Citation
A picture-book without pictures

Material Information

Title:
A picture-book without pictures and other stories
Series Title:
Francis & Co.'s little library
Creator:
Andersen, H. C ( Hans Christian ), 1805-1875
Childs, Benjamin F., 1814-1863 ( Engraver )
Hartmann, Carl ( Illustrator )
Francis, Joseph H ( Publisher )
C.S. Francis & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New-York
Boston
Publisher:
C.S. Francis & Co.
J.H. Francis
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
175 p. : <1> port. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1852 ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Biographies -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1852
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Biographies ( rbgenr )
individual biography ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Port. of Hans Christian Andersen engraved and signed by Childs from a painting by Carl Hartmann.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
from the Danish of Hans Christian Andersen ; translated by Mary Howitt ; with a memoir of the author

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026565972 ( ALEPH )
45839693 ( OCLC )
ALG1403 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text











The Baldwin Library

University
RMB ssi
Florida










FRANCIS & CO.’S

LITTLE LIBRARY:

FOR YOUNG PERSONS OF VARIOUS AGES.

A PICTURE BOOK WITHOUT PICTURES
AND OTHER STORIES

BY HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.



Hrancis & Co.'s Bittle Library.

©. 8, Francts & Co., New York, huve published a uniform Serics
of Choice volumes for Young Peopte, by some of the most distin
Qtished writers for Children. Neatly bound in cloth, and tilus
trated by Engravinga.

L. MARIA CHILD.—Frowrns ror Cnprun: No. 2, for Chik
dren eight or nine years old. .

—— Fiowerg ror Cainpran: No. 2, for Children threo or four
years old. .

——— FLowers yor Cuitpren: No. 3, for Children eleven oF
twelve years old.

MARY HOWITT.—Fingsips Taurs.

Tue Curistmas Tree: A Book of Stories. .

Tue Tursite Dove of CaRMEL; and other Stories.

Tne Favorire Scnotan; Lirrig Cuartersox ; Perse:

VERANCE, and other Tales. By Mary Howitt, Mrs. 8
C. Hah, and others.

MRS, TRIMMER,—Tux Rossing; of Domestic Lirz amone
THE Birps, Designed for the Instruction of Children
respecting their Treatment of Animals,

MISS LESLIE.—Russet anp Stoney ann CHasz Lourne:
Tales of the American Revolution.

MRS. CAROLINE GILMAN.—Tue Lirrir Wreata op

Sroxizs anp Poums FoR CinupaEn,

Srorigs anp Porms for Cuibpren,

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.—A CunisTMas GREET
ine: Thirteen New Stories from the Danish of Mana
Christian Andersen.

—— A Picture Book wiruour Picroures ; ana viner Stories:
by Hans Christian Andersen. Translated by Mary
Howitt, with a Memoir of the Author.

——— A Danisw Story Boos,

CLAUDINE; or Humtrity mix Basis or anh rue Vinturs,
A Swiss Tule. By a Mother; author of “ Always Hap-
py” “ True Stories from History,” &c.

FACTS TO CORRECT FANCIES; or Shert Narratives
compiled from the Memoirs of Remarkable Women.
By a Mother.

HOLIDAY STORIES. Containing five Mora} Tales.

MRS HOFLAND,~Tue Hisrony or an Orricer’s Wipow

and her Young Family. '

Tue Cirreyman’s Wivow, and her Young Family.

—— Tur Mercuant’s Wivow, and her Young Family.

MISS ABBOT.—Kare anp Lizzt; on Six Montus ovT oF

Scuoou.

MISS ELIZA ROBBINS.—Ctasstc Tatrs. Designed for the
instruction and Amusement of Young Persons. By the
author of “ American Popular Lessons,” &c.

MRS. S. C. HALL.—Turns or Fortuny; ALL 18 NoT Gone
THAT GLITTera, &c.

«=> Tam Private Purse; Creverness, and other Tales


















mar
4s IN

28

DEE

NT

NA

I

ST

HANS CHRI

z by Carl Hartmann

ram a Paintin

FE



@. H. FRANCIS, 128 WASHINGTON STREZT.

1852.






A

PICTURE-BOOK

WITHOUT PICTURES:
And @toer Htortes,
FROM THE DANISH
or
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
TRANSLATED BY
MARY HOWITT.

Mith a Memote of the Auther.

NEW-YORK:
0.8. FRANCIS & CO.,252 BROADWAY
BOSTON:
d. He FRANCIS, 128 WASHINGTON STREET.

1852.






CONTENTS.

~~

Mexorr or Hans Curistran ANDERSEN - - 7

A Picturs-Boox witnout Pictures - - - 33

Mr Boots - - - -2¢ «*# «© «» 195
Scenes on THE Danuse : - . - 133
Preasus anp THE Post-Honszs - - - 14

Tur Emperor's New Crotags 153

Tux SwincuxrrD - . - . - . - 164

Tux Reat Princess - - * . . - 173






MEMOIR OF

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
BY MARY HOWITT.






MEMOIR.

Waeruenr regarded as the human being as-
serting in his own person the true nobility of
mind and moral worth, or the man of genius,
whose works alone have raised him from the
lowest poverty and obscurity, to be an honor-
ed guest with kings and queens, Hans Chris-
tian Andersen is one of the most remarkable
men of his day.

Like most men of great original talent, he
is emphatically one of the people; and writ-
ing as he has done, principally of popular
life, he describes what he himself has suffered
and seen. Poverty or hardship, however,
never soured his mind; on the contrary,
whatever he has written is singularly genial,
and abounds with the most kindly andani-
versal sympathy. Human life, with all its

9



10 MEMOIR OF

trials, privations, and its tears, is to him a holy
thing ; he lays bare the heart, not to bring
forth hidden and revolting passions or crimes,
but to show how lovely it is in its simplicity
and truth: how touching in its weaknesses
and its short-comings; how much it is to be
loved and pitied, and borne and striven with.
In short, this great writer, with all the ardor
of a strong poetical nature, and with great
power in delineating passion, is eminently
Christian in spirit.

It is a great pleasure to me that I have
been the means of making the principal
works of Hans Christian Andersen known,
through my translations, to English readers ;
they have been well received by them, and I

now give a slight memoir of their author,
drawn from the True Story of his own Life,
sent by him to me for translation, and which
has lately been published.

The father of Hans Christian Andersen
was a shoemaker of Odense. When scarcely
twenty, he married a young girl about as
poor as himself. The poverty of this couple

' may be imagined from the circumstance that
the house afforded no better bedstead than a



HANS CHRASTIAN ANDERSEN. a BI

wooden frame, made to support the coffin of
some count in the neighborhood, whose body
lay in state before his interment. This frame,
covered with black cloth, and which the
young shoemaker purchased at a very low
price, served as the family bedstead many
years. Upon this humble bed was born, on
the second of April, 1805, Hans Christian
Andersen. .

The father of Andersen was not without
education; his mother was the kindest of
human beings ; they lived on the best terms
with each other, but still the husband was
not happy. He read comedies and the Ara-
bian Tales, and made a puppet theatre for
his little son, and often on Sundays took him
out with him into the woods round Odense,
where the solitude was congenial to his mind.

Andersen’s grandmother had also great
influence over him, and to her he was greatly
attached. She was employed in taking care
of a garden belonging to a lunatic asylum,
and here he spent most of the summer after-
noons of his early childhood.

Among his earliest recollections is the resi-
dence of the Spaniards in Funen, in the years



12 MEMOIR OF

1808 and 1809. A soldier of an Asturian
regiment took him one day in his arms,
danced with him amid tears of joy, which no
doubt were called forth by the remembrance
of a child he had left at home, and pressed
the Madonna to his lips, which occasioned
great trouble to his pious mother, who was a
Lutheran.

In Odenge at that time many old festivities
were still in use, which made a deep impres-
sion on the boy, and were as so much mate-
rial laid up in his richly poetical mind for
after use, as all who are familiar with his
works must be well aware. His father,
among other works, industriously read in his
Bible. One day he closed it with these words :
“Christ became a man like unto us, but a
very uncommon man!” at which his. wife
burst into tears, greatly distressed and shock-
ed at what she called “blasphemy.” This
made a deep impression on the boy, and he
prayed in secret for the soul of his father.
Another day his father said, “'There is no
other devil but what a man bears in his own
breast!” After which, finding his am
scratched one morning when he awoke, his



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 13

wife said it was a punishment of the devil, to
teach him his real existence.

The unhappy temper of the father increas-
ed from day to day; he longed to go forth
into the world. At that time war was raging
in Germany. Napoleon was his hero, and
as Denmark had now allied itself to France,
he enlisted as a private soldier in a recruiting
regiment, hoping that some time or other he
might return as a lieutenant. The neighbors,
however, thought it was all a folly to let him-
self be shot for no purpose at all. The corps
in which he served went no farther than Hol-
stein ; the peace succeeded, and the poor shoe-
maker returned to his trade, only chagrined
to have seen no service, nor even been in for-
eign lands. But though he had seen no ser-
vice, his health had suffered; he awoke one
morning delirious, and talked about cam-
paigns and Napoleon. Young Andereen,
then nine years old, was sent to the next vil-
lage to ask counsel from a wise woman.

“Will my poor father die?’ inquired he,
anxiously.

“If thy father will die,” replied she, “ thou
wilt meet his ghost on thy way home.”



14 MEMOIR OF

Terrified almost out of his senses lest he
should meet the ghost, he set out on his
homeward way, and reached his own door
without any such apparition presenting itself,
but for all that, his father died on the third
day.

From this time young Andersen was left
to himself. The whole instruction that he
ever received waa in a charity-school, and
consisted of reading, writing, and arithmetic,
but of the two last he knew scarcely any-

About this time he was engaged by the
widow of a clergyman in Odense, to read
aloud to herself and her sister-in-law. She
was the widow of a clergyman who had writ-
ten poems. In this house Andersen first heard
the appellation of poet ; and saw with what
love the poetical talent of the deceased pastor
was regarded. ‘This sunk deeply into his
mind ; he read tragedies, and resolved to be-
come a poet, as this good man had been be-
fore him.

He wrote a tragedy, therefore, which the
two ladies praised highly; it was handed
about in manuscript, and people laughed at



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 15

it, and ridiculed him as the “play-writer.”
This wounded him so deeply, that he passed
one whole night weeping, and was only pa-
cified, or rather, silenced, by his mother threat-
ening to give him a good beating for his folly.
Spite, however, of his ill success, he wrote
again and again, studying, among other de-
vices, German and French words, to give
dignity to his dialogue. Again the whole
town read his productions, and the boys
shouted after him as he went, “Look ! look :
there goes the play-writer.”

One day he took to his schoolmaster, as a
birthday present, a garland, with which he
had twisted up a little poem. The school-
master was angry with him; he saw nothing
but folly and false quantities in the verses,
and thus the poor lad had nothing but trouble
and tears.

The worldly affairs of the mother grew
worse and worse, and as boys of his age
earned money in a manufactory near, it was
resolved that there also Hans Christian
should be sent. His old grandmother took
him to the manufactory, and shed bitter tears
because the lot of the boy was so early toil



16 MEMOIR OF

and sorrow. The workmen in the factory
were principally German, and discovering
that Andersen had a fine voice, and knew
many popular songs, they made him sing to
them while the other boys did his work. He
knew himself that he had a good voice, be-
cause the neighbors always listened when he
sang at home, and once a whole party of rich
people had stopped to hear him, and had
praised his beautiful voice. Everybody in
the manufactory heard him with equal de-
light.

“T can act comedy as well!” said the poor
boy one day, encouraged by their applause,
and began to recite whole scenes from the
comedies which his father had been in the
habit of reading. The workmen were de-
lighted, and the other boys were made to do
his tasks while he amused them all. This
smooth life of comedy acting and singing
lasted but for a short time, and he returned
home.

“The boy must go and act at the theatre ”
many of the neighbors said to his mother;
but as she knew of no other theatre than that
of the strolling players, she shook her head,



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 17

and resolved rather to put her son apprentice
to a tailor.

He was now twelve, and. had nothing to
do; he devoured, therefore, the contents of
every book which came in his way. His
favorite reading was an old prose translation
of Shakspere. From this, with little figures
which he made of pasteboard, he performed
the whole of King Lear, and the Merchant
of Venice.

Andersen’s passion for reading, and his
beautiful voice, had in the meantime drawn
upon him the attention of several of the
higher families of the city, who introduced
him to their houses. His simple, child-like
behavior, his wonderful memory, and his
sweet voice, gave to him a peculiar charm ;
people talked of him, and he soon had meny
friends ; among others, a Colonel Guldborg,
brother to the well-known poet of that name,
and who afterwards introduced him to Prince
Christian of Denmark.

About this.time his mother married a
second time, and as the step-father would not
spend a penny, or do any thing for her son’s
education, he had still more leisure. He had

2



18 MEMOIR OF

no playfellows, and often wandered by him-

self to the neighboring forest, or seated himself

at home, in a comer of the house, and dreased

up little dolls for his theatre, his mother in|
the meantime thinking that, as he was des-

tined for a tailor, this was all good practice.

At length the time came when he was to
be confirmed. On this occasion he had his
first pair of boots; he was very vain of them,
and that all the world might see them, he
pulled them up over his trousers. An old
sempstress was employed to make him a con-
firmation-suit out of .his deceased father’s
great coat. Never before had he been possess-
edof such excellent clothes ; the very thoughts
of them disturbed his devotions on the day of
consecration.

It had been determined that Andersen was
to be apprenticed to a tailor after his confir-
mation, but he earnestly besought his mother
to give up this idea, and consent to his going
to Copenhagen, that he might get employ-
ment at the theatre there. He read to her
the lives of celebrated men who had been
quite as poor as himself, and assured her that
he also would cne day be a celebrated man.



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 19

For several years he had been hoarding up.
his money; he had now about thirty shillings,
English, which seemed to him an inexhausti-
ble sum. As soon as his mother heard of
this fund, her heart inclined towards his
wishes, and she promised to consent on con-
dition that they should consult a wise woman,
and that his going or staying should be de-
cided by her augury. The siby! was fetched
to the house, and after she had read the cards,
and studied the coffee-grounds, she pronounc- .
ed these words.

“Your son will become a great man. 'The
city of Odense will one day be illuminated
in his honor.”

A prophecy like this removed all doubts.

“Go, in God’s name ! said his mother, and
he lost no time in preparing for his great
journey.

Some one had mentioned to him a certain
female dancer at the Royal Theatre as a
person of great influence; he obtained, there-
fore, from a gentleman universally esteemed
in Odense, a letter of introduction to this lady ;
and with this, and his thirteen rix-dollars, he
commenced the journey on which depended



20 MEMOIR OF

his whole fate. His mother accompanied
him to the city gate, and there his good old
grandmother met him; she kissed him with
many tears, blessed him, and he never saw
her more.

It was not until he had crossed the Great
Belt that he felt how forlorn he was in the
world; he stepped aside from the road, fell
on his knees, and besought God to be his
friend. He rose up comforted, and walked
on through towns and villages, until, on Mon-
day morning, the 5th of September, 1819, he
saw the towers of Copenhagen; and with his
little bundle under his arm he entered that
great city.

On the day after his arrival, dressed in his
confirmation-suit, he betook himself, with his
letter of introduction in his hand, to the
house of the all-potential dancer. The lady
allowed him to wait a long time on the steps
of her house, and when at length he entered,
his awkward, simple behavior and appear-
ance displeased her; she fancied him insane,
more particularly as the.gentleman from

whom he brought the letter was unknown to
her.



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 21

He next went to the director of the the-
atre, requesting some appointment.

“You are too thin for the theatre,” was
the answer he obtained.

“Oh,” replied poor Andersen, “only ensure
me one hundred rix-dollars, and I, will soon
get fat!”

But the director would make no agreement:
of this kind, and then informed him that
they engaged none at the theatre but people
of education. ‘This settled the question ; he
had nothing to say on his own behalf, and,
dejected in spirit, went out into the street.
He knew no human creature ; he thought of
death, and this thought turned his mind to
God.

“When everything goes adversely,” said
he, “then God will help me; it is written so
in every book that I ever read, and in God I
will put my trust !”

Days and weeks went on, bringing with
them nothing but disappointment and des-
pair; his money was all gone, and for some
time he worked with a joiner. At length,
as, with a heavy heart, he was walking one
day along the crowded streets of the city, it



2 =. MEMOIR OF

occurred to him that as yet nobody had
heard his fine voice. Full of this thought,
he hastened at once to the house of Professor
Siboni, where a large party happened to be
at dinner, and among the guests Baggesen,
the poet, and the celebrated composer, Pro-
fessor Weyse. He knocked at the door,
which was opened by a female servant, and
to her he related, quite open-heartedly, how
forlom and friendless he was, and how great
a desire he had to be engaged at the theatre ;
the young woman went in and related this
to the company. All were interested in the
little adventurer; he was ordered in, and de-
sired to sing, and to give some scenes from
Holberg. One of these scenes bore a resem-
blance to his own melancholy circumstances,
and he burst into tears. The company ap-
plauded him.

“J prophecy,” said Baggesen, “that thou
wilt turn out something remarkable; only
don’t become vain when the public admires
thee.” , »

Professor Siboni promised immediately that
he would cultivate Andersen’s voice, and that
he should make his debut at the Theatre



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, 23

Royal. He had a good friend too in Profes-
sor Weyse, and a year and a half were spent
in elementary instruction. But a new mis-
fortune now befell him ; he lost his beautiful
voice, and Siboni counselled him to put him-
self to some handicraft trade. He once more
seemed abandoned to a hopeless fate. Cast-
ing about in his rhind who might possibly
befriend him, he bethought himself of the poet
Guldborg, whose brother the colonel had
been so kind to him in Odense. To him he
went, and in him he happily found a friend;
although poverty still pursued him, and his -
sufferings, which no one knew, almost over-
came him.

He wrote a rhymed tragedy, which obtain-
edsome little praise from Oehlenschlager and
Ingemann—but no debut was permitted him
on the theatre. He wrote a second and third,
but the theatre would not accept them.
These youthful efforts fell, however, into the
hand of a powerful and good man, Confer-
ence CounseHor Collin, who, perceiving the
genius that slumbered in the young poet,
went immediately to the king, and obtained
permission from him that he should be sent,



24 MEMOIR OF

at Government charges, to one of the learned
schools in the provinces, in which, however,
he suffered immensely, till his heart was
almost broken by unkindness. From this
school he went to college, and became very
soon favorably known to the public by true
poetical works. Ingemann, Oehlenschlager,
‘and others then obtained for him a royal
stipend, to enable him to travel; and he
visited Germany, France, Switzerland, and
Italy. Italy, and the poetical character of
life in that beautiful country, inspired him ;
and he wrote the “ Improvisatore,” one of the
most exquisite works, whether for truthful
delineation of character, or pure and noble
sentiment, that ever was penned. This
work most harmoniously combines the warm
coloring and intensity of Italian life with
the freshest and strong simplicity of the
north. His romance of “O. T.” followed ;
this is a true picture of the secluded, sober
life of the north, and is a great favorite
there. His third work, “Only a Fiddler,”
is remarkable for its strongly drawn personal
and national characteristics, founded upon
his own experience in early life. Perhaps



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 25

there never was a more affecting picture of
the hopeless attempts of a genius of second
rate order to combat against and rise above
poverty and adverse circumstances, than is
given in the life of poor Christian, who dies
at last “only a fiddler.”

In all these works Andersen has drawn
from his own experience, and in this lies their
extraordinary power. There is a child-like
tenderness and simplicity in his writings; a
sympathy with the poor and the struggling,
and an elevation and purity of tone, which
have something absolutely holy about them ;
it is the inspiration of true genius, combined
with great experience of life, and a spirit
baptized with the tenderness of Christianity.
This is it which is the secret of the extremé
charm his celebrated stories have for children.
They are as simple and as touching as the old
Bible narratives of Joseph and his brethren,
and the little lad who died in the corn field.
We wonder not at their being the most pop-
ular books of their kind in Europe.

It has been my happiness, as I said before,
to translate his three principal works, his
Picture Book without Pictures, and several of

¢



26 MEMOIR OF

his stories for children. They have been
likewise translated into German, and some
of them into Dutch, and even Russian. He
speaks nobly of this circumstance in his life.
“My works,” says he, “seem to come forth
under a lucky star, they fly over all lands.
There is something elevating, but at the same
time something terrific in seeing one’s thoughts
spread so far, and among so many people;
it is indeed althost a fearful thing to belong
tosomany. The noble and good in us be-
comes a blessing, but the bad, one’s errors,
shoot forth also; and involuntarily the prayer
forces itself from us—‘God! let me never
write down a word of which I shall not be
able to give an account to thee? a peculiar
feeling, a mixture of joy and anxiety, fills my
heart every time my good genius conveys
my fictions to a foreign people.”

Of Andersen’s present life we need only say
that he spends a great deal of his time in
traveling ; he goes from land to land, and
from court to court, everywhere an honored
guest, and enjoying the glorious reward of
a manly struggle against adversity, and the



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 27

triumph of a lofty and pure genius in seeing
its claims generously acknowledged.

Let us now see the son of the poor shoe-
maker of Odense—the friendless, ill-clad, al-
most heart-broken boy of Copenhagen—on
one of those occasions, which would make an
era in the life of any other literary man, but
which are of every day occurrence in his. I
will quote from his own words.

“T received a letter from the ministry, Count
Rantzau Breitenburg, containing an invita-
tion from their majesties of Denmark to join
them at the watering-place of Fohr; this
island lies in the North Sea, on the coast of
Sleswick. It was just now five and-twenty
years since I, a poor lad, traveled alone and —
helpless to Copenhagen. Exactly the five-and
twentieth anniversary would be celebrated by
my being with my king and queen. Every-
thing which surrounded me, man and nature,
reflected themselves imperishably in my soul ;
I felt myself, as it were, conducted to a point
from which I could look forth more distinctly
over the past, with all the good fortune and
happiness which it had evolved for me.

“ Wyck, the largest town of F'Ghr, in which



28 MEMOIR OF

are the baths, is built like a Dutch town,
with houses one story high, sloping roofs,
and gables turned to the street. The number
of strangers there, and the presence of the
Court, gave a peculiar animation to it. The
Danish flag was seen waving, and music was
heard on all hands. I was soon established
in my quarters, and was invited every day to
dine with their majesties as well as to pass
the evening in their circle. On several eve-
hings I read aloud my little stories to them,
and nothing could be more gracious and kind
than they were. It is so well when a noble
human nature will reveal itself, where other-
wise only the king’s crown and the purple
mantle might be discovered.

“T sailed in the train of their majesties, to
the largest of the Halligs, those grassy runes
in the ocean, which bear testimony to a
sunken country. ‘The violence of the sea has
changed the mainland into islands, has again
riven these, and buried men and villages.
Year after year are new portions rent away
and in half a century’s time there will be no-
thing left but sea. The Halligs are now low
islets, covered with a dark turf, on which a few



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 29

flocks graze. When the sea rises, these are
driven to the garrets for refuge, and the waves
roll over this little region, which lies miles dis-
tant from any shore. Oland, which we visited,
contains a little town; the houses stand
closely side by side, as if in their sore need
they had huddled together ; they are all erect-
ed on a platform, and have little windows like
the cabin of a ship. There, solitary through
half the year, sit the wives and daughters
spinning. Yet I found books in all the
houses ; the people read and work, and the
sea rises round the houses, which lie like a
wreck on the ocean. The church-yard is
half washed away ; coffins and corpses are
frequently exposed to view. It is an appalling
sight, and yet the inhabitants of the Halligs
are attached to their little home, and fre-
quently die of home-sickness when removed
from it.

“We found only one man upon the island,
and he had only lately arisen from a sick-
bed; the others were out on long voyages.
We: were received by women and girls ; they
had erected before the church a trium-
phal arch with flowers, which they had



30 MEMOIR OF

fetched from Féhr, but it was so small and
low, that one was obliged to go round it; it
nevertheless showed their good will. The
Queen was deeply affected by their having
cut down their only shrub, a rose-bush, to lay
over a marshy place which she had to cross.

“On our return, dinner was served on board
the royal steamer, and afterwards as we sail-
ed in a glorious sunset through this archipe-.
lago, the deck of the vessel was changed to a
dancing hall: servants flew hither and thith-
er with refreshments ; sailors stood upon the
paddle-boxes and took soundings, and their
deep tones might be heard giving the depth
of the water. The moon rose round and
large, and the promontory of Amrom assumed
the appearance of a snow-covered chain of
Alps.”

The next day he visited the wild regions
about the promontory, but our space will not
admit of our giving any portions of wild and
grand sea-landscape which he here describes.
In the evening he returned to the royal din-
ner-table. It was on the above mentioned
fjve-and-twentieth anniversary, on the 5th of
September ; he says,



HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. al

“The whole of my. former life passed in
review before my mind. I was obliged to
summon all my strength to prevent myself
bursting into tears. There are moments of
gratitude, in which we feel, as it were, a de-
sire to press God to our hearts! How deeply
I felt at this time my own nothingness, and
how all, all had come from him! After din-
ner the king, to whom Rantzau had told how
interesting the day was to me, wished me
happiness, and that most kindly. He wished
me happiness in that which I had endured
and won. He asked me about my early,
struggling life, and I related to him some
traits of it. .

“In the course of conversation he asked
me of my annual income. I told him.

“That is not much,’ said he.

“*But I do not need much, I replied;
‘my writings furnish something.’

“Tf can in any way be serviceable to
you, come to me,’ said the king in conclusion.

“Tn the evening, during the concert, some
of my friends reproached me for not making
use of my opportunity. .

“ into your mouth.’



32 MEMOIR.

“¢T could not have done more,’ said I; ‘if
the king thought I required an addition to
my income, he would give it of his own free
will. ,

“ And I was 8 right ; in the following year
the king increased my annual stipend, so that
with this and my writings I can live honor-
ably and free from care.

“The 5th of September. was to me a festi-

val day. Even the German visitors at the
baths honored me by drinking my. health in
the pump-room.
_ “So many flattering circumstances, some
people argue, may spoil.a man and make
him vain. But no, they do not spoil him,
they make him, on the contrary, better; they
purify his mind, and he thereby feels an im-
pulse, a wish to deserve all that he enjoys.”

Such are truly the feelings of a pure and
noble nature. Andersen has stood the test
through every trial, of poverty and adversity ;
the harder trial that of a sun-bright prosper-
ity, is new proving him, and so far, thank
God, the sterling nature of the man has re-
mained unspoiled.



A PICTURE-BOOK WITHOUT PICTURES,

33






Ir 1s wonderful! When my heart feels
the mest warmly, and my emotions are the
noblest, it is as if my hands and my tongue
were tied; I cannot describe, I cannot ex-
press my own inward state; and yet lam a
painter ; my eye tells me so; and every one
who has seen my sketches and my tablets ac-
knowledges it.

I am a poor youth ; I live over there in one
of the narrowest streets, but I have no want
of light, because I live up aloft, with a view
over all the house-tops. The first day I
came into the city it seemed to me so confined

and lonesome ; instead of the woods and the
35 °



36 A PICTURE-BOOK

green breezy heights, I had only the grey
chimneys as far as I could see. I did not
possess one friend here; not a single face
which I knew saluted me.

One evening, very much depressed in mind,
I stood at my window ; I opened it and look-
ed out. Nay, how glad it made me; Isaw
a face which I knew; a round, friendly face,
that of my dearest friend in heaven; it was
the Moon—the dear old Moon, the very same,
precisely the same, as when she peeped at
me between the willow trees on the marshes.
I kissed my hand to her; she shone right
down into my chamber, and promised me,
that every night when she was out she would
take a peep at me. And she has honestly
kept her word—pity only that she can re-
main for so short a time!

Every night she comes she tells me one
thing or another which she has seen either
that night or the night before. “Make a
sketch,” said she, on her first visit, “of what

7



WITHOUT PICTURES. 37

I tell thee, and thus thou shalt make a really
beautiful picture-book !”

This I have done; and in this way I might
give a new Thousand and One Nights in
pictures : but that would be too much ; those
which I have given have not been selected,
but are just as I heard them. A great, ge-
nial-hearted painter, a poet, or a musician,
may make more of them if he will; that
which I present is ‘only a slight outline on
paper, and mixed up with my own thoughts,
because it was not every night that the moon
came; there was now and then a cloud be-
tween us.



38 A PICTURE-BOOK

FIRST EVENING.

Last night,—these are the Moon’s own
words,—I glided through the clear air of In-
dia; I mirrored myself in the Ganges. My
beams sought to penetrate the thick fence
which the old plantains had woven, and
which formed itself into an arch as firm as
the shell of the tortoise. A Hindoo girl, light
as the gazelle, beautiful as Eve, came forth
from the thicket. There is scarcely anything
80 airy and yet so affluent in the luxuriance
of beauty, as the daughter of India. I could
see her thoughts through her delicate skin
The thorny lianas tore her sandals from her
feet, but she stepped rapidly forward; the
wild beast which came from the river, where
it had quenched its thirst, sprang past her,



WITHOUT PICTURES. 39

for the girl held in her hand a burning lamp.
I could see the fresh blood in her fingers as
she curved them into a shade for the flame.
She approached the river; placed the lamp
on the stream; and the lamp sailed away.
The flame flickered as if it would go out;
but still it burned, and the girl’s dark, flash-
ing eyes followed it with her whole soul
beaming from under her long silken eyelashes ;
she knew that if the lamp bummed as long
as she could see it, then her beloved was alive;
but if it went out, then that he was dead..
The lamp burned and fluttered, and her heart
burned and fluttered also; she sank on her
knee and breathed a prayer: close beside
her, in the grass, lay a water-snake, but she
thought only of Brama and her beloved. “ He
lives” exclaimed she, rejoicingly, and the
mountains repeated her words, “he lives F



40 A PICTURE-BOOK

SECOND EVENING.

It was last evening,—said the Moon,—
that I peeped down into a yard inclosed
by houses. A hen was there with eleven
chickens ; a little girl was playing around
them ; the hen set up a cackling cry, she
was frightened, and spread out her wings
over her eleven young ones. With that, out
«ame the father of the child and scolded her.
This evening (it is only a few minutes since,)
the moon looked down again into that yard.
Everything was quite still; presently, how-
ever, out came the little girl, and stole very
softly to the hen-house, lifted the latch, and
crept in to the hen and the chickens. The hen
and chickens set up a loud cry, and flew here
and there, and the little girl ran after them.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 4l

Again the father came out, and now he was
very angry indeed, and scolded her, and
pulled her out of the hen-house by her arm ;
she hung back her head, and there were large
tears in her blue eyes.

“What wast thou doing here ?” asked the
father. She wept; “I only wanted,” said she,
“to kiss the hen, and ask her to forgive me
for yesterday: but I did not dare to tell
thee.”

The father kissed the sweet innocent on
her forehead; the moonlight fell lovingly
upon her eyes and mouth.



42 A PICTURE-BOOK

THIRD EVENING.

In a narrow street, just by,—said the
Moon,—which is so very confined that only
just for one minute can my beams fall upon
the walls of the houses—and yet at this
moment I can look abroad and see the world
as it moves—into this narrow street I looked
and saw a woman. Sixteen years ago and
she was a child; she lived away in the
oountry, and played in the old pastor’s garden.
The hedges of roses had grown out of bounds
for many years; they threw their wild un-
trimmed branches across the path, and sent
up long, green shoots into the apple-trees;
there was only a rose here and there, and
they were not beautiful as the queen of flow-
ers may be, although the color and the



WITHOUT PICTURES. 43

odor were there. The pastor’s little daughter,
however, was a much more beautiful rose: she
sate upon her little wooden stool under the
wild untrimmed hedge, and kissed her doll
with the broken face.

Ten years later I saw her again; I saw
her in the splendid dancing-hall; she was
the lovely bride of a rich tradesman, and I
rejoiced in her good fortune. I visited her in
the still evening. Alas! my rose had put
forth also wild shoots like the roses in the
pastor’s garden ! ,

Every-day life has its tragedy—this evening
I saw the last act. Sick to death, she lay in
that narrow street, upon her bed. The wick-
ed landlord, her only protector, a man rude
and cold-hearted, drew back the curtain.
“Get up!” said he, “thy cheeks are pale
and hollow; paint thyself! -Get money, or I
will turn thee out into the streets! Get up
quickly ”

“Death is at my heart!” said she, “oh!
let me rest !”

He compelled her to rise; painted her
cheeks, twined roses in her hair, placed her
at the window, with a buring light beside



44 A PICTURE-BOOK

her, and went his way. I glanced at her;
she sate immoveable ; her hands fell upon hea
lap. The window blew open, so that one of
the panes of glass was broken; but she
moved not; the curtains of the window were
blown around her like a flame. She was
dead. From that open window the dead
preached powerfully ; my rose of the pastor's
garden !



WITHOUT PICTURES. 45

FOURTH EVENING.

I was last evening at a German play,—
said the Moon ;—it was in alittlecity. The
theatre was a stable; that is to say, the
stalls were made use of and decorated for
boxes, the old wood-work was covered over
with figured paper. There hung from the
low roof a little iron chandelier, and in order
that it might rise the moment the prompter’s
bell rang (as is the custom in large theatres),
it was now covered by a tub turned upside
down. The bell rang, and the little iron
chandelier made a leap of half an ell, and by
that token people knew that the comedy had
begun. A young prince and his wife, who
were traveling through the town, were to be
present at the performance, and therefore it



46 A PICTURE-BOCK

was a very full house, excepting that under
the chandelier it was like a little crater. Not
a single soul sate there ; the chandelier kept
dropping its oil—drop! drop! It was so hot
in the little theatre that they were obliged to
open all the holes in the walls to let in fresh
air, and through all these peeped in lads and
lasses from the outside, although the police
sate by and drove them off with sticks.

Close by the orchestra, people saw the
young princely couple sitting in two old arm-
chairs, which otherwise would have been
occupied by the burgomaster and his lady;
as it was, however, they sate upon wooden
benches, like other townsfolk. “One may
see that there are falcons above falcons!” was
Madame’s silent observation; and after this
all became more festal; the chandelier made
a leap upwards, the people began counting on
their fingers, and I—yes, the Moon—was
present during the whole comedy.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 47

FIFTH EVENING.

Yesterday,—said the Moon,—I looked
down upon busy Paris. I gazed into the
chambers of the Louvre. An old grandmother,
wretchedly clad, and who belonged to the
lower class, entered the large, empty throne-
room, accompanied by one of ‘the under ser-
vants of the palace. It had cost her many
small sacrifices, and very much eloquence
had she used before she could be admitted
here. She folded her thin hands, and looked
as reverentially around her as if she had been
in a church.

“It was here!” she said, “here!” and she
approached the throne which was covered
with a cloth of rich velvet, trimmed with gold.
“There !” said she, “there !” and she bowed



és A PICTURE-BOOK

her knee and kissed the crimson velvet—I
think she wept.

“It was not that velvet,” said the at-
tendant, while a smile played round his
mouth.

“But still it was here!” said the woman,
“and it looked in this room just so!”

“Just so,” replied he; “and yet it was not
just so either: the windows were beaten out ;
the doors were torn off their hinges, and
there was blood upon the floor! You can
say, however, for all that, that your son
died upon the throne of France !”

“Died!” repeated the old woman.

No more was said; they left the hall;
the shades of evening fell deeper, and the
moonlight streamed in with twofold bright-
ness on the rich velvet of the throne of
France.

I will tell thee a story. It was in the
revolution ot July, towards evening, on the
most brilliant day of victory, when every
house was a fortress, every window a redoubt,
the people stormed the Tuilleries. Even
women and children fought among the com-
batants; they thronged in through the



WITHOUT PICTURES. 49

chambers and halls of the palace. A poor,
half-grown lad, in ragged clothing, fought
desperately among the elder warriors; mor-
tally wounded at length by the thrusts of
many bayonets, he sank to the ground; this
took place in the throne-room. They wrap-
ped the velvet about his wounds; the blood
streamed over the royal purple. It was a
picture! The magnificent hall; the combat-
ing groups; a rent banner on the floor; the
tri-colored flag floating above the bayonets;
and upon the throne the poor lad, with his
pale, glorified countenance, his eyes turned
towards heaven; his limbs stiffening in
death ; his uncovered breast; his miserable
garments, and around these the rich folds of
the velvet, embroidered with silver lilies !

As that boy lay in the cradle, it had been
foretold that he should die on the throne of
France! His mother’s heart had dreamed
of anew Napoleon. The moonbeams have
kissed the garland of everlasting upon his
grave; her beams this night kissed the old
grandmother's forehead as she dreamed of
this picture—The poor lad upon the throne
of France !

3 4



86 A PICTURE-BOOK

SIXTH EVENING.

Ihave been in Upsala,—said the Moon.
She looked down upon the great castle, with
the miserable grass of its trampled fields. She
mirrored herself in the river Fyris, whilst the
steam-boat drove the terrified fish among the
reeds. Clouds careered along the moonlit
sky, and cast long shadows over the graves,
as they are called, of Odin, Thor, and Freya.
Names are carved in the scanty turf upon
the heights. Here there is no building-stone
in which the visitors can hew their names;
no walled fences on which they can paint.
them ; they cut away, therefore, the turf, and
the naked earth stares forth in the large
letters of their names, which look like a huge
net spread over the hill. An immortality
which a fresh growth of turf destroys.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 61

A man stood on the hill-top; he was a
poet. He emptied a silver-rimmed mead-
horn, and whispered a name, which he bade
the wind not to reveal; a count’s coronet
shone above it, and therefore he breathed it
low—the moonbeams smiled upon him, for a.
poet’s crown shone above his! The noble
name of Eleonora d’Este is united to Tasso’s.
I know where the rose of beauty grows. A
cloud passed before the moon. May no
cloud pass between the poet and his rose !



52 A PICTURE-BOOK

SEVENTH EVENING

Down by the seaside there extends a
wood of oaks and beeches, fresh and fragrant
and every branch is visited by hundreds of
nightingales. Close beside is the sea, the
eternally-moving sca, and between the sea
and the wood runs the broad high-road. One
carriage after another rolled past. I follow-
ed them not; my eye rested mostly on one
spot where was a barrow, or old warrior’s
grave. Brambles and white thorns grew up
from among the stones. There is the poetry
of nature. Dost thou believe that this is felt
by every one? Listen to what occurred there
only last night.

First of all, two rich countrymen drove
past. “There are some splendid trees there,”



WITHOUT PICTURES. 53

said one. “There are ten loads of fire-wood
in each,” replied the other. “If the winter be
severe, one should get forty rix dollars in
spring for the measure !” and they were gone.

“The road is abominable here,” said an-
other traveller. “It is those cursed trees,” re-
plied his neighbor; “there is no circulation
of air here, excepting from the sea :” and they
advanced onward.

At that moment the diligence came by.
All were asleep at the most beautiful point :
the driver blew his horn, but he only thought,
“T blow it capitally, and here it sounds well ;
what will they think of it?” And with that
the diligence was gone.

.Next came by two young country-fellows
on horseback. The champagne of youth cir-
culated through their blood ; a smile was on
their lips as they looked towards the moss-
grown height, and thedark bushes. “I went
there with Christine Miller,” said one to the
other; and they were gone.

The flowers sent forth their fragrance;
every breeze slept ; the sea looked like a por-
tion of heaven spread out over a deep valley ;
a carriage drove along; there were six per-



BA A PICTURE-BOOK

sons in it, four of whom were asleep; the
fifth was thinking of his new summer-coat
which was so becoming to him; the sixth
leaned forward to the driver, and asked
whether there was anything remarkable
about that heap of stones: “ No,” said the fel-
low, “it’s only a heap of stones, but the trees
are remarkable!” “Tell me about them,”
said the other. “Yes, they are very remark-
able; you see, in winter, when the snow co-
vers the ground, and everything, as it were,
goes out in a twinkling, then those trees serve
me as a landmark by which I can guide my-
self, and not drive into the sea; they are,
therefore, you see, very remarkable,”—and by
this time the carriage had passed the trees.

A painter now came up; his eyes flashed ;
he said not a word, he whistled, and the
nightingales sang, one louder than another ;
“hold your tongues !” exclaimed he, and noted
down with accuracy the colors and tints of the
trees; “blue, black, dark-brown.” It would
be a beautiful painting! He made sketch,
as hints for his intended picture, and all the
time he whistled a march of Rossini’s.

The last who came by was a poor girl;



WITHOUT PICTURES. 85

she sate down to rest herself upon the old
warriors grave, and put her bundle beside
her. Her lovely, pale face inclined itself to-
wards the wood as she sate listening; her
eyes flashed as she looked heaven-ward acroes
the sea; her hands folded themselves, and
she murmured the Lord’s Prayer. She did
not understand the emotions which penetrated
her soul; but, nevertheless, in future years,
this moment, in which she was surrounded
by nature, will return to her much more
beautifully, nay, will be fixed more faithfully
in her memory, than on the tablets of the
painter, though he noted down every shade
of color. She went forward, and the moon-
beams lighted her path, until daylight kissed
her forehead !



56 A PICTURE-BOOK

EIGHTH EVENING.

There were thick clouds over the sky;
the Moon was not visible ; I stood in twofold
solitude in my little room, and looked out
into the night, which should have been illu-
minated by her beams. My thoughts fied
far away, up to the great friend who told me
stories so beautifully every evening, and show-
ed me pictures. Yes, what has not she seen !
She looked down upon the waters of the
deluge, and smiled on the ark as she now
smiles upon me, and brought consolation to
a new world whith should again bloom
forth. When the children of Israel stood
weeping by the rivers of Babylon, she look-
ed mournfully down upon the willows where
their harps hung. When Romeo ascended



WITHOUT PICTURES. 87

to the balcony, and the kiss of love went like
a cherub’s thought from earth, the round
Moon stood in the transparent atmosphere,
half concealed amid the dark cypresses. She
saw the hero on St. Helena, when from his
solitary rock he looked out over the ocean of
the world, whilst deep thoughts were at work
in his breast. Yes, what could not the Moon
relate! The life of the world isa history for
her. This evening I see thee not, old friend!
I can paint no picture in remembrance of thy
visit !—and as I dreamingly looked up into
the clouds, light shone forth; it was a moon-
beam, but it is gone again; dark clouds float
past ; but that ray was a salutation, a friend-
ly evening salutation from the Moon.



AS A PICTURK-BOOK

NINTH EVENING.

Again the air is clear; I had again mate-
rial for a sketch; listen to that which I
learned from the Moon.

The birds of the polar region flew on-
ward, and the whale swam towards the
eastern coast of Greenland. Rocks covered
with ice and clouds shut in a valley in which
the bramble and whortleberry were in full
bloom. The fragrant lichen diffused its odor ;
the Moon shone faintly; its crescent was pale
as the leaf of the water-lily, which, torn from
its stalk, has floated for weeks upon the water.
The northern-lights burned brightly; their
circle was broad, and rays went upwards
from them like whirling pillars of fire, as-
cending through the whole sphere of the



WITHOUT PICTURES. 59

heavens, in colors of green and crimson.
The inhabitants of the valley assembled for
dance and mirth, but they looked not with
admiring eyes at the magnificent spectacle
which was familiar tothem. “Let the dead
play at ball with the heads of the walrus !”
thought they, according to their belief, and
occupied themselves only with the dance and
the song. In the middle of the circle, wrap-
ped in fur, stood a Greenlander with his
hand-drum, and accompanied himself as he
sung of seal-hunting, and the people answer-
ed in chorus with an “Bia! eia! a! and
skipped round and round in their white furs
like so many bears dancing. With this, trial
and judgment began. They who were ad-
versaries came forward; the plaintiff impro-
vised in a bold and sarcastic manner the
crime of his opponent, and all the while
the dance went on to the sound of the drum;
the defendant replied in the same manner;
but the assembly laughed and passed sen-
tence upon him in the meantime. A loud
noise was now heard from the mountains:
the icy cliffs were cleft asunder, and the huge
tumbling masses were dashed to atoms in —



60 A PICTURE-BOOK

their fall. That was a beautiful Greenland
summer-night.

At the distance of a hundred paces, there
lay a sick man within an open tent of
skins; there was life still in his veins, but for
all that he must die, because he himself be-
lieved it, and the people all around him believed
ittoo. His wife, therefore, had sewn his cloak
of skin tightly around him, that she might
not be obliged to touch the dead; and she
asked him—“ Wilt thou be buried upon the
mountains in the eternal snow? I will
decorate the place with thy boat and thy
arrows. The spirits of the mist shall dance
away over it! Or wouldst thou rather be
sunk in the sea?’ “In the sea! whisper-
ed he, and nodded with a melancholy smile.
“There thou wilt have a beautiful summer-
tent,” said the wife ; “ there will gambol about
thee thousands of seals; there will the walrus
sleep at thy feet, and the hunting will be
certain and merry!” The children, amid
loud howlings, tore down the outstretched
skin from the window, that the dying man
might be borne out to the sea—the swelling
sea, which gave hjm food during his lifetime,
‘and now rest in death.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 61

His funeral monument is the floating
mountain of ice, which increases night and
day. ‘The seals slumber upon the icy blocks,
and the birds of the tempest whirl about it.



62 A PICTURE-ROOK

TENTH EVENING.

I knew an old maid,—said the Moon,
she wore every winter yellow satin trim-
med with fur; it was always new; it was
always her unvarying fashion; she wore
every summer the same straw bonnet, and, I
fancy, the very same blue-grey gown. She
never went anywhere but to one old female
friend of hers who lived on the other side the
street ;—during the last year, however, she
did not even go there—because her old friend
was dead. All solitarily sate my old maid
.working at her window, in which, through
the whole summer, there stood beautiful
flowers, and in the winter lovely cresses,
grown on a little hillock of felt. During the
last month, however, she no longer sate



WITHOUT PICTURES. 63

at her window; but I knew that she was
still alive, because I had not seen her set
out on that long journey of which she and
her friend had so often talked. “Yes,” she
had said, “when I shall die, I shall have to
take a longer journey than I ever took
through my whole life; the family burial-
place lies above twenty miles from here;
thither must I be borne, and there shall I
sleep with the rest of my kin.”

Last night a carriage drew up at her
door; they carried out a coffin, and by that I
knew that she was fead; they laid straw
around the coffin and drove away. There
‘slept the quiet old mgid, who for the last
year had never been out of her house; and
the carriage rattled along the streets and out
of the city, as if it had been on a journey of
pleasure. Upon the high road it went on yet
faster ; the fellow who drove looked over his
shoulder several times; I fancy that he was
afraid of seeing her sitting in her yellow satin
upon the coffin behimd him; he therefore
urged on the horses thoughtlessly, holding
them in so tightly that they foamed at the
mouth: they were young and full of mettle:



64 A PICTURE-BOOK

a hare ran across the road, and off they set
at full speed. The quiet old maid, who
from one year’s end to another had moved
only slowly in a narrow circle, now that she
was dead, drove over stock and stone along
the open high-road. The coffin, which was
wrapped in matting, was shook off, and now
lay upon the road, whilst horses, driver, and
carriage, sped onward in a wild career.

The lark which flew upward singing
from the meadow, warbled its morning song
above the coffin; - it’ then descended and
alighted upon it, pecked at the matting with
its beak, as if it were rending to pieces some
strange insect. . ,

The lark rose upward again, singing in
the clear ether, and I withdrew behind the
rosy clouds of morning.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 68

ELEVENTH EVENING.

I will give thee a picture of Pompeii,—
said. the Moon. J have been in the
suburbs, the Street of Tombs, as it is called,
where once the rejoicing ‘youths, with rosea
around their brows, danced with the lovely
sisters of Lais. Now the silence of death
reigns here; German soldiers in the pay of
Naples keep guard here, and play at’ cards
and dice. A crowd of foreigners, from. the
other side of the mountains, wandered into
the city, accompanied by the guard. They
wished to see this city, arisen from the grave,
by the full clear light of the Moon; and I
showed to them the tracks of the chariot-
wheels in the streets paved with broad slabs
of lava; I showed to them the names upen

5



66 A PICTURE-BOOK

the doors and the signs which still remain
suspended from the shop-fronts ; they looked
into the basin of the fountains ornamented
with shells and conches; but no stream of
water leaped upwards; no song resounded
from the richly painted chambers, where
dogs of bronze guarded the doors. It was
the city of the dead; Vesuvius alone still
thundered his eternal hymn. .
We went to the temple of Venus, which
is built of dazzling white marble, with broad
steps ascending to its high altar, and a ver-
dant weeping-willow growing between its
columns. The air was exquisitely transpa-
rent and blue; and in the back-ground
towered Vesuvius, black as night: fires
ascended from the crater of the mountain
like the stem of a pine-tree; the illumined
cloud of smoke hung suspended in the still-
ness of night, like the pine-tree’s crown, but.
red as blood. Among the strangers there,
was a singer, a true and noble being, to whom
I had seen homage paid in the greatest cities
of Europe. When the party arrived at the
amphitheatre, they all seated themselves upon
the marble steps, and again, as in former



WITHOUT PICTURES. 67

centuries, human beings occupied a portion
of that space. T'he scene was now the same
as in those former times; the walls of the
theatre, and the two arches in the back-
ground, through which might be seen the
same decoration as then—Nature itself—
the mountains between Sorento and Amalfi.
The singer, for fun, threw herself back into
those ancient times, and sung; the scene
inspired her; she reminded the listener of the
wild horse of Arabia, when it snorts and
careers away, with its mane lifted by the
wind; there was the same ease, the same
security; she brought to mind the agonized
mother at the cross of Golgotha ; there was
the same heartfelt, deep sorrow. Once more
resounded around her, as had resounded
thousands of years before, the plaudits and
acclamations of delight. “Happy! heavenly
gifted one! .exclaimed they all. Three
minutes after and the scene was changed ;
every one had departed; no tone was heard
any longer; the whole party was gone; but
the ruins still stood unchanged, as they will
stand for centuries, and no one knows of the



68 A PICTURE-BOOK

applause of the moment—of the beautiful
singer—of her tones and her smile. ll is
past and forgotten; even to me is this
hour a perished memory.



WITHOUT PICTURES. 69

TWELFTH EVENING.

I peeped in at a critic's window,—said the
Moon,—in a city of Germany. The room
was filled with excellent furniture, books, and
a chaos of papers; several young men were
sitting there; the critic himself stood at his
desk; two small! books, both by young
authors, were about to be reviewed. “One
of these,” said he, “has been sent to me; I
have not read it though—but it is beautifully
got up; what say you of its contents?”

“QO,” said one of the young men, who was
himself a poet, “there is a deal that is good
in it; very little to expunge; but, he is a
young man, and the verses might be better !
There is a healthy tone in the thoughts—
but they are, after all, such thoughts as every-



70 A PICTURE-BOOK

body has!—but as to that, where does one
find anything new? You may very well
praise him, but I never believe that he will
turn out anything of a poet. He has read a
deal, however ; is an extraordinary orientalist,
and has sound judgment. He it was who
wrote that beautiful critique of my Fan-
cies of Domestic Life. One ought to be
gentle towards a young man.”

“But he is a thorough ass? said another
gentleman in the room; “nothing worse in -
poetry than mediocrity, and he does not get
above that !”

“Poor fellow,” said a third, “and his aunt
makes herself so happy about him. She it
was, Mr. Critic, who obtained so many sub-
scribers’ names to your last translation.”

“The good woman! yes, I have given a
short notice of the book. Unmistakeable ta-
lent! a welcome gift! a flower out of the
garden of poesy; beautifully got out, and so
on. But the other book—he shall catch it! I
had to buy it—I hear it is praised; he has
genius, don’t you think?”

“That is the general opinion,” said the
poet, “ but there is something wild about it.”

«



WITHOUT PICTURES. 71

“Tt will do him good to find fault and cut
him up a little, else he will be getting toogood
an opinion of himself !”

“But that is unreasonable,” interrupted a
fourth ; “don’t let us dwell too much on tri-
fling faults, but rejoice in the good—and there
is much here—though he thrusts i in good and
bad altogether.”

“Unmistakeable talent!” wrote down the
critic; “the usual examples of carelessness.
That he also can write unlucky verse, may
be seen at page five-and-twenty, where two
hiatuses occur: the study of the ancients to
be recommended, and so on.”

I went away, said the Moon,—and peep-
ed through the window into the aunt’s house
where sate our honored poet, the tame one, the
worshipped of all the guests, and was happy.

“TI sought out the other poet, the wild one,
who also was in a great party of one of his
patrons, where they talked about the other

‘poet’s book. “T shall also read yours !” said
Mecienas, “but, honestly speaking, you know
I never say to you what I do not mean; I do
not expect great things from it. You are too
wild for me! too fantastic—but I acknow-



72 A PICTURE-BOOK

ledge that as a man you are highly respecta-
ble!” . ,

A young girl who sat in a corner read in
a book :—

To the dust goes the poet’s glory,
And common-place to fame !-~
That isthe trite old story,
And ‘twill ever be the same!



WITHOUT PICTURES. 73

THIRTEENTH EVENING.

The Moon told me as follows :—There
lie two peasants’ cottages by the road through
the wood. The doors are low, and the win-
dows are irregular, but all around them grow
buckthorn and barberries ; the roof is mossy
and grown over with yellow-flowered stone-
crop and houseleek; nothing but cabbages
and potatoes grow in the little garden, but
there grows in the hedge an elder-tree, and
under this sate a little girl; and there she
sate with her brown eyes riveted upon an old
oak tree between the houses. This tree has
a tall and decayed hole, the top of it is sawn
off, and there the stork has built his nest ;
there he stood and clattered with his beak.

&



T4 A PICTURE-BOOK

A little boy came out of the cottage and
placed himself by the little girl’s side; they
were brother and sister.

“ What are you looking at ?” cried he.

“Tam looking at the stork,” she replied ;
“the neighbor told me that this evening the
stork will bring ua either a little brother or
sister ; and so now I will stand and watch
when they come.”

“The storks do not bring anything,” said
the boy. “The neighbor’s wife told me the
same thing ; but she laughed while she said
it, and so ] asked her if she durst say as sure
as heaven, to it, but she dared not, and there-
fore I know that the story about the stork is
only what they tell us children.”

“Qh, really!” said the little girl.

“And I'l tell thee what,” said the boy;
“It is our Lord himself that brings little ba-
bies ; he has them under his coat; but no-
body can see our Lord now, and therefore we
do not see him when he comes.”

At that same moment the twigs of the
elder-tree were moved; the children folded
their hands and looked one at the other, for
they thought that it was our Lord passing



WITHOUT PICTURES. 75

along with the little ones. They stood side
by side, and took hold of each other’s hand.

The house-door opened, and out came the
neighbor.

“ Come in now,” said she; “and see what
the stork has brought; he has brought a lit-
tle brother !”

The children nodded their heads; they
knew very well that the little brother was
come.



76 4 PICTURE-BOOK

FOURTEENTH EVENING.

I passed over Luneburg Heath,—said the
Moon,—a solitary house stood by the road-
side ; some leafless trees grew beside it, and
among these sung a nightingale which had
lost its way. In the severity of the night it
must perish; that was its song of death
which I heard. With the early twilight
there came along the road a company of em-
igrant peasants, who were on their way to
Bremen or Hamburgh, to take ship for Amer-
ica, where happiness—the so much dreamed-
of happiness—they expected should spring
up for them. The women carried their
youngest children upon their backs, the older
ones sprang along by their side ; a poor mis-
erable horse dragged a car, on which were a



WITHOUT PICTURES. 77

few articles of household furniture. The cold
wind blew ; the little girl clung closer to her
mother, who looked up to my round waning
face and thought upon her bitter want.

Her thoughts were those of the whole
company, and therefore the red glimmering
of daylight was like the evangile of the sun
of prosperity which should again rise. They
heard the song of the dying nightingale ; it
was to them no false prophet, but a foreteller
of happiness. The wind whistled, but they
understood not the song; “Sail securely
across the sea! thou hast paid for the long
voyage with all that thou art possessed of;
poor an’ helpless shalt thou set foot on
thy land of Canaan. Thou mayst sell thy-
self, thy wife, and thy child, yet you shall
none of you suffer long. Behind the broad
fragrant leaf sits the goddess of death; her
kiss of welcome breathes consuming fever in-
to thy blood, far away, far away, over the
swelling waters !”

The emigrant company hstened joyfully
to the song of the nightingale, which they
thought announced to them happiness. Day
beamed from behind light clouds, and the



78 A PICTURE-BOOK

peasant people went over the heath to the
church ; the darkly-apparelled women, with
their milk-white linen around their heads,
looked like figures which had stepped forth
from the old church paintings; all around
them was nothing but the vast and death-
like landscape, the withered brown heath—
dark, leafless plains, in the midst of white
sand-banks. The women carried their hymn-
books in their hands, and advanced towards
the church. Oh, pray! pray for them who
wander onward to their graves on the other
side of the heaving water !



WITHOUT PICTURES. 79

FIFTEENTH EVENING.

I know a theatrical Clown,—said the
Moon,—the public applauds when it sees
him; every one of his movements is comic,
and throws the house into convulsions of
laughter, and yet he is not moved thereby :
that is his peculiarity. When he was yeta
child, and played with other boys, he was
already a punchinello. Nature had made
him one ; had given him one lump upon his
back, and another upon his breast. The
inner man, however—the spiritual—that was
really well-formed. No human being had
deeper feeling, or greater elasticity of mind
than he. The theatre was his ideal-world,
Had he been slender and well proportioned,
then he might have become a first-rate tragic



80 A PICTURE-BOOK

actor, for the great, the heroic, filled his soul ;
but he was obliged to be the Clown. His
sufferings, even, and his melancholy increased
the comic expression of his strongly-marked
countenance, and excited the laughter of the
crowded public who applauded their favorite.
The pretty little Columbine was friendly and
kind to him, and yet she preferred marrying
Harlequin. It would have been too comic in
reality to have married the Clown; like the
union of “ Beauty and the Beast.” When the
Clown was most out of humor, she was the only
one who could make him smile—nay, even
burst into peals of laughter. First of all she
would be melancholy with him, then rather
cheerful, and at last full of fun.

“T know what it is thou art in want of!”
said she—“ yes, it is this love !” and so he was
obliged to laugh.

“Me and love!” exclaimed he. “That
would be a merry thing! How the public
would applaud.”

“It is love!” continued she; and added,
with comic pathos—“It is me that you love !”

“Yes! and yet there are people who say
there is no such thing as love!” The poor



WITHOUT PICTURES. 81

Clown sprung up into the air, he was so
diverted: his melancholy was now gone.
And yet she had spoken the truth: he did
love her—loved her like the sublime and great
in art.

On her wedding-day he was more amusing
than ever. At night he wept: had the public
seen his distressed countenance then, they
would have applauded him!

A few days ago Columbine died. On the
day of her funeral Harlequin’s appearance
was excused on the stage, for he really was a
mourning husband. The manager, however,
was obliged to give something more merry
than common, in order that the public should
not miss too much the lovely Columbine and
the light-bodied Harlequin, and for this reason
it behoved the Clown to be doubly entertain-
ing. He danced and sprung aloft with de-
spair at his heart, and the public clapped their
hands and shouted— Bravo, bravissimo !”
The clown was called for when the perform-
ance was over. Qh, he was invaluable !

This evening, after the play, the poor
little man walked out from the city to the
solitary churchyard. The garland of flowers

6



8 A PICTURE-BOOK

‘was withered on Columbine’s grave; he sate
down. It was something worth painting,
His hands under his chin, his eyes fixed upon
the moon; it was like a monumental figure.
A clown upon a grave! very peculiar and
very comic ! Had the public seen their favorite
then, how they would have shouted—“ Bravo,
Clown ! bravo, bravissimo !”



WITHOUT PICTURES. 88

SIXTEENTH EVENING

Listen to what the Moon said.—I have
seen the cadet, become an officer, dress him-
self for the firet time in his splendid uniform ;
I have‘seen the young girl in her beautiful
ball-dreas ; the young princely bride happy in
her festival attire ; but the felicity of none of
these could equal that which this evening I
saw in a child, a little girl of four years.
They had just put.her on a new blue frock
and anew pink bonnet. The beautiful things
were scarcely on when they called for candles,
because the mo@p-light through the window
was too faint; they must have other light.
There stood the little girl as stiff as a doll,
her arms stretched out from her frock, her
fingers spread out wide from each other—and



84 A PICTURE-BOOK

oh! how her eyes, her whole being, beamed
with delight! .

“To-morrow you shall go out into the
street,” said the mother; and the little one
looked up towards her bonnet and down to-
wards her frock, and smiled joyfully.

“Mother,” said she, “what will the dogs
think, when they see me so beautifully dress-
ed!”



WIFHOUT PICTURES. 85

SEVENTEENTH EVENING.

I have,—said the Moon,—told thee about
Pompeii, that corpse of a city amongst living
cities. 1 know another, one still mfore
strange; not the corpse, but the ghost of a
city. On all sides where the fountain splashes
into a marble basin, I seem to hear stories of
the floating city. Yes, the fountain-streams
can tell them! The billows on the shore
sing of them. Over the surface of the sea
there often floats a mist, that is the widow’s
weeds. The sea’s bridegroom is dead ; his
palace and city are now a mausoleum. Dost
thou know this city? The rolling of the
chariot-wheels, or the sound of the horse’s
hoof, were never heard in its streets. The
fish swims, and like a spectre glides the black
gondola over the green water.



86 A PICTURE-BOOK

I will—continued the Moon,—show thee
the forum of the city, the city’s great square,
and then thou wilt think it to be a city for
adventures. Grass grows between the broad
flag-stones, and thousands of tame pigeons
fly circling in the twilight around the lofty
tower. On three sides thou art surrounded
by colonnades. The Turk, with his long
pipe, sits silently beneath them; the hand-
some Greek-lad leans against a pillar, and
looks up to the elevated trophies, the tall
masts, the memorial of the ancient power.
The flag hangs drooping like mourning
crape; a girl stands there to rest herself, she
has set down the heavy buckets of water,
whilst the yoke on which she sustained them
rests upon her shoulders, and she supports
herself on the column of victory. That is
not a fairy palace but a church which thou
seest before thee! the gilded dome, the gilded
balls around it, shine in my beams; the
magnificent bronze horses upon it have
traveled about like bronze horses in a fairy
tale; they have traveled thither, away from
their place, and then again back! Seest
thou the beautiful painting on walls and win-



WITHOUT PICTURES. a

dow panes? It is as if some genius had done
the will ofa child and thus decorated this ex-
traordinary temple. Dost thou see the winged
lion upon the pillar? Gold yet shines upon
it, but the wings are bound, the lion is dead
because the king of the sea is dead ; the vast
halls are empty, and where once hung costly
pictures the naked walls are now seen.
Lazzaroni sleep under the arches, where at
one time only the high noble dared to tread,
Either from the deep well or from the chamber
of the leaden roof, near to the Bridge of
Sighs, sounds forth a groan, whilst tamborines
are heard from the painted gondola as the
bridal-ring is cast from the glittering Bucen-
taur to Adria, the queen of the sea. Adhia,
wrap thyself in mist! let the widow's veil
cover the breast, and cast it over thy bride-
groom’s mausoleum ;—the marble-builder, the
spectre-like, Venice.”



88 A PICTURE-BOOK

EIGHTEENTH EVENING.

I looked down upon a great theatre,—said
the Moon,—the whole house was full of spec-
tators, because a new actor made his debut;
my beams fell upon a little window in the
wall; a painted face pressed its forehead
against the glass; it was the hero of the
night. The chivalric beard curled upon his
chin; but there were tears in the man’s eyes,
because he had been hissed—hissed with
reason. Poor fellow! but the realm of art
will not endure the feeble. He deeply felt
and passionately loved art, but she did not
love him.

The prompter’s bell rung ;—according to
the piece, the hero stepped forth with a bold
and determined air—thus had he to appear



WITHOUT PICTURES. 89

before a public which burst into peals of
laughter—The piece. was ended; I saw a
man wrapped in a cloak steal away down the
steps; it was he, the spirit-crushed cavalier;
the servants of the theatre whispered to each
other as he passed. I followed the poor
wretch home to his chamber. Hanging is
such an ignominious death, and people have
not always poison at hand. I know that he
thought of both. He looked at his pale face
in the glass; half closed his eyes to see
whether he would look handsome as a corpse.
Itis possible for people to be unfortunate in
the highest degree, and yet in the highest
degree vain at the same time. He thought
upon death, upon self-murder ; I believe he
wept in pity of himself—he wept bitterly,
and when people have had a good fit of cry-
ing they do not kill themselves,

A year has passed since then. A comedy
was acted, but this time in a little theatre, by
a poor vagrant company. I saw again the
well-known face, the painted cheeks, the
curled beard. He again looked up to me
and smiled—and yet for all that he had been

hissed—hissed scarcely a minute before in
h



90 A PICTURE-BOOK

that miserable theatre, hissed by that miser-
able audience! .

This very evening a poor hearse has
driven out of the gate of the town; not a
single being accompanied it. There lay upon
it a suicide, our painted and derided hero.
The driver was the only attendant; no one
followed, no one except the Moon. In an
angle of the churchyard wall is the self-
murdered laid; nettles will soon spring up
thereon ; there will grave-diggers cast thorns
and weeds from other graves.



WITHOUT PICTURES. a1

NINETEENTH EVENING.

I come from Rome,—said the Moon,—
there, in the middle of the city, upon one of
the seven hills, lie the ruins of the palace of
the Ceesars ; a wild fig-tree grows in a chink
of the wall, and covers its nakedness with its
broad, gray-green leaves; the ass wanders
over the heaps of rubbish among the laurel
hedges, and feasts on the golden thistle.
From this spot, whence the Roman eagle
once flew forth, went, and saw, and conquer-
ed, the entrance is now through a small, mis-
erable house, smeared with clay, betweeu
two broken pillars; tendrils of the vine hang
down, like a mourning garland, over the nar-
tow window. An old woman, with her little
grand-daughter lived there ; they ruled now



92 A PICTURE-BUUA

in the palace of the Cesars, and showed to
strangers the buried treasures. There remains
of the rich throne-room nothing but a naked
wall; the shadow of the black cypress points
to the place where the throne stood. The
earth lies to the depth of some feet above the
broken floor; the little girl, now the daugh-
ter of the palace of the Cesars, often sits
there upon her little stool, when the evening
bell rings. The keyhole in the door, close
beside her, she calls her balcony, and through
it she sees over half of Rome, as far as the
mighty dome of St. Peter’s.
It was silent as ever, this evening, and
the little girl came homeward in my full,
bright light. She carried upon her head an
antiquely-formed earthen jug filled with wa-
ter; her feet were bare; the black petticoat
and the little chemise sleeves were in tatters ;
I kissed the child’s beautiful round shoulder,
her black eyes, and her dark shining hair.
She mounted up the steps of the house, which
were steep, and were formed of broken pieces
of wail and a shattered capital. The bright-
colored lizard glided timidly past her feet,
but she was not frightened; she raised her



WITHOUT PICTURES. 93

hand to ring at the door; there hung a hare’s
foot in the packthread, which is now the bell-
pull at the palace of the Cesars. She stood
stock-still for a moment ; what was she think-
ing about’? Perhaps of the beautiful Jesus-
child clothed in gold and silver, in the chapel
pelow, where the silver lamp was burning,
and where her little-girl friends were singing
in chorus as she knew ; I cannot tell if it was
of this she thought! but again she made a
movement, and stumbled; the earthen jug
fell from her head and was shivered in pieces
upon the broken marble pavement. She
burst into tears; the beautiful daughter of
the palace of the Cesars wept over the poor,
broken, earthen jug; she stood with her bare:
feet and wept, and dared not to pull at the
pack-thread string, the bell-pull at the palace
of the Cesars.



Full Text








The Baldwin Library

University
RMB ssi
Florida




FRANCIS & CO.’S

LITTLE LIBRARY:

FOR YOUNG PERSONS OF VARIOUS AGES.

A PICTURE BOOK WITHOUT PICTURES
AND OTHER STORIES

BY HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
Hrancis & Co.'s Bittle Library.

©. 8, Francts & Co., New York, huve published a uniform Serics
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L. MARIA CHILD.—Frowrns ror Cnprun: No. 2, for Chik
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—— Fiowerg ror Cainpran: No. 2, for Children threo or four
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twelve years old.

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Tue Curistmas Tree: A Book of Stories. .

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MRS, TRIMMER,—Tux Rossing; of Domestic Lirz amone
THE Birps, Designed for the Instruction of Children
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MISS LESLIE.—Russet anp Stoney ann CHasz Lourne:
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MRS. CAROLINE GILMAN.—Tue Lirrir Wreata op

Sroxizs anp Poums FoR CinupaEn,

Srorigs anp Porms for Cuibpren,

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.—A CunisTMas GREET
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—— A Picture Book wiruour Picroures ; ana viner Stories:
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——— A Danisw Story Boos,

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FACTS TO CORRECT FANCIES; or Shert Narratives
compiled from the Memoirs of Remarkable Women.
By a Mother.

HOLIDAY STORIES. Containing five Mora} Tales.

MRS HOFLAND,~Tue Hisrony or an Orricer’s Wipow

and her Young Family. '

Tue Cirreyman’s Wivow, and her Young Family.

—— Tur Mercuant’s Wivow, and her Young Family.

MISS ABBOT.—Kare anp Lizzt; on Six Montus ovT oF

Scuoou.

MISS ELIZA ROBBINS.—Ctasstc Tatrs. Designed for the
instruction and Amusement of Young Persons. By the
author of “ American Popular Lessons,” &c.

MRS. S. C. HALL.—Turns or Fortuny; ALL 18 NoT Gone
THAT GLITTera, &c.

«=> Tam Private Purse; Creverness, and other Tales












mar
4s IN

28

DEE

NT

NA

I

ST

HANS CHRI

z by Carl Hartmann

ram a Paintin

FE
@. H. FRANCIS, 128 WASHINGTON STREZT.

1852.
A

PICTURE-BOOK

WITHOUT PICTURES:
And @toer Htortes,
FROM THE DANISH
or
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
TRANSLATED BY
MARY HOWITT.

Mith a Memote of the Auther.

NEW-YORK:
0.8. FRANCIS & CO.,252 BROADWAY
BOSTON:
d. He FRANCIS, 128 WASHINGTON STREET.

1852.
CONTENTS.

~~

Mexorr or Hans Curistran ANDERSEN - - 7

A Picturs-Boox witnout Pictures - - - 33

Mr Boots - - - -2¢ «*# «© «» 195
Scenes on THE Danuse : - . - 133
Preasus anp THE Post-Honszs - - - 14

Tur Emperor's New Crotags 153

Tux SwincuxrrD - . - . - . - 164

Tux Reat Princess - - * . . - 173
MEMOIR OF

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN.
BY MARY HOWITT.
MEMOIR.

Waeruenr regarded as the human being as-
serting in his own person the true nobility of
mind and moral worth, or the man of genius,
whose works alone have raised him from the
lowest poverty and obscurity, to be an honor-
ed guest with kings and queens, Hans Chris-
tian Andersen is one of the most remarkable
men of his day.

Like most men of great original talent, he
is emphatically one of the people; and writ-
ing as he has done, principally of popular
life, he describes what he himself has suffered
and seen. Poverty or hardship, however,
never soured his mind; on the contrary,
whatever he has written is singularly genial,
and abounds with the most kindly andani-
versal sympathy. Human life, with all its

9
10 MEMOIR OF

trials, privations, and its tears, is to him a holy
thing ; he lays bare the heart, not to bring
forth hidden and revolting passions or crimes,
but to show how lovely it is in its simplicity
and truth: how touching in its weaknesses
and its short-comings; how much it is to be
loved and pitied, and borne and striven with.
In short, this great writer, with all the ardor
of a strong poetical nature, and with great
power in delineating passion, is eminently
Christian in spirit.

It is a great pleasure to me that I have
been the means of making the principal
works of Hans Christian Andersen known,
through my translations, to English readers ;
they have been well received by them, and I

now give a slight memoir of their author,
drawn from the True Story of his own Life,
sent by him to me for translation, and which
has lately been published.

The father of Hans Christian Andersen
was a shoemaker of Odense. When scarcely
twenty, he married a young girl about as
poor as himself. The poverty of this couple

' may be imagined from the circumstance that
the house afforded no better bedstead than a
HANS CHRASTIAN ANDERSEN. a BI

wooden frame, made to support the coffin of
some count in the neighborhood, whose body
lay in state before his interment. This frame,
covered with black cloth, and which the
young shoemaker purchased at a very low
price, served as the family bedstead many
years. Upon this humble bed was born, on
the second of April, 1805, Hans Christian
Andersen. .

The father of Andersen was not without
education; his mother was the kindest of
human beings ; they lived on the best terms
with each other, but still the husband was
not happy. He read comedies and the Ara-
bian Tales, and made a puppet theatre for
his little son, and often on Sundays took him
out with him into the woods round Odense,
where the solitude was congenial to his mind.

Andersen’s grandmother had also great
influence over him, and to her he was greatly
attached. She was employed in taking care
of a garden belonging to a lunatic asylum,
and here he spent most of the summer after-
noons of his early childhood.

Among his earliest recollections is the resi-
dence of the Spaniards in Funen, in the years
12 MEMOIR OF

1808 and 1809. A soldier of an Asturian
regiment took him one day in his arms,
danced with him amid tears of joy, which no
doubt were called forth by the remembrance
of a child he had left at home, and pressed
the Madonna to his lips, which occasioned
great trouble to his pious mother, who was a
Lutheran.

In Odenge at that time many old festivities
were still in use, which made a deep impres-
sion on the boy, and were as so much mate-
rial laid up in his richly poetical mind for
after use, as all who are familiar with his
works must be well aware. His father,
among other works, industriously read in his
Bible. One day he closed it with these words :
“Christ became a man like unto us, but a
very uncommon man!” at which his. wife
burst into tears, greatly distressed and shock-
ed at what she called “blasphemy.” This
made a deep impression on the boy, and he
prayed in secret for the soul of his father.
Another day his father said, “'There is no
other devil but what a man bears in his own
breast!” After which, finding his am
scratched one morning when he awoke, his
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 13

wife said it was a punishment of the devil, to
teach him his real existence.

The unhappy temper of the father increas-
ed from day to day; he longed to go forth
into the world. At that time war was raging
in Germany. Napoleon was his hero, and
as Denmark had now allied itself to France,
he enlisted as a private soldier in a recruiting
regiment, hoping that some time or other he
might return as a lieutenant. The neighbors,
however, thought it was all a folly to let him-
self be shot for no purpose at all. The corps
in which he served went no farther than Hol-
stein ; the peace succeeded, and the poor shoe-
maker returned to his trade, only chagrined
to have seen no service, nor even been in for-
eign lands. But though he had seen no ser-
vice, his health had suffered; he awoke one
morning delirious, and talked about cam-
paigns and Napoleon. Young Andereen,
then nine years old, was sent to the next vil-
lage to ask counsel from a wise woman.

“Will my poor father die?’ inquired he,
anxiously.

“If thy father will die,” replied she, “ thou
wilt meet his ghost on thy way home.”
14 MEMOIR OF

Terrified almost out of his senses lest he
should meet the ghost, he set out on his
homeward way, and reached his own door
without any such apparition presenting itself,
but for all that, his father died on the third
day.

From this time young Andersen was left
to himself. The whole instruction that he
ever received waa in a charity-school, and
consisted of reading, writing, and arithmetic,
but of the two last he knew scarcely any-

About this time he was engaged by the
widow of a clergyman in Odense, to read
aloud to herself and her sister-in-law. She
was the widow of a clergyman who had writ-
ten poems. In this house Andersen first heard
the appellation of poet ; and saw with what
love the poetical talent of the deceased pastor
was regarded. ‘This sunk deeply into his
mind ; he read tragedies, and resolved to be-
come a poet, as this good man had been be-
fore him.

He wrote a tragedy, therefore, which the
two ladies praised highly; it was handed
about in manuscript, and people laughed at
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 15

it, and ridiculed him as the “play-writer.”
This wounded him so deeply, that he passed
one whole night weeping, and was only pa-
cified, or rather, silenced, by his mother threat-
ening to give him a good beating for his folly.
Spite, however, of his ill success, he wrote
again and again, studying, among other de-
vices, German and French words, to give
dignity to his dialogue. Again the whole
town read his productions, and the boys
shouted after him as he went, “Look ! look :
there goes the play-writer.”

One day he took to his schoolmaster, as a
birthday present, a garland, with which he
had twisted up a little poem. The school-
master was angry with him; he saw nothing
but folly and false quantities in the verses,
and thus the poor lad had nothing but trouble
and tears.

The worldly affairs of the mother grew
worse and worse, and as boys of his age
earned money in a manufactory near, it was
resolved that there also Hans Christian
should be sent. His old grandmother took
him to the manufactory, and shed bitter tears
because the lot of the boy was so early toil
16 MEMOIR OF

and sorrow. The workmen in the factory
were principally German, and discovering
that Andersen had a fine voice, and knew
many popular songs, they made him sing to
them while the other boys did his work. He
knew himself that he had a good voice, be-
cause the neighbors always listened when he
sang at home, and once a whole party of rich
people had stopped to hear him, and had
praised his beautiful voice. Everybody in
the manufactory heard him with equal de-
light.

“T can act comedy as well!” said the poor
boy one day, encouraged by their applause,
and began to recite whole scenes from the
comedies which his father had been in the
habit of reading. The workmen were de-
lighted, and the other boys were made to do
his tasks while he amused them all. This
smooth life of comedy acting and singing
lasted but for a short time, and he returned
home.

“The boy must go and act at the theatre ”
many of the neighbors said to his mother;
but as she knew of no other theatre than that
of the strolling players, she shook her head,
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 17

and resolved rather to put her son apprentice
to a tailor.

He was now twelve, and. had nothing to
do; he devoured, therefore, the contents of
every book which came in his way. His
favorite reading was an old prose translation
of Shakspere. From this, with little figures
which he made of pasteboard, he performed
the whole of King Lear, and the Merchant
of Venice.

Andersen’s passion for reading, and his
beautiful voice, had in the meantime drawn
upon him the attention of several of the
higher families of the city, who introduced
him to their houses. His simple, child-like
behavior, his wonderful memory, and his
sweet voice, gave to him a peculiar charm ;
people talked of him, and he soon had meny
friends ; among others, a Colonel Guldborg,
brother to the well-known poet of that name,
and who afterwards introduced him to Prince
Christian of Denmark.

About this.time his mother married a
second time, and as the step-father would not
spend a penny, or do any thing for her son’s
education, he had still more leisure. He had

2
18 MEMOIR OF

no playfellows, and often wandered by him-

self to the neighboring forest, or seated himself

at home, in a comer of the house, and dreased

up little dolls for his theatre, his mother in|
the meantime thinking that, as he was des-

tined for a tailor, this was all good practice.

At length the time came when he was to
be confirmed. On this occasion he had his
first pair of boots; he was very vain of them,
and that all the world might see them, he
pulled them up over his trousers. An old
sempstress was employed to make him a con-
firmation-suit out of .his deceased father’s
great coat. Never before had he been possess-
edof such excellent clothes ; the very thoughts
of them disturbed his devotions on the day of
consecration.

It had been determined that Andersen was
to be apprenticed to a tailor after his confir-
mation, but he earnestly besought his mother
to give up this idea, and consent to his going
to Copenhagen, that he might get employ-
ment at the theatre there. He read to her
the lives of celebrated men who had been
quite as poor as himself, and assured her that
he also would cne day be a celebrated man.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 19

For several years he had been hoarding up.
his money; he had now about thirty shillings,
English, which seemed to him an inexhausti-
ble sum. As soon as his mother heard of
this fund, her heart inclined towards his
wishes, and she promised to consent on con-
dition that they should consult a wise woman,
and that his going or staying should be de-
cided by her augury. The siby! was fetched
to the house, and after she had read the cards,
and studied the coffee-grounds, she pronounc- .
ed these words.

“Your son will become a great man. 'The
city of Odense will one day be illuminated
in his honor.”

A prophecy like this removed all doubts.

“Go, in God’s name ! said his mother, and
he lost no time in preparing for his great
journey.

Some one had mentioned to him a certain
female dancer at the Royal Theatre as a
person of great influence; he obtained, there-
fore, from a gentleman universally esteemed
in Odense, a letter of introduction to this lady ;
and with this, and his thirteen rix-dollars, he
commenced the journey on which depended
20 MEMOIR OF

his whole fate. His mother accompanied
him to the city gate, and there his good old
grandmother met him; she kissed him with
many tears, blessed him, and he never saw
her more.

It was not until he had crossed the Great
Belt that he felt how forlorn he was in the
world; he stepped aside from the road, fell
on his knees, and besought God to be his
friend. He rose up comforted, and walked
on through towns and villages, until, on Mon-
day morning, the 5th of September, 1819, he
saw the towers of Copenhagen; and with his
little bundle under his arm he entered that
great city.

On the day after his arrival, dressed in his
confirmation-suit, he betook himself, with his
letter of introduction in his hand, to the
house of the all-potential dancer. The lady
allowed him to wait a long time on the steps
of her house, and when at length he entered,
his awkward, simple behavior and appear-
ance displeased her; she fancied him insane,
more particularly as the.gentleman from

whom he brought the letter was unknown to
her.
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 21

He next went to the director of the the-
atre, requesting some appointment.

“You are too thin for the theatre,” was
the answer he obtained.

“Oh,” replied poor Andersen, “only ensure
me one hundred rix-dollars, and I, will soon
get fat!”

But the director would make no agreement:
of this kind, and then informed him that
they engaged none at the theatre but people
of education. ‘This settled the question ; he
had nothing to say on his own behalf, and,
dejected in spirit, went out into the street.
He knew no human creature ; he thought of
death, and this thought turned his mind to
God.

“When everything goes adversely,” said
he, “then God will help me; it is written so
in every book that I ever read, and in God I
will put my trust !”

Days and weeks went on, bringing with
them nothing but disappointment and des-
pair; his money was all gone, and for some
time he worked with a joiner. At length,
as, with a heavy heart, he was walking one
day along the crowded streets of the city, it
2 =. MEMOIR OF

occurred to him that as yet nobody had
heard his fine voice. Full of this thought,
he hastened at once to the house of Professor
Siboni, where a large party happened to be
at dinner, and among the guests Baggesen,
the poet, and the celebrated composer, Pro-
fessor Weyse. He knocked at the door,
which was opened by a female servant, and
to her he related, quite open-heartedly, how
forlom and friendless he was, and how great
a desire he had to be engaged at the theatre ;
the young woman went in and related this
to the company. All were interested in the
little adventurer; he was ordered in, and de-
sired to sing, and to give some scenes from
Holberg. One of these scenes bore a resem-
blance to his own melancholy circumstances,
and he burst into tears. The company ap-
plauded him.

“J prophecy,” said Baggesen, “that thou
wilt turn out something remarkable; only
don’t become vain when the public admires
thee.” , »

Professor Siboni promised immediately that
he would cultivate Andersen’s voice, and that
he should make his debut at the Theatre
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, 23

Royal. He had a good friend too in Profes-
sor Weyse, and a year and a half were spent
in elementary instruction. But a new mis-
fortune now befell him ; he lost his beautiful
voice, and Siboni counselled him to put him-
self to some handicraft trade. He once more
seemed abandoned to a hopeless fate. Cast-
ing about in his rhind who might possibly
befriend him, he bethought himself of the poet
Guldborg, whose brother the colonel had
been so kind to him in Odense. To him he
went, and in him he happily found a friend;
although poverty still pursued him, and his -
sufferings, which no one knew, almost over-
came him.

He wrote a rhymed tragedy, which obtain-
edsome little praise from Oehlenschlager and
Ingemann—but no debut was permitted him
on the theatre. He wrote a second and third,
but the theatre would not accept them.
These youthful efforts fell, however, into the
hand of a powerful and good man, Confer-
ence CounseHor Collin, who, perceiving the
genius that slumbered in the young poet,
went immediately to the king, and obtained
permission from him that he should be sent,
24 MEMOIR OF

at Government charges, to one of the learned
schools in the provinces, in which, however,
he suffered immensely, till his heart was
almost broken by unkindness. From this
school he went to college, and became very
soon favorably known to the public by true
poetical works. Ingemann, Oehlenschlager,
‘and others then obtained for him a royal
stipend, to enable him to travel; and he
visited Germany, France, Switzerland, and
Italy. Italy, and the poetical character of
life in that beautiful country, inspired him ;
and he wrote the “ Improvisatore,” one of the
most exquisite works, whether for truthful
delineation of character, or pure and noble
sentiment, that ever was penned. This
work most harmoniously combines the warm
coloring and intensity of Italian life with
the freshest and strong simplicity of the
north. His romance of “O. T.” followed ;
this is a true picture of the secluded, sober
life of the north, and is a great favorite
there. His third work, “Only a Fiddler,”
is remarkable for its strongly drawn personal
and national characteristics, founded upon
his own experience in early life. Perhaps
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 25

there never was a more affecting picture of
the hopeless attempts of a genius of second
rate order to combat against and rise above
poverty and adverse circumstances, than is
given in the life of poor Christian, who dies
at last “only a fiddler.”

In all these works Andersen has drawn
from his own experience, and in this lies their
extraordinary power. There is a child-like
tenderness and simplicity in his writings; a
sympathy with the poor and the struggling,
and an elevation and purity of tone, which
have something absolutely holy about them ;
it is the inspiration of true genius, combined
with great experience of life, and a spirit
baptized with the tenderness of Christianity.
This is it which is the secret of the extremé
charm his celebrated stories have for children.
They are as simple and as touching as the old
Bible narratives of Joseph and his brethren,
and the little lad who died in the corn field.
We wonder not at their being the most pop-
ular books of their kind in Europe.

It has been my happiness, as I said before,
to translate his three principal works, his
Picture Book without Pictures, and several of

¢
26 MEMOIR OF

his stories for children. They have been
likewise translated into German, and some
of them into Dutch, and even Russian. He
speaks nobly of this circumstance in his life.
“My works,” says he, “seem to come forth
under a lucky star, they fly over all lands.
There is something elevating, but at the same
time something terrific in seeing one’s thoughts
spread so far, and among so many people;
it is indeed althost a fearful thing to belong
tosomany. The noble and good in us be-
comes a blessing, but the bad, one’s errors,
shoot forth also; and involuntarily the prayer
forces itself from us—‘God! let me never
write down a word of which I shall not be
able to give an account to thee? a peculiar
feeling, a mixture of joy and anxiety, fills my
heart every time my good genius conveys
my fictions to a foreign people.”

Of Andersen’s present life we need only say
that he spends a great deal of his time in
traveling ; he goes from land to land, and
from court to court, everywhere an honored
guest, and enjoying the glorious reward of
a manly struggle against adversity, and the
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 27

triumph of a lofty and pure genius in seeing
its claims generously acknowledged.

Let us now see the son of the poor shoe-
maker of Odense—the friendless, ill-clad, al-
most heart-broken boy of Copenhagen—on
one of those occasions, which would make an
era in the life of any other literary man, but
which are of every day occurrence in his. I
will quote from his own words.

“T received a letter from the ministry, Count
Rantzau Breitenburg, containing an invita-
tion from their majesties of Denmark to join
them at the watering-place of Fohr; this
island lies in the North Sea, on the coast of
Sleswick. It was just now five and-twenty
years since I, a poor lad, traveled alone and —
helpless to Copenhagen. Exactly the five-and
twentieth anniversary would be celebrated by
my being with my king and queen. Every-
thing which surrounded me, man and nature,
reflected themselves imperishably in my soul ;
I felt myself, as it were, conducted to a point
from which I could look forth more distinctly
over the past, with all the good fortune and
happiness which it had evolved for me.

“ Wyck, the largest town of F'Ghr, in which
28 MEMOIR OF

are the baths, is built like a Dutch town,
with houses one story high, sloping roofs,
and gables turned to the street. The number
of strangers there, and the presence of the
Court, gave a peculiar animation to it. The
Danish flag was seen waving, and music was
heard on all hands. I was soon established
in my quarters, and was invited every day to
dine with their majesties as well as to pass
the evening in their circle. On several eve-
hings I read aloud my little stories to them,
and nothing could be more gracious and kind
than they were. It is so well when a noble
human nature will reveal itself, where other-
wise only the king’s crown and the purple
mantle might be discovered.

“T sailed in the train of their majesties, to
the largest of the Halligs, those grassy runes
in the ocean, which bear testimony to a
sunken country. ‘The violence of the sea has
changed the mainland into islands, has again
riven these, and buried men and villages.
Year after year are new portions rent away
and in half a century’s time there will be no-
thing left but sea. The Halligs are now low
islets, covered with a dark turf, on which a few
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. 29

flocks graze. When the sea rises, these are
driven to the garrets for refuge, and the waves
roll over this little region, which lies miles dis-
tant from any shore. Oland, which we visited,
contains a little town; the houses stand
closely side by side, as if in their sore need
they had huddled together ; they are all erect-
ed on a platform, and have little windows like
the cabin of a ship. There, solitary through
half the year, sit the wives and daughters
spinning. Yet I found books in all the
houses ; the people read and work, and the
sea rises round the houses, which lie like a
wreck on the ocean. The church-yard is
half washed away ; coffins and corpses are
frequently exposed to view. It is an appalling
sight, and yet the inhabitants of the Halligs
are attached to their little home, and fre-
quently die of home-sickness when removed
from it.

“We found only one man upon the island,
and he had only lately arisen from a sick-
bed; the others were out on long voyages.
We: were received by women and girls ; they
had erected before the church a trium-
phal arch with flowers, which they had
30 MEMOIR OF

fetched from Féhr, but it was so small and
low, that one was obliged to go round it; it
nevertheless showed their good will. The
Queen was deeply affected by their having
cut down their only shrub, a rose-bush, to lay
over a marshy place which she had to cross.

“On our return, dinner was served on board
the royal steamer, and afterwards as we sail-
ed in a glorious sunset through this archipe-.
lago, the deck of the vessel was changed to a
dancing hall: servants flew hither and thith-
er with refreshments ; sailors stood upon the
paddle-boxes and took soundings, and their
deep tones might be heard giving the depth
of the water. The moon rose round and
large, and the promontory of Amrom assumed
the appearance of a snow-covered chain of
Alps.”

The next day he visited the wild regions
about the promontory, but our space will not
admit of our giving any portions of wild and
grand sea-landscape which he here describes.
In the evening he returned to the royal din-
ner-table. It was on the above mentioned
fjve-and-twentieth anniversary, on the 5th of
September ; he says,
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. al

“The whole of my. former life passed in
review before my mind. I was obliged to
summon all my strength to prevent myself
bursting into tears. There are moments of
gratitude, in which we feel, as it were, a de-
sire to press God to our hearts! How deeply
I felt at this time my own nothingness, and
how all, all had come from him! After din-
ner the king, to whom Rantzau had told how
interesting the day was to me, wished me
happiness, and that most kindly. He wished
me happiness in that which I had endured
and won. He asked me about my early,
struggling life, and I related to him some
traits of it. .

“In the course of conversation he asked
me of my annual income. I told him.

“That is not much,’ said he.

“*But I do not need much, I replied;
‘my writings furnish something.’

“Tf can in any way be serviceable to
you, come to me,’ said the king in conclusion.

“Tn the evening, during the concert, some
of my friends reproached me for not making
use of my opportunity. .

“ into your mouth.’
32 MEMOIR.

“¢T could not have done more,’ said I; ‘if
the king thought I required an addition to
my income, he would give it of his own free
will. ,

“ And I was 8 right ; in the following year
the king increased my annual stipend, so that
with this and my writings I can live honor-
ably and free from care.

“The 5th of September. was to me a festi-

val day. Even the German visitors at the
baths honored me by drinking my. health in
the pump-room.
_ “So many flattering circumstances, some
people argue, may spoil.a man and make
him vain. But no, they do not spoil him,
they make him, on the contrary, better; they
purify his mind, and he thereby feels an im-
pulse, a wish to deserve all that he enjoys.”

Such are truly the feelings of a pure and
noble nature. Andersen has stood the test
through every trial, of poverty and adversity ;
the harder trial that of a sun-bright prosper-
ity, is new proving him, and so far, thank
God, the sterling nature of the man has re-
mained unspoiled.
A PICTURE-BOOK WITHOUT PICTURES,

33
Ir 1s wonderful! When my heart feels
the mest warmly, and my emotions are the
noblest, it is as if my hands and my tongue
were tied; I cannot describe, I cannot ex-
press my own inward state; and yet lam a
painter ; my eye tells me so; and every one
who has seen my sketches and my tablets ac-
knowledges it.

I am a poor youth ; I live over there in one
of the narrowest streets, but I have no want
of light, because I live up aloft, with a view
over all the house-tops. The first day I
came into the city it seemed to me so confined

and lonesome ; instead of the woods and the
35 °
36 A PICTURE-BOOK

green breezy heights, I had only the grey
chimneys as far as I could see. I did not
possess one friend here; not a single face
which I knew saluted me.

One evening, very much depressed in mind,
I stood at my window ; I opened it and look-
ed out. Nay, how glad it made me; Isaw
a face which I knew; a round, friendly face,
that of my dearest friend in heaven; it was
the Moon—the dear old Moon, the very same,
precisely the same, as when she peeped at
me between the willow trees on the marshes.
I kissed my hand to her; she shone right
down into my chamber, and promised me,
that every night when she was out she would
take a peep at me. And she has honestly
kept her word—pity only that she can re-
main for so short a time!

Every night she comes she tells me one
thing or another which she has seen either
that night or the night before. “Make a
sketch,” said she, on her first visit, “of what

7
WITHOUT PICTURES. 37

I tell thee, and thus thou shalt make a really
beautiful picture-book !”

This I have done; and in this way I might
give a new Thousand and One Nights in
pictures : but that would be too much ; those
which I have given have not been selected,
but are just as I heard them. A great, ge-
nial-hearted painter, a poet, or a musician,
may make more of them if he will; that
which I present is ‘only a slight outline on
paper, and mixed up with my own thoughts,
because it was not every night that the moon
came; there was now and then a cloud be-
tween us.
38 A PICTURE-BOOK

FIRST EVENING.

Last night,—these are the Moon’s own
words,—I glided through the clear air of In-
dia; I mirrored myself in the Ganges. My
beams sought to penetrate the thick fence
which the old plantains had woven, and
which formed itself into an arch as firm as
the shell of the tortoise. A Hindoo girl, light
as the gazelle, beautiful as Eve, came forth
from the thicket. There is scarcely anything
80 airy and yet so affluent in the luxuriance
of beauty, as the daughter of India. I could
see her thoughts through her delicate skin
The thorny lianas tore her sandals from her
feet, but she stepped rapidly forward; the
wild beast which came from the river, where
it had quenched its thirst, sprang past her,
WITHOUT PICTURES. 39

for the girl held in her hand a burning lamp.
I could see the fresh blood in her fingers as
she curved them into a shade for the flame.
She approached the river; placed the lamp
on the stream; and the lamp sailed away.
The flame flickered as if it would go out;
but still it burned, and the girl’s dark, flash-
ing eyes followed it with her whole soul
beaming from under her long silken eyelashes ;
she knew that if the lamp bummed as long
as she could see it, then her beloved was alive;
but if it went out, then that he was dead..
The lamp burned and fluttered, and her heart
burned and fluttered also; she sank on her
knee and breathed a prayer: close beside
her, in the grass, lay a water-snake, but she
thought only of Brama and her beloved. “ He
lives” exclaimed she, rejoicingly, and the
mountains repeated her words, “he lives F
40 A PICTURE-BOOK

SECOND EVENING.

It was last evening,—said the Moon,—
that I peeped down into a yard inclosed
by houses. A hen was there with eleven
chickens ; a little girl was playing around
them ; the hen set up a cackling cry, she
was frightened, and spread out her wings
over her eleven young ones. With that, out
«ame the father of the child and scolded her.
This evening (it is only a few minutes since,)
the moon looked down again into that yard.
Everything was quite still; presently, how-
ever, out came the little girl, and stole very
softly to the hen-house, lifted the latch, and
crept in to the hen and the chickens. The hen
and chickens set up a loud cry, and flew here
and there, and the little girl ran after them.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 4l

Again the father came out, and now he was
very angry indeed, and scolded her, and
pulled her out of the hen-house by her arm ;
she hung back her head, and there were large
tears in her blue eyes.

“What wast thou doing here ?” asked the
father. She wept; “I only wanted,” said she,
“to kiss the hen, and ask her to forgive me
for yesterday: but I did not dare to tell
thee.”

The father kissed the sweet innocent on
her forehead; the moonlight fell lovingly
upon her eyes and mouth.
42 A PICTURE-BOOK

THIRD EVENING.

In a narrow street, just by,—said the
Moon,—which is so very confined that only
just for one minute can my beams fall upon
the walls of the houses—and yet at this
moment I can look abroad and see the world
as it moves—into this narrow street I looked
and saw a woman. Sixteen years ago and
she was a child; she lived away in the
oountry, and played in the old pastor’s garden.
The hedges of roses had grown out of bounds
for many years; they threw their wild un-
trimmed branches across the path, and sent
up long, green shoots into the apple-trees;
there was only a rose here and there, and
they were not beautiful as the queen of flow-
ers may be, although the color and the
WITHOUT PICTURES. 43

odor were there. The pastor’s little daughter,
however, was a much more beautiful rose: she
sate upon her little wooden stool under the
wild untrimmed hedge, and kissed her doll
with the broken face.

Ten years later I saw her again; I saw
her in the splendid dancing-hall; she was
the lovely bride of a rich tradesman, and I
rejoiced in her good fortune. I visited her in
the still evening. Alas! my rose had put
forth also wild shoots like the roses in the
pastor’s garden ! ,

Every-day life has its tragedy—this evening
I saw the last act. Sick to death, she lay in
that narrow street, upon her bed. The wick-
ed landlord, her only protector, a man rude
and cold-hearted, drew back the curtain.
“Get up!” said he, “thy cheeks are pale
and hollow; paint thyself! -Get money, or I
will turn thee out into the streets! Get up
quickly ”

“Death is at my heart!” said she, “oh!
let me rest !”

He compelled her to rise; painted her
cheeks, twined roses in her hair, placed her
at the window, with a buring light beside
44 A PICTURE-BOOK

her, and went his way. I glanced at her;
she sate immoveable ; her hands fell upon hea
lap. The window blew open, so that one of
the panes of glass was broken; but she
moved not; the curtains of the window were
blown around her like a flame. She was
dead. From that open window the dead
preached powerfully ; my rose of the pastor's
garden !
WITHOUT PICTURES. 45

FOURTH EVENING.

I was last evening at a German play,—
said the Moon ;—it was in alittlecity. The
theatre was a stable; that is to say, the
stalls were made use of and decorated for
boxes, the old wood-work was covered over
with figured paper. There hung from the
low roof a little iron chandelier, and in order
that it might rise the moment the prompter’s
bell rang (as is the custom in large theatres),
it was now covered by a tub turned upside
down. The bell rang, and the little iron
chandelier made a leap of half an ell, and by
that token people knew that the comedy had
begun. A young prince and his wife, who
were traveling through the town, were to be
present at the performance, and therefore it
46 A PICTURE-BOCK

was a very full house, excepting that under
the chandelier it was like a little crater. Not
a single soul sate there ; the chandelier kept
dropping its oil—drop! drop! It was so hot
in the little theatre that they were obliged to
open all the holes in the walls to let in fresh
air, and through all these peeped in lads and
lasses from the outside, although the police
sate by and drove them off with sticks.

Close by the orchestra, people saw the
young princely couple sitting in two old arm-
chairs, which otherwise would have been
occupied by the burgomaster and his lady;
as it was, however, they sate upon wooden
benches, like other townsfolk. “One may
see that there are falcons above falcons!” was
Madame’s silent observation; and after this
all became more festal; the chandelier made
a leap upwards, the people began counting on
their fingers, and I—yes, the Moon—was
present during the whole comedy.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 47

FIFTH EVENING.

Yesterday,—said the Moon,—I looked
down upon busy Paris. I gazed into the
chambers of the Louvre. An old grandmother,
wretchedly clad, and who belonged to the
lower class, entered the large, empty throne-
room, accompanied by one of ‘the under ser-
vants of the palace. It had cost her many
small sacrifices, and very much eloquence
had she used before she could be admitted
here. She folded her thin hands, and looked
as reverentially around her as if she had been
in a church.

“It was here!” she said, “here!” and she
approached the throne which was covered
with a cloth of rich velvet, trimmed with gold.
“There !” said she, “there !” and she bowed
és A PICTURE-BOOK

her knee and kissed the crimson velvet—I
think she wept.

“It was not that velvet,” said the at-
tendant, while a smile played round his
mouth.

“But still it was here!” said the woman,
“and it looked in this room just so!”

“Just so,” replied he; “and yet it was not
just so either: the windows were beaten out ;
the doors were torn off their hinges, and
there was blood upon the floor! You can
say, however, for all that, that your son
died upon the throne of France !”

“Died!” repeated the old woman.

No more was said; they left the hall;
the shades of evening fell deeper, and the
moonlight streamed in with twofold bright-
ness on the rich velvet of the throne of
France.

I will tell thee a story. It was in the
revolution ot July, towards evening, on the
most brilliant day of victory, when every
house was a fortress, every window a redoubt,
the people stormed the Tuilleries. Even
women and children fought among the com-
batants; they thronged in through the
WITHOUT PICTURES. 49

chambers and halls of the palace. A poor,
half-grown lad, in ragged clothing, fought
desperately among the elder warriors; mor-
tally wounded at length by the thrusts of
many bayonets, he sank to the ground; this
took place in the throne-room. They wrap-
ped the velvet about his wounds; the blood
streamed over the royal purple. It was a
picture! The magnificent hall; the combat-
ing groups; a rent banner on the floor; the
tri-colored flag floating above the bayonets;
and upon the throne the poor lad, with his
pale, glorified countenance, his eyes turned
towards heaven; his limbs stiffening in
death ; his uncovered breast; his miserable
garments, and around these the rich folds of
the velvet, embroidered with silver lilies !

As that boy lay in the cradle, it had been
foretold that he should die on the throne of
France! His mother’s heart had dreamed
of anew Napoleon. The moonbeams have
kissed the garland of everlasting upon his
grave; her beams this night kissed the old
grandmother's forehead as she dreamed of
this picture—The poor lad upon the throne
of France !

3 4
86 A PICTURE-BOOK

SIXTH EVENING.

Ihave been in Upsala,—said the Moon.
She looked down upon the great castle, with
the miserable grass of its trampled fields. She
mirrored herself in the river Fyris, whilst the
steam-boat drove the terrified fish among the
reeds. Clouds careered along the moonlit
sky, and cast long shadows over the graves,
as they are called, of Odin, Thor, and Freya.
Names are carved in the scanty turf upon
the heights. Here there is no building-stone
in which the visitors can hew their names;
no walled fences on which they can paint.
them ; they cut away, therefore, the turf, and
the naked earth stares forth in the large
letters of their names, which look like a huge
net spread over the hill. An immortality
which a fresh growth of turf destroys.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 61

A man stood on the hill-top; he was a
poet. He emptied a silver-rimmed mead-
horn, and whispered a name, which he bade
the wind not to reveal; a count’s coronet
shone above it, and therefore he breathed it
low—the moonbeams smiled upon him, for a.
poet’s crown shone above his! The noble
name of Eleonora d’Este is united to Tasso’s.
I know where the rose of beauty grows. A
cloud passed before the moon. May no
cloud pass between the poet and his rose !
52 A PICTURE-BOOK

SEVENTH EVENING

Down by the seaside there extends a
wood of oaks and beeches, fresh and fragrant
and every branch is visited by hundreds of
nightingales. Close beside is the sea, the
eternally-moving sca, and between the sea
and the wood runs the broad high-road. One
carriage after another rolled past. I follow-
ed them not; my eye rested mostly on one
spot where was a barrow, or old warrior’s
grave. Brambles and white thorns grew up
from among the stones. There is the poetry
of nature. Dost thou believe that this is felt
by every one? Listen to what occurred there
only last night.

First of all, two rich countrymen drove
past. “There are some splendid trees there,”
WITHOUT PICTURES. 53

said one. “There are ten loads of fire-wood
in each,” replied the other. “If the winter be
severe, one should get forty rix dollars in
spring for the measure !” and they were gone.

“The road is abominable here,” said an-
other traveller. “It is those cursed trees,” re-
plied his neighbor; “there is no circulation
of air here, excepting from the sea :” and they
advanced onward.

At that moment the diligence came by.
All were asleep at the most beautiful point :
the driver blew his horn, but he only thought,
“T blow it capitally, and here it sounds well ;
what will they think of it?” And with that
the diligence was gone.

.Next came by two young country-fellows
on horseback. The champagne of youth cir-
culated through their blood ; a smile was on
their lips as they looked towards the moss-
grown height, and thedark bushes. “I went
there with Christine Miller,” said one to the
other; and they were gone.

The flowers sent forth their fragrance;
every breeze slept ; the sea looked like a por-
tion of heaven spread out over a deep valley ;
a carriage drove along; there were six per-
BA A PICTURE-BOOK

sons in it, four of whom were asleep; the
fifth was thinking of his new summer-coat
which was so becoming to him; the sixth
leaned forward to the driver, and asked
whether there was anything remarkable
about that heap of stones: “ No,” said the fel-
low, “it’s only a heap of stones, but the trees
are remarkable!” “Tell me about them,”
said the other. “Yes, they are very remark-
able; you see, in winter, when the snow co-
vers the ground, and everything, as it were,
goes out in a twinkling, then those trees serve
me as a landmark by which I can guide my-
self, and not drive into the sea; they are,
therefore, you see, very remarkable,”—and by
this time the carriage had passed the trees.

A painter now came up; his eyes flashed ;
he said not a word, he whistled, and the
nightingales sang, one louder than another ;
“hold your tongues !” exclaimed he, and noted
down with accuracy the colors and tints of the
trees; “blue, black, dark-brown.” It would
be a beautiful painting! He made sketch,
as hints for his intended picture, and all the
time he whistled a march of Rossini’s.

The last who came by was a poor girl;
WITHOUT PICTURES. 85

she sate down to rest herself upon the old
warriors grave, and put her bundle beside
her. Her lovely, pale face inclined itself to-
wards the wood as she sate listening; her
eyes flashed as she looked heaven-ward acroes
the sea; her hands folded themselves, and
she murmured the Lord’s Prayer. She did
not understand the emotions which penetrated
her soul; but, nevertheless, in future years,
this moment, in which she was surrounded
by nature, will return to her much more
beautifully, nay, will be fixed more faithfully
in her memory, than on the tablets of the
painter, though he noted down every shade
of color. She went forward, and the moon-
beams lighted her path, until daylight kissed
her forehead !
56 A PICTURE-BOOK

EIGHTH EVENING.

There were thick clouds over the sky;
the Moon was not visible ; I stood in twofold
solitude in my little room, and looked out
into the night, which should have been illu-
minated by her beams. My thoughts fied
far away, up to the great friend who told me
stories so beautifully every evening, and show-
ed me pictures. Yes, what has not she seen !
She looked down upon the waters of the
deluge, and smiled on the ark as she now
smiles upon me, and brought consolation to
a new world whith should again bloom
forth. When the children of Israel stood
weeping by the rivers of Babylon, she look-
ed mournfully down upon the willows where
their harps hung. When Romeo ascended
WITHOUT PICTURES. 87

to the balcony, and the kiss of love went like
a cherub’s thought from earth, the round
Moon stood in the transparent atmosphere,
half concealed amid the dark cypresses. She
saw the hero on St. Helena, when from his
solitary rock he looked out over the ocean of
the world, whilst deep thoughts were at work
in his breast. Yes, what could not the Moon
relate! The life of the world isa history for
her. This evening I see thee not, old friend!
I can paint no picture in remembrance of thy
visit !—and as I dreamingly looked up into
the clouds, light shone forth; it was a moon-
beam, but it is gone again; dark clouds float
past ; but that ray was a salutation, a friend-
ly evening salutation from the Moon.
AS A PICTURK-BOOK

NINTH EVENING.

Again the air is clear; I had again mate-
rial for a sketch; listen to that which I
learned from the Moon.

The birds of the polar region flew on-
ward, and the whale swam towards the
eastern coast of Greenland. Rocks covered
with ice and clouds shut in a valley in which
the bramble and whortleberry were in full
bloom. The fragrant lichen diffused its odor ;
the Moon shone faintly; its crescent was pale
as the leaf of the water-lily, which, torn from
its stalk, has floated for weeks upon the water.
The northern-lights burned brightly; their
circle was broad, and rays went upwards
from them like whirling pillars of fire, as-
cending through the whole sphere of the
WITHOUT PICTURES. 59

heavens, in colors of green and crimson.
The inhabitants of the valley assembled for
dance and mirth, but they looked not with
admiring eyes at the magnificent spectacle
which was familiar tothem. “Let the dead
play at ball with the heads of the walrus !”
thought they, according to their belief, and
occupied themselves only with the dance and
the song. In the middle of the circle, wrap-
ped in fur, stood a Greenlander with his
hand-drum, and accompanied himself as he
sung of seal-hunting, and the people answer-
ed in chorus with an “Bia! eia! a! and
skipped round and round in their white furs
like so many bears dancing. With this, trial
and judgment began. They who were ad-
versaries came forward; the plaintiff impro-
vised in a bold and sarcastic manner the
crime of his opponent, and all the while
the dance went on to the sound of the drum;
the defendant replied in the same manner;
but the assembly laughed and passed sen-
tence upon him in the meantime. A loud
noise was now heard from the mountains:
the icy cliffs were cleft asunder, and the huge
tumbling masses were dashed to atoms in —
60 A PICTURE-BOOK

their fall. That was a beautiful Greenland
summer-night.

At the distance of a hundred paces, there
lay a sick man within an open tent of
skins; there was life still in his veins, but for
all that he must die, because he himself be-
lieved it, and the people all around him believed
ittoo. His wife, therefore, had sewn his cloak
of skin tightly around him, that she might
not be obliged to touch the dead; and she
asked him—“ Wilt thou be buried upon the
mountains in the eternal snow? I will
decorate the place with thy boat and thy
arrows. The spirits of the mist shall dance
away over it! Or wouldst thou rather be
sunk in the sea?’ “In the sea! whisper-
ed he, and nodded with a melancholy smile.
“There thou wilt have a beautiful summer-
tent,” said the wife ; “ there will gambol about
thee thousands of seals; there will the walrus
sleep at thy feet, and the hunting will be
certain and merry!” The children, amid
loud howlings, tore down the outstretched
skin from the window, that the dying man
might be borne out to the sea—the swelling
sea, which gave hjm food during his lifetime,
‘and now rest in death.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 61

His funeral monument is the floating
mountain of ice, which increases night and
day. ‘The seals slumber upon the icy blocks,
and the birds of the tempest whirl about it.
62 A PICTURE-ROOK

TENTH EVENING.

I knew an old maid,—said the Moon,
she wore every winter yellow satin trim-
med with fur; it was always new; it was
always her unvarying fashion; she wore
every summer the same straw bonnet, and, I
fancy, the very same blue-grey gown. She
never went anywhere but to one old female
friend of hers who lived on the other side the
street ;—during the last year, however, she
did not even go there—because her old friend
was dead. All solitarily sate my old maid
.working at her window, in which, through
the whole summer, there stood beautiful
flowers, and in the winter lovely cresses,
grown on a little hillock of felt. During the
last month, however, she no longer sate
WITHOUT PICTURES. 63

at her window; but I knew that she was
still alive, because I had not seen her set
out on that long journey of which she and
her friend had so often talked. “Yes,” she
had said, “when I shall die, I shall have to
take a longer journey than I ever took
through my whole life; the family burial-
place lies above twenty miles from here;
thither must I be borne, and there shall I
sleep with the rest of my kin.”

Last night a carriage drew up at her
door; they carried out a coffin, and by that I
knew that she was fead; they laid straw
around the coffin and drove away. There
‘slept the quiet old mgid, who for the last
year had never been out of her house; and
the carriage rattled along the streets and out
of the city, as if it had been on a journey of
pleasure. Upon the high road it went on yet
faster ; the fellow who drove looked over his
shoulder several times; I fancy that he was
afraid of seeing her sitting in her yellow satin
upon the coffin behimd him; he therefore
urged on the horses thoughtlessly, holding
them in so tightly that they foamed at the
mouth: they were young and full of mettle:
64 A PICTURE-BOOK

a hare ran across the road, and off they set
at full speed. The quiet old maid, who
from one year’s end to another had moved
only slowly in a narrow circle, now that she
was dead, drove over stock and stone along
the open high-road. The coffin, which was
wrapped in matting, was shook off, and now
lay upon the road, whilst horses, driver, and
carriage, sped onward in a wild career.

The lark which flew upward singing
from the meadow, warbled its morning song
above the coffin; - it’ then descended and
alighted upon it, pecked at the matting with
its beak, as if it were rending to pieces some
strange insect. . ,

The lark rose upward again, singing in
the clear ether, and I withdrew behind the
rosy clouds of morning.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 68

ELEVENTH EVENING.

I will give thee a picture of Pompeii,—
said. the Moon. J have been in the
suburbs, the Street of Tombs, as it is called,
where once the rejoicing ‘youths, with rosea
around their brows, danced with the lovely
sisters of Lais. Now the silence of death
reigns here; German soldiers in the pay of
Naples keep guard here, and play at’ cards
and dice. A crowd of foreigners, from. the
other side of the mountains, wandered into
the city, accompanied by the guard. They
wished to see this city, arisen from the grave,
by the full clear light of the Moon; and I
showed to them the tracks of the chariot-
wheels in the streets paved with broad slabs
of lava; I showed to them the names upen

5
66 A PICTURE-BOOK

the doors and the signs which still remain
suspended from the shop-fronts ; they looked
into the basin of the fountains ornamented
with shells and conches; but no stream of
water leaped upwards; no song resounded
from the richly painted chambers, where
dogs of bronze guarded the doors. It was
the city of the dead; Vesuvius alone still
thundered his eternal hymn. .
We went to the temple of Venus, which
is built of dazzling white marble, with broad
steps ascending to its high altar, and a ver-
dant weeping-willow growing between its
columns. The air was exquisitely transpa-
rent and blue; and in the back-ground
towered Vesuvius, black as night: fires
ascended from the crater of the mountain
like the stem of a pine-tree; the illumined
cloud of smoke hung suspended in the still-
ness of night, like the pine-tree’s crown, but.
red as blood. Among the strangers there,
was a singer, a true and noble being, to whom
I had seen homage paid in the greatest cities
of Europe. When the party arrived at the
amphitheatre, they all seated themselves upon
the marble steps, and again, as in former
WITHOUT PICTURES. 67

centuries, human beings occupied a portion
of that space. T'he scene was now the same
as in those former times; the walls of the
theatre, and the two arches in the back-
ground, through which might be seen the
same decoration as then—Nature itself—
the mountains between Sorento and Amalfi.
The singer, for fun, threw herself back into
those ancient times, and sung; the scene
inspired her; she reminded the listener of the
wild horse of Arabia, when it snorts and
careers away, with its mane lifted by the
wind; there was the same ease, the same
security; she brought to mind the agonized
mother at the cross of Golgotha ; there was
the same heartfelt, deep sorrow. Once more
resounded around her, as had resounded
thousands of years before, the plaudits and
acclamations of delight. “Happy! heavenly
gifted one! .exclaimed they all. Three
minutes after and the scene was changed ;
every one had departed; no tone was heard
any longer; the whole party was gone; but
the ruins still stood unchanged, as they will
stand for centuries, and no one knows of the
68 A PICTURE-BOOK

applause of the moment—of the beautiful
singer—of her tones and her smile. ll is
past and forgotten; even to me is this
hour a perished memory.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 69

TWELFTH EVENING.

I peeped in at a critic's window,—said the
Moon,—in a city of Germany. The room
was filled with excellent furniture, books, and
a chaos of papers; several young men were
sitting there; the critic himself stood at his
desk; two small! books, both by young
authors, were about to be reviewed. “One
of these,” said he, “has been sent to me; I
have not read it though—but it is beautifully
got up; what say you of its contents?”

“QO,” said one of the young men, who was
himself a poet, “there is a deal that is good
in it; very little to expunge; but, he is a
young man, and the verses might be better !
There is a healthy tone in the thoughts—
but they are, after all, such thoughts as every-
70 A PICTURE-BOOK

body has!—but as to that, where does one
find anything new? You may very well
praise him, but I never believe that he will
turn out anything of a poet. He has read a
deal, however ; is an extraordinary orientalist,
and has sound judgment. He it was who
wrote that beautiful critique of my Fan-
cies of Domestic Life. One ought to be
gentle towards a young man.”

“But he is a thorough ass? said another
gentleman in the room; “nothing worse in -
poetry than mediocrity, and he does not get
above that !”

“Poor fellow,” said a third, “and his aunt
makes herself so happy about him. She it
was, Mr. Critic, who obtained so many sub-
scribers’ names to your last translation.”

“The good woman! yes, I have given a
short notice of the book. Unmistakeable ta-
lent! a welcome gift! a flower out of the
garden of poesy; beautifully got out, and so
on. But the other book—he shall catch it! I
had to buy it—I hear it is praised; he has
genius, don’t you think?”

“That is the general opinion,” said the
poet, “ but there is something wild about it.”

«
WITHOUT PICTURES. 71

“Tt will do him good to find fault and cut
him up a little, else he will be getting toogood
an opinion of himself !”

“But that is unreasonable,” interrupted a
fourth ; “don’t let us dwell too much on tri-
fling faults, but rejoice in the good—and there
is much here—though he thrusts i in good and
bad altogether.”

“Unmistakeable talent!” wrote down the
critic; “the usual examples of carelessness.
That he also can write unlucky verse, may
be seen at page five-and-twenty, where two
hiatuses occur: the study of the ancients to
be recommended, and so on.”

I went away, said the Moon,—and peep-
ed through the window into the aunt’s house
where sate our honored poet, the tame one, the
worshipped of all the guests, and was happy.

“TI sought out the other poet, the wild one,
who also was in a great party of one of his
patrons, where they talked about the other

‘poet’s book. “T shall also read yours !” said
Mecienas, “but, honestly speaking, you know
I never say to you what I do not mean; I do
not expect great things from it. You are too
wild for me! too fantastic—but I acknow-
72 A PICTURE-BOOK

ledge that as a man you are highly respecta-
ble!” . ,

A young girl who sat in a corner read in
a book :—

To the dust goes the poet’s glory,
And common-place to fame !-~
That isthe trite old story,
And ‘twill ever be the same!
WITHOUT PICTURES. 73

THIRTEENTH EVENING.

The Moon told me as follows :—There
lie two peasants’ cottages by the road through
the wood. The doors are low, and the win-
dows are irregular, but all around them grow
buckthorn and barberries ; the roof is mossy
and grown over with yellow-flowered stone-
crop and houseleek; nothing but cabbages
and potatoes grow in the little garden, but
there grows in the hedge an elder-tree, and
under this sate a little girl; and there she
sate with her brown eyes riveted upon an old
oak tree between the houses. This tree has
a tall and decayed hole, the top of it is sawn
off, and there the stork has built his nest ;
there he stood and clattered with his beak.

&
T4 A PICTURE-BOOK

A little boy came out of the cottage and
placed himself by the little girl’s side; they
were brother and sister.

“ What are you looking at ?” cried he.

“Tam looking at the stork,” she replied ;
“the neighbor told me that this evening the
stork will bring ua either a little brother or
sister ; and so now I will stand and watch
when they come.”

“The storks do not bring anything,” said
the boy. “The neighbor’s wife told me the
same thing ; but she laughed while she said
it, and so ] asked her if she durst say as sure
as heaven, to it, but she dared not, and there-
fore I know that the story about the stork is
only what they tell us children.”

“Qh, really!” said the little girl.

“And I'l tell thee what,” said the boy;
“It is our Lord himself that brings little ba-
bies ; he has them under his coat; but no-
body can see our Lord now, and therefore we
do not see him when he comes.”

At that same moment the twigs of the
elder-tree were moved; the children folded
their hands and looked one at the other, for
they thought that it was our Lord passing
WITHOUT PICTURES. 75

along with the little ones. They stood side
by side, and took hold of each other’s hand.

The house-door opened, and out came the
neighbor.

“ Come in now,” said she; “and see what
the stork has brought; he has brought a lit-
tle brother !”

The children nodded their heads; they
knew very well that the little brother was
come.
76 4 PICTURE-BOOK

FOURTEENTH EVENING.

I passed over Luneburg Heath,—said the
Moon,—a solitary house stood by the road-
side ; some leafless trees grew beside it, and
among these sung a nightingale which had
lost its way. In the severity of the night it
must perish; that was its song of death
which I heard. With the early twilight
there came along the road a company of em-
igrant peasants, who were on their way to
Bremen or Hamburgh, to take ship for Amer-
ica, where happiness—the so much dreamed-
of happiness—they expected should spring
up for them. The women carried their
youngest children upon their backs, the older
ones sprang along by their side ; a poor mis-
erable horse dragged a car, on which were a
WITHOUT PICTURES. 77

few articles of household furniture. The cold
wind blew ; the little girl clung closer to her
mother, who looked up to my round waning
face and thought upon her bitter want.

Her thoughts were those of the whole
company, and therefore the red glimmering
of daylight was like the evangile of the sun
of prosperity which should again rise. They
heard the song of the dying nightingale ; it
was to them no false prophet, but a foreteller
of happiness. The wind whistled, but they
understood not the song; “Sail securely
across the sea! thou hast paid for the long
voyage with all that thou art possessed of;
poor an’ helpless shalt thou set foot on
thy land of Canaan. Thou mayst sell thy-
self, thy wife, and thy child, yet you shall
none of you suffer long. Behind the broad
fragrant leaf sits the goddess of death; her
kiss of welcome breathes consuming fever in-
to thy blood, far away, far away, over the
swelling waters !”

The emigrant company hstened joyfully
to the song of the nightingale, which they
thought announced to them happiness. Day
beamed from behind light clouds, and the
78 A PICTURE-BOOK

peasant people went over the heath to the
church ; the darkly-apparelled women, with
their milk-white linen around their heads,
looked like figures which had stepped forth
from the old church paintings; all around
them was nothing but the vast and death-
like landscape, the withered brown heath—
dark, leafless plains, in the midst of white
sand-banks. The women carried their hymn-
books in their hands, and advanced towards
the church. Oh, pray! pray for them who
wander onward to their graves on the other
side of the heaving water !
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FIFTEENTH EVENING.

I know a theatrical Clown,—said the
Moon,—the public applauds when it sees
him; every one of his movements is comic,
and throws the house into convulsions of
laughter, and yet he is not moved thereby :
that is his peculiarity. When he was yeta
child, and played with other boys, he was
already a punchinello. Nature had made
him one ; had given him one lump upon his
back, and another upon his breast. The
inner man, however—the spiritual—that was
really well-formed. No human being had
deeper feeling, or greater elasticity of mind
than he. The theatre was his ideal-world,
Had he been slender and well proportioned,
then he might have become a first-rate tragic
80 A PICTURE-BOOK

actor, for the great, the heroic, filled his soul ;
but he was obliged to be the Clown. His
sufferings, even, and his melancholy increased
the comic expression of his strongly-marked
countenance, and excited the laughter of the
crowded public who applauded their favorite.
The pretty little Columbine was friendly and
kind to him, and yet she preferred marrying
Harlequin. It would have been too comic in
reality to have married the Clown; like the
union of “ Beauty and the Beast.” When the
Clown was most out of humor, she was the only
one who could make him smile—nay, even
burst into peals of laughter. First of all she
would be melancholy with him, then rather
cheerful, and at last full of fun.

“T know what it is thou art in want of!”
said she—“ yes, it is this love !” and so he was
obliged to laugh.

“Me and love!” exclaimed he. “That
would be a merry thing! How the public
would applaud.”

“It is love!” continued she; and added,
with comic pathos—“It is me that you love !”

“Yes! and yet there are people who say
there is no such thing as love!” The poor
WITHOUT PICTURES. 81

Clown sprung up into the air, he was so
diverted: his melancholy was now gone.
And yet she had spoken the truth: he did
love her—loved her like the sublime and great
in art.

On her wedding-day he was more amusing
than ever. At night he wept: had the public
seen his distressed countenance then, they
would have applauded him!

A few days ago Columbine died. On the
day of her funeral Harlequin’s appearance
was excused on the stage, for he really was a
mourning husband. The manager, however,
was obliged to give something more merry
than common, in order that the public should
not miss too much the lovely Columbine and
the light-bodied Harlequin, and for this reason
it behoved the Clown to be doubly entertain-
ing. He danced and sprung aloft with de-
spair at his heart, and the public clapped their
hands and shouted— Bravo, bravissimo !”
The clown was called for when the perform-
ance was over. Qh, he was invaluable !

This evening, after the play, the poor
little man walked out from the city to the
solitary churchyard. The garland of flowers

6
8 A PICTURE-BOOK

‘was withered on Columbine’s grave; he sate
down. It was something worth painting,
His hands under his chin, his eyes fixed upon
the moon; it was like a monumental figure.
A clown upon a grave! very peculiar and
very comic ! Had the public seen their favorite
then, how they would have shouted—“ Bravo,
Clown ! bravo, bravissimo !”
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SIXTEENTH EVENING

Listen to what the Moon said.—I have
seen the cadet, become an officer, dress him-
self for the firet time in his splendid uniform ;
I have‘seen the young girl in her beautiful
ball-dreas ; the young princely bride happy in
her festival attire ; but the felicity of none of
these could equal that which this evening I
saw in a child, a little girl of four years.
They had just put.her on a new blue frock
and anew pink bonnet. The beautiful things
were scarcely on when they called for candles,
because the mo@p-light through the window
was too faint; they must have other light.
There stood the little girl as stiff as a doll,
her arms stretched out from her frock, her
fingers spread out wide from each other—and
84 A PICTURE-BOOK

oh! how her eyes, her whole being, beamed
with delight! .

“To-morrow you shall go out into the
street,” said the mother; and the little one
looked up towards her bonnet and down to-
wards her frock, and smiled joyfully.

“Mother,” said she, “what will the dogs
think, when they see me so beautifully dress-
ed!”
WIFHOUT PICTURES. 85

SEVENTEENTH EVENING.

I have,—said the Moon,—told thee about
Pompeii, that corpse of a city amongst living
cities. 1 know another, one still mfore
strange; not the corpse, but the ghost of a
city. On all sides where the fountain splashes
into a marble basin, I seem to hear stories of
the floating city. Yes, the fountain-streams
can tell them! The billows on the shore
sing of them. Over the surface of the sea
there often floats a mist, that is the widow’s
weeds. The sea’s bridegroom is dead ; his
palace and city are now a mausoleum. Dost
thou know this city? The rolling of the
chariot-wheels, or the sound of the horse’s
hoof, were never heard in its streets. The
fish swims, and like a spectre glides the black
gondola over the green water.
86 A PICTURE-BOOK

I will—continued the Moon,—show thee
the forum of the city, the city’s great square,
and then thou wilt think it to be a city for
adventures. Grass grows between the broad
flag-stones, and thousands of tame pigeons
fly circling in the twilight around the lofty
tower. On three sides thou art surrounded
by colonnades. The Turk, with his long
pipe, sits silently beneath them; the hand-
some Greek-lad leans against a pillar, and
looks up to the elevated trophies, the tall
masts, the memorial of the ancient power.
The flag hangs drooping like mourning
crape; a girl stands there to rest herself, she
has set down the heavy buckets of water,
whilst the yoke on which she sustained them
rests upon her shoulders, and she supports
herself on the column of victory. That is
not a fairy palace but a church which thou
seest before thee! the gilded dome, the gilded
balls around it, shine in my beams; the
magnificent bronze horses upon it have
traveled about like bronze horses in a fairy
tale; they have traveled thither, away from
their place, and then again back! Seest
thou the beautiful painting on walls and win-
WITHOUT PICTURES. a

dow panes? It is as if some genius had done
the will ofa child and thus decorated this ex-
traordinary temple. Dost thou see the winged
lion upon the pillar? Gold yet shines upon
it, but the wings are bound, the lion is dead
because the king of the sea is dead ; the vast
halls are empty, and where once hung costly
pictures the naked walls are now seen.
Lazzaroni sleep under the arches, where at
one time only the high noble dared to tread,
Either from the deep well or from the chamber
of the leaden roof, near to the Bridge of
Sighs, sounds forth a groan, whilst tamborines
are heard from the painted gondola as the
bridal-ring is cast from the glittering Bucen-
taur to Adria, the queen of the sea. Adhia,
wrap thyself in mist! let the widow's veil
cover the breast, and cast it over thy bride-
groom’s mausoleum ;—the marble-builder, the
spectre-like, Venice.”
88 A PICTURE-BOOK

EIGHTEENTH EVENING.

I looked down upon a great theatre,—said
the Moon,—the whole house was full of spec-
tators, because a new actor made his debut;
my beams fell upon a little window in the
wall; a painted face pressed its forehead
against the glass; it was the hero of the
night. The chivalric beard curled upon his
chin; but there were tears in the man’s eyes,
because he had been hissed—hissed with
reason. Poor fellow! but the realm of art
will not endure the feeble. He deeply felt
and passionately loved art, but she did not
love him.

The prompter’s bell rung ;—according to
the piece, the hero stepped forth with a bold
and determined air—thus had he to appear
WITHOUT PICTURES. 89

before a public which burst into peals of
laughter—The piece. was ended; I saw a
man wrapped in a cloak steal away down the
steps; it was he, the spirit-crushed cavalier;
the servants of the theatre whispered to each
other as he passed. I followed the poor
wretch home to his chamber. Hanging is
such an ignominious death, and people have
not always poison at hand. I know that he
thought of both. He looked at his pale face
in the glass; half closed his eyes to see
whether he would look handsome as a corpse.
Itis possible for people to be unfortunate in
the highest degree, and yet in the highest
degree vain at the same time. He thought
upon death, upon self-murder ; I believe he
wept in pity of himself—he wept bitterly,
and when people have had a good fit of cry-
ing they do not kill themselves,

A year has passed since then. A comedy
was acted, but this time in a little theatre, by
a poor vagrant company. I saw again the
well-known face, the painted cheeks, the
curled beard. He again looked up to me
and smiled—and yet for all that he had been

hissed—hissed scarcely a minute before in
h
90 A PICTURE-BOOK

that miserable theatre, hissed by that miser-
able audience! .

This very evening a poor hearse has
driven out of the gate of the town; not a
single being accompanied it. There lay upon
it a suicide, our painted and derided hero.
The driver was the only attendant; no one
followed, no one except the Moon. In an
angle of the churchyard wall is the self-
murdered laid; nettles will soon spring up
thereon ; there will grave-diggers cast thorns
and weeds from other graves.
WITHOUT PICTURES. a1

NINETEENTH EVENING.

I come from Rome,—said the Moon,—
there, in the middle of the city, upon one of
the seven hills, lie the ruins of the palace of
the Ceesars ; a wild fig-tree grows in a chink
of the wall, and covers its nakedness with its
broad, gray-green leaves; the ass wanders
over the heaps of rubbish among the laurel
hedges, and feasts on the golden thistle.
From this spot, whence the Roman eagle
once flew forth, went, and saw, and conquer-
ed, the entrance is now through a small, mis-
erable house, smeared with clay, betweeu
two broken pillars; tendrils of the vine hang
down, like a mourning garland, over the nar-
tow window. An old woman, with her little
grand-daughter lived there ; they ruled now
92 A PICTURE-BUUA

in the palace of the Cesars, and showed to
strangers the buried treasures. There remains
of the rich throne-room nothing but a naked
wall; the shadow of the black cypress points
to the place where the throne stood. The
earth lies to the depth of some feet above the
broken floor; the little girl, now the daugh-
ter of the palace of the Cesars, often sits
there upon her little stool, when the evening
bell rings. The keyhole in the door, close
beside her, she calls her balcony, and through
it she sees over half of Rome, as far as the
mighty dome of St. Peter’s.
It was silent as ever, this evening, and
the little girl came homeward in my full,
bright light. She carried upon her head an
antiquely-formed earthen jug filled with wa-
ter; her feet were bare; the black petticoat
and the little chemise sleeves were in tatters ;
I kissed the child’s beautiful round shoulder,
her black eyes, and her dark shining hair.
She mounted up the steps of the house, which
were steep, and were formed of broken pieces
of wail and a shattered capital. The bright-
colored lizard glided timidly past her feet,
but she was not frightened; she raised her
WITHOUT PICTURES. 93

hand to ring at the door; there hung a hare’s
foot in the packthread, which is now the bell-
pull at the palace of the Cesars. She stood
stock-still for a moment ; what was she think-
ing about’? Perhaps of the beautiful Jesus-
child clothed in gold and silver, in the chapel
pelow, where the silver lamp was burning,
and where her little-girl friends were singing
in chorus as she knew ; I cannot tell if it was
of this she thought! but again she made a
movement, and stumbled; the earthen jug
fell from her head and was shivered in pieces
upon the broken marble pavement. She
burst into tears; the beautiful daughter of
the palace of the Cesars wept over the poor,
broken, earthen jug; she stood with her bare:
feet and wept, and dared not to pull at the
pack-thread string, the bell-pull at the palace
of the Cesars.
94 A PICTURE-BOOK

TWENTIETH EVENING.

For upwards of fourteen days the Moon
had not shone; now I saw it again, round
and bright, standing above the slowly ascend-
ing clouds; listen to what the Moon related
to me. I followed a caravan from one of the
cities of Fez; it made a halt upon one of the
salt plains, which glittered like an ice-field,
and where one little stretch only was cover-
ed with moveable sand. The eldest of the
caravan, with his water-flask hanging at his
belt, and a bag of unleavened bread around.
his neck, marked out a square in the sand
with his staff, and wrote therein some words
of the koran; within this consecrated spot
the whole caravan drew up. A young mer-
chant, a child of the sun, as I could see by
WITHOUT PICTURES. 95

his eye and by his beautiful form, rode
thoughtfully upon his white and spirited
charger. Perhaps he was thinking of his
young and lovely wife. It was only two
days since the camel, adorned with skins and
costly. shawls, bore her, a beautiful bride,
around the walls of the city ; drums and bag-
pipes resounded, women sang, and shouts of
joy were sent forth from those who surround-
ed the camel, the bridegroom shouted the
gayest and the loudest of them all, and now
~——now he rode with the caravan across the
desert. I accompanied them for many nights ;
saw them rest beside the wells, among the
crested palm trees; they stabbed with a knife
the fallen camel and cooked the flesh with
fire. My beams cooled the burning sand;
my beams showed them the black masses of
rock, islands of death in the immense ovean
of sand. No hostile power had they met
with upon their trackless path; no storm
was abroad; no pillars of sand carried death
over the caravan.

The lovely wife prayed to heaven for her
husband and father. “Are they dead?” in-
quired she from my gilded horn. “ Are they
96 A PICTURE-BOOK

dead?” inquired she from my beaming cres-
cent. The desert now lies behind them; on
this very evening they rest under the tall
palm trees, around which circle the storks
with their long wings; the pelican rushes
down upon them from the branches.of the
mimosa, The luxuriant vegetation is tramp-
led down by the many feet of the elephants;
a troop of negro people come onward from a
distant fair; women with copper buttons in
their black hair, and in indigo-colored petti-
coats drive on the laden oxen on which the
naked black children lie asleep. One negro
leads in a thong a lion’s cub, which he had
purchased ; they approach the caravan ; the
young merchant sits immoveable, silent ; he
thinks upon his lovely wife, dreams in this
negro land of his white fragrant flower on
the other side the desert ; he lifts his head—
A cloud passed over the Moon, and again a
cloud. I heard no more that night.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 97

TWENTY-FIRST EVENING.

I saw a little girl weeping,—said the Moon,
—she wept because of the wickedness of the
world. She had hada present made her of
the most beautiful doll—Oh, it was a doll, so
lovely and delicate, not at all fitted to strug-
gle with misfortune! But the little girl's
brother, a tall lad, had taken the doll and set
it up in ahigh tree in the garden, and then
had run away. The little girl could not
teach the doll, could not help it down, and
therefore she cried. The doll cried too, and
stretched out her arms from among the green
branches, and looked so distressed. Yes, this
was one of the misfortunes of life of which her
mamma had so often spoken. Oh, the poor
doll! It already began to get dusk, and then

7
98 A PICTURE-BOOK

dismal night would come! And was she to
sit up there in the tree, and by herself all
night? No, the little girl would not endure
the thought of that.

“T will stay with you !” said she, although
she was not at all courageous. She began
already to see quite plainly the little elves, in
their tall pointed hats, peeping from between
the bushes, and down the dusky alleys danc-
ed tall spectres, which came nearer and near-
er. She stretched her hands up towards the
tree in which the doll sate, and they laughed
and pointed their fingers at her. Ah, how
terrified was the little girl! “But if one has
not done anything wrong,” thought she, “no-
thing can do one any harm! Have I done
anything wrong ?”

She thought. “Ah, yes! said she, “I
laughed at the poor duck with the red rag
tied round its leg; it hobbled so comically,
and that made me laugh; but it is wrong to
laugh at poor animals.”

“Have you laughed at poor animals?”
inquired she, looking up to the doll, and it
seemed to her as if the doll shook her head.
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TWENTY-SECOND EVENING.

T looked into the Tyrol,—said the Moon,—
I caused the dark fir-trees to cast strong sha
dows upon the rocks. I saw the holy Chris
topher, with the child Jesus upon his shoul-
der, as he stood there against the wall of the
houses, colossal in size from the foundation
to the gable. The holy Florian carries water
to theburning house, and Christ hangs bleed-
ing upon the great cross by the wayside.
These are old pictures for the new generation :
I have, nevertheless, seen them depart one
after another.

Aloft, in the projection of the mountains, a
solitary nunnery hangs like a swallow’s nest.
Two sisters stood up in the tower, and rung
the bell. They were both young, and there-
100 A PICTURE-BOOK

fore they looked out beyond the mountains
into the world. A traveling carriage drove
below along the high road, the postillion’s
horn resounded, and the poor nuns riveted
with kindred thoughts their eyes upon it:
there were tears in the eyes of the younger of
the two. The horn sounded fainter and
fainter : the bell of the nunnery overpowered
its dying tones.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 101

TWENTY-THIRD EVENING.

Listen to what the Moon said.—Many
years ago, in Copenhagen, I peeped in at the
window of a poor chamber. The father and
mother slept, but the little son slept not. I
saw the flowered cotton bed-hangings move,
and the child peeped out. 1 fancied at first
that he was looking at the Bornholm time-
piece, it was so beautifully painted with red
and green, and a cuckoo sate on the top of
it; there were heavy leaden weights, and the
pendulum with its shining brass surface,
went to and fro, “dik, dik! but it was not
that which he was looking at—no, it was his
mother’s spinning-wheel, which stood under
the clock. That was the most precious piece
of furniture in the whole house to the boy,
but he did not dare to touch it, for if he did,
102 A PICTURE-BOUK

he got a rap on the fingers. All the time his
mother was spinning he would sit beside her,
and watch the humming spole and the turn-
ing wheel, and he had the while his own pe-
culiar thoughts about them. Ah! if he could
only dare thus to spin on the wheel! Father
and mother were asleep; he looked at them,
he looked at the wheel, and presently after-
wards one little naked foot was pushed out
of bed, and then another naked foot, then two
little legs—thump ! stood he upon the floor.
He turned himself once round, however, to
see whether father and mother slept. Yes,
’ that they did! and so he went softly, very
softly—in nothing but his short little shirt—
to the wheel, and began to spin. The cord
flew off, and the wheel ran round faster than
ever. Ikissed his yellow hair and his light
blue eyes; it was a lovely picture. At that
moment the mother awoke—the curtains
moved—she looked out and thought about
elves, or some other kind of little sprite.

“In the name of Jesus!” said she; and full
of alarm, awoke her husband. He opened
his eyes, rubbed them with his hands, and
looked at the busy little creature.
WITHOUT PICTURES. ‘103

“Tt is actually Bertel !” said he.

I withdrew my gaze from that poor cham-
ler—I can see so far around me! I looked at
that very moment into the hall of the Vatican
where the marble gods stand. I illumined
the group of the Laocoon; the stone seemed
to sigh. I pressed my quiet kiss upon the
muses’ breast; I fancy it heaved. But my
beams tarried longest upon the group of the
Nile, upon the colossal god. He lay full of
thought, supporting himself upon sphinxes :
dreaming there as if he were thinking of the
fleeting year ; little loves played around him
with crocodiles. In the horn of plenty sate,
with folded arms, and gazing upon the great
tiver-god, a very little love, a true picture of
the little boy with the wheel ; it was the same
expression. Living and charming, here stood
the little marble child; and yet more than a
thousand times had the wheel of the year
gone round since it stood forth instone. Just
so many times as the boy in the poor cham-
ber turned the wheel has the great wheel of
time hummed round, and still shall hum, be-
fore the age creates another marble-god like
this.
104 A PICTURE-BOOK

See, it isnow many years since then. Last
evening,—continued the Moon,—I looked
down upon a creek in the east coast of Zea-
land. Beautiful woods were there, lofty
mounds, an old mansion-house with red walls,
swans in the moat, and a little trading town,
with its church among the apple-orchards. A
fleet of boats, each bearing a torch, glided
over the unruffled water; it was not to catch
fish that the torches were burning—no! every-
thing was festal! Music sounded, a song
was sung; and in the middle of one of the
boats stood he whom they honored, a tall,
strong man in a large cloak; he had blue
eyes, and long white hair. I knew him, and
thought upon the Vatican, and the Nile-group,
and all the marble gods; I thought upon the
poor little chamber where little Bertel sate in
his short shirt and spun.

The wheel of time has gone round; new
gods have ascended from the marble. “ Hur-
rah !” resounded from the boats—“ Hurrah for
Bertel Thorwaldsen !”
WITHOUT PICTURES. 135

TWENTY-FOURTH EVENING.

I will give thee a picture from Frankfort,
—said the Moon :—I took notice of one build-
ing in particular. It was not the birth-place
of Goethe, nor was it the old town-house,
where, through the grated windows, are still
exhibited the horned fronts of the oxen which
were roasted and given to the people at the
emperor's coronation, but it was the house of
a citizen painted green and unpretending, at
the corner of the narrow Jews’ street. It
was the house of the Rothschilds. I looked
in at the open door; the flight of steps was
strongly lighted; servants stood there with
burning lights in massive silver candlesticks,
and bowed themselves lowly before the old
woman who was carried forth down the steps
in a scdan chair. The master of the house
106 A PICTURE-BOOK

stood with bare head, and impressed reveren-
tially a kiss upon'the old woman’s hand. It
was his mother. She nodded kindly to him,
and to the servants; and they carried her out
into the narrow, dark street, into a little
house, where she lived, and where her child
was born, from whom all her good fortune
had proceeded. If she were now to leave the
despised street and the little house, then, per-
haps, good fortune would leave him !—that
was her belief.

The-Moon told nothing more. Her visit
to me was too short this evening; but I
thought of the old woman in the narrow, de-
spised street. Only one word about her—
and she had her splendid house near the
Thames ; only one word about her—and her
villa was situated on the Gulf of Naples.

“Were I to léave the mean little house
where my son’s good fortune began, then;
perhaps, good fortune would leave him !”

This is a superstition, but of that kind
which only requires, when the history is
known and the picture seen, two words as
a superscription to make it intelligible—A
MorTHER.
“WITHOUT PICTURES. 107

TWENTY-FIFTH EVENING.

It was yesterday, in the morning twilight,
—these were the Moon’s own words,—not a
chimney was yet smoking in the whole city,
and it was precisely the chimneys that I was
looking at. From one of these chimneys at
that very moment came forth a little head,
and then a half body, the arms of which
rested on the coping stone of the chimney.
“Hurrah It was a little chimney-sweeper
lad, who, for the first time in his life, had
mounted a chimney, and had thus put forth
his head. “Hurrah!” Yes, there was some
difference between this and creeping upwards
in the narrow chimney! The air blew so
fresh ; he could look out over the whole city
to the green wood. The sun had just risen ;
108 A PICTURE-BOOK

round and large, it looked brightly into his
face, which beamed with happiness, although
it was famously smeared with soot.

“ Now the whole city can see me, and the
moon can see me, and the sun also!” and
with that he flourished about his brush.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 109

TWENTY-SIXTH EVENING.

Last night I looked down upon a city in
China,—said the Moon. My beams illumin-
ed the long naked walls which form the
streets ; here and there, to be sure, is a door,
but it is closed, because the Chinese troubled
not themselves about the world outside.
Impenetrable Venetian shutters covered the
windows of the houses behind the walls;
from the temple alone light shone faintly
through the window-glass. I looked in—
looked in upon the brilliant splendor ; from
floor to ceiling was covered with pictures in
strong colors and rich gilding, which rep-
resented the works of the gods on earth.
Their statues themselves stood in every
niche, but mostly concealed by brilliant dra-
110 A PICTURE-BOOK

peries and suspended fans; and before every
divinity—they were all of tin—stood a little
altar with holy water, flowers, and burning
wax-lights. Supreme in the temple, however,
stood Fu, the supreme divinity, dressed in a
garment of silken stuff of the holy yellow
color. At the footof the altar sate a living
figure, a young priest. He appeared to be
praying, but in the midst of his prayer he
sunk into deep thought ; and it certainly was
sinful, because his cheeks burned, and his
head bowed very low. Poor Souihoung!
Perhaps he was dreaming about working in
one of the little flower-gardens which lie be-
fore every house behind the long wall of the
street, and which was a far pleasanter occu-
pation to him than trimming the wax-lights
in the temple; or was he longing to be seated
at the well-covered board, and between every
course to be wiping his lips with silver paper?
or was i. a sin so great that if he had dared
to utter it, the heavenly powers must have
punished him with death ? Were his thoughts
bold enough to take flight with the ship of
the barbarians to their home, the remote
England? No, his thoughts did not fly so
WITHOUT PICTURES. 111

far ; and yet they were as sinful as the warm
blood of youth could make them—sinful here,
in the temple before the statues of Fu and
the holy deities. I knew where his thoughts
were. In the most distant corner of the city,
upon the flat, flagged roof, the parapet of
which seemed to be made of porcelain, and
where stood the beautiful vases in which
grew large white campanulas, sate the youth-
ful Pe, with her small roguish eyes, her pout-
ing lips, and her least of all little feet. Her
shoes pinched, but there was a more severe
pinching at her heart; she raised her delicate,
blooming arms, and the satin rustled. Be-
fore her stood a glass bow], in which were four
gold fish: she stirred the water very softly
with a beautifully painted and japaned stick.
Oh, so slowly she stirred it because she was
deep in thought! Perhaps she was thinking
how rich and golden was the apparel of the
fish, how safely they lived in the glass bowl,
and how luxuriously they were fed; and yet,
for all that, how much more happy they
might be in freedom: yes, the idea distressed
the beautiful Pe. Her thoughts passed away
from her home; her thoughts went into the
112 A PICTURE-BOOK

church, but it was not for the sake of the gods
that they went there. Poor Pe! poor Soui-
houng! Their earthly thoughts met, but
my cold beam lay like a cherub’s sword be-
tween them.
WITHOUT PICTURES. 113

TWENTY-SEVENTH EVENING.

There was a calm,—said the Moon—the
water was as transparent as the pure air
through which I floated. I could see, far
below the surface of the sea, the strange
plants which, like giant trees in groves,
heaved themselves up towards me with stems
a fathom long, whilst the fish swam over
their tops. High up in the air flew a flock
of wild swans, one of which sank with
wearied wings lower and lower: its eyes
followed the airy caravan, which every mo-
ment became more distant; its pinions were
expanded widely, and it sank, like a soap-
bubble in the still air; it touched the surface
of the water, bowed back its head between
its wings, and lay still, like a white lotus

k
114 A PICTURE-BOOK

upon the calm Indian Sea. The breeze blew
and lifted up the bright surface of the water,
which was brilliant as the air; there rolled
on a large, broad billow—the swan lifted its
head, and the shining water was poured, like
blue fire, over its breast and back.

The dawn of day illumined the red clouds,
and the swan rose up refreshed, and flew
towards the ascending sun, towards the blue
coast, whither had betaken themselves the airy
caravan ; but it flew alone—with longing in
its breast, flew alone over the blue, the foam-
ing water !
WITHOUT PICTURES. 115

TWENTY-EIGHTH EVENING.

I will now give thee a picture from Swe-
den, said the Moon.—In the midst of black
pine woods, not far from the melancholy
shore of Roxe, lies the old convent-church of
Wreta. My beams passed through the grat-
ing in the walls into the spacious vault where
kings sleep in great stone coffins. On the
wall above them, is placed, as an image of
earthly magnificence, a king’s crown, made
of wood, painted and gilded, and held firm
by a wooden pin, which is driven into the
wall. The worm has eaten through the
gilded wood, the spider has spun its web from
the crown to the coffin; itis a mourning
banner, perishable, as mourning for the dead !

How still they sleep! I remember them so
116 A PICTURE-BOOK

well! I see now the bold smile on the lips
which expressed joy or sorrow so strongly,
so decisively. When the steam-vessel, like
an enchanted ship, sails hither from the
mountains, many a stranger comes to the
church, visits this vault, and inquires the
names of the kings, and these names sound
forgotten and dead ; he looks upon the worm-
eaten crown, smiles, and if he be of a pious
turn of mind, there is melancholy in his
smile.

Slumber ye dead! the Moon remembers
you. The Moon sends in the night her cold
beams to your quiet kingdom, over which
hangs the wooden crown!
WITHOUT PICTURES. 117

TWENTY-NINTH EVENING.

Close beside the high road,—said the Moon,
—lies a little public house, and just opposite to
it is a great coach house. As the roof was
‘under repair, I looked down between the
beams and saw through the open trap-door into
the great desolate space; the turkey slept up-
on the beam, and the saddle was laid to rest
in the empty manger. In the middle of the
place stood a travelling-carriage, within which
the gentlefolks were sound asleep, whilst the
horses were feeding, and the driver stretched
his limbs, although I know very well that he
slept soundly more than half the way. The
door of the fellow’s chamber stood open, and
the bed looked as if he had tumbled neck and
heels into it; the candle stood on the floor,
118 A PICTURE-BOOK

and burned low in the socket. The wind
blew cold through the bar; and the time
was nearer to daybreak than midnight. Upon
‘thé floor within the stall, slept a family of
wandering musicians; father and mother
- were dreaming about the burning drop in the
bottle ; the pale little girl, she dreamed about
the burning tears in her eyes. The harp lay
at their head, and the dog at their feet.












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'2013-12-19T07:13:11-05:00'
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
'518' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
a2bb7ecd1aff02939ed45a25f8b66973
03ef0c771a1a5eafad9c6e20b1ce787d14e9d352
describe
'738' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPM' 'sip-files00059.txt'
6ca1ec3fa153c08deed16c7c761663b4
2d65531341b3b452485edb317956c8a1bdc2b033
'2011-10-13T20:27:21-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPN' 'sip-files00060.txt'
6c3b08ed0480641cd0c00a8e98811376
4deb188f74b6c005a732d45cd9cc0d8eeab89eb4
'2011-10-13T20:29:42-04:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPO' 'sip-files00061.txt'
41c4cc27140d09a89c20c44dcef1de07
e5759a3f4b25d5ae56489de38d3830991019265d
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPP' 'sip-files00062.txt'
72e315807501246776c5c92fa8b7120a
9da84a983a0493117859ed88fcec362b252f967c
describe
'747' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPQ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b7ccbfd039b8f444ea1326136278344a
808686ac3354ecf0efa5361799b3765e568a355d
'2011-10-13T20:29:05-04:00'
describe
'776' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPR' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bd88830ad7b0aef2731dbbc1cb30a1ee
2eafb5241e5eb2e995db8b6b94c2e128dd1b68f4
describe
'750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPS' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5e54dffccd9e985714fbf949a78896af
7fd945db760a3f90a760671a066f94b425067cc1
'2011-10-13T20:27:06-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPT' 'sip-files00066.txt'
241d60d2940e493e883f428ee594efb0
0009760db75d58127ef097a33ed47a12bf1b3a4d
'2011-10-13T20:27:01-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
103c3759210b63bbf0164de639300d99
ae587f3c8c3a6f47fdbad607c46ceb72583a583b
'2011-10-13T20:29:40-04:00'
describe
'228' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
0208505169e16ed1d0e00d948750e204
4cd5dcf85abf8c5d0ac932c09e60dc809d41e231
'2011-10-13T20:28:32-04:00'
describe
'758' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPW' 'sip-files00069.txt'
80ebb4afa17c00018f6954ee3fb68eca
f885c8866e0988cf85af8442e7949f429b835723
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPX' 'sip-files00070.txt'
5123c6906ceac1cd9fecc05c5b1cc7f4
120a7537c1463b8bc5627cb37af74494f3fc44d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPY' 'sip-files00071.txt'
80cc12557e7f60c772ce0f1998c99279
c37340b0b5c3c308cd5b2426f5fa013d94ea82f6
'2011-10-13T20:27:13-04:00'
describe
'760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKPZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
069300770268979716fbea5bfc2a1092
28650a3ad4ed8a285f3387f0482283e4d573c53f
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQA' 'sip-files00073.txt'
d5525cd04a1688082765cd112017d339
7ecdd23944337afbf83c5e5e19be1b36636f07cf
'2011-10-13T20:28:43-04:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQB' 'sip-files00074.txt'
0a09e5de559bcb5732a9698d9765d214
0fe5e2ff9c56cfeee16ee4a801e74202df43c69d
'2011-10-13T20:28:56-04:00'
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQC' 'sip-files00075.txt'
6a43e77cc175f10bae9ca17d6e6430b9
65861d3099e2c75d6e9309785849e506491c1d47
'2011-10-13T20:28:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQD' 'sip-files00076.txt'
89da1ee4f2facb2ee442c233f39399b5
a0891a9b5dbef3789a63cfde718339a4e406a38f
'2011-10-13T20:29:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
10483602bf30e68966ddee2e1d4f89fd
9b1dc880c76bea1104149023a8089ba40ab857a1
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQF' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2b902709fd9a3520d891090306a610bd
1477f55a6e2ccb0d20bae2ec735afe073821608c
'2011-10-13T20:26:52-04:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQG' 'sip-files00079.txt'
103acd098fd7e30976e4d953e0e64648
4c1181d2fff426f3ed7aa99128d03ba23af21b90
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQH' 'sip-files00080.txt'
f54484715298680fb103d6aceb8de060
fb47edb2b654d450a99dbaab8b2074de683be6f8
'2011-10-13T20:28:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
e9371cff734baa52a6fab5b9fa661f8b
e75d457314fb67bf69b9784153aa7883d9b42662
'2011-10-13T20:29:10-04:00'
describe
'394' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQJ' 'sip-files00082.txt'
cb4480e2e0e960036b14390156c9b265
01f3307e8f4b7664758e143e59e2e0c53d9ac806
describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQK' 'sip-files00083.txt'
8abe79313a0e364f719e9295e4744a4d
5d309cdb3a2b62505f41b16e6e119e45f6228e61
'2011-10-13T20:27:30-04:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQL' 'sip-files00084.txt'
14df66cced99ecb3c9bfd0a15911a165
9c63728b745579720377522ccf2e2d4657814c61
'2011-10-13T20:27:00-04:00'
describe
'589' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
d85b4dddf464f75d8f6624cb5b26aaef
50ccb3f5294ae9a1af6c47cfdf974efcf9a19bbc
describe
'744' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQN' 'sip-files00086.txt'
7f7ee370e674ffe0e87840cc80f874ac
4c2df8e8253b18605690a9560ea97bb302b36fa4
'2011-10-13T20:28:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQO' 'sip-files00087.txt'
abf22a9a4d3113591f285bbb382ee0df
95ba75af205345daa7512584350c9bb233c3962b
'2011-10-13T20:26:58-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
31367adee9af5e848b991eb32f06f079
299d0fd86617bcfa4cc7bf78f74a6d09dfff3456
'2011-10-13T20:29:16-04:00'
describe
'376' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQQ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
a530276eec915248e1122d164bdbb9bc
ea69ceac27855ac770d503098a52d0b7146b6301
describe
'794' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQR' 'sip-files00090.txt'
61654f7eb027af60b6f7668dfb5eb14c
7498e0cfdadf42c32bfa7c6af40fd3603a57f4f4
'2011-10-13T20:26:57-04:00'
describe
'363' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQS' 'sip-files00091.txt'
127193acbf41257ad759dcc7e0a76c11
d3cb9f6970c3e1a7a9de7cb100e92292558997a1
describe
'811' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQT' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b020b84a1af81028febff8e99773b77d
4fd89af1b54b4212ec6dc1faf99635a0ace41d6c
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQU' 'sip-files00093.txt'
6cf8897acf102f39611bc04437b4d0d6
c1187e65ef88f35e9155623063ef406299cacf1e
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b18cc03aec2e57faa61da958da374afc
e50b2180203c11c2687ae5def0b3fb2925a0e636
describe
'731' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQW' 'sip-files00095.txt'
6cc8d7138591fba1d344962f43939b5f
b7b78a796e027f5cb32265f6f1b9b27455662537
'2011-10-13T20:27:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQX' 'sip-files00096.txt'
8d28dff01857797a3fe4d3287e3c80d8
07e10935a40a2acaf8915364fda1afb7f3ed7623
'2011-10-13T20:29:33-04:00'
describe
'523' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
eda7be655a0f447aa7d4bc659dc7ac3f
e64dd087c4b8ca13d71b689814108dec834894ae
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKQZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
52e688f0a1d8b7a457a380705ca643c4
8f8b4f7cc42e73839c3433efd35b3c3ce9fc7bb9
'2011-10-13T20:26:50-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
705280de092f9d3a65141e5907f09f28
10a2e5f729f49e5f109bb6fcf9d8641add3101ec
describe
'876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRB' 'sip-files00100.txt'
cdfbbf2810fde135d159fb4ca3247e65
c3e27f024e93352fe954813c6479f02b82a7d1df
'2011-10-13T20:29:20-04:00'
describe
'774' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
8f682a07f837df174c28b5715c1b42d0
c2177df6f113800e08afdb2973aa4da401f600f7
'2011-10-13T20:27:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRD' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fe54417613d7b0b79e50fc47b1736a76
506b79ccca96b7df82f95f2a9b85acfb63fb4bd7
'2011-10-13T20:29:39-04:00'
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRE' 'sip-files00103.txt'
6a46f95ef5015312921ea060500f96a0
c07d96af983dff34a47d6f8ffe7051a83276fe5e
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRF' 'sip-files00104.txt'
489579237c8c047b924d7b92927002db
ff7286fb1f35a14f87a56b45831f91bba4cc58f5
'2011-10-13T20:28:35-04:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7d5e6b180b0d64e3e7ec05fcd668b368
65aa3f8ed9db1830aa08348bb3fa4424404f7885
'2011-10-13T20:28:06-04:00'
describe
'766' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRH' 'sip-files00106.txt'
eb979a27b71e40280c27b1914c40c03b
c83c0a624d1164b2dc21c8b5453c24da55981e2d
'2011-10-13T20:29:19-04:00'
describe
'407' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
81114829d73dd1e385edd7d6f3f6ac3e
1ba930b01260ee7942e1cc37211a631af0ba6fb6
describe
'822' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRJ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
f0f91e44f3e569e057f169aae640251a
27e5398f43ca14897a1bd787085144534b954229
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRK' 'sip-files00109.txt'
6fd81c2317ee642dee6397d8ec11455e
a434ceeeef92c05b664a9327de46d6741da31556
'2011-10-13T20:27:04-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRL' 'sip-files00110.txt'
8be84c588878ec8371fa44bde8534310
28adae31c3276ff735a85b91abf58a8811a712d4
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRM' 'sip-files00111.txt'
800e56048adc3722d1b30b20c40ad44a
4bbfb7cab638a504e90099480e5bd0e13817699e
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRN' 'sip-files00112.txt'
75efbe7c7fd1200e086f52c66f113a57
dd74612c56556f476f9417750c289311b0b23db6
'2011-10-13T20:27:15-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRO' 'sip-files00113.txt'
10cf64e11f32d255a9390ac587fbf333
65841c22910179b94bb14f51e1bf632263416373
'2011-10-13T20:27:38-04:00'
describe
'767' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
ef3bf81fd4532ede50eb45f400fdc281
dc9dcf30acca819ea379ee056052f90d791b676b
describe
'295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRQ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
6f9e82d831babd0f0b908500cc9149b0
d0924f00a4745a99928c67ca67e60e87ace3844d
describe
'764' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
54a49101b353e240286f0bcfc480abbe
b77daccdfa4e7e637b58524836e9fbc15670ef40
'2011-10-13T20:27:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRS' 'sip-files00117.txt'
7942af2ff540cee538aef320c996563e
273a73e47cec5494800ed351fa7f451bc10184e3
'2011-10-13T20:30:07-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRT' 'sip-files00118.txt'
92cc502892f57afc46269fe39cb294a0
d25c46c6dc49e35634fc5a2971d11f765577cf30
'2011-10-13T20:29:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRU' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a333d8052f3dfd44f2e953492a6adcc2
6467b70e77f807e74bd4bca729cb3659d672368a
'2011-10-13T20:28:37-04:00'
describe
'762' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
92bb9637cc12d31fd5f88ebd9f4fbfbc
efa6cd9c475dfc827df91e36b58aabde8fcb7c61
describe
'591' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRW' 'sip-files00121.txt'
7a5a7f602a2bf99588635908c1ca2203
aeebb26506e0ee8102c9d6f722c6b6f26e4b013b
'2011-10-13T20:28:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRX' 'sip-files00122.txt'
302a9cd693b20bdaac2f4619167ac132
cc6a7858f74e038a75f46797b64d9062d2e97a58
describe
'632' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRY' 'sip-files00123.txt'
4542b433449c0c9c03ea9a65bee670b2
1dc046412ddc0c50e1c56fdeba929c09842a7b3f
describe
'801' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKRZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
21f5c53be467fe4a340eea715af4cb3f
416ba4e5b2eea6903a881a858e496c0184164a75
'2011-10-13T20:29:30-04:00'
describe
'435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSA' 'sip-files00125.txt'
26ede96ea420ec33ba33fd6e712af180
ae270cfb4359e269d523ad3862c8d6f52ca42e89
describe
'178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d206f769e0042c73242dbb1144e81c11
efb19a464828ab70b337246a0a4f4f997ce53637
'2011-10-13T20:27:36-04:00'
describe
'4457' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSC' 'sip-files00004.pro'
abde65e613c464825cdd16e37c11c972
bca2f2d0c00a336a6886441dc07ac798a1670ea7
'2011-10-13T20:28:45-04:00'
describe
'54179' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSD' 'sip-files00005.pro'
9ddc3e464cfe9caf09aaf7492d877bab
fca1ace447159f9601e2e1c96615fe28d152efd2
describe
'2307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSE' 'sip-files00007.pro'
319b3b87ff1ef726a9dde7c17a14f8a6
2c04102d236bebcad9d72b5256b56b79671c5a52
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
c766828a299bab868af0633d7e0d9800
e8a6c37f327b19fcca521fe6e9dfacf3abfc3615
'2011-10-13T20:27:56-04:00'
describe
'6868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
3b723fa341d4b574c447932abf7590a9
c59b621a6639c376334565012263239026ba7df8
describe
'7681' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSH' 'sip-files00012.pro'
e4e7e48cce971d89259e525ddbc31ec3
939a6a8e7f6704de3af61439855c74ffa69aa6b2
'2011-10-13T20:29:50-04:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSI' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a7b7e4d28978191fd07a0d6e0f421577
1753fb30ce17649d6fba238debd7fac98ddd4c67
describe
'19018' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
76f0c8d47465b6ecfe9bf9c2ee5fbbcb
3bd1e30b71dd003de4c78491de44faf0d48de8bf
'2011-10-13T20:26:47-04:00'
describe
'29114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSK' 'sip-files00017.pro'
e5c7a21f7cf2f1b6afc1259fd9f828f8
4f9e115a08764b24614edde9dcb7a87f56d1eca1
'2011-10-13T20:30:00-04:00'
describe
'28598' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSL' 'sip-files00018.pro'
b004e50c687731b8055ed1022b9aafb2
25e99b3f42c371487f82054c4d383e5fc53bfd52
describe
'28455' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSM' 'sip-files00019.pro'
b4d2880739d1bb359fd592e3b42298c6
a9d76d55b6782c6b50fd320c89c7737b2a5916ee
describe
'29119' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
9b3a03947409c7abbb0abb652d71892d
8a84a723917c3dde3609d80e7555d179a8e21fb9
'2011-10-13T20:28:10-04:00'
describe
'26688' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1a808acae806efd46301733712523045
8f280ba1b4cbcdcc0a1ec9fc04332fabb92c51b2
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
c507d9e9f28f611f138f4fed95c0288f
62795d33d49b112679541502e74d258d90f8983c
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSQ' 'sip-files00023.pro'
abeb03324b79a31ec7578be84e865b4f
8f23987a2a2bd9950d81b7d33b7dad91613649dc
'2011-10-13T20:28:18-04:00'
describe
'27709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
e2e4dc192a15e451bdab1a2f936466dc
4a6bfb756ec3f11fd61bb5ae0e9a6ad7fd10c11f
'2011-10-13T20:28:17-04:00'
describe
'29660' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSS' 'sip-files00025.pro'
57f8839fba6b24477edd7eccc3227d0c
c427d089e119454839f347d0afa42ea1edfe20d5
describe
'27986' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKST' 'sip-files00026.pro'
ef4467f6a032d96ce4e5f8b0b1a9720c
a243f63afb8866932a8a661ce05e33b3656baf1f
'2011-10-13T20:28:39-04:00'
describe
'27028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSU' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ef5308727935ad8d7e78f013cefa35e6
a3205bdb227292b46e979ef1c67ae53b554f426c
'2011-10-13T20:28:48-04:00'
describe
'26497' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSV' 'sip-files00028.pro'
ef03d86fd52f8cc09777f860f932cac4
b63ab462358af876a29f9bbc87c860b883f99f8e
'2011-10-13T20:28:11-04:00'
describe
'27772' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
de3db058d452882e4a3be549196897d1
f0a427ad315f53e721cd3526ecdb8c0e2aa9e5da
'2011-10-13T20:28:02-04:00'
describe
'29088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSX' 'sip-files00030.pro'
1acb70d15c07c4bf58f0fb090d435110
6b5e45049db947dc6358f6c7b8cf39b435425580
describe
'29402' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSY' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d4b819dd753ea6a295a7b2dc62649fc4
ebf05b2d83167f40eba34482d76730d6231592be
'2011-10-13T20:27:32-04:00'
describe
'30304' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKSZ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
716a18b0827fc11ea7e0b064046032d9
02e8a5eec053ab72fb0ab1149b86bc3df7b5b562
'2011-10-13T20:29:46-04:00'
describe
'28717' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTA' 'sip-files00033.pro'
76c8d9b115ef5b343daa88918379fd09
f54090174d0334af92da577694d057276a63ad85
'2011-10-13T20:29:11-04:00'
describe
'29985' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
1a004956bcc27511857957e893c6dcfd
2932a165e642d1ed55f64790919a8f9c8bae2be1
describe
'30028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
b4869e3819ed66594dca638a3edad2d1
11571ef0a05293f2dd334c7988c4b602d824cd8d
'2011-10-13T20:27:46-04:00'
describe
'29482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTD' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1e4e7f82cced944d6a2543f68f52435c
b15861144892a770524789a20e2ce6061ef41608
'2011-10-13T20:29:37-04:00'
describe
'28469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
b4ca13ebec2c80e7d70aeff4e28b3962
f83460776ccdf7da20c8789547b5c162ae75e95d
'2011-10-13T20:29:09-04:00'
describe
'27749' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTF' 'sip-files00038.pro'
a0215d5b109c718135d789c02274417b
232064575607798f272cfbc36e73a73639cb1c90
'2011-10-13T20:27:17-04:00'
describe
'25809' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTG' 'sip-files00039.pro'
d8f94e3a86bd9305283e08e4664b0fb0
320f49ed3c67a22b851ebb874cd9412aba9b9d66
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTH' 'sip-files00040.pro'
3f016ed9c2375ab6683f327919e73a05
ab319895cc087878938b9b433c72f94662f791a3
'2011-10-13T20:29:23-04:00'
describe
'15289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTI' 'sip-files00042.pro'
b90031130b61afb7ba002ebef52c6f9c
98d91460b92f5eb62a152fbbfce2ad2195a0e2b3
describe
'24110' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f097a72090ef5a8b4d040be52ef442f2
b4beda734bfbd45f7c22b6cb15c48b5c81a33137
describe
'14820' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTK' 'sip-files00044.pro'
49188c614e862a6f818bf6a7e27b06e0
41f6a501d2c533028d5b0e20c77a683a20c4cf3b
describe
'19159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTL' 'sip-files00045.pro'
fe7f9a980d11efee722f3a57859c32c2
c60a2517e5411ed984aa4b77bb6cb2f740c19af6
'2011-10-13T20:28:49-04:00'
describe
'22345' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTM' 'sip-files00046.pro'
2cb49df570716c9f04e79ba3c06ea5e9
281efd626a053f42f3eef6a9d5a9e6f846fce74b
'2011-10-13T20:30:01-04:00'
describe
'19194' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTN' 'sip-files00047.pro'
43099216bf7949c8e9ddf2bc21796779
858134b163fc7c712c156e655f09f01a285ced1b
describe
'13280' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
0c6a6de65be4eddc965b0da8b4b85ae6
8ced155883eb0196d21907b21066558c64c61b68
'2011-10-13T20:28:16-04:00'
describe
'18705' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
84149996f5e135b6d7e22ac5eb8afa1c
20f1164f05c2a82e6bfe843fbd8bb746a75585d0
'2011-10-13T20:28:22-04:00'
describe
'27052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTQ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
0fab7ce1b31a82dcf2e0d85246ba2541
423cba879902ac37d9e6c5c8f4653876b4f49c6a
'2011-10-13T20:29:07-04:00'
describe
'9517' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTR' 'sip-files00051.pro'
7a1b9ad4926bfb6ba5d348cf23960fd7
57162a35e7e406aae146a2c8914f3bdbc94812d7
'2011-10-13T20:27:20-04:00'
describe
'19039' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
475111870deb4aaf05640878e45b2bbc
255b5df33e37a39a4b5041818bb92296e9922387
'2011-10-13T20:28:20-04:00'
describe
'24289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTT' 'sip-files00053.pro'
a1729618bae5ea4ece382b2d3f581aca
7921cc8139b0d1f4989144c56a121dd1b7193023
describe
'18118' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTU' 'sip-files00054.pro'
efecc0f31bb348b9f3ab290e0c52719a
d0d3b802d9e09b6a17f0ee74d594dd37df999868
'2011-10-13T20:27:18-04:00'
describe
'25770' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTV' 'sip-files00055.pro'
b62699ff9602492b539bd24696656abf
0580009122ff0f9035778106b93db7701d3d7312
describe
'28865' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTW' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a1f1aa46d6ca1aa788d2b5be1d2dc7c0
90915fa7071ef30c2cbd8f6ab6a57ed9e85a35db
describe
'20310' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTX' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e8eaa5586ed3eb547a8aefa067375203
107c4b853bc27bef2b389ea2373de8e1b157502d
'2011-10-13T20:28:29-04:00'
describe
'12573' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTY' 'sip-files00058.pro'
fb611631d288efd23de3d50588f0a7a8
e7daeb3920002117e8c070b0c46dab3769e8ce8b
'2011-10-13T20:27:52-04:00'
describe
'18229' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKTZ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
01d0fd210455358891edc99b21e644b5
127ab0408c3e01bf2d0ede6aaaa98a5456f4e5f9
describe
'28872' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUA' 'sip-files00060.pro'
805e85073fb0d16a73c27667802c6729
d1f88e6a09d6821008a0575230298ceaba3a0740
describe
'29861' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUB' 'sip-files00061.pro'
c7c9355beac0177d02f00a0e9542764a
29c74b0754d81e26d9349465cecbb2f5faa3295a
describe
'19202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6c0a0c7912c7d74063ceb6ffe9ecf392
af57d375b27ac5c364841ea36e9f217a70a1b05a
describe
'18551' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUD' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ff66a7f4009ddafa22e63688a2f2358f
3465d2f37deab8bd39a7e302e2ff87a30f6f1a07
'2011-10-13T20:28:36-04:00'
describe
'19174' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUE' 'sip-files00064.pro'
001454dc1ea0bf759c5a4c65d1df5b90
7f207e379676bf8c3d5ca744b50b78b07964b5dc
'2011-10-13T20:29:01-04:00'
describe
'18469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUF' 'sip-files00065.pro'
7f2b828f325b21c24311c36781ec34bc
5c9ed3a5d689b66db4ed4934e97a547ba871f3f3
describe
'29440' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
9770c1649f9703873186c41538ec4342
00f0c6bd2bba31f93a0d76bedbabb702477c8ad8
describe
'29753' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUH' 'sip-files00067.pro'
72c8c91c6d2582081bcd6b8deb9ca07c
22da87f88b4d378b5e556bd7e4e45a0a167e9eca
describe
'5160' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUI' 'sip-files00068.pro'
f9573038a2ed94a9d9e68bf9147fec76
434fcec68f0dfc14f6c784a621860c15832d441e
'2011-10-13T20:27:44-04:00'
describe
'18523' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUJ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
ab8956675a56be26e84489d4ef8b3628
862c2d4fdd961425445dfcc2e1e22c07b4a311f4
describe
'29432' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUK' 'sip-files00070.pro'
66e8a6acb8def53177ef206a7452e5fb
b4eeb8fe2feb72cb7eb715bece2ad75ff5b971fa
describe
'19227' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUL' 'sip-files00071.pro'
e63545ea2b0647ff7bbceb18d175673d
e1b5d1bc1e74d60e8801b69a8c90f1dd2ca4db22
describe
'18913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUM' 'sip-files00072.pro'
788c1e208869d1e85a06ae7d66276f3c
e73910054a1ffe8b9bbcc3ae26dfad1da2053d7e
describe
'29016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUN' 'sip-files00073.pro'
cf16ab2a2bae1dd08c172c5cf4463a18
88525ab99ee7931c44192e283e1fee1eba18af57
'2011-10-13T20:28:07-04:00'
describe
'28114' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUO' 'sip-files00074.pro'
ae9dca65cb458f41d0dff42d0637928c
5a595fa7f06fb2d708bc33aab60c564c9b963b5b
describe
'4519' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
a1882fc34a0bfc1953fbe173cbdc1366
edf9b07b22e4a15120cb459934184efb76353042
describe
'19128' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUQ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
72e59f0a2e52601d143ab0fc4a9296fc
532c1cc1795818746337e353e39f4115aca8417a
'2011-10-13T20:29:52-04:00'
describe
'27718' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUR' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7aed47e29005301c6b8400b5ef157be9
88b36f48c226b9d23e44bf3eca2ac61ebda527db
describe
'28793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUS' 'sip-files00078.pro'
def4d1fb7f5cd843d97cd6ae047f2e57
7b86ac0263f3334ca31aa7e0f8dcee59e92ca12f
describe
'6511' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
e867996d7e7e996b4fa8d9e340857102
3d991f33b8b7f98ab0181cdb45027e3ac935b3c0
describe
'18231' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUU' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ea8409ab221e12196cf7f1bf2bc43e30
05698c48c7740ece022c94a6a5eb77bbb6bb6e47
describe
'28071' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUV' 'sip-files00081.pro'
8bc941b9c99632e0076e9891e772d75e
e1a4a25284311567627905bc232fe72ce12fd354
describe
'9234' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUW' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ae72cc66bbd8bf8d3747753cb8ba98c4
4cd7ccef3cc60bed29a877ff364bf3159b849b92
'2011-10-13T20:27:45-04:00'
describe
'18774' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUX' 'sip-files00083.pro'
024059bbacda975c2acaf414dff8ebb2
ae41e0debbd5a5f1b43fce1c5e0656f187b54f1e
describe
'29034' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUY' 'sip-files00084.pro'
31a9aaa1c6b77d0aae81a0c68795ba6b
f6da2d705c2596b9fdce9b1b914d7ae6d3e975cc
describe
'14671' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKUZ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
840f8a5802f445f34abc6a97c6a47a5c
5af92c26e1e136ac7f8e141f684892288de59bba
'2011-10-13T20:29:17-04:00'
describe
'18446' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVA' 'sip-files00086.pro'
fc88caf9543434bd78e75b7efa13fde1
e2f11c62ebc4637358f2b99c107ec9e6b809ce37
describe
'28417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVB' 'sip-files00087.pro'
7f912e198d7664696d752b18675f832f
c74a336b1aa1e449ad190763129793290ffd8e78
describe
'28046' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
df33cd0442b2f11826757d29bec48a83
4a3b757c1420e47157acd1c512a56c6d31dfd3de
'2011-10-13T20:27:33-04:00'
describe
'9274' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVD' 'sip-files00089.pro'
1a6000e5a0de6a00441cbef68d3196ab
d25fa57d2588a6179733a6edf149d1cce2ce0a6c
'2011-10-13T20:27:28-04:00'
describe
'19766' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVE' 'sip-files00090.pro'
31cddac5fd95d74846919d061272460d
84d45bc884d834bc744a8510747b43d6762463cb
'2011-10-13T20:30:04-04:00'
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVF' 'sip-files00091.pro'
9c1239bd9f25a5793f85f51eca300c7f
a1fb3bfa526b3524a6b3fb11b2278cd81c7e3cf5
describe
'20136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
7d8989685312d3671a686e72e63b607c
10845a1c56f173405ba608568a1ba8851b7bf413
describe
'29620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVH' 'sip-files00093.pro'
3e479358e9c9156ab9d7ac77be896d0e
122576fe9ec5aabcc30b9116797ff1523cb31144
'2011-10-13T20:27:48-04:00'
describe
'23184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVI' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f58de8c8462cd906bdd9bbbf1c1d92a2
ba3a61f115e00fe845902ef8d064a16b148b5827
'2011-10-13T20:28:52-04:00'
describe
'17984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
e8dde9910c1b5f7a22fe4aa2e98dda00
e914d607ad01e78502cbf1d55e20881408dacfd1
describe
'29225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVK' 'sip-files00096.pro'
17a7ff281e5c5728c49aba6570dd5f36
3253419e6f4ba1c4ca0d3690ea9952cd9ae05e21
'2011-10-13T20:29:53-04:00'
describe
'12919' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVL' 'sip-files00097.pro'
096e26d5a0e2087ab4dc103c8c4e3c4a
82bbe9052dd82a9f2fea873b8694402eef848550
describe
'19282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVM' 'sip-files00098.pro'
b9bc970ac86244ca29c681505834664a
32eb7822b73c6d15b2eee4592e65a6389aa9ceb8
describe
'30277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVN' 'sip-files00099.pro'
5b4da72286914834fa668f05add88b18
b4820df0c6ebb457540e3bce604751509dfb4b9e
describe
'22006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVO' 'sip-files00100.pro'
63273f1e24b674624da76dc3d825cd8a
5e5edc08a2d59f02f35cad39d4753a00ae9d7910
describe
'19249' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
5acff672a32ae0ddbe8da9046f6d280f
3336f68497d1f54d40a19706c7545c50da6fa302
describe
'28669' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVQ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
133470322410a76c9436b71bc9c17810
261f3ec025aba4fd35f6beda578b4b349ea54e25
describe
'23914' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVR' 'sip-files00103.pro'
7ca8cbf14113c36f7a11b627dcaac76e
6c36e56f6e1e287da7db1d4d0190c6d9d77cf804
describe
'19837' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVS' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9855ac0ebfea7926079700b5ecae0c35
df2ad48687dc68afdf62aeec01f065635f98ff56
describe
'27221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVT' 'sip-files00105.pro'
8ee1cfe0a00deb343953d9c0e3fbe646
576e6710cc6198f68a58897ca71a1fcae9af9dc0
'2011-10-13T20:29:48-04:00'
describe
'19047' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVU' 'sip-files00106.pro'
28f5d75cd2cdf154e8fe6447f7364f18
be545f84b3e9b8e1c183c437a1bb4c3200fec434
describe
'10082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVV' 'sip-files00107.pro'
988fe546a43665419c44c87d7cab3c1d
4cdbdddc216c36a634752e35b00056fb77098fee
describe
'20513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d9dc3ba3db73d828e742ccc7036c9141
4d8bec2a76e43daf96e2c5ed727471287a71c653
'2011-10-13T20:28:26-04:00'
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVX' 'sip-files00109.pro'
9b6b163dda9717ed18859cb46af1ea12
0531bbf9a806aa5841db8d1da9a5463f1f2f6b49
describe
'29178' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVY' 'sip-files00110.pro'
72cbf0c5389de0d12d5d92592adf55f6
b9da53cb9e409dbeab895b8a44bff6824f9c23dd
describe
'25516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKVZ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
747c9484d797c0110cd302fb3b8c3c1f
96fffab9f926ab8c33e5dd29d5107a8add516b9d
'2011-10-13T20:27:29-04:00'
describe
'20803' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWA' 'sip-files00112.pro'
fc530dfc464aaf911b929acb95ac8042
1e32c873ef525c231750061a51fa20fbff7f18f5
'2011-10-13T20:27:41-04:00'
describe
'27588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWB' 'sip-files00113.pro'
c8c91f14e1394fe04f03d0600381c7f0
63bbe28ee776382ae7f7ea55eb50e75faa43aa3f
'2011-10-13T20:30:06-04:00'
describe
'19109' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
a6f82d5d481c847550d2f871b0aa292a
8c2d4a68e067390f2440347c7cf7a5ac10833f9c
describe
'7161' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWD' 'sip-files00115.pro'
d895c1484b2cc22f8ad0e3991d0070a9
877d32f40f5992aa9ec4a726dd0c336d321f4d3e
'2011-10-13T20:29:18-04:00'
describe
'18965' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWE' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3ef8dc2f5647d5a3ca26cd871489c682
ecda13a9f8c1d2a05202eab650f5debae0f0158b
describe
'30170' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWF' 'sip-files00117.pro'
7baa58992514790b845d7e5d4abd13bf
6bd159faa68a81e326769f1a4069f9ae72abacbc
describe
'30500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWG' 'sip-files00118.pro'
175f7273b637b7df178c5fe53a9f71ca
aed5d034953a74c86e5fe9ba94e9211393634c40
'2011-10-13T20:29:38-04:00'
describe
'5549' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWH' 'sip-files00119.pro'
0f0e0f3ad139f6e416509cbdb5823d0d
9243509ca61621e353792bf5d256599d60c05c4c
describe
'18905' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWI' 'sip-files00120.pro'
e1e8c485148007935fcdb294f3f3884c
cef27af7c184c2cc1c93891651e208418668e2b6
'2011-10-13T20:29:25-04:00'
describe
'14643' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWJ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
d708b3746557111575cd134f85c1151a
9835a86a98313e160da7360cf96c54f972cca1ba
describe
'19144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWK' 'sip-files00122.pro'
238d7c464ea17437b4aa6187da3cbcb1
9ccc08e639995c6d938db09ae3dcb1dea4c67811
'2011-10-13T20:28:13-04:00'
describe
'15678' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWL' 'sip-files00123.pro'
7443e3f1260faf01e906892e75f0eabc
52ce3f02daee6c974c34b042701228c3e9a6d1eb
describe
'19994' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWM' 'sip-files00124.pro'
ed1a702f6dbee820f6ce01f75977ea36
17e4f925a4e604db3d36e815c756a08cc5c88dd0
describe
'10701' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWN' 'sip-files00125.pro'
646a69f6b0b0336dcbb9d8a8bcca0c55
128207773bc8206510bd7492558d5051603cd1b8
describe
'400' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
b71407482edbff069bf74a511312ef9d
3cd3a81c4830378dec9008e9e89a69e7a5ba7048
describe
'219244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWP' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
1d362b32be834b25c93f115b78137087
0940b578fd17493621cc20cdb74399e14a8eb74e
describe
'228694' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWQ' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
86725cb591e78d5c52a0d2752cde39b2
86177f5025c239a86aa33351b05f4b2303e67b99
'2011-10-13T20:28:27-04:00'
describe
'12913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWR' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
fcf3ee88ab2b24c26660052161d42822
b5407a1c5e1388b0437886eea499ce5377758019
describe
'68945' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
bf7053eb489dc8ef333173c8befdd9d2
2e6825777353f903ec44a30e0c376fbcbc9108a4
describe
'871072' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWT' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
18a94d6860ba9ac1204a2dec47aa4df7
60515e3ec03aac24669560170ea5f90f3a1d6f9f
describe
'3275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
a01d60f399565ab3d3c8dba1c867ada5
cf13d46604830ae2aaf9aecd7cafa7cd56fcc8eb
'2011-10-13T20:27:16-04:00'
describe
'19745' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWV' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
4604f1ac571465b9b1d6414a86013644
17b3b996b921ece333a03013c96659e7c1e035f5
'2011-10-13T20:30:05-04:00'
describe
'14470' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d46c0b847552206fb17d7e4fdf794bda
09a471ed213de9ba1960611d3e897f6436c6a425
describe
'5478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWX' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
d9cd57901678b2116c440a246df94ecc
eaf980b3484897dc4d090bcedd4bc869aa8d56d3
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWY' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
7a8cb19568d0b321ec1baf0f67c2ccfc
b0ac7f35b62b5497cf4a0f44405691ccced82bc6
describe
'40496' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKWZ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
4f9658a42b408cd2db43b7b77325dcf9
708fe29fa8dd038eb61af0406d90fbb2591a339e
describe
'58539' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXA' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
aa1e2612a8b30bbc8aa968bb4cef3a2e
683bddf93a009e510c69ae9e07627b79ca43c053
describe
'58494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXB' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
89a1675f1d1d8ed09cf7ccad3e0f19e8
37712ff14bdd7142295bb61da0941abf6e6ef176
describe
'57613' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXC' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
14df5969880017f6f23e587f75af40dc
208bd63bb1ecb28b2e1fc83122fae0de0f30c989
'2011-10-13T20:29:06-04:00'
describe
'57866' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXD' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
18ef911d820318a9fd9757fe337c2daf
f815b700f937ac527aed9f6ea2e0ada9fe2dc478
'2011-10-13T20:28:57-04:00'
describe
'54183' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXE' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
e58aa3752d05d9bd06b3cbe99152e064
3570a87f02704a95a2d50090e8692abede443d8d
'2011-10-13T20:29:00-04:00'
describe
'58124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXF' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f53febaa27efb97d3875a8d331b5d283
cf35dff592867c7750b130cde045cf178433c28c
describe
'55418' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXG' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
cd4976621d4883ddc468971a5d5deac3
de38fd58836e697b0eccd9eb88aa07818ac67044
describe
'56275' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
b35c0842f423c8d84b28525999b6d675
13f9c79dfdc4b05c5c18f385d1caab253da9adf2
describe
'58856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXI' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
36f1c3d0bb18c8df356d6cad896eaf75
d24b990f87b3d629f27dbd45792839b0bf84c662
describe
'55507' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXJ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
485ba424784c41a09280ccbcab1bcf7f
e41ee2bac9fcc0730d290bc665641146b27bd0f6
describe
'54826' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
e606eb795c626add1c0ba6503e9d8fb5
05ffafba795d86de3da5ac6ad6c813453d58eea7
describe
'54093' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXL' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
fb65f53398c499aa3f1b00dc0c471119
2da9d364c57d4eee912a27607391499a002e7586
'2011-10-13T20:27:40-04:00'
describe
'57182' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXM' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
4939f42ea1ae0694bdb7a28ec6e3f230
c470b786e78c621c222fc0b769a1b25397af115e
describe
'59358' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXN' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
66dc1cf3964088ec25369ad84b8e7e9e
0046661556e19b2953b71a89132ac7b661b8b8e9
describe
'59493' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXO' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
7607ae11ff3d6144661d5082aedb71cc
7d52fe38d16b6e51efcc1d4c68c37d6ce68cbd3f
describe
'60442' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXP' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
35860e05ae66f5c1ab21e305e81273e0
f9723d0ab049d3b99671785caeb76330c9b22b5a
describe
'57363' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXQ' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
47be89bd17628e0f09e89d126ae652cd
c0fab0b211882e8df5e10a255d314dcda00f4447
describe
'59473' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXR' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
0cf3e5696cbcb0f57a1d2d0aef0b258e
6a1328af2e2a6fead2e54b5ab32344023c60d3e5
'2011-10-13T20:29:03-04:00'
describe
'59417' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXS' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ab219539d01c4b8fd724cc3c7cf44fc0
957d64032301817699c5b46c0a1955df01381473
'2011-10-13T20:27:57-04:00'
describe
'58370' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXT' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
58027822957bd3a5ec2cf921a11f0622
64f373baabffcc74b1a57a9a0a0c13590736df2c
describe
'57662' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
f8950bbd8e2990287d1f614f301be668
4ef075fc4639abbe43625fe2696730bfde2fb4bb
describe
'56149' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
6438f1135c0d45887c7a36f06ab1f879
3307fd9a090c90d8be5915b725abbb59d4ebf0a7
describe
'51695' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
09e2734636277b04d1e1a4cb23b96c52
c058690fe47f48267958c40081efab8400246f7f
describe
'4533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXX' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
fcb99f5e8b6613ef5fdb801729d3a990
2c43bd7719b62b3778c3c6aea7f84a9f7f8a2e7c
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1c4058c1df5159ac8b07a961e1c1a5ad
a69d8141c27a94bf17a3d158d98641c7b7ff04aa
'2011-10-13T20:26:56-04:00'
describe
'31276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKXZ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
cbe942d8e690af6c3408abf17d1747db
f53124e2f85c1e74570fcf0163c44adb382e0f45
describe
'49885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
a7539327788ecbfe6727ba7319130a95
f0c87cf816b69228b0e341bdc4e04ac15fc922d2
describe
'31394' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
beb7db54bc5233c337292947e6c5c177
6f694e3ba87e927eacaf240b3554e6da90b72e6c
'2011-10-13T20:28:42-04:00'
describe
'39857' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYC' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
29e555715893352352206300c132c1bc
d7f5a8a905cb593f4e6fcbdbac81dfbd49f1774e
describe
'44914' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYD' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
619045688be8d956035a33f1362b1c74
8be7e9793f55e57bfeb743f6f9b9a67c6539dbc2
describe
'39293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYE' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
e3919aeaaa34381c9592965310f32ed7
2442f02b4c856c3d94a583c37a4e7b157df2f62b
'2011-10-13T20:28:25-04:00'
describe
'27629' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYF' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
17ace7798099a33634f5cb4969eb8a89
20deaab1414ea364e87fb96d10b2f1e35a51293b
describe
'39352' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYG' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
649938c2fbbb269cfc920012a3f73c31
f22e3fb49749ae177af6d2562e5a77255d2c16f0
describe
'54321' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
fbb6c89df965b777ff4b8128be6e8591
962992be00a290c07bfd87942796aa75ed7a0266
describe
'20384' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYI' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
1e359a3ab740f17c9e4886fc03850dd2
f7d6f6398084d85505868761ea44ef19fbffe865
describe
'39202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYJ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ea6a4b85b4f01eacae17d812d0b7b463
0a3e8921526b4b1055bf53926f1927be6f8edbc8
'2011-10-13T20:29:22-04:00'
describe
'49825' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYK' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1fea6416e0851af84dfc1f7d44033a5c
0098a553303ca9a34764caf6ef82e25896459ca1
describe
'38448' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYL' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
fc8ba639a587736c6675349e1fe0d933
8e9384f7c65a5f5c5b4f2f8031bdb07b380d7c14
describe
'52092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYM' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
8511829b77554a6c94633fec31976490
b77ca625920ce4539af23d53fe39fc9992e4d085
describe
'58747' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYN' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
28ef81d121b75af883eb15782957b744
9a9a20108c8d94519e8588a89173a94239a967af
describe
'42386' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYO' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
cc2fb71b36f04046251e7c807fb48c8f
cc2d8916be7263c08e373e79b48266dd9dff06ea
describe
'26885' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYP' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
1e9614b017fd4c4d953f9adcc4dd36e0
03d7a540dec74e374474fdfb635ab48f17de2003
'2011-10-13T20:27:22-04:00'
describe
'38873' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYQ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
1ecfe2f9c989177ab760713cc473c768
4bfceaa43f590ba2c143b175b48875e27ad88c83
describe
'58033' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYR' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
fefb056ccaf8a77b1850f043b05304fd
16c666b24e9b0e04b2ced891e104c3975174196b
describe
'60298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYS' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
ecf6fbf994ded511b8176d84bf51a014
50f64e037d35d8009cec73e3aa416b1c30636675
'2011-10-13T20:28:50-04:00'
describe
'38462' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYT' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
9989307965f3595e838cb48bad5b73f5
79980baa1623232a716c104bea99cefe1845783f
describe
'39729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
bdbcdd0910b411bfbf1f1bf05ecd93bb
a8fb2ae981e1b077206e30de498f2ffa735380c6
describe
'38933' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYV' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
a5fa469cd400dd2b5e5354047d540fbd
889fbcb7bce6cb74bef75310361e26873828e503
describe
'38159' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYW' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
3ae728e3365b1fc6409768b367671576
c3ed7e22b33946c016a21387b2bfb55b24bbba91
describe
'59429' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
00c221c08eca5e95a7ab094c1897e801
f61dbe00e8234df16ffe2f7b74c62ddc7be4c8aa
describe
'59524' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYY' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
1adcee40bdc998297eced8c22dc1e236
b8056370ad9473086896af2a45fbbc30c9309d6c
describe
'11608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKYZ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
f22f447ff56d213991cc2520e2d79c23
b63d869f5ca3966b085769cc50847d5e218f942e
'2011-10-13T20:29:54-04:00'
describe
'39516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZA' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
578b9ffd8ec0e32a3e6fc7e95db22b93
9ac2f4fb57792ff7b31b8ec7bd8f9ab648e12e16
'2011-10-13T20:28:59-04:00'
describe
'58409' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZB' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
7806e29c79f058469c961211c65bf7b9
52316aa5f274c98956c5809e0cd4d02793ad1417
describe
'40401' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZC' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
a84518a21f1af0e4428ae8469424e8ce
c48787a0290b45d22b2d88f8f9b7589ad2d70bbb
'2011-10-13T20:28:28-04:00'
describe
'40663' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZD' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
590417dc215e2b5be48f29a8203d424a
6d3728c2e55bb5aa7c69510276a8d118eabefa30
'2011-10-13T20:28:41-04:00'
describe
'59592' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2033015f308f95ca55f5ec8270a0ad7f
b473e3caf82a6a7310f69e0a35b154b7abaa96fa
describe
'57469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
2352871c8ea2305a9c0cd3ee130edbd6
e9390b2a5f46fae70aa9f36d4b34bcf22d134080
describe
'11703' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZG' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e4e5f72f89c87da38d602b7bc1f216e9
01fcd95a01f5b742cb8984f995e49277c3f4564c
describe
'39342' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c3bcec99e632fc834c9ebb6e3644ac5c
ebbb052a48b41671889596c5eac1dc118d1e2043
'2011-10-13T20:27:50-04:00'
describe
'55859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZI' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
010a7cbe0ef286777e6a889ae4d52b85
7222535e5136c432deacabbea0e67b77ee955400
describe
'56393' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
94448fb3ec52a10d4bf19e6c95a09c1c
01971bd860639c1d74cf1973db782758a4588720
describe
'13406' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
f4764b04f315eb518bcd58af60e9d27c
c30df967719f0d70ddb28e9d5d08b107eda9d811
describe
'38152' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZL' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
b4f21e96f966669afab00c5cecbf4d01
2d7be71c6b74c7098e81f7882a8098bd8af03ca6
describe
'56441' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
8bd21bc5a23359af7ef2fb665b50503e
dadb8cbc6deda8db0d65c677e5230c14f2cbb3c6
describe
'20398' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZN' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
aab7bf87f7b4b9cd9cee22b4cbe249cb
efcabd80fbf75b70c690096e3fa596c888af20d9
describe
'41132' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b64339bc77a2c8e6a2da731e5d628ec2
ac3b3d01949808a6d68c9369ecd4d3867a35e52e
describe
'59536' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZP' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
900c7500ff0f7826edecd79e04c385a6
e059bd46ea10d45539babf94a126857ea0ecec29
describe
'31036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZQ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
dc34b5713b331f9cb8cb09a46dc11a83
3750e46de22f81d763562e1517436b41d9411be5
describe
'38971' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZR' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
d03730ff9dcda28e2bd57f1bfe25264c
16d0662e5c72d932f8b3315870654c4b5314299a
describe
'57468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZS' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
1d04868c3e1d08658ac2e91b32997aa8
c412ef0af41c5948932bb641aafdf9948ca07928
describe
'56778' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZT' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
34e01730afdc1a2b75360d71e8fe6dab
e086fa86063523175f0e115dae3aa14da04bbea7
'2011-10-13T20:29:56-04:00'
describe
'20714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
6a30bcca7910a08b0a9a586139dabf5e
7e860a0e2837d7a99851f51d0df930f2d38d51f6
describe
'40166' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZV' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
43a96c869b5e95e201c3bf63a039c8ac
87bcc9e30d5860de8b4edbec6e71d2fd852630c0
describe
'18936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZW' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b3fcade3019ef87b497059eada6a6466
06d3af5ed0428ce6aa3a318cef8026f9c32b49c7
'2011-10-13T20:27:25-04:00'
describe
'42357' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
260a2335890cee805e79b6a9cb193d8c
d80034afc5531dff9d4cab43efd32d638be6a711
describe
'59379' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZY' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
91c48fa39397d6f3e685cecbac6e33a6
da4f54cd16978086d53a9fd78655b1db5f9b7eac
describe
'46934' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABKZZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4c37bf7a4c60f0ee4b3fc308234a6891
a360908b4623b075732e31f41faccb08dfde8e29
describe
'37596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAA' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
2938e47015cdb0465125416f57874782
8422310cc336520e39be98e634e7a97462f18ef4
describe
'58575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAB' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
90b6d49adab223fd256ce1998b5dfaa9
4f31767797ea7c392c8fdd9b2df636583ce45c9d
describe
'26779' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
f17300b126dda433b72f29f3479d148f
fa38f701f7c36630314ab8c840f809bad03a1577
describe
'39215' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAD' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
2e6e6eb01f63efb399eb1c0241cf21d3
317ec869517fc52b41f5ac68789793119f75c577
describe
'60217' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAE' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
ab9707cade80242ec7c5dea1d2a910d0
825693ab8ab8d14c08377e0b85280e93f78bb905
describe
'44135' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAF' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
229d2b58da6055fd1b3b294476279cdb
a157b5da0bb535599b24a3fee96d610d402e8822
describe
'39518' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAG' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
1a998c84334cb34ed2b9e35d5c99f5c2
3488c77e01a011d19235238cb659fe45970aba80
describe
'58672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
3b4cd070314c4fcef8c7fba7681f92ef
576f91bb352d9f42db4825a2565c4eb2c584d2e9
describe
'48468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAI' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
e37ec7cfe904b5bce13452dd3c65e209
a3ce306f4848070840da7fc1deb7e31fe68529f2
describe
'39984' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAJ' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d04e20f93ccc314cd57cf673674dba19
d725d0ac01d14b03a188090e0106fdc19751a089
describe
'54734' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
2bfccd7813f21ca70a7af117a4c6fb67
f30c57273c9a7e40c73698a488fd4e2594d78fef
describe
'39494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAL' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
ef4adba2157fbec8e7551c2a9fbbcf4d
dc6fec476996a0b9c27f8ca7f30fa4237ccbdf3c
describe
'22041' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
66b4a949ee03c5d60293fc907fa4825b
364e897773e345d958c17a64e6836c3368b4107e
describe
'42759' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAN' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
ef6f9401aaaae25e27c75485724fd705
7060095d4f7aaffae3aaf40e312ef9d0c1f92ef1
describe
'58924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAO' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
98a35b4f7d18def21810c1fc48d79478
ba98b2acd1334c7cf231c7d920716d8c39b2f00c
describe
'59430' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAP' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0e6a7e78f53e57183822c4bb426c1aca
ba857b4e5d35ca8d3a71e89e5e2b4ba2e727d856
describe
'52348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAQ' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
a1567b3d01174d008216754036f9e469
a1bd81d8083bcf4f0313333c5f9174e59a8db952
describe
'43664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAR' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
71c042096783694afd6232b61ed18472
6f394e62107d19b67b51594b6405a187127df01c
describe
'56341' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAS' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
762f0098367499f97906bf5f20eba8f7
cf86e125813db5717268dd1b9004522054560234
describe
'40509' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAT' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
ec1444d8be22c34e2a31933389be2f3a
9faece423625569833db6a41e9530b3fed200155
describe
'16521' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAU' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
2061867b474b9cd6c197d17494ac04a3
a0b77e7f333e0feb73955156e565960eed4292b0
'2011-10-13T20:29:29-04:00'
describe
'40028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAV' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
074709101e4a36126aa3aca81fb0870c
eda2b8a67b6a669228536316c810b249d055a8be
describe
'60940' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAW' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e65a82f6723d9cd7a099d11121d87367
ae15bcc9aa626ae3eb0341179d75592aab344d9e
describe
'63255' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
d5618bfbd9f1a9465ea2daef4d54cf3a
ea0758683d53e9d1b10028edd6ee535b610917f9
describe
'12295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAY' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e7eed294a6aba008e2c55288a94b4651
87ea337cba5b0395e0bd7326bb7074788048d64f
describe
'40174' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLAZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
5d0593615151b4a45cbbe31b0af9803b
7a57d0364c71e2668c6a9e88566f61461b8d0a44
describe
'30546' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBA' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6bae68403f32b784fa4feb2aa51c87bc
1cab27817c0a1535b514b0ac463b5e24ac539f33
'2011-10-13T20:27:23-04:00'
describe
'40107' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBB' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
e565a4adc34517bed28b91c04f3875f5
c40a006d6c143ec37a783f8bb663937ad63fe2de
describe
'33195' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBC' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
053c54038675b2776a16f55ddd24eb81
def04f1b04baa7275e27d2b87293769142efcc2c
describe
'41344' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBD' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
87f0a0e9abcf359f884f1df5330a23bf
9790e8e9e630954c2e0f36a71da8e432e538dbdb
describe
'23259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBE' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c0d936bbc8b036878931d5074594eb25
579e61084dcd322e24fa766991cf81594962169d
describe
'233802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBF' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
9b1a27222f88a9afc0ea737385f9d698
6ae345fe33f89a04f01067bdf38eeffdb3c51369
describe
'221729' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBG' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
1afb4c1ea5614284ac7a8b86f4988f18
c0d99bbe12cb7747139201b94b511dfdb84f3822
describe
'49463' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBH' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
d5563b2749c493cfbfa7816c9675ecf1
57cc914d49def7ebaecb0d005830dfb221247be4
describe
'5274920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBI' 'sip-files00001.tif'
722f46901dd2148153d7b2df84225325
f85b401d1563252a701f19963d5beb25bd02ce75
'2011-10-13T20:27:12-04:00'
describe
'5497376' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBJ' 'sip-files00002.tif'
954c552b0fd9611f7b683cb084a03a8c
8eb9df23b918c171acb130f89c2322a6afcdce53
describe
'248596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBK' 'sip-files00004.tif'
3491819e95c2c5b078624d9d1c371747
da97eb506c0aeaa08c6fac2b7eca6103961ebf71
describe
'250760' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBL' 'sip-files00005.tif'
db320428892e6853016051ff377787b0
6a15432743d2124489c457dfe91cdf8a321035a2
describe
'6980184' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBM' 'sip-files00007.tif'
766dd4b93e2239c3034990a26ad56341
cd6a2a0c869ebd0a00e6ce105bc251ec96b87a9e
describe
'231508' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
7411a2555b896ae170b5cabd69b2ff4b
4745198e1740f8433b38e950a000d97579dd3f8a
'2011-10-13T20:29:49-04:00'
describe
'238444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBO' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0fc8b7c36a05b19c6f3749260d980a95
3883cf88e7f0d10d71920d142118abbbc4ce5104
describe
'246780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
96baf0deb73ee966bb7c3e8085959933
0d5a6a97f5925183b19d87da7b624871d4b3ec68
describe
'241640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBQ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
88a1625210cad43995f08b32fa2d8f19
3fa136987058d7d5c972df76d8dbe2432dccbba6
describe
'222676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBR' 'sip-files00015.tif'
0e2b9597103700dfb40117f06ce7d4ee
b7e9051c0cbbb8327bf378bbad0a7de6c3229a2e
describe
'269056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBS' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f7fe26918ecb4c03d60f639c716e8585
dcdfe99c5e5416a5098900cb74ec80137dcb87fd
describe
'250824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBT' 'sip-files00017.tif'
e5d51c0dc01b8bd347a931e5dc91a364
ba31a4281b8249139a47be93724c4e377ee5c686
describe
'265524' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBU' 'sip-files00018.tif'
7616942c5698b18c29a6a945e5b47aa9
8c9403302eee55d440ee419d91c738361a95f52c
'2011-10-13T20:28:21-04:00'
describe
'244124' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c94c37f8f2f747bc2cabb5d00717ec43
ebfab2630fdf7804376cbb405950213074ac7f44
describe
'251572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
3a3c8e70696fc270fe09dc971d19ba0a
afff6fb1634e01679fd36b8280538d28f380a0d1
'2011-10-13T20:28:08-04:00'
describe
'253036' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBX' 'sip-files00021.tif'
ac63cd37b9c6b7541b4c9012ca0874b0
00e357fd874fe3353bc5ee8f4c183eee3e8aa3fe
describe
'268768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBY' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2a1a660555cf38f441cee6e845490405
50deda9297ce8d9727140fd2355ea5840dbd7900
describe
'251260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLBZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
1850fcb7a2b53c7257f313178f3a8560
848feffd6a936b4a893daf24b2ee681e165128f4
describe
'268052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCA' 'sip-files00024.tif'
45054e4ea9823d47cca1baf4634bf281
5ad86bfbff947e7019ef9eef85bdaca00bf496be
describe
'243564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCB' 'sip-files00025.tif'
626d17d86e16ef811fc7e372791134b2
cb1432a81c5784f35125e620704719799c0fe91d
describe
'242008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
655e56fdc69ddf7a633151d90dd9b6c6
d343f7d7fbe4a31d24d3cc7a7cee9caf54c99279
describe
'254156' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCD' 'sip-files00027.tif'
1ae1ea1d62bad47ee65dfba7ec06c373
58a897307d603d5601206afc4219c6764eecbec6
describe
'241028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCE' 'sip-files00028.tif'
1eadd473cf7bd4f4ff96ad7b268041b3
8707567a63acb4399e02f5039b7ac82c3d4d8dad
describe
'252136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCF' 'sip-files00029.tif'
ed136dd11df9d1acc17ebf4f03ac8360
0c16f1e56b6dd396557d630e77f0608a8582704e
'2011-10-13T20:27:55-04:00'
describe
'251264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCG' 'sip-files00030.tif'
c261374c905f490d253b64ee4ac16054
376cf0bf796ffaa353ecb3e675add3f5f6e2a624
describe
'255424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCH' 'sip-files00031.tif'
196c060e9b0a47e3590cee23ee8b5a20
bf5c496ed740b3260c36a79470b198ca43e4fe88
describe
'255364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCI' 'sip-files00032.tif'
fd05495ec911657fc75db46147dad1e0
1cf4c51e270ff2335984db368c09fc196527c01c
'2011-10-13T20:28:01-04:00'
describe
'261620' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
1e0f215af04ebe5c595a04024c243804
809543f22db7e3acc25a378a86a37fc75be58ee0
'2011-10-13T20:27:26-04:00'
describe
'254020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCK' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b5633e0f99746f6664d16dab48f9da0f
9ca12cabcaf65ca5aaac6ec6104d82bedcf48f19
describe
'262180' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCL' 'sip-files00035.tif'
915cd8653e24c77a6d5c493db3fe5b19
173c8489bc2f85539d5580cf0e6d0c0cb77a04c6
describe
'252420' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
adfea385c06eb64dc48961b2bdad9552
d5fd1f7f13e7c7dc39dae0b09bbeb1d2f780de75
describe
'250116' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCN' 'sip-files00037.tif'
562a7253e861d666903c7c0bfad2408e
1abba52cb764c1b6a6fa0c775e16cc9ef43d8f2a
'2011-10-13T20:27:39-04:00'
describe
'251596' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCO' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9e90e2e1b8b865c48b7bc97915400414
509708ac9c8bb82a1eef56e5e2d236fad3c5d489
'2011-10-13T20:29:34-04:00'
describe
'258192' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCP' 'sip-files00039.tif'
2c8449ea7b1908beefe1e56fc8e0fb79
f97618cb179bd0f38cd90efb135fbedf6dd903bb
describe
'234920' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a0c1b11e1be847bab839892de7939fd5
05f67ee6f527ac8f3007736c6900f0692bcd9f29
describe
'209756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
470174a79c2eed05a219cf1782e90394
64fb6391b2c0407b3459031af3aab1e76367762c
describe
'233780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCS' 'sip-files00042.tif'
95e646797139feb137796d89516a001c
e2c28ac8d7a2548d562f7c6e6d43344dd2ad16c8
'2011-10-13T20:27:02-04:00'
describe
'279704' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCT' 'sip-files00043.tif'
344358fecf8ddf6b14d01c2558211132
705a23b50daeedf2c85181b1ba77aee0311af2b1
'2011-10-13T20:27:11-04:00'
describe
'253032' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCU' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a076ef127036a536716f3e090be0ac70
fe872b60661cc3b8941de58991bf162de5287ced
describe
'261456' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
e4914cd0e12d823616cd800066950f8d
1951c12936c7b407da9b837308d2d8b23819ab03
describe
'244884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCW' 'sip-files00046.tif'
e978ad6eba0742f6d488db265375647d
71d7218e531a90bf326a4a7186b94546653fbc6a
describe
'261468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCX' 'sip-files00047.tif'
94ab1871ab5db10ce3c1feec1915017a
7765b112ee856da8079799a3a0e00053ec7158b0
describe
'251424' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCY' 'sip-files00048.tif'
28a2ffd355680b41b9be56629566740c
3b21205751b53d33a57416f5961fe4df2982588e
describe
'260396' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLCZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
7cb9b54e691669cda1056365aa847b07
0f13de352fd03444459a8bdbb5da5cefcd4d9b24
describe
'268860' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDA' 'sip-files00050.tif'
ef7a414c059ca953c80b8a5d94c348cb
29d26dfac1b9057136591c5197dc76c4ab3ced32
'2011-10-13T20:30:02-04:00'
describe
'236884' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDB' 'sip-files00051.tif'
88f43befa3ba9cdde496895cf3ce9034
7679384966cfd3da11487ce2631db9bdfe0ea08c
'2011-10-13T20:28:58-04:00'
describe
'244644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDC' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ae75a019dcca006be2fdf2116c320aa5
3496c1101ce0a5ce3cda110f381d71651f3466b1
describe
'258100' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDD' 'sip-files00053.tif'
fba10fdce88ad971bb550570d7a662e0
5479d4bf470ea882f3c0de05505b566cc00084b3
'2011-10-13T20:28:53-04:00'
describe
'255204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDE' 'sip-files00054.tif'
58399de1299683e084850a5dde6e04fe
9d34fdb9059f082e0365ad55748687f94c6542f0
describe
'259572' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDF' 'sip-files00055.tif'
d66ca9579af49dddb727502830061354
f5812dee08ef9e8a12a0f25080868718073c97c4
describe
'261480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDG' 'sip-files00056.tif'
706fff68976074dfb97e87fda8c39e7f
37755b76402efb3f8a088bbd8551ec7be2e4eced
describe
'264524' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDH' 'sip-files00057.tif'
b093523bc576fe4124c55e5f7afc29e3
e045a1060b367ce353b990d7e78e3640d06ea9c1
describe
'250016' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDI' 'sip-files00058.tif'
5dab479c8127f6fba0ad503b3c8fdb05
2f7241cc2a7ce6ee9dd926602d4a9e1c717a2fa3
describe
'255672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3b04a3d5b35931415fea7f16c5724653
2e4be67ec59e21dc8eaa4443d580fd7bd3beb56d
describe
'255376' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDK' 'sip-files00060.tif'
620184a17e0ef74aa526778b9c864940
f05cebf027702dad0edd62352a2c9f4ee2ba8303
'2011-10-13T20:29:41-04:00'
describe
'256004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDL' 'sip-files00061.tif'
faa27437622d2b8149121d93a4cb1495
7125c6fd69d8d5877ec129ac42c1431718a8f882
describe
'253944' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDM' 'sip-files00062.tif'
93106a7a35bfad8c9eb6a46fd5b888a7
c44e51ca13c3a1e101ff07c9da3ff4c67c271f35
describe
'262372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
eac03553b5d25871cb78b462759abc2f
bbf587d3b0820ccd09ca1bb0d4fa119ff521cf7c
'2011-10-13T20:27:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDO' 'sip-files00064.tif'
576eb8968e0bbcf25d5550c99835b165
d135398edb9b20b72fa4f76550542ffb8e4ba8be
describe
'253936' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDP' 'sip-files00065.tif'
b2095eaa35d47d2817161d842f495a3e
953247766d6a0a371b5ba06d4402ab6a97473615
describe
'263476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDQ' 'sip-files00066.tif'
bdb563184cc599c3310d265861837720
baa249c884e9717b84d3586f0a1bf8a2e88e124f
describe
'255876' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDR' 'sip-files00067.tif'
26d3b64549a25345001258b805d0bb29
cdaa5dd9bb395ea4084f8e6911a93e26802f4d0e
describe
'243164' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDS' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a66b4203bc3f4dfd4d7ecbcdf1880295
188a0d45827a5dd85020e336d84d16051e0554b2
'2011-10-13T20:27:59-04:00'
describe
'254392' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDT' 'sip-files00069.tif'
fa872ecd5a6ca08a2718272ac4989814
2ee8b33b12cb2e13078f40b219fb977e7ce9803e
describe
'257052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDU' 'sip-files00070.tif'
641ba616ee7f1a962462e3be2c8e9eca
1d70f225867be1c951cc2287f62ee79e60593493
describe
'259708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b679a91b24e1882e8e2c5c3350e0d787
8071b21adc4c7f2bdf488d8e2d06ef56d53a607d
describe
'255564' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
03a0f9e3c2d75ac01476c3ffc34980ba
be30b055f81628b21342d38be056aa1a5b57ff73
describe
'256600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDX' 'sip-files00073.tif'
b117c46806e0e04b2cf7c6dc420bae50
88187b8aa0acf8632add00173d32bb0e539b6f3f
describe
'246804' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDY' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1a18b841c5c51af694545c21a163a334
a43ee0eb0021f666678a0b98d65f71f1e6948db1
describe
'259264' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLDZ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b8efff7dd156a0e2ed848531927ef582
dba8e18dab9a85216be45aebcd6a8b3206e10e48
describe
'248148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
7dc1ac0f674c0a022150c91b51db582c
fe0d8b7876e71072cae3aaaecf4c666848a3c892
describe
'245096' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEB' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7c455048d3f5f294568c8a3aac5ced4d
1f8ef228a801f6240ae2f2e0fccc7c1f41c74149
describe
'245260' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEC' 'sip-files00078.tif'
aa10ac563c51b6c3a7e4f1a851030961
cad426b5d34638bc3e9e81c4565eb5dbdda7fccc
describe
'239516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLED' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ad3f0be3589ac8d5569bb54b3445ca39
3722d9ad53c758bf712fd57cdd8616f418c5da62
describe
'251144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEE' 'sip-files00080.tif'
ff58ecc57cfe636b95b0fb9cf58080f4
e33ad0d332c9100bae7e498c020ba44f1c0458e7
describe
'259544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEF' 'sip-files00081.tif'
01063ff663e5672f5d64737b4a81c5e6
382c31b00cdf13434ccfbb51a9ff02138fa1797d
describe
'252388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEG' 'sip-files00082.tif'
5e8c2a7991f073f6ce60d9d28071fa11
6198b9070b38efec54a856ae998972ade9643586
describe
'255552' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEH' 'sip-files00083.tif'
084a9ab69bf73c3175c27003f2a1b7f5
629e940ff27b89b8ae6f18a6f3b02a92f7e61e1c
describe
'260000' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEI' 'sip-files00084.tif'
3de57963c7a665f9cc26f01b2241ce20
cc6ccabd67ef44a8ec4ac5f53cfe6418dfe43ef7
'2011-10-13T20:28:30-04:00'
describe
'254816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
4681540985acbc794a28707da0484b45
4cfdb635c4fb69eccda7e90530318d910d3561d7
describe
'242092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
37682e83b22ed293343e41fa161450a0
499bbfc4df80ed3009e105f8b5b3df3b0c7dfa98
describe
'271348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEL' 'sip-files00087.tif'
8e13586f6dc4ca6b7f6a9ae1c713a986
332dce9a8a942d829cacec66e4404707176d405e
describe
'261960' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
5cc8167a5d0d7108aff55779db2a35da
430f91cbe08eac2e0a4fa4a49caaa5a480fede63
describe
'255664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
32eae3caa66ca6e7ae6013ca86aff6b4
93ebd66ab6e41a3e7f75b5bc9319455ba45ac19a
describe
'257356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEO' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a43048d45f6fb476708859ac1ce13417
f8ec50278ada89ff0194056a72d9884fabeda62c
'2011-10-13T20:27:53-04:00'
describe
'263092' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEP' 'sip-files00091.tif'
83a578f78cee62bc2d67f5c3b2b9456f
d7ae4272e6b370a32b2141569ba9d9a5d4091074
describe
'257644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
17866fc27ec94960c905a76152033bb0
b7f9769b89610b5a0365cbcf0394ee1276ea1a3a
describe
'253616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLER' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ab18d86eaf6f2bb1787dfcd7b1844df8
6b44155f6784a87fce42f62080ee6526e8179517
describe
'259220' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLES' 'sip-files00094.tif'
233b6b815555d1ef75901d609168c53a
95d810f91ea057eddfb23e9b3300f3e127c3b0e2
describe
'242296' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLET' 'sip-files00095.tif'
e1ab6349b8d6ee7c3fd74c28cccfd5fa
fe9ae660414639990b21874fe01c54ba90b0e40e
describe
'252276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEU' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9cdbd989a3890ab0b45ad7c8415eefe6
75ba37fdccea1ddb81ca1151d396aea17ba705f9
describe
'244292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEV' 'sip-files00097.tif'
07087d9ef62cb5936c591dbcc115507c
1e4f21c802eef887b859bb832cacfd15096dac2b
'2011-10-13T20:29:35-04:00'
describe
'239904' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
83c8c679802ec0718a4dd3b48ec8aa51
6d641c7f9fc0b95fd319f8d2bb89477771308253
'2011-10-13T20:29:14-04:00'
describe
'246356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEX' 'sip-files00099.tif'
1dd6aee40c8db72d15506227d595241f
eef6df062a156466354423517b99d8441e06acea
describe
'250028' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEY' 'sip-files00100.tif'
facddd18020d0dde63f9491b66f0cbe8
5fc500e1d0474be3fa259cee86248999da521572
describe
'256224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLEZ' 'sip-files00101.tif'
02dae87cd21c23e331c332d453111517
ffc96305775acaaced5767c8b6a0424319646383
'2011-10-13T20:30:08-04:00'
describe
'262676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFA' 'sip-files00102.tif'
65eedea2be928d6fb424ed70a87c0d40
b331bd338d1e8569b1ddc11e5109ec87c4242254
'2011-10-13T20:29:55-04:00'
describe
'259104' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFB' 'sip-files00103.tif'
562bc721612a7cd4f34dad83fe0db868
fe33fcf7fa97a984d0efdbe384d93fc61b158daf
describe
'247628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFC' 'sip-files00104.tif'
f096308a582bc55fac12b845732cbd2d
bb80ee7bc359c524d48e13788a54d6cfe76eac01
describe
'283284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
8479cc5f352419913c1e1b9a5cd21567
7b9bdec92bef885e8c91cfdcd70abed4acc72fb0
describe
'249628' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFE' 'sip-files00106.tif'
164543654d72e487f0207444e25f30c0
f56f9470e95b920b024bede4f88ae9994346a122
describe
'256684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFF' 'sip-files00107.tif'
1d329ac1281a6570e3ae8dadff67f85b
284213c43fbfe270c5cd0c2797fca7ce0b755358
describe
'252816' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFG' 'sip-files00108.tif'
29a3d7e31ef5604ba7ca07a562a7ab36
2d89081f439cad2d2a72092dc89c0a7056523c22
describe
'264004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFH' 'sip-files00109.tif'
f1463107b5b7a59360835f9a6c13eddf
82e8c3038bc375d238fb1933279c8508e8a77f19
'2011-10-13T20:26:48-04:00'
describe
'253672' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFI' 'sip-files00110.tif'
031c83dcbc3e03ed5a59c5f43c930f68
270656c410cf6a5f3e2a850663c1a51121e44bf0
describe
'247416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
bb386aed499ea9ee7f9c11b21f44e1b3
f96396291e6030ccaf0175dfa629c5eb05a23551
'2011-10-13T20:29:15-04:00'
describe
'255372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFK' 'sip-files00112.tif'
65fc1e5b93cb58e12040ecb749f1d50d
81a5105f8397a3494fddd0d3f8e6e233ddf8ebf1
describe
'254272' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFL' 'sip-files00113.tif'
31ce6a0bd851e6860ebf6d1a57e06764
2afa96a16d7b8b82a529ba306f7094b595368940
describe
'260244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFM' 'sip-files00114.tif'
63f6630bbd2907f3809cf77061aed5b5
0d532f965965ff73c1374e9fb292882357382b4b
'2011-10-13T20:28:05-04:00'
describe
'251584' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
53038ce72c41a8c235ce98426327b2b9
987de282a6bc75f5634b33f05694b75e4b1ca803
describe
'257856' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFO' 'sip-files00116.tif'
56e025fe14bfa9b9f56cb22ff36bdbe5
4653740e597e9577f61245a333b4eeac4a74b23f
describe
'242800' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFP' 'sip-files00117.tif'
0af9ec3c21ab73febdf973e13b6e9b61
777dcab8a741d0c7f0d6650490361420b8140322
describe
'249480' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFQ' 'sip-files00118.tif'
30d1fb0e31c2f1820782db21ac38c68f
6edf804c6cbf14ac94354d3a9957765f893ce5cc
describe
'242680' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFR' 'sip-files00119.tif'
2e55c98af292a9db2b8cf2e99d412184
1dfb48dfa0ccbbeced81484b6ea2ecbedc817a83
describe
'247544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFS' 'sip-files00120.tif'
b213a16fef6f6c75eec559a0bede9ed1
4acafe9b425f8175bb51e54a18a9be2c595cbcc5
describe
'248780' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFT' 'sip-files00121.tif'
e57926ac9bfde7f284d0a4a78b3d089c
e13c022f24a011dcbb53ceb7b57f14ca82119ff5
describe
'266756' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFU' 'sip-files00122.tif'
af0fec20742a8ed2e30b82df976bc1e8
6dc5472410f4b1919240e43b71c5f33ef444f362
describe
'237852' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFV' 'sip-files00123.tif'
2a4e1f722a34f9a9d80acf3ab606cfe6
5f93362ff44a6d2d73bd3768477f7c1d73ed77ca
describe
'262140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
6b2e4b11b3f9f765343c2096f2093751
785fedcc1bd375bea16d8f2ef903fe984e558c53
'2011-10-13T20:29:27-04:00'
describe
'244172' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFX' 'sip-files00125.tif'
f55be7d425ce285e3c8c54c0a0ae9ba7
a6000a62ac4f4628e3f9cff95495bf1e2d2f33c5
describe
'5622416' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFY' 'sip-files00127.tif'
ea5f6a793bf2f0e05aee5c96730db5a9
3a9d687317348b784f9d74f7495831b10a92a026
describe
'5329588' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLFZ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
0a40adc2a1ea57fbc94029216b3124af
1e623f8321df96a47c50debc4b134ba4248173c2
describe
'1194464' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
209e8c2f8e7c1616c08dfaabd8606fe5
9b0ccb997b666e59aaf4e3761da4b7549de8545a
describe
'341684' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGB' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
4595d70b93f4ee3fb9454efc3db068a1
cbbcc644ac6f881e2da80b8f2a41a8b92abe7f24
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'161292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGC' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
09e72aa9e2418a04033337a34e36f006
351d910146edb1d445c1558da9e60e0e7bc03d2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'62140' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGD' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
3b639c577580897fe2d8037991649cc7
e6ef49143677e8cc6a20bda69bee5b22414536ce
describe
'306585' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGE' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
a1e85d0017c95b07a40a8931720f9b5a
8507663b536d7f94c213259fcea53f2aacfa2a60
describe
'238513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
2cb97b5c6330b67a281de6771f182280
07000c5d05f02a628db78cd461efc0a76c121918
describe
'15293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGG' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
aa7d45edc3c5881e922ea7872c40a79a
b65e428c9d4ddaf531c997b2f83bb529db5494aa
describe
'100361' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGH' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
a7b782c42064ce908dd82cb2b4581396
0e55cbb335be743a10aacbf3b3b223ff836398aa
describe
'69491' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGI' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
aee87e0c639e2d7e8c1b007904a35d75
7a4d3ba76a3a0cae51883f2dde46d12edeccc197
describe
'27426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d873c763ae06cf63ae49ebe3921ab1be
f50219112b3edfd191024b7e279fa5dbeb15e659
describe
'4427' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
f225bb324c2f275986a04998a45b9df0
291010c6182f18a06da69bc8bb1aa9bd2c8d6014
describe
'192765' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
682c561ffaffd046e868f37628cd5b90
c041d5491c72c0a6b84e96b24434b77b2f2de0f7
describe
'287533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
79e639e968364901855f8ea38482af2e
f866ebe31b55af5154da8455eb55850020ca5ee5
describe
'282670' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
ca57abd5b3b7fd0df0ef4a6b763f34e0
4b1eba4dffe0002ee79e66f7e5661e91d31ff7c1
describe
'287314' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
7289cf6e773ce28cdd49dde050c236de
4cab39293ba8787b2200e55975b69614519fbc79
describe
'296877' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
f95deaa78037e865557abfe5f1344895
87c0d588c5749c9532e1d36c52536d179700319c
describe
'271783' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
792bddd76c5e2b57f52868442973391c
9857657cf288b01419ac635696037aa597d28874
'2011-10-13T20:27:34-04:00'
describe
'281494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
18e2d26268f7c3256a4d6214a8af2590
f7c75f331b031c953d5740d7605fea41835bf08d
describe
'288407' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
58c8fd6fca0906c2bb11372a26c4b79e
ae30cde56c3c341ceadd2c296675f986e2c8e4c9
'2011-10-13T20:26:59-04:00'
describe
'275673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
a1581f7b6c5786832aefc782c182b955
69a4ec26b835943e6612e4dda8c161372f6d80bb
describe
'303202' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d10344c5d14e05220cdff7f682dd8095
894b28fbc99298be1d7460e0a796c2d7e2d6ccb3
describe
'281360' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGV' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
5b90dde7cf69f5efcc71d34aae3460f2
de3ebcfb4e5e88c5d185db2da22fda40ae63afeb
describe
'274412' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2533db1448164c9df17af0c44cfe43f5
ba72b49be9544da2e1bc15c13656f364cb71e6f6
describe
'268698' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
f52174f0ec31ff1eaf826ad398eea6dd
7584c7a22ff461dfc7547cc9251870c0c17066ee
'2011-10-13T20:29:24-04:00'
describe
'276125' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
1f7c1779e6cf3139db8d1ba4575d7794
d507a6f6e1ad984da83e370c236120e35daf12cd
describe
'295221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLGZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
3d660cebfed5a8b1ff361b129d7bb377
f852ea786b57b1a1a307aeb90c21418396cccc17
describe
'296540' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
b3a4449321a481e47dc07e03cf7ce205
f2414b1f8554d06faaa672cabc014c6a5defdbd2
describe
'294727' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
a5685bf1bf9d9334e7343c91723ae167
663e62717ce51b9b3a6253d46c39ddcdcf5d9196
describe
'280443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
1f6ef89c86f25ef0869ac14eaafe0cbd
97fe961e8991b2544420f6756c2f265ca5af6049
describe
'290224' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHD' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
003fc02d3814af299031d4cc16b6f2ae
08576952fdb2d51ebe370705eda63bf8c9fe6386
describe
'289404' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7c2d55c8b6bb06f74b1a7fd5185bd588
33392a403e6070ddd89324237c3b6ef5b14de647
describe
'290048' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
d998bef3cb0fc56bca0b123ddd4cdcbd
df2060dad6faa96d33a5ee231633ad2fe488c8ca
describe
'282965' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
9e0a92271ef3f35694c1d7a20762315d
0879eaa9746ef4861daf9c2b521a519b467bb35e
describe
'264947' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHH' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
bb641926fc7e9b81c990704a1037d385
991831f1b80e24ffc0de60fb135cb89bf5c6319a
describe
'256373' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHI' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5db0bcaa9736784b4e3397d1c252b011
2f014c73e71c78861ac749dfb40dbad2f79664c4
describe
'20892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4bdce217f316047b25fa20065cec1484
8e0dbfdc7aa471ad2bdc949758c6093eb3c55db4
describe
'4913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
71e3b37cb16a0e255845a67357624b50
43b15e9c9a209d10ab20bf376179b765fb0d91d7
describe
'157259' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHL' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f5e22c2452118b5e12228b0e058d53ca
72e5aeb657b12b7dc24bd8fcd695d67aad222b4f
describe
'238690' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHM' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
db5d0ebedbbdbc8e5d42f48e9a570c83
6e75962526ad77517dfe370fa36b4d760e39148c
describe
'153892' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
c1825d1f7b5217c5e63bd7e5e97689e8
ca4d354b4ab2dd4518cb761178313754f6feb739
describe
'190614' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHO' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
a7893dbf72fdd6a0c12f723e613c24e5
03176abed32039512df89e253865f42ee8e0665f
describe
'226347' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHP' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
58651c8909c226f5c3b0fe116a0123f0
f04e402fb6fbe11f595cc4ddbd70f167e647fb03
describe
'190626' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHQ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
75138a2f4c37125d551735a97264b61e
fd8847dfde36f14284b65e6b8bd2e558a3a9f79f
describe
'139371' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHR' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
70472e5b6f8e9b5b6ad8f04f3adb83db
468845d8098b5b3fb21a6a9414e2b9ed0354cf01
describe
'184211' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHS' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
77ae06b0e3c905a60c6fa51ca61afc3b
c1024ab76d0ea8168c6c4b06dbf0448d39867e24
describe
'261599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHT' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
62a64a5aa4f792086697eb0fd67437f7
cf3bfda598fc40ba7480be653afdbb6e2998f4a3
describe
'104306' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHU' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
4eea6b4ea3e9bf6dbe1b6cbe0e2c73c7
5880b393bb371915a157a2d5f64339a3a4e1ce07
describe
'200476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHV' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
0b84aa83b1a03633a35eee1116b52643
2d1cc495f6bd5d13b2a70ed2ef07ce8a5f59c54a
describe
'236022' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
7fd93260814b911990e62915c14a5489
eaa132c0a37b54cbd9b2c31cc514e7920bc80c61
describe
'185465' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
a4d2dfc0538f373a933104f164318a9d
9f51d49fb1b13401b232ed3aac15b1dfaf98a888
describe
'256309' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHY' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
29b11d55e3bdc094858b599a6f3e3328
4fa1cf65a2fdeba8fcc2e0b214042e5c44ae60cb
describe
'287436' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLHZ' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
111f36e865a36fd8ced137d50f6e80ec
98ab918de696f66a1a16e55432fb543aa5a588ae
describe
'206204' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6499b304b264fbfba566a3b5324b0acb
0661bb08688f1c1c120464c92d5946955494941a
describe
'126067' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIB' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f547064391ec05c40574f67fe11caae5
6eb9c941f35c4a265f119be119b006299992c0ca
describe
'188708' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIC' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
013bf1aaed60f01b13e9845a6c86f25b
f52fe1818151845b5d2cae85221e41ca00cc8f54
describe
'281671' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLID' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
5b62524d9a7a42062fb49e4f94668fb2
3eebd951643c65b04f0615b9024bdf8a1c70d8bf
describe
'296808' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIE' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
8d537ddaf4a9a98e735841ad408caf6a
62f6e9a3240fb51588642e3b6345fd5043bc489e
describe
'192289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIF' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
3791bb58abf3fa263dfe56b040ba807e
e575a2131fc7ba7ff855a5ee732ba4a7b6e08f37
describe
'191591' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIG' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
94d56fd9e7a0079e2e1aed85f5c2874b
bf0337eb7e128027567d27625954cbd85cf74309
describe
'188106' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIH' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
369b3ffbacb81964424857a5ab49ddb8
1df752477b5596311e05ffb2757f7414db9260f6
describe
'182774' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLII' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
cad1c3b0a7bda0645109349e5bad104c
e03b5416218690053cdf21674295b207a530d42c
describe
'287378' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIJ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
9626ee8aca3e409f7e2d64bee98d0d8d
56f7d56b5f8565681bb5b762c511d85ff05054a7
describe
'291006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
aa4e40d331145fbae0a8c02b8296c982
f37d9333704757d5a8067d47c991a22d695089ef
describe
'55231' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIL' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
319b2710ae9507ba068f4a84e5579c6b
835397b2b5a4c4ad84738337231c33dcfcf4bf7e
describe
'183644' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIM' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a2b0f37cdce74480e09a1b2ee7a1f7bf
356b931917b37432438fdcb5091955e06820ba62
describe
'290215' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIN' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
22217bf019c9466f1bed9d7aa27a88cc
0f72c2c0dff19c4bdfb677946aead084b81cff55
describe
'187069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
cf235b3bd9287746596ec2bdade9b166
8a0cea956a7b617528dd1c7bc521a916786ddcaf
describe
'201232' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIP' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
8c31846c4005d0b1bf90936e523c0e21
fdc744e4e0a01992dc538ec1dcc0f49e443606c4
describe
'294113' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIQ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
df2ebc9e2ae58fbbfa5278f28444d4ea
04a1e3de6dea5268f67d1024d64d6d9d2e0b1b3f
describe
'286993' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIR' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
681b95f18ee3d7df95b70e1e4bf62db4
915020811d047a0e4d4c8f56e6f0a1db6fcb3ef4
describe
'49925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIS' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
5fb23e5ade4284e5678bce470769cb06
3b75c26cfce917a5ba3c3b577fa575849d9a383c
describe
'194367' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIT' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
d0b663d684f607b80c2393e60af58f77
6ed41a9d483524a06adc2bdd57a82eaa9388c0de
describe
'278385' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIU' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
bdb20e26b7326f19bd634a3ae854062c
75fa50d4577eb1557b170292dff8cfb20da9c3bf
describe
'284148' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIV' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
316b5bb5e2943553c2b0621ecb301913
3578283f75938ca2e5898e60503908e6771e0e74
describe
'63356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIW' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
86b922a8e800b2dc57d0a50eba24c485
106198718d8c142723d707190f9df957ff9dd06f
describe
'180454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
caa16261adf44f0743a84fdb78d8809c
6854751b40a5db3595d0f6a4d9021a4931afba1c
describe
'269136' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIY' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
e9eb2a25aa9c254175572c12a324252b
173a0ab7d2d34d82def58e96d8f900d352496e95
'2011-10-13T20:29:13-04:00'
describe
'95866' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLIZ' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
4c55b2b467fe799f88aeba3397d83e4d
381f86b6dd7b1c963ecf58ba00847d184fc4d6d6
describe
'189618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJA' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
8d922b296feb695f379763e408497692
88b0bfd7f08559ba2c75e69d1e4466e31f881b5e
describe
'292969' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
b95162fbab18e943228650cbd42bab97
ae2932706f02bfa0b68e88c1a3833889c9e4597a
describe
'155088' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJC' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
3c85882666ce827f13ea4a2ed41f81c1
66eb09aa0fee846206c6858298e52d554cfa26fe
describe
'195174' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJD' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
9c17a6b2bcb6ee647a794e588784210c
771bff05b708fe026b143d26902b19015ab6830a
describe
'276888' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJE' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
8cf5bf904a094f9e42c22d4a0a64bac0
51740e164f5f502a1dde5bf669d1a98fc74f4cef
describe
'283544' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJF' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
45c526bd52394c0f7774042db3ca689a
85f4a4a67157b4bbaf43a4c1c49c876375cb7087
'2011-10-13T20:29:44-04:00'
describe
'100052' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJG' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
0376af095f8d3dd0310af2c3cfc4f865
91bcc6f9cf20fc43ea0aaab98e115103e458ac6a
describe
'200102' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJH' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
7cd904c5595d666c24af6f005240bdbd
073e9cd21910881a0a5e62d2aec18365bfb0b714
describe
'90005' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJI' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8679910ae11a4bf256f2e98557aa0afa
3e5f73da65acaf809ddf1e867293019ad87ebc6f
describe
'198130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJJ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
fba8336ceff7ef957f104d7bac1b7dbb
184cd2c799c36e38d2b01f0287636a7a6ac8651b
describe
'293813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
520589a615b2297581feaf85f3333aca
24df571a2fdfffe040b671455eda278a682caa4f
describe
'226297' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJL' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f8327b20c99701aa12b2658e1f9e6c77
c62fe90d2128c6e5e477e9adb8092366f7a4ec6b
describe
'180721' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJM' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
856ddb89c99e3d317b1a1af66b389286
a6a7ce1e2ed4d4b8500dce180f2d2eb643d03cb0
describe
'287911' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJN' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
cf84e93732dbec5dfcfccf8f545e8193
a732fa3b0e126efaccbbe9a14e8278c3eec7245d
describe
'138045' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
fe02581e441e2b4a82ca893ef3f818ad
dac64d352c63242a99e410840c1e48418a275e09
describe
'194297' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJP' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3f613df0fa9bb1fda1c5ee3f1cc6b92e
a2c2cbb8825e28046d4b9e14505cf3e0779fcd7b
describe
'293955' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJQ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
7e9ba8c81a9aa16849f34cbabf15da4e
69f3da684c8993bcb404c46af6b40d2eb7f4c70d
describe
'220516' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
1ac1d07449265e717ec014ac08502ba7
752e2fff238623d219194a2e3c69ab24478f3887
describe
'197478' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
aae4e70977842d47d0fd8d706c0c8b91
84b2d610a19e6c7daeef937e665006d34a44f9b1
describe
'288165' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJT' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
f39a94830aeb620da211c2a4c58542b6
235091af389f21bd07b616244dd17563e38f10b1
describe
'236004' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJU' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
66bf9ed795db3b54da751bebd012e57c
7dc52e37a2f66be10da7200d13c32e331022138e
describe
'197366' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJV' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
2c39f29b5161cf71a415ea5a84549bc2
aa87b299ad1c5c622219cf5a81eae2048981190e
describe
'259924' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJW' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
4194e9ed2921dc93673d63f7e5f7cd2d
6243cd649a50f59cb4fc857101df6525e8d5e825
describe
'190607' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
787e4bbb40f2359c9b1bd2d7e70fe1a2
4de509abbe83a500bfe8dc54b64b4a6a348aa8bd
describe
'102673' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJY' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
5d014b300f11a31657ac36693961eaa6
095b1c3c105f09a803b8939aec95a17da1c98f9d
describe
'204176' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLJZ' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b240c48d88db135d783dce2cedf62aad
5c9c263f663e42f89da5a8ce518966deacc61a79
describe
'282130' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKA' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
7056a34a68234b0fff84b9385b74a086
d117fa61e51e60370253a82a8ebee4617c86d114
describe
'282806' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKB' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
331cf97913202f9a608d51c02526f0cc
3a213b125df51e54f2634f0ca2f97546fd343b44
describe
'259269' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKC' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
074c0a589dbeb86cc9615e411e4711ca
e9cac7b6622550789a94b954e53a65ecfe189eb3
describe
'203292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKD' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
eb75b7f4d45efa596718c9cf620922dc
49607febd25d5be23ab8bdfedb4d3fee88571064
describe
'270500' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
1e47fd5e11a0e14bf3d444f11811080d
cac1e0483e468f3edf5ab76ff9a3c81871549173
describe
'192122' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKF' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
dcee821b6a3f88e60f02eef185e87e7c
6054ec5104e343b75ae0739a663b5c0cb34a42a9
'2011-10-13T20:29:26-04:00'
describe
'75056' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKG' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
c3b64d5a8f014ac3d26b2f4ed0492428
d7c0c3e1d53cd7fc5c1d0515b2ce85483c29f74f
describe
'193616' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKH' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
95a2674650221f043c336e0ec8e57689
afc7af6adc3c3bd9e4e067d63dc1e33bbd10e204
describe
'295179' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKI' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
1df7c00b4ea94f8b52cf79cc97fd97c3
0bdb14756e3e30575331b3f102f5ca37c531d9b7
describe
'307082' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKJ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d9e0c942fa75a183bcb6268a534f7f1d
cb59c3871dbac81e7949c4d7d1876169228d07f3
describe
'61169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
4332d4e1be43b3809f39cf17c5a6bb5d
b80d38357ce6b5209d423aee3dea6d54dac61d00
describe
'197811' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKL' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
6fcda182dc7f907ba1ba20e43c7e93b8
b7ed4a110489cc2a818db0c3bb94c6dc0d37d851
describe
'151246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKM' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
d777646a4b80532bc88aaab9cb4ec87f
61dcd97c5a2e17041565ec3aef7ab66496964e90
describe
'196912' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKN' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
b7b762d95378d84bccb6f891c5c53529
4ba2e44fdb3dc1a4094885340f04a39d7aa2a577
describe
'164755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKO' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
376052b76dd5ce02c37e935541a63fff
1021cef24e91fd273286476979654dc81642683d
describe
'199718' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKP' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
044456944c658b0652eb4f386dbcb8c2
8b4572c45be9431c3660c40cf0017cdcb4eee122
describe
'111685' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKQ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
a19938511fac5741b586b9a3d041eb88
52362c17a1e7bf02f4fff0b547ef8f59ab020f30
describe
'153938' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKR' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d8e2efb29f1bf78a3fa689cbe3fd083b
1e410cb7565550ac30f0a9e88d063fdf64385896
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'332040' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKS' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
108a4127bbc9fe7ccf3630adeedee450
e68486d858754f3d95d55aaafbeb708b0187dad1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100747' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKT' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
77105d7e97edd82ec3482299871957f1
7d87c2f30bb22ef9cd515e90203773c8d1b38b23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84796' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKU' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
7732cf97351e5735a3a69b747bb73f92
269ce39770adcf002332a651e98bcdc12ddef203
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29746' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKV' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
fe26bfe4eb2677a2535ea873b589b05e
52b13193631825eef5962b78078554c11c9ce75c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'50618' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
977b8515be03862457ba20f85a14b87d
268139d7bbeb20d202ad4198e6c0303c74ba8510
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'24295' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKX' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
0e94f1c8603e75c3762e3e9fde0a40ed
468a8f7584c32be96b172dac74ad34f94ddf69d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'2504' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKY' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
ef6c972fea4df9e1cba790b97999a05f
16e16d51e0d416b7cb09d7b5c205cf2bf49d1117
describe
'25636' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLKZ' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
36bf1a3d2951596ce6589d97beadae42
a34a4b1108b02e5045644dbd1a5386b4776daf0b
describe
'12451' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLA' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
f3dc955353f85d9abacfa246b7cc20da
d1e122cd073e5134a613be6aa46edfa9c6c63cf9
describe
'99444' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLB' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
0ce07dec46c96386498460303b4c4b1b
2ff4e387ec3493f6f83fadd84301aefbb211ba7e
describe
'37419' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLC' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
0716767e79722cfabd0d3a15dc1622b3
6ba78893133a3551a1f7aa1570364f645f5f6969
describe
'2499' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLD' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
a749b93fe421c7c36239887767de52ae
6df6d0d997fb18e789d0ea8e64080003f699b6b8
describe
'67289' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLE' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
ad062aaee77ece174f4bb4e33de94e76
90e50f179acfb9fc62d604a73b3838719f685223
describe
'24335' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
35c71508a9756a9514769959c84645bb
13d01797b31e058a74217a4f6d2fab352127a121
describe
'6943' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLG' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
c271ff20af275723058cb9289f3d0c4a
96790e35861228e6cbdaa94e8afc15991a1a097b
describe
'4209' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLH' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
c5d13c97cd68ab018a470bb812c168a4
6d0da5d48cce6564403a9d0b11a672e817852dc9
describe
'2494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLI' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
11c8a3053a61a0d64d2a4f0a72b5f7cc
f8c0e79cc69822dc525125b17fb32cda49b9c978
describe
'42523' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLJ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
8cf3b7c70890c4b306de7a811558f678
28bf8b37b34568b9d4ee7e8cfcbced0461151d88
describe
'20358' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLK' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
d3525f33a604da858a72aeec8017b42d
21c2c04d925ddbfc46a8036abe00371892dd33cc
describe
'2547' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
67621bd18b30cc7361c9ad8b3edb1780
7868a543b31b0db990d7a6bf5841bb155e76b660
describe
'30676' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
1bff50d80c18e0b29a9e8746e4cda8df
6dff7e6b58ed24bf5c838a9c5d7fb6944bc14c29
describe
'16600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLN' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
037789d89ce4c2194de082d13ccc13b2
c57824ef216992c62eeb1135900f3c0ebfb925cc
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
d1810532d8bf53cf46bd84d8ff372d90
961efe29dbbe4f286dffb16e7ac19afccadc40ae
describe
'12075' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
3eb7619bb7ce542373be963e386c1634
ece3e1ad93a8d5648e76ce5ec8bf664b05de6190
describe
'6853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a0005f47bca909243979a8ced3dfcd2d
28f84d6ac967ee55eeddc5ed4b1610acc25e4e19
describe
'2868' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLR' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
980454f4cd6b96585c0f1e15ad32f45b
c2aa9c984da6ad0d2fe75f87cee982a5cd4db3b1
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLS' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
981d67982ec78558e924ba906e2d8716
3459708e4ba1fff66d7dff786f2c31ae4d50f506
describe
'70190' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
051056c49577f5982585e3fcdf618907
82408e4da8278b0379f6a8ed90abfe3db7af33bc
describe
'26372' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLU' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
cbf974280a44376d32bf11d9643ba745
5b61415b3453f348a8e7b2da230307096ee24733
describe
'103216' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
d8acd9b35edbb71a181ab54355339962
c6b1702ef0e259c34439727c7f6fc6c16589e1cc
describe
'40037' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLW' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
64c2540088c28a013ea2c067892ec993
54541a76f2f8c0cf5135302429d45110713827fd
describe
'103162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLX' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
a961d12902cbe66ce7f9340eff2fa48a
9a904eb65393679517138a83b45389d7a1e09de7
describe
'37630' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLY' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
59f5f9e0b558f809834c1c8fa2a21305
f74aed9675ef1c09065d71eebe72d33a19bdcaf7
describe
'104735' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLLZ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
0137fe041cff9fcea6d969c39d99189d
5e326a73a5d630657e76b9ab9ab37a43847db83f
describe
'41042' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
1d43fc5c998bc846981be02c1713c09d
2ea795c4fb39755228a2bc04ba8334bce8ea55a7
describe
'106977' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
d384c77ce16552b389cb6426f9a809a1
ba1ca795f4d2b0ccdee6836e824ff077ba40034c
describe
'41131' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMC' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
e3d4943c607fa65dd750deafb377f513
2f50686315fffef5eca5c0f0ece22edc3b2197e0
describe
'98277' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMD' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
ab3d2254b33dce0394b7b598f7066d91
307ac0ebb1dc250ecf9681189600a428ca4136e5
describe
'40246' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLME' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
d0dcdc6ee304cce391496097ecc7280d
3d2cb308cc9482986c0a9fcf90199b71f4d3d1d3
describe
'101212' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMF' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
545a2d736188cfc6355fe4eda214dd95
dbb94389caed5bbd6ddfcae5a94cf197ecdffb9f
describe
'38664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMG' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
44ee9e03d246a53aff141ab97dd662b7
bcddee1a6e2e977555aa5ee028672cc1947131b3
describe
'103575' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMH' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
deadd6bf01a6d56bdf2b4a77056ed399
4cfd7baf73d54d02f80dae17dda7f2629eb38d84
describe
'38431' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMI' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
eb4e1eed6f0b9359669e188ffe11b56a
2adc69e7c29bd47300fec579d733cdfe25f23086
describe
'99330' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMJ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
6c35ac92e7c82c8a2c3ec54890a7c7bb
fd93fc8bcddb3ee6417e598e20baa15ae04e2bad
describe
'37221' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMK' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a5c4908333c28bab4c053ef29b156442
ff27af5b6a9bc40812da2c525380ab2f4d9271f6
describe
'108743' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLML' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f4502ea50ff3247ee8a8a5c8699b6357
e996ba10c41c6ce8049795168584fbfc9110d792
describe
'40775' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMM' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
ed34d98d85dcc50b0ede1af1e70f4af7
af21110c3ff991330358d9eb87549075284d88c0
describe
'102261' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMN' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d4418395f134891f2eb8177c3aff472d
4c2ad9da99c152834a6504717f8376faf06ef111
describe
'42325' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMO' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
0a9a753190d7e507bc48a2d384637887
858a1df19762e6369edfc39b24e965d8a70cd7ec
describe
'99677' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMP' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
0a9f15f855d6866b3143d6a351a18717
d7f9e88c14942a09dedefea9c6da8724d3689054
describe
'37908' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
10b2af0ddfd2de898d7d3636c6dbb7c3
a4a7b23db99fb47aceed9af326a6d839a638ee84
describe
'97848' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMR' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
5482bb51847e6e87b3e6ea88d7a68581
e0898e4b6f3dc3a43e5d71609f460a5692ae2087
describe
'41426' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMS' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
370bdacb10682f5b7f006f6f580e85dd
71cb585d321b91e3397bcaaba525635f9b1bf79e
describe
'101265' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
ef926c086110928ea95e14ea68d98c42
2189470322b5cf7ea7e35b3648fc3b111b5117cb
describe
'38301' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMU' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
65ba468f1f46e8a665f081c1a1cac3c0
641a05669b8c69ec6d1c6b6d799e8874d0777675
'2011-10-13T20:28:15-04:00'
describe
'104768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
2c1b569656a8d8eb41c235518a9785b6
89027f452dfa452bcf379c1905682d84d7b5663e
describe
'41526' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
ef1af29e801b537906c5779602c8a998
bed19f1bda64b8d2cd868ceb5f20e60ee588aae9
describe
'107059' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMX' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
46d08dd84f5ae23a46a6bbe52206429d
94a2eba535e6d5c21e94902d31193ba2ce30bc78
describe
'38479' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMY' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d796bda3130c8ffd31308f96ee566a0f
e1e70eff61e2f16aca620dbf0d9dcc89a9b4d9b9
describe
'103319' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLMZ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
184bf577bf311f159febed66373e3f33
638364f2f83283ffcbb2f33aeab37e400df286a3
describe
'40454' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNA' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
24025877b8e71c94f3ef93294f30abc8
9f0b1c1e0d891f2c88e96bb93d241d6bf1ee76e6
describe
'102138' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNB' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
f97ba195102578a04dde12c200126e17
780865faf4d4d1e58140fef55ddb6bff3e9a8846
describe
'35850' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNC' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
8d5039dbd7b9d7c3bb15dc8ae2c85b04
a5c50f219a086e21ad5cacd5bd0afb9af70d5b36
describe
'102443' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLND' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
b56b6a2cd21026e89d974da275296298
0502a61b99770be3df2cd7c77e39f05f6756a209
describe
'40595' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNE' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
325785eeacd4274e73469bc51b8a5956
9f4611293853fc28ba0462c2d402d7033778f8e5
describe
'105179' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNF' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3ea2530a0116e538539713ff7cd3b526
320837d9a7c33da5e944e25dd493275fe203c634
describe
'37599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNG' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
972fc263baebf6825236afcd57c9191d
aab89c55f2ffbab192e627b90c98c1adf9095f40
describe
'103463' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNH' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
853f5c4ee6ed1f02ef08c09846b76837
6d90429becb613c623e41bf8ec135cc22daedc0c
describe
'41577' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNI' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b1cc99c17adf1a1d6053ca2b80675cdc
6c35e9934c0fdc1191e53f03f5d92bd588dce2eb
describe
'101429' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNJ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
980be532f18e5f594809427f1bf54ad0
594a0061b0a6c3315bfdab7f9e85004cabf1d8a5
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNK' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
623bf546fda6ad5aa01f01b75f95c3aa
f266e4300eb9e53cd9f821d325afcd320ce1fc59
describe
'98570' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNL' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b15c56371dae299f755993ab51cf06ee
28c22edf2d699e095752cea1d3e2764d66cd4e56
describe
'38830' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNM' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
c49ab91276c77e6eeb0f7d94003af00b
78c2a3fbdab2f8c18db6d306d10991095dc261a0
describe
'92790' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNN' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
c8333863b92953640467c3bdffbe40ba
c1288779ecf23c9a7a3bef6c967afc1775a221d6
describe
'36119' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
6a707167b801e5fa2ad23c90b07ec172
9d3494f0bdadf6f47a0fafba945d18cadcfb2c24
describe
'9650' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNP' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f6631e1911b6c35a17f8c43208651744
84fc0326497c0cda0378580dc32021ba1a84da30
describe
'5913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
a4b8d076e6b3ec786e5667a8513e4dfa
00e7c22deb741bf1c6d562976b2c20737ed2dbd6
describe
'3188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNR' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
27da69dcf3a6a6d3f29c43ab38ace596
9a7d04d304e7f93d608f934db1b13bdc1a52249c
describe
'2755' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNS' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
33e6d310338c895a4cbb4a30648154bc
03e7a5511af38f213d147048d38745d2e47211ae
describe
'62870' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNT' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
cfac65974ea4f0cd34235e8eec3e9d49
26ccb7f86b777059ac7987559913e743a033a892
describe
'26656' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNU' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
509c34fe041b94e763ae20b57ea84d72
f4c2d5cad6b9ddedc2862fc54f91ce251ad6761d
describe
'93377' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNV' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
4c61209eddae6af317e6a63b3a0e72b4
315aefa9dcd2c46015056515a88edb949070f26f
describe
'33439' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNW' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
eef4a08b48b44cbed8c507025182b148
5a45b693599ae799bec7ae476d001d3131bfe3f6
describe
'59828' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNX' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
7a5e6e6677b1519d465f5ae7fddfd42e
f0dbc49e883ee75e1d5ecff218c4727c112ef7e3
describe
'25169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNY' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f2761324d20bab3b1678206e51c39c7e
f45d569af27ab18fbf324541ac25f643d3534d33
'2011-10-13T20:27:54-04:00'
describe
'70664' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLNZ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
f1707558037ee9ab8b19706acf787940
88d8ec352e3cf6381986888cb5ba79aca9be0ff5
describe
'25597' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
bb7c62b92b86ec6513f3db1531d8b670
f40cd9bc0d8429cb4aaea8d18cd7961b4ed3e5be
describe
'82144' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
67870146535c074563b67fd5d13df2db
9bcea065366e50114b17e24d36c4de1249a30b7c
describe
'32002' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOC' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
a1e673ac59940175cf07dd9240d51c68
72cf8cad3f3f8fbcda969bccb8e0428b711b991f
describe
'69600' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOD' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
9e0af04537dc11408be25382494be764
78c642867bbf3ef8c677773641e1a9ae42214048
describe
'25832' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOE' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
df5f73283468a5c0dcbf0c224cfe0d44
b0f9c04abd3e6b3853659e5701ea8161cd438224
describe
'52422' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOF' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
27d582e4f5ab0085aee30af27a7d2259
10e99da757cacc26148499190804251dee9656fa
describe
'21854' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOG' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
2790ba8077f67637bebc725851e72c42
d1ea7e7321932b19296b420b5e70ed072893729d
describe
'69348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOH' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
cc3a6f20e6c1ba1ec6e25e8d9045fc20
396e4fbeed9803192dd0d1af83495a1ba7804d7e
describe
'26736' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOI' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
1311b501a9fd9daf0291777a7d5e9838
98caa1237263451d89f58e250363dd114585ae8a
describe
'95954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOJ' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
82304b19ce026530e7e33829c0211e35
f662e9d2334cbec7abd6cb3e07312c050c115e0b
describe
'34841' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOK' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
d61518ab43fb12d4f1c5c2781e972b27
f4777f3103394cf66e59a8cd32c4de82e55f5a0b
describe
'40261' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOL' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
1747eb2e713ea324a90b17e6277bbf37
29416b62256789fd196527d00f777675ccf887bf
describe
'16389' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOM' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
e39ba66dc6a5d75fa75867e904482e1a
48e70a6b7e1a98a9c9576ce330f4e07098780a1c
describe
'74513' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLON' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
08d29c519bf304173d97e84ab4d2b0aa
703e744651af8aa17edff3d4c7ea12f28df2423d
describe
'29299' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOO' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
5a1de514c94a0e8c47db542bf3c752e7
be0a79c96f2d0b61d1b0c5c67855fb40b62d8fa3
describe
'85008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOP' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
03b8f3f58f2288ea1e69dcc1e48bfec9
95c866db5ecbffcefea28ac9345e060430845871
describe
'31698' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOQ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c4772994c863c1ea931254452d498227
5a5f7e235a18d6d608ca22a4d33ec621baa66dbc
describe
'68574' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOR' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
b3774d11eef40c2c4735a8333f0bd0ab
c92da37444766df53494826d107aabb29f919085
describe
'26297' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOS' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d2bebf6e0f9b12ebf2898ecd6bf0585b
9673bde30c522b84bad190bdf0e8d4b3614d9b5d
describe
'98008' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
bdc39e12b364a4fa3b5bd3e9856acd9b
5bf57bb9377bef19287781160bcdf4f27e1eb459
describe
'38316' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
fb4998e24db95abbab0c4c444e170e23
bc6ad97203f1d755309574a2299818c2d312069c
describe
'104073' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
e1f72f7547786ab667e5176a60d3e4cf
6654ff23732e2268dca00b8cd21acf8ce9e7f43d
describe
'38228' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
d817260312fe4cabe23c76d6716f1675
7fefdfad6e257b3a926904aced8632bebd0a5a27
describe
'75157' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOX' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
50112333e58cb915858225f7dda2bf5f
993d4787427937237e6702feb0582c4903399803
describe
'27134' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOY' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
e15d6f4d9c4ec572856f894329d5a222
419ad1fad62f82323b53d395aa4618f6c5d4118c
describe
'47474' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLOZ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
dfa9d8967a0f4e524fe9d1f2b3da212f
d67a9b69b242b187b3d049c3bd5e371ec694aa4c
describe
'19751' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPA' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
c46ed308422c9721d97f5b203c09d5b7
efb21192bbdd892c03e269a4ed5cfe7860aec615
describe
'70153' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPB' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3d6259c47fdf5ca5f460da15da9dd700
97a88155655dd90a96a35857fb6a8669d4330ee9
describe
'26669' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPC' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
4b7613ab0929f5677cd02d0f49031833
80cfc8732ca4c8342e6e9f14be9633e634b420c4
describe
'102640' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPD' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
a2522bdcf33ba64e82f5616a8fd144e9
afdfce1639f4ba5a113d19287131ae2c9d8f3128
describe
'39310' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPE' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
044f26e21ed1437f546ec52bd16bcc53
38b0aceb1617d0bf29205c2110e43019ff6c6b41
describe
'107225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
02906a24b6ab4724db01282a7341bd61
00e77f429abdfa52a7665ec4fd6a7a35f7f08401
describe
'39550' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPG' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
10c938e3e45b16acd382da84c7e5cd5b
928ba1bfe686b2d152fa7b866efbe0e9e87dfb6e
describe
'70307' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPH' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3d1534ca90dd4b536f90db2239626fd3
cd80d96a97d9aeb13129f6ed0028bfcd82000497
describe
'26805' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
8137fe9b3552f9bc9d77a57841afefba
21760fc7514b9df73f87209f63227bbba48bb72e
describe
'71188' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPJ' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
63ca9c220abc203690b5ab0374048132
e77aa324312456680bce3314abb088941c2643b2
describe
'25872' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPK' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
faccf5602a85e251571334bfbc42e871
6cd5e0068670d266ffb1cfe1872302ff37bab8c4
describe
'69020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPL' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
fe07da3645fd78916772ab9068cadc17
a3306bce3eee462ad5196f0550ef8960722d6a08
describe
'25284' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPM' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
c11af515bcd7470e765a75058bd0ef66
f856e6d45fa4422e905a4b43561a4675c01c2dde
describe
'68690' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPN' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e162fb1b8220071ae7335a83a7546810
91e90e04a6f294a0d93c518c458c3f619ba41e04
describe
'27097' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
ccfd2735e63962bb68864876fd54decd
f000e27419aeda2a4a6bd19fe890721fc7ee710a
describe
'107026' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPP' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
36af0c5b903edb3682fd18e866141798
f9e03e2922c152e9b660edff4554608271be2bea
describe
'37982' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPQ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
0f74cc4ed04e5ebd6deabd6b88c45ba6
60962f8c6e69160cd62520eaa14c194b9d9eda77
describe
'106720' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPR' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
f0f402f82f8b1f2a5cd9d081e58a7360
e2a98cd3b859490fab1808d2d121e7f59add6d79
describe
'39556' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPS' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
be78f395cb5af19afc6373892c2337db
6fe235b76a3ab8c542a357946d0377b8308455b6
describe
'22642' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
6187791679328555919bd64e4f528589
5992cf10a4983de8667d4f837cc4c4f1140e3e37
describe
'10197' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPU' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
185b1635366818a376ff3203c105fee5
a2cf3ae149c82148b6adeeb4b6551b5b098ac574
describe
'69045' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
addfcedd24b1b5c9c43dc2a37334fa84
d92a501110c556abf08b5c74c587fce69b34a8e3
describe
'26824' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
850150489758fff3b0224763bb647e89
c0a66d49628c766ee95498b43aa1a072951448e6
describe
'106819' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPX' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
affad5133ddb3f54ec6f20963cd1bea3
a8ab35ab39ff06ad23be2ec0e056f6013576d14a
describe
'38469' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPY' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
11b38543e17b97c8a2a4004e32fd74b9
690e27194ff2e117c92e26caff7877dbbda22d9f
describe
'70608' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLPZ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
40dc4325c322896bc085aa0b50d797e4
8c2fba61d0a161f2fe65fd19f66211abd47e5abc
describe
'26799' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
bb46c7893fa4fb9232f3cd1d9d2ace08
5dd330ca7c8a802e27dd797fa51b1c24889441c9
describe
'73364' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQB' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
cffd1136c1be97d9be4a91931a4c48af
a48e43e5f1acf12c1d33286f738fd270b8e74c2e
describe
'26802' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQC' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
f908937fe420e21f27af991c6a6194e7
840eb9885858badd250a4413a6a050fef5364475
describe
'106244' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQD' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
20d816595414d0610e1f8ae996b1f63a
6607f87e8e749faec1d0140487b052c473ae5fdb
describe
'39730' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
e8bfd42ceb420dc4061d9280152f71a8
8758b8c8532b0fbececadafcda96db5bccd178e3
describe
'104678' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQF' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
5af317d86a34e68763d4211a84df2e0a
d83f26cfb148fac92e81c97fe4d8563665bdbf58
describe
'39551' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQG' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
38f3a516b867df758a265fc821d12e32
09541e0d82def5365614e789a20e49f6a531d812
describe
'20817' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQH' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
4204a9dc52e80b47a85bef29db2661da
24ab3e225ef9723f966fec3566a83e48bf877a9a
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQI' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
0b196cdebf8d14fcbc84b6a2a6257f91
2f11a24fb1ecd80b2afd6ca26abcc5c8bc1c2c6b
describe
'71348' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQJ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
3bd3feefc113c81f3038abf10cb84532
026a6f00d39caccb87aeae2af8719da6beb5671b
describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQK' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
03f4ed8514fc84c4200051955ee56ef3
8714fa4d7c8201cf31e92bcdcd692b50ddec71fe
describe
'103115' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQL' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
fe52b0f0388f54723fdfa44b9ab51f5b
77b8c861f16710b12d495a6370736ba71b7ced26
describe
'40027' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQM' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
dc1fbe1af9669b304eac31d8accc18d5
ede1bb05f370ccd05baece7ed59465c8777b3073
describe
'105225' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQN' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
aff26c3f74991f2ceaec62e50e723203
7e2b187ebc49973a878e2c983a1e7d2bd07d4173
describe
'40768' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
67eb72a48b483ea5ec0bad1f69f14534
63fb6f7e44d86b563343ff0db4e48be47df0ec3f
describe
'24355' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
3daba0414923a4834b21507079110698
bb2bfe1019a020bddba20ba25a2b714aceedc061
'2011-10-13T20:26:49-04:00'
describe
'12338' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
1ee846a239904732309350540129d34f
3be1a5730c80ee968167fb13f088e102d04362b3
describe
'66069' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQR' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
0d9fc424f0fd2a39bddef92097874625
ddf267bf14e0103051889380be469f88a8539935
describe
'26909' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQS' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
51b539d84d95e64a72e82c42534e7343
c47a5946d6a6e2401ba9449163612eb85a1e02a8
describe
'97213' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
e6b910e36b3eae3a5a27ae193b29c5cc
fe4a3e8e86cae5bf280d82852e254cf1fa492e25
describe
'37714' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQU' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
6a0058afd463ce443bbe378176889b27
93a05d3e200a95078bd45c4206bbf9b78bef3c41
describe
'37127' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQV' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
d361b2591f4c08d0f89d90b4b8fc1e33
bd2862970a0eabc3751781a98649ab686972d61d
describe
'17654' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQW' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
5ac3899f1e6c2d36ff18c4cebd030708
020cb35c70fec125e4d39430024a2103884fcce4
describe
'69006' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQX' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
edfbb683b2c9b4295787552a19ac7d2c
78e720bdfb94a9bae671991b8cc20744e1af689f
describe
'28051' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQY' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
233039f091aecef2e90a1965c449a526
bce6c20876679dfae6204ea9014360472f756a74
describe
'105659' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLQZ' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c44493c66ff7fc703e29a89c08df56c1
4d5c3c101a6e0a5f52478ea530e4d56a03c0d2f5
describe
'38468' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRA' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
f295eda22224c9e65c48b3da27fd2a6e
d2816c9b65675f7f1daef2ba24034998525d6b2c
describe
'58241' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRB' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
68613841ec26284977ebbf8b1cf586d0
3a26c2058497bf44aae4150472a35c3e8195a3d2
describe
'21859' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRC' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a6435a374c855e4d73d7f4cd644a1433
7a03f1951878bf7da270f1389286146bc0b874ff
describe
'70599' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRD' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fe809b9e064ef4d3789ff9bb5fcf9fc9
dc5acc0cb218a67f1862627864981908eeea663e
'2011-10-13T20:26:51-04:00'
describe
'28299' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRE' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e374e3b27ff61a4165014560adbf64c1
7839af04e7330e8ecdbf2cea65653743fe383e84
describe
'100268' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2fe4edfc47d96f87f3f05f124cdf9f57
79c71191ce49f9e1922ae4e1a5a6b04fac48a3f6
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRG' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
9d68b63ce86f3dd1819052b62348162b
f24968a5abe9b3fbee4c88ee41ad06495d2de6c4
describe
'101535' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRH' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
29ff52c957d31869c477594da260467c
9128253634999c0c5b3ea3f9244c674e07c5f440
describe
'38282' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9799e55736ee6d56cd640264848f5ed0
181b1fceba07500282f8763b1fb805bcae465963
describe
'36839' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRJ' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
69bdc2b2e83e98a67c63117bcb771547
9b0cd533fb5c308995187fb1ed7ae0e27a943c82
describe
'15366' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRK' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
59dedb3501c968df6e13870a23117802
7ea29d3d54aacc34dce8da7c9de4c1753870ba44
describe
'73091' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRL' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
f921245fc514feea230cb1d0e5718bde
9e2d3e806f9200fb80032b9f4af374ab3fab34be
describe
'26606' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRM' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
89dfc559f6ffb863d2784801dda92bad
3567427275ee2593f4d63e1cfcae6e76790447a4
describe
'34293' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRN' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
cb43d43066069cd234290d5c9911df6d
a91848d22c5cb1fa285912aed4140d4e223c6a7a
describe
'14435' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
04bbd6e18ffb734d2b18ebcb7d9c7729
9ac49fb5d0c69fb1ef759b949da3af02aa3f72b0
describe
'73471' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d2497e20d17b292b80f88294d2256a4e
8e32ae70aed3ed1674a8a478f1993153c012fdd9
describe
'27871' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRQ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
95dd705e7de5feff9983fd8f6e327da6
5d1da181d1e58c9b4e293d9b12e331c4e4d1804d
describe
'106752' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRR' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
4fce73eb69cf124ded630b8e2ade6ab1
0e517da1661a30c6fcab2ef412b5c26699a97698
describe
'40482' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c17989e8bc52d7893e2079384f9cd2eb
0180784db513aa68a043c4019a198c7830205107
describe
'81638' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRT' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
12bd1e44e1fb90ad9e4bedbcdefee800
80362165ec590b4b64deb5c06da290a15af1a81f
describe
'31001' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRU' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d4ca1973fd6cb2438ef524939a6cfa0a
b4ba8309cc888b1ac82abb0205215f71b635ffd9
describe
'67494' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
1ca12e7ab98f71444b13f7c32a00a157
bf30784714842f01cdc0634ff7185c965762d405
describe
'28604' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRW' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
81c1de59dfc9ebaec95aa3cdcb5bfdec
46dedee4a4abdd595b00ffa001e7d8fe6c36f5d6
describe
'106185' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRX' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
7520ed85594f446d699c984a73f2cb7e
265996f0c1619115cc58b9599b90a272699898a5
describe
'39502' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRY' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
80c2a70ff5be0b7f1980de68d4ca0cba
1c5d0cc09804e1b54ab197952df1e0fdff42ffeb
describe
'51170' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLRZ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
4ef1510eb89bf1ff0a480e3cc3c35a66
d8240e41b6f396a22cde353f1f01e94ead6b5d73
describe
'20750' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
399d6df3f9c17b3f01f8931a38d470be
22870f69cb23a559462c2d31c303d247456ee0ce
describe
'72525' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSB' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
818bfcb62d8552d10af67d7c72181aef
8b6a73eed6b00e0c4d2fd14932d6ebc46f772f36
describe
'28298' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSC' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4bda6ee6a9156b04bb54914740a3537d
462469dae74ea14bbf11d513a375a9f0f15b399a
describe
'107589' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSD' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
cd1b429e90b87893b7bbe29725f19f34
2c0259f3f2b6c73545282b81bd06faac1c7521f1
describe
'40334' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSE' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
173955bbf00eee7024b2adec8780a31e
f791673b5df81d3b0c2c48f0d96a656e8d7135b9
describe
'79593' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSF' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
3c99111212510b470ac9eca9c545d134
9be3cc3714ff7b47151859c5fb433214e4c9749e
describe
'30292' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSG' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
27fe414b7a75e16a0c79af583f462019
ad3c7a3762abe09435d865fc102e09eb7d74e924
describe
'71014' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSH' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
d33151b15046d848a1447c4375ce51b2
d07f18b8907bf92c86e87ee6b755c4469114ff14
describe
'26758' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSI' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
646204f22a5db881262c491a8a312954
473e5684226eb27815b7bbb9d71fb4621c31d2eb
describe
'103706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSJ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
aa52594a63573ff382b21d79b029bfae
3a333884125625567122aef96d714ec9032c7d3c
describe
'37763' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
921037f90b31c58360b15b8803337673
433762acbb068e66aeb1951363330a378be77ec8
describe
'86566' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSL' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
4d2eb03575418a034891690fd0fadff0
9dbcfea081a41f20199b58d59d2f12b236468545
describe
'32020' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSM' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
5b64cf9c7aebca27aa3c3ed64418411c
6d5f938644bcdb685e5b76e1ef971631c5611b4e
describe
'72198' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSN' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
1ce754cbc0c4b4f044d313dd6021279b
4ea4a8c071f1c95bd65244c6dd15a2b97aa50c73
describe
'28162' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
f1e7dcf92b0cfd8170bd4aca1c9aec2b
085c4037798e53f92154cbd796a46cc52fd6722e
describe
'93174' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSP' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
a007e463bbc5a08af9cf51d1bb5721d3
5d15818113f55186786e5be84eb0e28b80d6d154
describe
'32101' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
a00307c9aac1bd798d8ba2d0810a2e0b
2c3bf59f1c0bb44fb3d3227f0ff45db9fe8a0c7d
describe
'70954' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSR' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ece44c4e7c9a228b4789970e130ebc28
7a0412c8a739146757e4ae1ae0e6972235b76857
describe
'27182' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSS' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
81039297e9255549e18589ae33ed04a1
57ced226c94507a4e444230a4ed9c23ff3f04fb9
describe
'39476' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLST' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
fff6d380f511a2090e07223a1be5e6ad
46bdb8394ded0664e4c9bcb4abc181dc3c914969
describe
'16250' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
8e6ce5ca7d8501a4ac987165a7e85c24
4ff6bb50fceadf7e3e5d586aa2aea5f0857fdb4c
describe
'75078' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSV' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
e600f99d25f3a2fbbb9bcb7c38b095c5
0970097818883b78fd4a4d05a4e1fdb86b721eb0
describe
'29356' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSW' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
a64633c06290c45186d4eaae54998809
cf9511d753a9f3360c68e65eead2493e21736ded
describe
'103925' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
96fb0354a71cf3a4a188e65854a982f6
c21098da2b5e8ae0aa10fa1ac7c8e1d61b793a30
describe
'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSY' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
4135abfde78d0b0a9b3c0d7988eba68b
e35b5e0ec8ba366aeb8ee6aae4dbe72f231c8ada
describe
'102458' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLSZ' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
6bd147f85ae80738cfa640e625eda463
0b85f247887de4a536823e3bd05e3268fb3e389d
describe
'38505' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTA' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
16f1c93569708e95b77dc4f821a1ea8b
4efe80e400356e56cb564b3e548b8e4bf5c639f9
describe
'93169' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTB' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
9d07e2405a65e93ac90395cdff43ad6e
8bbaae1edce6b1144fc791f719e18f3de6863af8
describe
'35053' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTC' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
722813665aa1d6121b98df05dc499285
bc55fa2554b2a3a72c87ba0d3f5cf9fc67239064
describe
'75709' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTD' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
1a89b2c02ddcd585fa6a269798c8d7dd
48950409a8ae4118e6af138ad533ef067558b7d0
describe
'28621' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTE' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
4d207cf3e8b8523cc7fc23cefcd82073
29051c924d3e091b42a853c215e86e034a21e2e6
describe
'98239' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTF' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
3e96d79c664b3810e5a2615fe1b0dfd6
79973358b01b37a6da83182df8eecb42ebe384a0
describe
'37813' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTG' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
f07504e64f918fa651cb70bf5377ce83
2c249f64a1688c60f7d8c461f380bf1f0b9c3e91
describe
'70665' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTH' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
a9dad1a35323c9f478249ec61a3f6887
d470887635ea8843a6ee9395141f8331f64ae90e
describe
'26228' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTI' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
4ef947e351f8e9bdd73536986e8fcdc5
6ea84e9011d15fe329e7d118e2f7091cf226d914
describe
'28086' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
59892c5f644976b46f9ad449f3215167
60a7908e356521a9a19a58d28059bde2a8550a8b
describe
'12320' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTK' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
bed82516b237ff387627e16b98a9a3d7
0da5e8299aa9a51081d6a3faef8a13e73af8e7ce
describe
'71944' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTL' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
6a976ed3ef7ccf9ffb0c0098ce2f5088
d76c7f633e38e5ffa82a701089041467151a412c
describe
'27706' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTM' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f4e4ffdf2e0132290e20ae900c8d7840
e7f87fbcd1b9af8abd387bd71709a353001371ee
describe
'106399' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTN' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c7d71494d5000157d4b0a46eb38596c1
b38ea9f551b0aed293a899191963a0ad7597ebc5
describe
'41853' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTO' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
338da793296acfb752a40b60677a0129
a871f026b0375aa216d7558a46f77c3956323384
describe
'109875' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTP' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
e7ce0f4bc1e681ec7b47c7f3c63339e3
c8a6204dfd0ce7ee5d488f222929b544fcdd6944
describe
'39902' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTQ' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
c7b4b1764c3761634ded041b378b1584
2467b2ba9a33039bc6896a88c2e7f1ea3b904548
describe
'23878' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTR' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2970430897173eb6978a73580793c1b6
580312ed5203193dfdf8ccd97d662cffcff012f3
describe
'11111' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTS' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
83f968250c3604cdfed8d63fbc8b8f7b
9f3ebab2619e7639c4e3397dbfcb902ce69c25bb
describe
'75077' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
74a7af01da71a72a924880738d8b6518
cfe0ca4ce91afc4f8083f14250d03b5292286425
describe
'28361' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTU' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
632744e58a6adf463d7c0c31ea2fcda3
080f8bb2b76b74f76ed6279cabbb4cb2495a8171
describe
'53492' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
acf23e05cc452c6a1441630b15b54669
157b2cab44517eddbf7161b717e3f29248d5a20a
describe
'21262' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTW' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
f357336a770526350baf03a0d7af1fad
b86992d4326f9636b07f1798e37e00b8cb628c0c
describe
'71112' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTX' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c5ff9dd4cee8942f4711b846f389ec4a
6cc3108521be258e28687459be6d771d1930cd55
describe
'25087' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTY' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
ccaca875d1d5f2c15fc25b833a65a922
92f337ef4b22c09666b0629b647674e48487a478
describe
'62122' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLTZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
df8b3588d7a3ef670cafa6c4442c6499
d8651ee5fa40c550b9c04e067a52305b71ab0e94
describe
'25697' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
1ee116b4974fa165491f47565a31ee49
41d061bec4b5dafeb8c4523757f4eeb12e849546
describe
'71389' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUB' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
8dbb90967247ea0c1dfca52298127a60
57526810536ba1d9223801905db8587d0c09114a
describe
'27207' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUC' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d417ec3e55d9b985f637b3bea7875c01
1587e0cb82e83afdc81dbc1add64e79631688c7e
describe
'42438' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUD' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
0a7c48da51865c672c5198a4a0439eff
b08f7607017255390e30d82027dd3c5065732bb8
describe
'17353' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUE' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
ddf8eb1b383aff68e728a43372322497
da4329e25c22db77fa4a671e9b33e531f56acfce
describe
'2533' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUF' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
f6d43bc911d3a02ad3141a78fd7c39d4
a8d40800c872f17cb9840526b2831b0d49f626de
describe
'45243' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUG' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
36d1b5aae5c32433e3c6225f7a29c915
504ffe52410e166d4c1ccc98252c4d7f421792ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21793' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUH' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
be3bafc6653fc893c9ebd2ce4df8912f
15c3001fe085e29ffa87a863ffd41fd4ebd3c649
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84388' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f9699b18c68f0ad144fc73ad84a851f3
e32d68dbeefce35a9c657580859ac5244392fa54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'29276' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUJ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
6b5960d370174f3c3ca50d1ee1aba205
dc5d6e0d38e645b79a9da96a5ab93cb17f7835ca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'35931' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUK' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
3f658be556f160d7b2978f630d1ad775
744c094fc050abab39dd7a1cb0309cbd7a0fd5eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'21550' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUL' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
4d5e195af07fa56acf5b82c3287c9dc1
432c59081077b57ca75b7d24ae9f8a83c63d5349
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUM' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
589cea745defe9e60fc1c662ed8bd7eb
aad973f41ef657f58cd24424ebcff3f53fd1889f
describe
'205818' 'info:fdaE20080328_AAAAHCfileF20080329_AABLUN' 'sip-filesUF00002223_00001.mets'
820794b7c087aa3385c9e1c70921a651
6165715c0cb83f563bc35e329b737e906ccc52ff
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-19T07:13:09-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.










Package Processing Log















Package Processing Log







12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM Error Log for UF00002223_00001 processed at: 12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00001.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00001.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00002.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00002.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00003.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00003.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00004.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00004.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00005.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00005.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00006.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00006.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00007.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00007.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00008.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00008.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00009.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00009.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00010.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00010.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00011.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00011.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00012.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00012.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00013.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00013.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00014.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00014.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00015.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00015.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00016.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00016.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00017.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00017.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00018.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00018.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00019.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00019.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00020.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00020.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00021.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00021.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00022.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00022.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00023.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00023.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00024.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00024.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00025.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00025.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00026.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00026.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00027.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00027.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00028.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00028.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00029.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00029.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00030.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00030.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00031.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00031.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00032.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00032.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00033.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00033.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00034.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00034.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00035.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00035.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00036.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00036.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00037.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00037.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00038.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00038.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00039.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00039.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00040.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00040.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00041.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00041.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00042.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00042.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00043.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00043.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00044.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00044.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00045.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:51 PM 00045.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00046.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00046.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00047.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00047.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00048.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00048.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00049.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00049.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00050.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00050.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00051.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00051.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00052.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00052.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00053.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00053.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00054.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00054.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00055.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00055.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00056.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00056.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00057.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00057.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00058.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00058.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00059.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00059.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00060.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00060.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00061.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00061.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00062.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00062.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00063.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00063.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00064.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00064.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00065.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00065.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00066.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00066.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00067.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00067.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00068.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00068.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00069.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00069.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00070.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00070.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00071.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00071.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00072.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00072.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00073.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00073.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00074.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00074.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00075.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00075.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00076.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00076.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00077.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00077.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00078.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00078.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00079.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00079.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00080.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00080.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00081.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00081.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00082.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00082.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00083.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00083.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00084.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00084.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00085.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00085.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00086.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00086.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:52 PM 00087.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00087.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00088.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00088.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00089.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00089.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00090.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00090.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00091.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00091.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00092.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00092.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00093.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00093.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00094.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00094.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00095.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00095.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00096.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00096.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00097.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00097.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00098.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00098.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00099.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00099.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00100.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00100.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00101.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00101.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00102.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00102.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00103.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00103.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00104.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00104.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00105.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00105.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00106.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00106.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00107.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00107.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00108.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00108.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00109.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00109.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00110.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00110.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00111.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00111.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00112.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00112.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00113.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00113.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00114.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00114.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00115.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00115.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00116.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00116.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00117.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00117.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00118.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00118.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00119.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00119.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00120.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00120.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00121.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00121.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00122.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00122.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00123.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00123.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00124.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00124.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00125.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00125.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00127.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00127.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00128.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00128.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00129.jpg is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM 00129.jp2 is specified in the METS file but not included in the submission package!

12/15/2014 12:53:53 PM