Citation
The New-Zealanders

Material Information

Title:
The New-Zealanders : abridged from the Library of entertaining knowledge
Added title page title:
Library of entertaining knowledge
Creator:
Smith, Daniel, 1806-1852 ( Author, Primary )
Longking, Joseph
Lane & Scott ( Publisher )
Methodist Episcopal Church -- Sunday School Union
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Lane & Scott, for the Sunday-School Union of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Manufacturer:
Joseph Longking
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
282, [ 4 ] p. : ill. [1] port. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Missionaries -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Maori (New Zealand people) -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile literature -- New Zealand -- To 1840 ( lcsh )
Civilization -- Juvenile literature -- New Zealand ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1852 ( rbprov )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1852 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Bookplates (Provenance) ( rbprov )
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's advertisement follows text.
General Note:
Portrait of John Rutherford, p.2.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Rev. Daniel Smith.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026962142 ( ALEPH )
45839607 ( OCLC )
ALH8126 ( NOTIS )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text




New- Zealanders.

JOHN RUTHERFORD.
From an Original Drawing taken in 1828,

1
Ai
i
e
i
a)

Zee





THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,.
ABRIDGED FROM
THE LIBRARY OF ENTERTAINING KNOWLEDGE,

BY REV. DANIEL SMITH.



a
) ~ n ¢ SY . .. = ie as,
——— As ie

View in New-Zealand, from Cook’s Voyages.

New-Vork :
PUBLISHED BY LANA & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER.
1852.






INTRODUCTION

ro
NEW-ZEALANDERS.

—

In the following pages will be found a highly interesting
account of a very interesting people. The New-Zealanders
are muscular and robust, capable of enduring great fatigue,
and are also uncommonly active. Their intellectual
powers are vigorous and acute, and in their dispositions
they are independent, bold, and vigorous. They inhabit
two extensive and fertile islands, mantled with lofty forests
of valuable timber, and intersected by fine rivers and
streams. ‘They are surrounded with the treasures of the
South Seas, and favourably situated for commerce with
various parts of the civilized world. Their climate is
neither so sultry as to enervate nor so frigid as to stupify.
‘With all these native advantages they are capable of being
one of the finest races of men on the face of the globe;
but alas! what is man without the gospel? The New-
Zealanders are heathen, and like other heathen they are
ignorant, superstitious, treacherous, violent, blood-thirsty
idolaters. ‘Toward each other they are implacable and
unmerciful: of their Creator they are ignorant, and their
worship is the worship of idols and of demons.

I have abridged this work for Sabbath schools with the
design of adding to the number of those works which are
calculated to impress on the minds of the young the value
and importance of their own country and institutions.



6 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Here they have freedom, protecting laws, schools, teachers,
and books. Born in New-Zealand, they would probably
have been slaves destitute of education, without schools or
books, and exposed to be murdered and devoured at the
will of a tyrannical master.

Here they have all the comforts and conveniences of life.
There they would have few of the comforts and none of
the conveniences which alleviate suffering and enhance
enjoyment. Here they have cuurches and Bibles, Sabbath
schools and ministers, to help them on to eternal life.
There they might live without Ciod and die without hope.
Think, my young friends, of these advantages, and adore
that gracious Providence which has caused “ the lines to fall
to you in pleasant places, and given you a goodly heritage.”

Another part of the design of this and similar works is,
by presenting a true picture of savage life, to impress on
the minds of the young the importance and necessity of
sending out the Bible and the missionary. ‘These will
impart the moral and social elements which will ultimately
“leaven the whole limp,” and elevate in the scale of
knowledge and civilization, while they at the same time
prepare for the hich destiny of glorified spirits.

Tam happy to add that missions have been already com-
menced in New-Zealand, and prosceuted with encourag-
ing success, The Canteh Missionary Society, and the
Wesleyan Missionary Soci heye both established
missions among those noble but depraved islanders, num-
bers of whom have learned to read and write, and a consi-
derable number have given evidence of genuine conversion
to God. The Rev. W. White, Wesleyan missionary,
gives the following pleasing account of an annual public
examination which took place on the 25th of Dec., 1834.

“ From the various out-stations, we had on our beech










THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 7

fifty-three canoes, which in all, I suppose, contained about
one thousand persons ; and, be it remembered that it was
not pork, potatoes, and flour, that induced them to come,
for we gave them none—they brought their own provender
with them, and several came from the distance of twenty-
six, and two or three more than thirty miles. Our new
chapel, which was not then covered in, was crowded, and
several sat on the outside. I addressed, in the morning,
at eight A. M., a congregation as orderly and attentive as
any I ever saw in England, from Matthew ii, 6, after which,
the examination in reading and writing commenced ; and,
notwithstanding the disadvantages under which we and
the natives labour, we had present fifty-eight males, chiefly
young men and boys, who could read the New Testament
and write a good hand. The number of females present
who could read was twenty ; making in all seventy-eight
persons who could read the word of God. There were
also many who had not courage to come forward for ex-
amination, because ihey could not read without spelling.
* * * * " * * * * *

“6 Several chiefs have lately declared in favour of Chris-
tianity. I name two—Tawai and Miti. They are both
about thirty-five years of age. The former has been one
of the most cclebrated and successful warriors in the land.
‘These two chiefs, with all their people, including some old
gray-headed cannibels, are now sitting, like the man in the
gospel, out of whom the foul spirit had been cast, at the
feet of Jesus, anxious to learn, and ready to embrace, the
will of God. We have cut a road, through a dense forest
from behind our settlement, about six miles, that we may
be able to visit them by land on horseback.

“ Moitara, also, a very popular chief, at the entrance of
this harbour, and about twenty-four miles from this station,



8 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

has, within the last month, expressed a strong desire for
a teacher. Some of his friends have embraced the truth ,
but he says he will not unless you send him a missionary.
He has pressed me so closely on this point, that I have
been induced to say, that if you will send out any more
missionaries, he shall have a teacher. And I think if you
can allow us three missionaries for Hokianga, that one
might be stationed to great advantage with the above-
named chief. ,
“Tt affords me very great pleasure to be able to say,
that many of our people are making a steady and pleasing
progress in knowledge, and in the love of God and man.”
D.S.
New-York, May, 1838,



THE

NEW-ZEALANDERS.

CHAPTER I.

Voyage of discovery of Tasman—Van Diemen’s J.and—-
New-Zealand—Hostile behaviour of its inhabitants—Ac-
count of Cook’s first visit to it—Ascertained to be composed
of two islands—Minute survey of the coast—Size of the
islands.

Ir was on the 14th of August, 1642, that the
Dutch navigator, Abel Jansen Tasman, whose
name now occupies so honourable a place in
the history of nautical discovery, left the port
of Batavia, in the East Indies, on a voyage to
the yet almost unentered regions of the Southern
Pacific. He was despatched on this expedi-
tion by Anthony Van Diemen, then governor of
the Dutch possessions in that quarter of the
globe ; and had under his command the yacht
Heemskirk, and the Zeehaan fly-boat. The
first reward of Tasman’s research was the dis-
covery of Van Diemen’s Land. After spending
some days in navigating the coasts of this coun-
try, he proceeded toward the east, till on the
13th of September, being then in latitude 32°
10’ south, and longitude 167° 21’ east from
Greenwich, he again saw land lying about a
degree to the south-south-east. Next day, after
having steered east, he was within two miles
of the shore, beyond which the mountains were
so high that their tops could not be seen for



10 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the clouds which rested upon them. They
continued to pursue the course of the coast to
the northward, keeping so close to the land
that they could see the waves break on the
shore; and for some days could perceive
neither houses, nor smoke, nor any other sign
of inhabitants. At last, on the 17th, they reach-
ed the northern extremity of the land, and, turn-
ing to the east, anchored next day within a
large bay, three or four miles wide. It was
now that the natives for the first time made
their appearance, two of their canoes having
put out from the shore soon after sunset, the
people in which called out to the Dutch in a
strong, rough voice, but in a language which
the latter did not understand. They sounded
also an instrument, which ‘Tasman says made
a noise like a Moorish trumpet, but which was
probably a species of shell merely, such as is
used in other islands of the South Sea, for the
purpose of convoking the people to war, and on
other occasions. ‘The New-Zealand chiefs, it
would seem, carry such shells at the present
day as part of their usual accoutrements.
“ Mowenna had his shell hung upon his arm,
which he immediately sounded ; when his peo-
ple flew to arms in all directions, and those
that were with me girded up their loins, and
prepared for war or flight, as circumstances
might dictate.”*

At nightfall the canoes returned to the shore ;

* Rev. Mr. Marsden’s Journal of a Visit to New-Zea-
land in 1820.



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 11

but next morning a boat with thirteen men in it
made its appearance, and approached within a
stone’s cast of the ship. The people, now more
distinctly seen, appeared to be of common
stature, and strong-boned ; their colour between
brown and yellow, and their hair black, which
they wore tied up on the crown of the head like
the Japanese, each having a large white feather
stuck upright in it. Their vessels were double
canoes, fastened together with cross planks, on
which they sat. ‘Their clothing seemed to be
of mats, or of cotton; but most of them had the
breast naked. It is remarked that their Jan-
guage seemed to bear no resemblance to that of
the Solomon Isles, with a vocabulary of which
Tasman had been furnished by the general and
council at Batavia.

The people in this canoe also rowed back
after some time to the land, having been in vain
tempted to come on board by the exhibition of
fish, linen, and knives. Immediately after-
ward, however, seven other canoes put out to-
ward the ships, and one of them came within
half a stone’s cast of that in which Tasman
was. Meanwhile a boat, in which were a
quarter-master and six seamen, was despatched
from the Heemskirk to the Zeehaan, which
lay at a little distance, to direct the people in
the latter to keep on their guard, and not to
suffer too many canoes to come alongside. No
sooner had the boat put off than the natives in
the nearest canoes called to those that were
farther off, making at the same time a signal to



12 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

them with their paddles; and when she had
got quite clear of the ship, such of the canoes
as were within reach rushed with their beaks
violently against her, so as to make her heel.
At the same time one of the savages, with what
Tasman calls a blunt-pointed pike, gave the
quarter-master a violent blow on the neck,
which made him fall overboard. The others
then attacked the rest of the boat’s crew with
their paddles, and with short thick clubs, which
the Dutch had at first taken for clumsy parangs,
(knives used in some part of the East Indies
for cutting wood,) and in a few moments three
of the seamen were killed, and a fourth mortally
wounded. After this the assailants made a pre-
cipitate retreat, carrying with them one of the
dead bodies; and before those on board the
ships could be ready to avenge the murder of
their comrades, they were out of reach of the
guns.

Having no hope of obtaining refreshments
after what had happened, Tasman immediately
left the scene of this bloody transaction, which
he designated the “ Bay of Murderers.” Cook
supposes this to be, not the opening which in
his first voyage he named Blind Bay, but an-
other, a short way to the north-west of it, and
about six leagues to the east of Cape Farewell,
the northern extremity of the southern island.
When they were under sail, twenty-two more
boats put off from the shore, and advanced to-
ward them, at which they fired, but without
hitting any person on board, except a man in the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 13

foremost canoe, who was standing with a white
flag in his hand. The shot, however, striking
against the canoes, made them all retreat to-
ward the shore. Instead of continuing his
course toward the east, Tasman now stood to
the north, and soon came in sight of land ahead.
He now took it for granted, that in his tack
eastward he had only entered a large bay, and
that the land before him belonged to the same
island or continent with that which he had left
behind.

At this time, and for more than a century
afterward, the existence of a land extending
around the south pole, which was denominated
the Terra Incognita Australis, was the favour-
ite dream of geographers ; and upon this Tas-
man imagined that he had now touched: “ It is
a very fine country,” says he, ‘and we hope it
is part of the unknown south continent.” 'Twenty-
six years before this, his countrymen Schouten
and Le Maire, on peuetrating into the Pacific
through the strait which bears the name of the
latter, had given that of Staten Land, or States’
Land,tothe coast which appeared on their left, and
which they conceived to belong also to the long-
sought polar continent. Tasman accordingly
gave the same name to the land which he had
just discovered, under the impression that it
might be only another part of the same extensive
region. It happened, however, that within
three months after this, Schouten’s Staten
Land was found to be merely an inconsiderable
island; another Dutch navigator, Hen:rick



14 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Brouwer, having sailed around its eastern and
southern coasts in making a voyage to Chili.
Upon this discovery being announced, the coun-
try which Tasman had called Staten Land lost
its first name, and received, instead, that of
New-Zea.anb, by which it has ever since been
known.

After the attack made upon the boat in Mur-
derers’ Bay, Tasman did not attempt to put in
at any other part of the coast of New-Zealand ;
but on passing its north-western extremity, off
which he arrived on the 4th of January, 1643,
he bestowed upon it the name of Cape Maria
Van Diemen, in honour, it is said, of a young
lady, a relation of the East India governor, to
whom he was attached. Two days afterward
he came to an anchor on the north side of an
island, lying a few miles to the north-west of
the cape, which, in allusion to the day, (Epipha-
ny-day,) he named the Island of the Three Kings.
This was all that Tasman saw of New-Zealand,
the existence of which, however, he was cer-
tainly the first to make known.

After Tasman’s departure no account has
been preserved of any visit paid to New-Zea-
land till the year 1769, when on the 6th of
October it was seen by Captain Cook, bearing
west by north, on his return from the Society
Isles, in the course of his first circumnavigation
of the globe. The land Cook ascertained to be
New-Zealand. On drawing nearer they saw
smoke ascending’ from different places on the
shore, and at last they could perceive that “ the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 15

hills were clothed with wood, and that some of
the trees in the valleys were very large.” Cook
was now approaching New-Zealand on the op-
posite side from that on which Tasman had
been, nearly one hundred and twenty-seven
years before, and in a latitude considerably to
the north of that in which it had first presented
itself to the Dutch navigator. For some time,
in consequence of a violent north wind, he
found it impossible to weather a point of land
which formed the south-west head of a bay he
wished to enter; but at last, about four o’clock
on the afternoon of the 8th, he came to an an-
chor on the north-west side of the bay, in lati-
tude 38° 42’ south, and longitude 181° 36’ west
from Greenwich. Here he lay before the en-
trance of a small river, about half a league from
the shore. The sides of the bay were “ white
cliffs of a great height; the middle low land,
with hills gradually rising behind, one tower-
ing above another, and terminating in a chain
of mountains, which appeared to be far inland.”

Captain Cook’s first intercourse with the New-
Zealanders was not calculated to prepossess
either party with favourable sentiments toward
the other. On the same evening on which he
arrived in the bay, he went on shore, accompa-
nied by Mr. Banks and Dr. Solander ; but they
had not long left their boat when they were at-
tacked by a party of the natives. They were
at last obliged to fire in self-defence, and one
of the New-Zealanders was shot. Another at-
tempt, which was made the following morning,



16 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

to establish a friendly intercourse with them,
was attended with no better success, although
it was now found that a native of Otaheite,
named Tupia, who was on board the ship, could
make himself perfectly understood by speaking
to them in his own language. In the course
of the day, however, Cook at last succeeded in
getting some of these suspicious islanders on
board ; but it was only by using force, and after
a contest, which unhappily proved a very
bloody one. He had set out along with three
boats to make the circuit of the bay in search
of fresh water, that in the river being found to
be salt, when he met one of their fishing canoes
coming in from the sea, having seven people
on board, four men and three boys. As soon
as the New-Zealanders perceived the boats,
which they did not till they were almost in
the midst of them, they took to their paddles,
and plied them so briskly that they would act-
ually have effected their escape had not Cook
ordered a musket to be fired over their heads,
thinking this would probably make them sur-
render. But unfortunately it had not that effect ;
for although, on the discharge of the piece,
they immediately ceased paddling, and began
to strip, it was only that, unequal as was the
contest, they might mect and fight their assail-
ants. They themselves, indeed, as soon as the
boat came up, commenced the attack with
their paddles, and what other weapons they had
with them; and so obstinate was the resistance
they made, that the scuffle did not end till the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 17

four men were killed. On this the boys, the
eldest of whom was about nineteen, and the
youngest about eleven, instantly leaped into the
water ; but although even here they continued
their resistance by every means in their power,
they were at last taken up and placed in the
boat. It is but just to Captain Cook to give
his own remarks on this unfortunate transaction :
“Tam conscious,” says lic, “that the feeling of
every reader of humanity will censure me for
having fired upon these unhappy people ; and it
is impossible that, upon a calm review, I should
approve it myself. They certainly did not de-
serve death for not choosing to confide in my
promises, or not consenting to come on board
my boat, even if they had apprehended no dan-
ger; but the nature of my service required me
to obtain a knowledge of their country, which I
could not otherwise effect than by forcing my
way into it in a hostile manner, or gaining ad-
tuission through the confidence and good will of
the people. | had already tried the power of
presents without ejlect ; and 1 was now prompt-
ed, by my desire to avoid farther hostilities, to
get some of them on board, as the onlv method
left of convincing them that we intended them
no harm, and had it in our power to contribute
to their gratification and convenience. Thus
far my intentions certainly were not criminal ;
and though in the contest which I had not the
least reason to expect our victory must have
been complete without so great an expense of

life, yet in such situations, when the command
cp
2



18 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

to fire has been given, no man can restrain its
excess, or prescribe its effect.”

When the boys were first brought into the
boat, they seemed evidently to have no hope of
any thing except instant death ; but, upon be-
ing kindly treated, and furnished with clothes,
they very soon forgot both their alarm on their
own account, and even their grief for the loss
of their friends, and gradually got into high
spirits. When dinner was set upon the table
they were anxious to partake of every dish, and
seemed particularly delighted with the salt
pork and bread. They ate voraciously, and at
sunset made another enormous meal, devouring
as before a large quantity of bread, and drink-
ing above a quart of water. But although they
had been so cheerful during the day, and had
taken apparently a great deal of interest in
whatever their attention was directed to, the
recollection of what had befallen them seemed
to return to them after they were in bed, and
during the night they sighed often aloud. By
Tupia’s encouragements, however, they were
soon once more enabled to escape from their
gloomy reflections, and were even induced to
amuse their entertainers with a song. “ The
tune,” says Cook, ‘ was solemn and slow, like
those of our psalms, containing many notes and
semitones.” In the morning they again ate
with extraordinary appetite ; and having then
been dressed, and adorned with bracelets, ank-
lets, and necklaces, expressed at first the
greatest. joy upon being told that they were to



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 19

be sent on shore. When they came to the
place, however, at which it was proposed to
land them, they entreated with great earnest-
ness that they might not be put ashore there,
“because,” they said, ‘it was inhabited by
their enemies, who would kill them and eat
them.” But their fears left them when, upon
landing in company with Captain Cook and
the boat’s crew, they perceived the uncle of
one of them among the Indians who had assem-
bled on the beach. Yet after some hesitation,
and an attempt to ascertain the disposition of
their countrymen, they finally preferred return-
ing with the English ; and they were accord-
ingly again taken on board the boat. They
changed their minds once more after dinner,
and with their own consent were again sent on
shore ; but on seeing the boat that had convey-
ed them put off from the land, they waded into
the water, and earnestly entreated to be taken
on board. ‘The people in the boat, however,
had positive orders to leave them, and could
not comply. Cook was, some time after, dis-
tinctly informed that they had received no
injury.

Finding it impossible to procure supplies of
any kind where he lay, Captain Cook next
morning weighed anchor, bestowing the name
of Poverty Bay wpon the place where he had
been so inhospitably received. It was called
Taoneroa by the natives. Following the coast,
Captain Cook finally circumnavigated the
two islands. In the course of this survey



20 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

he had a great deal of intercourse with the in-
habitants, | and enjoyed many opportunities of
observing their manners and method of life, as
wellas of examining the various natural produc-
tions of the country. But we must refer to the
published account of his voyage for these more
particular details. His visit must be consider-
ed the most important that has ever been made
tu those islands, in so far, at least, as respects
the geography of the country. The chart
which he drew has required but few corrections
or additions. The extent of the two islands as
estimated from this chart is estimated at ninety-
five thousand English square miles.

CHAPTER ITI.

Visits of different navigators to New-Zealand—Account
of the voyage of M. de Surville, and of his transactions at
New-Zealand—Voyage of M. Marion du Fresne—Massacre
of himself and part of his crew.

Coox’s ship, us we have already hinted, was
not the only European vessel which the year
1769 brought to the shores of New-Zealand,
notwithstanding that, in so far as is distinctly
known, they had remained unvisited till then
from the time of ‘l'asman. On the 8th of De-
cember the evreat [nelish navigator passed an
opening not far from the northern extremity of
the east coast of Eaheinomauwe, on which he
has hestowed the name of Doubtless Bay; and
he kept plying to the north of this bay till the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 21

evening of the 12th. On this very day, singu-
larly enough, a French vessel, the Saint Jean
Baptiste, under the command of M. de Surville,.
also first came in sight of the very same part
of New-Zealand.

It appears that De Surville had left the port
of Engely, in the Ganges, on the 3d of March,
1769, on an expedition in quest of an island,
said to have been some time before discovered
by the English, about seven hundred leagues to
the west of the coast of Peru, abounding both
in the precious metals and every other descrip-
tion of wealth. De Surville was an able and
intrepid seaman, and if any captain could have
conducted the ship to the fabled Isle of Gold, of
which it was sent in search, he was certainly
as likely to be successful as any other. He
commenced his voyage by visiting some of the
more northern islands of the great Indian Archi-
pelago, through which he afterward steered his
course in a south-easterly direction; but we
must pass over the adventures he met with
during the first nine months he was at sea.
We find him, on the 30th of November, at an
island to the east of New-Guinea, which he
named the Island of Contrariety, but which was,
in all probability, one of the Solomon Isles.
From this he proceeded toward the south, and
on the 12th of December, as we have already
mentioned, arrived in sight of the north-east
coast of New-Zealand. He was prevented,
however, for some days, by contrary winds, from
making the land; but at last, on the 17th, he



22 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

succeeded in effecting his entrance into an in-
let, to which he gave the name of Lauriston
Bay, in honour of the governor-general, and
which was the same that Cook had called
Doubtless Bay. At this time, Cook was still
beating about, not a great way to the north.
Having come to an anchor, De Surville, the day
following, went on shore, and was very hospi-
tably received by the natives. Next day he
landed again, when he found a considerable
body of them assembled to meet him, one of
whom, who appeared to be a chief, advanced
from among the rest, and, having come up to
him, demanded his musket. Upon his refusing
to part with it, he was next asked to let them
have his sword; and with this request he
thought proper to comply. As soon as the chief
had received the sword, he marched off with it
to his countrymen, and addressed them for some
time in a loud voice, alter which he brought
hack the weapon, and restored it to its owner.
It would appear that the evidence De Surville
had thus given of the confidence he placed in
them had completely won the hearts of these
people ; for after this, they showed every dis-
position to treat their visiters as friends, and
supplied them abundantly with such refresh-
ments as they wanted. On the 22d De Sur-
ville left his first anchorage, and proceeded to
another in a cove at the head of the bay, which
he named Cove Chevalier. Soon after he had
dropped anchor in this second harbour, a terri-
ble tempest arose, and swept the coast with such



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS., 23

fury as to tear the ship from her moorings, and
to expose her for some time to the most immi-
nent hazard of destruction. This was the same
storm by which Captain Cook, it will be remem-
bered, was attacked on the 27th, at which time,
however, he was to the south-west of Cape
Maria Van Diemen, and consequently on the
opposite side of the island to that on which the
French vessel lay.

During the gale, a boat, in which were the
mvalids of De Surville’s crew, in attempting to
make from the shore to the ship, was very
nearly lost; but contrived at last to get into a
small creek, which hence received the name of
Refuge Cove. As soon as they had arrived
here, the sick men were sent on shore ; and no-
thing could exceed the kindness with which
they were received and treated during their stay,
by Naginoui, the chief or lord of the adjoining
village. They remained in his care, having his
house for their home, and feeding upon his
bounty, (for he would accept of no remunera-
tion for the refreshments with which he supplied
them,) till the storm was over; and then on the
29th they got back in safety to the ship. But
this conduct of the humane and generous New-
Zealander was soon after cruelly requited by
the French commander. Having missed one of
his small boats during the storm, De Surville
was induced from some circumstances to be-
lieve that the natives had stolen it; and he de-
termined to be avenged for this supposed injury.
Seeing, therefore, one of the chiefs walking on



24 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the shore, he made him a signal from the ship,
and with many professions of friendship invited
him to come on board—which, however, the un-
suspecting savage had no sooner done than he
found himself a prisoner. Not satisfied with
’ this treachery, De Surville next gave orders that
a village which he pointed out should be set on
fire; and it was accordingly burned to the
ground. It was the very village in which the
sick seamen had a few days before been so
liberally entertained; and the chief who had
been ensnared on board the ship was their host
Naginoui. Immediately after this infamous
transaction, De Surville left New-Zealand, car-
rying the chief with him. But Naginoui did
not long survive his separation from his country ;
he died of a broken heart, on the 24th of March,
1770, when the ship was off the Island of Juan
Fernandez on her way to Peru.

The next visit that was paid to New-Zealand
was also by the French, and it is one of the
most memorable in the early history of our ac-
quaintance with this country and its inhabitants.
It was on the 18th of October, 1771, that M.
Marion du Fresne sailed from the Isle of France
in the Mascarin, having on board a young na-
tive of Otaheite, whom Bougainville had a few
years before brought with him to Europe, and
whom it was now determined to send back to
his own country. Marion’s ship was accom-
panied by the Marquis de Castries, under the
command of M. Duclesmeur; and it was in-
tended from the first that the two vessels, after



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 25

conveying home Aoutourou, should proceed to
explore the Southern Pacific in quest of its hid-
den islands or continents; not forgetting the
Island of Gold, the existence of which, how-
ever, now began to be very generally doubted—
so that Marion was ordered to spend only a
moderate time in searching for it. But he was
especially directed to examine New-Zealand—
an evidence of the interest that had already been
excited by the accounts of De Surville and
Cook. Aoutourou, having been attacked by
small pox, died at Madagascar; and Marion
then pursued his voyage to the south-cast.
Proceeding along the coast toward the south-
east, they arrived on the 3d of May off Cape
Brett, which they called Cap Quarré; and
here they sent a boat ashore. ‘Three canoes
also came out to them from the coast, the natives
in one of which were with some difficulty
induced to come on board, but having been
taken into the cabin, ate with great pleasure
the bread which was set before them. It was
with manifest repugnance, however, that they
drank a little of some spirituous liquors. Some
shirts, and other European attire, being given
them, they- immediately dressed themselves in
these new habiliments, of which they seemed ex-
ceedingly vain. Onbeing shown several common
iron tools, such as axes, scissors, and hatchets,
they evinced the strongest anxiety to get pos-
session of them, and instantly took up and hand-
led each of them in such a way as to let it be
seen that they completely understood its use.



26 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

This was a lesson of civilization for which they
had doubtless been indebted to the visits of
Cook and De Surville.

The New-Zealanders left Marion’s ship de-
lighted, apparently, with the presents they had
received. After they had taken their leave,
their countrymen in the other two canoes came
on board, and being similarly treated, were
equally well pleased with their reception. Five
or six of them, indeed, remained in the ship all
night, and both slept soundly and ate heartily,
although they would neither taste wine nor
spirits. Among them was a chief, named Ta-
couri, of whom we shall hear more presently.

Having thus begun an amicable intercourse
with the natives, Marion determined to put in
to the Bay of Islands, which lies immediately
to the north of Cape Brett; and he cast anchor
there, accordingly, on the 11th of May. On the
following day he landed the sick part of his
crew on one of the numerous islands within the
bay, which was called by the natives Motouaro.
Abundance of fish was now brought to them by
the New-Zealanders, who seemed by their
whole conduct disposed to regard them as
friends; while their intercourse with each other
was rendered much more agreeable by the dis-
covery, which was accidentaliy made, that the
language of the country was nearly the same as
that of Otaheite, of which the French had a vo-
cabulary on board, and which they consequently
found to be, if not quite a perfect, at least a very
useful medium of communication. This import-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 27

ant fact was found out, as he tells us himself,
by M. Crozet, Marion’s first lieutenant, from
whose papers the Abbé Rochon has compiled
his account of the voyage. Crozet, in his
anxiety to make himself understood, while con-
versing with one of the natives, bethought him
of trying whether one or two of his Otaheite
words might not assist him, when to his sur-
prise he found his meaning apprehended at
once.

In the succeeding portion of his narrative,
M. Crozet gives us a long and interesting
account of what he observed in relation to the
character and manners of the New-Zealanders,
during his residence among them. In the course
of this account, he mentions several particulars
not noticed by others who have visited the
country ; and we shall have occasion to refer
to some of his statements in a subsequent part
of our volume. But in the mean time it will be
more convenient to confine ourselves to his de-
tails in regard to the melancholy termination of
the intercourse with these islanders which had
been seemingly so auspiciously begun.

So intimate did the French soon become
with their new acquaintances, and such was
the state of harmony and mutual confidence in
which they lived together, that while on the
one hand the New-Zealanders were wont to
come at all times freely on board the ships, and
often to remain there all night: the crew and
officers, on the other, moved about on shore
almost us if they had been in their own country,



28 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

and would even occasionally make excursions
in small parties into the interior, traversing the
villages of the natives, entering their houses,
sharing their meals, and, in fact, putting them-
selves in every respect in their power. Almost
every officer had his favourite young friend, to
whose attachment he was indebted for a thou-
sand little attentions, and whose constant and
cheerful service was purchased by the most
trivial rewards. Marion himself, in particular,
whose authority over the others they were not
slow in remarking, seemed to be the object of
universal regard ; and he felt on his part a cor-
responding degree of affection for this apparent-
ly warm-hearted race, which almost prevented
him from setting any bounds to the extent to
which he trusted himself to their honour. Crozet
asserts that he himself was almost the only one
of the officers who did not quite permit himself
to forget all suspicion and precaution, in his
intercourse with these people. He frequently,
he tells us, took the liberty of pointing out to
the captain the imprudence of his conduct, and
of endeavouring to put him a little more on his
guard, but without effect.

And in this way matters went on till the 8th
of June, on which day Marion, having gone on
shore, was received with even more than the
usual honours and enthusiasm. As soon as the
islanders had got him in the midst of them, they
bestowed upon him the high distinction of deco-
rating his hair with the four white feathers
which form among them the insignia of chief-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 29

tainship ; and when he returned on board in the
evening, he seemed more delighted than ever
with his new friends. It was remarked, how-
ever, that from this day the New-Zealanders
discontinued their visits to the ship; even the
officers’ attendants, who had been wont to be
most frequently on board, no longer making their
appearance. ‘The young person who had at-
tached himself to Crozet had come on board in
the morning, but wearing an air of melancholy,
which was quite unusual; and would neither
accept of auy remuneration for some small pre-
sents which he brought with him, nor even eat
any of the food that was offered him. As he
took leave in the evening, it was evident, Cro-
zet says, that there was some weight upon his
spirits.

Four days after this, namely, on tle morning
of the 12th, Marion went again on shore, taking
with him this time sixteen other persons in the
boat, among whom were four of the superior
officers. As evening approached it excited
some surprise that he did not return on board ;
but it was known that the party had gone to
spend the day in fishing, near a village belong-
ing to Tacouri, the chief we have already men-
tioned, by this time the familiar acquaintance
of all of them; and it was supposed that they
might have been prevailed upon, at his hospita-
ble invitation, to remain with him for the night.
No suspicion was entertained for a moment
that any misfortune had befallen them. But
early next morning a boat was sent on shore



30 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

from the Marquis de Castries, for the purpose
of procuring wood and water; and it had been
absent about four hours, when, to the surprise of
those in the ship, one of the men who had gone
in it was perceived swiniming toward them from
the shore. On being taken up and brought on
board, this man told them a fearful narrative.
He and his eleven companions had been receiv-
ed, on reaching the shore, with every show of
affection—the natives even proffering to carry
them from the boat to the land on their shoul-
ders, that they might not wet themselves in
stepping through the water. When they had
got on shore they dispersed, as they had been
accustomed to do, to short distances from each
other, to gather the wood ; and they were very
soon completely separated, every one engaged
with his work, and unarmed, or at least so en-
tirely off his guard as to make what arms he
might have about him useless. While thus
employed, and with numbers of the islanders
mixed with them, in one moment each was
fallen upon by six or eight of these barbarians,
who, in almost every case, instantly overpower-
ed whatever resistance was attempted, bearing
down their victims to the earth or hanging
upon thein so that they could not move a limb,
and then beating out their brains with a single
stroke of their short stone war-clubs. In this
manner eleven of them were speedily despatch-
ed; one only, the man who now related the
bloody transaction, had escaped the fate of his
companions, having been by chance attacked



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 31

by a smaller number of assailants, from whom,
but not without being wounded, he had con-
trived to extricate himself in the confusion, on
which he immediately plunged into a thicket
of underwood hard by, where he lay concealed.
From this hiding place he saw the dead bodies
of his messmates cut open and divided among
their murderers ; who soon after left the spot,
each carrying with him the portion he had re-
ceived, and gave the man an opportunity of
making his escape to the water.

On hearing this horrible account, it was im-
possible that the greatest alarm should not
have been felt by all on board for the safety of
the captain and those who were with him. The
Mascarin’s long boat was immediately sent off,
with a strong party, well armed, on board, to
ascertain what had become of them, although
there was now but little room for doubt as to
what had been their fate. On approaching the
shore the first object that presented itself to the
men charged with this duty, was the boat that
had conveyed Marion and his companions
the day before, lying on the strand, and filled
and surrounded by a tumultuous crowd of the
natives, It was thought best, however, not to
stop for the present here, but to hasten as fast
as possible to a party of the men who had been
for some time employed on shore in cutting
down trees at a little distance from this place,
in order, if not too late, to inform them of what
had happened, and to warn them to save them-
selves from destruction by quitting the island



32 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

with all possible expedition. This party were
at present under the command of Crozet,
and consisted of about sixty individuals. Im-
mediately on receiving the intelligence of what
had taken place, that officer collected his men,
and ordered them instantly to make ready for
proceeding on board, but without informing them
of any part of what he had heard, lest they might
in their exasperation have sacrificed even their
own safety to the phrensy of a rash and unsea-
sonable revenge. From the plan that was adopt-
ed, all the tools they had been using were
gathered toyether, and packed up in an orderly
manner, beiore the command was given to
march. On their way down to the water, how-
ever, they were followed by multitudes of the
natives, who continued saluting them every
moment by cries of wild triumph, intimating
that ‘l'acouri had killed Marion, and that he was
dead and eaten. ‘They did not, however, ven-
ture to attack them. But when thev had got
to the waterside, and had halted in order to
prepare for embarking, the fury of the savage
mob, by whom they were encompassed, seeni-
ed to be about to break from the partial control
by which it had been tll now kept down, and,
pressing closer and closer around them, they
began to show every symptom of an intention
to commence an attack upon them by a gencral
rush. At this moment Crozet, scizing his mus-
ket, called to them with a commanding voice to
stand back; and, drawing a line on the ground
between them and the spot where his party



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 33

stood, threatened that he would kill the first
man who should dare to overstep it. Cook had
resorted with success to this expedient in a
similar extremity, when about to be attacked
by the inhabitants on one of the islands of this
very bay. ‘The expedient was attended with
the same success now as it was on that occa-
sion. Not one of the savages ventured to cross
the barrier. Nay, when Crozet, addressing
them a second time, ordered them to sit down,
the command was mildly repeated to the throng
by their chiefs, and instantly the whole multi-
tude, to the number of fully a thousand men,
seated themselves on the ground. And thus
they remained during all the time, which was
considerable, that was occupied in the embark-
ation both of the men and their baggage ; but as
soon as the last man had stepped into the boat,
they rose all at once with a loud shout, as if
released from a spell, and hurled a shower of
stones and javelins after the fugitive French.
"These missiles, however, did not do much harm,
any more than their vociferous outcries and
hideous gesticulations, when they found their
anticipated prey thus, as it were owing to their
own infatuation, escaped from them.

They then proceeded to wreak their ven-
geance on the huts the French had lately
tenanted, setting them on fire, and otherwise
demolishing them. Some of them, at the same
time, entered the water, with the intention of
pursuing the boat; but now was come the time
when the French could, without risk, render

3



34 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

requital for the blood of their butchered coun-
trymen, and they rendered it fully. Shower
after shower of musketry was poured in upon
the miserable rabble, who, stupified with con-
sternation as they felt their ranks mowed down,
actually stood still to be shot at. Crozet says
they could have been all killed, and takes some
merit to himself for restraining his men at last
from the farther prosecution of their murderous
work, on an occasion which, it must be con-
fessed, was enflaming enough to the passions
of rude natures.

It was eleven o’clock at night before the in-
valids were got on board from the small island
_ where their establishment had been fixed ; but
_they were all removed in safety. These lament-

able events, however, had completely put a stop
to the preparations that were making to obtain
a supply of wood and water for the ships; and
as it was impossible that they could proceed on
their voyage without being provided with these
articles, a party was sent on shore next day to
secure what was wanted, at all hazards. In
the performance of this duty, they found it ne-
cessary to attack a village on the Island of
Motouaro, containing about three hundred ia-
habitants, who evidenced something like a dis-
position to interrupt them. In this affair‘also a
great many of the natives werc killed. Such,
indeed, was the terror with which the fire-arms,
of the effect of which they had seen so much
the preceding day, had inspired them, that the
chiefs were utterly unable te prevail upon their



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 35

warriors even to face their formidable assail-
ants. Yet with such determined obstinacy did
they resist every attempt to capture them, that
no prisoners could be secured. All their women
and children, however, had been previously
removed, in the anticipation of this conflict.
Some days after this, while the French were
still employed in taking in their wood and water,
a number of the natives having been seen dress-
ed in the clothes of the murdered sailors, were
pursued, and a good many of themshot. During
the whole of the time the French remained, the
New-Zealanders continued to keep strict watch
in all directions, guards being stationed on the
tops of all the neighbouring hills, and fires kept
blazing on the same eminences at night. At
last every thing being in readiness, the former
determined to leave the island; but before set-
ting sail, an armed party was once more sent
on shore to make the last inquiries after the fate
of Marion and his companions, and to inflict yet
another chastisement on their destroyers. ‘They
proceeded or landing to the village belonging
to Tacouri; but on their arrival here they found
all the inhabitants had fled, except a few old
men, whoin it is to be hoped they did not injure.
They were just in time, however, to see Tacouri
himself running off, having the unfortunate Ma-
rion’s mantle, which was recognised by the blue
English cloth lined with red, of which it was
made, hanging from his shoulders. On enter-
ing, too, this chief’s deserted kitchen, they
found in it several pieces of human flesh, some



36 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

raw, and others roasted, the latter marked
with the teeth that had already been tearing
them. In another house they picked up a part
of a shirt with Marion’s name on it, together
with a variety of other evidences of the horri-
ble tragedy, of which the place in which they
now were had doubtless been the witness.
They set fire both to this village, and to another
at a little distance from it, the proprietor of
which they had reason to believe had been a
confederate in Tacouri’s treachery—a suppo-
sition which was confirmed by the fact that
its inhabitants had also deemed it prudent to
take flight, as well as by the remnants of human
flesh, and other traces of the recent barbarity,
which they found in different parts of it. Hav-
ing thus, as it was conceived, satisfied the
manes of their lost comrades, the French left
New-Zealand on the 14th of July, having, first,
however, taken possession of the country, or at
least of the northern isle, which M. Marion had
named France Australe, in the name of their
royal master. ‘To the inlet where they had
lain, (Cook’s Bay of Islands,) and of which M.
Marion is somewhat incorrectly termed the dis-
coverer, they gave the warning designation of
the Bay of ‘Treachery.

Weare left by M. Crozet’s narrative altogether
in the dark as to any circumstances which could
have led to the sudden and horrible catastrophe
which we have just related. He asserts indeed
repeatedly, that the French had given these
islanders no cause of offence whatever during



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 37

their residence among them ; and that up to the
fatal day when the cruel assassination of Ma-
rion and his companions was perpetrated, no-
thing could have exceeded the apparent cordi-
ality and harmony in which the two parties
lived together. “ They treated us,” is his ex-
pression, “with every show of friendship for
thirty-three days, in the intention of eating us
the thirty-fourth.” Most people, however, will
probably be of opinion that conduct apparently
implying such transcendent perfidy must be
capable of some explanation, if all the facts of
the case were known.

The first European vessel that visited New-
Zealand after the departure of the Mascarin
and the Castries, was the Resolution, in which
Cook was then making his second voyage
around the globe. ‘The great navigator arrived
again in sight of New-Zealand on the 25th of
March, 1773. The day following he entered
Dusky Bay, lying in the south-west part of the
southern island, immediately to the north of the
West Cape ; and here he remained till the 11th
of May. A few inhabitants were found even in
this spot, so remote from the quarters where
the principal settlements seemed to be establish-
ed. On leaving Dusky Bay, Cook proceeded
along the coast toward the north, and turning
into the strait between the two islands, came to
an anchor on the 18th in a harbour, to which
he gave the name of Ship Cove, situated in a
large inlet called Queen Charlotte’s Sound, on
the coast of the Southern Island, in which he



38 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

had lain for about three weeks on his former
voyage. Here the Resolution found her consort
the Adventure, commanded by Captain Furn-
eaux, from which she had been separated in a
storm on the passage from the Cape of Good
Hope, more than three months before. The
Adventure had reached the bay on the 7th of
April, having also entered the straits from the
west. The two ships continued here till the
7th of June, when they set sail in company, and,
bearing through the strait toward the east, pro-
ceeded on their voyage to the Society Islands.

On the 2ist of October, in the same year,
the two English discovery ships again arrived
at New-Zealand, on their return from the So-
ciety Isles. When the ships were a few miles
to the north of Cape Turnagain, some of the
natives came to them in their canoes, from
the shore, bringing a few fish which they ex-
changed for cloth and nails. ‘“ They were so
fond of nails,” says Cook, “as to seize on all
they could find, and with such eagerness, as
plainly showed that they were the most valu-
able things we could give them.” ‘The first
words which two of them spoke, who were pre-
vailed upon to come on board, were, Mataou no
ta pow pow (we are afraid of the guns.) These
two acquisitions—a knowledge of the value of
iron, and a sense of the power of fire-arms—
were, perhaps, all they had gained from their
four years’ intercourse with Europeans. The
last they shared with the inferior animal races
inhabiting their country. Crozet tells us, that



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 39

although, on the first arrival of the French, the
birds around the Bay of Islands were so entirely
without fear, that they would perch even on the
muskets, or stand still at their very muzzles
when pointed at them, they afterward took
wing whenever they observed the sportsman
approach. They still, however, he adds, suf-
fered the natives to come near them without
being at all disturbed. ‘he French navigator,
Bougainville, mentions, in the same way, that
when he landed in the Falkland Islands, all the
animals came about him and his men, the fowls
alighting upon their heads and shoulders.

In continuing their course along the coast to-
ward the south, the two ships were attacked
by a violent gale of wind, during which they
again parted company. Cook in a day or two .
regained his old station on the south side of the
straits; and here he remained for about three
weeks ; after which he bore away toward the
south-east. Meanwhile the Adventure had been
detained on the east coast from the time she
lost sight of her consort, and it was the begin-
ning of December before she arrived in Ship
Cove, where her consort had been. On going
ashore, however, they found the place where
Cook’s people had erected their tents, and ob-
served cut out on an old stump of a tree in the
garden the words, “ Look underneath.” ‘This
enabled them to find Cook’s direction for their
course, which he had written, and buried in a
bottle.

On the 17th they had got every thing ready



40 THE NEW-ZFRALANDERS.

for setting sail, and intended to weigh anchor
next morning, when Captain Furneaux sent off
one of the midshipmen, and a boat’s crew, to
the land, to gather a few wild greens, with or-
ders to return in the evening. As the boat,
however, did not make her appearance either
that night or the next morning, Captain Fur-
neaux became very uneasy about her, and hoist-
ing out the launch, sent her with his second- |
lieutenant, Mr. Burney, manned with a boat’s
crew and ten marines in search of her. The
result was, that another horrible massacre had
taken place. ‘The boat’s crew had been attacked
by the natives, and the whole of the unfortunate
men put to death and eaten. ‘The persons who
perished in this massacre, ten in number, were
the best hands in the ship. Mr. Bumey’s nar-
rative of this fearful transaction is exceedingly
interesting. ‘The Adventure left New-Zealand
four days afterward. .

On the 19th of October, 1774, Cook’s vessel
was again moored at her old anchorage in Ship
Cove ; and she remained here till the 10th of
the following month. None of the natives made
their appearance till the 24th, when two canoes
were seen, which, however, as soon as they
perceived the ship, retired behind a point of
land. In the course of the day some more of
the natives were discovered on shore, and even
hallooed to a boat they saw approaching, in
which Cook was; but as the boat drew nearer
to the land, they all took flight to the woods,
except two or three men, who remained sta-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 43

tioned on a rising ground with their anns in
their hands. ‘“'The moment we landed,” con-
tinues Cook, “they knew us. Joy then took
place of fear ; and the rest of the natives hur-
ried out of the woods, and embraced us over and
over again; leaping and skipping about like
madmen.” Cook did not succeed during his
present visit to New-Zealand in ascertaining
any thing as to the misfortune that had befallen
the Adventure, notwithstanding all his inquiries,
which were particularly called forth by the mys-
terious conversation of the natives. Captain
Cook paid his fifth and last visit to New-Zealand
in the course of his third voyage around the
world, having, after leaving Van Diemen’s Land,
come in sight of Rock’s Point on the west coast
of the southern island on the 10th of February,
1777. On the morning of the 12th he was at
anchor in his old station in Ship Cove, where
he had not lain long, before several canoes filled
with natives came alongside. Very few of
them, however, would at first venture on board ;
and Cook attributes their shyness, with every
probability, to their apprehension that he had
come to revenge the massacre of Captain Fur-
neaux’s men, with which they must have known
that he was now acquainted, as they saw he
had brought with him the native of the Society
{slands, Omai, who had been on board the Ad-
venture when the melancholy affair happened.
But they very soon laid aside their fears on
Cook assuring them that he had no hostile in-
tentions; and the English having formed an



42 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

encampment on shore, a great number of fami-
lies soon came from different parts of the coast
and took up their residence close to them.
They were even visited occasionally by a chief
named Kahoora, who was stated to have headed
the party that cut off Captain Furneaux’s people,
and to have himself killed Mr. Rowe, the of-
ficer who commanded. This personage seemed
t6 be an object of general terror and dislike
among his countrymen, many of whom impor-
tuned Cook to kill him, and appeared not a little
surprised when the English captain declined
complying with their request. ‘“ But if I had
followed,” says Cook, “the advice of all our
pretended friends, I might have extirpated the
whole race ; for the people of each hamlet or
village, by turns, applied to me to destroy the
other.”

Kahoora himself came afterward to the ship
inacanoe. “This was the third time,” says
Cook, “ he had visited us, without betraying the
smallest appearance of fear. I was ashore when
he now arrived, but had got on board just as he
was going away. Omai, who had returned with
me, presently pointed him out, and solicited me
to shoot him. Not satisfied with this, he ad-
dressed himself to Kahoora, threatening to be
his executioner if ever he presumed to visit us
again. The New-Zealander paid so little re-
gard to these threats, that he returned the next
morning with his whole family, men, women,
and children, to the number of twenty and up-
ward. Omai was the first who acquainted me



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 43

with his being alongside the ship, and desired
to know if he should ask him to come on board.
I told him he might; and accordingly he intro-
duced the chief into the cabin, saying, ‘ ‘There
is Kahoora, killhim! But, asif he had forgotten
his former threats, or were afraid that I should
call upon him to perform them, he immediately
retired. In a short time, however, he returned;
and seeing the chief unhurt, he expostulated
with me very eamestly, saying, ‘Why do you
not kill him? You tell me if aman kills another
in England that he is hanged for it. ‘This man
has killed ten, and yet you will not kill him,
though many of his countrymen desire it, and
it would be very good.’ Omai’s arguments,
though specious cnough, having no weight with
me, I desired him to ask the chief why he had kill-
ed Captain Furneaux’s people? At this question
Kahoora folded his arms, hung down his head,
and looked like one caught in a trap; and I
firmly believe he expected instant death. But
no sooner was he assured of his safety than he
became cheerful. He did not, however, seem
willing to give me an answer to the question
that had been put to him, till I had, again and
again, repeated my promise that he should not
be hurt. ‘Then he ventured to tell us, ‘ that one
of his countrymen, having brought a stone
hatchet to barter, the man to whom it was of-
fered took it, and would neither return it nor
give any thing for it; on which the owner of it
snatched up the bread as an equivalent, and
then the quarrel began.”



44 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

CHAPTER IV.

Intercourse of New-Zealanders with Australia—Hooda
Cocoty-Towamahowey and ‘Toogee—Tippahee—George
Bruce—Destruction of the Bayd—Duaterra.

AurHoucH New-Zealand remained unvisited
by the discovery ships of European nations, an
intercourse, which gradually became more fre-
quent, had been begun, some years before the
close of the last century, between these islands
and the English settlement in New South Wales.
From this colony, the voyage to the nearest part
of the New-Zealand coast could be made in
about a fortnight, the distance not being greater
than twelve hundred miles. In 1793, the govern-
ment of New South Wales having attempted to
form a settlement on Norfolk Island, a small un-
inhabited island, two or three days’ sail to the
north-west of New-Zealand, which Cook had
discovered on his second voyage, it was deter-
mined to send a vessel to the neighbourhood of
the Bay of Islands to bring away one or more
of the natives, in order that instructions might
be obtained from them as to the mode of dress-
ing the flax of their country, a production which
was also found to abound in the new scitlement.
The Dedalus, accordingly, under the command
of Lieutenant Hanson, having appeared on the
coast of New-Zealand, two of the natives, the
one named Hoodo-Cocoty-Towamahowey and
the other Toogee, were without much difficulty
enticed on board, and immediately carried away
to Norfolk Island. ere they were treated with



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 45

every attention by Captain King, the governor
of the settlement, but it soon appeared, that al-
though they were very ready to give all the in-
formation about the flax that they could, they
knew very little about the matter. “ This ope-
ration was found to be among them the peculiar
province of the women; ard as Hoodo was a
warrior, and Toogee a priest, they gave the go-
vemor to understand that dressing of flax never
made any patt of their studies.” The haughty
chiefs must, doubtless, have felt no little surprise
on discovering the very strange purpose, as it
would appear to them, for which their services
had been sought. But, although they knew
nothing about spinning, they were able to com-
municate many details in regard to the gceogra-
phy and political condition of their country; and
one of them even drew on the floor of a room,
with chalk, a map or chart, of the northern isl-
and of New-Zealand, which he afterward trans-
ferred to paper, and which was found to bear a
great similitude to Captain Cook’s delineation.
‘They remaincd at Norfolk Island for a consider-
able time, and were then carried back to their
native country in a vessel in which Governor
King himself accompanied them. ‘That gentle-
man, however, had but little intercourse with
the people of New-Zealand, not having gone on
shore during the short time the ship was off the
island, which was only eighteen hours in all.
But the kindness with which he had treated the
two chiefs appears to have been long remem-
bered both by them and their countrymen.



46 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

When the Fanny, a vessel from Port Jackson,
lay at anchor in Doubtless Bay, in December,
1795, several canoes came off to her from the
shore ; and inquiries having been made by the
English after Toogee, the New-Zealanders im-
mediately exclaimed in their own tongue, “ Good
Governor King! good ‘Toogee! good Hoodo !”
Toogee himself afterward came on board, and
informed them that he had still one pig alive,
and some peas growing, the produce of presents
he had received from Guvernor King. ‘Toogee
was also seen in August, 1819, by the Rev.
Mr. Marsden, principal chaplain of New South
Wales, in the course of his second visit to New-
Zealand. Mr. Marsden describes him as an
officer under Korrokorro, one of the most power-
ful chiefs of that district. He inquired very
affectionately after Governor King’s eldest
daughter, who was only a few years old when
he was at Norfolk Island; and when told that
she now lived at Paramatta, New South Wales,
he said he would go and live with her till he died.

About the same time that these two chiefs
paid their visit to Norfolk Island, many of the
English ships engaged in the South Sea whale-
fishing began to frequent the coasts of New-
Zealand in pursuit of fish. ‘They were at first
deterred by the notions which were entertained
of the ferocious character of the natives; but
some of the captains at last ventured to put in
to the land, and, having gone on shore, sought
an intercourse with the inhabitants. ‘They found
them in general, although very observant of the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 47

movements of the new comers, fur from being
disposed to offer hostilities; and after some time
the communication thus commenced became
frequent, and of the most friendly description.
The government at New South Wales even
took advantage of these visits of the whalers to
send the New-Zealanders occasional presents
of cattle, and whatever else was likely to pro-
mote their civilization, or to give them a taste
for the conveniences and enjoyments of culti-
vated life. At last a very powerful chief, of the
name of Tippahee, who resided near the Bay
of Islands, expressed a desire to be taken along
with his five sons to see Port Jackson; and
accordingly, having been conveyed to Norfolk
Island, they were, after remaining for some time
at that settlement, received on board his majes-
the governor s#/0, which cerrig’ them to New

nd after 28- During the time, dejy, ined,
he examined, with the most inquisitive atten-
tion, the various novelties that presented them-
selves to his notice, and evinced particular
anxiety to obtain an acquuintance with the dif-
ferent arts and manufactures which he saw car-
ried on by the settlers. ‘“ Being taken one day,”
says Mr. Nicholas, “to see a rope walk, and
shown the method of making small twine,
some of which was spun before him, and the
process explained, he was so affected by the
contrast of our enlightened knowledge with
the barbarous ignorance of his own country-
men that he burst into tears, and exclaimed, in
the bitterness of his regret, ‘ New-Zealand no



43 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS

good!” On his departure this chief carried with
him a great many presents from the governor,
among which were some seed potatoes, which
he had been taught the method of cultivating,
and from which he raised considerable crops
after his return to his own country. But Cook
had long before this left the potatoe both in the
northern and southern island. Tippahee also
carried out with him the first European, proba-
bly, who ever took up his abode in New-Zealand,
a young man named George Bruce. ‘This per-
son was a native of the neighbourhood of Lon-
don, who, having been appointed on the voyage
to attend Tippahee during an ijlness with which
he was seized, acquitted Rimself so much to the
chief’s satisfaction that he requested the cap-
tain to allow the young man to remain with him
when_jhe, 8D h f the LOBE Vi ‘Ss : eldest
after; yho wot ippahee’s youngest, v1.
and, having deen tattooed, was himself consi-
dered as a chief, and invested with a consider-
able share in the government of his father-in-
law’s territories, which were of great extent.
The authority which he enjoyed was found for
some time of the most beneficial consequence
to such English vessels as touched at the island
—which were now much more abundantly sup-
plied with provisions than formerly; and he
himself lived in great content and happiness.
At last a ship named the General Wellesley,
commanded by a Captain Dalrymple, having
put in at a part of the coast where Bruce and
his wife chanced tu be, but which was at some



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 49

distance from Tippahee’s residence, Dalrymple
induced them both, by the most solemn assu-
rances of bringing them back in safety, to come
on board in order to assist him in searching for
gold dust, which he expected to discover some-
where about the North Cape. On finding him-
self, however, disappointed in his object, the
English captain declined to return with his two
passengers to the Bay of Islands; but, retaining
them both on board, proceeded, in spite of all
their remonstrances, on his voyage to India.
Having arrived 4t Malacca, he contrived to
leave Bruce on shore there, and carried off his
wife to Penang, where, upon Bruce’s following
her by the first opportunity, he found her in the
possession of a Captain Ross, to whom Dalrym-
ple had sold her. Through the interference of
the governor she was restored’ to her husband ;
and, after several other vexatious delays and
digappointments, the two were at last brought,
by Sir Edward Pellew, to Calcutta, whence it
was expected they would find a passage to New
South Wales, and from thence to New-Zealand.
We do not know whether they ever succeeded
in regaining their country, this account of them
being taken from a statement in a Calcutta jour-
nal, as copied in “'Turnbull’s Voyage around
the World,” and which was written while they
were still in Bengal.

The year 1809 is memorable, in the annals
of our intercourse with New-Zealand, for the
most calamitous catastrophe which is known to
have ever resulted from the ferocity of the na-

4



50 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

tives to Europeans visiting their coasts. In the
latter part of this year, the ship Boyd, of five
hundred tons’ burden, left Port Jackson for Eng-
land, with seventy persons on board, besides
four or five New-Zealanders, whom she was to
convey to their own country, it being the inten-
tion of her commander, Captain Thompson, to
call at New-Zealand on his way, to make up
his cargo by taking in some spars for the Cape
of Good Hope. Among the New-Zealanders
whom he had with him, and who were to have
their passage for assisting to Work the ship, was
a son of one of the chiefs, who had served be-
fore this on board different Mnglish vessels
trading between his native country and New
South Wales, and who was generally known
by the name of George aimong the sailors, al-
though his proper name was Tarra. His tribe
resided in the neighbourhood of a bay called by
the natives Wangarooa, situated on the same
coast with the Bay of Islands, but about fifty
miles to the north of it. It appears that during
the passage George had refused to work with
the other sailors, under the double plea that as
the son of a chief he ought not to be subjected
to such a degradation, and that, even were he
willing to submit to work, he was in such ill
health as to be unable to do so. His repre-
sentations upon both these heads, however,
were treated with contempt by the captain, who
not only laughed at his claims to the dignity of
chieftainship, but had him twice tied up to the
gangway, and flogged with great severity, while



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 51

he was also deprived at the same time of his
usual allowance of food. The crafty savage
felt his injuries, but he felt too that this was not
the time for him to resent them; and he merely
remarked significantly, in reply to the captain’s
taunting affirmation that he was no chief, that
they would find him to be such on their arrival
in his country. It would even seem that he
had contrived by his show of good humour du-
ring the remainder of the passage to regain en-
tirely the confidence of the captain, who, on
their nearing the coast, allowed himself to be
persuaded by his insidious advice to put in to
Wangarooa, as the best place for procuring the
timber, although it was not known that the
harbour had ever before been visited by any
European vessel.

George had them now in his own power, and
he lost no time in making preparations for his
already well-devised revenge. Having gone on
shore, he detailed his injuries to his tribe ; and
it was resolved that they should be fearfully Te-
quited. ‘The captain was first persuaded to
land witha part of his crew, under the pretence
that they could not so easily find for him such
trees as he wanted, unless he would go along
with them to point them out. When they had
got him and his party into the wood, having
watched their opportunity, they suddenly fell
upon the unsuspecting men, and before they
could make any resistance, every one of them
was murdered. Elated with their achievement,
the infuriated savages next proceeded to the



52 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

ship. It was now dusk, and as they came
alongside in the ship’s boats, dressed in the
clothes of their victims, they were hailed by
the second officer, who, in reply, was informed
by them that the captain, meaning to remain on
shore all night, had ordered them to take on
board the spars that were already cut down.
On this, a number of them immediately ascended
the ship’s side, and before any alarm could be
given, knocked the officer down, and beat out
his brains, treating in like manner all the sea-
men of the watch. Some of them then going
down to the cabin door, asked those within to
come upon deck to sec the spars; on which a
female passenger, having stepped out to go up,
was killed on the cabin ladder. From this mo-
ment all was wild and indiscriminate slaughter ;
every man, woman, and child that could be
found on board was inassacred, with the excep-
tion of four or five seamen, who had succeeded
in escaping up the shrouds, and who were still
in the rigging when night closed upon the deso-
late and bloody deck.

Here these unhappy men remained till morn-
ing, when Tippahee, the chief, whosc visit to
Port Jackson we have already mentioned, ap-
peared alongside in his. canoe; and assuring
them of his protection, and of his detestation of
the horrible atrocity of which his countrymen
had been guilty, invited them to descend and
come with him. It appears that Tippahee had
come accidentally at this time to Wangarooa
from the Bay of Islands to trade for dried fish,



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 53

as his tribe are still in the habit of doing. The
men came down from the rigging at his invita-
tion, and having got into his canoe, were safely
landed by him at the nearest point, although
closely pursued by the Wangarooans. But here
Tippahee’s power to protect them ended: their
savage pursuers, leaping on shore, ran after
and soon overtook them all, and, while the old
man was forcibly held, and prevented from in-
terfering, murdered them before his face.

‘The only individuals who were saved from
this cruel slaughter were a woman, two children,
and the cabin boy. The boy had gained George’s
regard on the passage, by treating him with
more kindness than the other sailors; and,
trusting to this, had run up to hirn in the midst
of the slaughter and implored his protection,
when the grateful chief immediately exclaiming,
* No, my boy, I won’t kill you-—you are a good
boy,” took him under his own cure. The two
children, with the woman, who was the mother
of one of them, had remained concealed till the
fury of the barbarians was somewhat satiated ;
and the woman is said to have then moved the
pity of an old man who discovered her, by her
tears and enireaties.

The ship was immmediately plundered by the
savages of every article of value it contained,
although the iron-work and fire-arms were the
portions of the spoil that principally attracted
their cupidity. George’s father was so anxious
to commence firing the muskets of which he
had got possession, that he had a cask of gun-



54 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

powder brought up between decks, and, having
driven in the head of it, snapped a musket over
it, when a spark lighting among the powder pro-
duced an explosion that blew the upper works
of the vessel into the air, and deprived him and
all the other New-Zealanders then on board of
their lives.

‘lhe four individuals who had not been put to
death were indebted for their final preservation
to the intrepid humanity of Mr. Berry, super-
cargo on board the ship City of Edinburgh. ‘This
gentleman, happening to hear of the melancholy
tragedy soon after its perpetration, while he
was employed in taking in a cargo of spars at
the Bay of Islands, immediately set out, at the
great risk of his own life, to ascertain if any
persons belonging to the unfortunate vessel yet
survived, and, should any be found, to rescue
them, if possible, from the hands of the savages.
He conducted his heroic enterprise with ad-
mirable presence of mind, dexterity, and de-
cision, and obtained possession of all the four
who yet remained wnsacrificed. The last he
recovered was alittle girl of two or three years
of age, the daughter of a Mr. Broughton, of Port
Jackson, whose mother perished. ‘This child
was found to be in the possession of one of the
chiefs, and although promised, was not brought
to him till after a considerable delay. “ This
delay,” says Mr. Berry, “I afterward had rea-
son to belicve proceeded from the endeavours
of the natives to deliver it up im as decent a
manne) as possible. It was tolerably clean,



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 55

with its hair dressed and ornamented with white
feathers, in the fashion of New-Zealand. Its
only clothing, however, consisted of a linen
shirt, which, from the marks upon it, had be-
longed to the captain. ‘The poor child was
greatly emaciated, and its skin was excoriated
all over. When brought to the boat, it cried
out in a feeble and complaining tone, ‘ Mamma,
my mamma!’” ‘This child was carried to Lima
in the City of Edinburgh ship; and it was not
till more than two years after leaving New-
Zealand that she was restored to her father in
New South Wales. Although of so tender an
age when the destruction of the Boyd took place,
she was found, while in South America, to re-
collect well the dreadful scenes of which she
had been witness. ‘Ihave more than once
been present,” says Mr. Berry, “ when the cruel
but interesting question was put to her, if she
recollected what the Zealanders did to her
mamma? Her countenance, on such occasions,
assumed the appearance of the deepest melan-
choly ; and, without uttcring a word, she used
to draw her hand across her throat. On farther
questions, she would say, with every appear-
ance of the most painful feeling, that they after-
ward cut her up, and cooked and ate her like
victuals.” This statement is quite in accordance
with the accounts which the natives themselves
give of the horrid festivities that followed the
niassacre.

When Captain Cruise was in New-Zealand,
in 1820, he heard a good deal of George, and



56 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

met with him several times. He describes the
treachery of his character as being held in such
detestation even by his own countrymen, that
they seemed to have little or no intercourse with
him. It did not appear, however, that he him-
self felt any remorse for his share in the trans-
action we have just related. “ Though George,”
says Captain Cruise, ‘ had at first denied being
present at, or accessary to, the massacre of the
crew of the Boyd, yet when he became more
confident that we had no intention to injure him,
he not only acknowledged the leading part he
had taken in that atrocity, but more than once
told the horrid story with all that gesture for
which, when worked into a passion, he was so
remarkable. He mentioned particularly the cir-
cumstance of one of the sailors, who, in hopes
of finding a protector in an old acquaintance,
ran to him, and, seizing his mat, cried out, ‘ My
God, my God ” when he instantly, with a single
blow of his mearee, laid the unfortunate sup-
pliant dead at his feet. When passing by the
wreck of the Boyd, with some of the officers of
the Dromedary, he pointed at it, and remarked
to them, in his broken English, ‘‘That’s my
ship ;’ ‘ she is very sorry ;’ ‘ she is crying.’ But
in no instance did he express any compunction
for the horrible crime of which he had been
guilty.”

But we have not yet related all the unfortu-
nate consequences of the affront offered to this
haughty barbarian. Poor Tippahee’s accidental
presence at the scene of the massacre, and his



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 57

generous attempt to save the men who had taken
refuge in the rigging, brought upon him the
heaviest calamities, and from a quarter whence
he had the least of all any reason to expect such
a reward. A short time after the destruction
of the Boyd, four or five whale-fishing vessels
having put in to the Bay of Islands, the captains
were informed by some enemies of Tippahee,
that this chief was the head and instigator of the
recent massacre. ‘The circumstance of its being
undeniable that he was at least present on the
occasion, gave considerable plausibility to the
story; while it was still farther aided in as-
suming the semblance of truth by the similarity
between the sound of Tippahee’s name and that
of Tippouie, the brother of George, and who
was really one of the principal actors in the
tragedy. ‘Thus deceived, the commanders of
these vessels united their forces, and, attacking
the island where Tippahee resided, slaughtered
the inhabitants without distinction of age or sex,
and burned, or otherwise destroyed, whatever
stood or grew on the soil. Many hundreds, it
is said, of the innocent people perished in this
indiscriminate havoc ; and Tippahee himself
was severely wounded, and with difficulty made
his escape with his life. Even this he lost some
time after in an encounter with the Wanga-
rooans, which is said to have also originated in
the deplorable events that have just been de-
tailed.

The most interesting New-Zealander who
distinguished himself about this time by his en-



58 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

deavours to obtain an acquaintance with the arts
and manners of civilized life, was Duaterra, also
a relation of Tippahee, and himself a chief of
considerable power. Duaterra, when only about
eighteen, had, in the year 1805, shipped him-
self on board the Argo whaler, which was
leaving the Bay of Islands for Port Jackson,
agreeing, in order that he might gratify his de-
sire of visiting the English settlement, to serve
during the voyage as a common sailor. He
was accordingly attached to one of the whale
boats, in which he did duty for twelve months
while the vessel was cruising on the coast of
New-Zealand and New-Holland, and was at
last discharged while she lay in Sydney Cove,
having received no wages all the time. He
then entercd on board another whaler, the Al-
bion, in which he served for six months before
he got back to the Bay of Islands. Captain
Richardson, who commanded this vessel, was
very kind to him, and paid him wages like the
other sailors. After remaining six months at
home, Duaterra, not yet satisfied with what he
liad seen of a sea life or of foreign lands, next
embarked on board the Santa Anna, then bound
ona voyage to Bounty Island for a cargo of seal
skins. When they arrived at Bounty Island,
Duaterra and thirtcen others of the crew were
put on shore to kill seals, while the vessel pro-
cceded for supplies to Norfolk Island and New-
Zealand, leaving the fourteen men with very
little water, salt provisions, or bread. It was
five months before she returned, and during the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 59

greater part of this time Duaterra and his com-
panions, there being no water and scarcely any
food to be procured on the island, had undergone
such extreme sufferings from thirst and hunger
that three of them had died. ‘They had, how-
ever, procured about eight thousand skins ; after
taking which on board, the vessel set out on her
voyage for England, the great object for the
sake of which Duaterra had first gone on board
of her. He had, it seems, long entertained the
most ardent desire to sec King George, and,
sustained by the hope of this gratification, he
had patiently borne all the hardships we have
detailed. But when the Santa Anna at last ar-
rived in the river Thames, which she did in
July, 1809, poor Duaterra soon found he was as
far from his object as ever. Instead of suc-
ceeding in obtaining a sight of the king, he was
scarcely perinitted to go on shore, and never
spent a night out of the ship. When he made
inquiries as to how he could see the king, he
was told sometimes that he would never be
able to find the house, and at other times that
nobody was permitted to see his majesty. This
disappointment distressed him so much, that,
together with the toils and privations he had
already sustained, it brought on a dangerous ill-
ness. Meanwhile the master of the Santa
Anna, when he asked him for some wages and
clothing, had peremptorily refused to give him
any, telling him that he should send him home
by the Ann, a vessel which liad been taken up
by government to convey convicts to New South



60 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Wales. But when he brought him to Mr.
Clark, the master of this vessel, that gentleman
refused to receive him unless the master of the
Santa Anna would supply him with a suit of
slops. It happened that the Rev. Mr. Marsden,
from whose account these details are taken, was
then in London, and about to proceed to New
South Wales by the Ann, which he joined at
Spithead. “When I embarked,” says Mr.
Marsden, “ Duaterra was confined below by
sickness, so that I did not see him, or know he
was there for some time. On my first observ-
ing him, he was on the forecastle, wrapped up
in an old great coat, very sick and weak, had a
very violent cough, and discharged considerable
quantities of blood from his mouth. His mind
was very much dejected, and he appeared as
if a few days would terminate his existence.
I inquired of the master where he had met
with him, and also of Duaterra what had
brought him to England, and how he came to
be so wretched and miserable. He told me the
hardships and wrongs he had experienced on
board the Santa Anna were exceedingly great,
and that the English sailors had beaten him
very much, which was the cause of his spit-
ting blood; that the master had defrauded him
of all his wages, and prevented his seeing the
king.” ‘The kindness he now experienced,
however, gradually restored him to health;
and by the time the vesscl arrived at Rio de
Janeiro, he was able to do his duty as a com-
mon sailor, in which capacity he was consider-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 61

ed equal to most of the men on board. He
arrived at Port Jackson in February, 1810, and
resided with Mr. Marsden till the November
following, during which time he applied him-
self diligently to acquire a knowledge of agri-
culture. He then embarked on board the Fre-
deric, along with three of his countrymen, one
of whom was a son of Tippahee, and of course
his near relation, in order to return to New-
Zealand. ‘They were all, having been a good
deal at sea, to serve on board the ship while
it remained on the coast of that country, and
in return for this to be landed at the Bay of
Islands on its departure. But after detaining
them on board for six months, the captain had
the cruelty, notwithstanding their entreaties and
remonstrances, and although the vessel was
actually at the mouth of the Bay of Islands,
to bear away with them to Norfolk Island,
where he first made the four New-Zealanders
go on shore to get water, in which attempt they
were all nearly drowned in the surf, and then,
when he had no farther occasion for their ser-
vices, left them on the island. He soon after,
however, returned and took away ‘Tippahee’s
son by force, although he earnestly entreated to
be left with his companions. ‘That young man
was never afterward heard of, the Frederick
having been taken on her passage to England
by an American, after an action in which the
master was mortally wounded. -

A short time after the Frederick left Nor-
folk Island, the Ann whaler, commanded by



62 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Mr. Gwynn, having touched there on her way
to Port Jackson, found Duaterra and his com-
panions in a very distressed state, and almost
naked. In this vessel Duaterra, having been
kindly supplied with clothing by the captain,
obtained a passage to Port Jackson, and was
very happy when he found himself once more
with his old friend Mr. Marsden. But he had
now been absent about three years from his
wife and family, to whom he was much attach-
ed; and he was very anxious to get back to
New-Zealand. Another whaler, named also
the Ann, having arrived from England, and
being about to proceed to that country, he
embarked on board of her, under the usual
stipulation that he should be set on shore after
helping to work the ship during the time she
was taking in her cargo on the coast. He had
been provided with a quantity of seed wheat,
and various agricultural tools, when he set out
on his former voyage in the Frederick, but had
been plundered of every thing while on board.
He now, however, received a fresh supply of
seeds and implements. The Ann was five
months in making up her cargo, during all
which time Duaterra remained on board ; but
at last, he was landed once more on his na-
tive soil, to the inexpressible joy not less of
himself than of his friends, who had probably
before this given up all expectations of ever
seeing him again.

This narrative affords, it is to be appre-
hended, only too fair a sample of the treat-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 63

ment which the New-Zealanders received
from the captains and crews of many of the
vessels frequenting their coasts. On the other
hand, these savages, as might have been ex-
pected, lost no opportunity of retaliating.
Shortly after the devastation of Tippahee’s
Island, as above related, in consequence of
the share that chief was supposed to have had
in cutting off the Boyd, three seamen belong-
ing to a whaler named the New-Zealander
were murdered and eaten by the enraged na-
tives. But at last, in the course of the year
1814, the persons who had several years before
been sent out by the Church Missionary So-
ciety, and since remained at Port Jackson,
determined upon procceding to New-Zealand ;
when one of them was appointed by Governor
Macquarie to act as a magistrate in that coun-
try, and a proclamation was at the same time
issued, announcing to masters of ships the de-
termination of the colonial government to punish,
with the utmost severity, all outrages committed
on the persons or property of the inhabitants.
A good deal of information with regard to the
country in the neighbourhod of the Bay of
Islands has since been laid before the public,
in the annual reports respecting this mission,
as well as in those relating to another subse-
quently established by the Wesleyan Metho--
dists. The extracts that have been printed
from the journals of the Rev. Mr. Marsden,
especially, who has made five visits to this part
of New-Zealand since 1814, abound in the most



64 - THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

interesting and valuable details. Mr. Marsden
was accompanied on his first visit by Mr. Ni-
cholas, who has also published a very full nar-
rative of his voyage. His work forms upon
the whole the most complete account of this
part of New-Zealand that has appeared.
Along with it may be mentioned, as contain-
ing also much information with regard to the
same vicinity, the more recent publication of
Captain Cruise, who was in New-Zealand for
ten months in the year 1820, when Mr. Mars-
den was also there on his third visit.

CHAPTER V.

John Rutherford—Attack on the Agnes—Massacre of part
of the crew.

Aw Englishman, named John Rutherford, has
recently returned from New-Zealand, after a
residence of several years in a part of the north-
ern island considerably beyond the farthest limit
known to have been reached by any European
who has yet penetrated into the interior of the
country. Rutherford returned to his native land,
from his long exile, in the early part of the year
1828, bringing with him an account of the ad-
ventures he had met with in different parts of
the world, and especially during his detention
among the savages of New-Zealand, which he
had dictated to a friend (for he could not write



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 65

himself) on his voyage home. We mean, in
the course of the pages that follow, to lay the
substance of it before our readers. Making
allowance for some grammatical solecisms, the
story is told throughout with great clearness,
and sometimes with considerable spirit.
Rutherford, according to his own account,
was born at Manchester, about the year 1796.
He went to sea, he states, when he was hardly
more than ten years of age. Having served for
several years on board different vessels, he at
length entered on board the Agnes, an American
brig of six guns and fourteen men, commanded
by a Captain Coffin, which was then engaged
in trading for pearl and tortoise-shell among the
islands of the Pacific. This vessel, after having
touched at various other places, on her return
from Owhyhee, approached the east coast of
New-Zealand, intending to put in for refresh-
menis at the Bay of Islands.* They first came
in sight of the Barrier Islands, which lie oppo-
site to the entrance of the river Thames, and
consequently some distance to the south of
the port for which they were making. They
accordingly directed their course to the north ;
but they had not got far on their way, when it
began to blow a gale from the north-east, which,
being aided by a current, not only made it im-
possible for them to proceed to the Bay of
Islands, but even carried them past the mouth

* Rutherford states in his journal that this event, which
was to him of such importance, occurred on the 6th of
March, 1816.

5



66 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of the Thames. It lasted for five days, and
when it abated they found themselves some dis-
tance to the south of a high point of land, which,
from Rutherford’s description, there can be no
doubt must have been that to which Captain
Cook gave the name of Cape East.

The land directly opposite to them was in-
dented by a large bay. ‘This the captain was
very unwilling to enter, believing that no ship
had ever anchored in it before. We have little
doubt, however, that this was the very bay into
which Cook first put, on his arrival on the coasts
of New-Zealand, in the beginning of October,
1769. He called it Poverty Bay, and found it
to lie in latitude 38° 42’ S.

Reluctant as the captain was to enter this
bay, from his ignorance of the coast, and the
doubts he consequently felt as to the disposition
of the inhabitants, they at last determined to
stand in for it, as they had great need of water,
and did not know when the wind might permit
them to get to the Bay of Islands. ‘They came
to anchor, accordingly, off the termination of a
reef of rocks, immediately under some elevated
land, which formed one of the sides of the bay.
As soon as they had dropped anchor, a great
many canoes came off to the ship from every
part of the bay, each containing about thirty
women, by whom it was paddled. Very few
men made their appearance that day ; but many
of the women remained on board all night, em-
ploying themselves chiefly in stealing whatever
they could lay their hands on: their conduct



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 67

greatly alarmed the captain, and a strict watch
was kept during the night. ‘The next morning
one of the chiefs came on board, whose name
they were told was Aimy, in a large war canoe,
about sixty feet long, and carrying above a hun-
dred of the natives, all provided with quantities
of mats and fishing-lines, made of the strong
white flax of the country, with which they pro-
fessed to be anxious to trade with the crew.
After this chief had been for some time on
board, it was agreed that he should return to the
land, with some others of his tribe, in the ship’s
boat, to procure a supply of water. ‘This ar-
rangement the captain was very anxious to
make, as he was averse to allow any of the
crew to go on shore, wishing to keep them all
on board for the protection of the ship. In due
time the boat returned, laden with water, which
was immediately hoisted on board; and the
chief and his men were despatched a second
time on the same errand. Meanwhile, the rest
of the natives continued to bring pigs to the
ship in considerable numbers ; and by the close
of the day about two hundred had been pur-
chased, together with a quantity of fern-root to
feed them on. Up to this time, therefore, no
hostile disposition had been manifested by the
savages ; and their intercourse with the ship
had been carried on with every appearance of
friendship and cordiality, if we except the pro-
pensity they had shown to pilfer a few of the
tempting rarities exhibited to them by their
civilized visiters. Their conduct as to this mat-



68 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

ter ought, perhaps, to be taken rather as an
evidence that they had not as yet formed any
design of attacking the vessel, as they would,
in that case, scarcely have taken the trouble of
stealing a small part of what they meant imme-
diately to seize upon altogether. On the other
hand, such an infraction of the rules of hospi-
tality would not have accorded with that system
of insidious kindness by which, as we have
already seen, it is their practice to lull the sus-
picions of those whom they are on the watch
to destroy.

During the night, however, the thieving was
renewed, and carried to a more alarming extent,
inasmuch as it was found in the morning that
some of the natives had not only stolen the lead
off the ship’s stern, but had also cut away many
of the ropes, and carried them off in their ca-
noes. It was not till daybreak, too, that the
chief returned with his second cargo of water,
and it was then observed that the ship’s boat
he had taken with him leaked a great deal; on
which the carpenter examined her, and found
that a great many of the nails had been drawn
out of the planks. About the same time, Ruther-
ford detected one of the natives in the act of
stealing the dipson lead,—“ which when I took
from him,” says he, “he grinded his teeth, and
shook his tomahawk at me.” ‘The captain,”
he continues, “now paid the chief for fetching
the water, giving him two muskets, and a quan-
tity of powder and shot—arms and ammuni-
tion being the only articles these people will



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 69

trade for. There were at this time about three
hundred of the natives on the deck, with Aimy,
the chief, in the midst of them; every man
armed with a green stone, slung with a string
around his waist. ‘This weapon they call a
‘mery;’ the stone being about a foot long, flat,
and of an oblong shape, having both edges
sharp, and a handle at the end: they use it for
the purpose of killing their enemies, by striking
them on the head. Smoke was now observed
rising from several of the hills ; and the natives
appearing to be mustering on the beach from
every part of the bay, the captain grew much
afraid, and desired us to loosen the sails, and
make haste down to get our dinners, as he
intended to put to sea immediately. As soon
as we had dined, we went aloft, and I pro-
ceeded to loosen the jib. At this time, none of
the crew were on deck except the captain and
the cook the chief mate being employed in
loading some pistols at the cabin table. The
natives seized this opportunity of commencing
an attack upon the ship. First, the chief threw
off the mat which he wore as a cloak, and,
brandishing a tomahawk in his hand, began a
war-song, when all the rest immediately threw
off their mats likewise, and, being entirely
naked, began to dance with such violence, that
I thought they would have stove in the ship’s
deck. The captain, in the mean time, was lean-
ing against the companion, when one of the
natives went unperceived behind him, and struck
him three or four blows on the head with a



70 THE NE W-ZEALANDERS.

tomahawk, which instantly killed him. The
cook, on seeing him attacked, ran to his assist-
ance, but was immediately murdered in the
same manner. I now sat down on the jib-
boom, with tears in my eyes, and trembling with
terror. Here I next saw the chief mate come
running up the companion ladder, but before he
reached the deck he was struck on the back of
the neck in the same manner as the captain
and the cook hadbeen. He fell with the blow,
but did not die immediately. A number of the
natives now rushed in at the cabin door, while
others jumped down through the sky-light, and
others were employed in cutting the lanyards
of the rigging of the stays. At the same time,
four of our crew jumped overboard off the fore-
yard, but were picked up by some canoes that
were coming from the shore, and immediately
bound hand and foot. ‘The natives now mount-
ed the rigging, and drove the rest of the crew
down, all of whom were made prisoners. One
of the chiefs beckoned to me to come to him,
which I immediately did, and surrendered my-
self. We were then put all together into a
large canoe, our hands being tied; and the New-
Zealanders searching us, took from us our
knives, pipes, tobacco-boxes, and various other
articles. ‘The two dead bodies, and the wounded
mate, were thrown into the canoe along with
us. The mate groaned terribly, and seemed in
great agony, the tomahawk having cut two
inches deep into the back of his neck; and all
the while one of the natives, who sat in the



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 71

canoe with us, kept licking the blood from the
wound with his tongue. Mean time, a number
of women who had been left in the ship had
jumped overboard, and were swimming to the
shore, after having cut her cable, so that she
drifted, and ran aground on the bar near the
mouth of the river. The natives had not sense
to shake the reefs out of the sails, but had chop-
ped them off along the yards with their toma-
hawks, leaving the reefed part behind. The
pigs, which we had bought from them, were
many of them killed on board, and carried ashore
dead in the canoes, and others were thrown
overboard alive, and attempted to swim to the
land; but many of them were killed in the
water by the natives, who got astride on their
backs, and then struck them on the head with
their merys. Many of the canoes came to the
land loaded with plunder from the ship; and
numbers of the natives quarrelled about the di-
vision of the spoil, and fought and slew each
other. I observed, too, that they broke up our
water-casks for the sake of the iron hoops.
While all this was going on, we were detained
in the canoe ; but at last, when the sun was set,
they conveyed us on shore to one of the vil-
lages, where they tied us by the hands to
several small trees. The mate had expired be-
fore we got on shore, so that there now remain-
ed only twelve of us alive. The three dead
bodies were then brought forward, and hung up
by the heels to the branch of a tree, in order
that the dogs might not get at them. A number



72 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of large fires were also kindled on the beach,
for the purpose of giving light to the canoes,
which were employed all night in going back-
ward and forward between the shore and the
ship, although it rained the greater part of the
time.

“ Gentle reader,” continues Rutherford, “ we
will now consider the sad situation we were
in; our ship lost, three of our companions al-
ready killed, and the rest of us tied each toa
tree, starving with hunger, wet, and cold, and
knowing that we were in the hands of canni-
bals. ‘The next morning, I observed that the
surf had driven the ship over the bar, and she
was now in the mouth of the river, and aground
near the end of the village. Every thing being
now out of her, about ten o’clock in the morn-
ing they set fire to her; after which they all
mustered together on an unoccupied piece of
ground near the village, where they remained
standing for some time ; but at last they all sat
down except five, who were chicfs, for whom
a large ring was left vacant in the middle. The
five chiefs, of whom Aimy was one, then ap-
proached the place where we were, and after
they had stood consulting together for some
time, Aimy released me and another, and, taking
us into the iniddle of the ring, made signs for
us to sit down, which we did. In afew minutes
the other four chiefs came also into the ring,
bringing along with them four more of our men,
who were made to sit down beside us. The
chiefs now walked backward and forward in



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 73

the ring with their merys in their hands, and
continued talking together for some time, but we
understood nothing of what they said. The
rest of the natives were all the while very si-
lent, and seemed to listen to them with great
attention. At length one of the chiefs spoke to
one of the natives who was seated on the
ground, and the latter immediately arose, and,
taking his tomahawk in his hand, went and
killed the other six men who were tied to the
trees. ‘They groaned several times as they
were struggling in the agonies of death, and at
every groan the natives burst out into great fits
of laughter. We could not refrain from weep-
ing for the sad fate of our comrades, not know-
ing, at the same time, whose turn it might be
next. Many of the natives, on seeing our tears,
laughed aloud, and brandished their merys
at us.

“Some of them now proceeded to dig eight
large round holes, each about a foot deep, into
which they afterward put a great quantity of
dry wood, and covered it over with a number of
stones. They then set fire to the wood, which
continued burning till the stones became red
hot. In the meantime, some of them were
employed in stripping the bodies of my deceas-
ed shipmates, which they afterward cut up, for
the purpose of cooking them, having first wash-
ed them in the river, and then brought them and
laid them down on several green boughs which
had been broken off the trees and spread on the
ground, near the fires, for that purpose. ‘The



74 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

stones being now red hot, the largest pieces of
the burning wood were pulled from under them
and thrown away, and some green bushes, hay-
ing been first dipped in water, were laid around
their edges, while they were at the same time
covered over with a few green leaves. The
mangled bodies were then laid upon the top of
the leaves, with a quantity of leaves also strew-
ed over them; and after this a straw mat was
spread over the top of each hole. Lastly,
about three pints of water were poured upon
each mat, which running through to the stones,
caused a great steam, and then the whole was
instantly covered over with earth.

“ They afterward gave us some roasted fish
to eat, and three women were employed in
roasting fern root for us. When they had
roasted it, they laid it on a stone, and beat it
with a piece of wood, until it became soft like
dough. When cold again, however, it becomes
hard, and snaps like gingerbread. We ate but
sparingly of what they gave us. After this they
took us to a house, and gave each of us a mat
and some dried grass to sleep upon. Here we
spent the night, two of the chiefs sleeping
along with us.

“ We got up next morning as soon as it was
daylight, as did also the two chiefs, and went
and sat down outside the house. Here we
found a number of women busy in making bas-
kets of green flax, into some of which, when
they were finished, the bodies of our mess-
mates, that had been cooking all night, were



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 75

put, while others were filled with potatoes, that
had been preparing by a similar process. I ob-
served some of the children tearing the flesh
from the bones of our comrades, before they
were taken from the fires. A short time after
this, the chiefs assembled, and, having seated
themselves on the ground, the baskets were
placed before them, and they proceeded to di-
vide the flesh among the multitude, at the rate
of a basket among so many. ‘They also sent
us a basket of potatoes and some of the flesh,
which resembled pork ; but instead of partaking
of it, we shuddered at the very idea of such an
unnatural and horrid custom, and made a pre-
sent of it to one of the natives.”

According to this account, the attack made
upon the Agnes would seem to have been alto-
gether unprovoked by the conduct either of the
captain or any of the crew; but we must not,
in matters of this kind, assume that we are in
possession of the whole truth, when we have
heard the statement of only one of the parties.
According to the first accounts of the destruc-
tion of the Boyd, it would have appeared that
in that case also the perpetrators of the massa-
cre had received no provocation to excite them
to the commission of such an outrage. What
may have been the exact nature of the offence
given to the natives in the present case, the
narrative we have just transcribed hardly gives
us any data even for conjecturing ; unless we
are to suppose that their vindictive feelings
were called forth by the manner in which their



76 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

pilfering may have been resented or punished,
about which, however, nothing is said in the
account. But perhaps, after all, it is not ne-
cessary to refer their hostility to any immediate
cause of this kind. ‘These savages had proba-
bly many old injuries, sustained from former
European visiters, yet unrevenged; and ac-
cording to their notions, therefore, they had
reason enough to hold every ship that approach-
ed their coast an enemy, and a fair subject for
spoliation. It is lamentable that the conduct
of Europeans should have offered them an
excuse for such conduct. ‘The wanton cruel-
ties committed upon these people by the com-
manders and crews of many of the vessels that
have been of late years in the habit of resorting
to their shores, are testified to by too many
evidences to allow us to doubt the enormous
extent to which they have been carried; and
they are, at the same time, too much in the spi-
rit of that systematic aggression and violence
which even British sailors are apt to conceive
themselves entitled to practise upon naked and
unarmed savages, to make the fact of their per-
petration a matter of surprise tous. We must
refer to Mr. Nicholas’s book for many specific
instances of such atrocities ; but we may merely
mention here that the conduct in question is dis-
tinctly noticed, and denounced in the strongest
terms, both in a proclamation by Governor Mac-
quarie, dated the 9th of November, 1814, and
also in another by Sir ‘Thomas Brisbane, dated
the 17th of May, 1824. So strong a feeling,



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 77

indeed, had been excited upon this subject
among the more respectable inhabitants of the
English colony that, in the year 1814, a society
was formed in Sidneytown, with the governor
at its head, for the especial protection of the
natives of the South Sea Islands against the
oppressions practised upon them by the crews
of European vessels. ‘The reports of the mis-
sionaries likewise abound in notices of the fla-
grant barbarities by which, in New-Zealand,
as well as elsewhere, the white man has sig-
nalized his superiority over his darker-com-
plexioned brother. But it may be enough to
quote one of their statements, namely, that
within the first two or three years after the
establishment of the Society’s settlement at the
Bay of Islands, not less than a hundred at least
of the natives had been murdered by Euro-
peans, in their immediate neighbourhood. With
such facts on record, it ought indeed to excite
but little of our surprise, that the sight of the
white man’s ship in their horizon should be to
these injured people, in every district, the signal
for a general muster, to mect the universal foe,
and, if it may be accomplished by force or cun-
ning, to gratify the great passion of savage life,
revenge.

The circumstances of this attack are all
illustrative of the New-Zealand character; and
indeed the whole narrative is strikingly accord-
ant with the accounts we have from other
sources of the manner in which these savages
are wont to act on such occasions—although



78 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

there certainly never has before appeared so
minute and complete a detail of any similar
transaction. ‘The gathering of the inland popu-
lation by fires lighted on the hills—the previous
crowding and almost complete occupation of the
vessel—the sly and patient watching for the
moment of opportunity—the instant seizure of
it when it came—the management of the whole
with such precision and skill, that, as in the
case of the Boyd, and indeed in every other
known instance, while the success of the move-
ment was perfect, this result was obtained with-
out the expense of so much as a drop of blood
on the part of the assailants—all these things
are the uniform accompaniments of New-Zea-
land treachery when displayed in such enter-
prises. The rule of military tactics among this
people is, in the first place, if possible, to sur-
prise their enemies ; and, in the second, to en-
deavour to alarm and confound them. This
latter is doubtless partly the purpose of the song
and dance, which form with them the constant
prelude to the assault ;—although these vehe-
ment expressions of passion operate also power-
fully as excitements to their own sanguinary
valour and contempt of death. Rutherford’s
description of the violence with which they
danced on board the ship in the present case,
immediately before commencing their attack
on the crew, reminds us strikingly, even by
its expression, of the account Crozet gives us,
in his narrative of the voyage of M. Marion, of
their exhibitions of a similar sort even when



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 79

they were only in sport. They would often
dance, says he, with such fury when on board

the ship that we feared they would drive in our
deck.

CHAPTER VI.

Rutherford’s Journey into the Interior—Reception at a
Village—Crying of the Natives—Fcasting—Sleeping—
Carvings—Utensils—Chief’s Wife and Daughters—Tattoo-
ing—Taboo.

RurtuHerrorp and his comrades spent an-
other night in the same manner in which they
had done the last; and on the following morn-
ing set out in company with the five chiefs, on
a journey into the interior. When they left the
coast, he remarks, the ship still continued
burning. ‘They were attended by about fifty of
the natives, who were loaded with the plunder
of the unfortunate vessel. ‘That day he calcu-
lates that they travelled only about ten miles,
the journey being very fatiguing from the want
of any regular roads, and the necessity of mak-
ing their way through a succession of woods
and swamps. ‘The village at which their walk
terminated was the residence of one of the
chiefs, whose name was Rangadi, and who was
received on his arrival by about two hundred
of the inhabitants. They came in a crowd, and,
kneeling down around him, began to cry aloud
and cut their arms, faces, and other parts of
their bodies with pieces of sharp flint, of which



80 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

each of them carried a number tied with a
string about his neck, till the blood flowed co-
piously from their wounds. ‘These demonstra-
tions of excited feeling, which Rutherford de-
scribes as merely their usual manner of receiv-
ing any of their friends who have been for
some time absent, are rather more extravagant
than seem to have been commonly observed to
take place on such occasions in other parts of
the island. Mr. Marsden, however, states that
on Korro-korro’s return from Port Jackson,
many of the women of his tribe who came out
to receive him “cut themselves in their faces,
arms, and breasts, with sharp shells or flints,
till the blood streamed down.”

The crying, however, seems to be a ceremony
that takes place universally on the meeting of
friends who have been for some time parted
We may give in illustration of this custom,
Captain Cruise’s description of the reception by
their relatives of the nine New-Zealanders who
came along with him in the Dromedary from
Port Jackson. ‘“ When their fathers, brothers,
&c., were admitted into the ship,” says he, “ the
scene exceeded description; the muskets were
all laid aside, and every appearance of joy van-
ished. It is customary with these extraordi-
nary people to go through the same ceremony
upon meeting as upon taking leave of their
friends. They join their noses together, and
remain in this position for at least half an hour;
during which time they sob and howl in the
most doleful manner. If there be many friends



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 81

gathered around the person who has returned,
the nearest relation takes possession of his
nose, while the others hang upon his arms,
shoulders, and legs, and keep perfect time with
the chief mourner (if he may be so called) in
the various expressions of his lamentation.
This ended, they resume their wonted cheer-
fulness, and enter into a detail of all that has
happened during their separation. As there
were nine New-Zealanders just returned, and
more than three times that number to comme-
morate the event, the howl was quite tremen-
dous, and so novel to almost every one in the
ship, that it was with difficulty our people’s at-
tention could be kept to matters at that moment
much more essential. Little Repero, who had
frequently boasted during the passage that he
was too much of an Englishman ever to c

again, made a strong effort when his father,
Shungie, approached him, to keep his word ;
but his early habit soon got the better of
his resolution, and he evinced, if possible,
incre distress than any of the others.” The
sudden thawing of poor Repero’s heroic re-
solves was an incident exactly similar to another
which Mr. Nicholas had witnessed. Among
the New-Zealanders who, after having resided
for some time in New South Wales, returned
with him and Mr. Marsden to their native coun-
try, was one named ‘Tui, or Tooi, who prided
himself greatly on being able to imitate Euro-
pean mamners ; and, accordingly, declaring that
he would not cry, but would behave like an

6



82 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Englishman, began, as the trying moment ap-
proached, to converse most manfully with Mr.
Nicholas, evidently, however, forcing his spirits
the whole time. But “his fortitude,” continues
Mr. Nicholas, “was very soon subdued ; for
being joined by a young chief about his own
age, and one of his best friends, he flew to his
arms, and bursting into tears, indulged exactly
the same emotions as the others.” ‘Tooi, of
whom we shall have more to say in the sequel,
was afterward brought to England, and remain-
ed for some time in this country.

The house of the chief, to which Rutherford
and his comrades were taken, was the largest
in the village, being both long and wide, al-
though very low, and having no other entrance
than an aperture, which was shut by means of
a sliding door, and was so much lower even than
the roof, that it was necessary to crawl upon
the hands and knees to get through it. Two
large pigs and a quantity of potatoes were now
cooked in the manner already described ; and
when they were ready, a portion having been
allotted to the slaves, who are never permitted
to eat along with the chiefs, the latter sat down
to their repast, the white men taking their
places beside them. ‘The feast, however, was
not held within the house, but in the open air ;
where also such of the meat as was not con-
sumed was hung up on posts for a future occa-
sion. One of the strongest prejudices of the
New-Zealanders is an aversion to be where
any article of food is suspended over their heads ;



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 83

and on this account, they never permit any
thing eatable to be brought within their huts,
but take all their meals out of doors, in an open
space adjoining the house, which has been
called by some writers the kitchen, it being there
that the meal is cooked as well as eaten. Cro-
zet says, that every one of these kitchens has
in ita cooking hole dug in the ground, of about
two feet diameter, and between one and two
deep. Even when the natives are confined to
their beds by sickness, and, it may be at the
point of death, they must receive whatever food
they take in this outer room, which, however,
is sometimes provided with a shed, supported
upon posts, although in no case does it appear
to be enclosed by walls. Mr. Nicholas, in the
course of an excursion which was made in the
neighbourhood of the Bay of Islands, was once
not a little annoyed and put out of humour by
this absurd superstition. It rained heavily
when he and Mr. Marsden arrived very hungry
at a village belonging to a chief of their ac-
quaintance, where, although the chief was not
at home, they were very hospitably received,
their friends proceeding immediately to dress
some potatoes to make them a dinner. But
after they had prepared the meal, they insisted,
as usual, that it should be eaten in the open air.
This condition, Mr. Nicholas, in the circum-
stances, naturally thought a somewhat hard one ;
but it was absolutely necessary either to com-
ply with it, or to go without the potatoes. To
make matters worse, it happened that the pre-



84 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

sent dining-room had not even a shed. So, they
had no course left, but to take shelter in the
best way they could, under a projection from
the roof of the house, extending about three
feet; and here they contrived to take their
repast, without being very much drenched.
However, they were not allowed this indulgence
without many anxious scruples on the part of
their friends, who considered even their ventur-
ing so near to the house on such an occasion
as an act of daring impiety. As they had
got possession of the potatoes, their entertainers,
though very much shocked and alarmed, did
not proceed to such rudeness as to take these
from them again ; but whenever they wanted to
drink out of the calabash that had heen brought
to them, they obliged them to thrust out their
heads for it from under the covering, although
the rain continued to fall in torrents. Fatigued
as he was, and vexed at being in this way kept
out of the comfortable sheltcr he had expected,
Mr. Nicholas at last commenced inveighing,
he tells us, against the inhospitable custom,
with much acrimony; and as ‘Tooi, who was
with them, had always showed sq strong a
predilection for European customs, he turned to
him, and asked him if he did not think that
these notions of his countrymen were all gam-
mon. ‘l'ooi, however, replied sharply, that “it
was no gammon at all ;” adding, “‘ New-Zealand
man say that Mr. Marsden’s crackee-crackee
(preaching) of a Sunday is all gammon,” in in-
dignant retaliation for the insult that had been



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 85

offered to his national customs. But the worst
part of the adventure was yet to come; for as
the night was now fast approaching, and the
rain still pouring down incessantly, it was im-
possible to think of returning to the ship; “and
we were therefore,” continues Mr. Nicholas,
“ obliged to resolve on remaining where we
were, though we had no bed to expect, nor even
a comfortable floor to stretch upon. We wrap-
ped ourselves up in our great coats, which by
good fortune we had brought with us, and when
the hour of rest came on, laid ourselves down
under the projecting root, choosing rather to
remain here together, than to go into the house
and mingle with its crowded inmates, which we
knew would be very disagreeable. Mr. Mars-
den, who is blessed by nature with a strong
constitution, and capable of enduring almost any
fatigue, was very soon asleep; but I, who have
not been cast in the Herculean mould, nor much
accustomed to severe privations, felt all the
misery of the situation, while the cold and wet
to which I was unavoidably exposed, from the
place being open, brought on a violent rheumatic
headache, that prevented me from once closing
my eyes, and kept me awake in the greatest
anguish. Being at length driven from this
wretched shelter by the rain, which was still
beating against me, I crept into the house
through the narrow aperture that served for a
door; and stretching myself among my rude
friends, I endeavoured to get some repose: but
I found this equally impossible here as in the



86 THR NEW-ZEALANDERS.

place I had left. The pain in my head still
continued: and those around me being all buried
in profound sleep, played, during the whole
night, such music through their noses, as
effectually prevented me from being able to join
in the saine chorus.”

The New-Zealanders make only two meals
in the day—one in the morning and another at
sunset ; but their voracity when they do eat is
often very great.

The huts of the common people are described
as very wretched, and little better than sheds ;
but Mr. Nicholas mentions that those which he
saw in the northern part of the country had uni-
formly well-cultivated little gardens attached to
them, which were stocked with turnips, and
sweet and common potatoes. Crozet tells us
that the only articles of furniture the French
ever found in these huts were fishing hooks,
nets, and lines, calabashes containing water, a
few tools made of stone, and several cloaks
and other garments suspended from the walls.
Among the tools one resembling our adze is in
the most common use; and it is remarkable that
the handles of these implements are often com-
posed of human bones. In the museum of the
Church Missionary Society there are adzes, the
handle of one of which is formed of the bone of
a human arm, and another of that of aleg. The
bread-pounder, formed of a large fish-bone, is
also in general use.

The common people generally sleep in the
open air, in a sitting posture, and covered by



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 87

their upper mats, all but the head; which has
been described as giving them the appearance
of so many hay-cocks or bee-hives.

The house of the chief is generally, as Ru-
therford found it to be in the present case, the
largest in the village ; but every village has, in
addition to the dwelling houses of which it con-
sists, a public storehouse, or repository of the
common stock of sweet potatoes, which is a
still larger structure than the habitation of the
chief. One which Captain Cruise describes
was erected upon several posts driven into the
ground, which were floored over with deals, at
the height of abdut four feet, as a foundation.
Both the sides and the roof were compactly
formed of stakes intertwisted with grass; and a
sliding doorway, scarcely large enough to admit
a man, formed the entrance. ‘The roof projected
over this, and was ornamented with pieces of
plank painted red, and having a variety of gro-
tesque figures carved on them. The whole
building was about twenty feet long, eight feet
wide, and five feet high. The residences of
the chiefs are built upon the ground, and have
generally the floor, and a small space in front,
neatly paved ; but they are so low that a man
can stand upright in very few of them. The
huts, as well as the storehouses, are adorned
with carving over the door. Rutherford says
each of them has an image stuck upon the ridge
pole, to intimate that no slave may enter the
house during the absence of the owner, the



88 THE NEW-ZRALANDERS.

punishment for violating this regulation being
instant death.

One of the arts in which the New-Zealand-
ers most excel is that of carving in wood. Some
of their performances in this way are, no doubt,
grotesque enough ; but they often display both
a taste and ingenuity which, especially when
we consider their miserably imperfect tools, it
is impossible to behold without admiration.
This is one of the arts which even in civilized
countries does not seem to flourish best in a
highly advanced state of society. Even among
Europeans it certainly is not at present culti-
vated with so much success as it was a century
or two ago.

The war canoes of the New-Zealanders,
which are sometimes from sixty to eighty feet
in length, and capable of containing two hun-
dred individuals, have their heads and sterns,
in general, elaborately carved.

The considerations by which the New-Zea-
landers are directed in choosing the sites of
their villages are the same which usually regu-
late that matter among other savages. ‘The
North American Indians, for example, generally
build their huts on the side of some moderately
sized hill, that they may have the advantage of
the ground in case of being attacked by their
enemies, or on the bank of a river, which may,
in such an emergency, serve them for a natural
moat. A situation in which they are protected
by the water on more sides than one is prefer-
red; and, accordingly, both on this account,



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 89

and for the sake of being near the sea, which
supplies them with fish, the New-Zealanders
and other savage tribes are much accustomed
to establish themselves at the mouths of rivers.
Among the American Indians, as in New-Zea-
land, a piece of ground is always left unoccu-
pied in the middle of the village, or contiguous
to it, for the holding of public assemblies. So,
also, it used to be in our own country, almost
every village in which had anciently its com-
mon, and its central open space; the latter of
which, after the introduction of Christianity,
was generally decorated by the erection of a
cross. It is curious to remark how the genius
of commerce—the predominating influence of
a more civilized age—has seized upon more
than one of these provisions of the old state of
society, and converted them to its own pur-
poses. ‘The spacious area around the village
cross, or the adjacent common, has been
changed into the scene of the fair or the daily
market ; and the vicinity of the sea, or the na-
vigable river, no longer needed as a protection
against the attacks of surrounding enemies, has
been taken advantage of to let in the wealth of
many distant climes, and to metamorphose the
straggling assemblage of mud cottages into a
thronged and wide-spread city—the proud
abode of industry, wealth, elegance, and letters.

Rutherford states, that the baskets in which
the provisions are served up are never used
twice; and the same thing is remarked by
Captain Cruise. ‘The calabash, Rutherford



90 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

adds, is the only vessel they have for hold-
ing any kind of liquid; and when they drink
out of it, they never permit it to touch their
lips, but hold their face up, and pour the liquor
into their mouth. After dinner, they place
themselves for this purpose in a row, when
a slave goes from one to another with the cala-
bash, and each holds his hand under his chin
as the liquor is poured by the slave into his
mouth. ‘They never drink anything hot or
warm. Indeed, their only beverage appears
to be water; and their strong aversion to wine
and spirits is noticed by almost all who have
described their manners. Tetoro, one of the
chiefs who returned from Port Jackson in the
Dromedary, was sometimes admitted, during
the passage, into the cabin, and asked by the
officers to take a glass of wine, when he always
tasted it, with perfect politeness, though his
countenance strongly indicated how much he
disliked it. It is probable, however, that the
sobriety of this people has been hitherto prin-
cipally preserved, by their ignorance of the mode
of manufacturing any intoxicating beverage.
Dinner being finished, Rutherford and his
companions spent the evening seated around a
large fire, while several of the women, whose
countenances he describes as pleasing, amused
themselves by playing with the fingers of the
strangers, sometimes opening their shirts at the
breasts, and at other times feeling the calves of
their legs, “which made us think,” says
Rutherford, “ that they were examining us to



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 91

see if we were fat enough for eating.” “The
large fire,” he continues, “ that had been made
to warm the house, being now put out, we re-
tired to rest in the usual manner ; but although
the fire had been extinguished, the house was
still filled with smoke, the door being shut, and
there being neither chimney nor window to let
it out. In the morning, when we arose, the
chief gave us back our knives and tobacco-
boxes, which they had taken from us while in
the canoe, on our first being made prisoners ;
and we then breakfasted on some potatoes and
cockles, which had been cooked while we were
at the sea-coast, and brought thence in baskets.
Aimy’s wife and two daughters now arrived,
which occasioned another grand crying cere-
mony ; and when it was over, the three ladies
came to look at me and my companions. Ina
short time, they took a fancy to some small gilt
buttons which I had on my waistcoat; and
Aimy making a sign for me to cut them off, I
immediately did so, and presented them for
their acceptance. ‘They received them very
gladly, and, shaking hands with me, exclaimed,
The white man is very good. The whole of
the natives having then seated themselves on
the ground in a ring, we were brought into the
middle, and, being stripped of our clothes, and
laid on our backs, we were each of us held
down by five or six men, while two others
commenced the operation of tattooing us. Hav-
ing taken a piece of charcoal, and rubbed it
upon a stone with a little water until they had



92 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

produced a thickish liquid, they then dipped
into it an instrument made of bone, having a
sharp edge like a chisel, and shaped in the
fashion of a garden hoe, and immediately ap-
plied it to the skin, striking it twice or thrice
with a small piece of wood. ‘This made it cut
into the flesh as a knife would have done, and
caused a great deal of blood to flow, which
they kept wiping off with the side of the hand,
in order to see if the impression was sufli-
ciently clear. When it was not, they applied
the bone a second time to the same place.
They employed, however, various instruments
in the course of the operation; one which
they sometimes used being made of a shark’s
tooth, and another having teeth like a saw.
‘They had them also of different sizes, to suit
the different parts of the work. While I was
undergoing this operation, although the pain
was most acute, I never either moved or uttered
a sound; but my comrades moaned dreadfully.
Although the operators were very quick and
dexterous, I was four hours under their hands;
and during the operation Aimy’s eldest daughter
several times wiped the blood from my face
with some dressed flax. After it was over she
Jed me to the river, that I might wash myself,
(for it had made me completely blind,) and then
conducted me to wu great fire. ‘They now re-
turned us all our clothes, with the exception of
our shirts, which the women kept for them-
selves, wearing them, as we observed, with the
fronts behind. We were now not only tattooed,



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 93

but what they called ¢abvoed, the meaning of
which is, made sacred, or forbidden to touch
any provisions of any kind with our hands.
This state of things lasted for three days,
durmg which time we were fed by the daugh-
ters of the chiefs, with the same victuals, and
out of the same baskets, as the chiefs them-
selves, and the persons who had tattooed us.
In three days, the swelling which had been
produced by the operation had greatly sub-
sided, and I began to recover my sight; but it
was six weeks before [ was completely well.
I had no medical assistance of any kind during
my illness; but Aimy’s two daughters were
very attentive to me, and would frequently sit
beside me, and talk to me in their language,
of which as yet, however, I did not understand
much.”

The custom of marking the skin, here called
luttooing, is one of the most widely diffused
practices of savage life, having been found,
even in modern times, to exist, in one modi-
fication or another, not only in most of the in-
habited lands of the Pacific, from New-Zea-
land as far north as the Sandwich Isles, but
also among many of the aboriginal tribes both
of Africa and America. In the ancient world
it appears to have been at least equally preva-
lent. It is evidently alluded to, as well as the
other practice that has just been noticed of
wounding the body by way of mourning, in the
twenty-eighth verse of the nineteenth chapter
of Leviticus, among the laws delivered to the



94 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Israelites through Moses :—“ Ye shall not
make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead,
nor print any marks upon you ;” both of these
being doubtless habits of the surrounding na-
tions, which the chosen people, according to
their usual propensity, had shown a disposition
to imitate.

The term tattoo is not known in New-Zea-
land, the name given to the marks which are
elsewhere so called being in this country moko,
or, as it has been more generally written, from
a habit which the natives seem to have of pre-
fixing the sound a to many of their words,
amoco. ‘The description which Rutherford gives
of the process agrees entirely with what has
been stated by other observers; although it cer-
tainly has been generally understood that, in no
case, was the whole operation undergone at
once, as it would, however, appear to have been
in his. Both Captain Cruise and Mr. Marsden
expressly state that, according to their informa-
tion, it always required several months, and
sometimes several years, to tattoo a chief per-
fectly ; owing to the necessity of one part of
the face or body being allowed to heal before
commencing the decoration of another. Per-
haps, however, this prolongation of the process
may only be necessary when the amoco is of a
more intricate pattern, or extends over a larger
portion of the person, than that which Ruther-
ford received; or, in his peculiar circumstances,
it may have been determined that he should
have his powers of endurance put to still harder



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 95

proof than a native would have been required
to submit to in undergoing the same ceremony.
The portrait of Rutherford accurately represents
the tattooing on his body. Captain Cruise as-
serts that the tattooing in New-Zealand is re-
newed occasionally, as the lines become fainter
by time, to the latest period of life; and that
one of the chiefs who returned home in the
Dromedary was retattooed soon after his arrival.

The tincture is said to be sometimes obtained
from the juice of a particular tree. Rutherford
has omitted to mention that, before the cutting
has begun, the figure is traced out upon the
place; but this appears to be always done in
New-Zealand, as well as elsewhere, a piece of
burned stick or red earth being, according to
Mr. Savage, used for the purpose. Some are
tattooed at eight or ten years of age; but a young
man is accounted very effeminate who reaches
his twentieth year without having undergone
the operation. Mr. Marsden told one of the
chiefs, King George, as he was called, that he
must not tattoo his nephew Racow, who was a
very fine looking youth, with a dignified, open,
and placid countenance, remarking that it would
quite disfigure his face; “but he laughed at my
advice,” says Mr. Marsden, “ and said he must
be tattooed, as it would give him a noble, mas-
culine, and warlike appearance ; that he would
not be fit for his successor with a smooth face ;
the New-Zealanders would look on him merely
as a woman, if he was not tattooed.”

These stains, although their brilliancy may



96 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

perhaps decay with time, being thus fixed in the
flesh, are of course indelible—just as much as
the marks of a similar nature which our own
sailors frequently make on their arms and breasts
by introducing gunpowder under the skin. One
effect, we are told, which they produce on the
countenance of the New-Zealanders is to con-
ceal the ravages of old age. Being thus per-
manent when once imprinted, each becomes
also the peculiar distinction of the individual
to whom it belongs, and is probably sometimes
employed by him as his mark or sign manual.
An officer belonging to the Dromedary, who
happened to have a coat of arms engraved on
his seal, was frequently asked by the New-
Zealanders if the device was his amoco. When
the missionaries purchased a piece of land from
one of the Bay of Islands chiefs, named Gun-
nah, a copy of the tattooing on the face of the
latter, being drawn by a brother chief, was affixed
to the grant as his signature; while another na-
tive signed as a witness by adding the amoco
of one of his own checks.

The tattooing of the young New-Zealander,
before he takes his rank as one of the war-
riors of his tribe, is doubtless also intended to
put his manhood to the proof; and may thus be
regarded as having the same object with those
ceremonies of initiation, as they have been
called, which are practised among some other
savage nations on the admission of an individual
to any new degree of honour or chieftainship.

The New-Zealanders, like many other sa-



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 97

vages, are also in the habit of anointing them-
selves with a mixture of grease and red ochre.

The taboo, or tapu, prevails also in many of
the South Sea Islands, where it may be con-
sidered as the substitute for law ; although its
authority, in reality, rests on what we should
rather call religious considerations, inasmuch as
it appears to be obeyed entirely from the ap-
prehension that its violation would bring down
the anger of Heaven. It would require more
space than we can afford to enumerate the vari-
ous cases in which the taboo operates as a matter
of course, even were we to say nothing of the
numerous exigencies in which a resort to it
seems to be at the option of the parties con-
cerned. Among the former, we may merely
mention, that a person supposed to be dying
seems to be uniformly placed under the taboo ;
and that the like consecration, if it may be so
called, is always imposed for a certain space
upon the individual who has undergone any
part of the process of tattooing. But we are by
no means fully informed either as to the exact
rules that govern this matter, or even as to the
peculiar description of persons to whom it be-
longs, on any occasion, to impose the taboo. It
is common in New-Zealand for such of the
chiefs as possess this power, to separate, by
means of the taboo, any thing which they wish
either to appropriate to themselves, or to pro-
tect, with any other object, from indiscrimi-
nate use.

When the Prince Regent schooner, which

7



98 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

accompanied the Dromedary, lay at anchor in
the river Shukehanga, a chief named Moodooi,
greatly to the comfort of the captain, came one
day on deck and tabooed the vessel, or made it
a crime for any one to ascend the side without
permission, which injunction was strictly at-
tended to by the natives, during her stay in the
harbour. So, when any land is purchased, it is
secured to the purchaser by being tabooed.

SHAPTER VII.

Continuation of journey into the interior—Aimy’s vil-
Jage-—Origin of the New-Zealanders—Appearance—Dress—
Food—Agriculture—Face of the country—Climate—Soil—
Productions—Harvest—Trees—Flax spinning—Weaving—
Minerals—Quadrupeds—Birds—Fishes.

Rurnerrorp remained at this village for
about six months, together with the others who
had been taken prisoners with him and not put
to death, all except one, John Watson, who,
soon after their arrival here, was carried away
by a chief named Nainy. A house was assigned
for them to live in, and the natives gave them
also an iron pot they had taken from the ship,
in which to cook their victuals. This they found
a very useful article. It was tabooed, so that
no slave was allowed to eat any thing cooked
in it; that, we suppose, being considered the
surest way of preventing it from being stolen.
At last they set out in company with Aimy and



THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 99

another chief, to pursue their journey farther
into the interior; one of them, however, whose
name is not given, remained with Rangadi.
Having come to another village, the chief of
which was called Plama, another of them, whose
name was John Smith, was left with him. The
number of those preserved alive, it will be re-
collected, was six ; so that, three of them having
been disposed of in the manner that has been
stated, there were now, including Rutherford,
as many more remaining together. When they
had travelled about twelve miles farther, they
stopped ata third village, and here. they remain-
ed two days. ‘ We were treated very kindly,”
says Rutherford, “ at this village by the natives.
The chief, whose name was Ewanna, made us
a present of a large pig, which we killed after
our own country fashion, not a little to the sur-
prise of the New-Zealanders. I observed many
of the children catch the flowing blood in their
hands, and drink it with the greatest eagerness.
Their own method of killing a pig is generally
by drowning, in order that they may not lose
the blood. ‘The natives then singed off the hair
for us, by holding the animal over a fire, and
also gutted it, desiring nothing but the entrails
for their trouble. We cooked it in our iron pot,
which the slaves who followed us had brought
along with the rest of the luggage belonging to
our party. No person was allowed to take any
part of the pig unless he received some from
us; and not even then, if he did not belong toa
chief’s family. On taking our departure from



100 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

this village, we left with Ewanna one of our
comrades named Jefferson, who, on parting with
us, pressed my hand in his, and with tears in
his eyes, exclaimed, ‘God bless you both! we
shall never see each othcr again. We pro-
ceeded on our journey, in company with Aimy
and his family, and another chief; and having
walked about two miles without one word being
spoken by any of the party, we arrived at the
side of ariver. Here we stopped, and lighted
a fire; and the natives who had charge of the
luggage having come up in about an hour,
bringing with them some potatoes and dried fish,
we cooked a dinner for ourselves in the usual
manner. We then crossed the river, which was
only about knec deep, and immediately entered
a wood, through which we continued to make
our way till sunset. On getting out of it we
found ourselves in the midst of some cultivated
ground, on which we saw growing potatoes,
turnips, cabbage, tara, (which is a root resem-
bling a yam,) water-melons, and coomeras, or
swect potatoes. After a little while we arrived
at another river, on the opposite side of which
stood the village in which Aimy resided. Having
got into a canoe, we crossed over to the village,
in front of which many women were standing,
who, waving their mats, exclaimed, as they saw
us approaching, Arami arami, which means,
Welcome home. We were then taken to Aimy’s
house, which was the largest in the village, and
built in the usual manner, having the walls
formed of large twigs covered with rushes, with



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080816_AAAAAE' PACKAGE 'UF00002236_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-08-16T00:55:35-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-04T15:06:22-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297523; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2014-01-10T16:43:32-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '621930' DFID 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTB' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00002236_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 417c8596afd3215258f7d8f8abc41259
'SHA-1' 01b3ac9b13011a8b4479f7e9ca482817d2a3cc82
EVENT '2011-11-15T02:11:01-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2014-01-10T16:32:57-05:00'
xml resolution
'188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00001.txt'
b5e46fc8567b0f078b777f2afe84f2a2
fdb7d0dc435b8ceeb80ed9ec8df3998290ed05b0
'2011-11-15T02:09:06-05:00'
describe
'433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00002.txt'
90f9dbc6daec19849ac31c8f973aa91b
13342dca352d7d1c8d1eb624665b6bd6734d787c
'2011-11-15T02:09:56-05:00'
describe
'1482' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00004.txt'
a8f01bad458de377d26a5d1f96ab175c
3dc9b6303fa3af7738692a9a3be1e3895830f154
'2011-11-15T02:10:18-05:00'
describe
'1924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00005.txt'
075a0cce7e7a041f6b956e0fcd59d704
e0c4a4b3a98217dba11beaa3889647fc81677647
'2011-11-15T02:12:02-05:00'
describe
'1980' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00006.txt'
0e139f0d1722870cff27c5782a57b275
75ca8a7867c41e0859f101faa10147fdf4bf6b72
'2011-11-15T02:13:29-05:00'
describe
'773' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00007.txt'
e082cc67c4fa39e97d48d76b389c819f
7f039a901833faaa61b9964cac28beee987300b3
'2011-11-15T02:14:18-05:00'
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e6b11ad4455738962e6a017c8ee8ef65
7f7d0a049335696abe1fdb0fc26ba3db173b841c
'2011-11-15T02:08:35-05:00'
describe
'1516' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00009.txt'
f0684e1c13c74053963d52f7be6ae83c
ae87495bfa0501348be4655c592525c6c313cb05
'2011-11-15T02:14:59-05:00'
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00010.txt'
894b7f3ca22548131c199bd7de678b4e
6d1b8c58ea76a09b6fb2c294f62408e5c9c2663b
'2011-11-15T02:09:32-05:00'
describe
'1549' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
abdf8f61825e91132217246c57fc6cf6
9b9522918ef551887d4cd3826114d8a04b4d2bc7
'2011-11-15T02:16:18-05:00'
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
f62392449f55370e70af73f21967c3c6
4fd433dedfde822c2a12d1711c4095cc904fa2f2
'2011-11-15T02:08:43-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
0e8995524748ee0d2fee8a7831b48875
3fc29ee83591ad83d9c3dff0ad566987a5d0c2c7
'2011-11-15T02:14:34-05:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
766d18a79a6cb7b1241b1bc850d18fc7
67fc80b20b8deab3116a14d168bff4016672122c
'2011-11-15T02:11:37-05:00'
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
a8424fec21aeb92040b6545067821f77
786e5bb3c87fd633ea92754a5ad63f1b31803fb1
'2011-11-15T02:08:51-05:00'
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
b79c6edc5ce5114239b12d74fc62bd7e
ea25ca910839b830947b53a77a301d04392ac22a
'2011-11-15T02:15:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
c467ddcf5ff4f56e9362eb6993fe53de
c0fc8972adf32be953dadf0f3c6f9356bb685cdb
'2011-11-15T02:13:51-05:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
cf75d70617a727c91a9b9c2b391cb20b
08133da92b77967dc00cc4bbb2587abc10238cc8
'2011-11-15T02:12:17-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00019.txt'
fc4a33240a214a398ad05013e137615b
512a5f27c54f4cbbdf94df927044af2df0a741bb
'2011-11-15T02:16:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
0355daf40dc9f3e499386816462622e2
3e4a283900dc25ba16141cb743d8649445c3a028
'2011-11-15T02:10:14-05:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
2ac189065324b2b3fe342a6c8410b8f0
5e5d2f742f7fbedc3b2630bc7c6d629d81eb4eb9
'2011-11-15T02:15:21-05:00'
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00022.txt'
21c3d5156369090d5bac7bd9fc751d5c
59152a25aadf894a0179cf0050b3d32f628d5ebb
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
55114461f5cfb7aa6ade255305fca3f7
266916897f32748bdfdd4214d4f39c121c768d7e
'2011-11-15T02:11:29-05:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
915a6d81009f2086941703c6a78c4214
19d1c61df5c978124c9fcd7853a626a0df009018
'2011-11-15T02:15:23-05:00'
describe
'1568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
b35e9470fae89535a6b7bc45f3c08cdd
30ff91b8ac762625be761983ed574ba82ebeecd7
'2011-11-15T02:16:17-05:00'
describe
'1545' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
331604226d30ffa751815a03591909de
7a14ec0e656e27a56b84128a394539ea82a3be5d
'2011-11-15T02:14:48-05:00'
describe
'1606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
9509cfda933e806e8b6e5ce4ac1efb06
3b8136773da33056d4ca01bc660f42741734e95e
'2011-11-15T02:09:48-05:00'
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
605bdc23b5d66b66586bcf4b7c3613be
f71f13963c3eeb24fac9c1b72d0fea39a2c1901e
'2011-11-15T02:15:44-05:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
07d8493875a7dabbb9f14bef44bfac07
b1b05cac7623e276454c8e20c8dc079bf6bf8e54
'2011-11-15T02:12:00-05:00'
describe
'1592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00030.txt'
07b41ecde46c421d31b080fe247b50c4
a5e19a136d9697e8edcf55d6056c5ea5ffe6dd01
'2011-11-15T02:17:03-05:00'
describe
'1575' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
4289a919323e3a4dd950b3cf97a5a76b
ac50d4e48f72de504c316e6532748b8c435224c5
'2011-11-15T02:09:55-05:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
ef9bb13d1e6532ef5d9dff3bc077d7af
b3c87a84a3ebadfb69a5719fa6cf4432240b968e
'2011-11-15T02:08:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00033.txt'
104add49ab5d650abd98f6004f902a03
c341d7d22e57228a778bdd173dcfe509603f6d66
'2011-11-15T02:11:34-05:00'
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
24de47745c5c57c825d9e6dada675f02
1b26ea2388b91d1773e5bbe3a1be177c41d19b7b
'2011-11-15T02:10:03-05:00'
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00035.txt'
db1302fedcab569331a8eacfb9ad4e29
20e7c54966c667612a97a92539232c92b217d1ff
'2011-11-15T02:12:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
ffa44bab9c41a82484799b5a41e63476
6c6c56bb15b4a53d1b5c58ebdfd9ba9edd697a87
'2011-11-15T02:09:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
612858d260f8080a0d919b649f614b6d
0292cf68405aba3a3eacd3f9f9de2f69ba3e5eaf
'2011-11-15T02:10:53-05:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ee4a6d85b4657ca50d32da52cf49cf8a
f2900b5aca1892965fcea196448f4a175c34eb43
'2011-11-15T02:08:33-05:00'
describe
'1562' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a31c09d403026cffffd23a4bc3be261e
35da60d25c3fab355d1eb21f07d75f0783c31717
'2011-11-15T02:09:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
423faf0bc6edaaa25da01d35320b7443
e113f025b3cf08bbd65714716c062159ace75f39
'2011-11-15T02:14:24-05:00'
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
20dee0094c7119418789a459ef9e370f
bdc88403a05893a19844b06298472f4fa648b026
'2011-11-15T02:11:23-05:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00042.txt'
cba7429a977500ff8ebf47edf5cc2af1
7549b9978437d1e24f05f1837c0f092e16903cb1
describe
'1543' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00043.txt'
48dff9149a46afe7bb3ab69a0cafda45
739432ef25a7699133675563b8af3ce4900f7220
'2011-11-15T02:11:54-05:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
7e789a381af36827f75ba885de19eaca
35f2b150227b5c16dcd4ceaef6b59f4910f79f5b
'2011-11-15T02:14:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0d246edbdb1869d8a54034abbbc82b30
51373b5e0e7c62cea1c7b353b9b6823295c3f206
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00046.txt'
cd81b07b71de47f760e3f134922f641a
724f6c57bacbd009e6be6d0ee8412accaabe6e21
'2011-11-15T02:10:43-05:00'
describe
'1580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00047.txt'
6dbb3d05ab08959bc018a17bf76ec7e1
d91d19b8a9793c13453477f5fbfe1a0de65f56fa
'2011-11-15T02:15:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00048.txt'
11fef82c18c3a51625226b864f4d7241
9dfddb94955acee48a5d17843e09343d08e183c4
'2011-11-15T02:11:22-05:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
e68dda06a7d89721abcfb945dee911b0
b6e1c3d5e1c8790264d47bfd624db8dbc3782f4a
'2011-11-15T02:15:43-05:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6af412327785f6ae65a84acb460ec26b
abe5f61a9baac08830d72b2f9c7d60fc4eb88e05
'2011-11-15T02:16:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00051.txt'
fea3d4f31a1b295eb6e5803faef1d458
551831dcb2d43a08f2a06e305583ec495c482b68
'2011-11-15T02:09:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00052.txt'
f5f8bc11103477edac5d516b76d1b34a
bf5fed08bcc6afce75ac6cf5ded1974f44ccd207
'2011-11-15T02:13:38-05:00'
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
01316671ffd2a942265d213707252029
04b329c1866bdb264dc02671c39ea728c86019e7
'2011-11-15T02:14:51-05:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00054.txt'
fd59c5898f014a7a548a7842438f41c7
a9bdee3f6670d10d417d18813cc9a5505b10ae81
'2011-11-15T02:10:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1869cf1e90aadde6e7db51c210c11284
a53aa8c0700fbfb5dd89910c14efab8c5ad69fcd
'2011-11-15T02:09:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00056.txt'
ce924ab7f99a7c933fd35b66360e41dc
95775ad10232359524f0eb547084768efa3b8730
'2011-11-15T02:13:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00057.txt'
f36ac47469372c692a1f33e8e684f624
1b6cba127ca72bc58e226576baf86f3dcc95b05c
'2011-11-15T02:13:01-05:00'
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00058.txt'
dbe345621fec6a76ed5b8de58b721ffe
015f87a0704d1cae22e542abd4b21fa7ccf44312
'2011-11-15T02:11:18-05:00'
describe
'1546' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00059.txt'
97e2d888a9970a37d6bb9cfc7e851f86
f44f7c1ab3ace7bd4382223b73b2fe472cdd506b
'2011-11-15T02:16:22-05:00'
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00060.txt'
7c61d32abb8c6c9039653016f11c8f19
f2730f398545ed1fe53bd716b23a348515a2e1e1
'2011-11-15T02:14:49-05:00'
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00061.txt'
419fbe88dcbf04743ccc986f0541d03e
d3a16add6e0b2ad6a78beb03e9b3bb9e41f4e7db
'2011-11-15T02:14:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f24dd3dd346788bbc794bc606f149fc7
5397029ba643a67c63af1381ee772fb7bac29ae3
'2011-11-15T02:13:42-05:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
5eeb9cacc8729bc72496a3bf5676a6af
3af625333d4b3f2648cadd5d7b982bdd697b60e9
'2011-11-15T02:12:24-05:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00064.txt'
9215d432a64c541ac7c1770f8b7e75b9
ff89247708e2b93f324be08fc37bad94c5eb8419
'2011-11-15T02:12:32-05:00'
describe
'1576' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00065.txt'
0ef9888af5e4ecf81dcd28a14e17843d
241764dc0b1a7da37c0a51afd33c11765ae25bca
'2011-11-15T02:09:37-05:00'
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00066.txt'
031f4d43d38f9d4d6fae3aaa6e084baf
7ff14b3c0b0cd59e9ab0c125780294534daf9178
'2011-11-15T02:12:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
15f5c7a3a3298dff909d3332863dd2d4
b495ad54083b8116717041af7da1576a0d39a8e1
'2011-11-15T02:15:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00068.txt'
70b6d73e4253cb716a071bdb183e2777
770b842bdeda0ec2cca0f2b4e2a9c81aa5b15c3a
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00069.txt'
446df278512949ac1785319ebaecceb9
bea58678f76d7852326bd3a99d4975938c276c10
'2011-11-15T02:16:14-05:00'
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00070.txt'
332aee5bb18cf5277e626560ca906390
59b1cffc4ab098b20db429122f61776ee9d3a78b
'2011-11-15T02:12:09-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00071.txt'
bc27578daa06438a632b6becc5ea8a82
d192869172c54c8fd39a3e22d5a473a119ade0cf
'2011-11-15T02:13:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00072.txt'
d4a3ce496f49b912b0f9df0b4dce94e3
795bedee6d52a2abe058e78713253f6c20959797
'2011-11-15T02:13:00-05:00'
describe
'1525' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5352554cedbeed0027b119df9bde07d0
03a4c0091da368f4116e73cafaedfdae6d36f75d
'2011-11-15T02:13:17-05:00'
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00074.txt'
2d4feccc6f254fbb0fa6961f2a981f80
c59aa6c5cc99a6a09d0a1f047ed947d15438a4a6
'2011-11-15T02:15:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00075.txt'
c073a3f2a6fb8a2b87b2e869bf85e610
7863a435d34a710cc8a8d8deda82d5fd6316369f
'2011-11-15T02:10:55-05:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
1dfc8fe49c7df668c8350015d98d9fc1
89badda35ab5148867d784d2b6aac08555a04ac8
'2011-11-15T02:12:11-05:00'
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a06da1546c9862d554a71dcd331dd50a
925c8889740d7f89f29cf04784d728f43ac961f0
'2011-11-15T02:09:07-05:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00078.txt'
bc806b582a14c2f028e25d870c5ab947
da215863d60d23c2419c2c7200abafe57956ca88
'2011-11-15T02:11:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00079.txt'
f41f4d5ec3bf1d2818b1c99def91a2ce
badaa67ee8a92009828f93cb68a38ca5caf873cf
'2011-11-15T02:12:53-05:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
025903eb6bab0f1677416dbacf2eb85a
65027b9060f3081bd6f8713280c6d4b89e30f7ed
'2011-11-15T02:12:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
76058f61fca2660e7ed9830fc71b0060
d1b3a554a4cf01bacb140e977f80565f5546d0d4
'2011-11-15T02:15:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00082.txt'
e640c49b33112767237bb728c296b1ea
d7a78f4e46cb3712d43a267c7230e5c107968099
'2011-11-15T02:14:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00083.txt'
20093a7266646cac60b0fa6219b9911a
31b37ac763d7a67d329a6c774e39847a6ef08a7f
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00084.txt'
e94f9f8af9eaa5d4d2634d452bd76514
f9f45a79aa980889618e1106e080179eef8d3e96
'2011-11-15T02:09:13-05:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
854ee5ee8efcb1440d8f5bb30f8afe8e
4242b562feb3a70ae6a865972c7e6f0d3e2832f5
'2011-11-15T02:14:07-05:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e43292f95d6de49c95d37bd56a5631a0
1b08059c41ceca75e80f9efb4e6caf2470b6b624
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9927faa42492e5f9b46a8bc7d7560ae2
c786c5f3ff0a38431c056d68a51a38f6079b2ec7
'2011-11-15T02:13:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00088.txt'
9bc4334f0228622261ccb5b86ab47265
f1b504bd31372ee7d506ac730425c26d6bc66175
'2011-11-15T02:14:44-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
12ae4630be8a19469bb45ab83e6b5e86
e44fcd45066b87ef7f3d18a6f6b7a20837d88c83
'2011-11-15T02:11:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00090.txt'
0113919f260c70aa2f36e6754494d9a7
ab103eeac7deff583d09315b726985dbe0c5f132
'2011-11-15T02:16:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00091.txt'
a2e695a7d29f80ba5c5efdbdaed410fc
89653ef899aecc23413d35f54aa50e9f30db2af6
'2011-11-15T02:08:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00092.txt'
d52943e5c3dae58fa0f886fd75850a7a
34c9918e83e16eeb00a61d0889a71b64f1759a5c
'2011-11-15T02:11:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
5118e7f3b3e2f8b119bd59b62732eebd
888184bfa22bf60acd9ab9bfe0e9f87d48210385
'2011-11-15T02:13:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00094.txt'
c655c1ee5fbf9038ed2d1ff00b119029
e5e3c39bb6d389b2a918771a0467c7547af55bf7
'2011-11-15T02:13:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00095.txt'
171b6d27d02bd6c941b0ae2f7ef4aa7f
2cf376452c4f4bc6a0c47074bdce64a3fa5b4096
'2011-11-15T02:13:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
20c82fb6e1ec3e4dd84858e039c2636e
d6ac394fc633e37e5458b0c929082d6b2356a864
'2011-11-15T02:09:58-05:00'
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00097.txt'
da3363f69f5aa802e4b80686ddafe03e
f178886ba16a1f2427321cd7cea1d6ce40206b54
'2011-11-15T02:10:16-05:00'
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00098.txt'
7d92f2953a2c748a111667c57943ab47
8ff48ef41b3aa59b42be9a4a8bf3b58550fc608a
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00099.txt'
7bd75a81bb3b10784b095a5bcb0c50ac
e788470863857c9b75bc3ac05e4b4d06b5aef053
'2011-11-15T02:10:17-05:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00100.txt'
9bb193a28c9305344ca50002ff8e1548
4b83354fba8d651de439b58eae933405022f3a1a
'2011-11-15T02:12:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00101.txt'
4424fc4a99da721487ec6d07115f8022
a8f27f727b49ce27e11bdf9653c03c91fff5406e
'2011-11-15T02:16:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
75370ef18e26dd0d3bc1eacd79e3a70a
dbe5e1609dbacc8241f3c1ac71040ddf8f4d6de9
'2011-11-15T02:08:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00103.txt'
e54fdb9f433c6c167f29b8c81d5588c9
5f01ad36d0c50fbe7de55acd29983ce89971a1a0
'2011-11-15T02:16:48-05:00'
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00104.txt'
344c71da357e1169af874f11b81c852d
d2efe2655351c5420db4641e0820cbe52d931736
'2011-11-15T02:12:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00106.txt'
36c72a017ee36f3b24348ad0693cc1e3
33425092ece370567796aa7afecc29fb432ab406
'2011-11-15T02:12:16-05:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
cebf4bdc230c4f349d47fadf82b3ac7a
d994a8373f45ed066d0c4b86660dee23691533c8
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00108.txt'
313a53dc5b5d0f9f7fa05902b24339c4
c3aaf160f5929588eaa952eda634a4e133d1d648
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
febf5e33e3093a2f115637f4941bb273
dbdd13f16ede029dd57da4b1189eba43f9ebb745
'2011-11-15T02:14:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00110.txt'
f2057fa9a84c82a9bfe67d4a46c3e514
d960e38ce9bcdccc5746f4e6db8b83f8723055f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00111.txt'
ac8220eae9cc12631e2bf5af950a3f25
9fab0986d2c89d7d4ee324c1401b26ca1da18be2
'2011-11-15T02:11:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00112.txt'
ac7f198e5638a7fd499f647a5cc5f979
02a129bf1518f3a2a03137f51f4f322a75c8aad3
'2011-11-15T02:14:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
3ce3f254cc46e45393d12205decac083
9ab5a1898304a983dd1037de2b3fe70a52a559e0
'2011-11-15T02:13:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00114.txt'
26f110a1fc58a1120e1ff878cefcf05b
86b8ce232c1ecd17f38b5622a34b741e657a9cb6
'2011-11-15T02:14:56-05:00'
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6f52bf4012dbab58a2e1871a77c958e0
213bd837495dba5d053ff8ecd83f408302f5cf7c
'2011-11-15T02:13:23-05:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00116.txt'
62e72bc1420ad68dda578a534b9d44a6
a84b85a5e0d4c0197c818e6465f195475be8e72d
'2011-11-15T02:13:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00117.txt'
1a61a26c58a8c997df42b561c05a62c0
0e5c3b206b1eb8280dfe673ecc4c4b5587d19005
'2011-11-15T02:14:55-05:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00118.txt'
d55caf23aad3f834758af44b8b0312a2
87942cd0c319d9587034d46fb6e00d19b03f49de
'2011-11-15T02:15:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
468e7873ef79fc75e6cf1a4508569954
d22d3405311ff5948942192a1dfbb114447de22a
'2011-11-15T02:14:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
89e3373aa2a3f9f1078a54f79db8dad9
b2367cc65f263e3ad71ea9e8bdc3a8b04d930346
describe
'1628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00122.txt'
936f8d4100f24a549b9e3a460b82348c
e11e64b2e40d14f3207d2340fece22c820897da3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00123.txt'
91ea001b2d0a1314b4ca45f23e0bba57
bac3093a2bee2e826d7d1df4705d876f7d037bb2
'2011-11-15T02:14:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00124.txt'
b08d7744ae2a38cec415f07cc14a12bc
7838d06fc77d1745ef900eb84a8a906d788ed473
'2011-11-15T02:13:52-05:00'
describe
'1485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00125.txt'
f617ec111b4506e6e8bc041bca7e2fb9
df7a2f807a1ead244b9584f619c171fc4232ac46
describe
'1535' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00126.txt'
e28b3845094e45296795fc34419d510f
6d9644f3910a683e7629fd838075f299864373a3
'2011-11-15T02:11:42-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00127.txt'
01733aa307d0d11c10d88b62eaeb7db6
455fc9d4b662af458529215f0ffed657b807647b
'2011-11-15T02:13:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00128.txt'
a6e2adc08b3bb73b56fcd6e7f139b6bb
bf5614fd759789788b407e8b2187f087ba41f05a
describe
'1560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00129.txt'
3a6565f3baf013e1e671cef766b7eedb
975cc75d4755124ff78643a5636a0d8b37d9b213
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
26779b6ce261fcff94baf1edf90ffa84
82205f80831ee840d152342af02273efc3ae3471
'2011-11-15T02:12:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00131.txt'
390deaaa99062427e5dd42c750d19148
7278b10900885c2dc569bc6179c19343a221eb1e
'2011-11-15T02:10:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00132.txt'
00998defe614eaaadeddf8d25913528e
7a8700b05d27b74659b8a8d783ee1551a6250aae
'2011-11-15T02:12:20-05:00'
describe
'1519' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d6eca15d2cde6a05106df9d408862f84
9d28a0dbd548089aea98186999059419bfe665dd
'2011-11-15T02:16:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00134.txt'
d3c8f453d2a0f627af74462a1bdd2e79
8202a6e3b08d03a459ae4d802b4ff9eacca61f8f
'2011-11-15T02:13:14-05:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
182edcfab0d56dc6c6046fa08cb56104
81846dccaebcc5f6aae55db678b9bbea93b4fbbc
'2011-11-15T02:13:40-05:00'
describe
'1624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00136.txt'
d4b15c3bdf14bfe1bdfea5d1ea50521d
94b9e410e5e8f99cd413d693e72d7830d80614e8
'2011-11-15T02:15:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00137.txt'
b27e336ff9335a49337b432bbce5f4eb
e210c7c7d82a79bf53ed9a66a4e6eef08ca38272
'2011-11-15T02:16:43-05:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00138.txt'
2938f8ec1f4114eff668f911338b7e97
a852d32400519516f11a37b26939875754ddd2e4
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00139.txt'
bcdd8189ebea4f6645aa4b09390d7c78
92a2f4b498dba0bbe24545cae593e9aa5adcce5a
'2011-11-15T02:15:35-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
35cfd53ce2322b32d2769fcf99775b15
b366c08fd756570853816f81468b470c274a3edd
'2011-11-15T02:11:57-05:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00141.txt'
9fafc78a3af53bfce17e57c6403877b9
597cb2d60fecb7ec83667607850dec707ae3e32b
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00142.txt'
946373caf26fe093f28b58f1d66f9402
10039ed637900e775d672d1568e8e7454e301042
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00143.txt'
7211d976f4dbf39712298ec31fe1902f
e083906ae198e649bdb36252fcb15c30a1e41240
'2011-11-15T02:09:47-05:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00144.txt'
8e42c1d51c350e3e2f0bea5c18e8e7dc
c163a53f047d621c4d6ec7d86b2f63c5625dffa9
'2011-11-15T02:15:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
9d8a25c58b88270a7b3812c05b1c802b
62027cebd058c0aa2e666242abc0cd23401794a3
'2011-11-15T02:08:50-05:00'
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00146.txt'
1dfef84a367f8b5524682c1e8292dfa3
87e730454cb3d878fa884fc578b67e876bdc512b
'2011-11-15T02:15:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00147.txt'
1f969922f2ad543c1b3a318cf0fdfe2b
dbef1c946f9c737bd422c067b61cd96d1d3c9f44
'2011-11-15T02:12:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00148.txt'
f29919ebc31a7b6e9d693505e520a0f5
1cf780cb8daf2ea3ff5bf326f7414ee6d18c900d
'2011-11-15T02:12:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00149.txt'
54384fb11317e3fa43fac66a3b2a1915
483c5e7e061281da68e3e7a2c0128d03728987ec
'2011-11-15T02:12:12-05:00'
describe
'1567' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c1549bc8409513005c6bf960d0c68f1d
9600cf40dfe457019b9b5f3c8290d47cb5653432
'2011-11-15T02:12:31-05:00'
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00151.txt'
f8cfaa9a500061c48acb9598e59bc305
c50edb79294a276cb57e4ca32d8e79af96427e7b
'2011-11-15T02:09:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00152.txt'
8a04e3ed1385cf8af2d625e598e98b14
fc672cb73361d2acc971bafb96bcf1a3e748c5ec
'2011-11-15T02:15:33-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00153.txt'
4310adae62c6ff840d88cc08b2dc6895
5a279c0341630bab64ab800ac08f9455d615a7ec
'2011-11-15T02:09:46-05:00'
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00154.txt'
57b3ae314f5f5a9051752478f5366f9e
1b0036fdc964db1fd09603a733fe2b5dabb6542a
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00155.txt'
110f55eedb7b7fe794a89aa9f10921e1
ce7fd0fb1d0b1359897809f96bb65fc3e577c884
'2011-11-15T02:15:56-05:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
af390a0514d2905851d073df87938014
941b085c87442d3873b11f5fe2aecc7acfb662e6
'2011-11-15T02:12:06-05:00'
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00157.txt'
09dee5b64aa142e98eaea2da5851c913
0dc3dbf63a87a0d7a39451f7c2abda9318d6d90f
'2011-11-15T02:14:00-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00158.txt'
79e6238842ec0ba018bd55d5e135bbfa
94c21e5b27c6c4aaac497659cdc191688ea0fe9c
'2011-11-15T02:14:45-05:00'
describe
'1548' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
96c0bf462d81f479fa75640abf2be793
5d81cc2316af72117dfd3d434918e62060b1f9c9
'2011-11-15T02:10:51-05:00'
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00160.txt'
886003d327df3fcaec12c8fe84f683bc
92006fe7e5eb875e8b2dd849b1b51a0b57adfdee
'2011-11-15T02:12:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00161.txt'
850298aa6f53f5de2945f99036db2500
dbae142f5d700b55e38ec51e8c0b98f64389e343
'2011-11-15T02:12:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00162.txt'
1d6da0cae521b64e43ee9383bfacd64e
382587d0b4721bd3dc03f14176b6a1f8e2f4b921
'2011-11-15T02:13:03-05:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00163.txt'
0446dfc9588e9b230001b5fb6f57837b
abfd43af8504774ee52e2db1a856c63b7308f933
'2011-11-15T02:08:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00164.txt'
b03df106c0ee207e59a8026eefc205af
7585cacde33994b789f741fd769584c0ef5f14a0
'2011-11-15T02:13:37-05:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00165.txt'
0f0912c77132d6a52af08d43374b6155
57bed47a549a2ac3a69ed8befcf0de0bbec90e41
'2011-11-15T02:10:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00166.txt'
a340c66f8ee5d8d5e5f8c6205e9c4814
f3d2c71154e2f76210365c75d5a2dedd9e99a38b
'2011-11-15T02:16:28-05:00'
describe
'1595' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00167.txt'
9d13a21646c4e64500520ce3d1879161
77af284576230e115ee4b8915faa6e1b09824996
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00168.txt'
1b6548d63d5efe0b3f0501ed471785ce
faed97e00af9a0e6ccbb00530d8c941271961efb
'2011-11-15T02:16:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00169.txt'
0e56d4766bf29aadaef14223c4d4e8e1
367d6c67f12868568ae02fafda17405668d3cad8
'2011-11-15T02:15:27-05:00'
describe
'1559' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00170.txt'
7d7eeab4e79fa7294eaaeda1bdd764dc
dc5dcb834444f51d4c5311bf6682c8137092942b
'2011-11-15T02:08:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00171.txt'
0ce2400e302409eb38e7d7aeab9efcc8
5cde2ae598b8d461c7e6b1d0d9b1de87236f9ecf
'2011-11-15T02:13:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00172.txt'
92bce7f3fa0f830f2a078bcace1578c4
ee15cb9e1acf0917acc1aff5dcb6984e80e837fb
'2011-11-15T02:15:06-05:00'
describe
'927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00173.txt'
574f4029a40c42d424c01472a34dac34
c1caf89231f657062956ba9ad91c56ca31f35941
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00174.txt'
74630becc9984e339e2fc378e00c0faa
e7c0ebf2476d97be2f0cb42ae149a6cc718c8c87
'2011-11-15T02:10:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4bd1b133ed88e7aebe1038699f939d8f
4ac071467263beaaa004dbb6d742b20e7ade5baf
'2011-11-15T02:15:00-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00176.txt'
ce14cdb215135b9ce9357dbb91b43313
1858c3195fde239092cf6d5d264dcd586f70db69
'2011-11-15T02:13:02-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00177.txt'
5fb3ddad572947eff38cf9557140f0ea
68040ab4c337b8c5a4011e128b4ae1b5b9aa7e54
'2011-11-15T02:10:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00178.txt'
18a0e31a4aca7f5d62da5be374987f9e
46021919e5388e75b9e056884cb88b177ef342a7
'2011-11-15T02:09:35-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00179.txt'
4ad4d51dc81fb71802f3287508689527
bed2481298e2efe509abf5b8ac8aa1f16111cf7f
'2011-11-15T02:08:54-05:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a8546c1981254a6819dd30f68a3c6d2c
c7d09657c176eec2db3e1da3622bf4e7052eb8eb
'2011-11-15T02:13:59-05:00'
describe
'1484' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00181.txt'
be3d62dd4f5a2ac38c804e0a4641d4eb
44386592967529c40f91bb03b22975654d93645c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
33644ad9ab966131a51e1042a63c62f8
ed5acc551f141a9eed2705e92e90f147fddd5f60
'2011-11-15T02:15:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAA' 'sip-files00183.txt'
f2e6f009059b6a9a69628045587efac0
040bafe34f92c10d9cdc7fac3de153e5ecddca27
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAB' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8e42905ee72f99cc19bc93883a577af2
11ad115a11548be6df99efbfbc7317db89138689
'2011-11-15T02:12:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAC' 'sip-files00185.txt'
692a5d2b50a48729caff6ad419300b69
1c651501d836e7dd20f29632f5e8b6c36489d2d9
'2011-11-15T02:16:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAD' 'sip-files00186.txt'
9f970be7b90648b472cdceed37c837f0
d2f26c3644831d8367629111693fff3ea5e0d3ee
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAE' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b0dfad73c3eb697b3dc56bdfb6be14f5
f06d7338735881353438dc45b951aa02e7e3216f
'2011-11-15T02:15:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAF' 'sip-files00188.txt'
6865635ea9791e8fb8a58e5ea4f32f6b
c52ab556ccc78fdbbd834b55d2cda865a49be851
'2011-11-15T02:14:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAG' 'sip-files00189.txt'
55fcd75179464b90dc9c471dc0724614
1dec47a0bc917de6b3432c48996e45079f216576
'2011-11-15T02:09:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAH' 'sip-files00190.txt'
521eba148ad911e3c041ea8c974161f1
0436d1cfab0143c376d11aac2bae5687e8c7757e
'2011-11-15T02:10:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAI' 'sip-files00191.txt'
15e48d68b8b507e4d838799baed3ba26
d340c42006e37cb0c3f316de1b5c1558066b6a21
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00192.txt'
21d43701beb2e7647a795820448183c1
e08d00ef117ff0293496a671fc9dbdc1b2cfb5a7
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAK' 'sip-files00193.txt'
c8fa0f1178b55de1866140c7e6431977
7fccf97e20777e33cc4065a3b29928185d376cd0
'2011-11-15T02:16:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAL' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c2c24aadff3af84da27f6289a1af9168
b3594de3849e77726d4f4ee52fb0df62e2f312f9
'2011-11-15T02:09:19-05:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAM' 'sip-files00195.txt'
35cba4b298382c9699f23e01baac3796
7e16eee99fa7a0014aa619aa9ab391e573d47d64
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAN' 'sip-files00196.txt'
1a8a33fe8c6123106d096b0ea2da2a16
d9c4bfef5a8e07fa80089ab33cac6b43a3571d0d
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAO' 'sip-files00197.txt'
f5bfe948e2c3559e35e2d447fb851d75
0166ed2bd5eb0e5186da740687093ed6b262b9c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAP' 'sip-files00198.txt'
c4b62966dd845b62c76528f26975cbc7
5290c77cde38d7e5cf4f144623b7e88b92f0dabc
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00199.txt'
4f754175a1fac802ee1135c9bc374113
9d1ef4c007f4b2a934e3eb2549eb0e74d5704d99
'2011-11-15T02:16:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAR' 'sip-files00200.txt'
0c36dd902cb5137aa65d04037575668d
912fdae098c44e7e5e75f37a386037d6207488f3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAS' 'sip-files00201.txt'
7d9363b9236dcc322ec14a102648b679
bc9b426094920590b08ddd07bca9dab540672b8e
'2011-11-15T02:10:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAT' 'sip-files00202.txt'
663a53246b81a92a17fe12a761568d8e
365c930b88cbed3ac372e5f28609d4ad3e8123b7
'2011-11-15T02:13:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAU' 'sip-files00203.txt'
07c365b1fcaed84a570d181172afe77d
a350b5ea41f911d466c220e2852dc128ca139730
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAV' 'sip-files00204.txt'
0e42f53121eb0bccccd821ee9d2fee02
a3f0aa8b5b55193c87e1f992ab13d76fd7b77b68
'2011-11-15T02:14:16-05:00'
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAW' 'sip-files00205.txt'
3c9c033841551dd9818f10df3c11c9ac
2dfbf2a84262574f49e814e396af8b8d8ec68166
'2011-11-15T02:10:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAX' 'sip-files00206.txt'
7b68e39dacde89eb76dae646cad7e4b8
9fd91e56a996006a602bea3639b34e59041625a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAY' 'sip-files00207.txt'
3e4dce09f6ee4d12618a52b333d03aef
3ec2f046271921e142f82e73425a3ff32521f32c
'2011-11-15T02:12:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00208.txt'
4136f07f39a3e94f02b0dd50dba24558
949723c4adbdcf74a82b9e6b77b6a58a8d83041e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBA' 'sip-files00209.txt'
7709670c81362ce5dea056e235c09cf9
9125a657876c23f93b35c222ad32ed9ea753229f
'2011-11-15T02:11:51-05:00'
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBB' 'sip-files00210.txt'
257235d0692aa45bcfbe5563ad70081c
2f8e42ccec697684338a657c0bd8410c428aef6a
'2011-11-15T02:14:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBC' 'sip-files00211.txt'
f2134a05aadb224824f2571233dc0ed1
ec461ac1d0aa772c2fa3167f039d2ce095cef789
'2011-11-15T02:16:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBD' 'sip-files00212.txt'
97bf7465adffc3c324351b54374208e1
124f161105ff1da0dbfd63e0d91ee08795aeb2dc
'2011-11-15T02:15:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBE' 'sip-files00213.txt'
0aa68716a55462bec85da92438c71d1f
10e97e74c083ad67e2a4f0375d4218336d2e4a4d
'2011-11-15T02:10:33-05:00'
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBF' 'sip-files00214.txt'
0697d44df9092f6b3d3d95d8a6e579f6
9d0ee28b4a4695eebcaf92fb3ef847fba76ef372
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBG' 'sip-files00215.txt'
4dac1e915a41e98637f1d57b5bdc9398
3bc300b5c99b67f728e1d1719c6f61498493118b
'2011-11-15T02:10:47-05:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBH' 'sip-files00216.txt'
9c9cae7983fd994c886c24392c297c67
d62b880e7b20748add8814238d5cde33534acf9d
'2011-11-15T02:16:38-05:00'
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBI' 'sip-files00217.txt'
704090bf0daa638ca44e251287af15d5
53ac819812652eef619d79b0883fdf19b54ba300
'2011-11-15T02:09:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00218.txt'
593a3b936b34c1a19ea2ca49d42d9045
4f81abcb6e4e5ae485f941a525f865c60e50503e
'2011-11-15T02:13:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBK' 'sip-files00219.txt'
bad98d684a84a917679bb95cf7ec9692
a83388f152f95b3e138c1e213125d64be95caf37
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBL' 'sip-files00220.txt'
eab259d23d9f08c3a50cfa85a5a14888
48ec707950a7c41513d38501bbe9afe4cbd38668
'2011-11-15T02:12:04-05:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBM' 'sip-files00221.txt'
76a818f96663fc718220076294553192
2c13a686194a6dc48ae78f3345d9a6a138350bcc
'2011-11-15T02:10:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBN' 'sip-files00222.txt'
c9a66582cc3c061d9a9638e45e40bd88
1af00dd6534c85c7bd4ab03818c01e0385a59be1
'2011-11-15T02:09:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBO' 'sip-files00223.txt'
501759176c8ccb57032797b18c757d50
2b677c07c721e039fb799489871441a4eb9d2920
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBP' 'sip-files00224.txt'
70e468876dc414bc0ff86bb8ce9a7caa
5e2c78835ce4c5958533f573a226f8e46d970ad7
'2011-11-15T02:11:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00225.txt'
78e1b399d1fd96dcebb244a716d2fb2e
576596c7d098c7266bc2d8e8630baf02186755d2
'2011-11-15T02:11:38-05:00'
describe
'1547' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBR' 'sip-files00226.txt'
923103443981233c2de4c2e0d5725300
f0e939ffeb37c53664cf9d29d79231716e823493
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBS' 'sip-files00227.txt'
d9560c56d67515376e85b329cb9dcefb
6f97bd64885eaae58955234ce4a661da411cc93a
'2011-11-15T02:14:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBT' 'sip-files00228.txt'
e4989cfa336bfddf735de823825455e4
10e31bcf73a1e0287a8146e52fde42a5ae4ec717
'2011-11-15T02:14:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBU' 'sip-files00229.txt'
dcc03ca6974792ebd7e66ced864a08e2
192429184a7676d83589bc86f469294a0fc23f33
'2011-11-15T02:11:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBV' 'sip-files00230.txt'
bd71bf738b55a56a78eb3d33d679778b
b638f6315a4b64bd878ebc2d6f4351c09b4381ce
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBW' 'sip-files00231.txt'
28fce1c0beaa78e061dde6b35fb18690
8f5cf57246a192b75dd4b6dadcf5b1788b87e744
'2011-11-15T02:09:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBX' 'sip-files00232.txt'
2ebce05891eba633b3ea08365a1cdfa8
d67723b72383a3b758de54083005ed67b2604767
'2011-11-15T02:11:06-05:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBY' 'sip-files00233.txt'
10f88c5efeab9f660b923b2d7587caea
eff79f26108b13d99c8886a78ba997f8596954ad
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00234.txt'
970d73be37a687c8b7591c157a41cc07
67ba583b61080e741eeb4ef72a4b977879480622
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCA' 'sip-files00235.txt'
31f913b3d70a21b44d38cf06919d4ab1
541e00b25f2005060a70908aa29ee82c516f0fc8
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCB' 'sip-files00236.txt'
dd13dcb99475cde559f72de911a16dc4
b10044ffb0377061ca799c8c63b3a7f7533e4f39
'2011-11-15T02:15:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCC' 'sip-files00237.txt'
04c2016e429232bf8de262477006f070
f5eea77d1953423087a2c5fe957c661f05ff2736
'2011-11-15T02:13:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCD' 'sip-files00238.txt'
2c76c19705ffa2e519effa45063003c1
9408b6b89695e37aa4fe3d4ec0ecddf8a29d1320
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCE' 'sip-files00239.txt'
c11b5c35acafe265d5647df418d90380
1c69a95fa8cb5cf4c17ff836d25640a9b00ea0a9
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCF' 'sip-files00240.txt'
6dc06b81f04f45458031457f84fdbc30
89f20faecdaf8c8bd53576aca3f3ad9735da617b
'2011-11-15T02:15:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCG' 'sip-files00241.txt'
caaad39db2619464bebf10a7e5cb7a72
f4602f70110f1b2ed36b499a5f4eaa303ffb30ed
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCH' 'sip-files00242.txt'
6e575ab372b176ee6e425800e743ae07
551806757004e9b751ee475275d745487fd2bbb6
'2011-11-15T02:11:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCI' 'sip-files00243.txt'
8245710e26753f42faecea69c55d7adc
3defddaae84d35eb70c87159e7af91d3834996e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00244.txt'
042a254d37a6e0c7f2e5d4f926068887
120b3062491d462a6f4e7231f8588fe2fc1ebb6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCK' 'sip-files00245.txt'
631be9073e5a668ea1da5e190e7cc566
91d3a3a68190497efc65364cc2f13da79fbda4ef
'2011-11-15T02:13:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCL' 'sip-files00246.txt'
bd1d071ecce44016bdd2bfa0b7ab6181
8ec3c19fcd1fcb8e03308b7a2abf6eebc7352278
'2011-11-15T02:14:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCM' 'sip-files00247.txt'
f22c0b42b0caedf7b4c87eaf73f9752c
225fa163d4d54b22b2d7c877be0027a20a1686b6
'2011-11-15T02:14:11-05:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCN' 'sip-files00248.txt'
f39b9b63ea1c0a1d836daefcc1289661
ac51db47d12a289e569f16a0de4ec1e45af7ebef
'2011-11-15T02:10:21-05:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCO' 'sip-files00249.txt'
959743bd8b1ecbea6abf9ad482ece308
796a7abc4cc45c14688432675bc7665815041364
'2011-11-15T02:14:43-05:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCP' 'sip-files00250.txt'
646a32332870c396d9a931653847d4f4
e9d071cb01d4d64f4aea2e2c459d674709620fe4
'2011-11-15T02:09:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00251.txt'
a1f4da0b36148ee651752e6b7e4f058f
22e82dbbfb4808f2fc096cd75846487ccbf80cb6
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCR' 'sip-files00252.txt'
6d3f9e86ae5aedc8abd32c6c8c996722
85fa9cbe37c63ed022ff86ce9c29044cf4cfb1cd
'2011-11-15T02:09:39-05:00'
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCS' 'sip-files00253.txt'
ff9affdd8835dc23fef554084649829e
0589a8ac5130378a74349603be0a28604143c1dd
'2011-11-15T02:15:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCT' 'sip-files00254.txt'
3231f5e861f3ffc9dc834a7df88ea98e
4a48595be08d59a91f94e129eb948acc7a56e1ff
'2011-11-15T02:15:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCU' 'sip-files00255.txt'
1ac1f1afdde7aa8685bf277121cd29bd
b73c4f6643187e6ff0366638a7e843e47e2564ee
'2011-11-15T02:10:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCV' 'sip-files00256.txt'
9f1487f605f729ca5d90df445997475c
f72ada34327b35daf37e0fcd932679b65d9699e8
'2011-11-15T02:13:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCW' 'sip-files00257.txt'
970bd28da66ba501bc4d34481083f7c6
4aa08059630e8e69ba44d48e57e4e20749d931d5
'2011-11-15T02:10:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCX' 'sip-files00258.txt'
a17965b413742feb20d2d08f605bbbd5
f11dd974cd0827b25d7694d8c1bd54123e1d1d6e
'2011-11-15T02:13:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCY' 'sip-files00259.txt'
c02652b3df289d55763158c4d932df9e
9e3069581d409cc6f906bbcf8999159eb0b65319
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00260.txt'
b51f61591e3f56af37628abd2824856b
f9b7e9dd52b0c18c3223ac872e7a6291b00f24fc
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDA' 'sip-files00261.txt'
172b008dc4978c3bdaab68bd45f172d6
e37d44469bdf9b0bd8c222113f4bd8584430e7ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDB' 'sip-files00262.txt'
18ab6c0aeb07ad365dfc8ca6ac633557
2cd5d9f8aeab58c6e4baeb6e4bfbe19a8dbdd0f5
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDC' 'sip-files00263.txt'
ad4a1ebb51006665d6f3355c04f3eb50
66705d34381918f7371fa4b683f85b61b3c589fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDD' 'sip-files00264.txt'
1d11072d9d11f2d7cc3190b7693c20d9
8289193c4a9bb8b537674f68f845cad6987988a0
'2011-11-15T02:15:46-05:00'
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDE' 'sip-files00265.txt'
29b704f61066dd5575d02b58e1b39841
fc42e6f5f4102b21724833e76db99311394af584
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDF' 'sip-files00266.txt'
fbb323e691f1b28eb96212c256fcc1a7
8f93a77d85c0e479c2eb18cb6e33b10bc01c9f75
'2011-11-15T02:08:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDG' 'sip-files00267.txt'
99af8961251b0539bf90b337e12cceda
46ae42e1b1aa1cc1e492b5c190ff3759c02ac51c
'2011-11-15T02:11:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDH' 'sip-files00268.txt'
6df010cfb0866abe3f4cf8b404340be1
6fb5552dd1aedaa06500029d00dd6ba80321061e
'2011-11-15T02:12:47-05:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDI' 'sip-files00269.txt'
d9db8ce364453845a2a692dfa3e63b22
8cc9684e11f013ffa077d64192ce0a19344a4390
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00270.txt'
f7f6060d17f1ba7f3ca60b9964b5b70b
9f9690f77c23a673466e903534795621c37ad31b
'2011-11-15T02:10:07-05:00'
describe
'1555' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDK' 'sip-files00271.txt'
3d9feae57dcf1c46079cec2d69cc1a50
35b53091dce0ce8ea270e7ff44b73d329d3df9d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDL' 'sip-files00272.txt'
062fac4e12a7d687cbcedf2d9b85cadc
6e9ce8ba24d27ea2b3e8c8f651c0922e722dbd38
'2011-11-15T02:09:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDM' 'sip-files00273.txt'
215979edba5607e82e1854c06f16ccf2
331ffd97aef8a7ebae65c7fbb245e902786b3d1c
'2011-11-15T02:16:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDN' 'sip-files00274.txt'
45256a358c3443c5f6114eba2ec10099
5c952ea3aac90fb81722a65f4cfedfa89e458d58
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDO' 'sip-files00275.txt'
77b66f383dfcbcb9f48d8347c060d82b
0dc50539aa47043ce001b5b042008c47c3d46360
'2011-11-15T02:15:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDP' 'sip-files00276.txt'
d2d765e5f4493cc729d36f90bd035c57
442f9593de672263ef62412cc4cb935355d1a05a
'2011-11-15T02:14:15-05:00'
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00277.txt'
7a087932375f66e72eaa2389610da5a3
7a24d7fdffe73e8133e10d86499bfbcefae45f7a
'2011-11-15T02:11:50-05:00'
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDR' 'sip-files00278.txt'
89ec75376eed4cf6f397d3840e074eae
afd152912cf70479a35b333c55adb4fa3da3e651
'2011-11-15T02:12:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDS' 'sip-files00279.txt'
28dd86126a956c55525cbca89cf9313f
ee82ec52838531168a3963a4b340780e480473ec
'2011-11-15T02:10:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDT' 'sip-files00280.txt'
12433f7372058875e56e48213045b7b5
c583cb48cfd045f6de207a94e0626cf8e4f01c2b
'2011-11-15T02:09:29-05:00'
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDU' 'sip-files00281.txt'
e79d0112d4156c537cb1b6c69ccdee41
9f993ce9e2e1024a71e06a876067c50bb3aefbce
'2011-11-15T02:09:27-05:00'
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDV' 'sip-files00282.txt'
82f78d709bfa08251144507edc230a98
698189be20448c3351a345137ecd69a283985445
describe
'1843' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDW' 'sip-files00283.txt'
bbf9e0700327d2d3a516fbee58d2d4c7
07ca01ab5e825a1670820a490a37a355bfdbbe4b
'2011-11-15T02:16:46-05:00'
describe
'2303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDX' 'sip-files00284.txt'
39c223099e02f695113631a611291495
1e37aeabc627ded89edde6caee6a5b451246c6d8
'2011-11-15T02:13:33-05:00'
describe
'2167' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDY' 'sip-files00285.txt'
d56d2bed697a5b63e6369482bb39c68f
fa29b1de9eafc03b269a48b44e7937a9525724ee
'2011-11-15T02:15:47-05:00'
describe
'2115' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00286.txt'
fe1a0e5f132f125702db034f397424b3
1d34a36ff2dbbd935ec4627c3040c9e12a116594
'2011-11-15T02:14:27-05:00'
describe
'2058' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEA' 'sip-files00287.txt'
f363c25ede78765fa4e30993dc5d8888
313e916e4c44cdc8909f250c992ef09c113140f7
'2011-11-15T02:10:54-05:00'
describe
'3332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEB' 'sip-files00001.pro'
ffc4b8b4fb2b2f0c68b2ecd4b9c75bbc
791c7d499ef7821f6e3426d495c7ed8107b1f150
describe
'8032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEC' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d90614d2c5b327851f0533127406d53e
e1fca2552b7f7db86bb411ce0031899426e1cd04
describe
'35016' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALED' 'sip-files00004.pro'
aa1ebbf5a899d410a0f35274808aba6d
1e005cabb1faaefad957b58188e6d8f1697ca80b
'2011-11-15T02:12:40-05:00'
describe
'45974' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEE' 'sip-files00005.pro'
f9c8b6bb38d93f6cde8708bc716c84ef
d23ae4f4cb8f6ddeda7086b93c5c556c3617c363
describe
'46710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEF' 'sip-files00006.pro'
d755e9a0c436e99801466bccebdc0f3a
d5822330bc8aad51e7c3f427361fd070124737c1
'2011-11-15T02:16:40-05:00'
describe
'17243' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEG' 'sip-files00007.pro'
c7bd998975433a0be1bca321684572f2
6d2aa57b712a27dbb5eb194f480166075d2a55fb
'2011-11-15T02:13:45-05:00'
describe
'32652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEH' 'sip-files00008.pro'
e775da6206621d1d0c5ea61f9c0ae4a4
69b482bb9a4a7a238c66b19e58f55305d80b3da5
describe
'36564' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
4beceb3aa83fb8e342d460356241c864
108d7853884cfdc8679e36e89ef77766370cf07c
'2011-11-15T02:14:23-05:00'
describe
'38808' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3aade907ee928959f487d41401ff4e90
27f925def15940909d83f586f17e9fe82a6d287c
'2011-11-15T02:09:12-05:00'
describe
'38913' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEK' 'sip-files00011.pro'
235c3671e220c32be43a80a3d4028db5
d3736c9ea4f145b843146bde3be6171234be7338
'2011-11-15T02:10:25-05:00'
describe
'39198' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEL' 'sip-files00012.pro'
0058b9a349ec11eda63b0bdb99bae832
865074c70a4f0d03873495b31536e482b1becb2e
'2011-11-15T02:12:28-05:00'
describe
'37088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEM' 'sip-files00013.pro'
74ce46040ca449fae8904ec56a3f5bc5
6c848e005e33aa00e6c054b96e44882520400281
'2011-11-15T02:15:30-05:00'
describe
'40253' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEN' 'sip-files00014.pro'
28559ec478f9857f251922e9a5a7e13a
1b9ab3a22eb34470b4cd95bc71fc61cb89b8ee31
describe
'40052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEO' 'sip-files00015.pro'
47ea0a571ec50abdb5c66b0d221c28bf
5fb9a36a00dcc974e0b9787250cf7e770b889f78
describe
'39033' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEP' 'sip-files00016.pro'
f2f47c47278dbc539b49ad7a6445663d
db5e9fc81acbc766fdb84360cf360bcbcec20d94
'2011-11-15T02:10:20-05:00'
describe
'38164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d1671b7ab5a35a3fbdba691c94b76d7f
fbea77fa05a38fe9fd5bdce524fd552a00471b62
describe
'37832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALER' 'sip-files00018.pro'
cc84bfe8d68a4538832e74806aee3ad7
d159f5501f5997d312ea9b1a814c9f75ac47522a
describe
'35719' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALES' 'sip-files00019.pro'
c08b3289a9cb79ee1939da504123f8bb
4b56788d933e907b403d0d5e1b30d66a921abf3e
'2011-11-15T02:09:20-05:00'
describe
'39105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALET' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f4c9572aa27f8bc35a233ee96d292d02
08a312aa43b4171599fbc06f587dd22ba72098f3
'2011-11-15T02:12:19-05:00'
describe
'38219' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEU' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7124c551cf91cf1f2c1124e56c0c2f41
e1a3e9bce1f565a23f973721d4f3950ba64b89c8
describe
'38656' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
170778809f88b196c8b29bec2c40cf19
53e264245a18d87e6123fedf5c09bbb6f7b70d85
describe
'38094' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEW' 'sip-files00023.pro'
5836e1609c15c4e54b6355d8ea30a11e
b25de66ca532014eb27901694e66ecffd0b8722e
describe
'39685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEX' 'sip-files00024.pro'
586e3e2b425db11ffe02558a5eb4bb08
acff99dc5e36926576ca5cb22fef2c2c098bcbad
'2011-11-15T02:15:51-05:00'
describe
'37926' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
302cefb35c51c177678487cba9292d00
b05df36bb1fa8af457c406f9f074f25b8f52c800
'2011-11-15T02:11:21-05:00'
describe
'38338' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
8eadb510a4ef366a140115a311af5c1e
0f4e6cb3e71adc73bd13bbb348c19e8508825817
describe
'40376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d6a9555ea81f2b7d0eebf1269ce222a7
075ddff59c18d5463bf41e36f22ee22b6a881c05
'2011-11-15T02:12:42-05:00'
describe
'39014' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFB' 'sip-files00028.pro'
86db044ae819a2effe473cad12ce99f0
36e728c66c8fa3c919e3660b6206946c068d7796
'2011-11-15T02:15:02-05:00'
describe
'38302' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFC' 'sip-files00029.pro'
5a0cc78e897281529cf13e181b966ef3
485d6cc169d4aa2bbf6a1af38d830eb00a334099
'2011-11-15T02:14:12-05:00'
describe
'39744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
d4bc52588e9238db98f6428ba27ca3bb
fed52a8c73083e45212dc24e120739ca707926dc
describe
'38316' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
84d24f53943a89b0b2c2888c8eeda3d9
290980ebe4f93d846bfd8bc5c1a7a13711d18cb9
describe
'39559' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFF' 'sip-files00032.pro'
3dc22e49ee8818092f5518aeee5992d9
866607ddb49c477b7f03d7539ce945ca549f5e29
describe
'38527' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFG' 'sip-files00033.pro'
435af4900c243d0c549559ffba35c9f9
cb0176dfa11e21806b3ca60e0dda58646da87a8f
'2011-11-15T02:11:52-05:00'
describe
'40964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFH' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4546658a0a20f8a188e037add96ae3ea
07e071031a1b76dc2d273d9e3f634c1f7e5d13f5
'2011-11-15T02:09:00-05:00'
describe
'39790' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
56a94ac201a423bc562c0b7d2622ff0a
c6db544c4e3ae078ca284765aca595bece0afb6d
'2011-11-15T02:13:50-05:00'
describe
'37940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
84c0085e3f4d4f0699ec2ec19ded31ee
6ac854db2b49fab5fbb0ba875279545704054726
'2011-11-15T02:11:30-05:00'
describe
'39565' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
60e4b04ad3d6eff7605952455309ae4a
795d1335decba58402cd677b0219578b12d57a8a
'2011-11-15T02:16:35-05:00'
describe
'38756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
dc2246ccbf2d4c36abb83c567f909790
2456cc6841110c0d3bcb5a47297733e57302619b
describe
'39394' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFM' 'sip-files00039.pro'
443c253c26a12a1fa7114f9d415eed39
c0204419aee6455a544ebfe3b4ec2ad70703c90a
'2011-11-15T02:11:25-05:00'
describe
'40214' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFN' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e38f5bc1132d6b05674e8341028571dd
a863aa57a1e866957d214f0563e57c7cb23831ac
describe
'37678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFO' 'sip-files00041.pro'
303ae8ec4b9157892032138aad50b3da
847299b18ecd5b127f374ff19bd80e8f31c09529
'2011-11-15T02:09:45-05:00'
describe
'40155' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
8d1b7c8ea5fbbe765abeb7cb37f8c28d
b8957c2121b16bf9479b9d65047447ceb4d60b1b
describe
'38273' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
15e9194de05cf30b4844444ca39a5e1c
97221a4cc9901882e2df18883cebeeaace1ab729
describe
'40828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFR' 'sip-files00044.pro'
792f8cddb8516fdb71907e5f127ba70d
cba538a235bbee2410ab20e653ef649335ee3c62
describe
'38590' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFS' 'sip-files00045.pro'
2a3921b2bbfe9e403c89f9e95b966582
adebfec9065566e84bd6bf15f4828b26e867ad48
describe
'39895' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFT' 'sip-files00046.pro'
c9b8eadf1a7aaf10ba88e53f4c4f0b5b
f364431029f46dc1acb7e0df0b3c1da92c552c2f
'2011-11-15T02:11:16-05:00'
describe
'38257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFU' 'sip-files00047.pro'
cbe2ae366512509b7c1e3c78de558762
5fab6975abc3dfaa40508e718cd563f5f82c15cd
'2011-11-15T02:08:45-05:00'
describe
'38288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
9cf86ed66118bb4dc0c10cd2a96dd66a
694f00d30cb71e3043b3b7158b4d5c86f62b38f0
describe
'38687' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFW' 'sip-files00049.pro'
e99d4a2a0d21bd9964976b782b92453a
32bd7372edf4ba7a587525e33cb1b6d26563a580
'2011-11-15T02:16:56-05:00'
describe
'39592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFX' 'sip-files00050.pro'
9512ad0bfb76939812ed3d24663d85b0
92b101cc6adda874792d9d8cb23dbe71d7d42f34
describe
'37889' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFY' 'sip-files00051.pro'
48edd92f8fd1c9e1195bef9c23e745b8
ddf271330d3000861d45535bb0d4ea6ae5b1bcd4
'2011-11-15T02:13:58-05:00'
describe
'38038' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
d56263e6265d5582e559b9e096042ff2
72a1b544bf83188e47ab7644eabdb2765461f829
'2011-11-15T02:11:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d54373562b12efda1666d4ce2980331f
7edbc999f2869e5d0b8a6d99b93fe65ea68de3ce
'2011-11-15T02:13:21-05:00'
describe
'39120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGB' 'sip-files00054.pro'
6d68b132e4e58deffc45765808585798
6ad90a08cfab6375fffabdfedbc1b02a081ec7e2
'2011-11-15T02:16:06-05:00'
describe
'40032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGC' 'sip-files00055.pro'
551c413ac9c5c10ef31fd07023e8ecfe
b8d1845d866c6d4384c3c32c0add3ac7479532cb
describe
'38261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGD' 'sip-files00056.pro'
eb9e3412708e70ffe4ee87b683542ca2
2f85ee3ea45311c615aaa293fb5059514f081c1f
describe
'40176' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
37952a5ea900416b5efa1541764327ec
8831e8b78b33067a139472eba91eaf71373cf7fa
'2011-11-15T02:16:44-05:00'
describe
'40280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
89aef3ed7b494df22400022a6c9326cf
ffe78becef3cb348fa61cba72995acd894e6ec27
'2011-11-15T02:11:55-05:00'
describe
'37649' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGG' 'sip-files00059.pro'
033621df420205508dce2df7af9c94fa
49ac35994db5d3b1a89b99bf2cf1daa4f68ea9f9
'2011-11-15T02:14:19-05:00'
describe
'39020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGH' 'sip-files00060.pro'
9b8499f1fcf7da1cf9a9a8168b2c9448
94d43d2d5fdcfa3f41c918b39d8e874c2e989118
'2011-11-15T02:12:30-05:00'
describe
'36811' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
3357a9fb9c71eb16fe8d8ae70bdbc8c3
63d1bfb2f436bcf772d85283a8218229e4996692
'2011-11-15T02:15:45-05:00'
describe
'37896' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00062.pro'
dc564bdb66f4561edd998cca55e1c98b
c5dd7fd3b7259a6dbdad69c9d47a3471db52b6de
describe
'32234' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGK' 'sip-files00063.pro'
9b0cc2677c4906705d28a8b9ac92ea0c
336f34cb725f3f8dbd75cc7488f8af2100ddb979
describe
'39512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
adfdbfbcfd26c24395bc876ce4284618
b746e054577612305f89f4f3fcf44d8a0a608e46
'2011-11-15T02:11:47-05:00'
describe
'39641' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGM' 'sip-files00065.pro'
82fb014496f56cf5810c74cf87ecb387
017ec40341080e43760644308d2bb11397ece3b6
'2011-11-15T02:15:10-05:00'
describe
'38909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGN' 'sip-files00066.pro'
2adff81c1c6f1bfc43a36a8901b46b6d
1d810b9ea480cf636dc303d8f83515d3389910aa
'2011-11-15T02:16:33-05:00'
describe
'38246' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGO' 'sip-files00067.pro'
46ef7fa04692778b73e7c72dc32f47d9
73aee2a0f5417e9ad22e9f9282769b3b6b8230f2
'2011-11-15T02:14:26-05:00'
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGP' 'sip-files00068.pro'
faf1039f6f17d2c7d02dcf96a9edfd3e
7290d07751f1734bdb6878ecc92c32f7299990f0
describe
'39402' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
65694f2112e57a5e5d734ca6803ac10c
733e998ef620376ee5f6da45378639b312f98e06
'2011-11-15T02:10:42-05:00'
describe
'38371' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGR' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d70214094710102f5cbdb42fae5938b1
0a0f75cdecfe56e18ecd6b9d38ec3240b75d8a3b
describe
'37696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGS' 'sip-files00071.pro'
95a8119bedd2808bf774fc708f00cdec
69b711d130661cdfbf9a0f9f90d459d7f89b6a97
'2011-11-15T02:10:57-05:00'
describe
'37587' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGT' 'sip-files00072.pro'
8f2e2aed8172b29539d67b99f3b80f03
ffb253772ec14e018feaf960a7fb24b7e31338a6
describe
'36931' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGU' 'sip-files00073.pro'
a718380e9c5d779997d2644d9a80f09d
2ad45e3657a17e546cb3e63159bc725bf354a3fd
describe
'38542' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
58ba0bcb40f94f7a207469855c3f6c7d
4a9ba42f1acef07f8295ecc353322a5804e56356
describe
'40467' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGW' 'sip-files00075.pro'
b5e9dabab988a7fc00bf1c0aa19d0be5
d456ba411906ce8136590a3276c7422f8de85d1c
'2011-11-15T02:10:31-05:00'
describe
'38003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGX' 'sip-files00076.pro'
40d5c39287d83d11ca165e3e767c1a8a
fc963b3015a7f51f1d48f6c49d5ae94964d694d1
describe
'40082' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
2686110d6ba8386b086722b3065586ff
a03c69ea0ae3d490db2b9903a236a6a051b0aed4
'2011-11-15T02:16:10-05:00'
describe
'33909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8947808d202951b5fed80e1c2b956d23
9b9453e763fce28b6cb3a73d11b98e523d80d2fa
describe
'38132' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
a223a5fb480e58311664ccc2c06bc00d
c668afde25e9cfddf162af9e11db47f996c53a38
'2011-11-15T02:14:08-05:00'
describe
'39389' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHB' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7d762581c8d55763855aafbce7e05b2b
0462e824b0a7da59cd23d9a216c8178e9f8f2d5b
'2011-11-15T02:16:29-05:00'
describe
'38419' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHC' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0be2030915850e6e3105117b59da313a
7977a449c9721469008e58f9cd32ff5c1fdb5fd1
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHD' 'sip-files00082.pro'
65329f8995fdf257ae95b2f473ef6c08
856681c336bbc1c603ab13e916ac136e5eebcb12
describe
'38617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHE' 'sip-files00083.pro'
29f58f6afdc835edd1120419aa2b334e
2b4674a6ef866742aa5ad14d8067d83f4bd53589
'2011-11-15T02:12:23-05:00'
describe
'40091' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHF' 'sip-files00084.pro'
f9d13b423ef84db303d09edab8c09e83
eeb3b479530e56ad606ef1328144cde99b409c1f
describe
'38020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHG' 'sip-files00085.pro'
8edb7cedc427a51a93f67df281c385ad
26ec2ffd33845abe2509af7009f2db84f948e507
'2011-11-15T02:10:09-05:00'
describe
'37483' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHH' 'sip-files00086.pro'
24415b06626a42e18737a65a31840c74
38ebaee734c1ceeb04c3ea0e6f8ea09003f4245d
describe
'37542' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
5e5455ebb8682ecf1a42e4e3fdea3403
e524b732f43653d82e3500d69e892612f9ed1519
describe
'39854' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00088.pro'
eabd09c9a9d2bc48619c477240e5991a
6ea50b60a1b89e3c56b652d3878738a4c4e64244
'2011-11-15T02:11:17-05:00'
describe
'39782' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHK' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7165a17a2f3c679e2790f397de08578d
7692d477b7b595ea6d5d6ebe1186ffbb3af0d7d7
describe
'39374' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
d864ca29790e23816a9bc3f5f204f1a3
ff4e7d196de6585741b8a8a7ddf90529c88087e7
'2011-11-15T02:16:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHM' 'sip-files00091.pro'
07897c573af7878bf3e9bd456873bbf1
35da183f7743c49e451eebbc860ab8662d50bb4d
describe
'37349' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
2cf6d4848c6c718aa9eed2d0d24ae908
1f167386e45993cf331c2a8fef0b2c542726f515
describe
'37934' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHO' 'sip-files00093.pro'
4e6f876ed14a5a542caca3a23e813ef9
aaa4f8eccd0eeda56f28b40680304168e6b24fc3
describe
'38854' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHP' 'sip-files00094.pro'
330a6474aeb22e0ffe71ce8c3776bc74
67c5ea3b11a44d14fa5fa28774ec26254d54ed88
'2011-11-15T02:10:56-05:00'
describe
'38142' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
f1a17f5ebbf1dc3d910951ff4d8debdf
7e70fb18fac7b408df02b903b244f47ed97b8b25
'2011-11-15T02:09:10-05:00'
describe
'39344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHR' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5a39cbc12f64050817d194a8d74f59db
bc2232fde6a614955be2d53ab42878ac8b0417e3
'2011-11-15T02:10:30-05:00'
describe
'34735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHS' 'sip-files00097.pro'
683ec8a80a228f1fcf85e23310b3d228
a0b63b6aa07588bcceb96c14e916077fffc3192a
'2011-11-15T02:14:14-05:00'
describe
'40970' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHT' 'sip-files00098.pro'
f581554299f9eb656759aa7350c61c10
74bfe770eeff1278c35f9587a93adad4eeb76342
describe
'40029' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHU' 'sip-files00099.pro'
c038c25e1438f7ae1a9403cdcb453953
6421dbaa5ddd7a755f4fbd9982c3e28a3f649b16
describe
'39253' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHV' 'sip-files00100.pro'
9580e661040eedc6b3cfdc93138e0ed1
abb423c7f7fcb65ae8a761934bd501693d397d17
describe
'38855' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
01b5e36ea04ce220ef18d040b994a4b3
fd507c43509690965cb4ce8cf1640f71f7852e68
'2011-11-15T02:16:58-05:00'
describe
'39013' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHX' 'sip-files00102.pro'
fa3e5ee6d56ec176fe5c1d93b2a60748
f915cbd3d6bc4297450c63bb87c3aed7ceb7e006
'2011-11-15T02:10:40-05:00'
describe
'38686' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
9b072aa85c79f83ceaefb1fcaf0138dc
4f29301a2fb6b8945bf98e0a0e272735366f292a
'2011-11-15T02:15:58-05:00'
describe
'4384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
528d7952ba6788f25a9013d6f3caa0f2
7a8ef964e15b248d28841b2648a98c56c5a5934d
describe
'40145' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
20528b93857299dd7f83e255e35eb9d3
286756873678a30363d0f3efee9a4c670c771008
describe
'39202' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIB' 'sip-files00107.pro'
52f954e238223e02ddddf9d5ae96c2e3
4372bdde9a5136321aba6d57dd1ef95f0eb09d0e
describe
'39917' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIC' 'sip-files00108.pro'
60607f9c5ec1690595475b4ed9db9102
a347879dad180310c2a9161bce813b49ecee6561
describe
'39963' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALID' 'sip-files00109.pro'
77436133ddb4ee7b70d58bdf12823453
d1d19eedb8cbbda0606fbcd7a1cf7c21ee8a151c
describe
'39438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIE' 'sip-files00110.pro'
63868ce0dad221f08f5a650f25a03cab
101cb8410e2ac86d33a7fe22daf9e8e4a6182225
describe
'40683' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIF' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e74cfa07d8b2967cbcdf34b4bcf1ecab
5ac930c8a171e4ad24d2dec9796bf81c8c9c8769
'2011-11-15T02:09:49-05:00'
describe
'39755' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIG' 'sip-files00112.pro'
57f822fbb22fc1438ef4fe80adcb2466
fa3082d5ad9a63ae08d2919113fbb7ae04068593
'2011-11-15T02:14:22-05:00'
describe
'39100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIH' 'sip-files00113.pro'
a66ff7259ef3ccc0ebcfd5e6a4dc1f1e
071dc2cbc2e3fe25d8a6c87dc91fadbafa13e496
describe
'40688' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALII' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0076eb85530a4b7b3f02783f46d266fa
0ab56447aa103a1301bcd9a12309b665044a1b76
describe
'40636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
0a7a841e28fd186f4da384fe2ccb1daa
45a41df700bddfb01de1e2a676cc7143e60a5597
describe
'39233' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIK' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f172926bc98f1b1ba887f26da248daba
f08be6bb3871d76f698121bf0b7c5fd8647f5bf7
describe
'39644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIL' 'sip-files00117.pro'
e42d47c5a1a76c0b16896933b7d45858
48ff939e4ed1f07fe834f81231fcbbf47e32d338
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIM' 'sip-files00118.pro'
8b5128a52a13a409cbc5bf68a36c60ca
5f5416e202e21e6fd6471c2375df1f5645b47991
describe
'39316' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
de5972c9f996cea92b11c944906ef31a
c62a35b62956c12e0269569ea52bd37de90e360e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIO' 'sip-files00121.pro'
d75fc85ffc4fee216a9813bc790ccbac
3f2ef5806f3b36fc09c442afc6b2c15d04c1171e
'2011-11-15T02:08:46-05:00'
describe
'38955' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
0538bff9394081719f7130d108a9a9e0
43ebbc403f8b6702dbba53f941f92396c793143d
'2011-11-15T02:12:46-05:00'
describe
'40114' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
95eaeb8ad722042a638cfab2a42b5531
abe29ceac6253e16c3dcd6ea9974766b2381b6b5
describe
'39244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
8608d9e36f2dbefcda456ec31ee93858
f8c0c9a80ec312e55e09eb8eb5c2eb3654d5d16a
describe
'36159' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b78e5c5510c835f27aaa2f6a0db03d20
26fabc38bdc3a18ceb6c3825160a57d7975c937d
'2011-11-15T02:12:35-05:00'
describe
'38130' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
19c30b55f6ead5cbc69cbfa78456d8dc
c21a17546e8764443b3ee13b1b95dabdeefed8c5
describe
'39089' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
a660dd46ae83d95ca6c0ed4f830636d4
d519d8e089918196eedd48c7447870026693284e
'2011-11-15T02:09:40-05:00'
describe
'39642' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
b6876dba7bc59cc2b46b2c11d024713d
9be303b498f5efe439e3d582855cd9c47d764a4a
describe
'39458' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
2a3c86b911db86d3aa5679ff194b90ad
ce44d38290082d34e02a26d90b27691a69efe91c
describe
'39678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
1a6de87e9ca4a9393776e8bd5d8bd96b
c1c8bb0ccef99bab2b3bc1adeec386ae92a4050b
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
8960ad32834b7ebbec388523168ed3c7
af19166d67006a62eb331a5c6935ae0d2af1bef4
describe
'39606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
09982acaba9e259f5aacb403cb801378
58fc79f015e172365a2ef0b516cc8184de3cdb97
'2011-11-15T02:14:36-05:00'
describe
'36892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
a2aa4d5d62c0afcf3125f938706afdfe
69cf3a9b7fa0ef4f5eadbe148465ae1c06f501b2
describe
'39261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJB' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e828432b1fc0b6c43617cc7b9e7ab8f1
17c991458613e001721cc75908d1b1758fc56f79
describe
'40041' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7615ce327f6fce9f8fbedeffb33c81a2
807404ab1f02131e544b4f59b14733bd39cc317d
'2011-11-15T02:09:41-05:00'
describe
'40612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
ad6c92ccf05ae429614035a1d4d7b3a3
01e0c5c481a260397b5f0e336fc36496327151a2
'2011-11-15T02:10:32-05:00'
describe
'40753' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
450580d9e71da40d9e47f43706c57a85
3c66a08257ac50e55117aa2c9b3b6a9ba23deecc
'2011-11-15T02:09:16-05:00'
describe
'39091' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
83390ba2287f9aeb4d7ff2a90904a524
3402ef7b7e1660a67112daa87e26da0d190ee029
describe
'34668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
993866d593aafadc42757e3a2747a1d1
ef5c1ac393406514c0a9c09377bdd62e1e2b5916
describe
'37739' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
0ac04c1920827095bab99a60dc1306bc
7b6d9c1ccfaa1718f3182e50e83cb07578c17045
describe
'39188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJI' 'sip-files00141.pro'
794216284636f2d9d692ea7f45ff30c8
91e6ecb68ea81b6a2ee46e785788c0c234b76d8c
describe
'37774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
bb9de6f48bdb371156fc0976696e40b2
df79b4939d5bbb0d9062d76d8dba80215281638c
describe
'40677' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJK' 'sip-files00143.pro'
204ab2f962613ca3c7aeda82c5807b67
b76c17357d7ba2bbe717f61b02924fcbfc32f75d
'2011-11-15T02:10:34-05:00'
describe
'39103' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJL' 'sip-files00144.pro'
d517e5d003f0b31e3a363931cadde070
f273e67c24cc9dc76f40267000a5dd4b803a45f2
describe
'39610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
63318ceb3b593bbce894318b31b82b2f
887ef2fa550ea441c2243afd4fd88716563cfeab
'2011-11-15T02:12:18-05:00'
describe
'33812' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJN' 'sip-files00146.pro'
a3b00b12a9dfeff6ed10e33ed6d3c919
a80080a22c8f855cb953a3a2dd52fa81dc78a86b
describe
'40724' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
1268a03e40974706e09c4d35b2d1fad6
fcacc84d96f81b839e2e602c2e18f025074f3ef0
'2011-11-15T02:13:35-05:00'
describe
'40240' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
9126b1cefedb0269c977e51827ffd079
ab0c16eb4efcd01a09ddbb812f22f104fec6b137
describe
'40043' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
62d10a5d6109c970ffd8b5cb718f35d1
b6be308ed011047a8a20b6508298cae85eb8e646
describe
'37802' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
81d26087ba95d51ecdaf327b7b3ed351
e174a698a11fe7d5ccaa557b80c450eca7d5ba6a
'2011-11-15T02:13:31-05:00'
describe
'39115' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJS' 'sip-files00151.pro'
fe00e8b52b5514ea74f0cb798d7408fc
3bace1910f17ebf4210be08a69a02ab566c01bac
describe
'38056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJT' 'sip-files00152.pro'
6eea3bc4d755249e1b864c2dda18809a
6dadd9e2c2207ce1790759f47a144dd56de213b7
'2011-11-15T02:09:57-05:00'
describe
'37040' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJU' 'sip-files00153.pro'
d13e1690f860a2c2cbd629b84015b0df
59b18b8b6962bc4462f71d5c6f280683a72aa619
describe
'36720' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJV' 'sip-files00154.pro'
e69fd4b328b0b5db465ec6d29b7beda7
553ececb54be7468be9befc8a351c01aadd0c59a
describe
'37511' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJW' 'sip-files00155.pro'
775470fbd88e36e10d31b00130b5623e
e1695fdfe3f9c88e526714bc91e17a642bbfdf45
describe
'37894' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
2473a1299613316e0b197216ac3720b5
c198180ea274c5ad520f868fd76294943d3a98cc
'2011-11-15T02:11:04-05:00'
describe
'33685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJY' 'sip-files00157.pro'
1c97e0d4c734756a472dc822e993f065
9adaf82e9fe80d0bd7f3a1d31fb646e123f5225e
describe
'38483' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
78858c1b79de8f7fc2f53094e718ca01
d719da48d370669a706d0d05cfc39206f4138a7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
4c457d2b5f75dd63cf290a1b17c1a8cf
998f5574a55f031ac3be5f07d9a02625f38d4189
'2011-11-15T02:13:55-05:00'
describe
'38326' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
92305049c67fbbd3f7d1940a94460520
77b6c03a023f605b080966b7115919bde5875d5b
describe
'39517' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
238d4bb1bc5ab5fb105482204a6eec03
0d26a59a5220687eb3e02a06b325fae9e67ee1c6
describe
'40173' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
d121d344e8f941eebcaf623f53355a33
2c995b3d3dd57e9dd9d3bc4f09cdc5a98a362e01
describe
'37415' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
cdc539f72d2f9d07b5b78221975af05a
6d24e6ffde22a59e1319a3ad356f7bef880cc156
describe
'39384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
9d9a4471a1858724f87f4b9e2b3e6e21
5f43f9d28a27953ebe5cea5b83ae0a736c5566fe
describe
'39412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
72eb15213ace709e2ae4cbec200e4142
473649de99d2637d3bcef69ec30a640fbfc4c474
describe
'39674' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
597a7c406c13f9242de50fb95b385de0
46b2161eeeddf4be6e8e60dd0dd2ad79f22d0d4d
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKI' 'sip-files00167.pro'
1779318b4df8a7295e56b4d86cb8f594
c7df53ae981c9ed2ade73a150c57fe348e64b2a6
describe
'39740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
9337151d56c9b90033f65606aa373a01
9f59e008e48b9fad0bc697d3df983227d8f7a3b2
describe
'38809' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
4ec093b709dd8842e04bbb6431142325
f86a8ad9e6210c30ce44a083ca7aab42705982ee
describe
'38953' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKL' 'sip-files00170.pro'
6ae44b9b8ceba5693f348db6848b7e7d
6c9750a9d0f10fa8a233a741a5ef308987eee913
describe
'39695' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKM' 'sip-files00171.pro'
bbacca41f31a9e81146f570cd2700b93
7e6a5ac8591fde84ccf64f9d5dad578979043a07
describe
'38100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
9e652c3185be65a85e5daa841ab5f31c
6dd4385c73384f87337a2fcfa6fa0366460dfdde
describe
'22078' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
fee9bdc53652bf2bc743c62399c03c87
7c5da919dfad1b7a3ea56ac4e0a4e31405da33ae
describe
'39254' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
f5d8757a0dd44c1cdb4381919a12a132
2470251927ae7d91be33cbb512021c8c0291b834
describe
'38719' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
82dcadedab9fea8bcbce0cbeddce6fd2
dd07fbea28c488c3df4699186c117b8b69ca5ffd
'2011-11-15T02:14:33-05:00'
describe
'38409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKR' 'sip-files00176.pro'
25ffebb6bcae266fa6d80de1e8bf3d8f
1cd68082948ef3c49b332b9191a4945f64bbc7d4
'2011-11-15T02:15:04-05:00'
describe
'39002' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
d544da34ffb7837003b4d433517a5252
b2e52d48a220e08fbfa123d37b5b05a6e1893f94
describe
'39769' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
1140af88cce757e21e7249881c742e8f
2aff78e15180885539443b27409a0f1e627d6ec0
'2011-11-15T02:12:37-05:00'
describe
'39871' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
af1018474968920fcb2a366a7a9063aa
8020d2d1f311edcd74e7e8edb2ac1fb845197852
describe
'35904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
eb0ba0d220c3b7329d32f5586c4db792
15e96c000e2383077b7aff0a596f27b19cb5b29a
'2011-11-15T02:10:10-05:00'
describe
'36739' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKW' 'sip-files00181.pro'
285799d18cc42a4aecbe30b96f5526bf
452c3c09035d6fd677f6e8dfb239507ff9641420
'2011-11-15T02:15:15-05:00'
describe
'38390' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKX' 'sip-files00182.pro'
e1d7c01d02b4af54f241cee07915154f
9982ba6f3e8cf93cc03b23bd76d454fec077a976
'2011-11-15T02:16:57-05:00'
describe
'40905' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
853a6b6b580434b413530e91496d3c58
c472086fafeef918e32d9a4c23dd604298d1d71f
describe
'39158' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
367e40c5d7f93f6b99227556142ca43b
dcb40a860b78ea7cc326328c54af88f7b224079a
describe
'39590' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
bb78eb07b56def3435ed8a4628561382
a99838b8173a0ccd26965ccdc80c17cda6abf461
describe
'38608' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
92c2e567c86b6e097f9173a27aba7f9b
6a6e952947265eeda98f4b5aa8e7ca11c0a359d4
'2011-11-15T02:10:35-05:00'
describe
'39027' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLC' 'sip-files00187.pro'
798d69a1b6c0464c77da98ef1700bcf3
4bc8c72e885f4caadb0dfe8b3b1e5b7d1b8ae93f
'2011-11-15T02:16:26-05:00'
describe
'39009' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLD' 'sip-files00188.pro'
b99b20db94d42dec4df50447ee24fff9
d2e1c64048ed8aeff787209c6ca70e8b50c9cf3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLE' 'sip-files00189.pro'
e36ffd24662899175ffd66750be70d7a
56dbb6b13b1c53d1141b27b2c32fdb7311c23156
describe
'37602' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLF' 'sip-files00190.pro'
0fb9ae12452ab778b84f25a44c9e475b
f3485023d30ec7354e30f7bd0ebdca574fbd58fc
'2011-11-15T02:08:37-05:00'
describe
'40171' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
963df012fc58ee629bea4da1c9764876
54dbb49d09a931ce501fc162aab052c8ff1651b0
describe
'39833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLH' 'sip-files00192.pro'
c2b8ac554dcc4534df2aac81b367dbe8
a619ec0be36b8b16eedae6e305646d592b284f2d
describe
'39897' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLI' 'sip-files00193.pro'
e557fe71f2e68737d25ae50c870b8ad4
9637231e64fc0aebcc8c8ea626e58c4d273575c1
describe
'38152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
7257f5027baf63d12ca9cd72c4ebb714
1e7ae532404f265ce598df6177f9d89b605ed96b
describe
'38317' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLK' 'sip-files00195.pro'
6456619a02ae356a8a358f254deb24c0
5d665f1b97770940a4788fc8c50091ff089df505
'2011-11-15T02:11:49-05:00'
describe
'38242' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
af59c7303326e9929bcbdbb3a77cf424
2fa61dc1c79f29175fda6c3c0bae00d988fb1813
describe
'36988' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLM' 'sip-files00197.pro'
a15b3f9371f1eb070630abafee4ad45f
fef4fa499c8d16d4c5e75ec43b5b0d48ebe88b54
'2011-11-15T02:15:48-05:00'
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLN' 'sip-files00198.pro'
feef521a70da69f48b0403d18a9880a5
d471ae45e982bbd97a56a46ad0acecfb1ad2abd0
describe
'37531' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLO' 'sip-files00199.pro'
e4a43f2c6382e8270c6cf9e816dd0d98
5769ed4366e7db1cd42c4ecf96f7e9c95417fdc7
'2011-11-15T02:12:45-05:00'
describe
'37579' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLP' 'sip-files00200.pro'
aea4eba4203057f9783e246bbc5ef4f0
2269ae7c0e6ca53f7f9a3ab8666810786b488592
'2011-11-15T02:11:26-05:00'
describe
'40405' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
eb398fddbded79b1dfba9c8b19eebb34
f35a96e15bc085927eaa29e4dbdb94c10508ccfd
describe
'39319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLR' 'sip-files00202.pro'
8492346579e159f5b18c81aa191c6b4e
7e835d595e5148e9131f1ed5f9cb2be0c171070c
'2011-11-15T02:08:57-05:00'
describe
'39666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLS' 'sip-files00203.pro'
27320369c597e6ceae683870fd90c30f
97561dfa6eb05f203a9b4bfba68dacc6d3db73c9
describe
'38810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLT' 'sip-files00204.pro'
2e8b193cd373e2c824c4286694025fd2
d79cfa7a7ac01de1e9fc268f8d5285a5e72d2381
'2011-11-15T02:09:25-05:00'
describe
'32569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLU' 'sip-files00205.pro'
d84e3fc6a599fbfc14e3d26793d94e85
e9a1bb1cf532cd709a7ff7152a840e9324ff1e10
'2011-11-15T02:16:41-05:00'
describe
'38750' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLV' 'sip-files00206.pro'
2348d84fe5604db9bcc8a4766478bdd9
ed2703a68ddb7ab040b71602550990e127fcebef
describe
'38957' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLW' 'sip-files00207.pro'
9d392bf0a60c839ff2cc033899a3341c
9ae4890e1f1e9ab1164218326aa266bb9d6413d4
'2011-11-15T02:11:02-05:00'
describe
'39914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLX' 'sip-files00208.pro'
e08723ff23513b098e58de2c3f96535f
e87e539e2d295ceed5db95a65b5ecbfa6f2ab3d5
describe
'40054' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLY' 'sip-files00209.pro'
752c5863e758a11d4e49a1228248b4ad
d357c9aa0689aa382d31d8092ad6a758f0a2a737
'2011-11-15T02:13:54-05:00'
describe
'38746' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00210.pro'
f9c6fee7eb4addfaf1371a735602a15d
0c98c7d4d8d23cbe2f315f724cf4876547280cd4
'2011-11-15T02:16:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMA' 'sip-files00211.pro'
ad4528ec811a52cf305c7667adad0eef
471cb1ad3c82b6325bc9a49f3860f4ab40be9909
describe
'40011' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMB' 'sip-files00212.pro'
16115c0ab50b0b75fbc02d8b1bf4c2cd
3999c54a96f041579320a70fb2f21ff71c5b4157
'2011-11-15T02:09:51-05:00'
describe
'38128' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
db3a80e44f1cc7cdad832d8051fd282e
776cc3485ac7982ef58bf786928959d84c89e29f
describe
'38900' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMD' 'sip-files00214.pro'
50af285c1e02f9b13487f7d22ce35be4
28afbebaf869a012a7a41e733df4c4ed8003688a
'2011-11-15T02:15:36-05:00'
describe
'38734' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALME' 'sip-files00215.pro'
f3c86376d457491d9c276e2e56bd48aa
bdd99de9003ce9f9f3144c6efcedd65523ee4d00
'2011-11-15T02:16:12-05:00'
describe
'36940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMF' 'sip-files00216.pro'
a9dfd6679c3a215bc8991b314bff4d62
9be8c1aeecad2a1fc9439931dd0632a6b9652f02
'2011-11-15T02:10:01-05:00'
describe
'40622' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMG' 'sip-files00217.pro'
a615aadecd0d44f0364edee0d5406a71
b53189e62abc19a50575c5f1c035b736c26320ff
'2011-11-15T02:12:07-05:00'
describe
'38834' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMH' 'sip-files00218.pro'
af68e53104939eb61462eebcce952b92
e23438bab48a82883e85a0d173e4f914c4d8667a
describe
'38108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMI' 'sip-files00219.pro'
b07679228fdb56b82551443dda16d888
942021e20bea8fb1bd393c3be1e1738ec17b9a7b
'2011-11-15T02:11:56-05:00'
describe
'39558' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
ca124ac06c055d30b614ff4b55f694d9
8dcb62f885e8b32bcbe0ed965c35262b54d7077a
describe
'33818' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMK' 'sip-files00221.pro'
4a4e602447d96014f101546f7e9514b9
3ab7110c60f51654bd9aa18545c078e5a6529b2f
'2011-11-15T02:11:33-05:00'
describe
'40479' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALML' 'sip-files00222.pro'
6d533c253112373f6b028f70b272aef2
c5fc9612183eefcd3858e2886d0ba93d119a2409
describe
'40637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMM' 'sip-files00223.pro'
a02a7c924ee3e265b0db470a1c359604
0ba5a2e21cddb143f37ac1f878aceb6fd9d34b31
describe
'39345' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMN' 'sip-files00224.pro'
2ebd627ca99266b9d21e873e56de5191
0c76493c08d370aa3b75f13b5c6841beba139deb
describe
'41591' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMO' 'sip-files00225.pro'
104bd02bf500261cb2a7bc3740e04235
1e861cd87be443363292d97ed2f37283eba98645
'2011-11-15T02:10:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMP' 'sip-files00226.pro'
ec1f99e815fa84703d73d094a428f468
801a7ea842138291c26cb573164e82bcbf7ef68e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00227.pro'
620114e6cc496fa59eb9209a318122fb
0013441aa1f609a770256d6fb9bc01b4d7ed5408
describe
'39585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMR' 'sip-files00228.pro'
45d3e3aa3eba657334d9838b3103154e
bccefc2343587f36f1e0de264f9c0879cdcb10c4
describe
'39087' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMS' 'sip-files00229.pro'
ee48407b88c59775d62a75f21378b41e
040755c82b374bce660443fac59c9fd22ecd96a1
describe
'38060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMT' 'sip-files00230.pro'
e3f68810288ebe5af120df3ef14c973d
81f3c671511dff5dfe2e72f5c92221ab7f9d0016
describe
'37574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMU' 'sip-files00231.pro'
48fa7914fb1ed95b80cff754e6042195
c9b3fbe7c36ca3c67be908b904078f2191414d16
'2011-11-15T02:10:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMV' 'sip-files00232.pro'
e9f03215cfe68861f992241726531a66
c2008da687d1a18b62f144c3fa97da1e3e413a2a
describe
'33660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMW' 'sip-files00233.pro'
e704a7ef550635dc7cbb510f91c41f02
ea08c7ba477b9fba97a102b430d0b0639dff2512
describe
'39346' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMX' 'sip-files00234.pro'
023cb0da54d97db1e5308a921e1ac826
18431fa19ca0e2b8395e8eac8ec420ffa79efaff
'2011-11-15T02:16:16-05:00'
describe
'39445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMY' 'sip-files00235.pro'
21845a0c5b569e62d30ae12433807d6c
f1b71ca590ca1a13a52b2eab14be3d8f47f7efc7
describe
'38269' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00236.pro'
29d0d39c2cc010c5f08e0de86bcbefd7
f45623cf510c1a64bebc614fc966fda0a8d5db24
'2011-11-15T02:11:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNA' 'sip-files00237.pro'
840a783a10404a350bd7a8665af98ae7
89c81113371bfee387cae6bf77c97392ab779fd4
describe
'38387' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNB' 'sip-files00238.pro'
7a6401c6864a9aa88c0876e8d2e74dd0
c44d0ae77a3b89667bc36c1b44f14e47eae6edcd
describe
'39088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNC' 'sip-files00239.pro'
da17a663f2e9a91470799deb6bfc057d
42577f1a6a5bcbd68985e56540dbc2c45a54b156
'2011-11-15T02:15:53-05:00'
describe
'38671' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALND' 'sip-files00240.pro'
a16a59d8b781694b0b86eadd12c52eb8
ec11a4b44eb18d026ea13cbdf4ce8c49fd850b8c
'2011-11-15T02:10:52-05:00'
describe
'38588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNE' 'sip-files00241.pro'
318b185d98987a4b0790bd36e5711c35
107bc27208415764f4a8040797e279e78a7e7c19
'2011-11-15T02:15:18-05:00'
describe
'40017' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNF' 'sip-files00242.pro'
c4de0a061715bd72c09b659f8e10eed7
4ac96d37cec51799d21d75b5c0edb6587e1042cb
'2011-11-15T02:09:09-05:00'
describe
'40730' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNG' 'sip-files00243.pro'
267cb06f63d066a266c9b4873829b729
685c88ed5ffb5be14c14fad095d1e3f468fc49c1
'2011-11-15T02:14:35-05:00'
describe
'39739' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNH' 'sip-files00244.pro'
40e008d8e8a1c0e7c4d5cf2eb39d9bd1
25fb2ef2b0bb06af5c9e6d17692b0da5e7041aa1
'2011-11-15T02:13:20-05:00'
describe
'39954' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNI' 'sip-files00245.pro'
1736a73d723c8b01f08b59ad068bed81
55c7b05d4ecd923d413b0bc1e5d3c6dcf0eb1a77
describe
'39944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00246.pro'
b34f2ebf91d5325c28b46a50f08967fd
866ae20ffb1233db2f06e11f7cef96b6d439ba5b
'2011-11-15T02:09:53-05:00'
describe
'38659' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNK' 'sip-files00247.pro'
e20dc6e86f7d86520fc91a606b965d81
2f684ef6118270fe474782d34ca8eac0261791b3
describe
'34911' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNL' 'sip-files00248.pro'
a4c870339fa3ae21ac53cfa9a6008e91
cedb385aa88b28c5e131644e9e3a1ec8de9de900
'2011-11-15T02:17:02-05:00'
describe
'41400' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNM' 'sip-files00249.pro'
939acc973e2bc5b7bacd346fd0fc468d
42783b7976b8931efce2a05cc041eba611f6d997
'2011-11-15T02:16:30-05:00'
describe
'41020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNN' 'sip-files00250.pro'
d55e3dd886482cecac2070473ec063eb
99885de0e518a792c1efb245c82aa4a14e161aad
'2011-11-15T02:15:57-05:00'
describe
'38805' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNO' 'sip-files00251.pro'
5ad1293e267052d2a4292090521d1ff8
af82a1b4060bbee8341121dfc87c316574932ce7
'2011-11-15T02:09:05-05:00'
describe
'39170' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNP' 'sip-files00252.pro'
9fd5868f7bf9ff5e513c3d661c76a8bc
28c03ee2a9740c0779ed8a4ac7bee7609aa22b1e
'2011-11-15T02:11:20-05:00'
describe
'40372' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00253.pro'
852ab07281eda221bc049ba40e0a1c76
f3176359d70f883683eec43573dff080baa467c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNR' 'sip-files00254.pro'
965b8a76d4dc1500f31bcfba4df4a1cb
bb8c5238b28dd9f85d91a37bccc73b574f37a0f4
describe
'39377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNS' 'sip-files00255.pro'
2f70770593c322c9fd6a34964d65f287
3f9474caa4c8aa72f16371b7346aba1c768ba97a
describe
'40745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNT' 'sip-files00256.pro'
5f73558716e4f08248a87e73e5cadb24
ccfa6a48180c2bb32a46f8d128fa419016d602ea
'2011-11-15T02:10:19-05:00'
describe
'37532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNU' 'sip-files00257.pro'
9dcb928b7d2d97f09f723784fc6d6116
b5c08a0cb4abf50708fc18f3e48d11e8753fa519
describe
'39183' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNV' 'sip-files00258.pro'
85601c5fcb0a4c5d401381838449cddb
5cf1ccc962db40151db593ba9c6bef50d5929936
'2011-11-15T02:13:28-05:00'
describe
'38903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNW' 'sip-files00259.pro'
84b668aa4d0a3998cd8e6959569af106
7a14d89c0fc9f4b21bf424e85abb06b7c4ae9319
describe
'41022' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNX' 'sip-files00260.pro'
c406cd5a3c0a9a30bf164c8a8b73b75b
f64f9f9dc98647fc5b553b0edb1f4b5f7fc859e4
describe
'41052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNY' 'sip-files00261.pro'
3d862d95db55600f58841a307a1c06b7
c465680cfa7f462d48ded4794633016d8502f145
'2011-11-15T02:12:05-05:00'
describe
'38350' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
70d53129d85f8c6e145c28f4ae23b0a8
3e7fbdc5bd113698b1561f6689abf7229b2c13cd
'2011-11-15T02:09:36-05:00'
describe
'39949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOA' 'sip-files00263.pro'
34ebbbd8c4271389a7fc599ff47dc210
20609ae9d20366a01ce3a1ac0cdb8ba77dd85639
describe
'39358' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOB' 'sip-files00264.pro'
91da6ca04d387149274dfbaad48d4097
dfd4f5997ee4e7952558e734f41da1a02d5e6deb
'2011-11-15T02:14:42-05:00'
describe
'41099' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOC' 'sip-files00265.pro'
e7ee204f589ea77774c59af31dc676bd
3c4a1736d54a62e6940f508c9b8ed41b671a93d6
'2011-11-15T02:15:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOD' 'sip-files00266.pro'
bc8b2072b58ee0cc3920a7e75504ee52
ba56319443ddc3b917d70dd5f7ac6e1ab7f97fbd
'2011-11-15T02:15:52-05:00'
describe
'39039' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOE' 'sip-files00267.pro'
844be0ebbb1166b548aa488013a6c33f
85b4ccb59ab1b2f18b6200f056dea9fba1329fda
describe
'40045' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOF' 'sip-files00268.pro'
e7833e0ad9f195212d242109957dc440
5ba9d2a874c250be0a1c5e61a029cff650e5019f
describe
'38960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOG' 'sip-files00269.pro'
dca46adbf36075703d59c438db1ddbb8
e4062d657b53ec7d62a90579d5a0a1a9411aeea0
describe
'40762' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOH' 'sip-files00270.pro'
3edc0f7ec9a1fd0f13457499863e0bd8
21d457950997d4155a10ad535b9cf7191c8c6f80
describe
'37776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOI' 'sip-files00271.pro'
a2ab1c7ae3f0cd12c911e77f05766415
9eaf7a598d2b6460e36bdd3f1bc653dca3d176e2
'2011-11-15T02:10:38-05:00'
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
fb451dc9fb72032b672afe7fd3e6e751
3b0b4a3c59accab46684180d8638b4564f54835b
'2011-11-15T02:09:54-05:00'
describe
'41263' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOK' 'sip-files00273.pro'
ba72853788e70d6418594e0b11634f26
0a4365006935dc8c9c5e6c128873adca6c708953
describe
'39223' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOL' 'sip-files00274.pro'
ee70f4cba916bcfdf364a2cd3571e59c
82197f9fc3e5e62364359ddcff2fa8b3f9ad7e44
describe
'38738' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOM' 'sip-files00275.pro'
63f6a81f96396a1da2ab0cc294a84816
31210ee38a00a4895be0c731c5ebb3aabce2da02
describe
'38584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALON' 'sip-files00276.pro'
35ebb483f5b57d46fee1b319cc8d8f3a
77e94fe3290f4ca4547a0f8d80e0d7923e0f00aa
describe
'44742' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOO' 'sip-files00277.pro'
18e58e2d88948ab0fd15fdd7bf9e6ce4
52780c79aed35b4d2740e2a76ca2608a21a7d4be
describe
'43325' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOP' 'sip-files00278.pro'
aa88d2cd43b1b79d0cca3291bd4b37b6
5fdd707acc3fae6a68f1da0cfb6771e2cebe0efd
describe
'39515' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00279.pro'
f7fea59e3a8f5d250ce70fb39a0623d3
66bb13f9fc3d6f79a302a26a4ab61f7481165400
describe
'39470' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOR' 'sip-files00280.pro'
28fb0dc096d4563482e5f94867a2fa09
8ce511ea7d08a4d578c4bd829cbd1de4ec1c6b62
describe
'12046' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOS' 'sip-files00281.pro'
12b752271a00a06dd0b73f533892e574
4b38e17e98e830344a03b09c54b9c1215f63ef47
describe
'37333' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOT' 'sip-files00282.pro'
c6479bdfc77de2d1663985ca8fb1457d
6e5b89d767b7f5d2e48c61f704fdae4086a96960
describe
'39827' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOU' 'sip-files00283.pro'
1ab98e780fd8f9b772fb08026495a4d5
5a5d745f964684ed95abcd0025c010e0f1d68989
describe
'51725' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOV' 'sip-files00284.pro'
e47e4db741bc53918852666ab61cd776
0710e0c25edbd3ef81c2c2e329b37573e26678a4
describe
'47951' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOW' 'sip-files00285.pro'
fe33a7dea26f737596555eb9aab8c15f
ff3b2681399a51e22210b5432307d4e525ac85e9
describe
'48405' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOX' 'sip-files00286.pro'
8b4557273432312624b9d0b6f5016281
4e756335bf53181dd9137b5e3c1588465695f07f
'2011-11-15T02:11:53-05:00'
describe
'47205' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOY' 'sip-files00287.pro'
cce77fcbd6dc17086fa354b3749c5637
7dbb917006522186eb3980579667716b5ecd3a4a
'2011-11-15T02:10:36-05:00'
describe
'215155' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00000.jp2'
f25a6cf6efef760a8e59d5d03d73ad64
089f5ebc00e4f9bb8dad59eb13d8289b068acd4c
describe
'1151232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPA' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
1d63639ff89247ec2c2a25831add85c1
b0df6c1ebc820d20fbce9bff06279a5ff0f61ae1
'2011-11-15T02:09:02-05:00'
describe
'935731' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPB' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
893dc400964f8b1e4a33962f038414f9
9297338162fac66f754e2f7667222fb974a18005
describe
'2092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPC' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
9a002971867c00fd9ad64388535899ad
10b7609a188111f0eb5d50b4b78f71e34c0cb8e2
describe
'52386' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPD' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
1e2fa6b325bf2cf0cc49fd85f4662b17
292831deba7bb804c51a10997a124dc3b2772e5c
'2011-11-15T02:13:48-05:00'
describe
'69539' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPE' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
f46d2af75dc8107d566f716c6c1b7626
13e57f008ca7beed786856d5172a09b2c2a63dd1
describe
'68676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPF' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
870bc3311790421a266f497ba9476730
81099c02ae5f4728d313210ed6f1fe7ef9d3e41d
describe
'27466' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPG' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
46a76963ad0c8edcaf8b973f091d992c
d3c8e4a61498e72ae3a4493f1afbc23e370bde82
'2011-11-15T02:10:39-05:00'
describe
'57481' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPH' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
20b48ebe19e3655b7bf6eb9f977b5abd
6a5d4848a8917d96d74b9eede31f2558c4e7e93b
describe
'66330' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPI' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
b7c68a5a2ba3964f96017fe56f8d5095
ce3d9b33cf030600b640035c50310608b2b2811c
describe
'69173' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
403c54de7a96db2f98e0abf32ebc3d50
7a04c1bad3eb3702ae5605af17fb52f1c3fbf2f4
describe
'68562' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
abe5d68b743a5f45595b2e4684af7d56
ed95c9f6851877377f63a28ce9bfa1305c36907a
describe
'69550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPL' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
fab539a9c7e28c8b0841fb2f987cfa36
74b6dccf254ee2f7ea0d97547a88e5c0ba994d3f
describe
'68354' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPM' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
977250fd55dad1090b2a055bcfc86284
3047bd0fa84c2e5bc424a02946dc93bc234f7fc1
describe
'70079' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPN' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ba1dfef9ae3ddff7b6d6ed895b547734
a7cc8dd69201c9452a2d2eb27360be3bf7842d34
describe
'70086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPO' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
72c92954ca036c2e9871b6464618a68e
0e7918a33c45705e69332fc8bef837ba74f01d2d
describe
'69016' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPP' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2e062265a9f3dd63e692c33f8d063b4c
31eebc0c8b2ee1d5897c45748d1ca049ce073aad
'2011-11-15T02:14:50-05:00'
describe
'68980' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
7a451cb0b57a1a47e0f5c39433804502
1a556013f57053de0394a0a1564a79a601dadbaa
'2011-11-15T02:12:33-05:00'
describe
'66875' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
1067fa7c518de472564779f08a0a4103
3d4a9a7512cb737ece41a1d1123d4cf21d159029
describe
'60849' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPS' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
474ef8a8682da615d9df503c1c882e0c
bb59bd26fd23842d4b3bfb7c835fb3e8de91b767
'2011-11-15T02:14:28-05:00'
describe
'69232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPT' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
580e8e42647943b45ad6497e083fa711
724c1cf90b8d7f0051b9eae4c99f5ce1af3bd54c
'2011-11-15T02:08:40-05:00'
describe
'68181' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
98e7d815fa95f1c7c78bf622062305a3
869f92e2e7c21f13bad51a5d5ef3fd4e0428d5c4
'2011-11-15T02:13:49-05:00'
describe
'70349' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPV' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
4b0f0429a1b2ce898caef8be639e3036
25f1c18032e876eec8b6946f963b157b02d3db85
describe
'70319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
2e1449d0a8550f4950c9d7a14a10b0c7
b0f5f547e74b281357bb6a5e54c88fcbca07327b
describe
'70658' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPX' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
e1b839e0c2443a347da2814eca228c21
99dea6e8b1dc773414006c07412d2a313ef8aacd
describe
'70125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPY' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a63ec58bd51dcb3943f0cfe9d02fbefe
8e971079a42408241aad06fbbd6a076e5283caa2
'2011-11-15T02:09:22-05:00'
describe
'67520' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d5af431beb95281d2a65d2715475426a
bb572fda40e90de1befd5a2cbf8d150db75c858f
'2011-11-15T02:16:20-05:00'
describe
'69696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQA' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
87a5255151873865fb1525d8be87f19c
16ae603a5038be5a1df3a3fbd57a3f316771c86c
describe
'67654' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQB' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
cd8b73d9e40b838c0b22b1a4b8014408
001a40d8b03f13a6c7a482291f06c30e8d1b0c61
describe
'68950' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQC' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
6a00b0b716e6ecb3b01da15176b4b121
bd23c62e118882fa035d6cf242a73733f78f4ec4
describe
'68490' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQD' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
48b5c3ed7e2644e9c213850ede4d0636
056bc5b8d286eaa9137ad7ba438406b2a798a21c
describe
'67123' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7b1f96595d4de29801f5cc518eb5a9fa
a60d33c62f81c1b55f5d797b914c82a31cac4660
'2011-11-15T02:08:58-05:00'
describe
'69760' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQF' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
94f6ce0dfc9fa148bf8150cd18cd2289
40b5ba93b80fde12e2fbc1127ae98bb6b3b56192
'2011-11-15T02:15:42-05:00'
describe
'69612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQG' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
5f65ee863b3ec68339ba26690a8531e1
59275519955a3d2680951bbfd5b66d60409d08f6
describe
'70606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
088655bc9f69552bb3f201a25f764068
ad6f6a525735a23743c77a8eab29e1d505a7500e
'2011-11-15T02:13:15-05:00'
describe
'69359' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
fd727c14fae8b83efc1b82d7fbb34132
e515d89a9151976f35a40b4c0c79b15d2b0d9d92
describe
'70095' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ee93f2c00f814caaed381c5ca7e4af73
91282990c03bfe977f9dbb7ddf264876e295c21d
'2011-11-15T02:12:39-05:00'
describe
'69523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQK' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
9f8ecfd8fd4b56f341ac6b56aeee375e
b9522613705b698dca8188bf628a17db10b460b1
describe
'69140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQL' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
d835059f57b910d4dcf8f2023c6cc482
af6457a31e1de733f448fa7920f677b9dae613eb
'2011-11-15T02:10:15-05:00'
describe
'68888' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQM' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
3e5b9220617b233e5c1046b6ca66bb3c
66c2d4738129c28822e411070d6e5cfaa159fb99
'2011-11-15T02:16:23-05:00'
describe
'70463' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQN' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
631962d7e8e8bd37ca5b857ce54098f6
7e75d4750ef6844b09fa74567c864f72ff212bc7
'2011-11-15T02:15:05-05:00'
describe
'69676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQO' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
5e9e9872dd66fc478fcba1fde81789da
fe07d264424eea14d4c3b767f04d998360d0394c
describe
'69329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQP' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
49211313173b442caf09e6e7eedefc12
0c823c249695f6c57a47bbaa249c40dbbdf9f53f
'2011-11-15T02:15:31-05:00'
describe
'67719' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
8de0a5f3375d8cffa1ead883d613370f
950dc9cde9a7d2f392c8220dfee25b9923e8bbc8
describe
'70989' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
179170d9e40205645b647a46027ab079
63351c22597141c12d334f50c97ef760f691fcf4
describe
'70602' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQS' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
157c5091a33da4a0597a034c52e9de78
2db1c6f01e3d63c26e8ab6bf444add181c15d9e6
describe
'70206' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQT' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c97512635db7b19e4f9fd74c40de3a70
9d56cce7e2739eb993dc91fe1e59c03a1312ee4e
describe
'71144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
dbdf893ae24ea9344d8e21fc0ec1e459
31a801691b736428cd91fb3ec8e00232fd33945b
'2011-11-15T02:14:06-05:00'
describe
'70344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQV' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f098e55c7e8b81425afdf21274d2b9f0
ce49c97b3dbb70d2441f4038392d7e9ea3341134
describe
'71282' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQW' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
fdd82eb20d3b1fa20c09d61bba7b3844
1107600c79e733477484c1bd1717ff71626ac9d1
'2011-11-15T02:08:59-05:00'
describe
'69874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQX' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
aa94dad96b3d20d088f7f7096db5ea5a
ee07c045d7675c3b371e8bd8575ca9c8a164dcbc
describe
'68476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQY' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
759a065e6ad9ba64b01690451eba5d51
280986e20ebb171ace29252e19b59d873c167c87
describe
'68765' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
241b4a479f2eb30f95c8aa94df4e1a49
c5bccffb9d67acc290ca21923db4ccc98c72e2ee
describe
'69381' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRA' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
633b875b88c9ec7b387e7caafdcb15a5
353a9fd59092e40f250c37c0110c54c76a98d67b
describe
'69632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRB' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1439128a4b1d349d03b04d6f88a01943
e31c963bc05da76943a4608fe66730660ded0e2a
describe
'69833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRC' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
a2f3ebd259a8c2aa264d1a7bb1e14c42
3a7196fccea5ba79589bcf23f2f762442e0d6cee
describe
'69799' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRD' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
dc07b1b8f3fb88197f1ce95ac3d5ac12
7a65d4f57cd6e06969c1928bd82b5d58365c76c0
describe
'70359' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c5ac4de06208873f19324b5877f1f811
f6233d04ddda2dc2196d63f926b218adb07cb304
describe
'70800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRF' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
7589d65d0e91052e7b0483835c16efe7
8f0e6ca118ca3e569ae6bef68ab9dea85f915acd
'2011-11-15T02:09:14-05:00'
describe
'68380' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRG' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
56f5690583b9e236a74f083a51279640
bd0bbc7aa904518888e385de76c5cbbc3afa0aa6
'2011-11-15T02:09:28-05:00'
describe
'67930' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
61a4d39d7854a6c4d59b924186c1b0a1
35525d840c4bbd16b02bef84eefd9b38e01f151c
describe
'67561' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRI' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ff975f566412f2303bc61af15891cfb6
25d1083572307e4c23496003ec0ed1e05fd268a8
describe
'70190' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1135b9e9ec32a937c5472449fa10e066
9524b601700ae5467784db7541698df9b751e099
describe
'56711' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
2bdeb35f05f7aef8d239a841f4081110
4ac7536ab62c668b982b906b6ee4d6ae18c0cc5e
describe
'69514' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRL' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
4e1ceed2218099f8a69ef97b8b8741f7
01dd727e709abc6709128ff7ab330b5d2477ff68
describe
'69628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRM' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
849b862d826129e33255d5eb2a3d07f7
eca921347b5e267a53221aa9734f24a9f59aa466
describe
'70169' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRN' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
dd60c9daaccf1fcd5869264f9e59e8e2
d8a8c214df996260ec2abab2654967f36f585b37
describe
'67985' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRO' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
0e2b98913c1fc97c3dc526e8b908e82c
53675c4fcef0948c11129b16821d6f68c6eeff61
describe
'69582' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRP' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
5c7e76b5e21f299e4ef678e7e07b9fdb
ceaaef15166062277d31ee9405f43c8a9d71d0c7
'2011-11-15T02:16:00-05:00'
describe
'69633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d07018ca3e82b915ec9880e42f6d4b55
57703cc0d78d3df6dbea779acd7edcdd7daa3dfd
describe
'68835' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
f493f81d8b68445f2d514efed4f77378
5ef58c8365a28b338af5ff273ce78e5a6c87c16e
describe
'67771' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRS' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5cc65acc67d0ad3666d04740a8e0e1e8
54d453ef364e71e52e9eb3f87efc2bc7a91d6f28
'2011-11-15T02:15:55-05:00'
describe
'68089' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRT' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
6fcb4f8ba55de9aa9c0c76626afd6bcd
1f23e78b7c89a30769f6676c78760f2f6d2195c0
'2011-11-15T02:10:28-05:00'
describe
'67662' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2703996e1a9b585dcf16b113b7010a56
fb4586c9d7bf80cf21b2af48d9a874dd62bfe0d7
describe
'70039' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRV' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
d5a05621ea5fb462740d45ba55f06a4c
aaa0f01ac96470ae3d4ff24674a7bd0d216c2ec2
describe
'69119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
085970f19d43fd664fa25f240ef5c6ba
abc66e3c8f2d54e784daba8626d1995302eda8cd
describe
'67894' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRX' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
18c54c855bfa0c6002aafc1c0917aad4
3eb0a0d14458801fad4a7771aa6bffbf1f71f96f
describe
'70492' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRY' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
d24cb9fc5e12487f9e2cda8959003bfb
bafddff1766c1ab5cdb34c224490c50b597b9a04
'2011-11-15T02:13:36-05:00'
describe
'59416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
2f1a3aa18189f57a1f6fd6c52259c3bc
03f8d1eb85cf25dcef31361d8aace3787888097a
describe
'70023' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSA' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
cd72cfab3021145bccce1eb98d92977b
51c1d7e85bb4c213d6b32192f095a12d558190b3
describe
'69442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSB' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
762d57b5f1c724078ed3eb894e6b4a0b
77f7b4e8606e166bfb2248bd5f17cf11514fd73a
describe
'69686' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSC' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
7f8aeb41a322ddf0edd8789916abf73d
1311d41f48c55e31617721044abee8404b6a239a
describe
'70384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSD' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
6ff8866ab0deda8dbf293d929ec53582
b00fe7fb86f4229434f06934357f964ec312394c
describe
'69505' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
d1419e74243cb7c93c0db7aa29f0a48a
c517b1ed94fe4141ed8dce4247be0df500b0d07b
describe
'70783' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSF' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
e4b65d0f032bfbefe35c39c394ae24a1
13aa4e18efbe60f5e636b5ed57ca3cb75a1bcf9f
describe
'66858' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSG' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
536c92de67dc5cd31468d8f53d41a1e5
4cf9de481a0bdb3d68a1a3d3166833cb126adc06
describe
'69111' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
e4e94bb6d3c52c3acc3a67f9a6ba0a8d
c46b4f9847bcc189338bc8b60535a652820f30d6
'2011-11-15T02:13:13-05:00'
describe
'67105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSI' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9f09d3b83859361f70bd6ef9372fbb95
29c6e41b2f22a67f60644d3064ec553954342d22
'2011-11-15T02:12:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
68a9d63f452f89ac45e2ace9af0e3881
b520d54b5beb53acfa937e0c6f9a5517e77361cd
describe
'69552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
33cb8a738cf81aea159a80704c399a6f
d177c45218f6e8368147afaf94141cee87e60e71
'2011-11-15T02:14:47-05:00'
describe
'68492' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSL' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
47525eed72c7161f103022efebb7d2a1
a7c5bdad3223524c662081ca2eb442b4b069d81d
'2011-11-15T02:12:54-05:00'
describe
'68903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSM' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
5188905e5411ea9d4a1e3c3158c5747b
204f43b78cf73de364c2226b20c689859f3b8e31
'2011-11-15T02:09:33-05:00'
describe
'67069' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSN' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
3e553860e86904fa19c72efe61327a3f
363de2cc76dccffc50736e3bc7d5481a3a0f60a1
'2011-11-15T02:10:45-05:00'
describe
'67977' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSO' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
cf51c74769231b25538cd5abf2a70b00
f42a846a128d81f24285bfe532b814ec9cd5ce5a
describe
'70414' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSP' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
21525c964bef9ad39e910be9c029308b
caa11fdd39e02e25a7b677d22c668a41a4f82241
'2011-11-15T02:10:06-05:00'
describe
'69538' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ed748d29d0af7e143a050bcfbb90e8e1
c6136f59cf3334ca998555950a1e79008aaae3e8
describe
'68943' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5e024f243ed9ebe3be842bd81e9b63bd
ee4a58dbd5ac2c8b03a22ff3b0e3adb311538983
describe
'60251' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSS' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
bc55881f94a58e1053ef44e26364c0a5
c9176363aec3ebbdf55d4beeb3de63cd3392c85e
describe
'71987' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALST' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a8da7c6c10adaef5c203301e0a5ee226
7894abec15ccbbec05957a693282f300149d3aaf
'2011-11-15T02:15:28-05:00'
describe
'70859' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
87d0746c2b7e387e72bd6cddd1aa2063
07d3c1231a8443f3dc188e5a6918e0aa78b79864
describe
'70911' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSV' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
481bb9c1fd9dbaa9c218a32554767fa9
42c8b96e901c4ed5c96b8a16ff71be1c803983cd
describe
'68067' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ea00854a5eb6dfd0860a2e3cd8f3cfce
eee39493b2c75c99d9585e22c6c021eab332d16d
'2011-11-15T02:11:32-05:00'
describe
'69805' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSX' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
0e2112ba08a8f2455597524001ace291
8dbf77484c1590c389d7203a0d0f5360f0386385
describe
'70277' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSY' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
27cb1518331870d4246179af2baf1a5f
c506a343ed1b8c803317dc8f84f073c3fb46b5df
'2011-11-15T02:16:11-05:00'
describe
'915423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
74564fc914a01f5aad05e864b67cba4d
c053583b8ceff77d1aaf9a4047aa7072d07f26db
describe
'1510' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTA' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
822e91f0dafe0580718933a6e64690d0
ede0db8241bfe39e68cea8fe21ce39bdcfb6dff5
'2011-11-15T02:11:07-05:00'
describe
'70529' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTB' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
67840987b134c0b86d74c9e57ab7fd62
d81fe9fa55dd0ee450a18c3fcd9b4d1f8786e156
describe
'70320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTC' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
b672104a72f53f41269e3080a49ef08b
2b8b356f2038c46a861d1f39294cc79ac3453e93
describe
'69555' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTD' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
d5ad5796a146072b2b0db28d75725976
9edddcd4d4beccf5859101121960aaa42c1396f2
describe
'69167' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTE' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
38360be3d476da7c974437684b20515f
4225bce940a548ec492f1c0f775b06a5b74139b3
describe
'70690' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTF' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0a1de78ba317476885ad3112974ee5a6
c2b67d57819d5f1835b70b451b1a2c0b521318a2
describe
'70546' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTG' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
12950d065a6df76207f0ee8ad8c04d39
24497a1b1bf7093d1127eb37340c53a23ced862d
describe
'70182' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
dbf92350b4a60f6291b07ccf5decc1ee
4b8e9b57e66c30982aaa5b2bd554fcd6c1b8bfb5
describe
'68300' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTI' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
62e7d756566aec7f24d378348a65986c
603056599a5585b152eebddfb7f9ab28a873525a
describe
'70416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
79d4accb721500997a8956c82757f40a
aab7b50555239aaa18fcb3fd054ae5f24706fd08
describe
'69991' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTK' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
2f9bba94d1136e8a783ddb032fda034e
5dd0ac08814390e1b3223ca30912b14f404c32db
'2011-11-15T02:11:31-05:00'
describe
'69946' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTL' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
bd7a0fb1a3899eaeadfc6e7607856f31
8cfad81080a2a5ceea73d34ec3c78c550f9895ce
'2011-11-15T02:10:24-05:00'
describe
'68992' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTM' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a299c336f9384c064a9821f677a65062
2486a3a7146543a7e2d2756d44b801b79ccec09e
describe
'694537' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
088e4da2e85ad14dc7edbed4306a80c6
436cd219bc5d4d4182959ee9dd24fa99228c62d3
describe
'1978' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTO' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
9ef3f8328084d93dcc919a31fc396fb7
1fc213f26c96604adad4794b32c361d0c272f4c7
describe
'69285' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTP' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
39a64922bcae413624fb223750185735
498118760f842b68af2affb5f34d8ffcbe826d6a
describe
'71509' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
450b90f5b9dfd55df8a5ee45422fc654
a7df5bd48ca81bd3e774723889e8891a5c53c226
describe
'69690' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTR' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
5ae554f980545f0fb4a6edf36830a659
bb5777f2ad67f00ea6e001883850edfbb761c25d
describe
'70774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTS' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
b16560fe90527c7c84718c5d3ba5f354
b433aabcc12c21d3dfdaf252490a582b83c4415c
describe
'67706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTT' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
7f213a6af59f9a28770e0afe0e6b7aa5
94a8265a4585be58d58d4463dfc4d5d441c04ed0
describe
'65637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
40603d20c7e1205cfe961c1e5b4884f3
69cefa6958daff57d27dc9df6843f389a5dd5dc3
describe
'65503' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTV' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
6f2f51d72f8adc2c7e6d76b4e33c3e0f
b97aeefcc3ab0e5cf2064992cd783125073847f2
describe
'69759' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f170cbf3077462c9bb1233505cae4e89
47502965f718286e2795f916c812d08e82922176
describe
'70445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTX' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
853bc31afd46d09cb16cc5a70220b305
828413e0ed2c99643d2b7b66e2a7d8fbf8707151
'2011-11-15T02:16:07-05:00'
describe
'68403' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTY' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
74ee5b0a575280a801e615dcc9db1fe5
e121bdc8a67ef3e7a0d05d88ce0ffc0a9e94903a
describe
'69166' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
f557a20aaa5a00de5b85da1dfb740246
1baedfd35d3a712a93a4f10b25d47a7533f945fc
'2011-11-15T02:12:56-05:00'
describe
'67621' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUA' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
7b1ccab841d082a667304dbc831c53c1
ca76ce32eb0cc39218b7d9971e9e7aaac8c34b99
describe
'69169' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUB' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
c436982cce08f7f39c03d54a17aa5bd6
b24f3a1422987325815dc2889c0453f12d6a6a6c
describe
'68074' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUC' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
94a503af0373bcb96420ae1e16d246f7
fea6f86e4b191b396eceba2d6171ee31ae4d711a
'2011-11-15T02:16:45-05:00'
describe
'68175' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUD' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8a404b1ed58eabc320f1f3059be742a0
672b28c626d48d2e9672847a53ac9a1f091d25c6
describe
'69942' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUE' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
675161d510a2210d14f96d78e1a5bbd3
4f84031ef9ec9342acff3ae3a2dcb814a5764d14
describe
'70792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUF' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
f529cca738ba54dd7e2d79f2416bca1b
bbe7fe864b7291fea2bdbbe035cfa44c56b61ba1
'2011-11-15T02:09:15-05:00'
describe
'69981' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUG' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
d672608f2646403a797b76bdb246c21b
b867dec6b92eccaf7e4376eb6f76a56d131bc1a3
describe
'70391' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUH' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
c4304044be465d044d313fdcfed3abc1
4d93fd53cee81f28d317ae9d947a4a09a9822d6a
describe
'60463' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUI' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
e6250f9d7271c6475095f931fd4f8d36
397d75f90176517f80bd2f416db6c40e2ae089eb
describe
'68261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
a9d1265008eeeb3c253f43e65363b72e
5528e00eeffd92cb6fa14239476328f6b9f1fdc1
describe
'69420' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUK' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
34028b231ecba50b2410f3bb3716d7d8
8553c71bfc43b5c33f0f2fbf8feaea36ca44c78d
'2011-11-15T02:14:52-05:00'
describe
'66986' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
950c94d896e9946d06365f828a82d4a6
bf6cb829a0cd1089697b8a79e4e68c4860fe7b35
describe
'71768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUM' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
c97e31d977761cc341ef168ce9817f16
2f3fc95e873246e99ec911750067365e2f7c1e2e
describe
'70099' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7a21f7c5bf1f1a4ff5cdc19cf7a4c826
30da32f90e9938fdba4b3a864b1edae68d6e6c24
describe
'69574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6b787a4356a735abe45b22c7a1051669
2d04a3389ad80b7e5fe7b61fc9b4f3c67e717419
describe
'60369' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUP' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
198f7e4eac9153b51fc11d0a00116cf0
2efdbe1d1cd11dd449eeccf78b4086198603a1f0
'2011-11-15T02:15:39-05:00'
describe
'69884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
db005a8e8c1a21184519f0b17889d524
4e8c63b349bc9f97ca9948d5d262dccd4c0f63bb
'2011-11-15T02:13:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUR' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
eea10b157fa0eafe348cca1d37aa0a9d
f05dacf1e688e60a7e6112ca6a90d6114338497a
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUS' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
961352f0a25f2188cc00923f3ff046ed
2fc15e8bffeb4ab25c770442e5485b457d1f8378
'2011-11-15T02:09:23-05:00'
describe
'69075' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUT' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
423ae10596c2086fcc1b5b733c5e2ec7
3ece1cc8dfe7aaa9becc614c68d6ad154b505d95
'2011-11-15T02:12:15-05:00'
describe
'68486' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUU' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
0db85b11be0734b28a2120d7901244d2
6a52833442d6835c5c80b806a488896122812d2f
describe
'68748' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUV' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a35e5692d689372545b40f3955b57d40
a9b84945e457424bd2b516218b645144ca637158
describe
'67219' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
c509e46dbea1c56f25009ac0fe91b1c7
ccd1a7ec118a35bd9f3f364853d321f3ecc6e67b
describe
'66416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUX' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9544a359e59a3519b43e979cb56671de
36260ed4cc5f122544b4764803cefb4072ce05a8
describe
'67099' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUY' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
46d4a0acfef8802aa904d61099c44100
24a2b754699f2501933d44b5613b6f7cd83ea06a
describe
'66833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
ef31c186074e800cd035007e13fa6779
f6f55b38aab251b8202030b59b14da283ea0fbe7
describe
'57660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVA' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
513fbbe92ffd60b935ccee18aa012374
de61eb6aabd4e4219c71a03b4a56b2d7cf88fc48
describe
'67125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVB' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
1aa80a156f0166126774d5d9152ad5ea
48a4ba877f5f5df971eb61db9bb5f972d88752eb
describe
'67457' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVC' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
41f426eedb02c72ddd9812df507d5b3d
1b111227aa68e7be1667850a229a06735f2bcd87
describe
'70162' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVD' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
fbbb4892a4acccb2bd99f58a68d4294f
e84bd8b43f4e2f164a69f8262ff72349ec0cd349
describe
'70246' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
aebce01dc0be7f25801f2691562f0b48
5006688c9b37bb8d740ea668b01a750bd614aaeb
describe
'71115' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVF' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
d20ef1a6b5e450837d994023db99463d
b418ba7226e628b7e6487a44e1affc25ddad94bb
describe
'69730' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVG' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
ecb4150d837f2815011c4f5082dfc57e
3d44dc66ef227f5f099fe7a8e6d76135aa20fd4f
describe
'69957' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVH' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
217e3e69ce6992d3b9a37d9c520fc541
58dbd3a452060bdfbdb42314bf4e4ff27f7aac82
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVI' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
08c348023a4770ae19522a0295e2a963
362132c2ed3834db472370fac818174762b15941
describe
'72204' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b0748fd4b0fb748bff30d10594e9c66a
aacd50acdeecbd9da68b07064e2f56c2a0b48874
'2011-11-15T02:17:01-05:00'
describe
'71545' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVK' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
b83ee248193fc71bfaef60c15ba5bfc5
672a5b2339f9813b2518abf88e2b23b7303d86c5
describe
'70347' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVL' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
2a0a6ef03cfc320d9d333ba9c2455926
9fe28493afbc4936a35b29bff9442840bf62f630
describe
'68902' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVM' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
0b27494c7c5f1266a9d5b0feb0918e68
b129d566970b223a983337979eeddae8357c9d69
describe
'68727' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVN' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
00a2d083d103d3e6d654598c5fcdfaae
0c60a05553d1c7fe2c54642d3cc48d3942ddb6fe
'2011-11-15T02:08:39-05:00'
describe
'70795' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVO' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4d744371165b307eba3d9fc2c7e9b4aa
81d1ca09b604c6a84ca2957eaf10cfc6c37bdc28
describe
'69645' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVP' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
9cfb80f01aac9413513aad77ef34ca9c
206a9afb47bf57fcd655de35ee25a55ea8d136a9
describe
'918479' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
59661d6f0c2a438b3748123d9fa1778f
ef55a9781d046ad502d8e91ffbce45690cac36c3
'2011-11-15T02:13:43-05:00'
describe
'69353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVR' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
0f0718cf97c4c53c860ffa763ae4004d
628699bad254accf1f137df5d97d05f2d3d1d3a9
describe
'70148' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVS' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
f16fa89f66e0c0d496d1831824a5d8ab
9a0f8cc7a8edafea25d6580ad0d307e3bf3bfe3d
describe
'69135' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVT' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
950cb82f48a3a8b06d69eb46b9f40825
ead4b3a3c7cd79965f4a1a3f1d84b84fe8340af0
'2011-11-15T02:12:21-05:00'
describe
'68616' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVU' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
fd9e40fc779c34db4ad6de5775bc5adb
37a1fe03f0d7f976c156a0476d4066c6594f02d9
describe
'69887' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVV' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
051c296ad515355861f2c5c2280b4572
aef86f5b03a45b62da8886a3c26299f7b1ce035d
describe
'68779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVW' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
fc75377ede828ed51e6bdac70b957591
ea4c2c5a1e4ef881adb3b952cee2e1aafbbf49b4
describe
'62859' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVX' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
da68c6438587b51c2cbc61f97d1dbc67
c919e66bbeeec98d169d6926703b33f584ebc72f
describe
'64892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVY' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
8df7f99a1ae84e2bf4ca98bb7105b623
13aacee83677e125a265a43800a86e7d8566b4c2
describe
'70425' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
ea87d8384a2358cadcdeeec2f9c151ca
d7d697b0fd1b5b4d710dac68c3e57670445c08a6
describe
'72378' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWA' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
47b4e993ac1748a10f2aee0d8d305753
59e2e6e90b4dd400c075233d95090632944bfc24
describe
'69307' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWB' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
dc347c2f86f0bcbe5c70736de23939c2
31979814e63b3a63ecb25edd27b35550fee1a31d
describe
'70260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWC' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
d875d3644189130800b0a2170d78cdfe
54e43eb6404ec104e716bea47c2158e68f69bb96
describe
'68892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWD' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
f85209507ff176b492aab6a65841d087
9658c061214bfbfa6b51deb29df98c2ab1dd3f3a
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWE' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
8a60c21bd00a64f85918060167dfb568
9181a47f08c6c9b2d2bc9c8c418c71fb47ec3959
describe
'69371' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWF' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
16feea4c8f1a2faede334806f51282a5
62e936e569dc7008b9b36d2b8890f00c24bb17a0
describe
'69278' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWG' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
c6e593887de26505a55cda7362d81ac7
852fbee97eb492394617e27c2e8c7ba2295c3b83
'2011-11-15T02:16:31-05:00'
describe
'68636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWH' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
076a4d6df114f6fd05f4b87376536961
e4ffddf08294e96b501ce0b8e09c9bed87623dfe
describe
'71165' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWI' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
cc506338f871415ce23ff37486692b32
82122200ce6dc22347a0176f0b2ab702239eb336
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
e59a2ba52aa637e57a6d9615d503e3d4
3bd7e6862a9ae69fe07691a04eba56786c4a743c
describe
'70305' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWK' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
af3454298ff9761498b14e0f19f48fde
acc51b0d4086e43bae3c41e11a07e0fdd89c7793
describe
'68376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWL' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
d5c6f5166e4a284090348e14de803eff
c391b8fac28a01998e111fa3c2719dd7832bcda2
describe
'67569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWM' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
e4b585a11eb9aac8d584023caaea9b14
89b05185ca9b89fd756758450489741aae969834
'2011-11-15T02:12:50-05:00'
describe
'69251' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWN' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
67fdcfdebabb39f530eed10645bf7383
9cbdc1afd50ff258de9ca012334742ef9489e231
describe
'65451' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWO' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
c50d45084a58707aee280c9cd1a188ca
79f15146d38c120887ec229693e4b65f67a67970
describe
'68204' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWP' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
fee89332c5ef5601d210e198b27cb914
5eea6a3fc1e31ef699906c565fc22438c736a3d3
describe
'67633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
46c0e40715d5143f563ab568f8767c35
7ab2af200a04b925b3e2084f855332fe29f4aee2
describe
'68174' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWR' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
de9102b8583b87bef9986ea8f22c69a2
2ab63ebce47440bc16345af5c33811030132b3fd
describe
'70767' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWS' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
523f3cb608eb830472940e2a0fd8dddb
45c24ab475d1af1ba2831e64750b006fc54364ea
describe
'68909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWT' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
3052b3102d3932a8b3c3c04def24c724
3eeb35fadf52db316c0ade6eece28f1974fc70f7
describe
'70569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWU' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
5e5de13ab76361e56a42b61599d3b592
3854d3cc3387fc519811a783b5bd62f6fca5ae59
describe
'67680' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWV' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
2d79f169df56b402d1031d32a2e86f79
c68d05e38efc62c6fb7c45d34cc1763c272d9aec
describe
'58396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
d9547fb13fd8f160aa3ffc32528d2f43
9abb76095e8447019315635ee67f4f32ae4d946b
'2011-11-15T02:12:14-05:00'
describe
'67595' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWX' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
e291b3ac73672fdad55b7f498082e3e8
20018b3d023c5584368dfe3cdffd30d69246875a
'2011-11-15T02:11:44-05:00'
describe
'68833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWY' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
4d0962eeef3520b9dc9d7c374313952b
aef8581c2a34152ff69dfba505425c61f9153b1a
describe
'70103' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
76526149022084ba81721ea48dcb10ef
bb3d1b50d456c93715e2ac539fc45473581c9305
describe
'69242' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXA' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d052a5bb87efd98e4f8f038cde0f181f
228ea0d8aae63c369cae2aabd531a2516e56d978
describe
'70502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXB' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
85737ed7fc054c46f8193d8ac38c51d1
1b7ae8a58c07388271998e5a374cd84771dcf5de
describe
'68963' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXC' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
3f3186011abac2d296022af0b9a70241
50bb98798a8acb356899dbc75f29a9817eb84714
describe
'68700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXD' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
6570ce265cb2bb02fd53f1173856a1c5
6eb6df67f377f9abf264f2620b844ca32c912d47
describe
'69496' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXE' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
2849ae54001fbdfb2d8fa888bf0c6ea4
d64c4922b92c831ac4a4f1f38fda4a05e59c40eb
'2011-11-15T02:08:38-05:00'
describe
'69194' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXF' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
e432a31c2ac2af7bdb40d78d46f1c34a
9822c4320e60726d4c5576060527f7a5c4c92379
describe
'67784' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXG' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
b98fb836bcac958a974617d1843dc1cd
b23b944b8ced0d93826eb921123db9f924a41a70
describe
'67770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXH' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
7f783ea540f2abf7c9501928f781dcd5
b8304212f8032d0f95e88dad70c87b0c267e2e3c
describe
'70044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXI' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
366b43ec3cc2a93f3b54ba4496c1546f
7ef2d95dd99de8bf84513190c538c65d1b8cde22
'2011-11-15T02:11:39-05:00'
describe
'69873' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
e97566946dca60896522c8b357edc152
c7c1df04c6f650f20014bd0abfa6cb1be21cb5b7
describe
'68762' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXK' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
32c3153a65c0bdbd22e3f08a02be5954
aa05026029b0a84788637d83b07aed21ddc7f976
describe
'69261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXL' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
28ff137ba90fe919904b5600effaaa22
724122655f249b0158c995649869315f503956d5
describe
'60276' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXM' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
566ea5e20536f7ddb3cf8ad0d14373a6
4be98442f9fda8cd17ecb53c04cbc2f2ecf771e6
describe
'70653' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXN' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
fb8c7fb1089028cb01d234bd6a4ae52b
3e1bba20c16218ba73f964ec0e8503e1d0053a64
describe
'69392' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXO' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
3fb2050f5f01bfd7a88e63aedfdf662b
a76539e2f99aa436390c2b05f77db260c3a643e8
describe
'67175' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXP' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
5750a8b8a5d6175364f69d73b1b01d32
cfb6f37b603686570eece68c212657abba626b3d
describe
'71476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
bfbb2f7b40baaa8b0a5b0456dcb05fe4
ca5b6b3c5e142da210ab39db2bc570b4c4344021
describe
'66568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXR' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
6675146ba96fd2a378ff5d2ed63f823e
b839ea9e640cfa19e810c61db2cedc81604c11e7
describe
'67350' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXS' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
652fa5cb533e77ffbb445cc40136414b
011c7e8e1e831aa8c4a7c3b3828efc0f8cd6e31f
describe
'69966' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXT' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
233337e067564547cda07651a8e307ee
995decc2c554d004826ba4e9661e724f5a4437b2
describe
'69766' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXU' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
cdce5d3cbd09ad03b708b5034ce2bea1
fcc0a534bd85a5ef245cd1faa9fa787eec24098b
describe
'67804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXV' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
40c40b6c75636130d449530c4e3c06d2
693f784c7445af200e883e4b060e96839f72d26e
describe
'65840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXW' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
18f92070b1b093327b53b93db2e75470
ff21f2483525fe43003ae5a0a394e21b764afb6f
'2011-11-15T02:15:03-05:00'
describe
'69349' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXX' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
b7e7c542d2feeab2d16efbcdad870e7b
85773625904201171d4db5ccae977df84992676d
describe
'59778' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXY' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
3f307b82e91d9a5dccfaeeca22ed8553
585969d0aebeef4afd1500948a7c7e0306beecc8
describe
'70581' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
b05668cdc5e338ffc97f15ee29a0f0d4
8e32f17eaf7eb684d7fbd710b9694c750ab1f89f
describe
'68750' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYA' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
9405c87fcc3c727962ee3a8e9c35f028
f4df3f635dc133436c2095deeec348df7b9f7e3a
describe
'67700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYB' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
ecf741d10804381452e397cb869da482
9f667a3124c281a39b688d2baedd6f0c5a1ff811
describe
'67911' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYC' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
19f7e4e320d83ca60f279dd21e1bfd9e
270e1acbd4886211b12102b3dee3b1fbcec25ace
describe
'69055' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYD' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
fa0b4ce487c5b2309dbab5fad0495054
ab3b94f505f04e5a6c94bbba6d5684c36e2ceb89
describe
'67257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYE' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
05037d2436f2e962598a2d8978b2e682
c6854e8cab2cdbf0751c0034d7cb9c93bc186f5b
describe
'68075' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYF' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
f4b8aa401118002545d4e8dfb82425c9
8133125ca1258eb950b55c416993d7ed1a6f3411
'2011-11-15T02:12:57-05:00'
describe
'67638' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYG' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
fbf81e55b2ebd743f48b571200f11788
9aca0f852c882d9f2ddb8900344a7b3b026a21ef
describe
'69831' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYH' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
488a1ca0930bbe1f24d0e4c76d335eaf
9c20c1a14e98aa300efd2f39dbc0bd7a39bb3f7a
describe
'70014' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYI' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
2b5499b905088b84d86866bd4442a51d
a1bf4807794beaedb89c0e80bb841c795ba18794
describe
'71256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
7e4ae859dcf71e0dcb52cca496e95a63
d3d16df86ce74678e2fea90b2c703de97985a674
describe
'69931' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYK' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
bb4d4081813b6c212c2bbb56ba34def7
5f0f4dd699fb282f7e8bcddc28764483a6aa9f80
describe
'70065' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYL' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
137177a5b6924eb05af0e9660cee8623
de3dfa7eefeca47ceafa84d873bbba804b5608c2
describe
'67086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYM' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
e6f7206df22bf1ad62c2ef85da985066
ae91326fbf9d277abdf1219166c0b50562a5bf05
describe
'59235' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYN' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
4a67310096051025e03808fb4376f6ba
b259c6c784c177964ae7fec1104973de9566813a
describe
'71234' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYO' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
2a84d00efc0489d45c69e7cd3425f603
ae26d2c4e5c6ad6382727a59c2d505fece5edac2
describe
'70642' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYP' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
9d78d6e7b47b0dc5863be4b616c7731a
ccf5d474ddaa12824dc54af95c3f10abffc12005
describe
'70165' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
72c9abc88c9d39f66639224b19f89f89
31c77134aed9535a0530285acaf00addacc3ebd5
describe
'69614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYR' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
93ab42b1b1d5b72cba77644e711cb905
995cdb5342032233f2f3da5835c5585387d5d6ee
describe
'70665' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYS' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
024fbad161bef4a1668ac08d54cdd8e3
9f8ac4516fb70765e6ca8db6ba1393c86eba771c
describe
'70326' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYT' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
d83c63bbc7919c618864d72d146e1a53
6d81c2c46f4b1e1bae1ab559d30745df259aed3d
describe
'69530' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYU' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
a86d4ab9df01fb77b0eef6556dc8ad33
9faa0dfd4f1c7d7854aeddf21fc350dfad8ac695
'2011-11-15T02:15:59-05:00'
describe
'69506' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYV' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
1eb64ac058de3383734e46e212199ace
ce10852d28830f2434f39452142edb2ec9da2502
describe
'68126' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYW' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
c22294209ea00023feaef1031bf6e111
9ad50840c04dd74a8be952d916daf6bc4ce96386
'2011-11-15T02:14:01-05:00'
describe
'69731' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYX' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
bf005e01d9cece238f24ef09c8bf526b
c49118b1e940fe711e052bec89ef5f2997b302f5
'2011-11-15T02:16:13-05:00'
describe
'69207' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYY' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
ed6679556a1537c28d6d352f5da78da1
94e483b3619a84b16405cbffbfee5e471940de04
describe
'70409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
5f9603c6ade9b686643325359cb8dc73
6d8a273089e27da11ca63da3c738ae07a443e3c9
describe
'69340' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZA' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
06f3dc53d990c66e81410460459994e7
d768d68342a073c0b6904ed459e5375678f3adff
'2011-11-15T02:11:46-05:00'
describe
'70614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZB' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
1540a80527618b8b253fd4b71fd76cb9
f5725831ada5e0c5a17301ec3f765194463b7e2e
describe
'70234' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZC' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
3e1f4591cfcd622feb136db4dea6bb61
0bd74ef897da12734383b2c458241c443df5ee7f
describe
'71546' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZD' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
416b36e5010345dfdd755be26890a8f0
3137ceb04ebea84aedca97d5e354632b1cb40c40
describe
'70971' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZE' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
b7684a2cf18afb893c14f41b7e8b0de9
f110c2e86a46a4e7909d9e8b3d9a3520de1df61a
describe
'69414' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZF' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
b40aae7580522bc3f1f302b8a164e7a3
574f0afe809dc6a1f0fc7caf8595fe46f6f50920
describe
'70868' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZG' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
60566f0f36a015cbf668f1332d7f7ccd
796c1d2dec1e82894227634511472facde99a3ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZH' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
cf2e2d9834b32bcd4ae808530c64b864
c64d937a8a7df53f90980cb80f9575896e961692
describe
'70510' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZI' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
a7844616cf4763f12738f42c7e7b624d
0a3e9b35be788ae7d6efe1c71201171c7f8cd45f
describe
'69185' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
aa5a0663c53fcb49df441edc53a8bbe6
9d9df219849aa7c77ce1869ca19c9e868915fc5b
'2011-11-15T02:17:00-05:00'
describe
'68812' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZK' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
603f7bce084733be14b18fa2a050a434
1b35fd4deb7fe2e13b9fe5a5f4345e698074d9f1
describe
'69433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZL' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
8261a9811138a933c90a06f2aa2a1267
e9faddd6d26e60323f098c547731d9c676c9cc6d
describe
'71686' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZM' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
b2cbffad00f1a9f024585bda9069394d
b40c96a43bff5dde0c4f12d0bc78212dc27ee140
describe
'69979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZN' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
0877a55426e5bf02762bbff3710d3512
4ca895f6a1a7763bc3314a7aa02e9ebc956f8eef
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZO' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
de8681252cb6e544942a90ae946a88ba
e4699285803105150305f965998087722b5e65b3
'2011-11-15T02:09:04-05:00'
describe
'69088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZP' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
dea433a5fa0dc8a820898431e137cd38
15e6d1af946f0bc874a8a822378942bdd1a2255e
describe
'73395' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
41f0d91e0e5e8b78a741b794d000db72
ca59ebd7197112371b0883cd2c2e3a3cbe676af0
describe
'72711' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZR' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
5bf1ef82911fcfafe5a22d981ba5696c
a9b3307e1c614cecfadcabe73c61c17bcd64b0d3
describe
'70083' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZS' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
aa31eb01135b0b3f9cc1be30f450f706
918a9765f268411555f906a5c1263b294ed2fda4
describe
'69357' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZT' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
b6955f8d45a395d86da86529e04deb83
dec3824f3e843c8d1ea439709fe5efb5227d3990
'2011-11-15T02:09:38-05:00'
describe
'23352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZU' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
324ada0c8aa06baf45c0c3b92fcff9ce
b57ac60a3b0096fa531eb4d6c2f6dc577c235443
describe
'53976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZV' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
fd18b6d42275dd3e7df57d4c1bb13922
09b5ffd46988e36997c14b1317151ed768fbcc63
describe
'54959' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZW' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
d4de7f69ab45bacb797b29df1f4c9760
c19848399c99086620d0b0fbf2b27e3566124383
describe
'71892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZX' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
65400b4b0e9ceddbf0125984160da500
6b1d3053e4d01c0eea99b9eae3f6bf151f20b176
describe
'68150' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZY' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
f36c0ea439ea209e486ec15f1662e242
af8b38b4ed943ee5d027bc7178e7a9d7637f700d
'2011-11-15T02:11:59-05:00'
describe
'68429' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
ebba85080e2274d6d384140778b9dc38
a37b0eb966b9a0bdda12f3af7ed02b0dc4e2fb48
describe
'68060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
d56179067759645298fd6a01e6d5bc7d
3b5a383c0e826555e8be3424e2ff10ae392f4811
describe
'1947' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
ed88f86e94a4c025a9041b7381353e23
1163f585593ce9ab5ca5dcd004c9bf78b4bbbb8d
describe
'223916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
f7e703f4f6e6989b5d0e0010932a4c10
c569c99138ccaf63e4bfc2d037dc9e998ab8755b
describe
'5174412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00000.tif'
8f09d17f3b69ef627ad252be7413dd1c
53bfae8049b17539dcbe736bee023993b47e3b0e
describe
'9223632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00001.tif'
79dd1f1c033bcd8fd1be7e13763e313e
d48032dd3059ef13b34014305c825023097b738a
'2011-11-15T02:13:34-05:00'
describe
'7498644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00002.tif'
497d4428a8b21033b3354b22017e9d9a
c4b0ebf76661ef5af0e990f1373f8dd5e27a1bbe
'2011-11-15T02:16:50-05:00'
describe
'236964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00003.tif'
bc62eb88055937c2601712e276373cef
2eed0e1819dd80e9a858f2a90d1be91ab4504de3
'2011-11-15T02:09:18-05:00'
describe
'281996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00004.tif'
024d4328fd756665e89eb490de759f70
01b1f3665e89106823ce12f2ef5f530d6357cbfd
'2011-11-15T02:16:24-05:00'
describe
'248200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
44695c66c9c7b0f2a95eabb3b590531d
b430767c06dae278da14cdb12cbfbbce3b05ddb0
'2011-11-15T02:12:08-05:00'
describe
'247116' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
17a771abc85f7aa275f9b9a7ae773d4c
44c06d54b4005f6c55f68487a17ea21e2f0666d0
describe
'246164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
47d2b519aac630e178c0c16ba1db02ef
80aaaccee2f087561fb98e1f2c21ab467c3733f6
describe
'251528' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00008.tif'
c65a2992865d96d4fafc3cdaa78965e0
8d26a38b3c57ec96e4ad8ba39b348a008edaee1a
describe
'245528' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a1f5a5c487afc3bcb8a2768bd0a07647
82ae0e70d72dd05acadceadcacb8c0d6115c87ea
'2011-11-15T02:15:38-05:00'
describe
'247120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00010.tif'
f21dace429d127f5405fe156b0e784c5
287bad2904ce1af7d9eb73b140d68bb01f75ed43
describe
'245404' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
07069f06d2ce58aec16a8caccdaaea58
063f6366caaa8cb7d9ca0dcee8fdebd6d7e891e9
'2011-11-15T02:13:07-05:00'
describe
'247544' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
adf3e954c4331b2925f9c690e2a0c73e
673af50a11e5a03671224491d23fc63d35364742
'2011-11-15T02:16:25-05:00'
describe
'250796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
ab56c767cdfe3796df72b6de5a1eca3b
8b0c071492e78018af74cc7fcd986616c93edb4c
describe
'247468' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
0ce406d09ad21f3c102da6d239e690d9
5639f7a7e03621f8e1eb3db960119960d1b9d0a9
describe
'251060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9058a7d539193b9482cf35faa4af9791
d997ffb96797580a3e13788d7fab76173c8460e9
describe
'247448' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
00f636a69f78fefe4b406034d3e9d58d
35abc0e44cb87ef5c9a8ba168bea3a9b78a958b2
describe
'250988' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4facdf632279bb63b6f6dde0f7b02e3d
b48a4b59f1a1f9ddee74ac09a33072a542260419
describe
'250440' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
1dfbe3dc52e051f77327e35e76dee811
af40ea3415f592f6d52949632515ae496f413b53
'2011-11-15T02:14:57-05:00'
describe
'247960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
b2d555127e513a323b6dd474334d0665
579609eb5e10baadff8ee4cca02be7fa53439ea1
describe
'246992' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00020.tif'
5de74175326824efe53522e4a80c6510
e4829ae0e79c5ce4aa4c1582d91c782634245e6a
'2011-11-15T02:16:08-05:00'
describe
'250660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
aa142a0fdab3dc0190a8ddf7e0a609dc
34798ed8b1d825e72e5095b95818ab9bb959c2eb
describe
'247508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
8ac2e58ec883494088bc007dc70aa2d6
685bb37237d937efec0e20edbafdcbadfe55f7c2
describe
'245708' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
63411b3b7f07c115c04564b6117f2d31
aa084577bb8de1cd7832a1ccb8baa6e245e727fe
describe
'247492' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
277300385949adfb605ed4594cf06835
63ab016c94a5ba529289289dcb8b231e28617eed
describe
'250768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
04f8c2729b788b898cba522430b5f86a
da5e07a5860da46a74359c6e110fa3a5f7f8c8e1
'2011-11-15T02:11:40-05:00'
describe
'247444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
c5cd4264ed9aedf96f4e8ed070ab3b36
52a028a9cddc96080c14cea4c8cfd63ebfbdd188
'2011-11-15T02:15:01-05:00'
describe
'250716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
8770b725fc27eba6ea9b0dae6789b5f8
bb8dccdfb4a934c41545f3fc68f615e0b2d342c4
describe
'247264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
69201ba7cb1d718708a083045b374849
f7d4f101fa7f8fbff945d3af829ef845a8e8363c
describe
'245628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
eed2a8eacef7836762655a3391f4d9a9
af19be16ca2d0d6ba52370934e9adba62642681b
'2011-11-15T02:11:41-05:00'
describe
'250324' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
2c88c2c073740f7d87146953b348cf43
ce4368eca13d4fc8bcb96738c5258dea85d2a6a6
describe
'250916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0e1d89b2dca9fae96f9bf06f616bc120
b9284c97a10f2cdd79f5734a5827fb59072c08e4
'2011-11-15T02:11:58-05:00'
describe
'247484' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
9f43772b213acccd48f99fa476265a5e
50d7b83dc360afc6bc55704fa682670000bbf4ce
describe
'251028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b58812fd4583cbdf39edc5e28e296f1a
0060469355cb9bbf09e0389af2ad152b7ee64c6b
describe
'252804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
d9f4578c35224a8f4167a1ca8ff9c21f
570f24e1389144402c82b793878274b68def5b50
describe
'265176' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
de086aabc2e34b1f8580b4b3d365d2c4
53abaac0395f2f0b40859f7d24e1e945538b7ba0
describe
'252512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3bd85caf1648f9f681a2d2a87d55349b
54c347401a187ec6bd61a005c56b3cd56f5690ea
describe
'253148' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
c51711bf4458509a2a8ed01adbe3edbb
8fa96f2274f33c82f5800e916f2133046c2c1e55
'2011-11-15T02:16:36-05:00'
describe
'247428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00038.tif'
96a12d2041ce4b2550ff1b4ef2819b58
eb56299724b83457c0bc1cc65315dc6a84bde5e5
describe
'262612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d52b469227a76c9c179e73b16187a15d
6b739a0289acd465b256d56304135d1d35533ef7
'2011-11-15T02:13:06-05:00'
describe
'252600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00040.tif'
80a015ef13a37793d897234ecfd47823
da0d1e32ca1ced620758c929e153340b68680812
describe
'255740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00041.tif'
684fc9090b822920b2062418556085c2
22569dfeb9d938150083d75c895c8c9677b9f54e
describe
'252604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00042.tif'
65f4214d4aef48f2c6cfd517fd5ff606
3498ef729147bc9624c8ea6486ac96475144653c
describe
'252868' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c41837ad0f713296a7c6a3fe23be447e
8061bc6c3000566a01d0ae5bf5dd621a532db94b
describe
'255048' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
383148af3a2837a7c37efdf7b1ef7788
d42d7a44e15e25bfa37f545743319fb06af7ed9d
describe
'255728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00045.tif'
453a9b2ccfb274346b5608d557e8cc96
f6adb65c859e0c4aa2e9fced5927d391327bf643
describe
'247472' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00046.tif'
2209397ddbe212c859ba331ae7fb7b63
40c3205afd67770e72461c1868562a8417c01e3f
'2011-11-15T02:11:19-05:00'
describe
'253100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
0ec2016717db2fa3095a0972b4277823
cc17ceb1b072b9db2b2004316ef93361961c8cd8
describe
'250388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
bf7ec00e684cd70357b1908a20c5d796
5959c8234a910439e812cbbad1fe77635f28daa8
describe
'255860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00049.tif'
06f9851e003de57363cb18753155c5f2
3f7c7a0dd492a0c24336994b1bd0020ef033da07
describe
'250392' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
23f93c09ace087e44644019d2e5bb3ed
5ebb652bc544f15e85a19f7387f03c23b214379e
describe
'248560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2061968854a5866f0dbbba2cc0e82976
8095d3496efd2b15c581ce7b08e86193fbf757b4
describe
'247076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00052.tif'
189e38c2b4cee11ef1fe237396b74fd5
9de3b73ed91b481e38c42bbefb690ae22343a941
describe
'253236' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00053.tif'
49488c55fb9443f93ed6f735f27cf790
d6d150a17ca80e774a5213a48ca99c38ea00324a
'2011-11-15T02:16:15-05:00'
describe
'254940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9c3a6e4dbb30da6d0661f3741266ae5d
3ba006c5c229d15737a635b4775c578603461812
describe
'258184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d4ada44230059fa4443592694bfc2d06
44ead0df200a9a3ecf8df23092d74267d30ecb24
describe
'247408' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00056.tif'
049a9ad4028082ece2a41686fb80c6fd
e1b94da153d5234dcae2bfa6a2a9bbee87fa04fe
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
89e4c17234c0a1ed867376fe29ad9778
16d9e348d94dda8ee9a23bd5453b09539eb34f48
describe
'247108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00058.tif'
fbab5ad9d2accb8cda5cba26d3f3ae51
69e4a58fbc9510e58f913a7969d33f54c82cfeac
'2011-11-15T02:10:23-05:00'
describe
'265140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c68fdf28ff64b97c41ccf2e29a4356b3
864e37e473396b4c7b8142b01d046186b2519512
describe
'247332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00060.tif'
5f52d9e3f52ba049bd6bc417e6c7280a
1204293830a87e6d608c927523bffa5e40def846
describe
'253344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00061.tif'
868b99b16ce2aae14337260d7f1c0a75
66b81d2b9a7c3e54171b3fa0425426a54562e393
'2011-11-15T02:12:34-05:00'
describe
'250136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
c610287b9709a7f23f0ff49c1c836f87
ad6222a25f3427e795520cc5d61ba77ea639a1d8
describe
'247400' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
013d97eb3221aee1b8716abd197a05dd
f64fc61d6a1f149fb77d10dee17524f889e8f0bf
'2011-11-15T02:14:21-05:00'
describe
'247060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00064.tif'
25de76109fde67e1e0b5e2956945a610
3291e5c7b5d2492ba0d224d4f4e3521159d4fc51
'2011-11-15T02:13:39-05:00'
describe
'253164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
4749ac69f56c5605a2b544007eae92dd
18376b9061c145163b64fae85de10f9eedfb21d0
describe
'250236' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00066.tif'
fe71e8045deeacfa625ceba66af881b5
ac8f0054ec630f389c6020ae1aed04a69d3c4ee6
describe
'250728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00067.tif'
43c5a9ee0fb75aaf8902e1c72859f4e7
ca7d9723d9ec39706a24f54ab2480732ed4ef8b1
describe
'246916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00068.tif'
7a4fa4a3e946e36a90e3f2c3461adb4d
5c3669deadabbdf9d66b7960bd9a3d1b1256043f
describe
'245580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00069.tif'
1354c5ec84d44aa1bb3a154e239e5049
2e881a89c8492e7d2e8715ba1f389d3c521cd5da
describe
'255084' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
754c14d6135f935c0f8de07f3a47214d
9706c0598f3292087e3d2263f56801a14e3c091e
describe
'250656' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7844a080f17d72d8946888edd0602298
5241a116b8aadaf7c8b67981751d967d6ad6634d
describe
'252440' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00072.tif'
03014ee7f1e005f372860d91b666fedc
66f83db8eaef4bce7806e0ee8a679ad493233bab
describe
'253284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
c10414faff4bfd3cbb29c1c1c4bff772
3e0112c0be114d2cdb919209f79efeffe71398b6
describe
'255064' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
643cdb6c15df0ce5c6e11f302f927045
e7f05e210a77dd3c0d1e6370afa6687b70ce7e6c
describe
'248508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
9675316a5ccf5f6783ec712c6fa9e02b
8202d476f623fba2d139de116af269a103ea8b6c
describe
'250268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00076.tif'
e120ee0a7db192e220b7a827c4cb72a4
883c0d19a01d837ce7e032a45c50c5ee969b6c55
'2011-11-15T02:12:25-05:00'
describe
'245312' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00077.tif'
a3c0c704b53d2bf550527cada9892a02
2c5c2fb831e29105657bb4f02926bb264635f853
'2011-11-15T02:11:28-05:00'
describe
'256372' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00078.tif'
69b33b20474489b7d04793ab0cb22a57
e805b026a9a55a5581d713ec57c159c745413c25
describe
'257692' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00079.tif'
86c157f75828072177628e1b27a88395
4074be090d4013dd8fe356b53b3482257c4b8407
describe
'252468' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00080.tif'
3bf91af9439681c024ce6f791ae8aa43
7e61c99929b78bd543c8b44f287215dbc17d1380
describe
'262368' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00081.tif'
c5fa7e1e2b1ecf68ec9c71a82e33e40c
fcc56afec12756bba721d8dc2deb2485c3ad1695
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3c5ef160a3dc5a550a87e3c7729dbf4a
19c29df79d2c3c49954fdad3606735fec08f87d1
describe
'255296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e873f2e06fa17dd4417e7abe77f79d4a
37267c082b2c1875628e788a36baa90e423c1684
describe
'246984' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
13743e72fd7e5b2e69bf8171f0dcf60b
1bb17498cdd69139fcb70df482474216d961ac55
describe
'255352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00085.tif'
dcb74856b724aca72f1b08c0934e8e42
679b6fd141c6a4cdb1d35a5d2832a5b3316a4958
describe
'252572' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
cfcf278f0fb6f06dccc67dc06ccb82ca
7121a6bf50d6482315968b4cd41cde703edebe1e
describe
'257672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00087.tif'
81809d83a941f190aa625b81facc8671
5c76808c67d220773360188d5e41de338c864617
describe
'247380' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
27583db0e78233c772f0afdfa849e18d
449a2f0afe33ac095605ad2fff8dc56383b9f96b
'2011-11-15T02:15:41-05:00'
describe
'245104' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
622f6c46123a3bb33d4b1ebd0e016cb8
17b837fd98331c3c6fa4af6df83c4efb39219d4f
'2011-11-15T02:13:56-05:00'
describe
'252476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00090.tif'
6f3b678869b7f8d3e134fe77ffcb88bd
c1b01ca8215aa79b0ab035d3588f3fae90718dc1
describe
'250624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
11291e397b1742d4b6bd9be8e2f38b27
464c1eb34bd657a3d0e2ddab60b90775c1c81af0
describe
'252228' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d20bed7932723433e4aebc95a9471ca7
590da4547962668bad206b91227f2b2628bdf57e
'2011-11-15T02:16:21-05:00'
describe
'250632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00093.tif'
902d0c148b14e565bbec1e682372bc93
1a865fb1c8c06aed7675408a8492418730430238
describe
'252484' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00094.tif'
2c0e212bc90de1caa3b06cc9ca2a63e2
ecf29215fb9c9e4e5e95c96946af5c01caf4bab8
describe
'250648' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00095.tif'
1435108d253667accf519be47244e98b
68b5b7c94c05d8c7c5c0c84834f83e61d601a240
'2011-11-15T02:11:24-05:00'
describe
'259536' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
491c816cc556fccf0857e1da9cc40a6e
14a1796381f2a2208cfe1e4a4d076e14940ff06c
describe
'254476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00097.tif'
8d3699f8c1136b41986756d6f16f3d81
198cb122d01f41f3e16e64ff4aed4700ed746602
'2011-11-15T02:08:48-05:00'
describe
'259924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00098.tif'
85c7c6be6835970182e7b7b983c83f3d
44e6678d47cd2e56e0853fd1cc5e97d87b4c1851
describe
'255404' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
3bc6229592ec69136a3f5559717755a4
2acc604bb7441cb0ba717ed08f7086abc9e39a24
describe
'252320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00100.tif'
51018a77f3d1ef812d82e33942d801e0
ac1271977b865dd2dbeb8a11ad170da2ce8b4a4c
describe
'250256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
07693dc899fe8b95265875e6166c310d
84b556bd9c17d03cd6291d02d38a4c2e4e33d9a4
describe
'250292' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
db319df8584e0b54e20b77bd3cf97e3e
6050907fc9a590453f7af6a87e80495c48c7a1ae
describe
'248368' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00103.tif'
0ccda4ac7c400c29f42427de4417b06c
cbf6d5084e74a534c934950e1b984cee52ebf635
describe
'7334772' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMED' 'sip-files00104.tif'
f6c2580acb732eebef7503ddd8225f63
97e5c0b0baebeadfd3d8e94c7eab1b62891a0fc8
describe
'237244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00105.tif'
ca85654955883bfbeb9af182377d5b75
48fb2db7d29eccd9d4360d7d35561b175f295217
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b02c31f607d1e6b47143a34e70e210ae
259f7425e98312719749747103d1ff53eb5504f6
describe
'245512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a1bbd3d5232a77d041f2d787f1d049ca
dde3c17320c4d3217dfd148a0be1288d99070e1c
'2011-11-15T02:13:24-05:00'
describe
'239244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00108.tif'
b63cf6a8372c8e6d00fae0f291ee7b22
9eb3ef19689836ef1412f7e487a40bb7e36210f5
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
cd9bd913ad50244d46dec144174c68b3
28b162eb1b78f230e6d617ca37c8be789273427c
'2011-11-15T02:16:09-05:00'
describe
'250480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
d973e877933475d33c51466fc5055f89
c7ff9f3659f4df5bfa68aaf36ce77a14a89a0d7f
describe
'255776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00111.tif'
f678797c47f5a94feae0009f57227c8d
c506d6812a0225dc9004e00bc72c57e03161eb5f
describe
'252540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
01e029b124126b64ebacb9886abb6e5b
f6feddb77235ab02810a6bd95fa467cfe05916b5
describe
'260696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00113.tif'
cc49a7e6257c178a35386c18f9b814f8
a8cebbe08e44d0ba7de31b15640224616c07cbc2
'2011-11-15T02:10:13-05:00'
describe
'248180' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00114.tif'
34e3136a16d90e90b0008b08db44d70a
bb79a746cea425144d717ccb704e532ecc29e7bb
describe
'295716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00115.tif'
9219aa6d57174f585adb87aec5202cef
7c357e8673c7c34597a0a6e6b50287f9ef834eac
describe
'245376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00116.tif'
1c27b8d58b058a915ed32ef434598a95
2f893aaf01a33517f8817bd487461f6903c5a0ec
describe
'248160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
7f4bf0de3b41f38f19d02df59d18f0b2
2512976232bfb5de4c420ca095cea4de40d06683
'2011-11-15T02:16:01-05:00'
describe
'7267988' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMER' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ef76d92ea8c4e683f5a6fa6a21505023
8aa2c553a95fa924e226e26c0d3889d30d3cdb8d
describe
'239408' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMES' 'sip-files00119.tif'
4f53eaf7fab3685aa5a9eb1a4b1a93a4
c2608bc59d00494c2f8754f256e55a38d9ededae
describe
'245252' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMET' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d43c8087829a23dd7d10e66dada63196
ee0f089621c87059428172421a42adfd43e6f081
describe
'251252' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00121.tif'
bd0a8b18edce0f6d76eb905a2b84922a
2858a7b90fe26cf7fff10c9cc991c2020ddd5045
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00122.tif'
9cd9042f38a2a3604666c616d0e350cb
df46b8f1e924c30bb2a7a6fe40073e959f5c1f2b
describe
'250840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00123.tif'
52d3c2901973f515fe8867cc00f5a246
cf532e51cc2464824b5f319087594a7d73f9a5eb
describe
'254884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00124.tif'
6395ea9dce21d479bc9b7e418fa9064d
ae72495414ee2250a34d096b4d4fcc58fda497fa
describe
'265000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0df0bd59adc5a3e7d234e5331c7cea2d
48fe45295cffbf3f69513f317e86ffa19f9cb2e4
describe
'249956' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00126.tif'
90659ff39f642bd8e58749b54a75eff5
bc191521f884e6dc0ce3f5a14345cbcaf8292e10
describe
'253320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b74f062ce2296b9e0362848805c21356
a51a5e63fcb2caa45c46dc78fd73949176f9c678
describe
'250604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7f4aa5831a7ab381b707e56d17b7556d
af14ba1f34ee0d20588299aa19be540d4ac54250
describe
'260376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00129.tif'
65363c57d8229c2a6e992e5954ab1714
322857329dcc67c3a4d78573f341cfebe708cd63
describe
'247784' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00130.tif'
41940bbef4202ad94643d24c7ec21128
ac708cda07281bbd7803b1568e97e5ecd6e93cf9
describe
'255884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00131.tif'
06b2412b6ae4f6a1d4d2337b5c932040
9f53fb66d137b73305e043ad68b396fd0beb7179
describe
'245244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00132.tif'
9afe493e679b502298a585948b2775ae
0afe2277c56c67b29fdd79c2d2fbb67d199d844e
describe
'248104' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00133.tif'
96dd4b16c2d7e0083eaa3586f5c63744
c020c87dd60b63f0a79c8052746bc78e521af7f0
describe
'253040' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00134.tif'
db4bd355e91572ee337359a11d965f6c
a2986f829564fbe7530c2389f2e1077309da76ae
describe
'253544' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00135.tif'
668cabe03bd5194c3c9841996d14f978
545661112cb81c2e51b10443e08422ed734d9490
describe
'245336' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00136.tif'
288b21fc40696a20d2fee0021f5427b9
c070e9f1fa9431e1adc3c73003f6c472dde41a1e
describe
'255648' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00137.tif'
04d461861da7b389d14ead4e6a94be08
a63e74e63971dcb299ae63891c4d14da3779faa9
'2011-11-15T02:15:29-05:00'
describe
'245292' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
ce1249d92c14eb5798a9db81c85feee9
12d6ab01a427ea7aa05055397e94743c6216762f
'2011-11-15T02:10:04-05:00'
describe
'252616' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00139.tif'
0744840851915b881b26af01f75c74f8
932fbcee6a4b59ac0aac009ba6557c8595b50c44
'2011-11-15T02:14:38-05:00'
describe
'255108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
cebecb37a1f07bba6053c2b34ed2db35
0c360a0ba8a8288ed68af5bd76c633d42d6630f6
describe
'253264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00141.tif'
53cb4483d07f8f972706b1e81a749759
312ea0923565c08001234ac77a0dc213f6ba0e1c
describe
'255144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00142.tif'
201df00d492cd86c860d22df44137bb4
b8b5775cec9c8ced9dd2a7626972a6906ba54ca0
'2011-11-15T02:14:10-05:00'
describe
'253280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
0337e68b4482b2f5f23df444fc8b2997
5d89a1e3a24d8bb9da84d519687f9b0385ba3b0f
describe
'250312' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
6862b6f6a23a3c16de536d9b9f81f55b
08b8ef08ed243b8efdd1f8a2601ec8ff4b0164a6
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00145.tif'
7aae8a5a975ed670ad5c908de97340a6
d79ef0c2971a6a1016d431a2c99b8394df15b290
describe
'244200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00146.tif'
4c265162d4d54d260fb44fd70ceed813
5f83eae5bf13ec8d6a2764f184b2c682f902353d
describe
'258000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c2549c6cc47f6cbc412a85382852af3f
e648df4f5d5ef2b206278c544f652ca5c1979b1c
describe
'257836' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
0d96f2bdbfdd00f5b454003cc5638269
16bf140460c7f9f51c768d6c434e91c0668a98ac
describe
'253332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00149.tif'
47623539abc14e960e0d654592c93421
4c790cd5fa8ea5ab4f393fc74e320b521a04898a
describe
'257920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00150.tif'
bc10fd3c47abed1745a11181f5dfa553
9f4dd7a1088b680214089d42bab8e20496e70fc8
describe
'258308' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00151.tif'
73d8e17eae2fac7bb6c7d0014dfc84fe
b57c95d93fb60ea7fd54683befd97f32fdd86713
describe
'257468' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00152.tif'
93d744b7c74c0567f802493a4870df94
fdd6c47490d4ba01761b5d94dd5c45583d492755
describe
'248136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
c5bb7c98dae4aaf4dd3a9c93202f0dc6
d742c1749717ad3b84f2ac1d0165a62091e16f76
describe
'256960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00154.tif'
859cf2e0e0c315943dae3d52c5753b2e
99542420c5ff971d9b4fcedb6f70e27b917d094e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00155.tif'
1c12e8d8ac8ea19f720fa833209a4d72
67368cd6ebfa018119d46f488265c11a63c38bbd
describe
'252592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ecf0346923fa3e15e6c29bfaa94c9227
08f5fdbc431e7b49d523857eac50afb344aac12e
'2011-11-15T02:09:43-05:00'
describe
'257476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00157.tif'
41738d07508b209092fa91c45550d73a
c3ce4df7705ff9729f6a173ac38c3da7aafa7e2a
describe
'250444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00158.tif'
1a1b336a85e8a9ac0f82b02d9ceb87a0
8d371f28ffb78f18fab67b8b5a685ca798dbf72d
describe
'257756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00159.tif'
fb4dd2de19680cecdf11e3f4d771d8fe
724de126157ea7466523305eb193d9001132e5d1
describe
'245676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00160.tif'
f62d9cc937ccfd388d4ee7bc6c6f4aaa
b4621458693083f5c999189b1f12b858c8d17fe2
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
a2a26b9b30a2ce81984f38204c3b5727
338f550dc0e4d82acb7cd8fcc863a2a378cb3a04
describe
'255120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00162.tif'
8cb567e2fd7ca5edaa910083fac1e3a9
73e7fa8f83c7f172f1d46931fdda6298dcaf441d
describe
'257688' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00163.tif'
75061929f0004e2dba6f7dbfd0e52bd4
566335144b85b55f37d7d92ab18f1c574591716c
describe
'248012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
259195d88fd6e4efad722a0598aade4e
524f550e7044eaec41698b719518b2df2e7aa209
describe
'248300' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00165.tif'
7881e9b4c2abf05ae79f8e5c9c012ed1
789662451a624ecf8c62f696daa4a4a5a5a74746
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
4a8412e5e108977e6ca5807e32a6c342
3745ce3c79e4710cd51eaf8652168259a7fab54c
'2011-11-15T02:16:19-05:00'
describe
'248360' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00167.tif'
71788d667bc45eb2307150df31965684
b80deb46c9eb94c81ecec027ab627cda49f40e7d
'2011-11-15T02:09:17-05:00'
describe
'245456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00168.tif'
88edeb65b6b39eab041e5f4a13e5193a
f019dbfdd4aedf0fee03a3c2e94af07d308fdb36
describe
'251108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
d608fd9fe172d4dbcbf9760364910f67
7b65a0210c14ef54ace766e740a27ac061e90763
describe
'248236' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00170.tif'
e2ca7907a44d46def935ea3f1a2c0fdb
0e5df7bb92b078345122da5fea2e36929a8c70a5
describe
'248156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00171.tif'
8fc452f6d4313b72c38b1617ff92591b
c113fde9645399842634ad7d76285396be6676c3
describe
'245392' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6c944ffcfdef9c21613b0699a74714a0
66997fedd571d89983649d888985bf48c5383750
describe
'7361300' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00173.tif'
9a519d654b986f737fd8420fd68a3383
07530747d3dc22987481f8ae678bca367d1a455b
'2011-11-15T02:14:09-05:00'
describe
'248432' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00174.tif'
5d41a6b53d2c0dc9b587b92d772dcabd
1351b605cc33550df6b0af175bf72c321dc9b84c
describe
'255552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00175.tif'
11c41913388729f145b5b7563d6d1e94
c69efdc73823d43096def1f0b3cb32a07cfd1e7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00176.tif'
8695fdbef4d80f4e12b3464135d1cf0d
499d3885f98dc1da796343434b3e42ae86f1a79d
describe
'235328' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00177.tif'
549718b2715b104d92de0b0568e26a0b
ead3913ae10e460084d11eb0617a65d7bbc93d8b
describe
'254428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
9260e8d6e0dd44905dbacc84b4d08572
d76f1f9b36da21fff07375634111ca4c1dec450f
describe
'239804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00179.tif'
c4a23887b6876c1fcfc66cd85f10ed27
3864a02d153e7a2909a3c8e5834b5a5f81e9ce2b
describe
'251264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00180.tif'
eefd2b61e34fa2e211b070e8b9eb2125
c3acda94c9db61410856689c79a9c5246d28fca8
describe
'250804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00181.tif'
977767e2c13fd4b435404dd70cbd7dc3
2c5933f88451278ad3d697bec5ff6e922b85cc8a
describe
'254416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00182.tif'
42eaa7dc58450f7c78c70a6087c76d1b
79f886ed56526659a4b16cd485846eed81c46053
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00183.tif'
0921c420c11d84b45a40c08265efcad6
122fc1091c3136b09e436a7244e8e443d6a040ce
describe
'252556' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00184.tif'
c37647d231470a50de49b5f2674af9b7
b8fd77751ac203c9a5e844c7cefa62a74b193b05
describe
'253696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00185.tif'
eeac652655b99446e857fc5dfc10d6a2
6e0acf547b4814e911f550b54bf9c33d33d57701
describe
'249736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00186.tif'
b88973fa7b8c99e37614e687bc3a7136
2e94e66ea21220fdb061ebd98b540f4f836e79d2
'2011-11-15T02:14:40-05:00'
describe
'253876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00187.tif'
e777905b1e665567eca952fae1dde5e4
7caa1d8a06130bb2369021bb48021333ac7ff12e
'2011-11-15T02:15:08-05:00'
describe
'244608' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
24d3b3d4402e3dadd51ab167cf3ebcb8
f4f9b44c70e5b5793b6f30d1172f2bfd6a3a5194
'2011-11-15T02:12:44-05:00'
describe
'246944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00189.tif'
6c1bac587c235b4174c11a71ab426721
583178597e73bd5731dff108f1424c89b697f424
describe
'244560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00190.tif'
eb74e0562be1da2df1132ec82053cccf
cc1e4576c39602c33660e1b4788d008b41eb2013
describe
'244784' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00191.tif'
512a448b387177fc677dc67427cbc789
f2dafe71063187bd3260cc86d41b3ea02cb9b6b4
describe
'256376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00192.tif'
5fe95bf452737a913a23efaf9ed549b9
e4d9c6c0b4fb4a2c4aea50b4ba14c4bdd64fdeb6
'2011-11-15T02:08:34-05:00'
describe
'240076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00193.tif'
14671fe3eafc8900108b7920135f9c9d
c1477b66557ffac14919ce197ddae5a2c117faa6
describe
'278444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00194.tif'
eb0bf67a9055943a8ce761102ddf938f
fac32a2fcf9e41bbb8c9c47168cc78967209c3de
'2011-11-15T02:13:26-05:00'
describe
'241592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00195.tif'
af03a9304dae59de904c6f1c9235e0f7
a1560f480263e6629267cae0fa5495b78521b438
describe
'247500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00196.tif'
ff99a1f7627ec6250634637f7406aebd
b4d58c51d56243e47db1cd7ea5f8346de77e7b06
'2011-11-15T02:15:24-05:00'
describe
'242112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00197.tif'
a35009061f9d4538f37d8c49f0662936
aea2dd96af3c5a2df4f6597097a44fdf167020c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00198.tif'
a50fa62315995548a378a30e40184156
9779318ac001ffdd70b98363b3b4bb67f758239d
describe
'235216' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00199.tif'
19091b9a12b1c68b8d554174979c9120
ffb5ecb654466ec521df1a71b08a30aae678f0b6
describe
'249832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00200.tif'
c92921ef1b5bf591d13e0d0cf53d288e
da48b9fcce93023b83261d010f3c5060ca4db468
'2011-11-15T02:08:49-05:00'
describe
'251580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00201.tif'
a764554fa892e8ee45627e9de9aae49b
e93bcb8637132cede112f4b8941584db572d1a34
describe
'256792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00202.tif'
79a35b5e1cef11ca22a74af0cfe8a304
11cb4f8f1f9686187899a93467fd583c4535f072
'2011-11-15T02:14:29-05:00'
describe
'247180' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00203.tif'
7e40d47f865693ead87cf356e77a3ff6
321a3ea588bfadaf9c7455950e954fb6cf7658d0
describe
'249740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
42f3c45cbd12d30208d6222ca2ecaa0d
a4c6335d1366ad89e2f5ff28772253f703420fda
describe
'248364' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00205.tif'
69dbe090f47507f2f2674f9f0a26739e
31e0b7f706bc8f63aff90a1f9d9975d5dccb6c95
describe
'244536' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00206.tif'
a6b11c50779716eb1ce9b2834871fd1e
ef5943a61b4e8cb0146a8325cef062f87ac43eac
describe
'235224' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00207.tif'
43800555928737bc409b772a00d2a3a4
3ab70cea726af0c69a3ea7ece01a97b475876d0b
'2011-11-15T02:12:48-05:00'
describe
'244576' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMID' 'sip-files00208.tif'
5274fe22aaab63e1be03a957d64769a0
fc5de95c41ec0fb0fe1fe3af16b9a9b3802ef161
'2011-11-15T02:09:03-05:00'
describe
'244612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00209.tif'
e7bb59aa666e900362b205a6c627b0f9
2890735583a4e998aca819ed099926d7adae13ea
describe
'249540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00210.tif'
e9ddba1af0886f2c69e5d36ab327bda5
4ddeea7db8c9608dbacaba80dcc2ec36bc9b689d
describe
'234840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00211.tif'
fc3a8c161816aa78f0574189ddff67f4
a171e24e7d60cf93959964a3bbac6fc1ad6ef2b5
'2011-11-15T02:14:46-05:00'
describe
'244496' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00212.tif'
5db90d20b97f3744ab2889bb9901a73f
43caef31cee274b0ef4005a0b17d071014d1d2ae
describe
'244420' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMII' 'sip-files00213.tif'
ce6f1df71d25ca206a6348e9a12231e7
93750038986d58c9dd839823951a641c80c8420f
describe
'256864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00214.tif'
729613c9dfea12c4e80b3cd1d1469759
e075472d3ab5d54e0529e8ee0a4e38b08f1352b7
describe
'234996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00215.tif'
35fa56558fafeb8ba7c43ac7cab1ea7a
1335a5dee5eba5c41de1afa36e883cfa6cf61be5
'2011-11-15T02:13:25-05:00'
describe
'254260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00216.tif'
9d9cb01ad471a43eedb15d6e70d32b17
6fa81ad850860426c0b4dbcd17bb1546cf0c0b51
describe
'244684' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00217.tif'
99a06222b2fa20a520fb6c7a2ebbdd7b
04be66add3fd95795346fe6e38ec099c1d91faeb
describe
'249628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
da61b3a590ed9fa004c6ad3b26366545
b5bff70932b2ceb127fccf07dfca9b122e5e8c71
'2011-11-15T02:09:34-05:00'
describe
'239736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00219.tif'
ee7e2e12e2e9564b9279bb604d2d7de8
c73ee73901bb9de1c9351e6fc06ad56e27d6ad47
describe
'249444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00220.tif'
973afd2447295ea83e28477eece3ac0e
a1a26ee3e0cfe80c0dfb0790d64d7b4310753816
describe
'238936' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00221.tif'
58ea0a85dc658e7dd981e9bac2a7c7c4
53fcdd658d1d0038cd5168d3067cbee1d36b34f2
describe
'252344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00222.tif'
24c66812339119f240976b05c5785d68
131c6c00ecf926cbd4335528c016e6ab6136238b
'2011-11-15T02:09:26-05:00'
describe
'242272' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00223.tif'
4163483a1086caac29c85b226e3aa1bd
4e57b8a9944032de0ef5b057c17dc21e0cc9f738
describe
'244356' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00224.tif'
96ea43fd860cc44e6b3d17dc0dc7ea59
6a684a2b2ae4de617a1c5ff8c09a753d7ff7bf67
'2011-11-15T02:14:54-05:00'
describe
'253644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00225.tif'
bee5cbffd26812618afd0579c96a139e
15981aff5616c5d8815598cb15f63320dd816dd4
describe
'248972' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00226.tif'
ca503da45f3af98c2eca690bea5f525f
b4ed835e02688e3753f174bd69d7a6e3fe5f8c20
describe
'234680' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00227.tif'
5cf59163870dd9cfdb02dfc37e71f31d
f200357ca78ffa7a4591d513143142044fa5dea3
describe
'249196' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00228.tif'
83f63a31e8f15ed531e181a905c4ef10
e5db89904d2ccba492bb085f865cf221bf7db13e
'2011-11-15T02:14:53-05:00'
describe
'235644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00229.tif'
bb1c6bd11d1e42b1e2cc6fa3cc95097d
c34de35eb902e3c75617884085faac01fcdcd645
describe
'259228' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
066ef476ea9c5a55673fc52e1871e0c6
5234948348d7711c05bf00fbc5d49107484c3ad0
describe
'238836' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00231.tif'
10a7e58b97b980ba40e6fdd65f1b47b2
7d6234e0d5a89a2466b4633ae5e847985fc88b98
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00232.tif'
2d3720592946ca3baccfda3aea2391bf
15643d39d6aaec3662bff6d67c37152f2a27a99f
describe
'240772' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00233.tif'
0f44dd2fa31e14f2b61fe781fc9fd99e
0d60abeb344e0599503fe6e6cedb753fc05dfc96
'2011-11-15T02:10:29-05:00'
describe
'249400' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00234.tif'
5d2ab30d129cfe0496df16910a09feca
26047c1f6ef1066c5540bfbc89f07f2d7b9bad0b
describe
'240940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00235.tif'
d94759ee596e47e4a157d680c94a2041
508740682d5e6c59d1e1396981ea859b7810df94
describe
'247152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00236.tif'
cbc436431554786fa65d2accaa9616af
81e66374d6bd346c833db9cad242ff86177d2c1c
describe
'228756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00237.tif'
4d6a1f1a4c006b103fc6edd54758eeb2
8c46a4fd76f7d69e72d57ffe12e6537c41f657b9
'2011-11-15T02:12:10-05:00'
describe
'246336' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00238.tif'
b74bf387338c2c5de7eecce1d254ccc3
88843610564e92adeae76ecdd9577bc12d63ddc5
describe
'255584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00239.tif'
c06c1fa1cd95704c6cf894edf2496fd5
357cfe967297ba7b8cccee57a080b0e4eee0d620
'2011-11-15T02:10:46-05:00'
describe
'250964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00240.tif'
1ace411d7aefb8590479308ae8ebbb6a
ab566cf443e7dda3216b533ce4012ae0868cf056
describe
'257744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00241.tif'
2a758b0688af7d5eea4d64da0717e725
64eb6ef557096b4f45ae68124b2e2bf7ea6ddd2f
'2011-11-15T02:10:26-05:00'
describe
'250572' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00242.tif'
8ebae588d824db0af97597ab23a1ed74
62540d7a70544edede3634c93c3f158063f4f21b
'2011-11-15T02:14:32-05:00'
describe
'260072' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00243.tif'
7f8b2d8b9b5e8c1dd677be1d08379010
8af035466e5ec1a35b3124626334916aa38c6e74
describe
'255916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00244.tif'
5a1afd4ed56cc15781f2541a50b7c9be
add42da382cb75582363d216b21b5d666518693c
describe
'253880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00245.tif'
4479e9b9efd00512e53d70fdfbc5903d
d0f94777652b763fe66690bc10f7ad45fc6e5f3d
describe
'262432' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00246.tif'
355fd15475b51515e732e83244bb7b5f
2ab75fc485e2959630c10a96e61c3c0c62665be2
describe
'243624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00247.tif'
8e9c48dd848faf84ac63864c2f257e92
42703afa8f6bb6e61a67b9c89d897bc75f370d3e
describe
'255060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00248.tif'
9201349c142e9f63859db3d4c99f9b19
fdff2021015211d4e2fc7d736bc0409c2030a417
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00249.tif'
3d2ef3a6f4de1d480ba469ea1efe8ff3
e630e3c652b73da8a994ed5e971b1e61c886625d
describe
'255788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00250.tif'
4442d4330cb70106424a0204cd33166a
68502471821a2676672dd3c703c12ae155a769a5
describe
'248864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00251.tif'
37f54af4924cf02467fb521b7448a8b4
0fc3ed5a88e1016948d9a0bb2b59950b542b5ea4
'2011-11-15T02:11:48-05:00'
describe
'250996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00252.tif'
f5a780598bd3f74b3689435ee5d9241b
451914988a4a6798f7b9322ebdf442c40c25d4cf
describe
'248276' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00253.tif'
5ee7e55073e471cef142a26b2ac134fe
b1ba8a1c0e440e68f432d6ca8b54678db4caf593
'2011-11-15T02:16:49-05:00'
describe
'256096' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00254.tif'
9769c45af0ce4155dc9ffa33f44f624b
b0493d9dd9396dcfae2527bb2a332684a6c8dc57
describe
'253940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00255.tif'
0769fe214c5ae595ab9f939bd7142940
306a4fe67db799c442a6d2af624ca51836cd4c58
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
79f4854d4cb723a963fa9f1cb6803207
d57a2366ca5c6968d6c492f50c82f007a91c56d6
describe
'255260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00257.tif'
ce1d0be7b0dbe2aec0c63e49a54b63f2
f3d483e82b75d4bca5c5eab3e3f500ef8acb5fb8
describe
'255804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00258.tif'
64adb206a9d519dcb87954001f76ef63
1ecce23ec41830e747760ac0588b3fae8f3c148d
describe
'255576' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00259.tif'
a2bd6a7df65768972ecce68853d61a62
e484908780557a13728672fb5035703acc5b5131
describe
'250496' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00260.tif'
e003bf0e63900c7a106d33e84edeb79b
6b97982bf6f6e43b1f04a81ed73d56ea1bfa5b4a
describe
'248480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00261.tif'
8fefbc9c59638a2fc0d24ddf8966e76c
55d26b597fc423266b5ee7da3143130091ef534e
describe
'258036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00262.tif'
0ccca559e9ee0cd7decec542c52b5ec9
1b4d0cc3fd056ad9fa0aa0cc7c0eff89b6f4eb4e
describe
'257660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00263.tif'
a4e38c40ead287f8a71ef72ce511bcf8
b650847110c9116d1135227d2524800a011ee822
describe
'260068' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00264.tif'
e6b846cf654db847186aeba65ca1bf18
74509cab53af56701f6a8bf74a953bd5c2604c7d
describe
'255704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00265.tif'
ded493856f0de489f58530ba577ef24d
798f68247ff394687949af115af6d10272c8315e
describe
'253268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00266.tif'
f78436a24456f12dae0ab0ba2a494c79
171ae59a0d70a465d68a72e5b898b1c613a6babe
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00267.tif'
11a28ef4943c09f88f8918ed00ee6227
b6cfe6c8e77b9a0b571e6fc1cb86dd9fa266fdbd
describe
'258748' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00268.tif'
def5aed484e3050e4ab29fc5326390e1
4847b383acf03e4f1bb7342a5c6bbddcb137701d
describe
'243472' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00269.tif'
2e83289283b1ab9ff266bceb0763261c
710c4c083dddcf156f9fb9c6fa73815d2be1cf3c
describe
'251228' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00270.tif'
973ceca1a87ed473a6da1e23a67e0c0f
e78c038aa21cffb4e834b4071697dfaa11bfbb16
describe
'274212' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00271.tif'
7bbb0e806cef0b1954408ee3d8f7d112
e4852746728a82ab7f7af4c7562eeac55f9984bf
describe
'243308' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00272.tif'
8751d483a10e2b32ab31755a1aa4793a
e79951c839821a7d425766c20383c29cea0a84c1
describe
'271992' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00273.tif'
22b76af8fd82904d540b2a623da52714
94d6318754836e742e36dfca96af728edce5bca0
describe
'255480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00274.tif'
7b534df234fd8112c843de7eb89953fe
3bed0f392e543cb4bef1db32bf25f57821339e69
describe
'269796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00275.tif'
5c2e1e2b4723cd0cacfb3a466f2d42af
b74a78526c73157842a3c89377bcc6021b42d28d
describe
'253384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00276.tif'
b231f6868e9c9b473753ae13c6ae5a98
a6a1c96f173681032e21537865d8730b900863e1
describe
'274800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00277.tif'
e2d37b44ff30c86a0fba748665348458
3062eba1021badbb9e55cac156e9d1d85e0dbcbf
describe
'264832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00278.tif'
1df4c497ee2d51852288bdbb6e55d120
8634453a9e2efc200c7d08129a32a97a733a9062
describe
'255360' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00279.tif'
a92eff6c47162c8448316aed9e54a1e0
09c2b2010688f3a95304145d6655c2d994734ac4
describe
'250384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00280.tif'
d858eff561b365a6b2526c22e6b0a172
ffa3c59bad2cb6c21af0100943f95e4ec7047949
describe
'244204' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00281.tif'
149e9691ad4a919cded94e66beab9958
c59d5adbbde3a181ba6aa95aace9bc0091c7dec1
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00282.tif'
2bb2bd070c1fd8f8961879e060737bed
0180a921f3f59048af94f2a33daf4beb37b9126a
describe
'244060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00283.tif'
983b3d985a69e4a38cd533966ec1e84c
b2d20a5bf74d8d97492ffd9146b1de849cb8ae92
describe
'253960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00284.tif'
56d051177f08453ba84b6d87c2274ae6
589344c3b2f9b5d9296985e16299242e24302d62
describe
'244524' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00285.tif'
947cabb57a2bf0d2c4a40b440ff35078
601bd9b455997c52b8b94e61b485f40309324773
'2011-11-15T02:11:43-05:00'
describe
'256268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00286.tif'
8097e8b5877535ff4cb289bfe4ef63b7
b858a82fa46a7cfd767541e600a42079dfb5da31
describe
'267960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00287.tif'
947f4287722c75f5c78245dab3ca2538
488e32452dcf55f8db41ebe4393288a7d27b11ab
describe
'241788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00288.tif'
34ad76ae983a9812e1204141c8e24cd3
4749dad4afb59768051308693be796689fc1bb81
describe
'5384940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00289.tif'
c835791973abe4c22d789d4f433add0d
e872439cc720af4788b56fa927d83ec2c04d2f8a
describe
'393356' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00000.jpg'
5f2e9efaa93fafae0befcff8bce7f6ae
f2aaa9a277aa625fdeb9319165e6f1d408ee3d5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277253' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
f271d2dd59366f574d2fca166c143f7b
b87be4cd12937746ca2e5211151bf0f4185691f8
describe
'242118' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
ba2cf5447b665f4b925da5b5932328ce
4f3dda34d842dca2738bce4982a799178f6840c0
describe
'5402' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
6cac5d0ea29c03053bab34f38980aaaa
a26e105e80d25349d632524b0efa56787584d616
describe
'239501' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
9079620619637a7f6131de655e33603c
4826aaf830cf7a9f63e448cb25b3dfe8c05a3342
describe
'316097' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
26df4f3e28f8dc5053ebd7420b575249
199c6884f9825d0f9f13268cc0682ae97882c302
describe
'330047' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
bb693e49995662deccd1817f7f2d346e
2e7c3d21b26ef07e0762b82c4444459fb9d3296c
describe
'126653' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a6dab323a916b86c02eb853e13ba03d8
e0792ff31d958911cab795fe1f58aa7293389e8d
'2011-11-15T02:15:13-05:00'
describe
'281326' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
5dbf0ec186e942d88ab3d1f3adcd1b95
cd435794e6e75fb01e720a95bfaade4f754ce1f6
describe
'328971' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f82cd5168481a7c520813cad81c5879e
170e25e871aa3ad01d15589d1ccadb756d94cbcf
describe
'342740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
129501d795319f25907f0e7c40036bef
3543c530b4c2bbb38db0ba91b61e8c0d971b5752
describe
'340258' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
27756b3a46788cb4584778ffc4682327
c40b2be51d5c689d35290201e1e2d76a2940747f
describe
'345998' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
7354c7f617cc461b05686d198856c91a
b8e53c2e6cd533baf2f7a37ade5901582eacc8e6
describe
'329970' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
97e75001fcdaa7304dac2329b7e521a9
30a68a627a46b504a8b469050e537b6adbbc3c2f
describe
'350340' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6de9e62105330f92d96fa9eb4a2ded0e
d4578fdf3b7129f88a6190aac28e8aefc7aff9f6
describe
'342341' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
08be44494adcec214bc5788bcb1d7e59
7e39c367951c3bdc33e4bbfe18872e070c9900d9
describe
'342658' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
dfc26bfa8e06689f1377fb2736d8500a
5181d702feab90ff5236c41f57ef0fe168e132ca
describe
'338584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
96f0872e0d7a210ff853807a3c2ee3a2
906f62752a16ef50aed4734f9848e64c81ff35e9
describe
'329679' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
a132298b7b93cbbab0ace28b49cbc4a7
7385a456d8a96bd1e28c1f97e7e7478d8d3dbf92
describe
'296119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ec1491152bb23befb140b964e04f8091
8250ed4a203c5642ecbd61de812f0b295963bb70
describe
'342850' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
99f9293529bf9ce0288037bdaf34cd86
36c359f3dacdeed2ec564cb6a1a74f9b1c526c4e
'2011-11-15T02:14:31-05:00'
describe
'341245' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
664f60832ff1d291636952ae084ff4e2
964534fc025390b38d94750039823be678bcfd45
describe
'350638' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
24995196b64daf5bdb00e8cb33c467d5
3c7f8369ee1577a850984b1acb3b620bf9c0fc60
describe
'344027' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMME' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
cc7799888bd963cb39d878eb1c142317
7b75ec6db046d5c23c654f1e2f2e915bcfaaf04a
describe
'347873' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
d2dc0b991b0f445a9cb1ba9345528865
204a6414fb447e9fdf37a4db2ec5bc98a8aa976d
describe
'343032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b1fa07a0008575be7cc932fa23b7e608
9a952609834d2d4aed31fcc062d00aecc45e855e
describe
'335120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d51dfdc55aebd2ead2be37dfa6e33050
b5db8aba939e087e66527687c167f4092963c353
describe
'344111' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4fafaa80b8695fe90ddd9f2c97a32b82
1d898539c5f952249880a6f85193060eaa8bc3d1
describe
'337053' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
9c08a3ae9ba5e166f421861081e313c3
dc614c0c900bd7b900fef91725e429c4a20b0db3
describe
'343217' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
d0d446321b70bedd6dc04d6bedcdb7a7
d13d49ea2670433e9f29bb2582d38b556ae0422b
describe
'339536' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMML' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
27b024128c5d8a1abe0a968395a58b92
b00a6ebd7fedb318781e206017e0d113df904440
describe
'335968' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
1f59c28386238af8692a5574b309a3f8
7e6a78e53b90adeb9483a3caed2acd4b850e2e2f
describe
'342904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
9bdf69269e7bd97489f3534de50b4fcb
04f481321cf0c94f7525493a720a14a31e8cc62a
describe
'342743' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
d6b0e0f082e5eb9f4861113dce06f4fa
59e1314acaf26cc52d94be6ceb6f6c5da54ae0ba
describe
'348894' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
515dbac847e1cd99818a4926a53eccca
4a70fbb219ee046e233036f4e1161c9a5fc9a8d6
describe
'319042' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ac28b33df476790e61953155d6edbb8f
69ac134bd55ff43994a9b31856dac6d9ec6027d0
describe
'343020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
729d2f7fd418dd117f42bd2b6c11df0c
690b23d05384f163562e76fb883f429ca0444feb
describe
'339604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
cc748785e03bd6a4f743c2cad99413c7
d2b0d90337f2518af64374e87a08a79880c2ae54
describe
'341011' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
04dc83d1a46f1729a25317f173f00eb7
b17b0fd01dd5460cd8ad81d1e09ab46916971a34
describe
'345858' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
9bcebdbd03b860138778558d0e254e33
b8d7021760035f993ecbb7660e8e6d0f6f13ba73
describe
'346925' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
bdf5c7268ff61b01298ebf344f3e93c8
e218b875eeafc06b93005b8843b27530ca52cd9e
describe
'329026' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
9f8eedf7d8ffe5932ee1ddbc25a15a51
1b46a70cb2e04006ca77df03ea124a69903dc953
describe
'346626' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0fabccd232e924a57299529a8c8cb49f
c84062f3a315b74e747a69a95fe287c3de48a7f4
'2011-11-15T02:11:08-05:00'
describe
'330906' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
3e9a5102271d04faa2be1e96fb0ff747
6545ab74bfcc45e32a4730890bdbd46f9d7f0527
describe
'344814' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c13ac9555601d69c6c79bed879727422
88b3d3efb9c9835668c0d2244d014cd1dfa0c890
'2011-11-15T02:12:13-05:00'
describe
'345965' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
af0722f9d5eae4f3f22bbbeaf8386929
15c81f5a7bdb8c8df4ad9f852aabd06aab2ca510
describe
'350368' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
42ff5702918905694a830a9d3012234e
5094529ffe04031c02aa7488289b148dab4ab8c3
describe
'347372' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
c790d49e5ec441357759daf0515e1439
168dc267ad56de6e12816af644ac6745a6a1f3aa
describe
'344044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMND' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7fc6aed24ebca13fb38e45f998102958
abd5f024c2f68d255c5a081f12f33ea07650407b
describe
'341901' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3864e6f1eacd49e4c1ea988d75e6a18d
94711d0dfb72defd930b0ed0c532ee5d42d1a610
describe
'337416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
e2576fcede46fb6fb384626ef1df22f0
22be6a0f7c13bfcad39517ce0cb88ec459a83aa5
describe
'341826' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ba839c0ccbb44dc98e98fefdca133730
19af62477e52cadd81f46df30ac8e46251686b1e
describe
'342831' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
a0024a08b9088dc6e765b7180767b3cc
912b905724b9342da134184dc1433404b3bd079e
describe
'340179' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
691769ecbc248963137b5108a7eff183
3dd646ec351ca3265e2981a86ee822032ae1eab4
describe
'339084' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
ff989fc99d200d90479e5c36e492ee73
34589c780174567638af14ba9728be8a03a36557
'2011-11-15T02:16:59-05:00'
describe
'334259' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
198971d96894438838183a4859e7f921
044c1fb699b0da8109d0b747b9e9a4f29e229114
describe
'346243' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
bd3dc79ff23ae3f7eb42dd0253ab6b7f
3491134bdc4be83c5fa808c0f7716445aecf8887
describe
'336467' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
0fd368e7a87598e0abad0239459be794
ce8750d4621c84b03495c865ecfecdee6130fa3f
describe
'346999' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
0c16e31eef5e212cb02f6bee6fe72fce
3a3f6edb784c5e47ed79bd0aba5a52bf6b114262
describe
'348076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
808ee70e9a7ef99fe40a93eb17476c49
00e3a11194729ef9d80a8fa4aa31929fdd445e02
describe
'341217' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
d62fa39c3bb8fc9fce9fc1507d2abfcc
032c92dfbc123c00dc69f8ca2d0e927d2f8305a1
describe
'328655' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
55f7722f173cb576e05e554869025a62
334415ec1f2dc5e36a8cfdc1aae74de9b747752c
describe
'344214' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
37b879a3adad8a87bd92a1a4a918c11e
9f2e799818ce41a2d211a775631c711976f421ef
describe
'282397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
446a00599a8a7ff912d30eb10c1db657
12fc7ef54e39ba47f69d8f5aee4338c6822e02b7
describe
'337574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
bba43bc05faa8ff6d80c8ac26ef4516e
e32f089a697c72d6a36274ca194b901307aff61a
describe
'338551' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
19f5c400735cb3999582373b335e8838
474023f4b556cda6bc4a76742ba3c67aa3071077
describe
'343864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1bbde8c6d22e3727212848486aab7331
5e906365a72b4f33fbcb3d163f0f23ab13e401a5
describe
'335806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b7cdf9710d4d2283642e3e234f3954ae
7eb4161495bac6a848a342ff587b12ed2dc70019
describe
'345214' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
ba50cc92002e83ad628ad63fb55258b1
3b5ebf5fe40bb05d4ff6e830bb8c1496e618624c
describe
'348277' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
704b68197192ac2f61d979faa2d960f7
ab7cd63b07b293a23a3b009f80117d93629ad7be
describe
'339552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
f8c892e4949fa5d01a8fd1b3c6b50636
3400d922f150dfdfceff59eb6471784906eba191
describe
'332366' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
a9d99acb9e7ad08f014e3b809d637ddd
f94b86052c6c3caeeb00a45993861768e4df7fa2
describe
'334666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
0e8325f726b7a561f327738b224f24fc
230399309c3f385de6f042159b6af1551fb1c9a6
describe
'328580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ac3ff692e4a3b8ba814403be4e4b261a
36155eed86c713a65cf692f905c8c23fc6c762ab
describe
'345241' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
e4d73577fca7216f53e33c9ba0e5d02b
90db7914743d6ade5571cb3e4ab287c7d32bea2e
describe
'343735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
8d78c3512dff61bb445cafc735ce3ef3
236cef99a6e458502139cfe6ba1d3b4f26d0168c
describe
'332341' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a2bc0ddf8e535f545f24ceff5869b816
6a188aad119bd4634b4171fe3ed160a1b32c31ee
describe
'349234' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
206cd5f5b19c32c0f14546c4163f970f
2aeceaff68ca8d4f57b5b2c1d09d550583192019
describe
'282940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
aaf50b1d928f79fd2f79846c652737cc
58b6e26148ef408a5670fb36119ecf1fa22501b5
describe
'331501' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
a91d9b192ce7fc3b48783a405d246879
7b19ecd288ab4a8d9f0fcfe560f970c2ef8443a3
describe
'336777' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
2f9a220f74071bca7b1cf5376bd83a36
c77f150a1f70cd79c10207de0fbc8ae2cdadc4c9
describe
'340093' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
09dd01296f9cd89125777d782c8ce13f
bbc1378727eafbbdca3c4726825b663f8e0e5928
describe
'342642' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ffb54c8db45f52e1e0dc257f4b0688dd
bb5f7d1e5514aa0404f01ffd3ea7276c99ef2169
describe
'344160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a687efd01607c6de66ca53b1e5b47ba6
4ed7d03d04ef30b2de085afa83a7cf3a4838792f
'2011-11-15T02:13:05-05:00'
describe
'350060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMON' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
aad3667448941725a2bd42a7d8dae926
0b2fee635a37c3fcdac0aad9394261e00a103dca
describe
'326405' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
757f131bfc382baad33f74a1ad563575
023ac0cf57531893de8544ff0f4af4f9bc3db9ea
describe
'325446' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ac7abef3466bba950e084fec5d131794
13a32afa8c6ce22f6e3155e46fbe07523d582157
describe
'324766' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
d83ab6fa4aa2bf41cc983fbe1fb2b1da
0bbcfc9d7bb71be775f45d7b78066710512bed0e
describe
'347319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
c686612743d302375051885feb2825ce
aa2b52bb7694990f2059b5ddde44cad23f0b12e2
describe
'343158' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
fccd7ba1e10bd29783e21b6b0c9998a2
eec917040301ede4cd8b1c52fec38a26d61b802a
'2011-11-15T02:08:36-05:00'
describe
'338323' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
8be498279c882cb95dadfb36947a3248
85bdb4a1d7c44c9b2fa7647a6faf2d9757baca45
'2011-11-15T02:13:04-05:00'
describe
'341235' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
33dd346993c88e86e69a68671fdd145f
568f6c2a16bd98dedf8b96770dcc813ab0e4ea22
describe
'324914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
247c6dee1244ad1d170f21de7bcee184
69a6af02782a53e75b73f478525c62d9ad4d828e
describe
'333857' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
1f05f7f695fee7b323574473434e7398
bd03d80955b8f0d36bbe1c52750c88b96957de99
describe
'344727' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3b43fa030a578b6991aaf54d63be2ff5
aa5417db4117869491c28360c8d0062e368d0147
describe
'340975' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
51cbae5e708d5e49a19ee9083dc3171b
f180c612559e8f4c9743a7b09941520437b75b8b
'2011-11-15T02:10:05-05:00'
describe
'320128' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
ff51a077a0a0d6ee1a6ff7a2c0375066
15e42ba4e4397470ab5c3f0d5bb96c013a8c4e35
describe
'284857' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8fa08caa145bc42a87227e18e0f23436
f88b4fc6a3d962cdf4e697f3f60bb6222824b2fa
describe
'345156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
65fd8b6d15e762dce70e99bcfe901938
746a7b873eb5a81ddf3dab3180cb3f1ba6347c4d
describe
'343841' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
4e97944afa07634f84b37d5b3d9d2a3c
1f7ded8ffcbfa98e76be1712f37fdfe168bccc5a
describe
'346543' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
60b42b383bc2fc0dc9df635b5d771a5d
8aa9be337a5a03ac11404bbd8a360f429aa436ca
describe
'332778' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
297d9eedbf7f8d40e091a066b0ff7cdb
ebccd26cc72dfe880b5c09f48f770a43ccc7ae41
describe
'340910' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
7a4226048aeb8088a7b86f80ec183989
247bb629c27add0945d32a96484d2289a366925f
describe
'339799' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
15b36fa99d382ee67c588e65363b4837
f884fefad1450c6c3cfac1825f0b6a82be0a4658
describe
'215722' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
d7836be543c3e214502f23782e4e2486
767d11e8f8c3a9e4176691ce46e493d90a4b638a
describe
'4645' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
d7bbdc8ec0c61d40e424911ede360ded
a749807d5bd160040efa62a367c9b5fd3792d73a
describe
'345668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
7c7dd9440017088c53f0d73ea268fa97
7b808a34b2526f3d25d57b39170e6a5910c2c761
describe
'349937' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
588acc6d3d8b876622cc858a88afa761
6e33def6368224ca62f232f4f500e79770bd51ff
describe
'354227' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
995ac8048a63a4368f3d986638b25b82
580d7729bb9ea98d23b1db599050a3182b86f856
describe
'343404' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fe0f85253369f8d4cc091d51ea218d45
8916902361be94c32cca71d375db0e9b77776723
describe
'341770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
c264e3c5f39e647b683d14b1a7c2965e
676957f29db587fc4e346a6ac96f7992ae549758
describe
'346490' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
79b61ce1e09b899eee9cf804866eaf27
15896845a4a64c14f608b14482707fba76ea1c52
describe
'343387' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
6eab6fd5139d82da9789d4b418ab2361
8f8c91acee660ec1692d07f2d1aee939b5b8e5fd
describe
'339191' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
345df9d495e780043e539176386fb121
ff1cc939d0761cd2a0dc159f60dc8c9215cb056d
describe
'353035' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
3989ad4acb3b0f062b9059da8fffee19
b40327b1d6de60efae922142063106a41b79c31a
describe
'307881' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
8bdd89a626b2ebaa90e785508ace1579
248199cd001f5e9bdcbc194e4a15a80b3095f989
describe
'353542' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
063c4df8e786720acd8659d28e1a068a
01035edae3582b60453269a2054e5bb0c38d29b2
describe
'344250' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
990af7d93053c2eb2359f840a57ff5fc
de7fb0bfbdf7f0d37839b484f35406b0ed0210a2
describe
'159892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
feedc406c56bc87b1441eeeb92851094
4681a3e1c7cdf588a415c5cd802d120ad6903bf7
describe
'5093' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
1ebefb77f84800930de274953f1d0b04
7397ef627621512921fe1d7c5aa85be9de7941a7
describe
'344710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
517b84f3fc09c9e0eb7ec68933b42fd7
80622cba170910a6d856f0035cb585c95eb79573
describe
'354001' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
544dad4ca133a884bdf9a0bd3ecccb83
50160ec244fc1c5c1616f97f1582af7cf40c3607
'2011-11-15T02:16:03-05:00'
describe
'347178' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
e714eeaeb11bcbd490c0ddc1d2466e23
e79f0a26dfede4fa56604bea78b2aa4da6f48cf2
'2011-11-15T02:12:03-05:00'
describe
'346422' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
3fb274386285161a31003b6dafe5d57a
b41f06db191d94626aa39c58c44a4e387039856f
describe
'336800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
8d0098829882920172f9b07cbc243725
de6b4ec12a0408427dae8d65c2ea9b2cf46e73ba
describe
'324312' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
39acf324260b16fb14ac78d737397f57
ad8e531ee074f5daea9d83bfd9864b04fd781d48
describe
'326752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
400dc698d627c26e8bb21c1031e21993
4b0b63996d87bbba684674beacd3ee414b316367
describe
'348990' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d300015007998e5ad07b4d59e0de43c9
8d018d38c9e5292c45d3ac60fa0ba2a3f0d79457
describe
'353042' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
4ee5cb37da8d0d86fc20a760b8705686
5be8a9c90058e0292546ccc0ae45a111e4105722
describe
'348361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
f75e216bd8e72145a6876086f8b33edc
4b593ad914cf4f9f96ec40c33f09d5a5356c182d
describe
'346268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
f73b41ef48173fd40b91d21923b24216
aa08257009f3f0b60523579e23d48925c71b7c5f
describe
'338721' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
98c1f94fe7c1ea5231b9ffda67572912
96223848944863cb5c2a12473cc8229f9a7bd9d1
describe
'348287' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
3b1ad74416d9c7ef61d69d710af84e63
68fd93e4caea0d2bc11c457e91ab1c2cfeaf6f86
describe
'345450' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
3b6b36bf7e40fcc50febbe5b552a1afb
1af9c03d88bfc3663243cbd610db79a3921674ca
describe
'342232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
5e9277fec10c1d8e7d8ca741e602f0f6
7f04f12605506064a3690c6b669b3a081f0c0a12
describe
'341041' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
75e23d39331da17939952aaa539327a9
75a7f262d616f3cf8140a52367e7582bc8e0cd5b
describe
'352290' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
43821d3bd4ad29a8216df4073d9dffdd
0d6235adefc69ac79e9205cddd6fbbbacc333c89
describe
'350828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
d288932eed0d9c037fcb730c53aff244
11a5235bd4309ba88e0479c8631b5734518c203f
describe
'352074' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
e30f723a58552d0d5cc8ab3d1b3b8594
db47969de8512e811425cc1d56d02b4a990fe146
describe
'292511' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b3010cc55c3fc0ff638679b99aba165f
2679994f68561be2e79d3def197666fcc9bdf44a
describe
'334712' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
b8ebe0153d0d96e7780f49d5f91a0ce8
d99081efd8f426d7c299cb17b535accd82f30dae
'2011-11-15T02:12:36-05:00'
describe
'343260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a1329f1aec1cfbc250924683d9de7199
7df907536e494e72a06b1ba28c403e3346aa6275
describe
'333903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
5e9ec9b69ec0ca1164a54007f760e43a
e9bab8345e79f8a628b48723b876df509dbd9ea2
describe
'352973' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
a139d596824dba7e3d629dea16c44f8e
e12543b9e0883f6fe4f1755f35c9046e69cd53a8
describe
'353818' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
1e49b3e133440c3756248c05d41efda4
693aaf6ef3615198dc53e10f0cf2ba1db44cdb72
describe
'341170' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e488418a98aeae7605a802424f774b39
2c84afa7827a4ee81d414ce8700698a533a2ec78
describe
'300521' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
91ba4ec43f5b565c0bfe03c307fad7b9
9bd1b39fa29c5b26a8e61dd92350ee04da3ab627
describe
'341271' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
bc512b0ac896a769dca6d94d81f57c0d
1a31f8c06c215de3a6a8c94d9e809c9d22b117e2
describe
'342833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
90af063e3b09b1b951bfbf9b33868dc9
6aeceb105d1f37d887cf7b9a02d4fde9ddb9ced4
describe
'340673' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
3d78b93d8305adfd8a573ab207b2ce3f
2022558153ab37ebe7c045b7f305fb6a9dd2963d
describe
'337413' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
4b41dd921e32c326f400d2bb961dec68
90c04003ad8305dcc8f5110c054e28dda5dc4f68
describe
'337092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
fb24c4c18ade7eddc4440c8fa6bd41a0
ef64e096dfe3c6e2d9fa18ca96c7a113b55ac204
describe
'336297' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
b688235a3c93ca8b0e077149bca7bad8
56b3a2c03793e6a9c4a0fbedd533ee5f8b49c641
describe
'337008' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
4f0e88c53af9d3c2ea4cb9ea6b3a97f5
f96444fd04d59a6b6d8e51b621b8cf1b111754b6
describe
'331359' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
92077e2c41585cae467fea64cca7df7e
b7669475c9dcde7e2234eac7542befb22531868e
describe
'338086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
a381830f72a108571aba67bf911cf7c1
c3b7d91c293c5acc83b29ac234c6d346156ce706
describe
'332314' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
59d4d5ac57b7763cf3db28c49da2c4e2
750cec0fbb674d6e5674f4e3e12031aca1c23273
describe
'274960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
2139ab2d015f2f83e6ea7cd475998cc2
22e75d5f35ac1d5bf135e4974bf9d5fbafb67e9f
describe
'337374' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
940be3799d05cf455ea0cc5178a8114f
a2b51ccd381b1ecf4e64e8755d1d4d43f8dd45e6
describe
'331332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
e6af61cdd662b5bdfa85e4fb721db6e2
cca565bf6e2b27e0aa222b4b12034160ed5bcfb6
describe
'358394' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
a32ba3be65fe3cacf391be732098a073
c4c2f1f3020d19f1ef94f8841b3df80fd58ab5b7
describe
'353187' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
90ca28e92de09c4fb375b927136d3057
1dae051e5054643bebb2d714b6472e290f35d9e7
describe
'355287' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
f7b5b4c8313100b5ad46f49d8a89f0ed
03effd57f5b421193504e7961b585504dee97b96
describe
'342590' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
20151ddb74d7e2fd729548d45e48c819
35d39c0bcd25bca55db5c7068212719693eda5a6
describe
'350631' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
94cbc066c4b2e10bfe043e6e705f70f7
e7028727f64fbc711e65449f05a0d4bf584fa674
describe
'347412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
00d06098e44a7a8c0ab24d0880f164c3
d6de1d4ee2b7657492033baa01624ce4591ad299
describe
'366810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
20d5051d3a7c0d27749eda9adf85010c
b337b858d15fc735c90a288dd2174d2dd1204d76
describe
'360280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
c7acb2124a0c4c7b85aa7efa2c932140
a674fa95441e13886c5601e385ca782330886ee9
describe
'354366' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b8676136f285f7096c25120c170409bc
b9a024483170179e3d10c929bd2107c893251db1
describe
'340918' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
af9972d1e0b888b70c86b90ca634b9af
03211b64841dc69712c10bff4d219b3612837f1a
describe
'342150' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
95a661a5e4e518f15bd4a08bcab35d68
69cb542812974bc68521fa33309712a43346d16c
describe
'348891' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
4f31724e8a9f998f392bb99cfad7e7ee
9e839396b6101472646e40b7d4dfdd819625d077
describe
'349998' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
b82c96d7926a7c53b4490c40c34ecf3b
9c16cd947dd3f9cedf4499148b818ad93a63af52
describe
'320377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
0d237a62270a4f043182143bd9cf7865
caca4f438527ed973fd620b4b5ead9cc2ce2470e
describe
'348727' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
c5729e28a18a6d3ed1d112ef4d39d705
d0577a057ba514de483a6641e92c54e6623fbb03
describe
'348686' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
452df5f432396a916781f48fba23f918
381896097d865f76008f669f9f1112f60e5c96bc
describe
'345332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
2a589e9b345e0b6f52a41c46c1dd62ab
adeec902c9eccf1eb1f32077e7037930fcb89559
describe
'347138' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
dc8f6a788b8c3851270e38dd2d5124dc
4c9fe85044c659357af1c26fee69b96f8e01f98f
describe
'343964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c341cc536144c92b3a38964300cce3e0
7836f370d2b8c0754b1f58d5870bb2710d7f0b2b
describe
'343368' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
48c824377ae7fca410a53a7866f0e918
ca314babf8a4eee87232768bc3dc33842e4e48a9
describe
'309545' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
539fa15786dd194897dac5a7196352ea
0d0758f2fcbf03b7b8079f6ffca87ac4aa16f857
describe
'309903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
f9e47be6ca7204e1cba9cd6ea62d9250
ebeec291306649b73916bb159bd0681fa1326987
describe
'344650' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
ef7d350dbcfcd5e661e3a606653c8f81
595087156c4e73d13ebafc96302906d6431e5170
describe
'347875' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
843ef58dab1a96b52639dcbd6e6ca097
3c0e2f8d507019a5e29f369668361a4238bbcfa9
describe
'341827' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
c96295d1cb655294640df0295218e7ef
862ed6d629e8f587319dd830998e1dd56c4aad96
describe
'335843' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
bb59315c355778043fd79cd3d1080e85
d95faa2f7205cac873975ed3ecf867ce4db73e47
describe
'340577' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
76a191b7f7b3c8c08bfc375f0330ce9c
44d167bebd2c1b91c4d8335ef22420a5ce2ed129
'2011-11-15T02:16:05-05:00'
describe
'327358' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
7b9a49153c9dc26e896dc4b4225cf43e
e7cff3b7c561232f9ea807dac2fb3d4ae75727d0
describe
'346088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
5a1674045d02cef77940ffd069e43cbb
76199717454599fb3f33aad2814aa09cc0bf1762
describe
'340488' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
04646a38151a544bf7e13e6351746673
76ced8b2b36736a8e6d1c3a449dbd0b01a750dc6
describe
'341819' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
8cf4eb57b369ce898e0fb6790e35b593
af6d885ad9c1e4c29de363cd3c319da6cde9980f
describe
'349184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
215ee8cf92d23bf3444b717d999844df
729a72f63b6ee2de433b54ff1ea4a3116293ded0
describe
'340156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
19222fe306618ab0102affe809d973e6
16d18b0d909a9eed0b9710ae93731ff68eda1fc5
describe
'347058' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
3b68a2f5b8fd346b60df79f9e5573712
f9d02421cbb45b4bd79954230c026a4911b5e0cc
describe
'321657' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMST' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
fffae6f69f4d0a7c657f43fb87c25a25
dcc3ce8873ee926be15f857c6b48e42070198bf9
describe
'335788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
05ab2a46039f98f4a44f69836a2304c9
eca96e80d040dc0e5196ae352235a72aae54223d
describe
'339111' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
e0714fd5336eb08d85a8173efa119382
83c0db2836c83f6ab3f94e1de44d67c057d335ef
describe
'328591' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
61c24f9aa7c130f2880db964f0593acb
ae03049a57e3e5daac4b767f5fb5a0ffb9a2fc8c
describe
'344278' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
095321c8e9f167cab46bae515012e96d
93b10417c36bfa1856c0032be27bd7dd9b99ae4f
describe
'339866' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8f7035a7a66b0ecf38eb034c14f4c5ca
d3e58fb72221e36ae6250ef8ff7ae103b26a6720
describe
'334252' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
ba21bdbfe195965383f1eed3981aa7eb
29a08beeaca7bfb91cb5016c104f7c2f8da49e14
describe
'355273' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
9f8c2dd151080e296d8d78ad0f787985
f74cdd2fd28deb9abf4ac36f7ec5804cab657507
describe
'341330' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
1ee19e1f48c9fc015f9a78102710b93d
5b118032358a473361db86288c2c6bd1abe3a365
describe
'337787' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
c154426bfcb721670299ea1e32e24e9a
e8a41f60cfafc4a35ab583cd5fa041c357937962
'2011-11-15T02:09:11-05:00'
describe
'328442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
df88bc8b262a2048502516f570c46ac8
30cd904551586312c1b709073e3559f83f5b468d
describe
'284726' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
88dfa60a78f5e065bbd8c44e60b113d2
844c2ef441545488661978b2945e5074910c0d02
describe
'338052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
0614d8c18793a2b7c8b724d401981141
84e0127277db51dc6c8363677aed75bcc408b796
describe
'341678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
8f6c726d64828451cf96a965fe248d07
d8ee1d745b6101bd83e2d03d1db28e3d6fdf9988
describe
'349200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
ca050460f4d0294fc4d856658dd0b403
a91e2fadbb3a2a7d0c9b87dd9d33f7098d32f88e
describe
'335892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
63b07bf2ab5bc57ca4b24c614d18ddf5
913660c445423158486dafbcd6a51bd3e3539072
describe
'345056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
f1a9aa5d12076265b654a4cd16a5b919
968e23f6c495569c2ec9349e3d4c835bce49af9d
describe
'341778' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
d94619e80dea8ec0e7b09eb364b1536f
bc0e7ecb9202871fab85915654cbe3148068bfcc
describe
'344724' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
77efe6179e583fb7a7ab43079ca5a727
88cd70537a28327700c44c6134db2ebfba007c0e
describe
'343549' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
f39c3a0460fb9e2e5f38aa22ea96337c
667083eb5db2c541edd511029e12888743a9f259
describe
'327996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
ace31b6441bfda56b0a1b98465c2b76c
eb3867535c0c0166e4780a895af08a04a2e2df2e
describe
'340669' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
3da1b96c4399010da29145ca6c4a107d
e84c04f6390656590d35f7b76546d642a053b3fa
describe
'332589' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
b9c01be73045ae3d89dbb6861dfd360b
79504255f6d61ea9abfd77e837c2c0a32172500d
describe
'349193' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
cc86c1cd66791a52e51bfe7349e819e9
4fdcf1f37f6645f9f219c7e12d8527588a661ba6
describe
'347509' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
235c229e52b7c7e70b83bad80477d294
83a5365929f7929136789860ab320a81c50df260
describe
'342706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
913f28367cd7515fdd074c776031e60b
4d0d441b19d256225d8a9c1d9dc884cef0b2022d
describe
'343017' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
e3c4d4a113cbca17c0539bd356505322
8cfaaa208a40d32a5f1b4a01d9292cb5b7ca6700
describe
'292329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
261a23b37dfc5a4b0a34ba5c7bd04266
f24b4abc1a8b6fcd8b3e45d329ed5f6f53935d33
describe
'346480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
e0324e178fac020b77cf9acd2114b3f3
b32ce13d79dd48edea99ce3305f5a4cfd13d81e3
describe
'344661' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
ee4e6f768acd81fd3b095d750c7e357e
ccaadd80d700318e84d73717881c98896faca458
describe
'333267' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
08dc01ee57130ed5aaf502a30e7fc718
0eee24e287a86062b248f0fbede74c31daafa3e0
describe
'350066' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
03abfea6212f08b23ea9edd06c930b32
5ba0af184a83707c758ef024911cfffa305f1f6d
describe
'325519' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
9df0b84155ebeb1ac5cf14bc3e8faa3c
76a07af0aef578d7770857beb427699edb5181ac
describe
'338992' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
87c56d808fe568723776a447ca736536
e7fdd09626416b1c18de2a1cff8a574f6c8cf7e1
describe
'344982' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
4d8291bc58f154194d40205682636911
dff5771dfdc468e8ef0ef5faf7da798919ecce44
describe
'346830' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
c081e984b52f554b154d5ebe185e5b02
b187be4978b211f8f0acbb8c96143d661bed9aee
describe
'329499' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
e65e725060db7911f2585f2813c579c4
fbb71d30bcc5d1fc37560eda1a6f7f5065939dde
describe
'330804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
dcef33581284d4aeb48bc476132c19d3
a5c6b1c5d65d430bfce4e5b4c1e66c5fee549cf7
describe
'345637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
a6347f85e15e56ec0616397fc1baddcb
c863d422d39f6c371d572036d58d2d027f273a5a
describe
'285623' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
5cc3db48e0549ed23e85a8d9a0106356
d678efab9662f1005ac6e54579009298b004f602
describe
'346548' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
4f9b2c8975311e02917458ad8c1e6fa8
fae1911e6f5d2f5655d15dfa3c5771baa04f9c80
describe
'343822' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
9ae9861a9eea9e4c7ca8d21a66dbfb96
bb837d47d8a573d0bd48181dc8e39c11b586f698
describe
'331210' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
4a915372458136315f867939ca935479
f8ec7333f08ca40acac2b2872103616b97ad2505
describe
'345722' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
85929f505da82effee5fdd6531331768
468a65c0519ec4bcfefa137280afa17dc1e9d6e3
describe
'342795' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
a2f3e9d92d4e0579acf472397cd40567
028868adfb7d8b19c102aa3fc5bf863259f52590
describe
'340417' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
afba8da503580dc13815e1a6667f656a
b612341f9805ef0996ba31e36e58978dffa877ff
describe
'345199' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
06a683145a80c0b9ae49f0e0c465328b
5b3cfec860315c6b75cd5d22763b2554bce2cb11
describe
'338922' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
2c4293939cf8179d64cae3095466c006
d2cc42f6f54658364564c3d4f91662bb9dee633a
describe
'350247' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
38993855c1ed6fa4ba554450997e3b98
df564902d7e2a96e6eb67eb6701930fce1cd36cb
describe
'351761' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
b5398afcf324657c5d8154ec63831c78
28a7126765cc445dd8c3e5fc83d88065fedb4664
describe
'352017' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
3911cb5162e966f69fdf7691685ff0de
a4698a5000ac757ac2a2e7dcc402beccafc985f0
describe
'347955' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
d02209fbe726714f9518d271dc379ef3
08e37e10613f33549dce1932dbf976886ff3a4e3
describe
'339803' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
50b7c2b7a37980fd699ccc9c0cbf5dbe
839edab4786f4bd65ced0cc2962787584e53155f
describe
'345158' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
ee6e04d2dffc3f9e0eadb2e6dc47e7f9
92336963758d1a2950cc8bf33a44c7c875a281e8
describe
'291626' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
47aeb7ce49e02796acc166f652a27745
455e6e5aab5b99b399de415846b9884fc3d7f542
describe
'354759' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
d561f220a21331027035dfd33497f21e
4c51158cb24775f1b48430b6d3b15287dc33d3bf
describe
'351671' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
bb6e7e80aec251e4126aaab58fc3cf99
0d744a8b305d1a772bb36f92ce9754d2c8494c67
describe
'355790' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
3329249fe953f10b07f11f9bb7c1415f
d55ddb0d59436c60964c1024548e4ba08721d39d
describe
'351890' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
c7b9d1668807c5dd6f62ff891bc9cbd8
ba12812ca4ae746987fe6201f0f37619fa977ffd
describe
'352667' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
f81913818d779fb87d039afed4a8ea43
9e4e5ef29a0d7dc0db6af8bb1d78e61cb89ebc8c
describe
'353635' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
86f92f505f55419e0a2c82ff126c66aa
6d1b13c0bf4eba22a45aa8040904da9a962811d2
describe
'348606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
d30b95773c60fcd4881c6176d16791ce
722956d479e758f4daff3f589ecdbd9d5e87bd46
describe
'352877' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
07c0328f813755d607476fffeffb4833
8e2d04a6b5b0d96436cd800ee98459225dbbaad0
describe
'338675' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
be6ef5a7dd4c326e915dc7a3e2c769bc
40724eb2dfccfee58f7346d80ed50a0630d0a581
describe
'348798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
bcb2a9d7dc9f282818f7e00ed272598f
554f9ac968f25c2e9d76b3b9bb7a77e8d9973bb4
describe
'349601' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
50642e931e0337765c9c1957cf8ab036
5401aaba5093a2ecf4d2d4896570e8b50a070d06
describe
'355716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
3697eb8fcb03ad00631099aabfe4fba4
ce7b230e2da2bc9577aa1212a8aff7203db5cb29
describe
'353082' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
84e7fd986a8b1148f68bd507e8097c0d
b1e757f50ae3f422befda3eb4ed3575d4a2c9527
describe
'348000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
cf07cd56ea070aaa1d6b0b749076c0e4
f1740e57241698fab5aeb80487cd93c4701ffbcd
describe
'347105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
4b8245b22db96cd15ef5764db58bdf0c
1b2e46450a1b4e68a0893aa7e3d18687967fad1f
'2011-11-15T02:10:08-05:00'
describe
'349761' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
4e1ad2a4562f54c8ab53fb831922b89d
d49cb8a7b68cd3a59e243e4083bd28ea87d80f10
describe
'352463' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
d436522218d63951cd38d74588678e80
9b6301938d0f5e9232d88e2d8f3c0ff038e33d91
describe
'350024' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
c325e95a027334e587308264e238ebf3
ee00ecd7ea9aef7e84e5045e59717299040ffb7f
describe
'348719' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
adf8cffcb536d52237fff9c8cc52ef92
6862405810dc57bab42fedb5b10f5324296773e0
describe
'336786' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
07e88110fb830abcbcee2daa5040383e
1b3c51512c19a3c715a82962c6b07e0dd7d6a38b
describe
'358485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
036fcf0af31856372c3ade9a3e38503c
283955a619efd4fb9b0de95485b139744ae8d3d3
describe
'357028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
039ccc25262671128d56c63e1863c65e
2ad244adb9ef04ee1104598b458fe98f14fc30fa
describe
'326914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
fce38368ec3347d4ee700a420cfe5589
2e5698a40d1d6a74ef3df5c7ffb327f0d14367df
describe
'351509' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
411161bac13eda9429c00a14b95c5d91
ca46a6f0e508450ceecc637d07e2287338f381b6
describe
'339327' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
83aa40772b4bcbb62f76d8a55b8f5bd0
9814a250f45accf447a21b9721707e163d856776
describe
'340945' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
40d4defb6d05f647b6341d6d2cb1309c
420ca47773a32a68ef54a73972d570251f571e42
describe
'329563' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
1e2990001e9724954fec47ff9fd1cd7c
c422d86c0da305e482ce673d999309937086c4c3
describe
'341549' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
a9abb5df9d33fc3a8aaa39af5ce9e7ae
97d7b4d2396a0af2ba7c2e98b37afa94631cb09c
describe
'340029' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
69dc04874492ac9cc686d86762007858
3c14e172d348fa06ce21d57a88fcde1f99906168
describe
'334778' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
aff69f7bab1ca170201dd082d51b2519
473f1b0fc2546643702acb3be267c1f976ac591f
'2011-11-15T02:15:54-05:00'
describe
'348588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
351b21be23939b63aeffe72cbe36da81
cae0fc48f317e23c02a926dd1dcbfc9949eb252a
describe
'347764' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
4dcba2d4a8369ce283ce91ecb2023c9b
02a27b31e0c9c8aa6d61dfed9757830927a473a6
describe
'116497' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
d036e8f3b21d26393d2b41b062ed5499
689593b2589d4b41aaa889dd4bf95bd02e4ee8ab
describe
'248873' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
9ba01de7320d864cad73341dd46491b4
09d2537ce0f17b9f651578fbc27fedc8b7559d22
describe
'253865' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
46148385d487fa0f0aa2d453e6ad59f4
908380e4fe33251c7213b3a3558d7069f90c8c30
describe
'328911' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
fde58c0932af790f1007df25f5955358
a2265cd17d4c8b0bed530b88463dca75f2001aaf
describe
'315563' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
e03f6502df14b47b8136cc856f9553a9
c48cdbf1617e906aff6faa0972ed4ba520b1fef2
describe
'318632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
dfea61fe5860d1628280482838fe1ea5
0087bc8becc6c06dfb9b651559d2a2e4ffb39414
describe
'301425' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
8d1db32133927b5766a1cf9285444b38
c366ba14d5b2a2f18e3d03e82b670e56231bb76a
describe
'5620' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
5ddc470d7cfb50121ac323bca2526e20
8a8e94f242f21e1b7923868d797da9aafd5d3a1c
describe
'379137' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
f97274e92208b2e68604b8a8058b5c3d
55aaa41ff8cc5f0e1dad802a16630576ed82be6e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92096' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
fd42737f93be542459caf5732f400327
baba1c1d6662233a883ebf0788271e33dd5925ee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32851' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
0c03fb2bcc1b0def4f120a6f6968a128
e5b3fa36d9b10b4b9b5939fba151078f39c28bb2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84513' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
473cf52f64b00a1618b6720cf03c9528
b25e89cfe083266eb24e73a1dd401642f6378714
describe
'26223' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
644f50f588721c44f41d15f929d1f2c5
5b87ad7c00c3e776888561f999c6286f2d91792d
describe
'79904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
7fd449dfd248c2b3ab0a86211c36171d
f5365cd61f9abbff8f48e9d8048e6f3aae98268f
describe
'27809' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
3d1cd36d7ad6a0bded596d666f72d881
fb2da67a95af1a7ad7bf2d679108cf338adf6a7b
describe
'3524' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
744723bf8980d08f57a37bd46087a738
dbfb6caa97798404dcfd294b7356ee11605cbdc1
describe
'2843' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
e1fabb9b7c3768f277336201a19a5926
fce9a6b6ace1973f4283a052c03e4a194f566d03
describe
'80298' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
f74a33b1f4d82e85603931ba50bcfeb4
a3b86b69af4060d1a647ddc725eb10bb61d3fd97
describe
'26377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
751fc6ec8902c204585bab2819bbfc80
645d98a8a4e349b4731bf08c9e170cffa73fdcf4
describe
'106814' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
378f3e9f93783ee5d2b0e0118706ad80
49d027742dee003fcc4741fc204266689636cd5f
describe
'35819' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
362829445ccac8efb86f7688546caa74
cfa3ad480442705ff6413db6532567796c0c11d7
describe
'109209' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
81673a25264e565c44f4aa0bb296d19b
3262161d84395c66850a788bb409766a1ffa7d9e
describe
'36820' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
d93851fcb489f590ab415ae47c46249c
b5c36243bd228c6cce5a502963a26190aa8e0c1a
describe
'46036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
2033cff22dc7a0a7aaba9cf280a7d299
a43b48339182a131bac0fdb12f8cec825c1e05dc
describe
'17692' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
1db982b498ae2a9718df1569cd0472c8
67b0b62a4bc61d291a882bc6d71618fc1b1839de
describe
'94084' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
7565b1ab7bcc6e6c3d53e8d157d53bcf
7ce0462a93e08bb03afc3c528df339fe83538ed3
describe
'31991' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
61b80e144bac2c806d9743fdd7a5584d
8f3272214da626eaf66c8fa9cd98bbbf9e4b2579
describe
'111699' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
c28e1168d8510b1d605fbc3705839cec
19eaccc79f14f6c48c7a2a1a19b39aa5bd7d82ad
describe
'37831' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
da6243b2184cb56147e1b3e6aea86e57
f817f4fd625bfa46a1c59810c9320e181a152a42
describe
'114632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a70bb5e9a11fbeb580bf0ff9159d6dd3
47cb64fc8b8ec038cbd2eb696a5b7f1508ae9a76
describe
'38244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
0c8097f15205098f693118b355e8f4d9
602f68971da54c5383cd07b28e19c422a7fafb44
describe
'112664' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
e44a4e1c9e8dd16339b1fd2ffef2ab1c
1eb700198ac0b52d9f7386a843f0ac1794f0fd98
describe
'38571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
2b1c5277e7853e73f0f3072e6102a7f3
6e4bcae6828783a23176c808ff415daae11222a3
describe
'114968' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
ee9af57a05e32ed1df2ad04b6fd5fae9
2ef7c19de34b60bb8eaeda78b31a4088365dd620
describe
'38410' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
418a9499f4646cdf222462fd678f64bd
0c1a18c8257f40e3c0ff65298714caf0083d3ec8
describe
'110004' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
17c3bbd6fd62a5dec1483e3658ca3dca
0408050edf5becd0ab719b08e139dcdf27072f3c
describe
'36902' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
752e4610ca64dbf3c273880e5f54f630
8c33a1a6b146aecf4a323489a9c2b4d95973e768
describe
'114668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
b195daf378e24948d62b750188e95c4f
dd78d54e19332d1d288daf057c2330ee5b233039
describe
'38479' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
85e374d06f160583b2cdae86d30e9758
cc4101eb4a6048200e51d40226a09a04e5a4906d
describe
'114322' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
d7064a304f2f724a264193048a2ab7fe
04bd63c91702f47034f34e6e3acd603045b2a79b
describe
'37246' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
b38d9f0da25bb014d26cdc5f8774a502
b6b444484bf9c5dd6294c6389ee46a305f05c5dd
describe
'114284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
e2550768e1648b58ffa6d326beb08209
52ae243cbcdb03ca988b93a9247fafb05607cb2d
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
767f7d515f75936191f0afe95bdbdd02
d32a6e3bedbe586b3df950207f2cf6feefa42674
describe
'113003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
7ccbf1b4bba81344977446dbb5164b60
b08ee6e9fadf4129e238868bd622a4ef705792f0
describe
'36803' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
a0576c8e6daf84c64e4974334d034f15
15f3eda5b2e9881a714f952d0dba7dbcc1076ade
describe
'111402' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
0c69a68e21ba10227583c5e5fb04cfc9
ada2c9dbba1a033c4d47a367c55c06bbeb077f88
describe
'37619' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
34499e7b41b302613d3ff1babe1dace3
602041b15b891d8c20e1edab040d1ad38283be7c
describe
'100133' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b3b333c2290d4dc9685a6eeafe236089
6b043f93056d0810633526137c25c4234371085b
describe
'34983' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
cb8ceaf4f354edc8e10e2f2a3914dae2
acf78344e30902adbb61d86b90df30375767c917
describe
'114421' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
4a7f172b90bfe576a6308e8ee7186cb6
1793922935b5dcf590e5606d60eba30e3237d0e3
describe
'38397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
eda1c3fbe226dee5390e35a0d30ad03d
244900d332a7fc4d47e00efadb4958876391a59b
describe
'114200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
39d1361bf6ba13accfc94403650efdf7
bfc15b760cac989cc851067bff0f14d2c604932b
describe
'36961' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
35272ee6456399cf4c7ad821081001a5
d4906526ea5277903bc0ab5e8a42812d0466ab99
describe
'114767' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
61f88156aa679eaa96c0919008a837cf
0128cdac02bdb6417ef84cb4dc20d19d5ac1f0b8
describe
'38486' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a7d53f2fb6bacdfbbc830a6263fae4b8
5bf807895b9439b97d0394dd2ec933573620cfbf
describe
'114899' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
9438093f4afca797c41ec77affac9845
c52b2ff3e352544fa621ac2f9e97e1210a48a2cf
describe
'38272' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9f3b11525487e57d0f64e0af08e0199d
1edf7110f707039d8e940fa9414f2620d4d7b5ab
describe
'115119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e4914e9305b0b96c948dce91351fbad5
2cb4e63ed2242df144dfa595cbdcc9defe556390
describe
'38477' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
75dbb4e38ad440d57968954f663678e3
175e119c691aa9e8ae63338bf0dbd270b4313882
describe
'112478' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
16d42e16f0e84d4edacf0d5a011a30ec
9df60018033abf3c7c884701d814855e8b904769
describe
'36924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
33ad24ee738173409c16ea17b7a4d424
ed538b485e59fd14613a29004d7c7da628ba4d3c
describe
'113167' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d40d410b270d06ebec9a3445f3c771d6
2172994a015b0b60c97be54863c8a961b4e7555e
describe
'37982' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d11c945c796b1f7027b791819b8cf227
08988e9aa18f5bcfa425bf29ee4a7d68c679dd68
describe
'113633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7ec7250bdae18631d5987808cb1d5f3d
16821df48e2664d88cfad66914b0ae0a9f12bc67
describe
'37205' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c10a6c85180bcf5fd021c27b586a77c4
a7b43d6a64677a9ec8297c1c96f59044ec971d1b
describe
'112984' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
36d8a58371e8c12aa100253d239146a8
351336c4ee87dda3a83d4056a0774481db3c7c1d
describe
'38082' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5a8f12de57c45845ea47a96fabe47691
823edfb75dd29b2dab0e7122d827047c1f3e92ab
describe
'114667' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
3d8f41bfcddac2f0993fc99bac448f95
e451d68318e2320ad75464b049c38c9220083f39
describe
'38140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
696a36bfaf2c31fdf0d3d4c1c676de1d
9dbdbe5b37b7fda3549fff21369233fef0f9bd2e
describe
'113478' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
3696423289d4bcaea08b6a837962a487
ee86f63329f44b561ac28410d5fef4881576f571
describe
'37221' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
c97f0163c3b4e21e5ddb5bb7e11f973d
b16363616c4aca22afd23767e1095afba6a828c2
describe
'111644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4d1c458cec10d078fe7ee788e0c16784
bc9d26ab9331fa5728dfb15e02017c20f3629e92
describe
'36002' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
637b405cdd7a52a1ee19183fe2936b8f
df8f1483981faecff2b7c6c52085c74a1b96b90a
describe
'114091' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
b038ad4687a85f48c2de9cc947af12f8
54badcdb781ad3262f54309c5ed6994fc4787d87
describe
'38341' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
ed3833e985981c009d22e983675fe946
4490d78c39fdedcce9f1d82c645857419485e8ae
describe
'111944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMYZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
72d44d2d7d68a8a4fc9d454f18ae36dc
36a64521e7abb9fef53d2c11024327667b3e7044
describe
'36818' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
63a9139ba0af0e511cf5fddd8a425e5a
459cd3d008e5173f3d00bfa7be54755db6652ce1
describe
'114085' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZB' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
3bb4486b14aae72da1d4e7c7a791dffd
4884ea3254731b112e385d567a7347ac57b57f37
describe
'36972' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
93c7f331619298118c60ca2623af4d40
e36480d81f22770fc01744f949a16aeb01e4bbfa
describe
'103381' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ebb968a851fa49c44729eff1ae7fa583
29a47a88498c1b477d6dc8a8333050288bf75412
describe
'34221' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
6fa79fcd05dcdf229dcc4ff4161f6fe5
9fe3c83b25ba022da158111f2809431ef6dd3367
describe
'113285' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f7e54b01a1dbd85336fe258cee958b80
64920f5ab5a724461d6aa9425323744d76f89c77
describe
'36703' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c07c5577ca5380d762369988823583c2
8d8ab9df2732ec5c3d006c7248f418581ca49fc1
describe
'112787' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
f126757d7803efb7ce7cf422e4a69329
640b8d9ca3bf1ccf32f98a3362c470924fb3e86b
describe
'36950' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6408377a5e12821dbe47b79fd84f56f7
6b435cb965e3c91e4e11b6979348b7527c4e686d
'2011-11-15T02:16:52-05:00'
describe
'113907' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZJ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5c97ea117ecd5c09ccd0e1f5a7efad41
070d5d2905ef8a50046b5ef32f6fa2a9e7b26849
describe
'38621' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
374432bcb6fc1fb47b33d84ee5b74b15
eda0df074064ef86a59e2358af7394037a59eb2e
describe
'109806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
1c55e815fc732717d1ac33f2e6fea0d4
5cc89234e70e12d7f17a5c91c094742144e40488
describe
'35529' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
eb7a594c4811fcb0a4e73167ade7c37b
a20304cb3f6bea3da3a3ad8aa6c948063aadc50d
describe
'113200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
08856d1ffde5cd6d988f8e5d8c347fa3
2a907c46db865db4377f38dfcbcb285fa98e3006
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
936ce39da605cdc94241ac35ba92c311
e2a56ae40614556224ff68c38d2affd79620a682
describe
'111210' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
5b599abc3c58a4f4444445ed975edb7a
78acf50f299bd7c9d62f6265ea55d9ad304c35fa
describe
'36415' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
df75a5184d5d83f81e21d5bd4febee09
0451ede37db9260623c5a5059484a0b80d677ad6
describe
'112452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
e4e124e9951a2c91f479527727aab306
17418b6535ab2229e38224b771ceb1f69c43ea6f
describe
'37190' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZS' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d1d7517b158a0df5f26cc960ccaa1d4a
323c6b1226450e4e99d4e53ed45c680077439c12
describe
'106583' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
666124494678fa44b83f2dec5b0b314f
53239c3a42903f8eed4150b17339ed4add76eb53
describe
'34916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
ba0dfe4d6c7ae44133a33cb87f654a16
5a61212b741ea806ce747ea2772012a10bb17647
describe
'111959' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
388fbbf39b9bee0f87119f9d872ff32d
e3d9f10d827d14f5acc5868a995b25e0a6c9cf96
describe
'36218' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZW' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
ecb9c0d6d2a29cb782f61233653d6ebc
4570b269477bade16d131fd7ce83c0b8440a9d2e
describe
'111694' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
a5a26ddb94b8147d0b3c6dc34623b79e
5a9492f46be1ef5afcdfadd44905709706f70dc4
describe
'35973' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
5550795823f6f755a1abcfd6f70200ff
651b4338dc55b71275010c55825255b6621ca163
describe
'115316' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAAMZZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
fcdd4b58e85750a686abd7d4e387a517
82fb6fa13c9bde50f3700e71ac112d83875010c4
describe
'37632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
e2d6afcdf25c03911466e378b2be97b7
53e9538b1f3db8926f394d7997d079c9b9708226
describe
'112112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
ce8da5cd909ba49ce34762abbe2c32bb
0c6c1aefa97008638aabc3b26303c2b70e7122b1
describe
'37278' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
c3efbd79b73785eb12951fb79e2b49b9
a8652c6af578e859539d16012471708c3d5fcf0d
describe
'114098' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
821c423e3933d85582e3ac8929bbdb8b
5284571bb2045fe55a06ccca9465f31643cce630
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
96c54b823712c3b510894316fcca4d3f
d85c3a66d4428ba8f9861c5ef6e316d19df63714
describe
'113916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
b9bfe40ee6d4cb9bb9608dda64ca47ef
6f9bcb6ca1cb7acf8944d89fa3b701401c7ab3d6
describe
'37286' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
14970be24569bb5b6ebed7413fcc53af
e88083a16839f98ff26f2f5dc1d272f45932279f
describe
'112126' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
4e56924ecb9acc0eca17e41e553d4d7c
d033bda4bf7b951347daf1857b049fe888a6e260
'2011-11-15T02:11:13-05:00'
describe
'37695' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
6b504259bb6e81843b8bdbee04e3eccb
dd19045065d8a88857d22a9858e6b62633f9aff6
describe
'113826' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
001a6d246968a81a37c3ea0aee8e5d12
a5175319df10887152a914a65f7970fc08d568be
describe
'38105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
b22cfb221eb1d4e976fb70bb2e8b5fc3
cd658a2ba33cb1999e37cd620806092b08121d9a
describe
'114331' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
c9f2220316110205d7f3dd3f5701270b
33d1d10f473ddc74e8455b9b0c4282d8ed09d5ce
describe
'38250' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
43b3cc3e433bee84c561eed141b1db77
36169bbb32ca9fd1bad5bbd926be165e458313fa
describe
'111177' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
5d70556c92c4fb7fdf220f3fe05ae3c6
269e6403e32e3ecc2c418959fa6b36ef9728dfd2
describe
'36807' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
1758006d6cabbd15df6c0812a6e8befb
fe41762d92096871d89e1472f0dcce0e52678f56
describe
'110218' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
33009047f1790566ff250dfdbd3eacf2
a3e0b49cc8f8ea917766bf85ff9f39ffb0a5e6a5
describe
'36462' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
846fa8f486e7def1eb0296590d713ce5
35038ceac1d57458017164a5c0b80145e089e5f0
describe
'112046' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAR' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
3d9692b10268699feec5e28aca9860e8
f7a1c3394b51794f2a0d6a4c579614749e1ab75f
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
20c9967f4f59fb3316ee1c766c8e9374
3036af11c30a87781f39cb5398440da13d5ac392
describe
'114981' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
1653105d7427f54f0ed467948c6836c1
595398214ad3128d864d878cfa25341b98dbbe2a
describe
'38007' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAU' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
367bafb6fb60d6cdf5943b11ad2a0a34
17c13d3721bb90ec9eeadb075e552614163bcae2
describe
'111856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAV' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
9c930ddfc68dd6b4918d855353bae174
d6f0e435682a951c6d75856ed93a6f8efaadf381
describe
'36361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAW' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
26b5aa2b9d83be1c86a25f4060ad4e81
06356e40694092aae32bfa828d684b61f4630dc3
describe
'114886' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAX' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
bab583737f01c28f7b2909314a1a80b5
a178cbbc0666a56f6b79eba95c6804982b286df0
describe
'37935' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAY' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
87146965959283a8ad20c5d7e5a6bf80
f6cc58986f44dbfc987dd013ca86f84cffeab76d
describe
'110729' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANAZ' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
1500c92b3c806aaa7b93f5bd0cc05dd1
9f3582fb5c5924bccba4d825562923e314c15da6
describe
'34941' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBA' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
3f97a07dce946ddd01c2bcde43682ff5
2bdc759dceaec93c1e292984075869a43af3d9fd
describe
'114529' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBB' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f2b8a7ba844647ab68bcc4df889460ca
38dc0d40f9c37c1e3b0af745c4f03ddb43dab83d
describe
'38197' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBC' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
2f2aae23eecdf5634eb5913cdce6424d
712a12d1f4ab36031ff877746af0564e2b30b3de
describe
'111549' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBD' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
07d78943a97547a23632c4b88af2d93f
6762b50ded41f76c71589889acfbbc1f045878d6
describe
'37288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBE' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
8d1e84c51dca213e20e0feca6aa2b257
b33e8d61af4d0186ce5cabaec04fb3ead3a46a3f
describe
'114193' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
22f296bae13d30f2e58ab5a673f5bef4
8f4fc59a4fc98e7a3c31c98b99cbbbd59166e4aa
describe
'37673' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
46ab3c891c729d2b926a5d6a1c39c011
633e4605f15ab19e89fc6ddbd3e975317c2fc331
describe
'95611' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBH' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
a286aa66dd2492d589de39361de70e96
45969626ed5c75e6c215badc1bf2498bdbc7aa2b
describe
'34366' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
bce324a50fc8916c3a30dc90f1a7a34b
131152b5821861081fced67c8c119b24620a8cf9
describe
'113865' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBJ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
cbd9eaea071e61743061f24ed5993dd8
0cca8de406d71ba95a07d3d494f289f6259f1727
describe
'38672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBK' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
7e2ffecd836ebc9b46bc9a84ca4bfe9a
9d2f120b6031dcebc0b8616a5e1b4eff247c408b
describe
'112649' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
8e849cc0c8dcf93728daba6783f542f2
f2f3a5d38c7192aec5e5eaf919998d2d119759a3
describe
'37375' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBM' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
7aa66d27024671e3cfa0d566ef990280
d0d5c0077d2e6fd3e9d5a97bacdf922f791b4286
describe
'113825' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBN' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
d5c4cc7715962fd0c92698b6cb2d5aac
40ae1d5b19f69aef7c123fbbc68c3243d417da07
describe
'37257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
68522ff878abe5edec71a929d3e53d01
6a6f47b3f3f3672ab691fbc75c83c958469492b3
describe
'111167' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBP' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
75fa74cb5951cf411718576a1de16dba
678d26380f3e4fe970a8a77063a28ab9eb3611bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
174114c63a9629558aed640cf47aae08
f0ef9529ee06a2ff55818b8767eb2b7ff53274c8
describe
'115166' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBR' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
d4e18f540eb15e0be45c963080051925
8a2e347f29d3cd40712c7d977d54371cd6c175ad
describe
'37909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBS' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
c601a001ed32780e7a224663b97e8832
1256dfc90c03845774eb188ee1610999317cb4dd
describe
'115959' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBT' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
ed2c2c822c8cff54001f9328a6e48703
d29181d4bb64d5ce87e0c786486a15409f99ca96
describe
'38394' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBU' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
280526d429fd94d2e20e58e9c902c450
c7c94dea069db1e0b9b0f31625e76ae6c538e92d
describe
'112526' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBV' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f9727536ffe949d22dceae730a5ce112
dfe8514a3c24c80eb8fccf5cc057d62bdf7e5088
describe
'36347' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBW' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4ecb9633e78c45970ae20e9da66437f4
9a740b2061cecbbb778a75c9d13517550def4e47
describe
'112305' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
54dbaa9c6716257171526702e6c9ae15
9aaf41b5afd517eb801c938c8076317f001532b0
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBY' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
03c8c9857318f45c11818058de354522
fd8be4efda6a5ae268ba0ab859157bb4f13082b3
describe
'111813' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANBZ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
57fd93b394c8c10f8affb2f47c7b503b
513e1b70500bd472bd27b29a5d7b62949b054f07
describe
'37270' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
42c692ad7f18147c0b4f546acd57a58b
70cf15910bf8349bf1eda2036d5d17cbcd554e01
describe
'109184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
435fb6219bc311d0f173e4df66ec7ecb
30b8f45cec2b5d3111bde2122103149add605862
describe
'36450' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCC' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
c5c62b4e89d46399225637c192e09b01
bbe88b179b6769d67faa68316d2fbfa28ebec5bf
describe
'113805' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCD' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
7cbfecf07537270dcc5cae0642a8f2d2
64fe79aef64e9b3adbab269e52dd9598969b8f4d
describe
'37031' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCE' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
150c2b0ed830f26dcbc772476c3bef57
40362bcb5bd2a67eeb49a78ad78adc63dee551d2
describe
'113717' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCF' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2de8ccddbb3d0140c7699ac7a097c857
6d981709337fe2d10268f2dad76d4fa1f9e33d21
describe
'38086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
76bfb74bfa64dd134bf025ada07f5f43
5e5f15f07a49c75ec09de524fde17b2bdee0b3e7
describe
'112026' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCH' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
ebf63c60d3eab87e69e767b6bda7747e
461d62b9cd59bba15d6ee8327692c86ff7a1c867
describe
'36813' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCI' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
1a4c0927d84afaf2b730a8f87c90f5ae
ed549169e10b2c9d8728e31248963f93981342f9
describe
'114233' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCJ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
2604c3614ce288c8f7a381cbf91cdc4d
5d15dc26f67952d2aa4c6359fb2fa2053c8e5f8a
describe
'38406' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
474ae75d91063b0c4943055b4385a273
cae8f97aa40439cf10f8ecfe010a6de2440158ac
describe
'96653' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
c4fd524441b5ac8c018884b79ccb5e5f
8848aec06e82cbaa09c4494aab78c9d3ed484c8e
describe
'32099' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCM' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
53b9954428bba6d5a27a2846e2825a7b
de68678712e54294254a9b2ff2c58c2954558013
describe
'111534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
9dc11fc526a9c9c2cb814ae897c17ab4
7377852d52fa70f936514e3be980a42f2222ae39
describe
'36427' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCO' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
aa8bf289659d75c99570ff672315f8ea
bfa4e5236cb22b7782b1e4e495d66ca177a9f2f3
describe
'114472' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCP' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
7fe3ce49170d1f73b178115537581ab9
6c514e72bbbc4de80c3fb6953be13aa1afdbfacd
describe
'37217' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCQ' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
64c7b1b98da6c778ef0c6357fc819f7b
ee65ad041dc40948d6e334e38d72e2def3ff6502
describe
'111905' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCR' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
911230495f34004dc0f2689e9fb5fa11
800d73dce25fd3f88857fca59321509cf3466a53
describe
'34909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
c0fbc5cd3140646684606356e6b8e15a
dc8292df9307061f615ce0a4d943af8d14e16436
describe
'112051' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
fa49ce19c699bbc81026d01966e0ccc1
e850aa71e829938afe8e6cc8d17e7cca07d24a99
describe
'36192' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCU' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8b13bf0da80d5df7abc17a6c898a3383
03309ddd2672a0dbac259b81e6e73a6d59cd3e61
describe
'112639' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCV' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f506275f24a57287b47cb9f4fa1bdaf6
a9177f4481b394dbea6f346ce44e9d9672e74830
describe
'36019' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCW' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
09b6c666d92f62fced5d8ca31251419d
65b3ca7bcb7f07af9addb1e80d7c7a7581525482
describe
'114923' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCX' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1d6d89f51b3b4968b90ad27b30c49b40
51b2142fdbdffc034c8abf36dcaffa5b4111bc6e
describe
'37503' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCY' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
cb67fd0e610c3413a3af35e25fa8596b
d96f15edb74812feaffb407b6194823403e05c6e
describe
'110156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANCZ' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9223935b9d16289fcbe9300c8846554e
62b12e703c9a519a838a868e4a53b4d682b9e5d9
describe
'36522' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDA' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
1ad35c3775777354b7c83a384a08db54
16399e8ac9d6ee6ad73516336b809325363a1847
describe
'109471' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDB' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
eaddbaf9906869044a27a75fec1b5468
2666bd6b281a56666a064f1c67f269f8a12cba44
describe
'36228' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
6605db263ff5551dd9cfcee43dfc3a3f
f82b622a30e54500ae81a1e100b16030d1bb6ab1
describe
'109105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDD' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
4d4bb562d45b904d8d1072ba597d4315
7af0bb149a4e7630d04a1ad61b08b18776db1db4
describe
'35047' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDE' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
ac76124ca5d1a84d593e99ca69227539
3c8e7cbd7e6d893fc704d929bddfb18d409a086a
describe
'114709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a140ad3226a33eb1c66cdb96fa30b9a7
18be966daf51f36f43db2f60526b093b19e6432c
describe
'38015' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
cb52cdf02c2885aa4c16db59f96268db
bdbfca0a063ae0162e25cf0cd6d4c903f0a23784
describe
'114135' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDH' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
63515206fc9e7fdfde4710d1ef615117
a01699baa4a7d66fa0052d77e7ff68380d53a251
describe
'37899' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
899a6080127fd98aa2ded8d3b6a13130
979d9890b532102c266325cce4563a067c97c31f
describe
'113902' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDJ' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
45754371112437ff41a44c0467c79ebc
703ce6360ff0a853e2f90a154c979939f5b088ce
describe
'36208' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDK' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
3817f4f4ef8aed4dbd20214950b74f6d
94260e4bf05a683d55e00b122c2828a21315687c
describe
'113346' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
b8b552d194c6c341b411f7d408f671bb
e0f8f703986136f86703bbf14b2593c36268f4af
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDM' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
db0af5f358970649977a99149ea84f68
51cdc01fc2c1abb7a55a0efe9b98d328e374becf
describe
'111681' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDN' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
fc95f2f9dadf9d8fb3de2e6f9553c8e1
8e5d29117c28c3cb9ec75585cde3d697cd3b2981
describe
'35673' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDO' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
7667a474063483b73dba741bb4d7dbdc
02db411a9e5898f3398f1c7579c676815882800a
describe
'110568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDP' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
74e2ac4f10faf32780a6504dad9b0f91
db1e87bc0d733e98743eb04869ca84484e3d5ea1
describe
'37553' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
6a9e9bc89ac39b5319b9932eb2b5099e
10ed5c9691444b1140e2aa2c69206907fed0aba2
describe
'112175' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDR' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b424f1501d5844344d95798405e51a10
f9c562cfe5d23e4aa0f379a3d11c899028f8271b
describe
'36320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDS' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
b82d9d9084ad1b4a24faf5cdb42de7d9
7a44ebe7c2b43fa708d92412be5cab7b14373b45
describe
'113839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDT' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
ab70a0b6c91c5e8ab5473b91661cf5ad
30722ce37e41725978e692aba46f621ba7f7e5ff
describe
'38146' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDU' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
e8c7316f22dac42e96246cfa08b5d7fe
728e6129b87f89d5cccfaa99beb8619028cd7799
describe
'109215' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDV' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
107079cf18d20e32053b71e88eecaf3a
52fd6bd287f2752da41a65479564013a3b99202c
describe
'36065' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDW' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
0a8540a1b6bdd22d97fa4edb3ab7ad91
f0f80e4bd85bf1e69fcc0c97a5a3d8719b5bff78
describe
'95951' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
f4d90419b19e5cf00f0978c3089d33e7
6c54dfb33d92fcbc24dd140678169c3ebb932410
describe
'31938' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDY' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8091bd4c51ac6e6846be134b56a8d299
6e14bde8d539f3858d863f9667905ad0bc00bb3d
describe
'113706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANDZ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
6951534884dcb2c43148452b8028f62a
04eb0c27b03a80822b100c5623ebaa40f194f866
describe
'36569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
25747b78a4fe6a91e59d0b5da8845d93
28916416738a5fd7d0bcb780c858d38948a883d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEB' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
8bf3335547c35eaa4e250244bdf508d0
99491470d5667818356494416078d9d25daddda5
describe
'37172' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEC' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
194ce33dd4009c153294b5763e2f5802
a24ea4255ac4f98f3f40cc35a5340dbbc3b91003
describe
'113883' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANED' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
bb9a9eac14832390539ffc50095e41e4
ad6ec5fdeec97b4d1fbe3c18528b2d829d6081b5
describe
'37125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEE' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
7b3e8fe0aedc72310d15719310729f13
38252d1b0badfa91f2aadc4c5e5c5da6daba229c
describe
'111849' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEF' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
3a1a01375fd23ca16ebff8e72dfacdc1
e9d70b7399d2335099cd62ac65dc39f1dc319e35
describe
'36942' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
f4fbaa4451b2fac98aa735c1114bedf6
227dec033738a3569e4ef1255bee6522a7fa4f54
describe
'112862' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
d9de08e66d72b39182c4752f67c490ce
0ffa3afffed5a882a2c6e5043946e4d97498c40b
describe
'37583' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEI' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
42dd7e5052ee14d58f9b2cd0dc250a8d
c5cf65c6ba7d8caca334e8a78435f4264f945699
describe
'113079' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEJ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
fc5731b0c34b2f261323e3e279a1d83a
ae4b436ae496220c68cd078cb0b796c9f5adb740
describe
'37672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
7d11355287bd66de7e1b27fb6667d31f
bdea03df8fc78bc70cb2b81cd98bc00393fd3e23
describe
'64867' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
e949e751af8918bd38d831aeb431504f
7f82588439de94e551dc4c2c4f91aeca13d871d6
describe
'21773' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEM' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
221ee424a5432832e6bce4594564607a
027f6a44fdb40af2d2cc5434252b8fcfd9ee1402
describe
'2916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
e09c822f731eb7479d00fc5320ec2776
76b166ddab7eaa143b980c5299c93690cd07e2c2
describe
'2485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEO' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
e607dca4234c07943b850c4c5fbd0767
16766d65cbb4da8eb9a728637ba4884338d2bc99
describe
'114325' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEP' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
42ee4b1fdce01f34516c278f95d52c9a
9a7b8eb19aff643c45a8fa6fc829801829b02ce9
describe
'37354' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEQ' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
cb792ac07e9221b998e03620f0bda9d5
a6fb2b1d050d7f097b2e3453b999e32b6d6334d8
describe
'115380' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANER' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
28003d2777ddccaf27cc7110c0b180cc
c67389004701f1068c01d005fe15828fc5b61655
describe
'38582' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANES' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
021a55dc09445cf96afa38b17a7ea1f6
fd6675e2aa888ca4043fc4876f3435f954d145ef
describe
'118012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANET' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
8105230c816292a463cf671f825af5c9
a7674ed59aaff426f239a0a2c22e4994918095ff
describe
'38628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEU' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ee48cef239f08dff6bb8bc307d2680c0
74ddaa50852c3aa4b551caff2a4fd597aacab8a3
describe
'114178' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEV' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
4d9ea84166fb8b84f209222949185963
188074139abeffaffc1be28636f5bc6cf7ea4360
describe
'38141' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEW' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
9bb549852fc85e147a91e4c3a1a7b103
21d97f76cef9bede301f9726c55608cac8138948
describe
'114983' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEX' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
92122bb64428485b12396a17656e5ea4
917a1ec8c4e2d523dee8e63a1c39a6d46d509804
describe
'37710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEY' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
5468bd5ec08eb576aa78d005c316ca03
f9c22ad1c59cf6c1c538c119f349e944325f5a50
describe
'112699' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANEZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
20d5630e40b3431c984c005682c63287
841b5ef16e39bb471834230976009ca80a74a86c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFA' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
4fde76671326f984696c72250b774c7c
e9b587af15fcdc266d93d0a68b6e4d9d748f905b
describe
'112697' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFB' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
98863621f5ba58b777da6a8dca67ea05
0e8a704d30b0387287966a4a73d8babd4d20a5ef
describe
'37277' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
0f3e2e60d82a60cf250b76d1381fab12
592316566cd52c2608749b5e6fb99755c59ac480
describe
'113407' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFD' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
d09fb96c3eac98f7e689218a6fa03693
91a45d199ec9e91691e50dd9ba698649409cb9ec
describe
'35108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFE' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
49b88bf3df2a2ecff0df84fc985bf77a
c144a44d5966a4add16b1fc7f525aa11c88dd420
describe
'119446' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
d6e3c0348533235fe65c7c2ddb5c3ae3
de959a93258843819bcacc888aff12d946f68582
describe
'37325' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
09856393edb63a3ebfcefa6ce857f17b
16ed3e6deee4d14b559a1c90bdf6c23de0c8c254
describe
'99296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFH' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
96cb02fcb0d85c07812ef33a4120b75f
ed78568c223256454c8a1ce89bb98e5f391d0713
describe
'30606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
4e9a0bb0cb07d7a956249f68c3a00570
a7406c96fea3be837dabb3ffe1c3014b77147ac2
describe
'114992' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFJ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
981e6f24244d6422455c203b158f51ca
fc414f727a8a8831303f6bc5b6e21c57fde26d2d
describe
'37554' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFK' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
ea4d3e10ce1365dc75c7d369ae7b4f06
0c49ac1dc842af223c46587fcf96df805fee9685
describe
'114808' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c34c1901c911f3f13f337bd6af2545bd
4c801316ad79e42d0bc5132b32fef4aa4d4a5eff
'2011-11-15T02:13:53-05:00'
describe
'37474' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
8418d543168012ed3b373ec5e0d3c039
859ee97d5a4e80033b6319cb0566181226f168c8
describe
'54352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFN' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
b828afb32de629b4af93e10c1c00ca75
c063ba5c239e871c54b0359954b4e3cb15f66f81
describe
'21389' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFO' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
744d4a94b3a52ac7cb0524f4af7a7e62
37a3c4c544c3e5868246bbec805b8220fbb1150e
describe
'3257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFP' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
d77b0aeab4b22aa407d56ab87052ae02
2d1aaded67359d676d5a9837d36cca07a30d5c08
describe
'2629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFQ' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
4a5caca8505b15bc730fa1e436beef35
018fbc62d9f6332e3cb46cdd0e50dc3d50ee9b05
describe
'116036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFR' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
4649c8beb3d8ebd8695989a9ae91a572
a2157265540061cc68e2af3935be75dfaa028931
describe
'37072' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFS' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
102262c755ba87d929bb34babef36e03
4eb5c9fbe25dd453e831c74ffcc837629a109110
describe
'116460' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFT' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
15c833a0f3311ebd97caa4076fd6258a
fcec4f8cc1c00c853a3adf4acf24d1029605face
describe
'37271' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFU' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
b0e3233c25ecfc7e12acd8c6f37e30c2
447fe29ad8ea9c3ff83aa539f448f973c36b2f7a
describe
'115626' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFV' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
6706ed0187576c66b61ee1935c6d71a8
771dc8347210ef1bb136ae168e54696432469ff5
describe
'37923' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFW' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
24ece8187628af9338320c77197c6b54
199dc57ee7e20b00d432cc366e791fa8436e0f69
describe
'113964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
266ed8ac6290d9d922988ad01a756770
3451462e33bd16a637a181ab08a89dcb34d55ae1
describe
'36364' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFY' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e6a13589a65e46ab657efe049a6ef8c8
91556e20b1a4a7108d0ea99b5a58b394dc50f84b
describe
'113517' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANFZ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
2a2c78a26efb67c5f2056d3f09dcc2b8
af57d8e623c8997011f721460778000b76df174b
describe
'35754' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b00c30b776b4fabb4697b3bcd25daf21
4b25ce2623caeebeab3df30392166f038f7379a7
describe
'103404' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGB' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
8587021af8d3114c3c76655284e9cfcf
643b60d2fdc4afadc9c76262a60f3abd5d335dfd
describe
'32275' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGC' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
f611463e8a1a0911b64ab69fb9f7532c
ecd8e4f29cab852b0b395bcd971f4463e16245a9
describe
'107732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
a7a7f3bcd25b90d41a73deebc1347fb2
3f3e340b27a74e2b767d04e27bd602dbfb08a4cc
describe
'34672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGE' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
43814e1b0c24833ebb72d3d6c345ed04
b07360c8f1e89ed3f732686c5fbe02d4b20f8406
describe
'115505' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGF' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
868be51eda79dd68decab37929af86b2
7f6c41076c380aa55f11dc3ca19fcb154eeb1a2c
describe
'36197' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3b8f6367352e7e7e17586097feec4c28
635faadf2d72b239948ae05005a23c2e0673ca81
describe
'117498' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGH' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
a9e8fe15049217dfd7213ee0f434297a
6b9cc1383405187e5e3ddff599762464aebf8d85
describe
'37369' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGI' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
8bcc92c0883662d7828cd5490d011e60
e27ad4a97bf20ecf7d97afef439a231992fe2783
describe
'115357' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
aca87ef1823658cba7fd0ead431c1a06
edc57b3715ae4917477514f457c82499cbfea09e
describe
'35887' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
4804a40c1c000f729f9432ee4b9ab325
ba3868c6da88cf2f90635524fb99dc2b9bff52a2
describe
'115310' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
24d82b8c4aa4e2fd7b96460635d08dec
baa695c747eb24f02fd3030d75d43573f9c44c39
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGM' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
53d72499e0f16446fc44d3870abcca69
03fdf1ab0f50aea22269536b67ec2c3fefeba1ae
describe
'113751' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
adc1cbaa09a7d590591ddcd19efc222a
4498a3f29df269086a3e25b094d23b4338e10aad
describe
'36825' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGO' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
2eb049e75beedc5f0b34f6076f9e0247
53a05b19cd547f29daec1e4c759d64db239fbd38
describe
'115972' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGP' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
aa9f8ef84a799000211ed87c169100cf
279ab480b79276857901086d510b2c6668dbf75c
describe
'37534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGQ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
aee08fa06212e09d4271555545cfa6fe
d7c14c5a44b6c7f5d49887882a67c15a570334b1
describe
'113709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
7eaef64b2cf609446968de1cf3182a1e
9c88012c76dbeedd6dc7974696b90e8a3febbf0d
describe
'36953' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
c1d753025369d641800161a402993ac7
5133f905a5be4d830b285185a0efb3fc6a203a16
describe
'114700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGT' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
d1963ee75519b1b5abb8933b35a5d315
ad4a58e9dcef01dd7c6e54309618e003e141532d
describe
'36603' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGU' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
6fadf68af20c443efbcb6bd3214d10a0
d58506993096e359ac7d26dca8bb1fdc7ae3037d
describe
'114970' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGV' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
ef583f02a601fcfa0dd4c7fab390a685
29b99c1b953dd990501ec579f82459722c206246
describe
'36874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGW' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
19459d748aec52655aabebf91f049ba2
7972b03c5751ee57194b0df238b855e290e6eeed
describe
'117681' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGX' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
e7437a3728a4714172d1f8b5191eb0eb
5435c140ccc2d3a9eba3cfaf134914c37c775288
describe
'37194' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGY' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
1ebb8da0adce100b1f7d162b6776b83e
737e0c136795b3d791cd6a2a3d241168cd7eedc4
describe
'116038' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANGZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
cdc9efd1e4c92caf10f7d170d11a7e25
44b9cc70c2b2843a6212e86772f592255f1c5bc8
describe
'36032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHA' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
8009a73869bffd4a601d5b8ea50f1a9d
4cdf12d2604b346ee084662b7b1a59013d9b10ec
describe
'116103' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
05847590a2d9f1b9961ec20a30be7bc0
c46fdc4c387c3ef87cf416bc29260fbf508fb048
describe
'37584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHC' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
f63567ded22fce13790d8d1f227f01be
7585bfba0cdaec425c843f449eeed47bc6b8cda4
describe
'100441' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHD' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
8b57f39569601fdcaa807ba9567bd092
1dddf30902dd68132316d3adfc89b1e17f11d228
describe
'33425' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHE' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
c25b9640643071bf04b7580693aabb06
a81e6e83f5f796202e085f9657f0d8daa8327691
describe
'111410' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHF' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
54f8d44ce06bc0a54e4ccd29fc27d0c7
150592fe460dab41a21e8d6ad6274993b0fd8c8b
describe
'36277' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
d404afa48fa8a42758af6b668df2aa4b
adfeb2783b6344d010a87ff091366d016f8ab208
describe
'115892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHH' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
cfd3cb628617051ea5a9fe045967054a
730383ce1e028689e780f3f10e2a54b66c1cc9e2
describe
'36853' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHI' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
48a141f3bfeb9361a2e90c36322627df
13a47708d584714b156a10753c28dca2fb0f7a70
describe
'111117' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
19b00c5b99e090aa65830c7306516301
380a20fcd58bfdf31c44571be58d464c6ef545c1
describe
'36454' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHK' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
987f78aa028d36b445f327cc78facd14
838a93843ed0a54c701dee0b33abd1a5e29b583d
describe
'116226' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4d5238678cdcc4137325c15daa6ed4ab
485ba0b61389903db0055a234c30645de7dba997
describe
'37121' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
b30cac1703eea0d3729733df0dfb88a4
e9963fc57381a0330e0a98bab393cb1c4da68ae2
describe
'115807' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHN' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
b68eef424dea2245c5e5dd58489f66ac
8bd43127f0ec1448b25285eec9c9af3e51d38269
describe
'36780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHO' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
fd7e5b7d05bcb3519061142499174236
aa9c3c9a6c7ac0a65b8bf3408c57277897b1d07f
describe
'113705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHP' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
6c17e7f3b028ee7f97faca297d522026
5ca24a20cee78ece293bfd9edbf6baa6153cd39c
describe
'37728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHQ' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
d8b5d868877aa2e667a426ee84fdd1ae
71fbd032836b19a183e653d7878192d3737c993e
describe
'101548' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHR' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
3ceb3dc2b863dd48d517862a6ba48cfc
dcb4faebfef00e5810603d7c68fd02465f439aad
describe
'33935' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHS' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
879ddc2db3f37098c895e1a3d4c1b07f
8a04523695ac97211793e5ba4febff16500b0d46
describe
'112093' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHT' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
d7c210ded11b7aa0b0e1cb536db80f52
6476a38bff3e7f1089d8f3930229e4bcaffb1e4c
describe
'36062' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHU' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
f949566dfdf3c3926e7361aa26853a07
d9e67246e5f3724385af8ad3ee9f4ab9ee0a8e78
describe
'114295' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHV' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
a48e49ceeaba074ecdda3cb08dd64fef
8164eacd143f8f8cd027093d912f4ca80f8fc6d3
describe
'35211' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
d84724c8b4912d62988ec7f6e349c495
a43b22f5210ef1b98722392404e8e9e621a80306
describe
'115470' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
06d6d48a957a15390c0945aee8b3e446
2569dc8a5ee8030ff115bd35f1d32408eeacd35c
describe
'35924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHY' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
ae5d2ea3d7d8a1e9e60353781b36ff29
67b8831a9eb7922bc194d4d5b3402403822d54cc
describe
'113936' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANHZ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
392e94fcd78fa94713385a6d01f823f6
a982cbb11508ed29ab78b6330924495725c0e925
describe
'35607' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIA' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
f0e96cd80a51e2d255a90387b692259d
bf6db9092017bd8155846bcfbb5fe9c6f1868304
describe
'113172' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIB' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
9bb74a1c7321eefb19c6fb65ec76f7a5
86bd13eab61f47da86dd84d18a2597d766a11a28
describe
'36195' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIC' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
5e9163b33b0e77db3eccdf68330c9199
91dde1ec0b157ab763ed12da840ea372fe4690bb
describe
'111343' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANID' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
d1b53557dbb67ecf5812ab5222b2c535
ebca6b59249bd9e6f1507c73a11d8bc5f464cf35
describe
'35489' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
a5a6b8104e9ea8dbb354bfc91f5732ed
9e08118d06991fab8bbae38ce41819196e05772c
describe
'113438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIF' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
18e8cf3833c0a536cd96f39ffb58eeb7
054dcc77ee0dc703a0c289213a8b0e869ff042ba
describe
'37340' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
ca58634d2159a48e58086265c8f2f42b
2ba2741186aba4508b41cec0cb4c4ed792d9a1ae
describe
'108438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIH' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
b5111ac4b1e49bc312846b5463abcb48
d4ffb74695d6fd63b65f867a177d8a903b8727e1
describe
'34395' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANII' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
997be1d330e13742892039c9c3c803d7
2df9a5d295b14364e2f8c800e8b2ccbdde913f89
describe
'112764' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIJ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
aa150d86aba599626a04b6f37b3a38d4
f7041256bffacbb7b7ca6be8f4544e0dd0e9d5ff
describe
'38017' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIK' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
36fbb596130e17c3aa1284fdd0b6a1fb
9168e48ec3b08fffde134bd1c0978b04fdf6bb68
describe
'109631' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIL' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
d9ca5bc78076d1988dec7105284ba4b5
a0b2255e906ff567e015b0e44fc507e0a1d61150
describe
'36080' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIM' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
37b0a759075b905f488a05c8133aa465
326217b9a4626ad20f15dd18ef915b2a628bfee3
describe
'94643' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
70b91af625198450b42bdc07bbd55db0
5dd36aedad90ecbf47debb474fed949f3a79119c
describe
'31811' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIO' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
7cc06d3ca35ce30d6fe758c03e1afbf7
f33f30b944b9c07488558531dd1602a6b3826ac1
describe
'112652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIP' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
73d9d893a27040f3b1e18a790e0aa17b
918750292eee28fab1c84836bbdecad7e617d23e
describe
'35742' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIQ' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
40eb00826497f8bff49f7395802bec11
194dbff8bdbb114867737bc0e0cebe605ddfd58e
describe
'112566' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIR' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
492ba5e8d9e606761e9f4cebfece883d
ddb56268fbee4bf793bb7865d867448bcb21964d
describe
'35637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
6ee5a4877edc8e7c843632753c4c1dad
daecf172a657c4533058f5a2d78f60ed9e9f68b5
describe
'118382' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIT' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
12c4dd1370154dbe1e568976a4877347
a10c7a02fa9b688f5fc0c6d1725af12f75fef033
describe
'38293' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIU' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7c0c31050d759ad30328101bd4add680
f708b4234df873e300b6e83a7b0b508fe6a49868
describe
'115173' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIV' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
877343d1f477da9ffb1bc9024fb5e68c
3bc0ca0514c64b9c327c85be123542a9f06eecd5
describe
'36645' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIW' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
acbc7ed9436e37e5d8e8a402f3829bbd
f35b4e0b780ad700befed831453811670036694e
describe
'117456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
625f23e4dbebf8ec528083d3d10a0db1
97229900804be18e8e7823bc073c619e6ef730a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIY' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
88124dbb1fcca4e42dd6e83c0b1b8f5a
c6309e2c4d5a69d163c05c09a60508cc05a18cbe
describe
'114151' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANIZ' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
3dfc6ae921c9f1d725ee978894d6ca1d
3f4e5018bdc7d8acf4dc54d9b43b77a4effc4c1c
describe
'35787' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJA' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
dc007e156c7f942bc45eff658f732830
f09ebc76097d79be80c9781dc09aa5b1fe9dfce2
describe
'114332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
8e26b3030510ffc7101fc0521a09cbf8
304ac8b4854dfc7b682c13bb2e222aabf5767dff
describe
'36116' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJC' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
eb911665d03d5cf27711371b7f03965f
b3011608420f47e778bb485728867a7af4d5b5c5
describe
'115934' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJD' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
839b6d0a48ca49770d155ab7e7b7e503
5c8e6db0df69bb9e751c68d7e0e2ec9f6868b05b
describe
'38429' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJE' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
1ea4b9a796c5824698e6518331c26525
ffbde3ddba4cb36413f44097aa92ed3618d44dbe
describe
'118409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJF' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
46a95314ed9d4c673315993229023ef6
88ba2aae1d437ea78fa1474d0b27e6794d202d02
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
85ba6e21b92eee7e75ca2c134013d001
cc763f5db51fa9a127eb32fb126c5b6801ba28ce
describe
'118374' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJH' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
2f8d319fd301c0be91aadb5d48ecf0cf
d29ad5f8ff850d0b40493885d5b67e1ebad9990d
describe
'38890' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
a3d08a4b386a71fbc0cf551664933631
df424597a9cef908f0a428e094e9bc3b040a3e80
describe
'117370' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJJ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
67cd07af05666ad2fe95852e89a4e8ba
ec6d8d5d4a56cb229b0b735f0e415d0d9316607a
describe
'38052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
55b0f5d6188bfcabb66b07c6ada2a58d
1b023389554d792952276e5e12dea36149c9c31d
describe
'113358' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
6f1904656b10f7d5ff7b9bbde43ba5f3
3c1cb0b61d75adef0aea728f3cafc55fd93ab384
describe
'36566' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
3d3c240cddb4248e3c24f6854044fd64
6e91b367c02cc1eac53ea6554ea6531909de6444
describe
'114716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJN' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
fd4e91fbdc8b50c7cab489d55ad2fc6a
86a06ca28a9db9a70c7b299965ccdef33edb63fb
describe
'37513' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJO' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b57bea793cfdb1f7f375647c3f696518
5017babc513549fd9efd21a5dd783ace960025ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJP' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
a8cea6de1aa60e393cc97a10c790ba6c
b5d83ec38c18e53deff239c1bcb425f5a6357bb4
describe
'37585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJQ' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
8ceb1fddb53b69f661c8cd5c4803b7ad
d370613fd921fd8415f208fdd4e266ab66111f0b
describe
'117301' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJR' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
cc101a914032c4ecb01859f772d1a9d3
361c696d988d68ed5f52750811eb95260b40f264
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJS' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
e1fae41e1a8dd2f3695190e677cb5ca4
039adb5c08c207cba8a018c39fde6bb37d633eee
describe
'103298' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJT' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
06046fd7bcdb0363a78d75cf3d9a7e7d
cee08737926aa6efe327f25e46d807a3bc6104ed
describe
'33569' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJU' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
f0fceded09e0f8a8f5cb4d8034edf7c5
13b1a3c718616d58695a87554aee9500b1575922
describe
'115428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJV' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
59846a3dc35c8c0ff3d3481145c68916
b51efd47f698c8bd5cdd49801a58f4db67562bd6
describe
'37852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f6aeef82d8aee9b326c9ea6aea3ead29
1e9fc01d5eb2b5ab4c8f64b332654e69116a195b
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
183d72996fcd58d4b776e119411c24db
83e106ca10e49612491dc0aa4f894ad49cd9d3cf
describe
'36983' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJY' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
545ada34d79f8c71f0eb0b3c3252686e
7da2e9fcaea65ae2560444cbafc451a69a02aba6
describe
'114550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANJZ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
d8a302fea15bc39f5c0b5c26caaf4057
e17b6e504f1fbc44f407fda05642a8f67c57955b
describe
'37292' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKA' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
3495ab65ef2627e2995eceae03f3c9a5
d64c0f3dbb3db8afc58a8ec19d0f33412364251e
describe
'116515' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
42c39b6c7df1980bca38af805937eb92
254ada7053495a9603b17e7517695d7836da2043
describe
'41005' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
72e76c9f445edbb4703ac81f2970cb8e
a1cfa2156d7228b1cf493d043a117f722ae30ec6
describe
'112963' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKD' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
1f71dcd45691d495879c8901efa68b58
508aab4503ce290249b3a78acc9957da2596be84
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKE' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
a9731bdab98bf633b5fcbc18eda162c1
10ad425c3ca0b3c6f53dd0303f614b53415258d6
describe
'114161' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKF' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
5461fa280968052071fc2562e8f3ceb4
15ba89b53f4b9c8fa8aabe60207f4a8a671369de
describe
'40497' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
a4d7096760802b505b30bed1ac047c17
871f30591b605c67da17aa0f06a2b5f36fb86b3e
describe
'102796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKH' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
a78b120428c433fab9d57975ed74872c
90c6ab15c9b2b145f2b9a4be0818f336b7946bf7
describe
'33981' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKI' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
f44353d71f7e27dad5f7df88b018e140
7f67c688d52a40d575a7d5a86560af7487341745
describe
'102095' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKJ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
b0b4d6fa6f4a6232a983b207f5a33b41
d04279c3e85407626ed19df352a43e90f796b47a
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKK' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
9638fd28a16426ca172a31609e2b833f
ba75f93a8e72ff5c3fc0475af50181b331101a1c
describe
'113732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKL' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
369709e9b39c5943a9154a54a38d6adc
c21b9742b549646c34435cb4f1677b51a954d6e1
describe
'37426' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKM' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
30e3eb450cb4c03448679e2b8995d948
64850c8aa9cc7a51a87524d302bf07fd4597dc0e
describe
'114980' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
f6009088bd039512bd88524dc18a0538
5e323f35569c8c728be9b03db641604f1bdc6e5b
'2011-11-15T02:11:00-05:00'
describe
'39544' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKO' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
b602d268e8dcb0cf5b1b22db3f7e65f4
7a60652205729ebccbdc8bbda20d1f5cc34f41e8
describe
'114604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKP' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
34922e851d251d50f7bda6871d765b0c
dd3cc7b4f615f9a49d4c47ce86bc1aa2221b8a30
'2011-11-15T02:14:20-05:00'
describe
'37979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKQ' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
adea34218d0a98d2dcbb3f69c7404c5d
fea1389582faf5dd6c74df9a69a67d4ececeb901
describe
'113535' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKR' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
85ab4c99567b931e43101ffc499a4059
2058ca7f8a8ecd7a7d703e1fde9be82a70801f31
describe
'38178' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
d8f98dd99c72af7d27e08c17f8d161ea
d7ff5ff535ad4d6f85213bb7b58de68a5ebb2fd6
describe
'113351' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKT' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
2e88e69f18b77cc79ca8706fd6551c54
15ac75d5e75ab6f44fa57945e91cc74dd04ce6f2
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKU' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
5f1b4ae472a04ef74de82b835c716108
837e4afa2953eadae62f37de80b7a3f97c633ca8
describe
'111875' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKV' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
c7ee502912596090338c3cf4c85e79ab
68741b1ac7801449c4f05433c9036e4d43ae5bd2
describe
'38283' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
c90c83b315d9fc2179699ed93b26242b
600c1111e93feede9913f509472c264d6ae321e3
describe
'113867' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
3eac7af7ef4db40754e56fa8470b05d2
9d02ed7aad393508bb9b66526663b7ebf0d5dc45
describe
'38233' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKY' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
d619014ff5cdd1eaffc318afc562394a
6c51604545dbef2a8d943e5373db256884e181cf
describe
'112644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANKZ' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d000f90647483002933f909acd08851a
b4e25d4d5ed04b5a76f0acb0e703d4fdf778b6a4
describe
'38977' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLA' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
be9c710a7e3d9fe7f0b2abf338aef689
0ec0796c20975576623e496318dfe15adee42931
describe
'114427' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLB' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
1270f213f334632858e50e0bce252daa
a4a873a56987d0df717e189bfbf21c9f47084e2b
describe
'37556' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLC' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
6d5507bedc896ec085f792676bc8fc92
aebae5c0cc4277594f14de4102feb7133ac75a0a
describe
'112929' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLD' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
aad104ce4b42141fb57994f1985310e2
d854298683346f2247fdb2160e3fc22ea1e8ba27
describe
'39494' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLE' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
e952008375af0fe3acfc40cf9212778c
409adf74af9ea8c0960709a24423e4aa2bc607e5
describe
'112528' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLF' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ccfbfc65c1c49f0c7e6cdc18fb25010e
7ae12fe44373014084a80521544e5df876279d73
describe
'35596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLG' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
dff52668093b042f9da5e80a7b6cd2f8
fa074abc5ee39a72f3f360a6415b157f99bf860d
describe
'115033' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLH' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
f1a7ac883a5e81202136ad00d2a87df1
b46111a86d4008d247d4cb92048fd0066434d7ed
describe
'40125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
59ef1144815fdf495d6372aa16d32dcd
64d91513bc1720e50393f704bc098bdfd8664639
describe
'104543' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLJ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
3910c5707be1bbe2e368603e819bf2ed
ac28717f902ade3c6970cbf49b1cc1eb6183dc35
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLK' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
aff1a090923b61c04cc7a4196d1a0ac4
40df6915482268072ba2f92a1a32fc87d47ff78b
describe
'111742' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLL' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
03940986dc9a9f85861d6c4e5a4ed8c6
cfa7d18d72e647f9fe604f1db000ea9346e6f9e3
describe
'38856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLM' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
c5b84c33f390bab08699ef1c08ff5b65
f804dceac198fdeb40f4de00b790bc0c468de869
describe
'113769' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLN' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
7daa91d0359f7e6f9a7f6c2a3b25b12f
e8a0b55d4f91295efe4572263d2447c0111b55c7
describe
'37119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLO' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
2b4a7889480fa0f3682a8f99650b006d
90677d718b481cd6e0e61dccfa86222adb789912
describe
'109540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLP' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
e3e7246f6586854d2f11d06dde69f0fa
58c4a29af94f9d92037754db11e7a5a152812439
describe
'38417' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLQ' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
5de9ac778712279a72460f2ccf1879ee
b0d25811fa8e48a90684d640fb7cb1d7fa570bba
describe
'114457' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLR' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
eaa9d2f5b90ed859139acb8937cf1803
f839bc104d0e9ce763e73d5204fbd1a4d7f47e66
describe
'38596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLS' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
5643070799fbd59fe66d3e5cd6a131c3
1f560f04a88e85ee7786c6b315d56b7572dc87fe
describe
'113074' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLT' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
ede97be918471c4481b0a6423687877c
f17e74ebe27a06a9c8e4534964034029935f03ce
describe
'40602' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLU' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
0a4d6693ae720d06ce1de198d6893295
5a125067f2b52710ac820b4c972c575f7592aa25
describe
'111000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLV' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
70d0a7183897ec5d79cd63b63becd719
4f4e3079d401ab27eb872b555ca9a27b78e0ec5e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLW' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
09a0f6ff3eea0a5590b3b0c7d21fedc6
5d39fde5981e4ff1144780e8afc7da57c6ef3f27
describe
'111964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
40f373499f18132ff45d008e86fea5ee
9997439ebc7cb590b8f52d4fb15c6226624ebfa5
describe
'37517' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLY' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
962d63fc588adaa7ae0f75c8d490f4b4
8e248825769ea7e070e47b3f0cf835077464fad7
describe
'110168' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANLZ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
c65dd91d596db47eb194f8983e1b9283
23a75b2fbdb16fd40ef2c9c3cc2fa60dbe86e82b
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMA' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
0446bd1bb41225cccbe0d83e3b2e7195
d694e9d7052f8233fe3cc16eeb04eab4f6f35f92
describe
'113552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMB' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
bc3f799feeb3bbb9b1dbd0c031686e02
3c8e14a54ce41e7d558d48c65bfd9ebab56c99f4
describe
'38494' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMC' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
81eedf6d1f30ad471cac3ba4212f1cd6
390cd8d48527ee3ada85f7c8fe00948fe81be3c7
describe
'112052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMD' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
f1971a0200817abb9419751fffda97c5
00f4dba543598dc5e2ee029515448c57623111f2
describe
'36048' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANME' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
128319f4512f3f108d95a1d6ba4f9c51
c14411a75b4a43212b42548220e72b33e33a99a3
describe
'95433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMF' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
030f6b8d30f9b365e09192d27578bd1f
8a89eb8982a429ed0a76b2ee83b2ec00611affab
describe
'34600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMG' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
8ce3dfee0ec23b0ca73208d4d4b8a29e
2b771db64db6705ea2b737b20256d314be7c95f9
describe
'114705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
b757f1c0e2f85af4aeedcf45794aa940
f85f7e9e5611b2214352ea7dcbd9064c16b44ec6
describe
'37801' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
16c01c64c76e015c82cf977ce9681ff6
e86c889a11a534f255106f6d74e60c68731d8298
describe
'115186' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMJ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
f3918a6bc28666cdc8acb37996b6a19a
5fef3a796fecfe17595298c8134d019e95bf1e4c
describe
'40172' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMK' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
a7c43d14f7ce070efd68d3f148570999
d1ed8e53203c5a4692fd1dc07381d79f237af86b
describe
'116279' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANML' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
14578954b42cfd68655718744563669b
dfad0ce5c3f5ce04bbbade0427e752dc60785451
describe
'37994' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMM' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
95855479f56be558167e99b6cd8a691a
eb41e23360d569389097f9c6c3daaf02b540821e
describe
'112550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
ff1296c311aa42b1748932f997ec8c6b
4cd2079908f727947a49aaf4cdf8b4db55a73e3d
describe
'38774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMO' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
6d7297b3e3e01d2b697554a0467d3f83
9caec4f08a1406888c7977c14399ec5d0e8f5c30
describe
'113731' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMP' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
539f394d3299d075c4afa698713b44df
eb5ccb82fc6a6d6d762e7cb42c7c7bc7f49812cd
describe
'36976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMQ' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
3262027478697935da5da5de99af65bd
1720fe2a3a0e3d5da61f919ed27f93fff9bafe54
describe
'113558' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMR' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
58bd452e8ccb87be377bbd26ece83058
4fe346eb35a69427b8fca311b826b4c6d494849e
describe
'40451' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
b1399eebf2ba08abff28fae708cca1f3
41683fc21ffbf8c2c09dcf1b6759f861b6117e10
describe
'114216' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMT' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
bd224250723fb55b988dc13869aa574b
22840462702a86c9b5e344ee964b0b78dc174ffb
describe
'37770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMU' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
cb890e85cc8701f915d3a850d137795e
98e42646d104e3fe0de7ccb9b1f915198d234e87
describe
'112885' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
34d19ef80816a6002bcb68797a107614
0e4619f10454d5f7290bf4f7900937cb727b3559
describe
'38529' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMW' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
9f247aad7a0e53070773d11732551b72
117a94d0d5dcde851f56adff4147f561f2c48530
describe
'111099' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMX' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
ad9b3e6e844fc6e36170a0dbcb3cbbfc
a2bac5d1fbfcb0bd80c7f93c1185ae4ae1a64bb1
describe
'35330' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMY' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
c40a0f97e98f108e7da7129ecb3225db
f946ffbc6419eb22c9fb0db9ecfd453eccc9f64a
describe
'113508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANMZ' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
6d346ca65dd49a66a6ed71506f511b82
453558fa8609950ffddde20152f6276f4f328a42
describe
'39802' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNA' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
6e1fca4b5c2fe93bddc3c48907afbc1c
a971b0edf7cf2c420fa9d82634c92ece82056310
describe
'112944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNB' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
0f99b68dca0a41cdb2111fd4645ebc2c
a024253d51d9996bfa5162dda40ec4c3b42e5b53
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNC' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
02b545aed605309e39555b90698135c5
bdeb0657900e32e3e0f90e2345412abf5a52ac7f
describe
'113354' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANND' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
989ed7d12803de04622d8629ed56ff7a
460edc781875209f39b0e4c8de310d6d946ef4ef
describe
'38928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNE' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
7a965ad472d145af3b3fc56ecb63055c
3afe2fa90d992522a4f9a963e57fdaf51ed2da16
describe
'115543' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNF' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
fbea1a2cebf66dadb931b67b18dbfcd1
42d5f3a33be49c9d8a8cba749ce99cdfa260167c
describe
'38027' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNG' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
8f2939a961c50f91137b8f8d404f4154
9a66563cd2ecf1f8512ab397029fc2a1a28ba626
describe
'114442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNH' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
fb4dc5e4ac42dd75b785ba678a168e32
3d99e6ef836037f23db2aa34b4bbbb2d725939da
describe
'39572' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNI' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
8b5cd0dace19d9c9c6b9e368bd68b3a2
24efd166cb1e0f02e7a3fd4b5a9088501a25c7d3
describe
'114770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNJ' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
c0c3ba99942c1652b559f5cde4538da8
47c386863c4b83c2d31e9fc9f66b94b6faf9e941
describe
'37735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNK' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
21378f227bbb3e532baec966db36e7fa
025a46a6eeefe2ae1d080af29ccfe4ed7cc3838c
describe
'98396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNL' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
469cce6a965d7310b72049a4db1c3302
dd8ba7871b2bef947248cf5faf995ecac14d966d
describe
'36201' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNM' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
2baaea3006988505e394205181f7712a
f562005537784ce7b4850558d515dcf1130b8a80
describe
'113388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNN' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
3f576787cc6fb1bb68f979a9d9fce084
71a6516693624c33f26310c89827cb12c92e7ab8
describe
'36777' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNO' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
4c58c8cbb843c372c2ba668e0cf1f4ea
2838494a1ad63d9029b558df358a2e6ca9ab25dd
describe
'114647' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNP' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
553d0f07abcf6e5d8097c1b50eed0fbd
c64d733e25907839a49aacc4028bde397feb634b
describe
'40452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNQ' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
d314254086c0a6115c53564e5bd1a386
7cce4afe3b885db7a8e256d7f4615dc4869bcab7
describe
'112242' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNR' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
8d670f9ab7a2c10e3fbee944df30c472
210e12616a597ad56e0b49a2ba75a6e81ed92fc0
describe
'37768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNS' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
74c84ee490e2d74084fd2aebeb16d421
73020a9820de391fbfd1af8f2a05f00ae0a6d4cf
describe
'110122' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNT' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e129aad9ea3e56c85c5f0d9f2fad3047
c85da552203090b50c405b347db9f7f6df66a790
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNU' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
c09ddec1e9ac5656ba7e86c525f4b381
6c7f3033bcff70b8537d91a6c841cc321b699cc0
describe
'108003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNV' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
14e9db3a7ee96e07206fad8d87db5ef1
31a6bb6dadda7e85917611ae16bcb49254a41fc1
describe
'35565' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNW' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
b730fbbf331194e938e5bda93123f95f
6419de71700420248c3c63b8dcf44f43ea86aea4
describe
'112562' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
c17502bb894b88bc817c0c4c0ffb35c4
7d04e6667190716fb2a1e998c38dff8565c1e51f
describe
'39232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNY' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
437f1f08234c6ba9048d386b932e91bd
0f1405e488a1562ff65b4c9963dfccd6e0ce5d76
describe
'114774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANNZ' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
ffb36f47fd1b518ccb4edb8b7e659e13
0118ef9adfe89a09ccae7bf5c0fd3a1d39de0bef
describe
'37035' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOA' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
d2aa37925cf9f4667ac81f6b34e6d8cf
2689df351f2565b99c89e185ac71fee76a51a223
describe
'115683' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOB' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
b819d842b3db47769f46148ec50767ab
420f340b5aebc254fdcbb3981464af166b2f7e7b
describe
'39118' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOC' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
7d9ec3d16f7246347c8537833b15778f
e650ec498c5af97462cb2fa8476e6f0050aaed07
describe
'111514' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOD' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
bf47f4a4acfe856b2638c78c92788f6c
1194f981f83fc66a9a98797dbbc9f848928a0139
describe
'34743' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOE' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
9cd0133a05223ff8627d805fc99f33c1
1a0e74f859937e75d12ca7885c3530476df91b2d
describe
'111428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOF' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
6bf047904926750f693c5de94a79a464
dbd2c5cc07158d0a5196575d9f77d21b9b7ed40b
describe
'38247' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOG' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
1da79c85fa14acc0574723f992ba5e17
dd6d782662c1c1add6a73795c132e8492694126e
describe
'114592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOH' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
52a0cdfa69426f19b858327b52daaa77
5685c02e357ac9155380d9595c61e79577c2442d
describe
'36389' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOI' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
5f37d3be3c0856ca299780a181a637ce
cb805442618b6b38e863c5d07e068ea8e88dc43a
describe
'98316' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOJ' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
cff37559eb6a8105209e8354a34509df
9ff6e363ee8da59bbe4e7f41b9e558809317212d
describe
'35430' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOK' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
c22fc8f026c672981cf3550131a57744
32699c14be438a6b8bc55557b18e73dd5e9cad17
describe
'114817' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOL' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
06ec73cab0d0d118331ded1188ed5b1a
9be65052ea1d4dc12ee18e808b05f0c9959b92aa
describe
'37127' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOM' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
5d694b52cb11e5fe8debf79fbdc14ef1
17ca3864507fb2064c4c9280bcbcffa5952793c5
describe
'112979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANON' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
69f0efbf93f89b70265bddb8241f7402
00beefc99ad850ac517c838ab4f7e72f36c97a62
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOO' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
f48bc46a717ccbbd977ef29e461ed596
daac18126f06abde4e240c9cd55cc3297ac68795
describe
'111926' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOP' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
b2d8528a9d284cbe108f92c4fd4e373c
1037138e2e927add569c30105685322888dfabeb
describe
'36660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOQ' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
f20b52596546a3322e71f97420834cfe
74882517d3d6750fe3174af3c297d24184f7e4a9
describe
'118307' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOR' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
1fd304ac829a2766f668c3793d5b0308
1d058fcfdef0dba736ab0df209d62accdb3e52e0
describe
'42152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOS' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
7674df69177a95e3e0f08b837164a291
ae1662a56a31df8235362927efb532bad65f87d2
describe
'113523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOT' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
ea897f3013905e7dfe25dd3d7952289b
085ea18710b3306bc86e0281efc8cd9854a5e433
describe
'36652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOU' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
4a2d49c1abdd1b134f9a1a047f37f7ee
172fe4936a6fd47e11bdea5c91d3d5c35240bccd
describe
'113423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOV' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
0da68e1f03bb2fb5804494dee2252111
d84609a7e0a12cc38d063352f34df76ccdfc2a08
describe
'34908' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOW' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
c714a860a8151703357c5a0a967cf53d
aa140a9bd9f073f723469add372a1a14744e217a
describe
'115161' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOX' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
e71c431e309b2551f3d443a8acf71afb
9811ea1991f2024ffb6025bb7577847fa7f6d8b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOY' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
fdf873ee214689e2b7fc030ab13ef018
b65324e36217324dd830ac70b48622ee2444aed3
describe
'112415' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANOZ' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
2ea9390bbbe073582963e8e9fe3f8b42
3b5764c4411947bb55e7e3e7ee68c3de9c3018c7
describe
'35318' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPA' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
16596f75b2e0be3bf6541d93fb2012bc
39b3bcecb8bf95150720621e2e0be96e35bdb89b
describe
'115628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPB' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
5b8f72ef764b833250ff9d53efe0a6c2
23db5be0cdc6edd61d35b8bf1d7ee92ef89473f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPC' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
6e17afa08a1eb01dde243195f63d9d7e
47c3f31df7c94f15b7e7ced163326324679dba6b
describe
'115611' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPD' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
d05ff473530926f2087e402fc681370e
070717d2be032220d3a6d1f6d3d78b949690908e
describe
'35393' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPE' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
e0c661de1443c09fa82dbe137ec7e8f2
33157b51784f1d0ffafb493cb6edfb7c542ce320
describe
'116685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPF' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
33e697baa367290985383bde746fc10d
d29190f7d0ae34b1cdd06ddf06edbc88a8cdc26f
describe
'35423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPG' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
194e63e7d180d8208819a6ade6e6b34b
c3734df544c8c4b2c8480b9e98ef1b4a47fee3ef
describe
'115866' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPH' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
22a76496e1da72a65c62d09c3db38b54
95346b0664d11cf564eee852f1e96b12acf4e819
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPI' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
8e56c0f4467896a40939639f5bd4dab9
9036d4a491e784006bdaf8b7de61cdb4b3eb8761
describe
'113298' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPJ' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
7bd3a6f2318d58ac245986a67eca06da
04a6768bb355fd0d47c48eda331e02faa2e49eca
describe
'34928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPK' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
8f6279c05f7402be9dded1a9f111d80c
ca8e9c2b63ac1c25e7c30c7e048e253299d7c37a
describe
'117189' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPL' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
bbe72dd4f8cb5729a1621e6b8d8ab410
5956d3a9117b601c26efaa37250f00cd60108ceb
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPM' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
07640da275b9831312c0dcf8f4bb006e
05ae35ce0f0b1e5d6e05b852ff918bd42864353d
describe
'100581' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPN' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
415f39312c84e5895ece7a7ff8e53c94
d603f8e1f52f003b275b3d64d6418012cec2728f
describe
'33431' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPO' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
71ea167c0961e84826a1bbe0eef33b00
271f42147e260442f01565181fc973d366862733
describe
'117872' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPP' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
0d99be0a6cc95d21f8b5c4dcf3bde741
34f54a840ea3840ad084022adf1b797e1e239237
describe
'36503' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPQ' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
8014a2aa7e59088ba48ffa2feb79e14b
a85e5641b0c873f50a188e35a8452f27e3fa758f
describe
'114488' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPR' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
42a083d0a7ecd6c7bac6a02d759214e2
d8f5fd88b4fc62cb8c8024b39354437033dedfe5
describe
'35721' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPS' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
827504fa690e85a594273851af3a803c
814f4613c8a87bf363b401af4b0c34e523f77d5a
describe
'118435' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPT' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
df87ef43d8404d1e2232d71abe6f73bc
3982c803b44f2deb1e93d7b2a1bb02a86e42f052
describe
'37603' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPU' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
4b5a81b579a9fea61417a537b8000c09
6251ca7cc83b459675f7f1534a5b43a40ff5f439
describe
'118320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPV' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
1d571a9aa97d989433d22dcb5d22661c
7ddb1bbb0c66b22dee54e4ae35339642701e7ddb
describe
'36676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPW' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
0e4854370fdeb03c8715d0cef36e0592
2fe3ad00bda3627f0b77def5b915a43e000fecd8
describe
'118182' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPX' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
e0f075c334af1f2ea48732f76e35aec6
856ccd073260280c4b12cbd4df1e6cd0ba8e3711
describe
'36625' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPY' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
c261d2cb294111d773edab0d41d06b1d
dc44271807901fc81e28982f02bda62912bb68c4
describe
'116268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANPZ' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
66daad0e87d1d57777f0e474f0b0b4c5
e00d096fb0d14f06aefb14bed2105766d62c2dbb
describe
'35958' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQA' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
4d2dabd14b1241b3752ca98e3e80b55f
2287004f1bfca1726f19908f826ac174080b2ea0
describe
'117272' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQB' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
8665a898ff4fe67a54bb50c59fe6652d
525415b96675c6f96243ac58baeb784bca34ccf3
describe
'36584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQC' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
555a22aa8321281d18ab868a6769543f
30b71131600a50fcef7902ea7569d031f83d6b7a
describe
'116303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQD' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
cfb06bddb7417ed5d0554583944b0f67
da4d0df61083a3fca251acbcc191da7876b90c48
describe
'36007' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQE' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
f9df27b10edd317a12d8dac44dc9f2a2
e0cace1ee7f13f5d5bb68d75a23b89a87567fdba
describe
'114129' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQF' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
e6232782898b2ea8b659ac1c8059339d
80d75fc7dc45f9dafe9848ff91633c6df5531baa
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQG' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
06487129d0cb402e40b1bf40e0e50cfc
82d29cb1f07ab620fc95ab38c9a02b2b494f9203
describe
'114903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQH' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
e2992ce01c147fd846068f3fd16f140a
864016c218b8f9a847768b25eca2acd450451cf1
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQI' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
2c2a04cc2defa44c89165d644e67dba1
0f2beddea0e0dd0037b4589509cfcd4ad57b0dc8
describe
'116582' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQJ' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
e5466d12c7b33e2d11a441ffc0c993f1
3ec9fb2485c5f9b1d457c8cbc43135e7c5004218
describe
'35920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQK' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
6bf84f9a01066753ad0fdff7271383b6
8ab1875082164724d6ca887d4c7e23fda0f26761
describe
'117241' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQL' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
739501030132981695c2c5a593662179
0e64ba67e5a8e94e199c686f9f784dbc8f4aa4dd
describe
'35988' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQM' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
a7513238937a122b21d6e5beadb0e1ac
7d86bb2007f1170a4bf2979b37695981c9a49e6b
describe
'116260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQN' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
b9f77c8065c74f36e9067ab7200a188a
1a64ffcdd5195fa7dc81ede0d5fae7f70782671b
describe
'37006' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQO' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
df25f28df94da21f16c010fbbf48af5b
14d3a299cf4338ff5bd8e58207ed4a90249132e4
describe
'114071' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQP' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
f80a0c2535b7234d23851f9b6539fdb3
f3d463903eda3a7eb0a69a286782e2b4192aa028
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQQ' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
9231a07c2f553febf2ae35de74fc1780
f045cafda3c57184f4a90077d4d679bf76d4ab76
describe
'115530' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQR' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
4367ca211301687e74672a9972c44ef8
f990a11264be41cfe1bd04bf81835693d15c3700
describe
'35125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQS' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
590f261066cdca376e893173f187730d
7588f7198bb91ac2bbda2160ff1ce98a3ecebc41
describe
'115928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQT' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
d8382518f29b3b14e0720f8d40492319
c8f724937dbc5f11e3cc8f61af46d3f596aca66c
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQU' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
116a57cc033b6b13bb8ab1111c6a372f
ba202c928f9fccbb39b8210f47d118dfabd83e9e
describe
'116112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQV' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
23ef2fd7cd97e880b620ad0a21c61fae
bfb61b16203564bcfd99027f41b8a1e9f15c9032
describe
'35218' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQW' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
1fa5956b3bd6868162ac651aea2510c3
9f1d22f9bf6a72c1374a50fcc5a0248be627d0ce
describe
'117187' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQX' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
3df596943521ba04b0da1d10b5fd6548
a4a59954e76a32c6a39be1eba61e3271ba7ffe93
describe
'35283' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQY' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
e3c6dee7111ffce83ea2dc51bb395eb1
e2e7fdef702b6a08c7e526a2376700e102b88200
describe
'115340' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANQZ' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
49d659e91be296cb7478537c15ff7d44
8bde3f5bf4f5414e7f5d779fb6a33bbb4260afeb
describe
'35979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRA' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
74af401ac6aab20e0ccae574c93b8994
432f018e95bebf69966bb5b0e9924e22dddfa56e
describe
'113452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRB' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
c80d83b23e768fad02ba016d50e0e65a
0bede1cc909fd7fb2cf8634ce8239514a0b18a3e
describe
'34119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRC' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
5df58caf0ca718faca5d5522b05ff037
afd6ce732260d65a6cb97d2658b4c0515b1cafb4
describe
'119312' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRD' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
2950d2f482ef3f14966a23c8c28e9dd7
79ca37af57922830765e4d4854c3d12ce254dedf
describe
'38301' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRE' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
4dad78932d4844ef8b579a334ef7c277
0abc8f8045a14f4a706554f925f68432d885e36f
describe
'116635' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRF' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
495cc042f3df905b670bd1fa78ac048c
13aec4f155bd38fcd5c5229d1c9f90b0dc24ed95
describe
'35561' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRG' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
6d5149609eaa1e08f3f2d7575c89f4e0
a3d00c242a9df030267e6096610cedabc48c255e
describe
'107041' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRH' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
5fabd66d575e2c6e8047216411863719
61c066fcd1d59d0d8b2f3ea71cd71b5339bd0f79
describe
'33304' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRI' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
8992da00289c5fab2e3af8422de27cbf
673d16699e7ee36a584f0d7c7ce3c587842341c8
describe
'118137' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRJ' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
f59b156607d81de6f2c5df9936969a77
676b5a95af9cccba45d8a2165587f639826b8abb
describe
'37703' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRK' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
4dfde86f80682e6ce6b07b900192c410
94333d2733db1e01b5a2bb53f2b9779884a38560
describe
'109261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRL' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
5d62d7c55ca16ed8a0a2ab123f472c4e
2df96ce60085a542180d2175ae3e062f6abd5d95
describe
'33279' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRM' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
7be5373c6bd153d800ebd8df28c38ac9
8ae9629bc77f9525cd5b9e243c509ef09dafdc9b
describe
'112920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRN' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
ee9c81d471aac6022a8d102bf0fd0658
a99f4d6f5e675898eff6b8b017f1ea074630db12
describe
'34914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRO' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
4322422be81ab907dfee18907f7956b8
c6bc5aeaff726a1dd4676443585ddbe061146d0d
describe
'107997' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRP' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
3b43d716c6119bb22bb19a681db1f3e1
5c3d54b4c6b20009cbdef3e0835edeafde7ea229
describe
'33241' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRQ' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
ab1bbbba6147e65ac29a3659ab4ae6f5
026dc8a1788383755d55abc6e56fe8460b6052e2
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRR' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
afb5bbc7c95b0bb417b8d172b845ea68
006bce9097cc2abf62fceac0eef9553cd71eb875
describe
'35166' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRS' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
1e09e1e60a94c1ef4ce370e0bca6986c
9abf6f6095e26a7a60516346ca7264b1b4644e7c
describe
'108188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRT' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
6a03cc1b2b140581dcceede91a3b71d2
dd169d465b4407316b89c7bfecca789e51d860b4
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRU' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
ccdcb67cd37e5bc07b686a5addd1f5ae
73354d56bd946266844e9ea7ca34624ec171c93e
describe
'111315' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRV' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
6f0e77fa699d6a4bd4d0ba40e7eb92a2
3843343d48510950401703845852555e340cdaaa
describe
'33630' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRW' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
47ff03f013fae89d514875c5b40b362f
6a4fb773ee1c1d6bec2f3fc082ec1e0c160cc0e3
describe
'114345' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRX' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
7e79c5d0f4570b5c0fd5e085cd239243
6d0cb07e6d96cb73fc3d7bfefdba1b782bc41c48
describe
'35610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRY' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
e98c7ac0a29cce57d8a8f6d50e4bc9e8
9024d459f992c30598d0b37cb950c2a760e11cf1
describe
'115982' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANRZ' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
472486385b9f1b86adc223add334fd70
d373e6762f6aacf43f96cc328a70099e38d4c6b9
describe
'36373' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSA' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
98a6aa3a63c7aa8069051fb1fe6bee4e
a1ff9176af391846a1ebd4f8728a5677eef61942
describe
'40328' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSB' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
4b5a9ff090ff5b3aa8e7310c342e85d6
da8a6e79676ea77be36987880fd546b99e749f8b
describe
'14200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSC' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
9325fa77e898fbc60967a9d7d1b91383
611f942fe4027697717a2a25bb1448ee0f61c680
describe
'84999' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSD' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
a214056fc9fbfe25cadc8ba6f1857ddf
a756493921f1084455c21e4532965f01bb39faab
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSE' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
473c1303fa90f0741f0a4dcb3ed2fde4
b1b46b4b6ad358eb5510b97ae5ed304a4a3b9744
describe
'88003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSF' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
895e44bea05491ab814a9946937fd97a
6386c93ba214d2371b00b2d6c1bef244bed084bc
describe
'32856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSG' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
7786c7f1678c7dc2d8641bae86cbfbb9
7b7343277efb76816d1d744c218763c876465fe1
describe
'108369' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSH' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
96b732d1aff4c4a3a3c88cb7ce3b2de0
edd436955a9a206c9033291afb026081c0e1984f
describe
'37268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSI' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
1f63a7c073802025787f8b02c2eea620
7fc512709480b9852ea65dd938958b45ce517b79
describe
'108288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSJ' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
08a39791c5a33f31ee76d001981ad3a3
9b3fd6ac21618807753b0a45b674d4ff0b1b783f
describe
'38914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSK' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
ac20056fab029a79140d5133a6678639
4fc6327a7c972e2cd6fa0d2c5ad6e976c23c2dfd
describe
'108806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSL' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
d8aca52079d44e12bc4e4edb892d7b5c
1b71324d2a4876e73a8131f4a04993cd51990582
describe
'36993' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSM' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
f09551f96ae09b0e0933e5a762acbb00
bdb9b7bfb5efd0f0ee5e04c5f9a90f6c531887fd
describe
'103369' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSN' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
3ec71ee8eae91f64e303b0a73c062db7
c151152d790c20347be37bee1c5d25252a8eaeb2
describe
'35509' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSO' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
1959be0ed44bef950a50ea116396dc56
de57215b8b86e6a00ad2ffeee42aed5bc3fe751c
describe
'3532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSP' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
4459a9c52527d654eb9b4cf63b1fae69
82bd4e26325f791086f0ac7286508ac1450411b5
describe
'2832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSQ' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
dcd15dfc9095c88f804237389f29cd26
7cc0bc517a1c7e10a6c647d6861c965f02b5666d
describe
'91295' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSR' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
a49b431229d1e3a61a96f20ebcc77ffa
3ac56cc0287a85ce0b6f6db37e5c74c04747d20a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'31262' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSS' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
68a0eb1d0ce3511e1998780799dfc1de
669cf55f57082672d2361c9db2c19c6977ffadfc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANST' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
0184924370c1580eb7f959f23a4fe006
f05efbe103f9ef639048c228ff0a351a43c078bb
describe
'479574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAEfileF20080816_AAANSU' 'sip-filesUF00002236_00001.mets'
2f6fac20326ba4733082d872ebb9a0b5
e283d66cd14a7aad0625a720c817f38aea39e2eb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2014-01-10T16:33:03-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.





New- Zealanders.

JOHN RUTHERFORD.
From an Original Drawing taken in 1828,

1
Ai
i
e
i
a)

Zee


THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,.
ABRIDGED FROM
THE LIBRARY OF ENTERTAINING KNOWLEDGE,

BY REV. DANIEL SMITH.



a
) ~ n ¢ SY . .. = ie as,
——— As ie

View in New-Zealand, from Cook’s Voyages.

New-Vork :
PUBLISHED BY LANA & SCOTT,

FOR THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 200 MULBERRY-STREET.

JOSEPH LONGKING, PRINTER.
1852.
INTRODUCTION

ro
NEW-ZEALANDERS.

—

In the following pages will be found a highly interesting
account of a very interesting people. The New-Zealanders
are muscular and robust, capable of enduring great fatigue,
and are also uncommonly active. Their intellectual
powers are vigorous and acute, and in their dispositions
they are independent, bold, and vigorous. They inhabit
two extensive and fertile islands, mantled with lofty forests
of valuable timber, and intersected by fine rivers and
streams. ‘They are surrounded with the treasures of the
South Seas, and favourably situated for commerce with
various parts of the civilized world. Their climate is
neither so sultry as to enervate nor so frigid as to stupify.
‘With all these native advantages they are capable of being
one of the finest races of men on the face of the globe;
but alas! what is man without the gospel? The New-
Zealanders are heathen, and like other heathen they are
ignorant, superstitious, treacherous, violent, blood-thirsty
idolaters. ‘Toward each other they are implacable and
unmerciful: of their Creator they are ignorant, and their
worship is the worship of idols and of demons.

I have abridged this work for Sabbath schools with the
design of adding to the number of those works which are
calculated to impress on the minds of the young the value
and importance of their own country and institutions.
6 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Here they have freedom, protecting laws, schools, teachers,
and books. Born in New-Zealand, they would probably
have been slaves destitute of education, without schools or
books, and exposed to be murdered and devoured at the
will of a tyrannical master.

Here they have all the comforts and conveniences of life.
There they would have few of the comforts and none of
the conveniences which alleviate suffering and enhance
enjoyment. Here they have cuurches and Bibles, Sabbath
schools and ministers, to help them on to eternal life.
There they might live without Ciod and die without hope.
Think, my young friends, of these advantages, and adore
that gracious Providence which has caused “ the lines to fall
to you in pleasant places, and given you a goodly heritage.”

Another part of the design of this and similar works is,
by presenting a true picture of savage life, to impress on
the minds of the young the importance and necessity of
sending out the Bible and the missionary. ‘These will
impart the moral and social elements which will ultimately
“leaven the whole limp,” and elevate in the scale of
knowledge and civilization, while they at the same time
prepare for the hich destiny of glorified spirits.

Tam happy to add that missions have been already com-
menced in New-Zealand, and prosceuted with encourag-
ing success, The Canteh Missionary Society, and the
Wesleyan Missionary Soci heye both established
missions among those noble but depraved islanders, num-
bers of whom have learned to read and write, and a consi-
derable number have given evidence of genuine conversion
to God. The Rev. W. White, Wesleyan missionary,
gives the following pleasing account of an annual public
examination which took place on the 25th of Dec., 1834.

“ From the various out-stations, we had on our beech







THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 7

fifty-three canoes, which in all, I suppose, contained about
one thousand persons ; and, be it remembered that it was
not pork, potatoes, and flour, that induced them to come,
for we gave them none—they brought their own provender
with them, and several came from the distance of twenty-
six, and two or three more than thirty miles. Our new
chapel, which was not then covered in, was crowded, and
several sat on the outside. I addressed, in the morning,
at eight A. M., a congregation as orderly and attentive as
any I ever saw in England, from Matthew ii, 6, after which,
the examination in reading and writing commenced ; and,
notwithstanding the disadvantages under which we and
the natives labour, we had present fifty-eight males, chiefly
young men and boys, who could read the New Testament
and write a good hand. The number of females present
who could read was twenty ; making in all seventy-eight
persons who could read the word of God. There were
also many who had not courage to come forward for ex-
amination, because ihey could not read without spelling.
* * * * " * * * * *

“6 Several chiefs have lately declared in favour of Chris-
tianity. I name two—Tawai and Miti. They are both
about thirty-five years of age. The former has been one
of the most cclebrated and successful warriors in the land.
‘These two chiefs, with all their people, including some old
gray-headed cannibels, are now sitting, like the man in the
gospel, out of whom the foul spirit had been cast, at the
feet of Jesus, anxious to learn, and ready to embrace, the
will of God. We have cut a road, through a dense forest
from behind our settlement, about six miles, that we may
be able to visit them by land on horseback.

“ Moitara, also, a very popular chief, at the entrance of
this harbour, and about twenty-four miles from this station,
8 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

has, within the last month, expressed a strong desire for
a teacher. Some of his friends have embraced the truth ,
but he says he will not unless you send him a missionary.
He has pressed me so closely on this point, that I have
been induced to say, that if you will send out any more
missionaries, he shall have a teacher. And I think if you
can allow us three missionaries for Hokianga, that one
might be stationed to great advantage with the above-
named chief. ,
“Tt affords me very great pleasure to be able to say,
that many of our people are making a steady and pleasing
progress in knowledge, and in the love of God and man.”
D.S.
New-York, May, 1838,
THE

NEW-ZEALANDERS.

CHAPTER I.

Voyage of discovery of Tasman—Van Diemen’s J.and—-
New-Zealand—Hostile behaviour of its inhabitants—Ac-
count of Cook’s first visit to it—Ascertained to be composed
of two islands—Minute survey of the coast—Size of the
islands.

Ir was on the 14th of August, 1642, that the
Dutch navigator, Abel Jansen Tasman, whose
name now occupies so honourable a place in
the history of nautical discovery, left the port
of Batavia, in the East Indies, on a voyage to
the yet almost unentered regions of the Southern
Pacific. He was despatched on this expedi-
tion by Anthony Van Diemen, then governor of
the Dutch possessions in that quarter of the
globe ; and had under his command the yacht
Heemskirk, and the Zeehaan fly-boat. The
first reward of Tasman’s research was the dis-
covery of Van Diemen’s Land. After spending
some days in navigating the coasts of this coun-
try, he proceeded toward the east, till on the
13th of September, being then in latitude 32°
10’ south, and longitude 167° 21’ east from
Greenwich, he again saw land lying about a
degree to the south-south-east. Next day, after
having steered east, he was within two miles
of the shore, beyond which the mountains were
so high that their tops could not be seen for
10 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the clouds which rested upon them. They
continued to pursue the course of the coast to
the northward, keeping so close to the land
that they could see the waves break on the
shore; and for some days could perceive
neither houses, nor smoke, nor any other sign
of inhabitants. At last, on the 17th, they reach-
ed the northern extremity of the land, and, turn-
ing to the east, anchored next day within a
large bay, three or four miles wide. It was
now that the natives for the first time made
their appearance, two of their canoes having
put out from the shore soon after sunset, the
people in which called out to the Dutch in a
strong, rough voice, but in a language which
the latter did not understand. They sounded
also an instrument, which ‘Tasman says made
a noise like a Moorish trumpet, but which was
probably a species of shell merely, such as is
used in other islands of the South Sea, for the
purpose of convoking the people to war, and on
other occasions. ‘The New-Zealand chiefs, it
would seem, carry such shells at the present
day as part of their usual accoutrements.
“ Mowenna had his shell hung upon his arm,
which he immediately sounded ; when his peo-
ple flew to arms in all directions, and those
that were with me girded up their loins, and
prepared for war or flight, as circumstances
might dictate.”*

At nightfall the canoes returned to the shore ;

* Rev. Mr. Marsden’s Journal of a Visit to New-Zea-
land in 1820.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 11

but next morning a boat with thirteen men in it
made its appearance, and approached within a
stone’s cast of the ship. The people, now more
distinctly seen, appeared to be of common
stature, and strong-boned ; their colour between
brown and yellow, and their hair black, which
they wore tied up on the crown of the head like
the Japanese, each having a large white feather
stuck upright in it. Their vessels were double
canoes, fastened together with cross planks, on
which they sat. ‘Their clothing seemed to be
of mats, or of cotton; but most of them had the
breast naked. It is remarked that their Jan-
guage seemed to bear no resemblance to that of
the Solomon Isles, with a vocabulary of which
Tasman had been furnished by the general and
council at Batavia.

The people in this canoe also rowed back
after some time to the land, having been in vain
tempted to come on board by the exhibition of
fish, linen, and knives. Immediately after-
ward, however, seven other canoes put out to-
ward the ships, and one of them came within
half a stone’s cast of that in which Tasman
was. Meanwhile a boat, in which were a
quarter-master and six seamen, was despatched
from the Heemskirk to the Zeehaan, which
lay at a little distance, to direct the people in
the latter to keep on their guard, and not to
suffer too many canoes to come alongside. No
sooner had the boat put off than the natives in
the nearest canoes called to those that were
farther off, making at the same time a signal to
12 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

them with their paddles; and when she had
got quite clear of the ship, such of the canoes
as were within reach rushed with their beaks
violently against her, so as to make her heel.
At the same time one of the savages, with what
Tasman calls a blunt-pointed pike, gave the
quarter-master a violent blow on the neck,
which made him fall overboard. The others
then attacked the rest of the boat’s crew with
their paddles, and with short thick clubs, which
the Dutch had at first taken for clumsy parangs,
(knives used in some part of the East Indies
for cutting wood,) and in a few moments three
of the seamen were killed, and a fourth mortally
wounded. After this the assailants made a pre-
cipitate retreat, carrying with them one of the
dead bodies; and before those on board the
ships could be ready to avenge the murder of
their comrades, they were out of reach of the
guns.

Having no hope of obtaining refreshments
after what had happened, Tasman immediately
left the scene of this bloody transaction, which
he designated the “ Bay of Murderers.” Cook
supposes this to be, not the opening which in
his first voyage he named Blind Bay, but an-
other, a short way to the north-west of it, and
about six leagues to the east of Cape Farewell,
the northern extremity of the southern island.
When they were under sail, twenty-two more
boats put off from the shore, and advanced to-
ward them, at which they fired, but without
hitting any person on board, except a man in the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 13

foremost canoe, who was standing with a white
flag in his hand. The shot, however, striking
against the canoes, made them all retreat to-
ward the shore. Instead of continuing his
course toward the east, Tasman now stood to
the north, and soon came in sight of land ahead.
He now took it for granted, that in his tack
eastward he had only entered a large bay, and
that the land before him belonged to the same
island or continent with that which he had left
behind.

At this time, and for more than a century
afterward, the existence of a land extending
around the south pole, which was denominated
the Terra Incognita Australis, was the favour-
ite dream of geographers ; and upon this Tas-
man imagined that he had now touched: “ It is
a very fine country,” says he, ‘and we hope it
is part of the unknown south continent.” 'Twenty-
six years before this, his countrymen Schouten
and Le Maire, on peuetrating into the Pacific
through the strait which bears the name of the
latter, had given that of Staten Land, or States’
Land,tothe coast which appeared on their left, and
which they conceived to belong also to the long-
sought polar continent. Tasman accordingly
gave the same name to the land which he had
just discovered, under the impression that it
might be only another part of the same extensive
region. It happened, however, that within
three months after this, Schouten’s Staten
Land was found to be merely an inconsiderable
island; another Dutch navigator, Hen:rick
14 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Brouwer, having sailed around its eastern and
southern coasts in making a voyage to Chili.
Upon this discovery being announced, the coun-
try which Tasman had called Staten Land lost
its first name, and received, instead, that of
New-Zea.anb, by which it has ever since been
known.

After the attack made upon the boat in Mur-
derers’ Bay, Tasman did not attempt to put in
at any other part of the coast of New-Zealand ;
but on passing its north-western extremity, off
which he arrived on the 4th of January, 1643,
he bestowed upon it the name of Cape Maria
Van Diemen, in honour, it is said, of a young
lady, a relation of the East India governor, to
whom he was attached. Two days afterward
he came to an anchor on the north side of an
island, lying a few miles to the north-west of
the cape, which, in allusion to the day, (Epipha-
ny-day,) he named the Island of the Three Kings.
This was all that Tasman saw of New-Zealand,
the existence of which, however, he was cer-
tainly the first to make known.

After Tasman’s departure no account has
been preserved of any visit paid to New-Zea-
land till the year 1769, when on the 6th of
October it was seen by Captain Cook, bearing
west by north, on his return from the Society
Isles, in the course of his first circumnavigation
of the globe. The land Cook ascertained to be
New-Zealand. On drawing nearer they saw
smoke ascending’ from different places on the
shore, and at last they could perceive that “ the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 15

hills were clothed with wood, and that some of
the trees in the valleys were very large.” Cook
was now approaching New-Zealand on the op-
posite side from that on which Tasman had
been, nearly one hundred and twenty-seven
years before, and in a latitude considerably to
the north of that in which it had first presented
itself to the Dutch navigator. For some time,
in consequence of a violent north wind, he
found it impossible to weather a point of land
which formed the south-west head of a bay he
wished to enter; but at last, about four o’clock
on the afternoon of the 8th, he came to an an-
chor on the north-west side of the bay, in lati-
tude 38° 42’ south, and longitude 181° 36’ west
from Greenwich. Here he lay before the en-
trance of a small river, about half a league from
the shore. The sides of the bay were “ white
cliffs of a great height; the middle low land,
with hills gradually rising behind, one tower-
ing above another, and terminating in a chain
of mountains, which appeared to be far inland.”

Captain Cook’s first intercourse with the New-
Zealanders was not calculated to prepossess
either party with favourable sentiments toward
the other. On the same evening on which he
arrived in the bay, he went on shore, accompa-
nied by Mr. Banks and Dr. Solander ; but they
had not long left their boat when they were at-
tacked by a party of the natives. They were
at last obliged to fire in self-defence, and one
of the New-Zealanders was shot. Another at-
tempt, which was made the following morning,
16 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

to establish a friendly intercourse with them,
was attended with no better success, although
it was now found that a native of Otaheite,
named Tupia, who was on board the ship, could
make himself perfectly understood by speaking
to them in his own language. In the course
of the day, however, Cook at last succeeded in
getting some of these suspicious islanders on
board ; but it was only by using force, and after
a contest, which unhappily proved a very
bloody one. He had set out along with three
boats to make the circuit of the bay in search
of fresh water, that in the river being found to
be salt, when he met one of their fishing canoes
coming in from the sea, having seven people
on board, four men and three boys. As soon
as the New-Zealanders perceived the boats,
which they did not till they were almost in
the midst of them, they took to their paddles,
and plied them so briskly that they would act-
ually have effected their escape had not Cook
ordered a musket to be fired over their heads,
thinking this would probably make them sur-
render. But unfortunately it had not that effect ;
for although, on the discharge of the piece,
they immediately ceased paddling, and began
to strip, it was only that, unequal as was the
contest, they might mect and fight their assail-
ants. They themselves, indeed, as soon as the
boat came up, commenced the attack with
their paddles, and what other weapons they had
with them; and so obstinate was the resistance
they made, that the scuffle did not end till the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 17

four men were killed. On this the boys, the
eldest of whom was about nineteen, and the
youngest about eleven, instantly leaped into the
water ; but although even here they continued
their resistance by every means in their power,
they were at last taken up and placed in the
boat. It is but just to Captain Cook to give
his own remarks on this unfortunate transaction :
“Tam conscious,” says lic, “that the feeling of
every reader of humanity will censure me for
having fired upon these unhappy people ; and it
is impossible that, upon a calm review, I should
approve it myself. They certainly did not de-
serve death for not choosing to confide in my
promises, or not consenting to come on board
my boat, even if they had apprehended no dan-
ger; but the nature of my service required me
to obtain a knowledge of their country, which I
could not otherwise effect than by forcing my
way into it in a hostile manner, or gaining ad-
tuission through the confidence and good will of
the people. | had already tried the power of
presents without ejlect ; and 1 was now prompt-
ed, by my desire to avoid farther hostilities, to
get some of them on board, as the onlv method
left of convincing them that we intended them
no harm, and had it in our power to contribute
to their gratification and convenience. Thus
far my intentions certainly were not criminal ;
and though in the contest which I had not the
least reason to expect our victory must have
been complete without so great an expense of

life, yet in such situations, when the command
cp
2
18 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

to fire has been given, no man can restrain its
excess, or prescribe its effect.”

When the boys were first brought into the
boat, they seemed evidently to have no hope of
any thing except instant death ; but, upon be-
ing kindly treated, and furnished with clothes,
they very soon forgot both their alarm on their
own account, and even their grief for the loss
of their friends, and gradually got into high
spirits. When dinner was set upon the table
they were anxious to partake of every dish, and
seemed particularly delighted with the salt
pork and bread. They ate voraciously, and at
sunset made another enormous meal, devouring
as before a large quantity of bread, and drink-
ing above a quart of water. But although they
had been so cheerful during the day, and had
taken apparently a great deal of interest in
whatever their attention was directed to, the
recollection of what had befallen them seemed
to return to them after they were in bed, and
during the night they sighed often aloud. By
Tupia’s encouragements, however, they were
soon once more enabled to escape from their
gloomy reflections, and were even induced to
amuse their entertainers with a song. “ The
tune,” says Cook, ‘ was solemn and slow, like
those of our psalms, containing many notes and
semitones.” In the morning they again ate
with extraordinary appetite ; and having then
been dressed, and adorned with bracelets, ank-
lets, and necklaces, expressed at first the
greatest. joy upon being told that they were to
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 19

be sent on shore. When they came to the
place, however, at which it was proposed to
land them, they entreated with great earnest-
ness that they might not be put ashore there,
“because,” they said, ‘it was inhabited by
their enemies, who would kill them and eat
them.” But their fears left them when, upon
landing in company with Captain Cook and
the boat’s crew, they perceived the uncle of
one of them among the Indians who had assem-
bled on the beach. Yet after some hesitation,
and an attempt to ascertain the disposition of
their countrymen, they finally preferred return-
ing with the English ; and they were accord-
ingly again taken on board the boat. They
changed their minds once more after dinner,
and with their own consent were again sent on
shore ; but on seeing the boat that had convey-
ed them put off from the land, they waded into
the water, and earnestly entreated to be taken
on board. ‘The people in the boat, however,
had positive orders to leave them, and could
not comply. Cook was, some time after, dis-
tinctly informed that they had received no
injury.

Finding it impossible to procure supplies of
any kind where he lay, Captain Cook next
morning weighed anchor, bestowing the name
of Poverty Bay wpon the place where he had
been so inhospitably received. It was called
Taoneroa by the natives. Following the coast,
Captain Cook finally circumnavigated the
two islands. In the course of this survey
20 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

he had a great deal of intercourse with the in-
habitants, | and enjoyed many opportunities of
observing their manners and method of life, as
wellas of examining the various natural produc-
tions of the country. But we must refer to the
published account of his voyage for these more
particular details. His visit must be consider-
ed the most important that has ever been made
tu those islands, in so far, at least, as respects
the geography of the country. The chart
which he drew has required but few corrections
or additions. The extent of the two islands as
estimated from this chart is estimated at ninety-
five thousand English square miles.

CHAPTER ITI.

Visits of different navigators to New-Zealand—Account
of the voyage of M. de Surville, and of his transactions at
New-Zealand—Voyage of M. Marion du Fresne—Massacre
of himself and part of his crew.

Coox’s ship, us we have already hinted, was
not the only European vessel which the year
1769 brought to the shores of New-Zealand,
notwithstanding that, in so far as is distinctly
known, they had remained unvisited till then
from the time of ‘l'asman. On the 8th of De-
cember the evreat [nelish navigator passed an
opening not far from the northern extremity of
the east coast of Eaheinomauwe, on which he
has hestowed the name of Doubtless Bay; and
he kept plying to the north of this bay till the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 21

evening of the 12th. On this very day, singu-
larly enough, a French vessel, the Saint Jean
Baptiste, under the command of M. de Surville,.
also first came in sight of the very same part
of New-Zealand.

It appears that De Surville had left the port
of Engely, in the Ganges, on the 3d of March,
1769, on an expedition in quest of an island,
said to have been some time before discovered
by the English, about seven hundred leagues to
the west of the coast of Peru, abounding both
in the precious metals and every other descrip-
tion of wealth. De Surville was an able and
intrepid seaman, and if any captain could have
conducted the ship to the fabled Isle of Gold, of
which it was sent in search, he was certainly
as likely to be successful as any other. He
commenced his voyage by visiting some of the
more northern islands of the great Indian Archi-
pelago, through which he afterward steered his
course in a south-easterly direction; but we
must pass over the adventures he met with
during the first nine months he was at sea.
We find him, on the 30th of November, at an
island to the east of New-Guinea, which he
named the Island of Contrariety, but which was,
in all probability, one of the Solomon Isles.
From this he proceeded toward the south, and
on the 12th of December, as we have already
mentioned, arrived in sight of the north-east
coast of New-Zealand. He was prevented,
however, for some days, by contrary winds, from
making the land; but at last, on the 17th, he
22 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

succeeded in effecting his entrance into an in-
let, to which he gave the name of Lauriston
Bay, in honour of the governor-general, and
which was the same that Cook had called
Doubtless Bay. At this time, Cook was still
beating about, not a great way to the north.
Having come to an anchor, De Surville, the day
following, went on shore, and was very hospi-
tably received by the natives. Next day he
landed again, when he found a considerable
body of them assembled to meet him, one of
whom, who appeared to be a chief, advanced
from among the rest, and, having come up to
him, demanded his musket. Upon his refusing
to part with it, he was next asked to let them
have his sword; and with this request he
thought proper to comply. As soon as the chief
had received the sword, he marched off with it
to his countrymen, and addressed them for some
time in a loud voice, alter which he brought
hack the weapon, and restored it to its owner.
It would appear that the evidence De Surville
had thus given of the confidence he placed in
them had completely won the hearts of these
people ; for after this, they showed every dis-
position to treat their visiters as friends, and
supplied them abundantly with such refresh-
ments as they wanted. On the 22d De Sur-
ville left his first anchorage, and proceeded to
another in a cove at the head of the bay, which
he named Cove Chevalier. Soon after he had
dropped anchor in this second harbour, a terri-
ble tempest arose, and swept the coast with such
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS., 23

fury as to tear the ship from her moorings, and
to expose her for some time to the most immi-
nent hazard of destruction. This was the same
storm by which Captain Cook, it will be remem-
bered, was attacked on the 27th, at which time,
however, he was to the south-west of Cape
Maria Van Diemen, and consequently on the
opposite side of the island to that on which the
French vessel lay.

During the gale, a boat, in which were the
mvalids of De Surville’s crew, in attempting to
make from the shore to the ship, was very
nearly lost; but contrived at last to get into a
small creek, which hence received the name of
Refuge Cove. As soon as they had arrived
here, the sick men were sent on shore ; and no-
thing could exceed the kindness with which
they were received and treated during their stay,
by Naginoui, the chief or lord of the adjoining
village. They remained in his care, having his
house for their home, and feeding upon his
bounty, (for he would accept of no remunera-
tion for the refreshments with which he supplied
them,) till the storm was over; and then on the
29th they got back in safety to the ship. But
this conduct of the humane and generous New-
Zealander was soon after cruelly requited by
the French commander. Having missed one of
his small boats during the storm, De Surville
was induced from some circumstances to be-
lieve that the natives had stolen it; and he de-
termined to be avenged for this supposed injury.
Seeing, therefore, one of the chiefs walking on
24 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the shore, he made him a signal from the ship,
and with many professions of friendship invited
him to come on board—which, however, the un-
suspecting savage had no sooner done than he
found himself a prisoner. Not satisfied with
’ this treachery, De Surville next gave orders that
a village which he pointed out should be set on
fire; and it was accordingly burned to the
ground. It was the very village in which the
sick seamen had a few days before been so
liberally entertained; and the chief who had
been ensnared on board the ship was their host
Naginoui. Immediately after this infamous
transaction, De Surville left New-Zealand, car-
rying the chief with him. But Naginoui did
not long survive his separation from his country ;
he died of a broken heart, on the 24th of March,
1770, when the ship was off the Island of Juan
Fernandez on her way to Peru.

The next visit that was paid to New-Zealand
was also by the French, and it is one of the
most memorable in the early history of our ac-
quaintance with this country and its inhabitants.
It was on the 18th of October, 1771, that M.
Marion du Fresne sailed from the Isle of France
in the Mascarin, having on board a young na-
tive of Otaheite, whom Bougainville had a few
years before brought with him to Europe, and
whom it was now determined to send back to
his own country. Marion’s ship was accom-
panied by the Marquis de Castries, under the
command of M. Duclesmeur; and it was in-
tended from the first that the two vessels, after
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 25

conveying home Aoutourou, should proceed to
explore the Southern Pacific in quest of its hid-
den islands or continents; not forgetting the
Island of Gold, the existence of which, how-
ever, now began to be very generally doubted—
so that Marion was ordered to spend only a
moderate time in searching for it. But he was
especially directed to examine New-Zealand—
an evidence of the interest that had already been
excited by the accounts of De Surville and
Cook. Aoutourou, having been attacked by
small pox, died at Madagascar; and Marion
then pursued his voyage to the south-cast.
Proceeding along the coast toward the south-
east, they arrived on the 3d of May off Cape
Brett, which they called Cap Quarré; and
here they sent a boat ashore. ‘Three canoes
also came out to them from the coast, the natives
in one of which were with some difficulty
induced to come on board, but having been
taken into the cabin, ate with great pleasure
the bread which was set before them. It was
with manifest repugnance, however, that they
drank a little of some spirituous liquors. Some
shirts, and other European attire, being given
them, they- immediately dressed themselves in
these new habiliments, of which they seemed ex-
ceedingly vain. Onbeing shown several common
iron tools, such as axes, scissors, and hatchets,
they evinced the strongest anxiety to get pos-
session of them, and instantly took up and hand-
led each of them in such a way as to let it be
seen that they completely understood its use.
26 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

This was a lesson of civilization for which they
had doubtless been indebted to the visits of
Cook and De Surville.

The New-Zealanders left Marion’s ship de-
lighted, apparently, with the presents they had
received. After they had taken their leave,
their countrymen in the other two canoes came
on board, and being similarly treated, were
equally well pleased with their reception. Five
or six of them, indeed, remained in the ship all
night, and both slept soundly and ate heartily,
although they would neither taste wine nor
spirits. Among them was a chief, named Ta-
couri, of whom we shall hear more presently.

Having thus begun an amicable intercourse
with the natives, Marion determined to put in
to the Bay of Islands, which lies immediately
to the north of Cape Brett; and he cast anchor
there, accordingly, on the 11th of May. On the
following day he landed the sick part of his
crew on one of the numerous islands within the
bay, which was called by the natives Motouaro.
Abundance of fish was now brought to them by
the New-Zealanders, who seemed by their
whole conduct disposed to regard them as
friends; while their intercourse with each other
was rendered much more agreeable by the dis-
covery, which was accidentaliy made, that the
language of the country was nearly the same as
that of Otaheite, of which the French had a vo-
cabulary on board, and which they consequently
found to be, if not quite a perfect, at least a very
useful medium of communication. This import-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 27

ant fact was found out, as he tells us himself,
by M. Crozet, Marion’s first lieutenant, from
whose papers the Abbé Rochon has compiled
his account of the voyage. Crozet, in his
anxiety to make himself understood, while con-
versing with one of the natives, bethought him
of trying whether one or two of his Otaheite
words might not assist him, when to his sur-
prise he found his meaning apprehended at
once.

In the succeeding portion of his narrative,
M. Crozet gives us a long and interesting
account of what he observed in relation to the
character and manners of the New-Zealanders,
during his residence among them. In the course
of this account, he mentions several particulars
not noticed by others who have visited the
country ; and we shall have occasion to refer
to some of his statements in a subsequent part
of our volume. But in the mean time it will be
more convenient to confine ourselves to his de-
tails in regard to the melancholy termination of
the intercourse with these islanders which had
been seemingly so auspiciously begun.

So intimate did the French soon become
with their new acquaintances, and such was
the state of harmony and mutual confidence in
which they lived together, that while on the
one hand the New-Zealanders were wont to
come at all times freely on board the ships, and
often to remain there all night: the crew and
officers, on the other, moved about on shore
almost us if they had been in their own country,
28 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

and would even occasionally make excursions
in small parties into the interior, traversing the
villages of the natives, entering their houses,
sharing their meals, and, in fact, putting them-
selves in every respect in their power. Almost
every officer had his favourite young friend, to
whose attachment he was indebted for a thou-
sand little attentions, and whose constant and
cheerful service was purchased by the most
trivial rewards. Marion himself, in particular,
whose authority over the others they were not
slow in remarking, seemed to be the object of
universal regard ; and he felt on his part a cor-
responding degree of affection for this apparent-
ly warm-hearted race, which almost prevented
him from setting any bounds to the extent to
which he trusted himself to their honour. Crozet
asserts that he himself was almost the only one
of the officers who did not quite permit himself
to forget all suspicion and precaution, in his
intercourse with these people. He frequently,
he tells us, took the liberty of pointing out to
the captain the imprudence of his conduct, and
of endeavouring to put him a little more on his
guard, but without effect.

And in this way matters went on till the 8th
of June, on which day Marion, having gone on
shore, was received with even more than the
usual honours and enthusiasm. As soon as the
islanders had got him in the midst of them, they
bestowed upon him the high distinction of deco-
rating his hair with the four white feathers
which form among them the insignia of chief-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 29

tainship ; and when he returned on board in the
evening, he seemed more delighted than ever
with his new friends. It was remarked, how-
ever, that from this day the New-Zealanders
discontinued their visits to the ship; even the
officers’ attendants, who had been wont to be
most frequently on board, no longer making their
appearance. ‘The young person who had at-
tached himself to Crozet had come on board in
the morning, but wearing an air of melancholy,
which was quite unusual; and would neither
accept of auy remuneration for some small pre-
sents which he brought with him, nor even eat
any of the food that was offered him. As he
took leave in the evening, it was evident, Cro-
zet says, that there was some weight upon his
spirits.

Four days after this, namely, on tle morning
of the 12th, Marion went again on shore, taking
with him this time sixteen other persons in the
boat, among whom were four of the superior
officers. As evening approached it excited
some surprise that he did not return on board ;
but it was known that the party had gone to
spend the day in fishing, near a village belong-
ing to Tacouri, the chief we have already men-
tioned, by this time the familiar acquaintance
of all of them; and it was supposed that they
might have been prevailed upon, at his hospita-
ble invitation, to remain with him for the night.
No suspicion was entertained for a moment
that any misfortune had befallen them. But
early next morning a boat was sent on shore
30 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

from the Marquis de Castries, for the purpose
of procuring wood and water; and it had been
absent about four hours, when, to the surprise of
those in the ship, one of the men who had gone
in it was perceived swiniming toward them from
the shore. On being taken up and brought on
board, this man told them a fearful narrative.
He and his eleven companions had been receiv-
ed, on reaching the shore, with every show of
affection—the natives even proffering to carry
them from the boat to the land on their shoul-
ders, that they might not wet themselves in
stepping through the water. When they had
got on shore they dispersed, as they had been
accustomed to do, to short distances from each
other, to gather the wood ; and they were very
soon completely separated, every one engaged
with his work, and unarmed, or at least so en-
tirely off his guard as to make what arms he
might have about him useless. While thus
employed, and with numbers of the islanders
mixed with them, in one moment each was
fallen upon by six or eight of these barbarians,
who, in almost every case, instantly overpower-
ed whatever resistance was attempted, bearing
down their victims to the earth or hanging
upon thein so that they could not move a limb,
and then beating out their brains with a single
stroke of their short stone war-clubs. In this
manner eleven of them were speedily despatch-
ed; one only, the man who now related the
bloody transaction, had escaped the fate of his
companions, having been by chance attacked
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 31

by a smaller number of assailants, from whom,
but not without being wounded, he had con-
trived to extricate himself in the confusion, on
which he immediately plunged into a thicket
of underwood hard by, where he lay concealed.
From this hiding place he saw the dead bodies
of his messmates cut open and divided among
their murderers ; who soon after left the spot,
each carrying with him the portion he had re-
ceived, and gave the man an opportunity of
making his escape to the water.

On hearing this horrible account, it was im-
possible that the greatest alarm should not
have been felt by all on board for the safety of
the captain and those who were with him. The
Mascarin’s long boat was immediately sent off,
with a strong party, well armed, on board, to
ascertain what had become of them, although
there was now but little room for doubt as to
what had been their fate. On approaching the
shore the first object that presented itself to the
men charged with this duty, was the boat that
had conveyed Marion and his companions
the day before, lying on the strand, and filled
and surrounded by a tumultuous crowd of the
natives, It was thought best, however, not to
stop for the present here, but to hasten as fast
as possible to a party of the men who had been
for some time employed on shore in cutting
down trees at a little distance from this place,
in order, if not too late, to inform them of what
had happened, and to warn them to save them-
selves from destruction by quitting the island
32 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

with all possible expedition. This party were
at present under the command of Crozet,
and consisted of about sixty individuals. Im-
mediately on receiving the intelligence of what
had taken place, that officer collected his men,
and ordered them instantly to make ready for
proceeding on board, but without informing them
of any part of what he had heard, lest they might
in their exasperation have sacrificed even their
own safety to the phrensy of a rash and unsea-
sonable revenge. From the plan that was adopt-
ed, all the tools they had been using were
gathered toyether, and packed up in an orderly
manner, beiore the command was given to
march. On their way down to the water, how-
ever, they were followed by multitudes of the
natives, who continued saluting them every
moment by cries of wild triumph, intimating
that ‘l'acouri had killed Marion, and that he was
dead and eaten. ‘They did not, however, ven-
ture to attack them. But when thev had got
to the waterside, and had halted in order to
prepare for embarking, the fury of the savage
mob, by whom they were encompassed, seeni-
ed to be about to break from the partial control
by which it had been tll now kept down, and,
pressing closer and closer around them, they
began to show every symptom of an intention
to commence an attack upon them by a gencral
rush. At this moment Crozet, scizing his mus-
ket, called to them with a commanding voice to
stand back; and, drawing a line on the ground
between them and the spot where his party
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 33

stood, threatened that he would kill the first
man who should dare to overstep it. Cook had
resorted with success to this expedient in a
similar extremity, when about to be attacked
by the inhabitants on one of the islands of this
very bay. ‘The expedient was attended with
the same success now as it was on that occa-
sion. Not one of the savages ventured to cross
the barrier. Nay, when Crozet, addressing
them a second time, ordered them to sit down,
the command was mildly repeated to the throng
by their chiefs, and instantly the whole multi-
tude, to the number of fully a thousand men,
seated themselves on the ground. And thus
they remained during all the time, which was
considerable, that was occupied in the embark-
ation both of the men and their baggage ; but as
soon as the last man had stepped into the boat,
they rose all at once with a loud shout, as if
released from a spell, and hurled a shower of
stones and javelins after the fugitive French.
"These missiles, however, did not do much harm,
any more than their vociferous outcries and
hideous gesticulations, when they found their
anticipated prey thus, as it were owing to their
own infatuation, escaped from them.

They then proceeded to wreak their ven-
geance on the huts the French had lately
tenanted, setting them on fire, and otherwise
demolishing them. Some of them, at the same
time, entered the water, with the intention of
pursuing the boat; but now was come the time
when the French could, without risk, render

3
34 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

requital for the blood of their butchered coun-
trymen, and they rendered it fully. Shower
after shower of musketry was poured in upon
the miserable rabble, who, stupified with con-
sternation as they felt their ranks mowed down,
actually stood still to be shot at. Crozet says
they could have been all killed, and takes some
merit to himself for restraining his men at last
from the farther prosecution of their murderous
work, on an occasion which, it must be con-
fessed, was enflaming enough to the passions
of rude natures.

It was eleven o’clock at night before the in-
valids were got on board from the small island
_ where their establishment had been fixed ; but
_they were all removed in safety. These lament-

able events, however, had completely put a stop
to the preparations that were making to obtain
a supply of wood and water for the ships; and
as it was impossible that they could proceed on
their voyage without being provided with these
articles, a party was sent on shore next day to
secure what was wanted, at all hazards. In
the performance of this duty, they found it ne-
cessary to attack a village on the Island of
Motouaro, containing about three hundred ia-
habitants, who evidenced something like a dis-
position to interrupt them. In this affair‘also a
great many of the natives werc killed. Such,
indeed, was the terror with which the fire-arms,
of the effect of which they had seen so much
the preceding day, had inspired them, that the
chiefs were utterly unable te prevail upon their
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 35

warriors even to face their formidable assail-
ants. Yet with such determined obstinacy did
they resist every attempt to capture them, that
no prisoners could be secured. All their women
and children, however, had been previously
removed, in the anticipation of this conflict.
Some days after this, while the French were
still employed in taking in their wood and water,
a number of the natives having been seen dress-
ed in the clothes of the murdered sailors, were
pursued, and a good many of themshot. During
the whole of the time the French remained, the
New-Zealanders continued to keep strict watch
in all directions, guards being stationed on the
tops of all the neighbouring hills, and fires kept
blazing on the same eminences at night. At
last every thing being in readiness, the former
determined to leave the island; but before set-
ting sail, an armed party was once more sent
on shore to make the last inquiries after the fate
of Marion and his companions, and to inflict yet
another chastisement on their destroyers. ‘They
proceeded or landing to the village belonging
to Tacouri; but on their arrival here they found
all the inhabitants had fled, except a few old
men, whoin it is to be hoped they did not injure.
They were just in time, however, to see Tacouri
himself running off, having the unfortunate Ma-
rion’s mantle, which was recognised by the blue
English cloth lined with red, of which it was
made, hanging from his shoulders. On enter-
ing, too, this chief’s deserted kitchen, they
found in it several pieces of human flesh, some
36 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

raw, and others roasted, the latter marked
with the teeth that had already been tearing
them. In another house they picked up a part
of a shirt with Marion’s name on it, together
with a variety of other evidences of the horri-
ble tragedy, of which the place in which they
now were had doubtless been the witness.
They set fire both to this village, and to another
at a little distance from it, the proprietor of
which they had reason to believe had been a
confederate in Tacouri’s treachery—a suppo-
sition which was confirmed by the fact that
its inhabitants had also deemed it prudent to
take flight, as well as by the remnants of human
flesh, and other traces of the recent barbarity,
which they found in different parts of it. Hav-
ing thus, as it was conceived, satisfied the
manes of their lost comrades, the French left
New-Zealand on the 14th of July, having, first,
however, taken possession of the country, or at
least of the northern isle, which M. Marion had
named France Australe, in the name of their
royal master. ‘To the inlet where they had
lain, (Cook’s Bay of Islands,) and of which M.
Marion is somewhat incorrectly termed the dis-
coverer, they gave the warning designation of
the Bay of ‘Treachery.

Weare left by M. Crozet’s narrative altogether
in the dark as to any circumstances which could
have led to the sudden and horrible catastrophe
which we have just related. He asserts indeed
repeatedly, that the French had given these
islanders no cause of offence whatever during
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 37

their residence among them ; and that up to the
fatal day when the cruel assassination of Ma-
rion and his companions was perpetrated, no-
thing could have exceeded the apparent cordi-
ality and harmony in which the two parties
lived together. “ They treated us,” is his ex-
pression, “with every show of friendship for
thirty-three days, in the intention of eating us
the thirty-fourth.” Most people, however, will
probably be of opinion that conduct apparently
implying such transcendent perfidy must be
capable of some explanation, if all the facts of
the case were known.

The first European vessel that visited New-
Zealand after the departure of the Mascarin
and the Castries, was the Resolution, in which
Cook was then making his second voyage
around the globe. ‘The great navigator arrived
again in sight of New-Zealand on the 25th of
March, 1773. The day following he entered
Dusky Bay, lying in the south-west part of the
southern island, immediately to the north of the
West Cape ; and here he remained till the 11th
of May. A few inhabitants were found even in
this spot, so remote from the quarters where
the principal settlements seemed to be establish-
ed. On leaving Dusky Bay, Cook proceeded
along the coast toward the north, and turning
into the strait between the two islands, came to
an anchor on the 18th in a harbour, to which
he gave the name of Ship Cove, situated in a
large inlet called Queen Charlotte’s Sound, on
the coast of the Southern Island, in which he
38 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

had lain for about three weeks on his former
voyage. Here the Resolution found her consort
the Adventure, commanded by Captain Furn-
eaux, from which she had been separated in a
storm on the passage from the Cape of Good
Hope, more than three months before. The
Adventure had reached the bay on the 7th of
April, having also entered the straits from the
west. The two ships continued here till the
7th of June, when they set sail in company, and,
bearing through the strait toward the east, pro-
ceeded on their voyage to the Society Islands.

On the 2ist of October, in the same year,
the two English discovery ships again arrived
at New-Zealand, on their return from the So-
ciety Isles. When the ships were a few miles
to the north of Cape Turnagain, some of the
natives came to them in their canoes, from
the shore, bringing a few fish which they ex-
changed for cloth and nails. ‘“ They were so
fond of nails,” says Cook, “as to seize on all
they could find, and with such eagerness, as
plainly showed that they were the most valu-
able things we could give them.” ‘The first
words which two of them spoke, who were pre-
vailed upon to come on board, were, Mataou no
ta pow pow (we are afraid of the guns.) These
two acquisitions—a knowledge of the value of
iron, and a sense of the power of fire-arms—
were, perhaps, all they had gained from their
four years’ intercourse with Europeans. The
last they shared with the inferior animal races
inhabiting their country. Crozet tells us, that
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 39

although, on the first arrival of the French, the
birds around the Bay of Islands were so entirely
without fear, that they would perch even on the
muskets, or stand still at their very muzzles
when pointed at them, they afterward took
wing whenever they observed the sportsman
approach. They still, however, he adds, suf-
fered the natives to come near them without
being at all disturbed. ‘he French navigator,
Bougainville, mentions, in the same way, that
when he landed in the Falkland Islands, all the
animals came about him and his men, the fowls
alighting upon their heads and shoulders.

In continuing their course along the coast to-
ward the south, the two ships were attacked
by a violent gale of wind, during which they
again parted company. Cook in a day or two .
regained his old station on the south side of the
straits; and here he remained for about three
weeks ; after which he bore away toward the
south-east. Meanwhile the Adventure had been
detained on the east coast from the time she
lost sight of her consort, and it was the begin-
ning of December before she arrived in Ship
Cove, where her consort had been. On going
ashore, however, they found the place where
Cook’s people had erected their tents, and ob-
served cut out on an old stump of a tree in the
garden the words, “ Look underneath.” ‘This
enabled them to find Cook’s direction for their
course, which he had written, and buried in a
bottle.

On the 17th they had got every thing ready
40 THE NEW-ZFRALANDERS.

for setting sail, and intended to weigh anchor
next morning, when Captain Furneaux sent off
one of the midshipmen, and a boat’s crew, to
the land, to gather a few wild greens, with or-
ders to return in the evening. As the boat,
however, did not make her appearance either
that night or the next morning, Captain Fur-
neaux became very uneasy about her, and hoist-
ing out the launch, sent her with his second- |
lieutenant, Mr. Burney, manned with a boat’s
crew and ten marines in search of her. The
result was, that another horrible massacre had
taken place. ‘The boat’s crew had been attacked
by the natives, and the whole of the unfortunate
men put to death and eaten. ‘The persons who
perished in this massacre, ten in number, were
the best hands in the ship. Mr. Bumey’s nar-
rative of this fearful transaction is exceedingly
interesting. ‘The Adventure left New-Zealand
four days afterward. .

On the 19th of October, 1774, Cook’s vessel
was again moored at her old anchorage in Ship
Cove ; and she remained here till the 10th of
the following month. None of the natives made
their appearance till the 24th, when two canoes
were seen, which, however, as soon as they
perceived the ship, retired behind a point of
land. In the course of the day some more of
the natives were discovered on shore, and even
hallooed to a boat they saw approaching, in
which Cook was; but as the boat drew nearer
to the land, they all took flight to the woods,
except two or three men, who remained sta-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 43

tioned on a rising ground with their anns in
their hands. ‘“'The moment we landed,” con-
tinues Cook, “they knew us. Joy then took
place of fear ; and the rest of the natives hur-
ried out of the woods, and embraced us over and
over again; leaping and skipping about like
madmen.” Cook did not succeed during his
present visit to New-Zealand in ascertaining
any thing as to the misfortune that had befallen
the Adventure, notwithstanding all his inquiries,
which were particularly called forth by the mys-
terious conversation of the natives. Captain
Cook paid his fifth and last visit to New-Zealand
in the course of his third voyage around the
world, having, after leaving Van Diemen’s Land,
come in sight of Rock’s Point on the west coast
of the southern island on the 10th of February,
1777. On the morning of the 12th he was at
anchor in his old station in Ship Cove, where
he had not lain long, before several canoes filled
with natives came alongside. Very few of
them, however, would at first venture on board ;
and Cook attributes their shyness, with every
probability, to their apprehension that he had
come to revenge the massacre of Captain Fur-
neaux’s men, with which they must have known
that he was now acquainted, as they saw he
had brought with him the native of the Society
{slands, Omai, who had been on board the Ad-
venture when the melancholy affair happened.
But they very soon laid aside their fears on
Cook assuring them that he had no hostile in-
tentions; and the English having formed an
42 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

encampment on shore, a great number of fami-
lies soon came from different parts of the coast
and took up their residence close to them.
They were even visited occasionally by a chief
named Kahoora, who was stated to have headed
the party that cut off Captain Furneaux’s people,
and to have himself killed Mr. Rowe, the of-
ficer who commanded. This personage seemed
t6 be an object of general terror and dislike
among his countrymen, many of whom impor-
tuned Cook to kill him, and appeared not a little
surprised when the English captain declined
complying with their request. ‘“ But if I had
followed,” says Cook, “the advice of all our
pretended friends, I might have extirpated the
whole race ; for the people of each hamlet or
village, by turns, applied to me to destroy the
other.”

Kahoora himself came afterward to the ship
inacanoe. “This was the third time,” says
Cook, “ he had visited us, without betraying the
smallest appearance of fear. I was ashore when
he now arrived, but had got on board just as he
was going away. Omai, who had returned with
me, presently pointed him out, and solicited me
to shoot him. Not satisfied with this, he ad-
dressed himself to Kahoora, threatening to be
his executioner if ever he presumed to visit us
again. The New-Zealander paid so little re-
gard to these threats, that he returned the next
morning with his whole family, men, women,
and children, to the number of twenty and up-
ward. Omai was the first who acquainted me
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 43

with his being alongside the ship, and desired
to know if he should ask him to come on board.
I told him he might; and accordingly he intro-
duced the chief into the cabin, saying, ‘ ‘There
is Kahoora, killhim! But, asif he had forgotten
his former threats, or were afraid that I should
call upon him to perform them, he immediately
retired. In a short time, however, he returned;
and seeing the chief unhurt, he expostulated
with me very eamestly, saying, ‘Why do you
not kill him? You tell me if aman kills another
in England that he is hanged for it. ‘This man
has killed ten, and yet you will not kill him,
though many of his countrymen desire it, and
it would be very good.’ Omai’s arguments,
though specious cnough, having no weight with
me, I desired him to ask the chief why he had kill-
ed Captain Furneaux’s people? At this question
Kahoora folded his arms, hung down his head,
and looked like one caught in a trap; and I
firmly believe he expected instant death. But
no sooner was he assured of his safety than he
became cheerful. He did not, however, seem
willing to give me an answer to the question
that had been put to him, till I had, again and
again, repeated my promise that he should not
be hurt. ‘Then he ventured to tell us, ‘ that one
of his countrymen, having brought a stone
hatchet to barter, the man to whom it was of-
fered took it, and would neither return it nor
give any thing for it; on which the owner of it
snatched up the bread as an equivalent, and
then the quarrel began.”
44 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

CHAPTER IV.

Intercourse of New-Zealanders with Australia—Hooda
Cocoty-Towamahowey and ‘Toogee—Tippahee—George
Bruce—Destruction of the Bayd—Duaterra.

AurHoucH New-Zealand remained unvisited
by the discovery ships of European nations, an
intercourse, which gradually became more fre-
quent, had been begun, some years before the
close of the last century, between these islands
and the English settlement in New South Wales.
From this colony, the voyage to the nearest part
of the New-Zealand coast could be made in
about a fortnight, the distance not being greater
than twelve hundred miles. In 1793, the govern-
ment of New South Wales having attempted to
form a settlement on Norfolk Island, a small un-
inhabited island, two or three days’ sail to the
north-west of New-Zealand, which Cook had
discovered on his second voyage, it was deter-
mined to send a vessel to the neighbourhood of
the Bay of Islands to bring away one or more
of the natives, in order that instructions might
be obtained from them as to the mode of dress-
ing the flax of their country, a production which
was also found to abound in the new scitlement.
The Dedalus, accordingly, under the command
of Lieutenant Hanson, having appeared on the
coast of New-Zealand, two of the natives, the
one named Hoodo-Cocoty-Towamahowey and
the other Toogee, were without much difficulty
enticed on board, and immediately carried away
to Norfolk Island. ere they were treated with
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 45

every attention by Captain King, the governor
of the settlement, but it soon appeared, that al-
though they were very ready to give all the in-
formation about the flax that they could, they
knew very little about the matter. “ This ope-
ration was found to be among them the peculiar
province of the women; ard as Hoodo was a
warrior, and Toogee a priest, they gave the go-
vemor to understand that dressing of flax never
made any patt of their studies.” The haughty
chiefs must, doubtless, have felt no little surprise
on discovering the very strange purpose, as it
would appear to them, for which their services
had been sought. But, although they knew
nothing about spinning, they were able to com-
municate many details in regard to the gceogra-
phy and political condition of their country; and
one of them even drew on the floor of a room,
with chalk, a map or chart, of the northern isl-
and of New-Zealand, which he afterward trans-
ferred to paper, and which was found to bear a
great similitude to Captain Cook’s delineation.
‘They remaincd at Norfolk Island for a consider-
able time, and were then carried back to their
native country in a vessel in which Governor
King himself accompanied them. ‘That gentle-
man, however, had but little intercourse with
the people of New-Zealand, not having gone on
shore during the short time the ship was off the
island, which was only eighteen hours in all.
But the kindness with which he had treated the
two chiefs appears to have been long remem-
bered both by them and their countrymen.
46 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

When the Fanny, a vessel from Port Jackson,
lay at anchor in Doubtless Bay, in December,
1795, several canoes came off to her from the
shore ; and inquiries having been made by the
English after Toogee, the New-Zealanders im-
mediately exclaimed in their own tongue, “ Good
Governor King! good ‘Toogee! good Hoodo !”
Toogee himself afterward came on board, and
informed them that he had still one pig alive,
and some peas growing, the produce of presents
he had received from Guvernor King. ‘Toogee
was also seen in August, 1819, by the Rev.
Mr. Marsden, principal chaplain of New South
Wales, in the course of his second visit to New-
Zealand. Mr. Marsden describes him as an
officer under Korrokorro, one of the most power-
ful chiefs of that district. He inquired very
affectionately after Governor King’s eldest
daughter, who was only a few years old when
he was at Norfolk Island; and when told that
she now lived at Paramatta, New South Wales,
he said he would go and live with her till he died.

About the same time that these two chiefs
paid their visit to Norfolk Island, many of the
English ships engaged in the South Sea whale-
fishing began to frequent the coasts of New-
Zealand in pursuit of fish. ‘They were at first
deterred by the notions which were entertained
of the ferocious character of the natives; but
some of the captains at last ventured to put in
to the land, and, having gone on shore, sought
an intercourse with the inhabitants. ‘They found
them in general, although very observant of the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 47

movements of the new comers, fur from being
disposed to offer hostilities; and after some time
the communication thus commenced became
frequent, and of the most friendly description.
The government at New South Wales even
took advantage of these visits of the whalers to
send the New-Zealanders occasional presents
of cattle, and whatever else was likely to pro-
mote their civilization, or to give them a taste
for the conveniences and enjoyments of culti-
vated life. At last a very powerful chief, of the
name of Tippahee, who resided near the Bay
of Islands, expressed a desire to be taken along
with his five sons to see Port Jackson; and
accordingly, having been conveyed to Norfolk
Island, they were, after remaining for some time
at that settlement, received on board his majes-
the governor s#/0, which cerrig’ them to New

nd after 28- During the time, dejy, ined,
he examined, with the most inquisitive atten-
tion, the various novelties that presented them-
selves to his notice, and evinced particular
anxiety to obtain an acquuintance with the dif-
ferent arts and manufactures which he saw car-
ried on by the settlers. ‘“ Being taken one day,”
says Mr. Nicholas, “to see a rope walk, and
shown the method of making small twine,
some of which was spun before him, and the
process explained, he was so affected by the
contrast of our enlightened knowledge with
the barbarous ignorance of his own country-
men that he burst into tears, and exclaimed, in
the bitterness of his regret, ‘ New-Zealand no
43 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS

good!” On his departure this chief carried with
him a great many presents from the governor,
among which were some seed potatoes, which
he had been taught the method of cultivating,
and from which he raised considerable crops
after his return to his own country. But Cook
had long before this left the potatoe both in the
northern and southern island. Tippahee also
carried out with him the first European, proba-
bly, who ever took up his abode in New-Zealand,
a young man named George Bruce. ‘This per-
son was a native of the neighbourhood of Lon-
don, who, having been appointed on the voyage
to attend Tippahee during an ijlness with which
he was seized, acquitted Rimself so much to the
chief’s satisfaction that he requested the cap-
tain to allow the young man to remain with him
when_jhe, 8D h f the LOBE Vi ‘Ss : eldest
after; yho wot ippahee’s youngest, v1.
and, having deen tattooed, was himself consi-
dered as a chief, and invested with a consider-
able share in the government of his father-in-
law’s territories, which were of great extent.
The authority which he enjoyed was found for
some time of the most beneficial consequence
to such English vessels as touched at the island
—which were now much more abundantly sup-
plied with provisions than formerly; and he
himself lived in great content and happiness.
At last a ship named the General Wellesley,
commanded by a Captain Dalrymple, having
put in at a part of the coast where Bruce and
his wife chanced tu be, but which was at some
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 49

distance from Tippahee’s residence, Dalrymple
induced them both, by the most solemn assu-
rances of bringing them back in safety, to come
on board in order to assist him in searching for
gold dust, which he expected to discover some-
where about the North Cape. On finding him-
self, however, disappointed in his object, the
English captain declined to return with his two
passengers to the Bay of Islands; but, retaining
them both on board, proceeded, in spite of all
their remonstrances, on his voyage to India.
Having arrived 4t Malacca, he contrived to
leave Bruce on shore there, and carried off his
wife to Penang, where, upon Bruce’s following
her by the first opportunity, he found her in the
possession of a Captain Ross, to whom Dalrym-
ple had sold her. Through the interference of
the governor she was restored’ to her husband ;
and, after several other vexatious delays and
digappointments, the two were at last brought,
by Sir Edward Pellew, to Calcutta, whence it
was expected they would find a passage to New
South Wales, and from thence to New-Zealand.
We do not know whether they ever succeeded
in regaining their country, this account of them
being taken from a statement in a Calcutta jour-
nal, as copied in “'Turnbull’s Voyage around
the World,” and which was written while they
were still in Bengal.

The year 1809 is memorable, in the annals
of our intercourse with New-Zealand, for the
most calamitous catastrophe which is known to
have ever resulted from the ferocity of the na-

4
50 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

tives to Europeans visiting their coasts. In the
latter part of this year, the ship Boyd, of five
hundred tons’ burden, left Port Jackson for Eng-
land, with seventy persons on board, besides
four or five New-Zealanders, whom she was to
convey to their own country, it being the inten-
tion of her commander, Captain Thompson, to
call at New-Zealand on his way, to make up
his cargo by taking in some spars for the Cape
of Good Hope. Among the New-Zealanders
whom he had with him, and who were to have
their passage for assisting to Work the ship, was
a son of one of the chiefs, who had served be-
fore this on board different Mnglish vessels
trading between his native country and New
South Wales, and who was generally known
by the name of George aimong the sailors, al-
though his proper name was Tarra. His tribe
resided in the neighbourhood of a bay called by
the natives Wangarooa, situated on the same
coast with the Bay of Islands, but about fifty
miles to the north of it. It appears that during
the passage George had refused to work with
the other sailors, under the double plea that as
the son of a chief he ought not to be subjected
to such a degradation, and that, even were he
willing to submit to work, he was in such ill
health as to be unable to do so. His repre-
sentations upon both these heads, however,
were treated with contempt by the captain, who
not only laughed at his claims to the dignity of
chieftainship, but had him twice tied up to the
gangway, and flogged with great severity, while
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 51

he was also deprived at the same time of his
usual allowance of food. The crafty savage
felt his injuries, but he felt too that this was not
the time for him to resent them; and he merely
remarked significantly, in reply to the captain’s
taunting affirmation that he was no chief, that
they would find him to be such on their arrival
in his country. It would even seem that he
had contrived by his show of good humour du-
ring the remainder of the passage to regain en-
tirely the confidence of the captain, who, on
their nearing the coast, allowed himself to be
persuaded by his insidious advice to put in to
Wangarooa, as the best place for procuring the
timber, although it was not known that the
harbour had ever before been visited by any
European vessel.

George had them now in his own power, and
he lost no time in making preparations for his
already well-devised revenge. Having gone on
shore, he detailed his injuries to his tribe ; and
it was resolved that they should be fearfully Te-
quited. ‘The captain was first persuaded to
land witha part of his crew, under the pretence
that they could not so easily find for him such
trees as he wanted, unless he would go along
with them to point them out. When they had
got him and his party into the wood, having
watched their opportunity, they suddenly fell
upon the unsuspecting men, and before they
could make any resistance, every one of them
was murdered. Elated with their achievement,
the infuriated savages next proceeded to the
52 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

ship. It was now dusk, and as they came
alongside in the ship’s boats, dressed in the
clothes of their victims, they were hailed by
the second officer, who, in reply, was informed
by them that the captain, meaning to remain on
shore all night, had ordered them to take on
board the spars that were already cut down.
On this, a number of them immediately ascended
the ship’s side, and before any alarm could be
given, knocked the officer down, and beat out
his brains, treating in like manner all the sea-
men of the watch. Some of them then going
down to the cabin door, asked those within to
come upon deck to sec the spars; on which a
female passenger, having stepped out to go up,
was killed on the cabin ladder. From this mo-
ment all was wild and indiscriminate slaughter ;
every man, woman, and child that could be
found on board was inassacred, with the excep-
tion of four or five seamen, who had succeeded
in escaping up the shrouds, and who were still
in the rigging when night closed upon the deso-
late and bloody deck.

Here these unhappy men remained till morn-
ing, when Tippahee, the chief, whosc visit to
Port Jackson we have already mentioned, ap-
peared alongside in his. canoe; and assuring
them of his protection, and of his detestation of
the horrible atrocity of which his countrymen
had been guilty, invited them to descend and
come with him. It appears that Tippahee had
come accidentally at this time to Wangarooa
from the Bay of Islands to trade for dried fish,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 53

as his tribe are still in the habit of doing. The
men came down from the rigging at his invita-
tion, and having got into his canoe, were safely
landed by him at the nearest point, although
closely pursued by the Wangarooans. But here
Tippahee’s power to protect them ended: their
savage pursuers, leaping on shore, ran after
and soon overtook them all, and, while the old
man was forcibly held, and prevented from in-
terfering, murdered them before his face.

‘The only individuals who were saved from
this cruel slaughter were a woman, two children,
and the cabin boy. The boy had gained George’s
regard on the passage, by treating him with
more kindness than the other sailors; and,
trusting to this, had run up to hirn in the midst
of the slaughter and implored his protection,
when the grateful chief immediately exclaiming,
* No, my boy, I won’t kill you-—you are a good
boy,” took him under his own cure. The two
children, with the woman, who was the mother
of one of them, had remained concealed till the
fury of the barbarians was somewhat satiated ;
and the woman is said to have then moved the
pity of an old man who discovered her, by her
tears and enireaties.

The ship was immmediately plundered by the
savages of every article of value it contained,
although the iron-work and fire-arms were the
portions of the spoil that principally attracted
their cupidity. George’s father was so anxious
to commence firing the muskets of which he
had got possession, that he had a cask of gun-
54 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

powder brought up between decks, and, having
driven in the head of it, snapped a musket over
it, when a spark lighting among the powder pro-
duced an explosion that blew the upper works
of the vessel into the air, and deprived him and
all the other New-Zealanders then on board of
their lives.

‘lhe four individuals who had not been put to
death were indebted for their final preservation
to the intrepid humanity of Mr. Berry, super-
cargo on board the ship City of Edinburgh. ‘This
gentleman, happening to hear of the melancholy
tragedy soon after its perpetration, while he
was employed in taking in a cargo of spars at
the Bay of Islands, immediately set out, at the
great risk of his own life, to ascertain if any
persons belonging to the unfortunate vessel yet
survived, and, should any be found, to rescue
them, if possible, from the hands of the savages.
He conducted his heroic enterprise with ad-
mirable presence of mind, dexterity, and de-
cision, and obtained possession of all the four
who yet remained wnsacrificed. The last he
recovered was alittle girl of two or three years
of age, the daughter of a Mr. Broughton, of Port
Jackson, whose mother perished. ‘This child
was found to be in the possession of one of the
chiefs, and although promised, was not brought
to him till after a considerable delay. “ This
delay,” says Mr. Berry, “I afterward had rea-
son to belicve proceeded from the endeavours
of the natives to deliver it up im as decent a
manne) as possible. It was tolerably clean,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 55

with its hair dressed and ornamented with white
feathers, in the fashion of New-Zealand. Its
only clothing, however, consisted of a linen
shirt, which, from the marks upon it, had be-
longed to the captain. ‘The poor child was
greatly emaciated, and its skin was excoriated
all over. When brought to the boat, it cried
out in a feeble and complaining tone, ‘ Mamma,
my mamma!’” ‘This child was carried to Lima
in the City of Edinburgh ship; and it was not
till more than two years after leaving New-
Zealand that she was restored to her father in
New South Wales. Although of so tender an
age when the destruction of the Boyd took place,
she was found, while in South America, to re-
collect well the dreadful scenes of which she
had been witness. ‘Ihave more than once
been present,” says Mr. Berry, “ when the cruel
but interesting question was put to her, if she
recollected what the Zealanders did to her
mamma? Her countenance, on such occasions,
assumed the appearance of the deepest melan-
choly ; and, without uttcring a word, she used
to draw her hand across her throat. On farther
questions, she would say, with every appear-
ance of the most painful feeling, that they after-
ward cut her up, and cooked and ate her like
victuals.” This statement is quite in accordance
with the accounts which the natives themselves
give of the horrid festivities that followed the
niassacre.

When Captain Cruise was in New-Zealand,
in 1820, he heard a good deal of George, and
56 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

met with him several times. He describes the
treachery of his character as being held in such
detestation even by his own countrymen, that
they seemed to have little or no intercourse with
him. It did not appear, however, that he him-
self felt any remorse for his share in the trans-
action we have just related. “ Though George,”
says Captain Cruise, ‘ had at first denied being
present at, or accessary to, the massacre of the
crew of the Boyd, yet when he became more
confident that we had no intention to injure him,
he not only acknowledged the leading part he
had taken in that atrocity, but more than once
told the horrid story with all that gesture for
which, when worked into a passion, he was so
remarkable. He mentioned particularly the cir-
cumstance of one of the sailors, who, in hopes
of finding a protector in an old acquaintance,
ran to him, and, seizing his mat, cried out, ‘ My
God, my God ” when he instantly, with a single
blow of his mearee, laid the unfortunate sup-
pliant dead at his feet. When passing by the
wreck of the Boyd, with some of the officers of
the Dromedary, he pointed at it, and remarked
to them, in his broken English, ‘‘That’s my
ship ;’ ‘ she is very sorry ;’ ‘ she is crying.’ But
in no instance did he express any compunction
for the horrible crime of which he had been
guilty.”

But we have not yet related all the unfortu-
nate consequences of the affront offered to this
haughty barbarian. Poor Tippahee’s accidental
presence at the scene of the massacre, and his
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 57

generous attempt to save the men who had taken
refuge in the rigging, brought upon him the
heaviest calamities, and from a quarter whence
he had the least of all any reason to expect such
a reward. A short time after the destruction
of the Boyd, four or five whale-fishing vessels
having put in to the Bay of Islands, the captains
were informed by some enemies of Tippahee,
that this chief was the head and instigator of the
recent massacre. ‘The circumstance of its being
undeniable that he was at least present on the
occasion, gave considerable plausibility to the
story; while it was still farther aided in as-
suming the semblance of truth by the similarity
between the sound of Tippahee’s name and that
of Tippouie, the brother of George, and who
was really one of the principal actors in the
tragedy. ‘Thus deceived, the commanders of
these vessels united their forces, and, attacking
the island where Tippahee resided, slaughtered
the inhabitants without distinction of age or sex,
and burned, or otherwise destroyed, whatever
stood or grew on the soil. Many hundreds, it
is said, of the innocent people perished in this
indiscriminate havoc ; and Tippahee himself
was severely wounded, and with difficulty made
his escape with his life. Even this he lost some
time after in an encounter with the Wanga-
rooans, which is said to have also originated in
the deplorable events that have just been de-
tailed.

The most interesting New-Zealander who
distinguished himself about this time by his en-
58 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

deavours to obtain an acquaintance with the arts
and manners of civilized life, was Duaterra, also
a relation of Tippahee, and himself a chief of
considerable power. Duaterra, when only about
eighteen, had, in the year 1805, shipped him-
self on board the Argo whaler, which was
leaving the Bay of Islands for Port Jackson,
agreeing, in order that he might gratify his de-
sire of visiting the English settlement, to serve
during the voyage as a common sailor. He
was accordingly attached to one of the whale
boats, in which he did duty for twelve months
while the vessel was cruising on the coast of
New-Zealand and New-Holland, and was at
last discharged while she lay in Sydney Cove,
having received no wages all the time. He
then entercd on board another whaler, the Al-
bion, in which he served for six months before
he got back to the Bay of Islands. Captain
Richardson, who commanded this vessel, was
very kind to him, and paid him wages like the
other sailors. After remaining six months at
home, Duaterra, not yet satisfied with what he
liad seen of a sea life or of foreign lands, next
embarked on board the Santa Anna, then bound
ona voyage to Bounty Island for a cargo of seal
skins. When they arrived at Bounty Island,
Duaterra and thirtcen others of the crew were
put on shore to kill seals, while the vessel pro-
cceded for supplies to Norfolk Island and New-
Zealand, leaving the fourteen men with very
little water, salt provisions, or bread. It was
five months before she returned, and during the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 59

greater part of this time Duaterra and his com-
panions, there being no water and scarcely any
food to be procured on the island, had undergone
such extreme sufferings from thirst and hunger
that three of them had died. ‘They had, how-
ever, procured about eight thousand skins ; after
taking which on board, the vessel set out on her
voyage for England, the great object for the
sake of which Duaterra had first gone on board
of her. He had, it seems, long entertained the
most ardent desire to sec King George, and,
sustained by the hope of this gratification, he
had patiently borne all the hardships we have
detailed. But when the Santa Anna at last ar-
rived in the river Thames, which she did in
July, 1809, poor Duaterra soon found he was as
far from his object as ever. Instead of suc-
ceeding in obtaining a sight of the king, he was
scarcely perinitted to go on shore, and never
spent a night out of the ship. When he made
inquiries as to how he could see the king, he
was told sometimes that he would never be
able to find the house, and at other times that
nobody was permitted to see his majesty. This
disappointment distressed him so much, that,
together with the toils and privations he had
already sustained, it brought on a dangerous ill-
ness. Meanwhile the master of the Santa
Anna, when he asked him for some wages and
clothing, had peremptorily refused to give him
any, telling him that he should send him home
by the Ann, a vessel which liad been taken up
by government to convey convicts to New South
60 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Wales. But when he brought him to Mr.
Clark, the master of this vessel, that gentleman
refused to receive him unless the master of the
Santa Anna would supply him with a suit of
slops. It happened that the Rev. Mr. Marsden,
from whose account these details are taken, was
then in London, and about to proceed to New
South Wales by the Ann, which he joined at
Spithead. “When I embarked,” says Mr.
Marsden, “ Duaterra was confined below by
sickness, so that I did not see him, or know he
was there for some time. On my first observ-
ing him, he was on the forecastle, wrapped up
in an old great coat, very sick and weak, had a
very violent cough, and discharged considerable
quantities of blood from his mouth. His mind
was very much dejected, and he appeared as
if a few days would terminate his existence.
I inquired of the master where he had met
with him, and also of Duaterra what had
brought him to England, and how he came to
be so wretched and miserable. He told me the
hardships and wrongs he had experienced on
board the Santa Anna were exceedingly great,
and that the English sailors had beaten him
very much, which was the cause of his spit-
ting blood; that the master had defrauded him
of all his wages, and prevented his seeing the
king.” ‘The kindness he now experienced,
however, gradually restored him to health;
and by the time the vesscl arrived at Rio de
Janeiro, he was able to do his duty as a com-
mon sailor, in which capacity he was consider-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 61

ed equal to most of the men on board. He
arrived at Port Jackson in February, 1810, and
resided with Mr. Marsden till the November
following, during which time he applied him-
self diligently to acquire a knowledge of agri-
culture. He then embarked on board the Fre-
deric, along with three of his countrymen, one
of whom was a son of Tippahee, and of course
his near relation, in order to return to New-
Zealand. ‘They were all, having been a good
deal at sea, to serve on board the ship while
it remained on the coast of that country, and
in return for this to be landed at the Bay of
Islands on its departure. But after detaining
them on board for six months, the captain had
the cruelty, notwithstanding their entreaties and
remonstrances, and although the vessel was
actually at the mouth of the Bay of Islands,
to bear away with them to Norfolk Island,
where he first made the four New-Zealanders
go on shore to get water, in which attempt they
were all nearly drowned in the surf, and then,
when he had no farther occasion for their ser-
vices, left them on the island. He soon after,
however, returned and took away ‘Tippahee’s
son by force, although he earnestly entreated to
be left with his companions. ‘That young man
was never afterward heard of, the Frederick
having been taken on her passage to England
by an American, after an action in which the
master was mortally wounded. -

A short time after the Frederick left Nor-
folk Island, the Ann whaler, commanded by
62 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Mr. Gwynn, having touched there on her way
to Port Jackson, found Duaterra and his com-
panions in a very distressed state, and almost
naked. In this vessel Duaterra, having been
kindly supplied with clothing by the captain,
obtained a passage to Port Jackson, and was
very happy when he found himself once more
with his old friend Mr. Marsden. But he had
now been absent about three years from his
wife and family, to whom he was much attach-
ed; and he was very anxious to get back to
New-Zealand. Another whaler, named also
the Ann, having arrived from England, and
being about to proceed to that country, he
embarked on board of her, under the usual
stipulation that he should be set on shore after
helping to work the ship during the time she
was taking in her cargo on the coast. He had
been provided with a quantity of seed wheat,
and various agricultural tools, when he set out
on his former voyage in the Frederick, but had
been plundered of every thing while on board.
He now, however, received a fresh supply of
seeds and implements. The Ann was five
months in making up her cargo, during all
which time Duaterra remained on board ; but
at last, he was landed once more on his na-
tive soil, to the inexpressible joy not less of
himself than of his friends, who had probably
before this given up all expectations of ever
seeing him again.

This narrative affords, it is to be appre-
hended, only too fair a sample of the treat-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 63

ment which the New-Zealanders received
from the captains and crews of many of the
vessels frequenting their coasts. On the other
hand, these savages, as might have been ex-
pected, lost no opportunity of retaliating.
Shortly after the devastation of Tippahee’s
Island, as above related, in consequence of
the share that chief was supposed to have had
in cutting off the Boyd, three seamen belong-
ing to a whaler named the New-Zealander
were murdered and eaten by the enraged na-
tives. But at last, in the course of the year
1814, the persons who had several years before
been sent out by the Church Missionary So-
ciety, and since remained at Port Jackson,
determined upon procceding to New-Zealand ;
when one of them was appointed by Governor
Macquarie to act as a magistrate in that coun-
try, and a proclamation was at the same time
issued, announcing to masters of ships the de-
termination of the colonial government to punish,
with the utmost severity, all outrages committed
on the persons or property of the inhabitants.
A good deal of information with regard to the
country in the neighbourhod of the Bay of
Islands has since been laid before the public,
in the annual reports respecting this mission,
as well as in those relating to another subse-
quently established by the Wesleyan Metho--
dists. The extracts that have been printed
from the journals of the Rev. Mr. Marsden,
especially, who has made five visits to this part
of New-Zealand since 1814, abound in the most
64 - THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

interesting and valuable details. Mr. Marsden
was accompanied on his first visit by Mr. Ni-
cholas, who has also published a very full nar-
rative of his voyage. His work forms upon
the whole the most complete account of this
part of New-Zealand that has appeared.
Along with it may be mentioned, as contain-
ing also much information with regard to the
same vicinity, the more recent publication of
Captain Cruise, who was in New-Zealand for
ten months in the year 1820, when Mr. Mars-
den was also there on his third visit.

CHAPTER V.

John Rutherford—Attack on the Agnes—Massacre of part
of the crew.

Aw Englishman, named John Rutherford, has
recently returned from New-Zealand, after a
residence of several years in a part of the north-
ern island considerably beyond the farthest limit
known to have been reached by any European
who has yet penetrated into the interior of the
country. Rutherford returned to his native land,
from his long exile, in the early part of the year
1828, bringing with him an account of the ad-
ventures he had met with in different parts of
the world, and especially during his detention
among the savages of New-Zealand, which he
had dictated to a friend (for he could not write
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 65

himself) on his voyage home. We mean, in
the course of the pages that follow, to lay the
substance of it before our readers. Making
allowance for some grammatical solecisms, the
story is told throughout with great clearness,
and sometimes with considerable spirit.
Rutherford, according to his own account,
was born at Manchester, about the year 1796.
He went to sea, he states, when he was hardly
more than ten years of age. Having served for
several years on board different vessels, he at
length entered on board the Agnes, an American
brig of six guns and fourteen men, commanded
by a Captain Coffin, which was then engaged
in trading for pearl and tortoise-shell among the
islands of the Pacific. This vessel, after having
touched at various other places, on her return
from Owhyhee, approached the east coast of
New-Zealand, intending to put in for refresh-
menis at the Bay of Islands.* They first came
in sight of the Barrier Islands, which lie oppo-
site to the entrance of the river Thames, and
consequently some distance to the south of
the port for which they were making. They
accordingly directed their course to the north ;
but they had not got far on their way, when it
began to blow a gale from the north-east, which,
being aided by a current, not only made it im-
possible for them to proceed to the Bay of
Islands, but even carried them past the mouth

* Rutherford states in his journal that this event, which
was to him of such importance, occurred on the 6th of
March, 1816.

5
66 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of the Thames. It lasted for five days, and
when it abated they found themselves some dis-
tance to the south of a high point of land, which,
from Rutherford’s description, there can be no
doubt must have been that to which Captain
Cook gave the name of Cape East.

The land directly opposite to them was in-
dented by a large bay. ‘This the captain was
very unwilling to enter, believing that no ship
had ever anchored in it before. We have little
doubt, however, that this was the very bay into
which Cook first put, on his arrival on the coasts
of New-Zealand, in the beginning of October,
1769. He called it Poverty Bay, and found it
to lie in latitude 38° 42’ S.

Reluctant as the captain was to enter this
bay, from his ignorance of the coast, and the
doubts he consequently felt as to the disposition
of the inhabitants, they at last determined to
stand in for it, as they had great need of water,
and did not know when the wind might permit
them to get to the Bay of Islands. ‘They came
to anchor, accordingly, off the termination of a
reef of rocks, immediately under some elevated
land, which formed one of the sides of the bay.
As soon as they had dropped anchor, a great
many canoes came off to the ship from every
part of the bay, each containing about thirty
women, by whom it was paddled. Very few
men made their appearance that day ; but many
of the women remained on board all night, em-
ploying themselves chiefly in stealing whatever
they could lay their hands on: their conduct
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 67

greatly alarmed the captain, and a strict watch
was kept during the night. ‘The next morning
one of the chiefs came on board, whose name
they were told was Aimy, in a large war canoe,
about sixty feet long, and carrying above a hun-
dred of the natives, all provided with quantities
of mats and fishing-lines, made of the strong
white flax of the country, with which they pro-
fessed to be anxious to trade with the crew.
After this chief had been for some time on
board, it was agreed that he should return to the
land, with some others of his tribe, in the ship’s
boat, to procure a supply of water. ‘This ar-
rangement the captain was very anxious to
make, as he was averse to allow any of the
crew to go on shore, wishing to keep them all
on board for the protection of the ship. In due
time the boat returned, laden with water, which
was immediately hoisted on board; and the
chief and his men were despatched a second
time on the same errand. Meanwhile, the rest
of the natives continued to bring pigs to the
ship in considerable numbers ; and by the close
of the day about two hundred had been pur-
chased, together with a quantity of fern-root to
feed them on. Up to this time, therefore, no
hostile disposition had been manifested by the
savages ; and their intercourse with the ship
had been carried on with every appearance of
friendship and cordiality, if we except the pro-
pensity they had shown to pilfer a few of the
tempting rarities exhibited to them by their
civilized visiters. Their conduct as to this mat-
68 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

ter ought, perhaps, to be taken rather as an
evidence that they had not as yet formed any
design of attacking the vessel, as they would,
in that case, scarcely have taken the trouble of
stealing a small part of what they meant imme-
diately to seize upon altogether. On the other
hand, such an infraction of the rules of hospi-
tality would not have accorded with that system
of insidious kindness by which, as we have
already seen, it is their practice to lull the sus-
picions of those whom they are on the watch
to destroy.

During the night, however, the thieving was
renewed, and carried to a more alarming extent,
inasmuch as it was found in the morning that
some of the natives had not only stolen the lead
off the ship’s stern, but had also cut away many
of the ropes, and carried them off in their ca-
noes. It was not till daybreak, too, that the
chief returned with his second cargo of water,
and it was then observed that the ship’s boat
he had taken with him leaked a great deal; on
which the carpenter examined her, and found
that a great many of the nails had been drawn
out of the planks. About the same time, Ruther-
ford detected one of the natives in the act of
stealing the dipson lead,—“ which when I took
from him,” says he, “he grinded his teeth, and
shook his tomahawk at me.” ‘The captain,”
he continues, “now paid the chief for fetching
the water, giving him two muskets, and a quan-
tity of powder and shot—arms and ammuni-
tion being the only articles these people will
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 69

trade for. There were at this time about three
hundred of the natives on the deck, with Aimy,
the chief, in the midst of them; every man
armed with a green stone, slung with a string
around his waist. ‘This weapon they call a
‘mery;’ the stone being about a foot long, flat,
and of an oblong shape, having both edges
sharp, and a handle at the end: they use it for
the purpose of killing their enemies, by striking
them on the head. Smoke was now observed
rising from several of the hills ; and the natives
appearing to be mustering on the beach from
every part of the bay, the captain grew much
afraid, and desired us to loosen the sails, and
make haste down to get our dinners, as he
intended to put to sea immediately. As soon
as we had dined, we went aloft, and I pro-
ceeded to loosen the jib. At this time, none of
the crew were on deck except the captain and
the cook the chief mate being employed in
loading some pistols at the cabin table. The
natives seized this opportunity of commencing
an attack upon the ship. First, the chief threw
off the mat which he wore as a cloak, and,
brandishing a tomahawk in his hand, began a
war-song, when all the rest immediately threw
off their mats likewise, and, being entirely
naked, began to dance with such violence, that
I thought they would have stove in the ship’s
deck. The captain, in the mean time, was lean-
ing against the companion, when one of the
natives went unperceived behind him, and struck
him three or four blows on the head with a
70 THE NE W-ZEALANDERS.

tomahawk, which instantly killed him. The
cook, on seeing him attacked, ran to his assist-
ance, but was immediately murdered in the
same manner. I now sat down on the jib-
boom, with tears in my eyes, and trembling with
terror. Here I next saw the chief mate come
running up the companion ladder, but before he
reached the deck he was struck on the back of
the neck in the same manner as the captain
and the cook hadbeen. He fell with the blow,
but did not die immediately. A number of the
natives now rushed in at the cabin door, while
others jumped down through the sky-light, and
others were employed in cutting the lanyards
of the rigging of the stays. At the same time,
four of our crew jumped overboard off the fore-
yard, but were picked up by some canoes that
were coming from the shore, and immediately
bound hand and foot. ‘The natives now mount-
ed the rigging, and drove the rest of the crew
down, all of whom were made prisoners. One
of the chiefs beckoned to me to come to him,
which I immediately did, and surrendered my-
self. We were then put all together into a
large canoe, our hands being tied; and the New-
Zealanders searching us, took from us our
knives, pipes, tobacco-boxes, and various other
articles. ‘The two dead bodies, and the wounded
mate, were thrown into the canoe along with
us. The mate groaned terribly, and seemed in
great agony, the tomahawk having cut two
inches deep into the back of his neck; and all
the while one of the natives, who sat in the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 71

canoe with us, kept licking the blood from the
wound with his tongue. Mean time, a number
of women who had been left in the ship had
jumped overboard, and were swimming to the
shore, after having cut her cable, so that she
drifted, and ran aground on the bar near the
mouth of the river. The natives had not sense
to shake the reefs out of the sails, but had chop-
ped them off along the yards with their toma-
hawks, leaving the reefed part behind. The
pigs, which we had bought from them, were
many of them killed on board, and carried ashore
dead in the canoes, and others were thrown
overboard alive, and attempted to swim to the
land; but many of them were killed in the
water by the natives, who got astride on their
backs, and then struck them on the head with
their merys. Many of the canoes came to the
land loaded with plunder from the ship; and
numbers of the natives quarrelled about the di-
vision of the spoil, and fought and slew each
other. I observed, too, that they broke up our
water-casks for the sake of the iron hoops.
While all this was going on, we were detained
in the canoe ; but at last, when the sun was set,
they conveyed us on shore to one of the vil-
lages, where they tied us by the hands to
several small trees. The mate had expired be-
fore we got on shore, so that there now remain-
ed only twelve of us alive. The three dead
bodies were then brought forward, and hung up
by the heels to the branch of a tree, in order
that the dogs might not get at them. A number
72 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of large fires were also kindled on the beach,
for the purpose of giving light to the canoes,
which were employed all night in going back-
ward and forward between the shore and the
ship, although it rained the greater part of the
time.

“ Gentle reader,” continues Rutherford, “ we
will now consider the sad situation we were
in; our ship lost, three of our companions al-
ready killed, and the rest of us tied each toa
tree, starving with hunger, wet, and cold, and
knowing that we were in the hands of canni-
bals. ‘The next morning, I observed that the
surf had driven the ship over the bar, and she
was now in the mouth of the river, and aground
near the end of the village. Every thing being
now out of her, about ten o’clock in the morn-
ing they set fire to her; after which they all
mustered together on an unoccupied piece of
ground near the village, where they remained
standing for some time ; but at last they all sat
down except five, who were chicfs, for whom
a large ring was left vacant in the middle. The
five chiefs, of whom Aimy was one, then ap-
proached the place where we were, and after
they had stood consulting together for some
time, Aimy released me and another, and, taking
us into the iniddle of the ring, made signs for
us to sit down, which we did. In afew minutes
the other four chiefs came also into the ring,
bringing along with them four more of our men,
who were made to sit down beside us. The
chiefs now walked backward and forward in
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 73

the ring with their merys in their hands, and
continued talking together for some time, but we
understood nothing of what they said. The
rest of the natives were all the while very si-
lent, and seemed to listen to them with great
attention. At length one of the chiefs spoke to
one of the natives who was seated on the
ground, and the latter immediately arose, and,
taking his tomahawk in his hand, went and
killed the other six men who were tied to the
trees. ‘They groaned several times as they
were struggling in the agonies of death, and at
every groan the natives burst out into great fits
of laughter. We could not refrain from weep-
ing for the sad fate of our comrades, not know-
ing, at the same time, whose turn it might be
next. Many of the natives, on seeing our tears,
laughed aloud, and brandished their merys
at us.

“Some of them now proceeded to dig eight
large round holes, each about a foot deep, into
which they afterward put a great quantity of
dry wood, and covered it over with a number of
stones. They then set fire to the wood, which
continued burning till the stones became red
hot. In the meantime, some of them were
employed in stripping the bodies of my deceas-
ed shipmates, which they afterward cut up, for
the purpose of cooking them, having first wash-
ed them in the river, and then brought them and
laid them down on several green boughs which
had been broken off the trees and spread on the
ground, near the fires, for that purpose. ‘The
74 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

stones being now red hot, the largest pieces of
the burning wood were pulled from under them
and thrown away, and some green bushes, hay-
ing been first dipped in water, were laid around
their edges, while they were at the same time
covered over with a few green leaves. The
mangled bodies were then laid upon the top of
the leaves, with a quantity of leaves also strew-
ed over them; and after this a straw mat was
spread over the top of each hole. Lastly,
about three pints of water were poured upon
each mat, which running through to the stones,
caused a great steam, and then the whole was
instantly covered over with earth.

“ They afterward gave us some roasted fish
to eat, and three women were employed in
roasting fern root for us. When they had
roasted it, they laid it on a stone, and beat it
with a piece of wood, until it became soft like
dough. When cold again, however, it becomes
hard, and snaps like gingerbread. We ate but
sparingly of what they gave us. After this they
took us to a house, and gave each of us a mat
and some dried grass to sleep upon. Here we
spent the night, two of the chiefs sleeping
along with us.

“ We got up next morning as soon as it was
daylight, as did also the two chiefs, and went
and sat down outside the house. Here we
found a number of women busy in making bas-
kets of green flax, into some of which, when
they were finished, the bodies of our mess-
mates, that had been cooking all night, were
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 75

put, while others were filled with potatoes, that
had been preparing by a similar process. I ob-
served some of the children tearing the flesh
from the bones of our comrades, before they
were taken from the fires. A short time after
this, the chiefs assembled, and, having seated
themselves on the ground, the baskets were
placed before them, and they proceeded to di-
vide the flesh among the multitude, at the rate
of a basket among so many. ‘They also sent
us a basket of potatoes and some of the flesh,
which resembled pork ; but instead of partaking
of it, we shuddered at the very idea of such an
unnatural and horrid custom, and made a pre-
sent of it to one of the natives.”

According to this account, the attack made
upon the Agnes would seem to have been alto-
gether unprovoked by the conduct either of the
captain or any of the crew; but we must not,
in matters of this kind, assume that we are in
possession of the whole truth, when we have
heard the statement of only one of the parties.
According to the first accounts of the destruc-
tion of the Boyd, it would have appeared that
in that case also the perpetrators of the massa-
cre had received no provocation to excite them
to the commission of such an outrage. What
may have been the exact nature of the offence
given to the natives in the present case, the
narrative we have just transcribed hardly gives
us any data even for conjecturing ; unless we
are to suppose that their vindictive feelings
were called forth by the manner in which their
76 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

pilfering may have been resented or punished,
about which, however, nothing is said in the
account. But perhaps, after all, it is not ne-
cessary to refer their hostility to any immediate
cause of this kind. ‘These savages had proba-
bly many old injuries, sustained from former
European visiters, yet unrevenged; and ac-
cording to their notions, therefore, they had
reason enough to hold every ship that approach-
ed their coast an enemy, and a fair subject for
spoliation. It is lamentable that the conduct
of Europeans should have offered them an
excuse for such conduct. ‘The wanton cruel-
ties committed upon these people by the com-
manders and crews of many of the vessels that
have been of late years in the habit of resorting
to their shores, are testified to by too many
evidences to allow us to doubt the enormous
extent to which they have been carried; and
they are, at the same time, too much in the spi-
rit of that systematic aggression and violence
which even British sailors are apt to conceive
themselves entitled to practise upon naked and
unarmed savages, to make the fact of their per-
petration a matter of surprise tous. We must
refer to Mr. Nicholas’s book for many specific
instances of such atrocities ; but we may merely
mention here that the conduct in question is dis-
tinctly noticed, and denounced in the strongest
terms, both in a proclamation by Governor Mac-
quarie, dated the 9th of November, 1814, and
also in another by Sir ‘Thomas Brisbane, dated
the 17th of May, 1824. So strong a feeling,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 77

indeed, had been excited upon this subject
among the more respectable inhabitants of the
English colony that, in the year 1814, a society
was formed in Sidneytown, with the governor
at its head, for the especial protection of the
natives of the South Sea Islands against the
oppressions practised upon them by the crews
of European vessels. ‘The reports of the mis-
sionaries likewise abound in notices of the fla-
grant barbarities by which, in New-Zealand,
as well as elsewhere, the white man has sig-
nalized his superiority over his darker-com-
plexioned brother. But it may be enough to
quote one of their statements, namely, that
within the first two or three years after the
establishment of the Society’s settlement at the
Bay of Islands, not less than a hundred at least
of the natives had been murdered by Euro-
peans, in their immediate neighbourhood. With
such facts on record, it ought indeed to excite
but little of our surprise, that the sight of the
white man’s ship in their horizon should be to
these injured people, in every district, the signal
for a general muster, to mect the universal foe,
and, if it may be accomplished by force or cun-
ning, to gratify the great passion of savage life,
revenge.

The circumstances of this attack are all
illustrative of the New-Zealand character; and
indeed the whole narrative is strikingly accord-
ant with the accounts we have from other
sources of the manner in which these savages
are wont to act on such occasions—although
78 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

there certainly never has before appeared so
minute and complete a detail of any similar
transaction. ‘The gathering of the inland popu-
lation by fires lighted on the hills—the previous
crowding and almost complete occupation of the
vessel—the sly and patient watching for the
moment of opportunity—the instant seizure of
it when it came—the management of the whole
with such precision and skill, that, as in the
case of the Boyd, and indeed in every other
known instance, while the success of the move-
ment was perfect, this result was obtained with-
out the expense of so much as a drop of blood
on the part of the assailants—all these things
are the uniform accompaniments of New-Zea-
land treachery when displayed in such enter-
prises. The rule of military tactics among this
people is, in the first place, if possible, to sur-
prise their enemies ; and, in the second, to en-
deavour to alarm and confound them. This
latter is doubtless partly the purpose of the song
and dance, which form with them the constant
prelude to the assault ;—although these vehe-
ment expressions of passion operate also power-
fully as excitements to their own sanguinary
valour and contempt of death. Rutherford’s
description of the violence with which they
danced on board the ship in the present case,
immediately before commencing their attack
on the crew, reminds us strikingly, even by
its expression, of the account Crozet gives us,
in his narrative of the voyage of M. Marion, of
their exhibitions of a similar sort even when
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 79

they were only in sport. They would often
dance, says he, with such fury when on board

the ship that we feared they would drive in our
deck.

CHAPTER VI.

Rutherford’s Journey into the Interior—Reception at a
Village—Crying of the Natives—Fcasting—Sleeping—
Carvings—Utensils—Chief’s Wife and Daughters—Tattoo-
ing—Taboo.

RurtuHerrorp and his comrades spent an-
other night in the same manner in which they
had done the last; and on the following morn-
ing set out in company with the five chiefs, on
a journey into the interior. When they left the
coast, he remarks, the ship still continued
burning. ‘They were attended by about fifty of
the natives, who were loaded with the plunder
of the unfortunate vessel. ‘That day he calcu-
lates that they travelled only about ten miles,
the journey being very fatiguing from the want
of any regular roads, and the necessity of mak-
ing their way through a succession of woods
and swamps. ‘The village at which their walk
terminated was the residence of one of the
chiefs, whose name was Rangadi, and who was
received on his arrival by about two hundred
of the inhabitants. They came in a crowd, and,
kneeling down around him, began to cry aloud
and cut their arms, faces, and other parts of
their bodies with pieces of sharp flint, of which
80 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

each of them carried a number tied with a
string about his neck, till the blood flowed co-
piously from their wounds. ‘These demonstra-
tions of excited feeling, which Rutherford de-
scribes as merely their usual manner of receiv-
ing any of their friends who have been for
some time absent, are rather more extravagant
than seem to have been commonly observed to
take place on such occasions in other parts of
the island. Mr. Marsden, however, states that
on Korro-korro’s return from Port Jackson,
many of the women of his tribe who came out
to receive him “cut themselves in their faces,
arms, and breasts, with sharp shells or flints,
till the blood streamed down.”

The crying, however, seems to be a ceremony
that takes place universally on the meeting of
friends who have been for some time parted
We may give in illustration of this custom,
Captain Cruise’s description of the reception by
their relatives of the nine New-Zealanders who
came along with him in the Dromedary from
Port Jackson. ‘“ When their fathers, brothers,
&c., were admitted into the ship,” says he, “ the
scene exceeded description; the muskets were
all laid aside, and every appearance of joy van-
ished. It is customary with these extraordi-
nary people to go through the same ceremony
upon meeting as upon taking leave of their
friends. They join their noses together, and
remain in this position for at least half an hour;
during which time they sob and howl in the
most doleful manner. If there be many friends
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 81

gathered around the person who has returned,
the nearest relation takes possession of his
nose, while the others hang upon his arms,
shoulders, and legs, and keep perfect time with
the chief mourner (if he may be so called) in
the various expressions of his lamentation.
This ended, they resume their wonted cheer-
fulness, and enter into a detail of all that has
happened during their separation. As there
were nine New-Zealanders just returned, and
more than three times that number to comme-
morate the event, the howl was quite tremen-
dous, and so novel to almost every one in the
ship, that it was with difficulty our people’s at-
tention could be kept to matters at that moment
much more essential. Little Repero, who had
frequently boasted during the passage that he
was too much of an Englishman ever to c

again, made a strong effort when his father,
Shungie, approached him, to keep his word ;
but his early habit soon got the better of
his resolution, and he evinced, if possible,
incre distress than any of the others.” The
sudden thawing of poor Repero’s heroic re-
solves was an incident exactly similar to another
which Mr. Nicholas had witnessed. Among
the New-Zealanders who, after having resided
for some time in New South Wales, returned
with him and Mr. Marsden to their native coun-
try, was one named ‘Tui, or Tooi, who prided
himself greatly on being able to imitate Euro-
pean mamners ; and, accordingly, declaring that
he would not cry, but would behave like an

6
82 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Englishman, began, as the trying moment ap-
proached, to converse most manfully with Mr.
Nicholas, evidently, however, forcing his spirits
the whole time. But “his fortitude,” continues
Mr. Nicholas, “was very soon subdued ; for
being joined by a young chief about his own
age, and one of his best friends, he flew to his
arms, and bursting into tears, indulged exactly
the same emotions as the others.” ‘Tooi, of
whom we shall have more to say in the sequel,
was afterward brought to England, and remain-
ed for some time in this country.

The house of the chief, to which Rutherford
and his comrades were taken, was the largest
in the village, being both long and wide, al-
though very low, and having no other entrance
than an aperture, which was shut by means of
a sliding door, and was so much lower even than
the roof, that it was necessary to crawl upon
the hands and knees to get through it. Two
large pigs and a quantity of potatoes were now
cooked in the manner already described ; and
when they were ready, a portion having been
allotted to the slaves, who are never permitted
to eat along with the chiefs, the latter sat down
to their repast, the white men taking their
places beside them. ‘The feast, however, was
not held within the house, but in the open air ;
where also such of the meat as was not con-
sumed was hung up on posts for a future occa-
sion. One of the strongest prejudices of the
New-Zealanders is an aversion to be where
any article of food is suspended over their heads ;
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 83

and on this account, they never permit any
thing eatable to be brought within their huts,
but take all their meals out of doors, in an open
space adjoining the house, which has been
called by some writers the kitchen, it being there
that the meal is cooked as well as eaten. Cro-
zet says, that every one of these kitchens has
in ita cooking hole dug in the ground, of about
two feet diameter, and between one and two
deep. Even when the natives are confined to
their beds by sickness, and, it may be at the
point of death, they must receive whatever food
they take in this outer room, which, however,
is sometimes provided with a shed, supported
upon posts, although in no case does it appear
to be enclosed by walls. Mr. Nicholas, in the
course of an excursion which was made in the
neighbourhood of the Bay of Islands, was once
not a little annoyed and put out of humour by
this absurd superstition. It rained heavily
when he and Mr. Marsden arrived very hungry
at a village belonging to a chief of their ac-
quaintance, where, although the chief was not
at home, they were very hospitably received,
their friends proceeding immediately to dress
some potatoes to make them a dinner. But
after they had prepared the meal, they insisted,
as usual, that it should be eaten in the open air.
This condition, Mr. Nicholas, in the circum-
stances, naturally thought a somewhat hard one ;
but it was absolutely necessary either to com-
ply with it, or to go without the potatoes. To
make matters worse, it happened that the pre-
84 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

sent dining-room had not even a shed. So, they
had no course left, but to take shelter in the
best way they could, under a projection from
the roof of the house, extending about three
feet; and here they contrived to take their
repast, without being very much drenched.
However, they were not allowed this indulgence
without many anxious scruples on the part of
their friends, who considered even their ventur-
ing so near to the house on such an occasion
as an act of daring impiety. As they had
got possession of the potatoes, their entertainers,
though very much shocked and alarmed, did
not proceed to such rudeness as to take these
from them again ; but whenever they wanted to
drink out of the calabash that had heen brought
to them, they obliged them to thrust out their
heads for it from under the covering, although
the rain continued to fall in torrents. Fatigued
as he was, and vexed at being in this way kept
out of the comfortable sheltcr he had expected,
Mr. Nicholas at last commenced inveighing,
he tells us, against the inhospitable custom,
with much acrimony; and as ‘Tooi, who was
with them, had always showed sq strong a
predilection for European customs, he turned to
him, and asked him if he did not think that
these notions of his countrymen were all gam-
mon. ‘l'ooi, however, replied sharply, that “it
was no gammon at all ;” adding, “‘ New-Zealand
man say that Mr. Marsden’s crackee-crackee
(preaching) of a Sunday is all gammon,” in in-
dignant retaliation for the insult that had been
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 85

offered to his national customs. But the worst
part of the adventure was yet to come; for as
the night was now fast approaching, and the
rain still pouring down incessantly, it was im-
possible to think of returning to the ship; “and
we were therefore,” continues Mr. Nicholas,
“ obliged to resolve on remaining where we
were, though we had no bed to expect, nor even
a comfortable floor to stretch upon. We wrap-
ped ourselves up in our great coats, which by
good fortune we had brought with us, and when
the hour of rest came on, laid ourselves down
under the projecting root, choosing rather to
remain here together, than to go into the house
and mingle with its crowded inmates, which we
knew would be very disagreeable. Mr. Mars-
den, who is blessed by nature with a strong
constitution, and capable of enduring almost any
fatigue, was very soon asleep; but I, who have
not been cast in the Herculean mould, nor much
accustomed to severe privations, felt all the
misery of the situation, while the cold and wet
to which I was unavoidably exposed, from the
place being open, brought on a violent rheumatic
headache, that prevented me from once closing
my eyes, and kept me awake in the greatest
anguish. Being at length driven from this
wretched shelter by the rain, which was still
beating against me, I crept into the house
through the narrow aperture that served for a
door; and stretching myself among my rude
friends, I endeavoured to get some repose: but
I found this equally impossible here as in the
86 THR NEW-ZEALANDERS.

place I had left. The pain in my head still
continued: and those around me being all buried
in profound sleep, played, during the whole
night, such music through their noses, as
effectually prevented me from being able to join
in the saine chorus.”

The New-Zealanders make only two meals
in the day—one in the morning and another at
sunset ; but their voracity when they do eat is
often very great.

The huts of the common people are described
as very wretched, and little better than sheds ;
but Mr. Nicholas mentions that those which he
saw in the northern part of the country had uni-
formly well-cultivated little gardens attached to
them, which were stocked with turnips, and
sweet and common potatoes. Crozet tells us
that the only articles of furniture the French
ever found in these huts were fishing hooks,
nets, and lines, calabashes containing water, a
few tools made of stone, and several cloaks
and other garments suspended from the walls.
Among the tools one resembling our adze is in
the most common use; and it is remarkable that
the handles of these implements are often com-
posed of human bones. In the museum of the
Church Missionary Society there are adzes, the
handle of one of which is formed of the bone of
a human arm, and another of that of aleg. The
bread-pounder, formed of a large fish-bone, is
also in general use.

The common people generally sleep in the
open air, in a sitting posture, and covered by
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 87

their upper mats, all but the head; which has
been described as giving them the appearance
of so many hay-cocks or bee-hives.

The house of the chief is generally, as Ru-
therford found it to be in the present case, the
largest in the village ; but every village has, in
addition to the dwelling houses of which it con-
sists, a public storehouse, or repository of the
common stock of sweet potatoes, which is a
still larger structure than the habitation of the
chief. One which Captain Cruise describes
was erected upon several posts driven into the
ground, which were floored over with deals, at
the height of abdut four feet, as a foundation.
Both the sides and the roof were compactly
formed of stakes intertwisted with grass; and a
sliding doorway, scarcely large enough to admit
a man, formed the entrance. ‘The roof projected
over this, and was ornamented with pieces of
plank painted red, and having a variety of gro-
tesque figures carved on them. The whole
building was about twenty feet long, eight feet
wide, and five feet high. The residences of
the chiefs are built upon the ground, and have
generally the floor, and a small space in front,
neatly paved ; but they are so low that a man
can stand upright in very few of them. The
huts, as well as the storehouses, are adorned
with carving over the door. Rutherford says
each of them has an image stuck upon the ridge
pole, to intimate that no slave may enter the
house during the absence of the owner, the
88 THE NEW-ZRALANDERS.

punishment for violating this regulation being
instant death.

One of the arts in which the New-Zealand-
ers most excel is that of carving in wood. Some
of their performances in this way are, no doubt,
grotesque enough ; but they often display both
a taste and ingenuity which, especially when
we consider their miserably imperfect tools, it
is impossible to behold without admiration.
This is one of the arts which even in civilized
countries does not seem to flourish best in a
highly advanced state of society. Even among
Europeans it certainly is not at present culti-
vated with so much success as it was a century
or two ago.

The war canoes of the New-Zealanders,
which are sometimes from sixty to eighty feet
in length, and capable of containing two hun-
dred individuals, have their heads and sterns,
in general, elaborately carved.

The considerations by which the New-Zea-
landers are directed in choosing the sites of
their villages are the same which usually regu-
late that matter among other savages. ‘The
North American Indians, for example, generally
build their huts on the side of some moderately
sized hill, that they may have the advantage of
the ground in case of being attacked by their
enemies, or on the bank of a river, which may,
in such an emergency, serve them for a natural
moat. A situation in which they are protected
by the water on more sides than one is prefer-
red; and, accordingly, both on this account,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 89

and for the sake of being near the sea, which
supplies them with fish, the New-Zealanders
and other savage tribes are much accustomed
to establish themselves at the mouths of rivers.
Among the American Indians, as in New-Zea-
land, a piece of ground is always left unoccu-
pied in the middle of the village, or contiguous
to it, for the holding of public assemblies. So,
also, it used to be in our own country, almost
every village in which had anciently its com-
mon, and its central open space; the latter of
which, after the introduction of Christianity,
was generally decorated by the erection of a
cross. It is curious to remark how the genius
of commerce—the predominating influence of
a more civilized age—has seized upon more
than one of these provisions of the old state of
society, and converted them to its own pur-
poses. ‘The spacious area around the village
cross, or the adjacent common, has been
changed into the scene of the fair or the daily
market ; and the vicinity of the sea, or the na-
vigable river, no longer needed as a protection
against the attacks of surrounding enemies, has
been taken advantage of to let in the wealth of
many distant climes, and to metamorphose the
straggling assemblage of mud cottages into a
thronged and wide-spread city—the proud
abode of industry, wealth, elegance, and letters.

Rutherford states, that the baskets in which
the provisions are served up are never used
twice; and the same thing is remarked by
Captain Cruise. ‘The calabash, Rutherford
90 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

adds, is the only vessel they have for hold-
ing any kind of liquid; and when they drink
out of it, they never permit it to touch their
lips, but hold their face up, and pour the liquor
into their mouth. After dinner, they place
themselves for this purpose in a row, when
a slave goes from one to another with the cala-
bash, and each holds his hand under his chin
as the liquor is poured by the slave into his
mouth. ‘They never drink anything hot or
warm. Indeed, their only beverage appears
to be water; and their strong aversion to wine
and spirits is noticed by almost all who have
described their manners. Tetoro, one of the
chiefs who returned from Port Jackson in the
Dromedary, was sometimes admitted, during
the passage, into the cabin, and asked by the
officers to take a glass of wine, when he always
tasted it, with perfect politeness, though his
countenance strongly indicated how much he
disliked it. It is probable, however, that the
sobriety of this people has been hitherto prin-
cipally preserved, by their ignorance of the mode
of manufacturing any intoxicating beverage.
Dinner being finished, Rutherford and his
companions spent the evening seated around a
large fire, while several of the women, whose
countenances he describes as pleasing, amused
themselves by playing with the fingers of the
strangers, sometimes opening their shirts at the
breasts, and at other times feeling the calves of
their legs, “which made us think,” says
Rutherford, “ that they were examining us to
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 91

see if we were fat enough for eating.” “The
large fire,” he continues, “ that had been made
to warm the house, being now put out, we re-
tired to rest in the usual manner ; but although
the fire had been extinguished, the house was
still filled with smoke, the door being shut, and
there being neither chimney nor window to let
it out. In the morning, when we arose, the
chief gave us back our knives and tobacco-
boxes, which they had taken from us while in
the canoe, on our first being made prisoners ;
and we then breakfasted on some potatoes and
cockles, which had been cooked while we were
at the sea-coast, and brought thence in baskets.
Aimy’s wife and two daughters now arrived,
which occasioned another grand crying cere-
mony ; and when it was over, the three ladies
came to look at me and my companions. Ina
short time, they took a fancy to some small gilt
buttons which I had on my waistcoat; and
Aimy making a sign for me to cut them off, I
immediately did so, and presented them for
their acceptance. ‘They received them very
gladly, and, shaking hands with me, exclaimed,
The white man is very good. The whole of
the natives having then seated themselves on
the ground in a ring, we were brought into the
middle, and, being stripped of our clothes, and
laid on our backs, we were each of us held
down by five or six men, while two others
commenced the operation of tattooing us. Hav-
ing taken a piece of charcoal, and rubbed it
upon a stone with a little water until they had
92 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

produced a thickish liquid, they then dipped
into it an instrument made of bone, having a
sharp edge like a chisel, and shaped in the
fashion of a garden hoe, and immediately ap-
plied it to the skin, striking it twice or thrice
with a small piece of wood. ‘This made it cut
into the flesh as a knife would have done, and
caused a great deal of blood to flow, which
they kept wiping off with the side of the hand,
in order to see if the impression was sufli-
ciently clear. When it was not, they applied
the bone a second time to the same place.
They employed, however, various instruments
in the course of the operation; one which
they sometimes used being made of a shark’s
tooth, and another having teeth like a saw.
‘They had them also of different sizes, to suit
the different parts of the work. While I was
undergoing this operation, although the pain
was most acute, I never either moved or uttered
a sound; but my comrades moaned dreadfully.
Although the operators were very quick and
dexterous, I was four hours under their hands;
and during the operation Aimy’s eldest daughter
several times wiped the blood from my face
with some dressed flax. After it was over she
Jed me to the river, that I might wash myself,
(for it had made me completely blind,) and then
conducted me to wu great fire. ‘They now re-
turned us all our clothes, with the exception of
our shirts, which the women kept for them-
selves, wearing them, as we observed, with the
fronts behind. We were now not only tattooed,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 93

but what they called ¢abvoed, the meaning of
which is, made sacred, or forbidden to touch
any provisions of any kind with our hands.
This state of things lasted for three days,
durmg which time we were fed by the daugh-
ters of the chiefs, with the same victuals, and
out of the same baskets, as the chiefs them-
selves, and the persons who had tattooed us.
In three days, the swelling which had been
produced by the operation had greatly sub-
sided, and I began to recover my sight; but it
was six weeks before [ was completely well.
I had no medical assistance of any kind during
my illness; but Aimy’s two daughters were
very attentive to me, and would frequently sit
beside me, and talk to me in their language,
of which as yet, however, I did not understand
much.”

The custom of marking the skin, here called
luttooing, is one of the most widely diffused
practices of savage life, having been found,
even in modern times, to exist, in one modi-
fication or another, not only in most of the in-
habited lands of the Pacific, from New-Zea-
land as far north as the Sandwich Isles, but
also among many of the aboriginal tribes both
of Africa and America. In the ancient world
it appears to have been at least equally preva-
lent. It is evidently alluded to, as well as the
other practice that has just been noticed of
wounding the body by way of mourning, in the
twenty-eighth verse of the nineteenth chapter
of Leviticus, among the laws delivered to the
94 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Israelites through Moses :—“ Ye shall not
make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead,
nor print any marks upon you ;” both of these
being doubtless habits of the surrounding na-
tions, which the chosen people, according to
their usual propensity, had shown a disposition
to imitate.

The term tattoo is not known in New-Zea-
land, the name given to the marks which are
elsewhere so called being in this country moko,
or, as it has been more generally written, from
a habit which the natives seem to have of pre-
fixing the sound a to many of their words,
amoco. ‘The description which Rutherford gives
of the process agrees entirely with what has
been stated by other observers; although it cer-
tainly has been generally understood that, in no
case, was the whole operation undergone at
once, as it would, however, appear to have been
in his. Both Captain Cruise and Mr. Marsden
expressly state that, according to their informa-
tion, it always required several months, and
sometimes several years, to tattoo a chief per-
fectly ; owing to the necessity of one part of
the face or body being allowed to heal before
commencing the decoration of another. Per-
haps, however, this prolongation of the process
may only be necessary when the amoco is of a
more intricate pattern, or extends over a larger
portion of the person, than that which Ruther-
ford received; or, in his peculiar circumstances,
it may have been determined that he should
have his powers of endurance put to still harder
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 95

proof than a native would have been required
to submit to in undergoing the same ceremony.
The portrait of Rutherford accurately represents
the tattooing on his body. Captain Cruise as-
serts that the tattooing in New-Zealand is re-
newed occasionally, as the lines become fainter
by time, to the latest period of life; and that
one of the chiefs who returned home in the
Dromedary was retattooed soon after his arrival.

The tincture is said to be sometimes obtained
from the juice of a particular tree. Rutherford
has omitted to mention that, before the cutting
has begun, the figure is traced out upon the
place; but this appears to be always done in
New-Zealand, as well as elsewhere, a piece of
burned stick or red earth being, according to
Mr. Savage, used for the purpose. Some are
tattooed at eight or ten years of age; but a young
man is accounted very effeminate who reaches
his twentieth year without having undergone
the operation. Mr. Marsden told one of the
chiefs, King George, as he was called, that he
must not tattoo his nephew Racow, who was a
very fine looking youth, with a dignified, open,
and placid countenance, remarking that it would
quite disfigure his face; “but he laughed at my
advice,” says Mr. Marsden, “ and said he must
be tattooed, as it would give him a noble, mas-
culine, and warlike appearance ; that he would
not be fit for his successor with a smooth face ;
the New-Zealanders would look on him merely
as a woman, if he was not tattooed.”

These stains, although their brilliancy may
96 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

perhaps decay with time, being thus fixed in the
flesh, are of course indelible—just as much as
the marks of a similar nature which our own
sailors frequently make on their arms and breasts
by introducing gunpowder under the skin. One
effect, we are told, which they produce on the
countenance of the New-Zealanders is to con-
ceal the ravages of old age. Being thus per-
manent when once imprinted, each becomes
also the peculiar distinction of the individual
to whom it belongs, and is probably sometimes
employed by him as his mark or sign manual.
An officer belonging to the Dromedary, who
happened to have a coat of arms engraved on
his seal, was frequently asked by the New-
Zealanders if the device was his amoco. When
the missionaries purchased a piece of land from
one of the Bay of Islands chiefs, named Gun-
nah, a copy of the tattooing on the face of the
latter, being drawn by a brother chief, was affixed
to the grant as his signature; while another na-
tive signed as a witness by adding the amoco
of one of his own checks.

The tattooing of the young New-Zealander,
before he takes his rank as one of the war-
riors of his tribe, is doubtless also intended to
put his manhood to the proof; and may thus be
regarded as having the same object with those
ceremonies of initiation, as they have been
called, which are practised among some other
savage nations on the admission of an individual
to any new degree of honour or chieftainship.

The New-Zealanders, like many other sa-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 97

vages, are also in the habit of anointing them-
selves with a mixture of grease and red ochre.

The taboo, or tapu, prevails also in many of
the South Sea Islands, where it may be con-
sidered as the substitute for law ; although its
authority, in reality, rests on what we should
rather call religious considerations, inasmuch as
it appears to be obeyed entirely from the ap-
prehension that its violation would bring down
the anger of Heaven. It would require more
space than we can afford to enumerate the vari-
ous cases in which the taboo operates as a matter
of course, even were we to say nothing of the
numerous exigencies in which a resort to it
seems to be at the option of the parties con-
cerned. Among the former, we may merely
mention, that a person supposed to be dying
seems to be uniformly placed under the taboo ;
and that the like consecration, if it may be so
called, is always imposed for a certain space
upon the individual who has undergone any
part of the process of tattooing. But we are by
no means fully informed either as to the exact
rules that govern this matter, or even as to the
peculiar description of persons to whom it be-
longs, on any occasion, to impose the taboo. It
is common in New-Zealand for such of the
chiefs as possess this power, to separate, by
means of the taboo, any thing which they wish
either to appropriate to themselves, or to pro-
tect, with any other object, from indiscrimi-
nate use.

When the Prince Regent schooner, which

7
98 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

accompanied the Dromedary, lay at anchor in
the river Shukehanga, a chief named Moodooi,
greatly to the comfort of the captain, came one
day on deck and tabooed the vessel, or made it
a crime for any one to ascend the side without
permission, which injunction was strictly at-
tended to by the natives, during her stay in the
harbour. So, when any land is purchased, it is
secured to the purchaser by being tabooed.

SHAPTER VII.

Continuation of journey into the interior—Aimy’s vil-
Jage-—Origin of the New-Zealanders—Appearance—Dress—
Food—Agriculture—Face of the country—Climate—Soil—
Productions—Harvest—Trees—Flax spinning—Weaving—
Minerals—Quadrupeds—Birds—Fishes.

Rurnerrorp remained at this village for
about six months, together with the others who
had been taken prisoners with him and not put
to death, all except one, John Watson, who,
soon after their arrival here, was carried away
by a chief named Nainy. A house was assigned
for them to live in, and the natives gave them
also an iron pot they had taken from the ship,
in which to cook their victuals. This they found
a very useful article. It was tabooed, so that
no slave was allowed to eat any thing cooked
in it; that, we suppose, being considered the
surest way of preventing it from being stolen.
At last they set out in company with Aimy and
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 99

another chief, to pursue their journey farther
into the interior; one of them, however, whose
name is not given, remained with Rangadi.
Having come to another village, the chief of
which was called Plama, another of them, whose
name was John Smith, was left with him. The
number of those preserved alive, it will be re-
collected, was six ; so that, three of them having
been disposed of in the manner that has been
stated, there were now, including Rutherford,
as many more remaining together. When they
had travelled about twelve miles farther, they
stopped ata third village, and here. they remain-
ed two days. ‘ We were treated very kindly,”
says Rutherford, “ at this village by the natives.
The chief, whose name was Ewanna, made us
a present of a large pig, which we killed after
our own country fashion, not a little to the sur-
prise of the New-Zealanders. I observed many
of the children catch the flowing blood in their
hands, and drink it with the greatest eagerness.
Their own method of killing a pig is generally
by drowning, in order that they may not lose
the blood. ‘The natives then singed off the hair
for us, by holding the animal over a fire, and
also gutted it, desiring nothing but the entrails
for their trouble. We cooked it in our iron pot,
which the slaves who followed us had brought
along with the rest of the luggage belonging to
our party. No person was allowed to take any
part of the pig unless he received some from
us; and not even then, if he did not belong toa
chief’s family. On taking our departure from
100 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

this village, we left with Ewanna one of our
comrades named Jefferson, who, on parting with
us, pressed my hand in his, and with tears in
his eyes, exclaimed, ‘God bless you both! we
shall never see each othcr again. We pro-
ceeded on our journey, in company with Aimy
and his family, and another chief; and having
walked about two miles without one word being
spoken by any of the party, we arrived at the
side of ariver. Here we stopped, and lighted
a fire; and the natives who had charge of the
luggage having come up in about an hour,
bringing with them some potatoes and dried fish,
we cooked a dinner for ourselves in the usual
manner. We then crossed the river, which was
only about knec deep, and immediately entered
a wood, through which we continued to make
our way till sunset. On getting out of it we
found ourselves in the midst of some cultivated
ground, on which we saw growing potatoes,
turnips, cabbage, tara, (which is a root resem-
bling a yam,) water-melons, and coomeras, or
swect potatoes. After a little while we arrived
at another river, on the opposite side of which
stood the village in which Aimy resided. Having
got into a canoe, we crossed over to the village,
in front of which many women were standing,
who, waving their mats, exclaimed, as they saw
us approaching, Arami arami, which means,
Welcome home. We were then taken to Aimy’s
house, which was the largest in the village, and
built in the usual manner, having the walls
formed of large twigs covered with rushes, with
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 101

which it was also thatched. A pig was now
killed for us, and cooked with some coomeras,
from which we supped; and, afterward seating
ourselves around the fire, we amused ourselves
by listening to several of the women singing.
In .1e meantime, a slave girl was killed, and
put into a hole in the earth to roast in the man-
ner already described, in order to furnish a feast
the following day, in honour of the chief's re-
turn home. We slept that night in the chief's
house; but the next morning a number of the
natives were sct to work to build us one for
ourselves, of the same form with that in which
the chief lived, and nearly of the same size. In
the course of this day many other chiefs ar-
rived at the village, accompanied by their fami-
lies and slaves, to welcome Aimy home, which
they did in the usual manner. Some of them
brought with them a quantity of water-melons,
which they gave tome and my comrade. At
Jast they all seated themselves upon the ground
to have their feast,—several large pigs, together
with some scores of baskets of potatoes, tara,
and water-melons, having first been brought for-
ward by Aimy’s people. ‘The pigs, after being
drowned in the river and dressed, had been laid
to roast beside the potatoes. When these were
eaten, the fire that had been made the night
before was opened, and the body of the slave
girl taken out of it, which they next proceeded
to feast upon in the eagerest manner. We were
not asked to partake of it, for Aimy knew that
we had refused to eat human flesh before. After
102 VHE NEW-ZEALANDERS,.

the feast was over, the fragments were col-
lected, and carried home by the slaves of the
different chiefs, according to the custom which
is always observed on such occasions in New-
Zealand.”

The house that had been ordered to be built
for Rutherford and his companion was ready
in about a week; and having taken up their
abode in it, they were permitted to live, as far
as circumstances would allow, according to their
own customs. As it was in this village that
Rutherford continued to reside during the re-
mainder of the time he spent in New-Zealand,
we may consider him as now fairly domes-
ticated among his new associates, and may
therefore conveniently take the present oppor-
tunity of completing our general picture of the
country and its inhabitants, by adverting to a
few matters which have not yet found a place
in our narrative.

No doubt whatever can exist as to the rela-
tionship of the New-Zealanders to the numerous
other tribes of the same complexion, by whom
nearly all the islands of the South Sea are peo-
pled, and who, in physical conformation, lan-
guage, religion, institutions, and habits, evidently
constitute only one great family. Recent inves-
tigations, likewise, must be considered to have
sufficiently proved that the wave of population,
which has spread itself over so large a portion
of the surface of the globe, has flowed from the
same central region which all history points to
as the cradle of our race, and which may be
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 103

here described generally as the southern tract
of the great continent of Asia. This prolific
clime, while it has on the one hand sent out its
successive detachments of emigrants to occupy
the wide plains of Europe, has on the other
discharged its overflowing numbers upon the
islands of the Pacific, and, with the exception
of New-Holland and a few other lands in its
immediate vicinity, the population of which
seems to be of African origin, has, in this way,
gradually spread a race of common parentage
over all of them, from those that constitute what
has been called the great Indian Archipelago,
in the immediate neighbourhood of China, to the
Sandwich Isles and Easter Island, in the re-
motest east of that immense expanse of waters.
The Malay language is spoken, although in
many different dialects and degrees of corrup-
tion, throughout the whele of this extensive
range, which, measured in one direction,
stretches over nearly half the equatorial circum-
ference of the globe, and in another over at
least seventy degrees of latitude. ‘The people
are all also of the same brown or copper com-
plexion, by which the Malay is distinguished
from the white man on the one hand, and the
negro on the other.

In New-Zealand, however, as, indeed, in
most of the other seats of this race, the inhabit-
ants are distinguished from each other by a
very considerable diversity in the shades of
what may be called the common hue.

Iu general, the New-Zealanders are a tall
104 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

race of men, many of the individuals belonging
to the upper classes being six feet high and up-
ward. ‘They are also described as strong, act-
ive, and almost uniformly well-shaped. ‘Their
hair is commonly straight, but sometimes curly :
Crozet says he saw a few of them with red hair.

The dress of the two sexes is exactly the
same, and consists of an inner mat or tunic,
fastened by a girdle around their waists, and an
upper cloak, which is made of very coarse ma-
terials for ordinary wear, but is of a much finer
fabric, and often, indeed, elaborately ornament-
ed, when intended for occasions of display.
Both these articles of attire are always made of
the native flax, of which we shall immediately
give an account. The New-Zealanders wear
no covering either for the head or the feet, the
feathers with which both sexes ornament the
head being excepted.

The food upon which they principally live is
the root of the fern-plant, which grows all over
the country. Rutherford’s account of the me-
thod of preparing it, which we have already
transcribed, corresponds exactly with that given
by Cook, Nicholas, and others. ‘This root,
sometimes swallowed entirely, and sometimes
only masticated, and the fibres rejected after the
juice has been extracted, serves the New-Zea-
landers not only for bread, but even occasionally
for a meal by itself. When fish are used, they
do not appear, as in many other countries, to be
eaten raw, but are always cooked, either by be-
ing fixed upon a stick stuck in the ground, and
PO

i

|

———————
———
=——o——o

—s

|

:



ED Na
i a i 4 | Ne
Byy hy na Ni XS Zh =Ni\
Y=
=
§
& , - = “Coe _= -—— — ww =
%, Sa 1 ——— Sp. 105.
° Se

The above cut represents a Sandwich Islander, whom the New-
Zealanders closely resemble both in dress and general appearance.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 107

so exposed to the fire, or by being folded in
green leaves, and then laid between heated
stones to bake. But little of any other animal
food is consumed, birds being killed chiefly for
their feathers, and pigs being only produced on
days of special festivity. ‘The first pigs were
left in New-Zealand by Captain Cook, who
made many attempts to stock the country both
with this and other useful animals, most of -
which, however, were so much neglected that
they soon disappeared. Cook likewise, as has
already been mentioned, introduced the potato
into New-Zealand; and that valuable root ap-
pears to be now pretty generally cultivated
throughout the northern island. The only agri-
cultural implements, however, which the natives
possess are of the rudest description; that with
which they dig their potatoes being merely a
wooden pole, with a cross bar of the same ma-
terial fixed to it about three feet from the ground.
Mr. Marsden saw the wives of several of the
chiefs toiling hard in the fields with no better
spade than this ;—among others the head wife
of the great Shunghi, who, although quite blind,
appeared to dig the ground, he says, as fast as
those who had their sight, and as well, first
pulling up the weeds as she went along with
her hands, then setting her fect upon them that
she might know where they were; and, finally,
after she had broken the soil, throwing the mould
over the weeds with her hands.

The labours of agriculture in New-Zealand
are, in this way, rendered exceedingly toilsome
108 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

by the imperfection of the only instruments
which the natives possess. Hence, principally,
their extreme desire for iron. Mr. Marsden, in
the journal of his second visit, gives us some
very interesting details touching the anxiety
which the chiefs universally manifested to ob-
tain agricultural tools of this metal. One morm-
ing, he tells us, a number of them arrived at the
settlement, some having come twenty, others
fifty miles. “They were ready to tear us to
pieces,” says he, “for hoes and axes. One of
them said his heart would burst if he did not
get a hoe.” They were told that a supply had
been written for to England; but they replied,
“that many of them would be in their graves
before the ship could come from England, and
the hoes and axes would be of no advantage to
them when dead. ‘They wanted them now.
They had no tools at present, but wooden ones,
to work their potato grounds with, and request-
ed that we would relieve their present distress.”

Taken altogether, New-Zealand presents a
great variety of landscape, although, even where
the scenery is most subdued, it partakes of a
bold and irregular character, derived not more
from the aspect of undisturbed nature, which
still obtrudes itself everywhere among the traces
of commencing cultivation, than from the con-
fusion of hill and valley which marks the face
of the soil, and the precipitous eminences, with
their sides covered by forests, and their summits
barren of all vegetation, or terminating perhaps
in a naked rock, that often rise close beside the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 109

most sheltered spots of fertility and verdure.
The southern island, with the exception of a
narrow strip along its northern shore, appears
to be, in its interior, a mere chaos of mountains,
and the region of perpetual winter; but even
here the declivities that slope down toward the
sea are clothed in many places to the water’s
edge with gigantic and evergreen forests; and
more protected nooks occasionally present them-
selves, overspread with the abundance of a teem-
ing vegetation, and not to be surpassed in love-
liness by what the land has anywhere else to
show. ‘The bleakness of the western coast of
this southern island, indeed, does not arise so
much from its latitude as from the tempestuous
north-west winds which seem so much to pre-
vail in this part of the world, and to the whole
force of which it is, from its position, exposed.
The interior and eastern side of the northern
island owe their fertility and their suitableness
for the habitation of man principally to the in-
tervention of a considerable extent of land, much
of which is elevated, between them and the
quarter from which these desolating gales blow.
Much of the land, both in the valleys and on
the brows of the hills, is covered by groves of
majestic pine, which are nearly impervious from
the thick underwood that has rushed up every-
where in the spaces between the trees; and
where there is no wood, the prevailing plant is
a fern, which rises generally to the height of
six or seven feet. Along the skirts of the wood-
lands flow numerous rivers, which intersect the
110 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

country in all directions, and several of which
are navigable for miles up by ships of consider-
able burden. Various lines of communication
are in this way established between the oppo-
site coasts of the northern island; while some
of the minor streams that rush down to the sea
‘through the more precipitous ravines are inter-
rupted in their course by magnificent cataracts,
that give additional effect to the other features
of sublimity and romantic beauty by which the
country is distinguished.

The climate of New-Zealand, in so far as
regards the extremes of heat and cold that are
felt in the country, is decidedly temperate.
During nearly ten months that Captain Cruise
was in the northern island, from about the mid-
dle of February to the beginning of December,
the general range of the thermometer was be-
tween 50 and 759, nor did it ever descend be-
low 40°, or rise above 80°. The coldest day
marked, we believe, is the 4th of July, when it
stood at the former elevation; and one of the
warmest, the 4th of April, when it rose to within
two degrees of the latter. A country thus situ-
ated is placed in the very happiest mediunr be-
tween the torrid and the frigid. The prevalence
of stormy weather, especially on the west coast,
from the cause that has just been mentioned,
forms the chief exception to the general excel-
lence of the climate of New-Zealand.

The quality of the soil of this country may
be best estimated from the profuse vegetation
with which the greater part of it is clothed, and
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 111

the extraordinary vigour which characterises
the growth of most of its productions. The
botany of New-Zealand has as yet been very
imperfectly investigated, a very small portion of
its native plants having been either classified
or enumerated. From the partial researches,
however, that have been made by the scientific
gentlemen attached to Captain Cook’s expedi-
tions, and subsequent visiters, there can be no
doubt that the country is rich both in new and
valuable herbs, plants, and trees, as well as ad-
mirably adapted for the cultivation of many of
the most useful among the vegetable possessions
of other parts of the world. Rutherford, we
have seen, mentions the existence of cultivated
land in the neighbourhood of the village to
which he was last conveyed. The New-Zea-
landers had made considerable advances in
agriculture even before Captain Cook visited the
country; and that navigator mentions particu-
larly, in the narrative of his first voyage, the
numerous patches of ground which he observed
‘all along the coast in a state of cultivation.
Speaking of the very neighbourhood of the
place at which the crew of the Agnes were
made prisoners, he says,—“‘ Mr. Banks saw
some of their plantations, where the ground
was as well broken down and tilled as even in
the gardens of the most curious people among
us. In these spots were sweet potatoes,
coccos or eddas, which are well known and
much esteemed both in the East and West In-
dies, and some gourds. The sweet potatoes
112 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

were placed in small hills, some ranged in rows,
and others in quincunx, al] laid by a line with
the greatest regularity. The coccos were
planted upon flat land, but none of them yet (it
was about the end of October) appeared above
ground; and the gourds were set in small hol-
lows or dishes, much as in England. These
plantations were of different extent, from one or
two acres to ten. ‘Taken together, there ap-
peared to be from one hundred and fifty to two
hundred acres in cultivation in the whole bay,
though we never saw a hundred people. Each
district was fenced in, generally with reeds,
which were placed so close together that there
was scarcely room for amouse tocreep between.”
Since the commencement of the intercourse
of the New- Zealanders with Europe, the sphere
of their husbandry has been considerably en-
larged, by the introduction of several most pre-
cious articles which were formerly unknown to
them. Captain Cook, in the course of his seve-
ral visits to this country, both deposited in the
soil, and left with some of the most intelligent
among the natives, quantities of such useful
seeds as those of wheat, pease, cabbage,
onions, carrots, turnips, and potatoes ; but al-
though he had sufficient proofs of the suitable-
ness of the soil and climate to the growth of
most of these articles, which he found that even
the winter of New-Zealand was too mild to in-
jure, it appeared to him very unlikely that the
inhabitants would be at the trouble to take care
even of those whose value they in some degree
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 113

appreciated. With the exception, in fact, of the
turnips and potatoes, the vegetable productions
which Cook took so much pains to introduce,
seem to have all perished. ‘The potatoes, how-
ever, have been carefully preserved, and are
said to have even improved in quality, being
now greatly superior to those of the Cape of
Good Hope, from which the seed they have
sprung from was originally brought. In more
recent times, maize has been introduced into
New-Zealand ; and the missionaries have sown
many acres in the neighbourhood of the Bay of
Islands, both on their own property, and on
that of the native chiefs, with English wheat,
which has produced an abundant return. Dua-
terra, part of whose history we have already
given, was, however, the first person who actu-
ally reared a crop of this grain in his native
country. On leaving Port Jackson the second
time, to return home, he took with him a quan-
tity of it, and much astonished his acquaint-
ances by informing them that this was the very
substance of which the Europeans made biscuit,
such as they had seen and eaten on board
their ships. ‘He gave a portion of wheat,”
says Mr. Marsden, “to six chiefs, and also to
some of his own common men, and directed
them all how to sow it, reserving some for him-
self and his uncle, Shungie, who is a very
great chief—his dominion extending from the
east to the west side of New-Zealand. All the
persons to whom Duaterra had given the seed
wheat put it into the ground and it grew well;
8
114 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

but before it was well ripe, many of them grew
impatient for the produce ; and as they expected
to find the grain at the roots of the stems, simi-
lar to their potatoes, they examined the roots,
and finding there was no wheat under the
ground, they pulled it all up and burned it, ex-
cepting Shungie. The chiefs ridiculed Dua-
terra much about the wheat, and told him that,
because he had been a great traveller, he
thought he could easily impose upon their cre-
dulity by fine stories; and all he urged could
not convince them that wheat would make
bread. His own and Shungie’s crops in time
came to perfection, and were reaped and thresh-
ed; and though the natives were much aston-
ished to find that the grain was produced at
the top, and not at the bottom of the stem, yet
they could not be persuaded that bread could
be made of it.” Mr. Marsden afterward sent
Duaterra a steel mill to grind his wheat, which
he received with no little joy. “He soon set
to work,” continues Mr. Marsden, “and ground
some wheat before his countrymen, who danced
and shouted for joy when they saw the meal.
He told me that he made a cake and baked it
in a frying-pan, and gave it to the people to
eat, which fully satisfied them of the truth he
had told them before, that wheat would make
bread.” The chiefs now begged some more
seed, which they sowed ; and such of it as was
attended to grew up as strong a crop as could
be desired.

‘Theoretical writers are fond of talking of the
THE NEW-ZLALANDERS. 115

natural progress of the species to the agricultu-
ral state, from and through the pastoral ; as if
the one were a condition at which it was no-
thing less than impossible for a people to arrive,
except by first undergoing the other. In coun-
tries circumstanced like New-Zealand, at least,
the course of things must have been somewhat
different ; inasmuch as here we find the agri-
cultural state begun, where the pastoral never
could have been known, there being no flocks
to tend. Cook, as we have seen, found the in-
habitants of this country extensive cultivators
of land, and they, probably, had been so for
many ages before. Although the fern-root is in
most places the spontaneous produce of the soil,
and enters largely into the consumption of the
people, it would yet seem that they have not
been wont to consider themselves independent
of those other crops which they raise by regu-
lar cultivation. To these, accordingly, they
pay the greatest attention, insomuch that most
of those who have visited the country have
been struck by the extraordinary contrast be-
tween the neat and clean appearance of their
fields, in which the plants rise in even rows,
and not 2 weed is to be seen, and the universal
air of rudeness, slovenliness, and discomfort
which their huts present. But we must remem-
ber, that in the latter case we see merely a few
of the personal accommodations of the savage,
his neglect of which occasions him but very
slight and temporary inconvenience ; whereas
in the former it is the very sustenance of his
116 THE NEW*“EALANDERS.

life which is concerned, his inattention to which
might expose him to all the miseries of famine.
The commencement of the coomera (sweet po-
tato) harvest in New-Zealand is the signal for the
suspension of all other occupations except that
of gathering in the crop. First, the priest pro-
nounces a blessing upon the unbroken ground ;

and then, when all its produce has been gather-
ed in, he taboos, or makes sacred, the public
storehouse in which it is deposited. In New-
Zealand all the cultivated fields are strictly ta-
booed, as well as the people employed in culti-
vating them, who live upon the spot while they
procced with their labours, and are not per-
mitted to pass the boundary until they are ter-
minated ; nor are any others allowed to trespass
upon the sacred enclosure.

And, indeed, when we are told that the trees
rise generally to the height of from eighty to a
hundred feet, straight as a mast and without a
branch, and are then crowned with tops of such
umbrageous foliage, that the rays of the sun,
in endeavouring to pierce through them, can
hardly make more than a dim twilight in the
lonely recesses below, so that herbage cannot
grow there, and the rank soil produces nothing
but a thick spread of climbing and intertwisted
underwood, we may conceive how imposing
must be the gloomy grandeur of these gigantic
and impenetrable groves. Inthe woods in the
neighbourhood of Poverty Bay, Cook says he
found trees of about twenty different sorts, alto-
gether unknown to any body on board; and
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 117

almost every new district which he visited after-
ward presented to him a profusion of new va-
rieties. Among those which the natives prin-
cipally make use of, are the henow, from which
they extract a black dye, and the vow, a species
of cork tree. But the trees that have as yet
chiefly attracted the attention of Europeans are
certain of those more lofty ones of which we
have just spoken.

According to Captain Cruise there are two
kinds of trees known in New-Zealand which
are fit for masts for large ships; the one of which
is called by the natives kaikaterre, the other
coury or cowdy. ‘They both grow to an immense
height without a branch; but the cowry seems
to be the tallest, and is also to be preferred on
other accounts. It is not, however, so easily
procured as the other, being to be sought for
frequently on the tops of the highest hills, from
which it is scarcely possible to get it conveyed
to the seaside ; whereas the kaikaterre is found
generally in low swampy ground, often on the
banks of rivers, so that little difficulty, of course,
is experienced in bringing it on board. It has
since been stated in the Quarterly Review, that
the spars brought from New-Zealand have been
“ found on trial to be of equal gravity with Riga
spars, and to possess a greater degree of flexi-
bility, as well as of strength, than the very best
species of fir procured from the north.” “ The
wood of this tree,” (the cowry,) it is added, “ is
much finer grained than any timber of the pine
tribe ; and the trunks are of such a size as to
118 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

serve for the main and fore-top-masts of the
largest three-deckers.”

The only vegetable production of New-
Zealand which we can afford to notice is one
that has of late attracted a great deal of atten-
tion, both in this country and in other parts of
Europe—we mean the plant from which the
natives fabricate not only their fishing lines and
nets, and such other cordage as they require,
but also the cloaks, or mats, as they have been
somewhat improperly called, which form their
clothing. ‘This plant is repeatedly noticed by
Cook; and Mr. Anderson describes the flax
produced from it as of a silky fineness, and su-
perior to any thing we possess. In the neigh-
bourhood of Queen Charlotte’s Sound, in the
southern island, it grows, he says, everywhere
near the sea, and in some places a considerable
way up the hills, springing up from the earth in
bunches or tufts, with sedgelike leaves, and
bearing, on a long stalk, yellowish flowers,
which give place to long roundish pods, filled
with very thin, shining, black seeds.

‘This is very nearly the description of it given
by Mr. Nicholas, who saw it in the northern
island, where he found it flourishing with equal
luxuriance in the most exposed as in the most
sheltered situations, and growing to the height
of from five to seven feet. It bears a strong
resemblance, he says, to our common flag, only
that the stem is much thicker, and the flowers
less expanded, and of a red colour. It belongs
tothe genus to which Linneus gives the name

THE NEW-ZEALANDERS., 121

of phormium; and seven varieties of it have
already, it seems, been discovered in New-
Zealand. Of these, one is particularly de-
scribed as remarkable for the facility with which
its boon, or useless vegetable matter, admits
of being separated from the fibres. Fibre of a
peculiarly silky lustre and softness is also said
to be produced from another species, which is
understood to grow in the more southern parts
of the country.

According to Rutherford, the natives, after
having cut it down, and brought it home green
in bundles, in which state it 1s called koradee,
scrape it with a large mussel-shell, and take the
heart out of it, splitting it with the nails of their
thumbs, which for that purpose they keep very
long. It would seem, however, that the natives
have made instruments for dressing this flax,
not very dissimilar to the tools of our own wool-
combers. The outside they throw away, and
the rest they spread out for several days in the
sun to dry, which makes it as white as snow.
In this prepared state it is, he says, called
mooka. They spin it, he adds, in a double
thread, with the hand on the thigh, and then
work it into mats, also by the hand: three wo-
men may work on one mat at a time. Mr.
Nicholas, on one occasion, saw Duaterra’s head
wife employed in weaving. The mat on which
she was engaged was one of an open texture,
and “ she performed her work,” says the author,
‘‘with wooden pegs stuck in the ground at
equal distances from each other; to which
122 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

having tied the threads that formed the woof,
she took up six threads with the two composing
the warp, knotting them carefully together.” It
was astonishing, he says, with what dexterity
and quickness she handled the threads, and how
well executed was her performance. He was
assured that another mat which he saw, and
which was woven with elaborate ingenuity and
elegance, could not have been manufactured in
less time than between two and three years.

Valuable, however, as is the phormium for
the purposes to which alone it is applied in
New-Zealand, it would appear that the attempts
which have been made to fabricate from it what
is properly called cloth have not hitherto been
attended with a favourable result. It will, how-
ever, prove highly valuable to the shipping and
fishing interests. Rope made of this flax, when
proved by the breaking machine, bore nearly
double the strain of a similar-sized rope made
of Russia hemp. The plant may be cut down
in New-Zealand three times a year; and may
be imported at the rate of about eight pounds
per ton, or one-seventh of the cost of hemp.

As yet, the mineralogy of New-Zealand has
been as imperfectly investigated as its botany.
A blue pigment, which the natives make use of
to paint their faces, appears to be manganese.
They also, as has been already mentioned, make
certain of their weapons and carving tools of
a green talc, or jasper stone, which is found only
in the southern island, and, at least before they
became acquainted with iron, used to be ac-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 123

counted by themselves a very precious article.
Captain Cook remarked, on his first visit, the
great quantities of iron-sand which were brought
down to the shore by every little rivulet of fresh
water from the interior, and regarded the fact
as a demonstration that there was ore of that
metal not far inland. Rutherford expressly
states, and he is the only authority who does so,
that many fine veins of coal make their appear-
ance from the sides of the mountains in the
interior of the northern island, although the
natives burn nothing but wood.

The native land animals of New-Zealand are
not numerous. ‘The most common is said to be
one resembling our fox-dog, which is sometimes
eaten for food. It runs wild in the woods, and
is described by Mr. Savage as usually of a black
and white skin, with pricked-up ears, and the
hair rather long. The first hogs were left in
the country by Cook; but the animal was not
altogether unknown to the New-Zealanders be-
fore the visit of that great navigator. It is stated,
in the account of Cook’s first voyage, that when
they were not far from the Bay of Islands they
had a conversation, by means of 'Tupia the Ota-
heitan, with some of the natives, who informed
them that very long ago a canoe, after sailing
to the north-west for about a month, had at last
reached a country of great extent, called Uli-
maroa, where the people eat hogs. According
to Rutherford the pigs now run wild in the
woods, and are hunted by dogs. He also men-
tions that there are a few horned cattle in the
124 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

interior, which have been bred from some left
by the discovery ships. No other account,
however, confirms this statement. There are
in New-Zealand a few rats and bats; and the
coasts are frequented by seals of different spe-
cies. One of the natives told Captain Cook that
there was in the interior a lizard of eight feet
long, and as thick as a man’s body, which bur-
rowed in the ground, and sometimes seized and
devoured men. ‘This animal, of the existence
of which we have the additional evidence of an
exactly similar description given by one of the
chiefs to Mr. Nicholas, is probably an alligator.

There are not many species of insects, those
seen by Mr. Anderson, who accompanied Cook,
being only a few dragon-flies, butterflies, grass-
hoppers, spiders, and black ants, vast numbers
of scorpion-flies, and a sand-fly, which is de-
scribed as the only noxious insect in the coun-
try. It insinuates itself under the foot, and bites
like a moscheto.

The birds of New-Zealand are very numer-
ous, and almost all peculiar to the country.
Among them are many sorts of wild ducks, large
wood-pigeons, sea-gulls, rails, parrots, and pa-
roquets. They are generally very tame. Ruth-
erford states that during his long residence he
became very expert, after the manner of the
natives, in catching birds with a noosed string,
and that he has caught thousands of ground par-
rots witha line about fifty feet long. The most
remarkable bird is one to which Cook’s people
gave the name of the mocking-bird, from the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 125

extraordinary variety of its notes. There is
also another which was called by the English
the poe, or poi bird, from a little tuft of white
curled feathers which it has under its throat,
and which seemed to them to resemble certain
white flowers worn as ornaments in the ears by
the people of Otaheite, and known there by a
similar name. This bird is also remarkable
both for the beauty of its plumage and the
sweetness of its note. Its power of song is the
more remarkable as it belongs to the class of
birds which feed on honey, whose notes are ge-
nerally not melodious.

The encltanting music of the woods of New-
Zealand, indeed, is dwelt upon with rapture by
all who have had an opportunity of listening to
it. Describing one of the first days he spent
in Queen Charlotte’s Sound, Cook says,—
“The ship lay at the distance of somewhat
less than a quarter of a mile from the shore, and
in the morning we were awakened by the sing-
ing of the birds. ‘The number was incredible,
and they seemed to strain their throats in emu-
lation of each other. This wild melody was
infinitely superior to any that we had ever
heard of the same kind: it seemed to be like
small bells, exquisitely tuned ; and perhaps the
distance and the water between might be no
small advantage to the sound.” Upon inquiry,
they were informed that the birds here always
began to sing about two hours after midnight,
and, continuing their music till sunrise, were
silent the rest of the day. Mr. Nicholas de-
126 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

scribes a similar concert, which he heard in
the northern island, in still more glowing terms.

One of the chief sources of natural wealth
which New-Zealand possesses, consists in the
abundance and variety of the fish which fre-
quent its coasts. Wherever he went, Captain
Cook, in his different visits to the two islands,
was amply supplied with this description of
food, of which he says, that six or eight men,
with hooks and lines, would in some places
catch daily enough to serve a whole ship’s
company. Among the different species which
are described as being found, we may mention
mackerel, lobsters, crayfish, a sort called by
the sailors colefish, which Cook says was
both larger and finer than any he had seen be-
fore, and was, in the opinion of most on board,
the highest luxury the sea afforded them ; the
herring, the flounder, and a fish resembling the
salmon. ‘To these may be added, besides many
other species of shell-fish, mussels, cockles, and
oysters. The seas in the neighbourhood of
New-Zealand also, we ought not to forget to add,
are much frequented by whales, which, hesides
the value of their blubher, are greatly prized by
the natives for the sake of their flesh, which
they consider a first rate delicacy. ‘The New
Zealanders are extremely expert in fishing.
They ure also admirable divers. The hooks,
and other implements for fishery, which they
make of bone, are of various forms.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 127

CHAPTER VII.

Murder of Rutherford’s comrade—Funeral of a chief’s
mother—Rutherford made a chief—Marries—Music of
New-Zealanders—Distinctions of rank—Notions of theft.

Tue details we have thus given will enable
the reader to form a conception of the state of
society in the country in which Rutherford now
found himself imprisoned. The spot on the
northern island of New-Zealand, in which the
village lay where his residence was eventually
fixed, cannot be exactly ascertained from the
account which he gives of his journey to it from
the coast. It is evident, however, from the
narrative, that it was too far in the interior to
permit the sea to be seen from it.

“ For the first year after our arrival in Aimy’s
village,” says Rutherford, “we spent our time
chiefly in fishing and shooting; for the chief
had a capital double-barrelled fowling piece, as
well as plenty of powder and duck-shot, which
he had brought from our vessel: and he used
to intrust me with the fowling-piece when-
ever I had a mind to go a shooting, though he
seldom accompanied me himself. We were
generally fortunate enough to bring home a good
many wood-pigeons, which are very plentiful in
New-Zealand. At last it happened that Aimy
and his family went to feast at another village
a few miles distant from ours, and my comrade
and I were left at home, with nobody but a few
slaves, and the chief’s mother, an old woman
who was sick, and attended by a physician. A
128 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

physician in this country remains with his pa-
tients constantly both day and night, never
leaving them till they either recover or die, in
which latter case he is brought before a court
of inquiry, composed of all the chiefs for many
miles around. During the absence of the family
at the feast, my comrade chanced to lend his
knife toa slave for him to cut some rushes with,
in order to repair a house ; and when this was
done he received it back again. Soon after he
and I killed a pig, from which we cut a portion
into small pieces, and put them into our iron
pot, along with some potatoes which we had
also peeled with our knives. When the pota-
toes were cooked, the old woman who was sick
desired us to give her some, which we did in
the presence of the doctor, and she ate them.
Next morning she died, when the chief and the
rest of his family immediately returned home.
The corpse was first removed to an unoccupied
piece of ground in the centre of the village, and
there placed with a mat under it, in a sitting
position against a post, being covered with ano-
ther mat up to the chin. ‘The head and face
were anointed with shark oil, and a piece of
green flax was also tied around the head, in
which were stuck several white feathers,—the
sort of feathers which are here preferred to any
other. ‘They then constructed, around the
corpse, an enclosure of twigs, something like a
bird’s cage, for the purpose of keeping the dogs,
pigs, and children from it ; and these operations
being over, muskets continued to be occasion-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 129

ally fired during the remainder of the day to
the memory of the old woman. Meanwhile
the chiefs and their families from miles around
were making their appearance in our village,
bringing with them their slaves loaded with
provisions. On the third day after the death,
they all, to the number of some hundreds,
knelt down around the corpse, and having
thrown off their mats, proceeded to ery and cut
themselves, in the same manner as we had
seen done on occasion of the different chiefs of
the villages through which we passed being
welcomed home. After some time spent in
this ceremony, they all sat down together toa
great feast, made of their own provisions which
they had brought with them. The following .
morning, the men alone formed a circle around
the dead body, armed with spears, muskets,
tomahawks, and merys ; and the doctor appear-
ed, walking backward and forward in the ring.
By this time, my companion and I had learned
a good deal of their language ; and, as we stood
listening to what was said, we heard the doc-
tor relate the particulars of the old woman’s
illness and death: after which the chiefs be-
gan to inquire very closely into what she had
eaten for the three days before she expired.
At last, the doctor having retired from the ring,
an old chief stepped forward, with three or four
white feathers stuck in his hair; and, having
walked several times up and down the ring,
addressed the meeting, and said, that in his
opinion, the old woman’s death had been occa-
9
130 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

sioned by her having eaten potatoes that had
been peeled with a white man’s knife, after it
had been used for cutting rushes to repair a
house ; on which account he thought that the
white man to whom the knife belonged should
be killed, which would be a great honour con-
ferred upon the memory of the dead woman.
To this proposal many of the other chiefs ex-
pressed their assent, and it seemed about to be
adopted by the court. Meanwhile, my com-
panion stood trembling, and unable to speak
from fear. I then went forward myself into the
ring, and told them, that if the white man had
done wrong in lending his knife to the slave, he
had done so ignorantly, from not knowing the
customs of the country. I ventured at the
same time to address myself to Aimy, beseech-
ing him to spare my shipmate’s life; but he
continued to keep his seat on the ground,
mourning for the loss of his mother, without
answering me, or seeming to take any notice
of what I said; and while I was yet speaking
to him, the chief with the white feathers went
and struck my comrade on the head and killed
him. Aimy, however, would not allow him to
be eaten, though for what reason I never could
leam. The slaves, therefore, having dug a
grave for him, he was interred after my direc-
tions. As for the corpse of the old woman, it
was now wrapt up in several mats, and carried
away by Aimy and the doctor, no person being
allowed to follow them. I learned, however,
that they took her into a neighbouring wood,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 131

and there buried her. After this the strangers
all left our village, and returned to their respect-
ive homes. In about three months, the body
of the woman was again taken up and carried
to the river side, where the bones were scraped
and washed, and then enclosed in a box, which
had been prepared for that purpose. The box
was afterward fastened on the top of a post, in
the place where the body first lay in state ;
and a space of about thirty feet in circumfer-
ence being railed in around it, a wooden image
was erected, to signify that the ground was ta-
booed, or sacred, and as a warning that no one
should enter the enclosure. This is the regu-
lar manner of interment in New-Zealand for
any one belonging to a chief’s family. When
a slave dies, a hole is dug, and the body is
thrown into it without any ceremony ; nor is it
ever disinterred again, or any farther notice
taken of it. They never eat any person who
dies of disease, or in the course of nature.
Thus left alone among these savages, and
taught by the murder of his comrade on how
slight a tenure he held his own life, exposed as
he was every moment to the chance of in some
way or other provoking their capricious cruelty,
Rutherford, it may be thought, must have felt
his protracted detention growing every day
more insupportable. One of the greatest in-
conveniences which he now began to feel,
arose from the wearing out of his clothes,
which he patched and tacked as well as he
could for some time, but at last, after he had
132 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

been about three years in the country, they
would hold together no longer. Ail that he
had to wear, therefore, was a white flax mat,
which was given to him by the chief, and
which, being thrown over his shoulders, came
as low as his knees. ‘This, he says, was his
only garment, and he was compelled to go both
bareheaded and barefooted, having neither hat,
shoes, nor stockings. His life, meanwhile,
seems to have been varied by few incidents
deserving of being recorded, and we are left to
suppose that he spent his time principally in
shooting and fishing, as before. For the first
sixteen months of his residence at the village,
he kept a reckoning of days by notches ona
stick ;—but when he afterward moved about
with the chiefs, he neglected this mode of trac-
ing the progress of time.

“ At last, it happened one day,” the narra-
tive proceeds, “ while we were all assembled
at a feast in our village, that Aimy called me to
him, in the presence of several more chiefs,
and, having told them of my activity in shoot-
ing and fishing, concluded by saying that he
wished to make me a chief, if I would give
my consent. ‘This I readily did; upon which
my hair was immediately cut with an oys-
ter shell in the front, in the same manner as
the chiefs have theirs cut; and several of the
chiefs made me a present of some mats, and
promised to send me some pigs the next day. I
now put on a mat covered over with red ochre
and oil, such as was worn by the other chiefs ;
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, — *131

and my head and face were also anointed with
the same composition by a chief's daughter,
who was entirely a stranger to me. I received,
at the same time, a handsome stone mery,
which I afterward always carried withme. Aimy
now advised me to take two or three wives,—
it being the custom for the chiefs to have as
many as they think proper; and I consented
to take two. About sixty women were then
brought up before me, none of whom, however,
pleased me, and I refused to have any of them ;
on which Aimy told me that I was tabooed for
three days, at the expiration of which time he
would take me with him to his brother’s camp,
where I should find plenty of women that would
please me. Accordingly we went to his bro-
ther’s at the time appointed, when several wo-
men were brought up before us; but, having
cast my eyes upon Aimy’s two daughters, who
had followed us, and were sitting on the grass,
I went up to the eldest, and said that I would
choose her. On this she immediately screamed
and ran away ; but two of the natives, having
thrown off their mats, pursued her, and soon
brought her back, when, by the direction of Aimy
I went and took hold of her hand. ‘The two
natives then let her go, and she walked quietly
with me to her father, but hung down her head,
and continued laughing. Aimy now called his
other daughter to him, who also came laugh-
ing ; and he then advised me to take them both,
I then turned to them, and asked them if they
were willing to go with me, when they both
132* THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

answered by a word which signifies, Yes, I be-
lieve so. On this, Aimy told them they were
tabooed to me, and directed us all three to go
home together, which we did, followed by seve-
ral of the natives. We had not been many —
minutes at our own village, when Aimy, and his
brother also, arrived ; and in the evening a great
feast was given to the people by Aimy. During
the greater part of the night, the women kept
dancing a dance which is called Kane Kane,
and is seldom performed, except when large
parties are met together. While dancing it,
they stood all in a row, several of them holding
muskets over their heads ; and their movements
were accompanied by the singing of several of
the men; for they have no kind of music in this
country.

“My eldest wife’s name was Eshou, and
that of my youngest Epecka. They were both
handsome, mild, and good-tempered. I was
now always obliged to eat with them in the
open air, as they would not eat under the roof
of my house, that being contrary to the cus-
toms of their country. When away for any
length of time, I used to take Epecka along
with me, and leave Eshou at home. The
chiefs’ wives in New-Zealand are never jea-
lous of each other, but live together in great
harmony ; the only distinction among them be-
ing, that the oldest is considered the head wife.
No other ceremony takes place on occasion of
a marriage, except what I have mentioned.
Any child born of a slave woman, though the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 133

father should be a chief, is considered a slave,
like its mother. A woman found guilty of adul-
tery is immediately put to death. Many of the
chiefs take wives from among their slaves ; but
any one else that marries a slave woman may
be robbed with impunity; whereas he who
marries a woman belonging to a chief's fa-
mily is secure from being plundered, as the
natives dare not steal from any person of that
rank. With regard to stealing from others, the
custom is that, if any person has stolen any
thing, and kept it concealed for three days,
it then becomes his own property, and the only
way for the injured party to obtain satisfaction
is to rob the thief in return. If the theft, how-
ever, be detected within three days, the thief
has to return the article stolen; but, even in
that case, he goes unpunished. The chiefs,
also, although secure from the depredations of
their inferiors, plunder one another, and this
often occasions a war among them.”

By music, in this passage, Rutherford evi-
dently means instrumental music, which, it
would appear, was not known in the part of
New-Zealand where he resided. Other autho-
rities, however, speak of different wind instru-
ments, similar to our fifes or flutes, which are
elsewhere in common use.

We are as yet very imperfectly informed in
regard to the distinctions of rank, and other
matters appertaining to the constitution of so-
ciety, in New-Zealand. It would appear, how-
ever, that, as among most other Asiatic races,
134 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the great body of the people are in a state ap-
proaching to what we should call slavery, or
vassalage, to the few owners of the soil. Al-
though there are no written laws in New-Zea-
land, all these matters are, no doubt, regulated
by certain universally understood rules, liberal
enough, in all probability, in ,the license which
they allow to the tyranny of the privileged class,
but still fixing some boundaries to its exercise,
which will accordingly be but rarely overstep-
ped. Thus, the power which the chief seems
to enjoy of depriving any of his slaves of life,
may be limited to certain occasions only ; as,
for instance, the death of some member of the
family, whose manes, it is conceived, demand
to be propitiated by such an offering. On other
occasions, it is likely that the life of the slave
can only be taken when he has been convicted
of some delinquency ; although, as the chief
is the sole judge of his criminality, he will
find this, it may be thought, but a slight protec-
tion. The domestic slaves of the chiefs, how-
ever, it is quite possible, and even likely, are
much more completely at the mercy of their
caprice and passion, than the general body of
the common people, whose vassalage may, after
all, consist in little more than the obligation of
following them to their wars, and rendering
them obedience in such other matters of public
concern.

The account which Rutherford gives of the
law, or custom, which prevails in New-Zealand
in regard to the crime of theft, may seem, at
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 135

first sight, to be somewhat irreconcilable with
the statements of other authorities, who tell us
that this crime is regarded by the natives in so
heinous @ light, that its usual punishment is
death; whereas, according to him, it would
seem scarcely to be considered by them as a
crime at all. This apparent disagreement, how-
ever, arises, in all probability, merely from that
misapprehension, or imperfect conception, of-
the customs of a foreign people into which we
are so apt to be misled by the tendency we
have to mix up constantly our own previously
acquired notions with the simple facts that pre-
sent theniselves to us, and to explain the latter
by the former. With our habits and improved
ideas of morality, we see in theft both a tres-
pass upon the arbitrary enactments of society,
which demands the correction of the civil ma-
gistrate, and a violation of that natural equity
which is independent of all political arrange-
ments, and would make it unfair and wrong for
one man to take to himself what belongs to
another, although there were no such thing as
what is commonly called a government in ex-
istence. But in the mind of the New-Zealander
these simple notions of right and wrong have
been warped, and, as it were, suffocated by a
multitude of unnatural and monstrous inventions,
which have grown up along with them from his
very birth. How misapplied are the epithets
natural and artificial when employed, as they
often are, to characterize the savage and civil-
ized state! It is the former, in truth, which is
136 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

by far the most artificial ; and much of civiliza-
tion consists in the abolition of the numerous
devices by which it has falsified and perverted
the natural dispositions of the human heart and
understanding, and in the reformation of society
upon principles more accordant with their un-
sophisticated dictates. Probably the only case
in which the New-Zealander looks upon theft
as a moral crime, is when it is accompanied by
a breach of hospitality, or is committed upon
those who have, in the customary and under-
stood manner, intrusted themselves to his friend-
ship and honour. In any other circumstances,
he will scarcely hold himself disgraced by any
act of depredation which he can contrive to ac-
complish without detection ; however much the
fear of not escaping with impunity may often
deter him from making the attempt. Then, as
for the estimation in which the crime is politi-
cally held,—this, we need not doubt, will be
very much regulated by the relative situation
in regard to rank of the two parties. Most of
the European visiters who have hitherto given
us an account of the country have mixed chiefly
with the higher classes of its inhabitants, and
consequently learned but little with regard to
the condition of the great body of the population,
except in so far as it affected, or was affected
by, that of the chiefs. Hence the impression
they have taken up, that theft in New-Zea-
land is looked upon as one of the worst of
crimes, and always punished with death. It is
so, we have no doubt, when committed by one
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 137

of the common people upon any of the privi-
leged class. In that case, the mean and despised
condition of the delinquent, as compared with
that of the person whose rights he has dared
to invade, converts what might otherwise have
scarcely been deemed a transgression at all
imto something little short of sacrilege. The
thief is therefore knocked on the head at once,
or strung upon a gallows ;—for that, too, seems
to be one of the modes of public punishment
for this species of crime in New-Zealand. This
severity is demanded by the necessity which is
felt of upholding the social edifice in its integ-
rity; and is also altogether in keeping with the
slight regard in which the lives of the lower
orders are universally held, and the love of
bloodshed by which this ferocious people is
distinguished. But when one cookee, or com-
man man, pilfers from another, it is quite
another matter. In this -case, the act entirely
wants those aggravations which, in the estima-
tion of a New-Zealander, give it all its crimi-
nality ; and the parties, besides, are so insigni-
ficant, that the notion of avenging any injury
which the one may have sutiered from the
other by the public execution of the offender,
would probably be deemed in that country near-
ly as unreasonable as we should hold a propo-
sal for the application of such a scheme of go-
vernment in correction of the quarrels and other
irregularities of the lower animals. It need
not, therefore, surprise us to be told,—espe-
cially when we consider also the trivial value
138 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of any articles of property they possess,—that
thieving among the common people there is re-
garded, not as a crime, but as an art, in which,
as in other arts, the skilful and dexterous prac-
titioner deserves reward rather than punish-
ment—nearly as it was regarded among the
Spartans, who punished the detected thief, in-
deed, but not so much for his attempt as for his
failure; or more nearly still as it is said to have
been among the ancient Egyptians, by whom
such acts were, in all cases, allowed to be
perpetrated with impunity.

This view will go far to explain various in-
cidents which we find noticed in the different
accounts of New-Zealand. The reports of the
missionaries, in particular, abound with notices
of individuals put to death by the chiefs for
alleged acts of theft; but in every case of
this kind which is mentioned, the person
punished is, we believe, a slave.

CHAPTER VIII.

Dirty habits of New-Zealanders—Method of curing fish—
Baskets—Rutherford’s journey into the interior—Notice of
Pomaree—Method of preserving human heads—Farther no-
tice of Pomaree.

Wiru regard to many of the other habits of
the New-Zealanders, Rutherford in general
corroborates the testimony of other travellers.
He mentions particularly their extreme inatten-
tion to personal cleanliness—a circumstance
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 139

which very much surprised Mr. Nicholas, as it
seemed to present an unaccountable contrast to
the neatness and order which were usually to
be found both in their plantations and huts. All
the natives, Rutherford states, are overrun with
vermin, which lodge not only in their heads,
but in their mats.

The New-Zealanders cure their fish, Ruther-
ford tells us, by dipping them a great many
times in salt water, and then drying them in
the sun. The large mussels they first bake in
the usual manner, and then taking them out of
the shell, string them together, and hang them
up over the fire to dry in the smoke. Thus
prepared, they eat like old cheese, and will
keep for years. ‘The coomeras, or sweet pota-
toes, are also cured in the same manner, which
makes them eat like gingerbread. Their pota-
toes the natives pack in baskets made of green
flax, and in this way preserve them for the win-
ter. There are, however, three months in the
year during which they live upon little except
turnips, and at this time they do with almost no
drink. The baskets in which they keep their
provisions, and apply to other domestic purposes,
are formed with considerable ingenuity, and
with some taste in their decorations.

Notwithstanding the stormy seas by which
their islands are surrounded, and the woods,
swamps, and rivers, which oppose such difficul-
ties in the way of passing from one place to
another through the heart of the country, the
New-Zealanders are known to be in the habit
140 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of making long journeys, both along the coasts in
their canoes, and through the interior on foot.
Rutherford gives us some account of a journey
which he once accomplished in company with.
the chief Ainiy. “TI took,” says he, “ my wife
Epecka with me, and we were attended by
about twenty slave women to carry our pro-
visions, every one of whom bore on her back,
besides a supply for her own consumption, about
thirty pounds of potatoes, and drove before her
at the same time a pig, which she held by a
string tied to its fore leg. The men never
travel without being armed. Our journey was
made sometimes by water and sometimes by
land ; and, proceeding in this manner, we ar-
rived in about a month at a place called Tara-
nake, on the coast of Cook’s Straits, where we
were received by Otago, a great chief who had
come from near the South Cape. On meeting
we saluted each other in the customary man-
ner by touching noses, and there was also a
great deal of crying, as usual. Here I saw an
Englishman, named James Mowry, who told
me that he had formerly been a boy belonging
to a ship called the Sidney Cove, which had
put in near the South Cape, when a boat’s
crew, of which he was one, had been sent on
shore for the purpose of trading with the natives.
They were attacked, however, and every man
of them killed except himself, he having been
indebted for his preservation to his youth and
the protection of Otago’s daughter: this lady
he had since married. He had now been
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 141

eight years in the country, and had become so
completely reconciled to the manners and way
of life of the natives, that he had resolved never
to leave it. He was twenty-four years of age,
handsome, and of middle size, and had been
well tattooed. He had also been made a chief,
and had often accompanied the natives to their
wars. He spoke their language, and had for-
gotten a great deal of his own. He told me
he had heard of the capture of our ship, and
gave me an account of the deaths of Smith and
Watson, two of my unfortunate shipmates. I,
in turn, related to him my story, and what I had
gone through.

“On leaving Taranake we took our way
along the coast, and after a journey of six weeks
arrived at the East Cape, where we met with a
great chief named Bomurry, belonging to the
Bay of Islands. He told us that he resided in
the neighbourhood of Mr. Kendal, the mission-
ary. He had about five hundred warriors with
him, and several war canoes, in one of which I
observed a trunk, having on it the name of
Captain Brin, of the Asp, South Seaman.
These people had also with them a number of
muskets, with polished barrels, and a few small
kegs of powder, as well as a great quantity of
potatoes and flax mats. They had plundered
and murdered nearly every person that had lived
between the East Cape and the river Thames;
and the whole country dreaded the name of
Bomurry.”

The person whom Rutherford here calls Bo-
l42 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

murry is doubtless the chief described in mos
of the other recent accounts of New-Zealand
under the name of Pomarce, or Pomarree, one
of the most extraordinary characters in that
country. Pomarec is described as having been
looked upon, even in his own country, as a
monster of rapacity and cruelty, always involved
in quarrels with his neighbours, and in the habit
of stealing their property whenever he had an
opportunity. Duaterra asserted that on a recent
occasion he had made an incursion into his ter-
ritory, and, without any provocation, murdered
six of his people, the bodies of all of whom he
afterward devoured, not even their heads having
escaped his gluttony, after he had stuck them
upon a stick and roasted them at the fire. The
New-Zealand chiefs, however, not excepting
the most respectable among them, were found
to be sadly given to calumniate one another by
all sorts of fictions ; and even Pomaree, bad as
he really was, seems sometimes to have been
worse reported of by the others than he deserved.
Notwithstanding Pomaree’s bad reputation, in-
deed, it is remarkable that we do not find a sin-
gle instance anywhere recorded in which any
European had reason to complain of his con-
duct. Mr. Nicholas was once dreadfully alarm-
ed by the apprehension that he had decoyed
away his friend, Mr. Marsden, to murder him; but
was very soon relieved by the return of the reve-
rend gentleman from a friendly walk which he had
been enjoying, in the company of his supposed
assassin, throughone of the woods on his territory
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 143

Pomaree, in truth, was too thoroughly aware —
of the advantages to be derived from the visits
of the Eaopeans, to think of exercising his
murderous propensities upon their persons,
however fond he might have been of imbruing
his hands in the blood of his own countrymen.
‘* We found Pomaree,” says Mr. Nicholas, “ to
be a very extraordinary character; he was of
more service to us in procuring timber than all
the other chiefs put together; and I never met,
in any part of the world, with 2 man who showed
so much impatient avidity for transacting busi-
ness. His abilities, too, in this line were very
great; he was an ‘excellent judge of several
articles, and could give his opinion of an axe as
well as any European: while handling it with
ecstasy the moment he got it in his possession.
his eyes would still feast themselves on so valu-
able au acquisition.” He then relates an anec
dote of him which strikingly corresponds with
one of the circumstances which Rutherford
inentions—his custom of trafficking in preserved
heads. ‘ This man,” continues Mr. Nicholas,
“ displayed upon every occasion 4 more uncom-
plying spirit of independence than any of the
other chicfs. It is customary with the New-
Zealanders to preserve from putrefaction, by a
curious method, the heads of the enemies they
have slain in battle ; and Pomaree had acquired
80 great a proficiency in this art, that he was
considered the most expert at it of any of his
countrymen. ‘The process, as I was informed,
consists of taking out the brains, and drying

10
144 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

the head in such a manner as to keep the flesh
entire ; but in doing this an uncommon degree
of skill and experience is required.”

Captain Cruise has given us a short account
of the manner of preserving heads ; and we find
it also detailed in Rutherford’s Journal some-
what more minutely. According to him the
skull is first completely emptied of its contents,
the eyes and tongue being likewise extracted ;
after which the nostrils and entire inside of the
skull are stuffed with flax. At the neck, where
the head has been cut from the body, they draw
the skin together like the mouth of a purse,
leaving, however, an open space large enough
to admit the hand. They then wrap it up in a
quantity of green leaves, and in this state expose
it to the fire till it is well steamed, after which
the leaves are taken off, and it is next hung up
to dry in the smoke, which causes the flesh to
become tough and hard. Both the hair and
teeth are preserved, and the tattooing on the
face remains as plain as when the person was
alive. ‘The head, when thus cured, will keep
for ever, ifit be preserved dry. :

We have only to add, with regard to Poma-
ree, that it appears by other authorities, as well
as by the notice we find in Rutherford, that he
was in the habit of making very devastating
excursions occasionally to the southern part of
the island. When Captain Cruise left New-
Zealand in 1820, he had been away on one
of these expeditions nearly a year, nor was it
known exactly where he had gone to. The
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 145

people about the mouth of the Thames said they
had seen him since he had left home, but he had
long ago left their district for one still farther
south. The last notice we find of him is in a
letter from the Rev. H. Williams, in the Mis-
sionary Register for 1827, in which it is stated,
that he had a short time before fallen in battle,
having been cut to pieces with many of his
followers by a tribe on whom he had made an
attack. This evept, of the circumstances of
which Captain Dillon was furnished with a par-
ticular account by some of the near relations of
the deceased chief, took place in the southern
part of the island.

CHAPTER IX.

Religious and superstitious notions—Ideas of a future
state of existence—Power and rank of the priests—Opi-
nions respecting dreams.

Tue New-Zealanders, according to Ruther-
ford, have neither priests, nor places of worship,
nor any religion except their superstitious dread
of the Atua. ‘To an uneducated man, coming
from a Christian country, the entire absence of
all regular religious observances among these
savages would very naturally give such an im-
pression. Cook ascertained that they had no
morais, or temples, like some of the other tribes
of the South Seas; but he met with persons
who evidently bore what we should call the
priestly character. The New-Zealanders are
146 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

certainly not without some notions of religion ;
and, in many particulars, they are a remarkably
superstitious people. During the whole course
of their lives, the imagined presence of the un-
seen and supernatural crosses them at every
step. What has been already stated respect-
ing the taboo may give some idea of how sub-
missive and habitual is their sense of the power
of the divinity, and how entirely they conceive
themselves to be in his handy; as well as what
a constant and prying superintendence they
imagine him to exercise over their conduct. It
would be easy to enumerate many minor super-
stitions, all indicative of the extraordinary in-
fluence of the same belief. They think, for
instance, that if they were to allow a fire to be
lighted under a shed where there are provisions,
their god would kill them. ‘They have many
superstitions, also, with regard to cutting their
hair. Cook speaks, in the account of his third
voyage, of a young man he had taken on board
the ship, and who, having one day performed
this ceremony, could not be prevailed upon to
eat a morsel till night, insisting that the Atua
would most certainly kill him if he did. Capt
Cruise tells us, that 'Tetoro, on the voyage from
Port Jackson, cut the hair of one of his com-
panions, and continued to repeat prayers over
him during the whole operation. Mr. Nicho-
las, having one day found another chief busy
in cutting his wife’s hair with a piece of sharp
stone, was going to take up the implement after
it had been used, but was immediately charged
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 147

by the chief not to touch it, as the deity of New-
Zéajand would wreak his vengeance on him if
he presumed to commit so daring a piece of
impiety. “ Laughing at his superstition,” con-
tinues Mr. Nicholas, “I began to exclaim
against its absurdity; but like Tooi, on a for-
mer occasion, he retorted by ridiculing our
preaching, yet at the same time asking me to
sermonize over his wife, as if his object was to
have her exorcised ; and upon my refusing, he
began himself, but could not proceed from in-
voluntary bursts of laughter.” On this occasion,
the chief, when he had cut off the hair, collect-
ed it all together, and, carrying it to the outskirts
of the town, threw it away. Cook remarks,
that he used to see quantities of hair tied to the
branches of the trees near the villages. It is
stated, in a letter from one of the mission-
aries, that the hair, when cut, is carefully col-
lected, and buried in a secret place.

Certain superstitions have been connected
with the cutting of the hair, from the most an-
cient times. Many allusions are found in the
Greek and Roman writers to the practice of
cutting off the hair of the dead, and presenting
it as an offering to the infernal gods, in order to
secure a free passage to Elysium for the person
to whom it belonged. Of the antiquity of this
practice, we have a proof in a command given
by Moses to the Jews:—‘ Ye shall not cut
yourselves, nor make any baldness between
your eyes for the dead.” ‘These were super-
stitious customs of the nations by whom they
148 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

were surrounded. The Gentiles used exces-
sive lamentations amounting to frenzy, at their
funeral rites. According to Bruce, the Abys-
sinian woman, upon the death of a near rela-
tion, cuts the skin of both her temples with the
nail of her little finger, which she leaves long
on purpose ; and thus every fair face through-
out the country is disfigured with scars.

Mr. Marsden, on asking a New-Zealander
what he conceived the Atua to be, was answer-
ed—‘ An immortal shadow.” Although pos-
sessed, however, of the attributes of immortality,
omnipresence, invisibility, and supreme power,
he is universally believed to be in disposition
merely a vindictive and malignant demon.
When one of the missionaries had one day
been telling a number of them of the infinite
goodness ot God, they asked him if he was
not joking with them. They believe, as has
been already mentioned, that whenever any
person is sick, his illness is occasioned by the
Atua, in the shape of a lizard, preying upon his
entrails ; and, accordingly, in such cases, they
often address the most horrid imprecations and
curses to the invisible cannibal, in the hope of
thereby frightening him away. ‘They imagine,
that at other times he amuses himself in en-
tangling their nets and oversetting their canoes.
Of late years they have suspected that he has
been very angry with them for having allowed
the white men to obtain a footing in their coun-
try,—a proof of which they think they see in
the greater mortality that has recently prevailed
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 149

among them. This, however, they at other
times attribute to the God of the Christians,
whom they also denounce, accordingly, as a
cruel being, at Jeast to the New-Zealander.
Sometimes they more rationally assign as its
cause the diseases that have been introduced
among them by the whites. Until the whites
came to their country, they say, young people
did not die, but all lived to be so old as to be
obliged to creep on their hands and knees.

The white man’s God they believe to be alto-
gether a different being from their own Atua.
Mr. Marsden, in one of his letters, relates a
conversation he had upon this subject with
some of the chiefs’ sons who resided with him
in New South Wales. When he told them that
there was but one God, and that our God was
also theirs, they asked him if our God had
given us any sweet potatoes, and could with
difficulty be made to see how one God should
give these to the New-Zealander and not
equally to the white man ; or, on the other hand,
how he should have acted so partially as to give
to the white man only such possessionsas cattle,
sheep, and horses, which the New-Zealander
as much required. ‘he argument, however,
upon which they seem most to have rested,
was— But we are of a different colour from
you; and if one God made us both, he would not
have committed such a mistake as to make us
of different colours.” Even one of the chiefs,
who had been a great deal with Mr. Marsden,
and was disposed to acknowledge the absurdity
150 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

both of the taboo and of many of his other na-
tive superstitions, could not be brought to admit
that the same God who made the white men
had also made the New-Zealanders.

Among themselves, the New-Zealanders ap-
pear to have a great variety of other gods be-
sides the one whom they call emphatically the
Atua. Crozet speaks of some feeble ideas
which they have of subordinate divinities, te
whom, he says, they are wont to pray for vic
tory over their enemies. But Mr. Savage gives
us a most particular account of their daily ado-
ration of the sun, moon, and stars. Of the hea
venly host, the moon, he says, is their favourite,
though why he should think so, it is not easy
to understand, seeing that, when addressing
this luminary, they employ, he tells us, a mourn-
ful song, and seem as full of apprehension as
of devotion: whereas, “ when paying their ado-
ration to the rising sun, the arms are spread
and the head bowed, with the appearance of
much joy in their countenances, accompanied
with a degree of elegant and reverential solem-
nity, and the song used upon the occasion is
cheerful.”

Mr. Nicholas has given us, on the authority
of his friend Duaterra, the most particular ac-
count that has appeared of the inferior deities
of New-Zealand. ‘Their number, according to
him, is very great, and each of them has his
distinct powers and functions ; one being placed
over the elements, another over the fowls and
fishes, and so of the rest. Deifications of the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 151

different passions and affections, also, it seems,
find a place in this extended mythology.

It is very remarkable, that the New-Zea-
landers attribute the creation of man to their three
principal deities acting tugether; thus exhibit-
ing, in their barbarous theology, something like
a shadow of the Christian trinity. What is still
more extraordinary is, their tradition respecting
the formation of the first woman, who, they say,
was made of one of the man’s ribs; and their
general term for bone is hevee, or, as Professor
Lee gives it, iw—a sound bearing a singular
resemblance to the Hebrew name of our first
mother.

The part of the heavens in which the gods
reside is represented as beautiful in the extreme.
“‘ When the clouds are beautifully chequered,”
writes Mr. Kendal, “the Atua above, it is sup-
posed, is planting sweet potatoes. At the sea-
son when these are planted in the ground, the
planters dress themselves in their best raiment,
and say that, as Atuas on earth, they are imi-
tating the Atua in heaven.” ‘The New-Zea-
landers believe that the souls of the higher
orders among them are immortal; but they
hold that when the cookees die they perish
for ever. ‘The spirit, they think, leaves the
body the third day after death, till which time
it hovers around the corpse, and hears very
well whatever is said to it. But they hold also,
it would seem, that there is a separate immor-
tality for each of the eyes of the dead person ;
the left, ascending to heaven and becom-
152 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

ing a star, and the other, in the shape of a
spirit, taking flight for the Réinga. Réinga
signifies, properly, the place of flight; and
is said, in some of the accounts, to be a
rock or a mountain at the North Cape, from
which, according to others, the spirits descend
into the next world through the sea. The no-
tion which the New-Zealanders really entertain
as to this matter appears to be, that the spirits
first leap from the North Cape into the sea, and
thence emerge into an Elysium situated in the
Island of the Three Kings.

In the heaven of the New-Zealanders, as in
that of the ancient Goths, the chief employment
of the blessed is war, their old delight while on
earth. The idea of any more tranquil happi-
ness has no charms for them. Speaking of an
assembly of them which he had been endea-
vouring to instruct in the doctrines of Chris-
tianity, one of the Wesleyan missionaries says,
“On telling them about the two eternal states,
as described in the Scriptures, an old chief
began to protest against these things with all
the vehemence imaginable, and said that he
would not go to heaven, nor would he go to
hell to have nothing but fire to eat; but he
would go to the Raing or Po, to eat coomeras
(sweet potatoes) with his friends who had gone
before.”

Though the New-Zealanders do not assem-
ble together at stated times to worship their
gods, they are in the habit of praying to them
in all their emergencies. ‘Thus, when Korro-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 153

korro met his aunt, as before related, his brother
Tooi informed Mr. Nicholas that the ejacula-
tions the old woman uttered as she approached
were prayers to the divinity. When Korro-
korro urged Mr. Marsden to take his son with
him to Port Jackson, and was told by that gen-
tleman that he was afraid to do so lest the boy
should die, as so many of his countrymen had
done when removed from their native island, the
chief replied, that he would pray for his son
during his absence, as he had done for his bro-
ther Tooi when he was in England, and then
he would not die. ‘Tupee, too, another of the
Bay of Islands chiefs, Mr. Marsden tells us,
used to pray frequently. When that gentle-
man lay sick in his cot, on the voyage home
from his first visit to New-Zealand, Tupee,
who was with him, used to sit by his side,
and, laying his hands on different parts of his
body, addressed himself all the while with
great devotion to his God, in intercession for
his friend’s recovery.

The priests, or tohungas, as they are called,
are persons of great importance and authority
in New-Zealand, being esteemed almost the
keepers and rulers of the gods themselves.
Many of the greatest of the chiefs and Areekees
are also priests, as was, for example, Tupee,
whom we have just mentioned. It is the priest
who attends at the bedside of the dying chief,
and regulates every part of the treatment of the
patient. When the body of a chief who has
154 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

been killed in battle is to be eaten, it is the
priest who first gives the command for its be-
ing roasted. The first mouthfuls of the flesh,
also, being regarded as the dues of the gods,
are always eaten by the priest. In the case of
any public calamity, it is the priest whose aid
is invoked to obtain relief from heaven. Mr.
Marsden states, that on occasion of the cater-
pillars one year making great ravages among
the crops of sweet potatoes at Rangheehoo, the
people of that place sent to Cowa-Cowa for a
great priest to avert the heavy judgment; and
that he came and remained with them for se-
veral months, during which he employed him-
self busily in the performance of prayers and
ceremonies. ‘The New-Zealanders also con-
sider all their priests as a species of sorcerers,
and believe they have the power to take the
lives of whomsoever they choose by incanta-
tion. Themorangha, one of the most enlight-
ened of the chiefs, came one day to Mr. Mars-
den, in great agitation, to inform him that a
brother chief had threatened to employ a priest
to destroy him in this manner, for not having
sold to sufficient advantage an article which
he had given him to dispose of. “I endea-
voured,” says Mr. Marsden, “ to convince hia
of the absurdity of such a threat; but to no
purpose : he still persisted that he should die,
and that the priest possessed that power; and
began to draw the lines of incantation on the
ship’s deck in order to convince me how the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 155

operation was performed. He said that the
messenger was waiting alongside, in a canoe,
for his answer. Finding it of no use to argue
with him, I gave him an axe, which he joyfully
received, and delivered to the messenger, with
a request that the chief would be satisfied, and
not proceed against him.”

The demeanour of most of the New-Zealand
priests is something so entirely different from
that observed by the ministers of religion in
civilized countries, that it is not surprising
Rutherford should have failed to recognise
them as belonging to that order. Thus, we
read of a priest who speaks of having killed,
not by enchantment, but in the usual way, with
his own hands, both a woman who had gone
on board a ship contrary to his orders, and
a man who had stolen some potatocs. Ano-
ther is mentioned as having one day introduced
himself into the house of Mr. Williams, one of
the missionarics, by springing over the fence,
and then, when his rude conduct was reproved,
stripping himself to fight with that gentleman.
The same personage, who bore the venerable
name of ‘Towee ‘Taboo, or Holy 'Towee, a short
time after attempted to break Mr. Williams’s
door to pieces with a long pole ; and when he
could not accomplish that object, effected his
entrance by leaping over the fence as before.
What he now wanted, he said, was hootoo, or
payment for a hurt which he had given his foot
in performing this exploit on the former occa-~
156 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

sion. When this strange demand was refused,
he attempted to set the house on fire; and hav-
ing collected a mob of his friends, would cer-
tainly have done so, had not another party of the
natives come to the assistance of Mr. Williams
and his family.

It is very remarkable, that, whenever a child
is born in New-Zealand, it is the invariable
practice to take it to the tohunga, or priest, who
sprinkles it on the face with water, from a leaf
which he holds in his hand. It is believed that
the neglect of this ceremony would be attended
with the most baneful consequences to the child.

Much reverence is felt among the New-Zea-
landers for dreams ; and it is believed that the
favoured of heaven often receive in this way
the communications of the gods.

CHAPTER XI.

Rutherford’s journey to Kipara—Method of fighting—
Rejoicings for victory—Proceedings at a war council—
Warlike instrumcents—Increasing use of fire-arms—For-
tifications, or hippahs—Canoes.

For some time after his return from Cook’s
Straits, Rutherford’s life appears to have been
unvaried by any incident of moment. “ At
length,” says he, “ one day a messenger arriv-
ed from a neighbouring village with the news
that all the chiefs for miles around were about
{o set out, in three days, for a place called
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 157

Kipara, near the source of the river Thames,
and distant about two hundred miles from our
village. The messenger brought also a request
from the other chiefs to Aimy to join them,
along with his warriors; and he replied that
he would meet them at Kipara at the time ap-
pointed. We understood that we were to be
opposed at Kipara by a number of chiefs from
the Bay of Islands and the river Thames, ac-
cording to an appointment which had been
made with the chiefs in our neighbourhood.
Accordingly, every thing was got ready for our
journey as quickly as possible ; and the wo-
men were immediately set to work to make a
great number of new baskets, in which to carry
our provisions. It is the custom for every person
going on such an expedition to find his own
arms and ammunition, as also provisions, and
slaves to carry them. Onthe other hand, every
family plunder for themselves, and give only
what they think proper to the chief. The
slaves are not required to fight, though they
often run to the assistance of their masters
while engaged.

“When the day was come for our departure,
I started along with the rest, being armed with
my mery, a brace of pistols, and a double-bar-
relled fowling-piece, having also with me some
powder and ball, and a great quantity of duck-
shot, which I took for the purpose of killing
game on our journey. I was accompanied by
my wife Epecka, who carried three new mats
to be a bed for us, which had been made by
158 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Eshou during my absence at ‘Taranake. The
warriors and slaves, whom we took with us,
amounted in all to about five hundred; but the
slaves, as they got rid of the provisions they
carried, were sent home again, as we had no
farther use for them. While on our journey, if
we came to a friendly village at night, we slept
there ; but if not, we encamped in the woods.
When the provisions we had brought with us
were all consumed, we were compelled to plun-
der wherever we could find anything. Our
journey, being made during the rainy season,
was more than usually fatiguing. We were
five weeks in reaching Kipara, where we found
about eleven hundred more natives encamped
by the side of a river. On our arrival, huts
were immediately constructed for our party, and
one was allotted to me and my wife. We had
also two female slaves allowed us for the pur-
pose of digging fern-root, gathering cockles,
and catching fish, which articles were our only
provisions while we remained here ; unless
now and then when [ went to the woods, and
shot a few wood pigeons or a wild pig.”

A party of New-Zcalanders thus wander-
ing through their country, with all the incon-
veniences attending the movement of large
hodies of men, but without the combinations of
foresight which are necessary for the safety of
an army, or the management of supplies, must
he occasionally exposed to great privations.
Their island, however, it would seem from
Rutherford’s narrative, abundantly supplied
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 159

them with provisions, and their slaves were at
hand to perform the office of cooks. :

“On the opposite side of the river,” Ruther-
ford proceeds, “‘ which was about half a mile
wide, and not more than four feet deep in any
part, about four hundred of the enemy were en-
camped, waiting for reinforcements. Meanwhile
messengers were continually passing from one
party to the other, with messages concerning
the war. One of them informed us that there
was a white man in his party who had heard of
and wished to see me; and that the chiefs, who
also wished to see me, would give me permis-
sion to cross the river to meet him, and I
should return unmolested whenever I thought
proper. With Aimy’s consent, therefore, I went
across the river; but I was not permitted to go
armed, nor yet to take my wife with me. When
I arrived on the opposite side, several of the
chiefs saluted me in the usual manner, by touch-
ing my nose with theirs: and I afterward was
seated in the midst of them by the side of the
white man, who told me that his name was
John Mawman, that he was a native of Port
Jackson, and that he had run away fram the
Tees sloop of war while she lay at this island.
He had since joined the natives, and was now
living with a chief named Rawmatty, whose
daughter he had married, and whose residence
was at a place called Sukyanna, on the west
coast, within fifty miles of the Bay of Islands.
He said that he had been at the Bay of Islands
a short time before, and had seen several of the

1]
160 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

English missionaries. He also said that he
had heard the natives had lately taken a vessel
ata place called Wangalore, which they had
plundered and then turned adrift ; but that the
crew had escaped in their boats, and put to sea.
This is the same place where the crew of the
ship Boyd were murdered some years before.

“J now returned to my own party. Early
the next morning the enemy retreated to the
distance of about two miles from the river;
upon observing which our party immediately
threw off their mats and got under arms. The
two parties had altogether about two thousand
muskets among them, chiefly purchased from
the English and American South Sea ships,
which touch at the island. We now crossed
the river; and, having arrived on the opposite
side, I took my station on a rising ground, about
a quarter of a mile distant from where our party
halted, so that I had a full view of the engage-
ment. I was not myself required to fight, but I
loaded my double-barrelled gun, and, thus arm-
ed, remained at my post, my wife and the two
slave girls having seated themselves at my feet.
The commander-in-chief of each party now
stepped forward a few yards, and placing him-
self in front of his troops, commenced the war-
song. When this was ended, both parties
danced a war-dance, singing at the same time
as loud as they could, and brandishing their
weapons in the air. Having finished their
dance, each party formed into a line two deep,
the women and boys stationing themselves
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 161

about ten yards to the rear. The two bodies
then advanced to within about a hundred yards
of each other, when they fired off their muskets.
Few of them put the musket to the shoulder
while firing it, but merely held it at the charge.
* They only fired once; and.then, throwing their
muskets behind them, where they were picked
up by the women and boys, drew their merys
and tomahawks out of their belts, when, the war-
song being screamed by the whole of them to-
gether in a manner most dismal to be heard, the
two parties rushed into close combat. ‘They
now took hold of the hair of each other’s heads
with their left hands, using the right to cut off
the head. Meantime the women and boys fol-
lowed close behind them, uttering the most
shoeking cries I ever heard. These last re-
‘ceived the heads of the slain fromr those engaged
in the battle as soon as they were cut off, after
which the men went in among the enemy for
the dead bodies; but many of them received
bodies that did not belong to the heads they had
cut off. The engagement had not lasted many
minutes, when the enemy began to retreat, and
were pursued by our party through the woods.
Some of them, in their flight, crossed the hill on
which I stood; and one threw a short jagged
spear at me as he passed, which stuck in the
inside of my left thigh. It was afterward cut
out by two women with an oyster shell. ‘The
operation left a wound as large as a common-
sized tea cup ; and after it had been performed,
I was carried across the river on a woman’s
162 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

back to my hut, where my wife applied some
green herbs to the wound, which immediately
stopped the bleeding, and also made the pain
much less severe.

“Ina short time our party returned victorious,
bringing along with them many prisoners.
Persons taken in battle, whether chiefs or not,
become slaves to those who take them. One
of our chiefs had been shot by Shungie, and
the body was brought back, and laid upon some
mats before the huts. Twenty heads, also,
were placed upon long spears, which were
stuck up around our huts ; and nearly twice as
many bodies were put to the fires, to be cooked
in the accustomed way. Our party continued
dancing and singing all night; and the next
morning they had a grand feast on the dead
bodies and fetn roots, in honour of the victory
they had gained. The name of the chief
whose body lay in front of our huts, was Ewan-
na. He was one of those who. were at the
taking of our vessel. His body was now cut into
several pieces, which being packed into baskets,
covered with black mats, were put into one of
the canoes, to be taken along with us dowp. the
river. There were, besides Ewanna, five other
chiefs killed on our side, whose names were,
Nainy, Ewarree, ‘Tometooi, Ewarrehum, and
Erow. On the other side three chiefs were
killed, namely, Charly, Shungie’s eldest son, and
two sons of Mootyi, a great chief of Sukyanna.
Their heads were brought home by our people as
trophies of war, and cured in the usual manner.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERB. 163

“ We now left Kipara in a number of canoes,
and proceeded down the river to a place called
Shaurakke, where the mother of one of the chiefs
who was killed resided. When we arrived in
sight of this place, the canoes all closed to-
gether, and joined in singing a funeral song.
By this time, several of the hills before us were
crowded with women and children, who hav-
ing their faces painted with ochre, and thei:
heads adorned with white feathers, were wav-
ing their mats, and calling out to us ara mi, are
mi, the usual welcome home. When the fune
ral song was ended we disembarked from our
canoes, which we hauled up from the river, and
our party then performed a dance, entirely naked ,
after which they were met by another party of
warriors, from behind the hill, with whom they
engaged in a sham fight, which lasted about
twenty minutes. Both parties then seated
themselves around the house belonging to the
chief of the village, in front of which the bas-
kets containing the dead body were at the same
time placed. They were then all opened, and
the head being taken out and decorated with
feathers, was placed. on the top of one of the
baskets; while the rest of the heads that had
been taken at the battle were stuck on long
spears, in various parts of the village. Mean-
while, the mother of the slain chief stood on the
roof of the house, dressed in a feathered cloak
and turban, continually turning herself round,
wringing her hands, and crying for the loss of
her son.
164 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

“The dead body having been in a few days
buried with the usual ceremonies, we all pre-
pared to return to our own village. Shaurakke is
one of the most delightful spots in New-Zea-
land, and has more cultivated land about it than
I saw anywhere else. While I was here, I
saw a slave woman eat part of her own child,
which had been killed by the chief, her master.
I have known several instances of New-Zea-
land women eating their children as soon as
they were born.”

This is, we believe, the most complete ac-
count, and at the same time, the one most to be
depended on, which has yet been given to the
public, of a New-Zealand battle. None of the
other persons who have described to us the
manners of these savages have seen them en-
gaged with each other, except in a sham fight ;
although Mr. Nicholas, on one occasion, was
very near being afforded an opportunity of wit-
nessing a real combat. That gentleman and
Mr. Marsden, however, have given us some
very interesting details respecting the prelimi-
narles to an actual engagement. ‘They describe
the debates which generally take place in the
war council of a tribe or district previous to any
declaration of hostilities ; and those conferen-
ces between the two opposing parties in which,
even after they have met on the intended field
of action, the matter of dispute is often made
the subject of a war of argument and eloquence,
and sometimes, it would seem, is even settled
without any resort to more destructive weapons.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 165

‘When Mr. Marsden visited the neighbourhood
of the Shukehanga, in 1819, he found a quarrel
just about to commence between two of the prin-
cipal chiefs, whose land lay contiguous, and
who were also, as it appeared, nearly related,
in consequence of the pigs of the one having
got into the sweet potato grounds of the other,
who had retaliated by shooting several of them.
The chief whose pigs had committed the tres-
pass, and whom Mr. Marsden was now visiting,
was an old man, apparently eighty years of age,
named Warremaddoo, who had now resigned
the supreme authority to his son Matanghee ;
yet this affair rekindled all the ancient enthusi-
asm of the venerable warrior, The other chief
was called Moodeewhy. The morning debate,
at which several chiefs spoke with great force
and dignity, had been suddenly::interrupted ;
but it was resumed in the evehing, when Mr.
Marsden was again present. On this occasion
old Warremaddoo threw off his’ mat, took his
spear, and began to address his tribe and the
chiefs. He made strong appeals to them against
the injustice and ingratitude of Moodeewhy’s
conduct toward them,—recited many injuries
which he and his tribe had suffered from Moo-
deewhy for a long period,— mentioned instances
of his bad conduct at the time that his father’s
bones were removed from the Ahoodu Pa to
their family vault,—stated acts of kindness
which he had shown to Moodeewhy at dif-
ferent times,—and said that he had twice saved
his tribe from total ruin. In the present in-
166 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

stance, Moodeewhy had killed three of his
hogs. Every time he mentioned his loss, the
recollection seemed to nerve afresh his aged
sinews : he shook his hoary head, stamped with
indignant rage, and poised his quivering spear.
He exhorted his tribe to be bold and courageous ;
and declared that he would head them in the
morning against the enemy, and rather than he
-would submit, he would be killed and eaten.
All that they wanted was firmness and courage ;
he knew well the enemies they had to meet—
their hearts did not lie deep ; and, if they were
resolutely opposed, they would yield. His ora-
tion continued nearly an hour, and all listened to
him with great attention. This dispute, how-
ever, partly through Mr. Marsden’s intercession,
who offered to give each of the indignant lead-
ers an adze if they would make peace, was at
last amicably adjusted ; and the two, as the na-
tives expressed it, “were made both alike in-
side.” But Mr. Marsden was a good deal sur-
prised on observing old Warremaddoo, immedi-
ately after he had rubbed noses with Moodee-
why in token of reconcilement, begin, with his
slaves, to burn and destroy the fence of the
enclosure in which they were assembled, belong-
ing to Moodeewhy, who, however, took no
notice of the destruction of his property thus
going on before his. face. Upon inquiry he
was told that this was done in satisfaction for a
fence of the old man’s which Moodewhy had
destroyed in the first instance, and the breaking
down of which had, in fact, given rise to the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 167

tresspass. A New-Zealander would hold him-
self to be guilty of a breach of the first princi- -
ples of honour if he ever made up a quarrel
without having exacted full compensation for
what he might conceive to be his wrongs.

The principal native war instrument of the
New-Zealanders is the short thick club which
has been so often mentioned. This weapon
they all constantly wear, either fastened in their
girdle or held in the right hand and attached by
a string to the wrist. It is in shape somewhat
like a battledore, varying from ten to eighteen
inches in length, (including a short handle,) and
generally about four or five broad, thick in the
middle, but worked down to a very sharp edge
on both sides. It is most commonly formed of
a species of green tale, which appears to be
found only in the southern island, and. with
regard to which the New-Zealanders have
many superstitious notions. Some of them are
made of a darker coloured stone, susceptible of
a high polish; some of whalebone; and Mr.
Nicholas mentions one, which he saw in the
possession of Tippoui, brother of the celebrated
George of Wangarood, and himself one of the
leaders of the attack on the Boyd, which,
like that of Shungie, which Rutherford speaks
of, was of iron, and also highly polished. It
had been fabricated by the chief himself, with
tools of the most imperfect description; and
yet was, in Mr. Nicholas’s opinion, as well
finished a piece of workmanship as could have
been produced by any of our best mechanics.
168 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

This instrument is employed in close combat,
the head being generally the part aimed at ;
and one well directed blow is quite enough to
split the hardest skull. ‘The name usually given
to it, in the earlier accounts of New-Zealand,
is patoo-patoo.

Their only missile weapons (except stones,
which they merely throw from the hand) are
short spears made of hard wood, or whalebone,
and pointed at one extremity. These they are
very dexterous, both in darting at a mark and
in receiving or turning aside with the blades
of their battle-axes, which are the only shields
they use, except the folds of their thick and
flowing mats, which they raise on the left arm,
and which are tough enough to impede the pas-
sage of a spear. They have other spears,
however, varying from thirteen or fourteen to
thirty feet in length, which they use as lances
or bayonets. These, or rather the shorter sort,
are also sometimes called by English writers
patoos, or patoo-patoos. Lastly, they often
carry an instrument somewhat like a sergeant’s
halbert, curiously carved, and adorned with
bunches of parrot’s feathers tied around the top
of it. This they call a hennee.

The musket has now, however, in a great
meagure superseded these primitive weapons,
although the New-Zealanders are as yet far
from being expert in the use of it. Muskets,
however, are by far more prized and coveted by
the New-Zealander than any of the other com-
modities to which his intercourse with the civil-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS 169

ized world has given him access. ‘The ships
that touch at the country always find it the rea-
diest way of obtaining the supplies they want
from the natives, to purchase them with arms
or ammunition ; and the missionaries, who have
declined to traffic in these articles, have often
scarcely been able to procure a single pig by
the most tempting price they could offer in
another shape.

Rutherford does not take any notice of the
pas, or, as they have been called, eppas, or
hippahs, which are found in so many of the
New-Zealand villages. These are forts, or
strong holds, always erected on an eminence,
and intended for the protection of the tribe and
its most valuable possessions, when reduced by
their enemies to the last extremity. These
ancient places of refuge have also been very |
much abandoned since the introduction of fire
arms ; but formerly, they were regarded as of
great importance. Cook describes one which °
he visited on the east coast, and which was
placed on a high point of land projecting into
the sea, as wholly inaccessible on the three
sides on which it was enclosed by the water ;
while it was defended on the land side by a
ditch of fourteen feet deep, having a bank rais-
ed behind it, which added about eight feet more
to the glacis. Both banks of the ditch are also,
in general, surmounted by palisades, about ten
or twelve feet high, formed of strong stakes
bound together with withs, and driven very
deep into the ground. Within the innermost
170 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

palisade is usually a stage, supported by posts,
from which the besieged throw down darts and
stones upon their assailants; and in addition
to this, the interior space, which is generally
of considerable extent, is sometimes divided
into numerous petty eminences, each surround-
ed by its palisade, and communicating with
each other by narrow lanes, admitting of being
easily stopped up, in case of the enemy having
effected his entrance within the general en-
closure. The only road to the strong hold is
by a single narrow and steep passage. Captain
Cruise describes a fort at Wangarooa, as situ-
ated on an insulated rock, about three hun
dred feet high, and presenting the most im
posing appearance. These elevated pailings
were a subject of much speculation to those
on board of Cook’s vessel, when that navi-
gator first approached the coast of New-Zea-
land. Some, he tells us, supposed them to be
enclosures for sheep and oxen, while others
maintained they were parks of deer.

The New-Zealanders may, in some degree,
be considered as a warlike people upon the sea.
We have no distinct account of any maritime
engagements between one tribe and another
carried on in their vessels of war ; but as these
belong to the state, if it may be so termed—that
is, as the war canoes are the property of a par-
ticular community inhabiting a village or dis-
trict, as distinguished from the fishing boats
of individuals—it is probable that their hostile
encounters may occasionally be carried on upon
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 171

the element with which a nation of islanders
are generally familiar. Rutherford has given a
minute description of a war canoe, which accords
with the representation uf such a large vessel
in the plates to Cook’s Voyages :—

“ Their canoes are made of the largest sized .
pine trees, which generally run from forty to
fifty feet long, andare hollowed out, and lengthen-
ed about eight feet at each end, and raised about
two feet on each side. They are built with a
figure head ; the stern post extending about ten
feet above the stern of the canoe, which is
handsomely carved, as well as the figure head,
and the whole body of the canoe. The sides
are ornamented with pearl shell, which is let
into the carved work, and above that is a row
of feathers. On both sides, fore and aft, they
have seats in the inside, so that two men can
sit abreast. They pull about fifty paddles on
each side, and many of them will carry two
hundred people. When paddling, the chief
stands up and cheers them with a song, to
which they all join in chorus. These canoes
roll heavy, and go at the rate of seven knots an
hour. Their sails are made of straw mats in
the shape of a lateen sail. They cook in their
canoes, but always go on shore to eat. They
are frequently known to go three or four hun-
dred miles along the coast.”

It would be difficult, within the limits which
the size of our page allows for illustration, to
give a complete representation of a war cance ;
but we subjoin a figure of a double canoe of
172 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

small dimensions, from a model in the museum
of the Church Missionary Society.



CHAPTER XI.

Escape of Rutherford-—Return to Europe—Attachments
of the natives to the customs of savage life.

We have noticed all the adventures which
Rutherford records to have befallen him during
his residence in New-Zealand, and have now
only to relate the manner in which he at last
effected his escape from the country, which we
shall do in his own words. “A few days,”
says he, “after our return home from Showra-
kee, we were alarmed by observing smoke
ascending in large quantities from several of the
mountains, and by the natives running about the
village in all directions, and singing out Kipoke,
which signifies a ship on the coast. I was
quite overjoyed to hearthe news. Aimy and I,
accompanied by several of the warriors, and
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 173

followed by a number of the slaves, loaded with
mats and potatoes, and driving pigs before them
for the purpose of trading with the ship, imme-
diately set off for Tokamardo ; and in two days
we arrived at that place, the unfortunate scene
of the capture of our ship and its crew on the
7th of March, 1816. I now perceived the ship
under sail, at about twenty miles’ distance from
the land, off which the wind was blowing
strong, which prevented her nearing. Méan-
while, as it was drawing toward night, we
encamped, and sat down to supper. I observed
that several of the natives still wore around
their necks and wrists many of. the trinkets
which they had taken out of our ship. As Aimy
- and I sat together at supper, a slave arrived
with a new basket, which he placed before
me, saying that it was a present from his
master. I asked him- what was in the basket,
and he informed me that it was part of a slave
girl’s thigh, that had been killed three days be-
fore. It was cooked, he added, and was very
nice. I then commanded him to open it, which
he did, when it presented the appearance of a
piece of pork which had been baked in the
‘oven. I made a present of it to Aimy, who
divided it among the chiefs.

“The chiefs now consulted together, and
resolved that, if the ship came in, they would
take her, and murder the crew. Next morning
she was observed to be much nearer than she
had been the night before ; but the chiefs were
still afraid she would not come in, and therefore
174 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

agreed that I should be sent on board, on pur-
pose to decoy her to the land, which I pro-
mised todo. I was then dressed in a feathered
cloak, belt, and turban, and armed with a battle
axe, the head of which was formed of a stone
which resembled green glass, but was so hard
as to turn the heaviest blow of the hardest steel.
The handle was of hard black wood, handsomely
carved and adorned with feathers. In this at-
tire I went off in a canoe, accompanied by a son
of one of the chiefs, and four slaves. When we
came alongside of the vessel, (which turned
out to be an American brig, commanded by
Captain Jackson, employed in trading among
the islands in the South Sea, and then bound
for the coast of California,) I immediately went -
on board, and presented myself to the captain,
who, as soon as he saw me, exclaimed, ‘ Here
is a white New-Zealander.’ I told him that I
was not a New-Zealander, but an Englishman;
upon which he invited me into his cabin, where
I gave him an account of my errand and of all
my misfortunes. I informed him of the danger
his ship would be exposed to if he put in at that
part of the island ; and therefore begged of him
to stand off as quickly as possible, and take me
along with him, as this was the only chance I
had ever had of escaping. By this time the
chief’s son had begun stealing in the ship, on
which the crew tied him up, and flogged him
with the cluw of one of their hammocks, and
then sent him down into his canoe. They
would have flogged the rest also had not I in-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 175

terceded for them, considering that there might
be still some of my unfortunate shipmates living
on shore, on whom they might avenge them-
selves. The captain now consented to take me
along with him; and, the canoe having been set
adrift, we stood off from the island. For the
first sixteen months of my residence in New-
Zealand, I had counted the days by means of
notches on a stick; but after that I had kept no
reckoning. I now learned, however, that the
day on which I was taken off the island was
the 9th of January, 1826. I had, therefore, been
@ prisoner among these savages ten years all
but two months.”

Captain Jackson now gave Rutherford such
clothes as he stood in need of, in return for
which the latter made him a present of his
New-Zealand dress and battle-axe. The ship
then proceeded to the Society Islands, and
anchored on the 10th of February off Otaheite.
Here Rutherford went into the service of the
British consul, by whom he was employed in
sawing wood. On the 26th of May he was
married to a chief woman, whose name, he
says, was Nowyrooa, by Mr. Pritchard, one
of the English missionaries. While he resid-
ed here, he was also employed as an interpreter
by Captain Peachy, of the Blossom sloop of
war, then engaged in surveying those islands.
Still, however, longing very much to see his
_ native country, he embarked on the 6th of Janu-
ary, 1827, on board the brig Macquarie, com-
manded by Captain Hunter, and bound for

12
176 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Port Jackson. On taking leave of his wife
and friends, he made them a promise to return
to the island in two years, “ which,” says he,
“T intend to keep, if it is in my power, and end
my days there.” 'The Macquarie reached Port
Jackson on the 19th of February ; and Ruther-
ford states that he met here a young woman
who had been saved from the massacre of
those on board the Boyd, and who gave him
an account of that event. This was probably
the daughter of the woman whom Mr. Berry
brought to Lima. He also found at Port Jack-
son two vessels on their way back to England,
with a body of persons who had attempted to
form a settlement in New-Zealand, but who
had been compelled to abandon their design, as
he understood, by the treacherous behaviour
of the natives. He now embarked on board
the Sydney packet, commanded by Captain
Tailor, which proceeded first for Hobart’s
Town, in Van Diemen’s Land, and after lying
there for about a fortnight, set sail again for Rio
de Janeiro. On his arrival there he went into
the service of a Mr. Harris, a Dutch gentleman.
Mr. Harris, on learning his history, had him
presented to the Emperor Don Pedro, who
asked him many questions by an interpreter,
and made him a present of eighty dollars. He
also offered him employment in his navy ; but
this Rutherford refused, preferring to return to
England in the Blanche frigate, then on the
point of sailing, in which he obtained a passage
by an application to the British consul. On the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 177

arrival of the ship at Spithead, he immediately
left her, and proceeded to Manchester, his na-
tive town, which he had not seen since he first
went to sea in the year 1806.

After his return to England Rutherford oc-
casionally maintained himself by accompanying
a travelling caravan of wonders, showing his
tattooing, and telling something of his extraor-
dinary adventures. ‘The publisher of this volume
had many conversations with him in January,
1829, when he was exhibited in London. He
was evidently a person of considerable quick-
ness, and great powers of observation. He went
over every part of his journal, which was read
to him, with considerable care, explaining any
difficulties, and communicating several points
of information, of which we have availed our-
selves in the course of this narrative. His
manners were mild and courteous; he was
fond of children, to whom he appeared happy
to explain the causes of his singular appear-
ance; and he was evidently a man of very sober
habits. He was pleased with the idea of his
adventures being published; and was delighted
to have his portrait painted, though he suffered
much inconvenience in sitting to the artist, with
the upper part of his body uncovered, in a se-
vere frost. Upon the whole he seemed to have
acquired a great deal of the frankness and easy
confidence of the people with whom he had
been living, and was somewhat out of his ele-
ment amidst the constrained intercourse and un-
varying occupations of England. He greatly
178 . THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

disliked being shown for money, which he sub-
mitted to, principally that he might acquire a
sum, in addition to what he received for his
manuscript, to return to Otaheite. We have
not heard of him since that time ; and the pro-
bability is that he has accomplished his wishes.
He said that he should have no hesitation in
going to New-Zealand; that his old companions
would readily believe that he had been carried
away by force ; that from his knowledge of their
customs, he could be most advantageously em-
ployed in trading with them; and that, above
all, if he were to take back a blacksmith with
him, and plenty of iron, he might acquire many
of the most valuable productions of the coun-
try, particularly tortoiseshell, which he con-
sidered the best object for an English com-
mercial adventure.

The circumstances of Rutherford’s capture
and detention in New-Zealand were but indif-
ferently calculated to reconcile him to the new
state of society in which he was there com-
pelled to mix, notwithstanding the rank to which
his superior intelligence and activity raised him.
Though a chief, he was still a prisoner; and
even all the favour with which he had him-
self been treated could not make him forget the
fate of his companions, or the warning which
it afforded him to how sudden or slight an ac-
cident his own life might at any time fall a
sacrifice. But it is certain that, where no such
sense of constraint is felt, not only the notion,
but even the reality, of savage life has a strong
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 179

charm for many minds. The insecurity and
privation which attend upon it are deemed but
a slight counterbalance to the independence,
the exemption from regular labour, and above
all, the variety of adventure which it promises
to ardent and reckless spirits. Generally, how-
ever, the Europeans that have adopted the life
of the savage have ‘been men driven out from
civilization, or disinclined to systematic indus-
try. They have not chosen the imaginary free-
dom and security of barbarians, in contempt of
the artificial restraints and legal oppressions of
a refined state of society, in the way that the
Greek did, whom Priscus found in the camp of
Attila, declaring that he lived more happily
among the wild Scythians than ever he did
under the Roman government.

But if those who have been accustomed to
the comforts of civilization have not unfrequently
felt the influence of the seductions which a bar-
barous condition offers to an excited imagina-
tion, it may well be conceived that, to the
man who has been born a savage, and nur-
tured in all the feelings and habits of that state
of society, they must address themselves
with still more irresistible effect. We have
many examples, accordingly, of how difficult it
is to extinguish, by any culture, either in an old

or a young savage, his innate passion for the
wild life of his fathers.
180 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

CHAPTER XII.

Impression produced on savages by an introduction to ci-
vilized life—Shungie—Visit of Shungie and Whyeato to
England—Of Tooi and Teeterree.

MonrtateneE, in his essay on cannibals, has
described some particulars of the feelings of
three savages who were taken to Rouen to see
the court of Charles 1X. According to this lively
observer, they were principally struck with won-
der at the appearance of a weak youth, as the
French king was, having authority over the
powerful guards by whom he was surrounded;
and at the contrast presented between the riches
and splendour of one part of the people, and the
poverty and wretchedness of another. The
complicated frame of European society must
doubtless fill a simple barbarian with astonish-
ment; but even with regard to those matters
which are easiest of explanation among a civi-
lized nation, there are many circumstances cal-
culated to excite unmingled surprise in those
who have grown up under an entirely oppo-
site condition of life. The New-Zealanders,
in their visits to England, have exhibited
similar impressions in a peculiarly lively and
striking manner; and this was a natural con-
sequence of the general activity of their
minds. It will be instructive, therefore, to col-
lect some particulars (in addition to a few scat-
tered notices already given) of the more remark-
able visiters who have come hither from some
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 181

motive of curiosity or interest: for, in truth, the
impressions produced upon the minds of such
men are in many cases striking lessons for
ourselves ; and altogether they have a tendency
to counteract that indifference which we more
or less acquire with regard to objects whose
real importance is lessened in our view, if not
wholly forgotten, in consequence of their fami-
liarity. We shall also be enabled, incidentally,
to bring out some additional illustrations of the
general condition of the savage, by presenting
a few portraits of those individuals of whose
characters and conduct we have been enabled,
by close inspection, to obtain something like an
accurate knowledge.

There is no name that has been so frequently
mentioned in all the more recent accounts of
New-Zealand as that of Shongee, or Shungie,
of whose precipitate and sanguinary justice
Rutherford has recorded so striking an instance.
Shungie was first introduced to civilized life in
the year 1814, when he arrived at Port Jack-
son, which he had long been anxious to visit,
in company with Duaterra, of whose early
misfortunes we have already given some ac-
count, but who was by this time reinstated in
his native country. Duaterra was the son of
Shungie’s sister ; and the nephew’s relation of
his adventures, calamitous as in many respects
they were, had nevertheless inspired the uncle
with a passion for travelling, and seeing the
world. Shungie was at this time a man of
between forty and fifty years of age ; and, along
182 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

with his brother Kangarooa, (who appears to have
been the elder of the two,) ruled over a territory
comprehending seventeen districts, and stretch-
ing from the east to the west coast of New-
Zealand. The extent of his possessions, in-
deed, would have alone rendered him one of
the most powerful chiefs in the country; but
he was still more celebrated and dreaded, as
one of the very greatest of its warriors. Yet
was this man, although in battle ferocious and
blood-thirsty as a beast of prey, at other times
all equability and gentleness; and not more
distinguished by the mildest manners and the
kindliest affections than by a natural taste and in-
genuity in such arts as his rude condition of life
had made him acquainted with. Mr. Nicholas
saw a gun in his possession, which he had stock-
ed, that gentleman tells us, in amanner that would
have done credit to the most expert workman. It
will be recollected, that when Duaterra distribut-
ed the seed-wheat he had received from Port
Jackson among the different chiefs of his ac-
quaintance, Shungie -was the only one of those
to whom he gave it who had patience and sa-
gacity enough to wait for the ripening of the
grain, before attempting to reap it. He returned
to his native country in 1814, with Mr. Nicholas
and Mr. Marsden ; and became the most pow-
erful and zealous supporter of the English set-
tlers, who some years after purchased from him
a large tract of land, on which they formed
their principal establishment. Had it not been
for his friendship, they would, probably, have
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 183

found it impossible to remain in the island ; for
Duaterra had returned only a few months from
his last visit to Port Jackson, provided with a
considerable supply of agricultural stock and
implements, as well as with no contemptible
amount of knowledge in many of the arts of
civilized life, when he was suddenly cut off by
a fever. Unfavourable as had been the circum-
stances of his intercourse with Europeans, this
young man, the prime of whose life, as we have
seen, had been spent in as hard a struggle for
the attainment of knowledge as perhaps any
person ever underwent, had nevertheless ac-
quired the manners of a gentleman, and thrown
off in his ordinary demeanour whatever could
have betokened his savage origin. Tenderly
attached as he was to his family, Duaterra had
voluntarily separated himself from them for
years, that he might retum to them and his
country more worthy of the respect and affec-
tion of both ; but, after all he had endured,
when he at last set foot once more on his
native soil, it was only to find in it his grave.
His last thoughts were given to those schemes
of improvement for which the better part of
his life had been spent in so severe a prepa-
ration ; and while he was able to move his lips
he spoke only of the new arts he was to intro-
duce among his countrymen, the fields he had
marked out for the plough, and the European
village he had intended should rise in the
midst of his harvests.

Shungie was particularly attached to Duat-
184 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

erra, and his grief was excessive on the sudden
death of that young man ; but both he and his
brother Kangarooa immediately promised the
missionaries that they would now be their pro-
tectors in lieu of the friend they had lost.
War, however, had been too much the habit
of Shungie’s life for him to be weaned from
the love of that fierce pastime, either by the
exhortations of his pious friends or the new
art of agriculture, to which he had begun to
pay some attention ; although he had promised
Mr. Marsden that, now that he had been inform-
ed it was wrong to eat human flesh, he and his
people would in future abstain from that prac-
tice. About four months after the death of
Duaterra he experienced another loss, which he
felt severely, in the death of his brother Kanga-
rooa. On this occasion he was so overwhelmed
with sorrow that he twice attempted to hang
himself. The practice of suicide, we may re-
mark, is common among the New-Zealanders.
When Duaterra died, his head wife Dahoo, to
whom he was fondly attached, hanged herself ;
at which, we are told, none of her relatives
appeared either shocked or surprised. Her
mother, indeed, wept while she was compos-
ing her limbs; but even she applauded the re-
solution and tender affection which the act dis-
played. When Tooi first proposed going to
England, his brother Korro-korro wished him
to take his wife with him, and when it was ob-
jected to this proposal, that in the event of
Tooi’s death his wife would find herself in a
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 185

very distressing situation from being so far
separated from all her relations, Korro-korro
merely replied that it would be a good thing, in
that case, for her to hang herself, as her coun
trywomen were accustomed to do.

In 1820 Shungie determined to visit England;
and accordingly on the 2d of March of that
year he embarked on board the New-Zealander,
Captain Monro, being accompanied by Mr.
Kendal the missionary, and another chief
named Whycato, a young man of about twenty-
six years of age, who had married a sister of
one of Duaterra’s wives. They reached Lon-
don on the 8th of August. The objects which
Shungie and his friend professed to have in
view in visiting England will be best under-
stood from their own statement, as written
down by Mr. Kendal from their dictation :—

“They wish to see King George, the multi-
tude of his people, what they are doing, and
the goodness of the land. Their desire is, to
stay in England one month, and then to return.
They wish for at least one hundred people to
go with them. ‘They are in want of a party to
dig the ground in search of iron, an additional
number of blacksmiths, an additional number
of carpenters, and an additional number of
preachers, who will try to speak in the New-
Zealand tongue, in order that they may un-
derstand them. They wish also twenty
soldiers, to protect their own countrymen, the
settlers; and three officers, to keep the sol-
diers in order. ‘I'he settlers are to take cattle
186 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

over with them. There is plenty of spare land
at New-Zealand, which will be readily granted
to the settlers. These are the words of Shun-
gie and Whycato.”

The two chiefs remained in England for
about four months, during which time they ex-
cited a good deal of public attention. ‘They
were sent, in the first instance, in company
with Mr. Kendal, to Cambridge, in order to be
near Professor Lee; and it was principally
from the materials furnished to him on this oc-
casion by Mr. Kendal, that the learned profes-
sor compiled his grammar of the New-Zealand
language. After residing for some time at
Cambridge, they returned to London; when,
among the marks of attention which were shown
to them, his majesty was pleased to admit them
to an interview, and to show them the armory
in the palace, as well as to make them some
valuable presents. The climate, however, ora
manner of living to which they were unaccus-
tomed, soon began to produce alarming effects
on their health ; and for Shungie serious appre-
hensions were for some time entertained, his
lungs being found to be greatly affected. He
violently resisted the application of some of the
remedies which his medical attendants wished
to employ, particularly a blister. ‘The benefit,
however, which he felt from this was so great,
that he earnestly begged for a pot of the prepa-
ration to carry home. Both of them recovered
so far as to be able to embark on the 15th of
December in the convict ship Speke, Captain
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 187

Macpherson, in which government granted
them a passage to Port Jackson. When they
arrived in the English colony in May, 1821,
their health appears to have been perfectly re-
stored ; and having again set sail on the 4th of
July, they reached the Bay of Islands on the
11th of the same month, after an absence of
about a year and four months.

Shungie soon began to show by his conduct,
after his return home, what had been the real
motives of his voyage to Europe. It appears
that he had no sooner got to Port Jackson than
he had disposed of many of the presents that
had been made him in England for arms and
ammunition; and, on his reappearance among
his countrymen, such dependence did he place
on the military stores he had brought with him,
that his ambition seemed to point at nothing less
than the subjugation of all his brother chiefs,
and the elevating of himself to the sovereignty
of the whole island. He now let the missiona-
ries understand in plain terms that he was
indifferent as to whether they remained in the
country or left it. “1 asked him,” writes Mr.
Butler, in 1821, “how he liked England. He
immediately began to tell me of the innumera-
ble quantity of muskets, and guns of all sorts,
and soldiers, and ships, and people belonging to
King George. [Ee also told me how he had
been received by the king, and of the presents
which his majesty had made him; that King
George had assured him that he had never
written to say that the New-Zealanders should
188 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

not have muskets and powder. He likewise
informed me that he went to Cambridge, saw
the colleges and many other things; and that
he saw wild beasts, &c. ‘The elephant is the
only animal that seems to have struck him with
any degree of surprise. He spoke with great
disrespect of the missionary society and its
officers. ‘ All the people at missionary house
no good!’ I told him that I was sorry for that,
and wished to know how he made it out. He
replied, They looked upon me as a poor man,
and did not treat me as a great chief, and
give me plenty of muskets and powder, axes,
&c.” view. ‘ He first charged me,” says Mr. But-
ler, “ with doing all I could to hinder his going
to England, which he considered a very bad
thing: I told him that this statement was true,
and that we ail wished him not to go; but the
reason was that we loved him and his family
and people, and were afraid that the cold
weather in England would kill him. He said
that my words were all nonsense ; and that we
wished to hinder him from obtaining some fine
guns ; and charged me with writing a bad let-
ter to the missionary house: I told him that I
did not write at all. He then went on with a
long story concerning the treatment of the so-
ciety toward him, which he did not consider at
all good. Whycato being present, I asked him
what he had to say about this; he replied,
‘The people at the missionary house, and the
preaching, no good for New-Zealand man.’
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 189

Shungie then went on with a statement of
their treatment at Port Jackson, saying that
they were angry with Mr. Marsden, because he
did not use them well: he added, that he told
Mr. Marsden, that, as soon as he got down to
New-Zealand, he would send me away: I re-
plied that if this was on account of muskets and
powder, I was willing to go, as I would not sell
or give away either the one or the other any
more: he said that if I would not sell them
muskets and powder, it would be good for me to
go away. I then said, ‘If I go, I hope you
and your people will let me take away my pro-
perty.’ No answer.” He now also, instead of
sending his children to school as he had promised
to do, declared that he wanted them to learn to
fight, not to read.

Shungie, though a rude and unskilful chief
of a barbarous people, was as much possessed
with the desire of being a conqueror as if he
had lived in the early times of European civili-
zation, when such a passion was considered
among the most glorious of human attributes.
He saw nothing of real interest to him in Eng-
land but our military stores and our soldiers.
He asked for men—and he succeeded in obtain-
ing muskets and ammunition. When he re-
turned to New-Zealand all his fiercer passions
became developed; for he saw that he possess-
ed a new power by which he could subdue his
rude countrymen, as Europeans have subdued
many other barbarous tribes. He had the same
ambition in his breast, with the same materials
190 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

to work upon, as the Tartar chiefs who gradu-
ally obtained supremacy over their own class,
and then carried desolation all over a vast con-
tinent. The accounts of Shungie, subsequent
to his departure from England, present a con-
stant narrative of his expeditions, sometimes
against one part of the island, sometimes against
another. Even before quitting his country, he
appears to have had enemies on all sides of him.
Among those against whom we find him at
different times making war, are the people of the
North Cape, those of Wangaroa, his neighbour
Korro-korro and his allies, some of the tribes
on the banks of the Shukehanga, the inmhabit-
ants of the neighbourhood of the river Thames,
those of the East Cape, &c. Kiperro, where
Rutherford saw him, appears to have been fre-
quently appointed as the place of meeting for
the adverse bands from the north and south.
About the close of the year 1821, his son-in-
law Tettee, described by the missionaries as
‘the most civilized, best behaved, and most in-
genious and industrious man” they had met
with among the New-Zealanders, fell in fight in
the district of the river Thames. Tettee’s
brother Apoo, a fine young man, was also slain
at the same time; and his wife hung herself
on hearing the news. The following season
Shungie set out with a great armament to re-
venge the deaths of those two chiefs, and some
time after returned home in high spirits from
his expedition, in the course of which he stated
that he had killed at one place fifteen hundred
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS, 191

of his enemies. One of the Bay of Islands
chiefs is said, on this occasion, to have so com-
pletely glutted himself with human flesh, that
he never was well afterward, and died a few
days after hisreturn home. We find him away
on another expedition to the East Cape, in
February, 1823, on which he appears to have
been absent several months. In the course of
this expedition, we are told great numbers were
slain on both sides; and mention is made of a
helmet worn by Shungie, which, on one occa-
sion, preserved him from a blow that would other-
wise have proved fatal. Whycato, who was with
Shungie at this time, afterward told Mr. Mars-
den, that the scenes of cannibalism which he
had witnessed after one of the battles were so
horrid, and had shocked him sv much, that he
could not eat any thing for four days. Whycato
after this gave up going to war, and devoted
himself to the cultivation of his farm.

The battle which Rutherford describes to
have been fought at Kiperro, took place in 1826.
The ambitious chief was subsequently over-
whelmed with domestic calamities; and he
rushed again to war for some alleviation. In
the beginning of January, 1827, he set out to
attack his old enemics, the people of Wanga-
roa, being this time resolved to effect the com-
plete conquest of that territory, and there to es-
tablish his future residence. Tis invasion of
Wangaroa was the means of occasioning the
destruction of the Wesleyan mission, which had
been for some time settled in that district; but

13
192 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

it appears that this was not the act of Shungie.
In his attack upon the Wangaroan forces, how-
ever, he was struck by a ball which broke his
collar bone, and then passing in an oblique di-
rection through the right breast, came out a lit-
tle below the shoulder blade close to the spine.

Although it was at first reported that Shungie
was dead of his wound, he afterward so far re-
covered from it, that by the month of August he
was talking of another attack upon the Wanga-
roans, and soliciting some of the other chiefs to
join him in it. About this time he paid Captain
Dillon a visit on board the Research, when, that
gentleman says, the wind, greatly to his own
amusement, was hissing through his wound as
through the nose of a bellows. One of the
missionaries writes in September, “ Shungie is
much recovered, and will probably resume his
operations in the spring, if he can assemble a
force ; but there is no calculating on their move-
ments; for those who are acting in alliance one
month may the following be at war, and the
third month acting in conjunction against a
common foe.” After lingering, however, for
nearly fifteen months, this celebrated chief at
last expired, on the 5th of March, 1828. “ His
constant attention to Europeans,” says Mr.
Clarke, a missionary, “ made him generally re-
spected among them; nothing could ever pro-
voke him to take the life of a European ;
although the treatment which he sometimes
received on board the ships would have roused
an Englishman possessing his influence to take
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 193

signal vengeance. His general conduct to-
ward us was kind ; and his last moments were
employed in requesting his survivors to treat us
well, and on no account to cause us to leave the
island.”

With all his savage love of strife and blood-
shed, Shungie had many high qualities, which
would have distinguished him from common
menin whatever country he had been born. To
his quick and vigorous intellectual powers, tes-
timony is borne by all who have given us any
account of him. Fertile in ingenious contri-
vances, whenever a sudden difficulty was to be
coped with, he was sure to be the individual of
the party who first suggested the method for
surmounting it. Even his bravery, universal
as that quality is in his country, seems to have
been of a more generous complexion than we
should be led to look for in the treacherous an-
nals of New-Zealand warfare. On one occa-
sion, a short time before his visit to England, it
is related that, in a battle in which he was about
to engage, he ordered his men to fight only with
spears and clubs, and not with muskets and
ball, although he had plenty of both; nor did he
begin to fire until two of his men had been
killed by the shot of his opponents. With his
station, and the endowments he inherited from
nature, Shungie might have done more than any
other man to civilize his country, had not his
turbulent ambition made him its curse. The
softer parts of the character of this warlike bar-
barian are not without interest. When his
194 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

favourite son, for instance, embarked with Mr.
Marsden for Port Jackson, he parted with him
in the cabin without a tear; but “ I afterward,”
says Mr. Marsden, “ heard him on deck giving
vent to his feelings with the loudest bursts of
weeping.”

About the beginning of February, 1818, the
young chief Tooi, or Tui, who has already been
frequently mentioned, arrived in London, ac-
companied by his friend Teeterree. ‘They had
been allowed a free passage in his majesty’s
brig Kangaroo from Port Jackson, where. Tooi
had resided about three years, and Teeterree
about a year and a half, with Mr. Marsden.
When Mr. Marsden and Mr. Nicholas visited
New-Zealand in 1814, Tooi accompanied
then; and amused them on the passage by
many remarks full of the sly humour for which
his countrymen generally are remarkable. They
had searcely been a month in England when
they began to show symptoms of declining
health; but as the summer advanced they re-
covered, upon which they were sent to Shrop-
shire, in the hope that the air of the country
would agree with them better than that ‘of Lon-
don. Here they remained for four months;
and during this time they were taken to see the
coal, iron, and china works, with which they
were greatly surprised and delighted. Tooi,
before leaving home, in addition to his martial
accomplishments, was a tolerable proficient in
the spinning of flax ; and both he and Teeterree
showed great quickness in learning different
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 195

processes of manual dexterity which they were
shown while in this country. When about to
embark again for Port Jackson, which they did
in the middle of December, they addressed
farewell letters to several of their friends, which
have been printed, and are very curious. These
epistles they dictated to the gentleman in whose
charge they were, who wrote what they said in
a plain hand; and this they afterward copied
with so much exactness as to produce almost
fac-similes of the original. Both deal lavishly
enough in the phraseology of piety, but they
seem to use it by way of display rather than
from feeling; and it is easy to perceive that
their thoughts were chiefly occupied about
other matters. In a letter to the secretary of
the Church Missionary Society, Tooi, speaking
of a visit he had made to a pottery, says, “I
make four cups. Mr. Rose tell me, you soon
learn. Yes, ] say, very soon learn with fin-
gers; but book very hard.” A little afterward,
however, he adds, “1 could not like to leave
off my book now,” apprehensive, it may be
supposed, that he had before spoken of his lite-
rary occupations with somewhat scanty enthu-
siasm. But his principal anxiety seems to
have been to secure comfortable accommoda-
tion for himself, and exemption from the neces-
sity of working, during the voyage he had in
prospect. “If you please,” he writes, “ Mr.
Pratt, sir, I could not like go mess with sea-
men that use bad language. ....... I go
aboard, and help work the ship when T please,
196 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

and learn book a little.” Teeterree, in his let-
ter to the same gentleman, expresses himself
in a similar strain. “TI hope,” says he, “ Mr.
Pratt got a ship ready when I come to London.
I go aboard—a little work, and learn a little the
book : no work always. ..... If you please,
Mr. Pratt, I no like to mess with swearing peo-
ple on board the ship.” It may be suspected
that their dislike to swearing was not the only
reason Tooi and his friend had for desiring to
be promoted from the common mess. In a Iet-
ter to Mr. Marsden, Tooi again complains of
the difficulty he found in learning to read: “I
learn the book a little, but it is very hard—go
away next morning. ...... I can say all
Lord’s prayer, and have begun the com-
mandments. ‘Tooi learn little hymn—very
hard—I do any thing with my finger—my head
in morning go all away.” In giving an account
of the wonders he had seen during his visit, he
says, “I have been up the country in Shrop-
shire ; see with mine own eye the iron rn like
water; my countrymen no believe suppose |
tell him. ...... I see great elephant, and
great many great beasts and guns at the tower.”
He adds, however, “I like up country very
much—better than my own country. Tooi no -
like London—shove me about.” Teeterree
expresses the feelings which the view of the
curiosities in the tower excited with less re-
serve: “ Mr. Hall took me see the tower—see
thousand thousand guns: no give me one at ait.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 197

See lion, elephant, monkey, and cockatoo ; the
cockatoo he knew me very well.”

These New-Zealanders returned to Port
Jackson in the convict ship the Baring. On the
passage, symptoms of a relapse to old habits
began to manifest themselves both in Tooi and
Teeterree ; and there was evidently too much
reason to apprehend that, when they got back
among their savage countrymen, neither would
long remain much the better for his intercourse
with the civilized world. And so it turned out.
When Mr. Marsden embarked on board an
American brig to make his second visit to New-
Zealand, in the end of July, 1819, they ac-
companied him. A few months after this Cap-
tain Cruise met Tooi, who made his appear-
ance one morning on board the Dromedary,
dressed in a blue coat, trowsers, and boots,
and wearing a cocked hat with a long white
feather. Being very little tattooed, he looked,
Captain Cruise says, not unlike a foreign offi-
cer; and as soon as he had come upon deck,
he addressed those about him in English. At
breakfast, he conducted himself quite like a
gentleman. His conversation, however, all
the time was, it is added, “a continued boast
of the atrocities he had committed during an
excursion which he and Korrokro had made two
months before to the river Thames ;” and he
dwelt with marked pleasure upon an instance
of his generalship, when, having forced a small
party of his enemies into a narrow place,
whence there was no egress, he was enabled
198 THR NEW-ZEALANDERS.

successively to shoot two and twenty of them,
without their having the power of making the
slightest resistance. To qualify this story, he
remarked, that, though all the dead bodies were
devoured by the tribe, “ neither he nor his bro-
ther ate human flesh, nor did they fight on Sun-
days.” When asked why he did not try to
turn the minds of his people to agriculture, he
said it was impossible ; “that if you told a
New-Zealander to work, he fell asleep ; but if
you spoke of fighting, he opened his eyes as
wide as a teacup; that the whole bent of his
mind was war, and that he looked upon fighting
as fun.”

In the latter part of the year 1823, Mr. Mars-
den, who was then making his fourth visit to
New-Zealand, learned that 'Tooi’s elder brother,
Korro-korro, had just died a natural death, and
that Tooi was now chief of his tribe. ‘The two
brothers were on their return from war when
Korro-korro died ; ‘but Mr. Marsden was in-
formed that ‘Tooi was now become so tired
of this kind of life, that, rather than continue
it, he was determined to leave New-Zea-
land. If such was really his intention, he was
allowed but a short time to practise the refor-
mation he had resolved upon. As soon as his
brother died he appears to have been attacked
by his enemies from all sides; and he was at
last reduced to such extremity that he was left
without any thing to support him except fern-
root and water. In this destitute state he was
humanely taken on board the Mary, then lying
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 199

in the bay, by Captain Lock, that he might have
medical assistance and proper food. But it was
too late; he died on board, on the 17th of Oc-
tober, 1824. One slave had been already kill-
ed by his tribe to avert his death; and four
more were now sacrificed to appease his
manes.

The gentlemanly appearance and manners
of Tooi seem to have struck all who speak of
him. When he appeared in an English dress
he is described as bearing few marks of the
savage ; and with all his barbarous propensities
he had evidently some natural refinement which
distinguished him from the generality of his
countrymen. The faculty of imitation which
the South Sea Islanders possess doubtless con-
tributes largely to their speedy acquirement of
the best manners. Dr. Johnson in this way
accounted for the propriety and even elegance
of the demeanour of Omai, a native of New-
Zealand who visited England. “Sir, he had
passed his time, while in England, only in the
best company ; so that all he had acquired of
our manuers was genteel. As a proof of this,
Lord Mulgrave and he dined one day at Streat-
ham; they sat with their backs to the light,
fronting me, so that I could not see distinctly ;
and there was so little of the savage in Omai,
that I was afraid to speak to either, lest I should
mistake one for the other.” But the character
of Tooi exhibits a more than ordinary share of
the cunning of his nation ; and his courage may
perhaps be thought to have been little more than
200 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

a species of reckless and brutal phrenzy. Some
anecdotes, however, which are told of him show
that he was also capable of a generous daring
which would have done honour to the bravest.
On one occasion a favourite Newfoundland dog,
belonging to a ship in which he was, leaped over-
board, during the night, and swam to the shore
of a desert island near which they lay ; and the
boats having been all despatched to a consider-
able distance to catch seals, there seemed no
possibility of recovering the animal, which had
now come down to the beach, and was howling
piteously. But Tooi immediately set about con-
structing a bark of hoops and seal-skins, and in
this he boldly volunteered to set out to fetch off
the dog. Although he reached the shore in
safety, the boat was capsized on its return, and
Tooi and his charge were thrown into the sea,
while the tide was drifting with great force.
Incommoded as he was by the dog continually
attempting to get on his back, Tooi was, after
some time, almost overpowered ; but at last
both of them reached a point of land three or
four miles distant from the ship. Here, although
he gathered some oysters among the rocks, he
could find no water. At length, after enduring
the agonies of thirst for two days and nights,
he resolved, although from want of nourishment
he had become very weak, to attempt swimming
for the ship. This he accomplished, but was
so exhausted from his sufferings that he kept
his hammock several days. The dog after-
ward swam off, and was also saved. Another
THR NEW-ZEALANDERS. 201

time he was serving as one of the crew of a
whaler, and was out in a boat with the captain
and four men, when, having killed one whale,
the boat was soon after struck by another, which
dashed it to pieces, and at the same time broke
both the captain’s legs. The other men imme-
diately swam away to the dead whale, from
which they were now about two miles and a
half distant. But Tooi, although thus deserted
by his comrades, determined not to leave the
captain to perish; and having caught him by a
boat-hook while he was sinking, succeeded in
getting him upon a piece of the wreck, where
he bound up his wounds in the best manner
he could, with his own shirt, and other cloth-
ing. He then left him upon a raft which he
had constructed, and on which he fixed a flag,
and swam away for the dead whale, where he
found the other four men nearly exhausted, and
unable from its slipperiness to get upon the
fish. Tooi, however, had his knife slung
around his neck, and with this he cut holes
in the skin, by which they all ascended.
They remained here for about two hours, at
the end of which time a boat came and took
them off, and then proceeded to the captain,
who was also picked up. The captain recover-
ed, and rewarded Tooi for his noble conduct.
These anecdotes will probably induce the
reader to think that Captain Cruise speaks of this
chief with too much severity, when he con-
cludes his notice of him with the remark that
they found him, “ without exception, the great-
202 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

est savage, and one of the most worthless and
profligate men, in the Bay of Islands.”
Korro-korro, Tooi’s elder brother, and lord
of the district called Parro, in the neighbour-
hood of the Bay of Islands, containing about
five hundred fighting men, never was in England,
but had resided for some time with Mr. Mars-
den, in New South Wales, and returned home
with that gentleman and Mr. Nicholas, when
they visited New-Zealand in 1814. Although
then apparently on very good terms with Shun-
gie, he was the natural rival of that chief, and
they were generally at war with each other.
Korro-korro’s features, although far from being
so handsome as those of Shungie, are described
by Mr. Nicholas as not uninteresting. Their
predominant expression, however, was that of
warlike ferocity. When recounting his martial
exploits, in particular, he was agitated almost
to phrenzy. One day he gave them on board an
exhibition of his plan of attacking his enemies.
“His gesticulations,” says Mr. Nicholas,
“were on this occasion more furiously violent
than ever I beheld them; he thrust out his
tongue as far as it could go, tortured his coun-
tenance into all the horrible writhings of savage
grimace, stamped on the deck like some angry
fiend, and staring around him with the glare of
the wildest phrenzy in his eyes, he brought
to our view the most hideous denizen of the
infernal regions.” Yet with all this ferocity,
Korro-korro was a very child when the more
tender emotions of his heart were appealed
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 203

to. ‘The warmth and constancy of his friend-
ship were at least equal to the vehemence of
his enmity ; and of any sort of guile or dissi-
mulation his character seems to have been en-
tirely destitute. In this latter respect, he was
avery opposite description of person to his
brother Tooi, as well as to most of his coun-
trymen. If he was a rude, he was also an
honest barbarian. Mr. Marsden characterizes
Korro-korro as ‘a very brave and sensible
man.” ‘“T]T have seen no chief,’ he adds,
“who has his people under such subjection and
good order as he; yet he is tired of war, and
wishes that there was no fighting at New-
Zealand.”

The sketches which we have thus given of
some of the most powerful chiefs of New-Zea-
land with whom Europeans have of late had
intercourse afford a valuable lesson to those
who may thoughtlessly consider the institutions
and laws of a settled guvernment as troublesome
restraints. In acountry where there is norespon-
sibility attached to the possession of power, to
what miserable ends must even the highest
talents and the noblest natures be directed ;
what a mad and brief intoxication, at the best,
must be the only happiness that can be known
in such a scene of restlessness, insecurity, and
the unlicensed sway of all the worst and most
destroying passions. And if this be a faithful
representation of the condition of the higher
orders, how much more wretched must be that
of the great budy of the people, who have not
204 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

even any wild feeling of independence to
sweeten their sufferings, but are the despised
and helpless victims of that state of turbulence
in which their country is kept by the inces-
sant animosities of their chiefs, existing as
they do for hardly any other end than to be
kicked about as footballs in the rude and
bloody game. Such exhibitions as this tend
to make us estimate aright the blessings of
civilization. They ought, too, to make us
shrink from the gratification of that propensity
to war which has been as much the curse of
civilized as of savage life.

CHAPTER XIV.

General view of the aspects which civilized life presents to
the savage.

From the intercourse between Rutherford
and the common people of New-Zealand he
had opportunities of observing their characters
in the lowest darkness under which the great
body of such a nation must live. He aflirms
that it was the general belief that New-Zealand
comprised all the habitable globe, and that the
men who came to their country in ships lived
always upon the waters. The difliculty in
making these people comprehend a thing which
they have not seen, has been exhibited in se-
veral instances; and Rutherford’s statement,
therefore, upon this point is not contradicted by
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 205

the circumstance that many New-Zealanders
have been both to England and to New South
Wales. If this belief be at ail general, we
can easily understand how the natives have
been struck with astonishment at many circum-
stances arising out of our intercourse with them,
which are sometimes viewed with indifference
by other barbarians. At any rate the belief,
whether it be partial or universal, is a proof of
the isolated state in which these islanders have
lived for many centuries. They have dwelt in
a world of their own; and what, therefore, be-
longed exclusively to a world beyond the wa-
ters was calculated to seize with irresistible
force upon their natural curiosity. The objects
which have excited their surprise are to us
“ neither new nor rare ;” but it may be instruct- .
ive to show under what different aspects they
have presented themselves to the minds of
Savages.

Some of the natives, as we have already had
occasion to mention, came on board the Active
while she was in the neighbourhood of the
North Cape, and on her way to the Bay of
Islands. Nothing could exceed the astonish-
ment which these people manifested at the va-
rious wonders which the ship presented to
them. The operation of shaving, which they
saw Mr. Marsden perform, seemed in particu-
lar to strike them as a most singular exhibition ;
and one of them stood looking on the whole time
so transfixed, that, having opened his mouth as
wide as he could on the first impulse of his
206 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

amazement, did not shut it till the whole pro-
cess was finished. ‘The sight of their faces in
a looking-glass of course startled them exceed-
ingly at first, and was afterward a source of in-
finite amusement. ‘This is 2 common effect
produced by the sight of a mirror upon all sav-
ages. When Lee Boo first saw himself in a
mirror at Canton, his amazement exceeded all
bounds. It is the same, in a degree, with chil-
dren, and some of the lower animals. What
most of all excited the wonder of the New-
Zealanders were the cows and horses. One
of them asked in great perplexity where the
mouth of the cow was, which he saw with its
head hanging down. ‘To the people who had
never beheld any quadruped larger than a hog,
the size of these animals must have seemed
quite preternatural. When the Active arrived
at the Bay of Islands, and the live stock on
board were landed, they were viewed with
equal astonishment. While an immense crowd
of persons were assembled around them on the
beach, one of the cows became unmanageable
and rushed in among them, which so terrified
the whole multitude that they immediately fled
in all directions. ‘lhe cow, however, having
been caught and secured, they again collected,
and were now witnesses to a greater wonder
than they had yet seen. he reader will re-
collect Tupai Cupa’s amazement when he first
observed a man on horseback in the streets of
Liverpool. Not having seen the person mount,
he naturally enough took him for a part of the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 207

quadruped. In the same way his countrymen,
when they first saw a horse and rider in New-
Zealand, felt as those in all probability did in
ancient times with whom the fable of the cen-
taurs originated ; or as the Peruvians when they
first looked upon their Spanish conquerors,
coming against them in the splendid terrors of
European warfare, to charge “with all their
chivalry.” On this occasion, although Mr.
Marsden got on the animal’s back before their
faces, their astonishment was unbounded when
they beheld the rider fairly mounted on his
steed, and afterward galloping up and down
the beach. Duaterra had before this given
them some account of a horse ; but having, for
want of a better word, described it by the term
corraddee, their name for the small native dog
of the country, he had only excited their ridi-
cule when he told them of its carrying the
white men on its back. Some put their fingers
in their ears, and begged he would let them
hear no more of his lies; while others in a more
philosophical spirit, as they probably imagined,
set about bestriding their pigs, that they might
ascertain whether or not the thing was really
practicable. ‘The result of the experiment,
however, soon made these as skeptical as the
others. It was, therefore, it may be imagined,
no small triumph to Duaterra now to point to
Mr. Marsden’s equestrian performance. We
may here remark, by the way, that the New-
Zealanders, although they had no horses, ap-
pear not to have been altogether unacquainted
14
208 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

with land-carriages before the arrival of the
Europeans in their country. Crozet was told
that the chiefs of some of the interior districts
were wont to be conveyed from one place to
another in litters or palanquins, borne on the
shoulders of their slaves; and Mr. Nicholas,
who does not appear to have seen Crozet’s ac-
count, mentions the same thing.

A watch, to persons without a notion of ma-
chinery, must be a fund of wonder and perplex-
ity. Mr. Berry, in his account of the destruc-
tion of the Boyd, states that the first watch seen
by the people of Wangaroa was one belonging
to a Captain Ceronci, the master of a vessel
employed in taking seals, who put into that har-
bour in 1808. ‘They could form no other con-
ception of it, of course, than that it was alive ;
and so mysterious did it seem to them, that they
speedily agreed among themselves that it could
be nothing less than an atue or god. At last
one day, when its owner was showing it to
some of them, it fell intothe sea. This circum-
stance inspired the whole inhabitants of the
place with the greatest terror; and, when Ce-
ronci set sail a few days after, they had no
doubt he had left his demon behind him to
plague them. Shortly after this a violent epi-
demic carried off their chiefs, and great num-
bers of the tribe; and this calamity they una-
nimously attributed to the white man’s atua
Within less than a year after this Captain Ceronci
again arrived at New-Zealand, a passenger on
board the City of Edinburgh, which put in at the
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 209

Bay of Islands, and lay there for three months.
This was about half a year before the catastro-
phe of the Boyd. On leaving the country on
this second occasion, Ceronci again, by a sin-
gular fatality, dropped a watch overboard. On
this one of the chiefs, who stood near him,
wrung his hands, and, uttering a shriek of dis-
tress, exclaimed that Ceronci would be the de-
struction of the Bay of Islands, as he had
already been of Wangaroa. Mr. Berry seems
to be of opinion that these two unfortunate ac-
cidents had a considerable share in stirring up
the people of Wangaroa to the act of terrible
revenge which they so soon after perpetrated.

Mr. Nicholas, in one of his excursions a
short way into the interior, came to a village,
some of the inhabitants of which had never seen
a watch. In like manner, they, immediately
on hearing it ticking, concluded it to be a god,
and regarded it accordingly with the profound-
est reverence. The most curious and graphic
description, however, that has been given of
the surprise manifested by savages on first see-
ing this wonderful contrivance, is contained in
Mr. Mariner's account of the ‘Tonga Islands.
We shall transcribe the passage, upon the prin-
ciple which we have pursued of giving as many
illustrations of our subject as are naturally pre-
sented in the history of other savages.

“One morning, during Finow’s stay at this
island, some of the natives brought to Mr. Ma-
riner his watch, which they had procured from
his chest, and with looks of curiosity inquired
210 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

what it was. He took it from them, wound
it up, put it to the ear of one of them, and
returned it: every hand was now outstretched
with eagerness to take hold of it; it was applied
in turns to their ears; they were astonished
at the noise it made ; they listened again to it ;
turned it on every side, and exclaimed, ‘ mo-ooi,’
(it is alive!) they then pinched and hit it, as if
expecting it would squeak out; they looked at
each other with wonder, laughed aloud, snapped
their fingers, and made a sort of clucking noise
with the tongue, (expressing amazement.) One
brought a sharp stone for Mr. Mariner to force
it open with; he opened it in the proper way,
and showed them the works; several endea-
voured to seize hold of it at once, and he who
got it ran away with it, and all the rest after
him. In about an hour they returned with the
watch completely broken to pieces. One had
the case, another the broken dial, and the
wheels and works were distributed among them.
They then gave him the fragments, and made
signs to him to put it together, and make it do
as it did before: upon which he gave them to
understand that they had killed it, and that it
was impossible to bring it to life again. ‘The
man who considered it his property, exclaimed
mow-mow, (spoiled!) and made a hissing noise
expressive of disappointment: he accused the
rest of using violence, and they in return ac-
cused him and one another. While they were
thus in high dispute there came another native,
who had seen and learned the use of a watch
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 211

on board of a French ship; when he under-
stood the cause of their dispute, he called them
all cow-valé, (a pack of fools,) and explained in
the following manner the use of the watch:
making a circle in the sand, with sundry marks
about its circumference, and turning a stick
about the centre of the circle, to represent an
index, he informed them that the use of the
watch was to tell where the sun was: that
when the sun was in the east the watch would
point to such a mark, and when the sun was
highest it would point here, and when in the
west it would point there ; and this he said the
watch would do, although it was in a house,
and could not see the sun; and in the night
time, he added, it would tell what portion of a
day’s length it would be before the sun would
rise again. It would be difficult to convey an
adequate idea of their astonishment; one said
it was an animal, another said it was a plant;
and when this man told them it was manufac-
tured, they all exclaimed, Fonnooa boto ! what an
ingenious people! All this Mr. Mariner collected
partly by their gestures, and afterward more fully
when he understood their language, and con-
versed with this man, who always prided him-
self upon his knowledge of the use of a watch,
calling himself Papalangi, (a European.”)

The power of machinery, whether it be ex-
hibited in the complicated movements of a
watch, or the simple operation of a hand-mill,
is peculiarly calculated to arrest the attention
of a people whose few tools are of the rudest
212 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

construction. ‘Tippahee, it will be recollected,
burst into tears at the sight of a rope-walk;
because the process of spinning, although com-
paratively simple, impressed him with a humi-
liating sense of the inferiority of his country-
men. Among a people to whom the weaving
of a fine mat, in their rude loom of pegs
stuck into the earth, is a work of several
years, such processes must be full of the deep-
est interest. Even with nations much more
advanced, such as many of the islanders of the
Indian Archipelago, the simplest wheel which
they use in spinning is distinguished by a name
which is at the same time the common term
for machinery, as if the mechanic arts could
go no farther. The exclusive employment of
women in weaving is a proof of the little esti-
mation in which such pursuits are held. And
yet, when the benefits of machinery are made
obvious to their understandings, even the New-
Zealanders are not slow to comprehend the ad-
vantage they may derive from such inventions.
Duaterra valued a small hand-mill for grinding
corn as the best of his possessions. ‘Tupai
examined carefully the flour-mills of Liverpool,
and could understand how the great water-
wheel was the moving power of the whole erec-
tion. His mind, however, naturally shrunk from
an attempt to investigate the more complex ma-
chines which he had an opportunity of examin-
ing ;—and, probably, he did not perceive the
immeasurable distance between the common
wind-mill, or water-mill, and the applications
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 213

of the steam engine. Where every thing is
new and wonderful, there must necessarily be
a very limited sense of the degrees in which
objects are curious. Such a discrimination is
the result of knowledge and experience. Lee
Boo was taken to see a balloon ;—but it pro-
duced no greater interest in his mind than the
sight of a coach. How should it? A New-
Zealander, as we have seen so often, has a pro-
per regard to his own personal interest in view-
ing the wonders of civilization. He is not an
idle traveller ;——he has to learn something that
may be useful, and he applies himself to what
he can render of practical utility to himself and
his tribe. Moyhanger was indifferent to the
elaborate splendour of Lord Fitzwilliam’s man-
sion ; but he leaped for joy at the stores of old
iron in the neighbourhood of Wapping ; and he
did not forget to observe, that the people of
London had water carried to their own houses,
without personal trouble, by the aid of ma-
chinery. This man had not even a pump or a
well at home ;—and he knew what it was to
fetch water from the distant river, or to endure
all the miseries of prolonged thirst. He doubt-
less had suffered, too, the severest penalties of
hunger, in his own country, where the people
were only beginning to study the arts of tillage;
his astonishment, therefore, was great, as well
it might be, when he beheld the population of
London supplied with their daily food, although
he could see neither fields nor cattle. ‘Tooi
saw an iron-foundry ;—and there he first dis-
214 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

covered how man converts the rough ore, which,
in truth, is nothing more than the name it bears,
iron-stone, into the various implements which
administer to his first necessities. He saw the
source whence the spade and the musket, the
two great objects of his countrymen’s desire,
were obtained, and his amazement was un-
bounded: ‘Iron run like water—my country-
men no believe, suppose I tell him.” There
are many among us who have reason to blush
at the intelligent curiosity of these poor savages ;
for we are surrounded with wonders which we
take no pains to examine. Whether we look
around upon the kingdom of nature or of art,
every object is full of instruction. To examine,
to inquire, to compare, to think, are not pro-
cesses that suit an indolent mind ;—but they
are exertions that every member of a civilized
community should tax himself to perform. If
he neglects to acquaint himself with the ordi-
nary circumstances that make up his existence ;
if, while the corn is grown, the cattle reared,
the fleece woven, the elements subdued, the
ocean traversed, for his use, he is ignorant how
these and other blessings of civilization are ob-
tained by industry and science, he is morally
lower in the scale of intellect than the poor sa-
vage who wonders at a cow, who is in ecsta-
cies when meal is procured from wheat, who
breaks a watch to pieces to see the living crea-
ture within, and who knows nothing of books.
The savage uses his opportunities ;—the civil-
ized idler does not comprehend their value. For
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 215

such persons, if there be any in this age, the
following anecdote of a barbarian, as the pride
of Europeans has denominated him, may have
its use :—It is related of the inca of Peru,
- whom Pizarro treacherously murdered, that he
was amazingly struck with the power which
the Europeans possessed of communicating
ideas by writing. ‘The knowledge of these
people was chiefly traditionary; and he at
once saw the manifold advantages of establish-
ing a mode of communication and of record,
which should enable men to overcome the dif-
ficulties of time and space in the interchange
of their thoughts. He was anxious to acquire
this art; and, that he might make trial of its
effects, asked some of the Spanish soldiers to
write the name of God upon his thumb nail.
When his merciless jailer, Pizarro, approached
him, Athabaliba presented the writing to him,
by way of experiment upon his knowledge.
The rough soldier could not read :—and the
contempt which the inca expressed for a man
who had possessed the opportunity of acquiring
such an important power, and neglected to profit
by it, was so undisguised, that the conqueror
never forgave him, and soon hurried him to a
cruel death.

We have already stated that the New-Zea-
landers have not the art of communicating ideas
by writing. They are excellent imitators, as
we have seen ;they can make a copy of their
own amoco with the utmost ease ;—they can
execute a fac-simile of European penmanship.
216 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

This is merely the mechanical part of the art ;—~"
and, therefore, the power of conveying thoughts
by written language, with the same precision as
by speech, is to them, as to most other savages,
a matter of extreme surprise.

We have nowhere any precise account of
the first introduction of a New-Zealander to the
art of writing; but Mr. Mariner, in his work
already quoted, has given us a most curious and
interesting description of the surprise and per-
plexity with which the powers of the invention
were contemplated for the first time by some of
the natives of the Tonga Islands. Mr. Mariner,
shortly after the commencement of his captivity
among these savages, had, in the hope of thereby
obtaining his liberty, written a letter, with a so-
lution of gunpowder, on a piece of paper which
he obtained from one of the natives; and he
confided it to the care of a chief, with direc-
tions that it should be given to the captain of
any ship which might appear on the coast.
Finow, the king, however, having heard of this
transaction, his suspicions were excited, and he
immediately sent to the chief for the letter, and
obtained it. “ When it was put into his hands,”
the narrative proceeds, “he looked at it on all
sides ; but not being able to make any thing of
it, he gave it to Jeremiah Higgins, who was at
hand, and ordered him to say what it meant:
Mr. Mariner was not present. Higgins took
the letter, and translating part of it in the Tonga
language, judiciously represented it to be merely .
a request to any English captain that might
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 217

arrive to interfere with Finow for the liberty of
Mr. Mariner and his countrymen; stating that
they had been kindly treated by the natives, but
nevertheless wished to return, if possible, to
their native country. * * * This mode of
communicating sentiments was an inexplicable
puzzle to Finow ; he took the letter again and
examined it, but it afforded him no information.
He considered the matter a little within him-
self; but his thoughts reflected no light upon
the subject. At length he sent for Mr. Mari-
ner, and desired him to write down something ;
the latter asked what he would choose to have
written ; he replied, Put down me; he accord-
ingly wrote ‘ Fee-now,’ (spelling it according to
the strict English orthography ;) the chief then
sent for another Englishman who had not been
present, and commanding Mr. Mariner to turn
his back and look another way, he gave the man
the paper, and desired him to read what that
was: he accordingly pronounced aloud the
name of the king, upon which Finow snatched
the paper from his hand, and, with astonish-
ment, looked at it, turned it around, and examin-
ed it in all directions: at length he exclaimed,
‘ This is neither like myself nor any body else !
where are my legs? how do you know it to be
1?” and then, without stopping for any attempt
at an explanation, he patiently ordered Mr.
Mariner to write something else, and thus em-
ployed him for three or four hours in putting
-down the names of different persons, places,
and things, and making the other man read
218 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

them. This afforded extraordinary diversion
to Finow, and to all the men and women pre-
sent, particularly as he now and then whisper-
ed a little love anecdote, which was strictly
written down, and audibly read by the other,
not a little to the confusion of one or other
of the ladies present; but it was all taken in
good humour, for curiosity and astonishment
were the prevailing passions. How their names
and circumstances could be communicated,
through so mysterious a channel, was altogether
past their comprehension. Finow at length
thought he had got a notion of it, and explained
to those about him it was very possible to put
down a mark or sign of something that had been
seen, both by the writer and reader, and which
should be mutually understood by them; but
Mr. Mariner immediately informed him, that he
could write down any thing that he had never
seen; the king directly whispered to him to
put Toogoo Ahoo (the king of Tonga, whom he
and Toobo Nuha had assassinated many years
before Mr. Mariner’s arrival.) This was ac-
cordingly done, and the other read it; when
Finow was yet more astonished, and declared
it to be the most wonderful thing he had ever
heard of. He then desired him to write ‘ Tarky’
(the chief of the garrison of Bea, whom Mr.
Mariner and his companions had not yet seen;
this chief was blind in one eye.) When ‘'Tarky’
was read, Finow inquired whether he was blind
or not; this was putting writing to an unfair -
test! and Mr. Mariner told him that he had
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 219

only written down the sign standing for the
sound of his name, and not for the description
of his person. He was then ordered, in a
whisper, to write, ‘ Terky, blind in his left eye,’
which was done, and read by the other man, to
the increased astonishment of every body. Mr
Mariner then told him, that in several parts of
the world messages were sent to great distances
through the same medium, and, being folded
and fastened up, the bearer could know nothing
of the contents ; and that the histories of whole
nations were thus handed down to posterity,
without spoiling by being kept (as he chose to
express himself.) Finow acknowledged this
to be a most noble invention, but added that it
would not do at all for the Tonga Islands;
that there would be nothing but disturbances
and conspiracies, and he should not be sure of
his life, perhaps, another month.”

The few scattered notices which we have
thus collected of the aspects under which the
arts of civilization are presented to the savage,
might be easily extended ;—but we have given
enough to direct the current of thought to this
very interesting subject. ‘The objects which
strike the savage are upon the surface. He is
astonished at the art of writing ;—but he knows
nothing of the vast treasures which have been
laid up for mankind, by the power of perpetuat-
ing the thoughts of the wisest and the noblest
of the human race. He wonders at a horse
and a carriage ;—but he does not perceive the
extent of our communication, not only with the
220 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

most unpeopled districts of our own country,
but with every civilized nation of the earth. He
gazes with delight upon a simple wheel ;—but
he understands little of the astonishing powers
of machinery, which have rendered the piece
of cloth, which he regards as a robe for princes,
accessible to the humblest of the land ; and the
solitary nail, for which he would barter his best
riches, a thing too common among us to be
picked up by the sweeper of kennels. It is
for us to look beyond the surface.

CHAPTER XV.

Comparative view of savage with civilized life—Character
of the New-Zealanders.

Ir was, no long time ago, a favourite contro-
versy among philosophic inquirers, whether
man enjoyed the greater happiness in the civil-
ized or in the savage state. At the period when
this question was most keenly agitated, the real
circumstances of savage life were very imper-
fectly known ; and such information as did exist
upon the subject was not always most familiar
to those who showed the greatest zeal in the
discussion. The sources from which their no-
tions were principally taken were rather the
dreams of poetry than the accounts of actual
observers ; and the evidence of facts, indeed,
was in general so sparingly appealed to, that
the debate was upon the whole much more a
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 221

contest of eloquence than of argument. In
such disputations a mere name or phrase is
sometimes a powerful auxiliary to one of the
parties ; and there can be no doubt that in this
case the patrons of savage life were a good deal
assisted in imposing both upon others and them-
selves by the softening expression, “a state of
nature,” or “ the natural state,” by which they
generally used to designaie their favourite form
of society. If this was to be considered as the
natural condition of man, it required no great
management to represent any deviation from it
as unnatural; and this charge, accordingly, we
find to be the burden of much of the declama-
tion in which it has been attempted to expose
the evils of an advanced state of social refine-
ment. Perhaps all that was really meant by
those who first applied the epithet natural to
savage life was, that such was the primitive
condition of the species—and even that much
was an assumption. But it soon came to be
taken as signifying a great deal more ; and was
at length rarely used, perhaps, except to con-
vey, and with the effect of conveying, an im-
pression that only in barbarism was man placed
so as to enjoy the power of acting in conformity
to the demands of his nature, or of growing up
either to the highest happiness or the highest
perfection of which it had made him capable.
When we come to examine savage life, how-
ever, in any of the forms which it has been
found actually to assume, we discover it to be
something very different from the popular pic-
222 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

tures of it. In the first place, almost all sava-
ges exist in the social state—that state in which
one man is to a certain extent dependant upon
another. They do not roam the woods or
mountains, as has been often taken for granted,
as free as the wild beasts or the winds. The
few individuals of our race who have been
found in this condition of lawless and solitary
liberty, so far from having exhibited human
nature in its noblest or happiest form, have uni-
formly turned out to be samples of its lowest
wretchedness—worse than brutified, not in
mind merely, but even in outward shape. The
fact is, that whatever the poets may say, men
are not at all formed to exist like the brute in
the lair. ‘The social state is natural to the hu-
man being, both because he has one of his chief
enjoyments in intercourse with his fellows—in
the sympathies which this excites in him, and
in those of which it makes him the object ; and
because he is so constituted that he really needs
the assistance of others to enable him easily to
supply many of the most pressing even of his
physical wants. Alone, he is no match for
many of the lower animals; in society, be it
even of the very rudest form, he can cope suc-
cessfully with all of them, as well as with the
fury of the elements, the obduracy of the earth,
and the hostility of his own species. Thus
placed, he is the lord of creation ; but, a naked
rover of the forest, he would, instead of carry-
ing any show of nobility or sovereignty about
with him, be only a miserable fugitive before its
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 223

other savage tenants, and the most helpless of
all living things.

Another vision of the savage state, common
in sentimental works, represents it as a scene
of universal peacefulness and ease, where life
is all innocence and sunshine. Here alone, it
is said, is society found to exist in a form de-
serving of the name. ‘The union which binds
man to man is here, according to these writers,
a spirit of spontaneous love, which leads each
to delight in the brotherhood of his kind,
and thus gathers together all the members
of the tribe into one affectionate and harmo-
nious family, Where the heart is thus left
to its free play, the restraints of government
and law are needless and unknown. Here,
they say, every man acts as his own feelings
dictate, and yet injures no one else; for why
should he? The gracious earth supplies abun-
dantly his few and simple wants. All day long
he spends his time in happy communion with
nature, now bathing in the neighbouring lake, or
skimming over the sca in his light canoe, or
wandering in sultry noon among shady groves,
or at eventide joining his fellow-villagers in
dance and song. The savage, whose enjoy-
ments are thus described, is held to be wiser
than the proud and pampered inhabitant of the
land where civilization has established her
crowded cities, her lordly institutions, her in-
numerable sciences and arts, because he indulges
no desires the gratification of which demands
either thought, skill, or labour, or which excite

15
224 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

him to trespass upon the enjoyments of others
in order that he may augment his own.

But this conception of savage life is as much
a dream as the former. Many of the evils
which it attributes to civilization cxist of neces-
sity in every form of society, for their sources
lie among the principles of human nature ; and
civilization, in truth, instead of either creating
or augmenting them, operates with incalculable
effect in their control and diminution. The
notion of property is found, under certain forms,
to be as lively and active in savage as in civil-
ized life ; but it is only in civilized life that the
feeling of the right is combined with any thing
like a sense of security in its enjoyment. In
the savage state the notion of property is, gene-
rally speaking, merely a comfortless and uneasy
appetite after something of doubtful or imprac-
ticable altainment, or an equally restless appre-
hension of losing what has been actually attain-
ed. The absence of law and government, in
so far as these restraints are really wanting in
the savage state, instead of heing the source of
many blessings, is more than any thing else the
curse of that condition of society. For the truth
is, that it is only the protection of these sanc-
tions of which the people are deprived ; of their
controlling and oppressive power they generally
feel enough. Whatever of independence exists,
belongs, in most cases only to the chiefs; and
even they, although the superiors of the great
body of the people, and equal among themselves,
are often subject to a common head, on whose
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS., 225

caprice their property and their lives hang in
the same manner in which those of their imme-
diate vassals do on their own.

The bright colours, in truth, in which savage
life somctimes presents itself to the imagination,
will be found to be chiefly borrowed from the
mere physical circumstances of situation and
climate. But these would not be destroyed by
civilization. ‘The sunny and fertile isle, se-
questered in the bosom of the Pacific, would be
no less lovely than it is, if it were the abode of
literature and the arts. At present, even the
bounty of nature, instead of conferring upon its
inhabitants a dower of perfect innocence and
blessedness, has in some cases only reduced
them to a race of nerveless and grovelling vo-
luptuaries.

But it is seldom that a state of barbarism
does not exhibit much harsher, if not more re-
volting features, than those that have just been
alluded to. Instead of being a state of univer-
sal love and harmony, it is most commonly one
of perpetual discord and violence. Whenever
savages are possessed of much vigour or ac-
tivity of spirit, it displays itself in this manner.
War becomes the passion and occupation of
every man’s life ; and the land has no rest from
confusion and bloodshed. Such a condition of
society is evidently as much opposed to the
growth or indulgence of a taste for any species
of tranquil or reflective enjoyment, as it is to the
cultivation of either the elegant or the useful
arts.
226 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

We shall not weaken the general course of
the argument if we acknowledge that savage
life has some enjoyments peculiar to itself. It
is often, at least, a life of much less toil and
anxiety than that of the great body of the in-
habitants of civilized countries.

We shail, perhaps, indecd, arrive at the
truest and most comprehensive estimate of the
condition and character of the savage by con-
sidcring him as «a child in intellect, and, at
the same time, in physical powers and passions
aman. A being so constituted is obviously in
both an unnatural and an unfortunate state. The
two parts of which he is made up—his spiritual
and his sensual organization—are not suited to
work harmoniously together. The one cannot
act as a governing power over the other. On
the one hand, we have the whole host of the
passions in the maturity of their strength, and
wielding their most formidable weapons ; on
the other, where there should be authority to
command this turbulent array, there are only
the ignorance, the improvidence, the frivolity,
the fickleness, the irresolution, and all that con-
stitutes the weakness and inefficiency of child-
hood. ‘There may be no want of capacity ;
but, remaining, as it does, untaught, it grows up
to nothing beyond a habit of narrow and insidi-
ous cunning, which, if it must be accounted in
its degree an intellectual accomplishment, indi-
cates at least the very reverse of any thing like
a moral advancement. Some tribes of savages,
of course, answer more, and others less exactly,
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 227

to this description. In some the boyhood of
the intellect is less, in others more advanced.
But its immaturity, as contrasted with that of
the natives of a civilized country, is sufficiently
remarkable in all. ‘Take an individual belong-
ing even to any of those races which have ge-
nerally displayed both the greatest virtues and
the highest intellectual powers of all savage
nations, perhaps those found in North America
are best entitled to this distinction. Many of
these barbarians are brave, enterprising, de-
spisers of fatigue and torture, capable, upon oc-
casion of extraordinary efforts, of self-control,
ingenious and skilful in the few arts which they
practise, eloquent after the fashion of savage
oratory, sagacious in their political contrivances
and arrangements, courteous and hospitable to
strangers, just in their dealings with each other.
All this they are made by the necessity of the
circumstances in which they are placed; by
their military habits, by their fixed social insti-
tutions and customs, and by those few simple
rules and maxims of traditionary wisdom or pre-
judice which they learn to acquiesce in and to
actupon as instincts. But the mind of even the
ablest warrior or gravest sage among them is
still, in many respects, merely that of a child.
All his notions are simply articles of faith,
which he has taken upon trust. None of them,
accordingly, have the comprchensiveness of
principles. His very virtues serve him only
ior the particular time and place in which he
hae been specially taught and accustomed to
228 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

exhibit them. He does not even make the at-
tempt to practise them on other occasions.
Thus, for example, the same individual who, in
the ambush, or the stealthy invasion of an un-
suspecting enemy, shows 2 management, cirt-
cumspection, coolness, and patience, that can-
not be surpassed,—or who, if he were brought
out to die at the stake, would endure the most
agonizing tortures with a stern and unshrinking
stoicism that might be esteemed almost super-
human,—is in ordinary circumstances all in-
considerateness, precipitation, and mutability.
This latter is his natural character ; the other is
an artificial display to which he is only rarely
wrought by circumstances of peculiar excite-
ment. The grave, steady, and calculating war-
rior is now a reed to be shaken by every wind—
one moment inflamed into passion by the slight-
est and most unintentional affront or neglect ;
the next, restored as suddenly to smiles and
good humour by as trivial a pcace-offering.
The eloquent old man who was yesterday the
sage of the deliberating council, to-day carried
away by an admiration altogether infantine, is
ready to exchange the most valuable of his pos-
sessions for a string of glass beads. ‘The inde-
pendence of the tribe, the maintenance of their
old customs, revenge on their enemies,—these
are the three or four boundary marks of every
man’s political and moral faith; and no one
even thinks of looking beyond them. Hence
their unchanging institutions, and the unpro-
gressive character of their knowledge and their
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS., 229

arts. Society is with them merely a game,
which, like other games, must be played accord-
ing to certain conventional rules ; and of course
it is no business of theirs either to alter these
rules, or to trouble themselves by inquiring into
the reasons of their original enactment.

All that we know of the condition of the
New-Zealanders is calculated to illustrate and
confirm these general views of savage life.
The character of this people, both moral and
intellectual, exhibits, however, a much richer
and more interesting variety of peculiarities
than that of most other savages. Its very ano-
malies constitute much of its attraction. They
belong, as the reader has by this time had
abundant proof, to the class of the energetic,
bold, and haughty nations; and both their vir-
tues and their vices wear the same general air
and complexion of independence, decision, and
fearlessness. It will be useful to recapitulate
here the broader features of their character ;
first, as such a summary will allow us to intro-
duce many points of illustration which have
been omitted in the preceding narrative,—and,
secondly, as we may, through these general
views, arrive at a clearer perception of the
probabilities of their ultimate advancement in
real knowledge and civilization.

The first and most conspicuous quality in the
character of the New-Zealanders is their inor-
dinate passion for war.

The wars of these savages are maintained
and perpetuated both by their love of contention
230 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

and bloodshed, and by that spirit of revenge
which seems to be more implacable in them
than in almost any other people on earth. The
law of retaliation in its most rigorous literality
is their only rule for reconcilement of differ-
ences ; and so long as the demands of this in-
exorable principle remain unsatisfied, the two
parties can only know each other as enemies.
“When we ask the chiefs,” writes one of the
missionaries in 1827, “ when their wars with
each other will terminate, they reply, ‘ Never ;
because it is the custom of every tribe which
loses a man not to be content without satis-
faction; and nothing less than the death of
one individual can atone for the death of an-
other.’”

Where injuries of long standing do not exist
to give a pretext for their insane and destroying
contentions, the pride, sensitiveness, and sudden
inflammability of the New-Zeulanders, are eXx-
tremely apt to create causes of offence in a mo-
ment, which may prove the sources of hatred
and bloodshed for a century. ‘I'he most trivial
slight, or any thing which they imagine to be en
insult or failure of respect, fires them to instant
indignation.

The younger Forster, in his account of Cook’s
second voyage, relates an anecdote strikingly
illustrative both of the New-Zealander’s quick-
ness in taking offence, and of his equally in-
stantaneous forgetlulness of what he had felt,
whenever he discovers that no insult was really
intended. On putting off one day from a port
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 231

on the north coast of Cook’s Strait, where they
had gone on shore only for a few minutes, one
of the sailors informed Captain Cook that he
had purchased some fish from a native for which
he had not had time to pay him. On this, Cook
took the last nail they had left, and threw it to
the New-Zealander, who was standing on the
beach. Probably conceiving that there had
been an intention of hitting him, the infuriated
savage instantly took up a stone, and hurled it
at the boat. It struck nobody ; and Cook, with
very commendable forbearance, merely pointed
out to their assailant the nail which lay at his
feet ; and as soon as he saw the valuable article
that had been given to him, he was the first to
laugh at his own petulance. This little inci-
dent, as the narrator remarks, might have led to
serious consequences if Cook had not shown the
prudence he did. If the conduct of the New-
Zealander had been met by a precipitation equal
to his own, a general quarrel might have ensued
between the boat’s crew and the natives, in the
growing violence and confusion of which the
mistake in which it originated would very soon
have been obscured beyond all chance of ex-
planation. But how often, among these impa-
tient and irascible savages themselves, must it
happen that a case no weightier than this shall
give rise to mutual exasperation, which many
bloody conflicts may not heal! How often, in-
deed, to our disgrace, do such things happen
among the members of civilized communities.
The passionate revenge of the poor barbarian
232 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

has an excuse, in his ignorance of a higher rule
of conduct, which the Christian cannot plead.

CHAPTER XVI.

Summary of the general character of the New-Zealanders,
continued.

UnacquainTEp as the New-Zealanders are
with any thing deserving the name of science,
and insignificant as is the progress they have
made in the arts, their intellectual powers are
evidently of a superior order. Such of them
as have come in contact with European civiliza-
tion have in general manifested extraordinary
quickness and tact in catching its spirit, and
adapting themselves te the new opinions and
manners to which they were introduced. And
all that we are told of them shows acuteness,
reflection, readiness, fertility of resources, and
the other faculties and habits of mind that go to
make up a commanding intellectual organization.
As Duaterra remarked to Mr. Nicholas upon one
occasion, “ New-Zealand man no fool.” In
the few arts which are known among them, as
we have already seen, they display exceeding
neat-handedness and ingenuity, and even no
contemptible portion of taste and elegance. Nor
are they without a genius fer the higher exer-
cises of the imagination. ‘Their music is
spoken of as superior to that of many of the
other South Sea islands; they possess a body
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 233

of national poetry, which is constantly receiving
additions as new events awaken the fancy of
their bards ; and eloquencg in the council is as
indispensable a qualification of their chiefs and
warriors as valour in the field. Among all or-
ders of the people much time is spent in con-
versation, in which they discuss the general con-
cerns of the tribe, taking, as might be expected,
especial interest in whatever relates to their
chief and his family. But other topics alse ob-
tain their eager attention, whenever they enjoy
the rare opportunity of acquiring any informa-
tion respecting what lies beyond the very bound-
ed sphere of their own experience and tradi-
tionary knowledge. Mr. Marsden, who, during
his several journeys through the interior of the
country, saw more of their domestic habits than
any one else who has attempted to give us a
picture of New-Zealand society, found them
everywhere both ready and anxious to listen to
him, when he addressed them even on what
may be called scientific subjects, and most in
telligent in the questions they asked him, and
the remarks they made. After the work of the
day was over, they used to crowd around him in
the evenings to hear him dispense to them the
wisdom of Europe; and not only agriculture
and navigation, but the general principles of
geography and astronomy were often the matter
of his discourse, which would sometimes run far
into the night before his auditors were weary,
or thought of repose. Nor was it found by any
means impossible or difficult to convince them
234 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

of the folly of some of their prejudices, when
the reason of the thing admitted of being plainly
stated to them. In his visit to Tiami, for ex-
ample, Mr. Marsden had a great deal of conver-
sation with the chiefs, and took an opportunity
of arguing with them about several of the native
customs and superstitions. Among other things,
“they said,” writes the reverend gentleman,
“that some time ago one of their tribe went on
board a ship, where he ate some provisions,
contrary to their customs; when their god, in
his anger, slew a great many of them. I in-
quired in what manner those that died were
affected. They represented their tongues to be
foul, and their whole bodies in a burning heat.
The natives, supposing the heat which they ex-
perienced to proceed from a secret fire within
them, threw off all their mats, drank and bathed
in cold water, and exposed themselves, as much
as they could, to the cold; under the idea that
cold would quench the heat which they felt.
We informed them that this was the way to in-
crease the heat and to kill them; and that, in-
stead of exposing themselves to the cold, they
should have kept themselves warm, in order to
make them perspire ; as the perspiration would
carry off the burning heat from the body, and
not cold air and water. They laughed at this
idea, and supposed that this would increase their
complaint. I then asked them if they remem-
bered at any time, when they perspired freely,
feeling that burning heat in their bodies which
they mentioned ; after some reflection and con-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 235

sultation together, they thought, from what they
felt when they perspired freely, that we might
be right in our opinion.” They afterward asked
Mr. Marsden to explain to them, upon his prin-
ciples, how Duaterra came to die—an event
which they themselves had never thought of
attributing to any other cause than the vengeance
of the Atua, which, having got within him,
had devoured his entrails; and on a true ac-
count of the disease which had carried him off
being given to them, they appeared to be con-
vinced that it was really more reasonable than
their own notion.

They are much less disposed, however, than
most other uncivilized tribes, and the fact is
greatly to the credit of their thinking powers, to
receive any opinion merely upon the assertion
even of a white man. Upon all subjects they
question and cross-question those who attempt
to instruct them, until they are satisficd with the
explanation given. Naturally suspicious, a con-
sequence partly of the inquisitive and pene-
trating character of their understandings, and
much accustomed themselves to conceal the ob-
ject they actually have in view, and to proceed
to it by an indirect course, they generally en-
deavour very anxiously, when they meet with a
stranger, to ascertain the motives of any con-
duct they see him pursue. They must have a
reason for every thing. When Mr. Marsden
went to see the Shukehanga people, the first
inquiry they made was, what was the object of
his visit. And when he afterward began to con-
236 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS,

verse with them about the geography of their
country, and other topics on which he desired
information, they maintained the same guarded
manner. If a question was asked, they gene-
rally took care, before answering it, to inquire
for what reason it was put. Any inquiry, for
example, about the distance of a particular place
in the island, was sure to be met in the first in-
stance by the counter interrogation, What do
you want to know for? or, Are you going there ?

Many of the New-Zealanders are well ac-
quainted with the geography of their own coun-
try. Notwithstanding the want of roads, they
are accustomed to traverse the islands in all
directions.

Like other rude nations, who spend much of
their time in the open air, the New-Zealanders
have an experimental acquaintance with the phe-
nomena of external nature, which serves them in
place of science, and in certain cases, indeed,
enables them to judge as certainly and much
more quickly than science could do. ‘Thus, by
a glance at the position of the sun during the
day, or of the stars at night, they can at any
season of the year tell the points with the ac-
euracy of a compass ; and, in looking for dis-
tant and obscure objects, they will often make
the discovery with the naked cye before a
European could with the aid of a good glass.
Their sight, indeed, is singularly acute ; and is
seldom affected even by that soreness and in-
flammation of the eyes which is common among
them, owing probably to the freedom with which
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 237

they expose their heads to the cold. When
the officers of the Dromedary went to shoot in
the woods, they had great difficulty in finding
the pigeons, from the thickness of the foilage in
which they concealed themsclves ; but their
native attendants pointed them out with the
greatest facility.

Several of the most conspicuous deformities
of the New-Zealand character originate in the
abuse and perversion of their intellectual powers,
which, properly trained, would carry them for-
ward rapidly in the career of social improvement
and happiness. They are nota people sunk in
sloth, and abandoned to an enervating luxury,
as has been found to be the condition of some
savage tribes. (Cn the contrary, although, as
we have seen, full of sensibility and warmth of
heart, their chief enjoyment is in activity and
enterprise—in the toils, the dangers, and the’
other coarse hut stirring excitements of war.
From this active, restless, and ardent constitu-
tion of mind, however, spring many of their
vices, as well as their virtues—not only their
hardihood, and exemption from effeminacy, but
their turbulence, their ferocity, their love of
blood, and whatever else is in the popular
sense of the word most savage in their dis-
position and manners. With less intellectual
acuteness and energy, they would be in many
respects less revoltingly barbarous. Their cun-
ning, also, would be less refined and insidious ;
and they would not be so much given to sus-
picion, jealousy, dissimulation, lying, and ca-
238 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

lumny. All these faults indicate the deficiency
not so much of intellect as of moral principle ;
or, rather, they are the fruits of intellectual
powers allowed to grow up wild, and without
their natural and requisite nourishment. ‘They
are such as are not unfrequently seen in clever
children, whose training has been little attend-
ed to. Even the most respectable of the chiefs
are often not to be trusted on their most solemn
affirmation ; and in speaking of each other, in
particular, they are accustomed to indulge in
the wildest excesses of falsehood and slander.
Yet the very individuals who deal thus freely in
mutual invectives and misrepresentations behind
each other’s backs are, face to face, apparently
the best friends imaginable.

In pursuing our review of the state of society
in New-Zealand, and the peculiarities of the
national character, it is necessary to notice
shortly the station which the women occupy,
and the manner in which they are treated.
We have already had occasion to introduce
some of the females of highest rank as at one
time engaged in the labours of agriculture, and
at another distinguishing themselves in warlike
exercises, or accompanying their husbands to
the field of battle, to fight by their sides. Shun-
gic’s blind queen, it may be remembered, used
to figure occasionally in all these capacities. It
would appear, however, from what Rutherford
states, that the women who follow a military
expedition are not in general expected to take
an active part in the combat; but attend only
LHE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 239

for the purpose of helping their husbands to
their arms, acting as their nurses if they should
be wounded, and receiving and taking charge
of the heads they cut off. But although the
duty of fighting is discharged principally by the
men, the women take at least their share in
most of the other descriptions of labour. ‘The
cultivation of the fields, especially, and the
gathering in of the produce, seem to be princi-
pally their occupations. They also paddle the
canoes occasionally as well as the men, and
assist in curing the fish for the general stock ;
and they are the chief operators in dressing
and spinning the flax, and in the manufacture
of mats.

Yet, with the exception, perhaps, of the
chiefs and professed warriors, who would pro-
bably disdain to engage in any meaner occu-
pation than that of arms, it does not appear that
the men are in the habit, as in some barbarous
countries, of devolving the common toils of life
exclusively upon the women. The latter seem
to be far removed, for example, from that state
of subjection and wretchedness which is de-
scribed as their lot among many of the African,
and even among some of the American savages.
In most of their labours the men take at least
some share, although perhaps not quite an equal
one. Of one important duty, however, the
husband relieves the wife almost completely—
namely, of the care of the children. As soon
as the infant is weaned, it is taught to twine its
arms around its father’s neck; and so com-

16
240 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

pletely does it in a short time acquire the habit
of trusting to this support, that, asleep or awake,
it remains the whole day thus suspended, pro-
tected from the weather by the same mat which
covers its parent; and in his longest journeys,
as well as his most laborious occupations, it is
his constant companion.

The circumstance, however, which most af-
fects the condition of the women in New-Zea-
land is the prevalence of the custom of poly-
gamy. Almost all the chiefs have more than
one wife, most of them six or eight; of these
there is always one who is accounted the head
wife. To this arrangement the weaker sex are
said to submit in general quietly enough ; but
its inconveniences are not unfelt either by them
or their husbands. Some of the chiefs admit-
ted to Mr. Marsden that they should have a
much quicter house with only one wife; when
there were more, they remarked, the women
always quarrelled. Debates upon this some-
times took place when the women were pre-
sent; and they generally seemed to be of opi-
nion that a man should have no more than one
wife. When there is a plurality, indeed, their
mutual jealousies sometimes rise to a great
height.

This system, indeed, necessarily establishes
a tyranny of the stronger sex over the weaker,
which, although it may not often show itself in
acts of violence on the part of the one, is sure
to keep the other in subjection and degradation.
The head wives of the chiefs seem in many
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 241

cases to enjoy considerable consequence, and
women are sometimes chiefs themselves; one
in particular is mentioned as queen of a large
interior district to the south of the Thames : but
still they are under many restraints from which
their husbands are free. Among others they
are not permitted to marry again, should their
husbands die ; and if this regulation is disre-
garded by them, as it sometimes is, they. are
exposed to many indignities which render life
hardly endurable. They are generally given in
marriage, too, without their own consent being
even asked, many of them being in fact prison-
ers of war; and even the head wife, who is
generally her husband’s equal in rank, is merely
delivered over to him by her father.

The moral character of the females, as well
as the estimation in which they are held, cannot
but suffer considerably from the customs of the
country, which, in some places at least, tolerate
any degree of abandonment and profligacy be-
fore marriage. In New-Zealand, as in others
of the South Sea Islands, it is only after a wo-
man, by being married, becomes an article of
property, that she is considered as guilty of any
impropriety in acting as licentiously as she
chooses. Yet it is said to be surprising how
few instances of misconduct occur on the part
of the females after marriage, notwithstanding
this extraordinary training.

Both parents are in general fondly attached
to their children, and treat them with great kind-
ness and indulgence. Of this Mr. Ellis relates
242 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

an instance which fell under his observation,
during the short time he spent at the Bay of Isl-
ands in 1816. One of the chiefs with whom
he formed an acquaintance was Tetoro, the
same person with whom Captain Cruise some
years after sailed from Port Jackson, and of
whom he gives so favourable an account. Mr.
Ellis went one day to Tetoro’s residence to re-
quest him to accompany himself on a short ex-
cursion they proposed making, which the chief
immediately agreed to do. ‘“ But before we set
out,” continues the writer, “an incident occur-
red which greatly raised my estimation of his
character. In the front of the hut sat his wife,
and around her playing two or three children.
In passing from the hut to the boat, Tetoro
struck one of the little ones with his foot; the
child cried, and though the chief had his mat
on, and his gun in his hand, and was in the act
of stepping into the boat, where we were wait-
ing for him, he no sooner heard its cries than he
turned back, took the child up in his arms,
stroked its little head, dried its tears, and, giving
it to the mother, hastened to join us.” No
civilization could have improved the tenderness
or beauty of this conduct. Nature here spoke
from the heart of this untutored barbarian.

The children, indeed, are alleged to be in
general spoiled and rendered unmanageable by
the over indulgence of the parents ; and, doubt-
Jess, few of them enjoy the benefit of a very wise
corrective discipline. They have also, of course,
by right of birth, their share of the audacity
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 243

and wildness of the intrepid, turbulent, and reck-
less race to which they belong. No wonder,
therefore, that we find them characterized as
idle, unsteady, wilful, despising at times even
the control of their parents, and, of course, still
more difficult to be managed by any one else.
But, on the other hand, this comparative free-
_ dom from restraint in which they are brought
up, among its many evil effects, is not without
some advantages. Not only is their whole
bearing to an extraordinary degree frank and
free from embarrassment, but, in many respects,
their intelligence at a very early age surpasses
that of the generality of European children.
Almost as soon as they leave their mother’s
breast, their fathers take them with them to the
public assemblies, and even on their military
expeditions. Hence they acquire a familiarity
even with what may be called affairs of state,
at an age when children with us are considered
hardly more than ready to be sent to school.
Mr. Marsden tells us that he has often seen the
sons of chiefs, at the age of four or five years,
sitting among the chiefs, and paying the closest
attention to what was said. At the age of eight
or ten years, he adds, they appear to be initiated
in all the national customs and manners. The
first lessons taught them are to dance the war-
dance, to paddle the canoe, and to use the war-
like instruments of their country. ‘The son of
a great chief is expected to show his prowess
in battle at a very early age, if he means to
emulate his father’s renown ; and Captain Cruise
244 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

mentions that Shungie’s son, Repero, had ac-
quired no little ascendancy in his tribe, by hav-
ing shot a man before he attained his fourteenth
year.

The English missionaries have established
several schools at their settlements in the neigh-
bourhood of the Bay of Islands. ‘The first was
opened in August, 1816, when an attendance of _
thirty-three children was immediately obtained,
of whom about two-thirds were girls. ‘The num-
ber of the boys, however, afterward increased,
till at last it became nearly equal to that of the
girls.. But it was no easy matter for the teacher
to secure any thing like regularity of attendance
from his restless and wayward pupils. It was
soon found, in fact, that every thing depended
upon his having it in his power to give them
plenty to eat; for neither they nor their parents
had any notion of receiving his lessons with-
out some reward for their compliance. Many
of the latter, indeed, afterward began to insist
upon being paid for permitting their children to
attend the schvol, by something over and above
the maintenance of the young people. The
morning and evening were found to be the most
convenient times for assembling the pupils, all
of whom rose at daybreak. For food they
generally received a handful of potatoes each,
and sometimes a little fish. It was a consider-
able time before it was found possible to make
them comprehend the purpose for which they
were brought together ; and the first four months
passed away in little else than incessant shout
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 245

ing, singing, and dancing. Indeed, after the
first month they got tired of the school room
altogether, and the master was obliged to follow
them into the woods. By a more liberal ex-
penditure of provisions, however, he at last
brought them under more regular government.
Still, at the best, the scene is described as a
somewhat tumultuous one. ‘ While one child,”
writes Mr. Kendall, the teacher, “is repeating
his lesson, another will be playing with my feet,
another taking away my hat, and another my
book ; and all this in the most friendly manner.
I cannot be angry with them; but it requires
some study how best to introduce some salutary
discipline among them.”

With all this wildness, however, most of them
made a rapid progress in learning to read their
native language, in the spelling book which had
been prepared for their use. Their quickness
of apprehension, when they could be induced
to give their thoughts to their lessons, was found
fully to equal that of English children. In
course of time the boys were taught writing ; in
this, also, many of them in a short time attained
a most creditable proficiency. The young New-
Zealanders are described, indeed, by all who
have had an opportunity of observing them, as
displaying great readiness and ingenuity. When
the Active made her appearance at the Bay of
Islands, the children of the neighbourhood fitted
up a mimic ship in wicker work, in which the
bowsprit, the two masts, and the different ropes
of their model, were all carefully copied.
246 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

Among their acquirements, Mr. Kendall's pupils
soon learned from the children of the settlers to
spin tops, to fly kites, and other amusements of
English schoolboys.

To complete the picture of this singular
seminary, we may mention the names of the
pupils, all of which are descriptive ; and they
are in some degree illustrative of the origin of
names generally. One is a word which signi-
fies first year, or born the first year after mar-
riage ; another means, born ten years after the
eldest son. A third child was called Atowha,
after the name of a tree. Others had their
names from their tempers; one being designated
Atooma, to look a person sternly in the face;
another Akahe, to stamp with the foot ; another
Aweddee, to tremble with rage ; and one little
fellow was named Pakekooda, which means, to
dig fern-root out of red soil, because his grand-
father had been killed while so employed.

To this, as another illustration of native man-
ners, we may add the account which is given
in a letter from Mrs. Williams, the wife of one
of the missionaries, of her native household
servants :—

“The best of the native girls,” writes Mrs.
Williams, “if not well watched, would strain
the milk with the duster, wash the tea things
with the knife cloth, or wipe the tables with the
flannel for scouring the floor. The very best
of them also will, on a hot day, take herself
off, just when you may be wishing for some
‘ e to relieve you, and swim ; after which she
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 247

will go to sleep for two or three hours. If
they are not in a humour to do any thing that
you tell them, they will not understand you ; it
is by no means uncommon to receive such an
answer as, ‘ What care I for that!” The moment
a boat arrives, away run all the native servants—
men, boys, and girls—to the beach. If there
is any thing to be seen, or any thing extraordi-
nary occurs, in New-Zealand, the mistress must
do the work while the servants gaze abroad ;
she must not censure them; for if they are
‘rangatiras,’ they will run away in a pet; and
if they are ‘ cookies,’ they will laugh at her,
and tell her that she has ‘too much of the
mouth ;’ having been forewarned of this, I wait,
and work away, till they choose to come back,
which they generally do at meal time.”

CHAPTER XVI.

Contrasts between savage and civilized life—Modes of
civilization—Conquest—Gradual progress of civilization—
Early opinion on the mode by which the New-Zealanders
could be civilized—Efforts of the last twenty years—Mis-
sions.

Speaxine of the notion of civilizing the
New-Zealanders, “that is a thing,” says
Rutherford in his narrative, “which I think
is past the heart (or, as he probably means,
the art) of man to accomplish:” and this, it
must be confessed, was no unnatural conclusion
for one who, not much acquainted with the his-
248 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

tory of mankind, nor accustomed to philosophi-
cal speculation, merely remembered, in all pro-
bability, when he thought of civilized life, the
present condition of England, and contrasted in
his mind the character and mannets of his own
countrymen,—the accommodations of all kinds
with which they are provided, and their gene-
ral way of life—with the rudeness, the desti-
tution, the ignorance, the ferocity, and the other
elements of the degradation and wretchedness
of the savages among whom he then was. A
highly civilized has in almost all respects so
different an aspect from a barbarous community,
that, to a person merely looking first to the one
and then to the other, without taking the pains
to consider the matter farther, it may indeed
very well seem that they exhibit, not so much
two different forms of society, as two entirely
distinct species of human beings. Almost every
thing that seems to constitute social life in the
one state of things, is wanting in the other.
There does not exist any thing deserving the
name of a regular government; authority is
felt only in its exactions and aggressions ; its
protection is almost unknown. Instead of equal
laws, the only fence drawn around the posses-
sions, the liberties, and the lives of individuals,
consists of a loose and irregular heap of old
customs, to be sought for in the doubtful mists
of tradition; and the general character of which,
after all, is not so much to defend the weak as
to maintain and augment the power, and to give
additional facilities to the tyranny, of the strong.
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 249

Every thing is the dictatorship either of brute
force exerted directly and openly, or of certain
antique forms and maxims which are too often
merely its disguised but most effective auxilia-
ries. Worst of all, even what of fairness and
justice may be inherent in these old usages, is
disregarded whenever they offer any restrictions
upon power and oppression. Hence the almost
entire extinction of individual liberty, in so far
as the mass of the people are concerned. And
even the higher ranks and the chiefs, nominally
independent as they are, are actually so only so
long as each can protect himself. The govern-
ment throws no shield over him. Thus Mr.
Nicholas states, that after Duaterra returned
home with the different articles of property he
had obtained at Port Jackson; he never used to
venture abroad without being armed. One day
some of his people came to tell him that his cow
had calved, on which he immediately set out to
see the increase of his wealth; but although he
had to walk only a few hundred yards, he did
not venture on the journey without first sticking
a pistol in his breast and taking a bill-hook in
his hand. On being asked the reason of all
this precaution, he replied that since he had be-
come possessed of so much property, he was
no longer sure of his life for a moment; and
therefore he made a rule never to stir without
having his defensive weapons about him. On
another occasion, we find him actually attacked
by a brother chief, whose object apparently was
nothing else than to murder him, in order to get
250 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

possession of part of his much envied wealth ;
and had the man succeeded in this attempt, he
certainly would have had very little reason to
concern himself about any punishment with
which the laws of the country would have
threatened him. In this way, too, Moyhanger,
as has been already mentioned, had, there was
every reason to believe, been very soon plun-
dered of the riches he brought back with him
from England. Shungie, on the other hand,
succeeded in retaining possession of his import-
ed treasures; but he attacked and despoiled
every body else. In such a state of society, in
short, every man is either a robber, or the vic-
tim of robbery: it is a scene of universal vio-
lence and depredation. Yet this is what some
writers call the reign of absolute liberty. It is
the absolute liberty of the strong to tyrannize as
they choose over the weak—which is exactly
the definition of an absolute despotism.
Without protective institutions, such a coun-
try is also without all those things which are
calculated to flourish under their protection. No
arts or manufactures, or next to none—no ge-
neral distribution of the people into trades or
professions—no diffused appearance of regular
industry—no commerce, domestic or foreign—
no coin or other circulating medium,—these are
a few of the more conspicuous deficiencies that
must strike even the most ignorant observer of
savage life who has been accustomed to another
condition of society. They will force them-
selves upon his attention, in fact, as he looks
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 251

even upon the landscape around him. The
country is nearly a wilderness,—all swamp or
woodland, except a few scattered patches by
the seaside, or along the courses of the rivers ;
the only cultivation to be seen is in the heart,
or the immediate vicinity, of the villages; and
these (how unlike the populous cities and towns
of a civilized country, with their streets of pa-
laces, and intermingled spires, and towers, and
domes !) are merely small groups of hovels that
dot the earth like so many mole-hills, each a
shelter from the weather, only one remove from
the caverns of the Troglodytes. ‘Then there are
no roads, those primary essentials of all improve-
ment; and, it is needless to add, no artificial
means of conveyance from one place to another.
To make a journey of any length is an enter-
prise of labour and peril, which can only be ac-
complished by the union and co-operation of a
band of travellers. ‘There is not an inn through-
out the land~—nor a bridge—nor a direction
post—nor a milestone. The inhabitants, in
fact, have not, in any sense of the word, taken
possession of the country which they call their
own. It is still the uninvaded domain of na-
ture; and they are merely a handful of strag-
glers, who wander about its outskirts.

Their appearance, too, and all their more
strictly personal accommodations, distinguish
them almost as much from the people of a civil-
ized country as if they were another species.
‘There is a wild unsettledness in the very ex-
pression of their countenances, that assimilates
2523 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

them to a troop of animals of prey. Then they
have probably a profusion of fantastic and un-
natural decorations painted or engraven upon
their persons ; while clusters of baubles dangle
around them ; and coloured earth, grease, filth,
and vermin, combine to complete the extraor-
dinary spectacle. Their food is coarse; and
their cookery rude to a degree that almost takes
from it the right to be called by the same name
with the art which, in a civilized country,
heightens the enjoyment of the poorest man’s
meal with so considerable a variety of prepa-
rations. Their furniture is equally scanty and
penurious. Often they have neither tables nor
chairs ; their beds are generally the floor; and
their covering for the night the same mats
which serve them as clothes during the day.
If we look beyond these mere outside ap-
pearances, the difference between the two con-
ditions of society is still more remarkable. Ig-
norant of nearly all the useful arts, the savage
has seldom made any progress worth naming
in those that minister to the gratification of taste
or luxury: a simple style of ballad poetry, a
limited and generally rather monotonous music,
some skill in carving ornaments in wood,—
such is usually the short catalogue of his attain-
ments in this department. The want of mate-
rials, or of command over them, necessarily
prevents him from attempting any thing that
can be denominated architecture ; and painting
also demands materials, and a degree of science,
which he has no means of attaining. Whatever
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 253

arts he practises at all must be such as the hand
alone can execute, with the aid of the most im-
perfect tools: for he is seldom or ever pos-
sessed of iron, by which man has chiefly con-
quered the physical world ; and he is almost
always entirely ignorant of machinery. But
his especia! distinction, and that which more
than any thing else keeps him a savage, is his
ignorance of letters. This places the commu
nity almost in the same situation with a herd of
the lower animals, in so far as the accumulation
of knowledge, or, in other words, any kind of
movement forward is concerned ; for it is only
by means of the art-of writing that the know-
ledge acquired by the experience of one gene-
ration can be properly stored up, so that none
of it shall be lost, for the use of all that are
to follow. Among savages, for want of this
admirable method of preservation, there is rea-
son to believe the fund of knowledge possessed
by the community, instead of growing, generally
diminishes with time. If we except the abso-
lutely necessary arts of life, which are in daily
use, and cannot be forgotten, the existing gene-
ration seldom seem to possess any thing de-
rived from the past. Hence the oldest man of
the tribe is always looked up to as the wisest,
simply because he has lived longest, it being
felt that an individual has scarcely a chance of
knowing any thing more than his own experi-
ence has taught him. Accordingly the New-
Zealanders, for example, seem to have been in
quite as advanced a state when Tasman dis-
254 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

covered the country in 1642, as they were
when Cook visited it, a hundred and twenty-
seven years after.

But, without regarding what letters have
done for such a country as England, let any
one merely reflect what this great possession
is to us in the actual enjoyment—how much,
of all that makes civilized life what it is, we
derive immediately from its presence. To all
classes among us it may be said that the ac-
commodations we owe to reading and writing
rank next to food and clothing. What would
religion itself be, in the aspect which it pre-
sents to the understandings of the people, if
dissociated from books ;—and without book
learning, how should we conduct the great bu-
siness of education, the first temporal concern,
after the mere procuring of sustenance, of every
family in the land. It certainly is not neces-
sary or desirable that education should be wholly
an affair of books ; but instruction through that
medium must ever form the prominent part of
it. Add to this, that much of the knowledge
necessary for even the most common handicraft
is best sought for in books ;—that all descrip-
tions of artisans are every day feeling, more
and more, the necessity of resorting to them
for the practical science which they require in
their several occupations ;—and that, generally
speaking, of the more profound theoretical learn-
ing which must be possessed by the directing
minds in every department, books are the only
fountains. Whatever, indeed, exists among us
THE NEW-ZEALANDERB. 24

13 a science, owes that character to its alliance
with letters. Without that. our medicine would
be a medley of empiricism and superstition ;—
our laws would be, at best, merely a few gene-
ral maxims, almost useless for the extended
relations of a state of society like ours. With-
out the arts of reading and writing, the system
of our commerce could no more go on than
could the solar system if the principle of gra-
vitation were to be suddenly annihilated. The
same thing is true of the complicated machinery
of our civil polity, the universal motion of which
would stop like a run-down watch, if the use of
letters were tobe taken fromus. Whata blank,
too, would such a catastrophe create in the
religious world! Public worship could scarcely
be conducted, at least not with that facility and
satisfaction as it now is. ‘The reading of the
Holy Scriptures, and of those sacred effusions in
our hymn-beoks which are now the means of
kindling and sustaining our devotions, must be dis-
pensed with, and more than half of the sources of
information on different subjects would be dried
up. There would be no newspapers, no arrivals
by the post; the diffusion of intelligence would
cease, or be carried on laboriously, slowly, and
imperfectly by oral messages. Finally, an entire
world, that of the press, would disappear from
the system of the national industry; and its
productions, that have given occupation to so
many heads and hands, and are now to be found
on every table, would be no longer seen.

From this rapid sketch we may perceive how

17
256 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

little there really is which the aspect of society
among savages has in common with that
which exists in a civilized country. It is no
wonder, therefore, that the distance between
the one state of things and the other should
strike a man like Rutherford as altogether im-
passable.

Nevertheless, the known history of mankind
will not allow us to entertain a doubt that even
the New-Zealanders are perfectly capable of
being civilized. Ferocious as they are, they
are probably not more so than our own ances-
tors in this very island were at one time. With
all their savage propensities they are evidently
possessed of many high qualities, both moral
and intellectual. ‘They are far from being,
even now, as they have often been described
to be, in the lowest known state of barbarism.
The natives of New-Holland, for example, are
a great decal more ignorant, destitute, and
wretched—so much so, that we ourselves can
scarcely feel that we are farther elevated above
the New-Zealanders than the latter are in their
own opinion above these their miserable neigh-
bours. When Mr. Nicholas returned to Port
Jackson, the vessel, before reaching that settle-
ment, touched at another part of the Australiag
continent, where, on landing, they perceived
two of the natives at a little distance. Having
been induced by signs to make their approach,
these poor creatures were conducted to some
of the New-Zealanders who made the voyage
in the English ship. The latter were arrayed
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 257

in their war mats, and armed; the former were
perfectly naked; and even in respcct of exter-
nal appearance, therefore, the contrast between
the two parties was sufficiently striking. But
in regard to demeanour, it was still more so.
The New-Hollanders stood trembling in every
joint, while their fellow-suvages gazed on them
with looks of surprise and compassion,—and
with a considerate kindness which would have
done credit to any degree of culture or reéfine-
ment, and which the natives of civilized coun-
tries are very far from having always practised
in similar circumstances, did every thing in
their power to win their confidence and induce
them to lay aside their terror. First they at-
tempted to rub noses with them, but seeing that
this mode of salutation was not understood, they
then took them by the hand. After this they
danced and sang to them, till their kind inten-
tions were felt and acknowledged by the New-
Hollanders, who exclaimed at length, in their
own jargon, ‘“ Very good you, very good you,”
although they still continued shaking with alarm.
The New-Zealanders, in short, showed on this
occasion quite as much interest as any of the
Europeans on board about the condition of these
poor people, who were examples of a barbarism
evidently many shades deeper than their own ;
and after they had left them, “they eagerly in-
quired,” continues Mr. Nicholas, “ whether
they cultivated the coomera or potato, and if
they had plenty of pigs; and being told that
they were too idle to work, and had not a single
258 THE NEW-ZEALANDERS.

pig in the world, they expressed both pity and
contempt at their wretched mode of living.”
Different views have been entertained as to
the manner in which the civilization of savages
may be best effected. Some writers, deducing
their conclusions from what they hold to be the
history of several of the more remarkable in-
stances of the transformation of barbarous into
civilized countries, have been disposed to con-
tend that the only, or at least the surest and
speediest method of bringing about this me-
tamorphosis, is by the direct application of
force. Despotic power, they contend, is the
only principle that can be effectually applied to
the abolition of those habits and customs which
have a tendency to perpetuate the degradation
of the people, and to the introduction of the
new form which it is desired their social con-
dition should assume. The late able and ex-
cellent Sir Stamford Raffles, we observe, from
the memoir of his life which has recently ap-
peared, was an advocate for this employment
by civilized nations, of the superior power with
which they are armed, in their intercourse
with savages. Undoubtedly the inhabitants of
some parts of the earth have been thus civilized
by compulsion, and a permanent renovation of
their condition introduced by conquest and vio-
lence. But it may, perhaps, be questioned if
this process has had, in the history of the
world, that very general success which has
heen sometimes ascribed to it. Whatever may
have been the effect of some of those early in-
THE NEW-ZEALANDERS. 259

vasions of one country by the people of another
which took place before the birth of history, the
conquests of the Romans, for example, do not
appear to have been usually directed in the
manner which this theory would recommend.
When that great military people added to their
empire the territories of a new vassal tribe, their
custom does not seem to have been to attempt
the extinction of the old usages of the inha-
bitants by any positive prohibition of their ob-
servance, or the diffusion over the country by
systematic measures of their own arts, religion,
or language. If this result was, in most cases,
to a certain extent, produced, it was so rather
through the natural operation of superior skill
and intelligence, working their own way against
rudeness and ignorance, than by the imstru-
mentality of any regular plan which was adopt-
ed for bringing it about,—much less by any ap-
plication of force for that end. ‘The conquerors,
it is true, erected their forts and cities on the
vanquished soil, and within these military strong-
holds re-established the manners and occupa-
tions of their native land ; thus exhibiting to the
contemplation of the surrounding barbarians a
standard and pattern of comfort and elegance
which they could hardly fail first to admire,
and afterward to imitate. But beyond these
stations the country was in general allowed to
remain untouched; and the people, in so far as
their peculiar customs were concerned, were
unannoyed. All that was required of th