Citation
Stories about birds

Material Information

Title:
Stories about birds
Creator:
Mackarness, Henry S., 1826-1881
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Clarke, J. O ( Printer )
Darton & Co ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros. (Printer) ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Darton and Co.
Manufacturer:
J.O. Clarke
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p., [8] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 21 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Birds -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1854 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1854
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Plates chromolithographed by Leighton Brothers.
Statement of Responsibility:
by a young naturalist ; with illustrations by Harrison Weir.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA3005 ( ltqf )
ALH9947 ( notis )
33191692 ( oclc )
027010162 ( alephbibnum )

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STORIES ABOUT BIRDS.

BY

A YOUNG NATURALIST.

With Flustrations,

BY

HARRISON WEIR.

LONDON:
DARTON AND CO, 568, HOLBORN HILL.



. ea 2 *.

BILLING, PRINTER,
108, HATTON GanDEx, LONDON,
AND GUILDFORD, sURREY.



PREFACE. |

Birps are undoubtedly the most attractive ob-
jects in the Animal Kingdom—to the young
especially. The beauty of their plumage, resplen-
dent with the most brilliant colours; the grace
and elegance of their movements, and the un-
rivalled melody of their voice, particularly com-
mend them. Hence all children love birds, from
the gentle girl, whose pet canary enlivens the
drawing-room window, to the sturdy country
boy, whose cage of blackbirds, reared from the
nest, hangs by a nail at the side of the cottage-

door.



7. PREFACE.

To encourage this taste, to increase the love
for the beautiful, and to cultivate that sense of
kindness to animals, which a familiarity with
them always produces, are the objects with which
these anecdotes: have been collected by

A YOUNG NATURALIST.







BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

Ovr common Fowls, that are so well known for
their usefulness and breeding, came originally from
the warmer parts of Asia; but the time at which
they were first domesticated by man is lost in the
darkness of distant ages, and, as is the case with
many of our domestic animals, it is not even known
from what wild bird our tame Fowls are descended.

With the habits of common poultry all persons
are more or less acquainted. The generous disposi-
tion of the Cock, giving the best and choicest
morsels of his food to the Hens, and his courage
and perseverance in fighting, are familiar to every
one; whilst the patient endurance of the Hen, in
closely sitting for twenty-one days, and her un-
wearied care in feeding and protecting her chickens,
are equally: familiar.



6 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

To keep Fowls in health, they must have a good
space to range in, so that they may supply them-
selves with worms and insects; they must also be
fed liberally with grain, if many eggs are desired ;
during storms they should have shelter, and their
house should be cleaned out, so as not to become
offensive. The Hen likes the prospect of having a
great many chickens, and, therefore, she generally
lays where there are most eggs. To make her lay
where it is wished, a few chalk or wooden nest-eggs
are placed in the nest ; when she has laid a number
she usually becomes “‘broody,” as the country-
women term it, and wants to sit, when she makes
a strange, chuckling noise, and runs about with her
feathers raised. The desire to hatch chickens is so
strong, that many Hens will sit for days, even on an
empty nest, where they have been accustomed to
lay. On the twenty-first day the young chickens
burst through the shell, which is broken from the
inside, a large end being cut off all round, and
coming away like a lid; the little prisoner being
furnished with a hard point on the end of its beak,



BARN-DOOR FOWLS. 7

with which it is enabled to chip through the walls
of its prison; this point, being useless after the
chicken is once out of the shell, falls off in a few
days. 5

There are many varieties of Domestic Fowls,
differing very much in appearance and usefulness ;
some being more advantageous for producing a great
number of eggs, others for their size ; some laying
in winter, others only in summer. One variety is
perhaps valuable for the delicacy of its chickens,
and another for their hardihood ; among the most. .
useful may be mentioned the Spanish, in its
plumage of unrivalled black; the Polands, with
their tufts; the Hamburgs, who lay so constantly
as to be termed “ every-day layers ;” nor must we
forget the Dorkings, celebrated as table birds—nor
the now fashionable Cochins, from Shanghai. Those
who desire to know how to keep Poultry to the
greatest advantage, and to acquaint themselves
with all the little details of their management,
should obtain the work entitled “Profitable Poul-
try,” published by Darton and Co., illustrated by



8 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

Harrison Weir in the same manner as this Book,
and which is.written by one of the most ex-
perienced Breeders of the day.

It may, perhaps, surprise some of our readers,
who know how courageously Hens in general defend
their chickens, and how they peck at the person
who tries to remove them from the nest when
sitting,-te be told that there are several kinds of
Fowls that never even attempt to hatch their eggs,
but go en laying nearly all the year round, if well
fed, and: furnished with warm, comfortable, clean
houses in the winter; to this class belong those
most useful Fowls termed “ every-day layers,” such
as the Hamburgs, which are also known in some
parts of the country as Pheasant Fowls, because
their feathers are marked somewhat like those of
the Pheasant; they are also called in other parts
Bolton Bays, and Bolton Greys, or Creoles, and
sometimes Corals. In the Northern Counties of
England these small though useful and beautiful
birds are very common, and as layers they far
surpass the common Barn-door breed, as each Hen



BARN-DOOR FOWLS. 9

will lay more than two: hundred eggs in a year.
To the same kind belong the Spanish, who are
also remarkable for the large size of their eggs,
which often weigh nearly or even more than a
quarter of a pound. Other kinds, on the contrary,
sit so steadily and with such obstinacy, that it is
almost impossible to overcome the desire ; and we
have known a Cochin Hen to sit for six weeks
in an empty nest, where she had been accus-
tomed to lay. If Fowls are kept merely as
pets, then the little fairy-like Sebright Bantams,
each feather of which is margined with a dark
band, must be allowed to surpass all the others,
although in size every other kind excels them.
We were much struck the other day by seeing
two full-grown Cocks, side by side, one of which
was a Sebright Bantam weighing under thirteen
ounces, the other a Cochin Cock weighing over
thirteen pounds—the dwarf and the giant of the
poultry tribe ; but even this weight, enormous as
it may appear, is not the greatest that has been
reached by some varieties of fowls. Recently a



10 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

new breed has been introduced, which is said
to have been originally imported from the Valley
of the Brahma Pootra River, whence it takes its
name, and a specimen has been exhibited in London
of the enormous weight of fifteen and a half pounds.



THE PHEASANT.

Tue Pheasant derives its name from having been
brought by the adventurous Argonauts into Greece
from the banks of the River Phasis, in Colchis,
Asia Minor. Although introduced at so early a
period into Europe, it has never become tho-
roughly inured to the rigours of a northern cli-
mate, and it would speedily perish in this country,
unless preserved and fed with assiduity in winter.
In appearance it is, without doubt, one of the most
striking of our British birds; the resplendent tints
of green and blue in the upper part of the neck
of the male, the bright scarlet of his cheeks, and
the rich colours of the whole plumage, render it
especially beautiful.

The female, however, is oii more sober in
colour, being of a greyish yellow. variegated with



12 THE PHEASANT.

black and brown. As in all domesticated, or half-
domesticated animals, several variations of colour
exist. In the ring-necked variety, which is so
characteristically figured in the engraving, there
is a white band surrounding the neck : that termed
the Bohemian Pheasant has a much lighter ground
to the plumage; and entirely or partially white
individuals are not unfrequent. The wings, which
are small in comparison with the size of the bird,
are much curved; in flying, they are moved very
rapidly, to compensate for their small size, and
produce a loud, whirring sound. The power of
flight possessed by Pheasants is small, but they
run well, and with great rapidity.

During winter ‘the males generally associate
together; in spring each one selects a particular
spot, where he struts, and invites the hens by crow-
ing and clapping his wings, in the same manner
as the Domestic Fowl. The nests, which are made
by the female, are simply a slight hole scratched
in the ground, and generally filled with decayed
leaves, &c.; they usually contain from six to ten



THE PHEASANT. 13

eggs, which are pale greyish in colour. Some-
times the Pheasant mates with the Domestic
Fowl, and it has also been known to do so with
the Black Grouse ; in these cases the young birds
possess, in part, the character of both their parents.
The young Pheasants when first hatched are
covered with down, and are able to seek for food
almost immediately after escaping from the egg,
being born with their eyes open, and their bodily
powers in an active state.

The Pheasant is one of the most injurious
birds to the farmer. Where they aré numerous,
the damage they inflict on the young plants of
winter wheat is very considerable ; and during the
severe weather they injure, very materially, fields
of red clover and turnips; were not their numbers
annually thinned by the sportsman, they would be
found equally injurious in spring-time, in the
newly-sown fields of pulse and corn; but their
ravages are not then so much felt, as, in addition
to their diminished number, they are largely supplied
with insect food.



14 THE PHEASANT.

Pheasants are highly prized as articles of food ;
they are regarded as game-birds by the laws of
this country, and are not allowed to be shot except
by persons who'pay annually a certain sum to the
government for the privilege, and under no circum-
stances may they be killed before the first day of

October in each year.







THE DUCK.

Tue beautiful Mallard, or Wild Duck of the fens
and marshes, is the original bird from which the
Domestic Duck is descended ; the Wild Drake is
doubtless in its plumage one of the most beauti-
ful of all water-birds, and, in many cases, this
beauty is found to prevail to a considerable degree
in its domesticated descendants. The deep grassy
green of the head and neck ending in the narrow
white collar, the brownish chestnut of the breast,
the banded wings, the dark tail with its four re-
curved middle feathers, the grey white of the under
parts, and the orange of the feet, form altogether
a pleasing and harmonious though striking arrange-
ment of colours; in the female we: find a much
more sober dress, the whole plumage being grey-
ish or brownish, and the re-curved feathers of the



16 THE DUCK.

tail are always wanting. Many of the domestic
Ducks and Drakes retain this plumage ; other
varieties, particularly the large and useful breed
termed the Aylesbury, are perfectly white, with
light yellow bills and orange legs ; these lay well,
and the eggs are large. They are also very good
sitters and nurses; and, from the abundance of
their white downy feathers (which are nearly
equal to those of Geese for stuffing beds and
pillows), their large size, and delicate, savoury
flesh, they are in very great demand.

As in all swimming-birds, the plumage of the
Duck is so formed that the outer: layer resists
the entrance of. water, and, by this means, the
feathers next the skin remain dry and warm.
The plumage is enabled to repel the water from
its surface, by being covered with an oily sub-
stance, which is formed in two large glands
situated on the tail; the birds may be frequently
noticed pressing out a portion with the bill, and
covering the feathers with it; the head and neck,
being out of the reach of the bill, are oiled by



THE DUCK. 7.

rubbing them against the other parts of the
body.

The food of the Duck, when wild, consists of
seeds, grasses, worms, slugs, and small animals
inhabiting the muddy margins of the waters.
The mode in which these latter portions of its
food are obtained is very remarkable: the edges
of the bill are furnished with strainers, formed
somewhat like the teeth of a comb; mouthfuls
of soft mud are taken in very rapidly, and, by
the action of the large fleshy tongue, are forced
out through the strainers, any small insects being
retained. The fondness of Ducks for slugs, worms,
and caterpillars, renders them useful in a garden,
especially as they are not liable to do any injury
by scratching up the ground for seeds.

The nest of the Duck is made upon the ground.
The young, which are covered with a yellow
down, swim with ease immediately they are
hatched, taking to the water with the greatest
readiness, Wild Ducks remain during the whole
year in this country, but seem more numerous

c



18 THE DUCK.

in cold weather, particularly in severe winters, at
which time it appears probable that a large number
arrive from the continent of Europe, to pass the
severity of the winter in the milder climate of our
favoured island. During winter, immense numbers
are captured by means of decoys, which are usually
made where there is a large sheet of water in a
marshy or fenny district ; in one part of the borders
of this lake a ditch is dug, about twenty yards
long, and curved at the end farthest from the lake.
This ditch is about four or five yards wide at the
mouth, and narrows gradually to two feet at the
end; the broad end is arched over with young
trees, and the narrow with a net, which forms a
sort of tunnel, getting gradually smaller as the ditch
narrows ; around the-whole, trees and shrubs are
planted, so as to give the place a wild, natural
appearance. There are constantly swimming about
a number of tame Ducks, which are fed in the
decoy, and when they are joined by a number of
wild ones, they are attracted, by feeding, into the
net, and on the fowler showing himself at the



THE DUCK. 19

entrance, the wild birds rush towards the narrow
part, where they are readily captured. A still
greater number are shot, being pursued at night
when they are searching for food, and fired at, as
they rise in flocks, with large guns, capable of
destroying numbers at each discharge.

_As a domestic animal the Duck is of great value ;
allowed to seek for their own food, which, in great
part, consists of worms, slugs, and similar animals,
they cost very little: but, shortly before being
killed, they require a supply of better diet. The
eggs of the Duck are darker in colour than those
of the common Fowl, and they possess a peculiar
flavour, which renders them less adapted for eating
alone than for use in pastry. They require to be
sat upon for thirty-one days before they are
hatched ; and as the Duck does not always sit
steadily, nor cover many eggs, they are frequently
placed under a Hen. This plan is not destitute
of some slight degree of cruelty ; for naturally the
Hen sits a much shorter time, and the young
Ducklings, as soon as hatched, betake themselves



20 THE DUCK.

to the nearest water, greatly to the distress of the
Hen, who runs backwards and forwards along the
margin, expressing her fears in loud and vain cries ;
sometimes she will even fly over the water, and
attempt to settle in the midst of her brood.

The young Ducks, however, progress very well
under her care, as she leads them away from water,
and keeps them out of the damp grass, both of
which are rather injurious than beneficial to them
when very young, and at the same time feeds them
with the same unwearied care and attention that
she would pay to her own natural offspring.

After hatching several broods of Ducklings, the
Hens become accustomed to their taking to the
water ; and one Hen that had always had Ducks’
eggs placed under her, on being permitted to hatch
her own, led the young Chickens to the edge of
the pond, and seemed much surprised that they
showed no inclination to enter.







THE MACAW.

In the warmer regions of the earth, where the
dense forests are clothed with verdure during the
entire year, and where fruit of various . descriptions
is always abounding, may be found, in immense
numbers, a vast tribe of Birds, consisting of several
distinct yet nearly related families, known to
naturalists under the names of Parrots, Lorys,
Cockatoos, and Macaws. These Birds are, gene-
rally speaking, inhabitants of the trees, and are
furnished with peculiarly constructed feet, by
means of which they are enabled to climb readily
from branch to branch ; their toes are four on each
foot, and instead of being placed, as is usual in
birds, three in front and one behind, they are in
D



22 THE MACAW.

pairs, two before and two behind. This kind of
foot gives them enormous power of grasping; and
they are also capable of using the foot as a hand
for taking up any object and carrying it to the
mouth In addition to this most serviceable con-
trivance, the upper jaw is hooked, and forms a
most important auxiliary in climbing from bough
to bough.

Of all birds they are the most intelligent, being
readily taught to whistle tunes, and to repeat words
or even long sentences, although the natural voice
of all the different varieties is harsh and disagree-
able. The capability of imitating sounds, which is
possessed to so great a degree by these animals,
seems to be in some way connected with the
peculiar nature of the tongue; which, instead of
being horny and pointed, as in most birds, is thick
and fleshy, resembling much more the tongue of a
quadruped than that of a bird.

In cultivated districts of the country they do
much damage to the crops of fruits—and, in the
United States of America especially, are objects



THE MACAW. 23

of dislike to the farmer and agriculturist, their
brilliant colours in no way compensating, in his
eyes, for their destructive propensities. In this
country they are only known as domestic pets,
and their gorgeous plumage finds for them
general admirers. So highly are they prized as
ornamental birds, that from five to ten guineas
is the ordinary price of a fine Macaw; and
when the power of talking is added to their
other attractions, much higher sums are frequently
obtained.

It is sometimes imagined that these Birds under- _
stand the meaning of the words they utter, but
there is really no foundation for such an opinion ;
they are generally taught to talk unmeaning sen-
tences, such as ‘“ What’s o'clock,” “ Pretty Poll,”
&ec. A relative of ours had a very fine bird, that
was sent from the house during the illness of a
lady, and was kept in a barber’s shop upon the
river side. On the lady’s recovery he was brought
home and welcomed by a large party in the drawing
room, when he instantly poured forth such a flood



24 THE MACAW.

of bad language that he had to be immediately
banished ; and it was thought that the barber had
taught him to talk like a blackguard, knowing that
he would probably have to keep him after his expul-
sion from respectable society.







THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

Boru these well-known, and rather common birds,
are natives of the wooded and cultivated parts of
our own country; their size, the loudness and
mellowness of their song, and their ‘habit of fre-
quenting our gardens in search of food, cause them
to be familiar to most persons.

Shakspere, who is not more remarkable for the
correctness with which he describes the different
characters of men, than the appearance of trees,
birds, and other objects of Natural History, makes
one of his simple country characters sing the fol-
lowing song :—

“ The Ouzel Cock, so black of hue,
With orange tawny bill ;

The Throstle with his note so true,
And Wren with little quill.”



26 THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

The Ouzel Cock is the male Blackbird, which
is also, in many parts of the country, termed the
“Merle ;” the female and young birds are of a
dark, dusky brown, the bill being tawny, but not
orange. Who, when walking along the “ hedge-
rows green,” has not been almost startled by the
sudden outburst and long chuckling ery of the
Blackbird, as he flies away on the further side of
the hedge, passing through, when at a safe dis-
tance, as if to see who it is that has alarmed
him ?—a habit which renders it difficult for one
person to get within shot of them; but they are
readily obtained by two persons, one on each side
of the hedge.

In winter, Blackbirds resort to the neighbour-
hood of houses and gardens, and may often be
seen searching for snails and worms, or feeding
on the few remaining fruits and berries. In addi-
tion to the ery which they make when disturbed,
the cock has a loud, mellow song, which he
continues to pour forth from spring-time to the
end of summer. The nest of the Blackbird is



THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD. .- .

large and open; it is formed of fibrous materials, -
as grass, roots, moss, &e., cemented together with
mud and lined with grass; it contains usually
about five pale-green eggs, of a bluish-cast, spotted
with brown. The plumage of the young birds re-
sembles closely that of the female in colour.

The Thrush, whose loud song surpasses, in
mellowness and clearness of tone, that of most
other birds, is.as common, though perhaps not as
familiar, as the Blackbird. In winter, however,
it frequents our gardens—sometimes in small
flocks, seeking for snails, which form a large and
favourite part of its food. Thrushes have been
observed to bring snails repeatedly to the same
spot in a gravel path, where two projecting stones
furnished a convenient means of fixing them,
whilst they were broken by repeated blows with
the beak. Worms, seeds, and berries form an
addition to its fare, and both it and the Blackbird
repay themselves for their music by a toll levied
on all the soft fruits of the garden, though there
is little doubt that their utility in destroying snails,



28 THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

grubs, and caterpillars much more than counter-
balances any injury that they may do.

The nest of the Throstle is even less finished
than that of the Ouzel, being frequently fur-
nished with no other lining than cow-dung or
mud; the eggs of both are very similar. “The
Throstle, with his note so true,” has, like its
companion, the Ouzel Cock, received several names ;
it is generally termed the Thrush, or Song-Thrush,
but in many parts of the country is known only
as the “Mavis.” Both the Song-Thrush and
Blackbird remain in this country throughout the
year, differing in this respect from some other
birds of the same tribe, as the Fieldfare and
Ring-Ouzel, whith are migratory.

When not persecyted, Blackbirds become ex-
ceedingly familiar; in captivity they are readily
tamed, and will feed freely from the hand; those
reared from the nest may even be suffered to fly
about without attempting to escape; and, as the
following anecdote will show, will even build their
nest in the house.



THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD. 29

A labouring man of the village of River, near
Dover, reared a young hen Blackbird from the
nest, in the spring of 1844, and so perfectly tamed
it that it was allowed its full liberty in flying in
and out of the house at will, and roosting in the
little kitchen parlour. Early in the spring of the
next year it’ disappeared, and was mourned as
lost ; but at the end of a few weeks it returned
with a mate, which, after a short time, lost some
of its natural fearfulness, and would stand on the
sill of the window, beyond which, however, it
never ventured. The hen bird built its nest, and
hatched and reared its young ones, and at length
flew off with them. In the spring of 1846 they
again returned, the male bird taking up its old
position on the window, and again a nest was
begun ; but the place chosen being on the little
dresser between two plates, was so inconvenient to
the woman of the house that she destroyed it ; but
the bird began another in the same place, and it
was then allowed to remain. The good woman
took in washing, and having to go out for a short



30 _\ THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

time, left some lace she was ironing on the table ;
on her return she found the lace had been taken
‘ by the bird and neatly woven into the nest on
which it was then sitting. Not liking to disturb
her favourite, and yet fearful of being blamed by
her employer, she went to the lady, and begged
her to see the nest, and say what was to be done.
The nest was left with the lace forming part of it,
and the bird reared its young in safety, the male
bird constantly bringing food to the window, which
the female there received and carried to the nest-
lings; and often, when picking up crumbs from
the table, she would carry them to her mate,
feeding him with dainties he was afraid to take
himself.



Pace!





Ss

wots Laar

*



£2











THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

Tue noble and commanding appearance, the pierc-
ing eye, the great strength and courage of the
Eagle, its rapid flight and the powerful weapons
it possesses, have caused it to be styled the King
of Birds. From the most distant times it has
borne this title ; the Romans regarded it as sacred
to Jupiter, and pictured it conveying his thunder-
bolts in its claw ; and even modern nations esteem
it as the symbol of bravery and daring, and adopt
it for their national emblem; the French, under
Napoleon, employed the Eagle for their standard :
on the coins of the United States of America may
be seen the representation of the Eagle of that
country; and on those of Austria and other
countries similar symbols ; and the Highland chief-
tain of the present day wears an Eagle’s feather in
his cap as a sign of his nobility. Even barbarous
nations look upon this bird as the emblem of cou-



32 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

rage and daring; and their warriors, in the same
way, pride themselves on the possession of its fea-
thers; and so highly do they value them, as to
exchange a horse for the feathers of a single Eagle,
and with them they also ornament their arrows and
calumet, or pipe of peace.

The Golden Eagle is now rarely found in England,
but in the mountainous and inaccessible parts of
Scotland and Ireland its nest or eyrie is still to be
seen; and the bird itself, soaring high in the air on
wide-expanded wings, or swooping down with the
rapidity of an arrow upon its destined prey, may yet
be observed.

The food of the Eagle consists of birds, such as
grouse and water-fowl; or the smaller quadrupeds,
as lambs, hares, rabbits, fawns, young pigs, &c.,
which are seized and borne away by its powerful
hooked talons, by the aid of which it has been known
to bear away young children to its nest. Except
when severely pressed by hunger it refuses carrion,
and all such food as it does not capture for itself.

The nest, which is constructed of sticks, sea-weed,
heather, &c., is placed on the inaccessible part of



THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 33

some precipice, and is used repeatedly, year after
year. The eggs are two in number, and of a fine
white colour. During the time the young require
to be fed, the Eagles are most anxious in pursuit
of food, bringing enormous quantities to the eyrie,
and families have lived for some time on the game
they have purloined from an Eagle’s nest.

The weight of a full-grown male Eagle is about
seventeen pounds, the length about three feet, and
the expanse of the wings nearly as many yards. The
female, as is the case in all the Eagle tribe, is larger,
stronger, and more courageous than the’'male. The
legs are feathered to the talons, which circumstance,
and the tail being of a similar colour to the rest. of
the plumage, distinguishes the Golden Eagle from
a much more common bird, the white-tailed Sea
Eagle, or Erne. This latter, which is rather common
in the Orkney and Shetland Islands, is smaller in
size, and does not possess the noble aspect and
piercing gaze of the Golden Eagle. In food and
habits the Erne resembles somewhat the Vulture, not
refusing to feed on carrion, if chance throws it in

F



34 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

its way, although it also carries off lambs, and does
much damage in the pastoral districts of the Nor- .
thern Islands.

Formerly the Golden Eagle was sometimes used
in falconry, being captured when very young, and
trained with great care and patience to pursue and
destroy the larger kinds of game. It was found,
however, that they could never be rendered so tame
as to remove all fear of danger, for, though capable
of showing much attachment, they are fierce, and
apt to revenge themselves for injuries. A gentle-
man, who lived in the north of Scotland, had, a few
years since, a tame Golden Eagle, which the keeper,
in a fit of anger, punished severely with a horse-
whip. About a week after, the same man happened
to stoop down within reach of its chain, when the
animal, recollecting its late injury, flew at him with
fury and violence, and with its beak and _ talons
severely wounded him, but he was fortunately driven
so far back by the force of the blow as to be out of
the reach of further danger. The screams of the
Eagle alarmed the family, who found the man lying
on the ground covered with blood, and nearly



_THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 35

stunned by the fright and the force of the blow,
whilst the bird was pacing in a most threatening
and majestic manner, and so violent were its efforts —
that it was even dreaded whether it might not break
loose, which indeed, fortunately perhaps for them,
it did—just as they had left the place—and escaped
for ever. Another is mentioned by Bishop Stanley,
as having been so completely tamed as to have
been left at perfect liberty with its wings uncut.
It would frequently use its freedom, and go away
for weeks together. On one occasion it attacked
its owner with violence ; it is supposed for his not
supplying it with its usual food. It was never
known to attack young children, although it fre-
quently despatched young pigs, if they came in its
way when it was hungry. After having been
safely kept for ten or twelve years, it was unfor-
tunately killed by a savage mastiff dog. The
combat between these strange and brave enemies
was not seen, but it must have been a very
severe one; the Eagle was killed on the spot,
but he did not die unavenged, for his enemy ex-
pired shortly after of the wounds he had received.



36 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

The Golden Eagle, when it has pounced down
upon its victim, kills it in all cases by its power-
ful talons, the neck being seized by one foot, and
the body with the other. The bill is not used in
destroying the life of its prey, but only for tearing
it after death. ,

The immense power of the talons, and their
use in enabling the Eagle to secure its food, are
strikingly proved by the following account of an
Eagle in the possession of a celebrated, though
cruel, Italian anatomist, the Abbe Spallanzani,
which was so powerful as to kill dogs that were
much heavier than itself. The Abbe used to
thrust one of these animals into the apartment
where the Eagle was kept, when the bird imme-
diately ruffled the feathers on its head and neck,
and, casting a dreadful look upon its victim,
pounced upon its back ; it held the neck firmly with
one foot, by which the dog was prevented from
turning its head to bite, and with the other grasped
the body of the animal, forcing its sharp talons
deeply into the flesh, and in this manner held the
dog until it was killed.







THE OSTRICH. -

THE Ostrich is amongst birds what the Camel is
amongst quadrupeds; both are formed for travel-
ling across the wide-spread desert and stony tracks
of land prevalent in many parts of Africa. In
speed, however, the bird far outstrips the more
useful beast of burden: her long and immensely
powerful legs enable her to take lengthened strides,
which carry her across the plain with a rapidity
that few animals can equal Her power of out-
stripping the fleetest horse has been noticed ever
since the time that the Book of Job was written,
for there it is remarked that “she lifteth herself
up on high, and scorneth the horse and his rider.”
This extreme rapidity of motion is always noticed
by those who have been fortunate enough to see
G



38 THE OSTRICH.

the bird in her native haunts. One of the most
poetical of modern travellers says :—

“The fleet-footed Ostrich, over the waste,
Speeds like a horseman who rides in haste.”

Another remarkable circumstance connected with
this bird is also noticed in the Book of Job. It
is stated; “‘she leaveth her eggs in the earth, and
warmeth them in the dust.” It appears from.
recent observations, that during the time that the
heat of the sun is sufficiently great to keep the
eggs at the proper degree of heat, the bird for-
sakes them, but sits on them at night. “That
they do this,” says Mr. Jesse, “is shown by the
fact that the Ostrich feathers are of less value
during the period of hatching than at any other,
either before or after. At that time they are
tinged with red, which the Hottentots say is occa-
sioned by their sitting on the red earth to hatch
the eggs. I have this information from Mr. Bur-
chell, who says, he never saw an Ostrich on its
nest in the day-time.”

It is supposed that several Ostriches join together



THE OSTRICH. 39

in the formation of the hollow cavity in the sand
which serves as a nest, and that sometimes as
many as five join together in this kind of partner-
ship, and that they regularly sit on the nest from
night till morning. Each Ostrich lays from ten
to twelve eggs, so that sometimes in one nest there
are fifty or sixty, and a number more are always
found in a shallow trench which surrounds the
nest. '

Mr. Burchell, the celebrated African traveller,
thus describes a nest which he found in a sandy
plain, fourteen miles across :—‘ In our way over
the plain we fell in with an Ostrich’s nest (if so one
may call a bare concavity secreted in the sand), six
feet in diameter, surrounded by a trench equally
shallow and without the smallest trace of any
materials, such as grass, leaves, or sticks, to give it
a resemblance to the nests of other birds. The
Ostriches to which it belonged must at that time
have been feeding at a great distance, or we should
have seen them in so open a plain. The poor
birds at their return would find robbers had visited



40 THE OSTRICH.’

their home in their absence; for we carried off
all their eggs. Within the hollow, and quite ex-
posed, lay twenty-five of these gigantic eggs, and
in the trench were more, intended, as the Hottentots
observe, as the first food of the twenty-five young
ones. Those in the hollow being designed for
hatching, may often prove useless to the traveller,
but the others on the outside will always be found
fit for eating.”

The extreme beauty of the quill-feathers of the
wings and tail have constantly led to their employ- |
ment for crests, and as plumes for helmets, &c.
The crest of three Ostrich feathers, so well known
as belonging to the Prince of Wales, has been
used by the reigning monarch’s eldest son since
the time when Edward the Black Prince slew the
King of Bohemia, at the battle of Cressy, and
appropriated his crest with the motto, “Ich Dien,”
(I serve,”) to his own use.

In confinement, Ostriches may be tamed. suffi-
ciently to carry a boy on their backs; but it is
stated that they are often very fierce towards



THE OSTRICH. 41

strangers, whom they will attempt to push down
by running furiously at them, and if they succeed,
they not only peck at their fallen foe with their
bills, but strike at him with their feet with the
utmost violence; and, from the strength of their
limbs and size of their inner claws, these blows
have been known to kill a man. Whilst thus en-
gaged they make a fierce, hissing noise, their long
throats being swollen out, and mouths open.

They feed on coarse vegetable food of almost
all kinds, and swallow stones and other hard sub-
stances, to assist the grinding action of the gizzard.
The instinct which leads them to do this is very
powerful, and the practice prevails to so great an
extent, that a quantity sufficient to fill a large glass
bottle has been taken out of the stomach of a bird.
They also swallow glass, keys, or other metal arti-
cles, and sometimes with injurious effects, as the
following anecdote will prove :—

«Two remarkably fine Ostriches, male and female,
were kept in the Rotunda, in the Jardin du Roi, at
Paris ; the sky-light over their heads having been

H



42 THE OSTRICH.

broken, the glaziers proceeded to repair it, and in
the course of the work let fall a broken piece of
glass. Not long after this the female Ostrich was
taken ill, and died in great agony; the body was
opened, and the throat and stomach were found to
have been dreadfully cut by the sharp corners of
the glass which she had swallowed. From the
time his companion was taken from him the male
bird had no rest: he appeared always seeking for
his mate, and daily wasted away. He was moved
from the place and allowed more freedom, in the
hope that he would forget his grief, but without
any benefit, for he slowly pined himself to death.”



: ey 3
Wall
sy :





GEESE.

Witp Geese, of which there are several distinct
kinds, are natives of the temperate and colder
regions of Europe, Asia, and America; they asso-
ciate together in large flocks, and naturally reside
in marshy and fenny districts, grazing or feeding
on the grass in a manner which much more resem-
bles the actions of a quadruped than that of a bird.

During the time of feeding they are very watch-
ful, especially if they have settled in any cultivated
part of the country, and are picking up the newly-
sown grain. Before alighting for this purpose they
make several circling flights, carefully looking out
on all sides to see that no enemies are near, and, if
all is safe, they descend and feed. At such times
there is always one of the flock on the look-out,
and he either stands in the highest part of tlie field
or walks slowly with the rest, never, however, ven-



44 "GEESE.

turing to pick up a single grain of corn—his whole
energies being employed in watching. When the
sentry thinks he has performed his fair share of the
duty, he gives the nearest bird to him a sharp jerk;
and Mr. St. John, in his book on the “ Wild
Sports of the Highlands,” states, “I have seen
him pull out a handful of feathers if the first hint
is not immediately attended to, at the same time
uttering a querulous kind of ery. This bird then
takes up the watch,. with neck perfectly upright,
and in due time makes some other bird relieve
guard.” In some parts of Scotland, small parties
of wild Geese often settle in the fields of winter
wheat and young clover, and do much damage,
by grazing on the tender blades and young leaves.
In places where they abound, they are said to be
a great nuisance, and they are captured by setting
the common iron rat-traps in the fields. The
Geese walk over these as they graze, and are
caught by the foot, and the trap being fastened
by a chain, prevents their escape.

All the various kinds of Geese swim with great.



GEESE. 45

ease, floating lightly on the surface of the water. -
Unlike the Ducks, they never dive; on land they
walk with a steady pace, and although moving
slowly, will perform considerable journeys. It is
stated, that a wager was once made as to whe-
ther a flock of Geese or one of Turkeys could be
driven furthest during a long summer’s day ; at
first the Turkeys left the Geese far behind, but,
when tired, they flew up into the trees to rest,
and could not be got down; whilst the slow, but
sure and steady-paced Geese passed them on the
road, strongly reminding one of the old fable of
the Hare and the Tortoise.

Although Geese appear unwieldy, heavy birds,
they fly with great rapidity and strength, either
in a straight single line, with one end foremost,
or in two lines, meeting in a point like the letter
>; it is said that the forémost bird, who has evi-
dently the hardest work to perform, leaves his
place when he is tired to the next in order, and
falls back to the end of the line. |

As a domesticated animal, the Goose is of great



46 GEESE.

value; kept in the neighbourhood of commons,
they live almost entirely on the short grass, re-
quiring only a warm place to sleep, and a little
food for the old birds when laying, and for the
young goslings. Geese are valuable, not only for
the sake of their flesh, which is nutritious and
much esteemed, but for their feathers, the larger
quills of which furnish materials for pens, and the
smaller for stuffing beds, pillows, &c. To obtain
the latter, it is the custom, where many Geese are
kept, to pluck a portion of the feathers every year
from the living birds — a cruel operation, which
not unfrequently destroys the life of the animal.
Geese are usually regarded as very stupid birds,
and their name is used as a term of reproach ;
this, perhaps, arises from their habit of hissing at
strangers. In reality, they are intelligent birds,
capable of very strong attachments to men, and
sometimes to other animals, as in the following
singular instance, related by Colonel Montague, in
which an affection took place between a widowed
Goose and a pointer-dog, who had killed her mate.



GEESE. 47

The dog was very severely beaten for the offence,
and had the body of the bird he had killed tied to
his neck. The solitary Goose became extremely
distressed for the loss of her partner and only com-
panion, and she was apparently attracted to the
dog’s kennel by the sight of her dead husband,
when she seemed determined to persecute the dog
by her constant attendance and continued outcry ;
but after a little time a strict friendship sprung up
between these two strange animals; they fed out
of the same trough, lived under the same roof, and
in the same straw bed kept each other warm; and
when the dog was taken to the field in pursuit of —
game, the outcries of the Goose were loud and in-
cessant, ceasing only on his return.

In a recent work on the “ Passions of Animals,”.
the following anecdote, proving not only their intel-
ligence, but the power they possess of understanding
each other, is related :—‘‘ An old Goose that had
been for a fortnight hatching in a farmer’s kitchen,
was perceived on a sudden to be taken violently ill:
she soon after left the nest, and went to an outhouse,



48 GEESE.

where there was a young Goose that had never
hatched, which she brought with her into the kitchen.
The young one at once got into the old one’s nest,
sat, hatched, and afterwards brought up the brood ;
the old Goose, as soon as the young one had taken
her place, sat down by the side of the nest, and
in a short time died. As the young Goose had
never entered the kitchen before, there is no other
way of explaining this circumstance, except by
supposing that the old one had some means of
communicating her thoughts and desires, which
the other was perfectly able to understand.”

The domestic Goose will sit upon and hatch fif-
teen eggs, which are about twenty-eight days under
the bird before the young goslings make their ap-
pearance. Unlike some other birds, the Gander
never disturbs his mate when on the nest, but sits
by, and most courageously repels any unwelcome
intruders.

BILLING, PRINTER, 108, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, AXD GUILDFORD, SURRBY.










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STORIES ABOUT BIRDS.

BY

A YOUNG NATURALIST.

With Flustrations,

BY

HARRISON WEIR.

LONDON:
DARTON AND CO, 568, HOLBORN HILL.
. ea 2 *.

BILLING, PRINTER,
108, HATTON GanDEx, LONDON,
AND GUILDFORD, sURREY.
PREFACE. |

Birps are undoubtedly the most attractive ob-
jects in the Animal Kingdom—to the young
especially. The beauty of their plumage, resplen-
dent with the most brilliant colours; the grace
and elegance of their movements, and the un-
rivalled melody of their voice, particularly com-
mend them. Hence all children love birds, from
the gentle girl, whose pet canary enlivens the
drawing-room window, to the sturdy country
boy, whose cage of blackbirds, reared from the
nest, hangs by a nail at the side of the cottage-

door.
7. PREFACE.

To encourage this taste, to increase the love
for the beautiful, and to cultivate that sense of
kindness to animals, which a familiarity with
them always produces, are the objects with which
these anecdotes: have been collected by

A YOUNG NATURALIST.

BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

Ovr common Fowls, that are so well known for
their usefulness and breeding, came originally from
the warmer parts of Asia; but the time at which
they were first domesticated by man is lost in the
darkness of distant ages, and, as is the case with
many of our domestic animals, it is not even known
from what wild bird our tame Fowls are descended.

With the habits of common poultry all persons
are more or less acquainted. The generous disposi-
tion of the Cock, giving the best and choicest
morsels of his food to the Hens, and his courage
and perseverance in fighting, are familiar to every
one; whilst the patient endurance of the Hen, in
closely sitting for twenty-one days, and her un-
wearied care in feeding and protecting her chickens,
are equally: familiar.
6 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

To keep Fowls in health, they must have a good
space to range in, so that they may supply them-
selves with worms and insects; they must also be
fed liberally with grain, if many eggs are desired ;
during storms they should have shelter, and their
house should be cleaned out, so as not to become
offensive. The Hen likes the prospect of having a
great many chickens, and, therefore, she generally
lays where there are most eggs. To make her lay
where it is wished, a few chalk or wooden nest-eggs
are placed in the nest ; when she has laid a number
she usually becomes “‘broody,” as the country-
women term it, and wants to sit, when she makes
a strange, chuckling noise, and runs about with her
feathers raised. The desire to hatch chickens is so
strong, that many Hens will sit for days, even on an
empty nest, where they have been accustomed to
lay. On the twenty-first day the young chickens
burst through the shell, which is broken from the
inside, a large end being cut off all round, and
coming away like a lid; the little prisoner being
furnished with a hard point on the end of its beak,
BARN-DOOR FOWLS. 7

with which it is enabled to chip through the walls
of its prison; this point, being useless after the
chicken is once out of the shell, falls off in a few
days. 5

There are many varieties of Domestic Fowls,
differing very much in appearance and usefulness ;
some being more advantageous for producing a great
number of eggs, others for their size ; some laying
in winter, others only in summer. One variety is
perhaps valuable for the delicacy of its chickens,
and another for their hardihood ; among the most. .
useful may be mentioned the Spanish, in its
plumage of unrivalled black; the Polands, with
their tufts; the Hamburgs, who lay so constantly
as to be termed “ every-day layers ;” nor must we
forget the Dorkings, celebrated as table birds—nor
the now fashionable Cochins, from Shanghai. Those
who desire to know how to keep Poultry to the
greatest advantage, and to acquaint themselves
with all the little details of their management,
should obtain the work entitled “Profitable Poul-
try,” published by Darton and Co., illustrated by
8 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

Harrison Weir in the same manner as this Book,
and which is.written by one of the most ex-
perienced Breeders of the day.

It may, perhaps, surprise some of our readers,
who know how courageously Hens in general defend
their chickens, and how they peck at the person
who tries to remove them from the nest when
sitting,-te be told that there are several kinds of
Fowls that never even attempt to hatch their eggs,
but go en laying nearly all the year round, if well
fed, and: furnished with warm, comfortable, clean
houses in the winter; to this class belong those
most useful Fowls termed “ every-day layers,” such
as the Hamburgs, which are also known in some
parts of the country as Pheasant Fowls, because
their feathers are marked somewhat like those of
the Pheasant; they are also called in other parts
Bolton Bays, and Bolton Greys, or Creoles, and
sometimes Corals. In the Northern Counties of
England these small though useful and beautiful
birds are very common, and as layers they far
surpass the common Barn-door breed, as each Hen
BARN-DOOR FOWLS. 9

will lay more than two: hundred eggs in a year.
To the same kind belong the Spanish, who are
also remarkable for the large size of their eggs,
which often weigh nearly or even more than a
quarter of a pound. Other kinds, on the contrary,
sit so steadily and with such obstinacy, that it is
almost impossible to overcome the desire ; and we
have known a Cochin Hen to sit for six weeks
in an empty nest, where she had been accus-
tomed to lay. If Fowls are kept merely as
pets, then the little fairy-like Sebright Bantams,
each feather of which is margined with a dark
band, must be allowed to surpass all the others,
although in size every other kind excels them.
We were much struck the other day by seeing
two full-grown Cocks, side by side, one of which
was a Sebright Bantam weighing under thirteen
ounces, the other a Cochin Cock weighing over
thirteen pounds—the dwarf and the giant of the
poultry tribe ; but even this weight, enormous as
it may appear, is not the greatest that has been
reached by some varieties of fowls. Recently a
10 BARN-DOOR FOWLS.

new breed has been introduced, which is said
to have been originally imported from the Valley
of the Brahma Pootra River, whence it takes its
name, and a specimen has been exhibited in London
of the enormous weight of fifteen and a half pounds.
THE PHEASANT.

Tue Pheasant derives its name from having been
brought by the adventurous Argonauts into Greece
from the banks of the River Phasis, in Colchis,
Asia Minor. Although introduced at so early a
period into Europe, it has never become tho-
roughly inured to the rigours of a northern cli-
mate, and it would speedily perish in this country,
unless preserved and fed with assiduity in winter.
In appearance it is, without doubt, one of the most
striking of our British birds; the resplendent tints
of green and blue in the upper part of the neck
of the male, the bright scarlet of his cheeks, and
the rich colours of the whole plumage, render it
especially beautiful.

The female, however, is oii more sober in
colour, being of a greyish yellow. variegated with
12 THE PHEASANT.

black and brown. As in all domesticated, or half-
domesticated animals, several variations of colour
exist. In the ring-necked variety, which is so
characteristically figured in the engraving, there
is a white band surrounding the neck : that termed
the Bohemian Pheasant has a much lighter ground
to the plumage; and entirely or partially white
individuals are not unfrequent. The wings, which
are small in comparison with the size of the bird,
are much curved; in flying, they are moved very
rapidly, to compensate for their small size, and
produce a loud, whirring sound. The power of
flight possessed by Pheasants is small, but they
run well, and with great rapidity.

During winter ‘the males generally associate
together; in spring each one selects a particular
spot, where he struts, and invites the hens by crow-
ing and clapping his wings, in the same manner
as the Domestic Fowl. The nests, which are made
by the female, are simply a slight hole scratched
in the ground, and generally filled with decayed
leaves, &c.; they usually contain from six to ten
THE PHEASANT. 13

eggs, which are pale greyish in colour. Some-
times the Pheasant mates with the Domestic
Fowl, and it has also been known to do so with
the Black Grouse ; in these cases the young birds
possess, in part, the character of both their parents.
The young Pheasants when first hatched are
covered with down, and are able to seek for food
almost immediately after escaping from the egg,
being born with their eyes open, and their bodily
powers in an active state.

The Pheasant is one of the most injurious
birds to the farmer. Where they aré numerous,
the damage they inflict on the young plants of
winter wheat is very considerable ; and during the
severe weather they injure, very materially, fields
of red clover and turnips; were not their numbers
annually thinned by the sportsman, they would be
found equally injurious in spring-time, in the
newly-sown fields of pulse and corn; but their
ravages are not then so much felt, as, in addition
to their diminished number, they are largely supplied
with insect food.
14 THE PHEASANT.

Pheasants are highly prized as articles of food ;
they are regarded as game-birds by the laws of
this country, and are not allowed to be shot except
by persons who'pay annually a certain sum to the
government for the privilege, and under no circum-
stances may they be killed before the first day of

October in each year.

THE DUCK.

Tue beautiful Mallard, or Wild Duck of the fens
and marshes, is the original bird from which the
Domestic Duck is descended ; the Wild Drake is
doubtless in its plumage one of the most beauti-
ful of all water-birds, and, in many cases, this
beauty is found to prevail to a considerable degree
in its domesticated descendants. The deep grassy
green of the head and neck ending in the narrow
white collar, the brownish chestnut of the breast,
the banded wings, the dark tail with its four re-
curved middle feathers, the grey white of the under
parts, and the orange of the feet, form altogether
a pleasing and harmonious though striking arrange-
ment of colours; in the female we: find a much
more sober dress, the whole plumage being grey-
ish or brownish, and the re-curved feathers of the
16 THE DUCK.

tail are always wanting. Many of the domestic
Ducks and Drakes retain this plumage ; other
varieties, particularly the large and useful breed
termed the Aylesbury, are perfectly white, with
light yellow bills and orange legs ; these lay well,
and the eggs are large. They are also very good
sitters and nurses; and, from the abundance of
their white downy feathers (which are nearly
equal to those of Geese for stuffing beds and
pillows), their large size, and delicate, savoury
flesh, they are in very great demand.

As in all swimming-birds, the plumage of the
Duck is so formed that the outer: layer resists
the entrance of. water, and, by this means, the
feathers next the skin remain dry and warm.
The plumage is enabled to repel the water from
its surface, by being covered with an oily sub-
stance, which is formed in two large glands
situated on the tail; the birds may be frequently
noticed pressing out a portion with the bill, and
covering the feathers with it; the head and neck,
being out of the reach of the bill, are oiled by
THE DUCK. 7.

rubbing them against the other parts of the
body.

The food of the Duck, when wild, consists of
seeds, grasses, worms, slugs, and small animals
inhabiting the muddy margins of the waters.
The mode in which these latter portions of its
food are obtained is very remarkable: the edges
of the bill are furnished with strainers, formed
somewhat like the teeth of a comb; mouthfuls
of soft mud are taken in very rapidly, and, by
the action of the large fleshy tongue, are forced
out through the strainers, any small insects being
retained. The fondness of Ducks for slugs, worms,
and caterpillars, renders them useful in a garden,
especially as they are not liable to do any injury
by scratching up the ground for seeds.

The nest of the Duck is made upon the ground.
The young, which are covered with a yellow
down, swim with ease immediately they are
hatched, taking to the water with the greatest
readiness, Wild Ducks remain during the whole
year in this country, but seem more numerous

c
18 THE DUCK.

in cold weather, particularly in severe winters, at
which time it appears probable that a large number
arrive from the continent of Europe, to pass the
severity of the winter in the milder climate of our
favoured island. During winter, immense numbers
are captured by means of decoys, which are usually
made where there is a large sheet of water in a
marshy or fenny district ; in one part of the borders
of this lake a ditch is dug, about twenty yards
long, and curved at the end farthest from the lake.
This ditch is about four or five yards wide at the
mouth, and narrows gradually to two feet at the
end; the broad end is arched over with young
trees, and the narrow with a net, which forms a
sort of tunnel, getting gradually smaller as the ditch
narrows ; around the-whole, trees and shrubs are
planted, so as to give the place a wild, natural
appearance. There are constantly swimming about
a number of tame Ducks, which are fed in the
decoy, and when they are joined by a number of
wild ones, they are attracted, by feeding, into the
net, and on the fowler showing himself at the
THE DUCK. 19

entrance, the wild birds rush towards the narrow
part, where they are readily captured. A still
greater number are shot, being pursued at night
when they are searching for food, and fired at, as
they rise in flocks, with large guns, capable of
destroying numbers at each discharge.

_As a domestic animal the Duck is of great value ;
allowed to seek for their own food, which, in great
part, consists of worms, slugs, and similar animals,
they cost very little: but, shortly before being
killed, they require a supply of better diet. The
eggs of the Duck are darker in colour than those
of the common Fowl, and they possess a peculiar
flavour, which renders them less adapted for eating
alone than for use in pastry. They require to be
sat upon for thirty-one days before they are
hatched ; and as the Duck does not always sit
steadily, nor cover many eggs, they are frequently
placed under a Hen. This plan is not destitute
of some slight degree of cruelty ; for naturally the
Hen sits a much shorter time, and the young
Ducklings, as soon as hatched, betake themselves
20 THE DUCK.

to the nearest water, greatly to the distress of the
Hen, who runs backwards and forwards along the
margin, expressing her fears in loud and vain cries ;
sometimes she will even fly over the water, and
attempt to settle in the midst of her brood.

The young Ducks, however, progress very well
under her care, as she leads them away from water,
and keeps them out of the damp grass, both of
which are rather injurious than beneficial to them
when very young, and at the same time feeds them
with the same unwearied care and attention that
she would pay to her own natural offspring.

After hatching several broods of Ducklings, the
Hens become accustomed to their taking to the
water ; and one Hen that had always had Ducks’
eggs placed under her, on being permitted to hatch
her own, led the young Chickens to the edge of
the pond, and seemed much surprised that they
showed no inclination to enter.

THE MACAW.

In the warmer regions of the earth, where the
dense forests are clothed with verdure during the
entire year, and where fruit of various . descriptions
is always abounding, may be found, in immense
numbers, a vast tribe of Birds, consisting of several
distinct yet nearly related families, known to
naturalists under the names of Parrots, Lorys,
Cockatoos, and Macaws. These Birds are, gene-
rally speaking, inhabitants of the trees, and are
furnished with peculiarly constructed feet, by
means of which they are enabled to climb readily
from branch to branch ; their toes are four on each
foot, and instead of being placed, as is usual in
birds, three in front and one behind, they are in
D
22 THE MACAW.

pairs, two before and two behind. This kind of
foot gives them enormous power of grasping; and
they are also capable of using the foot as a hand
for taking up any object and carrying it to the
mouth In addition to this most serviceable con-
trivance, the upper jaw is hooked, and forms a
most important auxiliary in climbing from bough
to bough.

Of all birds they are the most intelligent, being
readily taught to whistle tunes, and to repeat words
or even long sentences, although the natural voice
of all the different varieties is harsh and disagree-
able. The capability of imitating sounds, which is
possessed to so great a degree by these animals,
seems to be in some way connected with the
peculiar nature of the tongue; which, instead of
being horny and pointed, as in most birds, is thick
and fleshy, resembling much more the tongue of a
quadruped than that of a bird.

In cultivated districts of the country they do
much damage to the crops of fruits—and, in the
United States of America especially, are objects
THE MACAW. 23

of dislike to the farmer and agriculturist, their
brilliant colours in no way compensating, in his
eyes, for their destructive propensities. In this
country they are only known as domestic pets,
and their gorgeous plumage finds for them
general admirers. So highly are they prized as
ornamental birds, that from five to ten guineas
is the ordinary price of a fine Macaw; and
when the power of talking is added to their
other attractions, much higher sums are frequently
obtained.

It is sometimes imagined that these Birds under- _
stand the meaning of the words they utter, but
there is really no foundation for such an opinion ;
they are generally taught to talk unmeaning sen-
tences, such as ‘“ What’s o'clock,” “ Pretty Poll,”
&ec. A relative of ours had a very fine bird, that
was sent from the house during the illness of a
lady, and was kept in a barber’s shop upon the
river side. On the lady’s recovery he was brought
home and welcomed by a large party in the drawing
room, when he instantly poured forth such a flood
24 THE MACAW.

of bad language that he had to be immediately
banished ; and it was thought that the barber had
taught him to talk like a blackguard, knowing that
he would probably have to keep him after his expul-
sion from respectable society.

THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

Boru these well-known, and rather common birds,
are natives of the wooded and cultivated parts of
our own country; their size, the loudness and
mellowness of their song, and their ‘habit of fre-
quenting our gardens in search of food, cause them
to be familiar to most persons.

Shakspere, who is not more remarkable for the
correctness with which he describes the different
characters of men, than the appearance of trees,
birds, and other objects of Natural History, makes
one of his simple country characters sing the fol-
lowing song :—

“ The Ouzel Cock, so black of hue,
With orange tawny bill ;

The Throstle with his note so true,
And Wren with little quill.”
26 THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

The Ouzel Cock is the male Blackbird, which
is also, in many parts of the country, termed the
“Merle ;” the female and young birds are of a
dark, dusky brown, the bill being tawny, but not
orange. Who, when walking along the “ hedge-
rows green,” has not been almost startled by the
sudden outburst and long chuckling ery of the
Blackbird, as he flies away on the further side of
the hedge, passing through, when at a safe dis-
tance, as if to see who it is that has alarmed
him ?—a habit which renders it difficult for one
person to get within shot of them; but they are
readily obtained by two persons, one on each side
of the hedge.

In winter, Blackbirds resort to the neighbour-
hood of houses and gardens, and may often be
seen searching for snails and worms, or feeding
on the few remaining fruits and berries. In addi-
tion to the ery which they make when disturbed,
the cock has a loud, mellow song, which he
continues to pour forth from spring-time to the
end of summer. The nest of the Blackbird is
THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD. .- .

large and open; it is formed of fibrous materials, -
as grass, roots, moss, &e., cemented together with
mud and lined with grass; it contains usually
about five pale-green eggs, of a bluish-cast, spotted
with brown. The plumage of the young birds re-
sembles closely that of the female in colour.

The Thrush, whose loud song surpasses, in
mellowness and clearness of tone, that of most
other birds, is.as common, though perhaps not as
familiar, as the Blackbird. In winter, however,
it frequents our gardens—sometimes in small
flocks, seeking for snails, which form a large and
favourite part of its food. Thrushes have been
observed to bring snails repeatedly to the same
spot in a gravel path, where two projecting stones
furnished a convenient means of fixing them,
whilst they were broken by repeated blows with
the beak. Worms, seeds, and berries form an
addition to its fare, and both it and the Blackbird
repay themselves for their music by a toll levied
on all the soft fruits of the garden, though there
is little doubt that their utility in destroying snails,
28 THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

grubs, and caterpillars much more than counter-
balances any injury that they may do.

The nest of the Throstle is even less finished
than that of the Ouzel, being frequently fur-
nished with no other lining than cow-dung or
mud; the eggs of both are very similar. “The
Throstle, with his note so true,” has, like its
companion, the Ouzel Cock, received several names ;
it is generally termed the Thrush, or Song-Thrush,
but in many parts of the country is known only
as the “Mavis.” Both the Song-Thrush and
Blackbird remain in this country throughout the
year, differing in this respect from some other
birds of the same tribe, as the Fieldfare and
Ring-Ouzel, whith are migratory.

When not persecyted, Blackbirds become ex-
ceedingly familiar; in captivity they are readily
tamed, and will feed freely from the hand; those
reared from the nest may even be suffered to fly
about without attempting to escape; and, as the
following anecdote will show, will even build their
nest in the house.
THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD. 29

A labouring man of the village of River, near
Dover, reared a young hen Blackbird from the
nest, in the spring of 1844, and so perfectly tamed
it that it was allowed its full liberty in flying in
and out of the house at will, and roosting in the
little kitchen parlour. Early in the spring of the
next year it’ disappeared, and was mourned as
lost ; but at the end of a few weeks it returned
with a mate, which, after a short time, lost some
of its natural fearfulness, and would stand on the
sill of the window, beyond which, however, it
never ventured. The hen bird built its nest, and
hatched and reared its young ones, and at length
flew off with them. In the spring of 1846 they
again returned, the male bird taking up its old
position on the window, and again a nest was
begun ; but the place chosen being on the little
dresser between two plates, was so inconvenient to
the woman of the house that she destroyed it ; but
the bird began another in the same place, and it
was then allowed to remain. The good woman
took in washing, and having to go out for a short
30 _\ THE THRUSH AND BLACKBIRD.

time, left some lace she was ironing on the table ;
on her return she found the lace had been taken
‘ by the bird and neatly woven into the nest on
which it was then sitting. Not liking to disturb
her favourite, and yet fearful of being blamed by
her employer, she went to the lady, and begged
her to see the nest, and say what was to be done.
The nest was left with the lace forming part of it,
and the bird reared its young in safety, the male
bird constantly bringing food to the window, which
the female there received and carried to the nest-
lings; and often, when picking up crumbs from
the table, she would carry them to her mate,
feeding him with dainties he was afraid to take
himself.
Pace!





Ss

wots Laar

*



£2








THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

Tue noble and commanding appearance, the pierc-
ing eye, the great strength and courage of the
Eagle, its rapid flight and the powerful weapons
it possesses, have caused it to be styled the King
of Birds. From the most distant times it has
borne this title ; the Romans regarded it as sacred
to Jupiter, and pictured it conveying his thunder-
bolts in its claw ; and even modern nations esteem
it as the symbol of bravery and daring, and adopt
it for their national emblem; the French, under
Napoleon, employed the Eagle for their standard :
on the coins of the United States of America may
be seen the representation of the Eagle of that
country; and on those of Austria and other
countries similar symbols ; and the Highland chief-
tain of the present day wears an Eagle’s feather in
his cap as a sign of his nobility. Even barbarous
nations look upon this bird as the emblem of cou-
32 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

rage and daring; and their warriors, in the same
way, pride themselves on the possession of its fea-
thers; and so highly do they value them, as to
exchange a horse for the feathers of a single Eagle,
and with them they also ornament their arrows and
calumet, or pipe of peace.

The Golden Eagle is now rarely found in England,
but in the mountainous and inaccessible parts of
Scotland and Ireland its nest or eyrie is still to be
seen; and the bird itself, soaring high in the air on
wide-expanded wings, or swooping down with the
rapidity of an arrow upon its destined prey, may yet
be observed.

The food of the Eagle consists of birds, such as
grouse and water-fowl; or the smaller quadrupeds,
as lambs, hares, rabbits, fawns, young pigs, &c.,
which are seized and borne away by its powerful
hooked talons, by the aid of which it has been known
to bear away young children to its nest. Except
when severely pressed by hunger it refuses carrion,
and all such food as it does not capture for itself.

The nest, which is constructed of sticks, sea-weed,
heather, &c., is placed on the inaccessible part of
THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 33

some precipice, and is used repeatedly, year after
year. The eggs are two in number, and of a fine
white colour. During the time the young require
to be fed, the Eagles are most anxious in pursuit
of food, bringing enormous quantities to the eyrie,
and families have lived for some time on the game
they have purloined from an Eagle’s nest.

The weight of a full-grown male Eagle is about
seventeen pounds, the length about three feet, and
the expanse of the wings nearly as many yards. The
female, as is the case in all the Eagle tribe, is larger,
stronger, and more courageous than the’'male. The
legs are feathered to the talons, which circumstance,
and the tail being of a similar colour to the rest. of
the plumage, distinguishes the Golden Eagle from
a much more common bird, the white-tailed Sea
Eagle, or Erne. This latter, which is rather common
in the Orkney and Shetland Islands, is smaller in
size, and does not possess the noble aspect and
piercing gaze of the Golden Eagle. In food and
habits the Erne resembles somewhat the Vulture, not
refusing to feed on carrion, if chance throws it in

F
34 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

its way, although it also carries off lambs, and does
much damage in the pastoral districts of the Nor- .
thern Islands.

Formerly the Golden Eagle was sometimes used
in falconry, being captured when very young, and
trained with great care and patience to pursue and
destroy the larger kinds of game. It was found,
however, that they could never be rendered so tame
as to remove all fear of danger, for, though capable
of showing much attachment, they are fierce, and
apt to revenge themselves for injuries. A gentle-
man, who lived in the north of Scotland, had, a few
years since, a tame Golden Eagle, which the keeper,
in a fit of anger, punished severely with a horse-
whip. About a week after, the same man happened
to stoop down within reach of its chain, when the
animal, recollecting its late injury, flew at him with
fury and violence, and with its beak and _ talons
severely wounded him, but he was fortunately driven
so far back by the force of the blow as to be out of
the reach of further danger. The screams of the
Eagle alarmed the family, who found the man lying
on the ground covered with blood, and nearly
_THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 35

stunned by the fright and the force of the blow,
whilst the bird was pacing in a most threatening
and majestic manner, and so violent were its efforts —
that it was even dreaded whether it might not break
loose, which indeed, fortunately perhaps for them,
it did—just as they had left the place—and escaped
for ever. Another is mentioned by Bishop Stanley,
as having been so completely tamed as to have
been left at perfect liberty with its wings uncut.
It would frequently use its freedom, and go away
for weeks together. On one occasion it attacked
its owner with violence ; it is supposed for his not
supplying it with its usual food. It was never
known to attack young children, although it fre-
quently despatched young pigs, if they came in its
way when it was hungry. After having been
safely kept for ten or twelve years, it was unfor-
tunately killed by a savage mastiff dog. The
combat between these strange and brave enemies
was not seen, but it must have been a very
severe one; the Eagle was killed on the spot,
but he did not die unavenged, for his enemy ex-
pired shortly after of the wounds he had received.
36 THE GOLDEN EAGLE.

The Golden Eagle, when it has pounced down
upon its victim, kills it in all cases by its power-
ful talons, the neck being seized by one foot, and
the body with the other. The bill is not used in
destroying the life of its prey, but only for tearing
it after death. ,

The immense power of the talons, and their
use in enabling the Eagle to secure its food, are
strikingly proved by the following account of an
Eagle in the possession of a celebrated, though
cruel, Italian anatomist, the Abbe Spallanzani,
which was so powerful as to kill dogs that were
much heavier than itself. The Abbe used to
thrust one of these animals into the apartment
where the Eagle was kept, when the bird imme-
diately ruffled the feathers on its head and neck,
and, casting a dreadful look upon its victim,
pounced upon its back ; it held the neck firmly with
one foot, by which the dog was prevented from
turning its head to bite, and with the other grasped
the body of the animal, forcing its sharp talons
deeply into the flesh, and in this manner held the
dog until it was killed.

THE OSTRICH. -

THE Ostrich is amongst birds what the Camel is
amongst quadrupeds; both are formed for travel-
ling across the wide-spread desert and stony tracks
of land prevalent in many parts of Africa. In
speed, however, the bird far outstrips the more
useful beast of burden: her long and immensely
powerful legs enable her to take lengthened strides,
which carry her across the plain with a rapidity
that few animals can equal Her power of out-
stripping the fleetest horse has been noticed ever
since the time that the Book of Job was written,
for there it is remarked that “she lifteth herself
up on high, and scorneth the horse and his rider.”
This extreme rapidity of motion is always noticed
by those who have been fortunate enough to see
G
38 THE OSTRICH.

the bird in her native haunts. One of the most
poetical of modern travellers says :—

“The fleet-footed Ostrich, over the waste,
Speeds like a horseman who rides in haste.”

Another remarkable circumstance connected with
this bird is also noticed in the Book of Job. It
is stated; “‘she leaveth her eggs in the earth, and
warmeth them in the dust.” It appears from.
recent observations, that during the time that the
heat of the sun is sufficiently great to keep the
eggs at the proper degree of heat, the bird for-
sakes them, but sits on them at night. “That
they do this,” says Mr. Jesse, “is shown by the
fact that the Ostrich feathers are of less value
during the period of hatching than at any other,
either before or after. At that time they are
tinged with red, which the Hottentots say is occa-
sioned by their sitting on the red earth to hatch
the eggs. I have this information from Mr. Bur-
chell, who says, he never saw an Ostrich on its
nest in the day-time.”

It is supposed that several Ostriches join together
THE OSTRICH. 39

in the formation of the hollow cavity in the sand
which serves as a nest, and that sometimes as
many as five join together in this kind of partner-
ship, and that they regularly sit on the nest from
night till morning. Each Ostrich lays from ten
to twelve eggs, so that sometimes in one nest there
are fifty or sixty, and a number more are always
found in a shallow trench which surrounds the
nest. '

Mr. Burchell, the celebrated African traveller,
thus describes a nest which he found in a sandy
plain, fourteen miles across :—‘ In our way over
the plain we fell in with an Ostrich’s nest (if so one
may call a bare concavity secreted in the sand), six
feet in diameter, surrounded by a trench equally
shallow and without the smallest trace of any
materials, such as grass, leaves, or sticks, to give it
a resemblance to the nests of other birds. The
Ostriches to which it belonged must at that time
have been feeding at a great distance, or we should
have seen them in so open a plain. The poor
birds at their return would find robbers had visited
40 THE OSTRICH.’

their home in their absence; for we carried off
all their eggs. Within the hollow, and quite ex-
posed, lay twenty-five of these gigantic eggs, and
in the trench were more, intended, as the Hottentots
observe, as the first food of the twenty-five young
ones. Those in the hollow being designed for
hatching, may often prove useless to the traveller,
but the others on the outside will always be found
fit for eating.”

The extreme beauty of the quill-feathers of the
wings and tail have constantly led to their employ- |
ment for crests, and as plumes for helmets, &c.
The crest of three Ostrich feathers, so well known
as belonging to the Prince of Wales, has been
used by the reigning monarch’s eldest son since
the time when Edward the Black Prince slew the
King of Bohemia, at the battle of Cressy, and
appropriated his crest with the motto, “Ich Dien,”
(I serve,”) to his own use.

In confinement, Ostriches may be tamed. suffi-
ciently to carry a boy on their backs; but it is
stated that they are often very fierce towards
THE OSTRICH. 41

strangers, whom they will attempt to push down
by running furiously at them, and if they succeed,
they not only peck at their fallen foe with their
bills, but strike at him with their feet with the
utmost violence; and, from the strength of their
limbs and size of their inner claws, these blows
have been known to kill a man. Whilst thus en-
gaged they make a fierce, hissing noise, their long
throats being swollen out, and mouths open.

They feed on coarse vegetable food of almost
all kinds, and swallow stones and other hard sub-
stances, to assist the grinding action of the gizzard.
The instinct which leads them to do this is very
powerful, and the practice prevails to so great an
extent, that a quantity sufficient to fill a large glass
bottle has been taken out of the stomach of a bird.
They also swallow glass, keys, or other metal arti-
cles, and sometimes with injurious effects, as the
following anecdote will prove :—

«Two remarkably fine Ostriches, male and female,
were kept in the Rotunda, in the Jardin du Roi, at
Paris ; the sky-light over their heads having been

H
42 THE OSTRICH.

broken, the glaziers proceeded to repair it, and in
the course of the work let fall a broken piece of
glass. Not long after this the female Ostrich was
taken ill, and died in great agony; the body was
opened, and the throat and stomach were found to
have been dreadfully cut by the sharp corners of
the glass which she had swallowed. From the
time his companion was taken from him the male
bird had no rest: he appeared always seeking for
his mate, and daily wasted away. He was moved
from the place and allowed more freedom, in the
hope that he would forget his grief, but without
any benefit, for he slowly pined himself to death.”
: ey 3
Wall
sy :


GEESE.

Witp Geese, of which there are several distinct
kinds, are natives of the temperate and colder
regions of Europe, Asia, and America; they asso-
ciate together in large flocks, and naturally reside
in marshy and fenny districts, grazing or feeding
on the grass in a manner which much more resem-
bles the actions of a quadruped than that of a bird.

During the time of feeding they are very watch-
ful, especially if they have settled in any cultivated
part of the country, and are picking up the newly-
sown grain. Before alighting for this purpose they
make several circling flights, carefully looking out
on all sides to see that no enemies are near, and, if
all is safe, they descend and feed. At such times
there is always one of the flock on the look-out,
and he either stands in the highest part of tlie field
or walks slowly with the rest, never, however, ven-
44 "GEESE.

turing to pick up a single grain of corn—his whole
energies being employed in watching. When the
sentry thinks he has performed his fair share of the
duty, he gives the nearest bird to him a sharp jerk;
and Mr. St. John, in his book on the “ Wild
Sports of the Highlands,” states, “I have seen
him pull out a handful of feathers if the first hint
is not immediately attended to, at the same time
uttering a querulous kind of ery. This bird then
takes up the watch,. with neck perfectly upright,
and in due time makes some other bird relieve
guard.” In some parts of Scotland, small parties
of wild Geese often settle in the fields of winter
wheat and young clover, and do much damage,
by grazing on the tender blades and young leaves.
In places where they abound, they are said to be
a great nuisance, and they are captured by setting
the common iron rat-traps in the fields. The
Geese walk over these as they graze, and are
caught by the foot, and the trap being fastened
by a chain, prevents their escape.

All the various kinds of Geese swim with great.
GEESE. 45

ease, floating lightly on the surface of the water. -
Unlike the Ducks, they never dive; on land they
walk with a steady pace, and although moving
slowly, will perform considerable journeys. It is
stated, that a wager was once made as to whe-
ther a flock of Geese or one of Turkeys could be
driven furthest during a long summer’s day ; at
first the Turkeys left the Geese far behind, but,
when tired, they flew up into the trees to rest,
and could not be got down; whilst the slow, but
sure and steady-paced Geese passed them on the
road, strongly reminding one of the old fable of
the Hare and the Tortoise.

Although Geese appear unwieldy, heavy birds,
they fly with great rapidity and strength, either
in a straight single line, with one end foremost,
or in two lines, meeting in a point like the letter
>; it is said that the forémost bird, who has evi-
dently the hardest work to perform, leaves his
place when he is tired to the next in order, and
falls back to the end of the line. |

As a domesticated animal, the Goose is of great
46 GEESE.

value; kept in the neighbourhood of commons,
they live almost entirely on the short grass, re-
quiring only a warm place to sleep, and a little
food for the old birds when laying, and for the
young goslings. Geese are valuable, not only for
the sake of their flesh, which is nutritious and
much esteemed, but for their feathers, the larger
quills of which furnish materials for pens, and the
smaller for stuffing beds, pillows, &c. To obtain
the latter, it is the custom, where many Geese are
kept, to pluck a portion of the feathers every year
from the living birds — a cruel operation, which
not unfrequently destroys the life of the animal.
Geese are usually regarded as very stupid birds,
and their name is used as a term of reproach ;
this, perhaps, arises from their habit of hissing at
strangers. In reality, they are intelligent birds,
capable of very strong attachments to men, and
sometimes to other animals, as in the following
singular instance, related by Colonel Montague, in
which an affection took place between a widowed
Goose and a pointer-dog, who had killed her mate.
GEESE. 47

The dog was very severely beaten for the offence,
and had the body of the bird he had killed tied to
his neck. The solitary Goose became extremely
distressed for the loss of her partner and only com-
panion, and she was apparently attracted to the
dog’s kennel by the sight of her dead husband,
when she seemed determined to persecute the dog
by her constant attendance and continued outcry ;
but after a little time a strict friendship sprung up
between these two strange animals; they fed out
of the same trough, lived under the same roof, and
in the same straw bed kept each other warm; and
when the dog was taken to the field in pursuit of —
game, the outcries of the Goose were loud and in-
cessant, ceasing only on his return.

In a recent work on the “ Passions of Animals,”.
the following anecdote, proving not only their intel-
ligence, but the power they possess of understanding
each other, is related :—‘‘ An old Goose that had
been for a fortnight hatching in a farmer’s kitchen,
was perceived on a sudden to be taken violently ill:
she soon after left the nest, and went to an outhouse,
48 GEESE.

where there was a young Goose that had never
hatched, which she brought with her into the kitchen.
The young one at once got into the old one’s nest,
sat, hatched, and afterwards brought up the brood ;
the old Goose, as soon as the young one had taken
her place, sat down by the side of the nest, and
in a short time died. As the young Goose had
never entered the kitchen before, there is no other
way of explaining this circumstance, except by
supposing that the old one had some means of
communicating her thoughts and desires, which
the other was perfectly able to understand.”

The domestic Goose will sit upon and hatch fif-
teen eggs, which are about twenty-eight days under
the bird before the young goslings make their ap-
pearance. Unlike some other birds, the Gander
never disturbs his mate when on the nest, but sits
by, and most courageously repels any unwelcome
intruders.

BILLING, PRINTER, 108, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, AXD GUILDFORD, SURRBY.

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f440a36ce5567f2b787c8ad8b7dd44e995b2d6a7
'2012-05-13T09:13:46-04:00'
describe
'10609' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCJ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
f4b0210395d065ba35f15020a6a7262e
3e33259a4a07b2a3883f3b89767e3f2b0a0f577b
describe
'3690664' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCK' 'sip-files00004.tif'
73c68b8c414fb2cf3ac38a233244d87f
ea32963899c8354a28cf632fe175dac2c9331145
'2012-05-13T09:17:49-04:00'
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCL' 'sip-files00004.txt'
2247771fd3e330698ba952d452981125
cc2b26fdfef487043044c2c157fbd859f09d2a82
'2012-05-13T09:17:54-04:00'
describe
'3412' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCM' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
a820ac8376a597e2d343d7b59ceb6279
4f81769f3643fcc61c405498d8d3b59bd55856e2
'2012-05-13T09:17:32-04:00'
describe
'363449' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCN' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
6e58ac8239896849a064c9c57cf9ad7a
2223e7b607f69bbc791753c83b516fa40bfdc61a
'2012-05-13T09:18:48-04:00'
describe
'13437' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCO' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
348c757e17e34ba2348895f0204973b2
ab4d7c62fa965a3d6936232cf51494a325f3c7fb
'2012-05-13T09:13:23-04:00'
describe
'2217' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCP' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ef7f698f4dd287b4e073c75e8df70c63
c066a48241f13c0d202bbc41aff33fd577bcb4c8
'2012-05-13T09:13:39-04:00'
describe
'4332' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCQ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
285bd8e40d72c9549f4b49ddc09eacc7
08c6ec1ab1ede96f303cfdbbdb2c8baf13e1142f
'2012-05-13T09:14:37-04:00'
describe
'3395120' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCR' 'sip-files00005.tif'
8c8c99fc9dc17de7a8dcc0959dad5b94
e4ba273e7626b501b8b2b55f52e749010bbef2cf
'2012-05-13T09:17:10-04:00'
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCS' 'sip-files00005.txt'
8042828fb93d4c70d30cd8690d317339
a9dcd395069c1b24a9ec00ce303a9f4877b0549c
'2012-05-13T09:16:56-04:00'
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCT' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
7962305770537a4c3a2d9e17b5a96bc7
602bbd5308fce5819b93834d0020c1c84a00d048
describe
'446623' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCU' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7627bf780c4e0f7d4f6669555607e375
217f9f640d857085417228f0f0d3ce1c4690f7f8
'2012-05-13T09:17:28-04:00'
describe
'47543' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCV' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
a570aa9d265165a24b7109fd12bf7772
5f3f63859b32e3f2570676e521308e3f17fc5f3b
'2012-05-13T09:18:35-04:00'
describe
'14079' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCW' 'sip-files00006.pro'
7bba98bd4b58d654b3aa30038eba219a
a580f930cf90f96518cca624cf83445c2bcd8566
'2012-05-13T09:18:02-04:00'
describe
'18435' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
a7bf2e47783535f339f9e0fb057f9db4
a050762e0672474a4d1325dfdbd37a20155d4e75
'2012-05-13T09:13:47-04:00'
describe
'3576277' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCY' 'sip-files00006.tif'
ca3d9ec80d0ab206c73766661e564033
c048c35c6ebd48b75e40ca41558d5dadc857ffd8
describe
'584' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHCZ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
88d7e00873701b84d8753618eda44b13
e8bd117b465c1ecc7c45189f11ac39e74b7a752d
'2012-05-13T09:16:36-04:00'
describe
'5472' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDA' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
4ce2cd37e24c2debccb4d2f7b7e23674
96b0babfdfdbbf1c477f111eb443df8ee8a44be7
describe
'399743' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDB' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
d6887a52818eaac2b2f7ff89a9675a5e
b4da7b1f6d9e0ed313cfc6d2321b128c1edb774a
describe
'32120' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDC' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
fc3e021aea6fdb43272d146d548d32e2
f6d09ae424857aec51320783bc6690ed597de27c
describe
'7211' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDD' 'sip-files00007.pro'
e17833984634b387cad101ebf8387845
a775e7dfa1bac2707275dcc3bfc96ba6c00663f4
'2012-05-13T09:17:22-04:00'
describe
'11595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
df7744a526b1ce8a052d3e364d0856bc
3b24ddb39b27d859ce5365215869330e8050358c
'2012-05-13T09:16:53-04:00'
describe
'3437380' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
3d459d4f038479c244499eef9e044d38
18defafd8a357181b4febe12b9434ae762a6037b
'2012-05-13T09:18:31-04:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDG' 'sip-files00007.txt'
72c82035f170a4842005b78e2d8c41c1
84c7ad1549323c14a4dd7c39a7620604b511ef21
'2012-05-13T09:14:35-04:00'
describe
'2283194' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDH' 'sip-files00007a.jp2'
bef51f94cfe92bccf36707f147b09952
f5c9b52ac32ad48aea167226d5d7609461935f27
'2012-05-13T09:14:44-04:00'
describe
'57898' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDI' 'sip-files00007a.jpg'
d585ebabbfd103da6aa8a7f009f9cd9f
c15f0e5681782975c1fe0fcf36df2ec4994bcb18
'2012-05-13T09:14:55-04:00'
describe
'489' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDJ' 'sip-files00007a.pro'
fc508dbddbe07bf6e9744d1280177aa3
80b50865200b93a899b4f27969396907bed52cbf
describe
'15310' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDK' 'sip-files00007a.QC.jpg'
cc0ab4d80eeab473d99859f245885fb2
21d16f6319529ef2f759d1b5a8159c64de3ad855
describe
'54798132' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDL' 'sip-files00007a.tif'
d153ef838f584b83d01adf40c0bb76b9
995487fa24fc9ed4c19fac23451f5429f6698907
'2012-05-13T09:19:09-04:00'
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDM' 'sip-files00007a.txt'
5412c3dff818b439bd23e9d69685aa78
8b9b4000843f5f6eb23afe1bf4e51c10203ed92f
'2012-05-13T09:13:29-04:00'
describe
'4503' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDN' 'sip-files00007athm.jpg'
7e407428902c8cf2090e4b3cefd37279
47b0a0c7156a67b81c096facb83af4370a3753ad
'2012-05-13T09:18:33-04:00'
describe
'3764' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDO' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d4e28fd1d2191cd7b2a55080afd49666
2c0b7f9a3f7fe1b8836aeb2a3869ebda139e760a
'2012-05-13T09:16:32-04:00'
describe
'440839' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
e56165309c0d53bb14537ea3b28640a7
4133d35cdc5cd20833a36b5dcad0e8e1cd53c329
'2012-05-13T09:16:34-04:00'
describe
'67610' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
edb7326a1a73b8d84b1ef131c707e876
41e2550f0b51dadd512f157c15fa82034b341e03
'2012-05-13T09:18:10-04:00'
describe
'20783' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDR' 'sip-files00008.pro'
0abad9ef8974ad038d6d8c14adfe7a25
9bd756b050725b5cf84f4513f83641f12555b940
'2012-05-13T09:16:18-04:00'
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDS' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
275abf37fb3f9f43c38970c48884bce7
99978e2e41058afad2b06bb03de4417327837549
describe
'3549336' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDT' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f99decee3dbd4449698294b74bace5d2
1cafee471611a6dcc14c9c987b0858dd4af332d1
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDU' 'sip-files00008.txt'
9bcf5481fe8e991341a14b55419a9a32
23bfa40fdf43a0762f413a47b89d1474bdfaf633
'2012-05-13T09:16:48-04:00'
describe
'7016' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDV' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
d1ff4a6fed2ff28cfc5e476a97e4f38f
7cbb2832f250740d8412a36b6cdf1efceb0b5c91
'2012-05-13T09:19:10-04:00'
describe
'462851' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
071aa99fe0171da481bfb3d6c11b6f97
cbab80bd82c661bd683a0ef5abf66363d71ff03e
'2012-05-13T09:13:35-04:00'
describe
'80179' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDX' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
66496cf2d933fef35f0a594708f3f13d
1bc7692af166cf11b9becc80bd7a6a2ab55f7998
'2012-05-13T09:15:48-04:00'
describe
'29443' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
e771df19b9014a9ab1eaa9047f3dded8
2354deb4f42c27b36cb63837b75a35aacf8f7ceb
describe
'30378' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHDZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
62fbcf0cd6f88735852f49acb37ee873
531ce83f6142900ed6d54f872492652219a6be06
'2012-05-13T09:16:38-04:00'
describe
'3726656' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
618e965ec9124637743951fa3eec7eb9
09cb459b01817d4915f2ffb9326ee20df54f04cb
'2012-05-13T09:16:46-04:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bba6709da3ec67082181f5dc3c544a2e
d39b7398880b41f9107acb984de67e3fc8c11433
'2012-05-13T09:17:47-04:00'
describe
'8057' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
1fed0d676f2eb85d5a8b9ea259cb9853
83edacc63bd996b31aa6bf1a49463732de8d3f8a
'2012-05-13T09:18:28-04:00'
describe
'466752' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHED' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
325c526f8f16ee896145259463effa5f
3e996befe4e063d96db8e939c18a5d17bffadfcc
describe
'78219' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
41e192f42b3d960c03ee64e81fbb3feb
e192efd6cecf0e26e8b9c3dbadd706ba000da4ac
'2012-05-13T09:17:01-04:00'
describe
'27901' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEF' 'sip-files00010.pro'
ab3034e1c79f9289f74a269b9dad45db
6dd005f9c774529dcc3d04863a216e90db2a13c5
'2012-05-13T09:16:05-04:00'
describe
'28833' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEG' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
607879a2fc821f735d75a1632279dcfa
e6d4d2844689fd059411174884ad0c6e7e9811a0
describe
'3757844' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEH' 'sip-files00010.tif'
44922777c54a02635228f77aa845ed77
2fbc8481941a223842559f2cf9b641d79ca0fd9b
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEI' 'sip-files00010.txt'
17e692c62948ee2aaf57d5aa61de5f26
57e5fe41588566b82acee6b2ee11e0dcc59e6f12
'2012-05-13T09:18:00-04:00'
describe
'7930' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEJ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
32196c8351e131ae33e15225fc1e1a55
a363517668f7a75aa16aefcf3d37bf511f2905ea
'2012-05-13T09:16:10-04:00'
describe
'438349' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f81b83303fd4000b6cc6b7f220a6769c
9519614952547f18781c7e2865d1d562043c74f9
'2012-05-13T09:16:27-04:00'
describe
'81811' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
19b8ed6b9c34c360393957488eddd10c
6b5e6488b2c2d55d077092debb161305bdd16917
describe
'27918' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEM' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cc2bce637b480a8d0cfb4ccfff71875e
2cca7d67ba61cc46ea0322a9694e3a6e7fb086bb
describe
'31580' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEN' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b438898ffe0d437091144bb8716459c1
33ef121490900337aaa4b3895c56075f43969a4f
'2012-05-13T09:18:41-04:00'
describe
'3530332' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0ca84aa4e4fb4a77c533f284ea55a46d
4b5170e9369d4c25b4396f75717770766e9aec14
'2012-05-13T09:18:50-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
6a0ad70b627afae5290130697e7a22b8
edad40f20e561830d24290eb6c33f09691ed186e
describe
'8677' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEQ' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
f30c105dc29e968ccddd85f217d69a92
c49fcdbb68cb7dee1c5ee2fe7c6264bb0c2bc4a1
'2012-05-13T09:17:00-04:00'
describe
'455003' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHER' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
e1a46745ae82093376ba753accb1f75a
1779968135bc09c92916307903a6920a0a3f805c
describe
'81320' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHES' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
71e39953f1a32ab55369116d96ee6126
9c23976941bbf7de8636c6ebc6608c3cb4e0002e
'2012-05-13T09:17:39-04:00'
describe
'27835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHET' 'sip-files00012.pro'
21799a4d58de7ed83cc0e967289cb84f
0f962604b98a6dc7f8283da68b2c21f363665d34
'2012-05-13T09:15:57-04:00'
describe
'31595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEU' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
5deba03073d6e8784d1c14a4eae90747
2bffe99dc1de0b629e0643e411b2b75eaaca72f2
'2012-05-13T09:16:52-04:00'
describe
'3663236' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEV' 'sip-files00012.tif'
47291f6bc7dc309a732a3407062a98e3
db65a891534a147989d4a31be3d05f402bcfce51
'2012-05-13T09:17:55-04:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEW' 'sip-files00012.txt'
22aedc69c55b841c88801e69c82b31ed
c122cfea1f43a03c8a79dd260e8230b845c40d10
'2012-05-13T09:17:44-04:00'
describe
'8735' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEX' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
79152ce31c6537cbc465e37c3fd8d5a0
2a2f483968e4f5097fa926311f9c5f7335bf81b0
'2012-05-13T09:19:11-04:00'
describe
'442611' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEY' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
8a1c86d2fecfaba8cdb4186d5b474687
36257ba4561a51fdb1e24f293691ced3ea4f53d7
'2012-05-13T09:18:40-04:00'
describe
'32164' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHEZ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
c307f1a84376a27938e6b02dead971ae
a1a82e91a435d608522be4f19b3bc3490f46cc94
'2012-05-13T09:17:43-04:00'
describe
'7300' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFA' 'sip-files00013.pro'
c203e9369368311ef3472e262658a592
af77e6f9c14a151b75cd83c32ac0be2d07b5e87b
describe
'11487' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFB' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
10481f691d61d91b536ad7a4b92d9658
2f29e60ceba0da7fdc3a140fefa48868dbf5c01f
'2012-05-13T09:18:43-04:00'
describe
'3560456' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
b8c5c13fa8832ba7cb1fce8380aa1b7d
bba328a6be23551ac4ac9ad09886ef162a42e8a5
'2012-05-13T09:14:53-04:00'
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
f2fc7d410457034eafd5704d5c048492
fd7734d2ed8f9263e9b3694323d35d171636a457
'2012-05-13T09:18:04-04:00'
describe
'3496' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFE' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
69215f6a3a34540d629a144acd9b4519
d7e1f09c38e68711c4921fe47da33779639554e2
'2012-05-13T09:17:23-04:00'
describe
'446311' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFF' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ed40596b75bec094f73efafe9fdb90cb
31beb9f9cb6347bd198b1d21f56d0b572a453f2c
describe
'64503' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFG' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d9faa486f1d23348bdf896fd3a9f0609
63ba948c4178a82d6a0ef33562ca6c37c516bed9
describe
'20362' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFH' 'sip-files00014.pro'
208b7be7b36f8066d84add95cb616adc
18c694717106a5c6e5eb17dfcbee2f09da9b4cf7
'2012-05-13T09:16:33-04:00'
describe
'24089' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFI' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d86b7b0ffa01f7798ae41d42c7f603d3
ebff83a4869d48d9b00c9002997b94ac63e2450c
'2012-05-13T09:14:34-04:00'
describe
'3592604' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
cba540168cb839c78e560213a4362843
00a546492af25b47e8da4a782246ccaa8f1b630b
'2012-05-13T09:17:46-04:00'
describe
'808' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
bdb876a632256a8bc630760ba993d225
f43baec138b3baeb918b68b5bcc077f5ed9f9b69
'2012-05-13T09:14:07-04:00'
describe
'6725' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFL' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5bb7b95cd3bea49ad67b99a12ba43f93
e9beafb15bde224cbbd023af4e986c2c2d1bcfc2
'2012-05-13T09:16:49-04:00'
describe
'445991' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1f509025cac4b7a579ff0d114d381e41
58a5a563be9a01bdc5feee40bcb890a2b83c65d6
'2012-05-13T09:18:19-04:00'
describe
'79598' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFN' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d76f6602feb070d82968c8a18d565110
7a460cb0382aa3c5f16b638ea1f21a5622ff937a
'2012-05-13T09:15:07-04:00'
describe
'28372' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
628a40528902821eba1f59e0c67abe29
1be4691cdd8005123f42565a6e453f523b7952a1
describe
'30608' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3937925fb0518e312018fe5fe5ff042a
77ad202c582878a84e9a0b522d76c3cba38df247
'2012-05-13T09:17:57-04:00'
describe
'3591920' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFQ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
4ba15b44fed6a21a99837a66e067cb3c
712a3795f34b330381e4278bbbd6b10de64960b1
'2012-05-13T09:14:54-04:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFR' 'sip-files00015.txt'
8de6785a7512e5f2647b8731308f7d08
ab3473ed5d4e2577b71295a48f1f008dce452c5c
'2012-05-13T09:16:39-04:00'
describe
'8458' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
f7aa82aa80901b5caa90ac8ba1044479
b96a890c45de043d5307e0be9b8340a7ee0b9574
describe
'455593' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFT' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
06e916fb24d04c5415e0175b5b0cb6e0
e0c76f6bbe957bb7a89b35a7050787671ca68a3a
'2012-05-13T09:16:14-04:00'
describe
'77601' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
deb62cde0ee85d6cfe80f446c09e6476
5f41e1d8a30889940981505bbff7c44d45172e9c
'2012-05-13T09:18:55-04:00'
describe
'27232' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFV' 'sip-files00016.pro'
238401302071b2c10fc42b50f44acf0e
3d82b704a8526c20d0e5c9aa66be8b193c482e58
describe
'29255' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFW' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7e9bfd278e20a0f67c45817667086c49
4d47374e4c96cd914a4d39ff3a580ad500afa4be
'2012-05-13T09:13:41-04:00'
describe
'3667964' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFX' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c850f81ea713e8bcc26d352d9c204364
64d64760e053787f03ca353786b8139b3345971b
'2012-05-13T09:17:16-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFY' 'sip-files00016.txt'
c01c167e04e7046cc12a958c516ec704
ae782a525876e78aa9dbe2d41b0a59c48d091e1f
describe
'8347' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHFZ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
240ce2e8e920e1ca4cc604ecb1246654
fd490ad8815496f8f8deebafed83e6208f74372b
'2012-05-13T09:16:29-04:00'
describe
'424556' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
cf2f2e9ba49fc5aec260cd4a03fdec12
45a7939a11708ed9d638ec3cfe0a548212f7c44a
'2012-05-13T09:15:31-04:00'
describe
'36468' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGB' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
36a0025d9e67bc4f6fcb81a42842b73d
bd76012b4eec9256707a02091a55a36c49d4aefd
'2012-05-13T09:16:17-04:00'
describe
'9164' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGC' 'sip-files00017.pro'
0766b9793b6b85a2bcc81e98f072e2c4
e0229155115fd2866f026fd7b3d1241937ac2656
'2012-05-13T09:14:52-04:00'
describe
'12498' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGD' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
9de4d1c909b9576e2b5b35f4599adb7d
9579489f5da428704b70d60b1a1e99a7cbaf2a72
'2012-05-13T09:14:09-04:00'
describe
'3416400' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGE' 'sip-files00017.tif'
309a0a0fb2f78d61f652d5a3764e90d9
0dce63dcd3e56b2c1b7aadc0e13ec21e9be3abc5
'2012-05-13T09:19:14-04:00'
describe
'371' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGF' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ecd55492d24943fdb8d171f14bedf760
bc5a99d332d3e5c0633ce790eceefdfdfb434202
'2012-05-13T09:18:22-04:00'
describe
'4043' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGG' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
ae3daf7f59876bc095183c5b871e54d1
7fe5874fde8c77eb0ce2dc9fb1d93e8d05def145
describe
'2277126' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGH' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
825b0562caddca6862785efa7e7daed5
d1169ade68d825c22b0dac82b9fb801304eb955e
'2012-05-13T09:15:23-04:00'
describe
'59469' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGI' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
38f3ca38894e59dd5395e38557dc3052
f10ab8cb53a4622e2221b38afa91003c0ae46e62
'2012-05-13T09:16:45-04:00'
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGJ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
02eeb03f1176d41f4a3574fedf99b1ea
ce32e5619321f5a66dfea0f0e4eb65d535e8f1a8
'2012-05-13T09:17:41-04:00'
describe
'15805' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGK' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
ee7a82dad3d12865681838204aaeb125
56d2bf7a7df7f7790bee7beec3c7bbecd8e5743a
'2012-05-13T09:16:26-04:00'
describe
'54652430' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGL' 'sip-files00019.tif'
6c912bf37ad093ce4648f11e8fa1f7b7
445545eb6bc9b497c1eeace65768bc522f5badfa
'2012-05-13T09:15:27-04:00'
describe
'404' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGM' 'sip-files00019.txt'
de8606129aa534a2ec302ddf2c1f1dd5
efc062b1c1b9aabaf3861d6a8df78ba7209572ae
'2012-05-13T09:15:24-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'4775' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGN' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
703d26064684b8a25ba95e960a0165af
4d7854ba47b9a575a7fea57e9ca44351d47ba66e
'2012-05-13T09:16:55-04:00'
describe
'439884' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGO' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d7fdc238735dd4fc1adac281e2dc99a1
867010b48e3f41259eb24b8522815d957d8e4f5d
'2012-05-13T09:13:31-04:00'
describe
'68374' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5027780036a85ba333002d99faf4a89b
eb4090542e64de8eb39cd5d6c24d87333026262a
'2012-05-13T09:16:24-04:00'
describe
'21274' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGQ' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c02442f67fd9dd30680006f4dc8f965f
7a76b5a90490720000d9acb4afd726badef14edb
'2012-05-13T09:15:47-04:00'
describe
'26143' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGR' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
422cb4da4f116b1bbd9e2a96b77cb1ac
21cfd3e2f24cc78853035b648b0e44d8e4a4ee3d
'2012-05-13T09:13:34-04:00'
describe
'3541904' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGS' 'sip-files00020.tif'
99921dbedf96c1dc9cffa40b9ad2eac7
70626e2d633c3091dec3931592697c68dc1db0c5
'2012-05-13T09:18:36-04:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
364f1a58b57649533432f8b424470848
0f62860fbe9c80d7cd8bdc909ffd76d740bb8b49
'2012-05-13T09:13:52-04:00'
describe
'7089' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGU' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
14a44380a65c04739524136a6ae306f7
3b45ad764b35c448a792aca8b7cac415b9cb7403
describe
'442857' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGV' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
ac00d7417c668b861348e72868e76114
989a68bdd66bfd86d57f831933633bf97d17c72f
describe
'79763' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGW' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
dc1d1c84c2aa80e81d31999fc36b6ef9
f120055848d2d8a375202b0d685fac2c4c464f28
describe
'27613' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGX' 'sip-files00021.pro'
14d4a2baf17625e70b78ce8b7505a5f9
710c723c534e8e5268a16260c2717b99688c37ab
'2012-05-13T09:18:05-04:00'
describe
'31321' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGY' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
67568829527d37db4d4bf094d9598c6a
8b575dee8964b57efe02fc4c182ae714fa9a81fd
'2012-05-13T09:19:03-04:00'
describe
'3567192' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHGZ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
fd07c05442bd51198ecf41e3a0b45332
45e27831f502bf713c848f150278d279be7d15f8
'2012-05-13T09:15:21-04:00'
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHA' 'sip-files00021.txt'
51feabafad0b19da5019259cc76def18
45f021fac8baffb53b4b759c6c0aa6e3a0744bc1
'2012-05-13T09:16:59-04:00'
describe
'8629' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHB' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
3316aa4db437ac280b5f9f97cd353834
5b0e42d861dc7328c06f6170ef0b8cfc2360bcd8
'2012-05-13T09:17:34-04:00'
describe
'457524' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
fbd3a17079890830348241ac66551e13
4a973b457eb08c6179b04254359a2b105c609363
'2012-05-13T09:16:40-04:00'
describe
'75847' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
f54a7fc6f5313934e0a9c00e341a45f9
2bd71105d8b7630d318d03ee717dcb92dd00e97d
describe
'26420' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHE' 'sip-files00022.pro'
fd6de13a1337e324c702dcf09be8567d
2c0a97d3ebe186389fc168324c00a8f9a8b0dd35
'2012-05-13T09:18:18-04:00'
describe
'28992' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHF' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
ca1276257e2ca03ceb96b2369090018a
eba58041eddc26759657b5e85e249d09c8d0272f
describe
'3662445' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHG' 'sip-files00022.tif'
39d49c7b2efe7ca178245ee0d1b61b0f
b1d8b3ef65d310e886708e3365c542802fe543ed
'2012-05-13T09:19:00-04:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHH' 'sip-files00022.txt'
2fbc4e3fa29bdc2eaa088a98ce8235e1
6b89ba43b7d9e0b67d77230fd966955930dce055
'2012-05-13T09:18:44-04:00'
describe
'8173' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHI' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
f752f0fec52107c97b2a38a17cd8554e
17e43014e4b3bc6fd8f7985ef37984befbaa19d1
'2012-05-13T09:16:09-04:00'
describe
'457204' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHJ' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
58603d7eef0887b528ea43d12df17df2
71004c20ca52073778b7d57ff02ab40e615055c2
'2012-05-13T09:17:48-04:00'
describe
'79357' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHK' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
a8993d4cd51db132f3b9b0e23668aade
45386b17172c0b39084e3b58f9f20bdfa66cbc72
'2012-05-13T09:18:53-04:00'
describe
'28975' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
f26c26620b50cede0676f57576b1ebe6
91edac7bbee32070c377940e68247141e285abd2
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHM' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e766bb2c6dd5c7f9de55d4a221b29518
270b2b7f30de322658c3a8a5baa255a19ea0157e
'2012-05-13T09:16:07-04:00'
describe
'3680992' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c217ddd938c27576d0e413438cb5e05f
76ed72f880e32a9720be318a5a9d8b3bc2739a57
'2012-05-13T09:18:21-04:00'
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHO' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0dfc869364142f2c1440c648b44ed425
ab13ba3da9a9379ec5e030f26d7947b1bbf7db40
'2012-05-13T09:14:45-04:00'
describe
'8193' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHP' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
0c0001c4bc634d0b879546ffa56ef60f
a5c91a1b9002a5ded988d6debf1c6800a975d62f
'2012-05-13T09:16:54-04:00'
describe
'455091' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHQ' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e399476594614c6f57dce38d37066ab9
127014c2151c97f1d15d860915de829b59924f43
'2012-05-13T09:14:33-04:00'
describe
'79524' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHR' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
59e0516466aaf8233891ff2e8eab034a
13517c28677fd8b2571e252ee1ac34e1c92aa16e
'2012-05-13T09:16:35-04:00'
describe
'28427' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHS' 'sip-files00024.pro'
9165de9e24e5b1dea851470b4ab004ea
cf6566071bd8acc367424fffeb895619ee73b1d2
'2012-05-13T09:17:08-04:00'
describe
'29905' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHT' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
243564b47b69911b0450e120f7c8c8a3
cdf212e71a397dda20812fdf48c00e809569fc55
'2012-05-13T09:18:06-04:00'
describe
'3663924' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHU' 'sip-files00024.tif'
3db493f1b19f912afbcaf89d0e348f68
0802b23f3e70ae7fa6628b43ddbda64918d06257
'2012-05-13T09:17:30-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHV' 'sip-files00024.txt'
45024d742a57caf3f0b2cc261ba4ef63
6aa4b203883749c2f1657df08255cdf4926cec3c
'2012-05-13T09:14:27-04:00'
describe
'8529' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHW' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
e84cff273142f3efdde06d95da5bd0c0
d65bddc5c7c7ca30ccfd8235205380f012d65d61
describe
'445362' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHX' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
0b44995a384f9aaab791dc7b1b0211b9
7334e5eadffebc507ee256ce8eae842722abe972
describe
'71851' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHY' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
c4bf415d099e7f1b38699e1fd6c9fc17
ad9c5de54ee6acca47081693ac0a29e8242798b3
describe
'23917' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHHZ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
2f6a7d40086d572c02bf4ff076b545f8
937424c03eeb60b7431815ff6c155eb2d578b020
'2012-05-13T09:18:07-04:00'
describe
'27602' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIA' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
55d0f3e7406af138533a3e7acb408796
48bf83316d1936e5966fe3346ff564f6599a433f
'2012-05-13T09:15:42-04:00'
describe
'3585424' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
5f736aaece932433896d5b2cf921c9f6
ae6e79246b54bcb85af387ff4ebb00fdf9c13f7d
'2012-05-13T09:14:10-04:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIC' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6f850168dac76b7a2cb3cd38836a776f
d874bd03a501b0a8ef4285d60985296e082794b2
describe
'7581' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHID' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f2c42aecfbaa9f7af103f67dad892a35
4343b513f5ab2dfe63a0ef9d8827a7afcb7d29fa
'2012-05-13T09:16:58-04:00'
describe
'2276563' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIE' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
3319df1cfa4d35630f59a005301c906b
fa079ecc31b3e5dfcf0c429f0922125d02f167a9
'2012-05-13T09:15:49-04:00'
describe
'43493' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
1f119ed3b7fcdffebcebc8be1b189b0a
18176e3c4eb12aff1d87f0be589baeb7e0cf6bca
'2012-05-13T09:13:20-04:00'
describe
'344' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIG' 'sip-files00027.pro'
e25a54064395612e1ffdf87a3ef73e85
86ce240bbb6978ec26150f1cc17dfd170fdc3da1
describe
'11978' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIH' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
951c0d5b42fd2759df2608e17e78380e
4395c9e5b6cdc21291dd60ab31d4b05f72d7c599
'2012-05-13T09:15:37-04:00'
describe
'54639078' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHII' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1e060184cf74a8d03ab9e76fb8d85770
cfcf590801583123990c15a9f4890b05f80635c3
'2012-05-13T09:15:00-04:00'
describe
'100' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIJ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7b936055cde3a9257544c9bc2a65f287
58e5a5a6b74bd36270df19dad3c6bf2956e7e9bf
describe
'3927' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIK' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ea62a67313031882639ba9311ab13882
369b7807aecd59a3831d5d48b2460fa963f66be0
describe
'452177' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
2edcad00823a629ecb22c4db053f1656
b828c8b5f6e12974ee5e7e67bbda2724c95cb5a1
'2012-05-13T09:16:23-04:00'
describe
'61018' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIM' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ca80edf303712a8493ed1b9a721aaf5f
ecdba02ca8a75b4129b6f792b637a2b0ba724821
'2012-05-13T09:14:06-04:00'
describe
'18534' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIN' 'sip-files00028.pro'
8c725a5bff58baa39b94bc3a3fce72c0
d82923569a1d74125aac67f0b920e44888d07bfb
describe
'21993' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIO' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
9ff115bb1f548e731e57e6deb5d84c1b
5ba8b8e4a838628931632a5835bf38a15e71f206
describe
'3639592' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
e9d49e53ef0265b24b2fa295633c2d4b
581e7468610bb6081e82b79aa6e9b97c8b972597
'2012-05-13T09:18:27-04:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIQ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
6fc525d440077b3dcee8304f2b8d52e7
04f84d23e22ef18a443f878827cb3cd376c9d2e5
'2012-05-13T09:16:47-04:00'
describe
'6456' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIR' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
1e601c44ddd54c2f563dcfc7ad234e1a
0d06208492ad220d228118821a3d6246634ffc31
'2012-05-13T09:14:00-04:00'
describe
'442329' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f4b4b4a00c4a83c2dcf544443d823f6b
d559f048a951525a1224cc9ba78af3671e2f3b4a
describe
'78857' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
77cfa6071939c7e95ee1bc40eaa7bae6
f0808230c667d608152b4db394c10f6606acfa62
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
37f40a0ef228c3a1c04422769d9b63e3
6e25d7bdc2aa83391ff318ff1da9d90523e9b158
describe
'29962' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
17e703d9e03882b1721c43bb0a57d198
ef49595e7ea9bef593f6c3edcd0c3ad52b5d9309
'2012-05-13T09:14:26-04:00'
describe
'3561928' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
a8db2265bf621ef07774ebb9a9b43a3e
8178b2a9f0ca8d5bdcd9341fe4de9e0a3b035676
'2012-05-13T09:14:05-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
c40a80fbda9b786a6223277f17715f57
ea8ab310b076c578399656130d2fae97146b7a9a
'2012-05-13T09:17:40-04:00'
describe
'8503' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
225d71bd03bcac61a1f1b2f8700246fc
4cd1f161ab409caff970e861307ab49761a1943b
describe
'439124' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHIZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
3cdae54552c3541ebd4f21ad564e6049
02db4fdf25b49bc398cff7a9a5eecbb3ae18f3d8
'2012-05-13T09:17:33-04:00'
describe
'79266' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
276b1dfcfa167e6eab2096709fb1ff5c
b47bb3da41ae1131f5b004a8845d28ed98853f1d
describe
'27285' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b49e87ece3db00549af93e0629e0c426
bca033dcceb6d1d16ec1ead24d763ac9cd2981c6
'2012-05-13T09:14:11-04:00'
describe
'30670' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2a18c23ce43f29f754152262fd221f7d
91c753f2ba668e80051082263519a1c6742ba220
describe
'3536384' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
001e1cd29fb01bde9ff8d5e9391776c0
9566824ace9cf38567eb0027d53a787c9629fbd6
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
332b1d7ad5465025e81e916b8c4abd85
337a7febcf314cdf0e3e6fa1185e668df2accb02
'2012-05-13T09:17:58-04:00'
describe
'8794' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
17f3b0bee183ae39db2d1fe9b36c3666
dd6cf52fa55c8084af47c8625d6cb098abaad2b0
'2012-05-13T09:18:59-04:00'
describe
'438144' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJG' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1b8d3e9b5052764a16dbc17ff41857bb
edb9f8c4d0b95d7c3bc49899b156e00541576d32
describe
'29032' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJH' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
920b2b0afb42168aea399f77af42ec5f
b6602038916d42a76b97151eb9e164762060b2c1
'2012-05-13T09:18:32-04:00'
describe
'6757' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJI' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4cf0870b930d7bd82e78906a7615d012
a7cf4d3a48b7f55f3d47ba052433e91e65ee939d
describe
'9760' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJJ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
092c706d8a3dbd6639afc29c7318cfc4
ce4d9c91eebed4f7c470c5fea51254f9fff96063
describe
'3591140' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJK' 'sip-files00031.tif'
012f2fbc30e5403759c23b8d2a6c5bcd
61d6a8a61545c3a1017e21b55ad58a2c98cb08d9
'2012-05-13T09:19:13-04:00'
describe
'275' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJL' 'sip-files00031.txt'
f5de4f7fbd9e4a656456bd8f36732526
0e6ddb06d8ea08d478db8fd8dfc57496f58d4ecd
'2012-05-13T09:14:25-04:00'
describe
'2248962' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJM' 'sip-files00031a.jp2'
591869bd237c01eb8bdf380956115a8d
6d1e0a6e3cb3de6969d81227cbf65759c833edb1
'2012-05-13T09:15:28-04:00'
describe
'50714' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJN' 'sip-files00031a.jpg'
245bfb45d2269d9697100d80b1b4d5c8
7e53eb1cc38b921d55729979deece5bca3acaca9
'2012-05-13T09:17:53-04:00'
describe
'3269' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJO' 'sip-files00031a.pro'
5620a2ee390ebaea08320d6dea3bb69a
dd34c9eacc29593a9e02b9a89a9adcfa45bc8a33
describe
'12917' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJP' 'sip-files00031a.QC.jpg'
89294508d42fcf6da58a8f5da460dfa1
c3346955cf907a174fe39e872dcd4c46162ad6da
'2012-05-13T09:19:01-04:00'
describe
'53976508' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJQ' 'sip-files00031a.tif'
3b51b8820de1e3d258f46c0c15dd8abd
bd65c00aa0a75175c158b8bf0272aff290ff10b7
'2012-05-13T09:18:15-04:00'
describe
'329' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJR' 'sip-files00031a.txt'
90f92243a8527f8c31fa099c4e828b5a
b9974101338a2bd1c4b61d93964ee6eee041b7aa
'2012-05-13T09:17:12-04:00'
describe
'4096' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJS' 'sip-files00031athm.jpg'
3d3adfa7c73a90119d8307960dce57ce
f69146d44a4af9926facdbca69d46fb02218e17c
'2012-05-13T09:18:26-04:00'
describe
'3148' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
1d8ecd285c165a3197433c41e7a0a359
120bb5e26bb851219ba75d04243fc71528c13da4
'2012-05-13T09:18:57-04:00'
describe
'440090' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJU' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
158062d759bdf9c810c9657d6cf47b02
defe63196ca84bed90e76fef6a930b69f7aa0063
describe
'57197' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9a6d6df7eaf67b30b6b03f987822ee8a
eaf978c1316dbd1676536754a910c7d26fbc29c4
'2012-05-13T09:14:03-04:00'
describe
'18183' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJW' 'sip-files00032.pro'
e5d36736d1682ea1f50dd6c6df565520
1fb0f368beea762e52f2e19a423e240daec78182
'2012-05-13T09:13:22-04:00'
describe
'20651' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e7e6315ac2a225fbf7f9d79f937c5b0b
3c8c32eeb67fff87a6cffda7864f7898b77accd4
describe
'3523153' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJY' 'sip-files00032.tif'
925cb12db1cde7e77ac8f29c4c963078
3fd6eabfdabef6b3f4bd168a857fe172f180733b
'2012-05-13T09:15:08-04:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHJZ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2eee666d6149e65b61d8a2a9ae276c73
282ede3ab7322088b878ab242ca2cdfb216f1b40
describe
'6050' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
56c58111fcab391f16e9087d37390fe4
846f8f7af6c013beb7bbbe169b1e572a8ac69731
'2012-05-13T09:15:10-04:00'
describe
'441138' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKB' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
2912b04068634087192ed69de0eee8e5
71d92ea7089218131bd23b53bbd1fc1eea0d5064
describe
'78459' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
3d4d49677141efc0e171aaa38cf67bcc
4d3749430957bc529ce8d873a231e82763b666ee
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKD' 'sip-files00033.pro'
cbfbaa359bdc3ccde0b4787f9c4a951f
462d941376c62bbf27c049191cb1b0515b8700ad
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKE' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
204134309bf02a4b904cabb339e06a64
4b1bdd62331b9a1e5a7a0b520525f8b5cb0f9d91
describe
'3552820' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKF' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b3fa6e2b69f06789153f5da485ac2803
0fc76bcd6e79daee5b97eaa435a257a714f35dd4
'2012-05-13T09:13:44-04:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKG' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9d5824cf22707e0b066d2471d1d24efe
ddcb36fc47d307f5d5a0e0c2e874ba12d160fc75
describe
'8761' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKH' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
fb2da7942d298e8dcc69e9aa0dcdd2e9
dfa4d85550bccf50fab86dc757eb3c5375c24540
'2012-05-13T09:18:37-04:00'
describe
'446305' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKI' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
dce04e81aa901916b72421865cfc8e58
2788180d3cf325c7f26709abae3378d331878ada
'2012-05-13T09:15:38-04:00'
describe
'81506' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKJ' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
acbe52353db0d76aab538c9130036d50
d7290078403eb38ad6059e66201194e6f1d28fd3
'2012-05-13T09:14:38-04:00'
describe
'28954' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKK' 'sip-files00034.pro'
f7356ffeef2033affbfe4f1de1a4eb37
f659995019edfb1d05aca50cc9cc9d00665ee2aa
describe
'30925' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKL' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
6ae987a14eb5920fe5c193f18af44124
77c2368e3ff49c16392e348d5594b377d8e08fa1
describe
'3572835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKM' 'sip-files00034.tif'
7bec83966f547ca29c5820b1a93b1ab2
3418f05c42dd3fa71b0cf274114bca802282114b
'2012-05-13T09:16:31-04:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKN' 'sip-files00034.txt'
600f741c05443247be81beca5d7ab9c3
20446656626e9b0ac9e434d77d657fd2bba3a996
describe
'8656' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKO' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
12a6a86869c78172996a48239bcdcf4b
ff646a244e54e8c6636757046213b452ae46fded
describe
'448301' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKP' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
9f981530bafddf2f4a5b700d1ab1e0a3
ab02ccf73649856ac083a8221559633e4a0cc920
'2012-05-13T09:17:35-04:00'
describe
'76306' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKQ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
babfcfcc2378180be5bc08cdf09ff83f
3e164f0c646edf6c8f7fb5a4d0dc99354ff96000
describe
'26903' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKR' 'sip-files00035.pro'
8c7b321ed1176a7a1070bf3c0710f7f1
87be68743fcc4833961da81a56ea1a81a418f46e
describe
'28836' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKS' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
d0061c28a08ab32ce6b4a4c17ff5d20e
7275b9b2a0f14f1b7ea82979b8fce83bde5a2b28
'2012-05-13T09:17:42-04:00'
describe
'3609832' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKT' 'sip-files00035.tif'
7a035ba839956c60fa38fa3ef108fb52
8963604820c7dce1ea60965085c399f4e18182f1
'2012-05-13T09:14:43-04:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKU' 'sip-files00035.txt'
0b85af50f68635f6a4991cafaad515fd
0e0755897ae7fdfebd6f6395a13df274a1f7fd02
'2012-05-13T09:15:17-04:00'
describe
'8160' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKV' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4c3d952f51e38bb5cacb04a8cd5561fa
e6a4849064acf33de5065cf8bdf4de4c12cd1058
'2012-05-13T09:17:31-04:00'
describe
'444563' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKW' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f6544e3b26b5acc1ae3316a3406bdf1f
620f23493b2e7f1e381e876114cf83e72cf52ed1
describe
'82086' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKX' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d63f851cddff8919c39e3b0112983028
5f9aa3a3de7564ec7eb4683206bf8c605fb03ec8
describe
'28696' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKY' 'sip-files00036.pro'
33bcbfe13faff150255ef6e33df65bb8
1d7e6bd3b5279ae993f8ff94578f22c69eb4075e
describe
'30810' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHKZ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
9f6fe669b6286eb0a781f10766120b97
b65652db89d9c880aeb135222c736cc6559bb306
'2012-05-13T09:18:01-04:00'
describe
'3558689' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
30cfab4febc830278ceb8d51907e4a80
448343b3bf7c9853eec1539f526b894cd58c5254
'2012-05-13T09:16:30-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLB' 'sip-files00036.txt'
a3099c464a3e5071c38ece34ee5cf2ca
c749f8728cb275d5d5c7abcb6ef2f2b931fa6d57
'2012-05-13T09:13:25-04:00'
describe
'8647' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLC' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
97c1b777e1c13851f72c5de5d368d66b
c68c4948abef68b455444ba12c8c0aec7140c6e4
'2012-05-13T09:18:38-04:00'
describe
'443310' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLD' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
757857ef997f68549a20b1c86a678f4a
cee5a6c831ddb9dbcd975c6a093e693f95632fe4
'2012-05-13T09:15:03-04:00'
describe
'58691' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLE' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
98fcc926723348b1fc03c4b07793c85b
650e2005fe3c6a87860147885510a6e8e3c4eea6
'2012-05-13T09:13:45-04:00'
describe
'19066' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLF' 'sip-files00037.pro'
d0dd210894547214c74b6b4a3604df85
3cc1fc4888325c86b69af41212ea80d312d423d9
'2012-05-13T09:15:29-04:00'
describe
'22366' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLG' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
25fa8133b8392c0ee3aa546db0679f07
ac4b3459b38acb2dbb762519c33d4367f831ab16
describe
'3568220' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLH' 'sip-files00037.tif'
60cc3943ed824b3876a9242f424d0736
a3cb30f798abd3c7381085bd71e883d65e94531a
describe
'746' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLI' 'sip-files00037.txt'
40e18ba4d90290b76eecf360cb544baf
26bee9bfd9c0a72d971791e3faa47ef43a5b3aa5
'2012-05-13T09:17:25-04:00'
describe
'2246549' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLJ' 'sip-files00037a.jp2'
0e17fdff853a9198e7234b1cfc66738c
03fdace8d5c8a4cb965515074bcdc32e26e6ea92
'2012-05-13T09:17:38-04:00'
describe
'50993' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLK' 'sip-files00037a.jpg'
5dbd9162289328d40d0c08a7ee3adc4b
bb294c9da6988903505b18be7d8005b390fbcb43
describe
'2074' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLL' 'sip-files00037a.pro'
58816bdb669f12cd0e90eeaaaaecaae3
085846f2ec7e8b45af875c549498b1ca56373538
'2012-05-13T09:16:51-04:00'
describe
'13268' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLM' 'sip-files00037a.QC.jpg'
3736d01c48ca7e6d6eca1b28176843cc
75bea0feeb2e5de546cfc4f2a6f6a21c3d4e062a
describe
'53919334' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLN' 'sip-files00037a.tif'
392e5e751f3fcfd1fe52baca5596368c
6117ca08f23cf9f4a75263fae90d4561ac3587f3
describe
'456' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLO' 'sip-files00037a.txt'
1c2dcb8710c000241a107166fb7aaa16
b872668af93af0ec27742c5433dc7252f29dc98e
describe
Invalid character
'4010' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLP' 'sip-files00037athm.jpg'
4570050053a53b2fabe5b41c9a16527a
0846f387944c031e680723498f3f9e11aa7b5bef
describe
'6210' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLQ' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
e6777978d06de5603526692214ffaa83
11e6756e172250f7bb36158e6738d7a7928998ff
describe
'443343' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLR' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4d60ee6a30b1c2e8d65771bb55a27b3d
c726b18e426cf2546386709898e166ebee5edcca
'2012-05-13T09:13:33-04:00'
describe
'73351' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLS' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9b4041c9d1ddcba69e855bba15c39f77
abc452d25b08a6b20b58a0fa21fb07d0f08797b2
'2012-05-13T09:13:19-04:00'
describe
'23748' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLT' 'sip-files00038.pro'
6ded5a98a82580772ade73a3be81589a
a879e02b46786027367b93057bcbc770494e943a
'2012-05-13T09:19:12-04:00'
describe
'27337' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLU' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
2ed0d12ff006067dcf5d0fdb61c90bfc
337c39a33769f1b71f9f629edcebddd1214b7d71
'2012-05-13T09:17:14-04:00'
describe
'3549179' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLV' 'sip-files00038.tif'
0a54fa82a339ade40f725e4064ccc7fc
b798f9d647738d4528b601da96663ec14251c5e8
describe
'942' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLW' 'sip-files00038.txt'
04dfc010be305be1afe62e9f844d30b8
c2c548c3f8d92d4df526bcc60f2c8850cbb68e85
'2012-05-13T09:18:23-04:00'
describe
'7799' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLX' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
25277091d2203133dbe46f82a6c86d68
870ce74831c718182dbd8351d0893e4abd071345
describe
'451898' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLY' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
33ee1163fa9f287422c7a89334ecedc0
c01849bf81147076d2f95d170715b83d3ad7ec53
'2012-05-13T09:16:01-04:00'
describe
'84767' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHLZ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e22f2b08a886d25a0fc522023c5d645f
1f69bee90e10f04cfb2cd4a1f8bd764f10a285f0
'2012-05-13T09:16:37-04:00'
describe
'29713' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
22470a16e4cf7aa390a07441919a7725
d3b202c57057541cba42a0ebb6ef5f9fc01a686f
'2012-05-13T09:13:24-04:00'
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMB' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1ec3b019e977fe013fd25f4e7db288dc
a96e07f6a83bd3d32507200e3b9f093190e96803
describe
'3639272' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMC' 'sip-files00039.tif'
ade38cb279f18d5de2739f2a3d9c33b6
141fe814d5f3c0b1fec14c5bf1df64adcc79c251
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
167f0acee067863e803a38b54ed6d137
9b55fbe6fdd03ab84ae9329f63547e97325dc19f
'2012-05-13T09:14:56-04:00'
describe
'8857' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHME' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
d9306df0c47971fa109a6afccaf0273d
b8bc1458f18c95b28cc7eb76050b3946ada9edfe
describe
'446322' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMF' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f59beb2b4b09d8e57f8456a410a8567c
f9bc802e8ae3783db0d0c20df5640e6438092180
'2012-05-13T09:15:32-04:00'
describe
'85169' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMG' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
d9b487cc1c738c6b10114a89282f034a
1505a8ef2da2b6fc0798eafd02099a3739767381
describe
'29486' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
91741552ce4f7ac42b42058ddaefd478
8cff40d17423f1378aea762b144db7291b27bb00
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMI' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
5a2451c54e37cdd42f8cbc280c02fb6b
d4add7fb52360cf180675461d08ee8aad6f047b4
'2012-05-13T09:17:59-04:00'
describe
'3594156' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMJ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
99ca72eb62dd6ddc11735cf011a68390
efaef33cfbaf0db25924807db2581315ba61402a
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMK' 'sip-files00040.txt'
80627faae9151764b4eac8b46f87eb67
659694da74fd2864e41b40a494ee046890184b22
'2012-05-13T09:15:41-04:00'
describe
'8829' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHML' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
02c4eba63ed00807bffc30102621cfe9
44d8ec052fdd477642b8f83065fed2da03e87aab
'2012-05-13T09:14:19-04:00'
describe
'450037' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMM' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
f706b9dc52946034303b2831267182b9
38d7611646cc6077860715e91f99569f512f7bb5
describe
'84042' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMN' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
227cfebcb4df1b3cbe30d7bb6de918a4
595a24a7fcab4c983a8dbdeda8232b6abac92b7c
describe
'30073' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
7c43fbbdca5adbba0aaab9552ca0e509
b980efbc6c29ced4f55de42252be6636471f5f2e
'2012-05-13T09:15:14-04:00'
describe
'31613' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
fcd3c5fefb1d0edc20e70ad079c7739d
2decd3cb856a0ccab0d43c0ffa1fda99c66447ea
describe
'3624528' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMQ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cfcbb4e09e460db70c6e7d8ce5c28a32
9970c385d376c1eda8625fa3668f7ffe27dda03b
'2012-05-13T09:18:29-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMR' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ef38b0c6aa2a563941e93e532ab90fb6
1b0a4acdf4af3cda8d6cbc066c726d41bd5f717b
'2012-05-13T09:16:11-04:00'
describe
'9061' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
77fd3570762c5358c47c5d62e8ba3436
e0e53a9a88fa1fc2c19be9493e3c95b61eb9b6fb
describe
'444907' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMT' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
baec7eb259cb699250b7278342275992
a279ff6894de7fb12a70027f19a0941cd0e3c1e8
'2012-05-13T09:18:34-04:00'
describe
'85079' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
de0a729eb11966167c7d6c3918d102b2
c06d21a34cb597d3db480be57556d13eb027da17
describe
'30143' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMV' 'sip-files00042.pro'
1db927b32f21b4c6b07cbc8813062ef0
acb0589767e84beae2352ce31b5c63a0bf9a5dcd
describe
'32721' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMW' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
f21730c9db2c3522f1635f51ddf536df
16233f0e8b8a7be8d90a57d9b64a1abbda0e3465
describe
'3583588' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMX' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9bf868351baf9f9cdd6985ee2ab62810
ff42b30657ee51a1a2542dc9774af9493880915f
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMY' 'sip-files00042.txt'
1327e6de55af2aec866b19f83f039998
5a1f32b0a48322ce60dec323dcf03d4c42869f82
describe
'9213' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHMZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
f3ca8d450ec4b0dd182d0093cfe2eb61
9fe10210750de6981250bfe5edac2a0f493a8221
describe
'441699' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
ff40cea6a46cda624a2bebda09d75458
135d845b53e6eea218d39a528317fd46620ab6ca
describe
'83024' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNB' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
743b7aa7f2575cc0aff931d23377da78
b822673cd6dca13e107af1844cb3dbf62329cb7b
'2012-05-13T09:18:39-04:00'
describe
'28501' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNC' 'sip-files00043.pro'
0463dddc7042c91d6a9a4ce505466fbb
13529a9151eaea60d34f21d581732b3a9a8fee16
'2012-05-13T09:15:22-04:00'
describe
'32030' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHND' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
eaf496fe270ecbf27fddf8f429736d0b
aeed72fd893681013c25e66b28a43b10e7af9d6b
'2012-05-13T09:16:08-04:00'
describe
'3558160' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNE' 'sip-files00043.tif'
60f9caf64aa166e43106fbd7a3bd23dd
268b5a5d3fc2648dd5ecd5483e1d3d0657dabd24
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNF' 'sip-files00043.txt'
599277ce3eecb2c4bcbe04cba1bf65cd
ead610789e04aafaf3441936813b17973e658518
'2012-05-13T09:15:11-04:00'
describe
'2282252' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNG' 'sip-files00043a.jp2'
61e5ca9e5f7b9b42873c5909def627e4
048f61106729682c9866b4c962d0c53abb5e0565
describe
'44542' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNH' 'sip-files00043a.jpg'
afdb03c36dd4470a6f54c2f57a833ad0
48f7aeb908e93596b5e4870a7c840cdc9ff669ff
describe
'6399' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNI' 'sip-files00043a.pro'
3e31ac34f822d9458ed5a24164302892
19c21efed2b619477c42ec4345f4b1cd288085bd
describe
'11977' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNJ' 'sip-files00043a.QC.jpg'
5d0c8980602f23092b1b1bdda40ed449
a7e295b196d32c7f60b4154a4d9ed996453a0350
describe
'54776220' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNK' 'sip-files00043a.tif'
13f50f126c58fe21f8ef2acee28adc4c
f9130403f5963b06bb33e62aadd4ca1cc90d773b
'2012-05-13T09:17:21-04:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNL' 'sip-files00043a.txt'
2cdb2b66e23f2959a7bc8995a5e24899
76cf362ce8987086b45f804e01dc898b6822868f
'2012-05-13T09:17:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'3774' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNM' 'sip-files00043athm.jpg'
ffb906445c1c1547e518188dc168faa9
88c3b3782dd42fa69628cae3466b15419432aca5
'2012-05-13T09:18:58-04:00'
describe
'9055' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
83e52fd8ef4303453a4941a71377ac5d
44657fb7c41465ab87edd4098488b76b2fdd78ad
describe
'441300' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4d70b28205f5782db5ece510355d980b
df63bfbb342ff612ad58fc0addf14f7332a0b816
'2012-05-13T09:14:40-04:00'
describe
'62922' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
47a8956b7a58d009202217da594ebf44
5e8e52909577f34cf1e5764935bbef7d79d59b3d
describe
'19820' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4adfd34013c94049a8fd913032f05b2b
ea333031b581f5871b619e8220f7d339b052a116
'2012-05-13T09:14:36-04:00'
describe
'24419' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
76af65cb38480da0d6e424903f8e39fe
6c7b140c60c8a8bf9802e266041c9035c76557be
'2012-05-13T09:15:50-04:00'
describe
'3552944' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
26bb6e44329a45a7c917d70f1d646479
fec1be01785e300610d420896964860dd49adb31
'2012-05-13T09:14:29-04:00'
describe
'786' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
a028752bb9ced9b14933d172aa18f7d8
7cb3d47c2c58f7c5d572e25779e806d3b1e57083
describe
'6801' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
40a8548b965f985803dfc3657ae73e8f
8e1708306c0033802c8c67334fafaf338998951f
'2012-05-13T09:14:28-04:00'
describe
'441986' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
0b489ac0b848b05431deec5e7e2ec4aa
01d7da75fbe5739177028a2fcafe568e26d9e2eb
'2012-05-13T09:16:57-04:00'
describe
'76508' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
87ce061cd25e77976b6e0f8e14d5dc7d
1d47e77e659937e38a9e9fb9bd8c4d73286b9e2d
'2012-05-13T09:17:45-04:00'
describe
'27459' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNX' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e64838c534f509ba9477015b94ded4fd
4794f9098f4644b092c833acd0351757991be6ad
describe
'29725' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNY' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
e452d5fe3ca4147e7e0c1ad11a3733bc
d27327f891e27d01cf66f5f36e542f4007115d80
'2012-05-13T09:18:46-04:00'
describe
'3537999' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHNZ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0f9a4ca8bac28948ba32bb7f05a21890
df7b61a6936f1bde9ae96414d6335890c8829cdc
'2012-05-13T09:13:21-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOA' 'sip-files00045.txt'
6e56f08703fa74b6e93696513127beaa
b08437a3a43d00c2f6b82a55e8cfef7ca30d7919
describe
'8434' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOB' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
089493fd3b09923fd926540522ac27f1
2ac2b8d8e0d350b67edd37929e16feb20aa4489b
describe
'453894' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
5aa57f7152914e9caf6ae0436a0b2faf
612f7d7b6e8ad9c484dbcc08ee6aad46c614a413
describe
'75814' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOD' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
bdf9f0b71a268377aa334b2c0ab66ef5
2b98df212f2999122fafbec36e39844858309f5a
describe
'28041' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOE' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0a3413f2f72562f3aad557713841af6b
ba18d31880ed3dc1b80969dae51ca833660b4767
describe
'28786' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOF' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
52ef25f30b40a2a1c840aa6730f79a95
5b2e34c2dd61057d77e867196be1dbb0ae4803b3
describe
'3655240' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOG' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f2a2f29a2877ebe857a3d3f71f41ebd9
edb6c2ca202e2a4e518a8f24b68ec108fbd7896d
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOH' 'sip-files00046.txt'
f293fc4849b4289b517d6d49e7182662
221885f5bcea37b942afdc82c1e87e83bdabcdf1
'2012-05-13T09:17:24-04:00'
describe
'8128' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOI' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
82a7286f0d19addce03ad8b5406fe42a
9944d63f78b15f03f4cae72be7975bfc87809e7e
describe
'445565' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOJ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
baae761cfb3ac65f95e1b964f0203bce
fcb7c3a8ce8d5b99e589b612a8a5495539642817
describe
'79480' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOK' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
964a50d0a5acf85d11635f69be54c094
613b2d4652f3ca563817ce4cce251afccd7d2c87
describe
'27762' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOL' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a397ba2ef206932572dd62b8fd3fcd42
7b34cf07ddc7af4726db0dcddf09f66215ce0fbc
'2012-05-13T09:15:09-04:00'
describe
'30659' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOM' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
3cb91e165b57e8dbc8c66fe101acf3b5
b0025a77df3d466d17f02fd2ea536021657b9acc
describe
'3587956' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHON' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d7cab903f6312ab247c4c5f71156000f
76edd35d6e3a1a7dc9f1df31803e2e019d3bc95c
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOO' 'sip-files00047.txt'
015c85c96b0d4e500cfaebdb47123376
dc861dc638f543672e52c12951eea04f6002e80f
describe
'8841' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOP' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
a3d0ea9f49c3d0c99c70d62cbfcc7c2d
e966c4ca010efb97579b4f6e53c47148bac3cb1c
describe
'438566' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
4e4b0fad64a05a6c676461e8ef3a48d3
64dea2df95cb5cc28b98099c320a924f06a01f1e
describe
'81029' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
0a84d57d6aa14afc1ebdd85e490f51d2
a0081526d29104d0522e1f7508d344f35ee5b973
describe
'29074' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
5fff3d20faace559b7ae534db15b3aa1
9bf4dac1be61aa84166c96eb4c299776c10aaca7
describe
'30778' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOT' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
e56f648713d787c273129faa52e5f4cf
4129669adedc854710c568d9a77a81189410db69
'2012-05-13T09:14:49-04:00'
describe
'3532160' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOU' 'sip-files00048.tif'
3b45fd2583659a5d9cd0a7872bc33387
83cbdcaa0d5f439bc22276c44090b15c55133a4f
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOV' 'sip-files00048.txt'
840877407d804741c05fdd344c5d66c1
87c753bab06eede42090a930afac937ebd48c31a
'2012-05-13T09:16:19-04:00'
describe
'8515' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOW' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
bc32575811e8a25ee9d93a5fef48a18e
0db785b9a6c346579ae2c6c7a960a10b0eb4463f
'2012-05-13T09:17:02-04:00'
describe
'434910' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOX' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
8a9f2091dbe37c3c883a5c5f36792995
cd7a62a2eccea8a4df7e704b41e5c3a41f720995
describe
'55213' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOY' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
92b6726e276601c5097cfef4ceecc559
083155c917f4367b290e613fc5d7d4fa5d8fab1f
describe
'17174' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHOZ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
155692b24565da64669b52cce3613db1
5a206de942b4b509ae1a491e9491f79fbf5f4dd7
describe
'20606' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPA' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
d95cb02938983bdd9597cbbdfc34d7fc
b10c2b228735be0406fe31801d80eb5f214525f0
'2012-05-13T09:13:43-04:00'
describe
'3500904' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPB' 'sip-files00049.tif'
44902f02de0122590b5f603e4db36969
f2e710f764aa14eb3a5b116fb7dafb158119178e
'2012-05-13T09:17:09-04:00'
describe
'671' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPC' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ef724d76c2aeb66945ee1503daa12acf
ab627e9dc91a0e324d2a0fb226530d35b4e7f99f
describe
'2281353' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPD' 'sip-files00049a.jp2'
043294606b64040787c48f18597531f6
e75a50a07d601c74cbf0513a3f1a16afe322751d
'2012-05-13T09:14:22-04:00'
describe
'63244' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPE' 'sip-files00049a.jpg'
71978d42dc08ff7d8fca8e82d3cec2c3
0f61c55e747cb500195bb6e03e681e8d580bc0c7
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPF' 'sip-files00049a.pro'
acaa93fceb25bbd07ddd547d7195ae5c
ef4022e48acf896c69aae5b01b843245fed6af29
describe
'16462' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPG' 'sip-files00049a.QC.jpg'
a983bf373bf5554a93f3f6710f21f21c
26379d5dd9b92e542f7c26372e356ee26ddc6d33
describe
'54754016' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPH' 'sip-files00049a.tif'
0c2598ec7650141405ce8f134642a3aa
7e8c24f66aea9a5226687ebd1521749a7aa32349
'2012-05-13T09:13:51-04:00'
describe
'165' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPI' 'sip-files00049a.txt'
928ab93d09448f0f4ab8a546406825cd
275591b17fd789c9fbadbbe1a9fa083d6264de6a
describe
'4719' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPJ' 'sip-files00049athm.jpg'
87e335143439177d138ce47a66f9091b
46b07151a5853c7be568f58e9fc6ad8d9ba5b103
describe
'5893' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPK' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
c47d6591c19b455168e9ac1d51c04914
a93371bba03339e58eff8bcd254fdaf99423baba
'2012-05-13T09:18:03-04:00'
describe
'438199' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPL' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
23a8924f4a5d7e7fded209ae9d8cb48d
40986a064185961799f6749a24ea8a77e3ad8f73
'2012-05-13T09:15:18-04:00'
describe
'69027' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPM' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
00feec70646e48472caf64ad143a7f29
177adf1337c7e475c09b50a87b2336e844ec9304
'2012-05-13T09:18:16-04:00'
describe
'23113' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPN' 'sip-files00050.pro'
8435488ab43bda0b004900f6f0fecc03
5539834f9b3f7b6568efa18c9cebbe7b468c64e2
describe
'26076' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPO' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
91a061cd7978db12a635ed5000e34ddf
0c0618160ff42eeb8625176886b01356ff1dd645
'2012-05-13T09:14:24-04:00'
describe
'3529036' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPP' 'sip-files00050.tif'
dc9d980d796d3109fad340e026e96388
4cce6e1041980964454d8210afed5e55bcf0cf2b
'2012-05-13T09:14:48-04:00'
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPQ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
d5b11fc8789339bbd1800f7f98e143b8
cd0d82b8ee34efca585c7d05a0931b99ddab67cb
describe
'7302' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPR' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d3f9e244c4e7234d81117fdfd6c7e126
be86cb504143b803708249028dd5206e1ef20cd2
describe
'442377' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPS' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
35a5ec17554ff3cc935ba8b736ddb453
e1e500000450359afbe020b0a8f5b6a0192ccf41
describe
'81816' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
0ad29b78cd411b753d4b567d6905f794
294af0180c923315b4291099a97c082e9a66a04d
'2012-05-13T09:16:41-04:00'
describe
'28138' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPU' 'sip-files00051.pro'
6d48ce30dfca73806d4242b68b861556
87b9fb5d5a4fcaea2a173531d4ff33e596e3cb9f
'2012-05-13T09:18:11-04:00'
describe
'31536' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPV' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f8bd2670fd3db42f18b6110e78ef7288
9effd654e4216f0767fac99837b5c43fd5236fc7
describe
'3562424' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPW' 'sip-files00051.tif'
ef207c7d8cdc6232a9caed8693814276
634e288a8cbc6d2012a150bd19d2d1bcac981381
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPX' 'sip-files00051.txt'
acdbfbffae2e57fd760a05d4c1adced9
af781bfaba6a4a202803f947f3a472b058400ca5
describe
'8871' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPY' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
5d1a1aa0d63487fb50ac3e3d6a35793c
e4e2d04bd89503d2c75365da3b58bf2f0654fbc5
describe
'445719' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHPZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
6951a49a67680c4d23926ec14f20e5c8
7b34d09b3caef869b110cac4ebc46f0bce1ce092
describe
'80649' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
554db3ccb4071796f45514cb2d277507
946f22d22c9bbb842d61dd9e8aef36e54d248c2c
describe
'27495' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQB' 'sip-files00052.pro'
efc791d22f2c870c89b27895a87ec22d
764334e00efc383846abd113b85000356a8d0cc9
describe
'30376' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQC' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
d0b72ff9c916cc69d913e5cf90f9924b
64a91c785549f22d65b210b7c6bdc1c858b5b48c
'2012-05-13T09:13:37-04:00'
describe
'3589288' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
f04144cde47296a623d0cfaccc0547e9
c8fa34c1859b9a961b3c4e3c2358e1a146781df2
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQE' 'sip-files00052.txt'
ec770defdd46b3508fa2d6896974ac3f
bf7e6a9b96536ae41286adabd8a6d9804fbe187f
describe
'8234' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQF' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
0ac335dc3e177a5f1878d2efe1439ce1
6869a8064999d0d2d244b53ad36fc34ef16a45e4
'2012-05-13T09:13:36-04:00'
describe
'453803' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQG' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d6507794b8a2383e024e5c5a48107e45
6fa3fa306bf06c0ab361c9ce8780017837201f55
'2012-05-13T09:18:12-04:00'
describe
'82924' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQH' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
47bc825812c97d1fe76e76a0745813ac
1f0624b686c525f8ed16d772c1bd9a77336571bb
describe
'28926' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQI' 'sip-files00053.pro'
762dcdf3cbc748d2d9c9ad50dc960f72
7659b9a35393b0ff0b601109e58c744a414df3c7
'2012-05-13T09:15:20-04:00'
describe
'31228' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQJ' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
f14da67bfd8a871ed30f3811a9b105c3
0389795454e6857045ded9725a3b055514c08207
describe
'3653972' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQK' 'sip-files00053.tif'
6ea0995288fe2d42ffd770a968291f62
39f5dcb150d13735805087d67d13f54b1955de73
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQL' 'sip-files00053.txt'
89883f928308da69d12e75c70c512ebd
2a9fc086b2851be054560a9871324396c93c24f4
describe
'8769' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
e5e2f7794140b81216a0e73359963da6
0c6a26c97d9d0e315814407b121277090c65fe44
describe
'448101' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQN' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
89635bed70653a00f5a2b8fa1aea0f3f
67426ffadac92ac09f580523a44eaaaf8f1e7014
describe
'82302' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQO' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ea5827f0221da82828d86d7c25aede20
e8f53ea6fa6193d2bfdc9129a71ffc184188c05e
'2012-05-13T09:14:16-04:00'
describe
'29137' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQP' 'sip-files00054.pro'
ffb97bd7c8eb019429d5620352a61cf8
0b5d8ea822ac8c9f90cdb62a5831645014ce11be
describe
'32303' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQQ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6636f9e28a6f465ea7145a6a433128c6
3e1bc56c4a1ae9b475f7b261d0f18793ba156965
'2012-05-13T09:15:19-04:00'
describe
'3608364' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQR' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9eafa32b45694b70756354a144fe7cec
b4d8206e5310d62c4516b92b84624a000de876b4
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
59b5facc6785eb6f0558fbc07557e3f4
3929284c4322950d7570d02b1d0db088608d758f
'2012-05-13T09:17:36-04:00'
describe
'8745' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQT' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
a82e3f9bc9790c792f14449773cdebbd
c1c2bcf554d8d56ccb9e774a541371c5859b6625
'2012-05-13T09:16:20-04:00'
describe
'438703' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQU' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
bc5351f12d80e204f91ddd4c29dbe5da
2391010b00d5e1cd2b59aabfc862206d4b78df15
describe
'74869' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQV' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
852e4efc8375e318b14542ac50797201
3dfaedb0f0a43b3748f50ecdd2f6af170745ff16
describe
'25087' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQW' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d26fe38b17e832445ea3d371af24d6a8
21bdfde0010ddea697fd13769ecda2e384d5275d
'2012-05-13T09:15:36-04:00'
describe
'28298' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQX' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
f43f78ebf192e289167462c7227956cb
2b713708713fbabd05d222fd292d143eb45a0f9b
describe
'3533360' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQY' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d0ac028dccf45091b89f03fffdddc140
e718d41afd40f88c9f870eba3b788180ce088477
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHQZ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
3edd7d489496ef5c2692de46d5fcdea3
3a482853325c80881a91f2c44024ed834cba83ce
describe
Invalid character
'7934' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRA' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
8419451c750c7c420c600fe10cf1a935
1124d45cb2fdf2451f76567dc8a9ff006e6582e1
describe
'410219' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRB' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
d3c7ba409f424b31198012c893ec16e7
8dcef6e4be284e6968dfa3e9dbd8b0993d55c8b7
describe
'13070' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRC' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
e408845c6701f7bee5f6ad3db3b91865
189eb9a1313c11c999404163d19a895121421dd8
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
742e146d01c85281a65d0deeeebfb7fb
0624a63aa1e14da796c03dd867abd6dc60bd1558
describe
'3817' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRE' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
cec3921352426126bf40ced245cb2e06
9dfbfc28372cea12a2534f3f9c752a65fc3cf66d
'2012-05-13T09:16:50-04:00'
describe
'3427832' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4564440db3a1f5d87baa76602b386f74
69eb7c465926f53bf821b88bbc23769c035bbe00
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRG' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
5b327acd4f4a05b08aa9df95e66e2855
296cf8abe0bcdd070e9db71d58f90fd67cb78011
describe
'2433160' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRH' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
65c97e36405398bf352d105f405d49bc
772fba21d3bda38e149b1d14e76da043fa32312c
'2012-05-13T09:17:29-04:00'
describe
'57048' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRI' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
873f4a925d3d7b21d77a0648a8d13d85
85dcc86ad32fc25f85f782fbc5f373757aaae68f
'2012-05-13T09:16:42-04:00'
describe
'516' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRJ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f3e49be6ef2508f15f50f730e269cd1c
6a3e2a37ff0d14afe8649e802a55b51072499516
describe
'12599' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRK' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f3ae74169d7f92ee08798dff1011f040
fae700d5dbaa1d86af7344b9064e4478e19dc738
describe
'58403548' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRL' 'sip-files00057.tif'
1e1f568fd34101a8c9283058f00f5ade
e7074ca897aecff9717b76003b003d9d8f020689
'2012-05-13T09:15:56-04:00'
describe
'36' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRM' 'sip-files00057.txt'
37d01c8106cc2d72ff368bf4ae327ba0
d4427676520d2a17ea066c0af8ffbdce6a3df630
describe
'3475' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRN' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
7c4aad2b0719ae004ddbd6d89a1d48a9
8eb14610c129d43cedaf286e45358a00ff519357
'2012-05-13T09:18:52-04:00'
describe
'2429230' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
b453518f99fd1ec32932aafd179f78b3
67e6b5a18d6adaa5d9a9de36f5d518f190bcbf61
describe
'33679' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRP' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
952eb526da385c03733c3305a140be0d
cd58aa65277e492a72a7a7b496a716e499c8f7e9
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRQ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
42460f9d61813ec829f1d6d636c64b89
ef5b9c7d01ce2eeff002ad152ca71e27a3536798
'2012-05-13T09:14:57-04:00'
describe
'6477' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRR' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f242fa56e4a3a6b176260a10005baa93
7d69e238b6e887a304653d164c249699ffdc7f17
describe
'58304040' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRS' 'sip-files00058.tif'
40d90342e3e62888f8b1e25aa9d7a851
60c4b11d69f94043e2227560b5ec762afa41d435
'2012-05-13T09:14:15-04:00'
describe
'1844' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRT' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
bc79f82b52cd0a00278246a79b7e9d14
7736720ce2f90f784d69fa07bf5ef1b0d709f99b
'2012-05-13T09:13:53-04:00'
describe
'173689' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRU' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
0a98767c1032546685518253bc11a907
6de1c50e8c6a3f81b19fcea4f1cf999a3ed3f809
'2012-05-13T09:13:18-04:00'
describe
'9436' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRV' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
a7ddcac4c8de2a51831d59aa203848cf
6101dac59bb6d69428814957d7bbc398f99b0ad3
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRW' 'sip-files00059.pro'
6455fd580d0d6058db364fc54492288a
c7df576ee7b650d7cef3b33dff93bb4c72c56b58
describe
'2861' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
b0ddf9ef8eb1c5a63c1e947963948df2
5097a7f9cfb6a60beb025b22162752c4cb613d32
describe
'4171596' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
d68085082b8e66c8f643bbac56d3aa6d
a2e9a2a33a0903f38af900bee8eac02688e8188f
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHRZ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
0599d0cb944edd795aa6e215707e92d9
d92147426e209c97f69f11fdef430e9e3adde17c
describe
'81250' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHSA' 'sip-filesUF00002714_00001.mets'
66c7f3f8c655e10926d43784322b9aee
a7e3e9906113240f1c9633cbdb6651039b72d5b4
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T22:09:45-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'102743' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPPfileF20091225_AACHSD' 'sip-filesUF00002714_00001.xml'
743eb03384c48093695c28c0140d9ccc
d5f2cbdb2ce8ac56b0a3aa0b36380fd5ef469093
'2012-05-13T09:17:11-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T22:09:46-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.