Citation
Recollections of my childhood

Material Information

Title:
Recollections of my childhood and other stories
Creator:
Greenwood, Grace, 1823-1904
Billings, Hammatt, 1818-1874 ( Illustrator )
Baker, William Jay ( Engraver )
Ticknor, Reed, and Fields ( Publisher )
Hobart and Robbins ( Stereotyper )
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publisher:
Ticknor, Reed, and Fields
Manufacturer:
Stereotyped by Hobart & Robbins
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1851
Language:
English
Physical Description:
144 p., <5> leaves of plates : ill. ; 16 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Girls -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Also published under title: Stories of my childhood.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by W.J. Baker.
Statement of Responsibility:
By Grace Greenwood <pseud.> ; with engravings from designs by Billings.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA2505 ( LTQF )
ALH1201 ( NOTIS )
04175839 ( OCLC )
026795102 ( AlephBibNum )
07015869 ( LCCN )

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RECOLLECTIONS

OF

MY CHILDHOOD,

OTHER STORIES.

BY

GRACE GREENWOOD,

acrnor of “wisTORY OF MY PETS.”

WITH ENGRAVINGS FROM DESIGNS BY BILLINGS,

BOSTON:
TICKNOR, REED, AND FIELDS.

M DCCC LI.



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, by
Sarna J. CLARKE,
In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.
â„¢~

Stereotypedt by
HOBART & ROBBINS,
BOSTON.



Dedication.

YO THE COUSINS,
UNA AND JULIAN HAWTHORNE,

HORACE AND GEORGE MANN,
T AM FROUD AND HAPPY TO DEDICATE THIS VOLUME,

GRACE GREENWOOD.







CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE OLD CIHAIR-MENDER AND HIS GRAND-DAUGHTER ]

THE TORN FROCK,—A LITTLE STORY FOR LITTLE

GIRLS : : ; ‘ ; ‘ 14

a

THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE : : . 2B
DENNIS 0’BRIEN : : ; ; F 34.
STRAWBERRYING . : ‘ ; . 45
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY . ; 55
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE CITY ., ; —
THE AUNT FROM THE WEST | ‘ . 80
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL ‘ ‘ . 91

THE HERMIT . ; . . f ‘ 107
EFFIE GREY’S SLEEP-WALKING ; ; . 109
LIZZIE IN THE MILL ., ; . P ‘ 119

JACK AND HIS JACK-0’LANTERNS = ; . 181



PREFACKH.

TO THE MOTHERS OF THE CHILDREN INTO WHOSE
HANDS THIS BOOK MAY FALL.

My FRIENDS :—

Many times, while writing this little volume of
stories, I have seemed to feel your eyes upon me,
in a look so serious, so searching, that my heart
almost quailed under it. I have felt, more deeply
than I can tell, that I was to be judged not alone
by literary umpires, by professional critics, fut
by the unbiased reason, the quick conscience, the
jealous watchfulness, the wondrous instincts, of
your maternal hearts.

As a practical florist would watch keenly, if
not distrustfully, a young gardener, in his first
essays at binding up rose-trees, watering and prop-
ping lilies, and training tender, young vines, — so,
but with infinitely deeper anxieties, must you
regard one like me, a stranger in your conserva-



VI PREFACE.

tory of fair soul-flowers, newly blossomed out of
the great life of God, seeking to stay with some
rude support the luxuriant growth and affluent
flowering of childish affections, to nourish the pure
white bloom of earliest thought, to train those beau-
tiful vine-like instincts of faith and holiness which,
even undirected, creep blindly toward heaven. As
Eve learned horticulture of the angels in Eden, so,
in the life of maternal love, have you been divinely
taught to rear your plants of immortality. Yet do
not distrust one who but seeks, as a subordinate, to
aid you in your labors. She may go about her
work with “a ’prentice hand,” all too unskilful,
but, surely, neither rash nor ungentle. |
Aside from the dear love I bear them, I have a
venuine reverence for children, —for that open-
browed innocence, that simple trust, that utter
unworldliness, which once drew them into the arms
of Jesus, and called from his lips that blessing
which is the seal of his divinity to the heart of a
mother. I look upon a joyous group of children,
not envying them their careless happiness, with the
sad retrospective feeling which murmurs, ‘I, too,
dwelt in Arcadia ; ”—but, regarding their purity,



PREFACE. Vil

I say, with a sort of grateful pride, “‘ Have I not
been as one of these? Did I not also inherit the
blessing ?”’

I have faith to believe that this book will speak
to the hearts of children, because, in writing it, I
truly lived again the life of my childhood; my
heart was dismayed anew at its little dangers, and
thrilled by its little joys; it bled again with its
sharp little sorrows, where the later, deeper wounds
of womanhood were healed forever.

It may be I have written too much as a child,—
too impulsively and inconsiderately. You may think
the mirth of some portions of the book rather too
free and wild. I can only reply that my humor is
not under my control; it: plays “fantastic tricks’?
on its own responsibility, in defiance of good sober
sense and the nice rules of propriety.

For the homely democratic sentiments scattered
through the volume I make no apology; I will
stand by them at all times. The religious senti-
ments are alike those of my reason and my heart.
[ have sought to point my readers to a heaven of
_ peace and brightness, not of storm and gloom; to
inculcate a belief which may bring comfort and joy



Vill PREFACE.

to their young spirits, not awe and terror;—a
faith as bright, as free, as clear, as cheerful, as the
skies, the birds, the waters and the flowers, of my
own remembered childhood.

In regard to the language employed, I have not
been conscious of striving after simplicity. I have
been a good deal influenced. by the advice of a little
girl, who, on hearing that a lady was writing 4
juvenile work, said, ‘‘ Do, papa, tell her not to talk
to the children more childishly than they ever talk
themselves.”

And now, dear friends, let me say I do not even
hope that you will pronounce my story-book fault-
less ; but, if you will only admit that it is harm-
less, — that it will do some little good,—if you
will believe I have meant well, I shall be quite
content. G. G.







RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD,

THE OLD CHATR-MENDER AND HIS
GRAND-DAUGHTER.

Pernaps some of my little readers have
seen in the country chairs bottomed with
thin strips of wood, or woven bark. These
make very easy seats, but do not last a
great while. We had such chairs in our
kitchen, and about once a year they needed
repairing. There was an old man, by the
name of Richards, who used to do this
work for us. I remember him now, as
_ plainly as though I had seen him only yes-
terday. He was a little fat man, between
sixty and seventy years of age, with a
good-natured, rosy face, and hair as white
as snow, which was very thick, and hung
down on his shoulders. He generally wore

1



9 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

a suit of coarse cloth, called ‘‘sheep’s
gray,” and a brown felt hat, with a round
crown and a wide brim. He always came
in a little unpainted wagon, drawn by a
sorel one-eyed pony, in a home-made
harness of light leather, with rope reins.
I remember that this pony, whose name
was ‘* Dolly,’’ had once a little colt, which,
not being as sober-mannered and lazy as ~
herself, gave her more trouble than pleasure.
He seemed remarkably cunning, and would
often. get on the blind side of his mother,
and keep as quiet as a mouse, while the
poor creature was whinnying for him, in
great distress.

Mr. Richards lived in a small log house,
a few miles east of us, with the only near
relative he had in the world,—a little
grand-daughter, named Amy, who, from
the age of ten years, when her mother
died, was her grandfather’s housekeeper.

Amy Ellis was one of the best, as she
was one of the prettiest girls in the coun-
try, far and wide. People called her ‘a



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 3
perfect little woman,’’ she was so active,
so steady and industrious. She was strong,
healthy and happy, and really could do more
work in a day than many a full-grown
woman, and with less fuss. She was not
tall, but rather stout, like her grandfather ;
her hands were hardened by work, and her
feet somewhat spread by going without
shoes in the summer time ; but she had a
clear brown complexion, rosy cheeks, and
very handsome hazel eyes. Her frocks
and aprons, though plain, and cut in rather
an old-womanly way, were always neat and
whole, and her grandfather’s clothes were
kept earefully brushed and mended.

I can see now that Amy was a very won-
derful child; but I own that there was a
time when I grew tired of her very name,
from hearing her praised so much, and held
up as a model for me to imitate.

Amy had a good deal of taste. I remem-
ber that she used to train up ivy-vines and
rose-bushes against her grandfather’s house,
till you could scarcely see the logs. She



- :
4 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

was very fond of her old grandfather, and
he of her. It was pleasant to see them
working in the field and garden together,
or walking to church, or sitting of a Sunday
evening in the burial-ground, on the rough
bench, by the graves of old Mrs. Richards
and Amy’s father and mother. They were
too poor to put up head-stones; but they
had placed boards, with nicely painted
inscriptions, there, and had planted the
sweet-brier and violets in great abundance.

IT remember the last chair which Mr.
Richards mended for us, and how it was
broken. There was a certain old soldier, a
very stout man, who was in the hahit of
calling at our house and asking for cider.
He grew rather troublesome, at last, and my
mother resolved to give him no more, as he
was suspected of drinking too much,—
though, for that matter, any cider is too
much. But, one hot summer day, he came
in, and asked for a drink. My mother
looked at him, saw that he had not been
drinking, and that he was very tired. So



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 5

she went for the cider herself, calling to
my brother William to hand the gentleman
a chair. Will was very mischievous, and
so brought forward an old arm-chair, the
bottom of which was broken in several
places. Of course, Mr. More, tired as he
was, came down so heavily that all gave way
under him, and when he rose the chair rose
with him. My mother returned in time to
reprove my brother for his ‘‘ carelessness,”
as she called it. I wish I could believe it
was carelessness, and no trick. She then
handed a brimming tumbler to our neigh-
bor; he drank one great swallow, then
made up a dreadful face, set down the glass,
and hurried angrily out of the house. My
mother, much astonished, tasted of that
which was left in the pitcher, and found
that it was vinegar. What a laugh we
children had at her ‘‘ carelessness”?! But
old Mr. More never again called at our
house for cider.

Mr. Richards happened along in a day or
two, and wove a new bottom for the chair.



6 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

That time he brought with him his grand-
daughter, who was then between eleven
and twelve years old. My sister and I,
‘wishing to amuse her, showed her our dolls ;
but she said, ‘‘ How can you waste so
many pretty pieces of calico in these little
frocks and aprons? I would sew them
together, and put them into a bed-quilt.”’

We took her to see our pretty pet pig,
** Nuggie,”’ who lived in a little house by
himself, and was washed every day; and
after looking at him a minute, she said,
** Do you mean to keep such a nice fat pig
as that? If he were mine, 1’d have him
killed, and roast him,’’

I thought this was very cruel of Amy,
for our Nuggie was no common pig; he
was civilized and good-mannered, and we
had taught him a great many cunning tricks.
I afterwards asked my mother if it was not
a hard-hearted remark; but she replied that
Amy looked more to the useful than the
ornamental. Poor Nuggie died that very



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 7

summer, of cholera-morbus, from my over-
feeding him with green apples.

Amy seemed most pleased with our ducks
and a pair of twin calves, which, she said,
were nearly as thriving as her own; but
she soon went into the house, took out her
knitting, and sat down near her grand-
father. My mother was making some pastry
in the kitchen, and Mr. Richards was con-
versing with her. J remember that he was
talking of a neighbor of ours, .who, he
said, was well enough off, but who. had sold
out, ‘* pulled up stakes,’’ and started for
the far-away State of Ohio, in hopes of
making his fortune. He said, ‘* As for me,
I have Jarned ‘in whatsoever state I am,
therewith to be content,’ and all I want,
here below, is food and raiment, and mid-
dling good clothing, and three meals of
victuals a day.”’

‘* Why, grandfather,’’ said Amy, ‘‘ does
anybody ask more than that ?”’

‘¢ Yes, child,’” he answered ; ‘* some folks

take a notion that they must be rich or



8 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

great. I had a brother that never would
give up peddling till he was worth a thou-
sand dollars; and my father, your great-
grandfather, was a Justice of the Peace ;
but I don’t think he was ever the happier
for his greatness. I rather think that it
shortened his life, though he was a-most
eighty when he died.”’

My mother invited Amy to stay with us
that night and the next day; but she
answered, ‘* I thank you,— I cannot possibly
stay, for to-morrow is my baking-day.”’

When she was going, we children offered
to lend her some of our story-books. She
looked at them as though she longed to take
them ; then shook her head, and said to my
mother, ‘‘ I have no time to read such things
as these ; but, if you could lend me a good
cookery-book, I should be very glad.”’

The very autumn after the visit I have
described, Mr. Richards was taken down
with a fever. The neighbors kindly offered
assistance, and did all they could for him ;
but he liked best to be tended by Amy, and



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 9

she wished to do all the nursing for him.
One afternoon, when he seemed somewhat
better, and nobody, not even the doctor,
thought him dangerously ill, it happened
that Amy was alone with him. As she sat
by his bedside, he stretched out his thin
hand and laid it on her head, saying, in a
faint voice, ‘‘ Poor Amy, I am sorry to
leave you; you have been a good child to
me. Keep a good girl, love God, and He ’Il
take care of you. You mustn’t live here
all alone when I am gone; but you’ll see
that somebody takes care of old Dolly.”’

‘‘ Why, grandfather,’ said Amy, ‘*‘ you
will live to take care of her yourself.’’

Mr. Richards was silent a moment; then
he asked,

‘* Ts there room between your mother and
your grandmother for me? ‘They ’ll have
to take up the sweet-brier ; but, if it dies,
maybe youll plant another over your poor
old grand’ ther.”’

‘©Q, grandfather,’ cried Amy, ‘‘ don’t



10 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

talk so,— don’t! You will live a great many
years yet, won’t you, dear grandfather ? ”’

“Well Amy, I’ll try,” he said; ‘* and
now I think I will sleep a little.”’

He turned his face toward the wall, and
lay very quiet. Amy sat by him more than
an hour ; then she went out softly and made
him some nice broth. When she came in
with this, she thought that he had slept long
enough ; so, laying her hand lightly on his
shoulder, she said, ‘‘ Come, grandfather,
wake up and take your broth before it gets
cold!’’ But he did not wake. She stooped
over him, and when she saw his face, she
started with fear; it was so white, and the
eyes were so sunken. She laid her hand
on his forehead, and it was quite cold. Her
grandfather was dead!

Then Amy flung herself down beside
him, wound her arms about his neck, and
cried aloud.

It happened that a stranger gentleman
and his wife were at that moment passing
the house in a travelling carriage, and hear-



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 11

ing the mournful cries of the poor girl,
they alighted and came in. The first that
Amy knew, she was lifted gently up from
the bed, and when she looked round she
saw a lady in deep mourning, who held her
in her arms, and was striving to comfort
her. She had never seen the sweet face
of that lady before ; but she loved her at
once, and clung to her as though she were
her own mother.

The strangers, Mr. and Mrs. Temple, had
a little while before lost their only child, a
daughter, about the age of Amy ; and after
hearing Amy’s sad story, and seeing her
lonely condition, they resolved to befriend
her. They stayed in the village near by
till after the funeral of Mr. Richards, wait-
ing to take his grand-daughter home with
them.

When Mr. Temple had led the weeping
Amy out of the little log house, so many
years her dear home, and handed her into
his carriage, he was heard to tell the driver
to drive rather slowly, so as not to hurry too

ie



12 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

much lazy old Dolly, who was fastened
behind.

Mr. and Mrs. Temple soon grew to loving
Amy very much, and finally adopted her as
their own daughter. They were wealthy,
and thinking that she should have a fine
education, they concluded to send her toa
fashionable boarding-school. But, though
Amy was clever, and proved to be a diligent
scholar, she was neither happy nor healthy
there. She grew so pale and languid, at
last, that her friends took her home, and
began to nurse her, and give her medicine.
But, one morning, Mrs. Temple missed her
from the sick room. She searched through
the house, and at length found her in
the kitchen, busy at the ironing-table. Then
it was agreed upon that Amy should do
some house-work every day, and study at
home ; and, I assure you, it was not long
before she was in fine health and spirits.

Amy is a woman now, and has a house
of her own to manage. She married a lit-
erary man— a poet, and a writer of stories.



THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 13

I have heard it said that she took him
instead of any one of her wealthy lovers,
because she knew that, as his wife, she
should not be obliged to play the fine lady,
but would always have plenty of good hard,
work to do.



THE TORN FROCK.—A LITTLE STORY FOR
LITTLE GIRLS.

I was the most unlucky child in the world
in respect to my clothes. My frocks and
aprons never kept whole, like those of other
little girls, but somehow went to pieces
before I knew it. If there was a brier in
my path, it was sure to fasten itself to my
pantalet, and tear the trimming off. If
a nail protruded from a box, I was sure to
come in contact with it, and find it was too
much for me. Ifa rail had an ugly splinter,
I was sure to undertake to get over the
fence in that very place ; and if there was
a thorn-bush on my way from school, just
as I was under full speed, my skirts were
sure to be blown against it, and awful con-
sequences to follow.

Some people said that these sad acci-
dents happened to my clothes because I



THE TORN FROCK. 15

never was slow or thoughtful, but did every-
thing with a hop, skip, and jump. But I
knew it was duck. I was born to have my
frocks torn. My mother sometimes talked
of dressing me in stout brown linen ; but it
would have been of no use. I don’t think
I should have been safe in a canvas frock
and cassimere pantalets.

When I was between seven and eight
years of age, my mother went away from
home, to spend some months, and left us
children under the care of a housekeeper. I
suppose that the widow Wilkins was a very
respectable, well-meaning woman ; she kept
the house neatly, sent us regularly to school,
and gave us enough to eat; but I do think
she was rather too hard on me for tearing my
clothes. She didn’t seem to believe in it
being all ill luck. Sometimes I would steal
slyly into the house, about dusk, with a
rent in my frock carefully pinned up, hoping
it would escape her notice ; but she never
failed to spy it out, and to be down upon
me at once. You would have thought that



16 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY «CHILDHOOD.

she mistook me for her bottle of bitters,
labelled, ‘‘ When taken, to be well shaken,”
she exercised me in such a remarkable man-
ner ; then she would settle me in my chair,
as though she meant that I never should
rise again on any occasion. But I did not
care so much for these things as I did for
her talk. Such long lectures as she would
give me on my carelessness; such awful
warning of the poverty and want I was
bringing on myself; such dreadful stories
she would tell of the melancholy end of
little girls who kept on “‘ slitting up ”’ their
frocks and rending their pinafores !

In late years, I have heard women speak
in public — lecture and preach, sometimes
talking very fast, and often quite loud and
brave ; but, even now, as I look back, I
think the widow Wilkins was a wonderful
woman with her tongue.

I did not improve under her severe
rule. Iam sorry to say that I rather grew
worse ; for now, when I was not careless



“

,

+

THE TORN FROCK. 17

I was awkward, from fear of her, and
blundered into tearing my clothes.

At last, our mother came home. How
well I remember that morning! She
arrived early, came to our beds, and waked
us with her kisses. I remember how she
laughed at our youngest, Albert, who did
not know her at first, aid as he was very
bashful, hid under the bed-clothes, and
when she caught him and pulled him out,
said, joyfully, ‘*O, it’s you, mamma! I
thought ’t was a lady.”’

I remember that she brought the little
fellow some toys, the like of which were
never seen in our part of the country.
There was a wee man, called ‘‘ Merry
Andrew,’’ with a mouth on the broad grin,
and you had only to pull a string to make
him fling out his legs and throw up his arms
in a surprising manner. There was a cob-
bler always mending a shoe that was never

idone, and a pasteboard cuckoo, which, with

“alittle squeezing, would send forth a sound
which we were so polite as to call singing.
2



18 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

This my little brother’ smashed the next
day, to see what made the noise. But, most
wonderful of all, was a village, the little
white block-houses all standing in rows on
a green board, and with little figures of men
and women which you could move about.
There was a meeting-house, with a sharp
steeple ; and when all was rightly fixed, a
minister, with a very long face, was just
going into the door, and the people were
following him. But Albert turned this
minister round, moved him across the street,
and made him going into the tavern-door,
which we told him was very wrong.

My sister Carrie and myself received each
a pretty black-eyed doll, all dressed, and a
new frock. Such splendid fine-lady dolls
we had never before seen. Why, they
actually had knee-joints and elbow-joints,
and red Morocco shoes! Our frocks were
of fine buff lawn, figured with the tiniest
white rose-budsin the world ; and our mother
made them in some wonderful new fashion,



THE TORN FROCK. 19

which almost threw us into convulsions of
delight.

There was in a distant part of the yard,
surrounding our house, an old apple-tree,
among the lower branches of which I had a
favorite seat, which I used to reach by the
help of a board, leaned against the trunk
of the tree. Two or three crooked limbs
formed an easy seat, and one higher up
made a nice shelf for books and playthings.

I have heard that the great poetess, Mrs.
Hemans, when a little girl of seven, had such
a perch, where she read Shakspeare. I never
undertook such fine reading in my apple-
tree, but I read ‘‘ The Babes in the Wood’”’
and ‘* Goody Two-Shoes’”’ there, with great
pleasure ; and, though I was no genius,
I rather think I understood them quite
as well as she understood her grand old
Shakspeare. On my shelf, in pleasant
weather, I kept two rather plainly-dressed
cloth-dolls, called Polly and Betsy ; and to
these I went to complain when I had been
ill-used at school, or widow Wilkins’ scold-



20 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

ing had been more than I could bear. I
liked to talk to these two friends, they lis-
tened so respectfully, never interrupting or
contradieting me. I can’t say that they
comforted me, as I was obliged to say every-
thing for them ; but they never blamed me,
or in any way took sides against me.
When, for the first time, I was dressed
in my new buff lawn, and it had been
admired by all in the house, I felt that I
really must gtve Polly and Betsy a sight of
it; and soon I was up in my lofty seat,
spreading out my fine gown, and talking of
the color, the fit, the ruffles and tucks, in
two little admiring voices, which I made
believe came from the pink button-hole
mouths of Polly and Betsy. When they
had said all the pretty and strong words I
could think of, I very uncivilly forgot their
presence, took up my book, and began to
read. The day was sultry, I was tired ; the
story was am old one, and, at last, I fell
fast asleep. When I awoke, some time after
sunset, I found that one of my mischievous



THE TORN FROCK. 21

brothers had taken the board away from the
tree, and that I must get down as best I
could. I was too proud and independent
to call for help, though I knew the boys
must be somewhere near, but jumped at
once. As usual, I forgot to gather my
frock around me; and,as I leaped from my
perch, there came an awful sound!—a
sound I knew too well. As I rose from the
ground and looked about me, 1 found that
my beautiful new frock was torn half across
one breadth, in that hateful zigzag way
that my frocks were always tearing. Of
course, the first thing I did was to sit down
and have a good cry ; then I stole up tomy
chamber by the back stairs, took off my
buff lawn, folded it, laid it away in my
drawer, and put on an old gingham frock,
feeling that it was vastly too good-for me.
After a while, I went down to supper,
though I felt sure I could not swallow a
mouthful. As I took my seat at the table,
my brother Rufus looked up from his bowl
of bread and milk, and said, ‘‘ O ho! you’ve



22 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

come down, have you? I thought you had
gone to roost for the night.”’

I wished to make a clean breast of it, and
tell all to my mother, but did not dare, for
fear she would punish me, or give me what
widow Wilkins had taught me to dread a
thousand times more—a severe scolding.
That night, oh, how I longed to have some
kind fairy come, when I was fast asleep, and
nicely darn my torn frock! I thought, too,
that the wicked being, whose name I never
then dared to speak, and even now would
rather not mention,— that the evil one would
not be so very bad, after all, if he would go
about sewing tears for poor unlucky little
girls while they slept !

The next day, at noon, my mother said
that I need not go back to school, but might
go with her to spend the afternoon at a
neighbor’s house, a most pleasant place. I
knew that she would tell me to wear my
new buff lawn; so I answered, ‘*‘I would
rather go to school, if you please.” My
mother was surprised at this, but she praised



THE TORN FROCK. 23

me for being so fond of my books. How
ashamed I felt at her praises! That night,
she told me that she had invited some little
girls of the house where she had visited to
spend the next afternoon with me. In the
morning, I longed more than ever to tell
her all; I even began,—but the words
seemed to choke me, and I ran away to
school without having confessed. I knew
I should be required to put on the lawn;
and I lingered on the way home, and paused
a long time on the door-step, fearing to go
in, because then my secret must come out.
At last, I softly opened the door, and
stepped into the sitting-room. My mother sat
by the window, sewing. I went up to her
so quietly that she did not hear me. In her
lap lay my new buff frock, and she was
putting the last stitches into the nicest piece
of darning ever done in the world! I
started with both joy and alarm, and my
mother looked round with a smile, saying,
‘‘ Why, my little daughter is late to-day!”’
and that was all! I knelt down by her



24 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

side, hid my face in her lap, had a hearty
cry, and felt better. The girls soon came,
and we had a happy afternoon.

My mother said nothing about my frock
for days after,— not even to ask how I had
torn it. But her silent, forbearing kindness
did more to make me careful in future than
any punishment or scolding could have done.
Yet I still tore my frocks occasionally ; and,
even now, I sometimes tear my best dresses,
and expect to tear them, as long as I live.

When, a year or two after my apple-tree
adventure, I saw my sister Sophie cutting
up my out-grown buff lawn for a bed-
quilt, I begged a scrap containing that
nicely-darned rent, which I had always
thought the prettiest part of the frock, and
laid it carefully away among my little treas-
ures, where I kept it for many years, as
‘‘a specimen of my mother’s fine needle-
work,’’ I told others, but, in truth, as a
reminder of her patience and goodness
toward her careless and luckless child.










THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE.

One summer afternoon, when I was about
eight years of age, I was standing at an
eastern window, looking at a beautiful rain-
bow, that, bending from the sky, seemed to
be losing itself-in a thick, swampy wood,
about a quarter ofa mile distant. We had
_ just had a violent thunder-storm ; but now
the dark heavens: had cleared up, a fresh,
breeze was blowing from the south, the
rose-bushes by the window were dashing
rain-drops against the panes, the robins were
singing merrily from the cherry-trees, and
all was brighter and pleasanter than ever.
It happened that no one was in the room
with me, then, but my brother Rufus, who
was just recovering from a severe illness,
and who was sitting, propped up with pil-
lows, in an easy-chair, looking out, with me,
at the rainbow.



26 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

‘¢ See, brother,”’ I said, ‘it drops right
down among the cedars, where we go in
the spring to find winter-greens !”’

“Do you know, Gracie,” said my
brother, with a very serious face, ‘* that if
you should go to the end of the rainbow, you
would find there purses filled with money,
and great pots of gold and silver ?”’

“¢Ts it truly so?” I asked.

‘Truly so,’ answered my brother, with
a smile. Now, I was a simple-hearted child,
that believed everything that was told me, _
although I was again and again imposed
upon; so, without another word, I darted
out of the door, and set forth toward the
wood. My brother called after me as
loudly as he was able, but I did not heed
him. I cared nothing for the wet grass,
which was sadly drabbling my clean frock ;
on and on I ran; I was so sure that I knew
just where that rainbow ended. I remem-
ber how glad and proud I was in my
thoughts, and what fine presents I promised
to all my friends, out of my great riches.

=

@



THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE, 27

Father should have a pair of new gold- *
rimmed spectacles, and a silver tobacco-box.
Grandmother should have a gold snuff-box,
and silver knitting-needles. I would allow
my mother two or three purses of money,
but would reserve the right to lay it out
for her, in gayer dresses and caps than her
erave taste would allow her to purchase.
My eldest sister should have a white horse,
with the longest possible tail, and a crim-
son side-saddle, with a silver stirrup. To
my sister Carrie and myself I promised
rings, necklaces, breast-pins, silk dresses
and false curls, in great abundance. My
elder brothers should have watches, guns,
silver fish-hooks, and each a scarlet soldier-
coat, and a pair of green velvet pantaloons.
For Albert, the youngest, I would buy a
rocking-horse, that should whinny when he
should mount it, as his cuckoo had sung
when squeezed. Carlo should have a new
red Morocco collar, hung with silver bells ;
and I even resolved to furnish a silver ring
for the nose of my pet pig, Nuggie.



28 ‘RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

So thinking, and laying delightful plans,
almost before I knew it, I had reached the
cedar-grove, and the end of the rainbow
was not there! But I saw it shining down
among the trees a little further off; so on
and on I struggled, through the thick bushes
and over logs, till I came within the sound
of a stream which ran through the swamp.
Then I thought, ‘‘What if the rainbow
should come down right into the middle of
that deep, muddy brook!’’ Ah! but I was
frightened for my heavy pots of gold and
silver, and my purses of money. How
should I ever find them’ there? and what a
time I should have getting them out! I
reached the bank of the stream, and ‘‘ the
end was not yet.’’ But I could see it a
little way off, on the other side. I crossed
the creek on a fallen tree, and still ran on,
though my limbs seemed to give way, and
my side ached with fatigue. The woods
grew thicker and darker, the ground more
wet and swampy, and Ifound, as many grown
people had found before me, that there was



THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. 29

rather hard travelling in a journey after
riches. Suddenly, I met in my way a large
porcupine, who made himself still larger
when he saw me, as a cross cat raises its
back, and makes tails ata dog. Fearing
that he would shoot his sharp quills at me,
and hit me all over, I ran from him as
fast as my tired feet would carry me. In
my fright and hurry, I forgot to keep my
eye on the rainbow, as I had done before ;
and when, at last, I remembered and looked
for it, ’twas nowhere in sight! I suppose
because it had quite faded away. When I
saw that it was indeed gone, I burst into —
tears; for I had lost all my treasures, and
had nothing to show for my pilgrimage but
muddy feet, and a wet and torn frock. So
I set out for home. But I soon foufd that
my troubles had only begun; I could not
find my way ; I was lost. I could not tell
which was east or west, north or south, but
wandered about, here and there, crying and
calling, though I knew that no one could hear
me. All at once, I heard voices shouting



30 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

and hallooing ; but, instead of being rejoiced
at this, I was frightened, fearing that the
Indians were upon me! [ had never before
been afraid of the Onondagas, who were a
harmless, peaceful tribe; but that week I
had been listening to a novel called ‘* The
Wept of Wish-ton-wish,”’ a story of the old
Indian wars, which my mother had read
aloud to my invalid brother. I remember
how, one night, when I was thought abed
and asleep, I was hid behind, or rather
under, my brother’s great arm-chair, with
ears open and mouth close shut, scarcely
daring to breathe, till I was found out by
my sobs for the death of poor Uncas. Now,
I thought of the cruel deeds of those bloody
Indians of the old time, till, getting more
and more alarmed, 1 crawled under some
bushes, by the side of a large log, and lay
perfectly still. I was wet, cold, scared,—
altogether very miserable indeed; yet,
when the voices came near, I did not start
up and show myself. At last, I heard my
own name called; but I remembered that



THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. Bl

Indians were very cunning, and thought -
they might have found it out some way; so I
did not answer. Then came a voice near
me, that sounded like that of my eldest
brother, who lived away from home, and
whom I had not seen for many months;
but I dared not believe the voice was his.
Soon some one sprang up on to the log by
which I lay, and stood there, calling. I
could not see his face ; [ could only see
the tips of his toes, but by them I saw that
he wore a nice pair of boots, and not moc-
casins. Yet I remembered that some
Indians dressed ‘like white folks. I knew
a young chief, who was quite a dandy ;
who not only
** Got him a coat and breeches,
And looked like a Christian man,”’

but actually wore a fine ruffled shirt, outside
of all. So still kept quiet, till I heard”
shouted over me a pet name, which this
brother had given me. ~ It was the funniest
name in the world. I don’t know where
he found it. Iyvather think he made it up
himself,—** Roxana Kusberger !”’



32 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

I knew that no Indian knew of the name,
as it was a little family secret; so I sprang
up, and caught my brother about the ankles.
I hardly think that an Onondaga could have
given a louder yell than he gave then ; and
he jumped so that he fell off the log down
by my side. But nobody was hurt; and,
after kissing me till he had kissed away all
my tears, he hoisted me on to his shoulder,
called my other brothers, who were hunt-
ing in different directions, and we all set
out for home.

I had been gone nearly three hours, and
had wandered a number of miles. Joseph’s
coming, and asking for me, had first set
them to inquiring and searching me out.

When I went into the room where my
brother Rufus sat, after IT had had a bath
and a change of dress, he said, ‘* Why, my
poor little sister! I did not mean to send
you off on such a wild-goose chase to the
end of the rainbow. I thought you would
know I was only quizzing you.”’

I am afraid I made up a naughty face, as



THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. 33

I answered, ‘‘ It was very cruel of you,
and now I will not give you that fine rifle I
was going to buy.”’

Then my eldest brother took me on his
knee, and told me what the rainbow really
was : that it was only painted air, and did
not rest on the earth, so nobody could ever
find the end; and that God had set it in
the cloud to remind him and us of his
promise, never again to drown the world
with a flood.

‘OQ, I think God’s promise would ke a
beautiful name for the rainbow!”’ I said.

‘“¢ Yes,’’ replied my mother, ‘* but it tells
us something more than that he will not send
great floods upon the earth,—it tells us of
his beautiful love always bending over us
from the skies. And I trust that when my
little girl sets forth on a pilgrimage to find
God’s love, she will be led by the rainbow
of his promise through all the dark places
of this world, to ‘treasures laid up in
heaven,’ better, far better than silver or
gold.”’

3



DENNIS O’BRIEN.

Once, when I was quite a little girl, lL
went to spend a few months in the family
of my uncle, Colonel Grove, who lived in
an old country-house, on a large farm, some
twenty or thirty milesfrom us. Here I was
always as happy and contented as in my own
home, as everybody was kind to me, and I
was allowed to have pretty much my own
way.

I found living at my uncle’s an Irish lad,
a sort of boy of all work, named Dennis
O’Brien. He was about sixteen, but rather
short of his age, with a broad; ruddy face,
bright blue eyes, and auburn hair. Though
not handsome, he looked frank and intelli-
gent, and almost everybody liked him at first
sight. He had always been industrious, —
had earned enough moagéy in Ireland to
bring him to this country, —and he was now

£





DENNIS O’BRIEN. 35

working very hard, and saving every penny,
so as to be able to send for his widowed
mother and young sister. Was he not a
noble boy ?

Dennis and I struck up a great friendship,
at once. In the long winter evenings, when
there was company in the parlor, I liked
nothing better than to sit by the great kitchen
fire, and listen to his stories of Irelandj—
especially of the Irish fairies, or ‘little
folk,’’ as he called them. But, though Den-
nis talked a great deal at these times, he was
never idle, but was always making axe-
helves, hoe-handles, or pudding-sticks, —
which he sold in the neighborhood, — or
small cross-bows and arrows for me, as I was
much given to shooting at the barn-yard
fowls, who took it all in good part, as they
were seldom hit. I have now a little bow,
and two arrows, whittled out of a shingle by
the great General Houston, but which, I am
sorry to say, do not come up to those my
Irish friend used to make for me.

One evening, after sitting quite still for



86 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

some minutes, Dennis asked, in a humble
way, if I would teach him to read. I was
astonished; a boy sixteen years old not
know how to read! But I ran for a
spelling-book, and began at once to teach
him. I never knew any one learn so easily
and eagerly ashe. Isoon had him through
a—b abs, but he stuck a while on ‘‘ Baker.”
After that, all seemed smooth sailing, and
we were in words of four and five syllables
before we knew it. Ah, I was a proud girl
about those days! I had never been a re-
markably good scholar myself; I could
count up on my fingers, without the aid of
my toes, all the times I had been at the
head of the second class in spelling. Now
I found out that teaching was the work for
me —to sit with the spelling lesson before
me, so that there was no danger of my mak-
ing mistakes, and laugh or look severe at
the blunders of my pupil. I began to put
on the airs of aschool-ma’am, and begged a
little old penknife of my aunt, with which I .
was always whittling hen’s quills into tooth-



DENNIS 0’ BRIEN. wr.

picks, and calling them pens; and if my —
pupil had been a little smaller, I don’t know
but I should have flourished a switch about
his ears. He was so provokingly good, he
never would have given me any occasion to
use it; as it was, he scarcely gave me
chances of reproving him enough to keep
up my dignity. *

When Dennis went from spelling to read-
ing, I gave him, as a “‘reward of metit,”’
a nice ‘* New England Primer.’ I first set
him to learning the verses ae :

**TIn Adam’s ; fall
me sinned all,’’

‘*You know about Adam’s fall, don’t
you, Dennis ?”’ I said, very solemnly.

‘‘Och, yes, Miss,’’ he answered; ‘‘he
fell from an apple-tree,; in the Garden =
Aden, — did n’t he ?”’

“QO Dennis,” said I, ‘*I’m afraid your
folks are heathens.’’

But Dennis got his lesson verywwell, only
he would always say,



88 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

** Goliah’s beauteous wife
Made David seek his life,’’

when the good little book says it was
Uriah’s wife that did the mischief.

‘‘ Faith,’ he would say, “and did n’t
David go out to slay Goliah with a sling,
and so sake his life? ”’

‘¢ But you don’t suppose that little David
would want to marry a big acai wife —
you stupid fellow !”’

When Colonel Grove heard what I had
been doing, *he praised me very much; and
when he found how anxious Dennis was to
learn, he bought him books, and sent him
to the district school. I was willing to let
him go; for, to tell the truth, I was getting
rather tired of teaching ; besides, I some-
times suspected Dennis of slyly making fun
of me; he certainly did not stand in much
awe of his school-ma’am.

. After school, Dennis used often to draw
me on a large sled to the top of a steep hill,
near the house, then sit down in front of me

» to steer with his feet, and down we would



@ DENNIS O'BRIEN. 39

go, like a flash! Ah, how I enjoyed the
sport! One very cold evening, he took me
out, wrapped in a warm cloak of my aunt's,
and fearing that my feet would be cold, he
drew this over them, and tied it down with
his handkerchief. We were hardly started
on the first course, before he happened to
tip us over, aid I began to roll down the
hill. Dennis called to me to stop; but
how could I stop, bagged up as Iwas? I
rolled on, faster and faster, and did not
pause till I was half across the pond, at the
bottom of the hill.

My uncle had many maple-trees in his
wood, from which he made sugar every
spring. The place where this agreeable
work was done was called ‘‘ the sugar-
camp; ”’ there were great iron ketiles, set
upon large stones, for boiling down the sap,
and bright fires kept burning under them ;
there was a shanty built of green hemlock
boughs, quite nice and comfortable. Alto-
gether, this sugar-camp was a very pleasant
ii My atuit, her daughter and I, visited

7



40 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILBHOOD.

it daily, and watched my cousin and Dennis
at their work, which, though really hard,
seemed to me to be half play.

One night Dennis happened to be all
alone in the camp. We had just been
‘“sugaring-off,’”’ and a dozen pans, filled with
the nice, soft sugar, were standing in the
shanty. My uncle had given Dennis all
that he could make after that day; and, as
you may suppose, the lad was very happy
and proud.

Near midnight,.he took his buckets, and
went to some trees, at a distance, for more
sap; and when he came back, he found a
number of young men and boys in the
shanty, making free with the sugar. He
set down his buckets, and boldly shouted
out, ‘* This way, Colonel Grove! this way,
Master Harry! Here are ¢haves staling
your sugar.” |

In a minute, the cowardly fellows scat-
tered and ran, crackling through the brush-
wood, and tumbling over one another in



DENNIS O'BRIEN. 41

their fright, leaving Dennis to laugh at his
own wit.

How kind was Dennis always! I remem-
ber that this spring, when he was ploughing,
he would let me sit on the little round of
timber before him, with my feet on the
plough, and sometimes even let me hold the
reins. I don’t suppose it would look very
proper in me to indulge myself in that way
now; but, to this day, I cannot think of
any kind of riding half so pleasant.

IT soon had an opportunity to repay Den-
nis for some of his kindness. One day, I
was sent to carry him his dinner to a distant
field, where he was ploughing with one
horse, between the rows of corn. I found
him unhitching his plough to come home.
He said the little boy who had’ been riding
the horse had been sent for by his mother,
and he must give up for the day, though
the corn needed ploughing sadly. ‘‘ Stop,
Dennis!’ I said; ‘‘I’ll ride horse for this
afternoon.’’. He laughed at me at first, but
after a while agreed to let me try. I did



42 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

my best, and we got along famously.
Though I went home at night dusty, tired,
and sunburned, I felt that 1 had done my
duty, and earned my supper of bread and
milk,

After this visit, I did not see any more
of Dennis, but I heard that at the end of the
very next year he was able to send enough
money to Ireland to bring over his mother
and sister. He hired alittle place for them”
in the country, which he afterwards bought.
Though he still worked very hard through
spring, summer, and fall, he gave every
spare moment he could get to his books,
and every winter attended school. At last,
he had a fine education, and commenced the
study of the law. Soon after he began to
practise, he moved out West, and I heard no
more of him. |

Not many months ago, as I was crossing
the Alleghany Mountains, a friend in the
cars introduced a fine-looking gentleman to
me as ‘‘Judge O’Brien, of Iowa.’”’ The
stranger smiled as though he knew me very



*DENNIS O'BRIEN. 43

well, and I thought I had seen his pleasant
face before ; but I could not tell when or
where. There was a man sitting near us,
holding a little model of a patent plough in
his hand. This Judge O’Brien took for a
moment, and pointing to the little round of
wood between the handles, said, ‘*-When I
was a farmer-boy, there was a little black-
eyed gypsy of a child, who used to sit be-
fore me, on this part of the plough, and ride
by the hour.”’

Then I knew him; but I only said,—
‘¢ What a sad romp she must have been !”’

We just then began to go down an in-
clined plane, very swiftly; and the judge
said, with a sly smile, —

‘This is very fast riding ; but don’t you
think it is pleasanter to slide down a steep
hill, on a sled, in the winter time ?”’

‘Yes, Dennis,’’ I answered, laughing,
“if you don’t let some awkward fellow tie
you up, tip you over, and dump you down
hill, like a bag of potatoes! ”’

After that, we had a long, lively talk



44 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

about old times; and then my friend told
me of his success in the West; how he had
made quite a fortune, had been appointed
judge, and had married ‘‘the best wife in
the world.”’

‘**T thank God,’’ he said, ‘for bringing
me to America, and giving me _ such
friends.””

But Dennis O’Brien would never have
had such friends, if he had not himself been
so good, so faithful, and industrious.



STRAWBERRYING.

One pleasant Saturday, in June, when IJ
was about ten years of age, and my sister
Carrie twelve, we had an unexpected visit
from a little girl of the«village,— Susan
Smith, the merchant’s in We were
happy to see her, but we really did not
know what to do with her. She was no
older than Carrie, and,small of her age,
but in her own opinion quite too much of
a woman to play with dolls, though we had
a pretty little house fitted up with every
convenience (it had once been the smoke-
house), and containing no less than fourteen
inhabitants, of all sizes and conditions.
She was quite too grand to take any notice
of our pet dogs, cats, ducks or chickens,
and too much of a little coward to mount
Milly, and take a good gallop. At length,
my mother proposed that we should go after

5 :



,
Pa
4 -

46 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

strawberries, to a meadow, about a mile
distant. We joyfully agreed, and started
off at once, with our baskets on our arms ;
all three,—or vated. for Carlo, the
pointer, was with us,—-&s merry and noisy
as we could well be. Susan Smith said a
great many bright things; at least, she
laughed at them a good deal, and Carrie
and I thought it no more than polite to
laugh also. She had a brother Sam, of
whom she was very proud, and she talked
about him nearly all the way.’ It was very
amiable, in her to love her brother ; but,
betw you and me, dear children, there
are Some better young men in the world
than Sam Smith. I am sorry to say that
- he was a wild, idle fellow, that nobody
"knew much good of As we were passing
| where my brothers were hoeing
corn, Susan exclaimed, ‘‘ Why, do your
brothers do such work as that? Our Sam
tends store in the day-time, and, in the
evening, he dresses up, oh, so fine! and
goes to parties and balls.’’




e
*



STRAWBERRYING. 47

‘‘Tsn’t it wicked to go to balls ?’’ I asked.
‘¢ My Sunday-school teacher says it is.”’

‘¢ Why,’ answered Susan, looking very
much astonished at my stupidity, ‘‘ didn’t
I tell you our Sam goes to balls ?—and our
Sam can’t sin.’’

After crossing our farm, and passing
through a piece of woods, we came upon
the strawberry-plot. We had never found
a great many here before, but this season
they were very plentiful. We had only to

part the high grass to find the ground all
red with the ripe, luscious fruit. Sister
and I went to work in good earnest, saying
how pleasant it would be to take home our
baskets quite full; but Susan soon com-
plained of being tired. She would pick
away diligently for a little while, and
then lie down in the grass and eat all she
had gathered. At last, as she lay looking
up into the sky, she called to us to stop,

and start for home, as a,storm was surely â„¢

coming on. We saw that the clouds were
rolling up, dark and threatening; but our

7
*

.



?

-
Pa

al

48 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

baskets were not quite filled,—so we only
picked the faster. Before we knew it, the
rain was upon us. It was one of those
pelting, soaking showers, which drive you
to seek any shelter. There was but one
house in sight,— a little log building, on the
edge of the wood,— and to this we ran. The
woman who came to the door knew my sis-
ter and me at once; she had often spun
yarn and woven linen for our mother. She
took us mto her one room, very kindly
kindled a fire, and began to take off our
wet clothes, declaring that we hadn’t ‘‘a
dry thread to our backs.’”’ She was all
alone, she said, as her husband (her “ old

“man,”’ she called him) was “down to the

village,” and her son Jerry had gone ‘to
his grandther’s ;’’ so we need not be-afraid.
But the poor woman was soon puzzled what
to do. She had never had any little girls, and
had but. two spare dresses of her own,— one

- for my sister, and one for Susan. What

was I to wear, while my clothes were dry-
ing? Presently, she begah to‘laugh; she

-



STRAWBERRYING. ° 49

was a good-natured, funny old lady, and
said she thought I would ‘‘ become”’ Jerry’s
new summer suit. JI refused to put it on,
at first, saying I would rather go to bed for
an hour or two; but she said she didn’t
want her nice bed tumbled and torn to
pieces by children. I shall always suspect
that worthy Mrs. Jones really wanted the
fun of seeing me dressed in boy’s clothes.
Any how, she had her way, and I was soon
rigged out in a pair of fine tow pantaloons,
und a long-tailed striped linen coat, with
great, shiny brass buttons.

Jerry was a big boy, of thirteen or four-
teen,—so his clothes were not a very nice
fit. The coat-tails nearly touched the floor,
and Mrs. Jones was obliged to roll up the
cuffs several inches to get at my hands;
indeed, I felt very much at large in the
whole suit.

O, how Susan and Carrie Iaughed at me !
But they could not say much, for Mrs.
Jones was a\ery: stout person, and they
looked like -tw6old women in. her great

4

*



50 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

brown gingham frocks, with the big balloon-
sleeves. Mrs. Jones told us that we should
not make sport of one another; but I sus-
pected her of sticking her head into the
cupboard, two or three times, to hide her
own laughter.

When she had made us ‘all nice and
comfortable,’’ as she said, she set out a
little round table, covered it with a white
cloth, placed on it some excellent bread and
milk, hulled some of our strawberries, and
invited us to sit up and take our dinner.
She had had hers two hours before. We
gladly obeyed. I helped the ladies politely,
and behaved like a gentleman, as well as I
knew how. I remember how Susan Smith
took up her pewter spoon, turned it over
and over, and looked at it very contemptu-
ously, which was certainly rather ungrate-
ful and uncivil. Mrs. Jones did not seem
to mind it, but, as the rain had now ceased,
she took our wet and soiled frocks, and car-
ried them to a stream, a little way off, to
rinse them. When she was gine, Susan com-



STRAWBERRYING. 51

plained that she could hardly lift her spoon,
and that she tasted the tin of her bright
basin. She said she had never been used
to eating bread and milk out of anything
but a china bowl, with a silver spoon. I
answered that these spoons were the best that
Mrs. Jones had ; that they were clean and
bright, and that I did not see but that bread
and milk and strawberries tasted as good
eaten from a tin basin as from grand-
mother’s ‘silver porringer. That hushed
her at once. I don’t think she had ever
heard of a silver porringer before. I did
not see but that Miss Susan ate as heartily
as sister and myself. Fine ladies do not
always have delicate appetites.

When the dinner-dishes had been cleared
away, and our frocks were spread on chairs
before the fire to dry, Mrs. Jones went up
the ladder-stairs to her weaving, and left
us to amuse ourselves as we could. I had
lost my shame-facedness, and felt in very
good spirits since dinner. Seeing an old
hat of Jerry’s hanging against the wall, I



52 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

took it down, placed it on my head, a little
to one side, and began striding up and down
the room, thrusting my hands into my
pockets, and talking large, in a way very
unbecoming toa little girl, but which I
thought only brave and manly inaboy. For-
getting the length of the pantaloons, [ some-
how got entangled, and tripped myself up.
But I was on my feet in an instant, as large
as ever.

The girls, who were more prudent and
kept their seats, laughed heartily at my
fall.

‘¢T think, sir,’ said my sister, ‘* that you
would walk more gracefully if you would
shorten your suspenders — don’t you say so
too, Susan ?”’

** You be quiet, old ladies!” said I;
** what do you know about suspenders, and
such things ?”’

Just at that moment Carlo set up a loud
barking, and I heard a whistle and a step
near the door! I gave but one bound, and
was under the bed! The quilt came down



STRAWBERRYING. 53

low in front, and I felt quite safe. But,
alas! those unlucky long coat-tails, with
their shining buttons, betrayed me! They
were partly left out, and Jerry Jones—for it
was he who came in—saw them at once.
‘‘Why, how came my Sunday-coat under
the bed?”’ he said, and, stooping down, he
pulled me from my hiding-place. ‘‘ Hello!”
he cried, ‘* what fellow is here, rigged out
in my clothes? Let me see.who you are,
won't you?’’ And, while I struggled and
cried, he laughingly pulled my hands away
from my face. ‘* Why,’’ said he, ‘* this
boy isa girl! O, I know you now! But
don’t cry; this kind of dress is becoming
to you, and my new suit never looked so
handsome before, — don’t ery !”’

‘‘ Jerry Jones, do you clear out of the
house !’’ called his mother from the top of
the ladder. Jerry did not wait for another
word, but took himself off. He stayed in
the garden till our clothes were ironed, and
we started for home, when he asked leave to
go with us, and carry our baskets. ~All the



54 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY ssl
way, though he ‘talked constantly,a never
once spoke of catching me in sucha mF th
lous dress ; and though I was so ashamed
I could hardly say a word, even to thank
him when he helped me over a fence, or a
wet place, I liked him, and always liked
“him, from that day to this. Mrs. Jones, too,
that good, kind woman, | must always think
pleasantly of her. She and her * old man’”’
were living on the same place, but in a new
house, when I heard about them last. By
great industry and economy, they were able
to educate Jerry, to send him to college.
He is a minister now; but, for all that, |
don’t believe he has grown too solemn to
laugh whenever he remembers pulling me
out from under the bed, by the long skirts
of his striped linen coat.





TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY,

Near the home of my early childhood,
there lived a plain but wealthy farmer, by
the name of Austin. He was a pleasant,
intelligent man, and his wife was an excel-
lent woman. ‘Phey had a fine family of
children, — from Ann, about sixteen, down
to Johnny, a bright little rogue of six.
But the pleasantest and cleverest of all was
Frank, the oldest son — a happy, handsome,
hearty, funny fellow, whom everybody liked,
although he was rather mischievous, and
fond of playing off little tricks. More was
pardoned to him than to any one else, be-
cause he was never ill-natured, even when
he seemed most wild and lawless. 4

Mr. Austin had a sister married to a rich’
merchant of the city of Albany, Mr. Shelby,
who had a son about the age of Frank, a good
enough boy at heart, but rather wild in his



56 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

ways, and full of foolish, fine-gentleman
notions. One spring, when Frank was about
thirteen, he made a short visit to the city,
and when he came home, brought his cousin
with him to spend the summer and fall. It
was whispered about the neighborhood that
-Master Tom was sent into the country
because ‘‘ his folks could n’t manage him at
home.’” Ido not know that this was the
case ; but very likely the report was correct.

I was very intimate with Hattie Austin,
one of the dearest and prettiest playmates
of my childhood, and happened to be

making her a visit when the boys arrived.

Frank leaped down the steps first, embraced
his mother heartily, and hugged all the
children. Master Tom Shelby descended
with slow dignity. He was dressed ina
suit of fine blue broadcloth—the panta-
loons tightly fitting, and strapped down

- under a pair of stylish, narrow-toed, high-

heeled boots. His delicate hands were en-
cased:in dark kid gloves, and very much on
one sude of his head he wore a black velvet



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY. 57

cap, with a long dangling tassel. His hair
was long and straight; by the way,
Frank could afterwards vex him very much
by telling that it curled naturally in Albany,
but that somehow it straightened out more
and more, the further he travelled from
French hair-dressers. I remember Tom
so plainly because he was the first dandy I
ever Saw. |

The first thing he did was to brush the
dust from his polished boots with his cam-
bric handkerchief ; then, looking up to the
driver, he drawled out, ‘* Boy, will you
hand me down my dressing-case ?”’

‘*¥es, grandfather,’ answered the good-
natured driver, taking off that elegant arti-
cle, and the other baggage.

That afternoon, a number of the boys and
girls of the neighborhood came to welcome
Frank home, and to have a peep at the
young stranger. I never shall forget the
airs that fellow gave himself. He walked
about the yard where we were at play, for
_ all the world, as a fine peacock struts among

*
By



5S RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

a crowd of pullets, ducks, and young
roosters. How scornfully he eyed our
homely clothes, and refused to join in our
merry game of ‘‘tag,’”’ saying if was too
rude and childish! Some of us took off our
stockings and shoes, to run the faster, and
he looked down at our bare feet with as
much horror as though they had been hoofs
or claws. But he soon found out, as some
great people had done before him, that it —
was tiresome work to be grand. We let
him alone, and he soon came down from his
stilts. He began to talk about Albany:
‘¢ We do this,”’ and *‘ We have that, in Al-
bany;’’ everything was handsomer and
finer there than in the country.

‘¢ Dreadful big of his Albany !”’ said little
Johnny. I had read in my copy-book, that
‘¢God made the country, and man made the
town,’’ and I told him so, right to his face,
and said I did n’t think men had better set
up to do things better than God.

‘*T don’t know about that,’ he said;
‘but I do know that we city people put up

%






TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 59

handsomer buildings than you country people
ever dreamed of. My father, now, lives in
a great brass house, with a brick knocker on
itt”

What a laugh we had at his blunder!

In the morning, we all went to take a
stroll in the woods. On the way, Tom
amused himself, and, I must confess, us
also, by telling of the tricks that, before he
left home, he had played off on Frank, who,
he said, was ‘*as green as that meadow,” ©
pointing to a wheat-field. He had made
his poor visiter drink the water from his
finger-glass, for lemonade ; had sent him to —
the Female Academy, telling him it was the —
Capitol; and to an undertaker’s to buy a
new trunk; and one evening he sent him
home on the full run, by pointing to a watch-
man, and telling him that after one appeared
in the streets all strange boys were liable
to be draggedg off to the watch-house.
Frank langhed good-humoredly while Tom
was relating these cunning exploits; but
shook his head once in a while, as much as

a



.

+

a

60 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

to say, ‘* Wait a bit, my lad, and I’ll pay
you!”’

As we were passing through a cow-
pasture, on the edge of the wood, we came
upon a flock of geese, with a host of goslings,
and a fierce old gander flew at us, hissing
like a serpent. Tom started back, and
talled out, ‘‘ Why, Frank, what is the mat-
ter with that great white goose, that it hisses
so?”

‘Tt does behave strangely,’’ said Frank,
quite soberly ; ‘* what can ailit 2 Can it
be that it has gone mad? ”’

In amoment Tom took to his heels, and
did not stop till he reached the wood, rods

‘ away. While we were screaming with

laughter, Frank called out, ‘‘ Stop, Tom!
stop!—it’s only a gander; you ’re the
goose yourself ! ’’

In the afternoon, Tom brought out his

. fishing-tatkle, — his nice-jginted rods, his

delicate lines, and his flies, —and invited

a Frank to go trouting with him. -T ough he
~ talked ‘large, as usual, Frank saw es



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 61

that he knew little or nothing of that sort
of fishing. So he started out with him,
stopped at the first piece of water they came
across, put his finger on his lip in token of
silence, then lazily flung himself on the
grass under a willow, to watch the sport.
The little sheet of water was nothing but a
frog-pond,; weedy and muddy, where fish
had never made their appearance. Tom
had heard that trout were exceedingly shy,
and went very softly to work, never
speaking above a whisper to Frank. After
about an hour, he concluded that flies were
not inviting bait, and, by Frank’s advice,
used worms instead.

‘¢ Do they bite now ?’”’ whispered Frank,
yawning, for he had taken a nice nap in the
shade of the willow.

**No,” said Tom, ‘ but hin begin to —
nibble; ’’ and in a minute after he cried,
jupfally, ‘* Now! have one! Come, Frank,
and helpgme out with it. I think it must be
a salmon-trout.’’

ip _ But before Frank reached him, he pulled

.
:

7 *



a*

62 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

up a great mud-turtle, which he had hooked
by the leg. Frank rolled on the ground
with laughter, and Tom did not soon hear
the last of his fine ‘‘ salmon-trout.”’

The next day, however, Frank took his
cousin to a real trout stream, some miles
distant, and taught him how to capture that
most shy and delicious fish.

Not long after this, Tom proposed a hunt.
Now, Frank was a good shot, but Tom knew
about as much of hunting as he had known
of trouting. Yet you would have supposed,
from his way of talking, that he was a per-
fect Nimrod—a ‘mighty hunter.” He
had an elegant little fowling-piece, and all
the accoutrements, even to a hunting-jacket
of the latest English fashion. But, alas! his
fine outfit brought him neither skill nor
luck ; he popped away incessantly, and, as
the boys say, ‘‘ killed nothing but powder.”’
At last, Frank, who had separated from him,
and had nearly filled his game-jag with
squirrels and partridges, took pity on the
poor fellow. He happened, himself, to have



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 63

shot an old owl, and, climbing a tree, he
fixed this on a large limb, so that it looked
very lifelike and natural. Then, going for
Tom, he led him softly within sight of the
game, telling him that there was a big bird
of some sort, he might have for the shooting.
Thinking that a big bird would require a
big charge, Tom put in a double quantity
of powder and shot, and the consequence
was, that he was kicked clean over — boys
will understand how. But he brought down
the owl, and never would believe but —
he had the first shot at him.

A few days after this, Mr. Austin said to
his young guest, ‘‘ I’ve a letter from your
father, my boy, and he tells me to set you
to work, and get some of the nonsense out
of you. J don’t want to put you to hard
labor; you may do as you please; but
Frank, here, has been fooling about long
enough, — he must go to work.”

Tom turned up his aristocratic nose at
the thought of his working on the farm ;
and when he saw Frank shoulder his hoe,

me



64 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

and go cheerfully over the hill to the corn-
field, he wondered at and pitied him.

But Tom had somehow become attached
to his good-natured playmate ; and, as he
idled away hour after hour of the pleasant
morning, through the house and about the
yard, he found himself very lonely and
stupid.

By the middle of the afternoon of the
second day, he felt that he really could not
stand it any longer; so paid a visit to the
corn-field, ‘‘ just to see how they got along,”’
he said. After watching his cousin a while,
he went to Mr. Austin, and asked for a
hoe, —‘* just to help Frank a little.”’ His
uncle gave him one, with a smile, telling —
him to be careful of his fine clothes.
Though Tom found that this work was even
harder than fishing for trout in a frog-pond,
— though it made his back ache, and almost
blistered his hands,— yet he liked it, and
hoed his row bravely. The next morning,
after an early breakfast, he drew on an old
pair of boots, rolled up his pantaloons,



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY. 65 .

shouldered his hoe, and set out with the ~°
other workmen, feeling very stout and im-
portant. In the course of the week, he
found in his room a regular farmer’s suit of
clothes, — more easy than elegant,— of
strong, but cool material. These he put on
with much pleasure ; indeed, it was'soon
hard to persuade him to dress himself in
broadcloth, even to go to church. He said
that, in tow jacket and corduroy trousers, a
man had room,—a man could do as he
pleased,— and that a good straw hat was
the thing for a man, after all.

Mr. Austin gave his nephew a small piece e
of land in the corn-field, for a melon-patch.
Tom planted and cultivated it, and was very
proud of the thriving condition of his water-
melons and canteleups. It happened that a
neighboring farmer had a fine melon-patch
in the very next field. This Mr. J ohnson @i |
was a cross, disobliging man, on whom the
boys loved to play little mischievous tricks,
—so 1 suppose Tom did not think he was
proposing anything wicked, when he said

9





66 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

to his cousin, one evening in September,
‘‘ Frank, let’s go, to-night, and hook old
Johnson’s water-melons ! ”’

‘Do you mean steal them, Tom ?”’ asked
Frank.

‘Why, yes; if you’ve a mind to calla
little fun by such a hard name. I don’t see,
for my part, what harm there could be in
taking a few water-melons from such a stingy
old fellow.’’

Frank, with all his wildness, had never
been guilty of a mean or a dishonest act ;
yet now, after thinking a moment, he agreed
to go with his cousin, but persuaded him to
wait till the moon was down, and it was
quite dark. Then, by a roundabout way
through the woods, he led Tom to his own
melon-patch, where he told him to hurry and
fill the basket, while he kept watch at a

@ distance. He afterwards said that he

ever came so near dying with silent laugh-
_ ter, as he did when he saw Tom creeping
* poftly about on all fours, stealing his own
melons, thinking that they were Mr. John-



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE CouNTRY. 67

son’s! At last, hearing some noise near, —
a cow, or a colt, perhaps,—he shouted,
‘*Run, Tom! run! Look out for old John-
son! ’’— and started for home, at full speed.
Tom followed fast, breathing hard, and
dropping a melon or two, in his fright. But
he reached the house with three fine ones,
of which he ate enough to make him so ill
that he was obliged to lie abed and take
inedicine the next forenoon. At night,
when he was much better, Frank confessed
the trick he had played off; and, I assure
you, the poor fellow made up a worse
face at the story than he had at the
bitter dose of the morning. Yet he did not
keep anger long, and he never forgot the
hard lesson he had learned,—never at-
tempted to steal again, even from himself.

Tom Shelby was more and more liked,
the longer he stayed with the Austins; and
in little more than half a year he grew to
be a sensible, industrious, agreeable lad.
So much did he become attached to his
cousin, that he could not be persuaded to





68 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD. .

return home without him ; and it was finally
agreed that Frank should be sent to one of
the excellent schools in Albany, and that
the two friends, if they remained good boys,
should be educated together.

IT remember the day they left us. They
were to go by stage some twenty miles, to
the town of S It was a keen morn-
ing in November, yet these two hardy,
ruddy-cheeked boys chose to ride outside,
with the driver. The night before, they had
gone all about the neighborhood, to bid
their friends good-by; and everybody, even
old Johnson, was sorry to see the merry lads
go. Tom had laid out a generous portion
of his pocket-money in parting gifts, —
from a ‘* Pilgrim’s Progress,’’ in large type,
for grandmother Austin, to a bag of painted
marbles for little Johnny. But to Hattie,
» his favorite, he made half a dozen handsome
presents, for her ‘‘ to remember cousin Tom
by,’ -he said. If he could have known how
she cried over them, when he was gone, he





- TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE CouNTRY. 69

would have been both glad and sorry, I
think.

After the boys had taken a hearty leave
of us all, and clambered to their seats,
while the driver was gathering up the reins,
Tom called out, ‘If any of you happen to
meet a slender, long-haired, milky-faced
young dandy, from Albany, who was about
here for a while last spring, just bid him
good-by for me, for I never shall see him
again.”’ ,



THE TWO LADIES FROM THE CITY.

It was near Christmas time, and Frank
Austin was at home for the holidays, hav-
ing with him his cousin, Tom Shelby. The
friends, now nearly sixteen, were as full of
merriment, as fond of laughter, and all
sorts of innocent fun, as ever. Ah! such
wild times as we all had together, for more
than one of my brothers might be counted
on, at any time, for any kind of a frolic.

It happened that Mr. and Mrs. Austin
went to the town of S , fora day or
two, on business, they said, which we
suspected meant little else than the
purchase of Christmas gifts. They left
Ann, the eldest daughter, as housekeeper.
By the way, I have scarcely mentioned
Ann. She was a_ kind-hearted, clever
girl, but was a little spoiled by reading
novels, and by some grand ideas of style
and fashion, which nobody knew how she





THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 71

came by. For instance, she disliked her
plain name, and always wanted to be called
Antoinette. Her brothers called her by
that romantic name, when they wanted
buttons sewed on, or hats lined; if they
wished to.see her vexed, they called her
Ann; but they must make up their minds to
be chased out of the house with the broom-
stick, if they called her ‘* Nanny.’’ She
really loved hard work, and yet she was
ashamed to be caught at it. Once, I remem-
ber, in house-cleaning time, while she was
washing the kitchen-floor, in an old gown,
with her sleeves rolled up, and no stockings
on her feet, the minister called. No one
heard his knock, and he walked through the
sitting-room, into the kitchen, where Ann
was making a great splashing with her mop.
When she caught sight of that solemn man,
she screamed, dropped her mop, and jumped
through an open window, right into the
rain-water trough.

But Ann was the pleasantest sort of a
housekeeper while her mother was gone,



72 RECOLLECTIONS OP MY CHILDHOOD.

and we had things quite to our liking. I
say we, for I was visiting Hattie that week.
To be sure, there was old grandmother Aus-
tin, always sitting in the warmest chimney-
corner; but she was amiable, and so deaf
and sleepy that she did not interfere with
us much.

One afternoon, at supper, Ann talked
a good deal with Frank and Tom about two
young ladies from Albany, Miss Flagg, and
. Miss Dillingham, who were visiting some
friends in the village. Ann had made an
early call on them, but did not see them,
—they were not at home ; and now she was
fretting because the call had not been
returned.

After supper, I noticed Frank and Tom
whispering together, and presently they
said they were going to our house, to see
my brothers for a little while ; and, putting
on their caps, they went off, running mer-
rily down the road, and chasing each other
with snow-balls.

In the course of an hour, a sleigh came



THE TWO LADIES«FROM THE city. 73

jingling up to the house ; two ladies got
out, came to the door, and knocked, rather
loudly. Mrs. Austin’s only hired girl was
out for the evening ; Hattie and I were too
bashful to go to the door; so Ann was
obliged to open it herself. ‘‘Is Miss
Antoinette Austin at home ?”’ asked one of
the ladies, in a little, mincing voice. ‘‘ Yes,
ma’am,’’ answered Ann. ‘‘ Well, then,
my good girl,”’ said the other lady, with a
toss of her head, ‘* will you inform her that
Miss Flagg and Miss - Dillingham have
called?’’ ‘*Why, I am Miss Antoinette
Austin, myself.’’

‘¢Q, I beg your pardon,’’ said Miss Dil-
lingham, while she and her friend walked
forward and took the chairs which Ann
offered them; but they would not sit very
near the fire, or the candle, and kept their
black lace veils partly over their faces.

*¢Grandmother,’”’ said Ann, ‘‘ these are
some ladies from the city,—Miss Flagg
and Miss Dillingham.”’

‘Who ?”’ said the poor, deaf old lady;



74 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

‘¢ Miss Ragg and Miss Dinner-horn, did you
say ?”’

‘ speaking loud in her ear, ‘* Miss Flagg and
Miss Dillingham !”’

‘* Yes, yes, | hear; Miss Lagg and Miss
Dinghammer.’’

The ladies laughed outright at this, and
poor Ann grew very red in the face. But she
sat down and began conversing with her
visiters, about Albany. I don’t suppose that
she knew it, but she talked very affectedly,
indeed, in a little, fine voice, nobody ever
heard her use before. She spoke of the
city as though she knew all about it, and
once in a while she brought out a French
word, but pronounced it so queerly that
Miss Flagg made her repeat it, and, even
then, didn’t seem to understand it. Once
she asked, ‘‘ Do you know my aunt, Mrs.
Mayor Shelby ?”’

‘¢No,’”’ answered Miss Dillingham, ‘* but
I know Mrs. Alderman Shelton.”

Hattie and I sat on a settee, near the



THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 75

fire, watching the grand visiters. ‘‘ An’t
it funny,’’ whispered Hattie, ‘* that such
little voices come out of such great
mouths !”’

‘¢ 'Yes,’’ I answered, ‘‘ and haven't they
big feet, for such fine ladies !”’

I think that Miss Flagg heard me, for she
drew her feet under her cloak. Then I
noticed that both her cloak and bonnet were
like those my eldest sister wore, and that
Miss Dillingham’s were a good deal like my
mother’s. I felt proud to know that my
mother and sister were in the fashion.

After a rather short call, the ladies rose,
made each a great courtesy, and took
leave. As we watched them from the win-
dow, getting into the sleigh, I thought the
boy that drove looked strangely like my
brother Will.

_In about half an hour, the boys came
home. Hardly were they in the house
before Ann cried out, ‘*O, you don’t
know what you have missed! Miss Flagg
and Miss Dillingham have been here, and



76 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

oh, such elegant, genteel young ladies as
they are! I never was so provoked in my
life, for Susan was gone, and I was obliged
to be waiter myself; they actually took me
for a servant-girl. But you should have
seen them !—such airs! Just proud and
haughty enough, I think.”’

‘© Well, I say,”’ spoke up old Mrs. Aus-
tin, ‘‘ that they are two pert, affected hus-
sies, with no manners at all.’’

‘¢ Why, grandmother,”’ said Ann, ‘* you
have always lived in the country, and don’t
~ exactly know what zs genteel.”

‘*T know,” said Mrs. Austin, raising her
voice, ‘* that it’s not the sign of a lddy to
grip a body’s hand as they did; and no real
lady or gentleman would giggle out loud at
a deaf old woman’s mistake.’’

*¢ You are very right, grandmother,” said
Frank, ‘‘ and Tom and I beg pardon for our
rudeness,”’

‘‘ What do you mean ?”’ asked Ann.

‘* Why, Nanny,” said Frank, mimicking



THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 177

her, ‘‘do you know my aunt, Mrs. Mayor
Shelby ?”’

‘¢ You good-for-nothing, hateful fellows !
how dare you play off such a trick on me ?””
said Ann, laughing and crying ‘all at once,
while we set up a perfect shout. But the
boys soon soothed her, by promising not to
tell her father, who loved dearly to tease
her about any such foolish little thing. I
saw how it was: the boys had been dressed
at our house, had come in our sleigh to
make their visit; and I was not sure that
my mother and sister were in the fashion,
after all. But I enjoyed the joke, rather
more* than Ann, I think. Yet she profited
by it, certainly, for she was never known
to talk in an affected or boasting way again.
The real ladies, from the city, came to see
her, a day or two after. They were nice,
quiet girls, with frank, easy manners, and
liked Ann so well, on acquaintance, that they
persuaded her to spend some time with °
them the next winter, when she visited her
aunt, in Albany. Then she saw city-life



78 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

without having her head turned by its
grandeur, but came home loving the coun-
try,— the dear, free, fresh, healthful coun-

try,— better than ever.

The hy after that merry Christmas-
time, we mo¥ed from our old home, further
west, and saw no more and heard very lit-
tle of the Austins. I parted from Hattie
with great sorrow. We solemnly agreed to
love each other dearly, for ever and ever ;
we exchanged locks of hair, and she prom-
ised to take care of the cat I left behind
me.

A year or two since, [ received a call
from a ‘* Dr. Austin,’’ whom I recognized,
at once, as my old friend Frank. I was
glad to see that he was as healthy and
hearty, as fond of laughter and fun, as ever.
He brought me a short letter from his sister
Ann, who wrote that they still lived in the
old place ; that her mother had been dead
‘ three or four years, and that Hattie was
married, and living near; that was all the
news she told me. ‘* Why, Frank,’’ I said,



THE TWO LADIES FROM THE City. ‘79

‘¢ Ann does not tell me the name of Hattie’s
husband.”

‘¢ Ah, haven’t you heard ?”’ he replied,
‘‘it’s cousin Tom Shelby. His father
couldn’t make a merchant, a lawyer, a min-
ister, or a doctor, out of him ;.he would be
nothing but afarmer. So he bought old
Johnson’s place, married our Hattie, and
settled down to farming, as happy as a
king:”’

‘“¢Q, I am very glad to hear it!’’ I said.
‘* But how is this, Frank! I see, by your sis-
ter’s letter, that she does not write her
name Antoinette any more.’ ,

‘¢ Why, no,’’ he answered; ‘‘ she calls
herself ‘plain Ann,’ now ; but no one else
calls her so, for, I assure you, my sister is a
very pretty woman; and she is better than
pretty, she is good; you know she always
wasy— but now more than ever, for, since
mother died, she has been like a mother to
us all,”’



PART SECOND.

THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

In the eastern part of the State of New
York, there once lived two sisters, Sarah
and Jemy Starr. They were left orphans
a young, and had been adopted by
some kind relations; but Sarah, who was
four or five years the oldest, took almost all
the care of Jenny. Sarah was a good,
motherly girl, very prudent and serious ;
she was plain in all but a pair of large,
dark brown eyes, and a great mass of curly
black hair. But she thought nothing of
herself, so dearly did she love her little
sister. And Jenny was, indeed, a darling
child, with a far prettier face than Sarah’s,
and the gladdest heart in the world. She
would play, and laugh, and sing, all the day

Lens



THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 81

long. Noone ever saw Jenny sad, or out
of humor; but, perhaps, this was partly
because, being so beautiful and so prettily
dressed always, everybody was kind to her,
and indulged her. It is easy for such pet-
ted children to be happy and good-natured.
But, any way, it was a pleasant sight to see
her dancing about here and there, chasing
butterflies, hunting flowers, frolicking with
her pretty spaniel Fido, laughing» lik
little silver brook, and singing
merry mocking-bird ; most often
eypsy hat fallen back from her héat
her long bright curls floating in the wind.

When Jenny was only sixteen, she was
married to a Mr. Silsbee, a very wealthy
gentleman, and went to live in a,beautiful
place, near the town where she was born.
She had an elegant house, surrounded with
trees and flowers, and everything delightful
about her.

Soon after this, Sarah was also married
to a young man who had loved her a num-
ber of years, but whom she had not been

6







82 THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

willing to marry until she could see her sis-
ter Jenny living in a home of her own.
Henry Williams was not rich, but he was a
good, amiable person. Sarah loved him,
and was very happy to be his wife. He
was a physician, and soon took her with
him to the far west, thinking that he might
do better there than in the east.

The sisters grieved much at parting.
Both wept a great deal,— Jenny the most
violently, and Sarah the longest. But they
hoped to see each other before a very long
times

In about two months, Jenny had a long
letter from her sister. Dr. Williams had
bought some land, and built a little frame-
house, in a beautiful oak-grove, on one of
the great western prairies. Sarah wrote
very cheerfully, and begged her sister to
come out and make her a visit, in a year or
two. But Jenny was indolent, and dreaded
the trouble of journeying, which was much
greater at that time than it is now. So
she was always promising, but never went



‘THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 83

to see her sister ; neither did she write to
her regularly. Sarah grew tired of writing
long letters, which received short answers,
or none at all, and wrote herself less often ;
and, at last, the sisters, who, in childhood,
had been such close and loving companions,
scarcely heard from one another once a
year. Yet they loved each other still,
though the thoughtful Sarah remembered
the dear old times oftener than the light-
hearted Jenny. ,

And so eight long years went by. Jenny
was yet as happy as ever. Her husband
was very fond of her, and she still had all
around her that her heart could desire.
First, among the good things that God had
given her, were three lovely children,—
two boys, Georgie and Willie, and one
daughter, ‘‘ little Kate.”

Jenny made a funny sort of a mother.
She was just like a child with her children ;
would romp and laugh with them, run
races, and play with balls, kites, kittens and
doll-babies. And Jenny looked like a child



84 . HE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

herself. She was short and plump, with
dimpled cheeks, rosy lips, bright curls, and
twinkling blue eyes. Any little boy or girl’
would be very unreasonable to ask a merrier
playmate than Jenny Silsbee.

To Sarah had been given two daughters,
' whom she had named for her mother and
sister, Alice and Jenny. They were not so
pretty as the children of Mrs. Silsbee, for
the climate of the new country proved
‘unhealthy, and they were always pale and
sickly. But their father and mother loved
them all the more dearly and cared for
them the more tenderly for that. Mrs.
Williams was also often sick, and her hus-
band did not have much practice ; so they
were quite poor. But the doctor was a
proud man, and did not ask his friends in the
east for assistance ; and Sarah was also too
independent in her feelings to write to her
wealthy sister for help. She did not doubt
but that Jenny would be glad to give it;
but she knew it must come from Mr.
Silsbee, and she did not wish to have the



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RECOLLECTIONS

OF

MY CHILDHOOD,

OTHER STORIES.

BY

GRACE GREENWOOD,

acrnor of “wisTORY OF MY PETS.”

WITH ENGRAVINGS FROM DESIGNS BY BILLINGS,

BOSTON:
TICKNOR, REED, AND FIELDS.

M DCCC LI.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1851, by
Sarna J. CLARKE,
In the Clerk’s Office of the District Court for the District of Massachusetts.
â„¢~

Stereotypedt by
HOBART & ROBBINS,
BOSTON.
Dedication.

YO THE COUSINS,
UNA AND JULIAN HAWTHORNE,

HORACE AND GEORGE MANN,
T AM FROUD AND HAPPY TO DEDICATE THIS VOLUME,

GRACE GREENWOOD.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

THE OLD CIHAIR-MENDER AND HIS GRAND-DAUGHTER ]

THE TORN FROCK,—A LITTLE STORY FOR LITTLE

GIRLS : : ; ‘ ; ‘ 14

a

THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE : : . 2B
DENNIS 0’BRIEN : : ; ; F 34.
STRAWBERRYING . : ‘ ; . 45
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY . ; 55
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE CITY ., ; —
THE AUNT FROM THE WEST | ‘ . 80
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL ‘ ‘ . 91

THE HERMIT . ; . . f ‘ 107
EFFIE GREY’S SLEEP-WALKING ; ; . 109
LIZZIE IN THE MILL ., ; . P ‘ 119

JACK AND HIS JACK-0’LANTERNS = ; . 181
PREFACKH.

TO THE MOTHERS OF THE CHILDREN INTO WHOSE
HANDS THIS BOOK MAY FALL.

My FRIENDS :—

Many times, while writing this little volume of
stories, I have seemed to feel your eyes upon me,
in a look so serious, so searching, that my heart
almost quailed under it. I have felt, more deeply
than I can tell, that I was to be judged not alone
by literary umpires, by professional critics, fut
by the unbiased reason, the quick conscience, the
jealous watchfulness, the wondrous instincts, of
your maternal hearts.

As a practical florist would watch keenly, if
not distrustfully, a young gardener, in his first
essays at binding up rose-trees, watering and prop-
ping lilies, and training tender, young vines, — so,
but with infinitely deeper anxieties, must you
regard one like me, a stranger in your conserva-
VI PREFACE.

tory of fair soul-flowers, newly blossomed out of
the great life of God, seeking to stay with some
rude support the luxuriant growth and affluent
flowering of childish affections, to nourish the pure
white bloom of earliest thought, to train those beau-
tiful vine-like instincts of faith and holiness which,
even undirected, creep blindly toward heaven. As
Eve learned horticulture of the angels in Eden, so,
in the life of maternal love, have you been divinely
taught to rear your plants of immortality. Yet do
not distrust one who but seeks, as a subordinate, to
aid you in your labors. She may go about her
work with “a ’prentice hand,” all too unskilful,
but, surely, neither rash nor ungentle. |
Aside from the dear love I bear them, I have a
venuine reverence for children, —for that open-
browed innocence, that simple trust, that utter
unworldliness, which once drew them into the arms
of Jesus, and called from his lips that blessing
which is the seal of his divinity to the heart of a
mother. I look upon a joyous group of children,
not envying them their careless happiness, with the
sad retrospective feeling which murmurs, ‘I, too,
dwelt in Arcadia ; ”—but, regarding their purity,
PREFACE. Vil

I say, with a sort of grateful pride, “‘ Have I not
been as one of these? Did I not also inherit the
blessing ?”’

I have faith to believe that this book will speak
to the hearts of children, because, in writing it, I
truly lived again the life of my childhood; my
heart was dismayed anew at its little dangers, and
thrilled by its little joys; it bled again with its
sharp little sorrows, where the later, deeper wounds
of womanhood were healed forever.

It may be I have written too much as a child,—
too impulsively and inconsiderately. You may think
the mirth of some portions of the book rather too
free and wild. I can only reply that my humor is
not under my control; it: plays “fantastic tricks’?
on its own responsibility, in defiance of good sober
sense and the nice rules of propriety.

For the homely democratic sentiments scattered
through the volume I make no apology; I will
stand by them at all times. The religious senti-
ments are alike those of my reason and my heart.
[ have sought to point my readers to a heaven of
_ peace and brightness, not of storm and gloom; to
inculcate a belief which may bring comfort and joy
Vill PREFACE.

to their young spirits, not awe and terror;—a
faith as bright, as free, as clear, as cheerful, as the
skies, the birds, the waters and the flowers, of my
own remembered childhood.

In regard to the language employed, I have not
been conscious of striving after simplicity. I have
been a good deal influenced. by the advice of a little
girl, who, on hearing that a lady was writing 4
juvenile work, said, ‘‘ Do, papa, tell her not to talk
to the children more childishly than they ever talk
themselves.”

And now, dear friends, let me say I do not even
hope that you will pronounce my story-book fault-
less ; but, if you will only admit that it is harm-
less, — that it will do some little good,—if you
will believe I have meant well, I shall be quite
content. G. G.

RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD,

THE OLD CHATR-MENDER AND HIS
GRAND-DAUGHTER.

Pernaps some of my little readers have
seen in the country chairs bottomed with
thin strips of wood, or woven bark. These
make very easy seats, but do not last a
great while. We had such chairs in our
kitchen, and about once a year they needed
repairing. There was an old man, by the
name of Richards, who used to do this
work for us. I remember him now, as
_ plainly as though I had seen him only yes-
terday. He was a little fat man, between
sixty and seventy years of age, with a
good-natured, rosy face, and hair as white
as snow, which was very thick, and hung
down on his shoulders. He generally wore

1
9 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

a suit of coarse cloth, called ‘‘sheep’s
gray,” and a brown felt hat, with a round
crown and a wide brim. He always came
in a little unpainted wagon, drawn by a
sorel one-eyed pony, in a home-made
harness of light leather, with rope reins.
I remember that this pony, whose name
was ‘* Dolly,’’ had once a little colt, which,
not being as sober-mannered and lazy as ~
herself, gave her more trouble than pleasure.
He seemed remarkably cunning, and would
often. get on the blind side of his mother,
and keep as quiet as a mouse, while the
poor creature was whinnying for him, in
great distress.

Mr. Richards lived in a small log house,
a few miles east of us, with the only near
relative he had in the world,—a little
grand-daughter, named Amy, who, from
the age of ten years, when her mother
died, was her grandfather’s housekeeper.

Amy Ellis was one of the best, as she
was one of the prettiest girls in the coun-
try, far and wide. People called her ‘a
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 3
perfect little woman,’’ she was so active,
so steady and industrious. She was strong,
healthy and happy, and really could do more
work in a day than many a full-grown
woman, and with less fuss. She was not
tall, but rather stout, like her grandfather ;
her hands were hardened by work, and her
feet somewhat spread by going without
shoes in the summer time ; but she had a
clear brown complexion, rosy cheeks, and
very handsome hazel eyes. Her frocks
and aprons, though plain, and cut in rather
an old-womanly way, were always neat and
whole, and her grandfather’s clothes were
kept earefully brushed and mended.

I can see now that Amy was a very won-
derful child; but I own that there was a
time when I grew tired of her very name,
from hearing her praised so much, and held
up as a model for me to imitate.

Amy had a good deal of taste. I remem-
ber that she used to train up ivy-vines and
rose-bushes against her grandfather’s house,
till you could scarcely see the logs. She
- :
4 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

was very fond of her old grandfather, and
he of her. It was pleasant to see them
working in the field and garden together,
or walking to church, or sitting of a Sunday
evening in the burial-ground, on the rough
bench, by the graves of old Mrs. Richards
and Amy’s father and mother. They were
too poor to put up head-stones; but they
had placed boards, with nicely painted
inscriptions, there, and had planted the
sweet-brier and violets in great abundance.

IT remember the last chair which Mr.
Richards mended for us, and how it was
broken. There was a certain old soldier, a
very stout man, who was in the hahit of
calling at our house and asking for cider.
He grew rather troublesome, at last, and my
mother resolved to give him no more, as he
was suspected of drinking too much,—
though, for that matter, any cider is too
much. But, one hot summer day, he came
in, and asked for a drink. My mother
looked at him, saw that he had not been
drinking, and that he was very tired. So
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 5

she went for the cider herself, calling to
my brother William to hand the gentleman
a chair. Will was very mischievous, and
so brought forward an old arm-chair, the
bottom of which was broken in several
places. Of course, Mr. More, tired as he
was, came down so heavily that all gave way
under him, and when he rose the chair rose
with him. My mother returned in time to
reprove my brother for his ‘‘ carelessness,”
as she called it. I wish I could believe it
was carelessness, and no trick. She then
handed a brimming tumbler to our neigh-
bor; he drank one great swallow, then
made up a dreadful face, set down the glass,
and hurried angrily out of the house. My
mother, much astonished, tasted of that
which was left in the pitcher, and found
that it was vinegar. What a laugh we
children had at her ‘‘ carelessness”?! But
old Mr. More never again called at our
house for cider.

Mr. Richards happened along in a day or
two, and wove a new bottom for the chair.
6 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

That time he brought with him his grand-
daughter, who was then between eleven
and twelve years old. My sister and I,
‘wishing to amuse her, showed her our dolls ;
but she said, ‘‘ How can you waste so
many pretty pieces of calico in these little
frocks and aprons? I would sew them
together, and put them into a bed-quilt.”’

We took her to see our pretty pet pig,
** Nuggie,”’ who lived in a little house by
himself, and was washed every day; and
after looking at him a minute, she said,
** Do you mean to keep such a nice fat pig
as that? If he were mine, 1’d have him
killed, and roast him,’’

I thought this was very cruel of Amy,
for our Nuggie was no common pig; he
was civilized and good-mannered, and we
had taught him a great many cunning tricks.
I afterwards asked my mother if it was not
a hard-hearted remark; but she replied that
Amy looked more to the useful than the
ornamental. Poor Nuggie died that very
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 7

summer, of cholera-morbus, from my over-
feeding him with green apples.

Amy seemed most pleased with our ducks
and a pair of twin calves, which, she said,
were nearly as thriving as her own; but
she soon went into the house, took out her
knitting, and sat down near her grand-
father. My mother was making some pastry
in the kitchen, and Mr. Richards was con-
versing with her. J remember that he was
talking of a neighbor of ours, .who, he
said, was well enough off, but who. had sold
out, ‘* pulled up stakes,’’ and started for
the far-away State of Ohio, in hopes of
making his fortune. He said, ‘* As for me,
I have Jarned ‘in whatsoever state I am,
therewith to be content,’ and all I want,
here below, is food and raiment, and mid-
dling good clothing, and three meals of
victuals a day.”’

‘* Why, grandfather,’’ said Amy, ‘‘ does
anybody ask more than that ?”’

‘¢ Yes, child,’” he answered ; ‘* some folks

take a notion that they must be rich or
8 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

great. I had a brother that never would
give up peddling till he was worth a thou-
sand dollars; and my father, your great-
grandfather, was a Justice of the Peace ;
but I don’t think he was ever the happier
for his greatness. I rather think that it
shortened his life, though he was a-most
eighty when he died.”’

My mother invited Amy to stay with us
that night and the next day; but she
answered, ‘* I thank you,— I cannot possibly
stay, for to-morrow is my baking-day.”’

When she was going, we children offered
to lend her some of our story-books. She
looked at them as though she longed to take
them ; then shook her head, and said to my
mother, ‘‘ I have no time to read such things
as these ; but, if you could lend me a good
cookery-book, I should be very glad.”’

The very autumn after the visit I have
described, Mr. Richards was taken down
with a fever. The neighbors kindly offered
assistance, and did all they could for him ;
but he liked best to be tended by Amy, and
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 9

she wished to do all the nursing for him.
One afternoon, when he seemed somewhat
better, and nobody, not even the doctor,
thought him dangerously ill, it happened
that Amy was alone with him. As she sat
by his bedside, he stretched out his thin
hand and laid it on her head, saying, in a
faint voice, ‘‘ Poor Amy, I am sorry to
leave you; you have been a good child to
me. Keep a good girl, love God, and He ’Il
take care of you. You mustn’t live here
all alone when I am gone; but you’ll see
that somebody takes care of old Dolly.”’

‘‘ Why, grandfather,’ said Amy, ‘*‘ you
will live to take care of her yourself.’’

Mr. Richards was silent a moment; then
he asked,

‘* Ts there room between your mother and
your grandmother for me? ‘They ’ll have
to take up the sweet-brier ; but, if it dies,
maybe youll plant another over your poor
old grand’ ther.”’

‘©Q, grandfather,’ cried Amy, ‘‘ don’t
10 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

talk so,— don’t! You will live a great many
years yet, won’t you, dear grandfather ? ”’

“Well Amy, I’ll try,” he said; ‘* and
now I think I will sleep a little.”’

He turned his face toward the wall, and
lay very quiet. Amy sat by him more than
an hour ; then she went out softly and made
him some nice broth. When she came in
with this, she thought that he had slept long
enough ; so, laying her hand lightly on his
shoulder, she said, ‘‘ Come, grandfather,
wake up and take your broth before it gets
cold!’’ But he did not wake. She stooped
over him, and when she saw his face, she
started with fear; it was so white, and the
eyes were so sunken. She laid her hand
on his forehead, and it was quite cold. Her
grandfather was dead!

Then Amy flung herself down beside
him, wound her arms about his neck, and
cried aloud.

It happened that a stranger gentleman
and his wife were at that moment passing
the house in a travelling carriage, and hear-
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 11

ing the mournful cries of the poor girl,
they alighted and came in. The first that
Amy knew, she was lifted gently up from
the bed, and when she looked round she
saw a lady in deep mourning, who held her
in her arms, and was striving to comfort
her. She had never seen the sweet face
of that lady before ; but she loved her at
once, and clung to her as though she were
her own mother.

The strangers, Mr. and Mrs. Temple, had
a little while before lost their only child, a
daughter, about the age of Amy ; and after
hearing Amy’s sad story, and seeing her
lonely condition, they resolved to befriend
her. They stayed in the village near by
till after the funeral of Mr. Richards, wait-
ing to take his grand-daughter home with
them.

When Mr. Temple had led the weeping
Amy out of the little log house, so many
years her dear home, and handed her into
his carriage, he was heard to tell the driver
to drive rather slowly, so as not to hurry too

ie
12 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

much lazy old Dolly, who was fastened
behind.

Mr. and Mrs. Temple soon grew to loving
Amy very much, and finally adopted her as
their own daughter. They were wealthy,
and thinking that she should have a fine
education, they concluded to send her toa
fashionable boarding-school. But, though
Amy was clever, and proved to be a diligent
scholar, she was neither happy nor healthy
there. She grew so pale and languid, at
last, that her friends took her home, and
began to nurse her, and give her medicine.
But, one morning, Mrs. Temple missed her
from the sick room. She searched through
the house, and at length found her in
the kitchen, busy at the ironing-table. Then
it was agreed upon that Amy should do
some house-work every day, and study at
home ; and, I assure you, it was not long
before she was in fine health and spirits.

Amy is a woman now, and has a house
of her own to manage. She married a lit-
erary man— a poet, and a writer of stories.
THE OLD CHAIR-MENDER. 13

I have heard it said that she took him
instead of any one of her wealthy lovers,
because she knew that, as his wife, she
should not be obliged to play the fine lady,
but would always have plenty of good hard,
work to do.
THE TORN FROCK.—A LITTLE STORY FOR
LITTLE GIRLS.

I was the most unlucky child in the world
in respect to my clothes. My frocks and
aprons never kept whole, like those of other
little girls, but somehow went to pieces
before I knew it. If there was a brier in
my path, it was sure to fasten itself to my
pantalet, and tear the trimming off. If
a nail protruded from a box, I was sure to
come in contact with it, and find it was too
much for me. Ifa rail had an ugly splinter,
I was sure to undertake to get over the
fence in that very place ; and if there was
a thorn-bush on my way from school, just
as I was under full speed, my skirts were
sure to be blown against it, and awful con-
sequences to follow.

Some people said that these sad acci-
dents happened to my clothes because I
THE TORN FROCK. 15

never was slow or thoughtful, but did every-
thing with a hop, skip, and jump. But I
knew it was duck. I was born to have my
frocks torn. My mother sometimes talked
of dressing me in stout brown linen ; but it
would have been of no use. I don’t think
I should have been safe in a canvas frock
and cassimere pantalets.

When I was between seven and eight
years of age, my mother went away from
home, to spend some months, and left us
children under the care of a housekeeper. I
suppose that the widow Wilkins was a very
respectable, well-meaning woman ; she kept
the house neatly, sent us regularly to school,
and gave us enough to eat; but I do think
she was rather too hard on me for tearing my
clothes. She didn’t seem to believe in it
being all ill luck. Sometimes I would steal
slyly into the house, about dusk, with a
rent in my frock carefully pinned up, hoping
it would escape her notice ; but she never
failed to spy it out, and to be down upon
me at once. You would have thought that
16 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY «CHILDHOOD.

she mistook me for her bottle of bitters,
labelled, ‘‘ When taken, to be well shaken,”
she exercised me in such a remarkable man-
ner ; then she would settle me in my chair,
as though she meant that I never should
rise again on any occasion. But I did not
care so much for these things as I did for
her talk. Such long lectures as she would
give me on my carelessness; such awful
warning of the poverty and want I was
bringing on myself; such dreadful stories
she would tell of the melancholy end of
little girls who kept on “‘ slitting up ”’ their
frocks and rending their pinafores !

In late years, I have heard women speak
in public — lecture and preach, sometimes
talking very fast, and often quite loud and
brave ; but, even now, as I look back, I
think the widow Wilkins was a wonderful
woman with her tongue.

I did not improve under her severe
rule. Iam sorry to say that I rather grew
worse ; for now, when I was not careless
“

,

+

THE TORN FROCK. 17

I was awkward, from fear of her, and
blundered into tearing my clothes.

At last, our mother came home. How
well I remember that morning! She
arrived early, came to our beds, and waked
us with her kisses. I remember how she
laughed at our youngest, Albert, who did
not know her at first, aid as he was very
bashful, hid under the bed-clothes, and
when she caught him and pulled him out,
said, joyfully, ‘*O, it’s you, mamma! I
thought ’t was a lady.”’

I remember that she brought the little
fellow some toys, the like of which were
never seen in our part of the country.
There was a wee man, called ‘‘ Merry
Andrew,’’ with a mouth on the broad grin,
and you had only to pull a string to make
him fling out his legs and throw up his arms
in a surprising manner. There was a cob-
bler always mending a shoe that was never

idone, and a pasteboard cuckoo, which, with

“alittle squeezing, would send forth a sound
which we were so polite as to call singing.
2
18 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

This my little brother’ smashed the next
day, to see what made the noise. But, most
wonderful of all, was a village, the little
white block-houses all standing in rows on
a green board, and with little figures of men
and women which you could move about.
There was a meeting-house, with a sharp
steeple ; and when all was rightly fixed, a
minister, with a very long face, was just
going into the door, and the people were
following him. But Albert turned this
minister round, moved him across the street,
and made him going into the tavern-door,
which we told him was very wrong.

My sister Carrie and myself received each
a pretty black-eyed doll, all dressed, and a
new frock. Such splendid fine-lady dolls
we had never before seen. Why, they
actually had knee-joints and elbow-joints,
and red Morocco shoes! Our frocks were
of fine buff lawn, figured with the tiniest
white rose-budsin the world ; and our mother
made them in some wonderful new fashion,
THE TORN FROCK. 19

which almost threw us into convulsions of
delight.

There was in a distant part of the yard,
surrounding our house, an old apple-tree,
among the lower branches of which I had a
favorite seat, which I used to reach by the
help of a board, leaned against the trunk
of the tree. Two or three crooked limbs
formed an easy seat, and one higher up
made a nice shelf for books and playthings.

I have heard that the great poetess, Mrs.
Hemans, when a little girl of seven, had such
a perch, where she read Shakspeare. I never
undertook such fine reading in my apple-
tree, but I read ‘‘ The Babes in the Wood’”’
and ‘* Goody Two-Shoes’”’ there, with great
pleasure ; and, though I was no genius,
I rather think I understood them quite
as well as she understood her grand old
Shakspeare. On my shelf, in pleasant
weather, I kept two rather plainly-dressed
cloth-dolls, called Polly and Betsy ; and to
these I went to complain when I had been
ill-used at school, or widow Wilkins’ scold-
20 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

ing had been more than I could bear. I
liked to talk to these two friends, they lis-
tened so respectfully, never interrupting or
contradieting me. I can’t say that they
comforted me, as I was obliged to say every-
thing for them ; but they never blamed me,
or in any way took sides against me.
When, for the first time, I was dressed
in my new buff lawn, and it had been
admired by all in the house, I felt that I
really must gtve Polly and Betsy a sight of
it; and soon I was up in my lofty seat,
spreading out my fine gown, and talking of
the color, the fit, the ruffles and tucks, in
two little admiring voices, which I made
believe came from the pink button-hole
mouths of Polly and Betsy. When they
had said all the pretty and strong words I
could think of, I very uncivilly forgot their
presence, took up my book, and began to
read. The day was sultry, I was tired ; the
story was am old one, and, at last, I fell
fast asleep. When I awoke, some time after
sunset, I found that one of my mischievous
THE TORN FROCK. 21

brothers had taken the board away from the
tree, and that I must get down as best I
could. I was too proud and independent
to call for help, though I knew the boys
must be somewhere near, but jumped at
once. As usual, I forgot to gather my
frock around me; and,as I leaped from my
perch, there came an awful sound!—a
sound I knew too well. As I rose from the
ground and looked about me, 1 found that
my beautiful new frock was torn half across
one breadth, in that hateful zigzag way
that my frocks were always tearing. Of
course, the first thing I did was to sit down
and have a good cry ; then I stole up tomy
chamber by the back stairs, took off my
buff lawn, folded it, laid it away in my
drawer, and put on an old gingham frock,
feeling that it was vastly too good-for me.
After a while, I went down to supper,
though I felt sure I could not swallow a
mouthful. As I took my seat at the table,
my brother Rufus looked up from his bowl
of bread and milk, and said, ‘‘ O ho! you’ve
22 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

come down, have you? I thought you had
gone to roost for the night.”’

I wished to make a clean breast of it, and
tell all to my mother, but did not dare, for
fear she would punish me, or give me what
widow Wilkins had taught me to dread a
thousand times more—a severe scolding.
That night, oh, how I longed to have some
kind fairy come, when I was fast asleep, and
nicely darn my torn frock! I thought, too,
that the wicked being, whose name I never
then dared to speak, and even now would
rather not mention,— that the evil one would
not be so very bad, after all, if he would go
about sewing tears for poor unlucky little
girls while they slept !

The next day, at noon, my mother said
that I need not go back to school, but might
go with her to spend the afternoon at a
neighbor’s house, a most pleasant place. I
knew that she would tell me to wear my
new buff lawn; so I answered, ‘*‘I would
rather go to school, if you please.” My
mother was surprised at this, but she praised
THE TORN FROCK. 23

me for being so fond of my books. How
ashamed I felt at her praises! That night,
she told me that she had invited some little
girls of the house where she had visited to
spend the next afternoon with me. In the
morning, I longed more than ever to tell
her all; I even began,—but the words
seemed to choke me, and I ran away to
school without having confessed. I knew
I should be required to put on the lawn;
and I lingered on the way home, and paused
a long time on the door-step, fearing to go
in, because then my secret must come out.
At last, I softly opened the door, and
stepped into the sitting-room. My mother sat
by the window, sewing. I went up to her
so quietly that she did not hear me. In her
lap lay my new buff frock, and she was
putting the last stitches into the nicest piece
of darning ever done in the world! I
started with both joy and alarm, and my
mother looked round with a smile, saying,
‘‘ Why, my little daughter is late to-day!”’
and that was all! I knelt down by her
24 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

side, hid my face in her lap, had a hearty
cry, and felt better. The girls soon came,
and we had a happy afternoon.

My mother said nothing about my frock
for days after,— not even to ask how I had
torn it. But her silent, forbearing kindness
did more to make me careful in future than
any punishment or scolding could have done.
Yet I still tore my frocks occasionally ; and,
even now, I sometimes tear my best dresses,
and expect to tear them, as long as I live.

When, a year or two after my apple-tree
adventure, I saw my sister Sophie cutting
up my out-grown buff lawn for a bed-
quilt, I begged a scrap containing that
nicely-darned rent, which I had always
thought the prettiest part of the frock, and
laid it carefully away among my little treas-
ures, where I kept it for many years, as
‘‘a specimen of my mother’s fine needle-
work,’’ I told others, but, in truth, as a
reminder of her patience and goodness
toward her careless and luckless child.

THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE.

One summer afternoon, when I was about
eight years of age, I was standing at an
eastern window, looking at a beautiful rain-
bow, that, bending from the sky, seemed to
be losing itself-in a thick, swampy wood,
about a quarter ofa mile distant. We had
_ just had a violent thunder-storm ; but now
the dark heavens: had cleared up, a fresh,
breeze was blowing from the south, the
rose-bushes by the window were dashing
rain-drops against the panes, the robins were
singing merrily from the cherry-trees, and
all was brighter and pleasanter than ever.
It happened that no one was in the room
with me, then, but my brother Rufus, who
was just recovering from a severe illness,
and who was sitting, propped up with pil-
lows, in an easy-chair, looking out, with me,
at the rainbow.
26 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

‘¢ See, brother,”’ I said, ‘it drops right
down among the cedars, where we go in
the spring to find winter-greens !”’

“Do you know, Gracie,” said my
brother, with a very serious face, ‘* that if
you should go to the end of the rainbow, you
would find there purses filled with money,
and great pots of gold and silver ?”’

“¢Ts it truly so?” I asked.

‘Truly so,’ answered my brother, with
a smile. Now, I was a simple-hearted child,
that believed everything that was told me, _
although I was again and again imposed
upon; so, without another word, I darted
out of the door, and set forth toward the
wood. My brother called after me as
loudly as he was able, but I did not heed
him. I cared nothing for the wet grass,
which was sadly drabbling my clean frock ;
on and on I ran; I was so sure that I knew
just where that rainbow ended. I remem-
ber how glad and proud I was in my
thoughts, and what fine presents I promised
to all my friends, out of my great riches.

=

@
THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE, 27

Father should have a pair of new gold- *
rimmed spectacles, and a silver tobacco-box.
Grandmother should have a gold snuff-box,
and silver knitting-needles. I would allow
my mother two or three purses of money,
but would reserve the right to lay it out
for her, in gayer dresses and caps than her
erave taste would allow her to purchase.
My eldest sister should have a white horse,
with the longest possible tail, and a crim-
son side-saddle, with a silver stirrup. To
my sister Carrie and myself I promised
rings, necklaces, breast-pins, silk dresses
and false curls, in great abundance. My
elder brothers should have watches, guns,
silver fish-hooks, and each a scarlet soldier-
coat, and a pair of green velvet pantaloons.
For Albert, the youngest, I would buy a
rocking-horse, that should whinny when he
should mount it, as his cuckoo had sung
when squeezed. Carlo should have a new
red Morocco collar, hung with silver bells ;
and I even resolved to furnish a silver ring
for the nose of my pet pig, Nuggie.
28 ‘RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

So thinking, and laying delightful plans,
almost before I knew it, I had reached the
cedar-grove, and the end of the rainbow
was not there! But I saw it shining down
among the trees a little further off; so on
and on I struggled, through the thick bushes
and over logs, till I came within the sound
of a stream which ran through the swamp.
Then I thought, ‘‘What if the rainbow
should come down right into the middle of
that deep, muddy brook!’’ Ah! but I was
frightened for my heavy pots of gold and
silver, and my purses of money. How
should I ever find them’ there? and what a
time I should have getting them out! I
reached the bank of the stream, and ‘‘ the
end was not yet.’’ But I could see it a
little way off, on the other side. I crossed
the creek on a fallen tree, and still ran on,
though my limbs seemed to give way, and
my side ached with fatigue. The woods
grew thicker and darker, the ground more
wet and swampy, and Ifound, as many grown
people had found before me, that there was
THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. 29

rather hard travelling in a journey after
riches. Suddenly, I met in my way a large
porcupine, who made himself still larger
when he saw me, as a cross cat raises its
back, and makes tails ata dog. Fearing
that he would shoot his sharp quills at me,
and hit me all over, I ran from him as
fast as my tired feet would carry me. In
my fright and hurry, I forgot to keep my
eye on the rainbow, as I had done before ;
and when, at last, I remembered and looked
for it, ’twas nowhere in sight! I suppose
because it had quite faded away. When I
saw that it was indeed gone, I burst into —
tears; for I had lost all my treasures, and
had nothing to show for my pilgrimage but
muddy feet, and a wet and torn frock. So
I set out for home. But I soon foufd that
my troubles had only begun; I could not
find my way ; I was lost. I could not tell
which was east or west, north or south, but
wandered about, here and there, crying and
calling, though I knew that no one could hear
me. All at once, I heard voices shouting
30 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

and hallooing ; but, instead of being rejoiced
at this, I was frightened, fearing that the
Indians were upon me! [ had never before
been afraid of the Onondagas, who were a
harmless, peaceful tribe; but that week I
had been listening to a novel called ‘* The
Wept of Wish-ton-wish,”’ a story of the old
Indian wars, which my mother had read
aloud to my invalid brother. I remember
how, one night, when I was thought abed
and asleep, I was hid behind, or rather
under, my brother’s great arm-chair, with
ears open and mouth close shut, scarcely
daring to breathe, till I was found out by
my sobs for the death of poor Uncas. Now,
I thought of the cruel deeds of those bloody
Indians of the old time, till, getting more
and more alarmed, 1 crawled under some
bushes, by the side of a large log, and lay
perfectly still. I was wet, cold, scared,—
altogether very miserable indeed; yet,
when the voices came near, I did not start
up and show myself. At last, I heard my
own name called; but I remembered that
THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. Bl

Indians were very cunning, and thought -
they might have found it out some way; so I
did not answer. Then came a voice near
me, that sounded like that of my eldest
brother, who lived away from home, and
whom I had not seen for many months;
but I dared not believe the voice was his.
Soon some one sprang up on to the log by
which I lay, and stood there, calling. I
could not see his face ; [ could only see
the tips of his toes, but by them I saw that
he wore a nice pair of boots, and not moc-
casins. Yet I remembered that some
Indians dressed ‘like white folks. I knew
a young chief, who was quite a dandy ;
who not only
** Got him a coat and breeches,
And looked like a Christian man,”’

but actually wore a fine ruffled shirt, outside
of all. So still kept quiet, till I heard”
shouted over me a pet name, which this
brother had given me. ~ It was the funniest
name in the world. I don’t know where
he found it. Iyvather think he made it up
himself,—** Roxana Kusberger !”’
32 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

I knew that no Indian knew of the name,
as it was a little family secret; so I sprang
up, and caught my brother about the ankles.
I hardly think that an Onondaga could have
given a louder yell than he gave then ; and
he jumped so that he fell off the log down
by my side. But nobody was hurt; and,
after kissing me till he had kissed away all
my tears, he hoisted me on to his shoulder,
called my other brothers, who were hunt-
ing in different directions, and we all set
out for home.

I had been gone nearly three hours, and
had wandered a number of miles. Joseph’s
coming, and asking for me, had first set
them to inquiring and searching me out.

When I went into the room where my
brother Rufus sat, after IT had had a bath
and a change of dress, he said, ‘* Why, my
poor little sister! I did not mean to send
you off on such a wild-goose chase to the
end of the rainbow. I thought you would
know I was only quizzing you.”’

I am afraid I made up a naughty face, as
THE RAINBOW-PILGRIMAGE. 33

I answered, ‘‘ It was very cruel of you,
and now I will not give you that fine rifle I
was going to buy.”’

Then my eldest brother took me on his
knee, and told me what the rainbow really
was : that it was only painted air, and did
not rest on the earth, so nobody could ever
find the end; and that God had set it in
the cloud to remind him and us of his
promise, never again to drown the world
with a flood.

‘OQ, I think God’s promise would ke a
beautiful name for the rainbow!”’ I said.

‘“¢ Yes,’’ replied my mother, ‘* but it tells
us something more than that he will not send
great floods upon the earth,—it tells us of
his beautiful love always bending over us
from the skies. And I trust that when my
little girl sets forth on a pilgrimage to find
God’s love, she will be led by the rainbow
of his promise through all the dark places
of this world, to ‘treasures laid up in
heaven,’ better, far better than silver or
gold.”’

3
DENNIS O’BRIEN.

Once, when I was quite a little girl, lL
went to spend a few months in the family
of my uncle, Colonel Grove, who lived in
an old country-house, on a large farm, some
twenty or thirty milesfrom us. Here I was
always as happy and contented as in my own
home, as everybody was kind to me, and I
was allowed to have pretty much my own
way.

I found living at my uncle’s an Irish lad,
a sort of boy of all work, named Dennis
O’Brien. He was about sixteen, but rather
short of his age, with a broad; ruddy face,
bright blue eyes, and auburn hair. Though
not handsome, he looked frank and intelli-
gent, and almost everybody liked him at first
sight. He had always been industrious, —
had earned enough moagéy in Ireland to
bring him to this country, —and he was now

£


DENNIS O’BRIEN. 35

working very hard, and saving every penny,
so as to be able to send for his widowed
mother and young sister. Was he not a
noble boy ?

Dennis and I struck up a great friendship,
at once. In the long winter evenings, when
there was company in the parlor, I liked
nothing better than to sit by the great kitchen
fire, and listen to his stories of Irelandj—
especially of the Irish fairies, or ‘little
folk,’’ as he called them. But, though Den-
nis talked a great deal at these times, he was
never idle, but was always making axe-
helves, hoe-handles, or pudding-sticks, —
which he sold in the neighborhood, — or
small cross-bows and arrows for me, as I was
much given to shooting at the barn-yard
fowls, who took it all in good part, as they
were seldom hit. I have now a little bow,
and two arrows, whittled out of a shingle by
the great General Houston, but which, I am
sorry to say, do not come up to those my
Irish friend used to make for me.

One evening, after sitting quite still for
86 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

some minutes, Dennis asked, in a humble
way, if I would teach him to read. I was
astonished; a boy sixteen years old not
know how to read! But I ran for a
spelling-book, and began at once to teach
him. I never knew any one learn so easily
and eagerly ashe. Isoon had him through
a—b abs, but he stuck a while on ‘‘ Baker.”
After that, all seemed smooth sailing, and
we were in words of four and five syllables
before we knew it. Ah, I was a proud girl
about those days! I had never been a re-
markably good scholar myself; I could
count up on my fingers, without the aid of
my toes, all the times I had been at the
head of the second class in spelling. Now
I found out that teaching was the work for
me —to sit with the spelling lesson before
me, so that there was no danger of my mak-
ing mistakes, and laugh or look severe at
the blunders of my pupil. I began to put
on the airs of aschool-ma’am, and begged a
little old penknife of my aunt, with which I .
was always whittling hen’s quills into tooth-
DENNIS 0’ BRIEN. wr.

picks, and calling them pens; and if my —
pupil had been a little smaller, I don’t know
but I should have flourished a switch about
his ears. He was so provokingly good, he
never would have given me any occasion to
use it; as it was, he scarcely gave me
chances of reproving him enough to keep
up my dignity. *

When Dennis went from spelling to read-
ing, I gave him, as a “‘reward of metit,”’
a nice ‘* New England Primer.’ I first set
him to learning the verses ae :

**TIn Adam’s ; fall
me sinned all,’’

‘*You know about Adam’s fall, don’t
you, Dennis ?”’ I said, very solemnly.

‘‘Och, yes, Miss,’’ he answered; ‘‘he
fell from an apple-tree,; in the Garden =
Aden, — did n’t he ?”’

“QO Dennis,” said I, ‘*I’m afraid your
folks are heathens.’’

But Dennis got his lesson verywwell, only
he would always say,
88 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

** Goliah’s beauteous wife
Made David seek his life,’’

when the good little book says it was
Uriah’s wife that did the mischief.

‘‘ Faith,’ he would say, “and did n’t
David go out to slay Goliah with a sling,
and so sake his life? ”’

‘¢ But you don’t suppose that little David
would want to marry a big acai wife —
you stupid fellow !”’

When Colonel Grove heard what I had
been doing, *he praised me very much; and
when he found how anxious Dennis was to
learn, he bought him books, and sent him
to the district school. I was willing to let
him go; for, to tell the truth, I was getting
rather tired of teaching ; besides, I some-
times suspected Dennis of slyly making fun
of me; he certainly did not stand in much
awe of his school-ma’am.

. After school, Dennis used often to draw
me on a large sled to the top of a steep hill,
near the house, then sit down in front of me

» to steer with his feet, and down we would
@ DENNIS O'BRIEN. 39

go, like a flash! Ah, how I enjoyed the
sport! One very cold evening, he took me
out, wrapped in a warm cloak of my aunt's,
and fearing that my feet would be cold, he
drew this over them, and tied it down with
his handkerchief. We were hardly started
on the first course, before he happened to
tip us over, aid I began to roll down the
hill. Dennis called to me to stop; but
how could I stop, bagged up as Iwas? I
rolled on, faster and faster, and did not
pause till I was half across the pond, at the
bottom of the hill.

My uncle had many maple-trees in his
wood, from which he made sugar every
spring. The place where this agreeable
work was done was called ‘‘ the sugar-
camp; ”’ there were great iron ketiles, set
upon large stones, for boiling down the sap,
and bright fires kept burning under them ;
there was a shanty built of green hemlock
boughs, quite nice and comfortable. Alto-
gether, this sugar-camp was a very pleasant
ii My atuit, her daughter and I, visited

7
40 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILBHOOD.

it daily, and watched my cousin and Dennis
at their work, which, though really hard,
seemed to me to be half play.

One night Dennis happened to be all
alone in the camp. We had just been
‘“sugaring-off,’”’ and a dozen pans, filled with
the nice, soft sugar, were standing in the
shanty. My uncle had given Dennis all
that he could make after that day; and, as
you may suppose, the lad was very happy
and proud.

Near midnight,.he took his buckets, and
went to some trees, at a distance, for more
sap; and when he came back, he found a
number of young men and boys in the
shanty, making free with the sugar. He
set down his buckets, and boldly shouted
out, ‘* This way, Colonel Grove! this way,
Master Harry! Here are ¢haves staling
your sugar.” |

In a minute, the cowardly fellows scat-
tered and ran, crackling through the brush-
wood, and tumbling over one another in
DENNIS O'BRIEN. 41

their fright, leaving Dennis to laugh at his
own wit.

How kind was Dennis always! I remem-
ber that this spring, when he was ploughing,
he would let me sit on the little round of
timber before him, with my feet on the
plough, and sometimes even let me hold the
reins. I don’t suppose it would look very
proper in me to indulge myself in that way
now; but, to this day, I cannot think of
any kind of riding half so pleasant.

IT soon had an opportunity to repay Den-
nis for some of his kindness. One day, I
was sent to carry him his dinner to a distant
field, where he was ploughing with one
horse, between the rows of corn. I found
him unhitching his plough to come home.
He said the little boy who had’ been riding
the horse had been sent for by his mother,
and he must give up for the day, though
the corn needed ploughing sadly. ‘‘ Stop,
Dennis!’ I said; ‘‘I’ll ride horse for this
afternoon.’’. He laughed at me at first, but
after a while agreed to let me try. I did
42 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

my best, and we got along famously.
Though I went home at night dusty, tired,
and sunburned, I felt that 1 had done my
duty, and earned my supper of bread and
milk,

After this visit, I did not see any more
of Dennis, but I heard that at the end of the
very next year he was able to send enough
money to Ireland to bring over his mother
and sister. He hired alittle place for them”
in the country, which he afterwards bought.
Though he still worked very hard through
spring, summer, and fall, he gave every
spare moment he could get to his books,
and every winter attended school. At last,
he had a fine education, and commenced the
study of the law. Soon after he began to
practise, he moved out West, and I heard no
more of him. |

Not many months ago, as I was crossing
the Alleghany Mountains, a friend in the
cars introduced a fine-looking gentleman to
me as ‘‘Judge O’Brien, of Iowa.’”’ The
stranger smiled as though he knew me very
*DENNIS O'BRIEN. 43

well, and I thought I had seen his pleasant
face before ; but I could not tell when or
where. There was a man sitting near us,
holding a little model of a patent plough in
his hand. This Judge O’Brien took for a
moment, and pointing to the little round of
wood between the handles, said, ‘*-When I
was a farmer-boy, there was a little black-
eyed gypsy of a child, who used to sit be-
fore me, on this part of the plough, and ride
by the hour.”’

Then I knew him; but I only said,—
‘¢ What a sad romp she must have been !”’

We just then began to go down an in-
clined plane, very swiftly; and the judge
said, with a sly smile, —

‘This is very fast riding ; but don’t you
think it is pleasanter to slide down a steep
hill, on a sled, in the winter time ?”’

‘Yes, Dennis,’’ I answered, laughing,
“if you don’t let some awkward fellow tie
you up, tip you over, and dump you down
hill, like a bag of potatoes! ”’

After that, we had a long, lively talk
44 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

about old times; and then my friend told
me of his success in the West; how he had
made quite a fortune, had been appointed
judge, and had married ‘‘the best wife in
the world.”’

‘**T thank God,’’ he said, ‘for bringing
me to America, and giving me _ such
friends.””

But Dennis O’Brien would never have
had such friends, if he had not himself been
so good, so faithful, and industrious.
STRAWBERRYING.

One pleasant Saturday, in June, when IJ
was about ten years of age, and my sister
Carrie twelve, we had an unexpected visit
from a little girl of the«village,— Susan
Smith, the merchant’s in We were
happy to see her, but we really did not
know what to do with her. She was no
older than Carrie, and,small of her age,
but in her own opinion quite too much of
a woman to play with dolls, though we had
a pretty little house fitted up with every
convenience (it had once been the smoke-
house), and containing no less than fourteen
inhabitants, of all sizes and conditions.
She was quite too grand to take any notice
of our pet dogs, cats, ducks or chickens,
and too much of a little coward to mount
Milly, and take a good gallop. At length,
my mother proposed that we should go after

5 :
,
Pa
4 -

46 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

strawberries, to a meadow, about a mile
distant. We joyfully agreed, and started
off at once, with our baskets on our arms ;
all three,—or vated. for Carlo, the
pointer, was with us,—-&s merry and noisy
as we could well be. Susan Smith said a
great many bright things; at least, she
laughed at them a good deal, and Carrie
and I thought it no more than polite to
laugh also. She had a brother Sam, of
whom she was very proud, and she talked
about him nearly all the way.’ It was very
amiable, in her to love her brother ; but,
betw you and me, dear children, there
are Some better young men in the world
than Sam Smith. I am sorry to say that
- he was a wild, idle fellow, that nobody
"knew much good of As we were passing
| where my brothers were hoeing
corn, Susan exclaimed, ‘‘ Why, do your
brothers do such work as that? Our Sam
tends store in the day-time, and, in the
evening, he dresses up, oh, so fine! and
goes to parties and balls.’’




e
*
STRAWBERRYING. 47

‘‘Tsn’t it wicked to go to balls ?’’ I asked.
‘¢ My Sunday-school teacher says it is.”’

‘¢ Why,’ answered Susan, looking very
much astonished at my stupidity, ‘‘ didn’t
I tell you our Sam goes to balls ?—and our
Sam can’t sin.’’

After crossing our farm, and passing
through a piece of woods, we came upon
the strawberry-plot. We had never found
a great many here before, but this season
they were very plentiful. We had only to

part the high grass to find the ground all
red with the ripe, luscious fruit. Sister
and I went to work in good earnest, saying
how pleasant it would be to take home our
baskets quite full; but Susan soon com-
plained of being tired. She would pick
away diligently for a little while, and
then lie down in the grass and eat all she
had gathered. At last, as she lay looking
up into the sky, she called to us to stop,

and start for home, as a,storm was surely â„¢

coming on. We saw that the clouds were
rolling up, dark and threatening; but our

7
*

.
?

-
Pa

al

48 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

baskets were not quite filled,—so we only
picked the faster. Before we knew it, the
rain was upon us. It was one of those
pelting, soaking showers, which drive you
to seek any shelter. There was but one
house in sight,— a little log building, on the
edge of the wood,— and to this we ran. The
woman who came to the door knew my sis-
ter and me at once; she had often spun
yarn and woven linen for our mother. She
took us mto her one room, very kindly
kindled a fire, and began to take off our
wet clothes, declaring that we hadn’t ‘‘a
dry thread to our backs.’”’ She was all
alone, she said, as her husband (her “ old

“man,”’ she called him) was “down to the

village,” and her son Jerry had gone ‘to
his grandther’s ;’’ so we need not be-afraid.
But the poor woman was soon puzzled what
to do. She had never had any little girls, and
had but. two spare dresses of her own,— one

- for my sister, and one for Susan. What

was I to wear, while my clothes were dry-
ing? Presently, she begah to‘laugh; she

-
STRAWBERRYING. ° 49

was a good-natured, funny old lady, and
said she thought I would ‘‘ become”’ Jerry’s
new summer suit. JI refused to put it on,
at first, saying I would rather go to bed for
an hour or two; but she said she didn’t
want her nice bed tumbled and torn to
pieces by children. I shall always suspect
that worthy Mrs. Jones really wanted the
fun of seeing me dressed in boy’s clothes.
Any how, she had her way, and I was soon
rigged out in a pair of fine tow pantaloons,
und a long-tailed striped linen coat, with
great, shiny brass buttons.

Jerry was a big boy, of thirteen or four-
teen,—so his clothes were not a very nice
fit. The coat-tails nearly touched the floor,
and Mrs. Jones was obliged to roll up the
cuffs several inches to get at my hands;
indeed, I felt very much at large in the
whole suit.

O, how Susan and Carrie Iaughed at me !
But they could not say much, for Mrs.
Jones was a\ery: stout person, and they
looked like -tw6old women in. her great

4

*
50 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

brown gingham frocks, with the big balloon-
sleeves. Mrs. Jones told us that we should
not make sport of one another; but I sus-
pected her of sticking her head into the
cupboard, two or three times, to hide her
own laughter.

When she had made us ‘all nice and
comfortable,’’ as she said, she set out a
little round table, covered it with a white
cloth, placed on it some excellent bread and
milk, hulled some of our strawberries, and
invited us to sit up and take our dinner.
She had had hers two hours before. We
gladly obeyed. I helped the ladies politely,
and behaved like a gentleman, as well as I
knew how. I remember how Susan Smith
took up her pewter spoon, turned it over
and over, and looked at it very contemptu-
ously, which was certainly rather ungrate-
ful and uncivil. Mrs. Jones did not seem
to mind it, but, as the rain had now ceased,
she took our wet and soiled frocks, and car-
ried them to a stream, a little way off, to
rinse them. When she was gine, Susan com-
STRAWBERRYING. 51

plained that she could hardly lift her spoon,
and that she tasted the tin of her bright
basin. She said she had never been used
to eating bread and milk out of anything
but a china bowl, with a silver spoon. I
answered that these spoons were the best that
Mrs. Jones had ; that they were clean and
bright, and that I did not see but that bread
and milk and strawberries tasted as good
eaten from a tin basin as from grand-
mother’s ‘silver porringer. That hushed
her at once. I don’t think she had ever
heard of a silver porringer before. I did
not see but that Miss Susan ate as heartily
as sister and myself. Fine ladies do not
always have delicate appetites.

When the dinner-dishes had been cleared
away, and our frocks were spread on chairs
before the fire to dry, Mrs. Jones went up
the ladder-stairs to her weaving, and left
us to amuse ourselves as we could. I had
lost my shame-facedness, and felt in very
good spirits since dinner. Seeing an old
hat of Jerry’s hanging against the wall, I
52 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

took it down, placed it on my head, a little
to one side, and began striding up and down
the room, thrusting my hands into my
pockets, and talking large, in a way very
unbecoming toa little girl, but which I
thought only brave and manly inaboy. For-
getting the length of the pantaloons, [ some-
how got entangled, and tripped myself up.
But I was on my feet in an instant, as large
as ever.

The girls, who were more prudent and
kept their seats, laughed heartily at my
fall.

‘¢T think, sir,’ said my sister, ‘* that you
would walk more gracefully if you would
shorten your suspenders — don’t you say so
too, Susan ?”’

** You be quiet, old ladies!” said I;
** what do you know about suspenders, and
such things ?”’

Just at that moment Carlo set up a loud
barking, and I heard a whistle and a step
near the door! I gave but one bound, and
was under the bed! The quilt came down
STRAWBERRYING. 53

low in front, and I felt quite safe. But,
alas! those unlucky long coat-tails, with
their shining buttons, betrayed me! They
were partly left out, and Jerry Jones—for it
was he who came in—saw them at once.
‘‘Why, how came my Sunday-coat under
the bed?”’ he said, and, stooping down, he
pulled me from my hiding-place. ‘‘ Hello!”
he cried, ‘* what fellow is here, rigged out
in my clothes? Let me see.who you are,
won't you?’’ And, while I struggled and
cried, he laughingly pulled my hands away
from my face. ‘* Why,’’ said he, ‘* this
boy isa girl! O, I know you now! But
don’t cry; this kind of dress is becoming
to you, and my new suit never looked so
handsome before, — don’t ery !”’

‘‘ Jerry Jones, do you clear out of the
house !’’ called his mother from the top of
the ladder. Jerry did not wait for another
word, but took himself off. He stayed in
the garden till our clothes were ironed, and
we started for home, when he asked leave to
go with us, and carry our baskets. ~All the
54 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY ssl
way, though he ‘talked constantly,a never
once spoke of catching me in sucha mF th
lous dress ; and though I was so ashamed
I could hardly say a word, even to thank
him when he helped me over a fence, or a
wet place, I liked him, and always liked
“him, from that day to this. Mrs. Jones, too,
that good, kind woman, | must always think
pleasantly of her. She and her * old man’”’
were living on the same place, but in a new
house, when I heard about them last. By
great industry and economy, they were able
to educate Jerry, to send him to college.
He is a minister now; but, for all that, |
don’t believe he has grown too solemn to
laugh whenever he remembers pulling me
out from under the bed, by the long skirts
of his striped linen coat.


TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY,

Near the home of my early childhood,
there lived a plain but wealthy farmer, by
the name of Austin. He was a pleasant,
intelligent man, and his wife was an excel-
lent woman. ‘Phey had a fine family of
children, — from Ann, about sixteen, down
to Johnny, a bright little rogue of six.
But the pleasantest and cleverest of all was
Frank, the oldest son — a happy, handsome,
hearty, funny fellow, whom everybody liked,
although he was rather mischievous, and
fond of playing off little tricks. More was
pardoned to him than to any one else, be-
cause he was never ill-natured, even when
he seemed most wild and lawless. 4

Mr. Austin had a sister married to a rich’
merchant of the city of Albany, Mr. Shelby,
who had a son about the age of Frank, a good
enough boy at heart, but rather wild in his
56 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

ways, and full of foolish, fine-gentleman
notions. One spring, when Frank was about
thirteen, he made a short visit to the city,
and when he came home, brought his cousin
with him to spend the summer and fall. It
was whispered about the neighborhood that
-Master Tom was sent into the country
because ‘‘ his folks could n’t manage him at
home.’” Ido not know that this was the
case ; but very likely the report was correct.

I was very intimate with Hattie Austin,
one of the dearest and prettiest playmates
of my childhood, and happened to be

making her a visit when the boys arrived.

Frank leaped down the steps first, embraced
his mother heartily, and hugged all the
children. Master Tom Shelby descended
with slow dignity. He was dressed ina
suit of fine blue broadcloth—the panta-
loons tightly fitting, and strapped down

- under a pair of stylish, narrow-toed, high-

heeled boots. His delicate hands were en-
cased:in dark kid gloves, and very much on
one sude of his head he wore a black velvet
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY. 57

cap, with a long dangling tassel. His hair
was long and straight; by the way,
Frank could afterwards vex him very much
by telling that it curled naturally in Albany,
but that somehow it straightened out more
and more, the further he travelled from
French hair-dressers. I remember Tom
so plainly because he was the first dandy I
ever Saw. |

The first thing he did was to brush the
dust from his polished boots with his cam-
bric handkerchief ; then, looking up to the
driver, he drawled out, ‘* Boy, will you
hand me down my dressing-case ?”’

‘*¥es, grandfather,’ answered the good-
natured driver, taking off that elegant arti-
cle, and the other baggage.

That afternoon, a number of the boys and
girls of the neighborhood came to welcome
Frank home, and to have a peep at the
young stranger. I never shall forget the
airs that fellow gave himself. He walked
about the yard where we were at play, for
_ all the world, as a fine peacock struts among

*
By
5S RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

a crowd of pullets, ducks, and young
roosters. How scornfully he eyed our
homely clothes, and refused to join in our
merry game of ‘‘tag,’”’ saying if was too
rude and childish! Some of us took off our
stockings and shoes, to run the faster, and
he looked down at our bare feet with as
much horror as though they had been hoofs
or claws. But he soon found out, as some
great people had done before him, that it —
was tiresome work to be grand. We let
him alone, and he soon came down from his
stilts. He began to talk about Albany:
‘¢ We do this,”’ and *‘ We have that, in Al-
bany;’’ everything was handsomer and
finer there than in the country.

‘¢ Dreadful big of his Albany !”’ said little
Johnny. I had read in my copy-book, that
‘¢God made the country, and man made the
town,’’ and I told him so, right to his face,
and said I did n’t think men had better set
up to do things better than God.

‘*T don’t know about that,’ he said;
‘but I do know that we city people put up

%



TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 59

handsomer buildings than you country people
ever dreamed of. My father, now, lives in
a great brass house, with a brick knocker on
itt”

What a laugh we had at his blunder!

In the morning, we all went to take a
stroll in the woods. On the way, Tom
amused himself, and, I must confess, us
also, by telling of the tricks that, before he
left home, he had played off on Frank, who,
he said, was ‘*as green as that meadow,” ©
pointing to a wheat-field. He had made
his poor visiter drink the water from his
finger-glass, for lemonade ; had sent him to —
the Female Academy, telling him it was the —
Capitol; and to an undertaker’s to buy a
new trunk; and one evening he sent him
home on the full run, by pointing to a watch-
man, and telling him that after one appeared
in the streets all strange boys were liable
to be draggedg off to the watch-house.
Frank langhed good-humoredly while Tom
was relating these cunning exploits; but
shook his head once in a while, as much as

a
.

+

a

60 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

to say, ‘* Wait a bit, my lad, and I’ll pay
you!”’

As we were passing through a cow-
pasture, on the edge of the wood, we came
upon a flock of geese, with a host of goslings,
and a fierce old gander flew at us, hissing
like a serpent. Tom started back, and
talled out, ‘‘ Why, Frank, what is the mat-
ter with that great white goose, that it hisses
so?”

‘Tt does behave strangely,’’ said Frank,
quite soberly ; ‘* what can ailit 2 Can it
be that it has gone mad? ”’

In amoment Tom took to his heels, and
did not stop till he reached the wood, rods

‘ away. While we were screaming with

laughter, Frank called out, ‘‘ Stop, Tom!
stop!—it’s only a gander; you ’re the
goose yourself ! ’’

In the afternoon, Tom brought out his

. fishing-tatkle, — his nice-jginted rods, his

delicate lines, and his flies, —and invited

a Frank to go trouting with him. -T ough he
~ talked ‘large, as usual, Frank saw es
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 61

that he knew little or nothing of that sort
of fishing. So he started out with him,
stopped at the first piece of water they came
across, put his finger on his lip in token of
silence, then lazily flung himself on the
grass under a willow, to watch the sport.
The little sheet of water was nothing but a
frog-pond,; weedy and muddy, where fish
had never made their appearance. Tom
had heard that trout were exceedingly shy,
and went very softly to work, never
speaking above a whisper to Frank. After
about an hour, he concluded that flies were
not inviting bait, and, by Frank’s advice,
used worms instead.

‘¢ Do they bite now ?’”’ whispered Frank,
yawning, for he had taken a nice nap in the
shade of the willow.

**No,” said Tom, ‘ but hin begin to —
nibble; ’’ and in a minute after he cried,
jupfally, ‘* Now! have one! Come, Frank,
and helpgme out with it. I think it must be
a salmon-trout.’’

ip _ But before Frank reached him, he pulled

.
:

7 *
a*

62 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

up a great mud-turtle, which he had hooked
by the leg. Frank rolled on the ground
with laughter, and Tom did not soon hear
the last of his fine ‘‘ salmon-trout.”’

The next day, however, Frank took his
cousin to a real trout stream, some miles
distant, and taught him how to capture that
most shy and delicious fish.

Not long after this, Tom proposed a hunt.
Now, Frank was a good shot, but Tom knew
about as much of hunting as he had known
of trouting. Yet you would have supposed,
from his way of talking, that he was a per-
fect Nimrod—a ‘mighty hunter.” He
had an elegant little fowling-piece, and all
the accoutrements, even to a hunting-jacket
of the latest English fashion. But, alas! his
fine outfit brought him neither skill nor
luck ; he popped away incessantly, and, as
the boys say, ‘‘ killed nothing but powder.”’
At last, Frank, who had separated from him,
and had nearly filled his game-jag with
squirrels and partridges, took pity on the
poor fellow. He happened, himself, to have
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE couNTRY. 63

shot an old owl, and, climbing a tree, he
fixed this on a large limb, so that it looked
very lifelike and natural. Then, going for
Tom, he led him softly within sight of the
game, telling him that there was a big bird
of some sort, he might have for the shooting.
Thinking that a big bird would require a
big charge, Tom put in a double quantity
of powder and shot, and the consequence
was, that he was kicked clean over — boys
will understand how. But he brought down
the owl, and never would believe but —
he had the first shot at him.

A few days after this, Mr. Austin said to
his young guest, ‘‘ I’ve a letter from your
father, my boy, and he tells me to set you
to work, and get some of the nonsense out
of you. J don’t want to put you to hard
labor; you may do as you please; but
Frank, here, has been fooling about long
enough, — he must go to work.”

Tom turned up his aristocratic nose at
the thought of his working on the farm ;
and when he saw Frank shoulder his hoe,

me
64 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

and go cheerfully over the hill to the corn-
field, he wondered at and pitied him.

But Tom had somehow become attached
to his good-natured playmate ; and, as he
idled away hour after hour of the pleasant
morning, through the house and about the
yard, he found himself very lonely and
stupid.

By the middle of the afternoon of the
second day, he felt that he really could not
stand it any longer; so paid a visit to the
corn-field, ‘‘ just to see how they got along,”’
he said. After watching his cousin a while,
he went to Mr. Austin, and asked for a
hoe, —‘* just to help Frank a little.”’ His
uncle gave him one, with a smile, telling —
him to be careful of his fine clothes.
Though Tom found that this work was even
harder than fishing for trout in a frog-pond,
— though it made his back ache, and almost
blistered his hands,— yet he liked it, and
hoed his row bravely. The next morning,
after an early breakfast, he drew on an old
pair of boots, rolled up his pantaloons,
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE COUNTRY. 65 .

shouldered his hoe, and set out with the ~°
other workmen, feeling very stout and im-
portant. In the course of the week, he
found in his room a regular farmer’s suit of
clothes, — more easy than elegant,— of
strong, but cool material. These he put on
with much pleasure ; indeed, it was'soon
hard to persuade him to dress himself in
broadcloth, even to go to church. He said
that, in tow jacket and corduroy trousers, a
man had room,—a man could do as he
pleased,— and that a good straw hat was
the thing for a man, after all.

Mr. Austin gave his nephew a small piece e
of land in the corn-field, for a melon-patch.
Tom planted and cultivated it, and was very
proud of the thriving condition of his water-
melons and canteleups. It happened that a
neighboring farmer had a fine melon-patch
in the very next field. This Mr. J ohnson @i |
was a cross, disobliging man, on whom the
boys loved to play little mischievous tricks,
—so 1 suppose Tom did not think he was
proposing anything wicked, when he said

9


66 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

to his cousin, one evening in September,
‘‘ Frank, let’s go, to-night, and hook old
Johnson’s water-melons ! ”’

‘Do you mean steal them, Tom ?”’ asked
Frank.

‘Why, yes; if you’ve a mind to calla
little fun by such a hard name. I don’t see,
for my part, what harm there could be in
taking a few water-melons from such a stingy
old fellow.’’

Frank, with all his wildness, had never
been guilty of a mean or a dishonest act ;
yet now, after thinking a moment, he agreed
to go with his cousin, but persuaded him to
wait till the moon was down, and it was
quite dark. Then, by a roundabout way
through the woods, he led Tom to his own
melon-patch, where he told him to hurry and
fill the basket, while he kept watch at a

@ distance. He afterwards said that he

ever came so near dying with silent laugh-
_ ter, as he did when he saw Tom creeping
* poftly about on all fours, stealing his own
melons, thinking that they were Mr. John-
TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE CouNTRY. 67

son’s! At last, hearing some noise near, —
a cow, or a colt, perhaps,—he shouted,
‘*Run, Tom! run! Look out for old John-
son! ’’— and started for home, at full speed.
Tom followed fast, breathing hard, and
dropping a melon or two, in his fright. But
he reached the house with three fine ones,
of which he ate enough to make him so ill
that he was obliged to lie abed and take
inedicine the next forenoon. At night,
when he was much better, Frank confessed
the trick he had played off; and, I assure
you, the poor fellow made up a worse
face at the story than he had at the
bitter dose of the morning. Yet he did not
keep anger long, and he never forgot the
hard lesson he had learned,—never at-
tempted to steal again, even from himself.

Tom Shelby was more and more liked,
the longer he stayed with the Austins; and
in little more than half a year he grew to
be a sensible, industrious, agreeable lad.
So much did he become attached to his
cousin, that he could not be persuaded to


68 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD. .

return home without him ; and it was finally
agreed that Frank should be sent to one of
the excellent schools in Albany, and that
the two friends, if they remained good boys,
should be educated together.

IT remember the day they left us. They
were to go by stage some twenty miles, to
the town of S It was a keen morn-
ing in November, yet these two hardy,
ruddy-cheeked boys chose to ride outside,
with the driver. The night before, they had
gone all about the neighborhood, to bid
their friends good-by; and everybody, even
old Johnson, was sorry to see the merry lads
go. Tom had laid out a generous portion
of his pocket-money in parting gifts, —
from a ‘* Pilgrim’s Progress,’’ in large type,
for grandmother Austin, to a bag of painted
marbles for little Johnny. But to Hattie,
» his favorite, he made half a dozen handsome
presents, for her ‘‘ to remember cousin Tom
by,’ -he said. If he could have known how
she cried over them, when he was gone, he


- TOM SHELBY’S VISIT TO THE CouNTRY. 69

would have been both glad and sorry, I
think.

After the boys had taken a hearty leave
of us all, and clambered to their seats,
while the driver was gathering up the reins,
Tom called out, ‘If any of you happen to
meet a slender, long-haired, milky-faced
young dandy, from Albany, who was about
here for a while last spring, just bid him
good-by for me, for I never shall see him
again.”’ ,
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE CITY.

It was near Christmas time, and Frank
Austin was at home for the holidays, hav-
ing with him his cousin, Tom Shelby. The
friends, now nearly sixteen, were as full of
merriment, as fond of laughter, and all
sorts of innocent fun, as ever. Ah! such
wild times as we all had together, for more
than one of my brothers might be counted
on, at any time, for any kind of a frolic.

It happened that Mr. and Mrs. Austin
went to the town of S , fora day or
two, on business, they said, which we
suspected meant little else than the
purchase of Christmas gifts. They left
Ann, the eldest daughter, as housekeeper.
By the way, I have scarcely mentioned
Ann. She was a_ kind-hearted, clever
girl, but was a little spoiled by reading
novels, and by some grand ideas of style
and fashion, which nobody knew how she


THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 71

came by. For instance, she disliked her
plain name, and always wanted to be called
Antoinette. Her brothers called her by
that romantic name, when they wanted
buttons sewed on, or hats lined; if they
wished to.see her vexed, they called her
Ann; but they must make up their minds to
be chased out of the house with the broom-
stick, if they called her ‘* Nanny.’’ She
really loved hard work, and yet she was
ashamed to be caught at it. Once, I remem-
ber, in house-cleaning time, while she was
washing the kitchen-floor, in an old gown,
with her sleeves rolled up, and no stockings
on her feet, the minister called. No one
heard his knock, and he walked through the
sitting-room, into the kitchen, where Ann
was making a great splashing with her mop.
When she caught sight of that solemn man,
she screamed, dropped her mop, and jumped
through an open window, right into the
rain-water trough.

But Ann was the pleasantest sort of a
housekeeper while her mother was gone,
72 RECOLLECTIONS OP MY CHILDHOOD.

and we had things quite to our liking. I
say we, for I was visiting Hattie that week.
To be sure, there was old grandmother Aus-
tin, always sitting in the warmest chimney-
corner; but she was amiable, and so deaf
and sleepy that she did not interfere with
us much.

One afternoon, at supper, Ann talked
a good deal with Frank and Tom about two
young ladies from Albany, Miss Flagg, and
. Miss Dillingham, who were visiting some
friends in the village. Ann had made an
early call on them, but did not see them,
—they were not at home ; and now she was
fretting because the call had not been
returned.

After supper, I noticed Frank and Tom
whispering together, and presently they
said they were going to our house, to see
my brothers for a little while ; and, putting
on their caps, they went off, running mer-
rily down the road, and chasing each other
with snow-balls.

In the course of an hour, a sleigh came
THE TWO LADIES«FROM THE city. 73

jingling up to the house ; two ladies got
out, came to the door, and knocked, rather
loudly. Mrs. Austin’s only hired girl was
out for the evening ; Hattie and I were too
bashful to go to the door; so Ann was
obliged to open it herself. ‘‘Is Miss
Antoinette Austin at home ?”’ asked one of
the ladies, in a little, mincing voice. ‘‘ Yes,
ma’am,’’ answered Ann. ‘‘ Well, then,
my good girl,”’ said the other lady, with a
toss of her head, ‘* will you inform her that
Miss Flagg and Miss - Dillingham have
called?’’ ‘*Why, I am Miss Antoinette
Austin, myself.’’

‘¢Q, I beg your pardon,’’ said Miss Dil-
lingham, while she and her friend walked
forward and took the chairs which Ann
offered them; but they would not sit very
near the fire, or the candle, and kept their
black lace veils partly over their faces.

*¢Grandmother,’”’ said Ann, ‘‘ these are
some ladies from the city,—Miss Flagg
and Miss Dillingham.”’

‘Who ?”’ said the poor, deaf old lady;
74 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

‘¢ Miss Ragg and Miss Dinner-horn, did you
say ?”’

‘ speaking loud in her ear, ‘* Miss Flagg and
Miss Dillingham !”’

‘* Yes, yes, | hear; Miss Lagg and Miss
Dinghammer.’’

The ladies laughed outright at this, and
poor Ann grew very red in the face. But she
sat down and began conversing with her
visiters, about Albany. I don’t suppose that
she knew it, but she talked very affectedly,
indeed, in a little, fine voice, nobody ever
heard her use before. She spoke of the
city as though she knew all about it, and
once in a while she brought out a French
word, but pronounced it so queerly that
Miss Flagg made her repeat it, and, even
then, didn’t seem to understand it. Once
she asked, ‘‘ Do you know my aunt, Mrs.
Mayor Shelby ?”’

‘¢No,’”’ answered Miss Dillingham, ‘* but
I know Mrs. Alderman Shelton.”

Hattie and I sat on a settee, near the
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 75

fire, watching the grand visiters. ‘‘ An’t
it funny,’’ whispered Hattie, ‘* that such
little voices come out of such great
mouths !”’

‘¢ 'Yes,’’ I answered, ‘‘ and haven't they
big feet, for such fine ladies !”’

I think that Miss Flagg heard me, for she
drew her feet under her cloak. Then I
noticed that both her cloak and bonnet were
like those my eldest sister wore, and that
Miss Dillingham’s were a good deal like my
mother’s. I felt proud to know that my
mother and sister were in the fashion.

After a rather short call, the ladies rose,
made each a great courtesy, and took
leave. As we watched them from the win-
dow, getting into the sleigh, I thought the
boy that drove looked strangely like my
brother Will.

_In about half an hour, the boys came
home. Hardly were they in the house
before Ann cried out, ‘*O, you don’t
know what you have missed! Miss Flagg
and Miss Dillingham have been here, and
76 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

oh, such elegant, genteel young ladies as
they are! I never was so provoked in my
life, for Susan was gone, and I was obliged
to be waiter myself; they actually took me
for a servant-girl. But you should have
seen them !—such airs! Just proud and
haughty enough, I think.”’

‘© Well, I say,”’ spoke up old Mrs. Aus-
tin, ‘‘ that they are two pert, affected hus-
sies, with no manners at all.’’

‘¢ Why, grandmother,”’ said Ann, ‘* you
have always lived in the country, and don’t
~ exactly know what zs genteel.”

‘*T know,” said Mrs. Austin, raising her
voice, ‘* that it’s not the sign of a lddy to
grip a body’s hand as they did; and no real
lady or gentleman would giggle out loud at
a deaf old woman’s mistake.’’

*¢ You are very right, grandmother,” said
Frank, ‘‘ and Tom and I beg pardon for our
rudeness,”’

‘‘ What do you mean ?”’ asked Ann.

‘* Why, Nanny,” said Frank, mimicking
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE city. 177

her, ‘‘do you know my aunt, Mrs. Mayor
Shelby ?”’

‘¢ You good-for-nothing, hateful fellows !
how dare you play off such a trick on me ?””
said Ann, laughing and crying ‘all at once,
while we set up a perfect shout. But the
boys soon soothed her, by promising not to
tell her father, who loved dearly to tease
her about any such foolish little thing. I
saw how it was: the boys had been dressed
at our house, had come in our sleigh to
make their visit; and I was not sure that
my mother and sister were in the fashion,
after all. But I enjoyed the joke, rather
more* than Ann, I think. Yet she profited
by it, certainly, for she was never known
to talk in an affected or boasting way again.
The real ladies, from the city, came to see
her, a day or two after. They were nice,
quiet girls, with frank, easy manners, and
liked Ann so well, on acquaintance, that they
persuaded her to spend some time with °
them the next winter, when she visited her
aunt, in Albany. Then she saw city-life
78 RECOLLECTIONS OF MY CHILDHOOD.

without having her head turned by its
grandeur, but came home loving the coun-
try,— the dear, free, fresh, healthful coun-

try,— better than ever.

The hy after that merry Christmas-
time, we mo¥ed from our old home, further
west, and saw no more and heard very lit-
tle of the Austins. I parted from Hattie
with great sorrow. We solemnly agreed to
love each other dearly, for ever and ever ;
we exchanged locks of hair, and she prom-
ised to take care of the cat I left behind
me.

A year or two since, [ received a call
from a ‘* Dr. Austin,’’ whom I recognized,
at once, as my old friend Frank. I was
glad to see that he was as healthy and
hearty, as fond of laughter and fun, as ever.
He brought me a short letter from his sister
Ann, who wrote that they still lived in the
old place ; that her mother had been dead
‘ three or four years, and that Hattie was
married, and living near; that was all the
news she told me. ‘* Why, Frank,’’ I said,
THE TWO LADIES FROM THE City. ‘79

‘¢ Ann does not tell me the name of Hattie’s
husband.”

‘¢ Ah, haven’t you heard ?”’ he replied,
‘‘it’s cousin Tom Shelby. His father
couldn’t make a merchant, a lawyer, a min-
ister, or a doctor, out of him ;.he would be
nothing but afarmer. So he bought old
Johnson’s place, married our Hattie, and
settled down to farming, as happy as a
king:”’

‘“¢Q, I am very glad to hear it!’’ I said.
‘* But how is this, Frank! I see, by your sis-
ter’s letter, that she does not write her
name Antoinette any more.’ ,

‘¢ Why, no,’’ he answered; ‘‘ she calls
herself ‘plain Ann,’ now ; but no one else
calls her so, for, I assure you, my sister is a
very pretty woman; and she is better than
pretty, she is good; you know she always
wasy— but now more than ever, for, since
mother died, she has been like a mother to
us all,”’
PART SECOND.

THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

In the eastern part of the State of New
York, there once lived two sisters, Sarah
and Jemy Starr. They were left orphans
a young, and had been adopted by
some kind relations; but Sarah, who was
four or five years the oldest, took almost all
the care of Jenny. Sarah was a good,
motherly girl, very prudent and serious ;
she was plain in all but a pair of large,
dark brown eyes, and a great mass of curly
black hair. But she thought nothing of
herself, so dearly did she love her little
sister. And Jenny was, indeed, a darling
child, with a far prettier face than Sarah’s,
and the gladdest heart in the world. She
would play, and laugh, and sing, all the day

Lens
THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 81

long. Noone ever saw Jenny sad, or out
of humor; but, perhaps, this was partly
because, being so beautiful and so prettily
dressed always, everybody was kind to her,
and indulged her. It is easy for such pet-
ted children to be happy and good-natured.
But, any way, it was a pleasant sight to see
her dancing about here and there, chasing
butterflies, hunting flowers, frolicking with
her pretty spaniel Fido, laughing» lik
little silver brook, and singing
merry mocking-bird ; most often
eypsy hat fallen back from her héat
her long bright curls floating in the wind.

When Jenny was only sixteen, she was
married to a Mr. Silsbee, a very wealthy
gentleman, and went to live in a,beautiful
place, near the town where she was born.
She had an elegant house, surrounded with
trees and flowers, and everything delightful
about her.

Soon after this, Sarah was also married
to a young man who had loved her a num-
ber of years, but whom she had not been

6




82 THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

willing to marry until she could see her sis-
ter Jenny living in a home of her own.
Henry Williams was not rich, but he was a
good, amiable person. Sarah loved him,
and was very happy to be his wife. He
was a physician, and soon took her with
him to the far west, thinking that he might
do better there than in the east.

The sisters grieved much at parting.
Both wept a great deal,— Jenny the most
violently, and Sarah the longest. But they
hoped to see each other before a very long
times

In about two months, Jenny had a long
letter from her sister. Dr. Williams had
bought some land, and built a little frame-
house, in a beautiful oak-grove, on one of
the great western prairies. Sarah wrote
very cheerfully, and begged her sister to
come out and make her a visit, in a year or
two. But Jenny was indolent, and dreaded
the trouble of journeying, which was much
greater at that time than it is now. So
she was always promising, but never went
‘THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 83

to see her sister ; neither did she write to
her regularly. Sarah grew tired of writing
long letters, which received short answers,
or none at all, and wrote herself less often ;
and, at last, the sisters, who, in childhood,
had been such close and loving companions,
scarcely heard from one another once a
year. Yet they loved each other still,
though the thoughtful Sarah remembered
the dear old times oftener than the light-
hearted Jenny. ,

And so eight long years went by. Jenny
was yet as happy as ever. Her husband
was very fond of her, and she still had all
around her that her heart could desire.
First, among the good things that God had
given her, were three lovely children,—
two boys, Georgie and Willie, and one
daughter, ‘‘ little Kate.”

Jenny made a funny sort of a mother.
She was just like a child with her children ;
would romp and laugh with them, run
races, and play with balls, kites, kittens and
doll-babies. And Jenny looked like a child
84 . HE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

herself. She was short and plump, with
dimpled cheeks, rosy lips, bright curls, and
twinkling blue eyes. Any little boy or girl’
would be very unreasonable to ask a merrier
playmate than Jenny Silsbee.

To Sarah had been given two daughters,
' whom she had named for her mother and
sister, Alice and Jenny. They were not so
pretty as the children of Mrs. Silsbee, for
the climate of the new country proved
‘unhealthy, and they were always pale and
sickly. But their father and mother loved
them all the more dearly and cared for
them the more tenderly for that. Mrs.
Williams was also often sick, and her hus-
band did not have much practice ; so they
were quite poor. But the doctor was a
proud man, and did not ask his friends in the
east for assistance ; and Sarah was also too
independent in her feelings to write to her
wealthy sister for help. She did not doubt
but that Jenny would be glad to give it;
but she knew it must come from Mr.
Silsbee, and she did not wish to have the
- THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 85

doctor indebted to him, for Sarah was only
proud for her husband.

One chilly autumn day, about sunset,
Mrs. Silsbee was sitting in a comfortable
arm-chair, before a bright fire, in her hand-
some parlor, stitching away at some worsted-
work. After quite tiring herself out frol-
icking with her children, she had turned
them into the hall to finish their play by
themselves. Suddenly, she heard the dog
barking furiously in the yard; and, soon
after, Georgie and Willie burst into the
parlor, crying, ‘‘O, mamma! come into
the hall! there is such a queer-looking
old woman there, with such a funny plaid
cloak, and such an old old-fashioned bon-
net on!”’

Half dragged by her merry boys, Mrs.
Silsbee went into the hall. At her first
look on the stranger’s old-fashioned dress,
Jenny laughed with the children, she was —
so childish. But, in a moment, she saw
that the woman was poor, for her clothes
were much worn; that she had been sick,
86 THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

for her face was thin and pale; and that
she was probably tired, for she carried a
heavy carpet-bag on her arm.

So Jenny said, kindly, ‘* Will you not be
seated? And pray _ me what I can do
for you, my good woman.’

‘‘Don’t you know me?” replied the
stranger, sadly. Jenny shook her head.

The woman took off her bonnet, and, as
she did so, her hair fell on her shoulders,—
Sarah’s own curly black hair. ‘* Now,
don’t you know me, Jenny ?”’ she cried, her
great brown eyes filled with tears. Jenny
sprang toward her, caught her in her arms,
and then the sisters kissed one another,
and wept together. The children were
sadly puzzled to know what all this meant ;
but they cried too, clinging to their mother.
At last, Mrs. Silsbee said to them; ‘ This,
children, is your aunt Sarah, from the west,
whom I have told you so much about..
Come, and kiss her.’’ And they kissed her
very affectionately.
THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 87

When they were all seated around the
fire, in the parlor, Jenny said,

‘¢ Now, dear sister, do tell me what this
means! Why do you come to us alone,
and in this condition ? ”’

Sarah replied calmly, ‘‘ It means, Jenny,
that my husband is dead. He was ill a
long time with the fever, and the expenses
of his sickness made us very poor. Iwas
obliged to sell everything, to get money
enough to bring me to you.”’

‘¢ But your children,— where are they ?’’
Jenny asked.

‘¢ They died before their father.’’

‘¢ What, both ? ”’

*¢ Yes, both,’’ answered Sarah,—‘‘ my
two dear little girls. So, Jenny, I would
have no children to make sport of you,
should you come, poor and alone, to see
me.”

‘ about that again, but forgive me and the
children! ’’ said Jenny, weeping; and lifting
Sarah’s dry, bony hand, she kissed it in a
88 THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

humble, loving way. But Willie looked up
in her face, and said, stoutly, though his
lip quivered all the while,

‘¢ Why, Aunt Sarah, we didn’t know it
was you, or we wouldn’t have laughed at
your queer old bonnet. Now, you may
wear two or three such bonnets, one on
top of the other, and we won’t make fun
of you.”

‘Even the sad aunt laughed at this funny
speech. Jenny and the other children
joined in, and they all made friends.

Mr. Silsbee soon came in to tea. He
seemed very glad to see his sister-in-law,
and welcomed her to his home.

Afterwards, he and his wife did all they
could to make Sarah comfortable and happy;
the children grew very fond of their gentle
aunt, who seemed to love them almost as
well as though they were her own. One
lesson she:taught them by her coming : never
to be rude to strangers, or to laugh at any
person for wearing a poor or old-fashioned
dress.
THE AUNT FROM THE WEST. 89

Sarah grew better in health, and became
quite cheerful; yet often, at sunset, she
would sit by the windows, looking out
toward the west. At such times, Jenny
would cease laughing and chatting, and the
children would gather about their aunt, very
still and sorrowful, for they knew she was
thinking of their uncle Henry, and the
‘< two dear little girls,’’ Alice and Jenny,
all lying in their lonely graves, in the dis-
tant prairie land. |

She has left her husband sleeping,
With a child on either side ;—

Did he hope so soon to meet them,
That he wept not when they died ?

Brightly on the mound above him,
And above each little grave,

Soon all golden, blue and crimson,
Shall the western wild-flowers wave.

Though thou ’rt far, sad wife and mother,
From the home so dear to thee,

Where the long grass of the prairies
Rolls in billows like the sea,

Grieve not for thy babes, for sickness
Pains no more their tender breasts,

And their father, worn and weary,
Close beside them sweetly rests.
96) THE AUNT FROM THE WEST.

Though upon their graves thy tear-drops
Fall no longer with the dew,

Till the stars come out in heaven,
And the moon rolls up the blue,

God’s good angels guard their grave-rest,
In the distant prairie land ;

God shall bring you all together,
In a heavenly household band.


LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

Water and Charlie Harrison were the
sons'of a sea-captain, and lived in one of
the fine old seaport towns of Massachusetts.

These boys were as unlike as two brothers
could well be. Walter was a rough, plain
boy, large of his age, and rather clumsy,
with a passionate, jealous temper, which
gave his friends a great deal of trouble.
But he had some noble qualities: he was as
brave as a young lion, faithful, diligent,
perfectly honest and truthful, and sometimes
very tender in his feelings. Charlie, some
two years younger than Walter, was a deli-
cate, beautiful, sweet-tempered boy, who
loved everybody, and in return was greatly
beloved. He was fair, pale, and slight,
with blue eyes and golden curls. Walter
said he looked like a girl, and sometimes
laughed at his delicacy ; but, for all that,
92 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

he was jealous of the poor child’s beauty —
even of his weakness.

Captain Harrison was most of the time
at sea, and his gentle wife found it difficult
to control the impatient spirit, or correct the
even more unamiable moodiness, of her eld-
est son. If she reproved him sternly, he
would often accuse her of being partial to
her youngest and handsomest son, and say
that she petted and indulged Charlie so
much, that he could not be disobedient, or
give her any trouble ; he himself, he said,
would be good, if he were so treated.

Walter really thought himself slighted
‘and unloved, because he knew he was very
plain, and he saw his sickly brother cared
for constantly. He never seemed to think
how ridiculous it would look in his mother
to be nursing and petting a stout, healthy
boy, who was one of the strongest wrestlers,
and the best hand with the ball, in all the
town.

Walter, with all his fine health, was often
silent and sullen, while his brother was sel-
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 93

dom too ill to be talkative and cheerful; so
it was very natural for visiters to notice
Charlie the most, and, as they supposed he
needed amusing, to send him books and to
make him presents most frequently. All
this ‘* partiality’’ was shown to him, Walter
said, because he happened to have a plain
face, and did n’t know how to put himself
forward. Charlie was grieved at this, and
always wished to share his gifts with his
brother; but Walter could never be per-
suaded to accept anything.

One time, when Charlie was about ten
years old, his mother had a visit from a
pious maiden aunt, who spent some weeks
- in the family. During Miss Hannah Per-
kins’ stay, she became much attached to
quiet little Charlie; but as Walter gave way
to his temper, two or three times, before
her, and made sport of some of her queer
ways, she did not like him over-much,
though she thought he might be made a
good boy of, with proper management. She
wondered how his mother could let such fits
94 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

of passion and such naughty tricks pass
without severe punishment. If he were her
child, she said, she would soon whip that
bad temper out of him. But Mrs. Harrison
believed that one blow would put more evil
passion into the heart of such a proud boy
as Walter than she could ever get out.

She never failed seriously to reprove his
faults and wrong actions; and she knew—
what she told no one — that Walter would
always come to her, after an outburst of
impatience or bad feeling, and ask her for-
giveness. She knew that he loved her, his
father, brother and little sister, intensely:
so she was patient, and prayed God to soften
the heart and subdue the temper of her
unhappy child.

A short time after Aunt Hannah returned
home, she sent the boys each a book.
Charlie’s happened to be opened first. It was
a handsome illustrated copy of ‘‘ Robinson
Crusoe.’”’ Walter then eagerly opened his
own, which was rather gayly bound. It was
** The Memoirs of a Sunday-school Scholar.”
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 95

Walter flung it down, saying, angrily,
‘¢ What did the old maid send me this for,
I wonder? I have had enough of such
things out of the Sunday-school Library.
She did not send you such a humdrum sort
of a book, Charlie. I suppose she thought
you were pious enough, without.”’

‘¢Q brother,’’ said Charlie, ‘‘don’t talk
so hard. I am sure Aunt Hannah meant
very kindly by us both.”

Walter took up his book, and began look-
ing through it ; but he soon broke out again,
—‘*Pshaw! just as I thought; nothing but
‘early piety,’ ‘early piety.’ Why could n’t
she have sent me some story about wars, or
pirates, or even Indians? I am tired to
death of ‘early piety!’ ”’

‘¢ You will never trouble your friends with
it, my son,’’ said Mrs. Harrison, who had
just entered the room. Walter started and
blushed ; he did not know that his mother
was so near. But he replied, sullenly, ‘‘ I
wish I might not trouble them in any way,
any longer. It would be better for all if I

.
96 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

were dead and buried; for I’m of no use
in the world, and nobody loves me.”’

After having said these unkind words,
Walter took his ball-club, and went out on to
the village-green, where the boys were al-
ready at play. Charlie soon followed; not
to mingle in the sport, for he was not strong
enough for that, — but he loved always to
watch his brother, and felt proud of his
skill and strength.

After about a half-hour’s play, many of
the boys set out for home, as a hard storm
seemed coming on. The clouds were rolling
up thick and black, the lightnings flashed,
and the thunder broke overhead. Walter
Harrison, who had appeared half angry in
all his play, was now leaning against the
side of the church, within a yard or two of
the lightning-rod. The boys called to him
to come away, as he was in a dangerous
place ; but Walter would not stir. Charlie
ran up to him, and begged him to go home ;
but he only said, ‘‘I don’t care if, the
lightning does strike me. [ tell you again,

,
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. _ 97

I’m of no use in the world — nobody loves
me. You may run home, if you are afraid.”’

‘“‘T am not afraid for myself, brother,’’
said Charlie, his lip quivering ; ‘‘ but I will
go home and beg mamma to come for you.”’

Charlie had not run half across the green,
when there came a great blaze of lightning,
and a heavy crash of thunder, which seemed
to shake the very ground, The boys who
were looking toward the church said that
they saw the lightning roll down the rod
like a ball of fire, and disappear in the
earth; and that, at the same instant, Wal-
ter fell to the ground. They ran to him at
once, raised him up, and carried him home,
The poor boy’s eyes and mouth wete open,
but he seemed quite dead. The doctor was
sent for,— came immediately, took Walter
from the bed, laid him on the floor, and began
pouring cold water upon him by the bucket-



ful. Mrs. Harrison had been strangely»



calm, at first; but when Walter began to =

show some little signs of life, the joy was
more than she could bear, and she fainted |

=

i
98 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

away. She went from one fainting fit into
another; and when Walter was at last so
much restored as to ask for her, she was
lying quite insensible. Then first he knew
how deeply and dearly his mother loved him.
Little Charlie threw himself down by Wal-
ter, in the water, which was flooding the
room, and the brothers kissed one another,
and cried for joy. It was many days before
Walter was entirely well; but, when he did
get about, everybody noticed a great change
in him. He was more kind and pleasant ;
far less jealous and passionate; he was
happier, and made others happier, than ever
before. He was so sure now that his mother
truly loved him ; and he knew, he said, that
he could never again be jealous of his little
brother. But, alas! Walter did not know
himself. When he was fourteen, and his
brother — still called ‘‘ little Charlie’? —
about twelve, a wealthy uncle came from
Boston for a brief visit. As this gentleman
had no family, it was thought that Walter,
who had been named for him, would be the

thi,

-*

isi :
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 99 .

heir to his fortune. For this very reason,
Walter was too proud to pay him any court;
indeed, he hardly paid him proper respect
and attention, and was generally silent and
reserved in his presence. Mr. Rogers did
not understand this manner; he thought
Walter sullen and cold, and, though he
could but see that he was an honest, intel-
ligent boy, he was not, on the whole, pleased
with him. But, like all other visiters, he
was quite charmed with little Charlie; and
he had not been long gone from the village,
before there arrived from Boston a beautiful
white pony, handsomely saddled and bri-
dled, ‘‘For Master Charles Harrison.”
In a letter to his sister, Mr. Rogers said,
‘¢ Thinking that a daily ride may benefit my
little invalid nephew, I send a pony, which
is both spirited and docile. I hope that
Charlie will accept it, with the kind wishes
of ‘Uncle Walter.’ ”’

Both Mrs. Harrison and Charlie were
pained that no present came for Walter, and
that he was scarcely mentioned in the let-


100 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

ter; while, as for Walter, he felt the old
jealous feeling boiling up from his heart,
hotter than ever, and said:some hard things,
which he had better have left unsaid.

‘* Why, brother,’’ said Charlie, ‘‘ the pony
shall be as much para as mine; you my
ride it every day.”’

‘* No, I won’t!’’ answered Walter, an-
grily; ‘‘1 never will mount it, as long as I
live. J would n’t be so mean.”’

But Walter had little call to be envious
of his brother, who was quite too weak to
ride his pretty pony. A few rods only,
_ gave him a severe pain in the side,—so
very delicate was poor Charlie.

This spring he seemed far worse than
usual: he did not complain, but he daily
grew weak and languid, till finally he could
no longer be about the house.

One afternoon, when he came from school,
Walter found Charlie sitting up in his bed,
writing ; but he hid his paper and pencil
under the pillow, when he saw his brother,
and hastily wiped away some tears, which

,
eye Pr
Bai. vor.


LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 101

were:on his cheek. That very night he
grew much worse ; a fever came on, and he
was quite delirious. All night long they
watched over him, with great anxiety; and
during the next day, though he was more
quiet, and slept most of the time. When
awake, he did not speak much, or seem to
recognize any one.

Just at sunset, Walter was sitting in his
own chamber by the window, with his face
hid in the curtains, — for he was grieving for
his gentle brother, who was like to die,—
when his mother entered, holding a paper in
her hand. Walter saw that she had been
weeping, as she said, ‘‘ I found this paper
under little Charlie’s pillow; you may read
it, if you will.”

Walter opened it, saw that it was in
Charlie’s handwriting, and read,

‘MY LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT.

**T leave to my dear mamma my gold-
clasped Bible, my trunk, and all my clothes,
except my new green cloth roundabout,
102 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

which I leave to Cousin John, because he
likes it, and it just fits him. To my papa
I leave my pictures of Jesus Christ stilling
the Tempest, and the fight between the
‘Constitution’ and ‘ Guerriere,’ my seal
of Hope and the anchor, and the ‘ Voyages
of Captain Cook.’ To my sister Clara I
leave my canaries, my pet squirrel, my
flowers, and all my fairy story-books. To
my brother Walter I give the rest of my
library, my chessboard and men, my battle-
dores and shuttle-cock, my rabbits, my dog,
and my white pony: and when I am dead,
I hope he will believe I have loved him
dearly. Cuartes Harrison.’

Walter wept bitterly over this will; but
when he had grown calm, he said, ‘* May I
gotohim, mother?’’ ‘* If you will promise
not to disturb him,’’ she answered. Walter
promised, and stole softly into the dim
chamber where Charlie was now alone,
sleeping quietly. He knelt down by the
bedside, hid his face in the counterpane,
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 103

and silently prayed God to forgive all his
sins, to give him a better heart, and to make
his brother well again. Suddenly he felt a
soft hand laid on his head. He looked up,
and Charlie’s mild blue eyes were smiling
on him. ‘*Come and lie by my side,”’ he
said; and Walter laid himself down there,
and the brothers again embraced, and kissed
each other.

As thus they lay, talking softly and
sweetly together, they heard some unusual
noise below; and then their mother coming
up stairs with some one who stepped a little
heavier. It was their father, returned from
his longest and last sea voyage! Now he
promised to stay at home with them always.

The return of Captain Harrison did more
than medicine to cure his little son, who
soon became stronger than he had ever been
before.

One afternoon, when Charlie had been a
fortnight about the house, it was arranged
that he should take a short ride on his white
pony, soon after breakfast, the next day.
104 LITTLE CHARLIE’S. WILL.

When Walter came down in the morning,
his mother kissed him more tenderly than
usual, and his father, shaking hands with
him heartily, wished him many happy re-
turns of the day. Walter looked as though
he did not know what to make of this, and
his mother said, ‘*‘ Why, my son, is it pos-
sible you have forgotten this is your birth-
day ?”’

‘Ah, yes, mamma,’’ he answered; ‘I
only remembered that it was Charlie’s first
day out.”’

*¢ And so,’’ said his father, ‘* you are. to
give him a ride; pray, what are you to
a6:277-.

**O, I’ll trot along by his side, on foot.
I believe I can outrun that pony, now.”

When breakfast was over, Walter helped
his brother into the saddle, and was arrang-
ing the bridle, when Charlie called out, joy-
fully, ‘* Look there, brother!’’ pointing with
his riding-whip to another white pony,
somewhat larger than his own, standing on
the other side of the yard. Walter ran to
LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL. 105

it, took off a slip of paper which was pinned
to the rein, and read: ‘* Will Walter, our
first-born and beloved son, accept this birth-
day gift from his parents ?’’

Walter laid his face against the slender,
arching neck of his beautiful horse, and.
burst into tears. But he was too happy to
weep long; he soon ran into the house,
thanked and kissed his father and mother,
ran out again, mounted, and rode off with
his brother.

They had a fine ride. They had many
fine rides together in the years that fol-
lowed; for Charlie continued to improve,
till he became quite strong and vigorous.
As for Walter, he always kept his robust
health; he did not grow to be handsome,
but he became what is far better, truly
amiable and agreeable. Even Aunt Hannah
Perkins grew to liking him, at last; and
Uncle Walter Rogers, who sent him to col-
lege, has been heard to declare that he
shall leave him all his fortune, — knowing
that he will not hoard it like a miser, or
106 LITTLE CHARLIE’S WILL.

waste it like a spendthrift, but so use it as
to do a great deal of good, and make a
great many people happy. But I do not
believe that the writing that gives to Walter
Harrison a large sum of money, land, and
houses, will ever be so dear to him as a
little serap of paper, which he keeps among
his most valuable and sacred things in his
private desk, and on which he has written,
*¢ Lirrte CHARLIE’s WILL.”’
ore

oS

*

_



“ai





‘ THE HERMIT.

I xNow an old man, with snowy white hair,
And figure all bony, and swarthy, and spare ;
With a long Roman nose, like a parrot’s hooked beak,
And little cross eyes, all rheumy and weak ;
Like an odd piece of crockery laid on the shelf,
This funy old man lives away by himself ; —
Alone, alone, all, all alone,
In a mouldering mill, with moss o’ergrown ;
Too lonesome for dogs and for sociable cats,
And only not too much battered for bats ; —
Down in a hollow, dark, swampy, and damp,
Where frogs might have agues, and die of the cramp,
And feathery owls be a-cold, —
There he grindeth his corn, and maketh his bread,
And stirreth the straw that formeth his bed ;
There taketh he patches, and needle arid thread,
And mendeth his garments old.

Sometimes he sings a dismal old tune,

In a small, cracked voice; sometimes, at noon,
When the sun is warm, and the wind from the south,
He falls fast asleep, — with his pipe in his mouth.
eee ee

108 THE HERMIT.

This old, old man was once a child, —

How strange it seems ! ~— was once a child ;
Over his cradle a father smiled,

And a mother, on her gentle breast,

Sang and hushed him into rest,

Smoothed from his forehead the silky soft hair,
And kissed the cheek of her baby fair.
Perhaps, as on her lap he lay,

He saw proud brothers round him play,

Who brought him toys to check his eries,
And sisters laughed at his cunning cross-eyes.

Where are they now? All gone —all gone!
Dead and buried these many years ;
And now, alack! he never hears,
Day or night, one kindred tone !
He never looks on a loving face, —
The last of all his humble race,
The poor old fellow must die alone!

_ But little cares he. For the Lord of all,

Who heeds the sparrows when they fall,
He trusts to forgive his errors past,
And see him safe in heaven at last.
EFFIE GREY'S SLEEP-WALKING.

Erriz Grey, though one of the sweetest,
was one of the most singular girls in the
world. She seemed to have two distinct
lives. Almost “every bright moonshiny
night, she was up, softly walking about the
house, and sometimes in the garden and
yard, all in her sleep. Sometimes she dimly
remembered these rambles, as though she
had dreamed of them, but oftenest she had

* not the least recollection of them. In dark

or unpleasant nights, she seldom was known
to go abroad; but when disposed to take a
stroll by moonlight, nothing could prevent
her; for she moved so quietly and softly,
that she awoke no one; and if she found the
doors locked and the keys. taken away, she
would escape by the windows.

When Effie was fifteen or sixteen years
old, she outgrew this strange habit, and
110 &FFIP GREY’S SLEEP-WALKING.

learned to sleep quietly in her bed, like
other people. Some two years before, how-
ever, an odd adventure happened ” her.
It was this:

On a pleasant Saturday sfhieebos. =
in the autumn, Effie, with her two brothers,
Jamie and Archie, and. three or four of her
schoolmates, went. into the woods to gather
wild grapes. The boys AÂ¥ould climb the
trees, break off the ripe clusters, and. drop
them into the spread aprons‘of the girls;
sometimes they would, tear away whole
vines, and fling them to the ground.

Altogether, they:had a right merry.time, *
though they were soméWhat disappointed in: *
not getting quite so many nice grapes as
they expected to find. Many of the vines
grew so much in the shade, that the fruit
was stunted and sour.

On their way home, they perceived across
a dark stream a large vine, which, growing
from between two rocky ledges, clambered
up the almost perpendicular bank, and hung
its rich clusters of purple fruit over the
EFFIE GREY'S SLEEP-WALKING. 11]

water. These were by far the largest and
ripest grapes the children had seen, and
they stood for some®Wfioments looking at
them with longing weyes.. But they could
only be gatherec bing the bank from
the water, an even the boys were
brave enough — ch an ‘exploit; for,





». though the stream was not deep, it was

~~ yery black and miry. So they all went on
their way, lef@ying the grapes for the wild
birds to feast {pon, at their leisure.

That night,-Effie was for a long time too
tired to sleep. She tossed and turned on
her soft bed, as “though it had been stuffed
with sccustielia or even chestnut-burs.
She lived over the toilsome sport of the
afternoon: now scrambling after grapes ;
now tumbling over logs, and breaking her
way through bushes; and, last before she
went to sleep, she thought longingly on
those nice, ripe, un-get-atable grapes, hang-
ing over the creek.

When Effie awoke in the morning, she
felt strangely lame and stiff; and when she
112 &FFIE GREY'S SLEEP-WALKING.

‘thrust her feet out of bed, what was her
astonishment to find them all covered with
thick black mud! The linen sheets of her
bed, so snowy clean the night before, were
now in a shocking Cofidition; and, from a
window opening on t@ a piazza, led miry
foot-prints across the nice rush matting.
But, strangest of all, on the table stood a
large basket, filled with grapes; she re-
membered having seen that basket on the
piazza the night before. Effig saw, at once,_
that she had gone in her sleep, at some hour
of the moonlight night, for the grapes which
had tempted her so much in the daytime ;
and she burst into a passionate fit of crying,
from a feeling half grief, half shame, which
she could hardly herself understand. Her
first thought was to conceal the adventure
from everybody. She could easily wash the
mud from her feet and ankles; but what
was she to do with her. soiled night-dress,
the bed-clothes, and the matting ?

* She must tell her mother; there was no
help for it. She must bear, as best she
EFFIE GREY'S SLEEP-WALKING. 113

could, her father’s jokes, and the laughter
of her merry brothers. But then she had
the grapes, — that was some consolation.
Early in the winter that followed, James
Grey, Effie’s eldest brother, died quite
suddenly, of brain fever, caused, it was
thought, by too hard study in preparing for
college ; for James was a remarkably stu-
dious and ambitious boy, and had never
been very strong. He had been lovely in
his life, and in his death he was mourned
by all who knew him; but his father
grieved most bitterly of all. It had always
been said that Jamie was Judge Grey’s
favorite child. I do not know how that was,
but it surely seemed that when the noble
boy was called away into ‘‘ the better land,’’
his father must go too. Day and night he
groaned and wept for his dear dead son.
He neither ate nor slept; he seemed not to
know*what was passing around him, and to
have almost forgotten that he had yet living
children, and a true, loving wife.
“A few months before this son’s death,
8
114 &EFFIE GREY’S SLEEP-WALKING.

Judge Grey had taken him to sit to a good
artist, who had painted a fine portrait of
him, which was prettily framed, and hung
in a little parlor where the family met for
prayers, and where they could lodk at it
night and morning, when Jamie should be
far away at college. Now the poor father
would stand before this picture hour after
hour, with his arms folded on his breast, the
tears slowly sliding down his cheeks; and
now and then he would give a sigh,— oh,
so deep and sorrowful! At last, when this
had continued for many days, Effie went
gently up to him, took his hand in hers, and
tried to lead him away; but he would not
go. Then her mother came, and wound her
arms about him, and pleaded with him, for
her sake, and the children’s sake, to stand
no longer grieving before that portrait; yet
still he would not go.

Late that night, after all the rest of the
family had retired, and wept themselves to
sleep, he stood with a lamp in his hand,
gazing on the likeness of his lost boy. It
EFFIE GREY'S SLEEP-wWALKING. 115

was hard to say good-night to that smiling
face, for there was no more any good night
or good morning for him.

In the morning, when the family came
together, what was their surprise to find a
thick veil drawn closely over Jamie’s por-
trait! Judge Grey was much, agitated, and
asked who had done this. Mrs. Grey knew
nothing of it; but when Effie was ques-
tioned, she said, timidly, ‘‘I remember
thinking, last night, that the picture should
be veiled, a little while, for your sake,
father ; and that is all I know about it.”’

Mrs. Grey then offered to remove the
veil; but her husband said,

‘< Let it remain, Mary. [have been rightly
reproved for my selfish grieving; and I
will not look on that dear face again until
I can say, ‘The Lord gave, and the Lord
hath taken away; blessed be the name of
the Lord.’ ”’

As month after month went by, Judge
Grey grew more resigned.and cheerful. Ie
began, at last, to talk freely of his lost son ;
116 =sEFFIE GREY’S SLEEP-WALKING.

he could even smile at the recollection of
some of the light-hearted boy’s wild tricks
and funny sayings. But he never removed
the veil from the portrait, though he knew
that no one else would presume to take it
away. He feared that his heart was not yet
strong and submissive enough to look calmly
on that pleasant 7 that always smiled on
his tears.

One night, early in June, as the Greys
were all standing on the vine-shaded piazza,
in the moonlight, listening to the low mur-
mur of the brook which ran near the door,
and breathing in the fragrance of roses,
Effie heard her father say to her mother,
‘* Do you remember, Mary, that to-morrow
will be Jamie’s birth-day ? He would have
been fifteen, had God left him with us.
How he used to enjoy a night like this!
and he had a real girlish love of roses.”’

‘¢ But, my dear husband,’’ answered Mrs.
Grey, ‘‘ we know there is no lack of light
and flowers, and all beautiful things, where
our Jamie is gone.”’
EFFIE GREY’S SLEEP-wALKING. 117

But next morning, when the family gath-
ered together in the little parlor, to thank
God for his care of them through the night,
the first thing that met the eyes of parents
and children was Jamie’s portrait, with the
dark veil taken away, and a beautiful wreath
of roses hanging in its place !

All looked at Effie, who turned pale, then
blushed deeply, and burst into tears. ‘‘ Did
I do it, mother?’’ she sobbed out; ‘*in-
deed, indeed, I cannot remember.”’

‘¢T think you must have done it, my dear
daughter,’’ replied Mrs. Grey. .

‘* Yes, Effie,’ said her father, folding
her in his arms, ‘‘ it was you, or some other
angel.”’

And this was the last of Effie Grey’s
sleep-walking.

Do not always weep, when thinking
Of the loved ones early gone ;

And their names speak not so sadly, —
Breathe them in a pleasant tone.
118 EFFIE GREY'S: SLEEP-WALKING.

Think of them as dear lambs, kindly
Borne away from storm and cold,

By the tender shepherd, Jesus;—
Grathered safely to the fold.

Think not of the dreary graveyard,
When comes on the wintry even ;—
Think how beautiful the place is,
They call home, and we eall heaven.

Sweetest, brightest thoughts weave round them,
When their faces you reeall, —

Even as Effie crowned with roses
Jamie's picture on the wall.
*

LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

Many years ago, in a pleasant village of
New England, lived the little girl whose true
story I am about to relate, — Lizzie Stone,
the only daughter of the miller.

Lizzie was a child whom everybody loved ;
not only because she was so pretty, lively,
and intelligent, but for her being so sweet,
gentle, and peaceable,—so truly good.
Lizzie had two: brothers a few years older
than herself, who were very fond of her,
and of whom she was very fond. These
three children always went to school and to
church together, and played in perfect”
agreement.

_ It happened that one sunny autumn after-
noon they had a visit from two little girls,
their cousins, who lived about a'mile dis-
tant. They had a wild, joyous time; they’
played in the yard, in the barn, and all over

.
*
120 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

the house. Mrs. Stone, who was a kind,
pleasant woman, looked on and laughed, if
she did not mingle in their spdrt. She got
them a nice early tea by themselves; and,
when the visiters, after one last merry game,
were about leaving, she said to Lizzie,

‘‘ Your brothers will go home with Alice
and Celia. You may go with them as far
as the mill; but be sure to stop there,
and come home with your father.”’

As the cousins set out, laughing and frol-
icking along, Mrs. Stone stood in the little
front portico of her cottage, looking after
them, as they went down the lane, and
thinking what handsome, and happy, and,
above all, what good children they were.
She smiled at Lizzie’s affectionate way of
taking leave of her, though she was to be
gone so short a time. Lizzie never parted
from her mother, even for a half-hour, with-
out kissing her lovingly, and bidding her
good-by ina voice as sweet and tender as
the cooing of a dove. Now, as Mrs. Stone
went into the house, she said softly to her-
LIZZIN IN THE MILL. 121

self, ‘‘ It is nearly ten years since God gave
me that child, and she has never yet caused
me one moment’s sorrow.”

The children played so much along the
road, and stopped so often to pick flowers
and berries, that it was nearly dark when
they reached the mill. Then, when the
girls came to part, they had yet so many
things to tell to each other, so many invita-
tions to give, so many good-by’s to say, it
was no wonder that they lingered a while.

It seemed that Lizzie could not let her
cousins go. She parted from them, in her
loving way, so many times, that her brothers
grew a little impatient, and George, the
eldest, said, ‘* Why, sister, I don’t see but
that Ned and I will have to help you in your
kissing, or you ll never get through.”’

Then Alice and Celia, blushing and laugh-
ing, broke away from their cousin, and ran
fast down a little hill towards their home.
The boys soon overtook them; and Lizzie,
after watching the group a while, and think-
ing how good was God to give hersuch amiable
122 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

cousins, such noble brothers, and such dear
parents to love, turned and went into the
mill. She found it going, and was almost
frightened by the din it made, and by the
darkness; for night was fast coming on.
She called her father’s name, and he an-
swered; but the machinery made so much
noise that she did not hear. Thinking that
he had already gone, she turned to go home
alone. She took a way she had often safely
taken, over the flume, by the great water-
wheel. But to-night she was bewildered, —
lost her footing, and fell off on to the wheel,
which whirled her down, down, crushing
and tearing her in a shocking manner! It
happened that just at that moment her
father, thinking that Lizzie had been sent
to call him home, stopped the mill, and be-
gan to search for her. Led by her cries, he
came to the wheel, and there found what
had occurred. ‘*Are you badly hurt, my
daughter ?’’ he asked, in great grief and
terror. ‘* Yes, father. I seem to be all
crushed to pieces, and I cannot stir; but I
LIZZIE IN THE MILL. 123

think I shall live till you get me out. Leave
me here, and go for help.”’

The neighborhood was soon roused, and
many men hurried, with saws and axes, to
the mill. But they found that only one or
two could work at a time in cutting away
the strong, heavy timbers, and that it would
be some hours before Lizzie could be taken
from the cruel place where she was held so
fast, and crushed so dreadfully ; and they
said that to move the wheel backward or
forward might kill her at once.

When Mrs. Stone came, one of the men
let down a light into the wheel, so that she
could see her poor child. When she saw
Lizzie’s white face, and the bleeding arms
held toward her, she shrieked and cried bit-
terly. But Lizzie called up to her as sweetly
and cheerfully as she had ever spoken in
her life, and said, ‘*Don’t cry, mother!
They will get me out before long; keep up
good courage, and pray to God for me.”’

And so she continued to talk, hour after
hour, while the men kept cutting and saw-
124 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

ing at the great timbers: so she cheered
and comforted her parents, and her poor
brothers, when they too came to the mill.

Once her voice grew very low and in-
distinct, — then it ceased altogether: the
doctor looked down, and said she-had fainted
away, and they sprinkled water upon her.
As soon as she revived, she began again to
say comforting things, and to beg her mother
and brothers not to ery. She said she did
not suffer so much pain as at first, and that
she was sure she should live to be carried
home.

It was nearly midnight when the last tim-
ber that held her was sawed away, and a
workman lifted her gently up, and laid her
in her father’s arms. The pain of being
moved caused the poor child to faint again,
and she did not revive until she had been
carried home. When she opened her eyes,
she found herself on her own little bed, with
her dear father and mother and brothers at
her side.

The doctor carefully dressed Lizzie’s:
LIZZIE IN THE MILL. -Y25

wounds, and gave her some opium to make
her sleep ; but he told her father and mother
that she could not possibly get well. When
he heard the dreadful words, Mr. Stone
groaned, and covered his face with his
hands; and, for a few moments, Mrs. Stone
leaned her head on her husband’s shoulder,
and cried. Then, lifting her eyes, and
clasping her hands, she said, ‘‘ Thy will, oh
Lord, be done!’’ and went and sat down
calmly by Lizzie’s side, and watched her
till she slept.

The poor little girl remained sleeping most
of the nextday. She would often wake, and
ask for water ; but she then seemed hardly to
know where she was, or who was with her.
Her cousins, Alice and Celia, came to see
her; but she did not recognize them, and
they went away, sobbing bitterly.

Karly in the night, however, she awoke,
and seemed better. She knew all about
her, and smiled on them, but said that she.
must leave them very soon. She told her
father that she wanted to hear him pray once
126 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

more; and Mr. Stone knelt down by her
bedside, and asked God to take safely home
the little daughter he had given them, and
thanked him for leaving her with them so
long. Then Lizzie said to her mother,
‘¢ Will you sing me just one verse of the
hymn I love so much, ‘Jesus sought me’ ?”’
Her mother tried, but she could not sing
for weeping; and Lizzie said, ‘‘ Never
mind, — where Lam going, there is beautiful
singing. Yet it seems to me I shall hear.
no voice so sweet as yours, mamma. Why
do you cry? Only think, mamma, if I
should live, now, how crooked and sickly
I should be. I might be a poor hunchback,
and give a great deal of trouble and sorrow
to you all. Will it not be better to bury up
this crushed body, and let the pleasant grass
grow over it, and have a new and glorious
body, such as the angels have ?”’

As she spoke these words, she smiled, and
did not weep; but when, afterwards, she
asked for a faithful house-dog, and her
pretty Maltese kitten, and they were brought
LIZZIE IN THE MILL. 127

to her, she burst into tears. ‘‘Good-by, old
Bose! good-by, Kitty!’ she said. ‘I
ery, mamma, to part from these, because I
never, never shall see them again ; for théy
have no souls, poor things! But you and
papa will come to heaven before many years;
and you, too, brothers, if you are good boys.”

A little while after this, she said, ‘‘ Geor-
gie, give my love to Alice and Celia, and
tell them I am glad I kissed them so many
times last night. Eddie, take care of my
flowers: and, boys, don’t miss me too much
in your play,”’

After lying very quiet for some moments,
she again spoke, and said,

‘‘Mamma, are the shutters open, and
has the morning come very brightly ? ”’

‘*No, my daughter,’’ her mother an-
swered, ‘‘it is still dark night.’

‘¢Q, then,’’ said Lizzie, ‘* it must be the
windows of God’s beautiful palace I see,
with the pleasant light shining through. I
am almost there! Good-by, mamma, and
papa, and brothers, good-by!’’ and, with a
128 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

smile spread over her face, Lizzie stretched
out her arms, looked upward, and so died!

When Lizzie lay in her coffin, that smile
was on her sweet face still, — brighter and
purer than the white roses that lay upon her
pillow, — and Mrs. Stone tried not to let her
tears fall upon it; for she said, ‘‘ God has
taken back a little angel he lent to me for a
few years, and why should I weep for my
happy, happy child ?”’

LIZZIE GONE.

Lizzie lieth cold and still,

In the church-yard on the hill,

Where the winter winds shall rave,

All night long, around her grave ; —
Poor little Lizzie!

She ‘Il not breathe the airs of spring,

Nor hear the tuneful robin sing ;

She ’ll not feel the sun’s bright glow,

Nor see the early violets blow ; —
Poor little Lizzie !

She'll not join her brothers’ play,
Through the sunny days of May;
LIZZIE IN THE MILL. 129

Nor mark how God his love discloses,
In the coming forth of roses ; —
Poor little Lizzie!

She ‘ll glean the yellow grain no more,

Nor taste the orchard’s ripened store,

Nor see the leaves, in autumn hours,

Come down in gold and crimson showers ; —
Poor little Lizzie !

She ’ll not run to meet, again,

Her dear tired father in the lane;

Nor hear her mother’s Sabbath-singing,

Nor the church-bells’ solemn ringing ; —
Poor little Lizzie !

She hath left the love and mirth,

All the sights and sounds of earth,

Long before her life’s bright noon, —

Must she go to sleep so soon ? —
Poor little Lizzie !

Say not so; for cold and still,
Tn the church-yard on the hill,
Only her crushed body lies ; —
Far in holy Paradise
Lives the soul of Lizzie!

Where the fair and sweet-breathed flowers
Die not in the pleasant bowers;

9
130 LIZZIE IN THE MILL.

And the lovely time of roses
Never fades and never closes, —
There dwelleth Lizzie!

Where the tuneful waters flow,

Comes no night, nor winter’s snow, —

For the sunshine all abroad

Is the constant smile of God, —
There dwelleth Lizzie!

Where the seraphs, winged and crowned,
With their harps make sweetest sound, —
Where the blesséd angels sing
Glad hosannas to their King, —

There singeth Lizzie!

She will feelno cruel pain,

She will never ery again ;

For the Lord, once crucified,

Who in bitter anguish died,
Comforts little Lizzie.

Leaning on his tender breast,

Who the little children blessed, —

Waiting till her dear ones come,

Till the Father calls them home, —
Happy angel Lizzie!
JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS.



Near the small village of H. , in one
of our Western States, may be seen an old
fort, built by the French, at the time of the
French and Indian war, many years ago.
This stands on a small hill, near the turn-
pike ; and, as the walls are much broken
down, and grown over with grass and shrub-
bery, it is a very pretty place, indeed.

Some years since, there came to reside in
H. an Englishman by the name of Hen-
derson. He was a hard, severe-looking
man, whom nobody knew anything about,
except that he seemed to possess consider-
able property, that he had a meek, sad-faced
wife, and four very idle, good-for-nothing
boys. There was also in his family a dark,
slender child, about eleven years of age,
who seemed to be a sort of an adopted son.
This John Elliot proved to be a very strange


132 - JACK AND HIS JACK-O LANTERNS.

boy, — almost as shy and wild as a young
savage. Nobody appeared to care for him ;
he was seldom seen with the other members
of the family, but spent most of his time
in the fields and woods, coarsely, if not
shabbily dressed, and often without shoes
or hat. He was never seen rambling or at
play with the Henderson boys, who, it was
said, were far from kind to him; and their
father was known to treat him very cruelly.
He was never sent to school, or to church ;
it may be that he could nof have been per-
suaded to go, he was so exceedingly shy
always. He never could be prevailed upon
to enter a neighbor’s house; and seemed
afraid to converse many minutes at a time
with any one, though he would answer very
civilly any question put to him. He never
complained of the hard treatment he had at
home, but surely his sad face and neglected
look were complaint enough.

Every one who heard him speak noticed
that he had a voice of remarkable sweet-
ness; and he seemed to have a talent for
JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS. 133

music ; for he would sing, when he thought
himself quite alone, wild, mournful, com-
plaining airs ; but nobody could ever catch
the sense of the words, and very likely they
had little meaning.

John, or Jack, as the Hendersons always
called him, seenied to take to the fort from
the first. He spent hour after hour there,
searching for the stone arrow-heads, pipes,
and beads, of the Indians, and rusty buckles,
bullets, and bayonets, of the French soldiers.
At one time he dug up an old iron-hilted
sword, with only about an inch of the point
broken off; this he hung at his side, by a
leathern belt, and for months was never seen
- without it.

It happened that the summer Jack came
to H , Miss Ellen Hayward, the minis-
ter’s daughter, a very sweet young lady, was
in delicate health, and was in the habit of
walking every morning. Often she went to
the fort, and, after climbing the little hill,
would sit down to rest on the grassy em-
bankment. °


134 JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS.

After a long time, she became acquainted
with Jack, who interested her very much.

Once she asked him to tell her about the
Hendersons and himself. He looked all
around them, as though he feared some one
might overhear him, before he answered.
He said he believed that Mr. Henderson was
not nearly related to him; that once, when
he was very small, he lived in a beautiful
home, where there never was any winter,
but where the flowers were always bright,
and the trees green; that he remembered a
tall man, in soldier’s dress, his papa, and a
sweet, kind mamma. He said he recol-
lected that one morning somebody came to
him, and told him his mamma was dead, and
he was never to see her any more ; and that
afterwards his papa took him to a ship, and,
after kissing him many times, left him there
with a nurse ; and that they sailed day after
day, over the sea, till they reached England,
when Mr. Henderson came on board, and
took them to his home. The next thing
he remembered was, that one morning his
JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS. 135

good nurse kissed him, and cried over him a
long time, and said they were going to send
her away ; she went, and he never saw her
again. Then he was sent toa great noisy
school for some years ; then they all came to
America, where they had moved from place
to place, till they settled at H

** Poor boy! ”’ said Miss Hayward, when
Jack had finished his little story. ‘* You
have had a hard time, so far; but cheer up!
your father will come for you, yet.’’

‘© No, no! ”’ cried Jack, throwing himself
down on the ground, and hiding his face in
the long grass; ‘* he will never come so far
for me, — he will never find me. And then
I’m afraid he has been killed, long ago, —
my brave soldier-papa !’”’

**] think,” said Miss Hayward, ‘‘ that
you must have been born in India, and that
your father was an English officer.”’

‘‘T think so, too,’’ said Jack; ** but I
never could get anybody to tell me anything
about it. I know my papa was a British
soldier ; for he wore a red coat, and because


1386 JACK AND HIS JACK-O’ LANTERNS.

I leve swords, bayonets, forts, and all such
things, and think ‘God save the King’ a
braver fighting tune than ‘ Yankee Doodle.’”’

The next day Miss Hayward brought Jack
that sweet East-Indian story, by Mrs. Sher-
wood, called ‘‘ Little Henry and his Bear-
er.”’ Scarcely had she read a page to him, -
before he cried out, joyfully,

“OQ, [had just such a home as that! I
had just such a bearer as Boosy, who car-
ried me on his back everywhere. O, I was
born in India !—TI was born in India!”

And Jack was right. The true story of
John Charles Elliot, as it afterwards came
out, was this. He was the only child of
English parents, and was born at a military
station near Calcutta. He was a delicate
boy, about five years old, when his mother
died ; and his father, Captain Elliot, fearing
that he could not live in the climate of India,
sent him to England, and placed him under
the care of a cousin and an old school-mate,
of his own, Mr. Henderson; for it happened
that neither the father nor the mother of the
JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS. 137

boy had any near relations then living in
England. Captain Elliot had great con-
fidence in Mr. Henderson; he made him
the guardian of his son, and placed in his
hands little John’s entire fortune, left to him
by his mother. But the frank, honest sol-
dier was deceived in his cousin, who was a
wicked, dishonest man. All the while that
Mr. Henderson was writing pleasant, friendly
letters to Captain Elliot, far in India, he was
treating very ill his lonely little boy, and
even using for himself and his family the
money rightly belonging to John.

He sent away the lad’s nurse, and forbade
every one in the family to talk with him
about India, for fear that, when he was old
enough, he would write to his father, and
tell him how he was treated.

When Mr. Henderson left England for
America, with his family, it was because he
feared that Captain Elliot was coming home,
and would find out what a villain he had
been for so many years. Of course, he did
not write to the captain that he was about
138 JACK AND HIS JACK-O’ LANTERNS.

to leave England; and after he had left, he
did not write at all: so, for two years, poor
Captain Elliot heard not a word from his
little son.

Jack was not altogether sad. He hada
quiet love of mischief and fun, which showed
itself in an amusing way, the summer he
spent at H It chanced that some silly
men got it into their heads that there was
money buried somewhere in the old fort,
and went to work digging for it.

Though, like Jack, they found. nothing
but arrow-heads, pipe-bowls, and pieces of
old guns and. swords, they were not dis-
couraged ; for they had consulted a famous
fortune-teller, who, after looking very sol-
emnly in a blue tea-cup, for ten minutes, told
them that ‘‘ Somewheres inside of the fort,
the French sartin buried five great iron pots
full of gold and silver.’’ She told them
that they must always begin to dig just at
midnight. And so, from twelve till the
cock crew for daylight, a watcher might see


JACK AND HIS JACK-O’ LANTERNS. 189

their lanterns burning on old Fort Hill, and
hear the sound of their pickaxes and spades.

Well, one evening Jack went alone to the
fort, carrying a spade and an iron dinner-
pot. He then dug a new hole, very near
the last place where the men had been
digging, pressed the pot down into the earth
with all his strength, so that it would leave
a deep impression, then took it up, hid it in
the bushes, and hid himself there until the
gold-diggers came, Presently, he heard
one of the men call out, ‘* Hallo! —some
thief has been here, and stole one of our
money-pots! Now, boys, for the other
four, — they must be somewhere near! ”’

As you may suppose, they went to work
harder than ever; and it was broad daylight
before they gave up, shouldered pickaxe
and spade, and went home.

The next day, Jack told his friend Miss
Hayward of the joke he had played off on
the foolish fellows who were spoiling the
fort by digging such great holes in the
ground. The story was soon all over town,
140 JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS.

and the gold-diggers were completely
laughed out of their folly.

Close behind the fort lay a large marsh;
and, in the dark nights of the autumn, this
was all lit up with brilliant jack-o’lanterns.
They even came pouring over the walls, and
danced about in the old fort as though they
were having rare frolics together. Strange
to say, Jack Elliot —who, people began to
think, was not in his right mind — might
often be seen with them there ; — dancing
with the merriest, chasing the swiftest, call-
ing to them as though they were real play-
mates, and singing more wildly than ever.

One night in October, as a traveller on
horseback was passing the fort, he observed
the jack-o’lanterns, who were out in great
numbers. He checked his horse to watch
their shining play, and presently he saw a
slight, dark figure moving about with them.
It was Jack, at his nightly frolic with his
friends. The gentleman felt curious to know
what that strange boy was about; so dis-
mounted, went softly up the hill, and hid
JACK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS. 141 |

among the bushes, near where Jack was
shouting, laughing, and striving in vain to
catch the dancing lights in his arms. Sud-
denly the boy began singing, in his sweet,
wild voice, such words as,

** Dance, dance around me! Don’t fly so high!

Don’t run away, now, be good, and come back !
Bright jack-o’ lanterns ! merry jack-o’lanterns !
Only play-fellows of poor little Jack !”’

That voice! oh, it sounded to the stran-
ger like the voice of his dear young wife,
dead these many years; and like the voice
of her boy and his, sent away from him
long ago, and for whom he had sought vainly
in England and America, —/for the atone
was Captain Elliot !

He now sprang forward, and unet Jack
in his arms, saying, ‘‘O my boy! my dear
boy! thank God, I have found you at last!”’

Jack was never known to be frightened,
or even startled; so now he said, quite
| calmly, but joyfully, ‘‘Papa! my brave
soldier-papa! is it you? I thought you
never were coming, — never, never! ”’
142 JACK AND HIS JACK-0’LANTERNS.

In a short time there were great changes
with the Hendersons. They were obliged to
give up the little that now remained of John
Elhot’s property, and to begin to live like
poor people, as they were. For the sake
of Mrs. Henderson, who had been as kind
to John as she dared to be, Captain Elliot
did not punish her husband as severely as
he deserved ; but everybody despised and
shunned the family, as long as they remained
in H It would take me a long time
to tell just how Captain Elliot, found his
son;—how he followed Mr. Henderson
from England to America, and tracked him
from state to state, and town to town, till
he reached that little village in the West.

Captain Elliot was a tall, soldier-like per-
son, still very handsome, though much sun-
burned, and beginning to show a few white
locks in the black curls around his forehead.
He had left the army, and said he intended
to return to England, and go to live with
his son on some property of his own in the

country.


JAGK AND HIS JACK-O’LANTERNS. 143

It was noticed that Jack did not rest till
he brought his father acquainted with his
only friend, Miss Hayward, the minister’s
daughter ; and it was also noticed that this
pretty girl seemed to please the father full
as well as the son. Soon the three might
often be seen walking together to the old
fort, — sometimes on jack-o’lantern nights.
Then people began to say, ‘“‘ I wonder what
that Captain Elliot stays here so long for?
His business is all done; and it’s getting
rather late in the season to cross the ocean.”’
And one good, careful, tea-drinking old
lady said,

‘“ her last spring’s sickness, or she’d run the
risk of catching her death-cold, in taking so
many evening walks.’’

One morning, early in November, Captain
Elliot said to John, ‘‘ My son, put on your
best suit of clothes; I want you to go to
church with me.”’

‘To church, papa?”’ said John ; ‘‘why,
it isn’t Sunday.”
144 JACK AND HIS JACK-0’LANTERNS.

“‘T know that,’’ answered his father ;
‘‘but if I go up there this morning, the
good minister will give his daughter Ellen
to me, for my wife, and your mother; and
we may take her with us to England.”

‘‘Q papa, how glad I am!” cried John ;
“*you did this all to make me happy, — did
you not?’’ Captain Elliot laughed, as he
answered, **l am afraid Iam not quite so
good as that. 1 own I want Miss Hayward
to finish taming my young savage; but
then I want her full as much for myself.
She is a noble girl! I think, John, that
she looks very much as' your mother did.’’

_ As John Charles Elliot took his sweet

one friend, his new mamma, with him to
England, there was nobody to mourn for
him when he went from . ; in fact,
nobody missed him much. One would have
thought that the jack-o’lanterns might have
been sorry for his going; but even they
‘made light of it, and that very night danced
away as merrily as ever.



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describe
'30113276' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_010.tif'
f0ee633ba3cae9829efcfe2db3c9a31c
2292e9db4626cccf4f7b992c2b54cb1c08fe8ccb
'2012-04-02T08:35:57-04:00'
describe
'5190' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_010thm.jpg'
e69c7fa66d705061dc56353625beaaae
dc6419b95499c401384de32d9cf06ac25dde1b85
'2012-04-02T08:36:08-04:00'
describe
'720422' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.jp2'
9a20db4a7ab89c8ba34bb2af615530d0
06b1b73687ee465bec924a3a68708bcba4a4600f
'2012-04-02T08:36:41-04:00'
describe
'40205' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.jpg'
baf31f3fd037ebc336f7f660eb4e70ec
37acf91c7d2b514838300acc8d4240eff758aba1
'2012-04-02T08:29:16-04:00'
describe
'6447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.pro'
ee815419c71fc22cbb941b8916446a45
5ddf5a910d93ca706353a7b51190ee0b6565162c
'2012-04-02T08:36:33-04:00'
describe
'14044' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.QC.jpg'
3620a9960cca4571c73fe255e2cbbc64
3b16c3237e46224bda85e345e8e90854f615eb00
'2012-04-02T08:29:06-04:00'
describe
'33802508' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.tif'
8b288d13aba4087152d33e5ca4ef6fd5
d79f4ec0f5a5df627f690f345b28f783ae02c625
'2012-04-02T08:35:43-04:00'
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011.txt'
414bbafd038439e5348758840de5d4ac
32be32e6f4f7752a3c52202c5a060462fae363c6
'2012-04-02T08:33:16-04:00'
describe
'4905' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_011thm.jpg'
d9f064e44f7e3730b64d2d306b0821e9
76610f9f29c3c90f181b3e22156f713a2d8d14f2
'2012-04-02T08:31:07-04:00'
describe
'349900' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.jp2'
1211eafeb826d7145325cefca807e9c7
c4852a2a080ab12392dc25d51ad895fd0e839ddd
'2012-04-02T08:33:15-04:00'
describe
'21911' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.jpg'
4f880f8eea6b52ac4f397d896452fef9
df179ac23d484784d8cacdb3a9cd2cce96795067
'2012-04-02T08:30:35-04:00'
describe
'5634' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.pro'
4372be062c76ee506b6f8c1050f063f4
f05569e068416e7799eb1db0382a33c7a200814c
'2012-04-02T08:29:50-04:00'
describe
'8171' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.QC.jpg'
f26be7be6335be6c2976540803fea63b
d3976efbb11974f8353e5fcf0b7fd58dab4768b2
'2012-04-02T08:29:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJDZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.tif'
10d7e0bb76114d19b576cc18d64ac1fc
07075c34eaf960fc71b0e0eb9cdc1e0e04760ec8
'2012-04-02T08:28:59-04:00'
describe
'379' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012.txt'
faf5b3bbe8eca68f060272c6ad93a858
02bd539e027ac411d7c5278dca57702d0ea4de30
'2012-04-02T08:36:20-04:00'
describe
'2847' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_012thm.jpg'
edffb7851521172f3cce93b7b12ed000
01c014a83bb66d094a80b61161c5c4c481ff413d
'2012-04-02T08:36:17-04:00'
describe
'475202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.jp2'
3346b4d73999ac877ed56a3d354b278a
47a3d1985fe50c41b5fca7312da12051bcff1d07
'2012-04-02T08:30:39-04:00'
describe
'29444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJED' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.jpg'
f5d133a1b647d7d4f4db4d4d85c27ad8
57f41f5e2058c401f5d7ed29ae851cdb53a2ac84
'2012-04-02T08:29:23-04:00'
describe
'3885' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.pro'
dcd442aedf8b9f4016e9113360ec96f8
c9f8af146b284f43cc5cc512e66dec9ffaf2dc0f
'2012-04-02T08:31:10-04:00'
describe
'10318' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.QC.jpg'
58e03f5e0394e2bbee7a2b0a6171e3de
d5d26f359f53aed6365dd18e3bcdb055afe60caa
'2012-04-02T08:29:26-04:00'
describe
'33502954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.tif'
ab1d10ef3ebf01b818eadfafd996201b
ff9e7adc7447c9d42867e6b7d6a160bc7a3b6704
'2012-04-02T08:27:36-04:00'
describe
'235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013.txt'
f43675ae04f040100bff4c735147b3e7
86809fc98634aebc04e8591a4fcb82b6c5c4df44
'2012-04-02T08:35:19-04:00'
describe
'3477' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_013thm.jpg'
9b8855f9752e32478426943fbffc82e0
e148dd24e19ba4d2eff751b8bfdf03d65044acdb
'2012-04-02T08:29:55-04:00'
describe
'263558' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_014.jp2'
8d9793fe053ba60d9e5ab1b1d623f400
46255a749c764c84a195a8f6543cfb0c0fbe49d5
'2012-04-02T08:32:39-04:00'
describe
'17428' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_014.jpg'
406288e6acf42aef3145c634521d8488
f8a47fb043b2cd81b3e7cda9bf4c9c9fec533d26
'2012-04-02T08:36:48-04:00'
describe
'6209' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_014.QC.jpg'
42c81f81dc6b6555b72353317b7fa010
a571e789f412a614f1b7aef27360448d44376af6
'2012-04-02T08:31:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_014.tif'
1f0193c881f69e8606eecf7597d9bda2
f4b3ff85ac005771fedce51becf4c45a55726d68
'2012-04-02T08:36:56-04:00'
describe
'2157' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_014thm.jpg'
4d8fe71897ebf75b4f6b43fb56e23f56
d6551338a609a74544e4d52da19e149be6a5e9cd
'2012-04-02T08:33:12-04:00'
describe
'849188' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.jp2'
b461f06ae818d5a943cd44349e287129
7ac0bb50130a8bd6763d2bd61b44cab08c85213c
'2012-04-02T08:32:01-04:00'
describe
'45108' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.jpg'
01432add376c52fcf169832aebdd22c9
a1957d06751b3d0ce68e80a1e9ad6eeef3cac5fd
'2012-04-02T08:35:28-04:00'
describe
'15046' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.pro'
73c2a4ebfd0242c199037821507936d1
29246b278d6b1fec40dcf60212257293db62364a
'2012-04-02T08:28:07-04:00'
describe
'18316' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJER' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.QC.jpg'
1f47f50a7c8701e183411e832138c96f
5c44d9d5134e531dc2fe08f19c57cc3bd81069a9
'2012-04-02T08:34:35-04:00'
describe
'32162844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJES' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.tif'
4490ef3a00cfbe1eda158eb6142ad90a
5fbf19c3f6779db02694e8490a08218ee3b6caa6
'2012-04-02T08:35:04-04:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJET' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015.txt'
7bed8021d9b48991bb5fc1b9e9d50b88
594b805689d4ffa43246362ea4ab09bedc81c0a9
'2012-04-02T08:33:06-04:00'
describe
'6334' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_015thm.jpg'
77a5589618f0e44e4cd625242289f48b
75dc2c5e45ed05cfa2be4092c187f9f3ff0f1995
'2012-04-02T08:30:06-04:00'
describe
'1401502' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.jp2'
6147dc945e37f1a3dc39cd003e4e0568
0735f99c1ea3014856d7d0f40338138b568c0dca
'2012-04-02T08:34:52-04:00'
describe
'74679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.jpg'
67c414ee6e929d8a2bc83dd7c16e9520
c971c9aa71de2a4c030e1f030744fafadcde78f8
'2012-04-02T08:32:37-04:00'
describe
'22235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.pro'
46395c582f06ba14c953185dc89be3ed
b79c90890b600f8bbf9626075e491f0f7bdc9361
'2012-04-02T08:36:42-04:00'
describe
'27668' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.QC.jpg'
ccc828a851cc6bbb3b0a1e9efb2dfe0d
7ac880864c881a3cd354c555a68fc2f1e1cbbef8
'2012-04-02T08:34:02-04:00'
describe
'33668498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJEZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.tif'
4535630410427cd784a5bbd91dc527b8
788f48440dfbad2bceb91b061aa06dee47e2b113
'2012-04-02T08:31:29-04:00'
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018.txt'
1cc9e85904f44b7a5f2adf204202df3d
b3c75984c6337dd122455e98a48bbe7042d6cb30
'2012-04-02T08:35:00-04:00'
describe
'8353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_018thm.jpg'
14175ce9ff7341654e1375581bf3bc8d
2e703d8453d3e636a8a6d41ed587427752c60c6f
'2012-04-02T08:34:30-04:00'
describe
'1405678' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.jp2'
19244b5b4cb86e8698c7db1863187892
59728346e19a1e83d8c063c06aabd3481a6df4cc
'2012-04-02T08:30:34-04:00'
describe
'93806' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.jpg'
08b0eb2151b9f4698c76675e2b42e173
baa15d0936efed20e3326f4afe35a7b18c1a07df
'2012-04-02T08:28:57-04:00'
describe
'33021' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.pro'
8e0182598b43ec6d12df620761ac357f
b40ac42e063fecf1bf689465a0b74cea81daf7b5
'2012-04-02T08:33:28-04:00'
describe
'36293' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.QC.jpg'
17622db8eae3a8287e3c93b16e091600
17417603e9107ec2c85d3fec203efbb98f53c9c9
'2012-04-02T08:31:36-04:00'
describe
'33770976' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.tif'
e79748d32f31b54d9c798489a8bb4fed
b592e0e8308da8ea9ccbecc07ccf3beb1c4a46e1
'2012-04-02T08:36:02-04:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019.txt'
52f2b2f96b29e44a7d40e2989d57b102
2851caccf07a5fea08e6f79bf260e190564d8495
'2012-04-02T08:36:54-04:00'
describe
'10530' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_019thm.jpg'
1d510aca1937ed5f4a8d7321a93a69c7
e62a66957599c53428084398fcaf9b45d16e4ae5
'2012-04-02T08:34:04-04:00'
describe
'1401527' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.jp2'
bffabd90cc0343e155711fa9a88266d6
f525631af1ed778d96d261c54c38597f348a0a46
'2012-04-02T08:28:58-04:00'
describe
'91529' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.jpg'
b75490117a7e6cdb5d09d50dbcad2b3f
13d4b822d0294b67073d4b400b25fd4423ac1afc
describe
'31304' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.pro'
04d1d45a5a28cddb3b3084bd8005b309
f0121c8f63c5be07cc50a2f373f704b722711822
'2012-04-02T08:35:39-04:00'
describe
'34814' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.QC.jpg'
db449b828a1c7c14380a84120ad924ca
b9c58ac9abadb6f4c4adad06d11b18f06d2deaf1
'2012-04-02T08:35:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.tif'
b61c72286421c7f46ede3167a7adb21e
ae8da786cae780a18d639d52988993af56681691
'2012-04-02T08:36:11-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020.txt'
dac83df1da362ea5501c399737039cb4
2f50f1879010b04729981e463bb4c8ca677ca7a2
'2012-04-02T08:33:59-04:00'
describe
'10126' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_020thm.jpg'
d85c68947c7dda9008aef1c4377e473b
aebb9df381f506dd16aa5b86bda8b2ed7dcfe870
'2012-04-02T08:35:26-04:00'
describe
'1112870' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.jp2'
7fb4ac67e09509137332994d017a5ad8
b9d20bfc83be4f4370d177f0596810af3a8d88ca
'2012-04-02T08:28:36-04:00'
describe
'66685' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.jpg'
56b2f7a1edf815de235a6b4f099fed52
2b5aa76d6ff6947a722c4d079a38f97a831a9df3
'2012-04-02T08:33:47-04:00'
describe
'21315' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.pro'
c968c06ca81f3535619bcc25ae8437e5
60765e31cfa8bbed6006f050f54386faa3b9c1d7
describe
'24826' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.QC.jpg'
cd1ea8cd6168857360aeb3f4e3f47f0b
739a16be99fa00555221f2d6df2fb3ff32972612
'2012-04-02T08:30:14-04:00'
describe
'26737660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.tif'
5e9fb25db9857fde26197e60549b08de
ae8b0b0d1ba06fceecfa9f23f561f102d9da728d
'2012-04-02T08:31:49-04:00'
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021.txt'
5166f3effe331c0ea4209891b2c4306a
c3a286df2c547148b65f15487c0662647b4b79c4
'2012-04-02T08:34:28-04:00'
describe
'8272' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_021thm.jpg'
77df7aa6f4adccfbf1e110027af62ff1
3d8449ce5cc9c5eed9c3724f7df1affbfeb3a9ba
'2012-04-02T08:27:38-04:00'
describe
'1133569' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_022.jp2'
a19e39081e1f12ccc7189eb612f6648b
bbbdd93ca346cceab593a21dcaa5adfbf7665880
'2012-04-02T08:35:55-04:00'
describe
'60902' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_022.jpg'
965b92f863c3f766f1d741ed93ff68dd
b699bb9915352a6caf31cbb5cc04b3f2e27b5169
'2012-04-02T08:31:05-04:00'
describe
'19465' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJFZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_022.QC.jpg'
08b7bc3eabff827d2db318b5ed3ebb7d
0cea09424e5f353ef35ed7a9f2b5ac8178faf8d6
describe
'27996076' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_022.tif'
16410d2baf1e7cc1a7b00a10d0695cfd
8c64d2f7b13ae6c42b22d43c1f63054b216d7551
'2012-04-02T08:30:00-04:00'
describe
'6039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_022thm.jpg'
e34f32f168161a3b6b427ff07f1c7a44
ff88797d62b08128b45817cb92057a46015eac1a
describe
'1327641' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.jp2'
5049aa3797857bea607e9acf19d30753
157761cb42be6d19737b42c4cfceffe00d46ae76
describe
'71887' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.jpg'
4a3845622b1f3b257be1ff6df56f1918
0c0bb2621194ea94d55b2ef7bfb7f4d88d7f25da
'2012-04-02T08:31:54-04:00'
describe
'18967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.pro'
754a60717c6b209226bce79ea6ce849a
c0953c93b74994302b577097e4cad43744c8de8e
'2012-04-02T08:28:09-04:00'
describe
'29454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.QC.jpg'
d509224d8983847b8290d3c43e0074f8
f0d82c64038b63f24d735a37757f6bc04995072d
'2012-04-02T08:29:09-04:00'
describe
'31894822' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.tif'
c0fd5e9be7f743fb351a281cec9b3496
cf7e6838a6e250fb732cc4323dd3fe085f424d39
'2012-04-02T08:31:01-04:00'
describe
'754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023.txt'
2be637f62e81fcbeafba55536e6b6084
d76cfce631e4d59c4a92d26bd2058beedd325212
'2012-04-02T08:32:23-04:00'
describe
'8140' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_023thm.jpg'
49d820006edd9eb727bad520b6263e7a
086b14ef4c58bb655ca9942ef468b20115ebe9f8
'2012-04-02T08:34:46-04:00'
describe
'1159403' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.jp2'
91565550cd2ac2e64a0472140d6aca03
8ce1d444ea3ce2148c86c058a9c7ad6ff1186431
describe
'93149' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.jpg'
837346f142b8656c86274ad645a688bd
c09e106c50cc16bf9059f9c0f7f1c3b1c8b11a2d
'2012-04-02T08:31:24-04:00'
describe
'26926' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.pro'
5b7dd165a03562740bcd4726a71f9f58
cfae92bd6f27b9a5bc3524f2922e231ef2bc5ad4
'2012-04-02T08:30:09-04:00'
describe
'35695' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.QC.jpg'
2e62c6beeee3d5110e322b5f7d199a2e
c0492652109ce57b3892a7e960cf2fac978aa92a
'2012-04-02T08:31:31-04:00'
describe
'27854954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.tif'
cea2cf2b91adcbbd55fe63bd8011bf7b
a144ee249ae7322b550560e9722120d0fc768c94
'2012-04-02T08:36:28-04:00'
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024.txt'
62f06a0f4c5f89eeca04993599062fe1
32f11ac6730261b37bb40ea1d4f3997b79c69507
describe
'10363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_024thm.jpg'
9a1f3cdb136c3023f3c59d6fe5ccfffd
4966c5e4a2c2ec508785ac8c2ab2a4728b36c759
'2012-04-02T08:33:24-04:00'
describe
'1385048' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.jp2'
1ddac6a79a1fd830bd2b667830f21f01
fa1bf90b21d34b48d4b21b77e84f98fcdcea8f47
'2012-04-02T08:28:26-04:00'
describe
'95290' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.jpg'
383a4d3c5ff43dcbcd15312965048498
4545cab776859c98a22c8be52c61caed1faeba74
describe
'27630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.pro'
0ad5d940d64fa1a42bb09903347d9536
c6cc1609ca0f8c2964aceb4d2414b304060a656c
describe
'36370' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.QC.jpg'
80634f05228c871c68e07beacb1d209d
01374767040d87b520ee49a48026583c3cd481db
'2012-04-02T08:28:45-04:00'
describe
'33274348' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.tif'
ecc937301ac9d0ea0eb47e795088738d
ad482945dcef329037856dc43a4234665ec6fd50
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025.txt'
a7054a02e4505ee476e6fb4aedabd11f
d0290381893cca023c1795396720465ea4d88b84
'2012-04-02T08:32:19-04:00'
describe
'10702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_025thm.jpg'
6e09abdcc408dc3c702694fe35b8eb00
aad4a0d39f8cf758643949353ca4e05f139155a9
describe
'1275780' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.jp2'
ff05db6238ae54ac15bda1671e46890b
858207ddacea8d80bc7f358ffe2d929da7a4a346
'2012-04-02T08:29:00-04:00'
describe
'86907' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.jpg'
f26bec833bdb5196057dde74080dd753
4958159dee40027a5a6e25555c3139782a974380
describe
'27572' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJGZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.pro'
9cf2bacab7f7b076833c5bb69bbfe72b
cdb97ecec8c83f9e10d5529656c2d7e26d2bac0f
'2012-04-02T08:36:22-04:00'
describe
'33824' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.QC.jpg'
211ea8cb2e7788a9a169cc005a7f231b
6d5f4cb396e2aefb9430f64aa9aefed9725973b7
'2012-04-02T08:35:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.tif'
af901e109d71c432ed242d5e1f137b9d
fdf8bfcc1af4dacd763fba7db756e3033118440a
'2012-04-02T08:34:58-04:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026.txt'
97f7df0cf2cf629dc052b63456b73043
0f7333081d31b94860745d0054c71b301c9c91ce
'2012-04-02T08:27:56-04:00'
describe
'9368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_026thm.jpg'
bdca03b47832ec417050ae909cbf9499
e3cb72cbb2e9428f5159c50018d0635861559108
'2012-04-02T08:30:01-04:00'
describe
'1305905' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.jp2'
a5894f0444a1f2a354b35be509cf609b
59a7a67b59bf7202614b8a3c916d00cdf2a73f1b
'2012-04-02T08:27:59-04:00'
describe
'85485' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.jpg'
f9552a266f7349785b8101b267399f58
b8392084376085298322742a576353ec34acc04b
describe
'27046' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.pro'
a9d5cc4858fdd650f1bff4b4f6fd0546
e32afe28dc7b92b6239385a06363def1b80f223a
describe
'32513' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.QC.jpg'
61df6217523116a8a1dfea2e9c99e6fa
9e993806a8cdcfa98260f4d5701148df80bdb91e
'2012-04-02T08:27:57-04:00'
describe
'31374544' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.tif'
9a00eece271edfecfca00a254a5f01d5
ea97f73aa68f3bdf7838d64f95ff3e5bfb75f900
'2012-04-02T08:30:57-04:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027.txt'
5e5efc1ad66203c8058695a2b0798fc0
853136b2a5336aa02f4e5da5ad5afdbca7abac3a
'2012-04-02T08:33:21-04:00'
describe
'9567' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_027thm.jpg'
4e5c4837750957fa770cac1228fad816
83a0a392050b842489b5151d0dfacea8dc9697d5
'2012-04-02T08:36:16-04:00'
describe
'1275845' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.jp2'
5a6cd804a71d96d22da39df6084c3d93
66f0633497f21436b195d4629e15cb75048ea2b5
'2012-04-02T08:32:06-04:00'
describe
'80135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.jpg'
6946f22096f49844127c3b2cc71c7e4f
580400e72f0717eab2da87ba75701fa5e46cfd83
describe
'25813' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.pro'
f99bf484501d509165b2d5e99971e121
d762aa61fbee2a98fc83909d06f5039827960c66
'2012-04-02T08:32:42-04:00'
describe
'32374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.QC.jpg'
f2530421a17b6b3829304ffe2d3efcdd
3cea675cc62b4aa23823b7278a2ea2f7b3196812
'2012-04-02T08:36:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.tif'
c921f7673542fc8eb8f2ab4f7c34342f
0f960b8a6491a866ce2200876bfbb56d5d238750
'2012-04-02T08:33:14-04:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028.txt'
0c67f7f7f0bd69c4d31450895a9816b9
8520503711a1a338f4f7966bb8de49a3593bcf2d
'2012-04-02T08:35:47-04:00'
describe
'8744' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_028thm.jpg'
67a1593950276b12a64b7c133a2024c9
5a5004f292cb3dcf381732a66b1c91d19cc3dcd1
'2012-04-02T08:28:03-04:00'
describe
'1306012' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.jp2'
c1064ae8f044f690c6455c773df0ff66
2130d3e4e26400d1a975d094baee9df4641be794
'2012-04-02T08:36:45-04:00'
describe
'83946' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.jpg'
d2dfe497301f1a4d4317c3cdecaf9e8a
468abde979da6fc1da3f0d38790a06b75ca471f9
describe
'26320' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.pro'
40d9caf469a3a51011fc5f343e02f8f5
2b2898f4a3ce5a69e431bbcba48525950acc239f
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.QC.jpg'
f173fdb5fb59a2057589bdbb5fac5c49
ea700301eb1e59ff427970c2b88094799f075192
'2012-04-02T08:35:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.tif'
54756e1eca81ef8865ad082a8522b295
b14e2b92fa32cb54a6b5d9de0a66b979154c3274
'2012-04-02T08:28:30-04:00'
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029.txt'
e5241ee9e0cd42164bea4bfb7c4048ea
39e20d621c2b7c39195b6dd74b1d808af2c0e12d
'2012-04-02T08:29:27-04:00'
describe
'9269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_029thm.jpg'
a3043ec34e55e8f98e4961215214ad10
3c5becadad09cbeee9b4bdf6874a9f912d2d3e2d
'2012-04-02T08:33:00-04:00'
describe
'1275828' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJHZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.jp2'
5ccd7697b5d3507734f8023a3122e226
53fa6d176d49fa51ab8e818ea1209d8ff79e4a91
'2012-04-02T08:34:47-04:00'
describe
'83385' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.jpg'
94859a762efbf5303d5b3cbafbdcb50a
b4aa85063f95a78edfd4b2a146a00ce5d55933a8
'2012-04-02T08:35:18-04:00'
describe
'27297' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.pro'
28d79853de5743e2eeb23a24565e7361
99ec29314fbe87256e0ca1e0cd54fdfee33212eb
describe
'33465' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.QC.jpg'
dfc9a261c6423ba166b487ba0790a3fb
eef71b8038942f2460a3cc3bb85bfec72488f244
'2012-04-02T08:35:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJID' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.tif'
1bc35dc8e8abe32f77ff38edd9fae647
a9d811f48993ed2596acb2ddbae21b7889ae49aa
'2012-04-02T08:33:02-04:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030.txt'
338a77490640cd4dca18e51359c5014a
e0dfe223458bfbe42f39d1cb63514cca39342b8b
'2012-04-02T08:32:47-04:00'
describe
'9279' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_030thm.jpg'
1fbaffad45481f503ce85a00313afc77
abd2d54832395bfdc848f7c6bceac11bd1a700de
'2012-04-02T08:30:10-04:00'
describe
'1306043' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.jp2'
9f1cfb5048ace6416df9c3461b070834
fe13abaa4864ac5bb732914f7b0883f4652166ce
'2012-04-02T08:32:56-04:00'
describe
'79967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.jpg'
e69995becf6c53170aaf4e76a0e8e33b
ef42f31051a39d4b046c464b0e7f4fa17309076b
'2012-04-02T08:27:54-04:00'
describe
'24671' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJII' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.pro'
a443295add9d402b908f404768aeb667
fbb8d2b7c09a76196de10cdf788059fcdce17044
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.QC.jpg'
8a291229eb0154e7b534e8e1037704e5
a44731ad2f7c65cb805efb631e05fd16de7ecc62
'2012-04-02T08:28:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.tif'
cb5145d633db138b8f25dba8b11965de
c839bd782b775e6a1d01bd8005a8321d26c52bf5
'2012-04-02T08:27:44-04:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031.txt'
d8cc64714190efa29bd34cf7ae87adbf
44f54c9010b482edcd66ba4403f9d24e743e96ad
'2012-04-02T08:34:21-04:00'
describe
'9104' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_031thm.jpg'
44dc154493b27b5a033990273fded58a
602a9e2b858e28c60e014130792cdfafd3ba90f2
'2012-04-02T08:30:24-04:00'
describe
'1275798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.jp2'
aa099717abe7b68064892e0b5034f3b2
75cfadc30e519011112b8ba19f6db017b8bafa45
'2012-04-02T08:30:38-04:00'
describe
'82000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.jpg'
97e74405f52c9e1068b81febb40aa329
a37ccfd1b38286cad5f5479b5c84bd2b7b0c7b38
'2012-04-02T08:34:43-04:00'
describe
'26492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.pro'
5125e1a9d21f4fe86d55e4c2f725f2de
55cffe5f193f5ec1efa134b00cf8cdc378c3e5dd
'2012-04-02T08:29:25-04:00'
describe
'32281' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.QC.jpg'
b6e1cbb8da22c439b1152970cb963eca
85d674b74f0eb2d7acbfe02a015cf4240d5eba12
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.tif'
ba184ad89f7b74b67695f6c033edbf9f
f02887688f3d819c31c49eb5787f4284a38de6cc
'2012-04-02T08:32:31-04:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032.txt'
b8a31470fd7f06739a455990ca0936a5
ecf18ce1dc5c7dc59fc7eb657d6d21868cf2d104
'2012-04-02T08:35:50-04:00'
describe
'9370' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_032thm.jpg'
49eacdfb89d8a0f8b2eec6c1a4249ade
0d173ec6435a0455af071aaa6740f425d810e4c0
'2012-04-02T08:31:32-04:00'
describe
'1306038' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.jp2'
094bdbf90824476ffe759cb7b0dec2aa
3a08b061fe1810c972e973e2bd2282f8700a9313
'2012-04-02T08:31:22-04:00'
describe
'83156' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.jpg'
a5781dcdc5e634880112e022ccda80cf
2e4e32efbef17d24ae449b5070cf2febd8dbe380
describe
'26458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.pro'
a67c94fea669a92db9aceaeecbe64142
3e5ca8593a642f7ce0b0dd988a6013a90c7df129
describe
'31318' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.QC.jpg'
d07558c27cf3f80bce341e72d4957269
18d567204d2183d460bce75f742306fef586ca0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.tif'
66859a2d961ebad75b9b4f312910a396
216c6ece86858c25118c48bd0820144105531ed5
'2012-04-02T08:33:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJIZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033.txt'
16eb261543e198f91772cb100ef4f0ff
8fc5776fdbaaa37e9c07162ef430e452a4ad3fd0
describe
'9489' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_033thm.jpg'
26767d4b04d5e010e1be6aa9c71a26ba
946ed1576a0a8dfb80a901528aca9042aff25052
describe
'1275857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.jp2'
34e888dbc5dcabf33a03033ff9f340c5
5789ebc84c1df18eb33f69392086f30997576323
'2012-04-02T08:35:15-04:00'
describe
'84455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.jpg'
4e82a15e72b31237d90b20f077c25c6d
563f16e1d2c0bf1bf2bb3654db5e152b62ba927f
'2012-04-02T08:35:14-04:00'
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.pro'
1e5eee20cfca12c901afdcaae07e98bc
ff8ecf58cac091a4344f60e7fc778253bf30ede7
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.QC.jpg'
a703384bd89ecd45c2544d1e423e33f6
c9b181ee1a4f4046920b078b9a9afe5d5bb2f0ae
'2012-04-02T08:34:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.tif'
ac29e6172a249ad69031a4eb6cff7530
b86b809f051005d552d4ec05ef0f5c3707816bca
'2012-04-02T08:28:18-04:00'
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034.txt'
c837dd5708c72bb05c72b20630e534c1
c232bab81cb3e1589c971312406240031a15c40d
describe
'9337' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_034thm.jpg'
b969800698cecec91b6acde27d1bef54
25fcf662de7338d4b3ac10a9761f98ac8d90c378
'2012-04-02T08:35:37-04:00'
describe
'634478' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.jp2'
c1ef5fbcd54fb542203f82f217cb7901
d61c9d815a46aeeead50ba0da86cca4a38aaee1e
'2012-04-02T08:31:23-04:00'
describe
'35071' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.jpg'
2eaaf223f7ae9a57908237c091d33ef4
6f50e16a2f4a494d28b7eb4b61e69eaabeb44327
'2012-04-02T08:28:14-04:00'
describe
'6764' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.pro'
2ced534f11f4ea398e01d46e34b1f133
476153d44ebd4103b734953e4112b1e72a255b9f
'2012-04-02T08:36:14-04:00'
describe
'12978' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.QC.jpg'
66ac44b3e9cd120cdac33939adb63361
823444812b2d622ee5f1f07aeaa5131c3e3f8bac
'2012-04-02T08:33:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.tif'
8994ef77f824ae78c209024f51dac590
bb9159924be7f9d751454ed51d76d0897c218e0f
'2012-04-02T08:29:38-04:00'
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035.txt'
0b6f7527143902c9d730a812d85dc54d
7ec6fbafd040e1c7340c6fc695f30b62b76d9866
describe
'4225' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_035thm.jpg'
4d6fbe2a3e66e31e1555d2d5763d1582
b555600d28f0e10e96a62279f6e181144ec9439a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.jp2'
9668684593f72c6c852050c2e470b46b
9c1fc73c5db4e6cc1d3f5d78e6213fabed5222f1
describe
'69663' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.jpg'
8501604955923cec4b6342b33362c04a
4e95c42a524c469e9b13a6c176f81fd357275ce2
'2012-04-02T08:35:40-04:00'
describe
'21602' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.pro'
caeb581fb6288783ef9041a42e04f3ca
f5bb901602846d3e242f542f49a4decd0e03f30b
'2012-04-02T08:29:15-04:00'
describe
'28490' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.QC.jpg'
b77028ef91081a865bd551171d6337ef
06273baf3405f4bc71a841e3366710aa94138f42
'2012-04-02T08:32:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.tif'
9210ab6f2668fc60c96cdfe9adc1bbbe
faaa2d5941b57689e4c5b4c6bb0d9914153b5208
'2012-04-02T08:30:59-04:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036.txt'
aaf6b3a8859c3f87edfa624d72cba8e8
46f4945c07cc12d46de26d3b24dc275cdb2b6efb
'2012-04-02T08:33:41-04:00'
describe
'7721' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_036thm.jpg'
b8e85619f838387e5374a31e11ea3ae8
bfab4907363e6b11ef7453dcc8936fc3423c8810
describe
'1306034' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.jp2'
4ce613e0685f01c1a881a1943494d2e8
efcec2112b4b449f3aa92d21961345c642dc893b
'2012-04-02T08:33:10-04:00'
describe
'87388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.jpg'
ece7be6354f56be44ef274f7d90b2b2e
7fc7eb146df37f4d89c8abf9daec3c777ddcc9c3
'2012-04-02T08:33:25-04:00'
describe
'27747' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.pro'
dd02309ee29070c33bec0cc7991b429c
1f2327d179973c0debd9ba7b01c2cb543910a778
describe
'32255' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJJZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.QC.jpg'
89f6bc018f4dc3b25a107230d97bdeda
81f42f212d756a2595c04d87fe6fbd99702e9e75
'2012-04-02T08:34:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.tif'
e657b33001801fc06cf9ccbf724df95e
17954d1feaaadcc5355d5cafa3f5e5893411f0d6
'2012-04-02T08:33:19-04:00'
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037.txt'
457008f900ddada83e64181233e899c2
d60cc766ea3d4791498c5c3ce55a8df54c1bd763
describe
'9414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_037thm.jpg'
94d15f2a4546e4776ee113c130c30057
eb81469306190487c480d4343cb546d717d14a02
'2012-04-02T08:32:46-04:00'
describe
'1275842' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.jp2'
98a55f9096b10a0a0ea432a0f4bc8545
25b98d99e0b3537938b7498e7e3427e588897c30
'2012-04-02T08:30:37-04:00'
describe
'82311' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.jpg'
cb1ffc7be780fecb3c0defc68b9b3b2a
719c50903f151b938d91dfbb95422cb4ce1a7dc1
'2012-04-02T08:27:53-04:00'
describe
'26135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.pro'
90a83c469a180d4fd6b3dc5db76cc129
b93a2b735bfa4d4a43602c7e2e7eede85ba10429
describe
'32422' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.QC.jpg'
4b1fa8a37def7aff9bd7e9e051e6c095
ff3057c6396b78fdc8b115b3502810ad31b9d2f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.tif'
4c0b092d8f13d90ed65bc829044cf43d
ca311647157421fabccf4040f378ec56db3fb071
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038.txt'
3c0fc75a9c9da6515662999f616ef915
705ed8a17d555e23e2571c4063a80e6acae06e25
'2012-04-02T08:33:58-04:00'
describe
'9045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_038thm.jpg'
86b2313544f2950d6bc566900b4a9f06
7e92f903d63d59b948ac6b14aa3b49d3f0f1c592
'2012-04-02T08:35:13-04:00'
describe
'1306047' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.jp2'
5f351d75f77b0d07d7185f0f3ecafc6d
0a6c3b9f122e0564a6fee6fb62feed74e12ef4f8
'2012-04-02T08:31:13-04:00'
describe
'87164' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.jpg'
88b3461b89c4a39ce3b9036fc7afb359
f653843968f24915ec5e7057d21904a742b16e0f
describe
'26637' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.pro'
96e935e1bde2d618b3b83f0541a04771
2239e67dac114296bcd99b6d5385796025badff9
'2012-04-02T08:36:46-04:00'
describe
'34807' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.QC.jpg'
14575323bda223c7ced77cb08d92a568
b95660194db10022f49707f85016318994b4ba79
'2012-04-02T08:35:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.tif'
75f46bd39e3acf421314cfad10189e0c
1cf664a99e323f923f670401acfb243c80eb09f6
'2012-04-02T08:28:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039.txt'
a6a98a2325721c9786426bc9afdd72fe
6c7b6137a9056eb801756c6e6560737eda4c417c
'2012-04-02T08:34:51-04:00'
describe
'9756' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_039thm.jpg'
7f3e98a79a4279ee41eb828a32768864
a1a703c745cd612d3a02b7ac00aff24801977d0f
describe
'1275847' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.jp2'
6301862fa8f4b03ece047a8aa4fb6832
d7d9ead59f5613f0dbec9bc6b40e5adfa7447145
'2012-04-02T08:34:31-04:00'
describe
'85184' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.jpg'
b2d4f2513d840870968bf68705b38a44
86c0c38ab8af415bea03025a9fc0a027ad5c4d6c
'2012-04-02T08:34:10-04:00'
describe
'26910' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.pro'
d50f4146f93b005a0e27ac3ab6c96ca7
33574b98396be8250062491499655793e8bf5535
'2012-04-02T08:33:08-04:00'
describe
'32985' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.QC.jpg'
6f704c4d67a07ad3ed1dbc77d9b0a8d4
33740f71efa0e7bfdc1a4a8d2b72bd218be24b75
'2012-04-02T08:30:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.tif'
0a5a49fe94047f143394bbf222122de1
4d213c138f8c7e266e66496b1188431e77f46b1d
'2012-04-02T08:30:12-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040.txt'
f81f3f51031eceb21bcf638096f7e514
7b242fede85bf6707f0fa9589d22846651f5c02d
'2012-04-02T08:36:13-04:00'
describe
'9138' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_040thm.jpg'
9ba9854ae184e966bb0f53f99629da04
ab78175f7829378e100db2203aca8562c070bf96
'2012-04-02T08:33:09-04:00'
describe
'1305994' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.jp2'
a5bb89fa0f220bcb4d1bf2415a6e84b5
20cd8de2e1ed03a42fa50c739400c834eb5ade1b
describe
'87121' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJKZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.jpg'
ed0a848c688f72ad5180837f8111ac7e
439c50dd12933849504bb89c4d3e84f4a7886271
describe
'27158' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.pro'
5942e9ce396418750c30e8a0b81401a1
38cc6fc8ec50922a79bfcba5e14546ec147a89b4
describe
'34363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.QC.jpg'
028865d16048bebfb6e30ea447b705d2
7c76c8b86e5024b9e0f6aba0ca1a5eb5a2093c6b
'2012-04-02T08:36:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.tif'
d9d5589903b56db2d8622d9b14fc4468
a96a903f6a188544154433480f2095893b109ceb
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041.txt'
9271d93468e16d15504d3b01ff5d20cc
c8cfe91853fad91bdbc1451fcb48dd06f2df6c21
'2012-04-02T08:36:23-04:00'
describe
'9625' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_041thm.jpg'
6a3a4fbbe600dd81bb7d2af5796e9206
579d4dfde7341d61e614b25987a14a424164b775
'2012-04-02T08:29:49-04:00'
describe
'1275760' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.jp2'
8dd485946f2ebe672c04552464a6c7bc
f3116796c0a241aeadf70f8344e64f94f93672da
'2012-04-02T08:28:27-04:00'
describe
'88460' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.jpg'
7a2e59a072b93aa68f8efc30d76cd418
b6b5bb0ae84450b6c8f7630d313e912340641541
'2012-04-02T08:29:24-04:00'
describe
'28320' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.pro'
3274ba48cad721f00b2de6a0baca8002
b298c0287b382c891630311479ab8967c18ead20
'2012-04-02T08:33:46-04:00'
describe
'36037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.QC.jpg'
7ae9fe41d57ac73a2ed0eabd83478042
85537cf2c6762c8a9b468dc9b41f6f80d8ec51e3
'2012-04-02T08:35:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.tif'
4d86acb3ad53154eaa27cc4ffa568031
12b07d353adc93cb52646dc1543ee24566f506f0
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042.txt'
38a8aedae6957794f919cdfaa1d4a452
5936fa2e309a0d471824a7169b70e10621798d8b
describe
'9512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_042thm.jpg'
0ea5b6119f8af3ffd900c02907e5d519
30b0e0f64d76b5438206fbdcd08a66b27faf390f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.jp2'
e793e836a4b1ff6a113c3783aa93a790
8a617743ed1da970a87c2fa53cb5255717ec905f
describe
'89667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.jpg'
676641a09f5199ff96a4e1a420895356
9ec1e589a26b564d60e18d0b143f6591108dee98
describe
'27526' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.pro'
de23a37cc25a458497e77b0b0ff032d6
90ffd4b4ecf370e941dd3d47819862c11de2b191
describe
'35656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.QC.jpg'
07a82a7fd57b1c582c07029c466d6930
74f6680006ffea5fd0aa4fab4309b3678c066c4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.tif'
3f2bb77fdcab2449ebcc5d192edcd6fe
6a525b64f783ce9d1c4a3e8bcebb0f77dbd6f99d
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043.txt'
f5317dcdb8325e3953af7377e12593f3
808f60f6fde5ebcd7e1d134fec77d8eaab5f15f0
describe
'10035' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_043thm.jpg'
c35943d33cd9e5c59b5197360555e253
86f43af37a9c5c8f60f36ca1f9a5b6cca5c2dc19
'2012-04-02T08:31:48-04:00'
describe
'1275827' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.jp2'
c1257bdb31a80cfed5edbd3c068c50c5
d77374cf0bf441725f67cb78f211baa2b67a58ce
describe
'84051' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.jpg'
d9fa0ab1b6ea8cd6a5fcb848fcf28b90
4dbc051d8944d18dab6dd3df1af0736c9a695b58
describe
'27560' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.pro'
02ffacb3ce9e98db070182439ac700b5
f11b74e84bf90fd3933cfeef154b581f7601b11b
describe
'33459' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.QC.jpg'
d3a7f28d4f7ce62d081eb7f4168ea139
aeddaaf65f9de8b6aae3fa85480766223deb68a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.tif'
7b20a2028c1dbf66668ff97ede552118
b45979b9c4bcf27fc6ff2da58a8729922c11d150
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044.txt'
afcda3d70c4debdea9063b337db66b1f
3cdd32b33b4c3a2e6bff61ae48e76f00a0836696
'2012-04-02T08:31:50-04:00'
describe
'8852' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJLZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_044thm.jpg'
435f7baaf6faa6f20ce3052054ab00c4
04244904abfb1f949118d70258cb5dc8ecac69cf
'2012-04-02T08:34:29-04:00'
describe
'1306027' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.jp2'
9b1407e6cb574130a4edbe2c220c5e13
585c1883794c1fb3e7bc4f1094f32fcacb1f2226
describe
'88236' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.jpg'
140db57c3119617da6eaf61e242d29cc
8f3bc3b63a4870a755e0dd8ff8fbb518023c92ba
describe
'27687' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.pro'
8b634256baaf5e1d2e2256cd1bb1aec6
36ee433ad8ca55fc1e24ec07427bf95f32d7e35f
'2012-04-02T08:30:25-04:00'
describe
'34961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.QC.jpg'
7be7510cd69fba9c405db18dd46badc2
36345c6746f303ecc6348c06cdcf0b8766dbf103
'2012-04-02T08:27:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJME' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.tif'
d3588b43162379b652417b3b70ce3f80
377b555b8efc356be16a3650318ee5ee7d7692cf
'2012-04-02T08:30:31-04:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045.txt'
7adff8b6e85bdd003741aa0099abeca4
758fb3ab2b4471473bd5feceaffa8f076796ecbe
'2012-04-02T08:33:33-04:00'
describe
'9612' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_045thm.jpg'
0b0f473ca8f2c5aa69c1884a02050951
5401692849a60dba88566b99416ae15339544058
describe
'1275849' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.jp2'
82360c34d57aa802dd8038cf1c6376ce
0f117fa82920586f54dddb98b8e5f757f68f328c
'2012-04-02T08:28:41-04:00'
describe
'83861' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.jpg'
1f50e25bf38e1453a404671d79076b55
a901e5daa2fc58e59751de38e5de9f544e0bc944
'2012-04-02T08:31:40-04:00'
describe
'26798' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.pro'
7f1d84e56b1deb3202880d21248a6746
1af117fa53e7086dba1bb6c3a80069984828db19
'2012-04-02T08:29:17-04:00'
describe
'33015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.QC.jpg'
b74774564729dbf073a38a5f35989960
df99c137fd5517120d01ab4d833d9a8ec9a85ce4
'2012-04-02T08:30:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJML' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.tif'
163fa3e373355886a0ace275059a50cf
4e9cda74ee3e77acaea4861f3d69695b7dcb9549
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046.txt'
1001ad3cd02467bec49bbf0cd8e48608
42c8cf14fe9178e2d71900a65da1bf949691b326
'2012-04-02T08:33:35-04:00'
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_046thm.jpg'
9a9675246b1b3cab10559dc8a65a84ca
55f5a8b047e79d43e4a4356875d46847c667d932
describe
'73935' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_047.jp2'
1b8fd2f7e87c0c59270b384bdd72df6a
db200019ca2a5af0d00624003097239f37a04320
'2012-04-02T08:29:54-04:00'
describe
'11675' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_047.jpg'
caf72336e9ca297720de32f038438a2b
d011d82c1ed5e516cf6c0b796bcbbaa7a594351a
'2012-04-02T08:36:53-04:00'
describe
'4006' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_047.QC.jpg'
9380f36e390bd39dc9ae76fa9a046618
996552eefadc6eeabc0857109bed175e303042a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_047.tif'
00cb873132dbfc8a20fa590b18a9b59d
85a03875ed71b7c0fa47a3d7b7db3caff58d648e
'2012-04-02T08:35:16-04:00'
describe
'1583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_047thm.jpg'
4e6c14d1486275be58e637a24b07609a
9760aa14ecd0e6cd9052ed53d30740eb58fb88f9
'2012-04-02T08:29:36-04:00'
describe
'1050944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_048.jp2'
bf1c720c1f6cc7b50c23fa2a723e4abe
37c9823267137441d74b770d8584bfac2fe47228
'2012-04-02T08:35:44-04:00'
describe
'55813' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_048.jpg'
200baff29cd45ae7797089fe6bdb1145
0aeb7cd678644639183e60f65116276e6109eb9e
describe
'18619' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_048.QC.jpg'
84d0e23df9af8a0f2b50e51ed3adf40d
74090af9d490b08a2b0513c646e9b28dbf530cf4
'2012-04-02T08:32:02-04:00'
describe
'28102024' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_048.tif'
28e10723ca782f338d9058c7ac9591b2
ff922ec208d6416fa3315f60378e2930e7ea75b3
'2012-04-02T08:35:59-04:00'
describe
'5679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_048thm.jpg'
ca51289a96853e21921e9d23766b1a6e
98bdc0c832f2c19dede747a0e182df3b6af61e33
'2012-04-02T08:34:22-04:00'
describe
'1306011' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.jp2'
7cddfd9ca510d225a97844ca93fd9ff4
c452640579eb6b66522084957c7d034ccce04b4b
'2012-04-02T08:30:15-04:00'
describe
'82669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJMZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.jpg'
d4a1a48539e1ab6d97496a53dfa5c25f
a3135b7e959251f088748a58e4e13845a845f61d
'2012-04-02T08:31:58-04:00'
describe
'22030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.pro'
397b9134a65f4fac068f49316c8b24e1
ca295a4bffaf4beb6c5df46143091cf98487e90f
'2012-04-02T08:34:27-04:00'
describe
'31172' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.QC.jpg'
4c4311c67578f3ec2231bb0f89fbeeea
148ab60db3b4b1b08ffa6e3d83010ce57d146a9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.tif'
52776e95071f2e7a260c422cae98c293
e850c7f196845a8743435cca992066cbc51bac1a
'2012-04-02T08:33:56-04:00'
describe
'848' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJND' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049.txt'
cd8ed11de0d903dae8262bfcf030eb84
e87f0f9e2bf314327e9f145501921d5fa3007402
'2012-04-02T08:36:43-04:00'
describe
'8458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_049thm.jpg'
704f2e88fb897c254bd041118d7135d2
e0b7bf92e0896a30f0e9bd881fe45706695f6de8
describe
'1275811' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.jp2'
9b02957549d9a291290cd3f7cfa26f90
bef10298e00e28e7275b13352a3c27245b88b7a8
'2012-04-02T08:31:16-04:00'
describe
'88099' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.jpg'
12292987edc30a47930e7711613c637b
af03642da141770aebfedaacd7585b7b11a4edee
describe
'27399' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.pro'
d6cba15bab529e6e230f85250f757e45
eb93357deddc2949126874d3fe2d511a3921912c
'2012-04-02T08:35:27-04:00'
describe
'33934' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.QC.jpg'
86a7e450042fe6b5bdb1103ef7760272
1e14818164f114bebcdf0d44529009e15407302c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.tif'
ac1620fa109f3fccf21b4bf3699d56f6
09f3e607a49ef57283bf3e994000c1c7475116c6
'2012-04-02T08:28:12-04:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050.txt'
97f87e2bada34e9cc388317dabcd8f1f
259e4b993e14fd7a237833224de42888f764db53
'2012-04-02T08:32:00-04:00'
describe
'9528' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_050thm.jpg'
327c6ea5f68d87291663b977c1b6a230
d5b87d35950d08471d0207a6f97f200db059503e
describe
'1305731' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.jp2'
0f02088fb24ff09baf7ece3d87e98175
a172ec21af7f7d6d6fe5f56fdb01d51d494cfcbc
'2012-04-02T08:27:52-04:00'
describe
'93153' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.jpg'
d11b273ddcfdc6726145d181610ff2ba
200b75b3113ea15449bdf3123bba6fc0d792b37c
'2012-04-02T08:33:34-04:00'
describe
'28387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.pro'
f2acf5581afcbcd1a76d6ce390c0e351
b862d1fff3597511686a505f8c497cf54d50e2d2
'2012-04-02T08:27:46-04:00'
describe
'35834' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.QC.jpg'
137db18dc24e307389ea4e7b4641c10e
f74d482d6d794ada60e6f89679605f89b27022b9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.tif'
ca94c9fa41873db8f55bba703c30f485
a28d20e54ab33113c893cefd8ba74ff37425ff56
'2012-04-02T08:30:52-04:00'
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051.txt'
9de92e35b72a3103f3ee23b7260c3981
67c20aff45c4bde80253696252637c6738a12bd2
describe
'9898' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_051thm.jpg'
9c10bd0c476c1b57e45a842636b8df5f
85d663f4acbf0d988fd5577fdb2af6b35537533f
'2012-04-02T08:35:52-04:00'
describe
'1275844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.jp2'
3b4da8a88842a638924d7f20fb4a074a
1f90f466ae66f86e000e482f85a8c35db2a5507b
describe
'90387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.jpg'
4a6b63cb4a7e516ac1f4e8bb1f9c3255
49c0c8be192cd39b4f40ae6ab496ace907c6efcc
'2012-04-02T08:36:12-04:00'
describe
'28096' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.pro'
b4a229d431d180e12009305c30081e7c
5a71c5a5325e52a04f944f0e9a5f2675322b684a
'2012-04-02T08:36:47-04:00'
describe
'35848' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.QC.jpg'
f098bad25006817856c8bc3c9e0663a4
6fee780ae2773f9aa45c2326e32f02ef2476e8a9
'2012-04-02T08:27:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.tif'
cdfdce0c8d43b74fe28ce7f12e73868c
4d1be11dd9818b26f87c95bb799447ec0bf8c8dd
'2012-04-02T08:29:08-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052.txt'
fc70eb8408f34a3d7f529b3c16f08522
09baa46e28b4d8aef7b000c4fa32ecfea679fbd3
'2012-04-02T08:33:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJNZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_052thm.jpg'
2f479d4badbf0c9f398a25d3c9a79b91
a9739df9cdfaf6a1fbf340616592d80632a16ab9
describe
'1306045' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.jp2'
2a22f904a14a82daab4b0815dbf6f798
4285e2b9744c3ffb0e4a958cdf682351816a3802
describe
'89828' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.jpg'
a6c14165aaebc5ab488ac0351446884c
f8f712f82072f37b477f0175c39062eef075c4e0
'2012-04-02T08:31:59-04:00'
describe
'28455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.pro'
3bf75666ba70756f7877d8f819d5c2ba
a8eaaf66441dc5d463a3d4ff58c16513ce5d9438
'2012-04-02T08:31:27-04:00'
describe
'35620' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.QC.jpg'
bd17408698b94977f3f87d8becf25fa2
b411b6a483f221a87ab33318d73eb134c45b04eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.tif'
e1cb3fab550d76c00504391dcbf72ff6
bdf43450c1e75c077f3ab9b0910d429fdf1fab55
'2012-04-02T08:32:44-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053.txt'
f2d249518ce135cbc64e518b358b103a
79687421e4c621acea5489f498cf616ec3f1d3bb
describe
'9901' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_053thm.jpg'
e88f9721295f372afea5e1f47ef2f3bd
c0795a11f5b3031a0d1475adb07cb080763a25c4
describe
'1275794' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.jp2'
b852f9911beb9c3f2e1742cfe7dc5e41
eb5d43145624ad6ad758ee3499ce257982bfa19e
describe
'89016' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.jpg'
f88f030c7e8b2fe1d6f48a6b985f5672
c54863ddb1e3e9977138758761c95debd525ee48
describe
'28231' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.pro'
8d0418e05bebeb6156fc623992feb482
1681a5c0f41e43a32181d21ee9d8e1ac698b461a
'2012-04-02T08:28:31-04:00'
describe
'34872' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.QC.jpg'
672bc03b277550d81fda3eab917b2494
2285911615285005e2ab3700efd49614726e403e
'2012-04-02T08:33:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.tif'
2cd2229b7a79242ffa760701a7da76d4
c839b891ff1b1ed18d7e4d60d305acc70e365c28
'2012-04-02T08:33:23-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054.txt'
63e773e78eb73f79aade422f33ff8a2e
2e5ca03666d7a8b80f18d0ffe3498e05ce1cf8a8
describe
'9455' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJON' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_054thm.jpg'
1eb8b0a9cf0deaec388ef12d79920313
a636919633a08f057e464779d9a5d3621efec167
'2012-04-02T08:29:57-04:00'
describe
'1305947' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.jp2'
7ce48f1799340e1d06a075346ca45a8a
598e0adcc6522cc97626dd41cd9152ab885cd63f
'2012-04-02T08:34:38-04:00'
describe
'86311' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.jpg'
10fb6731e6be31818f4a3910ad0e3358
baa5c77af59777d793abecc500fca193fbccddf3
'2012-04-02T08:29:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.pro'
1dc79283eb0af9461df98eb3bb8141c9
22cf7be41c059013b926fa6c1a3bdb8dcce272b3
'2012-04-02T08:31:37-04:00'
describe
'33961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.QC.jpg'
b4e36bb0864cf037189c8298d5d1b16b
0f4ea7d84836f893a737f688b205de61a96612ec
'2012-04-02T08:28:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.tif'
7f9cc2ce04b2a24c3ca8dd965c8ddc3c
f9157a37cc2db442d98870f4c4fb3359446d6022
'2012-04-02T08:35:30-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055.txt'
bf6f6094226aacb5ed79072aaa204dba
d9c2f7d6386a1630bcdd8aea41886c1f1ff9ac5c
'2012-04-02T08:33:32-04:00'
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_055thm.jpg'
e890311d9062d4f9f5b2578cc59a2312
e06c0a1b81ff1196887754dac0f0d3caad205ec7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.jp2'
286029856717698a3084d873ba6026e7
de9f25db2d217ed1b1a829975e8b1bf1ad6c3721
'2012-04-02T08:30:32-04:00'
describe
'85840' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.jpg'
db3922206cac598b103faf10779cae37
b0e764f217c26c3612003bd7fa96888d86457c70
describe
'27120' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.pro'
1d76a37f4e54c1521f21b5e96578c0b6
5c10034ff339113dd9395153b4474d9bb1b47176
describe
'33804' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.QC.jpg'
3e3f7fc20a8fc9df0a85a58906718423
a119a17765ca41bb729658f9c29e38caf5946d18
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJOZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.tif'
ca2768bd4433946d4f3beec610523181
512ca9c079bbf277953cdd9bdca286501e978b1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056.txt'
563ce9a82cb3a78ac98c6922f89b77d3
21a2b90b17b37fdf6989b487c2d9bfbcc2f6d089
'2012-04-02T08:28:04-04:00'
describe
'9199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_056thm.jpg'
76d8279d2f66f4891a7adac0aabd3913
dd04106751c1cffa173342668ecc969a68424d9b
describe
'1305966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.jp2'
4dea08b144de5dc73e0e70dd75e10f2f
7c0e403160c6fc56bbf70cd2f4d0794f849e9971
'2012-04-02T08:32:34-04:00'
describe
'83073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.jpg'
575ea2b74f98c4ae4b0f64cf38856e53
f6fef4f1f4ab88ba449194dbbe744c8ed05ca312
'2012-04-02T08:29:52-04:00'
describe
'26056' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.pro'
ac9e186654151a43e5006a1b517cd6e9
ece0285d8dd83df2fccf8c2a103a004a048e5bb2
describe
'32815' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.QC.jpg'
c38cfb296befc6fe68625545fde9e153
9ee598cae45e26d6d0011be0f84c70d1a7f77920
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.tif'
9a614115dc499a76789d80b7c587a917
c19f1270babc63d6295c26fce6eb13e36c3236cf
'2012-04-02T08:36:05-04:00'
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057.txt'
24ea671ab58e51daab2928d9cd706415
b63106452013406ae94926e5c9d5e1b30d95f685
'2012-04-02T08:35:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_057thm.jpg'
1cc85fde46dd1c153d2331f84ce78652
1b15df9217c7533d0c65e1cc5002a4cb5a377db6
describe
'1215245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.jp2'
7177d32373a493b1d472cc31ff1c4083
94c7814c0127591865c6e8b87f84f83846c472c5
'2012-04-02T08:36:00-04:00'
describe
'76991' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.jpg'
934bc9e1011914fb000ba1b09e3d7845
03ef81fefe2726cc4e9dc74635a7ffa14338092c
describe
'21436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.pro'
b0c1f18f68293b1785e46bbcf8709e93
64bc1f18a46161eb99e3aea8c68fd4fa2fb1135c
describe
'29927' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.QC.jpg'
411c5857b06f67da56659a4b4a2d227a
cc34382b3dd27acaaea1e173a6f8b1ac3542e01d
'2012-04-02T08:29:56-04:00'
describe
'29194754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.tif'
eae2a5aeb19ec9fbc5999197086be420
88d738a46ad86e4ee82ce0a10079737775dee995
'2012-04-02T08:32:59-04:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058.txt'
599445cf393aa8c57598851474e230f3
74b51237f86db3827ac80d19006d2763d330e6da
describe
'8227' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_058thm.jpg'
a50f0fbe16bdf94151eb15f689601a09
0b2c3fc297ecb53853baeb83fef73ac93a8fee46
describe
'1255520' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.jp2'
a50b393deffc1234cc3899659a4388ba
1d55fcb1b2219e55d4075813e5bf2385d8de990f
describe
'95842' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.jpg'
aad64adede2f55e4fe11066f96e8efdb
eb9c8f1b3618aefe90be9ba01ddf006c0d740678
'2012-04-02T08:31:47-04:00'
describe
'27524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.pro'
4c3694d40f0b2b208167ee8c47755dc9
a3cdd82c4b15b09314799588546a4627d0de575d
describe
'36437' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.QC.jpg'
7e0f3ec413d1a9949593fe913118dc08
cc557fa127de5ea2ff65ff470585a8fdc44a53ef
'2012-04-02T08:34:37-04:00'
describe
'30163830' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.tif'
406f3e0725f47813769f608afd69f72e
6047c6e43e542993fca351ea35e9c01a80c66ed3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059.txt'
63f64109834daaf6313b0714e240c806
6a56ca2fd9b1ac224215600c47595912a27a2ed4
describe
'9749' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_059thm.jpg'
17c136db2f277fc9978cec7442abc051
dcfa4af12ae5dc45c44410d0a8cc93755ea1a4a1
'2012-04-02T08:31:08-04:00'
describe
'1341447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.jp2'
e9e3342d9816d2bf3dae7ee47535bad3
7d99469c374c2b6f7a0f11e0f57efc2e3718fea9
'2012-04-02T08:32:53-04:00'
describe
'90142' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.jpg'
9880303647a2c96ba400cf16a508c51a
50e4fe6364446d291674d52f52ea036bc4acfa12
'2012-04-02T08:33:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJPZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.pro'
9acf6507e007e583a1956d9b19992fff
a0662f4c0c2f83dcd57080231cfa6fa96000ee04
describe
'38173' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.QC.jpg'
b1cabe3d2c606a19f630d91fe59d189a
d5b8049f31cc00154913f5494b7e02393fd838c3
describe
'32225908' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.tif'
6fc5611bee127bccf286d3652c0961f8
dbe59aeca17cfc21fe5cffdc3f8e40d265d17bb3
'2012-04-02T08:35:06-04:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060.txt'
eca6357c0ccfe11a143946b4119a1db3
02955e1a6b4eb2affc5138afe8c948090762d7f8
describe
'9974' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_060thm.jpg'
76c3f4882ef5ff2b0c219a00040ce03f
68466538a40b832ffbb529f12685284b0d729ee5
describe
'1404435' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.jp2'
0da4c5e2e487d4a4d39b0373b91fe4ce
afe362016056868b2ec8572a318f12a36afa3e53
'2012-04-02T08:36:39-04:00'
describe
'83082' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.jpg'
d18c0cea3d780ca9ccead43ad39fd38b
6c6a1a4af965f74bce14290c684fa617828a9b41
describe
'23036' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.pro'
17c9e02ea3fafbca764350894424d392
09c3fa0deb3829c3fda8c1152088b763175fa870
'2012-04-02T08:32:26-04:00'
describe
'32201' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.QC.jpg'
1ba52d6eb461b3d8eb3b19c8ae8a33df
21b50ed6962d84c989f23a98111590ff45a925aa
'2012-04-02T08:31:56-04:00'
describe
'33739444' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.tif'
d65888fe63813dc1e87bbec116bb11ec
d96791e6cd40f92dfd6d6b63af433a314c70dcbf
'2012-04-02T08:29:11-04:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061.txt'
1f43a5b3cbd81e8a899854aea3692e31
27232c9745aa4b7644e65757fe1924855f45cc63
'2012-04-02T08:31:21-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'9890' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_061thm.jpg'
168a0094cf9a50da9622605e4d3eeb8c
9ff9ed24593fd6ae127a576b44e810e8b5ca6d4e
describe
'1341393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.jp2'
ed228b2acdcf187b61a2f9612b0a9b7f
2da6011acc2c44dd68fc8ee5356b8a8dd390e073
describe
'86667' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.jpg'
e6a1445c9533fb2814f2133d13d23ca6
f4d39cd517a0051cb0b5561b7b6aca32c4abc83d
'2012-04-02T08:36:32-04:00'
describe
'25860' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.pro'
fc32cd71955e8787d1ccd4ff014fbb96
478e5f71d1a833b69f27849d902cc4606a5834f2
'2012-04-02T08:28:47-04:00'
describe
'33880' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.QC.jpg'
77d8ebc50ab7443bcb8b2106376f541d
3854f71620103a0e550f0a6134f29ded85bc4b21
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.tif'
2027f20aa9f3e3cfa8a36783d10cbfa2
8706c7ef6919649554c37726a3f16de02099dbac
'2012-04-02T08:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062.txt'
0dacd5abbe1e464f5ba1233934dc260f
7d2bb0eac5bf799adad56ad657e1e9e5282f1667
describe
'9187' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_062thm.jpg'
cd98f704391ec531a6fb6ce2e39e82fb
29cfdc263c4e00645ff6e633694138838f0bf850
'2012-04-02T08:36:15-04:00'
describe
'1404463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.jp2'
da6c2eb8411bc91be8960af5670205ee
721f16026c3c4c19f0592cb50af5d24a35a4f81e
describe
'95209' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.jpg'
8803ec2751328cc0998d50eb35c7fa32
801ea7a0874c1a526789915cfff7b647e711e73f
describe
'27672' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.pro'
62d266aa63cf5659b0eae8734366e491
bd4c375828bd63cf9b76500315d6afa3e91b903e
'2012-04-02T08:32:08-04:00'
describe
'36508' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.QC.jpg'
ed2b8cfee6c1d848635ef575e7f9e0c8
65e7fa2827e661a007b6956bb910f31ee0a6daa4
'2012-04-02T08:31:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.tif'
e5feacf1df9ece3cd8dbc072b88b99a1
6e239ee321327755317e63fb82f99748638be295
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063.txt'
f4debd0821e6a0a28fdc20ef8c160cd9
d0274f70d96cbc962764b941cc2314f8d1f6142c
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_063thm.jpg'
1b77b2d0ed105295158735542c3d7848
d425f4f2756a2fa7c250215c48d74be975cb4f99
describe
'1341410' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJQZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.jp2'
6ad18f6f76ed7d6ca5cc5e3af0fbb9ac
413b7e8534cfd09647f1210ab85c7a791f58849e
'2012-04-02T08:30:33-04:00'
describe
'86374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.jpg'
b3cb56252c88bd97396c44a6963ec9f4
5147597f17d2636b88d45dfb2e6546d06499902c
describe
'24481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.pro'
9b7238263a773cbee2b61b72b6808b61
bdfbcb7e7532b6abe257c4a3a20a9ab6e88da3ba
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.QC.jpg'
1d9aa96241af3845b93f2268525e8a90
9c9d4f9a3580054f58ad99a98053c63bfaec8a7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.tif'
239865d130af75c47061e8b013cc89b0
f4f2a93a70f85dfe9a470e9406a1a1475fbe33a7
'2012-04-02T08:31:26-04:00'
describe
'946' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064.txt'
10a77e18fd441674602bab6a91fab1da
2de956ec7017ce5b2df34d6a0cbed9da82c0bfdd
'2012-04-02T08:36:29-04:00'
describe
'9372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_064thm.jpg'
77b43d0445eb0c1e6cc4aec5979c0a8c
885c91a985282d58c99389c8235beb123ceded90
describe
'1404469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.jp2'
f40fe8229fd44502149ac1d3de83bef7
9daced615cb9dbc442d22074c94cf013d4d11328
'2012-04-02T08:32:35-04:00'
describe
'96916' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.jpg'
e3aca49a17dc914c093f505cecf8fefb
8456cadebd4a22a3c4b70012b86068ec09680f82
describe
'27100' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.pro'
3324aeaa02d751c09a0bad4b3859233a
214a31ac84a04faf1a586689e559e25be7c89b1d
'2012-04-02T08:32:09-04:00'
describe
'35961' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.QC.jpg'
5f71f9cc4f398f82444945ba007b8c20
c316d186d46217b1b2f28ef5596594df000e3ab9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.tif'
65047b8a10b44d951874969e0e03b7da
50ec4dad97984c7ec4681e7cbc41062e2d5ade93
describe
'1060' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065.txt'
fb23739770d9f9d079fde9e320127bed
dec9caa70bf64e8e8ee4f80236a9bb3bd0a03e90
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_065thm.jpg'
1d2b11ffbf030bf31b1a9abce39d2e39
1171829f9df771d6b241e80b5ca8fb27df05b21e
describe
'1341424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.jp2'
c125a5da164210685caf69cb8c1a26e7
4f8c0aefb771cc0eb62de98fab035355f42891da
describe
'92089' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.jpg'
2de4a7afe992f602a88cd65e214d8f93
98cf451df8cae7b1e1e105e33bf753105d271753
'2012-04-02T08:35:38-04:00'
describe
'26435' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.pro'
d5620abb0d2c39270e22ba35753b0b08
4d4c17b13c9b278c6957b555857fe311a91f8af2
describe
'34150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.QC.jpg'
888d4ad871f4edaa0af8f0fd6704bacf
a18e7e42711ec818f3c2f5eb316b3b898a9f10dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.tif'
586d5bd65bfe43851dc9f7babf244434
76e2508a013cd60f50846d33d23fff9167874ce4
'2012-04-02T08:35:21-04:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066.txt'
3ba3901f26661943f20c20a8b0808260
eaf918ddb9e94258f640e6f60652efe0fd1c2aa5
describe
'9742' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_066thm.jpg'
115a79f595bbf26f11119d5c34f68ff0
de49ae475f6e034bfcf3ea0469ab9d082b499517
'2012-04-02T08:27:37-04:00'
describe
'1404479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.jp2'
08b50b9ff138f0cd38fa7ff046fd56d6
891388fce26ed5b825af91f754ee6e1bdde49d03
describe
'89993' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.jpg'
7e3586808870592821c3b73b627a030e
d048cd78ac8e6273ff6d68080317ee5842d74bb3
'2012-04-02T08:31:52-04:00'
describe
'26280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.pro'
924f53c75b3ca555468aa801578bb7d8
f9d21658d4c21092c231c707222f8895f7ed3cb9
describe
'31480' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.QC.jpg'
135271b0b2a215e1cf6234ff115fbe8f
c1aa4ff63a10e326b02ce6e042137094b8bf1ddd
'2012-04-02T08:33:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.tif'
10a64b6f42d41d8e1cbbd7f8b07a221b
a715bfad417223a7b7fd6dd8a667fa144a539420
'2012-04-02T08:34:50-04:00'
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJRZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067.txt'
969c2fe951d7c2b9dd65cdb074fda52d
e805ae9d8cdfa4ec5accd2952de44be56c0a5dd0
describe
'10177' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_067thm.jpg'
8c3645e9a13140d1c2b47218011489ad
4435234a18620636adfb4ee6ea9f6408db5e8ece
'2012-04-02T08:34:34-04:00'
describe
'1041693' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.jp2'
265bdbdf5565ab0e9fdf2809b4fe3228
3e2601181d7c5d477821baefafaac46161cebb7b
'2012-04-02T08:30:29-04:00'
describe
'53495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.jpg'
0452ade974c5169f3ba197336e6f3317
2c94c28239776522331a7d6413914a9dd05ab90b
describe
'11202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.pro'
6b936c319cc0f8dc32f190d6148407bb
fef65117c0407793a8b18193e90f3a99f7c57b93
describe
'19527' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.QC.jpg'
4d324cb4b3b8504441e0695a51ced616
234d9c75f062473a6484ee0a1725dba8d6b8f4aa
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.tif'
8e56ee9dd959cc3ea3e55adcaf85506a
6f5801c39292aa80a6653fecea49f387bfa3214e
'2012-04-02T08:29:48-04:00'
describe
'447' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068.txt'
234432db030fb6f61cdcd02bc7eeb7e0
0ef9b46508efa9e3a6283f4d4ffacbcf526ba97d
describe
'6268' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_068thm.jpg'
d1dfbe20cf321aaec18224d244cf4c8e
20ab42f6d0e535989b84c7180125cf9602d904d4
describe
'1404407' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.jp2'
5a2f0e49d67ae831c5d58a74d52b9568
51a33b3b486e0bf1f312b6705048bda67089360c
'2012-04-02T08:32:55-04:00'
describe
'85288' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.jpg'
a75d5cf300f99c7e2187b8f0a94c3b86
7d1348bc5dd0b558106fd7b1f7898927ed7efae2
describe
'22190' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.pro'
4d5e3c78724552f38f07697a6b995c2f
83b034a5ddc5d5a6cafafefdec38a88c0d1754b4
'2012-04-02T08:36:07-04:00'
describe
'31860' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.QC.jpg'
3dbd4dd551fb72b804775cb9d40cb11f
e8cdceab5ff92f1ce1ddc21bb0507fa59416d405
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.tif'
fe51e7248eb6684865c7d69bd5e717df
020d3105f430496a9279e90b1e5488d64e61b194
'2012-04-02T08:33:50-04:00'
describe
'866' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069.txt'
78c907bb0ab8097e059762e8eac87539
848d1cef54608d810d5d898869729fddfaff9faf
'2012-04-02T08:28:44-04:00'
describe
'9183' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_069thm.jpg'
0291ff6a916cabee57219e0fd57e7088
d76a300756fdb22db89462525f46e97040e18dab
describe
'1341481' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.jp2'
ab21f19e3705d1c4e0e6b161c5246d62
d5a599c14ce09c95f7567d8b4d779f2dd550d4c7
describe
'90123' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.jpg'
7e6fc6edd52a9bf483d53de6fca2def5
6ac336eee713c5cbce58c02fa7433f93fb2b960f
describe
'26632' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.pro'
6f04fed1ed077d10a6bb2926f797cfa9
2028943b577c94507f9444edb140fad89439b60f
describe
'38545' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.QC.jpg'
9ea49adfdd116f85a432d9489c845b35
7f121c4a88d10f5093c393061a91c6a3f73d1b74
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJST' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.tif'
940c93a1a09daa5d4e587061763729bf
9c6576413901f2c1e305ce69a6fa1ce8bbae265f
'2012-04-02T08:32:58-04:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070.txt'
7ecf72aa64f3821665e8c94ab175713c
1c7aed3d91c314a2eb62592a22baccf92da8e99f
'2012-04-02T08:30:20-04:00'
describe
'10084' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_070thm.jpg'
bea8b88ba7ae9ffa6e857386dbb9c1e6
c384238ad740c35ce4be7d510934d7c29e728c86
'2012-04-02T08:29:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.jp2'
5fcaf19dbc5fb5c2e834b93270a3f7ab
d51d07dcec43fd9214880fcdbf39caad1fa9fa98
describe
'99872' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.jpg'
32357679a4738f725ad706e63fcdc9a1
a384ee8f493db64901319174955b19fc83b768ba
describe
'27033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.pro'
b4e0ef7e802bddd9822c75b110fc0796
6be171b14b32a9cd86125412d4aca5f12c775103
describe
'35427' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJSZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.QC.jpg'
e7cadc40e1fdf40fc9eec917b4f86f5c
966a1d1638b1f5f51922c306b0f2e065a18b8e90
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.tif'
e72e4c7f895a5cf0beb09a3c42994ae7
27b8351b2a19cfdcd975cf8bb97db9843f47b6f0
'2012-04-02T08:34:40-04:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071.txt'
95c130aade21e9a85cb84dc90bd414c6
ac7c7594b59f597ed8bc9e4cc07510c08ec191b1
describe
'10565' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_071thm.jpg'
8ee572b196043562e8826b6d10b486d3
5442e72463c52ba695429b3bb524db4a8a78381f
describe
'1355174' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.jp2'
ed87835eda82739e5d811043076a9719
d80a256bd3c81c9ffa2c10160d5b4076ef69d5c6
describe
'91691' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.jpg'
567ad90f7947d909bf87b0d5ed163f96
3a7018f1e4c005db0cf204e5957837ef87bf0579
'2012-04-02T08:34:42-04:00'
describe
'28214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.pro'
113a77f821e0bd4ee79e8bd82b57a6d7
53c96cc824e49baed8857942908a284b6dfc1ed2
describe
'35037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.QC.jpg'
49c3b3abc190a4448189d7f78ae75a24
39005c0e6ba3b026da144c773069c83abaa905d5
'2012-04-02T08:36:18-04:00'
describe
'32556994' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.tif'
212a69e2fdc9287b57df3755b43b2ffb
176554f124d2ede423fb2fa43434e57cb5014ed7
'2012-04-02T08:32:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072.txt'
467e56c43e362efef06ffad8a322d388
548f841f4d217e6d311628e276e769774767c44d
describe
'10403' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_072thm.jpg'
414e9463d6e6180cc54cd1d61d48d319
b2c8eca871c04489abe1beae08e54ed3de5e9457
describe
'1404336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.jp2'
e224f045e269e3d3bb9a8c9319d790f2
78a28cbe719906a54fe2d04e53275634f0f9e253
'2012-04-02T08:31:38-04:00'
describe
'95001' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.jpg'
ad50b91ef4d6438a8cc73b4e70026a39
86528e66d259fe58c4347acd1207791559385ed0
describe
'26742' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.pro'
fd78ca5e53e676ff97c94f24c420467c
eb030ca1c8286d1c1fc23eb7d63f06881a593c28
describe
'35797' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.QC.jpg'
63be6420a95192f048c98b434b3afa41
d09fc9cbeb15a48a41c2f77644368ec54ad9ad94
'2012-04-02T08:34:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.tif'
84b8d36599206d9da00f9da1cf9b70ed
31887d56dde5a1ca15542c2128f53f01e3740f6b
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073.txt'
0b89fead6bee2440501818af3ab4623a
9d62d5f0777b5ed0c1e48650c68930cdacf66f84
describe
'10317' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_073thm.jpg'
45dca365c14a204529343eb70df0e56c
a7b5ed610879bd8b7e31d4b14117acd3900210ac
'2012-04-02T08:33:45-04:00'
describe
'1439917' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.jp2'
afcb050aa7c6f9a965c27212f5599c45
fde096c95c618f891487d9b3398c66d1a240c4d0
'2012-04-02T08:28:37-04:00'
describe
'90250' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.jpg'
f90810d8776fb6c098ae11c6cf270b93
39336533db6b222aa3f70b96fc6e46f062547b9b
describe
'27865' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.pro'
aecebe1d791215b0d354bcf15e6ef63f
5d673cb11882e6d72ab611650f49a23b37179290
describe
'34507' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.QC.jpg'
60bfab5e0be36fa696ef5ff90d832fa1
97a219ef137b027f52a0f5b18de0fe1ec07e5b3f
describe
'34590808' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.tif'
73a658215a9773ec5ca08d04784f4c23
b4d637c5344476cc3fa88aa2176b672ec2e2c5f7
'2012-04-02T08:34:57-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074.txt'
e1954d8b3c6fcdf6ed393f5bac8a02c6
02ff6f1902e3d7c70ec40d0e72a07ef450ff6df7
'2012-04-02T08:30:22-04:00'
describe
'11245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_074thm.jpg'
c61525aa9553fda72e1d12d22aa79e45
b8891ca2ac719a8cb50a4e600875ed38bf227a2a
describe
'1404466' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.jp2'
f0e7d55a7cbf1c0818099b9fb7101bb7
64f77e14ce4e59e016bd7f0532e107288f90d83c
describe
'97311' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJTZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.jpg'
d161d68cf41531a432994fc2410d63da
50dd664f32d7d697b0b3f2190d2186d691d00ca6
describe
'27867' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.pro'
602c40ca4c2901c8cf1aa47e0d0a9a5e
2521f1cb485ad3b3d3179a4b8e55e6c05ab5d0f1
describe
'37135' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.QC.jpg'
f726dd229b309394fcd14fae88082890
87eca90a17257fe06e7e593f9a71da8d35434d23
'2012-04-02T08:28:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.tif'
8c1f33796a735d6e23c4fcef651c6c4a
f2ac953b1591bb4bc97e6e2d3f702fb61869584d
'2012-04-02T08:29:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075.txt'
c9def993be09dda35585f1d3d6374320
fe119749f076bf7054f6ee370b29f36173dfb4a9
'2012-04-02T08:35:36-04:00'
describe
'10470' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_075thm.jpg'
3ffa8ec8a0f17267e3a27db601b939d0
71a8154f2197668ae515cd7248c717d27d1fec09
describe
'1268547' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.jp2'
8c9d48aff765930e607be034cb876dca
431373e5db88d3715ba6a679de583a0fbe9b04d0
'2012-04-02T08:34:32-04:00'
describe
'88136' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.jpg'
8048bfd64c19d359766bb2a59b4314ba
ee199245954730fce652c3e09fc712e426b0690e
describe
'24806' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.pro'
fa2e80aca7529a28e64c6cbfff4aa275
b4fc81b14b3d0fff7858a167c74a3db4f788a47c
'2012-04-02T08:28:50-04:00'
describe
'33019' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.QC.jpg'
fd7466632b58f4da9633d02aa85ee73a
dc97bf54a0dcd8918be0ff55135b0e467d550aa9
describe
'30475176' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.tif'
573324ab171dda566363a43ced116877
5e3223915c65d48341e13598b4ed1d5f8dbda634
describe
'959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076.txt'
b3f58575d2e7eba6977c7fc7733a8930
ded2c71cd3ca865d270e5c9165173687699a1623
'2012-04-02T08:35:22-04:00'
describe
'9719' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_076thm.jpg'
667a92d6142810099897ba38b6468065
5751498a692a05e6fcfc95555ccc1fe32ea38f1f
describe
'1404475' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.jp2'
5b818be3d6ed51656d5a50ed96495833
07c45b107677c34bf781f531d08ff05550589ca8
'2012-04-02T08:33:57-04:00'
describe
'94500' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.jpg'
6338ee7bb4db3fc19b188695196ef04c
197705e25f2aa218b3ea29b63f5a462a18d5e394
describe
'27412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.pro'
9468c5ba9d73a139d028624d9dd235f7
389fa576b6f28eefa186066fae1def2be2efe5bf
'2012-04-02T08:31:02-04:00'
describe
'37810' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.QC.jpg'
6a263465afcd2d586096c02faae97967
44cc66c931147036ac7ba7bbb1bd015ea7509075
'2012-04-02T08:33:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.tif'
345f5213eeff78e6f0c31385c6072512
bef1b6cd99aa48f938dbb6266782010fd3bc1622
'2012-04-02T08:28:33-04:00'
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077.txt'
e8479222eab21cd0b4adaab0f599c284
4f0ef51e92e8567db9c2a068f303c14d09135234
describe
'10413' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_077thm.jpg'
48b5d16d3e6a77ec3dea871b72aea49c
12fcf58e9f400e454143f6dea7248172251b6f35
'2012-04-02T08:35:02-04:00'
describe
'1341459' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.jp2'
3498ad0fcc5c7fb4c5af03eaf5c3b7f3
1c67fc147d853409733c41fa04065d8ea8e17f9a
'2012-04-02T08:30:49-04:00'
describe
'79683' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.jpg'
e1b82d1d6bac5cacda1ff78d369ebc81
e3486095ae3e2d777eb2823f05ab0a15f709372b
'2012-04-02T08:32:51-04:00'
describe
'20833' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.pro'
f4ce664c8b5fa76abc66f09ea5485791
91249d9fd15e5f43f813f63715d04b78b5d78ca2
describe
'27728' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.QC.jpg'
823cb8deef59fc81a426df7fa5b098ad
ae12ff263d3b27c5c423aee7162c8233830e58ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.tif'
bb7985afb8276468c8aa9487599f2e47
ffd35f5930c4975594dbb812de4b90a49c6869e5
'2012-04-02T08:36:52-04:00'
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078.txt'
0aa62cfa0aaa7604fb8788629134aa53
9cb9f2a122b002e10a9a56f5d22084def4bbc1de
describe
'8450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJUZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_078thm.jpg'
bc6812cb7c6f8356d3f8998662419ce3
af1732480e49f26bbc540478341e1b6e79f342e6
describe
'1404477' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.jp2'
d66d2912bc24ddb37ebe113769f1adb7
1b4679957e0140b08b36940e3270469f38258534
describe
'88260' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.jpg'
813cefde14179d861b046495c97324d4
e801dfb88d654d913df17929d172945a7ceb84cf
'2012-04-02T08:30:53-04:00'
describe
'22832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.pro'
e1ea1b84adff4c6b8b41c67182ea861e
61e6f67148fe97d54ac8c99c596c8755d9311f74
describe
'29833' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.QC.jpg'
482cb5609f35341c80fc9789c5a9cae6
e3640d26d44e3ac1f688cf0d0d59d06361c05eb3
'2012-04-02T08:32:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.tif'
4602601458466912c0460045a35d7c38
07163684a8dbc4dccdca3f4291604cdf98a69b5c
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079.txt'
484da5a600559104847138c687a703b8
04078cd670267e4f43834460674b2432bf531bd7
'2012-04-02T08:34:36-04:00'
describe
'9488' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_079thm.jpg'
94c4b58753103f4cdceb1172bbd8ea2d
35e12cf97a6e6172da754bcccffebc439535751e
describe
'1303559' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.jp2'
b3f6b15d2ddd60a2aa2e2c17625fc407
32c76336558979e8b762916cad8641da7446d124
describe
'102572' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.jpg'
80e8f1d95c46d19c1431e72890a4025b
60081c997cf223fb98cb6a996ac5fc8d27386e98
describe
'28303' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.pro'
c20c1bed8138ed0a338da32f9e26c4e0
8456d7fec512f950c1948a9bfb73b8d2915d3938
'2012-04-02T08:27:41-04:00'
describe
'38129' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.QC.jpg'
30dbc732fd12b2754dff7bcdcbdb2cca
abb97c58940ed90a03efeab928d7bd5f8af89ca6
describe
'31316580' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.tif'
cc2d246e9803d77e43d9efd633afd930
abe72a3027c303fc867eaedb8a3016690ba31720
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080.txt'
4e45e00540fa0115a5c4e07c89b7d109
ce49aa259b2b6f257905cfc8a8c61df7b4167ec2
'2012-04-02T08:32:07-04:00'
describe
'10626' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_080thm.jpg'
1e10f58c43be75900271f5cad25e66a2
8443b44ce30d0b43eb881392e55782e0ca57e6a9
describe
'1404473' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.jp2'
18677da0733a4fe0eceedcc130ea6793
84d379a31142a6b6846808e5843e8966cf46faff
describe
'100166' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.jpg'
c60e70b5adbc885653d958ce89b8a302
bc2e69ec8272a7b0dd51a7c14ffbc758fc2251a5
'2012-04-02T08:35:51-04:00'
describe
'28204' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.pro'
361b821c5ac57e865b68c1fd211c6216
ea40a87971877b2454ea5b41f8bbc276ccc126b6
'2012-04-02T08:29:02-04:00'
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.QC.jpg'
e19887ff6a19d47897c99894f93a9ad4
fd5bfa459f27c0f0cfbf46b21d8f98491fedbc72
'2012-04-02T08:28:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.tif'
784871c227c9f67849e2e4cefb9f4c23
2acfa98d211e153804975a923391ffde376c6ed4
'2012-04-02T08:30:55-04:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081.txt'
7bd3b16e5fbb7107bb0836f6f4d377ad
30194550f92459465d0f245e75e5bdf34d8b61a1
'2012-04-02T08:31:44-04:00'
describe
'10749' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_081thm.jpg'
02117aaf8b03132ff2ed89fea18411b3
00161efa31b83318f909bcc0f585ee5f9fb03cc2
'2012-04-02T08:29:58-04:00'
describe
'1341415' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.jp2'
41812d85821497cd27252c7a52601854
8950fe60f4298236fc5d3e4982a96a1a3458702e
describe
'92838' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.jpg'
590352d0ee35d3ab6bc941bb088ade4d
d73b02fe843b4232d2b2e06090e7bfa6ddba433b
describe
'27288' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.pro'
1c8d362d39f6624261abf2de7b86e6f0
2f31ef8fac8572a70f15707b5ad8d04013e962e0
describe
'34881' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.QC.jpg'
8ed5edc791f1dd8d696785d23e91c760
c10b6ee98d54df8406d43d95c57c10670b27e1fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJVZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.tif'
5a393f1d7adeca9dff7c01839c3b86a3
c03a58f1729c3fce375104c57aff1ae11b6f5cb6
'2012-04-02T08:36:19-04:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082.txt'
e0a3673fa5f29bd4bd2afd9d694e0845
a987e0a0566eae8ea9d885e0e3aa7e47675f20b4
'2012-04-02T08:29:30-04:00'
describe
'10216' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_082thm.jpg'
7fa91e80eb9c51388a106827b142e020
d070ac34546a35371aebff825e579ccf8a1fe9ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.jp2'
b3307a3a3dd4238c8c5b83ca00e41bd5
bc38d7e5a027bb591b73e62fe48514833a62cd95
describe
'98581' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.jpg'
9c218d9424beee2749aae3fbe840f2b5
d68e1e66595e553703aa65c705f2acb66d4d6e40
describe
'27636' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.pro'
6f5e373a0b21cbf6e895994bd87efbd2
3bb36c449e4914edbfbde0cd7db2ddf1b4c3c796
describe
'38081' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.QC.jpg'
daa85afde3a209f87b0d3a34edf66500
915f03ec28e455758c6517ce2a47faa5dfc85c31
'2012-04-02T08:33:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.tif'
b0efd1b8c02cfae25864e484809a944d
5d073ad6a0a750f11eac430d9925f2d5dd257f20
'2012-04-02T08:30:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083.txt'
bc63f60b3257a79d1f382404f34b4c0c
6568f1968fe698bafdd77c2e16cbb946336a7d94
describe
'10962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_083thm.jpg'
633b0cea95c720ee6007233a2fa43673
54ac3abf72fc0d795d47c19a63451ad5cbf2ade5
describe
'1313652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.jp2'
f139a8a99b42d9108fe2a620097cff29
9aedc8036b1e97f50def3c2893137f1ce3ac4205
'2012-04-02T08:34:16-04:00'
describe
'93503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.jpg'
1ff1c8180bbc4a332d40ed10ec1859df
d1278d4bee6650fbfd830e4edb34540c54f0e2a3
describe
'25716' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.pro'
a7f0bbac3c88584d9f81179bb7ca1ae8
1bcdb8999665c6c2ce05ef026970ca04e08ecf1f
describe
'34697' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.QC.jpg'
d1e9d88367df453840a0f8ab5cff7268
fa3c7cd3a93a2cc4b9ea7ae982c1aad435490bc1
describe
'31560124' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.tif'
e3ec269ea155f0b80861bba86d3d23ae
59279061060cfff926b5304e4508f9ba3af95e59
'2012-04-02T08:29:29-04:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084.txt'
bcabb58b684fa3a5617bacb1330984b7
46dc7baec65d13050f74db3b13a89ca0ad379f71
describe
'10189' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_084thm.jpg'
9b39de495ee7c4dcb21a76fe82d43cd3
2536476db8c462e9c161320ee770555f464fb414
'2012-04-02T08:29:19-04:00'
describe
'1404405' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.jp2'
65410a06ccb7e3af2feda5826449cb1c
d256a725949319b653e946c774fdac19a9c42315
'2012-04-02T08:33:05-04:00'
describe
'94805' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.jpg'
8fa46e08f53df949ee26d63b008e35d6
5fec10d8d923501304a2398b27830b103a60c6f1
describe
'27109' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.pro'
12ec4676caaa6eb488b416d9b73c975f
2696401d57029a87aed9459da6a001771eac4a4e
'2012-04-02T08:30:07-04:00'
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.QC.jpg'
9d1b28c2afe6cafc2ddfbefc7cd1b9a8
c70776edb0a86a19d34905052d3e926063e9298b
'2012-04-02T08:34:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.tif'
9d767854309fbb11f7d4541b4ef7a4bb
a3c90c0425d6e2e6b74b4e7d7db5863d929d67e9
'2012-04-02T08:27:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085.txt'
c954a8e8d383f3465c8eb6fb6a1e85b9
b363168f5cf16e6cfbc4ccc7d7317b3ec8ec54d4
describe
'10650' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_085thm.jpg'
34fb53d7c7a2123ff8d521507da46152
cd60aee6d181f01e1727a1532faa82120971ccbd
'2012-04-02T08:30:23-04:00'
describe
'1390574' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.jp2'
689f3ef02ad859aa50fa9e17ef54d3e6
bab9a805db65d452bd87fa3ed2ffbd8ef48ade87
describe
'94626' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.jpg'
a99992d193313659bdb35b87e18098f1
2a1025ed46ee0be5253a24bded366b5832a2a138
describe
'28724' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJWZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.pro'
3a2a1a691b957464af19522e9028effb
b15be168796a1ee7bd9007d8ad364d2a3b7e6c4e
'2012-04-02T08:30:40-04:00'
describe
'35742' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.QC.jpg'
dccb73a3c4e746705490b679fbece71d
f9c54c5cfd42821d13f103da3f1eb53557aa2732
describe
'33408358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.tif'
2fb36abf4a266dcde2189c4e84f0e590
f799cd2c0e5926f9f8cef27389c56939a408423e
'2012-04-02T08:28:49-04:00'
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086.txt'
26d2b6386870891c5d26cb237ee14129
0264a76067a6e4c8fd381541334b588940a99555
'2012-04-02T08:36:25-04:00'
describe
'10583' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_086thm.jpg'
faca2a7cad3f2ac5d3d36b568941a034
88b1063f37fb782fe5a55e7f58adcd722af3856c
describe
'1348373' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.jp2'
c894d836bb71a1311b5caa29811169da
c45a36d8dda6a47e6cba7431955f6a8a170eefe0
describe
'90952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.jpg'
9594d252db9c84f790a6884d22ca4b25
977273b9df6172ce7d78c698553da1e8b6bb8c0e
describe
'27730' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.pro'
a483b886af181409b5234d86f3a85896
2022548bab59177bb0ff1f7f6bd52e2f4f996514
describe
'36257' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.QC.jpg'
59829444fe34679d2a6065c913551484
a932f34f6374cf52f68784416e21052a5703e1ca
describe
'32391452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.tif'
ba80f4d51485e9b4ed421cc2976d3fd2
e947ebe001f94b8e076ce6e63e1bca1e649e8a20
'2012-04-02T08:28:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087.txt'
58a29f219984985ea0f6eb7674ce9cd3
5faf6cf4257d703c2ffaeb76dc911f9d1619d7ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_087thm.jpg'
f399dd2e1e5816fe4f478077082d719c
50f11a44752e98c973f39bcf3423499ba9455ed9
describe
'1390694' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.jp2'
c373961db5252f7d503802856fe82419
f075d98806d0d34b1012e428ae96d7c466257158
describe
'89286' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.jpg'
ced3861973a0e3a016363f5a2cb738f0
22f0aa216926130d686a933fac0d333105dd2f8a
describe
'27428' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.pro'
7e5330060b6710dc97a8fd2eab486a50
0906a741bda83c98cd142d99ef749c46c2a6ea2e
'2012-04-02T08:32:28-04:00'
describe
'35368' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.QC.jpg'
22bfe78429252119d26ff5414d4110a6
c036e72853262127ab5c4692e133c0d8ff0688be
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.tif'
9ff64ac8b8d4cc6057731adc5ab55405
7b9a384c7088bfd01c12261d3978104a03351d7f
'2012-04-02T08:32:25-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088.txt'
f0201786c8c508355503fde7cf9b6aa8
96dbc522a4506213228a917d4a81c1faba24f19d
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_088thm.jpg'
4b36a4807a6a0c13e6b9209c1140662b
05e9da53197de1b012bc00f641b9a935a576115d
describe
'1348376' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.jp2'
d275692eab4bf5b366828022504694c2
a202f725051e1291f741704f02c9c7a0d06cbcff
describe
'92441' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.jpg'
5c152a4e04aa85dcd751e131ff26b9a8
023320d521f36797de32f59b4f4ef0ed24b583c1
'2012-04-02T08:28:39-04:00'
describe
'28431' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.pro'
318b025b7f083561bfff8eae0f5e4804
dcdfa349ae636972f8085f4b883f30d600449830
describe
'36992' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.QC.jpg'
664d9714e39157616f2f43f54cfb7258
ebfa81675f4bb2927299864d0065007dfde43e01
'2012-04-02T08:34:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.tif'
5d174d004cb797b9286a9c596ad58ef1
5f922192107bbfc057c53ce09b8f9290929326b2
'2012-04-02T08:33:37-04:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089.txt'
9b5a8e97225f937c9f7ea4727d45b90e
9fa3751b592a5bce8ab5792248b5be8210927180
describe
'10280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_089thm.jpg'
41e570cbb78824d7be82b12b962b6ca3
9f3a3cef90509c231d1eacbf47c7be7cb269ecad
describe
'1390688' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJXZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.jp2'
328fa21a2143f9c646eeb5d6ddd156c2
91a5e9ade72d3780ff92632fbaf823013d21f658
describe
'87649' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.jpg'
97a7693a3bd26fe6e1cf4c3ffd2a6280
deaa5a874e81733ae5dc1b57c758c30481b018eb
'2012-04-02T08:34:20-04:00'
describe
'26330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.pro'
fc86db2c6aa912d0335690db0e5ac7f8
81e99352ff07ab9e6efc8523e4b663715d682b16
describe
'33862' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.QC.jpg'
fbed18afa2f051f88750567d46bea025
c17c284d100602e8ad78d40d04f9f0df05504ed5
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.tif'
72907ae2f2dcbb65e1e69060f97d062d
35840da13e23335d43756ee49d9fecabbaa56b4e
'2012-04-02T08:29:04-04:00'
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090.txt'
322418b5731a1e2e0c8cb75d942be92a
0069f8844653d6a38dceab065d3460ee1d3b7622
describe
'9913' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_090thm.jpg'
053cc1b31a610f923d95adc14ad59d1b
5229e801028321e7048c7baf629f172a640e812a
describe
'1348354' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.jp2'
c3bacc045329cb539449dc811dc9ed6c
5784c285470db1e35a227f6d4924f88d3d423e4f
describe
'90751' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.jpg'
7a578c74db4ba48b002bc92caa81c319
ca2493cec137b72364b375eaeb776e3f20e496f0
describe
'28002' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.pro'
96706f7852d32b5006d08137f8f5adbf
82e0c6ac16379b6a99403685b9ad321df736fd6c
describe
'35958' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.QC.jpg'
4c6aa9392db85eb590a501f002fe701a
88aa98bd552b090d1c2685f7951559bd253aa12c
'2012-04-02T08:33:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.tif'
628335e18f45c9bd5334f52602c1b619
b1afa9e6ce89570a6296012fc820aecf44d569d3
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091.txt'
cb13702b5350c9f80bc4c176c6962ea6
55631341c79e50b32f5f7a71c7f5b77c2a8669ef
describe
'10227' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_091thm.jpg'
f27302618755f152dac6b3e38996a469
027df1e75cbd6cdfea09e32eecdd6e4851fef05c
describe
'1390679' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.jp2'
1f3a7820746b2dfeda9155634f44dabc
9fc89f5753f518594fb3ec3b19b34049ea6f0663
describe
'92393' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.jpg'
02071b90a6a23209d9f728a82fc6a99a
e34e1ae4032675d0c08ed0814fd9f8ec05950654
'2012-04-02T08:33:17-04:00'
describe
'26934' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.pro'
22d65592b90fc2f800bf9fe4e3ba744a
d2660796f283f559340a8befa4cfb4afe79cb86c
describe
'34711' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.QC.jpg'
6789c47fc2b6688895749ce7af1ec78e
860e77bbaacfd21498b7e2c9d148f51eafac0139
'2012-04-02T08:36:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.tif'
0f1aae04a18878dac7e6398f115c77ad
59a0575c4779801d8bb978d55c0cc9e0e9ef3e0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092.txt'
b83bd8ad271d54bbd595ffb988292d4f
e29b883a3a06faf069770fcbcd5c05ce0d5158fe
describe
'10048' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_092thm.jpg'
79d971733abc75c5d871addbc6ce997c
0a494422174e92247588a57ca79f351ee933b7bf
describe
'1033234' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.jp2'
0df8a3a4732e2a103169215fec116244
8e0e16c05f1eb067b6be6a906cb124a3d784af80
'2012-04-02T08:28:16-04:00'
describe
'53573' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.jpg'
38efd1c279f7e3a731cbe2f3227347ce
0fbe015f92b01abf10671c3fdf85b2e6cf05928c
describe
'11497' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.pro'
a594c9891243e6566eeb8b30057e3336
591c3558c9f5368116aa89de7074fc8a994d069e
describe
'20946' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.QC.jpg'
66e415a97bdb2c1c0d9ca606984d268d
cd2d6dc57dd0b3b71b15a4607c71b6eada74e1af
'2012-04-02T08:32:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.tif'
b5cb7d36198195a033ef518a04b45000
d8d642cb8dd2ce4055e642ce2bdf1c7d986dcf50
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJYZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093.txt'
adf2b92f3a451bd779eb7aec679a1d3b
f71caee15e2145e649631ae65077c105f34ab31d
describe
'6119' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_093thm.jpg'
f2ba668abef5060926929c36c6137be3
a95641c2e0f29e7ebe785ec03cf82ce0744ecb9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.jp2'
92755f5ef0357c6803ae57f67ae3bd66
52893ddcb82d367a34769de7c039ac271ea3f7aa
describe
'81492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.jpg'
d0ef5b8c9dd602aa85467a33ed963319
0b39013857f2db2024d13c1ae232c431254deb04
'2012-04-02T08:32:29-04:00'
describe
'23241' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.pro'
2d91d5c4ed9ac0d91e6fc8fcf7e758cc
7996cc05d34fea36f3622db06cd27560e608dc76
'2012-04-02T08:31:19-04:00'
describe
'31269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.QC.jpg'
ecfcf80a65d8180eac3a21724ebb2a71
09ec645f02f1c9c96320e69cb3712b04d165dd25
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.tif'
2ed507e42263f45ff8eb07d51587f175
d1f5fb7988068f94e580cd9813cc4f58aac7e764
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094.txt'
bf5a90361bcc80382c53183c3c24d5a3
0704a2c84a8ab4b73d8d18c3237f17392a2f95c6
'2012-04-02T08:35:32-04:00'
describe
'9085' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_094thm.jpg'
90a1584dd6f88caf010b1e4fe2b5f11d
78a5d37129ab7d9f5db5d45a6d803042135ae67f
describe
'1348323' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.jp2'
9a42dac5c614ff2f3ff2c9763d235e0d
3347ae06b658ed51e90c9b687b2c2992aa8e5460
describe
'92691' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.jpg'
d27f081da658bcd0d76c6a69fa35a3eb
ebd24f4c7dd7732887cb66cc121d86f53aa86af3
describe
'27409' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.pro'
e765792275d1d964de951254dff09248
44ca3ae00a50103abfafe4505b9dfa4fa626adaa
describe
'36241' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.QC.jpg'
b2a63878131b440ca8a97b6ab6c87aaf
eae4b3f541fb205dc79b6f3cdd83684ed3051cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.tif'
b6c26367f49a9bd2c3662bfef974aae8
e273a65a9c84036f59da96edc0861d9cc6e56fea
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095.txt'
10fd1139e378079d6cef9e43b0bfa7b6
ce95ed3bae3df59e5a66be9db9435aee3f8e137e
describe
'10195' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_095thm.jpg'
edee68ee58fce6b368c9c89d42e4a2c8
649978eaa10d2c4ca59c3d18726e6db309113d8e
describe
'1390572' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.jp2'
2dcc23802a717fbd6471cad402837756
223e8747113e550bfe7ad50d325d71cd040b2d06
describe
'90155' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.jpg'
422cd5d548c88493f5c6a562c3ff3c08
cf81068b82f04d068d84a88939be6e4630adb981
describe
'25632' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.pro'
5dc044fcc8f5598cf10e88d592087bcf
76db80f673c438a0bb75e7fe7486bb4205e29d64
describe
'34464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.QC.jpg'
d2ec1209b464294d722ad74c198b7aef
c3930483a056d0427b3ca10b4d60b4d7c2203f6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.tif'
1cb70d8a4a17a055fa4f0b90a40007b7
6f6e9ee283a039fbab3b72e971c2d255f9e288a4
'2012-04-02T08:30:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096.txt'
b100e9ab81bf452c5da7b159f9f5499f
068986d43846d0b82a365647cee2c440b06b60d1
describe
'10131' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_096thm.jpg'
5281498dc8544887a30c09db6031482d
fc46d9f6f29b20b2a1d52a2a01b7b58e9c78215a
describe
'1348269' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.jp2'
8fc573b52b2301f8f772ffd2dfa36709
4776ad7a9074498cc4969b0af173389d9e782a00
'2012-04-02T08:35:53-04:00'
describe
'90931' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.jpg'
5dad80c653a24019417170601aef4687
e7f7b68de58f29c8e88dd4855bda663af3682f52
describe
'26482' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.pro'
c9c8001d98d75c8a8bfc61b287ea66e5
2177b45803058fc0e2954b863e20875751925724
describe
'35510' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAJZZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.QC.jpg'
8e3f613031b3a65ecfde03ceea8fa20f
2a0a15794755e22abaaef1537e4d4485301bc825
'2012-04-02T08:29:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.tif'
e8d9f107f84578bd1224565a8b585be0
41e716b7136490f2ee05a67931a47eec1e56d993
'2012-04-02T08:30:16-04:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097.txt'
0501455e2e9b3fd9b7c1dba41aef4e39
7482bcc96793c6a3eab77656d77eba6a6b4ae5ef
describe
'10050' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_097thm.jpg'
c6ec11fdb0221d2675dfa4f309e7c70d
666954fe7c60696275ddcdc00c0cbabf3ddbe8da
'2012-04-02T08:31:11-04:00'
describe
'1390652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.jp2'
48678b3f8bb9f530886fa90e3c197be2
2c8b86207e195d119a1f948ce83ce9f6ff9d85d9
describe
'87717' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.jpg'
3a3566ee066ba48aa18de0f77e881fd8
563cf735092ed16531694bfd6270a2dfaf51a0e9
describe
'24523' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.pro'
7087b64ac1b284436130a3381cfa12cb
3d41ff3a8bc8b535343090be1cc3a846127a4267
describe
'32536' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.QC.jpg'
1f7a9aa8acd143e33bd5354a85aa03c0
5820619a6700164a6de8a0f2ce8d21b3c2c9df0e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.tif'
ade887a882dea4e77f6ed07e5279f855
9e31911ef2f18505283ed57d9717a3d24b958ac4
'2012-04-02T08:29:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098.txt'
0c67f8dbfc046a3ed46ec00fdc53da5c
130d230c9f24a8eb60341d150e29ce8a98071422
describe
'9893' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_098thm.jpg'
2200be264767e181453f0f09e32ca889
905db90f1df8a3683cfaa8e21a58798653eb5c5e
'2012-04-02T08:31:45-04:00'
describe
'1348352' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.jp2'
755c30873a97e0bfb3bdc8088b6f7e43
2da6f906e729a342723c978aa64b6a4425c07d6f
describe
'89645' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.jpg'
0be7b3bde8c6ec216e48001b057718fd
e3a1416609ef9d1681102b478f1c65b37d8a5af3
describe
'25623' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.pro'
a7d0b398269654f8b679b970c6d07619
4dc06554ab3a80bbba606652d4ffc9ff2436eade
describe
'34822' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.QC.jpg'
9f8c3c35c09f4d448fd3f9006c7b47f8
f685dd6b61c65107b92ae93833136440021ef162
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.tif'
2d7e9138f3171207b302c5e200f374a3
bd54dcf31d1d697df20a8567745268be5882732a
'2012-04-02T08:33:27-04:00'
describe
'1036' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099.txt'
6d4733f63b24a27a0c12ac4d27cdb8c9
43589a329fdebd7ca3de4e18d45ad3102d1b6e05
describe
'9815' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_099thm.jpg'
22c5c193edd1f46f96251f68b70afac7
d22b8243965d8fba838085e48cd2a6f4d5424172
describe
'1390693' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.jp2'
8bdbb8fb45ce3f75d3ade376b2ae2415
56f5330d47d0a7817deb3ed585bd0fc6687cdedc
'2012-04-02T08:33:39-04:00'
describe
'86908' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.jpg'
4060a179d3e3a173ab975d44acf0413d
935892a29c090818bd54d2d01a35fafdd63e4b88
describe
'24568' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.pro'
3a2d04e91108d96ab4345eb11f7e6bb5
dfd7dd6813121e43892b5f71ed579233dfc5e777
describe
'32999' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.QC.jpg'
7fb9ed76d735a7096e432d14b181079b
9e610b6feb20c977a5163e103a484fb22a5919f0
'2012-04-02T08:27:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.tif'
ba319300f8b84dd8ea6a3fba8181a3c6
c39c9582022e80eab2caec5a0efb8a640d8d6a1d
'2012-04-02T08:29:14-04:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100.txt'
7987964744322b95df65d24b9627bf72
8cb7a90feae2739761331d791591d135e3715800
'2012-04-02T08:31:06-04:00'
describe
'9437' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_100thm.jpg'
e2b6f4c804e6b3316ec33e7facd88b8f
f37d96d3a199b305a8b2d04516dcb4bfa989b0d6
describe
'1348306' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.jp2'
bdb7897ab181e6d8847cc2f2aaa7d8bc
2ab1b9fea53c4567ecc777be2f1ccd4c77775289
describe
'91898' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKAZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.jpg'
b5d3f5de35e308d6ee601a44b0c72429
33e1acc86a0f5a27a8a9f8f031303fba1d6e1d12
describe
'27785' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.pro'
99978974257bbd8765a8d91d1f78e3f2
3043c716099873acc6370d8da9b36987fe0955bd
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.QC.jpg'
69ccfa27eed220d3eeda2bf45b65e698
1b0c7e5baff670ebff78cfcb5018ca38b6c99b6c
'2012-04-02T08:27:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.tif'
5afd528710108d9316f4cb356162f448
f1b9388caf2e9cdc248e74341e26e354ef683c97
'2012-04-02T08:32:41-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101.txt'
190776a1c43b008c82d326230f9757c8
257392e54d1b4531c53111288d6fe1007c426006
describe
'10200' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_101thm.jpg'
f6bdc822cd9b90be57fe23b8c3023682
c5c1cf249c4464ce52c7a68faf55a4852aee132e
describe
'1390681' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.jp2'
65270a22e46a384f3f165615804e491c
61bdada2ef3870e088d7108ac2fc6eee2d778a2b
describe
'89738' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.jpg'
7c43b9ba0b44f19538acdc7b81768bb3
4925b68858f9647d38927f58f8b9c40a9ee8ad98
describe
'26869' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.pro'
3ff515636c823c11e94b6d2bd83aeb54
e0c5261802baa9187d209dcbb62b934d365a5c2e
describe
'34503' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.QC.jpg'
8dbdecf42c54233d1db72b980ad82ad5
76e2d9089b37b82cc1579efbaded9046fed7e423
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.tif'
84f5dca22c9a2492591b0562475e47e0
2fdb1352b6a6ceda361315bf7a4df41aa55242c5
'2012-04-02T08:31:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102.txt'
48b29499c4f6a52af0222bb3a27935ca
e6e4c5d65caff7214974543482791e157c536d9a
describe
'9953' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_102thm.jpg'
18fc2e121b89009933631c0ddcfdbb02
8fbf20bc4b43e673f8f1c9135f0c1981404063cc
describe
'1348338' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.jp2'
99858086287c658ea4111b2be5bc1938
0a311a73eb7d209b7840290f2b531cc234098b88
describe
'79128' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.jpg'
726b8e25824fa780b43bdefe34b860ea
ef03362a324c8de4c5bc402b5bad4f8572dd25b1
describe
'22897' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.pro'
d862040de6c174f84d9a0eeb2e976758
f65929ec10f0dd45eee9fb3fd28617f7df486be6
describe
'31092' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.QC.jpg'
86b73d634446bbe8ac92308bc7cafd76
99bb7d80cd2b549041f8606317dfa22b8f49f44f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.tif'
b53e4d7c368796c13962a2c8d47ad1e1
de4ab8617c14e5a5b8a3b85bdd50c62186603db4
'2012-04-02T08:35:24-04:00'
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103.txt'
28049793a9df6b652bd24ea5106ea6b8
5f288132fc08fed0c0f1f34515f4ae11335cc257
describe
'8978' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_103thm.jpg'
8c1b1799e0eaf2936f1c8e9d16ae28b5
e79f73d54472fff8894f358c75c6ab3581a7f902
'2012-04-02T08:28:15-04:00'
describe
'1390682' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.jp2'
6ff187784128127a8445fe3e2fb8118b
1972a4a7a0051f9e541f1dcf327e0ce7de56426c
describe
'76338' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.jpg'
5a3f131b92749cf7858b625fa25427d2
853451991390e2163f9dae385750b564f432a801
describe
'20149' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.pro'
514b2eb77d08c9b7260921018e86317c
1f7495e17d8f0dc851f262f95b6089502074c687
'2012-04-02T08:33:01-04:00'
describe
'28105' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.QC.jpg'
3296567c3cdcc9da843d1836c39054f3
b474e215f5280fcf4c6681baa000f41729aa0e6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.tif'
dc0e52b36b8f8f8d423a817885f4f344
5dde6a1f3516c28e11bca083e56a88ba92c3bca5
'2012-04-02T08:35:09-04:00'
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104.txt'
ddbc310d1a8404b7ed1a8e4c56d4d339
324528764f16bae537d5562836076b4e1d0b6f65
'2012-04-02T08:28:52-04:00'
describe
'8612' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKBZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_104thm.jpg'
24474678e9da804b80ff16f2c67f09a9
d00dd013963ddd2340d01e9272ebd3fb29eb8370
'2012-04-02T08:28:06-04:00'
describe
'1348363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.jp2'
272a84316d983b02fff94027fdc70b24
f2f35541eed0ff852bf2218a007b83f55a5ee7a1
describe
'92962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.jpg'
21f4be585749d06359797bbc6d33f48e
7ae6f7be4a0fc3c814a73be0868b09f357d2df18
describe
'26832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.pro'
a98682859195dbfb0293401cf3c3bc23
abb8a3d157861545781fd5d991ae5e370974e8f8
describe
'35965' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.QC.jpg'
0f4b1b6566209a6b50b492ecfdc9f056
cd7003efd98c624eb2f3f88529a066b03cd591a0
'2012-04-02T08:29:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.tif'
7fc18b79222cdfe64475b0b9a11ed02a
b9c005710012afdbb8a5e59f74161b9a20b3b135
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105.txt'
718d469e5bb4a9f447eb60888e6a076e
935991b04e28e9eafd11b72b2fa9801dd94b6c6e
describe
'10321' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_105thm.jpg'
4586d4bf344232da77e319cee49cb1e3
7fc81e1a1e4d908dc5d0720d331af857c159bc37
describe
'1390588' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.jp2'
5d7cca80d25ca5202894bd1ac6cf798d
12333085bfaf97f46d521afcb9864126a9917db7
describe
'90656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.jpg'
0066106c2703dd15977a26a7e0bd5593
4cfeabe87227e50ad3d2fd1c1544c25136bb71fb
describe
'26767' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.pro'
fcf3ff8f5b5cb6a0e8481dcb7cc922cd
d025185d385c1f93af96e5e4b0dc73cc8831bbb8
describe
'34999' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.QC.jpg'
8954acd7637ff4f9a0ad61506f839de3
43e546ae33038a8afeb6453ff895c6328baacb0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.tif'
31e102ca5f3c66e93f480015fc8feb3c
1c51589477f186f81c736dddcc689a1f0f4932b2
'2012-04-02T08:36:31-04:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106.txt'
d3c7209c9cd89f464c77b7213fddef67
3e275bf00119c57fd6171fb44ec5f67c3cf772ec
describe
'9966' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_106thm.jpg'
50aaf6058b30bfb793487895e101b690
f3baa93d9f929d55d9cf558e9fa3ac6fabc97c87
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.jp2'
4b76b9a7dcfb1629f36aa8037c5aa65a
bb45d6927ecdbde702c1bbb4a4b8af3c0a3f6e35
describe
'90541' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.jpg'
296bd88630c5f9caf64af6ee66067b97
1db60e406c99a9441537eae76c3a6bd57dd1d8ee
describe
'26976' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.pro'
1e26d11e46e940a0313330ca324e50f6
598840ed687ea6aff57d8e3eae8a9ddd48f3c27f
describe
'35944' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.QC.jpg'
88957af251fc91b4a2f76ef49f51933d
0d065c1c2eaec2a9b776934a3676d4eea79278d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.tif'
f34a102e71cf7b980061a7ab1be48de5
56fafa009677d5bd1f23087465bd3bef545c2416
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107.txt'
ed5e4d079314573ee9c9c92053de70b1
f13c230b78dee466f335b218e49b73e3e67bd5ac
describe
'10015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_107thm.jpg'
c2d1c71b82d96366df4b661e0df54c20
4508169cdce86d4c31073ec45bdcbc7a88fde956
'2012-04-02T08:30:42-04:00'
describe
'1390687' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.jp2'
ea06a6a08d54360aea1e0c84b1e437ae
9c0ac0bb6839a1e14ecd57bacf2088a385093f58
describe
'92418' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.jpg'
6a386c0095f34799b73b4d46c600423f
e68baa2e53413d63bb9e9149e9ab1c341be18c96
describe
'27638' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.pro'
d95749a03e3d0bcc2bc67a6293eb7c70
e5c77f5607a8f665ec0e314e68ac4115166e9df1
describe
'35128' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.QC.jpg'
463dbff0329891eb0a320726f44a8c90
f7c8209aa87b5944812e8ad6753a7024351f9d14
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKCZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.tif'
06e4f67be0f58c94946557c4d14cb8da
17f55f2ec2e7d36d0fe9d9bc97529dcf03018bba
'2012-04-02T08:32:10-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108.txt'
331f1759697cf118039771a73206bd8f
f20521d43e6c541cafa7b61d1b32e36599b6d745
describe
'10374' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_108thm.jpg'
133bddbcbbea43c2c5eb54c8c725a9ec
8077efd90bd189dfd887846925161273e34c60a1
describe
'1348371' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.jp2'
cd932ddd170b932680a35fabeec026bd
57e892275526614655fb82f66f30ed115f84a256
describe
'89367' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.jpg'
72e8ff37bc6ea580c5a36a86a5d8e314
5ab5057f493792f7ce811735a486249468866d6e
'2012-04-02T08:36:09-04:00'
describe
'26495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.pro'
93de94d0856f3e45255a1fcd3f19f6e0
4d7e2cd6bd856bc97e6555ce3d45efa2e03e041d
'2012-04-02T08:28:19-04:00'
describe
'35815' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.QC.jpg'
7f82b49483b5d7fb6324934bad72ed27
ea9e22694ffb9f711f92e673c40306c415fe08a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.tif'
145e4386adeaf1899cd0394694fbcbc3
46c22781e17367889b4ece1f7be5cdf33e4d317d
'2012-04-02T08:35:08-04:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109.txt'
4a795444c5e7628d85a1802d86872e91
fe0d589396bf175ec482f2032042c60766cc0238
describe
'10192' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_109thm.jpg'
e59b3ec1adb2b6be9455b9c5bc5fd596
7e538610b09576f17fa409535b668708009c60da
describe
'1390700' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.jp2'
09cd1ad9b0dc1fa27a9ada1f72500ee0
1324a0a5ac74d291c7eb57d43cfb75a798827b66
describe
'89973' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.jpg'
c74f83c1409498984601c6f32cd085ad
dc7127b7a1a9185b3a5e26ec404b725b32e363b8
describe
'25279' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.pro'
5e2d04035df32092d7c6b01d0eb4a891
c7029d2750233197a7d296f16ca9dcca6db21aec
describe
'33238' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.QC.jpg'
f1e38f1c35ded5be4bf47ee97148747f
e00dcf5145bb5a25e32f57c9be3fb71bb4c008d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.tif'
af210a88df4cbca0ee3122f4302c8641
ae63ad5eea0d9b82380314946ee8bae61dabfb5f
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110.txt'
154612a7d4fa35837ac86a00e409cdd4
89ccabdb511bd4e16bcc8e4125b21828f46e7ef5
describe
'9660' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_110thm.jpg'
302019d80370d45aa99c611ed0dc3ffa
45b3e10348c267ec15d9e111e6e2d22ba5c1fbb0
describe
'1348358' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.jp2'
e602770c0b32e1641a958afa120009c2
f1c63e7007ee83e27c9311cec19f89d4e37b4f6d
describe
'81449' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.jpg'
0ccd58599bf3a8a2421924e652ba21f5
1aae969e70b0cd2aaf467dff7f9845927c8f2051
'2012-04-02T08:28:01-04:00'
describe
'23791' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.pro'
b6b1f4e7ada5a45dffd08a5eee703043
3582d1b606b27fbce35d9ce2245819249be23f6f
describe
'32671' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.QC.jpg'
e363b707087cd105d038156309151ed5
8041e5c0ffa85e9b6a6ea61670629d7599cd7b23
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.tif'
f13ca705f66da740f237bb6d0b59f26c
8e76c6f3e515234d9e76a4e4c930d2506fe0621b
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111.txt'
308c57a4ee6b161dbaa1dd66d1422da8
08da3e01a9a0920caa202c381fd10d6388cf359c
describe
'9120' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_111thm.jpg'
e803e8aee26067ac83986e0c6058235e
f29d113207eaeb169009e66c573d8ec2ed00f5a3
describe
'1390625' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.jp2'
431705ee4f1706a4164949e74b3eb15a
416dab0cdd8431b27e0f706300e15b36e0aa3084
'2012-04-02T08:32:18-04:00'
describe
'86412' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.jpg'
59bec186ff8fbdb410ccde0918f5dfe0
96176afdd07cdd72f4be530a24ae2542ea9973a4
'2012-04-02T08:34:23-04:00'
describe
'25050' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKDZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.pro'
28aebdb50f86e509de602c94d2098df5
4090913ad53362e5f07dbc3e1306403cda664563
describe
'33543' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.QC.jpg'
66a6e53179a2803cec3f218b80f4ee64
bd13872edef33c2df02ff41fb93a76c63377f15c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.tif'
ec593911b6ebe84d10d79453d4a4585e
1f682a3a3255997308243b3c12aa770dd225e440
'2012-04-02T08:34:12-04:00'
describe
'962' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112.txt'
43bfe98764a46cff18c477d328f0baef
557ceeb58644863154c0487e03e8dffecc02a323
'2012-04-02T08:29:28-04:00'
describe
'10000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKED' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_112thm.jpg'
bac00e4cecbe18276dbbef1eaae21c6c
d60c58b304a465e4c578807d979bbe847c8a758d
describe
'1348361' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.jp2'
a804054dc9601355df758c81d59728d5
5ffec44108593e880dedfe680f1990a430d4e754
'2012-04-02T08:27:55-04:00'
describe
'78565' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.jpg'
f65a9e9bfd9a4a609ed36879787b9cc0
b226611308ff4c32db2bde8aff9aaac0fe557b52
'2012-04-02T08:30:46-04:00'
describe
'28567' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.pro'
9a7382e3753abb28e5ee1d5e71536f84
d251f71d73d31cfc10412a36fefdc7c5ba5cfa10
describe
'30607' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.QC.jpg'
0a5e2f2d9d0684d11dd69b0b54a1a423
6d5b40dc358f32e8ab77563b34565e58acd4a375
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.tif'
64468dac79ce22a1eb59d752667d8b49
0954a0420936de620dc860e09734fc5eaadd7699
'2012-04-02T08:35:12-04:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113.txt'
fab8458fabed9206fc12cba06fcfe5c9
e62b86698c0c554c25e695a7e80c8e4f6eede0ea
'2012-04-02T08:28:24-04:00'
describe
'8342' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_113thm.jpg'
a6071b2663a0107ae5f62720b8f750f3
9589395a01fff6f7f32fbe3e0afc0c457920f504
describe
'587854' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.jp2'
2cc5ada63a2dcb281e6949c5e460fa2d
ea159c403a10ecae6a9c9d12e9d7bec773cc649f
describe
'34696' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.jpg'
774bfc1682b08356183b74feac0f9819
00c5a2113c1cab6a54380176604da2ebbb089eca
describe
'8252' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.pro'
9a2f44a630d7847e722079c004d1c709
940b66e9af5c1ccee7fa5f969f3f178c09f488cf
describe
'12024' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.QC.jpg'
d8346987d1df8a49d24993406733f906
3604195320c7a13ddf8bb93e1c78a75d45cf62cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.tif'
269bdf0f3aea9c67521507d65c0adca9
47e25ae8eda958ea46d2120eb17c2e32187ed8b2
describe
'341' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114.txt'
0848ef71ea63f3975d7ed6ea238a7880
f66aa4a270b21c8219f48e242c1150620d12f218
'2012-04-02T08:33:26-04:00'
describe
'3898' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKER' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_114thm.jpg'
7d976e1ca98d70c3c2af5d393c5b8793
30bfed926ab0633e5aaef054eb6ddfb2f07fa032
describe
'59196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKES' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_115.jp2'
70b70ed5b485fe1adcda21fed35847fb
83d1f27e67c595d39a9aea926f84440dc03d24c1
describe
'11534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKET' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_115.jpg'
4739cd5499f5e1864c1128ac78d08a23
c163cb2c2b180ba711970f49ffb23fb22331d918
describe
'3821' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_115.QC.jpg'
5fac8d67322ba57cbfde292651c43f6f
a67e5fb2dc562eb7f1550c72cc9bc3998dba671c
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_115.tif'
33d5f86dd567567c2860bf18fce30490
9b62e0a763aa178ecb5c0a67a735ff676be2f203
'2012-04-02T08:34:15-04:00'
describe
'1492' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_115thm.jpg'
9360dfb136f6fb42a4d0c4cf132adcbe
77dcc84b8d44e21a414563b07195c225a0fd71ce
'2012-04-02T08:30:19-04:00'
describe
'1216498' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_116.jp2'
1528ba101e653702a760c50a9c89ddf9
505989685f0ef0774b91124a01eaa605c9ce6172
'2012-04-02T08:31:00-04:00'
describe
'57464' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_116.jpg'
3770bc4a5f5d0c7469c242228d7e946a
2d22d4acdd42986a3333d4feff393e33a1a16b19
describe
'18150' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKEZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_116.QC.jpg'
dd9a6045eb1ff77e26e22de3424bf306
5595ee9b21178922df8f03f68cc6ac6f7f94c469
'2012-04-02T08:32:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_116.tif'
fd8a5d289731b4269871db81f1f3ca5b
fea37ede123dfd75b8c7cd04af924d4ddd8c37b8
describe
'5523' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_116thm.jpg'
a81133818f7c887e6aaa6033f29f828e
458cb62ab6b2199f10235586c0ebd688daacd758
describe
'1348305' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.jp2'
eaa368c0f8afbdee33850539873fe632
861e1ffb0b277480dcfe060a117706dccc691d08
describe
'81290' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.jpg'
dfb562e66059d8ad2db26c09e1788641
2c3a920db0fbd7b59d0242ec6e42bb2d57dc076d
describe
'22783' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.pro'
70950f17a317e2ec0c263e5e258077b6
61ee049500cac0b4ac96d676f25f4b79d397847a
describe
'30194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.QC.jpg'
7837023733b9a45e65fbff32eedce550
62815637a937538e4422e2a42793b37947f65f33
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.tif'
d248d095b2968ae70cb8f7f782bfe495
81cad676a8695d6544e4bd85c3a43e06d1b1cbfc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117.txt'
ae42b717ae1b40c3183e03a5f0635e24
7d378ca6d784f93bb4d9fee328bfb7e2139aa4d4
'2012-04-02T08:32:21-04:00'
describe
'8710' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_117thm.jpg'
dbbf880e1282644719fa196b574d90bc
da2b1fca039363070cacd503c29fd09ea69733d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.jp2'
6506197c9207ecd0c0f7e5cce2d2066d
8c0313a9c4bbb1457eae7eaefc73b162d74e9811
describe
'91769' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.jpg'
8aefd4f0354b339d177c429f27226d9e
9771bfe697554dfa89e8ea643bab57408db8a45d
describe
'27196' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.pro'
eb677de8954f494c36ede5ca81fe9304
4aac87c465b4e6389b3582e97c1db68cc5831e6a
describe
'34197' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.QC.jpg'
84b8891c362799aac79938b84374995b
0bc30ee7c033a5bdf9bf350a404a2857e2c87c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.tif'
c38eaaf5f66cbf68d61b1e0cae2cc9b6
d8ef3e8003f5326f3f3ab849bf47a421451f3524
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118.txt'
4b56bd5264b10acaf2138411fcf0de0a
14f14dbd882c3c1930db006446b2944b9b39ebf9
describe
'10058' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_118thm.jpg'
1a01d4bb1c0eecbbc0130174897e6b81
610c2e2cf23d500d1129c8034a9d9ff5276d6fe1
describe
'1348277' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.jp2'
45187db220c2c3b5447ba9057df0928e
bdd3fd62427ac8bf1e3e654e90bfd16b8b4fd341
describe
'91844' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.jpg'
a8384a3cef31b0bcb5c26e121fd1aab4
c33938be49b40102c89c0314576acd3c27950f76
describe
'27548' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.pro'
beb11ca160e07c929b1c27def347da96
a50fd6df08501be35cdf2bf0961f4db663edb1e8
describe
'35401' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.QC.jpg'
7d69b0fa99bdde94d724eef4b2abf985
8c2338313319475896a594e726f3f4e1f16bb3f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.tif'
eb19a5cacb9cc895402dd26550d1234c
4c2fdfd96ebb98b510b7f0bcbfe6da5041211668
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119.txt'
fc0e5113c8c2b71168412c2932f8e517
abc6e6dff88ad05db0276f1a05e0eb5969f012bb
describe
'9924' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_119thm.jpg'
25af3217244416736916a7c68fb1f5f6
bae768d88bddbca20d4f12634b30934377e3f2cd
describe
'1390650' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.jp2'
3c391d969d2a1fc080363cc4b101d29f
6b86c3e781d7b012a4accc34346d1c58a2436e17
describe
'91839' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.jpg'
667cfce1b8ae83c29de51a11f8244b1a
4c3ab34c5e0b31e1e2bd793b21c76e5795430f35
describe
'27426' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKFZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.pro'
cec8c9d6b2d71d3df3c1ab91504766fe
fb6798287a684dbf33c6dce6bf0c52ecb6230e5f
describe
'35236' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.QC.jpg'
4b07fc1f022981e99cf7fe1692d087be
41efcd86399f1fecf1687607dc438219d6d42341
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.tif'
7b507ba209b42ba67be207e7f17337b8
f30b5de8bbeb0a00cfb1da90e3e9f8af29901467
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120.txt'
810d0fa391ee035fb8c6168c0cde088e
03d71242e5ff36ddf25f9795d7287a5b90840493
describe
'10037' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_120thm.jpg'
5622aa2c9a00808c25fa349163bfdb13
f9c312c1314c681553a42f223d4a9b332dff1f48
describe
'1348350' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.jp2'
be61afadb105ceed4f94e033d8d43dd4
f74c0190f3101648681876fd4ee243f80f5e5e32
describe
'89414' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.jpg'
dad93e656c60fe3de6f3f26f1f770731
8d63caf808b040e57861716731ae6bb8c9871365
describe
'26918' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.pro'
21a88028726a315d89df1aba7f607c4b
a29a6c59614a9b6d69aa67d32a80a9d72f9d30d5
describe
'34714' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.QC.jpg'
620cca27c43ffe60721904cfcdd53d2c
7b29b3ccdcaefea1129e6654eb2543beb7cdfb7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.tif'
552134270d94cc08ab2e05eac77750e6
aab503199017d95efc61c7663382607bbb4f733d
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121.txt'
8b0b0b0718b493e17c65015b3eee033f
779700996529ee4e7ee407b7cc591c0b5acc8819
describe
'10132' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_121thm.jpg'
26ee241238f5aae614d69da7cb8d65ce
6bbc711cc138021fd8291d92d5621795e0f6cbb9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.jp2'
54fc70ce5919bb922946eb1103f75df4
3addc4defc3f910e9e8949d1d5092ed5779f78ba
describe
'93722' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.jpg'
db0b0b4b74158dc4175a41eaf9b5a0d3
a1a54fabda917f610b3299a442d3f8e1009666b1
describe
'27654' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.pro'
40639f9adb005df6f43b41fda3b08209
5a8067a06a22ed166dcbdec4d3c98aabf9567497
describe
'35652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.QC.jpg'
f282d30916d718edd3169d142ca95533
ea7eb87b8c83bcf7aebebb80aee6d6b5bd080d28
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.tif'
666bda9c0e798337d5a003575fd47453
6f203c6c2a1c8dccdb50fa129cadb88bd1ac1ff7
'2012-04-02T08:28:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122.txt'
674c13f83e7aa04bb646f956ee7eaba9
5eec41f9ec075fe42595b1e0798b7d75460022cd
describe
'10401' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_122thm.jpg'
b931a1637c244ebf91b15d2f377cb136
a771518cfa8e61ffbc28c6f315f44bdab091c615
describe
'1348367' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.jp2'
138d9ac086d354b59d8809f71a664ab8
3143e141d5c97fe1bdce2a60340a196676a5bdb3
describe
'95064' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.jpg'
e9291b83580b82cc84b78bce435aa7f9
85b14fcb0c082731f7940e9e1fc5f387932f5eaf
describe
'29142' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.pro'
11cf03d1690e0901f5d41a671963a909
61d136ec487edae74426c36fc972a406ac325cb9
describe
'37644' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.QC.jpg'
b064ceff15a6a50077b76bf7870c367c
5b0855891644402119488b1ce4aaafb9f9b719ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.tif'
372d5196b6c1b98788649fef6f0c0571
a24fe3fb6bc75906fd9224eb44d3dfdae1e88a4e
'2012-04-02T08:34:06-04:00'
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123.txt'
495ef2129a58fd4c47030518fa8bfc94
e4e1c5d408d1092d6e7b252cdecc95c86e322d0c
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_123thm.jpg'
6b57e6224a8695c9685dc23872f7f454
eaa758d0fda9657f3d7c780ce4f1081d6e5d0fbf
describe
'1390669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKGZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.jp2'
2ec016624be5cb24198761e0c68911cf
0fb77ff4ace791694ce33cd9e803474a63285fdd
'2012-04-02T08:33:22-04:00'
describe
'96628' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.jpg'
0db5c0485c4c520c33b5a36d0de82088
f0c0e6297cafabe7c9c6f0870c575953a7d9f662
describe
'28443' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.pro'
a73b290928bd63950988cf192bea3353
de7c1112b4ea20bca449b5f265eea3bf07ccc3f3
describe
'37425' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.QC.jpg'
5a8c1594c01f398d9b292ea12da0647b
f16c39ff113566600dab9b543da3643f422ee609
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.tif'
ca4f8bcc7bd165b4665fcd5a4c57a053
a0a009c10208ef7515dbbbb040b17fb46cd74928
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124.txt'
17ce9f655db6d80c8f1fe659265f55e4
f680f27c9454a43706b7d5804c604394a49940d7
describe
'10992' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_124thm.jpg'
be540b1ce4d26abc4f9a2c7c64429809
c1a5c70f69b1733e88afa6df39450ce7c0e21a86
describe
'1348326' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.jp2'
1cf7e98a0260931b496dc9dab49c86b2
cd49019de1e0147f9de0a919111d0ce348b25523
describe
'94072' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.jpg'
0c901e5ad5b64534ba7e606b1228b4e9
c30dd9f0d1fc8d3878b25a21d91f0afb1280d7c5
describe
'28224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.pro'
19a17b1407eaa41ae5ce6dbfda328e92
8c3240920c8dcdb6a83cf5b23f138eb25914a449
describe
'36754' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.QC.jpg'
566c45da00bfc8e180b7898054005995
7db78b1440fdf9f59b40826c7e05a0869c9faeeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.tif'
a95e6b783af609a8a07a6ae1592a7ebd
7cc0dc9a62d860804c3f7ece40e943ee7716c9c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125.txt'
b6444cd02198823a6d5ef4d0ea8b1f1c
aaee6875aa327c205a2a5c198449a7f088320d7e
describe
'10388' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_125thm.jpg'
afbcf292803d461e0fc586df6c610941
f0d851c735c8c7aad5ef0716f94c5667143c8b84
describe
'1390689' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.jp2'
3b87bf79e3aa9abcc9b1ad09026ff200
9110a6c48bbc334fbcb16cc216dc9f634a6b439a
describe
'92640' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.jpg'
773d3e5eb4bde4b33c95145a677d0557
0fca49e7cb6269383a4278cc2d36ab8e442aaa1a
describe
'26801' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.pro'
30b73640870e72ebea2883aa55230cfc
4f403cfbe2b01c5461516c2cb94d5c1113c83b45
describe
'35341' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.QC.jpg'
bf5255d4bcacd5a9ee4c22c714a74730
a10d969594ae1232fe79222ec298c7fd72dc2748
'2012-04-02T08:28:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.tif'
ca41f6e51bc1e98d2b1fbe52c6cd16ca
dd65c8db4e898c342acc329f3b87cd4c74bce3a8
'2012-04-02T08:34:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126.txt'
f0db62e45ebc7921b13f6a0d11798963
1fc4c0c101be7900f4dbf7742b7c8849e12e060c
describe
'10479' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_126thm.jpg'
b447cb65b8d4c2f0d7410387821394c4
4fa0890cb2efb8f79b76f35477b8dbd39e60b7ff
describe
'1331868' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.jp2'
194df5e6feb1adc54d5502eb03f2252e
9e88344b9acbc4222a7b581337aa9dc07cdbff2a
describe
'87554' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.jpg'
eb394d50c3e2ca453a4af0cf99de4071
846e3a322d7ba74e449622c93e5ceedefbb96f1e
describe
'24850' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.pro'
b6c243124c40e7ccd24efce699c6470e
5032b2f2788d6fa62e38270f3934273871f52404
'2012-04-02T08:31:41-04:00'
describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.QC.jpg'
e518b71ae3167498c327ed8a2b2f75fe
142aed80c47aa589d234ff7f837a03664fc27bea
describe
'31997302' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.tif'
b913d5f173a797948b83a57a8984bc3d
544b542c7cda04efc9cd79c8ee27979b6a4bd2ff
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKHZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127.txt'
1e31e7b869ababebbcdbe58d6eec7e2e
614903b00ad546afd01b535a09f32d4332f37adb
'2012-04-02T08:33:51-04:00'
describe
'9826' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_127thm.jpg'
79fdcb88438413d365617140d7a59947
b3550e72d995e012042dcf844224987b93b8bedc
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.jp2'
87fa16806ed54e2a440f60392e4e55e6
79eff9d29248cc11af3e11a2e8b370a950bed6c3
describe
'90484' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.jpg'
a1c4f1efb9c3002ecf2b782b3f0b17bd
96688aebcc381bdd5cd86bc91a6b163315064f9d
describe
'26318' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKID' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.pro'
a6111b0aa5fa1f93fa5025b712c2c938
309c50215ad5b03558973ffc73a683591685a4b7
describe
'34832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.QC.jpg'
d7216a5a97e7dcaf505f22ba82195759
9fd67ea530a2f58f8d97d281c27ec168b7a8e6d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.tif'
85bd35dc97b2b40bec43e9da5a62262a
5f41634c22b272eea6b2e7edb0e0d1b3f9cfd32a
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128.txt'
5a14228a8ec65c541f19cc7361900ec3
a893419f9d137a12da43d07ce30f51375ebda755
describe
'10197' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_128thm.jpg'
74c50eea624a591c4315c519f68e9d52
4287d38ff5ff9467e444ab4a5bd812b3e14e93f8
describe
'1348369' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKII' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.jp2'
5fb70b588241cb75fd684b110d0931f5
9f81c505459adff0001b924be81c554cf5db789f
describe
'88449' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.jpg'
1c678354025ee04878d8da532d35ae7a
d425cb2ffc4e8147a87b14705d04f913396e5629
'2012-04-02T08:32:12-04:00'
describe
'26787' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.pro'
37de4d393dddc83e7d9f164696f9e725
c3b7f8521cf2244d963145b8eba7583b4592d023
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.QC.jpg'
a33463cc910ffceb88b3dfad2598b4a2
8192a08bff54ed0d39bd09b79f88d4afa3f288a8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.tif'
469a7fd4df6e6754632ffd7a886c728f
8e3d7aa1921d6bf4d76065b0d4a3ee98e59fa950
'2012-04-02T08:34:55-04:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129.txt'
40533e545657acc20ff1bf5dbcb7e63a
eff89856efd491ff01a4a365bc29eee2fc1958fb
describe
'9947' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_129thm.jpg'
12f614cba9f8f8bbbf1dea2b26a96c53
4528a5ea35a230b0d35ba1f680e0f43ad7833bae
'2012-04-02T08:30:51-04:00'
describe
'1390670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.jp2'
9e85896e9c44d33ffbb003fbe6b92e52
7b34729314e7c055fdf95300c31dd34564c68095
describe
'87528' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.jpg'
724ad3e34dfece58a034dd85c8fcbc57
0e39dd6bf5f68fa8b52c69b7d80fa65312544811
describe
'25199' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.pro'
6737d76b7ec185a5c43b7e2a2668fdc0
b63861e6bba376c482f0aa8ac1bd16eacbbd01b3
describe
'33927' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.QC.jpg'
4e0be95b0ec16e5f2727e8970e5e4266
61d6b80864a6f3ced1896380181b61338db95463
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.tif'
cf6a698e20fdb0daa652156e77e72b3b
5fcf7672610446eceeab7292b101851c4acdf88c
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130.txt'
cf8c8cc1bdb77304804843c9d16d8dbf
e04a727c1e69f7c3367f746764b3d8783cdd246a
describe
'9988' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_130thm.jpg'
c2d5b3ca3d0f7f09ad1e9423831d10a4
d96bc6b4c20ec38c6c79194e5cf84922d7c7d841
describe
'1348329' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.jp2'
e796e9a5509827406ed44194c7ba7c25
f1239e30b3b246e0b0e7efa00a84f02a4637febd
describe
'88439' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.jpg'
25876f6c58e38fe3bdab9e048da2244e
291615b4bd93ad31dde8735d27249b3fce010997
describe
'27014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.pro'
c27915753674c698c51ca70d58333a32
b6afa4255f811e5c18d33c798879dd4b6a3c81b5
'2012-04-02T08:34:53-04:00'
describe
'33875' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKIZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.QC.jpg'
566ed991837f2353f8ad2c58fdf38d28
bfe860c1f0bbc7d53fce6d59af8b70adc6736bae
'2012-04-02T08:31:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.tif'
b55b9a4ef511b0402f6d794656f9c387
c33f77efd9d031e7bc5b4d7453132b0ab5e766ca
'2012-04-02T08:33:38-04:00'
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131.txt'
b3ae68c4a72fd66dc745d3fb28bc3e56
09ca922e971776577e0f1237612cdf090eff8b7b
describe
'10215' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_131thm.jpg'
a23874592c93a775865fbdfee230e35b
00a7c4ad52674d6d652975a2cd132b04267be663
describe
'940652' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.jp2'
a11cf094fea250e14674e40cfdddf217
31b86f35a549043f992ad34de3200c870282f043
describe
'52198' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.jpg'
6a0a776be8ce840a90ad753061844de1
4ea358c386d2878ba0d1c23669da64ebfe7dc0eb
describe
'11747' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.pro'
d442573882f9eed4785a2f353b2dd7a0
4488fa920047906a64983d6f46c06c86b3c65779
describe
'20182' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.QC.jpg'
284b117ab52ebfac8d7829b81fcbb8d1
58a0abf0edb5832c2267bc8df4edbac3f1bebb47
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.tif'
ed6bd7057cc3b0991d44defe199072e2
d734874e20ba3aa1e7bd272068b4745d00b08875
describe
'458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132.txt'
cd105585775de3709493d982d8e4b18b
f008688a6acf8c74a4b79866b21f2cad0329bd01
describe
'6015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_132thm.jpg'
6f8ccfece759513f59e01d71835bf60a
12ff73b4c9e114d03534bc8c3ecbcbe8fc0462d4
describe
'58101' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_133.jp2'
123646efb5d2ef040cf7c90822e065db
cca530e2fc7bab21b5a8bf61b47ef6a907d409dd
describe
'11496' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_133.jpg'
da5b0098a8da37e634c8c79e14ada6db
ff9c73ff8c913da2ca914ea29db6a2a1140dd37a
describe
'3772' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_133.QC.jpg'
8bd7c5422bb3a508499f91aa88a74df5
2f2ed7ce5cf48732d835586c72768ab5cb226026
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_133.tif'
a0b5859a003d46c74789a17a54ee1b0d
1592f6fdc572970bcc3ce56bfe84f872c16a5b61
'2012-04-02T08:33:30-04:00'
describe
'1457' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_133thm.jpg'
bd503772212a75dadf338dc0ee4ae208
0c4d9da8e91e249e147cb5067f675b4dbe65ffe5
describe
'999032' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_134.jp2'
24132c4900e3239072430366258ada2b
84cc22d35099a248f1251c09febac06069daf4e5
describe
'52331' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_134.jpg'
bc991a71880035c1248be6c434353141
423be82c1f8c69fc6bdefd8dce9ed2aedef3c009
describe
'17330' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_134.QC.jpg'
ec0979a494508682beacc3588f406767
b1ebba593bacfe0377f0791deac0a28e61ce3f61
describe
'30347540' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_134.tif'
8dbec53a9a19015781fe75abdfc9d494
9e52253379227a1ed3047ec7e6742e87deae5f3d
'2012-04-02T08:36:50-04:00'
describe
'5574' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_134thm.jpg'
cd3517c70832da269ec0472cf4fc9514
7439c24cde6da8b6cb6b9ada64765aa8c7b8b8fe
'2012-04-02T08:35:20-04:00'
describe
'1348334' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.jp2'
30dc7974759e6474ee48869c1cad229f
076838d2685ba1d3b55854333620f030e14d827c
describe
'72686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.jpg'
16f6d068c6a56cc2aab01c2e9a5ca86b
b0410abc4a39691df42f16e5eeb3904c934e900a
describe
'25686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.pro'
7363f1e87ff9ba0ce1ac89b2254d74f6
da9be340bc63c5be648e413b4d49ba6e69cce10a
describe
'26859' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.QC.jpg'
6ecc2e51dda2c81f3879b972a6ca683a
5c2c1deb488ea294f286f10f966ed144a050e70e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.tif'
056ef705176b3528ad9566b20948174b
d14585d16a388c41252270f120c4a5f9b52fb176
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKJZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135.txt'
14d1884449f6fb679aa158d6e2fee4a0
1db75857bfc44002f2b2fe1344b9896bfc70d86c
describe
'7287' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_135thm.jpg'
dc39ea9db7dc5bb406da79778e8e0b4d
5fb8364e65ac0969ed53d851dedfa2df56f2ff39
describe
'1375505' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.jp2'
0cc9db9c6e68eb3accac8fde91ef556f
f4a044231015058bf29917f549d33a902ae88646
describe
'71941' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.jpg'
ce661cae2966a3dc4d233a5b25d5b7f4
edaa7aaf3923a48091565e21bc09c0868dfa3cbf
describe
'22950' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.pro'
8f4a2d1b1a680a22162d099bf850df2e
6a26c99e5e2423552d7afaa2d633176f6943f350
describe
'26033' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.QC.jpg'
3cea4d0b83301a85a1f142e67720467b
4a60f3d12cca86d5a2508c96e79320ea99a9c804
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.tif'
ee6b8328196602463fc0366a5421ff2e
125b99054ad723f3ba0907c2e724b348027849a3
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136.txt'
10f8bc498d0402853c57317e3c20e099
c558de05279d104783306211cec3dd52badc61ad
describe
'7639' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_136thm.jpg'
1d2058a95645179cda3e183d19755082
8c7ff68ad9aa6d9696b0a9e394b1c7cb3daa6f6c
describe
'1171210' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.jp2'
7a8f92e5e6ae9c0c053de54e990cb33f
ed3f7c1f2c95a8e4fdd8dbdc1d6330fa849de8ef
describe
'88633' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.jpg'
fc04b82f138b3b0f06c103370f84eac8
0d89b59153af9259758017d6d60feeb24d6bfbdc
describe
'22226' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.pro'
5488861cd4b050f3d2984df729673645
5caf3e35d92229f8e50c294ab0db74767c424d47
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.QC.jpg'
cbdaa7c36da302231ac310b1553e227a
bcd0293c0a29d728b23174d597a52cea57079da0
describe
'28139932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.tif'
1eeb2cd0dab683da016eba079a55dc8d
66a554dbe766c90041449732b1f2507901e4f183
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137.txt'
7a94bab43832afc2a21d190429fd0449
eec0b0ac8a1071b33192f4d123a6ca7bb562c8c4
describe
'10174' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_137thm.jpg'
8dafc248b9b93972f64ae0786536b858
419cae7953a428191973498fb7085772bed59cfb
describe
'1390698' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.jp2'
0ffd733adcc219e70d04f13ac33f1eeb
bd95f6c4c177c042ca4de346821a7669f3733d36
describe
'96919' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.jpg'
96b23d0ce730870dbb079a8e25818c69
5fb0959a5ce982d31f24b408ba3068433632d47b
describe
'26752' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.pro'
5c4d33bd15ead30b443d04b74e63bbe2
15e78bfd0f899bcb5af7872625d82e33e153453c
describe
'36451' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.QC.jpg'
98b3b650740f81892d127bcaaa99fe87
9ca6778d216b75aee34d5069d02526e690b4bd05
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.tif'
e14997dd07aec08406f16e04dd220293
cb1e11eb62db17aa4aeb6d92cd5412802f31178f
'2012-04-02T08:29:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138.txt'
c0eb6ed49ec77783d6469c342c75d987
32c528a7aeb1471494afee597a39189f19b88fe9
describe
'10737' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_138thm.jpg'
82f25abec1f455bbf8d101b283578934
56b5a94236171f53b38a1d14cc7fd31216ccd995
describe
'1175424' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.jp2'
e93536c0be07e44c9b2d064b10c16600
ba9da6cd47e58cf911a85d8165074533d63e37ad
describe
'87474' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.jpg'
d371becb42971f4d2cd58740a668dcf3
d80fc932d090f0d4b4c6b878de400756b34bd511
describe
'26851' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.pro'
a79dd8e5bfd1e1904eb7f3a2094ce357
39d5e2a67b0ad444771c0272a0bef0e2caade9fd
describe
'34494' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKKZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.QC.jpg'
8ba35911b8fa5be811571d1a8abb4db2
d68bd5bfa9c05d2b1240bff3fb5cddb6175e750c
describe
'28239752' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.tif'
839f0c82c640da2ad7e06638b20541ab
d7a4eb4d5475361aab2b19eb6c8ed188ea4598fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139.txt'
0de15d6707937f991f529c844be4ead0
cede25164c9de6401c8a8411fac47c5bf5cbbe31
describe
'11933' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_139thm.jpg'
38123f035cbedf9f26f8947c69ac2269
d18dc60dc2be6a67eefd4d4aa20f2a607a89b50b
describe
'1390597' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.jp2'
c3c2d6534952a8109ab1ee9784a2c93f
ce533f4372f39c2d8ed88f24f11d754189e0ec8d
describe
'98356' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.jpg'
bf127440d3cda37fb092fc3f375f718f
212db57f4fc2dcce8c4f8a10faf714bfe80eb5e2
describe
'28252' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.pro'
56834800db47b06933afb4e610f972c4
13bf402a65b85a01a2cce2b10bc92879bece0dad
describe
'37445' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.QC.jpg'
a0134a28f63cb8e64cef356743cf7b63
32dcf53c9bd8695a928fa5c15ec92f648b8e2eeb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.tif'
8de93eb106bfbc45a7057926d25c962c
694bcd11b816da274193ee3734ea652a975ee105
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140.txt'
6b61ced9bcf661c6cee328b277911566
20ef0976bf8b1ae3532732961b09ae96bc9db722
describe
'10959' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_140thm.jpg'
b0a525b694a053aa06267270fe434988
8d8296de948d329b33a524fc2e9e002624f8af88
describe
'1348375' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.jp2'
a2829926f66480ab64ff74778f49897b
fd3d80282527d50b7e9c8e61113f0a794f63ebf6
describe
'95783' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.jpg'
0bb966861260273ea59e24b9005ddf8e
8b518e7670fd67a2b24e8d148c0ca4e63947b9b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.pro'
1c759d4f902fb7629bf0286692d70d10
7d42ee80f976478fcd412b8a45ae1067965ec703
describe
'36788' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.QC.jpg'
36c12ca1a8d476a2392e768f9edf4fb5
982fba2a51490e2fd7619cc425c4db9fe1b579c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.tif'
ffd3ef8bcaf28b4531d19132af5c627b
d59e2926102ca7828b0b758a1b95cc4fee38d557
'2012-04-02T08:34:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141.txt'
3fe792f652bf2c999fdf5168c21e78be
714803bac7e5a0ac9b7c7b3620d9db5ce3e7e0a9
describe
'10436' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_141thm.jpg'
486777c2fb9a9919dc8ca5e3519d2556
93f17c419323cbf58ea3c8970c6f020ee7056d72
describe
'1390624' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.jp2'
5b798f442bb23928567aac7bba411d21
7b989eca0ac06e41d6227d0a156885ccaceac371
describe
'95756' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.jpg'
972efef053b95b74bf017334ccf8dbee
920d670acb9c1110f7fa9a627d113e15329dfa5c
describe
'28073' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.pro'
59f9aec9109d3b38b4e5155c630a5b3e
c7ed2c593dd261a9513ce6c0dd740c5c0c5d3069
describe
'36118' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.QC.jpg'
9a97c6dd6a4be1b2806b213cb75546ba
f871aee638a3fe22d683450b56e8e9034f19471b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.tif'
f93871ff8b1ebb179d23ef341fdde93b
60ba929578b69e305f491af69690d4487f89954e
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142.txt'
e2cf0da5461db9815ab3de6d87be0539
1c6b30b2c934ae9cc2fa9732ab97b85e0966bfd9
describe
'10516' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_142thm.jpg'
13aef3e3549f3118f3ad4d6199c21133
77309789dedc89e276f600b332a9660e2c871b5d
describe
'1223391' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.jp2'
5b3328109d6463ff8ae1e4bdb020b262
e7cd927b230454ae3846e9a779c0ec4ee004b723
'2012-04-02T08:31:35-04:00'
describe
'98181' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKLZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.jpg'
f916b325a27b1bd74ee5495430752489
b9a56b83c49624503c311614466b35fcf13b3b19
describe
'26336' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.pro'
b66c679490f671ec896f782acbbe49c3
6070173986f65a1262d412fb3af5f562e3b43ea6
describe
'36978' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.QC.jpg'
fcfb26f785dc804a8ce8207fa189f31e
fcac0e0644b29f58897539f62d99d9e069802a12
describe
'29391708' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.tif'
fc311c5184fbb87c205b16cf4443f603
8802d51e465c5c61e9b311fdba14cfc15f3a0ae5
'2012-04-02T08:31:39-04:00'
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143.txt'
679432ac01dd0a26c4fdd3db10d2bbb1
fa4f024a1c3e89392bd6972915c94caaa5415a02
describe
'10670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKME' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_143thm.jpg'
e4884056a926e4d38d3141aee8a81030
2864d2bda5e009d2003f1d80cdf8462443a338fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.jp2'
a71a939082163420202afc5ab9a02cc0
1f3751e5c54477f43d1044c825f9e77082a1f3a8
describe
'94495' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.jpg'
bb65dcb3d8e8f0dd3da542b3e8d268fd
b84083cd418d6114a8df1d0c310af0bd19dbd8cb
describe
'27088' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.pro'
dfb62f33d7efea0d2e130719b2fba97f
64e3f664710390be43c19d7620b37899f32d460f
'2012-04-02T08:31:20-04:00'
describe
'35435' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.QC.jpg'
844962b6839554d067a8067ba079545a
b2d3fd0e59b732276ffcb13c77baa53d88860d91
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.tif'
aee007c5127c85dabc979f22fcb529d1
0ccb354a057f96d975ff12a0338359f1bda9b372
'2012-04-02T08:30:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144.txt'
e4165e2a58f067dec78f879d8afd64c4
d19fc4a0fa12f9befc498caf2255e7f759bfc360
describe
'10406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKML' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_144thm.jpg'
78c13f919e4202a507eb5fa7f2d9127c
980578b157646f7a287f8eb65f92f390228aae5d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.jp2'
c1575a47f55eb328011f0d425462c493
90ac0a2e455eaf29961cd814b1fdc9b4ca97e83d
describe
'80913' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.jpg'
d4b055cb90ab91e2859b2d7b13a74e2e
ce8f5464829a3b782b9d2cb7ccf8f77a0ba512d4
describe
'22701' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.pro'
de1f9a40bb2e518c753ccb38764c3cb6
0df334fb78ddea2bac2a41e7b1079a8a605f464a
describe
'30201' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.QC.jpg'
6b988508338d739856aa1550d095c89e
4157d77c26c7301842a5bd9d360182586b748616
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.tif'
e888349e0307b9979b3ffcfb74c51c14
bffc9c292fd72b9c9a8e50a8efe2d18a5345f8e2
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145.txt'
1ca1fd19cd629deb0b56402a3fe9f69f
ca2d4f8c35343f9f899bf88245ffbf69c8c67cd0
describe
'8889' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_145thm.jpg'
64a4a88d1348e781c83e3e1fd3f944ee
18afaba064995232297360c4ecc82893cc4ca75d
describe
'950671' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.jp2'
a4cf37e28c5d5f361ebc2092b884feb4
ee59c1df94c725312b4d989a9852895dfb8e87ed
describe
'50613' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.jpg'
9cda133463ffe788dc4f21704823122e
a73ce6bf01771b3c5cef881a304e881afcc84f55
describe
'11843' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.pro'
1b9bc7bdf0df43ee020b4e56205477b4
d7beb47de54176d2dbaf1faf3db68b10649ea8ec
describe
'17577' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.QC.jpg'
bfa7b64a128784eab405c5d18a795b85
0d199cb7a8c8bf2605147a9793f26063ad6202ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.tif'
7fe1c1b34a9833c77e2b22be70ebd55f
9689332a6eaca28834c8e7b76d66c86f5ce2b2d4
'2012-04-02T08:30:48-04:00'
describe
'568' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146.txt'
a5efc7224782b95162f8f87f40f897c5
d10b0c141fed2a57c71d3464cb0740800ee32018
describe
'4965' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKMZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_146thm.jpg'
57bc7de827d5788d81067cc3047ee291
20e2bb784c1d6e362dfca5c55e6765db7bcf2949
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.jp2'
adb771abcbc48dbb27f580e0eaf82fb1
ce712289005db71aa620b89a2569ba098ac4234a
describe
'79245' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.jpg'
4a5a1f1d462bc91e0126e873501def40
e5ffadfac7cd50bceb077e638348c98e2f8cf3e5
describe
'21656' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.pro'
ffed3f7b091a66114eba86cfaf9457b5
85317eb9902a8bb8545579d26799ee0a88a46c07
describe
'30125' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKND' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.QC.jpg'
2683f36585825e70e8d7977a6b7a49f6
0a1d2f43a3c21de345c8045c0945750532fd7ec8
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.tif'
e2a7c5a496cb59b1af225e2d870765c1
3dcb778f6a6605a66d2af2ea931929374fcddd6b
'2012-04-02T08:30:26-04:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147.txt'
4c5845841bcfa59fcd66390a5378ecc1
235832b081ce0ce9a587e7c5c5c62590d8f6937f
describe
'8703' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_147thm.jpg'
339b8f656258d98460bd1be4c803f95f
26fee7728efa1915f3c64897793190b787c8b665
describe
'1390684' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.jp2'
083cc284bc8b96eb625385cb68f4e952
69b902a751b6752b43fe81b936c9c83e2f8366bc
describe
'96102' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.jpg'
b9cb13db61c1f3220343cca426b84b5c
bdc5d98d75bbbdc991865b3a3eb631839415460d
describe
'28026' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.pro'
76eb2f5c95b5466bd27ea94df794878d
79caebc044c291b9a9208d4ed604cf42f4166d1d
describe
'37634' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.QC.jpg'
2351cda44af0974e36644cb2e9aee58a
f4711fa5b0beb04fc35f3fa29e686add55d0724d
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.tif'
a9fa869a9f72a93f31ef8d4579f716c1
1139fff70722b7b2f74ce988fd58405580be2616
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148.txt'
430412fb705835375dc37563f2fa8367
da2ddb26b86fc1b3f8f4aba4c8caa23352784d78
describe
'10860' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_148thm.jpg'
2490ff35a1736511ba697b4d3f9e997b
4af7f1c9e4cf805de891ab830fe02abdf500e622
describe
'1194876' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.jp2'
30044edd43d76a528e24f0d05edbdfe5
ce8a0fa41624748c9eff0e349f54706a750c0f5b
describe
'97723' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.jpg'
459f9236c698493fc2cb02453f53a475
c148da524cc915de795fe26aebfc368b80a55bf3
describe
'28235' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.pro'
be0b9206f9afb258f350a00f6b989c6b
bfb8c433d6aac5e16015a92d8d75014cdad084b1
describe
'37867' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.QC.jpg'
bb4b5e13a0dba5e4ca0be1248dbfc8e8
ab3df66a541beae409e07948ec79a36e737e84cf
describe
'28709790' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.tif'
8488d0bbf622fa26e21b11134ff2db1e
5a468b3ef99c27821ef483f92923758279e4ffa0
'2012-04-02T08:27:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149.txt'
4f4f71234bd5f78899f03c5cc8db7b36
7f4484e53ceec8abd9fa0f64ea06b7efab11ee2f
describe
'10906' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_149thm.jpg'
20f973c595fe3207c09034bb45e038a6
63dc28040e7325d0a4182357382341279445dc45
describe
'1337139' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.jp2'
d24feefc2f05ea89bcd9cc606723b1d4
3fcbdee78e73c26ae93a22a1611bdaff2e5fa015
describe
'88534' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.jpg'
44ac1b911b73a6b3d0ec9848f815b06e
8c04d81ff827c93e57b1f771c0713727be0732a8
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.pro'
e5f85f40efac0099ddddfdd93cbc0962
053a9993a6089f364a849849aa8aba6f9d75ee9b
describe
'35307' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.QC.jpg'
70ee20ee115ff5bc660ad4b942ae7df5
214a4a4af84b382d0351cdd45865ef033be792c8
describe
'32123430' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKNZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.tif'
9469364fdd652f746dbce618bd00888f
3d537d0c7ea213490e930fdeba9bacd1963768f4
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150.txt'
a82d65542ecd5eb046666252b726f120
2b3ffac0ce3bf7e7baf12c86ba68fb13b71b46d2
describe
'9743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_150thm.jpg'
3b30c9efe67f69d4cb92dc6ea6008898
858fdf58850a0e344876197fa1f79bf4112af343
describe
'1259129' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.jp2'
d351a62c4556a843e8ecf3f25bff04e8
1e00477a2c0aeb7f4bb85147e09a8f0634a839e6
describe
'91174' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.jpg'
7333fc43ed01fa09c9145e499a2a1c8f
1d3833c55ce5e63cdca6305153b484638efbbafd
describe
'27512' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.pro'
717344842999d5f0e5a8f756c1e9cc0f
3e9156ec24f4925f5dda7b1eca949ec805b1e665
describe
'35769' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.QC.jpg'
b28569cf60be06894bb32ba93f2d6377
3319947893b7315c1fedaf3d20377ce9f798cc3c
describe
'30249954' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.tif'
ee8924b78d1b92622e5b88d8a38e3490
d4c573f6e5aa07c81cb763b1ea6cb2b6f6294961
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151.txt'
cdc2a77966c5a009aaee28ec5053501c
39a6247035c57ae85688af43453c8cbc5cfbcbb6
describe
'9928' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_151thm.jpg'
cdb7872f792406c06092d224598fdc1c
6d66bacc243cdc6019e7bb193b5cd44168ca922a
describe
'1337134' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.jp2'
a733655b764290dd72ae79ce11dfbeeb
28533aa54d4e579ba10c6b9b004e822c7be7a27f
describe
'84312' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.jpg'
7e5b3337e222b4c49c51256a00d4b0bf
6fac9a97356394548395fa9c97b93e07b896f034
describe
'26389' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.pro'
54c910e7eb4f1dfdd733cdb986dee52f
c9df8e977390a8dd753b12aafde7910845c2b955
describe
'35452' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.QC.jpg'
2935bdfc32de236db68a55cdff40efa6
4c62f7b24eb4430195790453a0dbf4d75e563fc9
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKON' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.tif'
5edffd15095189a45a3605feecb41cf8
fb9ff2cff2a3947b230c61dcb346ab5b1e2c32a1
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152.txt'
3cf6451354c68dc9a802e1603cf16f6e
d79e1d58f854ecb5c3b087d9a7fb8acd1358c98d
describe
'9355' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_152thm.jpg'
f9eb7e08b374a8a6203db4274c079d29
f3bb09641785e3db68b8bea2e19e7550f73a3546
describe
'1304363' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.jp2'
ed6dc261585580822129c246edd33986
081ceaecd7396f013f279fcf85915e8f5d920e4f
describe
'82629' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.jpg'
6b77771e86ae8f9cec3042ce360562ab
f3c22b97d1d247ef11dcb0936a7668216dd57824
describe
'27129' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.pro'
9555a55822fdf9b8fedf34c2fee7dc48
62576ed4605184786c69fb21eec5e877c82ceb67
describe
'30467' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.QC.jpg'
93ef943673cbf649a6ca3b51ec8bdf76
067e2a5dd8e55bafbad4c4a3fd294b3dec04b811
describe
'31335130' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.tif'
1f7f82d42b57364e31372800f7d8912b
1d64b0cc3f886ed13ab9972947f3476aeeeb4c5d
'2012-04-02T08:30:03-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153.txt'
3f3bfc6d75d780d4f80015624a7ad415
5f8ec99a09874bb154656e118c5e76167ada7836
describe
'9669' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_153thm.jpg'
a7e2e23579583f4c76fb58f996bd67e4
de62b10926b774be0c261cc4f23396dab9a598f7
describe
'1337160' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.jp2'
2a762ddd1cf96be92b9c77d962d3586e
92c8aa9ca45d7864db3936eec7ccbcd49b390c4f
describe
'87747' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.jpg'
577049d28b3e45b8f48581ccc8862895
97076c9bbd2311a9e5335ef1375db86af48d517e
describe
'27727' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKOZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.pro'
28f3f436f66bd4efc19d964ab132d0c0
f9f5d9ffb5fd9581959901dea82be4adcbc8e38b
'2012-04-02T08:30:47-04:00'
describe
'34684' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.QC.jpg'
3b5f5046dc7bfda8c3b128e078809312
a32b42d91f9e02daec77cd8707ebb05f1048224e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.tif'
08cb5027edd89e818d7d71f38dbb6bd9
316085329d3d1257787a45c1c337311f6ca35ee0
'2012-04-02T08:29:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154.txt'
3215fe6e69680ca2cc1b33ada55f019b
2911357cb36a534932f00fc6bada358e82fe2ed8
describe
'9442' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_154thm.jpg'
bf8c57cf7a3979b50e927a7bc59ec811
d68235e23b1f17cda5d901d831670a6710a1bd6c
describe
'1304397' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.jp2'
ea3dc9fc1087d8f3ec96d28a4111c2c6
efcb2978e155d5448a1d86427d2f35e4fca4f9b8
describe
'81349' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.jpg'
40bcdaa884881728da0231cac6b482c4
79bac5f66b9d206b2c1c956dad94d371bfa7a4a3
describe
'26319' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.pro'
06341981c507c38404766f2c68384b1c
85ad392de26b76853138b9c6a002657a4e945410
describe
'34826' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.QC.jpg'
61ce1e193401a6ce9bf8a5b37724045a
6bb19a511d62b6cfc9278562d47eab01e086cabb
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.tif'
921a25ea6c3a2ad6379bf12254660226
d1349842dcda2c9cf55092a7482d738668b5ced3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155.txt'
090e48258082096e9131cb78dff7a080
31b12994cd3248163bd50b9e4e9c2b9488cf5f62
describe
'9539' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_155thm.jpg'
a2941713f55e044c650df2c55fb3150e
8c42d03b7205fd0e395f2a933d14306d085ee73f
describe
'1306487' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.jp2'
5e194faae7b4795b1b11582f02fd943a
24aa4a39db88609ac17e0d81351517fcb3128e72
describe
'69972' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.jpg'
308befa1950e4bf7bcfd73e45bb1e776
ed4d7b5506f93f5f7480776824a85bc021bd2b0c
describe
'22932' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.pro'
2a2eea813f08af1829aa003faa87d8f5
8ad991761d8b99923febc2b98da54f9ae6c1cc1a
describe
'27622' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.QC.jpg'
8017ec3d6bcd9594daa8ccd3d792227f
1300dde7f8eaf1bb526592cfad48549ab5da383f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.tif'
6732bcde887b6d1d987dad9022ea2105
4b4a976b7c8d470827500cfe6f8204249fc351ec
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156.txt'
3c265bb8963402159d71ac9b86b7664a
f1cc3677c482ca0c4c3449d0ff105fed78b80596
describe
'7746' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_156thm.jpg'
b55ed9bdc8c4ff7a53739cc26b22c51e
851ee75411570afa5033e62280b78da68ad8ff88
describe
'1168450' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.jp2'
2e6af6db1ec47f0f928364948b8436ef
b0958687fde3b1312821ca333d018d51b5ecd313
describe
'62093' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.jpg'
f997c4454c1721d7cc96770db15bd9c7
7dedddaeeaa95b37eae9237f9042c25fdc9e2c46
describe
'22818' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.pro'
d64160e0f8627b8853d036a126767a26
10ec7752168c99aed66572487e16b89100cbbfb2
describe
'22979' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.QC.jpg'
82c39071ff39c24ceab0523cd0f4ba49
999c9382d9720c902b0b5d3aa216ccd14efa15c7
'2012-04-02T08:29:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.tif'
3e643c93abb1357c15d9c4b684184a42
83b58fdeb1c3b45c42008b04422e555a93a2f97b
describe
'956' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157.txt'
1410c00ea8d8b26aea53dec9dd580937
f96b367ed6e0a3a965691772a3be2a220d70f2c6
describe
'6743' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_157thm.jpg'
328039fe21cf2d96f6887ebd73c40c64
f13eb5c2bf42317012230184c954e43b97cabd97
describe
'1074458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKPZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.jp2'
3107f1810f1cfda6482beaf3fef93df5
27de3af87a44b4518039a3db8722c6bc4a0520e2
describe
'58224' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.jpg'
5d266325125367213897a3b06cd3150b
5ccfbdfefe64b393275419ea4d315201d416a8c4
describe
'19462' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.pro'
20f5706a91a0a9f5ea4cc27baf3bbbbd
3e87b5c6258d020c9a2981f64f36a3c12364e342
describe
'21458' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.QC.jpg'
e7f837e1a6d81fb3e54f199ee943ba47
7eb39e3c1b61d9f7921a2892d587b0d134bd43c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.tif'
5160d6cacae4652f090e714d97d03509
95036b79f451dfaf0583efbf053ec5ba6307554f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158.txt'
21ecc4721bb9e5fa98ec8f07fbb7a8a6
82db5c58f1fb33f59bde89ab71140beed67289b8
describe
'6089' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_158thm.jpg'
728ac45cab04efa7cccbd8c7bd08f645
f9eca7a8b1cb5066d8f38f05fefab5b44a4d4e6b
describe
'1304406' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.jp2'
9f18c077ea8e4b03bc9a9a55b7b50cd3
ac0ff90ce86e350cfbb840e58116994687b5e520
describe
'75049' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.jpg'
51093c35f3b6ff74bbab3a6890d3234c
f866f4e6303966d615235c6075e04dab2dd011dc
describe
'22726' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.pro'
d583dde81505b26544a1605a93939809
646492c92bc106d5f52e069237e5dc9068e6cef9
describe
'27162' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.QC.jpg'
82d490ae3c89c663061b896a28ba9397
520b1796e8cf1ada3da74f36ca8b2a130c226569
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.tif'
ff54d2ce44067e25ce5ca945b541355d
f7656cae530af84f356705d8d95060f422f24622
'2012-04-02T08:31:04-04:00'
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159.txt'
ddf4e5219c1898da57c184b875700c90
f719252f0e1ef99983075458674934494a2c7dfe
describe
'8288' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_159thm.jpg'
87f3fa18264202de328fbf4f9199ac5b
bf9f01de3865dde3135f04571bb0f6ac370b3bdb
describe
'1337194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.jp2'
77c4b839e47972730422960fca4fab6a
648d9135cf9cbcd40f1e2609b35b963aeec089e3
describe
'90283' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.jpg'
ab084c73459113f540c699e2b4934d91
4af708c9bf2f85417b8652a49780d480dbcf8276
describe
'27834' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.pro'
0fcbf57d796cf080574f5869f76caf27
2b252cdd495a599375c0b7f38afa588b838c34a3
describe
'38353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.QC.jpg'
ce600ae709a5e66d9ba8c7b431a64cfc
5f130f31b5e77fef1337e81324abdc19c01cfb36
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.tif'
c3d9f1e711f8d27a82a74e3f52bf11e0
805b7dbfd4d864347985c8195549cbfd03afed19
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160.txt'
7f1e200f2209dd9518cb2b9f26faa3cc
c55cdd7ed257643dd53f112779081af415b912cf
describe
'10046' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_160thm.jpg'
e337d82f58e31df231cf66fd64626f6c
9e99b068ecfeac12d12e51843f1513db7b522d34
describe
'1304387' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.jp2'
1467edacc9b5ae8842a943a85cb61c46
07adfbc8d69b3a034f729c9eae31410be2136228
describe
'86686' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.jpg'
c1e38f6451fdebe6930c3b17f2229f40
9aef64e50a4267a9ce22b0d5ffd3b47cfe3347db
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.pro'
4884b6a7d20759447cef29a648957dda
3fedcafe25826e50e6107360908f74f5d96a0494
describe
'32831' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.QC.jpg'
940713fa93a95bde76490571ff983aa7
8948f1b254bf84a222eef7824c5e55bf1287877e
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.tif'
b3ef32cfe2984fade1cb71d7d7d075a7
717f32f5b29e577e135f01b40e758e71f1b7f512
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKQZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161.txt'
d7782996b4a76cfa4a4ad553d87b62cb
284415a422181f92dcdc366ffe044abf5bee0617
describe
'9202' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_161thm.jpg'
78fbcbb8883f898f31c667fc4e287f4b
57fa803b28f91fb37d394e30ad9c08b6253bf604
describe
'1337188' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.jp2'
58d80788abb54c0eae32709d72f610a9
177776db4fef85d4ff7b3d7defd941afe10f6c9e
describe
'93657' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.jpg'
7eee19f330b57fd1cd779b1885bbcee9
685b644bc2fa08e64af60d2c392484e71c3dcc3a
'2012-04-02T08:33:13-04:00'
describe
'28332' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.pro'
a994ce0d9f69def7219a02a7149ba04d
f07efcdd5f0c0f85b0a225a5a451f6ee76fb2156
describe
'32233' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.QC.jpg'
07787ce6413e14ef0727f43f7b56c398
7c62955f21bc7d9e263704ee88aefe651863ea4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.tif'
f5439dfcc9c5f31c6ee90506ad3e5c78
a4c90ab6525e91b632295be0e62bd72375dc30cb
'2012-04-02T08:29:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162.txt'
c761b0a8cd6f68dc479739388f1cc47a
085725ac23052ec52438c987d61fad3eaa38f70c
describe
'9599' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_162thm.jpg'
b4775bd5d48db6325bcc8b71cfbe394b
3ee2adfd6a8b1f4687616c007725e516f561736f
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.jp2'
22286066ff9e427b4a3951d9e85d00b6
2e13fa1bf41017d7d185707e8e6df377885cda45
describe
'87194' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.jpg'
4cc83e8e6a846da4bbd50831a0710e87
3286c4d6a074c0781181a4cf17ce5450d48806ac
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.pro'
b44a60a7087b47cdeb24ff84e3e9e965
bf8725cf5e42c690962af8d640f2054081ff96c2
describe
'36524' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.QC.jpg'
9f0ec6cf88345e620ed499921329c10d
081a0a2e5a00c95a465a0234eff141f308f64421
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.tif'
6d76bed30bc3faf3c2b9e6ac3f09bd63
19728cd1ee331e486d4bb2328a3e566b19057294
'2012-04-02T08:29:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163.txt'
482128a047e303c36d30a641ce44bdba
f10b93658d768d0283e6e1d769bcc5acb4b4a970
describe
'9770' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_163thm.jpg'
a047b94f64816069ab3e847b5feeeb85
628b28909e258d0a3c2821ca1e45bae40c1e964d
describe
'1337207' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.jp2'
caebbae67a9f2f760fd69ba1e265959a
7e9c5c22786df2ad55e0f24e37ff98f5ab786a66
describe
'94322' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.jpg'
39b30f83dae596e455e05e7fef39fd13
2dd1b991a1c11452461da09a49be4947f9cd2014
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.pro'
697cc9e7f7f9f5b553ab48b2cf54dcdb
e91e1e3f9c983c688a3acc1c93b9a999995c5737
describe
'36991' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.QC.jpg'
3b4addb1a1bc34c654de12c267be8458
bead7f540f611d9408af8efc1184ddd49eb3f98a
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.tif'
b00642b41ff4f2bdbbe37ee72dff4604
7ed912afe6c8769a787845400982d3eef833ef36
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164.txt'
e7ebdb20d00edcebfc2da0f188248fff
d60bbae135a2d57692f2e3d87e4daaf187c1032a
describe
'10040' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_164thm.jpg'
9c63d14a71a5e62a2619c4c5d2e97a18
f00973cddd8a0e18be4103d317e2b5fdb508d687
describe
'1304372' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.jp2'
1f7d996802668c6478fdc63a7a933703
9df88cc61d72133037ee9f63a83eb446d86e5e00
describe
'94588' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.jpg'
cf9a05b05b85e34f0536344ce0862aec
9f837c23f421725c8d7e9ec02d31e4dee6db8918
describe
'28077' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.pro'
4ac60ff5c7213987b06184e5aa2454bf
be76ab33000ac4662a4f9e351b1a1fda2c0fcabe
describe
'36198' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKRZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.QC.jpg'
b07d51858051c772b733c9a725fbf1ac
2a9b0df712363cf5eaabbac74bdef9c0c1940967
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.tif'
c96674f34f5000a701d75b54054d2c99
f94ba7509dd9f322f5336c0f0a733f8c8750be17
'2012-04-02T08:32:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165.txt'
8b6bbd349c0bc066383ddcb3f8e6cb04
a7539a7b324edc718311789dc5cba0fbb5fb394d
describe
'9948' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_165thm.jpg'
587d0810a56e8423cc557b113cc2bf39
3d8d6f0dca6d3259396d526c7b90a8e4a167d151
describe
'1337106' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.jp2'
bfb8a1fc55124734c069e26e5e1ffb1e
b7017f84fc8952d2df65f60b9b6ae38656cb376d
describe
'92116' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.jpg'
2135f5bff119efd441faa1a2c91d1486
6f6fc10e7ef964ab1a61aaceb12727f49ef9bc5d
describe
'26670' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.pro'
45b0ba45f9550df3b1ef607c1f8fcdb5
afe6e6c26ded1874644bf98c7f79fb25cbe966e9
describe
'32833' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.QC.jpg'
b1014b24ab2619dd59a29f13dfd35920
ab7badec38d294c78e9d51d9184b1932288e4437
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.tif'
cfc1b3a738baeb0933dcf858eef8a82c
faa35f4ccd88aaa91d5eed88254ee9e807bd46a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166.txt'
74531ce842f114fc1732c7200c7936ad
7c8b21290983b78ceead211891e1616031b66b82
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_166thm.jpg'
d2250a4cfc575713e7ca99060de5565d
15629830cfbc58b635bc28d1b07ee42e7d92feef
describe
'1304322' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.jp2'
a4903d2b11b84cf84ebb3a9dd9c72887
d5e38325326f3a24f43b4b621b347936313b67cf
describe
'88871' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.jpg'
09268c7032c19f8e3874f5cafa450cdf
ba4ec8847ef1c64834c65a59baba74513d1961d8
describe
'27725' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.pro'
51ef6d9492f5d709132a12ce3456943a
3b279eca49402219aa03237e676ee936f088c13b
describe
'36952' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.QC.jpg'
00399b3e506015a63f962083931ebf2b
2ea25139a8f8c3a3c3a19e9be03b4ea22dca1344
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.tif'
ed262e0341d5061e89b2e72361351596
f9e4f5450597fe0088ebdc32fac9eec5c7dff09f
'2012-04-02T08:28:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167.txt'
0008e311880e9821a3dcb5ab875b1916
4bd318fef572f35dbb62255fa95f7801fcb2894c
describe
'9741' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_167thm.jpg'
cf0fe3886315e795ef7b4c80b016cbf9
dde241923eebdcfa5b7372721054eeb819ecf3b6
describe
'1337167' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.jp2'
685c66bb8c7f00680489a4ee07c22cce
e67397231f57651b223ff4894f153a108f4c45f9
describe
'95143' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.jpg'
e0a43ea755b7079f0628b000ce6447d7
177d2e3e42adfb9f99b9bc6fbef6c4a51ee38567
describe
'28379' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKST' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.pro'
151bff666e03616c960e0267c9edc978
f73e2587563362f8c6c2d4dce9f269a20fb735f2
describe
'37858' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.QC.jpg'
0f1259fba2b96b06eda981c8de9b0c8f
eb192151f7c1b9c409daf21753e65e0cc615d0a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.tif'
80bd4aac26fdcaa592e72429c2fff6fe
91305168d5da799921295e7409175d560c22bbb2
'2012-04-02T08:35:42-04:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168.txt'
beed160090ec3e3e00c910096c3defdd
3aa5cb632cce01767b46a17d4fa8dc26c6809a99
describe
'9643' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_168thm.jpg'
dc9d26e51dac0ee118acefc994609206
87749ae59451502459510f53e00c7fe41aab704a
describe
'1304402' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.jp2'
98bedbaa3af5c25ad4472a537aae2d69
6a99ec96ee94a0a0e03c2d87d5f198862b88adc6
describe
'85448' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKSZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.jpg'
bb8d0caa869d2d0083303e4dfe06701e
fa2454c3fbf396512ebba98748d505de18b11516
describe
'27233' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.pro'
6da9c5eab599bbfc4b1a88c8e20a9809
aec866095e831e0071720b3efbb17e2bec8f3c5f
describe
'32089' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.QC.jpg'
58628035ddb8193fb944ef3a5fca087a
8ca5b18f9039d1dcbf38a65edd62466a49797be4
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.tif'
dccc772d3d3171236c3a792ceebfed9b
5f2fde4d7d9a4de85211da284c360be11eb958a2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169.txt'
de26c9a7fc42ecb7a7a5b2ef1dfdc7dd
367304ac4735c8c7d5fb06973c349e23364f30f1
describe
'9260' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_169thm.jpg'
512002967b1590c2b647dcb7a4859cf8
b859db3e6580411db39b9fc9e3e5c835566a5130
describe
'1337090' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.jp2'
54d543fce8f84191c29b6869b8ec92cf
55b50adb1163eb9e904515bf8f3aa9925c0c633e
describe
'94745' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.jpg'
d2cd44e48e63d6175f7aa5006812cc28
cbc0851b9bf04e68932bffe1e4278eeaef51f1bc
describe
'27737' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.pro'
1c241a337cb9dc2425cc8bb1ba7a73c4
bc3149d1e4bd13073ba1940b45675d8c20debe37
describe
'36730' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.QC.jpg'
ec03194aebc18616eecf37b767812675
e3a3571a80a0a670b3bdabc8faa9743d654e89b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.tif'
203a2dd0bdf3d41c25bd55d8d5686669
38c0958fe11a15c12f548e1ae7444fc198d66f0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTK' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170.txt'
2513988c9d1758cb3593a8747a88c1ba
34dd715f32eb6dd82bc73b3896a864533735970c
describe
'9592' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTL' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_170thm.jpg'
4533db1cc6a9c4a29032a344e9ca3d95
ff07541bfee723a7014dccd3b9ee964ddfdd2de1
describe
'1304344' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTM' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.jp2'
c2c9a8abb711e60a0e0efa5062c2ce46
51cfef444085556c1b69944a5675cb6cdfed9afc
describe
'90630' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTN' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.jpg'
7f052062413feab6cb1c0f066dd60d57
de79f466e25b91335d32a2105b7fcbda9cb3013f
describe
'26014' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTO' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.pro'
dfa6f84c7e5c31a5f7651c2c7f22ba85
65c7577f4456da6898b46c1f92fd1fe0925ac1a5
describe
'35895' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTP' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.QC.jpg'
5602d001129ecb0616bbfbf6309d88ac
0b344748554accda81fa3a3a695e874de5501530
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTQ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.tif'
0d357266f2b971079ad1bfc6819d8452
cac8729fa4071be075d1442444e46f335567f7a9
'2012-04-02T08:28:25-04:00'
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTR' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171.txt'
cdf0425fe647162f5a7c24d1cf87d47c
7b355cf172a2c2f002ec7daeeb6236b2e2ccc3c0
describe
'9635' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTS' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_171thm.jpg'
c1aa9cae3fb96858f4651f0979661689
d2fa361da4ef00f2a3639fb1ce650f28700e42c2
describe
'1337214' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTT' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.jp2'
77d24ee0c653e418c7cacbaf8729604e
5b1911401aecf8cfe18c6440339e6358d36f070c
describe
'105778' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTU' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.jpg'
7dd8fbdfa7ea47292f4ae59a9185093a
f94dc0fd9e3032a7c5ba22b869ff3330f8bd7cc9
describe
'25676' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTV' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.pro'
e48f96023431e32b64d6c62ddd066cd6
91d811ac0466a52be629487c690961317c2b92b6
describe
'33649' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTW' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.QC.jpg'
8e9780d522fe9b04d45ff02fde445087
82728cfbcf77c692159e236e37146a4c955067af
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTX' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.tif'
59a758449aa802982555f7b76d9afd5a
9b14c2807a41436d2e86fc94255faa94c900270e
'2012-04-02T08:28:13-04:00'
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTY' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172.txt'
ed9ccf30ad72001983fa028283addbca
e315210ae28f9ffb80b292cf9207beb2eb10dabd
describe
'9791' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKTZ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_172thm.jpg'
1f4cf8e7294028d41df50c903aec376c
d3de33795cb0266d98958c27b0ac2e25dec4a94a
describe
'175719' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUA' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_175.jp2'
71538ce9a4a09060aadf7cfcbcf97240
4786f431380e0f54af7f7329ce4565a71f509280
describe
'15067' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUB' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_175.jpg'
e4bd6f27ab2362fea9daaa1aed9287c9
894140044c9f1a03d691607c4d2c08aa0dad8e44
describe
'5432' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUC' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_175.QC.jpg'
291208f728915316ba5fb8d8be10c1f3
1b7154f64b929686ecc24bd6aa5efc7c98cef424
describe
'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUD' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_175.tif'
4b528bc1a6a8a17ac9ab49ec4f0b7938
ad68c0f49c5841b2060d7fbd88fbc615a2c45cb7
'2012-04-02T08:32:22-04:00'
describe
'2031' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUE' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_175thm.jpg'
7601e4fa0d95d743513ce2c59cc42ae6
c1da16680fd5755e3b23c26c803f218d93115d32
describe
'1273173' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUF' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_177.jp2'
add604263b464792cf14d69690d28cc7
95426f35d15ea1857b21946e766dec1dc90774f2
describe
'65066' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUG' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_177.jpg'
e1f17c6635491bbc2aa6c61948225fa9
65d30c47910c37cd4885677366115f013ce97aa6
describe
'17353' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUH' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_177.QC.jpg'
163b41884ccf4723a2422f88250a34c4
46c8b96a0e6070c0b7dd52bef63716fd14d34848
describe
'30586244' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUI' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_177.tif'
2409b3afc1022c1299c4a6ea173fa652
27214fbcc855b9315cca27400ff0d6cbc68609ca
'2012-04-02T08:28:38-04:00'
describe
'4282' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUJ' 'sip-filesBinder2_Page_177thm.jpg'
dac8eeac099cdc69502dd0e52fc4a89f
e9877e3bf741382d24e4b45f731a758888c512c5
describe
'247' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUK' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
1d27e6f2383dd1d1ed3b42652d1d25a8
66900558755a7ae5a45fe714b15ef14b9ff4fd34
describe
'256248' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUL' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
b0b4c57cc9446f4ec6d151755e8b93b4
4af4c05091dc15c6a57ddd5f8440d17d75521e26
describe
'28888' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUM' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
fd6b7159dd513cb553390e72a1f323a4
e30ba2459a8c89839741d70eb223d647aac89c64
describe
'454' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUN' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
4d4fb72535ceae95b6c6761214b0e19e
fc39991524d09b3a9036725f9439486c9251d7a3
describe
'7729' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUO' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
3495cda4a2db8739b940fbc7ec7fb2e2
3cba689c5059546c62243c834e00b737e2155689
describe
'6153212' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUP' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
22e18def3dfd71296421cd00695a3278
64d1ccd4fd0e79d664f6e7c70febf2dff3a0a7ab
describe
'63' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUQ' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
c5cc67ec8e45f1013ecfce5936eb1508
535bd95a4184757cc8d177bccb80e982c4dd1be3
describe
'3000' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUR' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
c23e1d2102b3254d21163903baccd396
79b10b306e0ab3476649fe1c2f4ed5e2b6221354
describe
'255697' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUS' 'sip-filesUF00002233_00001.mets'
2ee81fe4ea84261012285698d6da449d
fa2c1b41e5f2a2c6bbc1799ec13cd20bc9f04263
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T14:26:36-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'314702' 'info:fdaE20090918_AAAAAMfileF20090918_AAAKUV' 'sip-filesUF00002233_00001.xml'
13e79a77548bf0dadc544b72704a6ad0
f00e420f04b5dd4961e6451f948e2ffd9859ef95
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T14:26:39-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.