careful not to waste
the smallest fragment of bread; for even the
‘BREAD.

205

crumbs which fall from the table may be con-
verted to the use of some of God’s creatues.

QUESTIONS.

Upon what do the goodness and |

lightness of bread depend ?

Of what kind of flour is the finest
bread made ?

Of what kind of flour is ordinary
bread made ?

Of what kind of flour is brown
bread made ?

What causes its brown colour ?

How is a loaf formed by a baker?

Can you describe an oven?

How are the loaves placed in the |

oven?
‘How can we tell when the bread
is baked?

Why are there two sorts of crusts
to a loaf?

Hiow are biscuits made?

Are not biscuits made for ships’
crews?

Is not bread excellently made in
England ?

Is not bread made, in some coun-
tries, of other substances besides
flour ?

What kinds of bread were com-
mon in England before wheaten
bread was in general use ?

What may bread be called?

Why should we be careful not to
waste bread ?

Lesson V. fice.

RIcE is a very important article of food. In this
country it is chiefly used in making puddings.
But in countries where rice grows, it forms the
chief subsistence of the inhabitants, who eat it
boiled, and either alone or with meat. In India,
rice is eaten at nearly every meal, and a spirit is
extracted from it; and in Cochin-China rice and
206 - RICE.

sugar are the ordinary breakfast of persons of all
ages. .

Rice is very nutritious; in England it is used
rather as aluxury than for its cheapness; though
of all kinds of grain, rice may be said to support
the greatest number of the human race.

The grains of rice grow on separate little
stalks, which spring from the main stalk. Each
grain has an awn, or beard; the whole ear re-
sembles that of barley, but the stalk is not
unlike that of wheat; when young, its blades
are of a beautiful green colour.

In South Carolina, one of the United States
of North America, rice is cultivated in planta-
tions to a great extent. In the month of March,
women sow the grain in rows at the bottom of
trenches. Water is then caused to flow over
the plantations, and to remain on the ground
until the seed sprout. The water is then drawn
off, and the ground allowed to dry, until the rice
has risen between three and fourinches. This
requires about a month. The plantations are
again flooded, to destroy the grass and weeds,
after which the ground is allowed to remain dry
until the middle of July. The ground is then
for the last time flooded, and the rice ripens
while it is standing in the water. It is next cut
with a sickle by labourers, and women make it
RICE. 207

up into bundles. It is then carried, and the
grains are threshed out with hand-flails.

Upon each plantation is a mill, at which the
rice is separated from its outer husks, by passing
it between a pair of mill-stones. The inner
husk is removed from the grain, by rubbing it
in mortars with iron pestles, weighing from two
hundred and fifty to three hundred pounds,
which are raised by machinery, and let fall upon
the grain. The husks are then cleared away,
and the rice is packed in large casks. Rice will
keep fresh and good for a longer time with the
husks on; and in this state it is brought to
England, as fresh in taste and appearance as
in South Carolina.

Rice-plantations, when they are in the green
state, are much injured by the rice-bird, which
feeds upon the grain before it hardens.

The mode of cooking rice is very simple.
When boiled in water or milk, the grains swell
and soften into a kind of paste. If itis ground,
rice may be used as flour. Its great value as
food, is, that it contains much nourishment in
a small compass. |

A few other nourishing vegetable substances,
which also come from abroad, may be mentioned
here, as arrow-root, sago, and tapioca, all which
are excellent food for children and sick persons.
208 ARROW-ROOT. SAGO. TAPIOCA.

Arrow-root is a fine powder or starch, which
is washed from a reedy plant growing in the
Kast and West Indies. Its name is derived
from aroo, the Indian word for starch. |

Sago is the dried pith of a vast palm-tree, a
single trunk of which will sometimes produce
six hundred pounds of sago. In Java, the
natives extract from a plant sago, which is so
highly valued by persons of rank, that it is for-
bidden to export the plant. A very small |
quantity of this pith serves to satisfy the hunger
of the native soldiers in time of war.

Tapioca is a kind of starch, which settles
from the milky juice of an American plant.

QUESTIONS.

In what countries is rice the most | How is rice cut and threshed ?
important article of food ? | How is rice separated from its

Is not rice much eaten in India? husks ?

What grain supports the greatest | In what consists the great value
number of the human race ? of rice as food?

How does rice grow? How is arrow-root obtained?

What English corn does it most | Why is arrow-root so named?
resemble ? | What is sago? |

In what part of America is rice | In what country is sago so highly
cultivated ? valued ?

How does rice ripen ? What is tapioca?
209

Lesson VI. Meat.

THE uses of animals to man are very numerous.
Some animals, as the horse and the ass, are em-
ployed for riding and drought; and the dog is
serviceable in hunting and watching. Other ani-
mals supply man with nutritious food, in their
meat or flesh; as oxen, sheep, and swine. These
also yield tallow and lard; and milk, which is
often made into butter and cheese. Their skins
furnish leather; and even their bristles, hair,
horns, and hoofs, are very useful; their bones
make excellent manure for Jand, and are also
burnt into ivory-black, of whichis made blacking
for cleaning shoes and for other purposes.

The finest meat is the flesh of those quadrupeds
which feed on grass or grain, as oxen and sheep.
In England, the pastures or feeding-places, are
richer than in other parts of Europe, and the
meat is fine in proportion; for its goodness de-
pends upon the nature of the food.

Meat is named differently, from the animals
which supply it. Thus, beef is the flesh of oxen;
veal, the flesh of calves; mutton, the flesh of
sheep: pork, that of swine, or pigs; and venison,
the flesh of deer.

Oxen and sheep are fattened in certain parts

of Great Britain, called grazing counties, where
IT. P

»
210 MEAT.

the land is richer, and yields finer grass, than
in other places. In these countries, also, the
rearing of oxen and sheep, or live-stock, as those
animals are called, is a chief branch of the
farmer’s business.

The finest oxen in England are the long.

horned, bred in Lancashire ; the short-horned,
bred in our northern counties; and the middle-

horned, bred in Devonshire, Herefordshire, and |

Sussex. There are also three breeds in Scot-
land, which are of smaller size, but are much
esteemed. In Wales are two breeds; and one in
Alderney. The young ox, or bullock, yields the
finest meat; calves are the young of cows; these

are reared with care, and fattened with milk,

which makes their flesh white and delicate.
The sheep reared in Britain are probably the
most valuable in the world. Some have horns,

but others are without. them. The horned.

breeds are fed in the northern counties of
England, in Norfolk, and in Suffolk ; and these
are black-faced, Others are fed in Hertford-
shire, Dorsetshire, and Devonshire ; and Scot-
land has three horned breeds,

The hornless sheep are bred in Lineolsbins,
Leicestershire, Devonshire, and Herefordshire.
A fine race is fed upon the South Downs of
Sussex, the meat of which is highly esteemed
MEAT. 211

for the table. Fine sheep also feed upon the
Cheviot Hills, which in part divide England
from Scotland; and some Welsh breeds are
much prized.

These sheep produce mutton of excellent
flavour. They are also valuable for their fleeces,
as you have been told in the account of the
manufacture of woollen clothing.

Lambs are the young of sheep. The Dorset
breed produce young in almost every season,
and supply us with delicate house-lamb.

In summer, oxen and sheep may be seen feed-
ing in rich grassy valleys and hilly pastures.
But, in winter, they are fatted on turnips, and
with hay or straw, beneath shelter, or in folds.

Pork is the fresh meat of swine or hogs, which
are mostly fatted in styes. Their flesh, when
salted and smoked or dried, is called bacon. A
flitch of bacon is one side of a hog, salted and
cured; and hams are the legs of hogs similarly
prepared. Pork which has been cured in this
manner, will keep good for some time ; but, if
it is not salted or cured, pork; and indeed every
other kind of meat, must be dressed and eaten
_ in a few days, or it will be unfit for food.

The animals hitherto named, and prized for
their meat, are domesticated, or tamed by man,
forhisuse. Othér animals, which run wild, are

P
212 MEAT.

also esteemed as food; the deer, for instance,

whose flesh is the meat called venison, is seen in

parks and forests, where it is hunted by men

on horse-back, with dogs. Not only is its flesh
so highly valued; but its fine branching horns,
and soft skin, serve for many useful purposes,

The hare and therabbit are also used as food; _

and their skins are made into clothing.

All kinds of meat must be cooked before they
can be eaten. This is done by boiling, roasting
_ before a fire, or baking in an oven; and all
these processes make the meat juicy and savoury,

en QUESTIONS.

Which are the principal animals | Which sheep supply the finest
that supply man with food ? | mutton ?

Why is meat finer in England | Is not the fleece of sheep valu-
thati iti other countries ? able ?

Name thé principal varieties of
meat, and the animals that sup- tened ?
ply them. | What are lambs ?

In what parts of Britain are oxen | What is pork?
and sheep mostly fattened ? | How is pork v.ade into bacon?

Can you name some of the places ' How may meat be kept good for
where the finestoxen arefatted? | long time?

Can you name some of the places What animal supplies venison?
where the finest sheep are | How is meat generally cooked?
fatted? |






How are oxen and sheep fat-§

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Lesson VII. Milk; Butter; Cheese.

{n the preceding lesson, we have read how oxen
supply us with wholesome meat. But this is
not the only benefit of their race to man: for
cows yield milk twice a day, giving plenty of
this nourishing drink for meals, and enough to
put aside for other purposes, as making into
butter and cheese.

All cows give milk ; but some, as the Alder-
ney cows, give richer milk, and more peat
fully, than others.

The making of butter from cream is a simple
process, and has been already described by
Mrs. Gibbs, in the little book in which we read
her account of making bread. —

The churn now in use isin shape like a barrel,




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214 MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE.

inside which are cross boards, pierced with
holes. The cream is poured into this barrel,
which is turned round with a handle, until the

|

heat and the motion change the cream to —

butter-milk and solid butter.

The butter is then washed and salted. If it
is to be used as fresh butter, only a small
quantity of salt is added, and it is made into
lumps. All butter contains some salt, or it
would be tasteless, and soon turn sour.

But ifthe butter be intended for keeping, much
more salt is added, and it is packed into wooden
tubs, which are marked with the maker’s name.

Butter is made all over England; but that
which is made in Essex, in Cambridgeshire, and
in Dorsetshire, is most esteemed. In most cases,
the flavour of the butter depends upon the rich-
ness of the pasture in which the cows are fed.
Iixcellent butter is also made from the milk of
those cows which feed upon commons and
heaths.

Great quantities of salt butter are made in

Ireland, and sent to this country. But this is
not so good as the salt butter made in Holland,
many thousand tubs of which are received in

Kingland every, year. This kind of butter is |

preserved in the tubs with a strong pickle, made
of salt, which is renewed from time to time.
MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE. 215

As butter is eaten nearly at every meal, an
almost incredible quantity is consumed in Eng-
land yearly. It has been calculated that nearly
forty million pounds of butter are eaten in Lon-
don in one year, which are worth nearly two
millions of money. Now, in this time, the milk
of one cow will produce one hundred and sixty-
eight pounds of butter, so that two hundred
and eighty thousand cows must be kept to
supply the London market.

Butter can only be used in a hard state in cold
or temperate countries. In hot countries, as in
India, butter is liquid, and is carried in skin
bottles. In the warm parts of Europe, as Spain,
Portugal, Italy, and the south of France, butter
is sold at apothecaries’ shops. But olive oil is
mostly used instead of butter, in all these
countries, where the olive tree grows in great
luxuriance.

Cheese is also prepared from the milk of the
cow; anda richer kind of cheese is made with
the addition of cream. The milk is first warmed, ©
and then some rennet is put into it, when it
curdles, and separates into a solid, called curd,
and a liquid named whey. Rennet is made by
soaking the stomach of acalf in salt and water.

The curd is then covered with coarse cloths
and put into vats, or round wooden frames, with
ff

216 MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE.

holes in them. These are placed between
boards and put into a press, which is worked by
a strong upright screw. The vats are turned,
and the cloths are changed, and when all the
whey is pressed out, the curd becomes cheese,
and is scalded, salted, and dried. The cheeses
are then rubbed and turned daily, until they
are hard, or the rind is formed.

To give cheese its high yellow or orange
colour, annatto, which is a preparation from the
seed of a foreign tree, is added to the milk

- before it is curdled.

Cheese is made all over England; but the

finest kinds are made in Gloucestershire, Wilt.
shire, and Cheshire, where cheese-making is the
principal business on large dairy-farms. In
Cheshire, some farmers keep from three to four
hundred cows, each yielding daily eight quarts
of milk, from which is made one pound of
cheese. Cheshire cheeses are sometimes as
heavy as aman can lift; and many hundred tons
of cheese are made yearly in Cheshire alone.
‘ In the several counties of England, the modes
of making cheese are different ; the milk is also
of different qualities; and on these accounts,
cheese is of so many flavours.

When the cheeses are ready, they are sent
from the dairy-farms in wagons, to large aes

a 3
q



MILK, BUTTER, CHEESE.

or cheese-fairs.

217

Here they are sold to cheese-

mongers, who supply cities and towns with this

useful article of food.

The milk of goats is little used in England;
but, in some countries of Europe, it is made

into cheese of delicious flavour.

In certain

parts of Africa, goats’ milk is so expensive, that
a quart is sold for two shillings.

QUESTIONS.

Are not cows very beneficial to
man ?

Which cows give the richest and
most milk ?

Can you describe the churn now |

in use?

What causes the cream to become
butter ? ,

How is butter salted ?

How is butter salted for keep-
ing ?

In which English counties is the
best butter made ?

Upon what does the flavour of.

butter depend ?

How is butter salted in Hol-
land ?

Ilow much butter is calculated
to be eaten in London in a
year?

How much butter is commonly

made from the milk of one cow
in a year?

How many cows are required to
supply the London market with
butter ?

How is butter preserved in hot
countries ?

In what countries is olive oil
used instead of butter ?

How is cheese made from milk ?

Why is the curd put into a
press ?

How is the rind formed on a
cheese ?

. How is cheese coloured ?

In what English counties is the
finest cheese made ?

Why is cheese made of so many
flavours ?

Is not the milk of goats as well as
of cows made into cheese ?


Lesson VIII. Poultry.

Pou.tTry is the general name of all kinds of tame
birds which are used for food; as fowls, ducks,
geese, turkeys, guinea-fowls, and others. Most
of these were originally brought from distant
countries, and domesticated in our poultry-
yards. Thus, the fowl and the peacock were
brought from India; the turkey from America; |
and the guinea-fowl from Africa. The small
fowls called bantams were originally brought
from Bantam, a kingdom in the island of Java.

Poultry not only affords us delicate food, but
the feathers of most kinds are useful for stuffing
beds; and the larger feathers of geese, or quills,
as they are called, are made into writing-pens.
POULTRY. 219

Large quantities of poultry are bred in Norfolk
and Suffolk; they are also reared on every farm
in England. A brood of fowls may often be seen
upon village-greens, as in the engraving at the
head of this lesson, pecking up stray seeds which
might otherwise be lost. Ducks and geese like-
wise feed upon the grass and worms which they
find in these places. At night all these birds
return home to feed and roost. ‘Their food is
barley and other grain, and meal, when it 1s in-
tended to fatten them for market.

The young of all kinds of poultry are hatched
from eggs, which the mother lays in some parti-
cular spot. As soon as the hen has hatched a
brood of chickens, they are put under a coop, or
wooden cage, until they are grownstrong enough
to walk about after the hen. It is pleasing to see
with what affection she then watches her young
brood, and calls them to their food; what anxiety
she shows if one of the little ones strays fromthe
rest; and how she gathers the whole brood under
her wings for shelter, if danger threatens them.

The hen will lay an egg a day during a great
part of the year. ‘These eggs are very nourish-
ing food, and great numbers of them are brought
to market. Eggs are likewise imported from
France in such quantities as to employ several
small vessels in bringing them to this country;
220 POULTRY.

and many thousand pounds’ worth are received
In one year.

For the great number of their eggs, and their
delicate meat, domestic fowls are amongst the
most valuable animals of their class. They are
valuable not only to the farmer, with whom it is
amatter of business to rear them on a large scale,
or the families who keep them as a source of
convenience and comfort; but they are also a
source of treasure to the cottager,who can never
fail to find a profitable market, either for newly-
laid eggs, young chickens, or fatted fowls.

The structure of the egg is one of the curiosi-
ties of natural history. It consists of the yolk,
or yellow part, and a clear liquid,which becomes
hard and white by boiling. The yolk and white
are contained in a fine bag, around which is the
thin shell. But this shell is strong; it is as firm
as the hardest cement, and requires the sharp
blow of a spoon or knife to penetrate it.

Ducks and geese live partly on the water, and
delight to swim in ponds and slow streams.
When tame, they rarely eat fish; but wild ducks
and geese are fond of fish, which gives their
flesh a strong flavour. Both the goose and the
duck form savoury dishes for the table.

The turkey is the largest bird of the poultry-
yard: its colours are mostly black and white, and
POULTRY. 221

ithas a large red wattle hanging from beneath its
throat. The finest turkeys are fattened in Not-
folk, and some of them weigh many pounds. In
their native country, wild turkeys live on trees
‘n flocks of many hundreds, where the turkey-
cocks make the forest ring with their crowing.

The guinea-fowl is of a grayish colour, spotted
with white, and its flesh is excellent. It lays its
eggs on the bare ground ; and the young are
better reared by the common hen than by their
own mother.

The peacock is a fine bird, and the pride of ~
the poultry-yard ; but the young pea-fowls only
are good eating. The plumage of the peacock is
rich and many-coloured ; especially its long
feathers, or train, improperly called a tail,
which it can raise and spread for show.

Pigeons are small plump birds, and theif .
flesh is generally esteemed. Their cooing note
+s unlike that of other birds. They roost in a
wooden house which is placed against @ wall,
or raised upon a pole, out of the reach of ver-
min; and a pigeon-house in the shape of a
barrel is commo? in poultry-yards.

Several other birds besides poultry are eaten
and considered great delicacies. These are called
«“ game :” including pheasants, partridges,wood-
cocks, snipes, grouse, and others. These birds
222

GAME,

are found in various parts of Britain, and being
put to flight by dogs, they are shot by the
sportsman with his gun. Game is only eaten in

autumn and winter, when it is “in season.”

The hare also is prized as game.

It runs

very swiftly, and is shot, or cruelly hunted with

dogs.

Its flesh is very finely flavoured, from

the wild herbs growing with the grass upon

which it feeds.

The rabbit is much less esteemed than the

hare, its flesh having less flavour.

The tame

rabbit is kept in the poultry-yard.

QUESTIONS.

What kinds of birds are called '

poultry ?

From what countries were the
fowl, peacock, turkey, and
guinea-fowl originally brought ?

Are not the feathers of poultry
useful ?

What bird furnishes quills for
writing-pens ?

In what English counties are
most poultry bred ?

What is the principal food of
poultry ?

Are not eggs very nourishing food?

Is not the structure of the egg
very curious?

Can you describe the parts of the
egg?

_ Is the egg-shell very strong ?

What is the food of the goose and
duck ?

Can you describe a turkey ?

Where are the finest turkeys fat-
tened ?

Can you describe a guinea-fowl ?

Is not the peacock a fine bird ?

What kind of bird is the pigeon?

Are not other birds besides poultry
eaten ? :

Can you name a few kinds of
game ?

How is the hare killed ?


Lesson LX. L’ish.

Fis supply us plentifully with delicious food at
all seasons of the year. They abound in the seas
which surround the British Isles, and they flock
in prodigious numbers to out shores. Such are
called marine, or salt-water fish. The rivers and
streams which flow through our country, swarm
with other kinds, which arecalled fresh-water fish.
. Our principal salt-water fish are the turbot,
sole, cod, whiting, herring, sprat, pilchard, and
mackerel; oysters, lobsters, and crabs. And
upon our different coasts, many thousand men
and boys are constantly employed in what are
called the fisheries, or in taking these fish in
boats, with strong nets. The turbot is one of the
224 FISH.

largest and best-tasted fishes, and is caught
along the coasts of Norfolk, Suffolk, and Essex:
it is likewise sent to the London market from
the coast of Holland.

The sole is a similar kind of fish to the turbot,
but much smaller. These and a few fish of the
like kind are the only animals which have both
eyes on one side of the head: they swim in a
slanting position, with the eyes uppermost.

The cod is a valuable fish on account of its
immense numbers, its various uses, and the
length of time it may be kept. It is so produc-
tive, that nine millions of eggs have been found
in a single cod-fish. It is fine eating, when
fresh, and great numbers are salted in barrels ;
the liver of the cod yields much oil, and its air-
bag, or sound, is very nourishing food. This
fish is taken with a strong hook and line: for |
it is so voracious as to catch ‘at any bait. |
The finest cod-fish are brought from the |
Doggersbank, in the North Sea. |

Herrings are cheap and nutritious food. They
swim in columns, four or five miles in length,
and three or four in breadth, and are taken in
vastnumbers. They are eaten fresh, or pickled in
strong brine ; and when salted, and driedin the
smoke of wood, are called red herrings. Many
thousand personsareemployed in catching,curing
FISH. 225

and packing them. In Scotland, herrings are
the chief food of working persons; nearly half
a million barrels of them are consumed annually,
and the comfort of the people depends greatly
on the plentifulness of this fish. Vast numbers
are also sent to the West Indies for the food of
the working population.

Sprats are caught with very fine nets; and
in winter they supply the poor with a cheap
and wholesome dish.

The pilchard resembles the herring, and is
caught off the coasts of Cornwall and Devon;
where upwards of one thousand boats, three
thousand five hundred men at sea, and above
fye thousand men, women, and children, on
shore, are employed in the pilchard fishery. Pil-
chards are pickled in brine, or salted and dried
for winter provision ; they yield oil for common
» purposes, and are packed in hogsheads for
_ exportation.

Mackerel are caught in great numbers, espe-
cially near the mouth of the river Thames, and
are principally sent to the London market for
sale.

The sturgeon is a very large fish; it is de-
licious eating; and of its sounds is made the
valuable article called isinglass; but itis seldom
caught on our coast.

II. Q
226 FISH.

Oysters are found in double shells growing to
rocks or beds; those on our shores are the
finest in Europe, and many thousand men are
employed in the oyster fishery. Other fish
which have their limbs covered with hard shell,
such as lobsters and crabs, are taken on the
British coasts; as are also prawns and shrimps.

Our chief fresh-water fish are the salmon, the
trout, and the eel. The salmon is principally
supplied by the northern counties. Itis amost
beautiful fish, and is covered with bright, silvery
scales. Itis very productive, the eggs of one
salmon often exceeding fifteen hundred in num-
ber. When just hatched, the young fish, or fry,

are scarcely an inch in length; but they increase |
rapidly to many pounds’ weight. Very fine |

salmon are sent from Scotland to this country
packed up in boxes with ice, to keep the fish
fresh.

The trout is found in shaded streams. It is
a beautiful silvery fish, with red and black
spots, and is very delicate ‘eating. In lakes is



also found a large kind of trout, which some-

times weighs many pounds. |

The eel is found in streams and in muddy
waters; and is taken in traps (called eel-pots),
or with a kind of spear. It has a serpent-like
form, and a savoury taste.
FISH. 227

There are likewise many other kinds of fish
in the rivers and lakes of England; as salmon-
trout, which resembles both a salmon and a
trout; also carp, tench, perch, roach, dace, and
pike, all which are esteemed delicacies.

Fish are only said to be “in season,” or in
perfection, at certain periods. But, as the
several kinds are not all in season at the same
time, there is no part in the year in which we
cannot be supplied with some fish in perfection.
They can be kept in a fresh state only for a
very short time, but there are many methods of
drying, salting,and pickling them for store food.

QUESTIONS.

Is Britain plentifully supplied with | Where are pilchards mostly
fish ? caught ?

Which are the principal salt-water | Where are mackerel principally
fish ? sold ?

Are many persons employed in the | Of what part of the sturgeon is
fisheries ? isinglass made ?

Where is the turbot caught ? How are oysters found ?

On what account is the cod a | What other shell-fish are taken on
valuable fish ? the British coasts >

Is not the cod-fish very pro- | Which are our chief fresh-water
ductive ? fish ?

Can you name a few of the uses | Is not the salmon a very fine
of god-fish ? fish ?

How do herrings swim ? How is salmon sent from Scot-

How are they cured for keeping ? land ?

Are not herrings important food in | Where is the trout found?
some countries ? Where is the eel found?

What fish does the pilchard most | Can you name any other British
resemble ? | fresh-water fish ?

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Lesson X. Salt.

SapT is foundin every quarter of the globe. It 1
is dug out of the earth in hard masses 5 and is |
also found dissolved in springs, andin sea-water. 3
The uses of salt are very numerous; indeed, it
ss one of the most valuable productions of the”
earth. You have been told how itis used to pre-"
serve fish and meat; and in making bre ad, butter,
and cheese. We also employ salt daily in cook:
ing most kinds of food, and use it daily at table.
Salt is very wholesome. In Africa, children
relish salt as with us they do sugar. In some
parts, salt is used for money; and to say thata
man “eats salt,” 1s the same as saying that he»

is 11ch.

:
SALT. 229

Yet savoury as is the taste of salt, it is com-
posed of the most unpalatable ingredients,
either of which, tasted separately, is very dis-
agreeable. When you become acquainted with
chemistry, you will understand how this change
of flavour is produced in the mixture. :

Salt is not only used as food, but for many
other purposes. It is employed in what is
called roasting the ores of metals, and in
making glass and earthenware. Salt is also
spread over land as manure.

Salt is found in immense rocks, and in some
countries it is used like stone forbuilding houses.
It is met with in mountains many thousand feet
high, and in mines some hundred feet deep. In
very hot countries, where the earth is dry and
sandy, wide plains are covered with a fleecy salt.

Great quantities of salt may be obtained from
sea-water, although we find salt more ready for
our use. In some places the sea flows into bays

and flats cut upon the shore, when the sun dries

_ up the water, and the salt is left. In this man-
_ ner day salt, used for curing fish and meat, is



obtained. Cattle will flock to these flats, and

_ greedily lick up the salt or strong brine.

Salt-springs occur in most parts of the
world. Those of our own country, at Droit-
wich, in Worcestershire, yield annually many
230 SALT.

thousand tons of salt. The springs are from
twenty to forty yards deep in the earth; the
water is raised by a steam-engine, and conveyed
through troughs to the brine pits; it is then put
into large iron pans, and left till the water
evaporates or dries up, and the salt crystallizes.
Rock-salt generally has a slight tinge; but
when pure, it is transparent and colourless.
Near Northwich, in Cheshire, are large salt-
mines; the beds of salt being from eighty to
one hundred and forty feet deep in the earth,
and of different thickness. The first bed re-
sembles brown sugar-candy, and is so hard as
only to be broken with iron picks and wedges,
or blown off in vast pieces with gunpowder.
Over this brownish salt is a thick bed of stone,
beneath which is another bed of salt, from five
to six yards thick, and clear as crystal.
Rock-salt pits are sunk at great expense ;
and one, near Northwich, is two acres in extent.
Its roof is supported by immense pillars of
salt, as shown in the engraving. When this
wonderful place is lighted up with torches, the
sides, roofs, and pillars glisten very beautifully.
‘he mode of manufacturing rock-salt into such
as we use at table, is as follows. The large craggy
lumps are drawn up in baskets from the pit, and
being dissolved in water, are boiled inlarge pans,
SALT. 231

until the water evaporates, and leaves the salt.
This is put into sacks for sale, and then sent
in barges by canals, to all parts of the kingdom.

There is much labour and risk in digging the

salt, and expense in conveying it.

But so

cheaply is it sold, that a sack full of salt, or as
much as a strong man can carry, may be bought

for six shillings.

In Poland there are vast salt-mines, upwards
of four hundred feet deep, from which salt is

dug ready

for table, without the process
boiling and evaporating.

of

In one of these mines

eight hundred men and many horses are em-
ployed; and at its greatest depth a stream of
pure fresh water flows to quench their thirst.

This stream

does not pass through the salt-

rock, which would render it unfit for drink, but

through a bed of clay.

QUESTIONS.

Where is salt found ?

In what state is salt found ?

Can you tell me a few of the uses
of salt ?

Is not salt much prized in Africa ?

Is salt used for other purposes
besides seasoning food ?

In what parts of the earth is salt
dug ?

How is salt obtained from sea-
water ?

How is bay-salt obtained ?

In what part of England are the
finest salt-springs ?

How is the dry salt obtained from
the springs ?

In what part of England is rock-
salt found ?

How is the roof of the pits or
mines supported ?

How is rock-salt prepared for
use ?

How is salt sold?

In what respect does the salt of
Poland differ from the English
salt ? }

Are not the salt-mines of Poland
very extensive ?
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Lesson XI. Vegetables.

Pants, or vegetables, form the great source of
our subsistence.’ Bread is a vegetable substance
prepared, as you have been told, from the meal
or flour of wheat, which isa plant. All fruits are
produced from plants, or trees. There are many
vegetables which are used as food, and nourish-
ing drinks are obtained from others. Besides,
the animals which supply us with meat could
not live without vegetable food, or grass.
Vegetables are necessary, indeed, to the ex-
istence of mankind; and looking around us, we

see how abundantly the earth is clothed with

vegetation, and how wisely the constant and

_ bountiful supply is suited to their daily wants.
VEGETABLES. 233

Certain plants which are cooked in a fresh
state, and eaten with meat, are more particularly
known by the name of vegetables. ‘They are not
so substantial as meat; but they are wholesome
and refreshing, and contain much nourishment.

Vegetables are grown mostly in gardens. In
Britain, many thousand men, women, and
children earn their living by cultivating them.
The garden of every cottage will yield its
occupier fresh vegetables for his owntable; and
it has been observed, that a well-stocked garden
bespeaks the industry and good character of its
owner. But vegetables will not grow, or the
ground cannot be spared for them in large towns.
There are, therefore, extensive vegetable gardens
in their neighbourhood, the produce of which is
sold fresh in the markets of the towns, to which
they are conveyed in carts and wagons. Around
London are many hundred acres of garden-
ground, in which great numbers of persons are
employed.

The potato is the most valuable of all vegeta-
bles. Having no peculiarity of taste, and consist-
ing chiefly of starch, it approaches nearer to the
nature of flour than any other vegetable root pro-
duction. In times of scarcity it has been substi-
tuted for bread; and it may be stored, so as to
supply the table throughout the winter. The
234 VEGETABLES.

plantis mostly raised from the potato, and shoots
forth from the marks called eyes. It is very
productive, for a single root will yield as many
as four pounds of potatoes. There are upwards
of twenty methods of cooking potatoes. Sugar,
starch, and flour may be obtained from them;
and a dye is made from the green tops of the
plant. With the flour of potatoes puddings are
made. With a moderate proportion of wheat
flour, bread of excellent quality may be formed
of it, and as delicate food as sago, oF arrow-root.
In short, the potato is prized wherever it is
known, and esteemed in countries where the
most luscious fruits are grown. Itisa cheap
and nourishing article of food for all classes.

Beans and peas contain much nourishment. |
The pods of beans are only eaten in this country
when they are young and green; but the dried
beans are also eaten in other parts of Europe.
Peas not only form a delicious dish, when they
are fresh and green, but they are also dried,
and largely consumed as sea-provisions, and
in making winter soup.

The turnip is a juicy and nutritious root, and
its leaves, or tops, when young, are wholesome.
The carrot is also very juicy, and 1s thought to.
be still more nourishing than the turnip.

The cabbage likewise possesses wholesome
qualities, and has been longer known than any



ee re
oe OR ag ee ee ee


VEGETABLES. 235

other vegetable. The cauliflower is a very
delicate variety of the cabbage; and brocoli is a
variety of the cauliflower. Spinach has fine juicy
leaves. Asparagus has a delicate flavour, but
affords little nutriment. Sea-kale resembles
asparagus in taste, andcan be obtained by forced
growth, when fresh vegetables are scarce. Arti-
chokes are considered nutritious.

All these vegetables are boiled before they are
eaten; but there are a few others which do not
require cooking: such as the plants generally
termed salad ; the lettuce, the radish, celery, and
the cucumber, which is, strictly, a fruit. Of this
class are mustard and cress, two annual plants,
which are cut when young, and used as ingre-
dients among salads. Herds, as parsley, sage,
thyme, and the like, are much used in cookery,
to flavour food. Mustard, which is eaten with
meat, is a seed, ground into powder, and mixed
with water; it grows upon a plant in fields.

Some vegetables are eaten when they are
pickled in vinegar, as capsicum, first brought
from India; and capers, which-grow on trees in
Italy and the south of France, and are brought
pickled to this country. Many other vegetables,
and some unripe fruits, are also pickled.

The onion is one of the most productive plants,
for it increases upwards of two thousand fold in
one season; that is, one onion will yield two
236 VEGETABLES.

thousand seeds. The onion is always wholesome,
but is milder and more juicy if itis cooked. It
is very useful; for it flavours the choice dishes
of the rich man’stable, and is a vegetable dainty |
in the cottage meal; and it may be stored in all |
seasons. The leek resembles the onion in |
flavour, and is used for similar purposes.

The onionis cultivated over the greater part of
the known world; and, with the leek,was used as
food by the Egyptians, upwards of two thousand }
years before the birth of our Saviour. Leeks
and onions were among the provisions, the want |
‘of which the Israelites lamented after their de- |
parture from their kingdom, as we read in the |
eleventh chapter of the Book of Numbers :—!
“ And the children of Israel also wept again,
and said, Who shall give us flesh to eat? We,
remember the fish which we did eat in Egypt |
freely ; the cucumbers, and the melons, and the |
leeks, and the onions, and the garlic.”

In the engraving prefixed to this lesson are}
represented potatoes, asparagus, artichokes,
cabbages, turnips, and celery.




QUESTIONS.

What is the great source of our What are the properties of vege:
subsistence ? tables as food ?

Can you name a few of the uses Where are vegetables mostly cul: |
of plants and vegetables ? tivated ?




VEGETABLES. 237

How are large towns supplied with | Are not the turnip and carrot

vegetables ? wholesome ?
What does a well-stocked cottage- Can you name a few of the pro-
garden bespeak ? perties of other vegetables ?
Can you name a few of the pro- | How are vegetables cooked ?
perties of the potato? Which plants are termed salad ?
Is not the potato prized by all | Are not some vegetables pickled ?
classes ? ls not the onion very produc-
Do beans and peas contain much tive ?
nourishment ? Is not the onion very useful ?



Lesson XII. Brewing; Malt and Hops.

NExT in importance to the various kinds of ani-
mal and vegetable food, are ale and beer, which
are the common drinks in this country. The art
of preparing these 1s termed brewing.

Beer is brewed from malt and hops; and malt
is barley prepared in a peculiar manner ; of
which, as well as of the erowth of barley and
hops, we shall speak before we describe the
process of brewing.

Batley is grown in fields, like wheat; but it
ss sown later and reaped earlier than wheat. It
is mostly shorter in the ear; but it has a rough
awn, or long beard growing from the corns,
which are threshed out like other grain.

‘The process of making barley into malt is
simply as follows. The barley is first steeped in
a cistern of water; it is then taken out and piled
in a heap, when the corns begin to sprout or
238 BREWING-——MALT AND HOPS.

grow. But, ata certain stage, this growth of
the grain is stopped by drying it upon a kiln,
which has a floor of wire-work or pierced tiles,
with a coke fire beneath it. The malt is then
spread out upon floors, to become mellow. In
this process, the starch of the barley is changed
into sugar; and, on chewing a erain of malt, you
will find it to have a pleasant sweet flavour.

Now, the taste and colour of beer depend
greatly upon the malt being more or less dried in
the kiln. For example, ale, or light-coloured
beer, is brewed from pale malt, which has only
been dried crisp; amber-coloured beer isbrewed
from malt which has been lightly scorched; and
brown, or dark-coloured beer, from burnt malt.

The business of malting is carried on in build-
ings which have barred open windows at the
sides, to allow the air to pass through them and
dry the malt upon the floors. The kiln has a
large circular chimney, over the top of which is
a projecting moveable screen.

Great quantities of barley, which is mostly
made into malt, are grown in England; and
forty million bushels of barley are sometimes
malted in one year.

Hops ave the flowers of plants, or dines, which
are cultivated in fields or gardens, and have rough
BREWING-——-MALT AND HOPS. 239

shoots twining round wooden poles, from fifteen
to twenty feet high. The flowers, or hops, are
picked off into baskets, by women and children ;
for which purpose the poles are taken up and
lowered with the plants clinging to them.

The crop is very uncertain ; as the bines are
liable to the attacks of the hop-fly. Upon the
numbers of this insect depends the crop of hops,
which, of all natural produce, are most subject
to variation in quantity and price.

A hop-ground in summer is a very delightful
scene. The poles are covered with bines, from
which the hops hang in clusters and light fes-
toons, and shed around them a delicious odour.

Again, the growth of the hop-bine is worthy
of remark. It is not supported on the pole by
fibres, like the ivy, nor by tendrils, like the vine;
but the hop-bine keeps to the pole simply by its
own twinings, as a snake would by its own
folds. It always twines from the left to the
right hand ; that is, from east to west ; or, with
the course of the sun. Now, the kidney-bean,
and some other plants, twine in the contrary
direction, or from right to left.

After the hops are picked, they are dried in a
kiln, and packed in large sacks as closely as they
can be pressed. The finest hops are put into the
240 BREWING—MALT AND HOPS.

finest sacks or pockets, and are sold chiefly to
the ale-brewer. The inferior hops are put into
very coarse bags, and are used for beer.

The use of hops in ale and beer is to give them
a fine bitter flavour, and to make them keep for
a longer time than they otherwise would.

In England, upwards of forty-three thousand
acres are planted with hops; principally in the
counties of Kent and Sussex, Worcester and
Hereford. The hops grown in Kent are gene-
rally considered to be of the finest quality.

QUESTIONS.

In what does brewing consist ? Why is the crop of hops so un-
Of what does malt consist ? certain ?
How is barley grown? Are not hops subject to great
Can you describe the process of | variation in price?

making barley into malt ? What is done after the hops are
Upon what does the colour of beer picked off the plant ?

depend ? What kind of hops is used for
What kind of malt is used for ale? ale ?
What are hops ? What is the use of hops in
How does the hop-plant, or bine, brewing ?

grow ? In what counties of England
In what direction does the stem are hops principally culti-

twine? vated?


Lesson XIII. Beer.

To brew beer, the malt is first crushed between
two iron rollers; or cut to pieces by a mill, much
like the coffee-mill, but of larger size; or ground
at a corn-mill.

The crushed or ground malt is then put into
a tun or large tub, with a false bottom, pierced
with holes. Hot, but not boiling, water is then
poured upon the malt, and the whole is stirred
about by the brewer, in the manner shown in
the engraving. This is called mashing, and the
liquor which runs through the false bottom into
the lower part of the tun, is called wort. It is
very sweet to the taste, for the hot water has

I. R
242 BEER.

extracted most of the sugar from the malt. More
water is then poured upon the malt, and weaker
wort is thus made, which may be set aside for
small beer. What remains of the malt is called
grains, which are used for feeding horses and
cows.

The wort is then boiled with hops, after which
‘tis strained off, and put into shallow tubs to
cool as rapidly as possible. The hot wort being
thus drawn out of deep into shallow vessels, it
cools sooner, as it is more exposed to the air. In
like manner, tea is cooled, if it is poured out of
a cup into a saucer. Cool weather, as spring and
autumn, is the fittest time for brewing. In some
large breweries, the wort is cooled by passing it
in pipes through cold water.

When the wort is cool enough, it is put into
open tubs, and yeast is added, which causes the
wort to ferment; that is, creamy froth rises upon
its surface, which is skimmed off as fast as it
appears. ‘The fermented liquor then becomes ale
or beer; and to this process of working, the
drink owes its brisk and refreshing qualities.

The beer is next put into smaller casks, and
when it has ceased to throw up yeast, it is bunged
down closely, and stored in the cellar; which
place being of the same coolness at all seasons of
the year, prevents the beer from again fermenting
BEER. 243

and turning sour. ._In a few months the beer
will be fit for drinking, but if it is strong, it will
be much improved by keeping for a longer time.

There are many kinds of beer; as the differ-
ence in their flavour depends on the properties
of the water, as well as upon the qualities of the
malt and hops, and the skillofthe brewer. But
in no other part of the kingdom is porter so
well brewed as in London.

Ale is of a lighter colour, is stronger, sweeter,
and is brewed with fewer hops than porter. Ale
sparkles in the glass, and is the most nutritious
of all malt liquors, when in good condition. Mild
beer is that which has been newly brewed; hard
beer is that which is stale, without being sour.

Such is the fondness of the English people
for all kinds of beer, that upwards of eight mil-
lion barrels are brewed yearly, and mostly drunk
in this country; great quantities of beer are also
“brewed here, and sent to the East and West
Indies.

Beer is brewed in small quantities for the use
of private families, and is then said to be home-
brewed. The utensils for brewing are few; con-
sisting of a copper set in brick-work, with a fur-
nace for the fire beneath it; and a mash-tub,
coolers, and a few casks, all which are made of
oak staves, bound with iron hoops.

R 2
244

Beer

buildings called breweries.
several very extensive breweries;

BEER.

is brewed for public consumption, in

In London there are
in the largest

of which three hundred thousand barrels of beer

are brewed in a year.

In these breweries, steam-

engines are employed to grind and mash the

malt,

one building to another.

and to pump the water

and wort from
vats, in which

The

the beer is stored, are as large as some houses;
the buildings stand upon several acres of ground;
and many hundred persons ate employed in

them.
Vinegar,

which is much used for pickling, is,

in this country, chiefly prepared from malt.

QUESTIONS.

How is malt prepared for brew-
ing ?

What is done when the malt is
ground ?

In what does mashing consist ?

Why is the wort sweet ?

What is done with the wort after
mashing ?

How is the wort cooled ?

To what may the process of cool-
ing be likened ?

Which are the fittest seasons for |

brewing ?
What is done when the wort has
cooled ?

Why is yeast added ?

To what does beer owe its brisk
and refreshing qualities ?

Why is beer best stored in the
cellar ?

Upon what does the difference in
various kinds of beer mainly
depend ?

Is ale stronger than porter ?

Can you teil me the difference be-
tween mild and hard beer ?

How many barrels of beer are
brewed in England in one year?

How is vinegar prepared ?


Lesson XIV. J’ruits.

In the preceding Lessons we have seen how-the
earth produces corn and vegetables for our sub-
sistence. Let us next inquire in what manner
the earth also yields its abundance of fruits, and
how those fruits grow and ripen.

Although fruits are not so nourishing as corn,
they are more pleasing to the eye, and more deli-
cious to the palate. Indeed, fruits are among
the most beautiful productions of nature; while
their agreeable juices quench our thirst, and are
both wholesome and refreshing.

Fruit trees are sometimes raised from seed,
which is contained in the fruit. Thus the pippins,
246 FRUITS,

or pips, of an apple are its seed: the stone con~
tains the seed ofa cherry or plum; and the kernel
is the seed of a nut. But fruit-trees are mostly
planted by slips or twigs, which take root in the
ground, and grow to the size of the parent tree.
The trees bud, and put forth leaves and blossoms
in spring; the blossoms grow into fruit, and the
fruit, ripened by the heat of the sun, is gathered
in summer or autumn. All fruits do not npen
at the same time, so that we may gather some
through half the year; and certain kinds can be
kept fresh; thus we may enjoy fruit during the
whole year.

Fruits grow and ripen in most parts of the
earth. In our own country are many fine varie-_
ties; but the sweeter and more luscious kinds
grow in much warmer countries than England,
and are called foreign fruits.

Our fruits grow in orchards and gardens; and
some few dre found wild in hedges and woods.
The former are principally fleshy fruits, as the
apple and pear; stone fruits, as the peach, nec-
tarine, apricot, plum, and cherry; berries, as the
gooseberry, currant, raspberry, and strawberry ;
nuts, as the walnut, chesnut, and filbert. All
these fruits are called hardy, as they ripen in the
open air; but other fruits, as the pine-apple, the
melon, and grapes, are reared in hot-houses,. or
FRUITS. o47 NS
buildings with glazed roofs, heated by fire, hot

water, or steam.

The apple is our finest hardy fruit, and up-
wards of two hundred sorts are known in Britain.
They grow mostly in orchards, upon spreading
trees, which are very productive.

The apple is also our most useful fruit. It is
juicy and refreshing, and is neither too sweet nor
too sour: it is good in puddings and tarts: and
its juice is made into the pleasant drink called
cider. The apple likewise remains longer in
season than most of the fruits; and it may be
kept sound for several months. |

The general shape of the apple must be well
known. Each sort differs in form, and in the
colour and markings of the skin. Thus, some
apples are of deep crimson; others, rosy red;
some gold-colour,as the golden pippin; others of
delicate green; and some bright yellow, streaked
with red; each sort of apple, as well as of every
fruit, having a particular name.

The pear is likewise a fine-flavoured orchard
fruit. It grows upon upright trees; and the
drink named perry is made of its juice. There
are upwards of one hundred and fifty sorts of
pears grown in England; they are more rare than
apples, but are not so useful a fruit; for few sorts

will keep along time. The wood of the apple
248 FRUITS.

and the pear-tree is useful; but that of few other
fruit trees is prized.

Peaches, nectarines, and apricots are stone
fruits. They are generally grown in gardens
upon trees, spread or trained against brick walls,
which, becoming heated by the sun, cause the
fruit to ripen sooner. These fruits have skins of
beautiful tints, and the pulp grows closely round
the stone, |

The finest plums are-also grown against garden
walls: but other kinds grow upon tall trees in
orchards, and ripen late. Plums are mostly
covered with a beautiful bloom; and a thick gum
runs from the tree. Plums, unless they are quite
ripe, are very unwholesome; indeed, all unripe
fruit is unwholesome, and persons are often
made ill by eating it. But ripe fruit contains
much sugary juice, and may be eaten in safety:
for, as fruits ripen, their acids become changed
to sugar.

Cherries mostly grow in orchards; but some
fine sorts are trained in gardens, T hey are of red
and purple black colours; the juice of their pulp
is sweet, but not unmixed with a pleasant sour- —
ness. Besides the fruit, the cherry-tree yields a
fine gum; the wood is prettily variegated, and is
used by turners and cabinet-makers for furniture.
Some of the finest cherries are grown in the
FRUITS. o. 249

county of Kent, where whole orchards are
planted with cherry-trees,

QUESTIONS,

Are not fruits among the most | Which are the principal fleshy
beautiful productions of nature? fruits ?

How are fruits raised ? Which are the principal stone-

Which are the seeds of the apple? | __ fruits ?

How are fruits mostly planted? | Why are these fruits called

How is fruit produced upon the hardy ?

luscious fruits grown ?

Where do our principal fruits
grow ?

Can you name the principal kinds
of British fruits >

Why are peach, nectarine, and
apricot trees trained against
brick walls >

How are cherries grown ?

tree ? How are the pine-apple, melon,
How are we enabled to enjoy | and grapes grown ?

fruits during the whole of the | Which is our finest hardy fruit?

year ? | How many sorts of apples grow
Are many kinds of fruit grown in | in Britain ?

England ? | How many sort of pears grow in
Where are the sweetest and most | Britain ?

|



Lesson XV. Fruits (continued. )

Berry fruits grow in great abundance in Eng-
land: and the currant is the most useful of the
small kinds, It mostly grows in gardens, upon
low, shrubby bushes. The fruit is agreeably acid,
and makes excellent tarts and puddings ; it is
also eaten at dessert ; and its juice is made with
sugar into jelly and pleasant gvine. The black
currant has medicinal qualities;.which red and
250 FRUITS.

white currants have not ; and its peculiar acid is
a remedy for sore throats. Altogether, currants
perhaps serve for more purposes, and continue
longer in succession, than any other fruit.

Gooseberries are grown finer in Britain than
elsewhere. ‘Those in the cottage gardens of
Lancashire are the largest in England: but the
Scottish gooseberries have the best flavour.—
Gooseberries grow upon low, prickly bushes, and
are of various colours, as white, yellow, green,
and red. ‘They are used in tarts when unripe 5
and when ripe, they are dessert fruit during three
months. Gooseberries are easily preserved, and
from some kinds may be made wine which has
the flavour and appearance of champagne, or the
choicest wine of the grape-

The raspberry grows upon slender bushes, and
is much esteemed for the table, and in confec-
tionary. Its juice is pleasantly acid and cooling;
and the fruit is made with sugar into a rich
jam.

The strawberry grows upon a creeping plant
along beds in gardens. It is a fragrant, whole-
some, and beautiful fruit; and its flavour is deli-
cious. Its seeds are set upon a fine red or scarlet
exterior. In the market-gardens round London,
great quantities of strawberries are grown, for the
supply of that city ; and the trade in that single


FRUITS. 251

fruit furnishes employment, during a short
season, for many hundred persons.

These are the principal berry-fruits which are
cultivated in Britain. Others grow wild, as the
dewberry, the barberry; and the blackberry, or
fruit of the hedge bramble.

We should not forget the elder-tree, from the
berries of which a grateful winter wine is made,
by simply boiling them with water and sugar, and
fermenting the liquor. A fragrant water is also
distilled from the elder-flowers; a healing oint-
ment is made from the inner bark of the tree;
and the wood is used by the turner for skewers
and netting needles. In short, every part of the
elder-tree serves for some useful purpose.

The fruits already mentioned are juicy ; there
are also dried fruits, of which the kernels are
esteemed for their sweetness; as the walnut,
chesnut, and filbert.

The walnut grows upon a noble tree, the tim-
ber of which was formerly used for furniture, and
is now made into the stocks or handles of guns.
The walnut, when it is green, Or before the nut
hardens, is pickled with vinegar, and the kernel,
when ripe, is eaten at dessert.

_ The chesnut also grows upon a stately tree,
the timber of which is useful. The nut has a
green, prickly covering ; and the kernel has a


952 FRUITS.

tough skin, and is sweet and nourishing. In
Spain and Italy, the chesnut is an important
article of food; for it is boiled and roasted, and
puddings, cakes, and even bread, are made of it.

The filbert grows in bunches with a fringed
husk, and is much cultivated in Kent. The com-
mon hazel nut, found in hedges, is the filbert in
a wild state. Other kinds of nuts are brought
from Spain; the Barcelona kind being first dried
in a kiln. nd

The pine-apple has been called “ the king ot
fruits ;” itis a native of very warm countries, as
South America andthe West Indies. In some
parts of Africa, pine-apples are so plentiful as to
be sold for a penny each. The pine-apple can
now be produced in British hot-houses and pits,
in as high perfection as in its native climate. It
grows upona large plant, with long pointed leaves;
the apple isa deep yellow colour, and has a beau-
tiful crown of leaves. Its flavour is very luscious,
and it is considered the finest dessert fruit.

The grape ranks next to the pine-apple, and
grows in perfection upon the vine, in hot-houses.
Grapes also grow in the open air, but they are
‘nferior in size and flavour to those which are of
forced growth. Grapes contain a delicious juicy
pulp, which is very nutritious; and, in some warm
countries, grapes with bread form a meal.
FRUITS. 253

Next comes the melon, which is a richly-
flavoured, fleshy fruit. It is grown upon vine-
like plants, on hot-beds, beneath glazed frames,
and in hot-houses and pits. It is a very hand-
some fruit, and has a delightful odour.

Besides these fruits, which are grown in
Britain, there are many kinds brought from
other countries. Most of these are dried, or
preserved with sugar; but some few are received
here in a fresh state. The foreign fruits, and
their uses will be described presently.

QUESTIONS.

Which is the most useful of the | Is not the chesnut a nourishing

small berry-fruits ? fruit ?
Can you name a few of the uses | Where is the filbert cultivated ?

of the currant ? | Are there not other kinds of nuts?
In what part of Britain are the | Which is the “‘ king of fruits” ?

finest gooseberries grown? | Which are the native countries of
Can you name the uses of the | the pine-apple?

raspberry ? . How is the pine-apple grown in
What kind of fruit is the straw- | Britain ?

berry ? , How is the grape grown in per-
Can you name a few of the uses , fection?

of the elderberry ? | Are grapes very nutritious ?
For what purpose is walnut tim- | How is the melon grown ?

ber now used ? In what state are foreign fruits
In what state are walnuts pickled? | brought to England ?.


254

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Lusson XVI. The Grape; Wine-making.

Tur grape is the only fruit from which true wine
can be made, although, as you have been told,
the juices.of other fruits are sometimes used for
the same purpose as the juice of the grape.

The art of making wine is very ancient; for
we read in the Bible that Noah drank wine,
which was the produce of his own vineyard ; so
that wine was probably made shortly after the
creation of the world.

The finest wines used in England are made
from grapes which grow in the warm and tempe-
rate parts of Europe. It is true that grapes grow
WINE-MAKING. 255

in our gardens; but the fruit is neither so abun-
bant nor so juicy as that which grows in the
vineyards of the warmer parts of France, and in
Spain and Portugal; the two latter countries
being in the south, or the warmest quarter of
Europe. But, in still warmer climates than
these, the grape does not produce such good wine.

A vineyard is not so beautiful a scene as a
hop-ground in our own country. The vines, in
some countries, are trained upon short poles ; in
others, they are cut down very low; but, in a
few places, they entwine their branches, and
hang in rich festoons from tree to tree. Insome
parts of Italy, vines are planted in corn-fields ;
and thus, grapes for making wine, and corn for
making bread, grow upon the same ground.

The vintage, or gathering of the grapes, takes
place late in September, or early in October.
The red grape usually ripens before the white.
The fruit is picked by hand, or cut from the
vines with a knife, or scissors, at three separate
gatherings. The finest and ripest bunches, of
which the best wine is made, are gathered first ;
then, such grapes as are not quite so ripe as those
of the first gathering; and, lastly, the inferior
grapes.

To prepare them for pressing, the grapes for
956 WINE-MAKING.

red wine are sometimes picked from the stalks 5
but white-wine grapes are rarely picked of. In
some countries, peasants wearing wooden shoes
tread the grapes in baskets, or in tubs with holes,
through which the juice runs into a vat beneath.
This is done for red wine; but the grapes are
never trodden for white wine. Red and white
wines are produced from the same kind of grapes,
the red colour and the slight roughness (such as
we taste in port-wine,) being obtained from the
husk of the grapes remaining in the juice.

The wine-press is usually worked with a bar
and upright screw, as represented in the engrav-
ing. Asthe men work the screw downward, the
fat board is pressed upon the grapes, and the
juice runs into a tub placed beneath to receive it.
The grapes are first pressed but moderately; and
the juice of the first pressing makes the finest
wine. The press is unscrewed, and again screwed
down, when the juice of the second pressing
flows; after which the grapes are pressed still
harder, or a third time.

As soon as the juice, or must, is obtained, it
is put into the tun, where it begins to ferment,
and continues to work for some time. It is next
drawn off into casks, and when it has entirely
ceased to work, and is clear, it becomes wine
WINE-MAKING. 257

is bunged tightly, and left to mellow by age.
Its quality is also much improved by bottling.

After the wine has been drawn from the cask,
there remains crusted on the bottom and sidesa
salt called tartar, which is used in the arts, as for
whitening pins; and in medicine, as cream of
tartar. Wine and tartar are not, however, the
only products of the grape. In countries where
wine is abundant, vinegar is made from it. The
refuse of the grapes, after they have been pressed,
is useful for many purposes. Verdigris is made
by placing grape husks between plates of copper,
and wetting them with acid wine. ‘The ground
of the vineyard is dressed with this refuse, fowls
will eat it, and, when dried, it makesa good fire.
An oil for eating, or for burning in lamps, is
extracted from the seeds of the grape.

Great quantities of foreign wines are consumed
in Britain; although they are only drunk at the
tables of the rich and middle classes. One of
the principal is Port, a red wine, from Portugal,
where it is made almost exclusively for the Bri-
tish market; for Port wine is but little drunk in
any other part of the world. Now, as the mer-
chants in Portugal take British goods in payment
for their wine, this consumption of Port wine is
a considerable benefit to the manufacturers in our
country; for, many thousand persons are em-

Il. 8
958 WINE-MAKING.

ployed in making these goods for the Portuguese
market; and, if so much Port wine was not
drunk in Britain, we should not send so many
goods to Portugal.

Sherry, a white wine, is brought from Xeres,
in Spain, and is made from red and white grapes
mixed. Madeira, a delicious wine, is sent from
the island of Madeira, near the coast of Africa.
From France are received Claret, a fine red wine;
and Champagne, which sparklesin the glass, from
having been bottled before it was thoroughly fer-
mented. Hock, and other Rhenish wines, are
produced in Germany ; and Constantia, at the
Cape of Good Hope.

There are many more wines sent from the
above and other countries, which are too nume-
rous to mention.

Cider and Perry are favourite English beve-
rages. They are made principally in the counties
of Worcester and Hereford, Somersetand Devon.
— Cider is the fermented juice of apples; and
perry the fermented juice of pears. Both are
prepared by similar methods. The fruit is first
crushed in a mill, which is an upright stone
moved round a circular trough. The pulp is then
put into hair-cloth bags, and squeezed in a press;
and the juice is fermented, and stored in casks.

In the cider counties are extensive orchards
of apple and pear trees; these arc covered with
-

WINE=MAKING, 259

beautiful blossoms in the spring; in autumn
they are loaded with ripe fruit; and vast heaps
of apples and pears may be seen ready for the
mill and the press. Cider and perry are whole-
some and refreshing drinks; and rough cider, or
that which has been completely fermented, is
the common drink of farmers’ labourers in se-

veral parts of the country.

QUESTIONS.

From what fruit is true wine |

made? _
Is the art of wine-making very
ancient ?

Where are the finest wines made? |

How are vines grown in vine-
yards ?

How are the grapes mostly
gathered?

Are all the grapes gathered at the
same time ?

Which grapes yield the best wine ¢

How are the grapes trodden ?

Are red and white wines produced
from the same kinds of grapes?

Why is some wine of a red colour,
and rough flavour ?

Can you tell me how the wine- |
press is worked ?

When is the wine put into casks ?

| How is tartar obtained from wine?

For what purpose is tartar used ?

Are wine and tartar the only pro-
ducts of grapes ?

Can you name the uses of the re-
fuse of grapes ?

From what country is Port wine
brought ?—Sherry ?—Madeira ?

From what country are Claret and
Champagne brought ?

Why does Champagne sparkle in
the glass ?

Whence do we procure Hock ?—
Constantia ?

In what counties in England are

| cider and perry chiefly made ?

Of what is cider made?
| Of what is perry made ?



How many times are the grapes | | How is the juice obtained from

pressed ?

What is first done with the grape

juice ?

| the fruit?

s 2
260

Lesson XVII. Tea.

Tra is one of the luxuries of life; and although
;t has not been known in Europe two hundred
years, and was at first sold at the price of three
guineas a pound, it is now enjoyed once or twice
a day by almost every family in England. It
makes a refreshing beverage, which may be safely
drunk, in moderation, by persons of all ages; and
custom has, in this country, caused tea to be
considered almost one of the necessaries of life.

Our consumption of tea is, accordingly, very
great; upwards of twenty-six million pounds’
weight being brought to this country every year,
for which we, in part, pay cotton, woollen, and
yon manufactures, worth a million of money,
Now, many thousand persons are employed to
manufacture these goods, as well as in the ships
which bring the tea; and these good effects
arise from tea-drinking, or, in other words, from
our preference for a leaf which is collected on
the mountains of a country many thousand miles
distant.

The plant which produces this leaf grows in
the temperate parts of China; that is, neither in
the north, which would be too cold, nor in the
south, which would be too warm; but in the
TEA, 261

region between north and south, which is called
the tea-country. Some parts of this district are
one thousand miles from Canton, the Chinese
port, at which all tea is shipped for Great Britain.

The tea-plant is a shrubby evergreen, like the
myrtle; it grows from three to six feet high, and
bears a fragrant, whitish flower, like the wild rose
of our hedges. It is planted in rows, and culti-
vated by the Chinese with great care. The leaves
are gathered when the plant is in its third year.

In gathering the tea, each leaf is plucked
separately from the stalk; and, with this nicety,
a labourer can frequently collect from four to ten,
or even fifteen pounds’ weight of leaves in one
day. There are three or four gatherings during
the season; namely, towards the end of February,
or the beginning of March; in April or May;
‘towards the middle of June; and in August;
and to the leaves gathered at these periods are
given the names which you see written upon
the tea-canisters in grocers’ shops.

The first crop consists of the very young and
tender leaves, from which are prepared the most
expensive teas; as the green tea called gun-
powder, and the black tea named pekoe. The
second and third crops yield the green teas called
hyson and imperial, and the black teas named
souchong and congou. From the fourth crop is
262 TEA.

prepared the coarsest and cheapest kind of black
tea, called bohea.

The quality of tea mainly depends upon the
age of the leaves: when very young they are of
delicate flavour; but, as they grow older, their
taste is coarser. The drying, or preparation of
the tea, is likewise an important process. This
is done by placing the fresh-gathered leaves in
shallow iron pans, with fires beneath them.
Some kinds, however, are only exposed to the
rays of the sun, and frequently turned over.
The leaves are next rolled in the palm of the
hand in one direction only ; and this drying and
rolling is repeated as often as necessary.

The tea is sold by the growers to the mer-
chants at Canton, who employ women and chil-
dren to mix, and assort the different qualities. —
The varieties of green tea originate not so much
from the stages of picking as the mode of pre-
paring them. When a merchant buys green tea,
he first passes it through a sieve which takes
out the dust, the young hyson, and the gun-

owder; through another sieve is passed the
small leaf hyson; and that which will not pass
through a third sieve is called hyson-skin.

The teas are then fired in iron pans with
great heat, which gives the leaves a tighter twist
and finer colour. The heavier teas, as the gun-
TEA. 263

powder and hyson, are next fanned from the
lighter and larger broken leaves. The young
leaves which take the long twist form the young
hyson; and those which take the round twist,
form the gunpowder. Some of the finest kinds
of tea are also scented with the flowers of the
fragrant olive, which is cultivated in China for
this purpose.

Lastly, the tea is assorted according to
quality, packed in chests, and made up into
parcels of from one hundred to six hundred
chests each. These parcels are stamped with
the name of the district, grower, and manufac-
turer, and are then ready for exportation. So
great is the quantity of tea used in this country,
that it exceeds the consumption of the whole
world besides, China only excepted.

In China, tea is made as in England: but it
ss drunk without milk or sugar; every Chinese
takes tea at least three times a day, and those
who can afford it much oftener. In Japan, the
leaves are powdered, and. put into cups filled
with hot water. In other countries tea is boiled
in water, with salt and milk. The Chinese,
likewise, prepare brich-tea, by mixing the refuse
of leaves and stalks with a glutinous substance,
and baking it in moulds shaped like bricks.
They also make tea into round balls; and pre-
264

TEA.

pare the essence of tea in small cakes, as bitter
as wormwood. |

Various plants are used in different countries
for making “ tea,” or, properly speaking, for the
same purpose that we employ the tea-leaf. Even
in China, where the tea-plant grows in such
abundance, the poorer classes use moss, and the
leaves of a kind of buck-thorn. In England,
dishonest persons employ the dry leaves of the
sloe, which grows in our hedges, to mix with the
genuine tea of China.

QUESTIONS.

How long has tea been known in
Europe?

How many pounds of tea are con-
sumed in England in one year?

How is the tea sent to England in
part paid for?

How is tea-drinking advantageous
to this country ?

In what part of China does the
tea-plant grow ?

What kind of plant is the tea ?

When are the leaves of the tea-
plant gathered ?

How many times in the season are
the leaves gathered ?

Which crop produces the finest
teas ?

Which kind of tea do the second
and third crops produce ?

Which kind of tea does the fourth
crop produce ?

Upon what does the quality of tea
mainly depend ?

How are the leaves dried ?

How are the leaves rolled?

Can you tell me how different
kinds of green tea are assorted ?

Are not the leaves fired a second
time ?

Is not more tea drunk in England
than in any other country ?

How is tea drunk in China, and
in other countries ?

Howis tea adulterated in England?
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Lesson XVIII. Sugar.

Sucar is one of the most nourishing substances
which we derive from the vegetable kingdom.
The inhabitants of all countries of the world like
sugar, and most animals will eat it; so that the
culture of the sugar-cane from which sugar is
prepared is an important business.

There are several kinds of sugar-cane, but two
only are cultivated for sugar; namely, the
spiked cane, in the East Indies, and the
common cane, in the West Indies. From
our own colonies in these countries we are
supplied with sugar, for which the sugar planters
take articles of British manufacture.
266 SUGAR.

In the West Indies, the labourers cultivate the
cane by first opening the land into square holes,
about four feet across. They next make little
trenches in the holes, and lay in them cuttings
from the top of the cane; the earth is then
thrown over them, and the buds appear on either
side. When the plant rises above ground, the
earth bank of the square holes is applied to the
roots of the canes, and the ground is weeded.
The canes are next thrashed, by picking off the
lower leaves of the stems, so that they may shoot
out, and that the sun and air may be admitted
between them. The leaves are also laid in beds
along the rows of canes, to prevent their touch-
ing the ground when they bend, by which the
quality of the sugar would be much injured.

The sugar-cane has many enemies in its
growth. Destructive flies breed in its stem;
ants hollow out the earth from its root; and
grubs bore holes in the stems; thus, sometimes,
destroying many acres of canes, and ruining the
planter. At other times, hurricanes, or violent
storms of wind, which move at the rate of a
hundred miles in an hour, sweep away whole
plantations, and with them corn, vines, houses,
forests, and everything from the face of the earth.

If the canes withstand these dangers, they will
ripen in twelve or sixteen months, and be ready
SUGAR. 967

for cutting. The labourers then, with hand-bills,
first cut off the upper part of the cane, which is
laid aside for planting. They next cut the rest
of the cane into pieces, about three feet long,
and bind them into bundles. As the cutters
proceed, they strip from the canes the trash, or
leaves, for fuel, and cattle are sometimes fed
with the green tops. The bundles are then con-
veyed in carts drawn by oxen, to the mill.

The sugar mill has shafts like the flour wind-
mill; in the lower part are metal rollers, between
which the canes are crushed, and the juice runs
from them into a leaden channel beneath. The
crushed canes are then removed, and dried in
the sun for fuel. |

~The juice is conveyed by pipes to the boiling-
house, which adjoins the mill. Here it is first
simmered in a copper with lime, when most of
the impurities rise to the surface. The juice is
then drawn from beneath the scum into another
copper, where it is skimmed and simmered. It
‘s then boiled and skimmed in three or four
other coppers, until the liquor is of the required
fineness; When it is conveyed into shallow
wooden coolers, where the sugar grams as it
cools, and separates ‘tself from the treacle. All
this must be done in a day, or the juice will
ferment and spoil.


268 SUGAR.

On the following morning, the sugar is carried
to the curing-house and put into hogsheads: the
treacle is drained from these, and they are then
headed up by the cooper for exportation.

Such is the method of preparing from the
cane, the raw or moist sugar, which is of a brown
colour. It is refined, or made into white loaf
or lump sugar, in this country; and this is a
process of chemistry, which, as you have seen in
several instances, is an important science in
adding to our enjoyments.

The refiner first mixes the sugar in the pais,
with lime-water and bullocks’ blood, and boils
them together; when the lime-water combines
with the treacle, and separates it from the solid
sugar; and the blood coagulates, that is, hardens
into a kind of jelly, and rises to the surface with
all the impurities of the sugar. These are skim-
med off, and the liquor is boiled until it is quite
transparent, It is then cooled, and heated again,
to boil off or evaporate the watery parts of the
juice. This is done in large pans, from the upper
part of which the air has been pumped out; for
the sugar is thus refined in much less time than
by boiling in open vessels. This is done until a
small quantity of the sugar can be taken on the
thumb, and drawn out into threads by the fore-
finger. The boiling sugar is then put into coolers,
SUGAR. 269 NY

‘

and stirred violently with wooden oars, till it
forms into grains, and begins to turn white.

The sugar is next poured into earthen moulds
in the shape of the sugar-loaf, with a stopped
hole at the pointedend. When cold, the loaves
are set with this end downwards upon earthen
pots, and the stop being drawn out, treacle drains
from the loaves, and leaves them much whitened.
A creamy paste of pipe-clay and water is next
put upon the loaves, when the water runs through
the sugar, and carries off all remains and tinge of
the treacle. Lastly, when the loaves are cleansed,
and the water drained off, they are set in a hot
stove and thoroughly dried. *

Sugar-candy is made by a simple process.
The sugar is cleansed and boiled as for refining ;
‘but instead of being put into coolers and beaten,
it is poured into pots, across which are strung
threads, to which the sugar hangs in crystals, as
it cools.

Barley-sugar is made by boiling sugar to a
very thick syrup; it is then poured upon metal
or stone, and when nearly cool, it is cut into
lengths with shears, twisted, and left to harden.
270

COFFEE.

QUESTIONS.

Is not sugar very nourishing ?

From what kind of plant is sugar
prepared ?

Which kinds of sugar-cane are
cultivated ?

How is the cane cultivated in the
West Indies?

Which part of the cane is planted ?

In what time do the canes ripen ?
| How are the canes crushed ?
Can you describe the sugar-mill ?
How is the juice boiled and made
fine ?
When does the sugar grain ?
How is raw sugar refined, or made
into white lump ?



How are the canes thrashed ? How is the sugar shaped into
Which are the principal enemies loaves ?

to the sugar-cane ? Can you tell me how sugar-candy
Are not hurricanes very destruc- is made ?

tive ? Can you tell me how barley-sugar
What is the rate of motion of a is made ?

hurricane ?

Lesson XIX. Coffee. Chocolate.

Next to tea and sugar,

coffee is the most useful

article sold by the grocer.

Coffee is the seed contained in the berry of an
evergreen shrub, which grows in warm countries,
from fifteen to twenty fect high. Its blossoms

resemble the flower of the
a red berry like a cherry;
place of the cherry-stone;

jessamine 5 the fruit is
and in the middle, in
are two hard seeds,

which are covered by a kind of husk, called parch-
ment. If you examine a seed of coffee, you will

find one side to be circular,
with a little furrow in it;

and the other flat,
and, within each coffee-
COFFEE. 271

berry, two seeds grow with their flat sides to-
wards each other.

Coffee is cultivated in fields, or plantations,
and the trees, when in bloom, have a beautiful
appearance. They blow in one night, and do
not last in blossom longer than one or two days.

When the berries are ripe, they are gathered
by the labourers into bags slung round their
necks. In some countries, the planters do not
gather the fruit, but place cloths beneath the
trees, and shake down the ripened berries. Each
tree yields from one to two pounds of ripe
berries, a bushel of which contains about ten
pounds of coffee.

The pulp of the berries is separated from the
seeds when fresh; or, the berries are dried on
mats in the rays of the sun. The parchment is
stripped off, by passing the seeds beneath heavy
rollers, which are worked by cattle; and the
chaff, or fine husks, is separated by winnowing
with a large fan. The coffee is then of a
greenish-gray colour, and is put into bags for sale.

The finest kind of coffee.is in the smallest
berries, and the seeds are scarcely bigger than
barley-corns. It is grown in Arabia, and shipped
from the port of Mocha, on which account it is
called Mocha coffee. ‘There are other kinds, the
names of which we see written upon canisters in

=


272 COFFEE.

the grocer’s shop. Turkey coffee is shipped from
the country of that name. Plantation coffee is
grown in the West Indies, and is sent to this
country in vast quantities. Bourbon coffee is
grown in the Isle of Bourbon, in Africa. Berbice
coffee is received from the place of that name, in
South America. Some of these countries are
British colonies: that is, they belong to Great
Britain, and are cultivated by British settlers,
who, in exchange for their coffee, receive goods
of British manufacture. A considerable quantity
of coffee is likewise received from Java, and
other parts of the East Indies.

All the coffee grown in the West Indies, is
said to have sprung from two plants, which were
taken there by a Frenchman. On his voyage
the ship’s supply of water became nearly ex-
hausted; but so anxious was he to preserve the
life of the plants, that he sometimes deprived
himself of his allowance to water them.

Coffee is roasted by the grocer, who puts it
into a closed iron vessel, which is turned round
in the midst of a fire, until the coffee is of a
browncolour. To ensure its fine flavour, coffee
should be used soon after it is roasted; it is
ground in a mill, which has been already de-
scribed ; and the powder is boiled with water, to
make the refreshing beverage which we call coffee.
Y
273 a”

In this country, milk and sugar are generally
added ; but this is not the practice in countries
where coffee grows.

The fashions of drinking coffee are very various.
In Arabia, a lady who pays a visit, carries with
her a small bag of coffee; and the poor Arabs use
the coffee husks. In some countries, the seed is
pounded in a large wooden mortar, and passed
through a cloth, before the water is poured on it.
The Turks drink coffee, in very small cups, at all
hours of the day. And, in most warm countries,
coffee is the common refreshment of all classes.

Chocolate, from which another delicious drink
is made, is a cake, or hard paste, prepared from
the cacao or chocolate-nut. This fruit grows in
the West Indies and in South America, upon a
tree like our cherry-tree; and consists of pods, in
each of which are from twenty to thirty nuts, or
kernels. These are dried in the sun; they are
then roasted and pounded, and made into a paste
with hot water and flavouring ingredients, This
paste is put into tin moulds to cool, and forms
the grocers’ chocolate.

Chocolate is very nourishing. In South
America it is considered one of the necessaries
of life; in Spain, it is the common breakfast
but in England, it is less frequently used, and
is considered more of a luxury than tea,

IL, T

CHOCOLATE.
a

274

CHOCOLATE.

QUESTIONS.

What is coffee ?

What flower does the coffee-
blossom resemble ?

What fruit is the coffee berry like ?

How do the seeds grow in the
berry ?

How are the berries gathered ?

How much coffee is obtained from
a bushel of berries ? ‘

How are the seeds separated from
the berries ?

What is the natural colour of the
coffee-seed ?

Which is the finest kind of
coffee ?

Can you name the principal kinds
of coffee, and the countries
which produce them ?

How is coffee roasted ?

Are not the fashions of drinking
coffee very various ?

Where does the cacao nut grow ?

How is chocolate made ?

Is chocolate very nourishing ?

Where is it chiefly used ?

Lesson XX. Spices.

Spices are various parts of plants which grow in
hot ‘climates. They are merely luxuries; but
are so largely consumed .in this country as to
make the trade in them an important one.
Spices are used to flavour and season food.
Most kinds of spices are not only hot, but aro-
matic, or strongly scented and flavoured ; such
as cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, cloves, ginger, and
allspice; but those which are merely hot are
called peppers. | |

Cinnamon is the inner bark of a beautiful tree

- Ls Ath
SPICES, 275

with flame-coloured leaves and delicate blossoms.
It grows in several warm countries, but most
abundantly in a part of the Island of Ceylon,
which is called “the cinnamon country.” Here
are cinnamon-plantations of eight or ten thou-
sand acres; and the trade in the bark is very
considerable.

In preparing cinnamon, the rough bark is first
scraped off with knives; the inner bark is then
formed into quills or pipes, and dried in the sun;
and the peeled wood is used as fuel. The best
cinnamon is not thicker than stout paper, and
of a brownish-yellow colour. It has a sweetish
taste, a very pleasant odour, and is warm upon
the tongue. The dried buds of the cinnamon-
tree are also used as spice, and are called cassia;
and a valuable oil is obtained from the cinnamon-
chips and leaves.

In this country, cinnamon is chiefly used in
cookery ; it is also employed in medicine; and
in South America it is eaten by the miners, to
preserve them from the unwholesome air of the
silver mines. |

The nutmeg, mace, and clove, are the produce
of trees which grow in the East Indies, in the
Moluccas, or Spice Islands, as they are called,
from the abundance of spices grown in them.

The nutmeg and mace grow upon the same

T 2
276 SPICES.

tree: the nutmeg is the kernel of the fruit, and
the mace is one of its coverings. The tree has a
fine deep-green leaf, and spreads its branches in
a circle. The fruit is remarkably beautiful; the
outside covering is of a rich cream colour, and
like a peach; and when this bursts, it shows the
dark nut, surrounded with bright crimson leaves,
which are the mace. When the fruit ripens, it
is dried in the sun, and afterwards by fire; the
shell is then broken, and the kernel or nutmeg
taken out: the mace is dried in the shade, but
for a short time. ‘The nutmeg has a delicious
aromatic flavour, and is used in flavouring pud-
dings and warm drinks, .

The clove-tree has leaves like the laurel, and
cloves are the flower-buds. ‘They are gathered
by hand, or by beating the trees, when the
cloves fall upon cloths spread beneath to receive
them. They are then dried over wood-fires,
and in the rays of the sun.

Clove-trees flourish wild in the Moluccas:
they are of noble height, of beautiful form and
foliage; and they perfume the air around them.
Cloves have a strong warm flavour, and contain
more oil than any other spice.

Ginger is the root of a plant which grows both
in the East and West Indies; but the finest kind
is brought from Jamaica. The root when dug up;
SPICES. | 277

is scraped clean and dried for spice. Young
roots are sometimes scaled and peeled, and put
into syrup, when they make “preserved ginger.”

Ginger is one of the most useful spices. It is
warm and grateful to the stomach, and very
wholesome. It is used in making cakes and
gingerbread: and it has also valuable properties
as a medicine.

Allspice, or pimento, is the berry of a hand-
some myrtle-tree, which grows most abundantly
in Jamaica; and hence it is also named Jamaica
pepper. ‘The berries are gathered when green,
and dried on floors, in the rays of the sun, until
they become reddish-brown. A single tree will
sometimes yield more than one hundred pounds
of dried berries, which, having the flavour of
many spices, are called allspice.

A pimento-plantation is a charming scene,
and the perfume of the plants is very delicious.
The leaves and bark of the trees easily take fire,
and will burn with great rapidity; on which
account the planters are careful not to approach
the plantation with a light.

Pepper is the berry of a twining plant whieh
much resembles the vine. It hangs in bunches
of twenty or thirty berries; each berry grows on
a little stalk, like a currant, and a single tree
yields six or seven pounds of pepper. It is
See
5

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