Citation
Fireside amusements

Material Information

Title:
Fireside amusements
Series Title:
Chambers's library for young people
Creator:
Millar, George ( Engraver )
William and Robert Chambers
Place of Publication:
Edinburgh
Publisher:
William and Robert Chambers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
188 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Word games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Magic tricks -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Riddles -- 1853 ( rbgenr )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre:
riddles (documents) ( aat )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Edinburgh
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece engraved by G. Millar, Edinburgh.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026769235 ( ALEPH )
22402575 ( OCLC )
ALH0059 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
‘The Baldwin Library

RMB rn







CHAMBERS’S

LIBRARY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM AND ROBERT CHAMBERS.
1853,





EDINBURGH >
PRINTED BY W. AND B. CHAMBERS.



CONTENTS.

First EvENING.—WINTER AND ITS FIRESIDE—TAE LITTLE OLD
MAID—OLD AND NEW AMUSEMENTS—THE PERSECUTED
FEATHER—HOW TO FORCE A LAUGH—JULLTEN’S CONCERT,

Seconp EVENING.—THE BALL OF WOOL—THE CANDLE RE-
LIGHTED——THE OLD SOLDIER—LIMPING TOM—THE SHEP-
HERD AND THE WOLF—HONEY-POTS—MILKING-PAILS,

‘Tainp EveNing.—puss IN THE CORNER—SMUGGLERS—CAT AND
THE MOUSE—MAGIC MUSIC—SUR LE PONT D’AVIGNON—
THE GARDEN-GATE—CUPID’S COMING—MY MASTER SENDS
‘ME TO YOU, SIR—THE GRAND MUFTI —MR RED-CAP,

Fount EvENING.—ORANGES AND LEMONS—BUFF SAYS BUTF
TO ALL HIS MEN—CHITTERBOB—PRUSSIAN EXERCISE—
THE TRAVELLER—THE COACH—MY LADY'S TOILET, &c. &c.

Firrn EvENING.—¥ARMERS AND MECHANICS—DUMB MOTIONS
—FLY AWAY, PIGEON — ELEMENTS — JACK STRAWS —
JERKING STRAWS—NEWSPAPER—DUMB ORATOR, - = -

SrxrH EvENING.—HOW DO YOU LIKE IT? WHEN DO YoU LIKE
IE? AND WHERE DO YOU LIKE IT?—PUZZLE WORD—
MANY WORDS IN ONE— WATCHWORD— WHAT 1S MY
‘THOUGHT LIKE?—1 LOVE MY LOVE—PROVERBS, ~~

SrventH EVENING. — CONSEQUENCES — CROSS QUESTIONS AND
(CROOKED ANSWERS—GENTEEL LADY—CHINESE SHADOWS,
—SHOPKEEPERS— APPRENTICES, ee ee

10

W7



60



i CONTENTS.

pace

rRN FINE BIRDS—PETER PIPER
PARAPLUIE—TON



Ercura Evextne.— poz !—
MR ROBERT ROWLEY —DIDON DINA-

THE —GROS, GRAS, GRAIN P'ORGE—SI J"ETAIS PETIT POT
DE BEURRE—SI JETAIS PETITE POMME—GAPING, WIDE
FROG—GRAND PANSANDRUM, = 71

SAPPING VERSES—CENTO VERSES—CRAMEO,
THE AMERICAN GAME, OTHERWISE THE







MOUTHED, WADDLIN



Niytu Evens’
OTHERWISE







GAME OF QUESTIONS AND NOUNS, =~ = =~ BL
Text EVENING. —rorrEtTs — SELLING PAWNS— TIE PRICES

PA =
Evevestn EVENING.—niDppLrs oR PMIGMAS, ~~ = == 100
Twrurrir EvesixG.—costineartos or tue RippLES, = 10



RIPHE—REBUSES—



cH ARADES— Lo



Turereenta Eyexr
ARITHMETICAL PUZZLES, Se. ee







Fourrrextic Evexiic.—coxuxprums,
cnRONOGRAMS— acrostics —
BOUTS RIMES, = - Ul
3 ace are



Firreestn Eyesine. —rv
FIGURE VERSES—ANAGRAMS.



Srxreesti EVENING.—TNE ACTED CHARADE,
Srvesteentu Evextnc.—'T'ue YouNe Macician.— acre
CIRCLE—IMPOSSIMILITY POSSIBLE—WONDERFUL HAT—
APPARENT IMPOSSIBILITY — DOUBLE MEANING—VISIBLE

INVISIDLE— MIRACULOUS COLTON—APPLE BEWITCHED —
MULTIPLYING COIN—LOCOMOTIVE SUILLING—PENETRAT-
PENCE, = =







ficureestu EVESING.—THE CHANGEABLE ROSE—CHAMELEON
FLOWERS—SAP GREEN —TEARS— BREATH — VISIBLE 1N=
VISIBLE —CURIOUS TRANSPOSITIONS—FLOATING STEEL—
COLOURED SHADOWS-—MAGIC PINHOLE— HANDWRITING

UPON THE WALL—CARD TEI - a7
- ». «180





Sonurioxs or THE Extemas, te



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



Tux spring, the summer, and the autumn have
passed away; and now we are in the night of
the year, the interval between the evening and
morning twilight—between the first faint peep
of spring, and the last fading smile of autumn.
The flowers are withered; the corn reaped;
the fruit gathered; the bare branches of the
trees shiver, as if from cold, in the blast ; and
the birds, that used to hop so merrily among
the twigs, not liking the change, have hopped
away—all but poor Robin. With them has de-
parted the melody of the woods; and so dear



2 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

old Winter has not even a song to enliven her
dark and solitary reign.

What shall we do to amuse ourselves, and
keep our fingers warm? Oh we know that very
well! There are walks and runs on the hard
ground; there are snow-sports in the fields ;
there is the hoar-frost to admire, that hangs
like silver filigree-work upon the trees; and
there are the ice-coverings of foot-prints to
wonder at, which, crunching beneath our feet,
show that there is not a drop of water beneath !
There are all sorts of out-door games for the
day; and at night the stars are much more
splendid than in summer, and we can learn the
names of many of them from a book, and know
them, like acquaintances, when we see them





again.

But the evening, the cold, dark, gusty even-
ing, when the daylight is past, and the stars
have not yet come fully out, do we not then
regret the bright balmy days that are gone?
No; for the winter evening, instead of the long
twilight of the earlier year, has its own F
side. Is there anything so beautiful, anything
so joyous, anything so loving and kindly, as our
dear fireside? It flings a ruddy glow upon the







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 3

faces around it, which scems to penetrate to the
heart. Tell me, girls and boys, tell me honestly,
if you were ever happier than on a cold, dreary
winter evening, surrounded by a company of
your young companions? For my part, al-
though I have been a little old maid for many
a day, I not only look back with pleasure upon
such enjoyments, but I could still join in them
as zealously as any of you. I begin to think,
however, that I am more competent to teach
than to play—to hold the candle, as the pro-
verb says, than to dance and sing; and there-
fore it is that I have determined, instead of
the floor with suppler limbs and
s, to retire into a corner of the
room, and direct the amusements I formerly
shared.

T have seen many more winter evenings than
you, and therefore I ought to be better ac-
quainted with Fireside Amusements; but at any-
rate it will be convenient to have the best of
them set down in a little book, so that, without
rauch waste of time, that important question can
always be settled, “What shall we play at?”

The advantage of most fireside games is, that
there is no preparation, no machinery wanted :

























4 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

we have everything within ourselves. The
older sort require a good deal of cleverness to
be done well; but many others nothing more
than a glib tongue or a good memory—and,
above all things, a merry, natural heart. This
is the difference between them and the amuse-
ments of our forefathers some generations ago.
At that time the company met, not to amuse
each other, but to be amused at the expense of
the entertainer. What would you think now-a-
days of seeing a great ship at one end of the
table, and a great castle at the other, with a
deer in the middle, having an arrow sticking in
his side—all made of pastry? The ladies pre-
tend to compassionate the wounded deer, and
perhaps a little girl is prevailed upon to pull
out the arrow—whereupon a stream of claret
spouts all over the table. hen the ship, which
is provided with little cannon, loaded with real
powder, begins suddenly to bombard the castle ;
the castle returns the cannonade as bravely ;
and so, in the midst of smoke, and screams, and
laughter, the fun is at an end. This is some-
what nonsensical for the few minutes it lasts:
the way to get an evening’s true and harmless
amusement is to depend upon ourselves.

















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 5

You must have observed that when the party
meet there is always a good deal of reserve at
first. The boys and girls sit eyeing one another
gravely: the older among them stand upon
their dignity, and wonder how it will be possible
to play with such children. After tea, the table
is wheeled away into a corner (where the little
old maid is sitting), and the circle draws round
the fireside. Mamma, or the eldest daughter,
or the governess, asks them what they will play
at? and they look at one another in silence,
as if afraid of compromising themselves. Some
whispers are exchanged here and there; but
the tallest make themselves as stiff in their
chair so many Maypoles, and cast their
eyes upon some books of prints on a side-table,
as if thinking they would furnish more suit-
able amusement for them.

This awkward pause is broken by a “ trifle
light as air ;” for the youngest child, picking up
a feather from the carpet, gives it a puff, which
sends it towards the circle of Mandarins. A
little girl cannot refrain from a modest puff
as it passes, and up it mounts into the air,
where it attracts the attention of all. As it
descends, several pairs of demure lips prepare















6 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



themselves by instinct, and another puff—an-

other—and another—passes it rapidly on. ‘The
tallest at length thinks no more of his height
than as an advantage which will bring him
nearer the object. ‘The governess puffs as zeal-
ously as any of them; mamma. herself cannot
refrain; and the little old maid, although she
is at the other side of the room, bends uncon-
sciously over the table with her lips pursed.
The zeal grows warmer and warmer; and at
length, one by one, all start upon their fect, big
and little, old and young, and with their heads
almost meeting, keep puff, pufling till the feather
“Ye smile,” says an author, treat-









disappe:

ing of this subject
‘Ye sinile,

I see ye, ye profane ones, all the while ;?
but yet that feather, that enticing spirit of
tation, that puff, puffing, and that competi-
tion, might be the subject of a homily too grave
for Christmas-time !”

Sometimes this accidental amusement is
tematised into a regular game. The feather,
or tuft of fl Ns
enough to float in the air, is puffed from one of
the cirele to the next ; and the unfortunate per-















or anything else light





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, a

son who suffers it to drop is condemned in a for-
feit. The most amusing, however, is what I have
described above; and it would be difficult for
one who has never witnessed the sport to fancy
the eager looks and determined lips that follow
the flying feather. When people, however, have
light hearts and good heads (for it requires
sound sense to enjoy innocent fan !), it is sur-
prising how mere a. trifle causes merriment.
Do you know what we who are learned in fire-
side amusements call “Forcing a Laugh?” It
is nothing more than this :—‘“Ha !” eries one,
looking into his neighbour’s face; “Ha!”
answers she instantancously ; “Ha!” says the
next as quickly; “Ha !—ha!—ha!”—round
it goes like lightning, till the gravity of the
proceeding—for everybody is anxious to be in
time with his “Ha!”—exeites such a feeling
of the ridiculous, that the forecd laugh changes
into a natural one, and ends in a general roar.
A laugh is a capital thing in its own time,
although very silly and impertinent when out
of season; but a laugh that is occasioned by
mere noise, forms, it must be confessed, a some-
what alarming accompaniment. Since we are
beginning at anyrate, however, with a crash



















8 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

(like the overture of most operas), we may as
well have out our instruments at once, and
indulge in a “Concert.”

The performers are ranged in a circle, in the
midst of which stands the leader of the or-
chestra, whose business it is to beat time, and
to see that each of the rest does his duty, and
n stop the performance instantaneously
dt is now settled





who ¢
by 2 movement of his hand.
what instrument each one is to play. Violin
holds out his left hand, and places the right
across it to serve for a bow; Horn doubl.
both hands, and puts them to his mouth; P:
spreads out her fingers upon a table; Harp
takes ac with her left hand, and prepares
to touch the imaginary strings with the other ;
and so on with Drum, Fife, Base-Drum, Kettle-
Drum, Cymbals, Clarionct, Hand- Organ, Hurdy-
gurdy—in short, as many instruments as there
are performers. All this being arranged, the
leader claps his hands, and off they go.
« Tweedle-dee —tweedle-dee !” squeaks Violin ;
« Twang-twang—twang-twang !” sings Han

«Too-hoo—too-hoo!” roars ‘Trumpet ; “ Rub-a-
dub—rub-a-dub !” thunders Drum ; and so on,
every performer making a sound with his lips




















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 9

to imitate his instrument, till the whole room
trembles to the noise of the concert, and the
little old maid stops her ears

Suddenly the leader claps his hands again,
and an instantaneous silence takes place. He
fixes his eyes sternly upon Drum,

“Why don’t you rub-a-dub better?” de-
mands he.

“Because one of my drum-sticks is broken,”
replies Drum. Thus satisfied, the leader gives
the signal anew, and the concert is’ resumed.
By and by another clap of the hands causes
another instantaneous silence, and he looks this
time at Miss Piano; but she, confused with the
suddenness of the address, and minding more
what her neighbours are doing than her own
business, answers to the question, “Why don’t
you play better?” by saying, “Because one of
my harp-strings is loose!” Miss Piano is of
course fined in a forfeit for her inadvertence ;
for in this world we must always mind what we
are about if we would get quietly along.
















Srconp Evenrna.

THE BALL OF WOOL—THE CANDLE RELIGUTED—THE OLD SOLDIER—
LIMPING TOM—THE SHEPHERD AND THE WOLF —HONEY-PoTS—
MILKING-PATLS.

The German game of the “ Ball of Wool” is
some little advance beyond “Blowing the Fea-
ther.” The wool is rolled lightly up into a ball,
and placed upon the table, when the company
set themselves earnestly to puff it off, the one
at whose right hand it falls being finéd in a
forfeit. A hunticane i is soon blowing from every
point of the compass on the unlucky ball,
which staggers from side to side, like a ship
blown by contrary winds. After a while, how-
ever, the winds abate—for people can’t blow
and laugh at the same time, you know—and
forfeits flow in thick and fast, till at last there
are only two combatants left. And now the
struggle begins in right earnest, and the
longest-winded rises as proud and triumphant
as any victorious gencral after a hard-fought
battle.







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. uw

When candles are first brought into the room,
the boys are usually eager to blow one of them
out—supposing that there is only one pair—in
order to give their companions the satisfaction
of relighting the other. The operator sits on
one foot, with the other crossed over the knee ;
but as he cannot retain so constrained a posi-
tion for more than a few moments, as soon as
the candles can be brought to bear upon each
other, he falls back sprawling upon the carpet,
amidst the laughter of the others.

But mamma thinks this rather dangerous
sport, and taking away the candles, proposes a
quiet game at “Old Soldier” instead. So they
all sit round in a corner; and trying to remem-
ber that they must not say “yes,” “no,”
“black,” “white,” or “scarlet,” in their answers
to the expected questions, wait the coming of
the Old Soldier with demure faces.

“What will you give an Old Soldier?” says
he to the first: “he is very much in want of
@ coat.”





“Well, I'll give him a green one.”
“A green one! A soldier would look ridicu-

lous in a green coat: wont you give him any
other ?”



12 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“No I wont.”

“Ah, give me a forfeit for that ‘no. ”

“Wont you, miss, give some of your pretty
black hair to make the Old Soldier a wig ?”

“No,” says miss, laughing: “I think white
hair more becoming an old man.”

“Oh, dreadful! two mistakes already. Two
forfeits, please.”

The next game I shall mention will be, for
the sake of varicty, “Limping Tom.” ‘The hen
sits in the middle, while her chickens form a
circle round her; and the fox limps on the
outside, coming nearer and nearer by degrees.
At last the hen says—

“Who goes round my house this night!”

“ None but Limping ‘Tom.”

“Do you want any of my chickens this night?”

“ None but this poor one!*~
And with that he seizes the smallest child, and
carries it away to his lair—which is the sofa,
or some other convenient corner. Thus he goes
round until he has got all the “poor ones ;”
and then the hen runs about erying, “Where
are my chickens ?—where are my chickens?”
And some of the chickens, on hearing her voice,
try to run away to her, and the fox has sharp







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 13

work to prevent them. He puts them all be-
hind him, however, in Indian file—that is, one
after the other—holding on by each other’s
clothes, and goes out to meet the bereaved
mother, who tries to run behind him, and get
back her children. If she takes hold of any
one, she can carry it away, and put it be-
hind her. The fox keeps his booty as well as
he can, although the hen generally contrives
to get back her chickens; and then she be-
comes the fox herself, and goes “round the
house” as Limping Tom.

“The Shepherd and the Wolf” is a similar
game to this; the lambs taking the place of
the chickens, and the wolf that of the fox.

Another game something like this is “ Honey-
Pots.” Here all but two sit in a row, with
their pinafores or handkerchiefs over their heads
—these are the honey-pots—and one stands up
to sell them. Presently the purchaser comes
and says, “Have you any nice honey this
morning ?”

“Oh yes,” says the merchant: “here are a
number of nic 8

“Well, Iwill buy them all. Will you help
me to carry them home ?”

c







14 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

This is done by the honey-pot clasping his or
her hands beneath the knees, and the merchant
and purchaser each taking an arm, or “ handle,”
as it is called, carrying her away, and setting
her down in a corner. When all have been
thus removed, the merchant comes and says,
“I think you have taken away my daughter,
and I suspect she is among those honey-pots.”

“No, indeed; they are all good honey, and
you can taste them.”

So the merchant opens a small space in the
pinafore, and pretends to taste the honey.
“Ah,” says he, “that tastes very like my little
girl.”

“Yes!” cries the little girl, and springs up,
and runs away, with the purchaser after her,
who tries to catch her; but while she is doing
so, all the others run away too, and the game is
ended.

In Germany they have a kind of dramatic
game somewhat akin to this, which I shall de-
scribe to you on account of its oddity, for I have
not seen it played in this country. It is called
the “ Milking-Pails,” and is always played by
girls. Two of the girls are mother and daughter:
half the others join hands, and form a line, with



Â¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 15

the mother in the middle; and the other half
do the same by the daughter. The daughter
then walks slowly forwards and backwards,
with her companions, before her mother, and
chants—

“ Mary’s gone a-milking, mother, mother ;
Mary’s gone a-milking, mother, dear mother mine ”

Then the mother answers in the same way—

“Take your pails, and go after her, daughter, daughter;
Take your pails, and go after her, daughter, dear daughter
mine.”

“Then buy me a pair of new milking-pails, mother,
mother ;

Then buy me a pair of new milking-pails, mother, dear
mother mine.”

«But where’s the money tocome from, daughter, daughter?
But where,” &e.

“Sell my father’s feather-bed, mother, mother;
Sell my father’s,” &c.

“But where will your father sleep then, daughter,
daughter?

But where,” &c.

“Oh he can have the servant’s bed, mother, mother ;
‘Oh he can have,” &c.



16 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

« But what will the servant sleep on, daughter, daughter?
But what,” &e.

“ Put him in the pigsty, mother, mother ;
Put him,” &e.

«Then where shall we put our pig, daughter, daughter?
Then where shall we,” &c.

“ Put it in the washing-tub, mother, mother ;
Put it,” &e.



“And where shall we wash our clothes, daughter,
daughter?
And where shall,” &c.

« Wash by the sea-side, mother, mother ;





“But suppose the clothes should blow away, daughter,
daughter?

But suppose,” &e.

“Then take a boat and go after them, mother, mother;

‘Then take,” &e.

hter?



“ And if the boat were upset, daughter, dau
And if the boat,” &e.



“Then there would be an end of you, mother, mother;
‘Then there,” &e.

's the mother



“Oh you cruel daughter!” ©



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 17

in a rage, and chases her unnatural child round.
the room.



Tuirp Evening.



PUSS IN THE CORNER—SMUGGLERS—CAT AND THE MOUSE—3MAGIC
MUSIC—SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON—CHE GARDEN-GATE—CUPID'S
COMING—MY MASTER SENDS MG TO YOU, SIR—THE GRAND MUFTT
AR RED-CAP.





I suppose “ Puss in the Corner” is too old a
game for any of you to be unacquainted with it;
but at anyrate you play at it thus:—Four of
you take the four corners of the room, and one
stands in the middle. One Puss cries to the
other, “Puss, puss, give me a drop of water ;”
and then both make a rush to exchange places.
But if the Puss in the middle can dart into one
of the corners before the other gets there, she
may keep it, and the other must watch in her
place to cheat some one else out of a corner.

“Smugglers” is a newer game of the same
kind. The “smugglers” stand at “harbour” in
a corner of the room, and one entitled the
Officer stands on the look-out. At the cry of
“Look-out!” the smugglers rush out for the
other side of the room. ‘The officer gives chase ;





13 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

and if he eaptures one of them, makes him offi-
cer, and becomes himself a smuggler.

Another more complicated game of this kind is
the “Cat and the Mouse.” ‘The company stand
hand in hand in a circle, the mouse being in-
side, and the cat outside. ‘hey dance round,
raising their arms and lowering them alter-
nately, which gives the cat an opportunity to
jump in at one side, while the mouse jumps out
‘at the other. Puss is now a prisoner, and goes
round mé-au-ing; but as the dance continues,
she soon gets out, and chases the mouse, who
darts in to save herself. To admit of this, the
dancers raise their arms; and if she enters
alone, the cat pays a forfeit ; but if her enemy
gets in with her, it is she who loses.

In “Magic Music” you must get somebody
who ean play the piano pretty well, but you ean
generally gct mamma or the governess to offi-
ciate; and if not, the little old maid, you know,
is always at your service. Well, when you have
chosen some one for that duty, some one else
must leave the room; and while he is gone, you
all agree on what he shall do when he comes in.
For instance, he shall take a flower out of the
vase on the table, and give it to one of the young













FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 19

ladies. Now, “Come in!” and some simple air
is struck up. He approaches the table, and the
music increases in animation: he lays his hand
on the vase, he takes it up—merrily goes the
music: he carries it away—ah, the music dies
away: he puts it down, and takes out a flower
—bravo ! says Piano: he takes the flower, and
presents it to a young lady—tush! ’tis not the
right one; you can hardly hear what tune is
playing: he gives it to another; she takes it
with a smile, and the piano drowns every voice
with its own. This game is played in the same
y by hiding a thing which is to be found,
instead of fixing on something to be done.

And now, while I am at the piano, T will
show you another game in which it is employed.
I never heard the name of it, so you must make
one for yourselves. You all join hands in a
ring, previously placing a number of chairs
round you, with one less than your own number.
While I play, you all dance round in time to
the music; but when I stop, which I will do
suddenly, and when you least expect it, you
must all make a rush for chairs. Of course one
is left without, who pays a forfeit ; and whoever
has paid three forfeits, is out of the game. An-





















20 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS

other chair is taken away, and the game goes
on as before.

I think singing and dancing together have
also a good effect. These are both introduced
in the pretty French game, “Sur le Pont
Avignon.” You all join hands in a ring ; and
dancing round in time, you sing—











“Sur le Pont d’Avignon,
On y danse tout en rond.”



Then standing still, you turn to the girls on
cach side of you, and rubbing your closed
hands together, chant, “Les blanchisscuses
Qvasherwomen) faitent comme ga: et comme
¢a.” Then all dance round as before. ‘The
second time you sit down on the ground; and
putting one foot on your lap, make as though
you were sewing your shoe with both hands;
and looking first at one of your companions,
sing, “Les cordonniers (shocmakers) faitent
comme ga;” and then at the other, “ Et comme
ga.” The next time you imitate a eross-leaged
inilor, singing, “Les tailleurs faitent comme
ga.” ‘Then, “Les charpentiers (carpenters)
faitent comme ga”—pretending to saw: and
“Les forgerons (blacksmiths) faitent comme ga”







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 21

—pretending to hammer on an anvil: and “Les
marchandes de modes (milliners) faitent comme
¢a”—taking up your dress, and hemming it: or,
“Tes danseuses (dancers) faitent comme ga’”—
dancing in an affected style; and so on with as
many different “comme ¢as ” as you choose.

The “Garden-Gate” is another musical game
in English, and sounds very pretty when all the
players sing in time. A ring is formed round
one in the centre, who stands still till it has
danced three times round her, when a pause
occurs, and she sings—



“Open wide the garden-gate, the
garden-zate 5

Open wide the garden-gate, open, and let me through !”





The circle then wheels round, singing —

“Get the key of the garden-gate, the gurden-gate, the
garden-zate ;

Get the key of the g
self through.”

@en-gate, and open, and let your-



Then they stop to listen to the little one within,

who, weeping, sobs—

“Pve lost the key of the garden-gate, the garden-gate,
the garden-gate ;

I've lost the key of the garden-gate, and cannot let my-
self through.”



22 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

But the circle revolves with the same velocity,

crying derisively—

“Then you may stop all night within the gate, withm
the gate, within the gate ;

hen you may stop all night within the gate, unless you
have strength to break through.”



The captive then rushes to the weakest part of
the walls, and tries to break them down—that
is, by throwing her whole weight upon the
clasped hands of her adversaries ; and generally,
after two or three trials, contrives to “break
through,” when the one whose hand first gives
way is made captive in her stead.

In “ Cupid’s Coming” you choose a letter—
D, or any other—and take care that your words
all end in “ings” then sitting in a circle, the
first says to his neighbour, “ Cupid’s coming !”

“ How does he come ?” says the other.

“Dreaming,” returns he.

“Cupid’s coming !”

“Tow docs he come?” says the third.

“Disenchanting ;” and so round and round,
until there are no more words of the kind. If
one stops, unable to remember another word
descriptive of Cupid’s course, he must leave the
















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 23

game. This is capital exercise; but you must
not forget that whatever énitial letter you
choose, it must always end in ing.

“My Master Sends me to you, Sir,” takes that
name from the announcement made by a mes-
senger who comes into the circle.

“My master sends me to you, sir,” says he.

“What to do, sir,” asks the person he
addresses.

«Po do as I do;” and he thumps his knee
gently with his closed hand. The other imi-
tates him closely ; and turning to Ais neighbour
with the like injunction, the command is soon
flying round the whole circle, and they are all
industriously thumping at their knees like so
many blacksmiths.

“My master sends me to you, sir,” says the
messenger again.

What to do, sir?”

“To do as I do ;” and he taps the floor with
his foot, still keeping his hand employed as
before. The next two commands are the same,
only applying to the other leg. Then the
master’s message is, that they shall sway their
bodies to and fro, and then shake their heads.
After this, the motions are at the diseretion









24 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

of the leader; but I always found the foregoing
quite enough for me, and indeed the game was
usually given up long before it came so far, I
never knew any game produce so much laughter
as this. No one, but on penalty of a forfeit,
must stop any of his diferent movements for
an instant; and the absurd appearance there-
fore presented on every side—each beating the
ground with his feet, thumping his knees with
his fists, swaying his body to and fro, and wag-
ging his head—would be too much for the
gravity of an anchorite, and make “Bedlam
broke Loose” a more appropriate name for the
game than any other. It is the leader’s duty
to inflict the usual fine of forfeits on whomever
fails an instant in his part; but as the delay
necessary to receive them would make himself
open to a fine likewise, it is rarely demanded ;
but amidst the laughter may every now and
then be heard aceusations and defences : “ You're
stopping!” “You stopped!” “I’m not!” “I
didn’t !”

The “Grand Mufti” is another game some-
thing like this, and is a great favourite among
the younger players. The Grand Mufti stands
up in a chair, and makes some gesture or











FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 25

grimace, saying each time, “So says the Grand
Mufti,” or “'Thus says the Grand Mufti.” When
he says “so,” the company remain still; but
when the word is “thus,” every one must imi-
tate him; and a mistake involves-a forfeit.

“Mr Red-cap” is another amusing game, but
its effect depends entirely upon the animation
with which it is played. “Each having assumed
a name, a handkerchief is suddenly thrown to
one, the thrower calling out his name—for in-
stance, “ Mr Red-cap !”

“What! I, sir?” says Redeap instantly.

“Yes, you, sir!”

“Not J, sir!”

“Who, then, sir?”

“Mr Bluceap!” and the handkerchief is
thrown to that gentleman, ‘The same dialogue
is repeated without a moment's interval be-
tween the sentences; and an incessant clatter
is kept up of “Red-cap! Blue-cap! Yellow-
cap! Green-cap! What! I, sir? Yes, you, sir!
Not I, sir! Who then, sir?”








Fourrn Evenina.

ORANGES AND LEMONS—DUPE SAYS BUFF TO ALT 1S teN—currrer-
LOR—PRUSSIAN EXERCISE—THE TRAVELLER—THE COACH—MY
Lapy’s Tore, &e. &e.







“Oranges and Lemons” is a truly London
game, and, I should think, a very old one. The
two tallest of the company take cach other’s
hands, and raise their arms high in the form of
an arch, while the rest have hold of each other's
petticoats or jackets, and pass through,
after another, like a string of cabs at Temple-
Bar, the arch singing in a tone as much like a
church-chime,as possible—



one



“ Oranges and lemons, says the bell of St Clement's;
You owe me five farthings, says the bell of St Martin’s;
When will you pay me? says the bell of Old Bailey;
When I grow rich, says the bell of Shoredite
When will that be? says the bell of Stepney;
Ym sure I don’t know, says the great bell of Bow.”







Then changing the chimes into a funereal
knell, the bells ring solemnly—



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 27

“ Here comes a light to light you to bed;

Here comes a chopper to chop—off—the—last—man’s

—head”

At these ominous words the arch suddenly
lowers, and encloses, unless he be too quick for
the chopper, the “last man” of the linc. He is
then asked, in a whisper, which he prefers —
oranges or lemons? and, according to his choice,
is put to one side or other. The same proceed-
ing goes on till every one has become a “ last
man,” and all are ranged in opposite factions.
The two leaders then try to ize upon the fol-
lowers of the other; and after a long struggle,
the one who obtains all the captives of the
other wins the game. This is pretty nearly the
same, with the exception of the rhyme, as the
modern game of “ Queen Victoria’s Troops,” and
the old Scottish one of “ Through the Needle-e’e,
Boys.”

There are several games in which the only
art consists in keeping one’s gravity while say-
ing absurd things. The company, for instance,
are seated in a circle, one with a stick in his
hand, who speaks thus :—












“ Bui says buff to all his men,
And I say buff to you again;



28 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Buff neither laughs nor smiles,
But carries his face with a very good grace,
‘And passes his stick to the very next place.”

The speaker now hands his stick to his neigh-
pour with as comical a gravity as possible, and
the same thing is repeated till the whole circle
has been gone through. Those who suffer them-
selves to be betrayed into a smile while speak-
ing must pay a forfeit. Another game of the
same kind bears the respectable name of “ Chit-
terbob,” and the rhyme is thus :—



“There was a man, and his name was Cob;
Tle had a wife, and her name was Mob;
He had a dog, and his name was Bob;
She had a cat, and her name was Chitterbob,
* Bob,’ says Cob;
«Chitterbob,’ says Mob.
Bob was Cob’s d
Mob’s cat was Chitterbob :
Cob, Mob, Bob, and Chitterbob.”







Of a totally different kind is the “ Prussian
Exercise.” The party form the regiment, with
a corporal at their head, and the eaptain stand-
ing before them, who puts them through their
‘ise.
ght-about face!” growls he. “ Pull







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 29

noses!” “Slap checks!” “Pinch chins!”
“Ground knees!” “Advance two steps, and
cough!” “Corporal, slap that fellow’s toes
with his feet turned out like a dancing-
master: doesn’t he know that the feet are
always worn inwards in this regiment?” “Eyes
right !” “Noses left !” The captain then walks
up and down for a few minutes, and stopping,
cries suddenly, “Present arms !”

This they do by thrusting their arms straight
out,

“ Fire!”

The corporal immediately obeys by giving
the soldier next him a smart nudge; and he,
falling upon his neighbour, and his neighbour
upon his, the whole line is down like a row of
cards. It is best to give the command, “ Ground
knees,” just before “ Present arms ;” because, as
they will then be kneeling, the fall will not be
so ‘severe, especially if a cushion or two are
placed beside the last victim of war. The
oddity of this game, as well as that of the
military exercise it represents and ridicules,
consists in the precision with which the orders
are obeyed at the same instant by the whole

company. The more absurd these orders are,
D



30 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

the more laughing there will be; but it must
always be contrived that the captain is the
smartest boy or girl in the room.

“The Traveller” is another amusing game,
depending likewise upon promptitude. The
party represent the officials of an inn, some
taking the name of different things or persons
whose services a traveller may be supposed to
require on arriving from a journey. When all
are ready, the traveller comes to the inn ery-
ing, “Ostler, here take my horse, and see him
well rubbed down, put into a comfortable stall,
and given a good feed of oats!” Those per-
sonating the ostler, horse, stall, and oats, imme-
diately jump up; for all must be sitting. “Land-
lady,” continues the traveller, “can I have a
good supper in no time?” (landlady and supper
both get up); “and pray send the chamber-maid
to look after a room for me. Meanwhile you ean
tell the landlord to give me a bottle of his best
port.” Chamber-maid, room, landlord, and port,
all start up like the others; or in ease of for-
getfulness, or slowness, they pay a forfeit. The
traveller may mention their names as often as
he chooses; but of course he must not ask for
anything which is not in the inn.



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 31

There are a good many ways of playing this
game ; that called the “Coach ” being, I think,
even better than this. The company take the
names of different things or persons belonging
to the coach—coachman, guard, passengers,
horses, wheels, doors, windows, &c.; and one
standing up while the rest sit, relates some little
anecdote of an accident on a journey, and at
every mention of any part or person belonging
to the coach, each jumps up as before.

“My Lady’s Toilet” is almost the same,
except in name. All personate different articles
of the toilet—such as Macassar-oil, hair-brush,
bracelets, cap, &c. with the exception of one,
who is the lady’s-maid, standing in the midst.

“My lady wants some Macassar-oil,” cries she:
“she wants her hair-brush, her cap, or her
bracelets,” and up jumps what is wanted the
moment its name is pronounced. Sometimes
the cry is, “ My lady wants her whole toilet!”
and at these words the toilet all jump up, and,
with the lady’s-maid herself, make a rush for
chairs, of which there is one less than the per-
sons present, The unlucky individual who is
left without a seat becomes lady’s-maid in turn.

We may now take a single glance at those



32 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

active games which are as household words
among us, and which are too well known to
require much description.

“unt the Slipper” is, I daresay, the oldest
of these. The company sit on the floor in a
circle, one personating the cobbler, and another
the hunter. The hunter brings a slipper to the
cobbler, saying, “I want this shoe mended;
when will it be ready?”

“To-morrow morning,” replies the cobbler. So
the hunter goes away for a few moments, and
then returns for his slipper ; but he is put off to
another day, and another, and another, until,
losing patience, he declares he will find it him-
self; and then commences a hunt after it, each
one passing it rapidly round to his neighbour.
He with whom it is caught becomes hunter.

A newer and prettier game than this—* Hunt
the Ring ”—is played with a ring strung upon
a ribbon, which passes round the whole circle
instead of a slipper.

In “ Hunt the Squirrel” all stand in a circle,
holding hands, excepting the squirrel, who
walks round and round behind backs with a
handkerchief in his hand, which he drops next
the individual he thinks most off his guard.





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 33

This one immediately darts after the squirrel,
singing—
« Hunt the squirrel through the wood !
Now I've lost him—now I’ve found him;
Hunt the squirrel through the wood! 2
When caught, the pursuer becomes squirrel him-
self.

“I Wrote a Letter to my Love” is very
similar to this, the words only being different.
The one who goes round with the handkerchief
says—

«I wrote a letter to my love,

And on my way I dropt it,
I dropt it, I dropt it ;”
dropping the handkerchief at the last word.
The pursuer must take particular eare to go in
and out at the same places as the other, or he
is liable to a forfeit.

“ Hide-and-Seek” takes its name from some
small object, such as a thimble, a ball of worsted,
&e. being hidden in the absence of one of the
party. He is then recalled, and told to “go
seck it.” When he approaches nearer and
nearer the hiding-place, it is the duty of the
others to ery, “ You are getting warm!” “You
are hot!” “Oh dear! you are quite in a



34 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

blaze!” But when he is not in the right scent,
and goes to some other part of the room, he is
said to be “cold,” “freezing,” &¢. When the
article is found, the person who hid it leaves
the room, that he may take his turn in seeking.

I suppose it is scarcely necessary to say much
about “Blind-Man’s-Buft” The eyes ‘of the
blind man are well bandaged with a handker-
chief, and he is then made to turn round three
times, in order that he may get confused as to
the geography of the room. The others then
run about him, touching his arms, sometimes
even pinching his fingers, but taking pretty
good care not to be caught. If one, however,
is seized, he may get off by the blind man being
unable to tell his name; but if once fairly
caught and identified, he becomes, as a matter
of course, the blind man.

The “French Blind Man,” instead of having
his eyes blindfolded, has his hands tied behind
his back; and thus disabled, he endeavours to
catch his companions.

“ Shadow-Buff ” is an exceedingly quiet game,
though well suited for a winter’s evening. A
Jarge white cloth is put up against the wall, so
as to make a smooth surface, and allow the





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 35

light to fall well upon it. Buff then sits before
it, so that he cannot see his companions, who,
dressing themselyes up as grotesquely as pos-
sible, throw their shadows upon the white sur-
face; and he has to guess the name of each as
he appears.

“ Blind-Man’s-Wand” is much like “ Blind-
Man’s-Buff,” but here the blind man is aceom-
modated with a small stick or wand. The others
dance round him, joining hands; and he then
stretches out the stick ; the one who is touched
takes hold of it by the point, and replies.in a
feigned voiee to three questions of the blind
man. If the latter recognises him, they change
places; but if not, Buffy has to make another
venture.

All the games of these four evenings are little
more than mechanical—that is to say, they
might be played as well by machines, if ma-
chines could speak. Of course some are better
than others, and some may be made more amus-
ing by the intelligence of the boys and girls
employed in them; but I mean that they do
not require any knowledge, or exercise any
faculty but the memory, and that only in a
trifling degree. We shall now get on, however,



36 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

to games not less amusing, but demanding a
little more thought and information, or where
they depend upon the memory, keeping that
faculty upon a greater stretch.

Firrn Evening:

FARMERS AND MECHANICS — DUMB MOTIONS — FLY AWAY, PIGEON —
ELEMENTS — JACK STRAWS — JERKING STRAWS — NEWSPAPER —
DUMB ORATOR.

On arriving at the amusements which require
somewhat more intelligence in the players than
the preceding ones, I might begin no doubt
in a lecturing key if I was in the mood; but
I always think that play is best considered
as play, and study as study; and at anyrate
you must know I am but very ditéle of an old
maid. I shall not even affect a much clearer
arrangement than on the former evenings ; for
the truth is, there is a certain confusion and
uproariousness, as it were, running throughout
the whole of these juvenile games which make
my little head turn round.

«Farmers and Mechanics” is another of this



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 37

kind of game; but instead of a word, it is a
trade which has to be discovered, and everything
is indicated by signs. Thus when the one who
left the room re-enters, if the trade chosen is
that of a farmer, the others will all be employed
in the different occupations of a farmer: one will
be reaping in a fine crop of nothing with papa’s
stick, with another perhaps gleaning after him ;
one, taking hold of the legs of a dining-room
chair, will form it into a serviceable plough; in
one corner a boy will be engaged in thrashing
with his sister’s parasol; and in another the
sister will be busily engaged in making butter
in an invisible churn. If they are mechanics,
they may mend their shoes in concert, or saw at
the chairs with a stick, hammer nails into the
pianoforte, plane the rosewood-table, or do any-
thing else, so that they all agree in acting one
employment, which may form a good indication
of their trade. When he who was out guesses
it, another takes his place, and another trade is
of course chosen.

“Dumb Motions” is just the same as this,
but the players are not obliged to be either
farmers or mechanics, but may choose a shop in
which to exercise their ingenuity.



38 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Here is a quick, lively, little game, very dif-
ferent from the last— “Fly away, Pigeon!”
‘The leader sits with his feet on a stool, so as to
make a large lap; or, which is better, all sit
round a little table. The leader then puts his
finger down upon it, and the others place all
their fingers round his. “Fly away, pigeon !”
cries he suddenly, and up all the fingers start.
Then they all settle down again. “Fly away,
eagle!” cries he again, and off they all go once
more. “Fly away, bull!” is now the cry, and
away most of the fingers fly as before, not re-
membering that bulls have no wings. Those
who make this mistake pay a forfeit amidst the
laughter of the others. “Fly away, feather!”
cries the leader again; but the others, taught
by the last experience, keep all their fingers
fixed to the table, and the leader’s flies up alone.

“Why don’t you fly?” says he.

“Why, feathers don’t fly, do they? They
have no wings !”

“No, but they fly for all that. Don’t you
remember the ‘Persecuted Feather’ we played
at some evenings ago, when the feather flew
all round the room, and afterwards went
up the chimney?” So the leader, like an



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 39

Eastern king, settles all disputes by his own
decision,

In the “ Elements” you require to have your
wits as much about you as in the “ Pigeon.”
This game creates much laughter—not from its
comicality, but because of the frequent and ridi-
culous mistakes committed by those who are
engaged in it. Before describing the game, I
must premise that the only “elements” acknow-
ledged in this game are earth, water, and air—
fire being omitted, because there are no crea-
tures known to exist in it, the salamanders we
sometimes read of in old books being fabulous
creatures. When all are prepared, the beginner
of the proceedings takes a handkerchief, and
looking at some one, as if he were about to
throw it at him, suddenly darts it at another
person, crying, “ Air” (or whatever element he
chooses) ; “one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
eight, nine, ten/” The other, if he be ready-
witted, will answer, before the numbers are over,
“Sparrow,” or the name of some other bird;
but frequently, when thus taken by surprise,
he will either remain in a state of stupid per-
plexity, or give the name of a four-footed beast
as an inhabitant of the air! If he make a



40 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

mistake, he pays a forfeit; but at anyrate
throws the handkerchief in his turn, and soon
meets with plenty of companions in misfortune,
whose forfeits are forming into a pile on the
table.

There is a newer game under the same name,
but I do not think it an improvement on the
old one. Here the players sit in a circle, and
the handkerchief being pinned into a. ball, is
thrown in the same manner, but without any
given time being fixed for the answer. Of
course, therefore, this game is not so lively as
the other.

A good deal of care and delicacy of touch is
required for “ Jack Straws.” A number of little
straws, or fine splinters of wood bearing this
name, are procured, and placed on end on the
table, meeting at the top, something in the
same way as we see the new-mown corn in the
fields. Three of these little straws are marked
in a peculiar manner—each one different—and
called King, Queen, and Bishop. The difficulty
of the game (and those who have tried it will
agree with me in thinking it a difficulty) is by
means of a little pin bent in the form of a hook,
and stuck into a splinter, to remove one of these



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 41

straws without moving any of the others. If
the experimenter succeeds, he lays the straw
aside, as the card-players do, counting it as one.
‘After he has obtained that one, he gives up the
hook to another, and thus it passes through all
the party. He who gets most straws wins the
game ; if he gets the king, he counts it as four;
the queen as three, and the bishop as two. I
think, when there are only a few playing, it
would be an improvement to divide the party
into two, each person playing for his party; if
any one, however, moves the heap, he is out of
the game.

«Jerking Straws” is exactly similar to this,
except that the straws are thrown in a heap
upon the table, and each one tries to re~
move them, under the same conditions, by
means of the hook, or a splinter sharpened to
a point.

Some games aspire to nothing higher than
“raising a laugh” by means of their sheer ab-
surdity. Of these the “ Newspaper” is perhaps
the most amusing. The company, sitting in a
semicircle, assume various trades—such as that
of a grocer, a cook, a draper, &c.; and when
the reader of the newspaper, who selects an



42 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

important despatch, pauses and looks stead-
fastly at one of the party, he or the next must
immediately help him out with one-or two words
relating to the particular trade adopted by the
individual. ‘The following reading is usually
given as an example, and it will do as well as
any other :—

“Early in the morning the whole” (looking
at one, who immediately continues) —

Dinner-service—

“Was in motion. Detachments from the
suburbs had put themselves in ”—

Vinegar ;

« Armed citizens occupied the ”—

Frying-pans ;



Cotton-balls ;

“ Planted the ”—

Marrow bones ;

“ And surrounded the ”—

Scissors.

« All were prepared to ”—

Break tumblers.

“All the powder and lead which they found
in the”—

Sugar hogsheads



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 43

“Were taken. The entire Polytechnic School
came out to”—

Make gingerbread ;

“The students of law and medicine imitated
the ”—

Worked muslin ;

“In fact, Paris appeared like a” —

Chopping-block ;

“ All the shops were”—

Cut bias ;

“And the Royal Guards, Lancers, Swiss,
and ”—

Teapots,

“ Were drawn up on all sides.”

The “ Dumb Orator” is a kind of little play
acted by only two persons, the rest of the party
being merely spectators, or relieving these two
out of their own ranks when they are fatigued.
When two actors have been chosen—the quali-
ties requisite for their parts being only that
both should possess plenty of self-possession,
and that one should be acquainted with a po-
pular speech—they leave the room, and consult
with each other which shall be the dumb, and
which the speaking orator. The latter then
puts on a large cloak, which should likewise



44 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

hide completely his associate, who creeps be-
neath it, with the exception of his arms, which
are thrust out before him, to represent the arms
of the speaker, these being held close to his
side beneath the cloak. When thus prepared,
they re-enter the room, resembling as much as
possible one individual, and begin the perform-
ance. The speaker recites with energy some
well-known speech admitting of a great deal of
action, while the other gesticulates in a violent
manner, throwing out his arms, clasping them
together, or beating the speaker's forehead and
breast at the pathetic parts; and throwing
them in the air, or clenching his hands, when
indignation and anger are to be depicted.
Neither speaker nor dumb orator ean be too
energetic, in order to produce the object of the
game—a hearty laugh. Any common specch
will do; but “My name is Norval” is generally
chosen, because it admits of a great deal of
acting, and is the speech most familiar to the
generality of girls and boys :—





“My name is Norval: on the Grampian hills
My father feeds his flocks; a frugal swain,
‘Whose constant cares were to increase his store,
And keep his only son, myself, at home.



Â¥FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 45

For I had heard of battles, and I longed

To follow to the field some warlike lord;

And Heaven soon granted what my sire denied.

This moon, which rose last night round as my shield,

Had not yet filled her horns, when, by her light,

A band of fierce barbarians, from the hills,

Rushed like a torrent down upon the vale,

Sweeping our flocks and herds. The shepherds fled

For safety and for succour. I alone,

With bended bow and quiver full of arrows,

Hovered about the enemy, and marked

‘The road he took: then hastened to my friends,

Whom, with a troop of fifty chosen men,

I met advancing. ‘The pursuit T led,

‘Till we o’ertook the spoil-encumbered foe.

We fought, and conquered. Ere a sword was drawn,

An arrow from my bow had pierced their chief,

Who wore that day the arms which now I wear.
Returning home in triumph, I disdained

‘The shepherd’s slothful life; and having heard

‘That our good king had summoned his bold peers

‘To lead their warriors to the Carron side,

1 left my father’s house, and took with me

A chosen servant to conduct my steps—

Yon trembling coward, who forsook his master!
Journeying with this intent, I passed these towers,

And, Heaven-directed, came this day to do

‘The happy deed that gilds my humble name.”



When this speech is well spoken, the exagge-
E



46 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

rated action of the dumb orator has a most
absurd effect, and the actors are usually repaid
with roars of applause.

Sixra Evenie.

HOW Do YOU LIKE IT? WHEN DO YOU LIKE IT? AND WHERE DO YOU
LIKE IT?—PUZZLE WORD—MANY WORDS IN ONE—WATCHWORD
WHAT 15 MY THOUGHT LIKE?—1 LOVE MY LOVE—PROVERES.

“ How do you Like it ? When do you Like it?
and Where do you Like it?” is the name of a
game, a favourite both of young and grown per-
sons. One of the party leaves the room, while the
others fix upon some word with two meanings,
or rather upon two words with the same sound
—such as bell, belle; quay, key—and when the
absent person is allowed to re-enter, he must
try to find out the word by asking the above
questions. His difficulty is, that the answers
refer sometimes to the one meaning and some-
times to the other, and he is puzzled by the
contradictions. For instance—if the secret to
be discovered is quay, key—on his asking the



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. AT

person next him the usual question, “How do
you like it?” the answer will probably be, “Oh,
I like it patent.” The others will perhaps say,
“TJ like it of stone ;” “of steel;” “with a strong
foundation ;” and so on. ‘The interrogator
perhaps can make nothing of so mysterious a
thing, and he has recourse to his next chance
by demanding, “When do you like it?”

“ After a long sea-voyage,” says one.

“When I have anything valuable I don’t
wish to lose,” says another.

“When I am locked out,” says a third.

The questioner, supposing him to’ be still
unable to discover the word, now puts his last
question in desperation, “Where do you like
it?”

“ By the sea-side.”

“Tn my pocket.”

“ Attached to my watch-chain.” Such an
answer as the last generally reveals the secret ;
but unless the answers are ingeniously framed,
it is frequently found out at the first or.second
question. When the questioner altogether fails
in discovering the word, it is customary to con-
demn him to a second trial with a new word ;
but I think it would contribute more to the



48 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

amusement of the company to put somebody else
upon the search, and set the former individual
to exercise his small ingenuity in puzzling other
people.

The “ Puzzle Word” is a very amusing game,
and much more difficult than the above. In this
case also one of the party leaves the room,
while the rest fix upon a word, which he must
endeavour to find out by asking ten questions
For example, if the word is “ paper,” on return-
ing into the room, he will ask some one—

1. “Is it animal, vegetable, or mineral ?”—
Answer (ve shall suppose), “ Vegetable.”

2. “Where does it grow ?”—“In most Euro-
pean countries, but more especially in Russia
and Prussia.”

3. “Is it a food, or a manufactured article?”
—*Tt is manufactured.”

4. “What colour is it ?”—* Generally white,
and often brown; but it can be made of any
tint.”

5. “It is not food you say—can it be tallow ?”
—“Tam not aware that tallow is a vegetable!
Remember that’s another question.”

6. “How stupid of me! Well, is it used in
England? and is it common, or a rarity ?”—



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 49

“These are two questions. It is common in all
civilised places; perhaps more common in Bri-
tain than anywhere else.”

8. “Is it in this room ?”—“ Yes.”

9. “Is it an article of clothing ?”—* No.”

10. “ What is its most common use ?”-——“ That
is hardly a fair question ; but it is mostly used
to convey our thoughts to one another.”

“ Ah, it is paper—is it not 2”

An easier game than this, which is too diffi-
cult for most children, is the “Secret Word.”
While one is out of the room, the others decide
on some common word fit to be introduced,
without attracting attention, in all the answers ;
for when the absent one returns, he is per-
mitted to ask a question of each of the com-
pany, and cach must make use of the secret
word in his reply. Let us suppose that this
word is “care :”—

“Did you see the Queen when she passed
through Glasgow?”

“No: I don’t care for any sight, however
grand, if I have to encounter a crowd to see it.”
“Do you ever read the Juvenile Library?”

“Oh yes; I take care never to miss a
volume.”





50 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“ Are you fond of conundrums ?”

“No; they give one so much trouble and care
in finding them out.”

And so on, round the whole circle, till the
word is discovered, when the person whose
answer has “let the cat out of the bag” leaves
the room in his turn.

“Many Words in One” is of something the
same nature, but still easier. Here a word is
chosen which has as many letters as there are
persons in the room, and each person must say
a word beginning with his letter. Thus, when
the one who was absent comes in, he fixes his
eye upon the first, who says immediately
“Prince ;” the others then all repeat their
words by turns :—

“Lightning.”

« Apple-pie.”

“Year.”

“Truth.”

“« Herald.”

« Ingenuous.”

« Nut-cracker.”

« Gamesome.”

It does not require a very good speller to
pronounce this—plaything ; but if some of the



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 51

players are unacquainted with the game, and
the leader tells them what words they are to
say, unless they are very clever, they will be
exceedingly astonished ‘at the word being
guessed so easily.

In the “Watchword” also, it is better that
the leader and the guesser alone be acquainted
with the game. The game consists in some one
touching a thing in the room while the guesser
is out of it, and which he has to point out when
he returns, though it is impossible he can have
seen the action. Thus some one touches a book
on the table; the other is recalled, and the
leader, pointing to the piano, asks, “Is it this?”

No.”

“ Or is it this newspaper 2”

“No.”

“Ts it not this flower-stand ?”

“No”

“Nor that purple book 2”

“Yes it is.”

“Dear me!” ery the others, opening their
eyes in innocent astonishment, “how did you
find it out?” Very easily: the whole secret is,
that whenever the leader changes her question
from “Is it this?” to “Is it that?” or the



52 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

reverse, the other knows she points to the
object which has been touched. Sometimes the
Jeader whispers the other whether the watch-
word will be “this” or “that,” but I think it is
unnecessary; and it looks more mysterious, if
there appears to be no communication between
the two.

«What is my Thought Like ?” is a good game
for testing the ingenuity of the players. One
of the party thinks of something—a dog, a eat,
the sun, moon, stars—anything, in short, he
chooses; and then, turning to the others, de-
mands of them, “What is my thought like?”
A most unwarrantable and unreasonable ques-
tion scemingly, for who can tell what an un-
known thought is like? However, as there must
be an answer, some one will perhaps begin by
replying at random, “I think it is like a goose ;”
and the others, ambitious of giving their opinion,
all hazard a conjecture of the thought being
“like” some object they themselves think of:
“like a table ;” “like awig;” “like a flower ;”
“like a fire ;” “like a frosty morning.” When
all have said their say, the thinker reveals his
thought, and each one, under pain of forfeit, has
to prove the resemblance he has ventured to



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 53

suppose; and it may be imagined that some
merriment is occasioned by the striking con-
trasts of the two objects. We will suppose a
party playing at this game, and the answers
have been those I gave as specimens: the
thought, for instance, may be a cat. “How can
a cat be like a goose ?”— Why, because they
are both sometimes seen to eat grass.” “Like
a table ?”—* Because it has four legs.” “ Like
a wig ?”—*'That is casy ; because it is covered
with hair.” “Like a flower?”—* Because they
are both often seen in the drawing-room.”
“Like a fire ?”—“ Because both, when touched,
give out sparks.” “Like a frosty morning?”
-—“How can.a cat be like a frosty morning?
Impossible.’ And the unlucky wight who gave
the answer, unable to find any similarity be-
tween them, pays a forfeit in default.

On one occasion, when a party of grown
people in high life were deeply engaged in the
game, the mystic thought, when disclosed,
proved to be “Lord Castlereagh,” a minister of
state, who had a very uninteresting way of
speaking in parliament. How could Lord





* When «cat is stroked in the dark, sparks of electricity
are seen to issue from her back.



54 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Castlereagh be like a score of incongruous
things to which he was likened? Above all
things, how could he be like a “pump,” the
resemblance adopted by Moore the poet, who
was among the players? The company were
delighted to catch a man of wit and genius in
so awful a scrape, and crowded round to hear
him bungle out his attempt at an impossible
explanation. But “Thomas the Rhymer” was
not easily caught unprepared, and opening his
oracular lips, he instantaneously replied—

« Because it is an empty thing of wood,

Which up and down its awkward arm doth sway,
And coolly spout, and spout, and spout away
In one weak, washy, everlasting flood!”

«I Love my Love” is too simple a game to
find its natural place here, but it comes into my
head because, like “ What is my Thought Like?”
it was a favourite with the “ grown children” of
a former age. There are three ways of playing
this game. In the first and simplest, which is
sometimes called “ Alphabetical Compliments,”
one of the party says to her or his com-
panions, “I love you, 4, because you are Affec-
tionate ; B, because you are Beautiful; C, be-

Gause you are Comic ;” and so on through the





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 55

whole alphabet excepting X, as there are no
English words commencing with that letter.
The two following, however, used to be the most
in vogue. In both these the party sit in a
circle, and each person takes a letter: the
first begins of course by 4, and without the
slightest hesitation—or a forfeit is inflicted—
goes through his letter; and the next takes
up B in his turn, and thus round the whole,
until the alphabet is exhausted.

“Tlove my Love with an 4,” confesses the
first, “because he is Amiable. I hate him with
an A, because he is Ambitious. He took me to
the sign of the Abercorn Arms, and treated me
with Almonds and Ale. His name is Alexis,
and he comes from Ardrossan.”

“TI love my Love with a B,’ pursues the
second, “because he is Beautiful. I hate him
with a B, because he is a Beau. He took me
to the sign of the Belle Savage, and treated me
with Bread and Butter. His name is Benjamin,
and he comes from Bedford.”

“T love my Love with a C,” exclaims another,
“because he is Careful. I hate him with a C,
because he is Cautious. He took me to the sign
of the Cat and Cradle, and treated me to Crab



56 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

and Capers. His name is Charles, and he comes
from Carolina.”

“I love my Love with a D,” pursues a
fourth, “because he is Diverting. I hate him
with a D, because he is Dainty. He took me to
the sign of the Dog, and treated me to Duck
and Dates. His name is Duncan, and he comes
from Dartford.”

“I love my Love with an H,” says a fifth,
“because he is Enthusiastic. I hate him with
an E, because he is Extravagant. He took me
to the sign of the Emerald, and treated me to
Egg-hot and Elder-wine. His name is Edward,
and he comes from Exeter.”

The third way of playing “ My Love” is much
the same as this; although in it the question is
of sending “ My Love” to a particular town, and
giving him certain articles.

In all these, whoever hesitates, or is unable
to find a word beginning with his letter, pays a
forfeit.

“Proverbs” belongs to the same more intel-
lectual (if I may so term it) class of games as
“What is my Thought Like?” In the absence
of one of the party from the room, the others
pitch upon some well-known proverb, and each





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 57

person takes charge of one of the words it con-
tains. When the one whose acuteness is to be
put to the test re-enters, he is permitted to ask
of cach of the company a question on any in-
different subject that may occur to him; and in
the answers, all must take care to introduce the
word they have charge of. If these answers
are ingeniously framed, and the proverb is of a
reasonable length, the hunt for it is difficult and
exciting ; but very short proverbs are too easily
discovered to afford much amusement. Let us
suppose, for instance, that the one in question
is, “ Allis not gold that glitters.” In this case
the words “all, is, not, that,” introduced into
the respective answers, give no clue; but if the
person who undertakes “gold” is not very care-
ful to introduce it in such a way as to prevent
its making any impression upon the questioner,
it is casily connected with “glitters,” and so
the “cat gets out of the bag” at once. We
will fancy, then, by way of example, that a
party engaged in this game have fixed upon
“ A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush :”
when the questioner enters the room, he will
find his companions sitting in a line or circle,
and beginning with the person next him, he



58 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

will put his questions regularly through the
whole.

“Were you out to-day?” he asks carelessly.

“Yes, and had a delightful walk.”

“Did you ever hear Jenny Lind?”

“Yes I did, and I thought her as superior
a singer to every one clse of her sex as the
nightingale is to every other bird.”

“I hear you intend taking lessons yourself ?”

“Yes; I mean to attend musical classes iz
winter.”

“Do you intend going to see the skating to-
morrow ?”

“Yes, if the day is fine.”

Can you tell me the day of the month?”

“No I cannot, for I have no almanac at hand.”

“Pray make some error in your answer, that
I may find out the proverb.”

“There és nothing worth your care, I assure
you, in my answer.”

“So I sce: is there more in yours ?”

“Indeed I cannot say mine is eworth much
either.”

“Do you not think trying to guess a proverb
is as diflicult as trying to find your way through
a marsh ?”



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 59

“I daresay you find it so at anyrate; but

be easy; in two or three minutes you will
be relieved.”

“Is it not provoking to be told to be easy
when you are on the verge of losing patience ?”

“Yes, and it scems particularly so ix your
case.”

“ Well, can you help me ?”

“ Not in the least.”

“Now I am at my last chance, and trust to
your mercy.”

“Trust rather to find an easy seat in a
quickset-bush than mercy at my hands.”

“Hands—bush! Well, I give it up. No!—
*bird—hand—bush ’—‘ A bird in the hand is
worth two in the bush !7”

But you see it would take a very clever boy
or girl to discover this; and perhaps, in some
Gompanies, it would not be discovered at all.





Srventa Evenine.

CONSEQUENCES—CROSS QUESTIONS AND CROOKED ANSWERS—GENTEEL
LADY —CHINESE SHADOWS—SHOPKEEPERS—APPRENTICES.

Consequences ” cannot be played by more
than ten persons at one time, who sit round’ the
table, each provided with a pencil. The leader
then takes a long slip of paper, and after writ-
ing down, if possible in one line, an adjective,
such as “the beautiful,” “the fascinating,” folds
the paper over, so as to conceal what he or she
has written, and then hands it to the person on
his right; the latter writes the name of a young
lady present, or who is known to the company;
the next writes a similar adjective to the first;
the next another name, either feminine or
masculine ; the next the name of a place, such
as “in the garden,” “at a concert ;” another
puts down some action, such as, “dancing the
Polka,” “cating apples ;” another a substantive,
such as “book,” “smile,” “lecture ;” another a
similar substantive ; another gives the opinion
of the world; and the last gives the final conse-





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 61

quences of the whole, All having “said their
say,” the leader unfolds the paper, and reads it
aloud for the diversion of the party. It should
run something in this fashion :-—

«The beautiful ”

“Miss Smith,”

And “eccentric ”

«Master Brown,”

“Were together at a Chartist meeting”

“ Dancing the Polka.”

“He gave her his opinion of the present
state of Bohemia,”

“And she, in turn, presented him with a
sugar stick:”

“The world thought the whole proceeding
very extraordinary ;”

And “the consequences were, that the cat
jumped out at the window.”

This game can be made much simpler by
cutting a piece of card into four dozen slips;
and writing on twenty-four of these slips the
names of those present, and of your common
acquaintances ; on twelve more some kind of
action, such as playing at battledoor and
shuttlecock ; and on the remaining twelve the

consequences. ‘These slips are then placed in
F





62 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

three little baskets, well shaken, and handed
round to the company, each person taking two
of the “names,” one of the “actions,” and one
of the “consequences.” When all are thus pro-
vided, cach one, in rotation, opens his budget
and reads it aloud. Or sometimes the game is
only played by three persons, who cach takes
charge of a basket, and when the first has read
his two “names,” the other two bring out their
“actions ” and “consequences.” Here are some
examples :—

“Jane Roberts” and “ Clara Vincent”

Were together “enjoying a see-saw ;”

The consequence was, “ they lost their shoes.”

“Miss Williams ” and “ Master Richards ”

Were “playing at battledoor and shuttlecock ;”

And the consequence was, “they had a fit
of the gout.”

«James Seymour ” and “ William Jennings ”

Were “hemming some pinafores ;”

The consequence was, “they strutted. about
as proud as peacocks.”

“Laura Jervis” and “ Miss Pattison ”

Were “ running a race ;”

The consequence was, “they went to logger-
heads.”












FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 63

« Cross Questions and Crooked Answers” has
so long been a well-known, favourite, that I sup-
pose there are few ignorant of its mysteries;
however, here it is for the benefit of these few.
The company being seated in a circle, one of
the party asks his neighbour a question in a
whisper, and the answer, which is conveyed to
him in the same manner, he treasures up in his
memory, until the questions having gone the
whole round, it comes to his turn to receive one.
Then joining the question he received from one
to the answer he had from the other, he tells
aloud his “ eross question and crooked answer ”
for the diversion of the company, whose mirth
is sometimes greatly excited by the ludicrous
effect these little unconnected sentences have
when put together. “T was asked,” one will
perhaps say, “whether I liked ice-cream? and
T replied, ‘Yes; I should think it would be a
great comfort to the dogs of St Bernard.”

“1 was asked,” says another in rotation,
“whether I liked to sce Italian greyhounds
wearing their little woollen greatcoats ? and I
replied, ‘I believed they were the laughing-
stock of the whole neighbourhood. ”

«T was asked,” says another briskly,













my



64 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

opinion of the fountains in Trafalgar Square ?
and I replied, ‘I didn’t know I was sure?”

“ And I was asked,” cries a fourth, “whether
I could skip a hundred jumps on the rope with-
out stopping? and I replied, ‘If somo one held
me by the heels I would,”

“And I was asked,” adds a fifth, “if I thought
T could hang-on for six hours to a branch of a
tree without falling? and I replied, ‘I was afraid
my great toe would be in the way.” And so
on to the end of the chapter—that is, till every
one is wearied.

With those who are fond of laughter and
absurdities, the “@enteel Lady” will be a
favourite. No forfeits arc exacted in this game,
which is only pl but a number of
little paper horn: prepared, she who
makes the slightest mistake is favoured with
one of these ornaments by way of punishment.
All being seated in a cirele, the first lady affects
to come as a messenger from some unknown
friond (a kind of “Mrs Harris”) to her neigh-
bour on the left, saying politely, “ Good-morn-
ing, genteel lady, always genteel ; I, a genteel
lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady,
always gentecl, to tell you that she owns an
















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 65

cagle with a golden beak.” The lady, properly
impressed with this singular fact, immediately
turns to her neighbour, and says, with equal
civility, “Good-morning, genteel lady, always
genteel ; I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come
from a genteel lady, always genteel, to say that
she owns an cagle with a golden beak and silver
claws.” The next, full of the important news,
turns to the lady next her, and repeats the
exact words she has heard, after the usual com-
pliments; “an e she, “with a golden
beak, silver claws, and—and ”. Wo to her
if she cannot remember the other perfections
of this wonderful bird, for she will be invested
with a horn for the rest of the game, and an-
other will take up her place, and say, “ Good-
morning, gentecl lady, always gentecl; I, a
gentecl lady, always gentecl, come from a
horned Nady, always horned, to say that she
owns an cagle with a golden beak, silver claws,
and a lace skin.’ The next in the circle re-
peats, if she can, the same words, adding,
however, “diamond eyes” to the list. As the
slightest mistake is punished by a horn, before
the game is finished, most of the heads are
bristling with paper, so that the last lady is





















66 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

able to say, “Good-morning, two-horned lady,
always two-horned (laughing); I, a three-
horned lady, always three-horned (weeps), come
from a five-horned lady, always five-horned
(laughing immoderately), to say that she owns
an eagle with a golden beak, silver claws, lace
skin, diamond eyes, and purple feathers.”
“Chinese Shadows” is of something the same
nature as “Shadow- Bui,” and when well
managed, forms a very good substitute for the
magic-lantern. A white shect, or large white
cloth of some kind, is drawn tightly over the
window, or upon the wall—a couple of stecl
forks at top and bottom will keep it stretched
very nicely. Before this the spectators are
seated, while two or three of their companions
stand behind them, and throw the shadow of a
number of figures, eut in paper, upon the smooth
surface. If ingeniously managed, this play may
be exceedingly interesting. You may form a
very pretty scene by keeping the shadow of a
little house stationary at one side of the space
you have marked out on the sheet for your
stage—which may appear lighted up, by having
the windows cut out, so that the light may shine
through. Around this, and at the other side of









FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 67

the stage, trees may be planted, and the figures
of minute birds, suspended on wires or fine
threads, be made to dart about through them.
A couple or more of human figures may then
appear, and by the mouth of the operators hold
humorous conversations. Or a battle-piece may
be represented; a man passing along the road
with his cart; a hunt, with the sportsmen
chasing the deer before them. As these scenes
appear, one of the performers may increase the
spectators’ interest by giving them high-sound-
ing titles, and describing a part of the picture.
Thus, if the representation is a battle-picce, he
may ery, “This is the battle of Crecy, which
was fought in 1346; in the middle is Edward
the Black Prince, holding his sword above his
head.” If it is a hunt—* This is the royal party
at Balmoral, her Majesty and the Prince riding
first.”

“The Shopkeepers” comprehends the whole
company: there is no leader, and no spectators.
Each person takes a profession of some kind:
some are druggists, and some are haberdashers ;
some are stationers, and others furniture-ware-
housemen ; every one, however, has something
to scll, and asks the opinion of the merchant



68 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

next him whether it belongs to the animal,
vegetable, or mineral kingdom. If he answers
wrongly, he is not allowed to sell any of his
goods until the next time the question comes
round. We will suppose a party playing at this
game, and that the first shopkeeper, tuming to
the one beside him, says, “I am a tea-dealer,
and have some green tea to sell; is it animal,
vegetable, or mineral 2”

“Tt is vegetable, because it is the leaves of a
shrub that grows in China. IT am a habérdasher,
nd have a card of mother-of-pearl buttons to
sell; are they animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”

“They are mineral, because they are formed
of the shell of an oyster” (This occasions an
argument, an oyster being an animal; but the
company settle it that the shell is only the
oyster’s house.) “I am a doctor, and have some
peppermint-drops to sell; are they animal, veget-
able, or mineral ?”

“They are vegetable, because they are made
of sugar, which is extracted from the sugar-
cane in the West Indies, and are flavoured with
the juice of the peppermint plant. I am a
stationer, and have a bunch of quill pens to
sell; are they animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 69

“ Animal, because they are plucked from the
wings of a goose. I am an upholsterer, and
have a mirror to scll; is it animal, vegetable, or
mineral ?”

“Tt is both vegetable and mineral, because it
is composed of sand, soda, and quicksilver, and
its frame is of wood, usually gilded. I am a
small-ware dealer, and have some whalebone to
sell; is it animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”

“Vegetable, is it 2”

“Oh, dear no! Don’t you know it is taken
from the great sea-monster, the whale? But
Jet us begin ag

The shopkeepers may then change their sex,
and become the mothers of an “ Apprentice.”
One of them, after having apprenticed her son
to a good trade, tells her neighbour the fact,
and also favours her with the initial letters of
the first thing he sold, which are to enable her
to guess the name of the article. Says the first
—T apprenticed my son to a mercer, and the
first thing he sold was S. 8.”

“Shaded silk, was it? Well, I apprenticed
my son to a shoemaker, and the first thing he
sold was a pair of C. 8.”

“Carpet slippers, I suppose? And J, having





70 ¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

apprenticed my son to a grocer, I went the next
morning and bought a pound of M. from him.”

“A pound of M.? Oh, maccaroni! I ap-
prenticed my son to a stationer, and he says
the first thing he sold was a shect of B. P.”

“ Brown paper ?”

“No”

“Well, blotting-paper? I apprenticed my
son to an ironmonger, and the first thing he
sold was a C. 8.”

“Coal scuttle? Well, my son was more re-
spectably connected by being apprenticed to a
Dazaar-master, and the first thing he sold was a
box of C. M.’s.”

“OM,

“ Cigar matches.

“Oh, no wonder we could not find that out.”




! What can that be?”



Erenta Eventnc.

buZ!—TEN FINE RIRDS—PETER PIPER—MR ROMERT ROWLEY—
DIDON DINA—PARAPLUIE—TON THE—GROS, GRAS, GRAIN D'ORGE
SI JEFAIS PErrT POT DE BEURRE—SI J
GAPING, WIDE-MOUTHED, WADDLING FROG—GRAND PANJANDRUM,







“Buz!” is a good exercise in arithmetic, and,
besides, a very amusing game. It stands quite
alone in its kind, for I think there is no other
similar. It merely consists in repeating all the
numbers of the multiplication-table except
seven, for which the word buz is substituted.
Thus, beginning at the right hand, the first per-
son says “one,” the next “two,” the next
“three ”—“ four ”— “ five” — “six” — “ buz!”
This is continued through all the multiplications
of seven—such as 14, 21, 28, and likewise
wherever the number seven should be used—17,
27, 37; and so on. When the number gets b
yond seventy, “buz-one,” “ buz-two,” &e. is said ;
and seventy-seven is “ buz-buz.” If any one
names a wrong number, speaks out of his turn,
or delays speaking after five is counted mo-





72 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

derately fast, he has to pay a forfeit, and begin
the game anew, by saying, “one;” when the
numbers will go round again, commencing on
the left hand.

The “'Ten Fine Birds” requires to be learnt
before being played, as it is rather an exercise
for the memory than a regular pastime; or at
anyrate the leader should be well acquainted
with it, in order to exact a forfeit from all who
stumble in their parts. The leader commences
by saying, “.A good fat hen;” and this is re-
peated by the whole circle, one after another.
«Two ducks, and a good fat hen,” says the
leader again, and so say all the rest. “Three
squawking wild e, two ducks, and a good
fat hen,” is now the sentence. “Four plump
partridges, three squawking wild geese, two
ducks, and a good fat hen.” This having gone
round as before, “Five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen,” is next given
out. “Six long-legged cranes, five pouting
pigeons, four plump partridges, three squawking
wild geese, two ducks, and a good fat hen.”
Waiting until the echo has died away, the
leader commences again— Seven green parrots,









FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 73

six long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen.” Adding again,
« Hight screeching owls, seven green parrots, six
long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen.” This having
been said, “Nine ugly turkey-buzzards, eight
screeching owls, seven green parrots, six long-
legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four plump
partridges, three squawking wild geese, two
ducks, and a good fat hen,” is the next round ;
and “Pen bald eagles, nine ugly turkey-bu
zards, eight screeching owls, seven green parrots,
six long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen,” is the finale.
“The House that Jack Built,” “The Little Old
Woman that Lived in a Vinegar Bottle,” and
other games of the same nature, may be sub-
stituted for the “Ten Fine Birds,” by way of
variety.

Sometimes the difficulty of the game consists
in the pains it takes to “get one’s tongue about
the words,” or in the mere oddity of the sound.
For instance, in the well-known “Peter Piper”—








74 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppe
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked ;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,

Where is the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?



Or in a cousin-german of Peter’s, “ Mr Robert
Rowley ”—
Robert Rowley rolled a round roll round ;

A round roll Robert Rowley rolled round.
Where rolled the round roll Robert Rowley rolled round?

The following French sentences are of a similar
kind :—

DIDON DINA.
Didon dina, dit-on, du dos d’un dodu dindon.

PARAPLUIE,



Etant sorti sans parapluie, il m’eat plus plu qu'il plit
plus tot.



TON THE.

A Frenchman having taken herb tea for a cough, his
neighbour asked him, “Ton thé, t’a Vil oté ta toux?”



GROS, GRAS, GRAIN D’ORGE.





“Gros, gras, grain d’orge, quand te dégrogragrain-
tu?” Second time going round: “Je me
ain-d’orgeriserai, quand tous les autres gros
gras grains dorge se dégrogragrain-d’orgeriseront.”












FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 75

SI PETAIS PETIT POT DE BEURRE.

“$i j’étais petit pot de beurre, je me dépetit-pot-de-
beurre-rais comme je pourrais.” The next time going
round: “ Et vous, si vous étiez petit pot de beurre, com-
ment vous Aépetit~pot-de-beurriez-vous?”



SI PHTAIS PETITE POMME.
“$i j’ctais petite pomme d’api, je me dépetite-pomme-
‘apierais, pomme je pourrais.” “The second one must
repeat this, word for word; and the third must ask, “ Et
vous, si vous étiez petite pomme d’api, comment vous
dépetite-pomme-d'apiericz-vous?” The fourth must re-
peat this without mistake.





A. very difficult game of memory is a very
odd one, the “ Gaping, Wide-Mouthed, Waddling
Frog.” One of the players, handing anything
he pleases to his neighbour, says, “Take this!”
The next answers, “ What’s this?” to which the

first replies—



“A gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog.”

The second docs the same thing to a third;
adding—

“Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, wide-mouthed,” &c.

And so on through the whole party.



76



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Three monkeys tied to a clog;
Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &






Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a deg;
With a gaping, &e.

Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog ;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, Ke.







inst the wall,



puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast cal!
Four horses stuck in a bog;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;
‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.





Seven lobsters in a dish,

As-fresh as any heart could wish ;
Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call;









FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 77



Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.

Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog ;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &c.

Nine peacocks in the air,
I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;
Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,
As fresh as any heart could wish;
Six beetles against the wall,
Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
a





78

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Four horses stuck in a bog;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.

‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high;

Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;

in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all ;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

‘As fresh as any heart could wish ;
Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog ;
With a gaping, &e.







Eleven ships sailing on the main,
Some bound for France, and some for Spain,
I wish them all safe home agai
‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high ;
Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 79

Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish ;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in.a bog;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &







‘Twelve huntsmen with horns and hounds,
Hunting over other men’s grounds ;

Eleven ships sailing on the main,

Some bound for France, and some for Spain,
J wish them all safe home again;

‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high ;

Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,

I don’t know, and I don’t care;

Fight joiners in a joiner’s stall,

Working with their tools and all;

Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;

Five puppies buy a rounded ball,

Which daily for their breakfast call;









80 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog

‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dogs
With a gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog.

This odd composition is the more difficult to
remember, from the ideas it contains having no
connection with each other, but being simply
absurd. It is surpassed, however, in the same
respect. by a picce of drollery known as the
“Grand Panjandrum,” invented by Foote, the
humorous writer, to puzzle a man who had
boasted of his memory. Here it is :—



“So she went into the garden to cuta cabbage leaf, to
make an apple-pie; and at the same time a great she-
bear, coming up the street, pops his head into the shop.
What! no soap? So he died, and she very imprudently
married the barber; and there were present the Picnin-
nies, and the Joblillies, and the Garyulies, and the grand
Panjandrum himself, with the little round button at top ;
and they all fell to playing the game of catch as catch

can, till the gunpowder ran out at the heels of their
boots.”



Nintn Evenine.

CAPPING VERSES—CENTO VERSES — CRAMRO, OTHERWISE THE
AMERICAN GAME, OTHERWISE THE GAME OF QUESTIONS AND
NOUNS.





There is a class of juvenile amusements which
Jeans in some degree upon literature, and has
therefore an air of more clegance than the
others. All of this class require a certain
amount of ingenuity, and imply some acquaint-
ance with at Ieast common books.

“Capping Verses” is an old game, that seldom
fails to amuse young people who have a good
store of poetry in their heads. One of the
party recites a verse of poctry, and the next
must immediately repeat another, beginning
with the same, letter as the last word of the first
verse began with, out of some diflerent picce.
Thus, if the first repeats—

“Go, lovely rose!

‘Tell her that wastes her time and me,
‘That now she knows,

When I resemble her to thee,

How sweet and fair she seems to be”—



82 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
The next immediately continues—

“Bird of the wilderness,
Blithesome and cumberless,

Light be thy matin o’er moorland and lea!
Emblem of happiness!
Blessed be thy dwelling-place !

Oh, to abide in the desert with thee!”



“The heath this night must be my bed,
‘The bracken curtain for my head,
My lullaby the warder’s tread,

Far, far from love and thee, Mary
To-morrow eve, more stilly laid,
My couch may be my bloody plaid,
My vesper-song thy wail, sweet maid !

Tt will not waken me, Mary!”



« My beautiful—my beautiful! that standeth meekly by,
With thy proudly-arched and glossy neck, and dark
and fiery eye;
Fret not to roam the desert now with all thy wing?d
speed;
I may not mount on thee again—thou’rt sold, my
Arab steed!”

“So stately his form, and so lovely her face,
‘That never a hall such a galliard did grace;
While her mother did fret, and her father did fume,
And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and
plume;



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 83

And the bridemaidens whispered, ¢*Twere better by far
To have matched our fair cousin with young Loch-
invar?”

“Cento Verses” is a much more difficult
pastime than this, and was formerly thought
worthy of being the occupation of high and
celebrated persons, though it has now degene-
rated into a fireside game for young people.
Instead of a verse, each person in this case has
a single line of poetry to say; but every two, or
every two alternate lines, must rhyme with each
other. As an example will show my meaning
better than any description I can give, here are
some verses compounded of these lines:—

“On Linden when the sun was low,”

“A frog he would a-wooing go;”

“He sighed a sigh, and breathed a prayer:”
“None but the brave deserve the fair.”

“A gentle knight was pricking o’er the plain,”
“ Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow3”

“ Gums and pomatums shall his flight restrain,”
“Or who would suffer being here below ?”

“The youngest of the sister arts”
“Was born on the open sea;””

“The rest were slain at Chevy-Chase,”
“ Under the greenwood tree.”



84 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

« At morn the blackcock trims his jetty wings,”
« And says—remembrance saddening o’er each brow” —

“ Awake, my St John !—leave all meaner things!”
“Who would be free, themselves must strike the blow!”



“Tt was a friar of orders gray,”

« Still harping on my daughter;”
“Sister spirit, come away”

“ Across this stormy water.”

“On the light fantastic toe,”
“ Othello’s oecupation’s gone ;”

“ Maid of Athens, ere I go,”
“ Were the last words of Marmion.”



“There was a sound of revelry by night”
“In Thebes’ streets three thousand years ago,”
“And comely virgins came with garlands dight”

To censure Fate, and pious Hope forego.”





©Oh! the young Lochinvar came out of the west,”
« An under-bred, fine-spoken fellow was h

“A back dropping in, an expansion of chest,”
“ Far more than I once could foresee.”



The game of “ Crambo”—for I like odd names
—is sometimes called the “American Game,”
and sometimes the “Game of Questions and
Nouns.” Let each of the party be provided
with two slips of paper of different sizes, and
write on the one a question, on the other a





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 85

noun ; then fold them up separately, and drop
them into a basket, a hat, or any convenient
receptacle placed ready to hold them. The
papers, when thus collected, must be shuffled
and handed round, when each of the company
takes two—the larger containing a question,
which he is to answer, and the smaller a noun,
which, however foreign to the subject, he must
introduce into the answer. Be it remembered
that the answers, and, if practicable, the ques-
tions, must be in verse. his partly constitutes
the difficulty of the game ; but an obstinate, im-
practicable noun, which will not take its place
quictly in verse, is a very serious obstacle.

Of course the papers are in due time col-
lected and read aloud by one of the party for
the amusement of the rest, no one present
knowing by whom they are severally written.
Here is a wide field for the imagination—a rare
opportunity for “ popping the question” without
feeling any alarm as to the consequences.
Imagine yourself for a moment making one of
a Christmas party so occupied, and eagerly exa-
mining the papers it has been your lot to draw.
One of them is written in a pretty feminine
hand, and contains an anxious inquiry for your





86 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

opinion on the subject of ladies’ eyes—* whether
black eyes or blue you prefer?” while coupled
with it, written in large characters on the other
slip, is the unintcllectual noun “mince-pies.”
“How provoking!” you exclaim. “What in
the world have mince-pies to do with a lady’s
most charming feature?” and you gaze despair-
ingly on the bright orbs around you, and wish
people would not put such words into the
basket. But patience; even more unmanage-
able words have been pushed into rhyme, and
very successfully too. If I may venture to in-
troduce to your notice a few specimens of this
amusing game, written by a few friends sitting
by my own fireside, I think this point will be
clearly established. The nouns in question are
printed in italics: —
“Which do you prefer—riding or walking?”
“ Gladly 1'd walk

To hear you talk,

And list to your accents sweet;

Gladly I'd ride

By your dear side,

But it would not be étiguette.”
Or, again; plumpudding is surely as difficult to
manage in a stanza as mince-pies; but we



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 87

think it appears to advantage in the following
couplet :—
“ How felt your heart—
Pray softly tell—
When Cupid’s dart
Upon it fell?”
“How felt my heart? Why, sure that’s a good ’un;
It felt like an o’erboiled Christmas plumpudding!”

The mention of pudding giving rise to the

inquiry—

«Since you talk of pudding, is it not to be dreaded,
That, by having too much, you become pudding-headed?”

It was met by the following tart rejoinder, in
which the “walnut-shell” proves a useful
auxiliary instead of an annoyance to the ver-
sifier :—



“To judge from the specimen furnished by you,
I fear the remark you've just made is too true.
But that you had a head, I knew not before ;
For I thought ’twas a walnut-shell, minus the core.”

This may be properly followed by another, in
an equally severe strain:—

“ For better or worse will you take me?
Believe that I ne’er can forsake thee.”



8s FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“It wont be for better, it can’t be for worse ;
As you're in such a hurry, you'll prove but a curse.”

But it is time we had a touch of the sen-
timental; of which, take the following speci-
mens :—



“Which instrument do you prefer—
‘The harp, piano, or guitar?



“ Piano and harp are sweet to hear,
Yet your tones have more music than either, my dear.
‘To me more fragrant than balmy spice
Is the breath of your lips. I spring up in a trice
If I hear but your name, for that is to me
‘The sound most melodious of all melodie.”





A fair querist asks—




“Why does the moon—
Infuse into thy soul sue!
And is told—

“Tf the moon e’er calm my restless mind,
*Tis when by its light my duck I find.”

ir empress of the night—
calm delight?”

I add only one more, though I fear the reader’s
patience is nearly exhausted:—

“ Dear sir, your opinion I'd like to know,
How far in Leap Year it is proper to got
Address to me
At No. 3,





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 89

On the left-hand side from the fire.
And postscript, I pray,
Will you please to say,

Do you black eyes or blue most admire?”





Answer—
“To Miss Mee,
At No. 3,

On the left-hand hob by thetide of the fire.
My dear ladie,
I can’t, d’ye see,
Give you my advice on the point you desire.
»*Twould be very improper for me to say
How late in the year you may safely delay ;
But really I think
I would not shrink
From an early endeavour to settle the thing





With orange flowers and a plain gold ring.
‘As to where beauty lies—
In black or blue eyes—
It’s my present impression,
The most pleasant expression
Is that which beams forth from your own pretty face.
Vm yours faithfully,
AB G, near the fireplace.” *



* The account of this game comes from an anonymous
correspondent.



Tentn Evenrne.

Fo!



oe



PAWNS —THTE PRICES PATD.

Tt will have been observed that the apparent
purpose of most of the preceding games is to
obtain forfeits from the company; and the
redemption of these forfeits, or “selling pawns,”
as it is called, is as amusing a game as any of
them. Sometimes the pawn merchant sits in a
chair with his or her eyes blindfolded, while
another holds up one of the forfeits, and the
former mentions at what price it may be re-
deemed; but more commonly mamma, or the
governess, or perhaps the little old maid, is
coaxed into taking charge of the pawns; and
one of the company kneels, or sits on a low stool
at her feet, and places her head in her lap, with
her face downwards, so as to answer the pur-
pose-of blindfolding. Supposing it to be done
in this way, which I like the best, perhaps
because I am most accustomed to it, the person
who sits holds the pawn or forfeit over the head







FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 91

of the kneeler, and says, “Here is a pretty
thing, and a very pretty thing; what shall the
owner do of this very pretty thing?” The
seller asks, “Is it fine, or superfine?” If it
belongs to a girl, the reply is that it is super-
fine; if to a boy, that it is fine; and the punish-
ment is awarded accordingly, giving of course
the milder task to the fair sex. If the forfeit
belongs to himself, the pawn merchant very
disinterestedly leaves his place, and some one
else conducts the sale. The following are some
of the most approved methods of regaining a
forfeit :—

1. Perform the laughing gamut rapidly with-
out mistake—

ha ha
hha ha
ha ha
ha ha
ha ha
ha ha

2. Say five flattering things to the person
sitting next you without using the letter 2.

3. Compliment and banter every one in the
room.



92 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

4, Stand in the middle of the room with a
lamp in your hand, and first make a very woful
face, and then a very merry one.

5. Stand with your face to the wall, while
some one stands behind you making silent signs
indicative of a kiss, a pinch, or a box on the
ear. You then choose, without knowing the
rotation of the signs, whether you will have the
“first,” “second,” or “third,” and abide by the
result.

6. Recite a piece of poetry, of a humorous
character if possible.

7. Laugh in one corner of the room, ery in a
second, yawn in a third, and sing in a fourth.

8. Kneel to the prettiest person in the room,
bow to the one you consider the wittiest, and
kiss the one you love best.

9. Propose a conundrum, or repeat a stanza
of poetry.

10. Sing a song, or, if unable, tell a short
story.

11. Kiss yourself in a looking-glass.

12. Kiss a box or bag inside and out without
opening it. This may be done by first kissing
it iz the room, and afterwards taking it owé of
the room and kissing it there also.



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 93

18. Walk round the room, and kiss your
shadow in each corner of it. Sometimes it is
added, that if you cannot refrain from laugh-
ing, you must pay another forfeit.

14. Keep a serious countenance for five
minutes, without either laughing or frowning,
whatever your companions may say or do to
disturb your equanimity.

15. Imitate, without a laugh or smile, any
animal your companions may name.

16. Repeat whatever your companions tell
you, however difficult; if you make a mistake,
you must pay another forfeit.

17. Compose two lines in rhyme.

18. Your companions give you a line of
poetry, and you must repeat another to rhyme
with it, or pay a forfeit,

19. Guess a riddle or conundrum, or pay
another forfeit. ..

20. Relate an anecdote.

21. Count twenty backwards.

22, Ask a question of any of the party
which cannot be answered otherwise than by
“yes.” The question is, “What does y-e-s
spell ?”

23. Mention the name of some remarkable

H



Full Text








Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM Error Log for UF00002754_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM

12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM

12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM 000a.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM 000a.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM 000b.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:30 PM 000b.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000c.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000c.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000f.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000f.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000g.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000g.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000h.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000h.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000i.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 000i.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:31 PM 035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:32 PM 076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:55:33 PM 112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

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12/15/2014 12:55:36 PM












‘The Baldwin Library

RMB rn




CHAMBERS’S

LIBRARY FOR YOUNG PEOPLE.

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

EDINBURGH:
WILLIAM AND ROBERT CHAMBERS.
1853,


EDINBURGH >
PRINTED BY W. AND B. CHAMBERS.
CONTENTS.

First EvENING.—WINTER AND ITS FIRESIDE—TAE LITTLE OLD
MAID—OLD AND NEW AMUSEMENTS—THE PERSECUTED
FEATHER—HOW TO FORCE A LAUGH—JULLTEN’S CONCERT,

Seconp EVENING.—THE BALL OF WOOL—THE CANDLE RE-
LIGHTED——THE OLD SOLDIER—LIMPING TOM—THE SHEP-
HERD AND THE WOLF—HONEY-POTS—MILKING-PAILS,

‘Tainp EveNing.—puss IN THE CORNER—SMUGGLERS—CAT AND
THE MOUSE—MAGIC MUSIC—SUR LE PONT D’AVIGNON—
THE GARDEN-GATE—CUPID’S COMING—MY MASTER SENDS
‘ME TO YOU, SIR—THE GRAND MUFTI —MR RED-CAP,

Fount EvENING.—ORANGES AND LEMONS—BUFF SAYS BUTF
TO ALL HIS MEN—CHITTERBOB—PRUSSIAN EXERCISE—
THE TRAVELLER—THE COACH—MY LADY'S TOILET, &c. &c.

Firrn EvENING.—¥ARMERS AND MECHANICS—DUMB MOTIONS
—FLY AWAY, PIGEON — ELEMENTS — JACK STRAWS —
JERKING STRAWS—NEWSPAPER—DUMB ORATOR, - = -

SrxrH EvENING.—HOW DO YOU LIKE IT? WHEN DO YoU LIKE
IE? AND WHERE DO YOU LIKE IT?—PUZZLE WORD—
MANY WORDS IN ONE— WATCHWORD— WHAT 1S MY
‘THOUGHT LIKE?—1 LOVE MY LOVE—PROVERBS, ~~

SrventH EVENING. — CONSEQUENCES — CROSS QUESTIONS AND
(CROOKED ANSWERS—GENTEEL LADY—CHINESE SHADOWS,
—SHOPKEEPERS— APPRENTICES, ee ee

10

W7



60
i CONTENTS.

pace

rRN FINE BIRDS—PETER PIPER
PARAPLUIE—TON



Ercura Evextne.— poz !—
MR ROBERT ROWLEY —DIDON DINA-

THE —GROS, GRAS, GRAIN P'ORGE—SI J"ETAIS PETIT POT
DE BEURRE—SI JETAIS PETITE POMME—GAPING, WIDE
FROG—GRAND PANSANDRUM, = 71

SAPPING VERSES—CENTO VERSES—CRAMEO,
THE AMERICAN GAME, OTHERWISE THE







MOUTHED, WADDLIN



Niytu Evens’
OTHERWISE







GAME OF QUESTIONS AND NOUNS, =~ = =~ BL
Text EVENING. —rorrEtTs — SELLING PAWNS— TIE PRICES

PA =
Evevestn EVENING.—niDppLrs oR PMIGMAS, ~~ = == 100
Twrurrir EvesixG.—costineartos or tue RippLES, = 10



RIPHE—REBUSES—



cH ARADES— Lo



Turereenta Eyexr
ARITHMETICAL PUZZLES, Se. ee







Fourrrextic Evexiic.—coxuxprums,
cnRONOGRAMS— acrostics —
BOUTS RIMES, = - Ul
3 ace are



Firreestn Eyesine. —rv
FIGURE VERSES—ANAGRAMS.



Srxreesti EVENING.—TNE ACTED CHARADE,
Srvesteentu Evextnc.—'T'ue YouNe Macician.— acre
CIRCLE—IMPOSSIMILITY POSSIBLE—WONDERFUL HAT—
APPARENT IMPOSSIBILITY — DOUBLE MEANING—VISIBLE

INVISIDLE— MIRACULOUS COLTON—APPLE BEWITCHED —
MULTIPLYING COIN—LOCOMOTIVE SUILLING—PENETRAT-
PENCE, = =







ficureestu EVESING.—THE CHANGEABLE ROSE—CHAMELEON
FLOWERS—SAP GREEN —TEARS— BREATH — VISIBLE 1N=
VISIBLE —CURIOUS TRANSPOSITIONS—FLOATING STEEL—
COLOURED SHADOWS-—MAGIC PINHOLE— HANDWRITING

UPON THE WALL—CARD TEI - a7
- ». «180





Sonurioxs or THE Extemas, te
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



Tux spring, the summer, and the autumn have
passed away; and now we are in the night of
the year, the interval between the evening and
morning twilight—between the first faint peep
of spring, and the last fading smile of autumn.
The flowers are withered; the corn reaped;
the fruit gathered; the bare branches of the
trees shiver, as if from cold, in the blast ; and
the birds, that used to hop so merrily among
the twigs, not liking the change, have hopped
away—all but poor Robin. With them has de-
parted the melody of the woods; and so dear
2 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

old Winter has not even a song to enliven her
dark and solitary reign.

What shall we do to amuse ourselves, and
keep our fingers warm? Oh we know that very
well! There are walks and runs on the hard
ground; there are snow-sports in the fields ;
there is the hoar-frost to admire, that hangs
like silver filigree-work upon the trees; and
there are the ice-coverings of foot-prints to
wonder at, which, crunching beneath our feet,
show that there is not a drop of water beneath !
There are all sorts of out-door games for the
day; and at night the stars are much more
splendid than in summer, and we can learn the
names of many of them from a book, and know
them, like acquaintances, when we see them





again.

But the evening, the cold, dark, gusty even-
ing, when the daylight is past, and the stars
have not yet come fully out, do we not then
regret the bright balmy days that are gone?
No; for the winter evening, instead of the long
twilight of the earlier year, has its own F
side. Is there anything so beautiful, anything
so joyous, anything so loving and kindly, as our
dear fireside? It flings a ruddy glow upon the




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 3

faces around it, which scems to penetrate to the
heart. Tell me, girls and boys, tell me honestly,
if you were ever happier than on a cold, dreary
winter evening, surrounded by a company of
your young companions? For my part, al-
though I have been a little old maid for many
a day, I not only look back with pleasure upon
such enjoyments, but I could still join in them
as zealously as any of you. I begin to think,
however, that I am more competent to teach
than to play—to hold the candle, as the pro-
verb says, than to dance and sing; and there-
fore it is that I have determined, instead of
the floor with suppler limbs and
s, to retire into a corner of the
room, and direct the amusements I formerly
shared.

T have seen many more winter evenings than
you, and therefore I ought to be better ac-
quainted with Fireside Amusements; but at any-
rate it will be convenient to have the best of
them set down in a little book, so that, without
rauch waste of time, that important question can
always be settled, “What shall we play at?”

The advantage of most fireside games is, that
there is no preparation, no machinery wanted :






















4 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

we have everything within ourselves. The
older sort require a good deal of cleverness to
be done well; but many others nothing more
than a glib tongue or a good memory—and,
above all things, a merry, natural heart. This
is the difference between them and the amuse-
ments of our forefathers some generations ago.
At that time the company met, not to amuse
each other, but to be amused at the expense of
the entertainer. What would you think now-a-
days of seeing a great ship at one end of the
table, and a great castle at the other, with a
deer in the middle, having an arrow sticking in
his side—all made of pastry? The ladies pre-
tend to compassionate the wounded deer, and
perhaps a little girl is prevailed upon to pull
out the arrow—whereupon a stream of claret
spouts all over the table. hen the ship, which
is provided with little cannon, loaded with real
powder, begins suddenly to bombard the castle ;
the castle returns the cannonade as bravely ;
and so, in the midst of smoke, and screams, and
laughter, the fun is at an end. This is some-
what nonsensical for the few minutes it lasts:
the way to get an evening’s true and harmless
amusement is to depend upon ourselves.














FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 5

You must have observed that when the party
meet there is always a good deal of reserve at
first. The boys and girls sit eyeing one another
gravely: the older among them stand upon
their dignity, and wonder how it will be possible
to play with such children. After tea, the table
is wheeled away into a corner (where the little
old maid is sitting), and the circle draws round
the fireside. Mamma, or the eldest daughter,
or the governess, asks them what they will play
at? and they look at one another in silence,
as if afraid of compromising themselves. Some
whispers are exchanged here and there; but
the tallest make themselves as stiff in their
chair so many Maypoles, and cast their
eyes upon some books of prints on a side-table,
as if thinking they would furnish more suit-
able amusement for them.

This awkward pause is broken by a “ trifle
light as air ;” for the youngest child, picking up
a feather from the carpet, gives it a puff, which
sends it towards the circle of Mandarins. A
little girl cannot refrain from a modest puff
as it passes, and up it mounts into the air,
where it attracts the attention of all. As it
descends, several pairs of demure lips prepare












6 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



themselves by instinct, and another puff—an-

other—and another—passes it rapidly on. ‘The
tallest at length thinks no more of his height
than as an advantage which will bring him
nearer the object. ‘The governess puffs as zeal-
ously as any of them; mamma. herself cannot
refrain; and the little old maid, although she
is at the other side of the room, bends uncon-
sciously over the table with her lips pursed.
The zeal grows warmer and warmer; and at
length, one by one, all start upon their fect, big
and little, old and young, and with their heads
almost meeting, keep puff, pufling till the feather
“Ye smile,” says an author, treat-









disappe:

ing of this subject
‘Ye sinile,

I see ye, ye profane ones, all the while ;?
but yet that feather, that enticing spirit of
tation, that puff, puffing, and that competi-
tion, might be the subject of a homily too grave
for Christmas-time !”

Sometimes this accidental amusement is
tematised into a regular game. The feather,
or tuft of fl Ns
enough to float in the air, is puffed from one of
the cirele to the next ; and the unfortunate per-















or anything else light


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, a

son who suffers it to drop is condemned in a for-
feit. The most amusing, however, is what I have
described above; and it would be difficult for
one who has never witnessed the sport to fancy
the eager looks and determined lips that follow
the flying feather. When people, however, have
light hearts and good heads (for it requires
sound sense to enjoy innocent fan !), it is sur-
prising how mere a. trifle causes merriment.
Do you know what we who are learned in fire-
side amusements call “Forcing a Laugh?” It
is nothing more than this :—‘“Ha !” eries one,
looking into his neighbour’s face; “Ha!”
answers she instantancously ; “Ha!” says the
next as quickly; “Ha !—ha!—ha!”—round
it goes like lightning, till the gravity of the
proceeding—for everybody is anxious to be in
time with his “Ha!”—exeites such a feeling
of the ridiculous, that the forecd laugh changes
into a natural one, and ends in a general roar.
A laugh is a capital thing in its own time,
although very silly and impertinent when out
of season; but a laugh that is occasioned by
mere noise, forms, it must be confessed, a some-
what alarming accompaniment. Since we are
beginning at anyrate, however, with a crash
















8 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

(like the overture of most operas), we may as
well have out our instruments at once, and
indulge in a “Concert.”

The performers are ranged in a circle, in the
midst of which stands the leader of the or-
chestra, whose business it is to beat time, and
to see that each of the rest does his duty, and
n stop the performance instantaneously
dt is now settled





who ¢
by 2 movement of his hand.
what instrument each one is to play. Violin
holds out his left hand, and places the right
across it to serve for a bow; Horn doubl.
both hands, and puts them to his mouth; P:
spreads out her fingers upon a table; Harp
takes ac with her left hand, and prepares
to touch the imaginary strings with the other ;
and so on with Drum, Fife, Base-Drum, Kettle-
Drum, Cymbals, Clarionct, Hand- Organ, Hurdy-
gurdy—in short, as many instruments as there
are performers. All this being arranged, the
leader claps his hands, and off they go.
« Tweedle-dee —tweedle-dee !” squeaks Violin ;
« Twang-twang—twang-twang !” sings Han

«Too-hoo—too-hoo!” roars ‘Trumpet ; “ Rub-a-
dub—rub-a-dub !” thunders Drum ; and so on,
every performer making a sound with his lips

















FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 9

to imitate his instrument, till the whole room
trembles to the noise of the concert, and the
little old maid stops her ears

Suddenly the leader claps his hands again,
and an instantaneous silence takes place. He
fixes his eyes sternly upon Drum,

“Why don’t you rub-a-dub better?” de-
mands he.

“Because one of my drum-sticks is broken,”
replies Drum. Thus satisfied, the leader gives
the signal anew, and the concert is’ resumed.
By and by another clap of the hands causes
another instantaneous silence, and he looks this
time at Miss Piano; but she, confused with the
suddenness of the address, and minding more
what her neighbours are doing than her own
business, answers to the question, “Why don’t
you play better?” by saying, “Because one of
my harp-strings is loose!” Miss Piano is of
course fined in a forfeit for her inadvertence ;
for in this world we must always mind what we
are about if we would get quietly along.













Srconp Evenrna.

THE BALL OF WOOL—THE CANDLE RELIGUTED—THE OLD SOLDIER—
LIMPING TOM—THE SHEPHERD AND THE WOLF —HONEY-PoTS—
MILKING-PATLS.

The German game of the “ Ball of Wool” is
some little advance beyond “Blowing the Fea-
ther.” The wool is rolled lightly up into a ball,
and placed upon the table, when the company
set themselves earnestly to puff it off, the one
at whose right hand it falls being finéd in a
forfeit. A hunticane i is soon blowing from every
point of the compass on the unlucky ball,
which staggers from side to side, like a ship
blown by contrary winds. After a while, how-
ever, the winds abate—for people can’t blow
and laugh at the same time, you know—and
forfeits flow in thick and fast, till at last there
are only two combatants left. And now the
struggle begins in right earnest, and the
longest-winded rises as proud and triumphant
as any victorious gencral after a hard-fought
battle.




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. uw

When candles are first brought into the room,
the boys are usually eager to blow one of them
out—supposing that there is only one pair—in
order to give their companions the satisfaction
of relighting the other. The operator sits on
one foot, with the other crossed over the knee ;
but as he cannot retain so constrained a posi-
tion for more than a few moments, as soon as
the candles can be brought to bear upon each
other, he falls back sprawling upon the carpet,
amidst the laughter of the others.

But mamma thinks this rather dangerous
sport, and taking away the candles, proposes a
quiet game at “Old Soldier” instead. So they
all sit round in a corner; and trying to remem-
ber that they must not say “yes,” “no,”
“black,” “white,” or “scarlet,” in their answers
to the expected questions, wait the coming of
the Old Soldier with demure faces.

“What will you give an Old Soldier?” says
he to the first: “he is very much in want of
@ coat.”





“Well, I'll give him a green one.”
“A green one! A soldier would look ridicu-

lous in a green coat: wont you give him any
other ?”
12 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“No I wont.”

“Ah, give me a forfeit for that ‘no. ”

“Wont you, miss, give some of your pretty
black hair to make the Old Soldier a wig ?”

“No,” says miss, laughing: “I think white
hair more becoming an old man.”

“Oh, dreadful! two mistakes already. Two
forfeits, please.”

The next game I shall mention will be, for
the sake of varicty, “Limping Tom.” ‘The hen
sits in the middle, while her chickens form a
circle round her; and the fox limps on the
outside, coming nearer and nearer by degrees.
At last the hen says—

“Who goes round my house this night!”

“ None but Limping ‘Tom.”

“Do you want any of my chickens this night?”

“ None but this poor one!*~
And with that he seizes the smallest child, and
carries it away to his lair—which is the sofa,
or some other convenient corner. Thus he goes
round until he has got all the “poor ones ;”
and then the hen runs about erying, “Where
are my chickens ?—where are my chickens?”
And some of the chickens, on hearing her voice,
try to run away to her, and the fox has sharp




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 13

work to prevent them. He puts them all be-
hind him, however, in Indian file—that is, one
after the other—holding on by each other’s
clothes, and goes out to meet the bereaved
mother, who tries to run behind him, and get
back her children. If she takes hold of any
one, she can carry it away, and put it be-
hind her. The fox keeps his booty as well as
he can, although the hen generally contrives
to get back her chickens; and then she be-
comes the fox herself, and goes “round the
house” as Limping Tom.

“The Shepherd and the Wolf” is a similar
game to this; the lambs taking the place of
the chickens, and the wolf that of the fox.

Another game something like this is “ Honey-
Pots.” Here all but two sit in a row, with
their pinafores or handkerchiefs over their heads
—these are the honey-pots—and one stands up
to sell them. Presently the purchaser comes
and says, “Have you any nice honey this
morning ?”

“Oh yes,” says the merchant: “here are a
number of nic 8

“Well, Iwill buy them all. Will you help
me to carry them home ?”

c




14 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

This is done by the honey-pot clasping his or
her hands beneath the knees, and the merchant
and purchaser each taking an arm, or “ handle,”
as it is called, carrying her away, and setting
her down in a corner. When all have been
thus removed, the merchant comes and says,
“I think you have taken away my daughter,
and I suspect she is among those honey-pots.”

“No, indeed; they are all good honey, and
you can taste them.”

So the merchant opens a small space in the
pinafore, and pretends to taste the honey.
“Ah,” says he, “that tastes very like my little
girl.”

“Yes!” cries the little girl, and springs up,
and runs away, with the purchaser after her,
who tries to catch her; but while she is doing
so, all the others run away too, and the game is
ended.

In Germany they have a kind of dramatic
game somewhat akin to this, which I shall de-
scribe to you on account of its oddity, for I have
not seen it played in this country. It is called
the “ Milking-Pails,” and is always played by
girls. Two of the girls are mother and daughter:
half the others join hands, and form a line, with
Â¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 15

the mother in the middle; and the other half
do the same by the daughter. The daughter
then walks slowly forwards and backwards,
with her companions, before her mother, and
chants—

“ Mary’s gone a-milking, mother, mother ;
Mary’s gone a-milking, mother, dear mother mine ”

Then the mother answers in the same way—

“Take your pails, and go after her, daughter, daughter;
Take your pails, and go after her, daughter, dear daughter
mine.”

“Then buy me a pair of new milking-pails, mother,
mother ;

Then buy me a pair of new milking-pails, mother, dear
mother mine.”

«But where’s the money tocome from, daughter, daughter?
But where,” &e.

“Sell my father’s feather-bed, mother, mother;
Sell my father’s,” &c.

“But where will your father sleep then, daughter,
daughter?

But where,” &c.

“Oh he can have the servant’s bed, mother, mother ;
‘Oh he can have,” &c.
16 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

« But what will the servant sleep on, daughter, daughter?
But what,” &e.

“ Put him in the pigsty, mother, mother ;
Put him,” &e.

«Then where shall we put our pig, daughter, daughter?
Then where shall we,” &c.

“ Put it in the washing-tub, mother, mother ;
Put it,” &e.



“And where shall we wash our clothes, daughter,
daughter?
And where shall,” &c.

« Wash by the sea-side, mother, mother ;





“But suppose the clothes should blow away, daughter,
daughter?

But suppose,” &e.

“Then take a boat and go after them, mother, mother;

‘Then take,” &e.

hter?



“ And if the boat were upset, daughter, dau
And if the boat,” &e.



“Then there would be an end of you, mother, mother;
‘Then there,” &e.

's the mother



“Oh you cruel daughter!” ©
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 17

in a rage, and chases her unnatural child round.
the room.



Tuirp Evening.



PUSS IN THE CORNER—SMUGGLERS—CAT AND THE MOUSE—3MAGIC
MUSIC—SUR LE PONT D'AVIGNON—CHE GARDEN-GATE—CUPID'S
COMING—MY MASTER SENDS MG TO YOU, SIR—THE GRAND MUFTT
AR RED-CAP.





I suppose “ Puss in the Corner” is too old a
game for any of you to be unacquainted with it;
but at anyrate you play at it thus:—Four of
you take the four corners of the room, and one
stands in the middle. One Puss cries to the
other, “Puss, puss, give me a drop of water ;”
and then both make a rush to exchange places.
But if the Puss in the middle can dart into one
of the corners before the other gets there, she
may keep it, and the other must watch in her
place to cheat some one else out of a corner.

“Smugglers” is a newer game of the same
kind. The “smugglers” stand at “harbour” in
a corner of the room, and one entitled the
Officer stands on the look-out. At the cry of
“Look-out!” the smugglers rush out for the
other side of the room. ‘The officer gives chase ;


13 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

and if he eaptures one of them, makes him offi-
cer, and becomes himself a smuggler.

Another more complicated game of this kind is
the “Cat and the Mouse.” ‘The company stand
hand in hand in a circle, the mouse being in-
side, and the cat outside. ‘hey dance round,
raising their arms and lowering them alter-
nately, which gives the cat an opportunity to
jump in at one side, while the mouse jumps out
‘at the other. Puss is now a prisoner, and goes
round mé-au-ing; but as the dance continues,
she soon gets out, and chases the mouse, who
darts in to save herself. To admit of this, the
dancers raise their arms; and if she enters
alone, the cat pays a forfeit ; but if her enemy
gets in with her, it is she who loses.

In “Magic Music” you must get somebody
who ean play the piano pretty well, but you ean
generally gct mamma or the governess to offi-
ciate; and if not, the little old maid, you know,
is always at your service. Well, when you have
chosen some one for that duty, some one else
must leave the room; and while he is gone, you
all agree on what he shall do when he comes in.
For instance, he shall take a flower out of the
vase on the table, and give it to one of the young










FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 19

ladies. Now, “Come in!” and some simple air
is struck up. He approaches the table, and the
music increases in animation: he lays his hand
on the vase, he takes it up—merrily goes the
music: he carries it away—ah, the music dies
away: he puts it down, and takes out a flower
—bravo ! says Piano: he takes the flower, and
presents it to a young lady—tush! ’tis not the
right one; you can hardly hear what tune is
playing: he gives it to another; she takes it
with a smile, and the piano drowns every voice
with its own. This game is played in the same
y by hiding a thing which is to be found,
instead of fixing on something to be done.

And now, while I am at the piano, T will
show you another game in which it is employed.
I never heard the name of it, so you must make
one for yourselves. You all join hands in a
ring, previously placing a number of chairs
round you, with one less than your own number.
While I play, you all dance round in time to
the music; but when I stop, which I will do
suddenly, and when you least expect it, you
must all make a rush for chairs. Of course one
is left without, who pays a forfeit ; and whoever
has paid three forfeits, is out of the game. An-


















20 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS

other chair is taken away, and the game goes
on as before.

I think singing and dancing together have
also a good effect. These are both introduced
in the pretty French game, “Sur le Pont
Avignon.” You all join hands in a ring ; and
dancing round in time, you sing—











“Sur le Pont d’Avignon,
On y danse tout en rond.”



Then standing still, you turn to the girls on
cach side of you, and rubbing your closed
hands together, chant, “Les blanchisscuses
Qvasherwomen) faitent comme ga: et comme
¢a.” Then all dance round as before. ‘The
second time you sit down on the ground; and
putting one foot on your lap, make as though
you were sewing your shoe with both hands;
and looking first at one of your companions,
sing, “Les cordonniers (shocmakers) faitent
comme ga;” and then at the other, “ Et comme
ga.” The next time you imitate a eross-leaged
inilor, singing, “Les tailleurs faitent comme
ga.” ‘Then, “Les charpentiers (carpenters)
faitent comme ga”—pretending to saw: and
“Les forgerons (blacksmiths) faitent comme ga”




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 21

—pretending to hammer on an anvil: and “Les
marchandes de modes (milliners) faitent comme
¢a”—taking up your dress, and hemming it: or,
“Tes danseuses (dancers) faitent comme ga’”—
dancing in an affected style; and so on with as
many different “comme ¢as ” as you choose.

The “Garden-Gate” is another musical game
in English, and sounds very pretty when all the
players sing in time. A ring is formed round
one in the centre, who stands still till it has
danced three times round her, when a pause
occurs, and she sings—



“Open wide the garden-gate, the
garden-zate 5

Open wide the garden-gate, open, and let me through !”





The circle then wheels round, singing —

“Get the key of the garden-gate, the gurden-gate, the
garden-zate ;

Get the key of the g
self through.”

@en-gate, and open, and let your-



Then they stop to listen to the little one within,

who, weeping, sobs—

“Pve lost the key of the garden-gate, the garden-gate,
the garden-gate ;

I've lost the key of the garden-gate, and cannot let my-
self through.”
22 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

But the circle revolves with the same velocity,

crying derisively—

“Then you may stop all night within the gate, withm
the gate, within the gate ;

hen you may stop all night within the gate, unless you
have strength to break through.”



The captive then rushes to the weakest part of
the walls, and tries to break them down—that
is, by throwing her whole weight upon the
clasped hands of her adversaries ; and generally,
after two or three trials, contrives to “break
through,” when the one whose hand first gives
way is made captive in her stead.

In “ Cupid’s Coming” you choose a letter—
D, or any other—and take care that your words
all end in “ings” then sitting in a circle, the
first says to his neighbour, “ Cupid’s coming !”

“ How does he come ?” says the other.

“Dreaming,” returns he.

“Cupid’s coming !”

“Tow docs he come?” says the third.

“Disenchanting ;” and so round and round,
until there are no more words of the kind. If
one stops, unable to remember another word
descriptive of Cupid’s course, he must leave the













FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 23

game. This is capital exercise; but you must
not forget that whatever énitial letter you
choose, it must always end in ing.

“My Master Sends me to you, Sir,” takes that
name from the announcement made by a mes-
senger who comes into the circle.

“My master sends me to you, sir,” says he.

“What to do, sir,” asks the person he
addresses.

«Po do as I do;” and he thumps his knee
gently with his closed hand. The other imi-
tates him closely ; and turning to Ais neighbour
with the like injunction, the command is soon
flying round the whole circle, and they are all
industriously thumping at their knees like so
many blacksmiths.

“My master sends me to you, sir,” says the
messenger again.

What to do, sir?”

“To do as I do ;” and he taps the floor with
his foot, still keeping his hand employed as
before. The next two commands are the same,
only applying to the other leg. Then the
master’s message is, that they shall sway their
bodies to and fro, and then shake their heads.
After this, the motions are at the diseretion






24 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

of the leader; but I always found the foregoing
quite enough for me, and indeed the game was
usually given up long before it came so far, I
never knew any game produce so much laughter
as this. No one, but on penalty of a forfeit,
must stop any of his diferent movements for
an instant; and the absurd appearance there-
fore presented on every side—each beating the
ground with his feet, thumping his knees with
his fists, swaying his body to and fro, and wag-
ging his head—would be too much for the
gravity of an anchorite, and make “Bedlam
broke Loose” a more appropriate name for the
game than any other. It is the leader’s duty
to inflict the usual fine of forfeits on whomever
fails an instant in his part; but as the delay
necessary to receive them would make himself
open to a fine likewise, it is rarely demanded ;
but amidst the laughter may every now and
then be heard aceusations and defences : “ You're
stopping!” “You stopped!” “I’m not!” “I
didn’t !”

The “Grand Mufti” is another game some-
thing like this, and is a great favourite among
the younger players. The Grand Mufti stands
up in a chair, and makes some gesture or








FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 25

grimace, saying each time, “So says the Grand
Mufti,” or “'Thus says the Grand Mufti.” When
he says “so,” the company remain still; but
when the word is “thus,” every one must imi-
tate him; and a mistake involves-a forfeit.

“Mr Red-cap” is another amusing game, but
its effect depends entirely upon the animation
with which it is played. “Each having assumed
a name, a handkerchief is suddenly thrown to
one, the thrower calling out his name—for in-
stance, “ Mr Red-cap !”

“What! I, sir?” says Redeap instantly.

“Yes, you, sir!”

“Not J, sir!”

“Who, then, sir?”

“Mr Bluceap!” and the handkerchief is
thrown to that gentleman, ‘The same dialogue
is repeated without a moment's interval be-
tween the sentences; and an incessant clatter
is kept up of “Red-cap! Blue-cap! Yellow-
cap! Green-cap! What! I, sir? Yes, you, sir!
Not I, sir! Who then, sir?”





Fourrn Evenina.

ORANGES AND LEMONS—DUPE SAYS BUFF TO ALT 1S teN—currrer-
LOR—PRUSSIAN EXERCISE—THE TRAVELLER—THE COACH—MY
Lapy’s Tore, &e. &e.







“Oranges and Lemons” is a truly London
game, and, I should think, a very old one. The
two tallest of the company take cach other’s
hands, and raise their arms high in the form of
an arch, while the rest have hold of each other's
petticoats or jackets, and pass through,
after another, like a string of cabs at Temple-
Bar, the arch singing in a tone as much like a
church-chime,as possible—



one



“ Oranges and lemons, says the bell of St Clement's;
You owe me five farthings, says the bell of St Martin’s;
When will you pay me? says the bell of Old Bailey;
When I grow rich, says the bell of Shoredite
When will that be? says the bell of Stepney;
Ym sure I don’t know, says the great bell of Bow.”







Then changing the chimes into a funereal
knell, the bells ring solemnly—
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 27

“ Here comes a light to light you to bed;

Here comes a chopper to chop—off—the—last—man’s

—head”

At these ominous words the arch suddenly
lowers, and encloses, unless he be too quick for
the chopper, the “last man” of the linc. He is
then asked, in a whisper, which he prefers —
oranges or lemons? and, according to his choice,
is put to one side or other. The same proceed-
ing goes on till every one has become a “ last
man,” and all are ranged in opposite factions.
The two leaders then try to ize upon the fol-
lowers of the other; and after a long struggle,
the one who obtains all the captives of the
other wins the game. This is pretty nearly the
same, with the exception of the rhyme, as the
modern game of “ Queen Victoria’s Troops,” and
the old Scottish one of “ Through the Needle-e’e,
Boys.”

There are several games in which the only
art consists in keeping one’s gravity while say-
ing absurd things. The company, for instance,
are seated in a circle, one with a stick in his
hand, who speaks thus :—












“ Bui says buff to all his men,
And I say buff to you again;
28 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Buff neither laughs nor smiles,
But carries his face with a very good grace,
‘And passes his stick to the very next place.”

The speaker now hands his stick to his neigh-
pour with as comical a gravity as possible, and
the same thing is repeated till the whole circle
has been gone through. Those who suffer them-
selves to be betrayed into a smile while speak-
ing must pay a forfeit. Another game of the
same kind bears the respectable name of “ Chit-
terbob,” and the rhyme is thus :—



“There was a man, and his name was Cob;
Tle had a wife, and her name was Mob;
He had a dog, and his name was Bob;
She had a cat, and her name was Chitterbob,
* Bob,’ says Cob;
«Chitterbob,’ says Mob.
Bob was Cob’s d
Mob’s cat was Chitterbob :
Cob, Mob, Bob, and Chitterbob.”







Of a totally different kind is the “ Prussian
Exercise.” The party form the regiment, with
a corporal at their head, and the eaptain stand-
ing before them, who puts them through their
‘ise.
ght-about face!” growls he. “ Pull




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 29

noses!” “Slap checks!” “Pinch chins!”
“Ground knees!” “Advance two steps, and
cough!” “Corporal, slap that fellow’s toes
with his feet turned out like a dancing-
master: doesn’t he know that the feet are
always worn inwards in this regiment?” “Eyes
right !” “Noses left !” The captain then walks
up and down for a few minutes, and stopping,
cries suddenly, “Present arms !”

This they do by thrusting their arms straight
out,

“ Fire!”

The corporal immediately obeys by giving
the soldier next him a smart nudge; and he,
falling upon his neighbour, and his neighbour
upon his, the whole line is down like a row of
cards. It is best to give the command, “ Ground
knees,” just before “ Present arms ;” because, as
they will then be kneeling, the fall will not be
so ‘severe, especially if a cushion or two are
placed beside the last victim of war. The
oddity of this game, as well as that of the
military exercise it represents and ridicules,
consists in the precision with which the orders
are obeyed at the same instant by the whole

company. The more absurd these orders are,
D
30 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

the more laughing there will be; but it must
always be contrived that the captain is the
smartest boy or girl in the room.

“The Traveller” is another amusing game,
depending likewise upon promptitude. The
party represent the officials of an inn, some
taking the name of different things or persons
whose services a traveller may be supposed to
require on arriving from a journey. When all
are ready, the traveller comes to the inn ery-
ing, “Ostler, here take my horse, and see him
well rubbed down, put into a comfortable stall,
and given a good feed of oats!” Those per-
sonating the ostler, horse, stall, and oats, imme-
diately jump up; for all must be sitting. “Land-
lady,” continues the traveller, “can I have a
good supper in no time?” (landlady and supper
both get up); “and pray send the chamber-maid
to look after a room for me. Meanwhile you ean
tell the landlord to give me a bottle of his best
port.” Chamber-maid, room, landlord, and port,
all start up like the others; or in ease of for-
getfulness, or slowness, they pay a forfeit. The
traveller may mention their names as often as
he chooses; but of course he must not ask for
anything which is not in the inn.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 31

There are a good many ways of playing this
game ; that called the “Coach ” being, I think,
even better than this. The company take the
names of different things or persons belonging
to the coach—coachman, guard, passengers,
horses, wheels, doors, windows, &c.; and one
standing up while the rest sit, relates some little
anecdote of an accident on a journey, and at
every mention of any part or person belonging
to the coach, each jumps up as before.

“My Lady’s Toilet” is almost the same,
except in name. All personate different articles
of the toilet—such as Macassar-oil, hair-brush,
bracelets, cap, &c. with the exception of one,
who is the lady’s-maid, standing in the midst.

“My lady wants some Macassar-oil,” cries she:
“she wants her hair-brush, her cap, or her
bracelets,” and up jumps what is wanted the
moment its name is pronounced. Sometimes
the cry is, “ My lady wants her whole toilet!”
and at these words the toilet all jump up, and,
with the lady’s-maid herself, make a rush for
chairs, of which there is one less than the per-
sons present, The unlucky individual who is
left without a seat becomes lady’s-maid in turn.

We may now take a single glance at those
32 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

active games which are as household words
among us, and which are too well known to
require much description.

“unt the Slipper” is, I daresay, the oldest
of these. The company sit on the floor in a
circle, one personating the cobbler, and another
the hunter. The hunter brings a slipper to the
cobbler, saying, “I want this shoe mended;
when will it be ready?”

“To-morrow morning,” replies the cobbler. So
the hunter goes away for a few moments, and
then returns for his slipper ; but he is put off to
another day, and another, and another, until,
losing patience, he declares he will find it him-
self; and then commences a hunt after it, each
one passing it rapidly round to his neighbour.
He with whom it is caught becomes hunter.

A newer and prettier game than this—* Hunt
the Ring ”—is played with a ring strung upon
a ribbon, which passes round the whole circle
instead of a slipper.

In “ Hunt the Squirrel” all stand in a circle,
holding hands, excepting the squirrel, who
walks round and round behind backs with a
handkerchief in his hand, which he drops next
the individual he thinks most off his guard.


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 33

This one immediately darts after the squirrel,
singing—
« Hunt the squirrel through the wood !
Now I've lost him—now I’ve found him;
Hunt the squirrel through the wood! 2
When caught, the pursuer becomes squirrel him-
self.

“I Wrote a Letter to my Love” is very
similar to this, the words only being different.
The one who goes round with the handkerchief
says—

«I wrote a letter to my love,

And on my way I dropt it,
I dropt it, I dropt it ;”
dropping the handkerchief at the last word.
The pursuer must take particular eare to go in
and out at the same places as the other, or he
is liable to a forfeit.

“ Hide-and-Seek” takes its name from some
small object, such as a thimble, a ball of worsted,
&e. being hidden in the absence of one of the
party. He is then recalled, and told to “go
seck it.” When he approaches nearer and
nearer the hiding-place, it is the duty of the
others to ery, “ You are getting warm!” “You
are hot!” “Oh dear! you are quite in a
34 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

blaze!” But when he is not in the right scent,
and goes to some other part of the room, he is
said to be “cold,” “freezing,” &¢. When the
article is found, the person who hid it leaves
the room, that he may take his turn in seeking.

I suppose it is scarcely necessary to say much
about “Blind-Man’s-Buft” The eyes ‘of the
blind man are well bandaged with a handker-
chief, and he is then made to turn round three
times, in order that he may get confused as to
the geography of the room. The others then
run about him, touching his arms, sometimes
even pinching his fingers, but taking pretty
good care not to be caught. If one, however,
is seized, he may get off by the blind man being
unable to tell his name; but if once fairly
caught and identified, he becomes, as a matter
of course, the blind man.

The “French Blind Man,” instead of having
his eyes blindfolded, has his hands tied behind
his back; and thus disabled, he endeavours to
catch his companions.

“ Shadow-Buff ” is an exceedingly quiet game,
though well suited for a winter’s evening. A
Jarge white cloth is put up against the wall, so
as to make a smooth surface, and allow the


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 35

light to fall well upon it. Buff then sits before
it, so that he cannot see his companions, who,
dressing themselyes up as grotesquely as pos-
sible, throw their shadows upon the white sur-
face; and he has to guess the name of each as
he appears.

“ Blind-Man’s-Wand” is much like “ Blind-
Man’s-Buff,” but here the blind man is aceom-
modated with a small stick or wand. The others
dance round him, joining hands; and he then
stretches out the stick ; the one who is touched
takes hold of it by the point, and replies.in a
feigned voiee to three questions of the blind
man. If the latter recognises him, they change
places; but if not, Buffy has to make another
venture.

All the games of these four evenings are little
more than mechanical—that is to say, they
might be played as well by machines, if ma-
chines could speak. Of course some are better
than others, and some may be made more amus-
ing by the intelligence of the boys and girls
employed in them; but I mean that they do
not require any knowledge, or exercise any
faculty but the memory, and that only in a
trifling degree. We shall now get on, however,
36 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

to games not less amusing, but demanding a
little more thought and information, or where
they depend upon the memory, keeping that
faculty upon a greater stretch.

Firrn Evening:

FARMERS AND MECHANICS — DUMB MOTIONS — FLY AWAY, PIGEON —
ELEMENTS — JACK STRAWS — JERKING STRAWS — NEWSPAPER —
DUMB ORATOR.

On arriving at the amusements which require
somewhat more intelligence in the players than
the preceding ones, I might begin no doubt
in a lecturing key if I was in the mood; but
I always think that play is best considered
as play, and study as study; and at anyrate
you must know I am but very ditéle of an old
maid. I shall not even affect a much clearer
arrangement than on the former evenings ; for
the truth is, there is a certain confusion and
uproariousness, as it were, running throughout
the whole of these juvenile games which make
my little head turn round.

«Farmers and Mechanics” is another of this
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 37

kind of game; but instead of a word, it is a
trade which has to be discovered, and everything
is indicated by signs. Thus when the one who
left the room re-enters, if the trade chosen is
that of a farmer, the others will all be employed
in the different occupations of a farmer: one will
be reaping in a fine crop of nothing with papa’s
stick, with another perhaps gleaning after him ;
one, taking hold of the legs of a dining-room
chair, will form it into a serviceable plough; in
one corner a boy will be engaged in thrashing
with his sister’s parasol; and in another the
sister will be busily engaged in making butter
in an invisible churn. If they are mechanics,
they may mend their shoes in concert, or saw at
the chairs with a stick, hammer nails into the
pianoforte, plane the rosewood-table, or do any-
thing else, so that they all agree in acting one
employment, which may form a good indication
of their trade. When he who was out guesses
it, another takes his place, and another trade is
of course chosen.

“Dumb Motions” is just the same as this,
but the players are not obliged to be either
farmers or mechanics, but may choose a shop in
which to exercise their ingenuity.
38 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Here is a quick, lively, little game, very dif-
ferent from the last— “Fly away, Pigeon!”
‘The leader sits with his feet on a stool, so as to
make a large lap; or, which is better, all sit
round a little table. The leader then puts his
finger down upon it, and the others place all
their fingers round his. “Fly away, pigeon !”
cries he suddenly, and up all the fingers start.
Then they all settle down again. “Fly away,
eagle!” cries he again, and off they all go once
more. “Fly away, bull!” is now the cry, and
away most of the fingers fly as before, not re-
membering that bulls have no wings. Those
who make this mistake pay a forfeit amidst the
laughter of the others. “Fly away, feather!”
cries the leader again; but the others, taught
by the last experience, keep all their fingers
fixed to the table, and the leader’s flies up alone.

“Why don’t you fly?” says he.

“Why, feathers don’t fly, do they? They
have no wings !”

“No, but they fly for all that. Don’t you
remember the ‘Persecuted Feather’ we played
at some evenings ago, when the feather flew
all round the room, and afterwards went
up the chimney?” So the leader, like an
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 39

Eastern king, settles all disputes by his own
decision,

In the “ Elements” you require to have your
wits as much about you as in the “ Pigeon.”
This game creates much laughter—not from its
comicality, but because of the frequent and ridi-
culous mistakes committed by those who are
engaged in it. Before describing the game, I
must premise that the only “elements” acknow-
ledged in this game are earth, water, and air—
fire being omitted, because there are no crea-
tures known to exist in it, the salamanders we
sometimes read of in old books being fabulous
creatures. When all are prepared, the beginner
of the proceedings takes a handkerchief, and
looking at some one, as if he were about to
throw it at him, suddenly darts it at another
person, crying, “ Air” (or whatever element he
chooses) ; “one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
eight, nine, ten/” The other, if he be ready-
witted, will answer, before the numbers are over,
“Sparrow,” or the name of some other bird;
but frequently, when thus taken by surprise,
he will either remain in a state of stupid per-
plexity, or give the name of a four-footed beast
as an inhabitant of the air! If he make a
40 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

mistake, he pays a forfeit; but at anyrate
throws the handkerchief in his turn, and soon
meets with plenty of companions in misfortune,
whose forfeits are forming into a pile on the
table.

There is a newer game under the same name,
but I do not think it an improvement on the
old one. Here the players sit in a circle, and
the handkerchief being pinned into a. ball, is
thrown in the same manner, but without any
given time being fixed for the answer. Of
course, therefore, this game is not so lively as
the other.

A good deal of care and delicacy of touch is
required for “ Jack Straws.” A number of little
straws, or fine splinters of wood bearing this
name, are procured, and placed on end on the
table, meeting at the top, something in the
same way as we see the new-mown corn in the
fields. Three of these little straws are marked
in a peculiar manner—each one different—and
called King, Queen, and Bishop. The difficulty
of the game (and those who have tried it will
agree with me in thinking it a difficulty) is by
means of a little pin bent in the form of a hook,
and stuck into a splinter, to remove one of these
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 41

straws without moving any of the others. If
the experimenter succeeds, he lays the straw
aside, as the card-players do, counting it as one.
‘After he has obtained that one, he gives up the
hook to another, and thus it passes through all
the party. He who gets most straws wins the
game ; if he gets the king, he counts it as four;
the queen as three, and the bishop as two. I
think, when there are only a few playing, it
would be an improvement to divide the party
into two, each person playing for his party; if
any one, however, moves the heap, he is out of
the game.

«Jerking Straws” is exactly similar to this,
except that the straws are thrown in a heap
upon the table, and each one tries to re~
move them, under the same conditions, by
means of the hook, or a splinter sharpened to
a point.

Some games aspire to nothing higher than
“raising a laugh” by means of their sheer ab-
surdity. Of these the “ Newspaper” is perhaps
the most amusing. The company, sitting in a
semicircle, assume various trades—such as that
of a grocer, a cook, a draper, &c.; and when
the reader of the newspaper, who selects an
42 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

important despatch, pauses and looks stead-
fastly at one of the party, he or the next must
immediately help him out with one-or two words
relating to the particular trade adopted by the
individual. ‘The following reading is usually
given as an example, and it will do as well as
any other :—

“Early in the morning the whole” (looking
at one, who immediately continues) —

Dinner-service—

“Was in motion. Detachments from the
suburbs had put themselves in ”—

Vinegar ;

« Armed citizens occupied the ”—

Frying-pans ;



Cotton-balls ;

“ Planted the ”—

Marrow bones ;

“ And surrounded the ”—

Scissors.

« All were prepared to ”—

Break tumblers.

“All the powder and lead which they found
in the”—

Sugar hogsheads
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 43

“Were taken. The entire Polytechnic School
came out to”—

Make gingerbread ;

“The students of law and medicine imitated
the ”—

Worked muslin ;

“In fact, Paris appeared like a” —

Chopping-block ;

“ All the shops were”—

Cut bias ;

“And the Royal Guards, Lancers, Swiss,
and ”—

Teapots,

“ Were drawn up on all sides.”

The “ Dumb Orator” is a kind of little play
acted by only two persons, the rest of the party
being merely spectators, or relieving these two
out of their own ranks when they are fatigued.
When two actors have been chosen—the quali-
ties requisite for their parts being only that
both should possess plenty of self-possession,
and that one should be acquainted with a po-
pular speech—they leave the room, and consult
with each other which shall be the dumb, and
which the speaking orator. The latter then
puts on a large cloak, which should likewise
44 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

hide completely his associate, who creeps be-
neath it, with the exception of his arms, which
are thrust out before him, to represent the arms
of the speaker, these being held close to his
side beneath the cloak. When thus prepared,
they re-enter the room, resembling as much as
possible one individual, and begin the perform-
ance. The speaker recites with energy some
well-known speech admitting of a great deal of
action, while the other gesticulates in a violent
manner, throwing out his arms, clasping them
together, or beating the speaker's forehead and
breast at the pathetic parts; and throwing
them in the air, or clenching his hands, when
indignation and anger are to be depicted.
Neither speaker nor dumb orator ean be too
energetic, in order to produce the object of the
game—a hearty laugh. Any common specch
will do; but “My name is Norval” is generally
chosen, because it admits of a great deal of
acting, and is the speech most familiar to the
generality of girls and boys :—





“My name is Norval: on the Grampian hills
My father feeds his flocks; a frugal swain,
‘Whose constant cares were to increase his store,
And keep his only son, myself, at home.
Â¥FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 45

For I had heard of battles, and I longed

To follow to the field some warlike lord;

And Heaven soon granted what my sire denied.

This moon, which rose last night round as my shield,

Had not yet filled her horns, when, by her light,

A band of fierce barbarians, from the hills,

Rushed like a torrent down upon the vale,

Sweeping our flocks and herds. The shepherds fled

For safety and for succour. I alone,

With bended bow and quiver full of arrows,

Hovered about the enemy, and marked

‘The road he took: then hastened to my friends,

Whom, with a troop of fifty chosen men,

I met advancing. ‘The pursuit T led,

‘Till we o’ertook the spoil-encumbered foe.

We fought, and conquered. Ere a sword was drawn,

An arrow from my bow had pierced their chief,

Who wore that day the arms which now I wear.
Returning home in triumph, I disdained

‘The shepherd’s slothful life; and having heard

‘That our good king had summoned his bold peers

‘To lead their warriors to the Carron side,

1 left my father’s house, and took with me

A chosen servant to conduct my steps—

Yon trembling coward, who forsook his master!
Journeying with this intent, I passed these towers,

And, Heaven-directed, came this day to do

‘The happy deed that gilds my humble name.”



When this speech is well spoken, the exagge-
E
46 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

rated action of the dumb orator has a most
absurd effect, and the actors are usually repaid
with roars of applause.

Sixra Evenie.

HOW Do YOU LIKE IT? WHEN DO YOU LIKE IT? AND WHERE DO YOU
LIKE IT?—PUZZLE WORD—MANY WORDS IN ONE—WATCHWORD
WHAT 15 MY THOUGHT LIKE?—1 LOVE MY LOVE—PROVERES.

“ How do you Like it ? When do you Like it?
and Where do you Like it?” is the name of a
game, a favourite both of young and grown per-
sons. One of the party leaves the room, while the
others fix upon some word with two meanings,
or rather upon two words with the same sound
—such as bell, belle; quay, key—and when the
absent person is allowed to re-enter, he must
try to find out the word by asking the above
questions. His difficulty is, that the answers
refer sometimes to the one meaning and some-
times to the other, and he is puzzled by the
contradictions. For instance—if the secret to
be discovered is quay, key—on his asking the
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. AT

person next him the usual question, “How do
you like it?” the answer will probably be, “Oh,
I like it patent.” The others will perhaps say,
“TJ like it of stone ;” “of steel;” “with a strong
foundation ;” and so on. ‘The interrogator
perhaps can make nothing of so mysterious a
thing, and he has recourse to his next chance
by demanding, “When do you like it?”

“ After a long sea-voyage,” says one.

“When I have anything valuable I don’t
wish to lose,” says another.

“When I am locked out,” says a third.

The questioner, supposing him to’ be still
unable to discover the word, now puts his last
question in desperation, “Where do you like
it?”

“ By the sea-side.”

“Tn my pocket.”

“ Attached to my watch-chain.” Such an
answer as the last generally reveals the secret ;
but unless the answers are ingeniously framed,
it is frequently found out at the first or.second
question. When the questioner altogether fails
in discovering the word, it is customary to con-
demn him to a second trial with a new word ;
but I think it would contribute more to the
48 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

amusement of the company to put somebody else
upon the search, and set the former individual
to exercise his small ingenuity in puzzling other
people.

The “ Puzzle Word” is a very amusing game,
and much more difficult than the above. In this
case also one of the party leaves the room,
while the rest fix upon a word, which he must
endeavour to find out by asking ten questions
For example, if the word is “ paper,” on return-
ing into the room, he will ask some one—

1. “Is it animal, vegetable, or mineral ?”—
Answer (ve shall suppose), “ Vegetable.”

2. “Where does it grow ?”—“In most Euro-
pean countries, but more especially in Russia
and Prussia.”

3. “Is it a food, or a manufactured article?”
—*Tt is manufactured.”

4. “What colour is it ?”—* Generally white,
and often brown; but it can be made of any
tint.”

5. “It is not food you say—can it be tallow ?”
—“Tam not aware that tallow is a vegetable!
Remember that’s another question.”

6. “How stupid of me! Well, is it used in
England? and is it common, or a rarity ?”—
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 49

“These are two questions. It is common in all
civilised places; perhaps more common in Bri-
tain than anywhere else.”

8. “Is it in this room ?”—“ Yes.”

9. “Is it an article of clothing ?”—* No.”

10. “ What is its most common use ?”-——“ That
is hardly a fair question ; but it is mostly used
to convey our thoughts to one another.”

“ Ah, it is paper—is it not 2”

An easier game than this, which is too diffi-
cult for most children, is the “Secret Word.”
While one is out of the room, the others decide
on some common word fit to be introduced,
without attracting attention, in all the answers ;
for when the absent one returns, he is per-
mitted to ask a question of each of the com-
pany, and cach must make use of the secret
word in his reply. Let us suppose that this
word is “care :”—

“Did you see the Queen when she passed
through Glasgow?”

“No: I don’t care for any sight, however
grand, if I have to encounter a crowd to see it.”
“Do you ever read the Juvenile Library?”

“Oh yes; I take care never to miss a
volume.”


50 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“ Are you fond of conundrums ?”

“No; they give one so much trouble and care
in finding them out.”

And so on, round the whole circle, till the
word is discovered, when the person whose
answer has “let the cat out of the bag” leaves
the room in his turn.

“Many Words in One” is of something the
same nature, but still easier. Here a word is
chosen which has as many letters as there are
persons in the room, and each person must say
a word beginning with his letter. Thus, when
the one who was absent comes in, he fixes his
eye upon the first, who says immediately
“Prince ;” the others then all repeat their
words by turns :—

“Lightning.”

« Apple-pie.”

“Year.”

“Truth.”

“« Herald.”

« Ingenuous.”

« Nut-cracker.”

« Gamesome.”

It does not require a very good speller to
pronounce this—plaything ; but if some of the
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 51

players are unacquainted with the game, and
the leader tells them what words they are to
say, unless they are very clever, they will be
exceedingly astonished ‘at the word being
guessed so easily.

In the “Watchword” also, it is better that
the leader and the guesser alone be acquainted
with the game. The game consists in some one
touching a thing in the room while the guesser
is out of it, and which he has to point out when
he returns, though it is impossible he can have
seen the action. Thus some one touches a book
on the table; the other is recalled, and the
leader, pointing to the piano, asks, “Is it this?”

No.”

“ Or is it this newspaper 2”

“No.”

“Ts it not this flower-stand ?”

“No”

“Nor that purple book 2”

“Yes it is.”

“Dear me!” ery the others, opening their
eyes in innocent astonishment, “how did you
find it out?” Very easily: the whole secret is,
that whenever the leader changes her question
from “Is it this?” to “Is it that?” or the
52 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

reverse, the other knows she points to the
object which has been touched. Sometimes the
Jeader whispers the other whether the watch-
word will be “this” or “that,” but I think it is
unnecessary; and it looks more mysterious, if
there appears to be no communication between
the two.

«What is my Thought Like ?” is a good game
for testing the ingenuity of the players. One
of the party thinks of something—a dog, a eat,
the sun, moon, stars—anything, in short, he
chooses; and then, turning to the others, de-
mands of them, “What is my thought like?”
A most unwarrantable and unreasonable ques-
tion scemingly, for who can tell what an un-
known thought is like? However, as there must
be an answer, some one will perhaps begin by
replying at random, “I think it is like a goose ;”
and the others, ambitious of giving their opinion,
all hazard a conjecture of the thought being
“like” some object they themselves think of:
“like a table ;” “like awig;” “like a flower ;”
“like a fire ;” “like a frosty morning.” When
all have said their say, the thinker reveals his
thought, and each one, under pain of forfeit, has
to prove the resemblance he has ventured to
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 53

suppose; and it may be imagined that some
merriment is occasioned by the striking con-
trasts of the two objects. We will suppose a
party playing at this game, and the answers
have been those I gave as specimens: the
thought, for instance, may be a cat. “How can
a cat be like a goose ?”— Why, because they
are both sometimes seen to eat grass.” “Like
a table ?”—* Because it has four legs.” “ Like
a wig ?”—*'That is casy ; because it is covered
with hair.” “Like a flower?”—* Because they
are both often seen in the drawing-room.”
“Like a fire ?”—“ Because both, when touched,
give out sparks.” “Like a frosty morning?”
-—“How can.a cat be like a frosty morning?
Impossible.’ And the unlucky wight who gave
the answer, unable to find any similarity be-
tween them, pays a forfeit in default.

On one occasion, when a party of grown
people in high life were deeply engaged in the
game, the mystic thought, when disclosed,
proved to be “Lord Castlereagh,” a minister of
state, who had a very uninteresting way of
speaking in parliament. How could Lord





* When «cat is stroked in the dark, sparks of electricity
are seen to issue from her back.
54 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Castlereagh be like a score of incongruous
things to which he was likened? Above all
things, how could he be like a “pump,” the
resemblance adopted by Moore the poet, who
was among the players? The company were
delighted to catch a man of wit and genius in
so awful a scrape, and crowded round to hear
him bungle out his attempt at an impossible
explanation. But “Thomas the Rhymer” was
not easily caught unprepared, and opening his
oracular lips, he instantaneously replied—

« Because it is an empty thing of wood,

Which up and down its awkward arm doth sway,
And coolly spout, and spout, and spout away
In one weak, washy, everlasting flood!”

«I Love my Love” is too simple a game to
find its natural place here, but it comes into my
head because, like “ What is my Thought Like?”
it was a favourite with the “ grown children” of
a former age. There are three ways of playing
this game. In the first and simplest, which is
sometimes called “ Alphabetical Compliments,”
one of the party says to her or his com-
panions, “I love you, 4, because you are Affec-
tionate ; B, because you are Beautiful; C, be-

Gause you are Comic ;” and so on through the


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 55

whole alphabet excepting X, as there are no
English words commencing with that letter.
The two following, however, used to be the most
in vogue. In both these the party sit in a
circle, and each person takes a letter: the
first begins of course by 4, and without the
slightest hesitation—or a forfeit is inflicted—
goes through his letter; and the next takes
up B in his turn, and thus round the whole,
until the alphabet is exhausted.

“Tlove my Love with an 4,” confesses the
first, “because he is Amiable. I hate him with
an A, because he is Ambitious. He took me to
the sign of the Abercorn Arms, and treated me
with Almonds and Ale. His name is Alexis,
and he comes from Ardrossan.”

“TI love my Love with a B,’ pursues the
second, “because he is Beautiful. I hate him
with a B, because he is a Beau. He took me
to the sign of the Belle Savage, and treated me
with Bread and Butter. His name is Benjamin,
and he comes from Bedford.”

“T love my Love with a C,” exclaims another,
“because he is Careful. I hate him with a C,
because he is Cautious. He took me to the sign
of the Cat and Cradle, and treated me to Crab
56 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

and Capers. His name is Charles, and he comes
from Carolina.”

“I love my Love with a D,” pursues a
fourth, “because he is Diverting. I hate him
with a D, because he is Dainty. He took me to
the sign of the Dog, and treated me to Duck
and Dates. His name is Duncan, and he comes
from Dartford.”

“I love my Love with an H,” says a fifth,
“because he is Enthusiastic. I hate him with
an E, because he is Extravagant. He took me
to the sign of the Emerald, and treated me to
Egg-hot and Elder-wine. His name is Edward,
and he comes from Exeter.”

The third way of playing “ My Love” is much
the same as this; although in it the question is
of sending “ My Love” to a particular town, and
giving him certain articles.

In all these, whoever hesitates, or is unable
to find a word beginning with his letter, pays a
forfeit.

“Proverbs” belongs to the same more intel-
lectual (if I may so term it) class of games as
“What is my Thought Like?” In the absence
of one of the party from the room, the others
pitch upon some well-known proverb, and each


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 57

person takes charge of one of the words it con-
tains. When the one whose acuteness is to be
put to the test re-enters, he is permitted to ask
of cach of the company a question on any in-
different subject that may occur to him; and in
the answers, all must take care to introduce the
word they have charge of. If these answers
are ingeniously framed, and the proverb is of a
reasonable length, the hunt for it is difficult and
exciting ; but very short proverbs are too easily
discovered to afford much amusement. Let us
suppose, for instance, that the one in question
is, “ Allis not gold that glitters.” In this case
the words “all, is, not, that,” introduced into
the respective answers, give no clue; but if the
person who undertakes “gold” is not very care-
ful to introduce it in such a way as to prevent
its making any impression upon the questioner,
it is casily connected with “glitters,” and so
the “cat gets out of the bag” at once. We
will fancy, then, by way of example, that a
party engaged in this game have fixed upon
“ A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush :”
when the questioner enters the room, he will
find his companions sitting in a line or circle,
and beginning with the person next him, he
58 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

will put his questions regularly through the
whole.

“Were you out to-day?” he asks carelessly.

“Yes, and had a delightful walk.”

“Did you ever hear Jenny Lind?”

“Yes I did, and I thought her as superior
a singer to every one clse of her sex as the
nightingale is to every other bird.”

“I hear you intend taking lessons yourself ?”

“Yes; I mean to attend musical classes iz
winter.”

“Do you intend going to see the skating to-
morrow ?”

“Yes, if the day is fine.”

Can you tell me the day of the month?”

“No I cannot, for I have no almanac at hand.”

“Pray make some error in your answer, that
I may find out the proverb.”

“There és nothing worth your care, I assure
you, in my answer.”

“So I sce: is there more in yours ?”

“Indeed I cannot say mine is eworth much
either.”

“Do you not think trying to guess a proverb
is as diflicult as trying to find your way through
a marsh ?”
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 59

“I daresay you find it so at anyrate; but

be easy; in two or three minutes you will
be relieved.”

“Is it not provoking to be told to be easy
when you are on the verge of losing patience ?”

“Yes, and it scems particularly so ix your
case.”

“ Well, can you help me ?”

“ Not in the least.”

“Now I am at my last chance, and trust to
your mercy.”

“Trust rather to find an easy seat in a
quickset-bush than mercy at my hands.”

“Hands—bush! Well, I give it up. No!—
*bird—hand—bush ’—‘ A bird in the hand is
worth two in the bush !7”

But you see it would take a very clever boy
or girl to discover this; and perhaps, in some
Gompanies, it would not be discovered at all.


Srventa Evenine.

CONSEQUENCES—CROSS QUESTIONS AND CROOKED ANSWERS—GENTEEL
LADY —CHINESE SHADOWS—SHOPKEEPERS—APPRENTICES.

Consequences ” cannot be played by more
than ten persons at one time, who sit round’ the
table, each provided with a pencil. The leader
then takes a long slip of paper, and after writ-
ing down, if possible in one line, an adjective,
such as “the beautiful,” “the fascinating,” folds
the paper over, so as to conceal what he or she
has written, and then hands it to the person on
his right; the latter writes the name of a young
lady present, or who is known to the company;
the next writes a similar adjective to the first;
the next another name, either feminine or
masculine ; the next the name of a place, such
as “in the garden,” “at a concert ;” another
puts down some action, such as, “dancing the
Polka,” “cating apples ;” another a substantive,
such as “book,” “smile,” “lecture ;” another a
similar substantive ; another gives the opinion
of the world; and the last gives the final conse-


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 61

quences of the whole, All having “said their
say,” the leader unfolds the paper, and reads it
aloud for the diversion of the party. It should
run something in this fashion :-—

«The beautiful ”

“Miss Smith,”

And “eccentric ”

«Master Brown,”

“Were together at a Chartist meeting”

“ Dancing the Polka.”

“He gave her his opinion of the present
state of Bohemia,”

“And she, in turn, presented him with a
sugar stick:”

“The world thought the whole proceeding
very extraordinary ;”

And “the consequences were, that the cat
jumped out at the window.”

This game can be made much simpler by
cutting a piece of card into four dozen slips;
and writing on twenty-four of these slips the
names of those present, and of your common
acquaintances ; on twelve more some kind of
action, such as playing at battledoor and
shuttlecock ; and on the remaining twelve the

consequences. ‘These slips are then placed in
F


62 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

three little baskets, well shaken, and handed
round to the company, each person taking two
of the “names,” one of the “actions,” and one
of the “consequences.” When all are thus pro-
vided, cach one, in rotation, opens his budget
and reads it aloud. Or sometimes the game is
only played by three persons, who cach takes
charge of a basket, and when the first has read
his two “names,” the other two bring out their
“actions ” and “consequences.” Here are some
examples :—

“Jane Roberts” and “ Clara Vincent”

Were together “enjoying a see-saw ;”

The consequence was, “ they lost their shoes.”

“Miss Williams ” and “ Master Richards ”

Were “playing at battledoor and shuttlecock ;”

And the consequence was, “they had a fit
of the gout.”

«James Seymour ” and “ William Jennings ”

Were “hemming some pinafores ;”

The consequence was, “they strutted. about
as proud as peacocks.”

“Laura Jervis” and “ Miss Pattison ”

Were “ running a race ;”

The consequence was, “they went to logger-
heads.”









FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 63

« Cross Questions and Crooked Answers” has
so long been a well-known, favourite, that I sup-
pose there are few ignorant of its mysteries;
however, here it is for the benefit of these few.
The company being seated in a circle, one of
the party asks his neighbour a question in a
whisper, and the answer, which is conveyed to
him in the same manner, he treasures up in his
memory, until the questions having gone the
whole round, it comes to his turn to receive one.
Then joining the question he received from one
to the answer he had from the other, he tells
aloud his “ eross question and crooked answer ”
for the diversion of the company, whose mirth
is sometimes greatly excited by the ludicrous
effect these little unconnected sentences have
when put together. “T was asked,” one will
perhaps say, “whether I liked ice-cream? and
T replied, ‘Yes; I should think it would be a
great comfort to the dogs of St Bernard.”

“1 was asked,” says another in rotation,
“whether I liked to sce Italian greyhounds
wearing their little woollen greatcoats ? and I
replied, ‘I believed they were the laughing-
stock of the whole neighbourhood. ”

«T was asked,” says another briskly,













my
64 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

opinion of the fountains in Trafalgar Square ?
and I replied, ‘I didn’t know I was sure?”

“ And I was asked,” cries a fourth, “whether
I could skip a hundred jumps on the rope with-
out stopping? and I replied, ‘If somo one held
me by the heels I would,”

“And I was asked,” adds a fifth, “if I thought
T could hang-on for six hours to a branch of a
tree without falling? and I replied, ‘I was afraid
my great toe would be in the way.” And so
on to the end of the chapter—that is, till every
one is wearied.

With those who are fond of laughter and
absurdities, the “@enteel Lady” will be a
favourite. No forfeits arc exacted in this game,
which is only pl but a number of
little paper horn: prepared, she who
makes the slightest mistake is favoured with
one of these ornaments by way of punishment.
All being seated in a cirele, the first lady affects
to come as a messenger from some unknown
friond (a kind of “Mrs Harris”) to her neigh-
bour on the left, saying politely, “ Good-morn-
ing, genteel lady, always genteel ; I, a genteel
lady, always genteel, come from a genteel lady,
always gentecl, to tell you that she owns an













FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 65

cagle with a golden beak.” The lady, properly
impressed with this singular fact, immediately
turns to her neighbour, and says, with equal
civility, “Good-morning, genteel lady, always
genteel ; I, a genteel lady, always genteel, come
from a genteel lady, always genteel, to say that
she owns an cagle with a golden beak and silver
claws.” The next, full of the important news,
turns to the lady next her, and repeats the
exact words she has heard, after the usual com-
pliments; “an e she, “with a golden
beak, silver claws, and—and ”. Wo to her
if she cannot remember the other perfections
of this wonderful bird, for she will be invested
with a horn for the rest of the game, and an-
other will take up her place, and say, “ Good-
morning, gentecl lady, always gentecl; I, a
gentecl lady, always gentecl, come from a
horned Nady, always horned, to say that she
owns an cagle with a golden beak, silver claws,
and a lace skin.’ The next in the circle re-
peats, if she can, the same words, adding,
however, “diamond eyes” to the list. As the
slightest mistake is punished by a horn, before
the game is finished, most of the heads are
bristling with paper, so that the last lady is


















66 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

able to say, “Good-morning, two-horned lady,
always two-horned (laughing); I, a three-
horned lady, always three-horned (weeps), come
from a five-horned lady, always five-horned
(laughing immoderately), to say that she owns
an eagle with a golden beak, silver claws, lace
skin, diamond eyes, and purple feathers.”
“Chinese Shadows” is of something the same
nature as “Shadow- Bui,” and when well
managed, forms a very good substitute for the
magic-lantern. A white shect, or large white
cloth of some kind, is drawn tightly over the
window, or upon the wall—a couple of stecl
forks at top and bottom will keep it stretched
very nicely. Before this the spectators are
seated, while two or three of their companions
stand behind them, and throw the shadow of a
number of figures, eut in paper, upon the smooth
surface. If ingeniously managed, this play may
be exceedingly interesting. You may form a
very pretty scene by keeping the shadow of a
little house stationary at one side of the space
you have marked out on the sheet for your
stage—which may appear lighted up, by having
the windows cut out, so that the light may shine
through. Around this, and at the other side of






FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 67

the stage, trees may be planted, and the figures
of minute birds, suspended on wires or fine
threads, be made to dart about through them.
A couple or more of human figures may then
appear, and by the mouth of the operators hold
humorous conversations. Or a battle-piece may
be represented; a man passing along the road
with his cart; a hunt, with the sportsmen
chasing the deer before them. As these scenes
appear, one of the performers may increase the
spectators’ interest by giving them high-sound-
ing titles, and describing a part of the picture.
Thus, if the representation is a battle-picce, he
may ery, “This is the battle of Crecy, which
was fought in 1346; in the middle is Edward
the Black Prince, holding his sword above his
head.” If it is a hunt—* This is the royal party
at Balmoral, her Majesty and the Prince riding
first.”

“The Shopkeepers” comprehends the whole
company: there is no leader, and no spectators.
Each person takes a profession of some kind:
some are druggists, and some are haberdashers ;
some are stationers, and others furniture-ware-
housemen ; every one, however, has something
to scll, and asks the opinion of the merchant
68 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

next him whether it belongs to the animal,
vegetable, or mineral kingdom. If he answers
wrongly, he is not allowed to sell any of his
goods until the next time the question comes
round. We will suppose a party playing at this
game, and that the first shopkeeper, tuming to
the one beside him, says, “I am a tea-dealer,
and have some green tea to sell; is it animal,
vegetable, or mineral 2”

“Tt is vegetable, because it is the leaves of a
shrub that grows in China. IT am a habérdasher,
nd have a card of mother-of-pearl buttons to
sell; are they animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”

“They are mineral, because they are formed
of the shell of an oyster” (This occasions an
argument, an oyster being an animal; but the
company settle it that the shell is only the
oyster’s house.) “I am a doctor, and have some
peppermint-drops to sell; are they animal, veget-
able, or mineral ?”

“They are vegetable, because they are made
of sugar, which is extracted from the sugar-
cane in the West Indies, and are flavoured with
the juice of the peppermint plant. I am a
stationer, and have a bunch of quill pens to
sell; are they animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”












FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 69

“ Animal, because they are plucked from the
wings of a goose. I am an upholsterer, and
have a mirror to scll; is it animal, vegetable, or
mineral ?”

“Tt is both vegetable and mineral, because it
is composed of sand, soda, and quicksilver, and
its frame is of wood, usually gilded. I am a
small-ware dealer, and have some whalebone to
sell; is it animal, vegetable, or mineral 2”

“Vegetable, is it 2”

“Oh, dear no! Don’t you know it is taken
from the great sea-monster, the whale? But
Jet us begin ag

The shopkeepers may then change their sex,
and become the mothers of an “ Apprentice.”
One of them, after having apprenticed her son
to a good trade, tells her neighbour the fact,
and also favours her with the initial letters of
the first thing he sold, which are to enable her
to guess the name of the article. Says the first
—T apprenticed my son to a mercer, and the
first thing he sold was S. 8.”

“Shaded silk, was it? Well, I apprenticed
my son to a shoemaker, and the first thing he
sold was a pair of C. 8.”

“Carpet slippers, I suppose? And J, having


70 ¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

apprenticed my son to a grocer, I went the next
morning and bought a pound of M. from him.”

“A pound of M.? Oh, maccaroni! I ap-
prenticed my son to a stationer, and he says
the first thing he sold was a shect of B. P.”

“ Brown paper ?”

“No”

“Well, blotting-paper? I apprenticed my
son to an ironmonger, and the first thing he
sold was a C. 8.”

“Coal scuttle? Well, my son was more re-
spectably connected by being apprenticed to a
Dazaar-master, and the first thing he sold was a
box of C. M.’s.”

“OM,

“ Cigar matches.

“Oh, no wonder we could not find that out.”




! What can that be?”
Erenta Eventnc.

buZ!—TEN FINE RIRDS—PETER PIPER—MR ROMERT ROWLEY—
DIDON DINA—PARAPLUIE—TON THE—GROS, GRAS, GRAIN D'ORGE
SI JEFAIS PErrT POT DE BEURRE—SI J
GAPING, WIDE-MOUTHED, WADDLING FROG—GRAND PANJANDRUM,







“Buz!” is a good exercise in arithmetic, and,
besides, a very amusing game. It stands quite
alone in its kind, for I think there is no other
similar. It merely consists in repeating all the
numbers of the multiplication-table except
seven, for which the word buz is substituted.
Thus, beginning at the right hand, the first per-
son says “one,” the next “two,” the next
“three ”—“ four ”— “ five” — “six” — “ buz!”
This is continued through all the multiplications
of seven—such as 14, 21, 28, and likewise
wherever the number seven should be used—17,
27, 37; and so on. When the number gets b
yond seventy, “buz-one,” “ buz-two,” &e. is said ;
and seventy-seven is “ buz-buz.” If any one
names a wrong number, speaks out of his turn,
or delays speaking after five is counted mo-


72 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

derately fast, he has to pay a forfeit, and begin
the game anew, by saying, “one;” when the
numbers will go round again, commencing on
the left hand.

The “'Ten Fine Birds” requires to be learnt
before being played, as it is rather an exercise
for the memory than a regular pastime; or at
anyrate the leader should be well acquainted
with it, in order to exact a forfeit from all who
stumble in their parts. The leader commences
by saying, “.A good fat hen;” and this is re-
peated by the whole circle, one after another.
«Two ducks, and a good fat hen,” says the
leader again, and so say all the rest. “Three
squawking wild e, two ducks, and a good
fat hen,” is now the sentence. “Four plump
partridges, three squawking wild geese, two
ducks, and a good fat hen.” This having gone
round as before, “Five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen,” is next given
out. “Six long-legged cranes, five pouting
pigeons, four plump partridges, three squawking
wild geese, two ducks, and a good fat hen.”
Waiting until the echo has died away, the
leader commences again— Seven green parrots,






FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 73

six long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen.” Adding again,
« Hight screeching owls, seven green parrots, six
long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen.” This having
been said, “Nine ugly turkey-buzzards, eight
screeching owls, seven green parrots, six long-
legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four plump
partridges, three squawking wild geese, two
ducks, and a good fat hen,” is the next round ;
and “Pen bald eagles, nine ugly turkey-bu
zards, eight screeching owls, seven green parrots,
six long-legged cranes, five pouting pigeons, four
plump partridges, three squawking wild geese,
two ducks, and a good fat hen,” is the finale.
“The House that Jack Built,” “The Little Old
Woman that Lived in a Vinegar Bottle,” and
other games of the same nature, may be sub-
stituted for the “Ten Fine Birds,” by way of
variety.

Sometimes the difficulty of the game consists
in the pains it takes to “get one’s tongue about
the words,” or in the mere oddity of the sound.
For instance, in the well-known “Peter Piper”—





74 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.



Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppe
A peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked ;
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers,

Where is the peck of pickled peppers Peter Piper picked?



Or in a cousin-german of Peter’s, “ Mr Robert
Rowley ”—
Robert Rowley rolled a round roll round ;

A round roll Robert Rowley rolled round.
Where rolled the round roll Robert Rowley rolled round?

The following French sentences are of a similar
kind :—

DIDON DINA.
Didon dina, dit-on, du dos d’un dodu dindon.

PARAPLUIE,



Etant sorti sans parapluie, il m’eat plus plu qu'il plit
plus tot.



TON THE.

A Frenchman having taken herb tea for a cough, his
neighbour asked him, “Ton thé, t’a Vil oté ta toux?”



GROS, GRAS, GRAIN D’ORGE.





“Gros, gras, grain d’orge, quand te dégrogragrain-
tu?” Second time going round: “Je me
ain-d’orgeriserai, quand tous les autres gros
gras grains dorge se dégrogragrain-d’orgeriseront.”









FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 75

SI PETAIS PETIT POT DE BEURRE.

“$i j’étais petit pot de beurre, je me dépetit-pot-de-
beurre-rais comme je pourrais.” The next time going
round: “ Et vous, si vous étiez petit pot de beurre, com-
ment vous Aépetit~pot-de-beurriez-vous?”



SI PHTAIS PETITE POMME.
“$i j’ctais petite pomme d’api, je me dépetite-pomme-
‘apierais, pomme je pourrais.” “The second one must
repeat this, word for word; and the third must ask, “ Et
vous, si vous étiez petite pomme d’api, comment vous
dépetite-pomme-d'apiericz-vous?” The fourth must re-
peat this without mistake.





A. very difficult game of memory is a very
odd one, the “ Gaping, Wide-Mouthed, Waddling
Frog.” One of the players, handing anything
he pleases to his neighbour, says, “Take this!”
The next answers, “ What’s this?” to which the

first replies—



“A gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog.”

The second docs the same thing to a third;
adding—

“Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, wide-mouthed,” &c.

And so on through the whole party.
76



FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Three monkeys tied to a clog;
Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &






Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a deg;
With a gaping, &e.

Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog ;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, Ke.







inst the wall,



puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast cal!
Four horses stuck in a bog;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;
‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.





Seven lobsters in a dish,

As-fresh as any heart could wish ;
Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call;






FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 77



Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.

Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog ;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &c.

Nine peacocks in the air,
I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;
Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,
As fresh as any heart could wish;
Six beetles against the wall,
Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
a


78

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Four horses stuck in a bog;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &e.

‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high;

Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;

in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all ;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

‘As fresh as any heart could wish ;
Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in a bog;

Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog ;
With a gaping, &e.







Eleven ships sailing on the main,
Some bound for France, and some for Spain,
I wish them all safe home agai
‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high ;
Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,
I don’t know, and I don’t care;


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 79

Eight joiners in a joiner’s stall,
Working with their tools and all;
Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish ;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;
Five puppies buy a rounded ball,
Which daily for their breakfast call ;
Four horses stuck in.a bog;

‘Three monkeys tied to a clog;

Two pudding-ends would choke a dog;
With a gaping, &







‘Twelve huntsmen with horns and hounds,
Hunting over other men’s grounds ;

Eleven ships sailing on the main,

Some bound for France, and some for Spain,
J wish them all safe home again;

‘Ten comets in the sky,

Some low, and some high ;

Nine peacocks in the air,

I wonder how they all came there,

I don’t know, and I don’t care;

Fight joiners in a joiner’s stall,

Working with their tools and all;

Seven lobsters in a dish,

As fresh as any heart could wish;

Six beetles against the wall,

Close by an old woman’s apple-stall ;

Five puppies buy a rounded ball,

Which daily for their breakfast call;






80 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
Four horses stuck in a bog;
Three monkeys tied to a clog

‘Two pudding-ends would choke a dogs
With a gaping, wide-mouthed, waddling frog.

This odd composition is the more difficult to
remember, from the ideas it contains having no
connection with each other, but being simply
absurd. It is surpassed, however, in the same
respect. by a picce of drollery known as the
“Grand Panjandrum,” invented by Foote, the
humorous writer, to puzzle a man who had
boasted of his memory. Here it is :—



“So she went into the garden to cuta cabbage leaf, to
make an apple-pie; and at the same time a great she-
bear, coming up the street, pops his head into the shop.
What! no soap? So he died, and she very imprudently
married the barber; and there were present the Picnin-
nies, and the Joblillies, and the Garyulies, and the grand
Panjandrum himself, with the little round button at top ;
and they all fell to playing the game of catch as catch

can, till the gunpowder ran out at the heels of their
boots.”
Nintn Evenine.

CAPPING VERSES—CENTO VERSES — CRAMRO, OTHERWISE THE
AMERICAN GAME, OTHERWISE THE GAME OF QUESTIONS AND
NOUNS.





There is a class of juvenile amusements which
Jeans in some degree upon literature, and has
therefore an air of more clegance than the
others. All of this class require a certain
amount of ingenuity, and imply some acquaint-
ance with at Ieast common books.

“Capping Verses” is an old game, that seldom
fails to amuse young people who have a good
store of poetry in their heads. One of the
party recites a verse of poctry, and the next
must immediately repeat another, beginning
with the same, letter as the last word of the first
verse began with, out of some diflerent picce.
Thus, if the first repeats—

“Go, lovely rose!

‘Tell her that wastes her time and me,
‘That now she knows,

When I resemble her to thee,

How sweet and fair she seems to be”—
82 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
The next immediately continues—

“Bird of the wilderness,
Blithesome and cumberless,

Light be thy matin o’er moorland and lea!
Emblem of happiness!
Blessed be thy dwelling-place !

Oh, to abide in the desert with thee!”



“The heath this night must be my bed,
‘The bracken curtain for my head,
My lullaby the warder’s tread,

Far, far from love and thee, Mary
To-morrow eve, more stilly laid,
My couch may be my bloody plaid,
My vesper-song thy wail, sweet maid !

Tt will not waken me, Mary!”



« My beautiful—my beautiful! that standeth meekly by,
With thy proudly-arched and glossy neck, and dark
and fiery eye;
Fret not to roam the desert now with all thy wing?d
speed;
I may not mount on thee again—thou’rt sold, my
Arab steed!”

“So stately his form, and so lovely her face,
‘That never a hall such a galliard did grace;
While her mother did fret, and her father did fume,
And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and
plume;
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 83

And the bridemaidens whispered, ¢*Twere better by far
To have matched our fair cousin with young Loch-
invar?”

“Cento Verses” is a much more difficult
pastime than this, and was formerly thought
worthy of being the occupation of high and
celebrated persons, though it has now degene-
rated into a fireside game for young people.
Instead of a verse, each person in this case has
a single line of poetry to say; but every two, or
every two alternate lines, must rhyme with each
other. As an example will show my meaning
better than any description I can give, here are
some verses compounded of these lines:—

“On Linden when the sun was low,”

“A frog he would a-wooing go;”

“He sighed a sigh, and breathed a prayer:”
“None but the brave deserve the fair.”

“A gentle knight was pricking o’er the plain,”
“ Remote, unfriended, melancholy, slow3”

“ Gums and pomatums shall his flight restrain,”
“Or who would suffer being here below ?”

“The youngest of the sister arts”
“Was born on the open sea;””

“The rest were slain at Chevy-Chase,”
“ Under the greenwood tree.”
84 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

« At morn the blackcock trims his jetty wings,”
« And says—remembrance saddening o’er each brow” —

“ Awake, my St John !—leave all meaner things!”
“Who would be free, themselves must strike the blow!”



“Tt was a friar of orders gray,”

« Still harping on my daughter;”
“Sister spirit, come away”

“ Across this stormy water.”

“On the light fantastic toe,”
“ Othello’s oecupation’s gone ;”

“ Maid of Athens, ere I go,”
“ Were the last words of Marmion.”



“There was a sound of revelry by night”
“In Thebes’ streets three thousand years ago,”
“And comely virgins came with garlands dight”

To censure Fate, and pious Hope forego.”





©Oh! the young Lochinvar came out of the west,”
« An under-bred, fine-spoken fellow was h

“A back dropping in, an expansion of chest,”
“ Far more than I once could foresee.”



The game of “ Crambo”—for I like odd names
—is sometimes called the “American Game,”
and sometimes the “Game of Questions and
Nouns.” Let each of the party be provided
with two slips of paper of different sizes, and
write on the one a question, on the other a


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 85

noun ; then fold them up separately, and drop
them into a basket, a hat, or any convenient
receptacle placed ready to hold them. The
papers, when thus collected, must be shuffled
and handed round, when each of the company
takes two—the larger containing a question,
which he is to answer, and the smaller a noun,
which, however foreign to the subject, he must
introduce into the answer. Be it remembered
that the answers, and, if practicable, the ques-
tions, must be in verse. his partly constitutes
the difficulty of the game ; but an obstinate, im-
practicable noun, which will not take its place
quictly in verse, is a very serious obstacle.

Of course the papers are in due time col-
lected and read aloud by one of the party for
the amusement of the rest, no one present
knowing by whom they are severally written.
Here is a wide field for the imagination—a rare
opportunity for “ popping the question” without
feeling any alarm as to the consequences.
Imagine yourself for a moment making one of
a Christmas party so occupied, and eagerly exa-
mining the papers it has been your lot to draw.
One of them is written in a pretty feminine
hand, and contains an anxious inquiry for your


86 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

opinion on the subject of ladies’ eyes—* whether
black eyes or blue you prefer?” while coupled
with it, written in large characters on the other
slip, is the unintcllectual noun “mince-pies.”
“How provoking!” you exclaim. “What in
the world have mince-pies to do with a lady’s
most charming feature?” and you gaze despair-
ingly on the bright orbs around you, and wish
people would not put such words into the
basket. But patience; even more unmanage-
able words have been pushed into rhyme, and
very successfully too. If I may venture to in-
troduce to your notice a few specimens of this
amusing game, written by a few friends sitting
by my own fireside, I think this point will be
clearly established. The nouns in question are
printed in italics: —
“Which do you prefer—riding or walking?”
“ Gladly 1'd walk

To hear you talk,

And list to your accents sweet;

Gladly I'd ride

By your dear side,

But it would not be étiguette.”
Or, again; plumpudding is surely as difficult to
manage in a stanza as mince-pies; but we
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 87

think it appears to advantage in the following
couplet :—
“ How felt your heart—
Pray softly tell—
When Cupid’s dart
Upon it fell?”
“How felt my heart? Why, sure that’s a good ’un;
It felt like an o’erboiled Christmas plumpudding!”

The mention of pudding giving rise to the

inquiry—

«Since you talk of pudding, is it not to be dreaded,
That, by having too much, you become pudding-headed?”

It was met by the following tart rejoinder, in
which the “walnut-shell” proves a useful
auxiliary instead of an annoyance to the ver-
sifier :—



“To judge from the specimen furnished by you,
I fear the remark you've just made is too true.
But that you had a head, I knew not before ;
For I thought ’twas a walnut-shell, minus the core.”

This may be properly followed by another, in
an equally severe strain:—

“ For better or worse will you take me?
Believe that I ne’er can forsake thee.”
8s FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

“It wont be for better, it can’t be for worse ;
As you're in such a hurry, you'll prove but a curse.”

But it is time we had a touch of the sen-
timental; of which, take the following speci-
mens :—



“Which instrument do you prefer—
‘The harp, piano, or guitar?



“ Piano and harp are sweet to hear,
Yet your tones have more music than either, my dear.
‘To me more fragrant than balmy spice
Is the breath of your lips. I spring up in a trice
If I hear but your name, for that is to me
‘The sound most melodious of all melodie.”





A fair querist asks—




“Why does the moon—
Infuse into thy soul sue!
And is told—

“Tf the moon e’er calm my restless mind,
*Tis when by its light my duck I find.”

ir empress of the night—
calm delight?”

I add only one more, though I fear the reader’s
patience is nearly exhausted:—

“ Dear sir, your opinion I'd like to know,
How far in Leap Year it is proper to got
Address to me
At No. 3,


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 89

On the left-hand side from the fire.
And postscript, I pray,
Will you please to say,

Do you black eyes or blue most admire?”





Answer—
“To Miss Mee,
At No. 3,

On the left-hand hob by thetide of the fire.
My dear ladie,
I can’t, d’ye see,
Give you my advice on the point you desire.
»*Twould be very improper for me to say
How late in the year you may safely delay ;
But really I think
I would not shrink
From an early endeavour to settle the thing





With orange flowers and a plain gold ring.
‘As to where beauty lies—
In black or blue eyes—
It’s my present impression,
The most pleasant expression
Is that which beams forth from your own pretty face.
Vm yours faithfully,
AB G, near the fireplace.” *



* The account of this game comes from an anonymous
correspondent.
Tentn Evenrne.

Fo!



oe



PAWNS —THTE PRICES PATD.

Tt will have been observed that the apparent
purpose of most of the preceding games is to
obtain forfeits from the company; and the
redemption of these forfeits, or “selling pawns,”
as it is called, is as amusing a game as any of
them. Sometimes the pawn merchant sits in a
chair with his or her eyes blindfolded, while
another holds up one of the forfeits, and the
former mentions at what price it may be re-
deemed; but more commonly mamma, or the
governess, or perhaps the little old maid, is
coaxed into taking charge of the pawns; and
one of the company kneels, or sits on a low stool
at her feet, and places her head in her lap, with
her face downwards, so as to answer the pur-
pose-of blindfolding. Supposing it to be done
in this way, which I like the best, perhaps
because I am most accustomed to it, the person
who sits holds the pawn or forfeit over the head




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 91

of the kneeler, and says, “Here is a pretty
thing, and a very pretty thing; what shall the
owner do of this very pretty thing?” The
seller asks, “Is it fine, or superfine?” If it
belongs to a girl, the reply is that it is super-
fine; if to a boy, that it is fine; and the punish-
ment is awarded accordingly, giving of course
the milder task to the fair sex. If the forfeit
belongs to himself, the pawn merchant very
disinterestedly leaves his place, and some one
else conducts the sale. The following are some
of the most approved methods of regaining a
forfeit :—

1. Perform the laughing gamut rapidly with-
out mistake—

ha ha
hha ha
ha ha
ha ha
ha ha
ha ha

2. Say five flattering things to the person
sitting next you without using the letter 2.

3. Compliment and banter every one in the
room.
92 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

4, Stand in the middle of the room with a
lamp in your hand, and first make a very woful
face, and then a very merry one.

5. Stand with your face to the wall, while
some one stands behind you making silent signs
indicative of a kiss, a pinch, or a box on the
ear. You then choose, without knowing the
rotation of the signs, whether you will have the
“first,” “second,” or “third,” and abide by the
result.

6. Recite a piece of poetry, of a humorous
character if possible.

7. Laugh in one corner of the room, ery in a
second, yawn in a third, and sing in a fourth.

8. Kneel to the prettiest person in the room,
bow to the one you consider the wittiest, and
kiss the one you love best.

9. Propose a conundrum, or repeat a stanza
of poetry.

10. Sing a song, or, if unable, tell a short
story.

11. Kiss yourself in a looking-glass.

12. Kiss a box or bag inside and out without
opening it. This may be done by first kissing
it iz the room, and afterwards taking it owé of
the room and kissing it there also.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 93

18. Walk round the room, and kiss your
shadow in each corner of it. Sometimes it is
added, that if you cannot refrain from laugh-
ing, you must pay another forfeit.

14. Keep a serious countenance for five
minutes, without either laughing or frowning,
whatever your companions may say or do to
disturb your equanimity.

15. Imitate, without a laugh or smile, any
animal your companions may name.

16. Repeat whatever your companions tell
you, however difficult; if you make a mistake,
you must pay another forfeit.

17. Compose two lines in rhyme.

18. Your companions give you a line of
poetry, and you must repeat another to rhyme
with it, or pay a forfeit,

19. Guess a riddle or conundrum, or pay
another forfeit. ..

20. Relate an anecdote.

21. Count twenty backwards.

22, Ask a question of any of the party
which cannot be answered otherwise than by
“yes.” The question is, “What does y-e-s
spell ?”

23. Mention the name of some remarkable

H
94 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

person, and repeat an anecdote of him. A
forfeit if you fail.

24, Repeat a proverb.

25, Spell Constantinople syllable by syllable.
When you have spelt Con-stan-ti-, all the party
will immediately ery out, “No, no!” and if
you do-not know the trick, you will stop in
great surprise, wondering how you have made
a mistake, and will begin over again. But
do not be alarmed; spell their “no,” saying
politely, “Thank you,” and finish the word.

26. Stand upon a chair, and perform what-
ever grimaces or motions you are bidden without
laughing.

27. Hop on one foot from once to four times
round the room as you are bidden.

28. Dance a solo, such as a minuet or horn-
pipe.

29. Rub one hand on your forchead, and at
the same time strike the other on your breast;
if you change or leave the motion of either
until you leave off altogether, you are liable to
another forfeit.

30. Bite an inch off the poker! This is done
by holding the poker to your mouth, and biting
the air at the distance of an inch from it.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 95

31. Make a good cat’s-cradle.
32. Repeat these four lines rapidly without
a pause or mistake :—

“ As I went in the garden, I saw five brave maids
Sitting on five broad beds, braiding broad braids.
I said to these five brave maids, sitting on five broad
beds,
Braiding broad braids, ‘ Braid broad braids, brave
maids.’ ”



83. Put yourself through the keyhole. This
is performed by writing the word “yourself”
ona slip of paper, rolling it up, and pushing it
through the keyhole.

34, Allow yourself to be fed with water till
you guess who is feeding you. To perform this,
you are blindfolded ; a glass of water and a
teaspoon being provided, your companions then
each pour a spoonful into your mouth by turns,
until you guess who is doing it. It is to be
hoped you are a good guesser.

35. Perform a statue. To do this, you stand
on a chair, and your companions cach gives you
a new position added to the last, until they
have exhausted their ingenuity. The first will
perhaps put one of your arms a-kimbo ; some
one else will place the other over your head ;
96 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

the next performer will point your toe; the
next will bend a finger; another will loop your
tresses (if you have any) over your fingers;
another will open your mouth; the next -will
command you to shut one eye; another to hold
your head back. And now, being fully engaged
With these different attitudes, I will leave you
to descend and require your forfeit, while I show
you how to redeem another by performing

36. The “Dutch Doll.” This is played by a
boy, who, unobserved by the company, lies
down on his face under a table, which should be
covered with a large cloth, so as completely to
conceal him excepting his feet, which are raised
soles upwards. Two of his companions then
dress the feet with clothes, so that they have the
appearance of a large, ugly doll. When every-
thing is prepared, the exhibition is opened, and
the figure begins to act, the legs making comical
movements, such as might be supposed to be
performed by a galvanised doll.

37. Stand in a corner while some one asks
you to come out. You must answer “No” to
every question, and yet will leave the corner at
last. Thus he will ask you, “You like being
in that corner, do you not ?”
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 97

“No”

“You would not object to remaining all
night though ?”

“No.”

“Then I may leave you there 2”

“No,” &e.

“You will not object to my taking you out?”

“No.”

The last “no” meaning an affirmative to his
request, you are then led out.

38. After a sixpence has been stuck upon
your forehead, take it off without touching it
with your hands. This is a very good trick to
play ‘upon a person not acquainted with it,
Some one showing him a sixpenny-picce, presses
it hard against his forchead, previously wetted;
and although the coin is instantly taken off and
concealed, the impression remains, and the vie-
tim is haunted for a long time by an imaginary
sixpence, which he supposes to be sticking to
his forchead. He will then begin shaking his
head, and rubbing it against different places, but
all of course to no purpose; his companions in
the meantime receiving with shouts of laughter
his efforts to dislodge—nothing at all. He must
not use his hands, or he pays another forfeit,
98 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

89. Two forfeits may be redeemed at once by
those to whom they belong lamenting the death
of the king of Bohemia. They go to opposite
sides of the room, and walk slowly towards each
other: one puts her handkerchief to her eyes,
and says disconsolately, “The king of Bohemia
is dead !”

“Is it possible?” cries the other, bursting
into tears; “sad news indeed—sad news !”

Then repassing one another with their hand-
kerchiefs to their eyes, they both cry, “ Alas—
alas! let us cry for the king of Bohemia!” If
either of them laugh during this lamentation,
a forfeit is exacted for the impropriety.

40, Two more may be regained by their pro-
prietors performing the “Dumb Orator.”

41. Two boys may redeem their forfeits by
performing the “Knight of the Rueful Counte-
nance and his Squire.” The knight takes a
candle in his hand, and marches ‘round the
room, stopping before every girl; the squire
kisses the hand of each girl, and afterwards
wipes the knight’s mouth with his handker-
chief. Both during the operation must pre-

serve grave, sad faces, If either laugh, he pays
a forfeit.
YIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 99

42. A number of pawns or forfeits may be
redeemed at once by some merry girls perform-
ing “Mrs M‘Tavish.” The first cries out to the
others, “ Mrs M‘Tavish has fainted away !”

“Ts it possible? How did she faint ?”

“Just in this manner,” and the first lady
throws herself fainting into a chair.

“Mrs M‘Tavish has fainted away!” cries
another.

“You don’t tell me so! How did she faint ?”

“It was thus,” rejoins she, and falls down
upon the carpet in a state of insensibility.

“Mrs M‘Tavish was nearly fainting!” cries a
third.

“Tt is not possible! How was it ?”

“So ;” and the speaker throws herself into
affected attitudes, fanning herself with her
handkerchief, and calling for water in a faint
voice. And so it goes round, until every one,
after fainting away, or nearly doing so, recovers
sufficiently to take back her forfeit.

43. When all the forfeits except two or three
have been regained, these few may be redeemed
all at once by the performance of the “Cats’
Concert.” To do this, the whole company sing
at the same time, each song and air being diffe-
100 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

rent, till the little old maid is as near fainting
as Mrs M‘Tavish,

Exeventa Evenina.
RIDDERS OR ENIGMAS,

Having now recited all the games I can
remember that have much chance of amusing
young people, I proceed to the various other
means of passing an evening agrecably by the
fireside.

First, we have to deal with a very numerous
tribe of enigmas or dark sayings, oA which the
company are required to exercise their inge-
nuity. The most famous of these is the riddle of
the “Sphinx,” a devouring monster, who could not
be destroyed till his conundrum was discovered.
GEdipus was at length so fortunate as to ex-
pound it: but for my part I will maintain that
Ihave found many boys and girls quite as clever
at such work as that renowned Theban king.
The affair was simply to tell what creature it is
which in the morning goes on four feet, at noon
on two, and at night on three. The answer
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 101

was “a man:” because in infancy he creeps on
hands and feet; in middle age he walks on
two legs; and in old age he adds to these a
staff. I shall now show that the ancient world
was more easily puzzled than the modern; for
in the following selection I flatter myself you
will find many that the Sphinx could not have
invented, and that Qidipus could not have
solved.



RIDDLES.

1. In spring T look gay,
Decked in comely array,
In summer more clothing I wear ;
‘As colder it grows,
I throw off my clothes,
And in winter quite naked appear?

2. Two women went to market to sell their eggs: one
had more in her basket than the other; the one who had
the most said to the other, “ Give me one of your eggs,
and then I shall have double the number that you have.”
“No,” said the other, “ give me one of yours, and then
we shall be equal.” How many eggs had each of these
women?



3. A shoemaker makes shoes without leather,
With all the four elements put together:
Fire, water, earth, and air;

‘And every customer takes two pair!
102

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

4. No body I have,
No food I e’er crave,

And yet of long legs I have two;
Yet I never wall
And I never talk,

Then what does my nobody do?



If you move me, then I
Move most pliantly,
And my feet always serve me for hands;
I gather up all,
‘The great and the small,
As my master or mistress commands.

If you straddle me wide,
I then cannot ride,

And this for the best of all reasons ;
That nothing I’ve got,
On which [can trot,

In winter or in summer seasons.

Although you may stare,
This is all, I de
So now, tell my name, if you can ;
Yl farther make known,
In the same honest tone,
V’m neither child, woman, nor man.



5. I'm strangely capricious; 'm sour or Pm sweet;

To housewives I’m useful, to children a treat;
Yet I freely confess I more mischief have done
Than anything else that is under the sun.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 103

6. I contain many gallons of drink ;
Yet I often am held to the lip:
Searce Goliah could lift me, you'd think,
And yet I can hold but a sip.





From the top of your house I descend,
And under the pavement I crawl ;

I furnish whole cities with drink,
Though seldom they see me at all.



s

. Deep in the bosom of the earth,

T lie concealed from sight,

‘Till man, who ransacks nature through,
Draws forth my form to light.

Yet when I first salute the view,
I'm rude, and void of use

‘Till frost, which other objects binds,
Assists to set me loose.



Then polished by the artist’s hands,
In wood I’m closely bound;

And when fair Learning calls her sons,
My ready help is found.

To me the sciences are known ;
In algebra I shine,

In mathematics often deal,
And make each problem mine.

Lo me the wisest heads submit,
‘The deepest scholars bend ;

And though I neither read nor write,
I’m Learning’s common friend.
104 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Of neither sense nor lore possessed,
The strongest sense I aid;

Relieve the memory of its load,
And ease the studious head.

Yet soon my knowledge is effaced,
And every trace is lost;

And oft again I’m filled with lore,
Nor feel the conscious boast.

8. I from Siberia’s frozen realms am brought,
Or in the wilds of Canada am sought;
But soon by art a domicile I form,
At once convenient, elegant, and warm.
Vithin the compass of this pretty cell
But two inhabitants can hope to dwell ;
Here, snug and warm, in spite of wind and weather,
They both may live most lovingly together.
When spring returns, with blooming flow’rets gay,
My fickle inmates from my shelter stray 5
And through the summer months inconstant roam,
‘Till winter’s cold recalls the wanderers home.



T have no head, and a tail I lack,
But oft have arms, and legs, and back ;

I inhabit the palace, the tavern, the cot—

Tis a beggarly residence where I am not.

Were a monarch now present (I tell you no fable),
I still should be placed at the head of the table.

2





10. Sixteen adjectives, twenty-four pronouns, a disap-
pointed lobster, an oyster in love, and nineteen Radicals,
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 105

may all be expressed in one common liquid—which you
must discover.

11. D’m here, and I’m there, and I’m everywhere ;
In one place not a moment I stay ;
Like a goblin or sprite I appear in the night,
And Shakspeare declares me a fay.
However this be, I am civil, you see,
In giving you pretty good warning—
That unless you take care, you will very ill fare,
And perhaps be drowned before morning.

12. Three feet I have, but ne'er attempt to go,
And many nails thereon, but not one toe.



18. My head and tail both equal a

My middle slender as a bee ;
Whether I stand on head or heel,
*Tis all the same to you or me.

But if my head should be cut off;
‘The matter’s true, although ’tis strange—
My head and body severed thus,
Immediately to nothing change.



14, Perfect with a head, perfect without a head;
perfect with a tail, perfect without a tail; perfect with
either, neither, or both.



15. There was a man bespoke a thing,
Which, when the owner home did bring,
He that made it did refuse it,

He that bought it would not use it,
106 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

And he that had it could not tell
Whether it suited ill or well.

16. I counterfeit all bodies, yet have none ;
Bodies have shadows—shadows give me one;
Loved for another's sake, that person yet
Is my chief enemy where’er we meet ;
Thinks me too old, though blest with endl

my speaking tru



youth,





17. A riddle of riddles! It dances and skips ;
It is read in the eyes, though it cheats in the lips;
If it meet with its match, it is easily caught ;
But if money will buy it, ’tis not worth a groat.

18. I lived before the Flood, yet still am young ;
I speak all languages, yet have no tongue;
In deserts was I bred; I know no schools,
Nor ever understood the grammar rules ;
Yet when the courtly gallant talks with me,
As polished in discourse I am as he.
Iam in France, in Spain, in England too;
Next moment I’m in China or Peru.
Yet legs to walk with nature did deny :
Nor have I fins to swim, nor wings to fly.
I sympathise with all, in joy or pain;
Laugh with the merry, with the sad complain.
By nature taught such an obliging way,
‘That if you converse with me all the day, }
I never once dissent from what you say.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 107

‘Where’er I am to understand I’m plain,

‘Yet all the while invisible remiain ;

Though thousands do, I ne’er shall die of age,
Till the last day concludes this mortal stage.

19. Ye bards, whose deep skill all mysteries clear,

Pray attend and discover my name

Four brothers I have, and a fifth I appear,
But our age is exactly the same.

Yet I to their stature shall never attain,
‘Though as fast as them always I grow 3

By nature I’m fixed, a dwarf to remain,
‘And hence the enigma you'll know.



20. Ever eating, never cloying;
All devouring, all destroying ;
Never finding full repast
Till I eat the world at last.

21. Enough for one, too much for two, and nothing
at all for three.

22. Cato and Chloe combined well together,
Make a drink not amiss in very cold weather.

23. There was a man who was not born,
His father was not before him ;
He did not live, -he did not die,
And his epitaph is not o’er him.



24. We are little airy creatures,
All of different voice and features :
108

2

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

One of us in glass is set,
One of us you'll find in jet;
One of us is met in tin;

And the fourth a box within :
If the last you should pursue,
It can never fly from you.



*Tis in the church, but not in the steeple;
*Tis in the parson, but not in the peopl

*Tis in the oyster, but not in the shell ;
Tis in the clapper, but not in the bell.



26. Light my body is, and small,
Though I have wings to fly withal,
‘And through the air may rove ;
Yet were I not by nature pressed,
In ease and indolence I'd rest,
And never choose to move.

°Tis beating makes me diligent;
When beat, and on an errand sent,
I hurry to and fro ;
And, like an idle boy at school,
Whom nothing but the rod can rule,
Improve at every blow.

7. *Tis true I have both face and hands,

And move before your eye;
Yet when I go, my body stands;
And when I stand, I lie.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 109

28. Formed long ago, yet made to-day,
I’m most in use whilst others sleep;
‘What few would like to give away,
Yet none would wish to keep.

29. There was a thing a full month old
‘When Adam was no more;
But ere that thing was five weeks old,
‘Adam was years five score.

30. A tall and slender shape I bear;
No lady’s skin more white and fair!
My life is short, and doth decay
So soon, it rarely lasts a day.

If in the evening brought to light,
I make my exit during night.

31. What is that which is neither flesh nor bone, and

yet has four fingers and a thumb?

This is enough for a time: let us now breathe
for an instant, and then begin a new series.
Twetrrs Evenine.
CONTINUATION OF THE RIDDLES.

82. Eleven great men, fifteen celebrated women,
twenty-three extraordinary children, thirty-two fine
pictures, a new manner of cooking oysters, the best way
of making coffee, a great improvement in the cultivation
of grapes, ten fashionable bonnets, and the substance of
a hundred books, may all be expressed by a liquid in
common use, and of only one syllable.

33. In every city, town, and street,
°Tis ten to one but me you meet;
Sometimes adorned in shining gold,
Splendid and brilliant to behold;
And different characters I wear—
‘A lamb or lion, buck or bear,

A dragon fierce or angel fair,

‘An eagle or # warrior bold,

‘These various forms in me behold;
But though exalted as a chief,

I’m gibbeted like any thief.

34. I am small; but when entire,
OF force to set a town on fire;
Let but one letter disappear,

I then can hold a herd of deer;
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 111

Take one more off, and then you'll find
I once contained all human kind.

35. In comes two legs carrying one leg, which he
lays down on three legs. Out goes two legs. Up jumps
four legs, and runs off with one leg. Back comes two
legs, snatches up three legs, and throws it after four legs
to get back one leg.

36. “ What relation is that gentleman. to you?” said
one Jady to another. She answered, “ His mother was
my mother’s only child.”

37. A man who was going to cross a river in a small
boat, had charge of a fox, a goose, and a basket of corn.
He could only take one at a time, and was much puzzled
how to take them all over, so as to save them from each
other, knowing that, if left together, the fox would eat the
goose; and that the goose could not be trusted alone with
the basket of corn, which she would certainly devour if
allowed to remain with it while the man carried the fox
across the river. If the goose was taken over first, it is
true that the fox would not meddle with the corn; but
then, after being carried across the water, and left with
the goose, he would surely eat her while the man went
back for the corn; and if the corn was taken first, the
fox would demolish the goose when left alone with her.
How did the man manage to convey the fox, and the
goose, and the basket of corn across the river in safety?

38. Formed half beneath and half above the earth,
We sisters owe to art our second birth ;
112 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

‘The smith’s and carpenter’s adopted daughters,
Made upon land to travel o’er the waters ;
Swifter we move the tighter we are bound,
Yet neither touch the sea, nor.air, nor ground.
‘We serve the poor for use, the rich for whim ;
Sink when it rains; and when it freezes, skim.

39. What is that word of one syllable which, if the
two first letters are taken from it, becomes a word of two
syllables?

40. Two brothers wisely kept apart,

Together ne’er employed ;

Though to one purpose we are bent,
Each takes a different side.

‘We travel much, yet prisoners are,
And close confined to boot;

Can with the swiftest horse keep pace,
Yet always go on foot.

41. I am a vehicle that’s wondrous large,
But neither coach nor wagon, ship nor barge;
Whether sitting, standing, lying,

With you I’m miles uncounted flying ;
You hear not a breath, while mute as death
My journey I pursue;
With a mighty swift whitling, I’m constantly
twirling,
But ’tis all unfelt by you.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 113

Some travel with me who never can see,
Nor believe I convey them a yard;
And for years I have taken them,
Nor ever forsaken them,
And yet claimed no reward.
And, gentles, against or with your will,
Or sleeping or waking, V'll carry you still.

42. I am red, black, or white; I am blue, gray, or green;
I’m intended to hide what is meant to be seen ;
Like mortals, inflexible often am I,

Till, by the tongue softened, I’m brought to comply;
Of prodigal spendthrifts I am an apt token—
Tonly exist to be ruined and broken.

43. Though I live in a study, I know not a letter;
I feast on the Muses, but ne’er am the better ;
Can run over English, o’er Latin, or Greek,
Yet none of those languages ever could speak.

44. What yesterday was, and what to-morrow will be.

45, What is that which, by adding something to it,
will become smaller; but if you add nothing, will grow

larger?

46. Suppose there was a cat in each corner of the
room ; a cat sitting opposite to each cat; a cat looking at
each cat; and a cat sitting on each cat’s tail: how many
cats would there be?
114 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

47, Mr Jones told another gentleman that he had six
daughters, and each daughter had a brother; how many
children had Mr Jones?

48. As I was going to St Ives,
I chanced to meet with nine old wives:
Each wife had nine sacks,
Each sack had nine cats,
Each cat had nine kits;
Kits, cats, sacks, and wives,
‘Tell me how many were going to St Ives?

49. Little Miss Netticoat, with a white petticoat,
And a red nose;
She has no feet nor hands ; and the longer she stands,
‘The shorter she grows.

50. What is that which in the morning walks on four
legs; walks on two legs at noon; and in the evening
walks on three legs ?

51. What is that which a pudding has, and which
everything else in the world has also?

52. A duck before two ducks; a duck behind two
ducks; and a duck between two ducks. How many
ducks were there in all?

58. There is a thing that nothing is,
And yet it has a name;
°Tis sometimes tall, and sometimes short,
It joins our walks, it joins our sport,
‘And plays at every game.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 115

54. Use me well, and I’m everybody; scratch my back,
and I’m nobody.

65. I never was, but always am to be;
None ever saw me—you may never see;
And yet I am the confidence of all
Who live and breathe on this terrestrial ball.
The princely heir, his honours not yet blown,
Still looks to me for his expected crown ;
The miser hopes I shall increase his wealth;
‘The sick man prays me to restore his health;
The lover trusts me for his destined bride ;
And all who hopes or wishes have beside.
Now name me, but confide not, for believe
That you and every one I still deceive.

56. What is that which lives only in winter; would
die in summer; and grows with its root upwards?

57. I have but one eye, and that without sight,
Yet it helps me whatever I do:
I am sharp without wits, without senses I’m bright,
The fortune of some, and of some the delight,
And I doubt not I’m useful to you.

58. If I from you a kiss receive,
And you that kiss return,
You by that act the word dost give
I now demand to learn.

59. Twenty pronouns, nineteen troops of horse, seven
regiments of infantry, what the ladies like, because the
116 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

gentlemen dislike, a child one year old, a tabby cat,
a screech owl, a bonnet, seven fat geese, an alderman’s
thumb, seventeen turkeys, a disappointed lobster, Mr
B—s nose, the third curl in Dr ——’s wig, and a
Maypole, may all be expressed by a thing in very com-
mon use.



60. Gentle breath of melting sorrow,
Pleasure does thy garment borrow ;
Love on thee is silent hung ;
Silence gives to thee a tongue;
Pleasing, sweet without a word ;
Gently felt, and softly heard ;
Never seen, though known to be;
Child of sensibility.

61. There is a thing by you possessed
(Strange as it seems, ’tis true),
Which your acquaintance ne’er can have,
‘Yet use it more than you.

62. No rose can boast a brighter hue
Than I can, when my birth is new;
Of shorter date than 1s a flower,
I bloom and fade within an hour;
Though some in me their honour place,
'm oft a token of disgrace;
Like Marplot, eager to reveal
Those secrets I would fain conceal ;
Fools, coxcombs, all agree in this,
And equally disturb my peace;
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 117

Though ’gainst my will to stoop so low,
At their command I come and go.

[The following riddle is by Lord Byron. It was written by him
many years ago in the scrap-book of a lady :]—

63. I am not in youth, nor in manhood, nor age,
But in infancy ever am known}:
I’m a stranger alike to the fool and the sage,
‘And though I'm distinguished in history’s page,
I always am greatest alone.

I am not in the earth, nor the sun, nor the moon—
You may search all the sky—I’m not there ;
In the morning and evening—though not in the
noon—
You may plainly perceive me, for, like a balloon,
I am midway suspended in air.

I am always in riches, and yet I am told
Wealth ne’er did my presence desire ;

I dwell with the miser, but not with his gold,

And sometimes I stand in his chimney so cold,
Though I serve as a part of the fire.



I often am met in political life—
In my absence no kingdom ean be—
And they say there can neither be friendship nor
strife,
No one can live single, no one take a wife,
‘Without interfering with me.
118 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

My brethren are many, and of my whole race
Not one is more slender and tall ;
And though not the eldest, I hold the first place,
And even in dishonour, despair, and disgrace,
I boldly appear ’mong them all.

Though disease may possess me, and sickness, and
pain,
I am never in sorrow nor gloom ;
Though in wit and in wisdom I equally reign,
I’m the heart of all sin, and have long lived in vain,
And I ne’er shall be found in the tomb!

64, We are spirits all in white,
On a field as black as night;
There we dance, and sport, and play,
Changing every changing day :
Yet with us is wisdom found,
As we move in mystic round.
Mortal! wouldst thou know the grains
That Ceres heaps on Libya’s plains,
Or leaves that yellow autumn strews,
Or the stars that Herschel views,
Or find how many drops would drain
The wide-scooped bosom of the main,
Or measure central depths below?
Ask of us, and thou shalt know!
With fairy step we compass round
‘The pyramid’s capacious bound,
Or, step by step, ambitious climb
‘The cloud-capped mountain’s height sublime.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 119

Riches, though we do not use,
°Tis ours to gain, and ours to lose.
From Araby the Blest we came;

In every land our tongue’s the same ;
And if our number you require,

Go count the bright Aonian quire.
Wouldst thou cast a spell to find

The track of light, the speed of wind?
Or when the snail, with creeping pace,
Shall the swelling globe embrace?
Mortal! ours the powerful spell :

Ask of us, for we can tell.

65. A word of three syllables seek till you find,
‘That in it are twenty-four letters combined.

66. A young lady had an aunt in prison; she sent
her an animal, whose name urged her to escape; and the
aunt returned a fruit, the name of which implied, “I
cannot escape.”

67. I’m English, I’m Latin, the one and the other:

What's English for one-half is Latin for t’other.

68. I went into a wood, and got it; when I had got
it, Ilooked at it; and the more I looked at it, the less
I liked it; and I carried it home in my hand because I
could not find it.

69. As I was walking through a field of wheat,

I picked up something good to eat;
It'was neither fish, flesh, fowl, nor bone,
And I kepé it till it ran alone.
120 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

70. I often murmur, yet I never weep ;

I always lie in bed, but never sleep ;
My mouth is wide, and larger than my head,
And much disgorges though it ne’er is fed :

I have no legs or feet, yet swiftly ran—

And the more falls I get, move faster on.



FRENCH RIDDLES.
1. Je suis ce que je suis,
Et je ne suis pas ce que je suis;
Si jretais ce que je suis,
Je ne serois pas ce que je suis.

2. Je suis capitaine de vingt-quatre soldats,
Et sans moi Paris seroit pris.

3. Mes amis, j’ai vécu cent ans et quelques mois,
J’aimais A célébrer le jour de ma naissance ;
Devinez de ce jour la singuliére absence—

Tl n’est pendant cent ans venu que vingt-cing fois.



ENIGMATICAL TREES.

1. What tree takes a gift?

2.
3.
4.

5.

‘What tree is of great use in history?

‘What tree smokes when water is poured on it?

For what tree will men scale precipices, and dive
to the bottom of the ocean?

What tree is a delicate-article of dress?
6.

7.

8.

9.
10.
le
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
a7.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24,
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
al.

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 121

‘What tree withstands the fury of the ocean?

‘What tree is eaten?

‘What tree is an officious gossip?

‘What tree is a city?

In what tree would you impound asses?

‘What tree is one hundred thousand pounds sterling?

‘What tree is double?

‘What tree do we keep in our barns?

What tree would be sure to lose in a race?

Of what tree do we make a wicked manufacture?

What tree plagued the Egyptians ?

‘What tree produces more leaves than any other?

‘What tree makes babies sleepy ?

What bush is superior to all others in age?

‘What bush needs a physician?

In what tree would you shut up a precious gift?

‘What small tree is a letter of the alphabet?

What tree is a lady’s name?

What bush keeps the floor clean?

What is the dandy among trees?

‘What plant makes a sweet walking-stick ?

‘What tree is the opposite of all that is beautiful ?

‘What tree carries you?

What tree gives an invitation to wander?

‘What tree decorates dresses and cushions ¢

Could this puzzle the trees, and in riddles involve
them,

°Tis the tree I address I call on to solve them.
122 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

ENIGMATICAL BIRDS.
1. The bird beloved by Eve.
2. Smooth and quiet.
3. A famous English architect.
4, What wicked men are doing.
5. What we all do at dinner.
6. A plaything.
7. A cheated person.
8. Spoil a metal.
9. A sound indicative of triumph.
10, Warm country.
11. A tailor’s instrument.
12. An instrument to raise weights.
13. A bird disliked by mice.

These enigmas are so various, that I have
found it impossible to classify them; but per-
haps there is more amusement in taking them
as they come—head and shoulders.

TurrTeents Evenine.
(CHARADES—LOGOGRIPHE—REBUSES—ABITHMETICAL PUZZLES, &0.

A charade is a sort of compound enigma, a
riddle being connected with each syllable of the
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 123

word in question as well as with the whole. The
following are a selection of the best I have heard
or read :-—



CHARADES.
1. My first is a contraction for society; my second
denotes a recluse; my third forms a part of the ear; and
my whole is but a quibble.

2. My first I would venture for; my second I would
venture in; my whole is more talked of than practised.

3. Without my first I ne’er should need the aid
Of Betty (simple soul !) the dairy-maid ;
My second (start not, ladies !) claims a place
As well in yours as in the tiger’s face;

My whole’s elicited by Sol’s bright ray,
To deck the bosom of sweet smiling May.

4. My first is a prop; my second is a prop; and my
whole is nothing else than a prop.

5: Where you place your child is my first; what you
make your child is my second; and a court ornament is
my whole.

6. My first is equality ; my second inferiority; my
whole is superiority.

7. My first is a proposition; my second a composition ;
and my whole an acquisition.
124 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

8. My first’s the gayest, saddest thing,
‘That Heaven to mortals gave;
It flutters most on rapture’s wing,
It withers o’er the grave.

My next is sought with toil and pain,
In various realms to find :

‘The search, alas, how very vain!
Its home is in the mind.

Just like a sweet and humble flower,
It seeks the silent shade;

It flees the haunts of pride and power,
Fops, fashions, and parade.

Lady, mayst thou, on whose fair breast
My whole with beauty glows,

Enjoy within that peace and rest
Which it alone bestows!

9. My first is ploughed for various reasons, and grain is
frequently buried in it to little purpose; my second is
neither riches nor honour, yet riches would generally
be given for it, and honours are often tasteless without it;
my whole applies equally to spring, summer, autumn,
and winter.

10. When frost and snow o’erspread the ground,
And chilly blows the air,
My first is felt upon the check
Of every lovely fair.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 125

In earth’s cold bosom lies my next,
An object most forlorn ;

For often cruélly ’tis used,

And trampled on with scorn.

Amid the dismal shades of night,
My whole is bright and gay ;
Though dark and gloomy it appears
Exposed to open day.

11. My first is a plaything; my second few play
with ; my third plays with nobody.

12. My first I hope you are; my second I see you
are; my whole I know you are.

13. My first a blessing sent on earth,
Of plants and flowers to aid the birth;
My second surely was.designed
‘To hurl destruction on mankind :

My whole a pledge of pardoning Heaven,
Of wrath appeased, and crimes forgiven.

14, My first gives light; my second gives light; my
whole gives light.

15. A mischievous urchin may soon do my first,
If he meet with a teapot or ewer ;
My second brings on us both hunger and thirst ;
My whole thirst and hunger can cure.
3;
126 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

16. My first is a fish; my second is a fish; my whole
is a fish, and also a fruit.

17. My first is irrational; my second is rational; and
my whole is scientifical.

18. My first keeps time; my second spends time; and
my whole tells time.

19. My first is to multiply; my second we ought all
to avoid; my whole the most avaricious will give, and
the poorest are seldom willing to receive.

20. He talked of daggers and of darts,

Of passions and of pains,

Of weeping eyes and wounded hearts,
Of kisses and of chains ;

He said, though love was kin to grief,
He was not born to grieve;

He said, though many rued belief,
She safely might believe =

But still the lady shook her head,
And swore, by yea and nay,

My whole was all that he had said,
‘And all that he could say.

He said my first—whose silent car
‘Was slowly wandering by,

Veiled in a vapour faint and far
‘Through the unfathomed sky—
21,

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 127

‘Was like the smile whose rosy light
Across her young lips passed,

Yet oh! it was not half so bright,
It changed not half so fast:

But still the lady shook her head,
‘And swore by yea and nay,

My whole was all that he had said,
‘And all that he could say.

And then he set a cypress wreath
Upon his raven hair,

And drew his rapier from its sheath,
Which made the lady stare ;

And said his life-blood’s purple flow
My second there should dim,

If she he loved and worshipped so
‘Would only weep for him:

But still the lady shook her head,
And swore by yea and nay,

My whole was all that he had said,
‘And all that he could say.

My first does affliction denote,
Which my second is fated to feel ;
My whole is a sure antidote
‘That affliction to soften and heal.

22. Allis my first,
So is my second,
And also my whole.
128 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS,

23. My first is myself in a very short word,
My second’s a puppet,
And you are my third.

24. Ages ago, when Greece was young,
‘And Homer, blind and wandering, sung,
‘Where’er he roamed, through street or field,
My first the noble bard upheld ;

Look to the new moon for my next,
You'll see it there; but if perplexed,
Go ask the huntsman, he can show
My name—he gives it many a blow.
My whole, as you will quickly see,
Is a large town in Tuscany,

Which ladies soon will recognise ;

A favourite head-dress it supplies.

25. My first is nimble; my second innumerable; and
my whoie fatal.

LOGOGRIPHE.
For man’s support I came at first from earth,
But man perverts the purpose of my birth ;
Beneath his plastic hand new forms I take,
And either sex my services partake ;
The flowing lawn in stricter folds I hold,
And bind in chains unseen each swelling fold ;
‘The band beneath the double chin I grace,
And formal plaits that edge the Quaker’s face;
Â¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 129

By me great Bess, who used her maids to cuff,

Shone in the dignity of full-quilled ruff.

Such is my whole—but, parted and disjoined,

New wonders in my varying form you'll find:

What makes the cit look big with conscious
worth ;

What bursts from pale surprise, or boisterous
mirth ;

‘The sweep Rialto forms, or your fair brow—

‘The fault to youthful valour we allow ;

A word by which possession we denote ;

A letter high in place and first in note ;

What guards the beauty from the scorching ray ;

What little master first is taught to say;

Great Nature’s rival, handmaid, sometimes foe;

The most pathetic counterpart of “Oh!”

The whiskered pilferer, and his foe demure ;

The lamps unbought, which light the houseless
poor ;

‘What bore famed heroes through the ranks of war ;

What’s heard when falls from high the-ponderous

jar;
‘What holy Paul did at Gamaliel’s foet ;
What Bavius writes, what schoolboys love to eat;
Of eager gamesters what decides the fate ;
The homely, rough support of Britain’s state ;
What joined to “ been ” is fatal to a toast ;
‘What guards the sailor from the shelving coast ;
The stage whence villains make their last
harangue;
What in your head and bones gives many a pang;
130 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

What introduces long-tailed similes ;
A preposition that to place agrees ;

A stately animal in forests bred

‘A tree that lifts on high its lofty head;

‘What best unbinds the weary student’s mind ;
A beauteous fish in northern lakes we find ;

‘A graceful blemish on a soldier’s breast—

‘All these are in my single name expressed.



FRENCH CHARADES.

1. Le nouvel enrichi porté sur mon premier,
Qui peut a l'indigent refuser mon dernier,
Ne vaut pas animal qui mange mon entier.

2. Mon premier est le premier de son espéce; mon
second n’a point de second ; et jespére ne te jamais dire
mon tout.

REBUSES

are a kind of charade, but are not very common
or popular. You are told, for instance, that a
“colour” and a “pledge” name a kind of
“ fruit ;” and you are required to discover what
fruit it is.

‘We come now to a selection of
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 131

ARITHMETICAL PUZZLES.

1. How can you take away one from nineteen, and
have twenty remain?

2. What is the difference between twice twenty-five
and twice five and twenty?

3. If you can buy a herring and a half for three half-
pence, how many herrings can you buy for elevenpence?

4, A and B made a bet concerning which could eat the
most eggs. A ate ninety-nine; B ate one hundred, and
won. How many more did B eat than A?

6. If a person hold in his hands a piece of silver and a
piece of gold, you can ascertain in which hand is the
silver, and in which the gold, by the following simple
process :—The gold must be named some even number,
say eight; the silver must be named an odd number, say
three. Then tell the person to multiply the number in
his right hand by an even number, and that in his left
hand by an odd number, and make known the amount
of the two added together. If the whole sum be odd,
the gold is in the right hand; if it be even, the silver is
in the right hand. For the sake of concealing the arti-
fice better, you need not know the amount of the product,
but simply ask if it can be halved without a remainder ;
if it can, the sum is of course an even one.

6. The figure 9 has one remarkable characteristic
which belongs to no other number. Multiply it by any
figure you will, the product added together will still be
nine. ‘Thus twice 9 are 18; 8 and 1 are 9. Three times
9 are 27; 7and2are9. Eight times 9 are 72; 7 and 2
132 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

are 9; &c. If you multiply it by any figures larger than
12, the result will differ only in there being a plurality of
nines.

7. When first the marriage knot was tied
Between my wife and me,
My age exceeded hers as much
‘As three times three does three.

But when ten years and half ten years
‘We man and wife had been,
Her age approached as near to mine
As eight is to sixteen.
Ques. How old were they when they married?

8. If you cut thirty yards of cloth into one-yard pieces,
and cut one yard every day, how long will it take you?

9. A boy went to a well to fetch exactly 4 quarts of
water. He had with him a 8-quart measure and a
S-quart measure: how did he contrive to measure ex-
actly 4 quarts?



MAGIC ARITHMETIC.

Think of any even number you please, but do not men-
tion it; I then ask you to double it; then I name to you
some even number to add to it; then I ask you to take
away half of the whole amount; then I ask you to take
away the number you first thought of: although { do not
know what that, number was, I can invariably tell you
the remainder. It will always be just half the number I
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 133

told you to add. For instance, you think of 8. I ask
you ‘to double what you thought of; you know that it
Will make 16, but I know nothing about it; I ask you to
add 4 to it; that makes 20; I ask you to take away half
of the whole amount; 10 is then left. Lastly, I ask you
to take away the sum you first thought of; without
knowing what the sum'was, I can tell you that 2 re-
mains. This seems very puzzling; but the fact is, half
of the sum ordered to be added is always left. I requested
that 4 might be added, therefore I knew the remainder
would be 2.

Fovrterntu Evenrne.

CconuNpRUMs.

I shall close this series of amusements by a
selection of conundrums, the most popular of all
enigmas.

1. If Queen Victoria gave Prince Albert a kiss, and he
returned it, what public building would it name?

2. What wig cannot a barber make?

3. On what side of the church does the yew-tree grow?

4, Why is an empty room like a room full of married
people?

6, Why is a cobbler like a king?

6 When is a man truly over head and ears in debt?
134 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

7% Why is a horse, constantly ridden, and never fed,
not likely to be starved?

8. Why is a drawn tooth like something forgotten?

9. Who dare sit before the king with his hat on?

10. Why is a schoolboy just beginning to read like
knowledge itself?

11. Why do we go to bed?

12. Why are two laughing girls like the wings of a
chicken?

18. Why are there three objections to taking a glass of
brandy?

14. What is that which goes from London to York
without once moving?

15. What is the difference between twice twenty-eight
and twice eight and twenty?

16. What is every one doing at the same time?

17. If Dick’s father be John’s son, what relation is
Dick to John?

18. What is that which, though blind itself, guides the
blind?

19. In what respect were the governments of Algiers
and Malta as different as light from darkness?

20. Why is an amiable and charming girl like one
letter in deep thought; another on its way towards you;
another bearing a torch; and another singing psalms?

21. Why is a.schoolmistress like the letter C?

22. What difference is there between live fish and fish
alive?

28. Why is a well-trained horse like a benevolent man?

24. What word is that which contains all the vowels,
and all in their proper order?
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 135

25. What is that which no one wishes to have, and no
one wishes to lose?

26. What word is there of five letters, that, by taking
away two, leaves but one?

27. Which has most legs, a horse or no horse?

28. Why does a miller wear a white hat?

29. What kin is that child to its own father, who is
not its own father’s own son?

80. Why do we buy shoes?

81. What is that which ladies look for, but never wish
to find?

82. If I shoot at three birds on a tree, and kill one,
how many will remain?

33, Why are cowardly soldiers like butter?

84, When is a window like a star?

85. Why is the wick of a candle like Athens?

86. To what question can you answer nothing but yes?

87. Why is a beehive like a spectator?

88. Why are fixed stars like pen, ink, and paper?

389. What letter used to be distributed at tournaments?

40. Why do you suppose a glass-blower can make the
letter E gallop?

41. What class of people bear a name meaning, “I
can’t improve?”

42, What word asks the question, “ Am I strong?”

43. Why is a fretful man like a loaf of bread baked too
much?

44, Why is heedlessness like a ragged coat?

45, Why should there be a marine law against whis-
pering?

46. What does a seventy-four weigh before she sets sail?


136 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

47. What people can never live long, nor wear great-
coats?

48. What word is shorter for having a syllable
added?

49. If the alphabet were invited out, what time would
U, V, W, X, Y, and Z got

60. If a tough beefsteak could speak, what English
poet would it name?

51. If a pair of spectacles could speak, what ancient
historian would they name?

52. Why is an uncut leg of bacon like Hamlet in his
soliloquy t

68. Did you ever see a bun dance on the table?

64. Name me, and you break me.

65. Why is Liverpool like benevolence?

66. Did you ever see the elegy on a turkey?

57. The figures representing my age are what you
ought to do in all things. How old am I?

58. Why is a very angry man like 69 minutes past 12?

59. Why are your teeth like verbs?

60. Why are deep sighs like long stockings?

61. Why is a tattler unlike a mirror?

62. What is placed upon the table, often cut, but never
eaten?

63. What word makes you sick if you leave out one of
the letters?

64. What sea would make a good sleeping-room?

65. Why would Titian’s large daughter, Mary, be like
avery able statesman?

66. Decline ice-cream.

67. Which side of a pitcher is the handle?
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 137

68. Where was the first nail struck?

69. Why is a short negro like a white man?

70. Why do white sheep furnish more wool than black
ones 2

71. Why is a Jew in a fever like a diamond ring?

72. According to the laws of retaliation, what right
have you to pick an artist’s pocket?

73. Why is a miser like a man with a short memory?

74. Why is a necklace like a speech on the deck of a
vessel?

75. When is a door not a door?

76. Why is a side-saddle like a four-quart measure?’

77. Why is a thief in a garret like an honest man?

78. If the letter D were never used, why would it be
like a dead man?

79. What is larger for being cut at both ends?

80. Why are conundrums like monkeys?

81. If Falstaff were musical, what instrument would
he play upon?

82. If you throw a stone into the water, what does it
become before it reaches the bottom?

83. What most resembles a cat in a hole?

84. What is a man like who is in the midst of a river,
and can’t swim?

85. In what place did the cock crow when all the
world could hear him?

86. What is the weight of the moon?

87. Tom went out, and his dog went with him. The
dog went not before, nor behind, nor on one side of him:
where did he go?

88. What colour are the winds and the storms?
138 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

89. What relation is your uncle’s brother to you if he
is not your uncle?

90. What is a sprat like lying on a gravel path?

91. When is a lady’s cheek not a cheek?

92. What smells most in a chemist’s shop?

93. If the poker, shovel, and tongs cost L.B, 4s., what
will a bushel of coal come to?

94. What is higher when the head is off?

95. Why is an iron steam-ship like losing one’s for
tune?

96. Who first introduced salt provisions into the
navy?

97. Who was the first whistler, and what did he
whistle?

98. What were the first words Adam said to Eve?

99. Why is the letter D like a wedding-ring?

100, When is a sailor not a sailor?

101. Why is your hat, when it is on your head, like a
giblet-pie?

102. When is a lady not a lady?

103. When is a man thinner than a lath?

104. Why is a pig in a parlour like a house on fire?

105. When is a fowl’s neck like a bell?

106. Which would travel fastest—a man with one sack
of flour on his back, or a man with two sacks on his
back?

107. If a gentleman bought four apples for a penny,
and presented a lady with one of them, why would he be
like a telescope?

108. Which is heaviest—a pound of lead, or a pound
of feathers?
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 139

109. Why are gymnastics like the tide at low-water?
110. If a man falls

By chance from St Paul’s,

‘What does he fall against?

111. Why is Westminster Abbey like a fender?

112. Why is a person in bed like a book unbound?

113, Why is Ireland like a bottle of wine?

114. What did Adam first plant in the Garden of
Eden?

115. Van Amburgh drove a ten-in-hand through
London, and his horses had only twenty-four feet among:
them. How was that?

116. Of what trade is the sun?

117. Of what trade is the sun in the month of May?

118. Of what trade are all the Presidents of the United
States?

119. Of what trade is a minister at a wedding?

120. What trade should keep flies from mirrors?

121. What trade is best fitted to cook a hare?

122. What trade never turns to the left?

123. What trade most deserves the gratitude of col-
leges?

124, What trade is more than full?

125, Of what trade is the manager of a theatre?

126. Of what trade is every child?

127. What trade is most likely to frighten handsome
ladies?

128, Of what trade are the greater part of authors?

129. What trade are, all of them, men of letters?

180. What trade is it whose best works are trampled
under foot ?
140 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

131, Of what trade are all mankind?

182. What Miss is that whose company no one wants?

133. What Misses are those whose days are all un-
lucky?

134, What Miss is always making blunders?

185. What Misses are of a very jealous temper?

136. What Miss occasions a great many quarrels?

187. What Miss is a very bad mantuamaker?

138. What Miss is very disobedient and disorderly?

139. What Misses can never find a thing when they
want it?

140. What Miss plays more tricks than a monkey?

141. What three Misses are great story-tellers?

142. What Miss is awkward and rude?

143, What two Misses should travellers avoid?

144. What Miss never studied arithmetic?

145, What Miss is very extravagant?

146, What Miss will ruin any man?

147. What Miss should never attempt to translate?

148. What Miss should never repeat anything she
reads or hears?



FRENCH CONUNDRUMS.

1. Quel est dans Vhistoire le roi dont le nom offre uneâ„¢
demi-douzaine de Russes?

2. Quelle est la plante sur laquelle on reste le plus
Jongtemps quand on apprend la botanique?

3. Comment se nomme le septiéme roi de la dynastie
des lapins?

4. Pourquoi le mouton est-il le premier des animaux?

5. Quelle est la personne qui dort les yeux ouverts?
Firrzentn Eveninc.

PUNS—CHRONOGRAMS—ACROSTICS—FIGURE VERSES—ANAGRAMS—
BOUTS RIMES.

On the Ninth Evening I touched upon Cap-
ping Verses, Cento Verses, and other amuse-
ments of a class leaning in some small degree
upon literature ; and now that you have exer-
cised your wits upon enigmas till you might
puzzle CEdipus, and laugh at the simplicity of
the Sphinx, I may proceed to unfold to you
some still less mechanical modes of playing
with the Muses.

You must have observed in the different
classes of enigmas that the puzzle frequently
turns upon what is called a pwn—that is, when
the same word, or at least the same sound, has
two meanings. This species of false wit is of
very respectable antiquity; even Cicero, a
famous Roman orator, having been. celebrated
for his puns. Thus he complimented a senator,
who was the son of ‘a tailor, by telling him that

he had touched the subject with the point of a
K
142 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

needle—that is, with sharpness; and when one
who was suspected of being a Jew attempted to
get the cause of a state criminal called Verres
(meaning likewise a male pig) out of his hands,
he observed, “What has a Jew to do with
swine’s flesh ?”

The chronogram may be termed a sort of
pun, although it was sometimes useful. It is
made by writing a sentence or a word in such
a way that the letters signifying Roman nume-
rals may be read both separately and as part of
the word or sentence. Thus, if the word is
“Diversion,” and you wish to indicate in con-
nection with it the year 506, you arrange the
letters thus:—DiVersIon. _ In this way, in
writing the name of a king, you may give at
the same time the date of his birth.

The acrostic usually occurs either in compli-
mentary or satirical verses, and is made by
causing the first letter of each line to form,
when read together, the name of the person
alluded to. Sometimes the same name is like-
wise“formed by letters down the middle of the
verses, and sometimes, in addition to the others,
by letters running diagonally across from corner
to corner! In playing the game of “Many Words
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 143

in One,” described in the Sixth Evening, you
form an acrostic in prose ; but this kind of folly
has now gone entirely out of fashion. In allu-
sion to the acrostic and chronogram, the author
of “ Seribleriad” says—

“To join these squadrons now the champions came—
A numerous race of no ignoble name:
Riddle and rebus, riddle’s dearest son,
And false conundrum, and insidious pun ;
Fustian, who scarcely deigns to tread the ground,
And rondeau, wheeling in repeated round:
On their fair standards, by the wind displayed,
Eggs, altars, wings, pipes, axes, were portrayed.”

The figures mentioned in the last line were
formed by making the verses long or short
according to the space they were required to
fill.

The anagram requires more ingenuity, and is
sometimes very amusing. It is made by dis-
solving the word, as it were, into its component
letters, and forming of these a new word or sen-
tence, with some complimentary or ludicrous ap-
plication to the other. For instance, the letters
in the name of Samuel Whitbread (the brewer)
were formed into this sentence—“ We use his
bad malt ;” and “Horatio Nelson,” our great
144 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

admiral, was turned into “Honor est & Nilo”—
“Honour to the Nile.” In like manner a beau-
tiful lady mentioned in French history, Marie
Touchet, was gallantly converted into “Je
charme tout”— “I charm everybody.” The
Hebrews and Greeks were great anagramma.
tists, and they attached a mystical importance
to the sentence into which a person’s name
might be transposed. Influenced by some such
crazy superstition, Lady Eleanor Davies, in the
time of our Charles I., fancied that the spirit of
prophecy was in her because the anagram she
had found of her name ran thus:—

“Exeanor Davirs”—
“Reveat, O Danren!”

After all, this anagram had an J instead of
an s; but the poor lady, notwithstanding, set
to prophesy on the: strength of it so vigo-
rously, and so much against the government,
that she was at length brought into the court
of High Commission. Here the lawyers .dis
puted with her, and the bishops reasoned with
her. from Scripture, but all in vain; till some-
body hit upon a very different anagram of her
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 145

name, which" he handed round the court amid
convulsions of laughter, for it read thus :—

“Dame Exvzanor Davixrs”—
“ NEVER SO MAD A LADIE!”

This shocking discovery is said to have silenced
the prophetess at once.

The following are a few anagrams; and you
may be worse occupied at the fireside than by
trying to add to the number :—

Revolution, . . To love ruin.
Democratical, . - Comical trade.
Telegraph, . . Great help.
The bar, . . ~ Breath.

Old England,. . A golden land.
Lawyers, . . . Sly ware.
Astronomers, . . No more stars.
Charades, . . —- ‘Hard case.
Patience, . . Anice pet.
Lame, - + « Male,

Cork, . . . Rock.
Potentates, s - Ten teapots.

“Bouts Rimés,” or rhyming ends, form a
game of skill which may be made interesting
enough. The father of this amusement is said
to be one Dulot, a fantastical French poet, who
once lamented in company an unfortunate loss
146 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

he had sustained—the loss of three hundred
sonnets! On being questioned by his sympa-
thising friends, he explained that they were
blank sonnets; that is, sonnets of which only
the rhymes were invented—doubtless the most
important part of the composition with him.
The idea seemed so comical, that it soon be-
came the fashion for a company to collect as
many difficult rhymes as possible, and tax the
ingenuity of each other to fill them up 0 as to
make complete verses. Suppose, since we are
only beginners, that we try a set of easy rhymes
as a specimen. Let us choose a subject suitable
to the present moment, and call the poem “My
Own Finesrpr.” What do you think you could
make of these rhymes ?— “Joys, play ; noise,
gay —away, divide; stray, Fireside — words,
arise ; chords, eyes—prize, abide; sympathies,
Fireside—now, mine; brow, thine—divine, hide;
shrine, Fireside—roar, earth; more, hearth—
birth, chide; mirth, Fireside—deities, joys;
flies, annoys—cloys, tried; toys, Fireside—
sweet, thee; fect, sanctuary—be, betide; me,
Fireside.”

Make a, column of these rhymes on the right-
hand side of your paper, and try if you can
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 147

prefix to each the rest of the line, so as to
make a complete and coherent copy of verses.
Try as you may, however, you will never suc-
ceed in producing a more charming and elegant
little poem than the following ; for the rhymes,
to confess the truth, are not set down at random,
but are taken from a poet who, unlike Dulot,
makes his sense first, and his jingle after-
wards :—

“ My Own Finesrpr.

Let others seek for empty joys
At ball or concert, rout or play;
Whilst far from fashion’s idle noise,
Her gilded domes and trappings gay,
I while the wintry hour away—
*Twixt book and lute the hours divide—
And marvel how I e’er could stray
From thee—my own Fireside!

My own Fireside! These simple words
Can bid the sweetest dreams arise;

Awaken feeling’s tenderest chords,
And fill with tears of joy my eyes!

‘What is there my wild heart can prize
That doth not in thy sphere abide?

Haunt of my home-bred sympathies,
My own—my own Fireside!
143

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

A gentle form is near me now;
A small white hand is clasped in mine;
I gaze upon her placid brow,
‘And ask what joys can equal thine!
A babe, whose beauty’s half divine,
In sleep his mother’s eyes doth hide;
Where may love seek a fitter shrine
‘Than here—my own Fireside?

‘What care I for the sullen roar
Of winds without that ravage earth?
It doth but bid me prize the more
‘The shelter of thy hallowed hearth ;
‘To thoughts of quiet bliss give birth:
‘Then let the churlish tempest chide;
It cannot check the blameless mirth
‘That glads my own Fireside!

Shrine of my household deities!

Fair scene of home’s unsullied joys!
To thee my burthened spirit flies

‘When fortune frowns or care annoys:
‘Thine is the bliss that never cloys;

‘The smile whose truth hath oft been tried
What, then, ave the world’s tinsel toys

To thee—my own Fireside?

Ob may the yearnings fond and sweet,
That bid my thoughts be all of thee,

‘Thus ever guide my wandering feet
To thy heart-soothing sanctuary!
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 149

Whate’er,my future years may be;
Let joy or grief my fate betide;
Be still an Eden bright to me,
My own—my own Fireside!” *

Srxreenra Evenine.
THE ACTED CHARADE.

A very fashionable game, and one played by
grown people as well as children, is a charade
put into action, like a little drama. You choose
a word of two or more syllables, of which each
syllable is a word in itself; and the actors must
so perform their parts that the audience may
be able to spell the word by the import of the
several scenes. Thus, if you select the word
“Innocent,” the first scone may be an Inn; the
second, some excitement which causes a frequent
repetition of the exclamation “O!”—the third
may draw the attention to the word “cent ”—
either the American fraction of a. dollar, for
instance, or the English per cent.; and the
fourth must give the whole word “Innocent.”

* Alaric A. Watts.
150 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

In the Acted Charade the business and bustle
must never flag; everybody must play with
spirit ; and there should be one or two clever
performers to sustain the principal parts. As to
the plot or story of the piece, the simpler that
it is the better. A few minutes of consultation
will determine what it is to be; and then each
person engaged must dash through his part in
the best way he can, saying anything that
comes uppermost. I have often seen a great
deal of natural humour thrown into scenes of
this kind; snd even when some of the per-
formers have no talent at all—why, we laugh
at their awkwardness, and that answers the
purpose as well.

I shall now give you a specimen of an Acted
Charade, which I am in hopes will be tried in
thousands of families this winter—only the
actors taking care not to mind the little old
maid’s words, but to put in better ones of their
own. The word shall be the one I have acci-
dentally mentioned; and I choose it the rather
that the words usually selected require for the
most part to be sadly misspelt to make out the
meaning of the dramatist at all. Our word has
at least the merit of being clear—Inn-o-cent.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 151

Scene THE Frrst—Room ARRANGED AS AN Inn.

Landlord, Landlady, Waiter, Boots, and Chambermaid,
all bustling about the room.

Landlady. It must be near the time for the
coach, John. I hope it will bring us more luck
than it did last time.

Landlord. Ah, business isn’t what it used to
be!

Landlady. Sally, are all the rooms comfort-
able?

Sally. Oh yes, ma’am; they’re all like so
many bandboxes.

(Horn blows from without.

All. There it is!

[The landlord, landlady, and servants, rush to the
door, and encounter traveller entering in tra-~
velling dress, with a portmanteau in his hand.

Landlady. (Curtseying.) Welcome, sir; very
welcome, sir!

Landlord. (Bowing. Fine day, sir. Picked
up an appetite, sir?

Waiter. Shall I take your portmanteau, sir?

Sally. Want your bed aired, sir?

Traveller. (Throwing down his portmanteau.)
There now; don’t bother. I’m as tired as a
152 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

dog. I declare that abominable coach has given
me the cramp in every limb. Three nights on
the road! No joke, I can tell you. Ab, here’s
a capital fire; the only good thing I’ve seen
since I left London.

[Goes up to the fire, rubs his hands, stamps about,
and finally stands with his back to it; the
others in the meantime bustling about the
room, handing him officiously a chair or a
newspaper, Sc.

Traveller. Here, landlord.

Landlord. Yes, six.

Traveller. Got something nice for supper, ch?
It don’t much matter what it is, so as you get
it soon. “If ’twere well done, ’twere well it
were done quickly”’—hem! Feel as though I
could eat a horse !

Au. Oh yes, sir; ready directly, sir.

[AU rush out to get the supper ready.

Traveller. (Throwing himself into a chair be-
side the fire) A—b! How tired I am to be
sure! Shall sleep to-night at anyrate. Wonder
how lawyers can live so far away from town,
dragging one down I don’t know how many
miles about » business that perhaps might havc
deen settled just as well without me. Noi
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 153

but it’s worth the trouble too, I daresay; but
—a—h (yarns).
[Enter waiter, and lays the table for supper.
Traveller. Waiter, bring me a pair of slippers.
Waiter. Yes, sir.
[Rushes out of theroom, and returns with slippers,
and proceeds to pull off the traveller’s boots.
Traveller. (In a rage.) Why, you blockhead,
what are you doing? Do you want to pull off
my leg too? If you haven’t got corns, I have, I
can tell you! There, there, that’ll do! Can’t
you let me have my supper in peace ?
Waiter. Yes, sir.

[Goes out with the boots, while traveller sits down to
his supper, yawning fearfully, and eating with
his eyes half-shut. Enter chambermaid.

Chambermaid. Please, sir, your room’s ready.

Traveller. Is it? Well, and I am ready for
my room. Here, Molly—Polly—what’s your
name?

Chambermaid. (Curtseying.) Sally, sir.

Traveller. Well, Sally, just get out my dress-
ing-gown from that portmanteau, will you?
There’s the key. (Throws it to her.)

Sally. Yes, sir.

[She tries to unlock the portmanteau, but does not
at first succeed; at last whe brings out the gown,
154 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
and carries it to the traveller, whom she finds
asleep.

Sally. Please, sir, here’s the dressing-gown.
My! he’s fast asleep. (Shaking him.) Please,
sir, wake up! Ho! ha! (Shaking him.)

Traveller. (Starting.) Eh—what? Bless me,
what’s that you say? Oh, ah, to be sure!
Think I’ve been to sleep, have 1? Ah, it’s no
wonder—three nights on the road! Shall be
quite knocked up to-morrow. Here, help me
off with this coat. (Sally helps him to take it
off, and to put on the other.) There, now, you
can (Yawns) take that away. Oh, stop; give
it to me:- I must take the things out of the
pockets.

[Takes the gown to the front of the stage, while Sally
clears the table. With his eyes half-shut, he
takes out a handkerchief, snuff-box, &c. from
the pockets of the day-coat, and puts them into
the one he has on. At last, yawning desperately,
he pulls out a pocket-book.

Sally. Please, sir, are you ready? The bed
is nicely warmed, and will get cold.

Traveller. (Nodding, as if falling asleep.) No,
no, neither cold nor warm; I have had enough.

‘Sally. Ready, sir! I said ready !

Traveller. Coach ready? What, already?
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 155
[Thrusts the pocket-book back into the day-coat by
mistake.

Sally. The bed, sir; the bed!

Traveller. Oh ay, true: but you needn’t hollo
so: I aint deaf. Come (Slapping his pockets),
it’s all right now. Must be careful in a strange
place. Girl looks honest too. Sally!

Sally. Yes, sir; coming, sir.

Traveller. Take this coat and the port-
manteau, and light me up stairs. Don’t know
where I am going. Dead asleep.

[They go out; the chambermaid carrying the port-

manteau, cout, and candle; and traveller fol-
lowing her, yawning.



Scrne Tux Seconp—TRaAveEtier’s Beproom.

Traveller discovered without a coat, and with his night-
cap on, holding his dressing-gown with one hand, and
ringing furiously with the other, shouting at the same
time for the landlord, landlady, and waiter. Enter
Landlord, Landlady, Waiter, Sally, and guests—some
with shawls and nightcaps on, as if just awakened.

All. What’s the matter? What’s the matter?

Sally. What’s the matter, sir?

Traveller. What’s the matter? You brazen-
faced thing! How dare you ask me such a ques-
156 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

tion? Do you see that? Don’t you see it, eh?
Don’t you see it?
[Waves the gown in Sally’s face,

Sally. (In great surprise.) La, sir, yes; I see
it. What’s the matter with it, sir?

Traveller. Phoo! You don’t gammon me!

[Strides up and down the room, dragging the gown
after him.

Al. (Looking after him in astonishment.) 0
—Oo—O!

Landlady. (Rushing up and down the room
after the traveller.) O dear, sir, pray do tell me
what is the matter?

Traveller. (Stopping suddenly before her)
Matter, ma’am! 0, nothing’s the matter—
nothing at all! I’ve only been robbed, ma’am
—robbed! and by that—that—that woman
there—that precious chambermaid of yours;
for there was not a soul in my room after she
left it; but I suppose that is nothing! O no,
nothing at all!

Waiter. (Shaking his fist at the traveller.)
How dare you say that our Sally robbed you?
It’s false! You ate the money to your supper
—you swallowed it in your sleep—anything,
everything but that our Sally is a thief!
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 157

Landlord. (Holding up his hands.) Well, what
will the world come to!

Landlady. (Crying) O, Sally, sure it isn’t
possible, after being two years with me, and
after getting such a good character with you
too, and all

Sally. (Bursting into tears.) O, sir!

Waiter. Don’t cry, Sally; take my arm: I'll
stand up for you, if all the world deserts you.
Don’t e-r-y. (Blubbering.)

Landlord. O, Sally!—and such a pretty
girl! O!

Landlady. O, Sally! and so good and pro-
perly-conducted a girl! O!

Guests. (Holding up their hands, and looking
at Sally.) Ot





Scene THE Turrp—Inn Par tour.
Traveller discovered with his coat and hat on, seated at
table eating his breakfast.

Traveller. A most unlucky journey! Lost
a bundred pounds by it already ; wonder what
I shall do before I get home. What’ll Mrs
B— say? My gracious !
[Enter two lawyers with bags in their hands.
L
158 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Traveller. Good-morning t’ye both. (Shaking
hands with them.) In a great hurry though—
can’t attend to business this morning—at least
to yours. Can’t, I assure you. Gobbling up
my breakfast as fast as possible, that I may be
in time to give my evidence at the Town-
Hall!

Lawyers. At the Town-Hall ?

Traveller. Yes, I tell you. What do you
think of being robbed in a respectable inn like
this? and by a little chit of a chambermaid, who
looked as if butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth,
However, she shall be tried to-day ; and

1st Lawyer. How much have you lost, sir?

Traveller. A hundred pounds, besides my
pocket-book.

Lawyer. (Hastily.) But our papers—Brown’s
papers—you’ve got them ?

Traveller. Oh yes! What good would she get
by them you know?

1st Lawyer. Then, sir, I would advise you to
give up this business—we'll manage to get you
off: you will get ten per cent. more in this affair
of Brown’s in half an hour than you would get
on that hundred pounds in a hundred years;
and it is impossible to put Brown’s off.


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 159

Traveller. I don’t care if you make it a hun-
dred per cent. My dear fellow, I wouldn’t give
up this business of the pocket-book for any
money. Why, sir, it’s a duty I owe to society
to get that girl punished: let her go, and
there’s no knowing what mischief she'll do at
last !

2d Lawyer. I perfectly agree with my friend
Mr Wiseman; but since you are determined to
go, you must at anyrate give us those papers.
if you are resolved on ruining yourself for the
sake of justice, we will do what we can to
lighten the loss, since we have undertaken your
cause.

Traveller. I shan’t be half an hour—besides,
I couldn’t attend to the business properly with
that girl on my mind! Here’s your papers.
(Thrusts his hand into his pocket,and draws out
the lost pocket-book !) Whew !—(Regarding it
with a look of dismay)—Oh, botheration, and
I’ve been on the wrong scent after all! Here,
where’s my hat ?

[Seizes his hat, and rushes to the door ; the lawyers
run after him, and hold him by each arm.
Traveller struggles to get free.

Lawyers. Stop, stop! Is the man mad?
160 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Where are the papers—the papers, man—the
papers ?

Traveller. Let me go, I tell you—let me go!

Lawyers. Never! You shall not ruin your-
self. If you neglect this business, you deserve
to be without a cent in the world !

Traveller. Hang your cents !

[Shakes himself free, and rushes out with the lawyers
after him.

Scene THE FourtH—Town-Hatt.

Magistrate sitting in a chair elevated above the rest;
Policemen, Lawyers, and inn-guests scattered about
the room; Landlady leaning on her husband’s arm
crying; Waiter beside them sniffing and rubbing his
eyes with his coat-sleeves; Sally standing by herself
weeping.

Magistrate. (Rising.) It is singular that the
prosecutor has not yet appeared, when he must
know that the principal evidence rests with
him. However, I am sorry to say that I think
we now only want his testimony; there can be
no doubt of the prisoner's guilt.

Waiter. Oh, sir, I’m sure our Sally didn’t
do it!

Magistrate. (In a passion.) How dare you
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 161

interrupt the court! If you say another word,
Ill commit you! As I was saying, there can be
no doubt of the prisoner's guilt ; and while we
are waiting for the prosecutor's appearance, I
think I cannot improve the time better than in
saying a few words to the unhappy girl upon
the nature of her ‘crime. (Magistrate pauses
to hem, and take a pinch of snuff) I shall
first point out what she might have been had
she never committed this felonious act. (Here
Sally, landlady, and waiter set up a dismal
howl, and the women burst into sobs.) Silence
—silence in the court!

[Instead of silence, a great murmuring gets up among
those nearest the door. Cries of “ How he is
running!” “What is the matter?” “Good
gracious!” and the like among the guests.

Magistrate. Silence—silence! What is the
meaning of all this ?

[Enter traveller running, and flourishing the pocket-
book above his head.

Traveller. This—this! Here—it—is ! (Pant-
ing.)
[The judge sits down, and blows his nose.
All. She is Innocent !

[The landlady and Sally rush into each other's arms.

The landlord smiles, and claps Sally on the back ;
162 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.
while the waiter performs an Qjibeway Polka
round the group, laughing and crying at once.
Waiter. Of course she is innocent! Hurra
[Learing“off his apron, and flourishing it like a flag
above his head.
All. Innocent !—Innocenrt !

Seventeentn Evenrne.

THE YOUNG MAGICIAN.

MAGIC CIRCLE—IMPOSSIBILITY POSSIBLE—WONDERFUL HAT—APPA-
RENT IMPOSSIBILITY DOUBLE MEANING—VISIBLE INVISIBLE—
MIRACULOUS COTTON—APPLE BEWITCHED— MULTIPLYING COIN.
LOCOMOTIVE SHILLING—PENETRATING SIXPENCE—SPINNING SIX-
PENCE



My reading, memory, and space are well-nigh
exhausted together; but I must not conclude
without unfolding some magical secrets which
rarely fail in exciting either the mirth or the
wonder of the fireside. Some of the simplest of
these do not aspire to any higher title than
that of a “bit of fun.” Such is the “Magic
Circle.” After professing yourself of course to
be a conjurer, every one will be anxious fora
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 163

proof of your art; and you propose to draw a
narrow circle round any one of the company,
out of which he shall not be able to jump,
though he will be a perfectly free agent, uncon-
fined either in hands or feet. To perform this
miracle, you blindfold one of the party, place
him in the middle of the room, and button
his coat round him. You then push him here
and there, telling him he is not on the right
spot of the carpet, in order to divert his atten-
tion, and to form an excuse for putting your
hands about him while you draw a line of
chalk round his waist. You then take off the
bandage from his eyes, and showing him the
circle, desire him to make haste and jump out
of it, as you have some other business of more
consequence to attend to.

Another much the same as this is the “Im-
possibility Possible,” or “Go if you Can,” as it
is sometimes called. Addressing the strongest
boy in the room, say to him that you are able
to clasp his hands in such a way, that unless
he unclasps them, he will be unable to leave
the room, though you will make no opposition
to his exit. The young gentleman being of
course incredulous, you can prove your boast by
164 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

clasping his hands round the leg of the piano,
and beg him to take the instrument away with
him, since he is determined to go.

The “ Wonderful Hat” belongs to the same
class. Get three hats, or boys’ caps, and place
them all in a row over three bits of bread, or
apple, or anything you happen to have for
supper. After having directed the attention of
the company to these preparations, you raise
the caps one after another, and deliberately eat
the articles beneath them; then declare that
you can put all the three devoured. pieces, or
any of them, under whichever of the hats the
company indicate. One hat is accordingly
selected to be the vehicle of the promised
miracle ; and amid much laughter, you take it
up, and placing it on your head, inquire if
there is any doubt that the things in question
are under it?

While at supper, you can exhibit another
“Apparent Impossibility.” Declare that you
are able, by the aid of magic, to show them
what they, and even yourself, have never seen
before; and after having once seen, will never
see again. To keep your word, you take a
nut and crack it, and holding the kernel up,
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 165

ask if any one has seen it before. ‘I'he answer
of course being in the negative, you declare
oracularly that it shall never be seen again;
and putting it into your mouth, you grind and
swallow it in an instant. It is to be hoped that
the nut is good, or the joke will be against
you.

The “Double Meaning” is performed by
placing a hat or cap over a full glass of wine
or water, or any other liquid at hand. You
then tell your companions that you will make
the wine, or whatever it is, disappear, though
you will not touch the covering that is over it ;
and knocking upon the table, you look know-
ingly under it, as if to see through the wood
that the liquid had taken itself off. Being
satisfied on this point, you raise your head
quietly, and say, “Look!” A dozen eager
hands are stretched out; the cap is removed—
not by you—and taking up the glass and drink-
ing the contents, you bid the company observe
that the wine has disappeared.

If there are no mirrors in the room you are
in you can successfully play the trick of making
the “Visible Invisible.” To do this, you first
offer to place one of the candles in the room in
166 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

such a position that every person there but the
one you select shall be able to see it; and it
will be an impossibility for that individual even
to look at it, though he shall not be blind-
folded, or prevented from looking anywhere he
chooses. This being agreed to, you take any
one you like, and making him stand in the
middle of the room, place the candlestick on
his head, where he alone will be unable to
see it.

We now come to those tricks in the perform-
ance of which a little more ingenuity is re-
quired ; for those I have just mentioned are of
course nothing more than “ practical jokes.”

The “ Miraculous Cotton” is a very good
trick, but a great deal of care is requisite in its
performance. Get two pieces of fine cotton of
equal length; roll up one,.unobserved by the
company, in a little ball, and place it between
your finger and thumb, and you can easily keep
it in that position, as you will have frequent
occasion during the performance to close the
fore-fingers and thumbs of both hands. You
then exhibit the other bit of thread; and fold-
ing it double, ask some person to cut it in two;
you then fold it again, and make the same re-
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 167

quest; and again, and again, until the cotton
will not admit of being folded more. Then roll
it up with the disengaged hand, and then with
both hands, so that you have both balls to-
gether ; breathe upon them ; and while so doing,
manage to get hold of one end of the entire
thread, which you draw gradually out, to the
astonishment of the party, who cannot but
suppose that it is the thread which was cut.
Sometimes the trick is played over again the
opposite way—that is, by bringing out an entire
thread in little bits—but this is at a great risk
of discovery ; indeed I think no trick should be
played twice over in any way whatever in the
same evening.

The “Apple Bewitched” causes a great deal of
laughter. ‘Take the largest and most beautiful
apple you can get; then pass a needle threaded
with silk under the rind, in and out at the same
place, until you have thus travelled round the
whole apple; then bringing out the needle at
the same hole in which you inserted it, take
both ends of the silk in your hands and draw it
out—thus cutting the apple in half underneath
the skin without its being perceptible on the
outside. Pass the needle and silk round once
168 ¥IRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

or twice again, in different directions, in the
same manner. When it is done to your liking,
affecting to be seized with a sudden fit of gene-
rosity, maké a gift of it to one of your com-
panions. As soon as he bites or pares it, of
course it will fall to pieces in his mouth or
plate.

A very curious and ingenious trick is that
called “ Multiplying Coin.” Tell one of your
companions that although you haye not yet got
so far in your profession of magic as to have
found any signs of the existence of the Philo-
sopher’s Stone, so much talked of, yet you have
already discovered a very useful art—that of
multiplying coin. Thus, if any one will give you
sixpence, you will increase it before their eyes to
eighteenpence. The sixpence haying been pro-
cured, you get a glass of water and a plate; put
the sixpence into the tumbler, and then, cover-
ing it with the plate, turn it upside-down on
the table; the coin will drop down upon the
plate, and appear a shilling, while the sixpence
will seem to be floating on the top. Any other
coin will increase in like manner—a shilling
appearing half-a-crown ; and half-a-crown a
crown.






FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS, 169

The “Locomotive Shilling” will win you a
great renown. In order to play this trick with
convenience to yourself, you should always keep
a shilling with some peculiar mark on it in your
pocket. Before stating that you are going to
perform the “ Locorhotive Shilling,” put this one
which is in your pocket in some place where it
is not likely to be discovered. Then borrowing
a shilling from one of the company, you mark it
openly with the same impression there is on the
other, in order, as you tell them, that it may be
recognised again. Then place the shilling near
the edge of the table; give a loud knock upon
it, and at the same time make a sudden cry,
which, startling your companions, will in some
measure prevent them from seeing you whip the
coin quickly into your sleeve. Having thus dis-
posed of it, say to the company, “I think it has
gone; did you see which way it went?” And it
will be amusing to see their perplexed counte-
nances when they answer, “ No.” Not being able
of course to get any information as to the where-
abouts of the shilling, you can say to the person
from whom you borrowed it, “ Will you be kind
enough to look into that vase; perhaps it may
be there?” On looking there, the shilling you
170 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

hid will be found, and will be bandied from
hand to hand for the inspection of doubting
eyes; whose owner, as he recognises the
mark, will scarcely be able to “believe his
senses.”

The “Penetrating Sixpence” has somewhat
the same properties as the “Locomotive Shil-
ling” To perform this trick, you must have a
sixpence, or something resembling one, sewn. in
a corner of your handkerchief. Having bor-
rowed a sixpence, pretend to wrap it up in the
middle of the handkerchief, but in reality put
the sewn corner there in its stead; and holding
the handkerchief in. your hand, ask any one
who chooses to fecl that the sixpence is there.
Then place it near the edge of the table, and
cover it with something; hold a glass of water
under the table, strike the table sharply, and
drop the borrowed sixpence with a splash into
the water; replace the glass on the table to
show the sixpence; and taking up your hand-
kerchief, shake it carelessly, and put it in your
pocket.

Here is a way of making a sixpence spin on
the point of a needle:—Cork a wine bottle, and
push the eye of a needle into the cork until it










FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 171

is half-way in; then get another cork, make a
little slit in the bottom of it, large enough to
receive the sixpence edgeways; then stick two
steel forks into the top. Place the edge of the
sixpence upon the needle, and spin it round by
means of the forks: it will revolve rapidly
without danger of falling.

Ereutreta Evenina.



THE CHANGEABLE ROSE—CHAMELEON FLOWERS—SAP GREEN—TRARS.
— PREATH — VISIBLE INVISIBLE — CURIOUS TRANSPOSITIONS —
FLOATING STEEL—COLOURED SHADOWS—MAGIC PINSIOLE—AAND-
WRITING UPON THE WALL—Canp TRICKS





As some of the amusements in an earlicr
part of the volume are described as leaning
upon literature, so there are others which, in
the same way, have a certain connection with
science.

Some of the experiments I allude to may be
made with little or no trouble or expense, which
are quite as wonderful as those tricks which
have just described, and which have the ad-
vantage of being real, no deception of any kind
being practised, although the hidden causes of
172 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

their beautiful effects are only revealed to the
student of chemistry.

To begin with the most simple, there is the
“Changeable Rose.” Hold a red rose over the
flame of a sulphur match, and whatever spot of”
it the fumes touch will become pale or white, so
that out of a red rose you can form a white
rose. I have heard of young ladies keeping
flowers in this way from summer till the season
of winter gaiety with suce Towards the
close of the season they picked a number of
the finest roses, taking care that they were
quite dry: they then held them over the fumes
of sulphur until the colour faded completely
away; the flowers were then sealed at the
cut stems, and shut up in air-tight boxes.
When the Christmas and New-Year festivities
began, the roses were taken from their retire-
ment, dipped in water, and carried into ball-
rooms nestling in the hair or on the bosoms of
their fair owners.

Another way of making “ Chameleon Flowers ”
is by the use of the spirit-lamp. Sprinkle the
wick of the lamp with a little salt. Place a few
scarlet flowers beside it, and they will appear
yellow. Purple flowers will appear blue.


FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 173

A lighted match will change the colour of
almost any flower except yellow ones; and
flowers put into a bottle of common sel poleton
will also change—making a pink flower, for
instance, a beautiful green.

Sap Green is very sensible to the influence
of soda and acids. © For instance, a little car-
bonate of soda dropped into it will change it
into a yellow colour, and by the addition of
acids, a red colour will be produced; and chalk
will restore it to its origi

Tears have also a singular effeet in changing
colours. Thus, if tears are dropped on a piece
of paper staincd with violets, the paper will be
changed into a green colour.

Perhaps you never knew before that there is
such magic in your breath as the two following
experiments will show :—Fill a tumbler with
lime-water, then, while you stir it round with
a piece of glass, breathe into it frequently. The
liquid, at first transparent, will gradually be-
come perfectly white; and if you leave it for a
short time, on again examining it, you will find
chalk deposited at the bottom of the tumbler.

The “Visible Invisible.” Get a dressing-
glass, or any kind of looking-glass, and write

M










174: FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

over its surface with French chalk; now wipe
all off with your handkerchief, and the clear
surface will again appear; breathe upon it, and,
hey presto! the lines are there again. You may
repeat the experiment several times, and the
effect will be the same.

“Curious Transpositions ” may be made with
hot water and jelly. Having placed a basin of
hot water upon the table, next procure a glass
of jelly, and let it down gently, mouth down-
wards, into the water, and let it remain for a
short time just under the surface. The jelly
being heavier than the water, will immediately,
on dissolving, sink to the bottom of the basin,
and the glass will fill with water.

Most persons, especially young philosophers,
would laugh on being assured that solid steel
will float; yct this fact may be proved by plac-
ing a few fine needles upon the surface of a
tumbler of water, where. they will remain with-
out sinking.

“Coloured Shadows” may be made simply by
the use of coloured glass ; for example, I will
suppose you have two pieces of glass—green
and blue. The wall in the room you are in
should be white or light-coloured; but if it is




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 175

not so, you can stretch a shect over it. Put two
candles on the table just before the part on
which you wish to throw your shadows; but
one of the candles must be at a greater distance
than the other. Take your green glass, and
hold it before the light nearest the wall, and
you will find two shadows thrown upon the wall,
one of which will be green, and the other red ;
now put your blue glass before the flame, and
of the two shadows thrown, one will be blue,
and the other yellow.

‘A curious representation of an inverted flame
may be seen by a “Pinhole Focus,” by using it
in this manner:—Take a lighted candle into a
dark room; make a hole ina card with a pin,
and hold it between the light and a shect of
white paper ; you will then see the exact repre-
sentation of the flame, only turned upside down,
on the paper. Make a hole rather larger, and
hold it between the light and the sheet of
paper, and on the paper will be seen a beautiful
and exact view of everything in the room, even
with the same colours they happen to have ;
and the objects either moving or stationary as
they are in reality.

A representation of “Handwriting upon the









176 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

Wall” may be obtained by cutting whatever
words you choose out of a picee of pasteboard;
put it between a lighted lamp and the wall, and
the words will be exactly delineated.

I suppose you have often heard of a diving-
bell, or perhaps have seen it in the Poly-
technic Institution of London? You can make
a good imitation of it with a glass goblet
instead of the bell. Fill a basin nearly full
with water, light one of the little wicks d in
invalids’ chambers, and set it floating on the
surface ; over this put the goblet, which, if you
press it down ever so hard, will not fill with
water, but will form an exact representation of
a miniature diving-bell and its occupant.

Some good tricks are performed by means of
cards, but it is very difficult to describe them
clearly enough for practice. The grand thing
requisite is to know, or be able to discover, the
card selected by your companion; and the
simplest way to effect this is to force one
upon him of your own choosing. Forcing a
ecard is commonly done in this way :— While
shuflling the cards as usual, turn their faces
‘towards you, and fix upon the card you wish
to force. Shuflle it towards one side of the













FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 177

pack, keeping your eye fixed upon it, so as
not to lose it: if you have occasion to pause,
or look somewhere else, take care to place a
finger against the card, so that you may know
it again. Now ask some one to choose a card;
and while he is choosing, throw the cards about
as much as possible, until at last you throw
the card (though without the appearance of
doing so) into his hand. Tell him to look at
the card, and shuflle it well into the pack.
When he returns it to you, look at the cards,
and shufile the chosen one to the bottom with
its face upwards; then bringing them near the
edge of the table, give them a sudden jerk, and
they will all fly along the table with their
backs upwards, spt the forced card, which
will of course exhibit its face.

“The Queens’ going to dig for Diamonds”
is one of the prettiest of these feats by cards.
Take all the Queens, Kings, Knaves, and Aces,
and four common cards of cach suite, from the
pack. Then putting the four Queens together,
lay them down, face upwards, on the table, and
say, “These four Queens went out together to
dig for diamonds (Here you place four cards of
Diamonds half over them), and each one took


178 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

a spade (Placing four Spades half over the Dia-
monds); but the four Kings, their husbands,
fearing that they would mect danger on the
road, sent an escort after them for a protection
(Here you put the Aces half over the Spades);
the Kings, however, became anxious, and all set
out together after their wives (Here the Kings
must be placed half across the Aces); this
business getting wind, four robbers determined
to lie in wait for the Queens on their return,
and seize the diamonds thus procured (Place the
Knaves half over the Kings); each one of these
robbers was armed with a club (Put the Clubs
half over the Knaves), and all were well known
as the bravest, stoutest-hearted men in that
country (Laying the Hearts half over the Clubs).”

Having finished your cards, you now pack
them up into one parcel; that is, you first
take up the Queens, and place them, face
downwards, on the table; then, keeping the
Diamonds together, you lay them in the same
way, face downwards, upon the Queens, and so
on. Give the cards to any one who wishes to
cut, and afterwards cut them yourself, until
the common card of Hearts remains at the
bottom: if you lay them out as before, you
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 179

will find them all come into their proper order.
Any one trying this feat, without knowing the
secret of keeping the Heart at the bottom, will,
unless favoured by some very rare chance, be
sure to fail.

But card-tricks are best learned from conver-
sation and practige, and I shall not venture on
any more, lest I should end my task by weary-
ing and confusing my readers. ‘The little old
maid likes rather to part with her young friends
in good-humour; and she hopes that in this
small volume she has left them a token whereby
to remember her kindly in their Frresipe
AMUSEMENTS.
. A chair

A

SOLUTIONS OF



Ripp
A tree.
Seven and five.
Blacksmith.
Fire-tongs.

‘An apple.

A pipe.

A slate.

A mui






Ink.

Ignis fatuus, ov Jack
o’Lantern.

yard measure,
Figure 8.

. A wig.

A coffin,

A looking-glass.
‘The heart.
Echo.

. The little finger.

Fire.





THE ENIGMAS.

21. A secreti

22. Chocolate.

23. The man’s name was
Nor.

The five vowels.
The letter P.
. A shuttlecock.

. A clock,

. A bed.

. The moon; never more

than a month old.

. A candle.

A glove.

Ink.

A sign.

. Spark. Park. Ark.
A man comes in car
ing a leg of mutton,
which he lays down
on a three-legged
stool; he then goes
out. A dog runs away
with the leg. ‘The




FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 181



man comes back, and be opposite each other,
throws the stool at could look at each
the dog, to make him other, and might sit
drop the leg of mut- on her own tail.
ton. 47. Seven. Having one

36. Her son. son, of course he

37. He first crosses the — was brother to all
river with the goose, the six daughters.
leaving the fox with 48. Only myself. As Z was
the corn. He then going to St Ives, of
returns for the fox, course all the others
which he lands, and were coming: from it.
takes back the goose. 49. A lighted candle.
He goes across again 50. Man. In infancy he
with the corn; and creeps on all-fours;
finally, conveys the when he is grown up,
goose over for the he walks erect; and
second time. Thus when life is closing
the fox is never left in, he supports his
with the goose, nor feeble steps with a
the goose with the stick. This is the
corn. famous riddle of the

38. A pair of skates. “Sphinx.”

39. Plague. Ague. 51. An end.

40. A pair of spurs. 52. Three.

41. The globe of the earth, 53. A shadow.

42, A wafer. 54. A looking-glass.

43. A mouse in alibrary. 55. To-morrow.

44. To-day. 56. An icicle.

45. A hole in a stocking. 57. A needle.
46. Four. Every one would 58. A rebus.
182

Ink.

A sigh.

Your name.

A blush.

The letter Z.

The figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, brought
from Arabia.

‘The alphabet

Antelope and cantelope.

67. To-ad.

68. A thorn.

69. An egg.

70. A river.

59.
60.
61.



65.
66.





Frencu Rrppies.

1. A footman following his
master:—I am what
Lam; Iam not what
I follow: if I were
what I follow, I
should not be what I
am.

2. The letter A.

3. The twenty-ninth of Fe-
bruary.



ENiGMatrcar TREES.
1. The palm.
2. The date.
3. Lime-tree.

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

4. Silver-tree.

. Lace-tree.

6. Beech-tree (beach).

7. Crab-tree.

8. The medlar.

9. Cork-tree.

Aspen (ass-pen).

Plum.

. Pear (pair).

Cow-tree.

‘The sloe.

. Tallow-tree. (Candles
are wick-ed.)

Locust.

The paper-tree.

Rock-maple.

Elder-bush.

. Fev





16.
17.
18.
19.





. Olive.

. Broom.

. Spruce.

26. Sugar-cane.

Plane (plain).

Axle-tree,

Orange (O, range!)

Fringe-tree.

Yew (L
you).

27.
28.



30.

31. call upon
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS. 183

EnieMatican Brrps.

Bird-of-Paradise.
Halcyon.

Wr
Robin (robbing
Swallow.

Kite.

Gull.

Martin.

Crov

Turkey.
Goose.

Crane.
Cat-bird.





FSpeuepaeyr



Craranrs.

Co-nun-drum.
Friend-ship.
Cows’-lip.
Foot-stool.
Lap-pet.
Peer-less.
For-tune.
Hear
Sea-son.
Glow-worm.
Rattle-snake.
Wel-come.
13. Rain-bow.
14, Fire-brand.







Soenooeeyn

15. Break-fast.
16.
17. Horse-man-ship.
18. Watch-man.

19. Ad-vice.

20. Moon-shine.
21. Wo-man.

22. Al-so.

23. I-dol.

24. Leg-horn.

25. Quick-sand.





Lococrirnk.

Starch. The parts are—,
Cash, Ah! Arch, Rash,
Hast, A, Hat, Ta,
Art, Ab! Cat and
Rat, Stars, Car, Crash,
Sat, Trash, Ace, Tars,
“ Has,” Chart, Cart,
Ache, As, At, Hart,
Ash, Chat, Char, Sear.



Frencu Cuaraves.

1. Char-don. Char is a
chariot; don is a gift,
chardon is a thistle,
which is caten by
jack-asses.

2. A-dieu.
184
Repus.
Green-gage.

ARITHMETICAL PuzziEs.

1, xix. xx.





2. Twice twenty-five is
fifty; twice five, and
twenty, is thirty.

8. If a herring and a-half



are three-halfpence,
of course each he
ring is a penny a-
piece.

4. Those who hear you,
will think you say
“one.”

7. The bride was fifteen,
and the bridegroom

forty-five.

8. Twenty-nine days.

9. He first fills the five-
quart measure, and
from it fills the three-
quart. He pours away
the jcontents of the
three quarts, putting
the two quarts into

i He then fills the

five-quarts, and fills

up the three-quart





FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

measure from it, thus
leaving exactly four
quarts in the five-
quart measure.
Con

1. Royal Exchange.

2. Earwig.

Outside.

4. There is not a single
person in it.

5. Because his nose is
above his chin.

6. When he has not paid
for his wig.

7. He has a bit always in
his mouth.

8. It is out of your head.

9. A coachman.

He is learning.

Because it wont come

to us.

12, They have a merry

thought between them.

There are three scruples

to a dram,

The road.

Twenty.

Growing older.

His grandson.

A staff or sti



NDRUMS.





13.

14.
15.
16.
17,
18.


19.





30. Because

31.
32.

33.
BA.
BB.

36.
37.

. A-musing ;

. She forms lasses

VIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

One was governed by
deys, the other by
knights.

B-coming ;

D-lighting ; N-chant-

ing.

into
classes.

‘There is a difference.

. He stops at the sound

of “wo.”
Facetious.
A bald head.



. Stone.
. No horse has five legs.

To keep his head warm.

A danchter.

no one
them to us,

A hole in their stocking.

None; they will all fly



away.
When exposed to fire,
they run.





‘When it's a skylight.

Because it is in the
midst of Greece
(grease).

What does y-e-s spell?
Because it is a bee-

holder (beholder).





185

BS. Because they are sta-
tionary.

39. Largess (large S).

40. Because he mak
decanter (D canter

Mendicant (mend 1
can’t.)

42. Amiable (Am I able?)

. He is crusty.

It is a bad habit.

Because it is privateer-
ing (private hearing).

3. She weighs anchor.

Dwarfs.

. Short

After tea (After T).

50. Chaucer (Chaw, sir).

51. Eusebius (You see by us).

52. It is Ham let alone
(Hamlet alone).

I often see abundance
on the table.

. Silence.

. It is founded on Mer-

sey (Mercy).



41.



45,







LEG,

7. X L (Excel).

58. He is just ready to
strike one.

59. They are regular, irre-



gular, and defective.
186

GO.

61.

62.
63.
64,
65,

They are high
(Heigh ho’s!)
One reflects without
speaking; the other
without

hose

re-



Adriatic (A dry attic).

She would be a great
politician (Polly Ti-
tian).

. I seream, thou scream-

est, he screams.
The outside.
On the head.

He is not a tall bla
(Not at all black).
Because there are more

of them.



- He is a jewel (A Jew

in).
Ile has pictures (Picked
yours).

78, He is always forgetting

. When it is ajar (A ja
. Because it holds a gal

(For getting).
It is a decoration (Deck
oration).
).



on (A Gallon).

FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

77. He is above doing a
wrong action.

It would be deceased
(D ceased).

A ditch.

They are far-fetched
and troublesome.

A sack-but.

Wet.

A cat out of a hole.

Like to be drowned.

. In the ark.

. Four quarters.

. On the other side.

The winds blew (blue),
and the storms

78.

79.







89. Your father.

90. Like a fish out of water.

91, When it is a litle pail
(pale).

92. The nos

93. To ashes.

94, The pillow



. Because
ship.
. Noah when he
Ham into the ark
. ‘The wind, that whistled
“Over the hills and
far away.”
Nobody knows.



is a hard-

took



98.
FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

99. Because we could not
be wed without it.

100, When he is a-board.

101. Because it contains a
goose’s head.

102. When her bonnet be-
comes her.

103. When he

104, Because the sooner it
js put out the better.





105..When it is wrung
(vung).

106. The man with two
sacks, because
would be lighter than
one sack of flour.

107. Because he would pre-
sent a far-thing pr
sent.

108. Both the same.

109. Because they develope
the muscles.

110. Against his inclina-
tion.

111, Because it contains
the ashes of the
great (grate).

112. Because he is in
sheets.

113. Because there is Cork
in it.



187

114.
115.

His foot.

They had twenty-fore
feet.

A tanner.

A mason (Mi

Cabinet-m

119. A joiner.

120. A glassblower.

121. A hairdresser
dresser).

A wheelwright.

. Founders.

- Buller

116.
17.
118.

sun).







(hare-




. A shoemaker.
» Dyers.

Mis-fortune.

Mis-chance and Mis-
hap.

|. Mis-take.

. Mis-give
trust.

Mis-understanding.
Mis-shape.

Mis-rule.

Mis-lay and Mis-place.

Mis-chief.





and Mis-




188 FIRESIDE AMUSEMENTS.

141. Mis-represent, Mis- 2. C'est la plante des pieds,











inform, and Mis- the French phrase for
report. sole of the foot.
142, Mis-behave. 3. Lapin VII. (La pincette).
143. Mis-guide and Mis- Lapin 7th, sounds in
lead. French like Ja pin-
144, Mis-reckon. cette, which means the
145, Mis-spend. tongs.
146, Mis-management. 4, Parcequ’il est. Vainé
147. Mis-interpret. (Laing). L’ainé means
148, Mis-quote. the eldest, and lainé
is : means covered with
Frencn Conunproms, wasls
1. C'est Cyrus. In French 5. Un homme sans un
pronounced six Russes, sourcil. Souci means
which means six Rus- care, anxiety; sourcil
sians. means an eyebrow.

THE END.





xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000275400001datestamp 2008-11-13setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Fireside amusementsChambers's library for young peopledc:creator Millar, George ( Engraver )William and Robert Chambersdc:subject Word games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Amusements -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Magic tricks -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Games -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )Riddles -- 1853 ( rbgenr )Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )dc:description Frontispiece engraved by G. Millar, Edinburgh.dc:publisher William and Robert Chambersdc:date 1853dc:type Bookdc:format 188 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00002754&v=00001002229725 (ALEPH)AAA3045 (LTQF)ALH0059 (LTUF)22402575 (OCLC)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


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describe
'19671' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAABV' 'sip-files000hthm.jpg'
af92c0abc34589f7df942bb4107ce8ac
ae0c0f9017daf5cf9a99b6133b8fa07c57108221
'2011-12-31T13:53:17-05:00'
describe
'62321' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAABW' 'sip-files000i.jp2'
5104b068e31e09f29151d122207d7c93
5ace5ba49ca8e0891872a6f579e949b5e2a0ec57
'2011-12-31T13:59:05-05:00'
describe
'103485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAABX' 'sip-files000i.jpg'
48268fbb632df05a75622eb0652eced8
69dd30e8df4197ac8d8fe76f813fb3b16f2d161a
'2011-12-31T13:55:26-05:00'
describe
'38708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAABY' 'sip-files000i.pro'
4e3d2e79d2a2542b0c8845ac3ed5e189
c3687a65f2120f9ae29290ff79801f116f629a87
'2011-12-31T13:56:28-05:00'
describe
'43801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAABZ' 'sip-files000i.QC.jpg'
35aa22eaac80cae5a508d93a81a2d995
92e550d776318ddb36450c2c2e1b6e5331360cef
'2011-12-31T13:53:10-05:00'
describe
'510684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACA' 'sip-files000i.tif'
b1049afda568d827c593f6a7741eafe7
f5ef7156e5482087ddbe40c504b0c02c02ebb00f
'2011-12-31T13:54:17-05:00'
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACB' 'sip-files000i.txt'
8fa0c0d9a3c78a1b832765ec92f7500b
6a69c124b5fa33968e640f68b67fff7a8b216518
'2011-12-31T13:52:43-05:00'
describe
'19752' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACC' 'sip-files000ithm.jpg'
fb4f3b639e2bf339b6b8c918bb510efd
5400180122337d080ec565f5393406cd0d1b7672
'2011-12-31T13:58:42-05:00'
describe
'62281' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACD' 'sip-files001.jp2'
cad1824913ceac1097d28b96809b8f40
4da278774ed3002d95baada1408296acb6cd869a
'2011-12-31T13:53:18-05:00'
describe
'83398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACE' 'sip-files001.jpg'
be62ee9abdd599b6dab994966c83e21d
ae9259b876547ea2d10da77ac98e2b9092246981
'2011-12-31T13:57:51-05:00'
describe
'19216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACF' 'sip-files001.pro'
061c9ae5b84eecdd1342e2bb507d38e4
b07084c543c3d3cf6490811129963223582e4d1b
'2011-12-31T13:52:22-05:00'
describe
'37213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACG' 'sip-files001.QC.jpg'
00be582136e9e869bee6e41e6ef16543
28f66d058dcef376340ad0385f60814ea9bffffb
describe
'510188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACH' 'sip-files001.tif'
3ff7895ce3070f9244a282e44e4afd02
4deedbf3f32ee43e4412fcec6f45c755910e7e9c
'2011-12-31T13:53:13-05:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACI' 'sip-files001.txt'
6fa4d2f8ecd3cb12e3a084e567277eeb
cafdf86f509c0f6bb03ba1ba86b3041e6f69bb6f
'2011-12-31T13:51:31-05:00'
describe
'17544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACJ' 'sip-files001thm.jpg'
93b54156d113923483e0b335eb78a29d
ba0e87d261a5858ac6f945960bf350d795ae7e7f
'2011-12-31T13:58:13-05:00'
describe
'62322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACK' 'sip-files002.jp2'
ba5166f7e68c7e391f0c409ead682c14
48f952e0c4bb5d81d9cb456b03cb70ffaca2ef9a
'2011-12-31T13:58:26-05:00'
describe
'122190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACL' 'sip-files002.jpg'
69ce002fea7564537dce6d3a7a9d745f
44553d1ec535a49e20b14c84fa98f6468f4e3425
'2011-12-31T13:58:49-05:00'
describe
'30360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACM' 'sip-files002.pro'
7e485e72d6e00b2968bf0b56bc5898df
516a3151abdfe3158c2e511cf0d2582c53079dcf
'2011-12-31T13:58:21-05:00'
describe
'51590' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACN' 'sip-files002.QC.jpg'
491f6d781fd7a71dfab1717c632572f9
3c3faa2f8081a0d87701834d063917a4f9056e3f
describe
'511764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACO' 'sip-files002.tif'
8cf83f46478b5a34c926e337045fc4ed
59b4d408df7a1b7776661c4c12d578b84495e8c5
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACP' 'sip-files002.txt'
27d1e30f1f69cafaddc81b514e794769
fe3825a6375ee896ee02ec6a687351c0379f9567
'2011-12-31T13:54:03-05:00'
describe
'21871' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACQ' 'sip-files002thm.jpg'
b66812f2c0e1836989153d10b4055882
6db27626db5e76411d85f13eb3a8dfcebf607937
'2011-12-31T13:58:37-05:00'
describe
'62288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACR' 'sip-files003.jp2'
dc151d3176ebb0e3471bfdc165864115
94d7d7d9991c11b4dc815a4ef8b0dbfc2a8d83cc
'2011-12-31T13:56:03-05:00'
describe
'123128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACS' 'sip-files003.jpg'
14fe91e3901d574926fb91321975a03b
6911678f846f090db6ec1cc210428520bbd700fe
'2011-12-31T13:58:07-05:00'
describe
'30864' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACT' 'sip-files003.pro'
e89efd56a955168f73741d5acbd992f4
88140bfa60d8bbb3301d1c86024b07e63a97cfff
'2011-12-31T13:52:50-05:00'
describe
'51672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACU' 'sip-files003.QC.jpg'
2c973d4c64d98de3973b86b59aee9450
69648b8600e1bc18ab09c5bdea2d9c5bd81496b6
'2011-12-31T13:53:34-05:00'
describe
'511736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACV' 'sip-files003.tif'
d615a54d13d1cb7c357287b13a2a7019
aa45102733092d5f1be10e779d52dcc4e98d5590
'2011-12-31T13:52:12-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACW' 'sip-files003.txt'
d896ff48d23fd465d72fd9fca41b0678
641437afbf6d2ea38f9f17e2a6fc969302345761
'2011-12-31T13:51:42-05:00'
describe
'21877' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACX' 'sip-files003thm.jpg'
4d2b4666de3627dad1cee061007987ab
adbfe353c85065614e516c99ddf4b7ad73cda5f8
'2011-12-31T13:50:49-05:00'
describe
'62319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACY' 'sip-files004.jp2'
b84e2fe32739c6abb5371ef67153ffb9
4a0dd5156af1c8d5cfb36559d1d1819a26420141
'2011-12-31T13:58:11-05:00'
describe
'127194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAACZ' 'sip-files004.jpg'
5f3e2fc51c7c17bb81221117139c0c68
6bf72a7f3197bb04e252ea306b2aab15da70f1f7
'2011-12-31T13:58:02-05:00'
describe
'31580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADA' 'sip-files004.pro'
96bca54c5986fa7c57a50f05de8cdac6
0ceb4b9302de935d9f690bb6bd4310cf277aad1e
'2011-12-31T13:52:27-05:00'
describe
'52847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADB' 'sip-files004.QC.jpg'
3042bee45160ea3f5652e56188721100
fbf06a26b69424e4b79b0d0a746ae48221b809b5
'2011-12-31T13:52:31-05:00'
describe
'511812' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADC' 'sip-files004.tif'
a788ed1cd2e723e554e0819e87044072
89e65915b6ff3b012619bdd101a6c2989092b12a
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADD' 'sip-files004.txt'
7960ea7e6c26c9f2d4d3aefc039cefd2
aabe8804a53aa4936aba295c923c7e1ceff69dbd
describe
'22002' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADE' 'sip-files004thm.jpg'
36940d916ca0cdb69a1a9c25a9383e9a
57f010d203fce7d2f6aa4eb689781ec1d34f3052
'2011-12-31T13:53:59-05:00'
describe
'62189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADF' 'sip-files005.jp2'
2d995b4c6ccc02c7bcf362759735c7a9
89a8bccb669ce9fbbec826651536252b7e8988ac
'2011-12-31T13:57:26-05:00'
describe
'125789' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADG' 'sip-files005.jpg'
f23b399cff1a6146e2d373598383e29e
7e7a2b3b3e519765bf68d185e669d505d902325f
describe
'32046' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADH' 'sip-files005.pro'
3115b86174b5cbfa4483ae537c6bd52b
411bf4c464374c899211097cdc8312982ba8e2d2
'2011-12-31T13:57:34-05:00'
describe
'52951' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADI' 'sip-files005.QC.jpg'
e6cb598a29026b7ec41c233583b544e0
09412afd6973e6bb3363a8a2461b2b1da68b63c6
'2011-12-31T13:54:19-05:00'
describe
'511888' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADJ' 'sip-files005.tif'
b07e39b7975fd103fdadaff1b581c443
a59ea4c7081493e515cfa533ec3277803d1e9cdd
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADK' 'sip-files005.txt'
cc7f302f7991c1e80f57b6a361753dd2
931ac56e7a39d12cac871d1bb50b89624b3d0ea8
'2011-12-31T13:57:32-05:00'
describe
'22226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADL' 'sip-files005thm.jpg'
cd31487ab225fbd17ac24599f7686373
fd35a09e7d18b3758ac5fbe7db5e167617e8cbbf
'2011-12-31T13:58:19-05:00'
describe
'62253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADM' 'sip-files006.jp2'
3640c9ff154b7d043b1b4db6d29bd0cb
0c5d384c94b4e802c19c14b08e2a88bbb699d259
'2011-12-31T13:53:56-05:00'
describe
'118163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADN' 'sip-files006.jpg'
2024b94fd5af680b692902dafe32b64a
523c8f09f9c82881d2d889f47979de1a1a98c129
describe
'29665' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADO' 'sip-files006.pro'
b49bb396891fd50b7541a34a6c61b7e8
f441e30eb50fd860979838783e9a36377a10133c
'2011-12-31T13:51:28-05:00'
describe
'49103' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADP' 'sip-files006.QC.jpg'
79e53cc89555743bc7579215e72f586c
9a01f8fa1350b1f1e2bf1dd03b055dc27cb2c065
'2011-12-31T13:55:54-05:00'
describe
'511460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADQ' 'sip-files006.tif'
fc066c938e291483efb92918c32b5385
566acbc2bf009ad5a13e13a43fafa745b26ad4f6
'2011-12-31T13:57:17-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADR' 'sip-files006.txt'
57629ef5436477ece752c933b65f3291
8568cedcaf735e78692ebf3b8731eb122df52f37
'2011-12-31T13:54:24-05:00'
describe
'21304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADS' 'sip-files006thm.jpg'
4cc9df2fdf2c72855ca75fa1532c6e73
3eeb51050b985e030bdcde4bb6ac871437c61c61
'2011-12-31T13:53:46-05:00'
describe
'62190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADT' 'sip-files007.jp2'
71461e862ced8142f377b087a0a0fbcf
2d352aa188b8304b6ab6adea6cf3852e7432beb3
'2011-12-31T13:58:38-05:00'
describe
'124844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADU' 'sip-files007.jpg'
4aa18486461e0c9f1987e5c5f8f19ec5
b29ef97d836133cb51ecef0e725ffc7684dea7de
'2011-12-31T13:54:01-05:00'
describe
'32166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADV' 'sip-files007.pro'
659be1057dc36a6f239713ae5dcdfa02
489cc6d37e08772a061ce787888213ad74e00880
'2011-12-31T13:56:01-05:00'
describe
'52032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADW' 'sip-files007.QC.jpg'
750199eb6b3b345148410521e4a8f0f1
312811f72a80ed1ea1198ac454ac3b62a9768606
describe
'511568' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADX' 'sip-files007.tif'
91fe8d7a537784bd4252773a76c9b450
62fbc26eb219684e6d3960b67f0ff4b7f46213ae
'2011-12-31T13:52:14-05:00'
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADY' 'sip-files007.txt'
afea8ae0cde7fef3c952df2711bf7f87
82a22c7b342d1858d0e31abb4b5b65a767b00f1a
'2011-12-31T13:58:14-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'21588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAADZ' 'sip-files007thm.jpg'
5942b90c97fb04317d975ee49b1652a7
08ac7c45e1f4c4492293a8728aad79be6188d662
'2011-12-31T13:57:33-05:00'
describe
'62229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEA' 'sip-files008.jp2'
afb6831678d6c0a1b56dc1da5998cec9
17c9df136c5755caa1f065e8101e4eebb14a79d2
'2011-12-31T13:58:45-05:00'
describe
'120853' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEB' 'sip-files008.jpg'
9d2777219fa22797e76ff434bff8f6df
47b85366a53fd40a8be0e6d54bfa9d9484359f3d
'2011-12-31T13:55:53-05:00'
describe
'30724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEC' 'sip-files008.pro'
ba14c535b13ccb9a666c60fd26549746
ae4c235ee5759ec4bd905f228e55ffd74ec80399
'2011-12-31T13:58:35-05:00'
describe
'50248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAED' 'sip-files008.QC.jpg'
f9d227035d4741b687c4c7c06fd77bb7
7ae1e44ed9fc371cc42dc81830f57ebbf9f50d7b
'2011-12-31T13:55:59-05:00'
describe
'511524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEE' 'sip-files008.tif'
99ab273d4084238cfdcbc5d907df9921
268b6822c4caa36ebb653a0e3749d2fd78afa44d
'2011-12-31T13:51:48-05:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEF' 'sip-files008.txt'
662452a988729eb453cc6511034718fe
475536083412f14511dff3de7c729c4cfc0915af
'2011-12-31T13:51:38-05:00'
describe
'21381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEG' 'sip-files008thm.jpg'
0e89282cc556b6ce93c611c87650f89c
e7c9fd6a3dd214b4e25da71dfc5e85eb8b704a21
'2011-12-31T13:58:15-05:00'
describe
'62256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEH' 'sip-files009.jp2'
9881d545649a3044106b0d7764013985
bf5a9f60e630af271fa950f8e14c405eaf1cee10
describe
'100821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEI' 'sip-files009.jpg'
1b3b29f12f593c353690b3c60425262d
35d0cfa55362e9ec5ffe70f7b6eef183e714a72e
'2011-12-31T13:50:59-05:00'
describe
'25601' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEJ' 'sip-files009.pro'
355e2b52e7e4adebe8d7fbe7b5d2fe2a
8bce29a85fa3a3db3d61b97ab2e4a6b17a64401c
'2011-12-31T13:56:54-05:00'
describe
'43137' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEK' 'sip-files009.QC.jpg'
a4d83b04bf68250c7f296713ce61a49e
70d784ada47485a9503c4b671a8488dc07512ee9
describe
'510516' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEL' 'sip-files009.tif'
04c9ee2c314453a579169a5840257f38
314b3064700794d7056dd2602ee9f6f7e30f843e
'2011-12-31T13:52:32-05:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEM' 'sip-files009.txt'
a08602d798ff75cfaed2e3fb7107fa13
098f7f43537d5cee6292b57e4422c6bc239670c4
'2011-12-31T13:57:37-05:00'
describe
'19270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEN' 'sip-files009thm.jpg'
c1c97e58ea7dd91724d714e8bea7b0ac
04b3459df6794b71612a7285f99bff5a144c04ce
'2011-12-31T13:51:45-05:00'
describe
'62113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEO' 'sip-files010.jp2'
e233c8bae0d34fd291188a64c2b27759
f16d6c621b2352c8dc2da5dfd81ac3bfe979dede
'2011-12-31T13:51:14-05:00'
describe
'99326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEP' 'sip-files010.jpg'
b6153052d940047dd69c60ce5f62f4db
b4013d30e304fbd9c6700d4dad92aeeaa9851139
describe
'24592' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEQ' 'sip-files010.pro'
524e1e5af36b97684f1e3f203353c475
f7fee36817624eb487de00771e805d2276038b1a
'2011-12-31T13:55:30-05:00'
describe
'42252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAER' 'sip-files010.QC.jpg'
4bf7f19460c9c0e7d3ac559fc9029af9
44c7d68c27c0beb652c5d44ca087d5d51af685b1
'2011-12-31T13:53:39-05:00'
describe
'510572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAES' 'sip-files010.tif'
a7201d6925f3992cb149ecc3c78cac1c
db798305027b50f2c8aa6a03b7dbc9019de49970
'2011-12-31T13:52:03-05:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAET' 'sip-files010.txt'
7cccc18a7530c43505937a7e9e2e93ca
7453e77f2de572b23c0d7a7267741f246559e84b
'2011-12-31T13:56:14-05:00'
describe
'19184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEU' 'sip-files010thm.jpg'
097bbd4df7f2b97093622f33401da9e1
51ddb91dbb6048bf8de193b1b4702a8b985dc950
'2011-12-31T13:58:00-05:00'
describe
'62305' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEV' 'sip-files011.jp2'
00cab420d79a0bace7bc3b43aca7d639
260b407cf36eb748f4e0d3c52cd3b81dfbc8e4bc
'2011-12-31T13:55:45-05:00'
describe
'120491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEW' 'sip-files011.jpg'
4b617ac2f618b185600402f518599019
1ac0b559af3d63cc638a8a5aa96c832e795ef2aa
'2011-12-31T13:57:29-05:00'
describe
'28787' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEX' 'sip-files011.pro'
9544d4218efc6728ce5856e9ebfe204b
dc075e95883c68cf3535ab01c8edb0605c4a253a
'2011-12-31T13:55:24-05:00'
describe
'50424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEY' 'sip-files011.QC.jpg'
895bc52de69be048bb16338e71c07cab
2233d265bc15419c077281c039599c67e5e59f3e
'2011-12-31T13:51:44-05:00'
describe
'511740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAEZ' 'sip-files011.tif'
a88a290f6db12985cd35597a6d193ace
60e20f400d88f043369de5572fc24248fdf408d5
'2011-12-31T13:50:46-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFA' 'sip-files011.txt'
6a708b35fa479967c1da08380eded832
3682e39a4809abee67463ad90aa2187dcd6765e7
'2011-12-31T13:54:28-05:00'
describe
'21770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFB' 'sip-files011thm.jpg'
6d7566ee24b85f3b8d0ae2a32489da1f
ab857af54757aedeb7b5ba28a2f5a7a9c1358845
'2011-12-31T13:55:10-05:00'
describe
'62230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFC' 'sip-files012.jp2'
4ec41fa3ff0724c43fe8f5c5a2cfe621
d0f2dcd7ceeb113391863aaff691173dc5dc7159
describe
'114289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFD' 'sip-files012.jpg'
fcdd87b12eeb28ca10f72768fe5f1d12
926efae11c746ef1bb871e1b1593f58578a80cc4
describe
'27224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFE' 'sip-files012.pro'
45ff20a27c2124f8cd8e497f8ba1fc94
f3274edef9748a80168ffcd76dc64d29fdb8b102
'2011-12-31T13:57:48-05:00'
describe
'49456' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFF' 'sip-files012.QC.jpg'
888af112226a6f0eb2213ac791a58ca9
330383670ea5953ed2fcb5c640161d1daa6b7db5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFG' 'sip-files012.tif'
01de3899bffbe01e78633208de43c2ec
371d7dae3a5cd6f986d1f4286b40cd49867d2a8a
'2011-12-31T13:51:53-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFH' 'sip-files012.txt'
15185db001f25792f81d066e154bff0d
d968e81985d9d19b69a98f0a637dfdd1067accf2
'2011-12-31T13:57:25-05:00'
describe
'21740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFI' 'sip-files012thm.jpg'
a3d82d6427de5b9d1392ee8421e90a10
c34e73a0ef9a638e422310094d319e3b305f29ef
'2011-12-31T13:50:41-05:00'
describe
'62275' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFJ' 'sip-files013.jp2'
a4fd418ad5743a41dd396f4df1b18ba3
258e59540dbce3972689368ab0334147e8015bac
describe
'118209' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFK' 'sip-files013.jpg'
6c6b0bffa230fe407c34243efb8449a3
e48a2fd1e63bc20e705ed83e4a2e7d92572d5115
'2011-12-31T13:50:43-05:00'
describe
'27985' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFL' 'sip-files013.pro'
5665d5cb1ec0f6e997542ec0386941a8
4319be07902dfa8276d3f2e62252dcbc0ced4b83
'2011-12-31T13:56:09-05:00'
describe
'50891' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFM' 'sip-files013.QC.jpg'
a4a585e342894d0f11238d563c670c22
8d972c6e794a35675fe7af399b98ef842885a091
'2011-12-31T13:53:28-05:00'
describe
'512004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFN' 'sip-files013.tif'
2d58809b43ad95042c9f7600d803bfb9
e6d1f3fa83a23ab3eadf02ead8d4619534349351
'2011-12-31T13:58:47-05:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFO' 'sip-files013.txt'
78411ff2dd12e10ff5011ac809ad7540
abded52fbba26e48b6058d8a153ab86cf2017abe
'2011-12-31T13:54:04-05:00'
describe
'22315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFP' 'sip-files013thm.jpg'
03a73e487ab29e679156b64c09144d11
a42910247cb7267671a4f8a0ae6ad049f613a4cd
'2011-12-31T13:55:40-05:00'
describe
'62308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFQ' 'sip-files014.jp2'
87cee7dc4b2980f736e126988771a1f0
2dcb6ee34ed8935559d29cd8c8a2e6e68600b170
describe
'128565' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFR' 'sip-files014.jpg'
29be62979347feb5a42a3e03ba474bf7
e118d086a5cc46c44ddafd596a011e2a8b31cbcf
'2011-12-31T13:51:55-05:00'
describe
'28944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFS' 'sip-files014.pro'
349d2f6fefef5bf71f85f06c93bb03a2
0c4d4c96c24380ed4e39b1f8092f3af8d3379f33
'2011-12-31T13:55:01-05:00'
describe
'54541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFT' 'sip-files014.QC.jpg'
c75d281ddce83d283dc6fccc904ec6f9
475a00b3151a655741a6b67ae0df969eb520deba
'2011-12-31T13:58:25-05:00'
describe
'512768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFU' 'sip-files014.tif'
512bf9d523a59ee16e44af584b02b818
e1df19afa98e1f8603a98ff069ffc50a66466d8f
'2011-12-31T13:50:53-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFV' 'sip-files014.txt'
743a5270b1785ced9a8d11ac5b1adbb0
a9e422d9466bc46957162db63646937bfe3b0719
describe
'23780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFW' 'sip-files014thm.jpg'
7d240d3075884001f2b12db9e3f5b866
9438c47dd648ace533b02393e6c2477784e186c5
describe
'62250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFX' 'sip-files015.jp2'
5afe9db1940b1784ff271415d1ad325a
48248ac8bbc0a85a144fba49c05e053ef69a6bb2
'2011-12-31T13:58:53-05:00'
describe
'95179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFY' 'sip-files015.jpg'
d2805e0344dc3c2084e5a47dba454f00
94a407f51cd6b04afbc0146185c295caed176591
'2011-12-31T13:51:49-05:00'
describe
'22724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAFZ' 'sip-files015.pro'
c2e07c80d0ec53d1093d5eba6402f96a
69ad67b8012702d5fe590475653ccdf4bfdbf0d5
'2011-12-31T13:51:59-05:00'
describe
'43692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGA' 'sip-files015.QC.jpg'
f684cb7c70a4b4068ad2c767cfd27e35
a285efa8b707bf68c6582c1b43ed8840576d0f29
describe
'512016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGB' 'sip-files015.tif'
3fe09ccbac35701215e17b476688301c
ba44c8bab401ccb7f1d64b3bd8dc6cf221470342
'2011-12-31T13:56:27-05:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGC' 'sip-files015.txt'
d520038d28561161c88674e6e01d6118
37ec3cb333b350b996287de3a3eaf683691c79ea
'2011-12-31T13:58:28-05:00'
describe
'21850' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGD' 'sip-files015thm.jpg'
7c6aa494b693183a7f4aaddae48758fc
437dc4bc995609e1e8eba95d82c1ab77f39a4e36
'2011-12-31T13:57:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGE' 'sip-files016.jp2'
5f36fed842587f7776e58f07115d4d06
291f7516593db4ae663641231066bbae567933eb
'2011-12-31T13:52:02-05:00'
describe
'75716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGF' 'sip-files016.jpg'
d51adb7545faeba8907375b8fba5a6e0
249a38bd32e58ea1873589bd5101cba472dbf423
'2011-12-31T13:57:02-05:00'
describe
'19825' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGG' 'sip-files016.pro'
5d9216663db94ff7a8114fcac55d13f9
6b3cbfc138cd3039ba38d2538fc94b4a772bc0d3
'2011-12-31T13:55:13-05:00'
describe
'35521' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGH' 'sip-files016.QC.jpg'
c64403a057d0529b7e81581d48d0d285
2bfb9e24dd9c204bb539495e037deb8d54005ad3
'2011-12-31T13:56:57-05:00'
describe
'510272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGI' 'sip-files016.tif'
796a50f0356c4207c6d9c496302974bd
c970fbcedd1c691ea81a28f999c63152f03fe944
'2011-12-31T13:58:12-05:00'
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGJ' 'sip-files016.txt'
9fb1da3ac73b82bf57e17c5477578e4d
1d5598fb839499011d574fdc53adfb43bdae372d
'2011-12-31T13:52:54-05:00'
describe
'18432' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGK' 'sip-files016thm.jpg'
63b06654df8f22e6046e98e37b1a0d0c
76e3f08b2542104ca8dad5e2ea94c74bf064d490
'2011-12-31T13:50:38-05:00'
describe
'62315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGL' 'sip-files017.jp2'
bcd71787a86db573546c87975ab8ecdb
c739b57085f6981b71906f2b63ee3267302aad4c
'2011-12-31T13:58:01-05:00'
describe
'110095' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGM' 'sip-files017.jpg'
02234bf42e4a23138887d8836eebc9f2
5e666d8155b04faebe8bcd5df0af280ff6056397
describe
'27331' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGN' 'sip-files017.pro'
6630b51f499f08fba60e7cf91935c7b0
d10568cc5a0d2368105e3884520a9fdb4c634b17
describe
'47561' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGO' 'sip-files017.QC.jpg'
7fde0c4aca9a872e3786b3fb98902bec
7b56e24ccef1635de5bb64b048a9396370aff59a
'2011-12-31T13:57:22-05:00'
describe
'511572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGP' 'sip-files017.tif'
5a2b0ba1d67b2aae1a618c7b572b50f6
e313784e47d95c57645547a286d3abe97b538daf
'2011-12-31T13:58:06-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGQ' 'sip-files017.txt'
ef83ec19b7164d84f944deb73e046a8f
69717fa3b0c50515af347d169ac3c1c9363b462c
'2011-12-31T13:56:15-05:00'
describe
'21382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGR' 'sip-files017thm.jpg'
f00258da84dea5ba5b6d261a47b428e4
623cf0a15ac4edbd5c36311e47e5d4d33fbf3072
'2011-12-31T13:54:44-05:00'
describe
'62142' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGS' 'sip-files018.jp2'
75469fe9385c8bed028aa70881d232df
18a04146966a2a68a70baab5068b6488dabcddcb
'2011-12-31T13:57:03-05:00'
describe
'127887' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGT' 'sip-files018.jpg'
51f6faf11d34a233e3ef48e350f09b4e
1c6269fbf69c3adb96a170a9527e95ffabb7cbb4
describe
'31524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGU' 'sip-files018.pro'
b090b75cc0c4981d7bb72c0979c3e8d8
8d1d27b42af3078315763acccf374692abedb8c6
'2011-12-31T13:53:35-05:00'
describe
'53392' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGV' 'sip-files018.QC.jpg'
b4dc64695aad7e5a03cf09987e79bbc1
54317cc989459a907b0c2715385b0b59cef16f23
describe
'511952' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGW' 'sip-files018.tif'
a90e726cc824d2c1ca0f0bec2f2fc99d
062186f3230ac4e78f744666172eb839b55d69b1
'2011-12-31T13:54:57-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGX' 'sip-files018.txt'
0abf50a80c2f089737fbd1126e9b7b65
82757825bcdb33a7c0e9a9919b0692531ec6c661
describe
'22148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGY' 'sip-files018thm.jpg'
74ae122c9863c544dfb89cb9066e5b7d
1949e477c54102e082a64807b18ed249452dd6d2
describe
'62302' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAGZ' 'sip-files019.jp2'
e205f6d2c46d50bf6e0c9dff7b7a0e1a
58a0bc32218580f20df3760200fd09059d105c9a
'2011-12-31T13:51:34-05:00'
describe
'123969' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHA' 'sip-files019.jpg'
9c967e27e023d9d646a115f03e2ac91d
d9df6226a3858844d2efcac3f49b5c54ef571201
describe
'32664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHB' 'sip-files019.pro'
1192877c4bfde75ba102072adf1fb1e7
05ad1604a1e64eb4a20d144b55a172675b2f4428
'2011-12-31T13:57:38-05:00'
describe
'52459' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHC' 'sip-files019.QC.jpg'
2f5467c39a54553fef71abc79f4afb50
9ed86f2088c0422bb6308f0fb4101bcb955e8582
'2011-12-31T13:52:37-05:00'
describe
'511672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHD' 'sip-files019.tif'
6b953175d58805677f82fd18e5d1c3b6
59f3d6310d7780e975983a5cd2ec38bf71d979d7
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHE' 'sip-files019.txt'
8c2e563075675f995db7565fd04f87f8
c2c2173d7acf4c542bcad19621ec216018ed08b2
'2011-12-31T13:50:42-05:00'
describe
'21624' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHF' 'sip-files019thm.jpg'
115520ff7298b8f24bd53c415754e79c
09be1338b623996b8e1a012954f6f5b43d36518f
'2011-12-31T13:58:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHG' 'sip-files020.jp2'
82bbd6a9e090b3a674e8a9e360f1954b
e27c3d327b6a8b5d118f5f9711c2a8fb31fbc116
'2011-12-31T13:51:12-05:00'
describe
'110382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHH' 'sip-files020.jpg'
3daa2824e3864e33d490e44965588683
00df8b30dfbd004bccd549cf354e06881beff331
describe
'27894' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHI' 'sip-files020.pro'
426b56ef69b754261523c13b6c641c1a
9ee58c9d4f94fe38c7255ddb71602c2bfcc56fe6
describe
'47251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHJ' 'sip-files020.QC.jpg'
f1e0e373b9c01a4fc45e556d825b815b
15b2786870d31a3950092976e4b18d76d4ad80fb
describe
'511172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHK' 'sip-files020.tif'
2d50e3de27c62d563a071ed448519ac3
566e4c608ec2f068a4eaf6a01ee16ca386a1d719
'2011-12-31T13:50:36-05:00'
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHL' 'sip-files020.txt'
d36e1a4bae5f61ff145c77e0e7dcfc6a
32d8a4d671d7d9c07ff5c9539b0ccc646ae57acf
'2011-12-31T13:52:57-05:00'
describe
'20626' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHM' 'sip-files020thm.jpg'
a92f5dd1003a44ad8d22ed554f26c127
605036c5a5f5af96f8b35f987a1794e8f7293dbf
'2011-12-31T13:54:27-05:00'
describe
'62300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHN' 'sip-files021.jp2'
198b38ac2fc5a10731ee525efd587632
0372902d133f8cbbdbf9b8f0777cdfdc13a66eb5
describe
'106041' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHO' 'sip-files021.jpg'
6a51a3d858ced68cc26b1f947052d481
fffe721d86f11bfaafccda5c937834d052d933cf
'2011-12-31T13:59:08-05:00'
describe
'27655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHP' 'sip-files021.pro'
8f34a33334d9490df70a609d080fbd7e
c39cdf6296ea00ddb59c2eed4b29ff72b0cc25a2
describe
'46265' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHQ' 'sip-files021.QC.jpg'
b0a755819f7f324ba66466347e66a2df
a41070486970e7261f47e23ac518c26766a1d9fc
'2011-12-31T13:52:10-05:00'
describe
'510996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHR' 'sip-files021.tif'
48d1296e1324fa3eaf860ac5aa6e4594
de325a64cb867792d932bd122db97977dcee58ed
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHS' 'sip-files021.txt'
c5cdf17d2aac234750ce9e0d4fea3f4f
b0e30a2116d3bdd900ab482d865b39f18dd02c77
describe
'20464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHT' 'sip-files021thm.jpg'
80922d02a00cf6f5e9744bbeef4ef73c
f9b7369559e89cf5b382d082244d904daae55f58
'2011-12-31T13:53:08-05:00'
describe
'62254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHU' 'sip-files022.jp2'
bbf9af93fe16fb3aa320bb2899346de6
3d7a02c57aa49f447336a82e9940827c0e9718d1
describe
'109078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHV' 'sip-files022.jpg'
62488cdbb6eab950e499cd80a0746d48
3d3210589e9dda2e52174aa5b50aa1b39e8b8ac6
describe
'28659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHW' 'sip-files022.pro'
a841631cb6cdf3f6f3458efd14a5227e
dabf6029545be5a7f57ea579b4b06bde5cad418b
'2011-12-31T13:52:59-05:00'
describe
'511220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHX' 'sip-files022.tif'
6852131f565960d041e261d54fceb479
5f4475d9210d401dbccedfdd529939b0c1e2a1fd
describe
'46535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHY' 'sip-files022.QC.jpg'
f14dd2f2cdad1a3269079feaa75f73fe
b3e85dc7e1137cea9344428d971b60bdab6c4c19
'2011-12-31T13:56:45-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAHZ' 'sip-files022.txt'
1fe0c17d1601704fd87fc4144a331ef9
73b747e4589a817eed9fcf1f8a7e8a9431784b9b
'2011-12-31T13:52:15-05:00'
describe
'20684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIA' 'sip-files022thm.jpg'
a6e2d83e39f44dd8726698772795937d
5292dcd018a3b12ccca37a517eab207c09ea2bbc
'2011-12-31T13:54:51-05:00'
describe
'62276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIB' 'sip-files023.jp2'
47e0266cb4e4c4d4e70ab49ecc340ed0
621af55dd3077d32667c68cf9adee3cbbf000255
'2011-12-31T13:52:53-05:00'
describe
'113128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIC' 'sip-files023.jpg'
69093d9e76ee2f2dab082fd666b83427
963c8ca2d94cd11839365adf8af9417e69ff695d
'2011-12-31T13:53:24-05:00'
describe
'27412' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAID' 'sip-files023.pro'
6766d3b779bbec8601fc502e6e08b15b
1cde2a66364ca89b625cd9581fb9475c295e6904
'2011-12-31T13:58:17-05:00'
describe
'47814' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIE' 'sip-files023.QC.jpg'
bfcd043514b65057513b785622b265a3
248048cb9c48d2e8133fb729ef4955f781bf7008
'2011-12-31T13:50:37-05:00'
describe
'511276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIF' 'sip-files023.tif'
a9d03aabe7eb159a788e0f0a59c94d63
05fa898a8ccbe12d71991595e9259095f972fa0d
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIG' 'sip-files023.txt'
dd84bd8b26fb01c6fd87bca3544c044b
6b73d9333e0bf28c0df16afa07fbd7a525bb3104
'2011-12-31T13:55:34-05:00'
describe
'20964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIH' 'sip-files023thm.jpg'
12e7eb1c5d799d3e292d06c396fe06af
db97098d69572f901017fe29635b53c0a347627f
'2011-12-31T13:55:19-05:00'
describe
'62296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAII' 'sip-files024.jp2'
2425ad64131bffcff5de68c7a769b10a
21c7bbc99cc599c58463773ee41c550f9fc4fd96
'2011-12-31T13:50:39-05:00'
describe
'127714' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIJ' 'sip-files024.jpg'
59f4058f77df9f0aec013f0e19429c1d
afc3f0c07da2aa9515a7eda8cd487a42a96042a5
'2011-12-31T13:53:20-05:00'
describe
'30297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIK' 'sip-files024.pro'
a4c0a4a3f54897a6684bf89fc2525cbc
89a3862dff15f5b44b50d82c6b9ccd2936c5b19e
'2011-12-31T13:55:16-05:00'
describe
'53252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIL' 'sip-files024.QC.jpg'
b80e5d1d3c5e402311e722f44c880abb
e9f3de2e9da9768b541254b8a31b86c3023511c4
'2011-12-31T13:57:31-05:00'
describe
'512080' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIM' 'sip-files024.tif'
149bd0bce78663618cbfd19b557f0c45
4270cdbdff7c930ca881d8132fb64c870ed5fd44
'2011-12-31T13:58:43-05:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIN' 'sip-files024.txt'
385cac0e7a0cdbc7bd68b76d2f9cd522
3bd9b010ba13a449a99b357d33076b9af893f3c2
'2011-12-31T13:54:12-05:00'
describe
'22399' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIO' 'sip-files024thm.jpg'
683c501d24cf1bd09f1fa511b2660804
9d25b3cd5917c5f9dff77a34b967541f265bb0cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIP' 'sip-files025.jp2'
64038e1099079aacf99fde1e031cf0ae
3376051a011588be0533d874572831db2b0e0944
'2011-12-31T13:58:10-05:00'
describe
'101125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIQ' 'sip-files025.jpg'
98893417353a5965eaf20db2cd088f2c
34e81c8a09250301182720713ff3da2ca2e6c38c
describe
'23458' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIR' 'sip-files025.pro'
eae9d936c96ac8718e83a4c3904b35dc
3d8b837c2c82e93525ad0104cccf44fc4c6aabd5
'2011-12-31T13:54:26-05:00'
describe
'43693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIS' 'sip-files025.QC.jpg'
5bc4fa250963df4f413fde43060ab91d
a1300b162bf7ee33b79f95f0b623bd94b60f2516
describe
'510964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIT' 'sip-files025.tif'
16de9f4af5a544a0d7e3c22e66fa0592
c8fd68b82c27ea475292c4930ca5dadac6aae97c
'2011-12-31T13:58:55-05:00'
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIU' 'sip-files025.txt'
c08c2a10fe1fbe14fb77b7ef579b1c03
20374f888be29f2b0db92897f973557954d7a3f2
describe
'19753' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIV' 'sip-files025thm.jpg'
27b1974f729a5c9af4c71a50299ee9cb
d52cca0ea7268127516d73124fa9adeec504b980
'2011-12-31T13:53:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIW' 'sip-files026.jp2'
0d8d8f28799ee1b6a786c4c110284c2d
88332e2c9b270cf7687b003892ccdd729993ff5b
describe
'90258' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIX' 'sip-files026.jpg'
b255dbe617d9200f8c04cc00ee2cbfb2
67456e2eca18b2e598803023eb83538cb16b8dba
describe
'25338' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIY' 'sip-files026.pro'
89b838dc43e8587d787a239eb9a1657d
12e4731a5f3bc307df1addaf9c91af48b2a8cf59
'2011-12-31T13:56:58-05:00'
describe
'37917' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAIZ' 'sip-files026.QC.jpg'
e4342df3a4ad14f005e4a84b41dcf83c
f6c2124513f79ba0dcc1168bb408d40f4ee22f00
'2011-12-31T13:57:05-05:00'
describe
'510116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJA' 'sip-files026.tif'
c4cf5d5bd17e6a69e2aadbfcaa0ca7c4
0dda1cee0e7fe862ce73462f7e869a6fea4c71ad
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJB' 'sip-files026.txt'
222e9a187c1a34ba5e097206f15117a7
59447e44b8b7b51c10ae584ece71c5330a028ca8
'2011-12-31T13:55:58-05:00'
describe
'18269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJC' 'sip-files026thm.jpg'
b963bd698b6826ae7e06b4a19244a135
c5b8de5dc52d4a79dafc6b004e82195c36adc8cf
'2011-12-31T13:57:53-05:00'
describe
'62291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJD' 'sip-files027.jp2'
f5aa62cef73e32c1a2c82b457ea2dd4c
cd9da1f3372b488b03c008b654122847e25e6fc0
describe
'110540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJE' 'sip-files027.jpg'
f09cb864d779f0c1cbb717071d421948
e8e718a5795f21ddd401c6fe7aa3d9e4760d380b
'2011-12-31T13:56:36-05:00'
describe
'28697' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJF' 'sip-files027.pro'
a4ce4cba5db3c01935a83b85a4e0070d
55eda62e5c3e419b76d4fe05417b3f48158a6457
'2011-12-31T13:56:00-05:00'
describe
'46926' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJG' 'sip-files027.QC.jpg'
eecb5f7bd5f668e32a1527e528ea232a
cb0539922375a1addc0e98892e5967de64af733e
'2011-12-31T13:54:06-05:00'
describe
'511108' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJH' 'sip-files027.tif'
768877ed830b327fb5586eaa7d3af3e8
a02b38e6e167f262dfd95b3a392f068b49983905
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJI' 'sip-files027.txt'
a17a66afb75498ebda6e83b2d0361e34
296fbb3ddc44b3a0cb72e8bc5e72504f14ccbee6
'2011-12-31T13:57:00-05:00'
describe
'20413' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJJ' 'sip-files027thm.jpg'
b0c745e926b206a67934d8fdca1e297d
d8af936529dbc954f62ba6adfa693589ccce3736
'2011-12-31T13:56:52-05:00'
describe
'62274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJK' 'sip-files028.jp2'
344d9f4e71ed30c0415dbb270486bee3
dc1377d2de1bf1e92b036d5b16e9feca595600b1
'2011-12-31T13:54:29-05:00'
describe
'104169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJL' 'sip-files028.jpg'
9f26e11ada06ad7d9d8966e3ccb23918
c48d9048554d70a2c6da9a18fc33c928c302a961
'2011-12-31T13:55:43-05:00'
describe
'27001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJM' 'sip-files028.pro'
83f9c55c519b5edb57f59c059377d19c
c11f981bc8bb98d0d3771cfaeb5439629617eedb
'2011-12-31T13:58:39-05:00'
describe
'43746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJN' 'sip-files028.QC.jpg'
353cba238492111ea633b1b0d5c4a2b6
a7c6feb821962a44a0630cfcc0febbfa8c160ec7
'2011-12-31T13:58:24-05:00'
describe
'510900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJO' 'sip-files028.tif'
a65f089ded525944d8821006c943a155
568464548ec7257dcda528ca39283f3a8022f5f9
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJP' 'sip-files028.txt'
098d5b7b8ab3227e0382b3be5c37a16e
538c5a740d81845293719d787825c5331abd356c
'2011-12-31T13:54:22-05:00'
describe
'19955' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJQ' 'sip-files028thm.jpg'
eee32b2b8b4de58504d09f37f5ae69f4
842d28d4d96943f1e0cbf30545e0314d37ad5336
'2011-12-31T13:55:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJR' 'sip-files029.jp2'
e6d55bfce67061572896aa2ca9cd158c
6debac40fb84792493d2337a2c735a42ff4028aa
describe
'119725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJS' 'sip-files029.jpg'
1676a8b370b57bd630decba3b45f70da
e5a4ca9b0b2407124edde87d18c0ae126fdef51f
'2011-12-31T13:53:50-05:00'
describe
'28808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJT' 'sip-files029.pro'
97a207e64c1fe2d3670c3eada54ddec1
d5e14dd820bdf573fe381169cf75ea2801034c35
describe
'51163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJU' 'sip-files029.QC.jpg'
9dcde4da12831c04ecfbfcd293dd8e76
b17a5e25055bb97a9e079f04f53c58b682e5eb5b
'2011-12-31T13:57:04-05:00'
describe
'511948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJV' 'sip-files029.tif'
25f4a8def2a4bf0246c57d7384422386
58c022339e4b6cd99d48ac74f76e4cea326e3ea2
'2011-12-31T13:54:36-05:00'
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJW' 'sip-files029.txt'
abcd420919b2e5066ac2becb6cebe415
9caa48eb21244f93ee740b33ea6f48a51d81e94c
'2011-12-31T13:56:55-05:00'
describe
'22269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJX' 'sip-files029thm.jpg'
01ad8df15da2b683ce55b2ddbed59bde
b14a21ece8e07649f4ddfeb4e64f12c7eb63c41e
describe
'62290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJY' 'sip-files030.jp2'
0146152abae91ce09c1b9b35ce522afd
ba9bdf1f94d98896129498a1698537af9b098365
'2011-12-31T13:55:49-05:00'
describe
'126023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAJZ' 'sip-files030.jpg'
de27a41476edacffad85aac7c472026e
938e6efe12aa388c10a4b562835a4cea66736260
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKA' 'sip-files030.pro'
0a642c80f90553f728530bc5ee3c1c83
746514cb78d3fc3f4e5173bea9a922b00b9ba257
'2011-12-31T13:52:41-05:00'
describe
'52293' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKB' 'sip-files030.QC.jpg'
6055674fe1ae6044de8a931c480bfb3c
3927ad0d04c91955e60867e2d16e5697deba4c96
describe
'511716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKC' 'sip-files030.tif'
030a6d0361fd52915459572c438589ea
08580de86794eb58058c6f7ed26cc25ac3f9110d
'2011-12-31T13:58:16-05:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKD' 'sip-files030.txt'
1fbe330a3adf88f1eda6ad737171cecf
e4bf39e47269dede6e224a637859f509c44f15a0
'2011-12-31T13:53:58-05:00'
describe
'62252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKE' 'sip-files031.jp2'
6ee24d9c39427b0caaaa900fbfceb9ef
6619ac5d9169e92a3e366b25596e4430ae9af197
'2011-12-31T13:57:35-05:00'
describe
'22007' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKF' 'sip-files030thm.jpg'
a7cca7f2c14399904d3ed2a9123f8a00
5e5b2773c2365ad67a1776ff53e57869764d0efb
'2011-12-31T13:57:16-05:00'
describe
'127992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKG' 'sip-files031.jpg'
d3b7d2b83e6bc521a865915bea19594c
8ef8747a7dfbce27709bc59bc4db8889d7f3027e
describe
'31325' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKH' 'sip-files031.pro'
233d9a73a71ef62a16d1a5287dd962ef
c66ca9222ed860eac21cd9158ce5ed8e9010a359
describe
'52443' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKI' 'sip-files031.QC.jpg'
8daf695f22ec74aae88fc0a8ca333a00
5dc24bb1da543f5144930eb88c30592c49c7a8ce
describe
'511828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKJ' 'sip-files031.tif'
86789fbfc9db40b5b8f36698320dfe22
a3fde785bb1d5f662baa5b2bc999e45baf0ed105
'2011-12-31T13:54:54-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKK' 'sip-files031.txt'
ba7a0f557faee4c4bde207a55813943e
7197e82a4740f53ee58bb3f67d5c6e5d68a5c3e4
'2011-12-31T13:53:41-05:00'
describe
'22085' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKL' 'sip-files031thm.jpg'
56ca8ac7d33ec219c9a31066ee33d6de
3d21a997c5bbbc7cc431f950ec1183a088aebbb9
'2011-12-31T13:58:48-05:00'
describe
'62298' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKM' 'sip-files032.jp2'
19b364d60a7ac83b529f7da1a5d3b8b3
ef2a67d46b60c0c0ba50a5d3dceccb571b52618c
'2011-12-31T13:51:00-05:00'
describe
'122157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKN' 'sip-files032.jpg'
5cbf338d60d8fc884388e23e5502db99
5951ead33cf6c30ea6e30aa26bbda82fb93b2259
'2011-12-31T13:53:31-05:00'
describe
'29661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKO' 'sip-files032.pro'
80437b4483cffb0738f258e2922f27df
6da9f4a8cd7ff6089e36636d4cb0b23cf20b0c70
describe
'50945' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKP' 'sip-files032.QC.jpg'
01510dbc7b2607563f6271774a6b6560
4d486c0ed889f2acf0fcd52ddfa5c85dcaa7ca94
'2011-12-31T13:57:44-05:00'
describe
'511652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKQ' 'sip-files032.tif'
3523b1aebaaf88b74219409290a8a42e
a07a81b002f624c4a9d810faafab5e4f1576c585
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKR' 'sip-files032.txt'
29e74820f245a0cb5623467c951a373f
2a647b1fb23b55507fda42982d9914688391bf1b
describe
'21738' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKS' 'sip-files032thm.jpg'
bd34e9977648cee6942c6cd27b2bc4e6
c4db1a7a3fbd7b6d9c68a2873a34fd2841aeda9f
'2011-12-31T13:54:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKT' 'sip-files033.jp2'
3d7ec10d3cc5131240fd1dd9c9185446
d12ce099acfcb75e15a385361583f0e711fad228
'2011-12-31T13:56:59-05:00'
describe
'104766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKU' 'sip-files033.jpg'
3abf76e0a1d0e62ab9a05270a1a0dab9
cecdba90136858c90ec004a7fe651d03e53e40c8
'2011-12-31T13:59:01-05:00'
describe
'25730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKV' 'sip-files033.pro'
cc9490dd443bded491e8dfbf1c5f4b84
5f2901b70fc3bd0e8dc4d07d7a4481356a3bafc1
'2011-12-31T13:57:09-05:00'
describe
'45487' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKW' 'sip-files033.QC.jpg'
af58ba9433fe2429c8ff09466a1f6d95
948bf2d94cd217a638760e24addea2e104c290d8
'2011-12-31T13:51:09-05:00'
describe
'511240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKX' 'sip-files033.tif'
d03a19822e83e4979700be0a48a3f911
1275487139252964b5dbac65ea3e3e6c700c4d1f
'2011-12-31T13:56:42-05:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKY' 'sip-files033.txt'
6e0e3f7fb0f0f2f733833cccb8ef7bc0
b453a1b1c89e30fda83f3b7ac99d1602dcada800
'2011-12-31T13:56:04-05:00'
describe
'20914' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAKZ' 'sip-files033thm.jpg'
984c58be364bd27a219938bf56dcf724
2656f52b7e1c4ce59bac2cec60a2c6ef1e1376b3
'2011-12-31T13:53:45-05:00'
describe
'62287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALA' 'sip-files034.jp2'
d03f4e86352eecfc865f2d438ea9ff2e
49ccbadc2895e21a7053ca4e5d62c9a8c2788bff
'2011-12-31T13:58:33-05:00'
describe
'126820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALB' 'sip-files034.jpg'
75f62ca7525a628efda6f42c6e11a4eb
def79abcc3137a45a6c26bc1ce29ec367a0fa3ab
'2011-12-31T13:55:14-05:00'
describe
'30418' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALC' 'sip-files034.pro'
705c5b4d52e7c4c255c486f8ad5cb107
57eb6083f393991cec04e5a21ef57f541b80059b
'2011-12-31T13:58:59-05:00'
describe
'52200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALD' 'sip-files034.QC.jpg'
c54425b7c93ae35d40af5afafffbfb1f
8b02f04fe83a891833d42e416f02db0724ab2e28
'2011-12-31T13:53:12-05:00'
describe
'511912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALE' 'sip-files034.tif'
9fe74002dcc205d4e47272ef5872ebc2
79b1234b8b777595e042bf38eb20f14f7f012233
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALF' 'sip-files034.txt'
6406ca6a5cdb358f0e9df0897e032a4b
55f5cd96881d8fcf7370d7827d591428eed31f91
'2011-12-31T13:52:40-05:00'
describe
'22352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALG' 'sip-files034thm.jpg'
31e65f76ad39eee19de97c1a013eb708
0265937805c1f5960b830ca9d1f5c2f31824588f
'2011-12-31T13:53:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALH' 'sip-files035.jp2'
0f286080aba1436f58b2683b56349bc9
f42805d5db965da888d5b660f780409d1db3b61c
describe
'123321' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALI' 'sip-files035.jpg'
03ce109305f97590aa4062f71b76967f
1b8c69da940b88ccbf5f713fc8fdb9fee9c5b38d
'2011-12-31T13:56:10-05:00'
describe
'29637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALJ' 'sip-files035.pro'
27990d169af7402e232411a60f82117e
41858225b4ade9e83b172390e816e7d727cedaa0
'2011-12-31T13:55:18-05:00'
describe
'51703' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALK' 'sip-files035.QC.jpg'
ce5ee32d28b0e70b6185d67f50f7ccdd
a93bf184ee4e91d0a4a54dc1c6a453418cf6ea04
'2011-12-31T13:53:51-05:00'
describe
'511752' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALL' 'sip-files035.tif'
bd56edb6e7f4d8739392af68b6a0c5ef
f5b2f30559eb1f4aa2cc31dee261852ad355ddb6
'2011-12-31T13:55:27-05:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALM' 'sip-files035.txt'
5b5e51dc68ddea66c0d8933c16b3479a
939ba8ba1825ee0f4c98c786e46a76c99a7e82c7
describe
'22142' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALN' 'sip-files035thm.jpg'
e5c647548fd1ac99f529201992b80e94
c3932c1aad4018a4f988f16e906965e3df50641f
'2011-12-31T13:53:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALO' 'sip-files036.jp2'
15ee2a60d34b2f0bd41b02a5f0c26e90
474022f7931bd618eb30123e15409af47d546c1b
'2011-12-31T13:52:24-05:00'
describe
'109581' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALP' 'sip-files036.jpg'
87f1de22d9b9254fa28003898ee5c716
088c557c8b55e9f05178803045f54edc5e849363
'2011-12-31T13:57:07-05:00'
describe
'23925' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALQ' 'sip-files036.pro'
c41f1dbc0576af0926992866c65762ce
2176e7fca730e2289ebf2a53d907438d4167d9a7
'2011-12-31T13:52:23-05:00'
describe
'47796' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALR' 'sip-files036.QC.jpg'
8919fa2af1bc5d4f8a5f307bf8da4c67
12672bab41b299b61f40b683bc4ef2253bbca776
'2011-12-31T13:50:44-05:00'
describe
'511540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALS' 'sip-files036.tif'
9b7a6d28ed5602dadc7af87a07bff2c9
7d7a56b76a88b565f1bbf031327083a56b8bde07
'2011-12-31T13:56:33-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALT' 'sip-files036.txt'
d6ef2bd269e7d84982b3c7ac8eb1d7e1
127be8055f674300323724e8e853c5d666f52ab2
describe
'21481' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALU' 'sip-files036thm.jpg'
39bc56f1510d3c44e557a4c168849911
241979feb26d61f78ffd6c57c63d05ade697f2c7
describe
'62304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALV' 'sip-files037.jp2'
a83a607a7e98f94c801dd6a0fdcf564f
b6457bacffdbf9b46f9e5a21ceb0f84053acbbb3
'2011-12-31T13:52:19-05:00'
describe
'136959' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALW' 'sip-files037.jpg'
35497af5e4164b9fb92058e60c62b5d0
4fb56b578d6162682838d7b5a859dd357e6872bd
describe
'31291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALX' 'sip-files037.pro'
2ea7774778eb36ce33c6cccc6edc9c48
c9870ec5e046ef8b64cf743a65ef7f5329bea211
'2011-12-31T13:54:05-05:00'
describe
'56913' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALY' 'sip-files037.QC.jpg'
aa68ae8a792e57aa2d22d55162642fc2
0d27d00ad4cbc4198c6163ce85dcf65fe3e91015
'2011-12-31T13:52:38-05:00'
describe
'512832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAALZ' 'sip-files037.tif'
9331bb2e845085a531ae841a1b108e0c
c1bb7a77dda49833e377386950890b41a8ec3ab8
'2011-12-31T13:53:11-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMA' 'sip-files037.txt'
c883eb7750730f8aada6a9fd28a05e82
371bd0d0f4aafbc72f1c673dc8d164e2b7b1f140
'2011-12-31T13:58:46-05:00'
describe
'24075' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMB' 'sip-files037thm.jpg'
cd588394659a17c12cf23f061c9febb5
1437e60090f328588e5694931527db795072c483
describe
'62307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMC' 'sip-files038.jp2'
7fe67728e717cf81ad67204268dc7fc7
9856848c71f76b387a6df2d7171ca6f592a6b679
describe
'127361' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMD' 'sip-files038.jpg'
78551fdc9bddb43af329820212ce9606
ea9208202f59cf910b02f15ac52511b5bfc88575
'2011-12-31T13:56:18-05:00'
describe
'30478' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAME' 'sip-files038.pro'
2c8bbefb958e78af2d54a85f9cc0f390
58ebc26d848c6062cbedae06cbc8f4e91300d60a
'2011-12-31T13:54:38-05:00'
describe
'54253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMF' 'sip-files038.QC.jpg'
9adcc8eba921c9d049f1a3fe90224a2f
bbb480a294378f26ce3860787f044931200a37b8
'2011-12-31T13:59:04-05:00'
describe
'512572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMG' 'sip-files038.tif'
ef1ab1e98b1359ba6693c67f3ccc13af
ea00b48f510a6c2d391348c135a6c39ba74b1085
'2011-12-31T13:57:42-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMH' 'sip-files038.txt'
71cd4fdc5ad05aaeb93407fd383aa1de
320f25defe6546f2f5f1b741dbfc6b79259ab086
'2011-12-31T13:51:50-05:00'
describe
'23276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMI' 'sip-files038thm.jpg'
9b6ebfcee06b83e42e0473a597d7ebbc
817f8f96aa8d4b767e4f92c18d1d3104a4e028e2
'2011-12-31T13:52:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMJ' 'sip-files039.jp2'
118f73db29af53ea4d7623b529c317b9
a3b06db1f61c05811528ed993922d1943f62b08c
'2011-12-31T13:59:07-05:00'
describe
'130172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMK' 'sip-files039.jpg'
f0f77b893d692643399a690b6f1d690c
11bbdd28f2a82dacd9167f45b37756e3cc53d95d
describe
'30894' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAML' 'sip-files039.pro'
706b134e7757ba245c8465b8b3de50de
043573a10cff1e6b5e4dea4d22ba2389e78d79f8
'2011-12-31T13:50:54-05:00'
describe
'54523' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMM' 'sip-files039.QC.jpg'
fb4548dcdcd40d2574713ef7624269a2
fbb7271525fad7f89db5b33e5568ae880ea9d168
'2011-12-31T13:51:22-05:00'
describe
'512420' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMN' 'sip-files039.tif'
f1d5322813110ca44879bba22452e3a1
df94ccecdbaa8a5a1b6f6909b2c4cfc4f212860a
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMO' 'sip-files039.txt'
b0ecfa51e06d8c4dffbbfc7e19e79390
5b9165a2f9fef0bd0c7bc863321eff8d49686fba
'2011-12-31T13:58:36-05:00'
describe
'22867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMP' 'sip-files039thm.jpg'
0912fde745f62c35ac75747a27e93a51
46e0587dcd5fca68661aa87b35c323dceee2b700
describe
'62220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMQ' 'sip-files040.jp2'
3fecb5157c82135ab71e41ab6c1b1716
366d905cf71ba012a0ff65f6bb2938fd70af7f35
'2011-12-31T13:57:27-05:00'
describe
'125530' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMR' 'sip-files040.jpg'
89b100e3b26f134d8e9c3e09ae272fb9
e6a3c86dd4194bbc120c775336040ef6966ca0c7
'2011-12-31T13:52:08-05:00'
describe
'29692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMS' 'sip-files040.pro'
6e984277b4ef92597bab60ea3d5a3270
80c7ca994104565830f0609912d7f99086ba44b4
'2011-12-31T13:57:21-05:00'
describe
'53215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMT' 'sip-files040.QC.jpg'
c7d0f6da294f932649d69f48a7d14d01
10c4e257439dd469f24851ab17da1ce2db9f23f8
describe
'512356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMU' 'sip-files040.tif'
b32362b41cd2a192478925c7df110e3c
27c8bd79085d1c88f28b47b957dfe5d966e21290
'2011-12-31T13:52:11-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMV' 'sip-files040.txt'
ac0f9cb49cb6eafde679a2804f14c71e
acb8f5e3cd75e5fa3249feb903b24061885eddc0
'2011-12-31T13:52:46-05:00'
describe
'22830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMW' 'sip-files040thm.jpg'
68d957774c895a66e87da077178e0cd2
a94c982cfebd13487c8b5e1a6176c9f5e66ffeb7
'2011-12-31T13:51:24-05:00'
describe
'62248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMX' 'sip-files041.jp2'
5e1778493dc9b36e549b195554787ce5
0dd2ea016b38b17088507d60843e21e9e33fba39
'2011-12-31T13:56:22-05:00'
describe
'123740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMY' 'sip-files041.jpg'
b514f91a730f75f4a4968d45cf3e2c05
512e2c35a98f50e5c2d6bd31d26a0dbc81045be8
'2011-12-31T13:54:58-05:00'
describe
'29318' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAMZ' 'sip-files041.pro'
b7dcab1e3e3a699562f141e6af6c1f01
b44c97c1572f814d62c6bd93cd85b512e9ce6879
'2011-12-31T13:54:11-05:00'
describe
'52438' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANA' 'sip-files041.QC.jpg'
a0b5260a82e15b2045db0acccf1936dc
ecf0212492cc2b0e6c5ee8449b6abb0a2d228511
describe
'512344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANB' 'sip-files041.tif'
0717afdc2c4e88bccc9ea51d8fecf9ef
ec4a7689f486cc9f2727cdd8f3329f03f0b9b097
'2011-12-31T13:58:30-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANC' 'sip-files041.txt'
075644284391061f4f546a821ef5238d
c147312ac6eb77cd4f92dd9bf711ce208652918a
'2011-12-31T13:51:29-05:00'
describe
'22815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAND' 'sip-files041thm.jpg'
c268addcfa62c58772ea0064ea9b96d9
b1c5c3a681a4fd89b884a2df345f4cd40bfd7102
describe
'62289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANE' 'sip-files042.jp2'
6e687cc827ea5c034f38f6c19c952bc4
7b1aefad2cd57e811579e1fdb8c977c807cfae62
'2011-12-31T13:53:32-05:00'
describe
'91602' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANF' 'sip-files042.jpg'
426a9e12952a8b77e3a6abf633766525
50c793be2ea86a3444fa6cff3a058321e4f1c759
'2011-12-31T13:53:53-05:00'
describe
'19710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANG' 'sip-files042.pro'
9ce61a735815f2bb2b3cf5c79cc9792c
e734591c155a53eb9b9d1c22efc35303a1d597fc
'2011-12-31T13:51:21-05:00'
describe
'40963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANH' 'sip-files042.QC.jpg'
35b3a904eaff050233bad30ef1b0cd76
f43e40c6c57df7f8d3da66a59ad3f64ec7b31f05
'2011-12-31T13:56:02-05:00'
describe
'510904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANI' 'sip-files042.tif'
bc7b6d3ec20b802472bfa1b08a62bcbc
741dc8221a82a75b1fc90b895e537cb26bddf50a
'2011-12-31T13:54:16-05:00'
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANJ' 'sip-files042.txt'
b3f1539de70c3208704d5d87c32918fe
af34474755e204546244b12e9f52877dbe933b47
describe
'19622' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANK' 'sip-files042thm.jpg'
1d1a529f3febbed8cb2021815e6a898b
30b1d8808df2f76d5db6ee3d8f881708db6f524e
'2011-12-31T13:53:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANL' 'sip-files043.jp2'
d15d8ca13154fd5a91f9f9d2a4e2c4ad
ec0a35e272b75a3f970304f8300662e0094a9200
'2011-12-31T13:58:54-05:00'
describe
'104245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANM' 'sip-files043.jpg'
4a1932153446c4fbc7595ad117828734
c60148f90c0a6952578469117794bc92122e39f5
describe
'23011' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANN' 'sip-files043.pro'
aa671c82d76716124c0edcbd8f9b1f1b
05f253bfad7ad9dacbf538ee878181f3e28f1bb9
'2011-12-31T13:51:20-05:00'
describe
'45506' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANO' 'sip-files043.QC.jpg'
da99ec5db368503324c616da0e3ce7c1
58404864884f8950609976fe04504573b46b08e0
describe
'511520' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANP' 'sip-files043.tif'
0b24b9812b6a0f1a40506fafeb0dd686
91c4d366e66384a8d0328bd18b96d966ae7a4fb7
'2011-12-31T13:58:56-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANQ' 'sip-files043.txt'
728f64210f5ba2e843df3b9d58d6190c
845575a4c8a7d74a77d33b25b00185e28779a5b9
describe
'21010' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANR' 'sip-files043thm.jpg'
b78d8772dd736d67961c42ac11364f51
a3ea34baf6e4313d3124d1d123e61d8de2f78b34
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANS' 'sip-files044.jp2'
e3e49a0e46457544af9ae4ab6134ed9f
7a48549fefbc9d2af939303b21691fc51211d38c
describe
'125278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANT' 'sip-files044.jpg'
aab4b6741d58184bb9fe6658249e28b6
a495504af36db5373b314b2d216abf4f3bbdd2c9
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANU' 'sip-files044.pro'
7f3a40f7a5e7d1a73640baf3103b9b34
19acb58a7f208e0a8cee4e12d9f9a227e9964eef
describe
'51874' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANV' 'sip-files044.QC.jpg'
2c7885f6268a6a0ad49b0a97e41ef554
86791a59776a90953ddfda5882829f26fee9ca88
describe
'511908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANW' 'sip-files044.tif'
b7ac1d145b3c5af2a42be467f9e3b926
6cd75f3cdf7d4732ddce1cc0a3a1335492c94e56
'2011-12-31T13:51:01-05:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANX' 'sip-files044.txt'
89857a5df22c2d5dd984bb103eca08e4
77ebacd1cf74739f5120caff492476a07b021217
describe
'22081' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANY' 'sip-files044thm.jpg'
59dcd83bafa7996222e21c81d328e7fc
64f71712e5ae44fdb8b160e7e1837e7ec1a43c82
describe
'62233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAANZ' 'sip-files045.jp2'
7222fdf8f715211e543e23f221903519
41841035d2ce4554e7d7b671f556ae25421e44cd
'2011-12-31T13:52:26-05:00'
describe
'118596' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOA' 'sip-files045.jpg'
ae92f8f78cbb52ed6c5e39e9021f3eca
8e16aca7065edbba112e20309f17edfa35cb7cc9
'2011-12-31T13:57:45-05:00'
describe
'33839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOB' 'sip-files045.pro'
f7064a646e08cc9c591df711019a5707
7bf76ea9fc1a679417e6e8d9bcb95dc43d72107c
describe
'47514' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOC' 'sip-files045.QC.jpg'
1c77852f55ed63266a563f459a8751d1
503f09617adde19166fdf92aef4a3bff1589458b
describe
'511548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOD' 'sip-files045.tif'
b099c11bc1eab68bec462722c430f199
03840409e95129807e5b1c57af29ddc2a106fd4c
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOE' 'sip-files045.txt'
844cc9ecd95cdbd62b53d5f6dc76ea88
88d7a55905cfb7b9cb819017834a08c6bd2ac6c9
'2011-12-31T13:51:08-05:00'
describe
'21088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOF' 'sip-files045thm.jpg'
36e6ec3dac1b8dfebb5beab0a95b3cca
490796976cb0de916a46b55f64e8a5d26baafded
describe
'62320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOG' 'sip-files046.jp2'
723934f3ea60a792e676f292f3be3daa
fea7ec78e4d93cf63b2ee12c3a958d6948395098
describe
'106635' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOH' 'sip-files046.jpg'
4f81b619e9bfc0a988ca9494c5e0eab9
091adee2a37a84cf62467f6db3089ed5ffd4dab0
describe
'24437' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOI' 'sip-files046.pro'
a323c132582cc21842ba152fc901bcdd
ef0592c6811168fd292b52055ac46d9e2d4bb7ad
'2011-12-31T13:54:41-05:00'
describe
'45789' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOJ' 'sip-files046.QC.jpg'
6c78a68cce9dd901f8fea39fa0af8b4b
4d195de6dc53b7128e97711c8c403bda3161681e
describe
'511664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOK' 'sip-files046.tif'
7470e0e128334acae94881493bd5640c
390d9fb0cc2d7d2058c2076b6897bf7c2e299aa9
'2011-12-31T13:54:02-05:00'
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOL' 'sip-files046.txt'
e5cd07ccd527900114d9015f37355ddc
8fe891af5e83eb2caadced0d3d8905bf0b2f29e0
'2011-12-31T13:57:10-05:00'
describe
'21278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOM' 'sip-files046thm.jpg'
f75d4f846d7e124ab29bca3031fbcbee
a851dfb1f22d552c925376c74ac4f8227ed4f9af
'2011-12-31T13:51:04-05:00'
describe
'62278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAON' 'sip-files047.jp2'
98d765de956c9603a91e00a326df0933
76653be5262534518dad66a9a427057d16768d39
'2011-12-31T13:58:40-05:00'
describe
'124235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOO' 'sip-files047.jpg'
37e40a7e81fdb22c44a120455ed15cbc
921d4ff28ef56cda7990d056ce45d8bf602819e0
describe
'27902' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOP' 'sip-files047.pro'
4859a2b61c4b15748c4fdbd2cadec06d
e0395b2a3006aeb181d89cd8ed7c5a0374e6b56a
describe
'53219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOQ' 'sip-files047.QC.jpg'
28a970f997a3fcfad630962307925401
dbaec2071489f03c86d16f0986dc0a618f57f498
'2011-12-31T13:56:07-05:00'
describe
'512704' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOR' 'sip-files047.tif'
d8648a744104f71c16016f2fd4415d84
8b3f9411136dba8cd2aa0c59ce172b42f6de934a
'2011-12-31T13:56:48-05:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOS' 'sip-files047.txt'
1f63e5c670933fe50822767ea525d02b
34ccd5c00dc07854ae32ac5fc90c044941c7be5d
'2011-12-31T13:55:07-05:00'
describe
'23291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOT' 'sip-files047thm.jpg'
09e5af22b4edf2f0e2d56a81784f0dd6
35aae8e06dc36b96907733c2a2f3c5ab8d69640d
describe
'62316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOU' 'sip-files048.jp2'
89827f783f5bb1dd8bb9f8089448c77a
7e2ef7cf52af15cf639bef4983c140f82f990526
'2011-12-31T13:59:00-05:00'
describe
'110438' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOV' 'sip-files048.jpg'
b6d2b7e793d39fd6db83c5d542de7410
ccd7cd3b38b087013ab494d4eb8b166f2d78dad5
'2011-12-31T13:51:07-05:00'
describe
'27307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOW' 'sip-files048.pro'
e3ee129d7dff1e0ebdfde30461d9aac0
7e8c55a37c8b49a54c222de5f2078e9d65829a64
describe
'47658' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOX' 'sip-files048.QC.jpg'
a9ac122d2868ad879239b11bc728b81f
7ee98bdbcc85bf03b5730545c43a9caaf2bac35e
'2011-12-31T13:55:41-05:00'
describe
'511312' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOY' 'sip-files048.tif'
a9b25703c398096477716ec4710f07d2
285a8912cd384641cbd3950a88dbe1fc4e8888c0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAOZ' 'sip-files048.txt'
b1ce528f729a259e9f9e015a35e27fa3
88c3da5a68573330e5cdc982e69b8efa97d74318
'2011-12-31T13:57:24-05:00'
describe
'20738' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPA' 'sip-files048thm.jpg'
29063b819123c328ea05be42638517dd
316cd2108f7ef9f8dacc113ffc1c16167f248bb5
'2011-12-31T13:50:51-05:00'
describe
'62093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPB' 'sip-files049.jp2'
caf955cc0e68f1b57edd4512de33f129
fac11e235cbe21f3a1747ccbe269227c4d1500a7
describe
'108614' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPC' 'sip-files049.jpg'
a0a605afa111bf012784caebab53aded
7e177ae65eafeb83e170bac4a26c2a836c4ee1d7
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPD' 'sip-files049.pro'
2d76f83132daf64a1e28ed21e7ad0e25
d5747c983f2455c43418fabdd094d0bb21dd201c
describe
'46679' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPE' 'sip-files049.QC.jpg'
1a1e1a81463137b4b8868c68b334e70a
41ce7ae1ba05bbd4f37cbf7bf2b94c070479826d
'2011-12-31T13:55:02-05:00'
describe
'511244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPF' 'sip-files049.tif'
b3a0d995445f809a4be6c14d24d31eb1
978e9be4f4eabaede58b8e0d08950ecd0c01b47b
'2011-12-31T13:54:35-05:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPG' 'sip-files049.txt'
45ed2d58bb46a6cf0fd3ed81e3da2a0f
2c12227f7936ff2924683ca3d72a6842ae04e549
'2011-12-31T13:51:46-05:00'
describe
'20650' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPH' 'sip-files049thm.jpg'
7655e1d1c7d7e60a2af7e239c9ade92e
e044b6b26f284cd93e9ed2f30372dc4bc906a3c0
describe
'62267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPI' 'sip-files050.jp2'
3f1312fb73c289de39287c5c7e1c7d6c
f8451618a381ef0077bcb4a0bb0fdd78c3736d6b
describe
'93774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPJ' 'sip-files050.jpg'
93b124b4a3b231f80e753585ef670815
351d1208a8361df575266c64201b5c82a22d5a2a
'2011-12-31T13:56:06-05:00'
describe
'22346' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPK' 'sip-files050.pro'
93db3a5ab7ce203d48a6d15f329c08b5
b98e3127cfaf55b9f15e658d6d90f1572cbb9d83
'2011-12-31T13:56:47-05:00'
describe
'41133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPL' 'sip-files050.QC.jpg'
f9eaf534f69aa5d9d3cf6a862294a7f9
2b6be78942766a2a6d374848f5994392e8a48d6a
'2011-12-31T13:53:15-05:00'
describe
'510576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPM' 'sip-files050.tif'
c503aa8fcd5cd2e62b4b292e092a0582
0028eca4bedf7977f7ac0a50f2d4f16fd06445fa
'2011-12-31T13:57:43-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPN' 'sip-files050.txt'
4bd599a3ed96da42386162face64f817
1148b884b382996fc0a9e8a35e6f1e207b7f3ea5
describe
'19070' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPO' 'sip-files050thm.jpg'
7d101fc25047007e5114a63d733724db
77265c4f2824a16e5bb92fb6353575ba376a1153
describe
'62173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPP' 'sip-files051.jp2'
77d23c524ffbe4a2a0ac31b56a544794
9691deb46356d8aaa5136bc5353f87893e908af2
describe
'108215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPQ' 'sip-files051.jpg'
b804e00eb1f4b6721ded54a6d6e2b090
519a41bd91f10eff95659caa1a41befaea764f41
'2011-12-31T13:56:23-05:00'
describe
'25629' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPR' 'sip-files051.pro'
8644b09b728ad413e9a0645ba2549bf2
b714609b419aceb6d3e625fcbb7be686ea25ed05
describe
'46457' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPS' 'sip-files051.QC.jpg'
3856272b446f1964d5dc3a53bf062497
efe5eaa5cf624cc5400f656b77a7a043fbe693dd
describe
'511296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPT' 'sip-files051.tif'
abd4e3375415b21afeea7a6f6ee5abd3
4a84d03396941adc7195e54ccfa234996da56db2
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPU' 'sip-files051.txt'
57086616ffd93c4f62d79fc1d557bc7a
ba412946ad0a7991a46695da61d49a23a44fe773
describe
'20797' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPV' 'sip-files051thm.jpg'
6c4bed80808b1714c9141d60a34a5a77
a75c5c8b06b7f45ba6536255cdd2dc2ee36b8bc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPW' 'sip-files052.jp2'
2b175aaa1557309c171637ae7ad88a00
1fa16746f38a576b43f9894a58a440c681422b81
'2011-12-31T13:57:13-05:00'
describe
'125374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPX' 'sip-files052.jpg'
8747093c61a470065fe77c1a8bd42d66
6badb7dbc56d4b804b99d1a24331e72639c6ce17
'2011-12-31T13:54:09-05:00'
describe
'30801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPY' 'sip-files052.pro'
b3029abbb749d4bdf0984a899f29c031
17ac9c3c90bf0c0d74af7b334ad59726b2d29fa3
'2011-12-31T13:57:47-05:00'
describe
'51984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAPZ' 'sip-files052.QC.jpg'
824c05a83c8bb302782a308f03b3f262
5e5cbec9b35df24633e7215e17e612c0c6a749c0
describe
'511792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQA' 'sip-files052.tif'
a45344acb093967da18495bb2973937d
7a81d2a88f82d648df11f570235c465303ecfb14
'2011-12-31T13:58:29-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQB' 'sip-files052.txt'
17634bf1925fcc434ac9ff7cbe82c68f
f9fd47c9c169dbd29ee991107305a4774f9f8a26
describe
'22194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQC' 'sip-files052thm.jpg'
3c0438af7f3731d2e62b3c6248b329ed
90858f8a6f3a1b7fdc77d691b036a51b4d024fc4
'2011-12-31T13:51:51-05:00'
describe
'62313' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQD' 'sip-files053.jp2'
d2721c1d3f75e8a24fb0720b1bb2c1e8
c7e819093421eb3f44cef1b5b60c6f8bd84ae898
describe
'122923' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQE' 'sip-files053.jpg'
694159472cafd93f580da4bf397d4724
e34c4ed1b291e586defdaba80b26240fa2f4e504
'2011-12-31T13:54:39-05:00'
describe
'30736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQF' 'sip-files053.pro'
a1e6816b4c0b39abd4d459e84f6a1e41
5cfc6d4dd54b7ab603e6a7abfa413ca73ab61749
'2011-12-31T13:58:52-05:00'
describe
'51991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQG' 'sip-files053.QC.jpg'
e3e6431a2b079d3e97b4723a9e5ca7de
da15ae1151ac6261149cccca1ae8e96860942d67
describe
'511804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQH' 'sip-files053.tif'
deaa4ce12cefe7d833409250a0d51ebf
60cd8db4fc78eb4c7fe704fb49b82e8d6af09f1f
'2011-12-31T13:52:04-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQI' 'sip-files053.txt'
4e0a515c394e1ad70aea346fd3efdfd2
5487f5d6f951dbaa63c8df093d3dd01979361dc1
'2011-12-31T13:55:23-05:00'
describe
'22070' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQJ' 'sip-files053thm.jpg'
b109439b956233a24080bd0ff313cade
5bb94a647be9f2ae93f0ca6cc25dda6cf76b99ab
'2011-12-31T13:55:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQK' 'sip-files054.jp2'
661f4a5d04611c34664954811dc7d3a3
1db34f79ee87c0b054b926a0073b4827445d489c
describe
'124473' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQL' 'sip-files054.jpg'
688b8788c018592e542b2c605b61962c
752ce35a07c4dea49db32169e04d114bfed6bf48
'2011-12-31T13:57:49-05:00'
describe
'30701' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQM' 'sip-files054.pro'
a50d04f31a1601749e17765735e76302
216b485ff6c73fe2f9635235406a466a08a66742
describe
'51720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQN' 'sip-files054.QC.jpg'
22e0aa5f211a4d93f5e08d6eab9c7714
d380a55351b7a0dff7097404b89c5489c799b70b
'2011-12-31T13:52:20-05:00'
describe
'511728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQO' 'sip-files054.tif'
8d793c9d489db352684fd61100872ea1
930fbc812b490227526643bd1877c4eaa15fb61b
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQP' 'sip-files054.txt'
a799e20c37a777c8dca90c1e5bf4c6bd
a77348909931091d3fb7a4216474ac4f209268c3
'2011-12-31T13:54:43-05:00'
describe
'21730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQQ' 'sip-files054thm.jpg'
1edd985e953608db32a8f1082da40cef
adf62ceddb0a4f3bdd21f446122dd423e1f96f6e
'2011-12-31T13:52:56-05:00'
describe
'62310' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQR' 'sip-files055.jp2'
675adde7be8e37256b7424351c99205a
dddd95168d7bfb7f5739008bf4381bf8a2ac31da
'2011-12-31T13:59:06-05:00'
describe
'125245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQS' 'sip-files055.jpg'
198a2e9eb2c892375b74645483dc4f1c
a294d66ef3493085525423885bc1bad44cbfacf1
describe
'29804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQT' 'sip-files055.pro'
9e456e8e2129051eadf107951d8766f4
dbc883328191b8c64e48f7289108962e1e0881ea
'2011-12-31T13:57:18-05:00'
describe
'52401' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQU' 'sip-files055.QC.jpg'
6a0878239835457ea79eb851ff7cbba3
c63a03db1ce28c98227ee226070ceee0331f2429
'2011-12-31T13:53:04-05:00'
describe
'511956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQV' 'sip-files055.tif'
0d2535679e1c8d3eca0ebde6bba7e157
89af89862c3f4905edc23d4dfe810ce126a2574e
'2011-12-31T13:54:53-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQW' 'sip-files055.txt'
c0564646c49fc49b48d390ffc4bed93d
a2c48cea016f03b3cafa2a3bd49d820345fe4b65
describe
'22386' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQX' 'sip-files055thm.jpg'
467329200fa42f827bbff7b7156bd93d
05e0519ea1d14ce09e5bfe679816e0c225ef927e
'2011-12-31T13:56:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQY' 'sip-files056.jp2'
c92161b266ca169ce26d4789950a4659
1e025c650a1640a15a033e99be7f7b54052f6d28
'2011-12-31T13:52:44-05:00'
describe
'115427' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAQZ' 'sip-files056.jpg'
6cd0fe800ea1b6f205ae195fa2c14522
c414a695752c3d5edcc010a8fdd91780116f5a79
describe
'28515' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARA' 'sip-files056.pro'
a2f74f525e2ed59890de52a05eba51eb
92fdd358f3c42227741592c5ff902175694f499d
describe
'49024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARB' 'sip-files056.QC.jpg'
43a9278c871e5bf72f7796375d29a906
7886ebaa3e50185ff4ebbbc38764e54c44e0becb
describe
'511708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARC' 'sip-files056.tif'
91354772f93ea08339053e6a295f182f
9f25625ab954c08867baa43a7813e2eb76c3e9c6
'2011-12-31T13:56:30-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARD' 'sip-files056.txt'
09a4d6bb3e1732a98b38d0b2ab6e2d31
74b545af74f40855b0624e4ba0a6719a2f128c73
'2011-12-31T13:52:13-05:00'
describe
'21870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARE' 'sip-files056thm.jpg'
603a93ec29adebdb4facb26dff74ccda
4bb916668df8b10a98d2e451781ab985b62798da
'2011-12-31T13:50:52-05:00'
describe
'62314' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARF' 'sip-files057.jp2'
821d8cf6858ba713168ff61f534d34c2
bac71eafa8e9965ef8e40f60daa1b40055483981
describe
'128869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARG' 'sip-files057.jpg'
50eaa8973c2b4e1eaec6481277231d8d
2bf68ee43dea82d1f330bddb06ab063a8939d863
'2011-12-31T13:50:58-05:00'
describe
'32366' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARH' 'sip-files057.pro'
94c690b7482f0875ff404aefbc7b72c9
37b78a3fc468807172354156865ff4992dbb795c
'2011-12-31T13:51:18-05:00'
describe
'53184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARI' 'sip-files057.QC.jpg'
3a6b19b94c58dac3b18b39a8436e0e02
c481fe2f335a6ceafe1c34ad02a62f5b38a4abc1
describe
'511748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARJ' 'sip-files057.tif'
2f60a39748eaa92e2d5791b4ad721f3d
ec5d99593fc625ec764ebaa1c02a89222de91f57
'2011-12-31T13:52:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARK' 'sip-files057.txt'
5792ff7d49a2051a4000f8e4e36de56d
2f4f51ae7f9ba2cade00dbc437b504f5fc254613
'2011-12-31T13:53:49-05:00'
describe
'21935' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARL' 'sip-files057thm.jpg'
d3093e83b3480f61fa661691fbac579e
72fb1922a500cc31a99b48a7fb4b817f29a96722
'2011-12-31T13:55:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARM' 'sip-files058.jp2'
119bf96bf456d1665ac1af7ab9df4523
c495a473de9ce71a55b8a54ae971bb562d432aac
describe
'101991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARN' 'sip-files058.jpg'
69694c68cfb6a0b6668a2c2e45f645fb
36527a281a7aa3d2ec797e64adf75942778bfa2d
describe
'23769' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARO' 'sip-files058.pro'
5acceaf6853eef4708fc1b117a6ea335
be648f88d48d1566df383f2ddabeee48acc2c59f
describe
'46364' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARP' 'sip-files058.QC.jpg'
1a15c1d4e090cc3f02ac3625fa97978d
4292231f4ce522ae0a1306b5ae2dee1ad12ccce1
describe
'511636' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARQ' 'sip-files058.tif'
98f45e3b06b7b3c9a7afe436609fed64
c8a670b811ad1f0e7db9c8c238d6934e9fe9afcb
describe
'960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARR' 'sip-files058.txt'
f9386c30dd5bf5f2fdf3d444c747c668
dd1fab2bcf2425f7055f82b06cf821bcc441849e
describe
'21412' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARS' 'sip-files058thm.jpg'
761fa4513951c2f740e104b4df8eafee
42083ae6486daa90e42a87dc2a5579c08662459e
'2011-12-31T13:54:08-05:00'
describe
'62293' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAART' 'sip-files059.jp2'
27f0dad79787f80929a1061a01e0724c
3a4a1114c9718da350ae5e96891cc82e4511311d
'2011-12-31T13:54:48-05:00'
describe
'81655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARU' 'sip-files059.jpg'
0ede162a0fb7835569a79c71d530df7f
02ad4568262b8a73e35d071dd4be402fbc68eec4
describe
'17740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARV' 'sip-files059.pro'
1689f9bfe5cd1ee1c8f46cd61b7b3ca4
fe59e1a42dc51e3c3fd450c45d7e98ceee31c5c1
describe
'38136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARW' 'sip-files059.QC.jpg'
1708f98ed9be6547b41879a81fd4b02c
288e40d7c1bb62f9ea81e8c7f501225f79eb8fe7
'2011-12-31T13:50:47-05:00'
describe
'510372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARX' 'sip-files059.tif'
5f60e41fa3e131b76762521ba850bd21
58ec9fa483886062e3b814f5a3693d15011c0f38
'2011-12-31T13:55:32-05:00'
describe
'715' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARY' 'sip-files059.txt'
4743aee8aa878050a5e28d5a6636d1f7
e367c02a17a96e743ed1923d4706d97c45a16990
describe
'18435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAARZ' 'sip-files059thm.jpg'
9c943b85c4d7f2d0617513ffa90ea92d
c76792072b66df79d99319c110834f4eb83ad0bf
describe
'62175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASA' 'sip-files060.jp2'
c300d04a4055a0f10934fb66561b1541
cc9a99b8577e5f76ed877a83284b13a03d054acb
'2011-12-31T13:51:33-05:00'
describe
'107327' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASB' 'sip-files060.jpg'
65bbc5d98afd85f197eeebcc39d22adc
193f90534d67269e3e50a5db88e181889af83255
'2011-12-31T13:52:09-05:00'
describe
'26902' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASC' 'sip-files060.pro'
89e66a472923a7e9e6c840d06d92e916
a06a5f29eee84bbf188a2203dc44d319c35ae959
describe
'510644' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASD' 'sip-files060.tif'
35daa16dfae4ceb65c99e0eccffed648
a1c33bbe48343f8950776a92b85952e65e28a78d
describe
'44101' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASE' 'sip-files060.QC.jpg'
a4764cc837a26ddf202ac8fc4d846e67
730a31648097ca3eb96a629699d58b4e2197a02b
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASF' 'sip-files060.txt'
b832d1dae5b2d83e6d58a23c688e5712
e679da8f78d6b7f507a2e2c280d78dfff294acc2
'2011-12-31T13:55:48-05:00'
describe
'19527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASG' 'sip-files060thm.jpg'
cd5711cd5e379f68ac2167f5d089c691
4931fb9b098a8f222c6eee62d08b8bc26dfb0138
describe
'62164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASH' 'sip-files061.jp2'
fa304e0e9483e13b27a88970377a0eb6
ad2036890f2029bffbc282e37032dda8fd9844cc
describe
'101961' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASI' 'sip-files061.jpg'
7c18e6855dbb8354c108389ff5412048
94d7f06b8e00e77b88b7d8cfcb07c091f14971b0
describe
'24070' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASJ' 'sip-files061.pro'
7c6aa838ccc7e03e900ef1c06239667c
94f317b0bc33945140652ba59b7d53b3245c3f52
'2011-12-31T13:51:27-05:00'
describe
'44476' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASK' 'sip-files061.QC.jpg'
4a2ae4f36521999bdeff3145b942647c
3c724aefc1ed3a77fddf4e009a8c516c724b3333
'2011-12-31T13:53:33-05:00'
describe
'511036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASL' 'sip-files061.tif'
694092132e22606d81c4cf631188db9a
ae7209df80a51bb1bf1e82298c9b3d4aaa394a5d
'2011-12-31T13:58:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASM' 'sip-files061.txt'
e58300f5d2c0c215e56066a956eeaf24
72a29c179381aa90a89fe8469470e4ed26d421b1
describe
'20448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASN' 'sip-files061thm.jpg'
8deac5387c259a894d0e6cd644fe29b9
87b77eec8e2cad195c05c7e19275fd64b93d99ef
'2011-12-31T13:56:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASO' 'sip-files062.jp2'
58a3e5647c1bb13ba8d9e96fef777cbd
371101275772549e88ad49f6fb47b543370d8f04
describe
'110239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASP' 'sip-files062.jpg'
c8bf04fa65e452e30f0b1eee9547b0ef
f6b2a11d447e8fe742148b97bb6dac9ca410b3ec
'2011-12-31T13:55:47-05:00'
describe
'26603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASQ' 'sip-files062.pro'
badd90a1638ed1e2ded405fca8418103
906c716b675fbde8f4501d4e1e7d8a3acfb0a447
describe
'46888' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASR' 'sip-files062.QC.jpg'
f575fb7ebf5bd28533bb7ee90d4c300f
fd84a85e21e5563671d52bc35ad5bf4b3103954a
describe
'511160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASS' 'sip-files062.tif'
fecf2154962bf2f46017c3c1d0b18b91
a6696363df70f7b7e52c154a28ea806513a910b2
'2011-12-31T13:56:20-05:00'
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAST' 'sip-files062.txt'
fe89fe78673e8d8f862e01acf2f24e32
e07b4dde51ec15583bf12678a2d4990467458061
describe
'20746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASU' 'sip-files062thm.jpg'
e7f98d6411b65734b3fec0eddc034b45
890f745f8cf4c8d53ef099adf2a1d7693e432d27
'2011-12-31T13:55:25-05:00'
describe
'62255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASV' 'sip-files063.jp2'
a8ac17e904529cb1a47b251f025fb24c
acf82367a91089219f77b8453bd108a92bd07f94
'2011-12-31T13:54:37-05:00'
describe
'126555' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASW' 'sip-files063.jpg'
cc7caee01a6bcf3f048fbd7881af966f
db9f175becfc118a98e282733ea1da5de426090e
describe
'31185' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASX' 'sip-files063.pro'
b9d1608ad2a942b9f23357442f396113
251e42983fb3e58d17077ee0034f40ffdf3c7469
describe
'52720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASY' 'sip-files063.QC.jpg'
2ffad659a30b1e631a2a1bbe891e46a6
48b55e56c57c5345a866c86bd7511b71fdbadb31
'2011-12-31T13:52:36-05:00'
describe
'511616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAASZ' 'sip-files063.tif'
56faaa9f3863cece0d01d5b50cd2b47b
fc92466641e5f6512d0118395f451bfa496506d1
'2011-12-31T13:51:13-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATA' 'sip-files063.txt'
e09288a72020382542ed56189b799fe1
cf9f8d8b2dc818a7e2bdd9f47884aa6edee0eba4
describe
'21876' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATB' 'sip-files063thm.jpg'
0583ea795d3234b668eed5f160d4d926
5dee8b8b74e417f84bd26d0097f6c582e71a380c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATC' 'sip-files064.jp2'
4b7a5890dd38fe85617d295fda35abfe
b1609a6eb353dc438ac604ec7ccaca73abcfc474
'2011-12-31T13:56:34-05:00'
describe
'122246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATD' 'sip-files064.jpg'
1cd2279dfba3658a56946ad5ec769233
8a60a99e01ee29995e63b3cb834977335e96962b
'2011-12-31T13:53:54-05:00'
describe
'31014' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATE' 'sip-files064.pro'
72c82ea0e35ec2ff562f8ae87f9dabe4
32689d3d92b662de201079a62c74e2b79c535d2b
'2011-12-31T13:57:06-05:00'
describe
'51774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATF' 'sip-files064.QC.jpg'
d1f8f02a9cb178b0f88ed6ae045f8537
0fbc2864bf2736a0ad7ffec1fcc7d45326ff3f64
'2011-12-31T13:51:40-05:00'
describe
'511936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATG' 'sip-files064.tif'
01f44713d431bec04e3f48c457bbaaa7
944e934a499636e7cbeb934229b0f63c769631a9
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATH' 'sip-files064.txt'
22fb31bb362eed8b5a4bba32f5dca3eb
a85cb755f59b2ba0dfb4640018f7f4229e55f314
describe
'22207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATI' 'sip-files064thm.jpg'
8789a642535815c3533d0860fa7abb17
473f16fe26dc234d7ab79adedbdd29c8c59921e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATJ' 'sip-files065.jp2'
453056e6fdc3203c806aad038d5537c0
55528aea607c36e2164c43e96d1bbba4978c50b1
'2011-12-31T13:55:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATK' 'sip-files065.jpg'
716f0c17bd22ef2b50ba56e9a6d76df8
3064ae94b83d3de30f0f380d5728bc6931840fad
describe
'31886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATL' 'sip-files065.pro'
95c5557f51b9092cd16d3d578d7a87ca
87bc5bc32b4eedf0a5674dddef532a6777bafd8d
'2011-12-31T13:59:03-05:00'
describe
'53260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATM' 'sip-files065.QC.jpg'
3b1b34fa12e67bfa0577a4ebdc7392c1
7b5e9838e7baab6f85c7e0d4af82e9fe6cf1bacb
describe
'511856' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATN' 'sip-files065.tif'
adc4b3be1c961ca56c8e6633098e5c33
80afdbc534d977ce121716b2eeb1c10bd0a2f724
'2011-12-31T13:56:12-05:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATO' 'sip-files065.txt'
bea016ebdfec91704736a1eda755f145
9468b7c49b9905be4053d4b9cb0f8f820e516c51
'2011-12-31T13:54:46-05:00'
describe
'22250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATP' 'sip-files065thm.jpg'
87802c93b9dbe0767223d26afbb51000
e36c54d62a77532128dbba75347a23421fdfa221
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATQ' 'sip-files066.jp2'
2ec2a934938d8f4e6e720cf86cb8de79
9df4780b14dae6b91344aa33c42c5c885d3756d5
describe
'131613' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATR' 'sip-files066.jpg'
a933474cef6bedd5d25bf07afb2ece87
38ac075b7013722594375749810e21ac4781589f
describe
'31307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATS' 'sip-files066.pro'
578dff51bee62179650521fad610996c
45fba87400d2c6f3a654fc1080a7912b5c78004b
describe
'54840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATT' 'sip-files066.QC.jpg'
43eb83c49b03f7d18e2e0a3388b9aa18
7d350df4bb6232991f0c5dfee80e413fc1468c1f
'2011-12-31T13:56:40-05:00'
describe
'512108' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATU' 'sip-files066.tif'
75aea1ef6cb57683d63bc462295cbf7a
69e7d6a4fe988d9dded38a9a3c1804feb5e1146a
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATV' 'sip-files066.txt'
84979083da5a34cd144ab6db41e837d0
e5a296a46a4f8742296d56885766fe46ac316340
describe
'22634' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATW' 'sip-files066thm.jpg'
395abd5bcb2e2aebbf13525964f67120
1bf13f831cbea398a52d113914d8e7d28500c90c
describe
'62242' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATX' 'sip-files067.jp2'
1a8261e4d6c0e9fafdc5e442dbaab0ae
ccc2885a5d593c5610a3bfd0846bd72993529afc
'2011-12-31T13:50:57-05:00'
describe
'130385' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATY' 'sip-files067.jpg'
5f16f9a158b4ef21aa346c4cc349cf7a
987af7b0e19d5bbeb899a7c98d6fcd151f7c4f33
'2011-12-31T13:53:26-05:00'
describe
'30779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAATZ' 'sip-files067.pro'
b0a0a15e706853ee95a4b63bcfb88df5
4d7b2410dd7ab2f4966201afef5b4e0df4537790
describe
'54588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUA' 'sip-files067.QC.jpg'
620c2f9ba59a8b570660fe7766207631
83bcec77fc8e6ebe880893e388dbbf1f6c8da0b1
describe
'512124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUB' 'sip-files067.tif'
3ef8f06f590b5e7e36df816f092dd0a8
105c81944dcec58fb1a73ff9db251e8f1f8d7e2b
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUC' 'sip-files067.txt'
2103857d6c14bd9c0b5645fad286011d
ba58177379bf3aca33b586ec2d6b65abc2ec5793
'2011-12-31T13:57:58-05:00'
describe
'22677' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUD' 'sip-files067thm.jpg'
ae655a917c92481d493401cd20d7639f
b9cdc5ffe3b2dc505a75521ba5f9776ea877c59d
'2011-12-31T13:51:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUE' 'sip-files068.jp2'
b90ce070dcc55b4905099dad882e63b7
5f0fce5c4504d7e209a3228e48cd261740925d00
'2011-12-31T13:54:32-05:00'
describe
'122853' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUF' 'sip-files068.jpg'
2ec7be134df85e382194738db95caea8
43e1778c80c98a716615033c976c3f9e74a956e4
describe
'30755' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUG' 'sip-files068.pro'
f74ab778aedcf2683c8ed1cc51460053
1fc2f52db25c03d18a238dbc78cfceaaf81ecfdc
'2011-12-31T13:56:41-05:00'
describe
'52460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUH' 'sip-files068.QC.jpg'
b00183f44afc31d88bc0b2a7049ca8d5
4692c2c92018607a966b7abaa233ef7f34d42ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUI' 'sip-files068.tif'
08ff578d79dc5f6f0f012a7c1715adf5
b1380f3bddcdac81444dc3bdfa806d06825cfdad
'2011-12-31T13:53:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUJ' 'sip-files068.txt'
b428055a0cacb1ea77cfbf97060d0cc9
33ea03c2994cd7db8e190a50b7978c30dc66677a
'2011-12-31T13:54:14-05:00'
describe
'62309' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUK' 'sip-files069.jp2'
7090d69bf89661ec23f6983420c51159
e6d2bf7422707976e552d1e6e2906abfe364051b
'2011-12-31T13:55:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUL' 'sip-files068thm.jpg'
792afbc62033d69a9fab2a0392bc5711
d54658435f5a8c28272e5740deb6715a36480608
describe
'113939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUM' 'sip-files069.jpg'
1489228b5b2e6897a104139b6090ac7c
19a520e4fe1f50c3a15246affb85cbdb5cc95584
describe
'28548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUN' 'sip-files069.pro'
a33054e01c581ecc11abbafccb5c2288
6b60518a10130706878f82d335607f1e8ac416d9
describe
'49330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUO' 'sip-files069.QC.jpg'
53c2eb8997962fe8c050967293a6640f
3a12fdb39f5fc50b1e753b887cbfe13662b58621
'2011-12-31T13:58:50-05:00'
describe
'511480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUP' 'sip-files069.tif'
5bb3da0bc37474aaf59d908ce3c47573
bba9b0c1bafacebc048965af5460ac268a08042e
'2011-12-31T13:52:00-05:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUQ' 'sip-files069.txt'
d270569224ee76ff45186da237fdb386
47b76c6ce2bc84ea0f5b0eb1945e4e165e722b35
describe
'21375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUR' 'sip-files069thm.jpg'
092df0696dfdb9b048241e493f1dc62c
05017304e7afdd298c6224aff252ea8939f078e6
describe
'62270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUS' 'sip-files070.jp2'
d14fe6f1516676a656481bd0e6b6c1f0
b6e59d2e09c5750a696af54aae9b725526e55261
describe
'73344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUT' 'sip-files070.jpg'
85b73303aa85f16fc36325aaed835852
3a10a376333cb5389f7b7a826fb87acbe8340982
'2011-12-31T13:54:25-05:00'
describe
'16256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUU' 'sip-files070.pro'
6f8a30618a00af39686b9bf9caf6889b
bedd781ed5f3c39774c37d03429213a584e2a055
'2011-12-31T13:53:14-05:00'
describe
'33986' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUV' 'sip-files070.QC.jpg'
bc8ea1744d1e88786d94de24c14c2025
3b5a20bbe04aab0f45c5834555ed939ecc284956
describe
'509712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUW' 'sip-files070.tif'
5dec41099dc17c1ee5eb734c3d760ec8
1d084a7859664f2079082315c09a7d58d575b6ab
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUX' 'sip-files070.txt'
e99ed291e9dd36efe6c9a5410bf5f1ae
377c39b03f655dab1e992e57e9b9c4bde29cc085
'2011-12-31T13:52:55-05:00'
describe
'16863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUY' 'sip-files070thm.jpg'
8c0c9faf15c30d32a9b7640890ffdd69
3c4e89bb617dad03eae2c54fbc51979283abe9fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAUZ' 'sip-files071.jp2'
4cb89647645dfe084e46d15b0a25a886
66a7dd1c1585af4ce77d774f8c16ef04cbcfe7ac
'2011-12-31T13:51:54-05:00'
describe
'104873' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVA' 'sip-files071.jpg'
a07540cdecabef960b5ba92161c352b2
77fd7c12e23983851ed1e419a19a0c0577966f2c
describe
'27284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVB' 'sip-files071.pro'
1556cbc965989117a054e9b95ea5eff5
f1980d4eafb822debada14a16e5b5281cb9641bc
describe
'43388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVC' 'sip-files071.QC.jpg'
ea164faa7f42fe094ef492be266129da
fdc608dfd134f3cf14328fac2c819d3b6f9a5413
'2011-12-31T13:55:21-05:00'
describe
'510776' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVD' 'sip-files071.tif'
2de532485d53965e4de3f03f249fbc95
d5bb7820bb013737d8a6f514c1a01a5978c5d2ea
'2011-12-31T13:51:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVE' 'sip-files071.txt'
f0bf917b58ecc42ddf354ccf7a51d85f
ed2e1cdc39b3a0e160cce95603661119e7a373e9
describe
Invalid character
'19749' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVF' 'sip-files071thm.jpg'
edef95ecee1daa5c73b1b50537ffaf37
1f8dac2c6f3865bf5c56ceb3045e467b398096bd
'2011-12-31T13:58:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVG' 'sip-files072.jp2'
3e3a1c529f64ec0060fc0ff24926858b
eb3b5f89df7b7d3fada1c434a6bc24fd8451eb30
describe
'124519' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVH' 'sip-files072.jpg'
392cd047bf994dbf680538db27e12b6e
cc9b3f0a35a16f0fbe947fea89ac437ce592afc5
describe
'31413' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVI' 'sip-files072.pro'
2a924977182ebaacce5e9c586d57967e
b7950d07f6d1a1e8285b51b8b2264c0eca2d130d
'2011-12-31T13:53:25-05:00'
describe
'53341' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVJ' 'sip-files072.QC.jpg'
305686254cafe959c41b70e0e194915a
9e717eee825f86db1a27e686b75569597bd63743
'2011-12-31T13:57:50-05:00'
describe
'511944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVK' 'sip-files072.tif'
4f7d734a902b2dd556575d1077a11cd3
40483a858891ebd5758fff9edabae1b86a49f32e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVL' 'sip-files072.txt'
e5334c9d45d7129c1d3f6df1e3628e40
5e0572de57f8b91a8b5124514418752a036ea243
'2011-12-31T13:54:20-05:00'
describe
'22261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVM' 'sip-files072thm.jpg'
e7f2e28ed4b47824b3c768bb82bc28e3
4a33ba97478b3c00b8f19623964b557475de032e
describe
'62299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVN' 'sip-files073.jp2'
e3a360f303aa1fe633425dda25c2f4cf
c0f77437b95779fa2dc32ca632b8aca7538a3f79
describe
'129355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVO' 'sip-files073.jpg'
d03b54b75951e4f2039f8b4a6b9d70d9
19376a63298c4dc1e6ae1589310d10ce4b0c3606
'2011-12-31T13:56:32-05:00'
describe
'31394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVP' 'sip-files073.pro'
dfabf328a753a6a147b150f9e2d70728
9c672c17c07f1a42888f41f1171afb216bb946bb
describe
'53411' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVQ' 'sip-files073.QC.jpg'
e4c149dfac06d48c167d9fd937127a0a
3ed1261eecf2e3d31d219ea46abf8eaa6f212161
describe
'511932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVR' 'sip-files073.tif'
4279647c1948e8e03e54195a7a820c85
6cfe3a421dc22b7861f9f4d382c0c68404a1939f
'2011-12-31T13:56:38-05:00'
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVS' 'sip-files073.txt'
9cde185e9ae4b7bfa8ae25a775a1c320
afb0b3c8a6a6a54f636d15523c1e351d1b15ad9b
describe
'22319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVT' 'sip-files073thm.jpg'
12cb9d337dcf72f5c5ec21fff9012b61
478166879ff0fce8cb50399a31cce43afac6bed5
describe
'62203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVU' 'sip-files074.jp2'
ef560698ee058d370a15ba891128bdbf
791263afe3768882cac42eef721ead9365d05ff7
'2011-12-31T13:54:07-05:00'
describe
'91570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVV' 'sip-files074.jpg'
bc4378c41383a7426ddbd820e017ac75
d7447dd9e2bb3111c938d3b3f1a0284091e7733e
'2011-12-31T13:58:04-05:00'
describe
'25173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVW' 'sip-files074.pro'
c3991f52b864d3c0e8e856c42d6fdcb2
4380af09c35511670e2be788594285c36ad9dfc0
'2011-12-31T13:54:45-05:00'
describe
'40742' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVX' 'sip-files074.QC.jpg'
483623cd815bc83942610124f5994bf7
564cbdcb12ba5472e0b5da2ad32e2b3d9834bfaf
describe
'510940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVY' 'sip-files074.tif'
01f00fc677fc5797b2c66701a298f839
a618957c608b894e5ae2404fb5650c3a4e2672b4
'2011-12-31T13:55:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAVZ' 'sip-files074.txt'
2b6476de1c4c3c64560be412f9ac551f
f8ab6f24ceba2c5c3f92b29abd79b77a0c39134f
'2011-12-31T13:56:16-05:00'
describe
'19798' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWA' 'sip-files074thm.jpg'
cc1c6e1157c2a12d8bd3898bba1b0cab
a86cae0d0f74ed3f62fc47c5058a00047fb06fc9
'2011-12-31T13:50:40-05:00'
describe
'62284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWB' 'sip-files075.jp2'
5cd0dfbbccf9c0c982bacf692c031bba
aa0f7d162f36289d2bc5817012923df59e14b5d7
describe
'102332' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWC' 'sip-files075.jpg'
796991e026624b69eaed34596a19b2bb
af8882c40d3e58f2d20e23fbedd171e827734e71
describe
'27768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWD' 'sip-files075.pro'
4961563e2058cb8068360c7e113e330a
ab814a038e88f97199dd75a289bbbfe81076f358
describe
'44790' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWE' 'sip-files075.QC.jpg'
569ac33d4a8525769d958d9ac7573e96
dee30bb86658b6db6cbf1a8c4cfaf12dcb77a6db
describe
'511128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWF' 'sip-files075.tif'
844d224d41f75c7d1c4b1654349e13f8
2f177a0975d62b4acb131a2634594e88281baf6c
'2011-12-31T13:58:44-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWG' 'sip-files075.txt'
d13b23c61fe381ff36f8de46acd6e2ee
b55161222f3c17b8c10fd97d8668a9785d66dc5f
describe
'20473' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWH' 'sip-files075thm.jpg'
329c48ac4c05a0edf4b6b75c7b99f8d2
1ab49164a55acc908d440587d2c39891d38ad980
describe
'62323' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWI' 'sip-files076.jp2'
be94bace9a4ae5c481b3c2147b7ef876
0f9a57116415881c115de471d6943fe1bd82a092
describe
'81023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWJ' 'sip-files076.jpg'
292657f7085e4923d4540fd92e22eabd
9423a2969f8cbe971c70922431d8af0e38e2fa67
describe
'22305' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWK' 'sip-files076.pro'
d8e71f081dcdd1b1efa563dc40c18644
c333651b9997bb170fd5c8b5c270646d66c1713e
describe
'34039' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWL' 'sip-files076.QC.jpg'
9bbd58c4cfc9772831a4c325e94a3a96
937583a0c7bcbe03acb319c8051619ba1f14e2ea
describe
'509716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWM' 'sip-files076.tif'
39bfb5b6151adbad1622b2f61657b131
e9e796963e7054d792880068cff64ae6b26fc0cc
'2011-12-31T13:54:42-05:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWN' 'sip-files076.txt'
cde66e5f2758474baf7d3c161d7a7d41
2b2eeab2e2abafedad579a2a84f447584fe4b8c4
describe
'17091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWO' 'sip-files076thm.jpg'
bba9e8d2a6c168e0df8008e533c1e3bf
af9ad22cbfa919bf1eee6b2fcea0371e11815364
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWP' 'sip-files077.jp2'
4803f8894e0eaf72bc14bdeb2c160439
bf8a446d3071ee39bf78935274ae6c9edb02e51d
'2011-12-31T13:58:34-05:00'
describe
'83306' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWQ' 'sip-files077.jpg'
28e93e5920943d7e6b4b354a257ca429
993d02d146af121700d8b517df1762fd116c28ab
describe
'22903' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWR' 'sip-files077.pro'
cc01253583265591d230791a1dece6ae
78f089882bd599e2acfd4e7e38d17bc15e240f4b
describe
'34750' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWS' 'sip-files077.QC.jpg'
ab2a41878e2214983b074ccfe09f954e
af311cc5a7d65e3f442d5f87d0ccae75a8b3681d
describe
'509852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWT' 'sip-files077.tif'
beb34a8ed9aebc2d91575e916d62e639
0d71b46158473f1eb56c6570e05e16d42007e6f2
'2011-12-31T13:51:16-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWU' 'sip-files077.txt'
9b9c750bba23a765616dc0337adbddd1
234543d4f7727e63fc1500cb6cdc306664e3801b
describe
'17359' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWV' 'sip-files077thm.jpg'
9fb7b0a242ede77a34d91d1d728756e7
b472fedc0d0f401b062bae0bd1e972bd66893e27
describe
'62183' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWW' 'sip-files078.jp2'
7041b454238c399f1a285f2b7e715859
888d05379e1d2f5ae081e4faaaec59aa6d809722
describe
'84430' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWX' 'sip-files078.jpg'
835a0c702dfb7e525c343b4d031270e7
5a957cba4b1227d6ae92ced826dbb17a3e6dded3
'2011-12-31T13:51:39-05:00'
describe
'23718' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWY' 'sip-files078.pro'
1031ef34feeb61465d8840661669713f
43bf7f103b8c3659da732127000810467d9ee79e
'2011-12-31T13:54:50-05:00'
describe
'34460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAWZ' 'sip-files078.QC.jpg'
d1acacebd6b15d4f653b989e274d71d3
ad5b5285b5c77597f6bb9f818194c3fe17246682
describe
'509760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXA' 'sip-files078.tif'
d31d28e18225184c61e0b2c0a7a42c12
c831da4c67995eca2410f8ebe95d33ae3d814eef
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXB' 'sip-files078.txt'
00eba6bf2cd557ccff2342d93e39c18e
8ed8e39b128d2738c4172c0c7b20e8ed302e8d37
describe
'17128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXC' 'sip-files078thm.jpg'
0f62aee150c1b311e77269663551fddf
2f931b2f3d9f0ae864baed43b040072e302183ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXD' 'sip-files079.jp2'
93d0823aa284186aa4b35edb0c9d0577
f2ef3b29d00cbc75aac03ec9df444e586771f472
'2011-12-31T13:55:35-05:00'
describe
'90840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXE' 'sip-files079.jpg'
dc92b512cd2a938116614a51b2dc8a69
b707937e71c09b38185e0bdd4f3ff204a7aa8fe2
describe
'25960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXF' 'sip-files079.pro'
b62de9e7f9d76124bc8a700815ed986c
045592a05f5473a97926ae59ba78e1784fb979b9
describe
'37099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXG' 'sip-files079.QC.jpg'
eb195efa36bf1d15f156df91778e19db
3685060974bb450f3feddac8af145941d6bf7035
describe
'510136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXH' 'sip-files079.tif'
bfb750de4a295e7da0f8e51e1dd4ef1c
915391decbdd51a1afe3a0283ffa3b81a020cf03
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXI' 'sip-files079.txt'
067b3700e10d13df06464286c401da1c
c8eb1ab3ca5b30608dd5dc9fc3ed0a76440dc01b
describe
'17970' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXJ' 'sip-files079thm.jpg'
603c1f8e173a888de47e32b7977a7f9c
7e00648f1832932a983598739a5132a95c35575b
describe
'62257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXK' 'sip-files080.jp2'
b666ff4373076e1cff071ec0b7ad37c4
9ef143c5b0af804ca56d858fb78d27f5624a53d7
describe
'100365' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXL' 'sip-files080.jpg'
a43f3add517a970d7d7941b3db3c0dc0
526c6ed0af88f3df83e82b1c95c0e99a0421e35a
'2011-12-31T13:54:56-05:00'
describe
'26465' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXM' 'sip-files080.pro'
094e5bd403208f47adf7a704ce9c537b
53e07e633d67d0c6bf1d70432cfafababee7376d
'2011-12-31T13:55:06-05:00'
describe
'41963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXN' 'sip-files080.QC.jpg'
838f9182651423f40d9e475876c79829
0511eb9d6838d591a375abfb4ccd37831a5e28fd
describe
'510492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXO' 'sip-files080.tif'
b62c35aa5d9b6b14df4efb0030f9bbde
d1b107f7f2a5c96830d302eeedfdeed8a4f6b2c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXP' 'sip-files080.txt'
4e1737bd549ab43abd0366483666bfe4
7aa0d8cb84f641b541fe00b69394eceac7505146
describe
'19036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXQ' 'sip-files080thm.jpg'
36aa9d1f7a30a7c65ffb26dbff762eda
ec8c9259cbddbbd2d86c776c082bad3504a17c7f
describe
'62266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXR' 'sip-files081.jp2'
387bac16a0a2c438dc934a43aee60866
53066159d31f52e19fcd508803092c31b3260ddf
describe
'91766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXS' 'sip-files081.jpg'
c5542e60b1922fd26c13a914625cc5f5
3d6e301a98bfd4ad51b934e43c0f105e496e2ccf
describe
'23281' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXT' 'sip-files081.pro'
736f591fb38e634027bc0bb2c943b19f
f6762c2066de85bd68cffb16df96d2dfb1ff7325
describe
'39895' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXU' 'sip-files081.QC.jpg'
20aef3a1670f2cc3d6886b0e1d3c53d5
48d00a2530344cc1a5d1a0d8dcc7e9c785cbb454
'2011-12-31T13:54:13-05:00'
describe
'510360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXV' 'sip-files081.tif'
f92cd282c04ada356ea1f02cb22858f1
ae5985757c2c3785257e84aa004a35c8c3410828
describe
'973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXW' 'sip-files081.txt'
f50d3c3487069a741666315dcc4a5557
45b0315b12ae95471d420a04b688e0766c5c6595
describe
'18594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXX' 'sip-files081thm.jpg'
3231ec32cdd19902b4f8722c0c4af059
9c3fd13c140090406a38fcbe195d9a6022ed3af2
'2011-12-31T13:52:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXY' 'sip-files082.jp2'
c077d3f3ac31acc360f8304133436b29
92b1c28d5e75437e10adb345be461aa508150fbd
describe
'91301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAXZ' 'sip-files082.jpg'
5549b7b4c5174b30b29f9759d65ebe75
f19bfcb4c2d18742cd89fba41a7f6715dcb0aff8
describe
'24766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYA' 'sip-files082.pro'
fcbe875de5f4648ce0e27b1fbd4943bb
f98dd6eb3054b6a6f6300aa3a4870b17ae98eee1
'2011-12-31T13:52:51-05:00'
describe
'39381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYB' 'sip-files082.QC.jpg'
fbff06f8d5f10d6cfa4d1ff633904c12
eae286b1841f60017ce0c824e4030649e0510d97
'2011-12-31T13:53:40-05:00'
describe
'510600' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYC' 'sip-files082.tif'
e3b6272d5513ce2fd39327c42c48fdd1
432b03043870acd28d08297d001b7e59fe3f2b94
'2011-12-31T13:53:57-05:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYD' 'sip-files082.txt'
83876ce399b723e9729c044d99785e01
87b7eed8095517712012199304a1b1e1328620f7
describe
'19100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYE' 'sip-files082thm.jpg'
4fac5508ab710636593f33c5f6d9c938
7278a39437f1376da8e574bc6dda445abfdd660f
'2011-12-31T13:55:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYF' 'sip-files083.jp2'
962f7a809240c972fee5b6520ee3d8e2
724efac5048ea9fccf00eb9c93c009eb735a9eda
describe
'110105' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYG' 'sip-files083.jpg'
4bba59a1459a884448834e641073b194
2085662d8e7a2bf994636523058159b0df890ffa
describe
'28673' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYH' 'sip-files083.pro'
5fb518bbaeb0cda76cd88e48c6fcad77
f36205601130e46e536bcaa1058be6410a6413a7
describe
'46132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYI' 'sip-files083.QC.jpg'
f101346430cbdc525da2a55cb80045d6
04e8b5459a8edf9db77d02218bab04bc9f1a6d18
'2011-12-31T13:54:23-05:00'
describe
'511256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYJ' 'sip-files083.tif'
a753bbe9676ffbb9fda1f6b6f119bcf1
233853317ce24c9722b5a213fbaf7b03026f9720
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYK' 'sip-files083.txt'
32177084144a8871bad77c62ec0541d1
5998ce3b3060f4baf7ba758e1bd18b8190d8a657
'2011-12-31T13:57:40-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYL' 'sip-files083thm.jpg'
871d7e39789e3341cf2aa979cefd30c1
436884f76d102905024b5a13e94df1ff09f50c1a
describe
'62178' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYM' 'sip-files084.jp2'
7bef507c77aa1b64a942e3a90d7230cf
115789ebf1fbf602c1f66d634b35f9b667e75d27
describe
'104853' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYN' 'sip-files084.jpg'
83ac3fe4a9f10811b909e525cea004af
d7db579da9dac239ac5ed6914a42f7846cbfbfc6
'2011-12-31T13:53:44-05:00'
describe
'28517' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYO' 'sip-files084.pro'
bc1b6b5d0b708b367935ec64822f11ba
578bd056d7e8568a9afa5324809f2fea6e24cc5b
describe
'43982' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYP' 'sip-files084.QC.jpg'
0376ccbb236eaea0d62da766b1254a91
5d7a58b70eb1e96bf6ae8ec66153de803b3ca2dc
describe
'511120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYQ' 'sip-files084.tif'
e38d32c62c7b89689521e5703ae4b3c0
4766cd88dd49f0738ec1817be79f01dd9eb343ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYR' 'sip-files084.txt'
7de2aedf08f5174eb38e6a9bb3a22b9a
6f280cc5cca060219e86db6e63bdbfc8f2818533
'2011-12-31T13:57:46-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'20176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYS' 'sip-files084thm.jpg'
c54f81c2fc7d5e9c40915f53d9b27bc0
2b89df47f06a22e030e6247e47cd6a85896e8b43
describe
'62226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYT' 'sip-files085.jp2'
c6caa6b9fdfc34a51817de418ba152cc
58c148e31c6781fee485ce87bd942ec035aa730c
describe
'131915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYU' 'sip-files085.jpg'
7200d3b4d3602555583f9e63609422d1
3f430f81ef2f796c4fe73c32940dfccfe430511a
'2011-12-31T13:57:55-05:00'
describe
'31749' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYV' 'sip-files085.pro'
44e5ca02df79470b3090b7158831d622
55d35d24bbc2f2669fbcf9fd7763f7414394acb7
'2011-12-31T13:56:50-05:00'
describe
'55082' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYW' 'sip-files085.QC.jpg'
8b11d607004a64dc6927d8aaba24b96d
ee6250e785e5cc338409cc06644052b8f36d7604
'2011-12-31T13:59:09-05:00'
describe
'511960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYX' 'sip-files085.tif'
e6ddc0d6e1450d30726aaf35ad32af38
f0ab5e984f918fabbf28429b8c6b5759de91b741
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYY' 'sip-files085.txt'
4138d1faa165cb3fcbabe260665e8f6e
330d6d25022edebfc8025bb2170c8e7b44eec326
describe
'22572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAYZ' 'sip-files085thm.jpg'
fdc8b72e8e505934d34cab04a1072613
99e9d0191f5e1bc5aba84bf759de59a06daaf6d7
describe
'62180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZA' 'sip-files086.jp2'
fa57d3c0b88474966bb9e4d4f2a01f5e
e1b1b784f47b5a367189929cad33b2396df13bc5
describe
'114090' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZB' 'sip-files086.jpg'
cb99f6348852ba3d9aaf2a8186f1c9d5
1d5f8f14083799f4f77fd9ef6c6f2040315c7a07
describe
'27094' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZC' 'sip-files086.pro'
580389368a7f59fba4ad1647fe02ca5b
430be2545bbf0b528c194a612230fa6a25f4e767
describe
'48723' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZD' 'sip-files086.QC.jpg'
63c8fa6ec0b0b0f4c8200640b4542393
c2fc0d17aa28c1a9b3938862a61adefb3ea6cb4c
describe
'511512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZE' 'sip-files086.tif'
80fa99467331456f1194d6db0b32c073
b9a8ec36486e0e34b58b6e8789b866170c91983e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZF' 'sip-files086.txt'
6f9ec1198d8936ca3a310c97d9b72190
2c2839e46257c01ee0965a193c18c80c5a5b295d
describe
'21119' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZG' 'sip-files086thm.jpg'
9d30850b5ff69bd78be70f40e1ce6293
706925a8897a2faffeacf008c14f2ac3cf408f84
describe
'62149' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZH' 'sip-files087.jp2'
e2391347c08576e0ac8b9285568f3bb6
6b79342ee89d565f4bb0b6cd7ade6fd43e8aa970
describe
'91407' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZI' 'sip-files087.jpg'
2d173868c75840aaed556c23aff09155
01f06b91b90e42390fffdf9b0934a594e346fc2e
describe
'23256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZJ' 'sip-files087.pro'
4ce308db0045454a47d82096e13709ee
d3e41c77b6b7df3d27fefe52b7b681f6f842f478
'2011-12-31T13:53:23-05:00'
describe
'41478' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZK' 'sip-files087.QC.jpg'
e15c78b0ae826455a44b8313e72e19fe
f44711f14cacbdb457990cf64fea0aaaffb88659
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZL' 'sip-files087.tif'
4e130c4db836879586d8cc20c581a5e8
90a883966dfb8986faa0f0f0f057e87a1f4f322f
describe
'950' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZM' 'sip-files087.txt'
887a5bf2efc3bc3a6fe9463dae96a491
2d4241869f51e9cd1d8662eda3314f9b063dfdb4
'2011-12-31T13:55:55-05:00'
describe
'19500' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZN' 'sip-files087thm.jpg'
9218437249afaea07fffae2479409fd3
c4bf38604a08b77d65a6dc3114c26725ed1f8c52
describe
'62157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZO' 'sip-files088.jp2'
31aeb7458fafe37af4849978830d6612
f2272a7821ed836e3457f3252af64c2e00fffebd
describe
'91429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZP' 'sip-files088.jpg'
f40b1a98f26b842c2b66894422454bdf
02344a34c16f1a2a3598d8f34b51d858f5e12e71
'2011-12-31T13:54:40-05:00'
describe
'24919' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZQ' 'sip-files088.pro'
fde538ba49e105464ac72015ccf27ecb
6e63e058006171f41c528823ecd931ae638e0b58
describe
'40319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZR' 'sip-files088.QC.jpg'
0ca9f6ea827386d3befff8050c92fe28
f4322c340cd6a1b0040e7a848c03a64f1878afc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZS' 'sip-files088.tif'
1091751e6a1d2a18c6cb63f18f7ffdc7
4f95282dd98b622a8a6bf4c4e6732850b06e0940
'2011-12-31T13:56:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZT' 'sip-files088.txt'
a528ce6b9fd6f35fdec98732977fd5cc
c6a05269b4b284af89283cbc5ccab98bfa073c71
describe
'18838' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZU' 'sip-files088thm.jpg'
3739b65d06cde1f36af61a8b22502c96
27c954f151e93fad36e7b29c1362ee90a2269070
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZV' 'sip-files089.jp2'
0b5f0a083de2e472f153828afb1890af
bd00693bf83cd4b149c8575b573466fd8a430f02
describe
'75517' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZW' 'sip-files089.jpg'
e12ad1130121407d6d06f3335177fcd2
59e5b5a0e054685e9793c078afa04bc710fdd9ed
'2011-12-31T13:57:59-05:00'
describe
'20357' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZX' 'sip-files089.pro'
a5c9d6f0b12dffcd34142638de734ec7
f74c7650f73329f62cdad0cd62ec923c57fabeb9
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZY' 'sip-files089.QC.jpg'
2a5da1a16ef2d50fc94f7212a29cd13d
1f42488b93897c504d247010cfda64e13dd479f4
'2011-12-31T13:53:06-05:00'
describe
'509872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAAAZZ' 'sip-files089.tif'
467e7f5ea7906a0e4ca3dd88cebad7d7
3cda8c57796b4aeef2d2d5f085044b7998309158
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAA' 'sip-files089.txt'
c681a139db45dcbe3a84298cd594b7e4
69352acfda340daa903965467a6b94d775cef8fc
describe
'17630' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAB' 'sip-files089thm.jpg'
ac700dcd48cbb800499594e14503f9a1
589372f470ce9d496fed9f3c9bc617b44be2148f
'2011-12-31T13:56:43-05:00'
describe
'62306' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAC' 'sip-files090.jp2'
6cad7c0693e79f185470d0d161d5f98e
3c2b518346021725343096e8a2f71b246d909556
'2011-12-31T13:52:16-05:00'
describe
'100835' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAD' 'sip-files090.jpg'
dfdbd265c5a7ae9a48f3370694b58b98
037c825a99bcb53affb4a39889499447ab5b7499
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAE' 'sip-files090.pro'
599111f2cc0c7240bea6ead339808f39
8abbf88fdbac132bd50182147f510f73573caf38
'2011-12-31T13:57:39-05:00'
describe
'42895' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAF' 'sip-files090.QC.jpg'
97af4db72024de7d77fbf159b5219c1c
7c0b6c4e600c6564eca0fa79d48a51f25822907f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAG' 'sip-files090.tif'
cf389c0045efe3846dcf1112b7cd53c6
3e34c4ffdc1e95db55dc400cdee8d21c3c70e2f2
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAH' 'sip-files090.txt'
6d78712aa39b0f603bb4f70bcb96467c
1c9909972b361546cd742edee48036b2e6f49f3e
describe
'18995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAI' 'sip-files090thm.jpg'
349c270b10ca262de004212b65618e05
db671a6d7e43a18aab4dd259902e221bbd6570ab
'2011-12-31T13:52:05-05:00'
describe
'62297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAJ' 'sip-files091.jp2'
ee2658c5defea631038f53751c630a33
57bb6364acefa5fb333475cdfc5dc204985783c8
'2011-12-31T13:54:47-05:00'
describe
'90504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAK' 'sip-files091.jpg'
5431ce315ca422a83ac53a0248f78b5c
1b68709a3b9788a57e37c529120576b33116b78e
describe
'22071' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAL' 'sip-files091.pro'
a4e3f3ea3cb34d318598bdb8f2cdb7dc
43d58d284d0bc4354e259bd0e29eb35c3aa8ac60
describe
'39994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAM' 'sip-files091.QC.jpg'
26db88547391c511d6d33716dcac87a9
d0143bb3f96918eee92080c4a2f4b5eea6b481e5
describe
'510448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAN' 'sip-files091.tif'
145977d14e69cbb55fab8621d0350136
cdb345d576b67bca97b2ccb528cb37c9aab22a38
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAO' 'sip-files091.txt'
b13157026fc8fc615c62bc69db35b2ad
5e10ce6fb0e87c1f744bb1b54d814be0970a8359
'2011-12-31T13:55:08-05:00'
describe
'18795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAP' 'sip-files091thm.jpg'
f891bac396f3fcfcc64223b55e0a13f3
49b3c7105f21fb66cace85142ad4c168ccd5d4cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAQ' 'sip-files092.jp2'
0c89ab0d5c7a8bde0c51cd3fc8cc73f3
50c5e242e84726e89d0c4fb99e28d4f4a671c257
describe
'110799' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAR' 'sip-files092.jpg'
2b0ec1d48fe490304ed0255521f514e2
029682fe547273626f72c3d8a794b467afff764d
'2011-12-31T13:56:39-05:00'
describe
'26672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAS' 'sip-files092.pro'
3aa2718d547cbfe530769fdf7abf6f1d
e90c684b00861ff6f27e819ed0ccaf0be8c0dd4f
describe
'47429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAT' 'sip-files092.QC.jpg'
24ea9791ee51d7f9cc43fb46e30ec61b
b4fdd849438926155b5d95a0bc1d61044d169899
'2011-12-31T13:54:00-05:00'
describe
'511612' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAU' 'sip-files092.tif'
37bd1f183561913e56927fd3fd63cacc
402aafd592d645b475bb25546631f072c4c960ea
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAV' 'sip-files092.txt'
86d24b4709d1dfd4a826e5df840606af
27e42a20485d2bbf9b36cf3d5e3aaddb607a089f
describe
'21494' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAW' 'sip-files092thm.jpg'
711264b960b88b90e055ed0319ef113f
a9325ec77e8b8f7ad33315081ac20c5e7ac0d875
describe
'62272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAX' 'sip-files093.jp2'
3becf6b4a03ff26a3039acb084d7ae53
00d65f2edd73cc9c3dbadf24c29ee6a93230b8d7
describe
'108884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAY' 'sip-files093.jpg'
ad11b2868eee3889d4f587a8fdbb01fd
4b843aa6ce1bed8bc54e96661a53d3820dcbeb61
describe
'25091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABAZ' 'sip-files093.pro'
92da75f2db7f1e27892a88a04fa65ba0
a37c1aa0c4d14335a926c847c2226cf834a0ecea
describe
'47085' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBA' 'sip-files093.QC.jpg'
7abf71e3fe0a21c18cb914a3e0430d78
4b2da7d6a2b685c6b7923d3099fdca33e780d4d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBB' 'sip-files093.tif'
e641a2ae247cf49ca8df833808bf837b
6b97f501baffc737eecc2612c07d25dcaea8cd98
'2011-12-31T13:56:08-05:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBC' 'sip-files093.txt'
c99b896c71c8255014131603867c994e
f3c3d2b34df91fc59d110b3974f00669e817b459
describe
'21548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBD' 'sip-files093thm.jpg'
5c9d9006bab6797f259b5d92b6bc2689
b2851fe77099334f905407e648f8cd51b0855a75
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBE' 'sip-files094.jp2'
d09fa0da5791ff91b05171a1f24c2500
745852606d5005d0d05f81731612d0aa14fccb8e
'2011-12-31T13:57:52-05:00'
describe
'114331' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBF' 'sip-files094.jpg'
b88513d057edf868495bdc40412e77f7
8d870db940bde1c395f7d837b980c12271cf9730
describe
'26674' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBG' 'sip-files094.pro'
50c942e197b982d81455de8887582e9d
239959a106cbe6724dbc1ec3283279acf68d1dc5
'2011-12-31T13:58:08-05:00'
describe
'49645' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBH' 'sip-files094.QC.jpg'
506334b42c14e23cfeebd12227ccb860
89a445d67fe32389e47235a5ac9c80524659a8a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBI' 'sip-files094.tif'
f0de0980333932387b225b602451c867
bdafea184fd38ce15ce4a17e8fa417d20dad5d0c
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBJ' 'sip-files094.txt'
9657713fbeb1afcec196eb1f94da816e
6f780701ea464630480be00ea9ceae03c41ccd78
describe
'22147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBK' 'sip-files094thm.jpg'
b35849f1cf2fcb89c4a77d05390c987b
65f239fc919eb11b2811ec2290cb741e6680f3ac
'2011-12-31T13:50:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBL' 'sip-files095.jp2'
6efedc99cdf8aa6c92c53473624b94f7
4794c404f853ef36feb7ce3790f1dd2d83f8ad2a
describe
'115129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBM' 'sip-files095.jpg'
d8ba3419ae04a9b2a73833e9f7be6c2f
1103fb927965575c9098fb85b7ec24f0aa3002f8
'2011-12-31T13:51:03-05:00'
describe
'28658' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBN' 'sip-files095.pro'
16a9adfae591c87458ab025dc87766e6
717d21cbc6f300cc5dfd9d636debac80b26e72d7
describe
'49718' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBO' 'sip-files095.QC.jpg'
ee30f177d0d6baf699b131f392f1e5b4
0ece35e594bc3156b61fad6c206bb7ea321522c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBP' 'sip-files095.tif'
f7d016eaa31cfa7e4347a4e8d4b8615c
a7d9dd6b90db81b0c4e50de8eae0a90f0f946f25
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBQ' 'sip-files095.txt'
652a35869b164bb668d9dd4baab09f9d
9449bb9df0f44aa58926699807115539178519b8
describe
'22162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBR' 'sip-files095thm.jpg'
5cec566d5b9b2dfc03211463feeb772a
7c7a617ff963b36f76ebc78f0d64310a1f12ee13
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBS' 'sip-files096.jp2'
9f2a2a1a611785c88da7f0569f75bedd
4764575a3fad72c49625ae81595dd20c7bf1cba5
describe
'128378' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBT' 'sip-files096.jpg'
bd0f6aed01ddb4bcbc78bd17e29976ca
fd29bf4e5e376fbcc08b87985c3fe67e81005ee8
'2011-12-31T13:51:47-05:00'
describe
'30712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBU' 'sip-files096.pro'
8abde40f77c5371c3ab01864c3bcb212
4bf609db3decd6f40416cb2bb7901fd882bfe7cd
describe
'53606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBV' 'sip-files096.QC.jpg'
5ed01f50cd1d7e4a13cd84d21860e354
a4a8ae584a4c144e96929c1866884bcc11a0d3f0
'2011-12-31T13:54:18-05:00'
describe
'512132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBW' 'sip-files096.tif'
88abe5eb232c2742fc41a24dda9c7d75
9bd91d3585c6bab7730b87bf2fe2e5e2bca39d99
'2011-12-31T13:51:02-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBX' 'sip-files096.txt'
7ed5549769210bda02479534c1ed36c5
7b889b502743fff7f1b4e3669aa31725590db13d
describe
'22730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBY' 'sip-files096thm.jpg'
ba89da0c474e0f9d41d121703a087caf
d6f95ff9dd45da8a7e8bca0b345e978a4a13c8e9
describe
'62285' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABBZ' 'sip-files097.jp2'
9cd9dd69602b6cd987d0115d76f211aa
754292fbf26d16f30d95502bd516c9d050370652
'2011-12-31T13:53:30-05:00'
describe
'109956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCA' 'sip-files097.jpg'
75c7660f6ef69ca7cce7d9ded1af7161
b720a6332d1fb595dc8b11d0127d119af076d55c
describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCB' 'sip-files097.pro'
5a0595561a18ab0a24ab032df9d21f29
75a715e3f1fa524ba49e35f280b2c9fd51c9bfac
'2011-12-31T13:52:18-05:00'
describe
'46410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCC' 'sip-files097.QC.jpg'
2920a82ca91c4eccf8b3a043202cc8fa
23291436cfa8bcb689fd2d1bf0d310564e8803c2
'2011-12-31T13:56:37-05:00'
describe
'511444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCD' 'sip-files097.tif'
f5ca610afd33a67b9aafe06ca3a65faf
f0a0a9aa39c4b9bc305ebf9ef8b0ef9bc28b99fb
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCE' 'sip-files097.txt'
4cbe0db9ff235753b309d9b345629eeb
ad25e0e3ba982d57fd97ec59797f318e5c76047c
'2011-12-31T13:51:11-05:00'
describe
'21429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCF' 'sip-files097thm.jpg'
3b909906198df572de801b48901c0c41
47fef142c40d1958b8783990fb5c67e6d907e840
'2011-12-31T13:52:29-05:00'
describe
'62295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCG' 'sip-files098.jp2'
9842bf6b507ae0c352a343b053d9c2e3
a2357c652a440dab9828f94d543386dfe6329fe6
'2011-12-31T13:53:55-05:00'
describe
'123168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCH' 'sip-files098.jpg'
7f655a8ec2b3e3733e13a9103a2fee26
766b35bf64c5a27abb4320ac137a342f0a48bf21
describe
'28908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCI' 'sip-files098.pro'
57160823743f4e6d666dc0790cdb2e5d
298515c93283177a6caa2efea7fa9ff2435f5fd1
describe
'512120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCJ' 'sip-files098.tif'
68e4213c60c2cc84b45bb8b72eb80f1f
acf23b0eb1607f1c94ba3c137d0cf7b52ec3fcaf
describe
'52428' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCK' 'sip-files098.QC.jpg'
68583b0734805d0694557738737f3b23
f8bcdcc36ec2ab03755727d8385a1d7657d530fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCL' 'sip-files098.txt'
c073de3099aed631378f5958194f06aa
621ba63fac93ac686368031e704a1c8dd4c059ea
describe
'22508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCM' 'sip-files098thm.jpg'
bffb70db8a397f8eebf06b86abb200f8
b9954024aefca41e5fec9da4343ba57c1b3075c7
describe
'62216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCN' 'sip-files099.jp2'
d550c583ee50abbf38bcdb3cbad834fb
e6d1b5389de1f8b63a54d9b4c93ead5aaddbe8c9
'2011-12-31T13:51:58-05:00'
describe
'120963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCO' 'sip-files099.jpg'
0c5ea4c9dcad73857784978f7595fe02
4ee56ba5384307362efd09b4db3421b5ee2ed58f
describe
'28292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCP' 'sip-files099.pro'
df6cbe6cf647431c23af98841c3c33cc
a56f6628efa26adbf3a79ed5fe779febb3dab5e1
describe
'51527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCQ' 'sip-files099.QC.jpg'
3060f5c7dbeb103fa17757e582b0f4e5
ceb7c7e3aae4b0aa11c4611c32e0a60a567dad62
'2011-12-31T13:54:10-05:00'
describe
'512096' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCR' 'sip-files099.tif'
94dbe760a21788155068b447fee97a25
a5444aef32490e13ab04a0175f8f40b85699680a
'2011-12-31T13:53:05-05:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCS' 'sip-files099.txt'
0fee82899181787abef17441a2b52334
76fe50f2c230d2aa1f3c55d3af63a0658ca2f1ab
describe
'22734' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCT' 'sip-files099thm.jpg'
d8713d61cb46e772c8ea56a581adae75
502789015a77836e348891df5532031848121a5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCU' 'sip-files100.jp2'
85e79cdbd0633787417a820aafc088d4
0bb009d089f26d80c73e0f7e83d85ccbed6d2d69
describe
'103454' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCV' 'sip-files100.jpg'
861432154cbbad1c44557d258b809daf
5fdbf8ae4d278b37c8b9d0f2fe80504af03d9caf
'2011-12-31T13:52:28-05:00'
describe
'23757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCW' 'sip-files100.pro'
fbb52724a5cd1d61ae244723f86df159
3c5beb8730d826edf70851cc98f2da33d819c12c
describe
'44576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCX' 'sip-files100.QC.jpg'
8afd75e900ff2aa831d8d8cbc16315bf
cafabe24defa2279e31f1bcd2ae5b7b1c9af8a8e
describe
'511132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCY' 'sip-files100.tif'
a21490969b0013ca26c87d936809b8da
614eec3a524da17bd9e3406ea5db22d034a3a6e5
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABCZ' 'sip-files100.txt'
828ff11413b82909e9e55168650cbcc6
584cf3a5958f944a33e479fd8296e838e4ccc902
describe
'20575' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDA' 'sip-files100thm.jpg'
ee0b1f4ffe993007d4895a3230d0ebf5
f90b9fd1264ede98a2088cc8b1592d7294ce9a91
describe
'62101' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDB' 'sip-files101.jp2'
1f4ec8714f141142df30506f5bfc3532
92436300063fa8038329fe3f801dfa3f93c7b611
describe
'104368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDC' 'sip-files101.jpg'
d0b608cd42a9010e950157459e1dfa57
33211a88d08d0c3e320b72bda6b4f8216d7b6c2c
describe
'27214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDD' 'sip-files101.pro'
b25e216a4408cd00aa5c7e20385831ad
4528059be8b52cc64d219c4f0ed68bb452fb0bd0
describe
'43851' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDE' 'sip-files101.QC.jpg'
b204b0d2100fe4fe7424ffa1feb25977
b3695daf75e7e8f31315674b13110f4a6d94a8a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDF' 'sip-files101.tif'
123f2bf216b6c4cb00ac7cb5fbc6ecf0
90cdb34ad2612c86677e0619b0d98aa841930dd9
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDG' 'sip-files101.txt'
563adc7e9b9691b6f5ce619d78e49b13
af73745935c6d55640b7b1410faecd31627dbd7b
describe
'20130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDH' 'sip-files101thm.jpg'
ce60e639282c0d3429aa0b1ddb7bb781
b06755cf01c0e3bcf4632ae863774c3363a7d6b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDI' 'sip-files102.jp2'
b9f21d0d371cd679e1068c74a0a3c67b
70914eb124432362778ba0261eca9c9cfab84695
describe
'79940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDJ' 'sip-files102.jpg'
7c32363c4ba4bcedac51a99e70fea54f
92e6571ae154aea1199c0fa3feec0e2863b6e074
describe
'22553' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDK' 'sip-files102.pro'
fe09d51361148d0a5662ce508cfd47ce
a50d065dd078dc193a1b93d7e7ebac4d62f456ea
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDL' 'sip-files102.QC.jpg'
95f4c089f84dd935805490de351ae888
43cc2e9f34d8dc7580b34b199c761b8b20b7f5f2
describe
'509956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDM' 'sip-files102.tif'
1d16b8540e5a19f66ffd6f198db89dd1
4ccd8dbaea036259d31678f8140b7fa406cd9d87
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDN' 'sip-files102.txt'
117fb6ce310db6b5fbfc85815881de00
ecd0ac2e9c6f349731c0aea88c3357a7a6cfcfa3
describe
'17375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDO' 'sip-files102thm.jpg'
e9dcd295ed97f137c5f84fff4526cc60
2de73d0222dfa4d8fc1078f62c47ded094275ac7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDP' 'sip-files103.jp2'
87b74ac1aa35404f44d78c7c3efd4baa
06c7ee143392f5fdf1fb5582f27c53587126f9d7
describe
'85948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDQ' 'sip-files103.jpg'
0927ad5bc39cde751e0a0b274912cc2a
74d332eb54d2e522da8195276a6a30ec65c9059b
describe
'23904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDR' 'sip-files103.pro'
f7aa055947ed3b19c32541ed2c57a7ab
8d07bfcbb9ab134e4591f1e946c654d4ec8106a7
describe
'36758' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDS' 'sip-files103.QC.jpg'
ddb9dd0afb8a01b87a8eb7c7783eecfb
96531b78f6d57fad00513d615916354cf76700ce
describe
'510012' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDT' 'sip-files103.tif'
be84d794240b7bc2d9188bac69da2b2d
e20e786842339a9b6567a5bd3d8e79bb4f762b42
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDU' 'sip-files103.txt'
4c5a95f7a368cf693e18896f287de059
1bd09abd2c7f7bb11a21e65e99956d2eb0adfbc1
'2011-12-31T13:55:00-05:00'
describe
'17826' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDV' 'sip-files103thm.jpg'
3c7f13eac47fbd0253e5787843e675e1
bb31e8416556b02f717c00821e0d0899319b5cde
'2011-12-31T13:58:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDW' 'sip-files104.jp2'
c3741e31f38328778a553f0050eb678b
5a084092f3cf88bc04fc29305f1fe34edff32015
describe
'104483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDX' 'sip-files104.jpg'
9674bee956904a8aafe3cd4f235af36e
bad14913cf1a9ca3f7be15448c53f455f154a5bf
describe
'30339' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDY' 'sip-files104.pro'
9ff2e447f9c10292c8268eba70ee55e3
5f033d173361c71a1b0264ac71b55e1b27c08c08
describe
'42285' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABDZ' 'sip-files104.QC.jpg'
40cf6c462e4863a28c11e36375217f59
eee53a7c34eabf8f976910370f1a7eaf78cc5830
describe
'510824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEA' 'sip-files104.tif'
07cd309a7fdfef15cf050af20de1750b
5064b6143b498c8022b18e02126eb4d9255dc29e
describe
'1356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEB' 'sip-files104.txt'
da1296e828c5a3465e9937578992a6a1
7f4b8f87b7dd234bd8c0284ba9c8ffb50c4884c3
describe
'19726' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEC' 'sip-files104thm.jpg'
a728697c9406a73ef848bc86b7acd202
57f99e3020ea0f0dcc735f3b227b82a3bb026f16
'2011-12-31T13:56:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABED' 'sip-files105.jp2'
2887588a742dde01384fef3601b762d2
69d96163dc1a01af983bd77ecf4808f14723373c
'2011-12-31T13:51:15-05:00'
describe
'97229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEE' 'sip-files105.jpg'
cc966823158234998d43772bb89d8b00
250d9263bcfaf79423fa320ab51f761071cb3370
describe
'27204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEF' 'sip-files105.pro'
5c8a890b21d640e18524aaf549e49b0a
7212e3a463b9fec6c5e6eefa7c4e2db2ce1bc069
describe
'41580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEG' 'sip-files105.QC.jpg'
6ab9166e2ccc9dbe4fe410a14b18f4e3
232733004d0d6ca27f2c030843d0c00aafc8757d
describe
'510868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEH' 'sip-files105.tif'
df7486a213a4b0b5861b4d3d72bec6ac
04943b48ca6bb1c66feab6657bb8422b2be6a9a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEI' 'sip-files105.txt'
b12d0ed004cba715b5892730a87ce9b0
c76964aafd2c858624a58d9d771ca2beb8dc520b
describe
'19837' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEJ' 'sip-files105thm.jpg'
b1b59fd88755c4895698f4208f335f57
c9c01e3d540e804bf2b269207dc223a341fda4df
'2011-12-31T13:58:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEK' 'sip-files106.jp2'
1575d3f9ebba78023420b82958026f99
baa7102e37da531caecc6d9f92ebd4b48b65b771
'2011-12-31T13:58:22-05:00'
describe
'103980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEL' 'sip-files106.jpg'
fbd0e948a762582a345caa29f3316075
8d4605859998f19c9740c37309ddd417d70e3b57
describe
'30273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEM' 'sip-files106.pro'
f4d971ffdf479efd5ab16f8b68ccc9fe
27015ee9cd725ff7eb1188d0b666170fdba9360a
describe
'42157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEN' 'sip-files106.QC.jpg'
063f66fce8db9f0a9debb9f221df66dd
d4cd610d506cac3f6f561e4a56a0c8bd032f178c
describe
'510852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEO' 'sip-files106.tif'
a82c62ba3fbdbd525cd90145a5434ceb
280fef8f3548834a5f107229ced73a8ea065f979
'2011-12-31T13:52:45-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEP' 'sip-files106.txt'
e8faf5014b84d30cfcff54d9e5201ea9
55b9dff67ac30b1fa676b48893d679c4226cd3b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEQ' 'sip-files107.jp2'
b83b0d23457c040f337cd8dbca2a39c0
2609aba954de5a8079c7342035079713289ab81c
'2011-12-31T13:56:53-05:00'
describe
'19728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABER' 'sip-files106thm.jpg'
b74bbaf6809bd9660f8020ce5f8918b2
73ebec24d340ff374227268bfc47e6a8d11b6856
describe
'89819' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABES' 'sip-files107.jpg'
89662f09e25c835f05babd1023ac8c03
86fa9535e2163a5acd8f638ad288802f63701462
describe
'26615' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABET' 'sip-files107.pro'
dd43e4b3342b65cf8bc8003a12d8c492
157891a7085081c10f720c15e4d2349f855aa176
describe
'38570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEU' 'sip-files107.QC.jpg'
07482ea212c345e8247f1a99e37b673a
6c10fdb79986f15b3d06d36b8693226f335b64eb
describe
'510432' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEV' 'sip-files107.tif'
0b8887f7424e9436d44ca091cb02e6f6
c61186a70f270b7bc3f91fa2e4b1388a74c8d824
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEW' 'sip-files107.txt'
b67657dd2b23ee9f0b5d87257b2862a8
5ba0571cc11b25d9e52419da14edf7bc01749f95
describe
'18540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEX' 'sip-files107thm.jpg'
694010530dc05ca20721def8a65170c6
0c3319ddc0215ecf9712625b4f31f29122032319
describe
'62318' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEY' 'sip-files108.jp2'
24ad8aec4b12b2beb65d33053946ed28
19c0784838dcb8e43085eb757e8ed7a0f3bc881a
describe
'79975' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABEZ' 'sip-files108.jpg'
0f0909256ee7b83596e7b3432c63fc46
5db18b2275ff55a833f7031e411e35e8bf6f41c3
'2011-12-31T13:53:00-05:00'
describe
'23065' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFA' 'sip-files108.pro'
b4c2023f383358c26ffd575ee869ad59
17f1ff77ce6588b5a0b598cfd5226df9628c24f3
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFB' 'sip-files108.QC.jpg'
703017c5d4585b750727f72e76510e17
a3e373004f36d0f4d5669de22924d0c6cf836ffd
describe
'509880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFC' 'sip-files108.tif'
5eee72c4df92a1162be086fa080f8639
ee696f22d0bede5d692ce4d835ceb21670adf9c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFD' 'sip-files108.txt'
9e20f0bba01e8ed83e20eb08b740abda
bf118633dc146fc8a94950e94d29d6c57d0d72c7
describe
'17440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFE' 'sip-files108thm.jpg'
65c28c11ac12622a6ab1f53e71175b40
df4b6e0e6f9843c646e0eb082909135d5de8da0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFF' 'sip-files109.jp2'
7d0152418da69c46576982533976b87e
ea31afaa06bb05303684de272d9e80db38376976
'2011-12-31T13:56:11-05:00'
describe
'68974' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFG' 'sip-files109.jpg'
79b25337126d1d9a0cdbc22c0f2a0000
08cba232a8ad52f8a85ea1032fc0c53a115faa9a
describe
'17401' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFH' 'sip-files109.pro'
e96717b5af5fa23984b7cf1d13bd6780
35944a0860fedd668f56121ecd748b402758b1ed
describe
'31281' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFI' 'sip-files109.QC.jpg'
ff5aa86980c0833c62bb83f21c360d3f
06e294ab7eae8ae928ee5392620b48b6eba8de4b
describe
'509376' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFJ' 'sip-files109.tif'
a9b211939c2773c89e3db6333b1665df
465cf5043d26ee7ba127725bc91725bcd67ff252
'2011-12-31T13:56:56-05:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFK' 'sip-files109.txt'
4957413f94a4e07c09163a24e9398130
e014807283ab2ef1d0ee7402ce695d2e2afce8e5
describe
'16184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFL' 'sip-files109thm.jpg'
faf6be35530d950e972293d6e2d74cc4
0ae6ce93367f5a632d72a3f798fe9e14d0c931d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFM' 'sip-files110.jp2'
6d29b3c7be445ab8e993f5a41cba474b
1ebf9aee588ef0be54e9c63368ef5d281a3194d0
describe
'87678' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFN' 'sip-files110.jpg'
c6b10899593be32495ac9abb0d17e965
9a382382c992a9647895fec119eb70623eb0de29
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFO' 'sip-files110.pro'
7d3d789e189f1a09ca888e0713e0d12e
dc730034a2aa93b88b0bd03a1cf8a2df3184683b
'2011-12-31T13:57:14-05:00'
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFP' 'sip-files110.QC.jpg'
b7a72d29980d6c8c384ca5d82699548f
946db30f283e83668b55620a5b71f51d24d8f42e
describe
'510180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFQ' 'sip-files110.tif'
6045d9b81f57a5e8cd3c8999d7c8c0c5
c4c366012f310379c98f9c257743fed3672c8907
'2011-12-31T13:56:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFR' 'sip-files110.txt'
f3529bd0e8c43ad1537a63000e929e7f
4aed8f9d55fe45b56797fb3c2f38899e49e229ae
describe
'18069' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFS' 'sip-files110thm.jpg'
5a22fd77d1cc31ea2a6df25edfdee556
4ad1a1926ec7abe6a21dfeec22be21bff06e61b6
'2011-12-31T13:56:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFT' 'sip-files111.jp2'
97fb6269e5ab4f321e8cda65aa7b057f
fbca1e1ad96031295eb67f0187bde8f5bc3f757a
describe
'132497' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFU' 'sip-files111.jpg'
0ffee39c75b95592f4b724ab026bd9c6
de2138539d00ed6ce90846ea25e3f600a767cc60
describe
'37527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFV' 'sip-files111.pro'
7a300572886d029ab99e9cb47b58d111
c9a32b7cda41233d3ea623bc702585518cba14ad
describe
'54360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFW' 'sip-files111.QC.jpg'
873a4442366903d1583f1ba81f90c631
3f3bd3c7a86a491f0946bdd37af6e1abe714c8e3
describe
'512800' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFX' 'sip-files111.tif'
2f69f7f3a31826c7f9b46f3f9d98b2c5
4a09c525c937ab10d937e534a09e2a09e8d67b81
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFY' 'sip-files111.txt'
000bba5dfc51791dd146dcf83c097f46
8b81a1ef2be83286faa9258a7918d5ac3589d279
'2011-12-31T13:56:13-05:00'
describe
'23712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABFZ' 'sip-files111thm.jpg'
ddb193dc7daa89a028a28f763a22dfb7
2bac8cfb71cf3661f06686bdb40f95402742bc77
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGA' 'sip-files112.jp2'
9f2de2878bbdebdc5be5049347a9d17f
f43cf92c10df4afc9f342710c00d0fd3537d3701
describe
'100067' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGB' 'sip-files112.jpg'
ff59604ed2258f5453e4198c05c67fa6
012d18f8b90b2ce8a176d986178445f537a7958b
describe
'25241' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGC' 'sip-files112.pro'
9c76ef7d48c7671ec4cdb890129b5697
3382cb5c6c1ac05c88738cc9e1714e19cdc6ec95
describe
'42274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGD' 'sip-files112.QC.jpg'
ea351ab27ac7c05e9957d1efefeb0a01
f83c17637feb97d3342fd53e74a9fa87be438c39
'2011-12-31T13:50:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGE' 'sip-files112.tif'
39c24f4ef3057e9e0ce4f6173f82feda
e1b8ddd390cb7dea7e22109ba352fc6bff450f05
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGF' 'sip-files112.txt'
957ef23d0920949d55acc95c15ce3c63
89b9240df3812807899acf396dc180e071d5bd98
describe
'21095' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGG' 'sip-files112thm.jpg'
e54d60dcdbef1eaf29de0a91c135dbd7
a56bcca46b197bf76ed0fcb45d293acc39e90b08
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGH' 'sip-files113.jp2'
a4ee7bad240b66ca8c208b1bdfd02dfc
b6cedc1054aeb96d03cc704b986b7f73441fadba
describe
'107230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGI' 'sip-files113.jpg'
8678a732cca1abe2008e1d6f8c98d171
6fcd05d800762b1e67fc488279603e115993c135
describe
'27988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGJ' 'sip-files113.pro'
a1abc88b8bd3b3d22fd0749c8ecaf376
e3724ea244828a7248a2c6ec94a0ede57c780057
describe
'46437' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGK' 'sip-files113.QC.jpg'
3a1d2e05b9d7ee1090bfcbdcf30d06e8
7614611bae34637a9ed46bef7bd7c514918cda9b
describe
'511992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGL' 'sip-files113.tif'
e7f020c904ef5ee819e0284cc3131d23
a069fe24aee76036b3003f72c1aed75f654b1245
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGM' 'sip-files113.txt'
b9fe5a37c2df1e1a9b1d55a7864b2786
f52c0afe9c87456354b90f98dda339fdaaf9f1f2
describe
'22307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGN' 'sip-files113thm.jpg'
e8366a55f2545a68f56f043804847401
dc378a7d0dd6452700040e1a782be0163203a684
describe
'62236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGO' 'sip-files114.jp2'
c0d8a14e5d811904e42d54cf13085f4a
07f31c5df7d309ef1b059fb5b5a3062c4e133285
describe
'105567' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGP' 'sip-files114.jpg'
431b1c802c23a07704aaa4d5dc0a993f
a8aa107570a249d9f379276467d623aa5ee2030f
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGQ' 'sip-files114.pro'
b1bf8562b2e7e20aba3c322f56a0ef42
d29f8044c475bf7461cf41ad517e732ed1c0b035
describe
'46499' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGR' 'sip-files114.QC.jpg'
6865c6cd550585732b97f4cbf711287f
8714e58f382db483db3e8864d00878bad3e0ae3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGS' 'sip-files114.tif'
4f060e34968eb612c82a33974a97e3fa
f74f6f77e84dc138fd1f5572090cb9cdf6a07164
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGT' 'sip-files114.txt'
b2eec5d6a94134d97756927a83de1b48
4c25a4cbd00872daf53c64b8b1ce676d58728666
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGU' 'sip-files114thm.jpg'
1e985555fba0acf30f418d788502ceb9
92bacb4083516737e60fbd484b6c11edab96d04b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGV' 'sip-files115.jp2'
c3ad838d2e3d601e3ffa5844e5f1dd60
4059d9ef0556a2297293c4f9ba1428f55ec61203
describe
'113379' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGW' 'sip-files115.jpg'
5f6ecf59a9d586f83af02fbe6269b59b
678fad21176a82b6410da6d8cdd275ca1baf8e88
describe
'29496' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGX' 'sip-files115.pro'
288c5d749de68b10b6523a7900d13cb3
8f8ba5697f60ea869c8d2a85e2bc0453e4dcfbac
'2011-12-31T13:52:49-05:00'
describe
'48231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGY' 'sip-files115.QC.jpg'
597126da0e2418e876b3e2bb9dde4d99
e0d9dbdb1e9ba4938b9a910fa4abd8bfd49bbf8f
describe
'512440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABGZ' 'sip-files115.tif'
8a03bb77ba75d77d282693f706467202
e642e3a1081a25075e9ad5d9bfaf43892e84052f
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHA' 'sip-files115.txt'
f15e235043647b0220cd78561c7aa385
d68cbbbed765c9dcd08d942ce8be93281713265f
describe
'22784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHB' 'sip-files115thm.jpg'
e025df530f3dbc0e36b36d9db4dcc4f2
428c28207ba5116a59877c27e670ebe740c6b9f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHC' 'sip-files116.jp2'
7dfade777fb30561515f8d2cfa10f25a
601b56f561b97a2d2c8b96af0bc4ceba4f6ee0aa
'2011-12-31T13:52:58-05:00'
describe
'106588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHD' 'sip-files116.jpg'
7e00666a54cf4ccafb0b8030430b47dd
3f3297b35929598928b81e5ce86009c8f5139829
describe
'26570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHE' 'sip-files116.pro'
72b07029b564569903ed9e2771ac2017
5083bb47bf13a71a889f7a82d6e4711753d417d8
describe
'44640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHF' 'sip-files116.QC.jpg'
e0baa03a0d53188940bc72b9e0cbfe02
c6468d2731548125318a1088dfc45477373cedc2
describe
'511784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHG' 'sip-files116.tif'
cb00418c594f59ca5450cc9e29c4ae84
882a42697c12e2ea217953163772348813725d74
'2011-12-31T13:56:17-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHH' 'sip-files116.txt'
e55c98fa4214500fc160262f468adc97
7379fa5b32691a71f7112402c1171a6f173fec03
describe
'21486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHI' 'sip-files116thm.jpg'
37706396b4d70e16ef5daaa5bb25b421
79e02471351d71c7f44e9273b6db2112de1965b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHJ' 'sip-files117.jp2'
1ea6239e6e2a307eff1c2cfd26d145cb
72599fda52ad6f8618f8371c318ed57e7bd50d6c
describe
'104670' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHK' 'sip-files117.jpg'
a7eac166e3e0889a1ee72a33d2d0a06d
062c25cb7600a80bfa0e316507bd6e28d479be0e
describe
'27909' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHL' 'sip-files117.pro'
93eff3a85e8529413a642585a5063b2d
bc91f7f9d22416199b4b8ef573d3fe742cbe61bb
describe
'46500' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHM' 'sip-files117.QC.jpg'
56f760094a5a4519800893f5a1f54dcd
2046c5e0724df6417937a7d7f25129d6a6b3f37e
describe
'512368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHN' 'sip-files117.tif'
937fb07d9eee5d3f0e13e930ca316ecd
87f68eca3d45528587477261af5309c4ac601d0d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHO' 'sip-files117.txt'
2f55c75f60c549219d0bd4a17525248b
3145915da869bc086dd35498125d02c4cc8a76f5
describe
'22439' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHP' 'sip-files117thm.jpg'
0bb6723835434ee7a5cf887039512285
f39d96e5369ad8fe966165092cca7521d5925cdc
'2011-12-31T13:56:44-05:00'
describe
'62232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHQ' 'sip-files118.jp2'
a17ff44602fe43da616b4061ef17790a
a5c27c7d631d4ab3dbcdf45697c42bebf7726450
'2011-12-31T13:53:02-05:00'
describe
'99276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHR' 'sip-files118.jpg'
e668a62947da94d6d471de32677209a8
ac7089b573d34252437c7fa010329dd1857c7689
'2011-12-31T13:55:44-05:00'
describe
'27793' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHS' 'sip-files118.pro'
cd8d2e5946e6180fbade808030c156d6
76b983079296b84f6d3ec66ce4d64a4d096175eb
'2011-12-31T13:55:50-05:00'
describe
'40680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHT' 'sip-files118.QC.jpg'
9e3956535d04e9834ea6a3ac1651e95c
ff486a117fb7d8806e04339e8e1753b311da2f88
'2011-12-31T13:53:16-05:00'
describe
'510980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHU' 'sip-files118.tif'
bd8f1dfc41a1353e3a19ed1f1280fab5
194e61a3825fc71df9fc45b8b7fd637ef8a0cc7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHV' 'sip-files118.txt'
489645de6256143220ce8e278c018000
db33cf128a6b0a7d3a0590bf3ff7d68a9770cae3
describe
'19602' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHW' 'sip-files118thm.jpg'
a6bd93a479974a73f5dbcb0a081b8e3c
9dc6f81ccae8d75f943973a6ed8bc720a1c593a1
describe
'62222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHX' 'sip-files119.jp2'
57aa44034aa618a9461d742d475ee6d3
547ddd12b32bfb1422be31d5b1682501bd2e1e9c
describe
'103748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHY' 'sip-files119.jpg'
0db2b644662ff6f4c4f55cc6a2292c36
43275b413c80f65245d4b0af177ed963da307bc5
describe
'29394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABHZ' 'sip-files119.pro'
bed3a5a95f1badb7f8dde9009f64b7be
ac40ce34e77e44ebed8b086d093e752fe5a0a48d
describe
'43075' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIA' 'sip-files119.QC.jpg'
35a01655b9a2ba57c4a16bbd4cbb2ab8
e84d6aa104a4953aa4cb99980303f7cc0efbe78d
'2011-12-31T13:51:17-05:00'
describe
'511320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIB' 'sip-files119.tif'
09961e5f35b11bb8654680c6b9797252
b899d456cda9317dc87ea5a40e286ff8e8a36d18
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIC' 'sip-files119.txt'
9b81d56d2ff0e9ca7067b6e6caeedfe0
c40ab97f74eb2634d0d1b6cd668bbcbdb0f21cce
describe
'20388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABID' 'sip-files119thm.jpg'
087861e40443249996dd2bfc473ab2b8
7db0483610bf53353adc143e2a1cbfe146ade189
describe
'62282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIE' 'sip-files120.jp2'
95aacc3baf669809645c894ab23ffb7b
bbbe4b1e7494963da62033226f3fca63126c56da
describe
'90687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIF' 'sip-files120.jpg'
68a630854275e58e0a6af2504dbe15bd
6d81788b52b611ded68f8e8c7b5fa08b385a851a
describe
'24635' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIG' 'sip-files120.pro'
144c6a409b3918e5dad92e216506eddd
16a7c5c3edf7d982ca528f9974fdf4de3d103916
describe
'39818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIH' 'sip-files120.QC.jpg'
0216c8a198635c4e4769fcd2d5b4e4f9
fb53028b8f8127e622790175d229d5f89393cb7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABII' 'sip-files120.tif'
dce08a2a2555f861c15c74f0cfa00710
5c941766d56ab300eeaec7fcd2e56cd00de62f81
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIJ' 'sip-files120.txt'
2f5334dc9378cf7d86a8f29fa89e767b
f69394cf6791c7fb1bc9e95bbb9b067c7cef7d9c
describe
'19616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIK' 'sip-files120thm.jpg'
9761733903a2ed6a04782370aeeeea99
7e1bd51b5789cc52c733e2c04ca66faec23122e1
'2011-12-31T13:50:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIL' 'sip-files121.jp2'
add03eb2faba4fdc475f1cb9a310021e
aab4b286dcb9c353b4f73d4e3cbce54dfa317b02
describe
'106870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIM' 'sip-files121.jpg'
270995bc6db2d0b0f6ec606f8fef11f2
55057442d911c43e6601bf93417010cd4dde780b
describe
'30509' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIN' 'sip-files121.pro'
d70e975f14430d6b016ad6316a6af8a2
f8520b40ce6bd169051921136f31640a08447c2e
'2011-12-31T13:58:51-05:00'
describe
'44676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIO' 'sip-files121.QC.jpg'
1b2d9a1695478efc513f76ce1434c748
8b6b333a669140b710b4084e3ae9605b6ea82938
describe
'511176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIP' 'sip-files121.tif'
bb802d21a755dd61ebf7fc4b053864fa
59840447a16ac9fafc5b9b6f44e5bae8a7021aa0
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIQ' 'sip-files121.txt'
0e0fd481aecebd1f8f49e65cba2e829d
d182445264cfc5c98f1204481a58e3288a03455c
describe
'20277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIR' 'sip-files121thm.jpg'
91a730b7d97b0895b80a24ea3cfabbb8
39763983d6ff09ec963186ad254dcdf2be388821
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIS' 'sip-files122.jp2'
058709859a2ab04ba8ee91c9c1096498
0db8a24b08aa0c19712ff124281097d4abfffe3e
describe
'79471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIT' 'sip-files122.jpg'
82f1e4f9a1777e8cae57bea58fae4f89
5c282ab5c974852214ef0e54b0849e775befee8a
describe
'18353' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIU' 'sip-files122.pro'
b5fd1a0c9975097a8683e23be7794005
c9fc2acc5a0125cbde8d4f3a6d5d9127629e604a
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIV' 'sip-files122.QC.jpg'
fbcb325aaaaca5e5c3c6de264b128cce
c9932eb5e8f1486bbf835f23ce7b3ee905cf78b9
'2011-12-31T13:52:25-05:00'
describe
'510172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIW' 'sip-files122.tif'
db42dd095c596d43f7c61abea6f6cbdb
8e6c9f70cbfc74583d48dede67ab61931dd91146
'2011-12-31T13:54:34-05:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIX' 'sip-files122.txt'
c60e53dcca7a36d6bd863c2dd1a806a8
975dd66781095e7a64640b81d23223021fd0fb5d
'2011-12-31T13:51:23-05:00'
describe
'18005' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIY' 'sip-files122thm.jpg'
a89ead9c9f7970d29f5ac047caf37d29
85e657ff6e90f6c6fc2d2909629d43b58e844a4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABIZ' 'sip-files123.jp2'
d752eef7a28a826ba537f699b2ffcf35
44e2e8474aff6283699fe597430c5121e2327868
describe
'99497' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJA' 'sip-files123.jpg'
7950f15ddc4f6215e9e898724f4737a8
cd257a9f538804b93e8f0b5831c818a482355979
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJB' 'sip-files123.pro'
83f740c0945844afa9569b5135686e43
670c5eae91eacafaf8404d0b8a9a83ec888180aa
describe
'42861' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJC' 'sip-files123.QC.jpg'
773bfe5aa0ff2620532171dd3b8d660f
392cee5bd3a460b9ad6ac33a7eab8fba6fd4e2cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJD' 'sip-files123.tif'
8132918ef558584f0645c69a5340e5af
6b551f6e9976d3df00fb9ad9f188fdd287391eb9
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJE' 'sip-files123.txt'
498fdff38ae839a7ee822a53ffcb6427
c64cd03d6d2c20e3f6f7a64aae9a1ede093e49cc
describe
'21330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJF' 'sip-files123thm.jpg'
0cd8bd8ebbd034d9ff5e1794732ce5e4
801c2bb233696238cd2b50f05627631eb7b1083b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJG' 'sip-files124.jp2'
ee64254c1e06fb4a9af2f4970b78b946
2ce29f05afda1a399c10920464554a72c0236101
describe
'90122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJH' 'sip-files124.jpg'
422ef7b659fe9e0685353d09ffc5366d
551afa77e75b4efa651d684b012d39c45ec2404d
describe
'24767' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJI' 'sip-files124.pro'
d5a79e0f20d337f06a8cb9902f6851fb
4332ab49bbc5c262e0f9b1ec782cc9cfc9545a84
describe
'38603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJJ' 'sip-files124.QC.jpg'
7879681ebf20e4d97338a7fa10563e69
c735a3becab6a12866791d8d897d56833a44f158
describe
'510676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJK' 'sip-files124.tif'
6587db2b431ce5b14483c68ab6c84010
1e815eed1cc952e17abfc3209b7ce9c37d8dcd5e
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJL' 'sip-files124.txt'
78496a1a80ed74eeeec42ac9f36f02cc
21f867413ad3943c409400af1c463a2a44e62a91
describe
'19252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJM' 'sip-files124thm.jpg'
86ba1e2aadbc630638afb9b45ad08d2e
0c1d5107a992011b7841e29e734b72de59ff2048
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJN' 'sip-files125.jp2'
e89ba0cbb37b1004d57701bfb1ceeed0
d6bf306192795da4e81feae9d8592d74ce288eee
describe
'86623' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJO' 'sip-files125.jpg'
8b63241ef4e11e3e23bf7b750c2d6851
b68a0da470d25575153f943de5166e3b668b92c6
describe
'22733' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJP' 'sip-files125.pro'
22bfb968287685fba725e187790f3830
35c8883adf243cc2d731103f808f4ae5e91485b9
describe
'38098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJQ' 'sip-files125.QC.jpg'
72c1a9b394729d4c1f4ef9d00a61ebc5
20841b1b8ab76fc74c2dcba017f198c3ccd6d2c9
describe
'510820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJR' 'sip-files125.tif'
0823ef3d30929bee976b68b14384b3a3
6aaf123db4dc70eadada687fae98aa7ab973614c
'2011-12-31T13:53:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJS' 'sip-files125.txt'
3f33a94a331a6b4059b96d5656b82756
baa03792110037308e3902b46870a244af4820ad
describe
'19478' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJT' 'sip-files125thm.jpg'
ffb91cb5581c93c3df8e44ebd1511ddd
63d07162dd39899015d9faa23fb21f2e21f7b4dc
'2011-12-31T13:57:36-05:00'
describe
'62279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJU' 'sip-files126.jp2'
a4a973a7553d770f58cbd113da137285
f9ce7a6390b803462741608e24e670c5d5de00c7
'2011-12-31T13:56:51-05:00'
describe
'90100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJV' 'sip-files126.jpg'
3b0f3cf93af5b416c858f9e05aaca41d
623af2860fc6ce5c4941c342ef806ccb41b777f8
'2011-12-31T13:52:48-05:00'
describe
'23478' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJW' 'sip-files126.pro'
6c76b9c8a0e46406e48fa0f65d4ba3a3
da94c18a313aeebfcc22ece597fda1c6e3b75de3
'2011-12-31T13:55:51-05:00'
describe
'39716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJX' 'sip-files126.QC.jpg'
8f7fe5379ebfd799fdb346e18e9b8583
f1a719f3f44a77ee5d997c3d3a9184fce6c4ac04
describe
'511032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJY' 'sip-files126.tif'
3ae52f20a09d69921734625abf398084
be0a1095701b0a7a880fa1c0e87b8959bb494297
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABJZ' 'sip-files126.txt'
0e379c76f17084c7efe6e9c7216e8a08
0aac6616c65cce5a1cc5182efb885a8602d502f3
describe
'20001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKA' 'sip-files126thm.jpg'
996239b1bef7a17468b4523ef03f0007
b31153fd8a49f302f9274304dd6267aa93ac3670
'2011-12-31T13:57:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKB' 'sip-files127.jp2'
3ff7b31b6fead20adf9ad47d09306bb9
279580bfa89a3273882ded4bd75ced41786c65bc
'2011-12-31T13:58:03-05:00'
describe
'84024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKC' 'sip-files127.jpg'
96388803e93dcd11b1eaef4fd8106954
3190adcb4c33c6babbce40d2651ba6d559c2666a
describe
'21693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKD' 'sip-files127.pro'
dc085cdab4431ab198f9fb4190ae8fec
d321c6a30e1d8650d683cc97ca910680a2eb3118
describe
'35991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKE' 'sip-files127.QC.jpg'
b9803e586b589c2f6966358d81fa05d1
75ef51d575ed541fa07de5ac4af2d7b564616237
describe
'510352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKF' 'sip-files127.tif'
5de4a8cdea12b7cb2990e6a8e4c4ce1c
810773dca1a7df33d0cbcb02198d20e8882058c2
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKG' 'sip-files127.txt'
82c2858ba62de4c3398ee98f18688b76
ecc8dd66fab88be2f3ff419afa8a40545dd5fefb
'2011-12-31T13:54:52-05:00'
describe
'18411' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKH' 'sip-files127thm.jpg'
4752215a32ae01456b07855722de5fb9
6737a80adbebf088a304d8746dba37b637e5ee41
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKI' 'sip-files128.jp2'
51ffe81b30dd064441a6142595b6687b
ac7ccd8b41bb8bf6a75bc579a476f95767e98048
describe
'95647' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKJ' 'sip-files128.jpg'
0bbe3c97e9eb195547dde04a722c31e0
4c5808723edffe274e0e8f823e98b949d35c3adb
describe
'24989' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKK' 'sip-files128.pro'
f11eea2e44375f16c59a9b18cf2cdf60
7d5a9a60c51e35f981944b515691a79ace4da8cc
'2011-12-31T13:56:46-05:00'
describe
'39365' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKL' 'sip-files128.QC.jpg'
6377b768322185b6a4065246c7435185
93d70420834c10fa13633f493393efe68fadd05e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKM' 'sip-files128.tif'
b8dc9d1d573559b57252543195f96e42
9e0e0948c3cbf16812d5fedf687382be7b346f3c
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKN' 'sip-files128.txt'
254c21c898ad3b4d577ae16e3cf2e280
f626ff0781fd8bb62b0848c8747b7bb0da92359f
describe
'19471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKO' 'sip-files128thm.jpg'
da1cd4dab44af85df2a0a5d094f30cab
92220ec37e62095f15fa113cadab2c871ae41bcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKP' 'sip-files129.jp2'
f39fde01ebecb119edeafcb19842541c
a06fe892be182164c49069fd1d6b8afdec9d270d
describe
'117482' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKQ' 'sip-files129.jpg'
fd6a4129896762128d611d9f54211087
6d1c95ce7318855ab51b66f1de9808c7f4800fa0
describe
'31455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKR' 'sip-files129.pro'
79e708b37179916a1a2a236e0d1692ad
9314f68271961ecb79b838693c0a86a7eb0f775a
describe
'48958' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKS' 'sip-files129.QC.jpg'
1d44bf4fefe612e17951637b6f298991
02bf44b3151985e7998ec17658745ce5db8c1106
describe
'512144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKT' 'sip-files129.tif'
7a54cfb48bb90461adb77f03a485277d
d70d5cdb061f4608f0dbf3bd7238759a8d2fa65e
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKU' 'sip-files129.txt'
cd38bae612970120277a9d8662d72802
7a6f1a386e26ff9c820d79a5a52be0beb4413a6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKV' 'sip-files129thm.jpg'
ec41e12f90fd76255f50e2529837dfe8
e88f396bfd9bac27b7fb19ed4ddf5e5756a06cd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKW' 'sip-files130.jp2'
409a33f0dd997c5efb821684e5215dea
0dcb6aae7c7fa2b438d44b49978ebbe903d6b141
'2011-12-31T13:57:20-05:00'
describe
'90078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKX' 'sip-files130.jpg'
e17e5842924ded3453b5028397b7dcd5
ff92408d89ad3ffa647b9ae4f9ef571e1fb21cf7
describe
'21786' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKY' 'sip-files130.pro'
6743d679279600a1477b49eb61a04255
9047d45d112286ba119ae6efda4daa915518e80b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABKZ' 'sip-files130.tif'
b8c2d07d2ee2dc136446c2699d628e81
8b44bcb8cd0b4cc79d38d94f93de7be3cebfb32a
'2011-12-31T13:57:23-05:00'
describe
'38670' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLA' 'sip-files130.QC.jpg'
c6ea27482aecd9ac9282e7bd2db109ea
a00d89ad19b887f1fb66499987fd6934a50907b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLB' 'sip-files130.txt'
defcf61ef35fd8d8ca29e87ac269dd46
67939fb5135045ed459883d9bd97d15527c155c8
describe
Invalid character
'19606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLC' 'sip-files130thm.jpg'
8420945205dfffdd607adc5e4ea7aabe
9bdeae9b8e82f0cc9b9d703cdfe1bd187e281b69
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLD' 'sip-files131.jp2'
aab548e8c8f92905a1a8dad7f6620c21
d33b634e0cc75cc7947d4a34ca5cc5897c2cc1dc
describe
'134767' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLE' 'sip-files131.jpg'
e55a47be14eba0168c319b77e98cb818
65da72c65a08987f97e78cacf4c261a500a59733
'2011-12-31T13:51:56-05:00'
describe
'38045' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLF' 'sip-files131.pro'
80927b8ff3dca07158547df1acb1c867
ecb41a9dc9f095ba42d33fb713eef3487865d30a
describe
'53863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLG' 'sip-files131.QC.jpg'
818eeffeda6fb020c02f7390fb377f4a
ae3d0194885dd6690c29b015277c7f5a03909bdd
describe
'512808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLH' 'sip-files131.tif'
d7f1ea1f01fc6f88dc7b483396332423
60d4078adbfa86c95796c1162a0e250bf36803db
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLI' 'sip-files131.txt'
83f75dc8d2fcdd5e31c99e0cb8a56327
6fedf16d59a74316e09d2870a01f04889475696f
describe
'23924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLJ' 'sip-files131thm.jpg'
bc65ca7bbde7c6f9246b07466812c558
4ebaf0225da341f368d3d1c8ff98c1a50a5db741
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLK' 'sip-files132.jp2'
de1b80e8cd3387bed9cfffcdac40f30d
fe4b7e27a7e05cf3976b9bd84669c8990539b965
'2011-12-31T13:58:05-05:00'
describe
'106984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLL' 'sip-files132.jpg'
34a2212fe2df1d4afc57a6226e58ce84
0208a3e2a12ac876fc915e7d94f0453090fb2122
describe
'29328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLM' 'sip-files132.pro'
cc8168c99e6c496612a146777e2f28dc
9be92d7d24acb3d81a480d7d8b3d7fa0125fbd87
describe
'45003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLN' 'sip-files132.QC.jpg'
e69bc36723449809e01450e07efeb125
927dce9118703d76183f3c068984d827b064600d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLO' 'sip-files132.tif'
5f213b83f926854c0ca909b593f94d7a
8df6b31fb940f209256cadd7bbfbc1f994e46b26
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLP' 'sip-files132.txt'
016d331ef0ce3ce31c8af2f39ffff5eb
6dbf1c5aca1a03daac21c4a631dd0281ba1e68f2
describe
'21230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLQ' 'sip-files132thm.jpg'
acc4d0c488f7db430fcff9adb881edd2
ca13ee47be6f5ab50f36ac42f3ea3cc82aca957c
'2011-12-31T13:55:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLR' 'sip-files133.jp2'
50a12237b6735e97ef58ba1cd99ce849
f15a923c6e3f2e04c948206155966db0bed69bf5
describe
'101842' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLS' 'sip-files133.jpg'
10e48554d3c298532c9145c231e66255
1bbdf6ff6a2341febc5495d7d23a2ab23ad8266c
describe
'27229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLT' 'sip-files133.pro'
b13979bf32e5594fe9157615c67817f9
356d03d48d5446b80cf435efe97f35543b3b60d7
describe
'43415' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLU' 'sip-files133.QC.jpg'
4643b1e7ded79ed59478e6a71dda2a17
b061464bd0604716ce4348fc96f326ec865e1476
describe
'511488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLV' 'sip-files133.tif'
98724f84566ebe0682e9606b18db4afc
c9c2575cf994e142d3f98be2ef7f28da6006a46c
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLW' 'sip-files133.txt'
a8f85ce5ce2d5e9ae8806dfc71ac6a38
1c1823f54a832b88f571f53a7a7111cfeb124232
describe
'21098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLX' 'sip-files133thm.jpg'
79c74059ca2515d3f1dbb7fdcf03488a
8e145d88255d391e1166b4f113e71c187708c609
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLY' 'sip-files134.jp2'
d2fb8fe8c3c493fa26b2a0f409e8cab9
b5606e15d700d59ded8acf8179362f8421d30421
'2011-12-31T13:57:30-05:00'
describe
'119145' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABLZ' 'sip-files134.jpg'
a69061f904e2f4b37b947e179818fcf2
6fcc1d0c41a50e6180a9a0b1dae5ec0bd8b16826
describe
'32382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMA' 'sip-files134.pro'
2ac22d06b683d77d1c81953edeb36c52
447546fbb125a56209251ac6ea03f16df8d1def2
describe
'50310' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMB' 'sip-files134.QC.jpg'
89d8eeabd03148e44ec25dac41c7fd4a
5506e666f92adbceb90680698c11a30781b9054b
'2011-12-31T13:58:20-05:00'
describe
'512508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMC' 'sip-files134.tif'
d61e40715697d10ce69ca407425ca7bd
5bf8cf3743cf434acde17ea8292c7d0edc858afe
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMD' 'sip-files134.txt'
3c000fad96b202441ca7c5982a1b9d00
b248cdf9a779064c929bed08cc3cb09ec72f3b75
describe
'23260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABME' 'sip-files134thm.jpg'
e72892d3f89a70fda8485f9aa64fbce4
3c7651b336abeebbed5ab001458e1999fba58fb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMF' 'sip-files135.jp2'
c91ecd9362aaa204f045dc9993121fa7
558c3a0d5a27501a7c95cca1740c8dd405f955ab
describe
'118147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMG' 'sip-files135.jpg'
55ecdb3f0d8c7b3a81669a9f124feaba
fa3cb98bdb79de671cf5324f4e4f39261b91a397
describe
'32138' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMH' 'sip-files135.pro'
e7d6c52bce72bf15c5660b3cf67c8749
7e96ad257bfe4138eb35a7d8e300d15c37af56e1
describe
'50217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMI' 'sip-files135.QC.jpg'
55574e85d6e2d04d358be4022b77b121
f9e65cf0452220aca7624c2fd7236d108d77539f
'2011-12-31T13:52:42-05:00'
describe
'512544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMJ' 'sip-files135.tif'
62de76809f36f4a6fe578f98f1329887
f4e280ed4c92548774484835a1a6b54826c2d66c
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMK' 'sip-files135.txt'
f4b7d0b84af5aa0e3d2f59bf85dc6d0b
435210ed58c9dcad3d33817578db09cf8fdaaaf8
describe
'23297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABML' 'sip-files135thm.jpg'
6284f1b96908b13e20640655cb5aa199
bb94ab9aa324e7a92c653765ca29c594131eb5e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMM' 'sip-files136.jp2'
c4fe2d67d6c0ff09b0ad8187c523ecbd
b9726dbf9f1b783e20de24377c6b7dfad4c4b925
describe
'114374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMN' 'sip-files136.jpg'
56703d6ff09f06b796eda04e3e6bb3ad
093b2165c2fe12887900882a91685257f9d1da6a
describe
'31259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMO' 'sip-files136.pro'
df67a90d59e8ee6b70c7f3f796d20cf8
95c6b742838ff562c0aaf1ae340cdb915edd9e16
describe
'511820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMP' 'sip-files140.tif'
8b325bccd19817578b75bbb73f626dfc
c47caebd5fca696ee63bd7ee90fe4afc3bda6750
describe
'48784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMQ' 'sip-files136.QC.jpg'
b108650e6a4ac1d45feebfc82c4a8e12
b899b2bb4f503796b67964650680e333e7c0557e
describe
'512552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMR' 'sip-files136.tif'
2512cad29b200755e0ea185394cfc1c2
1193f8a03d2cdce5310049fc81f80ed57272dfa7
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMS' 'sip-files136.txt'
ec486154cf5d1898efc2325466cdd77e
e6d841153e0e0f8cc94f3e1f67b24ffc5180596d
describe
Invalid character
'23257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMT' 'sip-files136thm.jpg'
1de37b06fd9d72cc1c6ecb26825defe0
44fac6c0fe532f8a8224a20706c9efcb214ad03b
describe
'62311' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMU' 'sip-files137.jp2'
96c82106a5ac2607f6e7584070e03953
a20a821267eca8d1ed118ebab3e1d4c15ef6f518
describe
'119126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMV' 'sip-files137.jpg'
8939d27444354f4462c3858376d940b4
7026c436435337f700d52e0a2ea823ac427ceff4
'2011-12-31T13:52:30-05:00'
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMW' 'sip-files137.pro'
d2ff6ba3c456047b627737d0d1392698
37f1804c9998931956b0300170ce10f1e80163db
'2011-12-31T13:57:28-05:00'
describe
'50079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMX' 'sip-files137.QC.jpg'
d5e1a1465c65d489bc7984e477b9d65c
01393613fe044b1be4084238de836aaccd8d26de
describe
'512696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMY' 'sip-files137.tif'
f039a13078b11c80b6487d0582ded7dc
2cd1c8d487b714efca9577cb1931aebdba889bac
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABMZ' 'sip-files137.txt'
f05908716fbb0ef164e49886b250c3e0
3bc42dee4308c5e7a4d0afa5cdcaf50f601833fe
describe
'23383' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNA' 'sip-files137thm.jpg'
77e3ab4cff395af62121550b0363eb86
ce5aa02664d0dea746eef8e247a78862a772e0d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNB' 'sip-files138.jp2'
8db55e26d19c5cb5770d34fb73ce1908
22f1d05d82004bc78f9cdef35e15324bf7fb6fd0
describe
'113300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNC' 'sip-files138.jpg'
3407b8714aacff8f29f56afff420aba9
2e66d98490c32bc7204d0d725c713727c8bb89e7
describe
'31541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABND' 'sip-files138.pro'
ca6d62a5e8ab987c69302ce3255d77e7
d45afc889a12c6041e7e878037c87955a82e85a2
describe
'48744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNE' 'sip-files138.QC.jpg'
d2a1a7a194ccbdf2968aefd14ceb2184
2a02ec1aee86b92ee5d5f4a06d0a163ff9d8660f
describe
'512424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNF' 'sip-files138.tif'
b91c19fb8d1dde649baec0532d8b6a4e
8378685ca96e1574a6a5d44dc885619261db994d
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNG' 'sip-files138.txt'
4206e115d0032afc7168151b7aef58a8
5a13f3ccf368909dd413e0451b0bb3d2b3038376
describe
'23061' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNH' 'sip-files138thm.jpg'
9392a57a9276add6568ae186c14f5124
38661bca03d596f209977fa946fc4d3d90ba084c
describe
'62214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNI' 'sip-files139.jp2'
4255e752b99df84ed17290df2847b83f
dafedfab8b3666a62fe614cc3cbc8b487ed213ea
describe
'112561' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNJ' 'sip-files139.jpg'
3cd32932e48ece03ed2103092ccf1050
1a8e0a1340f70af6dda4f5f78f7311c71044e268
'2011-12-31T13:57:01-05:00'
describe
'30784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNK' 'sip-files139.pro'
b956c463ac95aa07ff1ab60c433ae181
0dae2e8b2be56702c6d822829e82526bca850820
describe
'47757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNL' 'sip-files139.QC.jpg'
2eeb94248c7d80f8dbd894b9f8efe9ab
b74b2c9ae4c9eb80a71acefabef390a51e878564
describe
'512088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNM' 'sip-files139.tif'
c006b7923c48cab334e480460c3978ad
406c7039ba0b879e9d98685f0b13ad936c5c1742
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNN' 'sip-files139.txt'
b69eeb084ebfaedc562e481b25e7386e
0f6667d79be389ef228a721f54effddb5be6ac64
describe
'22335' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNO' 'sip-files139thm.jpg'
e348a1f268edebb9be6e7c26e72e2549
ffb1049cb5da3e6fed5e0b2d1c05e72f94750abc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNP' 'sip-files140.jp2'
e115f61e3dfd23b4dac7efd58e4cd59b
ae0fd03e81bdf4162d5c3102d080b43d12211143
describe
'113601' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNQ' 'sip-files140.jpg'
2c72f4e98413ad6c1c2a51a4cd0a337e
cbf317e0bfad3884cc18546b2c9ff821a0b3b35f
describe
'32605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNR' 'sip-files140.pro'
bfc9b21fdcd6a53f04d96d7d3e59f1c8
20168ef088b7b2527b91b2e711f593196a1cb2a7
describe
'46794' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNS' 'sip-files140.QC.jpg'
5b68b6e816c6111cb8f77b3d7694d4f9
429a548e0bc65302e2c9bff66a8846bc077e40f9
describe
'1340' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNT' 'sip-files140.txt'
d9928f74daf05f8c10d38cdefadbe95f
c6acb7384d440d7b3a660bb44c58f15ac5058b83
describe
'21899' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNU' 'sip-files140thm.jpg'
65fed3530879e57fff313d14c42631b1
a8fd2073689730f14488086a220fe6808c478a57
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNV' 'sip-files141.jp2'
d9e7f6ff76ad026ce6b1edc464f4303f
25cf8d65bd798f282d6e86d5575f44d2dbfb9fb8
describe
'100936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNW' 'sip-files141.jpg'
1b3b54f3b51f6ab056bce63a48d9c7f2
c0ce70aabf2f97331000ec6d174c59d00858690c
describe
'22278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNX' 'sip-files141.pro'
ae4a6c8a6fa12b026a6f01930e79bb0a
84d77ad2866b700a8f36cc4f680218080caf579a
describe
'43778' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNY' 'sip-files141.QC.jpg'
b7d66c2230e95f2b9da456c297e6afa3
bc61398fb5198ffab3331e9d150e391c03e3024d
describe
'510984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABNZ' 'sip-files141.tif'
879ac79021c02f84558a51798dc97b93
66c79b86c1031e04e645957de22cf75dad4e24c4
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOA' 'sip-files141.txt'
5d8af02ab97e1cba3860780c9758d82c
897b53ed83bf499ab65824678299cc9eb760bbe6
describe
'19917' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOB' 'sip-files141thm.jpg'
1858bc649da9335f2f569c428cf50c1a
b24633491356fe01ff074e6a267e68d410093126
'2011-12-31T13:50:45-05:00'
describe
'62206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOC' 'sip-files142.jp2'
68d6e77e9986703d102adebc4cfbfd23
edf1f040ee914e7576726a57e01141fcc9934c02
describe
'130400' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOD' 'sip-files142.jpg'
fc5ee648688cc9fe98c59dcdf58f5258
0d8cbfac8da9e69ac05fcb0edcd54d66e8265e45
describe
'30289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOE' 'sip-files142.pro'
b1a42fe7cf6bbd99b161a57417b26cb4
6f4f4c4cac7fb2fad3fe0ef6ca9749ad148c1fa1
'2011-12-31T13:51:25-05:00'
describe
'55139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOF' 'sip-files142.QC.jpg'
9489b1662cfedc0c1f0d05612e838a4a
b4507c9cab4f2dce8cfeff5c53c9083016cda301
describe
'512588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOG' 'sip-files142.tif'
ae04ee2bf2a1a483d34ea80c4e362337
e3c790f6386ff9e5128cb0b26420ef83a37705cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOH' 'sip-files142.txt'
dde69c1216b5209cb5dd3911e1b8e0c9
fe7f5cdf2af417dcd149a855214cca5714b28c30
describe
'23748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOI' 'sip-files142thm.jpg'
ec3baa19999be51b987c30bb5d5a5977
e67ff4f4918bcf509188a8c2510f1eb1d618a26f
describe
'62259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOJ' 'sip-files143.jp2'
e4be245a136cbb561e426fba5e16675f
8580f06a3b7a8c27052cb0c8ddd5e8dcfe16a4ba
describe
'122538' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOK' 'sip-files143.jpg'
e87a76b2a994ebb3d83538bfad3666a3
92610b75f9560d5d26f2d2343596c5c19e135ac6
describe
'29652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOL' 'sip-files143.pro'
251cf2fd6063a08f0f4a6bcc76b96ecc
fa44b28acb04af4f0fc097c85e101c840f78cf2b
describe
'51479' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOM' 'sip-files143.QC.jpg'
a9884443bde98a02487b8f6e15821220
b11d785c06c5a2d4f2c5d5f714ab51049bf4eb5a
describe
'512148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABON' 'sip-files143.tif'
bca0b7e7080ede011ce1523acecae035
cf17b98516257ab80cbeca70f5f1d08ba5fa28cb
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOO' 'sip-files143.txt'
ec2bf6641d5fc68b8fa204ac8884f769
f7fe362a7bb935a1b14f269d331234d1a82a09fa
describe
'22590' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOP' 'sip-files143thm.jpg'
8c831a4841df48f52160ace30ba81bce
343ff0f8866da6495ed75ced93d6b4aded6beb00
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOQ' 'sip-files144.jp2'
0e97dd33fec925e7d4c4ba35bbd97d85
1c370e975023fa47ff0ad1d8d3673b7dedcc5b96
describe
'120794' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOR' 'sip-files144.jpg'
ecadb5108a9a190aeecb79838dfc5b09
b4488d2c7c1abf2781e98c9165a8162e21d2dd46
describe
'27164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOS' 'sip-files144.pro'
a5febe8f75e7c5053c6e31f93feabbda
d00d11c306a8b47529532b61453dd7c8be846af5
describe
'50486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOT' 'sip-files144.QC.jpg'
f398f4bf0dd72653e8e190c6d9f774a4
1705455e987064e7d2412e170ecc6fd4dd5155a9
describe
'511964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOU' 'sip-files144.tif'
50998d7f9e5a85e4269cf3b13674d703
74799a12158ef7c94cd88798cd07f5f0b6b49e60
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOV' 'sip-files144.txt'
c43003e2e3815dc7efca9a76ac17cf47
ed5699a673f964ea6089e8544bfea67d51047ac9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOW' 'sip-files149.jp2'
277e1ace41d0d2547ac26f93098f9b7b
8a13e5465dd0e33025207c20c8b50a233d272161
'2011-12-31T13:54:55-05:00'
describe
'22356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOX' 'sip-files144thm.jpg'
ca327e763c2f879b6b79494ecf07ee33
89c17029d545719f4106ee13bb7f602ddbf25dd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOY' 'sip-files145.jp2'
d7fdeabd91f2cb008defb6c4cc3efea9
ca85edc1fb3a00f331280e22681553725b6cf4bf
describe
'94933' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABOZ' 'sip-files145.jpg'
ee0a5468d32c13e669f89830df15e964
cc15e4e69859d702c59fa45de78d74ff5e9b79ff
describe
'22819' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPA' 'sip-files145.pro'
1403e8117ed906aa38cc67e94cad3cca
81e712b59dbd7ff756e3473d811a6e781f70f384
describe
'41884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPB' 'sip-files145.QC.jpg'
5873c677924ecfde5c7e0ac80a3c72f2
ebcd4151162069022835fa1e5315be6bb0c41ac9
describe
'511136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPC' 'sip-files145.tif'
5673333cc3a592834a99afad78633818
67e5455f48d6f33bf595e17f7ffdf967930ed06c
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPD' 'sip-files145.txt'
7398add02095aa99f5d718b1fd9fdbdd
b9974da94529e1df3960fed1bfeb3f09e3cb17ce
'2011-12-31T13:51:06-05:00'
describe
'20370' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPE' 'sip-files145thm.jpg'
74cc389a89a80caeb978cbc8d67c4b35
df8aca81fa887d8453171a20ee651c6ea98f89f5
describe
'62128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPF' 'sip-files146.jp2'
ab8248321f54588d1a6ddf7ad386c3cf
fe98fc70b1675d8024f601fef5401e8f45e5af8e
describe
'132233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPG' 'sip-files146.jpg'
a08735045d0f81c424d9fbf3cd86c4b2
d36b9926e0adce38bb727d8514145dcc4a87465e
'2011-12-31T13:51:41-05:00'
describe
'30068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPH' 'sip-files146.pro'
d333f635a94b52bf0abcfe22d50ed831
18436ff4cb95ce4084927f0811f25c7342f3b482
describe
'54664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPI' 'sip-files146.QC.jpg'
1cf60db30b1337a9592190dedf6aaffe
6490b4d2d5feddd9ac1d3b411dc3a68a36cf7668
'2011-12-31T13:52:21-05:00'
describe
'512592' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPJ' 'sip-files146.tif'
122239a6e738ae95330e9a1f1daf8f00
c008fe60abab22373775e71264cb6b18400305d1
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPK' 'sip-files146.txt'
e73b3a8bc2d27ca84cc45cbc81c85ff3
3d3157619c0bf05a5120924b7d9ab6a11c05c19a
'2011-12-31T13:52:34-05:00'
describe
'23534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPL' 'sip-files146thm.jpg'
258102b89655e6ba5e955ecd3cddfcab
c0e068980880761808fa866a2de4b7121c93f794
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPM' 'sip-files147.jp2'
88654d2779775524b22bf6f62bbe97f5
b996db9bc13d5218b8e61b03cf00d3a74d036f0c
describe
'100174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPN' 'sip-files147.jpg'
d73f7d9ba17b072f9140f469659274a4
84bccf813953ea351747f0a72144e42ba2f7c12c
describe
'25069' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPO' 'sip-files147.pro'
8e733fc463df6dd3c16d876d98bdf9ac
fc375eccbfb3be3bde9234d23774c5879e4a7cad
describe
'41970' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPP' 'sip-files147.QC.jpg'
d373c1ab209419e31b00c5d896609195
2509abe79888c0a76d2fffff25aaee445b1b1666
'2011-12-31T13:52:35-05:00'
describe
'510972' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPQ' 'sip-files147.tif'
e008e4b97ad0a1f014f668c5f33434a7
64c697d9774e833b7172e6bb8a4d5bac9bbfaf70
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPR' 'sip-files147.txt'
4f1c1ae2e28bd80fb3c1760edc72aa90
454105b1ed276525787d56b8cb6a36c2cf20812b
describe
'19994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPS' 'sip-files147thm.jpg'
dbf25190aadae93d4712ec88cdd2c09b
f8274fa3d103da209dcf8927f089e076189753e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPT' 'sip-files148.jp2'
63317101b80462913e55df0a320215f5
5371d1fdf6ba449e334961f908f61e5dfba326d0
describe
'93068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPU' 'sip-files148.jpg'
7aead09b19ccfc565ef56eacbf591ecf
6ebeb1aa586d6d6e6cf75c8d0d2d77f8b6e86014
describe
'25854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPV' 'sip-files148.pro'
4ceff5cf9db5bdc6b3b3a3bad7fc7bf4
19d6d1dcbf65be36b9947e8e6e74e0d5ce4b6d4a
describe
'38341' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPW' 'sip-files148.QC.jpg'
78604e726db03232c51afc8d48788e86
ef14eaf4f437f84a7060dd8cc37c5746fad0e64a
describe
'510440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPX' 'sip-files148.tif'
91a611f7ce1368933b4598f818022baf
4485b59430d7616fef2ec15a985d3f0d09225a4a
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPY' 'sip-files148.txt'
089c9aa45bafc24e9df88737a8cf62d0
7bdaaae062cea9bdc904c88f2897dd8c680d64e6
describe
'18705' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABPZ' 'sip-files148thm.jpg'
d9fff39fba9fd82203e99e805157ddd0
fa1a951d079e676d02cc9b71af198aa915787707
describe
'96778' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQA' 'sip-files149.jpg'
b51fd70e5c654d3a7c6b687efa1e0f44
3e78f74482cb15ab2298fe1e25d1fad71fbad594
describe
'22636' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQB' 'sip-files149.pro'
8c2b1dcf701fba2b142f98111c1f5109
1e6ae99cbfdf7959656819a57940432505ba0686
describe
'42369' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQC' 'sip-files149.QC.jpg'
f19c2914f5d827de792641d33fa3ded5
a1cc7910fc6e945ae48d1cb8759c43d8b30d1c86
describe
'510840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQD' 'sip-files149.tif'
d71f4c026ee7e519aedcb718fe5c14e9
9488314cfa53d7297f3caa7f6466b63cc75ad519
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQE' 'sip-files149.txt'
89f36dcd3c0bb5f18b8ecbd876334358
0b1cf02fe536c1014770197ce3fd23c32f7c46c1
describe
'19491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQF' 'sip-files149thm.jpg'
305578e04c4fd131b78333e4ecda8cf7
38f493289e7de1f6d59866b553aa376ca85fde4f
describe
'62141' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQG' 'sip-files150.jp2'
60c7bcb3b361e0823d70260d65607b5e
1c6e63a35cc7e5ec2e22a06e1eef88857581e758
describe
'131998' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQH' 'sip-files150.jpg'
0bb0a4859305879c5a5c5174017514a2
74b2dffd7b0979b7d089fb60e88376081b157047
describe
'30553' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQI' 'sip-files150.pro'
e422fde417dd7487464402ddcba86ab1
f34e60abbf603920ac6cccc18a356f496cb9139a
describe
'55235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQJ' 'sip-files150.QC.jpg'
fbfc3b822bfdc683cb509e4f4a955895
635042e9007278852c81842f18a25d313e65dc14
describe
'512536' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQK' 'sip-files150.tif'
02050739d7795ce3ebfe74f947c4f058
5d3b5f5db03589e89b8e2e5df079c8fdba9f95aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQL' 'sip-files150.txt'
e42d9b035c86bc621ab2b3eb9b49d1e2
e30ffa20c7f3276d1e6da61820532cfff95ba4bd
describe
'23424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQM' 'sip-files150thm.jpg'
3bde56c46101daa2fc2013ac5c081569
c4ad67815429a621d5c5790475b2070a9ad1e205
describe
'62303' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQN' 'sip-files151.jp2'
5e200908028d1381b8c937ffff036f74
d9d6a4b61e1895abe598110a70c9f9154950b778
describe
'99924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQO' 'sip-files151.jpg'
f51d76d447f941732079f5076586944e
9c51dc253397e523d8ed67e99dd52ea2d97d40e5
describe
'23116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQP' 'sip-files151.pro'
422f14586bab7c8b3325f22ea9ab636c
565cc1b8e0bb63df60925d373e0ad3c640488083
describe
'44810' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQQ' 'sip-files151.QC.jpg'
cb35b993e1fde66ffa7ffb0fa9697407
c9e4425abfdbabe39c91112686ccd2ce317d075a
describe
'511720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQR' 'sip-files151.tif'
1bcf50edd9e7fe1f97d2c8d6a5d51a28
dbb7d7b4b096072acd048aec9f6245cea91f8ae1
'2011-12-31T13:54:30-05:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQS' 'sip-files151.txt'
4ab61bea3b8522c01ce418949d23a524
cd0413c3de73d94630d44d1241517ffc196ff510
describe
'21615' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQT' 'sip-files151thm.jpg'
6005eb3f34052db4d689705b785dcdf1
9ae47a2f5db43e40e3cf03697401c37115300af9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQU' 'sip-files152.jp2'
e6c257544cd7a0ad912ae824413b8db5
3540d97696a2de9992c414f822e53ca00728003d
describe
'115954' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQV' 'sip-files152.jpg'
a63b528f06784e2303b71958b9d8331a
105afc2a4698b11e3ef0cc1233b77168d34fab39
describe
'27838' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQW' 'sip-files152.pro'
24d2b88575b30ef25adfe0028067e0fb
c609fe213d3c123ce0d109950182380868be096a
describe
'49700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQX' 'sip-files152.QC.jpg'
33a2351d85556b66a9957b6fad903c4a
860c495da801a8873ed3a87501baa48a87671aa6
describe
'512084' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQY' 'sip-files152.tif'
9228c4124297a0b86d08152ba5e6ba1a
2cb1a720104cbcacd6a6fe8393e628c80eed2900
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABQZ' 'sip-files152.txt'
4f1d2433f7a3fd718f7708ca1daa3752
0fe2340a608aca468295d52a283efead54a5c137
'2011-12-31T13:55:29-05:00'
describe
'22360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRA' 'sip-files152thm.jpg'
33017407894341656da70a8cb7b463ab
75c4da1eb65e2d600d47ad565c182b67a1a189eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRB' 'sip-files153.jp2'
8adf45762cc6e97967c47339daa177b2
762cbce6a9b3678e61bda88b8c617dd22881ca52
describe
'114680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRC' 'sip-files153.jpg'
d1918cdaa0e5e9ee7c89f6d3c3027f04
13ff7a1223ce0cef00c276fd0b81e995f0f511a4
describe
'28643' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRD' 'sip-files153.pro'
9478dfe3e0b7240914b88e34174023e4
0df491812671a577816fee0fed0ed143fafe16a2
describe
'48500' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRE' 'sip-files153.QC.jpg'
2cfc7f7481e2702d8f49d81e3265dbac
5530436a7de0cc6f72022969626fd49bdc25afae
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRF' 'sip-files153.tif'
ff353baa41c5954bece27a16e9d55d0b
4e3f930634298e214dcc73291f2660c9de1d0362
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRG' 'sip-files153.txt'
4123b2cc4340e468e62bc889e8f8dc32
025e016827060ec415702bba5e53a77aa84f7ea5
describe
'22369' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRH' 'sip-files153thm.jpg'
6a0673e03526314fb923b80b58a14081
cb7d29c85789c8e653ae560a6005e451414f5f09
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRI' 'sip-files154.jp2'
18a5679d423f6267f447bbb79f1655ad
4740a87960c2633890c019a0198d3ba6e728d5fc
describe
'120303' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRJ' 'sip-files154.jpg'
15e90dd915660b0776c5b547995928b0
b2047ddc099bd6eb602fd3f2c9efba61ae4734d1
describe
'30198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRK' 'sip-files154.pro'
bc19c08aa4ebc47d448c8f166860008e
0866efe5e9e12a34c1bb3069c9ce5278ff366380
describe
'50706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRL' 'sip-files154.QC.jpg'
2aaeb69788a96f99255e63519a882c7b
34ea6964f6fc91041263a60ad785372bf776f67f
describe
'512348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRM' 'sip-files154.tif'
578e06126ecf1cb71777865065bddfbb
27cf4bcf0311563c825a49de0d220f45d1b7fe9d
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRN' 'sip-files154.txt'
c2a9fd304fbb46608a7f690704e34e26
3704cc3c084caa78bbd045404d9e0d0f53337461
'2011-12-31T13:56:35-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22887' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRO' 'sip-files154thm.jpg'
24eccb0a6e0c07c4194bea1ec0d6bd91
6ad55b299bf6ae3ed5d31b2c4774701a5feb67e2
describe
'62269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRP' 'sip-files155.jp2'
69c859040a3837b5d2dbccf328c24bfe
d81d213d7c99da6cb326e7f4776fbbd33d5cf254
describe
'112876' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRQ' 'sip-files155.jpg'
71c76906d77cc560d3a061abdded90f5
aeea80c55c912624ba24880527f8558d13db43ed
describe
'28054' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRR' 'sip-files155.pro'
ebce48a0c358c7a17401f51d1b7c7ce2
1f12a37386f6d4896757093a612dd392f7572230
describe
'47484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRS' 'sip-files155.QC.jpg'
9e21f62ed7ad8655ffe199208df3a54d
5ae0f47aea4540bb894314da0abbbc9ffbba5273
describe
'511788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRT' 'sip-files155.tif'
88242c061e14d265aa5a72c3161c5989
ce8613ed126a3109dde646dffb8bff2d5f3c7e87
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRU' 'sip-files155.txt'
46597bc78c399dabbb029cd721da934d
1b3e95a74d24973fce629ca2f8b6daacb81f30df
describe
'21791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRV' 'sip-files155thm.jpg'
4b5d47df6d751771d654fe6b4682db91
742bbb62c2dba6cd950b27271f921009f67c0e00
describe
'62317' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRW' 'sip-files156.jp2'
107b8559cf3b501ec0500c1be48bf70c
2e8c0d29e1b7f0eb308f9aacdbf9bb5d813bdeb1
describe
'111003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRX' 'sip-files156.jpg'
185aed85a8dd6a6c215cc270c233b823
3eb8029e91a1d14a4c137aaed5c2ee0d549d17b8
describe
'25989' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRY' 'sip-files156.pro'
03082ba1bac4b5d06d54b3bc4de09516
abaccbe62148e10ba27bede7d9fd18ef5259ae54
describe
'48627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABRZ' 'sip-files156.QC.jpg'
b49b0f975036c271667543a3b2f122c2
d0bbac31defc3b4b8224a724d2a76602d76bf9e2
describe
'512064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSA' 'sip-files156.tif'
7b26a7608cb1aa63c7e5adf844ecad61
dfca971b24bc1ea66c06280c0d576e4af14a3678
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSB' 'sip-files156.txt'
71f829734d4b0519303359b5d54a424b
333ebe138855cfd047e1f90e2d2ac222c58401a9
describe
'22635' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSC' 'sip-files156thm.jpg'
cb53ef8c43587090699563a6fe372618
e2ef4ccaa34cc5c207f08a9e808b4b146c1ce654
describe
'62235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSD' 'sip-files157.jp2'
ae7f4079a91c011e3ab1f2b29c57012b
a972f5a9f4cbfcb56a9521bb721ee111cb98ae7b
describe
'101938' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSE' 'sip-files157.jpg'
169fdca7eb51c5d7a15ae2bb4fabbb1b
12af530f3cfa377ac91af4c951d7e6a585feec49
describe
'23180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSF' 'sip-files157.pro'
878259930ba5382c8f1ec948dbc837de
8459b83149a3bfa47492eafe0b50fcc48d37a83a
describe
'45524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSG' 'sip-files157.QC.jpg'
176f3971008935431e21efd4f9846065
26ec877bd5e8f02de1377ee47e6308cd2a59bd48
describe
'511976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSH' 'sip-files157.tif'
7ee252d8e0c3084bac50daf365a16c1d
889356dde4a42ad9b6c02f16a6f4cb05c2ea0b01
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSI' 'sip-files157.txt'
8dc43c6102dc15e43854ae21d99a9e23
6aa13da97a4e724b2545a6117f6955418c727842
describe
Invalid character
'21886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSJ' 'sip-files157thm.jpg'
e4cc8d2c8e924a60d5b6e6d5b1071e75
b22d19ba9d90cb79649edaeb7425e3f30ece9f54
describe
'62154' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSK' 'sip-files158.jp2'
ce4e8c2a024d7f77ffc54b128e0b8b97
d7aa03a372c5adc23fedcdd1d6a5251f06a03627
describe
'123131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSL' 'sip-files158.jpg'
0585171d0a9a5bea4316c72542476857
65f004c6e0cf4427768f786f8b553a2d2abdace6
describe
'27093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSM' 'sip-files158.pro'
3f4628212bc73d7a41634cd273470b41
b5183475050495ffac5e332011613ad3d4b50860
describe
'53035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSN' 'sip-files158.QC.jpg'
a75f2740caf0a7311a5af42d1e1c7ddf
576fd32b7310bac9e62187ccfd9de9204181ba00
describe
'512764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSO' 'sip-files158.tif'
fb0746b1cadbc401d6c2f5ffab8d473a
d0cd2fe5ea679617d75b6c2345e0b47895e9e00a
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSP' 'sip-files158.txt'
45a720b30c64ebede61e872b36da70b7
ed5fe791cd0257b7535e899fdf370cf18ef2c7bb
describe
'23720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSQ' 'sip-files158thm.jpg'
964f69614936be2929d460828f8b8ab3
3cbc661d25e0b30c5367208a264f198e184a8f4f
describe
'62196' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSR' 'sip-files159.jp2'
40c2044749a5915ff8c704780b75b46e
efe4fbf3a3eac6229cbaef86ba733b6e2b72e146
describe
'124320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSS' 'sip-files159.jpg'
c98b85da7421e063ce8143ba7bd7bdca
55ea651641ded07b142fe81e98deaee9d1f6aeb7
describe
'28139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABST' 'sip-files159.pro'
8c02407da6f2ac2e3cf5d5f8947dacd5
daf32c1fea6b74496a428b0a9c2c49cbce62c1fb
describe
'54387' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSU' 'sip-files159.QC.jpg'
7136b2664839338e63da8a2130f9fb3b
07b1e1e24ce6a23ae826c5699da21c6e15cc3141
describe
'512892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSV' 'sip-files159.tif'
6437ef866fc9f14f2b3720f118ab085d
e2ab5a5a599a84f49c68e925e16da95f7da79e7d
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSW' 'sip-files159.txt'
d3df4973358a6237780e0b8ff27efb7e
b7d25faa14cd3765e91c670e56fda419b0a07c9b
describe
'24325' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSX' 'sip-files159thm.jpg'
c88c094b87752b636a23fd0551306263
1e750d232bd043f80b51e68167bb69f190a657be
describe
'62177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSY' 'sip-files160.jp2'
1b674ad98ca9db65fc0c6adf9fba37ce
68b280650fc2ac49a9c63708ff70a4edffcdd239
describe
'110950' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABSZ' 'sip-files160.jpg'
a3de7852b99843ca1a4757f2cfa8b2c2
40e41fc4abde558653be01cfe1e44c8a32319e6b
describe
'25649' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTA' 'sip-files160.pro'
f2940f54714168b0f762b4ae2d06e0e3
b969e85f991f65c8443e380bd1a7bd9f447c60bb
describe
'48850' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTB' 'sip-files160.QC.jpg'
41016a26fe8ee866e50a479f1e4b8360
5148fde229457eac0efd4761f4504635943cc91e
describe
'512604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTC' 'sip-files160.tif'
d4236ea742114f3c6c05829421aa8d8e
962fc0c2e8dbd757de6a1121529521f02d7c77f2
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTD' 'sip-files160.txt'
65534d52a02295da5d31445bf8da61c5
c3fd467096c556f5b2278ee0a665bbb538ae8f8f
describe
'23056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTE' 'sip-files160thm.jpg'
5be9beff24678b052f3a8946c31c3ddd
50b6a167c8e27b865fa43065b99a6962da5652a4
describe
'62202' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTF' 'sip-files161.jp2'
d694548878c702ccb920ae2269fb830d
aeba92dbc8e80a12e8626ac9b0e08c908f72e7ab
describe
'120887' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTG' 'sip-files161.jpg'
ef558ab993fa9704ba09f7bf613b7810
b62017f420d9e9650da62d55f403c458cdf7c521
describe
'29491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTH' 'sip-files161.pro'
9d18487b91ded0de491b4f0172d9ed2d
4cf4452703cf5fc830c8c96457de9d9e7eea0084
describe
'51926' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTI' 'sip-files161.QC.jpg'
2632c049ac0bf25617cb46dd274a540e
a6a802bf7f2804bdce56e1840b538a1664c88acb
describe
'512744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTJ' 'sip-files161.tif'
fdd605a776280fc56272bd66d9514a0e
e419fde2e920c93da81ba91a3e7a0680cd65b3de
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTK' 'sip-files161.txt'
0e6320a9b7a74b0b4fde6db3ff965e00
2952b32e4a95ba3e0ed77a902b3bc4ba440dc517
describe
'23688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTL' 'sip-files161thm.jpg'
ec6ef5a83d22ff5c4272f1a49c48db5f
47fa2bffa47083c07c42d4b4881238e515d4d635
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTM' 'sip-files162.jp2'
de6b435075624ec180d046d42cfa50cc
b84e6bcd7a216b821b23b30265f5c1440699ee54
describe
'100729' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTN' 'sip-files162.jpg'
dbf9e9c68f4d0f03f6f6de6c6b144dd8
29d9f66858eaf3e11ee042b8dceddbdbeae20f3d
describe
'23642' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTO' 'sip-files162.pro'
75ee95b2dd419541f5ad3e8f512e9db9
9b6cee38acf744b6eb2cbb9668a099d293ff50bd
describe
'42279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTP' 'sip-files162.QC.jpg'
1d50ef329b83697a402bf44052f90f4f
536b3d18ffcfb43ba84b52b6f909c95b8668da48
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTQ' 'sip-files162.tif'
cbabd54fe8ad07bc893d6036b8c664c2
a94b486ca686a2731d93577e9b725c19c95cd919
'2011-12-31T13:58:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTR' 'sip-files162.txt'
3ef424d59ecd7dfe32fdf1ce1154afd3
821576070bc6d5b1770ff93ad40f0e19436f57cd
describe
'20306' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTS' 'sip-files162thm.jpg'
35247c0a535c95380cd14301a2b963fd
8a1823472dc4c54cbaaec287ce2e526de6bc6112
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTT' 'sip-files163.jp2'
f0cc283cf1e1dcda92c633da0f105aec
3eae9f547533b887ae00b52bee776b18483ac28f
describe
'131425' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTU' 'sip-files163.jpg'
7e27179b4313c253789b41caca6614d3
4a46b1ef4436c81d382236d827b8c37a97017676
describe
'30686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTV' 'sip-files163.pro'
373c9a488286d65cfeb5dd8e5519e2f6
a2e68c1ba352bf8f20202952d046a03b62862e5e
describe
'55190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTW' 'sip-files163.QC.jpg'
0207c4039b263e0c005145207a53e260
c98f3b548686b34935467080f1392e9a555b7f47
describe
'512568' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTX' 'sip-files163.tif'
23ab22488255879ceb680e876ec4be72
3471d75c7ee6627b13185acd1bde39e06093ed5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTY' 'sip-files163.txt'
109f8bf5ef062cf02b88b7193b2bf47f
477435d0dafa2ad4e62c0d8da62c37133598a952
describe
'23596' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABTZ' 'sip-files163thm.jpg'
1758b1cf904f654b5cdd643d1e268a67
4983cc66953d2e759177aa572e040f71abdfe052
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUA' 'sip-files164.jp2'
464212234c450579cccc6a0191106a23
b7e00797773bdc7cfe2cda76f6ddc69c85d99a42
describe
'135004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUB' 'sip-files164.jpg'
f96dcd3612a34b4842880e1f203f3f50
fbc3f59dda595ff0e987f4ba20b2260f642cecae
describe
'29792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUC' 'sip-files164.pro'
d9a75da34fdaccc04bf1ca08cb6e4eef
98c61b5fc20beedc448a83fddb57542097d5e0c5
describe
'58329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUD' 'sip-files164.QC.jpg'
36e0e23fce9f677f6f313064e25ec999
5665dd47f0e2e2d4595612b7acba9c1f9e6851c3
describe
'513380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUE' 'sip-files164.tif'
b9e05fa0c54fe986ba76af74294693ae
dbc27be3899c434ab2e39ff5158bb8bbf155d290
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUF' 'sip-files164.txt'
6de782011db56a01954db5c44e380cb9
8c133418531c6507caec90c397475c2055203d96
describe
'24936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUG' 'sip-files164thm.jpg'
cb785052c94b1b335442a58784481c68
facd4baf20229d7798f09239f6f82e884fbb7c62
describe
'62262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUH' 'sip-files165.jp2'
f885d3e5ca82819fbbb789b290986506
2e839c42652fc38bc14fc4cc454f04371d70f33f
describe
'134282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUI' 'sip-files165.jpg'
37f8383f916075df91ad4a49f77541c5
0b3f064d45381ed53d5813f630622b9fbadd3c71
describe
'29953' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUJ' 'sip-files165.pro'
82549d7c3a109281e8a1c927b7d8ba25
6962f0767c43e385a5d7053e8cbce939e1ec4eb6
describe
'56992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUK' 'sip-files165.QC.jpg'
2d0cfb253c76f222b15eccff53188565
c32715a31385f59a4796b20038a0369bba527893
describe
'513344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUL' 'sip-files165.tif'
a5861178356544be6232c93d5e08f450
7e7c70ec28a1526dafbaf279b004ed21789d3d0e
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUM' 'sip-files165.txt'
1a30f1b33ac0834cde4c9b4b18ded5a3
73e7a8f8f5b0e116bb12994331ec70431a5dad6c
describe
'24754' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUN' 'sip-files165thm.jpg'
d0a09ae610b58720154a4176463cc657
c84b3da84b44133db595f8744cb482f4f519fc9c
describe
'62237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUO' 'sip-files166.jp2'
2a6f02ba60f8851dc28cce38f529fd9a
26329d2f440aed1f85215626186ffaa692a7c392
describe
'131823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUP' 'sip-files166.jpg'
1935cabbd97af16f45e0ddc1187ede10
5784eb28bc4af5727c98be2e4f387a06b1c2ad36
describe
'30630' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUQ' 'sip-files166.pro'
d7e0951a789e8eef1af111c9aed41a62
d57865964f3defc6c8e325b89f8ee77c70e92fe3
describe
'54678' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUR' 'sip-files166.QC.jpg'
4f0c2bf6387985f99041a427822be2eb
18deee40c3722786bf9298148fe982fc81bd6d83
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUS' 'sip-files166.tif'
7fc7792aedb501cc6577362466dcf7c4
439b0b26637e55160a5baefe9a74cf23e2f8d8b5
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUT' 'sip-files166.txt'
4ff73099e133b539601f6b03c80243eb
478ff354c589f39f8eb84925aaf03563761db251
describe
'23051' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUU' 'sip-files166thm.jpg'
67d2cacdf14528033dd497c2802cb14f
c87a17583c4a055246edc37ed69ee0dc0217b192
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUV' 'sip-files167.jp2'
4539894af9a342db6d49b5e59fb32dca
852e8447ef079ed510a76a527f25ca6d80742140
describe
'133560' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUW' 'sip-files167.jpg'
2d8277f26864b3f6388b8bae32f9d2e2
1a424a988153685a659683e80660b76801a7f08e
describe
'30836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUX' 'sip-files167.pro'
22ca72f015ba1abcadd8b7aaeeffabb1
7fd5b019ecc18003978794819d2112d83313f53c
describe
'55981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUY' 'sip-files167.QC.jpg'
0fe586cd8a1d8195f7d9e51c1f823411
bc3e32ca0479f884b8696134eb921bbd3a283f39
describe
'512512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABUZ' 'sip-files167.tif'
1a45b1d61a9d712a1942576ca76f5506
b5dbcc1e39dc46246667525adf4bdf0cebc6a7fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVA' 'sip-files167.txt'
de49f596b49732362c48ad5c9b91aa1d
5dab8d469961dbcc3b70d8b145f86adf9acecf02
describe
'23368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVB' 'sip-files167thm.jpg'
b9c2f04cd486db3324eefc62b008ac1c
8193554058cf84eddbd28cd171b38c0734d5d96f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVC' 'sip-files168.jp2'
5c2185481531c29f39ab78d1b51dca91
11844840e8f5284f5a356df88ac2fd1d7d081a47
describe
'125618' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVD' 'sip-files168.jpg'
baa8b73be6d8a8acd0cc7c79abc5720e
5c3893a829048971b44d1e1ea400b092394bfa85
describe
'30040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVE' 'sip-files168.pro'
7909fefa642d7a2a1446a3d85e67f70e
de998de1b9dcca5f707be24268ed44dab9b132b6
describe
'53166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVF' 'sip-files168.QC.jpg'
de3fc665ea59ddb09a1e875baaf5f011
532e2b552abbe9d01d38e4d6d3004e5f3fbcbd40
describe
'511880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVG' 'sip-files168.tif'
1faf65803194ed9c8439bc9f6d303eb2
37afef2c8129b68b6c6120ce4538e5c170fc765a
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVH' 'sip-files168.txt'
2566310b38e225b7789905899e44b83a
07ae7312f1bcc7fe05df5aeb18fbd3fe61da2ba1
describe
'21971' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVI' 'sip-files168thm.jpg'
76fa7d43915003fc24cc25dce6d53dd5
8b825d0016f313492f0310c5dc4aade3b52e6304
describe
'62179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVJ' 'sip-files169.jp2'
b01994a35f99b945d63aa8578e555ae2
f037880ccdadcd42645970937fae35efccff4ce8
describe
'136244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVK' 'sip-files169.jpg'
53f6b4f9e44d77b208451c82671d58e5
bc057f78b6a1addd6aac185c8508a5965f009405
describe
'32439' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVL' 'sip-files169.pro'
c91a5e1536e245bc750638100551af70
a27d05172258fb0b2a0e0723a339b1722c284bf7
describe
'55885' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVM' 'sip-files169.QC.jpg'
e6773343881e251a26c0a86a8c0e91da
f7d1289cd42864e0adecdcbc655a182b3f784610
describe
'512484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVN' 'sip-files169.tif'
cdfde9d1145488975b107235a89c8226
0e77ca1ec0f0644bac917ecd24403f76ae502cbf
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVO' 'sip-files169.txt'
dd5f1a063b8320ef16cf1e8bb213a1f5
f244baec059e22e2579cad7fdaaf5052875478f0
describe
'23232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVP' 'sip-files169thm.jpg'
71ab72de7c5b8b3de161131176ce40b9
445f4956c9f3ac3b2d68f7bcdaab095937565603
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVQ' 'sip-files170.jp2'
6f5b3abcb2dd3b8e398f1d9c6c4be289
390d1dca98a7a7a5e6a23810dc821d45f3273c06
describe
'124555' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVR' 'sip-files170.jpg'
93c48a28ef6a9c076de2dd0b2a207148
6ee167181157fd5d32231458d38293f7ff257cfe
describe
'29374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVS' 'sip-files170.pro'
a3f6648cb2d0945d9a181168f662bf13
6e7a729ef99eef6b36e9e711c2e7ada138345063
'2011-12-31T13:51:10-05:00'
describe
'52260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVT' 'sip-files170.QC.jpg'
dc5cf949b99abb0d09d2ab5141b022d9
5dedeac2819e7b4aec5c7214be068c35da227ced
describe
'512100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVU' 'sip-files170.tif'
b439851e2ff518665c82d67f544b5f18
5e1f0835077eeccbfaeda4ae97e70b0a6d6bcb3b
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVV' 'sip-files170.txt'
fbfedb175c5800805a47fbecaf27d911
3e8854a72185953042a3b67414165c6f4b9abd74
describe
'22700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVW' 'sip-files170thm.jpg'
b1e555db9506c1ee85f005ade73256ac
f72109153af1f132790cb2cce39799a94a22fdc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVX' 'sip-files171.jp2'
98d23737e10a282a429f7a8fb46c4438
b696501a09a3aa61284c90a9bbf3b6daa956aef6
describe
'109055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVY' 'sip-files171.jpg'
efdfe6b8006cbbe3f654a1422721d556
b3ed8bde8095ded8094246318bb5d1e93a8a8ce0
describe
'26088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABVZ' 'sip-files171.pro'
587f90c34bc1b8ce8a709cd884555d01
cfa4383bff5fb1176c971b75ea2504958ef0a462
describe
'47180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWA' 'sip-files171.QC.jpg'
166485bf05c882882e243b69ce617e29
ccfca7b31bbf2f38dd556ff7b7976e8cbdd9f6bb
describe
'511292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWB' 'sip-files171.tif'
bc1106e57396aaefe9b2e36e88f90d82
d76c46e0b5f9061e08e71792acea8880f7b0e043
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWC' 'sip-files171.txt'
d800ab7adc2e28bb11fa12b9355fe16b
c5a0041bbd5abae75869691c63a1236eced2537d
describe
'20763' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWD' 'sip-files171thm.jpg'
e2c6d7151c3d57340f99c695b25570b7
4b0c97c8063407c935669541d6950722a2e9fbdd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWE' 'sip-files172.jp2'
72e0effc05c7f9440e22a7f485bfda25
67a9fa038143b57cca95cdcc12f2baaba55b2d2a
describe
'126842' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWF' 'sip-files172.jpg'
45d0bbbc1a62417b239a5559d70a8451
a544801ca63554b022d630ff43198a902828c790
describe
'30031' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWG' 'sip-files172.pro'
ba57de91d6b7cc31198206ea64160b0e
aa18b6ca9a0c0c6ddcdc9a0d18d834e6857db1ed
describe
'54086' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWH' 'sip-files172.QC.jpg'
ea474d41d6b3fc1f79ed20538c146a18
cb40def0d7e170598f0da05377d8ebe6cb552a6c
describe
'512212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWI' 'sip-files172.tif'
ab206f1c3d82faefac20b12fe618af51
13ffe518564b77297819cf1e6a305cdb6d5d02ff
'2011-12-31T13:52:33-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWJ' 'sip-files172.txt'
27677aef4cb714092067c61d85137624
9ec766195d69d2a57f4864c3edfadf11efd5d8f5
describe
'22778' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWK' 'sip-files172thm.jpg'
172e68de5a88b64f413430020b2dae01
a095c348c8355692b925e6677cd6ac0bf95216e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWL' 'sip-files173.jp2'
5e987e15050385c6fa64653916f3b321
ec260276c19f1da675327ac2e558a4fd7815f7a0
describe
'128444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWM' 'sip-files173.jpg'
c5fb726edf459e93fb92ec728c3d647a
a90b0a3496d0c948e811ecd1a0c012469660022f
describe
'30713' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWN' 'sip-files173.pro'
4db6ceeeea3639014c73a55564b57250
2a38e38cb151c460790d4ec1b0294e028292b7a7
describe
'54031' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWO' 'sip-files173.QC.jpg'
e3f68ce77fc5adecd9b256828acb9b79
0a9eba57c391a419ef864c7b978fd3a18f12d898
describe
'512264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWP' 'sip-files173.tif'
89c4924d1e3ba33e81ce540391fd3c48
e52f277669762d0beaf7d8c50fe04b5472303e7e
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWQ' 'sip-files173.txt'
2d92701957b7a037f11fa8552027cbb1
0774f2f450c35c5a195f18db141f535610011ff6
describe
'22947' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWR' 'sip-files173thm.jpg'
de4721f8d6f1014bd30f3c90c5525e19
8f6c28d537b762b2a1a30ceec5fe11eaabfed05a
'2011-12-31T13:54:21-05:00'
describe
'62280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWS' 'sip-files174.jp2'
148eec3f0a51aeb65613adbd8a26233f
9746a4fb385b7be57aeef32367dc28bc3ae4efe0
describe
'123163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWT' 'sip-files174.jpg'
25f6881ee36753738bf648b41088c7a9
d935b335d4184d4a8b0e19b6bcd16b9e27e4e743
describe
'30053' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWU' 'sip-files174.pro'
b0b08cded7649bf8dc0ed91beed8d396
a6e68dd6410ab1b7148d5d0e848cc6c1347917aa
describe
'512360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWV' 'sip-files178.tif'
9343adcb4e37ee56d08ca14dfcfb5073
14322905dc09002a408d756a3092b60c2d993754
describe
'51598' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWW' 'sip-files174.QC.jpg'
1402c6b8f353e486ca087af72df2b102
a70b36ebb3fb6fcf00dcffadf69efc5d3222bf0d
describe
'511836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWX' 'sip-files174.tif'
1acc607bfa799bca533b6420466e68c4
e8c07a7fd4db5af69ed7dbe3c80eea97f7e8cc61
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWY' 'sip-files174.txt'
14da9647698198d4b4b63a09dc817e7c
746184988db4b5bffedc6fab6db12f5420d76f36
describe
'21863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABWZ' 'sip-files174thm.jpg'
439f2649ad06e939b34d99adb09f65b4
b1ce5856d24c4130d0f79f8c00298403685e3bc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXA' 'sip-files175.jp2'
02d9646db123d7a58cc48953775f4df1
e103756dd8c4b7ebc21a28e7e492ff23b0e37111
describe
'122526' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXB' 'sip-files175.jpg'
2c0741bdb831fada676acd710f5b6012
5b173271de40f2c393bdb5d7bfd800f84491988e
describe
'30368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXC' 'sip-files175.pro'
d8f0d371de0f4624ff0fe7a0312be0f6
bcb4445d4f499ec9ba3863172359b8fa25d826fe
describe
'51534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXD' 'sip-files175.QC.jpg'
d8fb51d9b7645a179bc123e828c42b3b
c22c225c38dcbbd7ee2737a080e425a94383d93f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXE' 'sip-files175.tif'
97bfa24df321303b77da1757ed9e072a
2143530e67e381ce1a74ff4511cea78a0f081218
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXF' 'sip-files175.txt'
404970893c24b06420c16414ae18e0e9
c944c2d34c4e883caa6645b99535a684c9397711
describe
'21733' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXG' 'sip-files175thm.jpg'
9f80e20cbb804644ec2ba76c635de140
4db3868f56a15fdd28fdf3e1d36654a890946017
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXH' 'sip-files176.jp2'
5fe3b160eabbc67e289ff0a4e5bb9857
50a570ca42dc2797301a46257a7d792e4a2f6e66
describe
'123041' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXI' 'sip-files176.jpg'
8ab93ec1d6c008bc3d3d3c960ec46b02
97709922ff9423ac96d03a610487cbd5b60d36f3
describe
'31212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXJ' 'sip-files176.pro'
294c19efbace7f881b724ab458b56d2e
806eb709b677147d80806e29082653cce5c3372c
describe
'51167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXK' 'sip-files176.QC.jpg'
affd13e10b709d605112c9f248857a86
6b93f636b03f789c3c5ad872da51c7be12dab0c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXL' 'sip-files176.tif'
b4f091071fc1bbb8e2e8fa80c61e8db3
ac39f8b8bc94bf2f910d4031ea413c9c90c88b27
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXM' 'sip-files176.txt'
e7a2cc60aaa87ddb0998067de6bfed8e
fffb033342e159d7c45de775bef9ddf81ffe1f1f
describe
'21444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXN' 'sip-files176thm.jpg'
5ebe960e5647dbd89772fccce90aae68
fe5728a497cd6234ad0fae1244401d7085e20f52
'2011-12-31T13:51:30-05:00'
describe
'63549' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXO' 'sip-files177.jp2'
d02473e2b3583229a5d03f5a01b90011
b281e21c3b8e71f528946fbe6c29b336ba9a055b
describe
'127381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXP' 'sip-files177.jpg'
1addd4907025350ab71ac2e892d5de25
ff14c3367bedd292a018a8e65fd349cd8a2fd0d8
describe
'31122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXQ' 'sip-files177.pro'
496197a4326ad8c77edbe107709789ac
42d2c42cbae4ce0986e8804319f91455cf77ddc4
describe
'53128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXR' 'sip-files177.QC.jpg'
7e1b349442d2e328ec12a5d53e6e4914
e2dfb7ea43e32392842bfb6a6f943c25e9bdb3fb
describe
'522536' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXS' 'sip-files177.tif'
f06c9476e34c2856af0c71643c64a043
7baa53d158933f15121f25921b892de112e3e0e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXT' 'sip-files177.txt'
34169986db9a32c42e357a49330c691c
fbd9b991ab91e91931c257d5b709d4f0e8f426d5
describe
'22094' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXU' 'sip-files177thm.jpg'
85ac33243ec5996bf3d3874f0bd2c082
dbd38be22eb6acecc809e7fd15a0493ac202720a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXV' 'sip-files178.jp2'
f3850aa4c9ac19d79a813b1123cbf45c
8e6ebae4231d36e548e051eb55e0c2946170ac6a
describe
'132435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXW' 'sip-files178.jpg'
ee3090374c4ad6d45966668a637eef5a
9d80f730c37ba44b2e805d9396da1fb859c7d2d8
describe
'31540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXX' 'sip-files178.pro'
01e3aef23855b8a81574d499373d909e
99085a00e90afbb4113a0a4b3f07b9f1d31494a2
describe
'55554' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXY' 'sip-files178.QC.jpg'
9b4cd81788b7de7a56ec9fdabb1096cf
cd5e9723f94a2494a7259522d0cba6c8931588a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABXZ' 'sip-files178.txt'
30ec45bf6232f15a5eb313ebe8419f0b
2371558cb019477ff38e0bb1f419338b206cbf18
describe
'23159' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYA' 'sip-files178thm.jpg'
8d3661c6f48483a4b8d14b56b4c74bd2
741f38968e8a8f8e043d2ef6c2052d7119ff77e3
describe
'62210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYB' 'sip-files179.jp2'
144a8b55504e0497ec74b3da6e9595ae
3c52198c5660d6d50a0be4ac86346eef5cb4adbf
describe
'72227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYC' 'sip-files179.jpg'
d036e85e5b50dba54d45c8755b6d8530
12d3547d87fcecf92586a0fa4c5fdf9c3cb2cee8
describe
'15537' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYD' 'sip-files179.pro'
439eff6b890e797482b0254332ba5bfe
18b9ff6ddc4487ee1a4ec62bb6cf0f41cca19af5
describe
'32643' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYE' 'sip-files179.QC.jpg'
3dad55342ff86bb6826b6b0248d77082
53ae8a54526cd3c25a5fe1df29038737d5e00dd1
describe
'509216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYF' 'sip-files179.tif'
d24dd093acbe51d0ec8be1007f97323b
914641f5c7a58e9c7acb4384faedf6efb32b8225
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYG' 'sip-files179.txt'
f38ccb6a5e3f158e783848b9f7484158
f8868b84602f6c6fed6439c81e5b23ff48c810b5
describe
'16040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYH' 'sip-files179thm.jpg'
3399814ba05507d820f14475eb4b9465
a3396ff2f73e0c39947d2fdf853a7291b095063a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYI' 'sip-files180.jp2'
9de0dd63e05d8f8a54ad052205d69cbc
cef5bd43d6e0177c924d85009130d91fad95922e
describe
'72221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYJ' 'sip-files180.jpg'
5064e4e182ce1257a8ecb73bf32c20a9
85e1bab58f74b40988a408704b3f088bc3d571f2
describe
'18022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYK' 'sip-files180.pro'
3554475f8460104048230b902e6f5d9d
98f3c74439612397353e5da5fc2e12ed9805c93b
describe
'32435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYL' 'sip-files180.QC.jpg'
18e91ac19e1e5c93c70036804367892c
81870553d8e61cd69b7bbc028e2b7ab726c752e9
describe
'509676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYM' 'sip-files180.tif'
48fb424fbc7adaea56b108b26b9a89f2
4602a3caf0d53283cbbcc3bc06e989114571f1ce
describe
'770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYN' 'sip-files180.txt'
8f9fa45115d43e4e19da253f8b023511
a97e59f05cafd2a75a6582a52d42ff121f0f3c57
describe
'16855' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYO' 'sip-files180thm.jpg'
792059441eb1471600c899c6e77af121
55865fca16d9e5396bce6dd174a95bb15252128d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYP' 'sip-files181.jp2'
db0e0fba66f47a537e62eecdede2a448
0b654300af88e32d4781b616a584aec657a8f083
describe
'106111' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYQ' 'sip-files181.jpg'
2caa544281f1060dbfff34a5490a5bc7
fddee597acb5dcbf2e47798bdd56166f3d496fc9
describe
'32545' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYR' 'sip-files181.pro'
b43355267b6e9b126fc8b65ae538df20
1ff6a11e6888eca945296968ba1fdf2403abc5bc
describe
'44878' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYS' 'sip-files181.QC.jpg'
8cc6c1af8216b4a771a4f440e68f7bcc
5a27ddf0f0791c626559f434b6737b8e2062850d
describe
'511196' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYT' 'sip-files181.tif'
bd17393389e23b6dd018938412c3a340
2a93225b43ee9c367940bf773da3a00026ed529d
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYU' 'sip-files181.txt'
9e3bf5d024e0d72112d8a9fc86ef4861
8de5a9b644601c192f84d725ae53dca1ac705fb5
describe
'20483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYV' 'sip-files181thm.jpg'
d9e35c7aeaec95c357001733197ef261
7807c0e46e3eeff6d265685de43b98681e62ada8
'2011-12-31T13:55:05-05:00'
describe
'62165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYW' 'sip-files182.jp2'
7e48751bb3fac1e786285dcb3352869a
76b755433096bea2e590a605bc943687a4ef810f
describe
'90271' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYX' 'sip-files182.jpg'
6df1e3a777760680cece9a3e347c4413
9b34fe69dcef05100ad6da5b110fa66f3c52c2d7
describe
'23152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYY' 'sip-files182.pro'
0e666770523a20d633968827eff87a8a
ac3ac7d094833c88db173d591a83a2dfd6abcd20
describe
'39276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABYZ' 'sip-files182.QC.jpg'
838acf1e9fdfd81b85356ef260bc7772
23c9c5222d9f2a868d30d96682c08af3655aac9c
describe
'510480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZA' 'sip-files182.tif'
ed9fd844795725a10739543884111dcf
1613acdc1e0579615c28903297b8d9d8f6499fad
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZB' 'sip-files182.txt'
786ce5ee5ad37a6730feb15e94ba290c
98033d2ad3561041f9cb2d0dee0e2e00c26900b0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZC' 'sip-files187.jp2'
34f2400d2c8529dc4a775fe2c26f366c
52e7faecc1718eb6f8936e827b85f499eec54c08
describe
'18840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZD' 'sip-files182thm.jpg'
9fdb93f4da2c2a8c1a90ba7bb0be0635
5668c9d12b323a8f56592bfaf6d35d87e68d04a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZE' 'sip-files183.jp2'
7766e701a23257cc8c476441925e9202
19cb96fdbeb5e16dc452ebdc42852836c0fc0953
describe
'85169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZF' 'sip-files183.jpg'
0682946f3ce260253e09340bd1b54023
3d899fc2d7da05e355b95c73205483c9576c1f39
describe
'24363' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZG' 'sip-files183.pro'
437d3b9fbd95fa8b7d960ac4f53d9f29
bdf3de7671d330d17b51aad2069692c1e882e80c
describe
'37033' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZH' 'sip-files183.QC.jpg'
416779626825f43d9c882b14ed7c231e
527be33998d6edd00f66ca6661e18305f5b050b4
describe
'510152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZI' 'sip-files183.tif'
11e29886f5d0462f2b0b09214c7392f0
52f297d492159df510348f9f141dd364c10c1940
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZJ' 'sip-files183.txt'
62d814e0029936c9881f1659559363c9
2785fbb02de23c93c7cd3d8af58713dcb2079465
describe
'18104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZK' 'sip-files183thm.jpg'
6615309b84544ac7526f11eebadd8935
6f0de373b988e010da0240b923dcf7a1264b2eef
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZL' 'sip-files184.jp2'
e215d99cf6be6123022b8b2e7040e87d
4016e76aedc27f704e83ad95f780e4a412bd9617
describe
'100939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZM' 'sip-files184.jpg'
90bfa0f625b5d7c80261595553ec3552
81988a8cc54bd1e43ffd1fa3ce22e1840dd55a79
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZN' 'sip-files184.pro'
8630c2c436f8f523d741eb3a9610e534
a09099bdee91d32ce83bb3450910641cc5d39a24
describe
'43923' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZO' 'sip-files184.QC.jpg'
0a19a0ca54bd73af91f3dd70f5438d5e
3edc1228142637e725ccf445b5929a40561dd561
describe
'511112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZP' 'sip-files184.tif'
e2de796805958126db62306e1b208d93
9fd1a29d74211aa1bc8ce3c0bf3884b450818a44
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZQ' 'sip-files184.txt'
bb6177824b1f8f00c4e4f5bed7853750
3d2460db405b3379f2065e7c952de4aaf48692ff
describe
'20333' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZR' 'sip-files184thm.jpg'
369dc53bb8aafcafdce72308edc05b0b
fe11fe0509eb0f8cc19d4678f7a4df41f1708a2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZS' 'sip-files185.jp2'
2485f980b6f474eb5edc07eb6763a64a
be8918c4d76f343fda1d2cd65da0a366ebcdae9f
describe
'111297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZT' 'sip-files185.jpg'
f17c57427cefbb7ea473c42b4fa85a3e
2fb87ec942152922089ecca6ee64220661ed5f31
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZU' 'sip-files185.pro'
33456e8d2050e382ce581e1963a4a526
76c38c0a3e706a108c0d28999918d69130c0582e
describe
'47470' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZV' 'sip-files185.QC.jpg'
416da98cd072584b19d8158af837b00a
6e6024bb93fbd6ddb3680354cfb62288b335b4d2
describe
'511632' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZW' 'sip-files185.tif'
921605e182047c7383951372f9f6fc6c
0593b365ca2f8b4d81c83c5c33e8db2c3d5156ea
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZX' 'sip-files185.txt'
55ef5515793588fea18cd1572f58b5be
076178f2fc25bb4877dc747484bf72bf22c7c6bf
describe
'21410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZY' 'sip-files185thm.jpg'
1b7cb5556b988f84dcde5da0223866fe
e350e7aecfcb093c9e67ab53057ef8b80172bcfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAABZZ' 'sip-files186.jp2'
911587602274c3f6793bd0a61e992a55
07983c22b870b52d925a7ebd524c003a0beb4bb8
describe
'109263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAA' 'sip-files186.jpg'
c61b7cc592b111753abb9d2dede4966c
f3251471340c24e4f2cc93b85fdb51649c150d58
describe
'32301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAB' 'sip-files186.pro'
bd2134dedea540e805abd846472e0d69
f673e1bff5e9eba56239202ba556db39f4aded70
describe
'46432' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAC' 'sip-files186.QC.jpg'
226e13026626bda0298c6f84425af423
565305185031ddaf84205fe4971356752697df50
describe
'511408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAD' 'sip-files186.tif'
6e8ec9d516e0a77d4b145a1e9d0def1a
c6d15e243f83d7a8f33f7a4bf5d054d4d06f8811
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAE' 'sip-files186.txt'
8f14696c82d4e72aa39c2d5fecf428dd
44d4c248c564dfec79668fd4ad970e22c2986157
describe
'21193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAF' 'sip-files186thm.jpg'
4bfca2766cb6e45511e51e5575d1c27c
efdd6b14da200d0b1a821943c752dabe7e460296
describe
'105125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAG' 'sip-files187.jpg'
3b7717466d6cc4f351e45e99d71b87cc
683fe5ee51be440bb0c90ec62afb9fa237adcafa
describe
'31584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAH' 'sip-files187.pro'
4f9019becf27162374339ac3777f8289
29820782a2103173e88e13c7e5e897a15d638a48
describe
'45395' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAI' 'sip-files187.QC.jpg'
d501792bf0758c0c08a42edc5877581a
a5a9877f5e638a73690d27a2b55081a14557ad37
describe
'511232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAJ' 'sip-files187.tif'
1a5cb70d35403b6c106878febcea2452
81a5ab5a60b16cf0572db465b8bbd4ae359d5958
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAK' 'sip-files187.txt'
bd2608ee45526c5b844da36c72274928
8134f0a49e6f122238a0588318ac5a8fa86cbaa6
describe
'20896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAL' 'sip-files187thm.jpg'
c57882ce586c06f0d2b185591d488949
a2a6b22131a3e486eb61cf87a6a12a780753e92d
describe
'62283' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAM' 'sip-files188.jp2'
993a7db24fd0f1349510c203d2c3c2d3
292708685f7b9c9db4363b47f274e90db7e4e477
describe
'66189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAN' 'sip-files188.jpg'
1fdc4e9c01318a366e437539c3e7f637
ca9af15c648633d9f367dc1ac7b16af2da9ee69d
describe
'17218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAO' 'sip-files188.pro'
44ba9c961c746a4d7f283dce6790e98b
bfdea1a9c081d0ee4bfd3aa9202acf1301970fea
describe
'30674' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAP' 'sip-files188.QC.jpg'
00d5243833dfa4ad3a1840b1dfe0d0d2
c9ce3c98e2e6134861204a3677984def9eab1226
describe
'509112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAQ' 'sip-files188.tif'
e2fc38f60148f6197dfd82447621480c
841e6947a1a16bf89273a0cdb44f40e7e059d66a
describe
'772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAR' 'sip-files188.txt'
ad64d17ddce7b7b2d159a74575498a02
26faafeeeb89971bf5cbaecec41aa5574d530b3b
describe
'15706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAS' 'sip-files188thm.jpg'
1c2798ac6b667d41042a246a42447148
5a6c7bbcdaa00b9fbd03b67b1f9967d51966ba0b
describe
'7' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAT' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
8f477706097b92095a724f91244be85a
0618a476bbb537d2f96e5859a18e2fbe6238cf18
describe
'288135' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAU' 'sip-filesUF00002754_00001.mets'
c28b7028cb39ab1a1bc9e6ce5bfd1e65
f43e09c43354c2bcb95c163bca61e0576459c58a
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T17:30:32-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'373754' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAADfileF20090220_AAACAX' 'sip-filesUF00002754_00001.xml'
7918ac436cbc44921180ee27849c9664
4c1317318be0345f209d59d2ba2ac1e5c18a598c
describe
'2013-12-13T17:30:29-05:00'
xml resolution