Citation
Marco Paul's voyages & travels

Material Information

Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels : Erie Canal
Series Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels
Added title page title:
Erie Canal
Added title page title:
Marco Paul on the Erie Canal
Creator:
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879 ( Author, Primary )
Doepler, Carl Emil, 1824-1905 ( Illustrator )
Roberts, William, b. ca. 1829 ( Engraver )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Harper & Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
203, [4] p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Erie Canal (N.Y.) ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1852 ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by W. Roberts.
General Note:
Title page engraved by Lossing & Barritt after C.E. Dopler.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob Abbott.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026784662 ( ALEPH )
ALH0734 ( NOTIS )
01873241 ( OCLC )

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. Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight hundred and fifty-two, by

HARPER & BROTHERS,

ia the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District
of New York.



PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Pavut’s ADVENTURES IN THE PurRsuIT oF
KNoWLEDGE, is not mercly to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it clements of a salutary moral influence, by means
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the °

story These incidents are, of course, imaginary—



Viii PreFace.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER : PAGE
LP LANNING, . + + 7 . e e ] 3

IL—Tue PackET, ‘ 7 ‘ : ; 4 31

Ill.—Gettine on Boarp, : ‘ . 46
IV.—Nicur, . ; ; ; ‘ ‘ ‘ 64
V.—CANAJOHARIE, a : ‘ : i . 84
VI.—Honesty, . : ‘ ; ‘ ; i 99
VIil.—Tue Pass or THE Monawx, ; ‘ . 114
VIIL—PERrPLexity, . ; . ; ; i:
IX.—A Project, ; ; ; . : . 144
X.—Tue STEERSMAN, . : : . ——
XI.—Tue Rive, . j ; : in

XI.—Tue Ovrtrer, . i : ; ‘ os:



ENGRAVINGS.

PAGE
Map anp Section or THE Canat, . . F) antispiece

Tue Steamsoar, ; ‘ ; ‘ : : 15
Towne, . ; ‘ ; ; : ‘ : i
Tue Packer Boat, . : : ‘ ‘ ‘ 44
Jump! Jump! . : . mr . ee
Brivce! . ‘ : ‘ ‘ ; ; . 71
Goinc To Bep, ; ; ‘ ‘ ; ‘ . =
Tae Lock, . oo ; : ‘ ‘ ; 88
Totu To Pay, ‘ ‘ ° ‘ . ; . 98

Tue Strratacem, ; ; : : ‘ e 104
Tue Car Winvow, ; ; d ‘ . ; 29
Tue Line Boar Canin, . ‘ ; ‘ ——
wee Pema Cams. =. WC) ie
MARCO AND THE STEERSMAN, . ; ; —
Pomrey’s Escape, . ; : : , ‘ - 189

Lookinc ouT OF THE WInpDows, ; : . 202



ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

——_ > > oe __——_——

Parco Paul,

I—IN NEW YORK.
Il.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

IIl.—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.

V.—IN BOSTON.
VI.-—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.



PRINCIPAL PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Marco, his son, a boy about twelve years old.

Joun Forrester, Marco’s cousin, about nineteen years old,
, z

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care.



MARCO PAUL ON THE ERIE CANAL

CHarrTrer I.

PLANNING.

The steamboat.

QO* the evening when Forester left New York

with Marco, on board the North America,
then one of the most celebrated boats on the
river, he was sitting upon a settee, by the side
of one of the great doors leading into the ladies’
cabin, thinking of future plans, when at length
he said to himself, “ How shall I begin to in-
terest Marco Paul in the acquisition of knowl-
edge ?”

As for Marco, he was at this time rambling
about the boat in search of amusement. Just
before he left New York he had bought a book
to take with him on his travels—in case he
should wish to read on the way. Accordingly,
as soon as he had come on board the steamboat
he took this book out of his carpet-bag, and



14 Marco on tue Erie Canat.

The cabin. Setting the tables.



went up on the promenade-deck and began to
read. His attention was, however, so much
diverted by the objects of interest around him,
that he made very little progress in his reading.
Presently he concluded that he would go.down
into the cabin, and see if they were setting the
tables for supper.

He found, on entering the cabin, that the
tables were set out, though every thing was not
fully arranged upon them for supper. There
were, however, a great many waiters busily en-
gaged in bringing things in and arranging them
upon the table. Marco stayed a little while in
the cabin, expecting every moment to see the
waiters bring in the supper itself. At last he
asked one of them when supper would be ready.
The waiter said in about half an hour. Marco
concluded, therefore, not to remain in the cabin
any jonger, but to go up on deck and see what
Forester was doing..

There were a great many passengers walking
to and fro upon the deck of the steamboat.
There were others seated on settees and chairs,
reading newspapers, or looking at the scenery.
Marco, as he came up from the cabin, walked
slowly along toward Forester, with his book in
his hand,



PLANNING. 15

Plans fur Marco’s studies.

- ~
[
Bi

mt:



THE STEAMBOAT.

“ Marco,” said Forester, “come and sit down
lieve, by me.” So Marco came and took his
seat by the side of Forester, on the settee.

“ Marco,” said Forester, “I have been con-
sidering what is best to have you study first, and
I have pretty nearly decided.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ what is it ?” .

“See if you can guess.”

“ Arithmetic ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester.



16 Marco on tue Erte Canat. °

——————S LLL LC Ce,
The Erie Canal. Books and observation.



“Grammar ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “ nothing like that.”

“What is it then?” said Marco. “I don’t
think I can guess.” |

“The Erie canal,” said Forester.

“The Erie canal!” repeated Marco. “How
am I going to study the Erie canal ?”

“There are two modes of acquiring knowl-
edge,” said Forester ; “the study of books, and
the study of things,—or observation. You
study books when you read in books an account
of the object, or a narrative of the events, or a
statement of the principles, which you wish to
learn. When we learn by observation, we go
out and see for ourselves, instead of taking the
statements or explanations of others.”

“Which is the best ?” asked Marco.

“Both combined make the best method of
study,” said Forester ; “ first to learn from books
all that we can, and then go and make our ob-
servations. I propose that you should study the
Erie canal in that way. We can not learn
from observation alone, because we wafit some
guide. We want to know where to look, and
what to look for. The Erie canal, for instance,
is several hundred miles long. It would take a
great while to explore it wholly from end to



PLANNING. 17

Le
Two mothods combined. Iilustration. Level of a canal.
einen tania

end. We want, therefore, to look at books
first, so as to learn what the points of interest
are, and then we can go out and make our ob-
servations to advantage.”

“But it would be better, if we had time
enough, to do it all by observation,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester ; “ there are some things
which we can not learn by observation. We
can only get them from books.”

“Such as what ?” said Marco.

“ Why take such a point as this, for example,”
said Forester: “ which end of the Erie canal is
the highest? It begins at Lake Erie, and ex-
tends through the State of New York to Al-
bany, where it comes into the Hudson river.
As it eomes along, it sometimes rises and some-
times falls, and,’—

“T thought,” interrupted Marco, “that the
water in a canal was always level.”

“Yes,” said Forester; “at any particular
place the water is level, or nearly level; but
then, in making a canal, after going along a little
way on a level, if the engineer comes to a place
where the land descends, and the country takes
a lower level, he stops there and builds a lock ;
that is, a place with great gates to shut in the
water. ‘Then he begins below, and makes an.

B



18 Marco ON THE Erie CAnat.
————t

Conversation about the canal.

——_—-

ib, SE ae amacen
other piece of the canal on the lower level; and
they have a very curious way of letting the
boats down from one level to another, and also
of raising them up from the lower level to the
higher, when they are going the other way ; $0,
as you go along the canal in a boat, you have
to stop continually, to be raised up or let down
from one level to another. Now if we were to
go through the whole canal, from Lake Erie to
the Hudson river, and examine both termina-
tions, could we tell, from our observations,
which end was the highest ?””

« No, I suppose not,” said Marco ;—“ yes, We
could, too ; we could measure.”

« Measure 2” repeated Forester. “ How ?”

«Why we could measure all the ups and all
the downs, and so see whether it goes up or
down the most.”

«Tyue,” said Forester, “ we could do that.
But that would take a great deal of time and
labor. At any rate, we can learn the fact a
great deal quicker from books, for there we
shall find a drawing, with all the locks marked
upon it, and the height of each one,—so that we
can tell at a glance that the end at Buffalo, on
Lake Erie, is the highest, and we can see how
much higher it is.”



PLANNING. 19

nee LLL ELL A
Measurements. The map. The profile.
ee ID

«“ How much higher is it ?” asked Marco.

« Five hundred and sixty-four feet,” said For-
ester.

« How did you know ?” said Marco.

« ] looked on my map,” said Forester ; “ there
is a profile of the canal on my map.”

« What is a profile ?” asked Marco.

«It is such a drawing as I have been speak-
ing of,” said Forester. “T will show you.”

So Forester took out from his pocket what
looked at first like a little morocco book; but
on opening it, it was found to contain only a
map, which was printed on thin paper, and
folded up neatly between the covers. Such
maps are only prepared for travelers. T*orester
opened it and showed Marco the profile of the
canal, which was drawn in one corner. It
represented the whole length. of the canal, with
all the descents and ascents. Forester also
showed Marco the course of the canal on the
map; and by comparing the course on the map
with the profile, they saw that the canal con-
tinually descended from one level to another,
until it reached a long line called the Montezu-
ma level. The cities of Syracuse and Rome
were on this level. Then the canal ascended
again to a higher level, where Utica and Little



20 Marco on THE Erie CANAL

Ascents and descents. Learning from books.

Falls were situated. After passing Utica, the
canal descended again, by a great many locks,
as it went along down the banks of the Mohawk
river to the Hudson, and finally it reached a
much lower level than that where it had com-
menced at Buffalo.*

“ Now,” said Forester, “you see that we
learn, by a glance at this profile, all that we
want to know about the level of the canal; but
it would require an immense labor for us to go
over the whole length of it; from one end to the
other, and make the measurements and calcu-
lations ourselves.”

“Then,” replied Marco, “ if we can learn bet-
ter from books, we need not make any observa-
tions at all; we may learn it all from books.”

“No,” said Forester, “for there are some
things which we can not learn from books so
well as we can by observation.”

“ What things ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, one part of the business of the canal
is to carry the emigrants out to the Western
country. Now, when a canal boat, full of emi-
grants, is passing along the canal, and night
comes, and they all gather into the cabin, it



* See Map and Profile of the canal in the Frontispiece.



PLANNING. | 21
Learning from observation. The emigrants.
ne

makes undoubtedly a peculiar scene, which it
would be very difficult to get an idea of from
description; but we should get a very vivid
idea of it by going there and observing it for
ourselves. So the views which are presented
‘to the eye, as you go along, sitting upon the
deck of the boat, the appearance of the villages,
and all the little scenes and incidents, which
occur along the line, which are characteristic
of canaling, must be seen, or else we can not get
a very clear idea of them.” .

“Can’t they be described ?” asked Marco. »

“It would be very difficult to describe them,”
said Forester. “Very few books do describe
them ; and, after all, no description can give
you so accurate an idea as you can get by wit-
nessing them. So you see that the way to ac-
quire the best and most thorough knowledge of
such a subject, is to study it first by books, and
then by observation. Now how should you like
to study the Erie canal in this way with me ?”

“Pretty well,” said Marco; “at any rate, |
should like to go and see the emigrants.”

“ Going to see the canal will be more agree-
able, than merely studying books about it, |
have no doubt,” said Forester; “ but then, if
we study the subject first in books, we shall



292 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

sates eeeenaaameiaaaaecasaaadtamanaintiinssiaieneminiimmmbiatl
Previous knowledge. Advantages of it.

take a great deal more pleasure in going to see
it. We always take more interest in seeing
what we have read and heard of, than in any
thing equally curious, which is entirely new.
For instance, now, do you recollect my telling
you, when we were in New York, about the
child that I saw, at the little farm-house in the
woods, who helped her father carry his gun
along the path ?”

* Yes,” said Marco.

“ Well, now if we were riding along the road,
you would take rather more interest in seeing
that house, if I should point it out to you, than
you would feel in other houses, that you had
never heard of.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “1 should.”

“ And so,’ continued Forester, “if we wish
to enjoy visiting the canal, we must learn all
we can about it beforehand, and that will give
a great interest to our observations.”

“Well,” said Marco.

“Therefore,” continued Forester, “I will
tell you now all that I know about canals, and
the Erie canal in particular; and then, when
we get to Albany, we will endeavor to get some
books, and Jearn more still, in respect to the
subject. We will spend a day or two in Ai-



PLANNING. 23



The tow-boat fleet.

bany, studying the books, and thus find out
what are the points of interest relating to the
canal, so as to know what it will be most inter-
esting to see. Then we will plan some excur-
sion, and go and see for ourselves.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “I should like that.”

Just then there came suddenly into view, at
the side of the steamboat, as she was gliding
swiftly along up the river, a group of small ves-
sels, side by side, with a steamboat in the mid-
dle of them. The vessels were fastened to
the steamboat, and
the steamboat was
drawing them a- &
long up the river.
Forester asked a Sa had
gentleman whowas 22M 2-="~
near, if he knew RS.
what it was.

“It is a tow- 3
boat,” said the gen- @
tleman, “taking
these vessels up to
Albany.” So the
gentleman explained to Forester and Marco
that merchandise for the country was carried
up from New York to Albany, partly in sloops




TOWING,



94 Marco on THE Brie CANAL.

Merchandise. Banks of a canal.



which sailed by wind, and partly in boats or
vessels drawn along by a steamboat, called a
tow-boat. A great many of the goods carried
up in this way were to be landed at Albany,
and thence transported to the West oe
the canal.

Marco and Forester had not time to look at
the tow-boat long, for the North America gli-
ded very swiftly by it, and in a moment it was
gone. Then Marco came back again and took
a seat by Forester, for he had at first left his
seat to look at the tow-boat.

«“ Well, Marco,” said Forester, “now I will
tell you what I know about the canal. This
will be a beginning; then we will get some
books in Albany, and learn all we can from
them. By this means we shall learn enough
about the canal to visit it to the best advantage.

“The first thing in the construction of a
canal is to have the banks water-tight. They
make the embankments of earth, but then they
have to prepare the earth in some peculiar way,
and ram it hard, so that the water can not get
through. The next thing is to get a supply
of water; for it is necessary to have streams of
water running into the canal all the time, so as
to keep it full.



PLANNING. Q5

RR
Must be water-tight. Feeders. Aqueduct,
LD

«“] should think,” said Marco, “ that if they
make the canal tight, and fill it with water once,
that would be enough.”

“No,” replied Forester, “they can not make
it perfectly tight; some of the water will ooze
out through the ground, and some will escape
by evaporation. Besides that, there is a great
deal of water used at the locks when a boat
passes up and down. So that it is necessary to
keep a constant supply pouring into the canal
all the time, at different places. Those places,
where the water comes into the canal, are
called feeders. We shall want to see some of
the feeders when we go to visit the canal.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I should like to see a.
feeder very much.”

“Another thing that is interesting to see
upon the canal is an aqueduct. An aqueduct
is a kind of bridge by which water is carried
over a stream. In fact, an aqueduct is any
artificial channel to carry water. If a small
quantity of water is to be conveyed across a
stream, it can be conveyed in pipes, which can
be carried along the bottom. But a canal re-
quires so much water that it can not be con-
veyed in this way. Therefore, aqueducts for
supporting a canal must be very large and solid



26 Marco on THE Erie Cana.u.

Aqueduct at Rochester. Studying the map.

structures. They are made like a bridge, only,
instead of a road upon the top, the canal is
there, with a pathway by the side of it, for hor-
ses to walk upon that have to draw the boats.”

“JT should like to see an aqueduct,” said
Marco.

“So should I,” said Forester.

“Did you never see one ?” asked Marco.

“No,” said Forester. “There is a magnifi-
cent aqueduct on the Irie canal, at Rochester,
I have heard ; but that is rather too far for us
to go and see.”

“ How far is it?” asked Marco.

Forester, instead of answering Marco’s ques-
tion directly, opened the map again, and showed
Marco where Rochester was. They found that
a considerable river, called the Genesee river,
ran across the route of the canal at this place,
so that it was evident that the canal must pass
over the river.

“ Are there any other aqueducts on the Erie
canal ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “1 presume there are
several. We will follow the course of the
canal on the map, and see what rivers it cross-
es. I suppose there must be an aqueduct at
every river.”



PLANNING. 27

Crossing rivers.

Geib tape > | NA nee reed iateesociacesen am

They found, by examining the map carefully,
that the canal crossed the Seneca river in one
place, and the Mohawk river in two places,
besides several smaller streams; and Forester
said he supposed that there must be an aqueduct
at every one of these places, to carry the canal
over.

“There certainly must be,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “not certainly.”

“Why,” said Marco, “I don’t see how the
canal can get over in any other way.”

“Why, if the canal should happen to be on a
level with the stream, where it was to cross, I
don’t know but that they might draw the boats
over in the water of the stream itself, without
any canal there; only they would have to make
a bridge for the horses to go over upon. There
can not be an aqueduct, unless the canal is
considerably higher than the river at the place
where it is to pass over. When the canal
comes to a small stream, I believe they turn the
stream directly into the canal for a feeder. We
shall probably, if we sail along the canal, see
such streams coming in, sometimes on one side
and sometimes on the other.” |

“Yes,” said Marco, “T’ll watch for them.”

“Beside feeders and aqueducts,” continued



28 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

Locks. Double locks. Lockport.

Forester, “we shall want to see some of the
locks. There are some double locks and some
single locks, I have been told.”

“ What are double locks ?” said Marco.

“ Double locks,” replied Forester, “are those
which are made in pairs, one by the side of the
other, so that some boats can be going up in
one, while others are coming down in the other,
at the same time.” |

“Why couldn’t they wait?” said Marco.

“Why, there are so many boats,” said T'or-
ester, “as I have been told, that they accumu-
late before the locks, waiting for an opportunity
to pass through. It takes some time for a boat
to get through a lock.”

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“You would see,” replied Forester, “if I
could explain to you the mode ; but I had better
wait until we can see the locks, and the boats
passing through. Then you will see at once
why it takes so much time.

“ There is one place in the canal where there
are a great many locks. It is a place called
Lockport.”

“We'll go there and see them,” said Marco.

“It is rather too far off,” said Forester.

So Forester found Lockport on the map, and



PLANNING. 29

——"* ae ————
Inconvenience of locks. Schenectady. Utica.
CO een AL CD

showed it to Marco. It was beyond Rochester,
in the western part of the canal.

« Besides,” said Forester, “ it is rather tedious
going through a great many locks. After we
have seen a boat go through two or three times,
we understand the process, and after that, it is
only a tedious repetition of the same thing. I
understand that travelers avoid those parts of
the canal where there are a great many locks.”

« How do they get along, then ?” said Marco.

«They travel in railroads or stages, if there
are any. For instance the first part of. the
canal, from Albany to Schenectady, is full of
locks. The ‘canal there ascends very fast, in
getting up into the valley of the Mohawk. We
will look on the map and see.”

So Forester showed Marco the map again,
and pointed to the profile of the eastern end,
where there were a great many locks repre-
sented. ;

“J have heard it said,” continued Forester,
“that it is very tedious to go by the canal from
Albany to Schenectady, and that travelers gen-
erally go across by the railroad route, and so
take the canal at Schenectady, or else they go
on to Utica on the railroad. For here at
Utica,” continued Forester, pointing to the



99 Marco on THe Erie CANAL.
asinine

Waste water.

ot camisetas
map, “ you see a long level commences on the
canal; and they travel fast on that level, for
there are no locks to delay them.”

“JT should rather go where there are locks,”
said Marco. |

“Yes,” said Forester, “I presume we should
be very much interested at first in seeing the
locks ; but probably we should soon get tired of
them.”

« What else is there,” asked Marco, “to see
on the canal ?”

«JT do not recoilect any thing more now,” said
Forester; “only there must be some con-
trivance for getting rid of the waste water.”

“ What do you mean by waste water?” asked
Marco.

« Why, the superfluous water,” said Forester.

“JT don’t understand superfluous any better
than waste,” said Marco.

Forester smiled, and said it was not a very
good explanation. He said, however, that it
was now time for them to go to their berths,
and that he would not talk any more on this
subject until morning.



Tue Packer. 31

Plans for the journey. Circuitous route.
; ioiplieattien



Cuarrer ILI.
Tue Packet.

ORESTER and Marco Paul remained a
day or two at Albany, making their in-
vestigations in respect to the canal ; and they
finally concluded that their first excursion in
visiting it, should be to go to Schenectady, and
there take a packet-boat and sail to Little Falls,
a village about fifty miles beyond Schenectady.
The reason why they went to Schenectady,
instead of beginning their voyage upon the
canal at Albany, will be made apparent by
looking at a map of the State of New York, and
a profile of the canal.* It will be seen that
from Albany to Schenectady the canal ascends
rapidly, by a great many locks, up the valley of
the Mohawk; and it takes also a circuitous
route. The ascent is to be seen by the profile,
and the circuitous course by the map. Now
the heavy goods which are transported along
the canal must necessarily be taken round that



© '
* See PÂ¥ontispiece.



Sp OS REL EI EA ae

392 Marco oN THE Brie CAaNnaAL.

s eee n ann
Packets. Line boats. Little Falla.



way. The delay is not of much consequence
to the merchandise ; but passengers, who wish
to get to the end of their journey as soon as
possible, generally go across from Albany to
Schenectady by a railroad, and then take the
canal there. The consequence is, that there
are no passenger-boats going from Albany to
Schenectady, but only boats for carrying mer-
chandise. The boats for passengers are made
very different from the boats for merchandise,
and they are called by different names. The
passenger-boats are called packets, and the
others are called line boats.

Now, though a great many emigrants travel
in line boats, Forester knew very well that they
would not be at all comfortable to those who
had been accustomed to the conveniences and
refinements of life ; so he concluded to proceed
directly to Schenectady by the railroad, and
take the packet-boat there.

And the reason why Forester and Marco
concluded to stop at Little Falls, was, because
they found, by the description of the canal in
their books, that there was a remarkable feeder
at Little Falls,—a feeder in which the water
was brought into the canal by an aqueduct built
across the Mohawk river. This aqueduct may



Tue Packet. 33



cena
Arrangements of the boats. Scenes. Scenery.
aoe ee eeatniinini csi



be seen represented on the large maps of New
York. The books said also that the scenery at
Little Falls was very romantic and grand, and
that there were several locks there too. So
that by visiting Little Falls, they found that
they would have an opportunity to see locks,
and a feeder, and an aqueduct, and romantic
scenery besides. |

There was another thing which they hoped
to accomplish, too, on this excursion. "They
found, on inquiring at Albany, that a packet-
boat left Schenectady every night, and another
every morning. Now they wished very much
to spend a night on board a boat on the canal ;
for they wished not merely to see the canal as
a mechanical structure, but also to witness
some of the various scenes of human life which
were presented in connection with it. One of
these scenes was a night in a packet-boat; and
they calculated that if they took a night boat at
Schenectady, they’should accomplish that ob-
ject; and then afterward, in the morning, be-
fore they reached Little Falls, they would have
time to sail along for some distance by daylight,
and see the country and villages, and observe

the incidents which occur along the hanks of a
canal.



34 Marco on tHe Erie CANAL.

Baggage. The small parcel. Tinman wanted.

“We will take very little baggage,” said
Forester, “so as to be independent.”

“What do you mean by that ?” said Marco.

“ Why, I will put all that we shall both want
in my little carpet-bag, and then we can go
where we please, with our bag in our hands.
A trunk is a great incumbrance on an excur-
sion in search of the picturesque.”

So Forester put some newspapers and a map
into his carpet-bag, and then began to roll up
some articles of dress into a small roll, which
he was going to put into the carpet-bag too.
He held this roll in his hand a moment, hesi-
tating, before he put it into the carpet-bag. “It
will get sadly tumbled,” said he, “knocking
about in the cars and in the boats ; I wish I had
some way of protecting it.”

“A trunk would be the best for it,’ said
Marco.

Forester did not answer. He seemed to be
musing.

“Never mind if it does get tumbled,” said
Marco.

“If I could find a tinman,” said Forester, “1
could get him to make a case for me in five
minutes. Come with me, Marco,” he con-
tinued, “and I will show you what I will do.”



THe Packer. 35

The tinman’s shop. The tinman busy.

So Forester went down to the office of the
hotel, and asked the clerk if he could direct him
toatinman’s. The clerk went to the door, and
told him to go in a certain direction, and into a
certain street, and he would find a hardware
store ; and he said there was a tinman’s in the
rear of the store. —

Forester and. Marco walked along to the
store. The store-keeper directed them out
through a back door which led down some steps
into a little yard, where the tinman’s shop was
situated.

When they entered, they found the tinman at
his bench, hammering some tin with a small
mallet. A little at one side of the place where
he was sitting, was an enormous pair of shears,
fixed in an upright position on the work-bench,
all ready to cut. The jaws were short; but very
heavy. They were what the tinman used in
cutting his tin.

Forester told the man that he wanted him to
do a little job. |

“It must be a very little one, indeed,” said
the tinman, “ for I am very busy. The other
man that works with me is sick.”

“ Well,” said lorester, “I will make it a very
little one. I wart-you to cut me out two pieces



36 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.



—_—_—__--—

Shuping the cylinders.

of tin, about ten inches long and three wide, —
and then bend them up into half cylinders, so
that when I put them together they will make a
hollow tube. Then I should have liked to have
some pieces soldered into the ends, but that is
of no great consequence, if you can not ‘do it
conveniently.” )

«JT will cut the piece out for you,” said the
tinman, “ but I have not time now to. solder in
the ends.” | | AF

So the man cut out the tins, and then, in
order to bend them into a circular shape, he
took a long, wooden roller, and rested one end
on the bench and the other end upon the stool
which he was sitting upon. Then he bent the
tins over upon this roller, and hammered them
with his mallet, so as to make them fit the roller
in every part. aD |

Forester found that he was taking more pains
than was requisite, since it was not necessary
for his purpose that the tins should be very true
‘n their form—and besides, he knew that the
man was in haste; so he said, “ That will do,
sir; it is not necessary to be very particular
about it.”

«Why, there is a max'm,” said the tinman,

-~



Tue Packet. 37

nn
Two maxims. A medium. The inclined plane.
cee Nearer

« that what is worth doing at all, is worth doing
well.”

«That is a very good maxim, I have no
doubt,” said Forester; “but the farmers in Ver-
mont have another one, that it is not worth
while to plane the under side of a barn fluor.”

The tinman laughed. )

“I suppose the true philosophy is,” said For-
ester, “ to go in the right medium between these
two maxims.’

By this time the tins were ready. Fonsster
paid for them, and he and Marco returned to
the hotel. Forester placed them one upon each
side of the small parcel containing his linen,
where they served as guards to protect the
contents of the parcel from shocks and concus-
sions. Marco, following Forester’s guidance,
found himself, not long after this, seated in a
car, which was trundling him out of Albany.

They came very soon to a long ascent, which
led up to higher land than that on which Al-
bany was situated. For the land which lies in
a direct line between Albany and Schenectady
is elevated, though it is nearly level when you
once get up, away from the river. The land is
sandy too; so that it would have been easy to
have made the excavation for a canal in a



32 Marco oN THE Brie CANAL.

— shania TTT
Engineering difficulties. Second inclined plane.

Engineering discus
straight line, but it would have been difficult to
have got a supply of water to keep it full. Be-
sides, it would have been necessary to have had
a great many locks in order to ascend from Al
bany to the table-land above, and then as many
more to descend again to the Mohawk, at
Schenectady. On account of these difficulties
they did not attempt to carry the canal across
this plain, but took it round, through the valley of
the Mohawk, from Schenectady, thus bringing
it down to Albany from the north. All this will
be made very clear by looking upon the map.

The railroad, however, they made straight,
and the consequence was, that it was necessary
to have the cars drawn up a long ascent near
Albany, in order to get them upon the high,
level land above. Then at Schenectady there
was another. long descent, by which the cars
were let down into the valley of the Mohawk.
All this is, however, changed now,—another
route having been found for the railroad, which
avoids these inclined planes.

Beyond Schenectady the railroad follows the
valley of the Mohawk along to Utica, with the
canal. So that for ninety miles there is a
canal, a railroad, a river, and a common high-
way, running side by side, in the same narrow



Tue PackeETt. 89
amet ceerrarneme natn catenccesTTE y
The valicy. Machinery. Tho pulleys.
eescaansiantanspniaaatattasimapeammaneaneanaiatan TL

valley. It was up this valley that Forester and
Marco were going to travel in one of the
packet-boats of the canal, as soon as_ they
reached Schenectady.

The cars were drawn up the long, inclined
plane,—so long that it seemed to Marco almost
half a mile from the bottom to the top,—by an
engine which was stationed at the summit.
There was a long cable, which reached from
the top to the bottom of the hill. To keep the
cable from dragging on the ground, they had a
line of wheels in the middle of the track, between
the rails. The cable passed along over the tops
of the wheels. There was a groove made in
the circumference of the wheels, to keep the
cable from slipping off upon one side. Such
wheels are called pulleys. When the cars
reached the top of the inclined plane, there was
a locomotive engine,—that is, an engine which
moved along the road,—ready to be attached
to it; and the locomotive soon carried the train
across the elevated plain, and brought it to the
brink of the hill, which descended into the val-
ley of the Mohawk, at Schenectady. Here
there was another inclined plane, and the train
was let down slowly, by a stationary engine and
a long cable, just as it had been drawn up at



40 Marco ON THE Erte CANAL.

A a _- erro
Inconvenience of inclined planes. Tho conductor.

Albany. The locomotive was left at the top of
the hill. At the foot of the hill they fastened .
horses to each one of the cars of the train, and
drew them separately into Schenectady. In-
clined planes are a source of great inconvenience
upon a railroad. They make a great many
changes and delays necessary. Still, there are
some places where they can not well be avoided,
though in this case, as has already been said, a
new and more level route has been found, by
which the ascent and descent that Marco and
Forester passed over are now saved.

As Forester and Marco were sitting upon
their seats in the car, just before they reached
the inclined plane, the conductor came climbing
along the side and looking in at the window to
take their tickets. ‘These.cars were not made
as cars are generally made now, with a door at
each end, and an aisle up and down through
the middle ; but they were divided by partitions
into three parts, and there was a door in each
side. ‘The conductor, however, did not come
‘nat the door. He only looked in at the win-
dow, and when he had got the tickets, he
climbed along to the next car.

« T should think he would fall off,” said Marco.

«He takes care, I suppose,” said Forester ;



Tue PAcKET. 4]

en ner vsinenstnnsiinsialacaninansianancniatiniin

The runners. Duties of the runners.

a nse tesco = ETS

«but I wish I had asked him something about
the packet-boats at Schenectady.”

«Why, we can find out well enough when
get there,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “but I expect there
will be a great competition for passages. The
runners will be after us, telling us all sorts of
stories, and I should like to hear something
about it beforehand.”

«The runners ?” repeated Marco. |

« Yes,” said Forester ; “the railroad people
want travelers to go on the railroad, and the
owners of the boats want them to go on the
canal. So they each send out men to find the
travelers as soon as they come into town, and
try to persuade them to go by their convey-
ance. These men are called runners.”

“Do you suppose they will be after us ?”
said Marco?”

«“ Yes,” replied Forester, “very probably they
will.’ The boats and cars both go at the same
time, I believe, and both companies wish to get
all the passengers.”

“It will do no good for the railroad men to
attempt to persuade us,” said Marco; “ for we
shall go in the packet at any rate.”

Forester was right in his expectation of be-





42 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

eet —————_———————
The depot. Competition. Forester decides.
rh rninnltlhemepeeeeaAaeeecacaiiiaiaitiaia

ing accosted by the, runners on his arrival at
Schenectady ; for, as the car which they were
seated in, was going into the depot, just before
the horse had stopped, a man jumped upon the
side of it, and Jooking in at the window, said,
in an eager voice, to Forester,

“ Going west, sir ?”

“ Yes,” said Forester.

« Will you take the packet, sir ?—carry you
to Utica for twelve shillings.”

At this instant another man applied at the
window, just as Forester was taking up his
carpet-bag and umbrella.

“Take the cars for Utica, sir?” said he.
«Run through in six hours.”’

« You can have a good night’s rest aboard
the packet,” said the packet runner.

« We will carry you for twelve shillings, sit,”
said the railroad runner, in a low tone, as For-
ester stepped out.

“Thank you,” said Forester, “but I have
some business along on the canal, and I believe
I must take the packet.”

“ Wel, sir, walk right along,” said the packet
man. “Have you any baggage ?”

“Only this,” said Forester.

The man took Forester’s bag and began to



Tue Packer. 43
a eau

Noise and confusion. The basin.

Bails See aE
push his way through the crowd of persons that
were coming and going in the depot, and For-
‘ ester and Marco followed him without any more |
words. In fact, the noise and confusion of the
bystanders, and the loud hissing of an engine,
which was standing there, prevented conversa-
tion. |

Their guide passed out of the depot, and then
turned into a busy street, built up closely on
each side with stores, shops, and taverns, A
short distance before them they saw a high
bridge. It was where the canal passed under
the street. There was a flight of steps, at each
side of the bridge, leading down to the banks
of the canal.

Forester and Marco followed the runner
down one of those flight of stairs, and there
they found a packet-boat ready to receive its
passengers. The canal was very broad at this
place. A canal is usually made broad where it
passes through a town. Along the sides of it
were walls of stone, and these walls were con-
tinued up, under the bridge, high enough to
form abutments for the bridge to rest upon.
The packet-boat was fastened by a rope to an
iron hook in the lower part of the abutment of
the bridge.



44 Manco | ON THE ERIE CANAL.



‘The Nout. Its construction.
ee



THE PACKET BOAT.

The boat was long and narrow, with a row
of windows on each side. There were Vene-
tian blinds, painted red, before these windows,
and the boat itself was. painted white. This
gave it a very gay appearance. Marco said
that it was a much handsomer boat than he
had expected to find. The top of the boat,
which formed a sort of deck, was nearly flat,
being only curved a little from the center to-
ward each side, so that the rain might run off.



~

Tue Packet. 45
a ee aletiaeiaanet oan ccmaaecaaeane

The baggage.

There was a very small iron railing, not more
than six inches high, along the edges of it.
This deck was four or five feet above the
water. At the bows, and also at the stern of
the boat, there was a lower deck, with steps to
go down to it; and from the lower deck in the
stern, there were other steps leading into the
cabin. \ There was a row of trunks and carpet-
bags commenced on the deck, beginning near
the bows; and men were carrying on more
trunks, which they placed regularly in continu-
ation of this row.. The runner steppéd from
the stone wall by the side of the canal, upon
the top of the boat, and Forester and Marco fol-
lowed him. The man put Forester’s carpet-
bag down with the rest of the baggage, and
then he took the umbrella from Forester’s hand,
saying, that he would put that in the cabin.



46 Marto on tue Erie CANAL.



The cabin. The interior,



Cuaprer III.

Gerting on Boarp.

ORESTER and Marco followed the run-.
ner down into the cabin. They found.

that it was a long and narrow room, which oc-
cupied almost the whole of the interior of the
boat. It looked like a pleasant little parlor,
only its shape was very long and narrow.
There were seats on the sides, under the win-
dows, covered with red cushions. They ex-
tended the whole length of the cabin. There
were one or two tables in the middle, with
some books and maps upon them. The cabin
was divided into two parts by a projection from
each of the two sides, which projections, how-
ever, were so narrow that they left a very wide
opening between them, almost as wide as the
whole breadth of the cabin. There wasa large
crims*n curtain hanging over this opening, so
that when the curtain was let down, it would
divide the cabin into two distinct parts. When
Iorester and Marco.came in, however, the cur-
tain was up; the two halves being drawn out



GetTine on Boarp. 47

Ladies’ saloon. — Entering the names.



to the two sides, and supported there by a large
brass curtain knob. Over this curtain there
were painted in gilded letters the words, La-
pigs’ SaLoon.

Marco understood from this arrangement
that that part of the cabin which was beyond
the curtain, was intended particularly for the
ladies, and that it could at any time be separa-
ted from the other part by dropping the cur-
tain. In the middle of the ladies’ cabin was a
table, with books and a bouquet of flowers upon
it. There were several ladies sitting upon the
cushioned seats at the sides of the saloon.

On the table in the gentlemen’s part of the
cabin, was a writing-desk, with alarge sheet of
paper uponit. This was the way-bill, on which
the names of the passengers were to be en-
tered. The clerk, who was in the cabin when
Forester and Marco came in, took a pencil up
from the till of the desk, and said to Forester,

“ What name, sir ?”
_ “Forester; and this lad’s name is Bare‘,”
said Forester. .

So the clerk wrote Mr. Forester upon the
list. Forester observed that there were unly
two names there before. Under Mr. Foreter,
the clerk wrote the name Baron.



48 Marco oN THE Erie CANAL.

Off for a walk. The bridge. View of the canal.

« What time do you go?” said Forester.

« At nine o’clock,” said the clerk.

Forester looked about the boat a few min-
utes more, and then went up on deck again,
and stepped off the boat upon the bank.

«Tt will be an hour,” said Forester, “ before
we shall go. So we will ramble about the
town a little, and see what Is to be seen.”

They ascended the long flight of stairs again,
which led up to the bridge. When they reached
the top, Forester proposed that they should go
across the bridge, and look at the canal on the
other side. . .

They went accordingly to the other side, and
looked down upon the broad and smooth sur-
face of the water which was spread out below
them. The view of the canal extended for
some distance, until it was lost by the canal’s
curving around to the right, where the prospect

was intercepted by buildings. On the left side
was a sort of street, with the canal on one side
and a row of small shops and warehouses on
the other. ‘There were 4 great many men and
large boys standing idle in this street, and
Jounging around the posts which were set near
the edge of the canal. There were stalls near,
with nuts and oranges for sale ; and children



GETTING ON OARD. 49

pcan eitimantimarapacnaiaita AIEEE ———
The tow-path. A line boat. Flovr.
ae, aigenin arsenic aA

playing with each other, so near the brink of
the water, that Forester thought they must be
in danger of falling in. On the other side of
the canal there was a path, called the tow-path.
It was for the horses to go in when drawing the
boats along the canal.

While they stood thus upon the bridge, look-
ing down upon the water, suddenly Marco per-
ceived two horses coming ‘into view along the
curve of the tow-path, at a little distance below.
They were harnessed one before the other, and
were drawing along rope. A moment after-
ward, the bow of a canal-boat, which the hor-
ses were towing, appeared, and then the whole
length of the boat glided into view. It was not
by any means so handsome a boat as the packet
which they had taken passage in, and the deck
was covered with long rows of barrels.

“There comes a load of flour, 1 suppose,”
said Forester, “from the west.”

“Ts that flour ?” asked Marco.

«I presume so,” said Forester. “I know
that a very large part of the business of this
canal is transporting flour from the west. In
fact, that was one of the chief things it was
made for. There is a large tract of land in the
western part of this state, and all around Lake

D



50 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

Fa salatmsimeiieeemmneinicmlteelnr cee ne
Use of the canal. Toll. Passengers.

Erie, and the other lakes, which produces im-
mense quantities of wheat, and it was thought .
that, if they made this canal, the flour might be
brought down very easily.”

«Did the farmers make the canal ?”’

“No,” said Forester; “ the State of New
* York made it.”

« Why did they make it?” said Marco; “it
was not their flour that was to be brought
down.”

«No,—but then the government knew that it
would be of great advantage to all the farmers
of the state to have the means of bringing
their produce to market; and, besides, they
knew they could manage it so that the state
should get paid again for making the canal.”

« How ?” said Marco.

« By making every one pay toll that comes
through with a boat. This man, with his load
of flour has had to stop somewhere and pay toll
for every barrel. . So, if a man owns a packet-
boat, he has to pay toll for every passenger.”

“J should think the passengers ought to pay
toll themselves,” said Marco.

«They do, in fact, for the packet-man charges
them enough to pay their toll, and also to pay
him for carrying them in his boat. But it is



Getrinée on Boarp.: 51

Revenue. Railrvad system.



more convenient to have the packet-master pay
once for all, than it is for every man to stop
and pay his own toll.”

“Why, every man has to pay to the packet-
man,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester; “but then he does it
at the same time that he pays his own fare, set-
tling for both in one payment, so that it is no
additional trouble. So all the masters of the
boats have to pay tolls, I suppose, for all the
merchandise and all the passengers they carry ;
and all these tolls are collected together, and
paid to the government of the state, and they
make a very large sum every year. But it is
not so with the railroad.” |

“ Why not ?” said Marco.

“Why, the railroad was built by a company
of individuals, who put their money together,
and they built or bought the cars and engine
too. So that the same parties-which own the
railroad, own the cars and engine; and they
carry all the passengers and all the freight
themselves. They do not allow any body else
to run on their road. But the State of New
York does not own the canal-boats. It only
owns the canal itself, and it allows any body to
run boats on the canal, if they will only pay the



52 Marco ON THE Brie CANAL.

ape eaten
The street. Writing a letter.

tolls. There is no danger in having ever so
many boats go to and fro, because they can
pass by one another very easily, but different
trains of cars, owned by different parties, would
be always coming into collision.”

«| don’t see how the boats can pass by each
other,” said Marco. “I should think that the
horses and the ropes would get entangled.”

« No,” said Forester; “ they have no diffi-
culty ; you will see how they manage it, when
we go in our packet.”

Long before this time, the line boat, which
they had seen coming, had passed under the
bridge, and gone on out of sight. So Forester
and Marco turned away from the bridge, and
began to walk about the street.

Presently they came to a hotel near the rail-
road depot, and as they were rather tired of
walking, they went in and sat down. Marco
began to read a newspaper. Forester saw a
desk in one corner of the room where the stage-
books were kept, and he told Marco that he
was going there to write a letter.

Forester always carried two or three sheets
of white paper folded in his pocket-book, and
also a pen. He.had, besides, a little pocket
inkstand and wafer-box, so that he could write



Getrine on Boarp 53



-cspindilliatansiitiatnssisiaicipianiiiiinaiinih
A crowd. The baggage on the boat.
Ee ereretsaneaeemaenanisiaeeatitt eae

his letters at any time and place, when he had
a few minutes of leisure. He accordingly went
to the desk and remained there nearly half an
hour, writing, and then he folded up his paper
and came back and told Marco it was time for
them to go aboard of the packet.

When they came in sight of the bridge, they
found a large number of men and boys stand-
ing upon-it, looking over the railing, or sitting
upon the upper steps of the stairs.

« What can be the matter there ?” said For-
ester.

“] do not know,” said Marco.

They went on to the place and looked down
upon the canal. The packet was there, in the
same position in which they had left it. There
were, however, a great many more persons on
and around it, and the row of trunks and car-
pet-bags had now extended almost the whole
length of the boat, from stem to stern. Fores-
ter and Marco supposed that some difficulty or
trouble must have occurred to draw so great a
crowd, but on looking down upon the scene,
from the bridge, they could not perceive any
indications that any accident had happened,
and besides, now they were near, they per-
ceived that the crowd were calm and quiet,



54 Marco on THE Erie Canat.

ieprememnennrerr nn mer
Seats on the baggage. ~ The band of music.

looking as if they were waiting for something
yet to come, rather than interested in any thing
which was then taking place.

«It can not be,” said Forester, “that all these
people have come just to see the packet sail! I
should have supposed they would have seen a
packet sail often enough at Schenectady, by
this time.”

«“] do not know,” said Marco, shaking his
head, “I do not know any thing about i”

They passed through the crowd and went
down the steps, and then got upon the boat ;
though the space not occupied by trunks was
so fully occupied by men, that it was difficult
for them to move about. At length Forester
found a good place to sit down. The seat was
a trunk, and there was a roll of carpeting upon
the other baggage near, which was very good
to lean upon. Here Marco and Forester es-
tablished themselves, and their attention was
soon absorbed in the novelty and interest of the
busy scene around them.

They had not been many minutes in this po-
sition, when they saw several musical instru-
ments appear at the head of the flight of stairs,
which descended from the bridge. There was
a bugle, a trumpet, a clarionet, and drums.



Getrring on Boarp. |



eee CE LAD
Marco. Sudden movement,

ecm nC EEOC



ee

«Ah!? said Forester, “ here comes a band
of music. This explains the mystery. The
people have come to hear the music.”

The musicians came down the stairs, and
stepped over to the boat, and took their stations
at the bows. A moment afterward, the band
struck suddenly into a fine martial air, which
made Marco jump up from his seat, so as to get
a better position to see. He stood upon a box,
gazing alternately upon the trumpeter and the
drummer with great delight.

Forester might have been expected to have
participated, at least in some degree, in this
pleasure, for he liked martial music very much.
To Marco’s great surprise, however, he sudden:
ly rose, and taking Marco by the hand, said,

“ Marco, come with me.”

Iorester passed rapidly along, wherever he
could find an opening through the passengers
who thronged the deck, and clambering over
the baggage, jumped off the boat to the shore,
and began to work his way as fast as he could,
wherever he could find a passage through the
crowd, toward the stairs, and then up to the
bridge. Marco had no opportunity to ask him
where he was guing.

As soon as he reached the street, he said,

H



56 Marco ON THE Erie Cana.
eee enna aaa
The lost inkstand. Marco’s fears.

«{ have left my little inkstand at the tavern.
J shall just have time to run and get it. Come
ulong as fast as you can.”

« Well,” said Marco, “ only if they go off be
fore we get back, we shall lose our baggage.”

«[ do not think they will go off,” said Fores-
ter. “Itis five minutes of nine yet. Besides, I
presume they will play a little while before they
go. At any rate, I must have my inkstand.”

They hastened to the tavern. Marco re-
mained at the door while Forester went in.
He found his little inkstand on the desk where
he had left it. The cover was by the side of it.
He seized his lost property, and hastened back
to the door, screwing on the cover as he went.

« Have you got it ?” said Marco.

« Yes,” said Forester, “and now. we will go
back as fast as we can.”

«And if they have gone you will lose your
baggage.”

« No,” said Forester, “ for we can go by the
railroad, and so get to Utica before the packet,
and wait there till it comes, and thus get our
baggage. But I think we shall be in time.”

Forester was mistaken. As they looked to-
ward the bridge they saw the crowd running
across, from the lower side, where they had



Getrinea on Boarp. 57

ain nan STE
Running to the boat. A chase. The moon rising.

been standing, to the upper side, which indicated
very certainly that the packet was passing
under the bridge. This was confirmed by the
sound of the music, which they could now dis-
tinctly perceive was in motion, as the boat,
bearing the band upon the deck, was chiding
along upon the water.

Now it happened that just as Forester and
Marco were running thus toward the bridge,
they perceived another young man before them,
having a paper of some sort in his hand, who
appeared to be also making his way as fast as
possible toward the boat. The people on the
bridge, seeing at once that there were passen-
gers left behind, began immediately to shout to
the packet.

“ Ho !” said one.

“ Hold up !” said another.

“ Ho-a—H-e-y !” cried another.

If it had been daylight those on board the
packet would probably at once have perceived
the truth of the case, and the captain would
have ordered the boy, who was driving the
horses on the tow-path, to have stopped. But
it was now nine o'clock. There was a moon
rising, it is true, which furnished light enough
to enable those who were on the bridge to see



58 Marco ON THE Brie CaAnaAt.

aang ns) rca. I
Confusion. Chase continued. The wrong side.
ee .- etnias — ne —

Forester and the others running, but they could
not see them from the packet. And then the
loud notes of the music in a great measure
drowned the sound of the voices calling upon
the packet to stop. The boy who was driving,
looked around and slackened his pace, but he
had been going very swiftly before, and the
boat glided along rapidly with the momentum
‘t had already acquired. Some of the musi-
cians, hearing a hubbub, stopped playing ; others
went on. In fact, the boat and all connected
with it, assumed an expression of the utmost
uncertainty and indecision.

« We will run on and overtake them,’’ said
the young man with the paper. in his hand.
Forester supposed that he belonged to the boat,
and he and Marco followed him.

They ran down the bank of the canal on the
upper side of the bridge, where they had seen
the stalls of nuts and oranges. The canal was
here very wide, being expanded into a sort of
basin, and as the tow-path was on the opposite
bank, the packet was at a considerable distance
from them. If they had crossed the bridge be-
fore they descended to the bank of the canal,.it
woul] have been better, as this would have
browzht them upon the tow-path, where they



Getrring on Boarp. 59

i cnerneeiennemnce een LTO OOO
A mistake.

IRE OT Sane nmeee
would have been nearer the packet; and it
would have been easy for the helmsman to have
steered up near to the bank, so that they might
have- jumped on. But they had no time to
think of this, and thus it happened that they
found themselves running along the bank on the
wrong side of the canal.

The packet went slower and slower, and the —
music ceased. Forester and his party found
that they were getting before it.

« We will run on here to the next bridge,”
said the young man, “and then we can get
aboard.”

Forester had thus far supposed that this
young man was connected with the boat in
some way, and was only endeavoring to stop it,
in order that he and Marco might get on board.
When he found, however, that he was putting
himself to a great deal of trouble, he said,

“Oh, it’s of no great consequence, sir; we
don’t care particularly about getting on board.”

« But I want to get on board myself,” said the
young man.

“Do you belong to the boat ?” asked Ior-
ester.

“No,” said the young man; “but I want to
go on her. We will run along to this next



LLL
.

60 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

iinet AaeC EAD ONO
A plan proposed. The old bridge. Danger of collision.

bridge, and then we can jump down on the boat
when she passes under.” |

«J don’t know,” said ‘Forester ; «T expect
you are more used to jumping off from a bridge
upon a canal-boat, than we are.”

«0, you can do it,” said the young man,
“only you must be quick ; she'll go under like
a shot.” |

Forester had no idea of exposing either him-
self or Marco to any risk. Still they pressed
on, half running half walking, for a short dis-
tance farther, when they reached at length a long
wooden bridge, which here crossed the canal.
It was old, and high above the water ; and it
shook fearfully as they went over it. They had,
however, outstripped the packet, for when they
got upon the middle of the bridge, they saw it
quite behind them, but coming along slowly up
the canal.

There was also another boat just then coming
down the canal, and the horses of the two boats
passed each other under the bridge, just as For-
ester and Marco were going over above ; and
when they got down upon the tow-path, on the
other side, the two boats were just shooting
under the bridge, one in one direction and the
other in the other. Marco thought that they



Gettrine on Boarp. 61

a
A jump.

LD





would certainly come into collision ; and in fact
the tow-lines seemed to him already all en-
tangled together.

However, the boats did not interfere ; the
horses and the tow-lines cleared each other in a
moment, and the packet came gliding along, not
far from the bridge where Forester and Marco
were standing. The young man jumped on
board, and the people who were standing upon
the lower deck at the stern, held out their hands
to Forester, and said, “Jump! jump!”



JUMP! JUMP!



62 Marco oN THE Erie CAnaAt.

Canal-boat and steamboat.

1 a ate
They spoke eagerly, for the boat was then
receding again, and they knew that in a moment
;t would be -too late. Forester saw this too;
but he did not attempt to jump. He shook his
head, and said, ;
«Not I. Ihave no idea of getting into the
canal.” |

In fact, Forester felt very easy about his pas-
sage now, for he knew very well that after
showing so much eagerness to get passengers,
the man who had charge of the. packet would
not go off and leave him and Marco, when it
was so easy to slacken their speed and let them
get in. If a man arrives at a landing just too
late for the steamboat, his case is generally
hopeless ; for a steamboat is so large and un-
wieldy, and it moves, when it is once put in
motion, with so great a momentum, that it is
seldom worth while to stop for a single passen-
ger. The case is very different with a packet
on the canal.

As Forester expected, the helmsman put his
helm off to the farther side of the boat, and this
caused the bows to turn in toward the shore.
It came so near that Forester and Marco step-
ped on board without any difficulty. They
made their way as well as they could, among



Gertine on Boarp. 63

~_—

Safe on board.

the men who were still standing upon the deck,
to their former position by the roll of carpeting,
where they took their seats again. The boy
whipped up his horses, the musicians com-
menced playing the Grand March in Abaellino,
the boat began to glide swiftly along, washing
the banks with the swell, which followed in her
stern,—and behold, Marco and Forester fairly
embarked on the canal.



64 Marco oN THE Erte Canat.

ecient EE,
The scencry. Lights coming.

Cuoarter LV.
Nicat.

HE first sensations which Marco and For-
ester experienced were delightful. They
passed almost immediately from the suburbs of
the town, into a delightful country, and they
found themselves gliding swiftly along among
groves and beautiful green fields; the moon-
light shedding a soft and gentle radiance over
the whole scene. The tones of the music re-
sounded loud and full in the still evening air, |
and echoed from the hills. The smooth tow-
path lay along the side of the canal, a few inch-
es above the surface of the water. Beyond it
was a fence, and the full moon which was just
rising on the opposite side of the sky, cast a
shadow of the men, standing on the deck, upon
the fence, where they glided along noiselessly
like a group of apparitions.

In a few moments, Marco saw before him two
bright lights, which seemed to be in motion.
They were approaching. He soon saw that
they were lights in the bow of another boat,



Nienr. 65

Load of lumber. Process of passing.

coming to meet them. Now he thought that
he should have an opportunity to see how one
boat could get by another.

The boat that was coming was a line-boat,
that is, one made to carry merchandise. It was
loaded with lumber. It was drawn by two hor-
ses. The line-boats are usually drawn by two
horses, while the packets have three. As the
horses were at some distance before the boats,
they would necessarily meet upon the tow-
path considerably before the boats would meet
upon the canal.

As the two sets of horses approached, the
line-boat horses turned off the path a little, on
the side of the path farthest from the canal, and
then stopped a moment so as to allow the pack-
et-horses to go by them. The horses were
stopped a monient, in order to let the tow-rope,
which they were pulling, fall down upon the
path, so that the packet-horses could step over
it easily. Then, when the boats approached
each other, the helmsman on board the line-
boat steered his boat out, away from the tow-
path, and the helmsman of the packet steered
his in, toward the tow-path. By this means the
rope of the line-boat came exactly across in the
way where the packet was to go, and it seemed

E



66 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

The boy. Management of the rope.

as if it was going to cut across the packet's
bows. But just before the bows of the packet
came against the rope, the boy who was driving
the line-boat horses, stopped a moment, and as
the line-boat kept moving on after the horses
had stopped, it caused the tow-rope to drop
down into the water, and it sunk so low that
the packet-boat sailed directly over it, without
difficulty. The boy began to drive his horses
along as soon as the rope was fairly under the
boat, and Marco could hear it rubbing along
the bottom of the boat, and it came up into the
air again as soon as it escaped at the stern.
Then the boats were clear of each other, and
each pursued its way.

Thus it was in all cases, when the packet
met the line-boats. They would always check
their horses, so as to let that part of the rope
which was over the tow-path fall down upon
the ground, and that part which was over the
canal, sink into the water. By this means, the
packet-horses could step over the part which
would otherwise have been in their way, and
the packet itself could sail over that part which
would have been in its way. |

In case the driver of the line-boat horses
should not stop his horses quick enough, there



Nigu®. 67

eee
A danger. Mode of guarding against it. Cool air.
Pitt ET reemenmnerenronnt

might have been danger that his tow-rope
would have gone above instead of going under
the packet-boat. This would have been very
disastrous in its effects, for the rope would have
been drawn along with great force over the
deck of the packet, and perhaps pull the pas-
sengers and the baggage off the decks into the
water. To prevent this, there was attached to
the bows of the packet, at the top, a hooked
knife, shaped like a sickle, with its edge turned
toward the front. If now the tow-line of a
boat coming the other way were to catch so
high that it would slip up instead of down, this
hook would catch it and cut it off. Forester
explained this to Marco, and Marco thought it
was a very ingenious contrivance. He could
not help wishing that a rope would get caught
so, in order that he might see it cut off. But
no such case occurred. In fact, the line-boats
are very careful to let the rope drop down soon
enough. If they are not, their rope gets cut off,
and they have to tie it; and thus in a short
time it gets full of knots.

Forester and Marco after this remained for
some time upon the deck, watching the changes
in the scenery, and listening to the music, until
at length they found that the evening air began



-

68 Marco on THe Eris CANAL.
ee EEA SEIS Lag”
Taking the pay. Settling the accounts.

Se te
to feel cool and chilly, and they then concluded
to go into the cabin.

The cabin was nearly full. A great many
men were seated on the cushioned seats, which
extended along the sides. Others were upon
stools by the tables, and some were standing.
The captain, who was a very young looking
man, not much older than Forester, was just
taking his place at the little portable desk
which was upon one of the tables, to receive
the money from his passengers. Those whose
names had been already put down, paid first,
and then the others came up one by one, and
the captain entered their names as fast as he
received their money. The passengers were
all talking about the crowded state of the boat,
and wondering what they were going to do in
the night. They said that it would not be pos-
sible to prepare places enough for them all to
sleep. Forester and Marco both thought, from
the conversation, that it was unusual to have so
large a number of passengers.

It took a great while to receive all the mo-
ney. There wasa little calculation to be made
in each case, and the change to be given. For
the passengers were not all going to Utica. |
Some were going to stop at Canajoharie, some



Niauat. , | 69



An alarm. The lock.



at Little Falls, and some at other places along
the canal, and the captain charged each passen-
ger a fare in proportion to the distance which
he was to go.

While the captain was transacting his busi-
ness in the cabin with his passengers, Marco
and Forester suddenly perceived that the boat
began to be thrown, at once, into a state of vi-
olent agitation. It rose and fell, and thumped
against one side and the other, and Marco could
hear a strange rushing sound as of water dash-
ing against it. Marco was startled. His first
idea was, that the boat had burst her boiler, but
this feeling was momentary ; for he recollected
in an instant that a canal-boat had not any
boiler.

“ What’s the matter now ?” said Marco, lock-
ing alarmed. .

“TI don’t know,” said Forester. So saying,
he began .to open the window to see.

“ We are only going through a lock,” said a
gentleman who sat near him.

«A lock!” said Marco, “let us go and see.”

By this time, Forester had opened the win-
dow. The sash was made to slide along hori-
zontally, that is, to one side, and not upward
like the window of a house. Outside of the



70 Marco on THE Erie Canal

i
Rising of the boat. Cause of it.

window were the red blinds which have already
been described. Forester pushed open one of
these, and it went against a wet stone wall.
The boat was moving restlessly about, and
by watching a moment they perceived that if
was rising higher and higher, as they could
see very plainly by the seams and stones of the
wall. At length they reached the top of the
wall, and then Forester could open the blind
wide. He perceived a sort of street, which ex-
tended back from the top of the wall, with some
buildings on the opposite side of it. Marco
was very much surprised at this process, though
Forester knew before that in passing through a
tock, from a lower to a higher level on a canal,
the boat first went into the lock, which was a
narrow enclosure, surrounded on all sides with
high stone walls, and that then water was let in,
which buoyed the boat up to the higher level ;
after which the gates were opened and the boat
was ready to sail on. |
He was not, therefore, surprised to find the
boat rising, though, as he had never been
through a lock before, ne was much interested
in watching the effects. A moment after the
boat had risen to its proper level, it began to
move on again, along the canal, just as before.



Niear. ;

ical

— ED
The deck. A bridge.

Then Forester drew the blind back and shut the
window, as the night air was very cool.

“J wonder what has become of our music,”
said Marco ; “let us go and see.”

« You may go,” said Forester.

So Marco went up to the deck; but the
musicians were nowhere to be seen. Marco
saw, however, at a short distance before him, a
bridge leading across the canal. It was so low
that it seemed to Marco that there was only
just room for the boat to pass under. He
thought that all the men and all the baggage
would be swept off the deck by it. He accord-
ingly hastened back to the stern, and got down
upon the lower |
deck, where he «|
could be safe. A a
moment afterward, ‘Svs
just as the boat @Â¥ a
reached the bridge, Seaaiifgae
the man at the helm22=4
called out, in a loud — Wiseagy
voice, yi

« Bridge !”

Instantly all the
men on the deck
bowed their heads BRIDGE,









ene

ee eee fay Sy, .
s are
| (oy Tai ee

f\|



72 Marco on THE Erie CaAnaAtL.

The valley of the Mohawk. The cabin again.

and to Marco’s great surprise they glided
under it in safety, and the heads all came up
together again, as soon as the boat emerged on
the other side. Marco was very much sur-
prised, for it seemed certain, when he first saw
the bridge, that it was as low as the top of the
boat. This was an optical illusion. Marco
afterward observed a great number of other
bridges, as the packet approached them, and
they all appeared much lower than they really
were.

Marco perceived that they were sailing up
the valley of the Mohawk, as Forester had be-
fore said they would do, when they were talking
about their intended excursion at Albany. He
very often had a view of the river itself, from
his place on the top of the boat. Still more
frequently he could see the broad meadows
which were upon each side of the river, and
which were bounded in the distance by verdant
hills.

Marco soon felt that it was cold, and so he
went into the cabin again. He sat down upon
a stool, and began to listen to some conversa-
tion between Forester and one,or two othe.
gentlemen who were sitting there. He was
soon interrupted, however, for thé ‘captain, after



Niceurt. 73

“Turned out of the cabin. The bridge.
iii.





having finished receiving his payments, and
putting away his money, rose and said,

«“ Now, gentlemen, if you will let us have the
cabin, we will make up the berths.”

« We shall have to take the tow-path, then,”
said one of the men who were,sitting there,
« for there is no room for us on deck.”

The passengers seemed rather reluctant to go
on deck. However, a number of them soon
rose and moved slowly out of the cabin. Some
of them went up on the upper deck; others
crowded around the helmsman at the stern.
Forester and Marco went to the stern, because
they were a little afraid of the bridges. By
standing at the stern, they were on the lower
deck, and their heads were more evidently safe.
There would have been little danger on the
upper deck, however, for the helmsman always
called out “ Bridge,” whenever the boat ap-
proached a bridge; so that even if a person
should happen to be looking the other way, he
would not come upon the danger without warn-
ing.

~The helmsman found it somewhat difficult to
see which way to steer, there were so many
persons standing up before him on the deck.
At length he said, in a gentle voice,



74 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

The helmsman’s advice. Advice disregarded.

“The boat would go better, if the gentlemen
would go farther forward. She would not draw
so much swell after her.”

Marco and Forester looked at the swell. It
formed a great wave, which seemed to dash
continually along the banks of the canal, just
behind the boat. They understood that the
helmsman meant that by crowding into the back
part of the boat, the passengers caused that part
to sink deep into the water, and thus to increase
the swell.

“Tt makes her bows rise right up,” said the
helmsman, speaking to one of the*hands belong-
ing to the boat, who stood near him.

The passengers, however, paid no attention
to these intimations of the steersman. Forester
thought that it was better to have the boat draw
a great swell than that he and Marco should get
knocked off into the canal, by a bridge. What
reasons influenced the others are uncertain, but
none of them moved.

They all stood in this manner, almost in per-
fect silence, for about a quarter of an hour.
Now and then, two or three who were standing
near together, held a little conversation, in an
undertone, and frequently Marco pointed out
something to Forester’s notice. At length the



Nieut. 75

om eeascccasstteiniasaninncnssinaliaia iA LET ae
Choosing berths. The curtain. Tiers of berths.

attention of the company was aroused by hear-
ing a voice coming out from among the persons
who were standing around the door of the cabin.
It called out,

“Mr. Forester.”

“ Here,” said Forester.

“Come forward, Mr. Forester, and choose
your berth,” said the voice.

So Forester made his way, as well as he
could, into the cabin, Marco following him.
Forester pushed forward rapidly to the upper
end of the cabin, and putting his hand upon a
berth, said, “I choose this, —_—

While he was walking forward, Marco had
time to observe the changes which had taken
place in the cabin while he and Forester had
been out. The curtain was drawn before the
ladies’ saloon, so that that part of the cabin was
now cut off from view. Over the place where
the seats had been, that is, along the sides of the
cabin, were rows of berths, just wide enough for
a man to lie in, and just far enough apart for a
man to creep in between them. There were
three in each tier; an upper, a middle, and a
lower one. Forester chose the middle one, in
the tier which was nearest the ladies’ saloon.

“Very well, sir,” said the captain, “ you had



96 Marco on tue Erie CANAL.

Mr Baron. Getting into bed.

better get right into it, before any body else gets
it.” Then, looking at his paper again, the cap-
tain moved toward the door of the cabin and
called out, in a loud voice,

“ Mr. Baron.”

Marco and Forester both laughed, and For-
ester, putting his hand upon Marco’s shoulder,
said, “ Here.”

The captain smiled too when he found that
the Mr. Baron, whose name he had announced
so pompously, was only Marco.

“Very well,” said he, “let him take the berth
right over you. He is young and spry, and can
climb.” |

“Shall I undress myself?” said Marco to
Forester, in a low tone.

“No,” said Forester, “only take off your
shoes and hat.”

Marco had some difficulty in climbing up into
his berth, and Forester had still more in getting
into his. They found that the berth consisted
of a piece of canvas stretched across a frame,
with one sheet and one coverlid upon it. There
was a little square pillow at the head, smaller
and thinner than any thing that Marco had ever
seen for a pillow before.

In the mean time the captain went on, call-



Nigar. 77

Close quarters. Merriment. Cabin full.

ing the other names in the order in which they
stood upon his list ; and as fast as the men were
called they chose their berths and got into them.

The passengers seemed very much disposed
to be dissatisfied at the closeness of their quar-
ters. The frames which supported the berths
appeared to be very frail, and they creaked and
settled as the occupants got into them, as if they
were coming down. One man, who was in the
middle berth, opposite to Forester’s, across the
cabin, began to punch the lodger who was
above him with his knee; for the berths were
so near together that.a very slight flexure of any
of the limbs of one in a lower berth, brought an
elbow or a knee into contact with the under
side of the bed above. “Lie still, down: there,”
said the lodger above. “Then keep off of me,”
said the lodger below. This dialogue was fol-
lowed with a loud peal of laughter from all
around.

In the mean time, the cabin began to get
very full, as more and more names were Called
and the persons answering to them came in
from the deck. ‘The voices became loud, and
jocose remarks and laughter broke forth in
every direction ; and thus before long the cabin
became full of confusion, frolic, and fun.



78 Marco on THE Wikit CANAL.





Noise and confusion.



Sez



GOING TO BED.

Marco lay still, enjoying the scene very much
He listened to hear the various sounds which
came to his ear from every part of the cabin
Every now and then, the loud voice of the cap-
tain, calling out, Mr. Green, or Mr. Wittiams,
or some other passenger's name, rose above the
general din. A great deal of the noise was
confused and indistinct ; but Marco could get
catches of the conversation, which, as it came
to his ear from various parts of the cabin,
sounded somewhat as follows :



Niaut. 79

ee ED
General din. Marco asleep.

“I wish I had a string to tie round my hat
and hang it up; for there is no place to put it
‘down anywhere.”—* Captain, what are you
going to do with the rest of us that have not
got any berths ?”—“ Oh, what a pillow! ’tisn't
bigger than my hand.”"—“ Do you kick, sir, in
your sleep ?”’—“ Kick! yes, sir.”—“ For if you
do, I don’t want you over my head.”’—* Cap-
tain, where shall I put my boots ?”—“ Mr.
Bevpen!” “Here.” “Choose your berth, sir ;
—they’re all taken but that one.” — Gentle-
men, don’t make such a noise,—I want to go to
sleep.” —“ My pillow is so thin, captain, that it
makes my head lower than my heels.”

These and similar sounds grew louder and
more confused, the more Marco listened to
them. He was at first much amused ; but he
was tired and sleepy. He shut his eyes, and
once er twice almost lost himself in slumber.
At length he heard a peculiar thump and a dash
of water about the boat. He aroused himself
and looked up. The noise which he heard was
evidently without. It was the noise made by
the boat passing through a lock. As soon as
Marco understood this, he was surprised to find
that the cabin, within, was entirely still.

He put his head out over the edge of his



80 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

ill ccc Ce
The calin floor. Midnight. Morning,
ee ceca aascA Aa

berth and looked down. The floor was entire-
ly covered with sleepers. They were lying
across the cabin, with their heads upon the
cushions, which had been taken off the seats.
Their heads were close to the line of berths on
one side, and their feet to those on the other.
The width of the boat was just enough to let
them lie so. They were close together, and the
range extended through the whole length of the
cabin, They all appeared to be sleeping qui-
etly. Marco listened, and when the agitation
of the boat, occasioned by its passing the lock,
ceased, he could hear no sound except the occa-
sional tread of footsteps upon the deck above
him.

“Jt must be midnight,” said Marco to him-
self, “and I have been asleep all this time.”

The next thing Marco was conscious of was
hearing a voice on the other side of the cabin,
saying,

“Come, Charles, get up.”

He opened his eyes, and he saw a man stand.
ing before a berth, trying to awake the person
who was occupying it.

« What do you want ?” said the man whom
he called Charles, in a sleepy voice.

«Come, the captain says we must get up.”



Nigar. §1

_

Sunrise. Toilet operations.

“What for ?” said Charles.

“ Because, it’s morning.”

Here Marco turned and looked out of the
window which was opposite to his berth. It
was indeed morning. The sun was gilding the
tops of the trees. Just then he saw Forester
get out of his berth, and so Marco came down
from his too.

When Forester and Marco had put on their
shoes and hats, they went out of the cabin.
They found the men who had preceded them
in getting up, washing themselves from a basin
which was placed upon a little bench, near the
place where the steersman stood. There was
a looking-glass too, hanging in a place where
there was just room enough for one person to
stand. There was a comb and _a hair-brush
by the side of the glass. There was a door
which opened into a little kitchen in that part
of the boat, where a black cook seemed to be
getting some breakfast. Marco looked at all
these things with great interest ; and even For-
ester regarded them with some curiosity, but he
did not seem to feel much personal interest in
these means and facilities for supplying his
usual morning wants. Marco, too, as soon as
he had once seen these novelties, began to look

F





s2 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

A new plan.

RE care eerentnieeereensinneret.
rather sober. It was cold and chilly outside,
and every thing within the cabin looked cheer-
less and uncomfortable ; for the room was full
of berths and beds, and of persons getting up
from them. In a word, both Marco and For-
ester began to think that they had quite enough:
of traveling on the canal.

At length Forester said to Marco, in a low
tone, as they stood together looking upon the
Mohawk river, which at this place was in full
view before them, |

«“|’ve been thinking, Marco, that we had bet-
ter go ashore at Canajoharie, and take the rail.
road for the rest of the way.” |

« Well,” said Marco.

“Jt is twenty or thirty miles yet to Little
Falls, and it will take us five or six hours to go
there in the packet. But in about an hour we
shall get to Canajoharie, and then we can get
out and ramble around till the cars come along.
Then we can go quick and pleasantly to Little
Falls.” .

« Well,” said Marco ; “ but how do you know
that the cars go through Canajoharie ?”’

« Why, I know that the railroad runs up the
valley of the Mohawk, and so it can not be far
from the canal and river. I think it will be



Nicut. &3

een AE OOD
Canajoharie.

pleasanter to go that way. And, besides, we
can then get a good comfortable breakfast at a
hotel.”

So this plan was agreed upon, and Marco
and Forester jumped off the boat at Canajo-
harie.



84 Marco on tHe Erie CANAL.
cere LLL LLL

Looking at the map.

CHAPTER V.
CANAJOHARIE.

7. before the boat reached Canajoharie,

it had to pass through a lock. Forester
saw this lock represented on the profile of the
canal, which was drawn on a corner of his
map. It was plain from the profile that the
lock was only a short distance from the village,
and so Forester proposed to Marco that they
should get out at the lock, and walk the rest of
the way along the bank of the canal.

“« Well,” said Marco, “1 should like that.”

« By this means,” said Forester, “ we shall
see the place a little better ; and, besides, we
can warm ourselves by the exercise of walk-
ing.”

So Forester got his carpet-bag and umbrella,
and placed them near the stern of the boat, and
he and Marco, taking their stand there, watched
the progress of the boat as it glided along to-
ward the lock.

« And now,” said Forester, “ we shall have



CANAJOHARIE. | 85

oceania eT
A lock. Mode of passing it. Marco’s observations.

an opportunity to see exactly how they manage
the business of passing through a lock.”

They saw that as the canal approached the
lock, it suddenly narrowed and entered between
two high walls of stone, so near each other that
there was just room for the boat to go in. This
was the lock, and at the farthest end of it were
two great wooden gates, which closed the pas-
sage-way, and Marco did not see how they
were to get through. }

Beyond these gates Marco could see the
canal again, but there the water stood at a
much higher level than it did on that part of the
canal over which the packet had been sailing.
The water seemed to press heavily against the
gates, and some of it spouted through the crev-
‘ces. The horses trotted along the bank till
they came to the lock, and the steersman
steered the boat, so as to carry it exactly in.
It seemed as if it was going with all its force
against the gates at the head of the lock. In
fact, Marco thought it must necessarily do so,
for he did not see any possible way to stop it.
If it had been a steamboat it might have been
stopped by reversing the wheels, but there were
no wheels to be reversed in the case of the
packet.



86 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

DE aac RSI acre gen Te
The spring bolt. The tow-rope.

At this instant, Marco observed a man stand-
ing near the bows, at the place where the tow-
rope was fastened to a sort of iron staple,
which was of a very curious construction. He
had noticed this staple before, and wondered
why it was contrived so curiously. He did not °
see why the rope was not fastened to a simple
ring. Now, however, he saw the reason ; for
the man just touched a spring with his foot, and
immediately the rope was loosed from its at-
tachment, and fell off into the water; and as
the horses were still going on, they soon drew
the rope out upon the bank, leaving the boat
entirely free.

As soon as the man had liberated this rope in
this manner, Marco saw that he hastily caught
up another large rope, which was lying coiled
up upon the bows. One end of this rope was
fastened to a staple, in the bow of the boat.
The staple, which the end of the tow-rope was
fastened to, was at a little distance from the
bows, near the side of the boat. The man took
the end of the bow-line and clambered up with
it upon the high stone wall, which formed the
side of the lock ; for by this time the packet was
gliding along smoothly into the lock. He ran
forward with his rope, and wound it twice round



CANAJOHARIE. 87
ON

Boat secured. The gates. Levers.
ee EE





a strong post which was set in the masonry in
a proper place for this purpose, and so he easily
checked the boat, just before it would have
come into collision with the gates. Then, by
means of this rope, he held the boat in its place,
so near the gates that the water which spouted
through the crevices, threw its spray over and
upon the little low deck which was formed at
the bows.

As soon as the boat was secured in this posi-_
tion, a man who was standing upon the bank
went to the stern of the boat, and began to shut
two great gates which were at that end of the
lock. Marco had not observed these gates be-
fore. They had been laid wide open, in order
to let the packet go in; and the walls had been
built so that the gates, when opened wide, fitted
so exactly into recesses in the masonry made to
receive them, that Marco did not notice them
at all. But now they attracted his attention
very particularly, as the man was slowly swing-
ing them to, by means of a long timber, which
projected over upon the ‘land side, and which
operated as a lever. When these gates were
shut, Marco perceived that the packet was
closely shut in at the bottom of a sort of deep
box, just big enough to hold it, and with walls



88 Marco .ons THE Erie CANAL.



Boat in the lock.



of solid masonry all around it.. The deck of

the packet was considerably below the top of
the lock.



> =
' — > a
——— NHVSLRTS.Sa7

THE LOCK.

Forester and Marco climbed up from the
deck to the top of the wall, and then walked off
upon the bank. There was a man just going
toward the upper gates. He moved along iron
lever, which was attached to an axis that passed
down through the stone work, and this seemed
to open suddenly a passage for the water, down



CANAJOHABRIE. 89:

Rushing uf the water. Effects of it.

_

whing the water, 0
near the bottom of the gates. For Marco ob-
served that there was immediately a great
foaming and boiling under the bows of the
canal-boat, as if the water was rushing furiously
in from under the gates. The man moved an-
other iron lever, and afterward two more, and
then Marco could hear and see the water pour
in with great force under the bows of the boat.

Now, as these lower gates were shut, the
water which was thus admitted through the
upper gates, from that part of the canal which
was on ahigher level, could not escape into that
part which was lower, but’ remained in the lock ;
and thus the water in. the lock was rapidly
rising, buoying the boat up with it. The water
rushed in, too, with so much force through the
opening in the upper gates, that it dashed
tumultuously along the sides of the boat, and
caused it to oscillate te one side and the other,
and to knock against the sides of the lock.
This was the agitation which Forester and
Marco had perceived at the time when they
were passing through the first lock, when they
were in the cabin.

After a short time the boat was raised quite
high in the lock, and Forester and Marco found
that the water was getting to be nearly as high



909 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

inate LLL SOT
Upper gates opened. A difficulty. Line-boat,
aaa npnmmtadaneecenenei ene

in the lock as it was in the higher part of the
canal above. When, at length, it was exactly
at the same level, the man swung open the
great gates, at the upper end, and then the tow-
line was fastened to the boat again, and the
packet was drawn along. A great many of the
passengers got off when Forester and Marco
did, and stood upon the bank, watching the
operation. They now jumped on again, though
the boat was now elevated so much above its
former level, that they had to jump up pretty
high. They were soon all in their places, and
the boat glided away again on its voyage.

« Now,” said Marco, “how are they going to
get all that water out of the lock, so as to let the
next boat in?”

« Let us wait a moment,” said Forester, “ and
perhaps we shall see.”

It happened that just as Forester said this, he
observed a line-boat coming down the canal.
It was very near, being just at that moment
about passing the packet, which was going
away from the lock. The upper gates of the
lock were of course open, the packet having
just sailed out of them, so that the way was
open for the line-boat to sailin. The steersman
steered the boat in, and a man from the bows



CANAJIOHARIE. 91

ssneiaaeicacteneenae nine O
It passes the lock. Explanation.

neces OT
of the boat cast off the tow-line by pressing the
spring with his foot, just as had been done in
the case of the packet. He then jumped off the
boat and secured the bows by a strong rope,
which he wound once or twice around a post
that was near the lower gates.

The line-boat was now in the lock, just as the
packet had been, only it was in a reversed po-
sition, the line-boat having her bows turned to-
ward the lower gates, as she was going down
the canal. As soon as she was secured in this
position, a man on the banks shut the great
gates, at the upper end of the lock. As the
water was on the same level on each side of
these gates, the gates moved easily through it
into the position necessary for closing the pas-
gage. The man then went to the lower gates,
and by means of some long iron levers, which
were fixed there, similar to those which Marco
had observed before, in connection with the
upper gates, he opened a passage for the water
through the bottom of the lower gates. This
let the water off from the lock into the lower
canal.

Of course, the surface of the water in the
lock rapidly subsided, and the boat settled with
it. Marco saw plainly that they were going by



92 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

a ceeeeceeaeninaeeinet AC SAGA
Spouting of the water. The line-boat.

Ee ene
this means to let the line-boat down to the level
of the canal below.

«“ There,” said Forester, “you see how it is
done. When the water is entirely down, they
will open the lower gates, and let the horses
draw the boat out.”

It was as Forester had said. The water
subsided rapidly, and the boat settled down with
it until it was on a level with the lower part of
the canal. The upper gates were shut all the
time, so that no water could come in from
above, except a little which spouted through
the crevices in the gates. Then the man
opened the lower gates, and then the way was
clear for the line-boat to be drawn along on its
way.

The line-boat was somewhat different in its
structure from the packet-boat. It had one or
two windows near the bows, and one or two
near the stern, but there were no windows
along the sides. The reason was, that there
was not a cabin for passengers extending
through the whole length of the boat, as in the
packet. For the line-boat was designed to
carry merchandise, not passengers. Therefore,
snstead of a cabin in the center of the boat, there
was a sort of hold to contain merchandise, such



CANAJOHARILE. - 93
enn”

Passengers in the line-boats.

oe naleimetainealnnane
as boards, or staves, or barrels of flour; and
such things, of course, needed no windows.
There were no trunks upon the deck of the
line-boat, but instead of them, there were three
or four rows of barrels, which Forester said he
had no doubt were filled with flour, going to
New York. There was a woman and a little
girl sitting upon stools upon the little low deck
near the bows. The woman was knitting.
Forester said he supposed they were passengers.

«Then they have some passengers on board
the line-boats,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “a few. It is cheaper
traveling in the line-boats ; and so some. passen-
gers go in them.”

When the line-boat sailed away, Forester and
Marco walked along the canal toward the vil-
lage of Canajoharie, which they saw at a little
distance before them.

« Now you see,” said Forester, “ one reason
why they need feeders for the canal. Every
time that a boat goes up or down, they have to
lose a lock full of water.”

« No,” said Marco, “ they do not lose it, they
only let it go from one part of the canal to an-
other.”

“Still they must lose it, for there must be



94 -Marco on THE Erie CAnat.

secrete iataamatnteeaeseccinscsinisiniseaaaiiniaisiasana nie
Loss of water. Weirs. A weir passed,
re ED

some place for it to run off, out of the lower
part of the canal; and they must also get a
supply somewhere to take its place in the upper
part.”

“Why must they let it run off?” said Marco,

“If they did not,” said Forester, “after a
while the lower part of the canal would get full
and run over, and when the water overflowed,
it would wash away the banks, and make a
breach.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “so it would.”

“So they have places made in the banks of
the canal, a little lower than the tow-path, with
an edge formed of stone or of timber, so that
the water can not wear it away ; and they let
the waste water run over these.”

“J should like to see one,” said Marco.

«JT saw one this morning,” said Forester. —

«“ Where was I ?” asked Marco.

“ You were in the cabin,” said Forester.

“Why did not you call me to come up and
see it ?” said Marco.

« Because, we had got nearly by it before I
saw it,” replied Forester ; “ and I knew that if I
went to call you we should have passed it en-
tirely before you could get up on the deck.”

“ What sort of a place was it ?” asked Marco.



CANAJONARIE. 95

a setpnetememmetatate eaten AE
Description of it. Going to Canajoharie.

«Why, it was a place,” replied Forester,
«where the bank of the canal was made of
timbers instead of earth, and it was a little
lower than the rest of the bank, so that the
water ran over it all the time, and fell down
upon a wooden platform below, and then it ran
off into a brook. I believe such a place is called
a waste weir.”

Marco said that he wished he could see a
waste weir very much, and Forester said per-
haps they might come to one on their way to
Canajoharie.

« At any rate,” said Forester, “ we will no-
tice the canal wherever we see it until we find
one. I presume there are a great many along
the canal at different distances ; for it is very
important to keep the water at about the same
level. So they have feeders to keep the water
from getting too low, and waste weirs to pre-
vent its rising too high.”

After this, Forester and Marco walked along
a few minutes in silence, and at length Marco
said, |
_ « What are we going to do, cousin Forester,
when we get to Canajoharie i

« The first thing,” said Forester, “is to find a
tavern, and get some breakfast.”



96 Marco on THE Erte CANAL.
i EER IE

Plans formed. A bridge.

cima OOO

« And what next ?”

«The next thing is to find the railroad sta-
tion, and to inquire what time the cars come
along.”

« How do you know that any cars are coming
along ?”

« Because,” said Forester, “1 know that the
train leaves Schenectady every morning at nine
o’clock, and that it goes through in six hours ;
and I see by my memorandum that Canajoharie
is about half way from Schenectady to Utica ;
so I presume that a train will come along here,
about twelve o'clock.”

“ And how do you know that the railroad
passes anywhere near here ?”’

« Because,” said Forester, “1 know that it
comes up the valley of the Mohawk. The rail-
road goes up on one side of the river, and the
canal on the other.”

« Then how are we going to get across the
river ?” asked Marco.

“There must be some way to get across,”
said Forester. “ Perhaps there is a bridge.”

There was abridge. It soon came into view.
It was covered with a roof, and the sides were
boarded up. It looked rather old. There wasa
village on the canal side, where they then were,



CANAJOHARIE. 97

i eel ania ET
Views. The toll gate.

8 ee EE
and another village on the other side. They
could see both villages as they walked along
between the canal and the river.

“Which village shall we go to?” said I"or-
ester.

“IT do not know,” said Marco.

“The one on this side looks the largest, but
the one on the other side will be nearer the
railroad,” said Forester.

“Then let us go to the other side,” said
Marco. “Besides, I should like to see the
bridge.”

Forester concluded to adopt this plan, and
they turned off toward the bridge, when they
got opposite to it. When they got in, under
the roof, they saw before them at the opposite
end, that the passage was closed by a great
gate. When they reached the gate, a young
woman came out from a door.in a building at-
tached to the bridge.

“T rather think there is a toll to pay?” said
Marco.

«A toll!” repeated Forester. “ This does not
look much like a toll-bridge.”

All this time the girl stood still before them,
looking at them with an expression of curiosity
and interest in her countenance. |

G



98 Marco on tHE Erie CANAL.

View of the railroad.

“Ts there a toll

———_





ithe money, and
| while paying the
il| toll, he asked her
= where the railroad
TOLL TO PAY. was.
“Right down
here, under the bridge,” said the girl.

So she opened a small gate in the large one,
and let Forester and Marco go through. As
soon as they came out into the open air, they
saw the iron lines of the railroad, laid along
upon the level ground, near the shore of the
river far below them. There was a flight of
steps to go down. Forester asked a man who
was standing there, at what time the train
would come along from Schenectady. He told
them it would come ut half-past eleven. Then
Forester and Marco went up ‘he hill to the vil-
lage, where they stopped at a tavern, and got a
good breakfast.



Honesty. 99
so decades

cciiiiiuiiiaslicdingsiniaiamiasi
Arches. Woman weeding.



Cuaprer VI.

Honesty.

FTER Forester and Marco had finished
their breakfast, they rambled about for a
time to see the village of Canajoharie. They
were very much interested in examining some
stone arches on the canal side of the river.
These arches were evidently part of an unfin- |
ished work, which was then in process of build-
ing, though Forester could not tell exactly what
the work was.

At one place Marco and Forester saw @
woman weeding in a garden. They stopped
and looked over the fence. The corn in this
garden was much higher than the other corn
which Marco and Forester*had seen along the
canal; and as Forester thought the woman
seemed pleased to have them notice her garden, —
he said to her, “ Your corn has grown very
well.”

The woman looked up and smiled, and said
something in reply ; but neither Forester nor
Marco could understand her. It seemed to be



100 Marco on tHE Erie CANAL.

The house, German woman.



only a single word that she spoke, but they
could not understand what the word was; so,
after looking at the garden a minute or two
longer, they walked on.

They came, a moment afterward, to the house
to which the garden belonged. There was a
little shop in one corner of the house ; over the
door was a sign, with a boot and a shoe paint-
ed upon it, and also some words which Forester
thought were Dutch or German.

« Ah!” said Forester, “I presume that woman
is a German, and does not understand English ;
and so she did not know what I said when |
spoke to her. I recollect now that I have heard
that there are a great many Germans in the
valley of the Mohawk, and that some of these
green meadows are called German flats.”

Forester and Marco walked along, and being
at length tired of rambling, they concluded to
go to the railroad station, and to wait there
until the cars should come. They accordingly
went down the stairs at the end of the bridge,
to the broad and level area which extended up
and down the river, under the end of the bridge,
on which the tracks of the railway were laid.

There were three or four tracks at this place,
as is usual at stopping-places .on railroads.



HoneEstTyY. 101

“The railroad. The gravel train.

SO
This made the road very wide. On the side
opposite to the river, the land rose abruptly to-
ward the village. On the other side there was.
a narrow space of level land, and then there
was a rocky descent down toward the water.
On this narrow space was a small building, with
a piazza before it. There was a room within
to accommodate passengers while waiting for
the trains.

Forester and Marco had just finished exam-
ining this locality, when suddenly they heard the
noise of an engine approaching. . It was com-
ing down the road, and presently it appeared
with the train which it was drawing, under the
bridge ; for the office where Forester and Marco
were standing was on the lower side of the
bridge. This train consisted of such cars as
are used by workmen along the road. They
looked like square carts on railroad wheels, only
instead of being open behind, like a farmer's
cart, each one was open at the side. There
was a workman seated upon each of these cars,
at the open side, with his feet hanging down be-
tween the wheels. This train passed rapidly
hy down the road, and was soon out of sight.

Just at this time, Marco happened to observe.
a small sail-boat with some boys in it, out upon



102 Marco on rue Eriz Cana. ~

So entegrninareai lt tanpepcececretetcensnensememeiamaginit iitaaeaaspaanata ata aeainmtae tacts iliac
The two boys. A boat. A plan formed.

the river. While he was looking at it, two
other boys came down the railroad, under the
bridge, and when they got to the corner of the
office where Forester and Marco were stand-
ing, they saw it too. One of these boys was
~ much smaller than the other, and wore a straw
hat.

“See,” said the small boy, “there are some
fellows out there that have got a boat.”

“Yes,” said the other boy; “let’s go and
have a sail with them.”

“ They won’t let us get in,” said the small boy.

The boys looked at the boat a minute or two
in silence, and then they crept down the bank,
near some bushes, where they could see it better.
Still they were not so far off as to prevent Marco
and Forester from hearing their conversation.

“Til tell you what we'll do,” said the large
boy ; “ we'll cut some poles here in the bushes,
and go down to the bank, opposite to where
they are, and call out to them to let us come on
board; and then you know they'll see our poles
and think they are fishing-poles. Then they’ll
come and take us on board, because they’ll
want to see us fish.” -

“ Well,” said the small boy, “I will lend you
my knife.”



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'2011-11-16T21:35:44-05:00'
describe
'1330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATGZ' 'sip-files00001.pro'
cc13c57cc05ff8d5ab7f487c0b443a89
2e8d453cfaf260036bef204c34976d1bb865b95d
'2011-11-16T21:37:05-05:00'
describe
'22294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHA' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
0edeb0a37cacbbd28b0597a2be982db0
c4b7e44dc8e38058a14c573720b0aafdcdc7e58e
'2011-11-16T21:36:15-05:00'
describe
'10150347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHB' 'sip-files00001.tif'
54da13fb5b9d8d788aaaaf5a361dd069
3eb13f36d39dd069611b8b96de435030cf39c4ff
'2011-11-16T21:32:46-05:00'
describe
'135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHC' 'sip-files00001.txt'
daf45bae9eccbf5651622df99032fd6c
a46226361803db9d2bb4def66408c897b1cba76f
'2011-11-16T21:38:10-05:00'
describe
'6984' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHD' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
a7e6bfcb3836cc2f073cbcef0ca99c26
ba461bb3e7e08855fbca83fa90318b3235191875
'2011-11-16T21:37:50-05:00'
describe
'1130628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHE' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
eb490348ba3c8030ce02938e2052f810
729d4d8ab63386356341e18ef4922f3133044532
'2011-11-16T21:35:20-05:00'
describe
'93506' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHF' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
d17954157910c96212810b39bfabff94
a547265d0eb9a50ac38ec4594760adeaa71b01cb
'2011-11-16T21:38:51-05:00'
describe
'339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHG' 'sip-files00002.pro'
cb314425d1c9f03fedf6ffeb1c41caf7
252b72e68a7fc103083f85c60b6b51c61ac83bd8
'2011-11-16T21:31:58-05:00'
describe
'25430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHH' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
4447122cade7c589062e1c0aa32c15b3
6cc23cbe3ae079113a4d0ec38b4a9fafe3af08e4
'2011-11-16T21:34:07-05:00'
describe
'9056705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHI' 'sip-files00002.tif'
331673fb1e52a9e7b285b3565474f43b
f07942032f94a5dda0be4f84544d1757f0c7333b
'2011-11-16T21:34:32-05:00'
describe
'114' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHJ' 'sip-files00002.txt'
750f4454d68958c25ae94e22bac86937
62121ecc4a34c9d063e53c26f1be5125b57bd018
'2011-11-16T21:38:47-05:00'
describe
'8248' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHK' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
90d9e2da58402f9dfbb35f1ac0fe2866
1210acef567fa1830ada5980010c3354cdc523e6
'2011-11-16T21:37:59-05:00'
describe
'962156' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHL' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
ee819443f86d33c9154c7c24a8e98c76
0eb1b37ed1d309e1fcd0cfb6e8e8f0c32517795c
'2011-11-16T21:32:21-05:00'
describe
'28644' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHM' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
e1fee8d6877f54bd83ed78b148ac20b7
30444a4da6722d354162ddd59c7bcde4caf804b4
'2011-11-16T21:38:23-05:00'
describe
'5172' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHN' 'sip-files00003.pro'
a13f9b302e5f4f4e98aa8c43ee93cce6
56dcab69f5332ccdbde295c615e0d8bb38e33627
'2011-11-16T21:36:42-05:00'
describe
'8362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHO' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
ffc95dcfb7026e9f17b782449a88dfc3
49bef131ee0c67e781d580b8b00a4f7f1a17355c
'2011-11-16T21:36:19-05:00'
describe
'8903527' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHP' 'sip-files00003.tif'
229a180774563e970a3ac1d9eda41aca
3907323863514835893dd04706a1efe69e159aef
'2011-11-16T21:33:30-05:00'
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHQ' 'sip-files00003.txt'
954cf3b7eb3007a2328c6ae9aec4b1d5
297e7485ac26048b65f7c8a8922a13a984fab56e
'2011-11-16T21:32:06-05:00'
describe
'2996' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHR' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
d1dd1bd375fa616411390caac62b7758
d9608547cc3d6109c54e7ab4bfe40f0840e03ce1
'2011-11-16T21:38:00-05:00'
describe
'1130767' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHS' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
b849b5eac0e407c811db2433cb255452
c4792f1c36c74a97bf0ca91a777d9a93a8085d82
'2011-11-16T21:37:22-05:00'
describe
'64456' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHT' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
a6d07794f867b4eaca09d6788b39cca0
6a8d78466f2acc1209323db9a347e1e830c68b5b
'2011-11-16T21:38:28-05:00'
describe
'22557' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHU' 'sip-files00004.pro'
bb944831ac3c8bc8443d44660bd85c10
8f7ab7a7fcab0acd8cea79ef7f65402ede4d313a
'2011-11-16T21:33:56-05:00'
describe
'23297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHV' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
a015e30b0f9a69ab019e609cbf85014e
faa514ee7228f201197e65fa6c319569e29826c9
'2011-11-16T21:32:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHW' 'sip-files00004.tif'
be49c37cd14d4ea0afc37e53b84afa0a
2c30b5e894eb9fd734399504b971518e4dd4ce17
'2011-11-16T21:32:47-05:00'
describe
'907' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHX' 'sip-files00004.txt'
c997615187bd60c8d77de0f91e5245c8
93ed4b28a9db949037f10e5455dbab7c7484435c
'2011-11-16T21:36:36-05:00'
describe
'7887' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHY' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
4ee7b97fd39afaccdd0b185676253075
ca3cb0e02749c2ac8b5037a1acd06c09ae69adc7
'2011-11-16T21:38:30-05:00'
describe
'961454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATHZ' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
ab603eac70329c6878ba67e560b29cb4
6bee0b4fc270d33c8d8398d4c8555624a4c34d11
'2011-11-16T21:33:38-05:00'
describe
'38090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIA' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
fe1008126bba154f941bce4f8e3d68d0
36bf91918dcbce30cdec948ae3539739bb431513
describe
'11101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIB' 'sip-files00005.pro'
ef11d827872d697753f594536db566d0
d16c4f2d69de390048ec992ef5fb8b5a229c3c7e
'2011-11-16T21:32:31-05:00'
describe
'13039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIC' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
21582fb7dbfc89cedaa790c44aa6ddf7
b4da2f374be0cf7618b204b2ad8d3a3c84eb033f
describe
'9983859' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATID' 'sip-files00005.tif'
bff30d5b9c2862e348a3beffc9078707
dc6a4e8d4ed0b01be8e64733b3c03334033a96ae
'2011-11-16T21:33:46-05:00'
describe
'448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIE' 'sip-files00005.txt'
67119c83fd2b9a90abdda4a0e0be8aa2
deaa9ff36e5bce2497fb519fcc9a9da62bb1c33e
'2011-11-16T21:31:42-05:00'
describe
'4187' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIF' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
1f4438fe8b052006b2c16e734ba69f26
eccab290f3604a0d55c937fec26fd16e3f0b8f17
'2011-11-16T21:31:54-05:00'
describe
'919157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIG' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
7363e2e21880406fe6df12c70b474676
cfa38e21a423edcfd7222cfd25828767c4d385c1
describe
'34763' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIH' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
fe921f5903dc68daa1520beef09a6c47
2f73549b076682791a7362775a505501b8531ffe
describe
'13207' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATII' 'sip-files00006.pro'
16f656dd38955b93a8c0ac3d256c3612
2530ba0f22eeea8659fb15caede95dd2b543bc70
'2011-11-16T21:35:41-05:00'
describe
'12418' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIJ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
644bc23bcab4201306a49c0dc2aa4332
aeb91d980582bd3d4ea5f5fb416195e4cc157f0d
'2011-11-16T21:34:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIK' 'sip-files00006.tif'
894ae11dface3db23559388d404464b8
abb4167111d32445c0bf5954e054f0f7215e0a0c
'2011-11-16T21:35:12-05:00'
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIL' 'sip-files00006.txt'
e95ded22475b9de3aae40c4f37704be9
a6d89abf5917a76cc8e140a00dad69339fcc888f
'2011-11-16T21:35:53-05:00'
describe
'4719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIM' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
14a88d35a100cf4f4446e71a97ec6a5c
e3b4b92e05af3b7382529f2c53f58b286465ecf6
'2011-11-16T21:38:09-05:00'
describe
'834330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIN' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
bb07d30f4af73e425176a0d9323683a4
68a09a0e7330aa2f32c629ca762a53cd9001b6f2
'2011-11-16T21:36:14-05:00'
describe
'36837' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
38d29722d00d1da31b1596ec9d82bb57
1ed1ed3d2b653d966ac528743cb9f89d9db07412
'2011-11-16T21:36:17-05:00'
describe
'13288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIP' 'sip-files00007.pro'
189d4b1cc1d560512e594702131afa4e
97562a363dca67571f01da580b1c890922b35c3b
'2011-11-16T21:32:07-05:00'
describe
'13915' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIQ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
dfccdd72399190f0a381df220230ab15
19938a6b4a2d5d7d7d281d1cec865d096bb373b9
'2011-11-16T21:38:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIR' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7ed7e8978d0160ba63cb364292af9dff
93e6b64f6f2c72e8d3c68b706a53c55ab862b1f9
'2011-11-16T21:35:48-05:00'
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIS' 'sip-files00007.txt'
46d26e1b5ee8230cd594de61410b3c95
3e7ca4b2466ec1deef5f7c55b0266c1c8d77ca1b
'2011-11-16T21:35:21-05:00'
describe
'5695' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIT' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
d8e7face1ac46d8e702d0ffee6c76266
9f00f71aaed18d54487d9ee352bf8f8a0a4df8b8
'2011-11-16T21:33:52-05:00'
describe
'922041' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
6238dd3142be5d6f44be0a680bb5bd43
4977957fe648c5dddafe0074f4dc849afbca3a80
'2011-11-16T21:38:43-05:00'
describe
'30240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
17dca4046fd6c875cceb372ef844a755
1f8d7fdbbd84e83e4f72d08919e87b7de37b7bd2
'2011-11-16T21:39:09-05:00'
describe
'4193' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIW' 'sip-files00008.pro'
134b9f41fb059c39314f70ac6be5eff1
ff79e4a0e73967b83dbab0accc495807e91fdb02
'2011-11-16T21:32:56-05:00'
describe
'9639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
0b717b5d0e9ac90ecd24b256d3bc22a5
0bd881bf5827521349870158458440e7575f1af6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
80c5603afa91fa85f521276725c71ff0
c75fd60547deec7e3facff6311f772fbcfb10852
'2011-11-16T21:32:50-05:00'
describe
'200' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATIZ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
f5aeb33a7a33526c31621d5606843377
8bd83939d350b55b4e5c93945e269fa9e0ccb963
'2011-11-16T21:32:30-05:00'
describe
'3864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
8d40e533c1e491fd64981f44399be821
f87e666c728a24a8f90544b53f997259b5c96d14
'2011-11-16T21:34:41-05:00'
describe
'771611' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJB' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
d327cf66bbb75266aa5a3b4fcc57a2c1
3525b201c96bc92538a9c5683e0570ff65869a59
describe
'25146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJC' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
4e7274cac5c97c035290a24f13e5471b
8ddb26ab90f28d8db5287387f41b85f26336b1c9
'2011-11-16T21:35:19-05:00'
describe
'5541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJD' 'sip-files00009.pro'
2a92c6889415d94631a388eecfab849c
91e102cf9eb228aabfb0d05674647b7aa48ed4f3
'2011-11-16T21:35:39-05:00'
describe
'8078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJE' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
8075965934b48e98459bfba60f27aab1
de5f8536665c16500903fa4b4828a50dc3290a6d
'2011-11-16T21:32:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJF' 'sip-files00009.tif'
1204a6d7b0924464326658dec1255752
9117573782c271110c0b4090650c19eaa7f69c6a
'2011-11-16T21:38:31-05:00'
describe
'269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7987c7f24e5a9de8f160231ce5e98b3d
1ff7fd72f0f54ad3b0c884398aee46d0848e53cd
'2011-11-16T21:36:25-05:00'
describe
'2934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJH' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b0a426b65661e2c2da8b91453eda2760
f9fd5660e42d7b4419d3e2c36db18fb98157bf5c
'2011-11-16T21:36:40-05:00'
describe
'1130780' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
a76980aee88aa051582e0363a16fe32f
89351e13885baf9c2835b3c67119108a612a478e
'2011-11-16T21:35:40-05:00'
describe
'70104' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJJ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
8cc0ad461b3f333af75b348c182389be
aa6f866b9b8bc80e8a4c996fc907b0bc81d8c9d6
'2011-11-16T21:37:37-05:00'
describe
'19876' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJK' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2f164463e7eb3b2ba4e13d19ede16f35
97e403e427ce5fa0410e5331b71c0d87b807ad12
'2011-11-16T21:39:11-05:00'
describe
'24491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJL' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
ae92547adefeb5e8859075b7fc2a2e55
a92ea347108aa472faa441e0fe1cf76134b27347
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
a61ce357595dd43fb012d71d45fb9e7f
61125c61447a50db377807cd0ac3d9564001ccbd
'2011-11-16T21:32:13-05:00'
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJN' 'sip-files00010.txt'
035535a29ec3cadc4bce698579a02c25
b2a370e306b91a7f6b6dfb97c0b52600cea39fa0
describe
'8203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJO' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
906ef566c30535f095436dae82bc183f
47b6b6900a935ddbbdf6bc0d9ad13eef8e3479da
'2011-11-16T21:35:18-05:00'
describe
'1111634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
923eada832827d8aff9f05ed8644d10f
e2f753c31c647b9f4065a1f0c0aafe472d0a7f08
describe
'92712' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
fdb489709021735c4fc7cef57df83305
a40673433745a828d2fe806711f4fd3bfdb34b5b
'2011-11-16T21:38:19-05:00'
describe
'31762' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
cde080ade92aaf8c3b3ecafc2e0da85e
f1c373049a600cc0e5bfaffbdcf782a2921db4a1
'2011-11-16T21:32:57-05:00'
describe
'33138' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
05a5dee721c6c61dda1804d2b66f33e7
73808a1fe7402d1afcdc134f86a0713ee8bfa60b
'2011-11-16T21:35:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJT' 'sip-files00011.tif'
e07f73b4cae51c59e99e22e8644e69e6
9c7a0f5e9f780e0fbad8271533ab6054160ff8ac
'2011-11-16T21:37:15-05:00'
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
0a49453ea6ef41c0914e98ca0c02fb51
0cb0f06b40554bb19f553e1a74383101f8a7ace2
'2011-11-16T21:35:26-05:00'
describe
'10995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJV' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
341c95fd62fb6c59b5f43a97e91a38c9
fbc1ec627691c27ade4f605df50a7480d6774d20
describe
'1130754' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJW' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
97b68839034ad54fa0d606f61e6b0977
5222f1730e7ac724e8e135b74c8032a4e73daae9
'2011-11-16T21:36:22-05:00'
describe
'76881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJX' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
cdb903fb8e65037902a4d5eb11d89271
237a4e059c60f0f6028d7e71a82f0ac3c1bdfc62
'2011-11-16T21:38:27-05:00'
describe
'11448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJY' 'sip-files00012.pro'
aa1b60dfcce306c2331af064f7651446
800fc87c6deaf91de2add67a57f03406ade33164
'2011-11-16T21:39:07-05:00'
describe
'23813' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATJZ' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
80a4224c986c6a0c135c018bd974fcb5
8744e376c3ec162f94ea52e7e2f8c34bde4ec9d3
'2011-11-16T21:38:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKA' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2bf5abb703122812b34ae481fdc84119
d8aaa51303f876f03082444fa4fc0005f021d0f3
'2011-11-16T21:36:47-05:00'
describe
'478' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKB' 'sip-files00012.txt'
5a13fa5cf3cf04a45b18143ae5febd16
83e4f538c0480276b59eaca1fd7194f7786c41f9
'2011-11-16T21:39:08-05:00'
describe
'8015' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKC' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
f983622ddabf1dc28292fbbabb1a9a6d
5677c6e3e349d5dada51cfcc5f881224320bd56a
'2011-11-16T21:31:36-05:00'
describe
'1111648' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKD' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
175d321404a0b91d84f204440b0349db
67f2a327c08118ac58a898c124a44368b4d82965
'2011-11-16T21:38:55-05:00'
describe
'92759' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKE' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
821d6999d7074ac1ac2dbca49956747d
8d3df43f9865fe8c7d9e7d6df1c61397f66f967d
'2011-11-16T21:39:02-05:00'
describe
'31369' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKF' 'sip-files00013.pro'
edfc8c5596253e5e4e854ccf2ddbee57
5677991a67ac47dbce74250e4545b29a2d736927
'2011-11-16T21:38:33-05:00'
describe
'33215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKG' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
9932e2d403f0c85a60bee02f0d54c597
035bcffd4ce1a9c9b42d69b3d26f30722ad98bce
'2011-11-16T21:36:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKH' 'sip-files00013.tif'
7c44187e7bec7d4155d4065cab3e1d33
f60021db0e47df8e8da6629324eaa8e56292c3e6
'2011-11-16T21:37:56-05:00'
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKI' 'sip-files00013.txt'
ceed796cb0f6dae31d682793f877ae89
43bdd05fbaf47bdf52ce00cd6cac102365206531
'2011-11-16T21:38:26-05:00'
describe
'10918' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKJ' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
c3884b4152d6560a390e04688027be99
5f0dcef98d8dbd25cb7a7739f737ff84fab5bcc2
'2011-11-16T21:37:25-05:00'
describe
'1130796' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKK' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
315b5ec90cce93bd2f58fd6f7f110920
6a665d930f006fe7443f4037630510d5932cc598
'2011-11-16T21:34:10-05:00'
describe
'91299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKL' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
9ae4d5dd2923f7ff7c8a639eb0e35251
959e987c095d2cace999cb57b61e454a81a9b8a3
'2011-11-16T21:37:45-05:00'
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
a56bbf19e211116dbdbc50a943489f0f
53d906fec7253d40d09da850e676e4e78108ae2e
'2011-11-16T21:39:03-05:00'
describe
'32846' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d1b163197cbb599e01b7170073cd1af4
8ef31cab9c46573d5db169696ef20c4101f38571
'2011-11-16T21:35:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKO' 'sip-files00014.tif'
8b0dd215fe2427a96489b8c404d1e229
0f790cafe21774a1c32944b39c9df8313a2fdae8
'2011-11-16T21:38:02-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
94f8b38db5c9d0927e4d712253e7fa99
b1cb09a6691f474e0a2b877f7db23743a67f5d99
'2011-11-16T21:38:42-05:00'
describe
'10275' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
a641f20480627e757ed56b9bc1f1e760
156c220fe60580fa056d063ff071e1d1076c2962
describe
'1111538' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKR' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
1e0ec3b8fc6a564c328b992e56e1a6ba
4a8f18c73fb2a169ecbe669a1aa1e75091bf79c4
describe
'89734' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKS' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
6f2a05e92712a46d18546a2e04bfc07e
c1cb6fadb4ad1c3ec852025ed3a6a0d287ebfc86
'2011-11-16T21:39:06-05:00'
describe
'31484' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKT' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a3f921601edcfdf419dea9b43545227e
ea7ae235c4a487574bcd3e5477b3d52d7c41a5c7
'2011-11-16T21:38:57-05:00'
describe
'32459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKU' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
985fc0e76bce2445244ee84a5b538fec
26ba791f7ecb09e4f9c6549c2096f0cbc14f7fa3
'2011-11-16T21:36:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKV' 'sip-files00015.tif'
97dadd0ab62c7fc58262b0c546b5e07e
7f72ec6859b3f0ba2f6d9d675c4142008370695f
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKW' 'sip-files00015.txt'
c15b8060c4adbab634fd3c8ca2907508
84dfffec410269f4d86462ddd2ecdc2ceb75f0e9
'2011-11-16T21:32:10-05:00'
describe
'10955' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKX' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
ab7b4715b0c6dd1af3badb1d3e55d4d9
0efa456815efea1e6b1b479ca6adf575848fb2f2
'2011-11-16T21:33:48-05:00'
describe
'1130785' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKY' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
2a54d3413df156dcf2f139f1f6b0f723
5bc85e1f4227d7308e7d275c3075decd4229c2da
'2011-11-16T21:35:57-05:00'
describe
'91722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATKZ' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f29faee26c328d5222201ed322043c2c
0385adbde387ae3a1f7a4e8a78b4fd4d660aced8
describe
'31271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLA' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9631576f6f0677c00aee14571fa4ef45
71aa25ad34b896c66fa8e0097a7102d72ce1dc66
'2011-11-16T21:37:19-05:00'
describe
'32772' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLB' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
a9c0ad54e2568e912005a5855cc4870f
cd9ec3e290061ffda1e7afeaf3772043bd892629
'2011-11-16T21:33:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLC' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a9d9c65e6dd786a30a29d6b2f3642e32
2b4b16f81afd4f9604a32c8291d8ce703b405e88
'2011-11-16T21:38:49-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLD' 'sip-files00016.txt'
bcad3ad2c740796a882a64724a6d9c4d
21cdd18d3940e9a917d69954698874041721d77d
describe
'10634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLE' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
e6812e8e9d488a9e0039ec939edca6cb
4c61cea699084e668f29a86c4a9d5b8492189b86
describe
'1111537' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLF' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c40a41ea5a17d0d0c2933bdf743162fc
86b9b17996faaf89da8f919c672d966421346809
'2011-11-16T21:35:45-05:00'
describe
'91341' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLG' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b86975ad75c7e1cdc8ef4c08601efec6
f8640b1718015963f7aa0a52b23e1bcc2853e2a3
'2011-11-16T21:34:52-05:00'
describe
'30853' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLH' 'sip-files00017.pro'
c7db3cb849272018b3a57f48593f0a4b
2a6c3dca8d73c017257437f1c63e637234ee468c
'2011-11-16T21:35:52-05:00'
describe
'32448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLI' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
39148007c350730d67c041f58f7db9fc
ab6c9c286c1b70fbd83f85c06f090182a12ed517
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLJ' 'sip-files00017.tif'
51379675c943d4f284256a678169d016
ae7ca1ad4662c8cd1d5f134dccf1b91c654cec29
'2011-11-16T21:35:27-05:00'
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLK' 'sip-files00017.txt'
e00f363ab5944e664156ae5cf00c3eea
c314eec7322e208336f8174a21d8181a37fb0b4f
'2011-11-16T21:31:38-05:00'
describe
'11083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLL' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
27f8f818b50ed4e562615cd9e24ffc9b
0215db8f4923f3ef703b440963ae60daf8efd73a
'2011-11-16T21:37:20-05:00'
describe
'1130801' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLM' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c221704d93b4ec3b7ad0414eb9304ce1
f5ac33f97d4632de580f6a0ff05c99475939f0ef
'2011-11-16T21:31:47-05:00'
describe
'96828' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f27d709ae066781c498e752e32baf4fd
9896ce3cba472fb5b4ad86e0546d58078e143a0d
'2011-11-16T21:33:57-05:00'
describe
'33344' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLO' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c0f361e8107ae9c3634d3f7622b3be50
4d03b9240ccdfb45ebd1ed9343ddea7685aa0ce9
'2011-11-16T21:34:02-05:00'
describe
'34252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLP' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
323f2165c494806ef48defe8ab818567
8bd19e9a7ea84896cb16f0d06df5a973b68d8581
'2011-11-16T21:33:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLQ' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3a9e9fccec36022497c2e3f5752d08f9
f904bd629934d3125f6cd6f7fcc5c3e0ab14a4ec
'2011-11-16T21:37:49-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
06419f2ae5efda23d214d5cb5f3eb1fb
24524c63eebb98564e2a803c65ffe2f3d9a88c3a
'2011-11-16T21:36:23-05:00'
describe
'11047' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLS' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5a3ca3cec107bbefb833e1fd952217f0
3d85926936679c34ba8130d59d396606dbbb1e74
describe
'1111654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLT' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e7f7b08107c8923c316e002d8d170fe3
68b7d43366c38dee39aeef4bcc06ddcb576a3880
describe
'88563' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLU' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
d5e57df2194d0a5ba8b1deb0c877a591
1fc9234782dee6de5b6b88834deddca915d63142
'2011-11-16T21:37:43-05:00'
describe
'30580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLV' 'sip-files00019.pro'
679bdbfeba0fffdc90f73d7882b41ee4
792134ea22179da4be59b70d433c16c1dab8b2bf
'2011-11-16T21:37:44-05:00'
describe
'31848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLW' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
eea216f7357572953fa701a90cf1030f
66e4ae93e7ffe77243ff383d54e710a275c54f23
'2011-11-16T21:32:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLX' 'sip-files00019.tif'
c06ebb77ee16ce9ae0e88cadbc2968e9
8f3665705d2622072f3fb953e5d3ad6a56d460cf
'2011-11-16T21:38:46-05:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLY' 'sip-files00019.txt'
07ea0f8debffee4df26a15ba848a3de8
1c3b0e26c19f61c33e51652f9377461c16b5779b
'2011-11-16T21:39:12-05:00'
describe
'11013' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATLZ' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
01b2cc999d77254bc1ea42929898ecd9
754dfbd0d4bde67de2d2e9d97abb4896f018b503
describe
'1130794' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMA' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
607090c82481462cdc459c103c5b18a8
f65d58dc62e16b1f5731c8d4b457ee3c599e8c52
'2011-11-16T21:37:40-05:00'
describe
'88322' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMB' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
456f90f07f91a05a555a928aba1b41da
b547cfe9376fb965c40df87887044f98618c34a3
'2011-11-16T21:32:03-05:00'
describe
'24124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMC' 'sip-files00020.pro'
7f2ee380ca8acd9e4aab3a2caa9401dc
a33f79b65b24b0f70424b9dc71692185ce9d2e26
describe
'30158' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMD' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
848d954c0e94dad3abc3fb7ce041397d
164c9a5bc8426140559994e6b8a8840af31d93a7
'2011-11-16T21:34:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATME' 'sip-files00020.tif'
225a0a9bae00255db47b23768df8d678
a74361bcc012b5f46d8bc3a00b9f5148a19d910d
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMF' 'sip-files00020.txt'
e3bb53b30314fc6c1dabae7e2cbbc52d
b4ddd7c828dcc379aa55b4e710f83cad7ca5867b
describe
'10239' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMG' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
5b20373f50b3f00ba54121935fc425e3
3ec72c810d16b08af92d14fa10735c609b8c4568
'2011-11-16T21:35:42-05:00'
describe
'1111560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMH' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1c28dbdafff27698448d98dc4e77f410
34d10e975ce2ac84a280e031b4629529a618937d
'2011-11-16T21:37:55-05:00'
describe
'90798' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMI' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
3112223489f5665c242a73fb6fbb84aa
d2d3df68bc98b80791e1247cd8e7997b8fdc73ac
'2011-11-16T21:35:37-05:00'
describe
'31560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
1548a08068d77eb53df57b783344cbcb
d88f89b120938814297bb062bf952e7f781b942a
describe
'33065' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMK' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
97e9a0e4998d922ff0443dc5a62b105d
a43f38d8dd02b53370dfe20bf10eb552f1ee4876
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATML' 'sip-files00021.tif'
0efdfb377715b401841cfa1000ec6fed
cbc08e90487ca4bea56463e7ac8fa4265db2fb20
'2011-11-16T21:37:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMM' 'sip-files00021.txt'
bdfefa2e724dd72d64e9ea9077d4c944
8d71348e00b4b6b7ce9b64dbab71ad4740602fc0
'2011-11-16T21:36:10-05:00'
describe
'10940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMN' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
e3a3b32f97280bd62acd23a03fed76bf
5d24fabcf870459635da85ca4c02ba854705e458
'2011-11-16T21:37:29-05:00'
describe
'1130806' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMO' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6cf6d121a53d4cf8596f04c057bf786e
634d0d53db32880e70d335522b6520f61c3a4fa9
'2011-11-16T21:38:15-05:00'
describe
'91622' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMP' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
2fb38d0dc74ed49e4bd1857c37aeaa0c
3c3846a0f95ae9340594a70451b0ba873d3c1955
'2011-11-16T21:32:54-05:00'
describe
'32285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMQ' 'sip-files00022.pro'
3472b0be9d17f944dc03f3bf1b8e2481
a48ac654bf65107183ab14c298eac669505790ce
'2011-11-16T21:33:34-05:00'
describe
'33031' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMR' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
135dfddbdd44a50a22ec9d574836cd0a
765e16bc051b73c5b788a13363611ae796edd788
'2011-11-16T21:36:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMS' 'sip-files00022.tif'
89367ab173a0304763056c54308598cb
8c86f371d8914508d596e4e3713cc6c8b93b9a1f
'2011-11-16T21:34:14-05:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMT' 'sip-files00022.txt'
c8b7bc45032c6eb30ac495ea9fba356f
07299cfabc345cc456e42e682e0fd8abe9aa951b
'2011-11-16T21:33:51-05:00'
describe
'10737' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMU' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
58f38db41580047bedc8b335841ad2f1
3f33046446cae39d53c6f15ebc357ce0f6dc2cfb
'2011-11-16T21:38:20-05:00'
describe
'1111555' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMV' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7fa65bd682cf9f84e3d8ace352e92235
58f348242da0458c1ef0f38d7f0fe55e77f6101a
'2011-11-16T21:35:08-05:00'
describe
'83056' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMW' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
b64d79ab899b1680fc59154e21c100d8
a34eb1b3750293e87b36dfc66b38a13cecf99f94
describe
'29165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMX' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7c1763f03249e503573976986c8e60f1
7255875c06723c675983b16bc978df441f2564ae
describe
'30307' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMY' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
324e357ca37cbbcd418fc5f8817a6f5d
f83ece9e75ac895003007da64d6cd654c2b99191
'2011-11-16T21:37:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATMZ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
2d540504166f9cfbeb895d28d8d57907
6023a43453af018f3d16edb842dc20258a3f638b
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNA' 'sip-files00023.txt'
cf50988eaa4303ecbcf7ae88e51e21df
cdc2c64bdc8388d69f328d0e2671948f4b86b60e
describe
'10328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNB' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
199cf86a93232c2d9c6a5a1f8e98eeab
60cd4c519314e6c0a4524d8b37fefea9ea99239f
describe
'1130803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNC' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
27453946cbdc2d16de913dbfcc062bab
099149299d738f27eea4ac093b2e84f2bc9a26f7
'2011-11-16T21:34:51-05:00'
describe
'89995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATND' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
e3d1610c84d2ee0fea219ba893584080
4be061493f4b388fa9a066adb897edcaeaca5788
'2011-11-16T21:37:23-05:00'
describe
'31189' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNE' 'sip-files00024.pro'
fe122e210741c66869da4ec0a7dfeade
35227603b76be1daf206282287994d055a573937
'2011-11-16T21:38:07-05:00'
describe
'32722' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNF' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
f351646d2cfb41f6e1b04c421940296d
698b4dd7b52aa3c9a853772cc1ca72357857f1a6
'2011-11-16T21:35:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
0cec8fc7a603591901fc098385592f0d
0601193969e5cb9c68f28891a4cf3a8237042e11
'2011-11-16T21:34:29-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNH' 'sip-files00024.txt'
cb99951aeca57f8fbb38e3fa7b66157e
629c0a4e6958df0030b3e67663bf38af5e0521f0
describe
'10662' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
ae138f83b6d08c6ffce15db81065e0db
09a699202f280f4d661e2f3399eb47ec5f479a5b
describe
'1111563' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a1a8794f227a358cef24753eccba9cc2
0481249d2292406af7d60d6d3711d182b5e5c113
describe
'88199' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNK' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
b6d01d650d4d3e50b4f2fff24f37410b
29f56a46fae9341ff524e0f852c512939f9dfa83
'2011-11-16T21:31:48-05:00'
describe
'29873' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNL' 'sip-files00025.pro'
45b8fa07b35e8a9f2d8227174ff1fc16
8f95c67461cf7bb0ac9c6de4c08a5efc2c2ede1d
'2011-11-16T21:34:58-05:00'
describe
'30975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNM' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
39a299743a3873cf7607e2a4e99825cd
e37bad18fd25026efef6f77f5d6099ee48ea9460
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNN' 'sip-files00025.tif'
73ca0fab51aa255d859d9f369da4e556
dd63e499b0dad1e8df944820a75154032e6f10ac
'2011-11-16T21:31:46-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNO' 'sip-files00025.txt'
c01f4b5928bbc633de92bf1fedde7c6c
0fb1fdad38414c9ae28c5ff034c1028747f23ec1
'2011-11-16T21:36:31-05:00'
describe
'10676' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNP' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
03a70ae1c361e36eee74792cbc21fe35
a3fcd5657b5132ab5ef41d61cb036914d510e8c8
describe
'1130575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNQ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ac945cda7a66bdef2d628fd7153463ca
31eefc8dcced1ed567d78588a923ab9622e9b6db
'2011-11-16T21:38:59-05:00'
describe
'92753' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNR' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
edeabe7f8403a70a6787046dd57adb31
a0f7ebacd7e3147d4c0fc37b810d561e1a2ab6ac
describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNS' 'sip-files00026.pro'
20df300c97ac2c1bd91affbd274cb1d3
88ddefb33c90161d5e1b6b9746b8e821ba6db39a
'2011-11-16T21:31:40-05:00'
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNT' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
b77474dd885069cad0896b451eeebc58
c2a318ce9539cd34074435aa60449cc4fe43742e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNU' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b3af3c1adb1b8deb394dc71239f7be94
2b22faa2062880649c023b2e18a3db38f2ca5948
'2011-11-16T21:34:09-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
d23794793345c7176697faf4ed128d08
c6f2e0fe802c4700309979fa31d26af4ba1be0bc
'2011-11-16T21:33:02-05:00'
describe
'10491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNW' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
be0c77477582ee290b3e29a3fd16992b
77541299fd1c410e6df9048231652f255069be61
'2011-11-16T21:35:24-05:00'
describe
'1111531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNX' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
7fb77ed6f4bf0869382f1704458964e3
ef38c8d1f505b81922a755c2410cc760b698613a
'2011-11-16T21:35:01-05:00'
describe
'75684' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNY' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
4be1474285c4897d1bfac9acfadfefd3
e7f95f43c8a3b36afc9ce9b5994794f38f48d3e7
'2011-11-16T21:35:31-05:00'
describe
'24254' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATNZ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5c048cd907f37a5239578e78e85e9e96
18b79e15836beb20b655deb5d9e37064beb9ca95
'2011-11-16T21:36:59-05:00'
describe
'27841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOA' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
7f8327a0800f037f0ed9ba0e266270c9
f4021c78b87bcf80cdc6bd95d1020311e310cd07
'2011-11-16T21:35:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOB' 'sip-files00027.tif'
66368ca35022e0248e433a7059e71811
4e73c9e66441d35bdf6bba807b845eecbec28372
'2011-11-16T21:32:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
81d059ccf931436e9c910123bea16dc7
8ad0305c270735eefa7c161f1f7bc2acf9ac7a5e
'2011-11-16T21:37:39-05:00'
describe
'9492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOD' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
6bfea16cb181072e2b5cd746904c0c68
d7dc931274bc92d7ee776eb1a204c40926d7360c
'2011-11-16T21:36:00-05:00'
describe
'1130753' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOE' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
832948bde574125129f5f7b3ad7bd910
074bc7ea934093abb3ccb81bf50e293e9c11748a
describe
'81494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOF' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
633b2b109d60ada0b10a35d10904b78c
a6af52cfff23a5e20ded4d995e3543328a41262c
'2011-11-16T21:33:44-05:00'
describe
'25382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOG' 'sip-files00028.pro'
205a287cbca0b239205266ffb54fd6b7
ac48f586d6747bd46e4a943f64be7ee2e1342319
describe
'28330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOH' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1cccb51297a2035962d954538a4727ff
b64cea16116d35013c8366b5997ee7cdf1e8e223
'2011-11-16T21:39:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOI' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9e5d7451d86f422d70374706face296b
568737fdbd507985e1491989669af59f5fe88809
'2011-11-16T21:32:24-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOJ' 'sip-files00028.txt'
0be2f07ac88ecdee0c13fbc6ad0b56a2
1e8ee5b4a3ab669614ed29a1260498aea7b43400
'2011-11-16T21:32:49-05:00'
describe
'9477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
acec9f9201aab197de585c1ed2f991d3
564b5a345c829ea8b8d5b7af81a8ea810b55050f
describe
'1115809' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOL' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
b92807a6cb994255b0bcbe0476285be7
cb3c1d8d7972319e9e85c230956c9ce00ac38419
'2011-11-16T21:37:47-05:00'
describe
'97718' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOM' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
584cec5e957c04fcd74b2e65b841e9cd
afabf966d031185499467258348ee9768ee40112
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATON' 'sip-files00029.pro'
4fa7dcc7ff56328e9851b2054290f781
9fcee372afa42657acea69b989e21a1625d8c5eb
'2011-11-16T21:36:43-05:00'
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
5e59ad386ce2f3c413822b56d64206f4
cd95544df3721fcc4f784dccfdb08054316af5c2
'2011-11-16T21:34:11-05:00'
describe
'8937793' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOP' 'sip-files00029.tif'
17e85839539469d3ab9ab55c809069cc
9d433e4e6a1d4c042fda220f8bfc870897f27e4a
'2011-11-16T21:35:03-05:00'
describe
'1348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOQ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
14bcce8716adcdb07595dcb08eea796e
2ea85e63cb51d556a2f46a1f3433ef0d90fe12b2
describe
'11344' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOR' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
fbc3c58d5be77215cde4ac10a203c2b0
79ea0bb21426c67371b64f2600a051adb6a6edc0
'2011-11-16T21:38:39-05:00'
describe
'1111610' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOS' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
83553e1c309011f9089f7397925768b8
132c7d965f968d5b2afaa8d43dd981ea4875e26e
'2011-11-16T21:35:56-05:00'
describe
'94836' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
34b8c8d1414bbc58bd0b58b2c8f4da8d
823606317a82287f309000867b4e735b12892547
'2011-11-16T21:37:33-05:00'
describe
'32037' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOU' 'sip-files00030.pro'
7195113358f5b4fb204da785b5dee3cb
cc96f38824963b8f99fcbcb0a708f99cf53b7cc2
'2011-11-16T21:38:36-05:00'
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOV' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7669fe72a1157848a3b780c0539a2a42
6dd081739f0b566983739d5cf0e2c2486ce0c1a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOW' 'sip-files00030.tif'
bc11a09b11fd42862d670e5900cd4d0c
fcc07fce49a139a3fdd5c375cace03e46a6eac71
'2011-11-16T21:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1303' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOX' 'sip-files00030.txt'
9e51f65c6675212cbae6b4264d833cfe
069c4433e7d96486e8f93091c8c7129d85de299e
describe
'10978' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOY' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
66797b3c4e53052279fb5b9b9b227a1f
a7258c0fc07ea45dcf50eb7574b97bfc4331cfc2
'2011-11-16T21:37:57-05:00'
describe
'1115937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATOZ' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
52cb6179f416e1571fc208186fe7f33c
c9ed7315192b8a5c70e295831b7bf91d8c11aeca
'2011-11-16T21:35:28-05:00'
describe
'90262' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
2e2282bed5bda626854958500e25d362
13b952ec366ec18335d0932c5ab0aad131f19e98
'2011-11-16T21:31:59-05:00'
describe
'29645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPB' 'sip-files00031.pro'
05a3515fadedb7fdd10a2a6dd4b8394e
71b3fa2453eb7ec7dc0b0c49e14203577537c849
'2011-11-16T21:31:51-05:00'
describe
'32526' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPC' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
8e465081a38df855b23b966701200bbb
1d32dc2af8f7365093b29d6fafaba919735efcc2
'2011-11-16T21:37:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPD' 'sip-files00031.tif'
0538f862d896491c5731cbca589aab93
13e81ebc4abe9b419c35497bffff4b84f5576013
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPE' 'sip-files00031.txt'
aee855aab9fc0c5ee84c34304450e261
534a757bb8f6ea00c3ee4e47729bca34ecb45801
'2011-11-16T21:36:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPF' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
bc3eff7c6fa414a8b5af94a199212d0e
20735e119d631e02779e19e3fb185ea045fb8efe
describe
'1111628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPG' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
d1361136309d16d9a38298a76ad9452c
19d1744b00ea3a92599b109289980ed79f352bf1
'2011-11-16T21:34:00-05:00'
describe
'89419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPH' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
4623a76cecfb2e98550cd918f49a896b
bf290e9bf833b216c75d4204b0d224ff97c7219a
'2011-11-16T21:31:55-05:00'
describe
'30229' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPI' 'sip-files00032.pro'
b617a05d4d017c6cbf3c8970da5a7866
e69337be287caa8e566c1f6b1ab2811a36c3dfe8
'2011-11-16T21:33:14-05:00'
describe
'31450' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPJ' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
2e6d9b2dd91b922d2c1b9669d79047d7
7d0b4d880207d4f0359149793fdbca9d5e731ef7
'2011-11-16T21:36:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPK' 'sip-files00032.tif'
c5a76d9cc6178db685593caeaba759b2
f1bd7d0d9e2141007b7ac1a25095d0158a89c19d
'2011-11-16T21:37:08-05:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPL' 'sip-files00032.txt'
0228136b7a42ed82f5ff2828f24fb7b4
49f6f6d590c9786a2dc30f07c5f8a6ab9761577b
describe
'10463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPM' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
a41516c8bc50e65e9829e17d3447b3e7
a58b273429607b6f8f84aab428fef4c688b3e790
'2011-11-16T21:36:32-05:00'
describe
'1115947' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPN' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
e31a4cb18421bba802e04e06c4a499ec
6f38bd461da5aa47506d6413ee3c18a656ae4507
'2011-11-16T21:33:22-05:00'
describe
'88263' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPO' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
949fb830e5df338e0f07e2c079ed563b
875277806a80ab239af5ac805abb1414129dbb08
describe
'29327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPP' 'sip-files00033.pro'
af34a4c4b376ad04f1505159ace19f57
63762ed9a275c35900feb4a67296fff08a870b73
describe
'31454' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPQ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
7f82fb677bfe64ab48d939d48c1442a0
8467b9ae7d0684d4e0dc85be7ccc42bc8c77482e
'2011-11-16T21:31:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPR' 'sip-files00033.tif'
66976839ed13f2217a5430fa5ee0e4c7
bf12bfdc2c16871e955fa01929f46b863df92a83
'2011-11-16T21:36:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPS' 'sip-files00033.txt'
20bbc0bf38017dfa04c96560c1c77057
8985fcbc57ae6bd3bc802b822ce2fe99bf21821e
'2011-11-16T21:37:34-05:00'
describe
'10235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPT' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
90619dcdb9eeb85efa8c04d523674745
89a22206518147b253f8961c69b7d083aae1d488
describe
'1111552' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPU' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
a0c329b4c29f455eba11ff86a9dda18f
200e87d21d4dd8404bba051da293f548c6b14600
'2011-11-16T21:38:48-05:00'
describe
'91591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPV' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
ada33a1327026b389260af3068a96618
055f36f92035b673eba55268f71e720628f9fd5c
'2011-11-16T21:31:43-05:00'
describe
'31118' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPW' 'sip-files00034.pro'
ba055e4eecdf3d429ff0e3f70bb18552
fbe5dbe3cf4386510c0e691868bf0699f12e282e
describe
'32461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPX' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
7ca01de6c8e36c9addadf0120e157285
39fb85eda09d35bb03f23d136af9b454e7b18699
'2011-11-16T21:34:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPY' 'sip-files00034.tif'
8f0c6c7f990dd4e475dd1d4a71164880
0d7d5223d7c08adb76ada50480d7459d6b5bfb9a
'2011-11-16T21:37:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATPZ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
1db4103da8d5df1064426d40333d9a8b
6e671d354f99f76b0b7ab0177e4bb5781c90c1ce
'2011-11-16T21:35:14-05:00'
describe
'10857' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQA' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
6da0965218565c2e72834922e6eb7d9f
1882177202e1f8f831a3d22b8dbcd4b64e8c3cd9
describe
'1115948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQB' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
0819b0bc41d497ec1483c4eb6a232210
fefb57916d2e41c30bf108953e08d7fc138d52e3
describe
'100091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQC' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bc7ca841f87b1e133f59be431423bf0d
ad496da96809acfe091d66128ce775dcfe3b089d
describe
'33940' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQD' 'sip-files00035.pro'
8f1e94bbd2a6e13c27dd894b556d2d85
6c99702cf110ce1ddd06ce8a38a3b3d9df18b291
'2011-11-16T21:38:34-05:00'
describe
'35499' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQE' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
10fbb428c8897d07470ea6412a4d14f7
7f7f6e2199a66a2788032c595b183f8350866a3c
'2011-11-16T21:34:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQF' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6758b0666d6b3c758edb8c8c052f80c7
1015a6f703e632d2b84945828bb94302cd70ef30
'2011-11-16T21:36:35-05:00'
describe
'1369' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQG' 'sip-files00035.txt'
27e6fbd4c43acf22fb682ceee976d371
219331f8c1261f47f3f45fcd69c39aea47401da1
describe
'11496' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQH' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
20ae30a75af4c15fbe75ea29b0399c0b
8213af2be605d912b483da1c5deeddc067426871
describe
'1111659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQI' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
7bc73f5113bad5c0c246a645e3533297
923ad649b4cf40e0aca0b3a6dbb6e7971bac70c9
describe
'96491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQJ' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
04c8b13b9c0d59ce31983dc314dd8324
4cae5c3162b935e9b0ee0ac80fb5de2b7516d3e5
describe
'32861' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQK' 'sip-files00036.pro'
5f0b470ab7b09e3c13b501b563f3e95c
1fa3fdd1b5606f431a8efb95cb192aab62c9030a
describe
'34741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQL' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d4b69d88c444dc322f022d3c7ac19eea
129941abca9e3fe1dc53aa5e72f55c80f6814753
'2011-11-16T21:35:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQM' 'sip-files00036.tif'
10a5c69e5e7fcd475573f31e145e12ad
4a3e176acc1509f427aa888bff30775c2b2d4eba
'2011-11-16T21:36:02-05:00'
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQN' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5a19fcb96ea5860f9b909333cbc381f3
2771358ee8686cff315811959edcac53911902b4
'2011-11-16T21:37:18-05:00'
describe
'11433' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQO' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
4d40944c8cc7710c3d59624bb84864d7
4a8546ca28fd973e501090a90c652cb050cab4f1
'2011-11-16T21:36:50-05:00'
describe
'1115942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQP' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
4aa9de89e141f8ae7b7d196d29ee3ee7
ed2381a01ae0451438428f24f2d570a9571117d3
'2011-11-16T21:37:51-05:00'
describe
'97017' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQQ' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
7feb4d943016031bbb0b4e2785814672
9b4e72d21b7ac49e700f2241db10416437ca363d
'2011-11-16T21:37:03-05:00'
describe
'33716' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQR' 'sip-files00037.pro'
06074438743d7468fe3e12271fc838d7
736c4ac7853fb3212751fb22e12c23f6e78b0f50
'2011-11-16T21:36:41-05:00'
describe
'35029' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQS' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
8e3f12c7254de39317d8dda435ff4aa1
dc8b68f08efd3395b576d8192d3cc371bbe642cd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQT' 'sip-files00037.tif'
30e2ae22572a584a15a4579ba0803e24
a8876cf9858357f7180b5cfe41a04fa5be580493
'2011-11-16T21:35:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQU' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f4b34775f9908e9914db2ab6e4ae9e24
ea27b61a9153fbaf21296b7cb82a5e1fc0cdaf3a
describe
'11420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQV' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
513ce426debb3d96d2db8df6dd375c45
052a7c15652df7230031ba13ab780ae113d53ab2
'2011-11-16T21:35:05-05:00'
describe
'1111596' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQW' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
ed34a153b6671ba3fb98983daf8063fa
629b68bdf4e2973f3204d8e7b63ccc81fb27fbba
'2011-11-16T21:31:44-05:00'
describe
'86295' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e127176b2376d809cd9a896b912c42e2
f8e82b954095e1b1b667e6cedbb1f44d1a240fec
describe
'29455' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
964e89b360b8a731d8898ef38e061e5c
bcfd184a52c8226e909273b62980b2217222b09c
describe
'31379' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATQZ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
5dd90cc21f35785ccb6f320dbfcb7367
00c69b9a3fa261b4148b9d3ee8354057e8c5042e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRA' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5003e093e409344eed23b8f931353d2e
172b6301ee412a616a81468646bb421a0ee0989d
'2011-11-16T21:37:30-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRB' 'sip-files00038.txt'
b2ae7815fd6485146f5fab679fce3f60
1db6290d8c5fa6bbea235705ca6fe631badd7492
'2011-11-16T21:37:53-05:00'
describe
'10547' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRC' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
6e48158d081c3bc5630a44c109d95e00
2660b73b4f9705d0677bd5a34559a6fdc89d8a7f
describe
'1115769' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRD' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
23ebff99e723898a87adebca5d7f3a3d
cd4de4b026cb0ea9d3ceab9b75000fbce86a02ef
'2011-11-16T21:32:01-05:00'
describe
'84960' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRE' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
eab8b49488911d3a366aae2e4724308a
091e1c0c9770878d8fb30feba901662e24e36a8e
describe
'28645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRF' 'sip-files00039.pro'
8b8a17c35b2baec49b06d0aa0c01937c
8ef16d3c0543f8272c924a23ed910cac8dca205c
'2011-11-16T21:36:48-05:00'
describe
'30782' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRG' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
0ae3a0e91d06fc3812975a7908141d5a
f21969a21bf4382d77796d13df902992fa9765dd
'2011-11-16T21:36:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
d7fecda1f09d29f41283091c8dfa32bc
8f2bc2aa100188bb7c15ec8879e4c226e90d5d28
'2011-11-16T21:37:42-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
c0484eb01646c2baf9b3fb96a184778e
d4021acf89ac244dcc7a24f4f3f573cbb7670c36
describe
'10278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRJ' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
efc26a41edd27eee23cc60cbb3d86fb1
061f4a4f5cc36704610bc61df2a7fc5349792cdc
describe
'1111653' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRK' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
05fd44257c0e50e3a8de2f0e2c61d068
dd26d0c7895c873e1e0d764559e761218c99596d
'2011-11-16T21:32:35-05:00'
describe
'90226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRL' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
04a83e504e79e6236ac4c8df8c1dffd1
a1ad982433b097b7c5b8436599059a081a186202
'2011-11-16T21:36:08-05:00'
describe
'30631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRM' 'sip-files00040.pro'
084dba6ab903ca8e5161e7cdab4af90c
0abfeb658bf343214905f23134c9c7f9fd8c0048
describe
'32491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1e6a4132e71297b44aeb5203865f6ea8
5c1a0068d090d7c8980424f93b2c4469a7afebe3
'2011-11-16T21:35:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRO' 'sip-files00040.tif'
a00e54a7fc85f4c4bd370e96154c45fc
0dc7abbfec384fff0de12b4f5de5cd635a44cc33
'2011-11-16T21:34:48-05:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRP' 'sip-files00040.txt'
d19bb2f4c4dec9de978bc93008f38b0c
12a4dad8d9ac0ed2815f99db65aa42bc7ffa85d1
'2011-11-16T21:35:22-05:00'
describe
'10880' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRQ' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
253a317d353a59b4f5b25b4dd87f611c
6fe9c72881f82904b948130d0e5c490e2b2166b6
'2011-11-16T21:34:39-05:00'
describe
'1115944' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRR' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
d63e813b37dc2335bb72a2a57afd3a7b
f801678394208ea89e4e4d023aa7f2eeb0accf2b
'2011-11-16T21:34:22-05:00'
describe
'93573' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRS' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
c2387f93c3a416dd9cae799013eb019f
db127b590010aec5d8ca86c77d2b165335c7cebc
'2011-11-16T21:34:24-05:00'
describe
'13851' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
9675cbe06e75592512cddd8b6bfed435
0b18468bedda8580c116aa51c9db8319e637123a
describe
'29321' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRU' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
cca40d7cc7a32ffeba7f1f94573a902d
2732d662a2cca04af0f134e8d468420880288446
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRV' 'sip-files00041.tif'
d8c94616fa07ac2135d517957fbe00c0
a8af0fe5eb765ef85189a9aa8a7911bbe523ed6d
'2011-11-16T21:31:50-05:00'
describe
'570' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRW' 'sip-files00041.txt'
933d2eeaa958269a2c06610c543a9a00
40aef82a9ba9146e23657fbb1618bd8af9e7498d
describe
'9820' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRX' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
69611c773eae0a51d12da99ae6f293c6
109abcad45dc2f3d63fe22c9b91514de030f0f5f
'2011-11-16T21:33:35-05:00'
describe
'1111583' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRY' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
01a329cef8b7ca7887663b4fa712f1ed
be70253bccdedffaf29900216520ebe10ec7ae27
describe
'72895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATRZ' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
6b7d3596d8fa9d9ad6e1f99eed67246b
518e11bfd31bcf7d99dc2cae12e3e8e34333a067
describe
'22068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSA' 'sip-files00042.pro'
9d5b1dff6c3d1a27295b06a21d170821
3c5479d49e05416cd248ccde7d02322806fba6e4
describe
'25645' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSB' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
9ce7f8f694a5ee45786fb470be0341da
78e8c43bd0c9fb4a75f0f6c48be30398f693b15a
'2011-11-16T21:39:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSC' 'sip-files00042.tif'
09cdc0fe5c408177aaf73ccb148f81a9
a9fc295c1e0218128d2e2e797bc8d39398506384
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSD' 'sip-files00042.txt'
068bf0ef896dc7fe88ef607115821cfe
e30b247468afcdd732a722bf1120b95de375b15f
'2011-11-16T21:32:59-05:00'
describe
'8430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSE' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
c9bd078d638724b05adede4faac2bb26
6c64c1220853e696b31cc56dbef4e11d787be3a4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSF' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
bfb2ceb637eab9722a429c2a5768ae50
7dafcd7b42df8e966833d678cce209eea298c90b
describe
'83157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSG' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
b306c5529405e8dee73c7f3785ed03ae
f31cd6e0644b65c9890627428471179fc1648ecd
describe
'26854' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSH' 'sip-files00043.pro'
9028616dac78518dad91284ea1976ffc
d615e6ccdffacdf94428c5b5b75e367826f98146
describe
'30418' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSI' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fe92acf5d42db362c7c3a8125ca80533
fab493bdef5029e91bc6b0aa5f625ef07edff0ef
'2011-11-16T21:37:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSJ' 'sip-files00043.tif'
30c9745ae6f8192829a56cad12968359
f4c0b06d8da983570b1a1487b03466dc45e6c25b
'2011-11-16T21:36:56-05:00'
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSK' 'sip-files00043.txt'
ec6e072d72609a5116090755b4f836e3
25dac02cccfc4584e9641fbe6ae1c77f054474a8
describe
'9904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSL' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
7f877e7fd42818351e0254f480fd45c3
5fe73c41d161b07586c4e4960ae950b0c6639b30
describe
'1111657' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
ed598fcf853a81e35d5d8f6ae36173f5
2a15138386882ed77c1505a5b15b11d2139f7045
'2011-11-16T21:39:10-05:00'
describe
'90443' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSN' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b94fd31525de770260b78cb910200d13
8273536e9919bbb204a74da37950a09cca745d07
'2011-11-16T21:36:37-05:00'
describe
'30924' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
e4b4c692a1b068fcb62463c48e58251d
f24b5bdf0e4ae0c77f2f72f508841a33b252c305
describe
'32786' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSP' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
be33cd4e9cb19a9ab48d1642ebb37c36
3956e57a8bac467d37674c88f526b4b79d7eac48
'2011-11-16T21:32:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSQ' 'sip-files00044.tif'
9143dfb484d20f41699de3a33df0d0f3
12c55611ff5809994757184a28ec866730ef50ac
'2011-11-16T21:34:21-05:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSR' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8763afa5131c53445eed5fd28674c7e5
62caffbad55c107f7ee3df2d07d17c2eb570c1e4
describe
'10986' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSS' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d30968abfa9bebafcb48337249e04af9
47d7bd5c9b718b5afdb8cb0c4b36447ec59a87af
'2011-11-16T21:31:33-05:00'
describe
'1122870' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATST' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
c2bf1398b6e1ca4a18525d976238a8dd
e116d0dfd552fff26b3a4fd989f788f54f18f539
'2011-11-16T21:34:06-05:00'
describe
'92347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSU' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f8c22723b92f862db0979d68f8863334
33fcd051dd0901006edc0e98de9c6776521414b0
'2011-11-16T21:31:37-05:00'
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSV' 'sip-files00045.pro'
68111cbd61dfeae07e3e24b373e3be08
969b5369caf734d8a7386595d27752fad6faf096
'2011-11-16T21:36:11-05:00'
describe
'33370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSW' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
49455071bda886e15390bb8e371bfec5
b24f72025c4805cca2d099a604c5e63bc095dd2d
'2011-11-16T21:31:39-05:00'
describe
'8989135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSX' 'sip-files00045.tif'
a834f03a445b079718597c5f0504095b
8fe74d2869f11bcd1ac1175b7c0f912ba5605fa2
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
20e0120aa8e5b20d71116d8f209bee56
e7af86465e11b657004e1577c29d02a7de51637f
'2011-11-16T21:34:36-05:00'
describe
'11497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATSZ' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
461e89a0591f2f4025f5999f8f0cafe2
b70e3aeea396cb5fe02c32d6031423ef99b545b5
'2011-11-16T21:37:28-05:00'
describe
'1111643' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c557d0a1f0540cc36ea2a2527066fe5b
0574b2c628fd3fd476f28db2dcaa5377720f371c
'2011-11-16T21:31:41-05:00'
describe
'92750' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTB' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
1aa04d6cfbe3e347d67314c1e6242025
7cbfdb2cc8ab5e65f1e052a4038fc7e97c62474e
describe
'32405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTC' 'sip-files00046.pro'
60da0fab12c05d47607d8ff3d8ffaa05
f9e118b5fd1059d2ca5bc6a24beae2abb4248656
describe
'33335' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTD' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
3a532eb0bb3825867626710e8e42d22c
1cbe1d969d8ec2c1e8d3f7eef1757656534bc56b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTE' 'sip-files00046.tif'
84a2e4c2d88ec222aeca77ed6cab792b
a0fdece3da4dd3579d4217a4d2cf97263e5108a2
'2011-11-16T21:36:01-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTF' 'sip-files00046.txt'
39032c6989e4255e1666bcd51286323d
6aeac9775d77c8a9461423f3e074b14c6633fbfe
'2011-11-16T21:32:34-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTG' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
23fb5d56e130550069b37ef3dcd05738
9760e2db5d13cac42bcd27417c0288e87d7f947f
describe
'1115936' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTH' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
4894a42fc836bddba0a7a7b7ae7db1a2
154638de648a66b4748fb397056f973744d78faf
'2011-11-16T21:37:58-05:00'
describe
'90616' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTI' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
22929c7e486a6cafe7d86ba02303fbf2
c4c5caa2c6488a2da37ae9a87ce59028d3d7c140
describe
'29932' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTJ' 'sip-files00047.pro'
d95d2ce13af8f98e144e55799dd9a179
dcd3f6f860585c7562d61d583fb9ed379a2c2e73
'2011-11-16T21:37:00-05:00'
describe
'32387' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTK' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5c49cfd72ff45bf432b22abdce1f47e5
ccd649cc26c9b805ffc5d02a28a06daf6c291196
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTL' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d48995d906acd8352366a81309bd7f72
089464320c6cb54430355b5b7a906cc775ff8c04
'2011-11-16T21:37:27-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTM' 'sip-files00047.txt'
7e5b4cc1f821a8610e7b24d3d8fea0fd
5d8df6a40ca024853e0a8865390f80c8c3ce9238
'2011-11-16T21:34:40-05:00'
describe
'10985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
eafeb57f1b556691c6dbd4c756bb73c5
3ad57ea897da2b9047e33e00e542b9a76eaa7187
'2011-11-16T21:38:40-05:00'
describe
'1111588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
7cf932b9cc610c2835907a568895c45b
ff1f3606d6f9f6adb2015e6a3f3640f7bc8dccb8
'2011-11-16T21:35:13-05:00'
describe
'90238' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a853025a96c58934ea81ba4a71428c28
4e594b1d5510e5a33cd06a11eddc1c83482b999d
describe
'31328' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
de1afefd1056cfda776be8e68d7f5158
f5344acb70d9bc9ab8f5874aebcf5b324fd56043
'2011-11-16T21:38:22-05:00'
describe
'32314' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
dca43f5dc88fbb44923f62eddcef8251
3e32001679982fbe01dd8a40b631767537bdaee1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
572e1965d5a56c5e475cea6d58efc557
11df627ba1a87ea70c77d7b7184d5b57f35ef710
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
08c46799d77891eee63ed6742ce0ad4d
b7c3347c661bd432821edefe55549407a5f0de80
'2011-11-16T21:34:25-05:00'
describe
'10882' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
b4b20d08705857f60e0fd2664e954a27
cc63da3271d2e828b5068fddf8290a1d6fa6c3b0
'2011-11-16T21:33:33-05:00'
describe
'1115943' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
3ab5edeecee2db3ae9e2889bd124c165
54b70bc56e1be7d967f2baf54924fec14785df1f
'2011-11-16T21:38:52-05:00'
describe
'92371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
1d8890b834b992be9918e9e6f7fbe121
1f356f48b7bab8217561d406a57f8724ffa0d174
'2011-11-16T21:33:42-05:00'
describe
'32100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
06bf81aa375c5cef6087257aaccf4eab
26e9547b0b1e386b4c9cf740bd22a85034e39aa1
'2011-11-16T21:33:10-05:00'
describe
'33665' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
646740e68f8d095b3568dc72da6a465f
67a9090a496686169af28901174bd5984efa527b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATTZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
aa3debebebf606142aaf689b8ebfff03
03b790eb548b62f858c8efa10be3d19a00d548a5
'2011-11-16T21:37:46-05:00'
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
933b2df29a3ca867da73b575cfe4dd0a
6d01d722fec69078b55481a6d102a20123b949ab
describe
'11020' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
8d1dcea277b6bfaa31b2742f22142f52
ba7eef1c68e499330d85e2c6c051083e237e9920
'2011-11-16T21:32:51-05:00'
describe
'1111629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUC' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b8f8a94b39df23ae163e7b117ca1076f
1942cfdf85c0a756db3f2505f9d6f6f6b45d1267
'2011-11-16T21:35:36-05:00'
describe
'90382' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUD' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
7370d8ac289dae8da24cf07d66e9ceb2
3e996e7440cc8ae018ffb0a39b93737bcfb5ea25
describe
'31422' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUE' 'sip-files00050.pro'
43f0e8acec425c7bf6a748a1a2360ee1
ba4eac26a52ca9e543ea5f10d94ff00d16f066a7
describe
'32982' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUF' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
7538c9d76fd26ff7a9a83615d0dc9e50
3ce1dd797153d22bc4eb62a7163b8ceefbac3572
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUG' 'sip-files00050.tif'
76a55b64ac3a5eee3be178d94938be33
3ca1754be336caea350945f9c275d415b686b9d4
'2011-11-16T21:37:41-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUH' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1557e0509e69f77991f7757e11428f32
2dd7ed1c48bd6f24e095ffe9edbce681e3cc9e08
'2011-11-16T21:34:59-05:00'
describe
'10732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
8a86fe92a583695c9c7d1031088ee686
eab1afee0f7b5151cb718f67a6dbfb8d029dc37f
describe
'1115879' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUJ' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
017c8d2bb302f235bf2316efa05993bc
100287c7b622a03222bff73e5eda254838c64c2f
'2011-11-16T21:34:23-05:00'
describe
'93049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUK' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
64d6932fa5fd373b173c44982ee3c9e5
e4ebc8498f2c245146c292d948a31f60f3e2ba9f
'2011-11-16T21:39:01-05:00'
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5e1298d717868efda06fd2f70dd125c2
90599873cafb49fcb017f6afb7cfcb30f61ad185
'2011-11-16T21:34:27-05:00'
describe
'33908' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUM' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
c34b96c5499cba0f05913ff8f8b1454e
9493f91aff62fbdebbee81c91c690c1a875a0290
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUN' 'sip-files00051.tif'
874a643f8aeb556838b2a05dd6bc029c
59b2b7f3be937848c0ec73146bcbed427f59828b
'2011-11-16T21:36:55-05:00'
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1e1de9ea757fa8e7c5a62bc79fbaf6fa
59b8c2b3fd94247e3112ac2f002650f32612b057
'2011-11-16T21:32:25-05:00'
describe
'11150' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUP' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
3a1ccc847b44b08ad8380763f7a5ca31
76c6d6c1d4c6e6fa0c72c26ade5c3d3a6f9d8cf0
'2011-11-16T21:34:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
e1d6144ecadca5c5b3aa7a4e107a90fa
51ca7c09be3e399e8d3b8b8af0521695688635f9
describe
'92420' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUR' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
41301d63bdb160bbf3c8166d02e55835
e5f3c921daf10aa54a98dcdf78161b496985a48f
'2011-11-16T21:36:20-05:00'
describe
'31297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUS' 'sip-files00052.pro'
7a9265ca4be280aaa8a44de81677bbe2
63826aa50aa0418d0d11d4b597f7e154486d9ad9
'2011-11-16T21:36:46-05:00'
describe
'33541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUT' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
56b51df7018f2fdd112de242dcd2b4e0
1e16c4df8b90810cb36cabf1f82b603039b12279
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ff1a1829d46f813b6c39201873da9a2f
d9e3144a695b59ae6dca6688154793b121418b36
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
4d020994185a1ff50f2351a5747ab032
08bb5846009dfccfafaa5cbe03730f97f64bc2df
describe
'11165' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUW' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d8dcb35c2c0cc77098db4b874722f3cd
9923baa32a9515eb608e6308179f370bd96c1294
'2011-11-16T21:34:19-05:00'
describe
'1115925' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUX' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
22ab9c7fa569d44f249503a4c263863f
2dc19551d9744073e0f258906c788070fd5c63b6
describe
'92567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUY' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
6d359484a3d87af4249274ab3af46a18
dfa153d618d041ca51c8ebc9dd2f9e008fda9865
describe
'31731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATUZ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
09e4e190c4a87fd29cbbf1c1f6714365
1e1aa85bd62305d323b903c428990c873bccbf86
describe
'33581' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVA' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
860797c14b9834422aee5e975f88a949
c98a9e45dbee125fe9c4d64fabd9851ab6442144
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVB' 'sip-files00053.tif'
647dbfb187566e748f1c63dc54d7fdee
ca07d6df9573016a2b28fda52b590d25bdf2a90d
'2011-11-16T21:33:47-05:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVC' 'sip-files00053.txt'
c5dd0fc10102d8045514ff3d872833c6
7f6722f80f670caca6550bcc848c9f84fa416bbd
'2011-11-16T21:35:49-05:00'
describe
'11015' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVD' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4c509152711537591f2dc8ac1ec64909
39333ece910bba3ddd5f3001dcfbdf4d93933cb6
describe
'1111565' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVE' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b9fbb0a3e8a56fa79f357430f8b7cbe6
94161c830f201f4f42886855f91d4b9b89a28bf8
describe
'90749' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVF' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
74c17860790f35ec951bb7072fa7c48f
08481a34c0ac6a694af8061dbb97bdd16e1ea356
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
a578dd8bec8925e09364ceb65d180761
24f8f309bb315c9fd29357d2dfcc1016d6b20d6e
describe
'32662' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVH' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8dcbf626eec8a49189cda00be8294ce6
2f832be374291b7dfc4ea3b2b4d63dd3476c6e7b
'2011-11-16T21:38:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVI' 'sip-files00054.tif'
4ac5deb791f547f90e09eb0519a76549
e205f77e7787e54ad4ab7d301d6428807082b15b
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVJ' 'sip-files00054.txt'
677a93cf75ff5a2016ab3095bfd16767
988892fad8c4a28981c3009e958b35d1bbc7de63
describe
'11014' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVK' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
19df80bb223d6dd6003e10cbca91c348
02da00a7092fc66655a9433e4bac342d71931fbc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
b385d30467cdaf34cb56e184d2e1e0b4
85762e4edce5083fb2a473e2726d6f17f4fec9ac
describe
'97654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVM' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
53b8d05977d8d9669bdf25b8ace12e54
9f937a37873398e7c6a0a3ec34a38706ceabbacf
'2011-11-16T21:33:41-05:00'
describe
'33127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVN' 'sip-files00055.pro'
d9d24e648d0f1f0e9dda7203e28777e3
7d1da2f07f207b7567144a0832d240b121a7607d
describe
'35543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVO' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7e00708000e48811d720dac5576ddae6
d0587f180e1d4cac96b66edc97e6b54aa51c0e92
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVP' 'sip-files00055.tif'
36ffe5c426718cb36bee6c7b927947b1
be7823e56759510a8dc10b0f5c4d224bb4f77d97
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVQ' 'sip-files00055.txt'
a883b644ede7e3cbc80d5502fb115953
f777a04e22b35618343e5b1db514d3f50af59242
describe
'11747' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVR' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
26dc22c5514be7789dd2d32830ecfcb7
c2cc5380c23f6170003187a8c974257f739e0abd
describe
'1111636' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVS' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
d37432263c0ac4d6bc0364bd84e5d5a2
09e67b2499f05c28bbfc7833ec49b4b9ec0e1ed6
'2011-11-16T21:39:05-05:00'
describe
'86083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVT' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
b2ec811eb0021d58b9950497ddddc927
b415c8dbb9433f7b96fae99b37cac04413395e30
'2011-11-16T21:33:23-05:00'
describe
'28562' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVU' 'sip-files00056.pro'
c3e5bf50c51edd90940aba34cec4dae5
37282a2d52a0a9653438551508f14d56e97ef528
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVV' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b8225135762605262670406fc98f7bc7
ec578339a05fc8969c22cbc88fc93686c848fe7d
'2011-11-16T21:32:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVW' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3d3e8f020773d44581b07a54d559f6e8
ad13cb3b49fe53d880de6b552508d53ac8dfdca0
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVX' 'sip-files00056.txt'
ee88a8b1a9230f4b0bdbc8dcd1b9a2db
f5ac7e12a4ed452295cea55e1c2f42c6d560ed2f
'2011-11-16T21:33:04-05:00'
describe
'10743' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVY' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
c1083c37635c4e234197e3224fc04c27
9c3057e684c2f5670a6c61a81fdd5c03a43dedf8
describe
'1115934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATVZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
195d5eaae00cdbb0d386bb3399730315
7d153333b64a97c12e2487acff99f26d492f56d1
describe
'94102' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWA' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
9c029b0d82ea31fbad16ac79121a42f8
6ae68bdda0934c76e830c809dd5b1a435871084e
describe
'31852' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
e03b9c605366368d94b10db637871fd5
67d3ce8ef9fdb3ea863ba4dad8a5d6cd4b9b384a
describe
'33177' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWC' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
b503c21f998389354f0ddbc03d497746
fa3f8a494dda94d377b3133fcafe79b7b04c2057
'2011-11-16T21:34:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWD' 'sip-files00057.tif'
bab9eb37668319ebd8cfa2a64468fbdb
f909f99711ca67a48cb2397118209dd38cc11b2e
'2011-11-16T21:33:58-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWE' 'sip-files00057.txt'
d6ae67d5fe220cfa281167874e51790f
fdeb33224058ae4d76e726e04a4110a6732b17cd
describe
'10948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
83d4025ae55463d77258a75331f38e61
7dc0a938dbc4cf1ffe1abfad1220cf36aec77f82
'2011-11-16T21:36:52-05:00'
describe
'1111639' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
543cbb721a3aa2147a01893bef2248f6
c8c3c4a44b4007ff912c1a47a66409d0a3b73a2b
'2011-11-16T21:36:34-05:00'
describe
'87175' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWH' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e6026d1e48c93240b805bb645adb22a4
826d68d6e8306b02f5ef9693f41f08d9c295b2d9
'2011-11-16T21:38:14-05:00'
describe
'13556' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWI' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f42f407e86257cd70fdd513ef6da334d
36be29344119fbc96ea917c4b0dd8baea2f2ca7e
describe
'26998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWJ' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
846faed11c1f16ba3df0e3e22759a011
f1d94e8d7b2db59d6a5c4be84a00dea066dbab93
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWK' 'sip-files00058.tif'
202e0f7a8ad0143069bd6ae2b80ef646
9a655a18049b9a8a32613de0e8ae7a779f924df6
describe
'566' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWL' 'sip-files00058.txt'
0d7d8a49995ba112a2b4d945469d4c5c
f1958c07309b324b7a982166d4f64cb42aee76ee
describe
'9131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWM' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
791cd434df92042b440d421164d8fbc9
02d89173a8c32aec0ae5509b0216bf34daf5cd75
'2011-11-16T21:37:14-05:00'
describe
'1115913' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWN' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
4228ac20965a02c24f90e5467038bbd6
789391962b6323c2a1929ef7f2fb55d27a0caf32
describe
'1293745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWO' 'sip-filesback.jp2'
a3e8bc9c5411b36ccfa28696f5e4e369
3734f0fe479a4504ae10330272f3432321ba12c5
'2011-11-16T21:38:11-05:00'
describe
'91384' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWP' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
ce685df0a30a487feafe28e263d4161c
bc7637dc16b329d48a5f0b44be45f18bd73345f1
'2011-11-16T21:38:24-05:00'
describe
'30948' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWQ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
c9786f9f8658314d3192b80ca7275d49
7ab5f09071f013a00368dde959f241377fb7a537
describe
'33149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWR' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
903eb7f4d20a09ad303d7423d722a9b9
0edc571023cd43305bff646b8ec342f2b8a7ee42
'2011-11-16T21:31:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
31581156992aaac6873a84cb44005c8d
24b8c355131b4684b7ad6b629a10de0f0855510e
'2011-11-16T21:36:30-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWT' 'sip-files00059.txt'
41ea8f6f1fde1706b6afa871bf0593bf
258ffa6032ee243f10d3596326fdb373d9b662c1
describe
'11196' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWU' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
18ad10dbd1160bcb6e74aebcf611c4e9
09190773b3d05680e2e0b3528840b76ef4bef650
describe
'1068304' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
f95f446f63540071df02d02afb4f2d19
e4b51b07ea4f2521e6efa288cafa1083bf2970a5
describe
'49835' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
13e7748f8bfcd28ae4b29f5df1105b44
cb89698a5502245764d5f0562b4eb35a61fe3cbc
describe
'11385' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
23fdb3e85b7221a877ee1c6e7ef68f34
0c63204dd13e67438f6972000796ef5a1aa63fe0
describe
'16626' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
f0c5998bd903d022092ccb2e813edca7
a1d32505e3aab95bdcb7980cf32a74f468701896
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATWZ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
8dfdfb48232005bcc611d896d4bc7415
e797c2ecd81a5ee445a5c3d0df48abfa9dd8496d
describe
'491' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9b74c0ee632ecdf8a785fa1c5b70fca2
91a37b6e54ae772f3aa12bf8d6f8b6e1d0509ad2
'2011-11-16T21:35:16-05:00'
describe
'5564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXB' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c5cd7ff174cac2eaf7f3cc994da92ae7
fc5b6b439e17bcdb9c4e67a9a6225f12204e5888
describe
'1115922' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXC' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
33011af6e882a8fb2546fcebbc43511c
6e8411cbd8e44ac23e28ac4449d877a3419bf0a1
'2011-11-16T21:38:41-05:00'
describe
'81915' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
0928bd7e56e581bb73ef7e925ae67370
b5fe17ab364ad1da7dd5f4fc1411e1cf0a27129f
'2011-11-16T21:36:04-05:00'
describe
'26628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXE' 'sip-files00061.pro'
2d9932e165a2e4cff99371d539816e40
f71ba4d3394fd4030f74a6879b0f71e4ad95480c
describe
'29058' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
03eea8878ad16f17dbccd0cbf2f3717e
0f2c72806da83adb6f686b97f72fef4f681bea13
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
aefe94c94d3f2adce0108d343d685e4d
40417b6ce4bf1cd18c23f40d65260b4e2c1de788
'2011-11-16T21:35:47-05:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXH' 'sip-files00061.txt'
77767e376c3dc7208124f7d7894f3d70
d704dde6796be8408dfe4cc0e7eac0be57323f8c
describe
'9774' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
83e9ad9e63896108016a0907314a5e63
98d76f902b295649e683e60a1c561ef876c1ac29
'2011-11-16T21:33:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXJ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
07057c2f12a85f9bb9f9dc8c3b11f745
81b78d87debcf06d6fd22d74c8024be57801f9c2
describe
'91216' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXK' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
6d1b2466b32ec8d6cab5843905f508dc
bc1a7041b07bc84994cb61a2bf6e5c3fe5661cba
describe
'32322' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
47a8a6f66e1a55cee01b45842a78b22e
cd51b5550bc9ff04d5c19feae1a8196d4487483e
describe
'32901' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
870eda721f7c3cb54a42458e02c46158
4c42dbb40e90998f96afbf91a62747700cb6d2bf
'2011-11-16T21:34:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
e6d3c091ad1a4f5416aca6c91b9bc6f5
f837205d54365ebe36cba3abcdcab5950289657f
'2011-11-16T21:32:05-05:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
a6965424b3944990e8627b489f89c71e
aa5b6615343d0410a209fc0340943e431e59f47a
describe
'10868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXP' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
a42582cf565e5879de85413cd9215c8a
1b5f7a083aa46e47224bdb4cf630b26e098f5408
describe
'1115881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXQ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
595c9a24dda904cd0e80e565d0f4cb15
5ba68ed1da8a7795b92b4371993347ed1c79ed23
'2011-11-16T21:34:44-05:00'
describe
'93418' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXR' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
7948600369f1669995546b3cf08da6c9
90dc738653c8b86b2c8f1d4e9720aa55989fcc0d
describe
'33141' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXS' 'sip-files00063.pro'
9cd499ac0ecad3896b5d1cfa2a8a0fa8
46f4da6fd1072f68d94bfc2eef95eaac3b81d87c
describe
'34111' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXT' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f72a6dee15f41d2355889755efeb7b07
b33e9966f906d10022fced4fb8231544c65f6487
'2011-11-16T21:31:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXU' 'sip-files00063.tif'
38710f139b4a961cb91363b52c360707
b6cbdc5b74cbc77417860d249a9b518ef3fd9d1b
'2011-11-16T21:34:34-05:00'
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXV' 'sip-files00063.txt'
fd0abb90ad4676ebd40c294645b84110
f2237ff15098399539e5adc881dc9540b0b7d3a8
describe
'11157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXW' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
b2ec5935d29ec601bd9af13cb22e7a15
f794afa3fe68fa1756b11c6330653530fe81e263
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXX' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0dc84d48e9b095f2f165e473cdc80c12
f709ba09193e103cadeec5cd171744ce779d4965
'2011-11-16T21:35:43-05:00'
describe
'93054' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXY' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
b5980a5143edd3ae57a64db552e73631
842cbb0b22d9380557e83f3bec2600fc52b929d7
'2011-11-16T21:33:55-05:00'
describe
'33713' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATXZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
8b7897a3b9b85101c5fe595615a7ccf5
17ad2fe66ecb318c41f628119a68e5748af3637f
describe
'33802' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYA' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
660de6d86d8c62cb1916c1b9d9e8a418
3937b0146a5f543739839165679b14f8ff324d4c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
7fdfb7398dfe64ccac52c76ffa570a87
cab08b8eda8b837d01a9c86f953ababeadab982b
'2011-11-16T21:33:18-05:00'
describe
'1368' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYC' 'sip-files00064.txt'
abfaff9ee8fcd41862aaaf9f3d2d8b30
4808e4c3ff1cbc86abe71b4cf0140a04a5a6c11c
'2011-11-16T21:31:52-05:00'
describe
'11129' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYD' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
24ad117255216a43ef886d399824ece6
d1959f58b141962dffece447618a6789037e9491
describe
'1115946' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYE' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
02c86866c6078ab2a39f23703b5d74cd
df34b4e302405e0deff2b20c70dfee6f06b83fc9
describe
'94517' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYF' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
fab98793b6aa220b2c69914dee737fe0
1c58e17a7f7600c919ce6ca68dda201390c819ad
'2011-11-16T21:36:05-05:00'
describe
'32799' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYG' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c32dd6c5a24a25a1ccc3fd9c5a469ea8
655411ed1fad2961bb3dbed69bcd22b120c59a8b
describe
'34412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
375b742a8c6045d4c7c207e0e02f8678
677495d47e91656e5c0f8f25625ee32dcb53614e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYI' 'sip-files00065.tif'
87d54c6faa383edc9e5322060ce4dd06
44e580be99439f7a2ee84ee692a2c66a8e541730
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYJ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
bb85202a37729b77d1003d99f93ca501
0b73ba9a2b109e710383ffcdf725d54181424ed0
describe
'11252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
8d72c11d9cb7c657983c0cfff9d9f3ab
0003f34735270e9ea95adad4bea5fc85b2b538e9
'2011-11-16T21:38:04-05:00'
describe
'1111658' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e766a1b930320fcf3f197633c553989f
6c7a50051c9cc214f051d054218f8aa20eff64dd
'2011-11-16T21:32:04-05:00'
describe
'87654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYM' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
6af9e59762f1f1fcbb3f3ec5b2d2be50
712860c9fa919cd425712befb04573d7e5e97375
describe
'30160' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYN' 'sip-files00066.pro'
8ea1413d2e2bdfa80a73396b71e015b6
86bf05038a7d4646e86217f18877b68c51cb1c33
describe
'31346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
66ca4c9557b0b66a089e497ecf18accc
2a17f60ea114627c1bff3628910e83aa389b5785
'2011-11-16T21:35:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYP' 'sip-files00066.tif'
65d133e2b5c61d21738454d975bd5a38
24aa37746083b3aefdf25a6d6782cd71a7ff013d
'2011-11-16T21:35:58-05:00'
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
0238c22a9e6181f1388870751a9ca4f0
a682a20c83690e6b40ab9386639e8203c4eaa715
describe
'10708' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYR' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
35364c3b58a5ce92cc305dc0df24d5b1
64e0b954137b0fb13202b346e50d3d661c0f0f07
describe
'1115898' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYS' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
3af064f35238442ab329bf08aabfbd87
72f0b41c4884c0906fa05fb39ec6387555f62561
describe
'95564' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYT' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
2b46126e0190bc00416af1eedabc8f74
0cec04840935dc3ff7fce9c0ef03eac491c83a87
describe
'33701' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYU' 'sip-files00067.pro'
14008656a36ada6422416d3632732dd1
08517fb51d0300b580651c0a402be9c1e22b88a0
'2011-11-16T21:38:44-05:00'
describe
'34377' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYV' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
04ec306b52fd32b132fa115e0b33cead
478a0ea3eaeb2425d1005441ab3464e4d79f863e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYW' 'sip-files00067.tif'
5ec98a09bc10314773c3bb6aeb41cab3
7f3891568ccc000bf29418f3cfda41709169e1fc
'2011-11-16T21:37:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYX' 'sip-files00067.txt'
c259fb60cd7ee74561379708b6472f83
a27f64987f240bd63c704d0d5f5866d7749333e0
describe
'11185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYY' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
6f02a029b452d96207943d72d1e3baeb
0179544e232fbe33f7ce718dcba7d31ab231ae28
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATYZ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
2a003bef65b9a43532bd9e538035f427
ca0fbe68b9b3caca17d384e6fa031490f935ff0d
'2011-11-16T21:36:03-05:00'
describe
'90345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d0195dff74905ce721386126f5720dd7
39ed8f5fd1509f0fc5ae687e7fd45308067729a6
describe
'22778' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZB' 'sip-files00068.pro'
6ea8e549129d5536f8e3cd5ba211c777
42f43e45585a0275286a7198caa6e76b26585212
describe
'30928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZC' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
de3233a6ac5ce4f886d4d9b7149766a3
ad9a21350008d8a499cff771d235f758a8f3547c
'2011-11-16T21:35:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZD' 'sip-files00068.tif'
9783826f0731509bfb4516f3b4228d7e
691f1ba44fa453188756216a11819eeb711007d5
'2011-11-16T21:38:53-05:00'
describe
'987' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZE' 'sip-files00068.txt'
1e8c1f28053339cf5227f1ea1d85776a
9b1fdf1cd45da34a3ee6668364036c5d4ac341ad
describe
'10473' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZF' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
6f1c3da964cfc0b3a2ab809de73f666e
f71353485c8976b4b386f0f891c2d80d6292b5d1
'2011-11-16T21:32:17-05:00'
describe
'1115862' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZG' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
c2f9a628fda7e496f4d2bb226e462993
3e03e6c536a217d1d113a282efd9bc741db3d120
describe
'90659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZH' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
4c644378e7da1a3125c5e18466980fb9
c63097982d74d60b8aa80fb86e923153b5da4e22
describe
'31493' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
1f57515c38878f2171dfa7ce54904c51
e4e19e4397ae6e017b42d29e54f4d8c6584100cb
describe
'32817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
93678cc46fad6d85979ef2c436a687e9
75cb73019bd4fa29c0b83bfc174d06173050a90d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
bb7c9e180e0e2fb97eeec901b0e66319
7413a2c1f8a753c52679720a3955d317acee0b5a
'2011-11-16T21:34:04-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
962caa12fa24e08f8c78b6f8ecb62de1
fd91ccdc95aa9a8b97ae4b0f3a6869943a8788a3
'2011-11-16T21:34:35-05:00'
describe
'11001' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZM' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ac571eeb4ffab25877e9da94be551db9
81b925a1142c0d6eee880e4b3d6f1eaf5d30638c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
00a89d7f5ebf4bff1bf82d00c111c513
074af3725ddb270aee213ee9b1b55182db66c5b0
describe
'90265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZO' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
0e90b5c9b9ea0a0a7343572dd480dee8
d6f69de926acaef086530d5bdaedeb8f3b75c73a
describe
'31130' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
2cf41a88be35225e8942fec691baea64
7b0606bbc671c33a6c4eeb409c059452724f996f
'2011-11-16T21:34:33-05:00'
describe
'32914' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
867fa3bd720a5a1c8ffe99a690bbe729
1811761d847adb50fbb989fa71e42ca1cb5d5e65
'2011-11-16T21:36:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
3dfb2b108ffba20e886c933488cab17b
840c2f1a68fa6758a127492cf65e02ef3d64ace7
'2011-11-16T21:38:03-05:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZS' 'sip-files00070.txt'
bb00538fde56fabb7fe2dab63b587434
ea0c37e223e1cfe0dbf1fb657e2bca3e21987f2d
describe
'10928' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
5e4ec94a7fa5e3b313bae609f8dde1ce
e33571203bbb76c34c59557ad3e441313f33dc92
'2011-11-16T21:38:25-05:00'
describe
'1115935' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
6d9d1757d740127bbdcf494a5d44631a
0f9950f011667c567630c9ce632b83db098e7917
describe
'91864' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
c7ec98bf947a3bdb525f65f23ec2c144
1359167aedb47e111f89d687fa04d15f22549d12
'2011-11-16T21:32:58-05:00'
describe
'32091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
28dd4030e3b8c24d1ed985def4f4b69f
c1edd9d9d2c839a9c56d183d8a992b2373b00bc3
'2011-11-16T21:38:37-05:00'
describe
'33211' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
2ef2630b78f929d8eea9ee75869f4182
207f78d845355821a3d3aee62cb3fefc409edcda
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
4151e6308124d06514598f1440422e07
f4e440fb2ce9de7653f991523f44bbffb5feda9a
'2011-11-16T21:37:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAATZZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
5f92e6f06d6fac5b70ff5d5c1502c084
a3079210805f416185a343bbfb47bfa8b230c0f7
describe
'10600' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
17784375b9af74deb1f010e5f8798e0d
8b9ba40e7f735486976aff759314e2fb457b8dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
265af3388799772a70495bf4180c2f77
50e674dab70eebaa534ca4516c066ce6c5522cf0
describe
'87859' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b21cbd765688f98c931f22f0b3cdf944
750794468df3c9b3aa6c6903b129c942c6185bf7
'2011-11-16T21:38:12-05:00'
describe
'30855' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAD' 'sip-files00072.pro'
fd924ffac01923ad8b61ed5c198ba6f7
25628f981b9e7e5cdafa422f18d7230e409f6f76
'2011-11-16T21:36:58-05:00'
describe
'31681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
e28af7fc29d2932f41e13a84bcb1f818
97678578915a326234a7074488e90d69cefa19bd
'2011-11-16T21:36:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
36bfe8eabcde229f4ee6aa946a38d1a6
ea74efcf393ee331a6419e99a773b848a730994e
'2011-11-16T21:33:24-05:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
60cedee1e5f16c1d6ba32c600679c97b
49ffa9007e3feeeb99a7924f1fa30c6e95da5ab7
describe
'10770' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
5c2a6b447107cecd5d2d98f3dc51a683
9abe920c1b4f4f901d5027673533c4c72521d7fa
describe
'1115779' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2f3e6c1d4eca0ad13e6dd8aa467627f5
e492ed60502495fba6ecfccd4c3467ba609c4350
describe
'83791' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
d05e509dd9d96f2988893b71b4418e4b
4ebd3f19a6e0ad017c50cb025bd762ddc4bd49bf
describe
'28640' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
038b81214c8a3c0a92ac754b51a44702
5d68e85d29fb80c776781effd386938a7c75c7a4
describe
'30534' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
797593da5a17148759da4fdb5bc51482
9dced527372108552882f72a309b23fa5721deee
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAM' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bd4b9e6e09377cde10483b6a8f17c69f
2676da11dac2b686de940637153b2f5c66114114
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAN' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5ebb5cfbd7bc61b78dfc676a441d61f3
7738d61b78e089bcef8c102c54830ab47d630861
'2011-11-16T21:39:00-05:00'
describe
'10262' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAO' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f6c1a01db158460bfb7a10fd84f1760f
f68fa00f8d8470b77433ca4a6df65ce0bea5ec9f
describe
'1111637' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAP' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
83e83245ac05139bc3efde590ef80ab7
2b794ab7998cdb5da938f1a882920663fa560374
describe
'92334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
96092183c9d2e7c3b9d314c583022cb6
ec3ec5334eb4c8198234298b1c5eeef848ec365c
describe
'32896' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAR' 'sip-files00074.pro'
0b121f542886ae36a86355847e78441f
86130d6a997a6f160cc693f03dfa5c6b1eb5078c
describe
'33198' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAS' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
e61ff57015dd00775576daca95242ab0
f814de9bda82a8ba70519250ca3a6d2d66c76665
'2011-11-16T21:38:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
db5d21d4525b48afb7a4def42d6ae16d
ed2530042543d6a075b4f883029b1dc6306d0a1e
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAU' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e0ddf001f5f138f412e1474b169e2332
d0f0cd461ae44444d9447ee9a690f26007434fe2
describe
'11010' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAV' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
79e4e51081acdf296cf41bfda3f4a403
d637da57e352381ad74149bce91894598076baae
describe
'1115920' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
c86e81a9e1a3bc345c6352c0a2f5655f
6d94d9e2e6de129640bb142fc34bb640829f65a0
'2011-11-16T21:35:30-05:00'
describe
'93666' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
a915c018bb90b93e22d0957e59b14c0d
c2734e19a623e1c928b100004624a78c70a93670
describe
'14621' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAY' 'sip-files00075.pro'
54174b69fb85f2d1c2691f5e13e6bd12
eb6ffe5e90a1dab7a4fc38879972af292afca32b
describe
'28954' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
bd5367ea6a03c65f8d704174f04878d5
6f3de7c9ec0eb18de8d8731c3ba61290b3ac2f82
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
b8d2f0ec27ae3c6872c7248cf065013a
fcc61cf36614312236c20e47e731a32231b040cc
'2011-11-16T21:35:02-05:00'
describe
'607' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBB' 'sip-files00075.txt'
f630618b311900d74e6d49c1ba09308e
89257af5182e32b279a860a44a80695f3204f0a8
'2011-11-16T21:36:12-05:00'
describe
'9554' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3a117fcf0421e7a599c6ebf8bc2a7e01
a80d73b74880a9ada9d8baa6641ca60ee80cdd15
'2011-11-16T21:34:26-05:00'
describe
'1111647' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBD' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
04026cc965908f56ee573294d0e92df4
0fcf87573aaad8e8a52ace3f556c44ac03ff81b3
describe
'91710' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBE' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
fc24e300389e6d1ab59241c252598918
90f35eec5f8c619c96f4542281df359cb32f6de2
'2011-11-16T21:33:09-05:00'
describe
'32463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
b01ef58abfe504f1a12202bbc4a241f7
bf5e517390b3154c3209676db6846f31fd7f19dd
describe
'33408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBG' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
6b54c605ac5dac28874fda9a1d654e8d
11c62567c8fcca6e50fe723eb196b0731080b899
'2011-11-16T21:38:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBH' 'sip-files00076.tif'
ec90e7217ce8554bd073ba0200833719
edafcb42eccb7ea50bfce09114877a2426a5b972
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBI' 'sip-files00076.txt'
dde57d7a8bb031624bdc1624552b3e2c
6001762416186de52aa860f2f3104c01d6723036
describe
'11097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9ec5e1b22f969352c9e59f205579c4cb
3823b41809fff82a78fee816a7a544fb0287f6c3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBK' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
a0e9356a83d93b37ec3d77187473cf61
9d0312787d620c2f34ecce341c02c9a6bcdce906
describe
'88151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
46307625b5d270734607baf58ef404af
bccba8c7954186b27e339b1dfb25694838e0215c
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ab4bf82255c3016362cc0c626e0fc120
c78993bf360eef11dd4b0e04b93b80f3270fe698
describe
'31980' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
40d22897266bf65c860579d69cc0515a
6bd8fbbe230f5482cf9a0e4bc5c5f664382e6436
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
9c3280c8aefa8671a368a0cc90157cc1
1f092741ec570b8b2f4bacf6ee66086e21cc9b79
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
35a19115000911c679a94bffd95d8e8e
540a93e76acfe46007f0aa757675a514780423c1
describe
'10565' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
2398ba2978ba5e925a04589841eab397
cc4ff532729c82aedd84c0917ddef685b14a2e34
describe
'1111631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
830a8c176cda4453aa06899363379492
3b9c9369c182cae942d828009fe8516b7f238de2
describe
'89313' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
8e5e54b16038802d2fcf160d1a4c622c
b081fd662a021715b2aea9021b3b2426fe72f3b7
describe
'31124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8c5a7ac6d4140f076ae801533e89f14c
92c532018ef0a64c87b697aae097a7182ab835c2
'2011-11-16T21:34:56-05:00'
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
fc4e889eb055a2d59e569dca5f8a4f50
bf14b0e0c028f11cb5f64de5acb74033d32f200f
'2011-11-16T21:38:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
eec19ab624ac89f74b3b222d0f82283c
d3c22d9f1a56901dd1b703c472c6fbc73ae7c887
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
2e3a1ca9f0d327d4622eea8247445f3a
11b8a8c6ca66b9568f38b5b5aed7b38674827556
describe
'10720' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
1b7f0d5ddaef9831033aadb6b6a7c271
ced413eb48af9352a00b584c996326c1264b227d
'2011-11-16T21:33:59-05:00'
describe
'1115900' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
5ad310860fc563d2347180c76734c810
4cb82be28c5a609289adb9afedcc8d6332c4fd53
describe
'87106' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
29be207e294f43bf8e1f47ee058f7159
bded5a84df238ee80d9371571e5db2155bbac616
describe
'30080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
57bcfb2fa8f807671052cfc24e42b9b7
045a54afec3ebdf2b7ddfef6675f53e3a4e19cb2
describe
'31970' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
a51824b4e5d80457a25c62c7c6286eba
3643f8bcbc75034e364c262447c8265977ffa8a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
acb97004ebc247f6d1b2c24c84ba9358
37981997c2fec2d7fcc8b1a4c0c3a60f67771567
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1ac0f55c3351198ca4acf3a2345620e4
64b0e3fe560315e9f930a4c53a57fb5a3723ffa2
'2011-11-16T21:35:06-05:00'
describe
'10641' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
c4eca0b4b8f36fe9022721e80a0ac22d
1c605d3df48dee7183515aee4e9b48b934a5b9f1
describe
'942364' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
61d63b3412ae2cca7dbc95bc0badbb60
ec84625fb104f4dad4baa7f138666c79850ab88c
describe
'36317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
2142a112c83f5c0795f85a1bd2c17622
783cec2a9ee0f0d624c4c34c8889a51aaad3340c
describe
'5937' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCH' 'sip-files00080.pro'
a4b82b283070f60e6ebeb0465aab9807
ea115007d34848c55f00bae38cb8cf318935fcd6
describe
'11924' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
10321535047d34ad3862a79439f84797
83d42feb1a931c773dc1fc1541879b4fbd04a70f
'2011-11-16T21:38:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
7cebaae69d0e87f4940c85b9f2674ec3
ee245a59629ff8ed8b76529a7e6024bd0b0e9f2a
'2011-11-16T21:35:25-05:00'
describe
'286' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
016b1f8cf542225c5fce7be78e595f4a
69296add7c5bf330aef25002043cf43bf4bc6b2b
describe
'4414' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
584eddbf0c15aa8b6a8461f7890f1c6e
da606927f6e7a0ca2e96f60289364ff105f15ef7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
fae665b234f47b5b1d4b458b7074d17b
d0f9e1642b1cc542179f8c1641a93325ce0bac47
describe
'74389' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
7f62d0818bc7ae9a20083946a15af2bf
b25c4d0d2be886dbcfca0bb623bf575308b48000
describe
'23607' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
66ebc008f4cd0c12feb48f5cb300db0c
54c5117dee22280b04d8bd8bbf109b8f1e71f213
describe
'26904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c55f6df6317daecd6716ef78031c3e60
6aa12f483306a2156c0781637cf7ceadf92e578d
'2011-11-16T21:32:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2e278a3e4eb1f48d1beb9c12030a3aed
871d6e596adf55715632b74b43c0f8975043b111
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCR' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b91c17cc2f6d789456df0fee8026207a
263d4133ff08e25c70cdac21fec6d1b5f735a7dd
describe
'9112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
353a1a96b812851ac666c91b20811e41
ee1216c06826ffa2ccbe96a5fcd6096280218f73
'2011-11-16T21:35:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
7d38fb8fa220177b7359239945a8b3eb
67054b5d69e3ef7fc14e862583f184c4f91627ee
describe
'91806' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
572d085ea7069ae1bd866d59bf6b2a68
3eb49b0cff72397115eead4a2e940fc601d3370b
'2011-11-16T21:37:24-05:00'
describe
'32445' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ad65e7f5566424c4d07b5df6d5f42db5
e4a1c0281c9aec8da818e2df4ba5eed393f10806
describe
'33455' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
18b168981026432ae936bc9218e3bc19
9c59dd82d24924646611ffc0a04d9edd19d5f26a
'2011-11-16T21:35:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
c77be5b5d0f2899214174d44917b5af6
472c5c2b16dc775e5de9eaf91abe22b92f04b5b6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
dc6587f8e89ed43152d0651501ff2b35
1304149ffac81580c6b93b885540f7ec8f08b328
describe
'11088' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
12102b7ad942d78b8b9d71af0f533684
674bb1d008a7285949305d67b236b3c40b404c7e
describe
'1115923' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b655790b26c4c3bf5a42c52e1e4d3a67
6807f816df973de0c0133c4cad8d5e733fa6ba8e
describe
'93348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
73920b339064b1b61794b95cb81cdfa9
f0d642002d1084917105663b16bfc0de5ff3510d
describe
'33289' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
23f62649d3329a49aedae88c30f09137
2f611b8252114ab07c708ab7ef8f05916d807313
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
100aa5aea6d564557635bb0b14fc6ba2
a5802253791771ea0d6c066e9c23eacfc63e131d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
4616009a0b76865d0ccc869916175e83
eb2329443e7d42fc638e8ca2cd1b3de0982980d8
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDF' 'sip-files00083.txt'
712cc76e111d7c2b024c1c377954c906
05743397ad0e61d0fe88c089c31ca7a464fa4fca
describe
'11124' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
5404c3b02db759f28506713c66505fa5
22d0130843c522a1011409b306e68c41408ab8a2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDH' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6237d732d138300c941e9f94f3c31a21
4bfe7219ff1e773d9af461c7ef393125d86e0508
'2011-11-16T21:38:16-05:00'
describe
'93228' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
1b012c4556fc3443a2f80164706241a4
a89effd2f3f5fcef24d1a350c290bd2ac1f524e6
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
29ac3828d2e060362a53b8f149dbf79f
96e89221c5ac5c346cc0d59d890f875ed97aaade
'2011-11-16T21:36:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1e3507b2c2c8951a12fbeba96c7c5683
88b0eeb50ff8691bc6e4adad5af73c5044e960d6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e9969eab4141919a535ebf08280dcd7a
4fd7d3ce8cf8dd92db9dfa977e27f432eab9be00
describe
'1370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
fd2bb285474bc0e1a1bb74b6ce395316
99172fc9095964ed1c7354860fb372d758850541
describe
'11353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
1097ff172e6cf9dddbbc9cdeb12568e5
004e4076a2c718d92128586a1c178f52680eb5a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
b685bf2c39e500c4494c73a55a060ecc
507444f6c4feac8fbc5316cd7379a2c708a88069
describe
'86693' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ce14ab86e32663e02e14fda3e6fe2188
d28b308f9ea4685377b588c4b01ed884b6cfca06
describe
'12575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
c9d90830869c143a807624960d6bab18
21d0808c8aeb32c560d57333bfe56bde01091d57
'2011-11-16T21:31:35-05:00'
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
6c9f4d36ef8c01af92853855b500f9a1
d5b4c418695ee635e95f9ed0f5a8dbefa337b9e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
2b8f67ade845c0c0458f2e01939830f8
ace206185190d59019d55b06d94eabcd479dde71
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDT' 'sip-files00085.txt'
fdd6371e9e6bc597f4bed43c3cbf38d8
2d12c10fb9f9f574fa47ff09637363e8b0fca25f
'2011-11-16T21:35:35-05:00'
describe
'9473' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a085c5dc701e77d31455db965671d3d3
217987f5753428eb7cc7dce756ae25e7f7be9cdb
describe
'1111644' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
016a2a4229f7373afb0ad9f5ed0799c3
966ec8348454108d3334cb27a76020ca4e23e1ee
describe
'92635' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a643cb6699af92283130c6a03349bf1c
de4d94bce874f943343df55761180e0ee040d471
describe
'32931' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
aa6a66ad11b58104bbf23913903091a9
4b7e8726731bfaf8fe42e62b70dfbe06857881bc
describe
'34063' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
141d24af0f4f3e3edf618de9d34c4d01
365b95688fd3e4b7ad87d45d9849871d0e228ad0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
3ae9f71221cf10935dcd9052fc985cff
ee04916ed0e183405c1142ddc304aeac296837c7
'2011-11-16T21:37:31-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ebbfe99082a6ebf75c27432aca6e3672
e7cc9304e02b53a5fbfbfd0588416c043317b381
describe
'11364' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
9eb8d809301f4cf040147f94466fcaa9
6effc4f52deb42bc8913a6563a52cc4ba40cb107
'2011-11-16T21:38:32-05:00'
describe
'1083146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEC' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
b11345d573472883fbf9295aa65c6b61
e0335ae3dc1fd88b67a018493c2dbc176048f520
describe
'91733' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUED' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
3df6924fc5286f4c6bbce75adeb26f50
f57e2b367fdb8291aff47eaa6bc5d7a78003d3cf
describe
'32198' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
aa3904f037cebb37dfe2423cca07ac82
90504554ffc5e75c6af29e9e15e5cbbb9b34a775
describe
'33768' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
f17bbea096dbd3d1577ebd0d0a32b111
16340550a3fb2d69140c5e32c1a5acfa94ade105
describe
'8675479' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
360e031e5b91c3672a14bd7e6bf7879d
97508fa9c226bd7e55dfe5977d6b38abb8b61e12
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
9f1a3df90af9b2603a4c83e1aaaa7f59
febcdfc520e7e9e27fbd6c0d12533f3735eb6bb9
describe
'11288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
6eb029a35883d94eeca06b35f559fe0d
154df0443679ea2fa3f6d0aebb26f256a722de7a
'2011-11-16T21:34:28-05:00'
describe
'1111607' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
46310b00de1179e017b9448936f1e71a
9c92054e70840961031e2dee3cc6cc486d168bb4
describe
'90774' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
678815dd949caad1fe14e35e0120cae8
31764a7a3beca6f84ebc3d3e8f826eddf5860457
describe
'163548' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEL' 'sip-filesback.jpg'
69be69e369f1695938e5e110f29a2fa3
833150ce53b2b363eb7aca88182d0eb038d1bc45
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEM' 'sip-files00088.pro'
87ee9cb213c1d03b5312ddf0dcd64a94
a15a59e10c617243d4c96298842bb07d1d2f9e1d
describe
'33112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEN' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
58cc277c05c0aa17ecb024baede8e709
69c5c494721d19e8f2bc73d442bf6eec6de73132
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEO' 'sip-files00088.tif'
df648bd60b8e7e1efbe2ff5b3c441f95
e9392d935823c0f8227310cc20f52820fd91e400
'2011-11-16T21:39:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEP' 'sip-files00088.txt'
8c7a86c2340a4b21e7e99e6895be349f
8f2a7db50e8f7aaa7f445a4c33251418c4b0c19b
'2011-11-16T21:34:31-05:00'
describe
'11095' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
9f7f6806c72625c2d606485977020a15
f6b42863bf746d9423d9f80b96d1c7070a5f3e6c
describe
'1084483' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUER' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9ef13ea43bef6a9205ffa4254d8e0861
bf91561214e2ddf6fb3c62ae2b2f6148018662e5
describe
'90376' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUES' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
4dd3f3435ce785a3553830a0f47d44de
f0cdf5b32200cc9606938b259a7a082e3e48b07e
describe
'31202' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUET' 'sip-files00089.pro'
7bc7a864625d4a19902545cca29732f6
2e45c7b9075f93224bdcdf0910e1fdc34407ae35
'2011-11-16T21:31:56-05:00'
describe
'33459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
5102a7dc89023168f6d581ae3801b8d7
88c015b8aaa6d34485cc79b91a268bc6a7d0b2df
'2011-11-16T21:36:29-05:00'
describe
'8686023' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEV' 'sip-files00089.tif'
040b7491734f605addedc974bcb7571e
75b4e2aa9746d57dbd78cbc31ae791cb6eb5d3e7
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEW' 'sip-files00089.txt'
a70b4b9c7e9ca21c0962171794b409cb
667636880dab623028f03a3a0bcca1e5510de87c
describe
'10988' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEX' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
0f415008dde2ed1e48ffc8d1c2083bbc
eedf3dcdf8bd3352e1f4e196df6c98ed95b8af4f
describe
'1111624' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEY' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
f2b3130596911a25a521275d78981fb9
693dda7c12f07b6cd1cc6d4d4142763f64452399
describe
'87556' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
40199715701280d0bf91c7ba0051a57f
2535b8214d45a981c79dd2cb201cd21eb1c639e2
describe
'30295' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFA' 'sip-files00090.pro'
78f99c89e47b45eba7452f3c40c938fc
374d3e289d38601f9563d12b4b71a4f9c4c99fdb
'2011-11-16T21:33:36-05:00'
describe
'31477' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFB' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
afa0dc0a981687e390a83fed33e1d854
fc16f3fff707bdfa6c2bc6fc66134114013f1173
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFC' 'sip-files00090.tif'
ee355f3df8926664bdd731a887b064ca
9f67b48ab553235aee07965babb6afa76c580fbe
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFD' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d334b52f5a96d0b57aa443440d82b590
2bdce875e53f76a7a27fbf124882fdad7f237f01
describe
'10817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFE' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d3a3783e4e9a6060b6148c022cfc7fe4
7b509beb54a814fe8e402b8bc6e43ee9bee85d1d
'2011-11-16T21:38:38-05:00'
describe
'1115885' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
54fcdfb28ab730081f8a1b9a3c97f771
b124deab761fa548b178e3beacdb951c6640ea62
'2011-11-16T21:36:06-05:00'
describe
'86717' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFG' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
2dbfb78a15857ce189777d276c6e2e00
cfc5f0fdd7e678c6ac2e5993845cf9fcd069615d
describe
'29814' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
38880aaad9fd04a93d88dc91fd119f90
2b5edc59cddc5cd1633c8ee096fcdbd34abc67da
describe
'31938' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFI' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
36fdd6b8c381573c92fafc92ec80dd1f
2de4dfdd7630f038b68b4c05b05737a3f2812c04
'2011-11-16T21:32:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
1166cdec3176dfa87892d24ec5f0894b
4556279e3e11682313224fa33ee9a79da4b465e5
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFK' 'sip-files00091.txt'
56b082016299bf266b441b43871f77bb
8ddf1397df95f5bac6a8cd6895558e721a729f0a
describe
'10574' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFL' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d4733473e05e45a7be6c013e19c8b3d6
64f274c1d1d930ae594fd383e6ab108d6694890e
'2011-11-16T21:34:43-05:00'
describe
'1111622' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFM' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
7e051d89323e7a38263a18d0389dd4dd
15c62ec70238ac85c53c5bda78e903d9b9227d77
describe
'84547' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFN' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
0e2a4f8d1822757f8d56584821c7cc39
65335336c4208812e4b3388bf6a1e2bd22ca28d6
describe
'29841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFO' 'sip-files00092.pro'
295670f518c4359ee6a046ca34865f67
e4467ad1bbdd9afa843b64ca11a1116857df5d1a
'2011-11-16T21:35:00-05:00'
describe
'30954' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFP' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
ec7f2cafcd16cf0a5d4ff55a0e0eb9f1
0894cba3108e0a25dc658469496936b5cfeecb8a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files00092.tif'
2dd9f380d1c8c95029cc7d042dc936a5
1ecee9ac8906d7b71a65c351f5855526d0ffafe3
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFR' 'sip-files00092.txt'
56d61b1417810be8922d5d9411b1a051
4fc666ff1775d6d8ad6dbb6f4bee17f24607f777
describe
'10497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFS' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
b6ded6edd833b26cc5795a17f793e7e0
3a3631b30d6375dc249a5acd038d98040b1cb17c
'2011-11-16T21:33:31-05:00'
describe
'1096085' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
6a9646a0ad0f608ff9eef00e046b12ac
1a9a54b7f54ef0f87fb0d2c22abc25e55c6f9175
'2011-11-16T21:32:23-05:00'
describe
'83749' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFU' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
044e452f495281f81fd5f0163cde53fb
b29212a517e096e8df20d180135189227460069c
describe
'28278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFV' 'sip-files00093.pro'
77f9c3da481366861f8f301144c41766
687e360c64a378d67137ba34330488d2b90fbf1c
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFW' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
25a63f97f274ad440880bfc7382d02ec
92aeeb028765b640bc36a34b43b598b1fe0562b5
describe
'8778959' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFX' 'sip-files00093.tif'
df94b0cc1afc6edf68c077f74a11d689
3888f02b2b27cc3f269433e3b06f34c7bd8a568f
'2011-11-16T21:33:50-05:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFY' 'sip-files00093.txt'
80dbdfe439841b127317519b3986b01a
10d48c2408b44291cc04f212f5fedc35705273e9
describe
'10458' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b8faaff147348b202854598284d3e747
cd9b6778151b6e4f59b4200958fd6e8a5d820bcc
describe
'1111513' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGA' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
9442ce3a18bf2fe899aa4e57c3dec0d0
746fad4e50de0195432abd9e1d03503afd9575ff
describe
'81541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGB' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
c41c94b5d4990d29ee9277db6945a9d1
ece164b6217003fb8b3dd08031d2588de6f6a6e1
describe
'27551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGC' 'sip-files00094.pro'
f3ae7835f047770fe3772a6aff631d20
739826168977461120a5c0a87a8ea5eb397e57c1
describe
'29149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGD' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
cd3ff21334cac8e4549fbb0329db78b8
76632b089e517a927391e3dd0c5505e22204ee50
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGE' 'sip-files00094.tif'
afb7d33d5e3db370cfe52440d906b163
231c1fbfd32f26811c5774143402fe219d311223
'2011-11-16T21:36:53-05:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGF' 'sip-files00094.txt'
aca4ac7fb94e6fff780eb530eddad767
52b03f5f208c4e98357aedd5b491619093c47640
describe
'10101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGG' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
70829b0046cb6466c0ca1a121dcdd5b7
1974e322fcba3d7a3dc5846e6071a9846ed3c0c5
'2011-11-16T21:32:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGH' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
7f53bfb0c277d2a942cff09990483a0d
f93fe43f443fdef0b1f2ade167d212df84c046d1
'2011-11-16T21:34:49-05:00'
describe
'86020' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
0dfab5816ae156ded47ace1447add0a8
1db0103e6d9a34cc3c216d3605a20f0fd4dc2488
describe
'22827' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
9102849a08e25fe44816bc129b637840
bfb137aff80ff2252f8abcddf2b1607aad7fdc18
'2011-11-16T21:35:33-05:00'
describe
'29598' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
612cb4e1c7706678bed526e95f9a7ea0
8e3615297a78fada2c62d51f76ad68a60eb70a38
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGL' 'sip-files00095.tif'
d8e111470bc2ecc669263e8356862107
59b88637e0040fa81a2c72746a4b98f19a6e905f
'2011-11-16T21:37:21-05:00'
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGM' 'sip-files00095.txt'
627a8e0d044a1238cc4c6b1c4b7ad0c9
4662af107e8f474eb7e3d5c15bca17abc7b1f611
describe
'10113' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGN' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
5f376be21897c7f2e937618055282079
3d56cead39beffdbc878e56b4506d156f5112b6c
describe
'1111619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGO' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
5931ab0dc841f69d0cf0718843263fd3
ebfc71ac052b6bceb6292a0f2cd3efcb3771c0c3
describe
'76235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGP' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
1f9a98f6ce462db3c684002829832372
66dfee95a1a2ab86ef784adc55f1a1b3645e304b
describe
'24294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files00096.pro'
dd238ebeb33637714c5d4493d14e8abc
9622ee0ff610bb2bf4182fbd095b57c6b293850a
describe
'27459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGR' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b71e8f6b6552af336af23e6ad4f36925
f298526c911873ce15cced29a7db9d313a88bddc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGS' 'sip-files00096.tif'
06f22a96d2b81d84fb9bd7dddc9b36d3
10187aeb0ca9b8c0a723eac6be8b9eac84ebde16
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGT' 'sip-files00096.txt'
3c95f937f3e9231f017b1823efe84d73
bff62975094c7b467dea1782ffe7cd95a1a172cf
describe
'9469' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGU' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
044aaa6aca3f1ecb65484cf242f61ece
c054b2a2713d245fdbfa7791316d105fd5625502
'2011-11-16T21:32:27-05:00'
describe
'1141408' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGV' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
5592eacb31f9eab8369e1d2ad20803cc
8f02fc0523dde10e640004b134513e2d7a94a885
describe
'93960' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGW' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
229f8f519add46f0c0550f1fe9720f28
e15f1645646c1425257365fad97fdb00ff17592a
describe
'32492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGX' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ef9e366c5c8eab0149d9305fbf710de2
3a4d768d64cf5c31d4ec82b6ea127d32f78c0014
'2011-11-16T21:36:13-05:00'
describe
'33071' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGY' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
54f40651a60b190dccf8e171d852b41c
aba77a9b0241711416761e1bba8aaa5da9bea8ff
describe
'9142081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
115d3b19702064bd812c6a3b2127347e
e2bbea148519855b2ba302b2eef67a2a68718bdd
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
380426418f12b8ae481ea27db7e13a2f
069eeec79c2f484d39593831ff69274459d36d48
describe
'10787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
6f7eaa87922fa60e0d80bc760da922f8
0726e74bfc1bac8bada788d2f08ae4e9f765d7d9
describe
'1120129' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHC' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
f0afef2de7b660dcad4e31d31a84ced9
656fb687b9fd0eb8b5c2da6e8289a0f7762c4f9f
describe
'94870' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHD' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
8ec36c770523a88cd526cf470d83e402
2bb955fbc2d5a403b471e66022d1258f4254a3f9
describe
'32969' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHE' 'sip-files00098.pro'
37522e9a4f2feee963ca6c6669f250a1
b3bfc8e78b4f30ba8fbebe5f81e39c1c85783adb
describe
'33397' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHF' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ccbd8c2dc5f3e7e9d982df0614179034
4f1c21a5c852103d671c4d80b5f8629770f2a619
describe
'8971329' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHG' 'sip-files00098.tif'
83364ecfad06f1c09a4927be165c1b04
910a2f576265a3198afd0a6b6d6a338005190908
'2011-11-16T21:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHH' 'sip-files00098.txt'
48f6758cf1b53ca521f9d6e74107b2c7
d8110a61c45a0908d4cfdde330ae4c04fb9b1be2
describe
'10631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHI' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
bc68dec264fe5a4327e72d8a6b7227d3
8759f53d8e38ecf119ee1b19abe6f382ff3b4495
describe
'1141458' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
6d7b19a380cb4a1e0bf6edc212d79908
5701d1746cbf3a7631efefed45d7d958f01a804f
'2011-11-16T21:33:27-05:00'
describe
'88756' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHK' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
399c7e4a06a749890dd9aeb34653b860
1822620bc15063623df3e814cc68016d293d3412
describe
'30731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHL' 'sip-files00099.pro'
45e44014fc919f357f4150d853d88c33
90a11cb1c8da80ff65d41b36aeba088c64105bff
describe
'32497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b7c816d78fc8f3cb19aba2120781e54f
58f3ce7b816849aa62afba037631d4998b28e710
'2011-11-16T21:37:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
29de0258fe167a6ba96e6c5c1ec14d13
0d7f261712ae3752849de0775a1090841359a44b
'2011-11-16T21:33:17-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHO' 'sip-files00099.txt'
c490d67bb6d2cdefe9734ee95cb6ec23
f679ea1b05f59b83fd6b402b489423de81d8a86e
describe
'10996' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHP' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
210bcb6f2b65fd4c98723e665fc25e08
42b9b6c9dc4f4201c5901e153e40f2ce3c5e3e75
describe
'1120145' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8591eb3051f455e3f9e172140003bd12
1e3b48c68fac8c2bb358bf289d704c54d9676a1f
describe
'86310' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHR' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
4ce94f3b6a4cc7c84f92f24813faf921
4cb865f6ab52778145d878882b357796e0bcc020
describe
'28783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHS' 'sip-files00100.pro'
6b2370ec48b868a5921bbe0f437a660f
2ae8c57f05911adfa3f931003367dfd90d247fa9
'2011-11-16T21:35:15-05:00'
describe
'31020' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHT' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
4a7907bcfdd6cf2560bf3d1a2a6c9126
eded7f9fcae3010cd3451c8196d2d284e770ba17
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c004f87108634de5bf7d2cd75425e462
9bbdd1e306abd28145fe01465a6126976238ef8e
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHV' 'sip-files00100.txt'
d8ddfb30481394228b92159df96c5126
f435e3e94c9ee0c5a8689aaa108f07abda239720
describe
'10240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHW' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
7123175cf897d774ca811defe8e442f9
7f9df93deb9b22a370a40cee80015e6677c5f745
describe
'1141396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHX' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
0db945375627c7009ee40c62c61fab0a
90de63aa43cae8f68008bc8a4be8a2ba4d29c2d9
describe
'83895' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHY' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
d6c8d9f885771eda3febd370b0e93dc9
809a5566ecbdc923fe15bd265ea8c83fca321511
describe
'11200' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files00101.pro'
8f05e24c5e1bdaa126508e8752c61e74
94e13f917a8720c2e1814295043deb5ca55f05ab
describe
'25179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIA' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
7cdd13ad0d580e562f28236eff553456
aa56bfe0d503688c0c885b09c17b74bd99565c91
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIB' 'sip-files00101.tif'
6e1765ca779e2a5876587cb56ca56721
91480bddf5ed90bf56189c58973b7bb8ab6aa8a6
'2011-11-16T21:36:16-05:00'
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIC' 'sip-files00101.txt'
bc996b3864d9daaa911092c606418d34
fe75f077725dee93de399a41df2789cbad06a3a2
describe
'8536' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUID' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
663f563348a1ad0f17bca912f23fa10c
d1811d3c58c99a8c7fae4bfbcd9fcb3eb489ee8b
describe
'1120127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIE' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
736a44b7f6f2a525175063b9e0c2c21c
dd86a33683e064b73394d770284e91b565e2f6bd
describe
'83567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIF' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
39585f837ff7611a9c34111294ae488d
7ef0e502a2917256b8398ce870db956fc99550c0
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIG' 'sip-files00102.pro'
95779eae2dab1dcb8d0ac29d86193692
efab145065979af031a70641bb4561929df8c39a
describe
'29726' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIH' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
e0bb7d3518a968cf3d29ef5a8a65568f
ff3e0af78924e85d91a735c9c16a20f6972e4984
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUII' 'sip-files00102.tif'
f74db194a45bdd4aa592e4fd4e5a2ec2
c962b13d947a2d046acc6565ad14fde86b17dcda
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
4307c31ae4cfbab76ba070b8f364e2bd
434f55d008c716787e1a04ff93a0a75181343d74
describe
'9863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIK' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1e56df0e1e32b8424f3bf145fa905c98
9e88044e93aaf27e3a693c711aee5970f5576715
'2011-11-16T21:33:45-05:00'
describe
'1141437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
9c695efdb15267bbf59d86aa25a51997
0ca53e1195e89691ec76fb91a9b8f80cbc4d2fa2
describe
'82019' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIM' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
3ca32b742903e023b247f0061c17293b
fa2ba159e3eb3c612d8a2ff77f2020e79790d0d3
describe
'27352' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIN' 'sip-files00103.pro'
a437dbfd11fab3892f9fb7485208dcc6
b95339947c527ada52991c97110ca4ed787d6823
'2011-11-16T21:34:38-05:00'
describe
'30419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIO' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
a4063a9d38504256a09e585ec9aa290d
298a2dbece270478ffa531028688f4744cd0f667
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIP' 'sip-files00103.tif'
ebc8fe6493bb91c3422b1e62439a13ef
d9dd3f8fe0ac66803b32c33a3b8fb19c3a984a76
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
d2744bf7234c321b839339a47e7a5462
d146bbdaf99bad8944d28f0c5f9883910ee071ec
describe
'10502' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIR' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
8992d3356a0b41a08decc1687ff67043
d21f865bf57392f62b21b37efbaaafdda57361c2
describe
'1120094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
6c7a3aba887614c9c69a83abe0db9f85
6f92124f89c9af4639b7c84fd8a75f4a5f34bfcb
describe
'90995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIT' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
72f7ddef378e260d62558b92cd5f087c
575fe4ea1df3bf6b1da840ab1d4d67f30b3a70da
describe
'30794' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0902284d688d7d42cdee8dddb9b9211f
f4c0d05a7402dc535ea8a87620e2ae328afb48c5
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIV' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2db21141b5dbeddafa37b8f4b2bf331a
17197cbbe53c74d7552a311a09cd8a39424f68ee
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIW' 'sip-files00104.tif'
3e8b988cd120f0c9f06d16f3f7b60077
da05a00be2f02f7ff5990e5eb5262f6813e27b5d
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIX' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a34534708d44158b8c0c6fbebb607b31
73fc72a1f071f8b94266650c2277016da4987073
describe
'10675' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIY' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
93e5dfbc92d50172dd4485f38eab1301
d6d702e88cc5fe08a5a705496d08f59b006bb063
describe
'1141447' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
17923395742c817f5124ab828784d949
b6769b354b597594ff2b2a6af7e5e2af26ae8a91
describe
'83177' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a043d6461e562e158a0b6f502da7f8a1
176412bd1d2dcfbff8fdc9b0ecf1f9f5c8653ffa
describe
'28742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJB' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d118012fdeaf100af15efb5b3c73ab3e
59928281d8c427089b54d2d47e0e9ff1c7329f6d
describe
'30288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJC' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
d843c62ed3edf9d4cfc9fa757ad91d1a
6a7933165e5aee33a127eb027af7a538f98bf7d1
'2011-11-16T21:32:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJD' 'sip-files00105.tif'
e10ef1493055a5cf708ea5f9bd946804
a9b02531afc79d5e5c7295c265104caf6d00d803
'2011-11-16T21:38:35-05:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJE' 'sip-files00105.txt'
df0d31b47e473dc0d0764c2b2b8a1e2f
08031768b02052d1360b14e9cba688861818467f
describe
'10000' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJF' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
0def52ee7acef7b7fb4255c7bd63eb4f
0d70b56256331e1f04a45bdcfa77faf578bb38e0
describe
'1120093' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
19cf7135a69cd6fd5c8e1680a5b7497d
5602b9b9a894b00783660a52ec1b1c0bf1f5e5d1
describe
'83751' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJH' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
c7cc0e69fb756e8d553e4c2246d0c938
a2d382678b63c5a358e82478de65caf3a7fd20ab
describe
'28318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJI' 'sip-files00106.pro'
027d28f5dc49592c32ef4cfab7d85ed4
3248482410f136ad09b3f088269067bec48651f2
describe
'29604' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
395adfe77d1f9cc3dd952e9b311970ea
48625ded45ded92c2f736f5b5c6816b0601fc5cf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJK' 'sip-files00106.tif'
1ef1cbbdb7e0516b16b1299021a61e6a
7469230a6027c448afa9f541bab0d79d6a00bd5d
'2011-11-16T21:35:04-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJL' 'sip-files00106.txt'
64f29f1016f5790efe7a6f4e762063d7
2c5214d0d37d79624e702d1dcfbffd4632e3dd8e
describe
'9791' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
2e0d3a03bd82389b659a9350af0968f7
42bed2b618f795d172d903106a67af8bfc26b0f7
describe
'1105470' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
a50e4bb67c8292c3c353c6fe748f015e
697f863bb308478ead989d998a4947af8859db88
'2011-11-16T21:37:12-05:00'
describe
'86712' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJO' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
2ef846ba107a01fef4e1803cc7e82240
1630f8571d726ed52c76295eb9ee73098efd4e94
'2011-11-16T21:38:08-05:00'
describe
'30151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJP' 'sip-files00107.pro'
2948f01323247daf837cf0b5ed6cc52d
2a0478d3524691f042d91f28a2989ac42cc16b2d
describe
'31674' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
56144b2ea33795b787f1ee658469faaf
1ecce8a78172354d909c3f8a94e6b8b1062f42f6
describe
'8854507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJR' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4820d7e785cacd2d0bd463dc87ec4b7a
0b1453a854ebf1f845c976fd650b5c6168f5aae1
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
01758115221222afca0b26b158f12506
9998908d4a55445dfc41cb7142f5ec1e55ba3b0d
describe
'11100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJT' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
fc1408c07775e6b04598b03fd4dc64eb
cb275c32573228e4af7a249815b22ac5c12c4262
describe
'1120136' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJU' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
274c9d0d1784ed9a82f72f97a47df9b4
566b686903ad09a497ac6a45b31c039b3555b56b
'2011-11-16T21:34:08-05:00'
describe
'82301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
247e6d651ff3c8e6b2087e58aa81615e
ef78dcdcee8260003f22ac38d267cb5a2310e49f
describe
'26666' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJW' 'sip-files00108.pro'
26b0d038156afe414758a52f3f35452b
067692c7b9862e949b95bde0540fbe1b55ac73f5
describe
'29567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJX' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
7c095d295db038409a288262654e343a
073560214c3a50148ba5e4c89ea121e41ef98b52
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
7ab8f82dbd4a397975403b367bc75fe5
b19e854eb7081dfed2ac98d4dee5ea9c3e656734
'2011-11-16T21:33:37-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
16d82bf0c5e9400e3f6be188142602d7
d1ba8bbc06a401f025ae810dae9ee81ffaea07d4
describe
'10068' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
6ecec7ebb286e34ece8b9545b7d84d9a
7e9e7b711fc8756cf697f8894ea9fe8b97310112
describe
'1141442' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
b90e97f3571fc580cc21fcbd954d91ca
de7e398a0ce28eb26e534e2024ce2e4114a81a44
describe
'91312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
bb3fe365be48ccec30e6435a76f3b758
c004cb080662da6682ecece6978d33a484043850
describe
'31394' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
c052a349e020fc9da775198a9e77853b
22b0155f592f13202fa22e6386521590e6a9a999
describe
'32912' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
54e6be3f15b24387a1f10f83c4263cbe
d232fc8e412f720ca3ca50afe14876973010a128
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6d2d24b5727c3a9f0ff962ad5dbd9ae9
493cb78b838a32cf16b93798260548342ec7f0ea
'2011-11-16T21:34:55-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
72912747ea315c8dc2f2cba7d11d3b91
c271208088844f6052479bc8d5495b95e5b8ad46
describe
'10620' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
5314dc48173ba2828c58670f8406d620
54891bbbd47a81fefc934fbc5a6107272311224e
describe
'1120098' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
6496856a11229238a23698a2672eb9cb
16392ec9ea91a9e94f43c66ac191f111b2b11e04
describe
'67050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
aa828e2d52c4fbedcccd9a4db854e2e6
b1b8934809154fffc4146fb606ba3b32049d4590
describe
'20265' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
3953073a33f895948a65095aef6a02f1
bf15c4d3ec4cfe5f863da3f56b0a0d815d971afb
describe
'23591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
e22be06c0a33714891a02bfbacad47a7
5ecba5844029af256b8a083f3c99faf479660083
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
31f249e802ca19ed3b086fab7eee4346
c22550fdb366e30a0feb64fedda3ebbc53c87966
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b0d9f71ea27a287dd9caa74a9889834c
f75ee0cd51f6a46d55eb3d54e0da7270c536d80a
describe
'8034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
9a263ac228ab03f9ea5449a3f765e870
1d70e9747e3088d747fabbcad4445a7290391dd7
describe
'1141463' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKP' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0665f403c0405f3f7b404920f1f943ab
68e545ca0fa581774344b0e40eb8a2c1ad47e1ea
'2011-11-16T21:34:37-05:00'
describe
'77811' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
0698144b12d450cb379659c48420bfb2
32867693a5d4b436de67d645d5f75c4064312c2e
describe
'25404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKR' 'sip-files00111.pro'
105c827e4a4b3f445a1d71b027ae677c
8952d969010e164e8c84c3a74ad5bd47aada6bdd
describe
'27930' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKS' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
95feb4f41c1393ff9566945c5c3788f8
965b8205f1c34d0b5f9492ddc7f9bfdc4c706bb2
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKT' 'sip-files00111.tif'
7074f5e784f27e3179b85b3690ea59e6
824fe005fec0c5297f69ca04abf9454ba4e67a3c
'2011-11-16T21:36:27-05:00'
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKU' 'sip-files00111.txt'
696e99e53af021aa117a4b20318ad065
97c62f55a0ff06c893ffecf1ccd8e88d88b008ab
describe
'9532' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKV' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
a2a8fd83b34529b1c1857b83bab6370b
352836c08e62cd3edae9f49c4378837ab1982cf2
describe
'1120118' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKW' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
997076821987e3a71a4e68e8e98b71ac
146b356bd1782abdaf7e8949488459785880af54
describe
'94852' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKX' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cf2260463206c738b616d832d83ed9fd
9b6aa05d86d778679e5975158b44651957650d63
describe
'32149' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKY' 'sip-files00112.pro'
2bc365daf46a393245a5e16ff61946ed
2cac0b6e7deccfef9b8e43904f0ae283cadebd67
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
99967b2fb1f93bef1331df688df3f70f
147f1cd05c08269011c5632a73f81f1afbf25ad7
'2011-11-16T21:33:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULA' 'sip-files00112.tif'
34faf8bc1ad50e0e8466e8fb43a7f622
bcd603020fcc0b1870b3c67898d3dbcdf4ad520f
'2011-11-16T21:33:54-05:00'
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULB' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b1efc300edb62c2208dbbd277b2ddf09
d9e6775da7c55153d9533f2d9a87e57f0583369f
describe
'10870' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULC' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
c8f488aba841441f8cb0a74cd9996654
744504064135e099d343508acf5b241ea734c8c3
describe
'1141427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULD' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
fd4b41d8ad1e8a0993404cc87f7a3461
6dfd46412ef23358cb3399c191f64681736c7145
describe
'89731' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULE' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
b156e4fb6b241ac5d17cdd5adb46ed09
0f6f44c185d18af492aa232ef8a36193d8a1fc23
describe
'31822' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULF' 'sip-files00113.pro'
b2c390e97a471608ba8c2d58f6da9ae6
2439d378f5d478b632aba412a082c4ecf6ece76f
describe
'32206' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULG' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
643f54807b6bd354962bd2bb310648ad
88e98277af6d2d3fed67103e5eac52982e1ca6f8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULH' 'sip-files00113.tif'
5ea04fcc0c02b334c358c98692d61c01
c157d8aced75336b6cf00aa3491e1710b3d4326a
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULI' 'sip-files00113.txt'
9a73b7fbf1f9637aaf0f8c15cd41f979
6ecdd1c495f1b03a47d35eff9a85947cbda1d2eb
describe
'10677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULJ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
9d994cee7ee68a400e6b958b0bc4a3cc
ab444f20ba76809fb37bf51dc1eae8c8f9201e0f
describe
'1120056' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULK' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
03d97bb3160b3d6263e630aed1a71e62
866f8a7142c846a2a80fd69b9de5407e0729a19b
describe
'92488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULL' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
b54d8081723c396a23943c93d9465f6f
6466535649f7c5848dd05b4ca288c39bf0aea4ec
'2011-11-16T21:35:17-05:00'
describe
'15325' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULM' 'sip-files00114.pro'
610aa79c24719a07976810767663873b
8324a764dffd194f3fa294be51319a7d234648eb
describe
'29629' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULN' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
05a32ceb46225d00daedefeb3a6500eb
2e06397214ee40485ca63d48d9e5ef168d42997e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULO' 'sip-files00114.tif'
809e1c2d18ce82b230697dc6d127c669
170205147cbb5480d690a3e87a06974f064c629c
'2011-11-16T21:31:53-05:00'
describe
'637' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULP' 'sip-files00114.txt'
feec49ea40af6e367334e52be9e2df9d
1679127ed8db0b523d4c94d1aef1d1d6cc66ecfc
describe
'9525' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULQ' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
ce386e9649fd4868c512245c5e73b481
e503a946765109f3c4d1ba489889cd45a4a9c3ea
describe
'1141462' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULR' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
433b5d238717747830d60c859e592e52
d27d002ecf4045a30459dfac8eb9fb1e219fc833
describe
'94514' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULS' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ccd31317f5e063f1de9dd4d9aec45f4b
4aaca75aa07047f3ce0c2612d166a03bda60a5c6
'2011-11-16T21:33:29-05:00'
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULT' 'sip-files00115.pro'
300fe780cc8b11b5e87eff5f206fc706
971b4b51b5d6c1685047ff5b100255bc76bc6772
describe
'33251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
35017b25f16909cd87ebee3e92718e39
88b188c7d2d6652816215db3970739ad3b27ca2c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULV' 'sip-files00115.tif'
88b712cf110ee3371e8fcd5aafa4a876
378bb4ad42db7b4b8b6de0ee1cc008bb76d39a61
'2011-11-16T21:36:51-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULW' 'sip-files00115.txt'
218ad83dbad9afb9830e53ada4d1d0a5
8df5822510301a821b380f6dd05d62fdaa7ae298
'2011-11-16T21:35:34-05:00'
describe
'11179' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
42f99ed2f1edf4897623d03c6953efc8
66ad61ea7372165f5eb0d58144fc8974d3a3d426
describe
'1120144' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULY' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d8d436ba7fa12096e0a6f771360e8399
944b5ddadb502ab86a2fa8a66573f4b8d67babe6
describe
'90568' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAULZ' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
5fbcc9816e8a026431b747934ec308f2
eb6f5e081ddef9a00e339f4ec7c71fd12a5084f1
describe
'30256' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMA' 'sip-files00116.pro'
e558aef62f53e76f3f2935f14e365e4d
a55a8e5aca7a49f1ef4dffecd1ff25060b4f2fa2
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMB' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
f5dd5471059a996ae16a36bff6b60b3a
e89f75e75a5593dad6e999afee7625c49612c6e1
'2011-11-16T21:33:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMC' 'sip-files00116.tif'
fcb40b4458a45c9af10b5560d57e2277
232030e121da817c92c5e7da7fefcf7727b8ef92
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMD' 'sip-files00116.txt'
4a83b32e5a5818dc579d44c1d904470e
625348c23b24c840ae3825c484e24d5feb24df2b
describe
'10449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUME' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
3adb008fb1b406b75c91582b7340bcf0
7945d91368d73d26739d07ab345feb3b8d0b1b51
'2011-11-16T21:32:29-05:00'
describe
'1141331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
e3dbec90fd6b3b25756cb681a4be81f2
6393cfe358229039771153bc7e81f105973617ca
describe
'83975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMG' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
6c4bd218ab4b0a1da37b759d33e98b10
78a86d1e45b1dae3cf8d7d24e7b41969aa206e4b
describe
'29151' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMH' 'sip-files00117.pro'
af58f417be8dd280c1de398e051d2bd1
89fd3eb0a8ddf5b2b38af886e56c212d1a0d9b36
describe
'214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMI' 'sip-filesback.pro'
fb19f4c78ca7cfd3086894e1b1c3ef19
8e30c9dc9152fc4d2cd277ec3ebc5843ccc53878
describe
'30947' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d9fd5b1b6c4494993a7da69a6300b983
2b6e5b652e1024bc288fd13cb545690d157f3e88
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMK' 'sip-files00117.tif'
2f95e06f5d18a4cebd9da3804e5b6925
c862cf2c157e3360fcdbd631185c1439a02cfcd2
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUML' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b11151fb3be936b9bcfefea0c706e8ed
7469a8d4828c31a2c732e147827eee3afed404d6
describe
'10437' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMM' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
0ca7c03f38e7904d6238f0cdaf5f2e19
b95708b1a6499747affd1cffc30b6ee2b6c74e62
describe
'1120080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMN' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
f46f2ef16d57b50fdcac6f016142de01
0614989b9052927abbf8d2fb229ff4cb3814bace
'2011-11-16T21:37:13-05:00'
describe
'88868' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMO' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9aac96c2a50af9d4b198e1abfd21c92d
47ed980b05bc117eef44b4b8c706833ac9eb2114
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMP' 'sip-files00118.pro'
c1c359b3409151d3085be6e3b16233cf
45fb17f21de32732404841fdc8e8bebb482f96a5
describe
'32610' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
5fb78ad71a67cb9d2c61c13f45348259
658e6ec957eb0372dabb8cf8d55b7b89dd7d243f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMR' 'sip-files00118.tif'
c5a9d6329d1c584beac8b08c2c086276
15ee43cb01b6d02060c915c3648ba70939cba281
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMS' 'sip-files00118.txt'
35bc18583efad21a503b5699ab49b960
1501d8c42738614fe7d44c7a64b3c768b1449385
describe
'10595' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMT' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
edd617313ffe63d3bcd08b4dbaec7f3e
5ea189a582ca8d38274667a55662cb13f03f2623
describe
'1141373' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMU' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
cc952462e275eeada79ed4c79af79770
a8fb8896b995e7c8dea30e3d0307bacd9b1d5462
describe
'84429' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMV' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
21b2086afc0a4901ac9f1e3518336041
3c36318f50db32ad57ba1c7d4e899ec1889d5162
'2011-11-16T21:32:42-05:00'
describe
'29409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMW' 'sip-files00119.pro'
2ea657d907669c194d4b88d85d6730de
a7358dbedd118177c776fc388f33f2b80a33a7eb
describe
'30982' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMX' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
3c7fcc0a783d738f025dc3f1589a0b11
f5d27a0cb8664da89c98ba00823d7a88bb88a6aa
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMY' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d7d24693f534003138b5cccd8084218a
055daf9b7f1e48374b533ce8ac78d833aea93aca
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
870f8fdb9b4bd360f8c3475a90ba106b
8c464cd78634882bea12719221a6500875433b8c
describe
'10392' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNA' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3f403a384277ee5bd9d609d32d7d7f2b
4419f335e04d48fd8473fd4765c9429f2dcbd0d3
describe
'1120101' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNB' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a703daf3638de0ca7abcd6f90c4a05d9
9eacc82fd1a90ac3f8a98335684a4715047adf94
describe
'91116' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNC' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
1400e531af2404d9e161765d28285e2a
1a6ec623e53a9f512c5bf1658ab5ded2fa418cc7
describe
'30619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUND' 'sip-files00120.pro'
9ba19f49e721d14bc37d8b2cf5480f53
bab9a3648a3f96799ea86753fbfd55f11125158a
'2011-11-16T21:33:25-05:00'
describe
'32776' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNE' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
824747e0e410aa4dff5143e10b951d2e
995f000ddcae396d56643d166d22b46cbbce63bf
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNF' 'sip-files00120.tif'
f631cd9adfe0e32d637421290fb7f290
9575b0bd46a0aab15da9393f3d851e7cc055d18d
'2011-11-16T21:37:16-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNG' 'sip-files00120.txt'
041f74ba533320bd98fa84befac3aba2
2401eb29d8da4f75837788ba38e46c0c3847ad6f
describe
'10587' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNH' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
68bfa368e4296659ed595041e663734d
e084d184742db96208a8b5227cd3679838565dec
describe
'1141449' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
06d99faae719a8e3988238f627db254e
57223c8e54eea0718c40f8e22f04693c14f68163
describe
'92331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
bf39924992e0a7c926e41f0394812515
087dfb931e9dbfc61f2a6a368e574ea70941c049
describe
'32451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNK' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8999e985d2ea11548ba5a8bbed7e12de
09291827fab3a0629315f1c38eada323b2bef8bb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNL' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
d38ca8f2d368d8995375e0f693475493
e4aabb1cd01c58da1ce08debe703e75a4c25cdf9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
9491f299f92d7a7c439e059017c5dc8a
a8d54922f0ed7a72b3e75cca2638b5b7e0ebd695
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNN' 'sip-files00121.txt'
9118a7a1b2c86e9f75679e7f8b65ae45
f249c14084573358f0b2c96c1cbd89296e952830
describe
'11043' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNO' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
b88dcd55a1630bfb23d0f80cad9dce24
cd29a21430e24625864e914680668931e1d2396d
describe
'1120085' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNP' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
08164053bf55817b50b8e2036cdd3681
8a98881d22392382cfe2b8c50c2b7dc2037667eb
describe
'93700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
5a7a667431f3eda19e1c6a504e7e176b
635ba7461de8909e9f3bcff9cf7d82c0fa0608a0
describe
'33076' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNR' 'sip-files00122.pro'
d7992e23ff2f5895ee6b16ab9414ec47
32e0f19397dac7721104e93525bf1087017d555b
describe
'34405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNS' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
60a09e6a5e260d2ae754c02af692ceaa
c0b45ace085dedf89c874c6be6386ca4b7a6b119
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNT' 'sip-files00122.tif'
5e4ed3974da8781eb9a0de455af3cf41
0279530be511455145192ba051940e569c8ec397
'2011-11-16T21:38:01-05:00'
describe
'1349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNU' 'sip-files00122.txt'
af6da58e9c150df30f456186b8cca0de
c411a7c6d6878c853a514b3ebd71dbff5b50a689
describe
'10976' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNV' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
bcead93662fd3c6bd0b2dd23288f7b25
0755253e1fa5d92affb3e301779448b721de92b7
'2011-11-16T21:36:28-05:00'
describe
'1141340' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
567a7ea8ef9ff252dfbc1a34a422c479
0a67a16d0261017066e162cef6e172e9d2ec0d88
describe
'90541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNX' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
82298e1e35d208cda3593e13d90f8d9d
514496e5beffc9bf1f793bab7a3b438372781dac
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNY' 'sip-files00123.pro'
568e1488b146e702b93bd6aa5c553a33
5e32b9be646dc4ae02aa83fa0f4bafdd492e4299
describe
'32892' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
41d92a7e2c5cc28bdd99184c82310e2e
0d7226f6cbfb5bec8598e52a0ca8f8d831e1fa63
'2011-11-16T21:32:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOA' 'sip-files00123.tif'
ae2d6438d5c34c3774d1889b984a923e
64b20e14ab67c9d400c1eeec7b2a88e425c48de3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOB' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2decc46becd385101303ce44c9638bc7
24f8ed91fd7ba3085aef4811d4a0db468508cb0b
describe
'10754' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOC' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
17e9111e3f7c7400cd24e629aa314045
6cb07bdc79d683e700572a94d36ce2b4b97955ef
describe
'1120146' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOD' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
75e1cc76b4f538c191cdd5f8bba9b691
66bd0a552efaf1d7d200e70f2153b9f4b5d310b5
describe
'93515' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOE' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0e070e86f2f33deb2fdfdc6121dfeb92
3a60a2518c63118a460d87d79385d7ba1bb57de7
describe
'32127' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOF' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2ff570125413bbe5f9a96502251af84c
52ad5a17db67f55f95f09d3b0a29dc725e8611ec
describe
'33543' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOG' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
a903d1a8cc393ab54831d5f2ed85ede2
edf48d468e4bf08a9f721598e7e57e1973b24570
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOH' 'sip-files00124.tif'
ca27fb7c9e0ac4e94e81e68a7abcd5bf
bb68e44df287099fc49a276b85c9021042143af3
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOI' 'sip-files00124.txt'
c55eb3c8524cebac1c162a046e57fc96
4b7920aa9a0d1f68f729849e2169aa209dd4cf08
describe
'10679' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
236b7285b7513f8e426f4c23300824c0
35de645f9a01815cac4046d3e61db5f47a15c7ef
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOK' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
4d00f3b4dfd90fa36641f66077de05fe
04296a5b958bc65def344b3b6c67d01855b79e70
describe
'90222' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOL' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4baf28ffef5192c96cc1c0b66c323f83
624b222ed0023c7b1467bf6c0710761eab20f49b
'2011-11-16T21:35:54-05:00'
describe
'32544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOM' 'sip-files00125.pro'
a182d270133da40d0d5ee5d963913250
1c47ce5efac79fa03f128e0a957bbe15deeb1a18
describe
'33312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUON' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
509e3d0d600d8761f85828aee82633e9
a9007c7bc17dd9926404db27bdba8dae8b3a9bc7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOO' 'sip-files00125.tif'
0220945414e0f8c9589f962c8be6c6ad
f1b89c7114bce41677109e4ea58fe3915b2e6968
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1434fc6b851c88451c705c768e60111a
ca289ef4cac674e5f3a52432ff0038bcc3fa172b
'2011-11-16T21:33:13-05:00'
describe
'10561' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
6dfc45fc451fe20a8c717f4c23ceed08
2d115c419f8304a1f50f1a2353bed72b0fc79a2e
describe
'1120100' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOR' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
520c5d3539ca56f604eca43391651313
4cd1d72bf979511b734b3e3cf4bfd963487e7f00
describe
'79398' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOS' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e30f5147c2cf16d1c97cf08eb82d9b68
ecca417b20a52fd951a9008cf461a599b32051a8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOT' 'sip-files00126.pro'
62f2146f5cc3c9d08a74c2be6223fc39
700a234cbaf290550d3df652b34a6c419914b505
describe
'28015' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOU' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
c37225c64a9f3f137716cab3c59d2e4b
22a9da6a2d66cf533930034c9d20d97ae99e4eab
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOV' 'sip-files00126.tif'
5e4b6b28896fd3ae636a4782a05427a8
cf243b3ca69affb9b1a8ee7110d35a9287ec1c38
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOW' 'sip-files00126.txt'
d94932c0478e9fdaa7ad8221d981e81d
f6d57ae1a4d025541353e547441268f7baf27a0b
'2011-11-16T21:32:02-05:00'
describe
'9139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOX' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
4c5a448b3179c46ae3ff3857f8bd43ea
bdb5ada6dd64752cc718f4950467d43d04625ffc
describe
'1141318' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOY' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
2ddb26db15a01b19241f5afc775ada74
a535664254459ed9484f43d3b062e98e1910e896
describe
'88540' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
50f2e99ed30e6ee4b9a40223bf66e7a4
aff567e3c4632df4b17856108dd255f7eb6d7693
'2011-11-16T21:33:01-05:00'
describe
'31119' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPA' 'sip-files00127.pro'
a5481ce80a6dda8f1f0b0457d499a549
d4eaf0204b9936b8ca88021e566a6b476ff47b33
describe
'31732' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPB' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
a1d06f7efdc6c24ececf2c15d985b0aa
dc5c944e44296d12f23b4fcfc92bbd6b178ef123
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPC' 'sip-files00127.tif'
07565d3f9b7620e9d88bde84385a31a3
eff3c60e09d196d6e9b172fdf244ed03a3869535
'2011-11-16T21:32:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPD' 'sip-files00127.txt'
1482b054509ea52af325f84861d952e9
d2179ebc0c961805f70c23ea21b827fae42d476e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPE' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3a2a115451ecc938dee12bf79b7dd8a7
2abc05d37324cb2a68f1f39a33935c03f22b439b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPF' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
1c07e276411369946178ab1eaa878e56
986cc6343d627034ff427237143411424169cfb5
describe
'92084' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPG' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
610358767625f04d0e4cca1db26bd308
044f2a500c33ce3fee6d4bfb71cc5f6a56ad033c
describe
'31553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4b778729866831fa514ff2e76000db22
4c0ecf96308fbc2afe20d36e403ff99f0fa58a1b
describe
'32774' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
36318445ac6a1d1e6b780757e8dddcdb
248b20dc7958013cec5addca2d95fc4f81577442
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
122dc001d846550b629ac6198517bc36
3e8a12cf3073ae9c911e0095832396eb65c0a54d
'2011-11-16T21:33:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
f6bbc865be405cfd76c008d4fa43442f
c788cd0c46f5ca258fba088ab87dacda94097e96
describe
'10448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPL' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
a2bd525457619cf1d87abdd87c2e3d5b
bc39866f34fe7e712eca65b643f4bfb4c03ddd54
describe
'1141453' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPM' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
b5f04bd2c57b9789659bef2a3b0ffc62
146cc3f050d97d3fa877258f21f701387be8bf62
describe
'93169' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPN' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
de9d9f2d6a79c4cd3360ec56cae23b92
a0ac5db1d06cb12287f61b1c02aa13b9b4570999
describe
'32563' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPO' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5e5d98d089ce4a260003b89f1104252c
095a17870be4c037e67fda29bea7718bf79605d1
describe
'33004' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPP' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
36b8d65fa41a7ee0aa68b1efb8499754
818fdb48ef37f9d957185456bbd40c62c816f46a
'2011-11-16T21:36:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
3204c15155d96e2db62684f83322f514
03a5132c345e3e7abf10dcc4b702733a13278ba3
'2011-11-16T21:34:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
da6ec3d3b8f82a0ffca456974894a6b9
dbbe17d14b9982763f7135521dcee301cf7750ce
describe
'10583' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPS' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
3b7ccc8f4f509092f07d54de039be38d
0a12e221102bc09539b73e71d1744741b5ecbf46
describe
'1120112' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPT' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
abb6f69e208e83eb66da5e782a77d8d4
8473b51fa390fec639b6e0e794667d43a6b83705
describe
'90751' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
cc801b40d1d5187a8a4f5db9b2ea3cc2
95da3410c9aaaf4d01540d9214038bbc7227cfb8
describe
'30492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPV' 'sip-files00130.pro'
3767302c1b9cce2e9fc8782e5071b6ec
9272a5b6e6865473b78cc7cf2d4fee3546fd68fd
describe
'32358' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPW' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
41271177a976f61fca1340eda6d2c697
d222c8304651916913c066117e8be4fb6f8a043f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPX' 'sip-files00130.tif'
a4aff69b05973624f542328b1d62cffc
c59506016b43066549fe4f24495e346ab294bd3a
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPY' 'sip-files00130.txt'
6f84047956050f7d564b8f25e3bdcf92
f82cad4a409f32ac821dadbd4e151487034150b5
describe
'10282' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
74d17e831fa20a78f0f1ef163d744e46
0b3b76ec80ef6bf3e87c5d45add61a8c3de1056a
describe
'1141448' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQA' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
4ef9cb6c6e28a26004c9a943d761e6a5
46dec66d6e6dff505714e8616734cc1733e46d22
describe
'92319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQB' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
d2a8891748c2dcfc657433c531328efe
7dbd13ca24771facef737f450c69e184eee06b35
describe
'32078' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQC' 'sip-files00131.pro'
5ae95d46354dcf4698b25330c3aa9c88
f46f38346c36c3b5ebe320818d7f50c3ab1937d8
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQD' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
f7d8d582fa54c5770aadb1bfb72b2996
a25b800cf30367365d7817625970267050a0d127
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQE' 'sip-files00131.tif'
6ba602701f4cffeef1cdbf900efe2d7c
dafde9aa8bf80065e6721d36d92de6520b8b2fc9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQF' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4dc383a63193f015242067ee6426a9b5
5296faa4a02410257f1d1048ff19864a5aed9b5c
describe
'10467' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQG' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
fde57054edab8ebd44242278511f407f
d7ffb791d42fe956f459e6916d722dd07cafe3f1
describe
'1119900' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQH' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
55c027d2cfa10c5a54cad47af9dc45e5
cf0e5ec46a36f76dacfd5c2255f5068da34f3714
'2011-11-16T21:37:01-05:00'
describe
'90053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQI' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
2c4a34c3e281bacbbd8bfacf7a6dcb20
082f1b3bc889375759024baa17d67e121dc3f375
describe
'14300' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
4da7680e52f3574e33bb55878acb8e8b
104e1ef4c7ba937a2b0eb2d1595300098b44d52b
describe
'27705' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQK' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
79f8e87b723c53a91fdbe29bba3169a9
5b89b5676a6d1598d315194cab8c59cf778c3e30
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
f5fc69fa0ff308b7f1ed995ac0df557c
0f99ab76df6b8d387c4fc1de1aef9436584d14b9
describe
'572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQM' 'sip-files00132.txt'
88b39a4d14cccb6903bacb3a85d2fc2a
4e5a564460059c415e1c4a5e9fabb09b576c193a
describe
'8917' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQN' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
650204ee6b5b47434d145a50089f69db
b38e322fa56a21504be7b8fb52fce72147c36498
describe
'1141464' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQO' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
485bcf5561c2870480a4f7b508f22db1
b013411f7b469f600dbc318dc270e4c86ca8d31f
describe
'92702' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQP' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
f3350816e0d2de3d46b5b6b0c4ea024c
f021d4fbd268f04a375ff76f8f20bd25cda61802
describe
'32849' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
4787c6d26c29094a8f00cec3fd2d32ec
6d04aa6a87ab075a4af076d8f8f80f2ecc5de003
describe
'33910' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
bb8f2ea58ecc14ac568e912d00ca107f
8a7c06b07d71e56f745e63e79280ada2ca353bab
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
a93438eb9877ec87ef40f5c300990220
842f833fc630bf25343de0949cf73c080c8c8335
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQT' 'sip-files00133.txt'
624f1c528649666f9a2683a0a50527ba
9ed39d4935ddde794ad754e672c46ab461a8eba3
describe
'11186' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQU' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
27582b9af24276ca56f24cb3b6d4626e
8ae68e37cb21e7b1e0722f277f077d788b8ee9f8
describe
'1120140' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
b905e8603e49ad792ded3632cc75a239
8a630f4d2319179af3d0711990657c20d8af6f50
describe
'90050' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
6b4ff0637d5ad7818ac990ab304b3d2e
2fd4cf6f9eb20e898c3cf2a7ca249f50c61fd2ca
describe
'30640' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
fdb5d0ac7846fe10bcd94be805d1b835
808f7a55236af267a2ea345b0fa5f347a67d724f
describe
'32818' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQY' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
6c0312e7f68ba965a3bceaf4f215646b
a806be58f9e31e52ef47e4388a43bd9d63defc15
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
5b6a2c76cadd2300f11152062a4f9706
0daad41e2289ca989d1302ab127376ecf5f632f8
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURA' 'sip-files00134.txt'
285a642fb941289fdcae0fe7b97e3585
e0f6ea790ab4db316e614039bb4ae3b46d09f889
describe
'10504' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURB' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
acbd3bacdf0232399a52646374091527
dc469e78830bdc6d71925f25aa0c6ad98a3d4798
describe
'1141296' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURC' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
eb47315aa639f1bcdcd768852c848503
b7b496fecc3d573924c5efbe3ff29770e8222612
describe
'87375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURD' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
8410eb4a1d4f4c598c31280c4febfc39
b2440b602b98c2fe4a9ee5adfc098da554701147
describe
'30551' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURE' 'sip-files00135.pro'
0340d33ee34fd0af90172d1affa9f3e1
2123384fabb6270efe70fd9a9c3542f09ea98900
describe
'31559' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURF' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
a668e6c2d8f2c9c75fd03dab44225e20
32596715ae180d285db360f71124aa29af9b6350
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURG' 'sip-files00135.tif'
e5ebcfb271bdebc4aca82972a14ed348
b537696b0c095b7b14b1d84d023a4be79dd35e3d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURH' 'sip-files00135.txt'
aeca90247f7072190f5895df394edf36
5befbc0ca3ac3fa2cc9b7f4588b397d7572a72a2
'2011-11-16T21:38:21-05:00'
describe
'10164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURI' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
09839c541bfc71859b03e9d69a894333
fb13fee72f5b9f9a29b904d7eef8bb77d875a393
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
f021dd9eea1f87386e22aadb0efd27b9
5beb31ca79cb3d020d0ad47014befc5dd91d12eb
describe
'83812' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
6abc05f6ab9c163d90614432c60d405e
373aa63c374eb8e3030c1a19ea3e03b9caa49e14
describe
'27800' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURL' 'sip-files00136.pro'
4cee253f7d963024447dda6342f62a9a
66d21c93e17758f598719b9f39d75c0e34e5f174
describe
'29881' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURM' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
c8a8dd1643f12af3d6fbd5a1687db6d3
b1322dc94dab5f2dcdd8dca18ee952900aae130e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURN' 'sip-files00136.tif'
0a9db835df8bec7a8e00a4f4475360e2
52a8b87dc7a089888c64dbbcaa19808214bf0470
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURO' 'sip-files00136.txt'
9b182af7abe482bedcb102cbb68afcfb
7c09345c7d2490406dfb7dfd003e5e75474e7623
describe
'9711' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURP' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
c2ae59a61dfbbb18349b5f5801ed3628
bbd60e5db3c041b4f5057fbf6e6afcdeed126dd2
describe
'1141451' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURQ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
be52c80e57d05d986dccd27101d5aeb9
c1d75ac43a4b43372212e5223c3e413ea815b8f0
describe
'88500' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURR' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
1277557c2cbfa25618865b9fb4a810e6
199bee5b52132ebb8f81c5738d6c626de33771ff
describe
'30621' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURS' 'sip-files00137.pro'
844fa6e73734c5a7222d141302f549cb
69153f753d7e628ec2ce1a2503378eae93c39358
describe
'32190' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURT' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
710ca22836023fac6e78f4c0b60fb938
c2a20b6041eff6656d08ab48eb6f5cb0309c8081
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURU' 'sip-files00137.tif'
26a77d0e50c24313abccac36a5573e55
aa8ee8b5193227d47b73b7f039b0cf60cb1fa168
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURV' 'sip-files00137.txt'
9c10117888f2f490d33da3c523112b17
5a936dce5a4c2fc3828a62aba000dcc47bd2e3f0
describe
'10606' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURW' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
cd8ad1de58c7185c535bc7c7b8159365
5da78b383da2c30402a495ce80dc423d46824d22
describe
'1120138' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURX' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
f26ff5afe9871816e7461bf1bdc794cb
36b208165228b514af1a1c4c69c28030fcbbd80e
describe
'95985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURY' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
14cd56bee9c51d3946b4d494eb42f5a3
7ed57253d8e6a9cabe95e5371a268eebdcccf7a9
describe
'32496' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAURZ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
1098847be6bf5558e5c4148b44ba8a74
fda8e7e5f51ec3fd533fd4f90ddbc9f66b40028d
describe
'34325' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
7186872a1e303626c6b405c392fbc13e
0f9398f3856635e7f692864a45fe94eadbcbe749
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSB' 'sip-files00138.tif'
4cd4010df4bc17db0e2c4875e4a80f50
4c7c156bd83e0d897bab9dd2df8b5818548f0b75
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSC' 'sip-files00138.txt'
6f2124773d8bbc9c2dfc792ef9d19e08
4cfa59a1770b98db9b7120277ae9a0ecd6e4a176
describe
'10577' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSD' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
bb6d038fba42c334848aa72ccf5aa6ec
77fcba4fd722a6a26bcca9fc665eb34cdae0c602
describe
'1141457' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSE' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
57f081d4b16fe7ba7686db56667e5b76
eabbe59437c1514114506cc4d8def599c099bb35
describe
'95685' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSF' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
bf42f46bd8bf2690d750f5eca67dbd5c
e6533ae119395765ffc3abc056d5d2c2e8a98626
describe
'34062' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSG' 'sip-files00139.pro'
79002ee9749e9bfca77716ddc1a5cf91
a7514cfa1a69935a970e2c37b82e640d21ee379d
describe
'35109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSH' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
78f2b0527beaf6e8af1efa26ae0112f1
610a4db4b85c9dd258ad8a4589b5a734feea86a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSI' 'sip-files00139.tif'
a2c2ce585c12ac63e08ac44eaa0867a2
cec6da227e062d2c009a97d88b2adc8f395dbe46
describe
'1376' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files00139.txt'
1cc503961efac68d0bd1c1cf37c92ed7
6a08ed1b687e7af8ab69dec67422de2c0bb576fd
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSK' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
e17aea7df91b0630f47f1c6961c02486
4ec73901afc71f619a2bd17c59bafc3b4992b784
describe
'1120125' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
ff075f6a6a15af0cd271802a9e07888c
3ab32b668f84d862ea5e82dc9309b3112b5957d7
describe
'85745' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSM' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
76ba996dff728910ed1333218a9483f2
91d9b52a78bce559881afc5551492d391f583bfd
describe
'28036' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSN' 'sip-files00140.pro'
0cd822e8a1232dbabf30b634c82c8c4a
f5282bcc2f5fcdb2f104dd027bb8cfc886e53166
describe
'30565' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6ea07dd240e935dac7e80e8714de37fe
c9ac6872979f94d3b8a4ec5c17f4547376065406
'2011-11-16T21:31:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
e187c16a49774b1daa925cad6e76668c
9e1b857930f3950068c9f120843125df2afd4891
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
9a8fe0919ba78e1042e41adfe36e70a2
3ca91041db99175c3264479ade74792dabf02ce9
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
0c0382124e3a317e6c8cabeeb9afad74
b3e9bf24679bf76cc0d11d99f5d072306c2d7884
describe
'1141394' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
e04a9ba95237f8df715e7963f1f2bf2e
897328e30778628149eaa352b95d68c9b8b15b44
describe
'71264' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUST' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
da0424a86ee0a9d55213181822bce3dd
8785d3233294bd92cd647696efbf44ec37dba55a
describe
'22593' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
132f0f808215e04c55c5b0f05c52faa6
47a2da2192f1ccc396556b52053a01c77e5c6487
describe
'25231' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
17dda1ca25bbdc1e4a4846dc9d4fc57e
e8cf00a1564db165dce22344eacf3d951f6edd3f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
302325cb1088fe3ace945b717b425116
0d27f6927fc0a2fde94e0fd71abc15a86bf381cc
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
a59bb93efef83903e7c556106263be15
ff99a4ee7d06ff2243cd3f6193dbf2940f6f75ad
describe
'8903' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
8e71426c69ed9bf71e44a7f4525c131e
4e11c2f0ed37de6716977a5fde1dd69d13c8cf2e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
09606da73ed03640f7682c8d937930e5
5fbe2e39276bf0bd260b067bca58a3d10d4d5ff1
describe
'87115' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
2682fea54d77904e7fe2107265c258c9
5fa04e0ccbaa188c7ee1e8d0991612ec264f5989
describe
'29497' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
76b66fb242be0e5e434626dd42937430
fc438f5abd663ecae784b6d577b10fb4d6eeab7d
describe
'31728' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
c64442321e27aee1a3b625f4b6e5e396
125767ef6e074b705738b74b19b658a136dcf8e7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
fb78aa0d071af8ac9fcd0b19a90482d7
6a807a052265341d60e93c2520b38ecd13bd1600
'2011-11-16T21:39:15-05:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
8c8ca3052b528dedc03cc34a19296a86
2db0d7f32f20e18f77d89a89e2d2e8eee5167760
describe
'10492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTF' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
19df471dcf1b7bd7282b3a71cbbdad99
0e2bbaf687ece67a0873dc5d5979197057f990ad
describe
'1141446' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTG' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6492bf4e39b7a2ca0684f5880e2089ad
56ba5ed5452348ba42eb42bb5c24b8e0d6bc1612
describe
'89825' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTH' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
4fdf75aa21a0f4e545d395c4dd7dad02
68098618f4b8ee7afecb79261f64a3602377165a
describe
'31742' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTI' 'sip-files00143.pro'
1bfb026caa08a09d7ae55096fa419a9a
8d7ba7d339aeebbd0f3e1aae90943d33f8afab7f
describe
'32588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
67dc39d2739954fc1faa5c5faf3066fe
eb3ab54864920083efa4675679b5816d834a53f1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTK' 'sip-files00143.tif'
0b1b73789b7aff5b3dc78d38df5c7f8c
ce4573d139f75db184367e62e46fa2b30b486e1f
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTL' 'sip-files00143.txt'
d75e6c3d15d08dd88735045435a7a771
3af78b4dd013464e54f37285e40ed7909cdd7a42
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTM' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
c97e098a3ce273e64884bdaf54a8504c
5fa7c2fb11327341f2d1dce2ad88d081bfa21074
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTN' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
7b562d6f7ffa7255251f323645ac0a3e
dba308a7a77e58140307e87bbe68932c42f5cb2c
'2011-11-16T21:33:07-05:00'
describe
'86258' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTO' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2f4057cb76ffbba990ce4996a873673b
c8253c5ee66a3a89e03b6c830a369ad28aa9168b
describe
'28855' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTP' 'sip-files00144.pro'
da9e334d150450579473388fff3b7a47
ceae86137355dfdf7f60febad2c4d1b6e848e185
describe
'30867' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
23432599ee1bf3ba1f3c49d3bbc4b740
bbc451a15992e2b2873a6bbbcf971c835f444e29
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTR' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b89851567dbb0da7475e0714c8554f2a
48526ae1f9058d914d16b6faec0b06a75c5d45c1
'2011-11-16T21:38:05-05:00'
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTS' 'sip-files00144.txt'
86bff1be68f553d140ff4b731ed979e0
6c8cfb77808a8df98a1ca7ea5dadb79fad6e3980
describe
'9856' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTT' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
69cdc3bb26d1ad0a39f1a30a240bfc62
cc48ffd212f9e273b9143475adafd8e113dc5994
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTU' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
d24bf98bc0483602671d24d67e905d5a
81a5ff0509c9acb29bc67dfa72903c778f533c62
describe
'87184' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTV' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
aadd3e9e928de26d085e3bd1f28f9aed
bc2e1ec53c6f6b94d68408ac431463a6654d5f34
describe
'29388' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTW' 'sip-files00145.pro'
2b71016838c4642b889a426056329fd6
722924e42630616b7a2fbac2d962437013165565
describe
'31386' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTX' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
cd97064ee1763e8bd08617df164cd7cc
ea8802592fabbcb19d5f4fb9e9370a4355ef5c3d
'2011-11-16T21:34:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTY' 'sip-files00145.tif'
cbf74c8374b7596255a5338e59bda693
b9504e781711d48d6912f3a153c882547e38d4fb
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
e382a258b27e023bf5ee85a12c635fb4
18231db7d93d2962978abddc47c646137edc82af
describe
'10359' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
8e3caf3830d29340cdb20d0d4e2be37f
34db9f533133751080b6fb10e4026ca5a9dd4a78
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUB' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
64c822e7f6191ff6d786beab3935df21
fbc380c1e065dd371abd1f331d04a9c922830715
describe
'97409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUC' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
8ebbb0286c7068cba0473a5d90b6908f
8570e590393bc2941c0bfe3dd1598f2ca90f62aa
describe
'33609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUD' 'sip-files00146.pro'
f2fa7cdb28a9353ed1a724c5711c7881
066f9d48440a71026734d612f2f792001df7eb82
describe
'35087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUE' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
c9cec9ba57c42aae60b8005bde35db9e
9eb34e8fe75938e9c395e72cface2402f0443175
describe
'31053268' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUF' 'sip-filesback.tif'
6162e3d87ed84a13329d9c3228e0ab46
bdb951dd1da6bcfe26d8a2f446f2a1582302ec9e
'2011-11-16T21:32:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUG' 'sip-files00146.tif'
0bdbee355549de83e5ac5d7a74bd4bb5
4180a35c1d8d75cd54407c88b7ae7bfeb0be361f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUH' 'sip-files00146.txt'
733d43e1b44372c90e8942a688fa3b15
d18c3c673e2a6527bfa09703f8b0a0ad73049c98
describe
'11321' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUI' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
fc9d2c62791ea1d6ee60ce47cdf80538
b57ed25825e1b45d84f608b9c69581da1638935b
describe
'1141368' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9aab1cf5483fa71e86bf79784777dc7a
c2fbfe9dfeda9fd6ab95bcf8cfa4f1337b1fc99f
describe
'87333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUK' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
7f1c726a5ee895b847d2e43d79d8c474
4315a41a6ee0c7c9b7323cf292d095eead51c8e5
describe
'31053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUL' 'sip-files00147.pro'
eb5055832893c8fc7b715d2711fa20ff
f681c0ccef073ddb1155bf88c8e702185a299ed3
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUM' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
3c1a2e9354f33ada1af9c41066a27019
565dbb78e0a9dc549fb1490bdb72e8abc93abe29
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUN' 'sip-files00147.tif'
c3737c951c42554a75ccee1bc974c552
3ca6dcd162fe3eecf5d999002fb5268ce4ca6b96
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
10e4f8111d9a131d71294d2e4999debc
35eb6af588cdaa9ee624dc9628f95be3ef8b4d0a
describe
'10459' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUP' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
5c3e02cf6eb2d1dfe592e147c323c9d9
44fae882616ef9506f3ffd1ad60c474e1621a6ac
'2011-11-16T21:32:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
b6f29edf25720b720805755382fe7c66
a1628439ab38bbc9a6bb0be8c2a3c6e91ae3c7d7
describe
'81591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUR' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
00c86f3b86c7777765e91f7e6e357b4f
68b211e6dcce72905a36f7db425d0094db3dae07
describe
'27848' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUS' 'sip-files00148.pro'
9de3a1642b3b66bb129d005f99d64425
def75bdc0d5ed03308ea9d9cbdb5051769d6f957
describe
'28798' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUT' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
254726ad949ed440e2b016fa2e25607a
dc8a43ef3cdee2ca8b355f6b6030e4766c2ec575
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUU' 'sip-files00148.tif'
092b9cb36dc7c3a0fd09a16a1db945c7
dc117ea86f1a0b60e6bf76953285b63781274164
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUV' 'sip-files00148.txt'
41f755cfee4d4aed7b61d3e3b44f3ce8
ef4d61c4b15a1eebd5e68098a81c3e40b3e55a1a
describe
'9488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUW' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
e4b955fe52c179652ae2811df34a0f48
fe15e6f758a93cdb93595416f0b01684f8a96fc1
describe
'1141465' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
8b8cae5adccf4a6eea5d4f0881681341
b130c3cbc9a5edbb5c9441cea43337f69f94c69f
describe
'91677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUY' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
1ef95960a0dd6ef109251de45054886a
1a601a8487fc2d3abb818f5c413f173350a19a60
describe
'32194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
298b8b6e561d7db1cbe1d45cee5b35a0
a3c065951f46829a67a409db4d1a7ad4862acad4
describe
'33580' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVA' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
07403eaa6900e0df4059a02b8e3d49c3
eb7d6f3980b74588fe60be29cdce0b39fd5a1836
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVB' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b6ee8d32ea7cc29910aba9335a95a640
a8def91d552c85ce4bd767362829d25fee26017f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVC' 'sip-files00149.txt'
508e7cf3941edaa305cf054c09d7613c
9b9803224724cc4dabfecff4cd3ee92d8e69562b
describe
'10934' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVD' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
b33afb94f4197eade51a384541c88ff5
651913cf51db6642823f38e8c7c4992a1ff8d52c
'2011-11-16T21:38:13-05:00'
describe
'1120035' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVE' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
615165db9881b021e8aebaea2e7f03c6
f8464bc026aa41c31d3300d3ed977a01cfb93308
describe
'87294' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVF' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
d70fe33ec9b135352ea04246f2ce90f8
b5f5596c08775d8a88b7a4a572c4cb6e2af2db46
describe
'29180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVG' 'sip-files00150.pro'
66dba7ce18f17461c7a692d3a021302e
ff04e9459e9c470aedf4e62d16233a7e99eccaac
describe
'32030' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVH' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
33781e708374a23f75f69e9c62c41f05
d6043ac10b583e79c5e208b83a2d394f3af97445
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVI' 'sip-files00150.tif'
442b29f2f6b2a68c6e859bfc7e2f3bac
e505d8cababd3c2e3a6e22374769b9a9739ee28f
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
69358e2f046d3028b7b245279185ea4f
1bfcf66638e3a3f8d93e967ff952a00c4101f4f6
describe
'10461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVK' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
fd310700baa217e85221e58916fbaa61
c81aa116f266c2a0a8b0ab739b43c5fb628fa98d
describe
'1141412' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVL' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
fd779e327864f2b24e351a744d1855ea
e18af651eb96a618718dc44a5faa46aa483b60be
describe
'86769' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVM' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
9e3a64b9c07f01a1e0498c14b3557aa6
c792a146605ff9045dd38d9bc0542b7882220c83
describe
'11839' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVN' 'sip-files00151.pro'
4f0877f3b2af264e03de7ad3ecc797f6
953ef2037ea0aaa45e3d455bf19c8c3dc8b9ce39
describe
'26161' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVO' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
d6e64990063e7483fe18575678b6cc32
286c7d9b4f5202a07273ff0e187e6279aa80ba21
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVP' 'sip-files00151.tif'
c828559aae99414765e7992fc34f5b2f
9f8df94cbd50b4be1c8ff6991da1e80a5685b0e6
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
9aaee53f84e79e67d837368ebd5911d8
df60da753d609598c942a91fe1ad4ab4e778d77b
describe
'8511' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVR' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
0faf1470a0fa27fe6ff5bb435c69e464
78836a7f4c0c68ab7e7af58d19e363de2b42bfa8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVS' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
d4b5d88575cdd23caa96a9b50d255589
b01c48ca32412dae26746f6e439102ac37a558a5
describe
'88340' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVT' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
9b29c078733ec81f7863fcdb59f33dee
4f7d61a48706f959317d9d9d1a91598ffb54f14b
describe
'29882' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVU' 'sip-files00152.pro'
5f8e3b3f01c0a353e3aaf1d30f072037
fc3bb754ecc28c8bf01894f4826474fa4b8dcd28
describe
'31344' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVV' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
7488649dc36cea748743280aae3be18a
d00adf9c52c93061469e277556c9c084c38866b3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVW' 'sip-files00152.tif'
42be0cd4e5c7641f9579aafc9f927c01
9cd54b1d93b5ec9b255fa8e270889c4e3e252670
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVX' 'sip-files00152.txt'
aca7fce06f6ff04d43e2dde3dd1764ec
9ffc0a5c6eb0bdec560808f77e50724cfe08033c
describe
'10279' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVY' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
d6225a438ce9b3e06dbce42d400b27d4
99944f3a1ce8404b9d50598b16983ac009a99cf7
describe
'1141441' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
911558e24c32f35f9710f7376259e96e
5cd06cebdd464f5369a1813f8cb20c3060d23ef9
describe
'90971' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWA' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
6310cc7f54e6f3b5ebfb10d0b18d357a
f8932729bbde63d4e509994419c60af3fa4f5cfa
describe
'31038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWB' 'sip-files00153.pro'
c4c6cb74301b4cddd4c291cd27f47bdc
7eed198a56000e11c0caf891839582aa14ce82bb
describe
'33009' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWC' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
7fa35107e816ffc3d90b37a427cae4e8
8e2509943db7a86e3dab84ca3eb5fc919167a445
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWD' 'sip-files00153.tif'
28fd784fa53e369d40fa992fc28941c0
a48c1642a408eebaba1255929d44c00b8b4e850f
'2011-11-16T21:36:49-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWE' 'sip-files00153.txt'
8065bd701e945d27efa7d1bcff39abbc
c8bd2b5c5a23943a7df507384cfebc4545dc84d4
describe
'10883' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWF' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
1b4698950f3dd35ccdb60ea6ae22f580
a459822a9ac87ca3fe02cb6025426a04204d5cc3
describe
'1120128' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWG' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
31442be3c5616a3fc7c03e837b7c6f73
0a6c3fd86e685e0df88f39b1106c88a5dd657319
describe
'88700' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWH' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7cc3845a68d66a6cd9c7f59551c61d70
4ecfae9018bc2563a40238c79893f371cba8159b
describe
'29674' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWI' 'sip-files00154.pro'
8dc92619352909eed6fa227aa36f5978
b42e43e66966828b6a40dc27cc23e6f24c3f1326
describe
'32301' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
53928dc046e4d439c91da3886ef83933
aedd133648f7dbef02daecec9026dcd0071c1639
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWK' 'sip-files00154.tif'
f79d5b341607988cf30bcc489909a033
befbd8030c6b19365a086e0a85af656d80d28154
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWL' 'sip-files00154.txt'
122f4ac82d5ccff44900ecc830ae5591
643c957c9ffaa3965de6c1af003e2009a40a9e5e
describe
'10490' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWM' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
f04b2be1cc215a070453de3b37b9a79d
00d9d89f25dcd1aeba11aff902bea19950e7d057
describe
'1141389' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWN' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
4a159a13ff2be0184495d20279c0ab3a
47ff7184be164ae662d0bf680c9f7082a55f6233
describe
'82430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWO' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
a084e99e03e27d4053bc1dfe9734b38e
2a902f48b43f9aa706f0926dd266fc3bc87a2ae2
describe
'28190' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWP' 'sip-files00155.pro'
033ef7004b5daa0f9a7481f4013990d4
f68296c0fd0d2204bb75829de78eedbbccecadc7
'2011-11-16T21:38:17-05:00'
describe
'29735' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
21fad6cd638a9986af894389c2344824
8780a611d2c2d721f3051208fe27d4cd751838a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWR' 'sip-files00155.tif'
4806c769736e016957bf24b3b1437626
791d79fea6baa1c8aa023b8e6eb0af6571d754c1
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWS' 'sip-files00155.txt'
b90016f5fd3774de99f7fdee046677f9
6e9f0e706e1e9e560b2a35aab712dafea2a9be0d
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWT' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
fd789c822a5e7b457acfae54e92cb2ca
2f47f5e15627bae0a2ebc719bfab0a685f41d802
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWU' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
a84012c7e21d4c0ca8514d950bd92528
52411adeee58b52e6ce38d7574ed29151a08ff02
describe
'91073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWV' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
f8f360f7462f1e5a9a9ad4c1d78e7b78
fd1d4011a35277893a27125b4b92910dbc361575
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWW' 'sip-files00156.pro'
a68f68e2b821c20710531a18b4d590df
c415ae45ac775490f081caca8a0e5b46ac31298d
describe
'32154' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWX' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
ef1357de1f5b3b2746709c5fe960755d
0c4af7b84e9bdf9e80d4b0eaf2340ed26e3706a1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWY' 'sip-files00156.tif'
ebddb114c9a7de7878a22ecbb0524ed8
e799bfbc385dac90c3d7f4867e3e03ae6a2edb8e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
2cd57aca204105481e1031f50c1d9d14
3be29eb7eec7359d5c9b7f688d433ee2c5b663d0
describe
'9985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXA' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
f5d5d2073f0705071f6f04a7ad4d3108
830d5101042b209d86e1f589d3a38bab000bb3e4
describe
'1141440' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXB' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
b6ab7a651ea83b680cfec4c1e5bdf32c
9317c3993d57b5e462449007779a7c54d2bafa2a
describe
'90192' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXC' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
e3ac37bee985cb858dc55dfd5cb886d8
fcd83f7413c85f5a48cf13b2a68ffe8fea85f444
describe
'30677' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXD' 'sip-files00157.pro'
6d1d4f26876b26158f3e6734806e06ec
7df7150f14c81a4c056e9219efa8820496805881
describe
'33086' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXE' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ad433b9a85e3f8bcb6f425e65746663d
a87b513d63ee13040d4afc308b6748fef1a9a9da
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXF' 'sip-files00157.tif'
f2559d1c17cdab0d57f3464de78eb215
f7b6490ebba172953a3fefe9205e42fb9dae5704
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXG' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c78c719aa49e8bd0a539d3e6eb53952b
f21c716e827e93583c2407fb787b337c5c4a11e3
describe
'10905' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXH' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
04eb90b28cd78171ab812eb654a8becd
d80c80a2ff3df0cc98753c40bf36f36d429c2074
describe
'1067886' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXI' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
a8cd3a60d0f5600641c1a838d3a22755
901107948bb21247695b7a90d7d6cecd852652e7
describe
'44776' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e71b9b4e18ff5f3ee3b8ba1d7c54824d
c550ef9c0daef03896d567874ffa48dde354409a
describe
'9967' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXK' 'sip-files00158.pro'
86dc379ec48d095ac1dde0db5d095505
1611dc67dc4292be52458f1613bf2114936b7546
describe
'14888' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXL' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
c0ec23cfcd74b80311f9f89c6a51bcfe
0db98dfb84d1e9d9b68a872826e706fac4ea7b7d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXM' 'sip-files00158.tif'
8002064853f218fc511752bddedf43ab
1bfbc4091a850db125655630439b01e62a9fb031
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXN' 'sip-files00158.txt'
3d5d126a58b1a00c91a2d11f8bee01a8
6ed4066851f5a94d890c2aec26752b24e4cddadb
describe
'5419' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXO' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
90c0e52641a50211aad0d5eb56a048a0
7582e2fee2fffd2b99de956849ae361e73f94799
describe
'1141315' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXP' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
c3d04186a7900278f2c9e3f1b6e9d8ca
5dce465598f0b49f8420bffc73eaf0b73bc67100
describe
'76135' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
bfa655d895587b957f959b351488e057
94b852ea1b593aafb4443a02bc94660704ce0dee
describe
'23643' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXR' 'sip-files00159.pro'
bc856d54a4bfc35c91b25e1b62f8e874
76a2213931fb7951c946a8155505a314632c73d5
describe
'27631' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXS' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
d7e1fbcbf1286b05b64d02f1b5ed7a3a
d9015be43975c9db0ddddf8b0d26e5d3b1ae846f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXT' 'sip-files00159.tif'
374b0c467fb26dfcd75a657c68fcc7fb
c18b955dcaccb1d20120454d55f09f01869d5895
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXU' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c5282bda83464628d49c5ca1db560c89
b3d93c6b82ff05561be2d6973535141fa94c45cd
describe
'9416' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXV' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
71df0c198191a6cbe4db74e5ad1b8052
a1ddec3485216f94613dcc313a01f9fa7d32d64d
describe
'1120137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXW' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
79611cf9ce43acac27abe91959073ba6
695d27def146267ab748e70c56fc83015b3f12b5
describe
'96681' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXX' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
d0bf77322422888f5c01f98bf564b8bc
a629886df9eef3c6549a017ee1818abdcbad641a
describe
'32338' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXY' 'sip-files00160.pro'
a6571a657604c5259603cca948ec2052
776b4f97ab72d695b82315fc6ea67f6c7a9178b8
describe
'34505' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
aa9d30e51a6bcbc6f7922f56276bdc63
8c0aa69077b6524c44416a83066aea197c2a0c32
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYA' 'sip-files00160.tif'
8e265c696b55164daad7526cfe5afba0
c20c5d8acdcaa55e095461e541a468dabb7a892b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYB' 'sip-files00160.txt'
aa8ff9c8d091d822a31a475223c753b7
cb4031c5ec2805b3588bd7a49d3fcf12fb933e1e
describe
'11270' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYC' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
aed224ae3b53cb4db2adb386eb260ca4
b024a257f7e47849fae7c94adca576cef711507b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYD' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
af07f02e8668254d736e8205ad550a9f
d6273df4c39f39bda4431baaa483177400352ad3
describe
'95507' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYE' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
ae3b50acda0c692bdd5f7965a74dbf87
a8d0fcf23784b3cb6a323bc691b5763af1799cad
describe
'33261' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYF' 'sip-files00161.pro'
0ff9bc7b3c807ac2c960724f1ceefeb4
3de129da5e776fed802b3223475eb012a9d61011
describe
'35221' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYG' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
31cc647ca609e3a9df1ed4d490fb0b3d
e9c47c4f5e8d280c1ba15827e8dd23db963e9520
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYH' 'sip-files00161.tif'
913ea94b1838ac7b3c01df0544417140
d3516942eef6c0e48198bb4d4e7c319603e79e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYI' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c06617b87b413bb29ca0021e0c3d92ed
e14df1f3907e78ce482ee1da4e08b11bdf2d572f
describe
'11542' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
95da146bbc4201d3b71395817715fba8
51b84ace54124de4e5b33232074d82bc20bf13bb
describe
'1120117' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYK' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
ddd72fd6861b0a3b4a175c0e4173a58e
5ddcd4a005718686a9adb7288b1b6d3cac563905
'2011-11-16T21:37:06-05:00'
describe
'92904' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYL' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0cd6fa461e194aa73571b3580a57ea3a
3df924e7e3e7c7268f535d15c08400127eab40c4
describe
'30719' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYM' 'sip-files00162.pro'
93474ce66ed2eafe1bc6d0998a746a46
97b71c59a37f0b58163b34063282a4d0a23c5490
describe
'33827' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYN' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e81725631e2a6cb33f26037b38a18618
0be4d07b5f16f7e00af62c0309ed496fe7316743
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYO' 'sip-files00162.tif'
30f3806897338ed31192c35cc728d17e
268118a3f4b93df7070dde5b8016c30831e859e7
'2011-11-16T21:35:23-05:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYP' 'sip-files00162.txt'
9f972beec5448f1f6fc0e583b39715e0
8d07989e4508fa66fc61fcd4cea5aa59176950d8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
060a3c2e1bbec6f9e83e8da4ad6b84be
171be0b28270384f214594a98ae6c306553d6523
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYR' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
dde23710277e17a452aa589e518bbe76
58953194fce0619ecd42d17d52d75eb2b4b686a7
describe
'89288' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYS' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
d6ff0d22785593a3d2b6424a7fe55bce
9a08767a2d8823fd28f1e8e989d35812e94acb40
describe
'30758' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYT' 'sip-files00163.pro'
3b40ea62c9fd79522c458167d2f8c53b
8df1e1b6d6553493f7b35fea307c0dbdbb4cd433
describe
'32925' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYU' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
e45038193779e0d6d29c5777f5ac4fe6
1cac94c843f4cf2e4132f265d7d3af302a7a15cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYV' 'sip-files00163.tif'
93d76ef2db42c6ca513eb8c6facd359e
1b6c4191e7476d126e073c528427367434bafca4
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYW' 'sip-files00163.txt'
063761560782208ea5036f19938392d0
9e20ad1ce3cf0e1bcea684c48e5183d50f3a42b2
describe
'10651' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYX' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
622cf7924c89df9a8796ba04d668d1e4
89c6d9fa1b2849666e9b745ef223879ad280df34
describe
'1119985' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYY' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
b414967f8a76841c23df50b9baeab0c2
476e2b3e97260b16a005b7937aa5598683973f2f
describe
'89859' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
923e000259c8e8e6ffc12e44e65965f4
8ca23b60c63bd668c1a91e582c367cf72c5661a9
describe
'29875' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZA' 'sip-files00164.pro'
745ed00650816f98e07ff1ed27fd6509
a1619964b5d4d40ce0a879a133e342801683bb76
describe
'32353' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZB' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
16950aa3e211ee59dd75c888c07be894
cff8c4c791f022b16f7c1b85d73addfceab0e095
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZC' 'sip-files00164.tif'
e62215d90d15dba30977e08ab901d1f8
d55d2aa5d3a38044d6af4dd6a53aa9d6b6472320
'2011-11-16T21:36:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZD' 'sip-files00164.txt'
fa42e79f4f483aa82595c533f4a1d9ca
df7184dc9b9f25b57038e7656be62c0b0520a4d7
describe
'10609' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZE' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
fe9049528564f1c481bf20716fa2ac60
7815b00b7cd0d40b73e76e54a69f1540c2ccee7c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZF' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
c96e44f79282537d2bf18448075c350d
1cc07a6c2798cea2626ecc64ed99ee34dba25d12
describe
'87935' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZG' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
09c7b5f22530e8a7bb5a501942393693
96840eb3b1a212610b09f2b2f070fc6e3d159cdf
describe
'30038' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZH' 'sip-files00165.pro'
28e242991de6c643aaff1e87f2627d18
625bddf1358e75988bc78beda8c540a172a6bb15
describe
'31800' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZI' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
70466784d5339c354da46e69b2735710
303beab3659472bca54f8734503607e6c1900a5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
a0d8c690ade42b2d1b8d8fedcb61a549
7cbfa5d0bdbba39dabb4ea8fa4d6250a3bc28da4
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZK' 'sip-files00165.txt'
203b2d87e677894c7125bc4104b62241
a9ad6d8474d22fa7c57756fd3e814d461b142c58
describe
'10852' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZL' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
c6869df31c71ba7b0ed279a0c4ac2c6b
8eb20e7c54596ec26afb17d785cc27fad2812a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZM' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
b269e83f7fa704ef93fad99b8c0b33b9
bc2d1a19d63e4c6a8946fa547d2f962d47b981e1
describe
'85991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZN' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
3f708a7662db50a1c4802959c9ff5768
bef5624a2aa96f9ed3713d876dc628dbbcb022aa
'2011-11-16T21:32:37-05:00'
describe
'28494' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZO' 'sip-files00166.pro'
28b8adc3e9fda627acce679954385a09
85876b4098d52d5b8225d9850c8078085bad8063
describe
'30805' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZP' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f38c461ddc029e6eecc94182d464fd34
b98973b23ebc8417a8335744338a2d19391fa67a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
13245548d2966dd2c306b6781eb8ccfb
9f2733b685133601efd0ce3af75a7fc942702035
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZR' 'sip-files00166.txt'
5dbda1d7c09f5c26a51fc942c4f60bd0
9451573e078b890b2edbebc387f7403ff32632fe
describe
'9961' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZS' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
9ffaa89caa9965a5a669718c2b46ed65
293db70c84815b75f8602bb95986cb2cf6641d47
describe
'1141398' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZT' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
07f4a13d46f696db9b73ee7841a5394a
58349a9fa456735890ad55ab914b486e24681c0a
describe
'90644' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZU' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
308ab96f6867154f5111b405bda7a885
7910929726542cb0445ef9ea54e1532814bc3578
describe
'11949' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZV' 'sip-files00167.pro'
02b74dde5a02f93b85a8aca7b8070c58
895deaf27d6d3d533281a1dabb9a8b7a3aa2594c
describe
'28768' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZW' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
13b4e22d9aaf713d7eb63b787025aee8
17649738821f77ae74f925def774c3500ed187ad
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZX' 'sip-files00167.tif'
49baa9a58efead637a27607673125a1a
276d1af3753e602d891331e7e51f71130d66c2e7
describe
'503' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZY' 'sip-files00167.txt'
d9787fbe700bc360136c107ab1df4394
07d8a97364034741bc69b27b789e097e9f42bfb0
describe
'9690' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
84b93477561b30d187d7966f0d57ae7e
131daea2cbaad0d8b384a6d5ce2c2b29ecb9cb1e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAA' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
b6671f386aa2c7df79a139cd9679dcc1
a9d2286bed6a96081d247e7a0aaf30a95a854f03
describe
'92596' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAB' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
658c6093e615b24389de857aa62bcf41
f875d233d67c91b136d4b0471453fde68c851225
describe
'30738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAC' 'sip-files00168.pro'
57b6c1adfba5ae6f5fd0038500d45d4f
bd72abf254d9d587e2427c581025737d5c084cf5
'2011-11-16T21:33:43-05:00'
describe
'33372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAD' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
126fc900dfb3c61281c2c2df970792f0
bf5549b34d1fe82464ddfc99a52c52246a9d0257
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAE' 'sip-files00168.tif'
28e992d0b9710ef1b20ce32708f4aa88
e05d2fb6ced4bd8f49e094ec448b7a291c29230c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAF' 'sip-files00168.txt'
65f4cfff345b2a05f07a425b7cd6c8e0
dd95704c3e7b21901149a01478cb44b28075e6a8
describe
'10914' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAG' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
801169f20052cfa71bd5839f8588ef35
2777be8effcc781be7bc5f64d0b3df7b9dc9a9ea
describe
'1140336' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAH' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
ff75838333c93dc79c3c92077e76d1fd
acebe73d989c9c55b3b0361d61bca6373e3ff1fc
describe
'93672' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAI' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
aa8ca5881a2c8c960453f1b027ddfc64
0638e4a8f5b97812180cbec8a0782c67b52f430f
describe
'31834' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files00169.pro'
6dbab1f8fdb19649607dab4c288eb0df
1909517229a110967cf37da212ac395fc1a7a7e2
describe
'33628' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAK' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
8ca73759030f3e36c99918eb8d6105d3
914b7c8e46214ced1d8575ea588dfd52fd1200ef
describe
'9133295' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAL' 'sip-files00169.tif'
585dd011d102d041a33185b5289a22e5
5b1ec5c49834ebe67d845116a8ae2170aeedc416
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAM' 'sip-files00169.txt'
f613270e8ea580c93b8d07c6ebb99856
5f377b2d7092833c4208a8494d1a870e6b66dd50
'2011-11-16T21:37:48-05:00'
describe
'10723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAN' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
99b0e0f098ad8319bda314e9ca7f5aa4
0b1b4fb70c756b8c1cd816dc1f28968add2622d5
describe
'1163567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAO' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
e3cabc3c2eeca63bd62891f3efd5273c
443aff5b4ef19bd007d8c4fed1da759470618799
describe
'82594' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAP' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
38dfd69b0e394e9a476ea49562cc06c2
846c4f359900a6c2cd6540f8f33602dfb9639b69
describe
'26219' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
c2cd413c18c0e5109001fa2a205d10a6
41d6ecd9131a8351eadd800806cd04dc267c50c0
describe
'29410' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAR' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
332647447d0aba4335951119051449bb
da551779fb16f7c3d1a91aa1a2ce55ab45491f8b
describe
'9318933' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAS' 'sip-files00170.tif'
fb0f4823f1dfb0c17267561494bcc075
9b7d9aefdc7640f51c3e172df8406325a4577029
'2011-11-16T21:37:32-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAT' 'sip-files00170.txt'
407e50c5d1213e2d50ac7f893896471a
68d1a2aa6325fa1f98373227063e2fd0f88e07c5
describe
'9292' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAU' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
e555cc2fceb6ee3f85b6ab90ed6ad23c
fd1a6cfbbe2c90a4484914b351794e62620d1fdb
describe
'1140370' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAV' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
0851ecd66470ec18eb669e2319b70a24
5842d02d1e3afceae6ab1b6ca052e2c1c228c721
describe
'92875' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAW' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
93711560f01ebcecd8756d9036129382
28d0e98a65e6d2c76a010ccfd0f2c39d6ad908a0
describe
'30957' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAX' 'sip-files00171.pro'
e2b8eb104d829370ed4ae2d9fe0725b1
e5aca6cbd487186eafb51328fa3bd477ebf0b334
describe
'33186' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAY' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
a24cf8a9f881fae68699e2cc08012c48
83e04c13228f0a5361f4c52d088c4e0d0cb86078
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files00171.tif'
6548b3f1c3d779275317dd8f1966bd25
73e4a115ae235e63613b92443aa36e01985592e9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBA' 'sip-files00171.txt'
975cf01aff86d6dd7079f69bdb7b2226
ea930ec20f971a8fb2aa38ae3ee6a97202a8304d
describe
'10738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBB' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
20f070e273b77eb47aa832ee962aac58
2391a8b5c8394d9553919667c43efa991672d711
describe
'1163560' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBC' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
e36d13ea079fa5d9ff6110e7464e47ac
7f77e06c936bad467cb1ed9a0aea1363b4a7b1f0
describe
'91787' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBD' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
32acf2aac013be91eef1ec536579f334
5fe0d68cd8af428b2125123acbc55bae04be7ba9
describe
'29995' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBE' 'sip-files00172.pro'
6bf9706a251c4452e3a48783c4521b84
9a3211d1dcb743cf9f74a5a3ffcc1349ed8ee094
describe
'32875' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBF' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
6d612b381d7ad4e14955750eec1ad2f8
5eda60649d3cbcf2d2618994e230bd1910488844
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBG' 'sip-files00172.tif'
41b346c2ab7b2cbc879b8ab1dba1c12f
edad21c477b6a5ded13720668a4dd4a80f0581e9
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBH' 'sip-files00172.txt'
4baeceeee371813f04c47a29aebef842
49ae12cc73ab97424c90c094a6ff2e7e11b8177a
describe
'10152' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBI' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
6f2209e247cfaa10864ded834219b76b
700e0d91e1b1d6382eec4131b28033121cc0a551
describe
'1140380' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBJ' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
cd8713f43adad3842797c8eb2fcd6bc1
1139177f1f994bb8a1188b195abf2fb4812ce0f1
describe
'81349' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBK' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
20d4d6cefe9c30c06046cce0921e99ec
f43e6e560b5179e45fb260269627e45c983d4634
describe
'26600' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBL' 'sip-files00173.pro'
1a08b8689632a380e3d2aab0bbc10b65
c816696c842c73f67f73a80a7e79e6a36afeb49b
describe
'29500' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBM' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
46117dbcf13133c09831855bf9c44528
193bc32baaea6381eab127507169f0adedbf4f02
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBN' 'sip-files00173.tif'
d5da7577e773e0f458f715f487e8a6d5
b3a84c96b1e879aa7ccf017af6c9375f06269e41
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBO' 'sip-files00173.txt'
b9808f756cb8ffcf775aacf7b23ef200
05c27d637edf0afa6c4c99112cdec85be8abdf1f
describe
'9634' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBP' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
30bba9011f3fd7f7d1b9e51f685dd8ff
5916da509aafaec0f0c2bad842dc1c1991173815
describe
'1163575' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBQ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
6fd92050c99dc3cc9965eb4a81e5e09f
b7fb875bfdfecae1bda2caa77b1d8341dfd4c339
describe
'78285' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBR' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
d1390b37276d212d985d117fda10ad69
c93d7d6319c8f82af5e77268fec9facc6851a7bc
describe
'24348' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBS' 'sip-files00174.pro'
22482a071b50308d9ce98acf9303544e
263c0f2c9fb36d09754ca6d429dfc4ad56b2699e
describe
'27363' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBT' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
29162c46f8c5dcfb2d0d97f9396c4cb3
0ce6ed1402399e6ebc85a032c8009b7368119589
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBU' 'sip-files00174.tif'
473cfcc56da5586e4eb5325eef96c2a2
0d8ae8228d13093a2b5b52051e166359d59d0f28
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBV' 'sip-files00174.txt'
2cb83d5ebaaaa7c9155c299269fdeb2a
f328ee34172ae6c8e93897340fa4bb1fc99ee13d
describe
'8531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBW' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
674b6c9b1e399fb5cc83fb21d9edc8b4
663b5c60764740ca6054414c3ca48059eb171c68
describe
'1140375' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBX' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
7c6fc29331acea7cdc879e10af4325ac
c630337d583a817d1b2b4c9d8db3da8da5049b1b
describe
'88488' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBY' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
9a73e9a39efb7061fd2134169c61cbf2
755655b269c88c66d7134310cc3b2abf84df0027
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVBZ' 'sip-files00175.pro'
7b94d0d540bb412af751e9bb1898a9b4
dd3c4504775baef57f85cbf011472da119400ad5
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCA' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
06388fa5412623b081d2e42a57ff84a8
6a8b264832b9d79cf57c2cd2a88c4a14caf2523d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCB' 'sip-files00175.tif'
e26021c287c39562b5e1efa0d6f4a614
03c6b22f1760146a1f501c886ee1d3397f7a5d66
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCC' 'sip-filesback.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCD' 'sip-files00175.txt'
d263fc393d227fb1c4b1cd086170300d
f013bbc7838e53302257ef1384dcb1ea1e427ad0
'2011-11-16T21:36:21-05:00'
describe
'10468' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCE' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
3bd5db2b8a1903822f6ef764486ccf1d
bd0887cd7a3a174c2bb751325856ad0195a8883d
describe
'1163360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCF' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
baf56015caa0cad853365d4aba6b40c3
3de402b47c2fbe5eee60afcfed96d9883502df35
describe
'82775' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCG' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
2fc8dd858342b047447096b96ed392bb
b2592ec9f7657ce10d0561ef6090e213c63134f5
describe
'27409' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCH' 'sip-files00176.pro'
140a29c942297ac0052a373c39ecae92
389a1185993c0ea4727ec7014ab36f61450c2fa9
describe
'29371' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCI' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
7791be24c7c6d23836f12b0f0ba882d0
c4873acdd136bb953411ffa239687396d48f861b
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCJ' 'sip-files00176.tif'
739241ee40ca1f767afc9583c5fbbff0
c7869a2a7328dec4e45d7f411905cebdee86b36e
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCK' 'sip-files00176.txt'
fb6b34a1ddb93284fa4a387a855e6d0f
4c38df765f25afd275b1bc042b9057b0fddb0fe2
describe
'9430' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCL' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
74c9cb47cb7db04b428826e530b40ce6
139d7c710b163e181a6fc0c32095b61253e2d395
describe
'1140362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCM' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c2926a9e606bd417d80563157fe07880
3319ee96178b027938967fa51e0887ade865df90
describe
'92085' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCN' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
02b8fe3e8c4700155bc69fa54366b846
330eb7e4ee1733bdf4f880991e5be7f4643bc7f7
describe
'31567' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCO' 'sip-files00177.pro'
b7dc6eb4adf985181600570b87ced411
bccec1e04b2954be0e4bf00ac84dc29c6f36915c
describe
'33185' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCP' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
194a613161878e941b5941a6f45d6630
592479bc18f0b6356624a09a1f3351190f9d2c6e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCQ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
f47b4d30ec71daafaab2f053418757bd
96d242676b112696177d89e4ac9bda4822d2a34f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCR' 'sip-files00177.txt'
b56e111fd45590a3dd709cfa261014dd
55d2980d2418c8e805153a48f633341dace71e38
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCS' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
7d21eb1c20527630e35722e1eb55bdbd
834c928c023e39e908eb7a7a2feebaa9e0660546
describe
'1163586' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCT' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
929d02b24d7eefd10c6d611b144d4da5
aac34d748f71bdcf8151fd7780dc151f5cd8844f
describe
'90805' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCU' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
6b1de9220c4d28fce6b8e9acaa8233fe
7eaf9e037f53bd590af2046e3afb93cf212a02b5
describe
'30372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCV' 'sip-files00178.pro'
1a1b9f136bfd60328d12140d538411ce
b8372c41304a9c1230a3a42a3861c4973565bf60
describe
'32098' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCW' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
913238e53b50d071e59cc6e75d755962
048b297c3ec8c0852c7e390088cf251fafe3b4af
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCX' 'sip-files00178.tif'
f429074333da53f01a9ac8240529ccad
3a75cb46899590e4dbe0c0cbe8c39a8131211ed8
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCY' 'sip-files00178.txt'
90f636125309eff72c819c7111f3303b
42d60a8e92aa604a462f9947e263aa5462b20937
describe
'9879' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVCZ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
5c57005fb4014a9d5310f43aedcacca9
b2f6ced0505e98de9be129dad912c2e9f30ea9c8
describe
'1140337' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDA' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
6328ef638ceaa1cf69bfb3cff6885441
d8bf75fc05083a9159aae8d5df6053a9797e077c
describe
'94596' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDB' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
5214b8a84ffa9ee8812979e87851f16b
4dfed2831f89d34785f9415786032f9456f1dcd2
describe
'32121' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDC' 'sip-files00179.pro'
b529b110aff95435b2a6069c17b5a183
4df9ac59ae97bd122513fbbf52adfc9a3ab50bf5
describe
'33847' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDD' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
9834baa7ed8cd5d110ee7db6026c326a
64931e71ea33be4ef15e3644e2157c5d241a6085
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDE' 'sip-files00179.tif'
90e5f4a56e7ae134c5fe6befcb00f09a
3b92e8e4e68838119b634401f4bd658392390b58
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDF' 'sip-files00179.txt'
2d397174aa92a00a7ae539e6fd8bd0b5
2ef7b9f07192171c4c1292247aa02d9811676e26
'2011-11-16T21:33:39-05:00'
describe
'10755' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDG' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
9a0218c47e4bdf61bd3feffd12bef4bb
9009d766e5102018e02f73d4fb2cbce29df34aff
describe
'1163579' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDH' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
0880dacc80c84b36bacb86a59cd77149
1c24fdcbe1a2d50bd3bb1d7fa23a266b8635b5ff
describe
'86654' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDI' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
98637bfb32e83641b001fd21ecc79d07
f3ad01905f005a8ea7bd8c62069bcbb7554078b1
describe
'29998' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDJ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
f1475fea4a7bb9704ddbbdf2de2f9a04
87f6bac8b0634d420c5403845e8e006f930de1b8
describe
'31039' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDK' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
2bd8e5eea61fd9c2b2e4929750404ad3
de21cb8c38cefc76649f30002c9010cbdfb8cdab
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDL' 'sip-files00180.tif'
9b69ffc97f46fd85e47c6704d920c2aa
bbd8feb03517c82c7186dad696ab115d96270340
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDM' 'sip-files00180.txt'
7f263f127170c01fd800cf52c8b8ab12
5f82b8c8bfe582d5989a63e8c32a68a7623635fa
describe
'9476' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDN' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
9267d6181971019f75dce9986df5d612
6df7d7abba431d23de43883976008d45cc7d48c3
describe
'1140345' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDO' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
5d7db18559057624ab3470d34bdea327
46903ec80673aa2850ca1d135d6e224f93423c0b
describe
'90660' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDP' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
cc3a9b625b9a04698f56422e39447ce6
6aa99454d63eab91ad3cc536c3b4894bdf27af5f
describe
'31571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDQ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
08e75bd47889e6c8780fb134ee07c18f
23210b4da4715278e74028c8100b8d5f94b4a130
describe
'32457' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDR' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
c514b6a28f7cabf4911f453945f9e810
9b5129d1207d36dac5e20a84dccdc8272b82dcd0
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDS' 'sip-files00181.tif'
ba642031b6783c143fd1040bc44559e5
2d7e0eb3f3b2c6d1894b292bb1c83f27d3c6bf5a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDT' 'sip-files00181.txt'
a66d67fc9a4acf6379f7f1b34a8bd63e
ff89e8e191c256785351d1d61034ad8e4d3efaf1
describe
'10276' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDU' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
0b9767d47f590343dc957b47db5e5acc
3a7023b801a48be14d621c9d606b560cf54dcd3b
describe
'1163492' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDV' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
786aa359bec6fa1d6122b9d53a872b0a
3df88decaf95d6181dc76b472b5a4965350dab41
describe
'84090' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDW' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
97359f6a6ae59ec5b46dbd51c8c6bc96
bcceeab30cf35bb3f091d861bae2a81837840ad4
describe
'28312' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDX' 'sip-files00182.pro'
38755283b2c605a6e9ff31af07303265
da90436bfb81365f69972f8d846f39e4b42f8b6a
describe
'30673' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDY' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
55c9ae1dc04362fd6acc776d3e5f6739
d18b6134b2fdd4181c1285bca5a9816ed30f5bdc
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVDZ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
508312c9fb6a4cf76a2c2acd1158b13d
a923e862b534996cf506030cbb3c772805fffc19
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEA' 'sip-files00182.txt'
d4da0b9bdace2d4b485d23ded1bebfdb
2030a9ececa99f3e00c8dd21ad56395632a85b39
describe
'9327' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEB' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
d0a39f3c1fe23027eae852a8abbd342c
e11744c8a9c08c6f0395c68073d6d258795441c3
describe
'1140378' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEC' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
95827292896c25b0650f1fa738472d03
2f47f5c7044c915464131d6a6de5e92f6d340428
describe
'89951' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVED' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
669c9397b96239c20a527d8f12bf00eb
28ee227d8c3b1f60dd7dd2ecfadbbd2e5a074ddc
describe
'30804' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEE' 'sip-files00183.pro'
c6bd90c405bc92019036c6cad0dc307d
2ec93dc99ff8f1bb2ce4f5d7a71125fe790de896
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEF' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5df9f01b92bab9e19b61b89e7225185c
8e2a0ca1a640b74d303c661ab1453593c67a70e1
'2011-11-16T21:34:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEG' 'sip-files00183.tif'
69c724841cfaa3493d8268f41342af3b
aa4b7792465340e2a320752379afaec656d183f8
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEH' 'sip-files00183.txt'
625f932640bfd180b59daf972d09a036
2908029592a52a74026c1acd26df9ffd6e28b97d
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEI' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
a47539c5652e527f85479ece635fb7e9
7eb55925dedebd54dfc8c79c487768818ef2e77f
describe
'1163544' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEJ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
1f73679aafe1d50e90ebba55339ceff1
64f6eca990a7ee88ceba023db7e51d2702fc7bbc
describe
'95585' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEK' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
cf8c73af6bb6a03f2762e55318c4cc86
f5257398f2715c14611d35c4f19d814c9f6225ee
describe
'32450' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEL' 'sip-files00184.pro'
e217963333d634271dfc731a503dda6b
8c274f5919f1d3b1073ea7c3a9f94406bd5ebdbf
describe
'34653' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEM' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
98b4139f4e8573aeacfc1dda2abe1e9f
5cc446801c71dfb1c9c87c9709d026260d6dcb64
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEN' 'sip-files00184.tif'
7c1b60ff2349574a961de2d00ab63a03
ce372c70697672a534e55294ee95c788929b9b60
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEO' 'sip-files00184.txt'
f3d8bab49c653183f098c7226411d785
561e13760c4a7e8695b735e445e9772802ec375a
describe
'10520' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEP' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
5e116a93d32b1e459ca4fe7f2d66b683
73b7d7758d3bcfc7357efae92a6b9100b6059d95
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEQ' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
c8fc297c2510c1fadce509d948478f6b
60feda0ef90f85764fee5bf5a95978efdac25cef
describe
'95803' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVER' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
2c4fc50d07f410bc947f2a89985d630b
83230ff82eec3d50dd9b3b80ddf1e3a175ca9015
describe
'33046' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVES' 'sip-files00185.pro'
11a7a6da716bb351234ff1671294b41b
3df9a0e08e9de52910128b573dc2dad47de64a3f
describe
'34268' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVET' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
352dd88806f96aff562feef8cea6704c
ef5de3d778b27f9ec9c108f27bfa1453eb273ed7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEU' 'sip-files00185.tif'
436e428821f49cfd04ac01e19d2ea698
74779de2560105a57789965564ff1dc5a674a23c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEV' 'sip-files00185.txt'
e19f782fd7a69b6252226382ed74bd93
a75d91a5d2d07c9f27b40f22e2223ed186e635f1
describe
'10834' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEW' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
77e021a66b8bdbdce1e4a56f079b9551
d57b690b1c5bf53b21590c4c89aa745ba9e39c06
describe
'1163541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEX' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
34e45ca4caf6d8a936fcad90adceb9ff
48c006dc2e956e506066e4506b07d2a0de871229
describe
'92209' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEY' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
b40e413cd8ac4b2c6dbe68713e79cb7d
34bf15c1d4ceefcc8a4a5af1c0653cae134b08d8
describe
'13678' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVEZ' 'sip-files00186.pro'
433ee1c407b2fcf0e9b83bd1d06c8c3a
1778e1dc3157bf8dd93ce613d33b2fac16a683df
describe
'28457' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFA' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
72015a39f59e39a010b2d94a0bd70c25
599a5f66f655fe1c00f86fd49420bb3ff187df8d
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFB' 'sip-files00186.tif'
183f9e99693bfbc0604f3da884e55b72
d1a170b4de0de5ecc9a9e5b5139dfabe2a923231
describe
'588' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFC' 'sip-files00186.txt'
34705581265374748013413040543e35
7126df161720417cf5ed2b1daaf04eca17f33b60
describe
'8801' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFD' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
9208f37bf2ee14aa7a1bc017eac4fb2c
4917842d05d0d0080e77fa2ff7783da72c6038d5
describe
'1140330' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFE' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
9343367775b2fe8a2bc6da006f71dcc5
b8db145d3e9381378ba5f213277c378e19ea0c22
describe
'88795' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFF' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
2f8312f08d44f13ac390c614253dd084
b328926994da91d1dc7be462f795fc9e40e09fe0
describe
'30083' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFG' 'sip-files00187.pro'
4835a66142cc26c8eeac73c29bef3c9d
7f7de8d6811fea75a7bb89e4e7694d58128df0c7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFH' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
ab140e077f9cdc0a116c267e573fe09f
5af8699bcc69cef51e99ea4900272797517e651f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFI' 'sip-files00187.tif'
25fbc671d81fdc98d9436788432a86e4
417e365a42bf6dd4399c94f31d92469a9c84e26f
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFJ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
1e59e9724d8476b0253b689c795bfc1f
9b501f9d3c8b93a3c4a9c9139f37a04561bc5476
describe
'10489' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFK' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
9380425b0559a0112861741f6b78940f
c14eeac2e417f4f30369594cddef351bac7b48e0
describe
'1094965' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFL' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
6adf932c4361de80ca462f4dd233a9dc
c57616f095d3d2c5b3119267211c1b8f988043f7
describe
'50748' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFM' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
f60d04c408482a9484e254fc385da824
8b6e5a7387979ab697fbc39d1b78d353e7a33070
describe
'13154' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFN' 'sip-files00188.pro'
cb9a6478e6114db3d8b787b5338a957c
3f28f657a9685db7c0dcd6a3feb7b9ce6f61a133
describe
'17300' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFO' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
e2810199748b8aebb1cf76432d46fcc3
e3d2ac16147fe2808bc81acdfc6726bbe9f74b92
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFP' 'sip-files00188.tif'
3981d8eed4ece84655457416a682380c
d9f8f8ad017878c57d52a9d1b694e0456f6059d3
describe
'565' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFQ' 'sip-files00188.txt'
ee08a0fb83e9859ce82814ff7babd24a
98cd7884d4a9e89362e9b95db6d169661ab2e3db
describe
'5524' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFR' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
c71dd9d87a93ca5de6ad5787b14cb8bb
3bb67bd24d90dd5222dac0351f246609efae4f47
describe
'1140372' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFS' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
695e668a5a556580b5278a8e575d94fa
ac3baba989215255d5561ca17874934d593e764f
describe
'79116' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFT' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
b4ff3ac60aa9febd1fb16a931d9fface
f60f458a8878bed3257360ac24f0409739186194
describe
'26080' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFU' 'sip-files00189.pro'
9c36750f3eb333e1d457682f90205da1
0e9f57be8f8335d6d431d5cd4b204e48c08984aa
describe
'28427' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFV' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
f83a92fd5910a3f69cca1f21da90d379
872b8d17a5bbe29de4d5d373a2bc8f56b731157e
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFW' 'sip-files00189.tif'
5810674d26baa4182cb2142e301ba34b
65222cd4b0085b2b08c942ef184e4a9ac3ca9481
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFX' 'sip-files00189.txt'
d85cd8a24529a89a89fbf187babc2643
0037d66f60222cb61c4e28c018677179ae27dfc1
describe
'9347' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFY' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
7ec34ea39510cca444c5f1ef1cbfcd45
c316e29b33a65a9fcc726209c0cfd3ceec08640c
describe
'1163559' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVFZ' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
ab27530cea14507f63bd1ee35ed14beb
aea5635a38e9ede99da718db05cb98856551b495
describe
'95496' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGA' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
6c36ceafd53f9ac60d7c861d107f2a50
b20cb6c82b4b09a9c91dc05e7ccc485df7219dab
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGB' 'sip-files00190.pro'
503703444f1ed04e4b44cdabae430d9b
0f8a2c730e961549f71242dafeb27044d95f11a3
describe
'34541' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGC' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
cd48edcea81b7afd7ba37f78a2ebbdc5
5c9a13344ada037d643dc6f59ab088f32f87f4f9
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGD' 'sip-files00190.tif'
c4575ea945ce2c69be90a3dacc5016fc
bc2282ff11dd750a7fc08567dfcaf942c41cdcbb
'2011-11-16T21:37:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGE' 'sip-files00190.txt'
7d632726a01db248a284efc237596d0b
ecbda255d3c2b13d22d84c172356c05f073a922a
describe
'10252' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGF' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
ac8234ed18cf561fe720301952e4016d
f5f17f7945baa0969b54c229154781b2a4819826
describe
'1140339' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGG' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
dedbe7cc44c24104eaaaf19682b85491
8ffefb029339580cb7825c3346d7813e8b079082
describe
'93087' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGH' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
43830aa134bdcdf06639debe584a9df5
81c4847ae6a05a0f0c06b288b57e6f446812806a
describe
'31620' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGI' 'sip-files00191.pro'
4151dc7048eb266190eb833594a2e1b0
973f1269f967a07af688336b52bc683af9a4506f
describe
'34134' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGJ' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
565fac7b98cc122da6e4ff5d3cd67a2a
5164950b9833b53af4cba36cb70a3bf67cd996b8
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGK' 'sip-files00191.tif'
70b5ef5835b009604636da8cabbf72b0
3f50a9472638abf3e7146d07c96a6f7da13f7361
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGL' 'sip-files00191.txt'
31251036c06377f5e9609960af678ba0
c09c679333bb8f49869e172b4edfbc9ade55e3e7
describe
'11116' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGM' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
8bfe8e08ae45f540899320f8bc2a3c3b
638db8bbf40e8aca4f296f5a4d6247496c853f3d
describe
'1163572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGN' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
1f2101620c2ccd552c7f05ad66904096
a3d7fdffc1893058d5eae548c3e1265c68dc5869
describe
'96830' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGO' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
46a45e00ab6144bc10cb09156ce77b23
4ce7309f634b7757a90c0b392d38660cb19edf43
describe
'32935' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGP' 'sip-files00192.pro'
10c1af39d34dac547d104aef9b953b3f
411569300ca3e4b4175b20dade81bfc8f1ea4362
describe
'35235' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGQ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ee5cb0eb21cebc63f3a6d6c8263e09df
4085bfe92e4624934fc54dc1c1eb619c625016a3
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGR' 'sip-files00192.tif'
4dd7247722f821ce569a5e3bb86eaa00
d655e38134eb23b079330dbdb0b926bbb61909e1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGS' 'sip-files00192.txt'
4b5de3301230eda20ac71a69193c9bc7
00b7085844ba236bba0c82ce7a4a8f3c45c9f127
describe
'10362' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGT' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
77f3cb901b0270bc1cc402cd5d988e56
3a44ed47aa12f61b042d807e6fab1f8732322f86
describe
'1106331' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGU' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
cddab89954ae16246bf42ef2ba5a4dc3
79ca602d830a3252b64cd34ab72710eda8aa4fc8
describe
'94148' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGV' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
b114fb2c2097fc056025076f4043db23
fec10a4263be77bcf096020e3e4f9ea76b5c0d12
describe
'31527' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGW' 'sip-files00193.pro'
50f225616548582002401a6299038ff2
0d3721e8817fa98e50ee65a2cb249c43136d7b80
describe
'34283' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGX' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
92605d2f6eb1c1f7cae019f751baf6f8
2b6ba27b97fd9b978c22152227a915582342d946
describe
'8860783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGY' 'sip-files00193.tif'
034b20adb96d5c3b242b265d72f748a6
a3180afc7288cc3dba6199429ecb711b7471e491
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files00193.txt'
e452007cec1d49e73b6b47127c215389
ba557d239bb2cfef6fb64e27d1705a56255a3d22
describe
'11042' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHA' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
405a4f2e696ae5e726ed96920dfb6e95
843983a893deddc1fa70ec30a6a649b733fb928a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHB' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
2e5e949347ea3fa8ffb6e631829c1e25
d2b130dc2c78b71bdfbd2c1e0238c3b76658cae5
describe
'90931' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHC' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
d536947d68102ed9bf0798658faa3515
2efc11adbc6b8745d964084bce589ffbd6020731
describe
'31203' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHD' 'sip-files00194.pro'
ba085d8290f20f108f5d1d4e2785a674
9ce3a6436951cca358563d8723a8f247421490d2
describe
'32531' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHE' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
7d6204d64e5a52cc91623650608b7d6b
0bf4d2ec9f7046788d7bf69aceb64b59172d18d8
'2011-11-16T21:37:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHF' 'sip-files00194.tif'
347a2b6ff7918e663fa727e815ddf060
72aa994dc064fec5a03ff0069dfb8dc8c28a883a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHG' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4c9028654eaf40235d8beddfb9063b66
88ede84e3bde15a51a5fa8ae20f0757f370f60d7
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHH' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
d61bcf8b0d4addc48cf05765d415f27d
3393ab3e4924c5a734f2bdcdb5d24d4a50763260
describe
'1113304' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHI' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
5f2b2eff53d9d3d8eeb97fe372c38c43
d63fac1a16301d7b2e843530e881e3a4033abb1f
describe
'89795' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
ad76959b3b036ce2dcaddb096aa50737
9aa696e6cf4e705d6047101875d13aee3b02f750
describe
'29458' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHK' 'sip-files00195.pro'
c574fc231a5b9cb8f63648ef5b5f5676
076001bac384a3df032eab34e60e59eb5f8c8562
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHL' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
8c1cf41f2ac49ebdd1c8bfd15c52a5a6
bf8416ef9af0a8be85d9bad5afc4df1d3dc9154d
describe
'8916723' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHM' 'sip-files00195.tif'
8f8608df0d91195111055bc3412ea327
f789e0d0b146f51037ff85a419615169b64a8e66
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHN' 'sip-files00195.txt'
0e0684ae1493688d173fbe28c59cbd5d
0be3016775200af6b0ac04c301312617c4f91711
describe
'11073' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHO' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
daf1013be3e43eaec1e3538cdd5cc5eb
b9462434ba61cc99fac774788d0cfd17eaa0864e
describe
'1163590' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHP' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
dbc356df6fad2b0971e7389b1d713b64
5190aad4f0a99f603014643307150d1a6ff4d6cd
describe
'90841' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
755deb6f84154764213b8d661e8249f8
a906f34fd1274b84d265ace06843e0e8df21cf2f
describe
'30316' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHR' 'sip-files00196.pro'
b54878338a02e1bc07dfcc0906b4a7d0
b54692b0b21df261bd812738bf343d6174a0ba2d
describe
'33109' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHS' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
83a8020b56bca12a37589d7b6ab278fb
2227ef50b372e598ab8361907851f64d79d65485
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHT' 'sip-files00196.tif'
17fc48bea6f6ffdf77900913578dca3a
93a3cd10c2699bf848400bdba536a67c7aa2cbf2
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHU' 'sip-files00196.txt'
135db6ee658ffbacfb64eb0e501a5973
13186d5553ca839273b6bb2aee5686344efd5908
describe
'10271' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHV' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
490692f49fd00ff94ef938d66f7b5054
86daa2407d94d7c8a0a4a3ab717f5f165fd88f9f
describe
'1106049' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHW' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
836a90a9723561e17d9bfcbbc0524eb6
37b3a1f91a81caa1526a7516818474c5fd15e0e8
describe
'92664' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHX' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
fd21ebe044fd449b9403a9124834fa8d
ace6fc84b000c02e735bbc6953669afc2775da9c
describe
'30589' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHY' 'sip-files00197.pro'
34d8799a762125771d71fab5c74f86db
39d662df25948f1aa0544803852f02d07811dbdc
describe
'33975' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
bfc8f231e46e0e9215102a44b65f28b0
788ee039306861d92814e8310a610e0f4e809809
describe
'8858627' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIA' 'sip-files00197.tif'
108797f2da915c7d95d1622f089f4641
3bbefd8486bc51163ee9fe7b6913a34226f1bffa
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIB' 'sip-files00197.txt'
e20de96a9d3c965379cce70459487963
1a50904011c076dfb98a9519ebfe574c597c3c18
describe
'11026' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIC' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
1a4232f2980dac220c4f47aed16baafa
0429355c679d08985cefd8d4903898e1977ded4b
describe
'1134739' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVID' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
85e28b329b85d8e233d851a54b7c1c6d
5954a238901610ca2514852c7134136dd67f3f0d
describe
'93979' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIE' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
3c3bed8b5b8f0db93d5d8f056e8dd23d
24241d4cd1135b03fa9cf89142e0eaf9b1aa378a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIF' 'sip-files00198.pro'
8fdf449be6a4b5d4312bbaa21b01d3af
d1231f6190ac021c3e71fbf33b7e7d79494b4adb
describe
'34404' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIG' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
38ac92fa2bb11be8d116b214d8e259c8
b41a254b74dfe5c6d7bf5ad5afaf1c30dafdf843
describe
'9088369' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIH' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9e9912a33fc9c829b4794ba857d86d07
16419b17ceedfab0b69f9741b3f727e6b2579b39
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVII' 'sip-files00198.txt'
3ccec5ddbd9449d3d1639b850d357470
7a71768ad34ab11a3b5b0e3bffe7b725c6c3c1de
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
00080b55fd1f60d772d1edfa2888c68e
a69b9562bd6217c12d863187a169163e8ff79b6b
describe
'1140299' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIK' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
4d086c5e0e063af61e97397f79a193d3
963beb95868bcf151a19b7bb9c83c1caf17d8150
describe
'91738' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIL' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
07ac593822d8f1463c78dd6bf77143b0
514fcef0566c4ed2ac79288cf0386f60fe51f577
describe
'13659' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIM' 'sip-files00199.pro'
6206c8207459ee78bfc54df33ee16f4d
c53d05d04ddf9abdd43711c68886f650fe54e6cb
describe
'29690' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIN' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
44a0f2518076dee17a96c3e04c012291
bb6bacee01d57565ea73bb7f41a188bcaf6d695a
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIO' 'sip-files00199.tif'
ab5321262cb34ac549a2deaf508d17a9
b0e3340f5fdde7cb7660510a6037adacb564c9d8
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIP' 'sip-files00199.txt'
fa365490b356053c772c9ae94a21f1d0
1e4fad3d638742333d1a9f37cf6c9d4de35fa70f
describe
'9919' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ae8660dc23b61833dcee83569b8691bb
b502c9755682132140696204b4e5871501bf8b5a
describe
'1163413' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIR' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
212296f7cc654f42c2097be1b336d74a
d49473082b2e82ec616c57445d657fd1f7920974
describe
'63747' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIS' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
9093492baacb51ca076ed7f6b3e58069
603c49b27ac7702cc40c3eb208c01523de83cac2
describe
'17354' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIT' 'sip-files00200.pro'
bab6551ff4bd7a08803afdfadcdcb511
34a066761dc1157150965b530923d66094abbade
describe
'21796' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIU' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
3cc455b530c31a70aecf23152eb4c668
7097289acd6c2e1e712585ec5a060885706dc2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIV' 'sip-files00200.tif'
3208585b1ed88805a2d660e311fc9f29
950b609c8a9e59a2782d6cd3dc885b45e5786328
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIW' 'sip-files00200.txt'
a31987bc3d7b13f57ca7a3cca16f951a
669850620bfa7c5fb345701149d0faf9ab5d11d0
describe
'6636' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIX' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
664d40dcbbfa2a3f4e0391bcf02807c2
4fbd1c510b10b60d0deb1b77447280a65e759a9e
describe
'878474' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIY' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
fcfe15d47f55183b9f535c28c4fe5952
12c5ccdd5a0365551316a12003303bbc18ba8c81
describe
'19806' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
c20ac5204512e70256ffccbfc2c73cde
d92b2a63766291416ea2c3c0f4429a3fbeae5689
describe
'278' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJA' 'sip-files00201.pro'
1e2b123869b6506b00c176cbe530dc21
f487e1b2ea5d12b744dde1f17479c002f3d3cca0
describe
'5387' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJB' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
5bb762e402ab9a27230fbd9200339ba0
141f117d7ad7a9d9cd4e07b24c9d6aa18f94715c
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJC' 'sip-files00201.tif'
9ae21a0749908e89b8782a6e8642fb51
03d2840e1ec8cb685eb5c8aee89e3d67e693a025
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJD' 'sip-files00201.txt'
f6663a90b788c9992e357d7e534dc319
2165e778b8e5807468320ef592d8435cf2332467
describe
'2034' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJE' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
b026812c707e63f7fb680d59928f3a71
8e089a289f5ca0b68ac007b5105e980d712d6576
describe
'1163591' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJF' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
451f2cba998a3b752e66d1cf3444ad3d
004d46ad8030a4b8fb8493f52dd756199d7d017a
describe
'81319' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJG' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
cb280c7cfe7f301ff979bea25fb57bd7
ee954c5ec7d42f97a6da7136508b01a761fdae43
describe
'29728' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJH' 'sip-files00202.pro'
6cf75cc970dfb8aca4e23d0a03ed1aef
a961c90e04e43e8b985776a42622badd51c26e88
describe
'27696' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJI' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
97cdbcbbfbca3f4d7d8c4891633ba179
a2c767a27a8e746f92b57270640e8461dcf474ec
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
97e34a65b43c758af6d4a2ff8eca3208
7ae991242f9915c37073265415c2f8d90e8e1180
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJK' 'sip-files00202.txt'
a8b07e867353a5cd80c6162fc949671f
cd580ba854f27460989b737419a87f29eca04f57
describe
'8783' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJL' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
a9eda13c126ef5f078aeb6cb1715ca71
f648e9ef2b58de6577ab241799f92cf8a904ee57
describe
'1112262' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJM' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
b97e58925f2b68b985ca73ef0a5e501c
fde58c4b858a3a6bd775b17939725ab394fc3f40
describe
'104619' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJN' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
292fbda33b572f82fd3a98b3eedc9fe4
36471f232c7c4cf7c0e8f0ce80b9d9fc683456c7
describe
'42092' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJO' 'sip-files00203.pro'
6b37a2a1ebcad4f5fdb91b788b4244c6
455bfeb6c48080a070272ba58981cd74db060547
describe
'35351' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJP' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
40bde0dc10bea5ed089cddbea02fd6e4
acf42e6ffe35fc6ad4d85decc1f312d528740801
describe
'8908275' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files00203.tif'
7852546379a050a160823574bea1c8c4
d2ecbd171e881667c00cead1098f3b065d9dbd81
describe
'1965' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJR' 'sip-files00203.txt'
5801db7e452852f9d5f75679421dfc0a
eeb46cef585b144b7e80c22aedf4e47294a1aa04
describe
'11192' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJS' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
4600437db0ed601238b2c46f27156c41
a1ebc2f9ec6fbc057d363393d4be882369a251db
describe
'1163589' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJT' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
a9d338dc6fe4f72ac966e37e1f080eab
afd130c17e291d0d953cf44d59951fa100f8f231
describe
'96817' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJU' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
0f7085844c16cfe4fb44f178c825d0e5
e642a0356a8bd026319fa26b1b50e5a0e96aaaa3
describe
'37194' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJV' 'sip-files00204.pro'
dbc0e4de44acab009b51eee251cca68c
e6144c574b9cfc24914a6e27852221b8ac1f2e46
describe
'32630' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJW' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
00a6a608d135762c721292b9f1af4713
ac9383fdbd35713a83937b7299e1122ea9de3d15
'2011-11-16T21:32:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJX' 'sip-files00204.tif'
df64930a3aee4d5bcd1a37f7662dcfb2
165feba63fda3ed35e472504c5bb8803aa93024c
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJY' 'sip-files00204.txt'
5688de62e9fa071f4c854d9bee7ff938
012e7749baa1aff40fb08746f87021d0933eacda
describe
'10572' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
809a13f10614f676c0407ef5fbb1cb4e
d46e580b71fe3165873e4c47d0dbed32cf422b2f
describe
'1121760' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKA' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
5eb2525f9a7809935b3c5a891fbaf0d9
1b20883b9a58b000a4a10567a92cc6380c238c8e
describe
'119105' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKB' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
94c96eb8f29ce341c1af5975a3d0299c
b7f11279ed3470af40507b76d28cfeb33bfff32e
describe
'66346' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKC' 'sip-files00205.pro'
bdf811dcb83283907527779b44e758c5
a072b3c41e03981295b3db411836fd285716b709
describe
'37664' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKD' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
ab932b5438234047d0976e1330b87b4f
1118ba42fb64e9c88c07d61340fea7bbc13820fa
describe
'8984553' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKE' 'sip-files00205.tif'
dc9cca8cf60052f2ff31279e315c078f
e1e463d22da9c1641a27f5cb64e2cd4295fa1b67
describe
'2879' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKF' 'sip-files00205.txt'
5722426ba00793a2a95f76ce5d27221e
0391254fae2e1c058078c4abec8e87e2a72d7803
describe
'11212' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKG' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
f5ef8e07ed922bd328a1db44aa25cc91
2dfdeea5d6ed10668827ffae59469dff96f5cab1
describe
'940025' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKH' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
cb87bda048eba953ba3405f33ffa6c58
8399925bbf2d391fd9446d41d9a8b15553a6923d
describe
'23287' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKI' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
e3c698efdab7d738a86d6e4a31de468e
47c86c5473036222f8ffa0dd46f4ea0c2ec81aa8
describe
'283' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files00206.pro'
472928060926d36da245a68c01209b07
790d476c3ebab2ddc141d76dad0145db49f43ac9
describe
'6180' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKK' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
7fe8fa83ef9ea6f0e3e25e72676265de
712220b111f0aa167f70f71b9e953fd641a51414
describe
'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKL' 'sip-files00206.tif'
96798271a297de9888c889a3f5c9d12c
7f35ca2581090571b45ca05c4e67f71a65c960e6
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKM' 'sip-files00206.txt'
c7619811cb74360756245de267cf0a79
a6fde39ed4c34847a90a40e1be349a3875858665
describe
'1846' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKN' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
bc190a34ecf8e096f171cfed407b3ada
6568a29f276728fd747710aeb7fcdfac80735efb
describe
'33384' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKO' 'sip-filesback.QC.jpg'
af9c24167f30021591d816a2e79b2051
f4fab2d4a4fbb756553f69eab2aa6d917a9faff2
describe
'7332' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKP' 'sip-filesbackthm.jpg'
d8adcc3e64d87b3526c487a5299abec5
8d787d02b23f158c7ec7146406d7a85130c56329
describe
'1251977' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKQ' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
e7c77e8735c6c38eac287d949b650546
dc65ec48f83af47698c658d3c345edd5e2033553
describe
'133428' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKR' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
eeeae27c942a11673c7f1cd90946959d
babe088fffa663a20af0ffb1efb3622203dfb662
describe
'216' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKS' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
d50d987b6816a1f269deced139e6a429
1d014f798459cd43bdf29b58fb9affcea3f33f04
describe
'26176' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKT' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
d4c073bf5a62a8032b59620f4b5abfba
706770ad7c563febd80333f3aa767877e7406f3f
describe
'30049182' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKU' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
30d95bae05473de8eb6be9f3a7a09203
7a28da88da6b36d2f1acc38a88869a523acb564b
describe
'6094' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKV' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
561e68802858a946dbc91aa12f5824f8
12cea5e540b5a8f5acdaef4b0fd555b8456dc60b
describe
'205899' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKW' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
0919b5c71102ee51fb36b30dc21aad04
d85d37a0be82bf10148f650ec4496cfa77b869c8
describe
'26334' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKX' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
13c571968742b2358c9bf91b517b40da
474069166329d8a646153af9b32297e787b0c07a
describe
'479' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKY' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
19e879eb6ef1a196967d080139e5a18e
0c1e5da799a0411ee7b38d0be6ff42eca941f908
describe
'6067' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVKZ' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
ffb0b728daaf170b0ee6cf3e09e08cf9
29dd6c9483d4ffde641921ce1452ab44e40e5d72
describe
'4947982' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVLA' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
2afe7076fd67b910020c17e4f4d180f2
a7f3b09285d5cf9f40010fbcc96f650007dd3499
describe
'40' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVLB' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
cc9599ddaa4f17976e2af1e0ace04bd0
0e9faa73afe78a91fa823255eab534c7a93398c3
describe
'2571' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVLC' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
09e21b9ecfe5b477c2269cbcbd80a2cd
8f3500e536355246d08eb6f215c984c4b6fe3553
describe
'351574' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVLD' 'sip-filesUF00002199_00001.mets'
5c2fcc110adaae8906aa4d331b654634
186f0f4fb78119ce1d2d013223ee471cd72f2de3
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-16T00:10:38-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'452991' 'info:fdaE20080922_AAAAERfileF20080923_AAAVLG' 'sip-filesUF00002199_00001.xml'
a413adf5b62b6bc289d06f6e5caf3d51
45116af9c2196ba6a3dfbc5dd63187f20ffea4be
describe
'2013-12-16T00:10:42-05:00'
xml resolution


| *
es


el

See etet

1
coach ts

|


Bavapou 4147 AO rf. JZ
799 74Of" re

*“LIANTUNOspuzy 2y7 fo 42007

ore “Pe SSSSSSAAC

& rng) ie “oe .=
&

fs



. Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year one thousand
eight hundred and fifty-two, by

HARPER & BROTHERS,

ia the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the Southern District
of New York.
PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Marco Pavut’s ADVENTURES IN THE PurRsuIT oF
KNoWLEDGE, is not mercly to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualified
to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
the formation of character. The author has en-
deavored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
it clements of a salutary moral influence, by means
of personal incidents befalling the actors in the °

story These incidents are, of course, imaginary—
Viii PreFace.

but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and interested by them, his design through
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain
CONTENTS.

CHAPTER : PAGE
LP LANNING, . + + 7 . e e ] 3

IL—Tue PackET, ‘ 7 ‘ : ; 4 31

Ill.—Gettine on Boarp, : ‘ . 46
IV.—Nicur, . ; ; ; ‘ ‘ ‘ 64
V.—CANAJOHARIE, a : ‘ : i . 84
VI.—Honesty, . : ‘ ; ‘ ; i 99
VIil.—Tue Pass or THE Monawx, ; ‘ . 114
VIIL—PERrPLexity, . ; . ; ; i:
IX.—A Project, ; ; ; . : . 144
X.—Tue STEERSMAN, . : : . ——
XI.—Tue Rive, . j ; : in

XI.—Tue Ovrtrer, . i : ; ‘ os:
ENGRAVINGS.

PAGE
Map anp Section or THE Canat, . . F) antispiece

Tue Steamsoar, ; ‘ ; ‘ : : 15
Towne, . ; ‘ ; ; : ‘ : i
Tue Packer Boat, . : : ‘ ‘ ‘ 44
Jump! Jump! . : . mr . ee
Brivce! . ‘ : ‘ ‘ ; ; . 71
Goinc To Bep, ; ; ‘ ‘ ; ‘ . =
Tae Lock, . oo ; : ‘ ‘ ; 88
Totu To Pay, ‘ ‘ ° ‘ . ; . 98

Tue Strratacem, ; ; : : ‘ e 104
Tue Car Winvow, ; ; d ‘ . ; 29
Tue Line Boar Canin, . ‘ ; ‘ ——
wee Pema Cams. =. WC) ie
MARCO AND THE STEERSMAN, . ; ; —
Pomrey’s Escape, . ; : : , ‘ - 189

Lookinc ouT OF THE WInpDows, ; : . 202
ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

——_ > > oe __——_——

Parco Paul,

I—IN NEW YORK.
Il.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

IIl.—IN MAINE.
IV.—IN VERMONT.

V.—IN BOSTON.
VI.-—AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.
PRINCIPAL PERSONS.
Mr. Baron, a merchant of New York.
Marco, his son, a boy about twelve years old.

Joun Forrester, Marco’s cousin, about nineteen years old,
, z

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care.
MARCO PAUL ON THE ERIE CANAL

CHarrTrer I.

PLANNING.

The steamboat.

QO* the evening when Forester left New York

with Marco, on board the North America,
then one of the most celebrated boats on the
river, he was sitting upon a settee, by the side
of one of the great doors leading into the ladies’
cabin, thinking of future plans, when at length
he said to himself, “ How shall I begin to in-
terest Marco Paul in the acquisition of knowl-
edge ?”

As for Marco, he was at this time rambling
about the boat in search of amusement. Just
before he left New York he had bought a book
to take with him on his travels—in case he
should wish to read on the way. Accordingly,
as soon as he had come on board the steamboat
he took this book out of his carpet-bag, and
14 Marco on tue Erie Canat.

The cabin. Setting the tables.



went up on the promenade-deck and began to
read. His attention was, however, so much
diverted by the objects of interest around him,
that he made very little progress in his reading.
Presently he concluded that he would go.down
into the cabin, and see if they were setting the
tables for supper.

He found, on entering the cabin, that the
tables were set out, though every thing was not
fully arranged upon them for supper. There
were, however, a great many waiters busily en-
gaged in bringing things in and arranging them
upon the table. Marco stayed a little while in
the cabin, expecting every moment to see the
waiters bring in the supper itself. At last he
asked one of them when supper would be ready.
The waiter said in about half an hour. Marco
concluded, therefore, not to remain in the cabin
any jonger, but to go up on deck and see what
Forester was doing..

There were a great many passengers walking
to and fro upon the deck of the steamboat.
There were others seated on settees and chairs,
reading newspapers, or looking at the scenery.
Marco, as he came up from the cabin, walked
slowly along toward Forester, with his book in
his hand,
PLANNING. 15

Plans fur Marco’s studies.

- ~
[
Bi

mt:



THE STEAMBOAT.

“ Marco,” said Forester, “come and sit down
lieve, by me.” So Marco came and took his
seat by the side of Forester, on the settee.

“ Marco,” said Forester, “I have been con-
sidering what is best to have you study first, and
I have pretty nearly decided.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ what is it ?” .

“See if you can guess.”

“ Arithmetic ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester.
16 Marco on tue Erte Canat. °

——————S LLL LC Ce,
The Erie Canal. Books and observation.



“Grammar ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “ nothing like that.”

“What is it then?” said Marco. “I don’t
think I can guess.” |

“The Erie canal,” said Forester.

“The Erie canal!” repeated Marco. “How
am I going to study the Erie canal ?”

“There are two modes of acquiring knowl-
edge,” said Forester ; “the study of books, and
the study of things,—or observation. You
study books when you read in books an account
of the object, or a narrative of the events, or a
statement of the principles, which you wish to
learn. When we learn by observation, we go
out and see for ourselves, instead of taking the
statements or explanations of others.”

“Which is the best ?” asked Marco.

“Both combined make the best method of
study,” said Forester ; “ first to learn from books
all that we can, and then go and make our ob-
servations. I propose that you should study the
Erie canal in that way. We can not learn
from observation alone, because we wafit some
guide. We want to know where to look, and
what to look for. The Erie canal, for instance,
is several hundred miles long. It would take a
great while to explore it wholly from end to
PLANNING. 17

Le
Two mothods combined. Iilustration. Level of a canal.
einen tania

end. We want, therefore, to look at books
first, so as to learn what the points of interest
are, and then we can go out and make our ob-
servations to advantage.”

“But it would be better, if we had time
enough, to do it all by observation,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester ; “ there are some things
which we can not learn by observation. We
can only get them from books.”

“Such as what ?” said Marco.

“ Why take such a point as this, for example,”
said Forester: “ which end of the Erie canal is
the highest? It begins at Lake Erie, and ex-
tends through the State of New York to Al-
bany, where it comes into the Hudson river.
As it eomes along, it sometimes rises and some-
times falls, and,’—

“T thought,” interrupted Marco, “that the
water in a canal was always level.”

“Yes,” said Forester; “at any particular
place the water is level, or nearly level; but
then, in making a canal, after going along a little
way on a level, if the engineer comes to a place
where the land descends, and the country takes
a lower level, he stops there and builds a lock ;
that is, a place with great gates to shut in the
water. ‘Then he begins below, and makes an.

B
18 Marco ON THE Erie CAnat.
————t

Conversation about the canal.

——_—-

ib, SE ae amacen
other piece of the canal on the lower level; and
they have a very curious way of letting the
boats down from one level to another, and also
of raising them up from the lower level to the
higher, when they are going the other way ; $0,
as you go along the canal in a boat, you have
to stop continually, to be raised up or let down
from one level to another. Now if we were to
go through the whole canal, from Lake Erie to
the Hudson river, and examine both termina-
tions, could we tell, from our observations,
which end was the highest ?””

« No, I suppose not,” said Marco ;—“ yes, We
could, too ; we could measure.”

« Measure 2” repeated Forester. “ How ?”

«Why we could measure all the ups and all
the downs, and so see whether it goes up or
down the most.”

«Tyue,” said Forester, “ we could do that.
But that would take a great deal of time and
labor. At any rate, we can learn the fact a
great deal quicker from books, for there we
shall find a drawing, with all the locks marked
upon it, and the height of each one,—so that we
can tell at a glance that the end at Buffalo, on
Lake Erie, is the highest, and we can see how
much higher it is.”
PLANNING. 19

nee LLL ELL A
Measurements. The map. The profile.
ee ID

«“ How much higher is it ?” asked Marco.

« Five hundred and sixty-four feet,” said For-
ester.

« How did you know ?” said Marco.

« ] looked on my map,” said Forester ; “ there
is a profile of the canal on my map.”

« What is a profile ?” asked Marco.

«It is such a drawing as I have been speak-
ing of,” said Forester. “T will show you.”

So Forester took out from his pocket what
looked at first like a little morocco book; but
on opening it, it was found to contain only a
map, which was printed on thin paper, and
folded up neatly between the covers. Such
maps are only prepared for travelers. T*orester
opened it and showed Marco the profile of the
canal, which was drawn in one corner. It
represented the whole length. of the canal, with
all the descents and ascents. Forester also
showed Marco the course of the canal on the
map; and by comparing the course on the map
with the profile, they saw that the canal con-
tinually descended from one level to another,
until it reached a long line called the Montezu-
ma level. The cities of Syracuse and Rome
were on this level. Then the canal ascended
again to a higher level, where Utica and Little
20 Marco on THE Erie CANAL

Ascents and descents. Learning from books.

Falls were situated. After passing Utica, the
canal descended again, by a great many locks,
as it went along down the banks of the Mohawk
river to the Hudson, and finally it reached a
much lower level than that where it had com-
menced at Buffalo.*

“ Now,” said Forester, “you see that we
learn, by a glance at this profile, all that we
want to know about the level of the canal; but
it would require an immense labor for us to go
over the whole length of it; from one end to the
other, and make the measurements and calcu-
lations ourselves.”

“Then,” replied Marco, “ if we can learn bet-
ter from books, we need not make any observa-
tions at all; we may learn it all from books.”

“No,” said Forester, “for there are some
things which we can not learn from books so
well as we can by observation.”

“ What things ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, one part of the business of the canal
is to carry the emigrants out to the Western
country. Now, when a canal boat, full of emi-
grants, is passing along the canal, and night
comes, and they all gather into the cabin, it



* See Map and Profile of the canal in the Frontispiece.
PLANNING. | 21
Learning from observation. The emigrants.
ne

makes undoubtedly a peculiar scene, which it
would be very difficult to get an idea of from
description; but we should get a very vivid
idea of it by going there and observing it for
ourselves. So the views which are presented
‘to the eye, as you go along, sitting upon the
deck of the boat, the appearance of the villages,
and all the little scenes and incidents, which
occur along the line, which are characteristic
of canaling, must be seen, or else we can not get
a very clear idea of them.” .

“Can’t they be described ?” asked Marco. »

“It would be very difficult to describe them,”
said Forester. “Very few books do describe
them ; and, after all, no description can give
you so accurate an idea as you can get by wit-
nessing them. So you see that the way to ac-
quire the best and most thorough knowledge of
such a subject, is to study it first by books, and
then by observation. Now how should you like
to study the Erie canal in this way with me ?”

“Pretty well,” said Marco; “at any rate, |
should like to go and see the emigrants.”

“ Going to see the canal will be more agree-
able, than merely studying books about it, |
have no doubt,” said Forester; “ but then, if
we study the subject first in books, we shall
292 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

sates eeeenaaameiaaaaecasaaadtamanaintiinssiaieneminiimmmbiatl
Previous knowledge. Advantages of it.

take a great deal more pleasure in going to see
it. We always take more interest in seeing
what we have read and heard of, than in any
thing equally curious, which is entirely new.
For instance, now, do you recollect my telling
you, when we were in New York, about the
child that I saw, at the little farm-house in the
woods, who helped her father carry his gun
along the path ?”

* Yes,” said Marco.

“ Well, now if we were riding along the road,
you would take rather more interest in seeing
that house, if I should point it out to you, than
you would feel in other houses, that you had
never heard of.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “1 should.”

“ And so,’ continued Forester, “if we wish
to enjoy visiting the canal, we must learn all
we can about it beforehand, and that will give
a great interest to our observations.”

“Well,” said Marco.

“Therefore,” continued Forester, “I will
tell you now all that I know about canals, and
the Erie canal in particular; and then, when
we get to Albany, we will endeavor to get some
books, and Jearn more still, in respect to the
subject. We will spend a day or two in Ai-
PLANNING. 23



The tow-boat fleet.

bany, studying the books, and thus find out
what are the points of interest relating to the
canal, so as to know what it will be most inter-
esting to see. Then we will plan some excur-
sion, and go and see for ourselves.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “I should like that.”

Just then there came suddenly into view, at
the side of the steamboat, as she was gliding
swiftly along up the river, a group of small ves-
sels, side by side, with a steamboat in the mid-
dle of them. The vessels were fastened to
the steamboat, and
the steamboat was
drawing them a- &
long up the river.
Forester asked a Sa had
gentleman whowas 22M 2-="~
near, if he knew RS.
what it was.

“It is a tow- 3
boat,” said the gen- @
tleman, “taking
these vessels up to
Albany.” So the
gentleman explained to Forester and Marco
that merchandise for the country was carried
up from New York to Albany, partly in sloops




TOWING,
94 Marco on THE Brie CANAL.

Merchandise. Banks of a canal.



which sailed by wind, and partly in boats or
vessels drawn along by a steamboat, called a
tow-boat. A great many of the goods carried
up in this way were to be landed at Albany,
and thence transported to the West oe
the canal.

Marco and Forester had not time to look at
the tow-boat long, for the North America gli-
ded very swiftly by it, and in a moment it was
gone. Then Marco came back again and took
a seat by Forester, for he had at first left his
seat to look at the tow-boat.

«“ Well, Marco,” said Forester, “now I will
tell you what I know about the canal. This
will be a beginning; then we will get some
books in Albany, and learn all we can from
them. By this means we shall learn enough
about the canal to visit it to the best advantage.

“The first thing in the construction of a
canal is to have the banks water-tight. They
make the embankments of earth, but then they
have to prepare the earth in some peculiar way,
and ram it hard, so that the water can not get
through. The next thing is to get a supply
of water; for it is necessary to have streams of
water running into the canal all the time, so as
to keep it full.
PLANNING. Q5

RR
Must be water-tight. Feeders. Aqueduct,
LD

«“] should think,” said Marco, “ that if they
make the canal tight, and fill it with water once,
that would be enough.”

“No,” replied Forester, “they can not make
it perfectly tight; some of the water will ooze
out through the ground, and some will escape
by evaporation. Besides that, there is a great
deal of water used at the locks when a boat
passes up and down. So that it is necessary to
keep a constant supply pouring into the canal
all the time, at different places. Those places,
where the water comes into the canal, are
called feeders. We shall want to see some of
the feeders when we go to visit the canal.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I should like to see a.
feeder very much.”

“Another thing that is interesting to see
upon the canal is an aqueduct. An aqueduct
is a kind of bridge by which water is carried
over a stream. In fact, an aqueduct is any
artificial channel to carry water. If a small
quantity of water is to be conveyed across a
stream, it can be conveyed in pipes, which can
be carried along the bottom. But a canal re-
quires so much water that it can not be con-
veyed in this way. Therefore, aqueducts for
supporting a canal must be very large and solid
26 Marco on THE Erie Cana.u.

Aqueduct at Rochester. Studying the map.

structures. They are made like a bridge, only,
instead of a road upon the top, the canal is
there, with a pathway by the side of it, for hor-
ses to walk upon that have to draw the boats.”

“JT should like to see an aqueduct,” said
Marco.

“So should I,” said Forester.

“Did you never see one ?” asked Marco.

“No,” said Forester. “There is a magnifi-
cent aqueduct on the Irie canal, at Rochester,
I have heard ; but that is rather too far for us
to go and see.”

“ How far is it?” asked Marco.

Forester, instead of answering Marco’s ques-
tion directly, opened the map again, and showed
Marco where Rochester was. They found that
a considerable river, called the Genesee river,
ran across the route of the canal at this place,
so that it was evident that the canal must pass
over the river.

“ Are there any other aqueducts on the Erie
canal ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “1 presume there are
several. We will follow the course of the
canal on the map, and see what rivers it cross-
es. I suppose there must be an aqueduct at
every river.”
PLANNING. 27

Crossing rivers.

Geib tape > | NA nee reed iateesociacesen am

They found, by examining the map carefully,
that the canal crossed the Seneca river in one
place, and the Mohawk river in two places,
besides several smaller streams; and Forester
said he supposed that there must be an aqueduct
at every one of these places, to carry the canal
over.

“There certainly must be,” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “not certainly.”

“Why,” said Marco, “I don’t see how the
canal can get over in any other way.”

“Why, if the canal should happen to be on a
level with the stream, where it was to cross, I
don’t know but that they might draw the boats
over in the water of the stream itself, without
any canal there; only they would have to make
a bridge for the horses to go over upon. There
can not be an aqueduct, unless the canal is
considerably higher than the river at the place
where it is to pass over. When the canal
comes to a small stream, I believe they turn the
stream directly into the canal for a feeder. We
shall probably, if we sail along the canal, see
such streams coming in, sometimes on one side
and sometimes on the other.” |

“Yes,” said Marco, “T’ll watch for them.”

“Beside feeders and aqueducts,” continued
28 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

Locks. Double locks. Lockport.

Forester, “we shall want to see some of the
locks. There are some double locks and some
single locks, I have been told.”

“ What are double locks ?” said Marco.

“ Double locks,” replied Forester, “are those
which are made in pairs, one by the side of the
other, so that some boats can be going up in
one, while others are coming down in the other,
at the same time.” |

“Why couldn’t they wait?” said Marco.

“Why, there are so many boats,” said T'or-
ester, “as I have been told, that they accumu-
late before the locks, waiting for an opportunity
to pass through. It takes some time for a boat
to get through a lock.”

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“You would see,” replied Forester, “if I
could explain to you the mode ; but I had better
wait until we can see the locks, and the boats
passing through. Then you will see at once
why it takes so much time.

“ There is one place in the canal where there
are a great many locks. It is a place called
Lockport.”

“We'll go there and see them,” said Marco.

“It is rather too far off,” said Forester.

So Forester found Lockport on the map, and
PLANNING. 29

——"* ae ————
Inconvenience of locks. Schenectady. Utica.
CO een AL CD

showed it to Marco. It was beyond Rochester,
in the western part of the canal.

« Besides,” said Forester, “ it is rather tedious
going through a great many locks. After we
have seen a boat go through two or three times,
we understand the process, and after that, it is
only a tedious repetition of the same thing. I
understand that travelers avoid those parts of
the canal where there are a great many locks.”

« How do they get along, then ?” said Marco.

«They travel in railroads or stages, if there
are any. For instance the first part of. the
canal, from Albany to Schenectady, is full of
locks. The ‘canal there ascends very fast, in
getting up into the valley of the Mohawk. We
will look on the map and see.”

So Forester showed Marco the map again,
and pointed to the profile of the eastern end,
where there were a great many locks repre-
sented. ;

“J have heard it said,” continued Forester,
“that it is very tedious to go by the canal from
Albany to Schenectady, and that travelers gen-
erally go across by the railroad route, and so
take the canal at Schenectady, or else they go
on to Utica on the railroad. For here at
Utica,” continued Forester, pointing to the
99 Marco on THe Erie CANAL.
asinine

Waste water.

ot camisetas
map, “ you see a long level commences on the
canal; and they travel fast on that level, for
there are no locks to delay them.”

“JT should rather go where there are locks,”
said Marco. |

“Yes,” said Forester, “I presume we should
be very much interested at first in seeing the
locks ; but probably we should soon get tired of
them.”

« What else is there,” asked Marco, “to see
on the canal ?”

«JT do not recoilect any thing more now,” said
Forester; “only there must be some con-
trivance for getting rid of the waste water.”

“ What do you mean by waste water?” asked
Marco.

« Why, the superfluous water,” said Forester.

“JT don’t understand superfluous any better
than waste,” said Marco.

Forester smiled, and said it was not a very
good explanation. He said, however, that it
was now time for them to go to their berths,
and that he would not talk any more on this
subject until morning.
Tue Packer. 31

Plans for the journey. Circuitous route.
; ioiplieattien



Cuarrer ILI.
Tue Packet.

ORESTER and Marco Paul remained a
day or two at Albany, making their in-
vestigations in respect to the canal ; and they
finally concluded that their first excursion in
visiting it, should be to go to Schenectady, and
there take a packet-boat and sail to Little Falls,
a village about fifty miles beyond Schenectady.
The reason why they went to Schenectady,
instead of beginning their voyage upon the
canal at Albany, will be made apparent by
looking at a map of the State of New York, and
a profile of the canal.* It will be seen that
from Albany to Schenectady the canal ascends
rapidly, by a great many locks, up the valley of
the Mohawk; and it takes also a circuitous
route. The ascent is to be seen by the profile,
and the circuitous course by the map. Now
the heavy goods which are transported along
the canal must necessarily be taken round that



© '
* See PÂ¥ontispiece.
Sp OS REL EI EA ae

392 Marco oN THE Brie CAaNnaAL.

s eee n ann
Packets. Line boats. Little Falla.



way. The delay is not of much consequence
to the merchandise ; but passengers, who wish
to get to the end of their journey as soon as
possible, generally go across from Albany to
Schenectady by a railroad, and then take the
canal there. The consequence is, that there
are no passenger-boats going from Albany to
Schenectady, but only boats for carrying mer-
chandise. The boats for passengers are made
very different from the boats for merchandise,
and they are called by different names. The
passenger-boats are called packets, and the
others are called line boats.

Now, though a great many emigrants travel
in line boats, Forester knew very well that they
would not be at all comfortable to those who
had been accustomed to the conveniences and
refinements of life ; so he concluded to proceed
directly to Schenectady by the railroad, and
take the packet-boat there.

And the reason why Forester and Marco
concluded to stop at Little Falls, was, because
they found, by the description of the canal in
their books, that there was a remarkable feeder
at Little Falls,—a feeder in which the water
was brought into the canal by an aqueduct built
across the Mohawk river. This aqueduct may
Tue Packet. 33



cena
Arrangements of the boats. Scenes. Scenery.
aoe ee eeatniinini csi



be seen represented on the large maps of New
York. The books said also that the scenery at
Little Falls was very romantic and grand, and
that there were several locks there too. So
that by visiting Little Falls, they found that
they would have an opportunity to see locks,
and a feeder, and an aqueduct, and romantic
scenery besides. |

There was another thing which they hoped
to accomplish, too, on this excursion. "They
found, on inquiring at Albany, that a packet-
boat left Schenectady every night, and another
every morning. Now they wished very much
to spend a night on board a boat on the canal ;
for they wished not merely to see the canal as
a mechanical structure, but also to witness
some of the various scenes of human life which
were presented in connection with it. One of
these scenes was a night in a packet-boat; and
they calculated that if they took a night boat at
Schenectady, they’should accomplish that ob-
ject; and then afterward, in the morning, be-
fore they reached Little Falls, they would have
time to sail along for some distance by daylight,
and see the country and villages, and observe

the incidents which occur along the hanks of a
canal.
34 Marco on tHe Erie CANAL.

Baggage. The small parcel. Tinman wanted.

“We will take very little baggage,” said
Forester, “so as to be independent.”

“What do you mean by that ?” said Marco.

“ Why, I will put all that we shall both want
in my little carpet-bag, and then we can go
where we please, with our bag in our hands.
A trunk is a great incumbrance on an excur-
sion in search of the picturesque.”

So Forester put some newspapers and a map
into his carpet-bag, and then began to roll up
some articles of dress into a small roll, which
he was going to put into the carpet-bag too.
He held this roll in his hand a moment, hesi-
tating, before he put it into the carpet-bag. “It
will get sadly tumbled,” said he, “knocking
about in the cars and in the boats ; I wish I had
some way of protecting it.”

“A trunk would be the best for it,’ said
Marco.

Forester did not answer. He seemed to be
musing.

“Never mind if it does get tumbled,” said
Marco.

“If I could find a tinman,” said Forester, “1
could get him to make a case for me in five
minutes. Come with me, Marco,” he con-
tinued, “and I will show you what I will do.”
THe Packer. 35

The tinman’s shop. The tinman busy.

So Forester went down to the office of the
hotel, and asked the clerk if he could direct him
toatinman’s. The clerk went to the door, and
told him to go in a certain direction, and into a
certain street, and he would find a hardware
store ; and he said there was a tinman’s in the
rear of the store. —

Forester and. Marco walked along to the
store. The store-keeper directed them out
through a back door which led down some steps
into a little yard, where the tinman’s shop was
situated.

When they entered, they found the tinman at
his bench, hammering some tin with a small
mallet. A little at one side of the place where
he was sitting, was an enormous pair of shears,
fixed in an upright position on the work-bench,
all ready to cut. The jaws were short; but very
heavy. They were what the tinman used in
cutting his tin.

Forester told the man that he wanted him to
do a little job. |

“It must be a very little one, indeed,” said
the tinman, “ for I am very busy. The other
man that works with me is sick.”

“ Well,” said lorester, “I will make it a very
little one. I wart-you to cut me out two pieces
36 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.



—_—_—__--—

Shuping the cylinders.

of tin, about ten inches long and three wide, —
and then bend them up into half cylinders, so
that when I put them together they will make a
hollow tube. Then I should have liked to have
some pieces soldered into the ends, but that is
of no great consequence, if you can not ‘do it
conveniently.” )

«JT will cut the piece out for you,” said the
tinman, “ but I have not time now to. solder in
the ends.” | | AF

So the man cut out the tins, and then, in
order to bend them into a circular shape, he
took a long, wooden roller, and rested one end
on the bench and the other end upon the stool
which he was sitting upon. Then he bent the
tins over upon this roller, and hammered them
with his mallet, so as to make them fit the roller
in every part. aD |

Forester found that he was taking more pains
than was requisite, since it was not necessary
for his purpose that the tins should be very true
‘n their form—and besides, he knew that the
man was in haste; so he said, “ That will do,
sir; it is not necessary to be very particular
about it.”

«Why, there is a max'm,” said the tinman,

-~
Tue Packet. 37

nn
Two maxims. A medium. The inclined plane.
cee Nearer

« that what is worth doing at all, is worth doing
well.”

«That is a very good maxim, I have no
doubt,” said Forester; “but the farmers in Ver-
mont have another one, that it is not worth
while to plane the under side of a barn fluor.”

The tinman laughed. )

“I suppose the true philosophy is,” said For-
ester, “ to go in the right medium between these
two maxims.’

By this time the tins were ready. Fonsster
paid for them, and he and Marco returned to
the hotel. Forester placed them one upon each
side of the small parcel containing his linen,
where they served as guards to protect the
contents of the parcel from shocks and concus-
sions. Marco, following Forester’s guidance,
found himself, not long after this, seated in a
car, which was trundling him out of Albany.

They came very soon to a long ascent, which
led up to higher land than that on which Al-
bany was situated. For the land which lies in
a direct line between Albany and Schenectady
is elevated, though it is nearly level when you
once get up, away from the river. The land is
sandy too; so that it would have been easy to
have made the excavation for a canal in a
32 Marco oN THE Brie CANAL.

— shania TTT
Engineering difficulties. Second inclined plane.

Engineering discus
straight line, but it would have been difficult to
have got a supply of water to keep it full. Be-
sides, it would have been necessary to have had
a great many locks in order to ascend from Al
bany to the table-land above, and then as many
more to descend again to the Mohawk, at
Schenectady. On account of these difficulties
they did not attempt to carry the canal across
this plain, but took it round, through the valley of
the Mohawk, from Schenectady, thus bringing
it down to Albany from the north. All this will
be made very clear by looking upon the map.

The railroad, however, they made straight,
and the consequence was, that it was necessary
to have the cars drawn up a long ascent near
Albany, in order to get them upon the high,
level land above. Then at Schenectady there
was another. long descent, by which the cars
were let down into the valley of the Mohawk.
All this is, however, changed now,—another
route having been found for the railroad, which
avoids these inclined planes.

Beyond Schenectady the railroad follows the
valley of the Mohawk along to Utica, with the
canal. So that for ninety miles there is a
canal, a railroad, a river, and a common high-
way, running side by side, in the same narrow
Tue PackeETt. 89
amet ceerrarneme natn catenccesTTE y
The valicy. Machinery. Tho pulleys.
eescaansiantanspniaaatattasimapeammaneaneanaiatan TL

valley. It was up this valley that Forester and
Marco were going to travel in one of the
packet-boats of the canal, as soon as_ they
reached Schenectady.

The cars were drawn up the long, inclined
plane,—so long that it seemed to Marco almost
half a mile from the bottom to the top,—by an
engine which was stationed at the summit.
There was a long cable, which reached from
the top to the bottom of the hill. To keep the
cable from dragging on the ground, they had a
line of wheels in the middle of the track, between
the rails. The cable passed along over the tops
of the wheels. There was a groove made in
the circumference of the wheels, to keep the
cable from slipping off upon one side. Such
wheels are called pulleys. When the cars
reached the top of the inclined plane, there was
a locomotive engine,—that is, an engine which
moved along the road,—ready to be attached
to it; and the locomotive soon carried the train
across the elevated plain, and brought it to the
brink of the hill, which descended into the val-
ley of the Mohawk, at Schenectady. Here
there was another inclined plane, and the train
was let down slowly, by a stationary engine and
a long cable, just as it had been drawn up at
40 Marco ON THE Erte CANAL.

A a _- erro
Inconvenience of inclined planes. Tho conductor.

Albany. The locomotive was left at the top of
the hill. At the foot of the hill they fastened .
horses to each one of the cars of the train, and
drew them separately into Schenectady. In-
clined planes are a source of great inconvenience
upon a railroad. They make a great many
changes and delays necessary. Still, there are
some places where they can not well be avoided,
though in this case, as has already been said, a
new and more level route has been found, by
which the ascent and descent that Marco and
Forester passed over are now saved.

As Forester and Marco were sitting upon
their seats in the car, just before they reached
the inclined plane, the conductor came climbing
along the side and looking in at the window to
take their tickets. ‘These.cars were not made
as cars are generally made now, with a door at
each end, and an aisle up and down through
the middle ; but they were divided by partitions
into three parts, and there was a door in each
side. ‘The conductor, however, did not come
‘nat the door. He only looked in at the win-
dow, and when he had got the tickets, he
climbed along to the next car.

« T should think he would fall off,” said Marco.

«He takes care, I suppose,” said Forester ;
Tue PAcKET. 4]

en ner vsinenstnnsiinsialacaninansianancniatiniin

The runners. Duties of the runners.

a nse tesco = ETS

«but I wish I had asked him something about
the packet-boats at Schenectady.”

«Why, we can find out well enough when
get there,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “but I expect there
will be a great competition for passages. The
runners will be after us, telling us all sorts of
stories, and I should like to hear something
about it beforehand.”

«The runners ?” repeated Marco. |

« Yes,” said Forester ; “the railroad people
want travelers to go on the railroad, and the
owners of the boats want them to go on the
canal. So they each send out men to find the
travelers as soon as they come into town, and
try to persuade them to go by their convey-
ance. These men are called runners.”

“Do you suppose they will be after us ?”
said Marco?”

«“ Yes,” replied Forester, “very probably they
will.’ The boats and cars both go at the same
time, I believe, and both companies wish to get
all the passengers.”

“It will do no good for the railroad men to
attempt to persuade us,” said Marco; “ for we
shall go in the packet at any rate.”

Forester was right in his expectation of be-


42 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

eet —————_———————
The depot. Competition. Forester decides.
rh rninnltlhemepeeeeaAaeeecacaiiiaiaitiaia

ing accosted by the, runners on his arrival at
Schenectady ; for, as the car which they were
seated in, was going into the depot, just before
the horse had stopped, a man jumped upon the
side of it, and Jooking in at the window, said,
in an eager voice, to Forester,

“ Going west, sir ?”

“ Yes,” said Forester.

« Will you take the packet, sir ?—carry you
to Utica for twelve shillings.”

At this instant another man applied at the
window, just as Forester was taking up his
carpet-bag and umbrella.

“Take the cars for Utica, sir?” said he.
«Run through in six hours.”’

« You can have a good night’s rest aboard
the packet,” said the packet runner.

« We will carry you for twelve shillings, sit,”
said the railroad runner, in a low tone, as For-
ester stepped out.

“Thank you,” said Forester, “but I have
some business along on the canal, and I believe
I must take the packet.”

“ Wel, sir, walk right along,” said the packet
man. “Have you any baggage ?”

“Only this,” said Forester.

The man took Forester’s bag and began to
Tue Packer. 43
a eau

Noise and confusion. The basin.

Bails See aE
push his way through the crowd of persons that
were coming and going in the depot, and For-
‘ ester and Marco followed him without any more |
words. In fact, the noise and confusion of the
bystanders, and the loud hissing of an engine,
which was standing there, prevented conversa-
tion. |

Their guide passed out of the depot, and then
turned into a busy street, built up closely on
each side with stores, shops, and taverns, A
short distance before them they saw a high
bridge. It was where the canal passed under
the street. There was a flight of steps, at each
side of the bridge, leading down to the banks
of the canal.

Forester and Marco followed the runner
down one of those flight of stairs, and there
they found a packet-boat ready to receive its
passengers. The canal was very broad at this
place. A canal is usually made broad where it
passes through a town. Along the sides of it
were walls of stone, and these walls were con-
tinued up, under the bridge, high enough to
form abutments for the bridge to rest upon.
The packet-boat was fastened by a rope to an
iron hook in the lower part of the abutment of
the bridge.
44 Manco | ON THE ERIE CANAL.



‘The Nout. Its construction.
ee



THE PACKET BOAT.

The boat was long and narrow, with a row
of windows on each side. There were Vene-
tian blinds, painted red, before these windows,
and the boat itself was. painted white. This
gave it a very gay appearance. Marco said
that it was a much handsomer boat than he
had expected to find. The top of the boat,
which formed a sort of deck, was nearly flat,
being only curved a little from the center to-
ward each side, so that the rain might run off.
~

Tue Packet. 45
a ee aletiaeiaanet oan ccmaaecaaeane

The baggage.

There was a very small iron railing, not more
than six inches high, along the edges of it.
This deck was four or five feet above the
water. At the bows, and also at the stern of
the boat, there was a lower deck, with steps to
go down to it; and from the lower deck in the
stern, there were other steps leading into the
cabin. \ There was a row of trunks and carpet-
bags commenced on the deck, beginning near
the bows; and men were carrying on more
trunks, which they placed regularly in continu-
ation of this row.. The runner steppéd from
the stone wall by the side of the canal, upon
the top of the boat, and Forester and Marco fol-
lowed him. The man put Forester’s carpet-
bag down with the rest of the baggage, and
then he took the umbrella from Forester’s hand,
saying, that he would put that in the cabin.
46 Marto on tue Erie CANAL.



The cabin. The interior,



Cuaprer III.

Gerting on Boarp.

ORESTER and Marco followed the run-.
ner down into the cabin. They found.

that it was a long and narrow room, which oc-
cupied almost the whole of the interior of the
boat. It looked like a pleasant little parlor,
only its shape was very long and narrow.
There were seats on the sides, under the win-
dows, covered with red cushions. They ex-
tended the whole length of the cabin. There
were one or two tables in the middle, with
some books and maps upon them. The cabin
was divided into two parts by a projection from
each of the two sides, which projections, how-
ever, were so narrow that they left a very wide
opening between them, almost as wide as the
whole breadth of the cabin. There wasa large
crims*n curtain hanging over this opening, so
that when the curtain was let down, it would
divide the cabin into two distinct parts. When
Iorester and Marco.came in, however, the cur-
tain was up; the two halves being drawn out
GetTine on Boarp. 47

Ladies’ saloon. — Entering the names.



to the two sides, and supported there by a large
brass curtain knob. Over this curtain there
were painted in gilded letters the words, La-
pigs’ SaLoon.

Marco understood from this arrangement
that that part of the cabin which was beyond
the curtain, was intended particularly for the
ladies, and that it could at any time be separa-
ted from the other part by dropping the cur-
tain. In the middle of the ladies’ cabin was a
table, with books and a bouquet of flowers upon
it. There were several ladies sitting upon the
cushioned seats at the sides of the saloon.

On the table in the gentlemen’s part of the
cabin, was a writing-desk, with alarge sheet of
paper uponit. This was the way-bill, on which
the names of the passengers were to be en-
tered. The clerk, who was in the cabin when
Forester and Marco came in, took a pencil up
from the till of the desk, and said to Forester,

“ What name, sir ?”
_ “Forester; and this lad’s name is Bare‘,”
said Forester. .

So the clerk wrote Mr. Forester upon the
list. Forester observed that there were unly
two names there before. Under Mr. Foreter,
the clerk wrote the name Baron.
48 Marco oN THE Erie CANAL.

Off for a walk. The bridge. View of the canal.

« What time do you go?” said Forester.

« At nine o’clock,” said the clerk.

Forester looked about the boat a few min-
utes more, and then went up on deck again,
and stepped off the boat upon the bank.

«Tt will be an hour,” said Forester, “ before
we shall go. So we will ramble about the
town a little, and see what Is to be seen.”

They ascended the long flight of stairs again,
which led up to the bridge. When they reached
the top, Forester proposed that they should go
across the bridge, and look at the canal on the
other side. . .

They went accordingly to the other side, and
looked down upon the broad and smooth sur-
face of the water which was spread out below
them. The view of the canal extended for
some distance, until it was lost by the canal’s
curving around to the right, where the prospect

was intercepted by buildings. On the left side
was a sort of street, with the canal on one side
and a row of small shops and warehouses on
the other. ‘There were 4 great many men and
large boys standing idle in this street, and
Jounging around the posts which were set near
the edge of the canal. There were stalls near,
with nuts and oranges for sale ; and children
GETTING ON OARD. 49

pcan eitimantimarapacnaiaita AIEEE ———
The tow-path. A line boat. Flovr.
ae, aigenin arsenic aA

playing with each other, so near the brink of
the water, that Forester thought they must be
in danger of falling in. On the other side of
the canal there was a path, called the tow-path.
It was for the horses to go in when drawing the
boats along the canal.

While they stood thus upon the bridge, look-
ing down upon the water, suddenly Marco per-
ceived two horses coming ‘into view along the
curve of the tow-path, at a little distance below.
They were harnessed one before the other, and
were drawing along rope. A moment after-
ward, the bow of a canal-boat, which the hor-
ses were towing, appeared, and then the whole
length of the boat glided into view. It was not
by any means so handsome a boat as the packet
which they had taken passage in, and the deck
was covered with long rows of barrels.

“There comes a load of flour, 1 suppose,”
said Forester, “from the west.”

“Ts that flour ?” asked Marco.

«I presume so,” said Forester. “I know
that a very large part of the business of this
canal is transporting flour from the west. In
fact, that was one of the chief things it was
made for. There is a large tract of land in the
western part of this state, and all around Lake

D
50 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

Fa salatmsimeiieeemmneinicmlteelnr cee ne
Use of the canal. Toll. Passengers.

Erie, and the other lakes, which produces im-
mense quantities of wheat, and it was thought .
that, if they made this canal, the flour might be
brought down very easily.”

«Did the farmers make the canal ?”’

“No,” said Forester; “ the State of New
* York made it.”

« Why did they make it?” said Marco; “it
was not their flour that was to be brought
down.”

«No,—but then the government knew that it
would be of great advantage to all the farmers
of the state to have the means of bringing
their produce to market; and, besides, they
knew they could manage it so that the state
should get paid again for making the canal.”

« How ?” said Marco.

« By making every one pay toll that comes
through with a boat. This man, with his load
of flour has had to stop somewhere and pay toll
for every barrel. . So, if a man owns a packet-
boat, he has to pay toll for every passenger.”

“J should think the passengers ought to pay
toll themselves,” said Marco.

«They do, in fact, for the packet-man charges
them enough to pay their toll, and also to pay
him for carrying them in his boat. But it is
Getrinée on Boarp.: 51

Revenue. Railrvad system.



more convenient to have the packet-master pay
once for all, than it is for every man to stop
and pay his own toll.”

“Why, every man has to pay to the packet-
man,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester; “but then he does it
at the same time that he pays his own fare, set-
tling for both in one payment, so that it is no
additional trouble. So all the masters of the
boats have to pay tolls, I suppose, for all the
merchandise and all the passengers they carry ;
and all these tolls are collected together, and
paid to the government of the state, and they
make a very large sum every year. But it is
not so with the railroad.” |

“ Why not ?” said Marco.

“Why, the railroad was built by a company
of individuals, who put their money together,
and they built or bought the cars and engine
too. So that the same parties-which own the
railroad, own the cars and engine; and they
carry all the passengers and all the freight
themselves. They do not allow any body else
to run on their road. But the State of New
York does not own the canal-boats. It only
owns the canal itself, and it allows any body to
run boats on the canal, if they will only pay the
52 Marco ON THE Brie CANAL.

ape eaten
The street. Writing a letter.

tolls. There is no danger in having ever so
many boats go to and fro, because they can
pass by one another very easily, but different
trains of cars, owned by different parties, would
be always coming into collision.”

«| don’t see how the boats can pass by each
other,” said Marco. “I should think that the
horses and the ropes would get entangled.”

« No,” said Forester; “ they have no diffi-
culty ; you will see how they manage it, when
we go in our packet.”

Long before this time, the line boat, which
they had seen coming, had passed under the
bridge, and gone on out of sight. So Forester
and Marco turned away from the bridge, and
began to walk about the street.

Presently they came to a hotel near the rail-
road depot, and as they were rather tired of
walking, they went in and sat down. Marco
began to read a newspaper. Forester saw a
desk in one corner of the room where the stage-
books were kept, and he told Marco that he
was going there to write a letter.

Forester always carried two or three sheets
of white paper folded in his pocket-book, and
also a pen. He.had, besides, a little pocket
inkstand and wafer-box, so that he could write
Getrine on Boarp 53



-cspindilliatansiitiatnssisiaicipianiiiiinaiinih
A crowd. The baggage on the boat.
Ee ereretsaneaeemaenanisiaeeatitt eae

his letters at any time and place, when he had
a few minutes of leisure. He accordingly went
to the desk and remained there nearly half an
hour, writing, and then he folded up his paper
and came back and told Marco it was time for
them to go aboard of the packet.

When they came in sight of the bridge, they
found a large number of men and boys stand-
ing upon-it, looking over the railing, or sitting
upon the upper steps of the stairs.

« What can be the matter there ?” said For-
ester.

“] do not know,” said Marco.

They went on to the place and looked down
upon the canal. The packet was there, in the
same position in which they had left it. There
were, however, a great many more persons on
and around it, and the row of trunks and car-
pet-bags had now extended almost the whole
length of the boat, from stem to stern. Fores-
ter and Marco supposed that some difficulty or
trouble must have occurred to draw so great a
crowd, but on looking down upon the scene,
from the bridge, they could not perceive any
indications that any accident had happened,
and besides, now they were near, they per-
ceived that the crowd were calm and quiet,
54 Marco on THE Erie Canat.

ieprememnennrerr nn mer
Seats on the baggage. ~ The band of music.

looking as if they were waiting for something
yet to come, rather than interested in any thing
which was then taking place.

«It can not be,” said Forester, “that all these
people have come just to see the packet sail! I
should have supposed they would have seen a
packet sail often enough at Schenectady, by
this time.”

«“] do not know,” said Marco, shaking his
head, “I do not know any thing about i”

They passed through the crowd and went
down the steps, and then got upon the boat ;
though the space not occupied by trunks was
so fully occupied by men, that it was difficult
for them to move about. At length Forester
found a good place to sit down. The seat was
a trunk, and there was a roll of carpeting upon
the other baggage near, which was very good
to lean upon. Here Marco and Forester es-
tablished themselves, and their attention was
soon absorbed in the novelty and interest of the
busy scene around them.

They had not been many minutes in this po-
sition, when they saw several musical instru-
ments appear at the head of the flight of stairs,
which descended from the bridge. There was
a bugle, a trumpet, a clarionet, and drums.
Getrring on Boarp. |



eee CE LAD
Marco. Sudden movement,

ecm nC EEOC



ee

«Ah!? said Forester, “ here comes a band
of music. This explains the mystery. The
people have come to hear the music.”

The musicians came down the stairs, and
stepped over to the boat, and took their stations
at the bows. A moment afterward, the band
struck suddenly into a fine martial air, which
made Marco jump up from his seat, so as to get
a better position to see. He stood upon a box,
gazing alternately upon the trumpeter and the
drummer with great delight.

Forester might have been expected to have
participated, at least in some degree, in this
pleasure, for he liked martial music very much.
To Marco’s great surprise, however, he sudden:
ly rose, and taking Marco by the hand, said,

“ Marco, come with me.”

Iorester passed rapidly along, wherever he
could find an opening through the passengers
who thronged the deck, and clambering over
the baggage, jumped off the boat to the shore,
and began to work his way as fast as he could,
wherever he could find a passage through the
crowd, toward the stairs, and then up to the
bridge. Marco had no opportunity to ask him
where he was guing.

As soon as he reached the street, he said,

H
56 Marco ON THE Erie Cana.
eee enna aaa
The lost inkstand. Marco’s fears.

«{ have left my little inkstand at the tavern.
J shall just have time to run and get it. Come
ulong as fast as you can.”

« Well,” said Marco, “ only if they go off be
fore we get back, we shall lose our baggage.”

«[ do not think they will go off,” said Fores-
ter. “Itis five minutes of nine yet. Besides, I
presume they will play a little while before they
go. At any rate, I must have my inkstand.”

They hastened to the tavern. Marco re-
mained at the door while Forester went in.
He found his little inkstand on the desk where
he had left it. The cover was by the side of it.
He seized his lost property, and hastened back
to the door, screwing on the cover as he went.

« Have you got it ?” said Marco.

« Yes,” said Forester, “and now. we will go
back as fast as we can.”

«And if they have gone you will lose your
baggage.”

« No,” said Forester, “ for we can go by the
railroad, and so get to Utica before the packet,
and wait there till it comes, and thus get our
baggage. But I think we shall be in time.”

Forester was mistaken. As they looked to-
ward the bridge they saw the crowd running
across, from the lower side, where they had
Getrinea on Boarp. 57

ain nan STE
Running to the boat. A chase. The moon rising.

been standing, to the upper side, which indicated
very certainly that the packet was passing
under the bridge. This was confirmed by the
sound of the music, which they could now dis-
tinctly perceive was in motion, as the boat,
bearing the band upon the deck, was chiding
along upon the water.

Now it happened that just as Forester and
Marco were running thus toward the bridge,
they perceived another young man before them,
having a paper of some sort in his hand, who
appeared to be also making his way as fast as
possible toward the boat. The people on the
bridge, seeing at once that there were passen-
gers left behind, began immediately to shout to
the packet.

“ Ho !” said one.

“ Hold up !” said another.

“ Ho-a—H-e-y !” cried another.

If it had been daylight those on board the
packet would probably at once have perceived
the truth of the case, and the captain would
have ordered the boy, who was driving the
horses on the tow-path, to have stopped. But
it was now nine o'clock. There was a moon
rising, it is true, which furnished light enough
to enable those who were on the bridge to see
58 Marco ON THE Brie CaAnaAt.

aang ns) rca. I
Confusion. Chase continued. The wrong side.
ee .- etnias — ne —

Forester and the others running, but they could
not see them from the packet. And then the
loud notes of the music in a great measure
drowned the sound of the voices calling upon
the packet to stop. The boy who was driving,
looked around and slackened his pace, but he
had been going very swiftly before, and the
boat glided along rapidly with the momentum
‘t had already acquired. Some of the musi-
cians, hearing a hubbub, stopped playing ; others
went on. In fact, the boat and all connected
with it, assumed an expression of the utmost
uncertainty and indecision.

« We will run on and overtake them,’’ said
the young man with the paper. in his hand.
Forester supposed that he belonged to the boat,
and he and Marco followed him.

They ran down the bank of the canal on the
upper side of the bridge, where they had seen
the stalls of nuts and oranges. The canal was
here very wide, being expanded into a sort of
basin, and as the tow-path was on the opposite
bank, the packet was at a considerable distance
from them. If they had crossed the bridge be-
fore they descended to the bank of the canal,.it
woul] have been better, as this would have
browzht them upon the tow-path, where they
Getrring on Boarp. 59

i cnerneeiennemnce een LTO OOO
A mistake.

IRE OT Sane nmeee
would have been nearer the packet; and it
would have been easy for the helmsman to have
steered up near to the bank, so that they might
have- jumped on. But they had no time to
think of this, and thus it happened that they
found themselves running along the bank on the
wrong side of the canal.

The packet went slower and slower, and the —
music ceased. Forester and his party found
that they were getting before it.

« We will run on here to the next bridge,”
said the young man, “and then we can get
aboard.”

Forester had thus far supposed that this
young man was connected with the boat in
some way, and was only endeavoring to stop it,
in order that he and Marco might get on board.
When he found, however, that he was putting
himself to a great deal of trouble, he said,

“Oh, it’s of no great consequence, sir; we
don’t care particularly about getting on board.”

« But I want to get on board myself,” said the
young man.

“Do you belong to the boat ?” asked Ior-
ester.

“No,” said the young man; “but I want to
go on her. We will run along to this next
LLL
.

60 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

iinet AaeC EAD ONO
A plan proposed. The old bridge. Danger of collision.

bridge, and then we can jump down on the boat
when she passes under.” |

«J don’t know,” said ‘Forester ; «T expect
you are more used to jumping off from a bridge
upon a canal-boat, than we are.”

«0, you can do it,” said the young man,
“only you must be quick ; she'll go under like
a shot.” |

Forester had no idea of exposing either him-
self or Marco to any risk. Still they pressed
on, half running half walking, for a short dis-
tance farther, when they reached at length a long
wooden bridge, which here crossed the canal.
It was old, and high above the water ; and it
shook fearfully as they went over it. They had,
however, outstripped the packet, for when they
got upon the middle of the bridge, they saw it
quite behind them, but coming along slowly up
the canal.

There was also another boat just then coming
down the canal, and the horses of the two boats
passed each other under the bridge, just as For-
ester and Marco were going over above ; and
when they got down upon the tow-path, on the
other side, the two boats were just shooting
under the bridge, one in one direction and the
other in the other. Marco thought that they
Gettrine on Boarp. 61

a
A jump.

LD





would certainly come into collision ; and in fact
the tow-lines seemed to him already all en-
tangled together.

However, the boats did not interfere ; the
horses and the tow-lines cleared each other in a
moment, and the packet came gliding along, not
far from the bridge where Forester and Marco
were standing. The young man jumped on
board, and the people who were standing upon
the lower deck at the stern, held out their hands
to Forester, and said, “Jump! jump!”



JUMP! JUMP!
62 Marco oN THE Erie CAnaAt.

Canal-boat and steamboat.

1 a ate
They spoke eagerly, for the boat was then
receding again, and they knew that in a moment
;t would be -too late. Forester saw this too;
but he did not attempt to jump. He shook his
head, and said, ;
«Not I. Ihave no idea of getting into the
canal.” |

In fact, Forester felt very easy about his pas-
sage now, for he knew very well that after
showing so much eagerness to get passengers,
the man who had charge of the. packet would
not go off and leave him and Marco, when it
was so easy to slacken their speed and let them
get in. If a man arrives at a landing just too
late for the steamboat, his case is generally
hopeless ; for a steamboat is so large and un-
wieldy, and it moves, when it is once put in
motion, with so great a momentum, that it is
seldom worth while to stop for a single passen-
ger. The case is very different with a packet
on the canal.

As Forester expected, the helmsman put his
helm off to the farther side of the boat, and this
caused the bows to turn in toward the shore.
It came so near that Forester and Marco step-
ped on board without any difficulty. They
made their way as well as they could, among
Gertine on Boarp. 63

~_—

Safe on board.

the men who were still standing upon the deck,
to their former position by the roll of carpeting,
where they took their seats again. The boy
whipped up his horses, the musicians com-
menced playing the Grand March in Abaellino,
the boat began to glide swiftly along, washing
the banks with the swell, which followed in her
stern,—and behold, Marco and Forester fairly
embarked on the canal.
64 Marco oN THE Erte Canat.

ecient EE,
The scencry. Lights coming.

Cuoarter LV.
Nicat.

HE first sensations which Marco and For-
ester experienced were delightful. They
passed almost immediately from the suburbs of
the town, into a delightful country, and they
found themselves gliding swiftly along among
groves and beautiful green fields; the moon-
light shedding a soft and gentle radiance over
the whole scene. The tones of the music re-
sounded loud and full in the still evening air, |
and echoed from the hills. The smooth tow-
path lay along the side of the canal, a few inch-
es above the surface of the water. Beyond it
was a fence, and the full moon which was just
rising on the opposite side of the sky, cast a
shadow of the men, standing on the deck, upon
the fence, where they glided along noiselessly
like a group of apparitions.

In a few moments, Marco saw before him two
bright lights, which seemed to be in motion.
They were approaching. He soon saw that
they were lights in the bow of another boat,
Nienr. 65

Load of lumber. Process of passing.

coming to meet them. Now he thought that
he should have an opportunity to see how one
boat could get by another.

The boat that was coming was a line-boat,
that is, one made to carry merchandise. It was
loaded with lumber. It was drawn by two hor-
ses. The line-boats are usually drawn by two
horses, while the packets have three. As the
horses were at some distance before the boats,
they would necessarily meet upon the tow-
path considerably before the boats would meet
upon the canal.

As the two sets of horses approached, the
line-boat horses turned off the path a little, on
the side of the path farthest from the canal, and
then stopped a moment so as to allow the pack-
et-horses to go by them. The horses were
stopped a monient, in order to let the tow-rope,
which they were pulling, fall down upon the
path, so that the packet-horses could step over
it easily. Then, when the boats approached
each other, the helmsman on board the line-
boat steered his boat out, away from the tow-
path, and the helmsman of the packet steered
his in, toward the tow-path. By this means the
rope of the line-boat came exactly across in the
way where the packet was to go, and it seemed

E
66 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

The boy. Management of the rope.

as if it was going to cut across the packet's
bows. But just before the bows of the packet
came against the rope, the boy who was driving
the line-boat horses, stopped a moment, and as
the line-boat kept moving on after the horses
had stopped, it caused the tow-rope to drop
down into the water, and it sunk so low that
the packet-boat sailed directly over it, without
difficulty. The boy began to drive his horses
along as soon as the rope was fairly under the
boat, and Marco could hear it rubbing along
the bottom of the boat, and it came up into the
air again as soon as it escaped at the stern.
Then the boats were clear of each other, and
each pursued its way.

Thus it was in all cases, when the packet
met the line-boats. They would always check
their horses, so as to let that part of the rope
which was over the tow-path fall down upon
the ground, and that part which was over the
canal, sink into the water. By this means, the
packet-horses could step over the part which
would otherwise have been in their way, and
the packet itself could sail over that part which
would have been in its way. |

In case the driver of the line-boat horses
should not stop his horses quick enough, there
Nigu®. 67

eee
A danger. Mode of guarding against it. Cool air.
Pitt ET reemenmnerenronnt

might have been danger that his tow-rope
would have gone above instead of going under
the packet-boat. This would have been very
disastrous in its effects, for the rope would have
been drawn along with great force over the
deck of the packet, and perhaps pull the pas-
sengers and the baggage off the decks into the
water. To prevent this, there was attached to
the bows of the packet, at the top, a hooked
knife, shaped like a sickle, with its edge turned
toward the front. If now the tow-line of a
boat coming the other way were to catch so
high that it would slip up instead of down, this
hook would catch it and cut it off. Forester
explained this to Marco, and Marco thought it
was a very ingenious contrivance. He could
not help wishing that a rope would get caught
so, in order that he might see it cut off. But
no such case occurred. In fact, the line-boats
are very careful to let the rope drop down soon
enough. If they are not, their rope gets cut off,
and they have to tie it; and thus in a short
time it gets full of knots.

Forester and Marco after this remained for
some time upon the deck, watching the changes
in the scenery, and listening to the music, until
at length they found that the evening air began
-

68 Marco on THe Eris CANAL.
ee EEA SEIS Lag”
Taking the pay. Settling the accounts.

Se te
to feel cool and chilly, and they then concluded
to go into the cabin.

The cabin was nearly full. A great many
men were seated on the cushioned seats, which
extended along the sides. Others were upon
stools by the tables, and some were standing.
The captain, who was a very young looking
man, not much older than Forester, was just
taking his place at the little portable desk
which was upon one of the tables, to receive
the money from his passengers. Those whose
names had been already put down, paid first,
and then the others came up one by one, and
the captain entered their names as fast as he
received their money. The passengers were
all talking about the crowded state of the boat,
and wondering what they were going to do in
the night. They said that it would not be pos-
sible to prepare places enough for them all to
sleep. Forester and Marco both thought, from
the conversation, that it was unusual to have so
large a number of passengers.

It took a great while to receive all the mo-
ney. There wasa little calculation to be made
in each case, and the change to be given. For
the passengers were not all going to Utica. |
Some were going to stop at Canajoharie, some
Niauat. , | 69



An alarm. The lock.



at Little Falls, and some at other places along
the canal, and the captain charged each passen-
ger a fare in proportion to the distance which
he was to go.

While the captain was transacting his busi-
ness in the cabin with his passengers, Marco
and Forester suddenly perceived that the boat
began to be thrown, at once, into a state of vi-
olent agitation. It rose and fell, and thumped
against one side and the other, and Marco could
hear a strange rushing sound as of water dash-
ing against it. Marco was startled. His first
idea was, that the boat had burst her boiler, but
this feeling was momentary ; for he recollected
in an instant that a canal-boat had not any
boiler.

“ What’s the matter now ?” said Marco, lock-
ing alarmed. .

“TI don’t know,” said Forester. So saying,
he began .to open the window to see.

“ We are only going through a lock,” said a
gentleman who sat near him.

«A lock!” said Marco, “let us go and see.”

By this time, Forester had opened the win-
dow. The sash was made to slide along hori-
zontally, that is, to one side, and not upward
like the window of a house. Outside of the
70 Marco on THE Erie Canal

i
Rising of the boat. Cause of it.

window were the red blinds which have already
been described. Forester pushed open one of
these, and it went against a wet stone wall.
The boat was moving restlessly about, and
by watching a moment they perceived that if
was rising higher and higher, as they could
see very plainly by the seams and stones of the
wall. At length they reached the top of the
wall, and then Forester could open the blind
wide. He perceived a sort of street, which ex-
tended back from the top of the wall, with some
buildings on the opposite side of it. Marco
was very much surprised at this process, though
Forester knew before that in passing through a
tock, from a lower to a higher level on a canal,
the boat first went into the lock, which was a
narrow enclosure, surrounded on all sides with
high stone walls, and that then water was let in,
which buoyed the boat up to the higher level ;
after which the gates were opened and the boat
was ready to sail on. |
He was not, therefore, surprised to find the
boat rising, though, as he had never been
through a lock before, ne was much interested
in watching the effects. A moment after the
boat had risen to its proper level, it began to
move on again, along the canal, just as before.
Niear. ;

ical

— ED
The deck. A bridge.

Then Forester drew the blind back and shut the
window, as the night air was very cool.

“J wonder what has become of our music,”
said Marco ; “let us go and see.”

« You may go,” said Forester.

So Marco went up to the deck; but the
musicians were nowhere to be seen. Marco
saw, however, at a short distance before him, a
bridge leading across the canal. It was so low
that it seemed to Marco that there was only
just room for the boat to pass under. He
thought that all the men and all the baggage
would be swept off the deck by it. He accord-
ingly hastened back to the stern, and got down
upon the lower |
deck, where he «|
could be safe. A a
moment afterward, ‘Svs
just as the boat @Â¥ a
reached the bridge, Seaaiifgae
the man at the helm22=4
called out, in a loud — Wiseagy
voice, yi

« Bridge !”

Instantly all the
men on the deck
bowed their heads BRIDGE,









ene

ee eee fay Sy, .
s are
| (oy Tai ee

f\|
72 Marco on THE Erie CaAnaAtL.

The valley of the Mohawk. The cabin again.

and to Marco’s great surprise they glided
under it in safety, and the heads all came up
together again, as soon as the boat emerged on
the other side. Marco was very much sur-
prised, for it seemed certain, when he first saw
the bridge, that it was as low as the top of the
boat. This was an optical illusion. Marco
afterward observed a great number of other
bridges, as the packet approached them, and
they all appeared much lower than they really
were.

Marco perceived that they were sailing up
the valley of the Mohawk, as Forester had be-
fore said they would do, when they were talking
about their intended excursion at Albany. He
very often had a view of the river itself, from
his place on the top of the boat. Still more
frequently he could see the broad meadows
which were upon each side of the river, and
which were bounded in the distance by verdant
hills.

Marco soon felt that it was cold, and so he
went into the cabin again. He sat down upon
a stool, and began to listen to some conversa-
tion between Forester and one,or two othe.
gentlemen who were sitting there. He was
soon interrupted, however, for thé ‘captain, after
Niceurt. 73

“Turned out of the cabin. The bridge.
iii.





having finished receiving his payments, and
putting away his money, rose and said,

«“ Now, gentlemen, if you will let us have the
cabin, we will make up the berths.”

« We shall have to take the tow-path, then,”
said one of the men who were,sitting there,
« for there is no room for us on deck.”

The passengers seemed rather reluctant to go
on deck. However, a number of them soon
rose and moved slowly out of the cabin. Some
of them went up on the upper deck; others
crowded around the helmsman at the stern.
Forester and Marco went to the stern, because
they were a little afraid of the bridges. By
standing at the stern, they were on the lower
deck, and their heads were more evidently safe.
There would have been little danger on the
upper deck, however, for the helmsman always
called out “ Bridge,” whenever the boat ap-
proached a bridge; so that even if a person
should happen to be looking the other way, he
would not come upon the danger without warn-
ing.

~The helmsman found it somewhat difficult to
see which way to steer, there were so many
persons standing up before him on the deck.
At length he said, in a gentle voice,
74 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

The helmsman’s advice. Advice disregarded.

“The boat would go better, if the gentlemen
would go farther forward. She would not draw
so much swell after her.”

Marco and Forester looked at the swell. It
formed a great wave, which seemed to dash
continually along the banks of the canal, just
behind the boat. They understood that the
helmsman meant that by crowding into the back
part of the boat, the passengers caused that part
to sink deep into the water, and thus to increase
the swell.

“Tt makes her bows rise right up,” said the
helmsman, speaking to one of the*hands belong-
ing to the boat, who stood near him.

The passengers, however, paid no attention
to these intimations of the steersman. Forester
thought that it was better to have the boat draw
a great swell than that he and Marco should get
knocked off into the canal, by a bridge. What
reasons influenced the others are uncertain, but
none of them moved.

They all stood in this manner, almost in per-
fect silence, for about a quarter of an hour.
Now and then, two or three who were standing
near together, held a little conversation, in an
undertone, and frequently Marco pointed out
something to Forester’s notice. At length the
Nieut. 75

om eeascccasstteiniasaninncnssinaliaia iA LET ae
Choosing berths. The curtain. Tiers of berths.

attention of the company was aroused by hear-
ing a voice coming out from among the persons
who were standing around the door of the cabin.
It called out,

“Mr. Forester.”

“ Here,” said Forester.

“Come forward, Mr. Forester, and choose
your berth,” said the voice.

So Forester made his way, as well as he
could, into the cabin, Marco following him.
Forester pushed forward rapidly to the upper
end of the cabin, and putting his hand upon a
berth, said, “I choose this, —_—

While he was walking forward, Marco had
time to observe the changes which had taken
place in the cabin while he and Forester had
been out. The curtain was drawn before the
ladies’ saloon, so that that part of the cabin was
now cut off from view. Over the place where
the seats had been, that is, along the sides of the
cabin, were rows of berths, just wide enough for
a man to lie in, and just far enough apart for a
man to creep in between them. There were
three in each tier; an upper, a middle, and a
lower one. Forester chose the middle one, in
the tier which was nearest the ladies’ saloon.

“Very well, sir,” said the captain, “ you had
96 Marco on tue Erie CANAL.

Mr Baron. Getting into bed.

better get right into it, before any body else gets
it.” Then, looking at his paper again, the cap-
tain moved toward the door of the cabin and
called out, in a loud voice,

“ Mr. Baron.”

Marco and Forester both laughed, and For-
ester, putting his hand upon Marco’s shoulder,
said, “ Here.”

The captain smiled too when he found that
the Mr. Baron, whose name he had announced
so pompously, was only Marco.

“Very well,” said he, “let him take the berth
right over you. He is young and spry, and can
climb.” |

“Shall I undress myself?” said Marco to
Forester, in a low tone.

“No,” said Forester, “only take off your
shoes and hat.”

Marco had some difficulty in climbing up into
his berth, and Forester had still more in getting
into his. They found that the berth consisted
of a piece of canvas stretched across a frame,
with one sheet and one coverlid upon it. There
was a little square pillow at the head, smaller
and thinner than any thing that Marco had ever
seen for a pillow before.

In the mean time the captain went on, call-
Nigar. 77

Close quarters. Merriment. Cabin full.

ing the other names in the order in which they
stood upon his list ; and as fast as the men were
called they chose their berths and got into them.

The passengers seemed very much disposed
to be dissatisfied at the closeness of their quar-
ters. The frames which supported the berths
appeared to be very frail, and they creaked and
settled as the occupants got into them, as if they
were coming down. One man, who was in the
middle berth, opposite to Forester’s, across the
cabin, began to punch the lodger who was
above him with his knee; for the berths were
so near together that.a very slight flexure of any
of the limbs of one in a lower berth, brought an
elbow or a knee into contact with the under
side of the bed above. “Lie still, down: there,”
said the lodger above. “Then keep off of me,”
said the lodger below. This dialogue was fol-
lowed with a loud peal of laughter from all
around.

In the mean time, the cabin began to get
very full, as more and more names were Called
and the persons answering to them came in
from the deck. ‘The voices became loud, and
jocose remarks and laughter broke forth in
every direction ; and thus before long the cabin
became full of confusion, frolic, and fun.
78 Marco on THE Wikit CANAL.





Noise and confusion.



Sez



GOING TO BED.

Marco lay still, enjoying the scene very much
He listened to hear the various sounds which
came to his ear from every part of the cabin
Every now and then, the loud voice of the cap-
tain, calling out, Mr. Green, or Mr. Wittiams,
or some other passenger's name, rose above the
general din. A great deal of the noise was
confused and indistinct ; but Marco could get
catches of the conversation, which, as it came
to his ear from various parts of the cabin,
sounded somewhat as follows :
Niaut. 79

ee ED
General din. Marco asleep.

“I wish I had a string to tie round my hat
and hang it up; for there is no place to put it
‘down anywhere.”—* Captain, what are you
going to do with the rest of us that have not
got any berths ?”—“ Oh, what a pillow! ’tisn't
bigger than my hand.”"—“ Do you kick, sir, in
your sleep ?”’—“ Kick! yes, sir.”—“ For if you
do, I don’t want you over my head.”’—* Cap-
tain, where shall I put my boots ?”—“ Mr.
Bevpen!” “Here.” “Choose your berth, sir ;
—they’re all taken but that one.” — Gentle-
men, don’t make such a noise,—I want to go to
sleep.” —“ My pillow is so thin, captain, that it
makes my head lower than my heels.”

These and similar sounds grew louder and
more confused, the more Marco listened to
them. He was at first much amused ; but he
was tired and sleepy. He shut his eyes, and
once er twice almost lost himself in slumber.
At length he heard a peculiar thump and a dash
of water about the boat. He aroused himself
and looked up. The noise which he heard was
evidently without. It was the noise made by
the boat passing through a lock. As soon as
Marco understood this, he was surprised to find
that the cabin, within, was entirely still.

He put his head out over the edge of his
80 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

ill ccc Ce
The calin floor. Midnight. Morning,
ee ceca aascA Aa

berth and looked down. The floor was entire-
ly covered with sleepers. They were lying
across the cabin, with their heads upon the
cushions, which had been taken off the seats.
Their heads were close to the line of berths on
one side, and their feet to those on the other.
The width of the boat was just enough to let
them lie so. They were close together, and the
range extended through the whole length of the
cabin, They all appeared to be sleeping qui-
etly. Marco listened, and when the agitation
of the boat, occasioned by its passing the lock,
ceased, he could hear no sound except the occa-
sional tread of footsteps upon the deck above
him.

“Jt must be midnight,” said Marco to him-
self, “and I have been asleep all this time.”

The next thing Marco was conscious of was
hearing a voice on the other side of the cabin,
saying,

“Come, Charles, get up.”

He opened his eyes, and he saw a man stand.
ing before a berth, trying to awake the person
who was occupying it.

« What do you want ?” said the man whom
he called Charles, in a sleepy voice.

«Come, the captain says we must get up.”
Nigar. §1

_

Sunrise. Toilet operations.

“What for ?” said Charles.

“ Because, it’s morning.”

Here Marco turned and looked out of the
window which was opposite to his berth. It
was indeed morning. The sun was gilding the
tops of the trees. Just then he saw Forester
get out of his berth, and so Marco came down
from his too.

When Forester and Marco had put on their
shoes and hats, they went out of the cabin.
They found the men who had preceded them
in getting up, washing themselves from a basin
which was placed upon a little bench, near the
place where the steersman stood. There was
a looking-glass too, hanging in a place where
there was just room enough for one person to
stand. There was a comb and _a hair-brush
by the side of the glass. There was a door
which opened into a little kitchen in that part
of the boat, where a black cook seemed to be
getting some breakfast. Marco looked at all
these things with great interest ; and even For-
ester regarded them with some curiosity, but he
did not seem to feel much personal interest in
these means and facilities for supplying his
usual morning wants. Marco, too, as soon as
he had once seen these novelties, began to look

F


s2 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

A new plan.

RE care eerentnieeereensinneret.
rather sober. It was cold and chilly outside,
and every thing within the cabin looked cheer-
less and uncomfortable ; for the room was full
of berths and beds, and of persons getting up
from them. In a word, both Marco and For-
ester began to think that they had quite enough:
of traveling on the canal.

At length Forester said to Marco, in a low
tone, as they stood together looking upon the
Mohawk river, which at this place was in full
view before them, |

«“|’ve been thinking, Marco, that we had bet-
ter go ashore at Canajoharie, and take the rail.
road for the rest of the way.” |

« Well,” said Marco.

“Jt is twenty or thirty miles yet to Little
Falls, and it will take us five or six hours to go
there in the packet. But in about an hour we
shall get to Canajoharie, and then we can get
out and ramble around till the cars come along.
Then we can go quick and pleasantly to Little
Falls.” .

« Well,” said Marco ; “ but how do you know
that the cars go through Canajoharie ?”’

« Why, I know that the railroad runs up the
valley of the Mohawk, and so it can not be far
from the canal and river. I think it will be
Nicut. &3

een AE OOD
Canajoharie.

pleasanter to go that way. And, besides, we
can then get a good comfortable breakfast at a
hotel.”

So this plan was agreed upon, and Marco
and Forester jumped off the boat at Canajo-
harie.
84 Marco on tHe Erie CANAL.
cere LLL LLL

Looking at the map.

CHAPTER V.
CANAJOHARIE.

7. before the boat reached Canajoharie,

it had to pass through a lock. Forester
saw this lock represented on the profile of the
canal, which was drawn on a corner of his
map. It was plain from the profile that the
lock was only a short distance from the village,
and so Forester proposed to Marco that they
should get out at the lock, and walk the rest of
the way along the bank of the canal.

“« Well,” said Marco, “1 should like that.”

« By this means,” said Forester, “ we shall
see the place a little better ; and, besides, we
can warm ourselves by the exercise of walk-
ing.”

So Forester got his carpet-bag and umbrella,
and placed them near the stern of the boat, and
he and Marco, taking their stand there, watched
the progress of the boat as it glided along to-
ward the lock.

« And now,” said Forester, “ we shall have
CANAJOHARIE. | 85

oceania eT
A lock. Mode of passing it. Marco’s observations.

an opportunity to see exactly how they manage
the business of passing through a lock.”

They saw that as the canal approached the
lock, it suddenly narrowed and entered between
two high walls of stone, so near each other that
there was just room for the boat to go in. This
was the lock, and at the farthest end of it were
two great wooden gates, which closed the pas-
sage-way, and Marco did not see how they
were to get through. }

Beyond these gates Marco could see the
canal again, but there the water stood at a
much higher level than it did on that part of the
canal over which the packet had been sailing.
The water seemed to press heavily against the
gates, and some of it spouted through the crev-
‘ces. The horses trotted along the bank till
they came to the lock, and the steersman
steered the boat, so as to carry it exactly in.
It seemed as if it was going with all its force
against the gates at the head of the lock. In
fact, Marco thought it must necessarily do so,
for he did not see any possible way to stop it.
If it had been a steamboat it might have been
stopped by reversing the wheels, but there were
no wheels to be reversed in the case of the
packet.
86 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

DE aac RSI acre gen Te
The spring bolt. The tow-rope.

At this instant, Marco observed a man stand-
ing near the bows, at the place where the tow-
rope was fastened to a sort of iron staple,
which was of a very curious construction. He
had noticed this staple before, and wondered
why it was contrived so curiously. He did not °
see why the rope was not fastened to a simple
ring. Now, however, he saw the reason ; for
the man just touched a spring with his foot, and
immediately the rope was loosed from its at-
tachment, and fell off into the water; and as
the horses were still going on, they soon drew
the rope out upon the bank, leaving the boat
entirely free.

As soon as the man had liberated this rope in
this manner, Marco saw that he hastily caught
up another large rope, which was lying coiled
up upon the bows. One end of this rope was
fastened to a staple, in the bow of the boat.
The staple, which the end of the tow-rope was
fastened to, was at a little distance from the
bows, near the side of the boat. The man took
the end of the bow-line and clambered up with
it upon the high stone wall, which formed the
side of the lock ; for by this time the packet was
gliding along smoothly into the lock. He ran
forward with his rope, and wound it twice round
CANAJOHARIE. 87
ON

Boat secured. The gates. Levers.
ee EE





a strong post which was set in the masonry in
a proper place for this purpose, and so he easily
checked the boat, just before it would have
come into collision with the gates. Then, by
means of this rope, he held the boat in its place,
so near the gates that the water which spouted
through the crevices, threw its spray over and
upon the little low deck which was formed at
the bows.

As soon as the boat was secured in this posi-_
tion, a man who was standing upon the bank
went to the stern of the boat, and began to shut
two great gates which were at that end of the
lock. Marco had not observed these gates be-
fore. They had been laid wide open, in order
to let the packet go in; and the walls had been
built so that the gates, when opened wide, fitted
so exactly into recesses in the masonry made to
receive them, that Marco did not notice them
at all. But now they attracted his attention
very particularly, as the man was slowly swing-
ing them to, by means of a long timber, which
projected over upon the ‘land side, and which
operated as a lever. When these gates were
shut, Marco perceived that the packet was
closely shut in at the bottom of a sort of deep
box, just big enough to hold it, and with walls
88 Marco .ons THE Erie CANAL.



Boat in the lock.



of solid masonry all around it.. The deck of

the packet was considerably below the top of
the lock.



> =
' — > a
——— NHVSLRTS.Sa7

THE LOCK.

Forester and Marco climbed up from the
deck to the top of the wall, and then walked off
upon the bank. There was a man just going
toward the upper gates. He moved along iron
lever, which was attached to an axis that passed
down through the stone work, and this seemed
to open suddenly a passage for the water, down
CANAJOHABRIE. 89:

Rushing uf the water. Effects of it.

_

whing the water, 0
near the bottom of the gates. For Marco ob-
served that there was immediately a great
foaming and boiling under the bows of the
canal-boat, as if the water was rushing furiously
in from under the gates. The man moved an-
other iron lever, and afterward two more, and
then Marco could hear and see the water pour
in with great force under the bows of the boat.

Now, as these lower gates were shut, the
water which was thus admitted through the
upper gates, from that part of the canal which
was on ahigher level, could not escape into that
part which was lower, but’ remained in the lock ;
and thus the water in. the lock was rapidly
rising, buoying the boat up with it. The water
rushed in, too, with so much force through the
opening in the upper gates, that it dashed
tumultuously along the sides of the boat, and
caused it to oscillate te one side and the other,
and to knock against the sides of the lock.
This was the agitation which Forester and
Marco had perceived at the time when they
were passing through the first lock, when they
were in the cabin.

After a short time the boat was raised quite
high in the lock, and Forester and Marco found
that the water was getting to be nearly as high
909 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

inate LLL SOT
Upper gates opened. A difficulty. Line-boat,
aaa npnmmtadaneecenenei ene

in the lock as it was in the higher part of the
canal above. When, at length, it was exactly
at the same level, the man swung open the
great gates, at the upper end, and then the tow-
line was fastened to the boat again, and the
packet was drawn along. A great many of the
passengers got off when Forester and Marco
did, and stood upon the bank, watching the
operation. They now jumped on again, though
the boat was now elevated so much above its
former level, that they had to jump up pretty
high. They were soon all in their places, and
the boat glided away again on its voyage.

« Now,” said Marco, “how are they going to
get all that water out of the lock, so as to let the
next boat in?”

« Let us wait a moment,” said Forester, “ and
perhaps we shall see.”

It happened that just as Forester said this, he
observed a line-boat coming down the canal.
It was very near, being just at that moment
about passing the packet, which was going
away from the lock. The upper gates of the
lock were of course open, the packet having
just sailed out of them, so that the way was
open for the line-boat to sailin. The steersman
steered the boat in, and a man from the bows
CANAJIOHARIE. 91

ssneiaaeicacteneenae nine O
It passes the lock. Explanation.

neces OT
of the boat cast off the tow-line by pressing the
spring with his foot, just as had been done in
the case of the packet. He then jumped off the
boat and secured the bows by a strong rope,
which he wound once or twice around a post
that was near the lower gates.

The line-boat was now in the lock, just as the
packet had been, only it was in a reversed po-
sition, the line-boat having her bows turned to-
ward the lower gates, as she was going down
the canal. As soon as she was secured in this
position, a man on the banks shut the great
gates, at the upper end of the lock. As the
water was on the same level on each side of
these gates, the gates moved easily through it
into the position necessary for closing the pas-
gage. The man then went to the lower gates,
and by means of some long iron levers, which
were fixed there, similar to those which Marco
had observed before, in connection with the
upper gates, he opened a passage for the water
through the bottom of the lower gates. This
let the water off from the lock into the lower
canal.

Of course, the surface of the water in the
lock rapidly subsided, and the boat settled with
it. Marco saw plainly that they were going by
92 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

a ceeeeceeaeninaeeinet AC SAGA
Spouting of the water. The line-boat.

Ee ene
this means to let the line-boat down to the level
of the canal below.

«“ There,” said Forester, “you see how it is
done. When the water is entirely down, they
will open the lower gates, and let the horses
draw the boat out.”

It was as Forester had said. The water
subsided rapidly, and the boat settled down with
it until it was on a level with the lower part of
the canal. The upper gates were shut all the
time, so that no water could come in from
above, except a little which spouted through
the crevices in the gates. Then the man
opened the lower gates, and then the way was
clear for the line-boat to be drawn along on its
way.

The line-boat was somewhat different in its
structure from the packet-boat. It had one or
two windows near the bows, and one or two
near the stern, but there were no windows
along the sides. The reason was, that there
was not a cabin for passengers extending
through the whole length of the boat, as in the
packet. For the line-boat was designed to
carry merchandise, not passengers. Therefore,
snstead of a cabin in the center of the boat, there
was a sort of hold to contain merchandise, such
CANAJOHARILE. - 93
enn”

Passengers in the line-boats.

oe naleimetainealnnane
as boards, or staves, or barrels of flour; and
such things, of course, needed no windows.
There were no trunks upon the deck of the
line-boat, but instead of them, there were three
or four rows of barrels, which Forester said he
had no doubt were filled with flour, going to
New York. There was a woman and a little
girl sitting upon stools upon the little low deck
near the bows. The woman was knitting.
Forester said he supposed they were passengers.

«Then they have some passengers on board
the line-boats,” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester ; “a few. It is cheaper
traveling in the line-boats ; and so some. passen-
gers go in them.”

When the line-boat sailed away, Forester and
Marco walked along the canal toward the vil-
lage of Canajoharie, which they saw at a little
distance before them.

« Now you see,” said Forester, “ one reason
why they need feeders for the canal. Every
time that a boat goes up or down, they have to
lose a lock full of water.”

« No,” said Marco, “ they do not lose it, they
only let it go from one part of the canal to an-
other.”

“Still they must lose it, for there must be
94 -Marco on THE Erie CAnat.

secrete iataamatnteeaeseccinscsinisiniseaaaiiniaisiasana nie
Loss of water. Weirs. A weir passed,
re ED

some place for it to run off, out of the lower
part of the canal; and they must also get a
supply somewhere to take its place in the upper
part.”

“Why must they let it run off?” said Marco,

“If they did not,” said Forester, “after a
while the lower part of the canal would get full
and run over, and when the water overflowed,
it would wash away the banks, and make a
breach.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “so it would.”

“So they have places made in the banks of
the canal, a little lower than the tow-path, with
an edge formed of stone or of timber, so that
the water can not wear it away ; and they let
the waste water run over these.”

“J should like to see one,” said Marco.

«JT saw one this morning,” said Forester. —

«“ Where was I ?” asked Marco.

“ You were in the cabin,” said Forester.

“Why did not you call me to come up and
see it ?” said Marco.

« Because, we had got nearly by it before I
saw it,” replied Forester ; “ and I knew that if I
went to call you we should have passed it en-
tirely before you could get up on the deck.”

“ What sort of a place was it ?” asked Marco.
CANAJONARIE. 95

a setpnetememmetatate eaten AE
Description of it. Going to Canajoharie.

«Why, it was a place,” replied Forester,
«where the bank of the canal was made of
timbers instead of earth, and it was a little
lower than the rest of the bank, so that the
water ran over it all the time, and fell down
upon a wooden platform below, and then it ran
off into a brook. I believe such a place is called
a waste weir.”

Marco said that he wished he could see a
waste weir very much, and Forester said per-
haps they might come to one on their way to
Canajoharie.

« At any rate,” said Forester, “ we will no-
tice the canal wherever we see it until we find
one. I presume there are a great many along
the canal at different distances ; for it is very
important to keep the water at about the same
level. So they have feeders to keep the water
from getting too low, and waste weirs to pre-
vent its rising too high.”

After this, Forester and Marco walked along
a few minutes in silence, and at length Marco
said, |
_ « What are we going to do, cousin Forester,
when we get to Canajoharie i

« The first thing,” said Forester, “is to find a
tavern, and get some breakfast.”
96 Marco on THE Erte CANAL.
i EER IE

Plans formed. A bridge.

cima OOO

« And what next ?”

«The next thing is to find the railroad sta-
tion, and to inquire what time the cars come
along.”

« How do you know that any cars are coming
along ?”

« Because,” said Forester, “1 know that the
train leaves Schenectady every morning at nine
o’clock, and that it goes through in six hours ;
and I see by my memorandum that Canajoharie
is about half way from Schenectady to Utica ;
so I presume that a train will come along here,
about twelve o'clock.”

“ And how do you know that the railroad
passes anywhere near here ?”’

« Because,” said Forester, “1 know that it
comes up the valley of the Mohawk. The rail-
road goes up on one side of the river, and the
canal on the other.”

« Then how are we going to get across the
river ?” asked Marco.

“There must be some way to get across,”
said Forester. “ Perhaps there is a bridge.”

There was abridge. It soon came into view.
It was covered with a roof, and the sides were
boarded up. It looked rather old. There wasa
village on the canal side, where they then were,
CANAJOHARIE. 97

i eel ania ET
Views. The toll gate.

8 ee EE
and another village on the other side. They
could see both villages as they walked along
between the canal and the river.

“Which village shall we go to?” said I"or-
ester.

“IT do not know,” said Marco.

“The one on this side looks the largest, but
the one on the other side will be nearer the
railroad,” said Forester.

“Then let us go to the other side,” said
Marco. “Besides, I should like to see the
bridge.”

Forester concluded to adopt this plan, and
they turned off toward the bridge, when they
got opposite to it. When they got in, under
the roof, they saw before them at the opposite
end, that the passage was closed by a great
gate. When they reached the gate, a young
woman came out from a door.in a building at-
tached to the bridge.

“T rather think there is a toll to pay?” said
Marco.

«A toll!” repeated Forester. “ This does not
look much like a toll-bridge.”

All this time the girl stood still before them,
looking at them with an expression of curiosity
and interest in her countenance. |

G
98 Marco on tHE Erie CANAL.

View of the railroad.

“Ts there a toll

———_





ithe money, and
| while paying the
il| toll, he asked her
= where the railroad
TOLL TO PAY. was.
“Right down
here, under the bridge,” said the girl.

So she opened a small gate in the large one,
and let Forester and Marco go through. As
soon as they came out into the open air, they
saw the iron lines of the railroad, laid along
upon the level ground, near the shore of the
river far below them. There was a flight of
steps to go down. Forester asked a man who
was standing there, at what time the train
would come along from Schenectady. He told
them it would come ut half-past eleven. Then
Forester and Marco went up ‘he hill to the vil-
lage, where they stopped at a tavern, and got a
good breakfast.
Honesty. 99
so decades

cciiiiiuiiiaslicdingsiniaiamiasi
Arches. Woman weeding.



Cuaprer VI.

Honesty.

FTER Forester and Marco had finished
their breakfast, they rambled about for a
time to see the village of Canajoharie. They
were very much interested in examining some
stone arches on the canal side of the river.
These arches were evidently part of an unfin- |
ished work, which was then in process of build-
ing, though Forester could not tell exactly what
the work was.

At one place Marco and Forester saw @
woman weeding in a garden. They stopped
and looked over the fence. The corn in this
garden was much higher than the other corn
which Marco and Forester*had seen along the
canal; and as Forester thought the woman
seemed pleased to have them notice her garden, —
he said to her, “ Your corn has grown very
well.”

The woman looked up and smiled, and said
something in reply ; but neither Forester nor
Marco could understand her. It seemed to be
100 Marco on tHE Erie CANAL.

The house, German woman.



only a single word that she spoke, but they
could not understand what the word was; so,
after looking at the garden a minute or two
longer, they walked on.

They came, a moment afterward, to the house
to which the garden belonged. There was a
little shop in one corner of the house ; over the
door was a sign, with a boot and a shoe paint-
ed upon it, and also some words which Forester
thought were Dutch or German.

« Ah!” said Forester, “I presume that woman
is a German, and does not understand English ;
and so she did not know what I said when |
spoke to her. I recollect now that I have heard
that there are a great many Germans in the
valley of the Mohawk, and that some of these
green meadows are called German flats.”

Forester and Marco walked along, and being
at length tired of rambling, they concluded to
go to the railroad station, and to wait there
until the cars should come. They accordingly
went down the stairs at the end of the bridge,
to the broad and level area which extended up
and down the river, under the end of the bridge,
on which the tracks of the railway were laid.

There were three or four tracks at this place,
as is usual at stopping-places .on railroads.
HoneEstTyY. 101

“The railroad. The gravel train.

SO
This made the road very wide. On the side
opposite to the river, the land rose abruptly to-
ward the village. On the other side there was.
a narrow space of level land, and then there
was a rocky descent down toward the water.
On this narrow space was a small building, with
a piazza before it. There was a room within
to accommodate passengers while waiting for
the trains.

Forester and Marco had just finished exam-
ining this locality, when suddenly they heard the
noise of an engine approaching. . It was com-
ing down the road, and presently it appeared
with the train which it was drawing, under the
bridge ; for the office where Forester and Marco
were standing was on the lower side of the
bridge. This train consisted of such cars as
are used by workmen along the road. They
looked like square carts on railroad wheels, only
instead of being open behind, like a farmer's
cart, each one was open at the side. There
was a workman seated upon each of these cars,
at the open side, with his feet hanging down be-
tween the wheels. This train passed rapidly
hy down the road, and was soon out of sight.

Just at this time, Marco happened to observe.
a small sail-boat with some boys in it, out upon
102 Marco on rue Eriz Cana. ~

So entegrninareai lt tanpepcececretetcensnensememeiamaginit iitaaeaaspaanata ata aeainmtae tacts iliac
The two boys. A boat. A plan formed.

the river. While he was looking at it, two
other boys came down the railroad, under the
bridge, and when they got to the corner of the
office where Forester and Marco were stand-
ing, they saw it too. One of these boys was
~ much smaller than the other, and wore a straw
hat.

“See,” said the small boy, “there are some
fellows out there that have got a boat.”

“Yes,” said the other boy; “let’s go and
have a sail with them.”

“ They won’t let us get in,” said the small boy.

The boys looked at the boat a minute or two
in silence, and then they crept down the bank,
near some bushes, where they could see it better.
Still they were not so far off as to prevent Marco
and Forester from hearing their conversation.

“Til tell you what we'll do,” said the large
boy ; “ we'll cut some poles here in the bushes,
and go down to the bank, opposite to where
they are, and call out to them to let us come on
board; and then you know they'll see our poles
and think they are fishing-poles. Then they’ll
come and take us on board, because they’ll
want to see us fish.” -

“ Well,” said the small boy, “I will lend you
my knife.”
Honesty. 7 103

The false fishing poles.

a sncasissldaiete ae eeeeeet enone

So he took out his knife, and the boys both
went into the bushes.

In a few minutes they came out again with
their poles.

« Where is the boat ?” said the small boy.

«J gee it,” said the other. :

«They have gone‘down the river,” said the
small boy. “We will go along down till we
get opposite to them.”

So the boys walked off with their poles over
their shoulders.

« Let us go too,” said Marco, “and see if the
boat will come ashore for them.”

“No,” said Forester, “we will go up the
steps to the bridge, and then we can see.”

When Marco and Forester got to the top of
the stairs they could see the boat very distinct-
ly, and also the two boys with their poles, who .
were just going down the bank to the edge of
the water to try the effect of their stratagem.
They could also hear their voices, though they
could not distinguish what they said.

However, Marco soon perceived that the
cunning device of the two boys upon the shore
was successful ; for the boat very soon turned
in, and proceeded rapidly toward the shore, ma-
king a very beautiful appearance.
104 Marco on tne Eris Canal.



Success of the stratagem.



THE STRATAGEM.

“That was a good way,” said Murco, “to
make the boys let them get into their boat.”

“ Not very,” said Forester.

“Why, I think it was very ingenious in-
deed,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “it was ingenious ; but
an ingenious plan i is not always a good plan.”

“Why wasn’t this a good plan?” asked
Marco.

“ Why, those boys,” said Forester, “deceived


HonesrTy. 105

Forester’s opinion. Conversation with Marco,
— eeecmnntamtiatiinsatipicennccsinnnnscneissic nan onvunbaunaanis



the others, and now they will not be trusted an-
other time. They have gained one sail by their
stratagem, but they have lost their character ;
and to lose one’s character for the sake of a sail
on a river in a sail-boat, is a very bad bargain.
{t is very seldom wise to attempt to gain any
thing by deception.”

“Tt is never wise, is it ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester.

« How ?” said Marco.

«Why, it is wise,” said Forester, “to put a
chalk egg under a.hen, for a nest egg, and that
is deception ; it is deceiving the hen.”

«O, I didn’t mean that,” said Marco.

“No; I know you did not mean that, but
still, if I had said it was never right to attempt
to gain any thing by deception, it would have
included that. Whenever we say any thing in
a sweeping and unqualified manner, we are in
great danger of including something which we
don’t intend.”
« But,” said Marco, “it is never right to de-
ceive men or boys, is what I mean.”

“Very well,” said Forester, “I don’t dispute
that.” |

“And yet, you deceived me once,” said
Marco.
106 Marco on tue Erie Canat,



‘Deceiving. Concealment,

“ ‘When ?” asked his cousin.

“Why, when you took me to the dentist’s to
have my tooth taken out, without letting me
know where I was going.”

Marco referred to an incident which oc-
curred just-before he left the city of New York
with Forester, when Forester took dim to the
dentist’s without letting him know where he
was going, until he actually entered the den-
tist’s room.*

“Do you think I deceived you then ?” asked
Forester. |

“Why, yes,”—said Marco; “ didn’t you ?”

“We must make a distinction,” said Fores-
ter, “between deception and concealment. I
concealed from you the fact that we were go-
ing to a dentist’s, but did I do any thing posi-
tively to deceive you ?”

“Why, no,” said Marco. “I don’t know
that you did.”

“Tam very reluctant to resort even to con-
cealment, in the government of a pupil,” said.
Forester ; “ but I should think deception abso-
lutely wrong. I don’t think I shall ever at-
tempt to deceive.you ; and I shall never attempt
iit flinancnahiniaipnniichaipinssniiiehacithiitibbiicsansiapmiate tei

* Marco Paul in New York, chap. xii.


Honesty. ~ 107°

singin tae aia iat na tail iatelididisiteinreannmnennnaanaal
Two other plans. Plans considered. Difficulties.
cere ie iilieeccnecmcaseetiansciastinenapuiealitanssiantnmimmnn annette aia

to conceal any thing from you, in such a way
as I did then, unless it is absolutely necessary.
I should have preferred some other mode, if it
had been possible to adopt any other.”

« What ofher mode ?” asked Marco.

“There are two plans which | should have
preferred,” replied, Forester. ‘The best plan
of all would have been for you to have told
your mother that you would go at any time, of
your own accord, and have the tooth extract-
ed. But that you would not do.”

« And what would have been the next best
plan,” said Marco.

“The next best plan would have been,” said
Forester, “for me to have told you frankly that
you must go with me to the dentist’s, even if
you were unwilling, and then to have taken
you there in an open manner.”

“And why did you not adopt that plan?”
asked Marco.

“ Because,” replied eatin “T was afraid
to run the risk of it. I did not know how far
you would carry your opposition. I thought
that perhaps you would absolutely refuse to go,
or if I took you there in a carriage, refuse to
get out,.and so compel me to have you taken
out by force. That would have been exceed-
108 Marco on THE Erie Cana,

Evils of deception. Marco’s rula.

ingly unpleasant, you know. So I was com-
pelled to conceal from you where I was going ;
but I was very careful not to do any thing to
deceive you about it. That would have been
more objectionable than the trouble of taking
you out of the carriage by force.”

“Why ?” said Marco. _. ,

“Because,” replied Forester, “when you |
found that 1 deceived you, you would have dis-
trusted me another time, and I am very unwil-
ling that you should distrust me. I think it
probable that you will sometimes attempt to de-
ceive me; but I don’t think I shall ever do any
thing to deceive you. If that should be so, you
will soon get into the habit of placing confi-
dence in me, but I shall Jose confidence in
you.”

“You don’t seem to have much confidence
in me now,” said Marco, “ if you think before-
hand that I shall try to deceive you.”

Forester smiled.

“T have heard,” said Marco, “that persons
ought to be thought innocent until they are
proved guilty.”

“No,” said Forester, “that is not exactly the
rule.”

“ What is the rule, then ?” asked Marco.
HoneEsrTy. 109

Forester’s opinion of it. Reasonings.



“People ought to be treated as if they were
innocent,” replied Forester, “until they are
proved guilty.” |

“Well,” rejoined Marco, “is not that the
same thing ?”

“No,” said Forester. “There is a great dif-
ference between believing that people are inno-
cent, and treating them as if they are innocent.
Persons ought not to be punished or censured
until they are proved to have done wrong,—
but we may suspect them, or even believe they
are guilty, when we have reason to believe it,
even without absolute proof. Now I have con-
siderable reason to believe that you are not a
perfectly honest boy. At the same time I have
no positive proof of your dishonesty in any case
that has occurred since you came under my
care; and, therefore, I treat you as if you were
innocent, do I not ?”

“Yes, sir,” replied Marco. .

«But then,” continued Forester, “it would
be very foolish for me to believe that you are
honest, when I have no reason for believing it.
That would be only to expose myself to be de-
ceived.”

Marco did not answer.
110 Marco on tue Erie Canal.

Mothers often deceived. Forester’s story.

“Your mother believes that you are an hon.
est boy, doesn’t she ?” asked Forester.

' “Yes,” replied Marco. “I suppose she
aoes.” )

“ And isn’t she exposed to be often deceived
by you on that account ?”

Marco did not answer.

“Mothers are very unwilling to believe that
their sons can deceive them. That is one
reason why it is particularly wrong for a boy to
attempt to deceive his mother. It is making a
very ungrateful return for her kindness and
confidence.

“Besides,” continued Forester, after a short
pause, “it is very unwise to attempt to gain
any thing by any false pretenses; for such a
course soon destroys one’s character. And a
good character will help a boy get a great
many more enjoyments than any cunning.
Cunning will last a little while, but soon ex-
hausts itself; but character will last always.
If you could establish a good character with
me, so that I could trust you implicitly, I should
be able to allow you a much greater degree of
liberty than I could if I suspected your honesty.
I had a boy with me once who lost his charac.
ter by one single act of deception.”
Honesty. P lll

creer AOE
Raspberry time. Jeremiah. Going a gunning.

»

« What was it?” asked Marco.

« Why, he knew another boy, who was going
one afternoon into the woods a gunning. It
was in raspberry time. There are a great
many raspberries in the pastures and woods in
Vermont.” |

“Is it’ raspberry time yet, in Vermont ?”
asked Marco.

“No,” replied Forester. “ Raspberry time
will not come this month yet: Now Charles,”
continued Forester,

« Was the boy’s name Charles ?” said Marco.

“ Yes,” replied Forester, “ and he wished to
go into the woods with this boy to see him
shoot birds. He also wished to fire the gun
himself once or twice, if the boy that had the
gun would let him.”

«What. was the boy’s name that had the
gun ?” asked Marco.

« Jeremiah,” replied Forester. “So Charles
came to me and asked me if he might go a
raspberrying with Jeremiah. I told him, yes.
And afterward I found that he had been a gun-
uing.” .

«Ts there any harm in going a gunning ?”
asked. Marco. |

« It is too dangerous an amusement for boys,’


112 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.



Forester’s first design.

ee a iinien o eoemmamenennmroniomamatinamn aan
said Forester. “Charles knew very well that
I should not have let him go, if I had known
that there was to be a gun in the case.”

«Tt seems to me that this was concealment,
and not deception,” said Marco.

“Jt was pretty near the line between the
two,” replied Forester ; “ and yet I think it was
a decided case of deception. For when he
asked me to let him go a raspberrying, he meant
to lead me to suppose that that was really the
object of the excursion.”

“How did you find out that they went a
gunning ?” asked Marco.

« Why, first,” said Forester, “I noticed some-
thing in his air and manner when he asked me
to let him go, which did not appear quite frank
and open. I did not pay particular attention to
it at the time, but I recollected it a few minutes
afterward. Then I thought that I would. go
after him at a distance, so as to keep out of his
sight, and yet see where he and Jeremiah would
go, and what they would do.”

« Well,” said Marco, “ and did you do Bz

« No,” replied Forester ; “ on second thoughts
I concluded that I would not resort to any
secret means to discover the truth, but would
proceed in a frank and open-‘manner. Sol did
Honesty. | 113

His conversation with Charles.

Satta
nothing about it till he came home that night,
and then I took him with me to walk in the
garden, and there I told him that I had some
reason to suspect that he had not been quite
honest with me, but that he had had some other
object in view that afternoon, in going away
with Jeremiah, than to get raspberries.”

« And what did he say ?” asked Marco.

« Why, he held down his head and looked
guilty, and then presently said that he had been
a gunning.”

Here there was a pause, during which Marco
seemed to be seriously reflecting on what he
had heard.

“It is always best to be honest,” said Fores-
ter; “and I intend on my part always to be
honest with you. Whether you will always be
honest with me or not, time will show.”

H
114 Marco ON THE Erte Cana.

ence tnt N
Locomotive coming. Loaded train.

ee aera cence



Cuaprer. VIL.
Tur Pass or THE Monawk.

V HILE Marco and Forester were sitting

thus upon the stairs engaged in con-
versation, they suddenly heard the sound of a
locomotive coming up the road.

« There come the cars,” said Marco.

“ Tt sounds like a locomotive,” said Forester ;
“but it can not be time yet for the train from
Schenectady.”

“Jt is coming at any rate, if it isn’t time,”
said Marco; “1 can see it through the trees.”

“It is a freight train,” said Forester.

There are two kinds of trains of cars drawn
by locomotives upon railroads, one to carry
passengers and the other for merchandise, which
‘s called in such cases freight. Forester
thought, from the appearance of this train, that
it was a freight train.

“No,” said Marco, “ I know what it is now ;
+t is that train which went down a few minutes
ago, with workmen in each car. See, they have
got the cars all filled with stones.”
Tue Pass or tue MouAwk. 115

Seene at the station. ; Train coming.



It was as Marco said. That train had gone
down the road a little way after a load of stones,
and now they were returning. They were
going to take them up to a place where they
were wanted for building an embankment.
The cars advanced swiftly along the road, and
soon passed under the bridge and disappeared.
Each car was filled with stones, and had also a
workman sitting on the edge of it.

Marco and Forester waited here about half
an hour longer, and then, as the time for the
arrival of the great passenger train drew nigh,
various persons began to collect about the sta-
tion. Some came to see the cars arrive and
depart ; some came to go in them, and. others
were persons belonging to the road, who came
to render any assistance which might be needed.

At length the train appeared in sight at a
distance down the river. The smoke of the
locomotive was first seen through the trees.
Then the long line of windows in the sides of
the cars came gliding into the view. As the
train approached, it seemed to advance more and
more rapidly, with a thundering noise ; but it
slackened its speed when it had got pretty near
the station, and at length came to a stand with
116 Maftco on tHe Erie Canatu.

“Way car. All aboard.: View from the window.

the passenger cars exactly opposite to the
building.

One of the cars was marked over the door
with the words Way Passencers. Forester
and Marco perceived at once that this was the car
for them. - So they got into it, and some of the
other persons who had been waiting for the
cars at the station with them, got in too.

In a very few moments the conductor, stand-
ing upon the platform, by the side of the train,
called out in a loud voice, “ ALL Anoarp!” and
immediately afterward he gave a signal to the
engineer ; and then the engineer moved the iron
lever which admitted the steam into the cylin-
der, and thus set the locomotive and the whole
train in motion. The car which Forester and
Marco were in, started with a jerk, and then
trundled on, going gradually more and more
swiftly, until it attained a great speed.

I‘orester and Marco sat near a window on
the side of the car nearest to the river; and as
they were whirled swiftly along upon the bank
of it, they had beautiful views of the water and
of the green fields, and sometimes of villages
beyond.

At one time Marco’s attention was suddenly
arrested at the sight of what seemed to be a
Tue Pass or tue Mouwk. 117

ro





The canal-boat.



eS

long low building, with a row of windows in the
side of it, which seemed to be moving. It was
gliding smoothly along through a green field,
among some trees, on the other side of the river.

« Why, Forester,—what is that?” said Marco.

But before Forester had time to answer the
cuestion, and in fact almost before Marco had
spoken the words, he perceived that what he
saw was a canal-boat, and that, instead of being
in a field, as he had at first supposed, it must in
reality be in the canal. He could not see the



THE CAR WINDOW.
118 Marco on THE Erie Cana.



eee incinerate
The horses. Course of the canal.



canal, however. The bank of the canal, on the
side toward him, was of course a little higher
than the water, and it consequently concealed
the water from his view.

« Perhaps I can find the horses,” said Marco
to himself.

So he looked along in the direction towards
which the boat was going, and there he saw, at
some distance before it, two horses walking
slowly along. There was a boy mounted upon
one of them. These horses were walking upon
the tow-path, which was on the top of the bank
of the canal. The tow-path was on the side of
the canal toward Marco, so that he could see
the horses very plainly. Marco watched them
until they disappeared behind some trees, and a
moment afterward the boat disappeared too.

After this, Marco found that he could trace
the course of the canal on the other side of the
river, as he sat at his window in the car, very
well, by means of the tow-path, which continued
in view for along time. He saw several boats,
too, going and coming, with the horses belong-
ing to each one at a short distance before it.
Once a packet-boat came along. There were
a great many men standing upon the deck.
Marco thought it was a very singular spectacle
Tue Pass or THE Monawk. 119

erence TE TATE
The turnpike. Horses frightened. Difficulty.

to see a company of men gliding so smoothly
along through a field, without moving their feet.

Marco saw the turnpike road too, which
passes up the valley of the Mohawk, together
with the railroad, the river, and the canal. At
one place the railroad came very near the turn-
pike, and at that place there was aman coming
by with a wagon drawn by two horses. The
horses were afraid of the locomotive and the
train. The man stopped them, jumped off the
wagon, and went to hold their heads. They
looked very much frightened, but the man suc-
ceeded in holding them still until the train had
gone by. |

Presently after this, Marco's attention was
arrested by a peculiar sort of sound, half-way
between a hiss and a whistle, which seemed to
come from the engine. At the same moment
he could perceive that the train was slackening
its speed. | i

« What’s the matter now ?” said Marco.

« Perhaps we have come to a stopping place,”
replied Forester.

But the train did not stop, though it continued
to go slowly, and every now and then Marco
could hear the strange whistling sound from the
engine.
120 Marco on rHe Erie Canatu.

eet cence inmncennnntcealaceaiaaamaibaenals
Marco learns the cause. Cow in the way.



“]’Il look out and see what’s the matter,” said
Marco.

“Be very careful,” said Forester, “and do
not put your head out very far.”

The cars of this train were not constructed
like those in use at the present day, but were
divided into separate parts like coaches, with
two seats in each part, extending from side to
side. Marco was sitting on the back seat of
the car, near the window, and Forester on the
front seat, opposite to him. So that if Marco
looked out he could see on before the train,
while Forester’s face was turned the other way,
so that he could only see the road behind them.

“T see what the difficulty is,” said Marco.

“What is it ?” rejoined Forester. —

“ A cow,” said Marco.

“ A cow ?” repeated Forester.

“ Yes,” said Marco; “ there is a cow running
along by the side of the road. I wonder he
does not whip up, and drive right by her.”

“That would be dangerous,” said Forester ;
“for the cow might just at that moment run
across the road, and then the locomotive would
run over her.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ that would be just good
Tue Pass or THE Monawk. 121

Forester’s excuses for the owner.

see eee coneeaannaaaan thaliana ree
enough for her. She has no business to be here,

in the way.”
“J don’t think that she is to blame,” said
Forester. ‘“ Probably her owner turned her out

here, to graze along the sides of the railroad.”

“Then it is her owner that ought to be run
over,” said Marco. .

« No,” said Forester ; “1 don’t think he de-
serves so severe a punishment. Perhaps he is
a poor man, and has no other pasture for his
cow.”

Just at this moment both Forester and Marco
perceived that the train had started on, and was
beginning to go at full speed again. At the
same instant they saw the poor cow standing by
the side of the road, crowding herself up close
to the wall, as the train swept swiftly by. She:
held her head over the wall, and looked this way
and that, apparently very much frightened.

“He had to manage very carefully to get
by,” said Forester. “A great many persons
would have got out of patience, after trying a
few minutes to get by the cow, and then would
have gone on recklessly.”

« Yes,” said Marco; “J should.”

“I think it very likely; and therefore you
would not be a suitable person to have charge
122 Marco on tHE Erie Canat.

Te
Conductor’s duties. Great responsibility.

perme
of a train of cars. You would do perhaps to
collect the fares, but it would not be safe to
trust you with the guidance of the locomo-
tive.”

«“ Well,” said Marco, “ if I were obliged to go
ina railroad train for a living, I would as lief
collect the fares as guide the locomotive.”

«“ Only you would get better pay, perhaps, for
taking charge of the locomotive,” replied For-
ester. :

« Why ?” asked Marco.

« Because,” said Forester, “it requires pa-
tience, and skill, and steadiness of mind. Those
employments which require high mental quali-

fications are always better paid than others.
There is great responsibility attached to them
usually. For instance, the running over of a
cow might cost the owners of a railroad thou-
sands of dollars.”

“OQ, cousin Forester !” said Marco.

“Certainly,” said Forester ; “for it is very
probable that it would run the train off the
track.” |

« Well, and what then ?” asked Marco.

«Why, it is very likely it would break the
engine, and it might cost a thousand dollars to
repair it. Besides, some of the passengers might
Tue Pass or tue Monawk. 123

tain
Cases’of damage. Company responsible.

SE Ee ee
get their limbs broken, and so the company
would have to pay damages.”

“Do the company have to pay when any
body gets hurt ?” asked Marco. 3

« Yes,” replied Forester, “if the damage is
occasioned by their fault.”

«But it would not be by their fault,” said
Marco; “it would only be the fault of the en-
gine man.”

“Yes, but the engine man is their agent.
They choose him and employ him, and commit
the engine and the lives of all the passengers to
his care ; and so they take the responsibility of
investing him with power, and if he is unfaith-
ful or careless, they must pay the damage.”

«] should think that the engine man ought to
pay the damage himself,” said Marco.

« He ought,” replied Forester ; “ that is, he is
bound to the company to pay back to them all
that they pay on account of his carelessness.
When any damage is done, the company must
first make it good to the person who suffers.
Then they may make the agent that did the
mischief pay them, if he has got money enough.
But generally he has not got any money, and
so they are very careful to employ only discreet

and faithful men.”
124 Marco~-on tHe Erie Cana.

‘. a
Ascending the valley. Pass of the Mohawk. Narrow defile,

While Marco and Forester had been engaged
in this and in similar conversation, the engine
had been rapidly conveying them up the valley.
They stopped once at a station to let some
way passengers get out, and to take in others.
At length they perceived that the valley through
which they had been traveling for so many
miles was beginning to grow very narrow.
The mountains on each side grew more lofty,
and they approached nearer to the bed of the
river, leaving only a contracted passage of a
quarter of a mile in width between rocky pre-
cipices. They were beginning to enter the
Pass of the Mohawk.

For there is a place here called the Pass of
the Mohawk. It is where the river flows
thrcugh a narrow passage in the mountains,
with extensive ledges of rock and lofty cliffs on
either hand. As the train of cars advanced up
this defile, Forester and Marco perceived that
the mountainous ranges approached nearer and
nearer, until the river, the turnpike, the railroad
and the canal were crowded close together ;
and Marco could look down upon them from
the window of the car, running side by side, and
hemmed in on either hand by precipices of rag-
ged rocks. 7
Tue Pass or tHE Monawk. 12%

as cena ean ta A
Wild scenery. Winding way.

TR I cinnnaeidemnssaenencininnnanceciciistetsan

The track for the rails was, in fact, for a long
distance cut out of the rocks, there being no
room for it on the level land near the river.
Next to the railroad at this place was the turn-
pike, and close beyond the turnpike was the
river, with only a narrow gravelly bank be-
tween. Then, very near to the bank of the
river, on the other side, was the canal, with
barely room for the tow-path between them ;
and beyond the canal a perpendicular wall of
ragged rocks arose, with high mountains Cov-
ered with evergreen forests beyond.

The water in the river did not look calm and
deep, as it had done among the meadows below.
It was noisy and shallow, and it came tumbling
along over arocky bed. Marco asked Forester
if he thought it would be a good place to catch
trout, on some rocks which he pointed out.
But Forester did not know.

In the mean time, the railroad turned and
twisted up a winding ascent, cut out in the
rock, crowding harder and harder upon the
turnpike which was between it and the river.
At length the turnpike had to turn short to the
right and run under the railroad, to get out of
the way. After this the railroad kept along
close to the edge of the water, until a large vil-
126 Marco on tHE EriE CANAL.

as aninumensstieeahenabenenietaasintaicsemsnsennisineeeapsinnanipnineiiininatn
Littlo Falls. The station. Piazza,
caer cata tT ALD

lage came suddenly into view. It lay upon
both sides of the water, directly before them.

“ This. must be Little Falls,” said Forester.

“ How do you know ?” asked Marco.

« Why, it is about time for us to get to Little
Falls,” said Forester in reply ; “and, besides, I
know that Little Falls is in just such a situa-
tion.”

The train rolled slowly into the village, and
came to a stand at a depot opposite to a large
hotel. The building was called the Railroad
Hotel. As soon as the cars ceased to move, a
young man came out from the hotel and passed
along to all the cars, opening the doors and
saying at each car,—“ They stop here ten min-
utes.” ‘This was to let the company within the
cars know that there would be time, if they
wished, to get out and take some refreshment.

Accordingly, the gentlemen began to come
out in great numbers from all the cars, and to
hasten across a broad graveled space by the
road-side, to the hotel. Forester and Marco
followed them.

There was a piazza extending along the
whole front of the house, with several doors
leading from it into a large hall. Forester and
Marco entered with the rest. They found a
Tue Pass or trHE Monawk. 127

Tho refrcshment room. Bustle and confusion.

en neers ene rerenree eT
long table spread in the hall. It extended
through almost the whole length of the room.
It was nearly covered with refreshments for the
travelers. ‘There was a row of cups and plates
along on the outer edge of it, and behind these
there were pitchers of ‘coflee and milk, sugar-
bowls, plates of pie, cake, ham, chicken, apples,
and oranges,—every variety of food, in short,
suitable for a luncheon for travelers. Behind
the table were several waiters, in attendance, to
help the company to what they wanted, and to
take the pay. !

«Come, cousin - Forester,” said Marco, “ let
us have some luncheon too.” |

“No,” said Forester, “not now. This will
be only a hurried luncheon. We will wait un-
til the train has gone, and then have a regular
and quiet dinner.”

The hall was full. of bustle and confusion.
Some were taking refreshments themselves ;
others were hurrying to and fro, to carry cups
of coffee and little plates of cake to the cars, to
ladies who were under their charge, and who
had preferred not to leave their seats; others
were laying down bank bills or pieces of money,
in payment for what they had taken, and re-
eeiving small coin in exchange.
128 Marco on rue Erie Canatu.

The little parlor. Departure of the train.

Forester and Marco having nothing to do
with this scene, went out through a door at one
end of the hall, which led into a small parlor ad-
joining. Here there was a table, with news-
papers and prints upon it, and also some chairs
and a sofa. Forester put his carpet-bag and
umbrella down at the end of the sofa, in a cor-
ner of the room, and then took his seat, with
Marco by his side.

In a few minutes the Naninantione bell began
to toll, which was a signal for all the passengers
to get into the cars again. The sound of this
bell greatly increased the hubbub and confu-
sion ; men were running to and fro, in a great-
er hurry than before, and crowding into the
doors of the cars. At length the doors were
shut by the conductor, and the signal given.
The whole train then started and began slowly
to move away, leaving Marco and Forester in
_their little parlor alone. They were surprised
to observe what a sudden change was made in
the scene by the departure of the cars. A mo-
ment before all had been noise, tumult, and
confusion. But when the sound of the engine
died away in the distance, they found them-
selves left in a scene of almost entire silence
and solitude.
PERPLEXITY. 129

Search for the aqueduct. The street.

Cuapter VIII.
PeRPLEXITY.

FTER Marco Paul and Forester had had

their dinner, they went forth with feel-

ings of eager interest in quest of the aqueduct.

“How do you know where to find it?”
asked Marco.

«There can not be much difficulty i in finding
it, I think,” said Forester; “for such a work
must be a very conspicuous object in such a
village as this.”

They were on the north side of the river.
The village, however, extended to both sides.
As they walked along they could see the river
tumbling over the rocks, wherever a street or
an interval between blocks of buildings opened
aview. After following the line of the railroad
a short distance, they turned down toward the
river by a broad street, which seemed to be a
great thoroughfare, and which Forestér there-
fore thought would probably lead to a bridge.

He was right in this conjecture. The street

conducted him and Marco between buildings,
ee
130 Marco on THE ERte CANAL.

eee ements NCO A
They find a canal. The two bridges.

a eee
which seemed to be mills, machine-shops, and
foundries, and at length it came to a bridge
which led over what appeared to be a canal.

“Flere is the canal,” said Marco.

« Not the Erie canal,” said Forester.

« Why not?” asked Marco.

« Because,” replied Forester, “that is on the
other side of the river.”

«This is @ canal, at any rate,” said Marco.

He judged that it was a canal by its being
lined with walls of stone in some places, and by
the regularity of the bank in other places, show-
ing that it was an artificial construction. On
farther examination they found that it was par-
allel to the river and on a much higher level,
and they observed that there was a current in
the water.

« Perhaps,” said Forester, “this may be the
water which goes in over the aqueduct and
feeds the canal. Let us go on and see.”

So they walked on. Presently there came
into view the deep and rocky bed of the Mo-
hawk itself, with what Marco at first thought
were two bridges leading over it. The two
bridges were very near each other, side by side,
so near that it seemed to Marco that he could
throw a stone from one to the other.
PERPLEXITY. 131

‘esis inniniicimmnsiinim
One an aqueduct. The side walls.

In a moment, however, he perceived that
they were not both bridges ; for the lower one,
instead of haying a roadway passing over upon
it, had only the water of a canal. There wasa
kind of a narrow walk on each side, but noth-
ing but water in the middle.

“That must be the aqueduct,” said Forester

“Yes,” said Marco; “let us go and see it.”

So they left the street and went across a va-
cant piece of land between two piles of boards,
until they came to the bank of the canal.
They found now that the canal which they had
observed before they came in sight of the aque-
duct, turned its course as soon as it passed un-
der the bridge where they had crossed it. and
expanded into a broad basin, and from one side
of this basin there was a sort of branch which
led directly to the aqueduct, and so across the
river.

“Now,” said Forester, “we will go on to
the aqueduct, and walk along one of the side-
walks, and then we shall see the water pouring
over the aqueduct, across the river, into the
Erie canal.

Marco found in this case an iaatediees of
the truth of what Forester had told him of the
value of some preliminary knowledge, to give
182 Marco on THE Erie Canau.

The current. A canal-boat. The girl in the cabin.



interest and zest to traveling and observation.
He was very much interested in going on with
Forester to see the aqueduct. Even so slight
a circumstance as the expected flow of the wa-
ter across the river from north to south, instead
of coming in the opposite direction, interested
him strongly, on account of his having previ-
ously become acquainted with the facts and
principles on which the determination of the
current, as he supposed, depended.

There was a canal-boat lying in the aqueduct
‘itself. It was a coarse-looking boat, in the
form of a scow, and it was held in its place by
a cable. The cable was fastened by one end
to the bow of the boat, and by the other to a
post set in the bank. There was a little cabin
built in the stern of the boat, and a young girl
was looking out at the window of it.

“Where are you going in this boat ?” said
Marco to the girl. |

“To Rochester,” said the girl.

“ When are you going ?” asked Marco.

“T don’t know, sir,” said the girl.

Just then, Marco, who was standing while he
said this on the stone sidewalk, just at the be-
ginning at the aqueduct, looked down between
the boat and the wall, and to his great surprise
PERPLEXITY. 133

eet A LAE TEL
Water flowing the wrong way. Marco asks the girl.
nie acinar nae L OLA

he observed that the water, instead of flowing
on toward the Erie canal, which was on the
other side of the river, was in reality flowing
away from it. It was coming toward the side
of the river where they then were. He could
see the direction of the current very plainly by
the ripples between the side of the boat and the
edge of the wall.

“Why, Forester ! said Marco, “ the water is
running the wrong way.” 7

Forester looked down at the ripples which
Marco pointed out to him, in silence.

«Js not the canal over that way ?” continued
Marco, pointing over the river.

« Yes,” said Forester, “I suppose so.”

«Then the water is all running away from
it. The aqueduct is emptying the canal as fast
as it can, and they call it a feeder.”

Forester made no reply, but looked first into
the aqueduct, then over toward the canal, and
then back to the basin on the other side. He
did not know what to make of the case.

« Little girl,” said Marco, “what makes the
water in this aqueduct run the wrong way 1

« Sir?” said the girl.

«Ts not this a feeder?” said Marco.

«“T don’t know, sir,” said the girl.
134 Marco on tue Erie Canat.

~

senescence lai
Marco goes on board the boat. _ Interior of the cabin.
SRE a eR

“ Hush, Marco,” said Forester; and so say
ing, he drew him along toward the middle ot
the aqueduct. “Don’t trouble that poor gir
with your questions. It is not probable that
she knows any thing about it.”

“Why, cousin Forester,” said Marco, “she
has been sailing overit all her life,—it’s likely.
IT expect she lives on the canal. I wish you
would let me go in and see the room in the ca-
nal-boat that she lives in.”

“That you may do,” said Forester, “and I
will wait here until you come back.”

So Marco went and stepped on board of the
boat, and then proceeded to the cabin door.
The door was open, but he had to go down sev-
eral steps to enter it. The interior was very
plain, and very plainly furnished, ard yet it
had a cheerful and pleasant expression. |

There was a stove in one corner, with a pipe,
which, after being bent twice at right angles,
ascended and passed out through the deck of
the boat, overhead. There were some clothes
hanging upon a line which was stretched across
the corner of the cabin, behind the stove-pipe.
This line extended from a window on one side
to a nail fastened in the wall on the other. The
window was open.
PERPLEXITY. 135

on na a Rana ei as a
Objects seen within. The shelf. The table.
ee petal caebacnmiaaaleuiaulctnsubsiams meinen



2
0 —_———————— —_ ¢
——_-—_. = _ Yi l i
o . ee tae)
a ey ff [= LO \
— /-a
= = —- ory fe ——— i
— - eat Ai ff - MORI Vaal.
> y ‘
It,

Ve

OTe

— Os

THE LINE-BOAT CABIN.

There was a shelf on one side of the cabin,
with plates upon it. There was a little rail ex-
tending along this shelf in front of the plates, to
keep them from being thrown down by the mo-
tion of the boat. Under the shelf was a picture
hung against the wall, and under the picture a
table. There were various things upon the
table, such as a bottle, a dipper, &c. Marco
examined all these things with great interest,
as he stood at the door.
186 Marco on tHe Erie Cana:z.

The window. The girl. The sidewalk.

The window was rather high, but Marco
perceived that the girl could look out at it by
standing up. While Marco was standing at the
door, the girl was sitting down upon a stool.
Marco remained at the door a little time talk-
ing with the girl, and then he went back and
rejoined Forester.

Forester and Marco then walked along upon
the aqueduct sidewalk. This sidewalk was
formed of large square stones, beautifully hewn,
and there was a strong iron railing on the outer
side of it, toward the river, so as to keep the
passengers from falling off. There was, how-
ever, no railing on the inner side, that is, the
side next the canal. But this was. not neces-
sary, as the water in the canal was nearly on a
level with the sidewalk itself. But it was very
far down from the aqueduct to the river below.

Marco stopped to lean upon the iron railing
and look down. He could see the water of the
river, tumbling along in a narrow rocky chan-
nel, under the arches of the aqueduct.

“T should like to be down upon those rocks
with a good fishing-line,” said Marco.

Forester paid no attention to what Marco
was saying. He was looking at the bridge,
which was full in their view a little way up the
PERPLEXITY. 137

«csi inane iaamaceaatentittniatinnnaeiaasatanntn tt
The bridge. A funny house, View of the canr,
a een Tn en TsnSSn Stn sne a saaaaaaaaa

stream. The bridge was supported by two or
three arches, and was built of stone, in a very
substantial manner.

«Let us go around and get on the bridge,”
said Marco; “and then we can see the aque-
duct better.”

“Very well,” said Forester.

“© see, what a funny house!” said Marco,
pointing before them.

Forester looked in the direction which Mar-
co indicated, and he saw a house, which was
painted red and white, in small alternate
squares, like a chequer-board. It was but a
short distance beyond the aqueduct, and was
on the corner between the canal which came
in over the aqueduct, and the great Erie canal
beyond. When they came to this corner they
found the Erie canal before them, extending up
and down, parallel to the river, as far as they
could see. There was a lock very near, witha
boat going through it. Forester and Marco
stopped to see the boat locked through.

Forester looked around a little to find some-
body whom he might ask for an explanation of
the difficulty in regard to the current of water
over the aqueduct, but he did not succeed.
The man who had charge of the lock looked
1388 Marco on tue Erie Canas.

View of the aqueduct. The description of it,

very rough and ill-natured, as was very often
the case, in respect to workmen along the ca-
nal. Besides, as he was apparently only a com-
mon laborer, Forester thought it was very
probable that he would not know any thing
about it.

After the boat had been locked through, For-
ester and Marco walked along the bank of the |
canal until they came opposite to the bridge
which they had seen just above the aqueduct.
They walked over upon the bridge, and took a
view of the aqueduct from it.

“TI confess I don’t see how it happens that
the water is flowing out over the aqueduct,”
said Forester.

“Nor I,” replied Marco.

“ That must be the aqueduct, certainly,” said
lorester, though he spoke in a tone of doubt.

“T'll look at the description again,” he con-
tinued ; and so saying, he took out his little
map, and spread it open upon the railing of the
bridge, so that he and Marco could see it.

He found a brief description of the Erie canal
upon a corner of the map. There were seve-
ral aqueducts named. in this description, and
among others the one at Little Falls was par.
ticularly referred to.
PERPLEXITY. 139
Dimensions, Material. The river.

“TI will read the description,” said Forester,
“and you may see whether it corresponds to
this aqueduct.”

“ «Length two hundred and fourteen feet,’
said Forester, reading from his map.

“Well,” said Marco; “but ! don’t know
whether that is correct or not for I can not tel
how long this aqueduct is.’

So Forester looked up, in order to estimate
the length of the aqueduct before him, by his
eye. He said he thought it was as much as
two hundred and fourteen feet long.

“ «Constructed of hewed limestone,’ ”’ contin-
ued Forester.

“ The stones are hewed,” said Marco, “ but I
don’t know whether they are limestone or not.”

“T presume they are limestone,” said Fores-
ter,—“ ‘supported by three arches.’ ”

“Yes,” said Marco, “ that is right.”

“ spans the river, the water of the river princi-
pally passing under it.’ ”

“ Yes,” said Marco.

“* With a swift current,

“Yes,” said Marco.

“<« Twenty feet deep at low water,” contin.
ued Forester.

399

continued Forester.
140 Marco on tne Erie Canat.

anaes ecnaratsarentieegerceciagieetaaatiaiaataaaiaiaa tad cilities it.
Arches, The abutments. Piers.



“JT can’t see how deep it is,” said Marco;
but I don’t believe it is twenty feet.”

“*And on each side,’” resumed Forester,
“an arch of fifty feet chord.’”

“ Yes,” said Marco; “but I don’t see what
good the side arches do, since the river all runs
through the middle arch.”

“It does now,” said Forester, “while the
river is in its ordinary bed; but when it is
raised by the rains, or the melting of the snows
in the spring, perhaps it requires all three of
the arches to carry the water.”

“** These arches,’ ” continued Forester, read-
_ing again from the description on the corner of
his map, “ ‘rest on abutments and piers of solid
lime-rock.’ ”

“What are abutments and piers?” asked
Marco. '

“ Abutments are the foundations built up at
the ends of a bridge, in the bank ; and piers are
those built in the middle, in the stream. When
the stream is narrow, it is only necessary to
have abutments,—one in each bank,—and then
the bridge rests upon them, without any support
in the middle. But if the stream is so wide
that the bridge must have some support in the
middle, they build upa pier. A pier stands in-
PERPLEXITY. 14]

LL DDB DLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LLL LL LLL LL
The coping. Mystery about the current.

dependently ; whereas an abutment rests against
the bank on one side.”

“Yes,” said Marco. “There are two piers
and two abutments to this aqueduct.”

“« And surmounted,’ ” said Forester, reading
again from his map, “‘ by coping’ ”—

“Coping ?” said Marco, in an inquiring tone.

“ That means,” replied Forester, “the course
of stone laid along upon the top of the aqueduct
on each side, to make the side-walks.”

“Ts a coping a sidewalk, then ?” asked Marco.

“Ono,” replied Forester, “a coping is any
course of stone laid on the top of a wall of
masonry, to cover and protect it. “They use
the coping for a side-walk here,—that’s all.”

By thus examining the work before them
particularly in connection with the description,
Forester and Marco were convinced that it was
without doubt the aqueduct; but the direction
of the current of water through it remained still
a mystery. Forester proposed to Marco that
they should go up the river a little way, and
examine the canals and cuts which were con-
nected with it and with the Erie canal, and see
if they could understand what course the water
was intended to take. And they accordingly
did so. But they soon got entirely Jost and
142 Marco on rue Erie Canat.

Forester perplexed. Cause of his perplexity.

confounded in a perfect maze of locks, canals,
Cuts, waste ways, sluices, feeders and basins.
Forester became greatly perplexed. Here and
there he could trace the intent and design of
some detached part of the work, but he could
not get any clear or connected idea of the
whole. There seemed to him to be a great
many more-channels and locks than were ne-
cessary for the canal, and he did not know for
what other purpose they could be intended.
As for Marco, he gave up at once all idea of
understanding such a complicated system ; and
he walked about with Forester, paying but little
attention to his surmises and speculations.

The reason why the works were so unintel-
ligible to Forester, was that that he did not
understand some important facts in relation to
them. Before the Erie canal was made, there
had been a short canal cut around these falls,
with locks, and waste weirs, and other appur-
tenances ; and these all remained, some full and
some empty. Some parts of this old canal had
been converted to a useful purpose in the con-
struction of the Erie canal, and some parts had
been abandoned. Then the Erie canal had
been enlarged at this place, recently, and a new
feeder provided ; and there were mills and other —
PERPLEXITY. 143

Return to the hotel.

machinery which required a supply of wate1
and appropriate channels to convey it. All
these things made the hydraulic works in the
village of Little Falls very complicated. It
would have required close study for a week for
Forester and Marco to have understood them
perfectly.

After rambling about for an hour or two,
they returned to the hotel. Forester had en-
joyed the romantic scenery of the place, and
had been much interested in what he had been
able to understand of the construction of the
works, and the operation of the water. Marco
had been somewhat interested too, though, on
the whole, his attention had been more strongly
attracted by-the house painted in squares like a
chequer-board, than by the cuts and canals.
There was another thing also which pleased him
exceedingly. It was the name which he saw
painted upon the stern of a sort of scow which
was floating in the basin. The name was Skip-
jack. Marco declared that if he ever had an-
other boat or vessel, of any sort or size, he would
uiame her Skipjack.
144 Marco on tHe Eris Canat.

Talk about Vermont. Forester’s father’s.

Cuarpter IX.
A Prosect.

ORESTER and Marco went home, to the

hotel, to tea.” They took their seats on

the sofa in the little parlor, waiting for the bell
to ring.

“ Are there any canals in Vermont ?” asked
Marco.

“Very few,” said Forester ; “ but you might
make one when you go there.”

“ J make one!” exclaimed Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester; “I think you could
make a small one, around the falls in our little
brook.” !

“ Have you got a brook ?” asked Marco.

“Yes; there is a small brook on the grounds
behind my father’s house, and there are a great
many little waterfalls upon it. Now when there
are waterfalls or rapids on a river, so that boats
can not pass up and down, it is very common
to make a canal around the place, and then the
‘boats can be locked up and down through the
canal.”
A Prosect. 145

Canals and locks. How made, and why.

“What do you mean by locking them up and
down ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, passing them up and down through
the locks.”

“Why need they have any locks?” asked
Marco. “They might dig the canal deep, and
SO let the boats sail right round through the
canal. , £

“No,” said Forester; “that would not do; |
for, as the water above the falls is higher than
it is below, if a canal were to be cut around
them, and no locks made in it, the water would
run round through the canal 4s swiftly as it had
done in the natural bed of the river; and so
there would be nothing gained. They have to
put locks in the canal, so as to let the boats
down gradually from the higher level to the
lower level.”

“Then why do they dig any canal at all ?”
said Marco. “ Why don’t they build the locks
right in the river ?”

“ Because that would stop the stream. The
locks do not allow the water to pass through,
excepting one lock full every time a boat
passes ; they want to leave the channel of the
river open, therefore, in order to let the water
flow on regularly. So they make a canal by

K
146 Marco on tue Erie CANAL.

Mareo’s questions. Locking,

the side of the river, and build the locks in that.
Such canals are very short, and they do not
have any tow-path.”

“Then where do the horses walk,” said

Marco, “ to draw the boats ?”
_ . © They do not have any horses,” replied T'o1-
ester; “horses are only used on long canals,
where they have canal-boats. “hese short
canals, around falls and rapids in rivers, are
only for the river-boats, which come up by sails.
Such river-boats are generally large flat-bot-
tomed boats, each being rigged with a great
square sail. The'wind blows them up the river
until they get to the falls, and then the men
take down the sail and push the boat into the
lock with poles. Then they shut the lower
gates of the lock, and let the water in through
the upper gates. ‘This buoys the boat up, and
when it is level with the water above the upper
gates, the men open the way out of the lock and
push the boat along. Thus they lock the boat
through the canal. When they have got it
through into the river above the rapids,‘they
hoist the sail again, and sail away.”

“ Suppose the wind is not fair?” said Marco.

“Then they must wait until it is fair,” replied
Forester.
A Prosecr. 147

ener ee ee
Forester’s explanations. Rivers. The Niagara river.
ee reetdnrsenenienscusesenininstsinineiablaninsnanmusciaiins Meee

“T think it would be better,” said Marco, “to
have a tow-path all along the river, and so take
horses to draw the boat; then they would not
have to wait for a fair wind.”

“ They can not have a tow-path along a river,
very well,” said Forester.

“ Why not ?” asked Marco.

“ Because,” said Forester, “in the freshets
the water would rise and overflow the tow-
paths, and so the horses could not get along.”

“But they ought to make the tow-path so
high,” rejoined Marco, “that the water of the
highest freshets would not overflow it.” 7

“Then,” replied Forester, “when the river
was low, the water would be so far below the
_ tow-path that the horses could not draw the
boat.”

“T didn’t think of that,” said Marco.

“ Some rivers rise and fall much more than
others,” said Forester ; “ and there is one which
scarcely rises at all; so they can have a tow-
path on the shore of that.” ba

“ What river is it ?” asked Marco.

“The Niagara river,” replied Forester.—
“There are very peculiar reasons why the
Niagara river does not rise much.”
148 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

«commis im LCL

Its origin. The map.

a preeminence theca LCT TOD

« Don’t it rain mueh 1 in that country ?” asked
Marco.

« Yes,” replied Forester ; “ but then the Nia-
gara river, instead of coming down from the
mountains, flows out of a great lake.’

« What lake ?” asked Marco.

’ «Lake Erie,” replied Forester.

«The same lake that the Erie canal comes
out of ?” said Marco.

« Yes,” replied Forester, “ the same.”

Then Forester took out the pocket-map, the
same which he had spread out upon the railing

of the bridge, when he was comparing the de-
scription of the aqueduct with the aqueduct
itself, and he showed Marco the Niagara river,
flowing north from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario.
It would be well for the reader, before going ©
any farther, to take a map, and find the Niagara
river upon it too.

« What a short river !” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester ; “it is short, but it
is large. There is a great deal of water flowing
through it. And you see, Marco, that it comes
out of this great lake,—lake Erie. Now lake
Erie does not rise and fall much.”

“ Why not ?” asked Marco.

“ Because, if all the rivers which flow into it
A Projsject | 149

Permanent level of the lake. The Ohio.

were to rise very high, and pour a great deal of
water into the lake, the freshets would only last
a very few days, and in that time they would
only raise the surface of such a great lake a very
little. And so when the rivers which flow into
the lake get very low, the lake does not subside
very suddenly, for the water flows off slowly
from such a great surface. Thus the lake keeps
always pretty nearly at the same level.

“Then, besides,” continued Forester, “ the
falls of Niagara, which are in the middle of
Niagara river, between lake Erie and lake On-
tario, tend to keep the water in the river very
nearly at the same level; because, when the
lake is rising, all the superfluous water is drained
off very rapidly over the falls. Rivers which
are very long, and which have no great lakes
upon them for the superabundant water to
spread out upon, and no high waterfalls, to drain
off the water rapidly, are the ones which rise
and fall the most. The Ohio and the Missis-
sippi rise and fall very much indeed.”

“ How much ?” asked Marco.

“T have heard of their rising thirty feet, and
I don’t know but they do a great deal more,”
replied Forester. “The Niagara river scarcely
rises at all. And I believe there is a place
150 Marco on rue Eris Canat.’

‘ x
Tow-path on the banks of the Niagara. Forester’s proposal,
er

where the Erie canal comes out to the river, in
which they have made a tow-path on the bank,
so that they draw the boats along upon the
water of the river.”

~ - How do you know ?” asked Marco.

“ I was there some years ago, and I believe I
recollect seeing it. But I did not take particular
notice of the circumstance, for I did not know
then that there was such a difference in rivers,
in respect to the rise and fall of the water, and
so I was not particularly interested in observing
this tow-path, as a proof that the N lagara river
always continued at nearly the same level. I
should like now,” continued Forester, “ to be on.
the banks of the Ohio a short time, to examine
the marks of high and low water, and then
again to do the same at N lagara river, so as to
observe the difference.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I should like to -do
that.” :

“ But now,” continued Forester, “as to your
canal in Vermont. I think you might dig a
canal around one of the little waterfalls in the
brook. You could slope the banks properly,
like a real canal, and make a tow-path.”

- “But what should I do for a.lock?” said
Marco. ; |
A Prosect. 151

His explanations. Theo gates.

“J could make the lock for you,” said For-
ester. ,

“Could you?” asked Marco, eagerly; “ how
would you make it ?”

“JT would make a box,” said Forester, “ with-
out any top or ends. It should be a little
longer and wider than you would wish the boat
to be; which you were going to lock up and
down through it.”

“How large a boat should I have?” asked
Marco.

“T should think,” replied Forester, “ that you
might have your boat about a foot long and six
inches wide.”

“T should like to have it a little larger than
that,” said Marco.

“ The larger your buat is, the more hard work
will be required to make the canal; for the
canal must be in proportion to. the size of the
boat. However, we could determine that, after
looking at the ground. When the box for the
lock was done, | should have to make gates, one
at each end of it.”

. That would be very hand ” said Marco.

“No,” said Forester, “for it would not be
necessary for me to have the gates made on thé”
same plan with those on a great canal. I could
152 Marco on tHE Erie CAnaAt.

Construction of them. Placing the locks.

CN cactaneinninennaniniiicinn nate line aonane
have the gates made to slide up and down, in-
stead of having them open like great doors.”

« Would that be easier ?” asked Marco.

«“ Yes,” replied Forester ; “I could nail cleats
in on the bottom and sides of the lock, for the
gate to rest against. There must be a set of
cleats at each end. Then I should make two
square gates, just large enough to fit in at the
ends; and when they were in their place the
water would press them against the cleats.
Then I would have a handle to each of the
gates for you to pull them up by, whenever you
wanted to lock a boat through. |

“] think it would be well,” continued For-
ester, “ for you to make your canal at some fall
or rapid of so small a descent that one lock
would be sufficient for the difference of level.
You would have to be very particular, however,
in placing your lock, after I had got it made for
you.”

“Why should I have to be very particular
about that ?” asked Marco. +

« Because you would have to fix it in its place
before you had brought the water along in the
canal to it. If you could bring the water along
Yo the place in the canal, the surface of the
water would show you exactly the right level
A Prosect. 153

—

Precautions necessary. Plans for amusements,
aT tate mean ermeasienreeienengimenmiaann an

for the lock. But as you could not bring the
water there, you would have to measure the
level very carefully.”

“Why could not I bring the water along
first ?” asked Marco,

“ Because it would flood the place sa you
were going to put your lock, and keep you from
working. You might, however, dig the canal
along pretty near to the place, and let the water
in so far, and thus get the right level. But it |
would be necessary to keep the place where
you were going to set your lock, dry, until the
lock was in its place, and the earth rammed
down hard all around it.”

“ Have sn got some tools where you Line in
Vermont,” said Marco, “to make the lock
with ?” 3

“Yes,” replied Forester, “we have got tools -
enough for such a work as that. Though I
think I should let you make the lock, under my
supervision.”

“Well,” said Marco, “I like the plan ‘of
making a canal very much.” —

“Yes,” rejoined Forester, “I think it will a
a very good amusement. You can make a
flat-bottomed boat and put a-sailto it. You
can also put something into the boat to represent
154. Marco on THE Erte CAnau..





The proposed canal.

eee LLL

a cargo of merchandise ; and then if the wind
blows up the stream, you can carry the boat
down below the canal, and put it into the water,
and let the wind carry it up to the canal.
Then you can take down the sail, and lock the
boat up through the canal, and when it has
come out into the brook above the rapids, you
can hoist the sail again, and let the boat finish
her voyage.”



THE PROPOSED CANAL.
A Prosect. 155

eiccienineisiiiimileninililiiagitaisaamatisisnsnicinienieit TE LAE TN
Proposed advantages. Ivory. Ivory a sober boy.
on arenes enemies TE

Marco’s countenance expressed great satis-
faction and pleasure at this proposal. Forester
told him also that the plan would not only af-
ford him amusement, but it would be of great
advantage to him. —

«What advantage ?” asked Marco.

«First, it will impress very strongly upon
your mind all that you have learned of the Erie
canal. For while you are at work upon your
little canal, the various facts which you have
learned, and the incidents which you have met
with, will be continually coming to your mind.

« And then,” continued Forester, “ I presume
that Ivory will help you, and he will learn
something.” . |

“Who is Ivory ?” asked Marco.

“Ivory is a boy,” replied Forester, “ that
lives very near my father’s house ; and he will
come to play with you sometimes.”

« What sort of a house does your father live
in?” asked Marco. |

“QO, you will see when we get to Vermont,”
said Forester. ° “I had rather tell you about
Ivory now, than about our house.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ tell me about him.”

“Ivory,” said Forester, “ is a very sober
boy.”. But here Forester’s attempt to tell Mar-
135 Marco ON THE Erie CaAnaL.

Tea ready. Marco and Forester take a walk.

co something about Ivory was interrupted.
For at this point of the conversation they both
heard a bell ringing in the adjoining hall; and
a moment afterward a waiter came in to in-
vite them up stairs to tea. So they went up
stairs, Marco resolving that he would certainly
make a canal as soon as he got to Vermont,
and a flat-bottomed boat to go through it. He
determined also that he would name the boat
Skipjack. He thought that that name would
make Ivory laugh, even if he was a sober boy.

After tea Marco and Forester went out to
take a walk again, along the canal. When they
reached the margin of the water, they sat down
upon some blocks of white marble which were
lying upon the ground, and began to look
around upon the scene before them.

After a short pause, Marco commenced the
conversation by saying,

« How do they manage the work, cousin F’or-
ester, in digging a canal, so as not to have con-
fusion? If I were to attempt to make a canal
‘1 Vermont, with the other boys, it would be
all disputing and confusion.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “1 presume it would.”

«How do men manage it ?” asked Marco.
A Prosect. 157

eer LLL LA
Forming a canal company. Shares and stock.

“Why, if men are going to make a canal,’
said Forester, “the first thing is to form a com-
pany.”

« A company !” repeated Marco.

« Yes,” replied Forester; “ that is, unless the
canal is to be made by the state. I will sup-
pose, however, that a canal is to be made by a
company, and explain to you the method that is
adopted in that case.”

“ Well,” said Marco.

“They form’ a company in this way,” said
Forester. “They open books-and advertise the
plan in the newspapers, and then call upon all
persons who choose to join in the undertaking,
to come and put down their names. Every
man who puts down his name has to pay a hun-
dred dollars.”

« A hundred dollars!” said Marco.

“Yes—that is, if he subscribes for one
share,” replied Forester. “The price of one
share in such works is usually a hundred dol-
lars. A man may put down his name for as
many shares as he pleases. He may take a
hundred shares if he pleases, and then he must
pay ten thousand dollars. Of course, he will
then own all those shares of the canal, and will
have his proper proportion of the profits de-
158 Marco on tue Erie Cana:

The stockholders. Choosing directors.

rived from the tolls, when the canal gets into
operation.” , .

“Yes,” said Marco. “I would subscribe for
a thousand shares if I were going to put my
name down on the books.”

“If you had the money,” said Forester.

“Yes,” said Marco, “and I would have the
money.”

“The persons that own the shares,” contin-
ued Forester, “are called the stockholders.
They have . papers,—printed -papers—which
state how many shares they own. ‘These pa-
pers are called certificates of stock. Shares in
such things are called stock.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “I have heard of stock
in New York. They sell it in Wall-street.”

“When the shares are all taken up,” said
Forester, “the stockholders have a meeting, and
choose directors,—generally about five.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “ my father is a director.
But what are the directors for ?”

“They are to make the canal.”

«“ Hoo—oo—oo,” said Marco, in a tone of
great surprise. “I should not think that five
directors could make such a long canal.”

“Oh, they don’t make it with their own
A Prosecr. 159

Duties of directors Contractors. Taking contracts,

hands,” ‘said Forester, smiling. “I did not
mean that.”

“What then ?” said Marco.

“They divide the line of the canal into por-
tions called sections, and then they advertise
for proposals from men who will undertake to
make the canal along these different sections.
These men are called contractors.”

“Contractors ?” repeated Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester. ‘“ There is a certain
class of men called contractors, who have a
great many laborers under their employ, and
own carts, and horses, and wheelbarrows, and
tools of all kinds, and they agree to make the
canal along a certain section for so much.”

“ For how much ?” asked Marco.

“Why, for just as much as is agreed upon,”
said Forester. “The directors generally let out
the section to the lowest bidder. That is, when
a section is advertised, the contractors go and
look at it, and make up their minds what they
can do it for. They then write upon a paper
the sum that they are willing to undertake the
section for, and carry it to the directors. When
all these papers are given in, the directors open
them, and give the section to the one who wil
make it for the least money.”
/

160 Marco ON THE Brig CANAL.

CO pernreienaennmnmmmantnatett iano
Mason work. Deficiency of moncy. Assessinents.

«That isa very good way,” said Marco. .

“The directors,” continued Forester, “ let
out the mason work in the same way, such as
the locks, and the bridges, and the aqueducts,
and every thing else that is required along the
canal. As fast as the various sections are fin-
ished, the directors pay the contractors.”

“ Where do they get the money ?” asked
Marco. | .

“0, they take the money that the stock-
holders paid in when they subscribed for their
shares,” said Forester.

“Oh, yes,” said Marco. “ I forgot that.
But suppose there is not money enough.”

“Then they make an assessment on the
shares,” said Forester, “and raise more.”

“ What do you mean by that ?” asked Marco.

« Why, they divide the amount of the addi-
tional sum which they wish to raise,” replied
Forester, “among all the shares, and so make
each stockholder pay his portion. Or else they
get more people to come and subscribe, and so
make more shares.”

“Then,” continued Forester, “ when the ca-
nal is finished, they appoint a superintendent to
manage it, and to collect the tolls. The super-
intendent pays the money that he gets for tolls
A Prosect. 16]

The advantages of system.



to the directors, and the directors divide it
among the stockholders twice a year.”

“J think that is a very good way,” said
Marco. |

“Yes,” replied Forester, “it is regular and
systematic. The work is divided into separate
departments, and each man has his proper duty
to perform; and thus there is no disorder or
confusion.”

L
162 Marco ON THE Freie Canal.

The chequered house. Woman knitting.
Fe ean a

CuapTeR X.
Tue STEERSMAN.

bea this Marco and Forester took a
walk to see more of the canal. They
passed across the river on the aqueduct, and
came out to the canal at the chequered house
again. They then followed the canal up, going
from lock to lock, as it gradually ascended
along the bank of the river. rs
They stood upon the bank “at one of the
locks, seeing a boat go through. It was about
half-past six o’clock, and a calm and pleasant
w evening. The boat was not a packet, but it
PA had several passengers op board. There was
» woman sitting upon the deck, forward, with a
little child by her side. The woman was knit-
ting. The child was playing with a little bas-
ket.
« Cousin Forester,” gaid Marco, “let us get
aboard of that boat and go along the canal a
little way.”
« Then how shall we get back ?” said For-
ester.
Tue STEERSMAN. _ 163

checinniinciniiteiineitat acetates stein
Fvand to be a foreigner. The steersman.

“Why, we can find some other boat coming
back,” replied Marco. “ ‘The boats are going
and coming all the time.”

The boat was then in the lock, and was
rising very rapidly, as the water boiled up under
it from the passages which they had opened.
through the bottom of the upper gates. Marco
was in great haste to have Forester decide in
favor of going, so that he might jump on the
boat and be buoyed up with it. So Forester
went to the edge of the lock with him, and they
both stepped on together.

When the lock was full, the upper gates were
opened and the boats sailed along. Forester

. and Marco sat down near the woman and at-

tempted to talk with her, but they found that
she could not speak English. She was a Ger-
man woman. The child was just learning to
talk, and Marco was very much amusedat hear-
ing so small a child speaking a foreign tongue.
Presently, Forester took out a piece of paper
from his pocket-book and said that he was going
to draw a view of the canal, as it appeared be-
fore them while they were sailing along.
Every time they came to a bridge, the steers-
man, who stood in the stern of the boat, would
call out, “ Brince!” in a sharp tone, and then
164 Marco on THE Erie CANaL.

alana teteanTaN ET S IE
Forester at the bows. The map. The German child.

all who were sitting upon the deck would bow
their heads to pass under, as has already been
explained. This gave Forester so much incon-
venience in his drawing that he concluded to
go and take his seat on the little low deck at
the bows of the boat. There was a small deck
very near the bows in almost all the boats,
made so in order to furnish an entrance to the
cabin from the front of the boat. Forester
took his place here, and was now no longer in
danger of the bridges.

While he was sitting there Marco wanted to
look at the map, in order to see from the profile
whether there were many locks in that part of
the canal where he was sailing. So he asked
Forester for it, and Forester handed it up to ,
him from his place on the little deck below.
Forester charged him not to get so interested
in lookimg on his map as to forget to bow his
head when the steersman called out Bridge.
So Forester went on with his drawing.

Marco looked at the map for a short time,
and then folded it up. The little German child
seemed much attracted by the map, and es-
pecially by the red covers, which were brought
very distinctly to view when Marco folded it
up. Marco tried again to talk with her, but
‘Tue STEERSMAN. 165

Marco gives her the map. The flour barrels.
a Ae

she could not understand what he said. She
extended her hand toward Marco, and said
something to him in return, but he could not
understand her language any better than she
could his. He understood her gestures, how-
ever, and he handed her the map-book. She
was seated all the time upon the deck, a little
way from her mother. ?

Marco’s attention was here arrested by the
sight of another boat coming into view on the
canal before them. It was advancing to meet
the boat which Marco was in. 3

« Look, cousin Forester,” said Marco ; “here
comes a boat ; you must make it in your draw-
ing ;—quick, before it gets away.”

A moment after he had said this, the boat
came on to meet them. It was loaded with
barrels. Marco supposed they were barrels of
flour. On the side of the boat were painted
the words, New York anv’ Erte Live. Marco”
then remembered that he had seen the words
Rocuester Live painted upon the boat which
he was in. He had noticed it at the time that
he first saw the boat, when it was rising up. in
the lock. 1 |

Marco rose from his seat and walked toward
the stern of the boat, following the other boat
166 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

TT TD
Low bridge. Nvuw passenger, The old man.
scsanmamattaeaaieninaeseccaeccaaapaccininsisiensaeinaiaiaitils

as it passed them. While he was looking at it,
the steersman called out,

“ Brince! tow Brings!”

Marco jumped down to the place where the
steersman was standing, which was a low part
of the deck near the stern; and thus he glided
under the bridge in safety.

As soon as he came out from under the
bridge, he saw, at a short distance before them,
a man upon the tow-path, with a cane in one
hand and a small bundle in the other. He ap-
peared to be an old man. He stood at the edge
of the tow-path near the water, and he made a
signal to the steersman to take him on board.
The boat was at this time in the middle of the
canal, and if she had kept on in the same
course, it would have been impossible for the
man to have got on board. |

“That man wants you to stop for him, I
expect,” said Marco.

The steersman said nothing, but he pressed
the helm off to the farther side of the boat, and
this caused the bows of the boat to turn in to-
ward the shore. Thus the boat glided along
very near to the bank where the man was
standing, but without at all diminishing the
speed. The old man stepped on board at the
Tar STEERSMAN. * 167

Marco end the helmsman.



stern, and then the boat soon swept on out into
the middle of the canal again. The old man
ascended to the deck, walked on toward the
bows, and then stepped down and took his seat
on the little forward deck with Forester. For-
ester was on one side of the door leading into
the cabin, and he on the other.

“ Where is that man going ?” said Marco to
the steersman. :

“T expect he is going to eokinatas said the
steersman. |

Here there was a pause. Marco wanted to
talk with the steersman, but he did not know
exactly what tosay. He waited, therefore, hop-
ing that the steersman would say something to-
him. But the man did not appear much in-
clined to converse. In fact, Marco thought
that he was rather a surly-looking fellow.
_ “I wish you'd let me steer the boat a little,”
said Marco.

“ Poh,—you can’t steer,” replied he:

« But I want you to teach me,” said Marco.

“Teach you!” said the steersman, in a tone
of contempt ;—and just at that instant the boat
happening to come to a turn of the canal,
which rendered it necessary for him to crowd
the helm hard over toward the side where Mar-
168 Marco on tune Erie Canat.



Marco astonished. Conversation.

co was standing, ne added in a very zough
manner, “ Get out of the way !”’

Marco retreated a step or two to a place
where he could not be in the way ; and there
he stood and looked into the face of the steers-
man with an expression of astonishment. The
man paid no attention to him, but looked straight
ahead, with a countenance stern and unmoved.

“Were you ever a boy yourself, sir?” said
Marco. |

The rigid features of the steersman’s iron

visage slowly relaxed into a sort of smile at this
question, and he replied, after a moment’s pause,

“ Yes,—I was; that’s a fact.”

“ And when you wanted to learn, did they
tell you to get out of the way ?”

« Yes,” said the steersman ; “they treated me
a great deal worse than that. But what do you
want to learn to steer for? You'll never go
on a canal.”

“ Very likely I shall,” said Marco.

“Why isn’t your father rich ?”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “he is rich enough now,
but I expect he will fail one of these days.
However, if I should go on the canal, I should
rather drive the horses than steer.”

“Then,” said the steersman, “ you had better


THe STeERSMAN. 169
go and get Joe to teach you to ride,—not ask
me to teach you to steer.”

“Js the driver’s name Joe ?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said the steersman.

«“ Joe what ?” asked Marco.

“JT don’t know,” said the steersman. “I
never heard any other name for him.”

« Where does he live ?” asked Marco.

“J] don’t know,” said the steersman. “ Ile
lives on his horse pretty much, I think.”

“ And do you think he’d let me ride,” said
Marco, “ if I should go and ask him ?”

« Yes,” said the man, “I think he would.”

« Well,” said Marco; “only you must steer
the boat up near the bank, so that I can jump
out.” |

“Very well,” replied the man, “go to the side,
and be all ready to jump.”

The steersman turned the boat in a little, so
as to bring it up pretty near to the bank, but he
was very careful not to get it so near as that
Marco could jump across to the land. © He
wanted to make him jump and come down into
the edge of the water. So when he got it as
near as it was going, and Marco stood poising
himself onthe edge of the boat, he called out
aloud,
170 Marco oN THE Erie CANAL.

Jump! Jump!



Al Se ‘

° ee ee 2
AM ACBE PTS. S80.

MARCO AND THE STEERSMAN.

«Jump! Jump! !"

In a moment the boat was rapidly receding
from the bank again. Marco turned round and
looked at the steersman.’ He did not know
whether he was making a fool of him or not.
The man laughed.

“Why did not you jump ?” said he. “ You
might have been on the horse by this time, and
so rode to the station. But look there,” con-
tinued the steersman, pointing down into the
# te
eo

Tue STEERSMAN. 171

sili aaa acinar eae
Map overboard. Mischief. Woman angry.
Te aa neeeeeieinieesiieaialan

canal by the side of the boat, “ there goes ao
book.”

“It’s cousin Forester’s map,” said ined
“Dear me! it has fallen into the water. Stop
the boat! stop the boat!” |

Nothing was done, however, to stop the boat.
It glided steadily on its way, and soon left the
square red spot, which the covers of the "map
made upon the water, far astern. Marco ran
forward to tell Forester mat his map was over-
board.

Marco was stopped, however, when he
reached the place where the German child was
sitting, by observing | that the child had the map
itself, still in her hands. She had torn it.out
of its cover, and had only thrown the cover
overboard. She was just then beginning to
tear the map. Her mother happened to look
round and see her just as Marco came up.

The mother seemed very much concerned,
and she seized the child and took the map away.
In doing this she handled the poor child very
roughly, and seemed to be very much displeased
with it. At this moment Forester looked be-
hind him and perceived what was going on.
He camegip upon the dech and told the woman
that the accident was of no consequence; it
172 Marco oN THE Erie CANAL.

eee

esviiniaiesieaaaammmernte
Forester’s signs. The old man.

was an old map, he said, and he did not careé
about it at all. She did not understand one
word that he said, but she went on talking, her-
self, in German, with great fluency, pointing
first at the map and then at the child; and then
she advanced to the child and took hold of her
shoulder, and began to shake her.

Forester shook his head, and made signs that
she must not punish the child. He pointed to
Marco and made believe strike him, and then
made signs of giving the map to the child. He
meant that Marco was to blame for giving the
map to the child, and not the child for tearing it.

It is very uncertain whether the German
woman understood Forester’s signs or not.
But as he could see very plainly from her coun-
tenance and actions that she was very much
concerned at the accident, so it is not improb-
able that she understood from him that he did
not care much about it. Pretty soon Forester
went back to his place, and Marco followed him
to see his drawing.

The old man was sitting there too, quietly
leaning upon the top of his cane; and Marco
soon found that he was as good-natured and
talkative as the steersman was mayose and
sullen.
THe STEERSMAN. 173

eee eee EE EDEL
« Bob.” Talk with the old man. The stations,
eesaenceaessssnsaasastnanainstapasiaassacssasiiian sss

«“ Well, Bob,” said the old man, “ and how do
you get along on the canal ?” ;

Marco was smoothing out the remains of the
map, and folding it up. He looked up from his
work at the man and said,

_ “My name is not Bob, sir.”

« What is your name ?” asked the old man.

“Marco, sir,” was the reply.

“Well, Marco, how. should you like to go
driver in the Rochester line? See that boy out
there on the horse. You could ride like him all
day long.”

« Perhaps I should get tired of riding all day
long,” said Marco. |

“Very well,” rejoined the old man, “ then you
could jump off and walk alongside the team.
You would have to do that often in the cold
mornings, to keep warm.”

« How far should I have to ride in a day ?”
asked. Marco.

“Why, there are stations all along the
canal,” said the man, “ where the horses are
put up. You would ride from one station to
agother.”

« And then how long should I rest ?”

_ « You would rest until it came your turn te
174 Marco ON THE Erie Canat.

Life of a driver. Bowsman.

ee
go out again ; sometimes an hour, and some-
times aday. First in, first out, is the rule.”

Marco could not understand. the old man’s
account of the system by which the boats of a
line are towed along the canal. But he received
the idea that the driver's life was a very irregu-
lar one ; and he saw at once that it must be a
life of great exposure and fatigue.

« How many hands does it require to manage
a line-boat ?” asked Forester. |

« Why, there is the captain, and the bows-
man, and the steersman, and the cook. . Though
the cook is generally a woman. If they go
night and day, they must have a double set.”

«What does the bowsman do ?” asked Ior-
ester.

«Why, he takes care of the tow-rope,” said
the man, “and sees to securing the boat in the
lock when she is run in.” tik

« Here comes another boat,” said Marco.

« Yes,” said Forester, “ and it is getting dark ;
so I think we had better go back on her.”

So Forester gathered up and put away his
drawing materials, and then he went and fougl
the captain, and gave him a little change to pay
for the passage which he and Marco had had
‘n his boat. Then they bade the old mart
Tue STEERSMAN. - 2s

i iieeeaeanenmaenennenie®
Foroster an‘ Marco return. Marco’s essay.

ee is nies
good-bye ; and they also nodded to the German
woman and her child, though they knew it
would do no good to say any words to them.
By this time the two boats were opposite to
each other, and Forester and Marco stepped
across to the one which was going down the
canal; and in the course of half an hour they
were landed at the lock opposite to. the aque-
duct, at the village of Little Falls.

As they were walking along toward the hotel,
Marco said that he was sorry that their map
was torn up and spoiled. | |

“That is no great calamity,” said Forester.
« Besides, I can tell -you a way by which you
can make it useful, yet.” re Bh

« How ?” asked Marco. id

“ Why, I have been thinking,” said Forester,
“that when we get home to Vermont, I should
let you take for one of your first exercises, an
essay on the Erie canal.”. - woe 7

«JT don’t know how to write essays,” said
Marco. : 5°" ° "I :

“So I supposed,” replied Forester, “ and
th@efore I was going to let youlearn. I thought
| would make you a small book, and let you
write in it all that you can remember about the
Erie canal. And you can have two maps in it
176 Marco on THE Erte CANAL.

Marco amused. German.

‘Mareo amused,
now ; for you can cut out of this torn map the
profile of the canal which is in one corner, and
also that part of the middle of the map which
contains the course of the canal. These you
can paste on fresh sheets of paper, so as to get
a new margin around them, and then make a
new border with a pen. Then I will show you
a way to paste and fold them into your book,
and so you will have an essay on the Erie canal,
illustrated with a profile and a map.”

Marco smiled at this proposal, and said that
he should like it very much.

After this there was a pause for a few min-
utes, until they had nearly reached the hotel.
Then Marco broke the silence, by saying,

« T should like to understand German, cousin
Forester.”

“ So should I,” said Forester, “ and I intend
to learn it.”

“Do you think I could learn it ?” asked
Marco.

“Certainly,” said Forester; “you are bette1
able to learn German than that little child it;
and she is learning it very fast.” ‘
Tue Ripe. 177

ieee
Marco’s ride. Stopping for the night. Two propositions.

CoaptTer XI.
Tue Ripe.

ARCO had a ride, at one time, during his

travels along the canal, which interest-

ed him very much, though it ended rather dis-
astrously. ‘The circumstances were these.

It was at the time while he and Forester
were stopping to spend the night at a small
town on the line of the canal, when they were
returning toward the Hudson river. They
spent the night at the town, in order to have a -
more comfortable bed to sleep in than the berths
of the packet. They were intendmg to take
the boat again in the morning after breakfast.
They found, however, on inquiring, that it
would be two or three hours before the boat
would come along. The question then arose,
what they should do in the mean time.

“T vote to stay in the house and read,” said
Forester. :

« And I vote to'go out and take a walk and
see the canal,” said Marco.

M
178 Marco ON THE Erte CANAL.

New way of drawing lots. The horses and the dog.

« We will draw lots for it,” said Forester.
« Well,” replied Marco; “I will make the
lots.”

«Oh, we don’t need any actual lots,” said
Forester. “Go to the window and look out,
and if the first thing that you see is a dog, you
get it, and if it is a horse I get it.”

Marco ran to the window. He looked this
way and that, up and down the street, as far as
he could see, but there was neither a dog nor a
horse in view.

«Wait there then,” said Forester, “ until one
or the other comes along. In the mean time I
will be reading the newspapers.”

Marco was not obliged to wait long. It hap-
pened very curiously that a wagoner was CcoMm-
ing by pretty soon, who had two horses and a
dog. He kept the dog to watch his wagon
when he left it in the streets, or in the tavern-
yard, at night. Now, as this wagon came into
view before the window where Marco was sit-
ting, the dog was walking along underneath it.

“It's a dog! It’sa dog!” said Marco, clap-
ping his hands.

Forester looked up from his reading, and saw
the wagon and the dog. The dog was walking
very demurely beneath the wagon, little dream-
Tue Ripe. 179

i a ———— —
A line-boat coming. Marco’s request. Forester’s proposition.
2 claaemeiaitaniamaitteamiadsdincamepdaaneanenepmntaietana ne

ing what consequences were pending upon his
presence there. :

“Yes,” said Forester, “there is a dog, but
there are horses too.”

« Never mind,” said Marco, “they all came
along together.”

¢ | think the horses came first,’’ said Fores-
ter.

Marco laughed, but did not reply. Present-
ly he called out to Forester, saying,

“Here is a line-boat coming along the canal.
I wish, cousin Forester, that you would let me
go and see if the boy won’t give me a ride a
little way on his horse.”

«That will hardly do, I am afraid,” said For-
ester, talking half to himself, as he went on
reading his paper.

« IT should like to be a canal-boy,” said Marco.
“T should be riding all the time.”

Forester made no reply. -

“Cousin Forester,” said Marco, “I wish that
you would let me go and get a ride on that
jorse.”

“No,” said Forester, “but this I will do.
If you will go out and hire two good saddle-
horses, we will both go and take a ride.”

Mazco appeared extremely delighted ai this
180 Marco ON THE Erie CANAL.

The street. Mr. Ball’s stables. The groom.

proposal. He took his cap and sallied forth im-
mediately to find the horses. The landlord of
the tavern had one horse which he said that
they might have ; and he recommended to Mar-
co to go to a certain Mr. Ball, who kept a sta-
ble for the canal-boat horses, to get another.
Marco accordingly went in pursuit of Mr.
Ball’s.

After meeting with various adventures 10
finding the place, Marco came at length to a
sort of street near the side of the canal, where
there were a great many small shops and stores.
From some of these buildings there issued the
sound of a great deal of pounding and hammer-
ing. Marco came at length to a great stable-
door, over which was the sign, D. Batt. Sta-
BLING FOR Horses.

« This is the place,’ said Marco to himself,
and he walked in.

In the middle of the stable floor a groom was at
work rubbing down a canal-boat horse, which
seemed to have just come in. Another horse
was standing near, waiting, apparently, for his:
turn. There was a door at one side which led
into a little office where there was a desk.
There was a rough-looking man standing in
this door. His feet were set apart in the door-
Tue Rips. 181

etre
Conversation with Mr. Ball. Marco’s statement of the case.

way, and his hands were in his pockets as if he
had nothing to do but to keep people from go-
ing into the office.

The man surveyed Marco with rather a dis
dainful air as he entered, and then said,

« Well, Bob, and what do you want ?”

“My name is not Bob,” said Marco. “1
don’t see what makes every body call me Bob.”

The man make no reply to this, though his
stern features relaxed into some semblance of
a smile.

«Ts Mr. Ball here ?” said Marco. “I want to
see Mr. Ball.”

« And what do you want of Mr. Ball ?” said
the man. “They call me Ball sometimes.”

«J want to get a horse,” said Marco.

«A horse!” replied Mr. Ball. “ You are
not old enough to be trusted with a horse.” So
saying, Mr. Ball began to survey Marco from
head to foot with a look of contempt.

Marco, without appearing to be much daunt-
ed by his uncivil reception, went on to explain
to Mr. Ball, that he and his.cousin Forester had
been spending the night at the tavern, and that
they were going away by the next boat; that
+n the mean time, as they were to have about

two hours to spare, they proposed to go and
182 Marco on THE Erie CANAL.

FO aereeenneencimentsntcenatnocanasiiteeer sieneanrsiat SIT
«Give him Pompey.” Marco returns to the tavern.

Sone eer
take a ride, and that they had obtained one
horse at the tavern, and now wanted another.
Mr. Ball heard all this story in silence, looking
intently at Marco all the time, and remaining
immovably in the same position as at first.
While Marco had been speaking, the groom had
stopped his work, and he now stood, with his
brush in his hand, looking toward Marco and
Mr. Ball, as if waiting for Mr. Ball’s decision.

When Marco had finished his statement, Mr.
Ball paused a moment, still looking at Marco,
and then said to the groom,

« Give him Pompey.”

Saying this, he. turned round, went into the
office, and sat down at the desk.
’ The groom led Pompey out of his stall, wa-
tered him, put on the saddle and bridle, and
helped Marco to get on his back. Marco, feel-
ing quite pleased at the success of his negotia-
tion, rode out of the stable-door, and then
turned toward the tavern. The horse trotted
briskly with him through the streets, and he
was soon at the tavern door One of the win-
dows was open in the room where Marco had
left Forester reading. Marco rode up before
this window, and leaning down, he looked in.

« Forester,” said he, “look here r
Tue Ripe. — 188

Plans for the ride. The directorship.

Forester looked up and seemed quite sur-
prised to find that Marco was aétually mounted.
He put his paper down immediately and came
out. Ina short time the other horse was sad-
dled and bridled, and Forester was mounted
upon him. The two riders then took their way
together out of the tavern yard.

«Which way shall we go?” asked Marco.

“J propose that we go up on the hills,” said
Forester, “and get a view of the whole valley.”

« And I propose,” said Marco, “that we ride
along in the tow-path of the canal, and see the
boats.” |

« And how shall we decide which to do?”
asked Forester. ,

“Can’t we do both ?” asked Marco.

“No,” replied Forester; “ there will not be
time for both. I will tell you what we will do.
You shall take the direction of the ride until
we meet a dog, and then I will take the direc-
tion the rest of the time.”

“ Oh, no,” said Marco, “ that will not be fair:
for we shall meet a dog very soon, I know, and
then my direction will be ended at once.”

“Then I will take the direction,” said For-
ester, “until we meet a dog, and after that you
shall have it.”
184 Marco oN THE Eris CANAL.

Bea UREN Nan NSIS ET
They turn toward the hills. Conversation. The winding road.

« Agreed,” said Marco.

«Then come, follow me,” said Forester.

So saying, Forester turned his horse in a di-
rection away from the village, by a road which
just at this point opened before him on the right
hand, and which seemed to lead off among the
hills. | |

«] want to get out of the way of all dogs,”
continued Forester, “as soon as | can.”

Marco laughed, and he and Forester trotted
on along a very pleasant road, having a farm-
house with all its sheds, barns and yards on one
side, and the woods upon the other. The road
soon began to ascend, winding at the same time
through very picturesque and beautiful scenery.

«“ How pleasant it is here,” said Forester ; “I
hope we shall not meet any dogs, I am sure, for
then I suppose that you would turn immediately
about, and go back to the canal.”

“J don’t know,” replied Marco. “ Perhaps I
should keep on here. I like this road very
much.”

Presently they came to a long hill where the
road ascended in a winding direction, with for-
ests on either hand. On one side, concealed in
the depths of the forest, there was a brook run-
ning along a wild and rocky bed, at the bottom
Tue Ripe. 185

sie aes omen
Marco’s plan. Advice. Advice not taken.
ccatihanaaatiaplnciamdeininetiametaaitininnniniamnna

of a deep ravine. Marco and Forester could
hear the sound of the water, but they could not
see the stream itself, so dense was the foliage by
which it was hidden. -

“JT mean to get off,’ said Marco, “ and walk
ap this hill.”

“T advise you not to do any such thing,” said
Forester.

“Why not ?” asked Marco.

«“ Why—I hardly know why not,” said For-
ester, hesitating. “I have a sort of an idea that
it isnot wise. You will run a great many small
risks by getting off.”

“What risks ?” asked Marco.

“Why, you may fall and hurt yourself in
dismounting,” replied Forester ; “ then perhaps
your horse will get away, or you may not be
able to get on again.”

“No,” said Marco, “I can get off without
falling, Iam sure. Then I can keep hold of
the bridle all the time, and so prevent the horse
from getting away. And when I get to the top
of the hill I can lead him up to the side of the
fence, or up to some great stone, and so get on
again.”

« Well,” said Forester, “ you can do as you
please. Perhaps you will not meet with any
186 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

cent LOTT TT TTD
‘ Marco dismounts. He wants a switcn,

ee ee
mishap. Though I have generally found that
when we are dealing with horses the best way
is go forward pretty steadily, and with as few
- experiments and changes as possible.”

Marco, who was always restless and fond of
change, concluded, since Forester did not ab-
solutely forbid his dismounting, to carry his
original plan into effect. So he stopped the
horse in the road, loosened his feet from the
stirrup, and throwing his right leg over the
horse behind him, so as to bring both legs on
the same side, and then grasping the saddle with
both hands, he slid down safely to the ground.
He then called out to Forester, who had in the
mean time gone on a little before him, saying,

«See! Forester.” |

Forester looked around, smiled, and said,

« Dismounted.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I want to walk up the
hill; and besides, I am going to get a new switch
out of the bushes.”

« A new switch!” said Forester. “JT advise —

you to be very careful. Getting new switches
with a strange horse, is a very specially haz-
ardous business.”

Forester had been slowly riding on, during
this conversation, up the hill, Marco following
Tue Ripe. 187

a einieneinbeennaiiaant
Pompey follows Marco up the hill. Marvv gets his switch.
sesh niece aia eencimegllccaniainipmainaniaiettiaiitae> nichts

him and leading his horse by the bridle. Pres-
ently he let go the bridle for a moment,—
having his hand, however, all ready to grasp it
in a moment, if the horse should make any
movement indicating a design to run away.
But Pompey walked steadily on with the most
honest and innocent expression of countenance
that could be imagined. :

“See, Forester,” said Marco. “ Pémpey is
walking along by himself, without my holding
him at all.” '

Forester turned round, and looked somewhat
doubtfully, and yet with:a smile upon his coun-
tenance, at this proof of Pompey’s docility.

After a time Marco took hold of the bridle
again and threw it over, off the horse’s neck,
and then passed his arm through it. He thought
that in this way he could hold the horse more
conveniently while he was cutting his switch.
He led the horse accordingly out to one side of
the road, so far that with the bridle on his arm
he could reach and pull down a slender branch
of a birch-tree which was, growing near the
wall. He took his knife out his pocket and
began to cut the switch off. Pompey paid ne
attention to these proceedings, but putting
down his head, began quietly to crop the grass
188 Marco on THE ERIE CANAL.

a ceeeecmenenmancnaensicee ena nT aa
Marco trains Pompey. “ Whoa.”

Mareggreee ey
by the roadside, while Marco finished cutting
his switch. Marco then returned to the middle
of the road again, and began to go up the hill.

Forester had reached the top of the hill al-
ready, and was waiting there for Marco. It
was a wild and picturesque place, with rocks
upon one side of the road and woods upon the
other. There was an opening among the hills
in one direction, through which there was to be
seen a beautiful view of the valley below.
Forester wag admiring this prospect, as he sat
upon his horse, and was endeavoring to trace
the line of the canal along the valley.

Marco came walking up the hill by the -side
of the horse, and every now and then he would
let go the bridle for a minute or two, and allow
the horse to walk alone. Presently he began to
walk a little before, leaving the horse to follow
him like a dog. He felt more and more confi-
dence in Pompey at every step, and when he
came near the top of the hill he called out to
Forester to see, saying,

«There is no danger of his getting away, at
all. He will follow me just likeadog. Whoa -

As Marco said “ Whoa,” he turned round and
looked Pompey full in the face with a very
authoritative air. Pompey stopped immediately.
Tue Ripe. 189

—_——— ——- ----

Pompey concludes to go home.





“ Now come along again!” said Marco.

Marco moved forward as he said this, expect-
ing Pompey to follow him ; but Pompey did not
move.

Marco turned round to repeat his command,
but just then the thought of going home to his
stable happened to come into Pompey’s mind ;
and he accordingly began to turn too at the
same instant. Marco made a hasty effort tc
seize the bridle, but in vain. The horse shook
his head and trétted on a few steps down the hill.

S

—

—~
Sa

oe \
e

Ss Ke
_
-
2

ad
an |
i

S ER ——

ez
Pi
|
if

7
r |

|

“a
A Te

- %
oil

wei



ry ~ ‘ —
BILL”

POMPEY’S ESCAPE.
190 Marco on tHe ERIE CANAL.

Marco pursues him. The horse escapes.

‘Marco puroncs Mime 8

«Forester! Forester!” exclaimed Marco.
“Come quick! The horse is getting away.”

Forester, who had been sitting upon his horse
at the top of the hill all this time looking on,
was afraid to advance suddenly toward Pom-
pey, lest it should make him run away the
faster. |

« Softly ! softly | Marco,” said he.

Marco walked along after the horse. The
horse turned his head and looked at him, but
continued to walk. down the hill. Marco fol-
lowed him, but Pompey went faster and faster,
and presently began to trot, and was. soon
wholly lost to view.

Marco was very much chagrined at this re
sult of his experiments upon Pompey’s docility.
In fact he was at first quite frightened, but For-
ester told him that there was no great harm
done.

“The horse will go directly down to his
stable, I presume,” said he, “ and we shall find
him safe there when we get down.”

Marco was much relieved when he found that
Forester, instead of reproaching him for his
foolishness, spoke kindly to him, in respect to
the affair. In fact Forester thought that Marco
would be sufficiently punished by his own
Tue Ripe. 7 191

Marco and Forester ride double.

mortification, without any harsh words from
him. So he said,

Never mind it, Marco. You have only lost
a part of your ride. And now you can have
your choice either to ware back to the village,
or ride back behind me.’

4 Well, ” said Marco, “let me get up behind
you.”

So Forester drove his horse up to a great
stone by the side of the road, and there Marco
succeeded in mounting behind him ; and thus
they went back to the village, riding double.
192 Marco ON THE Erie Canal.

The long table. The train arrives.

Cuarrer XII.
Tue OvutTLet.

| was nearly nine o'clock when Forester and
Marco reached the hotel. They remained
there till half-past ten, waiting for the night
train which was coming down from Utica.
The hotel was quiet and solitary, though prep-
arations were made to receive a large compa-
ny of guests when the train should arrive. The
long table in the hall was covered with refresh-
ments as it had been in the morning; and the
waiters walked to and fro in expectation of the
arrival of the company.

At length the sound of the engine was heard,
and a few minutes afterward the great train,
borne on its twenty or thirty heavy iron wheels,
came rolling on, in front of the hotel. The
passengers came out and thronged into the
house, renewing the scene of noise and confu-
sion which Forester and Marco had witnessed
in the morning.

While this confusion was at its height, our
two travelers took their seats in one of the cars.
THe OuTLeET. 193

The car. Visit to Troy.





There was nobody in it. It was marked over
the door “ Way-Passencers.” Marco expect-
ed that somebody would come to get in before
the train should start; but no one appeared.
When the signal bell rang, the conductor came
and shut the door, and the train began to move,
leaving Forester and Marco a whole car to
themselves.

There were two seats in the car, a front and
a back seat. They each took one and laid
themselves down. In a few minutes they were
both asleep, and though Forester awoke, at in-
tervals, when the train stopped at the various
villages on the way, Marco slept soundly
through the whole, being entirely insensible to
every thing that passed, until Forester aroused
him and told him that they had arrived at
Schenectady, and that it was morning.

A few days after this, our travelers came to
Troy. Ifthe reader will look upon the map, he
' will find that Troy is on the North river, a
few miles above Albany. Troy, as well as Al-
bany, is a considerable city; and it trans-
acts a great deal of business by means of the
canal. For it will be seen, by looking upon
the map, that the Mohawk river empties into
the Hudson, but a short distance above Troy ;

N
194 Marco oN THE Erie CANAL.

Outlet of the canal. Troy. Its situation.

Cate hte nen
and as the Erie canal follows the valley of the
Mohawk down to the Hudson, the canal itself
comes out to the banks of the Hudson nearly
opposite to Troy.

Itis true that the canal does not terminate
here. By looking again upon the map, the
reader will see that when the canal reaches the
banks of the Hudson, it turns and follows the
river down to Albany, where it finally termi-
nates ina great basin, which opens upon the
river.

There is, however, a communication between
the canal and the river at Troy. So that the
boats, after they come through the canal, can
come out into the river at Troy; or they can .
continue in the canal until they get down te
Albany, and then come out into the river
through the great basin there.

Albany is upon the West side of the river,
which is the same side with the canal. But
Troy is upon the East side. Therefore, if a
canal-boat is going to Albany, it is not obliged
to cross the river; but if it is to stop at Troy,
‘t- Gomes out of the canal into the river on the
side opposite to Troy, and then they have to
push the boat across the river with poles; for
there can not well be a tow-path made over
\

Tre Our.ert. 195

a ee
Theo ferry. The street. The bridge.

a river so that horses can go across. There is
a ferry, however, at the place where the boats
cross, by which men can go over at any time;
and a small town has grown up on the west
side of the river where the canal comes down.
This town is called West Troy.

Marco and Forester knew something of this,
when they stopped at the hotel in Troy. That
is, they knew that the canal passed along on
the west bank of the Hudson opposite to Troy,
and that there was a communication there be-
tween the canal and the river; but they did
not know precisely where this communication
was, or which way they were to go to find it.

“We must get across the river at any rate,
for the first thing,” said Forester. “We will
go down to the shore somewhere, and look up
and down and see if we can see a bridge.”

There was a row of four-storied brick stores
on each side of the street which they were walk-
ing in, which prevented their seeing the river.
They, however, soon found a way to go down
to a landing where they could look up and down
the stream. There was no bridge to be seen
down the river, toward Albany ; but they saw
one about a quarter of a mile above them,—
very long. It was covered, and it looked very
196 Marco ON THE ERIE CANAL

They cross the bridge.

eS aaermrmrnner en ro
beautifully, as Marco thought, extending in a
perfectly straight line for a great distance over
the water. .

Forester and Marco then left the landing and
walked up the river in the direction of the
bridge. When they came to enter it they were
astonished at its length. It was divided into
two parts; one half was for the railroad track,
and the other half for common carriages. By
the side of the railroad track was a sidewalk
for foot passengers. |

When they had reached the end of the bridge, |
they came out into an open country, with sev-
eral roads before them, and they were at first a
little uncertain which way to g°- They ob-
served, however, the appearance of a town ina
certain direction down the river, and they con-
cluded to go that way. They had not proceed-
ed far, before they found themselves on the
bank of the canal. But it looked very different
here from what it had done at Schenectady. It
was a great deal wider, and the banks, instead
of being covered with grass and the foliage of
trees, were bare and gravelly. This was be-
cause they had lately been enlarging the canal
at this place, to make more room for the boats
to pass and repass.
Tue Ovurcer. (197

os

West Troy. The basin. Locking up a bout.

Forester and Marco walked along upon the

tow-path until they came to the town of West
Troy. Here they found two or three large and

handsome bridges leading across the canal.
Here, too, was a side cut leading from the ca-
nal into the river.

_ “Now,” said Forester, “ we can see how
they get the boats in and out between the river
and the canal.”

There was a small basin just below a bridge,
on the side of the canal toward the river; and
at the end of this basin there was a lock which
led toward the river. Below this lock was a
‘short canal, which led to another lock, and this
second lock opened out directly upon the waters
of the river. There was a boat just coming
into the lower lock.

“ See,” said Forester, “there is a boat com-
ing from the river into the canal; let us go and
see them lock it up.”

So Forester and Marco followed the side ca-
nal till they came to the second lock. They
saw the boat come up through this lock, and
thence to the second lock, where it was raised
again. At this second lock it was raised to the
level of the basin. The men then opened the
gates and fastened the horses to the boat. The
198 Marco oN THE Erie Canal.

a ms
Canal-boats in the river. Why.

(Capalbonte tn the tive mn
driver mounted one of them, and drove under
the bridge ; and thus the boat was drawn along
through the basin into the canal. Thus Marco
and Forester saw a canal-boat locked up from
the river into the canal at Troy. :

« T wonder what the canal-boats go down into
the river for ?” asked Marco.

There was a man standing near the gates
of the lock when Marco asked this question.
He seemed to have the charge of the lock, for
he had opened and shut the gates when the
boat went through. “When he overheard what
Marco said, he replied,

“Some of them go over to Troy to unload,
and to take in a fresh cargo for the west ; and
some of them go down the river to New York.
They are towed down by steamboats. ”

« Ah!” said Forester ; “I did not know that
the canal-boats went down to New York. I
thought that all the merchandise came up in
sloops.”’

«That used to be the way,” said the man,
«but slooping is pretty much done with. They
take the freight up and down by canal-boats
and by tow-boats.” |

While this man had been speaking, Forester
had observed a lock connected with the basin, |
Tue OutTLet. 199

< eaencliaeaaatpanaasiaiast a A
The weigh locks. Explanations. Weighing apparatus.

which had a roof over it. It was by the side
of the lock which led to the river. There was
also a building at the side of it which had one
or two public offices in it. Forester observed,
also, some singular machinery over this lock,
under the roof. He asked the man what it was
for. |

«That is the weigh lock,” replied the man,
-« where they weigh all the boats.”

« Weigh them!” asked Marco; “ how do they
weigh them ?”

« They float the boat into the lock,” replied
the man, “and then they shut the gates behind
it, and draw off the water. This lets the boat
settle down upon a frame, where it rests poised,
so that they can weigh it.” |

So the man very civilly conducted Marco
and Forester along to a door which opened into
a small room in the middle of the building that
stood by the side of the lock ; and there they saw
a large quantity of weights. They saw some
apparatus there too which was apparently con-
nected with the machinery for suspending the
boat. |

« But that method weighs boat and cargo all
together,” said Forester. * How do they know
what part of the whole weight is the cargo $f
200 Marco on THE Erie Canat.

Boats coming. The bridge.

«Oh, the weigh-master has the weights of all
the boats in the canal on his register. They
first weigh the boats when they are empty, and
put the weight down upon the register, which is
kept. in the office. So they can deduct that,
whenever the boat and cargo are weighed to-
gether.” | i

« | should like to see them weigh a boat,” said
Marco.

«“ So should I,” said Forester.

“T expect there will be one along pretty soon,”
said the man; “they are coming all the time.”

So the man began to look around up and
down the canal; but although there were a
great many boats in sight, there seemed to be
none coming just then to be weighed.

Forester then thanked the man for the in-
formation which he had given them, and then
they concluded to go up upon 4 bridge which
crossed the canal just above the basin, and look
at the boats as they passed along.

This bridge had a covered way for carriages
‘1 the center, and two sidewalks outside of the
covered way. The roof extended over the
‘sidewalks, but there was no wall on the outer
“side of them; so that, standing upon one of
these sidewalks, a passenger had a fine view of
Tue OvuTLet. 201

Boats in sight.

——_—=——$—$——___————

a es meena
the canal. From one of the sidewalks one
could look up the canal, and from the other
down the canal, toward Albany.

There were a great many boats in sight from
either of these sidewalks. ‘Some were passing
to and fro, under the bridge. Others were sta-
tionary, fastened to posts set in the bank of the
canal; for the canal was so wide that there
was room for a tier of boats to lie along the
side of it, and yet allow room for the other boats
to pass. There was one boat in the basin, dis-
charging a cargo of flour. There were several
long rows of barrels lying upon the bank, and
they were hoisting out more. They had a sort
of mast raised with ropes to brace it, and there
was a tackle attached to the top of it. With
this tackle they hoisted the flour out of the hold
of the boat. '

Marco stood for some time watching the
operation of this tackle. Forester told him
that the rope which the men took hold of to
pull by, was called the fall. There were two
men pulling at the fall, and they seemed to raise
‘the barrels of flour very easily. When the
barrel which they were raising was brought up
out of the hold, the men would pull it over to
the pier and roll it away.
: 4
2)2 Marco on THE Erie Canal.

The two windows. A great scow.

Some of the boats had women and children
on board. One had a horse looking out of a

—

—> - -——

——

sa
== ml
: ST tell i)

my) =







a
LOOKING OUT OF THE WINDOWS.
window at one end of it, and a baby looking
out of another window close by. Another boat,
which also attracted Marco’s attention, was a
large flat-bottomed sort of scow, shaped like
the Skipjack.

There were loose planks, black and decayed,
forming a floor at the bottom. Marco said i
looked like a barn afloat. It came gliding

under the bridge, and when the stern came
THe OurLeTtT — 203

Return to Troy.

iat Di on aera iaeeceieieinaeennnie anne
into view, Marco saw that there was a small
building erected in it, in a very coarse manner. .
The building looked like a little shed. There
was a door in the end of this little shanty, and
as the boat passed farther on, Marco saw a
woman in it setting the table for tea.

Marco and Forester amused themselves for
half an hour observing the various boats, and
witnessing the little incidents which were con-
stantly occurring. Then they came down to
the shore of the river, where they found a boat,
and a man to row them over the ferry. The
river was full of fleets of canal-boats, which had
been here let out into the Hudson.

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‘‘ Harrer’s Story Booxs” can be obtained complete in Twelve
Volumes, bound in blue and gold, each one containing Three Sto-
ries, for $21 00, or in Thirty-six thin Volumes, bound in crimson and
gold, each containing One Story, for $32 40. The volumes may be
had separately—the large ones at $1 15 each, the others at 90 cents

each.
VOL. I.
BRUNO; or, Lessons of Fidelity, Patience, and Self-De-
nial Taught by a Dog.
WILLIE AND THE MORTGAGE: showing How
Much may be Accomplished by a Boy.
THE STRAIT GATS; or, The Rule of Exclusion from
Heaven. :
, VOL. II.
THE LITTLE LOUVRE; or, The Boys’ and Girls’
Picture-Gallery.
_PRANE;; or, The Philosophy of Tricks and Mischief.
EMMA; or, The Three Misfortunes of a Belle.

VOL. III.
VIRGINIA ; or, A Little Light on a Very Dark Saying.
TIMBOO AND JOLIBA ; or, The Art cf Being Useful.
TIMBOO AND FANNY;; or, The Art of Self-Instruc-
tion.
VOL. IV.
THE HARPER ESTABLISHMENT ; or, How the
Story Books are Made.
FRANKLIN, the Apprentice-Boy.
THE STUDIO; or, Illustrations of the Theory and Prac-
tice of Drawing, for Young Artists at Home.

VOL. V.

THE STORY OF AN CIENT HISTORY, from the
Earliest Periods to the Fall of the Roman Empire.

THE STORY OF ENGLISH HISTORY, from the
Farliest Periods to the American Revolution.

THE STORY OF AMERICAN HISTORY, from
the Earliest Settlement of the Country to the Establish-
ment of the Federal Constitution.
Books by the Abbotts. 3

VOL. VI.

JOHN TRUE; or, The Christian Experience of an Hon-
est Boyes ; |
ELFRED ; or, The Blind Boy and his Pictures.
THE MUSEUM;; or, Curiosities Explained.

; VOL. VII.
THE ENGINEER; or, How to Travel in the Woods.
RAMBLES AMONG THE ALPS. s
THE THREE GOLD DOLLARS; or, An Account of
the Adventures of Robin Green.

3 VOL. VIII.
THE GIBRALTAR GALLERY: being an Account
of various Things both Curious and Useful.

THE ALCOVE: containing some Farther Account of
-'Timboo, Mark, and Fanny.
DIALOGUES for the Amusement and Instruction of
Young Persons.
VOL. IX.

THE GREAT ELM; or, Robin Green and Josiah Lane
at School.

AUNT MARGARET; or, How John True kept his
Resolutions.

VERNON; or, Conversations about Old Times in England.

VOL. X.

CARL AND JOCKO; or, The Adventures of the Little
Italian Boy and his Monkey. :
LAPSTONE; or, The Sailor turned Shoemaker.

ORENEY, THE PEACEMAKER;; or, The Various
Ways of Settling Disputes.
VOL. XI.
JUDGE JUSTIN;; or, The Little Court of Morningdale.
MINIGO; or, The Fairy of Cairnstone Abbey.
JASPER; or, The Spoiled Child Recovered.

VOL. XII.
CONGO; or, Jasper’s Experience in Command.
VIOLA and her Little Brother Arno. .
’ a PAUL; or, How to be Patient in Sickness and
ain.

Some of the Story Books are written particularly for girls, and
some for Boys, and the different Volumes are adapted to various
ages, so that the work forms a Complete Library of Story Books for
all the Children of the Family and the Sunday-School.
4 Books by the Abbotts.



— ABBOTTS’ ILLUSTRATED HISTORIES.

Biographical Histories. By Jacos ABBort anf Joun S.
C. Asgort. The Volumes of this Series are printed and
bound uniformly, and are embellished with numerous Engrav-
ings. 16mo, Cloth, $1 20 per volume. Price of the set (32
yols.), $38 40.

A series of volumes containing severally full accounts of the lives,
characters, and exploits of the most distinguished sovereigns, po-
tentates, and rulers that have been chiefly renowned among man-
kind, in the various ages of the world, from the earliest periods to
the present day.

The successive volumes of the series, though they each contain
the life of a single individual, and constitute thus distinct and in-
dependent work, follow each other in the main, in regular historical
order, and each one continues the general narrative of history down
to the period at which the next volume takes up the story; so that
the whole series presents to the reader a connected narrative of the
line of general history from the present age back to the remotest
times.

The narratives are intended to be succinct and comprehensive, and
are written in a very plain and simple style. They are, however, not
juvenile in their character, nor intended exclusively for the young.
The volumes are sufficiently large to allow each history to comprise
all the leading facts in the life of the personage who is the subject
of it, and thus to communicate all the information in respect to him
which is necessary for the purposes of the general reader.

Such being the design and character of the works, they would
seem to be specially adapted, not only for family reading, but also
for district, town, school, and Sunday-school libraries, as well as for
text-books in literary seminaries.

The plan of the series, and the manner in which the design has
been carried out by the author in the execution of it, have been high-
ly commended by the press in all parts of the country. The whole
series has been introduced into the school libraries of several of the
largest and most influential states.

ABRAHAM Lrncotn’s OPINION OF Anports' Hisrorrrs.—In @ con
versation with the President just before his death, Mr. Lincoln said: “I
want to thank you and your brother for Abbotts’ seriés of Histories.
have not education enough to appreciate the profound works of volu-
minous historians ; and if I had, I have no time to read them. But
your series of Histories gives me, in ef compass, just that knowledge

men and events which I need. Ihave read them with the great-
est interest. To them Iam indebted for about all the historical knowl
edge I have.”
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