Citation
Memoir of James Arthur Cobb

Material Information

Title:
Memoir of James Arthur Cobb
Creator:
Cobb, Eunice Hale, 1803-1880 ( Author, Primary )
Cobb, Sylvanus, 1798-1866 ( Publisher )
Pelton, Oliver, 1798-1882 ( Engraver )
Hobart and Robbins ( Stereotyper )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Sylvanus Cobb
Manufacturer:
Hobart & Robbins
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
144 p. : ill. port. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Religious education -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Biography -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Portrait engraved by O. Pelton, from a daguerreotype taken in his 6th year.
General Note:
Includes poems.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by his mother, Mrs. Eunice Hale Cobb ; with essay on religious education, by the publisher.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026648260 ( ALEPH )
45891825 ( OCLC )
ALG4786 ( NOTIS )

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MEMOIR

JAMES ARTHUR COBB.

BY HIS MOTHER,

MRS. EUNICE HALE COBB.




WITH

AN ESSAY ON RELIGIOUS EDUCATION,

BY THE PUBLISHER.

BOSTON: e*.
PUBLISHED BY SYLVANUS COBB, :
No. 61 Cornhill. he “ i el
1852. TE





Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1852, by

SYLVANUS COBB,

In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

Stercotyped by
HOBART & ROBBINS,
BOSTON. -



PREFACE.

By the earnest solicitation of many of our
friends, and in the belief that profitable instruc-
tion and a kindly influence will be imparted by
this means to other minds, both of parents and chil-
dren, I have been induced to engage in the pleas-
ant task of presenting to the world, and especially
to the young, a brief history of our “ darling boy
Jimmy.”’

The thought of the lovely child, as he was so
recently with us, and so pleasantly filled the
important place he held in the family circle, and
the reflection that that place can never be filled by
him again, has often overwhelmed my mind with
sadness, and led me to fear that I should fail to do



IV PREFACE.

justice to the work before me. But I have been
strengthened with the assurance that the spirit of
the dear departed one attends me, and would even
assist me in writing an account of his mission
on earth. With this sentiment, I would sit me
down to write of his life with the same blest feel-
ings with which I have sat to instruct that tender
and inquiring mind, which is now receiving divine
instruction in his holy, happy home above.

Having always shared his unbounded confidence,
and been constantly blest with his valuable society,
and having kept a daily record, I have been
enabled to give his history in a plain, truthful man-
ner; and although a mother’s partialities may
sometimes be betrayed, yet it is hoped that the
nature of the circumstances will be a sufficient
apology.

In preparing this little sketch, in so far as it
relates to the conversation of the angel boy, I have

- endeavored to give his own simple though impress-



PREFACE. Vv

ive language. And in doing this I have been
cheered with the reflection, that I have acted in
accordance with what would have been his own
desire, had he been permitted to express it. His
daily petition was “that he might live to do
good ;’’ and such was his brief but happy and use-
ful life, and his calm and triumphant death, that
it is thought no one, young or old, can become
acquainted with his prominent traits of character,
without being instructed and strengthened for
good.

I write not for the critic, but for the lovers of
truth and virtue, uttered in the simple language
of the heart’s affection ; believing that, if the biog-
raphy of a wise and good man may be profitable to
other men, the biography of a wise and good child
may be profitable to other children.

With a deep reverence for the character and
mission of one whom I have loved with a mother’s

most ardent affection, and a desire at the same
1*



VI PREFACE.

time to be the humble instrument of advancing
that all-sustaining and heaven-born cause, the
supreme value of which was illustrated by his life,
have I prepared this little volume.

And hoping it may lead the young to ‘¢ remem-
ber their Creator in the days of their youth,” and
the middle-aged and the aged to “seek first the
kingdom of God and his righteousness,” it is very
affectionately dedicated to the memory of JAMES

ARTHUR
By his Mother,

E. H. C.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

MEMOIR, ° e . o . * ° . . ° 7. . . . 9
CHAPTER ILI.

wae GUM, we a we

CHAPTER II.
JOURNEY TO MAINE, AND THE LOST HAT, . . . . 57

CHAPTER IV.
cau, it set meallhec. cont at oe oe ee er ee

CHAPTER V.
VISIT TO WORCESTER, AND THE LITTLE PAPER-BOY, . 17%

CHAPTER VI.
Te NO, OO 0 Bm ay he oe igen

CHAPTER VIL.
THE MIPSIONARY BOX,. . . . « © 2 0 ss 200



VIII CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII.

HIS VIEWS OF DEATH,. . - + «© © © «© ©. « 10%
CHAPTER IX.

HIS EXIT, AND FUNERAL OBSEQUIES, . . +. « ~» Il4
CHAPTER X.

ESSAY ON RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, i. Ss a.



CHAPTER I.
MEMOIR.

Tue subject of the present memoir, James
Arthur Cobb, was the son of Rev. Sylvanus
and Eunice Hale Cobb, and the youngest
of nine children. He was born in Hast
Boston, Dec. 22, 1842. The next young-
est child in the family being eight years his
senior in age, little James was a pet, as
well as a great favorite. And such was
his amiableness of disposition, so great his
sense of propriety, and so mild and gentle
was he at all times, that he was never
known to take advantage of the position
he held in the family, or the indulgences
which were unavoidably bestowed upon
him. From his infancy, so*easy was he to
be governed, or, rather, so great was his
love of duty, that correction was seldom
needed; and, in the family, often was he



10 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

referred to as the little boy who was never
whipped. And as long as he lived, nothing
would grieve him more than to see a
mother strike a child. Often, when his
playmates have erred, and knew that the
consequence must be a ‘‘ whipping from
their mother,’ he has gone, and, by rea-
sons strong, persuaded the mother to use
some other means of correction, and thus
saved his friend from the ‘‘ rod.”’

James not only early discovered a sweet-
ness of temper which greatly endeared him
to all, but he evinced, also, deep religious
feeling. His very nature seemed, as it
were, a holy one. His social and moral
sentiments were strongly marked, and very”
early did they become developed, insomuch
that, by one member of the family, he
received the name of ‘“‘glory,bud.”” A
friend, writing to his mother after his
death, says: ‘*I remember well the first
time I looked upon your boy. I came to
congratulate you upon his birth. He was
three weeks old, and, with a mother’s pride,



EARLY TRAINING. 11

you pointed to his head, and asked me if it
was not fine and promising. I assented,
and together we marked out for him a bril-
liant career. I come again, to-day, to con-
gratulate you in his death, that your highest
expectations have been far more than real-
ized in his life and departure.”’

The mind of little James was like a beau-
tiful garden of choice flowers, whose opening
buds and expanding petals, which are re-
freshed by the hand of culture, repay with
their richest odor the gardener’s care.
His opening, grasping mind, seemed early
to claim kindred with heaven itself; and
high and exalted, as wellas pure and peace-
able, were the teachings it naturally craved.
With him, God was love, heaven was beau-
tiful, and earth itself, when rightly enjoyed,
a meet temple in which for the indwelling
spirit to worship;,and admire its great and
supreme Architect.. And thus early was he
taught, and early did he enjoy, the faith
which embraces God as the Father and
Friend of all, Christ as the Mediator and



12 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

Saviour of all, and heaven as the final
inheritance of a ransomed, sanctified, and
sinless universe. And this faith ‘‘ grew
with his growth, and strengthened with his
strength.’’ Often would he express to his
‘‘ dear mother,”’ when conversing upon the
subject of religion, his deep gratitude to
God, that he had not been taught in his
childhood, as she had been in hers, ‘‘ to
believe so about God.’’ His sympathetic
mind would seem to be filled with surprise
and horror, when told of the song of endless
wrath which rocked the cradle of her in-
fancy, and the thoughts of final separation
and infinite torments which added a bitter
to every sweet of her childhood hours ; and
thankful would he express himself, that she
had since learned those blessed truths which
enabled her to teach him in a way that made
him so happy, and led him to “love to
be good.” And often, when he attended
school, would he come home with his bosom
actually swelling with anguish, because the
children had, as he thought, so profaned the



THEOLOGICAL PRINCIPLEs. 13

character of God. They had talked to him
about a ‘ devil and hell in another world,”’
and *‘how God would burn little children
forever there, if they did wrong here.’’ He
could well understand how sinners could be
‘in hell,’’ in their dark and sinful state, in
guilt of conscience and restless fear ; and
how they could be under the influence of an
‘evil spirit,” if they disobeyed the laws
of Heaven. But the idea that God would
punish his children, upon a principle on
which no earthly parent would punish his,
namely, for their final injury, was not only
to him a mystery, but an offence which he
could not away with. He would wonder,
when the children would refer to their pa-
rents’ teachings for a proof of what they
said, ‘* how people could so teach their chil-
dren,’”’ and would often say, ‘‘it is wicked
to believe so about God.” And when he
would hear these same children using pro-
fanity, he would remark that « he did not
wonder at it, and if they were taught to
love God as he did, they would not want to
2



14 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

swear about him.’’ Andif he has not been
heard to argue with the “learned doctors ”’
in the “temple” upon this subject, there
are many old enough for doctors who have
felt the force of his reasoning upon it, while,
in his gentle, childlike manner, he would
appeal to their own hearts for an answer in
favor of the only true teaching adapted to
the wants of the human mind.

He found this doctrine of God’s paternity,
and parental rewards and punishments, the
only doctrine he could reduce to practice,
when in health, among his playfellows ; and
it was this, and the thought that he had
lived it, and taught it to others as he had
had opportunity, which cheered and sus-
tained him through a painful and protracted
sickness. He was happy in a clear and
philosophical understanding of the consist-
ency of all punishment, under the govern-
ment of God, with his fatherly love. When
he had revived from the first exhaustion, in
which he was thought to be dying, when we
had not intruded upon him the probability



EARLY READING. 15

that he might soon be taken from us, lest it
should unpleasantly affect him, he intro-
duced the subject Aimself! He inquired
of his mother if she thought he should die,
and she answered him frankly in respect to
his situation. Unmoved, he very calmly
replied, ‘‘I am not afraid to die; I do not
believe what some say about God, and what
he will do to his children in another world, |

which makes them afraid to die. Of course, “”

God will punish us when we do wrong, be-
cause he loves us. He will punish us to
make us better. I shall find him as good
in another world as he is here.”’ This faith
even opened to him the bright glories of the
upper world,

‘Where sits the Saviour dressed in love,
And there the smiling God.”

EARLY READING.

JAMES early showed a love for books ; and
early, too, did he discover a taste for that
kind of reading which, while it would serve



16 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

for amusement, would also interest and
instruct him. It was always his delight to
read and hear read those books which
illustrated the true value of virtue, and the
importance of doing good. He was favored
with a good memory, and was thereby en-
abled to treasure up much which he gained
in this way; and, having great ‘ reflec-
tion,’ he was led to make useful application
of the knowledge thus gained. And during
his last sickness, reading engrossed much
of his time and attention. He had collected
quite a large library of well-selected books,
which were to him pleasant and agreeable
companions.

He was very fond of the Bible, and took
great satisfaction both in reading and hear-
ing it read. The same friend, from whose
note I have already quoted, further says:
‘The last time I saw you with your little
James was in your sitting-room, about a
year ago. You then told me of the preca-
rious state of his health, and said you felt,
each day, as you read to him from the evan-



EARLY READING. 17

gelists the life of the Saviour, that you
might be instructing a child for heaven.
These words have proved prophetic, and
you must be greatly comforted in the reflec-
tion that you have been permitted to see
so much of a Christ-like spirit manifested
in your child for the last year of his life.”’

The following is an extract from a letter
sent to my daughter while on a visit to
Maine, in August last:

‘“« Sunday evening, Aug. 3d. I have just
been engaged in reading to James Arthur
the last two chapters of Matthew. This
morning he wanted me to read to him of
Jesus’ birth, and to-night he wanted to hear
the chapters containing an account of his
trial and crucifizion. I have read these
chapters to him, until he can repeat the
most of them. What a little Christian!
How differently we should feel to part with
him now, from what we should to have had
him suddenly removed when he was first
taken sick! He seems constantly preparing

himself for a higher sphere, even for the
O*



18 MEMOSR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

sweet society of angels. His sickness is
made to me, by these accompanying cir-
cumstances, one of the greatest blessings I
ever enjoyed; and never before was I
taught to appreciate faith and contentment,
as I see it daily manifested in this little
disciple of Jesus.”’

And thus did his love for reading, and
particularly his love for the Holy Scriptures,
continue until his strength failed, which was
only three days previous to his death. The
last chapter which was read to him was the
one in Matthew which gives an account of
the ‘‘transfiguration.”’ After it was fin-
ished, he smilingly said, ‘* Mother, that is
the way those angels looked.* You know
I told you they were dressed in white, and
where they were it was all light.’’ He
seemed delighted that he had found some-
thing by which he could describe them,
because he had always said, when speaking
of them, that he ‘‘ could not tell how they
looked, for there was nothing on earth so

*See the ‘‘ Vision,”’ chap. vr.



SCHOOL—DAYS. 19

beautiful.”” And he was pleased that in
the word of God he had read of something
like them.

The week previous to his death, he had
his books all arranged in his library, accord-
ing to his direction, and wished they might
always be retained with the same care that
he had kept them.

Yes, precious child, these books we love,
Mementos of thy mind ;

Thy spirit meek, thy faithful heart,
Affectionate and kind.

SCHOOL-DAYS.

At the age of four, James entered school,
a period to which he had looked forward
with pleasant anticipations. Being favored
with one of the best of teachers, his school-
days commenced most pleasantly, and were
ever spent with much satisfaction and de-
light. Learning was to him no task, and in
whatever ‘‘department”’ he might be, he
always aspired for the head. With the
teacher, as far as consistent with the rules



20 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

of right, he was always a favorite, and
nothing pleased him more than to be ap-
pointed an assistant over the smaller schol-
ars. And, with the pupils, ‘‘ Jimmy” was
one who was always beloved, and his word
was ‘‘law.’’ Such was his mildness, and
so universally kind was he to all his school-
mates, that he never failed to gain the good
will of all. With him there was no par-
tiality, excepting it might be for some poor,
unfortunate boy, whom others would neglect
and abuse. Then he was always found on
the side of the ‘‘ injured party.”’

This characteristic, which ever beauti-
fully manifested itself in all his intercourse
with his playmates, seemed to be duly ap-
preciated by them, and rendered him one
to be sought after and loved. And it was
very gratifying, on the day of his burial,
when his playmates were admitted to take
their last look of one with whom they had
enjoyed so many pleasant hours, to witness
the deep and heartfelt sympathy which
seemed voluntarily to flow from all, as they



RESPECT FROM SCHOOL-MATES. 21

would utter forth their little encomiums :
‘Jimmy was a good boy;” ‘ We loved
Jimmy ;’’ ‘‘ We are sorry he can’t play
with us any more,— we always loved to
have him with us, because he was so kind ;”’
‘‘Everybody loved Jimmy,” &c. &c. And
such was the interest he felt for his school-
mates, and so desirous was he that they
should ‘*be good,’ that when he had be-
come so sick that he could neither go out
nor endure the fatigue of seeing all the chil-
dren in his room, he sent for Miss Lincoln,
who had been his teacher most of the time
from the commencement of his school-days,
that he might send his message to the school
by her. She very kindly consented to visit
him for that purpose, and at that time he
was so feeble that he was not allowed to see
any but those who were in attendance upon
him, it being but a.few days after the time
of his ‘‘vision.”” But his whole desire
seemed to be to ‘‘do all the good’’ he
could while he might be here, regardless
of any effort on his part which it might



22 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

require. And he was very desirous that
Miss L. should take the words from his lips,
that she might bear them directly to the
scholars from him. He was aware of his
situation, and thought he should never see
his school-mates again; and perhaps a few
words from him, at such a time, might pro-
duce upon their minds an impression which
would not be forgotten. His teacher came :
and, as she seated herself upon the couch of
this suffering, patient child, with whom she
had enjoyed so long and pleasant a relation,
and beheld his calm, ethereal countenance,
she could not repress the bright tear-drop
that started unbidden forth. But, perfectly
composed, and unmoved by tears, he was
prepared to give to her what he regarded
as his last message to his school-mates.
After speaking to her of his sickness, and
the happiness and peace he felt, and of his
Joy in seeing her, he told her he wanted * send to the scholars by her.’’ With the
assurance that his wish should be granted,
he said, ‘‘I want you to tell the children to



THE MESSAGER. 93

be good, and never swear, or use naughty
words. I want them to treat you kindly,
because, when they are out of your sight,
they do not do as you would wish them to
do. Tell them to be kind, and live to do
good.’’ This was his message; and as he
expected when he gave it, it was his last
message. He closed his conversation by
asking her to tell them all that he “‘ wanted
them to do as he wished of them, so that
if they should be sick, as he was, and thought
they were going to die, they could feel as
happy as he did.” His teacher retired
with the reflection that she had felt herself
to be benefited by this instructive and
interesting interview.

After this, the health of little James
continued to improve, and not knowing the
stage of the disease, hopes were entertained
that he might so far recover as to be able
te go out. And when he thought himself
that he might be able at some future time
to attend school, his great concern seemed
to be to know how he could go to school

hey



24 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

and not have to mingle with the boys, so as
to hear their profane and vulgar language,
which had always annoyed him. He
exacted the promise that if he should go to
school again, the teacher should first be
visited, to see if he could attend school
without being obliged to mix with the boys
out of the school-house. He at one time
remarked, ‘‘I had rather be confined at
home till I am too old to play with boys,
than to have to go into - street again and
hear their naughty talk.

He had attended the erammar-school but
a short time before his last sickness, having
been prevented from entering before, on
account of the feebleness of his health.
When he entered, it was with the determi-
nation that he would never have a ‘‘mark”’
for any misdemeanor whatever while he
should remain a member of the school.
And had his health been adequate to the
undertaking, no doubt he would have car-
ried his intention into execution. His
highest ambition always had been to stand



HONESTY AND INTEGRITY. 25

well in his school. After his death, in look-
ing over his papers; a note on interest, of
fourteen dollars and fifty cents, was found in
his wallet, which had been given him by
his father for the ‘“‘ Goods” and ‘* Excel-
lents’? he had brought from school as
‘rewards of merit.’’ But this ‘good
little boy’’ was not to join his school again
on earth. A higher school was appointed
for him, where sickness and disappointment
can never come.
“* Delightful scene! a world at rest ;
A God all love ; no grief, no fear ;

A heavenly hope, a peaceful breast,
A smile unsullied by a tear.??

HONESTY AND INTEGRITY.

Honesty and strict integrity were always
cherished and faithfully reduced to practice
by this lover of the right and the true.
From his infancy he despised everything
like deception and falsehood, and would
avoid, as much as possible, those whom he
knew to be regardless of the truth. He

3



26 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

had frequently remarked that he could not
enjoy his marbles with the boys, because
they so often sought to deceive him. This
he disliked ; and he thought it so wicked,
that he had made arrangements, should he
ever be able.to play with his marbles again,
to play in the house, either ‘‘ with the
family ’’ or ‘‘ alone,” because he could not
enjoy it to play with those who would
deceive him. His was a privilege, in
respect to this subject, of which he often
spoke with gratitude, and the value of
which he ever seemed fully to appreciate.
He despised, from the bottom of his heart,
anything like falsehood or deception ; and
whether he met with it in ‘‘ high places,”
or with his equals, he would never fail to
offer a gentle rebuke. Lying and swearing
were considered by him among the highest
offences. His word could always be
depended upon, and to question it would
sorely grieve him. He has often, through
the past year, spoken of the circumstance
of his never having told but three lies in



HONESTY AND INTEGRITY. 27

his life, and one of them was when he was
so young he had forgotten what it was.
Of those he remembered, he said, ‘* At one
time, when I had failed to receive a
‘good’ at school, I told, on getting home,
that the wind blew it away.’’ The other
was, ‘‘ When I was a very little boy, and
did not know what it meant to ‘play
truant,’ I went away with a boy older
than myself; and, when I came home and
was asked if I had played truant, I said I
had not.’’ These two he could remember,
but the other he could not. before his death, when conversing upon this
subject, he said, **I wish I could go down
to my grave without ever having told a Jie,
or sworn.”’ He continued, ‘‘I can say that
I never drank rum, and I wish I could say
I never did either of the others.”? On
being told that it was not known by the
family that he had ever sworn, he said,
‘Once, when I was a little boy, and did
not know better, I said a naughty word;
but when I knew it was wicked, I never



28 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

would say it again.”” But he seemed very
much to regret that he had ever done that,
‘« because he should like to go down to his
grave and say he had never done anything
so wrong.’ He was assured that his
heavenly Father would not consider him an
offender against his holy law; for those |
things were done when he was too small to

know the evil, and his true repentance

of them was such as God would own
and bless. Yet he wished he ‘‘ had never
done the wrong, even when he was so
young.” .

But few, perhaps,,go down to their
praves with so few faults to regret as did
this child of right, and lover of the good
and true. .

RESPECT FOR AGE.

James was a child who could always
render himself agreeable. His respect for
the aged and those who were his superiors
was such, that he never failed to receive
the notice he deserved, and never wanted



RESPECT FOR AGE. 29

for friends. He was always ready to con-
verse with, or hear conversation from, those
older than himself; and would enter into
the subject with all the interest of a person
of many years. In travelling, his respect-
ful treatment to all would secure him
friends, and, under all circumstances, he
never failed to receive his full share of

If an ‘‘old man” were passing by,
whom other boys would run after and
annoy, James would always be seen
*¢standing aloof,’’ until he could quietly
get to him, and render him all the assist-
ance which lay in his power. He would
never himself speak, nor would he allow
those with him to speak, disrespectfully of
others. This principle he carried out in
his every-day walk in life. A few days
before his death, a gentleman called into
his chamber to see him, and in the course
of conversation, when speaking of his
father, he spoke of him as ‘the old

gentleman.”” James very calmly looked
3%





30 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

up, and said to him, ‘‘ We have no such
person here as the old gentleman.’ <‘It
mean your father,” said he, thinking James
did not understand him. ‘I know whom
you mean,” said James, ‘‘ but we do not
call my father the old gentleman.” This
incident is mentioned to illustrate his re-
gard for etiquette, and his appreciation of
due respect to the several relations of life.
And this principle he extended to all, high
and low, rich and poor.

LEAVING SCHOOL.

James entered the grammar school in
East Boston, March 3, 1851, and he was
highly pleased that he had now commenced
a new era in_his school-day life. But ina
few weeks it became obvious to his friends
that his health was failing, and conse-
quently he would be obliged to leave his
school. His health had for some time been
considered delicate, but no particular alarm
was felt until about this time. The sum-



LEAVING SCHOOL. 31

mer that he was five years old, he was
kicked by a horse while playing with some
of his little friends upon the green, near his
father’s house. He was taken up and car-
ried home seemingly lifeless, and was
thought for some time to be dead. But
after the use of restoratives he revived, and
soon became able to speak. He thought
he was not much hurt; and as there was
no outward bruise, it was thought by his
physician that, if he had not received an
inward injury, he would soon recover.
But the blow which he received was very
severe, and upon the region of the heart.
This was probably the original cause of the
disease which terminated his life, —‘‘ en-
largement of the heart.’ It was some
time before he seemed much affected; but
from the time of this accident can be traced
a diminished inclination to engage in active
plays, and a desire to remain in the house,
and enjoy quiet. Often, when urged to
go out, he would decline, saying, he ‘‘ did



82 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

not feel sick, nor did he feel like gomg
out to play.”’

In the winter of 1851, he was attacked
with the whooping-cough, which very
seriously affected him. This was the latter
part of the winter ; and in May following,
on returning from a short journey to Ham-
ilton and Ipswich, where he had accom-
panied his mother, to spend a few days
with her friends, he was taken quite sick,
and the heart seemed very seriously
affected. The breast-bone had now become
considerably protruded by the enlarge-
ment of the heart ;—the beating of the
heart, which had been some time very
irregular, had now become much more
violent; and the disease, which had evi-
dently been more rapidly developed by his
cough, seemed daily to assume a more fear-
ful aspect. The following is an extract of
a letter sent about this time to Mrs. H. F.
M. Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio, May 24,
1851.

‘‘ With regard to the health of our family,



LEAVING SCIIOOL. | 33

we are all well, excepting our darling
James Arthur. He has been quite sick, for
some time, with a diseased heart. Within
a few weeks it has assumed quite an
alarming character, and we fear it will,
sooner or later, deprive us of the sweet
society of one who has ever been a bright
star in our happy ‘domestic constellation.
He has ever seemed a plant more fitted for
heaven than earth; and if my heavenly
Father has appointed to transplant him, in
all his angelic purity, to a clime more con-
genial, and a state more adapted to his
heavenly mind, may we view it right, and —
submit: with child-like resignation! True,
a vacancy would be made which nothing
else could fill; but the remembrance of
such a child would be sweet indeed, and
his name would be deeply engraved on the
tablet of each of our hearts. |

‘¢Q, could I not trust in God to ‘raise the
dead,’ this poor heart would burst! But the
sweet light of Jesus shines into my weep-



34 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ing soul, bidding every anguish to cease,
and every tear be dry.

‘The Lord is my helper, I will not fear.’ ”’

Our dear boy gradually recovered from
this epidemic, and by reason of a close ap-
plication to good medical advice, and the
unremitting care of the family, who were
ever anxious to render him all needed
assistance, he seemed not to suffer much
through the summer, although he was de-
prived of the privilege of attending school,
and was unable to engage much in his plays
out of doors. But, being well enough to
take short occasional journeys, and enjoy
his books, and the abundant articles for
his amusement which were constantly pro-
vided for him, he passed his time very
pleasantly, and was always contented and
happy. In September and October, he
appeared much recovered, insomuch that
his friends felt greatly encouraged to hope
that his life would be prolonged, and that
they should yet, for some time to come,



LEAVING SCHOOL. 35

enjoy the sweet society of him who ever
blessed the family circle. On the 7th of
October, he went, with his mother, again
to Hamilton, to visit his uncle, whose resi-
dence was upon a large farm, to spend a
few days among the ripened fruits. There
he always enjoyed himself very much, as it
was his delight to ramble in the open fields,
and watch the playful lambs and grazing
flocks. James was left at Hamilton to spend
a few days, while his mother was obliged to
return home. The following is an extract
from her diary :

** Oct. 19th. —I felt so very anxious
about, and so very lonely without, our dear
boy, that I could keep from him no longer.
So I took the cars, after dinner, and hied
me away to Hamilton. When I had come
in sight of the house, I saw the loved one
playing with his favorite ‘ pointer’ upon
the green grass. No sooner did his eye fall
upon me than he flew, with his dog after him,
to meet his ‘blessed mother.’ A happy
meeting it was for us both; and, although



6 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ou)

he had calculated to spend the rest of the
week, yet he was willing to return with me
this evening. O, precious child! what
should we do without him ?”’

While in H. he wrote a very interesting
letter to the family at home, and walked
nearly a mile, alone, to enjoy the pleasure
of putting it into the office himself. He
felt a great pride in being heard from, while
absent, in this way. He enjoyed his visit
much, and seemed as well after his return
as he had been for some time previous. He
had now so far regained his strength, that
he desired to attend school some of the
time, and engage in his lessons, to which
he had never failed, while at home, to give
considerable of his time and attention. And
through the kindness of Miss Lincoln, whose
school he had always attended, and who
kept very near his home, he went into her
school, some part of the time, for several
weeks. This was to him a happy privilege,
and he greatly enjoyed it. But, as the
weather grew colder, he began to be



THANKSGIVING. 37

troubled with a cough, and gradually to fail
in his general health. On the 6th of No-
vember, having a little cousin visiting him
from Maine, and being desirous to afford
her all the pleasure thit lay in his power,
he obtained the privilege of riding over to
the city to wait upon her to an ‘‘ice cream,”’
and give her the pleasant excursion of rid-
ing over to the city. This was the last time
he ever left his home. He soon became
quite feeble, and unable to go out at all.
The 13th of November was the last time he
ever went to the door to breathe the free
air of heaven; being unable, after that, to
be at all exposed. The 22d of November,
he became quite sick, and took his chamber,
to which he was confined, for most of the
time, until his death. He became more
comfortable,—so much so as to be with the
family on ‘‘ Thanksgiving Day,’’ and enjoy
their company in the evening, although he
was then so weak as to be obliged, for most
of the time, to recline upon the couch.
From this time until ‘‘Christmas,’’ he
4



38 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

seemed really to gain strength, insomuch
that he urged, and greatly enjoyed the ar-
rangements for, and the anticipation of, that
anniversary occasion. He was very happy
in the distribution*f his ‘‘ gifts,’’ and had
two handsome books procured for him, to
present to Dr. Crane and lady, as he felt
that it was through his kind instrumentality
that he was enabled to enjoy this pleasant
occasion with his friends on earth. Little
James looked forward with exquisite de-
light to the time when the ‘‘Tree’’ should
be dressed, on account of a ‘‘secret plot,”’
in the execution of which he had alone
invited his eldest sister to become engaged
with him. He had been laying by money,
for some time, to purchase presents for
‘¢ Christmas,’’ and he was desirous that

‘¢mother’’ should become a recipient of one -

of his choicest ‘‘ gifts.’ It was arranged
between the two that a fine gold bracelet
should be obtained, with a ‘‘spring locket,”’
and in it the likeness of little Jimmy. On

the back of the case was to be inscribed,
.



CHRISTMAS. 39

‘‘From Haley and Jimmey, to our dear
Mother.” This was to the ‘‘dear boy’ a
grand idea; but now the question was, how
was the likeness to be obtained? One more
must be let into the secret. The doctor
must be consulted, to know if James could
be allowed to ride a short distance from the
house, where there would be an opportu-
nity to have the daguerreotype taken pri-
vately. The doctor thought that if the
weather should be very pleasant, and he
should remain comfortable, he could be per-
mitted to go out to buy his ‘toys for pres:
ents,’’ and then he would have his likeness
taken. But in this plan he was disap-
pointed ; for the weather was unpleasant,
and he was not quite as well as he had been.
Now, there remained but one alternative,
and that was, for his father to be admitted
a member of the contemplated plan, and
ascertain if a guod copy could be obtained
from the likeness which was taken when he _
was between five and six years old. As
this was a very perfect likeness, it was at



40 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

once concluded upon that one could be
taken from it which would be equally as
good as to have it taken from the original ;
and so it proved. Christmas evening came,
the tree was dressed, and impatiently did
little James wait for his mother to retire,
after she had performed her part of the
labor, that he might have the ‘‘ box’’ con-
taining the famous bracelet placed upon
some conspicuous branch, so that it should
soon attract the intended owner’s attention.
When the signal was given, ‘¢ All is ready,”
James, in his father’s arms, headed the
company, and marched to the large, well-
lighted parlors, where stood the ‘Tree,’
heavily loaded with rich and well-selected
presents. And, although the inscriptions,
“James A.,’” and ‘Jimmy,’ were to be
seen upon articles on every part of the tree,
yet nothing could divert his attention from
Mother’s box. By his request, before the
time of ‘‘ gathering” had arrived, he was _
permitted to have the ‘‘ box”’ taken off, and
handed to Mother. As she was admiring



CHRISTMAS. 41

the beautiful workmanship, and expressing
her delight at receiving from her ‘ eldest
daughter’’ and ‘‘ youngest son’’ such a val-
uable present, he slyly stepped up, and
placed his tiny finger upon a secret spring,
when the bracelet opened, presenting our
darling’s face, natural as life.

The thrilling surprise, the interesting
sight, the presentiment that this was an
image of himself provided by one who was
soon to withdraw from these earthly scenes,
together with all the other attendant cir-
cumstances, drew a precipitous flow of tears
from the mother’s eyes, with which that of
all the family mingled. Even the little
designer of the delightful surprise was
obliged to dash, with his hand, a transient
tear from his eyes; but his soul feasted with
rich satisfaction on the consequence which
his gift to mother had assumed, and he smil-
ingly told her that father said ‘it would
make mother cry.”’

And now he was ready to assist in gather-
ing his own various ‘ gifts,’”’ consisting of

4*



42 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

a great variety of books, games of different
kinds, a choice collection of toys, &c. Xe.
All had been desirous to add their part for
‘¢ Jimmy.’ And when he had enjoyed,
with the family, all the pleasures of the
happy occasion, he retired, with his sensi-
tive heart filled with gratitude to God that
he had been favored with so rich an enter-
tainment; and the thought that he had been
so successful in ‘ pleasing mother ”’ seemed
to fill his soul with the purest pleasure.
After this, he continued very comfort-
able; so much so, that he was able to enjoy
his books, games and toys, for some weeks ;
and these, with his other means of amuse-
ment, added much to his comfort. He
possessed a natural taste for writing, draw-
ing, and painting, and had learned to work
with worsted, and knit and sew; therefore
he could occupy his time most pleasantly,
and never seemed lonely, or in the least
discontented. Indeed, he was as cheerful
as though he were in perfect health; and,
through all his sickness, he was never heard



REASONS OF CONTINUED HAPPINESS. 43

to complain, or utter a murmur. Even
after his ‘‘ vision,’ an account of which is
given in chapter v1., he seemed uniformly
happy, and would say, “*I feel that I have
two homes, one with the angels in heaven,
- and one with my friends on earth; and were
it not that you would be so lonesome with-
out me, I should rather be an angel in
heaven than live to suffer.’”’ This “ vision’?
afforded him much solid satisfaction. He
seemed to dive upon it; and so clear was
his mind at the time of its occurrence, that
he took great delight in contemplating upon
it. He continued quite comfortable, ex-
cepting that he suffered occasional pressure
and irritation of the lungs; and the dropsi-
cal affection, which had once been over-
come, again made its appearance. Simple
remedies were resorted to, which afforded
him much relief, and all his faculties re-
mained unimpaired. He never seemed to
consider himself ‘very sick,”’ although, at
times, he would speak of the probability of
his not getting well. He was always per-



44 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

fectly calm and reconciled; always express-
ing, in the most pleasant manner, his high
sense of gratitude for the kind attentions he
was constantly receiving, both from every
member of his own family and his numerous
circle of neighbors and friends. If the little .
sufferer erred in anything, it was in trying to
keep his feelings to himself, lest he might
cause ‘* work,’’ or ‘‘trouble.’”’ Every-
thing that was done for him was ‘‘ right,”
and all was always ‘‘very nice.” He
was not able to lie down for a week before
his death, but reclined in his easy-chair,
where he took all his rest. He seemed
very grateful that he could be made so com-
fortable, and would enjoy his rest quite nat-
urally; and in that chair he ‘‘fell asleep,”’
when everything, according to his direc-
tion, had been so ‘‘nicely’’ fixed.

The first Sunday in February he was able
to go into the ‘‘ study,’ and join in family
devotion; and greatly did he enjoy the in-
teresting occasion. The following, which
is the 106th hymn in the ‘‘ Family Sing-



GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 45

ing-book,’’ was sung for him, in which he
joined :
SICKNESS AND RECOVERY.
1 My God, thy service well demands
The remnant of my days ;

Why was this fleeting breath renewed,
But to renew thy praise ?

2 Thine arms of everlasting love
Did this weak frame sustain,

When life was hovering o’er the graye,
And nature sunk with pain.

3 I calmly bowed my fainting head
On thy dear, faithful breast,
And waited for my Father’s call
To his eternal rest.

4 Back from the borders of the grave,
At thy command, I come;

Nor will I ask a speedier flight
To my celestial home.

5 Where thou appointest mine abode
There would I choose to be ;

For in thy presence death is life,
And earth is heaven with thee.

He remained as comfortable as he had
been for a few days after this, but it soon
became apparent that he was not long to



46 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

remain a tenant of earth. His disease now
too plainly spoke of his approaching disso-
lution, and he appeared ‘‘ willing rather to
depart.’® Sunday, Feb. 22d, he was much
more weakened and debilitated than he ever
had been before, and for the first time dur-
ing his sickness passed a day without seem-
ing to notice and enjoy, in a greater or less
degree, what was passing arognd him. But
the application of warm baths and other
restoratives relieved him, and rendered him
more comfortable. Sunday night his rest
was more disturbed, and he still remained
very weak, but perfectly sensible to every-
thing that was done for him, and in posses-
sion of his natural pleasant and endearing
traits. Monday morn, when his father, on
leaving for his office, exchanged with him,
as was his wont, the kiss of affection,.and
asked him what he should bring him home
that day, he mildly, and for the first time,
answered, ‘‘nothing.’”’ He seemed done
with earth, and no longer asked for its sup-
port. And so it was ; for he never requested



GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 47

anything after that, but his simple drinks,
and a choice kind of jelly which was sent
him on Saturday. Monday afternoon he
revived, and spoke of the boys playing un-
der his window as he had been acéustomed
to speak of them through his sickness, and
seemed not at all disturbed by them. About
nine o’clock, Monday evening, he suffered
much from pain of the lungs and heart,
more than he ever had before. It was soon
relieved by the application of hot baths, so
that for a few hours before his death he
seemed free from pain and distress, and
expressed himself as feeling ‘* very happy.”
The applications which had been made dur-
ing the last three weeks had very much
relieved his breathing, so that in this respect
he was greatly benefited. About ten min-
utes before one, he asked: for sweetened
water, which he took and drank, saying,
“‘that’s good.” Then he requested to have
his pillow* “ fixed,’’ that he might ‘* rest
‘his head.’”’ It was accordingly arranged,
when he gently laid his head upon it, say



48 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ing, ‘that’s nice,’ and fell more quietly
asleep than he had done for many hours
before. But it was a ‘‘sweet sleep,” of |
which he had often spoken,— it was the
peaceful sleep of death. And when the
family were called to look upon him, he
appeared like one in the gentle unbroken
slumber, while that sweet, angelic smile of
content was still visible upon his mild and
tranquil countenance. It did not at all
seem as though death had visited us, but
that the angels had truly come, and escorted
home the one whom they had before desired
to come and be with them, and wear the
wreath they had prepared for him. And
O, death was to him a sweet release, and
he had desired it! His sufferings were o’er,
and our souls felt to say, ‘‘ The Lord hath
done as it seemeth to him good.”” Amen!

After his death, a ‘‘ post-mortem”’ exam-
ination took place, when the true nature of
his case was known. ‘The disease was
found to be of the heart, and of a very
decided character. The attending phy-



GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 49

sicians thought it the most so of any case
of a child that had ever come under their
observation. The heart was nearly siz
times larger than it should have been. The
‘‘ mitral valve”’ of the left auricle of the
heart had become so thickened that it was
almost entirely closed. The natural func-
tions of this organ had not been performed
for a great length of time; consequently
the system had gradually become weakened,
and prepared-to admit, without a struggle,
the transit of its heavenly tenant.

This disease must have been produced,
originally, by inflammation from some cause,
and no cause can seem so probable as that
produced by the accident before referred to.
James was a remarkably healthy child, hay-
ing never had a sick day until the develop-
ment of the complaint of which he died. It
is thought that-the whooping-cough acceler-
ated the development of his disease, which
had been gradually coming upon him for
two years previous.

It was a great satisfaction to know, on

5



50 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

examination, that nothing could have been
done, which was not done, to meet the cir-
cumstances of the case, or relieve his suf-
ferings. It was the most unremitting care
and attention, together with the best of
medical advice, that had so long preserved
his life, and rendered him, for most of the
time, measurably comfortable. And we felt
that we had reason for gratitude to God,
that he was not permitted to suffer with
protracted pain and distress. Though his
sufferings seemed at times severe, yet his
mind was so elevated, so strong in faith and
trained in contentment, that he was enabled
to pass his time pleasantly, and even said
he thought himself ‘‘ the happiest little boy
on the island.’’ On seeing his mother be-
tray signs of grief on account of his occa-
sional apparent sufferings, he would assure
her that she had no cause of. sorrow,— that
he did not suffer as she supposed,— that
God was good and would take care of him,
and he was happy. Such is the power of
enlightened faith in God, even in the child.



GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. O51

And O, that beautiful exit! O, precious
Gospel faith! I will love thee more than
ever, because thou didst bless the life, to
its last mortal moment, of my darling boy,
and didst sweetly bear him on, that he should
‘‘never die!’’ Gently he passed away, con-
voyed by those beautiful angels, who had
already borne to him the glad message of
life immortal, and shown to him the cloud-
_less glories of that celestial paradise above,

‘** Where sickness never comes,
Where grief no more complains,
Health triumphs in immortal bloom,
And purest pleasure reigns.’’

Nors. — I have spoken of James Arthur’s love of Scripture
reading, and his appreciation of its meaning. When I was
reading to him, during his last sickness, of Jesus’ entry into
Jerusalem, and of the hosannas uttered by children on the
way, he was so much pleased with the Saviour’s kind recep-
tion of children’s praise that he desired a request to be com-
municated to our pastor, Rev. C. H. Webster, that, on the
first Sunday he should be able to attend meeting, he would
preach from the words, ‘‘ Out of the mouths of babes and
sucklings thou hast perfected praise.’? He never became
able to attend church again ; but Br. Webster, to whom the
little boy had even personally preferred the request, made
that the foundation of a most profitable discourse, on the first
Sabbath the family attended public worship after his decease.



CHAPTER II.
THE COMMUNION.

In the arrangement of this work, I have
chosen the method which was most conven-
ient to myself, and was judged to be most
likely to interest,and edify the reader. In
the first chapter I have given a brief me-
moir of the life of James Arthur, in gen-
eral; and then I have devoted other chap-
ters to illustrate incidents and striking traits
of character, which, though in some cases
involving partial repetitions, render the
work as a whole more valuable than would
the crowding of all into a continuous nar-
rative. ,

From the first lispings of little James, he
ever manifested much pleasure in conversa-
tion on the life and mission of Jesus. He
would sit hours, and hear instruction in the
form of stories on the Saviour’s birth, mir-



THE COMMUNION. 53

acles, crucifixion, and resurrection. And he
thus became early acquainted with the pur-.
pose of the Saviour’s advent; and very
early, too, he expressed that faith in the
saving grace of the Son of God which
would well become an older Christian.
After he was old enough to attend meet-
ing on the Sabbath, he early became much
interested in all the exercises, and his
powers of observation were great. And so
often, when very small, had he expressed
his desire to partake of the sacrament, that
his mother would let him retire, to avoid
his discriminating questions, which had pen-
etrated her heart with a feeling of regret
that he could not be permitted to enjoy the
privilege he had seemed so much to desire.
On the first Sunday in June, 1850, James
attended meeting with his mother at father
Streeter’s. It was communion day. At
the close of the pulpit services, father
Streeter, as is his custom, invited all who
‘love our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ”’
to unite with them in this interesting com-

5*



54 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

memoration of his death, and of his love for
mankind. Little James very attentively
listened to all that was said, and then, turn-
ing to his mother, with a Christian smile
upon his countenance, and a heart swelling
with gratitude to God for the opportunity
of enjoying such a happy season, he said,
**Mother, J love our Lord and Saviour
Jesus Christ; can’t I partake with you?”
The appeal was powerful, and the earnest-
ness and sincerity with which it was made
sank deep into the mother’s heart. Struck
with his reasoning, and knowing his wish to
join in this beautiful service, from a pure
desire to show forth his love to Christ, his
wish was granted. And there, with the
aged, middle-aged and young, did this
child, but seven years old, sit with his
whole soul wearing the appearance of the
most devout meditation, and partake of
these sacred emblems! And no one pres-
ent seemed more perfectly satisfied with
this expressive ceremony.

Some, who had seen the child engage in



THE COMMUNION. 55

this interesting service, spoke with his
mother at the close’of the meeting, as
though they thought it to be a mother’s
indulgence to the whim of a thoughtless
child. But, on being made acquainted
with his deep religious character, and the
argument by which he urged his appeal,
they were melted to tears; and then,
instead of rebuke, they gave him the right
hand of Christian fellowship, which he re-
ceived, and with emotion, assuring them
that he loved the Saviour. On his way
from church, his happiness was great, that
he had now enjoyed what he had so long
desired, and he expressed a hope that ‘‘ as
soon as he was old enough he should become
a member of the church.’? And when his
health was such that he was not able to
attend meeting on the holy Sabbath, and
would read and have read to him of the
history of Christ, he would seem comforted
that he had shown to the world his love for
him by partaking of his holy sacrament.
And what a solace, when sickness had long



56 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

prevented this devout child of God from
attending the sanctuary of his Father in
heaven, to think that he had been indulged
the blessed privilege as above related!

O, sweet the memory, thou precious one,

Now that thy work so well on earth js done,

Of those communings, in thy truthful love,

With Him whom thou hast joined in worlds above,



CHAPTER III.
JOURNEY TO MAINE, AND THE LOST HAT.

Sucu was the amiableness of little ‘‘ Jim-
my’s’’ disposition, and the interest and
sympathy which he ever manifested for
others, that he never failed to gain the
attention and sympathy of those around
him. If he was travelling, and met with
persons who seemed to be needy, he was
ever anxious in some way to render them
assistance ; and hence he was always meet-
ing with every attention which the noble
and generous know well how to appreciate.

In the summer of 1850 he look a jour-
ney, in company with his mother, to the
State of Maine, to visit their friends in
Hallowell, Augusta, and Waterville. And
although then but seven years old, instead
of being, as most children would have been
at this age, a ‘‘ care,”” he was not only the '



58 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

best of company, but a great assistant in
taking charge of the baggage, and in other
attentions. In the evening he would seek
a place alone with his mother, upon the
deck of the steamer, and for hours visit the
stars and the planets, marking their regu-
larity, and admiring their loveliness and
grandeur. He would look at them as the
‘‘eyes of God,” and the « language of Om-
nipotent Power.,”’ ‘‘ Mother,”’? he would
say, “do you see them twinkle at us, as
though they were pleased that we are en-
Joying them so well? And perhaps God is
talking to us through them.’’ These were
ideas of his own; and the philosophical and
devotional converse greatly added to the
enjoyment of his mother, who could never
be an hour in the presence of this little rea-
soner, without feeling that she was made
better. His conversation would elevate her
mind to Him who established for the sun
and moon their eternal stations, and ap-
pointed to the stars their unvarying spheres,
James had designated the moon as the rep-



HALLOWELL. — AUGUSTA. 59

resentative of his ‘‘ mother,’’ and her bright
attendant planet as that of ‘‘Jimmy;’’ and
by these names he would be delighted to
address them. And he would often speak
of the time when he should go to the spirit
world, where he should know more of the
beauty of those heavenly bodies than he
could ever know here. Indeed, heaven
was the place where his hopes seemed
always to centre.

Little James and his mother _— in
Hallowell on the morning of July 10th.
He took much interest in perambulating
the place where his mother had spent the
early part of her life, and particularly did
he enjoy the Sabbath-school, where she
gave an account of her own religious expe-
rience. She referred to the time when she
stood alone in that place, not enjoying the
society of a single female associate who
dared to ‘name the name of Christ’’
‘*the Saviour of all men,’’ and God as the
Father” and Friend of all. He was led to
contrast her opportunities with his own, and



60 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

seemed much to realize how great were his
Sources of enjoyment in this respect.

He visited his friends in Augusta; and
there are those there who will long remem-
ber his strong sympathies and deep religious
feelings.

On Monday morning, July 22d, he started,
in company with his mother, for Waterville,
by the steamer Balloon. The morning was
serene and pleasant, and he was greatly de-
lighted in passing the new-mown fields, and
beholding the rich display of corn and grain
Which so beautifully dressed the rich and
fertile banks of the Kennebec. As we ad-
vanced, his eyes were constantly upon the
stretch to behold new and increasing beau-
ties; and his whole soul was «“ tremblingly
alive’’ to participate in the sublimity of the
scene, and love and adore the illimitable
goodness of Him who ‘‘ maketh his sun to
rise on the evil and on- the good, and
sendeth rain on the just and on the un-
just.”’

His visit in Waterville was to him pecu-



WATERVILLE. 61

liarly interesting. There he visited the
spot where his parents first commenced the
pleasant task of ‘‘ house-keeping ;’’ and
there he visited the first house his father
ever builded for himself and family. He
visited there, with his mother, the graves of
those whom she had loved, and with whom,
in former years, she had held sweet inter-
course on earth; and there did he mingle
his tears with hers, as they read the names
and epitaphs of those whom memory held
most dear. To the mind of James there
was nothing dark or gloomy in a visit like
this; for his happy mind would never look
down into the grave, but, upon the wings
of faith, it would soar aloft, where Christ
and angels dwell.

He also took much interest in calling on
those who had heard his father preach thirty
years before, and who were living upon the
riches to be enjoyed in a practical belief of
the truth as it is in Jesus. And Mr. and
Mrs. Morrill, with whom he made his home
while in Waterville, will never forget his

6



62 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

strong attachment to them, and the hours
he would spend with ‘‘ Grandpa Morrill,’’ as
he was pleased to call him, conversing with
him upon various subjects, until he would
push his little arguments to where the old
gentleman would confess himself ‘ almost
wound up.”’ But, although his ‘‘ perceptive ”’
and ‘‘reflective’’ faculties were so large as
to give him great advantage in conversa-
tion, yet his large conscientiousness and
benevolence, united with remarkable venera-
tion, would always give to his whole tone
such a perfect air of sweetness and respect-
ful love, that no one could converse with him
without becoming both pleased and inter-
ested.

After having spent a few days very
pleasantly in Waterville, James started, with
his mother, in the same steamer, on Thurs-
day, July 24th, to return to Hallowell. The
afternoon was delightfully pleasant, and the
fresh breeze, with the tide and steam, car-
ried us rapidly on our way. The company
on board was not large, but very pleasant,



*
THE DISCUSSION. 63

and such as suited the taste of little James.
Many on board soon became much interested
in his manly tone of conversation; and,
upon his giving a very interesting lecture
upon the subject of tobacco, seeing it was
pretty freely used by many of the gentle-
men, some were actually induced, for that
time at least, out of respect to him, to lay
it away. One gentleman, who urged his
argument on the ground of its making him
more healihy, was much pleased with the
manner in which his young antagonist met
him. Said James, ‘“‘My father never
chewed a grain of tobacco, nor smoked a
cigar, in his life, and he is fifty years old,
and he never was sick.’ The gentleman
gave in that ‘‘James had the floor.’? The
conversation passed very pleasantly, as some
who heard him at that time, and who may
read these pages, will undoubtedly recol-
lect; especially when he gave an account
of his religious belief, of the doctrines he
should preach should he conclude to follow
the profession of his father, and of the hap-



64 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

piness which he had always enjoyed in
‘* doing good.”’

About this time there had been a severe
freshet on the Kennebec, and much loss of
property had been realized by the large
quantity of logs which had been carried
away by the strong and rapid current: and,
of the company on board, there were a
number whose business it was to rescue for
the owners these floating timbers. Now
our little boy was much delighted, as the
sight to him was somewhat novel, to see
these large members of the forest come sail-
ing so leisurely and carelessly along, with-
out sail or rudder. While the boat was
‘hauled up”’ at one of her stopping-places
to ‘‘ take in freight,’ James was very pleas-
antly amusing himself in seeing those mast-
less ‘‘ craft’’ pass so very unceremoniously
by, without giving to their Superiors the
least attention. As he stood gazing in this
way, suddenly he gave a loud cry, and a
dozen voices at once gave the alarm, ‘‘ Lit-
tle James’ hat is overboard!” “‘ Down with



THE LOST HAT. 65

the boat!’’ ‘‘Get the hat !’’ ‘*Get the hat!”’
was the word. Poor little James wept
aloud to see his beautiful ‘‘ light beaver,”’
which he had so much admired, and for
which he had even been complimented by
the present company, very grandly sailing
down the Kennebec, entirely regardless of
the pain and disappointment it was inflicting
on its young and agonized owner. Just at
this moment, when all hope of rescue was
abandoned, a light and nimble-footed log-
man, who stood first in his profession, caught
a spear, and jumped upon a log which had
at that moment chosen to come within step-
ping distance. Ina moment, to the delight
of some and the terror of others on board,
he was fast sailing down the rapid stream,
upon this single log of a few feet in length,
and only a spear to guide or balance with.
All was anxiety on board, while a deep
interest was felt for the dear boy, who stood
looking, with tearful eyes, upon his favorite
floating hat, which had now gone the dis-
tance of half a mile. ‘‘ He will be drowned!”
6*



66 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

cried one ; —‘‘ No, he will get the hat,’’ re-
sponded another; and presently the sound
came with joyous peal, ‘‘ He has got it!—
he has got it!’’ A thrill of pleasure seemed
to pervade all hearts, as he elevated upon
his spear the rescued treasure. It was then
placed upon the log for ‘safe keeping,”’
and, with a skill which but few could equal,
he *‘neared”’ the boat, which had now pro-
ceeded on her way, but which ‘‘ hove to”’
for his accommodation; and, having gained
his ‘‘hold,”’ he relinquished his temporary
craft, and, amid shouts of joy, delivered to
Master James the loved lost hat. All were
delighted at his success, while the young
owner seemed perfectly overcome with
gratitude and love for the one who had so
nobly sacrificed his own ease and braved
danger for his sake. After the hat had been
safely deposited in a proper place to be
dried, and James had been furnished with
one for temporary use, he very manfully and
thoughtfully took from his pocket his wal-
let, and, taking out a two-dollar bill, which:



THE LOST HAT. . 67

he said he had received for being good at
school, he insisted that the gentleman should
take half of it, at least. ‘* No, no, my no-
ble boy,” said the generous man, ‘‘ you
have more than paid me; and the thought
that I could please so good a boy as you is
the best pay I want.’’ Little James, seeing
he could not prevail upon the gentleman to
take the money, told him he should ‘‘ send
him a book, to remunerate him for his kind-
ness,’’ — a promise which he did not for-
get. The hat was dried, and before the
boat arrived at Hallowell it was replaced
upon his head, and again he looked like
‘* Master James.”’

This little hat was ever held by him, after
this remarkable adventure, with feelings of
deep interest; and even when it had ceased
to perform its accustomed office, he had it
carefully laid away, to be kept as a remem-
brance of his pleasant visit to Maine, and
the ‘‘ lost hat.”’



CHAPTER IV.
HIS LOVE OF PRAYER.

THE subject of prayer, beautiful as it is,
is seldom appreciated according to the great
and happy results of its sincere and rational
exercise. How elevating to the mind, how
soothing to the feelings, and how strength-
ening to the whole spiritual being, is the
devout aspiration of the soul, when, in con-
fidence and love, we can approach the
throne of divine grace in holy supplication
and prayer! But we come not to our heay-
enly Father in this attitude as if our prayers
could affect his purposes and designs, or his
will concerning us.

It has been a question in curious minds,
If the Deity is not to be influenced by our
supplications, of what use is prayer? Prayer
is an appointed means of drawing the soul
to God, nourishing holy affections, trans-



LOVE OF PRAYER. 69

ferring in a measure the power of God to
the feeble suppliant, and placing us in an
attitude to receive and enjoy Heaven’s loy-
ing favors. Prayer is the outstretched hand
by which we take hold of the Almighty arm,
and find rest in his love. If we believed
that our prayers could change the mind of
God, we should hardly dare to pray; for we
are incompetent to direct the counsels of
Jehovah. But, with our faith in God, and
our blissful appreciation of the purpose of
prayer, we can ‘‘pray always,’’ and pray
in faith, assured that our communions will
be the medium of the good unto which they
are appointed.

It was in this way that little James al-
ways seemed to enjoy near and sweet com-
munion with his Father in heaven. From
his infancy he ever manifested a deep love
for this delightful exercise, and a strong and
natural desire to engage in it. And when
the members of the household were assem-
bled for family devotion, such was the sin-
cere and devout manner in which he always



70 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

joined in this pleasant exercise, that his
infant mind would rise in unison with those
much older than himself, and seem equally
to enjoy the high satisfaction which fervent
prayer is calculated to impart. It was his
invariable rule to fold his hands, close his
eyes, and seemingly to shut from his mind
and thoughts everything which might inter-
fere with a state of feeling appropriate to
the sacredness and solemnity of the occa-
sion.

For himself, when alone, or in company
with his mother, or any one who might have
the immediate care of him, at his appointed
time he would repeat the *‘Lord’s prayer,”’
until after the severe attack which com-
menced his last sickness, which was on
Saturday night, May 24, 1851. He had
been very sick through the first part of the
night, insomuch that his physician thought
his recovery doubtful. But as morning
approached, he became quite comfortable :
and having enjoyed some quiet rest, he felt
much refreshed. As his mother sat by him



LOVE OF PRAYER. 71

the next morning, he very smilingly looked
up, and said, ‘‘ Mother, as God has been so
kind as to relieve me of my distress, and
let me live longer with you, I think I ought
to say something more than my little prayer
that I have always said when I was well.”’
He then requested that his mother would
begin from that time, and pray with him
every day, until he could learn to pray him-
self. His request was granted, and he
chose the place for this pleasant meeting of
mother and child, with the promise that it
should never be neglected, and that, should
he not live, the same place should be daily
visited by his ‘*‘ dear mother,’’ where, he
said, his spzri¢t should always meet her.
Another request was, that the prayer should
always close with the same words, so that
he could join in the conclusion of the sup-
plication, He requested that it should end
thus, ‘*‘ which favors we ask for Christ’s
sake. Amen.’’ This request was granted ;
and as long as his strength would permit
him to speak, he never omitted to repeat



12 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

simultaneously these words. And after his
recovery from this severe attack, so much
did he appreciate this daily communion, he
requested that, when convenient, it might
be enjoyed in the morning, before leaving
the room, that nothing might interfere to
carry it far into the day. He felt that God
. should have our morning thanks, and that
we should ask for guidance from him through
the day; and if, from any circumstance, this

exercise was for a short time omitted in the ©

first part of the day, he would say, ‘‘ Mother,
I do not feel happy until we have prayed.”’
Indeed, prayer seemed to become a part of
his life, and was the medium of much, very
much, of his permanent enjoyment. And he
would often wish that he could have “ all
the little boys,’’ who were not learned to
pray, ‘‘ come in,’’ and be taught, as he had |
been, to look to God in prayer. ‘‘ I know,”’
he would say, ‘‘if they would learn to pray,
they would not then swear about God.’’
And often would he express his gratitude
that he had early been taught to pray, and



»

LOVE OF PRAYER. 73

to pray to God as his Father and Friend.
And during his last sickness, when unfavor-
able sensations in the evening would render
him apprehensive that he should have an
uncomfortable night, and when, after his
‘‘sweet prayer,’’ as he called it, he would
fall quietly asleep, often the first sound that
would greet the ears of her who was always
by his side would be the outburstings of his
thankful heart, as he awoke in the night
from his peaceful slumber, ‘‘ Mother, has
not God heard our prayer?’”’ ‘‘I think he
has.’’ ‘* Have not the angels watched
around my pillow ?’’ And then, with confid-
ing love, he would again fall quietly asleep,
and the morning light would again echo with
the sweet praises of his thankful heart; and
thus, from day to day, and from night to
night, would he live in the exercise of that
faith in holy communion with God, which
gave to his young heart the enjoyment of
the Father’s presence, and the assurance of
his unfailing love. |

After his heavenly ‘‘ vision’ (for which

7



74 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

see chapter vi.), and his communion with
those ‘‘ beautiful angels,’ he felt that he
must go still further; he felt that God had
done still more for him, and that he must
do more to serve God; and by his request
the family were assembled for evening de-
votion, and this sainted child led in one of
the most devout and earnest strains of prayer —
and praise that ever came from the lips of
mortal man. He was so divinely assisted
that no fear seemed in the least to impair
his voice or check his words. And it was
not anything that he had learned, or any
common form of words, but it was the out-
gushing of heavenly and sincere desires,
including all ranks, conditions, and circum-
stances of his heavenly Father’s children,
with the earnest wish that ‘‘ they might de
good, and live to do good.’’ And often
after this, until his sweet release from earth,
would he lead the family in the same holy
and devout exercise. The day before his
departure from earth, for the first time for
almost a year, he was too feeble to join in



LOVE OF PRAYER. 15

all the closing part, in which he had so
much delighted to participate vocally. But
his hearty ‘‘ amen”’ will never be forgotten.
This was the last time his devoted mother
enjoyed this blessed privilege with this
precious child of heaven. He was resting
upon his couch, reclining his feeble head
upon his ‘* dear mother,’’ when for the last
time her voice was lifted in prayer with this
dear treasure, which she felt was soon to be
_ removed from earthly sounds, to join in ho-
_ lier prayer and praise around that bright and
spotless throne, where, with pure, seraphic
beings, he had even here held sweet com-
munion. And, seeming himself to read her
prayer, and feel that he was soon to unite with
Christ and his angels in higher spheres, he
gave his cordial ‘‘ amen,’’ and remained for
a while in silent thought. Knowing how
very weak he was, he was permitted to
enjoy his own silent and heavenly contem-
plations.

This was nearly noon, on Monday. Mon-
day night, when he with the rest of the



76 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

family had urged his mother to retire to
another apartment for the first time, for
brief repose, she went to him, and found
him so feeble that she thought she would
bid him a “ good-night,’’ and wait for fur-
ther communion until she should join him,
according to appointment, at one o’clock.
But, after leaving the room, fearing he
might wish to join in some expression be-
fore she retired, she returned, and, after
receiving and imprinting the last kiss, she
put her mouth to his ear, assuring him that
‘‘the angels would take care of us,’’ to which
he sweetly responded. And it was even
so; for when she again looked upon that
dear face, the angels had taken care of him,
and sweetly conveyed him home, where a
mother’s prayers were no longer needed,
but where He who said, ‘of such is the
kingdom of heaven,’’ would perfect that
praise which was so beautifully and faith-
. fully commenced on earth!



CHAPTER V.

VISIT TO WORCESTER, AND THE LITTLE
PAPER-BOY.

Litre James was always much pleased to
travel, and especially so when his ride would
take him into the country. He was agreat
admirer of nature, and always took much
delight in viewing the goodness of his
heavenly Father, as manifested through his
beautiful and manifold works.

As his father had an appointment to
preach in Worcester on the third Surday in
August, 1851, it was proposed that James
and his mother should accompany him.
This suited the dear boy much, as it was so
pleasant a season of the year to journey
through the country, and behold the beau-
ties of nature. On the way to W., Satur- —
day afternoon, one of the most violent
thunder-storms for the season was experi-

:



78 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

enced, and the rain fell in torrents. This
James also enjoyed; for, from his infancy,
he had always loved the sound of the thun-
der-storm;— and even when danger was
apprehended, so much would he love to
hear the most terrific thunder, that he would
be unwilling to leave the window where he
could behold it in all its fulness and grand-
eur. And this was the last time he looked
upon the full and perfect rainbow. This,
too, was a sight which always filled him
with satisfaction and delight. It would
seem to inspire him with renewed confi-
dence in Him whose promise is so beauti-
fully read in that bright emblem of his
parental faithfulness which he has “set in
the cloud.”’

On arriving at Worcester, the scene was
admirable beyond description. The setting
sun was just leaving his last sweet tint
upon the western sky, while the full-orbed
moon was gently rising in all her silent
majesty, humbly waiting to resume her
reign, when the sun should resign his



ENJOYMENT OF THE SABBATH. 79

throne. The deep-green foliage with which
this pleasant city is so richly ornamented
was hanging in sparkling drops, beautifully
representing heaven’s choicest diamonds,
while the feathered songsters were vocal
with the praise of Him whose love and
goodness is felt

‘‘Tn the void waste, as in the city full.”

The happy mind of James, which had
been a lively participant in all the rich
variety of scenery, was filled to overflow-
ing ; and when he laid his head upon his
pillow, his infant voice was heard in offer-
ing his evening thanks to that beneficent
Being who had kindly given him a heart to
feel and a soul to enjoy.

The following Sunday was one of na-
ture’s choicest days, and early was James
ready for the sanctuary. As the place of
meeting was near, and he was kindly as-
sisted, he was able to attend church all day,
a privilege which he had not enjoyed for
some time before, and which he never en-





80 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

joyed afterwards, as his feeble state of
health would not admit of his attending
more than one service on a Sabbath. He
was very happy, and at the close of the day
he remarked, ‘‘ This has been the happiest
day I ever spent.’’? The thought that he
had been able to attend meeting all day,
and hear his ‘‘dear father preach,’’ and
witness the deep interest manifested as the
gospel was presented in its fulness and
glory, filled him with that which

‘* Nothing earthly gives or can destroy,
The soul’s calm sunshine and a heartfelt joy.”

Monday, too, was a continuation of that
series of sweet summer days, which are
often realized after copious rains, and at
the full of the moon. As James had been
promised a pleasant ride, by Esquire Green,
of Worcester, who owns a delightful coun-
try-seat about two miles from the city, he
was early dressed for the excursion. As
he was sitting by the window of his cham-
ber, which looked out upon the main street,



THE LITTLE PAPER-BOY. 81

he saw a little, lame, hump-backed boy
coming up to the hotel with the morning
papers. He immediately left the room,
and soon returned with a paper for his
mother, which he had purchased of ‘* the
poor little lame boy.’ No sooner had he
delivered that, than his sympathies for the
meek and dependent looking boy induced
him to go down and buy another, which he
brought to his father. He then wished to
know ‘‘if he might not buy a number more,
as he had money enough with him, which
had been given him for being good, and he
wanted to do good with it.”” But, on being
told’ that, as they were all of one kind, he
might again encourage his ‘‘ poor boy”’ the
next morning, he was willing to wait, by
assuring him that he should not be for-
gotten.

One fine and commendable trait in the
character of young James was, that he
always sympathized with the unfortunate ;
and often would his playmates, and even
those to whom he was inferior in size, re-



82 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ceive from him a gentle rebuke for unkind
words or rude treatment to those who were
lame or unfortunate. And often has he left
his play with the ‘‘boys,’’ and retired to
his own yard, with a little deaf boy of his
own neighborhood, and played with him
alone, because others would halloo in his
ears and hector him. And this little ‘¢ pa-
per-boy”’ was never forgotten by his young
and sympathizing friend. When, after his
decease, his little things which had amused
him in his last sickness were looked over
to be arranged agreeably to his request, the
wallet was found, which he had carefully
laid away to carry, if he should be able to
visit Worcester the next summer, to give to
the deformed ‘‘ paper-boy.’’ This he had
purposed, because, when he bought his pa-
pers of him, he had no purse for his money,
and he was afraid he might lose some of his
change.

After James had read the morning news,
Esquire Green called, with his carriage, and
James (with his little whip, which he had



THE RIDE TO ESQUIRE GREEN’S. 83

purchased the day before he left home,
thinking he might have an opportunity to
use it), accompanied by his mother, took a
seat for his ride. He was pleased with the
privilege of driving the ‘ family horse,’’
while the opening beauties around seemed
to inspire him with new and increased
strength. On arriving at the residence of
Esquire Green, he was delighted with the
beautiful flowers and trees, and the rich
berries and fruits, which were abundantly
presented on every side. And here, for
the first time in his life, he saw ripe apples
shaken from the tree; and so delighted was
the good old gentleman that the sight so
much pleased his young visiter, that he
almost robbed his ‘‘ early favorite tree’’ of
its ripened contents, to allow him to run
after and pick them up. This was to James
a rich treat. He walked around, plucking
the flowers, and partaking of the rich ber-
ries and fruits, and enjoying the wide-
extended scenery. After partaking of
further hospitalities, he returned with a



84 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

light heart to his temporary home. In the
afternoon he was accompanied to another
part of the city, where, having everything
to add to his enjoyment, he passed the rest
of the day in accordance with his own hap-
py feelings.

His visit was made very agreeable to
him, as his home was at Wait’s Temperance
Hotel, one of the best houses in the coun-
try. The circumstance that he could be at
a ‘*public house’’ for a number of days,
and not witness any « drinking,’’ or
‘swearing,’’ not only filled him with sur-
prise, but added much to his enjoyment.

Tuesday morning, leaving his father in
Worcester, and with a heart filled with
gratitude to God for the enjoyment of such
a visit, he returned with his mother to
Boston, saying, ‘‘I never shall forget my
visit to Worcester.”’



CHAPTER VI.
THE VISION.

On Saturday evening, Dec. 6th, 1851,
between two and three months before his
death, as he was thought to be dying, little
James was favored with a most remarkable
vision of the spirit-world. An account of
it was published in the Christian Freeman
of Dec. 19th, 1851, and its obvious traits of
reality have carried the richest comfort to
the hearts of many, whom it has confirmed
in the assurance that our departed friends,
though invisible to us in the body, can
draw nigh to us, and take an interest in
our welfare. Many have been the mani-
festations, especially to children, at or near
the closing moment, which are reasonably
regarded as the real greetings of friends
from the land they are about entering,—
coming in, not as a link in a visible chain

8



86 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

of present circumstances and suggestions,
but as a foreign incident ; and also present-
ing views, thoughts and words, above the
natural conceptions of the little child.

The account of the vision of which I speak
was written in the form of a letter to Mrs.
H. F. M. Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio; and as
it was written immediately after the event,
and under the promptings of the little boy,
I transcribe it in this place.

THE VISION.
East Boston, Dec. 11th, 1851.

SistseR Brown: This is indeed the
Castle of Peace and the home of blessed-
ness; and, although trials and sorrows
have visited us for a few weeks past, yet
great has been our joy and peace. Our
heavenly Father has seen fit, in his all-
wise providence, to lay his chastening hand
upon us; nevertheless his loving kindness
he has not withheld.

Our little darling boy Jimmy, whom you
will remember, has been for several weeks -



THE VISION. 87

very sick, and twice have we thought that
we should very soon be deprived of his
sweet and valuable society. His sickness
is enlargement of the heart, occasioned, as
we suspect, by a kick from a horse, which
he received, while at play upon the green,
about three years ago. Within a year it
has assumed a somewhat dangerous form ;
and recently, owing to a severe cough, it
has reduced him to a very feeble state.
But he is a happy child; and although, for
the last eight months, he has not been able
to attend school, or enjoy the usual plays
with his little mates, yet he never has been
heard to offer one murmur or complaint.
And even now, when his sufferings have
been great, not a word of complaint has
escaped his lips. He has ever been calm
and reconciled, always manifesting the
greatest confidence in the unerring wisdom’
of his Father in heaven. You undoubtedly
recollect his philosophical reasoning upon
the character and purposes of God, as ex-
hibited when you visited us, nearly two



88 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

years since. That same development of
mind has grown with his growth and
strengthened with his strength; and, in
his present sickness, the workings of his
little mind have been wonderful indeed.
Iie has never expressed the least fear of
death, and has viewed it as a ‘* sweet fall-
ing asleep ;’’ and the only regret he has
expressed was, that he thought we should
feel lonesome without him.

And now, sister Brown, could you have
enjoyed the happy scene which we were
permitted to enjoy with this child of faith
and holy trust, on Saturday evening last,
you would have felt that you were admitted
to the entertainment of angels. He had
been more unwell than usual through the
day; and, towards evening, when alone
with his eldest sister, he calmly looked up
and said, smilingly, ‘‘ Haley, I think this is
the /ast night I shall spend with you.” He
was perfectly calm and reconciled, and
said, ‘* When I am an angel, I shall not
suffer as I now do;’’ and he promised, if



THE VISION. 89

he did go to heaven first, he ‘* would come
and be one of our guardian angels.’’ Soon
after this, he closed his eyes, and, while
laboring hard for breath, he exclaimed,
‘¢O, what a beautiful sight! See those
little angels!’’ He was asked what they
were doing. ‘* Why, they have hold of
hands, and are dancing in a circle around
me, with wreaths on their heads. O,
how happy they look! and they are whis-
pering to each other. One of them says,
‘Jimmy has been a good litile boy, and
we would like to have him come and be
with us.’? Soon, he seemed delighted,
and said, ‘‘See, there come some older
angels, two at one end, and two at the
other.” Do you know who they are? he
was asked. ‘‘ Yes, uncle Eben is one (a
very dear uncle of his who died about six
months since) ; but there are a whole row
of older ones now standing behind the little
ones.”’ He was asked if any of them were
speaking to him.

‘Yes; but I can’t tell you as they tell

8*



90 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

me, for they sing it beautifully. We can’t
sing so.”’

He was then asked to ¢ed/ what they said.

‘Keep still,”’ said he; ‘don’t talk,
and I will listen and tell you.”’

‘‘They say, ‘Come, little Jimmy, and
be happy with us.’ ”’

‘¢Grandma is speaking now. She says,
‘You are a good little boy, Jimmy ; and if
you come now, I will take care of you.’ ”’

‘¢ Uncle Eben is speaking now,”’ said he.
‘He says Eunice and Hitty have been here ©
to-day [these were his two daughters, who
had spent the night with us]. Write, and
tell them that I am happy; and if you do
not get better, you shall come and be with
me in this world of love and joy.”’

Again he spoke: ‘0, this is Sally!”’
[My feelings here were indescribable, for
this was a dear sister of mine, who died
before I was married, and whom he knew
nothing about.] He was asked what she
said tohim. ‘‘ She says, ‘ You have a good
mother, Jimmy; but if you do not stay



THE VISION. : 91

with her, you will come here and be happy,
and I will be like a sister to you.’ ”’

After resting a few moments, apparently
in deep thought, he turned to me, and calmly
said, ‘‘ Mother, I have one word more to .
say, and that is, if I should fall asleep,
never more to awake, I want you all to live
a happy family, in peace and love, and
often think of your dear little boy Jimmy.”’

He then looked around the room, and
inquired how many were present. On be-
ing told, he sweetly said, ‘‘ There is one
wanting — my dear father.’’ He was told
that he should be immediately sent for,
though we were fearful he might not arrive
to see him, as. he had been obliged to leave
the city for a few hours. After this, he
seemed more quiet, and asked ‘‘if we
should know when he was dead.’ He felt
that he was ‘‘ falling asleep.’’ On being
assured that we should know, he remained
as if going to sleep for some moments ; and ©
then brightening up, he said, with a stronger
voice, ** I guess I shall live longer ; I don’t



92 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

think I shall die now; and the angels said,
‘if I did not get better, I should come and
be with them,’ and the angels are leaving
me.”’ In afew moments he said, ‘‘ They
are going ;’’ and again, ‘‘ They are all
gone.’’ He seemed to see many who were
waiting for him, and all appeared happy.
Shortly after this, he turned to speak to
his little niece, who stood beside him, when
he said, ‘“‘O, no! there is one angel flying
around in the air, with a wreath on its little
finger. This is my guardian angel.”
From this time he began to revive, and
in a few hours, assisted by our excellent
family physician, Dr. Crane, he was so far
recovered from his distress that, by his re-
_ quest, we joined with him, being led by his
angelic voice, in offering to the Father of
mercies our united thanks for such a won-
derful manifestation of infinite goodness.
And, could you now hear the fervent sup-
plications which his infant voice sends forth
from the family altar, when we are assembled
for our daily devotion, you would think that



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describe
'60182' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIE' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
87bfe2f33e63ecf64788a58a41013743
aa4453ad792b8581c6b45782d3ba476c9aab20d9
'2011-11-16T17:08:16-05:00'
describe
'5171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
1ca182475126d918c33b8fb9edad089a
4c402b519b790edd0695151d0415bc1c0f8954c6
'2011-11-16T17:07:45-05:00'
describe
'18175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ef7355dcde2cc7e1f9ac7132399cc0e9
163225e35c703d0dfa6f01f375b66eeb0a45c92e
'2011-11-16T17:08:10-05:00'
describe
'7236875' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIH' 'sip-files00008.tif'
e8c30dd76507f516353d439f2aeeb733
98ed01686b70f9c288acb5cad3f22b130e74ac6f
'2011-11-16T17:06:16-05:00'
describe
'298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARII' 'sip-files00008.txt'
54e2209c8de6eb2fc5c02119179b0b54
5310d3c65378806b19fa40e76ff4abb572306684
'2011-11-16T17:07:14-05:00'
describe
'5627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIJ' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
ce98be5c466252f1df0aa31599da8657
2d1a425b85482621459640f526bdd41cd1f170b5
'2011-11-16T17:07:15-05:00'
describe
'928406' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIK' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
171931d34297bc07dcfa9bb11fb204a5
72a0c1dfba737ada5cc5308bef6f7f88a8303491
describe
'33494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIL' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a0d5d61ba3253619e280356c4469784e
6c5b83f1013baff9368f58bec0ef20ac0212c1be
describe
'5315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIM' 'sip-files00009.pro'
09c24a02a429fa65c46771560b9ce76b
c5722671283acb78d3c5f31af45a6e1996e22868
'2011-11-16T17:04:38-05:00'
describe
'10036' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
210d785bfb7f3f5de6d8f3c73b221c17
3ffb87453c9ecc975da75a45fbb471a654e0f32c
'2011-11-16T17:05:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIO' 'sip-files00009.tif'
05075cf1cf39ce83ff6ccce2a6ae38f2
f0c74c40d64b66476dd60e323855f7aab3dbd518
'2011-11-16T17:09:36-05:00'
describe
'365' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIP' 'sip-files00009.txt'
fa2f9c48fcb2eb87b732d7a15462d362
2ccc5e937ae39415098a47abbc9f72c60dde17ee
'2011-11-16T17:07:57-05:00'
describe
'2991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIQ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
a5eed602ef8022dbe695cef30ed090f2
db6905823f8c6a03b9721f49f92c7964a564b3db
'2011-11-16T17:09:07-05:00'
describe
'903460' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIR' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4477e52bd2a2b9c6ff49cf765ec9ade1
bed6a3c11e558ce566f32be173f26ad6436a8751
'2011-11-16T17:07:09-05:00'
describe
'68183' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIS' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a6486db611462e745c53eb2f48049112
53377b4b828cf7c2752562657b71aecbeaeb7c27
describe
'17423' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
9a226ad2c15add5a5f30302139ccf4f5
094b002f511d0af9d10edec95758da86356fa7dd
describe
'24895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIU' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
cde910a8c7bbb01388729bb523e04023
2d50f567bf6484e1ceb75f91286015d362695ce4
'2011-11-16T17:08:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIV' 'sip-files00010.tif'
273a4eaa52f5fc8c3ccdefb08e8e207d
d15f5218b1032d07c9a1f79850eb0dab797ade9c
'2011-11-16T17:07:59-05:00'
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIW' 'sip-files00010.txt'
4e4ae0234ef00f18531370a4a06e237a
6139a90f2f581a48f0db947c2ec12f5ee4bcd728
'2011-11-16T17:04:51-05:00'
describe
'7689' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
ba5f20bd829f7ad06033cabada2526ef
07438dd23e1970cca0c5e3aeff24e4d18e0b12f1
'2011-11-16T17:07:37-05:00'
describe
'928441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c996d888fcd026f1aad5e7ffca94667a
79ed3b0577f3336baece38e90fc130a59c6c21b0
describe
'80506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARIZ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
63625f61c48323d1a202bccbf9c7e75c
7889d164e7697834e68bbde80bb63b94e4584002
'2011-11-16T17:06:09-05:00'
describe
'25012' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
08209fd86bab561cdd74999b44ec3f3a
51b101e7db67a5f44cb87c2dbdff605a843158e3
'2011-11-16T17:09:46-05:00'
describe
'30863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJB' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
7641beb4145005c3d7211ce58f3f090d
d26cf587b56ba8eec3bc242897a8141392ba0361
'2011-11-16T17:09:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJC' 'sip-files00011.tif'
c799fc6c4b6aa1cb26e2c5e516731108
470dbae213009089da1b3162234b00134e2849a3
'2011-11-16T17:05:06-05:00'
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJD' 'sip-files00011.txt'
10826a8d69351175b1d3b42687c20a81
74918afd507f3c779c225a9af2aefbfcae423c6d
describe
'9377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJE' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d0d7572af36fa785d1112a71cfee1b0e
e209003148224660056fe882c0c7e0a9991308c7
'2011-11-16T17:06:06-05:00'
describe
'903520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
610be6a7fe5ae5dc6e8b9df6a8d242d6
b054a6839620ea45cc7c973e7e5b4a6ffa8c8387
'2011-11-16T17:06:26-05:00'
describe
'79809' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJG' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
2ffc4857d66d64c6b40e4692c03c42b7
84203030f42a074f5e4db8a1ed98220c219bc6ad
'2011-11-16T17:08:15-05:00'
describe
'24285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
9a61f5aa64ca5cfc77e03dee4252443b
dd5300586fdfaf3f93de13efa8911e7860fba7f5
'2011-11-16T17:06:17-05:00'
describe
'30770' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9d12bf26c0d110c42a65112c22213b37
ee0859a45e00bc3c4943a34009c881e8cbcc70a3
'2011-11-16T17:04:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJJ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a3b2cbe5356e798b9d0e2c17b44da6b7
f1a10b58c089ab76f652484e1c2dd91417a7fd32
'2011-11-16T17:09:37-05:00'
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJK' 'sip-files00012.txt'
7c29b645956b367e4db6e3a5325221bc
fec373951884ae3ac7fcb73f1c8fbd86fd4e4b2d
'2011-11-16T17:09:38-05:00'
describe
'9519' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJL' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
7b832e433c98c0eb12431767ef1065ab
56747abda821d54c435def8108ac32cae8aa4cf2
'2011-11-16T17:06:47-05:00'
describe
'882166' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8ff62b9f779b01a7847954762c9601ce
e889917c269cad09497365c192b32881e8d75032
'2011-11-16T17:07:05-05:00'
describe
'49082' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
7f951e03f32c0a127ef22753816c6809
6adf42a04333e2f78fecc1d91092116179be0cfb
'2011-11-16T17:05:08-05:00'
describe
'12531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJO' 'sip-files00013.pro'
97c7a5fb72dda718a5f41fe4f5d31b01
035b6c2467978569ff8d49c0d94c74ae9cab8980
'2011-11-16T17:06:23-05:00'
describe
'18031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJP' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
727ea4e4d9bd0ce46aabbe28fdd8f185
7cb5ed1e8ed556a98dba3b434a3ec56c9e804160
'2011-11-16T17:09:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b6c6ea98ce5ab0f82457d5c62c34d3d5
8debeb332076824b5fe150a62bcd164bd28cc5ba
'2011-11-16T17:08:41-05:00'
describe
'579' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJR' 'sip-files00013.txt'
3f0d4bc03db0d6ec1405ada9d27da140
38a2bb8b31627361f725b9cbcf1b607d98eb2f91
'2011-11-16T17:08:47-05:00'
describe
'5526' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJS' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3b7533ae1b70f2cec1d5e186417ebee7
ba378114dbebbf3a8d9fc2a47d68d32a35d5a079
describe
'801969' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJT' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
c76166bf21e73874bfdac7f10ff40cac
8762e73634ef0f28739333769fbd8ee0c4bb412c
'2011-11-16T17:04:48-05:00'
describe
'35570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJU' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d741fe5c46845a89deb358cd594d44af
86cc574ab5f0ddb1a4eaa478c55a0df2c34ccb2f
describe
'10297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJV' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0e90958b4aaad7572848e85717c90476
f8c8ab274860967cf99ff5ebe0a8283ed6d1faca
'2011-11-16T17:08:20-05:00'
describe
'13506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJW' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
2476a2d8856238ef700ce67a64263ed6
e2b6b7383e6e99c71a284eb0f6809dbb79b046b5
'2011-11-16T17:09:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJX' 'sip-files00014.tif'
d8f78be361eb341fdd4705e906bc2cd9
38dd9a3765d641b6bafa0ea0f4f13653af2957b6
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJY' 'sip-files00014.txt'
13da985a1dfc68ea99abf602f617c8e5
17f3aa08bcb28c112973c0ae92fddd429a9ccb69
'2011-11-16T17:07:01-05:00'
describe
'4628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARJZ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
38283501380524c89b4355bb52fe0616
f16c74387b80160ce5fdd457ccf25b059edc27aa
'2011-11-16T17:07:00-05:00'
describe
'724554' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
a47dbc76c77023c3770815dd7fde9469
7b49f9e24b72619a1ea3fbd954059b1e13de907c
'2011-11-16T17:05:27-05:00'
describe
'26436' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKB' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
87d296a27952a6157e0d17c33b7c9990
0c36607b0efb6ef04b132d1a5aee020f7dbcb362
'2011-11-16T17:05:39-05:00'
describe
'5022' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKC' 'sip-files00015.pro'
991f216a092f2936194cabee7be55206
80a340f302c036ab4b5faf12e02dbd2176c1434a
describe
'9109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKD' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
c48cf30ecc7ad0374c389a5cfdaceece
f44dcd921453910e6bf8b606cb82ec725bb9b471
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKE' 'sip-files00015.tif'
3cf1ff3b38836cfdcd8af82015508f86
643d1aa5cdf1b112b32dd1d6ad399dbca033c2cf
'2011-11-16T17:07:33-05:00'
describe
'286' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
5ddc4be023aeceda764d8b5348b52264
e8b72f678397b5c55ab7ac4e06521e2bda1f9c80
'2011-11-16T17:06:08-05:00'
describe
'2898' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKG' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
89c0f9f540372f2d92ed71bdd41a78ba
b4199483343c4116a880b6f212ccade2a64eda95
'2011-11-16T17:05:50-05:00'
describe
'903531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
f30536263c79057c8dd6df4df5fa6a86
b4dea3bcf3d15ba0195666a5403f3f897efcbfbf
describe
'79730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKI' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
e33a19560e2dc551214b4a0746ab6e26
af50e0f2e1410adb04845b7fbd0586f0729dcdfd
describe
'20000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
ed58327e0a95b66b811846a893186f03
1e0e9e398d07233988b0f4c352aac6b0388c7d16
describe
'30364' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKK' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f90fd5dc7c2045b1d1713e81ff5e522d
d52d7f9c8590eb927fe90fe14ae6d4412e95858a
'2011-11-16T17:05:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
e972014ebb1c515b610378163785ad43
09555971b227a234c4551c07dd72a7fbb3c66f72
'2011-11-16T17:06:43-05:00'
describe
'814' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7def20e180a6a36495f0ebfa31e03fa1
35ebed2c33acfc8c58cd8e2b71d94860a188b273
describe
'8282' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKN' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
86c122990b071169c7b4411292ede18b
3c74b5d189ca728c1948ba8880159bf2865174c4
'2011-11-16T17:07:04-05:00'
describe
'928377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
6181bfbd8a9f4845852bd86f5de51e9a
95000c1454e877254c7635cadeeb828899c20fff
'2011-11-16T17:05:18-05:00'
describe
'96143' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKP' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
a2ea72d71b9248b99012ca2ab1f00502
96c434bc87ba2927af45db776e23b1caac39fdcf
'2011-11-16T17:08:48-05:00'
describe
'25964' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c53bf84b8ae289fb8586d79560909c9e
65fa15d9dc3b2ba1cab8c78df9a8b20e35882735
'2011-11-16T17:06:13-05:00'
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
3ef5fcaec206b21d114dc85a3579f36c
ebe8c7546e596494b0eb2d689f377912c9c41d10
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKS' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4d621852aca1e27ee23943e0456a2694
db8575e8b6e31fe4b4b41e660cd02bc1fa44707c
'2011-11-16T17:08:59-05:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKT' 'sip-files00017.txt'
82af8a54e3b41ba24eae44b8fc57c6c9
842a6dcfb8a537cdef3cf709ed570fcbfa50ed83
describe
'10158' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ac7a94199ec3df66f5e1d267e86280d9
855d16526a3cb821436aebf6b883463b3fd5fd58
describe
'903512' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKV' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1ad5c9fc99eb7a253c96c3edcebf6d94
90203c5cfc5293671b15d16189bf227dc2773ee8
describe
'101481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
560fa9d68864f7f20ab9485c8e3223af
63aefddaf07dc5064b138dd38ab1a6e2beb52f4d
'2011-11-16T17:07:20-05:00'
describe
'26968' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKX' 'sip-files00018.pro'
95a10c13c75550786da7aa43bbd68009
07c3da5fbccda449ab79cf7d111836f79b447f1e
describe
'37339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKY' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
af4a607d51e510f25879f04abe637d52
a60e9eb1ce36cd0192f74fb895aa9ac2b10fd661
'2011-11-16T17:10:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARKZ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
532f2bde3edff05dfd31ffb8b5f23ef9
b42924a712c19bb7a3207c5de147b4ae242ab9f0
'2011-11-16T17:07:08-05:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLA' 'sip-files00018.txt'
92fb776333dfda41bfd774c00994644e
7faed098c6675609e6bb79616b3acfa56bf12d7f
'2011-11-16T17:10:19-05:00'
describe
'10164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLB' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5f5836c81fd63fd022ea055e727e0512
ff8d75c9094b4f64606beeafdaaa97e72d972e72
'2011-11-16T17:07:52-05:00'
describe
'928437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
3f97f8f8c09a9186d67ce2a70ddc8180
0e67e42fa987b1acc9ab3ca503db1561c4e2cea3
describe
'100832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLD' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
f9424256de3694351f96e0d96cc0e09c
a4e75d88cb1a4c19baec82a5d344170c11ca8d88
'2011-11-16T17:09:56-05:00'
describe
'27210' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLE' 'sip-files00019.pro'
f786fd9b402dc6c870bc6a50e2e62cc3
d7fe5a8607b82532e38053690038dfc94bce6ce3
'2011-11-16T17:06:48-05:00'
describe
'38165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLF' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0bfefbe49597412cc8c30a1cd02419f2
93eb21a1d79a55c08d09466d184976eb2d53b990
'2011-11-16T17:09:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLG' 'sip-files00019.tif'
1d380063ad0574e5e8931608980c5f28
1f2abf56d0cc32ab6bc616a365f7c935ad9c742e
'2011-11-16T17:04:43-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLH' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5d50f0668a2f850edf9fa9e8e98db736
fc2f87e1c5c757125917a2095ce1881391c8e273
'2011-11-16T17:08:49-05:00'
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLI' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
89450d0000b790f58d1f883093ccbb1c
aa0cfb94fbc967845ebd99aa0b5c4b5e47bf807d
'2011-11-16T17:04:59-05:00'
describe
'903551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLJ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
0b798db12fc6d6eabae819687b8d8a55
9a7c32fc298651d78b706401b9c5c0172d57cf5b
'2011-11-16T17:05:49-05:00'
describe
'100279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLK' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9ac5838aa059a492704c3698321a3734
642174b5640f041848f9b77505f9332fc5fa5222
'2011-11-16T17:05:45-05:00'
describe
'27226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLL' 'sip-files00020.pro'
353ae2ea6830beda2b87ec1ac76ac76f
f72feee3d7e80281bfa1e1f230ed1db895487991
describe
'38328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLM' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
94fcb4dd554d7c9cfc735bfcc04628ab
a47f3b8b001bdbc81c49ffa1f690227b70c81b1f
'2011-11-16T17:05:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLN' 'sip-files00020.tif'
6bcee0983f554a1abd097a7b87ad8be3
28fc210686d74f8997bd14977d825e196172d1c5
'2011-11-16T17:08:14-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLO' 'sip-files00020.txt'
666e229e76638291d87eb6a5476dd204
d9f6010088881acadd465c121306d6752edb0849
'2011-11-16T17:06:44-05:00'
describe
'10509' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLP' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bd50160aaf4a93e9155c85bd62099130
1e3e8aa1dcda20206988824d84e9b83237620619
describe
'928438' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
18af2600efbcfd88c824e53025f3e07a
048583eaf90e03fc7fb883c2332eff4834a77464
'2011-11-16T17:06:01-05:00'
describe
'99131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLR' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
adc27852d87fdd0934a40dd7e1706ad0
685b43d18595e79d87fb04e5679e71ebf119aa8c
describe
'27243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2677bc49c744a9ff43f8cdc86dca7999
c47bba0a5d2cae05598979453e42d0212d881401
'2011-11-16T17:08:04-05:00'
describe
'37212' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLT' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
cc1136e4ac2a379c8c3ca61dada2830e
c00014ca0f4a95e10173800d074cb826e0bec921
'2011-11-16T17:08:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLU' 'sip-files00021.tif'
78ab6d98997a1f37be432aea23b36965
f2e4cdf9715b4f33a8429fbc99343f396378dde3
'2011-11-16T17:08:37-05:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLV' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e8d43754c9889a768b6b5930ff496d51
bb865e17b41a5d3fd17b466345be88614a17c625
'2011-11-16T17:09:48-05:00'
describe
'10203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLW' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
346c97a9543aebc1e81f5d4b16b567ec
900e40e4e127948e20f44fa045b7604dea9aa46e
'2011-11-16T17:09:35-05:00'
describe
'903547' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLX' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5b83a4ae32ffb50649e49db7d48e6fb3
7524c27cddb47253d3e4d6e627792a60a7f3b896
'2011-11-16T17:09:41-05:00'
describe
'87921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLY' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f7f2c24be5117b8939f81774f2eaf23f
4d7ca47f1fd29904dcadf71358c3a20bba96994c
'2011-11-16T17:08:35-05:00'
describe
'23163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARLZ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d96ab44c702513fcef3151fcdd9a917f
360f29388a4bc70bf2e56c7760fc708dbba00c42
'2011-11-16T17:08:52-05:00'
describe
'32980' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMA' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
5dfce5baf2dfee3e1b05f4480a50784f
fdcd62ba8bb6a92d218489fbe6d77502b5ff78ed
'2011-11-16T17:06:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMB' 'sip-files00022.tif'
06990f5768cdea3b0abc5bb01ac7da57
a06565d14e5180fcaf8e149b0fe8c6bff9b54b22
'2011-11-16T17:07:13-05:00'
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMC' 'sip-files00022.txt'
c02735bcf8a33b855030eae04b9ac37c
349b0c83e9c42a9d56ef1df77489406eb299cdf5
'2011-11-16T17:05:31-05:00'
describe
'9315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMD' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
68c3a1482c3bd26d8814fa1dd3abf81d
95648d9ba5f882149f1501360fac77efb69a02b7
'2011-11-16T17:07:48-05:00'
describe
'928261' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARME' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
0d3e160fe7ffbbe8919e16af3527db40
7e79152af8562ad8e9abd54d4dc8edfb38a27dbc
'2011-11-16T17:09:24-05:00'
describe
'97707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
622afa82ccfb95ffa72eb1373650513d
16e4452cd9af6d4c74f0e166e71f8f4cedfc54a7
describe
'26509' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMG' 'sip-files00023.pro'
32b360c3b787133be8f2cbe1dbbc2b6f
2592b45d9ac277f263351902316330dbbadc3975
'2011-11-16T17:09:40-05:00'
describe
'37018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
2be05597b4dc100f28708ffcbcbba18c
9fbe1eb9e6ba22c62479c53ff2d5144a7577436f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMI' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2f5d89487c5c5d1a5058396923c57263
7585751f91faa59a827a6e31586e8a68a402026c
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMJ' 'sip-files00023.txt'
7b64af1ac5259a9876211dcb8c7bd4f1
7947f57212e05c125e5ce7669e207d98bf1f9147
describe
'10068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMK' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
c3391baa4e513837a9f78b0097614483
3ccc3f22b0febd485574abe64b2f01f4d451e326
'2011-11-16T17:06:38-05:00'
describe
'903422' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARML' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
977e6612b3ca70c3ae908d918a12827c
bdebcee342e5fd1e0d2737183c69c441d2b106fe
'2011-11-16T17:07:38-05:00'
describe
'95795' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d27db1aa082a11dcefbfca0a4fa6604c
9afb86ff790cdaaf35f091a63e657f568e79e79b
describe
'26136' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
09b5c9d8c2243655eeb7d7f03e35eb94
8ef3d97337b9c93ec01af6dd8d41956db99d5f24
'2011-11-16T17:06:02-05:00'
describe
'36655' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
9afe28f539b5a14a26977b32fb01681e
a529f729b0456b8ca6720f4ee7b0f503f6f64678
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
755324e4f994932cddfb3bbf4759a4cd
50971141ea578d8c5c24b3120fd07bc358db5dc0
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
69f922372d67e8082164d201bad01f4b
b055d773745058ff6b7d555adfd8ec9496820b23
describe
'10170' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
610a5c0233486c25beee01eb609ea8e8
c9b8ffcc2ba0f2ed660698837694b3644e3c6877
'2011-11-16T17:08:21-05:00'
describe
'928307' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
1184035964d3dc3971228fa63c9ff9a2
68d304377462031272a09aaab4fb8ee66c7f23ee
describe
'96481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMT' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b9c652301052ef7865df0ef938ba9214
d43e715dbbf26b5629624e317b5e601d8fee09fe
'2011-11-16T17:07:55-05:00'
describe
'26231' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
c992a3cbeee8052b78a19c11a7fbda2f
dec68948d00236d8772a4136a6cf812a8166c518
'2011-11-16T17:10:10-05:00'
describe
'35593' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b4029d347c43d48c968f4fa1235555d2
ddcfecb0220d305571ff7b4e7cf286938e7ca388
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
687791d115999ff2f3ac93d53b914841
201967bbfde472aa37e4c4b37b4a0e88a6d10a48
'2011-11-16T17:09:22-05:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
ec15f56b7c2877664de7503a2320df12
a9c59ab14db855772d3c4790f6cd062bfe6632b1
'2011-11-16T17:09:14-05:00'
describe
'10184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
b9c5e0b956eb0b00fad097e48598e60a
d0798edaf3c156d5aecb6f818f01db679012c6e1
'2011-11-16T17:07:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARMZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d46a00e4739d6fa078a9e09de0a17f72
cc69d8b1f570e4652696aa3e72ecf76199bc7b61
describe
'82540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
fd67ad9235f0c6cc939c786f69b848fd
01c4f7d79ee943a2ee9e8a91f84480da29cc2b63
describe
'22324' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNB' 'sip-files00026.pro'
93809098c1c450fbb30bcb7d08ccb1f8
0f3deafc8caa670b71767c7974fffc0c5f4fde6a
'2011-11-16T17:07:46-05:00'
describe
'30763' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNC' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b36654997b7d678d0c34d5b3b1cc1400
e37623172df8672475d78bbb3f1262de68746a90
'2011-11-16T17:06:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARND' 'sip-files00026.tif'
5d1f94f70c3601392ee3c06b6ab4d0d0
56ec7196957486f73bb1e49d51f5bbc1b5e76c36
'2011-11-16T17:06:54-05:00'
describe
'957' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNE' 'sip-files00026.txt'
00a40a3c2594da5cac012db2fb570ee3
3ef87e2164297376f98fbb3ade075e458d394463
'2011-11-16T17:09:08-05:00'
describe
'8890' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNF' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
cdcca12df4e74911283670133be1313f
5fdced7fec2eb6abb82201626efb7bf3f86fb633
'2011-11-16T17:10:06-05:00'
describe
'928447' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNG' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
f1d48e0bb8b1a3005d28d5319eb54959
0a72bebf6b7fa47ef85792eb3f02d873fa7132de
'2011-11-16T17:06:58-05:00'
describe
'96919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNH' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
bfa15ae352621f4e576701b78b769400
f74b6a909ba4ad205cffa982df5de703d9484342
'2011-11-16T17:10:02-05:00'
describe
'27017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNI' 'sip-files00027.pro'
7277444b3d1daa73b508ba11ed41fe16
298af03eac85833cafd8a101b4cc537a3c0da68c
describe
'36518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNJ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
71972dd618ea40c0f835368d1e547b9e
4bbb72989308172153ce084f1c7eaa5f059eac4e
'2011-11-16T17:06:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNK' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b037096e65ee1894a8b3d6db1afc9f7b
3121a5639d9937a7edf0bd379bfe103421b84b30
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNL' 'sip-files00027.txt'
16330981d5991929e5b35006d20cebd9
afe79a3c445fbe4fd3fa412f7a72f25e23b3b129
describe
'10191' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
f8aae61c758960f02b98839c94ce580d
fb5a15a7da57ed81b3f43c25e117a40a9d08aae2
'2011-11-16T17:06:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNN' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d7b17f47f1e73a7ab02647fe4c8b26e8
3c2075b58d61fd2de934f46998dcbbeabc62ca24
'2011-11-16T17:06:07-05:00'
describe
'99539' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNO' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
37cbb5c9052ef53f29a46c0ec60299df
facfdb91e5421dc5dfe7735f8a3a48b8ca3e270d
describe
'26783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNP' 'sip-files00028.pro'
053f084493ccda35a75dc7cc514d61a8
743ba6300308ac9318ec7dda4b8ffc8fa8992d16
'2011-11-16T17:10:13-05:00'
describe
'37187' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNQ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
ea5a10a3c37b6239c55b97a281b52c26
eaefb0a10e3776608a1e3f8bdc4935676446c6bb
'2011-11-16T17:09:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNR' 'sip-files00028.tif'
092332de0698cdd38795aa6c3b6cc1fe
ea1ad0ccf723167d6d3725bf42ef834382a389a7
'2011-11-16T17:08:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
86fa2aa6e3a2fee0580232deb31be8b2
8ee53a5ac5dca9a3df3815d3d833579c7803bc71
'2011-11-16T17:07:42-05:00'
describe
'10497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
c23a552fe850bd9cfc1bef30839028cf
2a5f48356fa9e69389e8f4728b5fdc3aae961f30
'2011-11-16T17:10:21-05:00'
describe
'928299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b15d2d96a66c63b6efa47b8e1fab8324
8555a1e48989f7c6b2d7317006a10f69c72dbd28
describe
'100461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
9a43261a844d2e6fe39b8504deee5cd6
e5b5f98cbfbd7f6a445264975e7c5d7326a5ae14
'2011-11-16T17:07:21-05:00'
describe
'27432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ff385b0d3a00de8cbb6b5f46d0eba711
44265b16eb99aaabcfda552f1381b2be5ae0ce72
'2011-11-16T17:07:18-05:00'
describe
'37399' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
554a631e97303eaaa600e5f730d33b29
5a3f29012aa8defef0afe7a7691d8b4adc6c6708
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
2aa70699896c4f1e8ddb39b045a54be8
b5ab518686cabcf4193849095302928bc81ddbda
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARNZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
40fd5bd5d2bbe9f6525cbd7202a700ec
eb78fb04fe5ce5dafcdd1e904ce2635fb6936db6
'2011-11-16T17:06:05-05:00'
describe
'10274' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
ecc27a20da2de64e0203c74e23d57f4e
15941680a889f6628c8c85983ec139f70714522c
'2011-11-16T17:06:33-05:00'
describe
'903537' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
e9b370ac1a896462398a11b3f3f53db4
f8a729d66be66b2c2572d5adad9446c607ae7502
describe
'98089' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
d4c4e089d79e2240521d7b393111503d
324f20a570eb5481cf77a8f0b7e310a3ec5fa58a
describe
'26314' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b8ea2f6d25a4ccb52436ce27e49be031
fe4ac36834b1e4bf81acb12364e9e7e55d036e13
'2011-11-16T17:07:36-05:00'
describe
'37210' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1b2e58452328c61483d37a5cad08b30b
cc344e68b980cd7c99e3e6e186ec91ab88d4d166
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c9e09ed6854f0b1740f7d027e163d3d9
c9df6e97d1ce9b25ca43e49f1fa35893d604bdc3
'2011-11-16T17:05:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
6022fcb47dfdc3c71c91dfa5381f1d8f
5a1416680877737d6ee64941d4134801cfeb4979
'2011-11-16T17:06:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROH' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
ab7841a29dde65cd6c656b77ecde8051
f568d5808180b6900389c334fe57610a51bfd68f
describe
'928280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROI' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
782c9a4923a3b5d861867008106b132e
bdf2dc7287c5c261825f1170cdb56c59c9c928ca
describe
'96965' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROJ' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
77707082a2d0bf3efef713639d8a1147
49e9179be9eb59a8d2309d42a18ef348eafb7318
describe
'26562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROK' 'sip-files00031.pro'
40e665628304e6e5504ea93a5b08867e
f6b98f55901586c0046fe1cf836e2e10c30f728f
'2011-11-16T17:04:46-05:00'
describe
'36226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROL' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
a647561941e4b308a360ddbce16f87d5
31132940dc0a44bf586041e53c60d0db3bd2c9ef
'2011-11-16T17:06:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROM' 'sip-files00031.tif'
572e8fffe43062728275da58a3ff2b15
fdbaafdf46fd71d5844fe4d5ade2339829b19d32
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARON' 'sip-files00031.txt'
59bff0108681e2b5882ba989e9e473fa
b36975fa0422e9709bc39b173a0ae5d9ef0cedce
describe
'10056' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROO' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
9930fc0c3e2e865a806deaf5a804bf1f
4db5d5c6f9d569157684fef0746de71015d140de
'2011-11-16T17:06:18-05:00'
describe
'903426' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
96ed1034e3a5e07bebb6712444214feb
3040dc0f01e6117a848754b476fcfbe3a311ed14
describe
'86841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROQ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
0a021aef00a6a31bca1fcc61c2342723
f4927e750d9d173e7658382ea2d239c90ea98024
'2011-11-16T17:05:07-05:00'
describe
'23880' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROR' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3e19c39587f86cd157f68c28e9ff73b7
a0f012007666aa24d4ff76a63e011d927d8cf54e
'2011-11-16T17:06:22-05:00'
describe
'32981' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROS' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
6e1da2bc128935632612f55f90dd00e4
e9a9951e16f8c3d840d8858229a176280e5b46f9
'2011-11-16T17:07:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROT' 'sip-files00032.tif'
f45b57c73a224d444944ca6ba6c20853
c33d61abd38cce42af5e4a72aafe954d4347a710
'2011-11-16T17:09:57-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROU' 'sip-files00032.txt'
6580e031440941fa70c2ec5ff1401f0b
2653e0253ae863f627e8d023982f08b354f73419
describe
'8985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROV' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
fb7a81258d02806fab84dee92b9fba5f
5e9a0ecaa30568313cce3252b73250ef38143b62
describe
'955068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROW' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
4314d844a310c9373386b7f232d2ffd9
8c1e29533a7923fcad93f850bd52a175b3a07e5e
describe
'96028' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROX' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
ca9d231de407e65dc5733a1761f71734
edf7d08a7739f192d9256f2c51e3dffc2dc70140
describe
'26714' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROY' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3ad2dd5e5f08820b01106d37579a6d35
f894c60d7debae15dc3a415b09508e26aeed4e14
'2011-11-16T17:09:55-05:00'
describe
'35131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAAROZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
45d216d9ba97388e8737585cd39d11bf
ec253ad0432c917478082e2532b62a8f52a01aaf
describe
'7650405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPA' 'sip-files00033.tif'
4349957433ac2cbb6dec8f00f6f3a865
2ab5a89cdd7c045a63e585b7bfb19b292fcf7bdb
'2011-11-16T17:09:30-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPB' 'sip-files00033.txt'
66abaae6c60125d39878cdec2977b975
8f9e2fd70356002d6a850d8b707021270e937de2
'2011-11-16T17:05:17-05:00'
describe
'9734' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
93dd331f383a653392de1b567a6c9bfc
677c820f7731ea5a68cf6d1f5c02bf296a357a47
describe
'939024' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
5b272b8abf989549faa16d664ce872ee
ead403a450e77b56ce5ea8da26aab83f4916a8a4
'2011-11-16T17:04:40-05:00'
describe
'92605' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPE' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
2ba3d30a6c14bfddd520c33e731bf3c9
6970700f848748acbed60e4a020574c052f1aad8
'2011-11-16T17:05:47-05:00'
describe
'26077' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
47756f5bca3355951326dcc836e7019c
127d673a2c169f4c1d975164ec511c8bba53c707
'2011-11-16T17:08:24-05:00'
describe
'33447' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPG' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
a06369a5f35457c37221f1a4754afed9
3a30edb416e2e2dd310d54b33a27c85e9ff06ee8
'2011-11-16T17:08:53-05:00'
describe
'7520737' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPH' 'sip-files00034.tif'
fbcf8afad3eb0e519830fcee4186bc56
ab41dd2636cbec6e50e8358ab2bde2040d636567
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPI' 'sip-files00034.txt'
70d79b0b4e752e46466c58ca732e1a2e
7ae7304f386b2e020adee44f7abc20dc89315ebd
'2011-11-16T17:10:22-05:00'
describe
'9761' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
b39087b1933115ae8d552910c0d560be
1651e7c8e145709bd136b19390e40097abe5496a
'2011-11-16T17:09:17-05:00'
describe
'955207' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPK' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
f1d8cc9d22af800b7b59c8a639da5856
365efeb7350385116d5ce6345d6ac0902da37cb9
'2011-11-16T17:05:51-05:00'
describe
'82116' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
3d13da7aefcae37d2323b92bbc25e656
be1dacda07a93f7fc9d9042ab727f392cabe85ce
'2011-11-16T17:08:45-05:00'
describe
'22803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPM' 'sip-files00035.pro'
3a76ae2ec7110030a711fdb95deb3f51
380af547cc2ee76e302d864405397b9cac79d4e4
'2011-11-16T17:05:43-05:00'
describe
'31279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPN' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9ad395bae546a03cfee3a0b828e59671
3027bbf6123df0fe4fd6bdfb8f88a8f020ce8add
'2011-11-16T17:07:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPO' 'sip-files00035.tif'
b2cb0818f6f4a14224499c1e98054f04
06fcf77313d2ae21bbe95982bf280cf74c1f7d61
'2011-11-16T17:09:47-05:00'
describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPP' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4172b929919f24629052738e91793603
69dcece627b2d741f55d149f39e47617438bfe1c
'2011-11-16T17:07:30-05:00'
describe
'8831' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPQ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
6bd9352949d4f2c2eefe4bf01f4c1616
0e86e9a8b3cb02ac25cc1650e368bd3779cd52a0
'2011-11-16T17:10:01-05:00'
describe
'939009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPR' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
521f83206ce3ca19644010d63fce9e89
cd7ccb6b8e725f0d8e83c73638e0f56bf893511e
describe
'90663' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPS' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
16a106a75611838186fe711cec6bd4d0
192174bc8d8fdd8e746862af598c3cb8b4ebbdb0
'2011-11-16T17:05:59-05:00'
describe
'25293' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPT' 'sip-files00036.pro'
998d15992e7c5337feb17f42fee6a195
4b7b501eedac6011264f077c2286e14925794d2b
'2011-11-16T17:08:17-05:00'
describe
'35243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPU' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
830267070c083b55e39f091ba3ea46d6
a37d3ecc66eb7ca2aac9536f9145ed08e6211e7a
'2011-11-16T17:09:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPV' 'sip-files00036.tif'
11dec9ccac0b495781812eebf1cd0b37
eaabc28257126c95b7d42c8ca92689178d004e22
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPW' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c607961e404fe8358667a35841deabb6
41891682ce8fce8e4ef2a268917fa5068d68b9ce
describe
'9646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPX' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
809239d806b61c6084521defd4c09164
1c06de9b77720233083ab851bae684a717fef771
describe
'955214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPY' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
df567a363859d2fb6e2c71a4d3cd0828
b92f740f1297985cd9b816fce6294c3183c92bd0
'2011-11-16T17:06:12-05:00'
describe
'83842' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARPZ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1d7bff14570445320c2ff3905859f0dc
9330e01a415730247154d6442c4b0f784d024efb
'2011-11-16T17:07:07-05:00'
describe
'23557' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQA' 'sip-files00037.pro'
c82b62a5c17f05d15e3e54a0818a86d7
df8189ff68cd4e8261b637bc2214b72a77d4c005
describe
'30845' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQB' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0e5153ada921d8d1d4ede0caec7bf377
7f33bdd55ac64d311e817486a5f0d1da2903d9f4
'2011-11-16T17:05:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQC' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c509a2484e746dc388d9d61f02c61f07
263c82fcc18fb915d18927c1f049ba81265bf0a4
'2011-11-16T17:07:23-05:00'
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQD' 'sip-files00037.txt'
835b2a7196fbe9e85016a7f6a8097daf
10b9d1fc64ddc6e8ffad394976cc6f1aa73a4bb4
describe
'8841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQE' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
b5a5b0c27a788b2337352970f4334ab8
c12e385b5782942a0abcd71e880e4fcfefb1447e
describe
'938928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQF' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
97305936b60b12f24ed3d99f565c650f
028637a8a43e5662d1a6c73618a76efa78257840
describe
'91905' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQG' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8f30577e3aec25597284a1bfd76f0d58
108f25971a59b153a05ba7e4c3d7eb06aa649061
'2011-11-16T17:10:20-05:00'
describe
'25503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQH' 'sip-files00038.pro'
dab9c03aea72c6d5d73544e9d89ac705
388528d2189c00a9bc9212b0eb7b157a60653a2c
describe
'36563' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQI' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
96b4e40d0242e8914596a516a6d26c05
b7289d9a90028ae6b87735289ec589b96e52bc32
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQJ' 'sip-files00038.tif'
8a792e5ffb72df0130745ace42e8d7d6
cd371bdc4d7cb0a71bd79e8d61f81ef08a015872
'2011-11-16T17:08:58-05:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQK' 'sip-files00038.txt'
e786c98a70c773b71f84b3d903017b5c
3acfb0182697ce2e93b1a29ede7ba89874c57f95
'2011-11-16T17:07:53-05:00'
describe
'9409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQL' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
1923cd0bd33d3b3fcc3fedeefaaf27ef
243d81037b0b4465f19dc23b6f6a4ba2abc8720b
describe
'955203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f058df4504a8dc7a58b81a7a73baa19c
d067fa0632e851db381e4fd30f92482b9b5a4d75
describe
'89140' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
4fca479716978f89077f2ed39be98226
1b40aa57932adee4e09fc5352bca90aec8575624
describe
'24605' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQO' 'sip-files00039.pro'
0834b89e1931d08033415f6084918267
df6830f22853602bfd29132150e45062dcf26686
describe
'32161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQP' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
4e6706df20075c43923b6acf29053bbb
86145913a2ee1ae3fb50c8a0c0a1253761c5b782
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
db687047aa24406f32242c9b920a9e59
a2df1bbece2c55137fca5f9b3c4bfda9e1850616
'2011-11-16T17:10:00-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQR' 'sip-files00039.txt'
007fb48e3a2a80b038a09af86a88f459
6e562b0607e69c0efd1d71adcaf9be18f171f034
'2011-11-16T17:05:03-05:00'
describe
'9180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQS' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
b39fce1c4eecb3f7b723a53b33e86f42
ca5f2e7e7c9daf9fd0b3555a0a35bea113730d30
'2011-11-16T17:05:32-05:00'
describe
'939019' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQT' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f1fe57bc1a9667091cf9add544c83f50
2ab49706ce9a8629134d89b1effa1e63e1251026
describe
'90868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQU' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
5a4751dc86e4b6f5082f627d686750c1
342552d286209d9a3dd1fedbd59c77c72936988f
'2011-11-16T17:10:18-05:00'
describe
'25185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQV' 'sip-files00040.pro'
02693f4c7dd1e43ec8762a2cce12ac7e
530295dbc47fb650a7df5e887dcb89dbf382866c
'2011-11-16T17:09:31-05:00'
describe
'33076' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQW' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
4064774c2c2f77f17cf6e6c720edcf60
9c8db5f13adacdaef6bff6490c49925c23573a75
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQX' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1c07095bd48441bdc50f80d5ea1fb9f9
d7143189ceb109c54088a347721fa8db627af569
'2011-11-16T17:07:44-05:00'
describe
'1001' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQY' 'sip-files00040.txt'
460b73c6c98567a5105962fe0b0ef2d5
e888d23b52b5d88482d3b2cf8baba9cad16b587a
'2011-11-16T17:06:53-05:00'
describe
'9551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARQZ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
8411b178bd69efbba9ecf99995f610fc
41083a5d283777ca8504eb86a98f7302ed06fe54
describe
'955228' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRA' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
ed1f562c609f601d18f4dad26433da86
ba1338564c7eac53a969035a526d2d1db6bba1f0
'2011-11-16T17:07:54-05:00'
describe
'89972' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRB' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
2b3e5f89919543acfe743a4a2c85fd27
9b1b334da3c0b9d318c9ce0f79cfc59b2da5f4da
'2011-11-16T17:05:04-05:00'
describe
'25042' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRC' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f4b2807f0f955f8aaac2edd32c3fd269
a9583a6a33f357a8290905d753cf8600d2f5bc0d
'2011-11-16T17:07:47-05:00'
describe
'33396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRD' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
407da3c47ff3ab21b045922262cf4136
205cda9a9658c54e7cc298e43ff2fdfe03b2b2ec
'2011-11-16T17:10:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRE' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4f1a5d0d70ee65e869c490f37a87dd03
c2dde3a2aa6d958bd549beb5cfe86101f0a183cd
'2011-11-16T17:09:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f648b0141964fd7c10256a75e3f5080a
82a4549a8099e37e48a189c586f45de836a871c0
'2011-11-16T17:06:19-05:00'
describe
'9203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRG' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
16b5cded8e80a49ceb86d47f02d4b3a0
ca58c0b238a09c4f85a8ebc59840c4bc80575d50
describe
'939022' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRH' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4f871d71d327f90be2024c452ec40816
22b524bed31f8a0aaf95d9855c563fe0665d1fe8
describe
'91951' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRI' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
e798c57eb63e6af802a50439e7f0b44f
69791acc968af03600a6fc5ea4f5b9c3cb12d713
'2011-11-16T17:04:50-05:00'
describe
'26394' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRJ' 'sip-files00042.pro'
6bff573a0a2e18e148c3916ce43b1159
18bb176ca51a1804796cec01524958721905589c
describe
'37782' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRK' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
240786dd2a2df0362252ca8721cf9bc3
f58e8f6d5f92235bb761329185780bb56e46904d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRL' 'sip-files00042.tif'
b51766fd786b97cece1a2344d842a5ce
9c0bf621dfd7a0c3d10e49667d77ef588d4bea31
'2011-11-16T17:09:04-05:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRM' 'sip-files00042.txt'
545fe80824451055d5487c2ca1d64f60
0157aa78db8bd6e42ede582220a7219523e0092e
describe
'9649' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRN' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
ca8d14c25ad32589dcf8334a2b9b1ab8
fc7bc66ac9bcc8e8b0dd77638c6e30473bf8400f
describe
'955196' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ad96527f715b591a535dbd807668a6a3
87e945d46f9de156efdf496a6bc91aa207f9c5d7
describe
'92756' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRP' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
59102fad6d1313a50e889d4840e55b37
f461c29da49b6ccf7dda5c10f89007df4931e29d
describe
'26706' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
fd96357a70217eb3d3f32a79a6fc6309
f1c5e7df874b229a128e3cde5f81245997debc8c
'2011-11-16T17:10:16-05:00'
describe
'33270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
52976bc2656e0f374bef67d9b4178cee
2ca832162f2eb325702876f09efd1c23108410c5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
575a6c446ca8e7cbafee0923336c685e
79d8b6c865d9a3f71cd8babf46173719d7f690fa
'2011-11-16T17:05:21-05:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRT' 'sip-files00043.txt'
98ad63871fa7529ed4911d135be4d0aa
b8a563573302334185186b30ecd1e11e31393428
'2011-11-16T17:06:36-05:00'
describe
'9412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
05f19022928c4f560102d2c516d109f4
909b44af612915cd775928abf72297ac40c58fdc
'2011-11-16T17:06:28-05:00'
describe
'939018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRV' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
2e9bcc3680b07b9ba24e5088c99a5af8
9d782945fa0002fd4b3bf9f162957268871781ae
describe
'94624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRW' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
0d23cb3c9c54da82aae1f283d84cbead
d8a41d7044be9fad866e5ded163b7873e700fcbe
describe
'27082' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRX' 'sip-files00044.pro'
cc79d2304d816a157bb5e33087f7dd8e
7654bc924afb7297b2b48889f437fe573d8ee9d5
describe
'33146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRY' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
1c48b71590a094457b9d31797250675a
4c2a94aae03cc304c4711baaefb47b6fdb0413ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARRZ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
968c65730caa062c8683f23983c7617c
ee0d95c74e448306afde6b3bf38b0e04cb38b6fe
'2011-11-16T17:07:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSA' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a60ec7c71fe88e73abb77d0e3ca0d8c6
614bb8ba509613b804c22169dede9500efc2c71f
describe
'9778' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSB' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
84b009b707c86fc9ed10e4c45a08a380
cb292db26d4732688967acbdfd19b08b092bc396
'2011-11-16T17:05:30-05:00'
describe
'955204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
491a8530e6877939ee45a7fe6576203b
22ff3f458b4fb431d5e49a9ee7d628037c963708
describe
'93571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSD' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
8f5f453174a6581a3e08ddde3526ef47
cdf3c247ac9da2bfb9694a28688b447ad661e3d8
describe
'27008' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSE' 'sip-files00045.pro'
9fb03fe275a1694b156947b2c6bfbbe8
b2f44789f9d661420ab0590a17ef683e313bc141
describe
'38713' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSF' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
2c631184e7a49cf750ae571e0cdbb538
9e659799adcc1cd5de4b2ae3982d110b41d6c000
'2011-11-16T17:05:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSG' 'sip-files00045.tif'
3f430edcc91453669b49d83111f6c2b2
76e55c5c6cf4a431c78605d36c3fe425f061c63e
'2011-11-16T17:09:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSH' 'sip-files00045.txt'
134ca75ec2df805e9a53365aabe25a2e
151558d8d341a176fddd323ffdbf9d543011f227
describe
'9632' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSI' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
7dc5bd9119eea135cf7bdc6ed309793a
08192e19e628c888889827df478a45bf25b18009
describe
'939010' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSJ' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
72dff450365e7bfdfcc33fc642e92971
fda7a1ec1b9286faaafd3776c4b31c4e1b5a3174
describe
'94638' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSK' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
6a6cb85bd57e61406318841bdeab37c7
7cef76e56cff11465e9a745da1ce32cf6a9153d3
describe
'26649' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSL' 'sip-files00046.pro'
7f4175fcb128b248a673dfd4f7b13bcf
e87245f0c9f0ed65c988c359948198269e68a181
describe
'33168' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSM' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
c5d81e79fce325ae1dcdaef9859a7434
76aa8ca59d58c53cb5a69704c15e476bbb6288ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSN' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e3b107dfb06bdc6fd0ef4a51af02084a
4b8c3ac7d2a27177570627196caea58b27eb245c
'2011-11-16T17:05:01-05:00'
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSO' 'sip-files00046.txt'
422d6d7b46388fb40af61d38685a5102
d32011680d939b3d59214937d7be6fc03d7edfe6
describe
'9752' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSP' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a2f0b4aca35abf7d3678e15743bf2ac8
79d9709c64b5d5beed180695ec2c6a648eece4e5
describe
'955198' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSQ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e26b9e5c519a7e67095d552a42345502
124b23a795032693a41ea246e69bdbba8a3c38b9
describe
'94669' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSR' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
362077f8409e7a8cbdfbddc736d567c2
8e73f3ccd5c359ca4f7cf50bcbb74fda28897ed4
describe
'27021' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1319d3721d8a88e61dd7b96ba6513f76
0238a95a8006da9f3e3fea05992974edce9537e3
describe
'36597' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARST' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
f178b62900731d4c848693a48708fce4
d470dd09330c627323597a4cacb7aca342b4ac86
'2011-11-16T17:07:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSU' 'sip-files00047.tif'
68b63c413d2cfee8fc7cbe0398406c19
c1232b56c3bbfaa4d83461f6d3419154e697e8af
'2011-11-16T17:08:27-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
991ff17ca0291d5453f80f5a53f9d721
7bf613dd4169853a75cef891a8d471ed50dc96de
'2011-11-16T17:04:45-05:00'
describe
'9675' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSW' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
32c15adc6c8364cba5d877e29ad2668b
3f1ffd45f76f6f6a20094b4050d2d4801a95928b
'2011-11-16T17:07:27-05:00'
describe
'939017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSX' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
84835ee00569d6f322a34a0c763f9284
d54a848acf253378b9ce853b6b11f1f23c3fbc8c
'2011-11-16T17:08:46-05:00'
describe
'95275' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
f504c92515ce6e0d36ffa5e36a6e4a75
e921b6c2f000e0bb068c10bcc8868fcc57412269
'2011-11-16T17:08:31-05:00'
describe
'26511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARSZ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b86e0766e49c9416f5ff947d30a79990
19231c145bc87b8fb3aa65bbf160df6c37814593
'2011-11-16T17:06:42-05:00'
describe
'34962' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTA' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
64975f14de61d7b1a376416e02bf017e
349bd841528e5dde5bbf7e9ec769f885d31d6af5
'2011-11-16T17:05:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTB' 'sip-files00048.tif'
33d0622077507dda253d245f102c0482
601c641c55c20ea275ae8c0d6670bc7db652c680
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTC' 'sip-files00048.txt'
b9f6617ba33ec3effde0b5de0e01c74b
ae797fa069ee8dc3634ba6df92359bfaf36846f7
'2011-11-16T17:07:16-05:00'
describe
'9617' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTD' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
788197a3370e697960cee6c77d8d0dbd
aa2154521753c7084f71a51d76599544004a22d2
describe
'955055' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTE' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
9c2af5127bebd262a266e2a6c90de783
757ff37c428fa81b012218d1c35223a5fec8e0ea
describe
'95944' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTF' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
7dd69e597f04efc0648dc595f4e7c763
80f4628222f487f0b81802467ff68727d1310405
describe
'27610' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTG' 'sip-files00049.pro'
f7bd9f3d3210423652772c88a4d041c1
b2f404cd8d58a746b415cf1532a629a9d74b4c7c
describe
'35449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTH' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b9366044319af1b19676feb3d732a6cb
53bb5c8f7dcee963295349d802f5e0948a849e59
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTI' 'sip-files00049.tif'
bf54642a26794d3557a66615f3269a6f
62c513935945120221ffd8d0c98a8b7e4cfbd4ef
'2011-11-16T17:06:29-05:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTJ' 'sip-files00049.txt'
1c7169dea1216829d6e75c5007ef820d
a0bf32f896ce2259b548d34d24dacb7babfcff57
describe
'9623' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
705ba823fa029d0c58a56bb318b9ad75
500369bf4020f497a419b0a7fd8674ac57c101fb
'2011-11-16T17:05:16-05:00'
describe
'938975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTL' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
230061953a20f92a1626f10c0273b2c4
54147ada2c35ccecec52ee5c92eb4a2848bb817e
describe
'97703' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
64241ea6343aa1d7b736ef8bacf002c4
839628e4d14e46cf025d3e7e55fdca9fa7621992
describe
'27296' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTN' 'sip-files00050.pro'
db794aa587647e0291cda9dd830852cc
b3600ae2cde43c0c540658962f0f0c45f5f34c1c
'2011-11-16T17:06:25-05:00'
describe
'37350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4e1383843ddba8096f895c3bb80f5ed7
b8f47064e1bca98b2837ad1ee93b25ac38ffbc46
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
f48a9603443395a06fe4c1e9a9f09ae7
951c1d213b1e05cfd50267eded8ffc368bb80477
'2011-11-16T17:08:36-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
42e09eafe6cb0dfa7b83a38cf5fa06d7
7bc9d364cbfba4bb11294232ae0999c25fbc1781
describe
'9876' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
1b836c66283d318dfd1ffe717fef548b
40ecc6895f6f2211c8e2b02ae96180f7d07c1a64
'2011-11-16T17:09:33-05:00'
describe
'955134' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
00303bb11e9f86ab09fbe5b300d5f851
2072c8291de4eb76c3639234e894b9b30db71f22
'2011-11-16T17:09:23-05:00'
describe
'95057' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
26ef03da7fcba7243476491070805d97
00854074c9939d0de6a70f8f4c61807492e51912
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
fc787814921e61a50b8725bbc82a8d9e
0dc76be30e844ece789081f9620c136020d06231
'2011-11-16T17:09:42-05:00'
describe
'37144' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
250d5ddfc5902b55bfd44c59338b2e23
b16a0e758f82f7a85107a1b13438d4bf50360ca6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
c7595790c9a7fcd7828225aa557a512f
b6dc6b0d587830623b894bfa378fabbcdb4dcf1e
'2011-11-16T17:06:34-05:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
03e1437db82bd2dbd184a9a9b5c12701
ec68437bbd249a24fc80ab40535cc18f8a359d43
'2011-11-16T17:05:42-05:00'
describe
'9552' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cce4cc5724030538c4ecd8a2c12d8c06
3510867a66cd8c1572967cb09aa94cff46337c1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARTZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
88e71052d9233c82ae40d122543d5a94
c0ed808cc15f69b221a8d85fc3ce24135075ef14
describe
'67472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
9dce577259f2f80351d2eadb37a2a6fa
0b36323f79cbc39d8e54bb3cfccd018f26ceca46
'2011-11-16T17:06:00-05:00'
describe
'21770' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
7a7b56f731ef159cefa910b7ebbb6b8a
8209f9fe1116b530101cea955bb0c709277b4c6c
describe
'23787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
68cfea60f6fc63de34913212bfcf62f2
9acb1e31bff6fce1a8515afb6426b958270e95ea
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
2d49c6830cfd0dc8ac31037dbfb156b8
23c89f83be681d67712d0f33efcf1ecb205014a1
'2011-11-16T17:09:02-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
20056fe80da974de68132702eda45934
ff798b74b1a81a319206006a3104540a927098c4
describe
'7006' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUF' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
6726ea67c5102f0888a8814d75c1320c
7a1fe494a0134a8ac117f2b8035829812e61dfc3
'2011-11-16T17:10:03-05:00'
describe
'955230' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4126d84abfd4bb7378b7ab22e434b41f
d7fc1a00a81259b7091bec6562bf6de4f44d0150
describe
'93788' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
9076329fe2f6fda2735dd920778cb969
1dbb010b4eba7a810ab4b206cf7c161437926a41
'2011-11-16T17:06:20-05:00'
describe
'27594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5f1ae23da4b31c6cfba554bc8eac6ca9
f76c3fe7ce9ef42be2dc9739279e8dafb0232426
describe
'32164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
bd5cc13c1b7de6476929db3d70e632aa
2a6b64a0e8a367813f3cf9e96c3c2d0b02a793e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
b06ec5d21f298e10ebee9873c3489f78
26d92758d1f35962ed737847e26022d18f7616a3
'2011-11-16T17:07:11-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUL' 'sip-files00053.txt'
63ef5a780107f61f614fafdf0ed32983
c0f228c2c221d15dc1c04b5788efe5a52b9f1ace
'2011-11-16T17:09:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
693924f03367354b0327f8dde505c8d2
ae572d317bd61b9f5ec13b369fa5bcc0ffd14474
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
3d3d2bed4dbf94068edf03874c9c8bbd
96b98850db993ac072229258989f76ae527b79ca
'2011-11-16T17:09:00-05:00'
describe
'98727' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
1c38a1aa806b66180161d71625ec3edd
b38d679bc9eb3a963671da1b57f01fe02958e04e
describe
'27180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
3b698ba400b204a2a2fbecb77796bb18
6cf0f527c65d91815eaf7ed3aa0ca007e14c5354
describe
'35158' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
34b4ce4446930d4bbc9b7770f1ba02c3
5e569761fed3dade3f930b0ff5cea0eb4a285f31
'2011-11-16T17:08:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
6094cadb851e00ac51fdb284604a6a85
f40cd9c4fdb92e3b7a07be428e39a129adac66a6
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
669b04ec528f3faa413f82cb73d8dc51
14412d17939113ee2c0857d9649f7d3a3009efef
describe
'10078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
b9cac319d140546d912d7ee0ba4148b1
cc3203df3a615725e57981ca684a7956e2842d44
'2011-11-16T17:06:10-05:00'
describe
'955162' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
1caaac745c108b26a19d2b5b8881b870
36d6c46dba700aaa40455202976ac30752a52fba
describe
'94932' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
879999944d249101c5ac45187221c136
e338dbe170f6e5fd6a4894d249b783ecccbe8cbe
describe
'26489' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
422503c320929170cab57e96dd9f6ec1
43aa1f2b5af224d3e83ce346ef3a9a5b91090b7e
describe
'37265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
dac836977e89f081e612768dcf255480
21d9d43bb60a35bd3c4ef5b698a3152e1be97b4b
'2011-11-16T17:06:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
747655194b344139a36b3a7b855b9fcc
82afe549cc9ea0bfcec77c032a1651bde5730576
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARUZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
f9a9d90f6bd3bbd2b809676fb2df04af
675879a9be0c9dbaa6773e09c24bbeaab6977017
'2011-11-16T17:08:01-05:00'
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVA' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
e8c7b483ab59f7488e72ad27d1ffdc71
0775b7d7e47f8a522a0c18e5c9aa29f037534193
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3d77ce6dafbf5f387ea758624327b9eb
a8b42b42e7b517899085bf8924150349a4aeb380
describe
'102331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
3d10693f62a9fa998a8dae7206ae92f2
843f3f983ee5f0bf0ffd61bb29adb1c95c2c46fd
'2011-11-16T17:09:26-05:00'
describe
'26729' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
d58f88fc3fb92b3fef6148a19410dd66
38ecc07a8b75faaa65a02ceb0b17a2fc568ad189
'2011-11-16T17:08:00-05:00'
describe
'37302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVE' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
f995b15093e9b07e4bff3171ec483ee5
fd8b933913359872f07b05f1703f144289c54c91
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
6a9395073a83fae144dabc94d4ae1b5a
0fb4db2fad7fe5a733b64fb0c0905c5303ab134b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVG' 'sip-files00056.txt'
354227b5d2b7627bdd8cf788fc5990ee
1a9df9f9d559034dcef0642e3c82399e6ea77001
describe
'9765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVH' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
bfa3cc1419f237ed8dda8885bad263e0
45e6533999eacca0cc6bb7daafd6ca5d1196e54f
describe
'955169' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVI' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
85754755862e1d6ae08ce0a668cfa563
00dbeca5f9a0ba3b83f1b21fd3aa0c5346ae46aa
describe
'103306' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVJ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8809fc2737253c5fe617e05f2bb24245
2496e882c68361dcce6d16af66eb0f3326f1d725
'2011-11-16T17:04:44-05:00'
describe
'27648' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVK' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ccb9c57260887d6f4ba0d1afbc4255a7
84ffe4806221fa993380cc060d242f0fa96ec507
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVL' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
5b787c577eb9e2e662bcc908d16104f4
2e2591ed1f04707be764e7ab93950fa1bc768da3
'2011-11-16T17:09:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVM' 'sip-files00057.tif'
a0b0d1daeb967858bb41c34d4feb434f
b7abcc323878ce7d07b48b826c5d436f8d39785b
'2011-11-16T17:05:28-05:00'
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVN' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9067080658e61f6bc91cac1e7f1e262b
5f68a29880ecb2a87136d97f346adaae5f393550
describe
'9627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVO' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
43a6e58760058f22762e5bad5e407a3f
820393c7f3ff96658e2cef5652ebebd33d668579
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
28634166bdf42507e609abb224069e0a
df1c87b4a116676cecdb8e25c71e8892a1ee4c63
describe
'105358' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVQ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f47edf0f91aaca6e144da299fb187419
592e2f42a5a9a0210b921aa15095ef5a7bbd27d9
'2011-11-16T17:08:43-05:00'
describe
'36319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVR' 'sip-files00058.pro'
33aa893b75cd4404bc96aa4fe0dd6b14
df5199409740db7b448f9eba1884ebd4dc5e20c0
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
55591862c51cde317c32dcfb8b5f4eaa
f7e92088b9f20ab6565d4f4ff4d665f7a65fd756
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVT' 'sip-files00058.tif'
b6ee97991182faf75a711cdd071fd0c0
6e355b0086a131101074798c1a943e09971c347b
'2011-11-16T17:05:46-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVU' 'sip-files00058.txt'
af5f68013ae5b8c818684fd58071da96
4edc1c53535e25054d0eddf9d7e290bea02911ae
describe
'8922' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVV' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
16546d49ae3470fd5432f53eb1ac1942
b44f1ece5c133c7c6e32e61c70557b08522d4aa5
describe
'955131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVW' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
61b1e2dc5376fd20a7469b367ad44e65
92585e886f70b81e74330a04fa48853b541e612b
describe
'84396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVX' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
86fd60ee8d50144fdad248b121e1bc70
21d705bceaf6e954aaa38dd0b690902aec5f432e
describe
'20265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVY' 'sip-files00059.pro'
78a3af6aa3804b3386e8b28d87eb0cbb
dfda30561ee66e08a8683ee62bf4bb05374e9ab0
describe
'27560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARVZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
ce94a34da5a31d9e000db0fa9e2d829c
ff25390a8354b40f3244173454903eb20b908544
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWA' 'sip-files00059.tif'
0393f2cf4de28bdde052e89ec5aec235
c9086ca277529eaa92302049e45e05d872a4fbf8
'2011-11-16T17:05:55-05:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWB' 'sip-files00059.txt'
d78f8cebd99e0173b381cf9568812ca8
f7963c727ac34d73abc07854af74128cd0a017ab
describe
'7710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWC' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
cdfaaec8085aa5b8af88e17872396137
8e310622761d28991513514d9b96080650fc0485
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWD' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
245e80d589cffa302c26efb6db933afc
008f622019e00963441ad1dcda5df7a9222b3f93
describe
'102066' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWE' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
23750c1daca2573e3c2d95936280c1d8
81bee378fcb15a0731190fefc2b790ae64cbb6e5
describe
'26942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
d76f3f361f62d3eb1c04e8650da620c5
6f59edb3e93615e3be1c9ff40621295c77e8a83e
'2011-11-16T17:07:32-05:00'
describe
'32360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWG' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
1c18b0e12136493023f07e98c9359223
4520d8d5b289a1d89e7faf6534c026087b7fde3a
'2011-11-16T17:05:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWH' 'sip-files00060.tif'
73ccb097f7f5dffa73fb28a1900e610e
4dec9d549c93152244b3a896795dbff4d84ce7df
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWI' 'sip-files00060.txt'
063509d36429a049a37333e23524e409
974b0cb9d6e105c67c82420131773ef73da8ff87
describe
'9706' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWJ' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
258cc5b76935fa7a6ce9ab509c765ea3
82a37c8aadfe9063a121c47f14990d9fcd502601
describe
'921243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWK' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
f815c746c4e7d130d8e746038d01e2f5
86158442f2b17753fc23aaf42e8789942153a6f2
'2011-11-16T17:04:52-05:00'
describe
'99564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWL' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
09804bc1764d9717968b7e5ac1831199
111fabc936c088cdaa91c5b575b5faf91a19d1de
describe
'26403' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWM' 'sip-files00061.pro'
842318e2a5c622c703c8e2be81432d03
7669141a7f6380a80e708857723304ea5609eeba
'2011-11-16T17:06:37-05:00'
describe
'36178' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWN' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c3049ec73c9e108b51bbee9b5727e8b5
6eabe667c36fe307188e5c5f2f128073280cf226
describe
'7378411' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWO' 'sip-files00061.tif'
934309d87498afcc7c8fa607b94e74bf
fb50b3cfbc9e9ccf1bb0024653b825038eaa7630
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWP' 'sip-files00061.txt'
a31947c71dc25ac49468278ab84371bc
7c4f757ddc551fbbdda617fd91dbd11aa5742eb0
describe
'9578' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWQ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0d6cdf42285bf1f327de1d7e70aeeaa4
b387456af84ee763dd2a66c32edbc3a4938f44d3
describe
'922914' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWR' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
a475d783dbd36da454758a939a2fe3df
83a40f829cbc3fcffb8423adde42228e499087a0
'2011-11-16T17:04:35-05:00'
describe
'102063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWS' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
44a545e83a211470ab7592f1ee9d957c
3f10ceffd888f75a578f105fd8bebbef2c9509ac
describe
'26072' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWT' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3e1051c72a058628de486208d3181818
e9f3deef82e1ba27833bc1c20ff51d47abe1412f
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWU' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
815307ba03525033353d3ad7f3812d02
e6f91e1f10d5adb7f88de929f2caaa400787724c
describe
'7391871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWV' 'sip-files00062.tif'
875308a02a8f37d3601d84b4c76aaf0a
71277d4b28a13dc034d78ba9b2e702cf3ff33110
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWW' 'sip-files00062.txt'
9d80cf62971a916a2818a68166f2c699
9fcddbfa5eef6e48c6d7911125b383b53056a864
'2011-11-16T17:09:15-05:00'
describe
'9472' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWX' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
c9c94daca598bd144b3f47e707acaa50
f183e884558be3269c8241ffcc9546901b6ce75b
describe
'705039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWY' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
a40e2e24ae4e573d044ee5b23264f836
f2339d2d6f1558b1c578c350970fb5794b9fdc66
describe
'38243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARWZ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
380ddb2cdf679a90a82ad45d22441c3e
33c7e92139a37aaf9955b08abc6d846b91770615
'2011-11-16T17:08:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXA' 'sip-files00063.pro'
b4148086f26fd73ce1092c497d8fe222
de76023e283f8d249cfd332b346de7d206bfd991
describe
'12890' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXB' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d06ca675528aa0d01fff92f8c2289f82
eb8ab82b99eff17a5b7c81f39ac7e3fdba29bd0d
describe
'7810861' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXC' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c47ef7ef293d56164d91aeeddafae187
5b837a1fe2f58f1fd851bdc37785ac4fc5c33f66
'2011-11-16T17:09:28-05:00'
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXD' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e139c6b3a8dbe1570f5f560c8b13fe95
39ed3407ca5e3a7f539743b393f07038e7d058ed
describe
'3752' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXE' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
62e93e6240bd2042d0aabd4010ab383f
3e121592aa50fcd80b7c251c66eec473d199b3b1
describe
'962515' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXF' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
182447f75511d1086e982f2597fa1d81
dcb417e0b1738ccc285cf96120f00affee2cd2bf
describe
'76509' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXG' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
9c6cadf67f2ba65dfec2629bf21564bc
57e99d3747e53924faf77e89fea2f5ff71bce4b4
describe
'20757' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXH' 'sip-files00064.pro'
562b15de07c43088b3aeaca944b961d1
66b535ee755fac2771f741caf2af86c8e94364ae
describe
'30828' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXI' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
c2bab2d70fb5c6feb7aafe00bb52e316
97fc499d51652d4868af5630ece3d62746305f90
describe
'7709221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXJ' 'sip-files00064.tif'
5ef99cd2d33d4057571203b8a58975ff
42359c9df5926f9f6a6d9065c3e62b0b707942c4
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXK' 'sip-files00064.txt'
8fec9e83fb7ba7848912065988edb1e3
4ae5629667adeacbae6fb6f334df1935466fa3cc
describe
'8130' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXL' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
481a22ec909abff68beb5b401ee4f8ee
0970c0d070621174a585a4272faf5dd819c78b40
describe
'975244' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
ccef1cee7c29624be9b517e2d0a7704a
2ef19e7e7840e69bf4164f75381ddf82538dd825
describe
'93540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXN' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
6fcb6f3c5dae2e91aa7c704802335c42
ea5b2bbccae230eb1f365742030164f182e60810
describe
'27198' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXO' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ae787e6dc66354e93a2bd0f78813bd3a
71b20ba921a9691fd62769c8b6622240c7f92ec1
describe
'35000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXP' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
1fbd81979fe73130138212fcca975a74
bd230515ef1bfea3b87b9e440f7f57583acf328f
'2011-11-16T17:07:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXQ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
e7b2bd65eb40005de0038e6896788d75
85c9415c37091d240791201e51ac84a8836813c4
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXR' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0e17cf282f64a78b9307a288fee3b76d
405f6d80cce7f7c33d4f4d00e34fb6e370b0c591
'2011-11-16T17:08:29-05:00'
describe
'9293' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXS' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
7b5d087f5449d1c20c186cf2ed2249a7
e97e8e9f02da5d97ac944a9bac1fe9f360d52994
describe
'962577' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXT' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
0abccc6cd0467aaeb8b83bddff29a288
22be807c65f63762344e54d00ac5a75326d79c04
describe
'91044' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXU' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4efd8dbec1b766c1d6fb31de8d670ca6
b6453430e7af35d54b290c26a351c7be73262933
describe
'26035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXV' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4011b2121e627e24ee7494394e79ee0d
9b8d1b4003f0e7f622d7d1f9a7d3b79fda00cf11
describe
'32605' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXW' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
29b9a92efe621177b2438b8627fb980e
97276e50713905e30e77766e2cdfbd351f238993
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXX' 'sip-files00066.tif'
7d9736e0f29e95327c7292b0adf6a95b
1d51958aaa4e28f5dda6732716f16641644692a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXY' 'sip-files00066.txt'
b06726d5fc65af611595dd1066b1c09d
2816706fd436fd0572328271f880a60e84e8ceec
describe
'9549' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARXZ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
e30631dcef3ecefc8b9994d40ac7362f
8ffab11966e46a512013fde25656a9926daca575
describe
'975212' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYA' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4b61b5612eb07c618b49ffe3d93ec45b
05332742685c143b2a32780506dab72ef2ac4a63
'2011-11-16T17:08:30-05:00'
describe
'90035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYB' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a90be4e72df841a374d3b0d614cbf1e0
60d899fbd0862762c8d86dcdcca0257542ca9b16
describe
'25601' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYC' 'sip-files00067.pro'
975b3282f527206f542f55905b6142c1
6b5b58fe01bd3a4cec142c7b25d984e5b16b4ad1
'2011-11-16T17:05:15-05:00'
describe
'33152' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYD' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
b45133f5173603898f8826ee15c81599
09aed916073c723a07ce1381aa6168b4480a0d45
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYE' 'sip-files00067.tif'
55bc778c8e136d170048c8e083aafe72
96ec7084b18263999565cd6d155162b2b6055bad
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYF' 'sip-files00067.txt'
f9c31d4f5f301f5bbf5a67b9e1380211
713f109812e8cf6da3af3c681fc73302d3b2b556
describe
'9178' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYG' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
cf6e41f5599246561531a75dfcc83cd3
d5d952dd669aa1351007cbdbd1efaed70a1df96f
describe
'962568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYH' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
b3a792e9ee193835ce540092c7df5a74
4abeb9dd377e5e4fd7508d8e9ad40426bd2072ed
describe
'94748' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYI' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
04cbb2d4e0d56bf75726503e9d12a910
59f6804593f678b7a77c89d4c1a523fb28782df9
describe
'26555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYJ' 'sip-files00068.pro'
fb011d84a8525b37110a460fb303d5f1
2b2d991901c00ebc7e9523fe9e44e9a1d5557f39
describe
'36745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYK' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
dafb85f40d32821f27db1a7b3aec0f97
fe803173ee3706b236a1f98a29e12f45125cb050
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYL' 'sip-files00068.tif'
93ecaed8f676e5ee8f633721199584c9
73ca58a6805c298851fca0aa40acb22aff762546
'2011-11-16T17:05:57-05:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYM' 'sip-files00068.txt'
69104425ecd3bc94adc50a18779c4dcc
63ddad23579723101a126c3ca7ad73b23b8323d1
describe
'9569' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYN' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
9d88b3083dfd3bd69a9c100d312a869e
6bc01c770e359d827d6366e5856cea1e57b6e289
describe
'975221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYO' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
29958992166e59b65e725c50836ea086
f4ef2d3c741db8af6a5adf536a9375d1b9eb676a
describe
'94298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYP' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
0eb733135f015b7c7ff1543dbb0109cb
ee13157337acaece04438f93f4f4aa554fc4b4e9
'2011-11-16T17:09:16-05:00'
describe
'26864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYQ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
766b77e190be00d5d7096e6799b3152f
0e5ee494c72a292b8ea327917a8ed61c469c85dd
describe
'34480' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYR' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
95ad7e64ac88d6d4e6fae7c7c0b776c6
37ab44d415d9f48ad7200fc40f3e20c1db359153
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYS' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a2c6e439f9ae3c8b919c53954af9f690
2a98ad8abd1e9fb1a2a4cd31dc823ef2e337a722
'2011-11-16T17:09:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYT' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c4df797c39a3de383b4a043e49c8cb74
aa22593b9089f0f1a91f3b35ec952a50cd394ecd
describe
'9359' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYU' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
d40341b80b67d89371a1129dfe37c9f8
0a79979842ca373b6c38af73c9b694c4329e1f0c
describe
'962506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYV' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
668b1239a56df493c225fd8ac5e6c553
76fe01cc4d4df6460b7ec37c6545aa121baff3e4
describe
'95633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYW' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
00f85dfea75a05a4d19c037bbced4599
f9d672d85061f7f56767bcb6395760abcc44afd3
'2011-11-16T17:09:58-05:00'
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYX' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2312c69511f303ee8c15429c8242ed8d
e9453e29a41a9b86ee93dea298144ecdb1607338
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYY' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
7b00d1c46e9c0b99c678d18785581dc4
a07f5f7850b10cb6292806a0f53c211da3143a04
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARYZ' 'sip-files00070.tif'
d466cedd34ba2e0763f9fe1d2b8b502d
1dbc7b9d64efd1386805766748c5d263ab87a10b
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZA' 'sip-files00070.txt'
c77a39f4b2cd9b9a859008ccba77f305
32964d371e9625cca90864b99f7996f9f964f697
describe
'9525' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZB' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
54eae9916e3e0e66843b2c5ed90c5f4f
e0457f4639eb92dc244c1da3745006ee71af3323
'2011-11-16T17:05:24-05:00'
describe
'926752' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZC' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
afbf6445753f3b35400dbc87e6664a4f
781469dc680e34759479798e18295452c9aea36d
'2011-11-16T17:09:45-05:00'
describe
'96817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZD' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
9f0e225c2e735907b8e7b34da5b67e6a
6352ba306bda7f7dafe05bfec6f5097f68a51372
describe
'26284' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZE' 'sip-files00071.pro'
02598d5f45a5034f9d5e65ea3ab69816
e603d5796a1e1ead27f63418e744e0658c4c8a3f
describe
'37100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZF' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5ba278fda502ba93de71862f7831fca6
6f2762cceb5c6ef5f3925dee0fcdd584ff2cee4b
describe
'7422673' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZG' 'sip-files00071.tif'
78c7400c972e13fffbcecf36c03ebfdc
38b952620bbaa581af05ebdca6c2b9cfe975cb86
'2011-11-16T17:06:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZH' 'sip-files00071.txt'
3d22e645bc9b6ddbcd018c30dcf63533
0811b721f2bbf4d8397b433cceb7a72af6ffdb22
describe
'10118' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZI' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
2fc62c9282931aaea8702310846d8732
4ce6df7fcd6c9eee54f298b7938dca6718ecf37e
describe
'914828' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZJ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
09894173183675f5017087a3fea5818c
e42ffe0c336dcbb5f7f1249900d23ad3aa1bcb1f
describe
'97638' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZK' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
fcd85f98f0764b95f0dcd868edb67b70
2b7a147edaf181b2f660a7772b8b3f973a27859b
describe
'27240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZL' 'sip-files00072.pro'
9e3d24e77eb888c93fdf4d37a5e0a24f
3d0038207e618edd1dfda2dd44e7e2560bc48209
describe
'36091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZM' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
08709ba997563aa5975c26118e1ade74
fa7a146d577f69a21a54bb56594d8c8a9449dc4f
describe
'7327761' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZN' 'sip-files00072.tif'
93ab647ce95881f274c7593ef88bf795
3b2242e49195a0cd542903e115c9397a29253057
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZO' 'sip-files00072.txt'
2e1fd9ee16c59351e97d7dc40d6961df
6077cdfa7729efa61be42664e6206f4a55329330
describe
'9886' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZP' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
ca0126e534ba1e81f3ec87ed31bd3f65
0453839147d0b5cbed8fbdaca8a764158efb11cb
describe
'926731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZQ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
ab0a8244196620c95ea2299b99a34245
7b426f19c4f7bec3c4a487a379438019660eb183
describe
'98066' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZR' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
bee7e6833e348227cd66461e250a50d5
8f6c290da7153ce6f49d361f69bdee13ea2c4e5f
describe
'27372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZS' 'sip-files00073.pro'
595653c446ec3c5a64cac83051540d32
4421d2f449f024762ecd322d6062ddc03239c125
'2011-11-16T17:08:06-05:00'
describe
'37291' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZT' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
d17eb635e76ddebd0dec851039a07ee8
4204c51972c840e7e11371527632df34e0aaef11
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZU' 'sip-files00073.tif'
434473cee991cd3f4493db5afe1732d8
d3b33a13538d4437b48cd604d78df7136bd798d0
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZV' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d84bad8c5145a31cd90a56736c66efe0
6e859f776d6f320f7950c59c13cbc3cd2543e84b
describe
'9881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZW' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
35399e07e7f9496a472b8c1c7bf127b3
4e4a902698aae0cddd76913ea2de677e61eb3d14
'2011-11-16T17:10:23-05:00'
describe
'914867' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZX' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
4d7f8504b1e51219903ba7a4157cc9c6
db593b73375ed6a269d331734b331c36bfc6a3b4
describe
'85867' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZY' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ab86e8ab18aa32aaf7dfe7c7888c2dff
f3c53510ca31da8c69bd716d666b7b67fd3cf5d9
describe
'23531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAARZZ' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ba5c9717fd9dc17cba9a43e976a39a4e
e1c2da0eb500abfd50001d8096595f5f76542026
'2011-11-16T17:10:08-05:00'
describe
'31435' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAA' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
6ba16fa4e477f68a655eb4f62fde50d7
7d9929d2400429b3e9869de8648c0da8c759fe96
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAB' 'sip-files00074.tif'
dc45ce57ad083441a03abba764dfecf1
f00692f829b28f36e58c2b910a5f406c5ca5d2a3
describe
'939' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAC' 'sip-files00074.txt'
95ae1128edbecd9ad038268c9f5104c5
cd370c38d8d498aea9b5b8eb87d521de69b32617
describe
'8752' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAD' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
dfd2c64050c8793ab60a134b74a4f127
c8afdc4e7b7111f42bdecc64bd143b5ab7fb3a0f
describe
'926750' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAE' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
824800f1ac77b5bacaa2d8e68cd23c8d
06b46b18ee178db6e5ac2279c7b1d02c7f427f12
'2011-11-16T17:07:41-05:00'
describe
'77521' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAF' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
63b39e7b78aa0eb07b71354758108f6a
447c3081e1d0331393f9b8b04394623eeebb8b45
describe
'20914' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAG' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a1d460c36f97da0cd281683d9235aa81
c46f12d6a9e0cf0ec6f17793b183a26e53dffa56
'2011-11-16T17:08:13-05:00'
describe
'28432' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAH' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
e0740eb9a6df0bef8c03623462bef0fa
d88a212d1629c8691d2058f7793e69317ea45186
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAI' 'sip-files00075.tif'
700450ae3f3123f6d12d498c91b4a2ed
ac2f23d838823a7afb6e54e4c43343d849ca703e
'2011-11-16T17:08:57-05:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAJ' 'sip-files00075.txt'
2fb9d2cac3ca7708321200e68c155d04
8e23af55fc1d3240f0879d89b36aead150688105
describe
'7950' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAK' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
b4b102c3197554c0bd3d25ee7f78bb40
308977ddc4ee19ef3a8fa455b01b03ee51933d6f
describe
'914906' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAL' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
3bcabba82b79833e124e7a56a4568a6c
8244392a1d87c2d8e75f7c20a5db62a627cb191c
describe
'95986' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAM' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
091abf2b72d0c083e925b1d7bbe668c5
cfe41ef50ee483c10a158cead876602666873883
describe
'26345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAN' 'sip-files00076.pro'
756fb280af8ce6b9369c436dd72d55a9
fae4f34cfa118a8edabf355c54ae1fbcbba96638
describe
'35588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAO' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
2ad941ffd0f4a4d3e61c2de3faaaab42
195fc9f15c8278c7225661c291c80834c1335207
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAP' 'sip-files00076.tif'
b08a5dbcc01384f011563b757ca446df
f137a13b392efdcceee6d5d46bc648cf95e50bf2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAQ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
43ccf6aebf31b4008458a01c60fd8d8c
558963f8f848407099fa1d03dcd3a61f44c501a0
'2011-11-16T17:09:51-05:00'
describe
'9901' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAR' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
f506be906fe2e0168421f09bb264ec22
2413cd9e216b5e97cbd345f6c4a22ecc731fc7e3
'2011-11-16T17:10:07-05:00'
describe
'926754' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAS' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
af1465da44ebee13f5d2a4242986c62d
f0dfe97dceaf1a2a4ed96bcf2a1f072889bb1e21
describe
'94269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAT' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
a32fcf4736e0f97f6c4e8d92cb650c9a
8aacfadcb59c74cbfe7561a8a46aaf6d31b0e577
describe
'26371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAU' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ef601686f53ecc96db9f398f0f539d75
93384f8fc1c048fb0ac119bae429654f60188788
describe
'34917' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAV' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e3e87d2d6c6d998387dbf94dddbb8a11
194710c0e1b0a45ad42657664ac4cebde60c51f7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAW' 'sip-files00077.tif'
11ae3fc623d7bc25a16153c731931c99
4a5cbb0a8ecf11977198a64dfc3a5af616641229
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAX' 'sip-files00077.txt'
5d5ad00dfba92014c64b56879d21e40f
7acbde6a2fe4dfb6f0bc3438eb24d6d2e0650269
describe
'9633' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAY' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
f0d4615a1ed0ef151e7265c8f5cd672d
6ae0d704412deced28ff8a3ba24baf6e9834e08a
'2011-11-16T17:09:09-05:00'
describe
'914889' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASAZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
9780a4a63480ddc2676ed5f18c13f17b
809440d11614ce4784c6c1369362700d9d0aeeea
describe
'96748' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBA' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
72436229e723400216463098f2204c4a
27aafad4428f8f5428fe7539202566740468f91b
describe
'27102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBB' 'sip-files00078.pro'
1e7e25ae76542a216e8b451f485d5e7d
3ac1634c73910079709f6c9261813b582ffc23d3
describe
'36122' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBC' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
fda132baf0ece820b0f608fddc474907
731048003891901205749c1f9122eb982f5c7fce
'2011-11-16T17:07:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBD' 'sip-files00078.tif'
ea036ace610d90d71ff7998a91ec2bdd
6c06a51e2ac04cd27be6f2b67888618b99a55f02
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBE' 'sip-files00078.txt'
6055f3beeaa37605fa0d8c71f1ccb5d5
3adf41f2374788b03b44c07b828bcfb6f78ee1f2
describe
'10175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBF' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
4e1fddcbc8da9e8abf1e15276c94b85f
5e7e5b6f060c70022b3b59407e8a0c9b85b7ad94
describe
'926751' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBG' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
274dcccddab735c3d4425b099e55432b
12850b7d314c14e8ecc24dff4f7eb60680630360
describe
'97068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBH' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
019147aa53f9b4e8e6cf798e8f02eef7
91d06bc6504ffec8d73c1944c14cc3ab4d534b9b
describe
'27635' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBI' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a089415bc5ff5386f81b8fb05ff5b1d0
d70a799e61d4e026293f00aa7b0047d968700bd4
'2011-11-16T17:09:53-05:00'
describe
'36185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBJ' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cdb4bb5160c2ff95991824da86752167
b9fa186f6494abfee3cde43fd0c8aa2274817d6c
'2011-11-16T17:08:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBK' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c4466bb2b580546a17bec46f1fce79c6
cf5289a270b21674492eb267b7cd992cfc43f8d8
'2011-11-16T17:08:22-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBL' 'sip-files00079.txt'
ea3ac4668e91fe8e1361842ab34401b9
15e72c8ed51babf01162fa744cbdc466e0d59c0b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBM' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c326ab3add65dcb059c01ac206af0b77
8d017c34fe97dd4d1fe470f1925ae1aca21c70c2
describe
'914895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBN' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
84d4ae043e267df548a04c5f81592159
6fe2c78e30aaae89afcb759d5b80301dc0bbfe65
'2011-11-16T17:04:39-05:00'
describe
'94379' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBO' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
261ac43d0a278ab2ed692bd6ddf690a6
5c9bda3d8289964a74168b4b46c10f5a87877463
describe
'26538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBP' 'sip-files00080.pro'
08657f16063885fdbf9ec31af5429348
6dd949952d8c9bb5b888f02a598edd73a7efc45d
'2011-11-16T17:08:11-05:00'
describe
'34876' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBQ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0c446a965453c35a99b39b94c6c90106
276bd3f0157909280fc2d6aea822090db9c17609
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBR' 'sip-files00080.tif'
ee89953864674b8a1a2e6ecc333bea2f
e8a7078d41be4eb00877d681d8666e6f0768bca7
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBS' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c53397b7fc45219f2b18905bf6234c58
639413a651f0b7f09b8a9f814f0bc9f1c809d7e7
describe
'9637' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBT' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
656e8c72922e9a1b7164df3dce95f8c1
9a04331199c10395081c2b1c06f32eefa512abcc
'2011-11-16T17:08:02-05:00'
describe
'926743' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBU' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
68fcd400be15bd1657c20e50d3fd04f5
4e0f09d4ad222f5edfc73e7a26f8dff750cbb74b
describe
'95895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBV' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
933a2290e2120804e7e53cb650886c38
4e1c19c2e6a2819c72aaad5759fe8b96f9d07edc
describe
'27581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBW' 'sip-files00081.pro'
a4fbc7bddda41ebdaf615c8754cfe13e
ce7fe3ec8ccf31c276e780b4ea338f8adea35d1c
describe
'36874' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
52cc2b6799abc1c454c5f073399f84d0
5697aaa9e684234e797611189ba7740ae015cf7c
'2011-11-16T17:08:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBY' 'sip-files00081.tif'
efa74d74013791241e9f2f0e0b06305f
72e859eaf30cc6d9a834113b8849ec8fe7a1fe6b
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASBZ' 'sip-files00081.txt'
3a409b011947d28530b11b07ae334b1a
a4f12e3cae03e4b338d6810666ed9c0b8a6d382f
'2011-11-16T17:07:28-05:00'
describe
'9903' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCA' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ca4bef327faf72eeb3973539b8b3ea78
40193987463b9f7abcb30d7a4ba87f85b668c9ae
describe
'914896' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCB' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
24dc346fe62a93adea21d98e3283a032
6d81e6f0186a20a9eba0779c8cac09f90823abbd
describe
'95770' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCC' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
af20ecae22fb8944266feaacc0d2fb1a
02a637dec661672716842ffb918c37b69f7ad3ca
'2011-11-16T17:07:58-05:00'
describe
'26306' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCD' 'sip-files00082.pro'
50ce9e4c2fd9a7e27216e698148f95cc
c635a05efe2b86c9715ea047188c531ac97cb0b9
'2011-11-16T17:06:04-05:00'
describe
'37074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCE' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
196092bed77f77261d03aa3c53626aa1
0e32dbc1c74e1f53ea3b85eaaab1b26fb761f2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCF' 'sip-files00082.tif'
f8c0cb9e12e15a49e8922cc34baded17
ab04dbfd25cff9379f8be261f4e73d0457184a38
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCG' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f58d772199490a2974b87a2f65d3ad99
e3399001d0f7b716cff5acd029942245e715da00
describe
'10109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCH' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
4af1e661b872f4368432a9abfad56603
3443f314722f6f0c60daf576bc49d35e872fc1d3
describe
'926745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCI' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
c3239cd84e5561c2f60058349db33553
02e1b29699db9dbe2d9fcfad73514b2fbffde12a
describe
'89137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCJ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
2196fc9b9b3c441558a67bc53d89ae96
89ecac96b49cd63ae0b837945da9f2c928ea99c2
describe
'24301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCK' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1244e33f0840fbde4442ef732f73609a
d20e39186608fb9485156c60ccebd857c9b5b2b6
'2011-11-16T17:06:21-05:00'
describe
'33558' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCL' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
67480ccbc83b352d6d10bb37381a90a9
81c461d83c8c4a70717c7d332d5f143be6092379
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCM' 'sip-files00083.tif'
34251559a28ed0274887e319bed37d4b
6e28a39f99790f3e22e786b179990a30983313c0
'2011-11-16T17:07:22-05:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCN' 'sip-files00083.txt'
799fa63a985292f0997e78b0518a00fd
e0e6d39468d3b8d2bf90039bdf3dedf01dc5d1ed
'2011-11-16T17:08:55-05:00'
describe
'9270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCO' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
cc38565ca3818d525d2bfe3932510e65
3f0ee92ea3191fa3c2d38971a2ad04329c2f7643
describe
'914841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCP' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6e2e7cb6fafdd7c163d42ced22b01ee3
32d8db699e776e755518c4f3ac7e0e4d787f9c6d
describe
'76345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCQ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
4b635f5758885b708c9f7c24a512803e
6510912deb299d61cf7e7d4a8f15523e83631fae
describe
'19680' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCR' 'sip-files00084.pro'
4bda19735d5d4e6b089ddf08e0cf070b
a0e8ced3011befc2c2d3527d40d6c386609a572b
describe
'26759' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCS' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
89721b41dc802fc5302ea031a17de0d2
08e06249413b3873aa99b43108215a5cf591a109
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCT' 'sip-files00084.tif'
45633b9318feaa28c43c2a577b9c94c0
e59f97627a8f6f276126fe5bb9caa1d36b4b998e
describe
'820' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCU' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2d77814f13278462565e51a12fbea6e1
c8cb67934dc5d9200813b241a8777c16ae404fbf
'2011-11-16T17:06:50-05:00'
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCV' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
e9ab4ecfbfd95cf5fab610b9fa08fc17
beb2ad9f52947719af1ee3d5fe22f2a62f8b1cbd
describe
'926756' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCW' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
914f96c1bae431cb4d83debf177b301c
1830863be33cfeda757cb00ebda535dd59950d4f
describe
'93252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCX' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1d70e349871ca28cf4e6d161219e9fb5
a12c6fd4e9a9b32daa3d5e6fc7a9bc1cd9981ad7
describe
'25831' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCY' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a08ae58d07f563e4c7c2af6146991252
d871768979436eb2fd7ea365d5177f3eb2d1b38e
describe
'34516' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASCZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9aff12ffc412505d99613398173fe975
f462843a8cdb4f3b53bda60a99a52285118ace83
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDA' 'sip-files00085.tif'
efe2833e23891312d751af6c763af188
05a9408cccee31dfee0d7c1425a4d4bed86c7e30
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDB' 'sip-files00085.txt'
08a880bf9db9a9473c1f1bedb2d5fd0c
1d070603f2fda10a434e37e27ace62c764f3936a
describe
'10167' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDC' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
febade354115390d28de975e01cdda96
f3d97a79e61b8eb40c4aef0a4767b57894e57911
describe
'914885' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
5a70ac5b8f8be283acd910cd3dadc4f0
71d742506bd362974550ada0556c27fbeaea6fe1
describe
'89038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDE' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
eda468ffbfedf68721dbbeb30b2cc42e
0891e16dfdf072e4492c31fbb73967153233db14
'2011-11-16T17:06:49-05:00'
describe
'24668' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ee51165bebe0b12c42d5ee03395a17b6
d919f9c2648b66ce6f5d12454e4ce3ba22ad4ab7
describe
'33394' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDG' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
305702088269b6888d54aad64b95549b
6d7d1b3cb845037588be4e8bb8110ce67a19e9ed
'2011-11-16T17:04:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDH' 'sip-files00086.tif'
183084d112a01d107e1faf3032e07ec6
51bdd8bde62ef427c5190c53e3f5f738cf32d1bc
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDI' 'sip-files00086.txt'
50b2b7afc1ef9c7d4c8fce62b61caa2e
8d36c6eca8823e5592d61f579257278718acdbee
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDJ' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
80684a22a99c96b01f400476c7fd383c
5f55585e025775ff556404cbdc90392074af3e4b
describe
'981551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDK' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
5f5c448855265af5cca9ecb9b402a35f
85c94fbe41f3120dd747656b0a0236749b889c5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDL' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
fc82eecd8c95f05247ddf79d4d7adea7
30b216b227cf5c7d6531edbf87555eca3af6bda0
describe
'25584' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDM' 'sip-files00087.pro'
b0524608411d977962ab0b59f9566dae
a4af5c3985a9bfff59de06dcc20ffaf4f013dc2e
describe
'31357' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDN' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8cc38b2c9cec2a6e39f744665064eb66
878c28ce7d9d6f7077d47b32757172beb1e011ec
describe
'7861943' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDO' 'sip-files00087.tif'
71038a385934b3e874f57e1fc7cfd33e
d360f11cd52093b9a25b0b50878dedc66dead1ad
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDP' 'sip-files00087.txt'
5278dfe7745ff78a0c454141b0d7976f
094debfbd13d28c633b878b7cc8e7addc1c1eabd
describe
'8414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDQ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
e236773a382b6dc7cf6e42710e4aefcb
0dc15d5c5ae342d07f19e0d54bbfa04461d74d4f
describe
'970644' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDR' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
af97f6722f7323427c56e35c86eda9c7
a03468ac89080859bc20b314c535c6453cf25f4f
describe
'89333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDS' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
abac6b06faa3a8d3cc33170c9f1bc8f6
a2f1c3d27062a22a999ecbf946e11faddc017587
describe
'25458' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDT' 'sip-files00088.pro'
f75417b6754bb5391641b960488b0d67
a9462ef12b6fa4169ed41e7601d01b8429f32ebe
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDU' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
8df278b43d85e60fb8e5bd547ac5339c
551474d7f3fd8e1ac804051b55e630a98181fbd2
describe
'7774069' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDV' 'sip-files00088.tif'
bd263be466991040104458d48a263156
97036c6113cf5147e06e0f21e2049c16997edabc
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDW' 'sip-files00088.txt'
2fbfcadf178a3b4f1d6381e2d120f77b
51cc5c6961f7f0fd986bee8d4759fee709e00c40
describe
'9129' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDX' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
a79fcdb6797e3b3de076cf9917d693b0
8ba56db17f31799180da602fd8204a24b3a7f8b5
describe
'981620' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDY' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
8627330a6ec7f8223185f249e95d4781
900f0e11d4e54dc254d7dcdb747eecf296606ecd
describe
'90101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASDZ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e5f8897746f1454dab7fc343de8b90a7
5640d2c73743780b5a3f19dfa65e643002c4f613
describe
'26467' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEA' 'sip-files00089.pro'
cb77875522d8ee56a9bd40304a47b13f
6f8def27f04d7e3d6343bd9b9778bbb99f0cb217
describe
'33564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEB' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
692905f1e92d0e4ce67cd777a6e4ab8d
12396eeb7cf4fcf9b020ef553f7c28d7aa6a0804
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEC' 'sip-files00089.tif'
8fc2ef52becc9ffd1c0a0ab543a1fbf3
53af48236ce584c3f8d15d6993bdf7248cf9aebf
'2011-11-16T17:07:51-05:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASED' 'sip-files00089.txt'
f6617487fb848f427581d4187346a726
b00b88fd86aa5ac1af4410fd7f743f9d9e95dc9e
describe
'8998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEE' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
7d0bd0b0af840b2ada504b98a7b4efa2
58539fa48c14fbd8117ca684bb608c43dec3f7a8
'2011-11-16T17:09:13-05:00'
describe
'970671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEF' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
a98a923fde4869ba174ba4d26dc84729
90f7085d8f715dd0fbb3dfbff96320236be1651f
'2011-11-16T17:09:32-05:00'
describe
'93720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEG' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
521cfcd1e3ae69227c3239c0e283950c
2c395e86707d277174d1049dd00acfe1eb731b96
describe
'27099' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEH' 'sip-files00090.pro'
95801da04fd75f0750300b9184705290
1d7ad86464398f3ffadc687ac21d1c5fa4d7ddf4
'2011-11-16T17:04:54-05:00'
describe
'34879' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEI' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
3d9e735ac8da38a388f52741638205c1
6993088706bbc0539567b4bb3b34d5a4abf4e5b8
'2011-11-16T17:07:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEJ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a0a2fbae6a3db1ece128ef607b9c81bd
6aad33a47c27118ed804a7a4902f6c0cefb4ef5c
'2011-11-16T17:04:49-05:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
16bad83d9cbecb444b70ba56b2a687d7
f9547cffe877c627ebc8fdd75ca07b531384a1bf
'2011-11-16T17:09:44-05:00'
describe
'9251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEL' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
069ac711b8d757c4d36c39ed38f4a9f2
767e06ab65bb8a4348b26cac4646890331a2fc02
describe
'981591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ff702d9878d140f9b59c18018c699245
222e01024c834ce1c95f6709548845eed827b800
describe
'74626' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
45e180a862a19c5271fe298e4e873e5a
a9cf5fa718e50d860ed6a37231e6c5e87cf44c97
describe
'21066' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEO' 'sip-files00091.pro'
a8ea5c0fdc692d36a7584192923d91b2
2f71b439ed1a656d3f3515a4e85f9cbea5f023b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEP' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
566e73def1a28c705ae58ec5d8cd4442
a1f4eac8e956f9b0881bb6fbd9a7433403d240dd
'2011-11-16T17:05:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEQ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
276a87714c0cf64cab7833e2fb7e9234
326385f131822a9cc0f0e3088101e6917b64cf6c
'2011-11-16T17:08:26-05:00'
describe
'856' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASER' 'sip-files00091.txt'
9770a808b53433a90ad8ed6244e4adfe
5d5c80547aec818600feed3bdf667ba29f65d143
describe
'7539' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASES' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
47262dccd3a74e629b5048af9eead29d
64c16a74571d20e0afb678e0be59f5467f372f19
describe
'970595' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASET' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b80980f6e14576bd7f8860936b39877a
0ba951128455fb5362221d77c563f2d177f65054
'2011-11-16T17:09:59-05:00'
describe
'75360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEU' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
827a1190ca05c7e1845db17a08375296
3469483786ebee4b524551be7ca64edd17c34558
'2011-11-16T17:08:51-05:00'
describe
'20786' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEV' 'sip-files00092.pro'
5ae85bbbc94fba9faf7f3d708ba41c70
27f39a16246c511df11df4e14e271d7d623f7320
describe
'28280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEW' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
0efa335cb50c2db036affbf3d3bef613
4e94d5e61f00a7ea905a9d3840e81277fabae8b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEX' 'sip-files00092.tif'
9bcb9324d14df8760610a8106ea7c564
8ffe026c3178c29c690d030ae15d3dc99d37a95f
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b707b1ac9ee3670a69c21c5bbec131de
a70a134a8c9eb257de946b38c88befe24fc2de0a
describe
'7531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASEZ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
200c3699226e3736c02f25e6e50a36fb
7e0cb76bd0df922ffc8e38d83bbf3bab90404943
describe
'981580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFA' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
daa2336064a4aaf7cc40993657c9cd00
5deec44baebefa652574f2705a4b37d640cb291d
describe
'82638' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFB' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
adbd9db65ec5a373a512484fffb27cdc
a17df7ec2279a943c9bfa1bb3f0a4d68ea705c0a
describe
'24020' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFC' 'sip-files00093.pro'
d55f996dfb32b019027fbc6d8d3a93c9
63d3660460aa97b42ef84a8b6c1f8e89d00b63b0
describe
'31713' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFD' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
480f3002dea1b9515671342c00760be7
97b7561138d89090d2bed9608ad99fb51b23e26f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFE' 'sip-files00093.tif'
c112256793a4f2572c71cae937a9927c
704f62120036928c657971e0df695edbfd78e0e1
'2011-11-16T17:04:55-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b1df90cf44b8caf1b8d8b75ce37fe9b5
65c95d1e1908ea54771f6f8604e2f7c79ee0a56e
describe
'8370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFG' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
9e133b92eaff9ac83e26337a49a62e08
7b6eb03fd1d51584b2ebca63b7a52e5bae4c7b16
'2011-11-16T17:10:09-05:00'
describe
'970669' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
e1a64d8e44074ce1c0486e2bd5090ddb
640a4b4b4231d1c2f42ebc874e81cec6726727bc
describe
'91317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
ef18129b547a6e41ff5906f0dd537ad1
0a8962c6d4416dcb49b0540c2c9755d8c018c13a
describe
'26603' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFJ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
cad07c486c673bce9c1aa75b94969e84
049c6d9a747bd7bead732aee85cda4e2a62e7777
describe
'34096' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFK' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
1c65542a413a758e0e6b95dbbab0fa2e
d2888a5765f01afb7bd9b142bd054246f6187684
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFL' 'sip-files00094.tif'
d2a27dabd5e400d87c449f977131b63c
da6387b08d1bda3230cef632a930d9653c2e091d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFM' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b2f38501cb8abf1a46b82c59f90544ee
d52276e5ba3b17ba7e31af99f615455435f8ff67
describe
'9281' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFN' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
7c15d9447695fffd17094b226d9ec3ce
85cd0db1eea5f5b7921390c68fc6b3d479d6c0b9
describe
'981639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFO' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
0276ce516206d06e3acf512b9591f434
3ddb9f127564f2b5d8137cccdac2093ae9c1f887
describe
'88056' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFP' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
c3b8e8eac540691719d55503e5d45c35
8f5d993caf92fad40b91745e89188d6cfb0338f3
describe
'26074' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
78ea572654d80ccaeae417e440d7bb72
837c828dbd859434c6d24e41a080e45b29138aa8
describe
'31725' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
f690a9e122450751790a772584717942
53f8ad40eb5883bee357d89189aab9f8c070a78e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFS' 'sip-files00095.tif'
75124c73c0ad530709bf6781cd2f3f60
78b3cc8f1c9c6be328518ed506bbee9651f44ce8
'2011-11-16T17:05:11-05:00'
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFT' 'sip-files00095.txt'
430741891f8856c614930c56fab02761
0ef7f101bf5fc8642cd92e6455a132150d475a0b
describe
'8987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
408a2a16c73291c42554481e49aa7a87
20df13d445155729263f15762c4e071cf2be4ddc
describe
'966485' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFV' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
865d1f1f12af334aff02668016eba2b1
c88d3465403e8dcc01488f081bf7809c48f30cfd
'2011-11-16T17:07:19-05:00'
describe
'84142' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
90a11dcf9358369a3f220cc4a66aa16f
b9e5b7ac5f5fad98dad69cfa9d7f7a7f37976781
describe
'25194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFX' 'sip-files00096.pro'
9cfde9ce111de88eec24b5b273d176e9
c56cf4014294a3f46a435f63916857e525354e46
describe
'32018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFY' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
3268a3f864db84262f5d1c1e4a2aadcd
799360bbb3c8fb947d7ae471bb8dd851450ef2d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASFZ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
95ef4a30d493b30a368dc7f0a08e9754
bec7ee3a65d2ae6688567ffdaac371641976ceda
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGA' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f63d2af8b42ef933ab1696d387291e96
b87c8755ad702a89f76bc40fd8a48fbbd32d6d21
'2011-11-16T17:06:59-05:00'
describe
'9154' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGB' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f2762650f69579339912665f4e59cb6a
2d61f6f76b945da376d8dc092ac3c0593fe98159
describe
'974909' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
9af5dc514e28e381d80eb1bd3f5813e7
ca40c2287f13d63691469cbf4ae91f0ab7723c48
describe
'87603' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGD' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
27c4f9ebc3f0ae06249d49018954e7b8
d93da866f6f5ff29ae73d69b8f0bf08696c8d2d7
describe
'24520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGE' 'sip-files00097.pro'
57999c8509a835187184637080f9e638
f4b2f40978abb7fa48467a1c4df3fdd0cee21d21
describe
'31691' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGF' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
c57ed22a15a1a2e01337dbaf63e5105f
bd90554f782f9f4920993635dc2721031cc421c2
describe
'7808233' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGG' 'sip-files00097.tif'
f0de8d3a57bdd82b5ec9e7de416c4e40
ee99ec193fb4b09e802f8cde762241671f96ecfb
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGH' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a458dd20a2bc268589e51f27cd66cee0
53b56bc125e790478ab01d1906135f3a17efdb71
describe
'9299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGI' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8f43acc70ead759d1d8b760838b4b217
e6fb0c3ea79ee055eb99df9c304e2972ad9042ad
describe
'951543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGJ' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ef2e5b5fb5418bf23a4bc8f791a874e1
efb7bd97e90f346f35745c2ab49cab4a15c07c83
describe
'91253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGK' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a4a5e4f26ce32b8a3c67929752a165c9
33b497907ec3c2edbb98d48ac07c6b9cb5eeb826
describe
'26469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGL' 'sip-files00098.pro'
09e3f9afb61291ddf47d6277db38183b
4940be4eb62b17e43285b85d064ec93b4dacb779
describe
'36681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGM' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7a8da8b50d34d68ab3b92d576686902f
c08b8da43c351c1470bad6837004b1f51f7589c6
describe
'7621053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGN' 'sip-files00098.tif'
6153df2187421bd74c086feb9f9d7474
2ba523bf35a2ad3ab38a3ed6cb09ee467e91c19e
'2011-11-16T17:05:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGO' 'sip-files00098.txt'
2a33f04ab25b106b08f22d4580d08b89
92bd5fa9e05ded51e44eabb55fd4003208c80d45
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGP' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6568eaf4b05b3faf75ea2b4a957016d1
df2be443d8eba33d38c31035f6ffc5c350d47f25
describe
'974871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGQ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
91cf8a01c25b01dace7a9c30376e7534
babd99147dbb44de0f87e307654cbfa77f4bff80
describe
'93671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGR' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
cf119091bf54c32290dc16fc0b310d20
1d03f9572c99287054c82f51eaf250bc8cf7e1a3
describe
'27415' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
903ea3ca992189b678c5e1f523dcc7bc
2428ba7725c80db9446e499a94dc2c283e9e7c0c
'2011-11-16T17:05:13-05:00'
describe
'35416' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGT' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
ad26e2f154e53ea922124634bff59fff
91636716466385dc7cb10f4ebc4f9c75abd33569
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGU' 'sip-files00099.tif'
f51e3fba3253033cdedb5717e55c1986
2cecbdbb33c58e4e5dfa9e36d894d5ebf5ecd9d7
'2011-11-16T17:05:23-05:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGV' 'sip-files00099.txt'
5073bb5dee613f542320e99e22cab621
bfc4a829c65ecf1e0314264e3b79d5803b573100
describe
'9413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGW' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
ea3713cdf5d095ec3e37a60f72bb2de3
d875693159107a721589dd41f3427acda1be3975
describe
'951568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGX' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
c930271d032f628b00ce3d548a161f03
2e58da918d847e0bcee1f9315473494ffdfd6604
describe
'92131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGY' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
a516650767536d7e58f241ad3dac556d
b6733b227e9a906338ab64dfcb9f6f506ba79b3c
describe
'26700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASGZ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
32e33f6584af52a1280c689426d10ffd
ebf435df604cbede5516eff858833756fe2372ae
describe
'32116' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHA' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
0453cd5fdce2d56e805ce1f8dc4baecb
0255eb837d4503cb1f418a84513afa9364852ec4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHB' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fd954ad3c94b8a49951ccb427883aaf8
6efee28d691bed54d25f0f651b8a2a5075252fad
'2011-11-16T17:05:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHC' 'sip-files00100.txt'
36ced3f47816a1e9cad4bf09df573354
c07587d22fd88355fc2ca4ea6300d00aa76893d9
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHD' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5f7b358a61471f387ebbb48860c91b73
0460381ec7de5ad60c9330e6db907bef19d9c9b1
describe
'974947' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHE' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
31ca4d0e2fc788f70e3647d6e7a776b9
933ae774371158298ae6a858173694d5d5c81c25
describe
'88645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
95f11a0e6bab8f60ab82c99ab047216a
298155eb02f6d571bba6c9dd5cf4594b2a454ed9
describe
'25585' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHG' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9c868483c12b09005262f6bb346b4939
6c5178e7ca1252ccf663d32d542b105b3a062393
describe
'33063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHH' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
2ff8b2d18c48b8847448993183ce50cf
1ec63fd5198d5f3fab61f975ed139e72c8dc5c35
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHI' 'sip-files00101.tif'
1f2d38c9c0999660ab6176ebd12d8458
d395e6bce3549631934c4db7ab8735193f62b809
'2011-11-16T17:04:57-05:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHJ' 'sip-files00101.txt'
69da6808a580b3b957f345e404d11408
0bd46184a7cde2a7c6d28c063bcb4876b71a057d
describe
'8940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHK' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
fc63f1dbddcfb445155abd5ef6de011f
eeec957647c6d876e975a518cab5f7c76058e732
describe
'951566' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHL' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
4a3ca3e47a62cf684ef95166289c3f60
dd8b2cdd3f03792c16beee11a172d927441c25ea
'2011-11-16T17:07:56-05:00'
describe
'87253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHM' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
cf8b9def1cf58a99044293c87621301c
4a2344233b4afda797a3324db5b37f75b1725a2d
describe
'23928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHN' 'sip-files00102.pro'
10db61b68d7a604101320131edf1b563
9fcd03f0274dabff503509cee71962f2a5761901
describe
'33413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHO' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
ad60b6343d5a726232e26ce4f2b90002
73f42fdef2ab283f18f8c0258c888c76bc8d64b4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHP' 'sip-files00102.tif'
227c092495e4837c0fdc47ddebf33458
425f2b7e02e981fd1f39bcbada6c613bb52da4c2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHQ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
50192536d7cbffe049578d5e49458ba6
cc2305862e1cadc06081083947e723be6ef38dfb
describe
'9068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
8c31f28518cb0cfe37ec3fa3ae69cdf6
bfcd095fc3f3d63907d9d98d5e43a46a99015e19
describe
'974851' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHS' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
b5c3d8a2e199b24b6093c570979a13b8
58b198aceac06b5cdcce239468d9e03892187c0e
describe
'96179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHT' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
51630e7b5df148c507cbef73faaa727f
30fa2a6db18e514ff5f9221be3f6f5c8d5e60a0d
'2011-11-16T17:10:05-05:00'
describe
'27558' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHU' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ee76a052b75ec3b8576140ea4d043f09
c98461032adccd60d31dbea6525824b04bd9d80f
describe
'35619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHV' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
d43ec8c9a3e8a84964e0437f2783cde4
7ef1562c1c9272f2e3b2931e941a121027022ea0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHW' 'sip-files00103.tif'
82c79f43baf75b0da7738047ccafe5e4
52b00e4a6abc0362b97e5ac8a2ef178d780cffb8
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
843ca439e8b7c14fb0b28c7652aed8de
af570f7fd6291d7096c04d6ad781fa5b344fbfd9
describe
'9631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHY' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
046086ce12d294122851147760673541
af3eb32c1c1a6ca8b18669071bce74175024c9a9
'2011-11-16T17:08:25-05:00'
describe
'951562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASHZ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
79de704c1b8b630189393e256b25db72
947c646e49bcd5ddab887bf8992301bb2ff293e4
describe
'98847' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
0679f3ff8519a73c2bbaa464557e1f63
30a4d62e7a3c53bfe1a973737e454882c7fdcd41
describe
'25813' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIB' 'sip-files00104.pro'
3c6f49e9605a1db2a08a3e834646d5ac
1b99fbe8dd67f284d01eeefd91a8a65ece59741f
describe
'34880' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIC' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
71941761a1172038d4093f59c7d1913f
8a50d7d903b2def9903e2aa5face8047ba816829
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASID' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3db106c26b2f75f0f214c514965cb3e4
f0de439cbae324375ea85407104207ed6a836bf1
'2011-11-16T17:10:17-05:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIE' 'sip-files00104.txt'
76fa1d30ba812c175e772e5cf5c98597
852b692fcc8a36dcc6276073535f6ddeabb4f98a
'2011-11-16T17:09:25-05:00'
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIF' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
bebca51e5d98764eddfc53e2359b531d
d7184d3f804d26f12a20b0dee4e01b488b325f82
describe
'974930' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIG' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
ad898c94a991bc0e0d07a1239a6dc063
1dd8a1fc055eaca76067f2dc99c8e820ced183db
describe
'95840' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIH' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
475279573dcdf25ccf028b50f0e52e95
7a644f60680ec3256cc28c96069ff35152b493ae
describe
'26356' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASII' 'sip-files00105.pro'
25cef60d5f55c0f882a1df2df393576e
37cfc392b0cd54b3204bc0531afbd008935cbfd1
describe
'33507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIJ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
626cdc5585e79244f21d53881c77c21a
7631d6a433c3ba8f89e158c3d8ece98215243d76
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIK' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e95c2a642e0884b26ceea99925607975
1d51e0724566dc0c5215287cfe56d07a12c666dc
'2011-11-16T17:05:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIL' 'sip-files00105.txt'
2ec894fd425411872dc9d1c9fdc5c810
6741c6f636db8c9427257bbaf773a5cbb7e70e16
describe
'9099' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIM' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
705e3f4682d71019d944b7972855fc3e
c6d8ffe85db1333eed83ab0b1794cbc3961f87e6
describe
'951503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIN' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
1edd1b46ed2121748252cf416047b796
3e5e4bb6e4e9e3a8d7265ab4bde52bc1c27c0b0c
describe
'72173' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIO' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
5910c619de17204f15612f04d648f43e
0dd6cf024b2f0fa83acab1852c7023f7b5137b79
describe
'14128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIP' 'sip-files00106.pro'
955b97b2155f6271e0d81a7e595a5d45
bafb749413b7004e7c510ede3783b4b87224487c
describe
'24492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIQ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
5913af9b8c7f60ca6591c6bf271da91b
fed67e33b830f7de512b27201fc8c8a553092e51
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIR' 'sip-files00106.tif'
5a7e3f24a2a01a9a670e00860d2aa345
2158237ce41e610cc750a9f27a30890096e2c4f2
describe
'569' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIS' 'sip-files00106.txt'
94569f123f763b70b0ff8e44b8446780
8f43295de017931f6e7d696dac79194852493ed5
describe
Invalid character
'6163' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIT' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
dda3fb792844a7cc22f616b65c33b0c9
5d09b0de40cf951ab015d2629465a06c80786493
describe
'974922' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIU' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
85a239671edd8404848bcc56d79e3171
12e58aa724fb27e536d1a72f69d6485348ad366d
'2011-11-16T17:05:56-05:00'
describe
'87867' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIV' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
fcf9745800bd9372bce2d7e960f6d6c5
ec0ff920ab0ea3f0d2dc52780fc4960cd68edb55
describe
'20362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIW' 'sip-files00107.pro'
4840794ef9b667d52405a1108aa7550b
fd5e3737be64f6b3964cacea9b4047edc476505d
describe
'29234' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIX' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
f74b838ab27f3f07a9aa38530a804d86
fb1bccc80e7b17f32d752fbe54ebd4ab181bcf27
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIY' 'sip-files00107.tif'
3a8dbfb2207c223bf7b9b30c01d2aec9
7042c2c3df333cd9dca9dbef9f5a2cec1640d160
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASIZ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
8fa7bebf3f0a891b807da30a457f0a7b
6c428273e8143e788395999e7a1685d41405aec1
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJA' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7f5a03aa3674c5b49f60659324417415
cbcb6cf381b672b7e676329381f6aac4c22e749a
describe
'951498' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJB' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
e9e5e5b93ea4267971569b83d865eb0b
15a7831e0dd779bacba5896c734cf94b741f960b
describe
'99991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJC' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
852d13d04bb28a59ce91f061e6fc63ee
c2d4ce1321aa549831732d3ed5d943afc8792f85
describe
'25405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJD' 'sip-files00108.pro'
60757c577ea9847b51fafc201536fa83
9b222dd667ee89ef1aff5d3d313a60f3463b8298
describe
'31529' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJE' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
9cecb6845f05984a7c0247532d82b1f5
b1b516ee492f659d1cb4fe1875bcc2d73f8f7537
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJF' 'sip-files00108.tif'
929919dcc940ca18c5647d5e6516e5cf
dd0d67316e36be0c4bdc67cd1140b0dff36433d3
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJG' 'sip-files00108.txt'
ccf87941486329268fc1f218fbb1a873
bca24be3cec7d9e6868c198d5e0c8c15938ea51c
describe
'8895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJH' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
3275f5bce63c3ce7676e8c6306473b54
6f7245bdaa195f4b546026a87a0d0e31ca20b53c
describe
'968320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJI' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
e899daae9f01ef6b3ed734f232a3cb7e
9888e280bbd73d535f30eb3a70c187337cb4c96f
describe
'90920' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJJ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
bbb037c71fa43e819d106938f980fb2e
9cc8e5389d5ee917aaacbb4f67537b637754d50f
describe
'26490' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJK' 'sip-files00109.pro'
160e7da4e7283bbfb7c0eb0dbc30e117
554badd218f39f1201a4c1fbfb5a1f669c586519
describe
'34942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJL' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
cb0787033cc3cef66bed334cd9d7264c
40b4d6a76be5e9a3a4d2632fda69fb38dabdb665
describe
'7755475' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJM' 'sip-files00109.tif'
66091d751120b67745a6a58a8ce7d4d6
704b4fdfb166983ca0b1138594fe565ccf1ef66a
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJN' 'sip-files00109.txt'
142f7acc93d4d8206c05d49bc8c5f2b2
431b0c931f54577123348c23430da9c14b1430c1
describe
'9360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJO' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
ec2f2ec1088a2d66993b12943c01a9c6
481279630bf63b6484337a72fa9eac7f06423dbb
describe
'964056' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0c47eda8eb1e6cf4af19dee91fe3348e
20433c383d7e49838081a5dbef730b7bbe8af6cc
describe
'87964' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJQ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
bbf0e088db74b2ec9b12469adad33682
1274fcaba30f360eb7e3190df17d40646cca01a1
describe
'26071' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJR' 'sip-files00110.pro'
b75213d4dd2d908c96e37bbe33eeb15c
ab3e0e89b75f86d3452e52b3f822d0a2265d0cf2
describe
'33594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJS' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
fe1a5189e71c8fe9d43f6e40476a4f71
8be86e3aacdd628955ce31c8903927bce1cc9560
describe
'7721265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJT' 'sip-files00110.tif'
4313b4484a4c4dcf56a919115c7d6f58
7e5a761ca85c000e1e9661872366204e19801724
'2011-11-16T17:08:12-05:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJU' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b3ab51869d050892471e54abae747559
6fd06af5141840550043cfff8419433e04224e22
describe
'9176' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJV' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
937dd530a6a144a2c1e9e82202ba949b
3559f8854c180752153d1766758d75a2852b8126
describe
'968341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJW' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
2fdee6e2a005714e88f3d3544ea25fb4
312c9c4278226ccf8d19a5b7a3726c70ac99ddca
describe
'92016' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJX' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
015126785817596038aaa35b41b1d006
cd310e158260fe94d527d427ac17586de786f1ee
describe
'26121' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJY' 'sip-files00111.pro'
6878170553741d7a8e801cc237ad6e64
978cf92450599279c959d557a9b135fba0f23312
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASJZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d91ccd58f651c0a612d3c0a96bbe5063
dfd2fbeda6ebfd104653bb6c41747ec99b71b858
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKA' 'sip-files00111.tif'
defb08b23276a7a7b99c07587d6db8e0
7ab0d3c31c7f018e7377229bb77ecc574135f7ac
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKB' 'sip-files00111.txt'
26d686a8a79a8a7acc417b700e0ff009
e8eeac22d007789c769d8feab86a13ed11ee2b86
'2011-11-16T17:05:12-05:00'
describe
'9334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKC' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
91054aeb4c29e2b86567d38b8e57dae3
d37f4ee04919a984a8454ba11064b517c14f8865
describe
'964090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKD' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a0e7ac90d4e9923b78cbef4ef4b8101d
7c339a02698f916d1b52f19236fc417754de368a
describe
'93573' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKE' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9f91325d97e0261995166ed012793278
b05f81b9ed74f2a3f27214b4af7a994962dd953b
describe
'27393' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKF' 'sip-files00112.pro'
4a2b5fe96492ad0ce75c4505789e172d
7d1153c86cf2492098f8d5eec1b8da9adeba7dbb
describe
'34418' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKG' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
17ddccfa4bd84d24f827d53a6ca97f66
a58dfe5b3d6498a3af69984f745ea04dd63f3b7d
'2011-11-16T17:06:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKH' 'sip-files00112.tif'
8a86053a4d1ce8691ab7f0cf53b288e4
4cf641d658c4668824292d3a0e1ba91dabc3d1e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKI' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3047ea987d64d736358a4f990978ca34
320b02353f7b831d014b7877a19724a55b5e1de8
describe
'9555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKJ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
1f5328922313771443f5b8514168c8f9
2f8a38ad83efe008067c3705e57315ea34affb04
describe
'968213' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKK' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
9722b6e003157d07fab632e21e884078
0e172d6e3a10280cbd4ae85f12407eef65ed7863
describe
'77798' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKL' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
19ad4b04c1ac491f00b4790de1df1bd5
2acdf94e26d34fc156224fc0209635cdc3fdc0f7
describe
'21317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKM' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e54276cbfe9051481abd4d3cb12c7305
738390f33f9813c8e31527be977e8683c29e8f4e
describe
'30921' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKN' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
65fcbfce76c12a0a1411eb30b74031fa
c3aba3eda2ef032cd789a01a0ad054decb268da8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
0e47a0d769bbb27768b0646138241db3
01e956c14ce8586901f15b2054e7e8143fabccfd
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKP' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a968be35e2c97772d0050dc886f4bc13
1ec32b682b0df88343f6cf2bad969668d7ac67e5
'2011-11-16T17:06:52-05:00'
describe
'7937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKQ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
332f6689cdad408552ac75193df538bb
2033dd0a300a0978450ef0367db2ea23a47e1747
'2011-11-16T17:06:32-05:00'
describe
'964038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKR' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
89300fa290a7118fd651c9dd3ea6379b
fcb751ae0751d4f99aab505bcfabcf51b8ef1a6d
describe
'73557' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKS' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7bf2cc002d9ce08f58ce7b0881e75ab6
d53610d1ad0091ec7a4798cd21e8c4ddf83ecc37
describe
'20382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKT' 'sip-files00114.pro'
1ebe2dbabbecdf53f370ff13d58459fc
d10ae2a1fea489e26b4c8d90bba2f404c8c64d4a
describe
'26780' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKU' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
69e998b89136f2cb1849eda0f65e934b
4ec89f98951b7dd46a35669b0fcff3f542f299cb
'2011-11-16T17:07:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKV' 'sip-files00114.tif'
884e38e506bb605957e286f1751a3e83
0608feefef5dfac19174f189249555e606ff3e6d
'2011-11-16T17:10:14-05:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKW' 'sip-files00114.txt'
9ad937f1b360eda52f2255cbf9fbb9d0
eb615dd942ee176dbd7039368b2124d8bf9625b9
describe
'7686' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKX' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
8cc716ba971a298d5a1ed53f0492d049
4bdea7a11cf4b8441f01f079b040060b16a1a886
describe
'968351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKY' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
6f3a086ef8586ee0cd05c8972f8dd433
ea6c40b4e3c515a62baa393bb529688c23ba4626
describe
'89062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASKZ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6c68e9f5b1d7ca9b047878d4dd88f469
0f24d5131b16147ca527a50a8e081cb11cadfac6
describe
'26580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLA' 'sip-files00115.pro'
ffb36ced125eede22bdea6d7fd142735
00336d9891568608070430d1f96daa85edc29d52
describe
'30064' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLB' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
7ae4a4c8867d5d2f7459a3dff2c03e8f
6027a5e0fb760cdf7e19a266a1cdf47e1a2b889d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLC' 'sip-files00115.tif'
f1054d48d4533ca4528e0b9b3ee2f785
d4258fc2a1a99e6f90b48a6630a329a442204201
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLD' 'sip-files00115.txt'
d695146d79cc53689162ae77cd2db714
1ed7b87abd9f0a5f74d1be55c83a4786e1316fbc
describe
'9523' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLE' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
bb8ca7096ebb3f61cca0ee3e69b188a6
d36f08888989d32cf3b489fe3654a55f72a1fb85
describe
'964048' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLF' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
807721b779b23992d17ab68c604f2623
0a6b97c10a36b909e1870ed817c2527e0e9dcd93
describe
'94646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLG' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
ed7268c768cffc56e7b732cf4abaaaeb
f6728f5a66a3592affaac0479da8526010049c1a
describe
'27186' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLH' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3dc172dee0698a0ccd20538e6d5c7dc0
ca700e4495222baa1df25689a962b68149396a04
describe
'36125' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLI' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
91bd03fd21f9ea3327f245ae6e57afd5
3b78c75eaaab5af63b4958b5e30e7a8f2890d117
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLJ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
3c3c4c75dccbd8351f1dad8284c01e3c
771897b8c489b210d15bdac92f2abec81df688de
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLK' 'sip-files00116.txt'
46f8c314a1d50a9d15361c7c46eb5553
68bb083fc9c2fae988b97f9fdef6cb46e92e9891
describe
'9342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLL' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
34eaec9eac6218dfc4db2af973886d2d
9b3c9e7dbf969f32aea2d6751268192a8c720e60
describe
'968328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
ffebaad1f85301073c9ae151dd98b50c
cc2af38af73185d49cd3f759141842f30e76d089
describe
'91680' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLN' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
9fee3d6318d9fb99a95a6705b36e1d25
f9bd9a5550cd4a0b9c639c97915957edd4a95e2a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLO' 'sip-files00117.pro'
b814d2743b1a90bd05d6634b9824ac9b
ab417e6327a3d80ec8da83b53bc7126527791255
describe
'31793' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLP' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
59b7399391d87967673793f3051ad7c2
e1cecf5c7697d239ecb6362d2c43d6df00054728
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLQ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6ba68cb8b89fe36306a4ee4cffc656ad
996cf1506266e91878a471d103c5e1192c212772
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLR' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7a3776247ffe7cf54521f4a7859f886e
9e4c48eb0a3233432557878f1953ce1b8db81b69
'2011-11-16T17:09:18-05:00'
describe
'9427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
3ecb2737331c8030d5a2551407213b08
a6ea754191a6a36633b9d61afd06d11057a13e3a
describe
'964084' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLT' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ce23a7b6387dc244d5425ad480912b67
6c446924793534b29fef2a22553e07ae986bc546
describe
'92877' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLU' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
797acb6de1fa09383816a8baa8991b76
f5ee5f6641335c9daac6320c2579a5a064a2e2ec
describe
'27156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLV' 'sip-files00118.pro'
d826a3b01aae9e573364051cdc0460a5
3c582037937b5bdf30c0bbdac3d3502c0a3dffa2
describe
'33672' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLW' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
b3a72ac9a988268f945949aaa883d581
06b2c930492b57491af1620477b747429aba1304
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLX' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0c78cc8baa0600b7d437bd7b9850f849
d3bb8b54f9b824d4902409006080bfded47c547b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLY' 'sip-files00118.txt'
b7b4cab570bc625dee08f339e0575f85
c22b330a8e8e6203b74cb508246f7d2211547a10
describe
'9539' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASLZ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
676e0eb19f7a7377ff739966daca199a
5ce67ae96746437841a4b83db9b03d51bf8edba9
describe
'968326' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMA' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
59a3377847440e003c9f014e404b7d1c
1cc853a6ba3c572ea93a7d07ce6e272dce74faf5
describe
'95756' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMB' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
c29e359d386ef424a8606a1f89054aa1
c52ad687c2eaf2c2272c771aaa17c1bd70cb711b
describe
'27477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMC' 'sip-files00119.pro'
70ae84fe9d8665cc6892fb8e2e068829
90886d20f80b87bd40f21ed1db1eb1fd16022f48
describe
'39103' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMD' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2d2774b29b18c816f1049f560665447d
4a5e4ade115d34886031f418bcb4623d32c17a22
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASME' 'sip-files00119.tif'
af36afe9323c3871adb3695d400411c8
5ab820710a31c3177f6a4df0ec82ebee75dd787c
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
308f94504b44ed341647c1db1f84d435
64fa32588aa5d5f88dd7b7810d06164b953d6f29
'2011-11-16T17:07:49-05:00'
describe
'9681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMG' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
deb4d911121d413e6f7114b445b12802
067478802370b2922f2e8ecb6973b7a9b57c077e
describe
'731144' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4325af7b6e8d396ac5f48fc0d169c250
a8f0bb405e2b556986e95580d7783636d9f3a4bb
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMI' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c08a3268fc9e01f6640aade775d7ee84
6c470d12f7d3191d7ec4564506d8164742970873
describe
'7575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMJ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
3fcf9daba9a8e3fcacf4868f8402b88f
3fd8754607495e5e611d739e3bbe92f48ad21b8b
describe
'11651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMK' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
ab577f29baa3a37e94346f7119785b2f
c50151831477d0ac7d93d4726a63f4295853bfea
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASML' 'sip-files00120.tif'
91b9e84f7f658cdcfc90e0e6bc5e48f9
96af1fde28c4cf843fed443eec9d6defad41e7a0
'2011-11-16T17:08:08-05:00'
describe
'343' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMM' 'sip-files00120.txt'
406cc3a6783758b60e34c08eeadd27ca
32d9b27438cf5e493f00cf0c64c9e6fdcd747dc4
'2011-11-16T17:06:15-05:00'
describe
'3481' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMN' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
1180132470cc1c8cff4abef0a771ee46
26310103c090337ceb195d140914960e91c1429a
describe
'968348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMO' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
810060db61389ea76a0d0f722601e1df
4f2364bde8add58d44838f0bccad222f10460bc8
describe
'78288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMP' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
fc1c406dc330f0f68348dee30523422c
f1ed6c184010da5ceecaac7ef7d3367ba43c3ade
describe
'20966' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMQ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
965fb428e479a2bcdff0f29fdd79b76c
95b8782c4f4545bd025a6c5c7ee8abcb050977f2
describe
'29934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
b6339176dd7a494a42e0b50123c8092d
810347225f5110134cbba72a701488afacfb6006
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMS' 'sip-files00121.tif'
b218499ce4dbb1c1d4a8b94786fd099a
d3bf1be18db698b758395b4e58d5f6267db2e045
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMT' 'sip-files00121.txt'
5e1068880303b6fd012ca8b77b2f177d
171470e8b430ddbf23d271c7b2315aa060e225fc
describe
'8184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
d6638005b639d0556cf9b04e4aeca6b3
1cd43e83ff756e2d0ae61501242ac3388919c12e
describe
'964093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMV' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
052a444c2fe5f6ab71627af455e0580f
88896540dbd71b1fb0f8c7a76da4135b5e283391
describe
'85002' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMW' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
aebde54684005150f8335f7d102f6ea2
90bb2090b666636ae9a94486fb87041df0b65a38
'2011-11-16T17:07:02-05:00'
describe
'23527' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMX' 'sip-files00122.pro'
9fe1842304fa1f041adb0e8346d31143
55d53db5ecb48ba7ee0ab96306f90c4fb484495e
describe
'31537' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMY' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
249cfaecd1f6e99d83e96ae917178f20
6bbb263a021f5e31f1afc0bfbc23c605c8751a67
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASMZ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
fd1d41068cff91500caf90c233fcb82c
1b42960bd6a107bd7a05739518fe415ddae55226
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNA' 'sip-files00122.txt'
126aaca483e129ec7325d0118291ed9b
3ef591e93c56ac0e6cfe693befdbfeead63fe411
describe
'8391' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNB' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
e343fb2331c598f41118a104cbc752a0
d486c2d5fe49a27796e72421c4a96e4d305d5f85
describe
'968334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNC' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b90e857a3baa15b77903ca522493ae08
8f47cffb8e44ef1412910ae7ba808d6e071b8819
describe
'93614' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASND' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
cefde64fce48ede85fcefa6b631d30e5
2ab1d116742e3fa637479365703c1a5c15380562
describe
'26476' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNE' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e4cc70650398ff6d07ef024336347a11
5f97133705e51e45e9edb6b125509f15dbea0d11
describe
'31918' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNF' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
3d7de1e58d9cc8f665327bd4aa4d6a1c
d65a334d5eb0bf782e0bbbfc3449fa022adba86d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNG' 'sip-files00123.tif'
925e1e071901368e0a65752d62521f11
be231496cee06a37fd13185de927af4ac6233fa5
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNH' 'sip-files00123.txt'
80582f6b5ee4f59040bfe79cebf0634b
32d48dc6cb70efe39b21ccd31b720d446157152b
describe
'9253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNI' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a73fa1d2aa0b529d2724ba7268f82510
2317e80d79e0f5a76fbd11a6e4d2746797f3c49c
describe
'964050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNJ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
b043356edde4ecb21e241760b48a3d4a
0c84341b3678f91896e2f2cea5e814307477bd8c
describe
'91545' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNK' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
ce178469dec186dde7465594b19122db
4cda8598ae6c3012289aac0aa1087fb71be0b5b3
'2011-11-16T17:07:43-05:00'
describe
'27094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNL' 'sip-files00124.pro'
c4c05a71176d9aebe3e8c910c4122ae4
6fcc0aed5e7ae28dcdc2c1146c41a987a2cf4bd7
describe
'33871' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNM' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
05d2946046f84bdafbe66d7cda248b78
9cde994121cc1ba8070b977f1740aca2c98502c0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNN' 'sip-files00124.tif'
50dc8b71bd6795cb3cd76c58745207ea
643bd8ce73fc6b53ff72c0116cc70e1f048bc919
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNO' 'sip-files00124.txt'
70097066f8fba272f39bdb7ce0eb9cc6
a7b0ceb2a4122c848d0440136f8a831edf2b9dfc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNP' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
92b11876b36b4487b9abdc4445e72c49
2b5b73e784160dd7484ed6b1e0e0aaa8bf143051
describe
'968310' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNQ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
3d424ac98033973970c9da484e8002e9
ebe54c8a9d033a821ce30f9498aa6eef3ae37afe
describe
'96735' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNR' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
fbfe67ea2e79a7cbfa6f79f268208bca
2dda575c9d9286c9cdd2e7e69145a70ae791eff2
describe
'27514' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
c8a7185cc46bcce9bc28310a5c43321e
1b4943da7adf22d78b0f696b7b24a03587bd53b4
describe
'35634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNT' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
b0c9b7dc29565248d9853e16705bf280
e94c224c4c528e492d5e4619a5fbefa71b9900e5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNU' 'sip-files00125.tif'
041996fb4d55e54d231c088de5f85e94
f2504b6f33649d40e7accfdc10b04d9c36aa2b52
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNV' 'sip-files00125.txt'
a5ea7911138f9cdf7ae5febd05ae8f9c
ee536df327332d7fe00a61ad578dddfbb9eb6b5d
describe
'9666' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNW' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
afb0f77924df5835bff03572c3f90450
f01f6c0dcb5af267764900575d30e58011ae0e2f
describe
'964089' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNX' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b2278dd6cd6774cf01c07c8b22649870
378fe399f8d5957725e46fb86dc23d0d0f30a0be
describe
'92836' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e884780cbcafb7dca2341f5f3a809980
05d1d206fda87a0724adcf316aeacd376858bb29
describe
'26899' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASNZ' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a9ade7ba92bf279984cfebe2b903f234
f37cb74da7d5b49cd50b96da68373fa72dff0ad5
describe
'34907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOA' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a2fa94ce2d77b1218eeae85bd99e3da0
41c66ba636fe178c5c97812e58f00a7f3e8781f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOB' 'sip-files00126.tif'
b8261d4f8ac283d153ee016a609cdf19
e7435815514e6243d219163d891ad29c2f26592a
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOC' 'sip-files00126.txt'
8b181ac3cf7afddbe4516021a1f8b623
b3bf9f6e3b2518406a13bc6d9b792db8d1a46bf0
describe
'9586' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOD' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
bceec48568608ebb4634e20d174c1b2f
3f40a118e70c7dde36071f3bafb32ef0ae11e296
describe
'968267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOE' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
7624899a52a75cdc7376f52477813c3e
70116f121e11d3a08593ed15809f56cc978b3ca1
describe
'80684' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOF' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
093ef8b6da226e0df6c9334200c76bba
66c3a6ada9ef91df82cceef6fa9b815dc8706698
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOG' 'sip-files00127.pro'
eec9c0463fc4831012b6ec13383337fb
a89009d728e9268a339aa849fb0031a27ed88864
describe
'29779' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOH' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
1e078a7dd10c70d1c8adb01ea2901dea
8344e36516ee71d0161ee48d6dbba5289ac7aab0
'2011-11-16T17:05:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOI' 'sip-files00127.tif'
af6ffa9d616f73c78dcff982c2c4af13
a51fc0c4e94ceec3e8f3d4668870f2fa82980bda
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOJ' 'sip-files00127.txt'
4c14b04cd803e1fc241b3bad9699c975
61b7ce01df92d2cb193a7d8420259db630f4f2f0
describe
'8471' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOK' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
d03c0d1741325b87731e86e4450bcdc8
6e4ca8636eb2f14c07ea366371350d5bc7d1589b
describe
'964091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOL' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
de19757b23c946c70c1203a6e660ee7f
d224da00c52708377fadff4d98aeb210c55c5926
'2011-11-16T17:08:40-05:00'
describe
'76249' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOM' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
662e80ab4a91b210f339718f7ce5c08d
995b992fa0e117a846bb9322e7f129784bfcc88d
describe
'31363' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASON' 'sip-files00128.pro'
071358eee574c6b2b3fb426847eb93bd
cf761a84763a487df4b9a6b83b52470abac4532c
describe
'26202' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOO' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
c13da5dcc5ea623b178ad2db42d5fefa
b0ece88a46159ec223744a9cfbf58de58fdc93b5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOP' 'sip-files00128.tif'
dbf470d6f98f55920fab89b556a98b30
7bd8390c53d93920193701e6248fdd5a3e5a39e3
'2011-11-16T17:10:11-05:00'
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
44e9892a5fca052243b8fd55d949ce9c
eaee3cb7ba63cd89f1a044de6f509edd22e15922
describe
'7073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOR' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5021d9dda4ae1ece3c3b58927557bc34
1fc137acacbbfceb6000b3c9247b9c629251388b
describe
'836396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOS' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
d3fb425303447fb291318ec3bd7345c8
1fce1da0af986e42053c7f416895817ac05309c4
describe
'55161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
22d653f1b9ee9bac0a29133b8a6618cd
19b8e06d50e9acfe1275dd0c7efd41b1083b88a5
describe
'20792' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOU' 'sip-files00129.pro'
acbd0563d1fac2fd0b4c653e52241be2
39aa176eb41cc2861bd7801fc2a63734e969c1df
describe
'18845' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOV' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a3308389a2df369381bf56ac081c9666
e4006ccedb6d671785d457cdf0ade9321e70fc24
'2011-11-16T17:08:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOW' 'sip-files00129.tif'
3ae9bed816902afc75972b04cf76077d
2d025f5069027c7dd028f37353e459e08d4a6899
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOX' 'sip-files00129.txt'
ceb65d4fdc04e6cc06b154ac846fc817
cd01fc46940ac16d21767b686e086dfea0060e42
describe
'5351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOY' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0262b62de1ed59a8eba7d8d499d373bf
3886a2ab410280358631f4370e42c9b3c992d1f3
describe
'879209' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASOZ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
8d8cf0bfb674f8208ace5ae404ead4c7
d8b0e359fda04aeb6b0599053cb025c7955e8622
describe
'55643' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPA' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
b8163b943ec4521c7dd4bd2f8ffc0836
069ca395d938bd5a6a84ff5885bdb0466b0468a3
describe
'20984' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPB' 'sip-files00130.pro'
eff5cac2ae752dae924a90a82004a7a7
3be6628495fdaa471dca53184b672902fa0b8728
describe
'18837' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPC' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
bae032e5da295f229245b9dd6c2ccee3
3424beb78a8ba9011f1a3709565ab582f0984c4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPD' 'sip-files00130.tif'
83313e1f15a34309e81009a37edca45a
80a25aa02bb68ea5e6b323eee0d4caa8910438c7
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPE' 'sip-files00130.txt'
4f704169b979fd7cb31f747d373e0dbd
cfc3dd06141a8e0b1276f47c89f28efeba96b718
describe
'5412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPF' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
b7b62d9360273402bae49ed8514f2b48
20c56b32052f9b1ebd964078e6fa5d8b883d9aff
describe
'968347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPG' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
97c40d4a061033250d057ec219a7f989
acce2a85b49680b6d8a22caff19fde32a7727d9d
describe
'86510' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPH' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
9d21a3ae26575af30096e0ec8ee3483e
a7c61de81b0b85efdffc4c7c13bfee6196b9b016
'2011-11-16T17:04:47-05:00'
describe
'25851' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPI' 'sip-files00131.pro'
ee72a1bc1755319cbd1593faa6c2962f
80358df4118697b3348fff227bb7f3cd0b2a8f0f
describe
'30351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPJ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
ee85c511459df7fd9981559d5a52bc32
8a6b4040a6f479f595fe71e8a30193d033b9e56d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPK' 'sip-files00131.tif'
fbc657590965b44bdba073446450d75d
82308fcd5f91644b2ff825fbe87ab5386fbfde2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPL' 'sip-files00131.txt'
f1df4506c9aa30fc068d0aac0a993a93
151904dce5971717894eb66d12688cde7244aaf9
describe
'8765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
11b3960cca22c70770f072c2cb174aa0
11862f341ab35176ed5ec8b14274e2421c448a34
describe
'964079' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPN' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
0ac465a916841688014020660b20362b
4aedfe5f6e755e99044fb375d8968854822201fe
describe
'91999' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
0868b66b17c37ec522714dc7f1b4e0f1
f86b8bf8fa7347d4ec0ccfd94ea8b4dab1b71c6e
describe
'27439' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPP' 'sip-files00132.pro'
52491c50bd0e4916a9cf047e401b646d
ef1579aca768b85464a09ad141b7b3daaae3f869
describe
'34463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPQ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
2b51fd8600fff77082c5a94e50d44d33
28346bd770c0dcf6dfdd01579db3b5290029077e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPR' 'sip-files00132.tif'
790d9ddb67a2b9b4ec389f07942a3612
ed6f65a4033eb4bbbf63d43043b3f9c427e6238b
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPS' 'sip-files00132.txt'
c43c0fd81770700a54b87a929710e635
a5ae2a73945665866495b044b1a739e28101a80b
describe
'9562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPT' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
c03bf1d2efaf94ad8722e1d17c6318f1
5b808228c711731ee9d9114fd442df51c2f55718
describe
'968287' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e5d135792df44899de1d1f6c010dd9ab
23a8658075f2d145964bd1b5011e0d0e0960fffc
describe
'92958' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
6d25b93a566b70eefc9a209dadb613aa
88845ef8735e2234058fff21af4874fec14c13bb
describe
'26721' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPW' 'sip-files00133.pro'
c47644a29b789b34cb7215d51c756adf
628fba4b39a18d8cdc3613133a4771ab46202ce6
describe
'35080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPX' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
94c8451a19da5cd7dc10c1d6af95e4d9
7a8a081004339461be0afad5eec02fdb73a480cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPY' 'sip-files00133.tif'
e0677f9ab0f9702b08840e09af752b83
df04b1ff5d7f34b80d736c5d0aee03f92e20c55a
'2011-11-16T17:10:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASPZ' 'sip-files00133.txt'
c4034993515c12b15ab3912491b60ecf
ee6ec4e272951f223622806441b9a7cc42b39d88
describe
'9416' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQA' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
847be53dbbf2e1a1ed088f8bb8c31fba
7cbacd73950280624df75ada4724fd6551d4c2bb
describe
'964075' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQB' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
91e27cd011a8132a7f14e80d2acdbb52
d7dd67c31897c1b7c286e69df27e47d3c6edd12a
describe
'93114' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQC' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
5269bd9b9e262eebd44704f9f0e19d8c
ba24eaa8ffff4129be5939e11620c39dcbffe72d
describe
'27085' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQD' 'sip-files00134.pro'
1947d9bb929cca8dba41626e75e044b6
7012552fad432be1e46543ff98b6c4bd8b519b5d
describe
'35870' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
9fea03c4501ccbfd06c58c0f79148c4c
e530bdfed342b7abd5a7e7aae1ec59b75df846a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQF' 'sip-files00134.tif'
9cfe0cfd18ae24190b9468537f5f4e0c
15dd5f3b6269ec144fea2cb4e18ae4947a640486
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQG' 'sip-files00134.txt'
ae562523428ac83e989d92850a938e29
61aa9ec3820cdb68002dfc76bd9d61e8c9e011d7
describe
'9429' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQH' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
4607549ce7b27e2e70529a4c84ce7ab3
1c37410887cf123dffde8429c438130954f196ad
describe
'846078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
57735f29bff076ee96db3ab34cfd0f19
561be4d0c03d82093b454471c156d5464e51a31c
describe
'60751' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQJ' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
635a5dd5936735b248a440b6ff296f97
7326f8a776ffc3e8037a3339782065e32c625a73
describe
'20611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQK' 'sip-files00135.pro'
cbcf397a46b674bf79d5b6e55837369f
e5031b0e7623ab28562c392abdad77e437bc4521
describe
'22786' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQL' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
fd137c6bc08f3be206db1be732a3fe17
24e4f347242b5dcef120e3590d7d1c1f22da472b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQM' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e858a3b60bf000f71c21ecd63ad33ff6
d5012554b89c34bbfb79d849b89ea6df0bb0212a
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQN' 'sip-files00135.txt'
7e9bf31f28eebc0e68f3b1ec0e723c29
7fe86b6a2ac1eef58ebb48d581e214b9af6b5f02
describe
'5797' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQO' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
6a8092dc85c4e89c8740f8f07e524a58
73e662fca63f178bc6b42ae2f37dc5ace7380551
describe
'853442' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQP' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e0a6dfe4cabc036540717e9ded7a9876
b7adda84200831b38d5e3139c01f1b34e16fdd73
describe
'56377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQQ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b68bf18638e07056d72676ba6158f6ef
5098ff0dee39ea9127b396c1b0a8d27aa008039b
describe
'20682' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQR' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e52de6b06c397c207367ba5a7feea0af
7e86a0da0b0e98054c245c19333c71c95c94b66d
describe
'18988' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQS' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
9faa97c8caa5b296ace7302f0cab38b7
6dee9a4b8b2765689ea32b460f2af192ff1308da
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQT' 'sip-files00136.tif'
8de65af2caeed0d738ec8912b359a79c
41ebc7389eccdc63b3f51ae548f3a6caf0ec650f
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQU' 'sip-files00136.txt'
aa98ed11ee5212c89d669782db268c72
798a9df6ef42e14b8e84f13f976cbbddde514bd2
describe
'5261' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQV' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
9560eb7d4c63dd991081cc44f44bc478
399ecf261217e83df0d37460c5fefe41a01f732f
describe
'861302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQW' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
dc07982e16467e432fce11db4cb5af21
84ebfaccadb37459900dc1729eb111d4bcc7e338
describe
'64158' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQX' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
7f9e6ef1cf5ae12759621c4c08c42a77
ba14f1b80fb88f670dfc738034223903f30e5296
describe
'24139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQY' 'sip-files00137.pro'
609671772007921f56d1b0d7f9d9b8e1
91deda0353551bbb67bf07eb94e8e3712b4ba1e9
describe
'21692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASQZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
ace6f65459ad435c6ee0f39570261f1a
5f16fddca0b8affc8fac93f2a9e92895b9e84634
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRA' 'sip-files00137.tif'
175bafafc39f84f8fad8108d8cd3fa73
8861fc013dc7687a874ee560dedad298817c41c4
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRB' 'sip-files00137.txt'
1b5bb6834a055f479a9b5801d7444b1d
92e8338af30d70328f6b2f0f77b63456b0401d61
describe
'5819' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRC' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
8f61b675353c66161cc6ee7325a308f5
ff4b4c9412b40c8209b5cfa3ac783bf3ea1cdf3f
describe
'963953' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRD' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
64dd968a51c1d0a96d680a33f2a81d1b
f1b42d1178b665a4f6b104a2e8d3ca00423ad5a5
describe
'84498' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRE' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
913d0b910447cd108a3ba66ce2e7c2c3
145aac143810932fec8e64f91a7de2b454f3b66f
describe
'24916' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
25cfd39c2de5384a9c3f6bff6b57980d
164c59fc605340ee3928400ffa94f8461d2a2c2e
describe
'29545' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRG' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
9e9f4e937fbb61310f9b5e4643dbbf24
207bf366f2f14ae1d082dacdbccf27b182d323cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRH' 'sip-files00138.tif'
e4982de35b144481fdb3dfcb36e43754
1a7358e4b54f6f9f409dfd962fca8a9caa3d07a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRI' 'sip-files00138.txt'
b720f4db10c4544cfbc2da52d7ce13af
040cb2934204d91cc75f48fb6ab81df50c694040
describe
'7722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRJ' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d89a9f5924248eb55cfb4c3dbf27569b
1545c9bab25de22586d405fb0259e9b852409837
describe
'968322' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRK' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
3b7afd37c0bb573a8aa48b23ccaa102f
4190f8e617f5b36a2e7ef5eb8b4a6dc80d7e1f3f
describe
'108978' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRL' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b1f42c15b7da557ac3f34dc50a2891c8
c4c3f3ef1d961d8788e382df606016601cf3e1c4
describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRM' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9b6a1b61010487eac9750674e971cfbe
99c89a0b513a4cf48344a69edc8bbbc6a2db859e
describe
'39364' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRN' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ff7776d507f96483921986d2ba3adc29
8f4ab3d2f061fd1d3ac5620021e4c195722b3732
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRO' 'sip-files00139.tif'
7220e345be8430419a5129ec5cdb0d6f
c1541b6ab7fdd49e18d958a0a9dc26791b0347e4
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRP' 'sip-files00139.txt'
977c87701593a06dd7f047bc14d18cc3
233c146bf79865aecdf048c14fa73b8c8b838d5b
describe
'10105' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRQ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
3bd353640d2073075aa0fa9464efc0ae
30d088f9f215f02070312b17cc3f6ceeec5e0fe9
describe
'964068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRR' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
0cbccccaf759814d3ef3a1a24483d315
e0a572a686460649394eec90fdbfcb4ad163c983
describe
'100707' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRS' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ba5669a9209ce412a01cacf603840d53
d0488a22593c66d8a691462fc0bd937856e176ee
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRT' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7222ef98893e901d74a00e1ba683ef50
aefe5d28f46ea86b1930452c3f4bdfc1d42bc15e
describe
'36525' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRU' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
337ccc45817c31c594067a24a1594052
f25b27b837925e52cce3f96b916daad6c95edc54
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRV' 'sip-files00140.tif'
f688163ad17ca2cadf924eb36aa00df1
5fd6e3b017bf97ee533b0805eddf4df81e0238ae
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRW' 'sip-files00140.txt'
e5a2327ea7bd0976c874c9e4730beffa
209714927246f378f295fca9c8398ae16b240f8c
describe
'9017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRX' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
5f7caca40acf4ac0ad822cfee4280554
7b7aed46df60910641995861310f82725c63183b
describe
'968270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRY' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
987fc6aa7c7001b10bc6eaf80bd5fb8c
a46295d65ef560f1206fcde1a3c8baf8f6bbbf40
describe
'106062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASRZ' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
55b338233702eebcf908309eefe65e46
8f1db9795d8f962d732dcbf900bc232dc4fc2862
describe
'32142' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSA' 'sip-files00141.pro'
3d4d88b39940c67f767f20aa9830ed47
054620a89601915872cf182f1fc6df34f30781fd
describe
'37790' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSB' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
fa66d6a62723c8bad167b5e14748988a
a5fcc87cfb3d9f71754c0702ccb427d06ce27cdf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSC' 'sip-files00141.tif'
8dd8d69de02013e3bdd93fd27b53530b
927019fb382b293a969b3341dc8318d923e0f96f
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSD' 'sip-files00141.txt'
d23240528d65f33cdd5390710d5d2944
0b8f8f104d55fd2957600fae32df9a0ab2054a17
describe
'10082' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSE' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
c39c57a930011c29c7243b76eb6b6967
e327a35f99deb5e3d5c78c89cf43295dae1fed7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSF' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
1a0454467a3b7f6c1e48be5ac7650245
634a1cae6ebbedac25bb8276f18b58e522704c54
describe
'104207' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSG' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
cc10bbe76b0376b5c8ae3edebb357313
1a5a20b3d497473df3f4551c2bada0d34d65d12b
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSH' 'sip-files00142.pro'
0d5ee7d7074d172fdcea48ca49d663bd
bab04ab4674e85e53a1bef2ae4bf9181da327113
describe
'37629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSI' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
cb74df6dd7de5570b696a21c779c2b96
8771ec2934be27dc102e69d58d878e0a8fb5877e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSJ' 'sip-files00142.tif'
c4a9cf1a3dd3cd4a4e51d37cb4b0e2aa
2e094577f71aa9f057dfe010ad213593343c1623
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSK' 'sip-files00142.txt'
13b14571e5c4bde2b9cfbbc361519f29
342b9ae1179fc167a68a9d2b0b7b06bb400b9e2a
describe
'9723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSL' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a7cca2caaa652d3e1953b82afaa8e29e
f0e37145ecc4166b91ff48b92d7660ea67c8be2d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSM' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
a582d0de1353af37a86ce894004f36f3
b3352e12820868da715714b1ba044d65a901c009
describe
'103657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSN' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
3993704ec2634194fe402ad6a59dc1e1
abd08656227633103b2e20e68084eb7ca392c05e
describe
'32382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSO' 'sip-files00143.pro'
ed679fd9c6372ff606d70f10f762f100
5584b26fcf2d89352f9d04f1939d63b57602557c
describe
'38240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSP' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
5d4eb4e26108a4f4b72fa95879326b25
0cfd35a3078ecd41602cb9c0d5c6c36fa403bfdd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSQ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
7c769250c80725637f41550cab1bd145
0fb3416dfb9da1580aa589d6e02641ba9e4b97c1
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSR' 'sip-files00143.txt'
2bbe5b584c49196fee8748e01b5d7978
3fc6df9a1c59bb4cc960981eaf4c29148a766ed7
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSS' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
87c8fedeca600f8b0ac8b7e71df5dc25
4b6479310cfa99ec2792004c12d1bb2c08b9a1ba
describe
'964078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASST' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
b3538ca19e2511d0b5202b823c65d5d5
3881d1a3f47289c8f2b01da2e2fd849e8340b945
describe
'100695' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSU' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
e6c7994e25a5e09960949d03d4f035bc
5ccdff3949d3ea217468a3467974008301ea4718
describe
'31135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSV' 'sip-files00144.pro'
debcd1971e8fba8daf30fad860c199a7
be6dd509e43cb656cce685ed5ac720b3f48d88eb
describe
'35679' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSW' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
ca8982ff1115ca76111d741b0899296a
b711b65474a483dee265b02bac974e9115fb4ddf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSX' 'sip-files00144.tif'
ea0aa54183ef256360d04cc755936cc7
c7dce9bcdb456a2adcf6f4499103468a58de99df
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSY' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e22050030ff684b14cad881d531b9dfb
83cb1c5340979e8ab9119581da629cd76375a76c
describe
'9145' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASSZ' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
3d5c10bb42f55373c301f1492f6de289
c02c84e9e2a386c1c86a4abc2f4d82536b53ca41
describe
'928127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTA' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
781854507583ed7527c17e555d1f8a5c
b592dd32d2f2523e52fcb120b68e0193e77b319f
describe
'110885' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTB' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
2a7f2ff8e6f957ec90a715ff0ea55ca9
7d6d94a420090b0b38354630facc3c5a9b22f0e3
describe
'31184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTC' 'sip-files00145.pro'
036d96ae756829c565c6c3a09bd00f99
5d6d0bd6aa12cfddee1f738e0e940d8d14f243b6
describe
'40811' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTD' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
27f16ec0233b2807223ff01c1abc8097
0d7dbd5e90f3402b051d3b7ec2944e198bc31ce3
describe
'7434083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTE' 'sip-files00145.tif'
0f1fc8ad40db3badf1ce751109b34cc0
c9ef8e9691663b2885ef53ae816788c51f10c03c
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTF' 'sip-files00145.txt'
bd3769022ca05a1bee5b31b517f56af9
42263951d19de48b62d73b4c1cad2fb545e3ddc0
describe
'11025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTG' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
bee2dc3c441963c95eab2db4e320e91b
6fa5dc0328b9e4514dbebaee770fb69365af46bd
describe
'955754' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTH' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
39161f349fce8c23da9f10658b6054e2
0a2208e25bbae3e3cb198c932862beb1846049c2
describe
'103350' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTI' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
128eabd47e43fff1ed6d938eb943e78e
2322bfcb875d4a20795ed4c4da28900e478f7148
describe
'30532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTJ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
87b808f89594b6964b3f51a2120bb6de
5402b9bd77a40b8477cbf800ae557ea72a360f98
describe
'37196' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTK' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
36a17d9c203edf6fad62e877a7ca0b2e
28de620c9c356c96ea08412113155656ac0682f9
describe
'7654993' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTL' 'sip-files00146.tif'
0f4ac7f0f0c5691e682d4d87ad5401fc
6941526c404c9c2f7b70e476bc86b8f1cede9e20
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTM' 'sip-files00146.txt'
50130948a00865186a64b328404363fc
387cbd52feae23006ac7b0b896f9e6f59b95c783
describe
Invalid character
'9853' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTN' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
25debd5dab91c98749f0011bfc65a2d6
765482b390b4f74a1641d030900de6b5be8182eb
describe
'928151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTO' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
5818365ba55bab037d6cba00eb61ac70
005dde112446dea5665f8016dabe030860389d8c
describe
'111342' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTP' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
97256bcce1368dd68aeddd5856e4117b
c4c892c16acf64e949982edb19c3346e54c3df1e
describe
'32129' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTQ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
9e3e7757188e520d137a7c1a85a6fbc6
d628f95b629a31489d004fcff229f5a75d32794c
describe
'40762' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTR' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
3785d5eb55b3b51db8ebf42225080be5
4e24e627bafe471592a67e21d805dc89ccd1053d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTS' 'sip-files00147.tif'
706932d7c53788867c15bd5d69a1a2c4
7653ac369225312db7d188b3569375832cd6c85e
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTT' 'sip-files00147.txt'
ecf622d556153db9a22aa8c1c83dbf9d
f6cceffbf94de8a90243b6e9356e4215d4003395
describe
'10618' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
3da92f4472c26fd561437ee2c04d06b6
973fb8e4751e4b68d55141edaade0334869cdc88
describe
'955764' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTV' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
15c96990677dfb25c6b070357dc5deb7
0f18322bbc1084608de41e51bed28fe047198ccf
describe
'106739' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTW' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
a55082da30bc02a854161e4fd4280505
93e34bc67b92199946802885e5bcc2c95961abc5
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTX' 'sip-files00148.pro'
914b1480208a9fe099637883c009be69
9025e3a8d53f0c74a02ce95c39bbdcd9d80e7f23
describe
'38333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTY' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
14ccea83ea168ac5c821f886d14107ea
0db6d79be4a3d6c0400bf93bfc7f3313c91cb116
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASTZ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
ce3dfc854178d5b4c0e71e94b2d80589
8715e64fb19bd3c162943a84ee94fc2a2b2ddaf7
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUA' 'sip-files00148.txt'
1c028e241e35217ac132b075ba39eebb
8305be507ea48b18ca9b48e32f7d5d50842e7162
describe
'9996' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUB' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ee6bd776c433e861d6ea795a51841ec7
4c2a78244d892b8254dd2a6f893d0cc69dd3075d
describe
'928179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUC' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
90533ba711eae7817890bb74324315f2
f9e34a35ed900c8c80a82579a9c116de5aa310cd
describe
'108421' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUD' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
991ad3ab481eeb03ecf4e41ca9d18159
d8f28d4ee566ed7144a17422f316a983fa4d3245
describe
'30910' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUE' 'sip-files00149.pro'
29b0b493c93a72388210bc876bf2304c
c3ef50d05b6b1b8b3321e12e516c5107a1a4cb3c
describe
'39534' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUF' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
6ec3f69d075eb5d3a118441b0b63b6df
961fe10a46d40afed71a5718e5f204c0ab8ed14e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUG' 'sip-files00149.tif'
0860f360e1cb653383c2b771800ea1f3
206c07dd681bec2f1948efb3b2c9568a71197b12
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUH' 'sip-files00149.txt'
39dbd28db018511be3989b369bfd4099
9eec6b154060052e436c57e040b0c3bd17bef2c1
describe
'10552' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUI' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
428937c08ab5b603d4cc27ce4c73e599
c48d4274d30cfbfbbdff4c1bd40d13e57c8562c2
describe
'955789' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUJ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
26788b74b0aa6eb0899ad47c91eec9c7
9786d94de33591521504616a9609646734d7d327
describe
'109834' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUK' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7eb4db2571f1822325128aae87320bef
a526a31378242c78def8bba2735fcf2f5bc4df47
describe
'31704' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUL' 'sip-files00150.pro'
13adf4c76c7aa4900f0d5a9097b17b1f
9f257230e07886ad7e98717fc069c3006bedfb28
describe
'38904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUM' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
3f949c3da42d32894efb1db487e8670d
5a5adbf7d6a693398df0f8b834fd723c0915a7a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUN' 'sip-files00150.tif'
4e519417343ac0f560240cabaa5d0f59
eca46388c1355a29f70f4d1962d5a64f69603b3e
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUO' 'sip-files00150.txt'
537019372d4f6d5492bec6f133941c80
dd3f136bebe994ce3bf168fa100b8867eb10bbc7
describe
'10179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUP' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f718d3ca83c4dcd0689aff8ba83e3068
ad45251b29de918184148e28b387a86e5b609bc1
describe
'928183' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUQ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
455ddbf1b49f7b6018195cee83790460
6b97ff6b4bd6a6e2f8c9c730ce2655e1a58c5d95
describe
'104503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUR' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
5a44e6fdaf6ad8ab82d1beca8ef925e0
d9cccce3999caf98e656739afd4b5385dcdec3a6
describe
'29027' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUS' 'sip-files00151.pro'
0434b81ebea3db58a21b445cef84b1a9
c5f36134fb91ec4c46bca17e3c2635b147a2d7b0
describe
'37938' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUT' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
adfacf386934f4d19bb3d5faa7d166cc
8fcca8e8bb01d9872188173bd65036fccd18a695
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUU' 'sip-files00151.tif'
b0478d0c5d1f6a612e9dc69190857cd0
18b984039a21bd329f763bce53cc3e19c43e14e7
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUV' 'sip-files00151.txt'
eed2bb32342dc7cdb76023abc4ecb147
986413840529da7fbd4a2a2ebba8aa95a9b5f4e3
describe
'10106' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUW' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
fb4f67c2ac0982ccad58f779c8ea5dba
033d5a32fdbe05a810e57cb36dd9d15b279786fc
describe
'955546' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUX' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
7b9fbed04b68099bb168a15c3788cbe6
fa7da445cee8f07c29cf8d5185ce8b99d904bf01
describe
'44257' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUY' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
2c61152b6268e9d0bcc2ef0993fa0c6d
aaf5dd01072e7f03cd8ec5ce6f7e39674c67ed7b
describe
'1469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASUZ' 'sip-files00152.pro'
cf9c391a2787412147c4c757f9e87f58
e767cc9f647ba17a5235e6e9aa6b039476f1e224
describe
'12630' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVA' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
9d04598fe66bb01b23da35ac2f0a4fc1
bcb83bd64ca64e685c31e75c523679f7e3e5d83c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVB' 'sip-files00152.tif'
e3753f16e74a3aa1fcc4d38bae8636e0
d062ff4f0b046b0e4ec2dd2acd2245c584291ac3
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVC' 'sip-files00152.txt'
05a7f0158bd48330f88363889c709913
19a3e99d48c4ee447850a03fdb756921a2353854
describe
Invalid character
'3399' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVD' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
be0ea8d61904b8985c87bc88b8d24805
be56d1f7f345a4aa503c7d7c28ef25559deb6d69
describe
'1421066' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVE' 'sip-filesback4.jp2'
4c7f7407d2082723a4007cf97604d9b2
8aeecb641c85b1746a1116f1f3b9df3b35ab0908
describe
'107511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVF' 'sip-filesback4.jpg'
34d9ddc1d19ac3ae04b214643f6af9fd
037f02ec04b4486958b9a6a4ba3332bb518034e7
describe
'215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVG' 'sip-filesback4.pro'
2256c83073f1cab96aba8b62762a99de
87dfb5e06480bf248ef79b1bf6894520b4713785
describe
'21641' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVH' 'sip-filesback4.QC.jpg'
cb280f5ecb9dc7a6da5131aac0c98171
3d92e5131c9a9b7ae985d83aaf9e4a32617190c9
describe
'34107822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVI' 'sip-filesback4.tif'
fd99ea69705a48ea3ef388e580313a7d
b63f51a2645c8c44f5065c84643fba4415605646
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVJ' 'sip-filesback4.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'5129' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVK' 'sip-filesback4thm.jpg'
2b777c2aa8c8d13ebb19c646c3f1a5e7
5553cd6dbbe4a7a9b51672118087ce22937b7b99
describe
'359341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVL' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
68289d5d6e443a5a4c3bc99b451fe309
29f0500b65c920c146423ee0d0bc7ddf0a3c7d40
describe
'138039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVM' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
3967351fcf74ca1d8bdacdb261c9d04b
05020c4d1f39edce7961c7bab41b34a1e6bd734f
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVN' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
62aaf5a3b16228851a1ee95fe6d483bf
5326698b46bca2cb0697b3addfbdb716583cdcb6
describe
'29646' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVO' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
76cdb9dce6d1c62262b3ad1150b8fcc8
2b6d799ee8ed33f0037da592315d0f2436f982c7
describe
'8629612' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVP' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
2b35b2b40417cb67aad2acebadafc45c
d1ea17664ec4a3a1140500fd2f834a0a896505e2
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVQ' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
efc7b0945fe204c743ce9de0cedcb099
43d29265f4e9f7490c331c0e06d3abfad55bdd82
describe
'6857' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVR' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
feb8578dc1797e1e4bb064216618a915
5a9fa8816030f413d8f8fedf9142258ff0971640
describe
'198939' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVS' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
aedfd0d664dd8ea5b1afddbdecfdd486
1e4cc7f62cd1b9d259f299c2906e150361dccc2c
describe
'29979' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVT' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
bef4edd7469d36205c6adf6c3a88cc2b
983702a4a2b5e729d6e4a8033d257fc22ba02d05
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVU' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
dd793e376b227837d3a2ee46c2f60fb5
f3629b133f2feb13f40ed3a555ef6ac0b6237ec9
describe
'7856' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVV' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
abe399948611146b4b60ee764e5e3f64
3adfb8c19220306ed759abd12208575147f03a8b
describe
'4776582' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVW' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
715e32ebf563bab54dbba8d8ff353f86
1f16235bbc4ac5e023e6c898130126fc58145e37
describe
'113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVX' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
0b1f09b3cd4123277bb4c42889ead949
7ac5b86a9860e4c65025f184e5806d87595a2d3e
describe
'3200' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVY' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
5a8d06b98994a0fef87dbaefb434efc9
d30011fff7d7edb14c8287165a601af9c898b1cf
describe
'261974' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAEDfileF20080922_AAASVZ' 'sip-filesUF00002763_00001.mets'
f50e13e5487fde36f7f7a2e81e8726ef
1d01c0c141a3eee61e41c0369be72623c4b1a26e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T01:36:45-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
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The Baldwin Library


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MEMOIR

JAMES ARTHUR COBB.

BY HIS MOTHER,

MRS. EUNICE HALE COBB.




WITH

AN ESSAY ON RELIGIOUS EDUCATION,

BY THE PUBLISHER.

BOSTON: e*.
PUBLISHED BY SYLVANUS COBB, :
No. 61 Cornhill. he “ i el
1852. TE


Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1852, by

SYLVANUS COBB,

In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.

Stercotyped by
HOBART & ROBBINS,
BOSTON. -
PREFACE.

By the earnest solicitation of many of our
friends, and in the belief that profitable instruc-
tion and a kindly influence will be imparted by
this means to other minds, both of parents and chil-
dren, I have been induced to engage in the pleas-
ant task of presenting to the world, and especially
to the young, a brief history of our “ darling boy
Jimmy.”’

The thought of the lovely child, as he was so
recently with us, and so pleasantly filled the
important place he held in the family circle, and
the reflection that that place can never be filled by
him again, has often overwhelmed my mind with
sadness, and led me to fear that I should fail to do
IV PREFACE.

justice to the work before me. But I have been
strengthened with the assurance that the spirit of
the dear departed one attends me, and would even
assist me in writing an account of his mission
on earth. With this sentiment, I would sit me
down to write of his life with the same blest feel-
ings with which I have sat to instruct that tender
and inquiring mind, which is now receiving divine
instruction in his holy, happy home above.

Having always shared his unbounded confidence,
and been constantly blest with his valuable society,
and having kept a daily record, I have been
enabled to give his history in a plain, truthful man-
ner; and although a mother’s partialities may
sometimes be betrayed, yet it is hoped that the
nature of the circumstances will be a sufficient
apology.

In preparing this little sketch, in so far as it
relates to the conversation of the angel boy, I have

- endeavored to give his own simple though impress-
PREFACE. Vv

ive language. And in doing this I have been
cheered with the reflection, that I have acted in
accordance with what would have been his own
desire, had he been permitted to express it. His
daily petition was “that he might live to do
good ;’’ and such was his brief but happy and use-
ful life, and his calm and triumphant death, that
it is thought no one, young or old, can become
acquainted with his prominent traits of character,
without being instructed and strengthened for
good.

I write not for the critic, but for the lovers of
truth and virtue, uttered in the simple language
of the heart’s affection ; believing that, if the biog-
raphy of a wise and good man may be profitable to
other men, the biography of a wise and good child
may be profitable to other children.

With a deep reverence for the character and
mission of one whom I have loved with a mother’s

most ardent affection, and a desire at the same
1*
VI PREFACE.

time to be the humble instrument of advancing
that all-sustaining and heaven-born cause, the
supreme value of which was illustrated by his life,
have I prepared this little volume.

And hoping it may lead the young to ‘¢ remem-
ber their Creator in the days of their youth,” and
the middle-aged and the aged to “seek first the
kingdom of God and his righteousness,” it is very
affectionately dedicated to the memory of JAMES

ARTHUR
By his Mother,

E. H. C.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

MEMOIR, ° e . o . * ° . . ° 7. . . . 9
CHAPTER ILI.

wae GUM, we a we

CHAPTER II.
JOURNEY TO MAINE, AND THE LOST HAT, . . . . 57

CHAPTER IV.
cau, it set meallhec. cont at oe oe ee er ee

CHAPTER V.
VISIT TO WORCESTER, AND THE LITTLE PAPER-BOY, . 17%

CHAPTER VI.
Te NO, OO 0 Bm ay he oe igen

CHAPTER VIL.
THE MIPSIONARY BOX,. . . . « © 2 0 ss 200
VIII CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII.

HIS VIEWS OF DEATH,. . - + «© © © «© ©. « 10%
CHAPTER IX.

HIS EXIT, AND FUNERAL OBSEQUIES, . . +. « ~» Il4
CHAPTER X.

ESSAY ON RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, i. Ss a.
CHAPTER I.
MEMOIR.

Tue subject of the present memoir, James
Arthur Cobb, was the son of Rev. Sylvanus
and Eunice Hale Cobb, and the youngest
of nine children. He was born in Hast
Boston, Dec. 22, 1842. The next young-
est child in the family being eight years his
senior in age, little James was a pet, as
well as a great favorite. And such was
his amiableness of disposition, so great his
sense of propriety, and so mild and gentle
was he at all times, that he was never
known to take advantage of the position
he held in the family, or the indulgences
which were unavoidably bestowed upon
him. From his infancy, so*easy was he to
be governed, or, rather, so great was his
love of duty, that correction was seldom
needed; and, in the family, often was he
10 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

referred to as the little boy who was never
whipped. And as long as he lived, nothing
would grieve him more than to see a
mother strike a child. Often, when his
playmates have erred, and knew that the
consequence must be a ‘‘ whipping from
their mother,’ he has gone, and, by rea-
sons strong, persuaded the mother to use
some other means of correction, and thus
saved his friend from the ‘‘ rod.”’

James not only early discovered a sweet-
ness of temper which greatly endeared him
to all, but he evinced, also, deep religious
feeling. His very nature seemed, as it
were, a holy one. His social and moral
sentiments were strongly marked, and very”
early did they become developed, insomuch
that, by one member of the family, he
received the name of ‘“‘glory,bud.”” A
friend, writing to his mother after his
death, says: ‘*I remember well the first
time I looked upon your boy. I came to
congratulate you upon his birth. He was
three weeks old, and, with a mother’s pride,
EARLY TRAINING. 11

you pointed to his head, and asked me if it
was not fine and promising. I assented,
and together we marked out for him a bril-
liant career. I come again, to-day, to con-
gratulate you in his death, that your highest
expectations have been far more than real-
ized in his life and departure.”’

The mind of little James was like a beau-
tiful garden of choice flowers, whose opening
buds and expanding petals, which are re-
freshed by the hand of culture, repay with
their richest odor the gardener’s care.
His opening, grasping mind, seemed early
to claim kindred with heaven itself; and
high and exalted, as wellas pure and peace-
able, were the teachings it naturally craved.
With him, God was love, heaven was beau-
tiful, and earth itself, when rightly enjoyed,
a meet temple in which for the indwelling
spirit to worship;,and admire its great and
supreme Architect.. And thus early was he
taught, and early did he enjoy, the faith
which embraces God as the Father and
Friend of all, Christ as the Mediator and
12 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

Saviour of all, and heaven as the final
inheritance of a ransomed, sanctified, and
sinless universe. And this faith ‘‘ grew
with his growth, and strengthened with his
strength.’’ Often would he express to his
‘‘ dear mother,”’ when conversing upon the
subject of religion, his deep gratitude to
God, that he had not been taught in his
childhood, as she had been in hers, ‘‘ to
believe so about God.’’ His sympathetic
mind would seem to be filled with surprise
and horror, when told of the song of endless
wrath which rocked the cradle of her in-
fancy, and the thoughts of final separation
and infinite torments which added a bitter
to every sweet of her childhood hours ; and
thankful would he express himself, that she
had since learned those blessed truths which
enabled her to teach him in a way that made
him so happy, and led him to “love to
be good.” And often, when he attended
school, would he come home with his bosom
actually swelling with anguish, because the
children had, as he thought, so profaned the
THEOLOGICAL PRINCIPLEs. 13

character of God. They had talked to him
about a ‘ devil and hell in another world,”’
and *‘how God would burn little children
forever there, if they did wrong here.’’ He
could well understand how sinners could be
‘in hell,’’ in their dark and sinful state, in
guilt of conscience and restless fear ; and
how they could be under the influence of an
‘evil spirit,” if they disobeyed the laws
of Heaven. But the idea that God would
punish his children, upon a principle on
which no earthly parent would punish his,
namely, for their final injury, was not only
to him a mystery, but an offence which he
could not away with. He would wonder,
when the children would refer to their pa-
rents’ teachings for a proof of what they
said, ‘* how people could so teach their chil-
dren,’”’ and would often say, ‘‘it is wicked
to believe so about God.” And when he
would hear these same children using pro-
fanity, he would remark that « he did not
wonder at it, and if they were taught to
love God as he did, they would not want to
2
14 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

swear about him.’’ Andif he has not been
heard to argue with the “learned doctors ”’
in the “temple” upon this subject, there
are many old enough for doctors who have
felt the force of his reasoning upon it, while,
in his gentle, childlike manner, he would
appeal to their own hearts for an answer in
favor of the only true teaching adapted to
the wants of the human mind.

He found this doctrine of God’s paternity,
and parental rewards and punishments, the
only doctrine he could reduce to practice,
when in health, among his playfellows ; and
it was this, and the thought that he had
lived it, and taught it to others as he had
had opportunity, which cheered and sus-
tained him through a painful and protracted
sickness. He was happy in a clear and
philosophical understanding of the consist-
ency of all punishment, under the govern-
ment of God, with his fatherly love. When
he had revived from the first exhaustion, in
which he was thought to be dying, when we
had not intruded upon him the probability
EARLY READING. 15

that he might soon be taken from us, lest it
should unpleasantly affect him, he intro-
duced the subject Aimself! He inquired
of his mother if she thought he should die,
and she answered him frankly in respect to
his situation. Unmoved, he very calmly
replied, ‘‘I am not afraid to die; I do not
believe what some say about God, and what
he will do to his children in another world, |

which makes them afraid to die. Of course, “”

God will punish us when we do wrong, be-
cause he loves us. He will punish us to
make us better. I shall find him as good
in another world as he is here.”’ This faith
even opened to him the bright glories of the
upper world,

‘Where sits the Saviour dressed in love,
And there the smiling God.”

EARLY READING.

JAMES early showed a love for books ; and
early, too, did he discover a taste for that
kind of reading which, while it would serve
16 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

for amusement, would also interest and
instruct him. It was always his delight to
read and hear read those books which
illustrated the true value of virtue, and the
importance of doing good. He was favored
with a good memory, and was thereby en-
abled to treasure up much which he gained
in this way; and, having great ‘ reflec-
tion,’ he was led to make useful application
of the knowledge thus gained. And during
his last sickness, reading engrossed much
of his time and attention. He had collected
quite a large library of well-selected books,
which were to him pleasant and agreeable
companions.

He was very fond of the Bible, and took
great satisfaction both in reading and hear-
ing it read. The same friend, from whose
note I have already quoted, further says:
‘The last time I saw you with your little
James was in your sitting-room, about a
year ago. You then told me of the preca-
rious state of his health, and said you felt,
each day, as you read to him from the evan-
EARLY READING. 17

gelists the life of the Saviour, that you
might be instructing a child for heaven.
These words have proved prophetic, and
you must be greatly comforted in the reflec-
tion that you have been permitted to see
so much of a Christ-like spirit manifested
in your child for the last year of his life.”’

The following is an extract from a letter
sent to my daughter while on a visit to
Maine, in August last:

‘“« Sunday evening, Aug. 3d. I have just
been engaged in reading to James Arthur
the last two chapters of Matthew. This
morning he wanted me to read to him of
Jesus’ birth, and to-night he wanted to hear
the chapters containing an account of his
trial and crucifizion. I have read these
chapters to him, until he can repeat the
most of them. What a little Christian!
How differently we should feel to part with
him now, from what we should to have had
him suddenly removed when he was first
taken sick! He seems constantly preparing

himself for a higher sphere, even for the
O*
18 MEMOSR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

sweet society of angels. His sickness is
made to me, by these accompanying cir-
cumstances, one of the greatest blessings I
ever enjoyed; and never before was I
taught to appreciate faith and contentment,
as I see it daily manifested in this little
disciple of Jesus.”’

And thus did his love for reading, and
particularly his love for the Holy Scriptures,
continue until his strength failed, which was
only three days previous to his death. The
last chapter which was read to him was the
one in Matthew which gives an account of
the ‘‘transfiguration.”’ After it was fin-
ished, he smilingly said, ‘* Mother, that is
the way those angels looked.* You know
I told you they were dressed in white, and
where they were it was all light.’’ He
seemed delighted that he had found some-
thing by which he could describe them,
because he had always said, when speaking
of them, that he ‘‘ could not tell how they
looked, for there was nothing on earth so

*See the ‘‘ Vision,”’ chap. vr.
SCHOOL—DAYS. 19

beautiful.”” And he was pleased that in
the word of God he had read of something
like them.

The week previous to his death, he had
his books all arranged in his library, accord-
ing to his direction, and wished they might
always be retained with the same care that
he had kept them.

Yes, precious child, these books we love,
Mementos of thy mind ;

Thy spirit meek, thy faithful heart,
Affectionate and kind.

SCHOOL-DAYS.

At the age of four, James entered school,
a period to which he had looked forward
with pleasant anticipations. Being favored
with one of the best of teachers, his school-
days commenced most pleasantly, and were
ever spent with much satisfaction and de-
light. Learning was to him no task, and in
whatever ‘‘department”’ he might be, he
always aspired for the head. With the
teacher, as far as consistent with the rules
20 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

of right, he was always a favorite, and
nothing pleased him more than to be ap-
pointed an assistant over the smaller schol-
ars. And, with the pupils, ‘‘ Jimmy” was
one who was always beloved, and his word
was ‘‘law.’’ Such was his mildness, and
so universally kind was he to all his school-
mates, that he never failed to gain the good
will of all. With him there was no par-
tiality, excepting it might be for some poor,
unfortunate boy, whom others would neglect
and abuse. Then he was always found on
the side of the ‘‘ injured party.”’

This characteristic, which ever beauti-
fully manifested itself in all his intercourse
with his playmates, seemed to be duly ap-
preciated by them, and rendered him one
to be sought after and loved. And it was
very gratifying, on the day of his burial,
when his playmates were admitted to take
their last look of one with whom they had
enjoyed so many pleasant hours, to witness
the deep and heartfelt sympathy which
seemed voluntarily to flow from all, as they
RESPECT FROM SCHOOL-MATES. 21

would utter forth their little encomiums :
‘Jimmy was a good boy;” ‘ We loved
Jimmy ;’’ ‘‘ We are sorry he can’t play
with us any more,— we always loved to
have him with us, because he was so kind ;”’
‘‘Everybody loved Jimmy,” &c. &c. And
such was the interest he felt for his school-
mates, and so desirous was he that they
should ‘*be good,’ that when he had be-
come so sick that he could neither go out
nor endure the fatigue of seeing all the chil-
dren in his room, he sent for Miss Lincoln,
who had been his teacher most of the time
from the commencement of his school-days,
that he might send his message to the school
by her. She very kindly consented to visit
him for that purpose, and at that time he
was so feeble that he was not allowed to see
any but those who were in attendance upon
him, it being but a.few days after the time
of his ‘‘vision.”” But his whole desire
seemed to be to ‘‘do all the good’’ he
could while he might be here, regardless
of any effort on his part which it might
22 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

require. And he was very desirous that
Miss L. should take the words from his lips,
that she might bear them directly to the
scholars from him. He was aware of his
situation, and thought he should never see
his school-mates again; and perhaps a few
words from him, at such a time, might pro-
duce upon their minds an impression which
would not be forgotten. His teacher came :
and, as she seated herself upon the couch of
this suffering, patient child, with whom she
had enjoyed so long and pleasant a relation,
and beheld his calm, ethereal countenance,
she could not repress the bright tear-drop
that started unbidden forth. But, perfectly
composed, and unmoved by tears, he was
prepared to give to her what he regarded
as his last message to his school-mates.
After speaking to her of his sickness, and
the happiness and peace he felt, and of his
Joy in seeing her, he told her he wanted * send to the scholars by her.’’ With the
assurance that his wish should be granted,
he said, ‘‘I want you to tell the children to
THE MESSAGER. 93

be good, and never swear, or use naughty
words. I want them to treat you kindly,
because, when they are out of your sight,
they do not do as you would wish them to
do. Tell them to be kind, and live to do
good.’’ This was his message; and as he
expected when he gave it, it was his last
message. He closed his conversation by
asking her to tell them all that he “‘ wanted
them to do as he wished of them, so that
if they should be sick, as he was, and thought
they were going to die, they could feel as
happy as he did.” His teacher retired
with the reflection that she had felt herself
to be benefited by this instructive and
interesting interview.

After this, the health of little James
continued to improve, and not knowing the
stage of the disease, hopes were entertained
that he might so far recover as to be able
te go out. And when he thought himself
that he might be able at some future time
to attend school, his great concern seemed
to be to know how he could go to school

hey
24 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

and not have to mingle with the boys, so as
to hear their profane and vulgar language,
which had always annoyed him. He
exacted the promise that if he should go to
school again, the teacher should first be
visited, to see if he could attend school
without being obliged to mix with the boys
out of the school-house. He at one time
remarked, ‘‘I had rather be confined at
home till I am too old to play with boys,
than to have to go into - street again and
hear their naughty talk.

He had attended the erammar-school but
a short time before his last sickness, having
been prevented from entering before, on
account of the feebleness of his health.
When he entered, it was with the determi-
nation that he would never have a ‘‘mark”’
for any misdemeanor whatever while he
should remain a member of the school.
And had his health been adequate to the
undertaking, no doubt he would have car-
ried his intention into execution. His
highest ambition always had been to stand
HONESTY AND INTEGRITY. 25

well in his school. After his death, in look-
ing over his papers; a note on interest, of
fourteen dollars and fifty cents, was found in
his wallet, which had been given him by
his father for the ‘“‘ Goods” and ‘* Excel-
lents’? he had brought from school as
‘rewards of merit.’’ But this ‘good
little boy’’ was not to join his school again
on earth. A higher school was appointed
for him, where sickness and disappointment
can never come.
“* Delightful scene! a world at rest ;
A God all love ; no grief, no fear ;

A heavenly hope, a peaceful breast,
A smile unsullied by a tear.??

HONESTY AND INTEGRITY.

Honesty and strict integrity were always
cherished and faithfully reduced to practice
by this lover of the right and the true.
From his infancy he despised everything
like deception and falsehood, and would
avoid, as much as possible, those whom he
knew to be regardless of the truth. He

3
26 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

had frequently remarked that he could not
enjoy his marbles with the boys, because
they so often sought to deceive him. This
he disliked ; and he thought it so wicked,
that he had made arrangements, should he
ever be able.to play with his marbles again,
to play in the house, either ‘‘ with the
family ’’ or ‘‘ alone,” because he could not
enjoy it to play with those who would
deceive him. His was a privilege, in
respect to this subject, of which he often
spoke with gratitude, and the value of
which he ever seemed fully to appreciate.
He despised, from the bottom of his heart,
anything like falsehood or deception ; and
whether he met with it in ‘‘ high places,”
or with his equals, he would never fail to
offer a gentle rebuke. Lying and swearing
were considered by him among the highest
offences. His word could always be
depended upon, and to question it would
sorely grieve him. He has often, through
the past year, spoken of the circumstance
of his never having told but three lies in
HONESTY AND INTEGRITY. 27

his life, and one of them was when he was
so young he had forgotten what it was.
Of those he remembered, he said, ‘* At one
time, when I had failed to receive a
‘good’ at school, I told, on getting home,
that the wind blew it away.’’ The other
was, ‘‘ When I was a very little boy, and
did not know what it meant to ‘play
truant,’ I went away with a boy older
than myself; and, when I came home and
was asked if I had played truant, I said I
had not.’’ These two he could remember,
but the other he could not. before his death, when conversing upon this
subject, he said, **I wish I could go down
to my grave without ever having told a Jie,
or sworn.”’ He continued, ‘‘I can say that
I never drank rum, and I wish I could say
I never did either of the others.”? On
being told that it was not known by the
family that he had ever sworn, he said,
‘Once, when I was a little boy, and did
not know better, I said a naughty word;
but when I knew it was wicked, I never
28 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

would say it again.”” But he seemed very
much to regret that he had ever done that,
‘« because he should like to go down to his
grave and say he had never done anything
so wrong.’ He was assured that his
heavenly Father would not consider him an
offender against his holy law; for those |
things were done when he was too small to

know the evil, and his true repentance

of them was such as God would own
and bless. Yet he wished he ‘‘ had never
done the wrong, even when he was so
young.” .

But few, perhaps,,go down to their
praves with so few faults to regret as did
this child of right, and lover of the good
and true. .

RESPECT FOR AGE.

James was a child who could always
render himself agreeable. His respect for
the aged and those who were his superiors
was such, that he never failed to receive
the notice he deserved, and never wanted
RESPECT FOR AGE. 29

for friends. He was always ready to con-
verse with, or hear conversation from, those
older than himself; and would enter into
the subject with all the interest of a person
of many years. In travelling, his respect-
ful treatment to all would secure him
friends, and, under all circumstances, he
never failed to receive his full share of

If an ‘‘old man” were passing by,
whom other boys would run after and
annoy, James would always be seen
*¢standing aloof,’’ until he could quietly
get to him, and render him all the assist-
ance which lay in his power. He would
never himself speak, nor would he allow
those with him to speak, disrespectfully of
others. This principle he carried out in
his every-day walk in life. A few days
before his death, a gentleman called into
his chamber to see him, and in the course
of conversation, when speaking of his
father, he spoke of him as ‘the old

gentleman.”” James very calmly looked
3%


30 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

up, and said to him, ‘‘ We have no such
person here as the old gentleman.’ <‘It
mean your father,” said he, thinking James
did not understand him. ‘I know whom
you mean,” said James, ‘‘ but we do not
call my father the old gentleman.” This
incident is mentioned to illustrate his re-
gard for etiquette, and his appreciation of
due respect to the several relations of life.
And this principle he extended to all, high
and low, rich and poor.

LEAVING SCHOOL.

James entered the grammar school in
East Boston, March 3, 1851, and he was
highly pleased that he had now commenced
a new era in_his school-day life. But ina
few weeks it became obvious to his friends
that his health was failing, and conse-
quently he would be obliged to leave his
school. His health had for some time been
considered delicate, but no particular alarm
was felt until about this time. The sum-
LEAVING SCHOOL. 31

mer that he was five years old, he was
kicked by a horse while playing with some
of his little friends upon the green, near his
father’s house. He was taken up and car-
ried home seemingly lifeless, and was
thought for some time to be dead. But
after the use of restoratives he revived, and
soon became able to speak. He thought
he was not much hurt; and as there was
no outward bruise, it was thought by his
physician that, if he had not received an
inward injury, he would soon recover.
But the blow which he received was very
severe, and upon the region of the heart.
This was probably the original cause of the
disease which terminated his life, —‘‘ en-
largement of the heart.’ It was some
time before he seemed much affected; but
from the time of this accident can be traced
a diminished inclination to engage in active
plays, and a desire to remain in the house,
and enjoy quiet. Often, when urged to
go out, he would decline, saying, he ‘‘ did
82 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

not feel sick, nor did he feel like gomg
out to play.”’

In the winter of 1851, he was attacked
with the whooping-cough, which very
seriously affected him. This was the latter
part of the winter ; and in May following,
on returning from a short journey to Ham-
ilton and Ipswich, where he had accom-
panied his mother, to spend a few days
with her friends, he was taken quite sick,
and the heart seemed very seriously
affected. The breast-bone had now become
considerably protruded by the enlarge-
ment of the heart ;—the beating of the
heart, which had been some time very
irregular, had now become much more
violent; and the disease, which had evi-
dently been more rapidly developed by his
cough, seemed daily to assume a more fear-
ful aspect. The following is an extract of
a letter sent about this time to Mrs. H. F.
M. Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio, May 24,
1851.

‘‘ With regard to the health of our family,
LEAVING SCIIOOL. | 33

we are all well, excepting our darling
James Arthur. He has been quite sick, for
some time, with a diseased heart. Within
a few weeks it has assumed quite an
alarming character, and we fear it will,
sooner or later, deprive us of the sweet
society of one who has ever been a bright
star in our happy ‘domestic constellation.
He has ever seemed a plant more fitted for
heaven than earth; and if my heavenly
Father has appointed to transplant him, in
all his angelic purity, to a clime more con-
genial, and a state more adapted to his
heavenly mind, may we view it right, and —
submit: with child-like resignation! True,
a vacancy would be made which nothing
else could fill; but the remembrance of
such a child would be sweet indeed, and
his name would be deeply engraved on the
tablet of each of our hearts. |

‘¢Q, could I not trust in God to ‘raise the
dead,’ this poor heart would burst! But the
sweet light of Jesus shines into my weep-
34 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ing soul, bidding every anguish to cease,
and every tear be dry.

‘The Lord is my helper, I will not fear.’ ”’

Our dear boy gradually recovered from
this epidemic, and by reason of a close ap-
plication to good medical advice, and the
unremitting care of the family, who were
ever anxious to render him all needed
assistance, he seemed not to suffer much
through the summer, although he was de-
prived of the privilege of attending school,
and was unable to engage much in his plays
out of doors. But, being well enough to
take short occasional journeys, and enjoy
his books, and the abundant articles for
his amusement which were constantly pro-
vided for him, he passed his time very
pleasantly, and was always contented and
happy. In September and October, he
appeared much recovered, insomuch that
his friends felt greatly encouraged to hope
that his life would be prolonged, and that
they should yet, for some time to come,
LEAVING SCHOOL. 35

enjoy the sweet society of him who ever
blessed the family circle. On the 7th of
October, he went, with his mother, again
to Hamilton, to visit his uncle, whose resi-
dence was upon a large farm, to spend a
few days among the ripened fruits. There
he always enjoyed himself very much, as it
was his delight to ramble in the open fields,
and watch the playful lambs and grazing
flocks. James was left at Hamilton to spend
a few days, while his mother was obliged to
return home. The following is an extract
from her diary :

** Oct. 19th. —I felt so very anxious
about, and so very lonely without, our dear
boy, that I could keep from him no longer.
So I took the cars, after dinner, and hied
me away to Hamilton. When I had come
in sight of the house, I saw the loved one
playing with his favorite ‘ pointer’ upon
the green grass. No sooner did his eye fall
upon me than he flew, with his dog after him,
to meet his ‘blessed mother.’ A happy
meeting it was for us both; and, although
6 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ou)

he had calculated to spend the rest of the
week, yet he was willing to return with me
this evening. O, precious child! what
should we do without him ?”’

While in H. he wrote a very interesting
letter to the family at home, and walked
nearly a mile, alone, to enjoy the pleasure
of putting it into the office himself. He
felt a great pride in being heard from, while
absent, in this way. He enjoyed his visit
much, and seemed as well after his return
as he had been for some time previous. He
had now so far regained his strength, that
he desired to attend school some of the
time, and engage in his lessons, to which
he had never failed, while at home, to give
considerable of his time and attention. And
through the kindness of Miss Lincoln, whose
school he had always attended, and who
kept very near his home, he went into her
school, some part of the time, for several
weeks. This was to him a happy privilege,
and he greatly enjoyed it. But, as the
weather grew colder, he began to be
THANKSGIVING. 37

troubled with a cough, and gradually to fail
in his general health. On the 6th of No-
vember, having a little cousin visiting him
from Maine, and being desirous to afford
her all the pleasure thit lay in his power,
he obtained the privilege of riding over to
the city to wait upon her to an ‘‘ice cream,”’
and give her the pleasant excursion of rid-
ing over to the city. This was the last time
he ever left his home. He soon became
quite feeble, and unable to go out at all.
The 13th of November was the last time he
ever went to the door to breathe the free
air of heaven; being unable, after that, to
be at all exposed. The 22d of November,
he became quite sick, and took his chamber,
to which he was confined, for most of the
time, until his death. He became more
comfortable,—so much so as to be with the
family on ‘‘ Thanksgiving Day,’’ and enjoy
their company in the evening, although he
was then so weak as to be obliged, for most
of the time, to recline upon the couch.
From this time until ‘‘Christmas,’’ he
4
38 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

seemed really to gain strength, insomuch
that he urged, and greatly enjoyed the ar-
rangements for, and the anticipation of, that
anniversary occasion. He was very happy
in the distribution*f his ‘‘ gifts,’’ and had
two handsome books procured for him, to
present to Dr. Crane and lady, as he felt
that it was through his kind instrumentality
that he was enabled to enjoy this pleasant
occasion with his friends on earth. Little
James looked forward with exquisite de-
light to the time when the ‘‘Tree’’ should
be dressed, on account of a ‘‘secret plot,”’
in the execution of which he had alone
invited his eldest sister to become engaged
with him. He had been laying by money,
for some time, to purchase presents for
‘¢ Christmas,’’ and he was desirous that

‘¢mother’’ should become a recipient of one -

of his choicest ‘‘ gifts.’ It was arranged
between the two that a fine gold bracelet
should be obtained, with a ‘‘spring locket,”’
and in it the likeness of little Jimmy. On

the back of the case was to be inscribed,
.
CHRISTMAS. 39

‘‘From Haley and Jimmey, to our dear
Mother.” This was to the ‘‘dear boy’ a
grand idea; but now the question was, how
was the likeness to be obtained? One more
must be let into the secret. The doctor
must be consulted, to know if James could
be allowed to ride a short distance from the
house, where there would be an opportu-
nity to have the daguerreotype taken pri-
vately. The doctor thought that if the
weather should be very pleasant, and he
should remain comfortable, he could be per-
mitted to go out to buy his ‘toys for pres:
ents,’’ and then he would have his likeness
taken. But in this plan he was disap-
pointed ; for the weather was unpleasant,
and he was not quite as well as he had been.
Now, there remained but one alternative,
and that was, for his father to be admitted
a member of the contemplated plan, and
ascertain if a guod copy could be obtained
from the likeness which was taken when he _
was between five and six years old. As
this was a very perfect likeness, it was at
40 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

once concluded upon that one could be
taken from it which would be equally as
good as to have it taken from the original ;
and so it proved. Christmas evening came,
the tree was dressed, and impatiently did
little James wait for his mother to retire,
after she had performed her part of the
labor, that he might have the ‘‘ box’’ con-
taining the famous bracelet placed upon
some conspicuous branch, so that it should
soon attract the intended owner’s attention.
When the signal was given, ‘¢ All is ready,”
James, in his father’s arms, headed the
company, and marched to the large, well-
lighted parlors, where stood the ‘Tree,’
heavily loaded with rich and well-selected
presents. And, although the inscriptions,
“James A.,’” and ‘Jimmy,’ were to be
seen upon articles on every part of the tree,
yet nothing could divert his attention from
Mother’s box. By his request, before the
time of ‘‘ gathering” had arrived, he was _
permitted to have the ‘‘ box”’ taken off, and
handed to Mother. As she was admiring
CHRISTMAS. 41

the beautiful workmanship, and expressing
her delight at receiving from her ‘ eldest
daughter’’ and ‘‘ youngest son’’ such a val-
uable present, he slyly stepped up, and
placed his tiny finger upon a secret spring,
when the bracelet opened, presenting our
darling’s face, natural as life.

The thrilling surprise, the interesting
sight, the presentiment that this was an
image of himself provided by one who was
soon to withdraw from these earthly scenes,
together with all the other attendant cir-
cumstances, drew a precipitous flow of tears
from the mother’s eyes, with which that of
all the family mingled. Even the little
designer of the delightful surprise was
obliged to dash, with his hand, a transient
tear from his eyes; but his soul feasted with
rich satisfaction on the consequence which
his gift to mother had assumed, and he smil-
ingly told her that father said ‘it would
make mother cry.”’

And now he was ready to assist in gather-
ing his own various ‘ gifts,’”’ consisting of

4*
42 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

a great variety of books, games of different
kinds, a choice collection of toys, &c. Xe.
All had been desirous to add their part for
‘¢ Jimmy.’ And when he had enjoyed,
with the family, all the pleasures of the
happy occasion, he retired, with his sensi-
tive heart filled with gratitude to God that
he had been favored with so rich an enter-
tainment; and the thought that he had been
so successful in ‘ pleasing mother ”’ seemed
to fill his soul with the purest pleasure.
After this, he continued very comfort-
able; so much so, that he was able to enjoy
his books, games and toys, for some weeks ;
and these, with his other means of amuse-
ment, added much to his comfort. He
possessed a natural taste for writing, draw-
ing, and painting, and had learned to work
with worsted, and knit and sew; therefore
he could occupy his time most pleasantly,
and never seemed lonely, or in the least
discontented. Indeed, he was as cheerful
as though he were in perfect health; and,
through all his sickness, he was never heard
REASONS OF CONTINUED HAPPINESS. 43

to complain, or utter a murmur. Even
after his ‘‘ vision,’ an account of which is
given in chapter v1., he seemed uniformly
happy, and would say, “*I feel that I have
two homes, one with the angels in heaven,
- and one with my friends on earth; and were
it not that you would be so lonesome with-
out me, I should rather be an angel in
heaven than live to suffer.’”’ This “ vision’?
afforded him much solid satisfaction. He
seemed to dive upon it; and so clear was
his mind at the time of its occurrence, that
he took great delight in contemplating upon
it. He continued quite comfortable, ex-
cepting that he suffered occasional pressure
and irritation of the lungs; and the dropsi-
cal affection, which had once been over-
come, again made its appearance. Simple
remedies were resorted to, which afforded
him much relief, and all his faculties re-
mained unimpaired. He never seemed to
consider himself ‘very sick,”’ although, at
times, he would speak of the probability of
his not getting well. He was always per-
44 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

fectly calm and reconciled; always express-
ing, in the most pleasant manner, his high
sense of gratitude for the kind attentions he
was constantly receiving, both from every
member of his own family and his numerous
circle of neighbors and friends. If the little .
sufferer erred in anything, it was in trying to
keep his feelings to himself, lest he might
cause ‘* work,’’ or ‘‘trouble.’”’ Every-
thing that was done for him was ‘‘ right,”
and all was always ‘‘very nice.” He
was not able to lie down for a week before
his death, but reclined in his easy-chair,
where he took all his rest. He seemed
very grateful that he could be made so com-
fortable, and would enjoy his rest quite nat-
urally; and in that chair he ‘‘fell asleep,”’
when everything, according to his direc-
tion, had been so ‘‘nicely’’ fixed.

The first Sunday in February he was able
to go into the ‘‘ study,’ and join in family
devotion; and greatly did he enjoy the in-
teresting occasion. The following, which
is the 106th hymn in the ‘‘ Family Sing-
GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 45

ing-book,’’ was sung for him, in which he
joined :
SICKNESS AND RECOVERY.
1 My God, thy service well demands
The remnant of my days ;

Why was this fleeting breath renewed,
But to renew thy praise ?

2 Thine arms of everlasting love
Did this weak frame sustain,

When life was hovering o’er the graye,
And nature sunk with pain.

3 I calmly bowed my fainting head
On thy dear, faithful breast,
And waited for my Father’s call
To his eternal rest.

4 Back from the borders of the grave,
At thy command, I come;

Nor will I ask a speedier flight
To my celestial home.

5 Where thou appointest mine abode
There would I choose to be ;

For in thy presence death is life,
And earth is heaven with thee.

He remained as comfortable as he had
been for a few days after this, but it soon
became apparent that he was not long to
46 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

remain a tenant of earth. His disease now
too plainly spoke of his approaching disso-
lution, and he appeared ‘‘ willing rather to
depart.’® Sunday, Feb. 22d, he was much
more weakened and debilitated than he ever
had been before, and for the first time dur-
ing his sickness passed a day without seem-
ing to notice and enjoy, in a greater or less
degree, what was passing arognd him. But
the application of warm baths and other
restoratives relieved him, and rendered him
more comfortable. Sunday night his rest
was more disturbed, and he still remained
very weak, but perfectly sensible to every-
thing that was done for him, and in posses-
sion of his natural pleasant and endearing
traits. Monday morn, when his father, on
leaving for his office, exchanged with him,
as was his wont, the kiss of affection,.and
asked him what he should bring him home
that day, he mildly, and for the first time,
answered, ‘‘nothing.’”’ He seemed done
with earth, and no longer asked for its sup-
port. And so it was ; for he never requested
GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 47

anything after that, but his simple drinks,
and a choice kind of jelly which was sent
him on Saturday. Monday afternoon he
revived, and spoke of the boys playing un-
der his window as he had been acéustomed
to speak of them through his sickness, and
seemed not at all disturbed by them. About
nine o’clock, Monday evening, he suffered
much from pain of the lungs and heart,
more than he ever had before. It was soon
relieved by the application of hot baths, so
that for a few hours before his death he
seemed free from pain and distress, and
expressed himself as feeling ‘* very happy.”
The applications which had been made dur-
ing the last three weeks had very much
relieved his breathing, so that in this respect
he was greatly benefited. About ten min-
utes before one, he asked: for sweetened
water, which he took and drank, saying,
“‘that’s good.” Then he requested to have
his pillow* “ fixed,’’ that he might ‘* rest
‘his head.’”’ It was accordingly arranged,
when he gently laid his head upon it, say
48 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ing, ‘that’s nice,’ and fell more quietly
asleep than he had done for many hours
before. But it was a ‘‘sweet sleep,” of |
which he had often spoken,— it was the
peaceful sleep of death. And when the
family were called to look upon him, he
appeared like one in the gentle unbroken
slumber, while that sweet, angelic smile of
content was still visible upon his mild and
tranquil countenance. It did not at all
seem as though death had visited us, but
that the angels had truly come, and escorted
home the one whom they had before desired
to come and be with them, and wear the
wreath they had prepared for him. And
O, death was to him a sweet release, and
he had desired it! His sufferings were o’er,
and our souls felt to say, ‘‘ The Lord hath
done as it seemeth to him good.”” Amen!

After his death, a ‘‘ post-mortem”’ exam-
ination took place, when the true nature of
his case was known. ‘The disease was
found to be of the heart, and of a very
decided character. The attending phy-
GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. 49

sicians thought it the most so of any case
of a child that had ever come under their
observation. The heart was nearly siz
times larger than it should have been. The
‘‘ mitral valve”’ of the left auricle of the
heart had become so thickened that it was
almost entirely closed. The natural func-
tions of this organ had not been performed
for a great length of time; consequently
the system had gradually become weakened,
and prepared-to admit, without a struggle,
the transit of its heavenly tenant.

This disease must have been produced,
originally, by inflammation from some cause,
and no cause can seem so probable as that
produced by the accident before referred to.
James was a remarkably healthy child, hay-
ing never had a sick day until the develop-
ment of the complaint of which he died. It
is thought that-the whooping-cough acceler-
ated the development of his disease, which
had been gradually coming upon him for
two years previous.

It was a great satisfaction to know, on

5
50 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

examination, that nothing could have been
done, which was not done, to meet the cir-
cumstances of the case, or relieve his suf-
ferings. It was the most unremitting care
and attention, together with the best of
medical advice, that had so long preserved
his life, and rendered him, for most of the
time, measurably comfortable. And we felt
that we had reason for gratitude to God,
that he was not permitted to suffer with
protracted pain and distress. Though his
sufferings seemed at times severe, yet his
mind was so elevated, so strong in faith and
trained in contentment, that he was enabled
to pass his time pleasantly, and even said
he thought himself ‘‘ the happiest little boy
on the island.’’ On seeing his mother be-
tray signs of grief on account of his occa-
sional apparent sufferings, he would assure
her that she had no cause of. sorrow,— that
he did not suffer as she supposed,— that
God was good and would take care of him,
and he was happy. Such is the power of
enlightened faith in God, even in the child.
GRATITUDE, PATIENCE AND PEACE. O51

And O, that beautiful exit! O, precious
Gospel faith! I will love thee more than
ever, because thou didst bless the life, to
its last mortal moment, of my darling boy,
and didst sweetly bear him on, that he should
‘‘never die!’’ Gently he passed away, con-
voyed by those beautiful angels, who had
already borne to him the glad message of
life immortal, and shown to him the cloud-
_less glories of that celestial paradise above,

‘** Where sickness never comes,
Where grief no more complains,
Health triumphs in immortal bloom,
And purest pleasure reigns.’’

Nors. — I have spoken of James Arthur’s love of Scripture
reading, and his appreciation of its meaning. When I was
reading to him, during his last sickness, of Jesus’ entry into
Jerusalem, and of the hosannas uttered by children on the
way, he was so much pleased with the Saviour’s kind recep-
tion of children’s praise that he desired a request to be com-
municated to our pastor, Rev. C. H. Webster, that, on the
first Sunday he should be able to attend meeting, he would
preach from the words, ‘‘ Out of the mouths of babes and
sucklings thou hast perfected praise.’? He never became
able to attend church again ; but Br. Webster, to whom the
little boy had even personally preferred the request, made
that the foundation of a most profitable discourse, on the first
Sabbath the family attended public worship after his decease.
CHAPTER II.
THE COMMUNION.

In the arrangement of this work, I have
chosen the method which was most conven-
ient to myself, and was judged to be most
likely to interest,and edify the reader. In
the first chapter I have given a brief me-
moir of the life of James Arthur, in gen-
eral; and then I have devoted other chap-
ters to illustrate incidents and striking traits
of character, which, though in some cases
involving partial repetitions, render the
work as a whole more valuable than would
the crowding of all into a continuous nar-
rative. ,

From the first lispings of little James, he
ever manifested much pleasure in conversa-
tion on the life and mission of Jesus. He
would sit hours, and hear instruction in the
form of stories on the Saviour’s birth, mir-
THE COMMUNION. 53

acles, crucifixion, and resurrection. And he
thus became early acquainted with the pur-.
pose of the Saviour’s advent; and very
early, too, he expressed that faith in the
saving grace of the Son of God which
would well become an older Christian.
After he was old enough to attend meet-
ing on the Sabbath, he early became much
interested in all the exercises, and his
powers of observation were great. And so
often, when very small, had he expressed
his desire to partake of the sacrament, that
his mother would let him retire, to avoid
his discriminating questions, which had pen-
etrated her heart with a feeling of regret
that he could not be permitted to enjoy the
privilege he had seemed so much to desire.
On the first Sunday in June, 1850, James
attended meeting with his mother at father
Streeter’s. It was communion day. At
the close of the pulpit services, father
Streeter, as is his custom, invited all who
‘love our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ”’
to unite with them in this interesting com-

5*
54 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

memoration of his death, and of his love for
mankind. Little James very attentively
listened to all that was said, and then, turn-
ing to his mother, with a Christian smile
upon his countenance, and a heart swelling
with gratitude to God for the opportunity
of enjoying such a happy season, he said,
**Mother, J love our Lord and Saviour
Jesus Christ; can’t I partake with you?”
The appeal was powerful, and the earnest-
ness and sincerity with which it was made
sank deep into the mother’s heart. Struck
with his reasoning, and knowing his wish to
join in this beautiful service, from a pure
desire to show forth his love to Christ, his
wish was granted. And there, with the
aged, middle-aged and young, did this
child, but seven years old, sit with his
whole soul wearing the appearance of the
most devout meditation, and partake of
these sacred emblems! And no one pres-
ent seemed more perfectly satisfied with
this expressive ceremony.

Some, who had seen the child engage in
THE COMMUNION. 55

this interesting service, spoke with his
mother at the close’of the meeting, as
though they thought it to be a mother’s
indulgence to the whim of a thoughtless
child. But, on being made acquainted
with his deep religious character, and the
argument by which he urged his appeal,
they were melted to tears; and then,
instead of rebuke, they gave him the right
hand of Christian fellowship, which he re-
ceived, and with emotion, assuring them
that he loved the Saviour. On his way
from church, his happiness was great, that
he had now enjoyed what he had so long
desired, and he expressed a hope that ‘‘ as
soon as he was old enough he should become
a member of the church.’? And when his
health was such that he was not able to
attend meeting on the holy Sabbath, and
would read and have read to him of the
history of Christ, he would seem comforted
that he had shown to the world his love for
him by partaking of his holy sacrament.
And what a solace, when sickness had long
56 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

prevented this devout child of God from
attending the sanctuary of his Father in
heaven, to think that he had been indulged
the blessed privilege as above related!

O, sweet the memory, thou precious one,

Now that thy work so well on earth js done,

Of those communings, in thy truthful love,

With Him whom thou hast joined in worlds above,
CHAPTER III.
JOURNEY TO MAINE, AND THE LOST HAT.

Sucu was the amiableness of little ‘‘ Jim-
my’s’’ disposition, and the interest and
sympathy which he ever manifested for
others, that he never failed to gain the
attention and sympathy of those around
him. If he was travelling, and met with
persons who seemed to be needy, he was
ever anxious in some way to render them
assistance ; and hence he was always meet-
ing with every attention which the noble
and generous know well how to appreciate.

In the summer of 1850 he look a jour-
ney, in company with his mother, to the
State of Maine, to visit their friends in
Hallowell, Augusta, and Waterville. And
although then but seven years old, instead
of being, as most children would have been
at this age, a ‘‘ care,”” he was not only the '
58 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

best of company, but a great assistant in
taking charge of the baggage, and in other
attentions. In the evening he would seek
a place alone with his mother, upon the
deck of the steamer, and for hours visit the
stars and the planets, marking their regu-
larity, and admiring their loveliness and
grandeur. He would look at them as the
‘‘eyes of God,” and the « language of Om-
nipotent Power.,”’ ‘‘ Mother,”’? he would
say, “do you see them twinkle at us, as
though they were pleased that we are en-
Joying them so well? And perhaps God is
talking to us through them.’’ These were
ideas of his own; and the philosophical and
devotional converse greatly added to the
enjoyment of his mother, who could never
be an hour in the presence of this little rea-
soner, without feeling that she was made
better. His conversation would elevate her
mind to Him who established for the sun
and moon their eternal stations, and ap-
pointed to the stars their unvarying spheres,
James had designated the moon as the rep-
HALLOWELL. — AUGUSTA. 59

resentative of his ‘‘ mother,’’ and her bright
attendant planet as that of ‘‘Jimmy;’’ and
by these names he would be delighted to
address them. And he would often speak
of the time when he should go to the spirit
world, where he should know more of the
beauty of those heavenly bodies than he
could ever know here. Indeed, heaven
was the place where his hopes seemed
always to centre.

Little James and his mother _— in
Hallowell on the morning of July 10th.
He took much interest in perambulating
the place where his mother had spent the
early part of her life, and particularly did
he enjoy the Sabbath-school, where she
gave an account of her own religious expe-
rience. She referred to the time when she
stood alone in that place, not enjoying the
society of a single female associate who
dared to ‘name the name of Christ’’
‘*the Saviour of all men,’’ and God as the
Father” and Friend of all. He was led to
contrast her opportunities with his own, and
60 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

seemed much to realize how great were his
Sources of enjoyment in this respect.

He visited his friends in Augusta; and
there are those there who will long remem-
ber his strong sympathies and deep religious
feelings.

On Monday morning, July 22d, he started,
in company with his mother, for Waterville,
by the steamer Balloon. The morning was
serene and pleasant, and he was greatly de-
lighted in passing the new-mown fields, and
beholding the rich display of corn and grain
Which so beautifully dressed the rich and
fertile banks of the Kennebec. As we ad-
vanced, his eyes were constantly upon the
stretch to behold new and increasing beau-
ties; and his whole soul was «“ tremblingly
alive’’ to participate in the sublimity of the
scene, and love and adore the illimitable
goodness of Him who ‘‘ maketh his sun to
rise on the evil and on- the good, and
sendeth rain on the just and on the un-
just.”’

His visit in Waterville was to him pecu-
WATERVILLE. 61

liarly interesting. There he visited the
spot where his parents first commenced the
pleasant task of ‘‘ house-keeping ;’’ and
there he visited the first house his father
ever builded for himself and family. He
visited there, with his mother, the graves of
those whom she had loved, and with whom,
in former years, she had held sweet inter-
course on earth; and there did he mingle
his tears with hers, as they read the names
and epitaphs of those whom memory held
most dear. To the mind of James there
was nothing dark or gloomy in a visit like
this; for his happy mind would never look
down into the grave, but, upon the wings
of faith, it would soar aloft, where Christ
and angels dwell.

He also took much interest in calling on
those who had heard his father preach thirty
years before, and who were living upon the
riches to be enjoyed in a practical belief of
the truth as it is in Jesus. And Mr. and
Mrs. Morrill, with whom he made his home
while in Waterville, will never forget his

6
62 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

strong attachment to them, and the hours
he would spend with ‘‘ Grandpa Morrill,’’ as
he was pleased to call him, conversing with
him upon various subjects, until he would
push his little arguments to where the old
gentleman would confess himself ‘ almost
wound up.”’ But, although his ‘‘ perceptive ”’
and ‘‘reflective’’ faculties were so large as
to give him great advantage in conversa-
tion, yet his large conscientiousness and
benevolence, united with remarkable venera-
tion, would always give to his whole tone
such a perfect air of sweetness and respect-
ful love, that no one could converse with him
without becoming both pleased and inter-
ested.

After having spent a few days very
pleasantly in Waterville, James started, with
his mother, in the same steamer, on Thurs-
day, July 24th, to return to Hallowell. The
afternoon was delightfully pleasant, and the
fresh breeze, with the tide and steam, car-
ried us rapidly on our way. The company
on board was not large, but very pleasant,
*
THE DISCUSSION. 63

and such as suited the taste of little James.
Many on board soon became much interested
in his manly tone of conversation; and,
upon his giving a very interesting lecture
upon the subject of tobacco, seeing it was
pretty freely used by many of the gentle-
men, some were actually induced, for that
time at least, out of respect to him, to lay
it away. One gentleman, who urged his
argument on the ground of its making him
more healihy, was much pleased with the
manner in which his young antagonist met
him. Said James, ‘“‘My father never
chewed a grain of tobacco, nor smoked a
cigar, in his life, and he is fifty years old,
and he never was sick.’ The gentleman
gave in that ‘‘James had the floor.’? The
conversation passed very pleasantly, as some
who heard him at that time, and who may
read these pages, will undoubtedly recol-
lect; especially when he gave an account
of his religious belief, of the doctrines he
should preach should he conclude to follow
the profession of his father, and of the hap-
64 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

piness which he had always enjoyed in
‘* doing good.”’

About this time there had been a severe
freshet on the Kennebec, and much loss of
property had been realized by the large
quantity of logs which had been carried
away by the strong and rapid current: and,
of the company on board, there were a
number whose business it was to rescue for
the owners these floating timbers. Now
our little boy was much delighted, as the
sight to him was somewhat novel, to see
these large members of the forest come sail-
ing so leisurely and carelessly along, with-
out sail or rudder. While the boat was
‘hauled up”’ at one of her stopping-places
to ‘‘ take in freight,’ James was very pleas-
antly amusing himself in seeing those mast-
less ‘‘ craft’’ pass so very unceremoniously
by, without giving to their Superiors the
least attention. As he stood gazing in this
way, suddenly he gave a loud cry, and a
dozen voices at once gave the alarm, ‘‘ Lit-
tle James’ hat is overboard!” “‘ Down with
THE LOST HAT. 65

the boat!’’ ‘‘Get the hat !’’ ‘*Get the hat!”’
was the word. Poor little James wept
aloud to see his beautiful ‘‘ light beaver,”’
which he had so much admired, and for
which he had even been complimented by
the present company, very grandly sailing
down the Kennebec, entirely regardless of
the pain and disappointment it was inflicting
on its young and agonized owner. Just at
this moment, when all hope of rescue was
abandoned, a light and nimble-footed log-
man, who stood first in his profession, caught
a spear, and jumped upon a log which had
at that moment chosen to come within step-
ping distance. Ina moment, to the delight
of some and the terror of others on board,
he was fast sailing down the rapid stream,
upon this single log of a few feet in length,
and only a spear to guide or balance with.
All was anxiety on board, while a deep
interest was felt for the dear boy, who stood
looking, with tearful eyes, upon his favorite
floating hat, which had now gone the dis-
tance of half a mile. ‘‘ He will be drowned!”
6*
66 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

cried one ; —‘‘ No, he will get the hat,’’ re-
sponded another; and presently the sound
came with joyous peal, ‘‘ He has got it!—
he has got it!’’ A thrill of pleasure seemed
to pervade all hearts, as he elevated upon
his spear the rescued treasure. It was then
placed upon the log for ‘safe keeping,”’
and, with a skill which but few could equal,
he *‘neared”’ the boat, which had now pro-
ceeded on her way, but which ‘‘ hove to”’
for his accommodation; and, having gained
his ‘‘hold,”’ he relinquished his temporary
craft, and, amid shouts of joy, delivered to
Master James the loved lost hat. All were
delighted at his success, while the young
owner seemed perfectly overcome with
gratitude and love for the one who had so
nobly sacrificed his own ease and braved
danger for his sake. After the hat had been
safely deposited in a proper place to be
dried, and James had been furnished with
one for temporary use, he very manfully and
thoughtfully took from his pocket his wal-
let, and, taking out a two-dollar bill, which:
THE LOST HAT. . 67

he said he had received for being good at
school, he insisted that the gentleman should
take half of it, at least. ‘* No, no, my no-
ble boy,” said the generous man, ‘‘ you
have more than paid me; and the thought
that I could please so good a boy as you is
the best pay I want.’’ Little James, seeing
he could not prevail upon the gentleman to
take the money, told him he should ‘‘ send
him a book, to remunerate him for his kind-
ness,’’ — a promise which he did not for-
get. The hat was dried, and before the
boat arrived at Hallowell it was replaced
upon his head, and again he looked like
‘* Master James.”’

This little hat was ever held by him, after
this remarkable adventure, with feelings of
deep interest; and even when it had ceased
to perform its accustomed office, he had it
carefully laid away, to be kept as a remem-
brance of his pleasant visit to Maine, and
the ‘‘ lost hat.”’
CHAPTER IV.
HIS LOVE OF PRAYER.

THE subject of prayer, beautiful as it is,
is seldom appreciated according to the great
and happy results of its sincere and rational
exercise. How elevating to the mind, how
soothing to the feelings, and how strength-
ening to the whole spiritual being, is the
devout aspiration of the soul, when, in con-
fidence and love, we can approach the
throne of divine grace in holy supplication
and prayer! But we come not to our heay-
enly Father in this attitude as if our prayers
could affect his purposes and designs, or his
will concerning us.

It has been a question in curious minds,
If the Deity is not to be influenced by our
supplications, of what use is prayer? Prayer
is an appointed means of drawing the soul
to God, nourishing holy affections, trans-
LOVE OF PRAYER. 69

ferring in a measure the power of God to
the feeble suppliant, and placing us in an
attitude to receive and enjoy Heaven’s loy-
ing favors. Prayer is the outstretched hand
by which we take hold of the Almighty arm,
and find rest in his love. If we believed
that our prayers could change the mind of
God, we should hardly dare to pray; for we
are incompetent to direct the counsels of
Jehovah. But, with our faith in God, and
our blissful appreciation of the purpose of
prayer, we can ‘‘pray always,’’ and pray
in faith, assured that our communions will
be the medium of the good unto which they
are appointed.

It was in this way that little James al-
ways seemed to enjoy near and sweet com-
munion with his Father in heaven. From
his infancy he ever manifested a deep love
for this delightful exercise, and a strong and
natural desire to engage in it. And when
the members of the household were assem-
bled for family devotion, such was the sin-
cere and devout manner in which he always
70 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

joined in this pleasant exercise, that his
infant mind would rise in unison with those
much older than himself, and seem equally
to enjoy the high satisfaction which fervent
prayer is calculated to impart. It was his
invariable rule to fold his hands, close his
eyes, and seemingly to shut from his mind
and thoughts everything which might inter-
fere with a state of feeling appropriate to
the sacredness and solemnity of the occa-
sion.

For himself, when alone, or in company
with his mother, or any one who might have
the immediate care of him, at his appointed
time he would repeat the *‘Lord’s prayer,”’
until after the severe attack which com-
menced his last sickness, which was on
Saturday night, May 24, 1851. He had
been very sick through the first part of the
night, insomuch that his physician thought
his recovery doubtful. But as morning
approached, he became quite comfortable :
and having enjoyed some quiet rest, he felt
much refreshed. As his mother sat by him
LOVE OF PRAYER. 71

the next morning, he very smilingly looked
up, and said, ‘‘ Mother, as God has been so
kind as to relieve me of my distress, and
let me live longer with you, I think I ought
to say something more than my little prayer
that I have always said when I was well.”’
He then requested that his mother would
begin from that time, and pray with him
every day, until he could learn to pray him-
self. His request was granted, and he
chose the place for this pleasant meeting of
mother and child, with the promise that it
should never be neglected, and that, should
he not live, the same place should be daily
visited by his ‘*‘ dear mother,’’ where, he
said, his spzri¢t should always meet her.
Another request was, that the prayer should
always close with the same words, so that
he could join in the conclusion of the sup-
plication, He requested that it should end
thus, ‘*‘ which favors we ask for Christ’s
sake. Amen.’’ This request was granted ;
and as long as his strength would permit
him to speak, he never omitted to repeat
12 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

simultaneously these words. And after his
recovery from this severe attack, so much
did he appreciate this daily communion, he
requested that, when convenient, it might
be enjoyed in the morning, before leaving
the room, that nothing might interfere to
carry it far into the day. He felt that God
. should have our morning thanks, and that
we should ask for guidance from him through
the day; and if, from any circumstance, this

exercise was for a short time omitted in the ©

first part of the day, he would say, ‘‘ Mother,
I do not feel happy until we have prayed.”’
Indeed, prayer seemed to become a part of
his life, and was the medium of much, very
much, of his permanent enjoyment. And he
would often wish that he could have “ all
the little boys,’’ who were not learned to
pray, ‘‘ come in,’’ and be taught, as he had |
been, to look to God in prayer. ‘‘ I know,”’
he would say, ‘‘if they would learn to pray,
they would not then swear about God.’’
And often would he express his gratitude
that he had early been taught to pray, and
»

LOVE OF PRAYER. 73

to pray to God as his Father and Friend.
And during his last sickness, when unfavor-
able sensations in the evening would render
him apprehensive that he should have an
uncomfortable night, and when, after his
‘‘sweet prayer,’’ as he called it, he would
fall quietly asleep, often the first sound that
would greet the ears of her who was always
by his side would be the outburstings of his
thankful heart, as he awoke in the night
from his peaceful slumber, ‘‘ Mother, has
not God heard our prayer?’”’ ‘‘I think he
has.’’ ‘* Have not the angels watched
around my pillow ?’’ And then, with confid-
ing love, he would again fall quietly asleep,
and the morning light would again echo with
the sweet praises of his thankful heart; and
thus, from day to day, and from night to
night, would he live in the exercise of that
faith in holy communion with God, which
gave to his young heart the enjoyment of
the Father’s presence, and the assurance of
his unfailing love. |

After his heavenly ‘‘ vision’ (for which

7
74 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

see chapter vi.), and his communion with
those ‘‘ beautiful angels,’ he felt that he
must go still further; he felt that God had
done still more for him, and that he must
do more to serve God; and by his request
the family were assembled for evening de-
votion, and this sainted child led in one of
the most devout and earnest strains of prayer —
and praise that ever came from the lips of
mortal man. He was so divinely assisted
that no fear seemed in the least to impair
his voice or check his words. And it was
not anything that he had learned, or any
common form of words, but it was the out-
gushing of heavenly and sincere desires,
including all ranks, conditions, and circum-
stances of his heavenly Father’s children,
with the earnest wish that ‘‘ they might de
good, and live to do good.’’ And often
after this, until his sweet release from earth,
would he lead the family in the same holy
and devout exercise. The day before his
departure from earth, for the first time for
almost a year, he was too feeble to join in
LOVE OF PRAYER. 15

all the closing part, in which he had so
much delighted to participate vocally. But
his hearty ‘‘ amen”’ will never be forgotten.
This was the last time his devoted mother
enjoyed this blessed privilege with this
precious child of heaven. He was resting
upon his couch, reclining his feeble head
upon his ‘* dear mother,’’ when for the last
time her voice was lifted in prayer with this
dear treasure, which she felt was soon to be
_ removed from earthly sounds, to join in ho-
_ lier prayer and praise around that bright and
spotless throne, where, with pure, seraphic
beings, he had even here held sweet com-
munion. And, seeming himself to read her
prayer, and feel that he was soon to unite with
Christ and his angels in higher spheres, he
gave his cordial ‘‘ amen,’’ and remained for
a while in silent thought. Knowing how
very weak he was, he was permitted to
enjoy his own silent and heavenly contem-
plations.

This was nearly noon, on Monday. Mon-
day night, when he with the rest of the
76 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

family had urged his mother to retire to
another apartment for the first time, for
brief repose, she went to him, and found
him so feeble that she thought she would
bid him a “ good-night,’’ and wait for fur-
ther communion until she should join him,
according to appointment, at one o’clock.
But, after leaving the room, fearing he
might wish to join in some expression be-
fore she retired, she returned, and, after
receiving and imprinting the last kiss, she
put her mouth to his ear, assuring him that
‘‘the angels would take care of us,’’ to which
he sweetly responded. And it was even
so; for when she again looked upon that
dear face, the angels had taken care of him,
and sweetly conveyed him home, where a
mother’s prayers were no longer needed,
but where He who said, ‘of such is the
kingdom of heaven,’’ would perfect that
praise which was so beautifully and faith-
. fully commenced on earth!
CHAPTER V.

VISIT TO WORCESTER, AND THE LITTLE
PAPER-BOY.

Litre James was always much pleased to
travel, and especially so when his ride would
take him into the country. He was agreat
admirer of nature, and always took much
delight in viewing the goodness of his
heavenly Father, as manifested through his
beautiful and manifold works.

As his father had an appointment to
preach in Worcester on the third Surday in
August, 1851, it was proposed that James
and his mother should accompany him.
This suited the dear boy much, as it was so
pleasant a season of the year to journey
through the country, and behold the beau-
ties of nature. On the way to W., Satur- —
day afternoon, one of the most violent
thunder-storms for the season was experi-

:
78 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

enced, and the rain fell in torrents. This
James also enjoyed; for, from his infancy,
he had always loved the sound of the thun-
der-storm;— and even when danger was
apprehended, so much would he love to
hear the most terrific thunder, that he would
be unwilling to leave the window where he
could behold it in all its fulness and grand-
eur. And this was the last time he looked
upon the full and perfect rainbow. This,
too, was a sight which always filled him
with satisfaction and delight. It would
seem to inspire him with renewed confi-
dence in Him whose promise is so beauti-
fully read in that bright emblem of his
parental faithfulness which he has “set in
the cloud.”’

On arriving at Worcester, the scene was
admirable beyond description. The setting
sun was just leaving his last sweet tint
upon the western sky, while the full-orbed
moon was gently rising in all her silent
majesty, humbly waiting to resume her
reign, when the sun should resign his
ENJOYMENT OF THE SABBATH. 79

throne. The deep-green foliage with which
this pleasant city is so richly ornamented
was hanging in sparkling drops, beautifully
representing heaven’s choicest diamonds,
while the feathered songsters were vocal
with the praise of Him whose love and
goodness is felt

‘‘Tn the void waste, as in the city full.”

The happy mind of James, which had
been a lively participant in all the rich
variety of scenery, was filled to overflow-
ing ; and when he laid his head upon his
pillow, his infant voice was heard in offer-
ing his evening thanks to that beneficent
Being who had kindly given him a heart to
feel and a soul to enjoy.

The following Sunday was one of na-
ture’s choicest days, and early was James
ready for the sanctuary. As the place of
meeting was near, and he was kindly as-
sisted, he was able to attend church all day,
a privilege which he had not enjoyed for
some time before, and which he never en-


80 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

joyed afterwards, as his feeble state of
health would not admit of his attending
more than one service on a Sabbath. He
was very happy, and at the close of the day
he remarked, ‘‘ This has been the happiest
day I ever spent.’’? The thought that he
had been able to attend meeting all day,
and hear his ‘‘dear father preach,’’ and
witness the deep interest manifested as the
gospel was presented in its fulness and
glory, filled him with that which

‘* Nothing earthly gives or can destroy,
The soul’s calm sunshine and a heartfelt joy.”

Monday, too, was a continuation of that
series of sweet summer days, which are
often realized after copious rains, and at
the full of the moon. As James had been
promised a pleasant ride, by Esquire Green,
of Worcester, who owns a delightful coun-
try-seat about two miles from the city, he
was early dressed for the excursion. As
he was sitting by the window of his cham-
ber, which looked out upon the main street,
THE LITTLE PAPER-BOY. 81

he saw a little, lame, hump-backed boy
coming up to the hotel with the morning
papers. He immediately left the room,
and soon returned with a paper for his
mother, which he had purchased of ‘* the
poor little lame boy.’ No sooner had he
delivered that, than his sympathies for the
meek and dependent looking boy induced
him to go down and buy another, which he
brought to his father. He then wished to
know ‘‘if he might not buy a number more,
as he had money enough with him, which
had been given him for being good, and he
wanted to do good with it.”” But, on being
told’ that, as they were all of one kind, he
might again encourage his ‘‘ poor boy”’ the
next morning, he was willing to wait, by
assuring him that he should not be for-
gotten.

One fine and commendable trait in the
character of young James was, that he
always sympathized with the unfortunate ;
and often would his playmates, and even
those to whom he was inferior in size, re-
82 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ceive from him a gentle rebuke for unkind
words or rude treatment to those who were
lame or unfortunate. And often has he left
his play with the ‘‘boys,’’ and retired to
his own yard, with a little deaf boy of his
own neighborhood, and played with him
alone, because others would halloo in his
ears and hector him. And this little ‘¢ pa-
per-boy”’ was never forgotten by his young
and sympathizing friend. When, after his
decease, his little things which had amused
him in his last sickness were looked over
to be arranged agreeably to his request, the
wallet was found, which he had carefully
laid away to carry, if he should be able to
visit Worcester the next summer, to give to
the deformed ‘‘ paper-boy.’’ This he had
purposed, because, when he bought his pa-
pers of him, he had no purse for his money,
and he was afraid he might lose some of his
change.

After James had read the morning news,
Esquire Green called, with his carriage, and
James (with his little whip, which he had
THE RIDE TO ESQUIRE GREEN’S. 83

purchased the day before he left home,
thinking he might have an opportunity to
use it), accompanied by his mother, took a
seat for his ride. He was pleased with the
privilege of driving the ‘ family horse,’’
while the opening beauties around seemed
to inspire him with new and increased
strength. On arriving at the residence of
Esquire Green, he was delighted with the
beautiful flowers and trees, and the rich
berries and fruits, which were abundantly
presented on every side. And here, for
the first time in his life, he saw ripe apples
shaken from the tree; and so delighted was
the good old gentleman that the sight so
much pleased his young visiter, that he
almost robbed his ‘‘ early favorite tree’’ of
its ripened contents, to allow him to run
after and pick them up. This was to James
a rich treat. He walked around, plucking
the flowers, and partaking of the rich ber-
ries and fruits, and enjoying the wide-
extended scenery. After partaking of
further hospitalities, he returned with a
84 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

light heart to his temporary home. In the
afternoon he was accompanied to another
part of the city, where, having everything
to add to his enjoyment, he passed the rest
of the day in accordance with his own hap-
py feelings.

His visit was made very agreeable to
him, as his home was at Wait’s Temperance
Hotel, one of the best houses in the coun-
try. The circumstance that he could be at
a ‘*public house’’ for a number of days,
and not witness any « drinking,’’ or
‘swearing,’’ not only filled him with sur-
prise, but added much to his enjoyment.

Tuesday morning, leaving his father in
Worcester, and with a heart filled with
gratitude to God for the enjoyment of such
a visit, he returned with his mother to
Boston, saying, ‘‘I never shall forget my
visit to Worcester.”’
CHAPTER VI.
THE VISION.

On Saturday evening, Dec. 6th, 1851,
between two and three months before his
death, as he was thought to be dying, little
James was favored with a most remarkable
vision of the spirit-world. An account of
it was published in the Christian Freeman
of Dec. 19th, 1851, and its obvious traits of
reality have carried the richest comfort to
the hearts of many, whom it has confirmed
in the assurance that our departed friends,
though invisible to us in the body, can
draw nigh to us, and take an interest in
our welfare. Many have been the mani-
festations, especially to children, at or near
the closing moment, which are reasonably
regarded as the real greetings of friends
from the land they are about entering,—
coming in, not as a link in a visible chain

8
86 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

of present circumstances and suggestions,
but as a foreign incident ; and also present-
ing views, thoughts and words, above the
natural conceptions of the little child.

The account of the vision of which I speak
was written in the form of a letter to Mrs.
H. F. M. Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio; and as
it was written immediately after the event,
and under the promptings of the little boy,
I transcribe it in this place.

THE VISION.
East Boston, Dec. 11th, 1851.

SistseR Brown: This is indeed the
Castle of Peace and the home of blessed-
ness; and, although trials and sorrows
have visited us for a few weeks past, yet
great has been our joy and peace. Our
heavenly Father has seen fit, in his all-
wise providence, to lay his chastening hand
upon us; nevertheless his loving kindness
he has not withheld.

Our little darling boy Jimmy, whom you
will remember, has been for several weeks -
THE VISION. 87

very sick, and twice have we thought that
we should very soon be deprived of his
sweet and valuable society. His sickness
is enlargement of the heart, occasioned, as
we suspect, by a kick from a horse, which
he received, while at play upon the green,
about three years ago. Within a year it
has assumed a somewhat dangerous form ;
and recently, owing to a severe cough, it
has reduced him to a very feeble state.
But he is a happy child; and although, for
the last eight months, he has not been able
to attend school, or enjoy the usual plays
with his little mates, yet he never has been
heard to offer one murmur or complaint.
And even now, when his sufferings have
been great, not a word of complaint has
escaped his lips. He has ever been calm
and reconciled, always manifesting the
greatest confidence in the unerring wisdom’
of his Father in heaven. You undoubtedly
recollect his philosophical reasoning upon
the character and purposes of God, as ex-
hibited when you visited us, nearly two
88 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

years since. That same development of
mind has grown with his growth and
strengthened with his strength; and, in
his present sickness, the workings of his
little mind have been wonderful indeed.
Iie has never expressed the least fear of
death, and has viewed it as a ‘* sweet fall-
ing asleep ;’’ and the only regret he has
expressed was, that he thought we should
feel lonesome without him.

And now, sister Brown, could you have
enjoyed the happy scene which we were
permitted to enjoy with this child of faith
and holy trust, on Saturday evening last,
you would have felt that you were admitted
to the entertainment of angels. He had
been more unwell than usual through the
day; and, towards evening, when alone
with his eldest sister, he calmly looked up
and said, smilingly, ‘‘ Haley, I think this is
the /ast night I shall spend with you.” He
was perfectly calm and reconciled, and
said, ‘* When I am an angel, I shall not
suffer as I now do;’’ and he promised, if
THE VISION. 89

he did go to heaven first, he ‘* would come
and be one of our guardian angels.’’ Soon
after this, he closed his eyes, and, while
laboring hard for breath, he exclaimed,
‘¢O, what a beautiful sight! See those
little angels!’’ He was asked what they
were doing. ‘* Why, they have hold of
hands, and are dancing in a circle around
me, with wreaths on their heads. O,
how happy they look! and they are whis-
pering to each other. One of them says,
‘Jimmy has been a good litile boy, and
we would like to have him come and be
with us.’? Soon, he seemed delighted,
and said, ‘‘See, there come some older
angels, two at one end, and two at the
other.” Do you know who they are? he
was asked. ‘‘ Yes, uncle Eben is one (a
very dear uncle of his who died about six
months since) ; but there are a whole row
of older ones now standing behind the little
ones.”’ He was asked if any of them were
speaking to him.

‘Yes; but I can’t tell you as they tell

8*
90 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

me, for they sing it beautifully. We can’t
sing so.”’

He was then asked to ¢ed/ what they said.

‘Keep still,”’ said he; ‘don’t talk,
and I will listen and tell you.”’

‘‘They say, ‘Come, little Jimmy, and
be happy with us.’ ”’

‘¢Grandma is speaking now. She says,
‘You are a good little boy, Jimmy ; and if
you come now, I will take care of you.’ ”’

‘¢ Uncle Eben is speaking now,”’ said he.
‘He says Eunice and Hitty have been here ©
to-day [these were his two daughters, who
had spent the night with us]. Write, and
tell them that I am happy; and if you do
not get better, you shall come and be with
me in this world of love and joy.”’

Again he spoke: ‘0, this is Sally!”’
[My feelings here were indescribable, for
this was a dear sister of mine, who died
before I was married, and whom he knew
nothing about.] He was asked what she
said tohim. ‘‘ She says, ‘ You have a good
mother, Jimmy; but if you do not stay
THE VISION. : 91

with her, you will come here and be happy,
and I will be like a sister to you.’ ”’

After resting a few moments, apparently
in deep thought, he turned to me, and calmly
said, ‘‘ Mother, I have one word more to .
say, and that is, if I should fall asleep,
never more to awake, I want you all to live
a happy family, in peace and love, and
often think of your dear little boy Jimmy.”’

He then looked around the room, and
inquired how many were present. On be-
ing told, he sweetly said, ‘‘ There is one
wanting — my dear father.’’ He was told
that he should be immediately sent for,
though we were fearful he might not arrive
to see him, as. he had been obliged to leave
the city for a few hours. After this, he
seemed more quiet, and asked ‘‘if we
should know when he was dead.’ He felt
that he was ‘‘ falling asleep.’’ On being
assured that we should know, he remained
as if going to sleep for some moments ; and ©
then brightening up, he said, with a stronger
voice, ** I guess I shall live longer ; I don’t
92 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

think I shall die now; and the angels said,
‘if I did not get better, I should come and
be with them,’ and the angels are leaving
me.”’ In afew moments he said, ‘‘ They
are going ;’’ and again, ‘‘ They are all
gone.’’ He seemed to see many who were
waiting for him, and all appeared happy.
Shortly after this, he turned to speak to
his little niece, who stood beside him, when
he said, ‘“‘O, no! there is one angel flying
around in the air, with a wreath on its little
finger. This is my guardian angel.”
From this time he began to revive, and
in a few hours, assisted by our excellent
family physician, Dr. Crane, he was so far
recovered from his distress that, by his re-
_ quest, we joined with him, being led by his
angelic voice, in offering to the Father of
mercies our united thanks for such a won-
derful manifestation of infinite goodness.
And, could you now hear the fervent sup-
plications which his infant voice sends forth
from the family altar, when we are assembled
for our daily devotion, you would think that
THE VISION. 93

his tongue was touched with a live coal
from off the altar of the God of prayer.

His father had now joined us, and our
. souls were raised in thanksgiving to heaven,
that he could again clasp to his bosom this
treasured object of his paternal affection ;
and much did it add to the happiness of
our darling, waiting boy.

I have been particular in writing, know-
ing you would be pleased to be informed of
such a remarkable manifestation of the holy
spirit which shines with so resplendent a
lustre in that glorious gospel which we have
the happiness to receive. And I have
given it to you precisely as it came from
his sweet lips; for this heavenly scene threw
over my whole soul such a calm and peace-
ful influence, that I was prepared to take
the sentences upon paper as he delivered
them to us. I was able to be at liberty to
perform this pleasant task, for his faithful
sister, Haley, was his close attendant during
this season of his severe suffering, and
could easily distinguish every word he
94 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

uttered. And, so great was his desire that
his ‘‘ dear father’’ should enjoy this scene
with us, that he requested that I should
write it all down for him to see, as he
feared he might not return until he should
cease speaking.

You recollect his age, which will be nine
years the twenty-second of this month.
But, although a child in years, he is a
man in mind. He remains perfectly con-
scious of everything which transpired on
Saturday evening, and can accurately relate
every incident. And although he has be-
come very comfortable, he cheerfully rests
his life, and all, upon his heavenly Father’s
will. He says he has ‘‘ two homes — one
with the angels, and one with his friends
on earth.’”’ When asked if he could describe
to us the angels, he said he ‘‘could not, for
he knew of nothing on the earth so beauti-
ful, — they were clothed in white, and
dwelt in light.’’

It seems as though he had brought
heaven to earth for us, and we could realize
THE VISION. 95

in some degree the joys of the upper
world. We feel that he has already per-
formed a holy mission, and can but hope
that his work is not yet done. If it is the
wise design of Heaven that he should be
spared, it would be to us a great source of
happiness and joy.

He sends much love to you, and hopes
you will come and see us, as you promise in
your last, and that he may be able to enjoy
with you more of those pleasant walks.

Wishing that his desires may be an-
swered, I am, dear sister,

Affectionately thine,
KE. H. C.

The foregoing is the narration of that
remarkable converse with immortals which
was published immediately after. But
there are circumstances accompanying that
intercourse, as it progressed, which have a
bearing upon the question of its reality, —
that is, the real presence of his heavenly
visitants, — which I will add in this place.

The question has been asked, ‘‘ How was
96 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

James at the time of his ‘yision’?”’ ‘*Had
he taken medicine that would be likely to
throw him into a dreamy state 2 or, was he
awake, and conscious of what was trans-
piring?”’ These queries were made in his
presence after the event ; and the thought,
to him, that such questions should even be
asked, seemed to fill him with grief. No
visit on earth was ever enjoyed by him with
more rational pleasure than was this visit
from those ‘‘ beautiful angels’’ of heaven.
He had not been asleep through the day,
and, although quite feeble, he had not com-
plained much until towards night, when he
so impressively said to his sister, who was
watching by him, ‘Haley, J think this is the
last night I shall spend with you.” These
words were entirely voluntary on the part
of little James ; and although his sister, on
hearing this unexpected remark, and having
;t made to her in such an impressive man-
ner, was affected to tears, he remained
calm, and seemed perfectly to understand
what he had said, and to realize its import-
THE VISION. 97

ance. At this point of time, when his
mind was so perfectly clear, and cognizant
of things as they were, was the commence-
inent of his ‘¢ vision.”’

He had not taken medicine to affect him,
neither was his mind in the least impaired
by disease. Indeed, he never took medi-
cine, in the least, to affect his mind; and
not until within two days of his death did
his mind seem in the slightest degree
affected. At the time of his ‘ vision,’’ he
was not asleep, but sensible to everything
passing around him. If any in the room
were speaking when one of his beautiful
messengers was about to address him, he
would promptly request them to be ‘‘still,”’
saying, ‘‘ Hark! don’t make a noise; for
such an one [naming the person] wants to
speak to me. I want to hear, and then I
will tell you what is said.’”’ He would
then listen smilingly, and, on receiving the
message in full, would turn his head and
recite it to us in measured tones, and with
emphatic precision. As his sister placed

9
98 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

her hand upon his forehead in order to sup-
port his head, he instantly said, ‘‘ Don’t put
your hand on there, Haley ; for I see the
angels through my forehead. I don't see
them, as I do you, through my eyes.”

When he had called the name of my sister
who had been dead over thirty years, and
of whom he knew nothing at all, on hearing
him say, ‘0, there is Sally!’’— as that
was the name by which she was always
called,— I turned from him, and unavoida-
bly wept aloud. Fearing I should disturb
him, I went toward the window, when he
opened his eyes and requested me to return
to him, saying, “ You may weep, mother ;
‘t don’t hurt me!” And the next day,
when I asked him how he knew that it was
my sister, as he had never known anything
of her, said he, “ O, she told me it was
Sally, before she told me the rest.’’

When the vision was withdrawn, there
was no change with him, as arousing from a
dream; it was as if some of his loved
neighbors had made him a call, and retired.
THE VISION. 99

And ever after he would talk as familiarly
of the ‘‘angels’”’ as though they had vis-
ited him in the body. In all his subse-
quent prayers, he would devoutly thank
God that he had sent him his angels to
teach him of the beauties of his heavenly
home. And so perfect was his assurance
of a future abode with them, in that ‘‘ beau-
tiful world of peace and joy,” that death
_had for him no terror, and the grave no
cloud. Indeed, there was to him no grave,
but a passing upward to a higher mansion
in his Father’s house.
CHAPTER VII.
THE MISSIONARY-BOX.

James Arruur was a child who ever
took great delight in attending public wor-
ship, and hearing * about Jesus.’’ Often
has he gone out to meeting when he was
quite unwell, because, as he would express
it, ‘I feel that I want to do everything I
can for the service of God, because he has
done so much for me.’’ And when he was
not able to attend church, he would often
hold a meeting of his own, going through
with all the performances in regular, per-
fect order, and in such a manner as would
well interest an audience of maturer minds.

When he had become so weak that he
could not interest himself in this way, his
mind, which was ever devising purposes for
good, never became idle. He was still
snterested to know what he could do to
THE MISSIONARY—BOX, 101

show those around him his love of the gos-
pel, and thereby benefit both himself and
others. His mind, upon the paternity of
God, and upon his boundless love and
mercy, as well as his strict and impartial
justice, was wonderfully formed, and -im-
movably fixed. He would sit for hours
and converse upon these subjects; and
many times, during his last sickness, he
would warmly express his thankfulness and
delight, that he had been taught as he
had respecting his God and Saviour. In
conversation with his mother upon this
subject, of what some believe of the charac-
ter of God, he very emphatically remarked,
‘<7 think it is wicked for folks to believe so
about God! Do you think, mother, that
you love me better than God does? and
would you put me into a place to burn me,
or into a place where I should never see
you again? I know, if we do wrong, God
will punish us for it ; but he loves us, and
wants ug to be good, and would punish us,
x
102 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

as you would your children, until we are
willing to be good.”

In conversation with his mother a short
time previous to his death, upon the great
value of the gospel, and its beautiful adapt-
edness to our wants under all circumstances,
he said, ‘‘I wish all could know the gos-
pel, as it is taught in the Bible.’”? At his
request, his mother had commenced read-
ing aloud to him the New Testament, ex-
plaining it as she read, both doctrinally and
practically ; and well did he treasure up
and appreciate its beautiful teachings. On
being told that all could not enjoy the priv-
ilege of hearing the gospel as he so happily
believed it, he inquired the reason why
they could not. He was told that there
were many places where they were not
able to support a regular ministry, and
could but seldom hear the love of God
preached as he believed it. On being told
that the ‘‘ Missionary Societies’’ were
formed in order that means might be used
to carry the gospel to the needy and the
THE MISSIONARY—BOX. 1038

destitute, he was much pleased, and wished
to know if he could not join the missionary
cause, and ‘‘ give some of his money for so
good an object.”’

This suggestion opened to the mind of
his mother a new subject, and she proposed
to James the pleasant expedient of forming
a Juvenile Missionary Society, such as had
been formed in other denominations of
Christians. With this the dear boy was at
once delighted; and he immediately desired
that he might have a ‘‘ box’”’ procured for
him, as had been described, into which he
could put his cent a week, to be given to
the missionary cause. ‘‘I intend,” said
he, ‘‘to put in my fifty-two cents for the
year, that you may carry it over to the
meeting in May, and give it as my part.”
He then wished to be assured that a
request should be made by his mother at
that time to have ‘‘a Juvenile Missionary
Society,’’ and let his name be put down as
the first to join it. ‘‘I think,’’ he said,
‘‘that all good little children would be
104 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

willing to put into a box one cent a week ;
and that, at the end of the year, would
make a good deal to help send the gospel
to poor children who cannot now hear it.”
He was much gratified when he ‘was
assured that all should be done according to
his request; and that, should his health
permit, he should be present to write his
own name. The happiness that he enjoyed
seemed to inspire him with a desire that
other children should unite in that which,
while it would add to their own enjoyment,
would be the means of making happy those
poor and destitute children whose situa-
tion, in this respect, was less favorable.

When the ‘box’? was opened, after
little James had joined a higher society
in heaven above, it was found to contain
fifty cents, which he had already deposited,
that he might have his year’s account
ready. The money was replaced, and the
box put away, to be taken to the meeting
for which he had designed it.

This good boy did not live to see his
THE MISSIONARY—BOX. 105

design carried into execution ; but it is to
be hoped that others will carry forward the
work which his pious heart conceived, until
the gospel, in all its purity and love, shall
be borne to those who now sit in darkness,
and life, light and immortality, shall shine
upon their earthly pathway, purify their
hearts, and overcome death and the grave,
with the same glorious victory that was so
abundantly awarded to this Christian child.

The case of the ‘‘Missionary-box’’ is
but an instance illustrating the general
character of little James in respect to the
use of his money. It was but a little that
he wished to spend for the mere gratifica-
tion of appetite and fancy. He took the
greatest interest in drawing upon his little
resources for the purpose of doing some
form of good; and it was with the noblest
satisfaction that he would do anything in
his power for any measure which aimed at
the improvement of society. When, for
instance, it was proposed, in his hearing,
that a subscription should be raised to
106 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

cushion and carpet the ministerial pew in
the church he attended, it struck his quick
and apprehensive mind, at once, that this
would be a very suitable expression of
kindness and respect for the family of him
who was laboring to promote the interests
of the gospel, and he claimed the privilege
of putting in a quarter of a dollar, for his
part of the subscription. Though this took
off a large part of what he then had in
fund, yet there was no selfish and childish
use of it that had any consequence in his
mind, when he could do something with it
that would sustain the means of good to the
community. There dwelt in him, in an
ever active state, the spirit of the apostolic
injunction, ‘‘ To do good, and to communi-
cate, forget not; for with such sacrifice
God is well pleased.’’
CHAPTER VIII.
HIS VIEWS OF DEATH.

THERE is, with mankind in general, a
natural dread of death. The thought that
we must die fills most minds with gloom ;
and there is a natural desire to put ‘far
away’’ the subject, as one partaking too
much of sadness and melancholy.

But to the mind of little James death
could hardly be said to be fraught with
terror. There was not in the subject any-
thing unpleasant for him to contemplate.
Often would he remark that he should be
no more afraid to die than he should to lie
down to go to sleep. He felt that going to
sleep from the labors and fatigues of the
day did not shut us out from the presence,
or deprive us of the constant guardianship,
of our Father in heaven. And so he

believed, that should he lie down to sleep

-..
; .
108 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

the sleep of death, to rest from the cares
and toils of earth, to awake in another
world, even that would no more shut him
out from the presence of his God and
Father in heaven than would the sleep of
a night. He loved the saying, ‘ that
neither J7fe nor death can separate us from
the love of God.’’ I have had occasion, in
another chapter, to refer to the circum-
stance of his fondness of being entertained
with reading ; and a few months before his
death, as his mother was engaged in read-
ing Abbott’s histories of distinguished
characters, he would request to have her
read aloud. On coming to the life of
‘*Cleopatra,’’ so much of it was filled with
crime and wickedness, that it was not
thought proper for him to hear it. It was
therefore proposed that after it was fin-
ished a synopsis of the work should be
given, and he be saved from hearing those
parts which he would not so well enjoy.
His mind was so sensitive and sympathetic,
that if was thought best to avoid having
HIS VIEWS OF DEATH. 109

unfavorable impressions made upon it, by
the reading of that which was more cruel
than good. After the work was finished,
his mother gave him a synopsis of its most
interesting parts, and spoke of Cleopatra’s
having many of her prisoners put to death
by different descriptions of poison, in order
that she might thereby determine which
would produce the easiest death, in case
she should wish to take her own life. For
this she had resolved on doing, rather than
fall into the hands of the Romans. After
listening to the various modes of death pro-
duced by this monster in human form, he
sat.silent for a while, and then, turning to
his mother, he said, ‘‘ Mother, I will tell
you which J think would be the best way
for any one to die!’’ Thinking he had
been revolving in his mind the different
inodes adopted by the Queen of Egypt, and
made up his mind from that, he was asked
which he thought would be the easiest. ‘‘I
think,’’ said he, ‘‘the best way for any one
to die is to die in peace, when God wants
10
110 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

to have them die!’’ These were his precise
words; and the answer from the mother
was, ‘‘My child, that is an answer that
would well befit a king.”

During his last sickness, he would often
introduce the subject of death, and converse
upon it with apparent satisfaction. Indeed,
it seemed as though he was not only pre-
paring his own mind for the coming event,
but he wished that the minds of all around
him should not be unpleasantly affected by
it. So great was his faith in God, that the
‘¢ dead should be raised,’’ and we ‘‘ should
all live again,’’ that the thought of passing
into that heavenly state was to him a pleas-
ant one; and, young as he was, he had
done much to prepare his mind for the
event, cheered with the pleasant reflection
of a life well spent, and duties well per-
formed. This, with a knowledge of the
gospel, is what he thought would enable one
to die in peace.

A few days before his death, as if he
would give his last message of peace, when
‘HIS VIEWS OF DEATH. 111

alone with his mother, he introduced the
subject of dying. Said he, ‘‘ Mother, I wish
we could die together, with our arms around
each other’s neck, and then I think they
would bury us so. They could put us both
into one coffin, and we could always be
together.’” After some conversation upon
the subject, which greatly comforted him,
in which he was promised that, if we did not
die together, we should be Jaid together,
and after requesting that, should he die
first, he should often be visited at his grave,
with great emphasis he made some remarks
which were a sweet solace and a balm for
the saddened heart. ‘‘ Mother,’’ continued
he, ‘‘if you should again think me to be
dying, as you did when I had the vision, I
don’t want you to weep because you think
I am suffering; for when you went away
from me and cried, because you thought I
was suffering so much, I did not think any-
thing about my sufferings; all I was think-
ing of was those beautiful angels, and how
happy I should be when I came to be with
112 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

them.’’ These were his words, and deep did
they sink into the mother’s heart. At this
time the family were much encouraged, as
his appearance indicated a partial recovery
from his feeble state of health; and it was
thought that, as the spring approached, he
might be much better. But he probably
knew his own feelings best, and was thereby
differently impressed; and so unwilling was
he that any one should ‘‘ grieve,”’ that every
exertion on his part was made for the great-
est enjoyment of those around him. And so
it was. After having made every arrange-
ment with regard to his clothes, such as he
wished to have preserved, and as he thought
it would be a satisfaction for us to look upon,
and had done everything,he could to pre-
pare the minds of those he so dearly loved
to part with him, he seemed to feel that he
had nothing more to do. His mind was at
rest. His whole soul was filled with sweet
comfort and peace. He had nothing to
regret; he had nothing more to ask. He
had lived ‘‘to do good.’’ And with his
HIS VIEWS OF DEATH. 113

mission well performed, and with his labors
well done, he was ready to lie down to go
‘to sleep,’”’ that he might awake in the
presence of those beautiful angels,

To wear that “‘ wreath,”’ and with those seraphs join,
In joys more pure, in labors more divine.

10*
CHAPTER IX.
HIS EXIT, AND FUNERAL OBSEQUIES.

James Artuur departed this life at one
o’clock in the morning, February 24, 1852.
The account of this event, written by his
father, and published in the Christian F'ree-
man of March 5th, is the best I can present
to the readers of this little volume. From
the same editorial I also transcribe the
sketch of the funeral services.

In the night of the dear boy’s departure,
as soon as the father could sufficiently
control his feelings to use his pen, he
hastened to write the following, that it
might find place in the paper then about
going to press :

Tuesday morning, Feb. 24th.

Our BrereAvEMENT. — Though our paper
is filled, and ready for the press at early
morn, yet we must pen a word for our read-—
ers in this midnight hour, asking their sym-
HIS EXIT. 115

pathy in our bereavement. Our blessed
boy, James Arthur, the youngest of our nine
children, fell calmly asleep this morning, at
one o'clock. Our hearts bleed for the sun-
dering of ties so tender and so strong; but
O, the blessed comfort of gospel faith, of
which this little one was so bright an ex-
ample! He has long contemplated, with
serene and pleasant emotions, the passing
hence to the world of painless, deathless life
and glory. And now his sufferings are
over, and he has joined the angel band that
came weeks ago to greet and bid him wel-
come. The God of grace and comfort be
with us. Amen.

But that week’s paper had gone to press
before the above item reached the office ;
and the next week’s issue contained the
following :

Our last week’s paper went to press
before the above paragraph reached our
office, and we let it go to our readers as it
is, this week.

s
116 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

‘Our darling’s gone.’’ Never shall we
forget this announcement, and the inde-
scribable tones of resigned and affectionate
pathos by which we were awaked from our
slumbers at one o’clock last Tuesday morn-
ing week. Two hours before, we had left
our boy in the care of his eldest sister and
her husband, and retired for brief repose ;
and at one o’clock that sister glided to our
bed-side, and pathetically exclaimed, ‘‘ Our
darling’s gone. Father! Mother! Our
darling ’s gone!’’ O, the indescribable sen-
sations produced by this announcement!
Twenty-nine and a half years have passed
since we united in the sacred ties which
made us one for life and forever, and nine
children have been given us to form and
bless our family circle; and never before has
one of the circle ‘‘ gone,’’ to be with us in
the body no more.

We arose quickly, and hastened to our
little charge, and indeed he was quiet and
at rest. O, the bleeding of severed ties,
and mingled thankfulness to oa: We
HIS EXIT. 117

knew he could live but to suffer. He could
see no prospect of living but to suffer; and
he wished to go and be at rest. That night
he had said to his watching sister, ‘‘ Haley,
IT wish I could die;—-when can I die?”
And his wish was granted in a most beauti-
ful manner. He had called for water, and
on its being given him, he energetically
pronounced it good. <‘‘ Now,” said he,
‘‘ fix my pillow.”’ She fixed his pillow, and
he reclined his head upon it, saying, ‘* That
is nice.”’ Immediately his sister, standing
over him, saw his head drop slightly for-
ward (for he was bolstered up in a sitting
posture), and she looked, and saw that his
spirit had gone. Nota struggle nor a gasp
accompanied or followed its departure.
That heaven-visited and angel-welcomed
spirit was prepared to pass gently out from
its earthly tenement, without another jar to
a chord or muscle of that tenement. And
the angelic band who had held intercourse
with him, and whose converse he ever after
continued to contemplate with sweetest
118 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

pleasure, were the associates and convoy of
that freed spirit, according to their promise.
O God, we thank thee! Thy hand, in this
providence, has not sunk us deeper down,
but it has raised us nearer to heaven. O
God, we thank thee for thy grace, through
Jesus Christ our Lord!

We will not tax our readers with the
recital of the hundred little mementoes of
this precious boy, as we find his handiworks
in the different departments of our dwelling,
for these things are more suitable for our
own family converse than for public record.
Suffice it now to say that, though James
Arthur made so short a stay with us here,
— but little more than nine years,— he has
lived a great life, and performed an import-
ant mission. Every member of our family
feels that we could not, without insufferable
loss, part with the instructions which he has
given us. His clear, logical reasonings on
doctrines of faith, his strong filial confidence
in God, his full and glorious hope of immor-
tality and glory, all brought out in various
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES. 119

conversations ; his living piety, his pure
devotions, his sweet contentment, his tri-
umphant patience and resignation in suf-
fering, saying he did not realize suffer-
ing, because his mind was engrossed in
pleasant heavenly themes ; — all, all have
instructed, and will instruct and bless us.
Precious child! we will be together in
spirit. Thus shalt thou still be one of our
circle, and bless us.

We will add, that Fathers Ballou and
Streeter were present at the funeral, and
assisted our pastor, Br. Webster, in the ser-
vices; and the spirit of God and of heaven
inspired their sympathetic souls, and their
words of consolation and prayer were the
dews of heaven to our wounded hearts ; —
and our sympathizing friend, 8. D. Hadley,
and his associates, soothed our spirits with
their sweet and beautiful chants: By the
kind offices of Messrs. Bowker and Fuller,
the former a trustee, and the latter treasu-
rer, of Woodlawn Cemetery, it was arranged
for our bearing the remains to a new receiv-
120 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

ing tomb in that cemetery. The sun, near
his setting, shone out mildly as we gathered
around the bier, at the entrance of the sep-
ulchre. The brothers and sisters, a band
of seven, were simultaneously moved to sing
there the beautiful piece,

‘‘ Brother, thou wast mild and lovely, —
Gentle as the summer breeze ;”’

and this unexpected service inspired the
father to there bow in prayer, and lift up
his voice in praise to God, for that religion
which abolishes death, dissipates the dark-
ness of the tomb, and fills it with thoughts
of life and glory. Returning to our hab-
itation, with unavoidable feelings of loneli-
ness at times, we feel that God is with us,
who doeth all things well.
Sytvanus and Eunice Ware Coss.

We subjoin the tributes of other mem-
bers of the family:

TRIBUTE OF THE ELDEST BROTHER.

~ Dear Moruer :

An angel messenger passed o’er the earth,
Plucking sweet flowers to grace the diadem
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES. 121

Of God. Some soul of purity he sought, —
Some spirit meek, that longed to put away
The clod of earth, and bound, all joyously,
Within the sphere of Love and Truth eternal.
That soul — that flower — the angel found with us;
*T was one of us; our sweetest, fairest one,
In that it was our youngest. He plucked it,
And bore it off to God.
Now doubly dear
Is heaven to us all. That chain of ours,
Wherein each kindred soul formed one strong link,
Has reached the throne of Him who ruleth us
For good. It is not broke, nor shall it ever be ;
Only the transmutation has begun.
The mortal is now immortal, and that
Celestial link has raised us all toward heaven.
Our youngest was the first to be with God
At home. The next, the next, and still the next, —
It matters not which, when, or how; but yet
All, all will go to that bright home, and all
Will be a band unbroken still for aye,
In that soul’s sphere, where all is joy, and peace,
And truth, and love, forevermore.
Dear James,
Come to us oft, and bless us with thyself
In spirit presence. God shall have the praise.
SYLvaNvs, JR.

TRIBUTE OF THE ELDEST SISTER.
On the falling asleep of Dear Brother Jimmy.

Our darling one has gone,
Our youngest and our best,
11
122

MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

To where the wicked cease from strife,
The weary are at rest.

His sweet, angelic voice
We shall no longer hear ;

But his bright spirit-presence pure,
That ever will be near,

To guard our steps from sin,
And guide us in the way

To live the life that he has lived,
Which leads to endless day.

His soul, while here on earth,
Fit for the spirit-land,

Held sweet communion with the blest,
A bright, angelic band.

All dressed in robes of white,
Crowned with immortal flowers,

They lifted from his eyes the veil
That hides their world from ours.

They spoke to him of heaven,
Their blissful home above,

And bade him come and dwell with them,
In joy, and peace, and love.

And calmly as the babe
Sleeps on its mother’s breast,
Gently as wafts the summer breeze,
Our loved one sank to rest.
FUNERAL OBSEQUIES. 123

Now, freed from every pain,
New life to him is given ;

He dwells with Jesus, whom he loved, —
A blessed heir of heaven.

There shall we meet again,
When life’s short race is 0’er,
Our cherub boy, and be with him
Forever — evermore. HAezy.

TRIBUTE OF THE YOUNGEST SISTER.

Yes, Jimmy ’s left this world of pain,
For that bright, heavenly sphere ;

Yet his sweet presence oft we feel
Hovering around and near.

His noble mind soared far above
The transient things of earth ;

He loved to talk of angels bright,
And Him who gave him birth.

For hours he ’d sit and love to hear
His mother read to him

From that great Book of truth and love
Which gave him peace within.

We loved the darling boy while here
With us upon this earth ;

We love him still, the precious one,
In his bright heavenly birth.
124 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

We all shall meet him in due time,
And, as the Saviour taught,
A happy family in heaven, —
How sweet the precious thought! Saran.

T will add that all the members of our
somewhat numerous household have re-
ceived the same blessed influence from the
spirit of that sainted boy. They do not
feel that their circle is broken, but that one
link of the chain is raised to heaven, ele-
vating, in a degree, the whole unbroken
circle. This same sweet spiritual influence,
without a word or a letter to convey it,
extended at the same time three hundred
miles, to an absent brother in Philadelphia.
Our third son left home for Philadelphia
the week before James Arthur’s exit. The
letter which his father wrote him on the
morning of the decease failed to reach him,
on account of misdirection; and on the
16th of March, three weeks after this
event, he wrote a letter in which was this
remark: ‘‘I should feel anxious about
Jimmy, were it not that Iam sure, from
HIS SPIRITUAL INFLUENCE. 125

certain causes, that he is better.’’ On the
same day, after mailing this letter, he found
in the post-office one from his sister, in-
forming him of his little brother’s death,
when he immediately wrote another letter,
in which he says: ‘I say Jimmy has told
me he is happy. I wrote in my other let-
ter that I was not anxious about him, for
certain causes ; but | was almost ashamed
to give those causes. It was but a misin-
terpretation of my dreams, or rather my
conversation with him, that caused me to
attribute his comfort to this world. I had
framed in my mind the following to write
in that letter, but thought I would not: ‘I
know Jimmy is happy, and free from pain,
whether in this world or in any other; for
he has told me he is happy.’ ’”’ He then
proceeds to give a minute description of his
dream, or vision, in which he enjoyed the
sweetest embraces and the most heavenly
converse of little James, when he said ‘‘ he
felt well and happy, and should not suffer
any more.’ This son, who is twenty-
an”
126 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

three years of age, has but little of the
marvellous in his mental constitution ; but
there was in his vision such a ‘‘ realness,’” as
he expresses it, —something so unlike all
he had ever experienced, about its manner
and subsequent influence upon his mind, —
that it rested in his mind as perfect and
reliable information. <‘‘ Jimmy has told me
he is happy.’’ Blessed spirit! he is a
lovely messenger of ‘‘ peace and joy.”

And the same hallowed influence was
breathed into the soul of that distant mem-
ber of the family, as was present with those
who received the last blessing from the mor-
tal lips of the dying boy, and chanted the
sweet song of love and hope at the mouth
of his sepulchre. This is most happily
evinced in the following additional extract
from his second letter :

‘¢T weep alone, and my tears are not un-
manly. You have had time for resignation,
but to me little Jimmy’s death now comes
all fresh with its saddening influences.
Amid strangers, with no one bereaved to
HIS SPIRITUAL INFLUENCE. 127

reciprocate my feelings, — with no sympa-
thizing heart to weep in unison with mine,
—jit brings more of grief than I should
have felt, had I been with you when his
spirit left for brighter spheres, and with
you seen his sweet face once more before it
was laid away forever, leaving no truer
memory of its features behind than are en-
graved upon the hearts of those who so
much loved him. When I think of my
last parting with him here,— of the last
sweet kiss, — of how the tears rolled down
his thin, pale cheeks, as he thought of my
leaving, — the tears my stubborn eyes would
not then shed, but that swelled stronger in
the breast, now burst forth unrestrained. I
would not wish him back here, for he has
told me he is happy. Though reason, full
of kindness, prompted by the soul, looks up
calm and mild to heaven, and with a smile
bids him wait a while, fond memory must
weep before she can forget him here. How
every little gift from him now becomes a
dear memorial! A little odor-vial hung on
128 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

the ‘Christmas Tree,’,—how it will be
prized!
shall be filled with inscriptions to his mem-
ory.”

Then, in an address to his brothers and
sisters, he closes with these original lines:

Guard well your actions now, and let them prove
Such as would blend with spirits of pure love.
Think, when the world around you throws its snares,
A guardian spirit every presence shares.
Pause, when temptation draws the mind away,
And a foul appetite usurps the sway ; —
O, pause, when reason is o’erpowered by will ;
For, mark! that.spirit hovers o’er us still.
The chain that bound our hearts together here
Has not been severed ; but a brother dear, —
A darling child, — a stronger hold has given ;
For now its surest stay is fixed in heaven.

EBEN.
TO THE MEMORY
OF

JAMES ARTHUR COBB.

Homan blossoms fall diurnal
From Life’s broad outspreading tree,
But to bloom in bowers eternal,
In yon high eternity.
Eyer the pale Genius’ pinion
Sweeps above our fading home,
And to transient, brief dominion
Sorrow, pain and death, may come.

In the silent tomb are sleeping
Age and lovely youth so fair;
But their spirits, in God’s keeping,
Range the boundless fields of air.
All that pass the golden portals
Now are learning heavenly lore,
And with pure and blest immortals
Tread salvation’s gleaming floor.

Little James has done his mission !
Pain no more can mar his rest ;
Lo! he sings in Love’s Elysium,
In bright angel-plumage drest.
On his cherub brow is gleaming
The celestial ‘‘ wreath ’’ of Love ;
From his harp of flame is streaming
Music only heard above.
130

MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

Mourning kindred, cease to sorrow ;
Lo! your ‘‘ darling ’’ is with God!
And on the eternal morrow
All shall meet in His abode.
OQ! the glories of that Eden
Where our heavenly Father reigns,
And life’s golden tree is shading
Courts of bliss — Elysian plains!

There, no radiant link shall sever
In affection’s diamond chain,

But the countless jewels ever
In Love’s diadem remain ;

There, no sigh or pain of sadness
Swells on the ambrosial air,

But the songs of praise and gladness
Breathe the diapason there.

Farewell, little James! so lowly
In thy pleasant bed now sleep ;
May thy faith, our faith most holy,
Bid thy mother cease to weep.
Now, thy spirit in Elysium

Blooms amid that angel-band
Seen by thy unfolding vision

Ere departing from our land.
May thy memory, pure and holy,

Lead the childish band to God,
To adore the Saviour lowly,

Who the fields of earth has trod!

German, N. Y. Laura EGGLESTON.
CHAPTER X.

ESSAY ON RELIGIOUS EDUCATION.

BY SYLVANUS COBB.

In providing for and conducting the edu-
cation of children, we should study their
natures and wants. The agriculturist must
know what treatment is adapted to the na-
ture of the plants he would cultivate, in
order to bring them, each in its kind, to the
highest state of perfection. The shepherd
must know the censtitutional wants of his
flock, that he may be able to care for them
in a manner to promote their greatest health
and productiveness. So must the educator
of the human mind acquaint himself with
the constitutional wants of the mind.

All agree in regarding man as an intel-
lectual being, and a suitable subject, of
course, of intellectual training. But it is
just as certain that man has a religious na-
ture as that he has an intellectual nature ;
and, of course, that he is a proper subject
of religious training. When Professor
Combe was lecturing in this country on
om

132 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

the science of phrenology, he said that
some were fearful that this science would
overthrow religion. ‘* But,’’ he rejoined,
‘*it establishes religion, even on a scientific
basis. It finds in man a religious nature.
It finds organs provided in the constitution
of man for the especial use of the mind, in
its action on the subject of religion, or of
its relation to God and the spirit-world.’’
It is so; and what this sublime science dis-
covers in the natural organization of the
human mind, universal experience and his-
tory attest. Man is universally found, in
fact, to possess a religious nature.

And in this capacity, —in his religious
nature,— man requires’as much, and, if
possible, more than in all things else, to be
truly educated. His religious wants and
aspirations are earliest developed, next to
the physical, even before the scientific.
His earliest wants, when he has become ca-
pable of observation and reflection, are the
wants of religious knowledge,— of just
such knowledge as the gospel of Jesus
divulges. He feels his weakness and de-
pendence ; he finds himself surrounded and
impelled by a power he cannot control or
resist ; he sees that our race are subject to
disappointments, sickness, suffering, and
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 133

death ; he is surrounded by dangers, and
knows not what a day or an hour may bring
forth. By what power, what disposition,
and for what purpose, am I brought into
being, and to be disposed of ? —these are
among the earliest and most earnest in-
quiries of the young mind. No mind can
away with these inquiries.

Under these circumstances, we cannot
enjoy rest and satisfaction of mind,— we
cannot enter into that exalted sphere of
pure and rational enjoyment which the
mind is capable of and aspires to, — with-
out an acquaintance with the Deity; with
the almighty Creator and Governor, who
controls the affairs of the universe, affecting
us, in wisdom and love. It is not enough to
know God as a being of almighty power,
because power alone does not constitute
any being an object of trust. One may
possess great power, and a disposition which
will employ it to our hurt. Such power
would not be an object of trust. For our
rest and satisfaction, we need the assurance
that the God of almighty power is, and will
forever be, our friend.

And this assurance a truly gospel re-
ligious education richly gives us. This,

12
134 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

and nothing else, is adapted to the wants of
the mind. It teaches us of God’s univer-
sal providence; that not a sparrow falls
without his notice, — that the very hairs of
our heads are all numbered of him, — that
in Him, whose nature is love, we live, and
move, and have our being, —and our eternal
destiny is at his gracious disposal. Noth-
ing can fill the place of this knowledge, as
a fit and proper substitute. Without it,
speak lightly of these things as you may in
your giddy moments, and boast of your
having outgrown all concern with religious
matters, — yet without this Christian knowl-
edge and faith, the mind is an aching void,
an empty bubble amidst tumbling, dash-
ing billows. But by this knowledge of
God there is a dignity and glory added to
the human mind. It is raised up to live in
a higher and wider sphere. And amidst
the jars, and dissolutions, and decays, of
mortal nature, this mind, enlightened, lives
and rests upon the arm of almighty Good-
ness.

I have said that man, in early childhood,
perceives that we are mortal, and must die ;
andewe need the hope of renewed and con-
tinued being, and that in a higher and bet-
ter state, free from the evils that annoy us


RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 135

here. And this hope, too, the gospel |
richly gives us. It gives us to feel to be
children of God, and heirs, through Christ,
of immortal good.

But we stand not alone. Our fathers —
where are they? Gone; and some of our
brothers, sisters and children, are gone, to
meet us no more in the body. But we can-
not forget them. ‘The fond remembrances
of love cling to them. And there are
those around us bound to our hearts by ten
thousand tender strings entwined around,
whose happiness is as dear to us as our
own. Parent, can you mingle with your
loved domestic group, in a religious belief
which leads you to doubt or despair for any
of those loved ones, and say, ‘* With this
my soul is satisfied. I now know that I
have the primitive faith of the gospel, be-
cause my belief yields me the experience
which the apostles spoke of, ‘joy unspeak-
able and full of glory’ ’’? Can your affec-
tionate child be educated ina religion which
gives him not to trust his heavenly Father’s
love for his own dear mother, and _ that
child’s soul be fed and satisfied? Would
he feel that his soul was ‘‘ nourished up,”
as St. Paul expresses the effect of right
religious education, ‘‘in the words of faith
136 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

and good doctrine’? ? No—never. Pa-
rents need, and children need, a hope cor-
responding with their love. And Chris-
tianity enjoins us to love our nerghbor as
ourselves. With this love we need the faith
of the gospel of Him ‘‘ in whom it pleased
the Father that all fulness should dwell.’’*
We need the unadulterated gospel, in the
light of which we can see that ‘‘God is
love,’’t that ‘‘the Lord is good unto all,
and his tender mercies are over all his
works ;’’{ that ‘‘ he will swallow up death
in victory, and the Lord God will wipe
away tears from off all faces.’’ §

This faith is as legitimately needful to
the wants of the mind, as is bread to the
wants of the body. Hence the gospel is
denominated ‘‘the bread of life.” But
there are other departments of labor in the
conducting of religious education. he
laws of God, in relation to our duties to
him, to ourselves, and to one another, are
also important subjects of human study
and instruction. But, to undertake this
moral education without the religious, — to
instruct our children in the duties which
the laws of God require, without instruct-
ing them in relation to the character of him

*Col.1: 1). t¢iJohn4: 8 $Ps.145: 9. §Is. 25:8.
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 137

who gives these laws, — 1s undertaking to
build without a foundation. The child is
in no fit state to study with interest and
love the laws of God, till he has learned
the disposition of God towards him, and for
what purpose he has given him laws, and
made him a subject of his government ;—
not until he has learned, in short, for what
purpose God has given hima being. Knowl-
edge on these subjects, as we have seen, is
felt to be needed first of all. It is among
the earliest aspirations of the infant mind.
To these points, then, I repeat, must the
earliest teachings of the inquiring mind be
directed.

Then, when the child has learned to find
a father and friend in God, —that he has
given him an existence in love, with the
wise and infallible purpose to make his ex-
istence an infinite good,—he is in a fit
state of mind to study. and respect his
laws. With a calm and peaceful trust in
God as his loving Father, and a cheerful
hope in him for immortal good, he is pre-
pared to attend to his laws as the laws of a
friend, adapted to his highest practical good.
He cannot then regard God’s laws as mere
snares by which to involve his children in

12*
1388 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

trouble, or as arbitrary requirements from
which he would wish to be exonerated ; but
he regards them as the wisely constituted
rules of physical and moral health and hap-
piness.

In the light of such education, the well-
instructed child inherits the warmest moral
sympathy with the sweet utterances of Is-
rael’s royal poet: ‘‘ His delight is in the
law of the Lord, and in his law doth he
meditate day and night.’’* ‘The law of
the Lord is perfect, converting the soul :
the testimony of the Lord is sure, making
wise the simple. The statutes of the Lord
are right, rejoicing the heart: the com-
mandment of the Lord is pure, enlightening
the eyes. ‘The fear of the Lord is clean,
enduring forever: the judgments of the
Lord are true, and righteous altogether.
More to be desired are they than gold, yea,
than much fine gold: sweeter also than
honey, and the honeycomb. Moreover by
them is thy servant warned ; and in keep-
ing of them there is great reward.”’ t
How sweet to the child is the study and
practice of duty, in this light, the light of
faith in God’s love, compared with what it
is in darkness and distrust, without the

*Ps. 1: 2. + Ps. 19: 7—11.
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 189

knowledge of a friend, in earth or heaven,
in whom to repose a peaceful confidence !
Here is the moral element of Jesus’ mind :
‘¢ My —_ is to do the will of him that
sent me.’

In the aan of a proper religious
education, — which involves'the moral like-
wise, — a due attention is, of course, to be
paid to the evils of sin, by the condemna-
tory operation of the retributive judgment
of God. ‘‘ Verily he is a God that judgeth
in the earth.’”’t ‘Though hand join in
hand, the wicked shall not be unpun-
ished.’’{ ‘*Also unto thee, O Lord, be-
longeth mercy, for thou renderest unto
every man according to his work.”’ §

But it will be perceived, hence, that this
department of moral teaching, upon the
Christian system, has no tendency to coun-
tervail the other and primary department
of Christian education. This Scripture doc-
trine of moral accountability and retribu-
tive judgment exerts no weakening influ-
ence upon the child’s confidence and hope
in God, because it is in mercy that he chas-
tises. The punishments administered by
his government on ‘transgressors are not

*John4: 34. ¢Ps.58: 11. { Prov. 11: 21; 16: 5.
§ Ps. 62: 12.
140 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

the cruel inflictions of merciless revenge,
but the wise chastisements of a benevolent
Father, designed for the correction of his
children. Hence the apostle says, ** Whom
the Lord loveth he chasteneth.”’ * And he
argues that it is even more certain that God
will punish the disobedient for their good,
than it is that earthly parents will punish
their children on so wise and benevolent a
principle. ** Furthermore,’’ he says, ‘* we
have had fathers of our flesh which chas-
tened us, and we gave them reverence -
shall we not much rather be in subjection
to the Father of spirits, and live? For
they, verily, for a few days, chastened us
after their pleasure ; but he for our profit,
that we might be partakers of his holi-
ness.”

Here, then, in the Christian revelation, we
have a perfect system of faith and practice.
It employs the fear of evil as an aid to our
resistance of temptation, which lures by the
promise of good in sin. Yet it does not
take from our confidence in God as our
Father, which must ever be our highest and
most abiding principle of obedience in love.
There are principles here which are adapted
to all the religious and moral wants of the

*Heb. 12: 6. + Heb. 12: 9, 10.
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. ° 141

inquiring mind; and there is a beautiful
harmony of parts, a mingling and blending
of moral tone, which commands the appro-
bation and love of the unsophisticated,
philosophizing child. To educate our chil-
dren in these principles, is to nourish their
souls with the indispensable bread of life.

But there are parents who would not
have their children receive a religious edu-
cation. They would have their children
run, without having imparted to them any
religious instruction, until they become old
enough to collect and form their own opin-
ions.

But where will those parents keep their
children, all this while? Shut up, and ex-
cluded from all intercourse with mankind ?
No; they will mingle with the crowd, of
all opinions and characters. And do you
presume that the minds of your children
will remain a void, unoccupied by any
thoughts on the subject of religious doc-
trine, if you neglect to teach them? The
soil of their hearts will become overgrown
with something, and you are culpable if
you neglect to sow the good seed.

But you plead, in excuse, that you are
liable to be in error, and you do not wish
to entail your errors upon your children.
142 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

Do you think, then, that the opinions which
you have embraced are more likely to be
false than any other set of opinions in the
world? Why, then, hold to such opinions ?
Sentiments which you regard as unfit for
your children are unworthy of your own
belief. Why not seek until you find a
religion which 1s supported by evidence
satisfactory to yourselves, and whose prin-
ciples are the salvation of your own souls ?
“ found such areligion. The principles of
faith and practice which we hold we have
examined well, and our experience attests
to their goodness, and we sincerely believe
them to be true.”’

Then, because you may possibly be in
error in some unessential particulars, will
you prefer that your children should be
educated in any other set of religious opin-
jons than in your own? Will you choose
rather that the minds of your children
should be occupied by any wild seed that
may be thrown in by the busy partisans of
earth, or even by unprincipled latitudina-
rians, than sow and cultivate there what
you sincerely believe to be the good word
of truth? There is no justification for such
a procedure.
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 143

What though you are conscious you may
not, in all things, be free from error? You
are not required to teach your children to
regard you as infallible. When you pre-
sent them with what you regard as religious
truth, present them with the evidence on
which you rest its support, and thus incul-
cate and exemplify the principle of free
inquiry. Then, while you furnish them
with your well-proved principles of faith
and practice, you will also train them in
that principle and habit of investigation
by which they may correct even your mis-
takes, growing in grace and in the knowl-
edge of the truth.

But there is not only neglect, there is
cruelty, in the system of parental policy to
which we are objecting. While you would
have your children’s minds a waste, a void,
unoccupied by any sentiments of religious
faith, they seriously and painfully need the
principles of gospel truth. This we have
shown before, in exhibiting the constitu-
tional wants of the human mind. When
they witness the sickness and death of
friends, and know that they too must die,
they painfully need, and are capable of
receiving, too, the balmy comforts and con-
solations of the gospel,— of that gospel
de ’

144 MEMOIR OF JAMES ARTHUR.

which teaches them to trust in God as the
Father and Friend of all, and to hope in
Christ for the end of death and all unhappi-
ness, in the ultimate triumphant victory of
grace and truth.

The interesting case of our sainted
JAMES ARTHUR, which is exhibited in
the foregoing memoirs by his mother, illus-
trates the importance of the subject before
us. All the gold of California, heaped up
around him, and called his own, would have
been of no value to him, compared with
that of his religious education ; — I mean
the faith, and hope, and love, with which
an evangelical education had furnished his
inquiring mind. There is nothing which
all the kings of the earth could give me,
that I would have proposed to that loved
boy, for his life, and his dying hour, in
exchange for the riches of that education.
T need not enlarge upon this point, for the
reader of the memoirs has seen and felt it
all. O, then, parents and children, neglect
not the greater good,—

‘¢ But come, and with his people taste
The blessings of his love,
While hope attends the sweet repast
Of nobler joys above.’’











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