Citation
The farm and its scenes

Material Information

Title:
The farm and its scenes
Creator:
Lee, R., 1791-1856
Greenaway, John, 1816-1890 ( Engraver )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Measom, William ( Engraver )
Jewitt, E ( Engraver )
Grant and Griffith ( Publisher )
Levey, Robson, and Franklyn ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Grant and Griffith
Manufacturer:
Levey, Robson, and Franklyn
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
[20] p., [6] leaves of plates : col ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Farm life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Publishers' paper bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Hand-colored illustrations ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Engraved plates are hand-colored.
General Note:
Engravers: three plates are signed "A. J. M."; one plate is signed "W. Measom"; one plate is signed "Greenaway" (John ?); one plate is unsigned; and cover is signed E Jewitt.
General Note:
Publisher's catalog follows text.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
with descriptions by Mrs. R. Lee ; and six pictures from drawings by Harrison Weir.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
027267600 ( ALEPH )
30327498 ( OCLC )
ALK2540 ( NOTIS )

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THE

FARM AND ITS SCENES,

WITH

DESCRIPTIONS BY MRS. R. LEE,

AUTHOR OF THE “ AFRICAN WANDERERS,” “ ADVENTURES IN AUSTRALIA,”
“ ANECDOTES OF ANIMALS,” ETC.

AND
Six Pictures

FROM DRAWINGS BY HARRISON WEIR.

LONDON:
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS, )

CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.



CONTENTS.

THE FARM-HOUSE.
PLOUGHING.
HAY-MAKING.
REAPING,
THRESHING.
HOP-PICKING.



THE FARM-HOUSE.

A WELL-ORDERED and well-kept farm-house, with
all that belongs to the operations of farming’ sur-
rounding it, is perhaps the highest picture of com-
fort and wholesome enjoyment that the world can
produce. As we write these words, recollections of
one of these establishments, often visited by us in
our youth, rise before us; and we cannot offer a
better description of the generality of English farm-
houses than by giving an account of this one in
particular. Like that in our plate, it had two
gables and several tall chimneys, and doubtless it
had been an ancient manor-house; the upper rooms
projected over the lower; but every appearance of
antiquity had been obliterated by a general white-
washing, from which only the roof and chimneys
had escaped. In front was a small, square garden,
enclosed in front by a row of white palings, with a
white grate in the centre. Close to this gate stood
a white horse-block, which enabled Dame Newman
to seat her round, plump figure upon a fat, solemn,
old, white horse, with a long mane and tail, the



THE FARM-HOUSE.

only parts of him which ever frisked, and who seemed
to look down upon the stout pony, ridden by the
farmer, with a sort of dignified contempt.

A straight gravel-walk led from the gate to the
house; and two grass-plats, with a bed in the mid-
dle of each, were filled with cabbage-roses, red stocks,
lilies, and hollyhocks. On the lower part of the
house were trained, roses, honeysuckles, and jasmine.

The front-door opened into a stone passage, and
the staircase was directly opposite. On the right-
hand side was the best parlour, the chairs and
tables of which were placed against the wall, the
latter having club-feet. A large fireplace was filled
with geeen boughs and dried flowers ; the tall chim-
ney-piece had on it tall China jars; the looking-
glass was decorated with peacock’s feathers; and
the beaufet in the corner contained some splendid
punch-bowls, and curious old glasses. On the floor
was a red and green carpet, not nailed to the boards,
because it was always shaken after using.

On the left side of the passage was the keeping-
room, as it was called, being neither more nor less
than a lofty, stone kitchen. The fireplace was so
ample that there was room for a bench on each

side by. the fire. Rows of hams, flitches cut in



THE FARM-HOUSE.

halves for convenience, pigs’ faces, tongues, and
dried herbs, hung upon the large beams, which
crossed each other on the ceiling. On one side
was an ample store-closet, with rows of pickles and
jams; crockeryware and bright pewter-plates deco-
rated shelves at the farther end; by the window
stood a round table, on which Mrs. Newman’s work-
basket was placed, and where Mr. Newman’s stock-
ings were most conspicuous. In a large kitchen
beyond were performed all the baking, boiling, and
roasting. The passage ended in a cellar, where
stood goodly rows of beer of all kinds, and home-
made wine. The bed-rooms, with their poimted
roofs, were decorated with white dimity ; and fresh-
ness and wholesomeness were the first considerations.

_ On quitting the house at the back, we entered
the kitchen-garden, stocked with currants, goose-
berries, apples, and cabbages, &c. Against a dead
wall were trained two ample pear-trees.

The internal arrangements of the house taught
the stranger what to expect in the farm-yard ; the
cool air rushing through the well-ventilated dairy,
where stood the pans of milk, with rich cream
at the top; the stores of butter, both potted and
fresh, the latter made up daintily into half pounds,



THE FARM-HOUSE.

stamped with a cow and Mrs. Newman’s initials,
as if the cow had been her own portrait; the very
white churns, the casks of pickled pork, were all there.
In the cheese-room, some cheeses were made of cream
for immediate use, others for market ; then the long,
low, cow-houses, where the “ wicked” Alderneys
stood with their legs tied, ready for the milking,
durmg which they always kicked if they could.
The genteel-looking piggery, where cleanliness was
evidently considered as good as half the keep; the
spacious barns, with pigeon-houses at the top; the
stables, where the numerous stalls afforded accom-
modation for teams of stately chesnut-horses, whose
harness, decorated with bells and fringe, was hung
up, opposite each owner’s division. The poultry-
yard and hen-houses, almost all deserted for the
ample stack-yard, where the saucy birds pulled out
the ears of corn. The wagon-sheds contained red
and blue wagons, and a taxed cart. The geese and
their young were feeding on a small common close
by, and the pond was well filled by ducks and duck-
lings, occasionally disturbed when the fat pony, and
some of the cows, after nibbling’ a little of the de-
licious hay put into a bin on purpose for them, came
to slake their thirst.



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PLOUGHING.

It is not always that such light horses as those m
our plate are used for the plough; they are gene-
rally those which drag the carts and wagons; but
Mr. Newman seems to have purchased a pair of old
carriage-horses, and is trying to make them perform
this duty; he stands there himself to superintend
their first trial; but, at other times, they are gene-
rally committed to a boy.

Bullocks are often employed for ploughing, even
in England; and in other countries the most dis-
similar animals are frequently yoked together. We
have heard of an ass and a pig conducting them-
selves very sedately on such occasions. To form
straight furrows and go deep enough, are the great
requisites for good ploughing; and it is a process
which brings to the surface a number of insects which
live beneath the soil, and they attract numerous
crows, which feed upon them. The smell of newly |
turned-up earth is said to be extremely wholesome ; ,
but most agricultural labours are so, unless they be
those which are carried on in marshy lands.



PLOUGHING.

Frequently land is ploughed without being in-
tended to bear a crop, and is thus laid open, be-
cause a portion of the nourishing materials in it has
been absorbed by previous crops; so it is left what 1s
called fallow, to regain some of them from the rain
and atmosphere; others are supplied by different
substances laid upon it, and what is called “ plough-
ing-in” takes place. In light land it is not a la-
borious task, but in the heavy loams it is hard
work; and we do not know any English pig that
mull continue the operation after making one fur-
row.

The man at the farther part of the field is sow-
ing, in the manner called “ broad-cast,” by which
he, with a half-circular motion of his arm, scatters
the seed far and near, and then the harrow, which
is a machine made of crossed bars of wood, and
thick iron spikes underneath, is dragged across, and
covers up the seed with the soil. There are many
other ways of putting the seed into the ground, so
many that we cannot here point them out, and
several of which are effected by machimery.







“HAY-MAKING.

As Mr. Newman goes: himself to the plough, we
cannot wonder that his sister or daughter, we do
not know which, is sent into the hayfield, and there
she stands, with her polka jacket, her loose sleeves,
and her broad-brimmed hat.

When the grass of the meadows or pastures,
which is often mixed with sweet-smelling herbs, is
to be allowed to grow, the sheep or cattle which
have been feeding’ on it are taken away, the en-
closures are shut up, the grass shoots forth, even as
high as three feet, and comes into blossom in June, or
thereabouts. The mowers with their shining scythes,
and whetstones stuck in their waistbands, come some
fine morning and cut it all down; they are followed
by men and women with pitch-forks, who spread it
out lightly, so that the sun may shine upon every
part, and the rakers, in the afternoon, gather it into
ridges. When it is sufficiently dry, it is tossed into
cocks, and then the fun of the hayfield begins. To
_knock these haycocks down, to roll upon them, to
cover each other with the hay, to sit upon them



HAY-MAKING,

with a book, and be lulled to sleep with the soothing
perfume, are enjoyments of which few are ignorant}
for even the inhabitants of London steal out to the
hayfields near Hampstead.

If a shower should come, a scamper ensues, and
the haycocks have to be again spread out; but at
last, when dry, the wagons enter the field, the hay
is lifted up into them with forks, and it is carried to
the owner’s yard to be stacked. Great care must
be taken to let it be quite dry before the stack is
thatched, or it will catch fire, and not only be itself
burnt, but set fire to its neighbours. To prevent
this, a large piece of sacking is often suspended
over the top of the stack, at a distance of two or
three yards, so as to admit the air; till at last, when
all danger is supposed to be over, the pointed top is
piled up, and a covering of straw put on. Notwith-
standing all these precautions, the hay sometimes
catches fire, and when cut for the cattle in the win-
ter, a black streak of ashes may be seen, which for-
tunately, for want of air, has only smouldered.







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REAPING.

WE will suppose the grain to have been sown, its
tender green blades to have peeped above the soil,
sometimes, in a warm early spring, a little faster
than will bear the blighting winds and frosts of
March and April; when a heavy roller has been
made to pass over and crush their heads to keep
them back: we will have laughed at the apprehen-
sions of the ever-grumbling farmer, and turning to
our plate, where the golden harvest is ripe, imagine
the reaping of the corn to have begun. This opera-
tion is performed by an instrument called a sickle,
which is a half-circle of iron, tapering at one end to.
a point, and the other fixed into a wooden handle.
The reaper takes the corn in one hand, and bringing
the sickle round it, cuts it off a few inches from the
ground, and laying it down, proceeds to a fresh
handful. He is followed by men, who make it up
into bundles called sheaves, fastened with a wisp
of straw, and these sheaves are set up obliquely, with
their heads touching each other, forming a group,
which is called a shock. When these are dry, they



REAPING.

are carted to the stack-yard, to be piled up and
thatched over ; and-when the last wagon-load issues
from the last field, it is generally decorated with
green boughs, and accompanied by the labourers,
who utter loud cheers.

As many ears of corn inevitably fees from the
hands of the men who tie up the sheaves, the poorer
villagers are allowed to gather them for themselves,
which is called gleaning’; a beautiful description of
which is to be found in the Bible, in the book of
Ruth, and in the pages of the poet Thomson. ‘The
Americans have invented a machine for reaping,
which supersedes human labour, but which has not
been tried in this country.

When the harvest is quite over, the farmer al-
ways gives a supper to those who have gathered it,
which is often attended by the gentry of the neigh-
bourhood, who generally sit round the upper part
of the table, while the farmer takes the bottom
amidst his men. All the rustics put on their best
attire, and some look a little abashed at the com-
panionship of the upper end ; all the stores of good
thing's are brought forward ; and the feast generally
ends with heartily singing “ God save the Queen.”



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THRESHING.

WHEN the corn is all gathered into the barns, or
packed into close, compact stacks, with straw roofs,
then it is gradually threshed. Our plate represents
this operation as performed by hand, when the
thresher makes use of a flail. It is formed of two
slender poles, the shorter of which is fastened to the
top of the longer by a leathern thong. He flings it
above his head, with a peculiar motion only to be
attained by practice, and brings down the shorter
piece upon the corn, with great force. A machine,
however, has been invented, which, when farmers
are anxious to get their corn soon to market, is hired
from the owner, and is taken from farm to farm.
It speedily does its work, but some say not as effec-
tually.

In olden times (and even now in eastern coun-
tries) the ground used to be beaten hard and smooth,
the space enclosed with strong railings, the corn
spread upon it, and bullocks made to tread the
grain from the husk. In the Steppes of Asia,
horses are driven into such an enclosure, fright-



THRESHING,

ened by shouts and gestures from those outside the
railing; and the more these animals rush about,
the more thoroughly is the object effected.

When threshed, the wheat, barley, rye, and oats
are winnowed, or separated from the husks, put
into sacks, and taken to market. In London is
a large place, where corn-merchants come from all
parts of the world; and to those who regularly
have stalls there, quantities of corn are entrusted
for sale; many ships from the Baltic and other
places being laden with the precious grain, to be
consumed in this country.





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HOP-PICKING.

AurnovuGH the vintage is one of the most beautiful
sights connected with the vegetable productions of
the earth; if we mistake not, hop-picking would be
equally so, if the dresses of the peasantry were
equally picturesque in England. It might not be
advisable for our people to expose their throats and
chests as those in the south do; but some of the
gay colours used by them would much enliven our
scenery.

The hop is said to have been brought to us by
the monks of former times, and there is an old
saying that,

Hops, pickerel,* and beer,
Came to England all in one year.

However this may be, they now grow wild in our
hedges ; and the young tops are much sought for
by country people; as, when boiled, they taste like
asparagus. The roots of those cultivated are set
at some distance from each other; and when the

* Pike.



HOP-PICKING.

climbing stem is sufficiently long ; tall, straight poles
are placed close by them, to which they cling.
Their blossom is of a pale’ green, hanging in clus-
ters, like bunches of. grapes, and beautifully con-
trasting with the dark, toothed leaves. It is from
these blossoms that we mostly derive the bitter
flavour of beer; but quassia and other substances
are often pabatituted for them.

When ‘the stamens of the flowers are covered
with their usual dust, the pole is taken up, the vines"
or stems are cut from the root, and the pole is
placed over a bin or a basket, for the flowers to
be picked off with the fingers, The air in the
neighbourhood of hop-grounds is so full of the fine
dust, that no one can go out without receiving its
taste upon the tongue.

Kent and Sussex are the principal hop coun-
ties, although they are grown elsewhere. They
are a very uncertain crop, being so liable to de-
struction from insects; and in consequence of this,
large sums of money até won or lost by their cul-
tivators and buyers. They are packed in bags, and
sent to market; are used for medicine, and form a
powerful means of producing sleep; they are also
used for making a yellow dye.



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LONDON: GRANT & GRIFFITH, ST, PAUL’S CHURCHYARD,


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THE

FARM AND ITS SCENES,

WITH

DESCRIPTIONS BY MRS. R. LEE,

AUTHOR OF THE “ AFRICAN WANDERERS,” “ ADVENTURES IN AUSTRALIA,”
“ ANECDOTES OF ANIMALS,” ETC.

AND
Six Pictures

FROM DRAWINGS BY HARRISON WEIR.

LONDON:
GRANT AND GRIFFITH,

(SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS, )

CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.



MDCCCLII.
CONTENTS.

THE FARM-HOUSE.
PLOUGHING.
HAY-MAKING.
REAPING,
THRESHING.
HOP-PICKING.
THE FARM-HOUSE.

A WELL-ORDERED and well-kept farm-house, with
all that belongs to the operations of farming’ sur-
rounding it, is perhaps the highest picture of com-
fort and wholesome enjoyment that the world can
produce. As we write these words, recollections of
one of these establishments, often visited by us in
our youth, rise before us; and we cannot offer a
better description of the generality of English farm-
houses than by giving an account of this one in
particular. Like that in our plate, it had two
gables and several tall chimneys, and doubtless it
had been an ancient manor-house; the upper rooms
projected over the lower; but every appearance of
antiquity had been obliterated by a general white-
washing, from which only the roof and chimneys
had escaped. In front was a small, square garden,
enclosed in front by a row of white palings, with a
white grate in the centre. Close to this gate stood
a white horse-block, which enabled Dame Newman
to seat her round, plump figure upon a fat, solemn,
old, white horse, with a long mane and tail, the
THE FARM-HOUSE.

only parts of him which ever frisked, and who seemed
to look down upon the stout pony, ridden by the
farmer, with a sort of dignified contempt.

A straight gravel-walk led from the gate to the
house; and two grass-plats, with a bed in the mid-
dle of each, were filled with cabbage-roses, red stocks,
lilies, and hollyhocks. On the lower part of the
house were trained, roses, honeysuckles, and jasmine.

The front-door opened into a stone passage, and
the staircase was directly opposite. On the right-
hand side was the best parlour, the chairs and
tables of which were placed against the wall, the
latter having club-feet. A large fireplace was filled
with geeen boughs and dried flowers ; the tall chim-
ney-piece had on it tall China jars; the looking-
glass was decorated with peacock’s feathers; and
the beaufet in the corner contained some splendid
punch-bowls, and curious old glasses. On the floor
was a red and green carpet, not nailed to the boards,
because it was always shaken after using.

On the left side of the passage was the keeping-
room, as it was called, being neither more nor less
than a lofty, stone kitchen. The fireplace was so
ample that there was room for a bench on each

side by. the fire. Rows of hams, flitches cut in
THE FARM-HOUSE.

halves for convenience, pigs’ faces, tongues, and
dried herbs, hung upon the large beams, which
crossed each other on the ceiling. On one side
was an ample store-closet, with rows of pickles and
jams; crockeryware and bright pewter-plates deco-
rated shelves at the farther end; by the window
stood a round table, on which Mrs. Newman’s work-
basket was placed, and where Mr. Newman’s stock-
ings were most conspicuous. In a large kitchen
beyond were performed all the baking, boiling, and
roasting. The passage ended in a cellar, where
stood goodly rows of beer of all kinds, and home-
made wine. The bed-rooms, with their poimted
roofs, were decorated with white dimity ; and fresh-
ness and wholesomeness were the first considerations.

_ On quitting the house at the back, we entered
the kitchen-garden, stocked with currants, goose-
berries, apples, and cabbages, &c. Against a dead
wall were trained two ample pear-trees.

The internal arrangements of the house taught
the stranger what to expect in the farm-yard ; the
cool air rushing through the well-ventilated dairy,
where stood the pans of milk, with rich cream
at the top; the stores of butter, both potted and
fresh, the latter made up daintily into half pounds,
THE FARM-HOUSE.

stamped with a cow and Mrs. Newman’s initials,
as if the cow had been her own portrait; the very
white churns, the casks of pickled pork, were all there.
In the cheese-room, some cheeses were made of cream
for immediate use, others for market ; then the long,
low, cow-houses, where the “ wicked” Alderneys
stood with their legs tied, ready for the milking,
durmg which they always kicked if they could.
The genteel-looking piggery, where cleanliness was
evidently considered as good as half the keep; the
spacious barns, with pigeon-houses at the top; the
stables, where the numerous stalls afforded accom-
modation for teams of stately chesnut-horses, whose
harness, decorated with bells and fringe, was hung
up, opposite each owner’s division. The poultry-
yard and hen-houses, almost all deserted for the
ample stack-yard, where the saucy birds pulled out
the ears of corn. The wagon-sheds contained red
and blue wagons, and a taxed cart. The geese and
their young were feeding on a small common close
by, and the pond was well filled by ducks and duck-
lings, occasionally disturbed when the fat pony, and
some of the cows, after nibbling’ a little of the de-
licious hay put into a bin on purpose for them, came
to slake their thirst.
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PLOUGHING.

It is not always that such light horses as those m
our plate are used for the plough; they are gene-
rally those which drag the carts and wagons; but
Mr. Newman seems to have purchased a pair of old
carriage-horses, and is trying to make them perform
this duty; he stands there himself to superintend
their first trial; but, at other times, they are gene-
rally committed to a boy.

Bullocks are often employed for ploughing, even
in England; and in other countries the most dis-
similar animals are frequently yoked together. We
have heard of an ass and a pig conducting them-
selves very sedately on such occasions. To form
straight furrows and go deep enough, are the great
requisites for good ploughing; and it is a process
which brings to the surface a number of insects which
live beneath the soil, and they attract numerous
crows, which feed upon them. The smell of newly |
turned-up earth is said to be extremely wholesome ; ,
but most agricultural labours are so, unless they be
those which are carried on in marshy lands.
PLOUGHING.

Frequently land is ploughed without being in-
tended to bear a crop, and is thus laid open, be-
cause a portion of the nourishing materials in it has
been absorbed by previous crops; so it is left what 1s
called fallow, to regain some of them from the rain
and atmosphere; others are supplied by different
substances laid upon it, and what is called “ plough-
ing-in” takes place. In light land it is not a la-
borious task, but in the heavy loams it is hard
work; and we do not know any English pig that
mull continue the operation after making one fur-
row.

The man at the farther part of the field is sow-
ing, in the manner called “ broad-cast,” by which
he, with a half-circular motion of his arm, scatters
the seed far and near, and then the harrow, which
is a machine made of crossed bars of wood, and
thick iron spikes underneath, is dragged across, and
covers up the seed with the soil. There are many
other ways of putting the seed into the ground, so
many that we cannot here point them out, and
several of which are effected by machimery.

“HAY-MAKING.

As Mr. Newman goes: himself to the plough, we
cannot wonder that his sister or daughter, we do
not know which, is sent into the hayfield, and there
she stands, with her polka jacket, her loose sleeves,
and her broad-brimmed hat.

When the grass of the meadows or pastures,
which is often mixed with sweet-smelling herbs, is
to be allowed to grow, the sheep or cattle which
have been feeding’ on it are taken away, the en-
closures are shut up, the grass shoots forth, even as
high as three feet, and comes into blossom in June, or
thereabouts. The mowers with their shining scythes,
and whetstones stuck in their waistbands, come some
fine morning and cut it all down; they are followed
by men and women with pitch-forks, who spread it
out lightly, so that the sun may shine upon every
part, and the rakers, in the afternoon, gather it into
ridges. When it is sufficiently dry, it is tossed into
cocks, and then the fun of the hayfield begins. To
_knock these haycocks down, to roll upon them, to
cover each other with the hay, to sit upon them
HAY-MAKING,

with a book, and be lulled to sleep with the soothing
perfume, are enjoyments of which few are ignorant}
for even the inhabitants of London steal out to the
hayfields near Hampstead.

If a shower should come, a scamper ensues, and
the haycocks have to be again spread out; but at
last, when dry, the wagons enter the field, the hay
is lifted up into them with forks, and it is carried to
the owner’s yard to be stacked. Great care must
be taken to let it be quite dry before the stack is
thatched, or it will catch fire, and not only be itself
burnt, but set fire to its neighbours. To prevent
this, a large piece of sacking is often suspended
over the top of the stack, at a distance of two or
three yards, so as to admit the air; till at last, when
all danger is supposed to be over, the pointed top is
piled up, and a covering of straw put on. Notwith-
standing all these precautions, the hay sometimes
catches fire, and when cut for the cattle in the win-
ter, a black streak of ashes may be seen, which for-
tunately, for want of air, has only smouldered.




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REAPING.

WE will suppose the grain to have been sown, its
tender green blades to have peeped above the soil,
sometimes, in a warm early spring, a little faster
than will bear the blighting winds and frosts of
March and April; when a heavy roller has been
made to pass over and crush their heads to keep
them back: we will have laughed at the apprehen-
sions of the ever-grumbling farmer, and turning to
our plate, where the golden harvest is ripe, imagine
the reaping of the corn to have begun. This opera-
tion is performed by an instrument called a sickle,
which is a half-circle of iron, tapering at one end to.
a point, and the other fixed into a wooden handle.
The reaper takes the corn in one hand, and bringing
the sickle round it, cuts it off a few inches from the
ground, and laying it down, proceeds to a fresh
handful. He is followed by men, who make it up
into bundles called sheaves, fastened with a wisp
of straw, and these sheaves are set up obliquely, with
their heads touching each other, forming a group,
which is called a shock. When these are dry, they
REAPING.

are carted to the stack-yard, to be piled up and
thatched over ; and-when the last wagon-load issues
from the last field, it is generally decorated with
green boughs, and accompanied by the labourers,
who utter loud cheers.

As many ears of corn inevitably fees from the
hands of the men who tie up the sheaves, the poorer
villagers are allowed to gather them for themselves,
which is called gleaning’; a beautiful description of
which is to be found in the Bible, in the book of
Ruth, and in the pages of the poet Thomson. ‘The
Americans have invented a machine for reaping,
which supersedes human labour, but which has not
been tried in this country.

When the harvest is quite over, the farmer al-
ways gives a supper to those who have gathered it,
which is often attended by the gentry of the neigh-
bourhood, who generally sit round the upper part
of the table, while the farmer takes the bottom
amidst his men. All the rustics put on their best
attire, and some look a little abashed at the com-
panionship of the upper end ; all the stores of good
thing's are brought forward ; and the feast generally
ends with heartily singing “ God save the Queen.”
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THRESHING.

WHEN the corn is all gathered into the barns, or
packed into close, compact stacks, with straw roofs,
then it is gradually threshed. Our plate represents
this operation as performed by hand, when the
thresher makes use of a flail. It is formed of two
slender poles, the shorter of which is fastened to the
top of the longer by a leathern thong. He flings it
above his head, with a peculiar motion only to be
attained by practice, and brings down the shorter
piece upon the corn, with great force. A machine,
however, has been invented, which, when farmers
are anxious to get their corn soon to market, is hired
from the owner, and is taken from farm to farm.
It speedily does its work, but some say not as effec-
tually.

In olden times (and even now in eastern coun-
tries) the ground used to be beaten hard and smooth,
the space enclosed with strong railings, the corn
spread upon it, and bullocks made to tread the
grain from the husk. In the Steppes of Asia,
horses are driven into such an enclosure, fright-
THRESHING,

ened by shouts and gestures from those outside the
railing; and the more these animals rush about,
the more thoroughly is the object effected.

When threshed, the wheat, barley, rye, and oats
are winnowed, or separated from the husks, put
into sacks, and taken to market. In London is
a large place, where corn-merchants come from all
parts of the world; and to those who regularly
have stalls there, quantities of corn are entrusted
for sale; many ships from the Baltic and other
places being laden with the precious grain, to be
consumed in this country.


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HOP-PICKING.

AurnovuGH the vintage is one of the most beautiful
sights connected with the vegetable productions of
the earth; if we mistake not, hop-picking would be
equally so, if the dresses of the peasantry were
equally picturesque in England. It might not be
advisable for our people to expose their throats and
chests as those in the south do; but some of the
gay colours used by them would much enliven our
scenery.

The hop is said to have been brought to us by
the monks of former times, and there is an old
saying that,

Hops, pickerel,* and beer,
Came to England all in one year.

However this may be, they now grow wild in our
hedges ; and the young tops are much sought for
by country people; as, when boiled, they taste like
asparagus. The roots of those cultivated are set
at some distance from each other; and when the

* Pike.
HOP-PICKING.

climbing stem is sufficiently long ; tall, straight poles
are placed close by them, to which they cling.
Their blossom is of a pale’ green, hanging in clus-
ters, like bunches of. grapes, and beautifully con-
trasting with the dark, toothed leaves. It is from
these blossoms that we mostly derive the bitter
flavour of beer; but quassia and other substances
are often pabatituted for them.

When ‘the stamens of the flowers are covered
with their usual dust, the pole is taken up, the vines"
or stems are cut from the root, and the pole is
placed over a bin or a basket, for the flowers to
be picked off with the fingers, The air in the
neighbourhood of hop-grounds is so full of the fine
dust, that no one can go out without receiving its
taste upon the tongue.

Kent and Sussex are the principal hop coun-
ties, although they are grown elsewhere. They
are a very uncertain crop, being so liable to de-
struction from insects; and in consequence of this,
large sums of money até won or lost by their cul-
tivators and buyers. They are packed in bags, and
sent to market; are used for medicine, and form a
powerful means of producing sleep; they are also
used for making a yellow dye.
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| By the same Author.

FANNY AND HER MAMMA;; or, Lessons for Children. In
which it is attempted to bring Scriptural Principles into Daily Practice.
Illustrated by J. Ginsert. 16mo, price 3s. 6d. cloth ; 4s. 6d. coloured.

SHORT AND SIMPLE PRAYERS, for the Use of Young

Children. With Hymns. Second Edition, Square 16mo, price 1s. 6d.
cloth.

MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES, for her Little Boys and Girls.
Seventh Edition. With Twelve Engravings. Price 3s. 6d. cloth.

A SEQUEL TO MAMMA’S BIBLE STORIES. Third Edition.
Twelve Engravings. Price 3s. 6d. cloth.

ELEMENTARY FRENCH WORKS.
LES JEUNES NARRATEURS;; ou, Petits Contes Moraux:

with a Key to the difficult words and phrases. By MARIN DE LA VoyeE.
18mo. With Frontispiece. Price 2s. cloth.

LE BABILLARD; an amusing Introduction to the French
Language. By a Frencu Lapy. Fourth Edition. With Sixteen En-
gravings.

THE PICTORIAL FRENCH GRAMMAR, for the use of

Children. By M.pE 1a Vore. With Eighty Illustrations. Royal 16mo,
price 2s. illuminated cloth.

THE FRENCH WORD AND PHRASE BOOK, containing a
Select Vocabulary in English and French. By W. A. BELLENGER. New
Edition. Price 1s. sewed. |





























Price 6d. Plain, \=
ls. Coloured.

—_— 0-—

BRITISH ANIMALS,
With Seven Pictures.

THE DIVERTING

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By =|

With Six Pictures.
BRITISH BIRDS,

WITH

Seven Pictures.

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LEVEY, ROESON, AND FRANKLYN, | [GREAT NEW STREET, FETPER DANES







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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'2011-11-10T10:52:12-05:00'
describe
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describe
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'2011-11-10T10:51:37-05:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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3d6de0aad5d8ca66315cde686184fffb85d95fe5
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
9e852154aba016b59a4646deb437f757
a19ac8e75431cc9211903c1e28ecbd304b526f85
'2011-11-10T10:52:45-05:00'
describe
'8919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
c19f897a1e0a448412a246bfe6dc2023
a8ac17ce7fe8671f90c2adaf8f8b12741e4fc92a
describe
'1543368' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECU' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
f358b0a5f30b8f004fdbd6dd956d7e96
ecc3d20874109d4844fc8ae562baa5d38011a86a
'2011-11-10T10:51:56-05:00'
describe
'103634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECV' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
f363894a1c3fdac88314234cd03e30d5
2adbc4c1c0f5cbed6a1b167bc67949322789a7e4
describe
'28030' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECW' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
3feeb52bb3847809718fdce25d827eb2
85236b513f43a15d96b13358416605c6357dd81f
describe
'37062008' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECX' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c11d6797b9ed6e48cfd04d6f9edaca04
d1b78ada2c3f4eb86b6b21ca7d326badc0e1200d
'2011-11-10T10:52:56-05:00'
describe
'7955' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECY' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
7ebaf0059a9b1418cc470c7a2df28e70
a684218b1901977c81247d7a379fd654594d39f3
describe
'1446655' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAECZ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
cd6d22f40b2831ec3015bf10f7c7e1da
48081f16205ad364b2cca66dc92f94caf6626a11
describe
'101118' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDA' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
1b1d80e8dc3980159fe061cd671cf638
bc963566ef524cba02b310e0a3a55a1d42202224
'2011-11-10T10:52:35-05:00'
describe
'27765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDB' 'sip-files00014.pro'
74e2959171238eef513019f74fc2f28d
b50c31a6db3b38bf4b29bc7172fca6802ea89116
'2011-11-10T10:51:48-05:00'
describe
'35118' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDC' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
41796a439663d1ea5d34c08369b1743f
74a035b6099282b2a2cb95621e2acf7b925c8449
'2011-11-10T10:51:44-05:00'
describe
'11596544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDD' 'sip-files00014.tif'
3ff29fe088279ecef20aac77589c2ddc
97d58084d2d15545b1837613a98d4dd14368a6fe
'2011-11-10T10:52:47-05:00'
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDE' 'sip-files00014.txt'
0c43032dff0521d27daa524a61a22e8d
b0fa0074b7dcb7de863e58073199b5618b54a950
describe
'9127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDF' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
3058e23c646fb1189ae0d037e190f7a0
ad196f6236d387e4c6e9b23caa923e66217a54e1
'2011-11-10T10:52:01-05:00'
describe
'1414380' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
b23527795450f1dc39b55cc17ca2fd35
9528c83435601bcdb954c43fc73b435a25428063
describe
'104031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDH' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c320f26b0202b513ffbd49f88a66f134
7626e0efa02b6179f971dcfb7841c78586f6c2c7
describe
'28172' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDI' 'sip-files00015.pro'
18db9a6c63c57b03b666497f9ab82e6f
edf21183c392d3324891d4f98fa86362beaa5968
describe
'37402' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDJ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
5506ab7b3ef987018d9b17b5d8bf53a1
577f289c7005d990382adf7feefa2f81df0c24be
describe
'11339092' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0800571917abc12967dbe6c438750187
59a4442d90c82f9aa125f28d7557c3a63a97696e
'2011-11-10T10:52:57-05:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
dc6cffe2e9b183cb5cbef901685bb36f
ed0ad46199d4097a728ba0710310ec56f491a035
'2011-11-10T10:51:53-05:00'
describe
'9844' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDM' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
8eaadbbae26c700186dd953e50a7cdb4
d517d31ae5fd2b20511cdfd96f5cdf0514d136e4
'2011-11-10T10:52:40-05:00'
describe
'1548824' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDN' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
4d1f187891bad459695e0fbdc781138f
2f52df412331762313c3f7046c5768b0d7d09658
'2011-11-10T10:52:20-05:00'
describe
'90521' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDO' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
4c5290e5f699f8ef9c58968716ab72fb
440eb91f63681b9adf52f446396034431969af92
describe
'24236' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
fc9fe267c6278cb0e5698d6dbec3aabe
818a5f91d7eed3246947a1193c510a509cfa99fe
describe
'37191696' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDQ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4cda019a2bcb2a191dbe85cf5bd5bbb0
dd9de8bb905ea03ccbd240e98e49ee3098dcc57a
'2011-11-10T10:52:29-05:00'
describe
'7016' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDR' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d23819334c65faa05173fa89ec180ba8
9c983f3d13155cd64d562dcd0af1bab680a77d13
describe
'1446627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDS' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6e81026d633534309540e836913b1c1a
422e6103363092f0ca2207c0e06c36c33df74d36
describe
'99900' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDT' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
e4675e7b75358bf86f7e3c5a8006a7ac
3a691083586efffd90f8bf0dfe66a49fd9375019
'2011-11-10T10:51:33-05:00'
describe
'28330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDU' 'sip-files00018.pro'
84cb80cd2b8c5a28544cb04b69404944
a5e887031488a4363a599597150677edbf57e2b9
'2011-11-10T10:51:32-05:00'
describe
'34956' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDV' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a6aaf1b64df856a62637a0af824655ba
4f63b5f2a2a17c3f8daabb8ee2a2a2cdf99a4ba5
'2011-11-10T10:51:36-05:00'
describe
'11596256' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
deef7f0f2faa71bd9ffcd052ee696b22
95728f9bb5ecaf31ae98b67e52dae2c148c39613
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDX' 'sip-files00018.txt'
467d25ccee892046cf55f96d2f6d140a
b61ef95df247837f75cd395b37c5883b9f50f91b
'2011-11-10T10:52:43-05:00'
describe
'8724' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDY' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
505604a89ab7e9e64264badfa92fbee3
0e0804fabbae41ba53c983ceb605075527de3b9e
describe
'1414389' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEDZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
80a6b97deaae2641c55f1761fa493728
a4a13dc38ca1d56b7f3410bd04e068414e4b879a
describe
'110863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
45e58b3cf8afe2d8e24da48796b7879c
0d0a4fee6ca687d5870a7b0fd8e7ec7a9b0a9f4b
'2011-11-10T10:51:31-05:00'
describe
'30518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEB' 'sip-files00019.pro'
249e8666d4ad33042e9468192ba92174
0818577d07eb80a8939a8a0e2e26641133e5860e
'2011-11-10T10:51:34-05:00'
describe
'38999' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEC' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
2a3b0a7b429cb0806f09825c21921c92
29a4c88fe3307a0b02342fc6f87f731298e37a00
describe
'11339220' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEED' 'sip-files00019.tif'
37e06e1350297294662baa95f7d0e0a4
adf13ca51bec800f27bc8dce539ccff8afc565eb
'2011-11-10T10:52:41-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEE' 'sip-files00019.txt'
6bf77f20eec64812a1630f7a99ee9d8b
03ac73e433504246f55d8288ce40d3a27a224279
describe
'10324' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEF' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
3ef680c10db8b9dccaf0390f0b76faee
bc4d1b62132579876aeee7430adfb895e5566d25
describe
'1555253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
80ec8e7b3cf9ecf62c166e8750204253
c5b7c115ff170769cf74864dace059dcda05c316
describe
'88039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
8f3cc741f51c9b15b4e5f33f579b78be
df44a231801c80c8b4c951f9eb480d2176c065fa
describe
'23124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d3af56702c0ed80fdf76968d6169b134
e70996db89523b9a504e0295ab24c12d753f14f2
describe
'37345612' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ead18154b6bf37613cc7f51e3e9c8871
38827d5c2861d652751422788b7a1ae9640ebe79
describe
'6548' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEK' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
dbaeb47500d7e1a255f5fac076491bf0
a1d8f967a5bdde161767a27df29a31248d529a62
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEL' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
5f87b394393ec68d22ce79cfaef2b81e
d60af7c49a66ff0d4eb263eefd64e87523d27b2e
'2011-11-10T10:52:58-05:00'
describe
'95878' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEM' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
5ba9057131e86d6cb9a19a4188542852
af17f881d617ccbc8d092eae6348f0e1d184ca48
describe
'27013' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEN' 'sip-files00022.pro'
27030a4752a5bbd7cd3cfe1da0495119
d728ebaf61baba1105a89465fbf387ab7d516be0
'2011-11-10T10:52:44-05:00'
describe
'35629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEO' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
92c3c86ff1c77f8e306178d2d3d6306a
20c9424616295ddea1098c7992b6251cc9873b56
describe
'11596292' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEP' 'sip-files00022.tif'
d28abd773646821deb9dede8ca8c0982
231e59c0a6c41e1c1f9de268022650e9b253a38f
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEQ' 'sip-files00022.txt'
df6f74529c95ad3c8e739fb8e9e5c782
d7197b86181605d41850f26f0f0ebe548fdca73a
'2011-11-10T10:52:24-05:00'
describe
'8907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEER' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
56187af3297c94ca73abda8bd5994500
29b091841421bff47f8f6306430e07f021cbcd4e
describe
'1414322' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEES' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
2008886f4ef769e0bfe4e6f5e4baedf4
4ba1771fa525c33c70c6a36921581d5d1b912faf
describe
'67730' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEET' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
50d2727f35def41ba912b10d9d1cfa4f
f1919fa1ccc6ef6e4206a6500fc27bb4cb7e52db
describe
'14900' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
43a889eef899196045b1128b8e33f1cf
151cbd48ca163dde079e6ccaf209a70551c2494e
describe
'22904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEV' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
32b94a8d54050db6074e7865c3eeeed4
9b91857311e8653621006e1e36bda97fd5da273d
describe
'11336492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEW' 'sip-files00023.tif'
f6c2ded052af80d7451c047f0b98e6a1
17d04b76dbb339dc49047c053ab5f4ef2e6b908f
describe
'609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEX' 'sip-files00023.txt'
62289802a4e5dbc225e73de2faf7517d
13f71f995355df80e20ff35bb1d709cf4aeb9d19
describe
'6316' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEY' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
67a068a18e8d2bd4e44bec084ae77d9e
e3b91244cb927f9e6cd6e5050f3aca272d5a925a
describe
'1555203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEEZ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
c867630311b837e95b55e9771de44cad
55ca574e6113b0dc696ea095cc47074d3bcdd341
'2011-11-10T10:52:32-05:00'
describe
'95848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFA' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d0ce7e0b6b387365192c09f8ebca0c13
4f37cddeebe3479361088722a9dbb392447a9ccf
'2011-11-10T10:52:23-05:00'
describe
'26170' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFB' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
b8a1f7adb6aed755c3f55af3149c67db
10569671bf3b5f148eae6b5dacebcbf0afa577dc
describe
'37345524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
5ca40cc2aef93b1d43386de45780cb92
a8c5329f95ffd5db079613e734435b8e0cbb5453
'2011-11-10T10:52:26-05:00'
describe
'7553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFD' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
76a99bcdd1ad7d8a38a276c4befffd27
bc0ab7ac7552a974adf9da02f5dda3fa6ca89a24
describe
'1446657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFE' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
e65d024c6fb7ddbfcb242880183316ab
adeb9b0e8f20b16c5550e75a02a8686eff1a791c
'2011-11-10T10:52:50-05:00'
describe
'85554' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFF' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
c469aed4fc94bd4274b539b072884edd
6d6a4d4341e624313fef6d3296899e3f76b54837
describe
'22203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFG' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0ec64480cbd9389b9b228b9626014094
15afa18797a20d93b455046fe9289bb032d923f4
describe
'29270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d2a24211cb663ad474769f855e6fd43c
03c4dbda33848e7520618c30bfaba571abd35325
describe
'11595692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFI' 'sip-files00026.tif'
f66426ad7a781820fca3313e3493a8ad
bd4aeea838ded009320c971330f263a63bf3eeb6
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFJ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
0731a20365908166fbe7cd1f78834346
5885782c6fb4cb9899bf21a0e4d67318ff876107
describe
'7948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e34c8edd3a815f8e69d206c4a5ff5e92
83330f31246a062e6be7d5403740fabab9bcd587
describe
'1414393' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
edebf10adbe1ebeb3aafe625122142aa
e596dddaf7bfa0a1c8af45a2c68685def300417b
describe
'114386' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFM' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0ee83ae3869428e5c8f15150f5673d85
e16a6c47922b3e72e3ef119b3f2d7e6c63b4fed7
'2011-11-10T10:51:42-05:00'
describe
'31293' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFN' 'sip-files00027.pro'
d5d6d51ac38e36903979984be0b48b76
e7b24e310bdeaa35274be23321440419f372f2fe
describe
'40939' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFO' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
8ec69e137bd1424221f0677eff04dd97
ef665d50d37577334966639d902fda4393cb1c35
describe
'11339632' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFP' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b3824eaa0be0743ad1b51d2214e0ba8d
f7f6c4ab221541461ca3c3a2f1fd22ffca82a11c
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFQ' 'sip-files00027.txt'
5436d12c972766485f6a17654ed774cc
0511af460a97b6102abe0ec5956b00ba345c24a1
describe
'10881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFR' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
62f92835b4cfa958a59150eedb904235
e5d4c2763e76c7b3260e8ce415d65119f9102673
describe
'1400104' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFS' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
cc3cf88c2feb4fc85fbbe9cb893642b9
77d4aff9b6761ffec3248f689f33688f91d3d4be
describe
'87942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFT' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
cff871451d4b1344bbc04873e005367e
a830b2a6a8b5849111b01c3bbe0f04be6f9ec6dc
describe
'28379' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFU' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2374ffd5709eff8595a4bc9a97f5263e
e44d20283a7229680b5c76ea60c662993d59124d
describe
'30691' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFV' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2111c2f918be6c3acab8ad349256c8cb
49025e2899e04eba0022e0322ed7d9d1d6163a84
describe
'11223508' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFW' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ae4b5c7445c3e092d8a85d476460a921
2f11e67a3ce90d0bd47e5f37dcfd193885c18925
'2011-11-10T10:52:05-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFX' 'sip-files00028.txt'
e4f7d3a4670cbc33128998698e34c035
78ba9962524bc97d06488bf88968d66295a8b0b3
describe
'8235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFY' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2f44233d814a901e5cfe9bfefe8731a7
da6800504c6adcda77cb3e2f4d9183db9143b166
'2011-11-10T10:52:37-05:00'
describe
'1392101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEFZ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
619d172ddeaba6d575b026f32eb3bfeb
972ce55844195d2442c60c062dfe92ee5c835683
describe
'104073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGA' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
47107875270f2e06f3b3d08dfc4b9a1c
9a23fd88638f7662aec2c8d7c5531e2aaaeeb76c
describe
'39599' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGB' 'sip-files00029.pro'
0afda535aabbcd63794165cc62753687
af7548aa9db5a0ac16200119c9695cb17b719931
describe
'34065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGC' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
07987c5fbbcd40c1bfc946176fa189c5
6456e1b1d04d5162df180b2a9a55b38cd48618e2
describe
'11160768' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGD' 'sip-files00029.tif'
936a1de7c6b20e11258dba8cf2d630bc
7db5505e557a98c1e4b8b1d39331a644e7400070
'2011-11-10T10:51:29-05:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
68a19f60626619cedf8d0e2895c1a128
fd308a72d8861c0abba4d38eb89f324e082c66ce
'2011-11-10T10:52:39-05:00'
describe
'9462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGF' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
9bbeff486e815492a88d2b69bf45afeb
186be12d4ae7dc92cdcc26e6098418907f8447f0
describe
'1355518' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGG' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ee9990de9ab1c5c4a25ca64a5f8e0e69
84a43b8e85f9aab5a6af9232c09492915cb7808c
describe
'107806' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
9b29b1b8073709a8d5232a0bce42b430
a71710512b77ef89a32178781516c65579f89ba0
describe
'41038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGI' 'sip-files00030.pro'
2923b3c323f1f8bcdbe92c7c84fb8fbd
241e19c6898eba0bb1a5b6215eb4601ef3f7fd66
describe
'35131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGJ' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
ba6bdd89ca9f4910334ad6a535019dec
5aa396ad51ddbd6e9f175309e9e7d3cfd34a3927
describe
'10868312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGK' 'sip-files00030.tif'
fed457f245d453614189c0677c72716f
1d6a4388c602fd7d4b38b9f5c5535212f5b07b6b
'2011-11-10T10:52:31-05:00'
describe
'1715' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGL' 'sip-files00030.txt'
17970cb2789fedbe697d08fdf1f8d992
cd123d8d942cf8ed60d709f1863c95775798f2ce
describe
'10107' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGM' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
41628481f3f3ea380e47886b894417fd
3bfbe490f41a7ecc977a3d3e121636e231a9460e
describe
'1452992' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGN' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
dff5d57b6ef7611c93133553ff841387
dc17a0e645411610e11d04c114d30338f78de0af
'2011-11-10T10:52:21-05:00'
describe
'111729' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGO' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6e21d3f0d1818d235879be5e535735f4
de8875d814fac0c1574bd78f37c36e5b27ff3741
describe
'40226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGP' 'sip-files00031.pro'
c140453673417bd38e1b11b59bbb2aa8
a6888ecb3ca1601d2f8f52dc332d3ac0454d193a
describe
'37677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGQ' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
780a898e330449618f224fcf54ae4fd0
c1ce81bb2ec8b664348947436d958b6eba7b6fc5
describe
'11647072' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGR' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7c89f06411d8428187d778076af73161
a91e60717752fec1a45402cd6fffcc04b042dfff
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGS' 'sip-files00031.txt'
608b0697564efc3f51f97d38a1585c08
4a6b6a5e624f4b43de693d9979c4a596ff418760
describe
'9858' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGT' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
255ead45b6583bd6ef32851852d18822
cff1e2f9dd16a7293e0f0c295115a913f567265b
describe
'1519590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGU' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
bcf592519390546396cfbf612f366659
6b2c60d315a25221bfb227aa28b6494fb8d33ffd
describe
'31101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGV' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
3e37c4bf4184ca2ee2a65da642fa03b7
c8538ddc8192830f2bf53c5b571bf96c7ef5849a
describe
'7671' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
1c2ee09ac281a242fb25dafa116093aa
625ec5f5cca80df66a1f2ce9dbbe3db7844aabfd
describe
'12176600' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
4546810e2a37a8fb9dda8d57d1700ba8
b088871bea3624c80b892adb772e4044d4d62dfa
describe
'2225' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
79eb06c4461b7e3c3c4798d3e0ea1856
ae8dc7bede5e0d28fd1c4c766604362f7454942f
describe
'1642902' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEGZ' 'sip-filesback4.jp2'
06557e3b0691a1b504d18ea692fd1446
19f44a5fada92aab450643cba1ee8262aaa2612a
describe
'161564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHA' 'sip-filesback4.jpg'
9fa8916fb16d83400102debdce183fd5
8d6fb4b7110f672b3d400b612c545f74549462b3
describe
'5505' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHB' 'sip-filesback4.pro'
46799b42b80a10eb03fa8b9e015b8bd0
fc1d76fa81c0a4edf98e3c23aa2830269157ec84
describe
'43692' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHC' 'sip-filesback4.QC.jpg'
0af73a56744100b21ae70b965c476d0f
342533a4ee823c4ca9f6d880f2f8a1db7577d204
describe
'39432788' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHD' 'sip-filesback4.tif'
e57a48f6e52493e57da8a594a2e45fd4
570ce7ec692f33d983ffb5bc80fba64ee7dbb0ad
describe
'345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHE' 'sip-filesback4.txt'
fd3c57a2025f0045f69244c46b327da9
88a3bd6edfdee4f3812d71c10c05de2e8a8070f2
describe
'11062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHF' 'sip-filesback4thm.jpg'
ecce7f00eb99fe6d6a0f7552a8d9f9b5
7ed7ee2dfbbd442c29c222445597981bd657434c
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHG' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
bb9b05077163ca2b5c9f104631beb604
c64d1546c66645f5e2a13b811baa34ed628c153a
describe
'53427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHH' 'sip-filesUF00002227_00001.mets'
03aab70893d57f78d5948bd6eb65d087
332ea753c558f56d924e1a59202cd10fa17d8c3b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T02:20:03-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'66336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAADQfileF20080922_AAAEHK' 'sip-filesUF00002227_00001.xml'
2dfd02f5985acced248ce990c0772290
80a6ce38d9918b063fc63c020f10b2a852b978b2
describe
xml resolution