Citation
Beauty and the beast

Material Information

Title:
Beauty and the beast illuminated with ten pictures
Series Title:
Hewet's illuminated household stories for little folks
Uniform Title:
Beauty and the beast
Creator:
Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Thwaites, William H ( Illustrator )
Hewet, Henry W ( Publisher )
Brown, Loomis & Co ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Loomis & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1855 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1855
Genre:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
"With illustrations by W.H. Thwaites, engraved by the best artists"--Series statement on cover.
General Note:
Engraved col. t.p. bears imprint: New York, Loomis & Co., engravers and printers; series statement on ill. cover has imprint: New York, H.W. Hewet, publisher, no. 12 Dutch St.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by N. Orr.
General Note:
Colored frontispiece "printed in oil colors by Brown, Loomis & Co."
Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027265702 ( ALEPH )
46942184 ( OCLC )
ALK2467 ( NOTIS )

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ADs BEAUTY OFFERS TO MARRY THE BEAST (WHO IS A NOBLE
PRINCE IN DISGUISE) TO SAVE His LIFE.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

APARAALRNY PPPARLDARIOOOOrF

HERE was once a merchant who
had three daughters: Beauty was
the youngest of the three. She
had been called “Beauty” from her birth, on ac

count of her great loveliness. Charming modesty,









BEAUTY AND THER Beas,

kindness, and frankness were always beaming in her
face. She was beloved by all, and was most dear
to her father, who had lost his wife, for she was his

chief companion. Her two sisters were also beauti-

ful in their forms, but they were vain, haughty, and
untruthful. 7
The merchant was once very rich. He was the

owner of a large fleet of ships, which used to sail all
over the world. It so happened, that when they

were once all assembled in the Persian Gulf, a

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most frightful storm arose, and the whole of the Am

merchant’s fleet was lost. In the midst of one
of his most splendid feasts, a breathless messenger
rushed into the company and announced the disas-
ter of the loss of his ships. ‘The poor merchant was
ruined. |

He had nothing of all his great riches left but a
‘small house in the country. He was not, however,

neglected, for Beauty supplied all his wants. She








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| | soon forgot her grief for the change of fortune. \

> She found it quite as easy to be happy without jew- |
els and fine clothes as with them. But Beauty’s
contentment did not attend her sisters: they pined
at their altered state, despised their mean clothing,
refused to help in the work of the house, leaving all
the drudgery to their kind sister, and even re-
proached their father for their misfortune. They
were truly miserable. So their beauty passed away,

whilst Beauty’s looks were not only preserved by



her cheerfulness, but they became even more lovely.

3 Beauty had always doted on flowers. When she oN
came to the cottage she became her own gardener ; Vs
and her nosegays were not less fragrant, nor less
brilliant, thaneher rare flowers when she was rich.
Her garden was a pattern of tasteful arrangement:
all sorts of flowers bloomed there except roses ; and,
ae strange to say, though she often planted them, they
> always disappeared in the night.



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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

After some time, good news was brought to the
merchant of the safe arrival in a distant port of one
of his most precious cargoes, which had been thought
to have been lost when the great shipwreck of his
vessels happened. It was necessary that the mer- 5

chant should go to the port, and he resolved to start

on the next day.. He called his three daughters g

|, together to tell them of the news.

“Tell me, daughters,” said the merchant, “what
presents shall your father bring for you on his re-
turn from his journey ?”

“Bring me,” said the eldest, “a watch encircled
with diamonds, which plays the most seraphic
music; a girdle of the purest crystals, bracelets
studded with precious cameos, and a chaplet of
rubies: you may also bring any pearls of the size of
walnuts, if you meet with them, and—”

“ Hold, sister,” said the second, “you will ruin our

father before it comes to my turn. I will only ask










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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

of Cashmere shawls, and a tortoise-shell cabinet in-
laid with gold, to hold them all.”

The merchant then turned to Beauty, and said,
“Well, Beauty, and what shall your present be 2”

“JT wish for nothing, father, but your safe return.”

“Nay, child, you must make a request.”

“Well, then, dearest father, as roses won't grow
in my garden, bring me a rose.”

The sisters could not help laughing at her modesty.

On the morrow the merchant started on his jour-
ney. Beauty was in tears at his departure. But
her sisters could not suppress their joy at the pros-
pect of their new finery, and seemed to care but
little for their father’s absence. rr

The merchant arrived at the port, and found his
vessel, He arranged all his business, and made the
purchases, extravagant as they were, which his eld-
est daughters had requested. He mounted his Arab

steed, and commenced his journey homeward.





BDEAGTY AND Pie CaaS:

Towards evening he reached a forest of pines and
cedars, through which lay his way. The evening
was sultry and oppressive. The sun descended be-
low the horizon. The merchant was so wrapt up
his horse, and left him to take his own way. The

animal’s noiseless tread, as his hoofs fell upon the

trance. The scene grew gloomy, Presently thunder

boomed in the distance. Leaden-looking clouds,
_ folded one on another, covered the amber-tinted sky,
~ and large drops of rain pattered on the merchant

He

looked about him, and saw that he had lost his road.

( before he was roused from his own thoughts.

On all sides the forest seemed equally dark and im-
penetrable. Up came the distant thunder, roaring
—crash! crash! as if the heavens were split. Then
came thick darkness again, and the rain poured

down. The horse was stupefied with fear, the mer-





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clapped his spurs to his steed, urging him in the

direction of the light. The light expanded into a ee

large soft flame, and then disappeared. In its place
was seen the portal of a palace. A tablet above the

entrance was inscribed in glittering letters,—

Enter without fear ;
All are welcome here!

The merchant read the inscription, and pressed
against the golden gates, which opened without
noise ; and entering the first door he came to, he
stripped himself, and enjoyed a delicious warm
bath. Upon quitting it, his wet clothes had

vanished, and dry garments supplied their place.








BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

_ From the bath-room he proceeded to the supper-
room, and there found a delicious repast prepared,






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THE BEAST THREATENS THE MERCHANT'S LIFE BECAUSE HE HAS PLUCKED A
FORBIDDEN ROSE.

at which he made a most hearty meal. When he
had satisfied himself with one dish, another of a dif

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

During the progress of the feast, his ears were
filled with most exquisite music. When all was fin-
ished, the merchant departed for his sleeping apart-
ment. Having offered up his grateful prayers, and
especially for his deliverance during the storm, the
merchant retired to his bed, and instantly fell into
a refreshing sleep.

The next morning was bright and peaceful, and

ay

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* the merchant awoke quite refreshed from his fatigue.

‘Every thing was ready for his toilet and his break- ¥
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gardens of the palace. Such gardens he had never
seen before. Shrubs and flowers which he had

always thought most rare, in this garden appeared

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to grow almost wild. The flowers made him think
of Beauty. He searched for a rose-tree, but could
see none. Strange, thought he, that there should be

no roses in such a garden! At last, entering an

arbor, he found some roses within it. The mer-
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BEAUTY AND’ THE BEAST.

chant plucked a rose. Suddenly a monster seized
him.

“Ungrateful wretch,” said the Beast, “is this the
way you repay the kindness you have received?
You take refuge in my palace from the storm; you
are treated with the best that I can bestow upon
you, and in return you steal my roses! Your life
is forfeited for your baseness.”

The poor old man trembled beneath the grasp of
the monster.

“ My lord!” he said falteringly ; “ my lord—’

“ Call me by no such title!” interrupted the mon-
ster; “call me as I am—call me Beast !”

“pat

“Did you hear me say, call me Beast ?”

“Pardon me, Beast, I knew not I was offending ?”

“Were the roses yours ?” The merchant gave

“Why then did you pluck them?” Still

no answer was returned.
11

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«“ Answer me instantly !” said the Beast.
“T éannot,” replied the merchant; for he did not
wish to involve his daughter in his trouble.
“You cannot? You die unless you answer.”
“Spare my answer, Beast, but take my life.”

“It was your youngest daughter who asked for

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at > the rose! I see your astonishment, but I know all. ¢ a

' 4 4 Still, as you were too noble +o tell, and were ready & a
A to suffer for her sake, I will spare your life for the

<< present. I will allow you to return home and take





(32 leave of your children ; but you must return here in



| aweek, or send some one in your stead. Take the





\ rose and begone.”

The merchant stooped to pick up the rose, which
had fallen from his hand in his fright, and when he
turned to thank the Beast, the monster was nowhere
to be seen. The fatal rose seemed at once to wither:
the merchant put it into his bosom, and hastened











through the gardens.














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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.




The merchant proceeded at once to the stable,
where he found his horse already saddled, and res-
tive to be gone. He mounted his steed, which

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USY AT HER SPINNING-WHEEL IN HER FATHER’S COUNTRY HOUSE, OBSERVES HIS

BEAUTY, B
APPROACH AFTER HIS LONG ABSENCE.

dashed out of the stable towards the entrance gates.
They sprang open at his approach. The horse flew

through the forest, seeming scarcely to touch the









BEAUTY AND TERE Biaas,




ground with his hoofs, and continued going at the

fastest rate. In the evening the merchant, almost




broken-hearted, reached his cottage.




Beauty was seated under the cottage porch, spin- @




ning. She appeared to be anxiously watching the




horseman’s approach. The instant she saw that it




was her father, she sprang from her seat towards




him, and in a few seconds the father and child were “aa




locked in each other’s arms.







Beauty’s face was radiant with joy: the father‘
looked very sad. Aas

“Oh, father!” exclaimed Beauty, with fear and e i
pity, “why that look? Tell me, tell me, what has hap- |
pened.”

“My poor child, thou art the innocent cause of
my grief! Here, my child, take the rose you asked
for, 1t will cost thy father his life !”

The merchant took the withered rose from his

bosom, and placed it in Beauty’s hand. Beauty took
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

the flower, which began instantly to revive ; but she
fell fainting to the ground, terrified at her father’s
words. The merchant carried her into the cottage,
and related to her all that had occurred. As soon
as the merchant had finished his account, Beauty’s

face brightened, and she said smilingly, “ Oh father,

you shall not return: it was for my sake that the

misfortune happened, I alone will bear the punish-
ment. Frightful as may be the monster, and terri-
ble the death he may have in store, I will go.”

No entreaties of the father could alter her mind:
her resolution was made. “ Your life, dearest father,
is more valuable than mine. If you were gone, who
would support and protect my sisters ?”

The week had nearly passed, and Beauty was full
She took leave

of all her friends, giving each one some token of her

of preparations for her departure.

love. She sought to turn away her sisters’ unkind-

ness, and offered them the choice of whatsoever she









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BEAUTY: AND THE Beast.

possessed. They, finding that she was really going,
pretended to be in great grief; but in their hearts
they were glad, for they were full of EJes Puy at her
superiority over them.

The morning for departure came. The merchant
insisted on accompanying his daughter, and seeing
her safely to the monster’s palace. They mounted
“ i their horses and set off. As soon as they arrived at —

ir the cedar forest, the merchant’s horse darted into
*_the midst of it, as though he knew he right path,
i and Beauty’s horse followed close to ‘the other.

: Beauty thought she had never seen a wood so ae

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grand and yet so beautiful.
When they reached the golden gates of the

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palace, the inscription,

Enter without fear,
All are welcome here,

glittered more brilliantly than at the merchant's first
entrance. The gates instantly flew open. Beauty's We

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.












BEAUTY AND THE BEAS®.



horse placed itself at once near some steps of marble
with golden rails, in order that Beauty might alight.
Having done so, and her father being dismounted |
also, both horses ambled off to the stable. The

merchant and Beauty passed into the arcade. Over




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handle. The room contained the choicest sofas,
chairs, stools, and ottomans, of all shapes, high-
seated, low-seated, soft, hard, warm, cool. The
carpets were of the richest velvet, the hangings of £%@
satin, powdered with golden stars, and the finest \@

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another, all kinds of musical instruments; in another, ‘ f|
“cabinets of prints; in another, screens covered with /j
the finest paintings; in another, materials for needle-
work. Adjoining to this apartment were Beauty’s
dressing and bed rooms. She entered the former,

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pared. Yet she lacked heart and courage to touch



any thing, and sank down listlessly into a chair.

She raised her drooping eyes, and beheld a transpa-

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rency at the end of the room thus inscribed: "
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Welcome Beauty, banish fear ; f } 8)
| You are queen and mistress here! aA <
! Speak your wishes, speak your will, Satay
| Swift obedience meets them still. SNe
| aving changed her dress, she went in search of @ijgac
her father. They found a magnificent feast pre- Se ge
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pared for them. Every thing was brought and re- Wars

moved by invisible agency. During the repast, (Aa\j-
delightful music was performed. « ‘g)
“Certainly, father,” said Beauty, “the Beast must y A |
| possess excellent taste; and if I am to be killed, he
surely intends first to fatten me!”
A magic flute played a few bars of music, then a
voice said—

: The Beast is near,
— And asks leave to appear.







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a BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

house to make such a request! I tremble at his

coming,” thought Beauty.
The merchant then spoke: “ Appear, Beast, if it
be your pleasure.”

A door sprung open at the further end of the

i long fe Beauty could not ee his features ;
C27 * but as he came nearer, his hideous appearance began
to be seen, and Beauty clung to her father’s arm for
protection. He saw and pitied her alarm, and at
once spoke to the merchant: “ Merchant, you have
well redeemed your word. If this be the daughter
who has come in your stead, I trust, though absent
from those she loves, that we shall find means to
soothe her regrets, if not to make her time pass agree-

ably.

The voice which uttered this speech was most mu-

Of my palace she is the mistress.”

sical, and its kind expression emboldened Beauty to

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THb FlisT APPLARKANCE OF THE BEAST AT BEAUTY'S REQUEST.

“T am sorry,” said the Beast, “that I am not able
to ask you, Merchant, to stay here with your daugh-

ter: on the morrow you must take leave of each





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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.














“Your kindness, Beast,” answered the merchant,
“ig already much more than we were entitled to ex-
pect, and makes us feel most grateful to you. We
are prepared to submit to your will in all respects.”

Making a graceful bow, the Beast said, “ Farewell!”

As soon as he had gone, the music recommenced,

eed

and a concert was performed, after which the mer-
chant and his daughter retired for the night.

On the morrow the merchant departed with great
grief, and returned home.

At first, Beauty felt inconsolable at bathe alone.
But there was no help for it; and as she was too
wise to give way to her sorrow, she sought to find
means of interesting herself in various occupations.
Whatever she wished for, seemed to come at her
command.

Long before the first day had passed, she had
felt so lonely, that she quite welcomed the magic

flute, and the sounds— | Bs we








BEAUTY AND THE BEAST,

The Beast is near,
And asks leave to appear;

and was really glad to answer, “ Appear, Beast !”
She shuddered as he approached, but her fear wore
off as the Beast stayed. When the clock sounded
’ ten, he bid her a respectful “Good night.” The next ;
| aI day she got more used to the place, and even looked am eS















ve . out for the time when the magic flute should sound.

\ When the Beast appeared this evening, she looked



\. calmly at his ugliness. She was more than ever
e pleased with his conversation. Day after day thus
~ passed, the Beast appearing every evening. ‘Thus
\ the time passed for more than half a year; when one
evening, after Beauty and the Beast had been con-
versing, he took her hand. Beauty thrilled, but not

with delight: he had never done so before. Beauty
quietly withdrew her hand, at which the Beast
sighed deeply, and suddenly he bid her “ adieu !”
Some days after this, the Beast again took Beauty’s






a eee a





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a oe ap BN |b \v ‘ EN - is

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

hand, and she suffered it to remain.

said, “Beauty, will you marry me?” “ Impossible !”



oy) , replied Beauty. The Beast groaned deeply, and

v left as if he felt the greatest grief.

ON
WY,

eS the sounds of the flute, but none were heard.

The next mght
Beauty listened anxiously for
The
yar evening seemed to her the dullest which she had

mn Py passed since her arrival. ‘The next evening came, and
Oy still no Beast. “ What can this mean?” thought she;
is the Beast never to appear again ? I would sooner
KR have his presence, with all his ugliness, a thousand

x,

times more, than this constant absence.”

-<

She had

F scarcely acknowledged the thought to herself, be-
fore the flute sounded, and Beast entered. He
looked melancholy and pensive, except when Beauty

At the usual hour he departed.
As he was leaving, Beauty said, “I hope, Beast,

was talking to him.

you will come to-morrow.”

“Tt is a great balm to my unhappiness, Beauty, to

¢ v sn
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The Beast then |




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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

hear that my visit is not absolutely disagreeable to
you.”
The Beast continued his evening visits as before ;

: Q) but he never again mentioned the subject of mar-



THE MEBCHANT IS REJOICED TO SEE HIS DAUGHTER BEAUTY HOME AGAIN, AND RISES
FROM HIS SICK-BED TO WELCOME HER.

riage, or took Beauty’s hand. He was as kind and
agreeable as ever; but oftentimes Beauty thought |

es

he seemed very sad: she feared to ask him the



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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

cause. She asked herself over and over again, “ Can
Imarry him?” and then the thought of his excessive
hideousness rushed into her mind, and she reluctantly

answered, “ No.”






forget her own home, and often longed to hear how

We In the midst of all this new life, Beauty did not
(}



aN ,

yw was standing before a large murror, she exclaimed,
ey ‘“Oh that I could see what my father is about!” At
K that instant a reflection of her home appeared in
KR the glass. In one room were her sisters trying on

her father and her sisters fared. One day as she



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} some new gowns. In another room lay her father “y
\ on a bed of sickness, so feeble that he could scarce iy
hold any thing. Beauty screamed, and nearly CAN
swooned away. At that instant the magic flute
sounded, though it was but noon, and the Beast
came in. He found Beauty sobbing: he gently took
her hand, and said, “ Beauty, what ails you? are
you ill?” “No, Beast, no; but I have just seen the








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/ BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.





























reflection of my old home in the mirror, and my
?. father, I fear, is at the point of death.”
“Then you wish to visit him ?”

“Oh yes, Beast, it would indeed be great joy and 0
comfort to do so: perhaps it may be the last time
I shall ever see him alive.”

“Take the rose which your father first gathered,” aie“
said the Beast; “and as long as it is In your posses- “gals
sion, you have only to wish aloud, and your wish yt we
will be gratified instantly.”

“© Beast! believe me, I am most grateful for
your great kindness.”

“There is only one condition I have to make,”
said the Beast, “which is, that you are not absent
more than a week. Even that time will appear like
ages to me!” |

- €Yon may rely on my return within the proper
time. . Farewell!” Beauty extended her hand, and



even shed tears at leaving the monster.












ee ee
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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

enn th NET re
4 ~~

“ Adieu, Beauty, adieu!” and the Beast took
her hand and pressed it to his lips. He then left the
room sorrowfully.

When the Beast had gone, Beauty took the rose

and placed it in her bosom. She then said aloud,

a

~f
AF

' “JT wish I were at home.” And saying this, she
x Faryad her hand before her eyes to wipe away her
* a tears: she had scarcely removed her handkerchief,
’ ‘when, instead of being in her apartment in the
palace, she found herself at the porch of her father’s
cottage. She knocked gently, and the door was
} opened by her eldest sister, who started at seeing
, her, and said—

“Well, Beauty indeed! who would have thought
of seeing you? We thought you were dead long
ago, and perhaps eaten up by your monster.”

Beauty threw herself on her sister’s neck, and not
heeding her unkind greeting, kissed her. “ How is
my father? is he alive 2”



}

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BEAUTY AND: THE Beate.

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“ Alive! yes,and much better; but no thanks to your

nursing. We thought you had quite forgotten us.”

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BEAUTY AND THE PRINCE (WHO WAS FORMERLY THE BEAST) WELCOMED ON THFIL
MARRIAGE BY THE PRINCE'S SUBJECTS.

“Never! never! sister, I came the instant I knew

of our father’s sickness.”

“ Well, well, go in and see him.”
29





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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.



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Beauty found her father much better, and both \

were rejoiced to see each other again. The merchant

oe

became quite well before Beauty had been at home
two days. He delighted in hearing all her news. |
She related to him and her sisters how she passed
her time at the palace, and how kind the Beast was
to her. |
Beauty’s time to return had come, but her rose ‘
was nowhere to be found. As she wandered sadly
{about in search of it—oh, joy! she espied it upon a
2 heap of rubbish, the rose nearly withered. With
P -the greatest eagerness she seized it: its faded flow-

oo

, ers began to revive; she took farewell of all, and
; wished herself back at the Beast’s palace. In an in-
stant she was in her own room. As the evening
drew near, she anxiously looked for the Beast, but
he came not. Weary, she sat up all the long night,

believing he certainly would come at last, but no



Beast appeared. In her despair, she seized the rose,











BEAUTY AND THE waa,





and wished herself in the Beast’s presence. Oh, hor-

ror! there he lay as if dead. Beauty felt his heart




still beating. The Beast uttered a groan, and




looked up. His eye feebly opened, and seeing




Beauty, he said: “ Beauty, why did you return only




to see me die? I could not have believed you




would have deceived me. It was impossible to sur-




a vive your absence; but Iam happy to see you once

ee




again before I die.”

“O Beast, do not die! What can I do to save
you 2”






“Will you marry me?” faintly murmured the
Beast.

a Willingly, to save your life,” answered Beauty
eagerly. |






The Beast seemed to revive, and said timidly,
“ But not otherwise, Beauty 2”

a ee ee A -
a.

“Yes! yes!” replied Beauty, covering her face. i ,
The Beast had disappeared, and she saw at her

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BEAUTY AND THE DEAS.

feet one of the loveliest princes that eyes had ever
beheld. Loudly roared the cannon, amidst the
‘sounds of the trumpets and timbrels, and all the
palace seemed suddenly peopled with bustling
crowds engaged in festivity.

The Prince took Beauty’s arm, and led her mto

her father, but not her sisters. ‘They were changed
into stone statues, so to remain until they had re-
formed themselves.

The Prince and Beauty were married, to the great
joy of all his subjects, and they lived to a good old
age in great happiness. The Prince explained to
Beauty how he had been changed into-a beast by a
spiteful fairy, to be so until some one would consent
to marry him in his frightful form ; and how a good
fairy had given him a magic rose-tree, telling him it

would be the means of releasing him from his en-

chantment.




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HOUSEHOLD STORIES

LITTLE FOLKS.
———~<-—_—_-

THis series of FArRy STorIEs has for gene-
rations been listened to and read by Children
with an inexpressible delight, which other
books ivave tailed to afford them.

The extrava.zance of the Stories—the at-
traciive manner of telling them—the pic-
turesy ne scenery described—the marvellous
deeds +eiatede-the reward of virtue and pun-
ishmeat of vice, upon principles strictly in |
uecordance with ethical laws, as applied to
ine formation of character, render them
peculiarly adapted to induce Children to
acquire’t love for reading, and to aid them
to cultivaie the affections, sympathies, fan-
ey, and imagination.

The principle, that good examples only
should be imitated, has been lost sight of in
the Pictcrial embellishment of these stan-
dard Fairy Stories, upon the assumption
that indifferent pictures are good enough to
give first impressions of Art to Children.
Ti this holds true, then language and morals
ofa questionable cast will subserve the same
ends ; but the fallacy of this dogma, not-
withstanding, no one upon reflection will
deny. :

That this edition of these Stories may be
more perfect than any other extant, the pub-
lisher has embellished Tt with exquisite spe-
cimens of high Pictorial Art, from* which
Children may derive those correct ideas that
will mature into the beautiful and grand.

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ADs BEAUTY OFFERS TO MARRY THE BEAST (WHO IS A NOBLE
PRINCE IN DISGUISE) TO SAVE His LIFE.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

APARAALRNY PPPARLDARIOOOOrF

HERE was once a merchant who
had three daughters: Beauty was
the youngest of the three. She
had been called “Beauty” from her birth, on ac

count of her great loveliness. Charming modesty,






BEAUTY AND THER Beas,

kindness, and frankness were always beaming in her
face. She was beloved by all, and was most dear
to her father, who had lost his wife, for she was his

chief companion. Her two sisters were also beauti-

ful in their forms, but they were vain, haughty, and
untruthful. 7
The merchant was once very rich. He was the

owner of a large fleet of ships, which used to sail all
over the world. It so happened, that when they

were once all assembled in the Persian Gulf, a

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most frightful storm arose, and the whole of the Am

merchant’s fleet was lost. In the midst of one
of his most splendid feasts, a breathless messenger
rushed into the company and announced the disas-
ter of the loss of his ships. ‘The poor merchant was
ruined. |

He had nothing of all his great riches left but a
‘small house in the country. He was not, however,

neglected, for Beauty supplied all his wants. She








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| | BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
| | soon forgot her grief for the change of fortune. \

> She found it quite as easy to be happy without jew- |
els and fine clothes as with them. But Beauty’s
contentment did not attend her sisters: they pined
at their altered state, despised their mean clothing,
refused to help in the work of the house, leaving all
the drudgery to their kind sister, and even re-
proached their father for their misfortune. They
were truly miserable. So their beauty passed away,

whilst Beauty’s looks were not only preserved by



her cheerfulness, but they became even more lovely.

3 Beauty had always doted on flowers. When she oN
came to the cottage she became her own gardener ; Vs
and her nosegays were not less fragrant, nor less
brilliant, thaneher rare flowers when she was rich.
Her garden was a pattern of tasteful arrangement:
all sorts of flowers bloomed there except roses ; and,
ae strange to say, though she often planted them, they
> always disappeared in the night.
Nin

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

After some time, good news was brought to the
merchant of the safe arrival in a distant port of one
of his most precious cargoes, which had been thought
to have been lost when the great shipwreck of his
vessels happened. It was necessary that the mer- 5

chant should go to the port, and he resolved to start

on the next day.. He called his three daughters g

|, together to tell them of the news.

“Tell me, daughters,” said the merchant, “what
presents shall your father bring for you on his re-
turn from his journey ?”

“Bring me,” said the eldest, “a watch encircled
with diamonds, which plays the most seraphic
music; a girdle of the purest crystals, bracelets
studded with precious cameos, and a chaplet of
rubies: you may also bring any pearls of the size of
walnuts, if you meet with them, and—”

“ Hold, sister,” said the second, “you will ruin our

father before it comes to my turn. I will only ask







BEAST.

TIE

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BEAUTY

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

of Cashmere shawls, and a tortoise-shell cabinet in-
laid with gold, to hold them all.”

The merchant then turned to Beauty, and said,
“Well, Beauty, and what shall your present be 2”

“JT wish for nothing, father, but your safe return.”

“Nay, child, you must make a request.”

“Well, then, dearest father, as roses won't grow
in my garden, bring me a rose.”

The sisters could not help laughing at her modesty.

On the morrow the merchant started on his jour-
ney. Beauty was in tears at his departure. But
her sisters could not suppress their joy at the pros-
pect of their new finery, and seemed to care but
little for their father’s absence. rr

The merchant arrived at the port, and found his
vessel, He arranged all his business, and made the
purchases, extravagant as they were, which his eld-
est daughters had requested. He mounted his Arab

steed, and commenced his journey homeward.


BDEAGTY AND Pie CaaS:

Towards evening he reached a forest of pines and
cedars, through which lay his way. The evening
was sultry and oppressive. The sun descended be-
low the horizon. The merchant was so wrapt up
his horse, and left him to take his own way. The

animal’s noiseless tread, as his hoofs fell upon the

trance. The scene grew gloomy, Presently thunder

boomed in the distance. Leaden-looking clouds,
_ folded one on another, covered the amber-tinted sky,
~ and large drops of rain pattered on the merchant

He

looked about him, and saw that he had lost his road.

( before he was roused from his own thoughts.

On all sides the forest seemed equally dark and im-
penetrable. Up came the distant thunder, roaring
—crash! crash! as if the heavens were split. Then
came thick darkness again, and the rain poured

down. The horse was stupefied with fear, the mer-





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with his thoughts of home, that he forgot to guide |

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.



















chant hardly less so. During the lull of the storm,

a sweet sound was heard, as if it said—



A =——

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Thy journey’s near done

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And at the instant a small blue light was seen

through the trees. The merchant took courage, and

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clapped his spurs to his steed, urging him in the

direction of the light. The light expanded into a ee

large soft flame, and then disappeared. In its place
was seen the portal of a palace. A tablet above the

entrance was inscribed in glittering letters,—

Enter without fear ;
All are welcome here!

The merchant read the inscription, and pressed
against the golden gates, which opened without
noise ; and entering the first door he came to, he
stripped himself, and enjoyed a delicious warm
bath. Upon quitting it, his wet clothes had

vanished, and dry garments supplied their place.





BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

_ From the bath-room he proceeded to the supper-
room, and there found a delicious repast prepared,






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THE BEAST THREATENS THE MERCHANT'S LIFE BECAUSE HE HAS PLUCKED A
FORBIDDEN ROSE.

at which he made a most hearty meal. When he
had satisfied himself with one dish, another of a dif

a. ferent kind was placed in its stead.









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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

During the progress of the feast, his ears were
filled with most exquisite music. When all was fin-
ished, the merchant departed for his sleeping apart-
ment. Having offered up his grateful prayers, and
especially for his deliverance during the storm, the
merchant retired to his bed, and instantly fell into
a refreshing sleep.

The next morning was bright and peaceful, and

ay

A

* the merchant awoke quite refreshed from his fatigue.

‘Every thing was ready for his toilet and his break- ¥
ve j A
M2 fast. After breakfast, the merchant walked in the eggs

fe

gardens of the palace. Such gardens he had never
seen before. Shrubs and flowers which he had

always thought most rare, in this garden appeared

ee

to grow almost wild. The flowers made him think
of Beauty. He searched for a rose-tree, but could
see none. Strange, thought he, that there should be

no roses in such a garden! At last, entering an

arbor, he found some roses within it. The mer-
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BEAUTY AND’ THE BEAST.

chant plucked a rose. Suddenly a monster seized
him.

“Ungrateful wretch,” said the Beast, “is this the
way you repay the kindness you have received?
You take refuge in my palace from the storm; you
are treated with the best that I can bestow upon
you, and in return you steal my roses! Your life
is forfeited for your baseness.”

The poor old man trembled beneath the grasp of
the monster.

“ My lord!” he said falteringly ; “ my lord—’

“ Call me by no such title!” interrupted the mon-
ster; “call me as I am—call me Beast !”

“pat

“Did you hear me say, call me Beast ?”

“Pardon me, Beast, I knew not I was offending ?”

“Were the roses yours ?” The merchant gave

“Why then did you pluck them?” Still

no answer was returned.
11

no reply.



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«“ Answer me instantly !” said the Beast.
“T éannot,” replied the merchant; for he did not
wish to involve his daughter in his trouble.
“You cannot? You die unless you answer.”
“Spare my answer, Beast, but take my life.”

“It was your youngest daughter who asked for

~r

es FSS a
Â¥ | | * Sa oO Fe Pn at sel AN \
ee “oe. oe nage » eX. Q | Ax , Y
BIRDS a eS "

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. ; ie
\ 4s

\iry

|

If Se
a er P
ae
a a
,—— ———_—___—_—_——_--—

- CY =
at"
ee

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at > the rose! I see your astonishment, but I know all. ¢ a

' 4 4 Still, as you were too noble +o tell, and were ready & a
A to suffer for her sake, I will spare your life for the

<< present. I will allow you to return home and take





(32 leave of your children ; but you must return here in



| aweek, or send some one in your stead. Take the





\ rose and begone.”

The merchant stooped to pick up the rose, which
had fallen from his hand in his fright, and when he
turned to thank the Beast, the monster was nowhere
to be seen. The fatal rose seemed at once to wither:
the merchant put it into his bosom, and hastened











through the gardens.











a
Ae
A OO es



PEE
ON SZ ree eee Tl SSKes
/ ; £ oN ae oe ‘a aN )
Se as Jak We ON eS SY ARS

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.




The merchant proceeded at once to the stable,
where he found his horse already saddled, and res-
tive to be gone. He mounted his steed, which

3 A.



oy

ZA
pa
Gs






i
ay

}



USY AT HER SPINNING-WHEEL IN HER FATHER’S COUNTRY HOUSE, OBSERVES HIS

BEAUTY, B
APPROACH AFTER HIS LONG ABSENCE.

dashed out of the stable towards the entrance gates.
They sprang open at his approach. The horse flew

through the forest, seeming scarcely to touch the






BEAUTY AND TERE Biaas,




ground with his hoofs, and continued going at the

fastest rate. In the evening the merchant, almost




broken-hearted, reached his cottage.




Beauty was seated under the cottage porch, spin- @




ning. She appeared to be anxiously watching the




horseman’s approach. The instant she saw that it




was her father, she sprang from her seat towards




him, and in a few seconds the father and child were “aa




locked in each other’s arms.







Beauty’s face was radiant with joy: the father‘
looked very sad. Aas

“Oh, father!” exclaimed Beauty, with fear and e i
pity, “why that look? Tell me, tell me, what has hap- |
pened.”

“My poor child, thou art the innocent cause of
my grief! Here, my child, take the rose you asked
for, 1t will cost thy father his life !”

The merchant took the withered rose from his

bosom, and placed it in Beauty’s hand. Beauty took
14

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o
A aE



Pe
hs


Ne Y

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

the flower, which began instantly to revive ; but she
fell fainting to the ground, terrified at her father’s
words. The merchant carried her into the cottage,
and related to her all that had occurred. As soon
as the merchant had finished his account, Beauty’s

face brightened, and she said smilingly, “ Oh father,

you shall not return: it was for my sake that the

misfortune happened, I alone will bear the punish-
ment. Frightful as may be the monster, and terri-
ble the death he may have in store, I will go.”

No entreaties of the father could alter her mind:
her resolution was made. “ Your life, dearest father,
is more valuable than mine. If you were gone, who
would support and protect my sisters ?”

The week had nearly passed, and Beauty was full
She took leave

of all her friends, giving each one some token of her

of preparations for her departure.

love. She sought to turn away her sisters’ unkind-

ness, and offered them the choice of whatsoever she









EN




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BEAUTY: AND THE Beast.

possessed. They, finding that she was really going,
pretended to be in great grief; but in their hearts
they were glad, for they were full of EJes Puy at her
superiority over them.

The morning for departure came. The merchant
insisted on accompanying his daughter, and seeing
her safely to the monster’s palace. They mounted
“ i their horses and set off. As soon as they arrived at —

ir the cedar forest, the merchant’s horse darted into
*_the midst of it, as though he knew he right path,
i and Beauty’s horse followed close to ‘the other.

: Beauty thought she had never seen a wood so ae

wt

grand and yet so beautiful.
When they reached the golden gates of the

me So"

palace, the inscription,

Enter without fear,
All are welcome here,

glittered more brilliantly than at the merchant's first
entrance. The gates instantly flew open. Beauty's We

a cn iON AOI I A LO I II AM .







em cae

Po
C) Lee SS ye



= oe Quiret sy, :
pi es i oe —e Ya G {
Stix N / 7M S AS fe A
=) K— oN SS SY i ¢ YE “=~ “



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.









BEAUTY AND THE BEAS®.



horse placed itself at once near some steps of marble
with golden rails, in order that Beauty might alight.
Having done so, and her father being dismounted |
also, both horses ambled off to the stable. The

merchant and Beauty passed into the arcade. Over




ee

-e J

° * 3
one door was inscribed, “ Beauty’s APARTMENT.” {|°

CS
bees?
> eos Es TEA as
Rn es a WY eX,
ss.
a VES

ph
{yy

f The door sprung open as she touched the enamelled /

ey



handle. The room contained the choicest sofas,
chairs, stools, and ottomans, of all shapes, high-
seated, low-seated, soft, hard, warm, cool. The
carpets were of the richest velvet, the hangings of £%@
satin, powdered with golden stars, and the finest \@

Ht Y RS
lace. In one recess of the room was a library; in 44 4

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another, all kinds of musical instruments; in another, ‘ f|
“cabinets of prints; in another, screens covered with /j
the finest paintings; in another, materials for needle-
work. Adjoining to this apartment were Beauty’s
dressing and bed rooms. She entered the former,

where she found every article for her toilet pre- @&



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Kime Sa iROw SS

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.






J
oie

oe




Ape
vr.

ed

Sa

eh

pared. Yet she lacked heart and courage to touch



any thing, and sank down listlessly into a chair.

She raised her drooping eyes, and beheld a transpa-

Ses
St





rency at the end of the room thus inscribed: "
(a. q
2 \ LI
Welcome Beauty, banish fear ; f } 8)
| You are queen and mistress here! aA <
! Speak your wishes, speak your will, Satay
| Swift obedience meets them still. SNe
| aving changed her dress, she went in search of @ijgac
her father. They found a magnificent feast pre- Se ge
; CS
pared for them. Every thing was brought and re- Wars

moved by invisible agency. During the repast, (Aa\j-
delightful music was performed. « ‘g)
“Certainly, father,” said Beauty, “the Beast must y A |
| possess excellent taste; and if I am to be killed, he
surely intends first to fatten me!”
A magic flute played a few bars of music, then a
voice said—

: The Beast is near,
— And asks leave to appear.




;
|
|
|









Ras \ oe pe aac a ra _ r SS Res ‘ _ oe —_ z Bins wns age)
=o Se Se ace ae — Se a a com s. =
pn ee fs a pe wr ry ew ON Ve
OQ eg 0) sad) |: tig SL ~— a WY, W ) A= “| \ SENN =
SAN PAN eS i PON IR
es a Ue a en a ee t
pe Si o Op WSF SLU 4, E Yer Nee ee eRe,
a of ie "¢ a eal eee oe Ne 2 ee ee
7 i Sa 7 a 7S — { S ye A
a NZI Fe SK Cg PA \ Sal

a BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

house to make such a request! I tremble at his

coming,” thought Beauty.
The merchant then spoke: “ Appear, Beast, if it
be your pleasure.”

A door sprung open at the further end of the

i long fe Beauty could not ee his features ;
C27 * but as he came nearer, his hideous appearance began
to be seen, and Beauty clung to her father’s arm for
protection. He saw and pitied her alarm, and at
once spoke to the merchant: “ Merchant, you have
well redeemed your word. If this be the daughter
who has come in your stead, I trust, though absent
from those she loves, that we shall find means to
soothe her regrets, if not to make her time pass agree-

ably.

The voice which uttered this speech was most mu-

Of my palace she is the mistress.”

sical, and its kind expression emboldened Beauty to

— ig aioe ans
< ie ( Bt ree mn S AF,
4

“Flow very thoughtful for a master in his own A!



—



















5


om FS

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open ee,
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look up. She gave a glance, but’ the exceeding



ugliness of the monster caused her again to close her

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THb FlisT APPLARKANCE OF THE BEAST AT BEAUTY'S REQUEST.

“T am sorry,” said the Beast, “that I am not able
to ask you, Merchant, to stay here with your daugh-

ter: on the morrow you must take leave of each


mene ewe names ee

Fa ras SON IS SO ii

aS oe we A

(Je x Kas - ae ww oon y

























a



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.














“Your kindness, Beast,” answered the merchant,
“ig already much more than we were entitled to ex-
pect, and makes us feel most grateful to you. We
are prepared to submit to your will in all respects.”

Making a graceful bow, the Beast said, “ Farewell!”

As soon as he had gone, the music recommenced,

eed

and a concert was performed, after which the mer-
chant and his daughter retired for the night.

On the morrow the merchant departed with great
grief, and returned home.

At first, Beauty felt inconsolable at bathe alone.
But there was no help for it; and as she was too
wise to give way to her sorrow, she sought to find
means of interesting herself in various occupations.
Whatever she wished for, seemed to come at her
command.

Long before the first day had passed, she had
felt so lonely, that she quite welcomed the magic

flute, and the sounds— | Bs we





BEAUTY AND THE BEAST,

The Beast is near,
And asks leave to appear;

and was really glad to answer, “ Appear, Beast !”
She shuddered as he approached, but her fear wore
off as the Beast stayed. When the clock sounded
’ ten, he bid her a respectful “Good night.” The next ;
| aI day she got more used to the place, and even looked am eS















ve . out for the time when the magic flute should sound.

\ When the Beast appeared this evening, she looked



\. calmly at his ugliness. She was more than ever
e pleased with his conversation. Day after day thus
~ passed, the Beast appearing every evening. ‘Thus
\ the time passed for more than half a year; when one
evening, after Beauty and the Beast had been con-
versing, he took her hand. Beauty thrilled, but not

with delight: he had never done so before. Beauty
quietly withdrew her hand, at which the Beast
sighed deeply, and suddenly he bid her “ adieu !”
Some days after this, the Beast again took Beauty’s



a eee a





— ra oy {
mae SA 78 Sg ‘A Xt oS ;
a oe ap BN |b \v ‘ EN - is

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

hand, and she suffered it to remain.

said, “Beauty, will you marry me?” “ Impossible !”



oy) , replied Beauty. The Beast groaned deeply, and

v left as if he felt the greatest grief.

ON
WY,

eS the sounds of the flute, but none were heard.

The next mght
Beauty listened anxiously for
The
yar evening seemed to her the dullest which she had

mn Py passed since her arrival. ‘The next evening came, and
Oy still no Beast. “ What can this mean?” thought she;
is the Beast never to appear again ? I would sooner
KR have his presence, with all his ugliness, a thousand

x,

times more, than this constant absence.”

-<

She had

F scarcely acknowledged the thought to herself, be-
fore the flute sounded, and Beast entered. He
looked melancholy and pensive, except when Beauty

At the usual hour he departed.
As he was leaving, Beauty said, “I hope, Beast,

was talking to him.

you will come to-morrow.”

“Tt is a great balm to my unhappiness, Beauty, to

¢ v sn
ee ae ae as eee
a =A Tat
ea * 2 SK
oe * e 7
i ae

The Beast then |




rhs pr$ a
he ‘
Seen C3:

Cea N-
2 CR WE a
EA

5% SMS

eos
YS Brey

WS aoa IB

ae WIAA
Fa Soe a



















BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

hear that my visit is not absolutely disagreeable to
you.”
The Beast continued his evening visits as before ;

: Q) but he never again mentioned the subject of mar-



THE MEBCHANT IS REJOICED TO SEE HIS DAUGHTER BEAUTY HOME AGAIN, AND RISES
FROM HIS SICK-BED TO WELCOME HER.

riage, or took Beauty’s hand. He was as kind and
agreeable as ever; but oftentimes Beauty thought |

es

he seemed very sad: she feared to ask him the



Pit: sy a

A — gk



-~ et Picasa nenrm ort alia lett inemtinnel tm .
be Sse VU ae ee Ee ee































am.

iS me oe | (i.

yy Sig ng oe of e Sos ,
- \ ~~ x VW) a



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

cause. She asked herself over and over again, “ Can
Imarry him?” and then the thought of his excessive
hideousness rushed into her mind, and she reluctantly

answered, “ No.”






forget her own home, and often longed to hear how

We In the midst of all this new life, Beauty did not
(}



aN ,

yw was standing before a large murror, she exclaimed,
ey ‘“Oh that I could see what my father is about!” At
K that instant a reflection of her home appeared in
KR the glass. In one room were her sisters trying on

her father and her sisters fared. One day as she



A.
WOES v
} ‘pee Baas
eS |
=a F
¢
O

Z A
ee,
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Wg a MS a gk F-:
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} some new gowns. In another room lay her father “y
\ on a bed of sickness, so feeble that he could scarce iy
hold any thing. Beauty screamed, and nearly CAN
swooned away. At that instant the magic flute
sounded, though it was but noon, and the Beast
came in. He found Beauty sobbing: he gently took
her hand, and said, “ Beauty, what ails you? are
you ill?” “No, Beast, no; but I have just seen the





at. Pg pe 4 a, coe yu i
ee ee eee ee
wr

ana
a itn aisles meee a Casa
y XY 4a a tx e? TAN
S es \ ‘SZ SS 77 ‘S. a
ae ee 3 we SSD GNA:
~o Jy ¢ pt ae gasps

/ BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.





























reflection of my old home in the mirror, and my
?. father, I fear, is at the point of death.”
“Then you wish to visit him ?”

“Oh yes, Beast, it would indeed be great joy and 0
comfort to do so: perhaps it may be the last time
I shall ever see him alive.”

“Take the rose which your father first gathered,” aie“
said the Beast; “and as long as it is In your posses- “gals
sion, you have only to wish aloud, and your wish yt we
will be gratified instantly.”

“© Beast! believe me, I am most grateful for
your great kindness.”

“There is only one condition I have to make,”
said the Beast, “which is, that you are not absent
more than a week. Even that time will appear like
ages to me!” |

- €Yon may rely on my return within the proper
time. . Farewell!” Beauty extended her hand, and



even shed tears at leaving the monster.









ee ee
SOSTISZO-ALR Sy ey
oy ee Sah FARE SK] fp
; |
|
!
























BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

enn th NET re
4 ~~

“ Adieu, Beauty, adieu!” and the Beast took
her hand and pressed it to his lips. He then left the
room sorrowfully.

When the Beast had gone, Beauty took the rose

and placed it in her bosom. She then said aloud,

a

~f
AF

' “JT wish I were at home.” And saying this, she
x Faryad her hand before her eyes to wipe away her
* a tears: she had scarcely removed her handkerchief,
’ ‘when, instead of being in her apartment in the
palace, she found herself at the porch of her father’s
cottage. She knocked gently, and the door was
} opened by her eldest sister, who started at seeing
, her, and said—

“Well, Beauty indeed! who would have thought
of seeing you? We thought you were dead long
ago, and perhaps eaten up by your monster.”

Beauty threw herself on her sister’s neck, and not
heeding her unkind greeting, kissed her. “ How is
my father? is he alive 2”
}

. >.






























pee NN TEE = % ae d BPN tee Sn ae ee OS UN) Oe
ele he os \S C:y: eee EP

\ » QS io \ ie pea“ ¢ : SL LA de oN eh \ SEF

Yr, “or Z i \ R | Se yy “yy \ : N x

\ ° “3 oe - JOSOr> cai il wD ‘ Ns s

: ee y fas FRE N we ra Y \ an

’ ; A Y os Sep” SY SN ‘

& Ce uw

BEAUTY AND: THE Beate.

Aarne’

“ Alive! yes,and much better; but no thanks to your

nursing. We thought you had quite forgotten us.”

4
Benn

*\.) }
{ )
bet
r% . rN

‘

——y,
Sa

oO a

ee mid?
KR 7
ee

i x ane

zy
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MA

er :

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] Hue 4 A}: : AZ “{ . ; ~ a a
2 GU ar (geaes es inl)

\ : ah fi neV iH Geer ee
ee ee
Re HH ' | ; , ==



BEAUTY AND THE PRINCE (WHO WAS FORMERLY THE BEAST) WELCOMED ON THFIL
MARRIAGE BY THE PRINCE'S SUBJECTS.

“Never! never! sister, I came the instant I knew

of our father’s sickness.”

“ Well, well, go in and see him.”
29


ee
ees

fs
aie ee See
GSS 7 Th
aA => oe A.
dhe Sa ae St . eh

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.



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\
4

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ea fale |

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pti a
an a
sf

oa
es -——

ee
ee
+ ir—5

7 a YO -

Beauty found her father much better, and both \

were rejoiced to see each other again. The merchant

oe

became quite well before Beauty had been at home
two days. He delighted in hearing all her news. |
She related to him and her sisters how she passed
her time at the palace, and how kind the Beast was
to her. |
Beauty’s time to return had come, but her rose ‘
was nowhere to be found. As she wandered sadly
{about in search of it—oh, joy! she espied it upon a
2 heap of rubbish, the rose nearly withered. With
P -the greatest eagerness she seized it: its faded flow-

oo

, ers began to revive; she took farewell of all, and
; wished herself back at the Beast’s palace. In an in-
stant she was in her own room. As the evening
drew near, she anxiously looked for the Beast, but
he came not. Weary, she sat up all the long night,

believing he certainly would come at last, but no



Beast appeared. In her despair, she seized the rose,








BEAUTY AND THE waa,





and wished herself in the Beast’s presence. Oh, hor-

ror! there he lay as if dead. Beauty felt his heart




still beating. The Beast uttered a groan, and




looked up. His eye feebly opened, and seeing




Beauty, he said: “ Beauty, why did you return only




to see me die? I could not have believed you




would have deceived me. It was impossible to sur-




a vive your absence; but Iam happy to see you once

ee




again before I die.”

“O Beast, do not die! What can I do to save
you 2”






“Will you marry me?” faintly murmured the
Beast.

a Willingly, to save your life,” answered Beauty
eagerly. |






The Beast seemed to revive, and said timidly,
“ But not otherwise, Beauty 2”

a ee ee A -
a.

“Yes! yes!” replied Beauty, covering her face. i ,
The Beast had disappeared, and she saw at her

bs

3]



nt — 7 os :
* aN pn Sek
< = *























BEAUTY AND THE DEAS.

feet one of the loveliest princes that eyes had ever
beheld. Loudly roared the cannon, amidst the
‘sounds of the trumpets and timbrels, and all the
palace seemed suddenly peopled with bustling
crowds engaged in festivity.

The Prince took Beauty’s arm, and led her mto

her father, but not her sisters. ‘They were changed
into stone statues, so to remain until they had re-
formed themselves.

The Prince and Beauty were married, to the great
joy of all his subjects, and they lived to a good old
age in great happiness. The Prince explained to
Beauty how he had been changed into-a beast by a
spiteful fairy, to be so until some one would consent
to marry him in his frightful form ; and how a good
fairy had given him a magic rose-tree, telling him it

would be the means of releasing him from his en-

chantment.




“Sy St

Bao \ gf > <(V Noma. SX
QP SG aK ONS

tn apr pean tina pain, eth ght

Ba.

Sea,

gs
>
Vs
a



Sy

ts , > ‘ f
i Naa pe ele
caste

tas ce |
HOUSEHOLD STORIES

LITTLE FOLKS.
———~<-—_—_-

THis series of FArRy STorIEs has for gene-
rations been listened to and read by Children
with an inexpressible delight, which other
books ivave tailed to afford them.

The extrava.zance of the Stories—the at-
traciive manner of telling them—the pic-
turesy ne scenery described—the marvellous
deeds +eiatede-the reward of virtue and pun-
ishmeat of vice, upon principles strictly in |
uecordance with ethical laws, as applied to
ine formation of character, render them
peculiarly adapted to induce Children to
acquire’t love for reading, and to aid them
to cultivaie the affections, sympathies, fan-
ey, and imagination.

The principle, that good examples only
should be imitated, has been lost sight of in
the Pictcrial embellishment of these stan-
dard Fairy Stories, upon the assumption
that indifferent pictures are good enough to
give first impressions of Art to Children.
Ti this holds true, then language and morals
ofa questionable cast will subserve the same
ends ; but the fallacy of this dogma, not-
withstanding, no one upon reflection will
deny. :

That this edition of these Stories may be
more perfect than any other extant, the pub-
lisher has embellished Tt with exquisite spe-
cimens of high Pictorial Art, from* which
Children may derive those correct ideas that
will mature into the beautiful and grand.

AT eth

ed

a=

etait ee re ee
A ZA
Wye *

5 Xx

aie
_—E

De
.

a,

an hails * Seane
4
age

=.
=

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12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000f.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000g.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000g.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000j.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000j.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000k.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00000k.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:45 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:54:46 PM