Citation
Marco Paul's voyages & travels

Material Information

Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels : Maine
Series Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels
Added title page title:
Marco Paul in the forests of Maine
Added title page title:
Forests of Maine
Added title page title:
Maine
Creator:
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879 ( Author, Primary )
Doepler, Carl Emil, 1824-1905 ( Illustrator )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Bobbett & Edmonds ( Engraver )
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Harper and Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
191 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Responsibility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Forests and forestry -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Maine ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1852 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Title-page, illustrations engraved by Bobbett & Edmonds after C.E. Dopler.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob Abbott.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026784797 ( ALEPH )
04102881 ( OCLC )
ALH0739 ( NOTIS )
22017361 ( LCCN )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

E20080530_AAAAAO.xml

UF00002225_00001.pdf

UF00002225_00001.txt

00006.txt

00026.txt

00047.txt

00080.txt

00058.txt

00105.txt

00060.txt

00054.txt

00092.txt

E20080530_AAAAAO_xml.txt

00051.txt

00177.txt

00055.txt

00061.txt

00153.txt

00162.txt

00137.txt

00183.txt

00067.txt

00142.txt

00181.txt

00037.txt

00033.txt

00100.txt

00096.txt

00145.txt

00108.txt

00174.txt

00062.txt

00002.txt

00112.txt

00146.txt

00076.txt

00057.txt

00148.txt

00182.txt

00158.txt

00087.txt

00066.txt

00186.txt

00073.txt

00075.txt

00007.txt

00127.txt

00027.txt

00063.txt

00114.txt

00091.txt

00071.txt

00120.txt

00059.txt

00136.txt

00150.txt

00042.txt

00012.txt

00156.txt

00125.txt

00023.txt

00167.txt

00039.txt

00122.txt

00163.txt

00133.txt

00072.txt

00081.txt

00020.txt

00038.txt

UF00002225_00001_pdf.txt

00188.txt

00179.txt

00151.txt

00101.txt

00011.txt

00190.txt

00160.txt

00034.txt

00010.txt

00083.txt

00157.txt

00143.txt

00024.txt

00110.txt

00093.txt

00117.txt

00152.txt

00184.txt

00022.txt

00119.txt

00189.txt

00168.txt

00111.txt

00154.txt

00019.txt

00126.txt

00135.txt

00172.txt

00191.txt

00170.txt

00169.txt

00070.txt

00032.txt

00138.txt

00068.txt

00107.txt

00128.txt

00140.txt

00064.txt

00008.txt

00035.txt

00095.txt

00090.txt

00016.txt

00116.txt

00118.txt

00005.txt

00103.txt

00166.txt

00017.txt

00139.txt

00178.txt

00097.txt

00050.txt

00121.txt

00085.txt

00018.txt

00098.txt

00113.txt

00052.txt

00144.txt

00084.txt

00069.txt

00134.txt

00004.txt

00088.txt

00187.txt

00029.txt

00175.txt

00074.txt

00132.txt

00077.txt

00041.txt

00053.txt

00164.txt

00104.txt

00185.txt

00115.txt

00078.txt

00149.txt

00141.txt

00131.txt

00021.txt

00028.txt

00031.txt

00009.txt

00046.txt

00147.txt

00044.txt

00013.txt

00001.txt

00109.txt

00099.txt

00102.txt

00180.txt

00040.txt

00129.txt

00094.txt

00159.txt

00014.txt

00086.txt

00130.txt

00049.txt

00079.txt

00048.txt

00165.txt

00123.txt

00065.txt

00106.txt

00015.txt

00056.txt

00192.txt

00045.txt

00161.txt

00171.txt

00176.txt

00173.txt

00030.txt

00089.txt

00082.txt

00155.txt

00036.txt

00124.txt

00043.txt

00025.txt

00003.txt


Full Text











o>
A pb ittS

—

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight hundred and fifty-two, by

Harper & BROTHERS,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern Diatrict
of New York.

oi? 604



PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Paut’s ADVENTURES IN THE Pursuit oF_
Know LepcE, is not merely to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition’ of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it elements of a salutary moral influence, by means ~
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the
story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—



vi PREFACE.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through-

out will be to instruct rather than to entertain.



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER

I—Tse Movuts o£ THE KENNEBEC, .

I1.—Tue Losr Bucget, .
Wk—A Rart,
JV.—Tue Desert Istanp,
V.—Tue Benerit or THE Dovst,
VIL—Exzony anp Pine,
Vil.—Tue Bear in THE Mutt,
VII.—Tue Brvovac, .
IX.—Tse Encampment,
X.—Lost i THE Woops,
XI.—Tue Suincte Weavers,
XIL—A Vorace on a Ponn,

PAGE

11
25
41
55
70

- 102

117

. 130

146

- 160

170



ENGRAVINGS.



ees



Trying tHe Water,

Towixe THE Los, .

Tae Lost Bucket, . .

Gone AsHORE, .

ApRET,. . «© . . 4. «2.
Hattoo,

Tue Buu, .. . ‘ . . . .
Tue Wacon Rivz, . . . . .
Tue Rart,

Tue Bear,

Fire on THE Beacu,

Tue Loe Hovse,

Horse Lost, .

Tue Huts,

Tue Encamrine,

THE Cove,

Tue Losr Boat,

PacE

15
22
28
38
54
59
71
82
97
108

- 114

119

. 133

141

. 158

172

. 181



GROER OF THE VOLUMES.

Parra Parl,

I—IN NEW YORK.
Il—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

IIl.—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.

V.—IN BOSTON.
VI—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.



PRINCIPAL PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Maroo, his eon, a boy about twelve years old.

Joun Forrstzs, Marco's cousin, about nineteen years old.

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’a care.



MARCO PAUL
IN THE FORESTS OF MAINE.

Cuaprer I,
Tue Moura or toe Kennesec.

The plan. Fortifications of Quebec.

NE summer, Forester and Marco Paul
formed a plan for going to Quebec.
Marco was very much interested in going to
Quebec, as he wished to see the fortifications.
Forester had told him that Quebec was a
strongly-fortified city, being a military post of
great importance, belonging to the British gov-
ernment. Marco was very much pleased at
the idea of seeing the fortifications, and the
soldiers that he supposed must be placed there
to defend them.

On their way to Quebec, Forester and Marco
were to sail up the Kennebec in a steamboat.
As they were passing along, they sat upon the

\deck. It was a pleasant summer morning.



12 Tar Foresrs or Maine.

The Kennebec. Shores of the river. Water low.





They had been sailing all night upon the sea, on
the route from Boston to the mouth of the
Kennebec. They entered the mouth of the
Kennebec very early in the morning, just before
Forester and Marco got up. And thus it hap-
pened that when they came up upon deck they
found that they were sailing in a river. The
water was smooth and glassy, shining brilliantly
under the rays of the morning sun, which was
just beginning to rise. .

The shores of the river were rocky and bar-
ren. Here and there, in the coves and eddies,
were what appeared to Marco to be little fences
in the water. Forester told him that they were
for catching fish. The steamboat moved very
slowly, and every moment the little bell would
ring, and the engine would stop. Then the
boat would move more slowly still, until the bell
sounded again for the engine to be put in mo-
tion, and then the boat would go on a little faster.

“What makes them keep stopping ?” said
Marco.

“The water is very low this morning,” said
Forester, “ and they have to proceed very care-
fully, or else they will get aground.”

“ What makes the water so low now ?” asked
Marco.



Moura or THE KeEnNnNeEBEC. 13

a
Cause of it. The moon and the tides. Mouths of rivers,

“There are two reasons,” replied Forester.
«Tt is late in the summer, and the streams and
springs are all low; so that there is but little
water to come down from the country above.
Then, besides, the tide is low this morning in
the sea, and that causes what water there is in
the bed of the river to run off into the sea.”

“Ts not there any tide in the river?” asked
Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “ I suppose there is not,
strictly speaking. That is, the moon, which
attracts the waters of the ocean, and makes
them rise and fall in succession, produces no
sensible effect upon the waters of a river. But
then the rise and fall of the sea itself causes all
rivers to rise and fall near their mouths, and as
far up as the influence of the seaextends. You
see, in fact, that it must be so.”

“Not exactly,” said Marco.

“ Why, when the water in the sea,” continued
Forester, “at the mouth of the river is very
low, the water in the river can flow off more
readily, and this makes the water fall in the.
river itself. On the other hand, when the water
in the sea is high, the water can not run out
from the river, and so it rises. Sometimes, in
fact, the sea rises so much that the water from



14 Tue Forests or MaINgE.

‘Balt water. A plan. The stern of the boat.

the sea flows up into the river, and makes it
salt for a considerable distance from its mouth.”

“TI wonder whether the water is salt here,”
said Marco.

“T don’t know,” said Forester.

“If we had a pail with a long rope to it,”
said Marco, “ we could let it down and get
some, and try it.”

“We could let the pail down, but I doubt
very much whether we could get any water,”
said Forester. “It is quite difficult to drop the
pail in such a manner as to get any water when
the vessel is under way.”

“T should like to ¢ry,” said Marco.

« You can find out whether the water is salt
easier than that,” said Forester. “ You can let
a twine string down, and wet the end. That
will take up enough for a taste.”

“Well,” said Marco, “if I’ve got a string
long enough.” So saying, he began to feel’ in
his pockets for a string.

“ Let us go toward the stern,” said Forester.

.“ The water will be smoother there.”

There was a long cabin or saloon built upon
the deck of the steamer, with windows in it, on
both sides. This cabin was rounded toward
the stern, the stern itself being rounded in form



MourtH or THE KENNEBEC. 15



The flag. - The smoke,

too; and there was an open space upon the
deck between the sides of this cabin and the
railing of the boat. Forester and Marco walked
together along this
space tillthey came
to the stern.

There was a
great flag flying
over their heads. %
The flag was at-
tached to a flag-
staff which came
up from the stern
of the boat. Above
and beyond the =
flagstaff a great TRYING THE WATER.
cloud of black
smoke was rolling out from the chimney of the
boat.

Marco and Forester went to the stern, and
stood there upon a part of the deck which
projected over the water. This projection was
supported by braces beneath. - Marco and For-
ester stood upon it almost directly over the
rudder. They could not see the rudder, but
Marco would have been much interested in ob~
serving its form if he could have seen it, and





16 Tre Forests or Maine.

Tasting the water. The result,

the two chains attached to it, by which it was
moved. These two chains passed through two
holes, into the stern of the boat.

Marco found a piece of twine in his pocket,
which he thought would be long enough, but,
on trial, it appeared that it would not reach
quite to the water. Forester then tied it to the
end of his cane, and allowed Marco to take the
cane, and hold it over the side of the vessel ;
and by this means he succeeded in reaching the
water, and wetting the end of the string. He
could, however, after all, only wet a small part
of the string, for it was drawn along so rapidly
by the motion of the boat, that it skipped upon
the surface of the water without sinking in.

At length, however, after he had got the end
of his line a little wetted, he drew it up and put
it in his mouth.

“ How does it taste ?” said Forester.

The question was hardly necessary, for the
face which Marco made showed sufficiently
plain that the water was bitter and salt.

“ Yes, it is salt,” said he. Then, suddenly
casting his eye upon a long dark-looking sub-
stance, which just then came floating by, he

- called out,
“ Why, Forester, what is that ?”



Moura or THE KENNEBEC. 17



Pine logs. Booms. Rafts. Men upon them.

“A log,” said Forester.

The log was round and straight; it glided
rapidly by, and soon disappeared.

“It is a pine log,” said Forester. “There
are vast forests of pine trees in this state. They
cut down the trees, and then cut the trunks into
pieces of moderate length, and draw them on
the snow to the rivers. Then, in the spring,
the waters rise and float the logs down. This
is one of these logs floating down. Sometimes
the river is quite full of them.”

“ Where do they go?” asked Marco,

“Oh, men stop them all along the river, and
put them into booms, and then fasten them to-
gether in rafts.”

“ How do they fasten them together ?” asked
Marco.

“They drive a pin into the middle of each
log, and then extend a rope along, fastening it
to.each pin. In this manner, the rope holds
the logs together, and they form a long raft.
When they catch the logs in booms, they after-
‘ward form them into rafts, and so float them
down the river to the mills, where they are to
be sawed.”

“Can men stand upon the rafts ?” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “ very well.”

B



18 Tus Forests or Maine.
Floating bodies. Philosophy.

“ They make a floor of boards, I suppose,”
said Marco.

“ No,” replied Forester ; “ they stand directly
upon the logs.”

“T should think the logs would sink under
them,” replied Marco, “or at least roll about.”’

“ They sink a little,” replied Forester; “just
about as much as the bulk of the man who
stands upon them.”

“I don’t know what you mean by that, ex-
actly,” said Marco.

“Why, the rule of floating bodies is this,”
rejoined Forester. “ When any substance,
like a cake of ice, or a log of wood, or a boat,
is floating upon the water, a part of it being
above the water and a part under the water, if
a man steps upon it, he makes it sink enough
deeper to submerge a part of the wood or ice as
large as he is himself. If there is just as much
of the wood or ice above the water as is equal
to the bulk of the man, then the man, in step-
ping upon it, will sink it just to the water’s
edge.”

“ But perhaps one man would be heavier than
another man,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester ; “ but then he would
be larger, and so, according to the principle, he



Mout or THE KENNEBEC. 19

ee
Equilibrium. Floating and sinking.



would make more wood sink before the equi-
librium was reached.”

“ What is equilibrium?” asked Marco.

« Equilibrium is an equality between two
forces,” replied Forester.

*T don’t see what two forces there are,” said
Marco.

“There is the weight of the man pressing
downward,” said Forester, “for one, and the
buoyant power of the water, that is, its upward
pressure, for the other. The weight of the man
remains constantly the same. But the upward
pressure of the water increases in proportion as
the log sinks into it. For the deeper the log
sinks into the water, the more of it is submerged,
and it is more acted upon and pressed upward
by the water. Now, as one of these forces re-
mains constant, and the other increases, they

must at length come to be equal, that i is, in
equilibrium ; and then the log will not sink any
farther. That’s the philosophy of it, Marco.”

Marco did not reply, but sat looking at the
barren and rocky shores of the river, as the
boat glided by them. Presently another log
came into view.

“There,” said Forester, “look at that log,



20 Tue Forssts or Marne.

Another log. The mill-men. The steam ssw-mill.

and see whether you think that you could float
upon it.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I think I could.”

“It depends,” said Forester, “on the ques-
tion whether the part of it which is out of wa-
ter is as big as you are.”

“] think it is,” said Marco.

“Yes,” added Forester, “I have no doubt
that it is.”

“ Only I should roll off,” said Marco.

’ “True,” replied Forester; “but the mill-
men, who work about the logs, acquire aston-.
ishing dexterity in standing upon them. If
there is only enough of the log above water to
equal their bulk, so that it has buoyant power
enough to float them, they will keep it steady
with their feet, and sail about upon it very
safely.”

“I should like to try,” said Marco.

“Perhaps we shall have an opportunity at
some place on the river,” said Forester.

Here Marco suddenly interrupted the con-
versation by pointing up the river to a column
of smoke and steam which he saw rising beyond
a point of land which was just before them.

“ Here comes another steamboat,” said he.
“See, Forester.”



Moura or tHe KENNEBEG. QI

Water mills. The view.

“No,” said Forester, “I believe that is a
steam mill.”

“A steam mill!” repeated Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester. “They have steam
mills and tide mills to saw up the logs in this
part of the river. Farther up, where there are
water-falls on the river, or on the streams which
empty into it, they build mills which are car-
ried by water. I presume that that is a steam
mill.”

At this moment, Marco’s attention was di-
verted from the steam mill by a boat which
came gliding into the field of view, far before
them. There was one man in the boat rowing
it. Another sat in the stern, with a pole in his
hand. The pole had an iron hook in the end
of it. A short distance before the boat was a
log floating upon the water. The oarsman was
rowing the boat toward the log. He brought
it up in such a manner that the other man
could strike his hook into it. When this was -
done, the oarsman began to pull the boat to-
ward the shore, drawing the log with it.

Marco was very much interested in the gen-
eral view which presented itself to his observa-
tion as he looked up the river. The men in
the boat, who were towing the log, were out



22 Tue Forests or Maine.

a Men towing a log. pe
near the middle of the stream, but so far distant
that Marco could scarcely make out. what they
were doing. The steam mill where they were
going to take the log to be sawed, was round
behind a point of land, so that Marco could'see
nothing but the tall chimney, and the smoke
issuing from it, behind the trees. There was a
road leading along the bank of the river, at a
little distance from the water. _There was a
very smooth and level beach staitie the river
and the road.



TOWING THE LOG.



Moura or THE KewNNEBEC. 28

The beach. Marco goes forward, The decks.

. Marco was just wishing that he could go and
take a walk upon this beach, when his eye
caught | the figures of two men who seemed to
be at work there. Forester said that they were
rolling-logs off into the water. These men
were so remote that they looked very small.

' There were a great many logs floating down
toward | the steamboat, on the current of the
river.’

By this time the men with the log disappeared
from Marco’s view, behind a part of the steam-
boat which now: came in the way, in conse-
quence of a change in the direction in which
the steamboat was going. Marco, who wished
to watch the whole proceeding, left Forester,
and ran forward, in hopes that he could get
another view of the men in the boat. He found,
however, that they were proceeding so rapidly
toward the shore, that he was fast losing sight
of them; and then he concluded to go forward
to the bows of the steamboat, thinking that
perhaps there might be other logs coming
down the river, with men after them in boats.

When he reached the bows, Marco found
the deck encumbered with cables, and anchors,
and heavy boxes of freight, which made it dif-
ficult for him to find his way to a good place



24 Tue Forests or Marine.

“Beauty of the river. Tho ripple.

for a view. He finally reached a place where,
by standing upon an anchor, he could look over
the bulwarks, and get a view of the expanse of
water before him. The water was smooth, and
its glassy surface was bright with the reflec-
tion of the rays of the morning sun.

Marco admired the beauty of the river and
of its banks, but he could see no boats, or even
logs coming. He saw some large sand-banks
before him, which had been left bare by the
efflux of the tide. He wished that the steam-
boat would stop, and let him land upon one of
them. He also looked down over the bows,
and admired the graceful form and beautiful
smoothness of the ripple, or rather wave, which
was formed by the cutwater of the boat as it
urged its way rapidly through the water. Af-
ter gazing upon this for some time, Marco
turned to go away in pursuit of Forester, when
an occurrence took place, which being some-
what important in its consequences, the account
of it must be deferred to the next chapter.



Tue Lost Bucket. 25

ee ee
The bucket. Marco forms a plan.

Cuaprer II.
. Tue Lost Bucxet.

A’ Marco was stepping down from the posi-
tion which he had taken upon the anchor,
his eye fell upon a small bucket, with a long
rope tied to the handle, which he immediately
recognized as one of those buckets which the
sailors fit up in that way, in order to draw up
water from alongside the ship.

“ There’s’'a bucket now,” said Marco to him-
self. “Ideclare, I believe I'll draw up some
water. Forester said that it was hard, but I
think it will be easy. 1’ll draw up a bucket full,
and carry it to him and show him.”

So saying, Marco took up the bucket, lifted

“it gently over the side, and let it down slowly
by the rope into the water. There was a knot
in the end of the rope; and Marco held the
knot firmly in his hand, intending to draw up
the bucket by means of it, as soon as he should
get it full. He found, however, that, although
he could let the pail down easily enough, it was
no easy matter to dip up any water into it; for



26 Tue Forgsts or Maine.

A difficulty. The sailor boy. Marco goes aft.

the rope, being fastened to the bail or handle,
kept the handle, and of course the open part of
the pail, upward, so that the water could not
run in. If Marco let the rope down more, the
pail, being light, would not sink, but skipped
along upon the surface of the water, drawn by
the motion of the steamboat.

While Marco was making these fruitless at-
tempts, another boy, dressed in sailor’s clothes,
whom Marco had seen several times before
about the boat, came up to him, and asked him
what he was doing.

“T’m trying to get some water,” said Marco.

“ That isn’t the way to get it,” said the sailor
boy. “ Let me have the bucket. I'll show you
the way.”

“No,” said Marco, “I want to get it myself.”

“You never can get any that way,” said the
boy. “ You must swing it back and forth, and
when it is swinging well, let it drop suddenly

‘and catch the water.”

Marco had not a very convenient place to
stand, at the forecastle, to make his trial with
the bucket, and so he concluded to carry it aft
to a place on the guard, a little before the pad-
dle-wheel. There was a place there on the
main deck,—the place in fact where the plank



Tue Lost Bucxer. 27

His position there. He lets down the bucket. A disaster.

is usually put for the freight, and sometimes for
the passengers’ baggage to be passed in and out,
when the boat is at the land—where Marco
thought he could reach the water with the
bucket more easily.

When he got to this place he let the bucket
down till it was near the water, and then began
to swing it.to and fro, as the sailor boy had di-
~ rected him.. The boy was standing near him,
to see how he would succeed. It happened also
that there was a man,—one of the passengers,—
standing upon the promenade-deck above, look-
ing down to see what Marco was going to do;
though this Marco did not know.

So Marco ‘began to swing the bucket back
and forth, and after he had got it well a-swing-
ing, he let down the rope suddenly, at the mo-
ment when the bucket was at the extent of its
oscillation. The bucket filled instantly ; but,
as the boat was advancing rapidly, it was caught
by the water with such force that the rope
was twitched out of Marco’s hand with great
force. — .

“ Hold on!” exclaimed the sailor boy.

But it was too late. The rope fell down into
the water, and the bucket, rope, and all, sailed
away upon the surface of the water, until they



28 Tue Forests or Marine.
‘Bucket overboard. Joe.

floated under the paddle-wheel of the boat,
which dashed them down beneath the surface
of the water, and
they disappeared
finally from view.

“Why did not
you hold on ?” said —
the boy.
| Marco was si-
iis lent.

=: The boy looked
== round tosee if any

= body had observed

ae =~ what had. taken

THE LOST BUCKET, place. He sup-

| posed that nobody
had noticed what the boys had been doing.

“ Nobody has seen you,” said the sailor boy;
“so you say nothing, and I'll say nothing.”

“ But suppose they ask what has become of
that bucket,” said Marco ; “ what will you tell
them ?” “

“Oh, I'll them I don’t know where it is,” he
replied ; “and I don’t. I’m sure I don’t know
where it is now: do you? Hush, here comes
Joe.”

Marco looked up at these words, and saw the





Taz Lost Bucxer. 29
Concealment. Certain maxims,

sailor approaching whom the boy called Joe;
and the boy himself immediately went away
from the place where he and Marco had been
standing, and began coiling a rope upon the
deck. Marco walked sorrowfully away toward
- the place where he had left Forester.

There was something wrong and something
right in the boy’s proposal to Marco, to conceal
the loss of the bucket. His object was to be-
friend and help Marco in his distress. This
was right. The means by which he proposed
to accomplish the object were secrecy and
fraud. This was wrong. Thus, the end which
he had in view was a good one, and it evinced
a good feeling in him; but the means for pro-
moting it were criminal. Some persons have
maintained that if the end is only right, it is of
no consequence by what means we seek to pro-
mote it. Hence they have adopted this maxim,
namely, “ The end justifies the means.” But
this maxim is not sound. The contrary prin-
ciple is correct. It is sometimes expressed by
this saying: “ We must not do evil that good
may come ;” which is a much safer proverb to
be guided by.

Marco’s first impulse was, to go at once and
tell the captain of the steamboat that he had



30 Tue Forests or Maine.

Marco's first idea. The wrong man. Progress of the boat.

lost his bucket. But he did not know exactly
where he could find him. He looked at his
office window, and found that it was shut. He
asked one of the waiters, whom he met coming
up stairs from the cabin, if he knew where the
captain was. But the waiter did not know.
Presently, he saw a gentleman walking back
‘and forth upon that part of the deck which is
in front of the door of the ladies’ cabin. He
thought that he was the captain. Marco walk-
ed up to him, and accosted him by saying,

“ Are you the captain of this boat, sir ?”

“ Am I the captain ?” asked the man. “ Why? ?
What do you want to know for ?”

“ Because, if you are,” said Marco, «T have
lost your bucket.”

“ Lost my bucket !” repeated the gentleman.
“ How did you lose it ?” ;

“T lost it overboard,” said Marco.

Here the gentleman laughed, and said, “ No
I’m not captain ; but you seem to be an honest
sort of boy. I don’t know where the captain
is.” , Oo
All this, though it has taken some time to de-
scribe it, took place in a very few minutes ; and
the boat had now advanced only so far as to be
opposite the steam mill which Marco had seen



Tse Lost Bucket. 3]

The steam-pipe. Puffs. The cylinder.

just before he had left Forester. Marco hap-
pened to see the mill as the boat moved by it,
and he went immediately to the side of the boat
to get a better view of it.
- There was a chimney for the smoke, and a
pipe for the waste steam, at the mill.. From the
steam-pipe there issued a dense column of va-
por, which came up, however, not in a regular
current, like the smoke from the chimney, but
it was puffed up in regular strokes, making a
sort of pulsgtion. While Marco was looking at
it, Forester came along, and stood looking at it
too. There were a great many logs lying about
the shore, and enormous piles of boards, which
had been sawed, and which were ready for the
vessels that were to come and take them away.

“What makes the steam come up in puffs ?”
asked Marco. ~

“ Because, it is what they call a high-pressure
engine,” said Forester. “It works against the
pressure of the atmosphere. All such engines
throw out the steam in puffs.”

“Why do they ?” asked Marco.

“ Do you know what the cylinder of a steam-
engine is ?” said Forester. .

“Not exactly; I don’t remember it very
well,” replied Marco.



32 Tue Forests or Maine.

Mareo examines the machinery. The piston-rod.
nn

“Come with me, then,” said Forester, “ and
I will show it to you.”

So saying, he took Marco to the engine of
the boat, and showed him, in the midst of the
machinery, a large iron vessel, shaped like a
hogshead, only it had straight sides. Marco
could not see mych more than the top of it.

“ That is the cylinder,” said Forester. “It
is the heart of the steam-engine, as I may say—
the seat of its power. All the other machinery
is only to aid the cylinder, and to convey the
power: to the point where it is wanted to do the
work. Thus, the place where the steam exerts
its power, and on which the whole movement
of the machinery depends, is the cylinder.”

Marco observed that a long iron rod, large
and solid, and very bright, kept ascending and
descending through the top of the cylinder, as
if pushed up and drawn down again by some
force within. Forester told him that that was

“the piston-rod.

“ The piston-rod,” said Forester, “is fastened,
at its lower end, to the piston, which is a flat
plate of iron, made to fit the inside of the cylin-
der exactly. .

“ First,” said Forester, “the steam comes in
below the piston, and drives it up; and then it



Tae Lost Bucker. 38
Explanations. Low prossure, High preesure.

is stopped from coming in below, and is forced
in above, and so drives it down.”

“And how does the other steam get out ?”
asked Marco.

“ There are two ways of getting rid of the
steam that is below the piston when the piston
is coming down,” said Forester. “One way is,
to open a passage to let it out into the air. On
this plan, when the piston has been driven up
the steam is cut off from coming in below the
piston, and is admitted above. At the same in-
stant, the passage is opened to let the lower
steam out. Of course, the steam that comes in
above, drives the piston down, and forces the
steam that is below, out into the air. They
generally have a pipe to convey it away, and
as the piston goes up and down, the steam
comes out in puffs, as you saw it in that mill.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I understand that ; and
now what is the other way ?”

“ That kind of engine is called a high-pressure
engine,” said Forester, because “ the piston, in
coming down, has to drive out the steam from
below, against the pressure of the atmosphere ;
for the atmosphere above passes into the pipe,
and resists the movement of the steam in com-
ing out. It requires a greater force of steam

Cc



34 Tue Forests or Maine.
Engine stopped. Going slowly.

to work the piston on this plan than it does
upon the other.”

“ What is the plan of the other kind of steam
engine?” asked Marco.

“On the other plan,’ said Forester, “the
steam under the piston is condensed, that is,
turned suddenly into water; and this leaves a
vacancy or void below the piston, so that the
piston can be forced down much more easily
than if it had to drive the steam out before it,
against the pressure of the atmosphere.”’

Forester was going on to explain to Marco
how it was that the steam was condensed in
the cylinder, when the conversation was sud-
denly interrupted by the sound of the engine
bell, which was the signal for the engine to stop.
The thumping sound of the machinery and of
the paddle-wheels accordingly ceased, and the
boat began to move more slowly. Presently,
the bell sounded once more, and the piston-rod
slowly rose out of the cylinder, and then slowly
descended again.

“ They are going very slowly,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “the water is low,
and I suppose that the channel is narrow.”

Just at this moment, they perceived a strange
sensation, as if the steamboat had been suddenly



Tre Lost Bucket. 35

esse
Aground. The captain attempts to back off.



pushed backward. Marco was startled. He
did not know what it meant.

“ There we are,” said Forester.

“ What ?” said Marco. “ What is it?”

« Aground,” said Forester.

“ Aground § ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester; “that’s the sensation
produced when a ship goes aground upon sand
or soft mud.”

So saying, Forester left the engine, and went
up to the upper deck, followed by Marco.
There were several persons there, looking out
upon the water.

“Yes,” said Forester, “we are aground.
You see by the trees upon the bank that we are
not moving.”

Marco saw that they were at rest. He
asked Forester what they were going to do.

Just at this moment the little bell sounded,
and the engine, which had been stopped when
the boat went aground, was put in motion
again.

“They are going to back the engine, I sup-
pose,” said Forester, “to try to draw her off.”

But the boat would not move. The engine
did not seem to have power to release her from
her confinement. °



36 Tue Forests or Marne.

Btate of the tide. Discouraging prospect.

“ What shall we do now ?” asked Marco.

“Why, whenever a ship is aground,” said
Forester, “the first question is, what is the
state of the tide ?

“ Because,” continued Forester, after a mo-
ment’s pause, “if the tide is rising, it soon lifts
the vessel off, and enables her to go back, or,
perhaps, forward, if the water is not very shal-
low. But, if the tide is falling, it leaves her to
rest more and more upon the sand, and she can
not get off until the water has gone entirely
down, and then rises again. She can not get
off, in fact, until the water has risen higher than
it was when she first grounded.”

“ And how is it now ?” asked Marco.

“I presume the tide is going down,” said
Forester; “and if so, we must wait here until
it rises again.” So saying, he began to look
about for somebody of whom he could inquire.
He soon heard a gentleman say to another that
the tide was falling, and that they would have
to stay there three hours.

“That’s rather provoking,” said Marco.

“Oh, no,” said Forester. “ Perhaps we can
go ashore.”

“Well,” said Marco, with an expression of
gratification at the proposal.



Tae Lost Bucxer. 37

Forester’s proposal. The steam. Captain’s proposal,

“ And perhaps we can borrow some fishing-
lines, and go a-fishing.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “that will be an excel-
lent plan.”

“ At any rate,” said Forester, “when acci-
dents of this sort occur upon our travels, we
should not allow ourselves to be provoked by
them, but make ourselves contented by the best
means within our reach.”

At this time, they began to hear the loud,
hissing sound, produced by the blowing off of
the steam from the engine, which Forester said
was an additional indication that they were go-
ing to remain there for some time. Presently,
a man came up the stairs from the deck below
—for Forester and Marco were at this time
on the upper deck—and told the passengers
that the boat would have to remain there three
or four hours, and that if any of them wished to
go ashore to amuse themselves, he would send
them in his boat, after breakfast.

Quite a number of the passengers seemed
disposed to accept this offer, and the boat was
accordingly lowered ; and Joe, with two other

sailors, were ordered to come. and row it
ashore.



88 | Tue Forests or Maine.



The passengers going ashore.



GOING ASHORE,

The passengers who were to go in the boat,
descended into it from the deck of the steamer,
and took their places in the stern. There were
so many of them that they were obliged to stand
up, as there were not seats enough for them all
to sit down. Marco got a seat, at a place
where he could look out upon the river. He
can not be seen in the picture, being behind the
men.

While the boat was proceeding toward the



Tue Lost Boucker. 39

ee
The raft. Construction of the rafts.



shore, Marco was busy admiring the view up
the river. There was a raft of logs in the mid-
dle of the stream, with a man upon it. High
mountains covered with forests were in the
background, on the farther shore. They looked
very solitary and wild. There was, however,
a little viliage down near the shore, at the en-
trance, apparently, to a sort of valley which
there opened among the mountains. The
steatnboat itself, too, as it lay motionless upon
the water, formed a. beautiful view. Marco
could see the passengers that remained on
board, and the sailors standing on the fore-
castle.

When the boat approached the shore, it came
to a place where there were some rafts of logs,
lying upon the margin of a sandy beach. The
beach was broad and beautiful. The rafts were
made by fastening the logs together by means
of wooden pins, one of which was driven into
the middle of each log. Then there was a rope
passed along from pin to pin, and fastened to
each. The end of the rope for each raft, was
then carried to the shore, and fastened to a
strong stake driven into the sand. This was
to prevent the raft from being floated away on
the rising and falling of the tides.



40 Tue Forests or Maine.

The passengers land.

When the boat came up to the edge of the
raft, one of the men stepped out upon the raft
and held the bows, while the others got out.
The logs being all afloat, formed a somewhat
unstable foundation to stand upon, and it would
have been difficult to have got from the raft to
the dry land, had it not been that a single log
happened to lie in such a position on the sand,
as to form a connection. By means of this log
the passengers all safely reached the shore.



A Rart. 41

Tavern. . Breakfast.





Cuaprter ILI.
A Rart.

ORESTER and Marco did not take break-

fast on board the steamboat, but waited un-
til they got on shore. They had inquired of a
fellow-passenger, who seemed acquainted with
the country, and were told that there was a very
good tavern about a quarter of a mile from the
mill.

When they landed upon the logs, Marco,
whose curiosity seemed to be stronger than his
appetite, wanted to ramble about for a little
time along the shore and among the piles of
boards, but Forester thought it would be best
first to go and get their breakfast.

“Because,” said he, “we can then amuse
ourselves by rambling about here, and shall be
ready to return to the steamboat whenever they
send for us.”

So they went to the tavern.

Foresjer seemed to have little appetite for his
breakfast. He complained of feeling fatigued,
and yet he had nothing to fatigue him. Marco



42 Tue Forests or Maine.

Forester is unwell. Directions to Marco.

ate, and talked fast all the time; but Forester
seemed silent and dejected.

“Come, cousin Forester, what is the matter
with you ?” said Marco at last.

Forester said that he felt somewhat unwell,
and as there was a sofa in the room, he con-
cluded to lie down upon it, and not go out.
Marco was, at first, disposed to stay and take
care of him, but Forester said that he did not
need any thing, and he wished Marco to go out
and amuse himself.

“You may go and see the mill,” said he,
“and the logs along the shore ; only be careful
not to go where there is any danger ; and come
and let me know when the boat is coming from
the steamer to take us on board again.”

So Marco left Forester upon the sofa, and
went away. He was sorry that his cousin was
sick, and he was particularly sorry that he had
to go himself to take his walk without company.
But, concluding that he would adopt Forester’s
principle of making the best of every thing, in
the events which occur in traveling, he walked
along the road, singing a tune which he had
learned at a juvenile singing-school jn New
York, and watching the pulsations of the steam,
as it issued from the pipe at the mill.



A Rarr, 43

Marco’s reflections. Marco at the mill,

As Marco walked along, it occurred to him
that he had not, after all, succeeded in acknowl-
edging to the captain of the steamboat that he
had lost the bucket. And, since the first occa-
sion for doing so had gone by, he began to
doubt whether it would be best for him to
trouble himself any farther about it.

“The bucket was not worth much,” said he
to himself. “ Nobody knows it is lost, except
that boy, and he will not tell. I’ve a great
mind not to say any thing about it.”

In fact, Marco found that he was much less
inclined to make his acknowledgment now, than
he was when the circumstance first occurred.
He wished that he had at once stated. the facts
to Forester, which would have been his wisest
course; but now that the first occasion for
doing so had passed away, he began to feel dis-
inclined to do it at all.

Marco soon reached the mill, and he amused
himself, for half an hour, in watching the move-
ment of the engine, the strokes of the saw, and
the drawing up of the logs from the water to the
floor of the mill. There was a steep, sloping
platform from the mill down to the river, and a
long chain extended down to the water. This
chain was fastened to one end of one of the logs



44 Tue Forests or Maine.

The machinery. Men on the logs.

which lay floating there, and then, by means of
the machinery, it was drawn slowly up, bring-
ing the ponderous log with it.

The way in which the machinery drew up
the chain was this : The end of the chain, which
was within the mill, was wound round an axle,
which was made to revolve by the machinery.
The axle, thus revolving, wound up the chain,
and, in this manner, drew it gradually in, by
which means the log, which was attached to
the lower end of it, was drawn up.

Presently, Marco’s attention was attracted
toward some men, who seemed to be sailing
about upon some logs, in a cove, just below the
mill. He went down immediately to see what
they were doing. They had long poles in their
hands, with iron points in the ends of them, and
were pushing the logs about with these poles,
to choose out such as they wished to saw in the
mill.

Just as Marco came down, one of the men
stepped upon the end of a log which was float-
ing very near him. The log sank a little, but
not much, under him, and the man walked along
toward the other end of it. Marco wondered
how he could keep his balance.

When the millman reached the farther end



A Rart. 45

Dexterity. Marco and the millman. Rolling the log.

of the log, he extended his long pole very dex-
terously, and struck the point of it into the cor-
ner of a sort of wharf, which was built upon
the bank; and then, pulling gently, he drew
himself along, together with the log upon which
he was floating. Marco was surprised at this,
and he wondered that the man did not fall off
the log. He thought that if the log were to
roll in the least degree, the man would be rolled
off into the water. He ran down to the little
wharf, so that he could see better.

“ Weill, my boy,” said the millman, “do you
belong on board the steamboat ?”

« Yes, sir,” said Marco; “we got aground.
You'll fall off of that log if you don’t take
care.”

“No,” said the millman, “ there’s no danger.”

“ Why, if the log should roll the least atom,
away you'd go,” said Marco, “though still I
suppose that the water is not very deep.”

Here the man began to step upon the log in
a peculiar manner, so as to make it roll. It
rolled slowly, but the man continued stepping
until he had rolled it completely over. The
aide which had been under water appeared of a
dark color, and was very slippery, being cov-
ered with a sort of slime; but the man did not



46 Tue Forests or Maine.

Conversation. Falling in.

slip. After he had thus rolled the log completely
over, he looked up to Marco, and said,

« There, you see that there is no danger.”

When the man had drawn this log up to the
shore, he went for another ; and he had to sail
upon this second one a long distance, in bring-
ing it to its place. He pushed himself along
by running his pole down to the bottom, and
pushing against the sand.

“Could I sail upon a log ?” asked Marco.

“No,” replied the millman; “ you'd roll off.”

“ How did you learn to do it ?” asked Marco.

“Oh, I learned when I was a boy,” replied
the millman.

“ Did you roll off when you were learning ?”
asked Marco.

“Yes,” said the man. “I’ve been off the
log into the water many a time.”

“And how did you get out again?” said
Marco.

“Oh, I could swim,” he replied; “and as
soon as I came up, I would paddle back to the
log, and climb up upon it. Once, however, I
came very near being drowned.”

“ How was it ?” said Marco.

‘“‘ Why, I was on the upper side of a boom”’—

‘A boom ?” said Marco; ‘what is that ?”



A Rart. 47
Description of a boom. Fastenings.

“A boom ?” repeated the millman ; “don’t
you know what a boomis? It is a place to
catch logs. When we make a boom we go to
some cove or eddy, where the water is pretty
still, and chain logs together, end to end, so as
to form a long line on the lower side of the
eddy, and then along up the middle of the river
a little way, so as to inclose a space to catch
the logs.”

« What do they fasten the boom to?” asked
Marco.

“ Why, the lower end,” said the millman, “is
fastened to the shore, by means of a very strong
post, or an iron staple set into the rocks. The
other end, which is out in the middle of the
stream, is fastened to some island, if there is one,
or, if not, to a pier built up from the bottom.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “and now about your
getting in ?”

“ The boom was full of logs, and I was upon
the upper side of it, at work with some other
men. I was on a log trying to find the mark,
and I fell in.”

“ What made you fall off?” asked Marco.

“T don’t know,” replied the millman. “I
was not much used to logs then. I was trying
to find the mark.”



48 Tue Forests or Marne.

Marks of the logs. Register of the marks,

“ What mark ?” asked Marco.

“The owner’s mark,” said the millman.
“The owners all mark their logs, when they
get them out in the winter, and then we sepa-
rate or sort them in the booms. Sometimes
the mark is on the under side of the log, and so
we have to turn it over in the water to find it.”

While all this conversation had been going
on, the millman had been moving about over
the water with the various logs, Marco accom-
panying him, and keeping as near to him as
possible, walking along the shore, and some-
times on the logs which were resting by one
end on the shore. As the millman was de-
scribing the system of marking the logs, he was
sailing along very near to Marco, and he im-
mediately began to turn the log over under him,
saying—

“For instance, look here, and see me turn

-up the mark of this log.”

Marco watched the log, as it slowly revolved,
until presently there came a sort of hiero-
glyphical mark upon one end of the log, made by
crosses and lines cut into the wood.

“ Every owner has his particular mark,” said
the millman.

“ Whose mark is that ?” asked Marco.



A Rarr. 49

Pian for building a raft. Hammer and nails.

“T don’t know,” said the man, “but they
know at the mill. They have a register of
them all at the mill.”

“J wish I could turn over a log, standing on
it, in that way,” said Marco.

“You couldn't,” said the millman. “The
only way by which you can sail safely on logs,
would be to put two together, and make a sort
of raft.”

“ How ?” asked Marco.

“ By nailing short pieces of boards across
from one log to another. Then they would not
roll.”

“Well,” said Marco, “if I could only get a
hammer and some nails.”

The millman told him that perhaps they
would let him have a hammer and some nails
at the mill; and Marco, accordingly, went up
to inquire. They told him they had a hammer,
-but they had no nails to spare. So Marco
failed of getting the means of making a raft.
He forgot to go back to the millman to get the
rest of his story, but, instead of it, he rambled
down the bank of the river, until he came to a
place where there was an old fence, which had
fallen down, and the nails were sticking out of
the boards. He now wished that he had bor-

D



50 Tue Forests or Maine.

Nails found. Two logs for a raft.

rowed the hammer at the mill, and he tried to
persuade a boy, who was standing there, to go
and borrow it for him.

The boy told him that a stone would do very
well for a hammer.

“So it will,” said Marco; “find me a good
one, and bring it to this old fence.”

The boy brought Marco a stone, and Marco
began to knock out the nails. Very soon, how-

- ever, he set the boy at work upon the nails,

while he went in pursuit of some short boards,
to nail across from one log to the other. He
found some, which he thought that he could
make answer, without much difficulty. He col-
lected these boards together near the logs; and,
soon afterward, the boy brought him the nails.

The logs were lying side by side, with two
ends resting upon the shore, the two other ends
being out toward the stream. Marco concluded
to nail first the two ends which were toward
the shore, they being nearest, and being also
more steady than the others. He accordingly
laid one of his short pieces across, from one log
to the other, and nailed it as well as he could,
using the stone for a hammer.

*« Now,” said he to the boy, “I'll put another
board across at the middle, and one more at the



A Rarr | 51
Marco adrift. ‘The pole.

other end, and then, if I can find something for
a pole, I’ll take a little sail. Look about a little,
my boy, won’t you,” continued he, “and see if
you can’t find a pole, while I am nailing the
other boards.”

The boy accordingly went away in pursuit
of a pole, while Marco nailed first the middle
board, and then the end one. He came back
just after Marco had got the first nail of the end
board driven in, and as soon as he came in
sight of the logs and of Marco, he exclaimed—-

“You're adrift! you’re adrift !”

Marco got up immediately, and looked
around. He was indeed adrift. His weight,
pressing upon the outer ends of the logs, had
lifted the other ends off the shore, and the raft
was slowly floating up the stream. The reason
why it floated up was, that there was at this
place what they call an eddy, which is a cur-
rent near the shore, flowing up the stream.
Such eddies are caused, generally, by curves in
the banks.

As soon as Marco perceived that he was
afloat, he said—

“ Throw me the pole.”

The boy threw the pole, and it just reached
the raft. Marco took it up, all dripping as it



52 Tart Forests or Maine.

The stream. Marco on the raft. Picturesque shore.

was, and, thrusting the end hastily down into
the water, he endeavored to push himself back
by pushing against the bottom. But it was too
late. He had got already into such deep water,
that he could scarcely reach the bottom, and he
could not push the raft back.

In the mean time, the raft slowly moved up
the river.

“Never mind,” said Marco. “I’m going
right for the mill, and when I get there, they’ll
come out for me in a boat. In the mean time,
I'd better finish my raft.”

So saying, he kneeled down and finished
nailing on the last board. When he rose again,
he found that he had advanced considerably,
and the boy had accompanied him, walking
along by the shore.

The shore was a smooth, sandy beach, very
pleasant to walk upon, with a mass of rocks
crowned with evergreen trees, rising above it.
It was a very picturesque scene, but the boy
seemed to feel no particular interest in it.
There was, however, a sloop which just now
came into view, sailing down the stream, which
at once attracted his attention.

The boy wishing that Marco should look at



A Rart. 53

The sloop.



this sloop, and not knowing what his name was,
called to him by shouting out,

“Tsay.”

“ What,” said Marco, looking up. .

“See there!” said the boy.

Marco looked off to the middle of the river,
and gazed a minute or two upon the sloop with
great interest.

“ A sloop,” said he.

“ Yes,” said the boy, “bound to Boston.”

Marco could not look at the sloop very long,
for he felt uneasy in respect to his situation.
He had hoped indeed that he should be drifted
toward the mill, and toward the shore, but now
he began to perceive that he was gradually get-
ting away from the shore, and, looking forward,
he saw, to his consternation, that the eddy did
not extend to the mill; but that, at a short dis-
tance above him, it swept out into the main cur-
rent of the river, which was running by a point
of land at the upper part of the eddy, with great
speed. The raft advanced slowly till it came
to this current, when it turned around, and be-
gan to glide swiftly down the stream.

“ Boy,” cried Marco, in great distress, “run
to the mill as fast as you can go, and tell them
that I have gone down the river, adrift. Tell



54 Tue Forests or Maine.

Marco frightened.



them to send a boat after me as quick as they
can. My cousin Forester will pay them well.”

e®
a ) ‘eo
Ve
Jt cS ae
ey ae

: =_—F “
SAicdbet. «bdmor’: *



So the boy ran off toward the mill, while
Marco floated away helplessly down the cur-
rent.



Tae Desert Isvanp. 55

The steamboat. Marco’s danger. Paddling,

Cuaprer IV,
Tue Desert Isuanp.

FTER Marco had sailed on for a few min-
utes, he cast his eyes up the river, and saw
the steamboat. She was still lying in an in-
clined position, as she had been left grounded
by the tide. He shouted and waved his hat, in
the endeavor to attract the attention of the peo-
ple on board, and lead them to send a boat to
rescue him. But all his efforts were vain. He
could not make them hear.

The current soon bore him beyond a point
of land which hid the steamboat from his view,
and he began to fear that he should be actually
carried out to sea. He was calculating, in fact,
how many miles it was to the mouth of the river,
when it suddenly occurred to him, that, though
he could not push with his pole, he might per-
haps paddle with it. He accordingly took up
the pole, which he had laid down upon the raft,
and began to use it asa paddle. —

Marco found, to his great relief, that he could
produce considerable effect upon the motion of



56 Tae Forests or Maine.

Marco discovers an island. Marco safe.

his raft by using his pole as a paddle. He con-
trived, at length, to get the head of the raft
round toward the shore, and, by working hard,
he succeeded in urging it along through the
current, very slowly, indeed, but still percepti-
bly, so that at last he began to have some hope
that he might succeed in reaching land.

Before he had made much progress, however,
he suddenly saw before him, at a short distance,
a little rocky island, with some grass and a few
trees on the lower end of it. The island was
very small, consisting chiefly of a few precipi-
tous rocks, with a small sandy beach at the base
of them. It lay almost directly in his course—
so nearly, that he perceived that by working a
little more with his pole, it was probable that
he could bring himself into such a position as
to be thrown by the current directly upon it.

This he did. He paddled, with all his
strength, to get into a line with the upper end
of the island, the current, all the time, bearing
him down directly toward it. In a few min-
utes, he had the satisfaction of seeing that he
was going directly upon it.

“Allright,” said he to himself; “now I’m
safe.”

As he said these words, the end of the raft



Tae Desert IsLanp. 57

Perplexity. Marco’s situation on the island. House,

struck the sand, and he leaped off upon it. The
raft swung round, and was going away, but
Marco seized it, and dragged it up a little way
upon the shore, so as to secure it. He then sat
down upon the end of it, and began to consider
what was next to be done.

He was greatly at a loss to know what was
to be done. He waited an hour, and then, get-
ting very tired of his situation, he began to con-
sider whether it would not be best for him to
intrust himself once more to his raft, and en-
deavor to get to the shore by means of his
paddle.

While he was sitting thus on the end of his
raft, in great perplexity, looking toward the
shore that was nearest to him, he perceived that
there was a road there coming down from the
back country to the river. The road came
down in a winding direction between ledges of
rocks. It seemed to come from a wild glen or
valley among the forests and mountains. There
was only one house in sight, and that was upon
the side of a hill at a little distance from the
river.

The house was almost hidden from view by
the trees that surrounded it, but Marco looked
at it and all about it very intently for some time,



58 Tue Forests or Marne.

Boy coming. Conversation with the boy.



hoping to see some person there that he could
call to.

The house was very far off,—too far to make
it probable that any one could hear him there
if they were within the house, especially if the
doors and windows were shut. Marco thought
it possible that he could make them hear if he
could see them outside ;—but there was nobody
to be seen.

Pretty soon, however, there suddenly came
into view a boy upon a horse. He was coming
along the winding road which led to the river.
The boy was riding the horse down to’ the
water. The horse advanced to the brink of
the river, and then the boy dismounted and held
the horse by the bridle to let him drink. Mar-
co began to call out in his loudest voice,

“ Halloo!”

There was no answer.

“ Halloo—oo—oo,” called out Marco again.

“ Halloo !” answered the boy.

“Can’t you get a boat, and come and take
me off this island ?” cried Marco.

The boy paused a moment, and gazed ear-
nestly at Marco, while the horse continued
drinking.



Tue Desert Isuanp. 59

No boat to be had,

_



“ How came you on that island ?” said the
boy, calling out again in a loud voice.



HALLOO!

“I got adrift on some logs,” said Marco,
“and floated down the river. Can’t you get a
boat, and come and take me off ?”’

“T have not got any boat,” said the boy.
“ There an’t any boats about here.”

“I wish you would go and get one,” said

Marco. “I'll pay you well for it.”
The boy did not answer. He seemed to be



60 Tue Forests or Maine.

Proposal. The boy comes for Marco.

hesitating. In the mean time, the horse, hav-
ing nearly finished his drinking, lifted up his
head and looked at Marco.

“There is not any boat within a mile,” said
the boy. “But I should think you might wade
ashore. The water is not deep between here
and the island.” °

-“ Then wade out here with your horse,” said
Marco, “ and take me on behind you.”

The boy hesitated a moment, but he finally
decided to comply: with Marco’s proposal. So
he mounted his horse and began to drive into
the water. Marco watched his progress with
intense interest. As the water grew deeper, he
began to fear that the boy would get discour-
aged, and turn back. But the boy kept on. He
turned his steps somewhat below the island,
where there was an extensive shoal ; the water
grew shallower and shallower, until at last the
horse emerged entirely, and stood upon a little
dry sand-bank at the lower side of the island.

“T’m very much obliged to you, indeed,” said
Marco, “ for coming for me—besides the pay.
I will pay you for it as soon as we get on
shore.”

“Qh, no,” said the boy, “I don’t need any
pay just for wading my horse out here. I wade



Tue Desert IsLanp. 61

Four miles. Marco gets ashore.

him out here very often, when I come down to
water ; that.is, in the summer, when the water
is low.”

Marco mounted behind the boy, and the boy
turned his horse’s head toward the shore.

“How far is it back to the mill?” asked
Marco. ,

“To the steam mill ?—four miles,” answered
the boy.

“Four miles!” exclaimed Marco; “is it pos-
sible that I have floated down four miles? How
shall I ever get back again ?”

“ How did you happen to get adrift ?” asked
the boy.

Marco proceeded to give the boy an account
of his getting adrift, but in a short time the
water began to grow so deep that he was afraid.
The boy, however, told him that there was no
danger. The bottom of the river, at this place,
was a great bed of pebble stones, and the cur-
rent ran very swiftly over them, and curled in
sharp ripples about the horse’s legs. Presently,
however, the water became more calm, and
they soon safely reached the shore.

“ Now,” said Marco, “I want to go back to
the mill just as quick as 1 can—before the
steamboat goes.” ‘



62 Tue Forests or Marine.

Conversation with the boy. Riding double.

“ The steamboat ?” said the boy. “She has
gone long ago. She went by early this morn-
ing.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “she went by here, but
she got stopped.”

So Marco told the boy the story of their
having got aground, and of his going ashore ;
and of all his adventures, in fact, down to the
time of his being cast upon the desert island.
The boy told him that he had better make
haste ; “for,” said he, “ the tide has risen a great
deal already. When the tide is at the lowest,
we can go out to that island almost on bare
ground.” ;

“But 1 can’t walk back four miles,” said
Marco. “Could you not carry me in a
wagon ?” he continued.

“We have got a wagon,” said the boy, “ if
my father will let me go.”

“Let us go right up and ask him,” said
Marco.

They accordingly began to advance up the
road, the boy putting his horse to a rapid trot.
Marco, who was not accustomed to riding in
this style—behind another boy, and without a
saddle—was much jolted, and in fact, he found
it very difficult to keep his seat. He began to



Tue Desert Isuanp. 63

The farm-houze, Harnessing the horse.

feel so much anxiety, however, about getting
back again, that he did not complain. In a
short time, the boy reached the house. It was
a small, plain farm-house. There was a shed
round at the back side of it, with a wagon
standing in the shed—the shafts resting upon a
wood-pile.

“ My father is not at home now,” said the
boy, “ but he will be at home very soon.”

“Oh, don’t let us wait for him,” rejoined
Marco. “He'll be willing to have you go, I
know.”

“ No,” said the boy, “I should not dare to go
. without his leave.”

“Let us harness the horse into the wagon,
then, at any rate,” said Marco, “and then we
shall be all ready.”

“ We can do that,” said the boy.

So they harnessed the horse into the wagon,
and the boy led the horse around to the door.
Marco, who was quite impatient to go, got into
the wagon, and sat waiting. The man came in
about twenty minutes, and when he heard a
statement of the case, he said that his boy might
go and take Marco back to the mill.

It-was now so late that Marco began to be
seriously afraid that the steamboat might have



64 Taz Forests or Mating.

Marco's fears. Firing up.

gone. He was very impatient to have the
horse go as fast as possible ; and he watched
at every turn in the road which gave him a
view of the river, hoping to get a glimpse at
the boat. He wondered whether Forester was
still at the tavern, or whether he had come out
in pursuit of him. After wearying himself with
conjectures, which were all in vain, he suddenly
came to a view of the river opposite the mill.
The steamboat, to his great joy, was in its
place ; but there was a black column of smoke
issuing from the smoke-pipe, indicating that
they had built the fires and were preparing to
§0. ,
“ They are firing up,” said Marco, “I verily
believe.”

“ What do you mean by that ?” said the boy.

“Why, building up the fires,” said Marco,
“to set the engine a-going. They call it firing
up.”

Just at this moment there broke forth a loud
and hoarse hissing from the steam-pipe, and a
dense column of white vapor began to ascend,
which mingled its snowy volumes, in a beautiful
manner, with the dark masses of the smoke.

“They are blowing off the steam,” said
Marco.



Tae Desert Istanp. 65

Letting off steam. View of the river.

“ What does that mean ?” asked the boy.

“ Why, that they have got the steam up, and
are letting off a little of it, while they are wait-
ing for something. Perhaps they are waiting .
for us. Drive on as fast as you can.”

A moment after this, the sound of the steam
suddenly ceased, and the great paddle-wheels,
on the sides of the boat, began slowly to revolve.

“They are trying to get her off,” said Marco.
“TI do hope they can’t start her. Drive on;
drive on as fast as you can.”

Marco and the boy were, at this time, upon
the top of a hill which commanded a fine view
of the river, and of the scenery upon its banks.
The mill was before them, too, in full view.
But Marco was too much engaged in watching
the movements of the boat to regard the scenery.
The boy drove rapidly down the hill. They
reached the mill in a very few minutes, and
drove down to the bank of the river, by a road
which led to the water, a short distance above
the mill. But, in the mean time, unfortunately
for Marco, the steamboat had regained its lib-
erty, and when Marco and the boy came in
view of it again, as their horse stopped at the
edge of the water, they saw, to Marco’s dismay,
that she was plowing her way swiftly up the

E



66 Tue Forests or Marne,
Steamboat going. Forester.

river, being just about to disappear behind a
point of land which terminated the view of the
water in that direction.

“ They are gone,” said Marco, in a tone of
despair ; “ they are gone ; and what shall I do?”

“Can’t you go in the stage ?” asked the boy,
hoping thus to say a word of encouragement
and consolation.

“No,” said Marco, “I don’t believe there is
any stage from this old mill. Besides, I don’t
know where togo. I should not have thought
that Forester would have gone off and left me.”

“Was he on board the steamboat ?” asked
the boy.

“ Yes,” said Marco—* that is, he was to go
on board—but I left him at the tavern.”

“Perhaps he is there now,” said the boy.
“ Let us go and see.”

Marco approved of this plan, and they turned
the wagon, and rode toward the tavern. As
soon as the horse stopped in the yard, Marco
leaped out of the wagon, and ran in. He found
Forester reclining upon the sofa, where Marco
had left him asleep.

Marco advanced toward him, and took him
by the shoulder, roughly, to wake him up, say-
ing,



Tae Dessert Isuanp. 67

“Maroo wakes Forester up. Forester atill unwell.

“Forester! cousin Forester! wake up! the
boat has gone.”

Forester opened his eyes—looked wildly at
Marco, and then put his hands to his head,
pressing his temples with the palms, but he did
not speak.

“ The boat has gone, cousin Forester,” con-
tinued Marco.

“Then what good does it do to wake me up
so roughly ?” asked Forester.

“ Why—I—thought you’d want to know it,”
said Marco; “but why did not you come
down ?”

“ Because,” said Forester, “ you were to come
and tell me, I thought, when they were ready to
go.”

Marco had no reply to make to this sugges-
tion, and he was silent. He found, afterward,
on farther conversation with Forester, that his
cousin was quite unwell. His head ached, and
his face was flushed, as if he was feverish.
Marco related to Forester an account of his
adventures on the raft of logs. Forester
thought that he had had a very narrow escape.

Marco expected that Forester would have re-
buked him very sharply for his fault in going
upon the logs at all. But he did not. After



68 Tre Forests or Marne.

Forester’s view of the case. Settling damages,

Marco had got through with his account, For-
ester only said,

“ Well, Marco, you evidently did wrong in
getting upon the logs at all; but the evil con-
sequences to you will be punishment enough,
and, in fact, more than enough.”

“ Evil consequences?” said Marco—“no;
there are no evil consequences, only that we
have got left behind.”

“J don’t regard that,” said Forester, “for I
am too unwell to travel to-day; but then you.
have suffered considerable pain and anxiety
already, and, besides, there will be some money
to pay.”

“ What for ?” said Marco.

“Why, you have got to pay the boy for
bringing you home,” replied Forester.

“Must I pay him,” said Marco, “out of my
own money ?”

“ Who do you think ought to pay him ?” said
Forester.

“Why, I ought to, I suppose,” said Marco.
“ But it won’t be much. I think a quarter ofa .
dollar will be enough.”

“ Then, did not you say that you sent to the
mill to have somebody go down after you in a
boat ?” asked Forester.



Tue Deserr Jsuanp. 60

Forester gone to bed.

“ Yes,” said Marco, “but I don’t think they
went.”

“ You had better go to the mill and see,” said
Forester.

So Marco went out and paid the boy a quar-
ter of a dollar, with which he seemed to be sat-
isfied. Then he went to the mill, and he found
two men just returning, in a boat, from a long
pull down the river in pursuit of him. Marco
paid them half a dollar. Thus his loss was
’.three quarters of a dollar.

When he returned to the tavern, he found
that Forester had taken some medicine, and had
gone to bed. Marco went up into his room to
seehim. Forester said that he did not think he
was going to be very sick, but that he should
not be able to go out any more that day, and
that Marco must amuse himself the best way
he could.

“ After the experience that you have had,”
said Forester, “ I hope that you will be careful
not to put yourself any more into dangerous
situations.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I will.”



70 Tue Forests or Marne.

aN
Mareo alone. The barn behind the tavern. The bull.
ae

Cuarrer V.
Tue Beneritr or THE Dovst.

M ARCO took dinner that day at the tavern

alone, and, after dinner, he carried a cup
of tea to Forester,—but Forester was asleep,
and so he did not disturb him.

In the afternoon he went out to play. He
amused himself, for half an hour, in rambling
about the tavern yards and in the stables.

He went into a barn which stood behind the
house, and after looking at the animals that
were there, he passed out through great doors
that were open upon the back side of the barn.
There was a boy there busily at work digging,
in the barn-yard, behind. Marco did not know
what he was digging there for. Beyond the
boy, and at some distance from him, there was
a bull chained to a post.

Marco went to the boy and began to talk
with him.

“What is that bull chained up there for?”
asked Marco.

“He is going to be taken away,” said the



BenerFit or THE Dovst.. 71.
Marco goes to see the bull. The fence.

boy. “ He is sold, and they are coming for him
this afternoon.”

“] mean to go and see him,” said Marco.

“Very well,” said the boy, “He is a hand-
some bull. But you had better not go too near
him, for he is a little cross.”

There was a low fence running along the side

of the barn-yard, separating it from a field, and
_ the post which the bull was chained to was near
this fence. Marco concluded, since he had prom-
ised Forester that he would not put himself in
any dangerous situations, that it would be best
for him to climb over this fence and walk
along upon the outside of it. He thought that
from that side he
could look at the
bull very safely.

He accordingly =a
climbed over the \iam rr =
fence at a place //f"Su
near the barn, in a sb:
corner, where there ~ =aiigaillt ne
was an old wheel SS NIN
and some poles. @ rk ta
This wheel helped ¢. * Y- a aS
him to climb over
the fence. When THE BULL



ae

al



72 Tue Forests or Maine.
Boy digging bait. ; , Going s-fishing.

he was over he walked along to the place.oppo-
site to the bull.

Marco looked at the bull a few minutes with

‘great interest, and then began to look about for
a long stick or a pole, to poke him with a little,
through the fence, to see if he could make him
roar.

He, however, immediately afterward re-
flected, that this would not be right; and be-
sides, he perceived that the fence was so low,
that if the bull were by any means to break his
chain, he could leap over the fence in a mo-
ment.

So Marco concluded to leave the bull in
peace, and go back to the boy in the barn-
yard.

When he got back to the place he asked the
boy what he was digging there for.

“T am digging for worms for bait,” said the
boy. “See!”

As the boy said “see,” he pointed to a small tin
box which was lying near him on the ground,
and which had a number of worms in it.

“ Are you going a-fishing ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the boy.

“ And may I go with you ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the boy.



Benerir or tHe Dovusr. 73
“Linefor Marco. s—<“=t*=sé=s*s*s*s*s*s*~*~*~S*~S*S« rem
. “Only I have not got any fishing-line,” said
Marco.

- “Qh, I can rig you up a line,” said Jeremiah.

The boy’s name was Jeremiah.

Pretty soon Jeremiah took Marco into a sort
of back shed, and there he furnished: him with
a hook and a piece of sheet-lead to make a
sinker of, and Marco had some twine in his
pocket already ; so that he was soon fitted with
a fishing-line. But he had no pole. Jeremiah
said that he could cut one, on his way down to
the river, as they would pass through a piece
of woods which had plenty of tall and slender
young trees in it.

Mareo succeeded in getting a pole in this
manner, which answered very well; and then
he and Jeremiah went down to the river.
They stood upon a log on the shore, and caught
several small fishes, but they got none of much
value, for nearly half an hour. At last, Jere-
miah, who was standing at a little distance from
Marco, suddenly exclaimed :

“Oh, here comes a monstrous great perch.
He is coming directly toward my hook.”

“Where ? where?” exclaimed Marco. And
.. Marco immediately drew out his hook from the
place where he had been fishing, and walked



74 Tue Forests or Maine.

The perch. Difficulty about a porch.

along to the log on which Jeremiah was stand-
ing.

“ Where is he ?” said Marco, looking eagerly
into the water.

“Hush !” said Jeremiah ; “ don’t say a word.
There he is, swimming along toward my hook.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I see him. Now he’s
turning away a little. Let me put my line in,
too.”

Marco extended his pole and dropped his
hook gently into the water. He let it down
until it was near the perch. The poor fish,
after loitering about a minute, gradually ap-
proached Marco’s hook and bit at it.

Jeremiah, seeing that he was in danger of
losing his fish, now called out to Marco to take
his line out. “It is not fair,” said he, “for you
to come and take my fish, just as he was going
to bite at my hook. Go away.”

But it was too late. As Jeremiah was say-
ing these words, the: fish bit at Marco’s hook,
and Marco, drawing up the line, found the fish
upon the end of it. As the line came in, how-
ever, Jeremiah reached out his hand to seize the
fish, and Marco, to prevent him, dropped the
pole and endeavored to seize it too.

“ Let go my fish,” said Jeremiah.



Benerir or tae Dovust. 715

The perch escapes.



“ Let alone my line,” said Marco.

Neither would let go. A struggle ensued,
and Marco and Jeremiah, in the midst of it, fell
off into the water. The water was not very
deep, and they soon clambered up upon the log
again, but the fish, which had been pulled off
the line in the contention, fell into the river,
and swam swiftly away into the deep and dark
parts of the water, and was seen no more. He
was saved by the quarrels of his enemies.

Marco, who was not so much accustomed to
a wetting as Jeremiah was, became very angry,
and immediately set off to go home to the tav-
ern. Jeremiah coolly resumed his position on
the log, and went to fishing again, paying no
heed to Marco’s expressions of resentment.

Marco walked along, very uncomfortable
both in body and mind. His clothes were wet
and muddy, and the water in his shoes made a
chuckling sound at every step, until he stopped
and took his shoes off, and poured the water
out. It was nearly sunset when he reached the
tavern. He found Forester better. He had
left his bed, and had come down into the parlor.
He was reclining on the sofa, reading a book,
when Marco came in.

Marco advanced toward him, and began to



16 Tae Forests or Maing.

Marco’s complaints of Jeremiah. Claims.

make bitter complaints against Jeremiah. In
giving an account of the affair, he omitted all
that part of the transaction which made against
himself. He said nothing, for instance, about
his coming to put his line in where Jeremiah
was fishing, and while a fish was actually near
Jeremiah’s hook, but only said that he caught
a fish, and that Jeremiah came and took it
away.

“ But what claim had Jeremiah to the fish ?”
asked Forester.

“ He had no claim at all,” said Marco.

“You mean, he had no righé at all,” said
Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“ He had a claim, certainly,” rejoined Fores-
ter ; “ that is, he claimned the fish. He pretended -
that it was his. Now, on what was this claim
or pretense founded ?”

“T don’t know,” said Marco, “Iam sure. I
‘only know he had no right to it, for I caught
the fish myself, and he was going to take it
away.”

Forester paused a moment, and then resumed:

“T don’t think that you have given me a full
and fair account of the transaction ; for I can
not believe that Jeremiah would have come and



Benerit or roe Dover. 17
.Marco’s reasoning. Forester’s reasoning.

taken away the fish without any pretext what-
ever. You must have omitted some important
part of the account, I think.”

Marco then told Forester that Jeremiah said
that the fish was just going to bite at his hook ;
and, after several other questions from Forester,
he gradually acknowledged the whole truth.
Still, he maintained that it was his fish. He
had a right to put in his line, he said, wherever
he pleased, whether another boy was fishing or
not; the fish belonged to the one who caught
him ; and, before he was caught, he did not be-
long to any body. It was absurd, he maintained,
to suppose that the fish became Jeremiah’s, just
because he was swimming near his hook.

“ Sometimes one can judge better of a case,”
- said Forester, “ by reversing the condition of
the parties. Suppose that you had been fish-
ing, and a large fish had come swimming about
your hook, and that Jeremiah had then come to
put his hook in at the same place, should you
have thought it right ?”

“Why, I don’t know,” said Marco.

“It is doubtful. Now, it is an excellent rule,”
continued Forester, “in all questions of right
between ourselves and other persons, for us to
give them the benefit of the doubt.”



78 Tue Forests or Marne.

“Trials of criminals, Benefit of the doubt,



“ What does that mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, if a man is tried in a court for any
crime,” replied Forester, “ if itis clearly proved
that he is innocent, of course he goes free. If
it is clearly proved that he is guilty, he is con-
victed. But if neither the one nor the other
can be proved, that is, if it is doubtful whether
he is innocent or guilty, they give him the
benefit of the doubt, as they term it, and let him
go free.”

“JT should think that, when it is doubtful,” said
Marco, “ they ought to-send him back to prison
again till they can find out certainly.”

“No,” said Forester, “ the jury are directed
to acquit him, unless it is positively proved that
he is guilty. So that, if they think it is doubt-
ful, they give him the benefit of the doubt, and
let him go free. Now, in all questions of
property between ourselves and others, we
should all be willing to give to others the bene-

’ fit of the doubt, and then the disputes would be
very easily settled, or rather disputes would
never arise. In this case, for instance, it is
doubtful whether you had a right to come and
interfere while the fish was near his hook ; it is
doubtful whether he did or did not have a sort
of right to try to catch the fish, without your



Beneri? or THE Dovsrt. 79
Peace policy.

interfering ; and you ought to have been willing
to have given him the benefit of the doubt, and
so have stayed away, or have given up the fish
to him after you had caught it.”

“But I don’t see,” said Marco, “why he
should not have been willing to have given me
the benefit of the doubt, as well as I to have
given it to him.”

“ Certainly,” said Forester ; ‘‘ Jeremiah ought
to have considered that there was a doubt
whether he was entitled to the fish or not, and
to have been willing to have given you the
benefit of the doubt ; and so have let you kept
the fish. Each, in such a case, ought to be
willing to give up to the other.”

“And then which of us should have it?”
asked Marco.

“ Why, it generally happens,” said Forester,
in reply, “that only one of the parties adopts
this principle, and so he yields to the other;
but if both adopt it, then there is sometimes a
Jittle discussion, each insisting on giving up to
the other. But such a dispute is a friendly dis-
pute, not a hostile one, and it is very easily
settled.”

“A friendly dispute !” exclaimed Marco; “1
never heard of such a thing.



80 Tue Forests or Marne.
Friendly disputes. Wagon to go to Bath,

“Yes,” said Forester. “Suppose, for in-
stance, that, when you had caught your fish,
you had said, ‘There, Jeremiah, that fish is
yours ; he was coming up to your hook, and
would have bitten at it if I had not put my line
in ;’ and, then, if Jeremiah had said, ‘ No, it is
not mine ; it is yours, for you caught it with
your hook ;’ this would have been a friendly dis-
pute. It would have been very easily settled.”

“T am sorry that I left my pole down at the
river,” said Marco. “I cut a most excellent
pole in the woods, on my way down, and I left
it there across the log. I mean to go down and.
get it early in the morning.”

- “No,” said Forester, “we must be on our
way up the river early to-morrow morning.”

“ How shall we go?” asked Marco.

“T have engaged a wagon here to take us to
Bath, and there we shall find a stage.”

Accordingly, early the next morning, For-
ester and Marco got into a wagon to go up the
river to Bath, which is the first town of any
considerable consequence which you meet in
ascending the Kennebec river. It is true that
Bath is on the west side of the river, and Marco
and Forester were on the east side,—but For-
ester said they could get across by the ferry;



Bewerit or THE Dovsr. 8}

Beautiful views. Farm-house,

when they arrived opposite the town. Marco
and Forester sat on the seat of the wagon,
and a boy, who was going with them for the
purpose of bringing the wagon back, sat behind,
on a box, which had been put in to make a seath
for him.

It was very pleasant riding along in this man-
ner, upon the bank of the river. There was
the surface of the water itself, with the boats
and vessels upon it, to furnish a perpetually
changing series of beautiful views. The shores
were picturesque and beautiful too, and as the
course of the road was generally very near the
water, it gave the party a fine opportunity to
see these views.

Marco frequently called Forester’s attention
to objects that he saw as they rode along ;—
such as boats on the water, fishes jumping up,
and rafts tied to the shores, or slowly coming
down the stream.

At one place there was a very pleasant farm-
house by the side of the road. Marco said that
he should like to live there very much. There
was a little path leading from opposite to the
house down to the river, and there were two
men in a boat a little way from the shore bring-
ing in a log. F



82 Tue Forests or Maine.



THE WAGON RIDE.

Marco proposed to Forester to stop and let
him go down upon the rocks a few minutes,
and see what the men were going to do with
that log; but Forester thought it would be bet-
ter to go on, and make the best of their way to
‘the end of their journey. |

Marco saw some very square and regular
rocks upon this shore, that appeared in some
respects as if they were artificial steps made to
go down to the water. He said he thought



BENEFIT oF THE Doust. 88

Marco's pole.

that those rocks must be an excellent place to
fish.
This reminded him of his fishing-pole, which
he had left behind, near the mill. He said he
was very sorry that he did not have time to go
down and get it.

* It would not have done any good,” said For-
ester, “ for we could not carry it with us in this
wagon.”

“Why, yes,” said Marco, “ we might put it
on the bottom of the wagon, and let the end run
out behind. It is pretty long, I know.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “ we might have put it
in the wagon, in that way, and thus possibly
have got it to Bath, but what should we do with
it then ?”

“Why, then,” said Marco, “we might put
it on the top of the stage, I suppose. Would
not they let us ?”

“It would not be very convenient to carry a
long fishing-pole, in that way, to Quebec,” re-
plied Forester, “through woods, too, half of the
way, full of such poles. You might stop and
get accane or staff, if we find a place where
there are some good ones. A cane would. be
of some service to you in walking up the hills,



84 Tue Forests or Maines.

Canes. Qualities of wood,



and that could be taken along with our baggage
easily.”

Marco said that he should like this plan very
much ; and, as they rode along, they looked out
carefully for a place where there were slender
saplings growing, suitable for canes.

“What kind of wood would you have?”
asked Forester.

“TY don’t know,” replied Marco ; “ which kind
is the best ?”

“The different woods have different quali-
ties,” replied Forester. “Some are light and
soft; and these are very good qualities for cer-
tain purposes. Some are hard. Some are stiff,
and some flexible. Some are brittle, and others
tough. For a cane, now, do we want a hard
wood or a soft one ?”

“ Hard,” said Marco.

“ Why ?” asked Forester.

“Oh, so that it shall not get indented or

* bruised easily,” replied Marco.

“ A light wood or a heavy one?” asked For-
ester.

“ Light,” replied Marco, “so that it will be
easy to carry.”

“ Stiff or flexible ?” asked Forester.

“Stiff,” replied Marco.



Benerit or THE Dovat. 85

ee
Conversation. Qualities of pine wood. Oaks and beeches.

“ Yes,” said Forester. ‘Some kinds of wood
grow straight, and others crooked.”

“ We want it straight,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “The pine grows
very straight. If we could find some young.
pines, they would make us some beautiful-look-
ing canes.’

“ And how is it with the other qualities ?”
asked Marco.

«“ Pine is very light,” said Forester.

“ That is good,” said Marco.

“ And soft,” said Forester.

«That is not so well,” said Marco.

“ And it is very weak and brittle.”

“Then it will not do at all,” said Marco.
«T want a good strong cane.”

Just at this time, they were ascending a hill,
and, after passing over the summit of it, they
came to a place where Forester said he saw, in
the woods, a number of young oaks and beech-
es, which, he said, would make good canes.
The oak, he said, was very strong, and hard,
and tough ; so was the beech.

“Only there are two objections to them for
canes,” said Forester, as they were getting out
of the wagon; “they are not so light as the
pine, and then, besides, they are apt to grow



86 True Forests or Maine.

Value of pine. Uses of it.

crooked. We must look about carefully to find
some that are straight.”

“ Which is the most valuable of all kinds of
wood ?” asked Marco.

“ The question is ambiguous,” said Forester.

“ What do you mean by that ?” asked Marco.

“T mean, that it has two significations,” re-
plied Forester; “thatis, the word valuable has
two significations. Pine is the most valuable
in one sense; that is, pine is, on the whole,
most useful to mankind. But there are other
kinds of wood which are far more costly.”

“T should not think that pine would be so
valuable,” said Marco, “it is so weak and
brittle.”

“Tt is valuable,” said Forester, “because, for
the purpose for which men want the greatest
quantities of wood, strength is not required.
For boarding the outside of buildings, for exam-
ple, and finishing them within,—which uses, per-
haps, consume more wood than all others put
together,—no great strength is required.”

“TI think people want more wood to burn
than to build houses with,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “perhaps they do.
They do in this country, I think, but perhaps
not in Europe and other old countries. But pine,



Benerir or THE Doust. 87



Good canes.

though it has no great strength, is an excellent
wood for building, it is so soft and easily
worked.”

Forester’s remarks, upon the different kinds
of wood, were here interrupted by Marco’s,
finding what he considered an excellent stick
for a cane. When he had cut it, however, he
found that it was not so straight as it had ap-
peared to be while growing.

However, after some time spent in the selec-
tion, Marco and Forester both procured excel-
lent canes.

“This is good, hard wood,” said Marco, as
he was trimming his cane, and cutting it to a
proper length.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “it is beech, and beech
Is very hard.”

After finishing their canes, they took their
seats in the wagon again.



88 Tue Forests or Marne.
Woods. Costly woods. Ebony.

Cuarrer VI.
Esony anv Pine.

ANE riding along a short distance in

silence, Marco introduced the subject
of the different woods once more. He asked
Forester which was the most costly of all the
woods. 7

“Costly is not an ambiguous term,” said For-
ester; “that means, which has the greatest
money value.”

“Yes,” said Marco. “I suppose it is mahog-
any.”

“O no,” said Forester.

« Rosewood, then,” .said Marco. “It must
be rosewood. My mother has a beautiful piano
made of rosewood.”

“No,” said Forester. “ Ebony is more costly
than either rosewood or mahogany. They sell
ebony by the pound.”

“Where does ebony come from?” asked
Marco.

“TY don’t know,” replied Forester.



Esony AND Pine. 88

Color. The natural color best.

“ T should like to know,” said Marco. “ How

much do they sell it for, by the pound ?”
- “IT don’t know that, either,” said Forester.
“T know very little about it, only that it is a
very costly wood, on account of some peculiar
properties which it has, and its scarcity.”

“ What are the peculiar properties ?” asked
Marco.

“One is, its great hardness,” said Forester.
“Tt is very hard indeed. Another is, its color.”

“ What color is it ?” asked Marco.

“ Black,” replied Forester,—“ black as jet;
at least, one kind is black as jet. There is a
kind which is brown. That kind is called
brown ebony.”

“T don’t think black is very pretty,” said
Marco.

“No,” said Forester; “there does not seem
to be much beauty in black, in itself considered ;
but then, for certain purposes, it is much hand-

“somer than any other color would be; for a
cane, for instance.”

Marco looked at the beech cane which he had
before him, and began to consider how it would
look if it were black.

“T suppose I could paint my cane black,” said



90 Tue Forests or Maine.

“Ebony and ivory. Piano-forte keys.

he, after a moment’s pause, “if you think it
would be any better.”

“No,” said Forester ; “I should prefer hav-
ing it of its natural color. The bark of the
beech has beautiful colors, if they are only
brought out by a coat of varnish.”

“ Brought out ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester. “There is a kind of
fine dust, or something like that, which dims the
bark ; but, when you put on oil or varnish,
there is a sort of transparency given to the out-
side coating, which brings the natural color of
the bark fully to view.”

“ Then I will get my cane varnished, when I
get to Bath,” said Marco.

“Ebony,” said Forester, “is used a great
deal where a contrast with ivory is wanted.
Ebony is hard and fine-grained, like ivory, and
it takes a high polish. So, whenever they want
a contrast of black and white, they take ebony
and ivory.”

“When do they want a contrast between
black and white ?” asked Marco.

“One case,” replied Forester, “is that of the
keys of a piano-forte. It is necessary to have
the short keys, which mark the semi-tones, of a
different color from the others, so that the eye



Espony anv Ping. 91
Staining. . Wear.



will catch them as quick as possible. So in a
chess-board. They sometimes make chess-
boards with alternate squares of ebony and
ivory.”

“I think it would be just as well to take
common wood and paint it black,” said Marco,
“rather than pay so much money for ebony.”

“ No,” said Forester, “that would not do so
well. The paint would wear off; or, if it did
not wear off by handling, still, if it got a little
knock or hard rub, a part would come off, and
that would show a little spot which would be
of the natural color of the wood. This would
look very badly.

“Then, besides, painted wood,” continued
Forester, “ can not be finished off so smoothly,
and polished up so highly, as a wood which is
black by nature. They have a way of staining
wood, however, which is better than painting
it.”

“ How is that done ?” asked Marco.

Sa Why, they make a black stain,” said For-
ester, “ which they put upon the wood. This
staining soaks in a little way, and blackens the
fibers of the wood itself, beneath the surface.
This, of course, will not wear off as easily as
paint.” oo



92 Tue Forests or Maine.

“Ebony very hard. . Latha,

“TI should not think it would wear r off at all,”
said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “for if a cane, for
example, is made of any wood stained black,
after a time the wood itself wears away farther
than the staining had penetrated. Then the
fresh wood will come to view. So that, if you
wish to have any thing black, it is much better
to make it of a wood which is black all the way
through.

“ Besides,” continued Forester, “ebony is a
very hard wood, and it will bear knocks and
rough usages much better than other kinds of
wood which are softer. Once I made a car-
penter an ebony wedge, to split his laths with.”

“ What are laths ?” asked Marco.

“ Laths are the thin split boards which are
nailed upon the sides of a room before the plas-
tering is put on. Sometimes laths are made
very narrow, and are nailed on at a little dis-
tance from each other, so as to leave a crack
between them. Then the plastering, being soft
when it is put on, works into the cracks, and
thus clings to the wood after it has become dry
and hard. If plastering was put on to smooth
boards, or a smooth wall, it would all fall off
again very easily.”



Epony anp Pine. 93

_—_
Lath boards. Use of them. Tho ebony wedge.

“ Yes,” said Marco; “I have seen the plas-
tering coming up through the cracks in the
garret at your house in Vermont.”

“The lath boards,” continued Forester, “are
sometimes made narrow, and nailed on at a
little distance from each other, and sometimes
they are wide boards, split up, but not taken
apart, and then the cracks, which are made in
splitting them, are forced open when the boards
are nailed on. The way that they do it, is this.
They put the wide lath board down upon a
plank, and make a great many cracks in it with
an axe. Then they put it upon the wall, or
ceiling, and nail one edge. Then they take a
wedge and drive it into one of the cracks, and
force it open as far as they think will be neces-
sary to let the plastering in. Then they put in
some more nails, in such a manner as to keep
that crack open. Then they wedge open an-_
other crack, and nail again; and so on, until
they have nailed on the whole board, so as to
leave the cracks all open.”

“And you made the carpenter an ebony
wedge ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester. ‘He had had wedges
made of the hardest wood that he could get, but
they would soon become bruised, and battered,

4



94 Tue Forests or Maine.
Tops. Top of lead.

and worn out, with their hard rubbing against
the sides of the cracks. At last, I told him that
I had a very hard kind of wood, and I gave him
a piece of ebony. He made it into a wedge,
and, after that, he had no more difficulty. He
said his ebony wedge was just like iron.”

“Was it really as hard as iron?” asked
Marco.

“ Oh, no,” said Forester,— but it was much
harder than any wood which he could get. He
thought it was a very curious wood. He had
never seen any like it before.”

“J should like some ebony,” said Marco.

“ Ebony would be an excellent wood to make
a top of,” said Forester, “it is so hard and
heavy.”

“T] should like to have a top hard,” said Mar-
co, “but I don’t think it would be any better
for being heavy.”

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “the top would spin

-longer. The heavier a top is, the longer it will
spin.”

“ Then I should like a top made of lead,” said
Marco.

“It would spin very long,” said: Forester, “ if
it was well made, though it would require more
‘strength to set it a-going well. But lead would



Exsony ano Ping. 05

Ole ~~ Meaning of the word.
be soft, and thus would easily get bruised and
indented. Besides, black would be a prettier
color for a top than lead color. A jet black
top, well polished, would be very handsome.”

“Ts black a color ?” asked Marco. “I read
in a book once that black and white were not
colors.”

“ There are two meanings to the word color,”
said Forester. “In one sense, black is a color,
and in another sense, it is not. For instance,
if a lady were to go into a shop, and ask for
some morocco shoes for a little child, and they
were to show her some black ones, she might
say she did not wish for black ones ; she wished
for colored ones. In that sense, black would
not be a color.

“On the other hand,” continued Forester,
“she might ask for silk stockings, and if the
shopkeeper were to ask her what color she
wanted, she might say black. In that sense,
black would be a color.”

“Which is the right sense ?” asked Marco.

“ Both are right,” said Forester. “ When a
word is commonly used in two senses, both are
correct. The philosophers generally consider
black not to be a color; that is, they generally
use the word in the first sense.”



96 Tue Forests or Maine.

Long raft.

“ Why ?” asked Marco.

“ For this reason,” replied Forester. He was
going on to explain the reason, when suddenly
Marco’s attention was attracted by the sight
of a long raft of logs, which was coming down
the river. The road just previous to this had
taken a turn away from the river, so that the
party had been riding at some distance from
the bank, and out of sight from the water, but
now it caine suddenly into view, just as this raft
was passing by. There were two men on. the
raft.

“See those men on the raft,” said Marco.
“ They are paddling.”

“No,” replied Forester ; “they are sculling.”

“Sculling ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “They always scull
araft. It is a different motion from paddling.”

Marco watched the men attentively, examin-
ing the motion which they made in sculling, and
considering whether he might not have sculled
his raft to the shore in the same manner.

“ What straight logs!” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester; “the pine-tree
grows up tall and straight, and without branches,
to a great height. This is the source of some
of its most valuable properties. It makes the



Esony anp Pine. 97
The pine-tree. Many branches.
wood straight-grained. That is, the fibers run

smooth and regularly, from one end of the stem
to the other.”



THE RAFT.

Just at this time, Forester saw a large pine-
tree growing alone, by the side of the-road they
were traveling. This solitary tree had a great
many branches growing out from the stem, in
every part, from the top to the bottom.

“That is because the tree grows by itself,”
said Forester, “in the open field. Those that

G



98 Tue Forests or Maine.

Pines in the woods. Knots made by branches,

grow in the forest do not throw out branches
from the stem, but they run up to a great height,
with only a little tuft of branches on the top.”

“T don't see why they don’t have branches
in the woods,” said Marco.

“ Because,” replied Forester, “ where trees
grow close together, the light and the air is ex-
cluded from the lower parts of the stems, and
so branches can not grow there. Nothing can
grow without light and air.”

“I've seen monstrous long potato sprouts
grow in a dark cellar,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester; “so have I.- I did
not think of that. -But they don’t grow very
well.” oo

“They grow pretty long, sometimes,” replied
Marco.

“ At any rate,” said Forester, “the branches
of trees will not grow from the stems of the
trees near the ground, in the woods; and this
is of great importance, for, whenever a branch
grows out, it makes a knot, extending in to the
very center of the tree. This would injure a
pine log very much, as the knot would show in
all the boards, and a knot is a great injury to a
pine board, though it is of great benefit to a
mahogany one.”



Esony AanpD Pine. 99
Pine very durable. : GR.

“ Why ?” asked Marco.

“ Because it gives the wood a beautiful varie-
gated appearance when they get it smoothed.
So that the more knotted and gnarled a log of
mahogany is, the better. It makes the more
beautiful wood. But in pine, it is not beauty,
but facility of working, which is the great ob-
ject. So they always want to get pine as
smooth and as straight-grained as possible. So
that one of these trees that grow detached, in
the fields, would not be of much value for !um-
ber. It has so many branches, that the boards
made from it would be full of knots.”

« That is the reason, I suppose,” said Marco,
“why they don’t cut them down, and make
them into boards.”

“ Perhaps it is,” replied Forester.

“Has pine any other very good qualities ?”
asked Marco.

“J believe it is quite a durable wood,” said
Forester. “ At any rate, the stumps last a very
long time in the ground. I have heard it said,
that there are some stumps in the state of
Maine with the old mark of G. R. upon them.”

“ What does G. R. mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Georgius Rex,” replied Forester,—“ that is,
George, the king. If there are any such, the



100 Tus Forests or MatIne.
Very old stumps. Stump fences,

mark on them means that they belonged to
the king of England, before this country was
separated from England. Im those days, the
king’s workmen went into the forests to select
and mark the trees which were to be cut down
for the king’s use, and these marks were left
upon the stumps.”

“And how long ago was that?” asked
Marco. ,

“O, it must have been sixty or seventy years
ago. But I can hardly believe that the stumps
would last as long as that.”

“I mean to ask some of the men, when I get
up in the woods, how long the stumps do last,”
said Marco.

“« They last very long, I know,” said Forester.
“The people after getting tired of waiting to
have them rot out, tear them up with machines,
and make fences of them.”

“T don’t see how they can make fences of
stumps,” said Marco.

“They put them in a row, with the roots in
the air,” replied Forester. “They make a fun-
ny-looking fence.”

Just at this time Marco perceived a large
town coming into view before them, which,
Forester told him, was Bath. There were sev-



Full Text
xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080530_AAAAAO' PACKAGE 'UF00002225_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-05-30T13:50:47-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:13:48-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 298364; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-18T03:29:48-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '415534' DFID 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBR' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00002225_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 0e4086bda0eb297956e4bc50eb265064
'SHA-1' c3c88d7ae5d7deadd9db8662209e599b2004146b
EVENT '2011-12-16T18:09:03-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2013-12-18T03:22:43-05:00'
xml resolution
'13' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBT' 'sip-files00003.txt'
a5410bfe07c10b93d235f91266cb11c5
6a2ff939ae1880c5534c12cdb3cdbacc937ec937
'2011-12-16T18:05:29-05:00'
describe
'318' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBU' 'sip-files00004.txt'
64e7cc715a059fe62295546e298cf721
a24c9103dc71c0a3ed7b75850e1b002c1c373e71
'2011-12-16T18:08:51-05:00'
describe
'906' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBV' 'sip-files00005.txt'
c15374beb8c6f68dc50c05b957ca475f
ff10cd2514c9a275902296b931e9590575b36fb5
'2011-12-16T18:07:35-05:00'
describe
'449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBW' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e2aef6d8a1d09ad88ff1c15ae56a277b
c55cdf91eb1f677b129bc46b8ece15f8abdd00b0
'2011-12-16T18:06:19-05:00'
describe
'502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBX' 'sip-files00007.txt'
21e0e8b9c19270fd14e4ea41a67f7c9e
10b515ddc54e2a54b5a7db024ba8d18f603cda7d
'2011-12-16T18:10:23-05:00'
describe
'436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBY' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e09a5bb04e8c1d2d79eec301503d0e17
62ace6eb7888446980d80b9154cd33a9b20b1a2f
'2011-12-16T18:07:42-05:00'
describe
'198' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMBZ' 'sip-files00009.txt'
b39ef63b3e76734eca7c764b16a3f7e2
a5d9b08f811167f4cedf8a2c88dd834dbf9789bf
'2011-12-16T18:04:43-05:00'
describe
'270' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCA' 'sip-files00010.txt'
94a10962ebdc28761fd672823c1944b3
73e286d9443ac29539332b3d081dfe2b7db2d30c
'2011-12-16T18:05:06-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCB' 'sip-files00011.txt'
da3b3022f41c05d98e413b8828101528
3147643b70a55329ab5e142dc72ca1498b24aa8d
'2011-12-16T18:08:56-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCC' 'sip-files00012.txt'
7ccbf614dfb22f5cbb8c06015f97c343
32b0fffa72408ecb6b5a37457b4492140d9abc37
'2011-12-16T18:10:44-05:00'
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCD' 'sip-files00013.txt'
019901fcb4359e8bd705a922d7b73b54
6ce8a57f068e3f3b06ef7d9e4088634de3d578fc
'2011-12-16T18:03:41-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCE' 'sip-files00014.txt'
ee446776122bd1c3487dd24981dee6ec
76c0c84f0a9d565325c97c8213b8b9ae2b5dc1a6
'2011-12-16T18:05:31-05:00'
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCF' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c5bf52cca22af45f315c183f1c656214
c2cd14534563e8f952403050638195ce355387d5
'2011-12-16T18:08:28-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCG' 'sip-files00016.txt'
20666e7053917ad669c3ffe5b256cdc7
1554a026d02436aef045d25a6c0e18395eea2b13
'2011-12-16T18:10:10-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCH' 'sip-files00017.txt'
0295a19b3e81f4547c71567eb0a2a88c
a483ce1f51fb550c29b62a1d510cabd04797f0d0
'2011-12-16T18:05:59-05:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCI' 'sip-files00018.txt'
fb1d4fb8bdeea37695a0939ccc8cf21b
583c176401d67630daca158aea241343209f25d5
'2011-12-16T18:11:51-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCJ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
dddc2a8daeae501a3e988a5d5949a039
0b96d84e6504b8db483d5a83883322b9b14b250e
'2011-12-16T18:07:50-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
46c8c9f9b6c7b669704e17c48a62c8d3
3a824093eaa3804a4429ff4729b8a44f1a7ce428
'2011-12-16T18:08:27-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCL' 'sip-files00021.txt'
e349cbd528385b7547298192e9cff239
39d6d4a47721ec5bb97b4613b29bcda3ea208abb
'2011-12-16T18:05:23-05:00'
describe
'582' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCM' 'sip-files00022.txt'
fba9e252e6eea6b48830b4e986f429e3
8d86f1ba7bb5ace8dfb75b1eaf9a95928a9ae210
'2011-12-16T18:02:52-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
8e6aa2ab8546b0006a5c171cdf5c809a
ded725af4cd20bdde5153034b2839db6b50fd966
'2011-12-16T18:02:24-05:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCO' 'sip-files00024.txt'
9dbe299c2710e3060012d5b5755e3555
70309e6d6100217ff75bf75e6e4e7b1b94f3e1d2
'2011-12-16T18:06:42-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
9f2be61fd7c68c18f34819d1b23d12a1
42db89c75aae3d07f1b27fa31fca984fa332a61b
'2011-12-16T18:04:08-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCQ' 'sip-files00026.txt'
725d22545d457aae0271995e2487b5dc
53a8be7b237435f4778683f126f18538ea355f4a
'2011-12-16T18:07:00-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCR' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ba7cb23adb8cdefc035333c886d2c0c0
2c320b7e17898cbe54056969b0ba7bbb6ce6e2ad
'2011-12-16T18:09:34-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
f47a738d4f9ff4ecabb82330b50bae85
41c2ffea7a354c01605f97663fe2171114e7a85a
'2011-12-16T18:03:12-05:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCT' 'sip-files00029.txt'
4e9403b45dd8454e0b160386fd184cbf
99bde84876bd5698b68f37eb846fef0128e856a1
'2011-12-16T18:07:53-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCU' 'sip-files00030.txt'
fe9b7d0d3b1c5178b9d412b7b334342c
6f217eaa514c68009011a73191181bd9199b7d3e
'2011-12-16T18:07:55-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
fcf79b205e76769320554d0d522ed025
04033c3b83c1893c6f54a2dab96c0a56d3b22d37
'2011-12-16T18:03:24-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCW' 'sip-files00032.txt'
1c5a460c7ffd91e8348040d6577399ea
3a9f19cfaff204e5f31f857cffb0fd1183fae5d4
'2011-12-16T18:09:14-05:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
b2d89b2c3e1e4acb368f303f5fee7a99
0100282105ab3d51344dcd4cb08e0c6989dc2aba
'2011-12-16T18:02:47-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCY' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d46b58648c3b7d776e5f9e480c02596e
67149d8b52d2af0317ab3d9a1213cd28d5893dcc
'2011-12-16T18:03:06-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMCZ' 'sip-files00035.txt'
f77ab0f8391e182e86c9b77b8e15a817
231130b7351f8b0a23ee8aa8453c6310e1499607
'2011-12-16T18:07:41-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDA' 'sip-files00036.txt'
a6aec52c7fdc687dcf80337bcb254342
a8392239dd19fa610066d46b2484f76b46261002
'2011-12-16T18:11:00-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDB' 'sip-files00037.txt'
931522d1669ca9033d18bd12c4588153
7e22a65dba24c589c13191b964d943a65d0ad31a
'2011-12-16T18:06:47-05:00'
describe
'549' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDC' 'sip-files00038.txt'
53a7f11cef55139e7ed2a0eb4ad06e6b
f85ce47fce28468614db44fb69fb094d3ce8bb7b
'2011-12-16T18:03:25-05:00'
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDD' 'sip-files00039.txt'
5d641f17bc37834e3c940aeaf0b94751
b98d9149151b5eb8616287d49e95a72e067ae51a
'2011-12-16T18:08:09-05:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDE' 'sip-files00040.txt'
9ca63b5905153dcb0e424150c1373941
be31a5bb9f99361c5644716474c035cec7afb075
'2011-12-16T18:11:38-05:00'
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDF' 'sip-files00041.txt'
429056a503f83a31ea06256433e31c2f
489b65abb737650164b7356f38cf75c10fe3f5ab
'2011-12-16T18:04:15-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
13138a87bc1e8de5ff521a9dea5d8cc0
3cb0218cd2d4a8706e1bf257acd63fb0e05971bc
'2011-12-16T18:02:57-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDH' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c318c682a1d0d6e7bdad30584da51927
9b459433a78525625862e64588c77a32231f1658
'2011-12-16T18:06:37-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDI' 'sip-files00044.txt'
65b52b4d47b2ff653b768bdcb33e2fd2
53ce71232f185cfe99bf3b6595e0279e6d7a3d5e
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDJ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
9adc368e6dcbe1e9b2a830b68581a7e3
2d53bb92d76957608e39212298c7fa82019d0c27
'2011-12-16T18:10:48-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
1c621898d6c27ed3040fafca8537a656
f0c0c48fed94b4409a5ea452b80f870c7e5786e2
'2011-12-16T18:08:49-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDL' 'sip-files00047.txt'
aeef473fe1152a66ac5d03807eae9727
0a6aa7eb98f73273a5352270bcc144e5abfba9ca
'2011-12-16T18:02:49-05:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDM' 'sip-files00048.txt'
dbe1c429cda25991259d979980023e9e
0c43ab571117d43d110ec5074070fbfed17ef3e8
'2011-12-16T18:11:01-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDN' 'sip-files00049.txt'
29b8c618934bc699179a1c4ee0d60f06
118aad20f686bc496d383eeb96ab36e14c4a9556
'2011-12-16T18:07:27-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDO' 'sip-files00050.txt'
6fe204cf6a8f9fbd4306e47a1d6ef292
0be2b04a1e94a94d31093605d1a3ef64b4bf0d7a
'2011-12-16T18:09:31-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDP' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8997f311b1d6abb49c000876e08c408f
5ebbb0d326543f3c4abcf5e46853f68022e522d1
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDQ' 'sip-files00052.txt'
817ab858b486aa77ea72d3c8e143faf8
11a003388e53a7d3461fa97c370f3f021b7f684f
'2011-12-16T18:04:24-05:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDR' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f1870ffa375dadb98a69e088cc075a77
54ab1bccb34cc52e594d5bb07d4d4431aa9aa4f0
'2011-12-16T18:03:01-05:00'
describe
'284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDS' 'sip-files00054.txt'
f950b9693dbde9bbfefd10c833a24f87
916b32005603497ae9976e181576c488486c5137
'2011-12-16T18:10:51-05:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
48c746ae6b665d0d276de67cb2fcf009
ed83245991797efb75fb0e529dcc14155caa2015
'2011-12-16T18:04:44-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDU' 'sip-files00056.txt'
189cea251b0625ef3c05905e4de1673b
2eb8cce872b3c64b9f6b17b5557ca2612ae784de
'2011-12-16T18:02:55-05:00'
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDV' 'sip-files00057.txt'
651e7f239387c0d1796dc95a579fc138
1a9d8b939f4b726f7db5335a2241376263e35816
'2011-12-16T18:06:08-05:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDW' 'sip-files00058.txt'
9a320e85da02c29b4d9ead00f47c413b
b7d4027f1237c85727782bb1ca0cc9a765f41c5c
describe
'510' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1c77c1c3e7e66310f0638c84f1c33e32
e7589fe6bdd994611d2c3ce90a27f4285ab51d18
'2011-12-16T18:04:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDY' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d395557b295b08be7b77ed653be90a93
105a10175175ee64551cc68df0467de2db7b6644
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMDZ' 'sip-files00061.txt'
b63e4759198e1362a147fc280ea33900
0ad2b5f65e9bfd2b4bc97eb7532f1f10757693f3
'2011-12-16T18:10:33-05:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
59861238b605b174abf1f36f93469717
f519aec917ca56c482f8280a74a954ef68a16dc3
'2011-12-16T18:11:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEB' 'sip-files00063.txt'
abeee1f210c056c493d604970f0e9dde
d6032c47b1b849e061aea83ded9666463fdd469f
'2011-12-16T18:08:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEC' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f8d6dbf80f2b470f5df5cfd8828c286d
26357da921580e689467c0961dd599970f70a8ae
'2011-12-16T18:12:13-05:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMED' 'sip-files00065.txt'
8687a87194e3af6cbae2cafa6341bfc1
bba91cfcc8e45a9592c21246fd68ad8ce7dd4183
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEE' 'sip-files00066.txt'
57c84864a00651c987f02ba6a32a1a6e
6cc6564f197072a4bf0e889c3b0d59e1717e976c
'2011-12-16T18:03:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEF' 'sip-files00067.txt'
162db9c41836ae3c2f854741dd237846
7721e5edf0f0e6e7207dafa3fd7a8b2d0f7d9abf
'2011-12-16T18:04:48-05:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEG' 'sip-files00068.txt'
3b455e2b8cf688513186ed3ef89eae27
f2cfd64c07140fcb4caf84fe690a4c8038e50150
'2011-12-16T18:09:51-05:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEH' 'sip-files00069.txt'
52f384b005f5b1a12d5b127effd9588f
b36b77719cb9fb94b8bdda1c98016b4e3f9cc7af
'2011-12-16T18:12:05-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEI' 'sip-files00070.txt'
b555842b0f83d907c26657871598514d
7833c25b8d946740d518f3e374753f256aa309ab
'2011-12-16T18:09:27-05:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEJ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
389b46c37b99fc253597d2cc9b1a505f
72cf977c742b180de8ca91e903c0f614e8368608
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9dca277d005d6b919b315bc272ac59db
a1ed5274f0a13be2a6135e1b20b54a12d91d39d0
'2011-12-16T18:11:35-05:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEL' 'sip-files00073.txt'
f354d9a52c61aa0d2dd8d0b0ab252397
629a33d8d8c5e18861b7a431e75cb1fe60e82b60
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEM' 'sip-files00074.txt'
758a17452853e3dbf99de3c72123de71
fbd3081953f5d97ff7d5f1011df083633fff1aff
'2011-12-16T18:08:30-05:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
de7f27dedc546332ffaaf18445ac3e17
461cc2521d0d41073ce23b02f1b4251402442de6
'2011-12-16T18:11:42-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEO' 'sip-files00076.txt'
4dfa8e53d3519efc0717364f4ff506ec
ca790a21e2010592163e27d3e041e986697aa251
'2011-12-16T18:08:08-05:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8a55749c96231055225557febe848a15
933c874f3134c7da0f0ad10a0f896f41fd03974d
'2011-12-16T18:07:07-05:00'
describe
'1367' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEQ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
dba7cb5ea5075df0fb29a705f1130f05
7d402a5ea2a50cc6e894425d1086b1a6bfb8f8a3
'2011-12-16T18:02:56-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMER' 'sip-files00079.txt'
4cd224b012c4aec453a261280edb2713
659a2be3afcf327b73ba896c28404381e56f692b
'2011-12-16T18:02:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMES' 'sip-files00080.txt'
9c9f789ad6bfab263052d1185f50c315
4a7f99fbaf566800df6fae4bda23a0d149d5d491
'2011-12-16T18:11:24-05:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMET' 'sip-files00081.txt'
22ee4cc662834fd417656d78517f5d82
bd042937a812c31c6949c7bfbbe68920d9db6eff
'2011-12-16T18:06:34-05:00'
describe
'551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
d26292ce7b1db973ff27bd9d118f469a
d7dbd79882494b60db085842b97a7b36be5ae907
'2011-12-16T18:10:04-05:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEV' 'sip-files00083.txt'
fffa0b94800b194a0854731bb077b0cd
19c1e0fabc87f8bbaa523770641a907a417df08d
'2011-12-16T18:06:59-05:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEW' 'sip-files00084.txt'
5f459dc1e72482da5df152a89bd14ee3
9573b1e23f3c6c8848a75f0f6456840374f06fd4
'2011-12-16T18:04:35-05:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
f33ec41ef11cce2c395bed773636c8f9
fdbb27b1e0b77236b563049eb64ef5049f5ea445
'2011-12-16T18:12:20-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEY' 'sip-files00086.txt'
dc4e2ca04215f4352ab09fc20b93a90f
8d28cbcd2bfc9b0a0faeb7c040d6766bf527f869
'2011-12-16T18:07:33-05:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMEZ' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9324ba9e4ebb4c737956a66f698666a5
5c0b5b3ff465989c3ab27d70e27b23c90b182731
'2011-12-16T18:02:20-05:00'
describe
'827' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
884bd79eb03e446fe39b99b677c9ac1e
1525b3cb537c3d97dd8a012003d7d65172b06e17
'2011-12-16T18:05:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFB' 'sip-files00089.txt'
5272155b640c25eb0925645769dc4b68
33888ae166bd195fa7c3069efc4148bb340fff38
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
87b819a87da97f8cb4003e2e5d781397
ab89515232f5a2309b33f3389d6f69bef2aaae98
'2011-12-16T18:05:20-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFD' 'sip-files00091.txt'
5f7ab207cfa0202475116ec7440145ca
d94f4631be752fb2773d220db2316fd1af23bfc6
'2011-12-16T18:08:05-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFE' 'sip-files00092.txt'
07ca5a520f5604f5dd415da67154bb5b
b39a6418d1e622fc737496f5c34d497929fc500a
'2011-12-16T18:09:36-05:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFF' 'sip-files00093.txt'
cb36612b0fa7d5582851fb59e90a1b84
3f886867c759fa5b044153682c68dc196676018d
'2011-12-16T18:09:07-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFG' 'sip-files00094.txt'
7538759b9aaaf0dcbb33ee6794124f4b
2ad64c8d6666cc9e22dab76fb9bb3273862c4fa9
'2011-12-16T18:03:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFH' 'sip-files00095.txt'
e2c9c541bcaef8a03c8199e6405ec621
6fc8dd9fa07c7f372d9f4c2d2132706f67d31c7d
'2011-12-16T18:05:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFI' 'sip-files00096.txt'
92501d39171b2400bce8cdaa54100834
00082e5294be8013e3230a59e7d76f350357d3c4
'2011-12-16T18:11:40-05:00'
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFJ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
738cc8b79ecc9c80c1c42b9484f741e0
37aac38d692771a8048431ebffc6bd079b6017d8
'2011-12-16T18:10:32-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
ee6b3f53b17961e11992989e8b76109a
e5b9365c8dd107f2b0340c5708f67c2c6631dc61
'2011-12-16T18:11:23-05:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFL' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a9f1b802bbc49613e3a2e70cb0cae86d
067cc4ccb5cb3f9cd3a1b93b4c77265521e5d63e
'2011-12-16T18:02:44-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFM' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d701dafed6a89d1191539c6b26696452
62af0e80ad34db46f2f04e077266a0174c95d0a5
'2011-12-16T18:08:21-05:00'
describe
'1295' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
c8dfd5806c0337c48661f33ecff2dc11
24099dd1358674517ae7b98e130e13d36f5068d1
'2011-12-16T18:10:45-05:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFO' 'sip-files00102.txt'
95d090496e579757e7315ba74ed6a084
3b95d0aa267bb88b2f3db0ac8a35f708932ed783
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
91e99db9dd7fcd7c28df7622a0e9c65d
62f7747bde9d883a862e80eb17f95e5b42cf1640
'2011-12-16T18:04:42-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFQ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
047de07d0898dd517390986210f40c3d
fac96f3ba06814af211d94d0c3a05e837b78016b
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFR' 'sip-files00105.txt'
50b1007a8f668ffde6c6eeee2d0ddda7
13188342f4d120e0f88baa1819616a8bb0123bab
'2011-12-16T18:12:00-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFS' 'sip-files00106.txt'
dc450d1a1a1145d980e6fee8457d1546
6ed0e5eaa810dc2795f9c90ede5d5f952f4e3e13
'2011-12-16T18:05:48-05:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
0a7c8d28f580e19f4d2ba9fcac0781e2
af8cd93f733a068cf0d5123fd4d6c97396c3862d
'2011-12-16T18:06:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFU' 'sip-files00108.txt'
c8f292a51971c5904f6eb64c90c114c8
53ae8574213206649aad3736a4bb79677e18c48a
'2011-12-16T18:08:33-05:00'
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFV' 'sip-files00109.txt'
17b19509fd5fd63f4de49bbe19d51037
dbbbff70ede88ca5e00556605a3267dc0b136b55
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFW' 'sip-files00110.txt'
1861ce10e5d11d10dc46dc557c75ed37
db71238daf940f8e97ddfee4c2fc5ace8e2591b3
'2011-12-16T18:11:17-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
f1d4aa9cecb2e63c83ce1345eccfbf80
c992a075d8a041032b7ebed86d5958a6c842413b
'2011-12-16T18:03:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFY' 'sip-files00112.txt'
3f7b67e18055e0b9c780f5ceeacf3e95
87a608e97b21595604d10f11d913dc16ff525ca2
'2011-12-16T18:07:18-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMFZ' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bd0b829aa82d619a806ebc3048494f74
572b3c1c777fc741a432c26fde22c29d09312180
describe
'566' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6d7402f9f26e733c7352b69572d00168
6c7fd76b71274b86e9b2219fb9259d5f941248d8
'2011-12-16T18:11:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGB' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4514180ab52d5191ee1a8c0a2cea7817
279b020dad77abafed046d48ce3aa2bc5554ee0a
'2011-12-16T18:05:39-05:00'
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
3bc184629070dd6f6a90689220152c78
9ddf95dc9fe37da723d34314467388dcab079543
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGD' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7a93016a4d2781aa00b1fc5cbd0732af
78f7d4a8c4d437a78a088555f3c574c366dca109
'2011-12-16T18:11:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGE' 'sip-files00118.txt'
6ad46234444f80f5299a8192959b9a7b
f9f5cfef97f3b5f0c0941985fb77c6d7f51a5c0a
'2011-12-16T18:10:25-05:00'
describe
'498' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
08c0d13c5a0d0ffcf57e956fea23467f
548051a57c8e80de94ebc86ce8df246bae7bb272
'2011-12-16T18:09:33-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
f05a4dcba38856c9bb718af7f5f16813
cb717ee50deb7ec77238fd35e584abd41b1e26ff
'2011-12-16T18:03:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGH' 'sip-files00121.txt'
81b483ec6f4cd1f37c5b60bbe757163e
3f8f57e6c4e098d00fe92c6c3bdcff5737b85c16
'2011-12-16T18:02:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGI' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4090d692fbb75fb3c4c756ce87173980
08eefcafe38016455ae1112dd19be05e9eb16430
'2011-12-16T18:05:56-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGJ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
40c69b94aafd971adc85eb17a5d52464
10aa79809f8634445d35bbdcb958713de397386b
'2011-12-16T18:02:23-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
2109f82360d5e9c0b53cfc79c623e05c
5cc29bafeb17dbc2ed11f3e77ae57e30e81f8698
'2011-12-16T18:08:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGL' 'sip-files00125.txt'
e7ff055db332fefadb0354842ae47ef5
52600b56e08653418fc06a3185c07f609aeefedb
'2011-12-16T18:03:22-05:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGM' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f163ccd00ef9a8be325541d50268d657
af609aece79434220c4b9c2d17f10bb34849bc85
'2011-12-16T18:06:17-05:00'
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1b935f13c3e5bcd7e7751035102f05b4
779f475181e20a465e0070923d959d4519f9161d
'2011-12-16T18:11:31-05:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGO' 'sip-files00128.txt'
9d2eab360bd5b25806cdfc42675ee2f9
b5a0a628f1c2eefa11e4691e0ff546fda0bc75a7
'2011-12-16T18:04:02-05:00'
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
f6f90d94f0d5fee2c8a1b6ec59285787
144a55e0f6776a46f2192d0809dd51b309519591
'2011-12-16T18:02:27-05:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGQ' 'sip-files00130.txt'
52eabd2325e3b3f6b84492510e407b33
1e329dbac94db184df11682aa76b48ed368dd927
'2011-12-16T18:05:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGR' 'sip-files00131.txt'
0c77287f38a516d22aa6152d94519724
8286a5c2c3d670ec30eb4dad4026736089deea52
'2011-12-16T18:09:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGS' 'sip-files00132.txt'
9a1294d961bbaccf070f02f05818166f
aa73bc94c107fc45507ecac856e4f514da1444ff
'2011-12-16T18:12:01-05:00'
describe
'475' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
4ec45c8058ccf5398ec115ba91cc268c
9ad48927f270e48b2fac9856e7a213c3eb73257f
'2011-12-16T18:11:33-05:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
3700a5306a0bb28197c7ea9d701bc04a
4e22d6106882d7940cbcf68ce9de71a2952627cc
'2011-12-16T18:10:26-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGV' 'sip-files00135.txt'
8c2cec5f24e61d9bf8674dd56569eed7
49c1f0ad737aad6b81b43c9bfcbfbdc47c8b24fe
'2011-12-16T18:09:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGW' 'sip-files00136.txt'
b8aaa630313cbc6068282d4df51e16d3
ad626bcb6a873c6594409ba4ce8b36083fc46891
'2011-12-16T18:07:31-05:00'
describe
'1354' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGX' 'sip-files00137.txt'
ecaab2fb5490268b56584cd2b932dd15
ad6af5fa234ebb33299a62952585fb00dbd3d321
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGY' 'sip-files00138.txt'
73fc280fb2e3bab0e1ea94ec3046729a
5a472358fa5999bb3f29f55ecc6e4480bef203e0
'2011-12-16T18:10:46-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMGZ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
8ae0618c924fe3cff611c7e018d2b638
1d3a6161a10fd0fced12698a053bde6c0d47ddc5
'2011-12-16T18:07:52-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHA' 'sip-files00140.txt'
c2f71462268a776ac26f6887f8dd329a
2cfedefabfdaa548e14d02dadf95e70eccc3b678
'2011-12-16T18:05:30-05:00'
describe
'442' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHB' 'sip-files00141.txt'
f6f90c1943ab462bde39980587cdc210
353bdf72b7c35567d828b9f42c73f0cd11ba2566
'2011-12-16T18:11:19-05:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
c0198699c197d5c2798e1d09383eb78e
cc7d2d3ffe964f73f48fde5f274e7093eab115cf
'2011-12-16T18:11:39-05:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHD' 'sip-files00143.txt'
e8a2d48b9ffe17cd030ade256c586099
f9d330ea0c7d322b916ec9106ed067c63d69030a
'2011-12-16T18:03:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHE' 'sip-files00144.txt'
0c7329107f77afb19993ba59e8485822
6d7cc10c67d9d36e441a3209e4b97589450fc8e8
'2011-12-16T18:08:12-05:00'
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHF' 'sip-files00145.txt'
feaca961946ce856d6b609263f06d825
cbc81a0e01edf5732ba6870b846dc313bce5a4ea
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHG' 'sip-files00146.txt'
10e1786d4d275cf8860fc78d757a1b26
ef07ee5443dd8f6165853c7ca42a8161120d9c63
'2011-12-16T18:02:48-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHH' 'sip-files00147.txt'
f6b9b99f340edba039529ae8d2d20d46
e35e17e5dacc5e851f94fb68777c746b2af2c1dd
'2011-12-16T18:06:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHI' 'sip-files00148.txt'
e6e1ab39cd6b436c6387a4db22b6c1c2
fa244dee52709cc798979607c7eb502513f254b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHJ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
10eeef71a243857cad160fee2db3d51d
6b5e9bfd10bc5b4ec4ba0eb9f9d06134768e2350
'2011-12-16T18:06:21-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
769a98062c2e869685aac1d6f4055af1
c563e8c4e0787fcb7c96f68d8283506bbf159c4c
'2011-12-16T18:05:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHL' 'sip-files00151.txt'
1cb1eedf4cbf9687023ebe298f4145c0
b3d02a04271806669bceaf2c63b9a3ba058242f8
'2011-12-16T18:05:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHM' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a06b9ad816659e6b1cc793583ed1220d
49f6bafc7e7fa04934c6c5f49691eeb42312002f
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
f6f4155d8deb7ecc73419d6a834b98a3
d8acf736fa40d19c9022ca180adff219ef3dcd8a
'2011-12-16T18:04:04-05:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHO' 'sip-files00154.txt'
b6961c33e7afbc61281487e9c0cce6f9
dd49086db3738a1955fa9b92c10b81faac839231
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
8b18ba4d1c34f8f3eaa171d4a74bea38
92cd8da4cd8570c15ff044f4637dd1ad3717aab8
'2011-12-16T18:12:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
6055f7f11e782d6c5ed865e24906e090
cb2a2f8657cd3d230846ed373b04591952d410d4
'2011-12-16T18:07:04-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
9ebdb0875bac74a159cb855f579a5f1e
b6f1c111ac5339d4351501a52db0621675637988
'2011-12-16T18:09:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f9410dcdb4c2cb159c197414cfb4483c
4ea863ab96f214d322de123f606a3567918186bc
'2011-12-16T18:05:16-05:00'
describe
'633' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4722fc2bc051a12dc3e5e0100ed599ae
508bda772394ec3d938e814de919ea41fbc66781
'2011-12-16T18:07:40-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
f09c79cf5e219805b6eec1d26105c89c
76aa7c6990a173effa01c4928b190fb89324455f
'2011-12-16T18:07:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHV' 'sip-files00161.txt'
fcf32f5a4002024aaf898fc25be2228a
186c8c4239a91ab9aabec6246128a0e78080faed
'2011-12-16T18:07:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHW' 'sip-files00162.txt'
cd28d9378dca7a0cfba124a0d52a1043
41dec7a2c2c3d59d579060f311e48bd54f7c5aba
'2011-12-16T18:07:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
abdcd7ea617ddb1b2a92d88bd466cdae
2ec1670c85256fa43dcfa0c9bcac914d6dbb898a
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
445e2ebb0175098892a22da7140a50d1
19f0b6d3a74a0441a107a94f2e8d2d3d8bb7ebaa
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMHZ' 'sip-files00165.txt'
a253344c84d2e99925de52fe151860f2
15b4d5c9a14223a560ea46510cc498895cacfc4d
'2011-12-16T18:02:21-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
d20054f0dcf31b88316eb99cc2f5fc63
8e156f2775979d6749f2b636d7d92565219db14f
'2011-12-16T18:05:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIB' 'sip-files00167.txt'
96ada22a0769dd518ae8189550a129a3
6d0930e39be2fc96de92a85d5ec625617918e441
'2011-12-16T18:06:52-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
0edcfef78e86012ff5e47275315563f4
8ec2cca29a7c3317c46bf9b74340393d3fceaca3
'2011-12-16T18:03:39-05:00'
describe
'390' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMID' 'sip-files00169.txt'
dfba2ee0ba3cc29c00720d2de9639a2c
bdc2e0059bb674e6e6dcf7b451ae003a69a7980c
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIE' 'sip-files00170.txt'
6c9653ed44965c1f0ac4e944a4ed6332
9795b13d2662f655edbcb268ab36ade17ed03451
'2011-12-16T18:04:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIF' 'sip-files00171.txt'
ac9b8d998307d38733c984cc9f5c295f
1f11ddc630f3aac4bcf9bbac48cac45bf0382d85
'2011-12-16T18:08:25-05:00'
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIG' 'sip-files00172.txt'
463e2ba84fa2e058e201d51ea97f70e2
1b7ac53d3f92b08cfc656b0c9ef925e5e2b50856
'2011-12-16T18:08:20-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIH' 'sip-files00173.txt'
5b16b56239f26168f378dd583e5c78a4
b3594729f75952f235f35bece69debffdf049af1
'2011-12-16T18:07:37-05:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMII' 'sip-files00174.txt'
9d6f150921746c0a0cde1625726164c7
a9d589c93dd822d74c68f951108f2c55c123b4f0
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIJ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
de44bf32020134f4f38f9baf9a7bf5d9
2d0ca79dd40a38b377314c095a39602e165de2b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIK' 'sip-files00176.txt'
22f4cafe2de2d85b2f263dc9885f2737
a69b2b3c813dbe88c9bc96ff8f22a6135160ec7d
'2011-12-16T18:03:53-05:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIL' 'sip-files00177.txt'
f6f3f048a2f35eb7d4c05c0bb7b8e740
5800b6809e86be76d4515096c77151f834a55b06
'2011-12-16T18:05:34-05:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIM' 'sip-files00178.txt'
22010e031b0997a313dd87536308d943
6c48d407af337a22f04536b3c9284e7622e1c670
'2011-12-16T18:03:55-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
0c8b64a683f64d11df522e1c9bb62af8
087d3c61cb151d843f1d52addc8eb235736a1ac8
'2011-12-16T18:06:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIO' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a5a6a21fa95368f2544f8a483bf928bd
f22348d7127f59357d3f7c1286cb9128f967e51e
'2011-12-16T18:06:48-05:00'
describe
'613' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIP' 'sip-files00181.txt'
536f24e9a24e5e2d09a83412d4eb7c7c
0d81ce90ab5969de195fb677aa727f7db71124e3
'2011-12-16T18:06:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIQ' 'sip-files00182.txt'
87ace0506f63451dd30667c85dad80cc
6cca0d0ba086a60c8ae8c75cbd31b1eec7ebc8ac
'2011-12-16T18:11:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIR' 'sip-files00183.txt'
a1cadbe6b0bae2d2735f18ab6a63d09c
6e0c72f8044d7208d470199ae73f0df499ab75cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIS' 'sip-files00184.txt'
885002573c844c3a96b5306a4ddd1390
a3b18166ecc31cd335dd09ca57f0b25454866338
'2011-12-16T18:11:36-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIT' 'sip-files00185.txt'
f4a3d567e5979486d63222a708e80562
2e57d6ffa33223b7f63da75dfd1708cd107aa1ea
'2011-12-16T18:04:00-05:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIU' 'sip-files00186.txt'
fa3a1545d0a91aa7549e28da4125cabb
eff55caa24f69d98f35dc7b0878170c49f8c5f3a
'2011-12-16T18:03:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIV' 'sip-files00187.txt'
ee91db772c08ca0153d95c4b47f3213c
969d8912c1fcefaaa5dbc76a7eb2781e2eebc0b7
'2011-12-16T18:06:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIW' 'sip-files00188.txt'
2c3afdbb3e46279d6ba69069b1f0c6df
c85dd31fcaaa73c8b3d6bb1ef29e21c51e8c2c58
'2011-12-16T18:03:27-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIX' 'sip-files00189.txt'
db91eba55e6f9c2b916deb8942ff2128
3b7a9c91ca10f016fb4088359061d9c618402df1
'2011-12-16T18:03:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIY' 'sip-files00190.txt'
d9e0eeed6839f1ef6ddb316bb7bee5f3
6f041121172e06e942a3358643b840241a9a4ed0
'2011-12-16T18:08:11-05:00'
describe
'534' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMIZ' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3024d281a7184ef3776d89a21a488968
efaf49e100ecbeb063ed81e4f16ca20f5c458fb2
'2011-12-16T18:08:13-05:00'
describe
'368' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJA' 'sip-files00003.pro'
91361818d9a6cf6959865fa54435d6cb
873047989832534d650cae973b60ed440a7aa938
'2011-12-16T18:04:45-05:00'
describe
'5470' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJB' 'sip-files00004.pro'
ae8dc69b55b8a5fd45e9285d4fe340b2
2d0aa27284fdd0a1a6e09174b9d4ebd23713f9d6
'2011-12-16T18:08:19-05:00'
describe
'21814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJC' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ca2f3ae3ec53da4dc6a4ce90c1524ab5
3491683d8c2bdf0898f2ec66a8287190b8411d92
'2011-12-16T18:08:54-05:00'
describe
'11054' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJD' 'sip-files00006.pro'
d211a89c739cc7cc49b48a169f42e588
ef2716a2a801394f0cd175b034d30d44f30c6b91
'2011-12-16T18:12:06-05:00'
describe
'10279' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
47dbb5aa10d9bb7f29f36008b9cc60f5
4f93864af7a7165ce81cbcc5d369e48ff2f3f187
'2011-12-16T18:11:48-05:00'
describe
'8718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
676b324930a73c504c714a6af0b5ea86
f766a234560f8bfe900a593d0dce22cb4d08897c
describe
'4203' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJG' 'sip-files00009.pro'
cc3f87e8ee0f312d0cf284420f8cd494
d4af38c4c2c5d3f8c7b2468732499a705078eeee
'2011-12-16T18:03:38-05:00'
describe
'5558' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJH' 'sip-files00010.pro'
cac15d18cf5b1fd05f77e2a8faef1d7d
5bd14530e0f370dc9333f69b0d9204a18a90979a
'2011-12-16T18:11:12-05:00'
describe
'19599' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJI' 'sip-files00011.pro'
e7d6b8687e4febf8e1e2cd13fe19eb86
8a3be13b2267d0e4cebaa80459f554fa34ad4ca3
describe
'31311' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
681485eb3f3c9f2ee25229e569ce26b0
e3143d34b3924defceb8174a01ec048a9e9ed478
'2011-12-16T18:09:19-05:00'
describe
'33227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d2f7e17128275db70e0f249a80b720a3
69e0f1c1623bbae01ef2e1a82726faed1326e9e1
'2011-12-16T18:11:29-05:00'
describe
'30240' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
460822feb73f3801ebc2e7573fdcad13
295508af234bf9982ddc6e5fb001ff07df3193e9
describe
'22857' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
3c45bc3254d405bffaedd4838788a320
fcdb5d374935e53c1012109c7fcc5167563d008f
'2011-12-16T18:05:57-05:00'
describe
'31594' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2bf0a55b6df684f7cb9b6bb5131aa198
34851e17eb0f71bf13e151b6e5a3f406897e5c52
describe
'29797' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6244257583864aae813b9ebb0a3ec05a
8a1709d4f6ed65e6beff55756f82420765957b85
'2011-12-16T18:05:37-05:00'
describe
'29419' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c47484c351814f94d0b4cad023f495fc
0c8ff30801e4d0ed41f994c5773ac1951f0250da
'2011-12-16T18:08:34-05:00'
describe
'29711' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0f0f32c6c232b4630f02e04acc101385
39a8e730ae578995b742856000f7d4a8a19c368f
'2011-12-16T18:02:31-05:00'
describe
'28547' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
a2768ee94e464d3aa4107ec7ef6aee04
0bbe0a7a374e408f0d0b96d9c87a25ddb7a9cc08
'2011-12-16T18:03:18-05:00'
describe
'31236' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
4d381c849fb0f5dc408563b93f177623
ebeb8fa99bceff75592b0557fee19e7ba7d13c69
'2011-12-16T18:05:12-05:00'
describe
'14183' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
884dd2c3336448070c54379282b85745
908f8aeda0f759fdcdb83ce85e77b7efaea79c6c
'2011-12-16T18:12:22-05:00'
describe
'32462' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
fb4a1ef58556ccc8c5c3daa361db4e68
53326f772bb620da4ee378a8e899feaab41a4b75
'2011-12-16T18:09:42-05:00'
describe
'27536' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
25c94c22adadad489e875a3bcbc6524a
020db2f30b86b90bcbbfca14bf8cbb59fd7f7646
'2011-12-16T18:06:46-05:00'
describe
'27007' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
bdd22e1bc50034e16afe290f8a0e8240
a1cb298b59d6ae2c9c4d111b9b4c85403a38f8de
'2011-12-16T18:06:15-05:00'
describe
'31580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
077fedcf45d848a7a79cd1b0635701b4
e765c5bc4d9d298fa163259eb7becc3d3e30a5d7
describe
'32314' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0a717ab6edbbc1d99c280655c33a8ce2
4d33c3dd9a540c20b9750951cd753366f1c50e10
'2011-12-16T18:07:34-05:00'
describe
'21327' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMJZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2c4dc017df21adeefdddae795bf338c4
be1049ccab1677eaf71e106c31aeeaa774e95144
'2011-12-16T18:04:05-05:00'
describe
'32159' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
7816514f5f66051e391a0b6c96d22fbc
458cb9cc62000a4bb77ed979619bf386df897351
'2011-12-16T18:04:12-05:00'
describe
'30996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
02d2bb9e4eb591aecc56cfd62a0472ee
f3529ae8fa32394a72a35ebdbb2aaabc904543aa
'2011-12-16T18:11:28-05:00'
describe
'30890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
a8cb88c1210e65c256dc1c2a2de1fd2d
781d73ea3d4426ba0f3688703db253ee86d9c117
'2011-12-16T18:08:38-05:00'
describe
'32075' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
04b7b2787f1aa3af3348c7721f8ee6c2
b4f7773efb9fdbf94c31fc4f2f73a1b30b6d441a
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
73bb6ab5cc77f5f754e6d4276b239a0a
a307ca13b555aea9fa7d3b44388a648157964f60
describe
'31593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ff8d02ade7ebb3adaed38f28ec0fee1b
acdfa5e023414f70f191385db2ea221b93c10354
'2011-12-16T18:09:11-05:00'
describe
'27073' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
87ad4d1e75a28b411a191c33bf10fe44
6d22facb8bd7f066c437b5ebfe9eacd7d006bd14
describe
'31033' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
3a394ba24164b94e7b0d21e6e4dff705
19f70e0bb129874a5f97a703bc844be7611ad093
'2011-12-16T18:04:55-05:00'
describe
'29499' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
e63865034c92d6f1a74f954f01ffff3d
5de4c0d4e3f7db67e53bb700d7bfb9beb2dd4ee6
'2011-12-16T18:02:25-05:00'
describe
'12825' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKJ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
2068e03d0fa104505ad50cd8f8ba56b8
74e8b4c374babc93963a1f0db0de439eaa657b43
'2011-12-16T18:07:19-05:00'
describe
'32507' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
cbd939127f48886ad31496f06641c98a
d3ae3e8c833c42534aacde174eaf155a49fb2133
describe
'13462' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKL' 'sip-files00040.pro'
e3b3a2c9f5f4f02063404752e9565674
820439f368d0325dc997ef16c9b687558cdbdeb3
'2011-12-16T18:03:10-05:00'
describe
'24262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKM' 'sip-files00041.pro'
f2b8dbb1ba207284cec4a1a6a9b03e5c
fdd8fce18468e03572cd163ca4e03a2be51e638a
'2011-12-16T18:09:02-05:00'
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9aef842eb63974f15817038fca9975bf
a5909c7fee76f2c9e7b3778e4d7c12ba4596d180
'2011-12-16T18:06:49-05:00'
describe
'33074' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKO' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9d556524464bf760ab72005f764f891f
08537133aec8dfc35328f49ff7225069bd63278a
'2011-12-16T18:10:05-05:00'
describe
'31568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKP' 'sip-files00044.pro'
45166823b280512a3c88252616ff56e6
8078fed8090ceaca5c2757cef299bdd8b0dfe8cd
'2011-12-16T18:03:08-05:00'
describe
'32529' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKQ' 'sip-files00045.pro'
c05d8a5805fbc6b5d801225610e8a9b1
dacbfa0b26a2883c50ae23434fbf97d962266f09
'2011-12-16T18:11:20-05:00'
describe
'28625' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKR' 'sip-files00046.pro'
3d87eb2add48a3fda9b457184f3cee88
777d576042b8ef6601f6851c7505024e3d2ebc77
'2011-12-16T18:11:15-05:00'
describe
'29308' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKS' 'sip-files00047.pro'
42c56aa5930555e23c5067ddb0e68c3d
a1cc14dd1fea622f5472ccf8ced26ac6cbefbe65
'2011-12-16T18:06:10-05:00'
describe
'30443' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKT' 'sip-files00048.pro'
edf2631ffadf02531e9c603c4d1eeef2
140311dea2d6ee719ee72a950c6f6ee287ef3159
'2011-12-16T18:06:35-05:00'
describe
'28889' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKU' 'sip-files00049.pro'
d31bff49e66fa68d481c3f7dec6cf028
6124bad683763e13e55926637beff0b720beb609
'2011-12-16T18:07:09-05:00'
describe
'32169' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKV' 'sip-files00050.pro'
ccb42dda4479accafd3482f900a290c4
1b60b96adafb81f90f07d510cc08f6f41cfb2e27
describe
'30280' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKW' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1ac796fccabad1436782a030697f4f9d
d3a9f26239fdda7f7f9cbabb779eca108ae20400
'2011-12-16T18:03:29-05:00'
describe
'29765' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
9ad85db56450b68f787b28d51b6483bd
70275369f1f38775bce912a0cd932e09852c5368
describe
'30029' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKY' 'sip-files00053.pro'
9df16a0def55c7916f7691ebf4eb67d0
135834185716cc2cf798398a43b714f06dea600c
'2011-12-16T18:03:23-05:00'
describe
'6451' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMKZ' 'sip-files00054.pro'
10000bcd8304a5300b0e2a9ed8ec4fe8
7cb81012a7a4c43f97b7fda5331692558cc7a8c1
'2011-12-16T18:07:44-05:00'
describe
'27181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
7151cca04dee0478ff94ef04fa151fcf
6aece404c0e8373d9f2e4505e41cfb6c6423e9ea
'2011-12-16T18:04:51-05:00'
describe
'32956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLB' 'sip-files00056.pro'
292a8fc4d7ba778105eeddcd2d4afb38
a009ec9191019a0f4e730a0c4510cdb9fa4dc3b6
'2011-12-16T18:03:02-05:00'
describe
'32055' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
94159fa1d5802cd0602ec98c34a0f663
555dd4aa3a3e3e9c322fb24c72b3631e6ddb1479
'2011-12-16T18:12:07-05:00'
describe
'27207' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLD' 'sip-files00058.pro'
3c29b1aee9973e79e13487ca8ca67a06
52f0d913aba49798cd27aa122250325e8c4c42f3
'2011-12-16T18:05:25-05:00'
describe
'11997' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLE' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3df1476f947b8310eb0b687d15a21f70
ecd9b650a67a563d40c5f8d797720642ec5744e3
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
1643d3f07d8a8907ababc91af0eac6c7
9b494aa815bc5dfe57da5e888b3345853147af5f
'2011-12-16T18:02:36-05:00'
describe
'28392' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLG' 'sip-files00061.pro'
344a075e760cac4fb5bdef8a750f4db2
46dd38054534639c1e83a4d958ed9f0fbada37da
'2011-12-16T18:11:46-05:00'
describe
'28518' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLH' 'sip-files00062.pro'
1305187a620ac9dda6ff86a12d97e417
f7d5ac076797e2631169780bdb3a044939785ab4
'2011-12-16T18:08:32-05:00'
describe
'29545' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLI' 'sip-files00063.pro'
2e3894a73d8970351c1b4c87e5ce120d
5a45761db66c49611a18d32329cbbd0e08390ba7
'2011-12-16T18:04:10-05:00'
describe
'29433' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLJ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
590865b857bb14ede6a8ec922b86fcd4
355c2305ecfba289bbc5131384c73d4182dd7c00
'2011-12-16T18:12:18-05:00'
describe
'33463' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
67e52154a2c2899b15fe99dad283b5d6
c0acb090d58703d733bb8cd232746a70743f8372
'2011-12-16T18:09:54-05:00'
describe
'28682' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLL' 'sip-files00066.pro'
93b2ceee779ed25c0a4e44d1cff74932
7ebb704b2ee80410e278828c984f74e36b97e1f5
'2011-12-16T18:06:00-05:00'
describe
'28337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1dc6630d2cc08b27e2e0244368891fc9
39961913886a5b53439158539c2c89d7d7472796
'2011-12-16T18:03:16-05:00'
describe
'27281' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLN' 'sip-files00068.pro'
73effc888f121eae5417de638006c348
c80fdbb08a32eabd349d98cf0184becf4fea11b4
'2011-12-16T18:09:52-05:00'
describe
'25265' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLO' 'sip-files00069.pro'
37d4044f048870db5b8b847bb6fb80d5
97827f0477bce9e26efa13a027ee7a21f2edc0af
describe
'24964' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
49fe115fdd471a7d6abb25ed4e4cd78f
302f8b8071368ffbd7b9a736d68b95105d865727
'2011-12-16T18:11:09-05:00'
describe
'24157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLQ' 'sip-files00071.pro'
d0cd20da755f614ccb9ed8724c3b517e
9476379e8edf7fba98057a5c379d0bb32830e29a
'2011-12-16T18:05:36-05:00'
describe
'27321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLR' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c6056a8a75d896f49d986684d78a4b35
fa66a256444a4f58118d6314e6f32b719cf821a6
describe
'30696' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLS' 'sip-files00073.pro'
e45c2463586b085318964ea13104e02d
a5456e89716c3eb40fdb0b2e5c96fc95cf7732b0
'2011-12-16T18:09:53-05:00'
describe
'30018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLT' 'sip-files00074.pro'
8f1f65706848873e2349f1435c810851
ffa8aef2db80c442312224c1570caa17d3096210
'2011-12-16T18:02:19-05:00'
describe
'31853' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e66e2bbeda0426cd0a21b3b594820820
0fab831f8324c94acd10ab8c3d03cc571bb7abf0
'2011-12-16T18:05:22-05:00'
describe
'28892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLV' 'sip-files00076.pro'
25c97e486712d123165c9d17ceb0ac11
92ca11947ec75c2bc65655471d3307601534ca94
describe
'33063' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLW' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6160a0ed5ac118664cb70f926f252d1a
7fcb888ab43432f92496006906e70dcaca1e5869
'2011-12-16T18:06:13-05:00'
describe
'34216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
88ccabbe9885df9339c7eb9256601136
49550ebc4997e96eb380859b03f969fcec01d71a
'2011-12-16T18:08:10-05:00'
describe
'29867' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLY' 'sip-files00079.pro'
22de3385bf4d63039322329307a1a91b
3e96c211a9ae20ec2638da0bd8dbbaef3244aef9
'2011-12-16T18:03:36-05:00'
describe
'33097' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMLZ' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a909e659e6b36536fd85ddc571b1a1bb
e209a1cf5c2dbffa958c6001cd256a270bea2bb1
describe
'31117' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
1ffe5930ec2228b7205a8f871a42932b
2cb12566f815fa766bf7470de4b567d50989787e
describe
'13224' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMB' 'sip-files00082.pro'
5481c1e6c0597ee0ce440926ef0fc96e
30387102ccb45301f1edc17ac70acbd337159040
'2011-12-16T18:12:02-05:00'
describe
'27865' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
adf4d73bd16f11d974f434c2e30c1746
0950b71a64e0678ff121c40409333e9d4360898f
describe
'26277' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMD' 'sip-files00084.pro'
3fe7a12d1419563e6beed141a1a549ca
8e1ed2f566e78ca137fb43118c2b982f3f8ee5f7
'2011-12-16T18:03:59-05:00'
describe
'29361' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMME' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ce7d5c956fb187ad3dbe7f03626d2c49
3c01040c318fcba5c922245948beb6bb05e8c546
'2011-12-16T18:10:34-05:00'
describe
'31232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMF' 'sip-files00086.pro'
829e9844e329e042ea2d0a10a60ba764
e4b9ea263958bfc4b7850aa8c09e926dd5e2602d
'2011-12-16T18:11:03-05:00'
describe
'19357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMG' 'sip-files00087.pro'
0d716da8e5268f81da5d75485192e436
32e02ee393aa1972261c82968b98e5614109d137
'2011-12-16T18:03:58-05:00'
describe
'19336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMH' 'sip-files00088.pro'
9eb57a59a286e3a151d63c573c40406b
6535968956d542b5d8d1073b0fe57c4aed922f36
'2011-12-16T18:07:16-05:00'
describe
'28312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMI' 'sip-files00089.pro'
78e8d3d903a8c21d9378371c48f062bb
e8dbb2a63e69ff0a386ad5d87e64ca40d3497073
describe
'30609' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMJ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
ae17df83f0bc8edd2c49ed156075efb4
3721e1604e1743f47633326a6b9af2ba426790c7
describe
'29472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
7a1a82520005ac07eabde3c16cd7b6f3
7ede4635d8b83e785de413a3eff8d3ecf6a95326
'2011-12-16T18:06:02-05:00'
describe
'31327' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMML' 'sip-files00092.pro'
9e667d3f016b4bb6ff3090944c5eb7cf
a7d0cbeab52de83cac56867b536b4fec509ea169
'2011-12-16T18:09:45-05:00'
describe
'32389' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
9015475630da90f904cb89dbaed33029
ad9d37f5fbccbfc9f66be494d2672398dc364751
'2011-12-16T18:05:52-05:00'
describe
'28457' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
bdccbc38b81f83f58768ee1eaced8fce
f00620b38d95f59c773857619effbb7d5d686c06
describe
'30897' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMO' 'sip-files00095.pro'
7c5e4b8a3c49b17d6680209376b38374
d6e25e4616ddd8355999e45586afe911483e1634
describe
'30106' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
18b3af1f085cafc974c2134ebb20bf6b
1a8633dbdc7fb7f55a3edb70b39cd6b8ec2ac93a
'2011-12-16T18:09:13-05:00'
describe
'13168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMQ' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ea788acc52033e9902eadbd713c62efb
2b68ec768aa4ac0176f48ef10e491ce00d90fc7f
describe
'30263' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMR' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6eb42cf0bceced2bc52318586271f286
4e759d387605b82f19b3ad7650a146fef8037ee2
describe
'30794' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMS' 'sip-files00099.pro'
366f942a19d3cfd17c618ba1da57704e
94e067a6bea5e048de5b593abeb6739ec539e9ee
'2011-12-16T18:06:41-05:00'
describe
'28417' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMT' 'sip-files00100.pro'
29bb4eb748f5f5006f763db0fa8e7d6c
d7422368d4ac9784ed5ed52dc1481341f1b8ef55
'2011-12-16T18:02:41-05:00'
describe
'31906' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMU' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d598bfe9c304df402ea736d1952c8c68
d877a59f3b0ace7052923ae9c8fdafd7bc62a390
describe
'25920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMV' 'sip-files00102.pro'
0ba08361ab2f0e9af755f42edf3f0bd1
3dfda64d01578adc5c593a61b4568354583bb99e
describe
'29072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMW' 'sip-files00103.pro'
4222ac396d9f04022fbe70fbb906d6d6
3de7b7ce7343ca4cf3fe7f2045d39d312ed2e922
'2011-12-16T18:05:00-05:00'
describe
'30758' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
c5de53e033164ef7a56d2abc468fdd3d
5a7dedfc7190ae8fe3dd2304edad275ce46194ec
describe
'33568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMY' 'sip-files00105.pro'
1f038a3b0b486ce2e851868d1aa623cd
2330366b3d8feebc21b289b1074f1a67ff62fd08
describe
'33073' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMMZ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
c2e8eb814617f4572dbc572a8aee19e3
a04eb0be308c371507b57bf827d422b61f499ba8
'2011-12-16T18:08:16-05:00'
describe
'27313' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
9fe54148d40c1f4793763aabd6b8aca6
5bcf8a83c7487ea92774dd6ec3ffe6b0419e515d
describe
'22589' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNB' 'sip-files00108.pro'
459499e473b05cf0a9a60ad9c7bd88e9
13353a1d424ca49ba19b4267d0a0011b3ef83d9c
'2011-12-16T18:04:03-05:00'
describe
'30275' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
98118c0d724c78bc5d272405eebdc72b
7e0f367ab58bb368b9d1820420c26292d25f6b8b
'2011-12-16T18:10:02-05:00'
describe
'32417' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMND' 'sip-files00110.pro'
1abe9bf229073c23cf4979fbe368dee8
949ae0d0360474d981e8390039e8f37a11631a83
describe
'29810' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNE' 'sip-files00111.pro'
13c10c129ba458b8f1368ba5cbd852b2
16cfce10bcb943975061139139ac3f8517d89a6c
'2011-12-16T18:10:38-05:00'
describe
'31537' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNF' 'sip-files00112.pro'
ab8d046b19f4122096930507d746fc2a
3d86e45182c4f3e6fcd6e2ea4b9acacac68c918c
describe
'27273' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNG' 'sip-files00113.pro'
1ff60f5968230a4598a5650d07a8ade7
6ac2fdfcebd82ca7bb15e175ccd70e136842ebb6
describe
'13634' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNH' 'sip-files00114.pro'
64ce4272a01dec900b1bdc62b546bf1d
7c97cc697ba580f395edde512aa958c34b98f4ec
'2011-12-16T18:11:27-05:00'
describe
'27685' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
124b3c69e028bb40f904610d83ea57e5
0c134da3d4089e9ee1d9590a78ff73d4a27c6da4
'2011-12-16T18:03:13-05:00'
describe
'22192' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNJ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
074b96ea5032fd0d2a4411db5c0d1cb3
e66389299453ad2368f082f5dc626e94488aa880
'2011-12-16T18:10:07-05:00'
describe
'26404' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNK' 'sip-files00117.pro'
a67ac342da8696fff3ebd41b55f39d04
435394e7a5de7bec5cbc923a0a71a48939497f65
'2011-12-16T18:10:59-05:00'
describe
'30678' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
603d6acc63f7f6fe155feb348e4fc217
93f8435eddecf9367a5bd0cc618b7bab02f6feff
'2011-12-16T18:04:39-05:00'
describe
'12054' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNM' 'sip-files00119.pro'
b1a11762e95fc06beda7e0d91f9c7b4b
79e046a4cac5b970d367d606b8d2c4f9fd9cbe65
describe
'32190' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
1b91323976fb802ee54a890bd5c4fd8e
349c9c06fcab82a75b9b6c73a4e26ba2533a4af6
'2011-12-16T18:10:37-05:00'
describe
'29516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNO' 'sip-files00121.pro'
7fc1de229e2026c83b7faf2824f9137e
14c0c384a1271cf951baa8975b368085f2cb86d0
'2011-12-16T18:08:37-05:00'
describe
'29682' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
e6ed3851beffaa957a05484222843034
635cbbc0bebf1a7f91f0cc3e1c7f388e46d33140
'2011-12-16T18:06:24-05:00'
describe
'31753' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNQ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
6cc841c45e752b8f85a14c48d7c3c9cc
11a87abc2c3fc8f487add6624b6cad539130c531
'2011-12-16T18:04:14-05:00'
describe
'29109' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
22d598b6648da6bf96c744fb49f86b68
b62514e4a5b2c8bc6becc13343c9ec5969cd40b7
'2011-12-16T18:10:43-05:00'
describe
'28671' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNS' 'sip-files00125.pro'
5ee2060cc2b362adfc4dacdf4b075944
ad0bc0f4113a2e9e224d2327660b978272ecab04
'2011-12-16T18:08:26-05:00'
describe
'30226' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
1ed5f0a90826862c544ff5fdbc778fc9
d41b33740d728ad60ec4c48fad4ab9197673d582
describe
'32911' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNU' 'sip-files00127.pro'
5f91132814d704fabbf4b36f458915df
fb69545c937a7e016bf0c1d951e21c87f53ce92f
'2011-12-16T18:09:21-05:00'
describe
'29244' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNV' 'sip-files00128.pro'
cd8a4ce26b63f3b5b838300b9db726fb
36597fbab1e68b1fbc01c9367c062539be799342
describe
'23526' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
b4cda8cdd5562a06c24b4863c18e8567
40e6884fad7b7edad24efb277db695e0982dfa40
'2011-12-16T18:08:07-05:00'
describe
'26185' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ca0bc93e650d5f0df33dac81a7783236
7f1db2878768e82c67f3bd76d4fda6ddc26f963d
'2011-12-16T18:06:33-05:00'
describe
'32435' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNY' 'sip-files00131.pro'
c9840b3c804af307f2f71b9fb85b6d6b
a310752205e7022d0ea3a3e4aebd70949c908313
'2011-12-16T18:08:29-05:00'
describe
'32778' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMNZ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
d43d517263b07f6d3b4e3018b0f1d4b9
e9bf273c866401e7e86341f8e0d914d952459e56
'2011-12-16T18:06:58-05:00'
describe
'11588' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
70c4773f679633567f2407c3e753a5f5
b9e8abc8913cf383f941389d30c3a0220c882945
'2011-12-16T18:03:11-05:00'
describe
'28726' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOB' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c0aa2d0fbf0bd9d580f9eb6ae16fb997
b4a23bf4447d9d2988c12aba23463c464bf535b3
describe
'31567' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
045177bc08837a992671a8eb21ed4372
34a0ab134b9dc29eb19d0d66953fad9606fb47aa
'2011-12-16T18:09:40-05:00'
describe
'33543' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
93f08db455a0bcd51d0d35404343cf32
0e12b7e3fabe40432365dd370f1ecb1443ab2de9
'2011-12-16T18:10:55-05:00'
describe
'33293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOE' 'sip-files00137.pro'
bcd9f94619bae2679720519fa0931bc3
8d8209a6ac8965d005655ed6787d63a55196d1c5
describe
'31692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
a09c9463a6d358d8e22766a5a140eaef
7ff1202fa892cf3bbe03c93447a19a19b2feab48
'2011-12-16T18:06:36-05:00'
describe
'27449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
a2217e9ebb436375810d5306dc8ced86
3e013cf636cd7b12f4ce8244da42786cf4ff4b8c
'2011-12-16T18:08:18-05:00'
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOH' 'sip-files00140.pro'
115b97c4c2d4b2eac4ab71a7f3874b31
d1d3bea04371d97b1b51e972ee357149c7123e98
'2011-12-16T18:09:35-05:00'
describe
'10929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOI' 'sip-files00141.pro'
4406b4a6298cfb24966d68c838c0a7c2
985a5d89af6f696dfe0e6817a8a16d425d6ae567
'2011-12-16T18:04:18-05:00'
describe
'30480' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOJ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
f73b23a86e47c2b135eab41c866ba06c
4037b80ce3efc5f0ad010bec0b6fef7e59ba9f67
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOK' 'sip-files00143.pro'
ba9a376593b61b73d9b9eb71020ff528
2d7b0e1b083e322cf69f1e8930aa3a6f310a8d51
'2011-12-16T18:11:57-05:00'
describe
'33168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOL' 'sip-files00144.pro'
794e3ac808143cd1251df5929a057348
aa5d2e0a7e7f2af8588f5c3d713a1cfa3981ee12
'2011-12-16T18:08:02-05:00'
describe
'24093' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOM' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2187e7fe2a0abc7f8840050452374d5f
0bb218f2cbd9c001957b9594254a167e456c9976
'2011-12-16T18:03:26-05:00'
describe
'23321' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMON' 'sip-files00146.pro'
66204b5ec500928109ff251f6a9f23f1
6161239e557172c596b3e5391b8b68c2754b660a
'2011-12-16T18:07:30-05:00'
describe
'27951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOO' 'sip-files00147.pro'
f0bb4669c586367386876d96669f4fca
8749089dc3ab227c13e3acd8d52df1a270d08b67
'2011-12-16T18:02:42-05:00'
describe
'31581' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
67c88611369e788231e38e9e3fe6e3f1
c8b770e8e0fac3b205348ac751f84cc4c14fac6a
describe
'30783' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
5b9f968bb76ee53ec913431b12e33051
eba7e438fcdda6b6dc6914b54f141dcfee37aa36
'2011-12-16T18:03:21-05:00'
describe
'30519' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOR' 'sip-files00150.pro'
d9eecf9c9058f8f6c89c3355064f4359
2b200b24c2b76c1aefc45f617d04115e158ad381
'2011-12-16T18:05:18-05:00'
describe
'31825' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOS' 'sip-files00151.pro'
7c59f9489b1b187066ecfeb198766f8a
4c73cac8388a25132bbc9d0ea62f4af82552da8c
'2011-12-16T18:07:39-05:00'
describe
'29470' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOT' 'sip-files00152.pro'
70d4fc89a120c116e9c8395931d44608
95c6f9ec6926b89a0d778d1a2820439bf8c0d1e3
'2011-12-16T18:04:09-05:00'
describe
'32439' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOU' 'sip-files00153.pro'
a07b56f272ed7065a4498e4209eb72bd
fe797837f4abf5ad3c12cb80aefdb9df8de05c8d
describe
'28838' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOV' 'sip-files00154.pro'
124dc2f1632c842db856148b8f18411d
e9bf0f0b399889a8a613a14f7e7e67fed790193c
'2011-12-16T18:03:48-05:00'
describe
'28713' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOW' 'sip-files00155.pro'
4f5f3c79717e8d65be6eeec8082dcc28
24e4e067e0c565c55b2026b085c00ae1cdd9d2ea
'2011-12-16T18:11:14-05:00'
describe
'33122' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
50cd145911d78bcda4e4b60f83223d85
5de9671e3012009c2d400bbcf41bd314bc980968
describe
'28746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOY' 'sip-files00157.pro'
5ff5a3c92d299a38c73b9c3f29765369
57c743194f28ae8b94138e4b90a76ef8f43885eb
describe
'22920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMOZ' 'sip-files00158.pro'
4e15f60b273866271b0a698bbfaa0eaa
525105b95d60f88bebcb1879e13b06dc2711e339
'2011-12-16T18:10:36-05:00'
describe
'15189' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
9a8e19411ca92001e9a544d69c24721b
045a029c1f0978106f40de736abf17a285429eee
describe
'26163' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPB' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ff4086bc3a2b261a2805256743b45671
e9ff9611ef3e93b4aac376d29a7c0b4868fe3905
describe
'30431' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
b68f855cbf43166ba86f7ddf6510a360
a5e043b3dd34eb505bff00c709330763b1474e78
describe
'29025' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPD' 'sip-files00162.pro'
73b1098c7da9e61c4bce346be6328759
90037894e3139c376fdf25a8e61f9eeebca62a38
'2011-12-16T18:03:14-05:00'
describe
'30562' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
d65c4072748b7facb273def7d99e7f09
60eb559e57e79d9d2a63f474f432707607ea5577
describe
'28631' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPF' 'sip-files00164.pro'
68bd5f84b3e1a082b6a6cec50c41e22b
ea0b6748582d35cec6efed11ddb3f3c88765d2ad
describe
'32052' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPG' 'sip-files00165.pro'
305793cd164d1dae3ed8c2a0878cec73
237f1348496be6ee716f84ab8306db5e3e922a09
describe
'29698' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPH' 'sip-files00166.pro'
7179e7eb161954780adb56d2e9f331ce
0beef82ed585dd5bdfa2f03eaadac49ba9d77262
'2011-12-16T18:06:01-05:00'
describe
'26654' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPI' 'sip-files00167.pro'
75ad5afc220acc95789732c1cf24a5bc
453155a7aee207402ecf45aa31c3a7e23d21ca31
'2011-12-16T18:04:01-05:00'
describe
'29667' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPJ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
c675889db54c6c5e55d339dd5868eee3
508e49e2cd70764ee38e89b0be6fab90e8ad43d5
describe
'9039' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
1c1af8b39eac14af2daa5afe0c267fb7
a48ae1edf92273bc361334b496c6ed4e18fdb7ad
'2011-12-16T18:09:18-05:00'
describe
'25907' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPL' 'sip-files00170.pro'
21b85b408adb21efe2a0f2ec59396b11
75a72549021c5150cd3e8f98c508a16b5f57667e
describe
'30913' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPM' 'sip-files00171.pro'
f5ac6770becd94218ffb41897977396e
ddf0195a5ae24a80e654622cff0cf0c148d2ce56
describe
'12415' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
c125a8cf5ad541ba14f3b6ddc569ed8c
e128ee27cd755cf24b1dbe0e61946ff38539142c
'2011-12-16T18:04:30-05:00'
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
f2cb599ff0d18ef7addf85ae049bd799
68d1ba2fb6f6e9d739c01031ebfff3edefff9605
'2011-12-16T18:07:26-05:00'
describe
'29710' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
eab8bb1f2b1d57688b9014defcd1a6c0
3be5046e99d73641457ca1726f571b17a2fa2036
describe
'30182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPQ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
121559d333cc1093c6111850bbce9481
d9cf50b7511d7282e1390460517baa4802655621
'2011-12-16T18:09:05-05:00'
describe
'31187' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPR' 'sip-files00176.pro'
65fa25526c756265cef2dd40a88ea02c
d5770b2688820143053a0a51a95fcc99c4ee1fa3
'2011-12-16T18:12:23-05:00'
describe
'32841' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPS' 'sip-files00177.pro'
3e4a99bc6cac74a1f022c1744a747473
eb0435deec94e4f69e3a8bacc5664252ced0ba69
'2011-12-16T18:11:53-05:00'
describe
'32097' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPT' 'sip-files00178.pro'
ebe8ecd78a6ee96c664710b336e82b32
db900f6788048fc8f1a82b2700935281ec0461c9
'2011-12-16T18:05:21-05:00'
describe
'33184' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPU' 'sip-files00179.pro'
f65a3236879fc3288fa2406cbb765119
2cc956a526d40ae9dfa576f16f7cf3a73d9935c5
'2011-12-16T18:05:51-05:00'
describe
'30012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
9c24f04918fbe453e3f85d610a65b8d8
e20d4fe5552a306a5cbeba0a652a7272555b5966
'2011-12-16T18:04:07-05:00'
describe
'14983' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPW' 'sip-files00181.pro'
2d2eea8b2f5b024a81caa23335f39ea8
a20dd9816dc64ab3838ce41d2be203a7af14f91c
describe
'30663' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPX' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a94325baaa25e50c1a771cc5afd2640a
38c2857fb95d3bd329a0aad641754b0c07c3270b
'2011-12-16T18:12:15-05:00'
describe
'31123' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPY' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5c68b5f3e35f780a5ce8ae88cfd319cb
7db3fe1c6e3afebb72de984e2fb0b569c376f8c3
'2011-12-16T18:10:24-05:00'
describe
'29294' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMPZ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
052e658442af6e1296dad6b39fe5e108
96db3a1ab4814ded9d7c1915db46d6ffaa9223e2
'2011-12-16T18:10:56-05:00'
describe
'28728' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
c5fbad9a310e274a40449ccd15cd41a4
78157a26e43cc7e86d975c0f0d7c5656604697fd
describe
'31165' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQB' 'sip-files00186.pro'
ac1233733cc603cf8c906c6b1f4ec447
72afbdc04580fe5654b8740f7bee7be3139d90f3
'2011-12-16T18:05:09-05:00'
describe
'29293' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQC' 'sip-files00187.pro'
7538c109ce15ba28189779eb5f5113fb
c27b9ebafc65420dec89a9c2ff9b64722ab12cc1
describe
'29611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQD' 'sip-files00188.pro'
a224d371f0ec14952fbeb2cf1ca86c00
0c63c1dfdef83a7d3768af440f77b7eb028eb1e8
describe
'27185' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQE' 'sip-files00189.pro'
6d437b3e64b7b671ff1b7a8bc61b426c
6879ac024ccd5af58d285173b32f94f0774f818d
describe
'32187' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQF' 'sip-files00190.pro'
497ee0d4b36ddafd031b935c40897ec6
67cff3546336971909bf7eedf695766a98b636a5
'2011-12-16T18:11:37-05:00'
describe
'12624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQG' 'sip-files00191.pro'
69a4c9e6e8f0073265c00eccb7113882
a243390e6678af80b5b99ddbb7cc67bc958a669f
describe
'215411' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQH' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
343d37da0e51f5b220d66fc6f2329513
e8a5b2d9d90dd86aacc6280a69c593ce9976cd7e
'2011-12-16T18:07:01-05:00'
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQI' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
3bd4204257cdbb9ba01d3ebc0e38b67e
a34deb79276b7279c13064bc58caf2ae8af39257
describe
'1153695' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQJ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
863af49d315e0d832a779009808f557a
5d975cce59836b37722ef380a9046fc0545fbd90
'2011-12-16T18:02:54-05:00'
describe
'13435' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQK' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
a0abe5fedb23949a61b84bda6314ed43
0196ee772a67f9085aeb7c886354c8ab4af6dc13
'2011-12-16T18:03:07-05:00'
describe
'43061' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
1eb1105e98178c6e0a2ae6db46ffba39
515f7b072ea6fb5a09ed304db90930ee27d0ac0f
describe
'21452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQM' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
3d2ee864a5c894ff2cd040ecf7aff542
1c4d05f8a766ea9b6d67e084d37c9efb26a44e8c
'2011-12-16T18:08:14-05:00'
describe
'20991' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
a3b31cea01b024b2a2d95dee7c077aec
19695e059e28c396fa415f0d485679378d4af961
'2011-12-16T18:04:52-05:00'
describe
'22175' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQO' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
342912dd95d4958dac2fc5bbbe6464e4
6a39652c6fba6b97b1fca1ea94201b0d12ca28ed
'2011-12-16T18:11:10-05:00'
describe
'14709' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQP' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
2ca9e20a1f523f60c1845d8bab7aaa47
4aaa4c05e0ae6872f8e3723928288cc4f0664e46
'2011-12-16T18:11:49-05:00'
describe
'12792' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQQ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
912a12f012f26ef47cb1d635119b9a47
dedc50277c07a26f21aad190b9ebd18ff47e01e2
describe
'44350' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQR' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5834a9bbbf0add894727035626c77420
f2504252dfe90e92603622b6a603c101ae2e8594
describe
'63615' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQS' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
958853b41e848987a13efe8fcf3fe1ae
02f16ece14a0ee220f834398d031e917256bf8c2
'2011-12-16T18:12:19-05:00'
describe
'64284' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQT' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
9cfcba2160e634844ec8547a1192558f
2c81dd952ca7d0c22aec9790eb412648b8b8b909
'2011-12-16T18:04:56-05:00'
describe
'59602' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQU' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
8db90e583372c12936fb369d5852c803
49f9bafcb152f783fe04548be61f23e373ee78b3
describe
'1171913' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQV' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
bf02adcb6e3c0c3b8f7b1f19fecbb223
4395e519c17cf682260b7a7a9b41a0f678b1831b
'2011-12-16T18:10:42-05:00'
describe
'62333' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2da11277f413e6f25d66eda1385e9ec7
ac5fb3abd4778d8c2681055bde359625d556e6ce
describe
'59585' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e9f0f38a401d27b9a4081ae8ed65c39c
a3ef14b9a913add4b365f58691490fd4daff7e75
'2011-12-16T18:03:17-05:00'
describe
'59056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
b7c3e5b0ecc49cfe230e16c4dab754ad
370d3d1e3fc6f2a12f78b6f859a1bc7ce077db58
describe
'60174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMQZ' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
066bf4a2c721e6ad12aa05d0d182440c
30bba9c902a953b6e18b3360c357cf8ee73e2690
'2011-12-16T18:04:59-05:00'
describe
'58116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
e34f2353267a4c45dfafc351a9d493a2
09942ca8408e6ca033bec788f2f513c6d80b0cd0
'2011-12-16T18:12:08-05:00'
describe
'61597' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRB' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
f3d48eacd1f5d359fa784b92621b68f0
c54bf6b4fd74b8597a7ca85eced940df1ccae56f
'2011-12-16T18:07:49-05:00'
describe
'1212665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRC' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
37d13b77e0b959cf3e3a4fc286ad9323
adfd23a4ad23127194c0504e8fd3145931acd21e
'2011-12-16T18:03:19-05:00'
describe
'65927' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRD' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
33b991eac6d1aeb3a6eb6aa9a975f6f7
845fa0dcee6708fabf2d66a8836f1f9bfe52c00c
'2011-12-16T18:12:24-05:00'
describe
'57309' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRE' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a9c5d5ed6b81b7df4f519d3dca3b0593
90b3e59195165dcd169ca43c09d5274112f4c0e7
'2011-12-16T18:03:43-05:00'
describe
'54703' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRF' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
7d8384e63e544259558b74dc068c1819
b1525a3ab393a8b21e67e2a9d87511e279cc24c8
describe
'62596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRG' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
8a63b4677d3a6d146720b51ddbfd574a
b4acc0aec62da51b12890f4f4c7373a9335ed6b8
'2011-12-16T18:08:59-05:00'
describe
'63072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRH' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
de25e18a536d821b7a9b03a6df3e9df9
f6f4f49bf2d1572e7fc1952223ed4555cbe9fc19
'2011-12-16T18:09:22-05:00'
describe
'1211847' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRI' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
044809dcca4a376716ca967c2c543dd6
2ed27805523d219dce0776a5054784f2ce2c6cec
'2011-12-16T18:03:49-05:00'
describe
'65772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
2e0d6bcac23362627d0815cbcaca3bfa
b2b2146367c205243c0eec22cba781ebdcbdcd6d
'2011-12-16T18:08:42-05:00'
describe
'63455' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
286b788331b6abd29218f465a9b5bc5a
e46dfea6a4829be0ee5ae251857b5d243eea29d9
describe
'61814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRL' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
24cd7cdcdb1b456c115d6742283f8058
8b891700a4e9aae59d90151b305bbecdb1ee5557
describe
'64379' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
6f3a6c1780fe49268f50c419ebf0e53a
616634178ff81ca28382714b3afe81a6681ea9d7
'2011-12-16T18:07:38-05:00'
describe
'64675' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a026aea0130e2d4c4b016f727444a6c0
d6e13ee084b26eba3f76637b5634f8b61f6896c7
describe
'63328' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRO' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
351e00b96086d6f1a07cd5a4af9aa28f
5a476ebe355bd7dc2e33c0ba4922c0b958a42e56
'2011-12-16T18:03:35-05:00'
describe
'54828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRP' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
a2f47754bd14e70595ed77ab172f5a91
865cd7511d163ad2f4276afcad6fb3aadd2c4cd0
'2011-12-16T18:08:23-05:00'
describe
'60548' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRQ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7c8503bf1914863ac60fb55e9d713d3a
9c6bd8bbb41fab4d076b338d84e291355d6b34d8
describe
'59295' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRR' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
3adead81c24e8413c051119cae340e4e
41079ccce174219cfe6f4164d823bcf9cf7b8ead
describe
'1200227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRS' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
70d4c414a15995d28ad85237a1cb4d39
4c4e1098f21bb0ccc845bb36c64310023e1bd7c4
'2011-12-16T18:08:53-05:00'
describe
'62458' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRT' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
cd675417007ea9e37c9b09bc02561573
fd227a476c1783a8d7730677fedd3bb0ffef229d
'2011-12-16T18:09:09-05:00'
describe
'28749' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRU' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
3ba1f83600405e4df6ee12e3a91551c3
15297a438982466c5b7ee7e731438630ac75971c
'2011-12-16T18:08:41-05:00'
describe
'50247' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRV' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
14cfad9af7d911094817ac1393262ca5
d1e273b701b9f76b0808a35d539137083b068b2a
'2011-12-16T18:05:14-05:00'
describe
'64996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
26eb5d57ff62871c836b54568e5115d7
bf0e1f8f13c8380c8c724928858af364d2442320
describe
'64263' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d2f97f67e8435cd8574b1bb396607cfa
2f73db5da26001bc24a6832400c1de7f277de7ed
'2011-12-16T18:06:09-05:00'
describe
'64252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
cd57d91dc354ba4489a40b6600a80fa5
90768f984963cbe0b2396131836500b6bc039678
'2011-12-16T18:10:20-05:00'
describe
'63256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMRZ' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d2557cc4288a082bcb387a07a19eee15
478dc0a7893a6cecc1eb2019bb06b6ebd7b08d69
describe
'57449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
160f60f755a4b687dccede2d34528b69
accaf54889c3f929e2265381d7d56e2157bcea83
'2011-12-16T18:05:15-05:00'
describe
'56168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSB' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
76f34fb6b5cb0918551cbcd16488672f
65ec7d01b9fa273e1843daa8de7ed81c4926b2e7
'2011-12-16T18:09:41-05:00'
describe
'61831' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSC' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
8558730bdff08559deee500770344b24
6ceb6383d33da0c3de2600945f1f59ea50f685c0
'2011-12-16T18:11:13-05:00'
describe
'57529' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSD' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
2d56185d3af6a5c1d451585e2cc0f207
3098784b008e41694f717e1008d03976f208d9db
'2011-12-16T18:03:45-05:00'
describe
'63566' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSE' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
49ed25be95d8f247aa8b7c7f2f7d08eb
5ff114f05de1ecbc1c10bd2b61e0a494264db813
describe
'59345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSF' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
5a327b70878969313011008665a0d902
087d70120f7a14b61c1bb6567e7c3cd116621e6f
describe
'60020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSG' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
6962d0496058079ebd3931395291a03f
d243ccb5865f72f0c2223add3482366d347c4f9f
describe
'59657' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSH' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
574230fed0b29c3a47d26f58a6e47cee
39b4c55e64110c9ae5bd0e6fadded6d524b12772
describe
'1173296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
bca831e54ea6332d3370df41f8d6bd1d
a9a3a2e26d570d5ce4f1ffde03a3fb2caa6ce6e8
describe
'54600' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8f6fb1ba5a167d77ae24fa43a8c53bf1
232d5da786baeedf44f11bb9c53c05dbb87b85ee
'2011-12-16T18:08:39-05:00'
describe
'64112' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
1c329580e0c9b5282271faaaef037f0f
bb2f437aac24dc9bd4cbcea8cf3bbddf37fcbc0e
'2011-12-16T18:11:58-05:00'
describe
'62212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSL' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
fef14906958c1cba92ca4872a824750c
964b865566c54d69bd7482ebd3f371b9bea7eed3
'2011-12-16T18:10:28-05:00'
describe
'55744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSM' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
9f66182a1cdf27e7c8e871f67e0765c7
960aa95c19d9a765b855db9e2b98a38c737b3df2
describe
'1200995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
fbcb391ca3d34e7d9ed3e122132d860d
596562b0d8915a349c679a9296e6bef6aa6cb120
'2011-12-16T18:10:35-05:00'
describe
'63811' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSO' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
51179929fa23bca095660d95a60277dd
7b98e4a696b1a0a28388ab6cb6a65f6e979ad5cb
'2011-12-16T18:05:08-05:00'
describe
'56675' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSP' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
22270cc1995d87479ce4fcd9bba1cbf3
305f4985e91eeec2394da13262ec7fcd4b43f025
describe
'58225' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSQ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
35da7aa9394096dd0dcf100b2f735372
437f5bcc1ad3abb542cb32268aa99bdf7095fbe0
'2011-12-16T18:11:21-05:00'
describe
'58746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSR' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
1a9877a6959ccf89f5a931c1146fd723
796ecbca3fd52a83ca062ea6df81fb1fb5c5e302
describe
'59516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSS' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a56bde556a996538d985ddc6de7574f0
6f57afd031033e28602ebe6aa20dfb67c4057cea
'2011-12-16T18:06:11-05:00'
describe
'64983' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMST' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
4679de4f16ed19d6af13a7f438eb8d35
89ede9c51049699dc753131b6968200e263956a3
'2011-12-16T18:06:23-05:00'
describe
'57411' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSU' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
d106f9767ff53875cd0d4a8b4608690f
c45bf156809f3433073f319d844477a59d828583
'2011-12-16T18:09:10-05:00'
describe
'56990' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSV' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
79af5e6466ff78612640c374fa27ccba
8aa45e59bd94b793671a0211b779de3ec4e8add4
describe
'55603' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
8babe86faef1b9a8b1aa45533fd34f88
a2c5e551721d23a151f5c84aba386b9b3a722364
'2011-12-16T18:05:19-05:00'
describe
'50886' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
ed1dbb1a1cfec340c2c33d397e6df147
4bb73b30d780ac9f2aceb8e8bd32274a96e23770
'2011-12-16T18:08:45-05:00'
describe
'51193' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSY' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
fe89e8e3c55825dff8e551cd727cf3be
639c76f25ceaa80510ef6ac793ec6b5931de362b
'2011-12-16T18:11:26-05:00'
describe
'1231853' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMSZ' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
9db6402bb9d035e58aa275681d091e42
0ef8f87f748ee55b1f3ead1ca32a5085e160fb8b
describe
'56651' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTA' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
fb6939df2c20b50b981271654bf16d56
1738f97dcb98184633191122206b4fc8b620402f
'2011-12-16T18:03:04-05:00'
describe
'62351' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d21d93d3ab807b31eb4206a0e3635935
1e315927106419b732c1cbe7a88091aedb637b16
'2011-12-16T18:03:51-05:00'
describe
'60422' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTC' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
c6f1a24a7a74e4a7667576996488f260
93e663c8d1341aa9ee6fc993a76fe636d85432ab
describe
'63776' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTD' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
7f9c2244f42668f89f1c915b3482eae4
2c10eefb29eeff3d55d671afa5d4091708c10518
describe
'58653' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
4aa0a0eb88d594e6c8e45da9fe11dd31
3f8296289838410796a2f0ef8e6ef4e3e0df70e4
'2011-12-16T18:02:38-05:00'
describe
'64846' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
435f33923a8167fe092bbd1f26078abc
a957ddc853bd0d906882bcdef86bf0506c8d1680
'2011-12-16T18:02:53-05:00'
describe
'64127' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
46c2f98cb77faa4615c55fcc18ae0b6e
85b0653bad2f9d31c4cf66a90c3cd80dfc1227f5
'2011-12-16T18:09:20-05:00'
describe
'58958' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
404ec03ff29c227d6e2a920a88cf4c90
37b3ed563ff73f36cfc1868102327ed90329260e
'2011-12-16T18:02:26-05:00'
describe
'64182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTI' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
add1e017f0be3e0175bbe62ba9960ad6
ec9feb1b0a0e5743e4f381e615b0dfcedabc5d2b
describe
'60574' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5afd6550c2b704ab665a23192586c70d
f79c619a3776285f725907970f392a317e6f8eba
describe
'1197604' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
ac73c221744e7d6003ce4e3090f7a614
04e1f0729e3f93399f12cbdbc8683ad4257e651c
'2011-12-16T18:07:54-05:00'
describe
'54202' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTL' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
e401ea4b72a6263f59c8082f79e07eda
202532569f94281e8cea27a6f7e14acdfaea421d
describe
'52885' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTM' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
4567b71bd0701cef927c96162b5b9033
5c7fcecb00a3008d9f19a7b73fd682d8e839a2de
'2011-12-16T18:02:58-05:00'
describe
'58771' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTN' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
3149d23f41c8ce7de412b87d4a50d571
9df83cd5c237f56cd186f1999501de5f48eff094
'2011-12-16T18:07:08-05:00'
describe
'61667' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
2dc42547c4ec66fc4122e0698892a1c1
db63fcce8b8e7f0f2075bc082d7c831f01100397
'2011-12-16T18:02:30-05:00'
describe
'40838' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTP' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
9cae855f961c6a67dfcbabdfd6284bc9
4b2d4f2820859cb5cf5b9d5b8fef762770749265
'2011-12-16T18:09:00-05:00'
describe
'42825' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTQ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d12bc79996a1bccf491d70529626a30a
6a5c0032c1feb17d1d422f74b2165f42b947e56a
describe
'55639' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTR' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e3a79859f711c42ecdd7e7a54a985fa3
536ed357e545c48a29175d92aa3e72873f2e1359
describe
'60913' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTS' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
05323f1398e25a75f3d96e06c21df079
4095a75a34c61310fb6d7c327265d7d3c5037063
'2011-12-16T18:10:40-05:00'
describe
'57639' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTT' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
a25d0a94bc1d67f53899d341967c6bb6
c5d86cdeaa0189e67f529b24bfe28c62ba8d297b
'2011-12-16T18:05:55-05:00'
describe
'62475' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTU' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
374ef74fee75b89d5119817dd7b645cf
cfe81fcab9c3767c5ba7cddb0d146a9228353b95
describe
'63648' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTV' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
8664ca248cc0fe0d5d75385e66b99fbd
8565a3f0ed1547ddc98f488e85b173deb4fbfe8d
describe
'56116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTW' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
1a7e5e3ee28c628d6845041ab909d27c
d2d297fbdabcec866158d14a4447be007714723f
'2011-12-16T18:11:54-05:00'
describe
'60370' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
90e9c38571c4f0c43c0e950f53d09763
05a721a05cc2de3359e8ca0e6ca2a276a24aa3f0
describe
'60595' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTY' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
0f43c16ae860eee6a485f4f0d3fd153b
85ff63dbe6163c7f1d4483e1c66137d06c7fea55
describe
'1196530' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMTZ' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
c00f112b01572fdca8a38838f31e1549
79a53df91a75f642e162e5334c51d620abc55ab9
describe
'60268' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUA' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
59899da0f940864ef030d8173d4a2220
9e252fb4699839fc822fda45ba6cca58d9cdb28a
'2011-12-16T18:11:18-05:00'
describe
'60140' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
b55b9fb35b36e984f4df89b3ee32764b
d737e20bb8cd1a84ad763f184d331bdd8c565545
'2011-12-16T18:08:44-05:00'
describe
'58453' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUC' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
6894938935dd66c7cae7450b669efe09
21f1cb6fbe9f14574941d811b309947a1def327b
describe
'62956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUD' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
59e6763a50bf082422413d709a827282
53b0871e7976575ea018c841444276cfb8bde036
describe
'52806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
378fb6e19cd43cba90a8ea1a51d6edae
b5ac8da396a5854ba7e2045da1bdf2529935cf74
describe
'59875' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUF' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
32e1cbef5ebb286f50f2429743c7fcbc
eca8263b92f8ddd3d5905599b84f52cbf4a5c2fb
'2011-12-16T18:09:56-05:00'
describe
'62720' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUG' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d895489fac56cfc833ad8de41ddc01cc
ddd65847a3eee2aa1afc88e2a1bf74bc8ce8f097
'2011-12-16T18:05:32-05:00'
describe
'67686' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUH' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d84eb36664b1fd660d0cbc48a935b7fb
fad4b0e0c4222fe4785195bb960602550e8e64f3
'2011-12-16T18:11:55-05:00'
describe
'66229' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUI' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
977a34b7a25e4c8012a7fbe7485d9cd4
8f242e5fde60b6fed2663d0842e013fb484b5dca
describe
'55492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUJ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
1a6152fddb76acbf95c7a3dd8daef89e
817b9e928eec76d7b051147f03251a1b82865aed
describe
'1190724' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
640c55bad5331c092ad89fe0b5fc5702
88bb9988492d8b8d0ae7937d4abffc88f4d200b5
describe
'61621' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUL' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
adef52f40449cc7a65231007966f797e
161a771c701c952241d5b71394c0f09a6ea59565
describe
'64951' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUM' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
badd93ea4238aebaff4260e7aaa85742
495b6b5513172ca8b85ad3d253e8491b15bd1b14
'2011-12-16T18:03:05-05:00'
describe
'58345' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUN' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
05ae71a7f59e9d476d0ac464cb42d3e8
923fbb50c38b96855d5257740e9ae731aba76326
'2011-12-16T18:08:40-05:00'
describe
'63772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUO' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
157a2412a8184f1999ac046ce18e2b9a
c6ca5602b792429b68a1ce67f38534dceb24e91a
'2011-12-16T18:03:37-05:00'
describe
'55132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUP' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
8682fea1d8533116a72c6f3da1c9e4cf
8d9de965bca16686e53e18c318045b939dc894b4
describe
'1180238' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUQ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
b7e7b386e68c9d199d80a5dcab1e2042
b66545149a3d58b0717391aa2b58339368836ac1
'2011-12-16T18:04:46-05:00'
describe
'55752' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d5816777e24df10e0b9eda3cd616a683
8a79f10e83f63632dabe7f8d11252a8d17ff418e
describe
'46556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUS' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8ec74fcddd9f2eb80819cd8a2c989bf0
f44fcc84afc1fae3c05c0b05916a69169245569a
describe
'53269' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
f93bec9f211f1785da90cd06daf9529c
2ac8f8d94190760731b5a8a7f5d88abaa4786498
describe
'60502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUU' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f5fa71c79415ef4ef9a34c70e12250b3
0d7335481575aa9389c23c373a8c4bdb620b58ff
describe
'1196439' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUV' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
d598b56855c5e906a67ed1f7394bbdc9
895b3cc8d57e1562fa37d666a51722cf489beaca
describe
'63732' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUW' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
c8bcaeee18b2b84ce45c333ab9e2c48e
bceae224c9e86e694bc36cb6acfdcd69fffadc95
describe
'59426' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
4da5bd341d92c11fe2d3c52b2550192f
c21b3ee54c26c951104a1b6b9f1fde75a2212680
'2011-12-16T18:06:07-05:00'
describe
'59082' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUY' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
2a5bdb1232963013425e737849e58045
b47e24a8658aa8d8a5bacfa564dfb33791a66e9e
describe
'60281' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMUZ' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
6b355cf5be726bbd2e22ea26ec075ae9
811521a933d021d317a0faaecf52ba96e16486bd
'2011-12-16T18:07:20-05:00'
describe
'58772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVA' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e9f14e452c0b98d212581f8f9da193ae
77c748f8c752456c2dffaf2c6fbb567d953e6e3b
describe
'58400' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVB' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
699a525ca21c40f3be7473714fd43bc7
4c3d56ee9f6a3e8513b4cb228963f73d865d7bb1
'2011-12-16T18:06:40-05:00'
describe
'59391' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVC' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
a5056a7e440820bc5b108f6cd3436d92
0b20123de68ebd51a501e016078fbfcccabcc960
describe
'63581' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVD' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
0ec2b7ad68fdcf2b3531b490a0fe9fc8
10cddbfca6eb07df4f1d28c0b509ab8b99e71479
'2011-12-16T18:11:16-05:00'
describe
'58957' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVE' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
8463e6b8d583f82920939e7df0aa63bf
6a32917327f9b4ff1d5cbfffaeb5bdf601f8e3ec
'2011-12-16T18:09:44-05:00'
describe
'47818' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVF' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
4c71450dee7f173934d9c60a010db174
b0152bd028a5f603019962ad6a5968f98c643096
describe
'52672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVG' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
0cd0182f4f76134042d97146ba9089a9
f28b191e06360ba930c96d5bc0baf99c55349de8
'2011-12-16T18:03:52-05:00'
describe
'63450' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVH' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
25970e85354659d53329c6448f7a9e20
308e89c448a0f6168e8939636a72b69457ca7cee
describe
'66035' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVI' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
0c07758a7e57fe7aa7ef6a6109105139
c1896ec3f8fc1305c260dcb0ffb11153bb3f75df
describe
'1174337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVJ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e3e6cf5e7a4d88a0f9cd0747355ef3c6
146babffab2ed8f32717366db3700ed3b146c776
describe
'56636' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
a5278fef03d7f1dd173871d737053010
79edc4e2e2f5c8caa0a02f1287a76e44617baaa5
'2011-12-16T18:07:15-05:00'
describe
'60282' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVL' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
9aebe768abd3e67735c38ea6f8af1260
d13c3141f4c9112f6a65d13f38d9dcf69285d4bb
describe
'66825' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVM' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e1ec7606f1005891a0493fe5a638d5ef
059ed2c111ee45ff0be88c11a64b2ffc3db3606a
'2011-12-16T18:05:04-05:00'
describe
'65851' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVN' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
c85adb7ad7be88c2d8aef8285b46dbf6
1d8f4023cd4ed2b609c3896d6cc7e104ab17282a
describe
'62491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVO' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
6b2abbb8a157f6c016d7dce8cf350c6c
9f3fc2f403b980a9ecf55da16019a639155881ac
describe
'54893' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVP' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
231495062149ab3d53bdddd0e63b7b1d
88972c7702545ad8831fa6fced058e8fe166ea0d
'2011-12-16T18:11:45-05:00'
describe
'63759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVQ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
4c04cc3ca5d6bec83c35f3192f9de5c6
73b638acb19d1ed9711db050b9e98214a9fb794e
describe
'1191320' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVR' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
7896ae3e4608daea8be5c6f38149e652
66494bcea8d1368e687023b4b8afe8b4bdc6f7de
'2011-12-16T18:05:26-05:00'
describe
'60528' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVS' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
20499cdd96572d0195f33dd6e1897342
099d1f314bdc26f855e94a0de43ea593fa385c6a
describe
'57916' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVT' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
34d9804f6a69e52c269de6f715785502
4a5f187dc18454f47e88b918bd2e132447ac57a9
describe
'65791' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVU' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
3f4414d29e1a15bb2524f07ccadd44d8
e79bf9e53bd1d22ea44b2667efc915e1b1bb78c7
describe
'49050' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVV' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
7a90a45db56053dce023a8a1ab7eb2d9
9cced433297ababf583c7841ab624bd5161f183c
describe
'47967' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVW' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
4dee8f16d7790fe541093f010d6ef84e
e43014018cd2a55ba3824cf21bf37da1fc453e4f
describe
'55355' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVX' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
8f921436cd3b2395a216ceee3a7be2e6
80c33b5d3db47856553a0459d2469c32e2c41d03
describe
'61115' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
060fae85c44f1774aba19a00facb28ba
b670f0c53dc44817b650b01bd1c9c605226e1f84
describe
'59446' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMVZ' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
54a6fd9d038c72e4b0a512403b312d69
447d256c67f177d7854f472611a3c330373bdd1d
describe
'60389' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWA' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
75287b891b44b6fa7ef38d9603218cea
b5a0e4ede0d8fc3f4befb337d34589ecc744b3ba
'2011-12-16T18:08:04-05:00'
describe
'63252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWB' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
23a0aaceeb1e6bbe89f8cb8ee20ae1cc
e6130a011e8d18bd086f8fa7a97f3f00469c3ae9
describe
'58551' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWC' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
c772c99924e683972740e047e6e0c7b0
0bce72f12450e1d315c88357475ef2848cfb15d2
describe
'63671' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWD' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
b8aee4d54bbb10234bec830a94b39b45
26a56f1c18a5761880b4bb840a05aede7b789e4f
describe
'58325' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWE' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
f3a76bdd08f3eec40b61adfe59ee0335
cce5327d96706a2a628ba89de4b86c326778de84
'2011-12-16T18:09:06-05:00'
describe
'57191' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWF' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
b5961614707778a763b36207ce4b0c2c
55ab1ff411a803d457d22ebdf656153bb27961a1
describe
'65792' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWG' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
eccbbe40d80a4e11bc612e9e9d215727
b25666a6aef6145e04d004d557c1b8f625bc2373
describe
'57492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWH' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
d02b2d57a436e02a996350b25d5278f4
875b6e39cf4670af2371c620f1aba19ffd088f26
'2011-12-16T18:08:22-05:00'
describe
'1159369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWI' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
9efa99f1dc3b606cd76e4509f75f0478
4d432a5efe9d85a4e7b70a45ef5b21b2e3f00bc2
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWJ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
df7164da47e1e4c3e3ede839c45218f5
7db87a603e594ed2cd3912dc67af7bbc3816ae80
describe
'53948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWK' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
547f8cb8e8b321c5d42af6ebb4de26c9
ea6a09ad4dc70f0baf36cde4f95141c1712a0b24
describe
'62514' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWL' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
912373a09b95cf178fd158118b73a66f
8c09f5bf02e3ab4f7c7c984e4532022720aec3bb
'2011-12-16T18:12:11-05:00'
describe
'58385' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWM' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
cbc3aebd5bbd1c50d58330ff33a3fb46
3f8090ef24c826e03d716d11eb980699b45bfdc3
'2011-12-16T18:02:59-05:00'
describe
'60818' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWN' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
4296335054a37d65c3460f2892bfa742
c3bb7f76c09f8863d896aa59e7cefcc50d9c8431
'2011-12-16T18:06:03-05:00'
describe
'59597' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWO' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
6bc7faeff807d91ef1b4afbeaaaa188e
735f57aae5dc93c05a346f65a4207938e4bbf393
'2011-12-16T18:03:32-05:00'
describe
'62989' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWP' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
fc77e6c3170632dc4bbd0f69068af967
110600e75c5456f47f662351b1a12589adf1c70d
'2011-12-16T18:07:21-05:00'
describe
'60104' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWQ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
9086905f414b19ca0c13901eead65ee5
07f518e600baef8b27aedc1443cc3b91b7b86616
'2011-12-16T18:05:44-05:00'
describe
'53148' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWR' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
915a65bf00a9b131170dc64162fa4ff4
c0b7cb90d559989a5496ecbc5485df879ec34d24
describe
'60278' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWS' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
f18075c3580f94cedc892d5104193c38
43a5d142f2b94c503ff11b1042a74acd4e7b0967
describe
'20701' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWT' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
fe6f083a6f832100ccf822cd0082726f
0fc56b14c26159bab6e5e8ec728e3a2ebb092456
'2011-12-16T18:09:46-05:00'
describe
'53000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWU' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
b4f211f2638b1cd0b3d91a16f48a5ab6
cee4cc12f1d7f0752fe33be64eab8fd1d6708b78
'2011-12-16T18:02:29-05:00'
describe
'60270' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWV' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
6b17cafa6fa4e0515fda7bc3ebd18607
8bca279d5b3fb7697f484d0f4055fdfcd46d9aa1
'2011-12-16T18:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1159350' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWW' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
592bfe787c4f5360595717f1ead8c744
53c8df85281197628174484880e64b6781aa2e19
'2011-12-16T18:10:11-05:00'
describe
'64920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWX' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
6e6f173f3a7d4e3df485acbc3e30a769
bfe6f4f8757666c09ca29f5adf9e3b27f68e5d81
'2011-12-16T18:06:18-05:00'
describe
'59318' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWY' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
80cdccb24acb9b85f4056dd6a00eee21
172a323243f6155b15183095112cc45a8bbf5b03
'2011-12-16T18:07:23-05:00'
describe
'59494' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMWZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
407254c9152867712349161dad732bf7
b42fd2f23b54127f62dfd59a2f15dd7d86ed7d8c
'2011-12-16T18:09:55-05:00'
describe
'60968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXA' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
e9dd9fc403460e34a97e5f7ff182a620
f11d784e8f36c7f77c01cbc05cef3a176d2d6de8
describe
'65337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXB' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c98eae9f821bd39cf8a088dbaf931ef2
22ee88e042877ffac62c28a3609da9b1d6f1a515
describe
'63180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXC' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e0b53c634830c047d87309000da3b965
bf14e7a7b284efea7876885c8694116561b0d1b7
describe
'64471' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXD' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
f772f24b82089c0ce223818198efb682
181ea9f34df8b9030ff14b78a0c49b41e7d196ee
describe
'59503' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXE' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
f169e2692ed85023ee03f48ab5c47757
75e4f37484053acd303b6a528c42a3b7981dc63c
'2011-12-16T18:10:54-05:00'
describe
'1257032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXF' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5fca6ab4879efcf0947b7bdab88951f7
3a06afe2ca2c7cfca4be38dad42ec09a31877f72
describe
'62021' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXG' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
18fc25a9a604e8b5fde712f9f07d939f
bac3f1cfadc162daa3653f370fd0c4818ccd6208
'2011-12-16T18:07:03-05:00'
describe
'62139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
158ac711a6ae08b4b6451073c32a1655
522108d3262d4add59ea66b55303cd6252fe0890
describe
'59866' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXI' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
796fdc075da348d4d2466e47f9ddab1f
ae7c2408b7dd260ca0279ada78c81e5ddefc6889
describe
'58486' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXJ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
fd403130d58d20c30e456e7a30a623ba
cf9fa493628ffe100c1ae264087c7471413e2703
'2011-12-16T18:10:41-05:00'
describe
'62028' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXK' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
194e45a0453fd5b39d65be5280c23096
3a644e0686dd9ac6a0ebfcabd8cb513dee5092d7
'2011-12-16T18:12:16-05:00'
describe
'59032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXL' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
cecdc5d33ab192ccd1720e4a82d4f7c5
9dc2a92396e7d699f91fa9795cdb9237707153d6
'2011-12-16T18:08:06-05:00'
describe
'58890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXM' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
02c323e9f8ea412c24a61c71c2b6d933
688df7d5e91c345268142ccf885a18a55a05f5a2
describe
'54114' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXN' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
35f1ddd62a6743487f472e8bb6861d89
0bd8e0e8ce44b0bdc2af74e067f789ac32041222
describe
'63675' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXO' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
630e5997b8aabc06e61c632c902279c5
e67e7902d197fa4b33f248495100de9bc27032e8
describe
'26778' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXP' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e241ef234d7d7575f8328f124f3239b0
476d810acf44e55308ecfe99e7868bd1a409bcf1
describe
'223898' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXQ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
00c8b8d6f1b18f9b5561157213a7c09f
d9018f29dd18defa6e58be7812fbc2e56f1b2cbf
describe
'5180376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
a70b1a892f4c36b340eb684f32fa6de7
1d9c8d7dcd840fdf8de65d30369d91e98ee6f0ad
'2011-12-16T18:02:46-05:00'
describe
'302164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXS' 'sip-files00002.tif'
3780c5d257f2a0449291d3364b2d222a
7cde1ccbab2d5932619a51249dbbfee1fa737da1
describe
'9242512' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXT' 'sip-files00003.tif'
58e3962ab1bc857e5954a2f50e15d758
14f456350d4f33d736c6062d4a690b8915e32b9d
'2011-12-16T18:09:04-05:00'
describe
'317024' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXU' 'sip-files00004.tif'
7deccf1fe88e245c77ac236fe83ac6d1
ce14bd1f5ca8d02ab88e45223e542301f6f184e2
'2011-12-16T18:08:57-05:00'
describe
'304504' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXV' 'sip-files00005.tif'
8f0d7a1837ab05ee58a29fc66687d950
5d66f7969506f5846031a110e1ba1da7d8674480
describe
'309788' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
7c759cfffbf919907d240937987a5c8c
0dedcac59d9ee426558723aad6e0a7c65c0e50d3
describe
'299000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
43351ccc568e9482b78327d312be4b42
614d8a790d5032e023a8fe5106801b52a16f8c16
describe
'310800' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
314e479121b554d31e831b7a029c16d0
91130e7868f38aad80053cc6545fbb20cf0cfbf5
'2011-12-16T18:08:46-05:00'
describe
'314768' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMXZ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e2617aebd6dd4a8bbed70365246999b5
400b8d46d0a7ff7996b1dc4ed28d3131aa39be8d
describe
'316936' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYA' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1937266817eba5c333bbea8701d67cae
1cd035073b2df006a584bfb6ae8a78158f1d9780
describe
'315516' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYB' 'sip-files00011.tif'
33988353d243463bac4da3a51f9efbf0
4832f39c9e83b70f67173849fbfc41612b10b5b5
'2011-12-16T18:07:58-05:00'
describe
'328820' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYC' 'sip-files00012.tif'
224f873b94a1e4eff86ea37ed8acd99c
33fc4ab7a410353ff030d3d40736d63e684f3e33
describe
'309152' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYD' 'sip-files00013.tif'
589c131ca8ffade4923844c341f846ee
215a643c3cdb618b3552d6fb49eea4d91fed7916
'2011-12-16T18:03:30-05:00'
describe
'317464' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYE' 'sip-files00014.tif'
3718099c876aabeba33d3963e63c6f3a
edc864db1dcc50abf5a061692a4345befd7f4cb4
'2011-12-16T18:03:33-05:00'
describe
'9389084' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYF' 'sip-files00015.tif'
393bf441fe2900d06cb9b7bdaa1e564b
114951febe2091cbdd43186d886f2381250531ec
'2011-12-16T18:09:25-05:00'
describe
'309648' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYG' 'sip-files00016.tif'
2a1160cbe4236839153a0320729f51b7
b17f89efb1a5111f9e095ca75941342818ea6f50
'2011-12-16T18:11:41-05:00'
describe
'303856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
34eca8e2568952ad057229f216a3a78c
9b81761000d9782096c21686b9eaf597f9cdb769
describe
'317564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
e283f1d0742fcd09ed5b6aee54e22c2c
f04e72a025bca2e1be43eb3eaa1868eea9cd5532
'2011-12-16T18:05:02-05:00'
describe
'311556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
850eb7f577bd897a16b37001fe1e3a22
e4ec0e5113b76ce3f9c9ee97c4c99d4191397f82
'2011-12-16T18:10:49-05:00'
describe
'328056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYK' 'sip-files00020.tif'
06ace5f4626d61188b3c0db6ee3a4c03
253d31a277cab9754bc465511f8ef8d58a832e2f
describe
'306944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYL' 'sip-files00021.tif'
6cfb6625bef49d6f94a14ab582b3688a
0fba61b41c9293c944de0da1bbc823300c2f7478
'2011-12-16T18:06:51-05:00'
describe
'9714320' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYM' 'sip-files00022.tif'
90c312751a8f89e18b28acc106c31e1b
18a991b506d9a291e7384061b41ec380e91956ec
'2011-12-16T18:06:29-05:00'
describe
'315092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYN' 'sip-files00023.tif'
bf63c62c35ff90914abcfc1b08562626
2a9e2c34a2373c8283f73b7d769fca422574ad85
'2011-12-16T18:06:04-05:00'
describe
'313976' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYO' 'sip-files00024.tif'
2ef6701f28bcc1708b745229525de836
79bd2add29512cdeaef7f4647fe339800dea8010
'2011-12-16T18:06:30-05:00'
describe
'308280' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYP' 'sip-files00025.tif'
da4dd9d5fa95cb4c7914bb9c3176109f
e67f73533771fdd8fc59ad8066c8ca473ebae687
describe
'315032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYQ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
1804729ec47e9967c3bbabd0ef8fc405
2f28f5ff292f72e55234681a6c9b9fa80cd6561d
describe
'311832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYR' 'sip-files00027.tif'
a31235cf499cff6db0a81d8fa65e4856
e9794e59f366d376d659cb5c349681edcdcd830b
'2011-12-16T18:05:40-05:00'
describe
'9708636' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYS' 'sip-files00028.tif'
7fb5ed2c45feb2cf7816300713eb0435
134d72c7691d1cc5951c4863c4d6edae606a185b
describe
'314736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYT' 'sip-files00029.tif'
534ca3bacf403029cec113a81b38dc9a
f03382e229808447197587dba59162c0265319ed
describe
'328312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
213080fac437a2e12a397807a131af81
347f8766af2e5af5b489e01f8f372cc7513070a5
'2011-12-16T18:06:28-05:00'
describe
'309088' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
283eb0ac2bad29e1c3cdd10b03684581
ac0b3e5a3fc626ce911b67ac4cf9ea500e1a6db8
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYW' 'sip-files00032.tif'
80806ffe1fdffabe37d9f39e1057784a
c984b188f9555120ba67104f70f763c338b53dc5
describe
'311912' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYX' 'sip-files00033.tif'
38b65218c64d7ed22fcc1645c2ffc0ff
10f5528faebef913b29d077c2ebb7fe5d74cf5a6
'2011-12-16T18:05:50-05:00'
describe
'309780' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
4b8567eb5451351c6e3ef4cf65d0dae6
06f68f0aa14cb6f4266103da9a52222f3c6ace56
'2011-12-16T18:09:16-05:00'
describe
'303596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMYZ' 'sip-files00035.tif'
adfa6633ee859286c276c70929409e9c
ac00d864f1567e32376f82cebc50a1ce4aebb9b3
describe
'309520' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZA' 'sip-files00036.tif'
d53f6030a060e0abb3a4bb44110a1404
93721197e62d926b04e8c4c9ad1e032a8f652ecd
describe
'311408' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZB' 'sip-files00037.tif'
1d38dbacc09853a8aef8d9d122669aef
ad018aa86f1a0a984ab5268912f6172809c39e24
'2011-12-16T18:12:14-05:00'
describe
'9614948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZC' 'sip-files00038.tif'
4e20887c264e3899d81082fde46e0994
d7217d5c146a6ecb8e3b33e6d05334bbaabbb3c0
'2011-12-16T18:02:51-05:00'
describe
'303944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZD' 'sip-files00039.tif'
3191045e3099fff67423cfef4f23e799
9cd4aca4c4f7bf27879c87c8bd8656d63619244b
'2011-12-16T18:09:12-05:00'
describe
'313444' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZE' 'sip-files00040.tif'
4257de3375407435433864b562c34a65
027839708469beab13ca73eb50d653520b2e7036
describe
'316344' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZF' 'sip-files00041.tif'
1832eff264a3c4724daa049fd353c442
79c5c0b690491bcb20e6f343f0628451dce00dfa
'2011-12-16T18:05:17-05:00'
describe
'331412' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZG' 'sip-files00042.tif'
f9fd8697cc675e8b9af5a31b57e17eda
a57bb29a36e108a74cad6f2efaee8d4df1106254
'2011-12-16T18:05:27-05:00'
describe
'317456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
41aa7f167311882aba63304dbfc9639c
e0bfc43acf6c3ab2fff867475011493ebc46cac6
'2011-12-16T18:07:46-05:00'
describe
'320684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZI' 'sip-files00044.tif'
58811b1c2de8178edf9bb03ef351ac1a
04826a9503a40efe6cab9b24e60d8bc8b52cd9a0
describe
'319492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZJ' 'sip-files00045.tif'
bf29cc7c2b1a7443bfa2afa1c374a89e
0640dac75cd9d7dadc90910b0abce9d59c9c0ea0
describe
'333392' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
00e48166a0a7b532a0c765f15e7b304e
6dbd4b28523adc60819264139b96ad744296f8d2
'2011-12-16T18:09:57-05:00'
describe
'303220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
b3fb694fba59e04feab9c5a83e6a1c1e
49a4141b5f9503de4583d391a4f46323185e5ce4
'2011-12-16T18:09:23-05:00'
describe
'317500' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZM' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f18b2eb530af5c4f66f8a9427e965cac
07fdbabfd3941eb0ba31f653b70111f3e0801fa0
'2011-12-16T18:09:26-05:00'
describe
'303908' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZN' 'sip-files00049.tif'
638b18c763e2937ca4528e514213855d
fd12aae25b8bfb7e9c905a89e41a81641e6eb7cb
describe
'317640' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZO' 'sip-files00050.tif'
0309570ec61c3c328ff876b1c2698a17
ec25ff847c108b707f038bbe3662ee838471080c
'2011-12-16T18:12:09-05:00'
describe
'311604' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZP' 'sip-files00051.tif'
28a7068ad4878d4fd64b2b639f100d90
4aca92a3d224a7a59061abf923fdefd5fa5435e4
'2011-12-16T18:07:14-05:00'
describe
'317204' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZQ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
e8761f5a4d7de866c323fa16185b9f5a
0795a62d6c2086a3d8fe15cd251b3d7064b5e153
describe
'311020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZR' 'sip-files00053.tif'
bcb893b3c7dc1ce82bd9ea77e18718fc
2adb1f46dcb6d6f5bc510dc8771a1182569f381f
describe
'9399204' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZS' 'sip-files00054.tif'
63031b62e16454f016be0a7f1247119f
b137b7c287656c271384dc8d6bc2ca7b9608073e
describe
'302872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZT' 'sip-files00055.tif'
2c0013d975bbeea9414cbdf141e82555
3a86dc4ee490cf5d22ed5c9b807e2b400dd4aecb
'2011-12-16T18:10:03-05:00'
describe
'317624' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
0b943b136ca1685df32b54f1068a2d4c
e5fec9bab390e4b08d1679524287db633557d297
'2011-12-16T18:06:25-05:00'
describe
'303980' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
9299cfde61cc7ee96ba14a4343bf0820
6dfed7735836f2611ceaf63e24148eef815e9f7e
'2011-12-16T18:09:17-05:00'
describe
'317056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZW' 'sip-files00058.tif'
c1ca2373195653669132fdf0d9fa3945
777859190e288703666c4875245a1d07dce03e37
describe
'9621256' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZX' 'sip-files00059.tif'
2be75df2b41bb14a7d659b56aa2b9161
c434db92f16268675c52d82f1245b86a7627570b
'2011-12-16T18:10:08-05:00'
describe
'323764' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZY' 'sip-files00060.tif'
80feec98ea8aac48288d2b22b72107d4
dd0f20fa454c1e3530e1b984d2693449830d15b6
describe
'303940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABMZZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
59a6e03cf2bbb53a8f2f13389b0f2b6e
7c573a10579cc07b58908b4bc621ec4f3e1fc287
describe
'323528' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAA' 'sip-files00062.tif'
955a2c6dcda8aefee2c43a1892031a36
dc0fbdabf6edb76bc541673465e86f98150f4cee
'2011-12-16T18:09:01-05:00'
describe
'303288' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAB' 'sip-files00063.tif'
627e00e0e427ea004368d32a7802b0fd
8140c98b6c547d774f0080fb3a199795edbf5d85
describe
'317436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAC' 'sip-files00064.tif'
b13024487f330bb0007d88e09e6a700d
842bb08e8a4a1a3297f8b283aaa030a629d404dd
'2011-12-16T18:04:11-05:00'
describe
'304264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAD' 'sip-files00065.tif'
71403b12f63c47874768b632ff10b737
9bc6c544699a2486c523c45e93f7911e294ceee5
'2011-12-16T18:08:48-05:00'
describe
'309496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAE' 'sip-files00066.tif'
08bf781e24eca3be2d3185245e6fc1e2
6c52f1bf6d0d87ec2b8a78f52cc8043d8e182265
'2011-12-16T18:02:45-05:00'
describe
'303656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAF' 'sip-files00067.tif'
7bd6d7f3941ea8faa3e83741da87900b
724bc06867c857e10c1e4c716ce8c7b3f8d409b0
describe
'309100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAG' 'sip-files00068.tif'
79a3a7c3125fc02bc77df87fb63e5e83
a115fe504ae5930027d483f352beba47077df832
'2011-12-16T18:10:09-05:00'
describe
'313652' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
e5d4b60478de7cbfc77d7cd4105de1fe
87a2bbc3fc7d045c6560dec0cc71633ecd451ad1
'2011-12-16T18:03:28-05:00'
describe
'324884' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a0677f49bc166b15cd83b2fba1bf2d7a
9927c87209c50a8b7247e681f9dc4dd0154a778f
describe
'9869000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAJ' 'sip-files00071.tif'
63e6a504f425206cf7a07d8c9824bdb4
e6fd619d30199e023f7d6b750df86c38bb678663
'2011-12-16T18:10:58-05:00'
describe
'323204' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAK' 'sip-files00072.tif'
903d70e31c6b67230e939299a90bec9d
90df5d620e22e84ff34a04432eababb2cfa54e43
'2011-12-16T18:11:50-05:00'
describe
'311848' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAL' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bd073e126914307af03dda81fc1132fe
35ea99cb63a1cb734a3d8ed30f84eb79284d681f
describe
'336568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e5770400b4f37b715137c2c38d8288b5
30de8f208a2c7d45bce43ee69c12dfd70a932916
describe
'311812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAN' 'sip-files00075.tif'
94240f7ace9f46add15bda1a6bb3550a
15c39e364197d5e830b46180d04facb85a9d0565
'2011-12-16T18:07:11-05:00'
describe
'322964' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAO' 'sip-files00076.tif'
26254057a2951babcf2c1edfbf9f0364
e54539526303c0b5508aca469478b4dc858d0697
'2011-12-16T18:03:34-05:00'
describe
'303876' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAP' 'sip-files00077.tif'
826bc68621414a7026da59b575dcb3ae
fa86fce84427f89755f41ad3fbc324b4bd457cbd
describe
'317656' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAQ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
538e921571c8f2a9d72881f3546a1c52
ee008ca95a274acc3026162d71109f80d96da88f
'2011-12-16T18:09:28-05:00'
describe
'303988' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAR' 'sip-files00079.tif'
2c20f630eb400a3ace41915be384697b
fc26809bba9f32c1f1377400b303e834a9da431f
describe
'309676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAS' 'sip-files00080.tif'
82cd93dbe5bcba1ae40baa23c27ab827
e049b0f77d7210a416354ce89beded511c857435
describe
'304012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAT' 'sip-files00081.tif'
7d787dc24fbf2ba3ddd851b5e56e50b1
ce7f1e577658afb76da55e993ce4a8165a59f8c4
describe
'9594072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
678f36177e9b17f8c5bb3f4e250f04fc
51fd398d07e47f087cd93b12981153a47da72d87
'2011-12-16T18:02:43-05:00'
describe
'296212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f2c7a76ab68dee65395767bc3bedee4a
d754b959e915af8526575585b5737363c6dcad52
'2011-12-16T18:10:16-05:00'
describe
'309040' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAW' 'sip-files00084.tif'
1539bd2d8875d43d4333a5d4ef64ce6c
8165d885c96a1e6e16d6b7a541cab20bb59211b9
'2011-12-16T18:08:43-05:00'
describe
'303744' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAX' 'sip-files00085.tif'
172f42ca1a6f8c1181e2c3291e6220bd
112d416c339f7fba6e10941ca4ed94cb44857b94
'2011-12-16T18:11:59-05:00'
describe
'317520' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAY' 'sip-files00086.tif'
379125fe8c6704d2445bccdab88df94f
3077e220b58e977235307910a46dc6230b56274e
'2011-12-16T18:04:57-05:00'
describe
'314912' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNAZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
80c7116ac24dec82f4164eca2514df40
a5a46c4ecdc098289766ea0d8600b8d3d253305e
describe
'321276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBA' 'sip-files00088.tif'
ade4151b939413a7f4dd65baf272a628
11eb7f971bf04ae619c808053e6efea20ae8e712
describe
'316748' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBB' 'sip-files00089.tif'
d24c8896006f77ef10fda944ef06fffc
9aa8db10dad346a44ebf6a79a5e5b3638226b497
'2011-12-16T18:05:05-05:00'
describe
'323304' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
5f20fc397c29cd92db755cbb9f10bd40
ceb173eacf0c33fc80226c9371ee64ef71076b1a
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
6dc7fe601117bedbb1d446719f7212ee
b2babdd02c231e8a01988ccd944da6da2fcd0538
describe
'334712' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBE' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8dace00b4b6c607505d4660344104be7
ba61400c7dff14bf234f45e35799190a0b9ec941
'2011-12-16T18:09:43-05:00'
describe
'315564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBF' 'sip-files00093.tif'
4f652e18f442a239e311335c45486f68
1abb36064665050809d609d83fe59480f215de41
'2011-12-16T18:10:30-05:00'
describe
'315832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBG' 'sip-files00094.tif'
164e31e53b400910ae286d56d7ee7cca
d14eaeacd1d646c4813db076c3f365ae77e28f4f
describe
'316068' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c0bf5d39664f3e22442981149634ce01
3137cf6e3f8c757355c1cd3e7876f9772a98a72b
describe
'299400' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
2dd33b16de1744de40239aafb9d923d7
9c8f63827bdb7cfb39f2d6bd9aa0b73697cc49a5
'2011-12-16T18:08:31-05:00'
describe
'9585252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
6ef63e13f960aa6909b5c4fec8fa1a1e
da0f4707334a28fc6edecfcacbea900b9e02fa1c
describe
'316060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBK' 'sip-files00098.tif'
2d7b4fdbe9e846197e4f305351644c1a
fc7ad62977d881ae97cf3c83f2d042efdee76b08
'2011-12-16T18:10:29-05:00'
describe
'307080' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBL' 'sip-files00099.tif'
60c43bb05091714aac13b8ba5ca5cb47
30f7c400f9440a7819651ba06e3b771959bdce82
'2011-12-16T18:07:56-05:00'
describe
'304976' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
d1535c9e852a47e517e74d9873c9e087
963841b563ca9ec810a04d10cb35b539bf4ba346
'2011-12-16T18:06:20-05:00'
describe
'307448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBN' 'sip-files00101.tif'
fa336e74f99bd841efc2be75ce7a0667
c159d565d7a1662ca6dfa182ff0e6fb9508fb920
'2011-12-16T18:07:12-05:00'
describe
'311956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBO' 'sip-files00102.tif'
08c7f8fc4f4a49aa3ed13c9f46ae0c80
70060d6834f65c60ee3dd22428f0fd91c08e506c
describe
'320560' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
64fd1240ef9b4d3dd7d841c990661af5
94eb5394cb5b6d979bf63900c6ccedd304f73bb9
'2011-12-16T18:07:32-05:00'
describe
'305000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBQ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
b46a53060ce94206f7f66830131ca002
e3a573cac22b3bf382fd056e33aa6d91e60ac2f4
describe
'326552' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBR' 'sip-files00105.tif'
4930ef3cda8b6fd7b6a223d1d8bce3ec
2bddf93702eeebfb5bd7e2454ba15c0e0cc57f2a
'2011-12-16T18:05:10-05:00'
describe
'307844' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBS' 'sip-files00106.tif'
70c95b7a16b508731f6f76b5f1138e6a
4df31c71a3c2acaba23bb61e1598e39fb31fb9b7
describe
'323740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBT' 'sip-files00107.tif'
990d247e750e58012d332a33977a71ec
32301da0c0ab2b889eabf6eb4c2e069896380dbc
describe
'9540956' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBU' 'sip-files00108.tif'
853a00a854fc2fedf43a550ca8ff580d
2ddb6b60e54b9110e7bb554918f1392fe2bc7e66
describe
'318684' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
e85d38769fedf5f1507125a80cc6f0cd
03eb41aea2f1ab64b731c830bf95c96fb368aceb
'2011-12-16T18:09:15-05:00'
describe
'318680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBW' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c4233239ddb45202e804ee2b8b4a370d
dbcf4e029719382ecad32fe6e75edf05b67b936f
'2011-12-16T18:11:02-05:00'
describe
'317876' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBX' 'sip-files00111.tif'
42838794a5f62c205a634c6fc1e3aba7
f4c54f9a1f295c0a4085a4011f908071e602d255
'2011-12-16T18:06:27-05:00'
describe
'316016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBY' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2699e615cde06ea53d5e7e2028019536
2b0cccc20a31ef89fd739f9988489aca92f50672
describe
'312572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNBZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
c2c9f9208e6cdd99fbe4ea7a61ab6fbb
8379bafe69eb5c99789e08e5a9594f874fdeae93
describe
'9454828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e2e610398f7796ce576f4d3154128f80
d78815020b94855bb85069a16030c6a299fef804
describe
'312300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCB' 'sip-files00115.tif'
b5923240f7241ec80d0a39a10d576dcd
682a5ca13f8cd04dcc13ae8be7958c5f175fe26f
'2011-12-16T18:08:17-05:00'
describe
'303312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
827c9e2205990095f6134ac2e7c3478a
5c76fc9a6ef5ccfb012896bd7682f9f22b792e54
describe
'306812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCD' 'sip-files00117.tif'
d54aad8da6afcda2179c8e38573f54c4
e3b7a8ef582268c0a0debdc34c614915ba3de739
describe
'299716' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
0a514ccfd8919a407434d9b51f3d226e
89cd92fde26651b38457bdb6a375f69c6ecaf203
describe
'9584564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCF' 'sip-files00119.tif'
a725a344da6fe67df3b32fd850cad602
3cef5902210cef5eb84e2027b24414f316461a81
describe
'299840' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCG' 'sip-files00120.tif'
dcb0b78b4e605bff1fb3cfdbe01363a8
1a585a913309ad962a677d7d09bd25e598103972
describe
'312884' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
6778891b63d788dd3593af31a163012f
cdbc2022cdd183f0d164dd803ffac18d6a57a567
describe
'299564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6570d4c7da5b8b908a508fd3d902c770
cb3070f108a586f3b26f97c38461c3841f0feebe
describe
'307308' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCJ' 'sip-files00123.tif'
f9ec523468eeb5c3d9c47c7de6bec230
c4129917f4c56d86a7c86e6951e4b7a0234c7931
describe
'312456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCK' 'sip-files00124.tif'
44c057c3089b21e85aecd98f128c7e03
e06741867d1ba01c9c7f58aae508736611d4ab17
'2011-12-16T18:06:45-05:00'
describe
'315276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCL' 'sip-files00125.tif'
aac9c5bca1cd4a5ca0a92000a5d99ad5
79d5016c806c2d2bc596f01fc8c1d849fa1551cd
'2011-12-16T18:03:20-05:00'
describe
'306996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
56de7ff467eb9beedc6d1c8f29f13bee
cf5dcba583d0148bd76e94830407988b91c58b8a
describe
'310508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCN' 'sip-files00127.tif'
e9d9fa5551738c203513f26f2b3f0c86
86ff99febaf724ff3964b82f076de4d422362a1a
describe
'306796' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCO' 'sip-files00128.tif'
b3863a004b63346814e7b627b7404621
d8f3ce556fa2c8b71f2e140923d416122e89955f
describe
'309296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCP' 'sip-files00129.tif'
aab16fa853c7d91ed99afb5de3761532
0d17b4375ca7e80c38b4becee4a1774d630b21f7
describe
'306360' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCQ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
227bff3e00c41ce5ed8d011ee5049d0a
3c6cfc4e658663db7711c0861b9b9fe2b75944a3
describe
'316116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCR' 'sip-files00131.tif'
03f45fe841a06b5e8cab2edcee232d65
e321a7065ef33158fb69084ba5e5504a4196b478
describe
'315740' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCS' 'sip-files00132.tif'
245cd518ca73043e5cfa453af7ceb96b
cf9eda9674f086766d5870be46b786fbf636ea92
'2011-12-16T18:12:12-05:00'
describe
'9407892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCT' 'sip-files00133.tif'
285c48a06cbc9c4c7d42336e6cb97f74
2bd2a27172835852cf9e0630dc3bb0d7ba2b4b3b
describe
'307164' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCU' 'sip-files00134.tif'
638dffce4ba9a2264f33d13253b47d8e
f48af13a46a78370f58d319c012599a5a9e38b9a
describe
'310536' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCV' 'sip-files00135.tif'
dba1e2a13f268ab9104bfb05d9ba8232
c0ea99ec62d12ecb92655b7694ef18e429c8270e
describe
'313012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCW' 'sip-files00136.tif'
cd4cd8724dc1c9f8eea96ea828844409
38d98b4c1667424b9f63256f05e666ed29707a8d
'2011-12-16T18:06:26-05:00'
describe
'310804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCX' 'sip-files00137.tif'
baf9a03171cbaf5777e22e192055948e
edacfed97d0b11ee599f78ba61b947a8f83d4367
describe
'307360' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCY' 'sip-files00138.tif'
c1c7dfaf2d31892db09a2a86a4dd9757
036195bd14418b5815668f9f506ca10aeead4bcf
'2011-12-16T18:04:06-05:00'
describe
'315508' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNCZ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
77dc00c1d41ba0397be9e416f10bd8c8
0b048d9955383befca0b65f848de0762ca484c3a
describe
'321072' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
33cf6fe15a9172f1ce01520ed8aaeb37
a67943dbe75330fc308cd912322ff67ed168c817
'2011-12-16T18:06:14-05:00'
describe
'9543236' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDB' 'sip-files00141.tif'
9ba4667e98f50900468a413955173ebc
ff0751803d27d3c907c3b4a0f2348311c04fa134
describe
'315568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDC' 'sip-files00142.tif'
5fb66aa9e4ab3e7ad4cd05ebc5922d9a
9bfc436127a9654efaee4e61f366abfc46ec51e8
'2011-12-16T18:07:29-05:00'
describe
'315936' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDD' 'sip-files00143.tif'
8c3073419e70d539d7577aa49525c867
ca557017e011c7e3633ab4158b59d01e23fd79d4
describe
'313436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDE' 'sip-files00144.tif'
66dfcacd334f338231e71425bdab5502
db49e40213ffc3951f918fdae864aab2cf6c3a65
describe
'319664' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDF' 'sip-files00145.tif'
8debf79c29f08fbd19f12cbebd8b0074
cd232c05e1263dfb0b1f962e70f6fe23310e52c2
describe
'305988' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
aea31ea656d752c43b668b7b01123257
42aebc3ad0ba1ee2fcd7ae7815f8cf61f7511ab1
describe
'310488' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDH' 'sip-files00147.tif'
21fe9c59c09a2ddac10992be3dd0e920
e97ba93c0170b23cffe356e27456ed3171cf78ec
'2011-12-16T18:05:58-05:00'
describe
'307132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
a62ec172ee426affc1938d01fe1c1735
5e644109a16a1e018d45988724d1e273bcdfb821
describe
'310356' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
a4e8b79f76360bcb7acb58685f9682e6
8ed25d7fa0ed77aeee1fc755c260f26f48107836
describe
'313060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDK' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d4ab5ade4b9255fad295136d7f0013fd
47d35119bff98498fea49c9e154c4f2f7297b2c4
describe
'323444' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDL' 'sip-files00151.tif'
da780c16b30fea3934bc7aee858a5c55
19b5a604849ec40d47a3ed5e67336168a4960990
describe
'312348' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDM' 'sip-files00152.tif'
1370fa92256d1d7fd94497df96a7ac3e
b1535d1ff273fa0db7280e94a554c6bc4de5279a
'2011-12-16T18:09:49-05:00'
describe
'316044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDN' 'sip-files00153.tif'
66bcbe316b03feb4a5c033086a3ed695
9d3c78ae1618e53a1eaaf79db53889e2f612c21b
describe
'313200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
eed938ed4b2479e771c00d16ff8ac5fb
4529692807356f94040a7c274cd1143e48933c7a
'2011-12-16T18:10:15-05:00'
describe
'324172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
f3394898a511fea1b782347e90be1f7f
035bbd33c005d3b5d022ffda8eccc9e997610b86
describe
'307276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDQ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
9164bd82ecb23aa583b1c86e5ad258bd
725f3d7b8e38a5a3f6774170680d94b30ca74a4e
describe
'318260' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
0f53b694a158046c41e1b5b4b7c43e11
2ae02c97e99a02c335abf91f137f1e99aca989f3
describe
'9288116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
faaac52c508d49bb22fc8301851beb66
9de925cee781a73cb49d025e80f3a2b61762efcb
'2011-12-16T18:10:47-05:00'
describe
'320784' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDT' 'sip-files00159.tif'
e4659d70b8117777a384a2032def49fb
e645fb58eacbc8cd322e841ce800f08d10154d4d
'2011-12-16T18:05:46-05:00'
describe
'306264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
6901496092cd28b76510f2197054b92e
4a0962eb6f6a4ac1d43c3b8dd2669d367a4586b8
'2011-12-16T18:07:43-05:00'
describe
'323968' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
7bdd1d0b01f01564887f19a950a5bfd5
eff3e2b8de45926a1db23ade054d0959d37caff0
describe
'306952' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
07164cb19e3def4508f87ac125f86b93
bf59928685438877bbe59a527580eb090ff26ab9
describe
'323992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
dbc4369f87254591feac8e3a1d5cddc4
876d372008cbc7104ab1061b83b14e7859c78ce6
describe
'313040' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
bdfc28e58ded4535de014fa624b567ae
dd72185a6a6ca9603995ff79a09d11a21a633d8b
describe
'318592' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNDZ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
562a16ee3ccca758ae07d33fa239c670
26cbd86e47c3e08b96c473e5b0e789e6bde48ee2
'2011-12-16T18:11:52-05:00'
describe
'312892' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
0bcff278d35c6dbfd1557282424883cc
31f457853a7e1fca479b8a7faea9dae80f0ac4b8
describe
'331652' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
7e846774a5bb024bd82b0ca8b63a2a68
bc6e3cccf750c1625f5c2d538dda3322c71225a9
describe
'307120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
591d22a17ecbe887c00fdcf2e1235300
1b097574bbd3e97d2b704ba2bf628e6b8506bd28
describe
'316348' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNED' 'sip-files00169.tif'
3bba2bbe0fa283f3439d21a743b9e7f6
4227930813fdc0c21bf05e16310b2b6c6d45771b
describe
'311676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEE' 'sip-files00170.tif'
c31ea3159d5e1ff041c522fa1e917aa4
e0437dd1d869bb79642023f222548e27cad55ec0
describe
'323816' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
fe7c8fe0fb97293bd548e2435367c0c4
208b054b05bf7ca5f0a3f09539042123a75f05aa
describe
'9287936' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEG' 'sip-files00172.tif'
07cf9881485d087cee87f399e5412875
e1e4792191136bca177f126628e4e503bf696103
describe
'332276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
71a5c98420821d79a85c1c09a8695268
0ec94c37545ea237a7c580443acd526e31caec0f
'2011-12-16T18:08:47-05:00'
describe
'315416' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
3e9880b6a5df38cfaeca6c55521119dc
2472e1a8e8f9b2da26e362bb6253806f67fb14c9
describe
'329300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
21e57707d812e1be2f70051394dd3051
4bc58452323e80353379c3f5adca4a18a06f544c
describe
'307320' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
dddb63dea7e92ef3b140f4c1da020718
5b9fc84e2498078f5f2e880ce657ec181206af61
'2011-12-16T18:05:54-05:00'
describe
'321700' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEL' 'sip-files00177.tif'
77d370577474e4cea661cc22ed1b9eac
06e1106c03c8140a084abc24a49b6e98abfd8098
describe
'318628' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEM' 'sip-files00178.tif'
4c85fbdb61aaf57fa20b76f7f43edd4d
1d539ab80b5b60f1105e521838e637636ec4a49b
describe
'324304' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
b936d354e321a7d45b103a13889073a1
117c7a50308fc79de1ea6be6f9729a58d67e217a
describe
'318532' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
cdd8773ebbc28ee9f086fdc4b8df6de4
9105a6b54509cccc9a4342773200a170b82d35e5
'2011-12-16T18:06:06-05:00'
describe
'10070020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
8c328b43f41647123dea2ab9060638ae
862d0ee7db86f45ac218fb4d22eecd91f0e1322a
describe
'313000' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
d8261f0fcf24e12cbbe7080a50a4d621
26644835a7ae18e914573c2e7482b98955413df7
'2011-12-16T18:06:12-05:00'
describe
'324156' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNER' 'sip-files00183.tif'
33f746491c4877a31f9109f27d4c4102
d23b1b406e35a2d9bf35eadc95d47f2758678b92
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNES' 'sip-files00184.tif'
fe6607b310a4b7a58e3f3043554ac782
29e765eceb498058543135c9a31beb10be709659
'2011-12-16T18:04:50-05:00'
describe
'327056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNET' 'sip-files00185.tif'
6a65569b31b14459e0f863e7257d239d
b5f9b156bfcf297472a4a056013122383d140303
'2011-12-16T18:09:24-05:00'
describe
'315692' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
927269518fcdcee5b40bacae4517a73d
49ae0ce98aca2f3e7acf4cd1511a77ed85fd580a
'2011-12-16T18:06:43-05:00'
describe
'329244' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEV' 'sip-files00187.tif'
bbee2aae6029951cccdab513c0c678ff
2c9e90045ac71f7bb3d31a4df3a81291eec8e8d1
describe
'313004' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
b1b0177c092f99d8093cca9cca1b667b
839ff7dc43046bc6ecbde71faee24879129e6535
'2011-12-16T18:07:45-05:00'
describe
'321272' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
3c586f775f819481b2de76abbd1e3831
dee99b03c779ce4406d9d990db96f89109cb30a3
'2011-12-16T18:06:32-05:00'
describe
'307264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
de96d688648dcc530f12dd73a80c786a
f3f80154d9630700e444628f035896425558418f
describe
'320224' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNEZ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
943018bce5e3311f1545cad86dd8aa20
f775f563af2361df09c28e08445570f859482245
'2011-12-16T18:07:13-05:00'
describe
'5385572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
99e0da240581df18fea01413833284a2
6bcb7063694b52a2e466d6c85897dfccd0c92818
'2011-12-16T18:03:00-05:00'
describe
'435172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFB' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
04a96ce1db287aa217e7d927b2c774f4
afa89242dfcc63748f48ed11e9b0c839aca15b44
'2011-12-16T18:04:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'4648' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
f54c91aaf290bed7f6b65824b57a3705
01950743bc8f790d5b1f2e02bced2902ca40c99c
describe
'325267' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFD' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
53d753fd8758192ed4838997cb525126
a7907ed9e7e35adb283569c73dc31f667d6bb45e
describe
'45556' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFE' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
8f13e83ab60fffd8ace0cde57887fcff
2953dabd1d80da6d038b4ee481ba571239a06017
'2011-12-16T18:03:47-05:00'
describe
'174957' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFF' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
7c9fcf3fceb722f626f03ffa9dcf3ae4
87cfff1800257cf0ada2d23c6d87c64b3fe12643
describe
'87587' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFG' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
995eda01c5a3506166f3d1c2fda87481
d0c28d04bf79095d72e23dd730699f1bbb455fb3
'2011-12-16T18:11:44-05:00'
describe
'87691' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFH' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c4078e4995840df90e4432eaac934b8c
58e168bb5b67bc0cc73670f930902574d5c25e15
'2011-12-16T18:07:48-05:00'
describe
'91687' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFI' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
afbb4362eb95e8d410539e1b80f9c04a
42e9eb7c8ad72c862ecf27471906e8de4ec3253b
describe
'59772' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFJ' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
7e6c4947d25da0a3708dd3dae0032ffd
37dd55d82ca5eef485c89aa68aa67c9b340e6c02
describe
'42826' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFK' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
2d8c9a73c692cd1e1a4cb06fbcc92bfd
c279aad5f8933ca84b236a813f8d2f1f5cb4c4c7
describe
'189474' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFL' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
1aa7f5a817e59a2bbfbc43157484db02
3e18f49e1c041868b3d506b978e38a62dc7e9940
'2011-12-16T18:04:19-05:00'
describe
'266139' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFM' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
9ded8e7bc21b17f51d9399e6d5ef5a4f
9d2cbca842bacc2ece84762bc20c5d1560351b69
'2011-12-16T18:04:25-05:00'
describe
'276288' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFN' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5b30a7fab6b16edf0fce6028931e3648
63f0340e5e7b92db546fa4a486daf969aeac563d
describe
'252847' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFO' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
1460d687faa3abd2a6b4a7672fdd065f
df07d77551e9f2dfb49ca5e7a455f4f1a04a33f1
describe
'305227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFP' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
b0edb6d5e273869e5995ce205245d119
af521928201a402e83c570e339f80c2023a15c00
describe
'266371' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFQ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
cef0241860a79388c38e092410360311
cfb0254ccd48492a928dc9504ac9af2440692550
describe
'262814' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFR' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
fb6bc22ac2aa8dc559315d71b8ebcdda
516e92b01fc15a9c8e3859fa71a4c9c60c1763ff
describe
'248259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
38e120f4ad2faf04bc805ad1c4989474
97d59b61c6d50c4820f25181f4a6a37eb7518815
describe
'259645' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFT' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
cf43c503be15b0b0b60b6d80b33d5c4a
cb81a239325b9072a77975397c64816a07d0fa4b
'2011-12-16T18:04:54-05:00'
describe
'245324' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFU' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
c4e9c220ab9963668a6445df1d81fbb7
80f7f84a6b16be0243398a3db74033d686f6afc2
describe
'273809' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
189b386fcbf6fffe718184cde2bd1ce5
5f293de7f271d0159c05646f0ddd6b361331cc51
describe
'295205' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFW' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
d9a83a1b327d36c8adeade7ba7c8418d
e529a5e4e0b0547d4b5a2e1682ac26f5c95ffb16
describe
'289718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
03fca6d3d79f4681dcad75f34cabd834
2b6dca73477c9847c6fad6895827ceb2adc8678b
describe
'237367' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFY' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
1e3f265941c6316a19f411f8f0976ebf
718d8290015d9e229578bd663d536ae4383d6439
describe
'236248' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNFZ' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ae5aa5b2bfd28887d1cd4281a7c02480
9005d914b289046d1e52aee58c7c43e4aeda32f1
describe
'269168' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ec5a90fae00d12803b4ac5b11bbb0461
ee23f891e38a2c87b703022516c8ed4c50293f93
describe
'273882' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGB' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
066bcadf437eea5fd59a1a57a7c088a1
b2dcee0530b0a3b166923d5e487df1d7ac984dab
'2011-12-16T18:10:21-05:00'
describe
'310821' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f3a915dd2fbab45465e0cdd47a36011d
515690739df968acaa91487de99db05198583f82
describe
'284564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGD' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
f7c5434fada44955b9819e3de0228b03
55126f51efd7b1607a9ee3dd103618ccfad7e744
'2011-12-16T18:11:05-05:00'
describe
'266004' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGE' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3280b84755d76ff0a1dc53d0c6ba9f15
4c22c43802a704b066d314c3b3997383125b7a3b
'2011-12-16T18:10:27-05:00'
describe
'270540' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
f9708fb6b0c8a284abf25053d5e838a9
4b85989dc90e8e293f4fd7a61df41986700f9274
describe
'271562' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGG' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
33b9ffb51c6927569cc55b48b632d6ab
a4c645fd47e4634c97e330f2717f4ffb82f8bf16
describe
'277545' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGH' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
54119dc161d65b64943df8ee6e2002bd
31fffbb7d0ccf76f1dfa6242ef69398491187244
'2011-12-16T18:06:53-05:00'
describe
'265235' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
35e9d4792b1b3d632764816631b75249
bd6c9ac3a26d958ec226fcf04d8a547f334e6176
describe
'235978' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ec9b3c3cc8711d49264ee4d386e56efe
a63135793664f0f4ca782f476c07780185b0d0d2
'2011-12-16T18:11:08-05:00'
describe
'261758' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGK' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
3ccd72357e2e6e6acbbe90f7e2b7ca60
8cbca829cb21a732d9d4522f4c73a85abcb63f9a
describe
'250943' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGL' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
36cddc794a365e2fdc835a42bfcbd5e4
cc39a35cd9323e0e2693826070ad6cff1c64617a
'2011-12-16T18:07:28-05:00'
describe
'291507' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGM' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
f553f3cc46ef3ed063098f22901fb392
142b10d944afe94aaa1ff52dc15e7ab791ef1692
describe
'272318' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGN' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
e00f5b58edb66ce3a24f43c6260b895b
c66dd16d6c1ccb2e6981d0ff6745623c2d514bd2
describe
'119596' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGO' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
969a6560973e13f3877398d23c2d4b67
211c09eb36b6457fff630303845b4a43544d23fe
'2011-12-16T18:07:17-05:00'
describe
'212143' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGP' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
57df762e004d37add70681d20583aa3c
23f68823537a3634e03d2daceca3fe3fd0b64878
'2011-12-16T18:10:12-05:00'
describe
'265819' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGQ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
51867aa182b9f6ad5e537e1471c916a3
6e6c9fc73e98591a50f6f6b40052bad4752a9247
describe
'276734' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGR' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
54fc7e4e63207c236b88c3f30bf7ad2f
31f62c65aff4448666972c7daa07944c43c19212
describe
'265194' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
8a30fc69606e517a3732705737024249
ad2c78a571dd7cd9a9fd6fecf0494f95d7136bc7
'2011-12-16T18:12:21-05:00'
describe
'271311' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGT' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
2c153cb06160d086bb0490b97d6b9d05
feb7a4021eb1539bdebd01256e1329e50006a236
describe
'238723' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGU' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c6f69b86da61204ecf896611617d167d
7de27630e7974baa0b50d5bcc3d80d98d23b9095
'2011-12-16T18:10:39-05:00'
describe
'246110' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
519c73159518adcdb9c12dd73ae15252
8ea222f10cae87cb798779e5bbf4efdc4e787ba1
describe
'258818' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGW' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
1708cb44dbf178f807cf501298b7a044
ff1b18a857dfa20eb39d7b5ea69ff141df744c53
describe
'254099' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGX' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
8882e904769b7c21f6645ebb5b46b7d1
4dce231144da3b6e54370e0c235ccd8b664eaff5
describe
'268067' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
4d29ee7661725e4615028a98cd86ed4e
f790e5629d7e718dd6ef6363f56668750de681ef
describe
'256200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNGZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
77250e037d82ce8563c45f62e98df400
4caf76606dee18d5e074b424331e51d7c1d1d660
describe
'253515' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
27393a1d49e3eff98a35dda3762ea856
c1fe11ef1e2bc1a68aa7195d72dce4dafcca37a4
describe
'253682' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7159473181f0b91596d33ec14646942e
1a2063199387ac9ca95d2ce8f93fb4b07e35f853
describe
'243009' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d760b371dacab12193ed32d72bce4159
dd7a002820a31be0d021747d8511dfd5406a0074
'2011-12-16T18:06:44-05:00'
describe
'238209' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHD' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
68181a1cde7bd846da6ac8e42675da86
0902ec6c7142c7407c1ddef9083407b87ba0f775
describe
'275111' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHE' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
41519e775df8703bbdeedd04b13aa99e
722e7580008304b7f834edc6a0652f98b855910f
describe
'275541' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5b9461af964dc47f74b29d440b77b7e0
be1a4c76992d3fa5e52bca5874f47d46ea83beea
'2011-12-16T18:02:40-05:00'
describe
'228645' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHG' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
7b4cd4e160fcc3148ef8622bab4633b8
8f7177c726c8ee8c61f73ee6950abbb06b2abb94
'2011-12-16T18:09:50-05:00'
describe
'306044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHH' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
84c0d69476f9247b5a69d860632daf61
01b44a66c9d394e5b13e6f5a4978be134d56665b
'2011-12-16T18:11:07-05:00'
describe
'261972' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHI' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
80d91cb5456abd8703b2ed6cf83a5d20
d74669857fb7d4e70992ec9075aca015b0d5413e
describe
'244297' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHJ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
3e27d1c5574acf01176aae41ef2d0697
13545be8bbbf8c9ccd3fc6e35aa69da09d1ec96f
'2011-12-16T18:08:52-05:00'
describe
'239353' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHK' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
fac0b0debb2056ec146dc814b2ef9997
e1f3457d5c9eac82ab2a2894ad94534321909922
describe
'253436' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
5caba22b5ee81fe2954c8cc0317ca2de
455d6403e3c4438c70fd38182820f09ab13cbbfa
describe
'251461' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHM' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
bdc12819bdd1038006e9736c6fb0ce04
e9bc84fff55b5b1d7412089b959e56d44750cfe6
'2011-12-16T18:04:36-05:00'
describe
'285592' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHN' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8669f8ff800892fcdbd2e0c5488a0e1d
4058cc2e88a7aa2fc22c7a80cc8c15c496722263
describe
'247580' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHO' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
1b471a75b8c1c4e40715d64a05472bd6
90f2fd50ee9a2433d8d7720133568b442f3d81f2
describe
'244220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHP' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
a4744d2cb9a2d02486524c0d15c6a0ae
2271ef39e499eb78fb4c25db7f9d18d0c969edf2
describe
'236275' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHQ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
4e78721a1d01f8d732d67e009bda856f
f0b3db7f941cc37dba40e98a7bda0aea31745e4b
'2011-12-16T18:09:32-05:00'
describe
'220502' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHR' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
9e33ca068fba28c4d822d32a29a3c8fe
808e50865d77b3ed7d96e54b8fc403339edbc70a
describe
'213510' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
469948e37b64229d70baf2c254698e57
46fcbd9ff801ce36017f1e911831fd4afad067dc
describe
'317785' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHT' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
38c82a483f2c4d49085f9c76eb48d645
b248fb9d27be179ef1df6815d516356ff69b967f
describe
'236779' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
7df08fe66ccb9280960e9c4b588d77ae
a9542911c849bedd7850c4d01c5608ac482a9809
'2011-12-16T18:06:16-05:00'
describe
'271250' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
652a881ba5fa88b5e55056971a9cc2cc
5a5ac696b80aa04a82556d74023795b724287804
describe
'247177' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
5998276b460520ab5fbf3de1551a8150
11548b37e29d66c408edb8ce22530095ac109fc2
'2011-12-16T18:11:43-05:00'
describe
'283777' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
2551e770fc4e1bd474dc0f73ddf354f6
a225a754dceae841d06b4abffa0ef89d719092bc
describe
'246460' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHY' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
c57f1f7085b62ca9e7c6bb501b0bf208
dc562008137002c8a661d7f4571fb10d66bfc066
describe
'289016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNHZ' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
7133af2abc7e4dc3a2f7e9b43324abe7
dfb5495c36ce7a462be9b37a53ad2216d1e63911
'2011-12-16T18:10:50-05:00'
describe
'275472' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIA' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
b5647af1772b67fcd8a4019b6dcb55a6
9508be4bb6f838f2e8bec397189dac6d58b11166
describe
'261081' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIB' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
78663f02c91b8d766a34b33a20deca2d
2f9fa93658ef4a32054f532d6ae655e18649d4fb
'2011-12-16T18:04:40-05:00'
describe
'277572' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIC' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
df18ebbfe7d5100fd6aedb8ef9c8ba81
f00a8cc35c1bb6d2aebc1d995cce5bbe183c7476
'2011-12-16T18:04:17-05:00'
describe
'266020' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNID' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
a93d8572a1b13110e3d7c14425545fa7
8e1f1624001c6e68c2d280452fa431a40c9df4b8
describe
'354879' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIE' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
8b80c9d5418ee68097f0c62d68675437
0f147319b3e51f99c415a8897835830cd787f2b8
'2011-12-16T18:05:01-05:00'
describe
'245787' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d53446ce0728e4390e7aeb62a9bd4aeb
4318f3478efc7d24764dc9776947400ed9312155
describe
'224044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIG' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
53c8636175c65fa60e5f3e3d67daab4d
8d8db2767637d030d0ca93bcdfd6f877fc4a8b4f
describe
'250170' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIH' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
b888fe95e2160e28754d52eaa2dba256
15afe713c46849779de8e1a899b6a3d372b3c982
describe
'260031' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNII' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
7d396aa3c33f8a70b5fbb4576c43bd32
ed8a8deb8c6ff8cd14614f2dab1b59d2afa2bfd5
describe
'173478' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIJ' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
5e4070403176851efe2f8cc3cb8dfb8f
e406b323a4eb34a3420fbeea8b30031ba4f5c1b5
'2011-12-16T18:04:58-05:00'
describe
'175722' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
fa28a3ea3137690dc357557afa7062c3
9e85296144b893bc8ad4c57f279791cc876b2544
describe
'238597' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4e6e71ff21b55f456a6bc27df642acb2
ecadb0377a959947cf5e8ddbe6e606568b6d8ece
describe
'252126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIM' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
603c6614cf4595353fac286004fb2666
bb6ab35590c97f43a58ee78bb12be3a5a166e771
'2011-12-16T18:08:03-05:00'
describe
'247697' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIN' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a3cce837ae272298e602283e20dd1bfe
b26e4c775e34cb2f988c1b5fb3075512e4e20f9f
'2011-12-16T18:05:11-05:00'
describe
'261932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIO' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
f70248a51b237a94332828243af98b8c
ba88d1cd21c67eed6143e636a40186e9c4ae14fa
describe
'267623' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIP' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
3e789cbfb585932141d535ad821e9e57
d7cd5232be7fb3a43bf503eeb3967a8d0eaf32f1
'2011-12-16T18:12:03-05:00'
describe
'246337' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIQ' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
b960227fde8490188c6f1234986be7a4
96b05a9f27ee4ccab115f3985dbcc9dcd688c1b6
describe
'259245' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIR' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
7f81b18f82073358a746bdbb89b1041f
cc133ac6aec346926f15eabdca1d9f56abdab54a
describe
'275182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b4f8a8b022b02e746bcafc4640350700
886c042e62a482bdb09cb44cb3789d1182db21fe
describe
'348377' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
70968ca6ffff8518335f6cdb3e9bb3ec
6a952733909e09c05a173751ef0ea49432996ce8
'2011-12-16T18:10:19-05:00'
describe
'259636' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIU' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3695f34285f40d542c244f1fe806728b
0f3242c2cffb4b97192c9a61022f421f8d574aa2
describe
'259998' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
def5164ea78ac45d8b0e0b9a300d250f
ccb54160c9a0deb3f9c5b565d089efb5a78789fa
'2011-12-16T18:11:56-05:00'
describe
'256823' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIW' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
4750e26a083db78dca44d51901715b68
24e957f7d56651c4cd1c93de5d9a188a9f0c5f3a
describe
'274400' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
02ed1c06c6488bb3ef911a9bf9b4fca2
1e3b9d6a0b9f750759cb7bf6f788f6be465100b9
describe
'232200' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIY' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
e60ac7c731fde7af359ae29c23e26198
7439c8a8c5160fbbfa0f6b94684ba24fe0bbea8a
'2011-12-16T18:11:25-05:00'
describe
'248163' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNIZ' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
26530eb6726baea86f863e8ed25e4b5c
6ebffadea95eafbf0d7db3a522fc8a1083629104
describe
'275407' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJA' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
4dfbc760a5c378a788b3e0405496431b
5ea0c5295f4083046e5f87d85564cf5ae8d94c84
describe
'288259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJB' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
993fb6e533f5c7ec71779c24c01763d3
774cb1a6653652077c179fce7dcf8f5b138a2c36
'2011-12-16T18:06:54-05:00'
describe
'291872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJC' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
d67935416beb5aa2785ae6cab100ee11
d0fbe3cf5561d5bedb7a544235dcb89e37c634f0
describe
'230120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJD' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
c801652deca8279e5a8fd53e282ae06b
f529dc1d52c869277a61b59b149737bc874f788c
describe
'301504' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJE' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
94224282766ca7d8b3e6db6cde9b0938
47d2a90ad1b0b33b7f73c0ba845bbfea393317ac
'2011-12-16T18:05:53-05:00'
describe
'261832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJF' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
fbfadc6038faa387c3d046a1de1407ad
9aabf792ba3da3253f7296463dec10bb86adfafa
'2011-12-16T18:04:34-05:00'
describe
'284056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJG' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
464071649d9c100b9b27596ae9a46a7c
842cfad2a6790ebb5876c39c2babfefd002f1771
describe
'246790' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJH' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
1e91e9e09636bbe9de50dc386c1a4103
7538e883fa902e6bccad540a00eade7ccbdaa33e
describe
'276883' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
02bdea4b624c30ba8bcf5dc27c72cde7
65af7a766787668e20deddba2b720b135b138318
describe
'230718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJJ' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
21993f5c7c58ba1e03ca86fa3d65c7f6
be6f1def34646ca0b632fd24ac20267e0183aeb2
describe
'298535' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJK' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7740f720f6150e4e2e9ab9bc7b1509ef
d6b78dc728cc705844ee5067fa00f6f204503361
describe
'232115' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
16553641162f3a904e63997fbbe98e71
eba7582e984e3f89f505fae22ff992d1822d6bd8
describe
'200328' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJM' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
dd32c82413121e383ddd18a5ff24843f
896f5baed1cf409ae6904e27d81291230c7af950
describe
'232242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJN' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
7d28cfb3c25c5ea77d7e6c6370761e28
002e251419ac18f3feec9f3e9e45ed2430154230
'2011-12-16T18:12:25-05:00'
describe
'266501' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
a2ced3793e8e7e42ee40420897b2aded
a97b4283ee5ea725d441c2511c685be130b063a9
describe
'274838' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJP' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
26601f692c91b30b1e41d1f6e12bc125
6f73fa362c98c93fb31dadec1431a4ae4f8e0f4e
'2011-12-16T18:10:57-05:00'
describe
'283887' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJQ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
b1f733c7971d3fe6b5b3d656bf413687
55afbd15714eba528764f58622cd708615aa6c97
describe
'253056' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJR' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b5d5d3136eb039965462823ea5b2ebee
7ee453b4e3b25cb022b49dd45875e9cad5f19a7a
'2011-12-16T18:08:01-05:00'
describe
'259586' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJS' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2e67b56735b186b99d2153bf0d216f98
fd3e93e7d3a761d4110d8faa37452f42d514d1c6
describe
'261663' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJT' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
755c08a9a5ab2b3b7ba14f008467ad81
824a8209290500227eff37b1d4d09e30c0d0c152
describe
'252867' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJU' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
2fcfb80725d2beb07f57b64e763a176d
d9543d8147c6a34c80e88cb49da66910ef01a8bf
describe
'247841' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
26ed36ff2f4025aa2bac7c8d1ddbd6d2
e4edbbc8776e838c7dd0c5e9f7efcc06d8ade5d6
'2011-12-16T18:10:53-05:00'
describe
'260469' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJW' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
010a95eee23de7baa9f355cf7c86aefb
a2dceb9ce9d3cef09fffa9e53e7d5be84c616b72
describe
'278923' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
fc8bb2aa15086a931bf29eb9943c6498
c96140897a04449442cd831def58002357b256e4
describe
'255662' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJY' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
db2c94424ec96b706bc027830e29ce1a
61ef39261999a7be798b5e9c034ec157d0fe5e1c
'2011-12-16T18:07:06-05:00'
describe
'207180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNJZ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
16f0a78327913ba1133c82e6708452db
0b6111fb8ecc03d3a96c1d562595d06fe4d0f040
describe
'236981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKA' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ed0af6f2e0414af6836076dd2e09e5a5
94502339119e81681c10d9e8d773875980d66e05
'2011-12-16T18:09:29-05:00'
describe
'286894' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
812f828e47c14e0964c2b0956caffd1f
b39f3dee1f7c393affdba00105cae3f1cf666023
describe
'288161' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKC' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
1b24b4c09a1e50809bc0782b4c248daf
3d5782b15cf6202416bf4a20ff4fac05afe65369
describe
'305155' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKD' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
6c3f0987ce65ac60e1fda3ef7c50d11f
a9ca6fbcd8c9c31ef27db4ad18f3a9cee8946f7b
describe
'250593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKE' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
c4d1bf6194ae2616c65f25b6a77cb646
cdbee34c7ee435500e2e48e82cfd008241ce4eba
describe
'267290' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKF' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
7b4b2e50201e4298e697af79d1f7987a
9fc6e5576cb5f2e83502a039a172889b6773421a
'2011-12-16T18:05:43-05:00'
describe
'292016' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKG' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
d8c9dc4fdd81227ec5fc015bcc40026f
df478d09c4ce6b4be87405d63ea52e926fe47aa3
'2011-12-16T18:02:34-05:00'
describe
'288395' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKH' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
ddfb952fc4c469563cfa1635d9cc8797
28b1e4f6b08da95d50cbeda4487255c00da06163
'2011-12-16T18:09:59-05:00'
describe
'278018' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKI' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
bf383b0e8273da86d331ce38dd3060d5
e11d7eaf566859e149f9d9fd0b205cee86a83b66
'2011-12-16T18:10:31-05:00'
describe
'237276' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKJ' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
b286ffb4398ddcd2f4a46ea080a8ff38
04ea349a6ebd4c54de1dd992d79902501ef95663
describe
'278116' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
1e79e8acbd3734e2939c08c8d80c70cb
3c7c7dadea5658ff224dde3e83827c931c7a0860
describe
'258419' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKL' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
a455b86b5fd61182895ca3497a77726e
64f07eded642c709a80ee6c8a50ac63c8e47617a
describe
'264736' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKM' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
78f58809df1cf5b300dad26a58423e91
0b26e3029d0cd63be22c47727758311c26b1a642
describe
'255312' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKN' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
5d9c5df0fcb8bb11bb784dc2de843383
fe7e5d2d67cf58b498c600ddf93dddb0ec86b316
describe
'287834' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
19d7cab0a41486b979478d80caad301e
7136b99788abdbedc2aaaa44ba0bf1b297b76481
'2011-12-16T18:07:47-05:00'
describe
'214497' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKP' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
bd6fc32d9b7d2a79fc00e87d8430b03d
4bbca05366fbfbb543e6533ee217056e00507fb0
describe
'209961' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKQ' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
bac2c0e97010cc4054f05d8a6474e3b1
1b81220126796d86b5106219ddcc727b34980af0
describe
'241095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKR' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
1eab0c86f980958bfea976bcabaf7d8a
a3d20dcd6f5bfeaea78266252bef3d47f79851c2
describe
'266854' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKS' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
3d36dcfc95b6dcb9a650c6a759ed6a9e
712507f53c268dd97aeac7868bd369d6ab552c92
describe
'263496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKT' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8035724320d53e6136ca46e56d3efc6a
735dbe78d95dc86bc67f01af1f63941e1148f823
'2011-12-16T18:05:47-05:00'
describe
'260095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKU' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
13b30b14cca1640874aa5f0f5002ed8b
7b1bdc5b4f087ca5eaac96fcdc5010bddb9721e0
describe
'275174' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKV' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
32efcc7da8b2267ca71ec2c3ee1b1eb8
66543e452ab084b441f82612c890f9796a0717f6
describe
'256766' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKW' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
acac25daac1ec2d75620553d9c2a3a41
7c48586cb0426a6ee063e894098302b3c04921fc
'2011-12-16T18:06:50-05:00'
describe
'280449' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
7fdcc80e20cd35dc3c5709092f34b021
c88dd8a06801290fc76399610e7742c9f125b41f
'2011-12-16T18:02:22-05:00'
describe
'251999' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKY' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7c8c435e009d7ae00e118c0059a165e4
006c141de352bf98cdde3b0da3077abbd9418e36
describe
'248746' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNKZ' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
384131a5152a74fe8cffc00c82337964
90dfe9ff064ff4a35c47145535ab0c3b72962e0b
describe
'287707' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLA' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
33d54f093b6b29db0d4f19c73105c21c
2a7f0e36e377bd37f1f0af2217c1331129cef64f
describe
'245723' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLB' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e71f74fb2a984d51019a5ad2ebd5824c
1024ed112d4a2cde4da83893395d9fdf6b388434
describe
'328975' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLC' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
2393788c3ba851ab2fbed89ce203c7f3
99bde1bd76b3c7e72dcf118774eb8a427e7a068d
describe
'138362' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLD' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
f3a6e7598a9d48317c1098190fd8c5ce
cca59a9263487901fab8004943e53e8d15f33107
describe
'237738' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLE' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
b37d2c4aa76e11b24382818f135d283c
94bfc516df96e7770a49be38ce00a9589f870bff
describe
'260856' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
d7eb80e0de02ed2d78b2d710ce7e7c99
bf8c05b4ae4134b7f9889b86cabb66f03ab25801
'2011-12-16T18:11:06-05:00'
describe
'253369' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLG' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
7b2929dbe30f2382ae1119a3eebb69ad
94d5c5a9052db6bc99bbb5e0b71ad36872e3854b
describe
'262460' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLH' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
ab84dca4e769c414d316d0ae997e497d
65406bd69767d025a3605b07c8864a1cbad06d8d
describe
'255221' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLI' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
b2fbd16bc0198e40057b556784bd16c8
6656d014249135f88d0eabcfebb541b52797e13c
describe
'272419' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLJ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
5970a716b4cb66e6e3dee561136c1c58
4e28ef7eecfbaf35309b401a9e7ba6bd482a98f3
describe
'258249' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
044e873cd97cb51370e9950e01428667
9b14e65165717db33235d7fb8bea7ebe3ca67c73
describe
'228519' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d60fd0ee1a22dec8309c253ad1a657f8
6a72b04e2e6f75b8d9e0a44b5c36cf0312b580f0
describe
'266424' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLM' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
b8df93c5fdeb58a95fa712ad082d743b
ef1611cfda081bb94e06b0fa3797f2d61245dc5c
'2011-12-16T18:07:25-05:00'
describe
'88379' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLN' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
1d6384d26a11d491f10ae5618928a57a
06582ba2258d59ce505064c4a53837890e135631
describe
'232571' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLO' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
213292c681a9477ab7fac8a2b979e680
a845a824ee1b48d58101c98e78ab85c6a9940dae
describe
'260931' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLP' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
d4ee7081487edacf6cc4afda9050f1ea
8e41482ac403e30940b15a91af2922c6dc3670b2
'2011-12-16T18:03:54-05:00'
describe
'332467' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLQ' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
762041283e200efb503f50205a198f22
ea35ff424cbc1d549bb8ef55eb1fae058878df9d
'2011-12-16T18:04:32-05:00'
describe
'275979' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLR' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
404fb88564eb58bcc25cf350e769ed5c
96786cadcea349b05643eacf488663315de23f2b
'2011-12-16T18:09:30-05:00'
describe
'260728' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLS' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
73e2412671ab5fcb4e410f18f76e32de
cdca64bd0e939368046bfc2b9bc4148f6a7ca41a
describe
'254372' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLT' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
405471404e2170263beb44ee2e7ea8a5
ec432003a085dca93bef745e0005dc06dc413508
describe
'267943' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLU' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
106b4c63ca9c22ef1492da4d0346fa0c
566b09a9a461c1f78d991c3dd6885881ac08499e
'2011-12-16T18:04:22-05:00'
describe
'282599' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLV' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
5f11b8fe3b5e924eff0d1eb88fe8ae85
b92b77083ce4587eb6b0a54393529e2cc70bb9b1
describe
'273295' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLW' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
d0c8a88c7f4606fff131483fd974dfd5
5a46f7f3824693153ceef6854f981f1dde961b8a
describe
'283180' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLX' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
abe1808336f3f56cca66924bbc00a6e4
f83d3e7eedeefeeb47085f5012d03dd2b200c960
describe
'257278' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLY' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
18c29598a837670077c3b5a5995a5a3a
22136139f0e950378aee21e1dd3b3ff22c1bf1b5
describe
'334665' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNLZ' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
fa0ca9e193e1b16e8fa9cd5075cdf3b8
e6025a09b1ea3b1eb6e061588d84585ad114a953
describe
'272094' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMA' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
1195c1c10b89ea6a3e28fd776b572bf0
4c96204c24d01ee5f4766e2028164988f8d33959
describe
'268541' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMB' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
c543da42ad905d8becb9d0d373f56c9d
c252898d491f1de1f1f43f97c42e6fce4490bc0d
describe
'264294' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMC' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
568eaa570f3696b524973d49220400ec
5e5fee154254c2d21c1c21f44564a72a1bc8bc88
describe
'249159' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMD' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
a3c97d481817dccb604a830c79d8b8d5
98aa0d1ac869dd4d5987bc49dbec625c02b7b4b8
describe
'274490' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNME' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
53bb41b2083d476e0f96f3e1feb5546b
d3c13026e8b801e294a010b0a364689c601a061b
'2011-12-16T18:03:40-05:00'
describe
'255704' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMF' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
46df00cf8c3678e307b40774374d9c34
1c1ac296c19abb5628e42e66bc638252d75ee02f
describe
'258373' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMG' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3a275ca3fc5034363dafaf36b739a874
38fe948b23b6a976e507f04f55c85804029bad07
describe
'235812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMH' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
a9915eb0feb338d625572d8923bdeacd
be4402b428c89b42118e2444adc3f7b6a2ce5b66
describe
'281542' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMI' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
415d9f4880613fd438d78c541b2eb60c
567150d015328ed547f9bb41b166dd8c82c201f6
'2011-12-16T18:07:51-05:00'
describe
'118715' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMJ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
7c4758b9fb2789daffa93d71a5fb7a86
1e68d15fc98069c7d1a45cffe3cfbef55fc0548a
describe
'386424' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMK' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
168927f82c6dbe7daa547728e52af28c
3926ee7d77121e6a45a6747c4f85d8b64632e7d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102421' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNML' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
30d0953f609d43b75fd20ab654387475
bcd760154b9e7188d5c62f77116d7d78b45210d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMM' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
7e06ae7f638311a80ca926793768cadd
29856865e5966f03a321001b4fde540ca0831114
'2011-12-16T18:05:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2953' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMN' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
e1de75962e62c8c03723f38613aab50d
2dde3154b654bfbbcee053b464b93e63b5c707ff
describe
'2514' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMO' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
fbb564338b1a9beebf25128cf2f6de5a
62cef0c645ba538498da10839389dc248ff19c28
'2011-12-16T18:02:28-05:00'
describe
'92157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMP' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
a8cbd1c7d361e190b16dab91007eb59d
ee7df306e10cea849506bbf322868b4eb449795d
describe
'32175' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMQ' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
87d000055eebec060fd195681cd05860
ae9531f00ce2747a4eda8037921abfe86c940012
describe
'18796' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMR' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
b4b09b50b3473abe5c96807345490720
89351f8117e96b3869f42914964cb72af9d9d921
'2011-12-16T18:04:49-05:00'
describe
'9593' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMS' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
9fa64f7c57e0141dd4f308ea37236af0
54858e596e911a4ccf23343adbd0113069d4efc2
describe
'69431' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMT' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
58ce7d5f27c3ed0c756550e553513f71
cbdb9dd3d78ef55ac57aaf5a2dbeea33386c25e8
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMU' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
01df7ad0acada44c8053512775f9b32b
da8e1256fea082a06c4f375794bde893c49fa3e5
describe
'35896' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMV' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
2fa8f7b442cc046f68c1fc61ad476a4c
366e72af752408a7f58f3d2e310a63c289d72dd4
describe
'14491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMW' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
dd95e99c7c00990f7f60e312a1e0d02f
fd09226663654ea457486ba072b39775540759ce
describe
'37753' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMX' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
cff957b64a000dca29cd5fef1f2fdfbc
ad4a31a0537765d3edfcaef33738b41b50c661d4
describe
'17802' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
4563875a5d7ed6e23beac52e9719393f
6d2857210854d3f3749077813132e38981acb5e3
describe
'41429' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNMZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
00427502adfbc7fdbae2181070519866
e4167269cb86b84ee7e9d9bf935cde41ff49451d
describe
'20493' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
517f8668d76ca31b1c9a91c37d19a6e3
b311bf17aa5fafb0f456d822c6c7470ab7016b1f
describe
'24181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNB' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b470fb979717cb2123c2b06bb3127e48
79facfd48837af0d5b5648af180694e8e1c51668
describe
'11442' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
6465e40ade42182778e2c9bb82346c35
67052390a423e7c379820daafb988acb5ef1daf9
describe
'18838' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNND' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
7f72e04a47a8632ec66e437424e3af1b
ff1eadb77d6e6110692795c32c4841963daa90c4
describe
'9230' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNE' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
70ce07fd98621904aad4819c2b09cba7
991025801712fa1594b74b51fc401b0329a79b82
describe
'70642' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNF' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
cadc2470ad72488b5fde0870e2de0df5
7ec82ce116846e1b29ca43901ca62e3ed452bc8d
describe
'28484' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNG' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
96fe68c5281f820dac18a13da32eb0e4
b88f4f8b554b1577d6553f18b0173acecab153eb
'2011-12-16T18:12:10-05:00'
describe
'94397' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNH' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
2f90c69a75cdefabbefff6476c402af2
2693bf051143852295b5c273da9d21bdf50d1e67
describe
'32994' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNI' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d4124559fe89946e52fbabef70977509
fd57d68e1e4cdaab1b0a7bbdfea7a3a75aae4c33
describe
'99620' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
41461c6b4980aaa16ab5f14fc9113a7c
d1cb7613d33860d4045a2d763ed944dabcb993ed
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNK' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
0455b35f1ea7c6e64cbfbbb4dbebc73b
88b4ae2b58f8be0e2be4c1d81673b1f90e43ea3b
describe
'92993' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
7a17e83a6ddba07479e70d7e56503dba
c361728c699c08c5a90cecd784b941f8536a5bcd
describe
'34181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNM' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
0442c8f4756ebea441bcf9d27f75433f
b8a23f6f622b46cd11eb628372496d9037cd7c16
describe
'97264' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNN' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
6bfb35826f0341f432d178591618d891
d567c3001c6e0355f78394e6eee494d7045be1fc
describe
'34338' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNO' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
85b91150d30d49935d08317fec179a9e
cce76a2da3eb77c99029f8bc23b01027ef3d4db7
describe
'96425' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
add83bbf88128d9c9ea4c90f3b13ae60
f72adb553c347c93f0101d2db803d27c328598d5
describe
'35526' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3e2e1da36c5b52d6d61fdb4405dbf884
495ace537241891ed604eb1ce5cbfbd3fa8705ce
describe
'96981' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNR' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e8e04a7211d825dba0ea21318d774792
09f68261977b99c92f8b2e1b7f8d73ce78e0e517
'2011-12-16T18:03:44-05:00'
describe
'37064' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNS' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
b6146d7065e674d35213f83ac37a53ad
66041cd37836a189c457d1cdab3951e39e4b45c5
describe
'94759' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNT' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
cec6535b0104ada2156be191049564e8
d263a419c10fbdd0fff9e0a23aee49baa1f47659
'2011-12-16T18:02:18-05:00'
describe
'36146' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNU' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
63747f0e685e0188550792ce285795a6
22aca182693b015179095922805be8ed0a282e04
describe
'94544' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNV' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
4db02e2fbf5dbfe1b8bf490c7c7c7f88
3c3fc740c9cb78a00f00d45877bb50a06f998de0
describe
'36242' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNW' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
ec3fd21fce18abe05dbe0e9a47a340f1
fe85d619d0cb690c044c1ffb9faef8aac6fcc373
describe
'89840' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNX' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
9f0aa942aab07571c68cb9ad5d69abb7
3a079fd1377b0111a98eb0c108d50cc11f998b44
describe
'32391' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
bc30ff09092558f5ce2dab639a7d0c77
52f37e77ac6798806446cf0469664bcf2a5fed57
'2011-12-16T18:05:07-05:00'
describe
'100954' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNNZ' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
0ea52e7fc0d7e979c694be4be8c21859
abb71eeed85c99e48b5d7a4eca391d5eecd2f046
describe
'36329' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
0484dbf2e2a75b3b6b11ec61a48dd4c0
98754ccbb503eb08a6cd59ea8b56db84b23d5e15
describe
'89172' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
cc956c6bcc7deb6a1787de993090ff60
760958c4e8d6e14bbe6689e85c3ea1f1a089d9d5
'2011-12-16T18:09:08-05:00'
describe
'30433' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOC' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
40863d5a8d66b22253ced99eb80f17a7
e36a558d2e7f68597b3190cb2272f95c0e6d0aaa
describe
'103861' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOD' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
e36f8af65b99a34a1932eafe0e32111d
a47b2d3b84c7f67298cdcf8ba78198aca0150209
'2011-12-16T18:11:32-05:00'
describe
'35776' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOE' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
08dd5e1e2d0afefc99c7c67920636c71
5d6c7f5fd6ffa22675d2bdc6010b3488c3eaacb4
describe
'86542' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
8d0cefac2b96f50962a9b4906ecd2e90
4a66ecaf6579c92959bb1d38d09338348477ab3c
'2011-12-16T18:12:17-05:00'
describe
'31216' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
0b2fdcda07a0f6ee1a05c43beb723847
fc4b102855add647277824fafc8a567d6b64982f
describe
'86910' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOH' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
99cb68d1d4fe766121f099caceecd8ea
ef9634678691b06de5e0eb5d7d0b1efa7ca13224
describe
'31949' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOI' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
2385b46c9716815190f4f1d4a1e2ff01
2b6601928582d058b9421cefb0ba4e8f73a94c8b
describe
'97779' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOJ' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
52546756bb082269208369138507dc71
b76154222351f9f646f895ea433596beca2b4b53
'2011-12-16T18:08:35-05:00'
describe
'35765' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
d4c8ba131376b4f160f7b9e60617cd9e
0fe840761e65f779a8704e97413ecbb7dec255c3
describe
'99907' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOL' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
ab751432eacbd03f48c6bdd5379cb703
a84f269b5b12f3e267d0030b32b27649a17209c4
describe
'34942' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOM' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ba2848d838068f6650fa6dcba2e34949
32d33d90ca5b57382fa0aa11553dd33fa88f886b
describe
'98177' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNON' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
b6267f8fdd003e7194322964e2d2ca70
b5b9345ca3179d53115d61d25ee8ef8c6fabc5c4
'2011-12-16T18:04:28-05:00'
describe
'33718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOO' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2c39eea8ee25c159f88a4a8f6e6eae50
209a35d425075a972e9b25fb317ccbc84c12f0e6
describe
'101686' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOP' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
33741403723e81e16407685560fb2373
e1eb28177b8c98863f6b7847c31120ad33a410a1
describe
'36492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOQ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
436935e36c47db108ca85e2df873a496
87251a8f70ea07b9700535100accd78733f43e78
describe
'95680' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOR' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
97b79663443215e8a58f730086bae1c8
9d2f01f9dc61638a77e08149f6176c01e8394508
describe
'34533' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOS' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
91293f3037f21613017d5e5dad02006d
7326c1de4e1ff0b455c83c19eabb3781f11fd196
describe
'97787' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOT' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
ed7b8d3c12ff8b806418301fe1b4039a
299b53f081291df991bc736e6c7d4143d56e0064
describe
'35298' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOU' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
2039ce425830acf0c6721d397818b8b0
f36aca6ca87920446af08268d76578fcbf76e475
'2011-12-16T18:04:16-05:00'
describe
'99519' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOV' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
a617cef860735791e4f2bd3f25f9f36b
2be9df69b1696a337bc2ae52fcbc2496ff1ce3f3
describe
'36380' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOW' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
b41aa34ad9ad459334a7aab6686377a4
af82d585cdb1e38694c7481a98da63d53990a4cb
'2011-12-16T18:02:33-05:00'
describe
'100398' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4340ccd530b7b46d78b6f9adfc3c650a
1450bf1c9ee7a4bc343cbe2659b72712b7d760f6
'2011-12-16T18:08:24-05:00'
describe
'35843' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
0f766aafb87b0ba5182e0e90bc7a2dfd
322f533b77ec1694ddc7f47795b1150246e00e01
describe
'97394' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNOZ' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ddc1b4951023e1526da3a441404a4aa7
91c9ca0e5a7802e2802596b87d2e4b25bdb0c48d
'2011-12-16T18:09:37-05:00'
describe
'36150' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
9ddb9f107731ba81f1271e4cfcdb30e4
4fb84b89f0a484d7734d3ac234648d95a18ddac3
describe
'88425' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPB' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
45a31d09d6400ceb499baf9952b47994
a5fb1b9887ee551ee52c8d8398cccfe3846eb8cf
describe
'34266' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPC' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
4aa6e281c641dd6c6c9e0ad52589a409
fbb56af2186ebd716e361203329a3d35ca34bd70
describe
'93803' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
7a537de1a021762e888d451604a98d36
313b2827fd68f44345f96a147e52ea63045abf18
describe
'34763' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
2819b9150246332496d95dcdff5a4079
232d20808c712830d71691092d6e1640cb331aea
describe
'92919' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPF' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
b86a26f7e8ca4148bd25339eaf73d118
b82a2bdbe6e8c2dc91a80fbf895d4269d49debe2
describe
'34220' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPG' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
10c4198e0f18e83a5516de57af9b17bc
5ed9a44369975b9994e0cf49eb8de07ad83c25fc
describe
'89227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPH' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
4ea4b6e99847d4a07108a580a260c9bf
c1dd9bd7a587e31c7da5faf678a67095b16b2a3a
describe
'31283' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPI' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
5f1923257836ac85db28e89b5b3c1c22
31937e88baa0f60baae99c9e1631a9769fc3ec77
describe
'98996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPJ' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c1cb0cc2a88171969905bf43a8351c5e
703c9d7436783e68b72493c6ff636c4862cce7cd
describe
'35689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPK' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
9f61844daa1f090e40736ed1bfe34268
60c7fee6338b5f01e8ebda853e20f24becfe8505
describe
'44524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
233e8caf2c5b675d441dec2679640edd
d1f94ce8ebb3acba992830e1b1ac6a11f788b01f
describe
'17179' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPM' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
cca9d5be2d6d69fe87935e27aada52e6
88f9862d5d75f282e0335f1189355dd23d9aa349
describe
'79757' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPN' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4d5d5292854ed1b5d40469b253367188
2635238adb8045134f0f54470b0c2ab12dab8e46
describe
'30077' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPO' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
815967e4b360e4c67bda5969056f7262
465d2ae722965813af8b608b1522becf6cfb0f96
'2011-12-16T18:04:23-05:00'
describe
'96590' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPP' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
00299f661418fce34944e27a473ddfd2
a70b84a4c914855990508fe3e9207dab60da88d5
describe
'34689' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c72c04c77c0240f4ffe24d99e738da75
4d08cc53b6d86b1e5325d33dda14f06f95a0ab29
describe
'98745' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPR' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c281942b25a65a23482ae9d444f19860
e9be3b078972e197ac09be8096b91132c9021e4e
describe
'35617' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
88d348a683f18aeb7aa1bf00f22902f8
09cb1bdf7f6eeb8e1cbe0ddcc0ed5be09e0a9a1c
describe
'97336' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPT' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
ea0ed8a234b6c079fd4106b41c1569e7
971580d527a68a8d11eca6cdf93020261aabbd37
describe
'34789' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
c51ad49bc440a9f9a98b423a556be82e
1a47b5fc0bf2cccc9aaba92bbb5cb224ab5bca03
describe
'98175' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPV' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
59a33a37e0959156c7efe5847db45e05
24cb99fb49143bcdcd1a3408a7957970b24417d3
describe
'34718' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPW' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
f62ecb99f552860622bdab9b8a912970
f3e56f1bfdb09cc5ae6ab414202aae2bb6c415d8
describe
'88841' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPX' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
bc624ae3ef12b4e9109d41886588bdb3
dbba15fe8eff8a9bc2e9435431d27c6ecaa86558
describe
'32313' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPY' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c11266430d478af44ff210a8413e6079
19fd2695f9bce5a8b12af34c2be11410a1f701fb
describe
'92897' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNPZ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4c1c5114764b08d55e0fe3337e820b29
327cbfd1fc817736751453fdf2ad23d5e6e52e0d
describe
'35554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQA' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
16de687ed86d77c98ddcb961f3b071fe
aad2a16443370e1437cf83c1bf1115e42c71423c
describe
'95012' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQB' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
7ba776d53bab9e8f5c31497b672b328a
aae0778be82b9eb808528362a0469804839e2b84
describe
'34565' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQC' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
bd5ae81cbde8fcc7daab6e4c6ce015c3
273013bf21751eab13b0b04c5d09af87e66117dc
describe
'94850' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
87fe837022e798d92ee613dae6d3489a
631f4ec3b46073a7a39bd6f90bf2266cc2dff083
describe
'35439' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQE' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
0c75333954ddc851e312e0e574f20c0a
7bfdb5a4125071951aba213543146ae8cbe5cf2a
describe
'99828' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d6022384f17e9e048f392c5368774c67
22f516c7ff87a3e614dffdec40ef9ef46a480f34
describe
'35545' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
7819363dd2bc59d7ae199fb0269c498c
1f9d8c03b581936b96c1eaab41d8492a8b77cbef
describe
'95235' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQH' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
466ab0a0fe61bac4eba31654cf78d453
eb80504169aa37c98d20d91d1ef16feeab463b00
describe
'35359' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
fde09ed2c26a7cacb79a2ee50764a33f
22ae75e90482dd31e19fd0902ba4969ae70d5e53
describe
'92905' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQJ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
3b57273cf8e0953ca94ec58289008860
d376e1083e066e0ba699f93cd52414a3febfb599
describe
'33350' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQK' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
66517debf874ed1552cc6737160211a2
9ebbb4a2245f35453cb812bcfad21bbcfd56940e
describe
'93323' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQL' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
13b3d3b2ca56f8617f24e0cc6471bdb8
8c1c4e632e5c38a5dbc734a10c2d4da0656437ab
describe
'34227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQM' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
b57f8e896af02b9130d111935aaf5d6b
0368d3801fdd8a1aae3be14dbf51b40b4fd3dd50
'2011-12-16T18:02:35-05:00'
describe
'72620' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQN' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
148682568bc7af99336c6bf262100a2f
7842a46de0c0f8a006ae04544c519fc8832d7e60
'2011-12-16T18:10:06-05:00'
describe
'26732' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
3b9c054b908ed5d54e4a528ba5583f24
c5f69727a750f64dc4e1a64c47a8a71dfdcf7ecc
'2011-12-16T18:04:33-05:00'
describe
'86303' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQP' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c2fc45590a969616da66c8f46e13d607
ceac1287c132441d11c2dc517ed9a1d2bac9c70b
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQQ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
36a81fe91d9e43251cf1520be62d78e1
69b75d171dfa6258e616ee63bbaecd1518295155
describe
'98685' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQR' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
830c46b060869c02c4fed2698636efc3
a3eb17b26df8724783bfa9c35e621c11202b729e
'2011-12-16T18:02:32-05:00'
describe
'36358' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
0d02b92a61cdf7bba1af919040866671
02ee9a1c0d8ca2d4f50ef47e5c1d9225be744c17
describe
'99041' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQT' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
21e1eaed74048269aecd1da1f733061d
a11fb924b9229ec55825d553d52888fcfdb670ee
describe
'37118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQU' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
20b2b2b150ed68526a38f4e2624fe990
32940ccc2e6c3d2844bce688b924481ce346199b
describe
'86103' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQV' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
dec20cf71b132b1d00c9163484e2b2a3
7e98c7a33957742dd3d5079532156458c9451553
describe
'32785' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQW' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
7c750107fb80d3f78b7295f2db1c25e5
a187cbf1d9c088046e080a839ea0bae16444deda
describe
'92937' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQX' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
37204877566f8fffc48e3a3ea17fe830
5859e231650bdd5113df3448e86bffb61a57fc0d
describe
'31812' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
1ebd4908512989e98ce20c9bfea15804
28a5866000a87e34837d04e83dd0e1360211c1f4
describe
'95967' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNQZ' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
19f491272c4ab4c5927a70ab78d3a9a1
6d0359762d8a74c22acff15b980a2d666d7afcc7
describe
'35212' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRA' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
7847879174cb8ef6196187679a0dca50
617ea386ee6892f44b47eab5a4124c736928e6de
describe
'91748' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRB' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
a39dd75ec7a204cee4f4617e63cc23f0
884cfe674add5e73622fdf83f780e23c924a2ff3
describe
'35504' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRC' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0c0063416ce7df72fc36aba2574234e4
5630a0a2a281b6ad16bf8d9cb134bfa54c7d45f6
'2011-12-16T18:07:05-05:00'
describe
'91089' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRD' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
080b372caa0471c9c934e8297da66d2e
796b3c75a37cb19064453c0842b01015293768b4
'2011-12-16T18:10:17-05:00'
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRE' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
81a43042ef956c46753781b0c1d55a34
8905468a46c0bf7c408d90beb79764aad66d1a06
describe
'95589' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
eac792c7d836904ad8315802537e3520
e1f950b6a73de0d41d43dcc4664db82eb61e41d1
describe
'36524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRG' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
c92e0f315668fdc1f6aa67cb70381d13
79e332b5a6e116689b7f1198c9bd3312143c884b
'2011-12-16T18:06:22-05:00'
describe
'92537' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRH' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
3a7d96fffbaa169d2c5b6c015ce4637c
8c35527c11bc2917918fac4ecce681eb2ec169df
describe
'33903' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRI' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
37b00fd7a610fb836c620802e2907e6a
fb63ae24ef7ff4d02ee8ad1460381ffa821b6be6
describe
'104019' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRJ' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
15d126d85491e76c849ab9d9292ccd5c
44978a13ceb0a840a15ee3877e2d1a7986078f6c
'2011-12-16T18:07:10-05:00'
describe
'38123' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
84d56bf7fa8579cc948ee2cfdd4168a9
1b46f99fd3ea4c1338aa04b09b1047d7a726c458
describe
'92129' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRL' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
730991eb0b876d615a9d80007ecab0e1
75cfb4d54d1b11be399e479e477322daac3d9f4a
describe
'35296' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRM' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
fcbaba28544c3b7aa3c12fcd5d7fc8a2
5e23c75c57c86f47d6f2a22d1411fa7b51337e2d
describe
'93769' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
cccd62ea5fddaaef1b2879725102897a
489b312242b1fdc8df670bf7a7c2c19b00b8fa63
describe
'35908' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
79e63c896f4587e96d4aec6f4e234f93
d7c5c67803bd1cfc38f1671a6e2a2ae8f43097de
describe
'90259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRP' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
bfa548d95dd3bf3591aee093a79758db
ddca467234b7df3a60293484f2d682dacfc4de78
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRQ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
8b905c09dc229647f59a90acbe495207
1a01778200e8c88553aa5ba93bfa984327c3c681
'2011-12-16T18:07:24-05:00'
describe
'81339' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRR' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
249026b68021439938f153b338b8b6ba
6558ea86de7c84fcd86db9375cdfc5bbf260159a
describe
'31231' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
aaec0e1e4c8e05ee3e785ce37124a6b6
5a480098232b27b893a9a89a87a16d89eecbe6ad
describe
'80410' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
625108a0e9ea7535eaba5a6cc1a2e942
3e0c11ae9edd3d160d9f0402a616c38f3fc0bee4
describe
'30658' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
7321feb1390c69380906c5f633c9eef7
1961e485e2da8b797be159fdc13fed291ac94c96
describe
'100300' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRV' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
285fe5b9106829f6c568b5a80d290c24
86e7374ff5b676d590312e544749b534a4794f1d
describe
'33126' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
a620e174dda4d8a0a9aa8ced6d6e000a
8adbf15b94344706039e2c59e01e728becc1963a
describe
'87607' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a95b3dee29a580f4cfd070e38641ecc3
d9c8169dc3617a4d142d94f983305f18a3945d91
describe
'33840' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
7881621b8de71ce52b16a6c78eb1647e
b87dfdae71ab5d522ac3d524276c96fbf2cd1208
describe
'98895' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNRZ' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
01993b21450f7b3916811a2c33c9cd21
985ef229c8632debc3d3968f7462bc5380d86ba7
describe
'35448' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
5c534ef755d77ecde97ce3494bf546f4
9b0530f071ae5596b8e3e3b3abb7385ae73982f4
describe
'92049' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSB' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1dfbabec82f0679a5cce40d3ec9604b6
5bc3cd6b94343f4e64d33ebc91d6cb0e53092c56
describe
'33825' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSC' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
2ccc7969708f37ce51e9b5fdc9dae258
06f7b477c58503825cdcd19e1e62a7e5bc87da4e
'2011-12-16T18:11:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
665260e0bcab04a35725a7e1ae0e9cb3
35feea67e2573de38d2cc9f62f371982f60079c0
describe
'36756' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSE' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
da4f6cda40424cd3a853a84fc40ef356
fdc0fbd2538ec7953c3b5bcb9bf17d927bd55518
describe
'90198' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSF' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
8eee54e7ba78e5212c26e3b853a9029e
e043da41a092c07cef364a9b06fa9c89c693f29a
'2011-12-16T18:08:55-05:00'
describe
'33742' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSG' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
23080fc58e93d6ff95d464ab28178482
4fedb16a4568341194e0375efd794f8afb87cb68
describe
'102564' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSH' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fb221ffe94ce0a717b6780e315a4e496
484173bc2a4c7ec6e418fc4046af57212d8621cb
describe
'36711' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSI' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
6c8581977f80074cabcbc2bd77513872
b952d575dfdeaf0fbb8dbd950637b6bcc17cf981
describe
'99911' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSJ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
0bb931f9e48d36effc0847d209458d59
8dd940ebb04df858d5aa2422a5b5c120ac46fc02
describe
'35995' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSK' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
8d6ce06e8c0a84e70507c6a1fd6a7ad4
563556cc6ea07f8873c13162ca9c38f69a56d168
describe
'95017' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSL' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
a6fbe2cdafd8760e7c6ab837ec87d91a
d2cedc4160b5ea90a1dc6d8800d50c3433c53894
describe
'35853' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSM' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
70b79218c864e46f0fbe7d3c3122e44a
3a40cc9592b0cd03875cfb0f22ab79b9024fc263
describe
'100427' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSN' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
fb6b3ac0697f7d9f87b850218a084e98
3d90e040778a9b050aa534a6bf1ac024fa7c1ccb
describe
'36698' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSO' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
d658558a3ffc8cad1712451ca828801c
c7c0394a07e5e6d376b5af971304b8a353304259
describe
'98428' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
cfa6013bacaf3e832d10ce9678e686c9
8b50d7f944cdd68319e5dce890aadfa7ed877372
describe
'37053' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSQ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
5f698723f59adbdbb68681bc46058004
709474cd1016e72787d1dd980454e2a56c07bcb8
describe
'107032' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSR' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
875109aca99cd1c7d3f74c5e99ad0a68
0c78a5001459f02735489cc9fc9b4c9dd37fb4c8
describe
'35880' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
8e02b4e0d78da3251ba259ba1a4fd369
c2efc16bf9d0ac0a3b097a41141f49c780e285ac
describe
'92373' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNST' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
9b05f6f743953a28545830745942d8a7
4217a265d04ef1d205edf467786ede125ba0abe8
describe
'36019' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSU' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
1683abe9973b82cf8cef2b48519ec43a
6c3be6142fcb59b5f9ca951179061bb7b080ef17
describe
'83792' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSV' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
bbb46e0216236da58cc2c63a4be54e37
6fcdebdf5123bdf9e162b8668f751461e0a70a5b
describe
'32761' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSW' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c6a4db919e10d9fc9e6305321deef1a4
385506420b1678d2d95dc989224f625ecfe47923
describe
'92906' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSX' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
254d3fe5c9d6433f9036174cf51db7e5
8139eefdb0b9873d6d9210e244ce07eddd40c2f7
'2011-12-16T18:08:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
5894aba95c598acabff5c8162002d2c8
552337bb6f90a42a97c9505c2b29411f7d5c809c
describe
'96701' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNSZ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
f0cadd55b73724693ad703b47fa6e60a
2e0c52b55a50ea9021cc8019b17b6fdc65e6411f
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTA' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
d29ba7bafca169be97455859469aff04
db344e2ee807d481985b57fdcfba12a3e0df64e1
describe
'66432' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTB' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
80f2ee297dabf16f6a93dbc4a1095baf
187960cfc15692f0df634ebef3748e75c3a0d3d5
describe
'26141' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
173679448808928172a193b46aeceddb
24a317d507cb95ca04f9279bc580f80e2326bd76
describe
'66915' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
bcd5fde8caa47641155e4d5c3ce33639
fa413a14cec4b4c89b77095d767f3fb53cf0181f
describe
'27932' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTE' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
ea8bd121f45d5d4437de2326dd9f4569
016992c2f6bb69852c6051cc6757b96e45a8b12d
describe
'89137' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
6d384619f45ee7857a8947980f4791ea
b73c6f35a2356556de926d0a371edc51ffb430b3
describe
'32942' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTG' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
32e535b72dab941242191fe02f67e8aa
c7a738b3bb1d6374c008d7e4501adcc5ebeb64c4
describe
'93151' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
35a91121de8faf357461e0d7b966fa6d
45e42cc442e9472caeabf1705cc3622cd5b42c9e
'2011-12-16T18:05:28-05:00'
describe
'35100' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTI' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
07e04d97c9c319239e6a0bdf5a994c10
2bb776cbed7b57b697dd9e5bb7e4426e1d5c82f8
describe
'92214' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTJ' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
845983db9807e908c93b15cf22c63958
be38d3f696f4e24387c645f6516e4645594bde18
describe
'34612' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTK' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0721ff8f2b0c3c8d172f1e3a5eaef331
0aa5ab78b9728d75ed0996218c1a73d666df983b
describe
'95941' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTL' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
69f7f37d6de5d6ae35b8220d04411c7f
3b123378ebff65a1bbc0e918e1a07643263abe72
describe
'32082' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTM' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
5a652ba176acdd72000ef142523b84ae
32eec108eb89c1316cd8a1d0b5231236420d6d8b
describe
'100763' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
745bd40d3d52538b46a8da18c8c81057
5db027198830dfa93dc29d963c082c5faf2626b1
describe
'35811' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTO' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
8a4f28150966f0a1425c7d4f7ac687bd
66c996d52a896e4d90a3249b3147d16dabcdaa3b
describe
'93505' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTP' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
c96b91be2504d592d9398c9cda0b00a2
17cf9c8f4b1d038e967e735f654ecc48ecfab89d
describe
'33823' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTQ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
30b5f727f37505893de5fac31eaedaff
c825821d03dc2d3e441ec756ec1ad86cd69c5af2
'2011-12-16T18:07:57-05:00'
describe
'94434' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTR' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d22eb314e74bd2124116ed8e3179f988
d5a63cadf61f8cd8f60f4fd13873912f947aea4a
describe
'34170' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTS' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
3d929d798db1ba341e76a81554a4646a
1153216aa6361d05d39a3fdbaaa319b9da764b8e
describe
'99885' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTT' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
bbc7cd2d71b6428e49e3514774b8bf7d
8f43a6f5b5bac03729fc2360d56a89e10f517425
describe
'36190' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
bac0e0efc2ff9a07f4d814f72372a9b3
054dfab4f88299d0b44f521cb58085f13bc9dd21
describe
'102890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTV' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
160379c59609abc5c119d40017b210fc
ce0ce8a97c43a9af6fce9ad0f26b41e7e5e11f68
'2011-12-16T18:05:13-05:00'
describe
'34453' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8c3975dcfc18cd15b4ca6bac5e509160
bc5bc95d4e33a30d6dfbd4ca074ab724a9e9306d
describe
'96641' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
730d2651e720737ace06b0531b5726e6
a0e27c0dfef66e61946e2953ba109c802270310c
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
31534463a99a711486e03d0b5bdb05b8
080485c8572bb18f5a031807fdcef52d40fe2f0b
describe
'96672' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNTZ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
f173d5396e9faf5f99cbdf2c3eb14db0
1e1415457616630b6951bf01c62ac9968a4c16fc
describe
'36531' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
a5d982b6540f7cd5790e80c238a0b029
802702ad9f7d0f477172bf0d751f540a4a94daae
describe
'95786' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUB' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
4f1d1becf56f6972fbc101dad76bcebc
2d589612c3947ce8e19f15ad7fc5aef5088541dc
describe
'35890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUC' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
af7eb4f9df229a12192aa16212724aed
2e674ad601feee2bd9c5b3a4717ece3c4d55e232
describe
'97782' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUD' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
5f79ccce1567f7ef37da2a38b5896e7b
ffb448603d4fef2933441df5e06a09a3fb789f0b
describe
'36176' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUE' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
731ea509d02ffe51766070873585e647
615068cc16a876b3c8499c5a0800b55b9fc357cf
describe
'84505' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUF' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
b613b0f6be16c39314df8cfaccabd3b9
148f5c66b1df2620902d93597a7a2729009b6983
describe
'30950' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUG' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
eb3293736de32294abd9df847e980078
95a00fecff598c83b550c3896c959efbe7fcc054
describe
'91616' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
eb712e43eed95ee7426ae955d116c37a
7e79e1f7b37707dc5531266daa427c0738a44610
describe
'34544' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUI' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
415e809d188a53f7a656661808e6e3ed
59d44eaaad0413d4cd526378642d7ae0083dd63c
describe
'102845' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUJ' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
67c5d1196985d049c5ffdb6603a35c53
cd50d1a9685b488e53eee602d6bf56ea8f1fd242
describe
'36629' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUK' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
2e152eeb05f0d3e542cf2d20e77ebf4d
2e1ec9ef2132fafa66e4928b58261af667672fe2
describe
'102916' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUL' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
1f6a6a11ed7e6d46032a135e4cf8360b
927ba75e4843aa0329ef4ba36f610e0f16487b8b
'2011-12-16T18:04:20-05:00'
describe
'35206' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUM' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a8ac582e0bf9fc9e231f8d4aaec1b5f6
a2170e1cdfec563d7e11059be31dd6a1fd175bda
'2011-12-16T18:07:02-05:00'
describe
'106132' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUN' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
4505193ec20658b155aee155ce9962a3
5e799f219133e6fef30e18ad639e88cca604e39f
describe
'36219' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUO' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
e0953faf771fa6545574d0f394336a7b
e4a4ee987a74a673841f4f2aa1cba64473fca9b0
describe
'86652' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
54aa29809d96b94464346104eb4766b1
66eb103e8eac920edb30dbf562922325f508bb45
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUQ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c26a084e397483362e7053e9524f8174
c4ee43c3ad125406aec439964a3856025ac423fd
describe
'96503' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUR' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
eb78669c5564c5eeb27e0b45c1979676
f05e15703d4fc711f5aac3647d382dad62efa570
describe
'31113' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUS' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
fea7493d91a6cf3ba147313810b8b4ba
7a22bc0e3949467c0c65f8ec884dece75956a9fb
describe
'95870' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUT' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
bd2e70c1be3b0c9d2495d424e785f469
82a01ba039cb3e8284a2ebe5d5a889cb157c2cad
describe
'34611' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUU' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
cfa0d95fa2a945a954d7dd820fe7691a
829c1c3a38ed2598409b2c629beb33026cd0aa82
'2011-12-16T18:06:38-05:00'
describe
'103592' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUV' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
7aec3299504eb9f5d1366e767f3e16c4
70fc2469d441fd885a2c83e72a8ea2869b4b0fd5
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUW' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9271c45cc6f058b7895e870848ca8d46
cfb0ee011d9fcd58523beee697e3e01ba272ca00
describe
'92376' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUX' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
adc9abaf5a6a00344ba03a99c9105c20
2971bf3f3c188570f16034ef23fe2100481beac4
describe
'33944' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUY' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
29fd8db935f821c7379d0a88b621830c
6dc665e1b4883e7a60f4c73cafa95ee5bbfe08ae
describe
'100708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNUZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
69a20695ee68392881e584d279792bfa
0c4fc74e420434e01777bf8d4b25277fbf9c1c8a
describe
'34238' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVA' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
24d0ff0be3fa357497d7f048dd3026d3
f5af1469680013c600aaf673de9e02d4e505a4bd
describe
'90049' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
916c0a04b672ac6bd224e2d1bdbc8f60
e2d774d594a0c980ceef95d65528477315a8513c
describe
'33695' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVC' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
e18ad231c3df6f06b48ad68c881251bc
4b5fbc9241394cdfcb92511023ff0bccd67e5ab0
describe
'89987' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
b1897ff319eb1d425e57cc0efec56bfa
7bfbda6880c55745121372e71e08a2d15f92c813
describe
'28563' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVE' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4b951bad8bea3598d6afb723e4bc20cc
09109541f576484263ab693b15eba0978d42e4fd
describe
'86456' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
9f030e5993be879c4a3bff2d4d59e00c
d5767c27dcad406be5bc25987a29d03a4b5e224b
describe
'32565' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVG' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
f1f4f4442c4272ca42f117007c0f391c
d6d259f41dbb042c0f5050cbdc99a090b60bb71f
describe
'75859' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVH' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
059db55e45710cdff06c47e8a537b09a
af937f818afcc18d1a34697d348eb4b95ace833a
describe
'28127' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVI' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
80b16c55320b6504f700c4aaa2c1d5b2
44dcc5561b6165ffedbd0ce110a12c38cd9de10f
describe
'85996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1f3fe6e5752c991f8a6e538e834f71a9
8189de2c1a687fbe2265a5facff3e8419d9986ef
describe
'32060' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVK' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
6423a51f078ebbfcd437603c4bc04e79
a0da2c5e1ac857827144f75de85a4bae833eb9a0
'2011-12-16T18:08:58-05:00'
describe
'99481' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVL' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
768963b2054ae9d1707bb7c6292e0af6
f98003402e6b43aec1d7ccc1ff7e2b0cbfcbb541
describe
'36080' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVM' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
0ed115a82e1da236828ce3fb3c68505a
f7550f641756cf8debdec5039b78b29f0fd9e2e3
describe
'83014' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVN' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f62a72d4298818b19c3ad0a3b1f0766e
ebd56b50a7b21d38d8ce589353f72ff32df37110
'2011-12-16T18:03:46-05:00'
describe
'28567' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVO' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
73623a5a42ab9d87ea113f8086694778
716638a9ca693eaf5748cff8cdc35870a940141f
'2011-12-16T18:06:57-05:00'
describe
'105119' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVP' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
0a179d730a81b4aa38434bd3e155448a
0435eaa5267ae368d63dfdaa080a1e989d07997a
describe
'36768' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVQ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
c6a44798756fb4abd59e7466456c430e
3410e0eb240caa702422e7f5dd40df5400e176b2
'2011-12-16T18:04:53-05:00'
describe
'94398' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVR' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
7bae80dafa3213583491fa2e9ceaa988
5c73ca80ae590a0171a7cb8931a85853e2c24f89
describe
'34414' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVS' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
daf3ade6119a4a168f6126ec88a859c4
a0cf50dc7c00bb4996cf8f57f4d9aa1fee756d4a
describe
'97342' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVT' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
87f929a9a9284fa6958df3f9dc95b766
e0157667a083d182c81a0a73aa94b31b89f5e721
describe
'35313' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVU' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
1d4635409ab59907044eb699082d914d
85516e80de51b145e21d78ca570271d95973621b
describe
'95463' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVV' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
958a29210f2de7d530eb1f4a04a9f67a
3a1a74c08cc090350c91f1eb39fc78a78b10c50f
describe
'35363' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVW' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
88aa5a2af2164a5bde40ef089a2b5a79
8540021c03432309dd96739016a9080ebcc992fc
describe
'93617' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVX' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1c11cd2712e1f80f19eec6dbb4da56bd
0892c9400355846819f583c0884eca823aa45184
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVY' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
6a11eb8040e964ffcd428ee08c64bfe8
721e7e96093305e4a2ab57f273af33a80ad09639
describe
'90343' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNVZ' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
13b1ee916a585df9f79817b0d47c03c7
855996082bb4a4ea98c4a13d0a5ea0ec3e4c5972
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
66e2aa4352d1a9a5b99782c4f75ada66
21a14c9e824f9de46ad7272b6d7beaf582417d71
describe
'98404' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWB' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
27f66117cf876666cd781eef3a3377bb
5cdf460fd07a1b739e7677ed5dfd544c03aeb513
describe
'34920' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWC' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
750171bbeebcf667b60fcb88a11da79b
7dfd5e3f95a6a05dbf7e59392e7d8a875e37f887
describe
'99888' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
c4f03c4190280c9338f3ddaa691079ad
0d694bb149d4b6f2a93d27c67821e45b47d736bf
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWE' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
58a6243de947fc20d93a09187a6085fd
b54873394a0a954a1cd5a2922a63a8bbe5062be0
describe
'94205' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
74a4c566427f9892344b8d8ff29e913a
426dd5387f40a2e9e3f6c54618fd8d25b3f06825
describe
'32929' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWG' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
34f6286e8b60e289caa9c8026536cd62
a09805bc67b415d337f51f35501bf9d46de791ec
describe
'78659' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWH' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
f853ff0de42ce837e82acd79a8ef7474
8a5e1c3697183a7572ab0ad1e80b14245c37d3d1
describe
'29598' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWI' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
3dd5603960fd3ba4b48f92d02f8a09e6
7344ac58bddd4331b48bc703f67c118b39ccda8c
describe
'88890' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWJ' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
3ad42115812930d0e11e11704147f3ff
c9da677bf2ef02b41ea1d1a981969f3f16f58642
describe
'31710' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWK' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
d9ce4f71de4a0d9915fbcc6e3e40bca5
47caca5029bfb67371d0cd8e01e8eae0ed26e6ac
describe
'102232' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWL' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
b2173f64b7a7704552338bb2c7091749
8dc8b7b40c72296f4d51e67554ca5633b7a9a634
describe
'35224' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWM' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
d403788a999b43982b282ab8ec80f3e7
1932fa7bed0334afa06b78430bc269eaa1524c41
describe
'103531' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWN' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
54216941aec15118ba3f0e4b680886ff
5b9ced9811695ea286b6cb506994a87f867599f5
describe
'34821' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWO' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1fae2ac674e3526411d2d0dbd2877850
7d952191e695daa1f997b85ef8dffcca9849e1d4
describe
'94603' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
6acb5f53ae97371e52d50c2e4b472d41
1e76d4ba98bf36f21390e3be1deb6f9b17d4d279
describe
'31582' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWQ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
98624498bddbea746cd6afc71e056128
7d704242167842a354e92019d5bc8eaa470dd01d
describe
'95236' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWR' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
44ef62b9561cc8f63b17adb2cef842b1
ec57c7fb29da0c9d92df38dca274debbaaa33b53
describe
'35996' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWS' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
e4a2c324df887194cf53416ce530134a
f2e7528c71eaa8590c35883e606a98320360367b
describe
'98259' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWT' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
96374316324596b58d9976b786da3aba
d414bd2f8db1baff207e06f1dd1820b3709ad989
describe
'34435' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWU' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
b48f1fea255ff7c3435b7565b1251484
764e4c1c8a458aa0da61158429efc4d4e3e57fea
describe
'106050' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWV' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
a7a4599634e7e99bc8d445d8ac380130
38d5984a415804cfb2039ec8a615d7059bf1f3a7
describe
'35992' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWW' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
642995eb2f15bc511eeeb71c95c64dbd
1524af157fc26d82b8b3729f912e304f6f267db1
describe
'104315' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWX' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
32f18a180ab3569154142c202c9cf4d9
61b9184c98359fe64ff3d8cac119fc00e06f2cab
describe
'35905' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWY' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
4f830947e4f8172f1cb253b8d2c69036
333fc60300ed8c871d777a0e1260303fd2735fe4
describe
'102901' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNWZ' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
b38d3c3f640275fb93755eba0c22860b
2df3e1bdef09c69f1b1c0cf0f0e0f4d658cda9d3
describe
'36441' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXA' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
4d071b71818f88f04dbdece4ce561444
50be4bd59368f9c4d5960aa0d141b2dac9e18a7a
describe
'89452' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
410f55628786c9f70a8be4a72845a35c
c61a8a388d76eecc077a6787ffd8abb3e190b9e4
describe
'32894' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
e7bb9550a08504e6f0899e2d9d9fff87
a34ddfa8b5cdf8519bd43f09c610bb85d6b6ce45
describe
'100491' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXD' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
d1eaf432ff307eb4593ea6f3222da151
ed041a11a66839f5d6d638f08e28913159b61e1b
describe
'34676' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXE' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
8be7596e5ec05db01c8ab91fd3a91f24
5419a9f6ac10d21fca5eab2104abe023e8038f0c
describe
'82294' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXF' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c64e77823937fbb42fc9a5350f8fadd6
aa94f3d5c235f4ffbef0adc83587aeb508143d95
describe
'28176' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXG' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
0c3635f422fe53ef50dc589818071d3e
15627133b4269c3dacb3944f8bc43f27cee3e860
describe
'97014' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXH' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
e14777d4a6d2987ad2d71ff24a8eceb7
13b63340bbef7e4bcd4ca85bcdd004800a0861a1
describe
'34157' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXI' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
ef0ee5c9e1873168241f0b285b9d8d84
ada5d3def55733c827f5ff56a9d0be6ee6a9b2c5
describe
'96550' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4e0a9616eb46675ea7709ab5e542a592
bf2e678abc7e7d850dedef01255315d3baa785ef
describe
'34013' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
c5d8a591949bb2405cb21cbd4a9e59c7
5b4a873e3f5fc2e0345587f2bf17f62ea16d20b5
describe
'102470' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXL' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
f3b735020c0815054e7e388e35df5552
7f1c7dadeb0cd9f3c036614a36f9cb86e719e501
'2011-12-16T18:10:52-05:00'
describe
'35935' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXM' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
d7561855965f17ea1799dee9933a3433
b43d3f4f926dc7690362881477cf25a5a60eafd8
describe
'78106' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXN' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
c79786851d5344c565d6791d07cfef6b
fc595cb1c2b1db2e183135c257dc8ae8350bf409
describe
'27566' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXO' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
4c486b080a32da776b1bb3dbce0561d7
99b8c8929d555f2ed504df9a2a0a07f98470d568
describe
'80026' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXP' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
e10be53e0647e12b6cfa68a864887f54
1f7f9248b9fc311c2ffb50589ec9cf6b00e45814
'2011-12-16T18:11:11-05:00'
describe
'31181' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXQ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
04beb8cb81484ff5d619eb3de6b4f890
b89fd6fdd0ece5cbc4a73aac890a4d12e1d8d4e5
describe
'89950' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXR' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
e4dea49b408bd0adf2170db9af3858ee
27284b4d337f8104585cfbb98814b78f9a80826a
describe
'34382' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXS' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
6144e34ae7fb9948b1f2f65565890cd4
1d391167d9e65449c7cd8ed760c54f1f6c9b6a6d
describe
'100851' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXT' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
124e6a36cfa5f973b37edfc72a6f760c
4b49bc4629a91fa7de393104e736ad5f31c83ce1
describe
'35741' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXU' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
c48913b4305dd6c6a7b0a5cf634f303f
58aee118242a5ad7c9dfa2c239d0be1b3d55fd69
describe
'95948' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXV' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
27e8dcb80a8f4a95426e218b85150d0d
2c55d096817eceb153188c34cc54fa1f8e20c0b7
describe
'33794' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXW' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d702f12d98709dcf08adfedcf824caf9
e6064d398569a93437d6ba5792ca66f1cdca0295
describe
'97872' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXX' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
9ec2c9d29e41bd950bc48a0c1e54a7e5
438f054a3949319e7788ae361d3c04480379e3b1
describe
'34765' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
b17c6fdd8b78a5b63ace73e0a303ae2a
1429aaba7f712b434d0fde0d15407f93cce66cfc
describe
'98380' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNXZ' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
9b0459d5d6c281ea2dcc8e44fd56cbeb
afe6cef2239ed08b757639bdb12fa76ce3a3ce1e
describe
'34058' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYA' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
3bba90974147f644b4a73b67d94db9d1
d9f2ba5251d9c5917b964fee9607127c4120f4ec
'2011-12-16T18:04:21-05:00'
describe
'96095' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
5eed821a27e0921c06c8ffcaaa3c542e
daa61f2092e977aaff360799c38784eca6dca721
describe
'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYC' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
6e1ae5a86e55031e1ddd8c2d5d42f06f
81f83ba51079876304aa72f7ae8871c4679d5e20
describe
'101755' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYD' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
e86860262155b8dd31645854f45e8b7a
50d6b05d0bd172cf6f584f3e6b99d50368c41fe9
describe
'35213' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYE' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
76098f14d732a309701a661029b5096f
5f375123930262357264d54e7a78da8170d24efd
describe
'93122' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYF' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
021708f4fcdde9ad1608d4f19e140b56
18540ce28f6df39d17ec538125edb0a3b6b05664
describe
'34086' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYG' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
bfde2460aac19813ad0d4f879ebe3485
96f87a2536b63c92018341407316cf0235c29cf1
describe
'92115' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYH' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
2ccead793beda5cd0152349f6d3e4f0e
0060d2c53b26a98a6a46493b2171d2cb04f80b06
describe
'33699' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYI' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
1e7a7955c3d060069edbd9c8dcf617d5
afb2278a59d7b899c24e67a2764224ab790aea1d
describe
'104710' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYJ' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ff4a26bcd35aed0e66efbed615f1b4d3
662e691fc30f4e3ef40539744584303e065c7c09
describe
'36338' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
a90c31027fec0ae8bf99984a593e823d
bf94cf87d2d9c0ad47f0734c9312d48ebed12395
describe
'93524' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYL' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
9fceddb9029d6d9554405b62c934aae5
ba879edf008a790b1e90a790ba190fccf27bf017
describe
'33737' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
702a38d0041cf7ed92d1f1871c31d32b
1ebf92aaaa35b6ea040b144e676d677d9a1000fb
'2011-12-16T18:04:29-05:00'
describe
'105953' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYN' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
75ab541c98c959b498afa78ef178cf68
1d50b35891e4e6267ef78408a4aa5303cd73af39
describe
'34806' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYO' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
168dff2929b9b947486028f8973befcf
3e0702535181f98ec2258f8e64e29adb51ad674e
describe
'52124' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
3dda4c037eab838a5361208cf2c1af05
0a7d3b38761f2b2f49a1c6c7a435429c786c7c22
describe
'19558' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYQ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
f4523e7945f892e3999ae384b730e45c
e8fb03b66b1c9d20aa20c659e64695de080c39d2
describe
'88075' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYR' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
30023d59025135b4fe78098bfcc48a12
1a31650f240c392a4a84fd76224aca14670c0124
describe
'31721' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYS' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
88f25d1fcdae96ecce0888fb1a6d05e2
1b83a1a93a6c28b372aa28fa6f07b64448dac93c
'2011-12-16T18:05:35-05:00'
describe
'94957' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYT' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
0297296ca6101b699dc582ee817c780e
7fff9d17c37589e8164cb3305f437ab884453e82
describe
'33492' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYU' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
661d41a26db4e9ff4072a91e9a00d0ca
0d2a7fce5567c2bf8dbc3250196c3e881649a432
describe
'93959' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYV' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
6e66680535bede2a13ed9d3a59b8bb0e
cde5fe984520bfd363e577b8942ec552f0104586
describe
'35252' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
bdaf986b3b3eb9cc901a80d64537fe2e
415e65a9e82f9e1f30e33e03cd7b412cd7e87439
describe
'95066' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYX' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
7812555610f710681e049d523322b9c1
837397a3a565505833429ff7c28f9a84932faa96
describe
'32541' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
2f49229fb233bb006a175263043c86f6
8d9e6e9e71098e015a75e2aaa87dce566a171641
describe
'94037' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNYZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
c870412337b3dd0d34466446a7e356f7
0485ed3a1361af335065e45d6d825878508dde9e
describe
'34804' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZA' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
3115bb7ff5908df37545c060d74f05b1
418c8baae808120bffba23dcf9c834fccc058c7d
describe
'99118' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZB' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
d4e5089799846485d2ba6c00808fb822
51ecba3b499c99a553ee89deb83faf0d556a07a3
describe
'34708' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZC' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
6bd33f67f138e6f167a0dd655226285e
6606aa54884ddd1357d714499dab4e9aa82ff878
describe
'95207' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZD' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
d5b967266e2564e76713014af06ba92d
d1ffe211d2e78b0ce927419eeb0fc869c8fb2653
describe
'33006' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZE' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
3a473e36129153920fb84bcfed01cdb7
3d9ea243a0c10b07e29978779f9aade439fca116
describe
'84227' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
ad3b29ae5baa6a4d2daa30e6e54642ba
8bee148e199414fc3d628fef1c9013d3e9f99ac4
describe
'30629' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZG' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
57ec4d11fa5f9aa17804c6035cf4ae20
90e0015646cf0a3c0a08c6a85e33e4eeb9ec1bb8
describe
'97496' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZH' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
94b491ad65e2ade9a216be4f7f5afaf4
b3f2309aea75e2d5abeac22c36fe44eaa721dc2d
describe
'35885' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZI' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
397d7eee28033c34535af8254dc07ddd
40232a49c123d04c835cb0d3e2624c709e14cc2d
describe
'33952' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZJ' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
5615d48efe078d68749858b8fda7d474
c7cd836205ef8eb8245d57326384662ce5615e77
'2011-12-16T18:05:49-05:00'
describe
'13691' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
71d5a4e809d031d9227a64d99235cfea
ebbdfc6e293142ab6bfc2623d82da050aed1b165
describe
'88048' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZL' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
4df3443d99c1720e6851aef860cedb7c
0f40db47705791d8665faaa07e208e653edd8ff9
describe
'32265' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZM' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
ae13ce0ab00cd156896cf6de9f13b980
3897f921d7673bed12bb9c1cde2b41133b9093b4
describe
'96120' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZN' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
315314f5fc938eabd25dc6e843fd474e
339558f01412e412d676458e63381466dc8c204e
describe
'33217' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZO' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
2ea7612af1748d5f2eb8b92223fe571b
14f73997d76e730380baaba3b8b20aae743b7f6f
describe
'102070' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZP' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
2236538b540933d025534ea71f6ae65d
13c03dcd83720407643810b7435e4dce3ca853d3
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZQ' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
3fbda0378866e6fbba8995df726202e2
c2a742d275b12050e43f68dfeaa590456b57cad8
describe
'98082' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZR' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
0929095c48e2a97846134cc716b0d5ff
871a5c9882b154869258eca624637597520b79de
describe
'34044' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZS' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
43248a492c2b51e91cf6b8df5c7efcb0
9d31ea7c6997b338fd4085a7339c1645b47690a7
describe
'96208' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZT' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
cdd10bb7cef2835e71ca3bd8ee573291
1703ad84622cc8ecbba9a24878862be6d8758c8b
describe
'33738' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZU' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
f732f27f17e7a843579cbecf396684b8
adddf356b631e5c2aa5e151e25c5506f9b9847c4
describe
'92175' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZV' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
27281ed88e68dd12c0b005fd6cbf137e
b0e0a452c30fb746112ff5ff08fb7f8b3d9cf83d
describe
'32694' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZW' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
15d4d7d576e976b1a9c5cd57d90c08f0
83863614ebcba9f6e0797f445098be8dab2b06fa
describe
'100109' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZX' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
8299ec00bbf18dbfb6ce6ff249235816
01d222927a44315db67bc15ec0c33bec73c42dc4
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZY' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
20bd44bfa615d93b83635d6e7d26eb17
6e33b4dca981a722adf8e5a83e5f0319ce5e8bbf
describe
'101940' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABNZZ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
399441199aec7cac4619f4446e41a0c5
21705a26ef5825695148f677fa5e9a4fae0deda0
describe
'34357' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAA' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
a2a162689966fd3a8fc0491caa9ba3ca
93615a5d550b993eb560fef37b4493d28067bda3
describe
'99094' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAB' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
07d2b5ab004f7e4802991813846148df
8e7dd942efef322d23361ed25f51d3acd37df190
describe
'34166' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAC' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
c8f2fd7ac20fb9b279429ad42cabe5cd
7838e3aa20eee944db9f1e3fa2c7ea97791b3cc4
describe
'101380' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAD' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
f5dd55c6e6376982293ff742cde6e421
ce967835f74fd1218a4810577419320916ec83a1
describe
'34897' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAE' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
8a63b51c881e8fd8955e85be09c346b9
76cc40f142bb30801f1c8b85742830b3afcb5bec
describe
'96182' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAF' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
8abe3934fc5cd45c39d8c95cef7406a2
a7b94811abe90a8ed4893c950a955e5d8d53996a
describe
'34641' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAG' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
98ceb818adb560bcc71c6a39fa37b253
04eaebf9bcb7edc313ee09749ed730e914926851
describe
'102008' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAH' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
19c287c76753dab5e04253f9958dad70
07e6bd7c0cfb7aa78ac9987df210c32522d2d707
describe
'31554' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAI' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
da3a65c4966734d927fbc0299f3ceac1
a9036664c02d10937c3e492b70209f83c1e55f58
describe
'102274' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAJ' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8732a22b11b116dca37a9a2036bc1fed
201a590f883f647639e011168ada111e6a2779f8
describe
'36317' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAK' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2ea9a9854932fe012ab7f5124b25e3fe
fc6d8f0ff91123a54bcff062247943e0b4aeeffc
describe
'96937' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAL' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
0e4d8153754fc0fb41b653d1f319b18f
4ead219bf6e91f2f5f1d2f1956f50f03e903d625
'2011-12-16T18:04:41-05:00'
describe
'33324' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAM' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
6353a56542e2fa72bf95016493a590fa
0a41c615512a5213665bdcf5feddefc0d33d5b08
describe
'98322' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAN' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
a4670af491bbeef4d644c5a38b94adbd
2a1d67ca6c3c1e1cf87e5bbd0d09dd50e2866968
describe
'34967' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAO' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
377509c9b5c4c7ec01ff377a7ed3d7f9
3fe7d39646b27d396dfc66f81e139c78aebfb772
describe
'90905' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAP' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
ea6971e8cb76286a9fa6555e88a8cf16
22e3e7ae201bcfff8b465bcaecd1342a76139b46
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAQ' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
19a13250d4865edd8e8cc0deb355e52b
143787da63d361ffdaff7db89c4df390d6b0dba5
describe
'99871' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAR' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
d920a69653b23969a1fd31af13535396
893bb1f5d3f1932fa5f43ee56ea0d1a8b272b241
'2011-12-16T18:08:15-05:00'
describe
'34767' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAS' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
95c63136dc44214ae27291b04a38d4ef
f97ed259b41f4ea60dd3a03d1de11a0f8e92f6d3
'2011-12-16T18:03:42-05:00'
describe
'94569' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAT' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
7e1ef485c8215a56d0b364d64543c8b9
acbd4803cadc08982915e639226a50773cc754d3
describe
'32969' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAU' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
33f8c125324a5c06807807e081fa9989
d2c5f2256bd26fe06c5accc6b19fb7406d730a2c
describe
'97319' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAV' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
da9349e45fb8f0ddfdd04fe6958da3d0
a69076ae4b0257f197014b25451f4947f3862acd
describe
'34678' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAW' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
26d3e42e070488a778759d015bb57a66
0f5837c3c08b2b89849a3efcf7496f54d70ad22f
describe
'89604' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAX' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
20e858450ff27107133c926bcdb2473d
6d39834d8f9bbb660a7247e1a3ae8e8dbd73460a
describe
'33702' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAY' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
ac2d55675823bee6c073ed9a83787df0
be49a69127492ce0accc267b92a862fd302c588a
describe
'105576' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOAZ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
1bf8860c50f2b61571b8dfee859b8dfb
a8e2bf0504b8d3df04f83d6a06391d973f847189
describe
'36262' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBA' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
9a268f1461f041817147940d5c5bfd03
c8078e1dcb24e3a2e2e455301c96594a17f7eddf
describe
'44568' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBB' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
48c213528bacad3d93d0d31ccf9b4cd7
23555d46d4aafdbc500dd033218fbbc4f641d289
describe
'17414' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBC' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
fd7732f477da9aa1c298ec311f7ab6a0
6adc2d6da0503ebbf25d3385356591a4af2d6e13
describe
'94327' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBD' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
9af1445747929f5326d42fbe316c6965
2021b08949797dd2a3603e629728147941b368c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32414' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBE' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
31331e417bb876eb264515b75f17222f
60f14a78b00f77c72d3db22103fe957e0257f360
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBF' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
222c045aeaa266fe91ac912585c3bff7
d9591b21991462869ae60b785538ba97647ff514
describe
'322011' 'info:fdaE20080530_AAAAAOfileF20080530_AABOBG' 'sip-filesUF00002225_00001.mets'
f032c41ca2796f516b734619c3329259
0b76dfa2cd4302bfd86705dedeac0f420483616e
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-18T03:22:40-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.




o>
A pb ittS

—

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight hundred and fifty-two, by

Harper & BROTHERS,

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern Diatrict
of New York.

oi? 604
PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Paut’s ADVENTURES IN THE Pursuit oF_
Know LepcE, is not merely to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition’ of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it elements of a salutary moral influence, by means ~
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the
story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—
vi PREFACE.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through-

out will be to instruct rather than to entertain.
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER

I—Tse Movuts o£ THE KENNEBEC, .

I1.—Tue Losr Bucget, .
Wk—A Rart,
JV.—Tue Desert Istanp,
V.—Tue Benerit or THE Dovst,
VIL—Exzony anp Pine,
Vil.—Tue Bear in THE Mutt,
VII.—Tue Brvovac, .
IX.—Tse Encampment,
X.—Lost i THE Woops,
XI.—Tue Suincte Weavers,
XIL—A Vorace on a Ponn,

PAGE

11
25
41
55
70

- 102

117

. 130

146

- 160

170
ENGRAVINGS.



ees



Trying tHe Water,

Towixe THE Los, .

Tae Lost Bucket, . .

Gone AsHORE, .

ApRET,. . «© . . 4. «2.
Hattoo,

Tue Buu, .. . ‘ . . . .
Tue Wacon Rivz, . . . . .
Tue Rart,

Tue Bear,

Fire on THE Beacu,

Tue Loe Hovse,

Horse Lost, .

Tue Huts,

Tue Encamrine,

THE Cove,

Tue Losr Boat,

PacE

15
22
28
38
54
59
71
82
97
108

- 114

119

. 133

141

. 158

172

. 181
GROER OF THE VOLUMES.

Parra Parl,

I—IN NEW YORK.
Il—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

IIl.—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.

V.—IN BOSTON.
VI—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.
PRINCIPAL PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Maroo, his eon, a boy about twelve years old.

Joun Forrstzs, Marco's cousin, about nineteen years old.

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’a care.
MARCO PAUL
IN THE FORESTS OF MAINE.

Cuaprer I,
Tue Moura or toe Kennesec.

The plan. Fortifications of Quebec.

NE summer, Forester and Marco Paul
formed a plan for going to Quebec.
Marco was very much interested in going to
Quebec, as he wished to see the fortifications.
Forester had told him that Quebec was a
strongly-fortified city, being a military post of
great importance, belonging to the British gov-
ernment. Marco was very much pleased at
the idea of seeing the fortifications, and the
soldiers that he supposed must be placed there
to defend them.

On their way to Quebec, Forester and Marco
were to sail up the Kennebec in a steamboat.
As they were passing along, they sat upon the

\deck. It was a pleasant summer morning.
12 Tar Foresrs or Maine.

The Kennebec. Shores of the river. Water low.





They had been sailing all night upon the sea, on
the route from Boston to the mouth of the
Kennebec. They entered the mouth of the
Kennebec very early in the morning, just before
Forester and Marco got up. And thus it hap-
pened that when they came up upon deck they
found that they were sailing in a river. The
water was smooth and glassy, shining brilliantly
under the rays of the morning sun, which was
just beginning to rise. .

The shores of the river were rocky and bar-
ren. Here and there, in the coves and eddies,
were what appeared to Marco to be little fences
in the water. Forester told him that they were
for catching fish. The steamboat moved very
slowly, and every moment the little bell would
ring, and the engine would stop. Then the
boat would move more slowly still, until the bell
sounded again for the engine to be put in mo-
tion, and then the boat would go on a little faster.

“What makes them keep stopping ?” said
Marco.

“The water is very low this morning,” said
Forester, “ and they have to proceed very care-
fully, or else they will get aground.”

“ What makes the water so low now ?” asked
Marco.
Moura or THE KeEnNnNeEBEC. 13

a
Cause of it. The moon and the tides. Mouths of rivers,

“There are two reasons,” replied Forester.
«Tt is late in the summer, and the streams and
springs are all low; so that there is but little
water to come down from the country above.
Then, besides, the tide is low this morning in
the sea, and that causes what water there is in
the bed of the river to run off into the sea.”

“Ts not there any tide in the river?” asked
Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “ I suppose there is not,
strictly speaking. That is, the moon, which
attracts the waters of the ocean, and makes
them rise and fall in succession, produces no
sensible effect upon the waters of a river. But
then the rise and fall of the sea itself causes all
rivers to rise and fall near their mouths, and as
far up as the influence of the seaextends. You
see, in fact, that it must be so.”

“Not exactly,” said Marco.

“ Why, when the water in the sea,” continued
Forester, “at the mouth of the river is very
low, the water in the river can flow off more
readily, and this makes the water fall in the.
river itself. On the other hand, when the water
in the sea is high, the water can not run out
from the river, and so it rises. Sometimes, in
fact, the sea rises so much that the water from
14 Tue Forests or MaINgE.

‘Balt water. A plan. The stern of the boat.

the sea flows up into the river, and makes it
salt for a considerable distance from its mouth.”

“TI wonder whether the water is salt here,”
said Marco.

“T don’t know,” said Forester.

“If we had a pail with a long rope to it,”
said Marco, “ we could let it down and get
some, and try it.”

“We could let the pail down, but I doubt
very much whether we could get any water,”
said Forester. “It is quite difficult to drop the
pail in such a manner as to get any water when
the vessel is under way.”

“T should like to ¢ry,” said Marco.

« You can find out whether the water is salt
easier than that,” said Forester. “ You can let
a twine string down, and wet the end. That
will take up enough for a taste.”

“Well,” said Marco, “if I’ve got a string
long enough.” So saying, he began to feel’ in
his pockets for a string.

“ Let us go toward the stern,” said Forester.

.“ The water will be smoother there.”

There was a long cabin or saloon built upon
the deck of the steamer, with windows in it, on
both sides. This cabin was rounded toward
the stern, the stern itself being rounded in form
MourtH or THE KENNEBEC. 15



The flag. - The smoke,

too; and there was an open space upon the
deck between the sides of this cabin and the
railing of the boat. Forester and Marco walked
together along this
space tillthey came
to the stern.

There was a
great flag flying
over their heads. %
The flag was at-
tached to a flag-
staff which came
up from the stern
of the boat. Above
and beyond the =
flagstaff a great TRYING THE WATER.
cloud of black
smoke was rolling out from the chimney of the
boat.

Marco and Forester went to the stern, and
stood there upon a part of the deck which
projected over the water. This projection was
supported by braces beneath. - Marco and For-
ester stood upon it almost directly over the
rudder. They could not see the rudder, but
Marco would have been much interested in ob~
serving its form if he could have seen it, and


16 Tre Forests or Maine.

Tasting the water. The result,

the two chains attached to it, by which it was
moved. These two chains passed through two
holes, into the stern of the boat.

Marco found a piece of twine in his pocket,
which he thought would be long enough, but,
on trial, it appeared that it would not reach
quite to the water. Forester then tied it to the
end of his cane, and allowed Marco to take the
cane, and hold it over the side of the vessel ;
and by this means he succeeded in reaching the
water, and wetting the end of the string. He
could, however, after all, only wet a small part
of the string, for it was drawn along so rapidly
by the motion of the boat, that it skipped upon
the surface of the water without sinking in.

At length, however, after he had got the end
of his line a little wetted, he drew it up and put
it in his mouth.

“ How does it taste ?” said Forester.

The question was hardly necessary, for the
face which Marco made showed sufficiently
plain that the water was bitter and salt.

“ Yes, it is salt,” said he. Then, suddenly
casting his eye upon a long dark-looking sub-
stance, which just then came floating by, he

- called out,
“ Why, Forester, what is that ?”
Moura or THE KENNEBEC. 17



Pine logs. Booms. Rafts. Men upon them.

“A log,” said Forester.

The log was round and straight; it glided
rapidly by, and soon disappeared.

“It is a pine log,” said Forester. “There
are vast forests of pine trees in this state. They
cut down the trees, and then cut the trunks into
pieces of moderate length, and draw them on
the snow to the rivers. Then, in the spring,
the waters rise and float the logs down. This
is one of these logs floating down. Sometimes
the river is quite full of them.”

“ Where do they go?” asked Marco,

“Oh, men stop them all along the river, and
put them into booms, and then fasten them to-
gether in rafts.”

“ How do they fasten them together ?” asked
Marco.

“They drive a pin into the middle of each
log, and then extend a rope along, fastening it
to.each pin. In this manner, the rope holds
the logs together, and they form a long raft.
When they catch the logs in booms, they after-
‘ward form them into rafts, and so float them
down the river to the mills, where they are to
be sawed.”

“Can men stand upon the rafts ?” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “ very well.”

B
18 Tus Forests or Maine.
Floating bodies. Philosophy.

“ They make a floor of boards, I suppose,”
said Marco.

“ No,” replied Forester ; “ they stand directly
upon the logs.”

“T should think the logs would sink under
them,” replied Marco, “or at least roll about.”’

“ They sink a little,” replied Forester; “just
about as much as the bulk of the man who
stands upon them.”

“I don’t know what you mean by that, ex-
actly,” said Marco.

“Why, the rule of floating bodies is this,”
rejoined Forester. “ When any substance,
like a cake of ice, or a log of wood, or a boat,
is floating upon the water, a part of it being
above the water and a part under the water, if
a man steps upon it, he makes it sink enough
deeper to submerge a part of the wood or ice as
large as he is himself. If there is just as much
of the wood or ice above the water as is equal
to the bulk of the man, then the man, in step-
ping upon it, will sink it just to the water’s
edge.”

“ But perhaps one man would be heavier than
another man,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester ; “ but then he would
be larger, and so, according to the principle, he
Mout or THE KENNEBEC. 19

ee
Equilibrium. Floating and sinking.



would make more wood sink before the equi-
librium was reached.”

“ What is equilibrium?” asked Marco.

« Equilibrium is an equality between two
forces,” replied Forester.

*T don’t see what two forces there are,” said
Marco.

“There is the weight of the man pressing
downward,” said Forester, “for one, and the
buoyant power of the water, that is, its upward
pressure, for the other. The weight of the man
remains constantly the same. But the upward
pressure of the water increases in proportion as
the log sinks into it. For the deeper the log
sinks into the water, the more of it is submerged,
and it is more acted upon and pressed upward
by the water. Now, as one of these forces re-
mains constant, and the other increases, they

must at length come to be equal, that i is, in
equilibrium ; and then the log will not sink any
farther. That’s the philosophy of it, Marco.”

Marco did not reply, but sat looking at the
barren and rocky shores of the river, as the
boat glided by them. Presently another log
came into view.

“There,” said Forester, “look at that log,
20 Tue Forssts or Marne.

Another log. The mill-men. The steam ssw-mill.

and see whether you think that you could float
upon it.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I think I could.”

“It depends,” said Forester, “on the ques-
tion whether the part of it which is out of wa-
ter is as big as you are.”

“] think it is,” said Marco.

“Yes,” added Forester, “I have no doubt
that it is.”

“ Only I should roll off,” said Marco.

’ “True,” replied Forester; “but the mill-
men, who work about the logs, acquire aston-.
ishing dexterity in standing upon them. If
there is only enough of the log above water to
equal their bulk, so that it has buoyant power
enough to float them, they will keep it steady
with their feet, and sail about upon it very
safely.”

“I should like to try,” said Marco.

“Perhaps we shall have an opportunity at
some place on the river,” said Forester.

Here Marco suddenly interrupted the con-
versation by pointing up the river to a column
of smoke and steam which he saw rising beyond
a point of land which was just before them.

“ Here comes another steamboat,” said he.
“See, Forester.”
Moura or tHe KENNEBEG. QI

Water mills. The view.

“No,” said Forester, “I believe that is a
steam mill.”

“A steam mill!” repeated Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester. “They have steam
mills and tide mills to saw up the logs in this
part of the river. Farther up, where there are
water-falls on the river, or on the streams which
empty into it, they build mills which are car-
ried by water. I presume that that is a steam
mill.”

At this moment, Marco’s attention was di-
verted from the steam mill by a boat which
came gliding into the field of view, far before
them. There was one man in the boat rowing
it. Another sat in the stern, with a pole in his
hand. The pole had an iron hook in the end
of it. A short distance before the boat was a
log floating upon the water. The oarsman was
rowing the boat toward the log. He brought
it up in such a manner that the other man
could strike his hook into it. When this was -
done, the oarsman began to pull the boat to-
ward the shore, drawing the log with it.

Marco was very much interested in the gen-
eral view which presented itself to his observa-
tion as he looked up the river. The men in
the boat, who were towing the log, were out
22 Tue Forests or Maine.

a Men towing a log. pe
near the middle of the stream, but so far distant
that Marco could scarcely make out. what they
were doing. The steam mill where they were
going to take the log to be sawed, was round
behind a point of land, so that Marco could'see
nothing but the tall chimney, and the smoke
issuing from it, behind the trees. There was a
road leading along the bank of the river, at a
little distance from the water. _There was a
very smooth and level beach staitie the river
and the road.



TOWING THE LOG.
Moura or THE KewNNEBEC. 28

The beach. Marco goes forward, The decks.

. Marco was just wishing that he could go and
take a walk upon this beach, when his eye
caught | the figures of two men who seemed to
be at work there. Forester said that they were
rolling-logs off into the water. These men
were so remote that they looked very small.

' There were a great many logs floating down
toward | the steamboat, on the current of the
river.’

By this time the men with the log disappeared
from Marco’s view, behind a part of the steam-
boat which now: came in the way, in conse-
quence of a change in the direction in which
the steamboat was going. Marco, who wished
to watch the whole proceeding, left Forester,
and ran forward, in hopes that he could get
another view of the men in the boat. He found,
however, that they were proceeding so rapidly
toward the shore, that he was fast losing sight
of them; and then he concluded to go forward
to the bows of the steamboat, thinking that
perhaps there might be other logs coming
down the river, with men after them in boats.

When he reached the bows, Marco found
the deck encumbered with cables, and anchors,
and heavy boxes of freight, which made it dif-
ficult for him to find his way to a good place
24 Tue Forests or Marine.

“Beauty of the river. Tho ripple.

for a view. He finally reached a place where,
by standing upon an anchor, he could look over
the bulwarks, and get a view of the expanse of
water before him. The water was smooth, and
its glassy surface was bright with the reflec-
tion of the rays of the morning sun.

Marco admired the beauty of the river and
of its banks, but he could see no boats, or even
logs coming. He saw some large sand-banks
before him, which had been left bare by the
efflux of the tide. He wished that the steam-
boat would stop, and let him land upon one of
them. He also looked down over the bows,
and admired the graceful form and beautiful
smoothness of the ripple, or rather wave, which
was formed by the cutwater of the boat as it
urged its way rapidly through the water. Af-
ter gazing upon this for some time, Marco
turned to go away in pursuit of Forester, when
an occurrence took place, which being some-
what important in its consequences, the account
of it must be deferred to the next chapter.
Tue Lost Bucket. 25

ee ee
The bucket. Marco forms a plan.

Cuaprer II.
. Tue Lost Bucxet.

A’ Marco was stepping down from the posi-
tion which he had taken upon the anchor,
his eye fell upon a small bucket, with a long
rope tied to the handle, which he immediately
recognized as one of those buckets which the
sailors fit up in that way, in order to draw up
water from alongside the ship.

“ There’s’'a bucket now,” said Marco to him-
self. “Ideclare, I believe I'll draw up some
water. Forester said that it was hard, but I
think it will be easy. 1’ll draw up a bucket full,
and carry it to him and show him.”

So saying, Marco took up the bucket, lifted

“it gently over the side, and let it down slowly
by the rope into the water. There was a knot
in the end of the rope; and Marco held the
knot firmly in his hand, intending to draw up
the bucket by means of it, as soon as he should
get it full. He found, however, that, although
he could let the pail down easily enough, it was
no easy matter to dip up any water into it; for
26 Tue Forgsts or Maine.

A difficulty. The sailor boy. Marco goes aft.

the rope, being fastened to the bail or handle,
kept the handle, and of course the open part of
the pail, upward, so that the water could not
run in. If Marco let the rope down more, the
pail, being light, would not sink, but skipped
along upon the surface of the water, drawn by
the motion of the steamboat.

While Marco was making these fruitless at-
tempts, another boy, dressed in sailor’s clothes,
whom Marco had seen several times before
about the boat, came up to him, and asked him
what he was doing.

“T’m trying to get some water,” said Marco.

“ That isn’t the way to get it,” said the sailor
boy. “ Let me have the bucket. I'll show you
the way.”

“No,” said Marco, “I want to get it myself.”

“You never can get any that way,” said the
boy. “ You must swing it back and forth, and
when it is swinging well, let it drop suddenly

‘and catch the water.”

Marco had not a very convenient place to
stand, at the forecastle, to make his trial with
the bucket, and so he concluded to carry it aft
to a place on the guard, a little before the pad-
dle-wheel. There was a place there on the
main deck,—the place in fact where the plank
Tue Lost Bucxer. 27

His position there. He lets down the bucket. A disaster.

is usually put for the freight, and sometimes for
the passengers’ baggage to be passed in and out,
when the boat is at the land—where Marco
thought he could reach the water with the
bucket more easily.

When he got to this place he let the bucket
down till it was near the water, and then began
to swing it.to and fro, as the sailor boy had di-
~ rected him.. The boy was standing near him,
to see how he would succeed. It happened also
that there was a man,—one of the passengers,—
standing upon the promenade-deck above, look-
ing down to see what Marco was going to do;
though this Marco did not know.

So Marco ‘began to swing the bucket back
and forth, and after he had got it well a-swing-
ing, he let down the rope suddenly, at the mo-
ment when the bucket was at the extent of its
oscillation. The bucket filled instantly ; but,
as the boat was advancing rapidly, it was caught
by the water with such force that the rope
was twitched out of Marco’s hand with great
force. — .

“ Hold on!” exclaimed the sailor boy.

But it was too late. The rope fell down into
the water, and the bucket, rope, and all, sailed
away upon the surface of the water, until they
28 Tue Forests or Marine.
‘Bucket overboard. Joe.

floated under the paddle-wheel of the boat,
which dashed them down beneath the surface
of the water, and
they disappeared
finally from view.

“Why did not
you hold on ?” said —
the boy.
| Marco was si-
iis lent.

=: The boy looked
== round tosee if any

= body had observed

ae =~ what had. taken

THE LOST BUCKET, place. He sup-

| posed that nobody
had noticed what the boys had been doing.

“ Nobody has seen you,” said the sailor boy;
“so you say nothing, and I'll say nothing.”

“ But suppose they ask what has become of
that bucket,” said Marco ; “ what will you tell
them ?” “

“Oh, I'll them I don’t know where it is,” he
replied ; “and I don’t. I’m sure I don’t know
where it is now: do you? Hush, here comes
Joe.”

Marco looked up at these words, and saw the


Taz Lost Bucxer. 29
Concealment. Certain maxims,

sailor approaching whom the boy called Joe;
and the boy himself immediately went away
from the place where he and Marco had been
standing, and began coiling a rope upon the
deck. Marco walked sorrowfully away toward
- the place where he had left Forester.

There was something wrong and something
right in the boy’s proposal to Marco, to conceal
the loss of the bucket. His object was to be-
friend and help Marco in his distress. This
was right. The means by which he proposed
to accomplish the object were secrecy and
fraud. This was wrong. Thus, the end which
he had in view was a good one, and it evinced
a good feeling in him; but the means for pro-
moting it were criminal. Some persons have
maintained that if the end is only right, it is of
no consequence by what means we seek to pro-
mote it. Hence they have adopted this maxim,
namely, “ The end justifies the means.” But
this maxim is not sound. The contrary prin-
ciple is correct. It is sometimes expressed by
this saying: “ We must not do evil that good
may come ;” which is a much safer proverb to
be guided by.

Marco’s first impulse was, to go at once and
tell the captain of the steamboat that he had
30 Tue Forests or Maine.

Marco's first idea. The wrong man. Progress of the boat.

lost his bucket. But he did not know exactly
where he could find him. He looked at his
office window, and found that it was shut. He
asked one of the waiters, whom he met coming
up stairs from the cabin, if he knew where the
captain was. But the waiter did not know.
Presently, he saw a gentleman walking back
‘and forth upon that part of the deck which is
in front of the door of the ladies’ cabin. He
thought that he was the captain. Marco walk-
ed up to him, and accosted him by saying,

“ Are you the captain of this boat, sir ?”

“ Am I the captain ?” asked the man. “ Why? ?
What do you want to know for ?”

“ Because, if you are,” said Marco, «T have
lost your bucket.”

“ Lost my bucket !” repeated the gentleman.
“ How did you lose it ?” ;

“T lost it overboard,” said Marco.

Here the gentleman laughed, and said, “ No
I’m not captain ; but you seem to be an honest
sort of boy. I don’t know where the captain
is.” , Oo
All this, though it has taken some time to de-
scribe it, took place in a very few minutes ; and
the boat had now advanced only so far as to be
opposite the steam mill which Marco had seen
Tse Lost Bucket. 3]

The steam-pipe. Puffs. The cylinder.

just before he had left Forester. Marco hap-
pened to see the mill as the boat moved by it,
and he went immediately to the side of the boat
to get a better view of it.
- There was a chimney for the smoke, and a
pipe for the waste steam, at the mill.. From the
steam-pipe there issued a dense column of va-
por, which came up, however, not in a regular
current, like the smoke from the chimney, but
it was puffed up in regular strokes, making a
sort of pulsgtion. While Marco was looking at
it, Forester came along, and stood looking at it
too. There were a great many logs lying about
the shore, and enormous piles of boards, which
had been sawed, and which were ready for the
vessels that were to come and take them away.

“What makes the steam come up in puffs ?”
asked Marco. ~

“ Because, it is what they call a high-pressure
engine,” said Forester. “It works against the
pressure of the atmosphere. All such engines
throw out the steam in puffs.”

“Why do they ?” asked Marco.

“ Do you know what the cylinder of a steam-
engine is ?” said Forester. .

“Not exactly; I don’t remember it very
well,” replied Marco.
32 Tue Forests or Maine.

Mareo examines the machinery. The piston-rod.
nn

“Come with me, then,” said Forester, “ and
I will show it to you.”

So saying, he took Marco to the engine of
the boat, and showed him, in the midst of the
machinery, a large iron vessel, shaped like a
hogshead, only it had straight sides. Marco
could not see mych more than the top of it.

“ That is the cylinder,” said Forester. “It
is the heart of the steam-engine, as I may say—
the seat of its power. All the other machinery
is only to aid the cylinder, and to convey the
power: to the point where it is wanted to do the
work. Thus, the place where the steam exerts
its power, and on which the whole movement
of the machinery depends, is the cylinder.”

Marco observed that a long iron rod, large
and solid, and very bright, kept ascending and
descending through the top of the cylinder, as
if pushed up and drawn down again by some
force within. Forester told him that that was

“the piston-rod.

“ The piston-rod,” said Forester, “is fastened,
at its lower end, to the piston, which is a flat
plate of iron, made to fit the inside of the cylin-
der exactly. .

“ First,” said Forester, “the steam comes in
below the piston, and drives it up; and then it
Tae Lost Bucker. 38
Explanations. Low prossure, High preesure.

is stopped from coming in below, and is forced
in above, and so drives it down.”

“And how does the other steam get out ?”
asked Marco.

“ There are two ways of getting rid of the
steam that is below the piston when the piston
is coming down,” said Forester. “One way is,
to open a passage to let it out into the air. On
this plan, when the piston has been driven up
the steam is cut off from coming in below the
piston, and is admitted above. At the same in-
stant, the passage is opened to let the lower
steam out. Of course, the steam that comes in
above, drives the piston down, and forces the
steam that is below, out into the air. They
generally have a pipe to convey it away, and
as the piston goes up and down, the steam
comes out in puffs, as you saw it in that mill.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I understand that ; and
now what is the other way ?”

“ That kind of engine is called a high-pressure
engine,” said Forester, because “ the piston, in
coming down, has to drive out the steam from
below, against the pressure of the atmosphere ;
for the atmosphere above passes into the pipe,
and resists the movement of the steam in com-
ing out. It requires a greater force of steam

Cc
34 Tue Forests or Maine.
Engine stopped. Going slowly.

to work the piston on this plan than it does
upon the other.”

“ What is the plan of the other kind of steam
engine?” asked Marco.

“On the other plan,’ said Forester, “the
steam under the piston is condensed, that is,
turned suddenly into water; and this leaves a
vacancy or void below the piston, so that the
piston can be forced down much more easily
than if it had to drive the steam out before it,
against the pressure of the atmosphere.”’

Forester was going on to explain to Marco
how it was that the steam was condensed in
the cylinder, when the conversation was sud-
denly interrupted by the sound of the engine
bell, which was the signal for the engine to stop.
The thumping sound of the machinery and of
the paddle-wheels accordingly ceased, and the
boat began to move more slowly. Presently,
the bell sounded once more, and the piston-rod
slowly rose out of the cylinder, and then slowly
descended again.

“ They are going very slowly,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “the water is low,
and I suppose that the channel is narrow.”

Just at this moment, they perceived a strange
sensation, as if the steamboat had been suddenly
Tre Lost Bucket. 35

esse
Aground. The captain attempts to back off.



pushed backward. Marco was startled. He
did not know what it meant.

“ There we are,” said Forester.

“ What ?” said Marco. “ What is it?”

« Aground,” said Forester.

“ Aground § ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester; “that’s the sensation
produced when a ship goes aground upon sand
or soft mud.”

So saying, Forester left the engine, and went
up to the upper deck, followed by Marco.
There were several persons there, looking out
upon the water.

“Yes,” said Forester, “we are aground.
You see by the trees upon the bank that we are
not moving.”

Marco saw that they were at rest. He
asked Forester what they were going to do.

Just at this moment the little bell sounded,
and the engine, which had been stopped when
the boat went aground, was put in motion
again.

“They are going to back the engine, I sup-
pose,” said Forester, “to try to draw her off.”

But the boat would not move. The engine
did not seem to have power to release her from
her confinement. °
36 Tue Forests or Marne.

Btate of the tide. Discouraging prospect.

“ What shall we do now ?” asked Marco.

“Why, whenever a ship is aground,” said
Forester, “the first question is, what is the
state of the tide ?

“ Because,” continued Forester, after a mo-
ment’s pause, “if the tide is rising, it soon lifts
the vessel off, and enables her to go back, or,
perhaps, forward, if the water is not very shal-
low. But, if the tide is falling, it leaves her to
rest more and more upon the sand, and she can
not get off until the water has gone entirely
down, and then rises again. She can not get
off, in fact, until the water has risen higher than
it was when she first grounded.”

“ And how is it now ?” asked Marco.

“I presume the tide is going down,” said
Forester; “and if so, we must wait here until
it rises again.” So saying, he began to look
about for somebody of whom he could inquire.
He soon heard a gentleman say to another that
the tide was falling, and that they would have
to stay there three hours.

“That’s rather provoking,” said Marco.

“Oh, no,” said Forester. “ Perhaps we can
go ashore.”

“Well,” said Marco, with an expression of
gratification at the proposal.
Tae Lost Bucxer. 37

Forester’s proposal. The steam. Captain’s proposal,

“ And perhaps we can borrow some fishing-
lines, and go a-fishing.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “that will be an excel-
lent plan.”

“ At any rate,” said Forester, “when acci-
dents of this sort occur upon our travels, we
should not allow ourselves to be provoked by
them, but make ourselves contented by the best
means within our reach.”

At this time, they began to hear the loud,
hissing sound, produced by the blowing off of
the steam from the engine, which Forester said
was an additional indication that they were go-
ing to remain there for some time. Presently,
a man came up the stairs from the deck below
—for Forester and Marco were at this time
on the upper deck—and told the passengers
that the boat would have to remain there three
or four hours, and that if any of them wished to
go ashore to amuse themselves, he would send
them in his boat, after breakfast.

Quite a number of the passengers seemed
disposed to accept this offer, and the boat was
accordingly lowered ; and Joe, with two other

sailors, were ordered to come. and row it
ashore.
88 | Tue Forests or Maine.



The passengers going ashore.



GOING ASHORE,

The passengers who were to go in the boat,
descended into it from the deck of the steamer,
and took their places in the stern. There were
so many of them that they were obliged to stand
up, as there were not seats enough for them all
to sit down. Marco got a seat, at a place
where he could look out upon the river. He
can not be seen in the picture, being behind the
men.

While the boat was proceeding toward the
Tue Lost Boucker. 39

ee
The raft. Construction of the rafts.



shore, Marco was busy admiring the view up
the river. There was a raft of logs in the mid-
dle of the stream, with a man upon it. High
mountains covered with forests were in the
background, on the farther shore. They looked
very solitary and wild. There was, however,
a little viliage down near the shore, at the en-
trance, apparently, to a sort of valley which
there opened among the mountains. The
steatnboat itself, too, as it lay motionless upon
the water, formed a. beautiful view. Marco
could see the passengers that remained on
board, and the sailors standing on the fore-
castle.

When the boat approached the shore, it came
to a place where there were some rafts of logs,
lying upon the margin of a sandy beach. The
beach was broad and beautiful. The rafts were
made by fastening the logs together by means
of wooden pins, one of which was driven into
the middle of each log. Then there was a rope
passed along from pin to pin, and fastened to
each. The end of the rope for each raft, was
then carried to the shore, and fastened to a
strong stake driven into the sand. This was
to prevent the raft from being floated away on
the rising and falling of the tides.
40 Tue Forests or Maine.

The passengers land.

When the boat came up to the edge of the
raft, one of the men stepped out upon the raft
and held the bows, while the others got out.
The logs being all afloat, formed a somewhat
unstable foundation to stand upon, and it would
have been difficult to have got from the raft to
the dry land, had it not been that a single log
happened to lie in such a position on the sand,
as to form a connection. By means of this log
the passengers all safely reached the shore.
A Rart. 41

Tavern. . Breakfast.





Cuaprter ILI.
A Rart.

ORESTER and Marco did not take break-

fast on board the steamboat, but waited un-
til they got on shore. They had inquired of a
fellow-passenger, who seemed acquainted with
the country, and were told that there was a very
good tavern about a quarter of a mile from the
mill.

When they landed upon the logs, Marco,
whose curiosity seemed to be stronger than his
appetite, wanted to ramble about for a little
time along the shore and among the piles of
boards, but Forester thought it would be best
first to go and get their breakfast.

“Because,” said he, “we can then amuse
ourselves by rambling about here, and shall be
ready to return to the steamboat whenever they
send for us.”

So they went to the tavern.

Foresjer seemed to have little appetite for his
breakfast. He complained of feeling fatigued,
and yet he had nothing to fatigue him. Marco
42 Tue Forests or Maine.

Forester is unwell. Directions to Marco.

ate, and talked fast all the time; but Forester
seemed silent and dejected.

“Come, cousin Forester, what is the matter
with you ?” said Marco at last.

Forester said that he felt somewhat unwell,
and as there was a sofa in the room, he con-
cluded to lie down upon it, and not go out.
Marco was, at first, disposed to stay and take
care of him, but Forester said that he did not
need any thing, and he wished Marco to go out
and amuse himself.

“You may go and see the mill,” said he,
“and the logs along the shore ; only be careful
not to go where there is any danger ; and come
and let me know when the boat is coming from
the steamer to take us on board again.”

So Marco left Forester upon the sofa, and
went away. He was sorry that his cousin was
sick, and he was particularly sorry that he had
to go himself to take his walk without company.
But, concluding that he would adopt Forester’s
principle of making the best of every thing, in
the events which occur in traveling, he walked
along the road, singing a tune which he had
learned at a juvenile singing-school jn New
York, and watching the pulsations of the steam,
as it issued from the pipe at the mill.
A Rarr, 43

Marco’s reflections. Marco at the mill,

As Marco walked along, it occurred to him
that he had not, after all, succeeded in acknowl-
edging to the captain of the steamboat that he
had lost the bucket. And, since the first occa-
sion for doing so had gone by, he began to
doubt whether it would be best for him to
trouble himself any farther about it.

“The bucket was not worth much,” said he
to himself. “ Nobody knows it is lost, except
that boy, and he will not tell. I’ve a great
mind not to say any thing about it.”

In fact, Marco found that he was much less
inclined to make his acknowledgment now, than
he was when the circumstance first occurred.
He wished that he had at once stated. the facts
to Forester, which would have been his wisest
course; but now that the first occasion for
doing so had passed away, he began to feel dis-
inclined to do it at all.

Marco soon reached the mill, and he amused
himself, for half an hour, in watching the move-
ment of the engine, the strokes of the saw, and
the drawing up of the logs from the water to the
floor of the mill. There was a steep, sloping
platform from the mill down to the river, and a
long chain extended down to the water. This
chain was fastened to one end of one of the logs
44 Tue Forests or Maine.

The machinery. Men on the logs.

which lay floating there, and then, by means of
the machinery, it was drawn slowly up, bring-
ing the ponderous log with it.

The way in which the machinery drew up
the chain was this : The end of the chain, which
was within the mill, was wound round an axle,
which was made to revolve by the machinery.
The axle, thus revolving, wound up the chain,
and, in this manner, drew it gradually in, by
which means the log, which was attached to
the lower end of it, was drawn up.

Presently, Marco’s attention was attracted
toward some men, who seemed to be sailing
about upon some logs, in a cove, just below the
mill. He went down immediately to see what
they were doing. They had long poles in their
hands, with iron points in the ends of them, and
were pushing the logs about with these poles,
to choose out such as they wished to saw in the
mill.

Just as Marco came down, one of the men
stepped upon the end of a log which was float-
ing very near him. The log sank a little, but
not much, under him, and the man walked along
toward the other end of it. Marco wondered
how he could keep his balance.

When the millman reached the farther end
A Rart. 45

Dexterity. Marco and the millman. Rolling the log.

of the log, he extended his long pole very dex-
terously, and struck the point of it into the cor-
ner of a sort of wharf, which was built upon
the bank; and then, pulling gently, he drew
himself along, together with the log upon which
he was floating. Marco was surprised at this,
and he wondered that the man did not fall off
the log. He thought that if the log were to
roll in the least degree, the man would be rolled
off into the water. He ran down to the little
wharf, so that he could see better.

“ Weill, my boy,” said the millman, “do you
belong on board the steamboat ?”

« Yes, sir,” said Marco; “we got aground.
You'll fall off of that log if you don’t take
care.”

“No,” said the millman, “ there’s no danger.”

“ Why, if the log should roll the least atom,
away you'd go,” said Marco, “though still I
suppose that the water is not very deep.”

Here the man began to step upon the log in
a peculiar manner, so as to make it roll. It
rolled slowly, but the man continued stepping
until he had rolled it completely over. The
aide which had been under water appeared of a
dark color, and was very slippery, being cov-
ered with a sort of slime; but the man did not
46 Tue Forests or Maine.

Conversation. Falling in.

slip. After he had thus rolled the log completely
over, he looked up to Marco, and said,

« There, you see that there is no danger.”

When the man had drawn this log up to the
shore, he went for another ; and he had to sail
upon this second one a long distance, in bring-
ing it to its place. He pushed himself along
by running his pole down to the bottom, and
pushing against the sand.

“Could I sail upon a log ?” asked Marco.

“No,” replied the millman; “ you'd roll off.”

“ How did you learn to do it ?” asked Marco.

“Oh, I learned when I was a boy,” replied
the millman.

“ Did you roll off when you were learning ?”
asked Marco.

“Yes,” said the man. “I’ve been off the
log into the water many a time.”

“And how did you get out again?” said
Marco.

“Oh, I could swim,” he replied; “and as
soon as I came up, I would paddle back to the
log, and climb up upon it. Once, however, I
came very near being drowned.”

“ How was it ?” said Marco.

‘“‘ Why, I was on the upper side of a boom”’—

‘A boom ?” said Marco; ‘what is that ?”
A Rart. 47
Description of a boom. Fastenings.

“A boom ?” repeated the millman ; “don’t
you know what a boomis? It is a place to
catch logs. When we make a boom we go to
some cove or eddy, where the water is pretty
still, and chain logs together, end to end, so as
to form a long line on the lower side of the
eddy, and then along up the middle of the river
a little way, so as to inclose a space to catch
the logs.”

« What do they fasten the boom to?” asked
Marco.

“ Why, the lower end,” said the millman, “is
fastened to the shore, by means of a very strong
post, or an iron staple set into the rocks. The
other end, which is out in the middle of the
stream, is fastened to some island, if there is one,
or, if not, to a pier built up from the bottom.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “and now about your
getting in ?”

“ The boom was full of logs, and I was upon
the upper side of it, at work with some other
men. I was on a log trying to find the mark,
and I fell in.”

“ What made you fall off?” asked Marco.

“T don’t know,” replied the millman. “I
was not much used to logs then. I was trying
to find the mark.”
48 Tue Forests or Marne.

Marks of the logs. Register of the marks,

“ What mark ?” asked Marco.

“The owner’s mark,” said the millman.
“The owners all mark their logs, when they
get them out in the winter, and then we sepa-
rate or sort them in the booms. Sometimes
the mark is on the under side of the log, and so
we have to turn it over in the water to find it.”

While all this conversation had been going
on, the millman had been moving about over
the water with the various logs, Marco accom-
panying him, and keeping as near to him as
possible, walking along the shore, and some-
times on the logs which were resting by one
end on the shore. As the millman was de-
scribing the system of marking the logs, he was
sailing along very near to Marco, and he im-
mediately began to turn the log over under him,
saying—

“For instance, look here, and see me turn

-up the mark of this log.”

Marco watched the log, as it slowly revolved,
until presently there came a sort of hiero-
glyphical mark upon one end of the log, made by
crosses and lines cut into the wood.

“ Every owner has his particular mark,” said
the millman.

“ Whose mark is that ?” asked Marco.
A Rarr. 49

Pian for building a raft. Hammer and nails.

“T don’t know,” said the man, “but they
know at the mill. They have a register of
them all at the mill.”

“J wish I could turn over a log, standing on
it, in that way,” said Marco.

“You couldn't,” said the millman. “The
only way by which you can sail safely on logs,
would be to put two together, and make a sort
of raft.”

“ How ?” asked Marco.

“ By nailing short pieces of boards across
from one log to another. Then they would not
roll.”

“Well,” said Marco, “if I could only get a
hammer and some nails.”

The millman told him that perhaps they
would let him have a hammer and some nails
at the mill; and Marco, accordingly, went up
to inquire. They told him they had a hammer,
-but they had no nails to spare. So Marco
failed of getting the means of making a raft.
He forgot to go back to the millman to get the
rest of his story, but, instead of it, he rambled
down the bank of the river, until he came to a
place where there was an old fence, which had
fallen down, and the nails were sticking out of
the boards. He now wished that he had bor-

D
50 Tue Forests or Maine.

Nails found. Two logs for a raft.

rowed the hammer at the mill, and he tried to
persuade a boy, who was standing there, to go
and borrow it for him.

The boy told him that a stone would do very
well for a hammer.

“So it will,” said Marco; “find me a good
one, and bring it to this old fence.”

The boy brought Marco a stone, and Marco
began to knock out the nails. Very soon, how-

- ever, he set the boy at work upon the nails,

while he went in pursuit of some short boards,
to nail across from one log to the other. He
found some, which he thought that he could
make answer, without much difficulty. He col-
lected these boards together near the logs; and,
soon afterward, the boy brought him the nails.

The logs were lying side by side, with two
ends resting upon the shore, the two other ends
being out toward the stream. Marco concluded
to nail first the two ends which were toward
the shore, they being nearest, and being also
more steady than the others. He accordingly
laid one of his short pieces across, from one log
to the other, and nailed it as well as he could,
using the stone for a hammer.

*« Now,” said he to the boy, “I'll put another
board across at the middle, and one more at the
A Rarr | 51
Marco adrift. ‘The pole.

other end, and then, if I can find something for
a pole, I’ll take a little sail. Look about a little,
my boy, won’t you,” continued he, “and see if
you can’t find a pole, while I am nailing the
other boards.”

The boy accordingly went away in pursuit
of a pole, while Marco nailed first the middle
board, and then the end one. He came back
just after Marco had got the first nail of the end
board driven in, and as soon as he came in
sight of the logs and of Marco, he exclaimed—-

“You're adrift! you’re adrift !”

Marco got up immediately, and looked
around. He was indeed adrift. His weight,
pressing upon the outer ends of the logs, had
lifted the other ends off the shore, and the raft
was slowly floating up the stream. The reason
why it floated up was, that there was at this
place what they call an eddy, which is a cur-
rent near the shore, flowing up the stream.
Such eddies are caused, generally, by curves in
the banks.

As soon as Marco perceived that he was
afloat, he said—

“ Throw me the pole.”

The boy threw the pole, and it just reached
the raft. Marco took it up, all dripping as it
52 Tart Forests or Maine.

The stream. Marco on the raft. Picturesque shore.

was, and, thrusting the end hastily down into
the water, he endeavored to push himself back
by pushing against the bottom. But it was too
late. He had got already into such deep water,
that he could scarcely reach the bottom, and he
could not push the raft back.

In the mean time, the raft slowly moved up
the river.

“Never mind,” said Marco. “I’m going
right for the mill, and when I get there, they’ll
come out for me in a boat. In the mean time,
I'd better finish my raft.”

So saying, he kneeled down and finished
nailing on the last board. When he rose again,
he found that he had advanced considerably,
and the boy had accompanied him, walking
along by the shore.

The shore was a smooth, sandy beach, very
pleasant to walk upon, with a mass of rocks
crowned with evergreen trees, rising above it.
It was a very picturesque scene, but the boy
seemed to feel no particular interest in it.
There was, however, a sloop which just now
came into view, sailing down the stream, which
at once attracted his attention.

The boy wishing that Marco should look at
A Rart. 53

The sloop.



this sloop, and not knowing what his name was,
called to him by shouting out,

“Tsay.”

“ What,” said Marco, looking up. .

“See there!” said the boy.

Marco looked off to the middle of the river,
and gazed a minute or two upon the sloop with
great interest.

“ A sloop,” said he.

“ Yes,” said the boy, “bound to Boston.”

Marco could not look at the sloop very long,
for he felt uneasy in respect to his situation.
He had hoped indeed that he should be drifted
toward the mill, and toward the shore, but now
he began to perceive that he was gradually get-
ting away from the shore, and, looking forward,
he saw, to his consternation, that the eddy did
not extend to the mill; but that, at a short dis-
tance above him, it swept out into the main cur-
rent of the river, which was running by a point
of land at the upper part of the eddy, with great
speed. The raft advanced slowly till it came
to this current, when it turned around, and be-
gan to glide swiftly down the stream.

“ Boy,” cried Marco, in great distress, “run
to the mill as fast as you can go, and tell them
that I have gone down the river, adrift. Tell
54 Tue Forests or Maine.

Marco frightened.



them to send a boat after me as quick as they
can. My cousin Forester will pay them well.”

e®
a ) ‘eo
Ve
Jt cS ae
ey ae

: =_—F “
SAicdbet. «bdmor’: *



So the boy ran off toward the mill, while
Marco floated away helplessly down the cur-
rent.
Tae Desert Isvanp. 55

The steamboat. Marco’s danger. Paddling,

Cuaprer IV,
Tue Desert Isuanp.

FTER Marco had sailed on for a few min-
utes, he cast his eyes up the river, and saw
the steamboat. She was still lying in an in-
clined position, as she had been left grounded
by the tide. He shouted and waved his hat, in
the endeavor to attract the attention of the peo-
ple on board, and lead them to send a boat to
rescue him. But all his efforts were vain. He
could not make them hear.

The current soon bore him beyond a point
of land which hid the steamboat from his view,
and he began to fear that he should be actually
carried out to sea. He was calculating, in fact,
how many miles it was to the mouth of the river,
when it suddenly occurred to him, that, though
he could not push with his pole, he might per-
haps paddle with it. He accordingly took up
the pole, which he had laid down upon the raft,
and began to use it asa paddle. —

Marco found, to his great relief, that he could
produce considerable effect upon the motion of
56 Tae Forests or Maine.

Marco discovers an island. Marco safe.

his raft by using his pole as a paddle. He con-
trived, at length, to get the head of the raft
round toward the shore, and, by working hard,
he succeeded in urging it along through the
current, very slowly, indeed, but still percepti-
bly, so that at last he began to have some hope
that he might succeed in reaching land.

Before he had made much progress, however,
he suddenly saw before him, at a short distance,
a little rocky island, with some grass and a few
trees on the lower end of it. The island was
very small, consisting chiefly of a few precipi-
tous rocks, with a small sandy beach at the base
of them. It lay almost directly in his course—
so nearly, that he perceived that by working a
little more with his pole, it was probable that
he could bring himself into such a position as
to be thrown by the current directly upon it.

This he did. He paddled, with all his
strength, to get into a line with the upper end
of the island, the current, all the time, bearing
him down directly toward it. In a few min-
utes, he had the satisfaction of seeing that he
was going directly upon it.

“Allright,” said he to himself; “now I’m
safe.”

As he said these words, the end of the raft
Tae Desert IsLanp. 57

Perplexity. Marco’s situation on the island. House,

struck the sand, and he leaped off upon it. The
raft swung round, and was going away, but
Marco seized it, and dragged it up a little way
upon the shore, so as to secure it. He then sat
down upon the end of it, and began to consider
what was next to be done.

He was greatly at a loss to know what was
to be done. He waited an hour, and then, get-
ting very tired of his situation, he began to con-
sider whether it would not be best for him to
intrust himself once more to his raft, and en-
deavor to get to the shore by means of his
paddle.

While he was sitting thus on the end of his
raft, in great perplexity, looking toward the
shore that was nearest to him, he perceived that
there was a road there coming down from the
back country to the river. The road came
down in a winding direction between ledges of
rocks. It seemed to come from a wild glen or
valley among the forests and mountains. There
was only one house in sight, and that was upon
the side of a hill at a little distance from the
river.

The house was almost hidden from view by
the trees that surrounded it, but Marco looked
at it and all about it very intently for some time,
58 Tue Forests or Marne.

Boy coming. Conversation with the boy.



hoping to see some person there that he could
call to.

The house was very far off,—too far to make
it probable that any one could hear him there
if they were within the house, especially if the
doors and windows were shut. Marco thought
it possible that he could make them hear if he
could see them outside ;—but there was nobody
to be seen.

Pretty soon, however, there suddenly came
into view a boy upon a horse. He was coming
along the winding road which led to the river.
The boy was riding the horse down to’ the
water. The horse advanced to the brink of
the river, and then the boy dismounted and held
the horse by the bridle to let him drink. Mar-
co began to call out in his loudest voice,

“ Halloo!”

There was no answer.

“ Halloo—oo—oo,” called out Marco again.

“ Halloo !” answered the boy.

“Can’t you get a boat, and come and take
me off this island ?” cried Marco.

The boy paused a moment, and gazed ear-
nestly at Marco, while the horse continued
drinking.
Tue Desert Isuanp. 59

No boat to be had,

_



“ How came you on that island ?” said the
boy, calling out again in a loud voice.



HALLOO!

“I got adrift on some logs,” said Marco,
“and floated down the river. Can’t you get a
boat, and come and take me off ?”’

“T have not got any boat,” said the boy.
“ There an’t any boats about here.”

“I wish you would go and get one,” said

Marco. “I'll pay you well for it.”
The boy did not answer. He seemed to be
60 Tue Forests or Maine.

Proposal. The boy comes for Marco.

hesitating. In the mean time, the horse, hav-
ing nearly finished his drinking, lifted up his
head and looked at Marco.

“There is not any boat within a mile,” said
the boy. “But I should think you might wade
ashore. The water is not deep between here
and the island.” °

-“ Then wade out here with your horse,” said
Marco, “ and take me on behind you.”

The boy hesitated a moment, but he finally
decided to comply: with Marco’s proposal. So
he mounted his horse and began to drive into
the water. Marco watched his progress with
intense interest. As the water grew deeper, he
began to fear that the boy would get discour-
aged, and turn back. But the boy kept on. He
turned his steps somewhat below the island,
where there was an extensive shoal ; the water
grew shallower and shallower, until at last the
horse emerged entirely, and stood upon a little
dry sand-bank at the lower side of the island.

“T’m very much obliged to you, indeed,” said
Marco, “ for coming for me—besides the pay.
I will pay you for it as soon as we get on
shore.”

“Qh, no,” said the boy, “I don’t need any
pay just for wading my horse out here. I wade
Tue Desert IsLanp. 61

Four miles. Marco gets ashore.

him out here very often, when I come down to
water ; that.is, in the summer, when the water
is low.”

Marco mounted behind the boy, and the boy
turned his horse’s head toward the shore.

“How far is it back to the mill?” asked
Marco. ,

“To the steam mill ?—four miles,” answered
the boy.

“Four miles!” exclaimed Marco; “is it pos-
sible that I have floated down four miles? How
shall I ever get back again ?”

“ How did you happen to get adrift ?” asked
the boy.

Marco proceeded to give the boy an account
of his getting adrift, but in a short time the
water began to grow so deep that he was afraid.
The boy, however, told him that there was no
danger. The bottom of the river, at this place,
was a great bed of pebble stones, and the cur-
rent ran very swiftly over them, and curled in
sharp ripples about the horse’s legs. Presently,
however, the water became more calm, and
they soon safely reached the shore.

“ Now,” said Marco, “I want to go back to
the mill just as quick as 1 can—before the
steamboat goes.” ‘
62 Tue Forests or Marine.

Conversation with the boy. Riding double.

“ The steamboat ?” said the boy. “She has
gone long ago. She went by early this morn-
ing.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “she went by here, but
she got stopped.”

So Marco told the boy the story of their
having got aground, and of his going ashore ;
and of all his adventures, in fact, down to the
time of his being cast upon the desert island.
The boy told him that he had better make
haste ; “for,” said he, “ the tide has risen a great
deal already. When the tide is at the lowest,
we can go out to that island almost on bare
ground.” ;

“But 1 can’t walk back four miles,” said
Marco. “Could you not carry me in a
wagon ?” he continued.

“We have got a wagon,” said the boy, “ if
my father will let me go.”

“Let us go right up and ask him,” said
Marco.

They accordingly began to advance up the
road, the boy putting his horse to a rapid trot.
Marco, who was not accustomed to riding in
this style—behind another boy, and without a
saddle—was much jolted, and in fact, he found
it very difficult to keep his seat. He began to
Tue Desert Isuanp. 63

The farm-houze, Harnessing the horse.

feel so much anxiety, however, about getting
back again, that he did not complain. In a
short time, the boy reached the house. It was
a small, plain farm-house. There was a shed
round at the back side of it, with a wagon
standing in the shed—the shafts resting upon a
wood-pile.

“ My father is not at home now,” said the
boy, “ but he will be at home very soon.”

“Oh, don’t let us wait for him,” rejoined
Marco. “He'll be willing to have you go, I
know.”

“ No,” said the boy, “I should not dare to go
. without his leave.”

“Let us harness the horse into the wagon,
then, at any rate,” said Marco, “and then we
shall be all ready.”

“ We can do that,” said the boy.

So they harnessed the horse into the wagon,
and the boy led the horse around to the door.
Marco, who was quite impatient to go, got into
the wagon, and sat waiting. The man came in
about twenty minutes, and when he heard a
statement of the case, he said that his boy might
go and take Marco back to the mill.

It-was now so late that Marco began to be
seriously afraid that the steamboat might have
64 Taz Forests or Mating.

Marco's fears. Firing up.

gone. He was very impatient to have the
horse go as fast as possible ; and he watched
at every turn in the road which gave him a
view of the river, hoping to get a glimpse at
the boat. He wondered whether Forester was
still at the tavern, or whether he had come out
in pursuit of him. After wearying himself with
conjectures, which were all in vain, he suddenly
came to a view of the river opposite the mill.
The steamboat, to his great joy, was in its
place ; but there was a black column of smoke
issuing from the smoke-pipe, indicating that
they had built the fires and were preparing to
§0. ,
“ They are firing up,” said Marco, “I verily
believe.”

“ What do you mean by that ?” said the boy.

“Why, building up the fires,” said Marco,
“to set the engine a-going. They call it firing
up.”

Just at this moment there broke forth a loud
and hoarse hissing from the steam-pipe, and a
dense column of white vapor began to ascend,
which mingled its snowy volumes, in a beautiful
manner, with the dark masses of the smoke.

“They are blowing off the steam,” said
Marco.
Tae Desert Istanp. 65

Letting off steam. View of the river.

“ What does that mean ?” asked the boy.

“ Why, that they have got the steam up, and
are letting off a little of it, while they are wait-
ing for something. Perhaps they are waiting .
for us. Drive on as fast as you can.”

A moment after this, the sound of the steam
suddenly ceased, and the great paddle-wheels,
on the sides of the boat, began slowly to revolve.

“They are trying to get her off,” said Marco.
“TI do hope they can’t start her. Drive on;
drive on as fast as you can.”

Marco and the boy were, at this time, upon
the top of a hill which commanded a fine view
of the river, and of the scenery upon its banks.
The mill was before them, too, in full view.
But Marco was too much engaged in watching
the movements of the boat to regard the scenery.
The boy drove rapidly down the hill. They
reached the mill in a very few minutes, and
drove down to the bank of the river, by a road
which led to the water, a short distance above
the mill. But, in the mean time, unfortunately
for Marco, the steamboat had regained its lib-
erty, and when Marco and the boy came in
view of it again, as their horse stopped at the
edge of the water, they saw, to Marco’s dismay,
that she was plowing her way swiftly up the

E
66 Tue Forests or Marne,
Steamboat going. Forester.

river, being just about to disappear behind a
point of land which terminated the view of the
water in that direction.

“ They are gone,” said Marco, in a tone of
despair ; “ they are gone ; and what shall I do?”

“Can’t you go in the stage ?” asked the boy,
hoping thus to say a word of encouragement
and consolation.

“No,” said Marco, “I don’t believe there is
any stage from this old mill. Besides, I don’t
know where togo. I should not have thought
that Forester would have gone off and left me.”

“Was he on board the steamboat ?” asked
the boy.

“ Yes,” said Marco—* that is, he was to go
on board—but I left him at the tavern.”

“Perhaps he is there now,” said the boy.
“ Let us go and see.”

Marco approved of this plan, and they turned
the wagon, and rode toward the tavern. As
soon as the horse stopped in the yard, Marco
leaped out of the wagon, and ran in. He found
Forester reclining upon the sofa, where Marco
had left him asleep.

Marco advanced toward him, and took him
by the shoulder, roughly, to wake him up, say-
ing,
Tae Dessert Isuanp. 67

“Maroo wakes Forester up. Forester atill unwell.

“Forester! cousin Forester! wake up! the
boat has gone.”

Forester opened his eyes—looked wildly at
Marco, and then put his hands to his head,
pressing his temples with the palms, but he did
not speak.

“ The boat has gone, cousin Forester,” con-
tinued Marco.

“Then what good does it do to wake me up
so roughly ?” asked Forester.

“ Why—I—thought you’d want to know it,”
said Marco; “but why did not you come
down ?”

“ Because,” said Forester, “ you were to come
and tell me, I thought, when they were ready to
go.”

Marco had no reply to make to this sugges-
tion, and he was silent. He found, afterward,
on farther conversation with Forester, that his
cousin was quite unwell. His head ached, and
his face was flushed, as if he was feverish.
Marco related to Forester an account of his
adventures on the raft of logs. Forester
thought that he had had a very narrow escape.

Marco expected that Forester would have re-
buked him very sharply for his fault in going
upon the logs at all. But he did not. After
68 Tre Forests or Marne.

Forester’s view of the case. Settling damages,

Marco had got through with his account, For-
ester only said,

“ Well, Marco, you evidently did wrong in
getting upon the logs at all; but the evil con-
sequences to you will be punishment enough,
and, in fact, more than enough.”

“ Evil consequences?” said Marco—“no;
there are no evil consequences, only that we
have got left behind.”

“J don’t regard that,” said Forester, “for I
am too unwell to travel to-day; but then you.
have suffered considerable pain and anxiety
already, and, besides, there will be some money
to pay.”

“ What for ?” said Marco.

“Why, you have got to pay the boy for
bringing you home,” replied Forester.

“Must I pay him,” said Marco, “out of my
own money ?”

“ Who do you think ought to pay him ?” said
Forester.

“Why, I ought to, I suppose,” said Marco.
“ But it won’t be much. I think a quarter ofa .
dollar will be enough.”

“ Then, did not you say that you sent to the
mill to have somebody go down after you in a
boat ?” asked Forester.
Tue Deserr Jsuanp. 60

Forester gone to bed.

“ Yes,” said Marco, “but I don’t think they
went.”

“ You had better go to the mill and see,” said
Forester.

So Marco went out and paid the boy a quar-
ter of a dollar, with which he seemed to be sat-
isfied. Then he went to the mill, and he found
two men just returning, in a boat, from a long
pull down the river in pursuit of him. Marco
paid them half a dollar. Thus his loss was
’.three quarters of a dollar.

When he returned to the tavern, he found
that Forester had taken some medicine, and had
gone to bed. Marco went up into his room to
seehim. Forester said that he did not think he
was going to be very sick, but that he should
not be able to go out any more that day, and
that Marco must amuse himself the best way
he could.

“ After the experience that you have had,”
said Forester, “ I hope that you will be careful
not to put yourself any more into dangerous
situations.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I will.”
70 Tue Forests or Marne.

aN
Mareo alone. The barn behind the tavern. The bull.
ae

Cuarrer V.
Tue Beneritr or THE Dovst.

M ARCO took dinner that day at the tavern

alone, and, after dinner, he carried a cup
of tea to Forester,—but Forester was asleep,
and so he did not disturb him.

In the afternoon he went out to play. He
amused himself, for half an hour, in rambling
about the tavern yards and in the stables.

He went into a barn which stood behind the
house, and after looking at the animals that
were there, he passed out through great doors
that were open upon the back side of the barn.
There was a boy there busily at work digging,
in the barn-yard, behind. Marco did not know
what he was digging there for. Beyond the
boy, and at some distance from him, there was
a bull chained to a post.

Marco went to the boy and began to talk
with him.

“What is that bull chained up there for?”
asked Marco.

“He is going to be taken away,” said the
BenerFit or THE Dovst.. 71.
Marco goes to see the bull. The fence.

boy. “ He is sold, and they are coming for him
this afternoon.”

“] mean to go and see him,” said Marco.

“Very well,” said the boy, “He is a hand-
some bull. But you had better not go too near
him, for he is a little cross.”

There was a low fence running along the side

of the barn-yard, separating it from a field, and
_ the post which the bull was chained to was near
this fence. Marco concluded, since he had prom-
ised Forester that he would not put himself in
any dangerous situations, that it would be best
for him to climb over this fence and walk
along upon the outside of it. He thought that
from that side he
could look at the
bull very safely.

He accordingly =a
climbed over the \iam rr =
fence at a place //f"Su
near the barn, in a sb:
corner, where there ~ =aiigaillt ne
was an old wheel SS NIN
and some poles. @ rk ta
This wheel helped ¢. * Y- a aS
him to climb over
the fence. When THE BULL



ae

al
72 Tue Forests or Maine.
Boy digging bait. ; , Going s-fishing.

he was over he walked along to the place.oppo-
site to the bull.

Marco looked at the bull a few minutes with

‘great interest, and then began to look about for
a long stick or a pole, to poke him with a little,
through the fence, to see if he could make him
roar.

He, however, immediately afterward re-
flected, that this would not be right; and be-
sides, he perceived that the fence was so low,
that if the bull were by any means to break his
chain, he could leap over the fence in a mo-
ment.

So Marco concluded to leave the bull in
peace, and go back to the boy in the barn-
yard.

When he got back to the place he asked the
boy what he was digging there for.

“T am digging for worms for bait,” said the
boy. “See!”

As the boy said “see,” he pointed to a small tin
box which was lying near him on the ground,
and which had a number of worms in it.

“ Are you going a-fishing ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the boy.

“ And may I go with you ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the boy.
Benerir or tHe Dovusr. 73
“Linefor Marco. s—<“=t*=sé=s*s*s*s*s*s*~*~*~S*~S*S« rem
. “Only I have not got any fishing-line,” said
Marco.

- “Qh, I can rig you up a line,” said Jeremiah.

The boy’s name was Jeremiah.

Pretty soon Jeremiah took Marco into a sort
of back shed, and there he furnished: him with
a hook and a piece of sheet-lead to make a
sinker of, and Marco had some twine in his
pocket already ; so that he was soon fitted with
a fishing-line. But he had no pole. Jeremiah
said that he could cut one, on his way down to
the river, as they would pass through a piece
of woods which had plenty of tall and slender
young trees in it.

Mareo succeeded in getting a pole in this
manner, which answered very well; and then
he and Jeremiah went down to the river.
They stood upon a log on the shore, and caught
several small fishes, but they got none of much
value, for nearly half an hour. At last, Jere-
miah, who was standing at a little distance from
Marco, suddenly exclaimed :

“Oh, here comes a monstrous great perch.
He is coming directly toward my hook.”

“Where ? where?” exclaimed Marco. And
.. Marco immediately drew out his hook from the
place where he had been fishing, and walked
74 Tue Forests or Maine.

The perch. Difficulty about a porch.

along to the log on which Jeremiah was stand-
ing.

“ Where is he ?” said Marco, looking eagerly
into the water.

“Hush !” said Jeremiah ; “ don’t say a word.
There he is, swimming along toward my hook.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I see him. Now he’s
turning away a little. Let me put my line in,
too.”

Marco extended his pole and dropped his
hook gently into the water. He let it down
until it was near the perch. The poor fish,
after loitering about a minute, gradually ap-
proached Marco’s hook and bit at it.

Jeremiah, seeing that he was in danger of
losing his fish, now called out to Marco to take
his line out. “It is not fair,” said he, “for you
to come and take my fish, just as he was going
to bite at my hook. Go away.”

But it was too late. As Jeremiah was say-
ing these words, the: fish bit at Marco’s hook,
and Marco, drawing up the line, found the fish
upon the end of it. As the line came in, how-
ever, Jeremiah reached out his hand to seize the
fish, and Marco, to prevent him, dropped the
pole and endeavored to seize it too.

“ Let go my fish,” said Jeremiah.
Benerir or tae Dovust. 715

The perch escapes.



“ Let alone my line,” said Marco.

Neither would let go. A struggle ensued,
and Marco and Jeremiah, in the midst of it, fell
off into the water. The water was not very
deep, and they soon clambered up upon the log
again, but the fish, which had been pulled off
the line in the contention, fell into the river,
and swam swiftly away into the deep and dark
parts of the water, and was seen no more. He
was saved by the quarrels of his enemies.

Marco, who was not so much accustomed to
a wetting as Jeremiah was, became very angry,
and immediately set off to go home to the tav-
ern. Jeremiah coolly resumed his position on
the log, and went to fishing again, paying no
heed to Marco’s expressions of resentment.

Marco walked along, very uncomfortable
both in body and mind. His clothes were wet
and muddy, and the water in his shoes made a
chuckling sound at every step, until he stopped
and took his shoes off, and poured the water
out. It was nearly sunset when he reached the
tavern. He found Forester better. He had
left his bed, and had come down into the parlor.
He was reclining on the sofa, reading a book,
when Marco came in.

Marco advanced toward him, and began to
16 Tae Forests or Maing.

Marco’s complaints of Jeremiah. Claims.

make bitter complaints against Jeremiah. In
giving an account of the affair, he omitted all
that part of the transaction which made against
himself. He said nothing, for instance, about
his coming to put his line in where Jeremiah
was fishing, and while a fish was actually near
Jeremiah’s hook, but only said that he caught
a fish, and that Jeremiah came and took it
away.

“ But what claim had Jeremiah to the fish ?”
asked Forester.

“ He had no claim at all,” said Marco.

“You mean, he had no righé at all,” said
Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“ He had a claim, certainly,” rejoined Fores-
ter ; “ that is, he claimned the fish. He pretended -
that it was his. Now, on what was this claim
or pretense founded ?”

“T don’t know,” said Marco, “Iam sure. I
‘only know he had no right to it, for I caught
the fish myself, and he was going to take it
away.”

Forester paused a moment, and then resumed:

“T don’t think that you have given me a full
and fair account of the transaction ; for I can
not believe that Jeremiah would have come and
Benerit or roe Dover. 17
.Marco’s reasoning. Forester’s reasoning.

taken away the fish without any pretext what-
ever. You must have omitted some important
part of the account, I think.”

Marco then told Forester that Jeremiah said
that the fish was just going to bite at his hook ;
and, after several other questions from Forester,
he gradually acknowledged the whole truth.
Still, he maintained that it was his fish. He
had a right to put in his line, he said, wherever
he pleased, whether another boy was fishing or
not; the fish belonged to the one who caught
him ; and, before he was caught, he did not be-
long to any body. It was absurd, he maintained,
to suppose that the fish became Jeremiah’s, just
because he was swimming near his hook.

“ Sometimes one can judge better of a case,”
- said Forester, “ by reversing the condition of
the parties. Suppose that you had been fish-
ing, and a large fish had come swimming about
your hook, and that Jeremiah had then come to
put his hook in at the same place, should you
have thought it right ?”

“Why, I don’t know,” said Marco.

“It is doubtful. Now, it is an excellent rule,”
continued Forester, “in all questions of right
between ourselves and other persons, for us to
give them the benefit of the doubt.”
78 Tue Forests or Marne.

“Trials of criminals, Benefit of the doubt,



“ What does that mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, if a man is tried in a court for any
crime,” replied Forester, “ if itis clearly proved
that he is innocent, of course he goes free. If
it is clearly proved that he is guilty, he is con-
victed. But if neither the one nor the other
can be proved, that is, if it is doubtful whether
he is innocent or guilty, they give him the
benefit of the doubt, as they term it, and let him
go free.”

“JT should think that, when it is doubtful,” said
Marco, “ they ought to-send him back to prison
again till they can find out certainly.”

“No,” said Forester, “ the jury are directed
to acquit him, unless it is positively proved that
he is guilty. So that, if they think it is doubt-
ful, they give him the benefit of the doubt, and
let him go free. Now, in all questions of
property between ourselves and others, we
should all be willing to give to others the bene-

’ fit of the doubt, and then the disputes would be
very easily settled, or rather disputes would
never arise. In this case, for instance, it is
doubtful whether you had a right to come and
interfere while the fish was near his hook ; it is
doubtful whether he did or did not have a sort
of right to try to catch the fish, without your
Beneri? or THE Dovsrt. 79
Peace policy.

interfering ; and you ought to have been willing
to have given him the benefit of the doubt, and
so have stayed away, or have given up the fish
to him after you had caught it.”

“But I don’t see,” said Marco, “why he
should not have been willing to have given me
the benefit of the doubt, as well as I to have
given it to him.”

“ Certainly,” said Forester ; ‘‘ Jeremiah ought
to have considered that there was a doubt
whether he was entitled to the fish or not, and
to have been willing to have given you the
benefit of the doubt ; and so have let you kept
the fish. Each, in such a case, ought to be
willing to give up to the other.”

“And then which of us should have it?”
asked Marco.

“ Why, it generally happens,” said Forester,
in reply, “that only one of the parties adopts
this principle, and so he yields to the other;
but if both adopt it, then there is sometimes a
Jittle discussion, each insisting on giving up to
the other. But such a dispute is a friendly dis-
pute, not a hostile one, and it is very easily
settled.”

“A friendly dispute !” exclaimed Marco; “1
never heard of such a thing.
80 Tue Forests or Marne.
Friendly disputes. Wagon to go to Bath,

“Yes,” said Forester. “Suppose, for in-
stance, that, when you had caught your fish,
you had said, ‘There, Jeremiah, that fish is
yours ; he was coming up to your hook, and
would have bitten at it if I had not put my line
in ;’ and, then, if Jeremiah had said, ‘ No, it is
not mine ; it is yours, for you caught it with
your hook ;’ this would have been a friendly dis-
pute. It would have been very easily settled.”

“T am sorry that I left my pole down at the
river,” said Marco. “I cut a most excellent
pole in the woods, on my way down, and I left
it there across the log. I mean to go down and.
get it early in the morning.”

- “No,” said Forester, “we must be on our
way up the river early to-morrow morning.”

“ How shall we go?” asked Marco.

“T have engaged a wagon here to take us to
Bath, and there we shall find a stage.”

Accordingly, early the next morning, For-
ester and Marco got into a wagon to go up the
river to Bath, which is the first town of any
considerable consequence which you meet in
ascending the Kennebec river. It is true that
Bath is on the west side of the river, and Marco
and Forester were on the east side,—but For-
ester said they could get across by the ferry;
Bewerit or THE Dovsr. 8}

Beautiful views. Farm-house,

when they arrived opposite the town. Marco
and Forester sat on the seat of the wagon,
and a boy, who was going with them for the
purpose of bringing the wagon back, sat behind,
on a box, which had been put in to make a seath
for him.

It was very pleasant riding along in this man-
ner, upon the bank of the river. There was
the surface of the water itself, with the boats
and vessels upon it, to furnish a perpetually
changing series of beautiful views. The shores
were picturesque and beautiful too, and as the
course of the road was generally very near the
water, it gave the party a fine opportunity to
see these views.

Marco frequently called Forester’s attention
to objects that he saw as they rode along ;—
such as boats on the water, fishes jumping up,
and rafts tied to the shores, or slowly coming
down the stream.

At one place there was a very pleasant farm-
house by the side of the road. Marco said that
he should like to live there very much. There
was a little path leading from opposite to the
house down to the river, and there were two
men in a boat a little way from the shore bring-
ing in a log. F
82 Tue Forests or Maine.



THE WAGON RIDE.

Marco proposed to Forester to stop and let
him go down upon the rocks a few minutes,
and see what the men were going to do with
that log; but Forester thought it would be bet-
ter to go on, and make the best of their way to
‘the end of their journey. |

Marco saw some very square and regular
rocks upon this shore, that appeared in some
respects as if they were artificial steps made to
go down to the water. He said he thought
BENEFIT oF THE Doust. 88

Marco's pole.

that those rocks must be an excellent place to
fish.
This reminded him of his fishing-pole, which
he had left behind, near the mill. He said he
was very sorry that he did not have time to go
down and get it.

* It would not have done any good,” said For-
ester, “ for we could not carry it with us in this
wagon.”

“Why, yes,” said Marco, “ we might put it
on the bottom of the wagon, and let the end run
out behind. It is pretty long, I know.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “ we might have put it
in the wagon, in that way, and thus possibly
have got it to Bath, but what should we do with
it then ?”

“Why, then,” said Marco, “we might put
it on the top of the stage, I suppose. Would
not they let us ?”

“It would not be very convenient to carry a
long fishing-pole, in that way, to Quebec,” re-
plied Forester, “through woods, too, half of the
way, full of such poles. You might stop and
get accane or staff, if we find a place where
there are some good ones. A cane would. be
of some service to you in walking up the hills,
84 Tue Forests or Maines.

Canes. Qualities of wood,



and that could be taken along with our baggage
easily.”

Marco said that he should like this plan very
much ; and, as they rode along, they looked out
carefully for a place where there were slender
saplings growing, suitable for canes.

“What kind of wood would you have?”
asked Forester.

“TY don’t know,” replied Marco ; “ which kind
is the best ?”

“The different woods have different quali-
ties,” replied Forester. “Some are light and
soft; and these are very good qualities for cer-
tain purposes. Some are hard. Some are stiff,
and some flexible. Some are brittle, and others
tough. For a cane, now, do we want a hard
wood or a soft one ?”

“ Hard,” said Marco.

“ Why ?” asked Forester.

“Oh, so that it shall not get indented or

* bruised easily,” replied Marco.

“ A light wood or a heavy one?” asked For-
ester.

“ Light,” replied Marco, “so that it will be
easy to carry.”

“ Stiff or flexible ?” asked Forester.

“Stiff,” replied Marco.
Benerit or THE Dovat. 85

ee
Conversation. Qualities of pine wood. Oaks and beeches.

“ Yes,” said Forester. ‘Some kinds of wood
grow straight, and others crooked.”

“ We want it straight,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “The pine grows
very straight. If we could find some young.
pines, they would make us some beautiful-look-
ing canes.’

“ And how is it with the other qualities ?”
asked Marco.

«“ Pine is very light,” said Forester.

“ That is good,” said Marco.

“ And soft,” said Forester.

«That is not so well,” said Marco.

“ And it is very weak and brittle.”

“Then it will not do at all,” said Marco.
«T want a good strong cane.”

Just at this time, they were ascending a hill,
and, after passing over the summit of it, they
came to a place where Forester said he saw, in
the woods, a number of young oaks and beech-
es, which, he said, would make good canes.
The oak, he said, was very strong, and hard,
and tough ; so was the beech.

“Only there are two objections to them for
canes,” said Forester, as they were getting out
of the wagon; “they are not so light as the
pine, and then, besides, they are apt to grow
86 True Forests or Maine.

Value of pine. Uses of it.

crooked. We must look about carefully to find
some that are straight.”

“ Which is the most valuable of all kinds of
wood ?” asked Marco.

“ The question is ambiguous,” said Forester.

“ What do you mean by that ?” asked Marco.

“T mean, that it has two significations,” re-
plied Forester; “thatis, the word valuable has
two significations. Pine is the most valuable
in one sense; that is, pine is, on the whole,
most useful to mankind. But there are other
kinds of wood which are far more costly.”

“T should not think that pine would be so
valuable,” said Marco, “it is so weak and
brittle.”

“Tt is valuable,” said Forester, “because, for
the purpose for which men want the greatest
quantities of wood, strength is not required.
For boarding the outside of buildings, for exam-
ple, and finishing them within,—which uses, per-
haps, consume more wood than all others put
together,—no great strength is required.”

“TI think people want more wood to burn
than to build houses with,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “perhaps they do.
They do in this country, I think, but perhaps
not in Europe and other old countries. But pine,
Benerir or THE Doust. 87



Good canes.

though it has no great strength, is an excellent
wood for building, it is so soft and easily
worked.”

Forester’s remarks, upon the different kinds
of wood, were here interrupted by Marco’s,
finding what he considered an excellent stick
for a cane. When he had cut it, however, he
found that it was not so straight as it had ap-
peared to be while growing.

However, after some time spent in the selec-
tion, Marco and Forester both procured excel-
lent canes.

“This is good, hard wood,” said Marco, as
he was trimming his cane, and cutting it to a
proper length.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “it is beech, and beech
Is very hard.”

After finishing their canes, they took their
seats in the wagon again.
88 Tue Forests or Marne.
Woods. Costly woods. Ebony.

Cuarrer VI.
Esony anv Pine.

ANE riding along a short distance in

silence, Marco introduced the subject
of the different woods once more. He asked
Forester which was the most costly of all the
woods. 7

“Costly is not an ambiguous term,” said For-
ester; “that means, which has the greatest
money value.”

“Yes,” said Marco. “I suppose it is mahog-
any.”

“O no,” said Forester.

« Rosewood, then,” .said Marco. “It must
be rosewood. My mother has a beautiful piano
made of rosewood.”

“No,” said Forester. “ Ebony is more costly
than either rosewood or mahogany. They sell
ebony by the pound.”

“Where does ebony come from?” asked
Marco.

“TY don’t know,” replied Forester.
Esony AND Pine. 88

Color. The natural color best.

“ T should like to know,” said Marco. “ How

much do they sell it for, by the pound ?”
- “IT don’t know that, either,” said Forester.
“T know very little about it, only that it is a
very costly wood, on account of some peculiar
properties which it has, and its scarcity.”

“ What are the peculiar properties ?” asked
Marco.

“One is, its great hardness,” said Forester.
“Tt is very hard indeed. Another is, its color.”

“ What color is it ?” asked Marco.

“ Black,” replied Forester,—“ black as jet;
at least, one kind is black as jet. There is a
kind which is brown. That kind is called
brown ebony.”

“T don’t think black is very pretty,” said
Marco.

“No,” said Forester; “there does not seem
to be much beauty in black, in itself considered ;
but then, for certain purposes, it is much hand-

“somer than any other color would be; for a
cane, for instance.”

Marco looked at the beech cane which he had
before him, and began to consider how it would
look if it were black.

“T suppose I could paint my cane black,” said
90 Tue Forests or Maine.

“Ebony and ivory. Piano-forte keys.

he, after a moment’s pause, “if you think it
would be any better.”

“No,” said Forester ; “I should prefer hav-
ing it of its natural color. The bark of the
beech has beautiful colors, if they are only
brought out by a coat of varnish.”

“ Brought out ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester. “There is a kind of
fine dust, or something like that, which dims the
bark ; but, when you put on oil or varnish,
there is a sort of transparency given to the out-
side coating, which brings the natural color of
the bark fully to view.”

“ Then I will get my cane varnished, when I
get to Bath,” said Marco.

“Ebony,” said Forester, “is used a great
deal where a contrast with ivory is wanted.
Ebony is hard and fine-grained, like ivory, and
it takes a high polish. So, whenever they want
a contrast of black and white, they take ebony
and ivory.”

“When do they want a contrast between
black and white ?” asked Marco.

“One case,” replied Forester, “is that of the
keys of a piano-forte. It is necessary to have
the short keys, which mark the semi-tones, of a
different color from the others, so that the eye
Espony anv Ping. 91
Staining. . Wear.



will catch them as quick as possible. So in a
chess-board. They sometimes make chess-
boards with alternate squares of ebony and
ivory.”

“I think it would be just as well to take
common wood and paint it black,” said Marco,
“rather than pay so much money for ebony.”

“ No,” said Forester, “that would not do so
well. The paint would wear off; or, if it did
not wear off by handling, still, if it got a little
knock or hard rub, a part would come off, and
that would show a little spot which would be
of the natural color of the wood. This would
look very badly.

“Then, besides, painted wood,” continued
Forester, “ can not be finished off so smoothly,
and polished up so highly, as a wood which is
black by nature. They have a way of staining
wood, however, which is better than painting
it.”

“ How is that done ?” asked Marco.

Sa Why, they make a black stain,” said For-
ester, “ which they put upon the wood. This
staining soaks in a little way, and blackens the
fibers of the wood itself, beneath the surface.
This, of course, will not wear off as easily as
paint.” oo
92 Tue Forests or Maine.

“Ebony very hard. . Latha,

“TI should not think it would wear r off at all,”
said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “for if a cane, for
example, is made of any wood stained black,
after a time the wood itself wears away farther
than the staining had penetrated. Then the
fresh wood will come to view. So that, if you
wish to have any thing black, it is much better
to make it of a wood which is black all the way
through.

“ Besides,” continued Forester, “ebony is a
very hard wood, and it will bear knocks and
rough usages much better than other kinds of
wood which are softer. Once I made a car-
penter an ebony wedge, to split his laths with.”

“ What are laths ?” asked Marco.

“ Laths are the thin split boards which are
nailed upon the sides of a room before the plas-
tering is put on. Sometimes laths are made
very narrow, and are nailed on at a little dis-
tance from each other, so as to leave a crack
between them. Then the plastering, being soft
when it is put on, works into the cracks, and
thus clings to the wood after it has become dry
and hard. If plastering was put on to smooth
boards, or a smooth wall, it would all fall off
again very easily.”
Epony anp Pine. 93

_—_
Lath boards. Use of them. Tho ebony wedge.

“ Yes,” said Marco; “I have seen the plas-
tering coming up through the cracks in the
garret at your house in Vermont.”

“The lath boards,” continued Forester, “are
sometimes made narrow, and nailed on at a
little distance from each other, and sometimes
they are wide boards, split up, but not taken
apart, and then the cracks, which are made in
splitting them, are forced open when the boards
are nailed on. The way that they do it, is this.
They put the wide lath board down upon a
plank, and make a great many cracks in it with
an axe. Then they put it upon the wall, or
ceiling, and nail one edge. Then they take a
wedge and drive it into one of the cracks, and
force it open as far as they think will be neces-
sary to let the plastering in. Then they put in
some more nails, in such a manner as to keep
that crack open. Then they wedge open an-_
other crack, and nail again; and so on, until
they have nailed on the whole board, so as to
leave the cracks all open.”

“And you made the carpenter an ebony
wedge ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester. ‘He had had wedges
made of the hardest wood that he could get, but
they would soon become bruised, and battered,

4
94 Tue Forests or Maine.
Tops. Top of lead.

and worn out, with their hard rubbing against
the sides of the cracks. At last, I told him that
I had a very hard kind of wood, and I gave him
a piece of ebony. He made it into a wedge,
and, after that, he had no more difficulty. He
said his ebony wedge was just like iron.”

“Was it really as hard as iron?” asked
Marco.

“ Oh, no,” said Forester,— but it was much
harder than any wood which he could get. He
thought it was a very curious wood. He had
never seen any like it before.”

“J should like some ebony,” said Marco.

“ Ebony would be an excellent wood to make
a top of,” said Forester, “it is so hard and
heavy.”

“T] should like to have a top hard,” said Mar-
co, “but I don’t think it would be any better
for being heavy.”

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “the top would spin

-longer. The heavier a top is, the longer it will
spin.”

“ Then I should like a top made of lead,” said
Marco.

“It would spin very long,” said: Forester, “ if
it was well made, though it would require more
‘strength to set it a-going well. But lead would
Exsony ano Ping. 05

Ole ~~ Meaning of the word.
be soft, and thus would easily get bruised and
indented. Besides, black would be a prettier
color for a top than lead color. A jet black
top, well polished, would be very handsome.”

“Ts black a color ?” asked Marco. “I read
in a book once that black and white were not
colors.”

“ There are two meanings to the word color,”
said Forester. “In one sense, black is a color,
and in another sense, it is not. For instance,
if a lady were to go into a shop, and ask for
some morocco shoes for a little child, and they
were to show her some black ones, she might
say she did not wish for black ones ; she wished
for colored ones. In that sense, black would
not be a color.

“On the other hand,” continued Forester,
“she might ask for silk stockings, and if the
shopkeeper were to ask her what color she
wanted, she might say black. In that sense,
black would be a color.”

“Which is the right sense ?” asked Marco.

“ Both are right,” said Forester. “ When a
word is commonly used in two senses, both are
correct. The philosophers generally consider
black not to be a color; that is, they generally
use the word in the first sense.”
96 Tue Forests or Maine.

Long raft.

“ Why ?” asked Marco.

“ For this reason,” replied Forester. He was
going on to explain the reason, when suddenly
Marco’s attention was attracted by the sight
of a long raft of logs, which was coming down
the river. The road just previous to this had
taken a turn away from the river, so that the
party had been riding at some distance from
the bank, and out of sight from the water, but
now it caine suddenly into view, just as this raft
was passing by. There were two men on. the
raft.

“See those men on the raft,” said Marco.
“ They are paddling.”

“No,” replied Forester ; “they are sculling.”

“Sculling ?” repeated Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester. “They always scull
araft. It is a different motion from paddling.”

Marco watched the men attentively, examin-
ing the motion which they made in sculling, and
considering whether he might not have sculled
his raft to the shore in the same manner.

“ What straight logs!” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester; “the pine-tree
grows up tall and straight, and without branches,
to a great height. This is the source of some
of its most valuable properties. It makes the
Esony anp Pine. 97
The pine-tree. Many branches.
wood straight-grained. That is, the fibers run

smooth and regularly, from one end of the stem
to the other.”



THE RAFT.

Just at this time, Forester saw a large pine-
tree growing alone, by the side of the-road they
were traveling. This solitary tree had a great
many branches growing out from the stem, in
every part, from the top to the bottom.

“That is because the tree grows by itself,”
said Forester, “in the open field. Those that

G
98 Tue Forests or Maine.

Pines in the woods. Knots made by branches,

grow in the forest do not throw out branches
from the stem, but they run up to a great height,
with only a little tuft of branches on the top.”

“T don't see why they don’t have branches
in the woods,” said Marco.

“ Because,” replied Forester, “ where trees
grow close together, the light and the air is ex-
cluded from the lower parts of the stems, and
so branches can not grow there. Nothing can
grow without light and air.”

“I've seen monstrous long potato sprouts
grow in a dark cellar,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester; “so have I.- I did
not think of that. -But they don’t grow very
well.” oo

“They grow pretty long, sometimes,” replied
Marco.

“ At any rate,” said Forester, “the branches
of trees will not grow from the stems of the
trees near the ground, in the woods; and this
is of great importance, for, whenever a branch
grows out, it makes a knot, extending in to the
very center of the tree. This would injure a
pine log very much, as the knot would show in
all the boards, and a knot is a great injury to a
pine board, though it is of great benefit to a
mahogany one.”
Esony AanpD Pine. 99
Pine very durable. : GR.

“ Why ?” asked Marco.

“ Because it gives the wood a beautiful varie-
gated appearance when they get it smoothed.
So that the more knotted and gnarled a log of
mahogany is, the better. It makes the more
beautiful wood. But in pine, it is not beauty,
but facility of working, which is the great ob-
ject. So they always want to get pine as
smooth and as straight-grained as possible. So
that one of these trees that grow detached, in
the fields, would not be of much value for !um-
ber. It has so many branches, that the boards
made from it would be full of knots.”

« That is the reason, I suppose,” said Marco,
“why they don’t cut them down, and make
them into boards.”

“ Perhaps it is,” replied Forester.

“Has pine any other very good qualities ?”
asked Marco.

“J believe it is quite a durable wood,” said
Forester. “ At any rate, the stumps last a very
long time in the ground. I have heard it said,
that there are some stumps in the state of
Maine with the old mark of G. R. upon them.”

“ What does G. R. mean ?” asked Marco.

“ Georgius Rex,” replied Forester,—“ that is,
George, the king. If there are any such, the
100 Tus Forests or MatIne.
Very old stumps. Stump fences,

mark on them means that they belonged to
the king of England, before this country was
separated from England. Im those days, the
king’s workmen went into the forests to select
and mark the trees which were to be cut down
for the king’s use, and these marks were left
upon the stumps.”

“And how long ago was that?” asked
Marco. ,

“O, it must have been sixty or seventy years
ago. But I can hardly believe that the stumps
would last as long as that.”

“I mean to ask some of the men, when I get
up in the woods, how long the stumps do last,”
said Marco.

“« They last very long, I know,” said Forester.
“The people after getting tired of waiting to
have them rot out, tear them up with machines,
and make fences of them.”

“T don’t see how they can make fences of
stumps,” said Marco.

“They put them in a row, with the roots in
the air,” replied Forester. “They make a fun-
ny-looking fence.”

Just at this time Marco perceived a large
town coming into view before them, which,
Forester told him, was Bath. There were sev-
Esony ann Pine. 101
Arrival opposite to Bath, The baggage.

eral ships building along the shore of the river.
The view of the town, as they saw it across the
water, was very pleasant. It appeared much
larger than Marco had expected to find it.

Forester drove the wagon down to the bank
of the river opposite to the town, and there they
found a ferry-boat ready to take them over.

“T don’t think there will be any advantage
in taking the wagon over the river,” said For-
ester. ‘“ We can dismiss the wagon here, and
so only go across the river ourselves.”

“Yes,” said Marco,— because we have not.
got any baggage.”

Their baggage, it will be recollected, was still
as they supposed, on board the steamer, unless
indeed it should prove that the baggage-master
had taken it out and put it into some office.
Forester felt some small degree of uneasiness in
respect to it, fearing that he might experience
some delay in recovering it. He concluded,
however, at all events, to dismiss the boy with
the wagon, and to go over in the ferry-boat
with Marco alone.

This they accordingly did, and as soon as
they landed they went immediately to the steam-

_boat wharf and found their trunks all safe in a
baggage-room there.
102 Tae Forests or Maine.

Hallowell. ; Waterfalls.

Cuartrer VII.
THe Bear in tHE Mitt.

ARCO and Forester found a small steam-
boat at Bath, going up the river, and
they took passage in it to Hallowell. At Hallo-
well, they took the stage, and traveled along the
banks of the river, sometimes on one side of it,
and sometimes on the other. They crossed the
river by means of bridges; they found bridges
in nearly all the principal towns. They passed
a number of water-falls, where saw-mills had
been built for sawing the logs. Marco was
astonished at the number of these mills, the
quantity of logs which lay in the booms, and
the vast piles of boards which had accumulated
in some of the sawing villages.

At one of these villages, where Marco and
Forester stopped to spend the night, they went
out in the evening to see the mills.

When they got out into the street, Forester
said to Marco,

“ Walk along, Marco, till you get to that next
corner, and stay there till I come.”
Tue Bear in THE Mitt. 1038



A secret. Slabs.



“ Where are you going ?” asked Marco.

“That is a secret,” said Forester.

Marco accordingly went on, while Forester,
turning around another corner, disappeared.
Marco walked along until he came to the ap-
pointed place, and there he waited, wondering ~
all the time what Forester could be intending
to do.

Presently he saw Forester coming again along
the street.

« I wonder where he has been,” said Marco
to himself.

When Forester came up, Marco asked him
where he had been; but Forester would say
nothing except that it was a secret. So they
went on to see the mills.

The mills were lighted by little fires of pitch-
"pine knots, which made a bright flame and gave
a fine light. These little fires were built upon
slabs. Marco thought that this was a very
dangerous practice. The slabs, however,
though they looked dry, were really very wet,
being thoroughly soaked with water within,
having been sawed from logs which had been
for a long time floating in the river.

The beam to which the saw was attached in
each mill, as it ascended and descended with
104 Tue Forests or Maine.

The saw-mill. Marco goes in, The mill-man,

the saw, passed across these lights with a rapid
motion, which made the lights appear and dis-
appear, in regular succession, in a very beauti-
ful manner.

Forester and Marco clambered into one of
these mills. They had to make their way over
slabs, boards and heaps of rubbish of various
kinds, and the floor of the mill seemed to be
made of boards and planks, laid loosely and
with many open places between them, in which,
when Marco looked down, he saw dark and
frightful abysses, where he could hear the water
dashing, and, now and then, could get a glimpse
of the foam.

Of course, both Forester and Marco advanced
very carefully. When they had entered, they
found but one man tending the mill. He was
seated on a square block of wood, near the fire,
eating some bread and cheese. As Forester
and Marco advanced toward him, he looked
up and bade them good evening.

“Will you allow us to come in and see the
mill ?” said Forester.

“ By all means,” said the mill-man.

The mill-man here looked around at the log
which he was then sawing, and he observed that
it was time for him to attend to it. So he-put
Tre Bear rn tHe Miu. 105

The log on the frame. Sawing it.

down his bread and cheese upon the block, and
went toward the saw. Forester and Marco
both turned to see what he was going to do.

The log was lying upon a long frame, which
frame seemed to be mounted upon some sort of
trucks, for it advanced slowly, by a steady mo-
tion, against the saw. As the saw was con-
stantly moving up and down with great force,
the log was sawed as it advanced. It had now
advanced so far that the log had been sawed
nearly through from end to end. When it had
gone a little farther, the mill-man pulled a handle,
and stopped the motion of the carriage and the
log, and, in a moment afterward, the log began
to go back again,—the saw, all the time, as-
cending and descending as before, but without
doing any work. When the log had got back
so far that the saw came out of the cleft which
it had made, the man stopped it, and then, with
an iron bar, he shifted the position of the log in
such a manner that when the carriage should
be put in motion, the saw would cut the log in a
new place, at a little distance from the other,—
a distance just equal to the thickness of the
board which he wished to make.

Marco watched all these movements with
great interest. Forester, who had often seen the
106 Tae Forests or Maines.

Cool evening. The mill-man and Marco.

operation before, went back to the fire, and held
his hands out to it, for, as it was a cool evening,
the feeling of the warmth was pleasant. He
could see that Marco remained talking with
the mill-man ; but the noise of the machinery
was so great that he could not hear what they
said.

The flashes of light from the fire illuminated
Marco’s face, however, and Forester could see
that he was much interested in what the mill-
man was telling him. The mill-man sat down
upon the Jog, and made gestures as if he was
eating something. Then he took hold of Marco,
and put him down upon the log in his place, and
he took a seat himself beyond him—that is, be-
tween Marco and the saw. All this time, the
log, riding upon the great frame, was slowly
advancing against the saw, carrying Marco and
the mill-rnan along with it. When it had carried
them so far that the mill-man was getting to be
very near the saw, he turned suddenly round,
and made a gesture as if he was going to clasp
the saw in his arms,—laughing as he did,—and,
immediately afterward, he got up from the log,
and Marco got up, too,—beginning to laugh
himself, also, though his countenance had ex-
pressed surprise and anxiety before.
Tue Bear in THE MILL. 107



The story. . Bear in a mill.



A short time after this, when Marco came
back to the place where Forester was, Forester
asked him what the mill-man had been saying to
him.

« He was telling me a story of a bear,” said
Marco.

“ Of a bear ?” said Forester.

-« Yes,” said Marco, “of a bear in a saw-
mill.”

“T don’t see what a bear had to do in a saw-
mill,” replied Forester.

“Jt was a great many years ago, when. there
were bears in the woods about here. There
was a man sawing in a mill, and he was sitting
on the end of the log that he was sawing, eating
his bread and cheese. The bread and cheese
were lying on the log, next to where the man
was sitting.

“While the man was sitting there in this
manner, eating his bread and cheese, a bear
came into the mill,—a great black bear. He
came up to the log, and when he saw that the
man was eating bread and cheese, he thought
he should like some too. So he sat down on
the log.”

“ On which side of the man ?” asked Forester,
—‘ toward the saw or from it ?”
108 Tue Forests or Marine.
Story continued. The bear’s danger. —

“ Toward the saw,” said Marco. “The man
was on the end of the log farthest from the saw.
The bear sat a little beyond him, nearer to the
saw, and the bread and cheese was between
them. The bear began to eat the bread and
cheese.”

‘“ How ?” asked Forester.

“ Why, he took it up in his paws, I suppose,”
said Marco,—* though I don’t know certainly
about that. At any rate, he began to eat the
bread and cheese,—sitting with his back toward
the saw, and his face toward the man.

“And all this
PEN NLS. time, you must

AS understand,” said
Pees Marco, “that the
Wet! carriage was car-
rying the log, man,
bear, and all to-
ward the saw, and
the man saw that
if the bear would
only keep still, in
| m his place, until he

THE BEAR. was Carried to the
saw, he would get
sawed in two, and so killed. At first, he thought

AS \


Tue Bear in tHE Mitt. 109
Drawing up logs.

it would be best for him to get hold of the iron
bar, if he could, and beat the old bear’s brains
out. But he was afraid that he should not
succeed in doing that, and so he concluded to
wait and see what would happen.

“ Now, bears have a way,” continued Marco
“whenever they are angry with any thing, of
grasping it in their arms and hugging it tight.
The man did not think of this; he only hoped
that the saw would saw the bear in two. The
log moved on nearer and nearer, and at last
brought the bear along so far that the next
stroke cut right down his back. He immediately
turned around and seized the saw, and hugged
it with all his strength, and it tore him all to
pieces.” \

“Indeed,” said Forester. “That is quite a
story.”

Forester did not seem so much astonished at
this account as Marco had expected, but farther
conversation on the subject was prevented by
the occurring of a new object of attention.
The mill-man began to make arrangements for
drawing up more logs from the water of the
river, by means of a long chain passing around
a revolving axis, in the manner which has been
already explained.
110 Tae Forests or Maines.

Marco borrows 8 boat.

Marco watched the first log, as it came slowly
up, and then he wanted to go down the inclined
plane to the water below. The moon was just
rising, which gave them sufficient light, and so
Forester and Marco went down. Marco wanted
to ride up on the next log, but Forester thought
that that would be a very dangerous experi-
ment. There was, however, a boat lying there,
which Forester said perhaps they might get
into, and take a little excursion upon the water,
by moonlight. Marco thought that he should
like that very well, and so he went up into the
mill again, to ask permission to take the boat.
The mill-man said that they might have the boat
all night, if they wanted it.

Marco accordingly returned down the in-
clined plane, telling Forester that they could
have the boat. But Forester, who began to
find the evening air too cold and chilly, said
that he did not think it was worth while for
them to set out on a voyage at so late an hour.
But Marco’s imagination was so much taken
with the idea of a voyage in a boat by moon-
light, that he was very urgent to have Forester
go. So Forester consented, and they both got
into the boat.

“ Which way shall we steer ?” asked Marco.
Tae Bear in THE Miutu. lll

The dam. A log canoe.

“We must go up the stream,” said Forester. .

“ Why must we ?” asked Marco.

“ Because there is a dam and a water-fall be-
low us,” replied Forester.

There was a dam across the river, at the mill,
and the inclined plane, which led from the floor
of the mill down to the shore of the river, ter-
minated at the edge of the water just above the
dam. The water was so low that it did- not
fall over the. dam near the shore, though For-
ester and Marco could hear the roaring which
it made in falling over the dam nearer the mid-
dle of the river.

“ We must take care,” said Marco, “or we
shall get-carried over the dam. I read of an
Indian once, who was carried over the Falls of
Niagara.”

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “ we must be careful.”

Forester turned the head of the boat up the
river, keeping near the shore, so as to avoid all
possibility of being carried over the dam. The
boat glided along swiftly through the water.

“ The boat goes very well,” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester ; “ and yet it is only
a log canoe.”

“A log canoe?” said Marco. “Is this only
a log canoe ?”
112 Tue Forests or Maine.
Paddles, Moonlight night. Island,

“ That is all,” replied Forester. “It is made
of a log, hollowed out. They use a great many
such boats on this river. They go very easily
with paddles.”

Forester and Marco both had paddles. Mar-
co sat about in the middle of the boat, but For-
ester sat in the stern, propelling the boat and
steering it at the same time. When they got
up a little way above the dam, they went out
farther toward the middle of the river. Fores-
ter soon became warm by the exercise of pad-
dling, and had no disposition to return. They
both found it very romantic and delightful to
glide smoothly over the glassy surface of the
water, which was silvered by the moonbeams.

They soon came to a turn in the river which
carried them away from the sight of the mills
and the dam, and brought them under high
banks, which, in some places, presented rocky
cliffs to the view, and, in others, were covered
with forests. This scenery had a peculiarly
somber and solemn expression, seen thus, under
the light of the moon. Marco gazed at it in
silence, and with a feeling of awe.

They went on in this manner for half an
hour, until they found themselves approaching
Tue Bear in rot Mitt. 113

Marco and Forester land. The fife,

a rocky island, crowned with forests. Marco
proposed to land upon it.

“Very well,” said Forester ; “I have no ob-
iection ; but would you not rather go back ?”

“No,” said Marco. “I want to explore this
island.”

“ But are you not cold § ?” asked Forester.

“No,” said Marco, “ not at all.”

“ My hands and feet are a little cold,” said
Forester.

“Then we will go back pretty soon,” said
Marco, “ but first just let us land a minute upon
this island.”

So Forester turned the head of the boat to-
ward the shore, and Marco, as soon as it
touched, scrambled out upon the rocks.

“Oh, Forester !” he exclaimed, at once, “here
is plenty of drift-wood. Let us make a fire, and
warm your hands and feet.”

« Drift-wood ?” rejoined Forester. “ Will
: drift-wood make a fire ?”

“Why not ?” asked Marco.

“T should think it would be too wet,” replied
Forester.

Marco said no more, but, at that instant,
Forester observed a little flash, and then a faint
glimmer of light where Marco was. He had

ul
114 Tue Forests or Maine.

The fire.

lighted a match by rubbing it against some
drift-wood. He touched it to some dry bark,
and soon had a pleasant little blaze upon the
rocks, near the shore. He piled on pieces of
drift-wood, such as branches of trees, old slabs,
and pieces of board, which he found lying about
there, and he soon had a very good fire.

“There,” said Forester, “now let us get
some seats, and sit down and warm ourselves.”

“Not yet,” said Marco. “I want a bigger
fire first.”



FIRE ON THE BEACR,
Tue Bear in tHe Mitt. 115

The fire light. The moon coming up. Marco’s plan.

So Marco went about very industriously, and
brought armful after armful of fuel and piled it
on the burning heap. The smoke and flame
ascended very high, and the light shone beauti-
fully upon the rocks and trees around, as well
as upon the beach itself, and upon the top of
the boat, which was lying at the margin of the
water.

The moon shone too upon the scene. It was
just rising above the tops of the trees of the
forest, round and full.

- “J wish I had a hatchet here,” said Marco,
“or an axe.”
' “ Why ?” asked Forester.

“ Why, we could make a camp, and lie here
all night,” said Marco.

“O, no,” said Forester.

“Yes,” said Marco, “for the man said we
might. have his boat. all night.”

“No,” replied Forester. “We will camp
out when we get fairly into the forests on Dead
river.

“ But now for my secret,” added Forester.

So saying, he took out, first from one pocket
and then from the other, a considerable parcel.
Each of these parcels was neatly folded up in a

_ hewspaper.
116 Tue Foresrsa or MAINE.

The secret. Gingerbread.

“ What have you got there ?” asked Marco.
“ Books ?”

“ Hot gingerbread,” replied Forester.

“ Gingerbread!” exclaimed Marco, with as-
tonishment.

“Yes,” replied Forester. “Isaw a baker’s
sign as I was coming along the street, and I
thought that perhaps we should be hungry be-
fore we got back, and so I went in and bought
a sheet of gingerbread. It was fresh from the
oven. The man broke it up into lengths, and
wrapped it up in two parcels, and I put them
in my pockets for a secret.”

Forester then gave one of the parcels to
Marco, and opened the other himself. The
gingerbread, when it came out, was found to be.
very warm and tender; and Forester and Mar-
co ate it with excellent appetites, as they sat
upon two large stones which they had previ-

‘ously rolled up before the fire.
Tue Bivovac. 117

The log house. : The forest.



Cuaprer VIII.
Tue Brvovae. .

M ARCO and Forester had ultimately an op-
portunity to encamp for the night, in
the woods, in a manner different from what
they expected. It happened in this way. In
the course of their rambles among the forests
which are about the lakes and the upper branch-
es of the Kennebec, they came, one night, to a
farmhouse, where they had to spend the night.
The house was built of logs. It was in a small
opening in the woods. This opening was oc-
cupied with fielde, which were divided from
each other by log fences. The fields were full
of stumps. The whole opening was bordered
on every side by a perpendicular wall of for-
est,—the tall stems forming a colonnade, which
reminded Marco of the palisades on the North
river, just above New York.

There was but one room in this log house,
and, at first, Marco did not know where he and

“Forester were to sleep. There was a great

_ blazing fire in the fireplace, which was made
118 Tae Forests or Maine.

Great fire. Getting supper.



of rough stones. The hearth was made of great
flat stones. These stones were tolerably smooth
on the upper side ; but, as they were not square,
there were many spaces left between them, and
at the corners, which were filled with earth.
But, though the fireplace was rough, the great
fire blazed merrily in it; and Marco thought
that it was pleasanter than his father’s marble
fireplace, in New York, with a grate in it, filled
with a hard coal fire, looking like red-hot
stones. .

“JT wish we had such a fireplace as this in
New York,” said Marco. -

« And wood to burn in it,” replied Forester.

“O, we can get wood enough in New York,”
said Marco. “ The carmen bring it along every
morning. We might have guch a fireplace
down in the basement, or in that little room in
the stable, and then I would go and build fires
in it.”

Just then, the farmer’s wife came with a spi-
der to the fire, to broil some chickens for their
supper. She pulled out the coals with a long
handled iron shovel, which she called a slice.
She cooked the young travelers a most excel-
lent supper.

The farmer and his wife were both rather _
Tue Bivouac. 119

The cradle. Isaiah.



young. . They had one child. He was asleep
in the cradle. .This cradle was only a box made
of boards, and mounted on rockers. Marco
asked the farmer if he made the cradle himself,
and he said he did.



Se

THE LOG HOUSE,

There was a boy living in this house, named
Isaiah Isaiah was the farmer’s brother. He
worked hard all day on the farm, and at night,
he slept in a sort of garret, which they called
120 Tue Forests or Maine.

‘The atore-room, The farmer's gun, Bed up the ladder.

the loft. The way to get up to the loft was by
a ladder in a corner of the room.

Behind this ladder there was a corner which
seemed to be used as a sort of store-room.
There was a trunk there, and a basket, and va-
rious other similar things. There seemed to be
no closets in the room. There was one chair,
and also a table; though they were on the back
side of the room.

A sort of bench, with a high back to it, stood
by the side of the fire. Such a seat was called
a settle. Forester and Marco sat down upon
this seat, while the man himself sat down upon
the lowest step of the ladder, which had been
made wider than the other steps, so as to serve
for a seat. The farmer,—who had made the
ladder himself,—thought that this plan of hav-
ing the lower step answer the purpose of a seat
was a very ingenious contrivance.

The farmer had a gun and a powder-horn.
These he kept hung up upon the wall, at a
place where it was convenient to get them in
coming up and down the ladder.

When bed-time came, Forester and Marco
climbed up the ladder, and went to bed. They
slept upon a straw bed, which was lying in a
corner. They had two clean but very coarse
Tue Bivovae. 121

Rain in the night.

sheets, and a good warm coverlid. Marco
crept in well under the eaves of the house, but
Forester slept on the outer side of the bed,
where the roof was higher.

Marco was awaked in the night by a strange
sound, which he heard directly over his head.
He lifted up his head and listened. It was the
pattering of rain upon the roof. The roof was,
however, very tight, and none of the rain came
in. The roof was covered with shingles, which
the farmer had made himself, in a little shop
near his house.

Marco listened to the rain a few minutes, and
then went to sleep again. He was glad to hear
it rain, because he liked this house very much
and wished to stay here the next day, and he
thought that Forester would not go away in the
rain.

The next thing that he knew, was, that it
was morning. The rain, however, he supposed,
continued. He spoke to Forester, saying, .

“It rains, cousin Forester.”

“ Does it?” said Forester. “Then I don’t
know what we shall do.”

“We must stay here to-day,” said Marco.
“Then I can see Isaiah make a shingle. Isaiah
can make a shingle. Did you know it ?”
122 Tus Forests or Maine.

“Chinks, Marco’s rambles, The shingle,

. “I don’t hear it rain,” said Forester.

“T mean to get up and see,” said Marco.

There was no glass window in this garret,
but the light shone through chinks in certain
places between the logs. There was a wooden
window, as Marco called it; that is, there was
an opening in the wall, with a wooden shutter
to close it. Marco went to this window and
opened it. He looked out upon the wild and
solitary scene which was before him with great
interest. At length he said,

“ No, cousin Forester, it does not rain,—but
I wish you would stay here to-day.”

“Very well,” said Forester. “I will stay here
as long as you wish.”

Marco was rejoiced to hear this; and he
spent two hours, after breakfast, in rambling
about the farmer’s house and grounds. He
went into the little shop, and amused himself
for half an hour in seeing Isaiah make shingles.
Isaiah let him try to make one himself, and he
succeeded pretty well. He carried his shingle
in to Forester to show it to him.

Forester said he thought it was a very good
shingle.

“T should like to carry it home,” said Marco;
Tue Brivovae. 123

The apring. : Forester writes letters.

“but I suppose you would think that that would
be a foolish plan.”

“No,” said Forester, “ I do not think it would
be foolish. The shingle is flat, and will lie down
in the bottom of your trunk; and after you get
tired of it as a shingle, you can have a little box
made of it, and keep it all your life, as a memo-
rial of this expedition.”

This was a very good plan, for Marco had
not shaved his shingle very thin. In fact, it was
of about equal thickness at the two ends. This,
though a very serious fault in a shingle, made
it much more suitable as a material for making
a box of.

Marco also amused himself for half an hour
in going down to the spring, where the farm-
er’s wife went to get water, and playing there.
There was a pleasant little path leading from
the house down to the spring. He went down
once alone, and brought up a pail half full of
water for the farmer’s wife, which seemed to
please her very much.

While he was doing these things, Forester
remained in the house, writing letters. He
brought up the table to the settle for this pur-
pose, and wrote there. Before Forester had
finished his last letter, however, Marco had got
124 Tne Forests or Maing.



Marco in power.



tired of all his amusements, and began to think
that they had better resume their journey.

“Very well,” said Forester ; “ whenever you
say the word.”

‘‘ How are you going?” asked Marco.

“IT have made a bargain with the farmer,”
said Forester, “to let us have his wagon to go
through the woods about twenty-five miles, and
Isaiah is going with us, in order to drive the
wagon back.”

Marco was much pleased with this arrange-
ment, and Forester asked him what time they
should start. ‘“ We are under your direction,
you know,” said he. “I said that I would stay
here as long as you wished.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “so you did ; and cousin
Forester, I wish you would let me have the di-
rection all day.”

«T have a great mind to do it,” said Forester.

“Do,” said Marco, “and see how well T’ll
manage.”

“ Well,” said Forester ; “I will give up the
command to you till I resume it again.”

Marco was quite pleased with his new powers.
He said they must take a hatchet and a bag of
provisions, for he meant to dine in the woods on
the way. Isaiah accordingly put a hatchet in
Tue Bivovae. 125

The wagon. Bad road, Difficulty.

the wagon. They also took some bread and
cheese, and some other articles of food, in a
bag; and also a tin dipper, to drink from.
When all was ready, Marco called Forester, and
they set off. Their trunk was put into the
wagon behind.

They went on very well for ten miles. The
road led through thick forests for a large part
of the way, and it was very stony and rough.
But the wilderness, and even the difficulties of
the way, interested Marco very much. He
thought that it was much pleasanter traveling
through those forest scenes, the wheels of the
wagon sometimes jolting over roots, stones, and
logs, and sometimes sinking in the mire, than
riding in a carriage, as he had often done with
his mother, over the smooth and broad avenues
leading into New York.

After they had gone about ten miles, they
were brought to a sudden stop by a tree, which
had been blown down, and had fallen directly
across the road.

“ What is to be done now ?” said Marco.

Nobody answered.

“What is to be done now, cousin Forester ?”
repeated Marco. .
126 Tue Forests or MatIne.



“Marco plans. Extrication.



“Tdon’t know,” said Forester. “ J’ve nothing
to do with it. You are commander.”

“Oh, very well,” said Marco. “Then [ll
decide what todo. We'll chop the tree off with
our hatchet.”

Marco bustled about with an air of great im-
portance, taking the hatchet from the back of
the wagon, and advancing toward the tree, as
if he expected to sunder it at a single blow.
He looked toward Isaiah, and, seeing a lurking
smile upon his countenance, he immediately
perceived how absurd was the idea of chopping
off such an enormous stem with a hatchet.

He accordingly turned suddenly about, say-
ing,

“No; we can’t cut it off with the hatchet.
It is too big ; or, rather, the hatchet is too little.
We'll see if we can’t find a way to get around
it.”

So Marco asked Forester to look on one side
of the road, while he and Isaiah examined the
other side. They found that, by cutting down
one or two small trees, they could get around
very well. So Marco directed to have these
trees cut down, and then they led the horse
around without much difficulty, excepting a
slight obstruction from the bushes.
Tue Bivovaec. 127



Dinner. Arrangements for dinner.

Marco was quite pleased with the successful
result of his management in this first serious
emergency. They rode on five miles farther,
and then Marco determined that it would be a
good plan to look out for a place for their din-
ner. He chose a place in a pleasant dell, over-
shadowed by tall pines and hemlocks, and wa-
tered by a brook which meandered through the
middle of it.

Marco directed Isaiah to drive the horse out
to one side of the road, at a place where there
was a pretty broad and level spot, which seemed
to Marco a convenient place for the horse to
stand. Marco told Forester that he and Isaiah
might go and employ themselves in finding a
good spot for them to make a fire, and in col-
lecting some dry wood, while he fastened the
horse. Isaiah accordingly took the axe, and
Marco was to bring the bag of provisions.

Marco drew the horse out of the road, and
brought his head up near to the stem of a little
tree, which was growing there, and fastened him
to it,—as he thought securely. He then took out
the bag, and made his way through the bushes,
in the direction in which Forester and Isaiah
had gone, down a little cow path, which de-
scended to the bank of the brook.
128 Tue Forests or Maine.
A bivouac. Roasting potatoes,

He found Forester and Isaiah very readily.
Forester was seated upon a flat stone near the
water, and Isaiah was gathering dry sticks for
a fire. It was a warm and pleasant day, and
they wanted a fire, not so much for its warmth,
as for the cheerful and pleasant aspect which it
gave to the place. There was a gentle breeze
blowing that day in the open ground. This
breeze was not felt among the trees, but it
caused a gentle draft of air, which carried all
the smoke away from them, and made their
seat, on the great flat stone, very pleasant.

“Have you fastened the horse ?” said For-
ester.

« Yes,” replied Marco.

“ You ought to fasten him pretty strong,” said
Isaiah, “ for he’s very apt to get away.”

“O, he won’t get away,” said Marco; “I
fastened him to a good stout tree.”

When the fire was burning well, Isaiah and
Marco buried some potatoes, which they had
brought with them, in the embers under it.
They also put some apples down to roast on a
flat stone, which they placed near the fire.

“T wish we had some Carolina potatoes,” said
Marco.
Tue Bivovac. 129

Sweet potatoes.

“ What kind of potatoes are they ?” asked
Isaiah.

“They are sweet. They would be excellent
to roast in the woods.”

“T never heard of a potato being sweet,” said
Isaiah.

“ Yes,” said Marco. “They have plenty of
them in New York.”

“Then why don’t they call them New York
potatoes ?” asked Isaiah.

“Why, I believe they came from Carolina
first,” said Marco. “ And now I want a long
stick for a toaster.”

So Marco cut a long stick, and, after he had
made the end sharp, he put a slice of bread upon
it, and placed it before the fire, and thus toasted
the bread. It is remarkable that the business
of cooking the food, which, in houses and cities,
is considered a disagreeable drudgery that is
to be kept as much as possible out of sight, is
always in the woods a very important part of
the entertainment, in which all the guests are
pleased to take a share.

1
130 Tue Forests or MAINE.

A gray squirrel. His retreat.

Cuarprer IX.
Trae EncaMpPMENT.

Oo” party of travelers remained. at. the
place of their bivouac more than an ‘hour.
At the end of that time, having eaten all that
they had cooked, they began to think of re-
suming their journey. Marco was sitting upon
the stone, wishing that he had put down one
more potato to roast, when suddenly he per-
ceived a large gray squirrel upon a log near
him. The squirrel ran along the log, and Mar-
co immediately rose and went in pursuit of
him.

The squirrel ascended a tree, running up the
stem. Then he glided along one of the branches
till he came to the end of it, when he leaped
through the air and caught the end of another
branch, which was growing from another tree.
This branch, which was very slender, bent
down half-way to the ground under the squir-
rel’s weight. Bunny ran up the branch, how-
ever, as easily as if it had remained level. Thus
he went along from tree to tree, following, gener-
Tue ENCAMPMENT. 131

Horse and wagon gone. Isaiah gone.

ally, the direction of the path by which Marco
had descended in coming from the wagon.

At length he emerged from the wood, just at
the point where Marco had fastened the horse.
But all farther pursuit of him, on the part of
Marco, was suddenly arrested by the astound-
ing fact, which here burst suddenly upon Mar-
co, that the horse and wagon were gone. Marco
looked all about, this way and that, to assure
bimself. that it was the very same place where
he had fastened the horse. There could be no
doubt of it. There was the very tree to which
he had tied him, and the marks of the horse’s
feet, near it, upon the ground.

Marco was in consternation. He looked all
around, and then ran into the road and looked
both ways, but no signs of the horse were to be
seen. He then hurried back to the head of the
path which led up from their encampment, and
called out in a loud voice,

. “Cousin Forester! Isaiah! cousin Forester!
our horse has got away.”

Isaiah sprang from his seat and ran, quicker
than the squirrel had done, up the path. As he
came out to the:place where Marco was stand-
ing, Marco began to say, “ There’s where I tied
him. I fastened him strong to that tree.” But
132 Tus Forests or Maine.

Forester comes.

Isaiah paid no attention to what Marco said,
but ran directly to the road. He did not stop
to look both ways, but taking the road which
led toward his home, he ran along as fast as he
could go. Marco followed him as far as into
the road, and looked after him as long as he
could see him. Isaiah was, however, soon out
of sight, and Marco went back to find Forester.
Forester was coming up the path very leisurely,
bringing the bag, with the remaining provisions
in it,in his hand, and the hatchet on his shoulder.

The pathway was pretty steep, though the
rocks lay in strata in it, in such a manner as to
form a species of steps. Forester advanced up
these steps in a slow and deliberate manner.

This was owing partly to-the fact that the
steps were steep, and the bag and hatchet
heavy to carry,—and partly because Forester
was not much alarmed at Marco’s outcries.

In fact Forester always took such things very
coolly. He had observed that when any unex-
pected emergency occurred, it was not generally
best to act on any sudden impulses which might
arise in the mind, but to take time to consider
what it would be best to do. On such occa-
sions, therefore, he usually appeared quite calm
and composed. ,
Tae ENcAMPMENT. 133

Marco’s perplexity.



HORSE LOST,

“Well, cousin Forester,” said Marco, “we
are in a fine condition. Our horse and wagon
have run away, and now Isaiah has_run away
too.”

“TI think Isaiah will come back pretty soon,”
said Forester. “As to the horse and wagon,
that is more doubtful.”

“ And then what shall we do ?” asked Marco.

“JT don’t know,” said Forester. “We are
ten miles from any house in one direction, and
134 Tue Forests or Maine.
Isaiah returns, Sensible horse.

fifteen in another. But I’m not commander.
It’s nothing to me. I’ve only to obey orders.
Pll do whatever you say.”

“ Yes, but I should think that you might ad-
vise me,” said Marco. “Generals get advice
from their captains and colonels in battle.”

“Oh yes,” said Forester ; “I'll advise you. I
think we had better wait first till Isaiah comes
back. Perhaps he’ll find the horse.”

They waited about fifteen minutes, and then
Isaiah came back. But he had no horse. He
said he went on until he reached the top of a
hill where he could see the road for a long dis-
tance before him, but that the horse was not to
be seen.

“ He'll get home before I should overtake
him,” said Isaiah.

“Yes,” said Marco, “unless he stopped
where the tree fell across the road.”

“ True,” said Isaiah ; ‘perhaps he has stop-
ped there.”

“Or would not he find his way round the tree
through the woods ?”’ asked Marco.

“TI don’t know,” said Isaiah; “perhaps he
would.”

“Is he a pretty sensible horse ?” asked Marco.

“Yes,” replied Isaiah; “we have to keep
THe ENcAMPMENT. 135
A quandary. The trunk.

the granary door locked, or else he will open
the latch with his teeth, and go in and get the
corn.” ,

“Then,” said Marco, “I’ve no doubt that he .
will find his way around the tree and go home ;
and so we've got nothing to do but to walk back
fifteen miles.”

“ Or forward ten,” said Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco; “we can go on, to be
sure, if we only knew the way.”

Here followed a long discussion as to what
it was best to do. Marco thought that, if there
was any probability that the horse would have
stopped at the tree, it would be better for him
to go back and get him; but that, if he had got
by the tree, and had gone home, it would be
better for Isaiah to go back and get him, while
they went forward to the end of the day’s jour-
ney. He said that the trunk might be sent on.

Forester was himself very much at a loss to
know what it was best todo. As it was far-
ther to go back than it was to go forward, it
would be plainly best for them to keep on, were
it not for the difficulty of finding their way.
But Isaiah told them he thought they would not
have any difficulty on that account, as there
were very few roads in such a new country.
136 Tue Forests of Maine.

Plan decided upon. The hatchet. The solitary forest,

He said that, if they kept the principal road,
they could get along without any trouble.

So Marco and Forester concluded to go on,
while Isaiah returned. Isaiah said that he was
not afraid to return alone. He said also, that,
if he found the horse at the tree, he would turn
about and come and overtake them. And if he
did not find him there, he would walk on home,
and come the next day with their trunk.

Marco and Forester then went back to the
place where they had dined, and collected to-
gether all the food which had been left, think-
ing that they might possibly have occasion to
use it, before getting to the end of their jour-
ney. They also took the hatchet with them,
and bidding Isaiah good-bye, they set forth upon
their solitary journey.

The road, though rough and narrow for
wheels, was yery good for a foot-path, and the
travelers went on for several miles without dif-
ficulty, and with good courage. There was an
unbroken forest on each side of the way, with
here and there a solitary bird in the topmost
branches, singing in melancholy notes, which
echoed far and wide under the endless colon-
nades of trees. After they had gone on about
four miles, they met a man coming with a team,
Tae ENCAMPMENT. _ 18%

Short days. A puzzi



who told them that there was no road of any
consequence to turn them off, and that they
would, therefore, probably find their way with-
out much trouble. They were quite pleased to
hear this. In fact, it was some relief to them
to know that they were right, so far.

Marco was, however, not much accustomed
to walk, and Forester, to accommodate him,
advanced slowly. When they had gone about
five or six miles, the shades of evening began
to draw on. The days were getting shorter
at this season of the year, and then, besides, it
happened that, on this evening, there were some
dark clouds in the west, and the sun was sha-
ded by these clouds before the regular hour of his
going down. Then, besides, the trees’ of the
forest made it much darker in the road in which
Marco and Forester were traveling, than it
would have been in the open ground.

Now, just as it was thus beginning to grow
dark, they happened to come to a place where
the road divided, and Marco and Forester were
both puzzled to decide which was the one which
they must take. The roads seemed to be near-
ly equally traveled, though it was so dark that
they could not see very well. They examined
both as carefully as they could, and finally de-
138 Tae Forests or Marine.

“They goon, A pond ora Fiver.

cided according to the best of their judgment,
and went on.

They had some doubt whether they were
right, and Forester thought, as they proceeded,
that the road appeared somewhat different from
the one in which they had been traveling.
However, they thought it best to go on. After
advancing about two miles, in a very circuitous
direction, they came at last to a place where
several trees seemed to have been cut away,
and there were remains of several low huts.
Marco was very much interested in this discov-
ery, and he wanted to examine the huts very
particularly. But Forester, when he found that
they were not inhabited, thought it best to lose
no time, especially as it was now beginning to
be quite dark, and he urged Marco to leave the
huts and press on.

They went on for half a mile farther, when
Marco, seeing a glimmer through the trees, ex-
claimed that they were coming to some water.

“So it is,’ said Forester. “It looks like a
pond or ariver. If it isa river, we have lost
our way.”

They walked on a short distance farther, and
then they began to hear the rippling of the water.
In a few minutes, they were upon the bank of
Tue ENCAMPMENT. 139

Ead of the road. Great perplexity. The huts.

the stream. It seemed to bea small river, flow-
ing rapidly along, between banks overhung with
bushes. Marco looked for a bridge, or for some
place to cross, but they found none. In fact,
the road did not go down to the water, but
seemed to lose itself among the trees, before
reaching the bank.

“ This is not our road,” said Forester. “We
must go back.”

“What road can this be?” asked Marco.
“Tt seems to lead nowhere.”

“T presume it is a logging road,” replied For-
ester.

“ What do you mean by that ?” asked Marco.

“Why, I suppose that those huts must have
been a logging camp, where the men lived in
the winter, when they came here to cut logs ;
and this is the road that they drew the logs by,
down to the water. But this summer it has been
neglected. They don’t cut the logs in the
summer.”

“ And what shall we do ?” asked Marco.

“ We must go back to the place where the
road branched off,” replied Forester.

“Or else go and stay in the huts all night,”
said Marco.
140 Tue Forests or Maine.

Torches. Examination of the huts.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “ we can do that.
Let us go back and see.”

They accordingly went back to the huts.
Marco asked Forester whether he thought they
had better stay there.

“I don’t know,” said Forester. “Let us
strike a light, and see how the huts look.”

Marco took out his match-box, and, after first
gathering a few dry sticks, he struck a light,
and soon made a little fire. They found a birch-
tree growing near, and they stripped off some
pieces of the bark. These they laid upon the
fire, holding the ends of two long sticks upon
them, in such a manner, that, as the pieces of
birch bark curled up under the influence of the
heat, they curled around the ends of these sticks,
thus making flambeaux. These flambeaux,
though of rude construction, gave a very excel-
lent light, and Marco and Forester walked
about the huts, waving them in the air, and il-
luminating the whole scene in a very brilliant
manner.

On examination, the structures proved to be
booths rather than huts. They had been made
by setting large crotched stakes into the ground
and then placing poles across from one to the
other at the top, and covering the whole with
THe ENCAMPMENT 141

Encampment.

branches of trees. They were very low, having
been made apparently only for places of shelter:
to lie down under and sleep. There was a very
large and beautiful elm-tree growing up just
behind the-huts, and hanging over them.

wt

eer



- THE Huts. 7

“Do you suppose that this was a logging
camp ?” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester. “These huts are not
large enough for that. They were made prob-
142 Tue Forests or Maine.

Encamping for the night.

ably by some persons who only camped out
here one night.”

“ There must have been three of them,” said
Marco, “ for there are three huts.”

“Yes,” replied Forester, “at least three.
And now we must be very careful not to touch’
the huts with our flambeaux,” he continued,
“for the branches are very dry, and the huts
will burn like hay-stacks.”

Forester accordingly approached the huts very
cautiously, followed by Marco. They found, on
careful examination, that they were in a ruin-
ous state. Only one of them had its roof entire,
and that, having been originally made of hem-
lock branches, which had now become entirely
dry by long exposure to the sun, formed but a
very imperfect protection for a dwelling. This
covered hut was only a sort of booth, being en-
tirely open on one side. Forester said that he
recollected having heard of such huts, and that
the men built their fire, not in them, but on the
ground epposite the open side.

Forester and Marco concluded to remain in
this hut for the night. They got together a
great many hemlock branches, which they
spread in the bottom of it for a bed, and they
Tae ENCAMPMENT. 143
A spark. Fire! Fire!

built a fire opposite the open part, to keep them
warm.

Marco took a great interest in this fire. He
piled the dry sticks upon it until he had a very
warm and cheerful blaze, and then he collected
by the side of it a heap of fuel, to use during
the night.

In fact, Marco raised his fire too high; for,

from the column of smoke and sparks, one little
brilliant fragment lighted upon their roof; and
it was slowly burning and smoking there, while
Forester and Marco were opening their bag of
provisions, to see what they could make out for
supper.
' Marco was counting out the potatoes, say-
ing, “ Two for you, and two for me,” when his
attention was arrested by a spark which, at that
instant, fell into his lap. He looked up to see
where it came from, and saw that the fire
which had spread from the original spark which
had fallen upon the roof, had burned a hole
through, and the air, which was drawn up
through the opening, was at that moment fan-
ning it into a flame.

Marco ran out, calling out, “ Get some water!
Get some water!”

There was plenty of water in a brook, which
144 Tue Forests or Maine.
A conflagration. New camp.

flowed with a murmuring sound down a little
glen behind the huts, but there were no buckets,
and Marco called in vain. It would have been
equally useless to have raised an alarm of fire,
as there was nobody within many miles to hear
the cry. The flames spread rapidly, and For-
ester and Marco soon saw that there was noth-
ing to be done but for them to stand quietly
by and witness the conflagration. The flames
rose very high and raged fiercely, and the light
shone far into the forest, bringing into distinct
view the whole scene around, which had before
been involved in deep obscurity. The roof of
the hut was soon consumed, but the poles by.
which it had been supported were much longer
in burning. The fire made by these poles, when
they fell in together upon the bed which Fores-
ter and Marco had prepared, was so intensely
hot that it could not be approached for a long
time.

As soon as the intensity of this fire had a
little declined, Forester said that they must go
to work and build themselves another hut.

They found two young trees, growing pretty
near each other, which had branches about six
feet from the ground, so situated that they could
place a strong pole across from one tree to the
Tue ENCAMPMENT. 145
Arrangements,

other, resting the ends upon the branches.
This, Marco called the ridge-pole. They then
cut other poles, which they placed with the end
on one side upon the, ground, and the other ends
upon the ridge-pole. These were rafters, and
upon the rafters they placed a great many
branches of hemlock, which formed a roof.
This roof, however, was only upon one side.
The other side of the hut was open, and they
built a fire opposite this opening, feeling safe in
regard to their roof, as it was made of green
branches.

This work occupied them an hour. At the
end of that time, they put their potatoes into
the fire to roast, and then lay down upon the
hemlock beds which they made, to rest them-
selves a little while, till the potatoes should be
done. Wearied with their long walk and the
labors of the evening, they fell asleep, and did
not wake again till four o’clock the next morn-
ing.

K
146 Tue Forests oF MAINE.

Roasting potatoes. Potatoes burned.



CHAPTER X.
Lost in THE Woops.

HEN Marco awoke, he at first supposed

that he had been asleep about an hour,

and he was surprised to see how much the fire

had burned down in that time. He crept to-

ward it, and began to put the brands together,

when suddenly he recollected the potatoes. So

he began to feel for them in the ashes, by means

of a long stick, which they had obtained for a

poker. The potatoes were all burnt to a
cinder.

Marco then awoke Forester, saying,

“Cousin Forester! cousin Forester! wake
up. The fire has gone out, and our potatoes
are all burnt up.”

Forester awoke, and, after looking at the fire,
and at the charred and blackened remains of
the potatoes a moment, he took out his watch,
and said,

“ Why, Marco, it is four o’clock. It is almost
morning.”

“Ts it?” said Marco. “Then we have not
Lost in THE Woops, 147

Consultations. Small supplies. Money.

got much more time to sleep. Let us build up
a good fire, and then lie down again.”

“ Yes,” replied Forester. ‘“ We must keep
up a good fire, or we shall take cold, it is such
a cool night. It looks as if it were going to
rain.”

“What shall we do in that case?” asked
Marco.

“I don’t know,” replied Forester. “It would
be rather a hard case for us.”

“We could stay here, I suppose,” said Marco.
“T don’t think the rain would come through our
roof.” :

“No,” said Forester, “not much. But then
we have nothing to eat.”

“Could not we get any thing to eat about
here ?” asked Marco..

“Not very well,” replied Forester. “We
have got money enough, but this is a case where
money does not seem to be of any use.”

“How do the men who come here in the
winter to cut down the trees, get any thing to
eat ?” asked Marco.

“O, they bring it all with them,” said Fores-
ter. “The roads are better, in the winter, for
sleds and sleighs, than they are now for wheels;
for then all the stumps and roughnesses aré
148 Tae Forests or Maine.

Forester’s rule. The burning logs.



covered up with the snow. So, wherever there
is a camp, there is a road leading to it, and
sleigh-loads of provisions are brought up for the
men, from time to time, all the winter.”

“T wish one would come now,” said Marco,
“to us.”

“I wish so too,” said Forester. But it is of
no use to wish, and so we may as well liedown
and go to sleep again.”

“ But, Forester,” said Marco, “I don’t see
what we are going to do if it rains.”

“ Nor do I,” said Forester. ‘“ But this is not
the time for forming a plan. This is the time
for going to sleep. I make it a rule, in all per-
plexities and troubles, when there is nothing to
be done immediately in order to get out of
them, to lie down and go to sleep.”

Marco said no more, and Forester was soon
asleep again. Marco himself felt so much con-
cern about his situation that he could not go to
sleep for some time. He lay watching the
flames, which were creeping slowly around the
logs which he and Forester had put upon the
fire ; for, while they had been holding the con-
versation above described, they had been em-
ployed in replenishing the fire.

Marco heard a sound, which, at first, he
Lost 1n tHE Woops. 149
Rain tst—<“ thought was a bear. He was on the point of
awakening Forester, but, after listening a little
longer, he concluded that it was only the roar-
ing of the wind upon the tops of the trees.
After lifting his head from his pillow of hemlock
branches for a moment, until he satisfied himself
that it was no wild beast, he lay down again
and went to sleep.

He was awakened again, about three hours
~ afterward, by a long rumbling clap of thunder.

“ What is that ?” said Forester. “Thunder ?”

“T believe it is,” said Marco.

' * And it rains, I believe,” said Forester.

Marco raised his head, and looked out
through the open part of the hut. He saw the
drops of rain descending, and he heard the mur-
muring sound which the rain makes when fall-
ing upon the leaves in a forest. He saw, too,
that every thing was wet in the opening about
the hut, although it seemed dry in the forest
beyond, where the drops of rain had been in-
tercepted by the leaves of the trees.

“We must get our wood under cover,” said
Marco, “or it will get wet and won’t burn, and
then our fire will go out.”

“True,” said Forester. “There is room for


150 Tue Forests or Maine.

The bag. Short allowance, ’

some of it in this hut. Let us get up and put
it in.”

. So Marco and Forester arose, and, as they
were already dressed, they were soon at work,
putting the logs into the hut. Marco then pro-
posed that they should go into the forest, where
it did not rain, and get some more wood. But
Forester said he thought that would be of no
service, as they had no provisions, and, of
course, could not stay there. “We must go,”
. said he, “at any rate, whether it rains or not;
for it is better to get wet than to starve.”

* We have got something left in our bag,”
said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “just enough for
breakfast.”

. “ How I wish I had a bushel of potatoes,” said
Marco. “Then we could stay here a week.
Only we should want a little salt too.”

Forester opened the bag and took out the
provisions which were left. They found about
enough for a breakfast for them, but they con-
cluded to eat but half of their supply, as Fores-
ter thought it was best that they should put
themselves upon short allowance.

“ You see, it is possible,” said Forester, “that
we may be kept here in the woods a day or
Lost 1n THE Woops. 151

Another hut. Circumference and diameter,

two; so we must use our provisions economi-
cally.”

After breakfast, they went into the forest a
little way, where they found that they were
protected from the rain by the trees. This
proved, as Forester said, that it had not been
raining very long; and he thought, from ap-
pearances, that it would soon clear up.

At a little distance from their encampment,
they found another hut, which was in better
condition than either of those which they had
seen before. It was covered with strips of
birch bark, which made a very good roof for it.
Some of these strips, or rather sheets, for they
were quite large, had fallen down, and Marco
ran and got one of them, exclaiming,

“What a monstrous sheet of birch bark !”

This sheet, which Marco lifted up from the
ground where it was lying, was about four feet
long and two feet wide. Marco wondered that
so large a sheet could be got from any tree.

“ What a monstrous tree it must have been!”
said he to Forester.

“No,” said Forester, “not very large. This
sheet is about four feet long, which would make
the tree only about sixteen inches in diameter.”

“ How do you prove that ?” asked Marco.
152 Tue Forests or MAINE.

Shawls.

“ Why, the distance through a tree is about
one third the distance round it,” replied Fores-
ter. “Now, this bark grew around the tree,
and it is about four feet long. Four feet is
forty-eight inches, and one third of forty-eight
is sixteen. Now, sixteen inches in diameter
would not be a very large tree.”

“TI mean to try this bark on some of these
trees,” said Marco, “to see how big a tree it
wall fit.”

So Marco took up the sheet of bark. It was
white and clean, especially on the outside, hav-
ing been blanched by the summer rains. Mar-
co, in order to carry the sheet more easily, put
it upon his shoulders, drawing it up around his
neck like a shawl.

“Cousin Forester,” said he, “see my shawl.
It would do for an umbrella, if I only had a
handle.” .

So saying, Marco drew the sheet of bark up
higher, holding it in such a manner that it cov-
ered his cap, rising into a point above his head.
He held it in such a manner. as to leave a little
crevice open in front, to peep through, in order
that he might see where he was going.

“See, Forester,” said he,—“see my um-
brella,”
Lost in THE Woops. 153

Novel protection from the rain.

Forester looked at Marco’s contrivance, and
he immediately thought that such a sheet would
be an important protection to the head and
neck, in case they had to walk in the rain. He
accordingly went to the hut and selected a sheet
for himself, saying,

“ This is not a bad plan. The most impor-
tant point, when one is out in the rain, is to
protect the head and neck, and this will do it
pretty well. We can roll the sheets up and
carry them under our arms, unless it rains fast,
and then we can wrap them around us.”

Having thus found a rude substitute for an
umbrella, Forester thought that it would be best
for them to set out on their journey. They ac-
cordingly returned to their encampment, and
made preparations for resuming their march.
As it was raining but very little at that time,
they rolled up their umbrellas and carried them
under their arms. Marco took the hatchet, and
Forester the bag of provisions. Marco pro-
posed to set fire to the hut which had sheltered
them for the night. He wished Forester to
hear whaf*a loud crackling the green hemlock
branches, which they had put upon the roof,
would make, when the flames from the wood
below should envelop them.
154 Tue Forests or Maine.
Hut reserved. Lumber-men.

But Forester would not consent to this. He
said that some accident might possibly happen,
by which they should be obliged to come back
and spend another night there, though he hoped
such a measure would not be necessary.

“T hope so, too,” said Marco.

“We may, perhaps, lose our way again,”
said Forester.

“ But then,” said Marco, “ we shall not come
back to this place.”

“Why, I have heard,” said Forester, “of
people losing their way in the woods, and, after
a great deal of wandering, getting back to the
place they started from. So that, possibly, we
may wander about all day, and get back here
at night.”

“TT hope not, I’m sure,” said Marco. “I am
tired of this old hovel.”

“Why, the lumber-men stay in these places
all winter,” said Forester.

“ Yes,” replied Marco, “ but then they know
that they can get out whenever they please.
We don’t know that we can ever get out.”

“ That is true,” said Forester, “ anf it makes
a great difference. And besides,” he contin-
ued, “ they make themselves quite comfortable
houses I am told.”
Lost 1n tHe Woops. 155



Camps. Anxiety useless. Great rain.

“What do they make them of?” asked
Marco.

“Oflogs, I believe,” said Forester, “and
sometimes they cover them with a regular
roof.”

“I should like to see one of their houses,”
said Marco. “ But cousin Forester, don’t you
begin to feel concerned about our finding our
way out of these woods ?”

“No,” said Forester. “I make it a rule never
to be concerned about any thing.”

“Oh, Forester!” said Marco,—*I think we
ought to be concerned, when we get lost in the
woods.”

“No,” replied Forester. ‘We ought to do
the best we can to get oft, but not to be con-
cernéd.. To be concerned is to be anxious and
unhappy. This does no good. Being con-
cerned would never help us find our way out
of the woods.”

Thus talking, the two unfortunate travelers
walked on, with their rolls under their arms.
It was well that they took these rolls, for after
they had een walking about half an hour, the
sky grew dark, and, a short time afterward,
the rain began to come down in torrents. For-
ester and Marco unrolled their umbrellas, and
156 Tae Forests or Marne.



“Plans. Rain over.



wrapped them about their shoulders and heads;
and, at the same time, they fled for shelter un-
der an enormous pine-tree which grew in such
a spot that its branches extended in every di-
rection, and formed a canopy above them, which
kept off a great deal of the rain. When the
rain abated a little, they walked on.

Their plan was to get back to the place
where they had left the main road the day be-
fore. But they were somewhat perplexed to
find it. In fact, they met with several roads
which branched off from the one in which they
were walking. These were old tracks, made
by the lumber-men, and were partly grown up
to bushes. They wandered about among these
paths for some time, and at last, to their great
joy, they came out into a good beaten road,
which Forester immediately thought was the
one which they had been traveling in the day be-
fore. Notwithstanding Forester’s philosophical
resolution, never to be concerned, he could not
help confessing that he felt somewhat relieved
to find the right road again; and, as the sun
was just breaking through the clouds at this
time, they both thought that their prospects
were brightening considerably.

In fact, the sunshine, and the feeling that he
Lost in THE Woobs. 157

Marco's spirits revive. Conversation.

and Forester were now in the right road again,
produced such an effect upon Marco’s spirits
that he began to hike rambling there in the
woods, and to think that he should be rather
sorry to see a dwelling-house come into view,
since that, as he imagined, would bring their
adventures to an end.

“Cousin Forester,” said he, “I only wish
that we had a good stock of provisions, and
then I should not care if we had to camp out
again to-night.”

“J would rather sleep in a bed,” said For-
ester, “and have a good warm breakfast in the
morning.”

“If we only had a kettle we could make some
coffee ourselves, in our camp,” said Marco.

“And then if we only had a cow we could
have some milk to put in it,” added Forester.

“Oh yes,” said Marco. “I forgot about the
milk.”

After walking on a few steps farther, Marco
said,

“IT am going to throw away my umbrella.
I don’t believe it is worth while to carry it any
longer. The sun is shining.”

“It may rain again, by and by,” said Forester.

“ Well,” said Marco, “if it does we can make
158 ‘Tue Forests or Maine.
‘Rollsthrownaway. = ~~—~—~—~—~—~«Second-encamping,
another little camp. I like to make camps. 1
think it is good fun.”’

So they concluded to throw their rolls of
birch bark away.

It proved, however, in the end, that the rain
was not fully over. Although the sun came
out, the sky continued full of broken clouds; |
and at last an immense mass of black heavy
vapor seemed rising in the west, portending, as
Forester said, a great shower. Marco was glad
rather than sorry for this, and proposed imme-
diately that they should go to work at once and
make a hut for a shelter.

“Well,” said Fo-

rester, “I will make

ee the hut, and you

re may build the fire.”

> So Marco went

*& to work to build
‘ the fire, at a place
which was pointed
4 out to him by, For-
4 ester while Fores-
ter himself built the
hut. As all that
af == was necessary was
THE ENCAMPING. to pile up a dense


Lost In THE Woops. 159

Safe from the shower.

mass of branches against a pole placed across
two crotched stakes, the work was soon done,
and Forester and Marco were both well shel-
tered in the hut, before it began to rain. The
shower came on at length, but the roof which
they had made protected them from it very
perfectly.

Marco and Forester remained at this encamp-
ment for an hour or more, and got well rested
from the walk which they had taken. They
also ate a luncheon there. At the end of about
an hour, the sun came out again, and so they
resumed their journey.
160 Tue Forests or Maing.

Old road. . ‘Raspberries.

Cuarter XI.
Tue Suinete WEAVER’S.

me travelers walked on with fresh strength

and courage, after the luncheon, and the
rest which they had enjoyed at their last en-
campment. The road, was, however, monot-
onous, being, for most of the way, through a
dense forest ; and it was so very similar to the
road by which they had come the day before,
that they were convinced they were now right.

They went on, without any special adven-
ture, for nearly two hours, when they arrived
at what had the appearance of being an old
wood road, which branched off at right angles
to the one in which they were traveling. The
trees were somewhat more open here. This
admitted the sun; and there were several rasp-
berry bushes growing at the entrance of the
wood road, with ripe raspberries hanging upon
them, for the season of raspberries had now ar-
rived.

Marco seized this fruit with great avidity.
Forester followed his example, and began gath-
Tue Ssinatre WEAVER’S. 161
Another camp. . Shingle-making.

ering the berries. The bushes were, however,
not entirely dry, and they had to advance cau-
tiously among them. In fact, they soon found
it better to keep along the wood road, gathering
the berries as they advanced ; they thus avoid-
ed getting wet by the bushes. It was not a
road, strictly speaking, for there were no marks
of wheels upon it, or tracks of any sort, made
by traveling. It was only a space for a road,
made by cutting away the trees and clearing
the land.

Along this opening, Forester and Marco
slowly advanced, eating the raspberries which
grew by the side of the way. After going on
for a few rods in this manner, Marco suddenly
exclaimed,

“ Why, here is another camp p

Forester looked up and saw, just before them,
the remains of a sort of hut, somewhat similar
to those which they had seen the evening before.
There was a large heap of chips and shavings
about it.

“What can this be ?” asked Marco.

“T presume,” said Forester, “that it is an old
shingle-weaver’s establishment.”

“ What is a shingle-weaver ?” asked Marco.

“ A man who makes shingles,” replied Fores-

L
162 Tue Forests or Maine.



Pine. . A souvenir.

ter, “such as they use for covering houses.
They make them of clear straight-grained pine,
which will split easily and true.”

. So saying, Forester advanced toward the hut,
and took up one of the pieces of pine which had
been split out for ashingle. There were several
such pieces lying about among the chips and
shavings. The piece of pine was somewhat
browned by exposure to the weather, but it had
a very smooth. and glossy appearance, shining
with a sort of silken luster.

“ This is a beautiful piece of pine,’ ’ said For-
ester.

“Let us carry some of it home,” rejoined
Marco.

“ What good would it do us ?” asked Forester.

“Why, we might make something of it,”
said Marco. “Perhaps I could make a little
box.”

“ And that would serve as a souvenir of this
expedition,” added Forester.

“ A souvenir ?” said Marco,—“ what is that ?”

“Why, something to remember it by,” re-
plied Forester. “Hereafter, whenever you
should see the box, you would be reminded of
our wanderings and perils in this wilderness.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “let us take it.”
Tur Suinetre Weaver's. 163
Wagon coming. The fallen horse.

The farther conversation of our adventurers
was interrupted by a sound, like that of wagon
wheels, coming along the main road, which they
had just left.

“There comes some traveler,” exclaimed
Forester. “ Let us go and inquire about our
way.”

“ Hark !” said Marco.

At this instant, the sound of the wheels sud-
denly stopped, and Marco and Forester heard
the voice of a man calling out earnestly to his
horse, “ Whoa! whoa!” as if something had
happened. Marco and Forester hastened to the
spot, where they found that the horse had fallen
down, and the man was trying in vain to get
him up. The harness was drawn so tight about
the horse’s limbs, by the constrained position in
which he was lying, that he could not get up,
and the man could not extricate him. The man
had gone behind and had drawn the wagon
back, so as to loosen the pressure of the harness
upon the horse, but, until Forester and Marco
came, there was no one to unbuckle the straps
when they were thus loosened ; and, if the man
let go of the wagon to go and unbuckle the har-
ness, it was drawn forward again at once by the
164 Tue Forests or Maing.

Help for the traveler.

tension of the straps, and made as tight as be-
fore.

The unfortunate traveler was, therefore, very

‘glad to see Forester and Marco coming. He
asked them to come and help him.

Forester and Marco were immediately going
to attempt to unbuckle the harness, but the man
told them that there was danger of their getting
kicked by the horse, in case he should suddenly
begin to struggle.

“Come here,” said the man, “and hold the
wagon back, and I will loosen the harness.”

By means of this plan of operations, the horse
was soon liberated from his confinement, and
he got up. The man seemed very thankful to
Forester and Marco, and he asked them where
they were going.

“We are going to Number Three,” said
Forester. “Is this the right way ?”

The townships in a new country are num-
bered at first, not named. The place to which
Marco and Forester were going had yet very
few inhabitants, and it had no name but Num-
ber Three.

“Yes,” replied the man, “this is the right
road. I wish I were going that way, I would
take you along in my wagon.”
Toe SuinepE WEAVER’sS. 165

Marco puzzled. A purchase made.



This answer puzzled Marco a little, on two
accounts. First, the man was going the same
way with them, but then Marco thought that,
perhaps, he was going to turn off, pretty soon,
into some other road. Then, secondly, he did
not see how the man could possibly carry him
and Forester, in any event, as the wagon
seemed completely filled with bags, and kegs,
and firkins, leaving scarcely room for the man
himself to sit.,

Forester told the man that they could walk
very well; but he said that they were hungry,
and if the man had any thing to eat, in his
wagon, they should be glad to buy something
of him. .

« Yes,” replied the man, “I’ve a loaf of bread
that I can spare, and a jug of milk.”

“ That will be just the thing,” said Marco.

At first, the man was not willing to receive
any thing for the bread and milk, but as Fores-
ter insisted upon it, he consented to take a little
pay. He then told Forester that he had some
honey in his wagon, and a few apples, and For-
ester bought a supply of these. At first, they
thought they should not have any thing to put
the honey in, but Marco ran to the shingle-
weaver’s hut, and got one of the thin pieces
166 Tae Forests or Maine.

Good dinner in the woods.

which had been split out for shingles, and it
made a very good plate. Forester bought a
pound of the honey, and half a dozen apples.

They then bade the man good-bye, and he
resumed his journey. Forester and Marco
went back to the hut, where they had a most
excellent dinner. They built a fire, and roasted
the apples and toasted the bread. They cut.
the bread into slices with Marco’s knife. They
made wooden spoons for the honey out of pieces
of pine, which answered very well indeed.
Marco said it was the very best dinner he ever
ate in his life.

After dinner, they returned to the main road,
and resumed their walk. Forester said he
wished he had asked the man how far it was to
Number Three, but he thought it could not be
very far, as they had been traveling several
hours, and it was only about ten miles in the
morning.

As he was saying this, they were just ascend
ing a hill, and when they reached the top of it,
they had a prospect of the road for a consider-
able distance before them. Marco thought that
he saw something coming, and he asked For-
ester what it was.
Toe Suinere WeEAvER’s. 167
Another wagon. A surprise.

“T think it is only a stump, or something like
that,” said Forester.

“No, it moves,” said Marco.

“It is another wagon,” said Forester, “1
really believe. Now we can find out how far it
is to Number Three.”

It was very soon quite evident that the ob-
ject which had attracted their attention was
really a wagon, and that it was coming on apace.
As it drew nearer, it appeared that there was a
boy in it.

“He is just about as big as Isaiah, ” said
Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester. “ And the horse looks
very much like the horse that Isaiah had.”

“T verily believe it is Isaiah,” said Marco.

This supposition was confirmed as the wagon
drew near. The boy was Isaiah, but he stared
at Marco and Forester with a look of perplexity
and wonder, as if he was very much surprised
to see them.

“ Tsaiah !” said Marco, accosting him, as soon
as Isaiah drew up the reins and stopped the
horse opposite to them.

“What are you coming back for?” asked
Isaiah.
168 Tue Forests or Maine.

“Number Three. A quesiton.

“Coming back!” repeated Forester, not
knowing exactly what Isaiah meant.

“Yes,” said Isaiah. “I thought you were
going to stay at Number Three, and I was going
to carry your trunk there.”

It immediately flashed upon Forester’s mind
that they had got turned about in their wander-
ings, and, instead of going on toward Number
Three, as they supposed, they were in reality,
though in the right road, going the wrong way
in it.

Forester had a hearty laugh at this discovery, -
in which Marco joined, as soon as he fairly un-
derstood the case. At first, he was very much
perplexed. He could not believe that they
could have got their ideas of direction so com-
pletely reversed.

“ Besides,” said he, “that man told us that
we were in the right way.”

“ Yes,” said Forester, “but he did not tell us
that we were going right in it.”

“I suppose he did not know which way we
were going,” said Marco.

The question then arose, what was to be
done. Forester proposed that they should get
into the wagon and let Isaiah drive them to
Number Three, but Marco said that he was com-
Tue SHinete Weaver's. ‘169

They go back with Isaiah.

mander, and he was not going to try to get to
Number Three any more. He said that he liked
those woods very well, but that he had been
traveling back and forth through them now long
enough.

Forester laughed and submitted to the de- .
cision ; so they all returned to Isaiah’s father’s.
170 Tue Forests or Maine.

Going to Quebec. Plan.

Cuaprer XII.
A Voyage on a Pownp.

le next morning Forester and Marco

formed a different plan for pursuing their
journey. They wished to get to the Quebec
road now, as soon as possible, and they found,
by inquiry, that, by taking a boat upon a large
pond or lake, a few miles distant, they could go
about twenty miles by water, through a chain
of ponds, which led in the direction in which
they wished to go.

So Forester hired a man to go with them and
bring back the boat. They went, in a wagon,
to a place very near the landing, at the pond.
The landing was in a small cove, surrounded
by forests. The cove opened out into the pond
‘by two points of land, rocky and precipitous,
and crowned withevergreen trees. The water
was smooth, and the whole scene highly pic-
turesque. When Marco came in sight of it, he
was much pleased with the prospect of a voyage
on such a sheet of water.

There was considerable water in the boat
A Voyager on a Ponp. 171

The pond. Water in the boat. Scene at the landing.
ee

when the party arrived on the beach, and For-
ester undertook to bail it out. The man who
was going with them went and cut a bush, with
a thick top, to use as a sail, in case there should
be a fair wind. While he was bringing the
bush, and Forester was bailing out the boat,
Marco stood upon the beach, looking at the
paddles.

“Does she leak, cousin Forester ?” asked
Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “I presume not. - This
water has all come from the rain.” —

“I’m glad to hear that,” said Marco, “for I
don’t want to go to sea in a leaky ship.”

There was a great basket of provisions on the
beach, by the side of Marco, while these prepa-
rations were making, for he and Forester were
resolved not to expose themselves, a second
time, to the danger of famine.

Besides the man who was to go with them in
the boat, over the pond, there was a boy who
had come with them to drive the wagon back.
While the preparations for the embarkation
were going forward, this boy remained in the
wagon, to take care of the horse. He had driv-
en him down, however, very near to the shore,
in order that he might see.
172 Tre Forests or Maine.



Bailing out.





THE COVE.

Marco was quite impatient to get into the
boat. He was hardly willing to wait until For-
ester had finished bailing out the water.

“ Wait a minute,” said Forester, “till I get
the water all out.”

“Why, it is all out now,” said Marco.

“Not quite,” said Forester. “It is a great
comfort in a voyage to have a good dry ship,”

At length the bailing was finished, and when
all was ready, the bush, the basket, and the
A VoyvaceE on A Ponp 173
Setting sail. Scenery. Smokes.

paddles were put on board, and our adventurers
after. gliding smoothly through the water to the
outlet of the cove, doubled one of the rocky
points of land, and pushed boldly out upon the
waters of the pond.

_As the boat moved on, propelled by the pad-
dles; which Forester and the man who accom-
panied them were plying, Marco sat upon a
thwart, and gazed with great delight upon the
picturesque and romantic scene around him.
The shores of the lake, or pond, formed many
beautiful points and promontories, with deep
bays between them. There were a great many
islands, too, scattered over its surface. Marco
desired very much to land upon some of -these,
but Forester thought that they had better make
the best of their way toward their destined
port.

Marco contented himself, therefore, with
gazing on the changing scenery, as they passed,
in succession, one island and promontory after
another. The whole country was covered with
forests, except that here and there was an open-
ing, with the house and barn of a settler in the
middle of it. Smokes were rising, too, in va-
rious directions, where new clearings were in
progress. There was one in particular, on the
174 Tus Forests or Maing.
Trimming boat, Sailing on the pond.

side of a distant hill, which rose in such dense
white volumes as especially to attract Maroo’ 8
attention.

When Marco had admired these objects long
enough, he leaned a little over the side of the
boat, and began to look down into the water.
The water was not deep, and the bottom was
smooth and sandy. The boat glided rapidly
along above these sands. Marco’s leaning
caused the boat to incline a little to one side ;
but Forester instead of asking him not to lean
over so, just moved himself a little in the contra-
ry direction, and thus restored the equilibrium.

“There, Forester,” said Marco, suddenly
raising himself, “I forgot one thing.”

“ What is that ?” said Forester.

- “T forgot my piece of wood to make a box
of.”

“I am very sorry,” said Forester. “But
then you can get another piece, perhaps, before
we get to the end of our journey.”

“ But I wanted a piece from that very hut, so
as to make the box a souvenir of our having
got lost in the woods,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” rejoined Forester, “that would have
been very pleasant,—but, perhaps, we shall
A Vovacs on a Ponp. 175
Plan for making a presse. Description.

meet with some other odd adventure, which
will be as good as being lost in the woods.”

“T don’t think being lost in the woods is any
thing very good,” said Marco.

“Tt is not a very good thing at the time, but
the recollection of such adventures and dangers
is always pleasant afterward. You see you
specially want a souvenir of it.

“ But, Marco,” continued Forester, “I have
thought of something which will be, perhaps,
better than a box. At any rate, it will be more
convenient to make.”

“ What is it ?” said Marco.

“ A little press for pressing flowers,” replied
Forester.

“ How could I make it ?” asked Marco.

“ Have two pieces of pine wood, planed out
thin,” said Forester. “They might be var-
_ nished, and that would make them look very
neat and pretty.”

«“ How large must they be ?” asked Marco.

“Qh, about as large,” replied Forester, “as
the covers of a small book. Just large enough
to make it convenient to carry in the pocket.
Then you must have some pieces of soft paper,
of the same size and shape, to put between them.
You must also have a piece of cord or braid, or
176 Tus Forests or Maine.
Use of the press. Dinner.

something of that kind, to tie around them, to
keep them together. Then, when you are
traveling, if you find any pretty flower, you can
put it into this press, and put the press in your
pocket. Thus, the press will not only be a
souvenir itself, but it will procure for you a
great many other souvenirs.”

“ That’s an excellent plan,” said Marco. “I
like it very much. That will be better than a
box.”

“Tt will be easier to make, at any rate,” re- .
plied Forester. “ Any j joiner can plane out and
square the boards for you.”

“Yes,” said Marco. “I mean to get a piece
of pine to make them of, the first time I find
any.”

Marco had an opportunity to get a piece of
pine suitable for this purpose, and, at the same
time, a souvenir itself of an adventure, sooner .
than he anticipated ; for, after the party had

* paddled along in their boat many miles, toward
noon a breeze sprung up, which, though really
not against them, retarded them in some de-
gree, as it tended to drive them out of their
course. Their intention had been to have
stopped upon the water, about noon, to eat their
dinner ; but, as this breeze would prevent the
A Vovace on A Ponp. 177



The purty land upon an island.

boat from remaining at rest, they concluded to
land upon an island, which was near where
they were at the time, and take their dinner
there. Marco was particularly pleased with
this plan, as it would enable him to build a
fire, and he always wanted to build a fire on
such occasions, whether there was any thing
to be cooked by it or not.

-.- The island was rocky, and it was covered
with trees. On the sheltered side of it there
was a beach, where the party landed. Although
this beach was somewhat protected from the
wind, still the waves which rolled in kept the
water in a state of agitation. They, however,
‘landed here, running the boat upon the sand.

There was a large tree lying here, with its
top in the water, and the trunk upon the beach.
It was a tree which some settler had cut down
at some place near the shore of the pond, and
when the water was high it had been washed
off, and, after drifting about the pond for some
time, it had got lodged upon this beach, where
it remained in the position in which our adven-
turers found it. It had been lying there for
more than a year, and the branches which
were out of the water were dead and dry. The
foliage had long since disappeared.

M
178 Tue Forests or Maine.

Rustic pier. The fire. Marco’s stake.

The boatman brought the boat up alongside
of this tree, so that Forester and Marco stepped
out upon the trunk, and walked to the land.
The boatman then tied the boat to one of the
dead branches of the tree, and, taking the
basket of provisions, and the hatchet, they all
walked along, in search of a place for their
dinner.

They found a sheltered and pleasant place,
at a little distance, under the trees. Marco
soon struck a light, and began to build a fire.
He found it somewhat difficult, however, to pro-
cure dry wood enough for the fire, until, at last,
he thought of the branches of the tree to which
the boat was fastened. He accordingly went-
to the place and began to cut them off.

The boat was somewhat in the way while he
was doing this, and he thought he would move
it. He could fasten it just as well, he thought,
by a stake driven into the sand. He therefore
cut off one of the branches, and, after squaring
one end and sharpening the other, he drove it
down as well as he could into the sand. He
then fastened the boat to this stake, thus re-
moving it from the tree, and clearing the way
so that he could conveniently cut off the
branches.
A Vovace on a Ponp. 179

Boat adrift. Dinner. The alarm.

This was not, however, a very wise opera-
tion, for it is very difficult to drive a stake se-
curely intosand. Sand, even when wet, has so
little tenacity that it yields to the slightest
force, and the stake soon began to work loose,
by the motion of the boat, agitated by the
waves; and, in fact, before Marco had finished
carrying away the branches, the stake was en-
tirely loosened from its bed, and was just ready
to topple over.

As the boat continued to pull upon it, this
way and that, as it was agitated by the fluctua-
tion of the water, it soon drew it down, and the
boat, being now entirely at liberty, began to
move slowly off from the shore. It soon drifted
out where it was more fully exposed to the ac-
tion of the wind, when it began to move much
faster. And thus, while our party of voyagers

_were eating their dinner, seated on a flat rock,
by the side of a good fire, in fancied security,
their boat was quietly drifting away, thus ap-
parently cutting them off from all communica-
tion with the main land.

Marco made the discovery that the boat was
gone, just after finishing his dinner, and he im-
mediately gave the alarm. Forester and the
boatman came at once to the spot. They
180 Tue Forests or Maine.

They must make a raft.

could just see the boat, half a mile distant, un-
der a ledge of rocks, which formed the shore in
that place,

This was the third time, on this journey, that
Marco had found himself isolated in circum-
stances of difficulty and danger, and cut off,
apparently, from all convenient means of re-
treat ; and, at first, he thought that this was the
worst and the most dangerous of the three. In
fact, he did not see in what possible way they
could escape.

“ What shall we do ?” asked Forester.

“We must make a raft, somehow or other,”
said the boatman. “If I had a log, I could go
after the boat on that.”

“Won't this tree answer for a log?” asked
Marco.

The boatman looked at the tree. He said
that, if he had an axe, he thought he could cut
off the top, and roll the trunk into the water;
but it would take him a long time, he said, to
hack it off with the hatchet.

There seemed to be, however, no alterna-
_ tive; so’ he set himself at work, and in due_
time he cut off the stem of the tree, just where
it entered the water. They all three then took
levers, which the boatman made with his hatch-
A VoyvaceE on a Powp. 181
Operations,





et, and, by making great exertion, they got the
log out of the sand, and rolled it round into the
water, where it floated. The man then cut a
long pole, and, mounting upon the log, he pushed
himself out over the surface of the water.
Forester and Marco watched his progress
with great interest. Marco thought that -he
would certainly roll off the log, but he-seemed
to stand and to walk upon it, perfectly at his .
ease. He would advance to the forward end
of the log, and then, planting the foot of his pole



THE LUST soar,
182 Tue Forests or Maine.
Progrees of the boatman on the log.

in the sand on the bottom, he would push, walk-
ing along as the log advanced, until he came to
the stern end of the log, when he would draw
out his pole, and walk back again.

All this time Marco and Forester stood on
the shore of the island, under the trees, watch-
ing the man’s progress upon the log.

“Do you think that he will get the boat ?”
asked Marco.

“Qh, yes,” said Forester, “I have no doubt
of it. He gets along quite fast with his pole,
and then the wind helps him. Indeed, if he
were to do nothing, I presume that the wind
would blow him across to the same place where
it blew the boat.” .

In fact, the man was soon compelled to de-
pend entirely upon the wind, for, after propel-
ling the boat for some time in the manner that
has been described, the water became too deep
for his pole to reach the bottom, and then he
ceased these efforts, and standing upright, he
left himself to be driven along slowly by the
wind,

Forester and Marco saw plainly that he
would be gone for some time, and they amused
themselves, during his absence, in wandering
about the shores of the island. In one place,
A Voyvagce on A Ponp. 183

Marco finds a slab. ‘ Marco and Forester on the island.

Marco found, upon a rock a little above the
water, a slab of pine wood, which was bleached
by the sun and rain. It had drifted down, the
summer before, from some stream emptying into
the pond. In the winter it had been frozen into’
the ice, and, when the ice broke up on the fol-
lowing spring, the cake to which the slab was
attached, had been crowded up upon the shore,
and there the slab had been left when the ice
melted. oo

Marco immediately thought that this slab
would furnish him with a good piece of wood
to make a flower-press of, and he accordingly
dragged it up where he could work upon it with
his hatchet. He soon cut off a piece, of the
proper length, and hewed it down so as to make
it of a convenient shape to carry.

When Forester came to examine it, he said
he thought it was a very good piece, and when
it was planed smooth and varnished, he thought,
from its appearance, that it would be of a very
pretty color.

“You can get it made at the first shop we
come to,” said Forester, “and then you can
collect and preserve a great many flowers in it,
when we get to Canada. When you get home,
184 Tue Forests or MAINE.

The flower-press.



you can put them in a book, and call them the
Canadian Flora.”

“ That’s just what I’ll do,” said Marco, “and
then, when I get home, I'll give some of them
to my cousins. They will like them, because
they came from Canada. But I can’t put a
great many into such a press.”

“No,” said Forester. “You only collect
them in the press, which you always carry with
you in your pocket. You put them all in a
book, or in a larger press, as soon as you get
home, and then you have the small press ready
for use again.”

While they were talking thus, they watched
the boatman, who had, by this time, reached the
land and recovered the boat. He came back
quite rapidly, propelling the boat with the pad-
dle. Marco and Forester embarked on board
of her, and they finished their voyage without
any further adventure. The next day, they
reached the Quebec road, and, leaving the re-
gion of the Kennebec, they went on their way
toward Canada.

They stopped that night at a farmer’s house,
where Marco, looking about, spied among the
other buildings around the yard, a sort of work-
shop.
A Voyace on a Ponp. 185

The workshop. Marco’s questions. The farmer’s boy.

“There is a workshop,” said Marco. “I
verily believe. I mean to go and see if J can
not get my flower-press made in it. Only Iam
afraid that they have not got the right kind of
tools for such small work.” .

So saying, Marco walked away toward the
shop. Just as he was entering the shop door
he met a young man coming out. This young
_ man was the farmer’s son. He had been into
the shop to put away some tools which he had
been using in mending a plow.

“Ts this a shop?’ asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the farmer’s boy.

“And are there any tools in it?” asked
Marco.

“Yes,” said the boy, “plenty of them.”

“And could you do a little work for me,”
asked Marco, “ with them ?”

“Perhaps so,” said the boy,—‘ what is the
work ?”’ | :

“Twill show you,” replied Marco. So say-
ing he went toward the house to get the piece
of wood which he had procured for his pressing
apparatus. The farmer’s boy followed him.
When Marco came out he found the farmer’s
boy standing upon the step of the door.

“ What is your name ?” asked Marco.
186 Tue Forests or Maine.
Thomas. Explanations. Interior of the shop. Old vehicles.

“ Thomas,” said the boy.

“Well,” said Marco, “I want you to make
me a pressing apparatus out of this piece of
wood.”

“ A pressing apparatus!” said Thomas, with
surprise,—‘ what is that ?”

Marco explained to Thomas what he meant ;
and then they both went back to the shop to-
gether. On entering the shop Marco’s atten-
tion was at first so much occupied with the va-
rious objects which he saw there, and with the
general appearance of the interior of the room, |
that for a time he forgot the work which was to
be done.

The shop was in the lower part of a building
which was built in the side of a hill, so that
there were windows only in the front part.
The other three sides of the room were formed
of walls of rough stone. In the center of one
of these walls was an enormous fireplace.
This fireplace was full of shavings. The fire-
place had not had a fire in it for some time, and
all the shavings from the shop had been swept
into it from time to time, until now it was al-
most full. The back side of the room was
filled with carts, plows, old wheels, and parts
of wagons. In the front part, near the win-
A Voyace on A Ponp. 187
Marco's directions. Bigness. Varnish.

. dows, were various benches, with all sorts of
tools upon them. There was a large grindstone
in the middle of the floor, with a great chop-
‘ping-block by the side of it.
| Marco looked around at these things for a
few minutes, and then he went with Thomas to
one of the benches, and explained. to him how
the pressing apparatus was to be made.

“You must plane out,” said he, “two thin
pieces of wood about as big as book-covers.”

« How big is that ?” asked Thomas. “ Book-
covers are of all-sizes.”

“About so big then,” said Marco. As he
said this he put his two fingers down upon the
edge of the bench at such a distance from each
other as to indicate the size that he intended.

“You must plane them thin and smooth,”
continued Marco,—“ only they must not be so
thin as to split easily —and you must make the
corners all square. Then you must varnish
them. Have you got any varnish ?”

“Yes,” said Thomas, “we have got some
copal varnish. Will that kind do?”

“What kind is that?” asked Marco. “I
don’t know.”

“Nor I,” said Thomas. “That is, I don’t
188 Tue Forests or Marne.

Doubt about copal varnish. The vice.

know any thing more about it than that it is
copal varnish.”

“T will ask Forester about it,” said Marco.

So Marco went to ask Forester what kind
of varnish copal varnish was, while Thomas
began to plane out the little boards. Marco
came back pretty soon, saying that copal var-
nish would do very well.

While Thomas went on with his work, Mar-
co began to look around the room again to see
what he could find. As he walked around thus
he continually asked questions of Thomas in
respect to the objects that attracted his atten-
tion.

“ What is this great iron thing,’—said Mar-
co,—* screwed to this bench ?”

“Tt is what we call a vice,” replied Thomas.

“ What is it for ?” asked Marco.

“Tt is to hold things fast, while we are at
work upon them,” replied Thomas,—“ filing or
hammering them. You put the thing that you
want to file, in between the jaws of the vice,
and then screw up the jaws together by means
of that iron handle.

“I mean to try it,” said Marco.

So saying, he took up an iron bolt from off
the bench, and put it in between the jaws of the
A Voyace on a Ponp. 189

Maroo’s experiment. The iron ring. The heap-of shavings.

vice, and holding it there with one hand, he
began to turn the handle with the other. The
motion of the handle caused the jaws to ap-
proach each other until the bolt was seized and
held between them, and when Marco had
screwed the vice up hard, the bolt was held
with such force that he could not pull it out
at all.

Just then Maroo’s eye fell upon a large iron
ring which was lying upon the floor. He took
it up and asked Thomas what it was for.

“It is an old cart ring, I believe,” said
Thomas.

“I wish you would give it to me,” said
Marco.

“Why, what could you do with it?” asked
Thomas.

“ Oh, I don’t know,—” said Marco. “I could
play with it,—rolling it about.”

“Very well,” said Thomas, “ you may have
it to roll about, as long as you please.”

“ What are all these shavings for, in this fire-
place ?” asked Marco.

“ To burn,” said Thomas, “ the next time we
make a fire there.”

“I wish you would let me set them a-fire
now,” said Marco.
190 Tue Forests or Maine.
The firepan. Heap on fire. Burning of the shavings.

“ Very well,” replied Thomas, “ that you may
do.”

“ Where shall I get some fire ?” asked Marco.

“Tn the house,” said Thomas. “ They will -
give you some fire in the kitchen, and lend you
the firepan to bring it out in.”

So Marco went into the house; and a girl
who was at work there lent him the firepan, and
put some coals into it for him. Marco brought
them out to the shop. He laid the firepan
down upon a great flat stone before the fire-
place, which served the purpose ; of a hearth, and
then, pulling open the shavings with his arms,
he finally put the coals in among them down
near the very bottom of the heap, and covered
them up there, by pulling the shavings over
upon the top again as before. Then he stood
still, watching to see what would happen.

Very soon a smoke began to come curling
up among the shavings, and to issue out at the
top of the heap. This smoke increased more
and more, until, at length, it rolled up in dense
volumes, producing a very beautiful effect.
Before long a great flashing flame broke out,
and soon the whole mass of shavings was burn-
ing fiercely, the flames rising high into the
chimney, and roaring frightfully.
A VovaGceE on a Pownp. 191
Apprehended danger. The boards,

“Won't it set the chimney on fire?” said
Marco.

“ Perhaps so,” said Thomas.

“ And what then ?” said Marco.

“Nothing then,—” said Thomas. “Only
you can go outside and see it burn out from the
top.”

Marco amused himself with the fire a long
while, and by the time that it had burned en-
tirely down, the pressing apparatus was finished ;
and Thomas, after varnishing the boards, put
them up in the window to dry.