Citation
The story book for girls and boys

Material Information

Title:
The story book for girls and boys
Cover title:
Arthur's story book for boys and girls
Creator:
Arthur, T. S ( Timothy Shay ), 1809-1885
Wm. J. Reynolds and Company ( Publisher )
Howlands (Firm) ( Engraver )
Arthur, T. S., 1809-1885
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
W.J. Reynolds & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1842
Language:
English
Edition:
2nd ed. -- with illustrations.
Physical Description:
141 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1852 ( lcsh )
Printed boards (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Printed boards ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by Howlands.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by T.S. Arthur.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026569585 ( ALEPH )
10858259 ( OCLC )
ALG1542 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text


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THE

STORY BOOK

FOR GIRLS AND BOYS.



BECCND EDITION, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,



BY T. S. ARTHUR.



BOSTON:
WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS @é& Go.
1852.





Entered, according to the Act of Congress, in the year
1842, by
T. 8S. ARTHUR,
in the office of the clerx u the district court of the
United States, in and for the eastern
district of Pennsylvania.

LE a



CONTENTS.

Little Anna .......... ccccccccsccse SAE 6G
The Use of Learning .........eeeeee. coos WG
The Secret of Order........ Cocccsccccies 23
The Student and Apprentice......... coves DB
The Story of a Little Boy,who sometimes got
QNGTY coccccccccccccsccccccveceseses - 43
How to be Happy .......eceeeeeee cocccce Af
- BO caccac eceees Seeecoeccocdcicnses coeee 52
The Tongue Bridle.............+ cocsccse &
The Test of Courage........ssee0- émuehed -
The Tell-Tale......... pevocccescvcccvesn OE
BRO MGS EAs cc ncccccccvcdesseceess . 98
Try Again......... ec ccccccccccces seeee 104
GOOETIEES cc cccccccsece eoebhesdccvesbceea 115
The Pet Lamb......... eccccesecécceerun 120
The Young Teacher......... ovccivesecs . 125
Little George ........ 60 eosccseveueeud 133
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PREFACE.

Tue stories in this book are, with one
or two exceptions, written so as to
address themselves to the understand-
ings of children and young persons who
have advanced far enough to be able to
discriminate, rationally, between a right
and a wrong action. Their design is,
to give pictures of real life, such as may
be seen every day; and in these pictures
to present that which is good and true
as something to be loved and desired ;
and that which is evil and false as some-
thing to be shunned. They are intended,
also, to give to the young who are just
beginning to look about them, and to
reason on what they see, true principles
of action—such principles as will elevate
them out of mere selfishness, into a living

(7)



Vili PREFACE.

and active interest for all around them
These are the principles, the writer be-
lieves, that will make them, as men and
women, truly useful, and therefore truly
happy. For without usefulness to others,
from an earnest desire to be useful, there
can be no true happiness.

The present volume is designed as the
beginning of a series for children, by the
same writer, in which he will address
the young mind, in its different stages
of development, in various ways calcu-
lated to interest and instruct at the same
time.

Philadelphia, Nov. Ist, 1842,



LITTLE ANNA.

“‘T wisn there wasn’t any work, mother,” said
little Anna, letting the handkerchief she was hem-
ming fall in her lap. ‘“O dear! I wish I could
play all the time.”

**You may go and play, dear, if you wish.”
Anna’s mother said, in a mild tone of voice.

“May I?” and Anna dropped her work, and
was out of the cottage door in a moment.

First she went into the garden, and amused her-
self by running about through the different walks,
and pulling a flower here and a flower there. Soon
tired of this, she sat down listlessly on a grass
plat, and spent nearly half an hour in looking for
a four-leaved clover. Unsuccessful in this, the
little girl next resorted to the swing under the apple
tree, which her father had made for her, and swung
herself for a good while.

“O dear! I wish I had some one to play with
me!” she at length said, getting down from the
swing, tired with herself, and tired of everything
around her.

It was more than an hour since Anna had lain
aside her work, heartily tired of it; and now she
came back into the house, as heartily tired of play;
but still, with no disposition to resume her sewing.

“TI wish father would come home,” she said,
leaning upon the door, and fixing her eyes in the
direction from which he always returned in the
evening.

(9)



10 LITTLE ANNA.

“Tt isn*t time for father to come home, Anna,”
her mother said, looking up from her sewing.

“TI know it aint,” Anna replied. “ But then I
wish he would come home. Why don’t he come
home sooner 2”

“He has to work in the field, you know, and
can’t come home until his work is done.”

“It’s always work, work. I wish there wasn’t
any work, mother !”

‘“‘We should none of us be so happy without
work, my dear, as we are with it. It is while
engaged in useful employment, that we most truly
enjoy ourselves.”

Anna could not understand this, and her mother
saw that she did not understand it. She therefore
asked her this simple question.

** Do you love any one, Anna?”

“O yes!” said the little girl, turning away from
the cottage door, and coming up to the side of her
mother. ‘TI love you, and I love father.”

‘* And we love you too, very rmuch, Anna. Now,
in what way do we show our love to you, dear?”

“QO, in every way!’ replied Anna, her face
brightening and her voice becoming animated.
‘You buy and make me nice clothes, and get me
everything good to eat. You are always doing
something for Anna. That pretty frock you are
making is for me to wear to the church on next
Sunday.”

“It is because we love you, that we do all these
things for you. It is for your sake as well as for
mine that your father works in the fields all day
long; for by working, he makes the grain and



LITTLE ANNA. 11

fruits grow, and thus earns money to buy the good
things he is always providing for us. Don’t you
think that he is a great deal happier in working
thus for us, than he would be if he were to sit idle
at home, and see us suffering for comfortable food
and clothing ?”

“O yes. If he were to do so, neither he nor
any of us could be happy.”

‘“‘ No, my child, that we would not. And now,
dear, can you not see that to work is sometimes
better than to play ?”

““O yes, mother; for if you and father were to
play, instead of work, none of us would be so
comfortable and happy.”

** No, my dear, that we would not. And now,
can you not see that it may be in the power of
even a little girl like you to do something, some-
times, for the comfort of others, and thus minister
to the happiness of others ?”

*¢ How can I do that, mother?”

“You are now ten years old, are you not?”

“Yes, mother.”

“* And have learned to sew very well ?”

“Yes, ma’am, I can hem a great deal neater
than Lucy Arnold.”

“TI have much work to do, and sometimes when
I am not well, I feel very tired. Even now my
head is aching very badly.”

“Is it, mother? O, I am so sorry: I wish I
could do something to help your head.”

“Would you be willing to do anything for me
if it was in your power ?” |

** Indeed mother I would !”? and as the little girl
said this, the tears started to her eyes.



12 LITTLE ANNA.

“You can hem very neatly ?”

“*O yes, you know I can, mother.”

* Your father is going over to see the minister
to-night, and that new pocket-handkerchief which
you were at work on must be hemmed and washed
out and ironed for him before he comes home. I
was in hopes that you would have got it done for
me, but you got tired of work so soon !”

“TIl do it for you, mother,” Anna said in a
vheerful, earnest tone, sitting down quickly in het
little chair, and beginning to sew away as fast as
she could.

In about three-quarters of an hour she had
finished the handkerchief, and her mother, on look-
ing at it, said that it was done very neatly.

‘¢ And now, mother, must I wash and iron it for
father ?”

‘Are you not tired of work by this time?”

“Ono. Iam not tired at all.”

“ Very well, then, Anna, you may get the little
tub, and take a piece of the white soap and wash
it out for father.” |

Delighted with her task, ‘Anna got the tub and
the soap, and was soon busy at work acain, wash-
ing the handkerchief. After she had passed it
through two waters, and rinsed it thoroughly, she
hung it up, and fastened it tightly on the line with
a clothe’s-pin.

“Shall I put an iron down to the fire, now,
mother ?” she asked, coming in.

“Yes, my dear,” her mother replied, much
pleased at the interest that had so suddenly arisen
in Anna’s mind.



LITTLE ANNA. 13

As soon as the iron was hot, and the handker-
chief dry, which was before her father came home,
Anna got the ironing blanket, and spread it out on
the kitchen table.

‘* See mother, it is all dry,” she said, soon after,
bringing in the handkerchief to her mother. ‘ May
I iron it now, for father ?”

*‘ Yes, you may iron it, but I must show you
how to try your iron, and how to get it perfectly
clean, so that you may neither burn nor soil the
new handkerchief.”

So Anna’s mother showed her all about how she
must prepare her iron, and then taught her the way
to iron out a handkerchief smoothly, and to fold it
up neatly. During the whole time the little girl
was very much delighted, as much, and indeed,
more so, than she had ever been while at play.

At last, just as the sun was going down,
Anna, who had been looking out for her father,
saw him coming down the lane, and away she
sprang to meet him.

‘*O father,” she said, as soon as he had stooped
down and kissed her—‘I have hemmed a hand-
kerchief for you, and washed and ironed it all by
myself.”

‘‘ Have you indeed ?” her father said, very much
pleased that his little girl felt so delighted because
she had done something for him. ‘I am very
glad to hear it, Anna; for if you had not done it,
the task would have fallen on your mother, and
she has a great deal to do, and is not very well,
For ten long years, she has been caring for you,
and doing all in her power to make you comfort-

2



14 LITTLE ANNA.

able and happy; and this, often, when she has
been so sick that she could hardly hold up her
head. Now, do you not think that it is time for
you to be trying to do something for her 2”

“O yes, father, and I will work for her all’ day
long.”

] am glad to hear you say so, my dear. But
mother don’t want you to work all the while for
her. Little girls like you must play, sometimes,
and mother would be very sorry if you never had
any time to play.”

Anna did not reply to this, but said, after a short
silence,

“I don’t think I shall ever care about play so
much, father. You don’t know how tired | got of
play this afternoon.”

“ Why did you get tired of play, dear?”

“TI don’t know. But I did get tired. There was
nobody to play with me.”

‘And didn’t you get tired of work, too?”

“‘O yes. I was so tired of work that I said to
mother that I wished there wasn’t any work,”

“And then what did mother say 1”

“She told me that | might put aside my work
and go and play.”

“* Well ?”

“But I soon got tired of play, and then I didn’t
know what to do.”

“ Well ?”

“And then mother told me about your handker.
chief that had to be hemmed and washed out for
you by night, and how her head ached very badly.
When she said this, I felt as if I wanted to do it



LITTLE ANNA. 15

very much, and so she let me, and I didn’t feel
tired all the time.”

“Do you know why you did not feel tired 1”

“No, father.”

“It was because you felt that you were doing
something useful for your father and mother, and
there is no feeling so truly pleasant as that which
springs from the thought that you are doing good
to others at the same time that you have a desire
to do them good, Hereafter, Anna, try and think
much of your mother, and remember, that she has
to work all day long, and often at night, no matter
how ill she feels—and remember also, that every
hour that you work for her you are making her
burdens lighter.” :

Though a little girl, Anna understood her father
pretty well—at least, well enough to cause her,
ever after that, to work for her mother many hours
in each day. Notwithstanding this, she had as
much play as she wanted, and what was better, she
did not now get tired of play as she used to do, for
she ran through the garden, and amused herself
with her swing and play-house with a mind happy,
under the idea that she had been useful to her mo-
ther. After she had played as long as she wanted
to, she would go back to her mother, and ask if
there were not something else that she could do for
her. If there was, she went about it with delight.
Instead of complaining that she had work to do,
she now often said—

“OQ mother, I am so glad that I can work for
you!”

There are now few happier girls than little Anna.



THE USE OF LEARNING. .

“I’m tired of going to school,” said Herbert
Allen to William Wheeler, the boy who sat next
tohim. ‘I don’t see any great use, for my part,
in studying geometry, and navigation, and survey-
ing, and mensuration, and the dozen other things
that I am expected to learn. They ’Il never do me
any good; I’m not going to get my living as a sur-
veyor, or measurer, or sea-captain.”

“How are you going to get your living, Her-
bert?” his young friend asked, in a quiet tone, as
he looked up into his face.

“ Why, I’m going to learn a trade; or, at least,
my father says that I am.”

‘And so am I,” replied William. « And yet
my father wishes me to learn everything that I can;
for he says that it will all be useful, some time or
other in my life,”

“I’m sure I can’t see what use I’m ever going
to make, as a sadler, of algebra or surveying.”

“Still, if we can’t see it, Herbert, perhaps our
fathers can, for they are older and wiser than we
are. And we should endeavour to learn, simply
because they wish us to, even if, in everything that
we are expected to study, we do not see clearly the
use.”

“I can’t feel so,” Herbert replied, tossing his
head; “and I don’t believe that my father sees any
more clearly than I do, the use of all 7

16



THE USE OF LEARNING. 17

“You are wrong to talk so,” his friend said, in
a serious tone. “TI would not think as you do for
the world. My father knows what is best for me
—and so does your father know what is best for
you; and if we do not confide in them, we will
surely go wrong.”

“I’m not afraid,” responded Herbert, closing
the book over which he had been poring, reluctantly,
for half-an-hour, in the vain effort to fix a lesson
on his unwilling memory; and taking some mar-
bles from his pocket, he began to amuse himself
with them, at the same time that he concealed them
from the teacher’s observation.

_ William said no more, but turned to his lesson
with an earnest attention. The difference in the
characters of the two boys is too plainly indicated
in the brief conversation we have recorded, to need
further illustration. To their teacher it was eyi-
dent, in numerous particulars in their conduct, their
habits and manners. William always recited his
lesson correctly, while Herbert’ never learned a

_task well. One was always punctual at school—
the other a loiterer by the way. William’s books
were well taken care of-— Herbert’s soiled, torn,
disfigured, and broken, ex’ rnally and internally.

Thus they began life. ‘he one obedient, indus-
trious, attentive to the pre epts of those who were
older and wiser, and willi g to be guided by them;
the other, indolent and in. ined to follow the lead.

ings of his own will. .

As men, at the age of hirty-five, we will again
present them to the reader. Mr. Wheeler is an
intelligent merchant, in an active business—while

2



18 THE USE OF LEARNING.

Mr. Allen is a journeyman mechanic, poor, in em-
barrassed circumstances, and possessing but a small
share of general information.

“How do you do, Mr. Allen?” said the mer-
chant to the mechanic, about this time, as the lat-
ter entered the counting-room of the former. The
contrast in their appearance was very great. The
merchant was well-dressed, and had a cheerful
look—while the other was poorly clad, and seemed
troubled and dejected.

“T can’t say that I do very well, Mr. Wheeler,”
the mechanic replied, in a tone of despondency.
‘Work is very dull, and wages low; and with so
large a family as I have, it is tough enough getting
along, under the best circumstances.”

“IT am really sorry to hear you say so, Mr. Al-
len,” replied the merchant, in a kind tone. ‘ How
much can you earn now ?”

“If I had steady work, I could make nine or
ten dollars a week. But our business is very bad ;
the substitution of steam-engines on rail-roads, for
horses on turnpikes, has broken in seriously upon
the harness-making business. The consequence is,
that I do not average six dollars a week the year
round.”

“Ts it possible that rai roads have wrought such
a change in your busines ;?”

“Yes—in the harness-making branch of it—
especially in large cities l:ke this, where the heavy
wagon trade is almost entirely broken up.”

“Did you say that six dollars a week were all
that you could average ?”

“Yes, sir.”



THE USE OF LEARNING. 19

“‘ How large is your family ?”

‘¢ J have five children, sir.”

“Five children! And only six dollars a week ?”

“That is all, sir. But six dollars will not sup-
port them, and I am, in consequence, going behind-
hand.”

‘* You ought to try to get into some other busi-
ness.”

** But I don’t know any other.”

The merchant mused for awhile, and then said,

‘Perhaps I can aid you in getting into some-
_ thing better. Iam president of a new] y-projected
_ railroad, and we are about putting on the line a
company of engineers, for the purpose of survey-
ing and locating the route. You studied surveying
and engineering at school at the same time that |
did, and I suppose have still a correct knowledge
of both; if so, I will use my influence to have you
appointed surveyor. The engineer is already cho-
sen, and at my desire he will give you all requisite
instruction until you revive your early knowledge
of these matters. The salary is one hundred dol-
lars a month,”

A. shadow still darker than that which before
rested there, fell upon the face of the mechanic.

** Alas! sir,” he said, ** I have not the slightest
knowledge of surveying. It is true, I studied it,
or rather, pretended to study it, at school—but it
made no permanent impression upon my mind, [
SaW no use in it, then, and am now as ignorant of
surveying as if I had never taken a lesson on the
subject.”



20 THE USE OF LEARNING.

“T am very sorry, Mr. Allen,” the merchant
replied, in real concern. “If you were a good
accountant, I might, perhaps, get you into a store,
What is your capacity in this respect 1”

‘“‘[ ought to have been a good accountant, sir,
for I studied mathematics long enough ; but I took
little interest in figures, and now, although I was
for many months, while at school, pretending to
study book-keeping, I am utterly incapable of tak-
ing charge of a set of books,”

“Such being the case, Mr. Allen, I really do not
know what I can do for you. But stay !—I am
about sending out an assorted cargo to Buenos
Ayres, and thence round to Callao, and want a
man to go as supercargo, who can speak the Span-
ish language. The captain will direct in the sales,
I remember that we studied Spanish together,
Would you be willing to leave your family and
go? The wages will be one hundred dollars a
month ?”

“I have forgotten all my Spanish, sir. I did not
see the use of it while at school, and therefore, it
made no impression on my mind.”

The merchant, really concerned for the poor
mechanic, again thought of some way to serve him.
At length he said,

“7 can think of but one thing that you can do,
Mr. Allen, and that will not be much better than
your present employment. It is a service for which
ordinary labourers are employed—that of chain-
carrying to the surveyor on the proposed railroad
expedition.”



THE USE OF LEARNIN‘:. 21

‘What is the wages, sir?”

‘“‘ Thirty-five dollars a month.”

“© And found 1?”

“ Certainly.”

‘¢T will accept it, sir, thankfully,” the man said.
“Tt will be much better than my present employ-
ment.”

“Then make yourself ready at once, for the
company wil start in a week.”

‘I will be ready, sir,” the poor man replied, and
then withdrew.

In a week the company of engineers started, and
Mr. Allen with them, as chain-carrier, when, had
he, as a boy, taken the advice of his parents and
friends, and stored up in his memory what they
wished him to learn, he might have filled the sur-
veyor’s office, at more than double the wages paid
to him as a chain-carrier. Indeed, we cannot tell
how high a position of usefulness and profit he

_might have held, had he improved all the opportu-

nities afforded him in youth, But he perceived the

use of learning too late.

The writer earnestly hopes that none of his
young readers will make the same discovery as
that Mr. Allen did when it is too late to reap any
real benefit. Children and youth cannot possibly
know as well as their parents, guardians, and

teachers, what is best for them. They should,

therefore, be obedient and willing to learn, even if
they cannot see what use learning will-be to them.

Men who are in active contact with the world,
_ know, that the more extensive their knowledge on

a



22 THE USE OF LEARNING.

all subjects, the more useful they can be to others ;
and the higher and more important uses in society
they are fitted by education to perform, the greater
is the return to themselyes in wealth and honour.
And therefore it is, that children are educated by
their parents. They know the use of learning,
and if children cannot see it, they should be obe-
dient, and learn, in the full confidence that .their
parents know better than they.







THE SECRET OF ORDER.

“EVERYTHING in confusion again, Fanny,”
said Mrs. Fairfield, coming into her daughter’s
chamber. “Nota chair in its place. Both closet-
doors open, and the clothes on the shelves tum-
bled. And see your mantel-piece !—the books on

‘it are disarranged, and your candlestick is just
ready to fall off. The shawl you wore out last
evening, instead of being folded up carefully, and
laid away in one of your drawers, is lying upon
the back of a chair, all rumpled and creased.
And to crown all, it is ten o’clock, and your bed
is not made.”

“O, but I’ll soon put all right again, ma,”
Fanny said. “TI have been engaged all the morn-
ing over this letter. But I have just finished it,
and now I will clear up the room.”

“ But Fanny,” Mrs. Fairfield said, “you know
that I have often told you that you should not
allow everything to get into this state of confu-
sion,” |

“I really don’t know how IT can help it, ma,”
Fanny replied, «J put things in their proper
place every morning.”

“Still, you are very late about it to-day.”

“But I have been writing this letter, ma.”

-_ “You should never neglect one duty for another,
Fanny. You ought first to have put your room in
order, and then to have written your letter. It is
| (23)



24 THE SECRET OF ORDER.

this putting off the doing of a thing, that makes
your room get into such a state of confusion. Do,
Fanny, correct this bad habit. You are now six-
teen years of age, and if you are not careful, it
will be confirmed, and you will be a sloven all
your life.”

Fanny promised amendment, and her mother
went down stairs to attend to her domestic duties,

In less than a week, however, she found it neces-
sary to call her daughter’s attention to her neglect-
ful and careless habits.

«“ T am afraid, Fanny,” she said, “ that you will
never make a tidy woman. And I am really sorry
for it, for when you come to have charge of a
house of your own, you will find this habit a
source of great inconvenience to you, if not of
direct unhappiness. When things are in confusion
around you, your mind will be in a like confusion ;
and it is only the calm, quiet mind, that is truly
happy.”

‘Indeed, ma, I try,” Fanny replied, seriously.
‘«¢ But, somehow, or other, everything will get out
of its place. I am sure that I feel better when all
my things are properly arranged; for then I can
get what I want, when I have.use for it —and
besides, my mind, as you say, is calmer, and I feel
happier, when I have got my room and my draw-
ers arranged in an orderly condition. But, in a
little while it is all as bad as ever; and I am sure
I cannot tell how it gets so.”

‘There is a way, Fanny, by which order might
be permanently sustained, even in your chamber,
and closets, and drawers. Caroline Mayfield, her



THE SECRET OF ORDER. 25

mother tells me, is very orderly in her habits.
Her books, and clothes, and everything that be-
longs to her, or is placed in her care, are always
to be found in their places.”

“Yes, I have noticed that myself,” Fanny said.
‘*And I would give anything for her secret of
order.”

‘** No doubt she would impart it, Fanny.”

‘Yes, I suppose she would, if she really under-
stood herself what the secret was. It is natural
for her to be orderly ; and I presume, therefore,
that she has no system about it.”

“ Suppose you ask her, Fanny? I have no doubt
that she could help you a little.”

“Perhaps she could; and as I am going out
this morning, I will call and see her, and ask her
the question, It can do no harm any how.”

And so, in the course of the morning, Fanny
called in to see Caroline Mayfield.

“Everything as neat as wax,” Fanny said, as
she entered Caroline’s chamber, where the two
young ladies retired, after chatting for a few
minutes in the parlour. Do you know, Caro-
line, the object of my especial visit this morning ?”

** No, Fanny; what is it?”

“Well, I don’t think you would guess in a
month of Sundays.”

‘Perhaps not; for I am no very good hand at
guessing. So you will have to tell me.”

_ You will laugh I expect; but no matter. So
_ to begin, with a little honest commendation, I will
_ just say, that you are the neatest and most orderly
_ young lady of my acquaintance.”

3

|



26 THE SECRET OF ORDER.

“A pretty fair beginning, Fanny,” her friend
responded, in a laughing tone,

“And an honest one into the bargain, Well,
in the second place, I am about the most disorder-

know. And now | have come to you to get a
lesson in order and neatness. In a word, Caro-
line, I want your secret,”

“Are you really in earnest, Fanny ?”

“* Certainly. I never was more so in my life,”

“Well, I don’t know that I have any secret of
order. It all comes natural to me.” |

“But how do you keep things in their right
places? | cannot, let me do my best.”

“O, as to that, always put a thing into its
right place when | am done using it; and so
nothing, in that “ase, gets out of order. How can
it?”

Fanny paused a moment thoughtfully, and then
said with animation—

“That’s it! T see it all now. You have given
me your secret. If everything that is taken up,
is returned to its Proper place, how can there be
disorder, sure enough? Hereafter, I will try and
practise on your rule.”

When Fanny went home, she told her mother
of the discovery she had made, at the same time
that she smiled at the simple truthfulness of the
rule,

“‘ There is no doubt of that being the true secret
of order, Fanny,” her mother said; “and now
that you have found it out, I hope you will prac.



THE SECRET OF ORDER. 27

«] will try, mother,” the daughter replied.

And she began by trying that very day. While
the precept was fresh in her mind, she got along
pretty well; but it was not many days before her
mother discovered her room in no very orderly
condition.

“ You have lost your secret, I fear, Fanny,” she
said, as she looked in upon her.

«0, no, ma! I have not lost, but only forgot-
ten it for a little while. But I will try to keep the
recollection of it as fresh as possible.”

“It is worth all the trouble it may cost you,
Fanny, to acquire a habit of order. After this
habit is once formed, it will be like second nature
to you.”

“] know it, ma; and am determined to per-
severe. And I hope you will remind me of every
little omission that may come under your notice.”

Mrs. Fairfield promised that she would do so.
And whenever she found her daughter growing
remiss, would remind her of the secret she had
obtained from Caroline. Gradually, Fanny ac-
quired, by steady perseverance in adhering to her
rule of order, the habit of order itself, and then
she had no trouble; for it was as natural for her
to replace a thing properly, as it was for her to
take it up.



THE

STUDENT AND APPRENTICE,

“ How far is jt from here to the sun, Jim?” ask.
ed Harman Lee of his father’s apprentice, James
Wallace, in a tone of light raillery, intending by
the question to elicit some reply that would exhibit
the boy’s ignorance,

James Wallace, a boy of fourteen, turned his
bright, intelligent yes upon the son of his master,
and after regarding him for a moment, replied,

*T don’t know, Harman, How far ig it 7

here was something so honest and earnest in
the tone of the boy, that much as Harman had felt
at first disposed to Sport with his ignorance, he

not to be concealed, and he replied,

“ Ninety-five millions of miles, you ignoramus !”

James did not retort, but repeating over in his
mind the distance named, fixed it indelibly upon
his memory,

On the same evening, after he had finished his
day’s work, he obtained a small text book on astron-
omy, which belonged to Harman Lee, and went
UP into his 8arret, with a candle, and there alone,
attempted to dive into the mysteries of that sublime
Science. As he read, the €arnestness of his atten.
tion fixed hearly every fact upon his = So



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 29

intent. was he, that he perceived not the passage of
time, and was only called back to a consciousness
of where he was by the sudden sinking of the wick
of his candle into the melted mass. of tallow that
had filled the cup of his candlestick. In another
moment he was in total darkness. The cry of the
watchman told him that the hours had flown until
it was past eleven o’clock.

Slowly undressing himself in his dark chamber,
his mind recurring with a strong interest to what
he had been reading, he laid himself down upon
his hard bed, and gave full play to his thoughts.
Hour after hour passed away, but he could not
sleep, so absorbed was he in reviewing the new
and wonderful things he had read. At last, wearied
nature gave way, and he fell off in a slumber, filled
with dreams of planets, moons, comets, and fixed
stars. On the next morning the apprentice boy
resumed his place at the work-bench with a new
feeling ; and with this feeling was mingled one of
regret that he could not go to school as did his mas-
ter’s son.

« But I can study at night while he is asleep,”
he said to himself.

Just then Harman Lee came into the shop, and
approaching James, said, for the purpose of teas-
ing him,

‘ How big round is the earth, Jim ”

“ Twenty-five thousand miles,” was the prompt
answer.

Harman looked surprised for a moment, and
then responded with a sneer—for he was not a kind-

3



30 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

hearted boy, but on the contrary, very selfish, and
disposed to injure rather than do good to others—

*O, dear! How wonderful wise you are! and
no doubt you can. tell how many moons Jupiter
has ? Come, let ’s hear ?””

“ Jupiter has four moons,” James answered, with
something of exultation jn his tone,

“And no doubt you can tell how many rings it
has?”

“« Jupiter has no rings. Saturn has rings, and

upiter belts,” James replied, in a decisive tone.

For a moment or two, Harman was silent with
surprise and mortification to think that his father’s
apprentice, whom he esteemed so far below him,
should be possessed of knowledge equal to his, on
the points in reference to which he had chosen to
question him; and that he should be able to con-
vict him of an error into which he had purposely
fallen.

“T should like to know how long it is since you

came so wonderful wise |” Harman at length
said, with a sneer,

“Not very long,” James replied, calmly. «|
have been reading one of your books on Astrono.
my.”

“Well, you’re not going to have my books,
mister, I can tell you! Anyhow, I should like to
know what business you had to touch one of them ?

{me catch you at it again, and see if | don’t
cuff you soundly!) Youd better, a great deal, be
minding your work.”

“ But I didn’t neglect my work, Harman. I read



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 31

at night, after I was done my work. And I didn’t
hurt your book.”

«] don’t care, if you didn’t hurt it. You are
not going to have my books, I can tell you. So
do you just let them alone.”

Poor James’s heart sunk in his bosom, at this
unexpected obstacle thrown in his way. He had
no money of his own to buy, and knew of no one
from whom he could borrow the book that had all
at once become necessary to his happiness.

“ Do, Harman,” he said, appealingly, “ lend me
the book. I will take good care of it.”

“No, I won’t. And don’t you dare to touch it
was the angry reply.

James Wallace knew well enough the selfish dis-
position of his master’s son, older than he by two
or three years, to be convinced that there was now
put little hope of his having the use of his books,
except by stealth. And from that his open and
honest principle revolted. All day he thought earn-
estly over the means whereby he should be able to
obtain a book on Astronomy, to quench the ardent
thirst that had been created in his mind. And night
came without any satisfactory answer being obtain-
ed to his earnest inquiries of his own thought.

He was learning the trade of a blind-maker.
Having been already an apprentice for two years,
and being industrious and intelligent, he had ac-
quired a readiness with tools:and much skill in
some parts of his trade. While sitting alone, after
he had finished his work for the day, his mind
searching about for some means whereby he could
get books, it occurred to him that he might, by

,?



ner to turn his work into money, he knew not, [It

finally occurred to him, that, in passing a house

near the shop, he frequently obseryed & pair of
window-blinds with faded colours,

.. ‘< Perhaps,” he said to himself, «if T would do

it cheap, they would let me paint and put new
angings to their blinds,”

The thought was scarcely suggested, when he
was on his feet moving towards the Street. In a
few minutes he stood knocking at the door of the
house, which Was soon opened,

“ Well, my little man, what do you want ?” was
the kind salutation of the individual who answered
the knock.

James felt Confused, and stammered out,

“The hangings on your blinds are a good deal
faded.”

““That’s a very true remark, my little man,”
was the reply, made in an €ncouraging tone.

“And they want painting badly.”

“Also very true,” said the man With a good.
humoured smile, for he felt amused with the boy’s
€arnest manner and novelty of speech,

“ Wouldn't you like to have them painted and
new hangings put to them?” pursued James.

‘I don’t know, It would certainly improve them
very much.’™

“O, yes, sir. They would look just like new,
And if you wil] let me do them, I will fix them all
UP Nice for you, Cheap,”



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 33

« Will you, indeed? But what is your name,
and where do you live?” |

“My name is James Wallace, and I live with
Mr. Lee, the blind-maker.”

Do you, indeed! Well, how much will you
charge for painting them, and putting on new
hangings ?”

«| will do it for two dollars, sir. The hangings
and tassels will cost me three-quarters of a dollar,
and the paint and varnish a quarter more. And it
will take me two or three evenings, besides getting
up very early in the morning to work for Mr. Lee,
so that I can have time to paint and varnish them
when the sun shines.” :

«But will Mr. Lee let you do this?”

“J don’t know, sir. But I will ask him.”

“Very well, my little man. If Mr. Lee does
not object, | am willing.”

James ran back to the house, and found Mr. Lee
standing in the door. Much to his delight, his re-
quest was granted. Four days from that time he
possessed a book of his own, and had a half dol-
lar with which to buy some other volume, when he
should have thoroughly mastered the contents of
that. Every night found him poring over this
book, and so soon as it was light enough to see he
was up and reading.

Of course, there was much in it that he could
not understand, and many terms that defied all his
efforts and comparisons of the context, to under-
stand. ‘To help him in this difficulty, he purchased
with his remaining half dollar, at 4 second-hand
book stall, a dictionary. By the aid of this he



34 STUDENT AND APPRENTICRE.

acquired the information he Sought, much more
rapidly. But the more he read, the broader the
unexplored €xpanse of knowledge appeared to open
fore him, He did not, however, give Way to
feelings of discouragement, but Steadily devoted
every evening, and an hour €very morning, to sty.
dy; while, all through the day, his mind Was pon.
ering over the things he had read, as his hands
were diligently employed in the labour assigned
m,
It occurred, just at this time, that a number of
nevolent individuals established in the town where
€ lived, one of those excellent institutions, an Ap.
prentices? Library. To this he at once applied, and
obtained the books he needed. Instead, however,
of resorting to the library for mere books of amuse.
ment, he borrowed Only those from Which he could
obtain the rudiments of learning, such as text books
C.

Fe early felt the necessity, from having read a
book on Astronomy, With a Strong desire to master
its contents, for mathematica] knowledge ; and in
the effort to acquire this, he commenced studying
—for he had no Preceptor to guide him—a work
on Geometry, In Working out Problems, he used
& pair of shop compasses, with a pointed quill upon
one of the fret. And thus, all alone in his garret,

devotion to the acquirement of knowledge—did the
Poor apprentice boy lay the foundation of future
eminence and usefulness, © Cannot trace his
Course, step by step, through a long series of seven
years, though it Would afford Many lessons of per-



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 35

severance and triumph over almost insurmountable
difficulties. But at twenty-one he was master of
his trade, and what was more, had laid up a vast
amount of general and scientific information. He
was well read in history ; had studied thoroughly
the science of Astronomy, for which he ever re-
tained a lively affection ; was familiar with mathe-
matical principles, and could readily solve the most
difficult Geometrical and Algebraic problems. His
Geographical knowledge was minute ; and to this
he added tolerably correct information in regard to
the manners and customs of different nations. To
natural history he had also given much attention.
But, with all his varied acquirements, James Wal-
lace felt, on attaining the age of manhood, that he
knew comparatively but little.

Let us turn now, for a few moments, to mark
the progress which the young student, in one oO
the best seminaries in his native city, and after-
wards at college, had made. Like too many
tradesmen, whose honest industry and steady per-
severance have gained them a competence, Mr,
felt indisposed to give his son a trade, or to subject
him to the same restraints and discipline in youth
to which he had been subjected. He felt ambi-
tious for him, and determined to educate him for
one of the learned professions. To this end, he
sent him to school early, and provided for him the
very best of instruction. ,

The idea that he was to be a lawyer, or a doc-
tor, soon took possession of the mind of Harman,
and this caused him to feel contempt for other boys
who were merely designed for trades, or store-

keepers.



36 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

Like too many others, he had no love of learn-
ing, nor any right appreciation of its legitimate
uses. ‘To be a lawyer, he thought would be much
more honourable, than to be a mere mechanic;
and for this reason alone, so far as he had any
thoughts on the subject, did he desire to be a law-
yer. As for James Wallace, he, as the poor illiter-
ate apprentice of his father, was most heartily
despised, and never treated by Harman with the
smallest degree of kind consideration.

At the age of eighteen, he was sent away to
one of the Eastern Universities, and there remain-
ed, except during the semi-annual vacations, until
he was twenty-one years of age; when he gradu-
ated and came home with the honorary title of A.
B. At this time James Wallace was between
severiteen and eighteen years of age, somewhat
rough in his appearance, but with a sound mind in
a sound body. Although, each day he regularly
toiled at the work-bench, he as regularly turned
to his books when evening released him from
labour, and was up at the peep of dawn, to lay the
first offerings of his mind upon the shrine of learn-
ing. But all this devotion to the acquirement of
knowledge, won for him no sympathy, no honour-
able estimation from his master’s son. He despised
these patient, persevering efforts, as much as he
despised his condition as an apprentice to a trade.
But it was not many years before others began to
perceive the contrast between them, although on
the very day that James completed his term of
apprenticeship, Harman was admitted to the bar.

one completed his education so far as gen



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 37

eral knowledge, and a rigid discipline of mind was
concerned, when he left college. The other be-
came more really the student, when the broader
and brighter light of rationality shone clearly on
his pathway, as he passed the threshold of man-
hood. James still continued to work at his trade,
but not for so many hours each day, as while he
was an apprentice. He was a good and fast work-
man, and could readily earn all that he required
for his support in six or eight hours of every
twenty-four. Eight hours were regularly devoted
to study. From some cause, he determined that
he would make law his profession. To the ac-
quirement of a knowledge of legal matters, there-
fore, he bent all the energies of a well disciplined,
and active, comprehensive mind. Two years
passed in an untiring devotion to the studies he
had assigned himself, and then he made applica-
tion for admission to the bar.

« Who were admitted yesterday?” asked Har-
man Lee, the day after Wallace had passed his
examination, addressing a fellow-member of the

r.

“ Some half dozen, and among them a sturdy
young fellow, that nobody ever heard of before.”

“Indeed! Well, what kind of an examination
did he make.” |

“An excellent one. The Judges tried their best
with him, but he seemed furnished at every point.
He is said to be a young mechanic, who has thus
qualified himself in the time that he could spare
from the labours of his handicraft, by which he

has supported himself.”
4



38 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

“A mechanic! Poh! The whole court-room
will smell of leather, or’ linseed oil, I suppose, after
this. Did you learn his name?”

“‘ James Wallace, I believe he is called.”

“James Wallace! Are you sure?” ©

“Yes, that was it. Do you know him? You
look sufficiently surprised to know him twice
over.”

“My father had an apprentice by that name,
who affected to be very fond of books. But sure.
ly it can’t be he.”

“I am sure I don’t know. But here comes a
client for you, I suppose.”

As the latter spoke, a man entered the office,
and asked for Mr. Lee.

“That is my name, sir,” said Lee, bowing.
“ Take a chair.”

The stranger seated himself, and after a moe
ment’s pause, said,

“I wish you to attend a case forme. I have
been sued this morning, as an executor of an
estate, and the claim set up is a very important
one.”

The whole case was then stated with an exhibj.
tion of various documents. After Lee had come
to understand fully its merits, he asked who wag
the lawyer of the claimants.

“A young fellow, only admitted yesterday, by
the name of Wallace. I am told he has it in
charge. He was, however, consulted some months
ago, and his services retained, to become active at
this time.”



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 39

Lee turned to his friend, and remarked—

« So it seems that I am doomed first to come in
contact with this young mechanic. He is certain-
ly quick on the trigger. Only admitted yesterday,
and to-day pushing on a most important suit. But
[’ll cool him off, [’m thinking.”

‘¢ You must do your best, sir, for there is much
at stake,” said the client.

“Rely upon that. But don’t give yourself a
moment’s uneasiness. A few years’ experience at
the bar, is always enough to set aside your new
beginners.”

<< | wonder if it can be my father’s old appren-
tice?” the young lawyer remarked, after his client
had gone.

“Tt’s as likely as not,” his friend said. ‘ But
wouldn’t it be a good joke, if he gained the suit
over you !”

«¢ Never fear that!”

“© Well, we shall see!” laughingly exclaimed
his friend.

On the next day, James Wallace took his seat
among the members of the bar, and marked with
a keen interest, and an air of intelligence, all that
passed. One or two of the lawyers noticed him
kindly, but the majority, Lee among them, regard-
ed him with coldness and dislance. But nothing
of this affected him, if, indeed, he noticed it at all.

The cause in which he had been retained, and
which proved to be the first in which he took an
active and prominent position in the court-room,
came up-within a week, for all parties interested
inthe result, were anxious to come to trial; and,



40 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

therefore, no legal obstacles were thrown in the
Way.

There was a profound silence, and a marked
attention, and interest, when the young stranger

Harman Lee, but Wallace saw it not, The pro.
minent points of the Case were presented in plain
but concise language, and a few remarks bearing
upon the merits of the case being made, the young

co

lor the de.

Instantly Harman Lee was on his feet, and be.
gan referring to the points presented by his « very
learned brother,” in a flippant, contemptuous man.
her. There were those present who marked the
light that kindled in the eye of Wallace, and the
flash that Passed over his countenance at the first
contemptuous word and tone that were uttered by
his antagonist at the bar. These soon gave place
to attention, and an air of conscious power, Once
on his feet, with so flimsy a position to tear into
tatters, as that which his « learned brother”? had
Presented, Lee seemed never to grow tired of the
tearing process, Nearly an hour had passed awa
when he resumed his seat with a look of exultation,

that smile had changed to a look of surprise, mor.
tification, and alarm, all blended into a single ex.
Pression. The young lawyer’s maiden-speech
showed him to be a man of calm, deep, systematic



STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. | 41

thought—well, skilled in points of law, and in au--
thorities ; and more than all, a lawyer of practical
and comprehensive views. When he sat down no
important point in the case had been left untouch-
ed, and none that had been touched, required fur-
ther elucidation.

Lee followed briefly, in a vain attempt to torture
his language, and break down his positions. But.
he eit that he was contending with weapons whose
edges were turned at every blow. When he took
his seat again, Wallace merely remarked, that he
was prepared, without further argument, to submit
the case to the court.

The case was accordingly submitted, and a de-
cision unhesitatingly made in favour of the plain-
tiffs, or Wallace’s clients.

From that hour, James Wallace took his true
place. The despised apprentice became the able
and profound lawyer, and was so esteemed for
real talent and real moral worth, which, when
combined, ever place their possessor in his true
position.

Ten years from that day, Wallace was elevated
to the Bench, while Lee remained a second-rate
lawyer, and never rose above that grade.

In the histories of these two persons is seen the
difference between simply receiving an education,
as it is called, and self-education. Most eminent
men are self-educated men. ‘This fact every stu-
dent and every humble apprentice, with limited
advantages, should bear in mind. It should infuse
new life into the studies of the one, and inspire the
other with a determination to imbue his mind with

4 *



42 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

knowledge. The education that a boy receives at
colleges and seminaries, does not make him a
learned man. He has only acquired the rudiments
of knowledge. Beyond these he must go— he
must continue ever after a student—or others will
leave him in the rear; others of humbler means
and fewer Opportunities; the apprentice of the
handicrafisman, for instance, whose few hours of
devotion to study, from a genuine love of learning,
have given him a taste and a habit that remain
vith him in all after time.





THE

STORY OF A LITTLE BOY, WHO
SOMETIMES GOT ANGRY.

THERE was once a little boy, named Jonas
White, who had a very bad temper. A very tri-
fling thing would frequently make him get so angry
that he hardly knew what he was saying or do-

ing.

“iis father often talked to him, and sometimes
had to punish him for giving way to this very
wicked disposition; but as the little boy would
make no effort to conquer it, he grew worse, in-
stead of better. ?

One day Jonas came home from school, and
found that his little sister Emma had some of his
playthings. He was not a very good boy ; for he
did not like to see his sister enjoying herself with
anything that belonged to him; and this was be-
cause he was selfish. ;

«“ Give me my playthings!” he cried out, in an:
angry tone of voice, as soon as he saw. what Emma.
was doing. .

« O, let me play with them, brother, won't you:?”
Emma asked.

“ No, I will not!” the unkind boy said. “ And:
I’d like to know what business you had. to. touch:
my things !”

And so saying, he jerked away the playthings
with which Emma was amusing — = not:

43



44. STORY OF A LITTLE Boy,

Content with this, his anger so overcame him, that
he pushed her away so suddenly, that she fell, and
struck her head with a dreadful blow against a

Poor little Emma was: so Stunned with the blow,
that she lay insensible, while the blood flowed out
from a wound in her head,

In an instant the anger of Jonas disappeared,
and he ran to his sister, and endeavoured to lift
her up. But when he saw the blood running out,
and trickling down her beautiful dark hair, form.
ing already a pool upon the floor, he became sick
at heart with alarm and remorse for What he had

one,

His cries of terror brought his mother instantly
into the room. She was dreadfully frightened
when she saw Emma lying upon the floor ; and
still more so, when she perceived the deep wound
in her head from which the blood was flowing very
fast.

“T did it mother! I did it! | pushed her oyer,
But I didn’t mean to hurt her !”? Jonas said, burst-
ing into tears,

hen his mother heard this, she felt sick, and
faint ; for she Was in bad health, and was very
weak,
“ What if he has killed her?” she said to herself,
as. she took Emma in her arms, and laid her upon
er own bed,

This thought distressed her exceedingly. She

hew Jonas had &@ quick, bad temper, and the .
thought, that in a fit of passion he had killed hig
Sister, wag to her-a terrible one.



WHO SOMETIMES GOT ANGRY. 45

A physician was sent for, who had to cut much
of Emma’s_ beautiful hair away, to get at the
wound, which he then sewed up. ‘The pain which
this produced brought back the little girl to con-
sciousness, and she cried very bitterly while the |
doctor continued dressing the wound.

Jonas, whose father made him stay in the room
all the while that the doctor was sewing up and
‘dressing his sister’s head, suffered more than can
be described. He deeply repented of what he had
done, and resolved that he would try very hard to
conquer his unhappy temper.

His father did not punish him, for he knew that
punishment would do but little good, if the sad
condition of his sister did not produce a change.
But he told him about a boy that lived in the same
town, several years before, who struck his little
brother in anger, and killed him.

“¢] remember it very well,” he said, “ and it
was a dreadful time for his poor mother. Indeed,
I have always thought that it was the cause of her
death, for she never seemed herself again, and was
carried to her grave ‘1 two months afterwards.
Her son has grown up to be a man, and still lives
in town. But he never seems happy, and nothing
goes well with him. He walks about with. his
eyes cast down, and associates with no one, €X-
cept so far as his business requires. He seems,
and I have no doubt is, a very wretched man}; for
how can he ever forget that dreadful event.

“ And suppose, Jonas, you had killed your sis-
ter! The very thought ‘s awful! I have no doubt
but that it would have broken your mothez’s heart.



46 STORY ofa LITTLE BOY, &c.

Try then, to curb your bad temper, or some dread.
ful thing, I am afraid, will be the Consequence,”
Jonas cried bitterly, and determined that he
would never get angry with his Sister again, Ag
00N as she got well €nough to look about her, and
amused with anything, he brought his toys and
playthings, and Spread them out before her on the
bed, and told her that they were all her’s whenever
she wanted to play with them,
© was very much 8ratified when he saw that
tmma was pleased, and would pick up first one
little thing and then another, and seem to enjo
the sight of them ; much more really pleased than
ever he was while selfishly keeping them to him.
self.
After awhile Emma got well again, and was
able to come down stairs and 8° about as usual.
ut Jonas neyer Could get angry with her as be.

times it would break out, when others Opposed



HOW TO BE HAPPY.

«0, I am so tired! I wish I had something ¢o
do!” Jane Thompson said to her mother one day.

“Then why don’t you read?” asked her mo-
ther. ‘* You have books.”

«]?m tired of reading, and I’m tired of every-
thing.”

« You are a very unhappy gitl, Jane,” her mo-
ther said.

“{f I am, I can’t help it.”

« But I am sure you could help it, if you would
try, Jane.”

“«How can I help it, mother? I am sure |
should like very much to know.”

«“ By trying to be useful to others, my daughter.”

“So you have said before. But I cannot see
any thing so very pleasant in working for others.
Nobody thinks of being useful to me.”

“That is a very selfish thought, Jane,” her
mother said, in a serious tone, “ and the feeling
that prompted that thought, is the cause of all your
unhappiness of mind. You must cease to think
only of yourself, and have some kind regard for
others, or you will never be happy.”

Jane did not understand her mother, and there-
fore could see no force in what she said. And her
mother perceived this, and so said no more then
upon the subject. .

(4



48 HOW TO BE HAPPY,

About an hour afterwards she came into the
room, where Jane sat idle and moping, and said,

“* Come, Jane, I want you to walk out with me.”

“‘T dont care much about going, mother,” Jane
replied. “And if you are willing, would rather
Stay at home.”

“ But I wish you to go with me, Jane; so come,
dress yourself as quickly as you can, for you know
it never takes me long to get ready.”

Jane reluctantly obeyed, and, when dressed,
went out with her mother. She felt listless and
unhappy, for her mind was not employed upon
any subject of interest.

After walking for some ten or fifteen minutes,
her mother stopped at a low frame building, and
knocked at the door.

“What are you going in there for?” Jane asked
in surprise. =

“‘I want to see a poor sick woman who lives
here,” her mother said, in a quiet tone.

“QI wish you had let me staid at home 1?
But before Jane could say any more, the knock
was answered by a little girl about ten years old,
whose uncombed head, soiled clothes and skin,
showed that she needed the care of a mother’s
willing heart and ready hand,

The little girl conducted them into a back room,
in which were a few scanty pieces of furniture and
a bed, upon which was propped up with pillows a
sick woman, engaged in sewing. Her face was
pale and thin, and her eyes, bright and glistening,
were sunk far into the head. The work dropped
from her hand, as her unexpected visiters entered,



HOW TO BE HAPPY. 49

and then she looked up earnestly into the face of
the elder of the two.

“You do not seem able to work, ma’am,” Jane’s
mother said, advancing to the bed-side, and taking
the small thin hand that was offered her.

«“T am not very able, madam,” she replied in a
feeble tone. “ But I have to do something.”

‘Is there no one to provide any thing for you,
in your feeble state?” asked her visiter.

«No one, madam,” was the simple, and to
Jane’s mother, affecting response.

« And how many hours through the day do you
have to sit up in bed and sew?”

‘All day, when I can, ma’am. And sometimes
a good many hours at night. But I wouldn’t care
go much for that, if I was able to go about the
room a little, and attend more to my child, who is,
indeed, sadly neglected.” And the tears came into
the mother’s eyes, as she cast a look of tenderness
upon her little girl.

Jane saw that look, and noted the sad expression
of the poor woman’s voice, and both touched her
heart.

« Cannot we do something for them?” she whis-

« We must try,” was the low response.

«| heard of your being ill, this morning,” Jane’s
mother said, ‘and have come over to see if I can.
do any thing for you. You must be relieved from
your constant labour, for it is too much for your
feeble frame. As soon as I return home, I will send,
you over as much food as you and your little girl
will require for several days, and my daughter here:

5



50 HOW TO BE HAPPY.

will be willing, I think, to come in to see you now
and then, and give you such little assistance ag
you may require. Will you not, Jane?”

“O yes, mother. I will come most cheerfully,”
And the tone of her voice, and expression of her
face showed that she was in earnest,

The poor woman could not find words to speak

out her true feelings, but she looked her gratitude.
_ After Jane and her mother had left this miser-
able tenement, the former said,
_ “O, mother, it makes my heart ache to think of
that poor woman and her child! How can she
possibly get bread to eat, by the work of her own
hands, and she almost dying.”

The sympathy thus expressed pleased her mo-
ther very much, and she encouraged the good
impression. After she had returned home, she

that she knew would be grateful to the sick woman.
These she despatched by a servant. About half
an hour after, Jane, with a small bundle in her
hand, went out alone, and turned her steps towards
the cheerless hovel she had but a short time before
visited. In this bundle was a change of clothing
for the invalid, which Jane assisted her to put on.
And then she made up her bed for her, and beat
up the pillows, and fixed her as comfortable as
possible,

Then she took the little girl, and washed her,
and combed her hair, and put on a clean frock
that her mother told her she would find in a
closet. After this she arranged every thing in the



HOW TO BE HAPPY. 51

room in order, and swept up the floor. And still
- further, went to work and got a nice cup of tea for
the sick woman. |

It would have done the heart of any one good to
have seen how full of delight and gratitude was the
countenance of the sick woman. Jane had never
felt so happy in her life.

When she came home, her mother remarked her
light step and cheerful air.

“You have at last learned how to be happy,
Jane,” she said. “ The secret lies in our endeavour-
ing to be useful to others. All our unhappiness
springs from some indulgence of selfishness, and
all our true feelings of happiness, from that bene-
yolence which prompts us to regard others.”

Jane saw and felt the force of her mother’s
remark, and never forgot it. The sick woman, in
whom she had become interested, afforded ample
scope for the exercise of her newly awakened feel-
ings of benevolence, and thus they gained strength,
and grew into principles of action. May every
one who reads this little story, find the true secret
of happiness !



NO.

“THERE is a word, my son, a very little word,
in the English language, the right use of which it
is all-important that you should learn,” Mr. How.
land said to his son Thomas, who was about leay-
ing the paternal roof for a residence in a neigh-
bouring city, never again, perchance, to make one
of the little circle that had so long gathered in the
family homestead.

**And what word is that, father?’ Thomas
asked.

‘It is the little word No, my son.”

“And why does so much importance attach to’

that word, father 1”

** Perhaps I can make you understand the rea-
son much better if I relate an incident that occur-
red when I was a boy. I remember it as distinct.
ly as if it had taken place but yesterday, although
thirty years have since passed. There was a
neighbour of my father’s, who was very fond of
gunning and fishing. On several occasions, IT had
accompanied him, and had enjoyed myself very
much. One day, my father said to me,

“¢ William, I do ‘not wish you to go into the
woods or on the water again with Mr, Jones.’

“*¢ Why not, father? | asked, for I had become
so fond of going with him, that to be denied the

pleasure was a real privation. oa

od



NO. 53

«<] have good reasons for not wishing you to
o, William,’ my father replied, ‘ but do not want
to give them now. I hope it is all-sufficient for
ou, that your father desires you not to accompany

r. Jones again.’

©] could not understand why my father laid
upon me this prohibition ; and, as I desired very
much to go, f did not feel satisfied in my obedience.
On the next day, as | was walking along the road,
I met Mr. Jones, with his fishing-rod on his
shoulder, and his basket in his hand. |

«+ Ah, William! you are the very one that I
wish to see,’ said Mr. Jones, smiling. ‘I am go
ing out this morning, and want company. We
shall have a beautiful day.’

«But my father told me yesterday,’ I replied,
¢that he did not wish me to g° out with you.’

«¢ And why not, pray ” asked Mr. Jones.

«<] am sure that I do not know,’ I said; ‘ but
indeed, I should like to go very much.’

«+O, never mind ; come along, he said. * Your
father will never know a

“¢ Yes, but I am afraid that he will,’ I replied,
thinking more of my father’s displeasure than of
the evil of disobedience.

«There is no danger at all of that. We will
be home again long before dinner-time.’

« | hesitated, and he urged ; aud finally, I moved
the way that he was going, and had proceeded a
few hundred yards, when | stopped, and said—

« +] don’t like to go, Mr. Jones.’

6 ‘ Nonsense, William! There is no harm in

5



54 NO.

fishing, I am sure. I have often been out with
your father, myself.’

‘‘ Much as I felt inclined to go, still I hesitated;
for I could not fully make up my mind to disobey
my father, At length, he said—

“<1 can’t wait here for you, William. Come
along, or go back. Say yes, or no.’

“This was the decisive moment, I was to make
up my mind, and fix my determination in one way
or the other. I was to say yes or No.

“Come, I can’t stay here all day,” Mr. Jones
remarked, rather harshly, seeing that I hesitated.
At the same moment, the image of my father rose
distinctly before my mind, and I saw his eye fixed
steadily and reprovingly upon me. With one
desperate resolution, I uttered the word

“** No!’ and then turning, ran away as fast as
my feet would carry me. | cannot tell you how
much relieved I felt when I was far beyond the
reach of temptation,

“On the next morning, when I came down to
breakfast, I was startled and surprised to learn
that Mr. Jones had been drowned on the day be-
fore. Instead of returning in a few hours, as he
had stated to me that he would, he remained out
all the day. A sudden storm arose ; his boat wag
capsized, and he drowned. | shuddered when [
heard this sad and fatal accident related. That
little word, no, had in all probability saved my
life.

“<¢T will now tell you, William,’ my father said,
turning to me, ‘ why I did not wish you to go with
Mr. Jones. Of late, he had taken to drinking ;



NO. 55

and I had learned, within a few days, that when-
ever he went out on a fishing or gunning €Xxcur-.
sion, he took his bottle of spirits with him, and
usually returned a good deal intoxicated. I could
not trust you with such a man. I did not think it’
necessary to state this to you, for I was sure that
I had only to express my wish that you would
not accompany him, to insure your implicit obedi-
ce.’

“] felt keenly rebuked at this; and resolved
never again to permit even the thought of. disobe-
dience to find a place in my mind. From that
time, I have felt the value of the word No, and
have generally, ever since, been able to use it on
all right occasions, It has saved me from many
troubles. Often and often in life have I been urged
to do things that my judgment told me were wrong:
on such occasions, I always remembered my first
temptation, and resolutely said— |

“&é¢No?

“And now, my son,” continued Mr. Howland,
“do you understand the importance of the word
No?”

“] think I do, father,” Thomas replied. ‘* But
is there not danger of my using it too often, and
thus becoming selfish in all my feelings, and con-
sequently, unwilling to render benefits to others ?”

“Certainly there is, Thomas. The legitimate
use of this word is to resist evil. To refuse to do
a good action is wrong.”

“If any one asks me, then, to do him a favour
or kindness, I should not, on any account, say,
no.’



54 NO.

fishing, I am sure. I have often been out with
your father, myself.’

“‘ Much as I felt inclined to go, still I hesitated ;
for I could not fully make up my mind to disobey
my father. At length, he said—

“¢T can’t wait here for you, William. Come
along, or go back. Say yes, or no.’

“This was the decisive moment. I was to make
up my mind, and fix my determination in one way
or the other, I was to Say yes or No.

““* Come, I can’t Stay here all day,’ Mr. Jones
remarked, rather harshly, seeing that I hesitated.
At the same moment, the image of my father rose
distinctly before my mind, and I saw his eye fixed
Steadily and reprovingly upon me. With one
desperate resolution, I uttered the word

“* No!’ and then turning, ran away as fast as
my feet would carry me. I cannot tell you how
much relieved I felt when I was far beyond the
reach of temptation.

“On the next morning, when I came down to
-breakfast, I was startled and surprised to learn
that Mr. Jones had been drowned on the day be-
fore. Instead of returning in a few hours, as he
had stated to me that he would, he remained out
all the day. A sudden storm arose ; his boat was
capsized, and he drowned. | shuddered when [|
heard this sad and fatal accident related. That
_ word, No, had in all probability saved my
ife.

“* turning to me, ‘ why I did not wish you to go with
Mr. Jones. Of late, he had taken to drinking ;



NO. 55

and I had learned, within a few days, that when-
ever he went out on a fishing or gunning excur-.
sion, he took his bottle of spirits with him, and
usually returned a good deal intoxicated. I could
not trust you with such a man. I did not think it’
necessary to state this to you, for I was sure that
I had only to express my wish that you would
not accompany him, to insure your implicit obedi-
ce.”

“] felt keenly rebuked at this; and resolved
never again to permit even the thought of disobe-
dience to find a place in my mind. From that
time, I have felt the value of the word No, and
have generally, ever since, been able to use it on
all right occasions. It has saved me from many
troubles. Often and often in life have I been urged
to do things that my judgment told me were wrong:
on such occasions, I always remembered my first
temptation, and resolutely said— |

“6éNol

« And now, my son,” continued Mr. Howland,
“do you understand the importance of the word
No?”

«J think I do, father,” Thomas replied. ‘ But
is there not danger of my using it too often, and
thus becoming selfish in all my feelings, and con-
sequently, unwilling to render benefits to others?”

“Certainly there is, Thomas. The legitimate
use of this word is to resist evil. To refuse to do
a good action is wrong.”

“If any one asks me, then, to do him a favour
or kindness; I should not, on any account, say,
no.’



56 No.

‘That will depend, Thomas, in what manner
you are to render him a kindness. If you can do
So without really injuring yourself or others, then
itis a duty which you owe to all men, to be kind,
-and render favours.”

“‘ But the difficulty, I feel, will be for me to dis-
criminate. When I am urged to do something by
one whom I esteem, my regard for him, or my
desire to render him an obligation, will be so strong
as to obscure my judgment.”

“A consciousness of this weakness in your
character, Thomas, should put you upon your
guard.”

“‘ That is very true, father. But I cannot help
fearing for myself. Still, I shall never forget what
you have said, and will try my best to act from a
conviction of right.”

“Do so, my son. And ever remember, that
a wrong action is always followed by pain of
mind, and too frequently by evil consequences. If
you would avoid these, ever act from a conscious-
ness that you are doing right, without regard to
others, If another asks you, from a selfish desire
to benefit or gratify himself, to do that which your
judgment tells you is wrong, surely you should
have no hesitation in refusing.”

The precept of his father, enforced when they
were about parting, and at a time when his affec-
tions for that father were active and intense, lingered
in the mind of Thomas Howland. He saw and
felt its force, and resolved to act in obedience to it,
if ever tempted to do wrong.

On leaving the paternal roof, he went to a



NO. 57

neighbouring town, and entered the store of a
merchant, where were several young men nearly
of his own age, that is, between eighteen and
twenty. With one of these, named Boyd, he soon
formed an intimate acquaintance. But, unfortun-
ately, the moral character of this young man was
far from being pure, or his principles from resting
upan the firm basis of truth and henour.

His growing influence over Thomas Howland
was apparent in inducing him to stay away from
chureh on the Sabbath-day, and pass the time that
had heretofore been spent in a place of worship, in
roaming about the wharves of the city, or in ex-
cursions into the country. This influence was
slightly resisted; but Thomas felt ashamed or
reluctant to use the word * No,” on what seemed
to all the young men around him a matter of so
little importance, Still, his own heart condemned
him, for he felt that it would pain his father and
mother exceedingly if they knew that he neglected
to attend church at least once on the Sabbath-day
—and he was, besides, self-convicted of wrong in
what seemed to him a violation of the precept, Re-
member the Sabbath-day, &c., as he had been
taught to regard that precept. But once having
given way, he felt almost powerless to regist the
influence that now bore upon him,

‘The next violation of what seemed to him a right
course for a young man to pursue, was in suffering
himself to be persuaded to visit frequently the
theatre; although his father had expressly desired
that he would avoid a place where lurked for the
young and inexperienced so many dangers. He



58 NO.

was next easily persuaded to visit a favourite eating-
house, in which many hours were spent during the
evenings of each week, with Boyd and others, in
eating, drinking, and smoking. Sometimes dominos
and back-gammon were introduced, and at length
were played for a slight stake. To participate in
this, Thomas refused, on the plea that he did not
know enough of the games to risk anything. He
had not the moral courage to declare that he con-
sidered it wrong to gamble.

All these departures from what he had been
taught by his father to consider a right course,
were attended by much uneasiness and pain of
mind. But he had yielded to the tempter, and he
could not now find the power within him to resist
his influence successfully.

It happened, about six months after his introduc-
tion to such an entirely new course of life, that he
was invited one evening by his companion Boyd,
to call on a friend with him. He had, on that day,
received from his father forty dollars, with which
to buy himself a new suit of clothes, and a few
other necessary articles. He went, of course, and
was introduced to a very affable, gentlemanly young
man, in his room, at one of the hotels. In a few
minutes, wine and cigars were ordered, and the
three spent an hour or so, in drinking, smoking,
and chit-chat of no very elevating or refined
character.

“Come, let us have a game of cards,” the friend
at last remarked, during a pause in the conversa-
tion; at the same time going to his trunk and
producing a pack of cards,



NO. 59

“No objection,” responded Boyd.

“ Youll take a hand, of course?” the new friend
said, looking at Thomas Howland.

But Thomas said that he knew nothing of cards.

“© that’s no matter! You can learn in two
minutes,” responded the friend of Boyd.

Young Howland felt reluctant, but he could not
resist the influence that was around him, and so he
consented to finger the cards with the rest. As
they gathered around the table, a half-dollar was
laid down by each of the young men, who looked
towards Thomas as they did so.

“] cannot play for money,” he said, colouring ;
for he felt really ashamed to acknowledge his
scruples.

“And why not?” asked the friend of Boyd,
looking him steadily in the face.

« Because I think it wrong,” stammered out
Howland, colouring still more deeply. )

«“ Nonsense! Isn’t your money your own? And
pray what harm is there in your doing with your
own as you please?” urged the tempter.

« But I do not know enough of the game to risk
my money.”

“You don’t think we would take advantage of
your ignorance?” Boyd said. ‘The stake is only
to give interest to the game. I would not givea
copper for a game of cards without a stake. Come,
put down your half-dollar, and we’ll promise to
pay you back all you lose, if you wish it, until you
acquire some skill.”

But Thomas felt reluctant and hesitated. Never-
theless, he was debating the matter in his mind



60 NO.

seriously, and every moment that reluctance was
growing weaker,

“Will you play?” Boyd asked in a decided
tone, breaking in upon this debate.

“‘T had rather not,” Thomas replied, attempting
to smile, so as to conciliate his false friends,

“ You are afraid of your money,” said Boyd, in
a half-sneering tone.

“It is not that, Boyd.”

“Then what is it, pray 7”

“T am afraid that it is not right.”

This was answered by a loud laugh from his
two friends, which touched Thomas a good deal,
and made him feel more ashamed of the scruples
that held him back from entering into the temp-
lation.

“Come, down with your stake, Howland!”
Boyd said, after he had finished his laugh.

The hand of Thomas was in his pocket, and his
fingers had grasped the silver coin, yet still he
hesitated.

‘Will you play, or not?” the friend of Boyd
now said, with something of impatience in his tone,
“Say yes, or no.”

For a moment the mind of Thomas became con-
fused —then the perception came upon him ag
clear as a sunbeam, that it was wrong to gamble.
He remembered, too, vividly, his father’s parting
injunction.

* No!” he said, firmly and decidedly.

Both of his companions looked disappointed and
OME bointicnt ba

“* What did you bring him here for?” he heard



NO. 61

Boyd’s companion say to him in an under tone,
while a frown darkened upon his brow.

The reply did not reach his ear, but he felt that
his company was no longer pleasant, and rising,
he bade them a formal good-evening, and hurriedly
retired. That little word, zo, had saved him. The
scheme was, to win from him his forty dollars, and
then involve him in “ debts of honour,” as they are
falsely called, which would compel him to draw
upon his father for more money, or abstract it from
his employer, a system which had been pursued
by Boyd, and which was discovered. only a week
subsequent, when the young man was discharged
in disgrace. It then came out, that he had been
for months in secret association with a gambler,
and that the two shared together their spoils and
peculations.

This incident roused Thomas Howland to a dis-
tinct consciousness of the danger that lurked in his
path, as a young man, in a large city. He felt, as
he had not felt, while simply listening to his father’s _
precept, the value of the word no; and resolved,
that hereafter, he would utter that little word, and
that, too, decidedly, whenever urged to do what his
judgment did not approve.

“1 will be free!” he said, pacing his chamber
backward and forward, ‘I will be free, hereafter !
No one shall persuade me or drive me to do what
I feel to be wrong.”

That resolution was his safeguard, ever after.
When tempted, and he was tempted frequently, his
“¢ No” decided the matter at once. There was 8
power in it that was all-sufficient in resisting evil

ae



THE TONGUE BRIDLE.

* Wuar is the trouble now?” asked Mrs. Ellis,
coming into the room where her daughter Maria
sat weeping bitterly.

“That will tell you,” replied Maria, drying her
fears and handing her mother an open letter. Mrs.
Ellis read as follows:

To Marra Exuis,

Miss : —T have just learned from Harriet Wil.
son that you made rather free with my name yes-
terday. Now I would just like to know whether
you did, or did not say, that you thought me over
and above conceited ; and if you did, what you
mean by it? I am not used to be talked about in
that way. ANN HARRIS.

“And did you say so to Harriet Wilson ?” ask.
ed Mrs. Ellis,

“Yes, I did, and now how to get out of it, I am
sure I cannot tell. I never dreamed that Harriet
was such a tattler, or I’d have been Close enough
with her,”

“You cannot deny it of course.”

No, not up and down, but then, ma, it will
never do in the world to come right out and ac.
knowledge it point blank. I’d make Ann Harris
an enemy all my life.”

“ How very unguarded you are, Maria ‘ This is

(62



TONGUE BRIDLE. 63

the third or fourth time you have brought your-
self into difficulty by your free way of talking to
every one.”

«| know I am imprudent, ma, sometimes ; but
then I never can believe that young ladies with
whom I am intimate will act so meanly as to be-
come tattlers and mischief-makers, until it is too
late to make caution of any avail. But I’m done
with Harriet Wilson; I ve broken off my intimacy
with several girls already for repeating what I have
said; and I “Il do the same with her.”

“Tt would be much better, Maria,” said her
mother, “if you would put a bridle on your
tongue ; you would save yourself and others many
unkind thoughts and painful feelings.”

«| know I would, ma, but then I can’t always
be watching myself. It’s impossible ; I try often,
but it’s no use.”

«If you will persevere in trying, you will, in
time, gain such a control over yourself as to keep

ou out of these unpleasant difficulties.”

“Perhaps I might; but what shall I do now!
Ann has pinned me right down: and there is no
way of getting off, unless I say that Harriet must
have misunderstood me.”

“That would be prevarication, Maria, if not
something worse.”

«“ Yes, it would; for I remember well enough
that I said exactly what she has reported.”

«And do you seriously think, Maria, that Ann
is conceited 2”

“‘ Yes, ma, I do, or I would not have said so.”

“J think as you do, Maria, but then, there is



64 TONGUE BRIDLE.

to me nothing offensive in the good opinion she
seems to entertain of herself.”

“* No, there is not; and had I not been some.
what ill-natured at the time, I never should have
alluded to it.”

“I suspected as much,” Mrs. Ellis said. * And
under the circumstances, I am of opinion that your
best way is frankly to own that you did say what
has been reported, and why you said it. Such an
honest confession will do you both good.”

‘I don’t know, ma.”

‘* Why do you doubt?”

“I don’t believe that such an explanation. will
soften her angry feelings at all.”

“I am much inclined to think that you feel a
reluctance on your own account to pursue this
course.”

‘Well, perhaps I do,” Maria said, after a
pause.

“You are evidently in the wrong, Maria, and
@ consciousness of this clouds your perception of
the true way to act. Now, if you will let me
write your reply to Ann’s note, I think all can be
brought around fair again.”

** You are certainly at liberty to do so, ma: but
still, I should like to reserve the power of sending
or withholding it, as it seems best to me. Is this
asking too much ?”

“OQ, no, I would rather not have you send a re-
ply, unless you could see clearly that it was the
right one.”

“ Then write me an answer, ma.”

In the course of the day Mrs. Ellis prepared the



TONGUE BRIDLE. 65

following draft of a reply to Ann’s letter of com-
plaint, and submitted it to Maria.

“To Miss ANN Harris.

“ Dear Ann:—lI received your note complain-
ing that I had, according: to report, said unkind
things of you. I cannot deny, that in a moment
of ill-nature, I was tempted to say that I thought
you somewhat conceited; and to be frank with
you, your manners at times indicate this fault or
peculiarity of character. But it is not half so bad
a fault as the one I indulged in when | alluded to
it. Now, as I have confessed that I have a trait
in my disposition much worse than the one I
alluded to in yours, I must hope that you will for-
give me. Ever yours,

Maria E tis.”

“© What do you think of that?” Mrs. Ellis said,
after she had finished reading the proposed reply.

“It’s not exactly such a letter as I should have
written, but I believe it’s a much better one: so I
will send it.”

«| don’t think it can do any harm, and it tells
the whole truth, does it not?”

“© Yes it does, and in pretty plain terms too,”
Maria said smiling. ;

The letter was accordingly sent, and in the
course of a couple of hours, another was received
from Ann Harris. It read thus:

“ Dear Maria: —Your answer to my note has
been received, and it has completely dispelled my
unkind feelings. Let us forget the unpleasant

6 *



66 TONGUE BRIDLE.

incidents, and be the same to each other that we
have so long been ; neither of us is perfect, there-
fore we must learn to bear and forbear, When
I see Harriet Wilson again, I shall talk to her
about her fondness for retailing ill news.

Yours truly, Ann Harris.”

‘‘ You have helped me to get back a friend that
I always loved, dear mother! Maria said, a good
deal moved, as she finished reading the note. « [
shall try hereafter to be more guarded than [ have
been. I must bridle my tongue as you say, mo-
ther, at least unless I am pretty certain about the
company I am in.”

“The best tongue bridle, Maria,” Mrs. Ellis
replied, “is that which charitable feelings and
charitable thoughts give. If your restraints are
merely external, you will ever and anon be giving
the rein to your unruly member, and then troubles
will be the consequence.”

Maria hardly understood her mother, and did
not reply, and there the conversation ceased, On
the next morning, Cara Lee, another friend, called
in, and after some chat said,

‘‘T hear you have had a little fall out with Ann
Harris—is it true ?”

‘‘ ‘There has been a little difference, but it is all
settled now,” Maria replied. ‘ That tattling busy-
body Harriet Wilson, went and repeated ‘to her
that I said she was conceited. But she has been
well rewarded for her pains, for in a note that [
received from Ann, she expressed herself pretty
plainly about her, and said that she had a fond.



TONGUE BRIDLE. 67

ness for retailing ill news, and that she should
take her to task about it.”

“She is served perfectly right,” the friend re-
marked; then musing, as if suddenly recollecting
herself, she added; ‘ but I must be walking; |
have several calls to make this morning.”

As soon as Cara Lee parted with Maria, she
turned away to see Harriet Wilson, who was one
of her very particular friends.

“So Harriet,” she said, “ Maria and Ann Harris
have made up their difference, and from what f
can learn from Maria, Ann is pretty hard on you.
She is going to take you to task for your fond-
ness for retailing ill news. As for Maria, she
don’t spare you, but calls you a tattling busy-
body.”

Of course Harriet was greatly incensed, and so
soon as her friend was gone, put on her bonnet,
and posted off to see Ann Harris. She found that
young lady in, and commenced on her something
after this wise.

“1 understand, Miss, that you say I am a re-
tailer of ill news, and that you mean to take me to
task about it.”

Ann was taken a good deal by surprise, and felt
pained and confused at the sudden allegation. But
before she could collect herself sufficiently to reply,
Harriet said,

“| should like to know if what I have heard be
true?”

« It is true that J said,” Ann now replied calmly,
“that when I saw you again I would take you to
task for your fondness for retailing ill news.”



68 TONGUE BRIDLE.

“You had no right to make such a charge
against me,” Harriet said, in an angry tone, her
face flushed and her eyes sparkling. “It is a
false

“If you were not angry I might, perhaps, con-
vince you that I had some ground for what I said,”
Ann replied, still in a collected voice. « All of us
have our faults; I have mine, and you have yours,
and each of us is too apt to see those of others and
to be blind to our own. If instead of repeating to
me the remarks made by Maria Ellis, you had
reflected a moment as to what possible good could
grow out of it, and then resolved not to speak of it,
all this trouble would have been avoided.”

“And do you pretend to tell me to my face, that
I am fond of retailing ill news?” Harriet asked,
her anger greatly increased.

“‘T try whenever I speak of another to confine
myself to what I think the truth,” Ann replied, still
in a calm voice, “ and this | never retract,”

‘Give me. patience!” Harriet ejaculated, her
face now growing pale with passion.

‘¢ You are wrong, Harriet,” said Ann, “ thus to
be so much exasperated at so mere a trifle. Re-
flect whether almost every day you do not, in
speaking of your friends, allude to their faults in a
way that you could not bear to be spoken of. This
is too common a practice; and be assured, that
you do not always escape in this general habit of
Censoriousness, You are not faultless, and it is
not in the nature of things that you should be.”

Harriet could not collect her thoughts for a reply,
and Ann, after a pause, went on.





TONGUE BRIDLE. 69

~ Tf, when Maria Ellis, under the influence of a
momentary ill-nature, as she frankly confesses her-.
self to have been, spoke of me as she thought in
calmer moments, you had restrained your pro-
pensity to repeat such things, no harm could have
resulted from her thoughtless, and I might almost
say innocent allegation. But when you came to
me, and told me that she*had called me conceited,
it aroused my feelings and caused me to ask for
an explanation. With the frankness of a generous
spirit she at once confessed her fault, and all would
have been well again, if she had not thought-
lessly repeated what I said in my note to her about
you.”

But Harriet Wilson, though conscious that she
had acted wrong, was so much incensed as well as
mortified that others should think her wrong, that
she neither could nor would confess. her fault, but
braved it off with anger and defiance. As soon as
she had gone away, Ann sat down and penned a
note to Maria Ellis.

« Dear Maria: —It seems that our little diffi-
culty is not yet ended. I have just received a visit
from Harriet Wilson, who has treated me in a very
angry manner about what I said in my last note to
you in reference to her fondness for repeating ill.
news. Lam sorry that you communicated that to
any one, as it has not only prevented my making
an effort to show Harriet her fault, but has called
jown upon me her indignant censure. Yours, &c.

Ann Hagris.”



70 TONGUE BRIDLE.

‘What is the matter now?” asked Mrs. Ellis,
who saw by the sudden change in her daughter’s
countenance that the note she had received was by
no means an agreeable one. «No more doings of
the unruly member, | hope.”

Maria’s face crimsoned deeply as she handed her
mother the note. After Mrs. Ellis had read it, she
said somewhat kindly, for she really felt for Maria
in her unpleasant position :

“You have not put on the right tongue bridle
yet, I see.”

“TI suppose not. But indeed, ma, I try to be
guarded how and to whom, I speak. I never could
have dreamed that Cara Lee would have gone right
off to Harriet Wilson and told her what i said.’

“But the best way is not to speak unkindly of
any one,”

“‘ How could I have helped it, mother, in this
case 1”

“ Well I can’t say, mother, that it was.”

“Your real motive was to make Cara Lee think
sae of her, was it not 1”

“Why ma! do you think I ——.” Maria
paused and looked upon the floor, while her face
crimsoned.

** Probe yourself thoroughly, my child. It is of
the first importance for you to know distinctly your
true character. If you have taken pleasure in the
idea of injuring another because she has wronged



TONGUE BRIDLE. 71

or offended you, you have indulged in an evil af-
fection, and unless that evil affection had lain con-
cealed in your mind, it never could have been
aroused into activity.”

Maria looked thoughtful and concerned, and her
mother continued—

“Surely, my child, it is not by indulging this
evil that it is to be weakened, much less by con-
cealing it, even from yourself, after its indulgence.
It is better to look it in the face, confess that it is
wrong, and then try to shun it.”

“¢] think, mother, I now begin to see what you
mean by a tongue bridle,” Maria said, looking up
seriously into the face of her kind adviser.

“Well, my child?”

‘It is, that we should shun the cause of evil
speaking.”

“That is it, Maria. If we condemn the feeling
that prompts us to speak unkindly of others, and
try to conquer it, we shall be in little danger of in-
dulging the bad habit. But if we only curb the
busy ‘little member,’ at the same time that we
desire to speak censoriously, we will be sure,
sooner or later to be betrayed into a word that had
‘better not have been uttered. Kind feelings for,
and a desire to do good to others, is the best tongue
bridle.”

“| see it plain enough, dear mother! and I am
resolved to try and put the true bridle upon my
tongue.”

And Maria did try to some purpose. The little
difficulty that she was in was soon amicably settled ;



TONGUE BRIDLE.

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THE

TEST OF COURAGE,

“ You will stand alone, Harvey.”

“ T cannot help it.”

“ Every student in college will be against you.

“| should be sorry for that. Still, if that is to
be the consequence, I must meet it.”

‘© Won’t you join us? Say yes or no.”

* No.”

* You are a coward.”

A bright spot became instantly visible on the
cheek of Harvey Willet. But he replied, calmly,.

“Tf it be cowardice to fear to do wrong, then I
am a coward.”

“©O, a saint! a saint!” exclaimed several voices.
at once.

“‘ A precious stickler for right and wrong,” re-
marked another.

“ He shall join us!” one of the most reckless
students in the institution said, in an excited tone,
coming forward and standing close in front of
Harvey.

“Tet us hear his reason,” broke in another.
«‘ Yes—his reason !—his reason !” ran through the
group of students.

« They are easily given,” the young man replied,
calmly. ‘“ When I came to this institution, it was
with a resolution, never to set its rules at defiance.
So soon as: they become insufferable to i I will

7 (



74 TEST OF COURAGE.

apply to my friends to be removed. But so long
as I stay here, or in any institution, I will obey the
prescribed rules. As touching your proposed viola-
tion of one of these rules, I am clearly of opinion
that you are in the wrong, and that the faculty are
right.”

“i A Solomon!” was here heard from one or
two voices.

‘““He’s a paltry coward, that is what he is !””
added others.

“Yes— he’s afraid —”

“OF doing wrong,” was uttered in the same
calm voice,

“I hate a coward!” ejaculated one of the stu-
dents near his side, unmindful of Harvey’s quiet
vindication of himself, and unable, in the fevered
state of his mind, to perceive how far above mere
animal courage was the moral power within him,
that enabled Harvey Willet to withstand the almost
overwhelming opposition of his excited and thought-
less fellow-students.

** Why do you not carry out your scheme of
rebellion, or abandon it?” Harvey asked, turnin
to the young man who had last spoken, “ Most
certainly, in carrying it out, you act without me.”

“QO, let him alone,” now spoke up one. “He
wants to curry favour with the Faculty.”

“Let us duck the puppy !” said another.

“If he wasn’t a mean, cowardly fellow, he
would knock you down for that, John,” hastily
exclaimed one standing near.

“O, of course; but I knew what ‘kind of stuff
he was made of,” was the reply. ‘Come on, let



TEST OF COURAGE. 75

us duck him,” he added, advancing towards the
unyielding student.

Jarvey Willet folded his arms, and fixed his
eyes steadily upon the individual who approached
him. The latter could not brave the calm resolu-
sion of his manner, but paused, saying,

“Come on. Let us duck him.”

But none seemed inclined to join in that kind of
sport, for there was not one who did not, unac-
knowledgedly to himself, feel the moral superiority
of the young man whom they were trying in vain
to bend to their wishes, and, in spite of themselves,
a respect for his firmness and integrity of purpose.

A few silent moments passed after this propo-
sition, and then, with various exclamations of
contempt, the whole party turned away, and left
Harvey Willet in freedom.

Although, under the impulse of angry feelings,
the whole body of students had sneered at Harvey’s
honourable scruples, and well nigh proceeded to
personal injury because he would not join them in
a wrong action, yet such was the power of his
opposition, that a serious riot was prevented. As
calmness and reflection succeeded to their feverish
and irrational state, fanned into a flame by the
obstacle which they had imagined existed in Harvey,
many of the leaders felt a strange reluctance to
carry out the scheme of rebellion they had origin-

ated. And, finally, from the suggestion of doubts
and scruples, the whole project came to be aban-
doned.

Insensibly, a respect for the consistent firmness
of the student against whom they had been so in-



76 TEST OF COURAGE.

censed, came over their minds. A few, however,
still felt disappointed; and not unfrequently alluded
to the rare sport which they had promised them-
selves, and made no scruple of continuing to charge
its failure upon the cowardice or mean spirit of
Harvey Willet,

“T think you apply the wrong term to Harvey,”
said one of the students to another, who frequently
alluded to Willet in terms of contempt. ‘JI do not
believe that he is a coward.”

‘Then why did n’t he join us?”

* For other reasons, I am inclined to think, than
any fear of the consequences.”

“ What reasons, pray 1”

“He gave them. He did not wish to do
wrong.”

‘Pooh !* and the young man tossed his head
contemptuously. Then after a moment—

“T’ll test his courage. I’ll show you all that
he is a coward.”

*¢ How will you do that, John Green ?”

“Why, I'll insult him before all the students.”

“I would not, if I were you.”

“Yes you would; for I mean to do it.”

This determination soon became whispered
throughout the classes, reaching all ears but those
of Harvey Willet, Already had the tide of estima.
tion turned generally in favour of the young man.
The moral tone of his character could not fail of
making an impression, for it Was too apparent to
all who were not wilfully blind, that he acted in all
things from a principle of right. John Green, on
the contrary, was no favourite. He was reckless



TEST OF COURAGE. 77

and unprincipled, and there were but few who did
not fully estimate his true character.

When it became known that he was going to
insult Harvey Willet, and prove him a coward be-
fore all the students, a lively interest was awakened
in every mind; and there were few who did not
hope that Willet would act the man, as they said,
and signally chastise the other for any insolence that
he might offer. Various, however, were the opi-
nions as to the result; and two parties were soon
formed, one holding to the idea that Willet would
not fight, and the other to the belief that he would.
Under such circumstances, the interest of course
ran high.

On the next day, during a recess of the college
duties, all the students were assembled on the
rae and the opportunity was taken to offer

illet the proposed insult. The manner of begin-
ning it, was simply to jostle him so hard as nearly
to throw him over. This was of course observed
by all, and the two parties instantly became excited
to see the result.

«That was done on purpose !”” cried one.

“ Yes, it was; for I saw it !? said another.

« Knock him down!” exclaimed a third.

«¢ He’s too much of a coward for that,” Green
said, confronting him, and looking in his face with
a malicious, angry grin.

« Did you do it on purpose ”” asked Harvey, in
a calm tone of voice, looking the young man
steadily in the face.

“Yes, I did,” was the reply. ‘ And now I dare
you to resent it.”

"*

thus



78 TEST OF COURAGE.

“But why did you do it, John? Have I injured
you in any way, and refused to make repara-
tion ?”

“T did it to see if you were brave enough to
resent it,” Green said, in a sneering tone,

“That seems to me a very poor reason, John—”

“Knock him down, Harvey !” cried out one of
the company, interrupting Willet.

“Knock him down, or you are disgraced for
ever?” said a second.

‘Yes, knock him down!” exclaimed a third.

**He’s afraid!” burst out a fourth, with a pro-
voking, contemptuous laugh.

“‘] dare you to resent it,” Green repeated,
pushing his face almost into that of the insulted
student. |

Some who stood near, saw the hand of Willet
clench suddenly, and his arm tremble, as if the
impulse to strike the other were flowing down into
it. But the struggle in his mind was brief, and he
controlled himself.

“You are a mean-spirited, cowardly puppy !”
Green now said, his face red with evil and uncon.
trollable passions.‘ And I’Il disgrace you before
the whole college.”

And as he said this, he advanced towards Willet

“with his hand extended, and an expression of deter-
mination on his face.

But his purpose, whatever it was, he did not
execute. There was something in the stern, fixed,
resolute expression of Willet’s eye, that he could
not understand, and that the real coward, ia his
own heart, feared to encounter.



TEST OF COURAGE. 79

© Mean-spirited coward!” he contented himself
with sayiag, with his own face again close into
that of Willet’s.

“Let him alone, Green. He is disgraced
enough!” several voices exclaimed. |

“Yes, let him alone,” passed through the circle.
Even those who had perceived the true nature of
the manly struggle in Willet’s mind, were too
much under the power of the opposing sphere into
which they had been drawn, to acknowledge it even
to themselves, much less to speak a word in favour
of one whose very truth of principle had subjected
him to a base and unmanly persecution. But, as
the excitement of their feelings died away, there
were not a few to admire, secretly, and some to
venture on its expression, the dignified firmness
with which Harvey had borne the wanton insults
that were heaped upon him; even while there was
not a voice of encouragement lifted, nor a word
uttered in his favour.

“If Green had dared to lay his hands on him,
he would have found the lamb changed into a
lion,” —one ventured at length to remark,

“Yes,” said another, «| saw by his eye—and
what is more, Green saw it, too—that if any per-
sonal violence were offered to him, he would have
defended himself to the last.”

‘It is certain,” another remarked, ‘that in all
of his deportment, Harvey is consistent. If he
does not join in our tricks to annoy the Faculty,
he does not become, unasked, a mean informer.”

“Yes: but if he knew, and were asked, he
would not conceal the truth,” broke in one, with
something of indignant warmth.



80 TEST OF COURAGE.

“ And would you blame him for that ™

“ Certainly I would: from my very heart I de-
spise an informer. I would die, before I would
ever become evidence against a companion.”

“You and he have learned your morals in a
different school,” was the reply. ‘ However I
might fail to act up to his high sense of right and
wrong, | cannot but admire his fearless consistency °
of conduct. There is not another in the whole
institution who could have stood up as he did, when
all were opposed to him, and the infliction of cor-
poreal punishment threatened to be added to the
disgrace that was thought to be inflicted.”

“That’s all very pretty. But I don’t believe a
word of his moral courage. It was a mean timidity
that prevented his joining us, and sheer cowardice
that kept him from knocking John Green down,
Why, I would have fought him until I had died,
had he insulted me as he did Harvey Willet.”

Thus, there still continued two parties. One
fully in the belief that Harvey was a coward, and
mean-spirited ; and the other, more than persuaded
that just the opposite was the truth.

It was about a month after the exciting event
just recorded, that the inhabitants of the quiet
village where stood the literary institution to which
Harvey was attached, were aroused about mid-
night with the startling cry of “Fire!” Every
student of course repaired to the scene of destruc-
tion. The building that was on fire, was a dwell-
ing-house, and a large portion of it was enveloped
in flames, when the great body of the students
arrived, among nearly the first,-on the spot.



TEST OF COURAGE. 81

Just at that moment, every heart was thrilled by
the appearance of a mother, with her three chil-
dren, emerging from the burning house. The poor
woman looked about her with a bewildered air, her
face deadly pale, and terror sitting upon every
lineament.

‘© Where is Jane?” she suddenly exclaimed, as
the sympathizing crowd without gathered round
and tendered their aid.

« Jane! Jane!” she cried, turning this way and
that. ‘O, mercy! mercy! my child is still in
the house.”

And turning away, she was about darting back
into the burning house, when those around laid
hold of, and prevented her. Heart-rending were
her screams, and terrible the struggles that she
made to break away. But strong arms held her
back. 2
Just at that moment, one of the students glanced
past the crowd, and instantly disappeared in the
dense body of smoke that filled the lower part of
the building. Above, the flames were bursting
from the windows, the roof was just ready to fall
in, and instant destruction seemed to threaten any
one who would dare to enter.

«Who was it? who was it?” ran through the
breathless crowd, and all stood awaiting in anxi-
ous and painful suspense the reappearance of the
adventurous individual. While thus looking on,
with eager and trembling hearts, the wild screams
of a child rose clear and thrilling above the noise
of the hissing, crackling, and roaring conflagra-
tion, One minute more of intense anxiety passed,



82 TEST OF COURAGE.

and then the form of Harvey Willet appeared at
the door, bearing in his arms the missing child.

As he Jaid it in the mother’s arms, who clasped
it frantically to her bosom, the young man burst
into tears.

From that night, no student breathed aught
against the upright, brave, noble-hearted young
man. He was ever after loved and respected.
There was now no misunderstanding his true cha-
racter. }





THE TELL-TALE.

“ Wuo made that noise?” asked a teacher in
one of our public schools, coming into the class-
room.

A profound silence followed his question. ‘There
were thirty boys all looking at him, some three or
four of whom had been guilty of a flagrant breach
of order; yet every face was alike innocent in ex-
pression, and no one replied to his question.

“ Boys,” he asked in a calmer tone, “ who made
that disturbance? Many of you know, and I de-
pend upon the lovers of good order here to make
common cause against the breach of it.”

But still no one responded to the appeal.

«| know,” whispered one to another, “ but he’s
not going to make a tell-tale of me.”

“And so do I,” replied his companion, “ but
he’ll not get it out of me, I can tell him.”

And thus the low whispers ran through the room.
For more than a minute the teacher stood before
them awaiting some reply, and then retired to
attend to what he had been doing in the adjoining
room. But no sooner was his back turned than
the same noise that had disturbed him was renew- «
ed, even louder than before.

He of course immediately returned, and again

stood before them.
(83)



84 TELL-TALE.

“ Let the boys who have violated the good order
of the school hold up their hands,” he said.

No hand was lifted.

“ Now let all who are innocent hold up their
hands.”

Every hand was promptly raised.

For a few moments the teacher looked his schol-
ars in the face, his own countenance expressing
pain and mortification. At length he said—

“ From a boy I have ever looked upon falsehood
as the most debasing crime, indicating a disposition
to commit any of the whole catalogue of crimes,
if the individual had the courage to do so. I am,
therefore, deeply pained to find that I have scholars
in my class who are not above this meanest of all
vices. It was bad enough to break the rules of the
school, but a thousand times worse to tell a false-
hood about it—a falsehood too, that is reflected
upon every innocent, high-minded boy in the room.
I see here the sons of men whose standing in the
community for virtue and usefulness is known and
acknowledged by all. ‘These boys, I am sorry to
say, are all involved in the guilt of this violation
of order, and what is worse, in the crime of a vir-
tual denial of it; for how can I discriminate when
all act alike? When I ask the guilty to hold up
their hands, no hand is lifted ; but when I call upon
the innocent to attest their innocence, all declare
themselves to be innocent. I will now try you
once more. Let the guilty hold up their hands.”

But no hand was lifted.

‘‘ Now let the innocent lift their hands.”

Every hand was again raised.



TELL-TALE. 85

“ [ would not be the boy who has thus lifted his
hand before the school in attestation of a false-
hood, for all the wealth this world could bestow,”
the teacher said as he looked at his class for a mo-
ment or two and then turned away and again left
the room. Although he remained out for full ten
minutes, he was not again disturbed.

‘¢ You were one, James Harker,” said a boy in
a low tone, looking with a half indignant expres-
soe of countenance at the boy who sat next to

im.

<¢ | don’t care if I was. He couldn’t find it out,”
was the prompt reply.

« But | don’t think it right that others should be
blamed for what you have done.”

“You are not going to turn tell-tale, are you?”
Harker said with a sneer.

«¢ No, not a mere tell-tale ; but still I am not cer-
tain that [ shall not let our teacher know that you
were one of the offenders, unless you have the true
spirit to do so yourself.”

O, tell-tale! tell-tale! tell-tale! Tom Jones is
going to turn tell-tale ! James Harker said, so loud
as to be heard all around, pointing at the same time
at Jones, while his face was expressive of the most
sovereign contempt. |

“ Are you going to tell on me too?” asked a boy
sitting near, with a threatening look.

«T did not see you making a noise.”

« You ’d better not, I can tell you.”

«¢] did not see you, so you need not fear,” was
Thomas Jones’s reply: “ but I can tell you what
I think. If you did make the noise, and then so

8



86 TELL-TALE.

publicly denied it as you did, I think that every
honest-minded boy here should feel it his duty to
expose you.” |

“Let any one dare to do it,” was the reply to
this.

After school, several of the boys got around
Thomas Jones, and attempted to convince him that
to turn informer would be the most despicable thing
in the world.

“T don’t think it half so bad as to be a violator
of the rules of ahe school, and a liar into the bar-
gain,” was his quick rejoinder.

“There a’nt a meaner creature in the world
than a tell-tale,” said James Harker, with his ex-
pressive sneer, |

* Which is worse, James—he who tells what is
true of another, or he who falsely accuses him ?”?

“I will leave you to draw all ‘such nice distinc-
tions,” Harker replied, tossing his head contemptu-
ously.

“It is not hard for me to draw them, James,
nor, I presume, for any boy here. But it is use-
less for us to talk about this matter. I will tell
you what I will do, and if | Say so, you may be
sure that I will. If you will go up to-morrow.
and tell our teacher that you did the wrong he
complained of, I will keep silent — but if you will
not, my mind is made up to do it. I cannot, and
I will not, rest under the imputation of having told
a falsehood when I am innocent; nor do I think
that I am right in suffering the whole class to rest
under a false accusation, while it is in my power
to remove it.”



TELL-TALE. 87
&] always thought you were a mean, low crea-
ture,” Harker replied—‘* and now I know it.”
~ «He'll prove himself the meanest boy in the
school, if he does it,” said another of the wrong-
doers. |
Fle ’d better not tell on me,” broke in a third.
« Look here, Thomas, come with me,” another
lad said, taking Thomas Jones by the arm and
drawing him aside, when the two walked off to-
ether.
%] wouldn’t say anything about it if I were
ou,” continued the lad — “ you will only get the
‘1.will of those boys, and perhaps of the whole
class. You know how much an informer is de-
spised.” |
“There is a great difference, John,” was the
reply, “as my father has often told me, between a
mere informer or tell-tale, as it is called in school,
and one who makes known the wrong actions of
another for the good of the whole. Now, if, for
the mere delight of seeing others punished, I were
to be constantly running to the teacher with com-
plaints against my fellow-students, then I would be
that justly despised individual, a tell-tale. But!
have no such motives in view. James Harker has
not only violated the rules of the class, thus throw-
ing the class into disorder, and hindering its pro-
gress, but has, by his. bad conduct, and wicked
denial of it, involved the whole class, you and I
among the rest, in the imputation of being viola-
tors of good order, and utterers of falsehood into
the bargain. Now, for one, I have been taught to
love truth from my earliest recollection, and I



88 TELL-TALE.

cannot, and will not rest under a charge of false-
hood.”

“Then why not go to the teacher and declare
your innocence 1”

« What good would that do? Has not every boy
in the class made such a declaration, the innocent
with the guilty? I could not ask the teacher to be-
lieve me.” .

“© Well, indeed, I would not do it, Thomas,”
urged his friend.

«‘ You have presented no good reason yet, John,
why I should not do as I have determined.”

“J have said that you would gain the ill-will of
the whole class.”

« That is not a reason sufficient to induce me to
refrain from doing a right action.”

Thus the two boys conversed as they walked
along, and at length parted from each other. As
soon as Thomas Jones entered his own house, he
sought out lis father, to whom he always went in
difficulties, and by whose judgment he was always
guided. To him he submitted his case, and asked
to be advised.

“You have made up your mind, you say,” the
father remarked, after he had heard all his boy had
to relate, ‘to inform your teacher, to-morrow, that
James Harker was one of the offenders ?”

“That is, if you approve of my doing so.”

“From the statement that you have given,
Thomas, I do certainly approve of it. But you
will no doubt be censured, and have your motives
misinterpreted by many of your fellow-students,”

“T know that, father. But you have often told



TELL-TALE. 89

me, that in every important action I should be go-
verned by right motives, and not by the opinions
of others.”

« And you are conscious of having right motives
in what you now propose to do?”

“] am.”

“You do not feel glad at the idea of having
James Harker censured for his conduct 1”

« Indeed I do not. It is that idea that causes me
to hesitate more than anything else.”

“© What then is your motive ?”

“One motive is, to relieve myself from the
charge of disorderly conduct, and from an imputa-
tion of falsehood—and another motive is, to relieve
from similar censure, all in the class who are inno-
cent. It seems to me, in a case like this, that it is
every boy’s duty to point out the guilty who thus
take away from the good character of the whole.
Shall what is good be injured under the false idea
that it is mean to expose what is evil ?”

“You certainly reason correctly, my boy,” Mr.
Jones replied, ‘and I shall fully approve the act
you contemplate. Do not be deterred from doing
it, under the idea that you will be branded as an
‘nformer. ‘There are many cases where it is right
to become an informer, and wrong to withhold in- .
formation; and this, I am fully persuaded, is an
instance where the former rule is clearly applica-
ble. But, in making your communication, as it is
one in which your character and standing with the
school is involved, do so in writing, uoder your
own name, with reasons. It is the duty of every
one, after resolving to act right in a matter where

8



90 TELL-TALE.

he may be misjudged, to give his reasons, that he
may not be injured by false’*judgment.”

On the next morning, Thomas Jones waited
until near the close of the school, to see if James
Harker would be honest and magnanimous enough
to confess his fault; but as he did not do so, he
went up, with a firm step, to the teacher’s stand,
handed him a note, and then retired to his seat.
The teacher read the note, and, after reflecting for
a few minutes, arose and called the school to order.

‘“‘T hold a note in my hand,” he said, after
silence and attention were obtained, ‘the reading
of which has afforded me no ordinary gratification.
It indicates a tone of feeling and principle highly
honourable to the writer. As requested by him, I
will now read it to the class. |

i iim . Sir:—Yesterday there was a vio-
lation of order in the school, the perpetrators of
which you endeavoured to find out, but in vain.
In your manner of ascertaining the guilty, the
innocent became involved in the imputation of dis-
order, and what is a thousand. times worse, of
falsehood. I saw one boy in the act of making
the noise you complained of, and have tried, in
vain, to convince him that he ought to confess his
fault, and thus relieve his fellow-students from the
charge under which they now rest. But he will
not do so, and calls me a ‘tell-tale,’ and other
hard names, because I tell him that if he will not
do so, I shall be compelled to become an informer.
Now, in doing so, I wish it to be clearly under-
stood, that I am not prompted by a desire to see





TELL-TALE. 91

him punished, but am only impelled, from a sense
of duty to myself and the whole class, to do this
act. ‘The boy’s name is James Harker. Please
read this to the class.

Tuomas JonzEs.”

« James Harker will come forward,” the teacher
said, as he laid aside the note.

The boy he called came forward with a guilty,
downcast face. *

«Did you make the noise I complained of yes-
terday ?”
& Yes, Sir.”

“ Why did you do it?”

« Bill’ Grimes, and Henry Peters, and ‘Tom
Price, were as bad as I was. They made a noise

9

«“ William Grimes, Henry Peters, and Thomas
Price, will all come forward.”

The three boys named came forward, and when

questioned, did not deny the charge.
' «& You now see,” remarked the teacher, ‘“ the
four boys who involved in disgrace the whole
class. You also see the difference between a high-
minded boy, impelled by a sense of duty to become
an informer, and what is meant by a mere tell-tale.
Thomas Jones is the one, James Harker the other.
So soon as the guilt of the latter is discovered he
immediately informs on all who are guilty in the
hope of seeing them likewise punished.

‘And now,” continued the teacher, ‘‘ let every
boy who blames Thomas Jones for what he has
done, hold up his hand.”

Not a hand was raised.



92 TELL-TALE.

‘* Now let all who approve his conduct hold up
their hands.”

Every hand was lifted, and every countenance
expressed gratification,

The class was then dismissed, and the offenders
left with the teacher, to be dealt with as he might
see to be most for their good and the welfare of the
class,

In this little story, the principal incidents of
which are true, I have endeavoured to give my
young readers some idea of the difference between
acting from a mere selfish impulse, and from a
clear conviction of right. It is the motive from
which a thing is done, that determines the quality
or character of an action. Thus, an action may
be good or bad, so far as the individual is concern-
ed, according to the motive which influences him.
Thomas Jones did right in informing upon James
Harker, because his end was a good one — but
James Harker was acted upon by a wrong motive,
the desire to see his companions in evil punished
with himself, when he became an informer, and
therefore his act, as far as he was concerned, was
an evil one. Learn then, my young friends, to
discriminate between motives, and to be well as-
sured of their character before you act from them.
And also resolve, when you are clearly convinced
that it is right for you to do a thing, and that it is
your duty to do it, that you will do that thing, re-
gardless of what may be thought or said of you.
Then, when you grow up to be men, will you be
truly useful in society ; for to men of like charac-
ter is society indebted for all the great moral refor-
mations that have ever taken place in the world,



THE ENDS OF LIFE.

‘1 am going to leave school at the expiration of
this term,” remarked Edward Mayo, a youth be-
tween seventeen and eighteen, to his friend and
companion, Charles Carpenter, as the two were
wending their way homeward, after having finished
their studies for the day.

“And I expect to do the same very soon,”
Charles said, with evident pleasure at the idea.

« What business or profession do you intend
learning?” asked Edward.

«} have determined to go into a store. I want
to be a merchant. But what have you chosen,
Edward? Not one of the learned professions, I
hope? But I suppose you have. You will be a
lawyer, I have not the least doubt.”

“Yes, Charles, I have determined to go into Mr.
Barker’s office, and read law.”

“ Well, I’m sorry to hear it, Edward.”

«© Why are you sorry, Charles ?”

“Because you’ve got a hard, dull way before
you, and your final success is uncertain. Few,
Edward, I have heard my old uncle say, can gain
eminence in legal pursuits; and without distinction,
it is but a poor business. The field for merchan-
dizing is broader, and promises ta industry and
carefulness more certain returns.” aii

a



94 ENDS OF LIFE.

“That may be true, Charles; and merchan-
dizing is as honourable and useful a calling as any
other; but I have been taught by my father to
believe that our success and usefulness in any
business will depend very much upon the motives
with which we enter into it, and our happiness in
that business much more. If we have only ‘a
regard to ourselves — if the only motive we have
for choosing a profession be the selfish one of
getting wealth or honour—then, we may indeed be
successful, but cannot be happy in our success.
But if, in choosing among those to which our in-
clinations lead us, we choose that in which we
think we can, at the same time that we benefit
ourselves, render most important services to others,
then we are in the road to honourable success,
united to calm contentment.”

“Then I would advise you to be a minister,”
Charles said, half ironically —*« you can certainly
do more good as a minister than as a.lawyer.”

““T do not think so,” Edward replied, " “There
are callings many and various that are all useful,
as my father has frequently impressed upon my
mind, while talking to me about choosing a profes-
sion ; and there are as great varieties of capacities
for filling these. The man whose peculiarity of
mind fits him to be a successful lawyer, would not,
in all probability, make a good minister; nor
would the individual who has a preference for
medical ‘science make a good merchant; and so
through all the varied callings in life. Each of
them is useful and honourable, as I have before
said, if they are made useful and honourable.”



ENDS OF LIFE. 95

‘¢ Well, maybe you are right,” Charles said,
“ but Iam no philosopher, and cannot pretend to
look so deeply into matters and things. My old
uncle, whose opinions I am bound to respect, be-
cause he is kind to me, and has been quite success
ful in the world, says that he would rather see me
a sailor or a soldier than a doctor, lawyer, or
preacher, He don’t seem to have much opinion,
you see, of the learned professions; and I am
pretty much like him in that respect. But he
thinks I am the very one for trade, in which, he
says, | will be sure to be successful, if I am only
prudent at first: He prophesies that. L will be rich ;
and all, I can say, is, that I hope he is a true
prophet.” is : |

‘¢ Father says to me,”.dward remarked to this,
‘‘ that it would be wrong in me to set riches before
me as an end. That if I do so, I will look to
riches as the one thing in life desirable—that I will
be restless until I have gained my end, and then
discover that wealth has no power to make me
happy. But, that if I will endeavour to give the
idea of riches its true subordinate place, and make
usefulness to others, as far as I can, the end which
I have in view, then I will be happy as well as
successful, just so far as I can elevate usefulness
as an end above riches.”

“You have a strange way of talking, some
times,” Charles said, “ but I don’t pretend to see
things with your eyes, and I am sure I don’t wish
to. I am going to learn my. business, with the
same motives that others do, that I may get the
ability te make money. Money, you know, 1s



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12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:47 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:48 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00126.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00126.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00130.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00130.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00131.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00131.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00132.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00132.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00133.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00133.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00134.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00134.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00135.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00135.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00136.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00136.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00137.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:49 PM 00137.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00138.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00138.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00139.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00139.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00140.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00140.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00141.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00141.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00142.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00142.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00143.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00143.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00144.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00144.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00145.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM 00145.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM back4.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM back4.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM spine.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM spine.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:50 PM












xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080922_AAAAEC' PACKAGE 'UF00002766_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-09-22T18:03:31-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:27:29-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298832; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-16T01:52:42-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '871983' DFID 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRU' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 91d649ac1d25d911a8e660927f11792a
'SHA-1' 123bf783e7a3d63ccbc9cea381483d61bb3858ce
EVENT '2011-11-16T14:56:33-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'78562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
1a77ff082d0cf407bef1b3cd67bd8d22
8e99ae10ea65645f1f51328049f8f38df01bc5b0
'2011-11-16T14:57:22-05:00'
describe
'2850' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00001.pro'
e1bd3d3df61160aece81ea445aab6e94
7358584093c81ee712b90ddc04637c7080326178
'2011-11-16T14:58:27-05:00'
describe
'25730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
c25f6a5f4078b57253f52531841f08d4
d239d2893f14aa650195e6723d4e7ea20f2ea191
'2011-11-16T14:58:37-05:00'
describe
'6982355' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00001.tif'
99ffaee382ac2f90f8a1773c57878055
dd3b22b79e943b382b0a05fad181829cfc43cb0f
'2011-11-16T14:55:22-05:00'
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00001.txt'
82495ebc66891a32ca412284fa9c418f
130147158e2786857eec74379e9f6f71939b16da
'2011-11-16T15:00:37-05:00'
describe
'8185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
adf6bcb578c4ead4c24f8147f11fc08f
5e1ce89fae95711888f59468446073b5e262f636
'2011-11-16T15:00:00-05:00'
describe
'943906' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
6312eeabe92ae222211d6e1eb9f5d5ab
f84da7e45c9ac65d7bcc051ef8714381651b1cb8
'2011-11-16T14:55:40-05:00'
describe
'49740' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
66e583c92c541bbf1d56a36a03058a4e
f4370469c599acfe1f3eba0af7b28db2648a62a7
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00002.pro'
6e82382ecdcb9099fac25874c33b4b73
eedcfda0bd7d969e48183e1ceba96ccb7982d4ae
'2011-11-16T15:00:06-05:00'
describe
'14517' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d106992b534aef4a8689b6df60de0971
ae11e7e4cbdf48d52168a308288378e96697cbb2
'2011-11-16T14:57:35-05:00'
describe
'7560327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
1a27da6afdd205e28c6df06d5e419adc
f2025ac72e33693ced3e46730d9073f8ad7a73c1
'2011-11-16T14:57:39-05:00'
describe
'75' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00002.txt'
22c8b627111b2eb2b49a385d57bc6aa5
1301d05a2259046a4772306e59517d02e9c9543b
'2011-11-16T14:56:16-05:00'
describe
'4191' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
6f70d51c5effe07f7f10f9d510a90ee6
0229818cec635afc2d8973a0cb2907b97781e7d4
'2011-11-16T15:00:58-05:00'
describe
'956413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
94c194e450d54b1050c1763965dffa69
a3a0b932848209d7816373dae3f3559d501ed793
'2011-11-16T14:58:17-05:00'
describe
'51272' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
62bfbcbe8e622056671f67ed1c7c1c53
2efb05d2d38ced8e3d9ac9dea116d77be55e3a1a
'2011-11-16T14:56:02-05:00'
describe
'2244' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
367349586471aab5747590b3a2d01bb4
f320e42585bd0d8ae77efdeea632cb9bfc907196
'2011-11-16T14:55:27-05:00'
describe
'14997' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
8b9438a19c1d3b32ace423bb8b7e6c06
71eae349b2f7794b86ea3b8bcbbbc4bd58f7b1de
'2011-11-16T14:58:08-05:00'
describe
'7661437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00003.tif'
d3355ac0f70c84438029d5f5f2509152
2bf395ec9ee5fefa3b543123a73637a213d7f3e6
'2011-11-16T14:57:23-05:00'
describe
'248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00003.txt'
d0f55f50a6b7fa8aae58ba877cee492f
687d401c80e5261a1cc8273e27d3177f9769688d
'2011-11-16T14:56:11-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'4602' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
a7563dc0dc61f5d34a85f182be82d866
8f686cb5bcf63466608dd701d4aafccee73d4cf6
'2011-11-16T15:00:36-05:00'
describe
'865912' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
a8bc1b313727330de79e61ff3d2a7de0
fdd4ab3e369eb84cf1fbe3f79f24b0bb00366022
'2011-11-16T14:56:56-05:00'
describe
'90627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
e49dcede209e93ae43e8de3039a95d48
263487817726a7f67f6d03bda52d6b6728b7696c
'2011-11-16T15:00:03-05:00'
describe
'314' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00004.pro'
41be521cda798f951b25cd1688cb6ce4
d4673b4081d86974b62b991916c5c2f2028cbc7b
'2011-11-16T14:58:32-05:00'
describe
'26472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
17ea3f2bf155bc55a62d1abb2bc1b56e
d2b30843d3a3118b82daad59fdfbd3b1b3f24c61
'2011-11-16T14:56:04-05:00'
describe
'6934243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPST' 'sip-files00004.tif'
1b790b0ec5d9ac9b0df316b1f16127eb
f6e55bc480651fa6eeca011ad797d50088ac8830
'2011-11-16T14:59:24-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c5a25cf9bdb769a5ae564c1529a26660
1098f1c3c241026b68323aa7965083a0ce272541
'2011-11-16T14:56:55-05:00'
describe
'8192' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
87fcfb08160b60587cd21e05620401fe
8c17d106040f0c670332be50e3089f11ad70c1be
'2011-11-16T14:57:58-05:00'
describe
'826686' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
e94ca9d8d0b247d75319e15e5b853ebb
7879b440c7626fd8fbbce3ff9605c0f976d0eb72
'2011-11-16T14:57:08-05:00'
describe
'39787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
b2c21c2a23bed945c6f1af65597d4a4f
f11db6009ea6b3a84f604550333628d1048b9ff2
'2011-11-16T14:59:08-05:00'
describe
'3812' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00005.pro'
1271696b62d5c11e83ca7cd55ab7de35
0dd76501841d16169ef2e644d4fea9c74553e20b
'2011-11-16T14:57:49-05:00'
describe
'14223' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
ef53b83d6086cba11e6a2c4a52811beb
5e51e675504017571cbca7f7283bae1a2c6cbd92
'2011-11-16T14:58:05-05:00'
describe
'6911639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00005.tif'
c402fb8c858f8d5f02aa15bcbcc5b6a9
8af87784472d40e8e3610a62e4faf59165e16d0d
'2011-11-16T14:56:22-05:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00005.txt'
5b23fa1e8b5c5548ce7cd4fa039ddfc8
e0e9848e4a5cc8caf5225d4da0e0165a039f1dbc
'2011-11-16T14:59:36-05:00'
describe
'5453' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
4a5d6af4d9f6d658d98db64a6f85c9a5
967f1e9c7d6dcd062c60d07a61236eea85ed2d51
describe
'570585' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7a201b03781be99c287e16e732683a28
3f93c5a9034fff122b3eb829b4617b2596a4b3a7
'2011-11-16T14:59:03-05:00'
describe
'26432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
d11380a203f26cb04900318a046f098c
54c95967679ee475f28f4eb10cc571c16d0ac0a9
'2011-11-16T15:00:09-05:00'
describe
'5222' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
9f34b63eded4b80eb6f5f50f2fd5bb26
d6e536f9ecf91761d1032645e816953f4d2f841b
'2011-11-16T14:57:17-05:00'
describe
'9228' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
d6dc6bcfff33651563d26e4cdc1982dc
fa0b51f4c88c367247bee17608d4dca24506a251
'2011-11-16T14:57:10-05:00'
describe
'6360589' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00006.tif'
1dc646ba292a206484775eb0f9d5479a
f2929aee483375f818e1e5815f1009984de3dec8
describe
'302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e144d16f87e34fe6d4dd889cdd92e45e
871a61453998c2fa0864b4e7ae4233a6d928583a
'2011-11-16T14:55:37-05:00'
describe
'3429' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
bb7b01c464191060c05f8689cb529c0f
aaf1dfe82349fec610e0643b13f6cd77766b4669
'2011-11-16T14:58:39-05:00'
describe
'748885' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
f108989ac595824a753049452104e73a
50dabf26d0da37115d88c5438b6a5ec74a8eebc7
'2011-11-16T14:58:34-05:00'
describe
'55131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
1fa7be5413bbdc2196bd4ff701b64f19
3737fed55083cafe9e5c3f3f4c2f44bbc9e8c3d9
'2011-11-16T14:56:53-05:00'
describe
'20414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00007.pro'
da6f087025d63a6e602c7948404287f7
169edbaec3b604aa4cf9cb9e46cda57518e90b8d
'2011-11-16T14:57:00-05:00'
describe
'19711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
de6a38d9280586b7289f13fff769f2c4
939e720cec296f6155dace4853253dd18ed2cde3
'2011-11-16T14:59:18-05:00'
describe
'6332117' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00007.tif'
9891dda19b4791f36f85fd3fe374dc80
5bc0beb3a5d0b01272fccd973f327e001dfb19c2
'2011-11-16T14:57:06-05:00'
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00007.txt'
494364a6814361a9052829b5baa9f988
bf927d41b13b3826f8fe21e8f2a75fef257caea6
'2011-11-16T14:56:03-05:00'
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
23938c8b7a5548d058097b6b09772c13
52f88bc0f23ee648704817182fbfcff11cf5c32a
'2011-11-16T14:58:13-05:00'
describe
'394854' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a880124b1dff18157a3ed785c69d9204
e0057f92e3dbbb54df77f2995ef5441f3afee33f
describe
'12927' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
90ee56497acf4556dfb83842f8bfda96
4aabc3c8e45598b6cff46853ed1fa53a7f4892ff
'2011-11-16T14:55:43-05:00'
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8ec75175a38e43ab2de607cbaa4c3e72
cd9c37d234e36ae16f09878e5ea050904cb7614c
'2011-11-16T14:56:51-05:00'
describe
'4237' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
77c10b7f2e83e8c39fc32c5d331532d1
995e190afd62387458c7daa7cb935935511a79da
'2011-11-16T15:00:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00008.tif'
b5ed6bcc24d230c8ab5f68452a51a7d4
f00d9a4872c2b4cada1ea306538273a6f7889ef9
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00008.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
'2011-11-16T15:00:30-05:00'
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
e49d8f145a6f706a15fe9c06a7e7a309
1498d085083374f402c51cbec5ac6e62ba6ad82d
'2011-11-16T14:56:09-05:00'
describe
'790724' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
1db4ec304c94b85e3b5729fd998f74ad
2aac17a1d47669260e674ec27371dc493ab6e75a
'2011-11-16T14:59:40-05:00'
describe
'76091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e2200a2320ad4fd2452ce72a7babc8fa
f51242b21f6d7ceaabad056b385278a385ce04e8
'2011-11-16T14:55:42-05:00'
describe
'19114' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
798efc6f00681a9141f9b008ab649ff8
7fbc282e0e56c5305b294baa73f68a7074c39b03
'2011-11-16T14:59:32-05:00'
describe
'29560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
cff6b7f05a77cdca7e72e62ba99bdd7d
42537d96c48833fe187ac364ddc6ef0155f70d1b
'2011-11-16T14:55:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00009.tif'
d15c0b7c0b647a26a364773ab7f87674
f1594cdb97fb5d450bf6577fed7969feefa865ca
'2011-11-16T14:58:30-05:00'
describe
'819' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00009.txt'
86611b1e935893b4eff1b1adeff346c2
05b16881f96e0d092ed34a187fdef19b6b968d61
'2011-11-16T14:58:02-05:00'
describe
'9916' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
d955291eb2d207e9057f1fc9ca1c488d
eb75b44f99adbff3855dbbe65dc314c2a7bbe6b8
'2011-11-16T14:55:57-05:00'
describe
'794157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
3c52dc4c864ffb2d2fba38bb4c386a22
ff8d07f4aae49aca6ab5e56e4731b54242bd3997
describe
'62863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
cb02a2ee882b50f60921cf5d80a351e7
7217abb909f7bb4598e4f9087583f6aaffc7dbc0
'2011-11-16T14:58:51-05:00'
describe
'14777' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
36ba77447a14d0d127a7958053de7461
3c69d88841aad4db8e2f66d7183e24cf945b6523
'2011-11-16T14:59:34-05:00'
describe
'23614' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2c9f0987c47311ff8fddf932bf3929f5
2de900b016381268fe20ce6a955c1eafbc8ad76b
'2011-11-16T14:57:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
7250a483c5cf98bf746bbc8485b8fb39
1dac5e7dd16c17d007251ef248753c8022f47af5
'2011-11-16T14:59:38-05:00'
describe
'599' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00010.txt'
a4544f4ec8c8cbc77977dc94470126cf
966b2a620abaca0ef7fcd5ed6ca32a2875cfdb99
'2011-11-16T14:58:54-05:00'
describe
'7946' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
fa368d9ed2e7d5d5343cf2f12e04b020
6b3d27dd87ec06fc410282b0e1ef71f3e749dc25
describe
'790714' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
1234dbbec42f19886ea630365f2f80be
908babcf94e9db2eede5ddd56804eef5a4faae86
'2011-11-16T15:00:02-05:00'
describe
'91251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
3e475408c7b8a7a27b6ced07517e574b
9cf2a2ed375718fab1abe73235a27f35d8d1fb51
describe
'31995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
63ed330433c322ed3a9a197353550cc0
9df69e6458add65f1c9e040e30f7577212ef14cd
'2011-11-16T14:58:07-05:00'
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a8fe7a5cb1e59876f928d51678faaac0
b99d7e48ac2056a79e5cc5bc36f90b9475088534
'2011-11-16T15:00:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
daf8a1e52cdc3cdde7c296ed0a4ae4fd
7702a5939f301dbf3ca1e4af8cf0cecd9bcd145e
'2011-11-16T14:59:16-05:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00011.txt'
a4388fc52e18c600350e73f1fa5df845
421d8b19b555220c3c30b3f2e4776911bfd5ecc5
'2011-11-16T14:57:32-05:00'
describe
'10251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d855fdde56796489db9a340d02525c75
b023234cb79bb59d54fc742249444d3fb2ed5b8b
describe
'794297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
8a900b760374267eb35232540e9a6c31
fbc5580ed70bbcec6d35e7c5304fbb1d1f0aac6d
'2011-11-16T15:00:41-05:00'
describe
'97409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e874db93a74ca65d53db19a781a82f73
41bce44ea80ed491ad4e98d780d3d94bbce0c06e
'2011-11-16T14:57:36-05:00'
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
05a071fd6e88a4082a50bed73a410d5b
d985d836a624ee1a1303f799577d87a582ecea78
'2011-11-16T15:00:27-05:00'
describe
'35435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
87af41997273b77e14f0c046cff424ea
69f520a53e00764965efad87c75316c0b57d07ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00012.tif'
974c93b1e5c0efbac28f913d347007e1
ea34720823cd40a2b552f29053a07def290ae9d2
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00012.txt'
702057a07c01294085f4180960dd2bb6
9cd2eb5098abd16ac9a13c1f02727775badfe93a
'2011-11-16T14:56:29-05:00'
describe
'11182' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
02f21cf30f108776e91382764ecb1668
3a01bfc6077ca6e769150ee3c83a1fb53157dd77
'2011-11-16T14:57:52-05:00'
describe
'790739' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e78cb08c10771a8d5365a2322c361aa8
63cf62ff743044e0a542fe3ba430a3983f11624c
'2011-11-16T14:57:16-05:00'
describe
'97330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
055e1f689d91d83b4df036f2805236cb
3b9651d603a3a50d4a584ee9b56cd3a834487198
describe
'33830' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0da5a5e8e000c1732485bbacf21d4735
95d787418597fa50c54cd4451214c43dbaa873c6
'2011-11-16T15:00:34-05:00'
describe
'35862' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
47b51411e6deac85c2ce13441b8a5132
df38af9e29e60bbcd5b5b095bd9584d0457464f4
'2011-11-16T15:00:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a7069531e66963d03a76922c17e5fa73
65483fa35413802c5a47bb05c41490872e534604
'2011-11-16T14:59:42-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a960619860f4aa575d66765a43f5b75c
d43e1c0e1e3a22c192917c74c0488f74f12fc0e1
'2011-11-16T14:56:58-05:00'
describe
'11459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
5e3b564dccd526d18eebc1db4cce1b89
db48d98051c591161f2f5ac532946f40dbd8c38a
describe
'794260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ef2ae211c7caddb31d8d10c32c936882
e44f65f4a89f63d49c8ba1ce1ff3f99668ab83b7
'2011-11-16T14:58:47-05:00'
describe
'91151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
ed6e06ffead21d08f3e7f43ac30d42ee
692ee564e0662f9a4fde05a7a94ae7cde699bf6b
'2011-11-16T14:56:26-05:00'
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
3444ad1f05da06d60d8070c4c95288dd
bc983a5a56249dff7722ff60a566011842d43e19
'2011-11-16T15:00:22-05:00'
describe
'32687' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
0b9776fa69d95c7115536d99100789ed
b8914159c9dd077301e2357e05a687687d10cb08
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00014.tif'
b3185bbb83afb8f1d820a68f56c56fdc
64564482d8f170ba56e953efcbc9ec18365544b7
'2011-11-16T14:56:34-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00014.txt'
7186b7416860c2fcd43d004557289f0c
1d17a14f0bb470d75e01b3d4b5cc530d196dc458
'2011-11-16T14:59:57-05:00'
describe
'10299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
493bcbef06176a9dad3f1bc78e24e527
2abf8e0a1c8e1e2e77d26bfd5d4f191b2eb651e5
'2011-11-16T14:58:45-05:00'
describe
'790670' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
6b2175402914bb3b4aeb4e7c0c298f5b
83c9cb7ae85887f0bc1e5c8e02ffe87690ccf917
'2011-11-16T14:57:41-05:00'
describe
'100850' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f73943533bda44353a43583e7f8acb30
231ed427a91cdcd39f62a815f8c1586656c60b61
describe
'36369' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00015.pro'
95d851f93e88485465087a21cca1ac14
53228101d6d81eceb53249d63c87530dda7689fb
describe
'36167' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
4f1cf41b5455b47ad921552a642ef920
ad41c54854c1d5f79e992c386ee7d543dca3776d
'2011-11-16T14:57:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
b6396767a88c8234488c143c61e16d6c
2be2078f9634ce22aa1978c9ff47f8aa425e5863
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00015.txt'
cd71d514baf401c4aea558fff12296cf
d63bb2d26d6631c82045e6c814bc3dce6399f738
'2011-11-16T14:57:48-05:00'
describe
'11544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
7d0df67c2638efd8a9db8e4a893973dc
9a8cefc91a26067056eb16460dfa6d17f70538a5
'2011-11-16T14:58:15-05:00'
describe
'790717' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
bb076c0361d03c5e1218d188926efdf4
7743794625bf45384896750f67c4eacea76e3b35
'2011-11-16T14:55:31-05:00'
describe
'88499' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
3dc4727aad1f1c6eaf83afc7b639eff1
615e73101c17ca1910a69cd77e8dcf60f5d3776e
'2011-11-16T15:00:05-05:00'
describe
'31659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8ae32ac311d5c2eb2fccafac88386bfc
f0d5c3efb3fc536f340f742d443c28479aaafa07
'2011-11-16T14:58:22-05:00'
describe
'32350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
89186ba3b3ade2263e610db79fbd4329
adefa4c573678e3fbc8f9521f6e3f9d82d22d352
'2011-11-16T14:57:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
86812ada7eb401ac4ddabd68e5ded6a0
17b05fa317884387c60671a57faa5b7119516077
'2011-11-16T14:58:16-05:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00016.txt'
3be6d1a516a88d2b4ddc8cce87ab3386
e47f67fd430277e45e00abbd9ab97a266deff87e
'2011-11-16T14:57:04-05:00'
describe
'10250' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
ac8c157f34082abb99388976d572b7d0
3ad5db3360913efa0d99e61714d79349c4937045
'2011-11-16T14:55:12-05:00'
describe
'777597' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cc978b716676a7c6a85ca684d6628b1a
d36b22e00a6fc2a3a278eb67799f80dce10abe32
'2011-11-16T14:56:32-05:00'
describe
'101280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
d0ade54f0ec9fdd14faf0a81791cecd7
d8226f3a4b34cf64fbb7489fa635f67929f0db32
'2011-11-16T15:00:17-05:00'
describe
'36365' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c6f99da97b88645fe9ad122c4a52f9b2
38dc5d7e88b1ca6db86d4d5f51c2343cfb654a1d
'2011-11-16T15:00:20-05:00'
describe
'36729' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
bee16374d778aa12cbdeace3d6e75b24
d0d787fec42c2a9336c02096ee4a032a7b2e67bf
'2011-11-16T15:00:40-05:00'
describe
'6227473' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00017.tif'
2db26ed07524ec7541bb789a3c03808b
6da8a55891814243018e7427887e84eeb3bef9f9
'2011-11-16T14:56:48-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
51709e5621e81791e452a166f1e39006
82ed04c033b05c10dbff49b84aa24c3a0ef6b38e
'2011-11-16T14:58:11-05:00'
describe
'11220' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
bc9342e5bcf8672793165888369d9c22
d1df0e0c021c3a9994d5394902b2e29bd0542f2b
describe
'742422' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
f8d91575cbfedb111e24a324d37f4168
1751c0cdcd068f6ca4b226b90bf8be5cd6895de6
'2011-11-16T14:55:15-05:00'
describe
'92580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c16125b5b683a94e044dd2f87b263508
7de4c948b94319f2539296c47fab69247eab1ab3
'2011-11-16T14:59:17-05:00'
describe
'31838' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
1da78475e4b1eddb9d631c8463135bbc
310d9025b9ebdf2763fc34bab20cede06f14d74a
'2011-11-16T15:00:42-05:00'
describe
'33369' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
00f14e3b60bfc3039ef22c593d072ea7
95861e4e58fac4f97d85f96c776298c10a7badd5
'2011-11-16T14:59:41-05:00'
describe
'5945511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
a452e0b107af5eecab0fea856df4c73b
d314e091ed1127f5888e607ab212d1ff298ee822
'2011-11-16T14:56:12-05:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
360cdf34fc1020f54bf25732215e07d8
723f5bd5eee9255dc7b52cc99f3e26af93f47454
'2011-11-16T14:58:23-05:00'
describe
'11338' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
234990c338f070eb1c311034897fd57d
94a0e4e6c1ef216e46497eed548290e51cef15b6
'2011-11-16T14:57:50-05:00'
describe
'777626' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
806626384687c15fa43dd00b0b6b4f5f
c55b5884328bd26a40ed4c1d73075bcdc1953d71
'2011-11-16T15:00:38-05:00'
describe
'110812' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
1e294736c6d4405fd404526b8ee6b521
886fb74958a075d1fbdd9551f3c9632dd512aa8b
'2011-11-16T14:58:35-05:00'
describe
'39174' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00019.pro'
7e008d8c0ab88e5f4014e124e0402ce1
e22e2fd82897137f1ccca6ddd37ce393df3e05a1
'2011-11-16T14:59:12-05:00'
describe
'39939' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
65e48d66b81dad32d701ac8553d35eb5
43ee70febfc26147e1b37e2566b2ee05443dcec9
'2011-11-16T14:56:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c1586b924a19e9faf76d6083da6b0b9e
e9052d17ea68e2ceb69441c76d2e0f4dedf44093
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00019.txt'
c1d6faf14c2b9a837422dd88d8b21fb8
4ca2fffe078e21d37bf3a2bfba2108b781406d69
describe
'12218' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
82fc1bd986f4896b2293fe97bfff1512
f727b15d65ea298866f4feb8cbcb3db0645e0feb
'2011-11-16T14:58:09-05:00'
describe
'746091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
fa08ef09002b4405fbd85f02076eea87
6637a75c8d7e8076c7324b2735f17dc7d0dddb58
describe
'104699' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
7821bb2dbe6521bbf1e72979bc92f336
dbde8cbe4d12c88971149614ee0c0e44b07a0d9a
'2011-11-16T15:00:54-05:00'
describe
'35627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
83dfe6b2620b58d387a871f67f9a7f71
92a20e9c6658d93ead62975b575c4e3f612b0873
describe
'37570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
9fc7fc642bf8fb9a06e79d421c17c215
3afb071c2baa51b08cefa809f07a9e7a1e5b5063
describe
'5975849' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00020.tif'
7d19091284e3ff14d07d210f0c22a7e7
cbb73fe1ab8c71cd84aecce8223b09ea57cbc9af
'2011-11-16T14:57:19-05:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4804edd01317f81490c6c7da1eba8222
9ab0dd92b018a1621a925efec57eee5ba298088c
'2011-11-16T14:56:23-05:00'
describe
'12499' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
888fe3046346acdbc4842c60a5546d30
b6a0a90df3313152980ec5b99384d74a48f25eb0
describe
'749589' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
a2127cd6908169e48a27679d4f2010ab
d819d05a46df034d16c2121e32c97dc7a7b4594e
'2011-11-16T14:57:29-05:00'
describe
'98193' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
81ba35b00d3f59f1bc5333235fa0efe8
2c60f6b8a387bb74c3f6514276fdcc4042c346b3
'2011-11-16T14:59:28-05:00'
describe
'34443' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7e6539fb78fc1b370fe621c32deed738
c3d29593ffb6e231349459e5f1b31b4f0d724793
describe
'36026' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
a85756d289ac566c579825ab4fb5c0ea
650d17ec714643e0d97545a49bd4084717ebb1ce
describe
'6002803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00021.tif'
e012c43826bc2483370373701e6b547f
d5060b88281d4f892007c79399035cb71651f48d
'2011-11-16T14:57:47-05:00'
describe
'1462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
316fda31b7758ef43354a48bce58db5e
b358b72cbfb997e01c44f5496bb192f492bffe7d
'2011-11-16T14:59:31-05:00'
describe
'11353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
99a869b833300497ff15b402ef859ca5
73043ec70c3f19908449ec410c08873dc734a374
describe
'747720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
c1f7898cc3aef3bd62dd282f0f23a4e4
3699c6e122b3c7aad1b8212923604e44e1e96e8e
describe
'101685' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
a65778047ad0ca8215e9f039bad5553e
635e4f51f5ae2e4409acce6c2bec6b4490532385
'2011-11-16T15:00:04-05:00'
describe
'35596' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
4fa75e3f3195d5fa0f9f0b9879b636f3
86d963b5662ea7c67fe2b99330ea77dd7ba6b369
'2011-11-16T15:00:47-05:00'
describe
'36737' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
177f473d584ba36b4d2a5695e7f4a3c5
8908815c9741fd0c2e00f94cc363d26591b7d03a
'2011-11-16T14:59:05-05:00'
describe
'5988207' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
6308f20519f9f22c10cb055fce89cb24
80d9a3618cc54529998cd38874abdecd02658aff
'2011-11-16T15:00:26-05:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
23f99d48dc6753273741aa475899dfd4
a24dbafaa90ece421e0ec59c9ae79367ce436aad
describe
'11894' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
1e6162c1c3bac6790e14c60a572e70fb
532f0721b73e29962ac6ae9453b25e9d85d763d7
'2011-11-16T14:57:51-05:00'
describe
'751341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
2f6ff175865b93a82d08161f8ca61b41
e7ec81c7474315924a153d65d4d3057921bf17b1
describe
'98720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
5bdc97d69decac03147dfda868dbc05b
d6746d4fed5992058ecf965f449cc6309b40433a
describe
'34969' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
720cbeedaa39a2bb9c6dae7a380ba5a0
5c614c83ab36fcb54fd052ea8dd8684a9376211f
describe
'35888' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
cec8335a5744c50889b476bb9859d7d6
f2b46cec6ec927042b1c716f46932840b617947c
describe
'6017443' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
898dab290caa333cf662a86e099b44fa
d297f15cc112b22dd9e3b95225cc09c3634d42e0
'2011-11-16T15:00:12-05:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
ffbdd8f365eb670e4bded7beb72b9419
e97fa1e61651bc2e9636e3d1e69319d07596cea7
'2011-11-16T14:57:05-05:00'
describe
'11781' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
05c8fb3412a02b0b2b943a1818f6beef
dcc61695440cf73df87c59ac5bc1ffd40937563f
'2011-11-16T14:57:13-05:00'
describe
'750367' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e357f51ad73ffdd6b8ec1f058338b979
34b0134144d8fece35bd169b72eaab2d42c99df0
'2011-11-16T14:56:30-05:00'
describe
'82074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a1eb78a96f86266637a0d34e088e9388
287056c2faae7552a3c03d4e8ee0a3695abe3185
'2011-11-16T14:57:34-05:00'
describe
'12067' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00024.pro'
44da5c79a30b78eb853c5d2818ceeec1
dd252e281188263416d03979d0175738d3439c36
'2011-11-16T14:57:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
fc33a46018133954a61f2638d2685113
6153cc9d14e5015d2f74ed58ef1db711a5172719
'2011-11-16T14:56:47-05:00'
describe
'6009553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2737e59db48c75ca132efc152a9f89f7
37f80c33b04c7c41b46a69e5f334d7992b49123f
describe
'507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00024.txt'
890245aefbd001d535b3053d0d4afe99
3e70f2b0d0a13715b3ab71d402b9978e3272358b
describe
'9029' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c49438814cf8b81e1e8476d341b9b456
dbfc2f126421df400f590785c795131c22eff9fa
describe
'777580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
e95c819a850cf8640895988bd0ee4c56
44d59b22aa2f127775c3e1cad601ae9fa041d304
describe
'94573' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b0f3671f75a3364408cf62e754931e31
2f27610117787771450a0e9651ce6582af764079
'2011-11-16T14:55:46-05:00'
describe
'30926' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00025.pro'
82983dcecadca2afc9b110129f6b9527
d0f2c5254e67c404778b15ef74dad11b76461912
'2011-11-16T14:56:54-05:00'
describe
'33974' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
e0bbf58e1010f41ff43134a13d4d7227
aec132baee8584c3e656a9aadd970c9501e94e01
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00025.tif'
d88d3e99c5802d89aa8d879d25d3af50
1db0a9ee448abb1ce0d785e266118572e9b520fb
'2011-11-16T14:57:53-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00025.txt'
afaba8b54a5c829120645ae81c1963f5
4c23feb9eb26fb1c87bf97444a721b53c9d4ce6c
describe
'10576' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
d227396d89c86f8f8fb0385f314bf36f
dc7bb351bfcc26e5c7bc144e6489607240b9a00f
'2011-11-16T14:58:18-05:00'
describe
'743359' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
c3489fb42a694206195a6e53724be4af
fb5faeb783eb21e36bc5911e104b11c5c571e600
describe
'107761' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
db5d9ecf50dbceee9644b2b64f79d4e3
3c88565e189b7bc19e039b445a834b6fdc8453a1
'2011-11-16T14:57:45-05:00'
describe
'37826' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00026.pro'
df3cd0ab66cf409d7bc5b2557cb96552
70673b08ffece944338c63d3cce8802b59176328
'2011-11-16T14:58:10-05:00'
describe
'38759' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
567acdc65700ed5c22095505a20a7a29
3c4fa536f4dddfafa9f1befacd3268b0cd4ca7f7
'2011-11-16T14:56:41-05:00'
describe
'5953871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b281c1ff736c4ee4d28e8b58c507f14d
46785f0c98e1615fb26ad5e5d8a8420a8fa45018
'2011-11-16T14:59:13-05:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00026.txt'
ab819371abc7bdd1e016f739a89c7a1f
a1c8ec96baed77dd551891413bc38e8a583f05d4
'2011-11-16T14:59:51-05:00'
describe
'13215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
41bea4db639d622fe27afe1750d5a9f6
8cc2ba5f7582a98e4b5d664b9497b1d7b51b1b0b
'2011-11-16T14:58:57-05:00'
describe
'777619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
96c431e716501d33b6317e16c73de9e6
4b871d34c171d1aff130e6676f638371a702382c
describe
'104211' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2f3e90bc69edac393e8265cce1650762
a70c92ac336be99d0ed93d53df87c4b47835ead2
'2011-11-16T14:58:42-05:00'
describe
'36387' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00027.pro'
753b24d7a3b63bd544f87f40b2228385
f4e2c65cd3ea07ee502e999076fdbb1b523cd1cd
'2011-11-16T15:00:21-05:00'
describe
'38930' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
07c2e2217831a9c5746a2b3364103142
37069a005e3744f12cfac58fdc65fd6b7645556f
'2011-11-16T14:58:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00027.tif'
2efc0350686fc5c3aa84a4cbad04a36b
bb07a6afda393b3d9f5a2af466877e471ed72f58
'2011-11-16T14:57:14-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
4eb84e8354146b2263307df1a7e60060
7deb059806097d6acf38a94f68668fd964d7f32e
'2011-11-16T14:56:05-05:00'
describe
'12549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
47382d217f9867a41fe3f5cfd7426c39
b7ff2b9462921d6acfc93a06a98b76a8d5afe602
'2011-11-16T14:56:39-05:00'
describe
'774586' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a2978a24bd5db1b68358458007cb3dbc
1395b853353ef33a491b02e54312feb486b7c85b
describe
'101470' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
07f4bc93974cb68b4a92fd3284e7ff9c
eee33ea514c9a9779d4a965a8b172a871f1bd983
'2011-11-16T14:59:30-05:00'
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00028.pro'
236263b92d0a3b66c6b84c1b483b06be
1e6a11e5a521b1867ee21599b78c001138b46cf0
'2011-11-16T14:59:58-05:00'
describe
'37553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5d88aa782cc752ccb2a8cbcb05c05b51
2feb408464dc834922bbd8da6443a1caa5216942
'2011-11-16T14:58:56-05:00'
describe
'6203091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
bdf2a21c4e4c11c5e33876d14905ed03
800312e6ca343839addd7a222339978528cfb6b4
'2011-11-16T14:56:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00028.txt'
acec1157e18df29d174954cc47ded9d1
565c6e7745f2eed3bb298625275f43d423bcf77c
'2011-11-16T15:00:31-05:00'
describe
'11139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c68279ca556fe306ef31572654daecb6
23f84393613effb3f265360f7174100cf0056b12
'2011-11-16T14:56:35-05:00'
describe
'811556' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
c1a12f84e4c72523649419fafd98f06d
76755d9a1133b0560caa4a657db904ec4ba4cbdc
'2011-11-16T14:57:46-05:00'
describe
'87308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
ff6e57dfb5817ec0a9cd8c50703d02e7
b6aafa94497475b341921632771b07887dec5d77
describe
'29564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00029.pro'
26bee71e9b742972f54d5722544e14d7
f3b9702fa117f36bef24676623b32daed2c74648
describe
'31239' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
6022b3fa7931bd32be9ac6916c6b85c5
946ca5a6faf4babc918e93659e5fa9ea16a19cad
'2011-11-16T14:56:13-05:00'
describe
'6498797' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d6ccc7b195f73fa703220b8264b8fdb5
bebf2f46a79c94c4ef24e94e4b1bab641b2bd47e
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00029.txt'
91dd6b6b9466fb0ff4e2fb3d82e7aee7
9f5a7a86447a04374d1e3fa2126ae2e281a90e57
describe
'9544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
1367ddedc1fa49f1e3e32e3b8fd030b7
b1139e657b0bef56cb6b251d680446cde87d88f0
'2011-11-16T14:56:57-05:00'
describe
'826515' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ce5f1e6a19b96e3a28738821afd8cddb
52ad21c76a5a9baf23b6c3345cc55e330ada106c
'2011-11-16T14:57:30-05:00'
describe
'96301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e0906c3dba1c9ffc8f5b2d1b9026a548
4dcea8be69256b8b84287352cab68ea62e0e8a84
'2011-11-16T14:56:15-05:00'
describe
'31136' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00030.pro'
39df6045721199329f0b35b7079206b4
a3d5dd403aa8925a3f5093b7951d5eb0b907af55
'2011-11-16T14:59:29-05:00'
describe
'34950' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
78e87204bdd74021bc30ebb6846098b8
42d81c73e2d5c02b3828670bb0985dae8c1eb209
'2011-11-16T15:00:45-05:00'
describe
'6619935' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00030.tif'
3f1b120ab2ac5bd841cb9fea90a681c7
79f85c9327e1f0c50edf22e035a1d025f74462f5
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
26a7c1b220ddbf0a981ac3c7b611db5d
2b16ee8b5f2323cd75e420421646592ee03b024e
'2011-11-16T14:58:06-05:00'
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
97bee29f5d4501bc17e264378f7d7b99
8b8dd4529491543908d939609131f2430bd516f9
'2011-11-16T14:58:19-05:00'
describe
'811534' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
8693f2e92af40c2922895e6de8db90b1
3137ff406c8ac6d94277fda5072abe05083090cb
'2011-11-16T14:57:33-05:00'
describe
'107528' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2200b73567b942cf20165fcac7bfe2c7
57f92f4181f3a85d8426980ec18369120f2a2a15
describe
'35230' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
290bff8f470fe9e5025772bd82a29416
1808beb1a88e3a9a13dbe7345e342ca58718f9b5
describe
'38797' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
94b6412738bff2098e56b43ca2cd29c9
a2ff0bc7d2622a2b01a51dfb4960c70a28f74968
'2011-11-16T14:55:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
17387a94702258b2b029bd78cc6463fb
a5515b23feb9004e8f6064bf41949c31126eb565
'2011-11-16T14:58:38-05:00'
describe
'1522' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4a638655694115274ee86d90532c86fa
e72a8541c5252ad09c6ae0719775de1d4f20c36b
'2011-11-16T15:00:01-05:00'
describe
'11987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
b8bdc50dda781d1b2207b3b887df1cc4
643e7d29b97f9ba6600c4b786c14b165f3e75d0a
describe
'826704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e9222ca75e723d8851d42eaec7566e52
25c60a658de696ad96728835e3100b613889571d
'2011-11-16T14:56:10-05:00'
describe
'98932' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
70daefbbaf60ae7327a7f31e4d821cdd
c243614df5680c441fd9ecfc65c2abf4aa9f6873
'2011-11-16T14:56:07-05:00'
describe
'33708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
db6c8e34d4d0cf19a95c9909e8309a95
c7f4aacc0c0f212d5e3e834d0957a5f221b07807
'2011-11-16T14:56:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e46ac1e73530d95a9ebb87f87dcf5fff
997112218d91f73d63cea576b7d86d28f6b455bc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b56abe2370bd543feec189bd5a265ac6
0cafaf201e97d831c6274d97dec1228a53b4e2f8
'2011-11-16T14:59:52-05:00'
describe
'1478' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
205f63453ac33256d62cb196f58732a6
b0da9f7dba5878714628f0fe4bf9255239689a80
'2011-11-16T14:56:21-05:00'
describe
'10036' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
52d551d511a90f2d174f9a802b9ec485
d40aceffe3591a056e3df6ba189c166d5956b4ab
'2011-11-16T15:00:48-05:00'
describe
'811572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
ee6508005af47ca0947edcc8e808b4d7
4a1f786eefb730e944ac43166ee824e2fcd1693a
'2011-11-16T14:59:06-05:00'
describe
'108781' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c2a8f7bf53e946164226c04cd6b87cb7
2ea7e84d243c97e988ac704781423d1ff2de5c41
'2011-11-16T14:57:43-05:00'
describe
'38486' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00033.pro'
443bbfb83c55af35d3d39b1ef41f9360
b075cf97aee4bebe516c1d462c9f19a7756d97c0
describe
'38957' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
34bb94d366b959560c821bf15d83ecb2
8f5ab7c47037e838aebd2af266e09f355f102bda
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c1768d3478aa64cf8aa217f83ab2b505
f291c23b118cc4bf14a2b0aa925e62c3b552923c
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00033.txt'
d57a455e297990e3ccfeee32691a973f
509c75ca931bb7db77ea27ada85a424400936f3c
'2011-11-16T14:57:27-05:00'
describe
'11566' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
7f295d3bb9d17c3a79591e3851711198
9c874d9a29b9aca48139a7eb4c447c1d40fd96b3
'2011-11-16T14:56:38-05:00'
describe
'826720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ef2d9b7ee8cad20ce1fb18df7ce8a31d
b8a7e2da1ea8fec05238db19dac229549a7dc91c
describe
'101523' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
cf1f509b14cbcbc8a0cc91d2cccc4fbc
343071734e1b7d99e05d079bddece3b4c320b025
'2011-11-16T14:55:47-05:00'
describe
'33152' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00034.pro'
18301e8cf058e347cafb28d6cb86060d
93974cd23624e2bc1142782b7375d28a35b72c16
'2011-11-16T14:57:12-05:00'
describe
'37732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
9d4feb38684ca70732dd5d475a4093a2
49aefb6b4d7d0f165508a71a15ff1120596f1893
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00034.tif'
05dc527724936854720e4e068162680c
dd687721cfb65eeb72fcc1f1a02e238d6b7a95ff
'2011-11-16T15:00:24-05:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00034.txt'
cfabdf0ff8775bce27f77927c8f28e29
c4c75135273edbc236706e8ca25c63ebf172190e
'2011-11-16T14:55:54-05:00'
describe
'10960' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
e85f19223fae7b206169251ee1afbd7d
35b7c78ea472bf6bb2c6ae29feb50b78d9476206
'2011-11-16T14:56:08-05:00'
describe
'811581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
5e019dbab502c2d15800dffa5e7329ab
b9ca11f1f0e21e6895e7dc5307fdf7ca527b3bb5
'2011-11-16T14:58:41-05:00'
describe
'106312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
390c995ec710539d93cd277bd993a4cf
7cff8463c0e997aafd331a0356893dd6ff76cba6
'2011-11-16T14:56:25-05:00'
describe
'36012' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00035.pro'
647b895cb519b0f9608d102db7ca9a7c
dc37c4cfab3db2fb4e713da8d262b8bd14f5831e
'2011-11-16T14:56:00-05:00'
describe
'38789' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
cc919004476eb2e6f886b8b2ca52b2d6
005d1e627bab0f4c76096976d855e3b8b44ffc76
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00035.tif'
14156d52031146df7770e6ea68164836
bc95bb66030ee0647c2b9e683b0f284f544afeaa
'2011-11-16T14:55:30-05:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00035.txt'
fd0d06c7a84c37e1c726dc5c6acde473
e64c81cd392fd395699b1c13ca55e1bc0cb2cd34
describe
'11991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
cef8850330f95ce5d81390e63104bf5a
2e08e4f2ea98fba28fa2ee179c9bdcd82b5961b1
describe
'826722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
eaa0427ade6d260a5376d945b7c6f008
1010c720db42c07218fbb3091c7846324fa17a26
'2011-11-16T14:57:20-05:00'
describe
'112998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
300d28fb8d23ea509c925c6cdc3dea72
0f308a4f1ec9ae76a15c69c900d1369f5005f1af
'2011-11-16T14:57:44-05:00'
describe
'39978' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d2d45ab0f7709639483f7cba87402077
486c0d8846be71db1e4f9ea01337292573084e15
describe
'40214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
df7f3ca99056c44e9087cfa3232e8e79
61673e3dd957ac191d433f70faa6549e1ce048e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
eb3beed31bdb0e9f90b24bd537356217
95536683c905bfa2ceeb2890282662bfc5371cee
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5ca78ffcc14fb6582f0258531007a6ac
ba2dac39c16ae166a61bbc3da273363ea557df42
describe
'10597' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
0a841841ce9d9f13e3360b94f8e4ce8b
a0bc41ddbb39c53799b0b7d1cf45436c2a697e77
'2011-11-16T14:55:36-05:00'
describe
'811571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
c8c6712f82a538cb8871cb870b006b69
6f9f172937979c534f8ee2eb9a94874c74b3830e
'2011-11-16T14:59:02-05:00'
describe
'112847' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1586785a766e67de2fc42ae61159d77a
96b83ee5df1d134b606b4c095390fcc0f16b7518
describe
'40427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00037.pro'
a934bfa5e67708a8c9c14843ea9c57fe
9259e7686c2eed6298bb296a8ed0f820059cbd73
'2011-11-16T14:58:43-05:00'
describe
'40231' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
e93c8792d9fea4b86996323d2af69d0e
8eb220625aa73c5a3da01dc30faecc29f9b10e07
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
0e54bfcbb4cff5645e3131dcba6cbac4
c1c73e425b3a625c2e6bb5e03a83bfa3a750f55e
'2011-11-16T14:59:19-05:00'
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00037.txt'
d1b86560b4fed8c60d655a267fb41969
a5fba0f49066bec65a17edc96b64a5cb17160925
'2011-11-16T14:55:28-05:00'
describe
'11758' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
1554834c51f2d029be7a8dcac709083f
92677470a474f7ec880cea82278b7516349566d2
'2011-11-16T14:57:02-05:00'
describe
'826629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4980c2d3776adbd09b9c6051f84b5c29
960cbc8eb2eb9c6d9ebdd4f77b2a7dd2e0df767a
describe
'118709' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
32fb3701904d36b77a40510a67b6a0e4
b6e8dacc44895b48bbc3e7961b68e08f6e859b67
'2011-11-16T14:56:43-05:00'
describe
'41864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00038.pro'
720288acf19f743a3fe2b0b9a85f0cd9
adcb959fd2a0685a27eae73119db54ee164d2e87
describe
'43076' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5e2546a475ccb1d4c5d07a11bce34a5a
2bf95efd32cc99b3f310e7a6e3fdb5bc66ff2a48
'2011-11-16T15:00:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00038.tif'
ba3942385f668a7596f78f195d541225
6f852fccbfb60c6b5427d06c07726074e01f2497
'2011-11-16T14:55:23-05:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00038.txt'
f153d8955ecbdf2b4ff8401aa056d8bd
78f99f3f88b88abf89d1d6d950722ace983b844c
describe
'11543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
42cbf101f148633011714cf4d1bcfa78
0ca6b8e993087942c43aeb44708b9b64982b7d39
describe
'758687' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
52fa724a162298b655f60d4ee12a4a72
3eb8a6ac7c97e6f728974bfbd742f8d95efb19ec
'2011-11-16T14:56:40-05:00'
describe
'112234' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
3ed98477ff1f0884529f6e85b310dda3
0467e1f2fc1c40227aee734d61c3630488863dc2
'2011-11-16T14:55:55-05:00'
describe
'38719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0f5a6dfc56922176d3dc8291c6668259
ef771a443a0c5d6fb2674925217f61baa5896975
describe
'41414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
479ab6cdd0f162b1ece6f48b064b0ed9
a9b85b089d1435bcddee35259d71a6a70fb37248
'2011-11-16T15:00:16-05:00'
describe
'6075625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
f306a769a3d49acad961b409bbf980a5
1279475ee778822a0ab05581f005bf84d639f907
'2011-11-16T14:59:25-05:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f110fc0d907e3cf6ec3e0b13e8871374
b1bd0088231cdec9791445e0c2901b645b2d6521
'2011-11-16T14:57:28-05:00'
describe
'12677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
a55f791d6ed54469295b8989d52ad33b
a1334820b4952ee65288357915be0dc7695733f1
'2011-11-16T14:55:13-05:00'
describe
'826718' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
20f0212500ce9be0e394878fb8d0f4ee
ca3207e076fa32c21110ab89c2f05206a71775e6
'2011-11-16T14:56:45-05:00'
describe
'93422' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
73fc21e7a372237b5a2caf54ea187983
770db636eca101569bb10d7ca33aa17baadec97b
'2011-11-16T14:59:37-05:00'
describe
'30442' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
91c61d60366fa6f6de4b1c17d8728c57
72a739217bd0ebd25bee18dd779b92805f399562
'2011-11-16T14:55:16-05:00'
describe
'33948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
8ea23b893da671fb5e0559d482c5f366
842f9846b00678d39eb9696806a127260f40a678
'2011-11-16T15:00:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1d00f3527865a21f76bc7f81dd5bf6c4
76733833fdf5836b383a9063d60b7f28d30d2a7b
'2011-11-16T14:58:01-05:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00040.txt'
a86e09e1a9ce6ffedce579334d2c16cd
dd3ab585e6cba0e806d9f95aadf052f86886692c
'2011-11-16T14:58:59-05:00'
describe
'9854' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
c6d0b35bdcd554fbc34f1fe9632a2c7e
da4de0903e47847ba8848607635d169859ecd025
describe
'768290' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
885867a92ac3866ec145dd963808ff5c
0de769e884731a7879b04440a63db27f30544149
'2011-11-16T15:00:39-05:00'
describe
'103820' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
a7e42eab609942770038e4ff8af13167
61a6e2a44f17ef504f965a443fb0b4e505f9402e
describe
'35046' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00041.pro'
baca9ea9c8b79ff1ea80995994d76095
b829c67d9aeca8eb6086daea8993a36913287f62
describe
'37297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
6b86421a2059da353f8dddeadb276a66
7e1ce4b97fc2568c86813c194ffaf44615ba294c
'2011-11-16T14:58:00-05:00'
describe
'6152731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
602e436b2f9207efddc0491d3fe280de
de626aaf0284a9f5a20e494624ff5845e9e1fb88
'2011-11-16T14:57:31-05:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ab787b6c95e357df59040613a35c4451
02ba74c8ec45f57d63781bef699a7fb7a3d9a113
describe
'11420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
9d280229ee534659de7443995b4fbee5
97e3981f4a55cb52d882717afe86ec7902671806
describe
'794587' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
02226607e4dbb0528b9969b551caa0d8
6e266008da510d8e06db23a3a8ec26bcf3e9c197
'2011-11-16T14:56:59-05:00'
describe
'115204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
a738653e20422c7a4153287f76a6830e
f73ecd809c2783043df9deb230e70e07bdb4c994
describe
'41048' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00042.pro'
6f7f43ad32487fa19485ba0c7e20a397
42b0a393e46df7bbf41c1c2b0ff6dc27a7e07b00
describe
'42402' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
8afbc9e4f1fd925ab300a72b2e0591b9
bd79696d078063721e819f6d4bfe2d87db6040e0
'2011-11-16T14:55:21-05:00'
describe
'6363361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00042.tif'
d66cbc5ffc07a4d0393beecd152544e3
2a22781c4ede0d7c38d35ccdfbeda357f4e35b2d
'2011-11-16T14:59:54-05:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2b2e04f1202f16cca430500181e1c83b
fff21785bf64a4a5e324e47652c0436b129a787d
describe
'12493' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
29b25a7dab21948ae6afadeb220675de
deec9afd9f57772b68a496b4e4017c6e62ee42ea
'2011-11-16T14:58:24-05:00'
describe
'751486' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d6a8fee121653c7a7f88a4183f90257b
3dbf9930821d488f02e9aca14418b7ac64f989ed
'2011-11-16T14:59:14-05:00'
describe
'105678' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
58b40faa729eeb9672453c1e49cb35be
6d98876dad32808c06114374b81d287479193ec6
'2011-11-16T14:55:24-05:00'
describe
'37680' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00043.pro'
2dac970fe2958af1564f1b3118fb39b4
486e00c65b912cf7966a700fe9a3756fa1594e0c
describe
'37825' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
8ef64149c2a7ffc1ce908113c430d1da
41600896aceb196134348b58f40386356a2ddf1c
describe
'6017933' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00043.tif'
cbce85f584ab74c60971d54d50631019
1d25179aecd7a7c3a68ac1e817a5517a4a10c5ed
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
127b2c31c1428f38950f4e60202ecd7b
8058a8eebe37c03e8171ceb91056bb133306decb
'2011-11-16T14:58:04-05:00'
describe
'11590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
a79a0b8d163286282d21e05f63d70d2b
0dfba415f21ec0e46b6258f4372520e7c81813b2
'2011-11-16T14:59:26-05:00'
describe
'815609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
660f3b7f7e17bd886f8294d44d9fd87a
2cbfbb8a7a6b29b7c46ac07778a7856c829a39f5
'2011-11-16T14:58:44-05:00'
describe
'83522' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
e9e7458d2320121d52c97626a461354e
37170f98705d9c12277617a74ad823ca59ee3d42
describe
'13853' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00044.pro'
28278fabb8af60d25889b6245e17f896
c84fd4f1be1fc6ecaab8e2f247b949a209448b42
describe
'28995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7d33106c7ae3052b37c791d9584c9967
d8fc3f3f72946f908bb4984b8a5f6234e2c395c0
describe
'6531717' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00044.tif'
059eba2026561dff2b6a9b730ea5cafb
96408de72e5ace816b04880d9e6e64980f6311e1
'2011-11-16T15:00:07-05:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00044.txt'
0be57e9c1c4c195d354f2709d17e7f91
e84719e85c1b3fdbb200b1295c417562986cd37a
'2011-11-16T15:00:13-05:00'
describe
'8633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
95d1f8a01694b6e3bb154f79585a8087
08c5e00a52f9962de03b1b38806ee6b87ee4fb7e
'2011-11-16T14:56:01-05:00'
describe
'803722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
2e3d83a35ebbaa690389b3c3a4edb34f
4ca2ba745115b5a6c46c343b9fb7a578d0ebd8f7
describe
'91315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c47d877d59bfbfed7d2a16031d21501c
9ebaed45f4b07a3f006d4ec33000777362117d06
describe
'28072' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6f0a60ae88173c3d61ed2769722a5283
94121ff88ab8f9debe00f844629c6efa3dfc51da
describe
'33113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
acf8575f25342524f2823e5b37f6a369
023b5652e1fcd458d1b6a580bbb1e74b30679213
describe
'6436057' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
deade7a330baf2aeedd6d8d93cff4c7d
295acf9aa6debc254bed510816b2ee72d9213185
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0a744617356cc7e440575ee4bb5f80f5
73a98bf2334e93e419f8503049897f6ef6518cbb
'2011-11-16T15:00:53-05:00'
describe
'11006' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c56337f1ee4123d757deaa295a1a0ddd
b0e1576556af6eb4d6bd18278d2d2baf1a1a7234
'2011-11-16T14:57:59-05:00'
describe
'815683' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
a4aa2dc8c59f55c15d6722cb07206857
c0d30ab306f7d8c7a728aba4c3cfb394c0cf02e4
describe
'104787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
42ddfe06d020fd3f27593be810424de4
30c0c1e14ca4612a6ecd30e02bc083d7040b5b06
describe
'34836' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7dcf66e7f3004178711c0cbb69bd0f2e
40be5912da244403da7824f8cf12537a34161f66
describe
'37598' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
414c152b8a69c4bccfe4420b16572ed5
5aaada3cb745a45bf6dfc9f75f0ab4f08934f9d0
'2011-11-16T14:56:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00046.tif'
3fd2aa07dc8b552f962a0170198b0cab
3803824b7731a51e0d55cdcdbfe72e6c191d12f3
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d9687a3f00705d6df588cda3c22345b2
661dc8cf09264faa162867fb2c871934d7c1d42a
'2011-11-16T15:00:55-05:00'
describe
'10595' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQED' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
287e6d3ac0860b86560b151b3a02dae4
a4317a98ecd6ffe89b1fcb7195ba1118dc0e6ac9
describe
'803675' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3d69d0307b86d023c3200bc4f20f5ac3
070e346d9fa5b2a754e080025bc5abe984576274
'2011-11-16T14:59:21-05:00'
describe
'110843' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
788f4c45484463e0c2832609ec952a2f
b78989f49b8903274e47f358856f7698d5620cc6
'2011-11-16T15:00:56-05:00'
describe
'39292' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00047.pro'
3f6ee0f2e0929e90b6f380d68f682ac5
5076324615f8c61a89d9ffecb0613545bc6b8b95
'2011-11-16T14:56:17-05:00'
describe
'38449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
656d42fce5d7dfa8a5c2c98dc8f432f3
1458409a46b0c5892e59c66d7a2349850ef985ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00047.tif'
12c2e4544413f98952447b3a04cc0139
98ed8720b3cc2c78a03df70054fdfc26779540d4
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
48155800f1b43df8ac87e799588f2f03
de7dd14d2bf01606fab31e650acaaaccbf926daf
describe
'11258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
841f6f4561c17a03a61c5eab19834b4b
ea02055e0ad24ca345e660b679d8708f3204d391
describe
'815692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4f71987ce0432829470c5cfec67f490f
8e9adc29b44ae6b68f4afeafc4ab19a1d77548c1
describe
'119739' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
653676e8338a06990b0cbcd58e9dc01d
2710edd6422064867ff7043d4764b50e55c74325
describe
'41274' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00048.pro'
8478bded223f1afdc28b30b6e7b3b947
0ede9e07ee5da3425bba379dc18977c2aff5b1a2
describe
'43839' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f5c7ba3a1384a5e01910e1ac9aa0b1b6
f25161d52bd6edac0ad42864d903e6bc1379fcaf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00048.tif'
7badbcd98157263c20dec12b8bb089b7
80f23e719d45cbd0a16932d3f924d2d3c09fcf19
'2011-11-16T14:59:56-05:00'
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4765b8eb3d6da9f3aefbac35aff234cc
d357851990bf5cef4740a1bd950b5768cd3edd09
describe
'12520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQER' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
ba38f29b6ee264b994b08ad43139d03b
bbd6806a905831e57ab3aa110c63ed0b056e86d8
describe
'803701' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQES' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
b0b3da89f22fd83389a8b8345216f488
d30985c56179c4cadfdf5719a8d469be7a6040e4
describe
'85081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQET' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
9aad0407b193a8c17dd1a6f0925433d3
6c9057e89dbbf35f921f93d1e362c7567329aaaa
'2011-11-16T14:58:49-05:00'
describe
'28049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
2e2497f6950fafd04d96dcb27ee67b02
86b5f0653bbdea5d3c68c21374caf90b8751be2b
describe
'31160' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
6e756ee67f9334dc609a444b7e5f4456
5d023b060a245fc23ed6a1788b89fb17a133a3d9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00049.tif'
2bc0e139d313f9ca08c764e07dee40a5
2f80da87c518f3cd0da12427a900747cda8484d5
'2011-11-16T14:57:11-05:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
c89d810401664701a2c52b3dd63e655b
8e9cc0f031c0fc7845ce6bcda661d64ca0cf7bf1
describe
'10234' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8e87a2b2ac5b92a603e1207d25f700b8
2dbaac4d3efb35271b9e64b2a3aed5884cf42783
describe
'815650' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
24a2dbd49e830cbc09e5c488d76ccd84
52bfe4a7e33b1e3a1f2b74269dc3edee546ccf8f
describe
'103802' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
f648cc9bd58c1b96902152a0df5ff2c5
f7fd9cf5864891db29cfc786c38abce4599bfa36
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00050.pro'
efcc6cacb2ce4a92c0c27035a02a9af5
6fc5dfb0464f94946fd52bb926bd80a8730214d4
describe
'36824' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
e87f2e21bc2049bc0549a8ea3beb0076
8fecc2e76097760bffa596fb37a1782d0bad22c8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00050.tif'
209c70b3c37b2396cc043bfcff9f32b2
bdfcff593e10531d8de7b1d5f32caca89003cbac
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00050.txt'
214de322c907f1d650eb55314a802eb3
7420ffcc8aeaa7037ba2c59130b59b5329ff6976
'2011-11-16T14:57:24-05:00'
describe
'10334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
846cb60445accd72ed252e14a597d45f
4b524d6d5c891e88ff9616cc4a9e0fbb80326564
'2011-11-16T15:00:50-05:00'
describe
'803681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
b73c6aeecc35f1a62baa831ce2bd667b
08c1194c5b7d15eab95bb074be08f64041d626a7
describe
'107489' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e0a96a9249e81ba586989b8512d6f58a
85362538afe3ff61269b085a34729dac09f1d421
describe
'37123' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00051.pro'
171e52b4ed20a4ca8aca32bb66e31dd2
f05904387968294cf268a0045fec98b381056779
describe
'38596' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
b54bf424dc1d8172c771fb6998516bfd
72f485498105b6ef86edc857ed048ab1e1ef346c
'2011-11-16T14:59:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00051.tif'
03f092a86d95dff17f000779a28a0e16
6c2aaf5f00fe8a7264adf4f68767fa7c8adc9ce1
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00051.txt'
626b7ef8137e93d2908706c7d8637b6d
121bf5923d02ec13356148c66f2633fdbd752390
describe
'11975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
0f478477f30a910b2a904097bd3f1198
3950099ad3686950e2f1c8f0e939d46b846bf128
describe
'815606' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
bbdf00a5882f6cb88bf881a9d5eef72d
2261ac929b0a107554773aea3436254095073d1a
'2011-11-16T14:59:49-05:00'
describe
'114010' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
f314d2e78ee555ef7ebb5c178044144c
cb914aeef2b3b32a82e111b24a34389f2902ae3c
describe
'38264' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00052.pro'
005c8aaea55ed56f251ff9c8df990ebb
bb363b1b2aedc268b5bc6d3b080adbdf5dbf68b7
'2011-11-16T14:58:20-05:00'
describe
'41477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
137d32f385aa984a16f1fbbbd7dbd141
82d332c49f554ead658df451a971adb4dc49f2e8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a7a422f7054185694980dab5fa4e7694
25dd8bac6ab141b5cf5b59ebf6a0633d5ff83229
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00052.txt'
5d97eab90461633fa9d14092f61db75d
63a517dc94bf7d77472880b93d55a9ae40a50861
describe
'11670' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
098d680f52bcb5c088bfdbdc31d0ce71
dd01c5a3cc1d74271a9558cfb3e8eab945e46d35
describe
'803732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
7bdf862eac8eec1da1349fd5c19fa9a7
e67be67771728b40d31ed2430f40675d6b4c3bbf
describe
'84729' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
525f5ebed435cdcf0e033ed74cd0e7a6
8fafbef4eb70556f71282e31b6d48ce6025e6fd1
describe
'25871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00053.pro'
e51ca0831a2300b781b8908eca562f36
7494c5aa8537097c4f60aeb5b8450bd51355d8ce
describe
'30127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
cc86846191748f4d01712008075113e9
188590c7b8cde3345faa59c7919b5bb954f7df29
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00053.tif'
308d0d55de0e409addc2e3ffdff400f8
492b21d226fd9c0dd7ff603c583b5db6dea2ef94
'2011-11-16T14:56:19-05:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f112b07ae5f3fc258dc974759768d629
a7e4883568a4fe2ddc8ab928d98a27840845834d
describe
'9412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
69144b4170f6c206cbe467b40730e135
2d86650e93943dd2b5c77914f3eebcc3487af60a
'2011-11-16T15:00:18-05:00'
describe
'815664' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
ce85cbf447bb3202321e3d5a57f8f768
253fc275654211427290615fbcf42ca29e40625f
describe
'90375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
1241f86ee55e3694e00d457a6c5c39c8
7299b96ef8cd8285614815c56707cb3b96fc043c
'2011-11-16T14:55:14-05:00'
describe
'30254' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00054.pro'
21e9f5968fbed692d6e31f8cac58c1c2
652ac60744de202854ef8d357629a6178f4f88dd
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
9d725b45de1e06b4e465bf32c0e7917d
caf22677cfa68941f43c263f158fa1ad78e65558
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
a1ae87936b5827295a39e7e0574116c0
174bdef0598746e883dbdec8aac4f5899210fec1
'2011-11-16T14:56:06-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00054.txt'
dd957870160c8c8ecbc1e0af8fbfe365
3c00e155f53941cc45789961bf7e7bb1264239fd
describe
'9882' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
bf36019ddacb635c7e258c17dec89057
0a3be2e1eacdc07b66473ecf046f0cacccc6eed0
describe
'803613' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
cb0a1bc5a1a1ad918e4fcf4e096d26a9
e86650dbe3024260b57892f5609032e391b0a40a
describe
'103845' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
f337387cc9ccd6bab2cc1117fc5b5dbb
1f329917eca235544fad75998faf2a111e737705
'2011-11-16T14:59:09-05:00'
describe
'36382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00055.pro'
e3ede95546513ced95dfa81d09300e90
820af4cfbea6237ada6295eeadf20474a2ea9a76
'2011-11-16T15:00:33-05:00'
describe
'37567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7869de873e6c9b6a18b8b3bc69eb7773
8d6f2efc421bd7fa02b2a7bd85dfe4e05b9fd2a9
'2011-11-16T14:58:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00055.tif'
04a13994a500312ccf820ef2dc69ee81
e3db44628532c40d92c4ac836471d8c150524f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00055.txt'
14d403d7d0dd6105521c9f3ba5169276
2715ff8766722ffb55e9775ea23eccc553f40b2a
'2011-11-16T14:56:28-05:00'
describe
'11942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
36ebf878c97451eb08bdb3abd265deb4
4033693e290d16b951d53e203a0c0d7edcf43f45
describe
'749471' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
ce45df8893efdd0d94229fe30d524f08
bf56c3ae7e0425edce142dd396acad659e8817fc
describe
'108081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c9588011ea1ab2ef2dd0b20c4d69c624
400876d215bd6b9c8f6abe6fb704ae17d188529c
describe
'37343' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00056.pro'
0b851c7b616b820f66414fcef98827b3
f1765e92c3c70881fd50e46b1e5863d4028ddd85
'2011-11-16T14:59:35-05:00'
describe
'39448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
9fed93d48d2288a6e537c04170c82b68
f46102e7e9e0b007ceef0ccca06947246d8992fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00056.tif'
2dd540faadafa4fe36db898197eee22a
b25d953c5218294f06852b5b3d01001842ea3794
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00056.txt'
2298aed663073afb2f114483cb7b5d90
32be11cc583d08d3d978f80418ac5dcddb8268ba
describe
'13013' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
fa7e2f4e8dc4d5eb2e1e4aac5ee58a7f
9a0d07c0500fba8de96e97ff8ddcbe7c9cc5d9a5
describe
'768213' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0879fa4ce8855a8ce5bfaf3df2b654ba
aba937a41ed72694f100dce9daeebc27eaa3629d
'2011-11-16T14:55:50-05:00'
describe
'105813' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
0e2cde53892adfd44e2f908de523a286
d6b91202ec28d21606c41e74014e7fd440bb90f6
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
37376222a0745ceeeb7da3770bf59ba3
ae87d731ab2e742ccada49da487704388d6f1a04
describe
'38424' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
09a9a680b8a3527dd2b04379ee5c5016
720d61d5e342465c579759404125e683f5f40327
describe
'6152667' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
ea8bed6c4b35a0947fcaf57737203149
96e1b8032426832c25631817ee94978318d88b54
'2011-11-16T14:55:48-05:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
35685ab4e9df0aba3683341d3708d452
b5c6a8b5e9b37206d8fd833197365555c6350769
describe
'11953' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
29eb74e85c5b7543b28eaadbb2ccfc56
6e5e360f1c8308e8f9a3541f91567c1dc23cfd05
describe
'819317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
3a4019c05bd53a532c048c5fdb8a8a7d
f2192bb20b20e76df8bbadfd6b9c6543ea335f45
describe
'106427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e5b8c5b2f7356d7232805480cd0649ed
793de43ff146f8ef6a9dd6239e6f0c8d7071cdbf
describe
'36225' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
b7415a3e4958f225012c35229af94461
70b103bf4a6267c92709ee46641139597afa2c7a
describe
'38718' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8e0cccd83a8a0d69570300d3ea665b73
d83abbaa54a6964e8df392b0300322ebf92da2c3
'2011-11-16T14:57:38-05:00'
describe
'6561343' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
fa0bc5d15c9ed4184da099c38a1b3744
e6b50e6621ccc4add1c466f3e790427ef933e12d
'2011-11-16T14:58:14-05:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
7914e49ec76b81ea8bb874b958079c61
735fbf2f588cbe54000262846b9150a717382fa2
describe
'11342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
0edad4131454255c11472bfe63e08f50
e36c3b5e1bf0db2ce7112f3caf9ce56bf99e20cc
describe
'812937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
74d4eaca2a9848ed9487a4b71fdefd86
b720411661a5147a3fc59af269033f10d356d543
describe
'103855' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e55450b6297d249460c1ced09491a802
54dfb5850adb633fa1c9b04cb13ee0f4acbd62e7
'2011-11-16T14:56:31-05:00'
describe
'35145' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00059.pro'
fc885e651d9332fa72597291ffc15431
15ed63d32a860e2a2d4d3775b81470108d2f9137
describe
'37245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
97f5d8ed55b772d122244245e2b4039a
b8d8a938673b02a9e88505350ab6f4c6b8d13bbe
describe
'6510149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00059.tif'
eb813fcfb262b3e19e3de96692b79dfa
ce64407fc13e043cb02675d70cc0d2377c2bd642
'2011-11-16T15:00:15-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00059.txt'
b7585535312e1d8f524231c1b9e8a692
47f1196a649ce9bbea37fe25c3112295a3ef2cb9
describe
'11035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
e0f8ba7bf8b6458b40d1db339ee67834
55aff73a046563ff2e6937ae8623ca3cf65949d4
describe
'819395' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
a124aff6382eec03844bf1ff8a772dab
c50c451fdb4c74cae68474c6d946859d87b3974c
describe
'106350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
793a12e048cdbc50c0b6717e9ae3b45c
e8d23c957cae6821b53a98cb2b321bdfc6460740
describe
'36164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00060.pro'
a6b7c7bc58a9493fe01e8dde26a85d31
8eb3d3f62774587da6ecc7ebdca9efb6276ac3ad
describe
'38532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
d88e0d2a60300a81a9c10e1cfb0b3277
4fb73894233cb5df12b3b97a5a49102d8e3af67a
'2011-11-16T14:55:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00060.tif'
3677bbd10dd72d56fb6838f2ba063b08
af1067cf662680caee7335f5f8e6ea7bb2cbe952
'2011-11-16T15:00:08-05:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00060.txt'
51b714b19dc601c430033cfa726199d7
19e36a62e96074634e18a74a69a4c6964dbbacec
'2011-11-16T14:56:50-05:00'
describe
'11112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c678ca6cfa939f0a740aba344e6c701a
d4dbdf17f525cc79528c6182979e80788680df6d
describe
'812918' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ed6531beeeb199813b1c392687e1be30
4793d8b092e169b2d544dbd9e1dd8867e68562cf
describe
'114291' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
a46eda21814c6b58ef8c581a2725a880
5e9979ec1fa65ddcbee38123714409350c868786
describe
'39523' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00061.pro'
35abf2fe0c78b3f049c411e05f0b4921
324d60cd44669e4bc041998fb65f775febc018b0
describe
'40642' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
257def6016560c81349acbcb962026ea
289a9d742e62000890fb74194b42839aa37d0c98
'2011-11-16T14:58:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
1397ddb32c8a49a1c8839dd40387395c
9ca56c68417534ca3f705be5b701200032bf1bb4
'2011-11-16T14:57:18-05:00'
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQID' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a92ee34369b6dc16ad757774ffff6bc8
a726d31b26a2e030082f43d9ed47a8d99787d82a
describe
'11550' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
dc3dbcf6c7594c90f16316e1159275f5
bc9ec3c2a79b7518a3ecd16f4d5923897ebd5389
describe
'819371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
f4728f213328fc0cf8474c1d9ec29901
43709461151b13a4b38858741a39d4126a201687
describe
'111719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
8f7fe0f48d8e16f026f4d100ceea6054
34836f8b1f4506f407d01ca0a222b8880ecd72d3
describe
'38053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6417e5ddaf66e2b0b69611d0c4b00616
b072b4944bd3b153667fa250aba06af0d21e8160
describe
'40212' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQII' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
877130e94b4f0289dccef5aae9bc126e
00be4325216da63802f4480f6c1a51a709414d7b
'2011-11-16T14:58:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
4f9bdfb200e186d4137e471e7f3cf5b9
0389c5e5b83d9aa46e07bf70c7dec4aa2f4f0187
'2011-11-16T15:00:44-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00062.txt'
987e879419bfdb7aba772127b73cea9f
6c0ebb16a9a8e0172ff6e98f0253a827d119b51a
'2011-11-16T14:57:25-05:00'
describe
'11002' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
763a4e9062aa77f9bc4e878425f891f8
c7ffa5b144364fdd1c5a0cea1898774b6be75c27
'2011-11-16T14:55:19-05:00'
describe
'812976' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1e4a9b77396a7ee23d89a65d8578a942
d310b2354efcc819a33ce0ae022b40c7c5a79526
describe
'104848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
ad4072daf56cda3ef97c903531b01d44
4d7cbcba8b6598946bffc34118ba23fa5ed823e2
'2011-11-16T14:57:55-05:00'
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00063.pro'
b91b0feeed69a702d24c314e776e75f9
ae2b9364913e19541939cc823a03f70ec580f888
'2011-11-16T14:58:55-05:00'
describe
'37909' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
c27f9615a13bfaca8a37202648b05ca5
872e362cbf9ee9a20539ba44f2e94b3bb547a824
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00063.tif'
18ca39389c555d97c44e763015f07228
8dc7efa90855975c07caa144fd1a8ffe983c9b66
describe
'1500' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00063.txt'
885ba5d8bff22d5d4aa4757c4ec2f53f
77ecddd2ac2aa1e9572433a5d41152422d2c3496
describe
'11277' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
56813474511361907598bf5731362abe
30c5215d4bc498942448df825a12245c2d5276ae
describe
'819377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
77a0be02dd92cbbb5a6f9b0df21e2491
1e6d5d103d8a1fb0d7c883b303850e8820542c3f
describe
'95214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
dcfd5c13300614f880b8855f12eb1355
12a3378e2ea595f0070c94a1b15860e592126a24
describe
'31470' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00064.pro'
567626ac8a8b26322f045d140a1b6634
2e8f0f3d1bff60e26153e43df18510d7afb466fa
describe
'34694' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
538aff870256559c5e0d4e1f97998799
121581cc28f471138ba4a82a1d1d299aa6a80093
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00064.tif'
d9be103798d3645b7991ceac40575d4b
92d4af135de99033a0182b6fc6208234d93e1b2e
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00064.txt'
878e6d52e6a371df2f32acb06b5edb7f
e1f276933a0a5e39f8a88818e4f1995ebad3b38a
describe
'10530' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c9d846b958e5b5447b8c8fc4fb8d03ce
7dac1257313cab997e5f0719a7490580bea8bdef
describe
'812948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
bbf52ea7857c44e3a55987124c2a5cf1
bee9105294f686144c285eb918560338204d0b45
describe
'113262' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
77d513c7400ae09856db495a37e24ded
32456de9e154fc66f8e07b8708e2ee01068fbfee
describe
'38736' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00065.pro'
d43a893a646ffe85ecc88e83542318f2
2186b5123f160f4a108fa628f4c4bc8ba18ad6df
describe
'40766' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1a8addbda706f759ae70f1e865f2537f
6aa330453b782a9086b04d25f305569fda1726cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00065.tif'
312e8c6055d44c1a793840250d3c462b
1fb8abc4c3a5241bdf1abfcc0f96ea979187fb2c
'2011-11-16T14:59:27-05:00'
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5384bd47970ec97cc1dbb19100039036
dc03dc514c43b5ecf3efd41df98ffcf777470d40
describe
'11934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
fdc0b6dfce4f1a9147d67c08a3fa4da5
a83a61617d2ab5a9fe12f34ecc49dbb0a5d1a39a
describe
'805362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
4d72fe2fe7ad69011e2bdf3ae70d872a
46d47ebc6eed0d44a2088e8571915774c329b3a4
describe
'87272' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4f8238d380b29cf0af4768577a9cdfc8
0f886d735f4136adaf7eea5b2aa3943779397302
describe
'26485' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
0d0f2487ddf74398d47e4bf8160aeaf7
7826b26081e9152ef002d8c9ab1f4fde076ddb69
describe
'31479' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
191fcc89ca89e0a363d8c9a78c2018f5
e0b8ead7dfa01e3de25decd7d583bfa7b6376c86
describe
'6449417' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5656ff2e527ff95c7371b746c136cfec
b07f01edc108e08384e3b12ea934953ae4393f74
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00066.txt'
7a035e9b9cd97885f56fc519908e5231
f925b5116be15968d9eac70a7fda4de3a767070b
'2011-11-16T14:57:07-05:00'
describe
'9674' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
01d447c377b35ae08e425a1abd41d98a
c4448b2fedccb398b653ab5b27ca130d5656cb8a
'2011-11-16T14:59:43-05:00'
describe
'828822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
670962f09a76dbb4a15960e716726eaf
7c60447d842f6b547a291daabe6107f412669f55
describe
'105715' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b80d194f71ab547967c37277b6c2a143
fbecef16e8dfe775567407c3cd458897e411fc09
'2011-11-16T14:55:52-05:00'
describe
'35298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00067.pro'
b2346dcdd947010c51ab53d94135e730
5a0983801179b34640c310865f28497eb64bdf95
describe
'38345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
dd893f7654545de01c8419f45af70919
e86ce30d7e32d895135cc6545485eb75c10065d7
describe
'6637689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00067.tif'
4067761fd748da7ed6d87d8fdd27ccac
835cb9a37421163e242ae550229dd8194048d148
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d3dd6ea9f19f5cf585d78f2773086fb4
bc5974ec9cf2707d0c5a32a30e7143d8a98d6616
describe
'11134' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
d7f011741a53fc488bf8d30d23baea0d
f958bcf33f791cc403b474bcb24b54104528ea1f
describe
'814034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
36d66563a027d3c8555dc18637fd2386
a33ba68ec1cda91f1fd148309cb5f64196393c4c
'2011-11-16T15:00:35-05:00'
describe
'96807' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c0d9d73f22836036005bc644d10cd62f
416822a4f773a0e7a9ab922774ac704b55a2769c
describe
'33890' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8e452b4ba8eb05c31ec3ee5feae2e77e
e995e1a15badd1efbe9987fa99c2fd237cf51539
describe
'35451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
aae2349b56f2fbdb4216c12f3e23e50a
345ffb4672b981c1415f1f6cc2f834b1c0f67688
describe
'6518627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
37f4a5f78626a40053831532691b6061
028ad788dc16c213a91bc251696a9ffae9b31097
'2011-11-16T14:59:50-05:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00068.txt'
04d269286e95c6a5fae568b78536b5f6
3c37eced5ae872781113cf7d008ba961996c16d3
describe
'11307' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
daa2faf6b9761d2f479ecebf32b13f3e
147adee63b727d0ac4a24872f9ed04a18631aec3
describe
'820101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ca3e19ba5b988d93222ab561d7f99560
e7043ab9cc6395b22dd68752b9395b86e60f978a
'2011-11-16T14:56:18-05:00'
describe
'97830' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
36090b54233342aefb9bbd98d8ea155c
4969335c7fe02026d7ea5debe5d95e01859c4903
describe
'33208' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00069.pro'
7b9632699a2b45aa7ff2d1ce1e2e80f3
f9ca81b5653c32505b05f79a437517b292f5adb5
describe
'35327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
103690a9d120eb0887b0f6518685c932
5ddf1676d2a4f619f1b321431f36e4a9f1b70d25
describe
'6568923' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
f284fb498285255ed66b3c1dc4c53915
b2d4f154b0a9ab72193edd562ba11f066dbf2cb3
'2011-11-16T14:55:53-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00069.txt'
63f6a09305b66225a304b330fea143e5
31b410e6368fb1f8658d49f025ed5afcded05f3e
describe
'10941' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
eb1a273bfeb9b232ef26a239ac5f503d
4349096584ea74615778865c26ab7674d7ecc940
'2011-11-16T14:57:21-05:00'
describe
'814044' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7c5ae99546518ce1c697cca7e0ce26eb
0f7d24a28fb2daa79f4f015e819373e4d08933e9
'2011-11-16T14:59:01-05:00'
describe
'104704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
4beb6915f44d3b65aecd88706f0c8acb
61594fd4a2f29a9be5e89f67ac279f40fc8a62be
describe
'36491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2adfa720dd50f7e6cdc3a9ae50d38007
e2ad511bda270ff831656eeec9f618b2f0e3a89b
describe
'37926' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
c8e0a97dfc689d9b0b5632bb18a006e1
aa3c5020100b49cd0cdd9c1f649294c53af2db33
'2011-11-16T14:55:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00070.tif'
3604be15b59719100e08269cec6ab182
b31bbe7f88e9b9459ce3405d29874ad8be6e1bc4
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d1578ca0f2d86ab4445c23731e389a1d
00327a528d515b0dfa7812447601547a4809900a
describe
'11448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
f6d6f7d46e1556f6fca81cf823da306e
29b6ff6e983a24243a779f3bbfab6c44c0ef1b9a
describe
'820336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a73d77ef7b6e98a296f88033640d5cdf
7e1a61d354ca8ec8d51a4c0ef9458efbaf47be60
describe
'104174' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
4b4eaec08bfce2dc11c54abd66ac9e8f
31a5a7c6b7d4249c9c4fb0582d8b11b1af553796
'2011-11-16T14:55:10-05:00'
describe
'36039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
0addabea29b49c6eeb918492ec139e7a
e2a6c1819e89fdc5985ed1b109792e21cc506012
describe
'37485' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
df0a394b6d8ce35d2c3c522f822fdad7
f4deac2109058314178a0afea48ef573f559ee00
'2011-11-16T14:56:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00071.tif'
29efbc06c6a83181a09c5e8bdf9c9e2b
406d3a7e300b19f3b25785664d5361db965434f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00071.txt'
231b8f5e159cd2ed8fcbcf90f300a43e
eb0746a7bb7e7f1d21309e4995f13f05fb8a991d
describe
'11790' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2478977040d94a5b865d83d05cf300f7
f6647192daca63d1f01af73c80d7c913f40e7551
describe
'813986' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ba885f9fdd0c626c0d7e333a0dfaf62c
7d521c40ec3f6852f64898c76e7891d2e0bae0a1
describe
'109954' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7701c06a389e34bbb06420b3b65a5507
511e4f69d7b01f22a2c710db0be47f60664d4d1e
describe
'38715' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
675139eb0dc58a7427200a18dd8e85e6
5cb8f06866bcfa19e5fa00567ba871118e605b30
describe
'39790' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c2586683a328324b7d2ca21fd0bec543
e847cbc31092dd207977341fcb12e3bbb510f6ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00072.tif'
8983ece0f1bdf49c001f2bf263382c23
4be03561e7ca60db3d2237a3b74677837acf2de7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
ff1ee9827e8070e8414be5362f64e225
be66998cb34c79795e1e7aaf45e89eebe8f46abe
describe
'11841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
5c56785f8ccced5bf06f63e8c037c570
6eb22974ea5da4e6e48f5637a26e59210793fee5
describe
'820210' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
e985a0f23ea525cfbe5f55cba0ef9f18
7f3b445c4d622a6334c117bfb5eaa4a1c7c2de3b
describe
'107958' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
81ec173c09358943de334de357300395
ec53c16939e6e1a4ea0f2e97fa53afac3cfe6501
'2011-11-16T14:58:33-05:00'
describe
'35874' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
2d0fcf05e77caed739ae25baff98f687
11c722cf6b2d4e0ae508aabfe456139be4d3e24c
describe
'38624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
9edf085b1bbe715184d8a5553996a790
d0e58b653dbe7856913d2f8f63c5da4afc3ae806
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00073.tif'
093d53d7c335eb20d2f2a955e410707e
a36b893196e9cee93c5aede78f8d816bcbc36f76
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
78a33176cd9d650823a1166971295947
52a0ef5cc7f821389309289c235d5e5627a0ed2d
describe
'11430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
94261514f3b45561dc0503753552d2af
47dd5793b8a88804aa2fefffd4fdf84b3ee368c9
describe
'814027' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
0d1a3524f82b3a5bc460bd6ba1383908
1a09bbe58710dcc39cace070b66ed14717c3a188
'2011-11-16T14:57:37-05:00'
describe
'102488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
96f8e285ab5cb1d52c72326ad2925aff
e63391fb2cf69a42514db0fa9e83e2506cf1ff54
describe
'34405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
e096a52a2ea240c6a27cf3458f26bc5b
65692c6b87914b9b6f64e5c58b891bbd7a91cb10
describe
'36578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
eb8ef478e1552523451f8e6532a1bb04
019149aebe871d33ab9ef29d69fc7d5734f0b49b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
0b12e23b415de6865e3dbe69f16cfa87
1e0f17d2bd22580594b9021f418bd13d0360e811
describe
'1461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00074.txt'
aa9abc3c043831b7ce5d699619b00d0a
b0101968dab2fedea60e8485925f20bf9cc37830
describe
'11401' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
cbfead509981468acd99a1612f25ac3a
c38b2ba9ba324e5f4fbc31d496f460d1f5ae5b98
describe
'820320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
a77105e64fde5dd8680b945198233222
aa74e77b74f7e1e246b9b83f8ff1b2618e855e5b
describe
'99197' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ae1e0697453ed59df726a4c2128250b2
38b2e17d30db8470e1df32ad50da11cfedd6a6ec
'2011-11-16T14:57:40-05:00'
describe
'34342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3c1e8493606cc5d78b11b9375a16b9bf
86dac46d537fcd246f1e51e7814317dc12888de9
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
8d948cb3d76deb143cca82056c8be243
fb6005e20ac5104a9c9e5da4128b287a594fb2a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00075.tif'
382dda8bca2c5daa81e3e8886f1e63f2
abfa44322a1bc08d03500dec8862b18a734ed700
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00075.txt'
540fce32a0d212e8770b931f6a51f668
2c1e9993e19e0b8648843c6680af429c2eeae9e8
describe
'11385' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
a7ea0c7016f741f66ba812ba1b47c5e1
48fc9b304cb306daf60f72c39b44be2afd5a127d
describe
'813907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
0bf123ae0b0cc57ed140a76c679ee53a
f59cd3cffa4d660ab51cdb0dcaea27b7acc75575
describe
'61479' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
1c2388fa47438fb6c21b4ca476ca7f7e
51532ffa960a8f9da197b770ec2ce57ff7bd70f7
describe
'10712' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00076.pro'
37eb94f748bec7e80d00c774c6e4e5a7
3fa009aa9171f1be9c4705f1a97b79f1b13223e9
describe
'20432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
f92f7b0b83aef6814b065fd1545574d7
121e709157b9997112e17d72439390a13d7b3e81
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00076.tif'
3cb5ff2f6343dd9f4a5cbbad022c2160
d668c5366ad19f40214e5ef6e59896876fbe08c9
'2011-11-16T14:59:20-05:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQME' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b74626336148ec229ed5402cb49fbbe3
b62cb35e8f00e9bf76036f12f872d705d1773bb9
describe
'6301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
f4d0648ac967aa07230476f64536550c
f9925cbb73ad4839946c0e8b94bddef3ba0c93d5
describe
'820316' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
f1501bf93d65a017ffeca93de5b1600b
47cce30a5d48912296ff23fcc377ee9c691277e5
describe
'84259' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
03e9089b12ff25bb9a2ccc6cf9471e37
0ba1b550cdb6237be46dafe4e132526c7d64ef68
describe
'26440' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00077.pro'
78911f0040317c7eb92d68cd7c126adb
f7e12629ff3641fb79f71c4785bdcf7603fa73b8
'2011-11-16T14:55:38-05:00'
describe
'29799' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
7689dd051f8a091a75c1589f94479775
743b40077d0289452b2b802e88a63237f5d1b237
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00077.tif'
2d8c0807884427a5a50d54542ee8de6d
25258d0a39d4f9214b9acf1d5ce786d339feedef
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQML' 'sip-files00077.txt'
291f0016330674a9ae109910a92bad2e
58a856835e1014f1b02625c63d28a126d6fb3f83
describe
'9438' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
cfc872936c5d7c04a236ec1e65cc2d27
cba9b8c6c80b42a7da8db986a6535f8212c95cc1
describe
'814051' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
04abcea3af0594883e958a6bc36834ea
dc34244ada4168708f16d825941570e0f8b36a19
describe
'102345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
11a40ea9c27566fd41ecd72bfc6c4f48
42bc0bfc67144c1f5658104076f46cbbf0c4c600
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00078.pro'
178a96eedc0988dc96740822f146bb03
98dd70499c7921a15e8c6164d6cf027d92ca21e7
'2011-11-16T14:59:53-05:00'
describe
'37048' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
38369671341216ae719223f5b6d7fdae
137dec4def13a048aa6ec5c6bfe70fcbe96e5d1c
'2011-11-16T14:57:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00078.tif'
99f49f8532e5492137b58771418736d0
9b9086eb8ba13cf8ba98264956f5f7ba6ac9df90
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00078.txt'
d33b47907202ab32b1c14be2a23a36e9
4f3f1c8f73ba32b0cbabc2a7adaf03a49d22abcb
describe
'11199' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
bfd86521ea29b78a204bb1c020ebefe2
c1fb8b4ccafb811ae5e5683edaa87dfcca385dac
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3ec972e42fe4ec4227efe7f342757f4f
d690a8f1481b130abb5badb1f59d6af680a08aad
describe
'112405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
ab37acdb1ed9df77fe89616fd1cdc335
5ecbbd1b963972397bc40e6a1a0b181671b08229
describe
'38266' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7b966df2c407dd69929fc77b0cd5c7bc
95207636f88f185d4e77a8bd0633f8a8da044f22
describe
'39410' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
ea063fdc937548b9284592ebe32af70b
8295fead299eb9f6d3e0d4e7c611530ec98602e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00079.tif'
7ad19d148781eb718bf13c646596190d
966dcee34e3505c52857bc9ac86a9d81bdfdeb35
describe
'1648' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4707e741a046ccc59fb13d20e091f43b
595e3aec90f12926d17a9ba6398ea262db756ef8
describe
'11678' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
09bdb8cca6a8e837dfc2343084081f64
3c19fee903885dd70a7b89413762f20fb4bb64cc
describe
'813989' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
37fa42c0fba6fb64bc4eaf1a61bb0ce5
41d3069b17656b8ed089565dd30acb6f7cc0ed6c
describe
'104484' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0cb18c3fa2ef22fd594e6efdc34fd2d9
f5af476b4baf2b36a1b791b44f2096cfe58ba8ee
describe
'34942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQND' 'sip-files00080.pro'
4e047ad37e97867325f441fbffa56e13
02f40d73d2a52077978eec1f19cb9c0d7b6ccde4
describe
'37326' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
27da47c51f1901a6219262d5b4b3e324
0b5902a36d64bc1bcd2521f6b2d372ae76262aa0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00080.tif'
4912ac0cb58aa355eace3fc9bd82490c
653d7f9d16ba16d5e771264351f1a96acc4950a5
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3debbe7107364d94ab58fd40d4768195
bd5746011c4f9723c6d2a7bcb13f9c65c8a0cce0
'2011-11-16T14:59:48-05:00'
describe
'11341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
88ef3c47590864db06ca515ad24078cf
c8d6b64aa18187922324e0747dccd754f00e0986
describe
'820338' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
16b2e433031ea32d983e71cd40486ca5
7d784e31ef14f00647f6b5365f67186029ffd6db
describe
'108691' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
ab8bfef82a75e077bdad41402117d8ff
029d89278f5bc42da7eca4859567ef38475fc75a
describe
'36634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00081.pro'
4a4894b202acc459bebf7e15c8e805b4
c06ef695b766ff9879c9889cfbb0c09331ab51fe
describe
'38575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
b13f4969d90c3d909a292ffe99f7144d
0b8cd5900506b0e4a78bdd28f24c2064ec160517
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00081.tif'
80eaa430b5b79c92d1ad7adcb4706d85
54b6a7c410139e565fb375ce8efb8b61addf2d71
'2011-11-16T14:55:44-05:00'
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00081.txt'
2ad00ccf7b14e9369f2ceaf0d386d488
e3bea08485e867aded5bb60cd9edf50c97fac9f5
describe
'11465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
36c8f99f31e3393aec7cc71d675f4255
b9df80b28bf57658fb11d777344399eeddebeb23
describe
'813983' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
0611a70c404e40ca0bbc9051daad1193
37a306c12f24cca9a1a9db48e35470843d6b31a7
describe
'103686' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
72d1855cc9f0b96e768f5a680cc2c08a
f79e6efd03311b4a32a13e7481f2deb1520fdfc8
describe
'33825' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00082.pro'
c542db264a0a0981f100915c7af014e2
c2f2e3e39c00aa3571f5a7a8657aa84e41a26164
describe
'37139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
ea77fca67b3474469258c86716b31990
519d3f1f72896b1ad7317335d29e97cef0fa38d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00082.tif'
bf9e3efd18210b625a7269b6d881cf05
cbab21d13e156291e43fabc980cac2b830de6949
describe
'1468' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
bd479e7e3ae59ad94b0b9457772b7771
7eb2547fbd411d74f27389fc6e6344b93dcfd86c
describe
'11509' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9bbab2cfc9bfa9b80e02d11050a504d9
6079a0617d2bee65a906ca564d9e968ebd3a9c71
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
a761edc42114687950f037b8ec2965fd
ede1371b9fe5789db0fae833db1546cbac61e9be
describe
'114050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
43c07858bebc4315e58f6bdb2ff9d9da
d71984cafff16a07b081dbeed8e51d48838fb453
describe
'38734' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
e4cbd4584b6a6706559b25de8ca755ff
d19420bd5d67fd868a86ef1b6606966d88f06096
describe
'40227' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
2c78d11bd0b196abc45335673e6258a9
55ab169ff505f1f44aeeabfebbdcdf0af4705771
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
a5a0a44205a00967ac6c8460b6cae7db
14430bca77c1c0aa03d0c5519bb307bff514800a
'2011-11-16T15:00:32-05:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
80221d993ae7e82197fa83fa55263044
825d76a1e93042a7911d65d3998778866a626d5b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
a2d2ceb6aa22fa96a7ecb7cc6f5fabdf
063d070798bdaca24b8636456a1fc2aa22f6b1e4
describe
'814042' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b2f066a5f24a396e5f3f32817c8c73a2
7dd3035e3be72cfb25e28dac59fdf9ae81d88679
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
2038cc65e7c38945524f7ddecd479aaa
3c3ca902163693820ca077f2ee751c86974ce55d
describe
'39737' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00084.pro'
65d652a46fa4b60de7a59f9481b1f8ad
5e79fe1a53c921fa12ab6e4dd6b711567e850aed
'2011-11-16T14:55:59-05:00'
describe
'39945' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
8091a4fa1695dccad4e63fad1cd78254
6a1b6ddbe7afa65735ed0d7dc203e0cc509c7c32
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
5c909cd9f059b888c608726024849a14
92633fd80329fccf639486ebdb6c989dfb6a60a5
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00084.txt'
d310841d8f5b2d28c37cdcde81043c2d
14fb2e9b3ac74ad9cd6889fbc66ca4b00504037a
'2011-11-16T15:00:19-05:00'
describe
'11549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ce93bda8b3f3fd9af4181809e9843f36
180528ec09430c247dc1e59011d3f8b12cefed44
describe
'820311' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e685841b2659ffc9970e2be28d92a0a5
48081745acf2e2690d44e8a768f0e79098250f05
describe
'106705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
62174578730790dd403a6215af7e58dd
be1f2e7da1797d937f26e6e0c9030d0e0f664a3f
describe
'36735' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00085.pro'
73f2cb51999a7f6d35d788e3dee93156
410e1a81a1fa21c6f20be6166e56552cf77ead61
describe
'38177' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQON' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
1099704fcd3dcd9aa72533b95328bda9
7a39c2f29b1a7de3be2948d38fbad8478c7711fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00085.tif'
07e82e549f90a31c23bef39548e62207
3b860343c7d40e2ce346b62bd487dd08f73e2559
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00085.txt'
ece408c4dd0a73784aa70c75580d9484
2b7ff1205a95f2c0f386a33705531e2436034dfa
describe
'11366' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
6eddc05fadee68299d71ab36b7a6a956
8fa50ac0c2db8db8ffc8497d54d85f706b9f8f76
describe
'814031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
fe1e2f5d0fbc6f2f112effc0bfdbfe17
a761e0c21d2159edb81c8504088fd9f36ff572b7
describe
'90238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
2b9870893a82b33b9221b63894ff2e99
67f1c35db675923810ad18b83e443fc069630074
describe
'10490' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00086.pro'
58484f6ea09aa981275e759f34d508ab
3b928b533b6b8bd6d6770024de63f2840ab07db9
describe
'28469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fbf300c6b2363f2ca4fa61d01952893f
182a1756e2c965d7cbcd2e59782ff9156ba864c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00086.tif'
93ca14a056ae9feef69abf889d822612
0c70b7b9279398b71a1535702560b772e18a7450
describe
'448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00086.txt'
14622bda6a96625de9ab516d5f93ede8
548e4e09618c1921878e064189edab9304106d55
describe
'8877' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e268ddd12137cd50a19e321ae6351d81
8fa9e88fc405e6dfc481f6c293a1a08d3868764b
'2011-11-16T14:55:49-05:00'
describe
'820333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
bedad832658c04504ef9ff5d1b0374f7
df6b3c6c7f9a7bbfdb324301fbdbb82abf3f7ea5
describe
'89280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
0eef5f2f6e2227fd59026c6a35d9e62b
35f652467b180b6e0156a6a900f4869d845d5458
'2011-11-16T14:56:49-05:00'
describe
'28745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00087.pro'
723db1a675571993ab07e0a2583e8d6f
b293fc760888b3aa2d173364891d9c1ee82c03fc
'2011-11-16T14:55:56-05:00'
describe
'31708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9edda381aa387ed4b2902f2102872ed6
328a90f8ab9aa943c6207a4edb4338682c9925be
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00087.tif'
7fd9ca2d0d7ce4451b736568b0c058c1
f3d2d9e256b8b2bb3fc9a7640c24e0a615dd27f4
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00087.txt'
d05e546631bf19dbd1ba043db18c1bb7
67a8ee42b85f6375a2fe2b105038d5eed1950b7f
describe
'9800' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
aafaa254cb947206918fdf784528db45
7953d92a4013f5e5a251a6f166c8974f16086bad
'2011-11-16T14:58:29-05:00'
describe
'814002' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
aacbaca6f093c546406ae4ea60876b01
f717b483a40d12ec1c6cca7488f7d269ccc7466e
describe
'104103' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
6e877da935f9a6ca0334ec1c9c1b98f7
5a0670598c3efab3e031fa8925747c47ff72e284
'2011-11-16T14:59:33-05:00'
describe
'37676' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
e76561fdcdbb9f54b95ce69b5e6868b7
27ad52adf1f5030876c5e5349377c14bd5af1c27
describe
'37254' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
2bbbec9b83dcfff26537370c3efec1e7
6c4ceb434530a7df34818d71bb2325d4f740ed13
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
cb785e575c4036265c64e0994c5d1b10
9582977a875c6f46837e97d5b8ec5ccdc29ad190
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00088.txt'
fa42464a09aca838637b2f869e920535
2bb55dc05f0a659993df100b972103c04c8ceba9
describe
'11075' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
bd08084a96035fddb6296b7a73916a2e
27b8dcee951752a10f252d89a74ddda8a3142989
describe
'820295' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2fa3e8647ec547d432f734aaddad7dce
622277cd63ba4ce394c888b6aa3fb15b5114a7cd
describe
'103648' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
cba0c1ebdd0a48ed719804b8439a723f
b9b2dfd8887b5e661ea4e3437a948e0895d322fa
describe
'37844' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00089.pro'
421924e9e0576fb279dc0aa793d17eac
a7eb96cc1393b5b7a4d82178597084e0c6db9f3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ad8199011f2883be810dd0774eceb253
9f63659ecc77c1e038e40627f7ce1a553ca26ef0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00089.tif'
751449610d8a042e0358a22065106e55
d10e13c161e365fe75fa03eaacad5cbaf628f6ac
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00089.txt'
405f0ecea7baf35db4200f3fad942643
deef6201720afb5aabcdaf160aada85ccefa1b6a
'2011-11-16T14:57:57-05:00'
describe
'11217' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
2e8009c819956d202578f3c9166bd41e
29b1d4170257c1474da56a43a0175febdffd11b9
describe
'787406' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
08d16b50444d31b5cbfc3ceb4330af25
401a7ee9fa817ee6e0b4b70230d795e0958a9e81
describe
'102110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
f1d7224a2d99a8612a6674c0459709b6
fd7dd68f6f880f859c009d3e5fc6c3df65980fb8
'2011-11-16T14:55:20-05:00'
describe
'36142' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00090.pro'
81c8bc3a84cea77a61bc87731a8bed1a
209a0e34293304fea233fdde4bc0469071f6224a
'2011-11-16T14:55:09-05:00'
describe
'36833' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
c08d309f0f3891b1537f02fc3d924206
80694a65371cae20d428583b57d06fdf74d16a5d
'2011-11-16T14:55:18-05:00'
describe
'6305549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00090.tif'
257b920fe31f94416cf092c011f95bf0
fae4999652ba66754e29342422422d3bc252eb33
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00090.txt'
67f719d4a925fe5d958f0e5b217e39df
94f531a85b67597cc009e84c7afe81ef2cca191b
'2011-11-16T14:56:36-05:00'
describe
'11446' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
94e9c2f09737ac4d6c164a7169ee8dca
51a23d1031857c550ba08c9578be584ad5ac2ff1
'2011-11-16T14:56:37-05:00'
describe
'810330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
c5fdb1c9e2d00074402f2fb7f12c96c9
77a7674bd12568ce0017aa1281e141a85749633c
describe
'111375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
172411a3295f6309fe1017b71a24ae20
a83188f3b12ac598edc0bf018c675a1ce5c41ec3
describe
'37444' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00091.pro'
826112dcb1cd0dd4e0f7cfa568515a6a
9931e30710cda934df35280570606228e4815067
'2011-11-16T14:59:07-05:00'
describe
'39855' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
827ceed11d7bc2a524755711e3a895f7
c8e34a5c039839cd048f4740f9486e3b9e928fb9
'2011-11-16T14:55:58-05:00'
describe
'6489465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f96a7b39dab4985f431b95ab0393dd6b
c397c7ac1d7e581b76c7cfefe24174c844ba70d1
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00091.txt'
a623919aaebd2ec7f43acccd23f5e3db
5076af4ff2865268054a252bde496629865cf10d
describe
'11949' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
c8f5129374b731aaf50fe27a592563f9
1a0d1eee78dbc896e153f231df8e1d262fca5152
describe
'787425' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
521daab950a6ecbd3918b6355a29453a
78f6822c54edde745737c0525280d43ba61df58b
describe
'104480' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
8dad63cd6e45da4be94f96e58cda56af
80027c9d892e5edda30f072201352b72def03dca
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
0493a39a9685bc2c4e67c313a851c9e8
107abd022875964527c009d2e513bc4c2084fbaa
describe
'37663' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
872e5b7e0bd8604133897f2fa70e8ba6
62c8276b053651af454cdd4565d04759d68c6b7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00092.tif'
445539ae6d271e7c183a176cfb2e3f02
390a3fbf8b8251cfd398efea0d0d82a92baa99b5
'2011-11-16T14:56:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00092.txt'
cacd48073927f3c5f3fcb27736693c9f
8b6ddefa5082e6ae2fce98dd57ac4343e3bda9ff
describe
'11896' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
fe790cbe367036f5f98c0b8b29e0f18f
30a3075fb37f4f7744e3e3981f00e0462e2e749c
describe
'810349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
9708be8d93d243dc9988ee3cf53566c4
d29533fddc8dd325bd3f44c04a135864a948dd45
describe
'107809' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
78d9a6414a1dd90b6170eb8a9d609c01
9654ece7b0b1286ce1a9e9445ae66c4cb74de122
describe
'37741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
d18529b4fee7ac2dce766634ac6c788d
042587849f59b0308abe8e97bb0e12a2ca4748e0
describe
'38744' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
eb055c91431004d0ce196dce407e6c99
3ea5a908d268b5cb0646f3a486d8c472b1befb9e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00093.tif'
d50ff01ab0d2af6a9f9a7135d2836ba7
4ae8062c65a559e0ef064d809cc8d8702be2902c
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00093.txt'
3f50760ebf5b4ba2dcae484123f031a2
059aff2c6458e4e2bd7ad35e3127b72296019aaa
describe
'11625' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
905488f4cd2031fa811a3437199a715a
4f9d09fe3c39d7e0527496d16c46452623a03294
describe
'787407' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e4f04abc6f1165ce9a1ffc42784b335d
7fcae851b8c6b2e3234354939d709fa50ea3d1a7
describe
'111025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
8b006f923cbf75b77eca5dea78d918ca
bc3b186db333856d24c59a99582f577e1edd118d
describe
'39017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b6d2572e5e83f7e3da92f352a6aa70f9
ef3afe3498b0529980f09c53472248cf122504d4
describe
'39651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d0f9788416d5c3b47f9258f450a778e3
d2df73fdce4ac39af80898df91dcb793d6caeb0a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00094.tif'
9d20ffede51f105e1759f8dd36fb055e
26be19478a970bbb2ff3d3676458e8e5f473f8b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00094.txt'
36abe49841757a30a8cdb949f911c376
c9acdb4edb048b0466df7fb5f8c4ce2082b633ec
describe
'12426' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e70b9d5b9687b3f7f5dd8d70df4bb9ea
39578136ea951c069a6f0e9dbe859feefe2c8321
'2011-11-16T14:55:45-05:00'
describe
'810140' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
669392505e092ca71673eaf4a7a53620
38c65dca78fe9086b631bdd7c66921128b4f8cf8
describe
'96944' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
166292be4babbc5f142a5d10cd912db7
5700ed2c38f9f40ed2603fd173dbcab460bdce95
describe
'31163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00095.pro'
635a9e6955a73237daa2331692bda0bf
caa151d19a777a333cdbb34f764394d5981d62df
describe
'33760' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
63edc1768e22ea8c45d39ecef0897d52
ac848db978be7c3c2614f57edc65b8c7967e69eb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00095.tif'
3edc8830731c172535965a47bb0828b9
4228dbef4aa4cc7b46f4e28a1153fd337738cba0
describe
'1396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3dab7e7e816a6e5504332497fdfe359f
1f6bd4ac4df2d8cb3cdc8c7764559cd07774121b
describe
'10745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
40a78c8f660e00fa5da635d40755044f
bf70ea4f87b4b2123fc28daf223b9cd237c0d7b0
describe
'787388' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5e1dafb1d10bfaff81842e170256adc3
e43ed540067e545f67aab9c1a419ccff005e553f
'2011-11-16T15:00:11-05:00'
describe
'111251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
7cd67f392e428f0c63a574e8f7902369
e722377ad1210d301d976b36a9897f6285da456a
describe
'39718' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00096.pro'
72be809b82f6f49e56aa08ab9574a6a8
db38c5035ac2e9823a97d08a9d996911aa41688f
describe
'40649' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
89b998289b0fc206ddcf7c9b25b4d544
15715dbbb8a30bafe25802b33ae928433fae2968
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00096.tif'
a317d288bb792c0e42247116395bcff8
63dfd201bee91ff9fd5d228aa044f616ce5298d1
'2011-11-16T15:00:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00096.txt'
945c87c04795dd95a76d20d2e99b22c8
3480ec2c01daabb31ebb2bdf41e6bc942ab347de
describe
'12055' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
5d5e9070204312809040b7204f99246a
d6b125a360d662263b41a62d6ad40ebfee9e5cdc
describe
'810391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
20737695eb14dc6beb85c2cc8a447e36
8a8b0a152a2a7d396219c3a6eba729ef6ae4e505
describe
'88567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
62271ae6667219a3b64be32982c30b11
e3b178c79c4c0e6eea240e24d874b6890780617e
'2011-11-16T14:55:34-05:00'
describe
'28686' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00097.pro'
12d41a1a26842d84289d5d4ca9bc59b5
89a14a964801d0cb1a76744d72a9184365e9dbf2
describe
'31896' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
8b53e7ef4e34f039cbfc81ed7b7dd0f2
a5bf873aaa53153322cfde568a00574055edc79e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00097.tif'
9b3235b3ea48aaa08b082f4be163a9bc
ab325f79c9ad28e3e234d64ab62d34a129b5b9eb
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00097.txt'
76c7b236802086bc924065f36752b902
48c2f69a3a1a73a403f84f63c30f961b71ef33e0
'2011-11-16T14:59:15-05:00'
describe
'9594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
5167f823126211f240688df89f00b54a
c86b00066d58fa96347729ccda2bd70e7dcfb870
describe
'787402' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
75b83cf354b2d66ab2410987448aedbe
329be0a3866819abd6a7d26d31f4871ce0bc7add
describe
'114068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a6b65ff65b549ea0e278e5eaf82f1d56
f1c8248abd834a2462e62b769ae302e51098fafc
describe
'39417' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
87d0b6dd342c3aae4e5de7416a092238
2a2a5f64df6254d15a64d4282106f5c7d1353fde
describe
'40604' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
b1e9c60550e5a03e420b5f4fcf2f8dc8
45226130369a11c346a969dac4e862055f9f4db8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00098.tif'
6958be12d396bf377fcd3981c79a6ba0
5b90dd271b884ace70cfa25f51ceed1e7084425a
describe
'1658' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b203b2be96da4a1f21e8e68b8af319dc
c33996a119d40ca060531c2d953935dfbda23976
'2011-11-16T14:55:17-05:00'
describe
'12502' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
cc9da5a3017e80c1ce96c43454a476c0
198a111c175b99700653df6e2b7cd8989124c592
describe
'810355' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
d3da9262bcebbb26bae0e7ce5ae46bab
e9cad8e54f5bb72e4633f780721da5d964173ab5
describe
'112581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
7059e6c318295e46f501ec7bf00e71e1
950e0e8588842d6714a5c899dafb13464039aa1a
describe
'40050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00099.pro'
660c22ed5b5853ea42c40b55906d0389
9b1b5a7c67c9dacb5c93a588a1a7c0a9b10517b9
describe
'40599' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
436a09a6f6145ffddaaf2c04ac9f7395
5ed7a087ad59b236d99671dd9b3420ccf114a4c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00099.tif'
249576edf901124b3235f5f0f716918c
54b944f0b515043c16bb346168129ed27546ef21
'2011-11-16T15:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
0452a401783bb074f6d7cf7785247d2d
7a581e4d9b0cc7c6726830615292f173145ad94d
describe
'12018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a74b9716f0dfde709f19b104bc1d9106
8b25a759b79e878ae07c10b064572121a20480a1
describe
'794788' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
16c82dd940776186945870e7f1c53b4f
c14ab8a289f535237fe7fa99062cdf952a95705d
describe
'116865' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
ade91667f236fd14797bba4df513ae71
05d695f4f9a2530ebbb33e1645418bd5472652fd
'2011-11-16T14:58:48-05:00'
describe
'40126' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00100.pro'
a918897f3d35e37e665b5607437c331f
5f40c781b56257017fe25c7b65595211f21b766a
describe
'42347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
680fc8e75e74d5ba9ac17fb9103ff173
a1aaaffad72fe2e039ba0cb1e9392d8fee20e95d
describe
'6362451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d0583d266c3be2fab8db642a5729f47c
239712034dd5681124425db50eb29681bbe88060
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ef0927c2d115705f569c6c6089de1133
2eafbb7874a897e0e4e6f40c2ca6d12e2cbcffff
describe
'12395' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
467d1f8e2045603bec24988e00d7c2dc
b232977d1aa619072e290d73e86df1da04f1730c
describe
'810365' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
fd3adf7894314d36d66d877c441a86a2
a87c402f40c61551f6795ee10861c2536af7df86
describe
'112102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQST' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
dec02244ab0308168a755ad964cee9b2
ecc7a75c237fd68f148c0b1d640d2f3c2942e5ee
describe
'38835' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
6c16ac580eb60ae403f54e23c6a093ca
dfeabc410fd511e24aa998c5888a91f4ab445561
describe
'40590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
1c50be15ee1961211e3a4e2f88b6b7ca
a6456600d152379011113c27a209a14989f9cc93
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00101.tif'
bce15391b8baac74b1791f8dbc316345
a0abadc0f9bffcbff696bb1b46140b5bc6efadc6
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00101.txt'
b4afc32dcbd71816f01fc5c4b4732b4b
8b9f893165540c4155c709faf30756bdc90f7746
describe
'12061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
e39758d88d7d80ebb79dc78ce181302b
8b30658ed79648d8234b6ff1a97da359ffc4f1a3
describe
'787246' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0e705c363272611061dd5f1582f6efe5
c1a529a9f4eafafd59c5b3667baf20e53e846061
describe
'94180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
d84e20214fcebc14e15976b5fbd39ebf
96991630adb8e1a1037d0cb7398a1caf90e92925
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00102.pro'
9911e20cdfade6758a2a245585393a88
78dd37869bdf7a8c1045111e4ec880cdd6b4b638
describe
'35114' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
6328c2dd0ede4aba070606e26e8be1fc
f47db58184ab08922b3bc8b58dca4b6a8ebc4daa
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTD' 'sip-files00102.tif'
3093cea048b73db5a99d8c4cf438ee8b
56b7fab1897f7300694c56bdcd968c82867a60b5
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTE' 'sip-files00102.txt'
acf6d1a3cdbf22de1f226fcdff69e6a5
9252c07a7e2c3351054332af43045a0c9186b117
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTF' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
2adf988185de041277830e22987f838c
3d3329a6631ca1cdb1dbeb613599c1a7c2981055
describe
'810370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTG' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
fe0b9d88ffe7566450cd7915d6e0cd4a
668e6926358fa8220a4a96af09db1e409c4cfb10
describe
'111602' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTH' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
858c0f02234a7138f9a678756bb34041
6975768ca66490dd847ea2aa1432a57e3ab5b7a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTI' 'sip-files00103.pro'
0c9337aec3a2dbfaa1f987f1968eb786
b8016b9b6d8ab88bd25b1257d247b32a70839346
describe
'40001' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
f6d5e677b9149698ac9fd923e8847530
c28847190248ef4533b47861445d6f59ccbd992c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTK' 'sip-files00103.tif'
06a1a77d1d617e7199ed4fd3b291cd94
2f33b9fdba937dc73ad90d8bb1aef2cbed9dca67
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTL' 'sip-files00103.txt'
317b903a767a81a5aa0f833d858d1cf9
4e3dca595577d9418ff4aee0676391ed983b3cfb
describe
'11908' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
279401eda2e557e8862214e713f33cb3
3509964fa67e00620b6245dce5a05099c22ae94f
describe
'787360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTN' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
b83251752d7976ab39f8201e83e47f4f
5154bf494d6e6cc89275fac06365d8b1a0d760b4
describe
'109131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTO' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
07ee4c9c5acdc505db3d8fa2065efb2a
8fcbdf5ba622e4400b43ac5e746ed519ffba620f
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTP' 'sip-files00104.pro'
165e891f7f2c47a7d8f154ea5e821bc5
61872e8573810a8e381c10817e6e15cdcaa02bcc
describe
'39726' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
4d3835eaee1a240db51f90a3b55c9671
b30cec3a3bcfbe524b61a47df23c568897bfcfb7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTR' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7bbc0c0be70d51a247c5e657292f3345
42c9f520c598796b04d7d49fd6c9edd4b2dc6546
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTS' 'sip-files00104.txt'
055dc6c6e2b6de814ea5c0019018287d
ec8bce73c7d81675015cd136a02a0babf9de883e
describe
'12594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTT' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
6c019a03e57af023ef2cfea6f9c2b1e2
8925a968484a2216a52d5cecdf338d5d9df9e08e
describe
'810348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTU' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
e380e1e08acc4a6cc881a4cacc131bcf
96dbeb15658dd7ea7a7165eeb12d6c065a35c965
describe
'106761' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c44fd89f2d06c99c3cccfd699d6954b0
0a53fb5d9a08ec0267c31ac2ea5883160fce1a51
describe
'36817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTW' 'sip-files00105.pro'
726b666d4edbe9cba65211d91156799a
bb19ba5d7048cbb1c7a807ca552a352785ee715f
describe
'39166' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTX' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a721d87207f8cf84350a3eb61d4467bd
7f23acbecd023b7231ae1aadb990d1c9bf431531
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
705a8bc99100ffd8ce76b03c3b7d9554
2c56a0161361297a84d23330c8c90ca676cf1376
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e96255186c921a221cea54ff23e13d40
45a0d7a92a6a6bb60f96ab20decbc874303b01b2
describe
'11863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUA' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2b4d99fdb0f2dda41f43b0ac0406aaa9
a7e502d32fa4599f3d541605c98b9122634269d1
describe
'787372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUB' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
29a23dcf5a80ef2ccac46bfb2a3b2a58
a8e1df13f28455b49eed2b72eecfb892146c0c0b
describe
'109766' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUC' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
8e710dc999f139481cc52be9e3d39ae0
3db68a0ccfc351a2dccad6e5803fb223dfaf5fbf
describe
'38411' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUD' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d64464f33588af1cb113142acb0d5e0f
c41fb0cbf7483a868cc58d1e2c5e2dfced611c18
describe
'39730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUE' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
2d07c3f756f8c398955c352bd987ad71
81bdb46e70d842d2559a8bad5706ed222c529210
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUF' 'sip-files00106.tif'
7352752f91d8d7b1df07cc8485b61c79
ca8f7113aae17f1ad98dd44c2e80b385ab356b8a
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUG' 'sip-files00106.txt'
052c6a620166dd8d4883ba18c936808d
ff98cd1a92de3de9f7ad3af87298a7126823b935
'2011-11-16T14:59:55-05:00'
describe
'12229' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUH' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
37f91ea3f8d37a1a5f513e123e1236e8
b51b14446ca4c19bdc1af902466dc8d6ce532951
describe
'810410' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUI' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
7a379a45c07e6793a5b6b8253254607a
9af2d644452e4ff2bd293cdfd5710a1e8911d70d
describe
'70920' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
35094953676b05ae7cf129ed1f052ad1
77e99dfaffd88c427b97b21d93e389c7d504c6b6
describe
'10109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUK' 'sip-files00107.pro'
e53b2639140fe335a535a99eba27039d
1b1350aa8d21f444dd942d412e579de76608c230
describe
'22996' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUL' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
6850eb6dc4948314c0a2e384916a31c2
90cfb3cfc0da8d484c77b1d6bba21dd2fc35ac20
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUM' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8019aeb51359c788c6b5733448819e9d
9b5b23d3162a27198ddd5cbf81f57176314bffdb
'2011-11-16T14:58:21-05:00'
describe
'455' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUN' 'sip-files00107.txt'
b1d3575fca27eab332ff39644a8f4a14
ec6bdf025a41b99e20b8bceac0c3484ead167e54
describe
'7450' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUO' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7bd18d4bd4b926a9ee31366fadad2634
17df70b0ca0c920b27aded37363ada025bd63481
describe
'787229' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUP' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
821979b170ed7475e33a4de2a190007e
6d83118415f26520b66d4b7f87b55e8eff9ee1bf
describe
'79925' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
8f0e58ed2c6a6e52321593a99b21ba5f
4eed33a2445e1d7d1e5bd116b396c5de8e6c59b3
describe
'27472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
8d98d82fa5485ac3bada265a6d3f5f5c
710790ce041d1cf981d5ac16d5eebd507d67a978
describe
'29096' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUS' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
16b2e7178ae26a44528f993d4c502efb
c24ea5bb5e8f440b9fb10fe885905d8a98506eb5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUT' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b98675b930caf99cd8af5519e690d1cb
31a5d00c5b36aad36563e4ce3f77f88a20aec65a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUU' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f04c59462222bbaa99068058b4d480d7
308d79b6c7b9a90583dbce75dff0298faeed7f5c
describe
'9111' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUV' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
61885ccf0d8192e4449264d9a29c1edf
60e4a34ca4fc884cc4af1201a10d02cfa96084bb
describe
'810316' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUW' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
d57179c08e6b3c67d876eea180b1a60f
3bf0b6edc09fd4fb9527700cf904ed684422923a
describe
'98361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUX' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
e7cedfe004a105fe3fc785a73dc07dc9
cc5bad77084376029c808483866d9c18590f7f3e
describe
'33069' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUY' 'sip-files00109.pro'
67eb3ad2e078b61778479f42fe53d5da
e7244de28e47ee7624ff81d2cbb9b27a91db5d9d
describe
'35658' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
e4e9a9616aec8a19d9e9098040a48e95
58a23e6a54dff171729937969da9641627150017
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVA' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e5a42e2f085bfe53b27e813f762cd74c
667ab1ac3eb3b25527181ce7653684aeed6a52e6
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVB' 'sip-files00109.txt'
d23122146c7e9b7ec592a0fae5fc4841
31fc8ea6fa76fa2cf1b86e69f791feffdffc9795
describe
'11172' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVC' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
6d8ff407c61fd9147a2595946ff4b454
8e5a9f8ffd233b17958d604f966d4bf8e16153f4
describe
'787413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVD' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
4aef9311b008684a3ca15c16fe3ddb27
3e4f22a8bd44f33e558088754c673800155e8bf5
describe
'106518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVE' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
8074aa75d29a510b9997a42c7b885332
892949f98401004fa393e3ad74b32853fef13431
describe
'37034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVF' 'sip-files00110.pro'
50a3fedb89459a7d1eef0438fda67355
4762bcf923803649273fbbd4c54690eb2db3844a
describe
'38757' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVG' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
dd892d40afc9599dc941ca4876e09dd6
544b4508dab0e3424946aa2cb966439926d4481c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVH' 'sip-files00110.tif'
b47283f96259cd1f3ee9587aefa03f66
fc891145dff874a9740c1dc49c9a3ff1651709ff
describe
'1573' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVI' 'sip-files00110.txt'
32b33690131c653cf52246a0bc80aad6
4b5058ab3414057c8169401e9eebf823b757cae9
describe
'12093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
90acb29bed46eedc0d7418f525445a8d
bf226fdfbf1f9c90f0b357fba85e63592dac1ca8
describe
'810402' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVK' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
1f3921315ea23f2d33118e09df76f6fb
3ea55acf330faa1e2eb7ac0825657633f33961b0
describe
'94080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVL' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
b417210e5df6c5b519378516d5d42d59
04b28848017e0f22270c87ad4b399d09f408ad8f
'2011-11-16T14:59:04-05:00'
describe
'31014' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVM' 'sip-files00111.pro'
44488ab7ddd1ff5e616d57caa91df27c
9f276bb8687df8523eee8f5ed35dbc7de65960d5
describe
'34227' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVN' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
11a4546d7ed688d3318775008f78d6be
1a3ec89d2e945e0411e06a04e3beaa494156837f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVO' 'sip-files00111.tif'
2fdd059aeaf4dcaf6469a302c86ea568
ccdbdaab80fcc04a8bd2372c388b0b41ead62598
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVP' 'sip-files00111.txt'
3426ec749364800b5677e2614b49fb59
f9300e304835b384694b12c31df67d9744f55801
'2011-11-16T14:59:39-05:00'
describe
'10956' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
eaa90bf950db93de2c6b2cbc27f90855
324c323ea7859d05cbca1141f5394ac9d1fec0d4
describe
'787398' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
1920312f44225a264843734b875ff61f
2e9123fd4149aa4df0f869075d8e4262c121746c
describe
'98441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVS' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3d3504dd8598e5e288be06719f2ad812
cc152574e9920f7dc6742a61542cd4754fe7d8dd
describe
'33904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVT' 'sip-files00112.pro'
6aa14189ef3a81b1bf708a9f95f0aff8
08290b01d2af3287a03cbeee05e6a8eee06d0114
describe
'36300' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVU' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1db103dae77056c10c0fd5c3f28c15a1
c63c6e1464fd7c20cefbc9fff96f6637690f74a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVV' 'sip-files00112.tif'
9ec81039621ebe041f95f841964dc57b
39f81032f198a8daaf23a7c0af9647183a281e54
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVW' 'sip-files00112.txt'
c5dafaf55e34d2e5e78829ca9b243abc
48ce4f8f28d3e90b67a7544ff893c1341b657be9
describe
'11440' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVX' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
cd56f186e8d49c8b65bd9dca811b3c61
a581313abd3798b3b9c38dfcbd96148a8d454a9f
describe
'810404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVY' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
b2ba3219bf020012e47e6b94e92a2c05
f81b372ee6a6319ee2174542baffe022b387f72b
'2011-11-16T14:57:56-05:00'
describe
'103503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
1dd8773b58117f91768417cd100862d2
b47a9eb01b725830263d3bec52be81e2e9363812
describe
'36478' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWA' 'sip-files00113.pro'
6d6c5bd1008b109b55581be81150b11a
9f1a2753c8b050babe517453ef527c1300bf584c
describe
'37209' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
66c31fb937512aaba87a00f78c3ecbe5
8969b7bdce4ddb4f911b2c1fb927165243d8ef3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWC' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5d56312823de994c20b95fe9be44a08d
4215a11bb65952648ce0c2db81fa4dfbf99cb2ca
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWD' 'sip-files00113.txt'
689320ed1268fa3296f03ec1c77dc79e
62c1a4721fc48925928bebed71fdd629600bd37b
describe
'11201' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
e64e385c114572a67c62d74b71e4eef2
ba0f6cd6c2ff301fca4b63baf03e88051834557a
describe
'787419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWF' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
63455f0d520fa48bad876ffe77f24613
f39a6d7a6cf09e97b8c47b0286f29341fcf7b720
describe
'105085' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWG' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
16c8b9f6cb8c00bae3563ba11c5b6d53
aa36ad85e3100a3f36ee7a4cdfc10584a2897907
describe
'36112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWH' 'sip-files00114.pro'
5b87df8e32bae5b3be75efb790e3dbaa
add3d4160e9c958c1cde101260a5923f51705b70
describe
'37642' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWI' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
3fce5bab4a7d3b44ec0923610b6e2771
031a7385ebf562b3e8eaa3b1dce5ce3aa661a549
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
bc41bdbd5f5cbedb128df221ce014649
148a80467602ae26a94f383873698c4529779845
'2011-11-16T14:58:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWK' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ff4d907c3285088742d8ec1f350f4a26
7b6e24c86eb5ab21996890a335869b8fa19ecbd4
describe
'11613' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWL' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
250d902b4b0f3ebfac911ca6449bb49c
6a314fd2680b0009a356c67b2172b16fac1e1618
describe
'810346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWM' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
7975b4d20a0bf3e2ed59452352067da6
7fc46489aec4d8aa547a0480247e30e6cec3c0f7
describe
'113352' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWN' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
448456304373f74d2387fe1294af712e
2e630f2dcbef2c40ef124e9237a109f44bbf671b
'2011-11-16T15:00:46-05:00'
describe
'38861' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWO' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a02cb9937b3d260f325fc7208efec9a9
b3b09e51cd7fb61b5a2d04b00b0f9a5e80d84d10
describe
'40288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWP' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
01a47e4c82b99c3d684cff2191cfe7b5
0596d5438fba8ed074296c183b37b90dc48a6aeb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files00115.tif'
87343cc0c1a63324f3e823a95f0b1fe4
f226a7daa5e220cb767b0a2624e7378180daa00b
describe
'1637' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWR' 'sip-files00115.txt'
43299c83c685ca02c1a9600d8a4f2151
13c826a252cfabb0f64137b97e9548bce8923e3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWS' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
bca93c9af4a140e6601f6fbb77fd8b05
3c4dcfd5b8a05d01aff85a9da035982a9e847792
describe
'787417' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWT' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
60b694a3b93e0e7693a0d8b93bc85a60
5cdad9b2393486f1596e4e565d3722108605c8b1
describe
'105577' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWU' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
9af8b9a7161d613391f8fccfacad7d26
2162f64ee33b9d99a76a0f3292e30989d63a7d36
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
bb510e1bffb1f0bf001fe99c8bdd805d
7df89ddd765a8013b13f81de2fa72c556c043fa0
describe
'37915' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWW' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
80960adddf4db62a0fbbe5065bb9d408
4fc0a90bbaad817c5694e9965662b52a33e99614
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWX' 'sip-files00116.tif'
670512a694384f6707a9babd84bf637e
fb8e4eb63d6299b2c5d86023ee971c7a90298710
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWY' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c72547530250e051bd7bc82fed0ad9b0
711638d5dd6398de67124a66a2b324481f164e5b
describe
'12367' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
dc4369c3d8cdaec898d1ff1bd9ebfb32
cf2c6d4fcccb755f6a9f14008f67202b964447c8
describe
'810398' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXA' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
3041c370a220c3f99255100f2fc84f6a
784c8b47ca8b2e7c82b0dadebe0a74b145f6cb69
describe
'99874' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXB' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8dde17457b24e4de76d1b6dc9790fa42
461a54f6327e0cdce022a7e7818e58d0161e5f67
describe
'32963' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXC' 'sip-files00117.pro'
69e2691994990a7ead6244f6e9234d5f
a292dede046a394ef41316c39c336c7590e06bec
describe
'36077' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXD' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
ad0fc2e509497e0a724706b3546b3c4e
4ebaf8105ebac107724db42ed41bf0388369cddb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXE' 'sip-files00117.tif'
1870f205358fb1ffdd8ec558c95f7655
e5ed19791e820af52987a6809bf5b9e5eda8b23e
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXF' 'sip-files00117.txt'
3c9cfe52a18bb00f441affac7a28b024
743da2fd37f13a4bc7cbf04d3d5a879ef03f7339
describe
'11132' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXG' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
b01222ba373f317b9cc8055df047eb01
a4198058f0892408eb13e1505f3bbcc01fd1da9d
describe
'796245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXH' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f8e637a529f95e07ccc42f6f6c35db7f
73fbea479d91f8ab2ba6fe0a13a140ba5aa6784e
describe
'87696' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXI' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
00f234894366bc423b971d45676fb15d
a59797b75899a447a04a5c5711ed66c0e51cd5cc
describe
'8807' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
f9165f713afdfab41f66012b9c8560b6
fc9a4925602751aac647381d00635b131fcee65c
describe
'28432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXK' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
82bbc1d7963774c63334ed944692c82e
3941ab4e78bc996df4b6691ffc31f9f1fde99d73
describe
'6376287' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXL' 'sip-files00118.tif'
e7d1367b10b48d29f1d5184102d3fed0
f93d4238351e1c8c7224cb50e3355a77852aa7b0
describe
'381' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXM' 'sip-files00118.txt'
131d5748657c57b3f3a51beba60f5a05
67ddf31b384d2b55498d816e9e8334eb8959d8e4
describe
'8781' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXN' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
8ea6e1c46d9e97f85edb1ca5ac781089
95614f21a7c2497e2078b939c6776c0e9d914cf2
describe
'790412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXO' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
a6c6030042e9c38e6617b826256ea8c7
a8e4663a10805de5473e04702d966911229eec01
'2011-11-16T14:55:25-05:00'
describe
'95177' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXP' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d926a4949f480a78eaed3dca155ce3ad
4e54556b46587be3437057a0678cc2f7e0f2fd6f
describe
'30172' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files00119.pro'
5c2dce038b1810cf1560f1a4130e3efd
46f9839a820a4b96ca9dfd2a88271a2b57df5e62
describe
'33772' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXR' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
bc021916ca6a81a83ab438587dd3d4e9
a1a3290a1fd385b7b44a1e24aedb5a5ef44b370d
describe
'6329989' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXS' 'sip-files00119.tif'
639ead374f0b858d76498351eb275505
d8c5a0bb5a9119adcaf1884ea337020b31b680ac
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXT' 'sip-files00119.txt'
23a810076ea1374b90ff83539f15bd3d
60641743ec8b086dfeb5b9978c15779b29bf2b51
describe
'10238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXU' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
d8cf4d91c9215b3cb47db4ca4de4c84f
5ada94b4c80c76e9c86da1847b96fdff7a7ba06c
describe
'796238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXV' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c6c8f408c946a995704c1fdfefbed5b3
8abbe10ac01eef575e17fc50c82d9103f141c7de
describe
'106180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXW' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
bb1fe65e1b0cfc23391b96cff5159139
5afbeccf190f434a082977fa9e50ad951d23462b
describe
'36083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXX' 'sip-files00120.pro'
086ad7e6ba15e7ab48ee2b8398ceab7e
cb883af0e2fccf83d8e09193d9e4a84f22f10eb1
describe
'39061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXY' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
90a305a991004296d063a819fab30258
f9284030527553e8dc1a6c7523beae9de0094f72
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ffd3da00e3982859d2da617c43de0c4f
14ad87f2aef8bb67bfa7f8f8ab8bd49243025bf1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYA' 'sip-files00120.txt'
2c9aaa353041b35c1190dd86c9fd55d5
9019bbb6c9f3dadc3f8ac3cdb52979676b1c6139
describe
'11730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYB' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
3392591ca845a57e63a04ff9314d6c34
cf3ee636bd79d9bb201f1b6fcf4df677aee7b881
describe
'790476' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYC' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
5184d2ff4ead01b4e67d5adee95150c9
fd35843d3da17ca360798aed44e5843eb06e4eed
describe
'112034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYD' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
69008cb2da7914db9128d6418cd21d0a
51445a57c13b1d71a08f32175633cb1f57bb2480
describe
'37693' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYE' 'sip-files00121.pro'
219a040ad2604142e856fb70e464ebe5
df97c56c535a4cbdd7f36b24a790bfb39cb9498e
describe
'40538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYF' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
de2a7a4d3e70cae95d4f09ba7905a3fd
fa297de37b8d00b5527f4c7e0cdd6bedc2179c23
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
84a844286246017a1f36b0a30391990f
60f7642bd13b7218f416d529ec541947f51d53ef
'2011-11-16T14:55:08-05:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
566edbfa1d8c00967a3370ee384058c6
732700b6153d066c41f6591107a87b9a1c95e805
describe
'12038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYI' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
1e2420f93ddabdc193653f1689ef19ef
deea1e041eacffe6bd09e6329dbc24f59049dce4
describe
'796269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
9a53429e239ca4cf9fb4aa7dc6b0b267
fa5431539f8cb01b6faae88df42a65630aefa6aa
describe
'112667' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYK' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
3a732f4320a000794914afdba34a85e8
d2db5b81cc92794526cc4871bd2aab6513831760
describe
'40873' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
5a488dd3d9b9ddb063d13681d4ccbcee
e53ffde35c8a5cc3a882b3ddceec02b6ec5fb55e
describe
'40291' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYM' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
7d09f08d3b0816f3dce254408cc9ba8a
42918cbe22ad4c92e95d9b60481f33e913066706
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9215149fac4a93cbc1a47a764b22826d
1b501adc77beaef169ca3cfd0d198434605acc89
'2011-11-16T14:58:52-05:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYO' 'sip-files00122.txt'
7a9c27ca5ce5e1559376748688afc78a
55be9704e869981559036ba4f576801caf4d00eb
describe
'11914' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
3ef513581797b5199a2bfe0aa23717cd
e64ad84b13bce358bb9538f707fa97019d5be4d7
describe
'790442' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
44a20dac226435b62e4ba55544375dfd
70b35562c801ba28e50d65dcf36420fdbefd8c5c
describe
'111656' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYR' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
b36c1cd8f866565fac2ac596dcecda3a
3365f3633b728f23c7255ce307f9995e8652dc67
describe
'36714' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYS' 'sip-files00123.pro'
bb1e4ee10521bce9947a6fd306d47c82
a958c24dac82eb065cfeef5cc348e0817dab21ac
describe
'40157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYT' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
2130d718309311114160f14f73acb64a
959d3a84ea3cec562be77942f82a690b8b73e29e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYU' 'sip-files00123.tif'
62c1b1337e4d44ab6c113a653c14fee8
c1595c4af34bccd4f8c08c28bc27ebe24e3c11d0
'2011-11-16T14:59:10-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYV' 'sip-files00123.txt'
afd89aee6a0eec0af3a9f036245bb14d
72d63364513b35e77f8fd3ecb6aeae2c06fe9cdc
describe
'12467' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
67c85e1edf5c4d41d459161206d5be15
468954df82e773d3f452bf1ddba1a33aa64ff799
describe
'796254' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
0d27119c802d31c1e6e82bcd43e5ab31
1d41d7ad7eba596a615c86c26f92658b2ce72222
describe
'90578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYY' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
c00df45bacc57fc4300c8d3e65cda300
ce6601d3fc348e2c095a03047f3c3b39cb47f0ab
describe
'28878' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files00124.pro'
77bbc6acef81111a6ff4f83e5a384d7e
14b39d7fbfdd0a76d8008fa614fe7e420145a55e
describe
'32602' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c49d60da78bccbc46b2f563fd9d28e25
c12805a0f87aa8c5246177bfee9595c17e0a34b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZB' 'sip-files00124.tif'
5048f6f33f40fa01a23b7d50e4f1b301
32c8aa81b0f0bf6a6d5add8df688f72a27f1da71
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZC' 'sip-files00124.txt'
389144d73aae35d4ddf8b920f98a2f6e
251a48c9364e8391c2aac120dece262e293c45f0
describe
'10374' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZD' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
c90a6a67f6b237705c1dd947c212d3f2
f3800091791870a61a7dded30301ffd3b292ba32
describe
'790446' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
09ec6776ba6fc69f138a20c76d7efab3
ba5c0bde30539a1af5c4cc2bda832e1b0fcd595e
describe
'111100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZF' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
caafc730f45c7fdbdca8f266304cdcda
08c2d12d94a2b9d9c5b7dad51b697ef4fd0e75e8
describe
'37921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZG' 'sip-files00125.pro'
efe0406221b24f87aaac376eb3030424
7f688460bcb2fe71a8bfd620a55eb5d4e37ed9f7
describe
'39216' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZH' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
83006ff4872a2f77730392a02e6ddc96
248b3b8639bf6f0ab16526fc9b7b12eed3660e35
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZI' 'sip-files00125.tif'
2f0456476c9ebcd787125717bdf23896
67de46b1660b780d4cbaaad4bec553df7df5cfd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
3c52af2e665133d382c2ab4accefe194
b372a2c427f0f988ca6bcda4ad3a007f506daa3a
describe
'11464' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
2220b649e8014626bf2be341682dcff4
7f1d38cba1d645cecf6bdd619178f70fc3332d00
describe
'796232' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZL' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0782ffca2d5e1183d0a5ec57821a6a44
cffc0a27f24f1c33c8377624cd2593c78d22237f
describe
'112587' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZM' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
7235bcd3ddf73457c7d238c133209552
6235a25c805606e4844e00774fbaf85a2bd8bcf9
describe
'38201' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZN' 'sip-files00126.pro'
57cfbf75dd2de94ad9363cb3fc254aeb
0c16fad476258da519073f50936b583256a9c4de
describe
'40568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
d2385088785ddf82c7d2d611758fe245
81d960f1437adfff60365b1404b7cbb7e7580504
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZP' 'sip-files00126.tif'
41e1f2201ac1c9abe5e8e2426b52bccd
eaf972cdcc34121cec3103546720cdb60bfb68b2
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files00126.txt'
7276e94ab74af88e4ab0b237d206ea27
2d9283e8a070f24ac57c5c8d21a6811039f8d7aa
'2011-11-16T14:59:23-05:00'
describe
'11909' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZR' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
b45467bd20454c4609bafd160a7ce8e7
f7281878923ffdf1e5a9ae42dff5cb8728e69e73
describe
'790391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZS' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
69e8caea25e92755752a8a9bf63aca4a
a95c50c0ccad0fa4bc11fcbf885596a74b762a3c
describe
'101883' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZT' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
07e264a80ac39b0849bb38b3c62710d9
59085da737369b004815b851cdd46661e586c6ff
describe
'34484' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
c1bd224cceb74b663681cc8fbc4a7af7
e8ab64678b35b5952f78fa6689d1028a3a60953e
describe
'37202' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZV' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
31f42dff035e3e9e2b93ccf6e7af1939
2b2c7e5fcb16ea6f0352c7fd81c899fc8a194ab5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZW' 'sip-files00127.tif'
ab907ce26087b81ae3d99c9fc64a734b
436a025b883b65b68736247e5c99c358bf689a07
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZX' 'sip-files00127.txt'
fdcd9f250d800a6e9160ff11e9e2b1da
ae147d6fe6882c5e0c21103328271b8002df4263
describe
'11769' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZY' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5d3485737a48cb96e76b4a854e6cd92a
d8ae4119b1f182fca1f2f0a8fa62f3b4787ce2da
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
52592179ace2939b1e5ca9b2991fb443
7d9c34f1e66c1da63b7d7725b2d67106eca60eec
describe
'90168' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAA' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
e629ef5c918ab7cc85d6cb11c44bad57
3547ca9dc8db80d6213cb0e9053cedfa52a85e41
describe
'14214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAB' 'sip-files00128.pro'
61401571d838be4f7f5de14c5b8d21d4
56c1413a3743da252e1f42206ec502177d20bfde
describe
'29824' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAC' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
14e71e25303dfe00ac55fa8a35a77db8
8481d09b63bc3a5bbce6a6682f1a63d7d9fa654d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAD' 'sip-files00128.tif'
d223fb44df643b9074f4ef4177158991
6fc9854beeb2488e3173e5f9e9773eab438ebc88
'2011-11-16T14:59:22-05:00'
describe
'605' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAE' 'sip-files00128.txt'
af317de728cbca2e6da6ea80e35f1de8
e618efc85f08a51daa3b7fd835ceddeca2840947
'2011-11-16T14:57:15-05:00'
describe
'9279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAF' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
def711954b1cbb9f2572da3b8ae6549c
3a47aeb914044e6531c08047bcc99b4eb30947e6
describe
'790451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAG' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
b80ec45ab6946950e76f22e95eb60736
eb41e3f6d18b886a2714e18034dc532d21c69474
describe
'85800' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAH' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
94d256d0f486d7d8f71fc9324ce887ac
177d8780693bf31f4f5db45791643097c8652d6f
describe
'27915' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
9894756326f4571488e570fb1e498a36
76e9f5fc5af858bc8f8db2481fd534e726990852
describe
'31420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
489339c29ea4e78949bd210213203338
37fe0be01d39506dee192c48acab3f432a811dd3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAK' 'sip-files00129.tif'
1f3310278e9093e61bdda1f526b7b8f1
7e180a1441a637dbe3c9e87ad57f677e6e3d4fc2
'2011-11-16T14:58:53-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAL' 'sip-files00129.txt'
f8586f3944763c6466fedfc6dbed8ad7
35b11ddbc0913588a858137c4c59fde95f6e0668
describe
'10065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAM' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
d67ece9a208cc8918007f6b0090862b8
4ab2f4d7fe723020967ad27205b0b8d0cda392c6
'2011-11-16T15:00:29-05:00'
describe
'796194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAN' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
54d48e9e01c0ba66af4ca3648b8fad70
7b7486e7f71d96ed58f67dce3ba5a9d4ed8544fb
describe
'92659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAO' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
f9049a9a1857c309c2f7e156866ae862
80b4a0be54ed645bf6fe2f42ad8640868a61e631
describe
'29503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAP' 'sip-files00130.pro'
4182c23fc21aa17704fb355c1163d6be
e582ea3562144074f21009ec364bc99053c33a43
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAQ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
49d0f33afce021bd94537bdb14305e53
4d090c4292c9d47553d0bcb31a669cbf74c79e3c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
e13f7ad189974e952ddfbf4a36ea2755
0fbfbca344ec767c7e91f9af039e7c1b3365af73
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6f87499b223673c9e56d18637caf930a
b5c0b1c677c0f2620ca44050a1c517d92b87eb04
describe
'11080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAT' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
8a8143067681642cb8ae0c7739f77b75
dee08739bd6d97c745d7fcd8dd99c456d5ab3cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAU' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
d9425a45c242421bd000cc1e824d3a33
1cb27a22ba70c45f2e9c19669ca771b696cda3c9
describe
'110475' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAV' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
b87b3176e53d02fb45b548b693ebcb18
e2ca3e45658a47ff2d1a74f71828f469cd1b561f
describe
'38820' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAW' 'sip-files00131.pro'
504ea7fc75465a0239ae6852ca030556
d79c5757c5b15efdc30e3b1e7cd11ae939dba98f
describe
'40207' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAX' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
560532e21a5a751d3632c2feca53c987
c0ebfac09afdefcc699292ba8536add2980546c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAY' 'sip-files00131.tif'
9621a94f0cd4dbbe237b771dbf8b5bb7
474ab0f76bf54022a8176e031c371f61aa2a94c9
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARAZ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
771f10f49443adae9a06f7bb81ce0f1b
0ed1a4246ecb6dbe72b0ee5be40432f6f64c0038
describe
'12124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2e8592b3458531d7aee69bd0283113ba
77e772273ae11006f4f12985a1e65585f4556246
describe
'796239' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2726676d81f5621bd1b6104a7c552662
7a5842a55a0d24562220ac16b3fb5b4da01b173c
describe
'98933' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
978267c9b768c10781c801996f7cc3a3
c6fc3f9fdeedae3dce036be9f303d9b3f5174507
describe
'34568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBD' 'sip-files00132.pro'
4c7c6963531fa604e01dbd71b425b0de
d220a9f9255d8fcb926338f5293611a663897eff
describe
'35955' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
c7795097331371513754e36fb2ac0fef
e975cbb7a00e71ef19db9257aad6a45dd421ea7e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ee1253cb180d80a01f943da23c16d284
a246587478b5fa9fd2291a1a49d17e9ec496daf3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBG' 'sip-files00132.txt'
f246cfbfce1390f1f4ccc968dd46ba4b
1291e03292527de8bbb506e7828b4aaf360c4f72
describe
'11041' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBH' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
b88d14b76c1e5fbf1c674241e585feb0
4583304b2e16d0af71ae608e78e41cdfb20e47b4
describe
'790436' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBI' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
0917da4a636510124b11c146254bfe22
52acc2625042df793c6e331f85ca423b32480aaf
describe
'111164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBJ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
888264fb46063fedce7b0988c6013601
267e508549bed2cc2f901191ca69f5b16c9e1726
describe
'38793' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
39d590cc90c72581efbd9f49bbab329e
dbf02f06cec7725a342a11c0c8583edda30c0023
describe
'40578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
63d1b5cf3eeb64ce9fb7fa602a3106d0
5d25ce96bc96e9335693b60196a689280eefdbb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
d0bd3d29a74762c47c7ece828734a718
8e80e9f6341f2cc0b136c05f5efaa5d88b53db7b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
e8d15b2484ad34f2916aa9ce242494f1
381f7b51c7cc9667f3bdb099ebd12714e6cf3e35
describe
'11844' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
20b55395c6676a0ab83b6d5bcd94070e
b59cd46d454db76c0a34c505943f511964d9263d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b19b765a7b70bb4ce196aff3199d3ba6
93406433442a7587e1976c2631a3456607ab79f0
describe
'110488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
0a2ea9dbd582aef60f30df8a8185bcc5
c0fa7927693507dec1074eaa52ee41902c7b6335
describe
'36938' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
d39e9795cb700fa558fe430b4b880e06
dad496eb36465861cb5fa9decc8f752e50d80a29
describe
'40444' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
00cbd9700f33414e43a0b63709c243b9
dcc5c2ac627152902e842e8413dd8c8838c46b49
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
843e0040ca57c6147641308e0a9fa35d
0d33056d627b42f4fe63c4edcd0519877a37e0f9
'2011-11-16T15:00:52-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
963f6e15d66b14468320f067abdf9943
19ed21a03f65b12ec792f240ed62fcf5c5ab2394
describe
'12100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
a0065ff176e2fd688636cfa525ba0137
2ac141ae6c6bef8ab40a1f68b835dbd27b9e81a8
describe
'790452' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
6c4ba8da1466cb314d4099f4e809464a
83645ef303d468d506a016571e844891216848a9
describe
'112882' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
93aa6b63364f6dd059e167dd47aad64c
977c92af162e3fb17fa1e7261ee05cb7b7582524
describe
'38777' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8c4826e824a692b611d17e106c353b3b
8754ca183c59ad8015fa0f1ae82b3f929607a26e
describe
'41278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARBZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
671646e08a00914608cef54ad83ac07e
6be7f66ccd9a23fdcb8e468e044609936c473162
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
3239f59cbb68ae7894829ca0a66b0dbf
25f66b68ec4bae1e81b584c1247efc6ae0a7f339
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCB' 'sip-files00135.txt'
42793fbad73d55312d547c610e9d6042
4beaf092e7d1459be235ff64b0a2753e18c6cb19
describe
'12352' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCC' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
4454f8d62c7543a4c92a5c9f12c4b8aa
e0dcda58837fd337e84e33e146a76aaef3af0879
describe
'796249' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCD' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
d7d40c67cd04bfea8da8567e899d7c00
0f80ae1ce275234643ab7d10cd351bbf4ab1ad79
describe
'66220' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCE' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
fd3f0461ec7441e0536c09087e69db0c
3627195e0aef28e4d70a957e862012274067fe6b
describe
'13176' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCF' 'sip-files00136.pro'
29bb445241bb454aefad8938f2871dea
327d0424665d62ea39f6a2492cd52ce0f9c23e14
describe
'22221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCG' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
582bbf6a6737b37647ba887c185637ee
69d7d5a0b380bac394fdbae196ca5d39b4c8a394
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCH' 'sip-files00136.tif'
a20d647f196a5bee9e6fbb19e92f6cc0
0ce6b378842cdcef08b94285d21df75386211ca7
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCI' 'sip-files00136.txt'
db157d55191a8758cb85a67af014e583
38a391be3454b4d4113b5021f203855f51198d37
describe
'6937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
172e8d02cec59f487504881b5e8f2bba
6e90471961bed599fe8457ef0fa88febc5421f98
describe
'790461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
1804386bd89c18b5be0379db65d05890
85c2f67af135b0ea45b64c4344a8e022fa98e572
describe
'82536' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCL' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
1e960f526dd9445c985f0b4cfb39dc31
3be81339a30818b2820236c5ff82fecaa8f65bff
describe
'26657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCM' 'sip-files00137.pro'
0de7dd33bb064d325b94a878ca4a62a6
56c5a6faaaa804ee05b076cbc4bd3eeb1f4cf2e1
describe
'29921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCN' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
7f07e5d45a751c1aebcf8915b627cd46
4999451d0bd0d6e1728551d98661cfc64cb486a2
'2011-11-16T14:58:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCO' 'sip-files00137.tif'
951008dc776fd8872d1f637914a5dd86
6aa1b9e77b5669f17184e2bc42396fc3034bf316
'2011-11-16T14:57:09-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCP' 'sip-files00137.txt'
60ae426b9e1df4d48097bfa8b33d7f91
5a28eee60243ef4632afe3f7d19ad4ca1613d152
describe
'9497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCQ' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
25b49dcbdba0c9d5f6ba4a921aa51f50
09109eb516752ea3346fd2eec6e585744efab495
describe
'796040' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCR' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
3c1d02ec3ee0b873452a7aad630aaadb
0c639376b48e268276daee72ca4f0681150a28a3
describe
'95894' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCS' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2b5d192a79a58f3b089a8d7c2f579f40
94752d36086fa9576f65312a9e0110e1ce47582d
describe
'31430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCT' 'sip-files00138.pro'
d0b617f91adb34e2665fa2dfbb4f541e
4dae58e32f5887371e8cfb49ba226185e49745d2
describe
'35535' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCU' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
7eb7f95413fef278c4779f6ec7434229
ff6fb0c7a61ab0d60b3c9961b7d5d8a0b0da426f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCV' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d01f7ad1e8bf0f328f9f3364a7143b07
460182fb689892d72a5868b374822144a7975190
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCW' 'sip-files00138.txt'
01c6dafc385fed5e312fc1ae63421f67
99fa631b0268b5ca83114ca8bd380054fcc7ba44
describe
'11662' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCX' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
482dbdba84262386a4a2b9435160194b
acb42c848e632c29b85fb57b8bc8a5b03b187fd8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCY' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
6554d8744e466c59e7f0a41b2ceeae05
5d8b97fc5f27b538b2edff1e1bd2f99c6f3932d6
describe
'105009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARCZ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
ca73d5a523363055ee6b82730b9c70a1
c996b9692612f20755153ab8cd0182c0c5b8a531
describe
'34615' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDA' 'sip-files00139.pro'
99121b09aad93b91855122b3fed320a2
c92622ac2cddf8b6144a718212f998a569e2f2de
describe
'38496' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
2a87adb51fcd9e07d94759ebfbada228
99b11bb26987475f7c816fefd294a0ac3d08f932
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
487905d5a1ee55b8a744d8fc42011075
bd80d1472a8d8474794c008f450f7aa7f974dce3
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDD' 'sip-files00139.txt'
a7c42e33a239eddf27864321afb309aa
0715f436daa4c2aeb304c2c6f69c8f5608a4b6ac
describe
'12087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
1ce58efcc4811a1a29e38efaa4ee72d9
5ae8d2e415eeb4afe9bcb5e016b0c40b6b17c394
describe
'796268' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDF' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
dc28ca7fac2d7a2e1dc5500cf1053a62
20a4c787deaa94b21a653f36c61e7e70ed4a0ec4
describe
'108180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDG' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
d0eb198a5fee42ab1d582d39e9df6cfc
8dc908a938a2c7640779ec9fbdc19a0e309a61e9
describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
a6578c7e220f931a81a0fd2884fcfe6d
81b3a6f162cc293cabadfc93206409bff95c3ebc
describe
'39279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDI' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
67a043e19ad7d1b9434fe1031df3af5a
a3d0c6c156a817f66f9e1086acb232cdfe83b245
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDJ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
337386cd5803a10e543e6125ef166557
e571344ccd94d2d144ab5c9ad3470cba54935141
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDK' 'sip-files00140.txt'
ac5c7858c918c60209ba41f8d7756955
cb885d506f8708d8fecf3892852bbbcc97337ca4
describe
'11428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDL' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
f156990ecbe45131e5bfb5e8dc3d054a
a87b64acd6df1a5351d2fa60e651fab56d0f729e
describe
'790435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDM' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
8701a6af53fe7ec4117df41e2d109bd4
33f4517f9f42f44e22e4b232863810a69cdaa265
describe
'103654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDN' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
bc98a6fbae813070b2fad2ee7a11cf85
47369630cc636862b8064925ac41db80fc281d10
describe
'35065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDO' 'sip-files00141.pro'
c8796ede59951dc31beaa49cb8552c96
412b28b4f39c453257e87cbe37010a1c8a458742
describe
'37916' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDP' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
51cb01a28113ebbb5b28a38d59d1c393
ad106720772e0b6e18979d3d76fae38e2aa1c13b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDQ' 'sip-files00141.tif'
1621c6e98de76be2e9251377a9ed914a
63b3db7b2775bc0441c5bf70136dfb3e3de99068
describe
'1465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDR' 'sip-files00141.txt'
81a704a0983aff4d2c6a1c1b06ada06c
87299f37147d5ddb0b8b85c49d1f554da199b914
describe
'11831' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
5ae6f1d2a12ecc328c6ad80da5ad3a0c
c46e0ca0924e066556af2538fa22dbfba89f08ac
describe
'796259' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDT' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
20ca1a8eded638b58568fba273e79a87
acd109268bbb86cd5884180de3130dd128f57bac
describe
'81123' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDU' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
e9b2e36eefaee848948bc4a6bd9a6485
9518d1b55dd4aeeb032341eb5cf4ece58c6681f8
describe
'21512' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDV' 'sip-files00142.pro'
443f12ed74650ec7c49ae59e71489780
1a1832c0b1f93d29f3caceef73de6f4a1d28e1fc
describe
'28355' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDW' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
8f8c891cd6ce88a2c397c34ff7db3333
298361d2beb509d1f78bd7c3f189ed59414a18e0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDX' 'sip-files00142.tif'
8d887c4db9304dbc4ca01f6b9b891c45
d7846a286a3eb7d6e4d8255a4e5ac4e0eaf5c1b3
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDY' 'sip-files00142.txt'
d75161772f97bb6a7560802d85ec141c
3a200038aac33507af57df42c03cd5f1b8bab32d
describe
Invalid character
'8468' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARDZ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
da92cc7a8f6337988c0c5c393b0a704c
882f969523ee6c5d8827467c894f7f0e473dadd6
describe
'790462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREA' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
ceb6f380beb03a614b5bfaf75ab8f364
aff92a9371e57825947718ec2f63106dfced5eb1
describe
'85569' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREB' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
5a8e161da175f82ad4adac5068bdd6d0
1746d8a6a0e019900dc4b74d9555e4e2ad6713d4
describe
'27695' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREC' 'sip-files00143.pro'
9c73d017bd2ed7646a8845b10165171b
12f244eb9b4e2eac4cf0789d773176cf29edaf2d
describe
'30425' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARED' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
d5ab2af2cdb1eaa76707f4fd3d357ef0
7b3a580338c2e2412f4b1065a34906b10b02b83b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
f40ceef5dd0d75531ff61e4ce77c08a1
a66cc1b7c6f70f1beb5336ef849c027c4abdde61
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
4804576fe48bfa1d46a55883c598563e
d6db530c3f8ba230dc9c7e4c57958cf4f2abbd94
describe
'9351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREG' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
225e412c2ed4bd820c949e27d5b85078
009d6eb6182ddfd52f2c89b0f0ed6b585227d7a2
describe
'796261' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREH' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
2c13b8ab7fd4f2803e5f9aefa93ebacc
cb9968fff4c58a31ade14e632476f6c7586516cb
describe
'118408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREI' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
337e98fbf4f97aca968c968959ff600f
34e8c7d9d814e233b34457a42a07454f2377d631
describe
'40318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREJ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
e7aa4af871f6114b8102c8319fce2422
cc911ff67561aaff5595bdaba0f1b0c805c85e40
describe
'42536' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREK' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
5fcc4e6c41b17b6376725c855c4eb86c
9fed90eff7c4b250a96756ced97000339162d069
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREL' 'sip-files00144.tif'
83772c65ab571bf1cc245aa1f0e3d663
ad0cd04569e3d2d2a0f0b38c7de6a8f2993dd207
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREM' 'sip-files00144.txt'
60860a38d7e34ce177b4acb3143daf85
402433c81ac22a38c70016ff1b73ba863d19867f
describe
'12646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREN' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
7fffb3735c98aff8507c7c0d4494e4b4
b921dc7d6c9f6be9ca3c29bbec2c2a33ea03d4f6
describe
'764069' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
7dccc30b192cc813a3820b323102b30e
def9b709c74e736020492cc42d3e2647445bd66b
describe
'54247' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
7f6e1349924a6d89b5f47575bb7a6566
30e7907d3e092dcb55b4455bc3a8ffc626bea9d3
describe
'16417' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREQ' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e2ed6185098e4a8677641a7749714a00
459e33b2b67540e699d9137142115ef88b7dd69c
describe
'19567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARER' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
af8e310ba0aece650e99d569ef0b25c9
10a2d6325e65cdb914097c918d14ffe51fec4bbe
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARES' 'sip-files00145.tif'
477a7b6b98528b78e86bf9902dbbbf53
cbbe4b4b8f9a6812153a3d6ac8a84f487af98d7d
describe
'718' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARET' 'sip-files00145.txt'
a3481c756a9d17e0fd5d43d8fd7e7305
8de8c701e19b28fe27e1f53298a48968d5973946
describe
'6334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREU' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
73dd78d37f465d187320d61955e21e99
10f13226e2a390de4b44be6f95b18c5fa3a7b354
describe
'1182723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREV' 'sip-filesback4.jp2'
eebf9c83a2b2afcdc6c8694270ae6d36
78955e1880cab11fa0a5fa07da64c96577a7ae6d
describe
'95283' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREW' 'sip-filesback4.jpg'
bfca04bf926e6e9d1a3a86deca345984
a6cc6af2dea10f145fd41a25afd2bc7391e7eee5
describe
'512' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREX' 'sip-filesback4.pro'
2826923a33bc5c295373e25e099e076a
974a0a788fa87682218511a649487135991a7ecc
describe
'21881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREY' 'sip-filesback4.QC.jpg'
b3d7f3e6f04a011f7d9fac29cb326237
951544d2cd0d686a2ed554ba9ddc01698301017c
describe
'28387952' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAAREZ' 'sip-filesback4.tif'
08d56e23b69b45c2d5e348a2dbac20d6
1f9c955af50ed700f462547677a615d9698ef4b6
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFA' 'sip-filesback4.txt'
680026bcae85a1c948fc7c4e4ac92133
db264c0edb1e4894b154557053c0bad8f6dd1caa
describe
'5741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFB' 'sip-filesback4thm.jpg'
f0d4cb55bd01a1f1a38c52cf35db4f08
8fc49cbf9b23b99b328ed7b4a23bc7bbfbd80889
describe
'1183090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFC' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
0b403426775169f6d56fb2723b880b4d
266e47188337267024f43aaa13da116186289f1f
describe
'154775' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFD' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
f828caad0009b192d79aec4fb4c08821
47c725d8c7347fa9fa31861700b43c19f53e2960
describe
'4204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFE' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
a9775a9f3aa323234fbb6e0bce756d26
31355f2e3fa824d92a6e2a40e8d20ea2b6c77b16
describe
'38634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFF' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
e3e0e1b4d53ea78f2d2996af3c944bb1
7cb6f6b8fbae0e229161345a8e735830770a08a6
describe
'28395704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFG' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
e0af4a60e265211d575a996b2a154e90
915e83b6699a2134828e3f61d89b2a05e2754bba
describe
'392' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFH' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
d73ebc65164f98d8dd317f7206d4df9c
aaf1cce8731aafcae0cea9da50f6322bcaf6dd23
describe
Invalid character
'10000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFI' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
fd9d289a04c012062341fbcf5ea021f8
7820e62f2ad49d8e5f80d2f0fb9c19498dbb3a7a
describe
'174973' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFJ' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
e6d034669f2e0c481c1c65c90b8c685a
d7b54126205631843656f2339a39deb12981d787
describe
'22339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFK' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
2bc47015fd7e18259d004973888c06f4
75710ec4ed8b5cc0dcbf462f5d5d8ee51010abdf
describe
'361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFL' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
ebca90824c7a955d8ab673b7196a1fbb
29f9bb81a712d0c59045ac55b7ea9837d54354ae
describe
'5668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFM' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
3d34b5f0c31f0f95be00cfc11b8bee6f
532fbbe14f09fdf820a57bdca6cbfc849aecf63d
describe
'4201340' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFN' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
12b63561f0bdb13204e1f4f6b440fbf1
2aa4e26ed292e4437990339991f968ea761d9e08
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFO' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
200d6524c8d6212893306dfa02530655
0344889df5cbb8f13d231b58bfb55bfb8f1f1b25
describe
Invalid character
'2542' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAECfileF20080922_AAARFP' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
203593712e1719a2d0e279076650f046
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describe
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— ARTHUR'S:

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THE

STORY BOOK

FOR GIRLS AND BOYS.



BECCND EDITION, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,



BY T. S. ARTHUR.



BOSTON:
WILLIAM J. REYNOLDS @é& Go.
1852.


Entered, according to the Act of Congress, in the year
1842, by
T. 8S. ARTHUR,
in the office of the clerx u the district court of the
United States, in and for the eastern
district of Pennsylvania.

LE a
CONTENTS.

Little Anna .......... ccccccccsccse SAE 6G
The Use of Learning .........eeeeee. coos WG
The Secret of Order........ Cocccsccccies 23
The Student and Apprentice......... coves DB
The Story of a Little Boy,who sometimes got
QNGTY coccccccccccccsccccccveceseses - 43
How to be Happy .......eceeeeeee cocccce Af
- BO caccac eceees Seeecoeccocdcicnses coeee 52
The Tongue Bridle.............+ cocsccse &
The Test of Courage........ssee0- émuehed -
The Tell-Tale......... pevocccescvcccvesn OE
BRO MGS EAs cc ncccccccvcdesseceess . 98
Try Again......... ec ccccccccccces seeee 104
GOOETIEES cc cccccccsece eoebhesdccvesbceea 115
The Pet Lamb......... eccccesecécceerun 120
The Young Teacher......... ovccivesecs . 125
Little George ........ 60 eosccseveueeud 133
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PREFACE.

Tue stories in this book are, with one
or two exceptions, written so as to
address themselves to the understand-
ings of children and young persons who
have advanced far enough to be able to
discriminate, rationally, between a right
and a wrong action. Their design is,
to give pictures of real life, such as may
be seen every day; and in these pictures
to present that which is good and true
as something to be loved and desired ;
and that which is evil and false as some-
thing to be shunned. They are intended,
also, to give to the young who are just
beginning to look about them, and to
reason on what they see, true principles
of action—such principles as will elevate
them out of mere selfishness, into a living

(7)
Vili PREFACE.

and active interest for all around them
These are the principles, the writer be-
lieves, that will make them, as men and
women, truly useful, and therefore truly
happy. For without usefulness to others,
from an earnest desire to be useful, there
can be no true happiness.

The present volume is designed as the
beginning of a series for children, by the
same writer, in which he will address
the young mind, in its different stages
of development, in various ways calcu-
lated to interest and instruct at the same
time.

Philadelphia, Nov. Ist, 1842,
LITTLE ANNA.

“‘T wisn there wasn’t any work, mother,” said
little Anna, letting the handkerchief she was hem-
ming fall in her lap. ‘“O dear! I wish I could
play all the time.”

**You may go and play, dear, if you wish.”
Anna’s mother said, in a mild tone of voice.

“May I?” and Anna dropped her work, and
was out of the cottage door in a moment.

First she went into the garden, and amused her-
self by running about through the different walks,
and pulling a flower here and a flower there. Soon
tired of this, she sat down listlessly on a grass
plat, and spent nearly half an hour in looking for
a four-leaved clover. Unsuccessful in this, the
little girl next resorted to the swing under the apple
tree, which her father had made for her, and swung
herself for a good while.

“O dear! I wish I had some one to play with
me!” she at length said, getting down from the
swing, tired with herself, and tired of everything
around her.

It was more than an hour since Anna had lain
aside her work, heartily tired of it; and now she
came back into the house, as heartily tired of play;
but still, with no disposition to resume her sewing.

“TI wish father would come home,” she said,
leaning upon the door, and fixing her eyes in the
direction from which he always returned in the
evening.

(9)
10 LITTLE ANNA.

“Tt isn*t time for father to come home, Anna,”
her mother said, looking up from her sewing.

“TI know it aint,” Anna replied. “ But then I
wish he would come home. Why don’t he come
home sooner 2”

“He has to work in the field, you know, and
can’t come home until his work is done.”

“It’s always work, work. I wish there wasn’t
any work, mother !”

‘“‘We should none of us be so happy without
work, my dear, as we are with it. It is while
engaged in useful employment, that we most truly
enjoy ourselves.”

Anna could not understand this, and her mother
saw that she did not understand it. She therefore
asked her this simple question.

** Do you love any one, Anna?”

“O yes!” said the little girl, turning away from
the cottage door, and coming up to the side of her
mother. ‘TI love you, and I love father.”

‘* And we love you too, very rmuch, Anna. Now,
in what way do we show our love to you, dear?”

“QO, in every way!’ replied Anna, her face
brightening and her voice becoming animated.
‘You buy and make me nice clothes, and get me
everything good to eat. You are always doing
something for Anna. That pretty frock you are
making is for me to wear to the church on next
Sunday.”

“It is because we love you, that we do all these
things for you. It is for your sake as well as for
mine that your father works in the fields all day
long; for by working, he makes the grain and
LITTLE ANNA. 11

fruits grow, and thus earns money to buy the good
things he is always providing for us. Don’t you
think that he is a great deal happier in working
thus for us, than he would be if he were to sit idle
at home, and see us suffering for comfortable food
and clothing ?”

“O yes. If he were to do so, neither he nor
any of us could be happy.”

‘“‘ No, my child, that we would not. And now,
dear, can you not see that to work is sometimes
better than to play ?”

““O yes, mother; for if you and father were to
play, instead of work, none of us would be so
comfortable and happy.”

** No, my dear, that we would not. And now,
can you not see that it may be in the power of
even a little girl like you to do something, some-
times, for the comfort of others, and thus minister
to the happiness of others ?”

*¢ How can I do that, mother?”

“You are now ten years old, are you not?”

“Yes, mother.”

“* And have learned to sew very well ?”

“Yes, ma’am, I can hem a great deal neater
than Lucy Arnold.”

“TI have much work to do, and sometimes when
I am not well, I feel very tired. Even now my
head is aching very badly.”

“Is it, mother? O, I am so sorry: I wish I
could do something to help your head.”

“Would you be willing to do anything for me
if it was in your power ?” |

** Indeed mother I would !”? and as the little girl
said this, the tears started to her eyes.
12 LITTLE ANNA.

“You can hem very neatly ?”

“*O yes, you know I can, mother.”

* Your father is going over to see the minister
to-night, and that new pocket-handkerchief which
you were at work on must be hemmed and washed
out and ironed for him before he comes home. I
was in hopes that you would have got it done for
me, but you got tired of work so soon !”

“TIl do it for you, mother,” Anna said in a
vheerful, earnest tone, sitting down quickly in het
little chair, and beginning to sew away as fast as
she could.

In about three-quarters of an hour she had
finished the handkerchief, and her mother, on look-
ing at it, said that it was done very neatly.

‘¢ And now, mother, must I wash and iron it for
father ?”

‘Are you not tired of work by this time?”

“Ono. Iam not tired at all.”

“ Very well, then, Anna, you may get the little
tub, and take a piece of the white soap and wash
it out for father.” |

Delighted with her task, ‘Anna got the tub and
the soap, and was soon busy at work acain, wash-
ing the handkerchief. After she had passed it
through two waters, and rinsed it thoroughly, she
hung it up, and fastened it tightly on the line with
a clothe’s-pin.

“Shall I put an iron down to the fire, now,
mother ?” she asked, coming in.

“Yes, my dear,” her mother replied, much
pleased at the interest that had so suddenly arisen
in Anna’s mind.
LITTLE ANNA. 13

As soon as the iron was hot, and the handker-
chief dry, which was before her father came home,
Anna got the ironing blanket, and spread it out on
the kitchen table.

‘* See mother, it is all dry,” she said, soon after,
bringing in the handkerchief to her mother. ‘ May
I iron it now, for father ?”

*‘ Yes, you may iron it, but I must show you
how to try your iron, and how to get it perfectly
clean, so that you may neither burn nor soil the
new handkerchief.”

So Anna’s mother showed her all about how she
must prepare her iron, and then taught her the way
to iron out a handkerchief smoothly, and to fold it
up neatly. During the whole time the little girl
was very much delighted, as much, and indeed,
more so, than she had ever been while at play.

At last, just as the sun was going down,
Anna, who had been looking out for her father,
saw him coming down the lane, and away she
sprang to meet him.

‘*O father,” she said, as soon as he had stooped
down and kissed her—‘I have hemmed a hand-
kerchief for you, and washed and ironed it all by
myself.”

‘‘ Have you indeed ?” her father said, very much
pleased that his little girl felt so delighted because
she had done something for him. ‘I am very
glad to hear it, Anna; for if you had not done it,
the task would have fallen on your mother, and
she has a great deal to do, and is not very well,
For ten long years, she has been caring for you,
and doing all in her power to make you comfort-

2
14 LITTLE ANNA.

able and happy; and this, often, when she has
been so sick that she could hardly hold up her
head. Now, do you not think that it is time for
you to be trying to do something for her 2”

“O yes, father, and I will work for her all’ day
long.”

] am glad to hear you say so, my dear. But
mother don’t want you to work all the while for
her. Little girls like you must play, sometimes,
and mother would be very sorry if you never had
any time to play.”

Anna did not reply to this, but said, after a short
silence,

“I don’t think I shall ever care about play so
much, father. You don’t know how tired | got of
play this afternoon.”

“ Why did you get tired of play, dear?”

“TI don’t know. But I did get tired. There was
nobody to play with me.”

‘And didn’t you get tired of work, too?”

“‘O yes. I was so tired of work that I said to
mother that I wished there wasn’t any work,”

“And then what did mother say 1”

“She told me that | might put aside my work
and go and play.”

“* Well ?”

“But I soon got tired of play, and then I didn’t
know what to do.”

“ Well ?”

“And then mother told me about your handker.
chief that had to be hemmed and washed out for
you by night, and how her head ached very badly.
When she said this, I felt as if I wanted to do it
LITTLE ANNA. 15

very much, and so she let me, and I didn’t feel
tired all the time.”

“Do you know why you did not feel tired 1”

“No, father.”

“It was because you felt that you were doing
something useful for your father and mother, and
there is no feeling so truly pleasant as that which
springs from the thought that you are doing good
to others at the same time that you have a desire
to do them good, Hereafter, Anna, try and think
much of your mother, and remember, that she has
to work all day long, and often at night, no matter
how ill she feels—and remember also, that every
hour that you work for her you are making her
burdens lighter.” :

Though a little girl, Anna understood her father
pretty well—at least, well enough to cause her,
ever after that, to work for her mother many hours
in each day. Notwithstanding this, she had as
much play as she wanted, and what was better, she
did not now get tired of play as she used to do, for
she ran through the garden, and amused herself
with her swing and play-house with a mind happy,
under the idea that she had been useful to her mo-
ther. After she had played as long as she wanted
to, she would go back to her mother, and ask if
there were not something else that she could do for
her. If there was, she went about it with delight.
Instead of complaining that she had work to do,
she now often said—

“OQ mother, I am so glad that I can work for
you!”

There are now few happier girls than little Anna.
THE USE OF LEARNING. .

“I’m tired of going to school,” said Herbert
Allen to William Wheeler, the boy who sat next
tohim. ‘I don’t see any great use, for my part,
in studying geometry, and navigation, and survey-
ing, and mensuration, and the dozen other things
that I am expected to learn. They ’Il never do me
any good; I’m not going to get my living as a sur-
veyor, or measurer, or sea-captain.”

“How are you going to get your living, Her-
bert?” his young friend asked, in a quiet tone, as
he looked up into his face.

“ Why, I’m going to learn a trade; or, at least,
my father says that I am.”

‘And so am I,” replied William. « And yet
my father wishes me to learn everything that I can;
for he says that it will all be useful, some time or
other in my life,”

“I’m sure I can’t see what use I’m ever going
to make, as a sadler, of algebra or surveying.”

“Still, if we can’t see it, Herbert, perhaps our
fathers can, for they are older and wiser than we
are. And we should endeavour to learn, simply
because they wish us to, even if, in everything that
we are expected to study, we do not see clearly the
use.”

“I can’t feel so,” Herbert replied, tossing his
head; “and I don’t believe that my father sees any
more clearly than I do, the use of all 7

16
THE USE OF LEARNING. 17

“You are wrong to talk so,” his friend said, in
a serious tone. “TI would not think as you do for
the world. My father knows what is best for me
—and so does your father know what is best for
you; and if we do not confide in them, we will
surely go wrong.”

“I’m not afraid,” responded Herbert, closing
the book over which he had been poring, reluctantly,
for half-an-hour, in the vain effort to fix a lesson
on his unwilling memory; and taking some mar-
bles from his pocket, he began to amuse himself
with them, at the same time that he concealed them
from the teacher’s observation.

_ William said no more, but turned to his lesson
with an earnest attention. The difference in the
characters of the two boys is too plainly indicated
in the brief conversation we have recorded, to need
further illustration. To their teacher it was eyi-
dent, in numerous particulars in their conduct, their
habits and manners. William always recited his
lesson correctly, while Herbert’ never learned a

_task well. One was always punctual at school—
the other a loiterer by the way. William’s books
were well taken care of-— Herbert’s soiled, torn,
disfigured, and broken, ex’ rnally and internally.

Thus they began life. ‘he one obedient, indus-
trious, attentive to the pre epts of those who were
older and wiser, and willi g to be guided by them;
the other, indolent and in. ined to follow the lead.

ings of his own will. .

As men, at the age of hirty-five, we will again
present them to the reader. Mr. Wheeler is an
intelligent merchant, in an active business—while

2
18 THE USE OF LEARNING.

Mr. Allen is a journeyman mechanic, poor, in em-
barrassed circumstances, and possessing but a small
share of general information.

“How do you do, Mr. Allen?” said the mer-
chant to the mechanic, about this time, as the lat-
ter entered the counting-room of the former. The
contrast in their appearance was very great. The
merchant was well-dressed, and had a cheerful
look—while the other was poorly clad, and seemed
troubled and dejected.

“T can’t say that I do very well, Mr. Wheeler,”
the mechanic replied, in a tone of despondency.
‘Work is very dull, and wages low; and with so
large a family as I have, it is tough enough getting
along, under the best circumstances.”

“IT am really sorry to hear you say so, Mr. Al-
len,” replied the merchant, in a kind tone. ‘ How
much can you earn now ?”

“If I had steady work, I could make nine or
ten dollars a week. But our business is very bad ;
the substitution of steam-engines on rail-roads, for
horses on turnpikes, has broken in seriously upon
the harness-making business. The consequence is,
that I do not average six dollars a week the year
round.”

“Ts it possible that rai roads have wrought such
a change in your busines ;?”

“Yes—in the harness-making branch of it—
especially in large cities l:ke this, where the heavy
wagon trade is almost entirely broken up.”

“Did you say that six dollars a week were all
that you could average ?”

“Yes, sir.”
THE USE OF LEARNING. 19

“‘ How large is your family ?”

‘¢ J have five children, sir.”

“Five children! And only six dollars a week ?”

“That is all, sir. But six dollars will not sup-
port them, and I am, in consequence, going behind-
hand.”

‘* You ought to try to get into some other busi-
ness.”

** But I don’t know any other.”

The merchant mused for awhile, and then said,

‘Perhaps I can aid you in getting into some-
_ thing better. Iam president of a new] y-projected
_ railroad, and we are about putting on the line a
company of engineers, for the purpose of survey-
ing and locating the route. You studied surveying
and engineering at school at the same time that |
did, and I suppose have still a correct knowledge
of both; if so, I will use my influence to have you
appointed surveyor. The engineer is already cho-
sen, and at my desire he will give you all requisite
instruction until you revive your early knowledge
of these matters. The salary is one hundred dol-
lars a month,”

A. shadow still darker than that which before
rested there, fell upon the face of the mechanic.

** Alas! sir,” he said, ** I have not the slightest
knowledge of surveying. It is true, I studied it,
or rather, pretended to study it, at school—but it
made no permanent impression upon my mind, [
SaW no use in it, then, and am now as ignorant of
surveying as if I had never taken a lesson on the
subject.”
20 THE USE OF LEARNING.

“T am very sorry, Mr. Allen,” the merchant
replied, in real concern. “If you were a good
accountant, I might, perhaps, get you into a store,
What is your capacity in this respect 1”

‘“‘[ ought to have been a good accountant, sir,
for I studied mathematics long enough ; but I took
little interest in figures, and now, although I was
for many months, while at school, pretending to
study book-keeping, I am utterly incapable of tak-
ing charge of a set of books,”

“Such being the case, Mr. Allen, I really do not
know what I can do for you. But stay !—I am
about sending out an assorted cargo to Buenos
Ayres, and thence round to Callao, and want a
man to go as supercargo, who can speak the Span-
ish language. The captain will direct in the sales,
I remember that we studied Spanish together,
Would you be willing to leave your family and
go? The wages will be one hundred dollars a
month ?”

“I have forgotten all my Spanish, sir. I did not
see the use of it while at school, and therefore, it
made no impression on my mind.”

The merchant, really concerned for the poor
mechanic, again thought of some way to serve him.
At length he said,

“7 can think of but one thing that you can do,
Mr. Allen, and that will not be much better than
your present employment. It is a service for which
ordinary labourers are employed—that of chain-
carrying to the surveyor on the proposed railroad
expedition.”
THE USE OF LEARNIN‘:. 21

‘What is the wages, sir?”

‘“‘ Thirty-five dollars a month.”

“© And found 1?”

“ Certainly.”

‘¢T will accept it, sir, thankfully,” the man said.
“Tt will be much better than my present employ-
ment.”

“Then make yourself ready at once, for the
company wil start in a week.”

‘I will be ready, sir,” the poor man replied, and
then withdrew.

In a week the company of engineers started, and
Mr. Allen with them, as chain-carrier, when, had
he, as a boy, taken the advice of his parents and
friends, and stored up in his memory what they
wished him to learn, he might have filled the sur-
veyor’s office, at more than double the wages paid
to him as a chain-carrier. Indeed, we cannot tell
how high a position of usefulness and profit he

_might have held, had he improved all the opportu-

nities afforded him in youth, But he perceived the

use of learning too late.

The writer earnestly hopes that none of his
young readers will make the same discovery as
that Mr. Allen did when it is too late to reap any
real benefit. Children and youth cannot possibly
know as well as their parents, guardians, and

teachers, what is best for them. They should,

therefore, be obedient and willing to learn, even if
they cannot see what use learning will-be to them.

Men who are in active contact with the world,
_ know, that the more extensive their knowledge on

a
22 THE USE OF LEARNING.

all subjects, the more useful they can be to others ;
and the higher and more important uses in society
they are fitted by education to perform, the greater
is the return to themselyes in wealth and honour.
And therefore it is, that children are educated by
their parents. They know the use of learning,
and if children cannot see it, they should be obe-
dient, and learn, in the full confidence that .their
parents know better than they.




THE SECRET OF ORDER.

“EVERYTHING in confusion again, Fanny,”
said Mrs. Fairfield, coming into her daughter’s
chamber. “Nota chair in its place. Both closet-
doors open, and the clothes on the shelves tum-
bled. And see your mantel-piece !—the books on

‘it are disarranged, and your candlestick is just
ready to fall off. The shawl you wore out last
evening, instead of being folded up carefully, and
laid away in one of your drawers, is lying upon
the back of a chair, all rumpled and creased.
And to crown all, it is ten o’clock, and your bed
is not made.”

“O, but I’ll soon put all right again, ma,”
Fanny said. “TI have been engaged all the morn-
ing over this letter. But I have just finished it,
and now I will clear up the room.”

“ But Fanny,” Mrs. Fairfield said, “you know
that I have often told you that you should not
allow everything to get into this state of confu-
sion,” |

“I really don’t know how IT can help it, ma,”
Fanny replied, «J put things in their proper
place every morning.”

“Still, you are very late about it to-day.”

“But I have been writing this letter, ma.”

-_ “You should never neglect one duty for another,
Fanny. You ought first to have put your room in
order, and then to have written your letter. It is
| (23)
24 THE SECRET OF ORDER.

this putting off the doing of a thing, that makes
your room get into such a state of confusion. Do,
Fanny, correct this bad habit. You are now six-
teen years of age, and if you are not careful, it
will be confirmed, and you will be a sloven all
your life.”

Fanny promised amendment, and her mother
went down stairs to attend to her domestic duties,

In less than a week, however, she found it neces-
sary to call her daughter’s attention to her neglect-
ful and careless habits.

«“ T am afraid, Fanny,” she said, “ that you will
never make a tidy woman. And I am really sorry
for it, for when you come to have charge of a
house of your own, you will find this habit a
source of great inconvenience to you, if not of
direct unhappiness. When things are in confusion
around you, your mind will be in a like confusion ;
and it is only the calm, quiet mind, that is truly
happy.”

‘Indeed, ma, I try,” Fanny replied, seriously.
‘«¢ But, somehow, or other, everything will get out
of its place. I am sure that I feel better when all
my things are properly arranged; for then I can
get what I want, when I have.use for it —and
besides, my mind, as you say, is calmer, and I feel
happier, when I have got my room and my draw-
ers arranged in an orderly condition. But, in a
little while it is all as bad as ever; and I am sure
I cannot tell how it gets so.”

‘There is a way, Fanny, by which order might
be permanently sustained, even in your chamber,
and closets, and drawers. Caroline Mayfield, her
THE SECRET OF ORDER. 25

mother tells me, is very orderly in her habits.
Her books, and clothes, and everything that be-
longs to her, or is placed in her care, are always
to be found in their places.”

“Yes, I have noticed that myself,” Fanny said.
‘*And I would give anything for her secret of
order.”

‘** No doubt she would impart it, Fanny.”

‘Yes, I suppose she would, if she really under-
stood herself what the secret was. It is natural
for her to be orderly ; and I presume, therefore,
that she has no system about it.”

“ Suppose you ask her, Fanny? I have no doubt
that she could help you a little.”

“Perhaps she could; and as I am going out
this morning, I will call and see her, and ask her
the question, It can do no harm any how.”

And so, in the course of the morning, Fanny
called in to see Caroline Mayfield.

“Everything as neat as wax,” Fanny said, as
she entered Caroline’s chamber, where the two
young ladies retired, after chatting for a few
minutes in the parlour. Do you know, Caro-
line, the object of my especial visit this morning ?”

** No, Fanny; what is it?”

“Well, I don’t think you would guess in a
month of Sundays.”

‘Perhaps not; for I am no very good hand at
guessing. So you will have to tell me.”

_ You will laugh I expect; but no matter. So
_ to begin, with a little honest commendation, I will
_ just say, that you are the neatest and most orderly
_ young lady of my acquaintance.”

3

|
26 THE SECRET OF ORDER.

“A pretty fair beginning, Fanny,” her friend
responded, in a laughing tone,

“And an honest one into the bargain, Well,
in the second place, I am about the most disorder-

know. And now | have come to you to get a
lesson in order and neatness. In a word, Caro-
line, I want your secret,”

“Are you really in earnest, Fanny ?”

“* Certainly. I never was more so in my life,”

“Well, I don’t know that I have any secret of
order. It all comes natural to me.” |

“But how do you keep things in their right
places? | cannot, let me do my best.”

“O, as to that, always put a thing into its
right place when | am done using it; and so
nothing, in that “ase, gets out of order. How can
it?”

Fanny paused a moment thoughtfully, and then
said with animation—

“That’s it! T see it all now. You have given
me your secret. If everything that is taken up,
is returned to its Proper place, how can there be
disorder, sure enough? Hereafter, I will try and
practise on your rule.”

When Fanny went home, she told her mother
of the discovery she had made, at the same time
that she smiled at the simple truthfulness of the
rule,

“‘ There is no doubt of that being the true secret
of order, Fanny,” her mother said; “and now
that you have found it out, I hope you will prac.
THE SECRET OF ORDER. 27

«] will try, mother,” the daughter replied.

And she began by trying that very day. While
the precept was fresh in her mind, she got along
pretty well; but it was not many days before her
mother discovered her room in no very orderly
condition.

“ You have lost your secret, I fear, Fanny,” she
said, as she looked in upon her.

«0, no, ma! I have not lost, but only forgot-
ten it for a little while. But I will try to keep the
recollection of it as fresh as possible.”

“It is worth all the trouble it may cost you,
Fanny, to acquire a habit of order. After this
habit is once formed, it will be like second nature
to you.”

“] know it, ma; and am determined to per-
severe. And I hope you will remind me of every
little omission that may come under your notice.”

Mrs. Fairfield promised that she would do so.
And whenever she found her daughter growing
remiss, would remind her of the secret she had
obtained from Caroline. Gradually, Fanny ac-
quired, by steady perseverance in adhering to her
rule of order, the habit of order itself, and then
she had no trouble; for it was as natural for her
to replace a thing properly, as it was for her to
take it up.
THE

STUDENT AND APPRENTICE,

“ How far is jt from here to the sun, Jim?” ask.
ed Harman Lee of his father’s apprentice, James
Wallace, in a tone of light raillery, intending by
the question to elicit some reply that would exhibit
the boy’s ignorance,

James Wallace, a boy of fourteen, turned his
bright, intelligent yes upon the son of his master,
and after regarding him for a moment, replied,

*T don’t know, Harman, How far ig it 7

here was something so honest and earnest in
the tone of the boy, that much as Harman had felt
at first disposed to Sport with his ignorance, he

not to be concealed, and he replied,

“ Ninety-five millions of miles, you ignoramus !”

James did not retort, but repeating over in his
mind the distance named, fixed it indelibly upon
his memory,

On the same evening, after he had finished his
day’s work, he obtained a small text book on astron-
omy, which belonged to Harman Lee, and went
UP into his 8arret, with a candle, and there alone,
attempted to dive into the mysteries of that sublime
Science. As he read, the €arnestness of his atten.
tion fixed hearly every fact upon his = So
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 29

intent. was he, that he perceived not the passage of
time, and was only called back to a consciousness
of where he was by the sudden sinking of the wick
of his candle into the melted mass. of tallow that
had filled the cup of his candlestick. In another
moment he was in total darkness. The cry of the
watchman told him that the hours had flown until
it was past eleven o’clock.

Slowly undressing himself in his dark chamber,
his mind recurring with a strong interest to what
he had been reading, he laid himself down upon
his hard bed, and gave full play to his thoughts.
Hour after hour passed away, but he could not
sleep, so absorbed was he in reviewing the new
and wonderful things he had read. At last, wearied
nature gave way, and he fell off in a slumber, filled
with dreams of planets, moons, comets, and fixed
stars. On the next morning the apprentice boy
resumed his place at the work-bench with a new
feeling ; and with this feeling was mingled one of
regret that he could not go to school as did his mas-
ter’s son.

« But I can study at night while he is asleep,”
he said to himself.

Just then Harman Lee came into the shop, and
approaching James, said, for the purpose of teas-
ing him,

‘ How big round is the earth, Jim ”

“ Twenty-five thousand miles,” was the prompt
answer.

Harman looked surprised for a moment, and
then responded with a sneer—for he was not a kind-

3
30 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

hearted boy, but on the contrary, very selfish, and
disposed to injure rather than do good to others—

*O, dear! How wonderful wise you are! and
no doubt you can. tell how many moons Jupiter
has ? Come, let ’s hear ?””

“ Jupiter has four moons,” James answered, with
something of exultation jn his tone,

“And no doubt you can tell how many rings it
has?”

“« Jupiter has no rings. Saturn has rings, and

upiter belts,” James replied, in a decisive tone.

For a moment or two, Harman was silent with
surprise and mortification to think that his father’s
apprentice, whom he esteemed so far below him,
should be possessed of knowledge equal to his, on
the points in reference to which he had chosen to
question him; and that he should be able to con-
vict him of an error into which he had purposely
fallen.

“T should like to know how long it is since you

came so wonderful wise |” Harman at length
said, with a sneer,

“Not very long,” James replied, calmly. «|
have been reading one of your books on Astrono.
my.”

“Well, you’re not going to have my books,
mister, I can tell you! Anyhow, I should like to
know what business you had to touch one of them ?

{me catch you at it again, and see if | don’t
cuff you soundly!) Youd better, a great deal, be
minding your work.”

“ But I didn’t neglect my work, Harman. I read
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 31

at night, after I was done my work. And I didn’t
hurt your book.”

«] don’t care, if you didn’t hurt it. You are
not going to have my books, I can tell you. So
do you just let them alone.”

Poor James’s heart sunk in his bosom, at this
unexpected obstacle thrown in his way. He had
no money of his own to buy, and knew of no one
from whom he could borrow the book that had all
at once become necessary to his happiness.

“ Do, Harman,” he said, appealingly, “ lend me
the book. I will take good care of it.”

“No, I won’t. And don’t you dare to touch it
was the angry reply.

James Wallace knew well enough the selfish dis-
position of his master’s son, older than he by two
or three years, to be convinced that there was now
put little hope of his having the use of his books,
except by stealth. And from that his open and
honest principle revolted. All day he thought earn-
estly over the means whereby he should be able to
obtain a book on Astronomy, to quench the ardent
thirst that had been created in his mind. And night
came without any satisfactory answer being obtain-
ed to his earnest inquiries of his own thought.

He was learning the trade of a blind-maker.
Having been already an apprentice for two years,
and being industrious and intelligent, he had ac-
quired a readiness with tools:and much skill in
some parts of his trade. While sitting alone, after
he had finished his work for the day, his mind
searching about for some means whereby he could
get books, it occurred to him that he might, by

,?
ner to turn his work into money, he knew not, [It

finally occurred to him, that, in passing a house

near the shop, he frequently obseryed & pair of
window-blinds with faded colours,

.. ‘< Perhaps,” he said to himself, «if T would do

it cheap, they would let me paint and put new
angings to their blinds,”

The thought was scarcely suggested, when he
was on his feet moving towards the Street. In a
few minutes he stood knocking at the door of the
house, which Was soon opened,

“ Well, my little man, what do you want ?” was
the kind salutation of the individual who answered
the knock.

James felt Confused, and stammered out,

“The hangings on your blinds are a good deal
faded.”

““That’s a very true remark, my little man,”
was the reply, made in an €ncouraging tone.

“And they want painting badly.”

“Also very true,” said the man With a good.
humoured smile, for he felt amused with the boy’s
€arnest manner and novelty of speech,

“ Wouldn't you like to have them painted and
new hangings put to them?” pursued James.

‘I don’t know, It would certainly improve them
very much.’™

“O, yes, sir. They would look just like new,
And if you wil] let me do them, I will fix them all
UP Nice for you, Cheap,”
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 33

« Will you, indeed? But what is your name,
and where do you live?” |

“My name is James Wallace, and I live with
Mr. Lee, the blind-maker.”

Do you, indeed! Well, how much will you
charge for painting them, and putting on new
hangings ?”

«| will do it for two dollars, sir. The hangings
and tassels will cost me three-quarters of a dollar,
and the paint and varnish a quarter more. And it
will take me two or three evenings, besides getting
up very early in the morning to work for Mr. Lee,
so that I can have time to paint and varnish them
when the sun shines.” :

«But will Mr. Lee let you do this?”

“J don’t know, sir. But I will ask him.”

“Very well, my little man. If Mr. Lee does
not object, | am willing.”

James ran back to the house, and found Mr. Lee
standing in the door. Much to his delight, his re-
quest was granted. Four days from that time he
possessed a book of his own, and had a half dol-
lar with which to buy some other volume, when he
should have thoroughly mastered the contents of
that. Every night found him poring over this
book, and so soon as it was light enough to see he
was up and reading.

Of course, there was much in it that he could
not understand, and many terms that defied all his
efforts and comparisons of the context, to under-
stand. ‘To help him in this difficulty, he purchased
with his remaining half dollar, at 4 second-hand
book stall, a dictionary. By the aid of this he
34 STUDENT AND APPRENTICRE.

acquired the information he Sought, much more
rapidly. But the more he read, the broader the
unexplored €xpanse of knowledge appeared to open
fore him, He did not, however, give Way to
feelings of discouragement, but Steadily devoted
every evening, and an hour €very morning, to sty.
dy; while, all through the day, his mind Was pon.
ering over the things he had read, as his hands
were diligently employed in the labour assigned
m,
It occurred, just at this time, that a number of
nevolent individuals established in the town where
€ lived, one of those excellent institutions, an Ap.
prentices? Library. To this he at once applied, and
obtained the books he needed. Instead, however,
of resorting to the library for mere books of amuse.
ment, he borrowed Only those from Which he could
obtain the rudiments of learning, such as text books
C.

Fe early felt the necessity, from having read a
book on Astronomy, With a Strong desire to master
its contents, for mathematica] knowledge ; and in
the effort to acquire this, he commenced studying
—for he had no Preceptor to guide him—a work
on Geometry, In Working out Problems, he used
& pair of shop compasses, with a pointed quill upon
one of the fret. And thus, all alone in his garret,

devotion to the acquirement of knowledge—did the
Poor apprentice boy lay the foundation of future
eminence and usefulness, © Cannot trace his
Course, step by step, through a long series of seven
years, though it Would afford Many lessons of per-
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 35

severance and triumph over almost insurmountable
difficulties. But at twenty-one he was master of
his trade, and what was more, had laid up a vast
amount of general and scientific information. He
was well read in history ; had studied thoroughly
the science of Astronomy, for which he ever re-
tained a lively affection ; was familiar with mathe-
matical principles, and could readily solve the most
difficult Geometrical and Algebraic problems. His
Geographical knowledge was minute ; and to this
he added tolerably correct information in regard to
the manners and customs of different nations. To
natural history he had also given much attention.
But, with all his varied acquirements, James Wal-
lace felt, on attaining the age of manhood, that he
knew comparatively but little.

Let us turn now, for a few moments, to mark
the progress which the young student, in one oO
the best seminaries in his native city, and after-
wards at college, had made. Like too many
tradesmen, whose honest industry and steady per-
severance have gained them a competence, Mr,
felt indisposed to give his son a trade, or to subject
him to the same restraints and discipline in youth
to which he had been subjected. He felt ambi-
tious for him, and determined to educate him for
one of the learned professions. To this end, he
sent him to school early, and provided for him the
very best of instruction. ,

The idea that he was to be a lawyer, or a doc-
tor, soon took possession of the mind of Harman,
and this caused him to feel contempt for other boys
who were merely designed for trades, or store-

keepers.
36 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

Like too many others, he had no love of learn-
ing, nor any right appreciation of its legitimate
uses. ‘To be a lawyer, he thought would be much
more honourable, than to be a mere mechanic;
and for this reason alone, so far as he had any
thoughts on the subject, did he desire to be a law-
yer. As for James Wallace, he, as the poor illiter-
ate apprentice of his father, was most heartily
despised, and never treated by Harman with the
smallest degree of kind consideration.

At the age of eighteen, he was sent away to
one of the Eastern Universities, and there remain-
ed, except during the semi-annual vacations, until
he was twenty-one years of age; when he gradu-
ated and came home with the honorary title of A.
B. At this time James Wallace was between
severiteen and eighteen years of age, somewhat
rough in his appearance, but with a sound mind in
a sound body. Although, each day he regularly
toiled at the work-bench, he as regularly turned
to his books when evening released him from
labour, and was up at the peep of dawn, to lay the
first offerings of his mind upon the shrine of learn-
ing. But all this devotion to the acquirement of
knowledge, won for him no sympathy, no honour-
able estimation from his master’s son. He despised
these patient, persevering efforts, as much as he
despised his condition as an apprentice to a trade.
But it was not many years before others began to
perceive the contrast between them, although on
the very day that James completed his term of
apprenticeship, Harman was admitted to the bar.

one completed his education so far as gen
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 37

eral knowledge, and a rigid discipline of mind was
concerned, when he left college. The other be-
came more really the student, when the broader
and brighter light of rationality shone clearly on
his pathway, as he passed the threshold of man-
hood. James still continued to work at his trade,
but not for so many hours each day, as while he
was an apprentice. He was a good and fast work-
man, and could readily earn all that he required
for his support in six or eight hours of every
twenty-four. Eight hours were regularly devoted
to study. From some cause, he determined that
he would make law his profession. To the ac-
quirement of a knowledge of legal matters, there-
fore, he bent all the energies of a well disciplined,
and active, comprehensive mind. Two years
passed in an untiring devotion to the studies he
had assigned himself, and then he made applica-
tion for admission to the bar.

« Who were admitted yesterday?” asked Har-
man Lee, the day after Wallace had passed his
examination, addressing a fellow-member of the

r.

“ Some half dozen, and among them a sturdy
young fellow, that nobody ever heard of before.”

“Indeed! Well, what kind of an examination
did he make.” |

“An excellent one. The Judges tried their best
with him, but he seemed furnished at every point.
He is said to be a young mechanic, who has thus
qualified himself in the time that he could spare
from the labours of his handicraft, by which he

has supported himself.”
4
38 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

“A mechanic! Poh! The whole court-room
will smell of leather, or’ linseed oil, I suppose, after
this. Did you learn his name?”

“‘ James Wallace, I believe he is called.”

“James Wallace! Are you sure?” ©

“Yes, that was it. Do you know him? You
look sufficiently surprised to know him twice
over.”

“My father had an apprentice by that name,
who affected to be very fond of books. But sure.
ly it can’t be he.”

“I am sure I don’t know. But here comes a
client for you, I suppose.”

As the latter spoke, a man entered the office,
and asked for Mr. Lee.

“That is my name, sir,” said Lee, bowing.
“ Take a chair.”

The stranger seated himself, and after a moe
ment’s pause, said,

“I wish you to attend a case forme. I have
been sued this morning, as an executor of an
estate, and the claim set up is a very important
one.”

The whole case was then stated with an exhibj.
tion of various documents. After Lee had come
to understand fully its merits, he asked who wag
the lawyer of the claimants.

“A young fellow, only admitted yesterday, by
the name of Wallace. I am told he has it in
charge. He was, however, consulted some months
ago, and his services retained, to become active at
this time.”
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. 39

Lee turned to his friend, and remarked—

« So it seems that I am doomed first to come in
contact with this young mechanic. He is certain-
ly quick on the trigger. Only admitted yesterday,
and to-day pushing on a most important suit. But
[’ll cool him off, [’m thinking.”

‘¢ You must do your best, sir, for there is much
at stake,” said the client.

“Rely upon that. But don’t give yourself a
moment’s uneasiness. A few years’ experience at
the bar, is always enough to set aside your new
beginners.”

<< | wonder if it can be my father’s old appren-
tice?” the young lawyer remarked, after his client
had gone.

“Tt’s as likely as not,” his friend said. ‘ But
wouldn’t it be a good joke, if he gained the suit
over you !”

«¢ Never fear that!”

“© Well, we shall see!” laughingly exclaimed
his friend.

On the next day, James Wallace took his seat
among the members of the bar, and marked with
a keen interest, and an air of intelligence, all that
passed. One or two of the lawyers noticed him
kindly, but the majority, Lee among them, regard-
ed him with coldness and dislance. But nothing
of this affected him, if, indeed, he noticed it at all.

The cause in which he had been retained, and
which proved to be the first in which he took an
active and prominent position in the court-room,
came up-within a week, for all parties interested
inthe result, were anxious to come to trial; and,
40 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

therefore, no legal obstacles were thrown in the
Way.

There was a profound silence, and a marked
attention, and interest, when the young stranger

Harman Lee, but Wallace saw it not, The pro.
minent points of the Case were presented in plain
but concise language, and a few remarks bearing
upon the merits of the case being made, the young

co

lor the de.

Instantly Harman Lee was on his feet, and be.
gan referring to the points presented by his « very
learned brother,” in a flippant, contemptuous man.
her. There were those present who marked the
light that kindled in the eye of Wallace, and the
flash that Passed over his countenance at the first
contemptuous word and tone that were uttered by
his antagonist at the bar. These soon gave place
to attention, and an air of conscious power, Once
on his feet, with so flimsy a position to tear into
tatters, as that which his « learned brother”? had
Presented, Lee seemed never to grow tired of the
tearing process, Nearly an hour had passed awa
when he resumed his seat with a look of exultation,

that smile had changed to a look of surprise, mor.
tification, and alarm, all blended into a single ex.
Pression. The young lawyer’s maiden-speech
showed him to be a man of calm, deep, systematic
STUDENT AND APPRENTICE. | 41

thought—well, skilled in points of law, and in au--
thorities ; and more than all, a lawyer of practical
and comprehensive views. When he sat down no
important point in the case had been left untouch-
ed, and none that had been touched, required fur-
ther elucidation.

Lee followed briefly, in a vain attempt to torture
his language, and break down his positions. But.
he eit that he was contending with weapons whose
edges were turned at every blow. When he took
his seat again, Wallace merely remarked, that he
was prepared, without further argument, to submit
the case to the court.

The case was accordingly submitted, and a de-
cision unhesitatingly made in favour of the plain-
tiffs, or Wallace’s clients.

From that hour, James Wallace took his true
place. The despised apprentice became the able
and profound lawyer, and was so esteemed for
real talent and real moral worth, which, when
combined, ever place their possessor in his true
position.

Ten years from that day, Wallace was elevated
to the Bench, while Lee remained a second-rate
lawyer, and never rose above that grade.

In the histories of these two persons is seen the
difference between simply receiving an education,
as it is called, and self-education. Most eminent
men are self-educated men. ‘This fact every stu-
dent and every humble apprentice, with limited
advantages, should bear in mind. It should infuse
new life into the studies of the one, and inspire the
other with a determination to imbue his mind with

4 *
42 STUDENT AND APPRENTICE.

knowledge. The education that a boy receives at
colleges and seminaries, does not make him a
learned man. He has only acquired the rudiments
of knowledge. Beyond these he must go— he
must continue ever after a student—or others will
leave him in the rear; others of humbler means
and fewer Opportunities; the apprentice of the
handicrafisman, for instance, whose few hours of
devotion to study, from a genuine love of learning,
have given him a taste and a habit that remain
vith him in all after time.


THE

STORY OF A LITTLE BOY, WHO
SOMETIMES GOT ANGRY.

THERE was once a little boy, named Jonas
White, who had a very bad temper. A very tri-
fling thing would frequently make him get so angry
that he hardly knew what he was saying or do-

ing.

“iis father often talked to him, and sometimes
had to punish him for giving way to this very
wicked disposition; but as the little boy would
make no effort to conquer it, he grew worse, in-
stead of better. ?

One day Jonas came home from school, and
found that his little sister Emma had some of his
playthings. He was not a very good boy ; for he
did not like to see his sister enjoying herself with
anything that belonged to him; and this was be-
cause he was selfish. ;

«“ Give me my playthings!” he cried out, in an:
angry tone of voice, as soon as he saw. what Emma.
was doing. .

« O, let me play with them, brother, won't you:?”
Emma asked.

“ No, I will not!” the unkind boy said. “ And:
I’d like to know what business you had. to. touch:
my things !”

And so saying, he jerked away the playthings
with which Emma was amusing — = not:

43
44. STORY OF A LITTLE Boy,

Content with this, his anger so overcame him, that
he pushed her away so suddenly, that she fell, and
struck her head with a dreadful blow against a

Poor little Emma was: so Stunned with the blow,
that she lay insensible, while the blood flowed out
from a wound in her head,

In an instant the anger of Jonas disappeared,
and he ran to his sister, and endeavoured to lift
her up. But when he saw the blood running out,
and trickling down her beautiful dark hair, form.
ing already a pool upon the floor, he became sick
at heart with alarm and remorse for What he had

one,

His cries of terror brought his mother instantly
into the room. She was dreadfully frightened
when she saw Emma lying upon the floor ; and
still more so, when she perceived the deep wound
in her head from which the blood was flowing very
fast.

“T did it mother! I did it! | pushed her oyer,
But I didn’t mean to hurt her !”? Jonas said, burst-
ing into tears,

hen his mother heard this, she felt sick, and
faint ; for she Was in bad health, and was very
weak,
“ What if he has killed her?” she said to herself,
as. she took Emma in her arms, and laid her upon
er own bed,

This thought distressed her exceedingly. She

hew Jonas had &@ quick, bad temper, and the .
thought, that in a fit of passion he had killed hig
Sister, wag to her-a terrible one.
WHO SOMETIMES GOT ANGRY. 45

A physician was sent for, who had to cut much
of Emma’s_ beautiful hair away, to get at the
wound, which he then sewed up. ‘The pain which
this produced brought back the little girl to con-
sciousness, and she cried very bitterly while the |
doctor continued dressing the wound.

Jonas, whose father made him stay in the room
all the while that the doctor was sewing up and
‘dressing his sister’s head, suffered more than can
be described. He deeply repented of what he had
done, and resolved that he would try very hard to
conquer his unhappy temper.

His father did not punish him, for he knew that
punishment would do but little good, if the sad
condition of his sister did not produce a change.
But he told him about a boy that lived in the same
town, several years before, who struck his little
brother in anger, and killed him.

“¢] remember it very well,” he said, “ and it
was a dreadful time for his poor mother. Indeed,
I have always thought that it was the cause of her
death, for she never seemed herself again, and was
carried to her grave ‘1 two months afterwards.
Her son has grown up to be a man, and still lives
in town. But he never seems happy, and nothing
goes well with him. He walks about with. his
eyes cast down, and associates with no one, €X-
cept so far as his business requires. He seems,
and I have no doubt is, a very wretched man}; for
how can he ever forget that dreadful event.

“ And suppose, Jonas, you had killed your sis-
ter! The very thought ‘s awful! I have no doubt
but that it would have broken your mothez’s heart.
46 STORY ofa LITTLE BOY, &c.

Try then, to curb your bad temper, or some dread.
ful thing, I am afraid, will be the Consequence,”
Jonas cried bitterly, and determined that he
would never get angry with his Sister again, Ag
00N as she got well €nough to look about her, and
amused with anything, he brought his toys and
playthings, and Spread them out before her on the
bed, and told her that they were all her’s whenever
she wanted to play with them,
© was very much 8ratified when he saw that
tmma was pleased, and would pick up first one
little thing and then another, and seem to enjo
the sight of them ; much more really pleased than
ever he was while selfishly keeping them to him.
self.
After awhile Emma got well again, and was
able to come down stairs and 8° about as usual.
ut Jonas neyer Could get angry with her as be.

times it would break out, when others Opposed
HOW TO BE HAPPY.

«0, I am so tired! I wish I had something ¢o
do!” Jane Thompson said to her mother one day.

“Then why don’t you read?” asked her mo-
ther. ‘* You have books.”

«]?m tired of reading, and I’m tired of every-
thing.”

« You are a very unhappy gitl, Jane,” her mo-
ther said.

“{f I am, I can’t help it.”

« But I am sure you could help it, if you would
try, Jane.”

“«How can I help it, mother? I am sure |
should like very much to know.”

«“ By trying to be useful to others, my daughter.”

“So you have said before. But I cannot see
any thing so very pleasant in working for others.
Nobody thinks of being useful to me.”

“That is a very selfish thought, Jane,” her
mother said, in a serious tone, “ and the feeling
that prompted that thought, is the cause of all your
unhappiness of mind. You must cease to think
only of yourself, and have some kind regard for
others, or you will never be happy.”

Jane did not understand her mother, and there-
fore could see no force in what she said. And her
mother perceived this, and so said no more then
upon the subject. .

(4
48 HOW TO BE HAPPY,

About an hour afterwards she came into the
room, where Jane sat idle and moping, and said,

“* Come, Jane, I want you to walk out with me.”

“‘T dont care much about going, mother,” Jane
replied. “And if you are willing, would rather
Stay at home.”

“ But I wish you to go with me, Jane; so come,
dress yourself as quickly as you can, for you know
it never takes me long to get ready.”

Jane reluctantly obeyed, and, when dressed,
went out with her mother. She felt listless and
unhappy, for her mind was not employed upon
any subject of interest.

After walking for some ten or fifteen minutes,
her mother stopped at a low frame building, and
knocked at the door.

“What are you going in there for?” Jane asked
in surprise. =

“‘I want to see a poor sick woman who lives
here,” her mother said, in a quiet tone.

“QI wish you had let me staid at home 1?
But before Jane could say any more, the knock
was answered by a little girl about ten years old,
whose uncombed head, soiled clothes and skin,
showed that she needed the care of a mother’s
willing heart and ready hand,

The little girl conducted them into a back room,
in which were a few scanty pieces of furniture and
a bed, upon which was propped up with pillows a
sick woman, engaged in sewing. Her face was
pale and thin, and her eyes, bright and glistening,
were sunk far into the head. The work dropped
from her hand, as her unexpected visiters entered,
HOW TO BE HAPPY. 49

and then she looked up earnestly into the face of
the elder of the two.

“You do not seem able to work, ma’am,” Jane’s
mother said, advancing to the bed-side, and taking
the small thin hand that was offered her.

«“T am not very able, madam,” she replied in a
feeble tone. “ But I have to do something.”

‘Is there no one to provide any thing for you,
in your feeble state?” asked her visiter.

«No one, madam,” was the simple, and to
Jane’s mother, affecting response.

« And how many hours through the day do you
have to sit up in bed and sew?”

‘All day, when I can, ma’am. And sometimes
a good many hours at night. But I wouldn’t care
go much for that, if I was able to go about the
room a little, and attend more to my child, who is,
indeed, sadly neglected.” And the tears came into
the mother’s eyes, as she cast a look of tenderness
upon her little girl.

Jane saw that look, and noted the sad expression
of the poor woman’s voice, and both touched her
heart.

« Cannot we do something for them?” she whis-

« We must try,” was the low response.

«| heard of your being ill, this morning,” Jane’s
mother said, ‘and have come over to see if I can.
do any thing for you. You must be relieved from
your constant labour, for it is too much for your
feeble frame. As soon as I return home, I will send,
you over as much food as you and your little girl
will require for several days, and my daughter here:

5
50 HOW TO BE HAPPY.

will be willing, I think, to come in to see you now
and then, and give you such little assistance ag
you may require. Will you not, Jane?”

“O yes, mother. I will come most cheerfully,”
And the tone of her voice, and expression of her
face showed that she was in earnest,

The poor woman could not find words to speak

out her true feelings, but she looked her gratitude.
_ After Jane and her mother had left this miser-
able tenement, the former said,
_ “O, mother, it makes my heart ache to think of
that poor woman and her child! How can she
possibly get bread to eat, by the work of her own
hands, and she almost dying.”

The sympathy thus expressed pleased her mo-
ther very much, and she encouraged the good
impression. After she had returned home, she

that she knew would be grateful to the sick woman.
These she despatched by a servant. About half
an hour after, Jane, with a small bundle in her
hand, went out alone, and turned her steps towards
the cheerless hovel she had but a short time before
visited. In this bundle was a change of clothing
for the invalid, which Jane assisted her to put on.
And then she made up her bed for her, and beat
up the pillows, and fixed her as comfortable as
possible,

Then she took the little girl, and washed her,
and combed her hair, and put on a clean frock
that her mother told her she would find in a
closet. After this she arranged every thing in the
HOW TO BE HAPPY. 51

room in order, and swept up the floor. And still
- further, went to work and got a nice cup of tea for
the sick woman. |

It would have done the heart of any one good to
have seen how full of delight and gratitude was the
countenance of the sick woman. Jane had never
felt so happy in her life.

When she came home, her mother remarked her
light step and cheerful air.

“You have at last learned how to be happy,
Jane,” she said. “ The secret lies in our endeavour-
ing to be useful to others. All our unhappiness
springs from some indulgence of selfishness, and
all our true feelings of happiness, from that bene-
yolence which prompts us to regard others.”

Jane saw and felt the force of her mother’s
remark, and never forgot it. The sick woman, in
whom she had become interested, afforded ample
scope for the exercise of her newly awakened feel-
ings of benevolence, and thus they gained strength,
and grew into principles of action. May every
one who reads this little story, find the true secret
of happiness !
NO.

“THERE is a word, my son, a very little word,
in the English language, the right use of which it
is all-important that you should learn,” Mr. How.
land said to his son Thomas, who was about leay-
ing the paternal roof for a residence in a neigh-
bouring city, never again, perchance, to make one
of the little circle that had so long gathered in the
family homestead.

**And what word is that, father?’ Thomas
asked.

‘It is the little word No, my son.”

“And why does so much importance attach to’

that word, father 1”

** Perhaps I can make you understand the rea-
son much better if I relate an incident that occur-
red when I was a boy. I remember it as distinct.
ly as if it had taken place but yesterday, although
thirty years have since passed. There was a
neighbour of my father’s, who was very fond of
gunning and fishing. On several occasions, IT had
accompanied him, and had enjoyed myself very
much. One day, my father said to me,

“¢ William, I do ‘not wish you to go into the
woods or on the water again with Mr, Jones.’

“*¢ Why not, father? | asked, for I had become
so fond of going with him, that to be denied the

pleasure was a real privation. oa

od
NO. 53

«<] have good reasons for not wishing you to
o, William,’ my father replied, ‘ but do not want
to give them now. I hope it is all-sufficient for
ou, that your father desires you not to accompany

r. Jones again.’

©] could not understand why my father laid
upon me this prohibition ; and, as I desired very
much to go, f did not feel satisfied in my obedience.
On the next day, as | was walking along the road,
I met Mr. Jones, with his fishing-rod on his
shoulder, and his basket in his hand. |

«+ Ah, William! you are the very one that I
wish to see,’ said Mr. Jones, smiling. ‘I am go
ing out this morning, and want company. We
shall have a beautiful day.’

«But my father told me yesterday,’ I replied,
¢that he did not wish me to g° out with you.’

«¢ And why not, pray ” asked Mr. Jones.

«<] am sure that I do not know,’ I said; ‘ but
indeed, I should like to go very much.’

«+O, never mind ; come along, he said. * Your
father will never know a

“¢ Yes, but I am afraid that he will,’ I replied,
thinking more of my father’s displeasure than of
the evil of disobedience.

«There is no danger at all of that. We will
be home again long before dinner-time.’

« | hesitated, and he urged ; aud finally, I moved
the way that he was going, and had proceeded a
few hundred yards, when | stopped, and said—

« +] don’t like to go, Mr. Jones.’

6 ‘ Nonsense, William! There is no harm in

5
54 NO.

fishing, I am sure. I have often been out with
your father, myself.’

‘‘ Much as I felt inclined to go, still I hesitated;
for I could not fully make up my mind to disobey
my father, At length, he said—

“<1 can’t wait here for you, William. Come
along, or go back. Say yes, or no.’

“This was the decisive moment, I was to make
up my mind, and fix my determination in one way
or the other. I was to say yes or No.

“Come, I can’t stay here all day,” Mr. Jones
remarked, rather harshly, seeing that I hesitated.
At the same moment, the image of my father rose
distinctly before my mind, and I saw his eye fixed
steadily and reprovingly upon me. With one
desperate resolution, I uttered the word

“** No!’ and then turning, ran away as fast as
my feet would carry me. | cannot tell you how
much relieved I felt when I was far beyond the
reach of temptation,

“On the next morning, when I came down to
breakfast, I was startled and surprised to learn
that Mr. Jones had been drowned on the day be-
fore. Instead of returning in a few hours, as he
had stated to me that he would, he remained out
all the day. A sudden storm arose ; his boat wag
capsized, and he drowned. | shuddered when [
heard this sad and fatal accident related. That
little word, no, had in all probability saved my
life.

“<¢T will now tell you, William,’ my father said,
turning to me, ‘ why I did not wish you to go with
Mr. Jones. Of late, he had taken to drinking ;
NO. 55

and I had learned, within a few days, that when-
ever he went out on a fishing or gunning €Xxcur-.
sion, he took his bottle of spirits with him, and
usually returned a good deal intoxicated. I could
not trust you with such a man. I did not think it’
necessary to state this to you, for I was sure that
I had only to express my wish that you would
not accompany him, to insure your implicit obedi-
ce.’

“] felt keenly rebuked at this; and resolved
never again to permit even the thought of. disobe-
dience to find a place in my mind. From that
time, I have felt the value of the word No, and
have generally, ever since, been able to use it on
all right occasions, It has saved me from many
troubles. Often and often in life have I been urged
to do things that my judgment told me were wrong:
on such occasions, I always remembered my first
temptation, and resolutely said— |

“&é¢No?

“And now, my son,” continued Mr. Howland,
“do you understand the importance of the word
No?”

“] think I do, father,” Thomas replied. ‘* But
is there not danger of my using it too often, and
thus becoming selfish in all my feelings, and con-
sequently, unwilling to render benefits to others ?”

“Certainly there is, Thomas. The legitimate
use of this word is to resist evil. To refuse to do
a good action is wrong.”

“If any one asks me, then, to do him a favour
or kindness, I should not, on any account, say,
no.’
54 NO.

fishing, I am sure. I have often been out with
your father, myself.’

“‘ Much as I felt inclined to go, still I hesitated ;
for I could not fully make up my mind to disobey
my father. At length, he said—

“¢T can’t wait here for you, William. Come
along, or go back. Say yes, or no.’

“This was the decisive moment. I was to make
up my mind, and fix my determination in one way
or the other, I was to Say yes or No.

““* Come, I can’t Stay here all day,’ Mr. Jones
remarked, rather harshly, seeing that I hesitated.
At the same moment, the image of my father rose
distinctly before my mind, and I saw his eye fixed
Steadily and reprovingly upon me. With one
desperate resolution, I uttered the word

“* No!’ and then turning, ran away as fast as
my feet would carry me. I cannot tell you how
much relieved I felt when I was far beyond the
reach of temptation.

“On the next morning, when I came down to
-breakfast, I was startled and surprised to learn
that Mr. Jones had been drowned on the day be-
fore. Instead of returning in a few hours, as he
had stated to me that he would, he remained out
all the day. A sudden storm arose ; his boat was
capsized, and he drowned. | shuddered when [|
heard this sad and fatal accident related. That
_ word, No, had in all probability saved my
ife.

“* turning to me, ‘ why I did not wish you to go with
Mr. Jones. Of late, he had taken to drinking ;
NO. 55

and I had learned, within a few days, that when-
ever he went out on a fishing or gunning excur-.
sion, he took his bottle of spirits with him, and
usually returned a good deal intoxicated. I could
not trust you with such a man. I did not think it’
necessary to state this to you, for I was sure that
I had only to express my wish that you would
not accompany him, to insure your implicit obedi-
ce.”

“] felt keenly rebuked at this; and resolved
never again to permit even the thought of disobe-
dience to find a place in my mind. From that
time, I have felt the value of the word No, and
have generally, ever since, been able to use it on
all right occasions. It has saved me from many
troubles. Often and often in life have I been urged
to do things that my judgment told me were wrong:
on such occasions, I always remembered my first
temptation, and resolutely said— |

“6éNol

« And now, my son,” continued Mr. Howland,
“do you understand the importance of the word
No?”

«J think I do, father,” Thomas replied. ‘ But
is there not danger of my using it too often, and
thus becoming selfish in all my feelings, and con-
sequently, unwilling to render benefits to others?”

“Certainly there is, Thomas. The legitimate
use of this word is to resist evil. To refuse to do
a good action is wrong.”

“If any one asks me, then, to do him a favour
or kindness; I should not, on any account, say,
no.’
56 No.

‘That will depend, Thomas, in what manner
you are to render him a kindness. If you can do
So without really injuring yourself or others, then
itis a duty which you owe to all men, to be kind,
-and render favours.”

“‘ But the difficulty, I feel, will be for me to dis-
criminate. When I am urged to do something by
one whom I esteem, my regard for him, or my
desire to render him an obligation, will be so strong
as to obscure my judgment.”

“A consciousness of this weakness in your
character, Thomas, should put you upon your
guard.”

“‘ That is very true, father. But I cannot help
fearing for myself. Still, I shall never forget what
you have said, and will try my best to act from a
conviction of right.”

“Do so, my son. And ever remember, that
a wrong action is always followed by pain of
mind, and too frequently by evil consequences. If
you would avoid these, ever act from a conscious-
ness that you are doing right, without regard to
others, If another asks you, from a selfish desire
to benefit or gratify himself, to do that which your
judgment tells you is wrong, surely you should
have no hesitation in refusing.”

The precept of his father, enforced when they
were about parting, and at a time when his affec-
tions for that father were active and intense, lingered
in the mind of Thomas Howland. He saw and
felt its force, and resolved to act in obedience to it,
if ever tempted to do wrong.

On leaving the paternal roof, he went to a
NO. 57

neighbouring town, and entered the store of a
merchant, where were several young men nearly
of his own age, that is, between eighteen and
twenty. With one of these, named Boyd, he soon
formed an intimate acquaintance. But, unfortun-
ately, the moral character of this young man was
far from being pure, or his principles from resting
upan the firm basis of truth and henour.

His growing influence over Thomas Howland
was apparent in inducing him to stay away from
chureh on the Sabbath-day, and pass the time that
had heretofore been spent in a place of worship, in
roaming about the wharves of the city, or in ex-
cursions into the country. This influence was
slightly resisted; but Thomas felt ashamed or
reluctant to use the word * No,” on what seemed
to all the young men around him a matter of so
little importance, Still, his own heart condemned
him, for he felt that it would pain his father and
mother exceedingly if they knew that he neglected
to attend church at least once on the Sabbath-day
—and he was, besides, self-convicted of wrong in
what seemed to him a violation of the precept, Re-
member the Sabbath-day, &c., as he had been
taught to regard that precept. But once having
given way, he felt almost powerless to regist the
influence that now bore upon him,

‘The next violation of what seemed to him a right
course for a young man to pursue, was in suffering
himself to be persuaded to visit frequently the
theatre; although his father had expressly desired
that he would avoid a place where lurked for the
young and inexperienced so many dangers. He
58 NO.

was next easily persuaded to visit a favourite eating-
house, in which many hours were spent during the
evenings of each week, with Boyd and others, in
eating, drinking, and smoking. Sometimes dominos
and back-gammon were introduced, and at length
were played for a slight stake. To participate in
this, Thomas refused, on the plea that he did not
know enough of the games to risk anything. He
had not the moral courage to declare that he con-
sidered it wrong to gamble.

All these departures from what he had been
taught by his father to consider a right course,
were attended by much uneasiness and pain of
mind. But he had yielded to the tempter, and he
could not now find the power within him to resist
his influence successfully.

It happened, about six months after his introduc-
tion to such an entirely new course of life, that he
was invited one evening by his companion Boyd,
to call on a friend with him. He had, on that day,
received from his father forty dollars, with which
to buy himself a new suit of clothes, and a few
other necessary articles. He went, of course, and
was introduced to a very affable, gentlemanly young
man, in his room, at one of the hotels. In a few
minutes, wine and cigars were ordered, and the
three spent an hour or so, in drinking, smoking,
and chit-chat of no very elevating or refined
character.

“Come, let us have a game of cards,” the friend
at last remarked, during a pause in the conversa-
tion; at the same time going to his trunk and
producing a pack of cards,
NO. 59

“No objection,” responded Boyd.

“ Youll take a hand, of course?” the new friend
said, looking at Thomas Howland.

But Thomas said that he knew nothing of cards.

“© that’s no matter! You can learn in two
minutes,” responded the friend of Boyd.

Young Howland felt reluctant, but he could not
resist the influence that was around him, and so he
consented to finger the cards with the rest. As
they gathered around the table, a half-dollar was
laid down by each of the young men, who looked
towards Thomas as they did so.

“] cannot play for money,” he said, colouring ;
for he felt really ashamed to acknowledge his
scruples.

“And why not?” asked the friend of Boyd,
looking him steadily in the face.

« Because I think it wrong,” stammered out
Howland, colouring still more deeply. )

«“ Nonsense! Isn’t your money your own? And
pray what harm is there in your doing with your
own as you please?” urged the tempter.

« But I do not know enough of the game to risk
my money.”

“You don’t think we would take advantage of
your ignorance?” Boyd said. ‘The stake is only
to give interest to the game. I would not givea
copper for a game of cards without a stake. Come,
put down your half-dollar, and we’ll promise to
pay you back all you lose, if you wish it, until you
acquire some skill.”

But Thomas felt reluctant and hesitated. Never-
theless, he was debating the matter in his mind
60 NO.

seriously, and every moment that reluctance was
growing weaker,

“Will you play?” Boyd asked in a decided
tone, breaking in upon this debate.

“‘T had rather not,” Thomas replied, attempting
to smile, so as to conciliate his false friends,

“ You are afraid of your money,” said Boyd, in
a half-sneering tone.

“It is not that, Boyd.”

“Then what is it, pray 7”

“T am afraid that it is not right.”

This was answered by a loud laugh from his
two friends, which touched Thomas a good deal,
and made him feel more ashamed of the scruples
that held him back from entering into the temp-
lation.

“Come, down with your stake, Howland!”
Boyd said, after he had finished his laugh.

The hand of Thomas was in his pocket, and his
fingers had grasped the silver coin, yet still he
hesitated.

‘Will you play, or not?” the friend of Boyd
now said, with something of impatience in his tone,
“Say yes, or no.”

For a moment the mind of Thomas became con-
fused —then the perception came upon him ag
clear as a sunbeam, that it was wrong to gamble.
He remembered, too, vividly, his father’s parting
injunction.

* No!” he said, firmly and decidedly.

Both of his companions looked disappointed and
OME bointicnt ba

“* What did you bring him here for?” he heard
NO. 61

Boyd’s companion say to him in an under tone,
while a frown darkened upon his brow.

The reply did not reach his ear, but he felt that
his company was no longer pleasant, and rising,
he bade them a formal good-evening, and hurriedly
retired. That little word, zo, had saved him. The
scheme was, to win from him his forty dollars, and
then involve him in “ debts of honour,” as they are
falsely called, which would compel him to draw
upon his father for more money, or abstract it from
his employer, a system which had been pursued
by Boyd, and which was discovered. only a week
subsequent, when the young man was discharged
in disgrace. It then came out, that he had been
for months in secret association with a gambler,
and that the two shared together their spoils and
peculations.

This incident roused Thomas Howland to a dis-
tinct consciousness of the danger that lurked in his
path, as a young man, in a large city. He felt, as
he had not felt, while simply listening to his father’s _
precept, the value of the word no; and resolved,
that hereafter, he would utter that little word, and
that, too, decidedly, whenever urged to do what his
judgment did not approve.

“1 will be free!” he said, pacing his chamber
backward and forward, ‘I will be free, hereafter !
No one shall persuade me or drive me to do what
I feel to be wrong.”

That resolution was his safeguard, ever after.
When tempted, and he was tempted frequently, his
“¢ No” decided the matter at once. There was 8
power in it that was all-sufficient in resisting evil

ae
THE TONGUE BRIDLE.

* Wuar is the trouble now?” asked Mrs. Ellis,
coming into the room where her daughter Maria
sat weeping bitterly.

“That will tell you,” replied Maria, drying her
fears and handing her mother an open letter. Mrs.
Ellis read as follows:

To Marra Exuis,

Miss : —T have just learned from Harriet Wil.
son that you made rather free with my name yes-
terday. Now I would just like to know whether
you did, or did not say, that you thought me over
and above conceited ; and if you did, what you
mean by it? I am not used to be talked about in
that way. ANN HARRIS.

“And did you say so to Harriet Wilson ?” ask.
ed Mrs. Ellis,

“Yes, I did, and now how to get out of it, I am
sure I cannot tell. I never dreamed that Harriet
was such a tattler, or I’d have been Close enough
with her,”

“You cannot deny it of course.”

No, not up and down, but then, ma, it will
never do in the world to come right out and ac.
knowledge it point blank. I’d make Ann Harris
an enemy all my life.”

“ How very unguarded you are, Maria ‘ This is

(62
TONGUE BRIDLE. 63

the third or fourth time you have brought your-
self into difficulty by your free way of talking to
every one.”

«| know I am imprudent, ma, sometimes ; but
then I never can believe that young ladies with
whom I am intimate will act so meanly as to be-
come tattlers and mischief-makers, until it is too
late to make caution of any avail. But I’m done
with Harriet Wilson; I ve broken off my intimacy
with several girls already for repeating what I have
said; and I “Il do the same with her.”

“Tt would be much better, Maria,” said her
mother, “if you would put a bridle on your
tongue ; you would save yourself and others many
unkind thoughts and painful feelings.”

«| know I would, ma, but then I can’t always
be watching myself. It’s impossible ; I try often,
but it’s no use.”

«If you will persevere in trying, you will, in
time, gain such a control over yourself as to keep

ou out of these unpleasant difficulties.”

“Perhaps I might; but what shall I do now!
Ann has pinned me right down: and there is no
way of getting off, unless I say that Harriet must
have misunderstood me.”

“That would be prevarication, Maria, if not
something worse.”

«“ Yes, it would; for I remember well enough
that I said exactly what she has reported.”

«And do you seriously think, Maria, that Ann
is conceited 2”

“‘ Yes, ma, I do, or I would not have said so.”

“J think as you do, Maria, but then, there is
64 TONGUE BRIDLE.

to me nothing offensive in the good opinion she
seems to entertain of herself.”

“* No, there is not; and had I not been some.
what ill-natured at the time, I never should have
alluded to it.”

“I suspected as much,” Mrs. Ellis said. * And
under the circumstances, I am of opinion that your
best way is frankly to own that you did say what
has been reported, and why you said it. Such an
honest confession will do you both good.”

‘I don’t know, ma.”

‘* Why do you doubt?”

“I don’t believe that such an explanation. will
soften her angry feelings at all.”

“I am much inclined to think that you feel a
reluctance on your own account to pursue this
course.”

‘Well, perhaps I do,” Maria said, after a
pause.

“You are evidently in the wrong, Maria, and
@ consciousness of this clouds your perception of
the true way to act. Now, if you will let me
write your reply to Ann’s note, I think all can be
brought around fair again.”

** You are certainly at liberty to do so, ma: but
still, I should like to reserve the power of sending
or withholding it, as it seems best to me. Is this
asking too much ?”

“OQ, no, I would rather not have you send a re-
ply, unless you could see clearly that it was the
right one.”

“ Then write me an answer, ma.”

In the course of the day Mrs. Ellis prepared the
TONGUE BRIDLE. 65

following draft of a reply to Ann’s letter of com-
plaint, and submitted it to Maria.

“To Miss ANN Harris.

“ Dear Ann:—lI received your note complain-
ing that I had, according: to report, said unkind
things of you. I cannot deny, that in a moment
of ill-nature, I was tempted to say that I thought
you somewhat conceited; and to be frank with
you, your manners at times indicate this fault or
peculiarity of character. But it is not half so bad
a fault as the one I indulged in when | alluded to
it. Now, as I have confessed that I have a trait
in my disposition much worse than the one I
alluded to in yours, I must hope that you will for-
give me. Ever yours,

Maria E tis.”

“© What do you think of that?” Mrs. Ellis said,
after she had finished reading the proposed reply.

“It’s not exactly such a letter as I should have
written, but I believe it’s a much better one: so I
will send it.”

«| don’t think it can do any harm, and it tells
the whole truth, does it not?”

“© Yes it does, and in pretty plain terms too,”
Maria said smiling. ;

The letter was accordingly sent, and in the
course of a couple of hours, another was received
from Ann Harris. It read thus:

“ Dear Maria: —Your answer to my note has
been received, and it has completely dispelled my
unkind feelings. Let us forget the unpleasant

6 *
66 TONGUE BRIDLE.

incidents, and be the same to each other that we
have so long been ; neither of us is perfect, there-
fore we must learn to bear and forbear, When
I see Harriet Wilson again, I shall talk to her
about her fondness for retailing ill news.

Yours truly, Ann Harris.”

‘‘ You have helped me to get back a friend that
I always loved, dear mother! Maria said, a good
deal moved, as she finished reading the note. « [
shall try hereafter to be more guarded than [ have
been. I must bridle my tongue as you say, mo-
ther, at least unless I am pretty certain about the
company I am in.”

“The best tongue bridle, Maria,” Mrs. Ellis
replied, “is that which charitable feelings and
charitable thoughts give. If your restraints are
merely external, you will ever and anon be giving
the rein to your unruly member, and then troubles
will be the consequence.”

Maria hardly understood her mother, and did
not reply, and there the conversation ceased, On
the next morning, Cara Lee, another friend, called
in, and after some chat said,

‘‘T hear you have had a little fall out with Ann
Harris—is it true ?”

‘‘ ‘There has been a little difference, but it is all
settled now,” Maria replied. ‘ That tattling busy-
body Harriet Wilson, went and repeated ‘to her
that I said she was conceited. But she has been
well rewarded for her pains, for in a note that [
received from Ann, she expressed herself pretty
plainly about her, and said that she had a fond.
TONGUE BRIDLE. 67

ness for retailing ill news, and that she should
take her to task about it.”

“She is served perfectly right,” the friend re-
marked; then musing, as if suddenly recollecting
herself, she added; ‘ but I must be walking; |
have several calls to make this morning.”

As soon as Cara Lee parted with Maria, she
turned away to see Harriet Wilson, who was one
of her very particular friends.

“So Harriet,” she said, “ Maria and Ann Harris
have made up their difference, and from what f
can learn from Maria, Ann is pretty hard on you.
She is going to take you to task for your fond-
ness for retailing ill news. As for Maria, she
don’t spare you, but calls you a tattling busy-
body.”

Of course Harriet was greatly incensed, and so
soon as her friend was gone, put on her bonnet,
and posted off to see Ann Harris. She found that
young lady in, and commenced on her something
after this wise.

“1 understand, Miss, that you say I am a re-
tailer of ill news, and that you mean to take me to
task about it.”

Ann was taken a good deal by surprise, and felt
pained and confused at the sudden allegation. But
before she could collect herself sufficiently to reply,
Harriet said,

“| should like to know if what I have heard be
true?”

« It is true that J said,” Ann now replied calmly,
“that when I saw you again I would take you to
task for your fondness for retailing ill news.”
68 TONGUE BRIDLE.

“You had no right to make such a charge
against me,” Harriet said, in an angry tone, her
face flushed and her eyes sparkling. “It is a
false

“If you were not angry I might, perhaps, con-
vince you that I had some ground for what I said,”
Ann replied, still in a collected voice. « All of us
have our faults; I have mine, and you have yours,
and each of us is too apt to see those of others and
to be blind to our own. If instead of repeating to
me the remarks made by Maria Ellis, you had
reflected a moment as to what possible good could
grow out of it, and then resolved not to speak of it,
all this trouble would have been avoided.”

“And do you pretend to tell me to my face, that
I am fond of retailing ill news?” Harriet asked,
her anger greatly increased.

“‘T try whenever I speak of another to confine
myself to what I think the truth,” Ann replied, still
in a calm voice, “ and this | never retract,”

‘Give me. patience!” Harriet ejaculated, her
face now growing pale with passion.

‘¢ You are wrong, Harriet,” said Ann, “ thus to
be so much exasperated at so mere a trifle. Re-
flect whether almost every day you do not, in
speaking of your friends, allude to their faults in a
way that you could not bear to be spoken of. This
is too common a practice; and be assured, that
you do not always escape in this general habit of
Censoriousness, You are not faultless, and it is
not in the nature of things that you should be.”

Harriet could not collect her thoughts for a reply,
and Ann, after a pause, went on.


TONGUE BRIDLE. 69

~ Tf, when Maria Ellis, under the influence of a
momentary ill-nature, as she frankly confesses her-.
self to have been, spoke of me as she thought in
calmer moments, you had restrained your pro-
pensity to repeat such things, no harm could have
resulted from her thoughtless, and I might almost
say innocent allegation. But when you came to
me, and told me that she*had called me conceited,
it aroused my feelings and caused me to ask for
an explanation. With the frankness of a generous
spirit she at once confessed her fault, and all would
have been well again, if she had not thought-
lessly repeated what I said in my note to her about
you.”

But Harriet Wilson, though conscious that she
had acted wrong, was so much incensed as well as
mortified that others should think her wrong, that
she neither could nor would confess. her fault, but
braved it off with anger and defiance. As soon as
she had gone away, Ann sat down and penned a
note to Maria Ellis.

« Dear Maria: —It seems that our little diffi-
culty is not yet ended. I have just received a visit
from Harriet Wilson, who has treated me in a very
angry manner about what I said in my last note to
you in reference to her fondness for repeating ill.
news. Lam sorry that you communicated that to
any one, as it has not only prevented my making
an effort to show Harriet her fault, but has called
jown upon me her indignant censure. Yours, &c.

Ann Hagris.”
70 TONGUE BRIDLE.

‘What is the matter now?” asked Mrs. Ellis,
who saw by the sudden change in her daughter’s
countenance that the note she had received was by
no means an agreeable one. «No more doings of
the unruly member, | hope.”

Maria’s face crimsoned deeply as she handed her
mother the note. After Mrs. Ellis had read it, she
said somewhat kindly, for she really felt for Maria
in her unpleasant position :

“You have not put on the right tongue bridle
yet, I see.”

“TI suppose not. But indeed, ma, I try to be
guarded how and to whom, I speak. I never could
have dreamed that Cara Lee would have gone right
off to Harriet Wilson and told her what i said.’

“But the best way is not to speak unkindly of
any one,”

“‘ How could I have helped it, mother, in this
case 1”

“ Well I can’t say, mother, that it was.”

“Your real motive was to make Cara Lee think
sae of her, was it not 1”

“Why ma! do you think I ——.” Maria
paused and looked upon the floor, while her face
crimsoned.

** Probe yourself thoroughly, my child. It is of
the first importance for you to know distinctly your
true character. If you have taken pleasure in the
idea of injuring another because she has wronged
TONGUE BRIDLE. 71

or offended you, you have indulged in an evil af-
fection, and unless that evil affection had lain con-
cealed in your mind, it never could have been
aroused into activity.”

Maria looked thoughtful and concerned, and her
mother continued—

“Surely, my child, it is not by indulging this
evil that it is to be weakened, much less by con-
cealing it, even from yourself, after its indulgence.
It is better to look it in the face, confess that it is
wrong, and then try to shun it.”

“¢] think, mother, I now begin to see what you
mean by a tongue bridle,” Maria said, looking up
seriously into the face of her kind adviser.

“Well, my child?”

‘It is, that we should shun the cause of evil
speaking.”

“That is it, Maria. If we condemn the feeling
that prompts us to speak unkindly of others, and
try to conquer it, we shall be in little danger of in-
dulging the bad habit. But if we only curb the
busy ‘little member,’ at the same time that we
desire to speak censoriously, we will be sure,
sooner or later to be betrayed into a word that had
‘better not have been uttered. Kind feelings for,
and a desire to do good to others, is the best tongue
bridle.”

“| see it plain enough, dear mother! and I am
resolved to try and put the true bridle upon my
tongue.”

And Maria did try to some purpose. The little
difficulty that she was in was soon amicably settled ;
TONGUE BRIDLE.

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THE

TEST OF COURAGE,

“ You will stand alone, Harvey.”

“ T cannot help it.”

“ Every student in college will be against you.

“| should be sorry for that. Still, if that is to
be the consequence, I must meet it.”

‘© Won’t you join us? Say yes or no.”

* No.”

* You are a coward.”

A bright spot became instantly visible on the
cheek of Harvey Willet. But he replied, calmly,.

“Tf it be cowardice to fear to do wrong, then I
am a coward.”

“©O, a saint! a saint!” exclaimed several voices.
at once.

“‘ A precious stickler for right and wrong,” re-
marked another.

“ He shall join us!” one of the most reckless
students in the institution said, in an excited tone,
coming forward and standing close in front of
Harvey.

“Tet us hear his reason,” broke in another.
«‘ Yes—his reason !—his reason !” ran through the
group of students.

« They are easily given,” the young man replied,
calmly. ‘“ When I came to this institution, it was
with a resolution, never to set its rules at defiance.
So soon as: they become insufferable to i I will

7 (
74 TEST OF COURAGE.

apply to my friends to be removed. But so long
as I stay here, or in any institution, I will obey the
prescribed rules. As touching your proposed viola-
tion of one of these rules, I am clearly of opinion
that you are in the wrong, and that the faculty are
right.”

“i A Solomon!” was here heard from one or
two voices.

‘““He’s a paltry coward, that is what he is !””
added others.

“Yes— he’s afraid —”

“OF doing wrong,” was uttered in the same
calm voice,

“I hate a coward!” ejaculated one of the stu-
dents near his side, unmindful of Harvey’s quiet
vindication of himself, and unable, in the fevered
state of his mind, to perceive how far above mere
animal courage was the moral power within him,
that enabled Harvey Willet to withstand the almost
overwhelming opposition of his excited and thought-
less fellow-students.

** Why do you not carry out your scheme of
rebellion, or abandon it?” Harvey asked, turnin
to the young man who had last spoken, “ Most
certainly, in carrying it out, you act without me.”

“QO, let him alone,” now spoke up one. “He
wants to curry favour with the Faculty.”

“Let us duck the puppy !” said another.

“If he wasn’t a mean, cowardly fellow, he
would knock you down for that, John,” hastily
exclaimed one standing near.

“O, of course; but I knew what ‘kind of stuff
he was made of,” was the reply. ‘Come on, let
TEST OF COURAGE. 75

us duck him,” he added, advancing towards the
unyielding student.

Jarvey Willet folded his arms, and fixed his
eyes steadily upon the individual who approached
him. The latter could not brave the calm resolu-
sion of his manner, but paused, saying,

“Come on. Let us duck him.”

But none seemed inclined to join in that kind of
sport, for there was not one who did not, unac-
knowledgedly to himself, feel the moral superiority
of the young man whom they were trying in vain
to bend to their wishes, and, in spite of themselves,
a respect for his firmness and integrity of purpose.

A few silent moments passed after this propo-
sition, and then, with various exclamations of
contempt, the whole party turned away, and left
Harvey Willet in freedom.

Although, under the impulse of angry feelings,
the whole body of students had sneered at Harvey’s
honourable scruples, and well nigh proceeded to
personal injury because he would not join them in
a wrong action, yet such was the power of his
opposition, that a serious riot was prevented. As
calmness and reflection succeeded to their feverish
and irrational state, fanned into a flame by the
obstacle which they had imagined existed in Harvey,
many of the leaders felt a strange reluctance to
carry out the scheme of rebellion they had origin-

ated. And, finally, from the suggestion of doubts
and scruples, the whole project came to be aban-
doned.

Insensibly, a respect for the consistent firmness
of the student against whom they had been so in-
76 TEST OF COURAGE.

censed, came over their minds. A few, however,
still felt disappointed; and not unfrequently alluded
to the rare sport which they had promised them-
selves, and made no scruple of continuing to charge
its failure upon the cowardice or mean spirit of
Harvey Willet,

“T think you apply the wrong term to Harvey,”
said one of the students to another, who frequently
alluded to Willet in terms of contempt. ‘JI do not
believe that he is a coward.”

‘Then why did n’t he join us?”

* For other reasons, I am inclined to think, than
any fear of the consequences.”

“ What reasons, pray 1”

“He gave them. He did not wish to do
wrong.”

‘Pooh !* and the young man tossed his head
contemptuously. Then after a moment—

“T’ll test his courage. I’ll show you all that
he is a coward.”

*¢ How will you do that, John Green ?”

“Why, I'll insult him before all the students.”

“I would not, if I were you.”

“Yes you would; for I mean to do it.”

This determination soon became whispered
throughout the classes, reaching all ears but those
of Harvey Willet, Already had the tide of estima.
tion turned generally in favour of the young man.
The moral tone of his character could not fail of
making an impression, for it Was too apparent to
all who were not wilfully blind, that he acted in all
things from a principle of right. John Green, on
the contrary, was no favourite. He was reckless
TEST OF COURAGE. 77

and unprincipled, and there were but few who did
not fully estimate his true character.

When it became known that he was going to
insult Harvey Willet, and prove him a coward be-
fore all the students, a lively interest was awakened
in every mind; and there were few who did not
hope that Willet would act the man, as they said,
and signally chastise the other for any insolence that
he might offer. Various, however, were the opi-
nions as to the result; and two parties were soon
formed, one holding to the idea that Willet would
not fight, and the other to the belief that he would.
Under such circumstances, the interest of course
ran high.

On the next day, during a recess of the college
duties, all the students were assembled on the
rae and the opportunity was taken to offer

illet the proposed insult. The manner of begin-
ning it, was simply to jostle him so hard as nearly
to throw him over. This was of course observed
by all, and the two parties instantly became excited
to see the result.

«That was done on purpose !”” cried one.

“ Yes, it was; for I saw it !? said another.

« Knock him down!” exclaimed a third.

«¢ He’s too much of a coward for that,” Green
said, confronting him, and looking in his face with
a malicious, angry grin.

« Did you do it on purpose ”” asked Harvey, in
a calm tone of voice, looking the young man
steadily in the face.

“Yes, I did,” was the reply. ‘ And now I dare
you to resent it.”

"*

thus
78 TEST OF COURAGE.

“But why did you do it, John? Have I injured
you in any way, and refused to make repara-
tion ?”

“T did it to see if you were brave enough to
resent it,” Green said, in a sneering tone,

“That seems to me a very poor reason, John—”

“Knock him down, Harvey !” cried out one of
the company, interrupting Willet.

“Knock him down, or you are disgraced for
ever?” said a second.

‘Yes, knock him down!” exclaimed a third.

**He’s afraid!” burst out a fourth, with a pro-
voking, contemptuous laugh.

“‘] dare you to resent it,” Green repeated,
pushing his face almost into that of the insulted
student. |

Some who stood near, saw the hand of Willet
clench suddenly, and his arm tremble, as if the
impulse to strike the other were flowing down into
it. But the struggle in his mind was brief, and he
controlled himself.

“You are a mean-spirited, cowardly puppy !”
Green now said, his face red with evil and uncon.
trollable passions.‘ And I’Il disgrace you before
the whole college.”

And as he said this, he advanced towards Willet

“with his hand extended, and an expression of deter-
mination on his face.

But his purpose, whatever it was, he did not
execute. There was something in the stern, fixed,
resolute expression of Willet’s eye, that he could
not understand, and that the real coward, ia his
own heart, feared to encounter.
TEST OF COURAGE. 79

© Mean-spirited coward!” he contented himself
with sayiag, with his own face again close into
that of Willet’s.

“Let him alone, Green. He is disgraced
enough!” several voices exclaimed. |

“Yes, let him alone,” passed through the circle.
Even those who had perceived the true nature of
the manly struggle in Willet’s mind, were too
much under the power of the opposing sphere into
which they had been drawn, to acknowledge it even
to themselves, much less to speak a word in favour
of one whose very truth of principle had subjected
him to a base and unmanly persecution. But, as
the excitement of their feelings died away, there
were not a few to admire, secretly, and some to
venture on its expression, the dignified firmness
with which Harvey had borne the wanton insults
that were heaped upon him; even while there was
not a voice of encouragement lifted, nor a word
uttered in his favour.

“If Green had dared to lay his hands on him,
he would have found the lamb changed into a
lion,” —one ventured at length to remark,

“Yes,” said another, «| saw by his eye—and
what is more, Green saw it, too—that if any per-
sonal violence were offered to him, he would have
defended himself to the last.”

‘It is certain,” another remarked, ‘that in all
of his deportment, Harvey is consistent. If he
does not join in our tricks to annoy the Faculty,
he does not become, unasked, a mean informer.”

“Yes: but if he knew, and were asked, he
would not conceal the truth,” broke in one, with
something of indignant warmth.
80 TEST OF COURAGE.

“ And would you blame him for that ™

“ Certainly I would: from my very heart I de-
spise an informer. I would die, before I would
ever become evidence against a companion.”

“You and he have learned your morals in a
different school,” was the reply. ‘ However I
might fail to act up to his high sense of right and
wrong, | cannot but admire his fearless consistency °
of conduct. There is not another in the whole
institution who could have stood up as he did, when
all were opposed to him, and the infliction of cor-
poreal punishment threatened to be added to the
disgrace that was thought to be inflicted.”

“That’s all very pretty. But I don’t believe a
word of his moral courage. It was a mean timidity
that prevented his joining us, and sheer cowardice
that kept him from knocking John Green down,
Why, I would have fought him until I had died,
had he insulted me as he did Harvey Willet.”

Thus, there still continued two parties. One
fully in the belief that Harvey was a coward, and
mean-spirited ; and the other, more than persuaded
that just the opposite was the truth.

It was about a month after the exciting event
just recorded, that the inhabitants of the quiet
village where stood the literary institution to which
Harvey was attached, were aroused about mid-
night with the startling cry of “Fire!” Every
student of course repaired to the scene of destruc-
tion. The building that was on fire, was a dwell-
ing-house, and a large portion of it was enveloped
in flames, when the great body of the students
arrived, among nearly the first,-on the spot.
TEST OF COURAGE. 81

Just at that moment, every heart was thrilled by
the appearance of a mother, with her three chil-
dren, emerging from the burning house. The poor
woman looked about her with a bewildered air, her
face deadly pale, and terror sitting upon every
lineament.

‘© Where is Jane?” she suddenly exclaimed, as
the sympathizing crowd without gathered round
and tendered their aid.

« Jane! Jane!” she cried, turning this way and
that. ‘O, mercy! mercy! my child is still in
the house.”

And turning away, she was about darting back
into the burning house, when those around laid
hold of, and prevented her. Heart-rending were
her screams, and terrible the struggles that she
made to break away. But strong arms held her
back. 2
Just at that moment, one of the students glanced
past the crowd, and instantly disappeared in the
dense body of smoke that filled the lower part of
the building. Above, the flames were bursting
from the windows, the roof was just ready to fall
in, and instant destruction seemed to threaten any
one who would dare to enter.

«Who was it? who was it?” ran through the
breathless crowd, and all stood awaiting in anxi-
ous and painful suspense the reappearance of the
adventurous individual. While thus looking on,
with eager and trembling hearts, the wild screams
of a child rose clear and thrilling above the noise
of the hissing, crackling, and roaring conflagra-
tion, One minute more of intense anxiety passed,
82 TEST OF COURAGE.

and then the form of Harvey Willet appeared at
the door, bearing in his arms the missing child.

As he Jaid it in the mother’s arms, who clasped
it frantically to her bosom, the young man burst
into tears.

From that night, no student breathed aught
against the upright, brave, noble-hearted young
man. He was ever after loved and respected.
There was now no misunderstanding his true cha-
racter. }


THE TELL-TALE.

“ Wuo made that noise?” asked a teacher in
one of our public schools, coming into the class-
room.

A profound silence followed his question. ‘There
were thirty boys all looking at him, some three or
four of whom had been guilty of a flagrant breach
of order; yet every face was alike innocent in ex-
pression, and no one replied to his question.

“ Boys,” he asked in a calmer tone, “ who made
that disturbance? Many of you know, and I de-
pend upon the lovers of good order here to make
common cause against the breach of it.”

But still no one responded to the appeal.

«| know,” whispered one to another, “ but he’s
not going to make a tell-tale of me.”

“And so do I,” replied his companion, “ but
he’ll not get it out of me, I can tell him.”

And thus the low whispers ran through the room.
For more than a minute the teacher stood before
them awaiting some reply, and then retired to
attend to what he had been doing in the adjoining
room. But no sooner was his back turned than
the same noise that had disturbed him was renew- «
ed, even louder than before.

He of course immediately returned, and again

stood before them.
(83)
84 TELL-TALE.

“ Let the boys who have violated the good order
of the school hold up their hands,” he said.

No hand was lifted.

“ Now let all who are innocent hold up their
hands.”

Every hand was promptly raised.

For a few moments the teacher looked his schol-
ars in the face, his own countenance expressing
pain and mortification. At length he said—

“ From a boy I have ever looked upon falsehood
as the most debasing crime, indicating a disposition
to commit any of the whole catalogue of crimes,
if the individual had the courage to do so. I am,
therefore, deeply pained to find that I have scholars
in my class who are not above this meanest of all
vices. It was bad enough to break the rules of the
school, but a thousand times worse to tell a false-
hood about it—a falsehood too, that is reflected
upon every innocent, high-minded boy in the room.
I see here the sons of men whose standing in the
community for virtue and usefulness is known and
acknowledged by all. ‘These boys, I am sorry to
say, are all involved in the guilt of this violation
of order, and what is worse, in the crime of a vir-
tual denial of it; for how can I discriminate when
all act alike? When I ask the guilty to hold up
their hands, no hand is lifted ; but when I call upon
the innocent to attest their innocence, all declare
themselves to be innocent. I will now try you
once more. Let the guilty hold up their hands.”

But no hand was lifted.

‘‘ Now let the innocent lift their hands.”

Every hand was again raised.
TELL-TALE. 85

“ [ would not be the boy who has thus lifted his
hand before the school in attestation of a false-
hood, for all the wealth this world could bestow,”
the teacher said as he looked at his class for a mo-
ment or two and then turned away and again left
the room. Although he remained out for full ten
minutes, he was not again disturbed.

‘¢ You were one, James Harker,” said a boy in
a low tone, looking with a half indignant expres-
soe of countenance at the boy who sat next to

im.

<¢ | don’t care if I was. He couldn’t find it out,”
was the prompt reply.

« But | don’t think it right that others should be
blamed for what you have done.”

“You are not going to turn tell-tale, are you?”
Harker said with a sneer.

«¢ No, not a mere tell-tale ; but still I am not cer-
tain that [ shall not let our teacher know that you
were one of the offenders, unless you have the true
spirit to do so yourself.”

O, tell-tale! tell-tale! tell-tale! Tom Jones is
going to turn tell-tale ! James Harker said, so loud
as to be heard all around, pointing at the same time
at Jones, while his face was expressive of the most
sovereign contempt. |

“ Are you going to tell on me too?” asked a boy
sitting near, with a threatening look.

«T did not see you making a noise.”

« You ’d better not, I can tell you.”

«¢] did not see you, so you need not fear,” was
Thomas Jones’s reply: “ but I can tell you what
I think. If you did make the noise, and then so

8
86 TELL-TALE.

publicly denied it as you did, I think that every
honest-minded boy here should feel it his duty to
expose you.” |

“Let any one dare to do it,” was the reply to
this.

After school, several of the boys got around
Thomas Jones, and attempted to convince him that
to turn informer would be the most despicable thing
in the world.

“T don’t think it half so bad as to be a violator
of the rules of ahe school, and a liar into the bar-
gain,” was his quick rejoinder.

“There a’nt a meaner creature in the world
than a tell-tale,” said James Harker, with his ex-
pressive sneer, |

* Which is worse, James—he who tells what is
true of another, or he who falsely accuses him ?”?

“I will leave you to draw all ‘such nice distinc-
tions,” Harker replied, tossing his head contemptu-
ously.

“It is not hard for me to draw them, James,
nor, I presume, for any boy here. But it is use-
less for us to talk about this matter. I will tell
you what I will do, and if | Say so, you may be
sure that I will. If you will go up to-morrow.
and tell our teacher that you did the wrong he
complained of, I will keep silent — but if you will
not, my mind is made up to do it. I cannot, and
I will not, rest under the imputation of having told
a falsehood when I am innocent; nor do I think
that I am right in suffering the whole class to rest
under a false accusation, while it is in my power
to remove it.”
TELL-TALE. 87
&] always thought you were a mean, low crea-
ture,” Harker replied—‘* and now I know it.”
~ «He'll prove himself the meanest boy in the
school, if he does it,” said another of the wrong-
doers. |
Fle ’d better not tell on me,” broke in a third.
« Look here, Thomas, come with me,” another
lad said, taking Thomas Jones by the arm and
drawing him aside, when the two walked off to-
ether.
%] wouldn’t say anything about it if I were
ou,” continued the lad — “ you will only get the
‘1.will of those boys, and perhaps of the whole
class. You know how much an informer is de-
spised.” |
“There is a great difference, John,” was the
reply, “as my father has often told me, between a
mere informer or tell-tale, as it is called in school,
and one who makes known the wrong actions of
another for the good of the whole. Now, if, for
the mere delight of seeing others punished, I were
to be constantly running to the teacher with com-
plaints against my fellow-students, then I would be
that justly despised individual, a tell-tale. But!
have no such motives in view. James Harker has
not only violated the rules of the class, thus throw-
ing the class into disorder, and hindering its pro-
gress, but has, by his. bad conduct, and wicked
denial of it, involved the whole class, you and I
among the rest, in the imputation of being viola-
tors of good order, and utterers of falsehood into
the bargain. Now, for one, I have been taught to
love truth from my earliest recollection, and I
88 TELL-TALE.

cannot, and will not rest under a charge of false-
hood.”

“Then why not go to the teacher and declare
your innocence 1”

« What good would that do? Has not every boy
in the class made such a declaration, the innocent
with the guilty? I could not ask the teacher to be-
lieve me.” .

“© Well, indeed, I would not do it, Thomas,”
urged his friend.

«‘ You have presented no good reason yet, John,
why I should not do as I have determined.”

“J have said that you would gain the ill-will of
the whole class.”

« That is not a reason sufficient to induce me to
refrain from doing a right action.”

Thus the two boys conversed as they walked
along, and at length parted from each other. As
soon as Thomas Jones entered his own house, he
sought out lis father, to whom he always went in
difficulties, and by whose judgment he was always
guided. To him he submitted his case, and asked
to be advised.

“You have made up your mind, you say,” the
father remarked, after he had heard all his boy had
to relate, ‘to inform your teacher, to-morrow, that
James Harker was one of the offenders ?”

“That is, if you approve of my doing so.”

“From the statement that you have given,
Thomas, I do certainly approve of it. But you
will no doubt be censured, and have your motives
misinterpreted by many of your fellow-students,”

“T know that, father. But you have often told
TELL-TALE. 89

me, that in every important action I should be go-
verned by right motives, and not by the opinions
of others.”

« And you are conscious of having right motives
in what you now propose to do?”

“] am.”

“You do not feel glad at the idea of having
James Harker censured for his conduct 1”

« Indeed I do not. It is that idea that causes me
to hesitate more than anything else.”

“© What then is your motive ?”

“One motive is, to relieve myself from the
charge of disorderly conduct, and from an imputa-
tion of falsehood—and another motive is, to relieve
from similar censure, all in the class who are inno-
cent. It seems to me, in a case like this, that it is
every boy’s duty to point out the guilty who thus
take away from the good character of the whole.
Shall what is good be injured under the false idea
that it is mean to expose what is evil ?”

“You certainly reason correctly, my boy,” Mr.
Jones replied, ‘and I shall fully approve the act
you contemplate. Do not be deterred from doing
it, under the idea that you will be branded as an
‘nformer. ‘There are many cases where it is right
to become an informer, and wrong to withhold in- .
formation; and this, I am fully persuaded, is an
instance where the former rule is clearly applica-
ble. But, in making your communication, as it is
one in which your character and standing with the
school is involved, do so in writing, uoder your
own name, with reasons. It is the duty of every
one, after resolving to act right in a matter where

8
90 TELL-TALE.

he may be misjudged, to give his reasons, that he
may not be injured by false’*judgment.”

On the next morning, Thomas Jones waited
until near the close of the school, to see if James
Harker would be honest and magnanimous enough
to confess his fault; but as he did not do so, he
went up, with a firm step, to the teacher’s stand,
handed him a note, and then retired to his seat.
The teacher read the note, and, after reflecting for
a few minutes, arose and called the school to order.

‘“‘T hold a note in my hand,” he said, after
silence and attention were obtained, ‘the reading
of which has afforded me no ordinary gratification.
It indicates a tone of feeling and principle highly
honourable to the writer. As requested by him, I
will now read it to the class. |

i iim . Sir:—Yesterday there was a vio-
lation of order in the school, the perpetrators of
which you endeavoured to find out, but in vain.
In your manner of ascertaining the guilty, the
innocent became involved in the imputation of dis-
order, and what is a thousand. times worse, of
falsehood. I saw one boy in the act of making
the noise you complained of, and have tried, in
vain, to convince him that he ought to confess his
fault, and thus relieve his fellow-students from the
charge under which they now rest. But he will
not do so, and calls me a ‘tell-tale,’ and other
hard names, because I tell him that if he will not
do so, I shall be compelled to become an informer.
Now, in doing so, I wish it to be clearly under-
stood, that I am not prompted by a desire to see


TELL-TALE. 91

him punished, but am only impelled, from a sense
of duty to myself and the whole class, to do this
act. ‘The boy’s name is James Harker. Please
read this to the class.

Tuomas JonzEs.”

« James Harker will come forward,” the teacher
said, as he laid aside the note.

The boy he called came forward with a guilty,
downcast face. *

«Did you make the noise I complained of yes-
terday ?”
& Yes, Sir.”

“ Why did you do it?”

« Bill’ Grimes, and Henry Peters, and ‘Tom
Price, were as bad as I was. They made a noise

9

«“ William Grimes, Henry Peters, and Thomas
Price, will all come forward.”

The three boys named came forward, and when

questioned, did not deny the charge.
' «& You now see,” remarked the teacher, ‘“ the
four boys who involved in disgrace the whole
class. You also see the difference between a high-
minded boy, impelled by a sense of duty to become
an informer, and what is meant by a mere tell-tale.
Thomas Jones is the one, James Harker the other.
So soon as the guilt of the latter is discovered he
immediately informs on all who are guilty in the
hope of seeing them likewise punished.

‘And now,” continued the teacher, ‘‘ let every
boy who blames Thomas Jones for what he has
done, hold up his hand.”

Not a hand was raised.
92 TELL-TALE.

‘* Now let all who approve his conduct hold up
their hands.”

Every hand was lifted, and every countenance
expressed gratification,

The class was then dismissed, and the offenders
left with the teacher, to be dealt with as he might
see to be most for their good and the welfare of the
class,

In this little story, the principal incidents of
which are true, I have endeavoured to give my
young readers some idea of the difference between
acting from a mere selfish impulse, and from a
clear conviction of right. It is the motive from
which a thing is done, that determines the quality
or character of an action. Thus, an action may
be good or bad, so far as the individual is concern-
ed, according to the motive which influences him.
Thomas Jones did right in informing upon James
Harker, because his end was a good one — but
James Harker was acted upon by a wrong motive,
the desire to see his companions in evil punished
with himself, when he became an informer, and
therefore his act, as far as he was concerned, was
an evil one. Learn then, my young friends, to
discriminate between motives, and to be well as-
sured of their character before you act from them.
And also resolve, when you are clearly convinced
that it is right for you to do a thing, and that it is
your duty to do it, that you will do that thing, re-
gardless of what may be thought or said of you.
Then, when you grow up to be men, will you be
truly useful in society ; for to men of like charac-
ter is society indebted for all the great moral refor-
mations that have ever taken place in the world,
THE ENDS OF LIFE.

‘1 am going to leave school at the expiration of
this term,” remarked Edward Mayo, a youth be-
tween seventeen and eighteen, to his friend and
companion, Charles Carpenter, as the two were
wending their way homeward, after having finished
their studies for the day.

“And I expect to do the same very soon,”
Charles said, with evident pleasure at the idea.

« What business or profession do you intend
learning?” asked Edward.

«} have determined to go into a store. I want
to be a merchant. But what have you chosen,
Edward? Not one of the learned professions, I
hope? But I suppose you have. You will be a
lawyer, I have not the least doubt.”

“Yes, Charles, I have determined to go into Mr.
Barker’s office, and read law.”

“ Well, I’m sorry to hear it, Edward.”

«© Why are you sorry, Charles ?”

“Because you’ve got a hard, dull way before
you, and your final success is uncertain. Few,
Edward, I have heard my old uncle say, can gain
eminence in legal pursuits; and without distinction,
it is but a poor business. The field for merchan-
dizing is broader, and promises ta industry and
carefulness more certain returns.” aii

a
94 ENDS OF LIFE.

“That may be true, Charles; and merchan-
dizing is as honourable and useful a calling as any
other; but I have been taught by my father to
believe that our success and usefulness in any
business will depend very much upon the motives
with which we enter into it, and our happiness in
that business much more. If we have only ‘a
regard to ourselves — if the only motive we have
for choosing a profession be the selfish one of
getting wealth or honour—then, we may indeed be
successful, but cannot be happy in our success.
But if, in choosing among those to which our in-
clinations lead us, we choose that in which we
think we can, at the same time that we benefit
ourselves, render most important services to others,
then we are in the road to honourable success,
united to calm contentment.”

“Then I would advise you to be a minister,”
Charles said, half ironically —*« you can certainly
do more good as a minister than as a.lawyer.”

““T do not think so,” Edward replied, " “There
are callings many and various that are all useful,
as my father has frequently impressed upon my
mind, while talking to me about choosing a profes-
sion ; and there are as great varieties of capacities
for filling these. The man whose peculiarity of
mind fits him to be a successful lawyer, would not,
in all probability, make a good minister; nor
would the individual who has a preference for
medical ‘science make a good merchant; and so
through all the varied callings in life. Each of
them is useful and honourable, as I have before
said, if they are made useful and honourable.”
ENDS OF LIFE. 95

‘¢ Well, maybe you are right,” Charles said,
“ but Iam no philosopher, and cannot pretend to
look so deeply into matters and things. My old
uncle, whose opinions I am bound to respect, be-
cause he is kind to me, and has been quite success
ful in the world, says that he would rather see me
a sailor or a soldier than a doctor, lawyer, or
preacher, He don’t seem to have much opinion,
you see, of the learned professions; and I am
pretty much like him in that respect. But he
thinks I am the very one for trade, in which, he
says, | will be sure to be successful, if I am only
prudent at first: He prophesies that. L will be rich ;
and all, I can say, is, that I hope he is a true
prophet.” is : |

‘¢ Father says to me,”.dward remarked to this,
‘‘ that it would be wrong in me to set riches before
me as an end. That if I do so, I will look to
riches as the one thing in life desirable—that I will
be restless until I have gained my end, and then
discover that wealth has no power to make me
happy. But, that if I will endeavour to give the
idea of riches its true subordinate place, and make
usefulness to others, as far as I can, the end which
I have in view, then I will be happy as well as
successful, just so far as I can elevate usefulness
as an end above riches.”

“You have a strange way of talking, some
times,” Charles said, “ but I don’t pretend to see
things with your eyes, and I am sure I don’t wish
to. I am going to learn my. business, with the
same motives that others do, that I may get the
ability te make money. Money, you know, 1s
96 ENDS OF LIFE.

power. Our teacher says, knowledge, and so does
the proverb: but my old uncle says money, and |
believe him.”

The two boys parted. In due time each left
school, and Charles Carpenter went into a whole-
sale store to learn the business of merchandizing,
while Edward Mayo entered the office of Mr.
Barker to read law. Charles found it much easier
to keep his end of life in view, than did Edward.
But whenever the latter’s perceptions of right were
obscured, or his ardour in his studies diminished,
he went to the one competent and judicious friend,
his father, who always helped him to clear and
satisfactory views of his duty. It must not be
supposed, that the desire to be useful was the only
one that influenced Edward in persevering in his
studies. ‘That would have been too feeble a prin-
ciple in his mind, to have carried him through suc-
cessfully. The desire for wealth and fame, also,
contributed its share of incitement to perseverance.
Still, the great good was, that he could acknow-
ledge the end of use to be a higher and better one
than the end of riches or honour, and also, that he
could remain in the desire to have that end the
principal one. He was thus preparing the way to
have it, in after life, gradually, even if it were very
slowly, elevated above all the others.

A few years passed away, and the two youths
became of age, and each entered upon the responsi-
ble duties of life. Charles had his mind well stored
with mercantile knowledge, and the principles of
trade; and Edward was as well furnished for
action in his peculiar calling. Years passed on,
ENDS OF LIFE. 97

and the name of one was a familiar sound on
7Change, and that of the other as familiar to the
public as an eminent lawyer. But each had been
governed in action, by the end at first proposed as
the true one. Charles Carpenter had grown more
and more selfish and unregardful of others, as
wealth accumulated on his hands; and had like-
wise grown morose, irritable, and discontented.
Edward Mayo, on the contrary, as his power and
sphere of usefulness enlarged, endeavoured to bring
into quicker activity the desire to be of service to
others with which he had, as a matter of principle,
set out in life; and a real delight ever flowed from
bringing this desire into action. While the one
was known as a wealthy, but narrow-minded, sel-
fish man, the other was esteemed as a lover of
mankind, with the power, as well as the will, to
benefit society. Let us look in upon each, succes-
sively, at the age of fifty, and then decide which
set before him the best end in life.

We will introduce Mr. Carpenter at his own
house, un a stormy evening in December. ‘Tea is
ready, and his wife and only daughter, a young
lady of twenty, with himself, have drawn up to the
table. The meal is nearly half through, and yet
not a word has been spoken. He is all absorbed
in some business matter that perplexes him, and
the idea of a trifling loss has soured his mind, and
added to his habitual petulance.

“It’s a dreadful night out,” Alice, the daughter —
says; the oppressive and moody silence becoming
so irksome, that she prefers to hear the sound of

9
98 ENDS OF LIFE.

her own voice, even at the risk of its being unwel-
come to others.

The father responds to this by a look which
says, almost as plain as words,—

“© What’s the matter with you, ha?” And the
mother mutters out a reluctant—

“Yes.”

A few minutes more elapse, with only the clat-
ter of cups and saucers, when Alice again breaks
in upon the funereal silence with—

“I wish you would take us to the theatre on
Thursday evening, to see Celeste, Pa.”

“Indeed I shall not then,”—is the crusty re-
sponse. ‘Get your brother to go with you.”

« But, he won’t go. I’ve asked him already.”

“Then you’ll have to stay home, for I’m not
going.”

«] wish you were like Kate Mayo’s father,”
Alice rejoins —“ He always goes with her to the
concerts, and every place.”

“© Well, I’m not like him, Miss, and don’t want
to be! He’s one of your philanthropists — hum!
—pretending to do a great deal for other people,
and not doing anything worth talking about,
after all.”

“1 believe he’s an excellent man, pa. Every-
body likes him, and everybody speaks well of him;
and I’m sure Kate’s one of the happiest creatures
in the world.”

“And you are one of the most miserable, I sup-
pose ?”

“J don’t pretend to be very happy,” Alice
ENDS OF LIFE. 99

answers moodily, and then follows the same cheer-
less silence.

After the tea things were removed, the father
sat down to his newspapers, and between reading
these and meditating on plans for adding to his
large stores of unenjoyed wealth, spent the remain-
der of the evening. Not the slightest intercourse
did he pretend to hold with his family. The social
delights of the domestic circle had no charms for
him. Here, as in the busy world, he was the sel-
fish centre from which went out no radiations.
Alice tried to get interested in the pages of a new
novel, but in vain. Her heart yearned for living
companionship. And as she thought of Kate Mayo,
and the bright, happy fireside circle of which she
made one, she closed the book with a sigh, and
retired to her chamber, hoping to find relief and
quiet in the sweet oblivion of sleep.

On the same evening a very different scene was
presented in the family of Mr. Mayo, who, like the
merchant, had one son and daughter, now verging
upon maturity. The supper hour had passed in
cheerful conversation, and after the family returned
to the parlour, Mr. Mayo said, smiling :

“| must ask leave of absence for an hour, my
children. I suppose my request will be granted ?”

«<] don’t know, pa,” Kate responded, laughing
in happy, girlish tones, as she hung upon his arm, -
and looked affectionately into his face. “It will
depend very much upon the nature of your ex-
cuse.”

“That will have to be given, then, before my
request can be granted ?”
100 ENDS OF LIFE.

“©, of course! Let us have the reason,” Kate
said.

“ Well, you know that the winter has set in very
severely ?”

‘Indeed it has, pa,” Kate replied, her face at
once growing serious. ‘ And I do pity poor, desti-
tute people this dreadful night.”

“A few gentlemen,” continued Mr. Mayo, “ had
a meeting to-day, for the purpose of putting in
operation some measure of provision for the poor
and sick during the inclement season. It is well
known, that every winter great suffering is ex-
perienced by many who do all they can to help
themselves, and who would rather live poorly and
bear many hardships, than become an eotire bur-
den upon the community ; who would suffer almost
everything, rather than become acknowledged pause

rs. A little assistance to such, in winter, would
enable them to bear up in their praiseworthy spirit
of independence, without the extreme suffering that
many now endure. I have been chosen to draft
an address to the public, and I want an hour
to-night for the purpose. Am I now excused Y
added the father, smiling.

“© We were worse than heathens, to say no,”
Kate replied. ‘But how much time you do give
to measures of public benevolence, pa !”

“ Not more than I can readily spare from my
family and professional engagements, Kate ; and I
am sure that the pleasure I experience from these
acts, is to me a source of pure delight.”

“1 do not doubt it, pa, and I love my father
better, when I think how good and kind he is to
ENDS OF LIFE. 101

every one. Alice Carpenter said to me yesterday
—‘QO, Kate, if my father was like yours, how
happy | should be!”

Mr. Mayo kissed affectionately the cheek of his
daughter, and then left the room to perform the
work of benevolence he had assigned himself.

“Poor Alice! remarked Mrs. Mayo, as her
husband closed the door after him. ‘* She always
seems so glad to get here, and as reluctant to go
away.”

«| am sure I never like to go there,” said Kate.
“There is an atmosphere of constraint and sel-
fishness about the house; and as to spending an
evening with Alice when her father is at home, I
would almost as lief be at a funeral. He sits
moodily reading his newspapers, and we must steal
away into a corner and talk in whispers. If Alice
happens to laugh a little loud, her father will rattle
his newspaper and look up as cross at her.
would not live in that way for the world !”

<¢] don’t wonder that John has no inclination to
stay at home in the evening,” remarked Edward,
Kate’s brother. ‘He told me last week, that he
wasn’t home at night once in a month.”

«“ Why, where does he go?” asked Kate.

« Indeed, that’s more than I can tell,” Edward
replied. ‘But I fear, from his appearance and
manners, that his company is not the best.”

‘Poor fellow!” ejaculated Mrs. Mayo. “ Al-
most driven from home, and then left to himself,
he will, I fear, go to ruin.”

“You may well say driven, ma,” remarked
Kate. «For no young man, who had the liberty

9 *
102 ENDS OF LIFE.

to go, could remain in Mr. Carpenter’s presence,
if he is always as silent and cross as he has been
when I have visited there.”

“ He is in every way unlike our own father,”
Edward said. ‘ One seems to think about and
care about nothing but himself. The other’s con-
sideration is, apparently, all for others.”

‘“‘ That is the true secret of their great difference
of disposition. The selfish man repulses all, while
the benevolent man attracts all. Which would you
rather be, my son ?”

“The benevolent man, a thousand and a thou-
sand times,” Edward replied, fervently.

“Then, like your father, Edward, choose now
your ends of life. Resolve that you will seek to
be useful to others; that you will put away from
yourself every merely selfish motive, as an evil
thing. I have heard him often relate, how Mr.
Carpenter and he were boys at school, and how
they conversed about, and settled their ends of life.
Mr. Carpenter, he said, openly avowed, that, in
entering upon the task of learning a business, he
had no other motive, and wished no other, but the
desire to be wealthy, that he might be happy in
the possession of wealth; while your father, guided
by the excellent counsel of your grandfather, long
since passed away, chose a profession, such as
suited his taste and talents, fixing in his mind, as
far as possible, the desire to be useful. ‘This desire,
feeble, he said, at first, he nourished and fostered,
until it gradually gained strength, and in the end,
became with him a ruling motive. Now, he is not
ENDS OF LIFE. 103

only happy himself, but makes every one with
whom he associates cheerful and happy.”

«Tam sure you will try to be like father, Ed-
ward,” said Kate, looking her brother affectionately
in the face.

« That I will, sister; and if at any time I find
my resolutions, and the power within me failing, I
will think of Mr. Carpenter, with his ends of life,
and of my father with his.”


TRY AGAIN.

‘“‘ Have you finished your lesson, George ?” said
Mr. Prentiss to a lad in his fourteenth year, who
had laid aside his book, and was busily engaged
in the manufacture of a large paper kite.

‘“‘ No, sir,” replied George, hanging his head.

“ Why not, my son?” —

‘¢ Because it is so difficult. I am sure, father,
that [ shall never learn to read Latin.”

‘¢ And why not, George?”

«¢ Because—because, | can’t.”

*‘Can’t learn, George !”

** Indeed, father, I have tried my best,” the boy
replied, earnestly, the tears at the same time start-
ing to his eyes —*“ but it is no use. Other boys
can get their lessons without any trouble. But I
try, and try, but it is no use.”

*‘’You must try again, my son.”

“ But it is no use, father. I can’t learn it.”

‘“‘] can’t, is a word no boy should ever utter in
reference to learning. You can learn anything
you please, George, if you only persevere.”

*¢ Not Latin, father.”

“Yes, Latin.”

‘But havn’t I tried, and tried, father.”

“Yes. But you must try again.”

“And so I have, father.”

“ Well, try again, and again.”

(104)
TRY AGAIN. © 105

«¢ But I can’t remember the lesson, after | have
learned it. My memory is so bad,” urged the lad,

‘If I were to promise you a holiday on the
thirtieth of the month after the next, do you think
that you would forget it?”

‘¢ No, I am sure that I would not.”

“ And why ?”

‘¢T can’t exactly tell the reason, but I know I
should remember it.”

“Well, I can tell you, George. The pleasure
you would take in the idea of having a holiday,
would keep the date of it fresh in your memory.
Now, if you were to take the same delight in learn-
ing that you do in playing, you would find no dif-
ficulty. You play marbles well, I believe ?”

“O, yes. I can beat every boy at school.”

‘Few are more skilful at making and flying
kites, | believe.”

“No. My kites always fly the best.”

‘You skate well, too?”

“ Yes, I can cut every figure, from one to nine,
and form every letter in the alphabet.”

“And you are very fond of skating, and flying
your kite, and playing at ball, and marbles, &c.,
é&c.””

“Yes, father, too fond, [ believe, for a boy of
my age.” .

“And yet you cannot learn your Latin lesson,
My dear boy, you are deceiving yourself. You
can learn as well as any one. Only try.”

‘«‘ But have I not tried, father?” urged George.

“ Well, try again. Come, lay aside your kite,
for this afternoon, and make another effort to get
106 TRY AGAIN.

your lesson. And to inspirit you a little, I will
tell you a true story. One of the dullest boys at
a village school, some thirty years ago, came up
to repeat his lesson one morning, and, as usual,
was deficient. ‘ Go to your seat, you stupid block-
head !’ said the teacher, dealing him a severe blow
alongside of the head. ‘ You will never be fit for
anything but a scavenger. I wonder what they
send you here for, any how!’

«The poor, dispirited boy, stole off to his seat,
and bent his eyes again upon his lesson.”

“©¢]t is no use. I cannot learn,’ he said in a
whisper to a companion who sat near him.

«¢ You must try hard,’ said his sympathizing
friend.

«“<¢] have tried, and it is no use. I might just
as well give up at once.’

« «Ty again, Henry,’ whispered his companion,
encouragingly.

“These two little words, uttered so earnestly,
gave him another impulse, and he bent his mind
with a new effort to his task. That task was the
simple memorizing of a grammar lesson—not dif-
ficult by any means. The concentration of his
mind upon the object before him was more earnest
and fixed than usual; gradually he began to find
the sentences lingering in his memory, and soon,
to his surprise and pleasure, the whole lesson was
as vividly apparent to his mental as to his bodily
eyes. With a livelier motion and a more confi-
dent manner than he had ever before exhibited in
going up to say a lesson, did he rise from his seat,
and proceed to the teacher’s desk.
TRY AGAIN. 107

«©¢ What do you want?’ asked that individual,
harshly.

“¢¢ T'o say my lesson.’ |

“¢ Go off to your seat, sir! Didn’t you try half
an hour ago?’

“But I can say it now, sir,’ timidly urged the

y-

“¢Goon then. And if you miss a sentence, I
will flog you within an inch of your life.’

“ Henry proceeded, and said off the whole les-
son, rapidly, and without missing a word. The
master cast on him a look of surprise, as he hand-
ed him back his book, but said nothing. As Henry
walked back to his seat, his step was lighter, for
his heart beat with a new impulse.

“¢Did you say it?’ whispered his friend, earn-
estly. |

“‘¢Every word,’ replied the boy, proudly.

«©¢ Then you can learn.’

“¢ Yes, but it is hard work.’

‘¢< But there is nothing like trying.’

“*No, And from this hour,’ Henry replied,
with the energy of confidence, ‘I will never say I
can’t.’

“ From that day forth,” continued Mr. Prentiss,
“there was no boy in the school who learned more
rapidly than did Henry. It required more thought
and application, but these he gave in the just pro-
portion that success required, and success crowned
his efforts.”

“And did he always continue thus to learn ke
asked George, looking up earnestly into his father’s
face.
168 TRY AGAIN.

“From that day, up to this time, George, he
has been a student, and now urges you, in your
despondency, to ‘ try again,’ as he tried.”

** And was it, indeed, you, father?” George
asked, eagerly looking up into the face of his kind
adviser. |

“Yes my child. That dull boy was your own
father in his early years.”

“Then I will try again,” George said in a de-
cided tone, and flinging aside his half-made kite,
he turned, and re-entered the house, and was soon
bending in earnest attention over his Latin gram-
mar,

“‘ Well, what success, George?” asked Mr.
Prentiss, as the family gathered around the tea-
table.

1 ’ve got the lesson, sir!” the boy replied, with
a satisfied air.

*¢ Perfectly 1”

**] can say every word of it, sir.”

“ You found it pretty hard work, I suppose ?”

“Not so very hard after I had once made up
my mind that | would learn it. Indeed, I never
stopped to think, as I usually do, about its being
difficult, or tiresome, but went right on until I had
mastered every sentence.”

“May you never forget this lesson, my son!”
Mr. Prentiss said, feelingly. You possess now the
secret of success, It lies in your never stopping to
think about a task being difficult or tiresome, but
in going on steadily in the performance of it, with
a fixed determination to succeed. Notwithstanding
your despondency, and doubt of your capacity to
TRY AGAIN. 109

learn the lesson that had been assigned you, you
have, within an hour mastered a task that you
despaired of accomplishing, at all. Never again
my boy, utter the words J can’t.”

The success that had crowned his own deter-
mined efforts— united with the impulse that the.
simple reference of his father to his own early dif-
ficulties gave to his mind, was sufficient to make
George a rapid learner from that day. He gradu-
ally became interested in his studies, and this
interest was in itself a new capacity for acquire-
ment. When he left College at the age of eighteen,
he bore with him the highest honours of the institu-
tion. He now entered the store of a merchant, to
prepare for a business life. At first, his new oc-
cupation was by no means pleasant. The change
from books and studies to busy life, and the dull
details of trade, as he called them, was for a time
exceedingly irksome.

“| will never make a merchant, I fear,” he said
to his father one evening when he felt unusually
wearied with his occupation, and dispirited.

“ And why not George?” asked Mr. Prentiss.

“] have no taste for it,” the young man replied.

“Ts it not honest ?”

“ Yes.”

«¢ And honourable ?”

“‘ Certainly.””

“And are you not convinced that it is necessary
for you to follow some occupation, energetically 1”

“O yes.”

“TI gave you a choice of the professions ; but
you preferred, you said, a mercantile life.”

10
~

110 TRY AGAIN.

“Yes. And still, when I reflect on the subject,
my preference is for a mercantile life, over the
others.”

“Then, George, you must compel yourself to
be interested in your new pursuit.”

“| have tried, father.”

“Then, try again /”

These words, uttered with a peculiar emphasis,
thrilled through the mind of George Prentiss. The
past rose up before him, with its doubts, its diffi-
culties, and its triumphs. Springing suddenly to
his feet, he said with emphasis,

“T will try again.”

** And you will succeed,”

“Yes. I feel that I shall.”

And he did succeed in obtaining a thorough
practical *knowledge of business; for he applied
himself with patient determination, and soon bes
came interested in his new pursuits.

At the age of twenty-five he entered into busi-
ness for himself, with a small capital furnished him
by his father, as his proportion. Little beyond this
could he expect, as several younger brothers came
in for a share of their father’s property. It became
necessary, therefore, to invest it with care and pru-
dence. The house in which he had been employed,
was engaged in the West India trade, and as his
familiarity with this line of business’ was more
intimate than with any other, he determined to turn
his little capital in that direction. Accordingly,
after renting a store on one of the principal wharves,
he proceeded to freight a vessel with all the pru-
dence that an intimate knowledge of the West
TRY AGAIN. lll

India markets afforded him. But, alas !'—two days
before his vessel arrived, the market had been
overstocked by shipments from New York, and a
large loss, instead of the anticipated profits, was the
result.

For some days after this disheartening news
reached him, he gave way to desponding thoughts.
But soon he bent his mind to a new adventure. In
this he was more successful, but, as the investment
had been small, the profit was inconsiderable. His
next shipment was large; involving at least two
thirds of his capital. The policy of Insurance
safely in his fire-closet, our young merchant deemed
himself at least secure against total loss. But even
the best-laid schemes of success or security often
fail. ‘Two months from the day on which the
vessel sailed, news arrived that she had been
wrecked, and the whole cargo lost. Nor was this
all: some informality or neglect of the captain,
vitiated the insurance, and the underwriters refused
to pay. A suit was commenced against them,
which occupied from six to eight months, before a
decision could be obtained.

Nearly a twelvemonth from the day his last
most unfortunate adventure was made, George
Prentiss sat musing in his counting-rcom, his
mind busy with many unpleasant and desponding
thoughts. He had done little or no business since
the news of his loss had reached him, for he had
but a remnant of his capital to work upon, and no
heart to risk that. He was “holding off,” as they
say, until some decision was made in the suit
pending with the underwriters. While he thus sat
112 TRY AGAIN.

musing, a letter from his agent in New York,
where the insurance had been effected, was handed
to him. He tore it open eagerly. The first brief
sentence, “‘We have lost our suit,” almost un-
manned him. ) |

‘“* Ruined ! — Ruined!” he mentally ejaculated,
throwing the letter upon his desk as he finished
reading it. ‘* What shall I do?”

** T'ry again,” a voice seemed to whisper in his
ear.

He started and looked around.

“ Try again,” and this time he perceived that
the voice was within him. For a moment he
paused, many thoughts passing rapidly through
his mind. ,

“T will try again!” he exclaimed, rising to
his feet.

And he did try. This time he examined the
condition of the markets with the most careful
scrutiny; ascertained the amount of shipments
within the preceding four months from all the prin-
cipal atlantic cities, and then, by the aid of his
correspondents, learned the expeditions that were
getting up, and the articles, and quantities of each,
composing the cargoes. Knowing the monthly
consumption of the various foreign products at the
port to which he proposed making a shipment, he
was satisfied that a cargo of flour, if run in im-
mediately, would pay a handsome profit. And he
at once chartered a vessel, the captain of which he
knew could be depended on for strict obedience to
instructions, and freighted her with flour. ‘The
vessel sailed, and the young merchant awaited with
TRY AGAIN. 113

almost trembling expectation the news of her arrival
out. He had adventured his all, and the result
must be success, or the utter prostration of his
hopes.

In anxious expectation he waited week after
week, until every day seemed to him prolonged to
double its number of hours. At last a letter came
from his consignee. He almost trembled as he
broke the seal.

‘Your flour has arrived at the very best time,”
it commenced. For a few moments he could read
no further. He was compelled to pause lest the
_ emotion he felt should be betrayed to those around
him. Then he read the whole letter calmly
through. It stated that the supply of flour was
nearly exhausted when his cargo arrived, which
had been promptly sold at three dollars a barrel
above the last quotations.

‘¢] shall clear three thousand dollars by my last
shipment,” he said to his father, who entered the
counting-room at the moment.

“Indeed! Well I am very glad to hear you say
so George. I hope, after this, you will be more
successful.”

“I feel that I shall. But I had nearly given up
in despair ;” the son remarked,

“‘ But you thought you would try again ;” the
old gentleman remarked, smiling.

“ Exactly.”

‘That was right, George. Never despair. Let
try again be your motto at all times, and success
must ultimately crown your efforts.”

10*
114 TRY AGAIN.

His father was right. George Prentiss 1s now
one of the most wealthy merchants in the city of
_ He is somewhat advanced in years, and is



accounted by some a little eccentric. One evidence
of this eccentricity is the fact, that, just over the
range of desks in his counting room is painted iz
large letters, the words,

«TRY AGAIN.”


GRATITUDE.

Carotine Expriper came home one afternoon
.from visiting a young friend, but did not seem so
well pleased as usual. Her mother, who was al-
ways quick to perceive any change that occurred
in the states of her children’s minds, asked the
cause of her seeming unhappiness, when the follow-
ing conversation took place, which may be of use
to others who sometimes think and feel as she did.

“You do not seem to be in a pleasant mood,
Caroline,” said Mrs. Eldridge, after her daughter
had laid by her shawl and bonnet; ‘ what is the
matter ?”

“Why, mother, I’ve been so disappointed in
Jane Smith!” replied Caroline, “I thought she
had some gratitude !”

“What has Jane Smith done to disturb your
feelings so much?” asked her mother.

“ Why, you know that I always lend her my
new music. Her father never buys her as much
as I have, and she is a great deal fonder of playing
than lam. If it hadn’t been for me, she wou'dn’t
have known one half of the beautiful pieces that
she does. She’s got, at this very time, two of my
largest music books, and at least two dozen of the
most recent airs and waltzes.”

“ Well?” said Mrs. Eldridge, in an inquiring
tone, as Caroline paused to take a a
116 GRATITUDE.

“Why, after all that, don’t you think, that
when I asked her to lend me a London annual
that a friend in England has just sent to her, she
hesitated a moment or two, and then said, that she
would be glad to let me have it in one or two
weeks.”

‘‘ And what reason did she give, Caroline, for
wishing you to wait a few weeks before receiving
the book ?”

‘‘She didn’t give any good reason at all, only
made a few weak excuses,” replied Caroline,
moodily.

‘But what were her excuses?” urged Mrs.
Eldridge. ‘ Perhaps your disappointment at not
getting what you wanted, has prevented your
rightly appreciating them.”

*¢] don’t think I have judged her harshly, mo-
ther,” said Caroline, more calmly. ‘Indeed, I feel
certain that I have not. I understood her to. say
something about her cousin coming to see her to-
morrow, and her wish to show her the book. That
was about the amount of it. As I understood her,
she was hardly willing to let me have the book at
all. She gets any thing nice so seldom, that I
suppose she feels miserly about her annual.”

“Now my daughter is unjust,” Mrs. Eldridge
replied, looking Caroline in the face with a grave
countenance. ‘I see Jane Smith’s conduct with
very different eyes; and I[ think I can explain
to you very clearly the reason why she wished
you to wait a week or two before letting you
have her annual. I know the disposition of
her father, I think, pretty well, for I have often
GRATITUDE. 117

observe him, when I have been visiting at his
house. If Jane had loaned you the book to-day,
when hr cousin came to-morrow, she would not
have had it to show to her, and her father would
have certuinly asked for it. Indeed, there will be
no visiter in the evening for the next week or two,
whose attention will not be called to that annual by
Mr. Smith. If he were told that the beautiful book
had been loaned by Jane, he would be very much
displeased with her, and would chide her severely
after the company had retired. Jane, of course,
did not wish to tell you this.”

‘Do you think that was the reason?” asked
Caroline, looking into her mother’s face with a
serious, and even sad expression of countenance.

‘I feel very sure that she was influenced by
that, or some similar reason,” replied Mrs. El-
dridge. ‘Caroline is not the girl, if I have rightly
observed her character, to prefer her own gratifica-
tion before that of a friend.”

‘‘'Then how wrong I have been to judge her so
unkindly !” said Caroline, still more sadly.

“Yes, you have certainly done wrong,” her
mother responded, “ but this arises from your
thinking and feeling wrong. You were kind to
Jane in lending her your music, when she could
not otherwise have obtained it. But your remark
about gratitude, shows that your act, in so doing,
was not one of simple good will to the neighbour.
You took some merits to yourself for your good
actions.”

“OQ no, mother, I don’t think that I did,” Caro-
line said earnestly.
118 GRATITUDE.

«Jf not, then why did you expect her to lend
you her book, because you had loaned her your
music?’ inquired Mrs. Eldridge, “If, in letting
her have your music, you had been governed by
the simple desire to do her good, you would not
have thought of what you had done as a reason
why she should make a return of kindness to you.”

Caroline was silent, and her mother continued—

“ We: are told in the Word, you know, that all
the good which we have is from the Lord. Still
he grants unto us the appearance of having it in
ourselves. Consequently, every desire that we feel
to perform good actions, is not really our own, al-
though it seems to be ours, but is given to us by
the Lord. Now, the desire which first prompted
you to assist Jane in her musical studies, by loan-
ing her your new music, was not your own. But
it is plain that you have been thinking about it as
your own, and have looked upon Jane as under
obligations to you, and not to the Lord, who put it
into your mind to do her good. Do you think that
you understand me, Caroline -

“© yes, mother, I see it very plain. Jane
should be grateful to the Lord for making me kind
to her; and I should feel happy that he has done
her good through me.”

“Yes, my daughter; that is the way you should
both feel. Now, under this view, if Jane, from
any selfish feelings, had declined loaning you her
book, she would have been sinning against the
Lord, and not against you. Do you think that
the Lord would have been angry with her, for this
cause 1”
GRATITUDE. 119

“© no, mother; for he is goodness itself, and is
therefore never angry with any one.”

“No, he would not, my child. But his love
towards her, would have caused him to endeavour
to bring her into that condition of mind, wherein
she could perceive this selfishness, and put it away
from her. And as this is the way that the Lord
acts towards us, we cannot act in any other way
towards others, and be free from sin.”

“It seems strange, now, mother,” remarked
Caroline, “that I should ‘not have thought in this
way before. But I suppose my selfish feelings
blinded me.”

“Yes, my daughter. Whenever we indulge
any selfish feelings, our perception of what is
really good and true is obscured. In the provi-
dence of the Lord, in these states, we are generally
made to feel pain of mind, and are thus led, as you
have been, into a better understanding of what is
right.”

“ How good the Lord is, even in eausing us to
feel pain, when we are departing from him !” said
Caroline, earnestly.

“Yes, he is very good,” replied her mother,
“ for though we stray from him, and love our own
wills better than his, he is ever following us, and
drawing us to return, and love him supremely.”

“T shall try, after this,’ remarked Caroline,
“ never to think about gratitude for any good action
that I may perform. ‘The grateful feelings should
all be the Lord’s; if I desire them, I am doing
wrong.”

« Phat‘is a good resolution,” added her mother,
“and the Lord help you to keep it.”
THE PET LAMB.

“ Dear little lamb! O, dear little lamb!” said
a child only two years old, hanging upon the neck
of a pet lamb, and caressing the innocent creature
with infantile fondness. ‘Don’t you love the dear
little lamb, mother ?”

The mother, who sat with her babe in her arms
in a musing attitude, started at the question, while
a shadow passed over her face.

“Don’t you love Daisy, mother?” urged the
child.

“Yes, dear,” was the mechanical reply.

“ Dear little Daisy ! Dear little lamb!” continued
the child, while the animal, conscious of the affec-
tion bestowed, returned her caresses, and frisked
and gambolled about its little friend.

As the mother observed all this, her bosom
swelled with a deep sigh, while a darker cloud

sed over her face.

Presently three or four other children came into
the room, and all commenced romping in innocent
delight with their dumb companion, which enjoyed
itself as much as the rest.

All this seemed to trouble the mother; the
reason we will briefly tell.

Mrs. Grant was a widow with six children, the
youngest a babe in her arms only a ae months
PET LAMB. 12]

old. Her husband had been an industrious and
prudent man, but to support his large family it had
required all of his time and energy. At his death,
there was no provision for them beyond a cottage
and a few acres of ground. Scarcely a month had
passed before Mrs. Grant began to feel the inroads
of want. One little thing after another was sold to
supply pressing demands, but still, in providing for
so many, all her resources were speedily exhausted.
Flour and meat were both nearly gone at last, and
she had no money with which to replenish her little
store. Nothing remained that could be sold except
the pet lamb; but her heart sickened at the thought
of parting with Daisy whom all the children loved,
and whose innocent gambols had so often delighted
her own eyes.

The idea of having her children ask for food
without being able to supply them, so troubled her
mind, as her means gradually lessened, that she at
last resolved to séll the lamb. She could not ask
one of the children to go for the butcher, but went
with a heavy heart herself, and bargained for the
sale of Daisy.

While the children were all playing with the
lamb, the butcher and his boy came to the door.

“Good morning, Mrs. Grant!” he said, in a
loud, cheerful, unconcerned tone of voice. ** You
see I am here for the lamb.”

‘What for, mother?” eagerly inquired one of
the children, running to her side, and looking up
into her face with an expression of alarm. |

**Go away, dear,” Mrs, Grant said, gently push-
ing the child aside.

11
-
122 PET LAMB.

_ That’s my lamb now, Charley,” said the
butcher’s boy, in a tone of exultation, advancing
towards Daisy with a rope in his hand.

‘No it aint your lamb, though. It’s our lamb ”
replied a little girl, placiog herself in front of him,
and endeavouring to push him away.

The truth all at once flashed upon the minds of
the group of ¢hildren. The first impulse of one
was to protect the lamb by hiding it away—of an-
other to interpose his own strength, and set the
butcher and his boy at defiance. But the lad was
a stout one, and felt delight in the children’s oppo-
sition and consternation. Pushing them all aside,
he threw a rope around Daisy’s neck, and com-
menced dragging the little creature, which began
bleating most piteously, rudely away.

The cry of grief and alarm which instantly fell
upon the mother’s ears, made her heart sick in her
bosom. Ina moment after the children were all
around her, pleading with tearful eyes, and voices
choked with sobs, for their little favourite.

“Tell your boy to stop a moment,” she said in
husky tones to the butcher.

The boy, at a word from his master, stopped
dragging the lamb, and the little creature ceased
its bleating.

“My dear children,” began the mother, in a
yoice that trembled, for now that the time had
really come to part with the lamb, and while she
felt the pressure of her own babe on her bosom,
_her heart yearned deeply towards the gentle crea-
ture that had sported for months about her feet,
and gambolled with her little ones, — “I am very
PET LAMB. 123

poor now, and cannot earn money as your father
did when he was alive. The butcher has given me
money for Daisy, and with this money I will buy
you bread to eat.”

“ No—no—no!” the children eried—‘ We don’t
want you to sell Daisy! We won’t have our dear
little lamb sold! He is our lamb, apd you musto’t
sell him, mother. - We don’t want you to sell him
to buy us bread.”

It was in vain that Mrs. Grant endeavoured to
make her children see a reason for selling the
lamb. The more she tried to convince them, the
stronger did they plead for Daisy. At last she
handed back the silver, saying—

“] cannot sell it now, sir. Wait until another
time.”

But the butcher would not receive back the
money. 3 :

« Tndeed, sir, I cannot now let the lamb go”—
urged Mrs. Grant. “I must try a little while
longer to keep up.”

“T will take neither the lamb nor the money,
Mrs. Grant,” the man replied.—* If lam a butcher,
I have no harder heart than other men. I respected
and esteemed your husband, and have had a good
deal of his money, and I will not rob his children
of their pet. First I buy it of you, and next I give
*t back to the children. Come, Joe, you can’t take
that lamb. It shall never be killed in my slaughter-
house.”

As he said this, his voice slightly trembled, and
he dashed his hand quickly across his eyes.
124 PET LAMB.

Daisy was at once released, and the children

gathered round and caressed their pet in tearful
oy.
"After that, things seemed to take a more favour-
able turn with Mrs. Grant. A month brought the
harvest, and one or two fields of grain, sown by
her husband, yielded very liberally. She was en-
abled too, as she brought her mind down to think
about it, to devise ways and means for having her
little portion of land properly tilled, so that she
never afterwards found herself in so great a strait
as when she resolved to sell the children’s pet
lamb.


THE

YOUNG TEACHER.

‘¢] wisn I knew how to read,” said one little
boy to another. |

“Then why don’t you learn?” asked his com-
panion.

‘¢ Because I have no one to teach me, and my
mother is too poor to send me to school,” replied
the boy.

The name of the little boy who could read was
Albert Parker, and the name of the one who could
not read, was Henry Morrison.

“] think I could teach you,” Albert said. -

“Do you? O, I wish you would try, for I want
to learn to read very much.”

The earnestness with which Henry spoke made
Albert resolve that he would at least try, although,
as he was but a small boy, and had only just learn-
ed to read himself, he did not feel certain that he
could teach Henry; but, then, he determined in
his own mind, young as he was, that he would
make the trial.

« Do you know your A. B. C.’s?” asked Albert.

“© yes. [can say them all through.”

«Will you come into our house now, and try to
learn’? I have got all my books there.”

Of course Henry consented, and the two boys
went into the house, and sat down on two little

11* (125)
126 YOUNG TEACHER.

chairs, that Albert’s mother gave them to sit on,
when she learned her son’s kind intentions. She
felt very glad to see him so early in life in the
effort to do good, for she was a woman who loved
the Lord and her neighbour, and had taught her
boy that it was right for him to try and do the
same. She looked on and listened with a heart
full of pleasure to the young teacher and his pupil.

Albert.—* You know all your A.B. C.’s?”

Henry.—* Yes; I know every one of them.”

A.—“Then you must learn your A-b-ab’s next.”

H.— Well, where are they ?”

A,—(Tarning over the leaves of one of his little
books) —“ Here they are. Now begin. What letter
is that ?”

A AL”

A.—* And the little one alongside of it ?”

H.—* B.”

A.—* Well; Ab spells ab. Now what letter is
that ?” : 7

HH“ BE.” :

-A.—* And the little one?”

H.—* B.”

A.—“That spells eb. And this i-b ib, o-b ob,
atid u-b ub. Now fry and see if you can say the
whole line ?”

H.—* A-b—”

A.—* Ab.”

H.—O yes; A-b ab, eb eb, i-b ib, 0-b ob,
u-b ub.

A.— Yes} that is all right. Why, how fast

ou learn! Now go over it again.”

And Henry commented the lesson and went all
YOUNG TEACHER. 127

‘through it, without missing a single one of the little
words. Then Albert tried him in his b-a ba’s, and
soon he could say all of these. For an hour the
little boys were all intent, the one in teaching and
the other in learning. At the end of this time,
Henry could give the true sound of all the words
of two letters in the primer.

Albert’s mother had been attentive to all that
passed, as she sat engaged in sewing, and when
the little boys laid aside their book, she said—

“ You must come here every day, Henry, and
let Albert teach you to read.”

Henry promised that he would come, and then
the little boys went out and played until it was
time for Henry to go home.

On the next day, after Albert had returned frem
school, Henry Morrison came again, and took an-
other lesson. And so he continued coming every
day. At the end of a week he could spell out.
some of the easy lines that were in the first reading
book, such as—

“ My son, go not in the way of bad men.”

Now Albert’s father, when he saw that Henry
Morrison was so eager to learn, thought within
himself that he would send him to school. So,
after he had been to see, and had talked with his
mother, who promised to keep him always clean,
and his clothes neatly mended, he entered him at
the same school to which his own son went.

The reason why Mr. Parker was willing to place
Henry at the same school to which his own son
was going, was, because he saw that Henry was a
good boy; that he never said bad words, nor had
128 YOUNG TEACHER.

any bad habits. He was not, therefore, afraid to ~
let his own son be in company with him.

You may suppose that Henry Morrison learned
very fast at school. And so he did. In a few
months he caught up to Albert and soon went
rapidly past him. But itis pleasing to be able to
say, that Albert Parker had not a single unkind or
envious feeling towards Henry on this account, but
was, on the contrary, exceedingly pleased.

“ How is it, Albert,” his father said to him one
day, ‘‘that Henry learns so much faster than you
do?”

Albert thought, at first, that this question was
meant for a rebuke, but when he looked up into
his father’s face, he saw that it was not.

‘“‘T don’t know how it is, father,” he answered,
‘but he can and does learn faster than I can, and
I am glad of it.”

** Glad of it, Albert! And why so?”

“Why you know, father, that Henry can’t go to
school as long as | can, and so he ought to learn a
great deal faster. I shall be learning on still when
he has to be put out to a trade, to get his own
living.”

** And so you do not envy him, because he learns
so much faster than you do?”

*“O no, father; why should I? It would be
wicked in me, would it not?”

“Certainly, my son. And I am glad to hear
you say that you are pleased to see your little
friend learn faster than you can. Still, you must
try your best.”

«“ And so I do, father. And I learn as fast as
YOUNG TEACHER. 129

any boy in my class. But the schoolmaster says
that Henry is the fastest boy in the whole school.”

For three years Mr. Parker continued to send
Henry to school, after which it became necessary
for him to go out toa trade, as his poor mother
could not support him any longer. When he left
the school, he was far in advance of all the other
scholars, and his desire to learn was still greater
than it had ever been.

He felt very grateful to Mr. Parker, and before
he went to his trade came and thanked him for his
great kindness to him. While the poor boy thus
expressed his gratitude, Mr. Parker felt doubly re-
paid for all he had done.

“You are now far in advance, Henry, of most
boys when they go to a trade,” he said, ‘and if
you will only employ your spare time in improving
yourself, you may rise high in the world, and be
very useful when you grow up to be a man. Some
of the best and greatest men in the country, when
boys, were poor like you, and had to work at
trades. Persevere, then, as they did, and you will
rise as high. But above all, Henry, ever remember
that you are in the presence of the good and holy
Lord, who cannot look upon sin with the least
degree of allowance. Let his commandments be
ever before you. Do not break the least one. of
them wilfully; for, if you do, unhappiness will
surely follow. And now, my boy,” his kind bene-
factor added, fervently, “may our Heaver!y Father
ever have you in his holy keeping.”

Throughout his whole life Henry Morrison did
not forget the impression of that moment. As an
130 YOUNG TEACHER.

apprentice, instead of wasting, as too many boys
do, their leisure time in idleness, his books were
always resorted to, and some information gained at
every spare moment. Still, he was careful never
to neglect his work, nor to hurry through it, so as
not to do it well. ‘This his master, who was a kind
man, saw, and he therefore took pleasure in seeing
him at his books, when his work was done.

Albert continued to be the friend of Henry.
They met every Sabbath at the Sunday school,
and frequently the latter would go home and spend
the evening in Mr. Parker’s family.

Thus he continued to improve his mind, until
he arrived at the age of manhood, when, his mo-
ther having died several years before, he removed
many hundred miles away from his native place.

It was about ten years afterwards that Albert
Parker was travelling in the West, and stopped a
few days at Louisville, Kentucky.

He attended church on the Sabbath day, as was
his custom, whether at home or.abroad; for the
pious instructions that he had received in early
life had been like good seed sown upon good
ground.

When the minister arose in the pulpit, there
seemed to Albert something strangely familiar in
his face and form; but when he spoke, his voice
sounded like that of an old friend.

“ Surely I have seen him before,” he said, as he
looked at him earnestly, and tried to remember
where and when he had met with him. But he
could recall neither the time, the place, nor the
circumstances.
YOUNG TEACHER. 181

He listened to the sermon with the deepest atten-
tion. It was full of true and beautiful thoughts,
and the style and language were eloquent ard im-

osing. His text was—

« Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou
shalt find it after many days.” Eccl. xi. 1.

In closing, he said—‘I will give you a practical
llustration of what I have been trying to impress
upon your minds. Two little boys, about ten years
of age, were playing together. One of them was a
poor boy, and could not read. Young as he was,
he felt an anxious desire to learn like other boys,
but his mother was poor, and could not send him
to school. ‘I wish I could read,’ he said to his
companion. ‘Then why don’t you learn? asked
the other little boy; and he replied, ‘ Because I
have no one to teach me, and my mother is too
poor to send me to school.’ Then the boy who
could read said, that ‘he thought he could teach
him, and if the other were willing he would try.’
Of course he was willing, and the two little boys
sat down together, one as teacher and the other as
scholar, and while the one endeavoured to impart
the little that he had learned, the other tried as
hard to receive what his young friend so earnestly
endeavoured to give. And in this way the poor
boy learned to read. The father of his little friend,
on seeing him so anxious to learn, sent him to
school for three years. That poor boy, in the pro-
vidence of the Lord, is now your minister. His
kind teacher he has neither seen nor heard from
for many years, but he yet hopes to meet him.
182 YOUNG TEACHER.

The bread cast, more thin twenty years ago, upon
the waters, he will yet find.”

As soon as the minisivr began to speak of that
early scene, the count-:ince of Henry Morrison
grew at once familiar to Albert Parker. Their
meeting after service was, indeed, a joyful one.
Tears moistened their eves, as they grasped each
other’s hands, and uttered’ their heartfelt expres-
sions of delight.

Years have passed since that pleasant interview,
and both are now ministers, eminent for talents
and usefulness,


LITTLE GEORGE.

“O, cranpma!”’ said little George, opening the
curtain and looking out of the window — “the
ground is all covered with snow |”

“Yes, my dear, it has snowed during the night,
and covered the earth to the depth of several
inches.”

“O, look at the pretty snow-birds! See how close
they come to the door. But are they not very cold,
grandma, their feet are so red iad

“No, George. The little snow-birds are not
afraid of the cold. They are all covered with soft
and warm feathers.”

‘But aint their feet cold? When my feet were
once almost frozen, they were red just like the
snow-birds’ feet.”

“ Their feet are always red, as well in summer
as in winter.”

‘Where do the snow-birds go in the summer
time, grandma? I never sce them after the winter
is gone.” |

“They love the snow and the cold, and so they
go away off to the north in the summer time, where
they lay their eggs and hatch out their young
ones.”

“Then, if they love the cold so well, why don’t
they stay there? It’s always cold at the north, you
have told me.”

12 (133)
134 LITTLE GEORGE.

“ They come here for food. In our mild climate
grow very many plants, the seeds of which are
good food for them.”

‘‘ But it snows here too, grandma, and covers up
all the ground.”

«But not often so deep as to cover up in the
woods and corners of the fields the tops of weeds
and bushes from which they may still pick the
seeds. See there! Don’t you see that little bird
picking out the seeds from a stalk which still lifts
itself above the snow 2”

“0, yes! Dear little bird! See! Now it has
come close up to the door, and is picking up the
crums from the step.”

“ After a deep snow, they always come about
the houses and barns, and hay-stacks, to pick up
crums and seeds.”

«© Where are they when it don’t snow, or when
all the snow is melted ?”

“In the woods and fields, getting their food from
weeds and shrubs.”

“ They all turn to sparrows in the summer time,
don’t they ?”

“No, dear. Didn’t I tell you that they all left
us and went away to the north, where the climate
is colder ?”

“© yes. But then I heard Mr. Murray say,
that the little chirping sparrows that live about the
houses in summer time were snow-birds with new
feathers on.”

“ Other people besides Mr. Murray have thought
so. But a sparrow is a sparrow, and a snow-bird
LITTLE GEORGE. 135

asnow-bird. But come, it is breakfast time, and
you must eat and get ready for school.”

“Must I go to school to-day, grandma, all
through the deep snow ?” little George asked, mak-
ing a wry face.

“You are not afraid of the snow, are you,
George ?”

‘No, I am not afraid of it— but then it is so
deep, and looks so cold.”

“It’s only a few inches deep,” grandma said,
«and I will wrap you up so warm that the cold —
can’t touch you. So come down and get a nice
breakfast, and then my little boy will go off as
happy as he can be.”

Like a good many other little boys, George
liked to get an excuse for staying away from
school, and therefore it was, that as soon as he saw
the snow on the ground, he thought that now he
could stay at home and have a good frolic. But
when his grandmother seemed so in earnest about
his going, he felt a little unkind; and though he
said nothing more, he looked rather sober as he
came down stairs and seated himself at the break-
fast table.

“ Wouldn’t you like to hear a little story,
George?” his grandma said, after the breakfast
was over, and she was about getting him ready to
go to school.

« OQ yes, grandma, tell me a story,” and his eyes
brightened up, and he loaked all interest.

“ Well, a great many years ago,” began George’s
grandma, “ there lived a poor woman in a cottage
who had one little boy. She hadn’t money to buy
136 LITTLE GEORGE.

him such nice warm clothes as you have, but the
best that she could get for him were always kept
whole and clean. In the summer time he worked
in her garden sometimes, and sometimes in the
neighbours’ gardens, who paid him money. This
money he always brought to his mother, for he
loved her very much.

«© When the winter time came, and the ground
was all covered up with snow, he could not get
any work to do, and then he had time to go to
school. His mother was so anxious that her boy
should learn, that she saved a little money, poor as
she was, during summer, to pay for his schooling
in the winter.

‘«¢ Now the school-house was more than a mile
away, and the snow lay for months upon the
ground far deeper than it is now, for the winters
were a great deal colder then, and it snowed a great
deal more. But this little boy never asked to stay
home, although he was no bigger than you, and
hadn’t such « nice warm great-coat as you have.
In the morning he would be up bright and early,
and bring in wood for his mother from the wood
pile, and fetch her three or four pails of water from
the spring, enough to last all day, and then he
would go off to school as happy as a bird.

“ Well, in this way he got a good education, and
when he grew up to be a man, his learning enabled
him to earn money enough to keep his poor mother
from working so hard any longer.”

“ Wasn’t he a good little boy, grandma?”
George said, looking up with a face full of de-
lighted interest.
LITTLE GEORGE. 137

«Yes, George, he was a very good boy, and
when he grew up to be a man he was a good
man.”

« Where is he now, grandma ?”

« He is in heaven, my dear. After awhile he
took sick and died, and they buried his dead body
in the ground, but his living spirit—that part of
him that thought about and loved his mother, could
not die. It went to heaven. But his mother was
not all alone. He left her another little boy, his
own boy, whose mother had gone to heaven a little
while before him.”

« And was that little boy good to his grandma 1”

“© O yes.”

“ And did he love her ?”

« Yes, he loved her very much, and she loved
him, and made him warm clothes. But he didn’t
always like to go to school, because he didn’t know
how much good it had done his father, when he
was a little boy, nor how far his father had to go,
even when the snow was deeper and the air colder
than it is now.”

George stood thoughtful by his grandma’s side
for a moment or two, and then looking up into her
face, asked earnestly—

“Am I that little boy, grandma ?”

“Yes, my dear, you are that little boy,” she
said, stooping down and kissing him tenderly.

«¢ And was it my father who got you wood and
water, and worked for you in the summer time, and
then went so far to school in the cold and snow r

“Yes, my dear.” |

« JJ] never ask to stay home from school again

12*
138 LITTLE GEORGE.

if it snows up to the top of the door,” he replied,
lifting his head with a determined air.

His grandma was much pleased to see the effect
of what she had told him upon his mind. She got
his thick over-coat and buttoned it up closely about
tlie neck. Then she took his mittens and warmed
them all so nicely before she drew them on his
little hands. After he was all ready, with his
books and his slate under his arms, she gave him
a good kiss, and away he went as happy as a
cricket.

He never complained of the cold after that.
Whenever he saw the snow, he thought of his
father when he was a little boy, and of how he had
waded through it for more than a mile every day,
that he might get to school and learn, and of how
much good that learning had done him.

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THE

FAIRY MONITOR.

Ture children were playing in a garden, when
a fairy came to them in the form of a beautiful
butterfly. She was a good fairy, and loved little
children. She settled upon a flower, and grace-
fully expanded her wings, all be-gemmed with
green and gold; but in a moment rose lightly, and
passed to another flower, and then to another, thus
wooing them to follow her, until they became
enamoured of

“The winged gem,”
and pursued from leaf to leaf, and from flower to
flower, over blooming parterres and grassy lawns,
and out into the green meadows, the beautiful
thing they’so much desired to possess.

Sometimes the butterfly would fold together its
wings, and remain motionless upon a bud or blos-
som, until an eager hand was almost upon it, when
it would float gracefully away, eluding the grasp
that would have soiled or crushed its airy, sun-lit
pinions. But it still lingered near them, and still
wooed them to the pursuit.

At last the butterfly lit down upon a flower just
peeping out from amid a cluster of low green
leaves. Softly they approached, and camer caren

{
140 FAIRY MONITOR.

to make it a prisoner. An exulting shout rung upon
the air from each happy voice, as the hat, borne
by a steady hand, suddenly covered the spot where
the beautiful thing had rested.

And now all was eagerness to secure more Cer-
tain possession of their prize. One threw himself
at full length upon the soft green carpet of nature,
and cautiously raised an edge of the hat that he
might catch a sight of the prisoner, while another
stood bending eagerly forward, and the third knelt
with extended hands to prevent an escape. Slowly
and cautiously the hat was raised, and lo! the
expected prize was gone. Disappointment sat upon
the faces of the children, but this quickly disap-
peared, when a beautiful being, in robes of purest
white, stood among them.

“ My dear children,” she said, with a calm but
sweet smile, ‘many a butterfly-chase in life is
before you, and many a disappointment ; for not
always will a possession of the glittering toy reward
your pursuits; and even when it does, the soiled
wings and crushed body of the worm will suddenly
lose their attractiveness, and prove all unworthy
of your anxious desire. But, when hope is thus
deceived, let your disappointment be your instruc-
tor. Learn that a good and a true end of life is
never deceived. ‘That if you try in all things to
be good and to do good, no hope that agrees with
either, will ever prove false. When you again see
a happy butterfly, floating ‘ like a thought of joy’
in the balmy air, or resting gracefully upon some
opening blossom, look upon the beautiful thing
with delight, but do not attempt to take away its
FAIRY MONITOR. 141

liberty and its life. You can only perceive its
beauties and enjoy them, while it sports free in the
sunshine.”

The lovely being then seemed to go away and
pass out of their sight, and lo! the same butterfly
that had led them over the fields, went fanning the
air with its painted wings before them, lighting first
upon one sweet blossom and then upon another :
but they did not pursue it again. And, presently,
the fairy, for it was she who had appeared to them,
again in the form of a butterfly, flew afar off, and
the children returned hand in hand to the garden
from which they had wandered away.

THE END.








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